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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00020
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 11, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00020
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


-- ~ -._ -I)TD 1!PS~3?RY

-,,F qFLORIDA
GAI..Z;;J'ILAZ FL. 32b61)1


Local Caterers

Win 1st Place

At Chef Sampler

Story, Photo, Page 3
II


Free Training

Plus

Guaranteed Jobs

Editorial, Page 4


Kiwanians Hear

About Need

For Blood

Story, Page 7


Rotary Golf

Tournament

Winners

Story, Photos, Pg. 12


f Friday Morning





Montic


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 2005


Chamber Wants County To




Press For 2nd Bypass Study


Issue To Be

Revisited

In 90 Days

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Chamber of Commerce is
calling on county officials to con-
tinue pursuing the idea of a Monti-
cello bypass, lest the Department of
Transportation (DOT) forget the
-project.
Speaking on behalf of the cham-
ber, Dick Bailar last week asked
commissioners to adopt a resolution
calling for the DOT to authorize the
phase-r o study of the project.
The phase-two sriud. esrimited to
cost between $350,000 and
$500,000, is supposed to identify a
specific bypass route, as well as pro-
vide the engineering and environ-
mental documentation to support the
choice.
A phase-one study, which a con-
sultant firm. -- the LPA Group --
completed several months ago at a
cost of $250,000, merely set the
way for the phase-two study by
identifying the possible choices.
S"That consultant's report is now
in some obscure file in the DOT,"
Bailar told commissioners. "It will
only be brought back to light when
the County Commission requires
phase two,"
- Bailar said a DOT official had re-
cently informed him that if the com-
mission were to request the phase
-two study now, it would take a year,
before the request would even make
it into the process.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The County Commission last
week declared three buildings sur-
plus property, preparatory to selling
them for funds to begin refurbishing
the several buildings at the former
high-school slated to become county
offices.


Knowing the slow ways of the
DOT, Bailar said he figured it
would be another three or four years
before the phase two study was ac-
tually funded, and another two or
three before it was completed.
At that rate, the project wouldn't
be realized for another 20 or so
years, Bailar said. Hence, the ur-
gency of the commission making
the request now, he said.
Not all commissioners favored
petitioning the DOT at present,
however, and Commissioner Junior
Tuten's argument that the county
wait another three months before
making the request ultimately won
out.
Tuten's reason for arguing that the
county delay its request was his con-
cern that pestering the DOT over the
bypass might jeopardize another
pendinproject.
That other project is the resurfac-
ing of Lake Road, for which the
county is seeking $500,000 from the
DOT.
*"We're in a delicate situation on
Lake Road," Tuten said. "We need
to approach the DOT for extra
money. I'd hate to bum any
bridges."
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner didn't see where the commission
doing its job and it was commis-
sioners' job to seek state funding for
the county, he pointed out -- would
jeopardize any relationship with a
state agency.
"We don't offend anyone by ask-
ing for funds," Joyner said. "That's
the wrong word to use, offend. It's
our job to request funding for the
county."
A point well made, Tuten coun-
tered. But he also happened to know'
that certain DOT officials had al-


The three buildings declared sur-
plus property house the operations
of the Tax Collector, Property Ap-
praiser and Assistant State Attorney.
Commissioners, meanwhile, were
scheduled to hold another workshop
9 a.m. Thursday in the courthouse to
further review the allocation of
space in the old high school and the
disposition of the downtown offices.


ready had their feathers ruffled be-
cause of the pressure the community
had brought to bear on approval of
the first bypass study, he said.

... .!.....'.


Tuten's recommendation, which
the board embraced, if somewhat re-
luctantly on the part of at least one
commissioner, was that the request
S -V P it' 4
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, : .- -- ...: l: -


BACKED UP lines of traffic are becoming
more common around the courthouse circle,
an indication to proponents ttid a bypass is


be tabled 90 days, until the Lake
Road issue was resolved.
"I think this proposal needs to be
done and I go on record to approve


B I
-'- , .......



a necessity. The DOT sponsored study
found the level of traffic on US 19 to be ac-
ceptable-,rhowever. (News Photo)


Proposal TO Hold Loggers


Accountable Shot Down


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Loggers -- if they were ever really
worried about the proposal to make
them pay for alleged damage to
county roads -- can now relax.
County commissioners last week
overwhelmingly rejected the idea,
expressing concern that pursuit of
such a policy would lead them in-
evitably down the slippery slope to
regulation of other agricultural ac-
tivities.
"I'm against it," Commission
Chairman Skeet Joyner said em-
phatically to Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin, originator of the idea. "I
think you're getting into business
that you don't need to be getting
into."
"It's the county's responsibility to
maintain roads so that residents can
harvest their timber," Commissioner
Danny Monroe put in.
"The trucking industry does do
damage to our roads," said Commis-
sioner Junior Tuten, whose own cat-
tle raising operation entails the use
of heavy trucks for hauling. "But
they pay for it in the taxes and the
employment they create."


As for the alleged damage caused
to Hawkins Road in particular by a
logging operation, the commission-
ers disagreed with Sutphin's assess-
ment.
"My assessment of the road is that
I wish a lot of the roads in my dis-
trict were in that good a condition,"
Joyner said. "I think the overall road
is in fair condition. As for the log-
ging operation, I don't see where it
caused any damage."
Monroe quite agreed.
"I didn't see any problem with the
road," Monroe said. "If all the roads
in my district were in that good a
shape, I'd be happy."
Like Tuten, Monroe noted that if
the county took to requiring that
loggers post bonds, he too stood to
be affected eventually, as a cattle
rancher and watermelon grower. He
didn't think loggers should be sig-
naled out anyway.
Commissioners were equally dis-
missive of Sutphin's suggestion that
the county either raise the posted
limits on wooden bridges to make
them reflect the actual weights
crossing over them or simply do
away with the postings.
"The postings on the bridges are
for liability purposes only," Joyner


explained.
He said the county's best option
was to continue to pursue the pre-
sent course, which was essentially to
let sleeping dogs lie. He explained
the county's ticklish situation this
way: do away with the weight limits
and risk making the county liable if
a bridge collapsed; or enforce the
weight limits and stop all construc-
tion in the area.
"If we enforce the weight limits,
we'll have to tell future home build-
ers in the area that they can't bring
concrete trucks over these bridges,"
Joyner said. "We need to be very
careful how we approach this."
Tuten agreed.
"The most damage is done by the
concrete trucks," he said. "It's up to
the Road Department to maintain
the roads to make them passable."
Sutphin first proposed the idea of
making loggers post bonds several
weeks ago. He brought up the issue
again last week, relating a near con-
frontation he had had with a logger
whose operation he was photo-
graphing for causing alleged dam-
age to a road.
"He gave me the all American
sign and jumped on my case quite
(See Loggers Page 12)


i t Ends Ahead Of Schedule
S, '. than expected in order to reach bed-
S ...LAZARO ALEMAN rock.
h.. ; Senior Staff Writer But he said the pilings were en-
1a- .ua ':''" cased in steel, which assured the


COMMISSIONER JERRY SUTPHIN, right,
talks with Road Department Superintendent
David Harvey, during a recent commission


meeting. Sutphin's, proposal to require log-
gers to post a bond for timber harvesting
operations went nowhere. (News Photo)


Road Department Superintendent
David Harey last week reported the
completion of the West Lake Road
bridge, 30 days ahead of schedule.
Harvey had nothing but compli-
ments for Fairchild Construction
Company, the contractor hired by
the Department of Transportation to
do the work.
"Everything went smoothly," Har-
vey said, adding that he wished all
project could go as smoothly.
The only problem, he said, was a
$2.5 million overrun, due to the pil-
ings have to be driven much deeper


bridge would be maintenance free
for at least 50 years.
Commission Chairman Skeet Joy-
ner used the bridge as an example of
the benefits that could be reaped
from lobbying, as well as the pa-
tience that it require to bring pro-
jects to fruition.
Lobbying for the repair of the
bridge had been his first mayor ef-
fort on the board, he said.
"It took six years to complete the
project from where we started," he
said.


it," said Commissioner Jerry Sut-
phin, the lone dissenter.
Proponents of a bypass have been
pursuing the project for some 20
years with limited success. True, the
DOT has authorized at least three
studies, the most recent the one by
the LPA Group. But the previous
studies have gone nowhere beyond
the initial stage.
That's because, notwithstanding
the local perception that US 19 is al-
ready a traffic problem (one that
only gets worse with every passing
day), the studies find that the traffic
here is reasonable.
Indeed, according to DOT projec-
tions, a bypass isn't warranted until
2030 or beyond. And barring pres-
sure from the community, the DOT
is not likely to take any action on
the project until that time either.
The latter view was confirmed by
Jerry Oshesky, project manager of
the most recent study by the LPA
Group, and Noelle Little, a profes-
sional engineer with PBSJ, the gen-
eral consultant to the DOT.
Both let it be known in December,
when the LPA Group made the find-
ings of its study public, that the ball
now rested squarely with the com-
munity, insofar as further pursuit of
the project.
As far as the DOT was concerned,:
Little and Oshesky said, the comple-,
tion of the LPA study pretty much:
ended the DOT's. consideration of
the matter -- barring community agi-:
tation.
"At this point, this is it," Little
said. "It will be in the community's
hands to petition the DOT to step:
this up in priority."
Proponents' argue that a limited
access bypass not-only will alleviate
the traffic congestion on US 19, par-
ticularly from the big trucks, but it
will also revitalize the downtown
area.

Phone Misuse

Costs County

About $3,000

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Grants Office Director Cory Ya-
covone is looking into the unauthor-
ized use of a special phone in her
department that was tied to a past
grant.
Yacovone made the County Com-
mission aware of the problem last
week. She said her office had re-
ceived a bill for some $3,000 in tele-
phone calls dating from 2002.
"There's a substantial number of
calls that appear to be personal,"
Yacovone said.
She asked the board for permis-
sion to negotiate a lower amount
with the company, if possible, and
then pay the bill. She also asked for
permission to seek reimbursement
from the person believed to have
misused the phone.
The board granted both requests.
Yacovone assured commissioners
that the particular line is no longer
in service. The alleged misuse of the
phone occurred before Yacovone
took over the department.


137TH YEAR NO.22, 50 CENTS


County Readies To Move

Several Of Its Operations


I-







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005
ILI


C --- -r- .
hi--.


RAY CICHON
;' Managing Editor


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SBRIANNA TISDALE, left, and Tykeria Jones,
-students at the Jefferson Elementary Boys


JW~iA


and Girls Club, enjoy a bright and s
ternoon out of doors. (News Photo)


Watermelon Festival The


Expanded To Include 195


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Watermelon Festival Com-
mittee met Monday to continue to
plan events for the 55th Festival.
Among items of discussion was
the decision to expand the theme of
the festival from "A Slice of the
Good Life," to include "A Blast
From the Past, focusing on the 50's"
The committee believes this will
broaden the thematic possibilities
throughout the festival.
In addition, Festival Co-chair
Betsy Gray notes that since WCTV


is honoring organizations observing
50th anniversaries, and this is the
50th anniversary of the Chamber of.
Commerce, here, which sponsors
the Festival, it is wise to capitalize
on this free publicity.
Expanding the festival theme to
include the 50's will help tie.events
together, she said.
Gray conducted the meeting and
gave each event chairperson the
write-up from a previous festival
booklets, so they can update the
write-up for the 2005 booklet.
She stated that sealed bids will be
sought for the festival T-shirts and
the bidders will be invited to the


ACA, JCHS Represented

At NFCC Library Summit


Jhan Reichert represented Jeffer-
son County High School at the
North Florida Community College
Summit for librarians and library
personnel held Feb 25 in Maodison.
Kim Roccanri rcpiresericed Aucilla
Christiin -Acaden',.. at the sumniit.
Shelia Hiss, director of library
services at NFCC said the impor-
tance of the event was to bring like
minds together to discuss and share-


information that will benefit not
only those attending, the students
and faculty they serve.
"It's great to have an opportunity
to catch up with other librarians and
-hear the nejt things the, jae. doing
in their re.pecin\e hbrjries," sid
Kevin Evans of thie Sutannee High
Media Center.
"You've given me lots of ideas
and points to ponder from the vari-
ous presentations," he continued.


Beth Page MB Church To

Distribute Donated Food
17 at Beth Page MB Church in Wa-
DEBBIE SNAPP cissa, until all the food has been dis-
Staff Writer tribute.
Questions can be answered by
Innovation Baptist Church along contacting Pat Hall at 997-8231, or
with Capital Area Community Ac- Annie McDuffie at 222-2043, or
-Minister Mary Randolph at 350-
tion, will distribute can food items- 0397.
donated by Second Harvest of the All surrounding communities are
Big Bend, 10 a.m. Thursday, March- welcome.

Rotary Club To Hold Saturday
Relay For Life Fundraisers


opening of the bids, wl
awarded to the lowest bi
Gray will develop the
be included in seeking th
At the suggestion of
Chairperson Mary Franc
the committee voted to r
ception for them to Sat
11, the day of the Queen
The reception will b
Chamber with a lunches
Past Queens, and they w
duced during intermiss
Queen's Pageant that ev
JCHS Auditorium on Wa
Applications are avail
Junior Miss and Little
Queen Pageant at Monti
and Gifts, Jackson's Dr
the Chamber of Commer
Deadline for submitti
tions is Friday, April 8.
Availability of appli
deadline for the Queen's
expected to be announced
New this year, is the
have the winners of the
ieS-t cho.sen- b, the jud
Q()ieeri's Pae:cant. I1h I
to be announced at ihe Pi
Amanda Ouzts, Fashio
Luncheon chair, reports
has been decided and
the often requested chick
She said that the search
for a larger space for tf
while the -club enjoyed
Christ Episcopal Hall, m
it very tight to move abo
100 plus guests.
Budgetary constra
Woman's Club preclud
rental fee, which com
problem.


i

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"uh


ugs, and at
ce.
ng applica-
cations and
s Pageart is
d shortly
decision to
Baby Con-
Jies ,:f the
the '. in er
agency .
n Show and
s the menu
will fearnre
en salad
h continued
he event, as
working at,
ddels found i
)ut the usual

ints of the
e a sizable
pounds the


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CALL OR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


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Does Your Hear. Good.

American Heart
Association


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at


Movie Gallery

Announces It's-DVD & VHS Sales Event

w BU2 GET 2 G^


* SA VE ON


ALL PREVIOUSLY VIEWED


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Rotary Club Relay
For Life team will hold a fundraiser
for the Cancer Society Relay For
Life, at Jefferson Builders Mart, on
South Jefferson Street.


Team members will sell hot dogs
and Cokes 10:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.,
every Saturday, until the 18-hour
event, on the weekend of April 15-
16, when all the teams walk around
the Jefferson County High School
track to show their support and
dedication to fighting Caner.


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Queen Pageant Applications

Available At ACA, JCHS


Watermelon Festival Queen Pag-
.. .- eant Co-Chairs Linsey Taylor and
Roslyn Bass report that applications
are now available at the Guidance
S Offices of JCHS and ACA, at the
... Chamber of Commerce.
Deadline for returning applica-
tions is Noon, Friday, April 1, at the
Chamber of Commerce.
The first meeting with contestants
S '' is set for 6:15 p.m., Wednesday,
S April 6.

The pageant is set for 7 p.m., Sat-
urday, June 11, at the former JCHS
unny af- Auditorium.
The application packet contains
information of the Rules and Regu-
lations of the contest, and the quali-
m e fications for the contestants.
Among the qualifications are:
0 1 *Each entrant must be 15 years
0 's old, but not more than 19, by Dec.
31, 2005.
which will be *Each entrant cannot have been
dder. married, be married, nor have chil-
specifics to dren.
ie bids.
Past Queen's *Entrant chosen as Festival Queen
:es Drawdy, cannot many during her year of
nove the re- reign, nor'become pregnant. Doing
urday, June so results in forfeiture of her title.
's Pageant.. The highest qualified runner-up will
e held a the then be named queen.
e6n for the *All entrants must have a 2.0 GPA
rill be intro- for the latest grading period com-
sion at the pleted at the time of application.
ening at the *All entrants must be full time
iter Street. residents of Jefferson County.
able for the *Entrants will be required to per-
King and form in an opening group number,
cello FloriSt talent and evening gown competi-


D VD 's & VHS TAPES AND ALL

PREVIOUSLY PLAYED GAMES.
Sale Starts 3/11 and Ends 3/27

1244 S. Jefferson ~ 997-6598


tion, and a question and answer ses-
sion.
*If an entrant misses more than
one rehearsal, she will be disquali-
fied form the pageant and forfeit the
registration fee. Just cause absences
must be cleared through the chair-
person.
*The individual chosen as Festival
Queen must participate in certain ac-
tivities, to include appearances at all
scheduled events of the Festival, the
Perry Forest Festival Parade,
Springtime Tallahassee Parade, and
the subsequent year's Festival Queen
Pageant.
Failure to do so will result in for-
feiture of the queen's title.
*An entry fee of $25 is to be sub-
mitted with the application, payable
to the Jefferson County Watermelon
Festival, Inc.
*One recent 3 X 5, 4 X 6, or 5 X
7 black and white, preferred, photo


~


~R;rppla~p~Wp~pp~nnrm~I~L~~ `


. tx[ cls[


must be submitted with the applica-
tion.



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r







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005 PAGE 3


Vet Says Dogs Can Now Be


Vaccinated For Snakebite


CARRIE ANN AND COMPANY won first prize in the Cater-
ers Category, for taste and presentation, at the 20th An-
nual Children's Home Society Chef Sampler at Tallahassee
Mall, recently. The ladies prepared some 18 desserts for
the event. L-R Denise Vogelgesang and Carrie Ann Tellef-
sen.


Local Caterers Win 1st

Place In Chef Sampler


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Carrie Ann Tellefsen and Denise-
Vogelgesang, partners in Carrie Ann
and Company, won first place in the
Caterers Category at the 20th An-
nual Children's Home Society Chef
Sampler at the Tallahassee Mall re-
cently.
The ladies also won advertising
time for their catering company.
Their winning was based on taste
and presentation of the 18 desserts
they entered.
Among the desserts they entered,
were: a layered Punchbowl Cake, a
Cappuccino Torte, Cheesecakes
topped with cherries and caramel
sauce, Chocolate Truffles, a fresh
Apple Cake, and a 9" layered Wed-
ding Cake.
These were prepared over a few
weeks time, juggled around working
on catering jobs, and their family


and home lives.
These homemade desserts are pre-
pared at home and brought to the
function, with one hour allowed for
-setup and garnishing time.
A colorful array of flowers was
mingled in with their display of des-
serts, to add eye appeal and aid in
presentation.
The Chef Sampler fundraiser at-
tracts local food distributors, who
donate their time, talents, and prod-
ucts to benefit the Children's Home
Society.
Tellefesen has been involved in
the fundraiser for some 12 years. In
the past, only presentation was
judged.
Today, taste and presentation are
considered. Judging was done by
three judges: John Marks, Mayor of
Tallahassee; Amy Basista, Anchor-
woman for Channel 27 WTXL; and
Chef Keating from Kaiser Culinary
Institute.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Rattlesnake vaccine for canines"
is now available in the county,
which is of particular significance
here because rattlesnakes hibernate
during periods of reduced tempera-
tures and now that the weather is
warming, they are beginning to
move around.
Dr. Reginald Jordan of Animal
Medical Clinic, reports that in his
28 years as a veterinarian here, he
has seen many animals, including
dogs, cats, horses and cows, that
had suffered rattlesnake bites.
He said that the neurotoxin in
snake venom destroys red blood
cells and the effectiveness of the
vaccine has a number of variables.
"It depends on the size of the dog
bitten, where it was bitten in prox-
imity to the heart, and how much
venom was injected into the
animal."
He explained that the vaccine is
used as a preventative and lessens
the severity of snakebites. "Some
vaccinated dogs may not even
show symptoms after receiving a
bite," said Jordan.
All dogs, whether vaccinated or
not, should be taken to a veterinar-
ian for evaluation and care as soon
as possible following a snakebite.
- Even bites from non-venomous
snakes can lead to serious infec-
tions and antibiotic treatment may
be needed. A veterinarian can de-
termine if the dog is sufficiently
protected for the specific type of
snake involved and the amount of
venom injected, or whether addi--
tional medical treatment is neces-
sary.
Rattlesnake venom is a complex
mixture of toxins that spreads
'through the dog's body following
the bite.
The rattlesnake vaccine defends a


dog by creating an immunity that
works immediately to help neutral-
ize the toxins.
Like people, dogs may stumble
over the location of a snake by ac-
cident and curiosity or protective
instinct can place a dog at risk of
being bitten
Vaccination can reduce overall
effects of snakebite, reduce or
eliminate the need for anti-venom,
and decrease other treatment costs
as well.
According to Jordan, the dog is
vaccinated the first year twice, one
dose being received one month af-
ter the first. After the first year,
large dogs are vaccinated with a
booster once a year in the spring,
and the recommendation for
smaller dogs is twice a year every
year.


The rattlesnake vaccine is avail-
able at Animal Medical Clinic:
Veterinary Associates has none in-
house, but do have access upon re-
quest.


Nursing Center Tells

March Activities


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Activity Director Voncell Ed- -
wards announces the Schedule' of
Events for March at the Jefferson
Nursing Center.
Residents were entertained last
Thursday with a Music Ministry
brought to them by Destin DuBose
and the Hallelujah Choir from the
First Baptist Church in Monticello.
On St. Patrick's Day, Thursday,
March 17 the staff will dress in
green and white.
Colorful iced cupcakes will be
served with a green punch. At 10
a.m: staff and children from Head
Start will arrive to perform a St. Pat-
rick's Day program and a short visit
with residents.
Interested residents will travel to
the Pinelake Nursing Home to at-
tend a Talent Show on Friday,
March 18.


On Thursday, March 24, Tu-Tu
the Happy Clown will entertain the
residents at the Center. Martha
Draughon will present the show.
The celebration of Easter and an
Easter Egg Hunt will be held on
Good Friday, March 25.
A March Birthday Party will also
be held on this day on celebration of
the following residents: Aretha
Glenn, Thomas Mock, Mary White, -
Anna Hoadley, and Lucille Beck-
with.
Easter Sunday Dinner was cho-
sen by the residents during their
Council Meeting. Baked ham and
baked chicken, sweet potato souffl6,
corn, and collard greens, with corn-
bread and lemonade, and for dessert,
Sour Creme Pound cake.
Anyone wishing to be a part of the
Center's entertainment, for the resi-
dents, are welcome to contact Ed-
wards at 997-2313.


Catico Sprig

rrts & Craft Show
Oer 400 boohof sBr s & mit t duingsdh
Ornamental Iron %; Painted Glass :' Handcrafted Furniture Clothing
jewelry Folk Art Ceramics t* Pottery
Seasonal Decorations :- Wood Crafts ;- Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prints :" Painted Antiques ft Food Court

SMarch 19 & 20, 2005
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

Spence Field Moultrie, Georgia
(Sunbeli Expo site) 4 miles Southeast of Hwy 319 on Hwy 133

$3 per person
(Children 6 and under free with an adult)
FREE PARKING

For more information (229) 985-1968
| me~caIcocra~tsB icm wi^ nfoa[clomSil~ t5Em


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THE COMMUNITY IS INVITED TO A

CONTEMPORARY EASTER

MUSICAL & DRAMA

Original Music and Script written by Bill Moon.
Performed by Celebration and the Youth of First United Methodist Church.


AT

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

FAMILY MINISTRY CENTER

SUNDAY

MARCH 13th AT 11:00 AM

Location: W. Washington St. across from the old High School
Call: 997-5545 for more information


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h"." :-'-._...
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*^j. f.',.'








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

Mw MEMe, RON CICHON
C D4 Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Free Training Plus


Guaranteed Jobs


'At a time when higher education
costs continue to rise, there's actu-
ally a vocational training facility
that does not charge entry-level stu-
dents for tuition, room or board.
Plus, it assures employment.for its
graduates.
JThe Paul Hall Center for Maritime
Training and Education, affiliated
vrjth the Seafarers International Un-
ion (SIU), prepares students for suc-
cessful careers as U.S. Merchant
Mariners.
-4
SBased in Piney Point, Md., the
school offers entry-level training; a
program for military veterans; ongo-
ing vocational classes; academic
support and more.
Students are responsible for the
cost of travel to the school, clothing
awid pre-entry medical screening.
. Classes, meals and lodging are
fr e for those in the unlicensed ap-
prentice program.
,Graduates of the entry-level train-
ing program are guaranteed a first
jop aboard one of the SIU's con-
tracted vessels.
The Merchant Marine is composed
of men and women who crew
US.-flag commercial vessels on the
deep seas, inland waterways and
Gieat Lakes. Although civilians,
they are often referred to as the na-
tion's "fourth arm of defense."
tSince the founding of the United
States, merchant mariners have
played a vital support role in the na-
tion's conflicts. For instance, some


of the vessels they work on transport
troops and military goods.
The U.S. Merchant Marine also
plays a crucial role in America's
peacetime economy by crewing the
many vessels involved in interna-
tional trade. U.S.-flag ships can be
seen regularly in the major ports of
the world.
Crew members serve on all types
of vessels, including container ships,
tankers,, bulkers, passengers vessels,
tugs and much more.
Established in 1967, the Paul Hall
Center emphasizes hands-on train-
ing and features topnotch educa-
tional equipment in a picturesque
setting.
In September 2002, the school
opened an additional dormitory with
more than 100 rooms.
Recently, the school opened a
Coast Guard-approved safety school
at Barber's Point, Honolulu, Hawaii.
This satellite facility:, trains students
for new opportunities aboard
U.S.-flag cruise ships, while helping
meet the increased demand for
trained mariners from Hawaii.
Though perhaps best known for its
trainee program, the school also of-
fers courses for veterans who have
qualifying sea,time in a deck or en-'
gine rating.
Applicants must present a history
of their assignments while in the
military and an honorable discharge.
Applicants cannot be on parole or
_probation and must have a valid
driver's license. (NAPS)


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

The cast of "Nunsence" is doing a-
wonderful job if you haven't seen
the play, don't fail to catch it this
weekend at the Opera House. Lots
of good laughs in store.
Ministerial Association will host
Holy Week Services at First Presby-
terian Church. Light lunch will fol-
low the service.
.New, angle parking rates an A-plus
with me... Developments planned all
over the county... Pampered Chef
Kitchen Show featuring bakeware
and cookware sales will benefit the
library. Some tasty morsels will be
prepared forfsampling, I understand.
Show is at 10:30 Saturday morning.
As part of the Medicare Moderni-
zation Act, all Medicare beneficiar-
ies will have access to cholesterol,
screening and all new members will
be covered for a physical exam.


From Our Photo File
ER ~ f.,,**.a *rMM*J ^^^"*iJ ^ittj^''^MMt^ J^


FIVE COUNTY school bus.drivers were hon-
ored in June of 1988 for not missing a day
of work throughout the year. L-R: Opera-


tions Director Norma Leatherman, Dorothy
Bradley, Berline Cooksey, Ava Mathis, Ver-
nica Moore, Vicky Wittig. (News File Photo)


The U.S. Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention estimates that 10
to 20 percent of Americans come
down with the flu during flu season.
How far will fans go to get out of
things so they can see the big game?
A national contest found one faked a
seizure, went to the hospital and
watched the game on TV from his
hospital bed. Another fellow had a
cast put on his leg and called his
girlfriend saying he couldn't leave
the house because of iis brbkenh leg,.
He wore the cast for six weeks to
cover his story.
The Census Bureau says more
than 67 percent of the nation's hous-
ing stock is now at least 25 years
old.
The National Basketball Associa-
tion has established Reading and
Learning Centers throughout North
America, Brazil and South Africa.
Each Reading and Learning Center
features desktop computers, printers,
educational software and thousands


of books and educational materials.
More than six million fans attend
NASCAR races each year with an
additional 75 million people watch-
ing the races from their homes.
Each year, thousands of students
experience other cultures firsthand
through study abroad programs.
Some 31,000 Americans chose to
stay in the United Kingdom last
year.
Being fit may not only help you2
stay out of the hospital, it can beie-
fit you if you do go in. Studies show:
that fit people have a distinct advan-
tage going into surgery because
their bodies are better prepared for
anesthesia.
Fewer than half of the nation's
commercial motor vehicle drivers
wear seat belts even though it is the
law for truckers. Federal Motor Car-
rier Safety Regulations require that
truckers buckle up.
An exhibit featuring Michelan-
gelo's original 18-foot model of the


dom. of St. Peter's Basilica in
Rome is on exhibit through May
2005 at the Pope John Paul II Cul-
tural Center in Washington, D.C.
The "Creating St. Peter's: Architec-
tural Treasures of the Vatican" ex-
hibit includes more than 140
original architectural drawings and
other artifacts on loan from the Vati-
can. Admission to the center is by
donation.
Heroes often go unnoticed for
their selfless acts of kindness and
bravery but a new program aims to
give them the recognition they de-
serve.
Military, police, fire and emer-
gency medical services (EMS) per-
sonnel who deliver exemplary,
unique and heroic service to im-
prove the quality of life in cities and
towns across America will be re-
warded through the "Jeep Heroes
Nomination Program."
Nominations are sought through
Oct. 17, 2005 at
www.Jeep.com/Nominate.


Start Preparing Early


To Enjoy Retirement


\What is the key to retiring on your
own terms? Begin saving early, says
a.recent survey. Americans lead the
world in preparing for retirement.
In fact, they save more than peo-
ple in any other country and begin
preparations earlier than people in
most countries.
,.More than 75 percent of U.S. re-
spondents said they are saving
money for retirement, and 73, per-
cent say they are "prepared." In ad-
dition, nearly 80 percent have a plan
for where they want to live, what
they want to do and how much
money they'll need.
*: The survey, called AXA Retire-
ment Scope, was conducted by
Ak, a worldwide leader in finan-
cial protection and wealth manage-
mrent, in an effort to understand
global attitudes toward retirement.
SOne such reality is the age at
v4jich people will retire. Working
p% ople in the U.S. who were sur-
vpyed said they would like to retire
ae55, but expect they will actually
retire at 63. Retirement ages varied
worldwide.


The survey found Americans are
starting to prepare for their retire-
ment in their 30s. American
workers, on average, save $687 a
month for retirement.
Additionally, more than 50 per-
cent of working adults contribute to
an employee-sponsored retirement
plan.
Working people surveyed said
they are looking forward to retire-
ment, while most retirees said they
are enjoying being retired and with
good reason.
Thirty-seven percent of retired
people said they spend time travel-
ing, 19 percent enjoy a hobby, 18
percent participate in sports and 16
percent volunteer.
In addition, 72 percent of retirees
said their standard of living re-
mained the same or was better than
when they were working.
According to most respondents,
"old age' doesn't start until well af-
ter retirement age. People surveyed
said they consider 75 or older to be
old age. (NAPS)


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
S.T.. he Monticello News
. welcomes letters
Sto the Editor
lr All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.

500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


Some Elderly Overwhelmed


Elderly blacks are more likely
than their white counterparts to feel
overwhelmed by daily life, but at
the same time are more inclined to
view depression as a condition they
can overcome through personal or
religious strength rather than a-
medical one, a new University of
Florida study finds.
"This sense of being overwhelmed
may be associated with an incessant
feeling among many older African-
Americans that even in late life they
continue to struggle for.survival be-
cause of the lingering effects of ra-
cism and the cumulative effect of a
lifetime of limited opportunities,"
said Terry Mills, a UF sociologist
who did the study.
Depression in elderly Americans
often goes undiagnosed, but is a
public health concern that is impor-
tant to detect since it can signal the
onset of heart disease or other kinds


of vascular disease, Mills said.
"Since heart disease continues to be
a leading cause of death among
older persons, it is important that we
gain better knowledge about its as-
sociation with depression and de-
pressive symptoms," he said.
The connection between physical
health and depressive symptoms is
particularly significant for blacks,
who have higher incidences of heart
disease and stroke, he said. About
35 million adults in the United
States are 65 or older, and their life
expectancies have increased dra-
matically. In 1900, life expectancy
was about 49 years, increasing by
1997 to 79 for women and 74 for
men, he said.
Thirty-three percent .of older
blacks in. the study, compared with
22 percent of whites, indicated that
"everything is an effort," which
could include getting out of bed in


the morning, handling daily respon-
sibilities or even just day-to-day liv-
ing, Mills said.
In addition, considerably more
older blacks in the survey 57 per-
cent viewed depression as a per-
sonal weakness compared with 36
percent of their white counterparts,
he said.
The attitude that depression is a
weakness may relate to blacks'
strongly held religious beliefs,
which suggest that through faith one
can endure and overcome life's bur-
dens, Mills said. Depression may be
interpreted as a sign a person's faith
is weak, suggesting a character flaw,
he said.
"Because many African-Americans
are religious or spiritually grounded,
they're more likely to say, 'The
Lord won't put more on me than I
can bear,' and fall back on Scripture
or a sense of religiosity to try to


Sharks Target Of Study


BY CATHY KEEN
University of Florida

Swimmers kicking off the summer-
beach season .this year may fear
sharks, but in some ways the giant
predators face greater dangers than
humans, says a University of Florida
shark expert.
"Memorial Day weekend is the
first major holiday weekend of the
year for people entering the ocean,
and it's almost inevitable that we're
going to have a few nips," said
George Burgess, an ichthyologist'
who directs the International Shark


Attack File housed at UF.
"We need to understand that there
are millions of people spending a lot
of time in the water doing the kinds
of things that are provocative to
sharks kicking, splashing and
screaming in an area that many
species of sharks call home," he
said.
The tide has turned against sharks
because they and their relatives -
skates and rays are seriously
threatened by over fishing, loss of
habitat and other -man-made intru-
sions, causing their numbers to de-
cline dramatically, Burgess said.
The dusky shark population is esti-


mated to have declined by 80 per-
cent along the U.S. East Coast,
while other species have dropped by
30 to 50 percent, he said.
A large-scale effort is now under-
way to reverse that trend. The Flor-
ida Program for Shark Research at
the Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory at UF is a member of a consor-
tium of four shark research pro-
grams nationwide. The consortium
received $1.5 million from the Na-
tional Marine Fisheries Services ear-
lier this year and is to receive an-
other $1.9 million on July 1 to help
plat a brighter future for sharks.
"Our research is largely devoted


cope with feelings of psycho-social
distress," Mills said. "That means if
they can't bear it, somehow their
faith is not strong, which is often
seen as having a personality flaw."
The results of the study, published
in the August issue of the Commu-
nity Mental Health Journal, came
from a telephone survey of ran-
domly selected Florida residents -
180 whites and 224 blacks ranging
in age from 60 t6 95. A demo-
graphic chart was developed to
show U.S. Census tract areas with a
black population of 50 percent or
more.
Respondents were asked to report
whether they had experienced over
the past week certain feelings, in-
cluding loneliness and sadness,
whether they were having difficulty
sleeping and or were finding every-
(See Elderly Page 5)






towards gaining a better biological
understanding of the different spe-
cies of sharks so that refinements in
fishery management practices can
be put into place to assure that not
only we, but our children, will have
these critters around in the future,"
Burgess said.
One problem with current man-
agement policies is they assume all
sharks are alike, when in reality
each species has its own life history
characteristics, Burgess said. Some
reach sexual maturity faster or pro-
duce more young than others, while
the length of the reproductive period
(See Shark Study Page 5)


Opinion & Comment


" Short Takes & Other Notions


I,- ,,,, _,


, ~--I -r ill I ~1 III Irr i ~ II


-~-J~ a Is ~p-lb---~C~iP~









Elderly Overwhelmed


(Continued From Page 4)
thing was an effort, using an eight-
iten version of a questionnaire
developed in the 1970s that detects
major or clinical depression. In ad-
dition, participants were asked "Do
you believe that depression is a
medical condition?" And "Do you
believe depression is a personal
weakness?" As well as if they had
ever taken medication for depres-
sion.


This role of religiosity suggests
mental health professionals may
need to work more closely with the
clergy in identifying and getting
treatment for blacks who show
symptoms of depression, Mills said.
"The clergy may be the first line of
defense for elderly blacks who suf-
fer from depression," he said.
A comparable proportion of the


Sharks Study Target


(Continued From Page 4)
varies from species to species, he
said.
For example, the dusky shark,
once a major player in the commer-
cial shark industry, takes three years
to reproduce instead of the usual
two, he said.
"The reproductive .biology of the
dusky shark is its Achilles Heel, cer-
tainly contributing to its marked de-
cline," he said. "By contrast, the
sharp nose shark, a small species,
reproduces every year and its popu-
lation numbers are much higher. It's
this kind of variation from species to
species that often grossly affects its
vulnerability."
Learning more about how the
mother passes nutrients to the em-
bryo in the uterus, and how these
might be influenced by water qual-
ity and other environmental factors
is one aim of the UF research team,
Females of some species produce a
milk-like substance the fetus may
ingest or absorb, while those of
other species circulate blood across
a placenta wall, said Franklin Snel-
son, a biologist and another member
of the UF team.
"We think of sharks as primitive
animals, but nothing could be fur-


their from the truth," Burgess said.
"Because they've been around so
long, they've developed very special
adaptations unlike those found in
other fish-like vertebrates. So their
reproductive systems have devel-
oped in complex ways."
Reproduction is one of many life
history characteristics the UF team
also is analyzing growth rates by de-
termining the time span represented
by growth rings in sharks' back-.
bones, which are made of cartilage,
and is trying to figure out what
sharks eat by studying the fatty-acid
composition of their livers.
"One of the problems of looking
at the food habits of sharks has been
that they often regurgitate what's in
their stomach as part of the physical
labor of being caught by hook and
line," Burgess said.
Because environmental factors are
critical to sharks' well-being, the UF
team also is tagging sharks, which
use the shallow waters of the Indian
River lagoon on Florida's east coast
as a nursery for their young. Their
habitat is disappearing rapidly as en-
croaching boat traffic and human
populations moving up,the coastline
destroy these marshes, he said.


Health Department Sets

Fundraisers For Cancer


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff\\ rier


I, ii,),.


The Health Department Relay for
Life Team is planning a Hot Dog
Lunch and Dessert, 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. March 19, at the Health De-
partment. The cost is $5.
In keeping with the Relay theme:
A Blast From The Past, at the event,
old time Western photos will be
taken.
Props and costumes will be avail-
able for the sittings at $5 for 5x7
photos, and $10 for 8x10 photos.
Luminaria will also be presold at
the luncheon.
All monies collected from these
fundraisers will go to the American
Cancer Society for the fight against
cancer.
The, County.Health Department
Relay For Life team hosted a Chili
take out luncheon, recently, and
raised more than $367 for the cause.
Additional donations were re-
ceived as "tips" when chili deliver-
ies were made to local businesses.
No dollar figure was available for
' these donations.
A generous donation was also
made by Steve Andris from the Jef-
ferson County Kennel Club.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


"The community really came to-
gether for this one, and wereally
; \init t[:, thk hem." Co-Tea~n Cap-
tains Donna Melgaard and Jfoyce
Steele said.


older blacks.and whites surveyed -
15 percent and 12 percent respec-
tively reported being depressed.
The proportion of black and white
older adults who reported feeling
depressed in Mills' study is nearly
comparable to national averages for
individuals aged 65 and over. Ac-
cording to the National Mental,
Health Association, depressive.
symptoms occur in about 15 percent'
of community residents over 65
years of age, he said.
Three-quarters of whites said they
considered depression to be a medi-
cal condition, compared with 65
percent of blacks, Mills said.
This disparity may relate to whites
having a greater level of knowledge
about depression, Mills said. Studies
have shown that whites who seek
medical care for a physical problem
are more, likely than their black
counterparts to be referred for
evaluation of depression and diag-
nosed with depressive disorders, he
said.


C:X
cx

Joe Francis
CONCRETE & LANDSCAPE
SERVICE
P.O. Box 6203, Tallahassee, FL 32304
(850) 926-3475 -(Mobile) 556-3761
926-9064 556-1178


MAIN STREET

SATURDAY, MARKET:


Come One, Come All!

Free for first timers, $5 after that.


Garage Sale, Baked Goods, Produce,
Gift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
thing You Have To Sell, Including
Fainting Goats!
Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
Fund raisers more than welcome,


Call Tammie Peck @


997-6455


A A A A A A


A,.


1FWE

'l SAVER












When you.invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


]


.,. They also are more, likely to be
medically treated for depression.
One-quarter of elderly whites sur-
.veyed reported having taken medi-
'cation for depression, compared
with 17 percent of their black coun-
terparts, he said.
Ronald Angel, a sociology profes-
sor at the University of Texas at
Austin and co-author of the book
"Who Will Care for Us? Aging and
Long-Term Care in Multicultural
America," said Mills' research is
"very important."
"Dr. Mills' research makes it clear
that there is more to depression than
brain chemistry," Angel said. "The
lifelong disadvantages and social
stresses that older African-
Americans have experienced place
them at great risk of poor health and
depression. Dr. Mills' work clearly
documents that increased risk, but it
also provides useful insights into
how social factors, including relig-
ious identification,, provide older
African-Americans with ways of un-
derstanding and dealing with their
feeling."


0 0 00 0 000 0 0 0 0 A0n0n 0 n n0RUnLItUtiUti a,-- I- n fl n v a a IsoIs a


opooo o n -oo a 0oo a ooooo aa o o o

C



I [)






The Jefferson Coi
the follow\

All plastic bottles
laundry detergent b

E All type cans- Tin
etc.
Alur


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005 PAGE 5,1


MONTICELLO ROTARY

CLUB


I RELAY FOR LIFE FUNDRAISER
A 4
v HOT DOGS
RELAY &
FOR LIFE COKES
COKES

SATURDAY AT
JEFFERSON BUILDERS MART


10:30 TO 1:30
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY


unty Recycling Program accepts
wing items for recycling:

soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
bottles, etc.

cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,

ninum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.


News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping bp,~o,,etc.


All glass bottles. jars, etc.,(clear, brown & green)


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**the Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection, site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
,Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.iefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005


Lifestyle


U -,w.--


Church Of Nazarene Ladies


Attend Annual Retreat


WOMEN from the local Church of the Naza-
,rene attended the North Florida District
Women's Retreat'in Jacksonville, over the


Church Noews

SThe Ushers (No. 1 and 2) of New
Bethel AME Church will observe
their anniversary 3 p.m., Sunday,
lnarch 20, with a worship service.
Guest minister and church is Rev.
Marque D. Woodard and Friend-
ship AME Church, of Tallahassee.

2 Elizabeth MB Baptist Church in
Dills Community celebrates its
i;34th church anniversary, 3 p.m.
Sunday. Elder Alvin J. Ford and
Congregation from Mt. Zion PB
Church, of Tallahassee, will be in
chjrce of the service.

Philadelphia MB Church cele-
brates Pastor Joseph Francis' an-
niverary Sunday, with services at 11
am. and 3 p.m.. The morning serv-
ice will be rendered by a guest
church from Thomasville TBA, and
rle jfernrion service by The Holy
grlhi.:,' Re% I\%al Church iv

SBeitel AME ChurchW \omen's
l4inistry will sponsor a Prayer of
Deliverance Breakfast 9 a.m., Sun-
lay. Praise and Worship Service
will be rendered by the County's
housee to House Prayer Band's
&raise Team. Message of Deliver-
ance will be spoken by Evangelist
'Valerie Ellis.

2 Memorial MB Church observes its
Youth Choir Anniversary 11 a.m.,
Sunday. Guest Minister Is Elder
oVilbert O. Hobbs.
5*.*


weekend. L-R: Connie Dodson, Debbie
Snapp, Gina Diehl and Judi Cleckner



M.": r:: .
. L.- ".:. "


- ".. .I
* '.,..

is'. ,
44:


LATOYA WEAVER AND CLIFFORD SMITH


LaToya Weaver To Marry

Clifford Smith, Sr.

-Ada "Jackie" and Jo'eph Belliam:, fersbndCounty-.High Schoo ..She is
of Monticello and the late Lucious employed by the Lee County
Weaver; and Wilma and Hal Smith, Schools as a school bus driver.


of Ft. Myers, FL. announce the en-
gagement of their children LaToya
N. Weaver and Clifford Smith, Sr.
The bride-to-be's grandparents are
Inell Green of Ft. Myers, and Rev.
Lucious Rodgers of Baxley, GA.,
and Mildred Monroe of Ft. Myers.
The groom-to-be's grandparents
are Anell and Wilmer Young, of
Tallahassee.
Weaver is a 1996 graduate of Jef-


Homes Of Mourning


KAREN BETH CAMPION
GERREN
Karen Beth Campion Gerren, age
'48, a homemaker, died Monday,
March 7, 2005 in Tallahassee, Flor-
ida.
Karen was a native of Chicago, IL,
,and a former resident of Sarasota,
,FL. and Marietta, GA. Before set-
tling in Monticello 3 years ago. She
;had attended Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity and received the degree of
Bachelor of Arts and the University
;of Florida where she received her
Masters in Bio-Chemestry.
A Memorial Service will be held
Friday, March 11, 2005 at Christ
,Episcopal Church at 12 Noon.
;' Family will be receiving friends
after the service in the Gerry Hall.
She is survived by: Her Father:
fWilliam H. Campion of Mebane
,N.C., 3 Brothers: William H. Cam-
pion of Point-of-Rock MD., Clifford
I. Campion of Sunrise FL.,. and
Jeffery E. Campion of Cary N.C., a
sister: Julia M. Campion of Marietta
GA., Her Father-in-law: John Ger-
ren Sr., of Monticello FL., Nieces
4nd Nephews: Megan, Andrew, and
Katie Campion, Kyle and Sean
Campion.
S She was preceded in death by her
loving husband John Gerren Jr.
SDonations may be made to: Christ
Episcopal Church 425 N. Cherry St.
Monticello FL. 32344

MALCOM F. KINSEY
SMalcolm F. Kinsey, 65 died Tues-
day, March 8, 2005. In Augusta,
9eorgia.
He was born in Monticello, and
had resided in West Palm Beach for
6ver 30 years. He was a jet engine


specialist, and a veteran of the US
Air Force. He was 'a member of
Elizabeth Baptist Church in Monti-
cello.
The service will be held at 2:00
P.M. EST. Saturday, March 12,
2005. At graveside at Elizabeth
Cemetery, in Jefferson County,
Florida.

Visitation will be 6-8 p.m. Friday,
March 11, 2005 at Beggs Monticello
Chapel, in Monticello, Florida.
Interment at Elizabeth Cemetery
2:00 p.m. In Jefferson County, Flor-
ida.

He is survived by: 3 brothers,
Aaron Kinsey of Perry, Fl., Harold
Kinsey of Lloyd, Fl., Marvin Kinsey
and wife Mildred of Jacksonville,
Fl., 2 sisters, Jenell Tapley and hus-
band Al of Montgomery, AL.,
Naomi Walker and husband Car-
swell of Perry, Fl., and several
nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his
parents, Tommy and Ollie Kinsey;
brothers, James and Donald Kinsey;
and sister, Olivia Wood.
(See Homes Page 12)


Smith is a 1993 graduate of Ft.
Myers High School. He is employed
by the City of Naples.

The wedding will take place at 4
p.m., Saturday, March 26, 2005, at
the Unity Christian Church in Ft.
Myers. The church. is located at
2709 Highland Ave.

The Rev. Benny McCloud will be
officiating.
Friends and family are cordially
invited to attend the ceremony.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Two members of the Monticello
Church of the Nazarene and their
guests attended the North Florida
District Women's Retreat in Jack-
sonville this past weekend, under-
scoring the theme: "God is Good All
the Time."
treat, which began 7 p.m, Friday
with a banquet in the Ballroom, fol-
lowed by a welcome from Martha
Stephens, coordinator of the event.
Invocation followed, then a din-
ner of Beef Stroganoff with choco-
late mousse cake for dessert.
Vance and Jeannie Sharpe were
welcomed back, from last year's Re-
treat and brought their very own
blend of music to share with the
audience, which this year included a
few songs by their 10 year old son,
adding a touch of youthful inno-
cence to the affair.
They are from Blythewood, SC,
and have spent more than 10 years
performing Southern and Gospel
music to minister a message of hope
in Jesus.
Jeannie gave the message on Fri-
day evening, sharing a piece of her
life in story, which brought tears
and laughter to the audience. They
later gave a concert until 11 p.m.
Saturday's began with a buffet
breakfast, followed by the morning
session and more Music Ministry by
the Sharpe's.
The message was then brought by
Cindy Clary, who was eager to
share her life experiences about how
God is working in her life.

CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Mother
Flowerzell T. Saffo wishes to thank
everyone for all the .acts ofjoe,ve and
kindness shov. n ihrogh yYii,
; phone calls, flowers, cards, food and
whatever you did during the illness
of our loving mother.
T Special thanks to Al Hall and staff
of Tillman's Funeral Home for their
professional services and to Rev.
SDr. Melvin Roberts and the Greater
Fellowship MB Church Family for
hosting the Homegoing Celebration.
May God continuously bless each
of you.
Henry (Betty) Roberts
Laverne (James) Mack
Altamease (Rufus) Harmon
Pearlye (James) Gallon
Willie (Catherine) Saffo
Gwendolyn Saffo
Grands and Great Grands


She reminisced about her mission-
ary trip to Brazil. She had no idea
what she would do when she got
there, but knew it was where she
was supposed to be at that time.
She said that it's not about one's
ability, it's about one's availability.
She was invited by the Sharpe's to
entertain using sign language during
their Saturday Music Ministry.
Flowered China tea cups and sau-
cers filled with chocolate candy
were given as door prize gifts to a
few lucky winners.
Following lunch and additional
Music Ministry by the Sharpe Fam-
ily, the retreat closed. More than
$1,200 was donated towards the
Music Ministry.
2006 will mark the 10th Anniver-
sary of these ladies coming together
for the North Florida Retreat.
Next year's Retreat Theme will be
"Friends Through Thick and Thin."
The goal is to get 500 ladies in at-


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Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Trust in the
Lord with all
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lean not on
your own
understanding.
Proverbs 3:5
Come and hear...
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005 PAGE 7


Kiwanians Hear About Need


For Blood, Who Can Donate


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Guest speakers Wednesday at the
Kiwanis Club were Southeastern
Community Blood Center (SCBC)
CEO Jeanne Dariotis and Area
Blood Drive Coordinator Jen
Goldsberry.
SAs the Kiwanians are sponsoring
:'a bloodmobile during the April Re-
:lay for Life Weekend, the speakers
-were invited to speak about the
:need for blood and qualifications of
,donors.
SBlood stays in the county from
which it was donated, unless there
;is a surplus, as blood is only good
for 42 days, Dariotis explained.
"There is a critical shortage go-
.ng on right now, and we're desper-
.ate for donors," she said. "The cri-
:sis types are 0- and 0+ blood."
Donors may be anyone in good
:health, at least 17 years old and
weighing at least 110 pounds. Do-
nors may donate every 56 days.
: People who have had recent, ster-
tile ear or body piercing can donate,


those with non professional pierc-
ings have to wait for 12 months be-
fore donating.
People who have had profes-
sional acupuncture can donate and
people with new tattoos have to
wait 12 months before donating
blood.
Because of Mad Cow Feral dis-
ease the following can not donate
blood: Those who have lived in
France for five years or more be-
tween 1980 and the present or
those who have visited or lived in
the United Kingdom for a total of
three months or more between
1980 and 1996.
Those who have received a blood
transfusion in the UK, .between
1980 and the present, and those in
the military (current and former),
and their dependents, who spent
time in military bases in northern
Europe during 1980-1990, or
southern Europe during 1980 and
1996, for six months or more.
Those with AIDS, those at high
risk of AIDS and their. partners,
may not donate blood.


Those with colds, flu and infec-
tions cannot donate until they are
symptom free and feeling well.
Diabetics on injectable insulin can
not donate, but those on oral con-
trolled medications can.
Someone who has suffered from a
heart attack must first contact the
blood center.
Those with a history of hepatitis
can not donate, and those with ma-
laria have to wait for three years.
Those who have traveled to malar-
ial areas must wait one year before
donating blood.

Menstruating females can donate
and six weeks after a pregnant
woman has delivered or miscarried,
she can donate.
Those- having surgery without a
transfusion have to wait for one to
six months before donating and.
those going through surgery and
having blood transfusions or blood.
components, have to wait for one-.
year.
People taking allergy medications,


diuretics, diet pills, sleeping pills,
tranquilizers, aspirin, Tylenol and
hormones can donate.
Those on antibiotics have to wait
for seven days. People on most
types of blood pressure medication
can donate. Those having a vaccine
for measles, mumps or rubella,
have to wait for one month, and
those having the flu vaccine or the
Hepatitis B vaccine can donate.

It takes at least 24 hours for do-
nated unit of blood to become
available for use by patients and
one donation can save up to three
lives.

Dariotis said the donation proc-
ess was an easy one. Prospective
donors first complete a health his-
tory questionnaire and screening
interview.
The next step involves a brief
medical examination of blood pres-
sure, pulse,, temperature and a test
for anemia. If the medical require-
ments are met, a unit (about one
pint) is drawn from the donor.
Afterwards, the donors, are
served refreshments while remain-
ing seated for ten minutes. The en-
tire process usually takes less than
one hour.
For further information contact
SCBC at 877-7181.


Mailbox Marks Site

Of Home Set Back


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The 12 foot tall mailbox of Paul
Kennedy, of North Salt Road, elic-
its many comments, including that
it was designed for airmail.
Kennedy said he wanted to mark
his driveway in a distinctive way,
as the house is set too far back to
be visible from the roadway.
The florescent-orange mail box
set atop a 12 foot pole, with lines of
red reflectors climbing either side
serves his purpose well.
"I just wanted a landmark that
was easily visible to service vehi-
cles, friends, and -EMS,-, andJ fire-
fighters,' should the need risee" he
said. "' C
He explained that there had been'


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many occasions when he gave
people directions to his home, and
they would always drive by numer-
ous times, unable to find it.
"At first, I thought of a big sign,"
said Kennedy. "But signs are bor-
ing and forgettable. Then I thought
of putting a flag out there to mark
the driveway, but I reconsidered
when I thought of going out there
and putting it up and taking it down
every day.
"People might not remember a
sign or a flag, but they will remem-
ber a tall, colorful mailbox," he
added. "It's the best I could come
up with on short notice."
Ironically, Kennedy does not have '.
a standard mailbox on the site. "I
prefer geening mymail in town. It's'
more secure," he explained.


Park Registers 15

Spring Sports Teams


THIS MAILBOX marks the home of the Paul Kennedy fatm-
ily. on North Salt Road, which is set too far back to be visi-
ble from the road. (News Photos)

Red Hats To Meet Saturday

TO Celebrate St. Pat's Day


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Recreation Department reg-
istered 15 teams for spring sports,
Saturday.
There are four T-ball teams,
which include: Bishop Farms,
Capital City Bank, Rotary, and Jef-
ferson Builders Mart.
,Five :teams were registered in-
Coach Pitch, including: Kiwanis,
Masonic Lodge, Chicken Delite,


Merchants Bank, Williams Timber,
Jefferson Farmers Market, and
SMonticello Milling.
Two teams in the Girls Softball
League include: Jackson's Drug
Store and Joyner's Travel Center.
The Spring Jamboree is sched-
uled to kick off the season, April 2.
Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman said that during the Jambo-
ree, each team will play tx o prac-
tice games of three innings each,
annd a photographer will be a\ailk
able for team and individual


Frances Drawdy. ... State Farm Insurance and C & F photos.
DEBBIE SNAPP Members are requested to deco- Fencing. The regular season begins April
Staff Writer rate their hats accordingly for this Four teams registered for Little 4, and a schedule will be
occasion, and green is the color of League, including: Farmers and published.
Red Hats of America will meet at the day.
the Mbnticello/Jeffersdn Chamber Queen Mum Minnie ,Stokley .in-
of Commerce 11:30 a.m., Saturday, vites members and friends to come News W without Fear or Favor
March 12, in celebration of the St. and hear 'a bit of the old Irish tale'.
Patrick's Day holiday. Hostesses will be Tammie Peck M onticello N ew s
A luncheon of Chicken and and Illeane Vorce, who welcome ad-
Dumr~lings will be served by Mary ditional help.


A Public Service Message From:


Shoplifting Is A Serious Crime. eai
Federations'

And We're Serious About Stopping It. ..
.*.i.^ .;*. -,: W






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005



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Lady Warriors Win Over


Florida High Middle 14-8


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Warrior JVs beat Flor-
ida High Middle School last week,
14-8, and remained undefeated at
7-0.
Coach Frank Brown said that
Florida High was a very good team,
though they are somewhat younger
than the ACA girls.
"They're well-trained, well-
disciplined and they knew what do
with the ball when they had it,"
said Brown. "They have a real
good pitcher, too."
He added that the Lady Warriors
played a better'game and definitely


had to play ball seriously for the
win.
"We weren't just going to show
up and win, we definitely had to
earn it, which is the way it should
be," Brown said.
During the seven inning game,
ACA had a total of 18 hits, includ-
ing 17 singles, one triple, three
walks given to them, 10 RBI's, five
strikeouts and nine stolen bases.
Florida High had a total of 14
hits, including 13 singles, one
triple, eight RBI's, 10 strikeouts
and one stolen base.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat five
times, had four singles, one strike-
out, scored four runs, one RBI and
three stolen bases and Nicole


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Warrior JVs lost to Florida
High Middle School, 12-7
Tuesday, and fell to a 2-5 season.
Coach Daryl Adams said the ACA
batting was far below average. "We
onlywent 9 for 29 in hitting," he
addefl.
Casey Anderson went one for
four; Stephen Dollar had one walk,
one run; Kyle Barnwell went two


Simply Smashing
Rained Out Again

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Simply Smashing ladies A league
tennis team, was rained out again
last week and split points with the
Glen Arvin Alley Cats.
"The weather just hasn't been
working for us," said Captain Patty
Hardy. "Hopefully, we'll be able to
play this week, since the chance of
rain is predicted to be low."
., The ladies face off against the
Killeam Lucky Stars at the Killearn
Country Club. 9:30 a.m., Thursday.


for four with one double; Daniel
Greene went one for three, scored
one run.
Rob Searcy went O for three and
scored two runs; Matt Bishop went
three for three, scoring one run and
hitting two triples; and Will Harts-
field went one for two with one
double.
Dollar pitched five innings, strik-
ing out two batters and giving up
seven hits and four walks; and
Bishop pitched one inning, giving
up six walks.
The Warriors play Brookwood 4
p.m., Thursday.


Sports


Mathis went to bat five times, had
four singles, three runs, five RBI's,
one stolen base, one walk.
Mallory Plaines went to the bat-
ter's box five times, hit two singles,
one run, one RBI, two strikeouts.
Linsey Day went to bat five
times, for two singles, one run, two
RBI's, three stolen bases.
Paige Thurman went to bat five
times, for one walk, one run, twice
being put out at first, twice out on
a pop-up.
Tristen Sorensen went to the bat-
ter's, box four times, for three sin-
gles, one run, three stolen bases.
Hannah Sorensen went to bat
four times, had one walk, one run,
one strikeout, and was put out


WW NFC Clobbers

Lady Tigers

L_.-_ FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


LADY TIGERS Catcher Ashli Washington at bat, and center
fielder Kim Gilley at bat during a recent practice session.
Washington scored the only RBI in the NFC game. (News
Photo)


ACAs Colby Roberts


1st In Weightlifting


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Marking the first time an Aucilla
Christian Acadeinm student has,
ever participated in v.eihtiliftg
competition, Colby Roberts -has
competed in two meets, coming out'
well in both.
Spokesperson Tonya Roberts said
that in the competitions, ACA is
the only school being represented
by just one student.
There were three schools in the
Maclay competition. ACA, Maclay
and Oakhill.: ,
Roberts .won first place in his
weight division of 199 pounds. He
had a combined lift of 470 pounds,
285 pounds in the bench press and


185 pounds in the cling and jerk.
in the Taylor competition, there
were four schools, ACA, Taylor,
Hamilton and Suwannee and Rob-
erts took second place in his weight
division.
He had a combined lift of 480
pounds, 295 pounds in the bench
press and 185 pounds in the cling
and jerk.
Roberts' goal in the bench press
is to reach 345 pounds and his goal
in the cling and jerk is at least 220
pounds.
Roberts concluded that Colby
wishes to do well enough through-
out the season to be able to qualify
compete in the state meet.
The next competition is set 3:30
p.m., March 16, at Taylor.


The Lady Tigers were clobbered
for an 11-1 loss when they faced
North Florida Christian Tuesday,
falling to a 1-2 season, 0-2 in dis-
trict play.
Coach Earline Knight said JCHS
couldn't get their bats to connect
with the ball.
The only RBI was made by Ashli
Washington. Tiffany Walker
scored the only run for the Lady
Tigers and Nikidra Thompson had
the only hit in the game. Thomp-
son also pitched.
"We cut down on our errors con-
siderably and NFC did not blow us
away as they have done several
other teams during the season,"
said Knight. "The girls played
great defense."


.. -


ROBERTS

ACA Tennis Team
Beats Suwannee


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity tennis team recently de-
feated Suwannee County, 5-2 and
climbed to a 2-i season.

In singles action, Amanda Sapp
defeated Emily Graham, 8-5.
Courtney Connell beat Kelsey Sell-
gren, 8-6; and Kaitlin Jackson de-
feated Christian Wooley, 8-4.

Rebekah Aman defeated Re-
becca Wilkes, 8-1; Ramsey Revel
lost to Katherine Wilding, 1-8; and
Caroline Mueller defeated Prissy
Crapps, 8-5.

In doubles action, Sapp and Con-
nell defeated Graham and Wilkes,
8-6; Jackson and Mueller lost to
Sellgren and Wooley, 6-8.


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twice at first.
Katelyn Levine went to bat four
times, had two singles, scored one
run, one RBI, one put out at first
and one out on a pop-fly.
Savannah Williams went to bat
four times and smacked out one tri-
ple, one run, one walk, one strike-
out and one put out at first.
Thurman pitched the entire game,
striking out 10 batters and giving
up three walks and 14 hits.
The Lady Warriors play River
Springs, Thursday. and Florida
High again Friday. Both games are
at 4 p.m., here.


REBEKAH AMAN returns the.
serve at practice. In the
game, she won ovdr her op-
.ponent. (News Photo)


ACA Girls Beat

Suwannee 6-1

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

For the second time in a week,
.Lady Warriors varsity tennis team
defeated Suwannee County. This
time the score was 6-1, bringing the
ladies to 3-3 record.
In singles action, Courtney Con-
nell lost to Emily Graham,' 3-8;
Kaitlin Jackson beat Kelsey
Sellgren, 8-1; Caroline Mueller beat
Christen Wooley, 8-5.
Rebekah Aman won over Re-,.
becca Wilkes, 8-5; and Elizabeih
Shirley beat Katherine Wilding,
8-0.
iIn doubles action, the team of
Ramse Revell and Dana Jane
\\ a lost to Prissy Crapps and
Wilding, 5-8; Connell and Shirley
beat Graham and Wilding, 8-4; and
Jackson and Mueller were victori-
ous over Sellgren and Wooley, 8-5.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005 PAGE 9


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY. THE BANK, an
Alabama banking corporation, Plaintiff,
vs. JEFFERSON POWER, L.C. and
BESCO, INC. Defendant. NOTICE OF
SALE. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment and
Foreclosure dated the 28th day of
February, 2005, entered on Case No.
04-341-CA in the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit of the State of
Florida, in and for Jefferson County,
Florida, wherein The Bank is Plaintiff,
and Jefferson Power, L.C. and Besco, Inc.,
are Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at the North Door
of the Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, Florida, at 11:00 o'clock on
the 31st day of March, 2005, the following
described property situated in Jefferson
County, Florida, and set forth in said final
judgment and foreclosure, to-wit:
Commence at a concrete monument set at
the intersection of the South boundary of
the North half of Section 12, Township 1
North, Range 4 East, Jefferson County,
Florida and the West right-of-way line of.
US 19 and run East 877.10 feet along said
half section line to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, said point being on the
center line of the Old Pinhook Road and
on the North right-of-way line of the
Southwest Corner of Power Line
Easement, said point being 1293.8 feet
East of the Southwest Corner of the
Northeast Quarter.of Section 12; thence
North 2 degrees 05 minutes East 800.0 feet
along said Pinhook Road to a point; thence
East 544.86 feet to a point; thence South 2
degrees 05 minutes West 800.00 feet to a
point on the North Boundary of the
aforementioned power line easement and
the South boundary of the North half of
Section 12; thence West 544.86 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING. Being a part of
the Northeast Quater of Section 12, 1
North, Range 4 East, Jefferson County,
Florida (the "Property"). WITNESS my
hand and the official seal of this
Honorable Court, on this 28th day of
February, 2005. In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities Act, persons
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should


LEGAL NOTICE
contact the Clerk of Circuit Court,
Jefferson County, not later than seven (7).
days prior to the proceeding at Telephone-
850-342-0218. Clerk of Circuit Court By
Jeri B. Pearson, Deputy Clerk.
3/11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE.: 05-46-CA FAMILY LAW
DIVISION NIKKI RANSOM
TRAMMELL, Petitioner, and JEFFERY
WAYNE TRAMMELL, Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR -
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE To
JEFFERY WAYNE TRAMMELL 550
Piney Woods Road, Monticello, Fl, 32344.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been field against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of tour written
defenses, if any, to Petitioner' Attorney,
C. Erica White, Esq., whose address is 290
West Washington Street, Monticello, Fl
32344, on or before March 7, 2005, and
file the original with the clerk of this
Court at the Jefferson County Court
House, before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so,
a default may be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition. Copies
of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents upon request.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family,
Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain

-- q









It's easy to find government
information at www.FirstGov.gov
or 1 (800) FED INFO.
SFIRSTGOVgov -
Government made easy


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WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


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Jumping Jacks & Jills
3 to 5 yr. olds Pifates (ilates


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All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,, MARCH 11, 2005


,LEGAL NOTICE
automatic disclosure of documents and
information. Failure to comply can result
ii sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. Dated:02/15/05.
(LERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:
Jbri B. Pearson, Deputy clerk
2/18,25,3/4.11 pd
NEED AN ATTORNEY ARRESTED?
Criminal Defense *State *Federal
*Fellonies *Misdemenaners *DUI
*License Suspension *Parole *Probation
*Domestic Violence *Drugs "Protect Your
Rights" A-A-A Attorney Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A
WEEK.
3/11, fcan
Notice of Auction to the Highest Bidder:
Under the authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805, the described
below has been seized for nonpayment of
rent and other incurred expenses: Unit A3
Marsha Jones Household goods; Auction
Date: March 26, 2005 at 10:00 A.M. at
Register Mini Storage 315 Waukeenah
Hwy. Monticello Florida.
3/11,18


LEGAL NOTICE
DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children,
etc. Only one signature required!
Excludes govt. Fees! Call weekdays
(800)456-2000,ext.600.(8am-7pm) Divoce
Tech. Established 1977.
3/11, fcan
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machine Hd.
You approve Loc's- $10,670
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3/11, fcan
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
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Call US: We will not be undersold!
3/11, fcan
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Call Online Supplier For More Info
(800)940-4948 Ext. 5314.
3/11, fcan


NOTICE
Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read
DIANETICS by Ron L. Hubbard Call
(813)872-0722.
3/11, fcan
ARGENTINA, Goose, Duck, Dove, Perdiz,
Pigeon, Fishing. Best bang for the $ in the
world. Season April-August 2005.
Weekdays (314)293-0610.
3/11 fcan
GOVERNMENT AUCTION 520 acres In
Columbia, SC area- Horse training facility
and other acreage. Date March 24, 2005.
Visit: www.ustreas.gov/auctions/irs for
further details.
3/11 fcan
LAND & GROVE AUCTION! Lake
Placid, FL 11 AM, Sat., Mar 26 443.9+/-
Total Acres 3 Tracts Offered in 16 Parcels.
Preview: 1-5 PM, Sat., March 19 Call for
details: (800)257-4161 Higgenbotham
Auctioneers www.higgenbotham.com ME
Higgenbotham, CAI Fl Lic
#AU305/AB158.
3/11 fcan


HELP WANTED
MANAGER TRAINEE POSITION
AVAILABLE GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY
WARREN BUFFET COMPANY. The
future is bright, and we need
entrepreneurs who know how to build and
maintain successful organizations. Turn
on to uncapped performance-based
compensation, full benefits, 401 (K)
recognition, awards, trips and training.
It's a golden opportunity! Call for
appointment 850-576-2104.
3/11
Now Hiring 2005 Postal Positions Federal,
State & Local. $14.80/$48+/Hr. No
experience necessary. Entry Levels. Full
Benefits. Paid Training. Call 7 days
(888)826-2513 Ext. 2203.
3/11, fcan
Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers
Needed Now! Run SE Only or SE,
Mid-Atl, MW Regional, O/O's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel
(866)250-4292.
3/11, fcan


HELP WANTED
City of Monticello is accepting
applications for Police Patrol Officer.
Requires a minimum of high school
diploma and Florida Police Standards.
Must live in Jefferson County or be willing
to relocate. Have demonstrated police
skills, some advanced police Certification,
i.e. Radar or Breathalyzer. Must complete
a Dept. field training program within the
first month. Background check required.
Salary and benefit information available
upon request. Submit to City of Monticello
245 S. Mulberry St. Monticello, Florida
32344 by March 18, 2005 EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace.
3/11.16
Certified Nursing Assistants Pine Lake
Nursing Home in Greenville is recruiting
you for day and evening shifts. Your skills
and compassion are needed and
appreciated! We offer the best staff
education program in the Big Bend Area.
Apply in person at the Nursing Home or
Call 948-4601 for more information. Ask
for the Director of Nursing.
3/11,16


HELP WANTED
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg
UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
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Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
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3/11, fcan
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Transportation Required. 342-3288
2/16 tfn chg.
$ GET PAID TO SHOP! Mystery
Shoppers needed immediately on your
local are, as seen on TV. Flexible hours,
complete training. Internet access
required. Call (800)398-5791.
3/11 fcan
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
PT/FT no exp. necessary $50 Cash hiring
bonus Guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638 ext. 107 www.USMailing
Group.com.
3/11 fcan


Interior Exterior


~ ~cH:I:


*t


Residential & Commercial

Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.

Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296

Mobile: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


Allyn Sikes
Owner


*Sand
*Top Soil

Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


1830 Thomasville Road
Tpllahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-3473
(800) 541-8702
Free Delivery To
Tallahassee Hospitals &
Funeral Homes


-Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lie.
#SR0971265


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing

THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. I Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


DANNY'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
SERVING ALL OF YOUR
PAINTAND BODYNEED 'S


7-15765 E. WAS 0N
:765 E. WASHINGTON ST.


i i


Jamie's Body Works

Group Fitness



All Classes taught by Jamie
Cichon Rogers,

:Certified Personal Trainer and
SGroup Fitness Instructor.

Call 997-4253


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
T STARTER


H
0
MO
A
V


I Complete Auto
LL Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging

997-0039
Licensed & Insured


Register's

Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah

Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


r


Appliance

Service
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior ~ Exterior
Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables


GUNS
TV'S
STEREOS
GOLD
SILVER


DIAMONDS
VCR'S
RADIOS
GUITARS
TOOLS


Mon. Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassee
575-7682

yM ile'


rf II
WE CO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOW!

997-6500

WHEN YOU NEED 1-0 SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
REALTOR SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
(850") 997-4340 DIAGNOSIS REPAIR UPCRADLS
S7 INSTALLATIONS CONSULTATIONS
CUSTOM COMPUTERS l*UIORIA! S
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WI

Kayak
Longhorn
Grizzly







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FrF


-10
$.99
$1.19
$1.59


H
.+


Copenhag
Ice 4# .60


A very nice s
T-shirts Chri
$3.99 ez
4LB .60, 8LB .
ree Crystal Lighter
man


DAY'S TREE

TRACTOR SERVICE

Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Uip Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal
Mowing,
S, Bush Hogging
S, Harrowing. Road
Maintenance
Feed Plols
For Free Estimates
Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Chevron

+ tx Timberwolf $1.99 + tx
+ tx Red Seal $2.89 + tx
- tx Kodiak $4.41 + tx
gen $4.58 + tx
, 8# .93, 20# .2.25 + tx

;election and good quality
stian, Florida and others
ach or 3 for $10 + tx
93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
* w/carton purchases. We accept all
ufacturer's coupon


REAL GOOD PAINT
REAL GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
I Gallon Mmnimum)

342-3288


r


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389 2Z
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


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464-2500
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877-4550


YOUR LOGS TO
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Rough-sawn Oaks,
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Also Plainning Available
.--r


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FILL DIRT


850-997-58(08
850-545-9064
850-251-2911

155 JOIN

COLLINs R1).


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


~ --I


U


-* -~--------~----------~-~---~---~-----L-=


I I


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I


I


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I ff


I


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1







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions .Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MOREPAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
3/11, fcan
Cool Travel Job!!! One Month Paid
Training! $500 Sign on Bonus Must be
free to travel & Start Today
(800)735-7462.
3/11, fcan

GARAGE SALE


MOVING SALE
Through the month of March. Furniture
including beds, dressers, etc. Call
997-6220, 1430 Florida Avenue.
3/4,9,11, pd.
Garage Sale Sat.- 3/12/05 at 8:00 'til 1:00.
Furniture, Clothes, H/H items At ROYAL
MINI STORAGE U.S. Hwy 19 South 2
r-"s South of Courthouse.
3/11 chg.
COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET
Sponsored by the Lloyd Lions Club and
held at the U-Haul Sales & Storage
Warehouse located at 7337-A Old Lloyd
Road from 8am-4pm. on Saturdays.
Spaces available, call 997-5505 or
997-1754. Donations appreciated.
3/4,11,18,25. pd.
AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'97 Dodge Neon 59K miles $2,800
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn
1996 DODGE CUSTOM V-8 VAN
(MINT), $5,500. 997-1560 OR e-mail
GCASSBORO@NETZERO.NET
3.2.4.9.11. pd.

SERVICES

Backhoe Service:, Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing Work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates -
551-2000
1/7.14.21.28.2/4 11..18.25.3/4.11.18.25. pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers.
stores. refrigerators. Owidd ,'andl '
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648, Lease
message.
2/11-tfn
Experienced Baby-sitter who is Patient &
loving. Your house or mine whenever
needed. Call 997-5482 or 264-4854
3/2.4.9.11 pd.
Mortgages, Refinance or Purchase. No
money down. No Income, low rates. All
credit considered. (higher rates may,
apply) No mobile homes. (888)874-4829 or
www.AccentCapital.com Licensed
Correspondent Lender.
3/11. fcan
EARN YOUiR DEGREE Online from
home. Business. Paralegal. Computers,
Networking and more. Financial Aid
available. job placement assistance, and
computers provided. Call free
(866)858-2121.
3/11. fcan
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds ,or
practices' Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)


Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UIPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since
1958. Call for a free Brochure!
1-i00-432-0320 www.bertrogers.com.
3/2.4.9,11 16.18.23.25.30


FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
.1/26, tfn,c

3 Bedroom 1 Bath with Storage Shed
$650.00 Month Plus Deposit. Call
997-8295 or 352-514-7103 .
3/4,9,11,16,18, pd.

Booth rental space for stylist available at
the Retreat Salon and Day Spa, Madison.
Incentives for both new and established
stylists. Contact Linda 251-4828.
3/11,18 pd.

FOR SALE
FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT TV SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE HBO & Cinemax! Access to over
225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
3/11, fcan

Bed Solid wood cherry sleigh bed &
pillow top mattress set. All New in box.
Retail $1400, sell $575. 850-222-7783
3/11 tfn


Queen Double Pillow top mattress set.
Name brand, New in plastic, factory
warranty, $195. 850-425-8374
3/11 tfn

Couch & Lose seal: Brand ne. still
packaged, w/ warrant). Can deliver.
Suggested retail $1200. sell $450.
850-545-7112
S3/11 tfn

DINNING RM. Beautiful new cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs, lighted china.
Cabinet, can. deliver. $3K list, sell 'for
$1100. 850-222-2113
3/11 tfn

Keystone 2002 Everest, model 363K,
5th-Wheel, Fiberglass 3-slideouts. Priced
for quick salqqfjko Pre, 997-5441
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,11,16,18 pd.

FOR SALE OR RENT: Mobile Home 3
BR/2 Bath, Fireplace. 24x48' Selling for
payoff price, about $43,196. Call for
details: Barbara 997-5554
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,11 pd.

Steel Buildings. Faclors Deals Sa\e $S5.
4 0 "0' to i00\200 Eample 50i100\l' is
S$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
Sw sn.rigidbuilding.com.
3/11, fcan

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(888)393-0335.
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3/11 fcan

"BR Set, Solid'wood: 7 pe. queen/King bed,
dresser, mirror, 2 night stands, chest avail.
New in boxes. Can deliver. Reiail $5000
sell $1400. Call 850-222-9879.
3/11 ifn


Jenn-Aire Drop-in Range "ilh / Extra's.
(Down Draft) $399.
Amana, 25 Cu. Ft. Side b) Side, Excellent
Condition, Ice/Water in Door. $399. Call
(850)997-4350 if not in leave name and
number. .
3/9.1.13..25. pd

Bed. King Size, name brand mattress, box
w/ warranty, New in plastic. $295' can-
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3/11 tfn

1989 19 ft. Prowler In good Condition
$3000.00 or best offer 997-3890
3'9.! 1


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Please contact store Manager at your

local Fast Track store for an application.


FOR SALE
Bed, New Visco NASA Memory Foam
Mattress Set. Still boxed, factory
warranty, can deliver. Mfg. list $1200, sell
$400. Call 850-425-8374

Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced
to sale $1, $2, $5,$10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30 p.m. @ 342-3246.
2/23,25,3/2,4,11 pd

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WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North
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Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.
3/11 fcan

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region, views, canyons, trees, rolling hills,
wildlife. Enjoy hunting, hiking, horses,


REAL ESTATE

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3/11, fcan

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boat slip! High elevation beautifully
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'LAND WANTED Land Investment ''3/11, fcan
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'11 fIcan -
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3/11 fcan

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A sanctioned Golf Digest Teaching Facilit .
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LLC
Opening 3/12
Wanted collectibles, art, used
furniture, antiques, etc.
Booths available
Consignments welcome
100 W. Dogwood St-. .,:
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3BR/2BA 1,266 Sq Ft Manufactured Home,
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p (850) 997-4340

1 www.TimPeary.com

Great Buvl Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
'1 $8,500 per acre
1 Just Listed-Under Contract 6.67 wooded
1 acres on graded county road in eastern
Jefferson County $23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile 1
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000 ]
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home ]
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
S pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
New Listing 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre 1
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round i
pen in remote location only $295,000
S Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall j
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
SOLD Wonderful Home nice 4 bedroom 2
bath double wide with fireplace on 1.9
acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500 2
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store 1
for rent $650mo
Home Site on the edge of town on West I
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000 j
Sales are very good we have a
shortage of listing for uyers looking
for Homes and Land



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtor Associate

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate






Buyers looking for Homes and Land









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI.,MARCH 11, 2005


Rotary Golf Tournament


Winners Announced


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Rotary Club's Annual Sand-
baggers Golf Classic raised almost
$1,800 for the Rotary Scholarship
Fund, which offers vocational
scholarships for county residents.
Past President James Muchovej
said that nearly 30 players turned
out for the afternoon of golf, fol-


lowed by the famous rib-eye steak
dinner.
Monday was a beautiful, warm
spring day with gusty winds, per-
fect weather for hosting the tourna-
ment, he said.
The coveted Last Place trophy
was awarded to the team of Randy
Chapman, Jason Kinchen, Tim
Swords and Chris Peary.
Low Gross was won by the team
of Bobby Plaines, Chuck


IN ::.iva
'1:?'4 ni. 4 ~i:-, ~~~:7
.- ~


Chambers, Benny Bishop and De-
mott Anderson.
Low Net went to the team from
North Florida Abstract, John Geb-
hard, Ken Buzbee, Tommy Foun-
tain and Elbert Hartsfield.
Muchovej said the Monticello
Rotary Club wished to thank every-
one who made the event special,
especially the sponsors.
Sponsors included Capital City
bank of Monticello, Clerk of Court
Dale Boatwright, Judge Bobby
Plaines, Farmers and Merchants
Bank, Jack Brinson, MD, Jefferson
County Kennel Club, Jefferson
Builders Supply, Marion Drexel
Pierson, and Monticello Family
Medicine.
Also, Monticello News, Morris
Petroleum, Property Appraiser
David Ward, Royal Mini Storage,
Supervisor of Elections Marty
Bishop, Progress Energy and VMS
Maintenance services.
The Rotary Club also wished to
thank those local merchants who
donated door prizes.
. These include: C&D's Pro Shop,
Jefferson County Country Club,
Pizza Hut, Movie Gallery, Edwin
Watts, FMB, Subway, Bari Liquors,
Discount Auto Parts, and the Court-
yard Restaurant.


Homes Of

Mourning
(Continued From Page 6)


Y i











r


"* *






JASON KINCHAN watches his putt at the Rotary Golf
nament Monday. His team won the Last Place Trophy


Hagan New Boys, Girls Clubs'

Physical Education Coordinator


:TOMMY FOUNTAIN tees off. His team won
:Photos)


Low Net. (News


4-Hers Raise $191 For Trip


SThe 4-H County Council held a
Successful Bake Sale, Saturday in
front of the Monticello Post Office
and raised $191.50 towards their
end of year trip.
The sale began at 8 a.m. and 10
members of the 4-H County Council
manned the tables ladened with-
homemade cookies, Rice Krispy
marshmallow treats, cakes, and


brownies until-well after noon.
Special sweets that sold especially-
well included the chocolate chip
oatmeal cookies, baked and donated
by Heidi Copeland, and, the Cran-
berry Pumpkin Loaf prepared by
member Alana Chambers.
"They sold everything," said. 4-H
Assistant Gladys Neely.


Post 49 To Host Grouper Fish Fry


- American Legion Post 49 will
hdld a Grouper Fry 5 7 p.m., Sat-
urday, March 19, or until the grou-
per is all gone, at Legion Hall on
Water Street.
The cost is a donation of $8 and


School Menu
Monday
Rib B Que on Bun, Green Salad, Fruit,
Cookie Bar, Milk
Tuesday
Chicken Fajita Wraps, Lettuce,
Salsa, Cheese Potato Wedges, Fruit
Choices, Milk
Wednesday
Roast Turkey Creamed Potatoes,
Broccoli, Hot Roll, Pineapple Cake,
Milk
Thursday
Peanut Butter or Tuna Salad Sand-
wich, Carrot & Celery Stick, Fresh
Fruit, Pudding, Milk
Friday
Cheese Burger, Lettuce, Tomato,
Pickle, Frech Fries, Apple, Milk


included with the grouper will be:
hush puppies, cheese grits, slaw,
desserts, and a choice of coffee or
iced tea.

Loggers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tequila Hagan is the new Physical
Education Coordinator for the Boys
and Girls Clubs of the Big Bend
Area.
Hagan is a former employee of
Archbold Medical Center's Cardio-
vascular Center, Outpatient Cardio-
pulmonary Rehabilitation in
Thomasville, GA.
She was employed with the Medi-
cal Center for nine years, where she
served as an Exercise Physiologist.
SShe is a Monticello native, and
graduated from the Jefferson
County High School in 1994.
Hagan earned an Associate of Arts
degree and a Bachelors of Science
in Exercise Science from Valdosta
State University.
She will complete her Masters of
Science in Healthcare Management
at Troy University, in May 2005.
The Physical Education Program
(PEP) mission is to address the
growing problem of obesity and un-
healthy lifestyles that face our youth


F.














HAGAN
and their tamales.
The Boys and Girls Club of the
Big Bend (BGCBB) will work with
Jefferson, Franklin, and Leon
County schools to address the fact
that students in these counties do not
have sufficient access' to physical
activities.
With the help from the schools in


(Continued From Page 1)
heavily," Sutphin said.
He didn't necessarily want to sig-
nal loggers out, he said. But he '
thought at the least they should be
required to register in the county or
produce an occupational license. F R
Sutphin apparently never ex-
pected his idea to get much traction
with the public or from other com- ,
missioners. He conceded from their F R IDI.
qtart that h; idea -. wI... .uld rI)


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SLUIL taL I 1S I.swouI u proYlve un--
popular.
Last week, he made the best of a
bad situation, observing that possi-
bly, his raising of the issue had
raised public awareness.
"We haven't done much else," he
said. "I'd like to table this to another
day, when we bring it back up
again."


Buy, Sell, Rent With A
Monticello News Classified




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these counties, BGCBB pr
assist PE instructors in ir
ing new programs with pr
personnel, curriculum, a
needed new equipment.
Community interventi
signed to promote awaren
county.
The objectives of this pr
for students to learn: nut
healthy food choices; safe
jury prevention; positive
goal setting; balance and n
in diet and exercise; and d
television viewing and vi
playing.
Also: to provide opportu
families to become inv
learning healthier lifestyle
tunities to improve self es
cialization, coordination, a
valuable skills to motivate
to learn to live healthy lives
Schools and BGCBB s
equipment; schools receive
sional support and assistant
aspects of programs; sch
BGCBB can provide new
vative curriculum for exi
and Recreational programs'


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Memorial contributions may be
made to: Elizabeth Baptist Church
Building Fund, 4124 Bassett Dairy
Road, Monticello, Florida 32344.

HENRIETTA NELSON
-.. RANSOM
Henrietta Nelson Ransom, 85, a
Retired Homemaker, died Monday,
March 7, 2005 at her residents in
.- Monticello, Florida.
A native and lifelong resident of
Jefferson County, Mrs. Ransom was
the Matriarch to one of the area's
largest and distinguished families.
She was a member of Sweatfield
Missionary Baptist Church, where
her son the Reverend Ben Ransom,
Jr. is the pastor. She served as a
Church Mother and she held mem-
berships in Springfield Pallbearers
Lodge #10 and in the United Sons
and Daughters of Joshua, Sweatfield
Lodge #20.
The service will be at 11:00 EST
on Saturday, March 12, 2005 at
Greater Fellowship Missionary Bap-
tist Church, in.Monticello, Florida
with Rev. Dr. James Redmon, Offi-
Tour- citing. With burial at Springfield
Pallbearers Cemetery in Monticello,
Florida.
Viewing will be from 2:00 p.m. to
4:00 p.m. On Friday, March 11,
2005 at the Tillman Funeral Home
with a wake being from 5:00 p.m. to
6:30 p.m. at Sweatfield Missionary
Baptist Church in Monticello.
To hold sacred her memory and
proposes to her love, she is survived by six sons,
nplement- the Reverend Robert (Annie) Madi-
ofessional son of Madison, FL., the Reverend
nd much James (Willie Mae) Thompson, the
Reverend Ben (Donna) Ransom, Jr.,
on is de- and the Reverend Bethel (Lillian)
ess in the Ransom, all of Monticello. The Rev-
erend Joseph (Martha) Nelson of
ogram are Delray Beach, Florida and Jacob
rition and (Emma) Nelson of Tallahassee; her
ty and in- five daughters, Sarah R. (George)
self talk; Byford, Ann R. Reddick, Hannah
moderation Ransom and D'wanda R. (James)
decreasing Skipworth, all of Monticello, FL.,
deo game and Henrietta (Robert) Barnes, of
Panama City, Fl., two sisters, Isa-
nities for bella Nelson of Monticello, and
solved in Edna Norton of Live Oak, FL., 45
s; oppor- grandchildren, 58 great grandchil-
teem, so-
teem, so- dren and one great-great grandchild.
and other
SMrs. Ransom was preceded in
students
death by her husband, Ben Ransom,
l- Sr., in 1988.


3tare Inew
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