<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00019
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 9, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00019
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text









Group Helps
Kids

Enjoy Childhood

Editorial, Page 4
I I


-I* .........:' 7 F ORIID A HISTORY
q.Lj: AI,:\RY WEST
ijnI'.TLZTY OF FLORIDA
^i;Z. S]'ILLE, FL. 32611


Extension Agent
Offers
Nutrition Tips

Story, Page 7


Aucilla JV
Girls

Undefeated 6-0

Story, Page 10


Keep
Children Safe From
Falls In Home

Story, Page 12
II


Wednesday Morning
J


Montic


II


137TH YEAR NO.21, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


WEDNESDAY,MARCH 9, 2005


". P ...




FR I







puter guru, explains the intricacies of the tal in the conceptualization of the systerr
broad band system to the City Council on the city wants to install. (News Photo)


Firefighters Burn Historic


House Dating From 1800s
... : ::P, b~~h Ij ,9,.
40a- 4












pue .. the ,epthe "system



broad band system to the City Council on the city wants to install. (News Photo)


Firefighters Burn Historic


House Dating From 1800s


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Another of the town's historic
-houses has bitten the dust.
- This time it was the Dunn-Rainey
House, a structure on N. Cherry
Street dating from the 1850s.' Fire-
?fighters burned the large, single-
-story house Saturday as part of a
training exercise.
"I hated to do it," developer
-Riley Palmer said Monday.
But the fact was that he had had
-little choice, he said.
S"The long and short of it is that
the mover who was scheduled to
move the house backed out halfway
through the process," Palmer said.
"He showed up on a Saturday 'and
worked through Wednesday. On
Thursday he called me and told me


.. "" "; -: *"


.a.


that the house was in too bad a
shape and he didn't want it."
Meanwhile, construction had to
proceed on the eight townhouses
that Palmer is building on the site.
As it was, Palmer said, he had de-
layed the startup of his project in the
hope of finding a willing taker for
the historic house.
And interest in the house had cer-
tainly been great, he said, with in-
quiries coming as late as last Tues-
day. In fact, owners of two major
plantations -- one in the county and
the other in Leon County -- had ex-
pressed interest in acquiring the
structure.
SBut once people saw the condition
of the house, they lost interest, Pal-
mer said. He said not only was the
cost of the move exorbitant, but the
cost of the restoration was prohibi-
tive.


FIREFIGHTERS here burn the remainder of a historic build-
ing that was gutted by fire several years ago. The firefight-
ers use these occasions as training exercises, at the same
time that they save property owner the cost of demolition
and disposal. (News Photo)


"It was in too bad a shape," Pal-
mer said. "It had significant termite
damage in one end, as well as wood
rot. It would have required some-
body with a passion for
preservation, regardless of the cost."
He said he had approached the fire
department about the possibility of
burning the building as part of an
exercise after calculating the cost of
demolition and hauling off the de-
bris.
In fact, Palmer said he plans to
contribute a $1,000 to the fire de-
partment based on the savings he
had realized from not having to de-
molish the house and haul the debris
to the landfill.
His concern now is for the small
commissary from the same time pe-
riod that remains on the property, he
said. A local resident has agreed to
take the building on her property.
But the individual who was sup-
posed to move it on her property is
the same individual who reneged on
the other contract.
"I can't even get him to return my
calls," Palmer said.
The Dunn-Rainey house is the
fourth structure dating from the
1800s to be lost to the historic dis-
trict in recent years. The other three
burned from accidental fires.

Police Chief
Will Redefine
Bullock's Job

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Police Chief David Frisby in-
formed the City Council last week
that he will not replace Deputy
Chief Bill Bullock.
Instead, Frisby said, he will reas-
sign Bullock's duties among his
other officers.
"It will be revenue neutral,"
Frisby told the council. "I will make
some promotions and create new
positions but it will all be revenue
neutral."
Bullock retired from the Monti-
cello Police Department after 31
years of service. He is now the chief
deputy at the Sheriffs Department.


City's Internet



Enterprise Hits


Possible Sn


City May Hold Another

Workshop On Venture


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city's plan to install high-
speed Internet service may now be
in jeopardy, thanks to proposed leg-
islation that would prevent munici-
palities from entering the field.
City Superintendent Don Ander-
son informed City Council members
of the proposed legislation last
week, at the same time that he in-
formed them that two bidders had
submitted proposals on the installa-
tion of the system.
The two bids came from a com-
pany in Virginia and from Graybar
Electric, a national company that
has been working with the city on
the project since the beginning.
Graybar's was the low bid at
$225,814.23, well below the
$250,000 the system's proponents
had projected.
The bid price, according to Ander-
son, included the equipment, the in-
stallation, the software and the re-
quired training -- what he termed a
turnkey operation.
As much as he wanted to proceed
with installation of the system, how-


ever, Anderson conceded that the
proposed legislation presented a vi-
able obstacle.
"We can't make a commitment
until we know what the Legislature
will do," Anderson said.
Even so, he wanted permission
from the council to proceed with the
solicitation of bids for the financing
of the system as soon as the fate of
the bill was known.
"If three weeks from now we
hear that the bill has failed in com-
mittee, I want to be able to put the
financing out for bids without hav-
ing to wait for the next council
meeting," Anderson said.
The reason for his haste, he ex-
plained, was that the bid prices for
installation of the system were only
good until April 30. But equally im-
portant, he wanted to get the system
up and running as soon as possible,
he said.
City Attorney Bruce Leinback of-
fered that the city might be putting
the cart before the horse, should it
proceed with the advertisement for
the financing without first adopting
the appropriate ordinance.
"I can have the ordinance ready by
the next meeting," he said.


ag
Tom Love, a member of the
public, expressed excitement that
the city was pursuing the endeavor.
As one of the city's first broad band
users, he was well aware of the
benefits of the system, he said.
But he also wanted to make sure
that city officials had done their
homework, insofar as the workabil-
ity of the venture, the risks the city
was assuming, and such. Had city
officials done this, and did they
truly understand the risks and poten-
tials of the enterprise?
"I'd like to ask that there be some
meetings where citizens can be as-
sured that this is a workable
venture," Love said.
Major Julie Conley thought the
suggestion warranted following.
She, for one, didn't rightly under-
stand the proposed system or its
workings, she admitted.
She called for the scheduling of a
another public forum so that citizens
could have their questions and con-
cerns addressed.
"Sounds to me like we're moving
backwards," Anderson said, remind-
ing the council that the project had
been ongoing for almost two years
already and that previous workshops
had drawn little to no public partici-
pation..
Nonetheless, it appeared to be the
council's consensus that another
public workshop be scheduled on
the project in the near future.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Acting on the recommendation of
the Community Traffic Safety Team
(CTST), the City Council last week
voted to seek extension of the side-
walk on US 19 South and a change
of the angle of parking spaces in the
entire downtown district.
City Clerk and Treasurer Emily
Anderson told the council that with-
out exception, all business owners
within the to-be-affected area sup-
port. the proposed angle parking


"is~'' .t"l
d~t~~. *
":;i~5~d
a
I1I~PIR~


change. This, she said, despite the
fact that the change of the parking
angles from 45 to 30 degrees will
mean the elimination of a few park-
ing spaces.
"Everyone downtown loves it,"
Anderson said. "The response was
all positive."
She said the proposed angle park-
ing change will affect all streets
within a two-block radius of the
courthouse.
The city will now have to petition
the Department of Transportation
(DOT) for the change. The DOT, in
fact, earlier changed the angle of the


parking spaces on the east side ofN.
Jefferson Street at the city's request.
But it so on a trial basis.
Depending how citizens re-
sponded to the change would deter-
mine if the agency would even
consider expanding the project,
DOT officials let it be known at the
time.
To say that DOT officials em-
braced the change reluctantly is an
understatement. The DOT officials
offered reason after reason why the
change wouldn't work. When city
officials persisted in their request,
(See Sidewalks Page 3)


oilI"'
jU I- A ,


THE RECONFIGURATION of the parking
spaces on North Jefferson Street from 45 to
30 degrees has reportedly proven so popu-


lar that city officials want the Department of
Transportation to expand the program to
other areas of the downtown. (News Photo)


C.


City Officials Looking to Expand

30 Degree Parking, Sidewalks


I I r. ~lr r ,_ I i s Ir








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO,(FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9,2005

'Nunsense' Keeps Audiences


Laughing At Opera House


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Opera House Stage Com--
pany's production of "Nunsense"
continues over the weekend, and
will leave audiences chuckling as
they leave the theatre.
Six local "Sisters" don habits and
ingratiate themselves to the audi-
ence as they perform a fundraiser to
bury four remaining nuns, who have
been stored in the freezer.
You see, when the cook at the
convent whipped up a bad batch of
vichyssoise, some 61 nuns were
found stone cold dead with their
faces in the equally cold soup.
It seems funds ran out before all
could be properly buried, thus the
remaining four were stored in the
freezer.
When the Board of Health In-
spectors discovered this, the man-
date came down to bury the nuns or
else.
Through a combination of cir-
'cumstances, a handful of nuns were
away from the convent when the fa-
tal soup was served.
Thus the idea of a musical fund-
raiser came to be.
From the very beginning, the
nuns are lovable, comical, and en-
dearing.
They are ingratiating to the audi-
ence and move among them to chat
of this and that, and early in' the
play, the audience is given a quiz on


JUDI PERSONS, AKA Sr.
Mary Regina, mother supe-
rior, keeps the nuns on their
toes in "Nunsense," continu-
ing next weekend at the Op-
era House. (News Photo)
what just transpired.
After all, these nuns are teachers,
and teachers give quizzes, so....
Directed by George Hook, the
play draws every nuance qf word
play the author ever intended, and
maybe even an added one or two.
From the title of the play forward,
the dialogue is replete with. word
play and double entendres, which
only add to the comedy.
Rebecca Burkart as Sr. Mary Ar-
nold, provides the music at the
Baldwin grand, and as always, dis-


plays her considerable expertise.
Casting for the play is superb.
Anyone who ever had any dealing
with nuns will recognize one or
more of the personality types por-
trayed here.
Judi Persons, as Mother Superior,
is in her element. Affectionately
known as the Opera House Stage
Company's (word that rhymes with
witch) because of the numerous
roles she has played accenting that
quality, here is just plain feisty,
cranky, or in the words of the play-
wright, crabby.
After all, it just would not do for a
nun to display that other quality,
now would it?
Suffice it to say, Persons' encoun-
ter with "Rush," and her imitation of
Sophie Tucker, border on the bawdy
at best.
And who could forget her impres-
sion of Carmen Miranda?
Lisa Reasoner is second in com-
mand, and as such is Mistress of
Novices, always a challenge.
Her singing voice helps add to the
musical part of the program, as well
as her reaction to the number of ma-
jor or minor crises which e. apt.
Jan Rickey, as Sr. Robert Ai.ne,
was described as "si.:;e. smart,"
which to Persons mean' that she was
well versed in the geography of the
area.
Don't you believe it for one min-
ute. See the play and pay close at-
tention to her lines.
Also, Rickey struts her stuff with
the best when she sings and dances
to "I just Want to be a Star."
For this reviewer, Rickey's per-
formance is her best to date on
stage, at the Opera House.
In addition to the demands of the
role, Rickey stepped in three weeks
before opening night, when a cast
member dropped out. That alone is
no small feat, and demonstrates in
theatrical tradition: "The show must
go on," and Rickey made it happen.
Erika Siu plays Sr. Mary Amnesia,
and does it perfectly. She can't re-
member who she is, where she is or
.'why she's there, and is expert at


I



'(


RELAY
FOR LIFE


I


HOT DOGS
&
COKES


W SATURDAY AT
JEFFERSON BUILDERS MART


10:30 TO 1:30
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY


conjuring up the blank look of an
amnesiac.
Marisa Bueschel, as Sr. Mary Leo,
has all the attributes of youth on her
side, in addition to a beautiful sing-
ing voice and the ability to perform
graceful ballet.
The song and dance numbers are
wonderful, and the music is most
moving when it borders on the truly
religious, such a "Benedicte", "Ho-
sanna," and "Gloria In Excelsis
Deo."
Kudos and more kudos to the cos-
tumers, Who sewed the habits for the


nuns.
While most nuns today wear mod-
em dress, these nuns, were in full
regalia as the "Penguins" of years
gone by. The style of the habit indi-
cated the order of nuns, rather like
military uniforms indicate service
branches.
Speaking of habits, you will want
to listen carefully to learn why a
certain nun fell on her face while
bowing to kiss the bishop's ring.
The setting adds to the comedy of
the show, as it is in the auditorium
of Mt. St. Helen's School, where


students are rehearsing "Grease" and
can't be disturbed.
Thus undaunted, the nuns, carry
on their "Nunsense." The show has
the distinction of being the second
longest running show ever on
Broadway, with "Fantastics" as the
first.
Dinner precedes Friday and Sat-
urday's show, at 7 p.m. featuring
Carrie Ann and Company catering.
Tickets are $30 for dinner and
show; $15 for the 8 p.m. show only.
To reserve tickets, call the Opera
House at 997-4242.


Did YOU know the average person saves
$1500 a year by carpooling 3 days a week!




Find out how you can save...




Commuter Services
o North Floridac

888-454-RIDE



or visit our website at

www.comm uterservices. org


Already carpooling or vanpooling?
Ask about the guaranteed ride home program.
I ~~~-I d -~


Sprint offers DISH Network' Satellite TV.
In addition to phone and High-speed Internet service, you can
get DISH Network Satellite TV from Sprint. You'll have just one
monthly bill, and there's no commitment. Best of all, you'll get it
from a company you know. Call to ask about premium channels,
high-definition programming, DVRs and more.

Cal' -.: : '4, or visit spr;


-4 Sprt.


DISH r"ie.. rinE 1s bl-o, ini- ,rieirinei -l i.inid e: Must be a new, first-time DISH Network residential customer. All prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Local
and state sales taxes may apply. The $3199 programming package price assumes standard professional installation of one dual-tuner receiver with continuous phone connection. Where applicable, receiver
rental fees and programming are taxed separately. All DISH Network programming and any other services that are provided are subject to the terms and conditions of the promotional agreement and
residential customer agreement, available at wwwdishnetwork.com or upon request. Pay a $49.99 activation fee and receive a $49.99 credit on your first bill. Requires Social Security Number, valid major
credit card and qualifying programming purchase. Participation is subject to credit approval. If qualifying service is terminated or downgraded, equipment must be returned to DISH Network. A monthly $5
equipment fee applies for each receiver beyond the first. Limit of four tuners per account. A $4.99-per-month additional outlet programming access fee will be charged for each dual-tuner receiver (DISH
322 or DISH Player-DVR 522). This fee will be waived monthly for each such receiver that is continuously conn .ldi ri ,:u- r.i'-r O ph.:. I,;ee l 3.:h :a :ih Digital Video Recorder: Monthly $4.98 DISH
Network DVR service fee applies for the DISH Player-DVR 510 and 522. Significant restrictions apply to DISH 'J1i.'.,.., hih..re ,-aiJ pjdr:,ammiT,iA j-:..ii:il, .,nd for all offers. Social Security Numbers
are used to obtain credit scores and will not be released to third parties except forverification and collection puirpo.:e. 'nl -'i, 'li.O -prin'i m ii ..Igh Ie ..J .I',i tand the diamond logo are trademarks
of Sprint Communications Company L.P All service marks and trademarks belong to their respective owners. DISH Network is a registered trademark of EchoStar Satellite L.L.C All rights reserved


MONTICELLO ROTARY

CLUB


Notice of Comprehensive Plan Land Use Changes

AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING
POLICY 1-2 AGRICULTURAL AREAS OF THE FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT; PROVIDING
ADDITIONAL PERMISSIBLE LAND USES IN AREAS DESIGNATED AGRICULTURAL;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILTY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Jefferson County proposes to adopt the following land use change by ordinance Comprehensive Plan
Amendment 95-01. The land use map change proposed is from Agriculture 5 to Residential 1.
See map Below.














I...





t .. ,:



A public hearing on the ordinance or resolution will be held on
March 17, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. at the
courtroom of the county courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. Highway 90 and 19.


RELAY FOR LIFE FUNDRAISER
4,.iq,


N E T W 0 K








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005 PAGE 3


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

National Poison Prevention Week,
March 21-27, has as its theme:
"Poison Proof Your Home."
Emphasis is on encouraging all
to protect children from the poten-
tial dangers involving products
commonly found in home, and to
educate the public on the dangers
and prevention of accidents.
Children under the age of five are
particularly vulnerable -because of
their natural curiosity about the
world around them. What they see,
touch and reach is generally put
into their mouths.
Among groups commonly re-
sponsible for accidental poisoning
are:
*Acetaminophen is used as an as-
pirin substitute, pain reliever and
fever-reducer. Often found in chil-
dren's medication.
Toxic symptoms are delayed and
can cause profound effects, particu-
larly liver damage.
*Ethanol-containing products in-
cluding mouth\ ashes, perfumes,
colognes, hand sanitizers and adult
cold medicines. Toxic symptoms
include sleepiness, drop in blood
sugar and shallow breathing.
*Common hand soaps and deter-
gents may cause upset stomach and
may cause persistent vomiting, di-
arrhea and even dehydration if in-
gested. Automatic dishwasher de-
tergent may be caustic.
*Hypochlorites, which may in-


Sidewalks
(Continued FromPage 1)
the DOT officials finally acquiesced
grudgingly.
"I think our chances are 50-50
with the DOT,". Councilman Brian
Hayes observed Tuesday night. "I
think the fact that most people are
for it doesn't mean much to them."
As for the other recommended
project, Anderson said the idea was
to request that the DOT extend the
sidewalk on US 19 as far south as
the Tallahassee Memorial Family
Medicine Monticello clinic on the
east side and Brynwood Nursing
Center on the west side.
"A lot of people walk out there,"
Anderson said.

In Case Of

Emergency
Dial 911


elude bleach, pool chemicals and
supplies and cleaning products.
Toxic symptoms can include irrita-
tion to the mouth and stomach, and
potential burns to the mouth, throat
and esophagus.
*Hydrocarbon containing prod-
ucts, which include gasoline, kero-
senie, charcoal lighter .fluid,
automobile products and lamp oil.
Toxic symptoms may include vom-
iting and if the product enters the
lungs, fever, coughing, shortness


Educational Partnership Rally

Set At Howard Middle School


SYoung Doesn't Mind Wait

-DeANDRA YOUNG, age 5, waits for her mother to pick her
:up from the St. Philip Boys and Girls Club. She's shown
:here with Aide Sherill Johnson. (News Photo)


ACA Announces


Honor Students


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy an-
nounces its academic students for
the 2005-06 school year.
Daniel Roccanti is valedictorian
of the Class of 2005.
Salutatorian is Dorothy Holden.
Honor Graduates for the Class of
2005 include: Cassi Anderson,
Caroline Blair, Kayla Gebhard,
Kyle Hansen, Ridgely Plaines,
Amanda Sapp, Drew Sherrod and
Jeremy Tuckey.


Recently inducted into the Beta
Club were 22 students, including:
Jordan Patterson, Jeremy Tuckey,
Katie O'Steen, Brittany Williams,
Rebekah Aman, Courtney Brasing-
ton, Ben Buzbee, A.J. Connell;
Courtney Connell, Jayce Davis, Lin-
sey Day, Stephanie Dodson, and
Will Hartsfield.
.Also, Alfa Hunt, Claire Knight,
Nicole Mathis, Prateen Patel, Katy
Plummer, Ramsey Revell, Bethany
Saunders, Hannah Sorensen and
Tristen Sorensen.
An Academic Awards Program is


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

SThe Fourth Annual Educational
Partnership "SOAR" Rally is sched-
uled 10 a.m., Saturday, March 12, at
Howard Middle school.
Foundation members, post mem-
bers and ladies, Partners of the Men-
toring and Tutoring Programs of
Family Literacy, under the patron-
age of the Jefferson County Adult
School, Boys and Girls
Club/STARS Program, and Com-
munities in Schools (CIS) have once
again teamed together to help
county parents direct their youth to-
ward academic success.
The ultimate goal of these educa-



scheduled for 8:30 a.m., May 6 in
the auditorium for grades 7-12.
In other school news, Principal
Richard Finlayson reports that re-
enrollment forms and fees must be
turned in by .March 15 and open
registration begins March 16.
Finlayson said that officials al-
ready project that several classes
will be full next year, so it is im-
portant not to miss the re-
enrollment deadline.
ACA is now also taking and recy-
cling used cell phones in exchange
for cash. Those wishing to donate
old cell phones can drop them of at
the business office.
Finlayson encourages participants
to continue participating in the
Winn Dixie Rewards program and
that the deadline for box tops to be
turned in is March 15.


tional rallies is to promote strength-
of families through increased paren-
tal involvement and participation in
the academic and social successes of
their children's lives, said event Co-
ordinator Mary Madison.
This year's event will profile stu-
dent's activities in youth groups.
Boys and Girls Club Smart Girls,
Stubbs Musical Performers, Monti-
cello African Drummers (MAD) and
the Karate Group, are among per-
formers.
Once again, the featured guest will
be county native Sam Madison ,#29
of the Miami Dolphins.
He will present a free "SOAR" T-
shirt to all registered students and be
photographed with participants.
Madison Avenue For Kids Foun-
dation, in conjunction with the VFW
Post 251 and Ladies Auxiliary, join
with the county's educational system


and partners in showing concern for
educational empowerment, Madison
said.
She encourages those attending to
bring their cameras. Registration
forms will be placed in a drawing
for many special prizes. All partici-
pants will enjoy a no-cost lunch.
Among education enhancement
opportunities conducted here, VFW
Post 251, and Ladies Auxiliary offer
opportunities for youth to earn
scholarships and prizes through the
"Patriot Pen" and "Voice of Democ-
racy" writing and speaking contests.
CIS provides the opportunity to
tutor at-risk youngsters to help them
put into perpetual motion for life.
Family Literacy/Adult Education
offers opportunities for further and
higher education.
Participants must be registered.
Though preregistration is highly rec-


of breath, wheezing or chemical
pneumonia can occur.
For poisoning emergencies, call
the Poison Information Center, toll
Free 24 hours a day, at 1-800-222-
1222.
The health care professionals at.
the center will immediately respond
to poison emergencies and answer
poison related questions about
medications, household products
and other potentially dangerous
substances.


THE JEFFERSON COUNTY

SCHOOL BOARD

Announces the regular school board meeting to
which the public is invited.
The meeting will be held at the
Desmond M. Bishop Administration Building on
Monday, March 14, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up at the district office at
1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, Fl.
Monday through Friday between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.


ommended, on-site registration is
available.
To register for the rally contact
Madison at 997-4504 or pick up
registrations at county school sites.

-

<' <


c, on .. o
CALL OR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

S385-6047
o 9lt. If'lpV'pl,lsuuocr(..I -9'L-'i of-.-,ull n uIor-a0
l i ty I l-'ir(,1 11 I .I ( Yl t 4-1, '*"I' oant l l/ n (I
0,,,,,se s,, m o mruw m


Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Changes

AN ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP;
RE-DESIGNATING CERTAIN LANDS COMPRISING
APPROXIMATELY 55 ACRES FROM AGRICULTURAL 5 TO RESIDENTIAL 1 ON THE FUTURE
LAND USE MAP; PROVIDING FOR SERVERABILITY;
PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT;
PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Jefferson County proposes to adopt text changes in the Comprehensive Plan for the agriculture 20,
agriculture 5, and agriculture 3, land use classifications that will add agricultural
related activities,
outdoor recreation, bed and breakfast inns, and hunting lodges and clubs as land uses allowed by
ordinance in Comprehensive Plan Amendment 95-01. All of the agriculture areas of
Jefferson County are included in the proposed changes. See map below:













*I c. M.
I I 0 a .DII l
MAbon thcello



























at 6:00 p.m.
St i cio o .. iw 9







S.NM---- i

Gulf
Mexico

JEFFERSON COUNTY





A public hearing on the ordinance will be held on March 17, 2005
at 6:00 p.m.
at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19.


Freedom. For Nancy Kinnee. it's

the roar of a Harley and a stretch of

highway. But once she developed

cataracts, that freedom became

nothing more than a memory.

Thanks to Thomasville Eye Center,

she's regained her freedom A quick.

painless procedure removed her

cataracts and corrected her vision.

letting her take back her life Call

(229) 226-6000 for an appointment

and to take back your freedom

O A AS




SE C E .


Poison Prevention Week Tips


Help Avoid Home Poisonings


`--- I----~









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005
u 2t.:.....'..:. .......... .............-. ..r.:...


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

SME, RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


o LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Group Helps Kids


Enjoy Childhood


Too often, kids with life-
threatening illnesses aren't given the
opportunity to be kids.
Fortunately, there are organiza-
tions with the mission to provide
these children with trips to amuse-
ment parks for a chance to have fun.
Every year, individual amusement
parks and attractions across the
country raise millions of dollars for
local and national charitable organi-
zations and non-profits, often work-
ing in partnership with school and
other groups.
SThese facilities host rollercoaster
marathons, offer sneak peeks at new
rides and attractions, auction VIP -
front of the line passes, have pri-
vate parties with costumed charac-
ters and much more.
One of the recipients of this sup-
port is the Give Kids The World
Village in Kissimmee, Florida. The
Village is a nonprofit resort that cre-"
ates magical memories for children
with life-threatening illnesses and
their families.
SIt provides accommodations for
wish-granting organizations' guests
at its whimsical resort and offers at-


tractions tickets and meals for a free.
week-long fantasy vacation.
The children then receive a com-
plimentary World Passport for Kids
membership, giving them and their
families one day's free admission to
each of the 330 participating parks
in 34 countries during the next 12
months.
The Village, which has hosted
more than 66,000 families, and
plans to expand in the coming years.
The International Association of
Amusement Parks. And Attractions
(IAAPA) and its members have do-
nated hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars over the past 10 years, as well
as equipment, rides and supplies,
and'administers the World Passport
progra.n. IAA'A members donate
$40,000 in cash and relief equip-
ment when three hurricanes battered
the Village in the summer of 2004.
IAAPA is the largest international
trade association for permanently-
situated amusement facilities world-
wide.
The organization represents over
5,000 amusement and theme parks,
attractions, and suppliers from over
-85 countries. (NAPS)


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
March 15; 1995
To those familiar with the
Texaco/Colonial controversy and
Leon County's active opposition to
that project (because of its potential
for contaminating the Floridian Aq-
Lifer), the recent announcement that
:Leon County is considering locating
a 1,000 acre land fill in the same
area must come as something of a
surprise, if not downright ironic.
The Jefferson County Youth Lis-
'tening Project, begun about four
months ago, will culminate 6:30
p.m. March 25 with community
youth forum at the armory.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 13, 1985
Monday night's meeting to final-
ize teacher, salaries has all the mak-
:ngs of an evening of heated
Exchanges. Teachers have just
learned that the county's lowest paid
bus driver is paid considerably more
than most teachers.
At least 84 JCHS students ill re-
eceive an "incomplete" on their re-
,port card this year. En.'lish and
'gifted class tea her Lindlse, Orr ieft
the students high and d'ry ''hen he
-called school officials the morning
,of March 4 and said he was iot
coming back.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 13, 1975
Have you tried to dial a Monti-
Scello number recently, only to find
that the call wouldn't go through?
'Try dialing all seven digits, we can
"almost guarantee connection. Al-
though the system was set up to dial
seenn digits all the time, we have
'become lax in the past, but the calls
-went through anyway. But, with the
-arrival of some new equipment, this
SI ll no longer be possible.
Carmen Cummings was one of
thirty outstanding piano students
that performed for the Ho\ ard Wil-
son Scholarship recital recently held


at Opperman Music Hall, FSU.
Boy Scouts from three area troops
converged on Suwannee River State
Park for a Tri-County Camporee.

FORTY YEARS AGO
March 12.1965
Mr. And Mrs. Carr Settle, Miss
Sally Settle, Mr. And Mrs. Lewis
Getch and sons Earl and Charles, re-
turned Sunday night after spending
the weekend in Moore Haven visit-
ing friends.
Mr. And Mrs. James Bassett and
children of Perry visited Thursday
night with their parents Mr. And
Mrs. C.C. Wright and Mr. And Mrs.
W.W. Bassett.
Postmaster Tom Braswell was in
Lake City Sunday to attend a district
meeting of the Florida Postmasters
Association.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 11, 1955
C.R,(Slim)-Rankin; and another
member of the State Bar, alleged ir-
regularities in issuing some 19 to 20
licenses throughout the state.
Elizabeth Mays was selected as-
one of 77 students as speaker
choices for the 1955 Blue Key
Speakers Bureau at the University of
Florida.
The City Council voted to install
parking meters on a temporary
basis.
Miss Jonni Foster was initiated
into Gamma Phi Beta sorority at
FSU.


LETTERS TO THE-
EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.

500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


S Opinion & Comment


'Treasures' Found At Yard Sales


I've never been to a garage or
ya.d sale, but I have lots of friends
who make the rounds of these sales
with regularity.
They delight at the stuff they buy
for "next to nothing."
I'm sorry, but when I look at their
purchases, nothing seems more ap-
propriate to me.
Garage and yard sales provide in-
come out of the clutches of our
friends at IRS. Score one for the
hometeam!
I used to work with a man who
went out to garage sales every Sat-
urday morning.
SHe showed me some of his "treas-
ures."
In -fact, his entire garage was full
of garage sale stuff.
So his new car was parked outside
and junk.. I know no other name for
it, was protected from the elements.
I had listened to his stories about
garage sale buys for a long time and
when he invited me over to see what
he had accumulated, I went out of
curiosity.
Well, I was pretty surprised at
what I saw.


Publisher's

Notebook


4E


")on CiO/loi


He had a collection of pots in vari-
ous sizes that looked liked' they had
been beaten on rocks, the bottoms
were so lumped. A couple were
,-missing handles., i: 1
With great flourish he showed me
a number of hand saws collected
over the years. I would guess there
were 20 or more. All were terribly
rusted.
He had several tires of various
sizes and lots of hubcaps.
There were dishes, knives and
forks, a couple of framed prints and
I can't remember what else.
"Well, whaddya think?"


I didn't know what to think. Why
anybody would want to collect all
this junk was simply beyond me.
I took the diplomatic approach and
said, "you have some interesting
stuff."
We Americans are known for hav-
ing our stuff. We buy it, store it, re-
place it, put new stuff on top of the
old stuff and when we run out of
closets and space, we buy storage
sheds or rent space in the mini-
storage facilities.
Stuff is an industry. Buying stuff
is a way of life. Buying stuff is ther-
apy for some folks.


The garage and yard sale phenom-
ena helps us with our urge to accu-
mulate stuff.
We can take a few dollars and go
out on a Saturday morning and buy
battered pots and pans, rusted saws
and stuff like that. What a country!
The folks who hold garage sales
do not have to buy a city occupa-
tional license, pay state tax, or buy
workers compensation insurance.
I recognize I'm out of step here in
reporting that I've never been to a
garage sale. That's okay, being out
of step with what everybody else is
doing never bothered me very
much.
If you are a garage sale junkie, go
for it! There are plenty of sales for
you to attend.
When you have more stuff than
you can possibly store, order up a
storage building for your yard or
rent space in one of the mini-storage
places around town.
Tell 'em Cichon sent you!
Oh yes, if you have a collection of
battered pots- and pans and rusted
saws, I'll pass on seeing your "treas-
ures."


Help Eyed For Cancer Distress


One of every two men and one of
every three women in America will
have cancer in their lifetime. Most
patients experience emotional tur-
moil caused by the diagnosis, symp-
toms and treatment of cancer.
This distress a mix of anxiety
and depressive symptoms may
cause sleeplessness, lack of appetite,
trouble concentrating 'and difficulty
carrying on regular activities.
Although some distress is normal,
about a third of cancer patients ex-
perience significant distress. Only


.about five percent' of people, with
cancer obtain psychological help.
While distress doesn't affect the
cancer itself, it does affect how pa-
tients cope with their cancer and
their ability to follow treatment rec-
ommendations.
"Distress Treatment Guidelines for
Patients" is a free 32-page booklet
that offers help for this neglected
area of cancer care.
This definitive and first-of-its-lind
resource for cancer patients and
Their families and caregivers was


written by the world's leading can-
cer authorities at the National Com-
prehensive Cancer Network (NCCN
and the American Cancer Society.
Originally developed by the
NCCN for cancer specialists, these
treatment guidelines have now been
translated by the American Cancer
Society for the general public in
English and Spanish versions.
"They are designed to enhance a
patient's quality of life, support
patient-doctor communications and
increase the success of cancer thera-


pies by improving patients' ability
to stick with their treatment plans,"
said Stephen Sener, M.D., national
volunteer president of the American
Cancer Society and vice chairman of
the Department of Surgery at Evan-
ston Northwestern Health care in
Chicago.
"Given the busy oncology offices
today, there is often not enough time
for doctors to ask about distress,"
said Jimmie Holland, M.D., world-
(See Distress Page 5)


Project Attacks Invasive Tree


In Florida where invasive plants
account for as much as 31 percent of
all plant species, state and federal


Officials are ratcheting up their fight
against the Melaleuca tree, which is
one of the most significant threats


Resident Questions

Political Parties


Dear Editor:
I read with interest the article
about the emergence of the two po-
litical parties within Jefferson
County:
It will be of interest to see what,
if any, difference this will make in
the operation of our county govern-
ment.
'Personally, I see no advantage to
politicizing the process more than it
already is, as self interest appears to
be the guiding rule with most politi-
cians.
Throwing in politics confounds
the situation most of the time. The
last paragraph of the article is what
was of most interest.
The fact that the Republican Party
contributed to pay for the overtime
for the Emancipation Parade, I


tound very interesting, considering
that the original plan for the route
was denied because of police costs
involved, as determined by Chief
Frisby.
It is interesting to note that then
the Republican Party contributed the
necessary funds to allow the parade
as originally planned.
Chief Frisby, as I understand, is a
major player in this newly revamped
Jefferson County group.
Can anyone say conflict of interest
or even dirty politics?
As an aside, I later heard that
Chief Frisby then proclaimed his
one-upmanship to Eleanor Hawkins.
If this is how the Republican Party
will operate in Jefferson County, I'll
gladly take a pass.
Sincerely,
Harry M, Brenner


to the stability of the Everglades
ecosystem.
The new TAME Melaleuca
project, short for The Area-wide
Management and Evaluation of Me-
laleuca, was established by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture in coop-
eration with the University of Flor-
ida and the South Florida Water
Management District.
Control measures for the trouble-
some tree will be demonstrated for
residents and other land managers at
eight South Florida sites in
Broward, Collier, Hendry, Lee and
Palm Beach counties.
"The good news is that various
government agencies have been able
to clear Melaleuca from almost
100,000 acres of publicly owned
natural areas such as Big Cypress
National Preserve, the Lake
Okeechobee marsh and the Florida
Everglades," said Ken Langeland, a
professor of agronomy with UF's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
"The bad news is that the tree is
still spreading rapidly on privately
held lands where there are no con-


trols resulting in a no-net loss of
Melaleuca. Dense forests of Me-
laleuca now occur mainly on private
lands in Broward, Miami-Dade,
Palm Beach, Lee, Martin and Collier
counties," he said.
Langeland, a specialist on aquatic
and invasive plants, said the tree in-
vades moist, open habitats, forming
dense, often impenetrable stands of
trees. Native wildlife is threatened
because the tree crowds out benefi-
cial native plants. It's also a serious
fire hazard because oils in the leaves
burn hot and are difficult to extin-
guish.
"Imported from Australia in the
1880s as an ornamental plant that
would help 'dry up useless
swamps,' Melaleuca has behaved
badly invading a wide variety of
natural landscapes in South
Florida," he said. "Everything from
wetland marshes and prairies to
cypress domes and pine flatbeds is
affected, and one mature tree can
hold as many as 50 million seeds."
By the early 1900s, only 50 years
after it was introduced, Melaleuca
(See Invasive Tree Page 5)


-I rr -r -Y-


L~e ~-II~


II I I



























SC ... r- i ,

C LE Il ig ... + *. :; w .


Capital City Bank hot dog Relay for. Life, Scheese
sale was held at the bank, Friday. Rudy and Geri


Capital City Bank Team

Raises $450 For Cancer


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Capital City Bank held a fund-
raiser, Friday, to benefit Jefferson
County's 2005 Relay For Life,
"Blast From The Past," and raised
$450 for Cancer research.
The team sold a meal consisting of
a hot dog, chips and a cold drink for
$2, at the bank. This event was or-
chestrated by GeriAnn Driggers.
Another fundraiser for the Capital


h
A


City Bank team has been the ongo-
ing sale of raffle tickets for the
chance to win a 48" gas grill, do-
nated by Rudy and Jason Scheese
-for this event.
Team members have been selling
the tickets for $5 and will continue
to sell them until the drawing on
Friday, April 15.
Team Captain Tonia Baxter re-
ports that more than $400 has been
collected towards the Grill Raffle to
date.
Also, the team will be selling


Invasive Tree


(Continued From Page 4)
had spread over hundreds of
thousands of acres..In 1967, it was
found in Everglades National Park,
and by 1993 it covered 488,000
acres in South Florida. Melaleuca is
now listed by federal and state
agencies as a noxious weed, making
it illegal to possess, sell, cultivate or
transport on Florida.
Langeland, who is chairman,of the
teclknolo' trranster team. for tlhe
TAME Melaleuca project, said an
integrated pest management
approach is being used to control the
tree.
"Combining different management
control options will be more
effective than any one method
alone," Langeland said. "The goal is
to stop new infestations and treat
existing infestations before they
spread and become even more
difficult to control."
He said aerial spraying of
herbicide is effective for large
stands of Melaleuca. Ground crews


are used to girdle trees and apply
herbicide to individual trees. Cutting
Melaleuca trees will not kill the
stump or the roots, so herbicide
must be applied to the cut surfaces
to prevent regrowth. Flooding
doesn't kill mature trees.
And while fire may destroy seed-
lings and saplings, it won't kill ma-
ture trees and actually. helps release
and spread the seeds. Heavy. equip-
ment, which is difficult to use in re-
mote areas' with dense Melaleuca,
may harm soils and native plants,
but it is useful in certain situations.
Langeland said a long-term man-
agement option is biological control.
Biocontrol involves the importation
of agents, such as liost-specific in-
sects, to naturally control invasive
species like Melaleuca. After 16
years of research, five biocontrol in-
sects have been imported fron-i .Ats-
tralia. And two have been released
in South Florida by USDA and UF_
researchers.


buys his meal from Tonia Baxter
knn Driggers. (News Photo)


Glow Necklaces during the April 15
and 16, Relay for Life Campout.
All proceeds from these fundrais-
ers will benefit the American Cancer
Society research program.



Distress
(Continued From Page 4)
renowned psychiatrist at Memorial
Slap-Kettering Cancer Center in
New York, founder of the field of
psycho-oncology and author of
"The Human Side of Cancer."
Holland chaired the NCCN panel
of 23 nationally recognized experts
that developed these guidelines. "In
my more than 25 years of practice, I
have found that most cancer patients
are reluctant to 'bother' the doctor
and feel it would be a sign of weak-
ness to mention their distress."
"Distress Treatment Guidelines for
Patients" features The Distress Ther-
mometer to help patients differenti-.
ate between the normal, expected
distress that comes with the.diagno-
sis and a more serious form of dis-
tress that requires help from an
oncology professional;
Do's and Don'ts for coping; Deci-
sion Tree Flow Charts to help pa-
tients understand symptoms,
treatment and reevaluation; and a
- glossary3 of mdieal terms.


CHILDCARE
FUNDRAISING

Director needed by
National Co.
for local area to help run
money
making programs.
Work with directors,
owners, PTA's, schools.
1st yr 46k avg 813-788-1595


ltEf (cUIITVY SCHOaLS


2005 TEACHER INTERVIEW DAY

JUNLE 2, 2005



LEON COUNTY SCHOOLS TEACHER INTERVIEW DAY
will-hold interviews for those certified and certifiable in
all subject areas in Leon County on
Thursday, June 2, 2005
at the Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center in Tallahassee, Florida.
Applicants may apply on-line to attend Leon County Schools Teacher Interview
Day beginning February 1. 2005 thru May 1, 2005

Qualified Teacher applicants must: have a current/updated electronic application on
file with Leon County Schools. Only those applicants with appropriate
certification or certifiable and pre-registered will be allowed to participate.
Beginning February 1, 2005, to apply on line, go to: pats.leon.kl2.fl.us

For additional information, call:
Leon County Schools
Employee Relations & Equity/Recruitment
850-487-7105
1-800-245-9449

For questions p~eitiinin., to the online application process, call:
Personnel Services
850-487-7203 or
850-487-7197

William J. Montford. Ill, Superintendent
Dr. Malinda W. Jackson, Executive Director. Employee Relations & Equity/Recruitment
Leon County Schools
2757 West Pensacola Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer Building the Future Together


Cooley Sculpture
Dedication Set
In Tallahassee
"Movin' On," created by local
sculptors Bradley Cooley and Brad-
ley Cooley, Jr., will be dedicated 10
a.m., Tuesday, March 15, at the R.
A. Gray Building, 500 South Bro-
nough Street, Tallahassee.
The cast bronze sculpture depicts
a Miccosukee family circa 1930.

Sited at the northwest corner of
the R.A. Gray Building, this is the
first of four planned groups depict-
ing the.native peoples of Florida.

The dedication is the opening
event of Florida Heritage Month,
2005, hosted by Secretary of State
Glenda E. Hood, and Billy Cypress,
chairman of the Miccosukee Tribe
of Indians of Florida.

A reception follows the dedication,
in the R. A. Building Heritage Gal-
lery.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005 PAGE 5 .













A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
Sdba

V 7' V TiMntm Fue4e-al H omte
4 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
S Monticello, FL. 32344

850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman- Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Discount!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes; etc.

All glass bottles. jars, etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfiii
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?'
.o

SAdditional items accepted at the collection sites:

S Household garbage



Batteries
"White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing :
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)
0C

*Construction Debris. (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

o Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste -- pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center- Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.
i
SPlease take notice to all of the signage posted in the
a
Collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.jefferson.fl.uslSolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the-.
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.




.... ,' Visit the www.'zart;r 9 .org Recycling Information web page
S0 0 0 n000 a s o00 oooo o r6rpa~\ o000000f


_ II I 1


~I~1FhtvrP.

Te~;ci;l~:;L












PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9,2005


1IA -


Lifestyle


Kyle Hanson Among

Eagle Scouts Honored


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Kyle Hanson, of Boy Scout Troop
803. of Monticello, was one of 65
Eagle Scouts recently recognized by
the Suwannee River Area Council of
the Boy Scouts of America.
The scouts, who were awardae
their Eagle Scouts rank in 2004,
were honored at the Council's an-
nual Eagle Scout Banquet, held re-
cently at the Faith Presbyterian
Church in Tallahassee.


IONATHAN MYERS, a student in the after
school program at the Jefferson Elementary
'6


Karen Halpin

Will Marry

Josh Bullock
S Mr. and Mrs. John L. Halpin and
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace O. Bullock
announce the engagement of their
children Karen Marie Halpin and
oshua Robert Scotland Bullock.
The bride-to-be's maternal grand-
Sarents are the late W.R. and Pau-
ine Taylor. Her paternal
grandparents are the late John L.
and Ruby Halpin.
SThe groom-to be's maternal grand-
pnother is the late Joyce Blobel and
.paternal grandparents are Bill and
petty Bullock.
SHalpin is a graduate of Jefferson
County High School and will com-
plete her Associates in Arts Degree
at North Florida College in April.
-he is employed at Morrou Insur-
ance of Monticello...
j Bullock is also a graduate of Jef-
ierson County high School. He is
employed at Merrily Plantation.
-:A May 21st wedding is planned at:
:30 p.m. at Olive Baptist Church.
Vith Pastor Harold Reams officiat-
eSg.
SThe reception will follow at B&B
Farms.
Local invitations will be sent and
all family and friends are cordially
invited to attend.

4-H TO Offer
Public Speaking
Workshop

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

County 4-H will present a public
speaking workshop 3:00 p.m.,
Wednesday, at the Extension Office.
Getting in front of an audience can
be very intimidating, and the work-
shop is designed to present skills
and techniques to putting together
an excellent demonstration/illustra-
tion talk and speech.
* It is highly recommended for the
4-H members who are planning to
do a demonstration/illustration talk
or speech, during the County
Events, to attend this workshop.


Boys and Girls Club, works at the welcome
station. (News Photo)


KAREN HALPIN AND JOSHUA BULLOCK


Love Explosion Honors

Minnie, Sinclair Miller


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A "Love Explosion Banquet
2005" hosted by the Harvest Chris-
tian Center on Waukeenah Hwy.,
was the grand finale after a "Week
of Love" seminars.
Honored at the Banquet, were
Minnie and Sinclair Miller, who
were married 44 years..
The program for the Banquet was
titled "What Kind of Love is This,"
and began with everyone singing
"Love Lifted Me." Prayer followed,
offered by Pastor Marvin Graham.
Evangelist Shirley Hughley, Mis-
tress of Ceremony, acknowledged
the special guests in attendance.
Andrea Hanks, from Atlanta,
Georgia, was the speaker for the oc-
casion.
"In the Potter's Hand" was sung
by Mr. Charles, and Words of En-
couragement were given by Evan-
gelist David Hanks, also from
Atlanta, GA.
After Associate Pastor V.J. John-
son blessed the food, the attendees
feasted on a meal prepared and ca-


Elder Care Services

Seek Volunteers Here


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Elder Care Services AmeriCorp'
VISTA, is a non profit organization
designed to help and care for seniors
-and the elderly.
Seniors and the elderly in the Jef-
ferson County area receive helpful
information and are referred to re-
sources designed to help meet their
needs.
If the services needed are not of-
fered locally they are directed to the
appropriate resources elsewhere for
the help they need.
Director Angel Williams an-
nounces the immediate need for vol-


unteers. A volunteer campaign is
underway to find interested persons
who have a desire to donate their
time in the community.
Just a few hours a day will make a
difference in the life of a senior. In-
kind donations are also accepted and
greatly appreciated and needed.
For more information contact Wil-
liams at 342-0175.


tered by Chris Roberts. "The high
light of the meal was the Strawberry
Cheese Cake for dessert," remi-
nisces Rebecca Goldfarb, one of the
many attendees to the affair.
Presentations were made by
Hughley, Founder of Women of
Wholeness. Followed by door prizes
and final remarks.
The seminars included: Love thy
neighbor; Love and honor thy par-
ents; Love thy siblings and brothers
and sisters in Christ; and Love be-
tween a husband and wife.


one of the primary requirements for
being awarded the Eagle Scout rank.
These included a variety of pro-
jects that benefited the community,
church, or the environment. All of
these projects included extensive
planning, obtaining materials for the
project and organizing the man-
power to construct the project.
Hanson's project was the painting
of the outside of the American Le-
gion Hall, and yard cleanup for
which he received a Certificate of


Appreciation from the American Le-
gion Post 49.
The Eagle Scout rank is the high-
est rank in Boy Scouts and is at-
tained by less than four percent of
the boys who become scouts.
Many Eagle Scouts go on to be-
come leaders in their community
and the nation. An often cited fact is
that every man that has walked on
the moon is an Eagle Scout.
Other famous Eagle Scouts in-
clude H. Ross Perot, chairman, EDS
Corp.; Steven Spielburg, film
director/producer; Walter Cronkite,
journalist, TV commentator; and
Sam Nunn, U.S. Senator from Geor-
gia.


Prior to the banquet the Eagle save time and money... ..free 20-
Scouts showcased their Eagle Scout e valal
projects. The Eagle Scout project is
1-.800-489-8930
Fundraiser Set ... incredie...callt

TO Aid Library

DEBBIE SNAPP =
Staff Writer


A Pampered Chef Kitchen Show,
to benefit the Jefferson County Li-
brary, will be held in the community
room at the Library 10:30 a.m., Sat-
urday.
The Pampered Chef fundraising
program puts fun into the process.
Fifteen percent of all sales will go
directly to the Library. All donations
will be made to the Library in the
form of a check, and are in lieu of
host benefits.
Monies raised will be used for the
Summer Reading Program to pur-
chase prizes, crafts, and provide
summer programming for the chil-
dren in the community.
The community is invited to come
Enjoy the food and fun and to sup-
port the Library in the process.
Severe funding cuts in State Aid,
may force the cancellation of some
library programs, and this fundraiser
is designed to help avoid that possi-
bility.

Clothing Giveaway
At Harvest Center

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Harvest Center will hold a Cloth-
ing Giveaway 8 a.m., Saturday, at
the Church location 1599 Springhol-
low Road, at the corer of Hwy 259.
The Harvest Center has an over-
flow of donated clothing items to
share.
,To help at this event or for more
information about this event, contact,
Pastor Graham at 212-7669 or 997-
4859.


Galico Spring




SOrnamental Iron .. Painted Glass Handcrafted Furniture Clothing
lewelry Folk Art Ceramics Pottery.
Seasonal Decorations Wood Crafts Floral Arrangements
Artist's Prints Painted AntiQues Food Court

S- March 19 & 20, 2005
Saturday 9:00 a.m. ~ 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

Spence Field Moultrie, Georgia
(Sunbelt Expo site) 4 miles Souiheast of Hwh 319 on Hiy 133


(Children 6 and under free with an adult)
FREE PARKING I .

For more information (229) 985-1968
,-;" Pent~li@l 2 B :mmC C L


"Don't Just Vacuum...
TOTALLY CLEAN!"
The
Th ORe. Pam
Ib.0
tUri
sp asn


0,,OyClnClp.t K
Machi..
a5Ca*Lpnli _
auffl A Saws -
Saubsi, Cttans
Me4outt~rn


A
i








r


S OF
OR ECK ITALLAHASSEE
1891-2 Capital Circle NE (850) 402-1 192
Mon-Fri 10 am-6 pm Sat 9 am-2 pm J
S2W4 Oreck hoflings. LLC All rights reserved All word mark.. logon. produce configuration,
rc regsrse-, o iraema,kl are owned anduvied under the aulhoritly of Orack Holdings, LLC


Metal Pool is ophonal Copyright Home Store Plans and Publicatons

Call Today! rDW H
(850) 224-0614 f
Toll Free 1-800-771-0614 PWHnhomes com
allaasee A A Division of Pennyworth Homes, Inc.
Visit Our New Home Design Center Today! Open Mon. Fri. 9am -6pm Saturday 9am Ipm
9335 West Tennessee Street Ftl. IA0CRC1584T7 MM,


















ack orn'e Brug tor

S"Where Pharmacy is Phunily"
1-Hoin Health Care Free Blood Pressure
j Gifts Counseling on Medication
S Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553



SWA0 oJ drmoun r

U13 Encore Senior Living
Tallaia.s.ee .i Orinl As:isFted Livingi C(onmnni i
Assisted Living ~ Respite & Adult Day Seivice
(850) 562-4123 3207- North Monroe St.~ww\wencoresLcon

Assisred Living -Oacilily Licence
Ey areFo T e ntreFa il


TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US HWY. 221, GREENVILLE. FL, (850) 948-2840
i If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984


Elizabeih
flua,,cifr,&'eL


We accept Medicare, Medicaid
& most insurance plans


Open Mon-Fri 8-5, Tue, 8-7 walkins welcome,24hr telephone coverage


.m 41 ............


FRE GIR!
With the
Purchase of
an ck
Up,;Ore k
t system
Expints 3-27-05. Not Valid
with any othef offer. v
X, -- - - -


i:








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005 PAGE 7


GLORIA NORTON, enrichment leader at St.
Phillip Boys and Girls Club instructs
Calvette Williams on an assignment. Stu-


Heidi Copeland Offers

Nutrition Information


dent Harold Ingram is at right. (News
Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

f Recently, Family and Consumer
Extension Agent Heidi Copeland at-
tended a conference about prevent-
ing childhood overweight and obe-
sity entitled, "Making a Difference
in Nutrition and Fitness of Families,
Youth and Communities."
Copeland said the National Center
for Health revealed that the percent-
age of school-age children ages 6-11
that are overweight, more than dou-
bled between 1970 and 2002.
The percentage of overweight
adolescents ages 12-19, tripled dur-
ing the same period.
Overweight children are more
likely to be overweight adults. In
fact, 64 percent of Americans are
considered overweight or obese ac-
cording to BMI charts. (Body mass
m index, expressed as height/weight
Squared, BMI; kg/m, squared, is
commonly used to classify over-
Sweight and obesity among adults).
"Although obesity can have un-
I derlying causes, the most dramatic
Recent increase seems to be due to
behavioral'factors rather than genet-
Sics. We are eating too much and ex-
ercising too little," said Copeland.
Presenters at the conference, in-
c luded Donald L. Weaver, MD, As-
sistant Surgeon General of the Na-
tional Health Service Corps, who
spoke about the nation's health and
'weight, and what we, as a nation,
can do about it.
No group is immune to the dra-
matic raise in the rate of obesity, he
said, and this is the first time in his-


tory that children might not live as
long as their parents.
"What a significant statement, es-
pecially considering the substantial
health implication of obesity," said
Copeland.
"We need to rid ourselves of the
anxiety provoking words 'diet' and
'exercise'. A proper diet promotes
good health. Good health prevents
disease. Exercise is a good habit,
and we need to adopt this year's
'National Nutrition Month' theme:
Get a Taste for Nutrition."

After the conference, Copeland
compiled a list of simple sugges-
tions to help families promote good
health. Among these are:
I need to set good health exam-
ples including planning, shopping,
cooking and eating and increase the
availability of healthy choices.
Knowledge of food empowers,
so I need to do a better job reading
food labels, remembering that big-
ger is not always better.
I need to control portion sizes. I
need to 'Step-up' and get moving as
soon as possible each day to in-
crease caloric expenditure because
exercise is for the mind, body and
spirit.
I need to control the home envi-
ronment by limiting electronic me-
dia time and adding some activity to
our lives.
"If you think there is a need for
nutrition education in Jefferson
County, please contact the Jefferson
County Extension Office
(342-0187), to help me plan my
programs for the year," Copeland
said.


DIARY OF A MAD
BLACK WOMAN (PG13)
Fri. 5:00-7:25 9:55 Sat-Thurs.2:30
5:00-7:25-9:55
NO PASSES

CURSED (PG13)
Fri.5:15-7:55-10:00 Sat.-Thurs. 2:25-
5:15-7:55-10:00
NO PASSES


HITCH (PG13)
Fri.4:45-7:30-9:55 Sat.-Thurs. 2:00 -
4:45-7:30-9:55


MAN OF THE HOUSE
(PG13)
Fri. 5:10 7:50 10:05 Sat.-Thurs.
2:20-5:10 7:50 10:05
NO PASSES


CONSTANTINE (R)
Fri 7:35-10:10 Sat.-Thurs.7:35-
10:10

BECAUSE OF WINN
DIXIE(PG)
Fri 4:55 Sat-Thurs 2:10-4:55

BE COOL (PG13)
Fri 4:50-7:45-10:10 Sat-Thurs
2:05-4:50-7:40-10:15
NO PASSES

PACIFIER (PG)
Fri 5:05-7:45-9:50 Sat-Thurs
2:15-5:05-7:45-9:50
NO PASSES




~fY~j-


INSTRUCTOR AMY MULLINS collects pa- Club, during an after school project. (News
pers from Kevin Hill, left, and Terrell Photo)
Brown, at the St. Phillips Boys and Girls



Head Lice Study Explained


B\ PAUL RAMIEY
1.ni ersitr of Florida

New, genetic research of human
lice supports the evolutionary theory
of direct contact between modem
and archaic humans, according to a
study co-authored by a University of
Florida researcher. The study sheds
light on a hotly debated topic in
evolutionary biology: the origin of
modem Homo Sapiens.
Based on studies of the human
head. louse, Pediculus humanus, the
smu found that modem humans
have .two genetically distinct types
of head lice. One is found world-
wide and evolved on the ancestors
of our species, Homo Sapiens. The
second type is found only in the
Americas and evolved on Homo
erectus, another early human
species, but jumped to Homo Sapi-
ens about 25,000 years ago.
"I think it is amazing to know that
we had physical contact with an-
other species of human," said David
Reed, curator of mammals at UF's
Florida Museum of Natural History
and the lead author on the three-year
study. "We either battled with them,
or lived with them, or even mated
with'them. Regardless, we touched
them, and that is pretty dramatic to
think about."
The study's findings appear in the
Oct. online issue of the Public Li-
brary of Science journal, PloS, Biol-
ogy. Reed completed most of the
work while a postdoctoral fellow at
the University of Utah along with
colleagues there and at the Univer-
sity of Glasgow, Scotland, before he
came to UF earlier this year.
Recent studies of the evolutionary
history of other human parasites, in-
cluding tapeworms and malarial
parasites, fall in line with fossil and
genetic data that place human ori-
gins in Africa. The new study con-
firms the "out-of-Africa" theory that
the population of Homo Sapiens
mushroomed after a small group left
Africa between 50,000 and 150,000
years ago. The new study also
shows that human parasites, such as
lice, have recorded events in human
evolutionary history in their DNA,
just as humans have.

Lice require direct physical con-
tact between hosts for transmission
because they are obligate parasites,-
meaning the', can't-survive off that


host.,,They also pec rate each time
the host does, Reed says, making:
them excellent markers for tracing
man's evolutionary history, which
has a limited amount,of fossil evi-
dence.
Reed and colleagues analyzed the
physical appearance and DNA of
modem human head lice to con-
struct their family tree. The re-
searchers found the family tree of
the lice closely mirrors the previ-
ously published family tree of hu-
mans and their primate ancestors.
Scientists already believed that
early ancestors of our species,
Homo Sapiens, diverged from other
archaic humans about 1.2 million
years ago. The new study showed
two almost identical-looking but ge-
netically different strains of head
lice diverged about the same time.
That indicates each of the two kinds
of head lice infested a different spe-
cies of early human as the human
species diverged.
Genes from both types of head
lice are found on people today, sug-
gesting that after infesting Homo
erectus for 1 million years, one type
jumped from that soon-to-be-extinct
species onto Homo Sapiens.
Mark Hafner, a professor of bio-
logical sciences at Louisiana State
University who has been studying


lice in rodents' or 20 years, said it's
possible that both species of lice
have been on the Homo Sapiens
lineage all along, but not likely.
"I think it's an intriguing study us-
ing a blend of modem DNA analysis
and more traditional parasitology,"
Hafner said. "This is a very strong
hypothesis. The transfer of lice from
Homo erectus to Homo Sapiens
through direct contact is really the
most simple explanation."
The study also supports the con-
troversial view that there was a
"bottleneck," or reduction, on the
global Homo Sapiens population to
about 10,000 people between
50,000 and 100,000 years ago.
Some scientists believe a global vol-
canic eruption may have caused a
mass die-off of early humans and
created the bottleneck. Others be-
lieve the population bottleneck seen
in human genes occurred because
only a small group of human ances-
tors left Africa in the second wave
50,000 to 150,000 years ago, then
reproduced to cause a sudden popu-
lation expansion.
The new study used the mutation
rate and comparisons of genetic dif-
ferences among lice to find a similar
population bottleneck in the group
(See Lice Study Page 8)


Call To All Eagle

Scouts In County
The Suwannee River Area Coun- Be prepared to provide a name,
ci Division of the Boy Scouts of current mailing address, as well as a
America urgently requests that all telephone number where you may
local and registered Eagle Scouts, as be reached.
well as any Eagle Scouts that may
have relocated into the County, to
step forward. C
This is an effort in part :, r, iesc -
the local register of Eagle Sco.'u in
Jefferson County.
Interested parties are asked to con-
tact T. Buckingham Bird, Esq., a:
his law office, in Monticello.
The telephone number is 1-850-
997-3503.


1st Baptist To
Hold Easter
Celebration

The First Baptist Church of Mon-
ticello will hold an Easter Celebra-
tion 6 p.m. on Sunday, March 20.

An evening of music and drama
by the Celebration Choir and Or-
chestra; Handbell Choir; Children's
Choir; Hallelujah Choir; Men's
Quartet; and) also "Proclaim," a vo-
cal ensemble formerly known as
Shekinah, is planned. ..'.. .
Following intermission, the '-
Drama Ministry and Celebration
Choir will present "The Resurrec-
tion and the Life," a full length pas-
sion play depicting the death, burial, \
and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
Admission is free, but arrive early
for best seating.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, Fl. 32303 (904) 414-0844 1


i







PAGE 8. MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. WED..MARCH 9. 2005


4 ~ ... 1


j!'" 9a
-i~I $


Boys, Girls Club SMART

Girls Perform Often


V


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

SMART Girls of the Jefferson
Elementary School Boys and Girls
Club have been in demand recently.
In February, they performed at the
Howard Middle School, for the
Black History Program.
The group will perform at HMS
again on March 22.
At that time, Sam Madison, local
football player for the Miami Dol-
phins, will be in town to visit with
the members of the Boys and Girls
Club.
Special plans are in the works for


the occasion and the students are ex-
cited, club leaders report.
SMART Girls performed at the
National Guard Armory in Tallahas-
see recently. The students earning
Stubb's Music Scholarships per-
formed solo routines and also per-
formed as an ensemble.
Stubb's Instructor Patty Calendar
provides instrumental instruction to
the SMART Girls, and to other stu-
dents at this Club as well as at the
St. Phillip Club.
Working with the SMART Girls
on their dance routines are Muteteli
Mobley, Jackie Guyton, and Shar-
rico Parrish.


SMART GIRLS of the JES Boys and Girls Club have been
busy performing their routines around town. Front Row, L-
R: Samiria Martin and Charlene Austin. Middle Row, L-R:
Ladarion Smiley, LaNorris Footman, Nathaniel Lewis, Al-



Circle Hears Ghost


Trackers Founder


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Betty Davis, founder of the Ghost
Trackers, was the guest speaker at
the Founders Garden Circle's recent
meeting at the Rare Door.
Davis brought with her a mounted
display of pictures and paraphera-
lia pertaining to ghostly phenomena.
She enthusiastically explained the
significance of each of the items.
'She also brought for view and
demonstration, the equipment used
t6 photograph and tape "ghostly
happenings," such as the cameras
and sound equipment.
Davis spoke extensively on the
appearances of ghosts in the Monti-.
cello area.
She encouraged ihe group to at-
tend one or more of the Ghost Tours
offered on special occasions.
; Davis said that "Spirits can be as-
sociated with an item,' meaning that
if an item such as a brooch was pur-
chased and brought into one's


home, a ghost might also be-brought
in with it.
A brief business meeting was
held, with Chairman Cindy Lee re-
minding members that nominations
are still open for Chairman or Co-
Chariman, for the new Circle year.
The Circle has:also decided to as-
sume the responsibility for having
an arbor built at the Oakfield Ceme-
tery, in the circle area of the road-
way. Members will complete other
injller project's iiere throughout the
year.
A trip to the MacClay Gardens is
scheduled for Thursday, March
10, along with a brief business
meeting that will include the Elec-
tion of Officers.
The group will meet at 11 a.m. at
the Women's Clubhouse, March 10,
and will carpool to the Cypress Res-
taurant in Tallahassee, for lunch be-
fore traveling to view the Gardens.
Member Pat Smitl can be con-
tacted for more information about
the trip at 997-3279.


Homes Of Mourning


SAM SIMPKINS
Sam Simpkins, 72, a retired
barber, died Sunday, March 6, 2005
at Brynwood Nursing Center.
The service will be at 3;00 P.M.
Thursday at Memorial Missionary
Baptist Church with burial at Pall-
bearers Cemetery in Monticello.

Family will receive friends from 6
to 7 p.m. Wednesday at Branch


Street Funeral Home
(850-997-2024).
He is survived by an Aunt, Bea-
trice G. Sloan, an Uncle, Theodore
Gamble, both of Monticello,, loving,
cousins and friends.
He was preceded in death by his
parents, Sallie Gamble Broxsie and
Eddie L. Simpkins, Sr.
Branch Street Funeral Home is in
charge of all arrangements.


phonso Footman. Back Row, L-R: Tyshonda Jordan, Tessie
Saunders, Brianna Saunders, Lakedra Siplin, Britteny
Saunders, Lanesiya Massey, Brionna Jones, Amy Myers.



Head Lice Study


(Continued From Page 7)
of head lice that infested early
Homo Sapiens, but not in the lice on
the archaic human species.,
That means archaic humans didn't
go through the same population
shrinkage and thus must have spread
their lice to Homo Sapiens some-
time more recently than 50,000
years ago, Reed said.
The findings provide independent


confirmaLion of the out-of-Africa
event because genetic analysis
shows the population of lice like
their Homo Sapiens hosts -- also
dramatically expanded after the bot-
tleneck.
S"When scientists first determined
that we were contemporaneous with
Neanderthals in Europe, it was sus-
picious that our contact with them
immediately preceded their extinc-
tinn


Heritage Manor Apartments

1800 E. Texas Hill Road ~ Monticello, Florida
A unique community designed for

Elderly and Disabled.

Please contact Jerry (850) 997-4727 for further
information or stop by our leasing office
Mon. -Fri.
between 9 a.m. and Noon. LENDER


SI i -
-_ r .,

SL -
Many 32 x 80 Floor Plans 4 or 5 BR


I. .- I ,-
28x80 4 Bedroom
"... .
5.,-


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE.

11025 EAST MAHAN

8=4550 2 Border ,1-10
; MAHAN




MAIN STREET

SATUR DAY MARKET


Come One, Come All! ,

lrce for first timers, $5 after that.


Garage Sale, Baked Goods, Produce,
SGift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
S thing You Have To Sell, Including
Fainting Goats!
Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
Fund raisers more-than welcome,


Call Tammie Peck @ 997-6455


-Al AL A A A& AA


A


7322 West Tennessee St
Just 2 miles WEST of Capital Cirdcle NW
MA"AM-Al?,v yT--V :33


Ei~~'i1 ~:


-- --
""1 "


Only

869,900
Delivery 8 Setup
Only V

'59,900
Delivery 8 Setup
Only y

eliy 42,9v 00
Delivery 8 Setup


28x44 or 3 Bedroom 2 Bath
~- -.. O -nly

-_ -- Delivery 8 Setup
16x80 or 2 or 3 Bedroom


S muiwr r FLEEWCOD.
1055 N.W. CAPITAL CIRCLE ...:' ..:
S576-3007 oWd


I.I
K'-


RAQUEL WELCH
Stop in today to see the latest hair fashion
from the worlds leader in fashion wigs.


...... .................
FREE 3 piece wig car kit
with purchase of any wig.
$24.95 RETAIL VALUE
OFFER EXPIRES 3-31-05


Big Bend Eubanks Termite

& Pest Control, Inc.

TLet us undertake your pest control problems."
I RComplete Commercial
^' & Residential Service


Famiyondan
-. ac-I 954
Sammy A Gray, Owne
Sean Gay, Mnager


L N Protecting homes in Jefferson
County for more than 50 years.


MM~lS~~
~ss~~"(WAR (DENII I~~1~ggR


~t~ijIM


I; --:--.


'." 1 :


1
.~ f

E;


?


I~~raP~

''
i''
I,~ga,.


-'j;{ ,..-'. .
. ;. p- ;..


r*,~1*r~ow
r.trli(i












Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005 PAGE 9


ACA JV Ladies Clobber


Hamilton, Undefeated 6-0


1.
L I~s~c,

!J

!
~S.
i


;~J~~ ~ z --.-ti


'"," '~";-~
~c~ C

i
I
.,i.. .
rib.
i 1


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warrior JVs clobbered
Hamilton County 11-1, last week,
and remained undefeated at 6-0.
Coach Frank Brown said the game
started off slow, a defensive battle
for both sides. "It was cold and wet
and the batting wasn't there," said
Brown.
He added that in the third inning
the Lady Warriors "caught fire" and
began a hitting and base stealing
streak that lasted throughout game.
"It was real good game."
The competition only went for
five innings when the game was
called at the bottom of the fifth due


to the ten-run rule.
The Lady Warriors had a total of
ten hits (seven singles, one double
and two triples), seven RBI's, 10
stolen bases and five strikeouts.
Olivia Sorensen went to bat four
times, had one single, one walk, one
strikeout, one out on a pop-up; Ni-
cole Mathis went to bat four times,
had one walk, one single, one dou-
ble, two RBI's, three stolen bases.
Mallory Plaines went to bat three
times, had one out on a pop-up, one
single, one triple, one RBI, two sto-
len bhses; Linsey Day went to bat
three times, had one walk, one
strikeout, one triple, one RBI, one
stolen base; and Paige Thurman was
in the batters box three times, had


ACA Girls Win 2, Lose

One in Recent Action


one out on a pop-up, one walk, one
single, three stolen bases and one
RBI.
Tristen Sorensen went to bat three
times, had two walks, one single,
one RBI, one stolen base; Hannah
Sorensen went to bat three times and
had one strike out, two singles, one


RBI; Katelyn Levine went to bat
three times, had one out on a pop-
fly, one strikeout, one out at first;
and Savannah Williams went to bat
three times, had two out at first, one
strikeout and'one RBI.

Thurman pitched the entire game
and struck out seven batters. She
gave up six hits and no walks.
Defensively, the Lady Warriors
did an outstanding job, allowing
Hamilton County no stolen bases
during the game.


FRAN HUNT
SStaff Writer

Following'the three most recent
games, the Lady Warriors varsity
softball team stands at a 3-2 season.
The Ladies lost to Liberty
County, 0-1.
Brittany Hobbs pitched, striking
out four batters and giving up four
walks and four hits.
The Lady Warriors went on the
warpath in their game against Apa-
lachicola and massacred them for a.
24-0 victory.
ACA had 17 hits, and Bethany
Saunders pitched, striking out eight
batters and giving up four walks.
Cassi Anderson went three for
three; Caitlyn Murphy went two fur
two with two walks; and Jennifer,
Tuteii went r\ o for t\ro.
Kayla Gebhard and -Hobbs eacl'
smacked a triple; Chelsea Kinsey.
had three RBI; and Murphy had
two RBI.
The Lady Warriors squeaked by
Oakhill for a 5-4 win.


JCHS Track

Team 6th

In Relay

The Jefferson County High
School track team finished sixth of
13 teams last week during the
Forbes Relay.
Taking first place in the girl's 100
high hurdles was. Misty Mills with
18:09 seconds.
Jonathan Dady took second place
in the boy's 100 high hurdles with a
time of 15:04 seconds.
Finishing fourth overall in the 4 x
400 relay was the team of Dady,
Freddie Scott, J. R. Sloan and
Daryl Young with a time of 3:32.
Coach Harry Jacobs said other
runners times were down, but Dady
stood out in the 4 x 400 with a time
of 49:07 seconds and Scott with a
time of 49:06.
The Tigers were scheduled to
participate in the Madison Invita-
tional, but the meet was rained out
and rescheduled for today, (Tues-
day), here at 4 p.m.


HANNAH SORENSEN is at bat while Olivia Sorensen
catches at a recent practice session at ACA. (News Photo)



Lady Tigers Split


First Two Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County High
School varsity softball team split
its first two games, for a 1-1 record.
When the Lady Tigers went up
against West CjJd- en.i. thl lost,
14-2.
Coach Earlene Knight said the
Lady Tigers just could not execute
well and were plagued by errors.
Heather Miller scored the first
run after being hit by a pitch. Kim
Gilley scored the second run; and
Shaumese Massey had one RBI.
Samantha Pohle pitched the game.
When the Lady Tigers went up
against FAMU, they won 21-7.


Mixed Doub

Team Recoi

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello mixed doubles
6.0 tennis team has begun their sea-
son and now stand at a 1-1 record
after splitting their first two
matches.
Captain Doug Wainright said this
was not a very good year for play,
though. "Forest Meadows is resur-
facing their courts and rather than
being able to play once a week like
we did last year, we can only play
once a month," said Wainright.
Playing on the teams are Brad
and Pam Mueller, David and Cathy
Jackson, Bill Moon, George Miller,
Dave Jordan, Wainright, Trish
Wirick, Jennifer Ellis and Judy
Faircloth.
In their first match of the season,
the Monticello team won all three


Knight said the Lady Tigers were
able to cut down on the errors and
capitalize on the errors of FAMU.
Chandra Tucker went one for
two, hitting a home run, batting in
two runs and scored three times;
Ashli Washington went O for three,
with three RBI's, scored three times
and'stole six bases; and Miller went
one for one with one RBI, scoring
twice and stealing two bases.
Nikidra Thompson went one for
three, scoring four runs had one
RBI, three stolen bases; and Brit-
tany Harvey went O for one with
two RBI's. Thompson also pitched
the game.
The Lady Tigers were set to face
NFC 4 p.m. Tuesday.


Ales Tennis

rd Now 1-1

of their games.
Team #1, Brad Mueller and
Wirick won its sets, 6-1 and 6-2.
Team #2, Wainright and Ellis won
its sets, 6-3 and 6-4; and team #3,
Miller and Cathy Jackson won its
sets, 6-4 and 6-4.
In their second matches, the
Monticello team lost all three
matches.
Team #1, Wainright and Wirick,
won its first set, 6-3, lost the sec-
ond, 90-6 and lost the tiebreaker,
10-7.
Team #2, Miller and Cathy Jack-
son, lost its sets, 3-6 and 2-6; and
team #3, Moon and Ellis, lost its
sets, 2-6 and 1-6.
Only three games remain in the
season.
The 6.0 team is scheduled to play
again 5:30 p.m., Friday, March 18,
at Forest Meadows, in Tallahassee.


Down Home Medical
312 S. Washington St..
Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4590

Tammy Williams, NP-C
Dr Mi Stick "Professional Healthcare At Home"
HEALTHPLAN SOUTHEAST Provider lhmmy Wlniams


GULF COAST ,
METAL
ROOFING 3, WiE GALVALUME
f^ D 3' WIDE PAINTED
Full line of 2' WIDE 5V
accessories in stock
WIi HA 'E A METAL RUIL.ING(,S
Special Flashin.gs Made All Types Warranted Metal Available
(Call Tll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FI.
Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.


Lisa Bailey went one for three
with one triple and one RBI; An-
derson went one for two with three
RBI; and Gebhard and Tuten each
went one for two.


Instructor.


Sandwiches Soft Drinks Beer

(850) 668-7665


1698 Villiage Square Blvd Tallahassee, FL


Group Fitness Schedule ..



'".-f "7
^.A


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


Call 997-4253 for more information


Get You Annual Subscription Today!
In Florida: $45.00 Out of State: $52.00



Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without it'


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening



1630 E. JACKSON ST.
(Located behind Langdale Auto


Check out our selection of Olhausen
Pool Tables for your home game room!

New Pool Tables
o' Balls, Cues, and
.o .OthSer Pool
S .. Supplies


Wine


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
3 to 5 yr. olds Piates Pites


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
Fitness Com6o (Fitness Combo


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness


--- ----


I I I I'' I







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9,2005


Lady Warrior JVs Trounce


Maclay, Remain Undefeated


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors JVs remain unde-
feated at 5-0, after walloping Ma-
clay Tuesday, 18-4.
The Ladies had a total of nine
RBI. and were walked in for runs
nine times.
They had seven total hits all sin-
gles, 22 stolen bases, were only
struck out twice and were walked


Tig ers D, e
. -FAMU. H- 1 4.
VIALCOLM NORTON waits for the pitch at recent Tiger
practice session. Norton was a major contribution to the
recentt Tiger game, his coach reports. (News Photo)






"AMU Hig"h 14-11
s : t ,-


#AN HUNT
Siaff Writer

The Tiger varsity baseball team
cun its season opener 14-11
j Iainst FAMU, last week.
7 Coach Alfreddie Hightower said
tie game was a positive start for
le Tigers, and that all players had
a chance to participate:
S"We had a lot of first game mis-
r.kes, however, our bats were able
So ercome our mental mishaps,"
hle said
' M ljor contributors included l I-
plm Norton, who went three for
tree, had three RBIs. one double
Oid one walk; Scotty Norton, three
Mr five, five RBI and one double


and Jimmy Sloan went three for
three and had one double.
Breon Parker went three for four,
had one triple, one double and one
walk; Markyce Larry went three for
five. hit three singles; and Dionte
Hightower went two for five with
two singles.
The game was scheduled to be
the second of the season. However,
the opener scheduled against John
Paul was rained out.
Tigers were scheduled to take on
John Paul Friday, however, that
game was canceled because John
Paul is participated in district bas-
ketball playoffs that day.
The next game on the schedule is
against Rickards, 5 p.m., March 11,
there.


18 times. After four innings, the
game was called.
Coach Frank Brown said that
Maclay was a weaker team then
they were last year, especially in
pitching and slow balls.
"One good thing about the
game," said Brown, "was that I was
able to put my substitute players in
and give them some game experi-
ence."
Olivia Sorensen went two for
three and had one RBI; Nicole


Mathis went to bat twice and was
walked twice, stole four bases;
Mallory Plaines went to bat twice,
was walked twice, stole three
bases; and Linsey Day went to bat
twice, walked twice and stole two
bases.
Paige Thurman went to bat four
times, had one single, one RBI, two
walks and one out at first; Tristen
Sorensen went to bat once, was
waked, stole one base; Hannah
Sorensen went to bat once, had one


JV Warriors Split Games


With Carabelle, Perry


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After splitting its last two games,
the Aucilla Christian Academy JV
baseball team stands at a 2-4 sea-
son.
When the Warriors went up
against Carabelle, they whipped
them for a 13-5 win.
Coach Daryl Adams said they
played only three innings because
of darkness. The Warriors were
only able to pull off two hits during
the game.
Casey Anderson went one for
two, with one walk, scored three
runs; Kyle Barnwell was on base
three times with two walks and one
h t h.y ,; a0.u io .. ur.. a, n ii..u


Stephen Dollar went O for three,
with two strikeouts and scored two
runs.
Daniel Greene had one walk, one
error, scored two runs; Casey
Wheeler scored two runs resulting
from an on by error and a walk;
Michael Kinsey went one for two
with a sack-fly and two RBI's; and
Rob Searcy had two walks.
Dollar pitched the first two in-
nings, striking out one batter and
giving up three hits and four walks.

Wheeler pitched the final inning,
striking out one batter and getting
two ground-outs.
When ACA faced off against
Perry, they were defeated 10-5.


ACA Girls Defeat M;


Hamilton, Now 5-2


The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity softball team now stands at a
5-2 record after winning their two
most recent games last week.
In the first game, the Lady Warri-
ors Blanked Maclay for a 15-0 win.
After four innings, the game was
called due to-the 15-run rule. ACA
had 10 hits, one error.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the entire
game, striking out four batters, al-
lowing one hit, and giving up no


walks. She went two for three in the
batters box smacked an in-the-park
home run, had four RBI's, two sto-
len bases.
Chelsea Kinsey went two for two
and had one walk 'tWo RBI' stwo
siblen bases; BethByhy ,ainde.
went one for two, had one double,
two stolen bases; and ,Caitlyn Mur-
phy had two RBI's.
When the Lady Warriors faced off
against Hamilton County they 'won.


SIf It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read About It In The

Monticello News

S'You Can't Be Without It'
.*;r


Adams said the warriors did not
play well at all, only getting seven
hits throughout the game.
Anderson went one for four with
one single, one run; Reggie Walker
went one for one with one single;
Dollar went one for four with one
single; and Greene went one for
three with one single.
Matt Bishop went one for four
with one-single; Searcy went two
for three with two singles; and
Luke Whitmer went one for one
with one single.
Barnwell pitched four innings,
striking out one batter and giving
up five hits and six walks.
Anderson pitched the final two
innings, giving up three hits and
three walks.


aclay,


Season
The game was called after five in-
nings due to the 10-run rule.
ACA had 11 hits, seven walks,
one error.
Leading the game statistics and
beating a school record, Lisa Bailey
smashed out an oyer-the-fence home
run,, to end the game, and had three
RBI's.
According to Coach Roslyn Bass,
in recent school history, only three
over-the-fence home runs had been
hit, and one of those was also hit by
Bailey last year, giving her two of
the three.
Murphy went one for one, had two
RBI's and two walks; Shea Eason
went two for two, had one RBI; and
Jennifer Tuten went two for four,
had three RBI's.
Saunders pitched the entire game,
striking out eight batters and allow-
ing two hits and 12 walks.


single, one RBI and stole twc
bases; and Katelyn Levine went tc
bat twice, had three RBI, one single
and one walk.
Kalyn Owens went to bat three
times, was walked twice; Angela
McCune went to bat twice, had two
RBI, one single, one strikeout, stole
two bases; and Nikki Kisamore
went to bat twice, was walked
twice and stole four bases.
Jodie Bradford went to bat twice,
had one walk, one out at first;
Courtney Brasington went to bat
twice, had one single and one walk;
and Michaela Roccanti went to bat
twice, had one RBI, one single and
one walk.
Thurman pitched the entire game,
striking out eight batters and giving
up six hits and four walks.


ACA JVs

Tennis Team

Blanked 0-6
The Aucilla Christian Academ
JV tennis team lost to Communit
Christian last week, 0-6.
In singles action, Elizabeth Shirle:
lost to Sloan Campbell, 3-8; Dan
Jane Watt lost to Christin
Giarelcha, 2-8; Rebekah Falk lost ti
Jaimie Garrin, 2-8; and Alfa Hun
lost to Sawyer Campbell, 2-8.
In doubles action, Shirley an
Watt lost a hard fought 9-11 batti
against Sloan Campbell; and Giare
cha and Falk and Hunt fell to Garri
and Sawyer Campbell, 2-8.
The Lady Warriors now stand at;
one and one season.
They go up against Holy Com
forter 3:30 p.m., Thursday, here.


Warriors
Win Season
Opener 4-3
Warriors defeated Hamilton 4-3
in the bottom of the seventh in the
season opener.
"It was a good start for the
season. It wasn't flawless, but i'
was a win," said coach Ra3
Hughes.
Mat Bishop went two for four
and drove in the winning run; Chris
Tuten also went two for four; and
Daniel Roccanti went one for three,
knocking in two RBI's in the first
inning.
Casey Gunnels and Colby Rob-
erts each hit one single; and Drew
Sherrod went one for three and
pitched four and two thirds innings,
striking out four batters and only
giving up one earned run.
Ridgely Plaines pitched the re-
maining two and one third innings,
allowing only one earned run.


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


__ __ __ U


SBURNETTE PLUMBING &
I : WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
*Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


ritnBree Matr. Pu *.U.4


Appliance Service
of Monticello
The Name Says It All! r
"Call Andy" A.;
-- J E

997-5648 (Leave Message)
'Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


REALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.co m


DAY'S TREE & TRACTOR SERVICE


Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Clean Up Debris
Aerial Device
Tree Removal


For Free Estimates Call Gene Day 850-948-4757


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


I- U .


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Barbwire ~ Field Wood





Jim Phillips

850-973-8117


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT Licensed & Insured John A. Kuhn COMPETITIVE AUTO INSURANCE
CAC 058274 Owner Advertising Pays!


A/C -(In Southwood Publix Shopping Cnti
J & K Air Conditioning, LLC Allstate Insurance Compan

850-997-5808 A/C System and Pool Heaters This Space Can Be (in Southwood Pubhix Shopping Cnt
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations Yours For Only
Over 25 Years Experience Norman L. Barot 878-8077
850-545-9964 ~ 850-251-2911 Over 25 Ys $10 Per Week. Norman L. Barefoot 878-8077
(850) 997-4577 Exclusive Agent O)F'IN MonldaYv- IN d\ X 30-5 0
Barbfot Insurance Group -.mai:NORMANIARI -)0 I a.Illktcn m
155 JOHNCOLLINS RD. 30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344
15 ON.CLI sRD


Mowing,
Bush Hogging
Harrowing, Road
Maintenance
Feed Plots


~cb~B


I


i cl --cl 1


nit Dy pacn~l~scorec L two runs; anal


04


14


5


v










CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line... $1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005 PAGE 11:


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Application for Tax Deed.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Tony
Nativio the holder.of the following
certificates has filed said certificates or, a,
tax deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names
in which iti as assessed are as follows:
Certificate No. 29 Year of Issuance 1997.
Description or Property Town lot 1 and 2
Block number 3 of Florida Land Abstract
Company addition to the town of
Monticello located in Jefferson County
Florida. Name in which assessed R. Bruce
Warren. All of said property being in the
County of Jefferson, State of Florida.
Unless such certificates shall be redeemed
according to law the property described in
such certificate or certificates will be sold
to the highest bidder at the court house
door on the 10th da) of March al 11:00
A.M. Dated this 2nd day of March 2005.
Signature, Clerk of Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, Florida.
3/9

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The
District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday, March
15, 2005 at 5:30 p.m. in the
Suwannee-Hamilton Technical Center,
415 SW Pinewood Drive,-Live Oak, Fl. A
cop) of the agenda may be obtained b
writing: NFCC, Office of the President,
1000 Turner Davis Dr., Madison, Fl
32340. For disabiliri-related
accommodations, contact the NFCC Office
of College Advancement, 850-973-1653.
NFCC is an equal access equal
opportunity employer.
3/9 chg.


LEGAL NOTICE
The Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners will hold a workshop at
9:00 a.m., on Thursday, March 10, 2005,
at the Jefferson County Courthouse,
Courtroom, Monticello, Florida, to review
use of space in the old JeffeMrso'nCouilty
High School Buildings and disposition of
the County Offices downtown.
Fc!x "Skeet" Joyner, Chairman
3/9

In accordance with FL Statue: Public Auc-
tion March 26, 2005 @ 10:00 a.m.
1993 S-Trl Vin #1UYVS2488PM945250
1996 FRHT Vin #1FUYDDYB1TH855888
1991 Toyo Vin #JT4RN81A5R5194443
To be sold as is for Towing & Storage
Charges. Conditions & Terms at Auction.
Dave's Towing 7261 East Washington St.
Monticello, Fl 32344 / (850)342-1480
3/9

GARAGE SALE

MOVING SALE
Through the month of March. Furniture
including beds, dressers, etc. Call
997-6220. 1430 Florida Avenue.
3/4,9,11, pd.

AUTOMOTIVE
1996 DODGE CUSTOM V-8 VAN (mint)
$5,500. 997-1560 or e-mail
GCASS BORiE TZ E RO.NE T
3/2,4,9,11, pd

NOTICE
Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19 tfn


Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates Needed.



Fast Track Food Stores now

hiring in Madison and

Monticello areas.


Please contact store Manager at your

local Fast Track store for an application.


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

Use This form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail


Payment In Advance Is Required


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

3 Lines, One Edition $4.00 Each Additional Line $1.00
3 Lines, Two Editions Wednesday/Friday $7.00
Each Additional Line $1.00
30 Characters Per Line
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday '

~~n n

DATES TO BE PUBLISHED



CLASSIFICATION

WRITE YOUR AD HERE










Monticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344


Mosquito Control Technician Part
Time, Jefferson County Mosquito Control.
Seasonal work in the field operations of
the Jefferson County Mosquito Control
Department. Work hours may include
morning, evening or weekend shifts. Work
may include contract with mosquito
control pesticides and with animals
commonly used in mosquito control
programs. Good driving record required.:
Preemplbyment physical and drug
screening required. Starting pay is $13.00
per hour. Application deadline is 3-15-05.
Contact Sharon Ponder at 342-0170 x 207
for lurther information or an application.
3/2,9 chg.
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL TIME
'OSI TION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18, tfn.

TRI-COLINTN ELECTRIC COOPERa-
TIVE, INC. HAS AN OPENING FOR A
FULL TIME LINEMAN/LINEMAN
TEAINEE IN THE PERRY, FLORIDA
DISTRICT LOCATION. THE POSITION
IS FULL TIME WITH FULL EM-
PLO\EE BENEFITS. THE SUCCESS-
FUL APPLICANT SHALL BE
REQUIRED TO LIVE WITHIN 15 MIN-
UTES RESPONSE TIME OF PERRY OF-
FICE. PLEASE SEND RESUME OR
COMPLETED TRI-COUNTY ELEC-
TRIC EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION
ON OR BEFORE MARCH 18, 2005 TO:
WAYNE BASS TRI-COUNTY ELEC-
TRIC COOPERATE E. INC. MADISON
FL 32341. TRI-COLINTV ELECTRIC.
COOPERATIVE IS AN EQUAL OPPOR-
TUNITY EMPLOYER AND A DRUG
FREE WORK PLACE.
3/9,16


NOTICE
SGet Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochure! 1-800-432-0320
www bertrogers.com
2/4,9,11,16,18,23,25,3/2,4,9,11,16,18,23,25,
30

SERVICES
Were a church that values tradition, but
we're not fundamentalists. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of the
Court house. Sunday service at 10:00 A.M.
997-4166.
3/2,4 tan

Back hoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28 tan
Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names, creeds, or
practices? Jesus established His Church
called the Church of Christ and you can
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call 997-3466
10/1 tfn
DISCOUNTS FOR SENIORS Mowing,
Trimming, Tree Work, Painting +
Pressure Washing work most yards cut
For Retirees 20 25 $, free estimates Call
551-2000
3/9,11,16,18,23,25
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and operated
by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave Message.
2/11 tan
Experience Baby-sitter a Christian who is
patient & loving. Your house or mine
whenever needed call 997-5482 or
264-4854
3/2,4,9,11, pd

HELP WANTED


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571


AUCTION NOTICE


USED POLES AUCTION
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2005
10:00 A.M.


Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Perry Warehouse
242 Arthur Padgett Road
Perry, Florida
*******************************************


USED POLES AND VEHICLES AUCTION
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2005


1:30 P.M.
Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Madison Warehouse
Highway 90 West
Madison, Florida


I NEW! 40+ Acres-Great Investment
Zoned AG 5, Close to I-10 and High & Dry, I
Hwy 257 & Sparks Road ..............326,7201

ATTA TULGA ROAD : 5 AC Comer Lot, I
SRural Setting, Woods & Pasture......$85,00011

Casa Bianca Rd: 6.75 High & Dry Acres, ^
Restricted Homesite, Quiet Country Setting, I
County Maintained Road Convenient to 11
Monticello. A Great Place for that Custom 1
Home! ................................. $67,500"

Lloyd Road: 6.02 Acres, Lightly Wooded "
Restricted Homesite in a Convenient I
Location........... ........... 60,200
__ -_ -- -- -- llI


FOR RENT
RV/Mobile Home Lot for rent @
Monticello Meadows 19' South.
850-997-1630 Park Manager Liz. 1/7 tfn,
chg.
Rustic 1 BR Cabin. with Screened in
porch. Completely furnished including
Amenities Located on 4 Acres at end of
dirt road only 6 miles from Monticello &
25 miles from Tallahassee. Electric &
Satellite TV included $750 month + Sec.
deposit, 6 month minimum lease. Call
342-1324 LV. Mess.
'/4 tfn
3 Bedroom 1 Bath v ith Storage Shed
$650.00 Month ;"rs Deposit. Call
997-8295 or 352-514-7 10 .
3/4,9,11,16,18, pd.

FOR SALE
1989 19 ft. Prowler In good condition
$3000,00 or best offer 997-3890
3/9,11
SUB-ZERO wine cooler under counter
width 24" 34" high depth 24". Never
used- Handsome Appliance Call
850-997-3163
3/9,11 pd.
Jenn Aire Drop-in Range with / Extra's
(Down Draft) $399.
Amana, 25 Cu. Ft. Side by Side, Excellent
Condition, Ice/Water in Door. $399.
Call (850)997-4350 if not in leave name &
number.
3, ',11,18,25 pd
ATTENTION SATELLITE. OWNERS
you don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377.and get one or two day
service. We repair all Brands and
telephones.
12/08, tfn
New Living Room Set. Suggested list
$1400., sell sofa $275., love seat $225.,
chair $175., Set $625. Hardwood frames
with lifetime warranty. 850-222-9879
1/12, tfn
For Sale or Rent: Mobile Home 3 BR/2
Bath, Fireplace. 24x48' Selling for payoff
price, about $43,196 Call for details:
Barbara 997-5554.
2/23,25,3/2,4, ',11, pd'
Keystone 2002 Everest, model 363K, 5th
-Wheel, Fiberglass 3 slide outs. Priced
for quick sale. Book Price, 997-5441.
2/23,25,3/2,4 ),11,16,18, pd
Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced
to sale $1, $2, $5,$10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30 p.m. @ 342-3246.
2/23,25,3/2,4,11 pd
Church Mahogany Bald win Piano with
Seat 1,000.00 or best offer. Call
850-997-4104 leave message.
3/9,11 pd

REAL ESTATE
Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400. per
month. Call 997-4000
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Iniproved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, sd


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtor Associate

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


Buyers looking for Homes and Land
ai'~rc.t-B-e-B-r^c-c-ei--/-'B~B=B=*lii=*c==e


215 N. Jefferson
(850) 997-5516
www.cbkk.cnm


:' r---Sr-=r==r---Jr--J I-= k -a k --Zk --M- -2) k --2k --2 k --J k --Jr=g r--J r--Jr--M


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Jreat Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
$8,500 per acre
Just Listed-Under Contract 6.67 wooded
acres on graded county road in eastern
Jefferson County $23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Livinq 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
New Listinq 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900.
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
SOLD Wonderful Home nice 4 bedroom 2
bath double wide with fireplace on 1.9
acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Sales are very qood we have a
shortage of listing for uyers looking
for Homes and Land


br 1' I ---E- --lsl~L~1sr I
I C--








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.,MARCH 9, 2005


A1


Safety Council Offers Tips For

Keeping Children Safe In Home


.. -- .

--- "
--
,-:r'. "'.









;"'" '. ;.


I-
I


5'1


HOSTESS JENNIFER FRENCH pounds pan-
sies to transfer the design, at a recent
meeting of the Camellia Garden Circle.


'Jaws' Named Socie

Adoptable Pet Of VI
mixed male.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The County Humane Society has
chosen "Jaws" as its adoptable ca-
nine pet of the week.
"Jaws" is one very lucky four
month-old, sable color, Shepherd


Shelter caretaker
said he is the surv:
parvo threat.

Of a litter of three
the disease and "
housed with theta
showed no signs (


... DIGITAL SATELLITESY.STEMS :-
ASK US n-OW
-TO GET UP TO



ROOMS


luding Standard Insialiauion

*. DIGITAL SATELLITE -SYSTEMS:.


Members created note paper decorated with
the designs. (News Photo)



ty's all.
"He's as sweet as he can be," said
leek Bautista. "He's such a happy
puppy and a wiggler (so happy and
excited when a person approaches
him, he wiggles all over in greet-
r Cheryl Bautista ings).
ivor of the recent He is very playful and sometimes
shy and he is scheduled to be neu-
tered this week. The rabies vacci-
ee, two died from -nations are covered, but he still
Jaws", who was needs three puppy boosters.
m at all times, "Jaws" is an indoor/outdoor ani-
of the disease at mal and he loves adults, children,
Other dogs and even cats.
888-629.5000 Anyone wishing to adopt "Jaws"
Sor any of the other many
adoptables at the shelter should call
342-0244.


At
g 21 -
4ge



888-629-5000


CASH NOW,:
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS;,,.'
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUT

(800) 794-73107

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW,,
for Structured Settlements!


;


SDoyou like to fish? $


Do you like to hunt?


Do you like to work 4 days a week?

Would you like to earn $60,000-80,000 a year?


Call Jonathan Cheesborough 850-562-1765


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The North Florida Chapter of the
National Safety Council alerts citi-
zens to the importance of keeping
children safe from falls in the
home.
Although the home may represent
a haven of safety and security, but
for young children, it can also be a
minefield of potentially dangerous
falls.
The following tips will help make
the home free of fall hazards.
Falls from furniture:
*Don't leave babies alone on
beds, changing tables or sofas.
*Always strap children into high-
chairs and strollers.
*Don't let children play alone on
fire escapes, high porches or balco-
nies.
Slips and falls from floor surfaces:
*Secure area rugs, especially on
wood, ceramic tile or linoleum
floors. Area rugs can cause anyone
to slip.
Secure them with a piece of foam
carpet backing, double-sided tape
or rubber pad, available at many
carpet and department stores.
Falls on the stairs:
*Keep stairs clear. Children
spend as much time running up and
down stairs as they do in and out of
the back door.
Stairs figure in a large percentage


of home falls. Combine a child's
boundless, yet reckless energy with
a staircase full of junk and you
could end up taking an emergency
trip to the hospital.
*Use safety gates if there are in-
fants and toddlers in the home.
At the top of the stairs, attach the
gate to the wall. Avoid accordion
gates with large openings, which
can trap a child's neck.
Window falls:
*Be aware of the dangers of falls
from windows by unsupervised
small children. Keep windows
closed and locked when children
are around.
When opening windows for ven-
tilation, open a window that a child
cannot reach.
*Set and enforce rules about
keeping children's play away from
windows or patio doors. Falling
through glass can be fatal or cause
serious injury.
*Keep furniture or anything a
child can climb on, away from win-
dows.
*Never depend on an insect
screen to keep your child from fal-
ling out the window. Screens are
intended for keeping insects out,
not children in.


Great Mexican Cuisine!
Great Mexican Beer & Margaritas!


Lw ro.








Named one of Florida's Best Restaurants
by Florida Trend Magazine

Catering Available

656-3392 1 --,o
Open 7 days 652-
2329 Apalachee Pkwy. "Try Our Sunday Brunch"


Managers & Assistant Managers


Fast Track Food Stores now accepting
applications for Managers and Assistant
Managers in the
Madison and
Monticello areas.


Please fax resume or call to set up an interview.
Fax 352/333-1161 Phone 352/333-3011 ext 24


.1. .


Free' Gift
WITH PURCHASE
i'u'll recfr, c o: euiiem"t f- rtel-,>L ) t,

LLrXIVA Dual \krion Eve Makeup Remmer
LULKXfA' Changing Skin ELc ComplcN
DEFINITI\T 'E c Pencil
Lash Lift \\ ierprool MNladcra


.. -
V. ..1







'Free with the purchase of two or more Merle Norman cosmetic products. Cosmetic
accessories not included. Offer valid while supplies last at participating Merle Norma
Cosmetic Studios. Limit one per customer.

Tallahassee Mall
385-2142
Governor's Square Mall
SM656-1513

S Merle Norman Cosmetic Studios have been independently owned and operated since 1931.


I-"


Combine services and save. High-speed Internet, local and long distance.


Get Sprint high-speed Internet for
a month when
you combine with the Sprint Solutions'"
Standard plan.
One-year term agreement required.






-- Sprint.


n


Sprint high-speed Internet with EarthLink" brings you always-on access at
speeds much faster than dial-up, with free tools like spamBlocker, Virus Blocker
and Pop-up Blocker." Plus, you can talk on the phone and surf the Web at
the same time. Purchase Sprint high-speed Internet together with the Sprint
Solutions'' Standard plan and save on both. Talk all you want, surf all you want.
All from the provider you can trust.





Call 1-877-Sprint-2 or visit sprint.com/local.


Service available in select areas. Offer good for residential customers only who sign up for High-speed Internet and Sprint Solutions Standard plan. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice
Sprint Solutions: Services not available in all areas Lifeline customers may purchase vertical features by certifying they have a legitimate medical or safety need for the features) requested. All rates
subject to change. Restrictions apply see rates, terms and conditions at www sprint con. Monthly Fee: Promotional monthly rate will apply for 12 months as long as customer subscribes to both
Sprint Solutions Standard plan and Sprinthigh-speed Internet. After 12 months, standard fee will apply Rate applies to 1.5 Mbps speed, which is not available in all areas. $49 99 activation fee will apply
Taxes and surcharges are additional and are based on standard monthly rate Sprint high-speed Internet: A fee of $99 will be charged for early termination. Actual performance may vary due to
conditions outside of Sprints network control. These conditions may include variables such as customer location, physical equipment lirritations, network congestion, server and router speeds of Web
sites accessed, inside wiring ortelephone conditions. Minimum level of speed is 384 Kbps. Additional restrictions may apply Long-Distance Plans: State-to-state, international, in-state long-distance
(including local toll)services are governed by the applicable state tariffs and/orstate terms and conditions of service. U.S. residents only Dial one service. Additional restrictions may apply 2005 Sprint.
All rights reserved. Sprint, the diamond logo design. Sprint Privacy ID and Sprint Solutions are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L P EarthLink is a registered trademark of EarthLink, Inc


MERLE. ORM~n,,


Unguarded windows opened only
five inches can pose a danger to
children under the age of ten. In
some cities, landlords are required
by law to place window guards in
apartments where children live.
These guards prevent windows
from being opened wide enough
for children to crawl through. Be
sure to check with your local fire
department and building code offi-
cials to make sure bars or security
bars comply with all applicable re-
quirements.
In the bathroom:
*Always use a rubber mat or slip-
proof stickers in the tub. Never
leave a child unattended in the tub.
Should they slip and fall, they may
be unable to cry for help.
*Dangers that are obvious to
adults are not necessarily that ap-
parent to children. They need extra
guidance and an ever-vigilant eye.
By following these simple sug-
gestions, one can make the home a
safer and more secure place for
everyone.


E R T ip o
bieUr.S. Eivi. n ent


d ;-