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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00018
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: March 4, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00018
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


:....:: .. OF F'L RIDA HISTORY
S.i LI RA~~ WEST
i.:v-::'r: ITY OF FLORIDA


Help

Kids Become

Better Readers

Editorial, Page 4


,. .E, FL. 3261L.

Girl Scout


Ongoing

Story, Photo, Page 6


County Seeks

Legislative Funding

For Nine Projects

Story, Page 12
I mm


Qf Friday Morning





Montic


S137TH YEAR NO.20. 50 CENTS


Ilo


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Sws

FRIDAY, MARCH 4,2005


City Wants Pause


r ji .I




.4'-


City Considers Moratorium

A RASH of projected, ongoing and under review develop-
ment projects have raised concerns among city officials.
They worry the city will pay the consequences if it doesn't
establish rules and impact fees. (News Photo)


On


Development


Moratorium Would Allow

Guidelines TO Be Drafted


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Like the county, the city appears,
to be turning a corner in its ap-
proach to development.
For a long time, the mantra of city
and county officials has been 'de-
velopment at any cost'.
But now that development is oc-,
curring and occurring at an ever
faster rate, city officials are wanting :
to take a step back and reconsider;
their options. ,
City Clerk and Treasurer Emily
Anderson raised the issue Tuesday!


night. Anderson wondered if the
City Council might consider impos-
ing a short-term moratorium to al-
low for the formulation of a more
coherent policy relative to develop-
ment.
"I'm concerned that develop-
ment is happening in the city faster
than we can deal with it," Anderson
said. "I feel that we're not address-
ing the infrastructure impact of
these developments."
Besides the several projects al-
ready ongoing or undergoing
review, Anderson said she was
aware of several other projects com-
ing down the pike, including a sub-


division and
buildings.


three commercial


"We charge no impact fees," An-
derson said, noting that elsewhere
developers pay exorbitant impact
fees. Not that she was 'suggesting
that the city adopt a like amount, she
said. But the city should demand at
least some compensation for the ad-
ditional demand that developments
placed on city services and the infra-
structure.
It was a well-documented fact, she
said, that the property taxes gener-
ated by new developments did not
make up for the additional costs that
government incurred in providing
such basic services as water, sewer
and fire and police protection.
Storm water management was an-
other issue that was exacerbated by


development, she said. And the city
needed to have its own permitting
department, she said. But that was
an issue for a later discussion.
"We're hurting and fooling our-
selves if we don't do something,"
Anderson said. "I think we need to
have a resolution in place to at least
review each element of
development."
Mayor Julie Conley concurred.
She too had concerns, she said.
Conley noted that at one time,
the city had been desperate to attract
development and had been willing
to do anything to get it. But now
that the development'was coming,
the city no longer had to be so indis-
criminate in its approach, she said.
"In some ways, the developers are
taking advantage of the fact that we
(See Moratorium Page 12)


Tortoises, Development


Set On Collision Course


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

With- the rate of developments ac-
delerating in the county, an issue has
arisen that developers, planners and
county officials likely will have to
address more and more in the future:
gopher tortoises.
SA once prolific species in the
Southeast (commonly called go-
phers and eaten by some folks: they
supposedly were called "Hoover
chickens" during the Depression)
gopher tortoises today have declined
to the point that they are listed as
threatened, endangered or a species
of special concern in Florida and
other states..
That means certain legal protec-
tions are in place for the species, in-
cluding a ban on their harvesting
and the requirement of a permit to
possess, study or relocate them.
Angela Williams is the protected
.species permit coordinator with the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-


DEPUTY POLICE CHIEF BILL
BULLOCK was presented
with his service pistol at a
going-away party Monday.
Bullock retired from the po-
lice department with 31
years of service. He is now
chief deputy at the Sheriff's
Department.


tion Commission (FWC), which is
charged with protection of the spe-
cies.
Williams offers that for develop-
ers wanting to build on land that
makes up a gopher tortoise habitat,
several options are available: The
developer can forego development
(not a likely or viable alternative, in
Williams' words); they can seek on-
site relocation (if the population is
five or fewer tortoises); they can
seek off-site relocation, which re-
quires testing to ensure the tortoises
are disease-free; or they can prove
hardship and secure a take permit,
which essentially means-the devel-
oper pays a mitigation fee and de-
stroys the tortoises.
At least two developments in the
county are presently dealing with
the issue of gopher tortoises. The
two, both in the Lloyd area, are the
Turner Heritage Homes Subdivision
north of I-10 and the proposed Oak
Hill Farm Subdivision off SR-59.
Gopher tortoise burrows have been
found or reported on both
properties.
In the case of Turner Heritage
Homes, biologists have found ap-
proximately 20 gopher tortoise bur-
rows on the property, according to
Dan Brown, vice president of devel-
opment.
The company is now in the proc-
ess of conducting a survey to.deter-
mine the exact number of the gopher
tortoise populJiion, so that it can de-
cide what option to pursue.
"We're trying to get the (state
agency) to deem it a low quality
habitat," Brown says. "Trees are
growing and inhibiting the sunlight
from getting to the vegetation (the
tortoises feed on)."
Planning Official Bob Arredondo,
meanwhile, has instructed Jeff Ard,
developer of the proposed Oak Hill
Farm Subdivision, that he must ad-
dress the gopher tortoises reported
on his property.
The reported gopher tortoise.
population on the Oak Hill Farm
Subdivision came from Martha Ca-
nady, owner of an adjacent property
that is designated a conservation
easement for the protection of go-
pher tortoises.
In a letter to Arredondo dated Jan.


19, Canady claims that in excess of
70 burrows exists on her property, a
nearby cemetery and the to-be-
developed property.
She calls the population the last r' i
remaining large intact one in north
Florida, and warns she will report :'1
any disturbance of the species to the
appropriate authorities.
Ray Ashton is founder of the
Ashton Biodiversity Research and
Preservation Institute, Inc. in New-
berry, FL, a nonprofit foundation
created in 1999 "to contribute to
better understanding and manage-
ment of biodiversity in Florida."
Ashton has a lot to say about go-
pher tortoises, development, and the ---:--- ,
FWC rules, which he considers inef-
fective. JEFF ARD, the develop
Ashton can't say if the gopher tor- Oak Hill Farm Subdivisi
toise population on the proposed Lloyd area, discusses the
Oak Hill Farm Subdivision property sue'with planners at a re
is the last and largest intact gopher
tortoise population in north Florida.
That is what has been reported to
him, he says. But he does know that I
-in Jefferson County and throughout
the Panhandle, the gopher tortoise
population is in rapid decline due-to M o re T h
loss of habitat. M ore T


The two main culprits for the e-
cline, Ashton says, are development
and ( less obviously) the lack of
controlled burns to prevent the pro-
liferation of trees that destroy the
low-growing plants and sunny areas
necessary for gopher tortoise sur-
vival.
"There's so much tree coverage
that the forage is gone," Ashton
says. "We need fires to manage for
timber and for wildlife. But many
landowners are afraid to bur. Then
we have patches of development in-
side of forests. The habitat quality
has declined in the last 25 years be-
cause of a lack of burning."
Ashton calls the gopher tortoises a
keystone species.
"When they disappear, it indicates
that other species in the upland com-
munities are also disappearing," he
says
As goes the fate of the gopher tor-
toise, in other words, so goes the
fate of a multitude of less visible but
also endangered species associated
with the gophers, such as the indigo
(See Tortoises Page 12)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Why all the hullabaloo about the
gopher tortoises and what happens
to them?
Following are some facts garnered
from the Gopher Tortoise Council, a
group formed in 1978 by southeast-
ern biologists and citizens interested
in reversing the decline of the spe7
cies if possible.
Gopher tortoises belong to a
group of land tortoises that origi-
nated in western North America
nearly 60 million years ago and that
boasted at least 23 species on the
continent at one time or other.
Only four species remain today,
and three of these are found in the
southeastern United States, with the
majority found in north central Flor-
ida and southern Georgia. Their
populations, however, have been
greatly reduced from their historic
numbers.
Gopher tortoises live in extensive


er of the proposed
on off SR-59 in the
e gopher tortoise is-
ecent Planning Com-


mission meeting. The development is
scheduled to come before planners again
this month. (News Photo)


Tortoises Date Back


ian 60 Million Years


Biologists

Consider

Tortoises

Keystone

Species

subterranean burrows that can be 40
feet long and 10 feet deep and that
provide refuge to "more than 360
animal species."
Gopher tortoises feed mainly on
low-growing plants that require
abundant sunlight and they require
open sunny areas for nesting and
basking.
Their favorite habitats include
longleaf pine sandhills, xeric oak
hammocks and pine flatwoods. But
they can also live in man-made en-
vironments such as pastures, old
fields and grassy roadsides.
Gopher tortoises can live more
than 60 years. The adults have few


enemies, other than humans and
sometimes domestic dogs and rac-
coons.
The main reasons for the decline
of the-species are habitat alteration
and land development.
Other cited reasons: forestry prac-
tices that plant pines too closely,
preventing sunlight from penetrating
to the forest floor; disease; road
mortality; and the illegal hunting of
the tortoises for their meat.
Among the questions research has
to answer: How much land consti-
tutes an adequate habitat and what
are the effects of roads on tortoises
and their populations?
"We know that many animals use
gopher tortoise burrows for shelter,
and that some associates live most
or all their lives in the burrows," ac-
cording to the Gopher Tortoise
Council. "Many researchers fear
that if this keystone species be-
comes extinct, many other species
will soon follow."
For more information, go to
www.gophertortoisecouncil. org.


I I I I I I -I I L I I ~L I 1 I -x-


10 1 JLKA .-- --5 -- --- --


Register For
Spring Sports At

Park Saturday

Story, Page 9
I M







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005
.. h .. L ...


ATTENDEES at the recent Annual Farm Tour agency manager. Back, L-R: Dan Buchanan,
include, from left, front row: Zella Scott, district fieldman and Lewis Scott.
Dorothy Lewis, Brenda Pitts, Freddy Pitts,



County Residents Take Part


in Annual Farm Tour


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Several Farm Bureau members
from the Jefferson County Farm Bu-
reau recently traveled to Charleston,
SC on an Annual Farm Tour, join-
ing farmers from five other counties.
Zella and Lewis Scott, and Doro-
thy Lewis represented Jefferson
County.


The group visited the South's
largest collard greens, and other
wintergreens, farm, as well as a pre-
mier purebred Angus Cattle Ranch.
Both of these operations are near
Ridge Spring, SC.
The Angus farm annually holds
two purebred bull sales each year,
selling more than 130 animals at
each sale.
Also on .the tour Was a visit to the
USDA/Clemson University vegeta-


NFCCQ BOARD met recently at Green Industries. Pictured,
L-R: School Board Member Ed Vollertsen, NFCC Presidernt
Morris G. Steen, Jr., Board Chair John Maultsby, School
Board Vice-Chair Fred Shofner.


NFCC Awards $530,000

TO Locals In 10 Years


North Florida Community College
President Morris G. Steen, Jr. an-
nounced recently, that since 1994,
NFCC has awarded $530,000 to stu-
dents from Jefferson County.
Steen reported that the college
has provided $334,835 in financial
aid and scholarships, and $196,654
in tuition waivers to county
students.
In his report, Steen said that 200
Jefferson County residents have at-
tended NFCC, thanks in part to as-
sistance form the college during the
last 10 years.
This year, 52 students have been
awarded more than $84,000.
For dually enrolled students from
Jefferson County High. School, and
Aucilla Christian Academy, the col-


Rotary Golf
Tourney

Set Monday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Annual Rotary Sandbaggers
Golf Tournament will be held
Monday at the Country Club and
some slots are still available.
Spokesman James Muchovej said
play will be the usual format, with
teams of four players. Golfers will
tee off at 1 p.m.
The cost is $50 per person and in-
cludes the round of golf, door
prizes and a rib eye steak dinner.
Trophies will.be awarded for low
gross, low net and worst score.
Last year's event saw some 12
teams competing in the tournament,
Muchovej said they can accommo-
date up to 15 teams.

"We're always looking for a big-
Sger and better turnout than we had
before," said Muchovej.
For further information or to reg-
'ister, call Muchovej at 997-6508.


lege ,has covered tuition and fees
amounting to $195,554, since 1994.
Dual enrollment allows academi-
cally qualified students from area
high schools to attend college
classes for credit.'
School Board Members Fred
Shofner and Edward Vollertsen
were guests at the meeting held at
Green Industries Institute inMonti-
cello.
Steen said: "The mission of North
Florida Community College is to
make college accessible for as many
students as possible. Based on this
report, we are doing everything in
our power to fulfill our mission."


ble research station, located just
south of Charleston, SC. The group
had the opportunity to see and hear
about Sweet Potato research, as this
Research facility does the majority
of their work in this area.
Also while in Charleston, the
group had the chance to visit Pa-
triot's Point, where the aircraft car-
rier, Yorktown, is on display.
The last stop on the Annual Farm
Tour was a huge peach operation
consisting of nearly 3,000 acres.
This farm is owned by Lori Ann and
Chalmers Carr, who in the early
90's grew peaches in Madison
County, before they moved back to
their home state of South Carolina.
At this farm, the President of the
South Carolina Farm Bureau Fed-
eration, 'David Winkles officially
welcomed the tour group from Flor-
ida to South Carolina.
A total of 42 folks went on the
tour this year, and according to Dan
Buchanan, Farm Bureau Fieldman,
who arranged it, this year's tour was
perhaps the best ever held.
"Our group got the chance to see
some of the best cattle being grown
in the coullntrl, oda,. At: last jear'"
bull sale, the average price for ilhe
Angus bulls we saw was early
$3,000 each.
Also, the peach farm's dedication
to food safety at the farm, is unpar-
alleled in our nation. Everything
they do at the farm and packing
house revolves around food safety,
and that is what the American Con-
sumer demands from our farmers in
today's market.
Farm Bureau is known all over the
state as the "Voice of Agriculture,"
and we will always remain with that
tag," Buchanan said.


United Way Pledges

Still TO Come In


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson County United Way has
raised more than $15,122.00, to-
wards its goal of $25,000, with
pledges still coming in.
The deadline date was Feb. 28 for
this year's campaign but, donations
are always accepted for the United
Way.
Capital City Bank had 100 percent
employee participation this year.
And, last year Winn Dixie matched
employee donations of $1,136.00,
;but these have not come in as yet.
Others still not accounted for in-
clude the Sheriffs Department, the
School Teachers Union, and Em-
ployees for the State of Florida.
Nan Baughman, last year's chair-
man for the county remarks, "These
organizations are certainly "Serving


UNITED WAY CAMPAIGN has
a ways to go to reach the
$25,000 goal, but some ma-
jor contributions are still out-
standing. (News Photo)









Call 1-800-741-4DER
for the location nearsf you. ,






"

CALL DR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

385-6047
Gol--nn-tnl mpfiyes hl- --tr u e u o Gi tO Gr,,-rul Iniuo-t- to
G Ol0 Indmn lyl o Ulla suo ly t l o 0 to couio ri( ounly Mluol Int [ Co
G[NIU h'alllnr ton, Ou I d( t 0 l t, 0 atirI


Jefferson in a United Way in help-
ing to meet this year's goal of
$25,000.00."
This year's Chairman Jana Grubbs
says of Baughman, "She has been
busy with the follow-ups for the
pledges, by contacting the contribu-
tors and collecting the funds. She
has been working herself tired with
her tremendous help and dedication
to this county and to the United
Way."


The Jefferson County
Utility Coordinating
Committee will meet
at 9:00 a.m.
March 9, 2005,
at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North Mulberry
Street


Big Bend Eubanks Termite

& Pest Control, Inc.

"Let us undertake your pest controlproblems."
"L Complete Commercial
& Residential Service


Famil ownd0an
-inceI1954
Samy AGra, -ne
Sea GryMange


L Protecting homes in Jefferson
County for more than 50 years.





NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING


THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES A
WORKSHOP TO WHICH THE PUBLIC IS
INVITED


March 10, 2005
6:00 P.M.
Desmond M. Bishop Administration Building


SUBJECT:


1. Lease Agreement JCSB & Jefferson
County Board of County Commisioners
2. Policies
3. Salary Study
4. Other School Related Matters (If any)


April 15th may be

months away but


we're real close.



Our staff can help. Our Monticello office is open
'and eager to provide tax and accounting services.
Walk-ins Welcomed. Appointments Helpful.
850-997-3082 925 W. Washington Ave.






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SKEET JOYNER, County Commission Chair, was among the
walkers during the Step Up Florida Relay.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS,

r-.- .

/ -M ;.'I


.'i' "i .'

JCHS JROTC cadets carried this banner signed to emphasize the need for improving
JCHS JROTC cadets carried this banner the health of county residents.
during the recent Step Up Florida Relay de-

PO Sells Phone Cards


FRI., MARCH 4, 2005 PAGE 3
U


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CSM DWIGHT MACK leads the JROTC Color
Guard during the Step Up Florida Relay.


Mack is the drill instructor for the JCHS
JROTC cadets.


For Service Personnel


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
County Post Offices are joining
others in North Florida and partici-
pating in the "Phone Card For
Servicemen and Women Program."
Post Offices are stocked with the
cards and when customers enter,
employees urge them to purchase
the $10 cards to be sent to the
troops presently fighting in Iraq
and Afghanistan.
"We activate the cards and keep
them, then they are collected once a
week and sent to headquarters for
distribution," said Wacissa Post-
master Harvey Sheffield. "They
are distributed through all of the
military agencies."
He added that the program is go-
ing very well, with many willing to
contribute.
Monticello Postmaster Rodney
Boland added Monday, that the
Monticello card stock was begin-
ning to run low and he would reor-
der before the end of the day.
"People seem to wantto contrib-
ute," said Sheffield. "Everybody
wants to do something to show
support for the troops and this is an
inexpensive way to show support.
"This is a really good cause. It is
not a political issue, but a humani-
tarian one," Sheffield stated.


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DURING the
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Step Up Florida Relay, Mal-
and John Sneed, center left,
Donna Dickens and Phil Yon,


or Florida Association of People with Dis-
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bythI.S. Evionena


DISPLAYING the Step Up Florida Relay ban-
ner for the Jefferson Elementary School
Boys and Girls Club are L-R: Samiria


Martin, Christina Shiver and Amy Myers.
(News Photos)


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Help Kids Become


Better Readers


With all the electronic forms of
entertainment available today, chil-
dren are increasingly turning to the,
television, Internet and computer
and video games rather than picking
up a book.
Therefore, it is crucial that parents,
regularly create opportunities to
read together with their children and
encourage the practice they need.
"Building strong reading skills is
one of the most important things
parents can do for their children,"
says Richard E. Bavaria, Ph.D., vice
president of education for Sylvan
Learning Center. "Parents can foster
an interest in reading by spending
time reading with their children and
demonstrating that they enjoy read-
ing as well."
To help ensure that children are
reading well and reading often, the
experts at Sylvan bffer the following
advice:
:* Make reading first. Making time
for reading each day will help pro-
mote children's reading growth. By
emphasizing the habit of reading at
home, parents communicate to their
children that reading is a top
priority.
Let children explore. Encourage


children to read anything comics,
movie reviews, even cereal boxes!
Make it easy to read. Make sure
there are plenty of reading materials
available for children in every room
of the house. Make frequent trips to
the library so children always have
books on hand.
Use reading strategies. Use
strategies to help children identify
words they do not recognize. Ask
questions such. as whether it looks
like other words they know, if they
can recognize another word in the
longer word, or can they use the
words around it to figure it out.
Choose read-aloud books within
their reading level. If children have
trouble with more than five words
on a page, the book may be above
their independent reading level.
To help encourage children in
grades K-8 to read more often, for
longer periods of time and with
greater .,. understanding. S;:Sl.anr
Learning Center created Book Ad-
venture, a free online interactive
reading motivation program.
Parents can help children log on at
www.bookadventure.org, choose a
book, take a short quiz and redeem
points for prizes. (NAPS)


College Financing


Needs Planning


There was a time when the cost of
-)jllege could be added to the
monthly family budget. No longer.
Toda,. the costs of college require
early planning as an unsteady econ-
omy and the costs associated with
higher-level education create tre-
mendous financial pressure for par-
ents. .
Know, ing what to expect can alle-
viate some of the pressure by allow-
ing you to implement strategies that
make a real difference.
One of the factors driving the need
for planning is cost.
Tuition increases in higher educa-:
tion have skyrocketed past the aver-
age annual increase of the average
family's income.
According to The College Board's
2004 annual study on tuition and
student aid trends, the average in-
crease at a four-year public school
in fall 2004 was 10.5 percent.
Since.1994-95, average tuition and
fees have risen 51 percent at four-
year public colleges and
universities, and 36 percent at pri-
vate colleges.
There are many organizations that
assist families in financing a college
education For example, Monster.
pro\ ides a financial aid education
program called Making College Fi-
nancing Count. To find out more,
visit www.makingitcount.con/semi-
nar.
J.R. Cifani, general manager of
Making College Financing Count,
suggests college-bound families
learn all they can about the financial
-aid process.
SHe also suggests meeting with the
student's financial aid administrator
to establish a relationship. Be sure to
inform these aid administrators
about atypical expenses, because
certain allowances may be made.
One of the most important steps in
the finance process is to start with


the federal government, then turn to
the private sector for additional as-
sistafice.
Even if you don't think you or
\our child qualifies for aid, submit a
Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA). Being rejected for
federal aid is sometimes a prerequi-
site for private awards.
SBe sure to check out scholarship
search engines such as Fast Web
(www.fastweb.com) for help finding
private sector assistance.
And remember, early payment
does have its benefits. Some col-
leges and universities offer up to a
10 percent discount for early pay-
ment.
Financing a college education can
be intimidating. Take a deep breath,
develop a plan and stick to it.
In\ estimate all the financial aid op-
tions a ailable to you and take ad-
vantage of them.
This is an important time a col-
lege education,is a vital stepping-
stone to a rewarding career and a
fulfilling life. (NAPS)


LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR

The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
-All letters must be signed
and include a phone number.







500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345


From Our Photo File


V
0 0 '. h


MATT HENDERSON, left, and Tia Saffo,
were the top JES Grade Four Graduates in
May, 1988. They are flanked by Asst. Prin-


cipal Mary Newell and Principal Bill McRae.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


SShort Takes & Other Notions
h


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

A family oriented park at the head,
of the Wacissa River, which is the
goal of the County Commission,
would boost tourism here. Kudos to
all who worked with the Suwannee
River Water Management District to
affect the purchase of the property.
Kiplinger reports Medicare is in
bad shape r lh huge deficits ahead
and the trust fund likely to go broke
in less than 15 years. In 2007, Presi-
dent Bush will be required by law to
develop a plan to stop the hemor-
rhaging.
There will be a major struggle be-
tween governors and the Admin-
istration. States can't pick up the
difference after federal cuts so over
cuts in Medicaid basic health care
for the poor will be affected.
For years, Americans have been
warned about the harmful effects
cigarette smoking can ha e on the
body. Smoking is responsible for


one in three cancer-related deaths.
Smoking also increases risk of Age
related Macular Degeneration.
Americans use more than 500 bil-
lion matches per year to light any-
thing from birthday candles, to
campfires... Forty percent of 10 to
14 year olds own a wireless Phone..
Average number of minutes sub-
scribers use their cell phones each
month is 700
Many of the products that help
protect our troops are produced by
more than 45,000 people with se-
vere disabilities working through the
Javits-Wagner-O'Day Program. It is
the largest single source of employ-
ment for people ith disabilities
providing them with job skills and
training necessary to earn equitable
wages, benefits and greater index.
pendence.
Doctors are no' able to transplant
26 different human organs and ti-
sues... Argentina has 2.5 times as
many cattle as people.
Friday Dance for Life to benefit


Relay for Life sponsored by Kelly
and Kelly Properties was a smash
raising some $2000 for the fight
against cancer.
With the county vacating down-
town buildings, there is an opportu-
nity for expanded retail
activity...Rotarians are selling hot
dogs and cokes at the Builder's Mart
on Saturday to raise money for Re-
lay for Life, Bill Beaty is spearhead-
ing the project.- .; -i ?'
' Luther Davis very complimentary
on renovations at the Monticello
News office...Saw Chet'Cox at the
Post Office who said he was fine but
"getting old."
It's estimated that a third of all ad-
dresses change annually. That can
make it difficult for people to be
sure they have updated contact in-
formation for loved ones, especially
around .holidays.
How effective are booster seats?
Studies show that young children
prematurely moved to safety belts
are four times more likely to suffer


serious head injuries in a crash than;
are children in child safety or
booster seats.
A recent survey showed that fami-
lies are placing more emphasis on
dining together. The study found al-
most 80 percent of families believe,
dining together helps them keep up
with each other's lives.
Former Monticello police officer
and Florida Supreme Court officer
Sam Madison enjoying retirement.
He 'penids tiihe in Miami with his
son,N'Miarii Dolphin star Sam Madi-
son, Jr.
Last year, the Army National
Guard celebrated 368 years of dedi-
cated service. Units across the coun-
try participated in ceremonies wel-
coming new members and honoring
the. 350,000 men and women who
serve in the Guard.
A new study from Pennsylvania
State University shows that just one
serving of peanuts or peanut butter al
day can help children and adults'
meet requirements for nutrients of-'
ten lacking in American diets.


iguanas Spread In South Fla.
^ ^ -- "' '. ". :" \


BY CHUCK WOODS
Uni ersity of Florida

Brought into Florida as pets, igua-
nas are a good example of how ex-
otic animals can become a nuisance
on the: state, says a University of
Florida pest management specialist
Pet iguanas that have escaped or
been released are now well estab-
lished throughout South Florida and
can be found as far north as the
Tampa Bay area, said Bill Kern, an
assistant professor of entomology
with UF's Institute of Food.and Ag-
ricultural Sciences.
"Florida's subtropical climate al-
lows these large herbivorous (plant-
eating) lizards to survive, reproduce
and become a permanent part of the
environment," he said. "As a result,-
tens of thousands of iguanas are
multiplying in South Florida."
Three large members of the iguana


spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura pec-
tmata) and the black spiny-tailed
iguana iCtenosaura similis).
"Adult iguanas are large, powerful
animals that can bite, cause severe
scratch wounds with their extremely
sharp claws and deliver a painful
slap with their tail," Kern said.
'These reptiles usually avoid
people, but will defend themselves
against people and pets who try to
catch or corer them."
SWild adult iguanas, which can be
dangerous, never tame sufficiently
and rarely make acceptable pets, he
said.-
Damage caused by iguanas in-
cludes eating valuable landscape
plants, shrubs and trees as well as
orchids and many other flowers.
Iguanas do not eat citrus, but they
like door yard fruit such as berries,
figs, mangoes, tomatoes, bananas
and lychees, Kern said.
Mike Maunder, director of


family are common the green pairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
iguana (Iguana iguana), the Mexican in Coral Gables, said hundreds of


iguanas in its garden are a major
problem because they feed on im-
portant plant collections.
"Iguanas will climb trees to feed,
and young specimen trees have been
badly damaged and in some cases
killed," he said. "Our historic hibis-
cus garden was grazed to the ground
and has been moved to possibly a
safer location. The impact of these
herbivorous animals in a botanic
garden cannot be sustained five
large iguanas eat, as much as one
sheep!"
Maunder said their plant collection
will be subject to continual damage
from iguanas until an effective and
humane management system can be
initiated.
Iguanas also dig burrows that un-
dermine foundations and sidewalks,
Kern said. Iguana burrows next to
seawalls cause erosion and eventual
collapse of the walls. Droppings
from iguanas litter areas and may be
a source of salmonella bacteria,
which causes food poisoning.


Learn Art Of Negotiatio


BY KATHIE DICKENSON
Radford (va.) University

Although in many cultures
financial bargaining is as common
as a trip to the city market, in
America even those who will
bargain for a car or a house are
generally uncomfortable with the
idea of negotiating their salaries.
says management professor Dale
Henderson of Radford University.


Yet those who get the best car deals,
house deals and salary deals are
those who are willing to take action
,at the bargaining table.
"Other people have what we
want," says Henderson, "and
.negotiating is the best way to "get
it."
Henderson teaches his students
skills they need to be good negotia-
tors. Sometimes it makes a
thousand-dollar difference in gradu-


ate's starting salary; sometimes it
makes a difference of thousands of
dollars. Henderson offers the rest of
us these fundamentals of salary ne-
gotiation.
When interviewing for a job, don't
mention salary. Instead, focus on
selling yourself and let the prospec-
tive employer bring it up. Once she
has committed to a figure, you can
position yourself to get what you
want.


Alligators, dogs, raccoons and
birds of prey are probably the only
natural enemies of iguanas in the
suburban environments of South
Florida. Automobiles and people are
the main cause of mortality of adult
iguanas, he said.
In tropical America, large preda-
tors such as ocelots, pumas, jaguars,
anacondas and boa constrictors eat
iguanas. Iguana meat is considered a
delicacy by people in Central and
South America.
Kern said it is illegal to release
any exotic animal in Florida, includ-
ing iguanas. Because they are not
native to Florida, they are not pro-
tected in the state except by anti-
cruelty laws.
Green iguanas are listed by the
Convention on International Trade
in Endangered Species because of
their economic importance and
over-harvest for the pet trade. It
Florida, all captured iguanas must
(See Iguanas Page 5)





n
Never say yes to the first offer.
This is not the same as saying no,
says Henderson. You might instead
say, "That's not quite what I had in
mind."
Always ask for more than you ex-
pect to get. This creates a climate in
which the other person can have a
win. Part of the reason for going
through the negotiation process is so
(See Art of Negotiation Page 5)


I i


., is I I L- I


I~lslC T-~P~































WHILE JES Boys, Girls Club members enjoy time outdoors,
Club leaders pose for this photo. From left, Gerrold
Austin, director; Shirley Washington, education leader;


Muteteli Mobley, recreation leader; and Eric Reddick, par-
ent liaison.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005 PAGE 5

AFFORDABLE DENTURES



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Monticello News Classified


Learn Art Of Negotiation welcome Booth
Volunteers


(Continued From Page 4)
that both parties can feel they've
won.
STo know how much more to ask
Efor, do some research before the in-,
terview to find out what people in
similar positions in other companies
.are making. Web sites of profes-
sional organizations are good re-
sources, or you could call the human
resources offices of several compa-
nies, tell them what you're trying to
find out and ask for a range.
Before the interview, decide on a
"bracket" the lowest figure you'll
.accept (your \ alk away number)
and the highest you think you can
ask for (you wish number).


Iguanas

(Continued From Page 4)
be kept in captivity as pets or cap-
ti:re breeding stock, or must be de-
stroyed. They cannot be released
into the wild, he said....
Iguanas. which are con~'ered ex-
otic unprotected --ildllfe. can,ibe
captured and removed by property
owners from their own property at
any time without special sate or fed-
eral permits, Kern said. Some coun-
ties or municipalities may have
passed statutes that protect these in-
vasive exotics.


Usually a prospective employer is
under as much time pressure to hire
someone as you are to get a job.
You can use this in your favor..If
you're a good candidate for the job,
it's in the employer's best interest to
strike a bargain
Creating a perception that you
have options other interviews or
offers gives you more power, but
beware that if you use this tactic you
must be willing to leave if the em-
ployer doesn't budge.
Understand that in some organ iza-
tions, such as non profits and educa-
tional institutions, there are tighter.
limits on what the prospective em-
ployer can offer.


Help Florida's
marine animals
;,,;, survive! ,,
Keep litter out of our water-
ways. Recycle plastics and
fishing line. Boat safely.

myfwc.org/psm


Needed Here


W*S'atW


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer ... '
In preparation for the upcoming
Bike Weekend, volunteers are
sought to man welcome booths.
City Clerk Emily Anderson said
that approximately eight people are
needed to volunteer to welcome the
approximately 1,000 bicyclists,
give them area information packets
and ei\e them directions.
She added that the volunteerss
would be needed for appro\imnatel,
two hour shifts each.
Volunteers are needed Friday,,-
March 18 from 5-8 p.m. and Saturn,
day, March 19, from 8 a.m.. until 5:
p.m..
To volunteer, contact Anderson
at 342-0153.

Monticello News,
'You Can't Be Without It'
in State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00





SGet Your Annual
Subscription Today!


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & Jills tes
3 to 5 yr. olds Pites


4:15-5:OOPM
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5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
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All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

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Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.


a-~a a a a a ab-O -a~-Ca a a a a-66-a a~~-a~-rrraoaaaa a aa aa a w7~arraaa a a a a a a~a a a p a a a a-aa a bT~`6

io ;NL' r ,(
lo
C"': .. ~
C U, 'C
C~5l k ~c
aC


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts


the following items for recycling:


S All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
2 laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans,
etc.
I Aluminum cans -soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes;
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.
o C n
; ..,-Allass oittL es, jar, :etc. _i.ier; 'browni&.green) .

- Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located a~
- 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
Collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfiii
Sand saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


SAdditional items accepted at the collection sites:
> Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

I Batteries
. *White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

: Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
o clearly marked to identify contents)

1 **The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

, Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the

0
~ collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


o The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
E for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
, information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
0 Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
Shttp://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
Operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
6 Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.



': ,J Visit the www.Ear0t9 i ,.org Recycling Information web page
So a~ ~-6a rea a- o a-ro 0 ao ao -o a 6 aaaa-6 a- o oo0o r- o-rn-- a o-bTo Oa-eC ao o pc an mnp ar '


Group Fitness Schedule


Lijamie-'s Body Works.~YI


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.t~ i
F~--~-:.~:

;~;~,i;"~"~::. :f .6-f~~
.r~~L~cE~ll












,' PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI. MARCH 4. 2005


Lifestyle


'N


Girl Scout Cookie Sale


Ongoing Through March 6


.. -- I

$Fr Ca nc
.t' .iil




A .
S, _






IRENE WATSON, left, has sold more than 100 boxes of Girl
Scout Cookies at Sorensen Tire Center. Here Lonnie Jen-
nings buys a box of his favorite Tag A Long Cookies. (News
Photo)

Dance For Life Raises

$2,225 For Cancer


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The "Dance For Life" to benefit
the American .Cancer Society, held
.at the Opera House, Friday, was
well attended and a big success.
The Relay For Life fundraising
event was hosted by Coldwell
Banker Kelly and Kelly Properties.
Kelly and Kelly Properties thank
all who attended and supported the
event.
The fundraising event, and re-
Slated donations, generated a $2,225
contribution to the Cancer Society's


Relay for Life.
The Coldwell Banker team will
give $1000.00 of the total, as a team,
event, and $1250.00 as a corporate
sponsorship.
Thanks to \ rirglia and Frank
Blow at Radio Shack, and to Cristi'
Beshears and Simpson Nursery for
their donation of door prizes. Also
to LaConcha Cafe for all the Cuban
sandwiches and to everyone that
helped with food.
.The band 19 South kept couples
on the dance floor all night long.
Thanks to community support,
plans are being made to make the
"Dance For Life" an annual event.


SCommunity Coalition

|To Meet March 11'

;' .'' -' of the last meeting; Agencies will be
SDEBBIE SNAPP given ample time to share their
SStaff Writer news; and a Substance Abuse Fo-
i rum will conclude the meeting.
The Jefferson County Community Community agencies working to-
Coalition will meet from gether for the good of Jefferson
9:30-1la.m, Friday, March 11 at County, s e purpose of the JCCC.
the library on North Cherry Street. These; monthly meetings allow for
Guest Speaker will be Stephanie local agencies to reach out to serve
IShepherd with Tallahassee Coalition each other and the residents of the
for the Homeless. county and community.
The agenda will also include a For information about this upcom-
welcome to those in attendance, and ing meeting or to, schedule a speak-
the opportunity for introductions, ing engagement contact Donna
The group will review the minutes Hagan at 948-2741.


Camellia Circle Ladies

Complete Bat Houses


',The houses built by the' Garden
Circle members are 24 x 14 inch,
using / inch plywood, \% ith a di-
vider of /4 inch plywood. The
houses weigh about 20 pounds when
completed.
The bat houses are designed to in-
crease use by nursery colonies and
to 'accommodate larger colonies.
Bats are known to feast on mosqui-
tos, one of the purposes the ladies
built them.


Church News

Springfield AME Church will dis-
tribute free dinners to the elderly in
the community noon Sarurda.. until
they are all gone.
***
Greater Fellowship MB Church
celebrates its Missionary Anniver-
sary 3 p.m., Sunday. Speaker is
Evangelist T\y anda Morris of
Tallahassee.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Slaff % riter

Camellia Garden Circle members
completed their bat houses recently
and,are ready to have them mounted
high off the ground, ready for the
bats to move in.
The group has been congregating
at the home of Bobbie Golden to
make the houses, as she has the per-
fect space for the ladies to work to-
gether.
The houses they chose to build are
cost efficient in design and the con-
struction is simplified by the use of
two-by-fours and two-by-six lumber
and exterior plywood.
To help young bats secure a firm
footing, a problem. in many nursery
boxes, the roosting partitions are
covered with fiberglass, insect
screening, fit into the grooved ceil-
ing and sides, enabling tighter seals
and therefore maintaining a more
constant temperature.
The houses were carefully caulked
and painted on all exterior surfaces
with two coats of white paint.


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DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The ongoing annual Girl Scout
Cookie Sale continues through
March 6.
Sales booths have been set up
around town, including: Winn
Dixie, CUS. and Sorensen Tire Cen-
ter, making it possible for
cookie lovers to purchase their fa-
vorite variety.
In 2004, some 28 girls in the
Council sold more than 1,000 boxes
of cookies each.
This ranked the Girl Scout Coun-
cil of the Apalachee Bend number
five in the nation for average num-
ber of boxes sold per girl and num-
ber one in the state of Florida.
The Council recognizes these

; v*zn "..' +,' i


^.'.


FOUNTAIN


achievers by holding Diva Day each
year. Last year, the honorees were
rewarded for their hard work and
were treated to a day of pampering
and luxury.
The girls were driven by limou-
sine to receive haircuts, manicures
and pedicures, facials, for an arts
and crafts activity and a stop at Fun
Station.
This year's honorees will be
treated to a day at Wild Adventures
Theme Park, in Valdosta, GA.
For more than 60 years, the Girl
Scout Cookie Sale has been part of
American life. The purpose of the
Cookie Sale is twofold: to help girls
develop a wide range of skills, lead-
ership, entree preneurship, money
management, decision making,
planning, goal setting, team work,
responsibility, self reliance, honesty


Dollie Fountain

Celebrates

89th Birthday

Dollie Fountain, of Monticello,
celebrated her 89th birthday, Feb.
27, at the home of her granddaugh-
ter Toria, and Michael Tate.

Fountain lived in Monticello most
of her life and raised her family
here.
Celebrating her birthday with her
were family and friends, including
here.three sons Robert III, Terry and
Jack Warren Fountain.


Circle Plans TO Press Flowers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


c
''p


: The Camelli. jGarden Circle, will ,
,meet at the home of.Master Gar-
dener Lynn McGrady 2 p.m. on
Sunday.

Member Becky Bermundz will
present a. program on Pressing
Flowers. Last month members were ,
taught the technique of Pounding
Flowers.

President Isabelle deSercey will
hold a brief meeting, to.update the
membership on Garden Club busi-
.ness. She reminds members that in
,order for members to be included in
the Garden Club Directory, dues
'will need to be paid at this nmeeing


There is also a trip planned for the
ircle later this month, to Toby's
arm in Quitman, GA.
i n .


CHILDCARE
FUNDRAISING

Director needed by
National Co.
for local area to help run
money
making programs.
Work with directors,
owners, PTA's, schools.
1st yr 46k avg 813-788-1595


MAIN STREET

SATURDAY MARKET


Come One, Come All!

Free for first timers, $5 after that.


Garage Sale, Baked Goods, Produce,
Gift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
'thing You Have To Sell, Including
Fainting Goats!
Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
Fund raisers mdre than welcomes


Call Tammie Peck @ 997-6455


4AA. a4_lJAkwLC


- "5 -


M ODFL! M _ri.
Tr.- L'" ,. Fur. ..
Ib. Oreck B rvr. reeu, Ae .ll.:u n, Buf_%S
Upright T'-rsi ookrgrgPq Pi G
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and integrity and continuing to be
good to others.
Secondly, there purpose is to gen-
erate income for Girl Scout Troops,
Councils, and the Girl Scouts of the
USA. These funds are used solely to
help underwrite Girl Scout programs
in the United States.
The 1920's are most often cited as
the earliest years for home baked
Girl Scout cookies sales to the pub-
lic. However, it wasn't until 1936
that the first nationally franchised
Girl Scout Cookie Sale was held,
and it continues to grow in popular-
ity.

IN MEMORY
Grandma Della, Grandma Leola
It's been years since you ascended
into heaven to be with the Lord.
We have to understand when a
loved one passes away, it's the
Lord's will and purpose.
You only have one mother and
that's why it's so important to show
her each and every day how much
you truly love her.

Spend time with your mother
every chance you get. I've met a lot
of women and men in my life, but
nothing, I mean nothing, in the
world compares to motherly love.
If you have a mother, please treat
her with respect, because one day
she will be gone.
Flowers you wish to give her, and
the love you have for her, do it now
so she can enjoy it while still alive.
To the kids, men, women who
have a mother, do one thing for me:
Hug your mother and tell her you
love her.

For those that don't have a mother,
always know that every time you
read this out loud, she will be smil-
ing with joy.

y 'Love 'youd othere. Al'..iaj stay
sweet and I'll see you soon.
Terry "Bigworm" Brown


School Menus
Monday
Pizza, Whole Kernel Corn, Fruit, Peanut
Butter Bar, Milk

Tuesday
Turkey and Cheese Sub, Lettuce &
Tomato, Potato Wedges, Fruit
Choices, Milk

Wednesday
Oven Fried Chicken, Rice, Califor-
nia Blend, Diced Peaches, Rolls
Milk

Thursday
Corn Dog, Baked Beans, Cole Slaw,
Juice, Cookie, Milk

Friday
Manager's Choice


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Endovascular Technologies Corp., pled guilty to nine felony
felonies and agreed to pay more than $92 million in penalties
for not disclosing that its Ancure Endograft Stent System had
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surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm after 1999,
please contact us.
Hollis Law Firm, P.A. 1-800-701-3672
Attorney Lee Hollis practices only in KS, MO, NE, IA & MN and may associate with lawyers in other sales:
however, Florida citizens not represented or advised.






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rations.
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Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Trust in the
Lord with all
your heart and
lean not on
your own
understanding.
Proverbs:3k5 t'
Come and hear..:
Wayne Warren, Minister


"Don't lust Vacuum.


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Ir







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005 PAGE 7


NEWLY INDUCTED members of the Lloyd
Lions Club, at a recent dinner, include: L-R:
Debbie Snapp, Jerry Andrews, Toni


KAREN HALPIN Al




Circle Plan

Tallahasse

SDEBBIE SNAPPY ,,,-
StaffWriter- ---. ;


During the February meeting of
the Mignonette Garden Circle,
President Jan Wadsworth presented
club updates pnor to the program
for the da).
Among these, the Monticello Gar-
den Club is requesting nominations
for president and 1st vice president.
Anyone wanting to 'step up to the
plate' can contact her at 997-4440.
The members met at the home of
Barbara 'Culbreath. \\ here Brett
Winchester and Edye Corley of
Monticello Florist and Gifts, pre-
senting a program on the art of cor-
sage making.
Hostesses were FrancesBarrett and
Shirley Widd, assisting Culbreath

Homes Of

ETOY "NAN" ARNOLD
SFtoy "Nan" Arnold, 64 a Retired
machine operator died Saturday,
February 26, 2005 in Tallahassee,
Florida.
The service is at 1:00 p.m. EST on
Saturday, March 5, 2005, at Shiloh
MB Church, Greenville, Florida
with burial at NeI Zion Cemetery
in Greenville, Florida.
Viewing will be from 2:00 to 7:30
p.m. EST Friday, March 4, 2005 at
Tillman Funeral Home.
She was a Native of Greenville.


ND JOSHUA BULLOCK




s Trip To

e Nursery


with the luncheon meal of Chicken
,Tetrazinni, peas -.and lima. beans,
sided with,. a ,fresh green :garden
salad and followed by Strawberry
pie for dessert.

Member Mary McLeod is doing
quite well in her new location at the
\\oodmont Retirement Community
in Tallahjs.ee. She is sentling in
comfortably and passes on her best
regards to' her 'Circle' of friends.
Members and friends in the Mon-
ticello community joined with her in
celebrating her 90th birthday on
January 22nd.

The next meeting of the Circle is
scheduled for Wednesda,. Mar. 9.
The plan is to carpool for a visit to
the Tallahassee Nursery followed by
a meal at Manna's Restaurant.

Mourning

Mrs. Arnold was known for her
kindness. Before retiring, she was
employed as a machine operator at
Florida Plywood for 15 years. She
was a member of Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church in Greenville.
Survivors include her Mother, Re-
becca Noble Arnold; Three Daugh-
ters; Angie Thompkins and Shawnta
(Derek) Hopkins both of Greenville,
and Letha (Allen) Ganzy of Madi-
son; one Son, Patrick Hampton (Te-
(See Homes Page 12)


Custom Designed & Custom Built Log Home.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

'Mr. and Mrs. John L. Halpin and
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace 0. Bullock
announce the engagement of their
children Karen Marie Halpin'"and
Joshua Robert Scotland Bullock.
The bride-to-be's maternal giand-
parents are the late W.R. and Pau-
line Taylor. Her paternal
grandparents are the late John L.
and Ruby Halpin.
The groom-to be's maternal grand-
mother is the late Joyce Blobel arid
paternal grandparents are Bill and
Betty Bullock
Halpin is a graduate of Jefferson
County High School and will com-
plete her Associates in Arts Degree
at North Florida College in April.
She is employed at Morrow Insur-
ance of Monticello.
Bullock is also a graduate of Jef-
ferson County high School. He is
employed at Merrily Plantation.
A May 31st wedding is planned at
6:30 p.m. at Olive Baptist Church
with Pastor Harold Reams officiat-
ing.
The reception will follow at B&B'I
Faif= "
Local invitations will be sent and
all family and friends are cordially
invited to attend.


CONSTRUCTION
AHEAD


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Lloyd Lions Club held an Induc-
tion Ceremony at the Club, Friday
evening.
Bill Pace, Region Chairman for
District 35F, lead the Induction
Ceremony and spoke to those in at-
tendance about the responsibilities
of the Lion member and their place
in today's society.
Beginning with the Lions Motto:
We Serve, he continued with the In-
duction of the new members.
New members include: Angela
Henderson, Toni Jenkins-Flavier,


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

-.._- The First-Baptist- Church Youth
Group' .will 'holdM a! fundraisr for
Su-nim'ir (amnlp 11: airt. -, 2 p.mn
Saturday, March 12.
Enjoy a "Taste of Italy" at the
First Baptist Church Fellowship


With your help,
MDA is building a tomorrow
without neuromuscular diseases.


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Debbie Snapp, and Jerry Andrews.
New members were introduced to
the attendees by their sponsors. The
sponsors also gave the new mem-
bers a new members packet and a
Lions lapel pin.
Pace directed his speech, to en-
lighten new members and guests,
and as a reminder and refresher to
the seasoned members. He spoke
about the Lions, what they do,
where they serve, and how they
serve.
He mentioned that the entities
served by the Lions are: the Lions
International Foundation, Leader
Dogs for the Blind, Florida Lions
Foundation for the Blind, Florida


Hall in Monticello, either to eat in or
take out.
The Spaghetti dinner will be
served with a fresh garden jsald.
bread, a tasty dessert,';nd iced tea
.Tickets aie $5 .andmaybe pur-
chased by March 7 from any youth
group member or by calling the
church at 997-2349.


LLoyd Lions Hold

Induction Ceremony


Muscular Dystrophy
Association
1-800-572-1717


~'I
,1,
IKE k,~ i
1: Ui H
I I


Contact Numbers:
Office: 386-754-1132
Fax: 815-361-9196-
Cell: 386-697-4824


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening




1630 E. JACKSON ST.
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mail)


Lions Camp for Visually Impaired
Children, Florida Lions Conklin
Center for the Multi-handicapped
and Blind, Florida Lions Eye Banks,
Florida Lions Hearing Aid Banks,
District Disaster Fund, and South-
eastern Guide Dogs.
Pace awarded member Tammy
Simmons with a plaque of Appre-
ciation for her invaluable services
and cooperation she extends to the
Lions and especially to the Lloyd
Lions Club.









DIARY OF A MAD
BLACK WOMAN (PG13)
Fri. 5:00-7:25 9:55 Sat-Thurs.2:30-
5:00-7:25-9:55
NO PASSES

CURSED (PG13)
Fri.5:15-7:55-10:00 Sat.-Thurs. 2:25-
5:15-7:55-10:00
NO PASSES


HITCH (PG13)
Fri.4:45-7:30-9:55 Sat.-Thurs. 2:00 -
4:45-7:30-9:55


MAN OF THE HOUSE
(PG13)
Fri. 5:10 7:50 10:05 Sat.-Thurs.
2:20-5:10 7:50 10:05
NO PASSES


CONSTANTINE (R)
Fri 7:35-10:10 Sat.-Thurs.7:35-
10:10

BECAUSE OF WINN
DIXIE(PG)
Fri 4:55 Sat-Thurs 2:10-4:55

BE COOL (PG13)
Fri 4:50-7:45-10:10 Sat-Thurs
2:05-4:50-7:40-10:15
NO PASSES

PACIFIER (PG).,
SFi 5:05-j45-Q 50'Sat-Thurs
1 2:15-5105-7:45-9:50'
NO PASSES


Jenkins-Flavier, Bill Pace, regional chair,
Kevin Campbell, and Angela Henderson.

Karen Halpin

Will Marry

Josh Bullock


5'
I


1.
.5,
~4i


BILL PACE, Lions Club Region Chair for District 35F
awards Tammy Simmons an Appreciation Award for the
cooperation she extends to the club. (News Photo)

Supper Will Benefit Youth


O'Ll6


F.





PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005
...i ~m.b[ ... ...-u qJ [ a~i iii. i iJ J J i. J|..JI i Ja J ..l ...~iJi i J .. a a ai. i Ji Jh Ji Jl a . [ i.J -ii..' s~.- . .JiJh i-mi-.itJ iJ kJ IJ i m


Caring


For


Seniors


Big Bend Hospice Jefferson County
Volunteer Training
is being held on
MON., MARCH 7 and TUES., MARCH 8
frorn 9 AM 4 PM,
at the Jefferson County Library
located at
260 N. Cherry Street, Monticello
Interested persons who have a desire to volunteer in patient care,
companionship, clerical help or fundraising events are welcome to
attend.
To register, or for more information,
please call Marilyn
Big Bend at (850) 878-5310 ext. 274
os e or (850) 997-2827
Presently Big Bend Hospice has a severe shortage of volunteers in Jefferson
County and just a few hours a month can make a difference in someone's
life.


Instead of using
that ice pack,
get some real help
for your injury.
Physical therapy can play an important part
in healing whether you're recovering from an
injury or accident, you've had a stroke, or you
suffer from arthritis. Shands at Live Oak offers
the full range of physical therapy services to
help you get back into action.
/V


a
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110 SW 11" Str
386.362.1
shands.org


To make an appointment,
or for more information,
call us today and receive
a free tote bag.
eet
413 HANDS
at Live Oak


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i i E JL -i V' i f l -RE w H Ii -


Feel More

atHOME

At Woodmont Assisted Living
Community, you will find a community
of neighbors, that feel like familv.
Woodmnont is Tallahassee's established,
trusted assisted living community.
Come discover the advantages
of gracious living with services
when you need them.

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Providing Southern Hospitaility since 1986
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Bi II~ l /l i t p! mild I) degree ol hImeamiLe l u1 I4 I, e emI t IlImImIoll. iiji Ica I g03011mm i 11M :fIiI, mmd it, ','m mIR Ir lium e ll C /,1


We're pleased to serve the
people of Jefferson and Surrounding Counties
Lake Park of Madison is a modern 120 bed skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center
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Come see what makes us different. We wvelcome your visits.


Services We Provide:
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Sports


Lady Warrior JVs Profit


From Strength Training


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
junior varsity softball team has
played four games so far this
season, and remains undefeated.
Coach Frank Brown attributes
much of their strength gain, and
victories from the two year old
weight training and aerobic condi-
tioning program, initiated at the
school for the girls during the off
season.
"Typically, young female athletes
are lacking when it comes to power
and strength capabilities," said
Brown. "The structured program is
designed to help significantly im-














-'.






KYLE BARNWE--.- fields the,., bal frmtesorso oi


prove this area, and ultimately their gram and really profited from the
skills on the playing field. training.


Before the season began, the train-
ing was again offered to the seventh
and eighth grade girls during their
physical education (PE) period.
The goal of the program is to im-
prove the upper and lower body
strength of the girls, as well as their
aerobic conditioning, therefore in-
creasing endurance before the be-
ginning of the season, said Brown.
At the beginning of the school
year, the girls began the program
and according to Brown, they
worked hard, but after suffering
through some initial stiffness, they
began thoroughly enjoying the pro-


The program entailed three days
of lifting and weight training and
two days of calisthenics and
running.
As softball season grew nearer,
the girls worked two days a week
with the weight training and three
days a week on softball and when
Sthe season was upon them, they did
the weight training one day per
week and softball skills on the other
four days.
"This helps to prepare the girls for
the softball season and hopefully'the
training will stick with them
throughout their high school years,"
-he concluded.


."., *--*: ... : -.; .
S.. > 7. w .

JCHS JONATHAN DADY took
first place in the long jump
with 21 feet, 6 in.; second
place in high hurdles with a
time of 16:00 seconds, and
in the 200 meter with 23.01
seconds. He's shown here at
a practice session. (News
Photo)


ACA JVs Win Season

Opener Over Altha


V
-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Warrior JVs defeated Altha 13-9,
in the season opener last week.
Coach Daryl Adams said the
game was short one inning due to
nightfall.
The first three Warriors at bat
were walked to base, and on the
field they only had a couple of er-
rors.
Adams said the warriors were up.
13-4 when Altha started to come'
back strong. "It was a real good
game for the start of the season,",
he added.


Defensively, Stephen Dollar led
the batting, going two for three,
with two singles, one walk and one
RBI.
Casey Anderson went one for
three with two walks; Kyle Barn-
well went one for three with one
single and two RBI's; and A. J.
Connell and Daniel Greene each
had one RBI.
Bamwell pitched the first four in-
nings, striking our four batters and
giving up only two walks and three
hits.'
Anderson pitched the final in-
nings, giving up four walks and six'
hits.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tiger Boys report their %arslr
baseball schedule and roster.
"All game times are at 4 p.m. un-
less otherwise specified.
SAction begins against FAMU, 6
p.m., March 2, there; John, Paul,
March 4, here; Rickards. 5 p.m.,
March 11, there; Maclay, 3:30
p.m., March 15, there; and West
Gadsden, 5 p.m., March 17, there.
Carrabelle, 6 p.m., March 18,
there; Branford, March 28, here;
Maclay, March 29, here; West
Gadsden, March 31, here.
In April action: John Paul, April
1, there; North Florida, April 4,
here; Liberty County, 5 p.m., April


12, there; FAMU, April 14, here;
Carrabelle, April 19, here; and
Branford, 7 p.m., April 21, there.
District competition is scheduled
for two days at East Gadsden, dates
and times to be announced, and the
district playoff is scheduled 4 p.m.,
April 3,' location to be announced.
Playing for the Tigers this season
are Markyce Larry, Frederick
Mitchell, Jimmy Sloan, Dionte
Hightower, Clark Latson, Breon
Parker, Scott Goodin, and Jason
Kirkpatrick.
Also, Tim Crumitie, Demario Re-
vers, Quantez Burke, Scotty
Norton, Darnell Brooks, D'Vondre
Seabrooks, Malcolm Norton, James
Shiver and Alex Lingle.
The coach for the Tigers is Al-
freddie Hightower.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005 PAGE 9



JCHS Girls, Boys Place

In Lincoln Track Meet


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School
track team placed well in the mett
held recently at Lincoln High
School, despite the cold tempera-
tures during the meet.
Other schools competing in the
meet included: Godby, Rickards,
Lincoln and Leon, schools all much
larger than JCHS.
Coach Harry Jacobs said that be-
cause of the extreme cold, the Ti-
gers basically competed freelance,
competing only in events of their
choice.
Misty Mills took first place in

Register Saturd

Spring Sports A

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director Kevin
Aman reports that registration for
T-ball, Coach Pitch, Little' League
Baseball and girl's Softball takes


p
7
2(

8
1

y
b

al
A

S


Warriors Beat Echols

County 5-3, Tuesday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA varsity baseball team now
stands at a 2-0 season after beating
Echols County 5-3, Tuesday.
The Warriors scored three runs in
the first inning and two in the sec-
ond.
Ridgely Plaines pitched four in-
nings striking out nine, batters and
only giving up one unearned run.
Drew Sherrod pitched two in-
nings and had one save.


S(liris Tuten went two for four
and had two runs and one stolen
base; -Dustin Roberts had two RBI,
and. one- stolen base; and Matt
Bishop had two RBI.
Casey Gunnels and Plaines.each
had one stolen base; and Sherrod
had two stolen bases.
The game scheduled against
Ware County was rained out and
rescheduled for 4 p.m., April 11,
there.-
The Warriors are scheduled to
face Brooks County 4 p.m., March
10, there.


CHIDS .I.A yOA1E


WHERE YOU Bur.~T



14591 HMIY. 19 S.
AJ THOMABSVI1LE. GA
229-558-9016
P~P~IYERIPO ~ 11800-5891

~ ~i ~ --6,3


the high hurdles with a time of.
17.09 seconds, and Jonathan Dady:
mastered the boy's divisions taking:
first place in the long jump with 21
feet, six inches.
He also took second in the high -
hurdles with a time of 16:00 sec-:,
onds and second place in the 200:
meter with a time of 23:01 seconds. -
The team of Dady, J. R. Sloan, .
Darrell Young and Lucious Wade '
took fourth place in the 4 x 100'-
with a time of 44: 06 seconds; and
the team of Rashon Miller, Irene
Hamilton, Krystal Wilson and San-
tana Mitchell took fourth place in
the girl's 4 x 100 with a time of:
54:02 seconds.


ay For

t Park
For Little League Baseball, the
registration fee is $35.
A copy of the child's birth certifi-
cate must be presented at the time
of registration.
For further information, contact
Aman at 342-0240.


lace 9-11 a.m, Saturday.
T-ball is for children, ages 6 and Become an American Red
,who must turn 6 by Aug. 1, Cross Disaster Services
005. Volunteer
Coach Pitch is for children ages
and 9, who must be 8 before Aug. The Capital Area Chapter of the
,2005. American Red Cross is seeking to
Little League Baseball is for tran DisasterServices Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at i
outh ages 10-12, who must be 10 850/878-608( or visit our website
before Aug. 1, 2005. at www.tallytown.com/redcross.
Girl's Softball is for youngsters
ges 10-12, who must be 10 before 1 American
Wug. 1,2005. Red Cross
For T-ball, Coach Pitch, and girl's
oftball the registration fee is $30.


GULF COAST '\
METAL 5
ROOFING 3' GA,, ALME
3' WI)E PAINTED
Full line of 2' WIDEV ..V
S accessories in stock ,
S VE HA VF.AEMETAL .RBUt'ILI)/N(,'
Special Flashings Made All Types Warranted Metal Available -
Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.


KYLE.BARNWELL fields the ball from the shortstop posi-
tion during a recent practice session at ACA. (News Photo)


Tigers Post Roster


Baseball Schedule


What's New


With JIM?


Some how this

Ford F-150 Supercab

appeared on my lot.

It's Just Gotta

Go!








~k~Z--






12,986"
'S g;irig price plus sales lax. tag & 5148 dr h fee

Ro Campbell
Wei Just Do It!"
229-226-3901 206Moultrie Road
www.roycampbell.com Thomasville, GA
i usl t past 19onHHy 319Ni


h
,--I


I


.. :6-
#
.,F~
:r
I' h. .


~3F'







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 18, 2005

JCHS Reports Boys/Girls

Roster For Track Team


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School re-
ports its roster for the 2005
Boys/Girls track season.

Lady Tigers on the team include
Alexia Huggins, Angela Scurry,
Chandra Tuckers, Ceate Crumity,
Chelsea Hampton, Irene Hamilton,
K crystal Wilson, Misty Mills,
Quanesha Franklin, Santana
Mitchell, Shakelia Davis, Shanise
Brooks and Shannon Broxie.

Boy Tigers include Anthony


Brockman, Brandon Gilbert, Clar-
ence Fead, Darin Mills, Darnel
Bundrage, Darrell Young, Desrick
Jones, Dondre Tyson, Dramon Par-
rish, Freddie Scott and Frederick
Mitchell and Jamauri Parrish.

Also, Jon Snead, Jonathan
Counts, Jonathan Dady, Josh Sego,
J. D. Shiver, J. R. Sloan, Justin Ol-
iver, Keith Silcio, Kelvin Frazier,
Kelvin Salters, Lucious Wade,
Marcus Larry and Markyce Larry.

Also, Quantez Burke, Quinton
Harris, Rashon Miller, Robert
Nealy, Thomas Lyle and Tremaine
Parker.


LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE.: 05-46-CA FAMILY LAW
DIVISION NIKKI RANSOM
TRAMMELL, Petitioner, and JEFFERY
WAYNE TRAMMELL, Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE To
JEFFERY WAYNE TRAMMELL 550
Piney Woods Road, Monticello, Fl, 32344.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been field against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to Petitioner's Attorney,
C. Erica White, Esq., whose address is 290
West Washington Street, Monticello, Fl
32344, on or before March 7, 2005, and
file the original with the clerk of this
Court at the Jefferson County Court
House, before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so,
a default may be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition. Copies
of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at 'the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You


LEGAL NOTICE
may review these documents upon request.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and
information. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. Dated:02/15/05.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:
Jeri B. Pearson, Deputy clerk
2/18,25,3/4,11 pd
Pursuant to Ch. 373., F.S., the Northwest
Florida Water Management District gives
notice of receipt of an application
(4-2005-006 I), submitted by Fl Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Commission, 620 S.
Meridian Rd., Tallahassee, Fl 32399 to
install a concrete spillway at Lake
Miccosukee, located in S2/T2N/R3E,
Jefferson Co. For more information,
comments or objections, please write to
the Division of Resource Regulation,
NWFWMD, 152 Water Management Dr.,
Havana, Fl 32333. Any objections or
comments must be filed with the District
by 5:00 p.m., March 21,2005.
/4 dicg.


NOTICE
Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read
DIANETICS by Ron L. Hubbard Call
(813)872-0722.
3/4, fcan
Too Much Gas? Anti-flatulent tablets cure
gas from eating problem foods,
GUARANTEED, it's V' price of Beano,
FREE shipping, $6.95/100,(877)605-1745.
3/4. fcan
LEGAL NOTICE
DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children,
etc. Only one signature required!
Excludes govt. Fees! Call weekdays
(800) 462-2000, ex. 600. (8am-7pm) Di-
vorce Tech. Established 1977.
3/4, fcan
NEED AN ATTORNEY ARRESTED?
Criminal Defense *State *Federal
*Fellonies *Misdemenaners *DUI
*License Suspension *Parole *Probation
*Domestic Violence *Drugs "Protect Your
Rights" A-A-A Attorney Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A
WEEK.
3/4, fcan


NOTICE
GIGANTIC 3-DAY Auction. March
9,10,11, 2005. Montgomery, Al. Single,
Tandem & Tri-Axle Dumps (49 of which
are 2004-2005 year), Truck Tractors,
Lowboys, Crawler Loaders & Tractors,
Excavators, Motor Graders & Scrapers,
Backhoes, Rubber Tired Loaders,
Forklifts, Paving, Skidders, Feller
Bunchers, Log Loaders, Farm Tractors &
Cotton Pickers. J.M. Wood Auction Co.,
Inc. (334)264-3265. Bryan Wood Al
Lic#1137.
3/4 fcan
WILKINSON a manufacturer of Fashion
Bedding & Accessories WAREHOUSE
SALE FACTORY OVERRUNS AND
SECONDS DECORATOR PRINT
FABRICS COMFORTER
SETS-BEDSPREADS-WINDOW
COVERINGS-PILLOWS-DECORATOR
CHAIR PADS & PLACE MATS
Saturday, March 5th DOORS OPEN 8
AM 12 NOON 1701 WEST GORDON
STREET VALDOSTA, GA. CALL FOR
DIRECTIONS 800-633-2215
3/2,4,


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


I-


/ c / u c uI /iid al iuer,
Interior ~ Exterior


,1.


I


*


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.
Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296

Mobile: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


LARICHIUTA



*Limerock
*Clay
*Sand
*Top Soil

Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


'" Allyn Sikes
Owner


1830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-3473
(800) 541-8702
Free Delivery To
Tallahassee Hospitals &
Funeral Homes


. Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY,
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lic.
#SR097t265


I --I ---I--


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing

THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


DANNy'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
S SERVING ALL OF YOUR
PAINTANDBODYNEED 'S
. Fe Estim- at





In: 99W-.1W5

'765 E. WASHINGTON Sr.


Jamie's Body Works

" Group Fitness


SAll Classes taught byJamie
S Cichon Rogers,

I' Ce nled Personal Trainer and
Group Fitness Instructor.

Call 997-4253





I 10
:Kaayak $.99 + tx
.Longhorn $1.19 + t
;Grizzly $1.59 + t:
Copenhagen
Ice 4# .60, 8#

I. A very nice sele
: T-shirts Christia
: $3.99 each
SIce 4LB.60, 8LB .93
Free Crystal Lighter w/
manufa



Reserve

This

: Space

For Only

: $10

SPer Week


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.


H
0
M
A
S
V


STARTER


I Complete Auto
L Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging

997-0039
Licensed & Insured


Appliance SCREENPRINTING

Service, & EMBROIDERY
Serve ALL OCCASIONS
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL! Off
Call Andy C"P

997-5648
Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By 85-997-6023
Andy Rudd


Local Glass Company



Aulo A Huom a Comfrnitrcial
Accepted by All Insurance
Companies
NO INSURANCE?
N\e'll find \ou a windshield at
a reasonable price!
\\e Install Quality
624 Range St.

464-2500
973-4527


Register's

Mini-Storage


-315 Waukeereah
Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535

a D on 't L et ny ,Old, J oh


r


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior'" Exterior
Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


Border 2 Border

*eCI hlDK^A


Lawn & Landscaping

I" lenton 'This
SAd & Receive
A 10% 7
I AOI
Discount

11025 East Mahan
877-4550


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
S 850-997-0877.
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASI
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMON
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassce
575-7682


I


DS
MDS


WE GO I HE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

997-6500

WHEN YOU NELU IO SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
REALTOR SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
(850) 997-4340 DIA,N,SISREPAIRO UPC.DLS
SP INSTALLATIONS COS[ULlAJlONS
www.TimPeary.com. c LUSO.:MPU"LRS IUIOiRIAl
I W.IA IlII ~llX ,y.I REMOVAL Or VIRL)SFS, ADWARE, SVYW/..KF


E I


Chevron

x Timberwolf $1.99 + tx
x Red Seal $2.89 + tx
x Kodiak $4.41 + tx
$4.58 + tx
# .93, 20# .2.25 + tx

action and good quality
an, Florida and others
Sor 3 for $10 + tx
3, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
carton purchases. We accept all
cturer's coupon


REAL GOOD PAi
REAL GooD PR.
MANY COLO
$5 PER G..ia
i'j Gallon M inAmum)

342-32A


w7T
rCE
RS
9.N

98


This Space Can Be Yours
For Only

$20 Per Week


Advertising Pays!


I I


YOUR LOGS TO
LUMBER AT MY
SITE

Rough-sawn Oaks,
Cherry, Pecan, and
Pine available.

Also Plainning Available


Glenn Griffin
850-997-9947 I


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-580(8
850-545-9964
850-251-2 911
155 JOHN

CoLLINs RD.


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389 9
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


'e- I


I ICountry Mile"I


~ -r


_ -


f %+t


3







1


- --


m---mm4m


I -1 q


. .-


.I


A ; N4S


~ee~~~








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005 PAGE 11


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


To Place Your Ad




997-3568
997-3568


HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MOREPAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
3/4, fcan
Now Hiring 2005 Postal Positions Federal,
State & Local. $14.80/$48+/Hr. No
experience necessary. Entry Levels. Full
Benefits. Paid Training. Call 7 days
(888)826-2513 Ext. 2203.
3/4, fcan
Drivers Needed for over the road hauling.
CDL required. Call John for details @
850-528-6841.
3/2 4 chg.
Drivers- Owner Ops & Co. Drivers
Needed Now! Run SE Only or SE,
Mid-Atl, MW Regional, O/O's -No Forced
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel
(866)250-4292.
3/4, fcan
Sales $5,500 Weekly Goal Potential! If
someone did it, so can you! 2-3 confirmed
appointments daily! Benefits Available...
Call Catherine McFarland (888)563-3188.
3/4, fcan
Cool Travel Job!!! One Month Paid
Training! $500 Sign on Bonus Must be
free to travel & Start Today
(800)735-7462.
3/4, fcan

$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED. Now
accepting applications. $50 cash hiring
bonus guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638. Ext. 107.
Www.USMailingGroup.com.
3/4, fcan

Fast Track Foods or Land O Sun Mngmt.
NOW HIRING Managers, Asst. Managers
and retail assistants in. Monticello area.
Competitive pay. 1-352-333-3011 ext. 42.
1/21,-tfn
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg
UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
3/4, fcan
Florida Licensed Physical Therapist And
Physical Therapist Assistant wanted in
Rural Hospital in North Florida Call (850)
0722171 r Fax-Resume to (850)f


973-8158.
3/4, fcari


Deliver Trav
Thousands ol


GARAGE SALE

3 Family Yard Sale Saturday March 5,
806 Rabon Road 8 til.
3/4
Lots of BABY STUFF for sale cheap (boys
and girls). Yard Sale Sat. 3/5 from 8-12.
Highway 90 West next to the Petro Gas
Station.
'/ pd.


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
3/4, fcan
INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY!!!
Looking for a few exceptional people to
make an above average income. Call Lori
at (800)489-8930.
3/4, fcan
$$$$$ Weekly Use eBay to get Paid. Get
$250 in FREE products to Start No
Inventory Required Training Provided
Call Online Supplier For More Info
(800)940-4948 Ext. 5314.
3/4, fcan
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machine Hd.
You approve Loc's- $10,670
(800)836-3464#BO2428.
3/4, fcan

FOUND

Large black dog with white front paws.
Believed to be of German Shepard mix has
chrome choker chain around neck. Found
in area of US 19 and 1-10 on Feb. 22 call
997-5483

AUTOMOTIVE

Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'97 Dodge Neon 59K miles $2,800
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28, tfn
1996 DODGE CUSTOM V-8 VAN
(MINT), $5,500. 997-1560 OR e-mail
GCASSBORO@NETZERO.NET
3/2,4,9,11, pd.

SERVICES
I "I -- I I"'


.Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
..... ." ;--\ 'T ditches, tred 'tid-shirtub- removal, burn
l Traders F P piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
vel Trailers For Pay! 933-3458.
f 30 ft travel trailers tfn
tfn I


originating from Florida cities. We need
pickup truck owners to deliver.
www.horizontransport.com
3/4, fcan
Accounting Instructor needed at North
Florida Community College, Madison Fl.
Master's degree in accounting with 18
graduate hours in additional discipline
preferred. Experience in use of technology
in classroom highl% desirable. .Duties:
Teach 15 credit-hours each semester in
accounting and other qualified area.
Candidates chosen for interview will give
sample presentation utilizing instructional
technology. Duties commence 3/1/2005.
Position also requires having established
office hours, participating in department
and College activities. Teaching may be
night and/or dual enrollment courses on
NFFCC campus and/or at' satellite
locations. Applications to: Director HR,
North Florida Community College, 1000
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete application packets
considered: letter of interest; resume and
application; copy of transcripts (unofficial
okay). Application available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet must be
received by 03/04/2005. EOE
2/18,25,3/4, chg.
Experienced Painter. Full-time Position.
Transportation Required. 342-3288
2/16 tfn chg.

NOTICE
17 CABINS NEAR PIGEON
FORGE,TN,selling at Auction March 12,
10:30 a.m. Guaranteed financing available
with 25% down. Furrow Auction Co.
(800)4FURROW; www.furrow.com.TN
Lic #62.
3/4, fcan
Auction: 855+/- Acres-Divided Beautiful
home sites, excellent development
potential. March 12, 10 AM, Romeo,
(Ocala), Fl. 10% BP (800)323-8388
www.rowellauctions.com Rowell Realty &
Auction Co., Inc. Au479, Ab296.
3/4, fcan


We're a church that values tradition, but
we're not fundamentalist. Christ Episco-
pal Church, three blocks N of the court-
house. Sunday service at 10:00 AM.
997-4116
/% tfn

Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Experienced Baby-sitter who is Patient &
loving. Your house or mine whenever
needed. Call 997-5482 or 264-4854 /
3/2,4,91,11 pd.
Mortgages, Refinance or Purchase. No
money down. No Income, low rates. All
credit considered. (higher- rates may
apply) No mobile homes. (888)874-4829 or
-AH"%w.AccentCapital.com Licensed
Correspondent Lender.
3/4. fcan

Discount For Seniors House Painting.
-Int. + Ext., Low Rates, Free estimates
most pressure washing $45-$50, 555-2000
1/7,14,21,28,2/4,11,18,25,3/4,11,18,25 pd


Do you want to be just a Christian, with no
denominational names,' creeds ,or
,practices? Jesus established His church
called the Church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)


FOR SALE
Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
3/4, fcan

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
3/4, fcan

NEW QUEEN Pillowtop mattress set. In
factory plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
Must sell, $175 850-545-7112.
1/14, tfn, c

NEW LIVING ROOM SET: Suggested list
$1400, sell sofa $275 loveseat $225, chair
$175, Set $625 Hard frames with lifetime
warranty. 850-222-9879.
1/21,tfn

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT TV SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE HBO & Cinemax! Access to over
225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
3/4, fcan

Dining room table, leaf, and six chairs,
$600 sofa server table, $300 222-2113.
1/14 tfn, c

Mattress set: New King Pillow Top
mattress and base. In original plastic,
factory warranty, $295, 850-222-2113.
1/14, tfn, c

Leather Sofa suggested list $1400 100%
new, see 11 $500. 222-7783
1/14, tfn, c


The only ingredient in our 32-oz bottle of
100% pure Tahitian Noni Juice is the juice
ofa Noni fruit. $32.'bottle. Call 997-5644
3/2,1, pd

CHERRY SLEIGH BED, Still in box,
never used. Sacrifice $295. 850-222-7783
1/14, tfh, c

BEDROOM SET 6 pieces, new in boxes.
headboard, frame, dresser, mirror, chest,
nightstand. $595. 850-222-9879.
1/14 tfn,c

Enhanced mobile home, 2200sq ft. 1.56 ac.
4/2. sun room, carport, extras. $125,000
997-1093
2/11,18,25,14 pd

Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Re' & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers.. Priced
to sale $1,.', $5,.$10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30pm @ 342-3246.
2/23,25,3/4,11 pd

BAHIA HAY ROLLS FOR SALE $25 A
ROLL. CALL 997-8180 or 210-2441.
/23,25,3/2,4 pd.

FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry: room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
M\ aukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1,26. Ifn.c

3 Bedroom 1 Bath vith Storage Shed
$650.00 Month "' .s eposit. Call
997-8295 or 352-514-1 0 .
3/4,9,11,16,18, pd.
Ruslic I BR Cabin. ( ompletel3 Furnished
including Amentties Located on 4 Acres at
end of dirt road only 6 miles to Monticello
& 25 to Tallahassee. Electric & Satellite
TV included $750 month & Sec-deposit 6
month minimum Lease. Call 342-1324 Lv.
Mess.
3/4

GARAGE SALE

MOVING SALE
Through the month of March. Furniture
including beds, dressers, etc. Call
097-6220, 1430 Florida Avenue.
3/4,9,11, pd.
COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET
Sponsored by the Lloyd Lions Club and
held at the U-Haul Sales & Storage


Warehouse located at 7337-A Old Lloyd
Home Health Care Equipmenl Road from 8am-4pm. on Saturdays.
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare Spaces available, call 997-5505 or
Call for assessment of your needs. 097-1754. Donations appreciated.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE /4,11,18,25, pd.
1/19-tfn


Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since
1958. Call for a free Brochure!
1-800-432-0320 www.bertrogers.com.
3/2,4,9,11,16,18,23,25,30


Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates Needed.



Fast Track Food Stores now

hiring in Madison and

Monticello areas.



Please contact store Manager at your

local Fast Track store for an application.


REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Winter Season Is Here! Must See The
Beautiful Peaceful Mountains Of Western
NC Mountains. Cabins, Acreage, &
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty Murphy N.C. Call for Free
Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
3/4, fcan

New Log Home Shell -$99,900. Beautiful
log home shell nestled on private wooded
lot off Parkway North of Boone. Won't
last! 1st time offered. (800)455-1981.*119.
3/4, fcan

KENTUCKY 50-1000 acres. Incredible
trophy deer & turkey hunting. Some
w/lakes, creeks, rivers, ponds, & timber.
Great retreat/investment. New survey,
starting $795 per acre. Owner will finance.
(270)791-2538 www.actionoutfitter.com
3/4, fcan

N.C. Mountains: 2.3 acres with new log
cabin shell in secluded setting $89,900.
Acreage available with stunning mountain
views! Free info available. (828)247-0081.
3/4, fcan

NORTH CAROLINA LAKEFRONT
ONLY $39,900. Great All-sports lake. to
fish, boat, swim or just relax. Call for
details, MLC (866)920-5263.
3/24 fcan

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA. Spectacular
Mountain view & River home sites. Paved
roads, clubhouse & more. NEW
RELEASE! Home sites from $49,900.
Bear River Community Call now
(866)411-5263.
3/4, fcan


LAKE VIEW BARGAIN $29,900. Free
boat -slip! 'High elevation beautifully
wooded parcel. Across from national
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in
TN. Paved roads, u/g utils, central water,
sewer, more. Excellent financing. Call now
(800)704-3154, ext. 608. Sunset Bay, LLC.
3/4, fcan

FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No
Credit O.K. $0 to low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext.1299.
3/4, fcan

IRS auction 200+acres Waycross, GA
has large home, steel building, planted
pines and hunting land. March 18, 10 a.m.
Ware County Courthouse.
-ww.ustreas.gov/auctions/irs or
(850)445-4625 for more information i
3/4, fcan

COASTAL GEORGIA-GATED
COMMUNITY Large wooded water
access and marsh front home sites.
Ancient Live oaks, pool, tennis, golf.
Water access. From :$64,900.
Pre-construction discounts.
www.cooperspoint.com (877)266-7376.
3/4, fcan

FOR SALE

ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS:
You don't have to wait fordays to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all brands and
telephones.
1/21, tfn, c

Keystone 2002 Everest, model 363K,
5th-Wheel, Fiberglass 3-slideouts. Priced
for quick sale. Book Price, 997-5441
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,11,16,18 pd.

FOR SALE OR RENT: Mobile Home 3
BR/2 Bath, Fireplace. 24x48' Selling for
payoff price, about $43,196. Call for
details: Barbara 997-5554
223.25.3'2.49.11 l pd.


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Jreat Buvl Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
$8;500 per acre
Just Listed-Under Contract 6.67 wooded
acres on graded county road in eastern
Jefferson County $23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home.
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
New Listing 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
--pen' n remote location onliy$295,000 : "
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six very nice acres mostly
fenced pasture nice location near Lamont
$40,000
SOLD Wonderful Home nice 4 bedroom 2
bath double wide with fireplace on 1.9.
acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 2 wooded acres
in Lloyd Acres only $26,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Sales are very qood we have a
shortage of listing for uvers looking
for Homes and Land




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Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtor Associate


Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


Buyers looking for Homes and Land
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G a01 .....


!i / i-Lzi or


5








:PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 4, 2005
- '- a..,<: --,l "-: .. "......."".-*: s


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lop















Gorga Allen's Pre-K class at Jefferson Ele-
mentary School. Dr. Mike Purvis spoke to


RYAN BOYD
Your Capitol Bureau

Editors Note: Boyd is a FAMU
Journalism student covering af-
fairs for Monticello News at the
Capitol.
When the Legislature convenes
for its 60 day regular session to cre-
ate the state's 2005 2006 budget,
among considerations will be the
$5,928,100 requested by Jefferson
County to pay for nine projects.
These projects include:
*Infractructure at the Industrial
Park, $689,100.
*Acquisition of a building for the
County Health Department, owned
by TMH and formerly occupied by
Family Medicine, $225,000.
*Renovation of buildings on the
former Jefferson County High
School Campus for county offices,
$2,000,000.


*Construction of an Emergency
Medical Service Building,
$270,000.
*Public Safety Radio Communica-
tion equipment, $150,000.
*Sewers at Cooper's Pond,
$582,000.
*Citywide water conservation,
$750,000.
*Agriculture and Community De-
velopment Center construction,
$1,200,000.
*Youth program for students with
academic failures, $62,000.

Legislative assistants for Sen.
Nancy Argenziano, and Sen. Al
Lawson said it was too early to tell
which, if any, of these projects
would be funded.
County Commission Chair Skeet
Joyner stated that improvements at
the Industrial Park would attract
more businesses, consequently gen-
erating more.money for the county.


"The only way this will h
if the Legislature funds the I
"Jefferson County just
have enough money to mak
pen," Joyner said.
Concerning the acquisition
other building for the Hea
apartment, Director Kim
said that buying the building
allow the department to met
pending need for space.
While the Department
current facility for TMH, it
own the building at 175 Wes
ington Street.
"If the Legislature does r
the purchase," Barnhill sa
Department will have to s
other ways to get the money.
She stated that at a recer
symposium in Tallahassee
gressman Allen Boyd was c(
about the availability of
funding to buy the building
Health Department.


Health Department Offers


Tips For Nutrition Month


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

SJackie L. Gordon R.D., at the-
County Health Department, alerts
residents that March is National Nu-
trition Month.
This year the theme is "Get a
Taste for Nutrition." The campaign
encourages everyone to be adven-
turous and widen the variety of
foods they consume.
Mullins relates that it is what is
eaten over several days, and not just
bne meal or in one day that counts
SFavorite foods can be enjoyed,
but should be eaten in moderation.
:, Choosing the right balance of
foods helps you get the right combi-


nation of nutrients. It is also impor-
tant to balance your food choices
with your physical activities to
achieve and maintain a health
weight and lifestyle.
Thirty minutes of moderate physi-
cal activity most days of the week
can help prevent and control Type 2
diabetes, as well as helping to
weight in check.
Activity can be spread out over
the day in 10 minute intervals, or
such.
Easy ways to add activity to one's
lifestyle include:.
*Take the stairs instead of the ele-
vator.
*Avoid parking as close as possi-
ble to your destination.'
*Take a walk around the mall and


make an effort to walk from
to the other.
*Walk around the block v
ing out to get the mail, p
such.
To help control portion s
smaller plates, such as a l
plant rather than dinner plate
Share an entree or desert
friend.
Serve your plate as usi
divide the servings on anotl
for another meal.

Add fruit and vegetables
meals.
Keep your Salad lower ca
using lemon juice or special
gar rather than prepared dres


Tortoises Vs. Development


(Continued From Page 1)
snake, Florida mice and gopher
frogs. Ultimately, it affect the entire
ecosystem and quality of life, he
says.
"The loss of the gopher tortoises is
symptomatic of a total loss of habi-
tat," Ashton says.
As for the current rules protecting
the gopher tortoises, Ashton doesn't
think much of them.
. "The FWC's current rules on relo-
cation and take are way out of tune
with the times;" he says. "We don't
have a good plan to sustain species
when you have so much develop-
ment. Our rate of growth in Florida
is faster than any other country in
the world. The FWC needs to take a
defensive posture, so that we can re-
tain some of our natural heritage.
And it has to happen now. The cur-
rent FWC relocation permits are not
designed to protect the tortoises. Es-
sentially, tortoises are removed from
one form of destruction to another."
He calls the current testing that is
required for relocation cumbersome,
unnecessary and ultimately an in-
centive for developers to take the
easy way out and pay the mitigation
fee.
"URTD is.a disease that causes
'some infected tortoises to die, but
not whole populations," Ashton


writes on his institute's web page.
"Testing does not provide protection
from spreading URTD. Testing
does, however, cause months of de-
lay in resolving species mitigation
with the developer. This is due to
the cumbersome trapping, testing
and permitting process...Due to time
constraints, many developers are
pushed to paying for a take permit,
resulting in the death of the gopher
tortoise population on the land."
He decries the alleged lack of
training and experience on the part
of the consultants who report to the
state on the status of a gopher tor-
toise population on a particular
property to be developed.
"The consultants are paid by the
developers to give the report to the
state," Ashton says.
His point: the consultants have no
incentive to give a report that is con-
trary to the interest of the developer.
Notwithstanding the seemingly
dismal -picture for the gopher tor-
toises, Ashton takes hopes in recent
developments. For example, he's
noticed in the last two years an in-
terest at the grassroots level in sav-
ing the gopher tortoises, he says.
These aren't your traditional envi-
ronmental types, Ashton says. These
are regular folks who have noticed a


decline in the gopher tortois
lation in their communities
concerned enough to get inv
protective measures.


.- |i


'?
,

8~


^as^.^


.7 L~t


SHe believes the solution for saving
the species lies at the county level,
not necessarily the state level.
What is needed, Ashton says, is
more public education on the issue,
combined with local efforts to adopt
protective ordinances and land-use
policies that encourage the promo-
tion of conservation easements.
He cites six counties that have al-
ready taken such steps, implement-
ing polices that are more stringent
than the state. These counties in-
clude Citrus, Collier and Leon.
In Leon County, for example, de-
velopers can not resort to the take
permit as an option, according to
Ashton.
At the state level, he believes the
FWC should make the cost of the
take permit reflect the cost of the
acreage that is required to support
the relocated gopher tortoises,
among other things.


n Case Of Emergency

Dial 911
Emergenc1


County Seeks Legislative


Funding For Nine Projects


the class with Reny, as his patient,
demonstrated how a vet checks out animi


Black Lab Mix

Quints Seek

Good Homes

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A three month old litter of Border
Collie/Lab mix puppies are the re-
cent adoptables at the Humane So-
ciety.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
..--_ said the five puppies, two female
and three male, along with their
mother, were found by a local resi-
dent wandering along US-90, just
west of town, darting in and out of
traffic, and brought to the shelter.
"They're really lucky they were
not hit by a car," she added.
The puppies, named Trina,
and Trixie, Beasley, Bosely and Boone
lals. are black with some white on their
chests, with soft fuzzy hair. All are
very happy, healthy, lovable and
playful canines.
They are recommended as
indoor/outdoor animals and require
a lot of tender loving care. "They
love to be held and petted," said
Bautista.
The puppies have all been altered
and all vaccinations, other than ra-
appen is bies, is up to date. The rabies vac-
project. cinations are scheduled for March,
does not the cost of the injections are cov-
e it hap- ered by the adoption fee.

Sof an- To adopt one or more of the pup-
alth De- pies, or any of the many other ani-
Barhill mals awaiting homes at the shelter,
g wouldcall 342-0244.
g would
et its ex-Moratorium

rents its (Continued From Page 1)
wants to
st Wash- don't have our act together," Conley
said. "I hate the word moratorium,
not fund but in the interest of doing things
id, "the right and doing something that we'll
eek out be proud of 50 years from now,
maybe we need to step back and call
t a moratorium."
e, Con- Councilman Tom Vogelgesang
contacted was in agreement. A former member
federal of the county's Planning Commis-
for the sion, Vogelgesang noted that devel-
opers frequently claimed pressing
time constraints as reasons why
their projects should be approved
immediately.
S"Then nothing happens," Vogel-
gesang said. "They get their ap-
proval and nothing happens."
Councilman Brian Hayes was the
voice of restraint.
"I think it's necessary," Hayes
one end said of the moratorium.
But he drew the line at Ander-
when go- son's suggestion that the council
aperr, or should act on the moratorium imme-
diately. For one thing, the morato-
izes, use rium was not on the agenda, he
uncheon noted.
e. And secondly, he thought the is-
rt with a sue was of sufficient significance
that it merited public notice and
community discussion.
ual, then As for the impact fee, he had no
her plate problem with imposing a set amount
-- say $500 or $1,000 -- on an in-
to rterim basis until a more calibrated
fee schedule could be established,
Sb he said.
frie by The council left the discussion
Ity vine-
Svine with the stated intent of calling a
sings. public meeting in the near future to
further discuss the issue.
t The county, meanwhile, has hired
a consultant to explore the possibil-
ity of imposing a fire and ambulance
impact fee to help it pay for the ad-
es popu- ditional costs it incurs when it pro-
and are vides services to new developments.
o'lyed in That report is expected to be com-
pleted soon.


Continued From Page 7)
neka) of Greenville; Three Sisters,
Susie Jay, Beulah (James) Living-
ston, and Jane Arnold all of Green-
ville; Four Brothers, Eddie Arnold,
Woodrow (Odessa) Arnold, Roose-
velt (Linda) Arnold and Freddie Ar-
nold all of Greenville; 15 Grand-
chilldren, and One Great
Grandchild.
She was preceded in death by her
Father, Ed Arnold, her daughter
Debbie Arnold and her sister Mamie
Arnold.

FRANKLIN ANDERSON
LACY
Franklin Anderson Lacy, age 70, a
retired Foreman of Fleet Services
with Florida Power Corporation,
passed away Monday, February 28,
2005 in Thomasville, Georgia.
Service, was Wednesday, March
2, 2005, beginning at 11 a.m. At
Elizabeth Baptist Church in Monti-
cello, Florida. Visitation was on
Tuesday, March 1, 2005, at Beggs
Funeral Home Monticello Chapel in
Monticello, Florida. Interment was
Followed after the services at Eliza-
beth Church Cemetery.
Andy was a native of Thomasyille,
Georgia. He was raised in Monti-
cello, a former resident of Castle-
berry, Florida, he resided most of
his life in Monticello, Florida. He
served his country in the U.S. Air
Force. He was a member of Eliza-
beth Baptist Church where he has
served as a deacon since 1963 and
was also a Brotherhood leader.
Andy was a private pilot who loved
to fly. He also had a passion for line
dancing. He was an awesome hus-
band, father, grandfather and friend.
Andy is survived by his wife
Janice of Monticello; one son Frank-
lin Anderson Lacy Jr. of Aucilla,
Florida; two daughters, Kimberly
Rose Surrency of Avon Park, Flor-
ida, and Kelly Kay Griffin of Fort


Meade, Florida. Four grandchildren;
Matthew Adam Surrency, Lacy Sur-
rency, Andrew Lacy, and Lindsay
Giegel; four great grand children,
Sydney Surrency, Tyler Surrency,
Madison Brown, Olivia Giegel. One
sister Voncile Hunter of Monticello,
Florida.

CLEMER PALMER
Clemer Palmer, age 78 of Talla-
hassee, Florida, died Tuesday,
March 1, in Tallahassee Fl.
A native of Bainbridge, Ga., and
former resident of Thomasville, Ga.,
he had lived in Tallahassee, Fl., for
over 46 years. He was a retired self
employed floor cover installer. He
was a veteran of the Navy. He was
an avid fisherman and really en-
joyed the time he spent with his
family.
The service will be held at 3:00
P.M. Friday, March 4, 2005. Grave-
side at Woodville, Fla. Interment at
Woodville Cemetery 3:00 p.m., in
Woodville, Fla.
Family will receive friends at fa-
milys residence from 6:00-8:00
p.m., 9640 Elgin Rd., Tallahassee,
Florida. And also the day of the
service from 2:00-2:30 at Woodville
Cemetery,
He is survived by his wife Vir-
ginia Palmer of 54 years. One Son,
Randy Palmer of Woodville, Fla.,
Three Daughters, Vickie Reeves
(and husband Gary) of Wacissa,
Fla., Donna Lynn Beam (and hus-
band Ted) of Crawfordville, Fla.,
and Barbara Jean Owens (and hus-
band Mark) of Crawfordville, Fla.
One Sister, Nettie Spence of Tho-
masville, Ga., Four Grandchildren,
Catina Palmer of Woodville, Fla.,
Gary Reeves of Wacissa, Fla., Lance
Oliff of Woodville, Fla., Angela
Pyles of Woodville, Fla., and Six
Great Grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by a
son, Dewayne Palmer.


QUINTS, Trina, Trixie, Beasley, Boisely, and Boone, two
female and three male black lab mixed pups are three
months old. "We are good pups, and you really need us to
add a little spice to your life. Won't you give us a home,
please?" (News Photo)



Homes Of Mourning