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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00016
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 25, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00016
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINW 3'VILLE, FL. 32611


Farm Service Desalination

Agency Election Need Growing

Results In State

Story, Page 3 Editorial, Page 4


JCHS PTSO

Informative

Meeting Planned

Story, Page 6
III


Tips For
Tornado Safety

Offered

Story, Page 12


Friday Morning





Monticello

137TH YEAR NO.18,50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ws


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2005


THE BLOCK north of the
is expected to undergo a
the county vacates three


courthouse circle
big change when
of the buildings.


Operations to be move are the Tax
Collector, Property Appraiser and State At-
torney. (News Photo)


County To Sell



Three Buildings



In Downtown


Plan Calls For Moving To

New Place By Year's End


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners plan to sell three
coutr -owned buildings in the
downtown district and use the
money to renovate the newly ac-
quired buildings at the former high
school.
The three buildings the county
plans to sell are those occupied by
the operations of the Tax Collector,
Property Appraiser and Assistant
State Attorney.
Commi; -ioneris reached agree-
nmefit on the sale of the buildings
during a two-hour workshop Tues-
day morning. Not everyone, how-
ever, was satisfied with the decision
to use sealed bids as the mechanism
for the sale.
Several participants, including at
least one commissioner, argued that
selling the buildings b\ way of real-
tors would bring a better price. And
two audience participants argued for
restricting the sale to retail busi-
nesses.


Commissioners established at the
onset of the workshop two basic
goals. One, they wanted to accom-
plish the move of the appropriate
county operations into the high
school buildings by the end of the
year, if at all possible.
Two, they wanted the sale of the
downtown buildings to precede the
move.
"I don't want to leave these build-
ings vacant on the front side of
Monticello," Commissioner J. N.
"Junior" Tuten said, expressing a
general concern of the board.
Given the two basic goals, Tuten
argued that sc-aled bids were the best
way to go. Not only would sealed
bids get the county a good price on
the buildings, it would speed up the
process and provide the county with
the necessary money to begin reno-
vating the high school buildings, he
said.
"I think you'll shortchange your-
self on value if you put this out on
sealed bids," Extension Office Di-
rector Larry Halsey offered. "Have
you considered giving this to a real-


tor to sell with a trip value on it?"
Tuten discounted the idea. Getting
realtors involved would not only ex-
tend the process, it would also limit
the number of potential buyers and
incur an additional cost to the
county in the form of the realtors'
fee, he said.
Not necessarily so, Commissioner
Jerry Sutphin countered. He thought
realtors could actually get the
county a better price on the build-
ings, given their knowledge of the
market and their greater ability to
advertise.
What's more, realtors' fees were
negotiable, he said.
"We could let the brokers in the
county bid on what they would take
this for and they .would have the
burden of advertising," Sutphin
said.
Another possible alternative,
Halsey suggested, was for the
county to borrow the money.
"I know that the timing of getting
into the high school buildings is the
primary driver of this," Halsey said.
"I also know that this commission
has a pathological fear of bonding
indebtedness. But why not borrow
the money against the value of the
buildings you, plan to sell and use
that money to renovate the high
(See Downtown Page 12)


DEPARTMENT HEADS got to share with
commissioners their ideas of how the
county should proceed with the sale of the
vacated buildings. From left, Building In-


spector Wallace Bullock, Planning Official
Bob Arredondo and Extension Services Di-
rector Larry Halsey. (News Photo)


Commissioners Revisit


Assignment Of Buildings


City Moves Forward


On Internet Project


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials continue pursuing
the idea of the city establishing its
own high-speed Internet service for
residents and businesses.
Earlier this month, City Superin-
tendent Don Anderson informed the'
City Council that AT&T had sub-
mitted the only bid for the fiber op-
tic cable service -- a critical compo-
nent of the system.
Anderson said AT&T's monthly
charge for the service "came right at
what we expected."
He then asked the council for per-
mission to advertise for bids on the
equipment needed for installation of
the system. Depending on the prices
quoted, Anderson said the commit-
tee would recommend whether to
proceed with installation of the sys-
tem.
He said if the decision was to go
forward with the system, it could be
up and running by March,
The council is scheduled to re-
view the bids Tuesday night.
The idea of becoming a provider
of wireless broad band service to lo-
cal customers is part of an Action
Plan developed by the city "to create
economic vitality while preserving
the area's rich cultural heritage and


unspoiled landscape."
The plan is the product of a coop-
erative effort that solicited input
from the county government, the
school system, businesses and hun-
dreds of citizens. It outlines a vari-
ety of economic development initia-
tives, "including the provision to
make wireless broad band connec-
tivity available countywide."
States the project's vision state-
ment: "Although there is spotty
availability of broad band in areas of
Monticello and the surrounding
county, the aggressive plan devel-
oped by city staff will seek to fulfill
locally the mission statement of the
Federal Communications Commis-
sion and President Bush's directive
that each household in America will
have access to affordable high-speed
Internet service.
"By filling the gap in broad band
availability that the private sector
cannot -- or will not -- provide, the
city. has committed to eliminate the
disparity between technological in-
frastructure in urban and rural
America.
"This is to be accomplished by the
installation of a municipally-owned
system providing both first tier
minimum-speed broad band for
causal users, as well as increased-
speed tiers of service for users re-
quiring advanced technological ap-


plications."
Among the primary beneficiar-
ies of the system will be the city it-
,self, according to proponents.
"By incorporating wireless tech-
nology into its water and sewer sys-
tems, the city will eliminate the
manual reading of water wells,
sewer lift stations and 1,200 water
meters, thereby freeing several days
of labor and fiundreds of miles of
vehicle usage every month," goes
the argument.
The accompanying software,
moreover, will allow city personnel
to monitor water and sewage usage
in "real time", either directly from
City Hall or from any location after
hours.
The city will also be able to better
safeguard critical infrastructure .sites
in compliance with federal Home-
land Security guidelines.
Again quoting from the vision pa-
per: "To meet the requirement of se-
curity alarms at infrastructure sites,
the city has been compelled to pay
for outside monitoring. But with the
installation of its own monitoring
systems through the city's intranet,
tied directly to the police
department, security will be pro-
vided at a quicker response time and
in a more cost-efficient manner."
Police officers also will benefit
S(See Internet Page 12)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Unwilling to jeopardize $300,000
the county is seeking from the Leg-
islature for an Emergency Operation
Center, commissioners Tuesday
changed their minds about moving
Emergency Management (EM) to
the high school site.
Commissioners decided that EM
will remain at its North Jefferson
Street location, at least for the time
being.
EM pays a monthly rent of $1,200
for office space. That money, how-
ever, comes from the state -- a deter-


mining factor in commissioners'
decision.
Commissioners also decided that
the Grants Office, which previously
was to remain at its South Jefferson
Street location, will now move to
the high school. That leaves the
Grants Office building for the use of
the Solid Waste Department.
Commissioners next revised the
earlier assignment of buildings. Ac-
cording to the latest thinking, the
Planning and Building Inspections
departments will occupy the former
guidance building; the Tax Collector
will occupy the D-wing; the Prop-
erty Appraiser, the C-wing; and the
State Attorney and environmental


health and the Public Defender and
the Grants Office will split B-l and
B-2 respectively.
The Extension Services, mean-
while, will remain at its present lo-
cation on Mulberry Street. The plan
calls for the services to occupy the
entire buildings, once the Planning
and Building Inspections operations
move out.
Finally, Fire Rescue will return to
the fire station on US 19 South, next
to the Road Department. The idea is
to put a mobile unit there.
The move is one Fire Rescue
Chief Larry Bates has been seeking
for a long time, as it will put him in
proximity to his personnel.


-
CAROL ELLERBE, director of Emergency discuss the Emergency Operation Center
Management, and Dick Bailar, a member of and its possible funding by the Legislature.
the county's legislative lobbying committee, (News Photo)


L -L L -- ~s I IIL I _1


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005
N[ ^ '-* ,


Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tal lytown.com/redcross.

+
American
Red Cross


CHILDCARE
FUNDRAISING
Director needed by
National Co.
for local area to help run
money
making programs.
Work with directors,
owners, PTA's, schools.
1st yr 46k avg 813-788-1595


CARRYING the banner for the JES Boys,
Girls Club in the Step Up Florida Relay are


&v-
from left, Samiria Martin, Christina Shiver,
and Amy Myers.


Nim


aj i V.(:~

V


KIM BARNHILL, right, spoke
to the audience about the im-
portance of maintaining a
healthy lifestyle. (News
Photo)







PIN.

a


JAMIE ROGERS demon-
strates warmup exercises be-
fore the Relay. (News Photo)


JROTC COLOR GUARD presented the Colors
:and led the Pledge of Allegiance prior to the
beginning of the Step Up Florida Relay. L-R:


I;
;i
ii
lj
.i


SKEET JOYNER, County Commission Chair, reads the offi-
cial proclamation of the event at opening ceremonies of
the Step Up Florida Relay. At right is Kim Barnhill, Health
Department Coordinator, and Quashia Franklin JROTC ca-
det. (News Photo)


Jason Felix, Kim Gilley, Tabatha Smith,
Heather Miller, and Allen Kent.


The Jefferson County
Utility Coordinating
Committee will meet
at 9:00 a.m.
March 9, 2005,
at the
Jefferson County .
Extension Office,
275 North Mulberry
Street



News Without
Fear or Favor
Monticello News


Jr.


:LEADING JES Boys and Girls
:Club members in a walk to
:the courthouse are Charmane
::Crumitie, left, and Gerrold
Austin, right.


:DONNA DICKENS, left, and
:Phil Yon, represented People
*with Disabilities in the Relay
with hand pedaled bikes.


Did YOU know the average person saves
$(500 a year by carpooling 3 days a week!


Commuter Services
o'North Florida-i

888-454-RIDE


or visit our Website at

www.commuterservices.org


Already carpooling or vanpooling?
Ask about the guaranteed ride home program.


PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

Effective March 1, 2005, Economic Self-Sufficiency will begin providing
services on the first three Tuesdays of each month from 8:30 A.M. to
12:00 P.M. and 1:00 P.M. to 4:30 P.M. and on the fourth Tuesday of
each month from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M. and 1:00 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.
at the Jefferson County Health Department located at 1255 West
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida. Services will no longer be
available at the old office.

If you have any questions regarding available services, please call the
following toll-free number, 1-866-325-6021.




DANCE FOR LIFE

To Benefit


RELAY FOR LIFE



OPERA HOUSE

FEB. 25th

Live Band 19-South

Food & Refreshments



Call for Tickets Info:

997-5516



Sponsored By

COLDWELL

BANKER

KELLY & KELLY

PROPERTIES


AA

RELAY
FOR LIFE


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


i H&R BLOCK
*.. ^ 1z'.


* Instant refund.
* If you owe, we pay for you
90 days same as cash.
Electronic filing.
Best prices.
Best trained staff.
Open year round.

1267 SOUTH JEFFERSON
(WINN DIXE SHOPPING CENTER)
997-1782


K


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SHIRLEY WASHINGTON, JES Education Charles K
Leader supervises student Kary Kelly and Boys and


Farm Service Agency

Election Results


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Farm Service Agency Director
Mark Demott reports the results of
recent elections.
In area 1, representing NE Jeffer-
son County, Kenneth Sasser was se-
lected as committee person.
For area 2, South Jefferson
County, Benjamin Bishop was se-
lected as committee person.
For area 5, Wakulla County,
Hugh McCallister was selected
committee person.
In related Farm Service Agency
news, Demott reminds farmers to
know their land before planting.
To ensure that-farmers retain eligi-
bility for USDA benefits, it is im-
portant to know before planting
2005 crops, whether the land has a
Highly Erodible Land (HEL) or
wetland determination made.
Crops planted on HEL must be in
accordance with a signed conserva-
tion plan.
Land that is classified as a wet


area, and was manipulated after
Dec. 23, 1985, cannot be planted to
agricultural commodities.
Planting areas that were drained
after this date by someone other
than the operator does not excuse


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Jefferson Soil and Water Con-
servation District (SWCD) rents
conservation equipment to County
landowners so they can install con--
servation practices on their farm.
Contact the SWCD office at 997-
4058, or Danny Monroe III, equip-
ment custodian, to schedule the
equipment, or for answers to your
questions.
Required fees include: Prime Dirt
Pan (3.5 cu. yd) 130 + PTO HP re-
quired, $75 per day, plus $50 set up
-fee.


;elly, as they are stationed at the
d Girls Club Welcome Station.


the farm operation from a violation,
if they planted the converted area.
Farmers are advised to acquire an
official wetland determination be-
fore planting, if there is any doubt.
Once a crop is planted in violation
of the HEL or wetland requirements,
it is too late.
You will be ineligible for all
USDA benefits.


Amcco Trrace Plow 130 + PTO
HP required, $75 per day, plus $50
set up free.
GP No-till drill 10 foot(RC&D)
60+PTO HP required, $7 per acre,
plus $50 set up fee.
Aerway Pasture Aerator, 8 foot,
60 PTO HP required, $4.50 per
acre, minimum $75 plus set up fee.

n Case Of Emergency
Dial 911
;,(ac IcY


Post Sets
Workshop
VFW Post 251 will hold a free
workshop for veterans and their
family members 10 a.m. Saturday,
Feb. 26 at the Learning Center, 490
South Marvin Street.
Presenters for this workshop will
be Byron Bamhart, Raymond
Henry, and Henry McKinney, Post
Service Officers.
"This will be a hands on
workshop. We will help people fill
out their paperwork, so they can ap-
ply for the benefits they have
earned.
Hopefully, when they leave here,
all they will have left to do is to mail
the paperwork," explains Barnhart.
Participants will need to bring any
Proof of Service records.
Presenters will be on hand to an-
swer any questions.


'A'
MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005 PAGE 3

Big Bend Eubanks Termite

& Pest Control, Inc.

"Let us undertake your pest control problems."
Complete Commercial
& Residential Service






Protecting homes in Jefferson
County for more than 50 years.


The




of Socic


cure


al Security


Social Security and the clamor to reform it has dominated the
headlines. With the Baby Boomers starting to retire and people
living longer, many fear that Social Security .-. ,i !iil in the near'
future. To learn more about what the future of Social Security
may hold, please join us for a special video presentation,
which will discuss:
I The factors driving Social Security reform
I Possible solutions to reform Social Security
I How these solutions may affect you
To reserve a seat for yourself and a relative or friend, please
call or stop by. If you are unable to join us, please contact our-
office for other viewing opportunities.
Tuesday, March 1, 2005
12:00 Noon
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FI
Robert J. Davison
Monticello, FI. 32344
J L 850-997-2572
S. www.edwardjones.com/ssecurity


aLi


Member SIPC


Buys a New or Existing

Home up to $320,000










The Smart Way To

hoaj 3 BUILD, BUY, or SELL
HOME OWNERSHIP ACTION PLAN Your Home!


Conservation District

Rents Equipment


Notice to All New Homeowners

And Property Owners

In Jefferson County



If you are Entitled to Receive

Homestead Exemption or

Agricultural Classification for 2005

Your filing Deadline is March 1, 2005



Please file your applications at the
Jefferson County Property Appraiser's
Office

150 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida


~ ~ r- U


I


I ---









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

P iMEMBrE RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


OLAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Desalination Need


Growing in State


Desalination is often touted as one
solution to the world's water woes,
but current desalination plants .tend
to hog energy.
Now University of Florida re-
searchers have developed a technol-
ogy that can tap waste heat'from
electrical power plants as its main
source of energy, an advance that
could significantly reduce the cost-
of desalination in some parts of the
world.
"In the future, we have to go to
desalination, because the freshwater
supply at the moment can just barely
meet the demands of our growing
population," said James Klausner, a
UF professor of mechanical and
aerospace engineering, whose re-
search was funded by the U.S. De-
partment of Energy.
"We think this technology could
run off excess heat from utility
plants and producee millions of gal-
lons each day." -said Klausner, -lead
author of an article on the system
that appears in the current issue of
the Journal of Energy Resources
Technology. He CO-invented the
technology with fellow UF me-
chanical engineering professor Ren-
wei Mei.
More than 7,500 desalination
plants operate world ide. with two-
thirds of them in the Middle East.
where there often is no other alter-
native for fresh water, Klausner
said. The technology is less com-
mon in North America, with plants
located mostly on Florida and the
Caribbean producing only about 12
percent of the w orld's total volume
of desalinated water, he said. U.S.
Residents consume more fresh water
from desalination plants, he said.
The need for desalination is likely
to grow, however. as the population
increases and residents consume
more fresh water. In Florida, for ex-
ample, desalination has-been touted
as one solution for metropolitan ar-
eas where freshwater resources are
becoming ever more scarce. With
more than 97 percent of the Earth's
water supply composed of salt
water, desalination is even more ur-
gent in de eloping nations, such as
China, Klausner said.
"China has a large and growing
demand, Japan has a large demand,
the Middle East, Sub Saharan Africa


-I look at it as a worldwide
problem," he said.
Most commercial desalination
plants now use either distillation or
reverse osmosis, Klausner said. Dis-
tillation involves boiling and evapo-
rating salt water and then condens-
ing the vapor to produce fresh
water. In reverse osmosis, high pres-
sure pumps force salt water through
fine filters that trap and remove wa-
terborne salts and minerals.
Boiling the vast amounts of water
needed for the distillation process
requires large amounts of energy.
Reverse osmosis uses less energy)
but has other problems, including
mineral buildup clogging the filters.
That's the main technical issue
plaguing the largest desalination
plant in the United States, Tampa
Bay Water's $108 million plant in
Apollo Beach. Although it was sup-
posed to produce 25 million gallons
of: freshwater each day, the plant.
beset by technical and financial
problems since opening in 1999,
currently is shut down.,
Employing a major modification
to distillation, Klausner's technol-
ogy relies on a physical process
known as mass diffusion, rather than
heat, to evaporate salt water.
In a nutshell, purnps move salt wa-
ter through a heater and spray it into
the top of a diffusion tower a col-
umn packed with a' polyethylene
matrix that creates a large surface
area for the water to flow across as
it falls. Other pumps at the boom
of the tower blow warm, dry air up
the colunm in the opposite direction
of the flowing water. As the trick-
ling salt water meets the warm dry
air, evaporation occurs. Blowers
push the now-saturated air into a
condenser, the first stage in a proc-
ess that forces the moisture.to con--
dense as fresh water.

Klausner said the key feature of
his system is that it can tap warmed
Water plants have used to cool their
machines to heat the salt water in-
tended for desalination, turning a
waste product into a useful one.
He has successfully tested a small
experimental prototype in his lab,
producing about 500 gallons of
fresh water daily.


Courthouse Records

Get Special Treatment


BY CARL D. BOATWRIGHT
Clerk of Court


Q: What if the courthouse burned
to the ground. Would the Clerk's re-
cords be lost?
A: The Clerks of the Circuit Court
- have been mandated by the Florida%
Constitution to be the keepers of all
official documents and records. We
take this task quite seriously, and
take all steps available to us to en-
sure records are not lost.
In the past, before the age of tech-
- nolog.v, records were tragically lost
,due to fire, flood or other cata-
Sstrophic events, much to the frustra-
tion of people looking to recreate
their family tree or trying to recon-
struct history for whatever reason.
Fortunately, we live in a great age


in which such loss is virtually im-
possible.
Physical records are stored in
climate-controlled, steel encased
vaults located off-site, away from
the courthouse to insure their preser-
vation.
In addition, records are now stored
on computer-generated software
with back-up procedures which en-
sure they will never be lost. Increas-
ingly, even historic records across
the state are being scanned and
stored electronically.
If the courthouse were to be de-
stroyed, you can rest assured that the
records would be safe!
If you have any questions or com-
ments about this column, please for-
ward them to: Carl D. Boatwright,
Clerk of the Court, County Court-
house, Room 10, Monticello, Fl
32344.


From Our Photo File


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4
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NEWLY INSTALLED officers of the Woman's
Club, in May,in 1988 include: L-R: Edna
Eleazer, Bonnie McClellan, Bobbi Krebs,


Lottie Berry and Louise Chitwood. Installing
Officer was Donna Wiehaus, back to
camera. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


C, Short Takes & Other Notions


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

Rotary International celebrates its-
100th anniversary this week. The lo-
cal Rotary Club was chartered in
1983 with Mike Sims serving as the
first president. Over the years, the
club has donated more than
$100,000 to community groups and
projects.
A delegation of Rotarians %ere In
hand Wednesday night at the big
100th anniversary dinner held at the
University Club. Dr. Wes Scoles
serves "as current president of the
Monticello Club.
What about this? According to the
Department of Education, 61 per-
cent of low income families have no
books in their homes for their chil-
dren. Additionally, more than 80
percent of the preschool and after
school programs serving at risk chil-
dren have no books at all.
I often wonder if we're overstating
the importance of computers in ele-


mentary school. Young people have
applied for work at this newspaper
touting their computer skills yet they
could not write a simple declarative
sentence. Something is wrong with
this.
Pam and Barry Kelly sponsoring a
dance tonight at Opera House with
proceeds going to the Relay for
Life. They join a number of organi-
zations and individuals raising
money for the fight against cancer
Put your dancing' shoes onr and join
in the fun.
Didja know life insurers are
among the largest holders of un-
claimed money? Hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars in policy benefits go
unclaimed and unpaid every year
upon the deaths of the insured be-
cause beneficiaries aren't aware that:
policies exist.
The top-ranked hospital is Johns
Hopkins. Mayo Clinic ranked sec-
ond ,and Massachusetts General
third. Rankings are based on a na-
tionwide survey of doctors and an
analysis of death rates and staff


among other areas.
A 1950s study reported that 95
percent of diets fail. Similar findings
in 1992 from National Institutes of
Health gives the impression that it is
almost impossible to, lose weight
and keep it off. New surveys indi-
cate that success rates are much
higher.
On average, those who make a
concerted effort to lose weight man-
age to'keep off about "5 percent 6f
the pounds for two ears. After five
years, most have kept off at least 50
percent.
Our county had a good delegation
at the North West Florida Legisla-
tive Day Wednesday... Seems like
there are more and more semis rum-
bling through town.
Americans 55 and older control 70
percent of the country's personal
wealth. Unfortunately, fraud com-
plaints to the Federal Trade Com-
mission by older Americans in-
creased by 80 percent last year.
Quotable quotes from Ben Frank-
lin: "Wisdom goes not by years."


"Learning is a treasure that accom-
panies its owner everywhere." "Bad
news travels fast." "You cannot run
with the hare and hunt with the
hounds." "Oppbrtunity seldom
knocks twice."
Kiplinger reports "irrational exu-
berance" is worrying the Federal
Reserve Board again. Chairman
Alan Greenspan wants to curb
.speculative buying of housing and
other- assets .including public stock
offerings. i,
The hard work is ahead for Iraqis.
They must produce a draft constitu-
tion by August 15 and it must be ap-
proved in a referendum on Oct. 15.
If the document does not win ap-
proval, they go back to the drawing
board and start over.

I like the new angle parking
spaces downtown. Visibility is
greatly enhanced. Please let City
Clerk Emily Anderson know how
you feel about the new angles be-
cause spaces on U.S. 90 and 19 are
targeted for the change.


Three Digit Codes For Services


BY BRAULIO L. BAEZ
Chairman

Viruallh even telephone user.
knows that dialing the digits 8-0-0
to initiate a call insures a toll-free
. phone call. Equally recognizable are
the digits 9-1-1, which when dialed,
codes are used in many communities
in Florida to provide a range of
services. Those codes and their ap-
plication are outlined below.
211 Community information and
referral services are provided via
this code in some communities in]
Florida.' Potential users should in-
quire locally or, alternatively, can
check http://flairs.
http://flairs.org/florida21 Inetworkpl:
an.htm for a listing of active 2iil
providers.
If a community service agency,"
which may provide social or health-
services, wishes to acquire this num-.


ber, it must make a request to the
Agency for Health Care Administra-
tion.

There are 11 active 211 regional
and local call centers serving 33 of
Florida's 67 counties, supplying 211
services to 75 percent of the state's
population.

311 This code is reserved for non-
emergency police and other govern-
mental services. In communities
where this code is in use, it provides
residents with a simple way of gain-
ing access to local law enforcement
in circumstances that lack urgency
or to local government services
deemed appropriate by city or-
county officials.

In extreme circumstances, such as
hurricanes, the 311 code may be,
used when local 911 emergency
numbers are overloaded.


411 Most consumers recognize
this code as providing local direc-
tory assistance. At one time, calls to
411 were free. However, customers
should check to determine what
ineir calling plan charges for this
service.
511 The Florida Department of
Transportation implements and ad-
ministers the 511 service in the
state, which, like the 211 code, is
not in use statewide. In parts of

Florida where the code is in use -
mostly major markets callers can
receive travel information.

611 This code is assigned to local
-phone companies to provide cus-
tomers access to telephone repair
services.

711 This number is used to gain
access to the Florida Telecommuni-
cations Relay Service.


This system, created by the Legis-
lature in 1991, provides access to
the telecommunications network for
individuals with speech, hearing or
dual sensory disabilities.
811 The 811 code.currently pro-
vides access to the business offices
of the local service company, but
this may change in the next few
years.

Through the Pipeline Safety Im-
provement Act of 2002, Congress
mandated the establishment of a
three-digit nationwide toll-free num-
ber for states to use for a one-call
notification system. An advisory
group to the Federal Communica-
tions Commission has recommended
the use of 811.
911" Probably the most recognized
of the three-digit codes, 911 is for
emergency services only.


Swallowing Disorders Targeted


BY JILL PEASE
University of Florida

A University of Florida research-
team will evaluate the effectiveness
of a new therapy for the treatment of
swallowing disorders.
Led by Michael Crary, Ph.D., a
professor of communicative disor-
ders at the UF College of Public
Health'and Health Professions,. the
team will investigate how useful
electrical stimulation is in treating
patients who are unable to swallow
food or drink following disease or


illness,
The therapy involves taking elec-
trodes that emit very low electrical
currents and placing them on the pa-
tient's neck, with the goal stimulat-
ing inactive muscles.
Electrical stimulation has been
used for years in physical therapy
and other rehabilitation medicine
fields, Crary said. Although it has
shown promise for the treatment of
swallowing disorders, electrical
stimulation has never been evalu-
ated scientifically for its effective-
ness with this condition.
"Electrical stimulation may be a


good technique, and it certainly is
supported by a lot of anecdotal evi-
dence, but we need to systematically
study the outcomes of the therapy
and identify who might benefit most
from this approach," Crary said.
An estimated 15 million Ameri-
cans suffer from swallowing disor-
ders. The condition can affect pa-
tients with stroke, Parkinson's dis-
ease, traumatic injury, or head and
neck cancer.
Researchers will test VitalStim,
the only electrical stimulation de-
vice approved by the United States
Food and Drug Administration for


this use, with funding from the
Chattanooga Group, the device's
manufacturer.
Following an evaluation of swal-
lowing ability, participants enrolled
in the study will receive electrical
stimulation therapy five days a week
for up to three weeks. At the end of
treatment, the patient's swallowing
ability will be reevaluated to meas-
ure his or her progress.
Researchers also will conduct two
national surveys of swallowing
therapists to gather information on
(See Swallowing Page 5)


a ~ L r I


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A 1.1







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005 PAGE 5


of animals in house, and the num-
bers of incoming and outgoing
pets, as their. meeting Monday
night.
Member Tina Ames had both
good new and bad for the group.


"My name is Pete and I am a good hunting dog. You think
I can't catch that rabbit? Why, just give me a good home
and take good care of me. Then watch my dust!" (News
Photo)

'Pete' Humane Society

Adoptable Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The County Humane Society has-
named "Pete" as its adoptable pet of
the week.
Pete is a full-blooded Pointer, neu-
tered male, and all his immuniza-
tions'are current. His date of birth is
Nov., 2000.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
said it appears that Pete is a former


Swallowing
(Continued From Page 4)
how many people are using electri-
'cal stimulation for their patients and
the outcomes of the treatment.
. "Eating and drinking at gatherings
,with family and friends and business
functions is so important in our-cul-
ture," Crary said. "People who"in
longer have that ability are separated
from others and may become shut-
ins. Anyone who has significant re-
striction or loss of swallowing
ability will experience a total change
in his or her life. It is very important
that we find the most effective treat-
ments for swallowing problems."
To be eligible to participate in the
study, candidates must be between
the ages of 21 and 90 and ha'e ex-
perienced swallowing difficulties for
at least six months. Interested par-
ticipants can contact Crary at 352-
273-6159 or mcrary@phhp.ufl.edu.


hunting dog that received no loving
attention.
"He seems lonely and needs a lot
of TLC," she said. "He's very strong
and loves to run, it might be best for
him to go back to hunting."
She added that he does not get
along well with other, animals and
likes to dig.
To adopt Pete as a full-time, life-
time hunting partner, or to adopting
any of the many other animals at the
shelter, contact the shelter at 342-
0244.


GO


w e


.Metal Roof is optional
Call 1
(850) 2
Toll Free 1-8
Visit Our New Home
93'3 e rT


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Humane Society
received an update on the number




i "IAl


Ames added that she was able to
get the shelter's spot at the Pet Su-
per Market back for cats. Since then,-
two had been adopted and three are
currently housed there.
Foster Committee Chair Martha: ,
Jean Martin advised that there are
22 foster homes in the program, 16
of which are currently active.
In those homes, 28 animals, in-
cluding six dogs, 12 puppies, eight


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Humane Society Advises Of


Current, Coming Events


kittens and two cats, currently re-
side.
President Caroline Carswell ad-
vised that the membership drive
continues and encouraged all mem-
bers to get at least one new member
to join.
Membership Chair Martha Ca-
-nady informed that there were pres-
ently 205 members of the society
and that all incoming mail to the
organization, is now logged.
Ames said the shelter was still
badly in need of fence repair and
that the front gate, which was re-
cently destroyed, needed to be re-
placed as soon as possible.
She stressed the necessity of
scheduling a shelter workday 8
.a.m, Saturday, March 12, until the
'necessary work was completed.
Ames urged volunteers to plan to
be present for the workday.
She added that several adoption
booths were soon coming and vol-
unteers were needed for transporta-
tion, manning the booths and
animal bathing before hand.
Ames said she was also attempt-
ing to organize a Monticello booth
for March.
Adoption booths being conducted
for March are PetCo, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., March 5 and 6, and at
Petsmart, 11 a.m.to 4 p.m, March
20.


Members were reminded that the
WCTV spot was scheduled for
March 17 and the next Board of Di-
rectors meeting is March 7.
The general membership meeting
is scheduled for March 21. Both
meetings are 7 p.m. at the shelter.
To volunteer, foster, become a
member or adopt one of the many
animals in need of homes at the
shelter, call 342-0244.


She said that during their last regu-
lar WCTV spot, the puppy they
featured was adopted the same day
and the other puppies from the
same litter, were all adopted a day
or two later.
During January, 22 animals were
adopted, including eight kittens,
eight puppies, four adult dogs and
two adult cats.
Six of those adoptions were from
the shelter and 16 were through
other sources such as adoption
booths.
Though 22 animals were adopted
for the month, a total of 39, 24 ca-
nines and 15 felines, came in. Cur-
rently there are 28 canines and 27-
felines housed at the shelter.
"We are at what I call 'critical:
mass' on our canines," said Ames.
"We are unable to accept any more
dogs or puppies until further notice.
"I have contacted several rescue.
groups to try to get some of them
out of here," she said. Ames asked
for assistance with fostering, adop-
tion booths and spreading the word.
"Just pick out one dog or puppy
and make it your job to find them a
home," said Ames. "I do not want
to euthanise any of our animals, so
please, help me with this."


LU i Lii t 1


Contact Numbers:
Office: 386-754-1132
Fax: 815-361-9196-
Cell: 386-697-4824


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005


Lifestyle


Post 49 Shrimp


Dinner Successful


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

American Legion Post 49 and the
Ladies Auxiliary held a successful
Shrimp Dinner recently at the Le-
gion Hall.
120 tickets were sold in advance
at $7.50 each. Extra shrimp was
cooked to allow ticket sales at the
door.
Shrimp was served with a huge
oven baked potato, garden salad,
homemade cakes for dessert, and
iced tea.
In other club news: at the February


meeting, attendees were greeted by
Speaker Michael Bishop, County
Veterans Affair Officer. His pro-
gram centered around health bene-
fits, and just who is eligible to
receive them.
He spoke briefly on the various
categories and explained what is
available to the veterans and their
family members. He encouraged,
veterans to use the services of the
Veterans Hospital or Clinic.
Funds from the sale of the "Ball
Drop" tickets, a charity event to
benefit the County Special Olym-
pics, were collected.


The goal of the members was to
sell 100 tickets for this event, to be
held the end of February. There are
several prizes to be won with the
grand prize, a 2005 Ford Escape.
The Ladies Auxiliary were cred-
ited for the toiletries they collected
and donated to the Veterans Hospi-
tal, during the Christmas season.
The Auxiliary is currently collect-
ing stocking caps and white socks
for the hospital veterans.
Anyone wishing to donate for this
purpose, may contact President
Sheila Slik at 997-8103.
A Fish Fry is tentatively planned
for the Biker Weekend of Mar. 18
and 19.


Edward Jones To Host
'Future Of Social Security'


SHEILA SLIK, president, takes money for
tickets at the.Saturday Shrimp Dinner Fund-
raiser for the American Legion Post 49 Aux-


iliary, which sold more than 120 dinners,
from Martha and Lee Canady. (News Photo)


; "f
^ A
t -


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Edward Jones investment repre-
sentative in Monticello, Robert Dav-
ison, will host a free one hour
satellite broadcast titled "The Future
of Social Security" noon, Tuesday,
March 1, at the Edward Jones office
located at 205 East Washington
Street.
With- Social Security and the
clamor to reform it dominating the
headlines, and baby boomers start-
ing to retire, and people living
longer, many individuals fear Social
Security will fail in the near future.


Edward Jones specialists will ex-
plore the factors driving the Social
Security reform; possible solutions
to reforming Social Security; and
how these solutions may affect in-
vestors.
This interactive event is presented
at select Edward Jones branch of-
fices nationwide via the firm's pri-
vate video network.
To reserve a seat or for more in-
formation about the Tuesday pro-
gram, call Davison at
850-997-2572.
If you are unable to attend, addi-
tional viewing opportunities are
available.


Business Community I church NewsI
Prayer Breakfast


-JZ~ 4.


TAMMIE PECK, with children Cinnamon and
Autumn, enjoy the shrimp dinner served by

JCHS PTSO To

Meet February 28


Jefferson County High School
PTSO meets 6 p.m. Monday, Feb.
28, in the Media Center at the
school.
Principal Michael Bryan and Cur-
riculum Coordinator Marguerite
Bulloch will present a program on
how the Department of Education
calculates school report cards.
All interested parents and citizens'
are encouraged to anend.
The Florida Coiprehensive As-
sessments Test (FCAT) will be ad-


,a : ." --.,'+ .g,! ',, j
the American Legioi Poost 49
Fundraiser, Saturiay. (News Photo)


ministered from Feb. 28 through
March 11.
FCAT Reading for grades 9 and
10 takes place Feb. 28.
FCAT Math for grades 9 and 10
takes place March 1.
Students who are retaking FCAT
Reading and Math will be tested on
March 2 and 3.
FCAT Science will be taken on
March 7 for students in grade 11.
Students who have a 3.0 average'
for the third six weeks will be in-


MONTICELLO ROTARY

CLUB


I RELAY FOR LIFE FUNDRAISER


REL
FOR



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AY
LIFE

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IS' SATURDAY AT
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10:30 TO 1:30
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY


L
A.


Auxiliary


The Business Community Prayer
Breakfast will be held 7 a.m., Thurs-
day, March 3, at the First Baptist
Church in Lloyd.
Guest speaker is Virginia Glass, a
Tallahassee realtor.
All are encouraged'',to' altifYd' and
to bring a guest. : v M q


vited to participate in a reward ac-
tivity in April at FAMU.
Students whose parents sign in
with Bulloch at the PTSO meeting
will receive a pass to go to lunch
with the. seniors for the rest of the
week.


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Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
Fund raisers more than welcome,


Call Tammie Peck @ 997-6455


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Bethel AME Church will hold its
annual Evening in White, 4 p.m.,
Sunday. Guest speaker is Rev.
Elizabeth Yates, Pastor Tanner
Chapel AME Church, along with the
church choir and congregation of
Quinc',.


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Camellia Circle Learns To


Transfer Floral Designs


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Camellia Garden Circle met
recently at the home of Jennifer
French, where they participated in a
program of pounding pansies to
transfer the design.
The program was presented by
member Jane Davis, who demon-
strated how to get the colors of the
pansies to transfer to note cards,
paper, cloth, and the like.
This is done by placing the flow-
ers face down onto the item to be
decorated, and placing a white sheet
of paper on top of the flowers, used
as a guard to keep the flower from
tearing apart.
With a hammer, gently pound and
rub over the guard page over the en-
tire flower.
Lift the paper and the flower from
the item that is meant to be deco-
rated. The colors from the flower
will be transferred directly to the
item meant to be decorated.
The ladies enjoyed trying this
technique, as there was much
talking and laughter during the
pounding. Some even chose to keep
the guard paper, as it made a beauti-
ful, colorful piece of artwork.
A variety of colorful flowers and
greenery was used for the demon-
stration, allowing the ladies to create
some colorful creations.
The artwork was all signed by the
individuals before members chose a
few of the floral note cards to be ad-


dressed and sent to members that
could not attend due to illness.
Jenifer French was the hostess for
this month's meeting with all the
members bringing in snacks and
treats to share.
A brief meeting took place, with
Chairman Isabelle de Sercey in-
forming the membership about the
recent Board Meeting and upcoming
events.
The Monticello Garden Club is
still in need of a President and 1st
Vice President for the new year. The
Club is planning to donate benches
to the Oakfield Cemetery.
In other news, Green Industries in-
vited any Garden Club member to
attend a Landscape and Design
Workshop on Feb. 24.
Camellia Circle member Becky
Bermundz will be moving in April
to Nicaragua. She will be sadly
missed by all of her friends.
DeSercey also mentioned that the
Circle might want to give some
thought to setting up a booth for
Bike Week beginning on Mar. 18.
This will be brought up for discus-
sion again at the next meeting,
which will be on Sunday, Mar. 6.
The March 6 meeting will be held
at the home of Master Gardener,'
Lynn McGrady. The program will
be 'Pressing Flowers' and the pre-
senter will be Becky Bermundz.
A Field Trip to Toby's Farm, in
Quitman, Georgia'is scheduled for
Sunday, Mar. 20. Jean Brenner will
be the hostess for this trip. Members


i.

,~-----
. ; ...


will meet and carpool. There will be
more discussion about this trip at the
Mar. 6 meeting.
On a final note, dues are due now
in order to be listed in the Club rec-
tory.









1

>..


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005 PAGE 7


~ru~


HOLDING a completed note card, Isabelle de Sercey
watches Carolyn Milligan peel a pounded flower from her
note card design.


Chili Sale

Set Friday


ISABELLE de SERCEY dis-
plays color flowers used to
make transfer designs.
(News Photo)

CONGRATULATIONS
Gerrold and Yolanda Austin cel
brated their 15th Wedding Annive
sary with a quiet dinner.
Gerrold and the former Yoland
Howard were married Feb. 1"
1990, in San Antonio, TX.
His is a retired. US Army SS(
and currently employed as Direct(
of the Monticello Boys and Girl
Club, as a Technology Leader.
iThic- are members ofGrejier Fel
lowship MB Church. ;o: ;,'
The couple has three children
Gerrold II, Charlene and Sam III.
They will renew their vows
their church.
His parents \,.ere man-ied Feb. 1"
1945..


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Health Department
will host a chili lunch noon until
2 p.m., Friday, to benefit the
Count's 2005 Relay For Life "A
Blast From The Past".
Cost is $5 per meal and includes
a heart bowl of chili, freshlI
baked golden cornbread, and an ice
Scold soft drink
The meal is a carry out affair, but
the team is also offering to deliver
to businesses with five or more
meal orders.
The teamnencourages residents not
e- to miss this taste-tempting event.
r- To place an order call 342-0170
and press #3 for the clinic or fax to
342-0257.
a

Aucilla SHARE
, Signup Dates
Is) The Aucilla SHARE program has
announced its schedule for the
r March Food Program.
Registration will be from 10 a.m.,
' untiil no' on on Saurda, Feb. 26 and
:Saturday, Mar. 5 at the Central Bap-
tist Church and at the Library.
Distribution will be from 9 until
t 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Mar. 19 at,
the Central Baptist Church, located
on Tindell Road.
For additional information call
997-263 1or 997-2220. .


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Jack, Jim

Seek Good

Homes


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Jefferson Humane Society has
named the duo of "Jack and Jim" as
adoptables of the week.
Jack and Jim are longhair domes-
tic male felines both neutered, im-
munizations up to date bor June,
2003.
Jack is gray and white and Jim is a
brown tabby.
They are described as being very
loving and playful. "They're more
loving than anything else," said
shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista.
"They love loving."
Jack and Jim are believed to be,
brothers and they must be adopted.
together, therefore, there is a special.
adoption fee for the pair, is $100.
"They are two awesome cats,"
said Bautista. "They get along ex-
ceptionally well with everybody,
adults, children, other cats and they
even love dogs."
Anyone interested in adopting
Jack and Jim or any of the many
other loving animals at the shelter,
call 342-0244.


.:-W Si I I I .ArlpqL-L!0l t I -q
JACK AND JIM are brothers. They seek and good home.
"We share everything," they say, "and we don't eat much,
and won't mess up your house." (News Photos)


It's easy to find government
information atwww.FirstGov.gov
or 1 (800) FED INFO.
SFIRSTGOVgov
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005

Homes Of Mourning


Rodney M. Hamm
Rodney M. Hamm 20, a student
died Saturday, February 19, 2005 in'
Thomasville, Ga.
The Memorial Discourse service
will be at 2:00 p.m. EST Saturday
February 26, 2005 at the Kingdom
Hall of Jehovah's Witness, Monti-
cello.
Survivors include his Father and
Mother, Roosevelt and Katie
Hamm, his brothers Jason and
Kevin Hamm and his sisters, Jac-
queline H. Bowdry and Kathy H.
Jones, and his grandmother, Lee
Anna Hamm all of Monticello.
Lucille Kinsey Miller
Lucille Kinsey Miller, 86, died
Tuesday, February 22, 2005 in Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
The service will be held at 10 a.m.
EST Friday, February 25, 2005 at
graveside at Woodville Cemetery in
Woodville, Florida.
Interment at: Woodville Cemetery
10 a.m. Woodville, Florida.
Memorial contributions may be
made to: Lighthouse Children's
Home, 7771 Mahan Drive, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32309; Meals on
Wheels, 2518 W. Tennessee St.,
Tallahassee, Florida 32304.
She was born in Monticello, and
had resided in Tallahassee for over
sixty years. She was of the Pente-
costal faith and was a member of the
Four Square Gospel Church. She
was also a devoted business woman.
She is survived by: 3 sons Buck
Miller and wife Pamela of Monti-
cello. Gary Miller and wife Sherrie
of Ochlocknee Bay. Steve Miller
and wife Liz of Madison. Sister, Vi-
ola Tully of Medark. 9 Grandchil-
dren, 1 Great-grand child.
She was preceded in death by her
husband B.B. Miller.
Beggs Funeral Home of Tallahas-
see, Florida is in charge of all ar-
rangements.

Conrad Norton, Sr.
Conrad Norton, Sr. 90, a Retired
School Bus Driver, died Monday
February 21, 2005 in Tallahassee.


The service will be at 1:00 p.m.
EST. on Saturday, February 26,
2005 at St. Phillip AME Church
(Highway 27 S.) in Monticello, with
the Reverend J.W. Tisdale, pastor,
officiating.
Viewing will be from 2:00 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. on Friday February 25,
2005.
He was a native and lifelong Resi-
dent of Jefferson County, Mr. Nor-
ton was a staunch member of Sr.
Phillip AME Church where he had
served as a steward, trustee and
class leader. Most recently, he had
served as Steward Emeritus. He re-
tired from the Jefferson County
School District as a 20 year school
bus driver. In prior years, he had
worked at Elberta Crate Factory in
Tallahassee.
He was survived by his wife of 67
years, Nettie Ransom Norton.
Others left to honor his memory
and to treasure his love are his sons,
Joseph Norton and wife, Willie
Mae, of Crawfordville, Fl, Conrad
Norton, Jr. And wife, Lucille, John
M. Norton and wife, Nancy, and
Jerome Norton, and his daughters,
Gloria Norton and Pauline Norton
Hayes and husband, Curtis, Sr. all of
Monticello, and his two sisters, Mil-
lie Mae Wilson and Susie Mae Pugh
and a sister-in-law, Rosa Lee John-
son, all of Monticello; 15 grand
children and 16 great grandchildren,
along with a host of nieces,
nephews, and other relatives and
friends.
Mrs. Flowerzell Thompson
Saffo
Mrs. Flowerzell T. Saffo, 91, a Re-
tired Homemaker, died Thursday
February 17, 2005 in Gainesville,
Florida.
The service will be at 11:00 a.m.
on Saturday, February 26, 2005 at
Greater Fellowship Missionary Bap-
tist Church, Monticello, Fl with the
Reverend Wilson Hall, officiating.
.With burial at Springfield Cemetery
in Lloyd, Fl.
Viewing will be from 2:00 p.m. to
5:00 p.m. Friday, February 25, 2005


at Tillman Funeral Home with a
wake being held at Casa Bianca
Missionary Baptist Church Friday
evening from 6:00 p.m. until 7:30
p.m.
She was a native of Jefferson
County, Mrs. Saffo spent all of her
life in Monticello, except for the last
month or so, she lived in Gainesville
with her youngest daughter.
She was a member of Casa Bianca
Missionary Baptist Church where
she served diligently as a church
mother.
Mother Saffo will be sadly missed
by her large and extended family, to
whom she was the matriarch.
To treasure her love and her leg-
acy, she is survived by two sons,
Henry Roberts of Tampa and Willie
Saffo and wife, Catherine, of Monti-
cello, Fl., her four daughters, Lav-
eme R. Mack and husband, the
Reverend James, Pearlye Ann Gal-
lon and husband, James, both of
Monticello and Altameaser Harmon,
Rufus, of Jacksonville, Fl and
Gwendolyn Saffo, of Gainesville, a
sister-in-law, Pearlie M. Thompson
of Madison, Fl, 13 grandchildren, 14
great grand children and a host of
nieces, nephews, and other relatives
and friends.

Janie Gallon West
Janie Gallon West, 71, a Retired
Head Start Teacher, died Friday,
February 18, 2005 in Valdosta, Ga.
The service will be at 2:00 p.m. on
Saturday February 26, 2005 at Shi-
loh Missionary Baptist Church,
Greenville, Florida, with the Rev.
J.B. Duval, Pastor, officiating with
Cremation following.
Viewing will be from 3:00 to 7:00
p.m. on Friday February 25, 2005 at
the church (Shiloh) with Family re-
ceiving friends. Other services, from
6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
She was a Greenville native, Mrs.
West lived in Rochester, NY for
many years before retiring to Green-
ville in 1981. She was employed be-
fore Retiring as a teacher in the
daycare Head Start business. She
was a member of Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church, in Greenville.
To cherish her beautiful life are


her husband, Reginald A. West of
Greenville, her daughters Evonne
Manor, Alycia Manor, and Carol
Hamilton, of Greenville, and Bessie
Elaine. Thomas and husband, Mal-
colm, and Genel Sinkler and hus-
band, Levi, both of Rochester, NY,
her son Larry J. Manor and wife,
Tewana of Rochester, her mother,
Mrs. Bessie Jones Gallon of Green-
ville and her sister, Dorothy Gallon
Griffin of Madison, Fl, 14 Grand-
children and five great-
grandchildren. Mrs. West was.
preceded in.death by her Father,
James Gallon and son, Willie
Manor, Jr.


Rainfall


Level Is


Up Here


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Rainfall for the county in January
was below the level for the same pe-
riod last year and well below the av-
erage for this month, according to
the latest report from the Suwannee
River Water Management District
(SRWMD).
Even so, the rainfall here and in
Dixie County was the highest in the
district.
The hydrologic conditions report
shows that the county got 1.28
inches of rainfall last month, com-
pared with 1.61 inches the previous
year and 4.87 inches on average
during January.
The average rainfall for the dis-
trict, meanwhile, was 1.35 inches
last month, 1.58 inches last January,
and 4.18 inches overall.

The rainfall deficiency is gener-
ally reflected in declining ground-
water and lake levels across the
district.
River levels, meanwhile, generally
fluctuated around average levels in
January.
The SRWMD continues to recom-
mend water conservation.


Ghost Tours Filling


Fast For Bike Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Slots are filling fast for Haunted
Tours of the Big Bend Ghost
Trackers during the weekend of
March 18, and 19, when Monticello
will host more than 1,000 cyclists
participating in an annual bike tour.
BBGT Founder Betty Davis said
the request to conduct the tours
was originally made by Opera
House Director Jan Rickey and
members eagerly anticipate the
event.
"We're going to be set up under a
canopy tent all day those days, pre
selling tickets for the tours," said
Davis. She said that members will
be doing two tours per night, with
the first at 7 p.m, and the second at
9p.m.
If demand is exceptionally high as
it is expected to be, the BBGT will
add an additional midnight tour.
BBGT members will be dressed


in the clothing of the era and go all
out, performing skits, such as: the
ghost of a soldier visiting his
mourning wife, confederate sol-
diers walking the streets and the at-
tack of a carpetbagger.
Tours will be led by lighted lan-
terns, as the haunted history and sto-
ries of the sites, along with BBGT
investigation findings are revealed.
The tours are $10 for adults and
$5 for children.
Davis said recently, that the
BBGT has discovered interesting
facts about resident Scottie Ebber-
bach's home, as well as the loca-
tion of the grave site of the Henry
Perkins family in Roseland Ceme-
tery.
With these findings, the route of
the haunted tour changes and the
Perkins grave site will more than
likely be an attraction during the
BBGT workshop ghost hunt seg-
ments in the old 1827 Cemetery.
To make reservations for the tours
call the BBGT at 562-2516.


-i --: :I~



LEADING a Big Bend Ghost Tour are Star Nicholes, and
Ricky Letellier, complete with costumes and lantern.
(News Photo)


- I ----- I I I I -- I


- i.. i -- I












Sports


ACA JV Girls


Down Madison


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors JVs defeated
Madison Academy, 13-7, for 3-0
record
Coach Frank Brown said it was a
much harder fought game than the
Lady warriors would have wanted.
"After our two wins, they
(Madison) knew we were a good
strong playing team, and they
played at the top of their game,"
said Brown.
Madison gave up 15 hits to ACA,
which included 10 singles, four
doubles and one triple. The Lady
Warriors had a total of 12 RBI's
and 12 stolen bases during the
game.
"We got off to a slow start and
then the girls realized that they
can't take it easy here and came'
back to life," said Brown.
Paige Thurman went three for
four, had three singles, one double,


two RBI's and four stolen bases.
Linsey Day went three for four
with one single, two doubles, four
RBI's and one stolen base.
Brown added that one of her dou-
bles was within an arm's length of
going over the fence, flying high
and hitting the bottom of it.
There's only been two hit out of the
park in three years and that hit was
a close one to going out," Brown
said.
Mallory Plaines went one for four
with a long-drive triple that hit the
fence, three RBI's and two stolen
bases; Tristen Sorensen went one
for four with a single; Hannah
Sorensen went two for four with
two singles, one RBI; Katelyn
Levine went one for four with one
single and two stolen bases; and
Erin Kelly went two for three with
one single, one double, two RBI's
and one stolen base.
Thurman pitched the game, strik-
ing out five batters and giving up
11 hits and seven walks.


KAITLIN JACKSON demonstrates her skill during an ACA
practice session, with her two handed return, a skill she
carries over into her play on the court. (News Photo)


ACA Varsity Tennis Team

Loses To Munrde 1-6


FRAN HUNT:
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity tennis team lost a very hard-
fought battle against Munroe, 1-6,
for 0-2 season
In singles action, Amanda Sapp
lost to Mandy Clark, 1-8; Courtney
Connell lost to Meg Summerford,
1-8; and Kaitlin Jackson won over
Jessica Joyner, 8-2.
Elizabeth Shirley lost to Anna


Donner, 1-8; Rebekah Aman lost to
Elizabeth Bridges, 5-8; Ramsey
Revell and Ivie Thomas couldn't
get past the 8-9 score and Revell
lost the tiebreaker, 7-8.
In doubles action, Sapp and Con-
nell lost a hard-fought 7-8 battle
against Clark and Summerford; and
Jackson and Shirley lost a hard-
fought 5-8 battle to Joyner and
Donner.
The Lady .Warriors play John
Paul, 4 p.m., Thursday, there.


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JUDY FAIRCLOTH, and Jennifer Ellis are members of
Team #5 in the ladies Simply Smashing Tennis League.



ACA Loses 74-55


To Apalachicola


FRAN HUNT
St affWriter

Warriors lost the second round
in the semifinals in district play to
Apalachicola, 74-55, ending their
season with a 15-11 record.
Coach Richard Roccanti said that
the 15-11 record was the best for
the Warriors in the past 10 years
ard possibly the third best record
e\ er for ACA.
Stephen Griffin led the charge for
the Warriors with 17 points and 10
rebounds for a double/double, one
assis.i, 0e iteal. Rideclk PImIIIes.i,
I points, three assists, .ti .- re-
bounds, two steals; and Drew Sher-
rod. 10 points and 11 rebounds for
a double/double, seven assists, two
blocked shots, one steal. He shot at
11 "i percent from the field.
Daniel Roccanti, three points,
r. o assists, one rebound, three
steals; Jeremy Tuckey, five points,
one assist,. six rebounds; and Kyle
day, five points, five rebounds.
Coach Roccanti concluded that.
the Warriors were shooting at only
40 percent from the field, where
they normally average about 50


percent, and averaging 20 percent
from the three-point area, where
they normally average about 30
percent.


HMS Amends

Spring Schedule

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School has added
" two games to the softball schedule
and moved one .pn the baseball
sched le.
S Gaines added to the softball
schedule include: Trinity Catholic,
S4 p.m., April 13, there; and Trinity
SCatholic, 4 p.m., April 14, here.
On the baseball schedule, the
game scheduled against Trinity
Catholic for April 5, has been
changed to 4 p.m., March 29, there.




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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005 PAGE 9


Simply Smashing Wins One Match


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Simply Smashing ladies tennis
team, won one of six matches last
week against the Split Steps.

Team #1, Katie Brock and substi-
tute Judy Backstan, won its first
set, 6-3, lost the second, 1-6 and
lost the tiebreaker, 3-6.

Team #2, Maxi Miller and Patty
Hardy, lost its sets, 5-7 and 5-7.

Team #3, Cindy Williams and
Paula Joiner, won its sets, 7-5 and


ACA JV Girls

Softball Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy re-
ports the roster for the girls' JV
softball team.

Eighth graders include: Jodie
Bradford, Erin Kelly, Nikki
Kisamore, Katelyn Levine, Angela
McCune, Kalyn Owens, Mallory
Plaines, Michaela Roccanti, Olivia
Sorensen, Miranda Wilder and Sa-
vannah Williams.

Ninth graders include: Courtney
Brasington, Lindsey Day, Nicole
Mathis, Hannah Sorensen and team
captains, Tristen Sorensen and
Paige Thurman.

The team managers are fifth
grader Skyler Hanna and sixth
grader Sarah Sorensen and the head
coach is frank Brown.


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"P----s~


7-6.
Team #4, Trish Wirick and Laura
Phillips-Kirchhoff, lost its first set;
4-6, won the second, 7-5; and lost
the third set, 6-7.
Team #5, Jennifer Ellis and Judy
Faircloth, lost its sets, 3-6 and 4-6
and team #6, substitutes Angie
Delvecchio and Susan Scarboro,
lost their sets, 2-6 and 3-6.
The ladies go up against the
"Drop Shot Divas" 9:30 a.m.,
Thursday, weather permitting, at
Tom Brown Park.


LEGAL NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE.: 05-46-CA FAMILY LAW.
DIVISION NIKKI RANSOM.
TRAMMELL, Petitioner, and JEFFERY
WAYNE TRAMMELL, Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE To
JEFFERY WAYNE TRAMMELL 550
Piney Woods Road, Monticello, Fl, 32344.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been field against you and that you are
required to serve a copy ot tour written
defenses, if any, to Petitioner's Attorney,.
C. Erica White, Esq., whose address is 290
West Washington Street, Monticello, Fl
32344, on or before March 7, 2005, and
file the original with the clerk of this,
Court at the Jefferson County Court
House, before serviceon Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so,
a default may be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition. Copies
of'all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents upon request.'
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and
information. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. Dated: 02/15/05.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By:
Jeri B Pearson, Deputy clerk
2/1,25,3/4,11 pd


k







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005


LEGAL NOTICE

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921-0565.
2/25, fcan
Are you dissatisfied with your present job
and income? Do you want to have more
freedom, time and money? Success is just
a click away. www.startuppower.com.
2/25, fcan
HELP WANTED


Methodist Church Little Angels Preschool
has opening for substitute teachers.
Applicants must' be Christian and have
required child care courses. Please call
997-6400.
2/16,18,23,25 chg


HELP WANTED
Accounting Instructor needed at North
Florida Community College, Madison Fl.
Master's degree in accounting with 18
graduate hours in additional discipline
preferred. Experience in use of technology
in classroom highly desirable. Duties:
Teach 15 credit-hours each semester in
accounting and other qualified area.
Candidates chosen for interview will give
sample presentation utilizing instructional
technology. Duties commence 3/1/2005.
Position also requires having established
office hours, participating in department
and College activities. Teaching may be
night and/or dual enrollment courses on
NFFCC campus and/or at satellite
locations. Applications to: Director HR,
North Florida Community College, 1000
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida
32340. Only complete application packets
considered: letter of interest; resume and
application; copy of transcripts (unofficial
okay). Application available at
www.nfcc.edu. Questions call
850-973-9487. Application packet must be
received by 03/04/2005. EOE
2/18,25,3/2, chg.


HELP WANTED
Drivers Owner Ops &. Co. Drivers
Needed Now! Run SE Only or SE,
Mid-Atl, MW Regional, 0/0's-No Force
Dispatch, Good Pay plus Fuel
(866)250-4292.
2/25, fcan
The City of Monticello is accepting
applications for the position of Police
Patrol Officer. This position requires a
minimum of a high school diploma and
Florida Police Standards. The successful
candidate must live in Jefferson County or
be willing to relocate. The ideal candidate
will have demonstrated police skills, have
some advanced education and some
advanced police certification, such as
Radar or Breathalyzer. The successful
candidate must complete a Department
field training program within the first
month. The position requires a
background check. Salary and benefit
information available upon request.
Submit application and resume to: City of
Monticello 245 S. Mulberry St. Monticello,
Fl 32344 by March 7, 2005
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.


HELP WANTED
Drivers/OTR-Tanker looking for
Professional drivers! NEW 2005
Equipment, Top Pay, BONUSES, Prepass
& EZ Pass, Rider Program & Much more!:
North American Tank Lines:
(866)748-6285.
2/25,fcan
Florida Licensed Physical Therapist And
Physical Therapist Assistant wanted in
Rural Hospital in North Florida Call (850).
973-2271 or Fax Resume to (850)
973-8158.
2/25, fcan
Wanted: Paid Participants Earn
$400-$1150/Week. Guaranteed! Medical
research studies on new products. Our
Fortune 500 clients. No physical work
involved. Easy Qualification. Start Now.
Call Now (800)689-2076.
2/25, fcan
Deliver Travel Trailers For Pay!
Thousands of 30 ft travel trailers
originating from Florida cities. We need
pickup truck owners to deliver.
www.horizontransport.com
2/25, fcan


BUSINESS





DIRECTORY


I


Yor .uc .ial I'Prorol,'.,l u.iul P'int/'ers '
Interior Exterior



342m3288


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.
Custom Homes
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296

Mobile: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


. 5 7/ a "u Ie


Allyn
Ow


*Clay
*Sand
*Top Soil

Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


Sike
ner


1830 Thomasville Road
Tpllahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-3473
(800) 541-8702
Free Delivery To
Tallahassee Hospitals &
Funeral Homes


;Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lie.
#SR0971265


--N


SEPTIC TANK

LAND CLEARIN
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing

THOMAS B. SCOTT,
Rt. I Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


DANNy'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
SERVING ALL OF YOUR
PAINTAND BODYNEED S


97 7-1565
765 E. WASHINGTONST.


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
T, STARTER


0
A
S


I Complete Auto
L Electric Repair
E Service


Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging

997-0039
Licensed & Insured


Register's

Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah
Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH..
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassee
575-7682


HOME MORTGAGE OF
NORTH FLORIDA, INC.
Since 1986
WE SPECIALIZE IN FINANCING FOR'
*Purchases/Refinances
*Loans For The Self Employed
*Manufactured Housing
(including Single ,& non-owner occupied Doublewides)
*Good or Distressed Credit
For Sale By Owners
*No Application Fee
Contact Jim Ayers
& Bartow Myers
(cell 228-8137)
656-4055
Work with experienced Mortgage
Brokers serving this area since 1974
2708 Apalachee Pkwy *656-4055


Appliance

Service
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


Reserve

This

Space

For Only

$10 -

Per Week


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade


Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior Exterior
Residential Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-1544-2917


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YO0

0997-6500

L WHEN YOU NEL) TO SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
REACTOR SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICES
(850) 997-4340 DIAGNOSIS REPAIR I UIPGRDLS

-INSTALLATIONS CONSULTATIONS
wwTim Pea CUSTOM COMPUTERS I o lUIORIA!u s
www.Tim 11Peaiy.com REMOVAL Or VIRUSES, ADWARE, SPYWAKF


-10
$ .99
$1.19
$1.59


+-


Copenhal
Ice 4# .60

A very nice s
T-shirts Chri
$3.99 ee
4LB .60, 8LB .
ree Crystal Lighter
man


Chevron
" tx Timberwolf $1.99 + tx
" tx Red Seal $2.89, + tx
- tx Kodiak $4.41 + tx
gen $4.58 + tx
, 8# .93, 20# .2.25 + tx

electiori and good quality
stian, Florida and others
ach or 3 for $10 + tx
93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
* w/carton purchases. We accept all
.ufacturer's coupon


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389 S
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


This Space Can Be Yours

For Only

$20 Per Week


Advertising Pays!


YOUR LOGS TO
LUMBER AT MY
SITE
Rough-sawn Oaks,
Cherry, and Pecan
available.
Also Planing and
Hauling available
for a fee ...- _


REAL GOOD PAINT
REAL GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
i( Gallon Mininum)

342-3288


Local Glass Company



Aulo Home Commercial
Accepted by All Insurance
Companies
NO INSURANCE?
\'e'll find you a windshield at
a reasonable price!
\'e Install Quality
624 Range St.

464-2500
973-4527


Border 2 Border



Lawn & Landscaping



Ad & Receive
I
A 10%
I I
Discount J

11025 East Mahan
877-4550


Thurman
Tractor
Service
Mowing
SHarrowing
)Food Plots

Licensed S Insured
James Thurman.LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-58;08

850-251-2911

155 JOHNN

CoLLINs R1).


G







SR.


!


'!


I
Kayak
Longhorn
Grizzly







Ice
Fr


I ICountry Mile


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1 9 9


I l


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MONTICELLO(FL)NEW 1


1 -, -,


To Place Your Ad






997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED

Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MOREPAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
2/25, fcan

$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED. Now
accepting applications. $50 cash hiring
bonus guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638. Ext. 107.
Www.USMailingGroup.com.
2/25, fcan

Fast Track Foods or Land O Sun Mngmt.
NOW HIRING Managers, Asst. Managers
and retail assistants in Monticello area.
Competitive pay. 1-352-333-3011 ext. 42.
1/21,-tfn
EXPERIENCED PAINTER. FULL-TIME
POSITION. TRANSPORTATION
REQUIRED. 342-3288
2/18 tfn chg
Part time janitorial help needed in the
Monticello area. Call 681-3148
2/18,23,25,3/2 chg
UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
2/25, fcan

SERVICES


Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
The only ingredient in our 32-oz bottle of
100% pure Tahitian Noni Juice is the juice
of a Noni fruit. Call 997-5644
2123, 3/2, pd
HOME SITTER will sit with your elderly
or disabled loved; one. M-F, hours
negotiable, low rates and references
342-1486 or 510-0998.
2/18,23,25 pd
Discounts For Seniors House painting.,
Int. + Ext., Low Rates, Free Estimates
most pressure washing $45 $50, 551-2000
-1/7, 14, 21, 28, 2/4, 11, 18, 25, %, 11, 18, 25,
pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
-stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
211 -tfn
DIVORCES175-$275'COV ERS children.
etc. Only one signature required!
Excludes govt. Fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-200, ext. 600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977.
2/25, fcan
Do you need your home or office cleaned?
Feel free to call Gina or Rebecca at 342-
1486 or 510-0998.
2/18,23,25 pd
Home child care (in-tPwn) 6 wk up F/T
Professional. fun. loving atmosphere. Call
Heather 519-2369 : '
2/16,18,23,25 pd


GARAGE SALE

Community Flea Market
Sponsored by Lloyd lions Club and
held at the U-Haul Sales & Storage
Warehouse located at 7337-A Old Lloyd
Road from 8am-3pm. on Saturdays.
Spaces available, call 997-5005 or
997-1754. Donations appreciated.
2/11,18.25. nc

FOUND
Found Dog male hunting dog found on
Pearl Street call 342-1486 or 510-998
2/23,,n/c

FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1/26, tfn,c

For Rent 2BR, 1 B house Call 997-3368
2/11,16,18,25 c

3 BR/2 BA in Monticello, extra large living
and dining room, fireplace, CH&A, lots of
kitchen cabinets, W/D hookups, huge
screened sun room, shed and carport on
quiet street. Shopping nearby $650/mo. no
pets/smoking. 850-997-4999
2/11,16

Rental House 3BR/2BA, AV. 4/1/05, 2.5
MI. S of Monticello, EX. COND., C H/A,
HW Floors, LRG. Kitchen, Carport,
Approx. 2300 SQFT. No Large Pets.
$700/Mo 1st & Last Month Dep., $700. Pet
Dep. Ref. Required. 800-252-2755 Days
800-535-8729 Nights.
2/16,18,23,25 pd

FOR SALE

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery 'Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.' '
2/25,fcan

NEW QUEEN Pillowtop mattress set. In
factory plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
Must sell, $175 850-545-7112.
1/14, tfn, c


NEW LIVING ROOM SET: Suggested list
$1400, sell sofa $275 loveseat $225, chair
$175, Set $625 Hard frames with lifetime
g warranty. 850-222-8(79.,
I 21.ifn

'FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT T\ STSTEMl
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE HBO & Cinemax! Access to over
225 channels! Limited time offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
2/25, fcan,

*Dining room table, leaf, and six chairs,
$600 sofa server table, $300 222-2113.
1114 tfn, c

Mattress set: New King Pillow Top
mattress and base. In original plastic,
factory warranty, $295, 850-222-2113.
1/14,tfn,c


Do you want to be just a Christian. Wilh no
denominational names, creeds or Leather Sofa suggested list -1400 100 .
practices? Jesus established. His Church new, see 11 $500. 222-7783
called the Church of Christ and you can 1/14, tfn, c
be a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466. CHERRY SLEIGH BED, Still in box,
1/29 tfn (10/3) never used. Sacrifice $295. 850-222-7783
1/14, tfn, c


Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
2/25, fcan


AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW
$ Program FL Company offers best cash
now options Have money due from
Settlements, Annuities, or Lotteries? Call
(800)774-3113. www.ppicash.com
2/25, fean
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machine Hd.
You approve Loc's- $10,670
(800)836-3464#BO2428.
2/25, fcan UT

AUTOMOTIVE
000 I


Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'97 Dodge Neon 59K miles $2,800
'96 Mercedes 220 $5,800
1/28,tfn ,


FREE

Free mobile home. you move 2 Br, 10x50.
97-6259.


BEDROOM SET 6 pieces. ne" in boxes.
headboard, frame, dresser, mirror, chest,
nightstand. $595. 850-222-9879.
1/14 tfn,c

Enhanced mobile home, 2200sq ft. 1.56 ac.
4/2. sun room, carport, extras. $125,000
997-1093'
2/11,18,25,3/4 pd
For Sale or Rent: Mobile Home 3 BR/2
Bath, Fireplace, 24x48' Selling for payoff
price, about $43,196 Call for details:
Barbara 997-5554.
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,11, pd


Living rm couch, chair w/ottomon $350.
Gold Hide-a-bed,$25. 997-3808
2/18,25 pd

Ford Taurus Station Wagon New Tires
$800.00 or best offer 997-3013
2/18 pd


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


SHousing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2'@ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571


FOR SALE

ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS:
You don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all brands and
telephones.
1/21, tfn, c

Poulan Riding Mower- 17.5 horsepower,
42" cut, new battery, new blades, used two
seasons, garaged, excellent condition. New
$2,600. Excellent price $600. Call
528-7176
2/25

Crape Myrtle, Red Oaks, Red & White
Maples, White Blooming Flowers. Priced'
to sell $1, $2, $5, $10. Call Nathaniel after
4:30 p.m. @ 342-3246.
2/23,25,3/4,11, pd

Black Lab puppy. Both parents AKC,
OFA CGC sire titled, Junior Hunter. Calm,
housebreaking started, $350. 997-3379
2/25


THOUSANDS OF BUSINESS For Sale By
Owners Nationwide. Preview Business for
free! Interested In Buying or Selling A
Business Call GW Merger (877)217-8231
or visit www.gwmerger.com.
2/25, fcan

20 Vending machines with Custom
Locations. $2995. call toll free
(800)261-9001.
2/25, fcan

CHURCH FURNITURE. Does you church
need pews, pulpit set, baptistery, steeple,
windows, carpet? Big Sale on new
cushioned pews and cushions for hard
pews. (800)231-8360.
2/25, fcan
Keystone 2002 Everest, model 363K,
5th-Wheel, Fiberglass 3-slideouts. Priced
for quick sale. Book Price, 997-5441.
2/23,25,3/2,4,9,1.,16,18, pd.

Steel Buildings. Factory Deals Save $$$.
40x60' to 100x200 Example 50x100x12' is
$3.60/sq ft. 800-658-2885
www.rigidbuilding.com.
2/25, fcan

REAL ESTATE

Golf View Home $249,900. Spectacular
new Carolina mountain home at 18 hole
course near Ashville, NC. Enjoy mild
climate, great golf, low cost of living! Call
toll-free (866)334-3253 x790
'in l.c liro kem. alley .comn. .
2125. fca.

N.C. WATERFRONT $39,900. Coming
soon on All-sports Lake. Boat, fish &
swim. Will sell fast Call MLC to get on
the priority list today (866)920-5263.
2/25, fcan

ASHEVILLE, NC AREA. Spectacular
Mountain view &. River homesites. Paved
roads, clubhouse & more. NEW
RELEASE! Homesites from $49,900. Bear
Ri'cr Communit Call no"
(866)411-5263.
2/25. rlan


REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Winter Season Is Here! Must See The
Beautiful Peaceful Mountains Of Western
NC Mountains. Cabins, Acreage, &
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty Murphy N.C. Call for Free
Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
2/25, fcan

New Log Home Shell -$99,900. Beautiful
log home shell nestled on private wooded
lot off Parkway North of Boone. Won't
last! 1st time offered. (800)455-1981.*119.
2/25, fcan

WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS North
Carolina Where there is: Cool Mountain
:Air; Views & Stream, Homes, Cabins &
Acreage. CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE
OF MOUNTAIN PROPERTY SALES.
(800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy 317
Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.
2/25, fcan


KENTUCKY 50-1000 acres. Incredible
trophy deer & turkey hunting. Some
w/lakes, creeks, rivers, ponds, & timber.
Great retreat/investment. New survey,
starting $795 per acre. Owner will finance.
(270))791-2538 www.actionoutfitter.com
2/25, fcan

WE DO RENTALS! SOUTHERN
,VERMONT'S RENTAL CENTER.
MOUNT SNOW, WESTDOVER
SERMNONT. BY
\\EEK\\EEKEND MONTHOR
'.E -,ON! INCLUDES
RECRE ATIONAL/CULTURAL
:ACTIVITIES. WE OFFER HILLSIDE
CONDOS, TOWNHOUSES, CHALETS,
(LARGE/SMALL/HOMES.) MOUNTAIN
RESORT RENTALS, P.O. BOX 1804,
WESTDOVER, VERMONT 05356.
r. in .mouniainre orlrenlals.com. e-mail:
rcnt ermi'tsos er.net. (888)336-1445,
S802-464-1445.
2-25. fran

N.C. Mountains: 2.3 acres with new log
cabin shell in secluded setting $89,900.
Acreage available with stunning mountain
sieIs! Frree info available. (828)247-0081.
2 25. fcan

I" ( \BINS N E.1R PIGEON FORGE, TN,
killing at ,ucrion March 12, 10:30 a.m.
guaranteedd financing available with 25%
tldon. Furron Auction Co.
(800S4Fl'RRO\\: w w .furrou.com.
lNLicl6 2.
C 5. fcan

I..AKE \IE\V BRG-CIN $29,000. Fret
boat slip! High elevation beautifully
wooded parcel. Across from national
forest on 35,000 acre recreational lake in
TN. Pa'ed roads. u g utils, central water,
sewer, more. Excellent financing. Call now
(8001704-3154, ext. 608. Sunset Bay, LLC.
2 25. fcan
FORCLOSED GOV'T HOMES $0 or Low
down! Tax repos and bankruptcies! No
Credit O.K. $0 to lo% donn. For lisrings
(800)501-1777 e1. 1299.
2/25. fcan


Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates Needed.



Fast Track Fool Stores now

hiring in Madison and

Monticello areas.



Please contact store Manager at your

local Fast Track store for an application.




"7"



Marshall Health


& Rehabilitation Center





















DrgFe oklae qa poruiyEpoe


215 N. Jefferson
(850) 997-5516
www.cbkk.com


-------


* NEW! 40+ Acres-Great Investment
Zoned AG 5, Close to I-10 and High & Dry, I
Hwy 257 & Sparks Road ..............$326,72 01

ATTA TULGA ROAD: 5 AC Corer Lot, 1
SRural Setting, Woods & Pasture...... $85,0001

a Casa Bianca Rd: 6.75 High & Dry Acres, n
Restricted Homesite, Quiet Country Setting, I
County Maintained Road Convenient to 11
Monticello. A Great Place for that Custom "
Home! ................ .. .. ....... $67,500

Lloyd Road: 6.02 Acres, Lightly Wooded "
Restricted Homesite in a Convenient I
Location........... .. ........... .. 60,200


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
$8,500 per acre
Just Listed 6.67 wooded acres on graded
county road in eastern Jefferson County
$23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
New Listing 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big,
doublewide w/ fireplace,; stables.-round.-
pen in remote location only $295,000
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly fenced pas-
ture nice location near Lamont $40,000
Contract Pendinq Wonderful Home nice
4 bedroom 2 bath double wide with fire-
place on 1.9 acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 4.6 wooded
acres in Lloyd Acres only $25,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Buyers looking for Homes and Land






Buyers looking for Homes and Land


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtor Assocate

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 25, 2005


Tornado Safety Tips For


Hazardous Weather Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
With Hardous Weather Aware-
ness Week, Feb. 20-26, the national
Oceanic and local Emergency Man-
agement officials offer tips for tor-
nado safey.
When tornado conditions are a real
possibility in an area, a tornado
watch is declared.
Stay alert to danger signs which
include severe thunderstorms with
strong, gusty winds, a "funnel"
(dark column spinning from sky to
ground) and a loud, roaring noise,


Downtown
(Continued From Page 1)
school buildings in one swoop. The
timing quits being an issue then and
you can sell the buildings to best ad-
vantage."
Commissioners dismissed the sug-
gestion out of hand. But Commis-
sion Chairman Felix "Skeet" Joyner,
at least, was open to the idea of util-
izing realtors for the sale, provided
all were given an equal chance to
compete for the business.
County Attorney Buck Bird, a late
arrival to the meeting, immediately
put an end to that part of the discus-
sion. He pointed out the statute did
not allow for realtors, although that
didn't preclude them from repre-
senting potential bidders.
Bird also recommended that com-
missioners get a commercial ap-
praisal of the .property prior to
soliciting bids.
The discussion next delved into
whether restrictions should be put
on the sale of the buildings.
It was the suggestion of Mayor
Julie Conley, acting as a representa-
tive of the Economic Development
Council, and Dick Bailar, a strong
proponent of economic
development, that the sale be limited
to retailers.
Their concern, they said, was that
investors would purchase the build-


similar to a freight train.
A tornado warning is issued when
a tornado has been sighted and may
impact shortly.
Protect yourself and your family
by seeking shelter immediately.
When at home, go to a storm shel-
ter or basement or go to rooms near-
est to the center of the house.
In high rises or other public build-
ings such as schools, hospitals, nurs-
ing homes, etc., move to the interior,
preferably a stairwell or hallway.
If you're in the car, stop, get out,
lie flat in a low area and cover your
head and in open country, lie face
down in a low area such as a ditch


Buildings
ings and leave them vacant, defeat-
ing the vision of a vibrant and viable
downtown district.
The two's suggestion bordered on
heresy, in the thinking of commis-
sioners.
"You can't do that," Joyner said.
"You can't limit the buyers. If you
take the investors out of the picture,
you depreciate the value of the
buildings by two-thirds: If yofu limit
it to retailers and the economic don't
work, there's no way you can keep
anyone there."
"So we're just.going to hope that
somebody doesn't buy it and board
it up," Conley said.
No fear of that happening, Tuten
said. If an investor purchased the
properties, that person would have
every incentive in the world to get
the buildings occupied as soon as
possible, he said.
"The buyer will pursue occu-
pancy, have no worry of that,"
Tuten said.
In the end, commissioners agreed
to the commercial appraisal and to
time periods of 60 days for the clos-
ing of the deal and 90 days for the
vacating of the buildings.
Commissioners formalize the
agreement at the 9 a.m. meeting
next Thursday.


or ravine, if nearby and cover your
head.
Do not stay in a mobile home,
seek other shelter elsewhere, do not
try to outrun a tornado on foot or in,.
your car and do not open windows.
School should hold pre-season and
periodic in-season severe weather
drills to ensure that staff and stu-
dents know what to do when a tor-
nado or severe thunderstorm ap-
proaches.


with all necessary standby power
generation equipment, fully
equipped ambulances, and a staff
trained to respond to natural hazards
emergencies.
Shelter areas, usually the lower
floors, inside corridors, and bath-
rooms should be designated, and
staff members trained to know their
,locations and the best access to
them.
Beds should be moved to: inside
walls of rooms and blocked if there
is time before the tornado strikes.
Patients can also be shielded with
thick blankets. In an extreme emer-
gency, patients may take refuge in


Spotters should be posted at social. closets or under beds.
and athletic events to provide ample Develop a plan for internal dis-
advance warning and dismissal with semination of tornado and severe
take-shelter instruction if danger ap- "thunderstorm watches and warnings.
pears imminent. Assign key personnel and alternates,
Gymnasiums and auditoriums to this task.
with wide-span roofs are unsafe in Select and mark shelter areas
such situations. As many person as t ithir the facili,. Establish special
possible should be sheltered in rela- 'ila'rm signals. and have 'secondary
tively safe areas like pa.itage nnrenels system aj\ liable in case. of pov'er
under solid stands, in basements and .t-ialure:,
inner hall\ jI ,s. '. Appoint storm spotters and have
School buts lise or ronue proce- '.them ready to. nmotie outdoors
dures should be set up and dri.er: whenever a watch or \naming is is-
drilled t.:- help children rake ci:o er in sued lienn s\cere weather ap-
a shelter. ditch, or rj\ inc. il the.bua:,proaches. Nlake sure someone
is cauLlht in the open b; a tmormndo. ,, monitors radio jnd tele\ vision for ad-
Other insiirtutiun ish uld be readd, dilional severe % either inform action.

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Internet
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from the service, proponents say.
"For officers on the street, the
availability of Internet access at
their fingertips will allow immediate
access to criminal information and
critical alerts.
"Additionally, in a region fraught
with weather emergencies, and since
Monticello is considered a major
evacuation route for coastal resi-
dents, information on hurricanes,
tornadoes, floods, roads closings
and other critical emergency infor-
mation can be broadcast quickly to
citizens on the local Internet net-
work."
Other expected beneficiaries of
the system will be the county, the
school system and the local work
force:


"Expanding opportunities for
higher education will also play a
crucial role in the development of
the county's work force," goes the
argument. "Although Monticello is
located is within 75 miles of two
major universities and several com-
munity colleges, transportation chal-
lenges to attend college often prove
prohibitive for the county's wage
earners.

"By providing availability of video
streaming, partnerships can be de-
veloped with FSU, UF and NFCC
for distance learning centers. In fact,
the city of Monticello, in partner-
ships with the school system, antici-
pates that such a center could be
located at the original 1852 Jeffer-
son County High School, which is
now being renovated and wired for
high-speed purposes."


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