<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00013
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 16, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00013
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Sports
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text



t2ARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
r Lrjn=ARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, .FL. 32611.
Learning Center

Celebrates

Grand Opening

Story, Photo, Page 6


Stert -!lorida

Retl '/ /
Frica

Story, Page 3


Pole Vaulting

May Return

To JCHS

Story, Page 10
I


Wednesday Morning


Montic


Ilo


137TH YEAR NO.14, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESnDAV Fa RRTTARY 16. 2005


Planners OK Three


Big


Developments


One Project Put On Hold

Pending Further Review


W .










JITAVIAN BENNET, ninth grade student at Jefferson
County High School presents Physical Education Coordina-
tor, Tequila Hagan, with a white rose and a heart shaped
box of chocolates for Valentine's Day. (News Photo)



County Officials


Tour New Home


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials, department
heads and representatives of the
State Attorney and Public De-
fender's offices toured the former
high school Thursday, preparatory
to moving their operations there in
the foreseeable future.
The 9 a.m. meeting, called by
Commission Chairman Felix
"Skeet" Joyner, was held in the for-
mer band room, slated to become
the commissioners' new meeting
room.
The other building committed to
a definite occupant at this point is
the media center, which is slated to
become the library's new home.
Otherwise, the remainder of the
buildings donated to the county by
the School Board were pretty much
up for grabs, Joyner told the assem-
bled.
Even so, Joyner shared his ideas
on where he thought the various op-
erations should go, for the sake of
efficiency- arid convenience to the
public.
"Of course, this all depends
on the floor space," Joyner said,
adding that the calculations should


include additional footage for future
growth demands.
Joyner's suggested placement of
the various operations raised the im-
mediate concerns of some of the
participants.
Assistant State Attorney Michael
Bauer, for one, found the assign-
ment of a common building to the
State Attorney and Public Defender
offices problematical.
Bauer pointed out that the two
operations routinely were housed in
separate buildings, given the need to
keep defendants and witnesses
apart, among other reasons.
Planning Official Bob Arredondo
also thought that his operation
would be better placed if it was next
to the Property Appraiser, rather
than next to building inspections as
Joyner proposed.
Joyner reiterated that his sugges-
tions were merely that, and hence,
subject to change as new input came
in. He said the overriding concern of
the commission was that all opera-
tions be easily accessible to the pub-
lic.
The plan calls for the library to
move into its new building by De-
cember. The move of the other de-
partments, meanwhile, will depend
(See County, Page 13)


COMMISSIONERS, department heads and representatives
of the State Attorney and Public Defender's offices toured
the old high school buildings last week, in preparation for
an eventual move there. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

In a lengthy session Thursday
night, planners recommended three
developments for approval and ta-,
bled a fourth, pending the review of
information submitted at the last
minute.
Recommended for approval were
two subdivisions, north and west of
town respectively, and a horse arena
in the south part of the county. Ta-
bled for further consideration was a
large subdivision just south of
Lloyd.
Alan Saucier represented Keith
Samm.ons, the developer of the
North Ridge Subdivision, a pro-
posed development off US 19 near
the Florida-Georgia line.
As Saucier described it, North
Ridge will be a low-density devel-
opment, consisting of 10 lots on 129
acres zoned agriculture 5 (one
dwelling per five acres).
As such, the development faced a
routine review. A problem arose,
however, because the developer
wanted a variance to the county's
road constructions standards -- con-
trary to Planning Official Bob Arre-
dondo's recommendation.
Arredondo; in fact, recommended
12 conditions for approval of the
project, the majority of them stan-
dard requirements. When it came to
the road, however, Arredondo rec-
ommended the development be
made to conform to county stan-
dards.
As Saucier explained, the devel-
oper had taken advantage of the re-
surfacing of US 19 to get a contrac-
tor to put milling on an existing dirt
road.
The result, as one planner put it,
was a road that was neither fish nor
fowl -- a little better than a graded
dirt road but not as good as a paved
road.
"Now we have something that's
in-between," Planner Bill Tellefsen
said. "This is asking for forgiveness,
not permission. I feel we set a prece-
dent if we approve it, but I feel fool-
ish to ask them to tear it up."
Saucier's explanation was that the-
developer thought he was improving
the road. What's more, former plan-
ning official John Durst had more or
less approved the project, he said.
At the least, Durst had given mixed
signals, he said.
Saucier argued that the road was
private, that future homeowners
would be apprised of that fact, and
that the road could well stand the
traffic of 10 households.
"We believe this road will stand
up under the volume of traffic it will
have better than a dirt road," Saucier
said.
In the end, the planners approved
the variance, with reservations.
"It does have a potential for being
precedent setting," Planner Pat Mur-
phy said.
"Even if it's not precedent setting,
you don't want to encourage prop-
erty owners to take action and then
come seeking approval after the


fact," Planning Commission Attor-
ney Scott Shirley noted.
The planners next approved a sec-
ond subdivision with another road
variance request. This'involved the
Rainey Meadows Subdivision off
US 90 west of town.
Darin Taylor, standing in for de-
veloper Mike Rogers, described the
development as another low-density
subdivision, consisting of eight
houses on 92 acres.
The problem again centered on the
to-be paved road, which Taylor said
would be 12 feet wide, instead of
the required 18 feet. And it would
rest on a 35-foot easement, rather
4tan the required 6Q-fQot easement.
:, The reason for the variance re-
quest, Taylor said, was that the road
crossed land other than the devel-


oper's, and the adjacent property
owner was not willing to cede any
more land.
The planners recommended ap-
proval of the variance and subdivi-
sion, contingent on it meeting the
other conditions imposed by Arre-
dondo.
The planners tabled consideration
of the'Oak Hill Farms Subdivision,
a 105-lot development on 351 acres
off SR-59 south of Lloyd.
Among the more serious concerns
raised by Arredondo were "the lack
of commitment (by the developer)
to provide water" and the large
number of the endangered gopher
tortoise supposedly on the property,
"making it one of the most signifi-
cant gopher tortoise sites in the
state."
As for the water system, Arre-
dondo said it should be a condition
of approval, given the large number
of lots.
"This is one issue I feel very


ALAN SAUCIER addresses the Planning
Commission on behalf of developer Keith
Sammons, who wants to develop a 129-acre


strongly about," Arredondo said. "I
don't see why a water system
shouldn't be installed."
Developer Jeff Ard said he had no
problem with the requirement. But
he asked that it not be made a condi-
tion of the approval, lest it put him
over a barrel in his negotiations with
the Jefferson Community Water
System, the only available source.
As it was, he hadn't been able to
get Bob Cooper, head of the system,
to return his calls, Ard said.
Could he not provide his own wa-
ter system, if need be? he asked.
"I have no problem with you pro-
viding your own water system,"
Arredondo said. "But I feel it's im-
portant to have a water system."
Several adjacent landowners also
expressed concern about the storm
water runoff that presently comes
off the property and onto their land.
They worried that absent the proper
engineering, the problems would
(See Planners, Page 13)


property off US Highway 19 near the
Florida-Georgia line. (News Photo)


Planning Agency Smooths


Way For Small Subdivision


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

An agreement worked out by the
Local Planning Agency (LPA) last
Tuesday night should allow a devel-
oper to proceed with a planned sub-
division on the north side of town.
That's provided the City Council
approves the agreement, which it is
expected to do.
The agreement calls for the devel-
oper to abide by city standards in
the design of the proposed subdivi-
sion, even though the property's
present land-use designation sets
different standards.
The issue arose because the prop-
erty -- consisting of 12.84 acres near
the intersection of Rocky Branch
and Morris roads -- was only re-
cently annexed into the city under
the amnesty annexation program.


Agreement

Allows The

City's Rules

TO Apply

Under the county's land-use des-
ignation, which the property retains
until the city changes the zoning, the
parcel is classified mixed-use
suburban/residential.
Mixed-use suburban residential al-
lows four houses per acre, whereas
the city allows a slightly higher con-
centration, according to City Clerk
Emily Anderson.
But the city also has setbacks and
lot size requirements that don't ap-
ply in the county. The developer
wanted clarification from the LPA
as to which standards should be fol-


lowed -,- the city's or the county's.
According to Anderson, the LPA
is recommending that the city enter
an agreement with the developer
spelling out the standards that will
apply.
The issue is expected to come
before the City Council at its March
1 meeting.
The subject property is the first
annexed under the amnesty annexa-
tion program. A second property,
meanwhile, is in the process of be-
ing annexed under the program.
The brainchild of Councilman
Brian Hayes, the amnesty program
offers charge-free annexation to
property owners whose lands adjoin
the existing city boundaries.
The city, in other words, will
waive the filing, legal
advertisement, and recording fees
during the amnesty period, which
runs through April 15.


HMS Boys, Girls Club

Collect $366

For Charity

Story, Photo, Page 9
I i


~4:.i


Amk
way.


__ ._ -c- __ Je


VV A 9 1 JL!J"J-- k%---t%-L A LU, vw:


I


i

: ~b~d
-.
,,









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005


go


Beta Club Inducts


22 New Members


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

At Aucilla Christian Academy
last week, 22 high school students
were initiated into the Beta Club,


V's;

1i, ,now.i-P ip
*1~~


-,ni -~ ~ t,.


:BOYS, GIRLS of the Jefferson High School
Club created Valentine favors last week for
their sweethearts. L-R: Deandre Fagan, De-


veda Bellamy, leader, and Derrick Bell, tech
leader.


after which, they were invited to a
reception in the library.
Coordinator Linda Rose ex-
plained that the Beta Club was the
equivalent of the National Honor
Society, for students having an cu-
mulative average of 90 or higher.


One Vehicle Accident Takes

Life Of Panama City Man


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A 53 year old Panama City man,
Willie E. Prim, was killed last week
on I-10, in Monticello, in a one-car
crash.
According to the report prepared
by Trooper J. R. Love, Prim was
traveling westbound in a 1996
Ford sport utility vehicle, on the in-
side lane, and veered partially into
the median, at which point, he
turned to the right and reentered the
westbound lanes.


Prim then overcompensated and
steered to the left and again entered
the median, spinning in counter-
clockwise rotation.
He traveled through the median
and into the eastbound lane where
the vehicle overturned, ejecting
Prim from the vehicle.
Prim was not wearing his seat
belt. The crash was not alcohol re-
lated and no charges were filed.


The club members conduct fund-
raisers and make contributions to
the Second Harvest of the Big
Bend and Heifer International,
which provides animals to families
in other countries all over the
world, to supplement their family
incomes by breeding.
Rose said that during their next
meeting, she was going to mention
to club members, the need of the
Humane Society for volunteer
weekend dog washers.
Seniors initiated include Jordan
Patterson and Jeremy Tuckey, jun-
ior, Katie O'Steen and sophomore,
Brittany Williams.
There were 18 freshmen initiated
into the club, they include Rebekah
Aman, Courtney Brasington, Ben
Buzbee, A. J. Connell, Courtney
Connell, Jayce Davis, Lindsey Day,
Stephanie Dobson and Will Harts-
field.
Also, Alfa Hunt, Claire Knight,
Nicole Mathis, Prateen Patel, Katy
Plummer, Ramsey Revell, Bethany
Saunders, Hannah Sorensen and
Tristen Sorensen.


'Ir


"REATING Valentine favors at JCHS Boys,
Girls Club, are from left, Bruce Wilson, La-
tasha Jones, Takedral Gilley. Each member


will receive ;


Monticello News

Subscribe Today!

S " In State: $45.00
$:,,'., Out of State: $52.00





a favor to present to his/herl S--- |


sweetheart. (News Photos)
4


David Clark Songs, Stories


Saturday At Opera House


7322 West Tennessee St
Just 2 miles WEST of Capital Circle NW
Ei:iAWA l ^TSWV_4,7_.l]am


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

David Clark's Shakmin Hand
Tour: Touching Hearts takes place 8
p.m., Saturday, at the Opera House.
Gentlemen shake hands without
much thought. Ladies sometimes do,
but rarely for social reasons, usually
for business.
Now Clark's evocative Shaking,
Hands.Tour touches everyone in a
personal way that's more than just a
pleasant how do you do.
Funny, poignant, and emotionally
powerful, Clark performs his acous-
tic show at the Opera House.,
The audience, will meet a few of
those nice folks sitting right next to
them.
Immersed in the evening's songs
and stories, some funny, some sad,
all memorable, everyone will have
the oppirrunity to discover more
about living and dying,.as well as a
few secrets about craftsmanship,
kinfolk, soul food and Sundays.
Tickets are $12, $10 for members
Sand $5 for students.
Born some 40 years ago, Clark
grew up in Macon, GA, v. ith an ap-


preciation for craftsmanship,
kinfolk, soul food, and Sundays.
He left Macon and put down roots
in rural cotton country, near Co-
chran, GA.,
Clark began writing letters to city
friends about life in his adopted
town. These friends encouraged him
to record the stories, especially since
he had a natural ear for the country-
folks' vernacular cadences, and a
gift for revving up a guitar.
His many experiences as a musi-
cian, mechanic, recording studio en-
gineer, newspaper publisher, and
graphic designer began mixing to-
gether and Clark rediscovered his
love of storytelling.
After the death of his parents,
Clark took to American's byways on
a 60 city tour, to share his experi-
ences and to meet some of the nice
folks that his Daddy said were eve-
rywhere just. waiting to be met.
He has toured most of America-
and recently released his ninth al-
bum.
The author of three books, his es-
says have been featured on National
Public Radios "All Things Consid-
.ered," and his weekly column is
published in numerous Southeastern
newspapers.


w~~i


~it~rr~jri~u9a


Emwig-A'd


~


1


r-,


..-.
;
~f- f~'


--"' I



OA







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005 PAGE 3


!-aL


Step Up Florida Relay


Kickoff Event Friday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Kickoff Event for the Step Up
Florida Relay is set noon Friday at
the FMB parking lot.
County Health Department Di-
rector Kim Barnhill, will serve as
MC for the event, and will speak
on the importance of healthy life-
styles for residents of the county.
County Commissioner Skeet Joy-
ner will read the Step Up Florida
Proclamation, which will be signed'
by members of both the County
Commission and the City Council.
The proclamation reads,
"Whereas, a healthy and productive
community is essential to the mis-
sion of Jefferson County's ability
to successfully promote and protect
the health and safety of all of its
citizens; and,
Whereas, an unhealthy lifestyle


JULIUS NORTON picnics during a break at the the St. Phil-
lip Boys and Girls Club after school events. (News Photo)


K


Ci A.


LAW AND DEPUTY are these two pups available for adop-
tion at the Humane Society. They promise to help keep
your home crime free. (News Photo)


'Law,' 'Deputy' Seek


Loving Homes
Both get along very well with
FRAN HUNT other dogs, adults and children and
Staff Writer are said to be good watch dogs.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The quarantine at the County Hu-
mane Society was lifted Monday,
allowing the shelter to carry on as
usual.
The shelter had been under quar-
antine for approximately two
weeks as a precautionary measure
because of possible exposure to
parvo.
Humane Society officials con-
tinue to urge the importance of vac-


by Jefferson County citizens can
erode our important asset, our com-
munity;
Whereas, more than 65 percent of
all adults in Jefferson County are
overweight or obese; 61 percent of
adult residents report no regular
moderate physical activity; high
blood pressure is reported by 31
percent of adults in Jefferson
County; and 12.4 percent of all
adults in Jefferson County have
been told they have diabetes;
Whereas, citizens who engage in
health promoting habits, such as
physical activity, are less likely to
develop the chronic conditions of
coronary heart disease stroke, lung
cancer, chronic constructive lung
disease, and diabetes, that account
for 43 percent of al causes of death
in Jefferson County;
Whereas, much of the chronic
disease burden is preventable, ef-
fective measures such as physical


activity exist today to substantially
curtail illness, disabilities, and early
deaths caused by these diseases;
Whereas, Step Up Florida is an
event that will direct special atten-
tion to the benefits of physical ac-
tivity;
Now, therefore, we the commis-
sioners of Jefferson County, do
hereby encourage all residents to
set goals to improve their health
and wellness as Step Up Florida is
launched to motivate all residents
to make healthy choices and strive
for healthy lifestyles."
Jamie Rogers of Jamie's Body
Works will conduct a warm-up and
stretching session at 12:20 and at
12:30.
Rogers and Conley will lead a
half mile walk south on US-19 to
where the sidewalk ends, and pass
on the flag.
Between the groups of participat-
ing athletes during the relay, a dis-
tance of approximately 50 miles
will be covered from the
Jefferson/Leon county line to the
Jefferson/Taylor county line.
The Red Cross van will follow
the athletes with a ready supply of
Gatorade and water.
For further information or to sign
up for the event, contact Marianne
Goehrig at 342-0170, ex. 220.


~ .,,,;

~SYF


Custom Designed & Custom Built Log Home


the


'I -
Li 1 i:

-a----


FMB President and CEO L. Gary
Wright announces that Dan Peel has
received the bank's Employee of the
S Year Award.
This award is bestowed each year
upon one individual, selected by the
S vote of all the bank employees.
Peel joined the Monticello office
of Farmers & Merchants Bank, in
2003, as the Purchasing and Facili-
ties Assistant.
Prior to joining Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank, Peel was a supervisor
S with Tampa Electric.
He and his wife, Margie, reside in
Monticello, and have two children.
S The family attends Central Baptist
S Church.


l Quarantine At Shelter Lifted
cinating pets against


contagious, and often fatal disease.
There are many cats and dogs
still in need of good homes at the
shelter and adoptions are again
available through the shelter.
For further information, call the
shelter at 342-0244.


take advantage and step-up.

That's right. You make the call by contacting
us and we'll step you up to a new Certificate of
Deposit rate and term.

Start earning today. This special offer may expire
at any time without notice and will automatically
renew at the then current FMB rate. Some
restrictions may apply.


Call us for more information!
Tallahassee
Apalachee Parkway 878-2626
Killearn Center Blvd 893-5100
Mahan Office 942-2626
North Monroe 514-2626
\W. Tennessee St. 224-2626
lonticello 997-2591
Greenville 948-2626
Thomasville (229) 228-5900


Make the Smart Move



Farmers & Merchants Bank
www.fmbbank.com
Tallahassee / Monticello / Greenville / Thomasville
*Limited time offer. Minimum deposit of $500 is required to obtain the stated Annual Percentage Yield. This
Special 1SMonth"Step-Up"Certificateof Deposlthas a 3.25% InterestRatewithanAnnual Percentage Yieldof
329%.Note:$500,0001sthema)xmum depositllmit. Earlywithdrawalpenaltylsequivalentto 180days interest
MEMBER FDIC


Dan Peel Receives FMB

Employee Of Year Award


Contact Numbers:
Office: 386-754-1132
Fax: 815-361-9196-
Cell: 386-697-4824


Smart Savers Come


and Take Advan e


Farmers & Merchants Bank is proud to announce a new 15 Month CD with a
special "Step-Up" feature with a guaranteed interest increase protection.

During the term of this special CD, if FMB offers a more attractive 15 Month CD
rate, or a more attractive CD rate at a longer term (must be 15 months or longer),
you may step up to the higher rate and term without penalty. This means that
during the life of this special CD you can take advantage of the changing interest
market. If the interest rate increases above the original 3.25% rate*, you can elect to


Your retirement savings
could earn a higher rate if
you open Edward Jones IRA
by April 15th. Which might
make your retirement even
more
pleasant.

If you already have an IRA,
you can transfer it to Edward
Jones without taxes or penal-
ties. We'll take care of your
finances, while you get on
with other things.

To learn more about
Edward Jones IRAs, with
rates that makes sence, call
me today.

Robert J. Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, Fl. 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com



Edad1ns


;1D~e~a


' ' '
'' ~'''

U,


1 :
li~ II









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

e MCEM, RON CICHON
.HID4 Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Cholesterol Tests


Paid By Medicare


Thirty-nine million Americans
who receive Medicare now have ac-
cess to an important tool for fighting
heart disease: cholesterol blood
tests.
Heart disease is the leading cause
of death in the United States and
seniors account for more than 84
percent of annual cardiovascular
deaths.
An estimated 25 million
Medicare-eligible seniors suffer
from coronary heart disease, and
nearly 800,000 seniors die from car-
diovascular disease annually, ac-
cording to the National Cholesterol
Program.
Now, for the first time, all
Medicare-eligible beneficiaries have
guaranteed access to office based
cholesterol blood tests for the early
detection of cardiovascular disease.
As part of the first time, all Medi-
care Modernization Act (MMA), all
Medicare beneficiaries will have ac-
cess to cholesterol screening and all
new members will be covered for a
physical examination, which in-
cludes a cholesterol blood test.
"Cholesterol screening is vitally
important to identify individuals at
risk because treatment is proven to
save lives," said Lori Mosca, MD,
PhD, director, preventive cardiology
at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.
"Providing access to screening to
seniors, the population segment
most likely to develop heart prob-


lems, can have a huge impact on the
burden of heart disease as more than
40 percent of patients die from an
initial heart attack."
Previously, Medicare beneficiaries
were only covered for cholesterol
tests if they had already been diag-
nosed with heart disease, stroke, dia-
betes or other disorders associated
with high cholesterol.
In many cases, eligible seniors
were already victims of conditions
that cholesterol screening might
have caught and treatment may have
prevented.
"We encourage all Medicare
members to call their doctor and
take advantage of this improved ac-
cess to cholesterol testing as we
know it will significantly improve
the quality of cardiac health care for
seniors," said Mark Wurster, MD,
director, point of care testing, The
Ohio state University Primary Care
Network.
Using a single drop of blood, the
Cholestech LDX office based sys-
tem measures a patient's lipid pro-
file to determine overall cholesterol
levels and the patient's risk of heart
disease.
The lipid profile includes total
cholesterol; high density lipoprotein
(HDL), or "good" cholesterol; low-
density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad"
cholesterol; and triglycerides, a form
of fat that often results in high total
cholesterol, increasing a patient's
risk for heart disease. (NAPS)


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 17, 1995
If the Department of Transporta-
tion has its way, on-street parking
on US 19 south of Walnut Street
will be eliminated. In turn, the road
will be expanded and a uni-turn cen-
ter lane installed from Walnut Street
to the Pizza Hut.
JES First-Grade teacher Debra
Bishop, was chosen the outstanding
Teaching of the Year, at the School
District's annual celebration cere-
mony, held Tuesday at the Opera
House.
Officers Jerry Blackmon and Fred
Mosley were recently approved by
the School Board to work as School
Resource Officers at Jefferson
County High School, under funding
from the Juvenile Justice Grant.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 20, 1985
City and County officials are won-
dering where they are going to get
the money to replace federal reve-
nue sharing funds should those
funds be cut as President Reagan
has proposed.
A new firm, no-nonsense ap-
proach to discipline problems enti-
tled "Assertive Discipline" will be-
gin at HMS on February 28.
Conditions facing the American
farmer have been called the worst
since the Great Depression. Opti-
mistic words on the farm crisis are
few and far between.
Last January the City Council se-
lected Ike Anderson to serve as
mayor of the City of Monticello.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 20, 1975
E. Harold Hampton, retired Mon-
ticello rural letter carrier, was hon-


ored Saturday by the U.S. Coastal
Guard. At a Division Meeting held
in Carabelle, Mr. Hampton, a former
member of Flotilla 12, USCG Aux-
iliary, was awarded the Certificate
of Operational Merit for his coura-
geous actions and outstanding per-
formances during a rescue in the
waters adjacent to Live Oak Island
on March 20, 1974.

FORTY YEARS AGO
February 19, 1965
Miss Catherine Shiver has been
named the 1965 Star Student from
Jefferson County High School.
J.N. Hawkins returned home Sun-
day from visiting for several weeks
in Miami.
Mrs. Billie Rabon has been re-
leased from Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital where she was taken last
week for treatment of a snake bite.
Visiting with Mr. And Mrs. Blair
Lamont over the weekend were their
son and daughter-in-law, Mr. And
Mrs. John Lamont and daughter,
Michelle of Columbia, S.C.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 18, 1955
Mr. And Mrs. Glenn Miller pre-
sented new pews to the Methodist
Church. Stuart Simpson presented a
bronze plaque which stated that the
pews were dedicated to the Glory of
God in memory of Mrs. Miller's
mother and honoring her father.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
February 16, 1945
Rev. And Mrs. J.A. Boyd held
open house at the Waukeenah par-.
sonage for members and friends to
view the completely renovated and
remodeled home.


Opinion & Comment


Bill Would Outlaw Pant Fashion


Boys walking around with their
pants nearly falling off and their un-
derwear sticking out has puzzled-me
for some time. Apparently the same
is true for a legislator in Virginia.
He wants sagging pants to be
against the law and introduced a bill
to that effect.
I don't know that a state govern-
ment legislating fashion is a good
idea and can imagine all sorts of le-
gal challenges. Clearly this is a gen-
erational thing. When did old folks
understand kids?
As a fifties kid, I watched my par-
ents try to adjust to rock 'n roll and
some kid from Tupelo, Mississippi
with sideburns and swinging hips.
Their taste in music ran to Frank
Sinatra and Perry Como so Elvis
was a bit of a shock. .
My Dad was cool about the music.
though. He would mock the songs
with a smile on his face'.
Elvis sang "Don't Be Cruel." Dad


Publisher's

Notebook


iRon Cichon


sang "Don't Be A Fool" Elvis had Will the Legislator in Virginia
"You Ain't Nothin' But A Hound- submit a bill banning bare midriffs?
dog," Dad had "You Ain't Nothin' We'll have to wait and see.
But a Lazy Bum." You get the idea. As for the boys and their sagging
Naturally, I seethed and he pants, it seems to me, there's a seri-
laughi d. ous risk of wardrobe malfunction.;
' Well. back to the pants When I If the pants are halfway down, and"
read about the effort in.the Xirginia the law of gravity is still in effect -.
Legislature, I wondered about girls 'you get the idea.
with their navels exposed while The other day, CNN did a piece
walking the malls. on the baggy pants. One young man


was quite proud of his green under-
wear which had pictures of fish.
I never had any underwear with
fish. And, basic white is fine with
me, thank you.
You see, it is a generational thing.
Showing off your underwear on na-
tional television escapes my under-
standing.
Of course, a lot of stuff on televi-
sion doesn't make much sense.
But, we are living in an age when
the bizarre is acceptable and stan-
dards are stretched if not already
broken.
That, however is not the issue at
hand. It is sagging pants and ex-
posed underwear.
How did this fad start? Did a
'group of kids spot somebody whose
-pants were too big and sagging and
decide, "We want to look like that.'
Could have happened that way, I
guess.


Reverse Mortgages Hurt Aged


The explosive growth of reverse
mortgages can backfire for both eld-
erly homeowners and the nation's
cities, says a University of Florida
researcher.
Reverse mortgages which allow
elderly homeowners to borrow
against the home's equity encour-
age the elderly to remain in older
housing that may be unsafe because
of physical deficiencies, said Ste-
phen Golant, a UF geography pro-
fessor who presented a paper on the
subject at a Nov. 27 meeting of the
Gerontological Society of America
in Washington, D.C., based on on-
going research.
That makes deteriorating struc-
tures less available to younger
homeowners, who are more likely to
make improvements to them, which
ultimately helps rejuvenate neigh-
borhoods in the nation's older cities,
he said.
We have to be careful that we
don't romanticize the notion of


older people aging in place in their
own homes and be blind to the
many downsides," said Golant, an
expert on elderly housing who
reached his conclusions by analyz-
ing data from the U.S. Census Bu-
reau's 1999 American Housing Sur-
vey describing the characteristics of
the accommodations of more than
17,000 older homeowners.
Golant, who gas studied elderly
housing needs for more than 39
years, was recently a consultant to
the Commission on Affordable
Housing and Health Facility Needs
for Seniors in the 21st Century, a
panel created by Congress.
Although the elderly generally
prefer to remain in their own homes
rather than move to nursing homes
or other assisted living facilities,
many would be better off in new,
more user-friendly affordable rental
units designed with older people in
mind that are close to social services
and other sources of support that


could help them deal with their frail-
ties, Golant said.
S Reverse mortgages allow home-
owners 62 and older to borrow
against the equity in their home
without having to sell it, give up the
deed or take on new monthly mort-
gage payments, Golant said. They
are touted by financial experts as a
good strategy for low-income sen-
iors to cope with a variety of finan-
cial pressures, which include rising
out-of-pocket costs for medical care
and prescription drugs, inadequate
Social Security checks, meager re-
turns from investments and increas-
ing payments for long term care in-
surance premiums, he said.
Between April 2003 and April
2004, the number of reverse mort-
gages in the United States increased
by 112 percent, according to pub-
lished figures released by the Na-
tional Reverse Mortgage.
Holders of reverse mortgages are
disproportionately poor and, be-


cause they often are in their 70s and
80s more likely to live alone, Golant
said. "In many respects, these are
some of our most vulnerable older
residents," he said.
More than half of these mortgage
holders occupy dwellings at least 40
years old, which means they're
more likely to live in houses that are
run-down, unsafe, unhealthy and
uncomfortable.
Because they are frail or fear deal-
ing with home repair workers, older
people often don't make improve-
ments in their homes that could help
them avoid accidents, such as in-
stalling grab bars in the shower to
prevent falls, he said.
"This idea may sound draconian to
people who say, 'Aren't you sort of
pushing older homeowners out of
their treasured homes that they've
lived in for 30 years or more?" he
said. "But we're really not doing
older people a favor by encouraging
(See Reverse Mortgage, Page 5)


Teacher Shocked At Changes


BY CHARLES R. LEWIS
Columnist

In 1987, seventeen years after my
high school graduation (following
fourteen years in Washington, D.C.
Government schools), I returned to
teach mathematics. I was not pre-
pared for the sweeping changes that
has occurred in the interim, and that
continued to occur throughout my
fifteen years of labor there.
The discipline of arithmetic had
seemingly been about 90% elimi-,
nated from the curriculum in D.C.
And in government schools nation-
wide.
All of the more advanced level
math courses had been watered
down commensurately. Emphasis on
arithmetic had been supplanted by
early emphasis on higher level


courses like algebra, geometry,
probability, and statistics, and on
something new called math prob-
lem solving."
Of course, no meaning al learning
was taking place in those higher
level courses, since that would re-
quire mastery of basic arithmetic.
And no meaningful math problems
were being solved, for want of arith-
metic competence.
I actually did not figure this out
until many years later, due to the
fact that I generally never taught any
courses nominally below the
algebra-one level.
Until the past several years, during
which I headed a combination lower
and middle school at the charter
level, and tutored quite a few subur-
ban students from those grade
levels, I had simply assumed that the
startling across-the-board lack of


skills, knowledge, and comprehen-
sion even among my brightest pu-
pils had been the result of merely
bad teaching and social promotion
in the D.C. Public Schools (DCPS).
Arithmetic was not the only insti-
tution that had gone by the wayside.
Teaching in general had been all but
banned.

A genre of lesson planning and re-
quired "pedagogies" had sprung up
that allowed for a maximum of
about ten minutes of actual teaching
per class period.
The remaining class time had to be
devoted to a combination of
"touchy-feely" techniques; politi-
cally correct propaganda, and "ac-
tivities."
Additionally, teachers had been
de-fanged. For one thing, teachers
could no longer eject disruptive pu-


This was particularly vexing to me
for two reasons. First, I recalled that
in my student days the abject fear of
ejection had been enough to keep
my classmates and me perpetually in
line. Second, by 1987 government
school students were, as a rule, com-
pletely devoid of personal responsi-
bility when it came to behavior at
least in the DCPS schools where I
was to teach.
Any teacher who put students out
of class on other than the rarest of
occasions became branded with the
indelible stigma of having poor so-
cial director skills.
Administrators did not actually
use the term "social director" the
euphemism was "classroom man-
agement." In any event, it was clear
(See Teacher Shocked, Page 5)


--L


__CCy











Teacher Shocked


(Continued From Page 1)
that what administrators wanted
were classroom managers qua social
directors, and not teachers.
Teachers, by definition, risked dis-
missal.
Compounding the fact that one
generally did not dare evict a stu-
dent no matter that student's de-
portment there was now a slate of
parameters on teacher classroom be-
havior.
For instance, instructors were not
permitted to tell pupils (who gener-
ally chatted, argued, screamed, and
offered a cacophony of other noises
their entire time in a classroom) to
shut up.
This was something of which stu-
dents were keenly aware. In fact,
pupils were the ones who informed
me of this rule indignantly and on
countless occasions.
Nor could a teacher raise his voice
to students. Twice administrators
reprimanded me for shouting at ex-
tremely unruly pupils. On another
occasion, I was seriously astonished
for describing a pupil as
"immature."
In another school I actually side-
stepped the ramifications of the
ejection prohibition by using my
cell phone to call parents of misbe-
haviors (on the spot).
When an administrator got word,
she forbade me to continue the prac-
tice and demanded my phone. I re-
fused to hand it over and was fired
(on the spot).
In other instances I was fired for
blocking the pen of a student as, she
tried to write on a brand new desk,
and for assaulting the fist of one pu-
pil and the elbow of another both
times with my jaw.
The best rated teachers the ones
lavished with awards in these
schools were the ones who kept
their pupils the busiest and gave the-


highest grades (and whose pupils -
judging by their condition upon en-
tering subsequent classes in which I
received them learned the least).
I chuckle when I hear outsiders
criticize government schools, for
low pupil promotion rates.
If there were any justice in these
schools, next to nobody would ever
advance in grade (at least in terms of
the academic achievement realities
that prevail). Certainly, very few
would have passed any of the
classes I took as a child.
These appalling achievement defi-
ciencies were the norm in DCPS,
but since my departure I have dis-
covered that the affluent suburban
DC government school systems
seem to be doing, if anything, an
even worse job.
My vaults are full of protests of
middle schoolers some of whom
were honor students who failed to
pass my old inner city charter
school's final exams for the first
grade or even kindergarten.
Picture "advanced placement" 4th,
7th, or even 8th graders who do not
know their addition tables, or the
names (much less the sounds) of the
vowels.
I not so long ago looked into some
federal funds for preschool reading
programs under the No Child Left
Behind (NCLB) Act.
I was initially optimistic, as I had
had recent success getting three and
four-year-olds reading fluidly (as
high as the upper middle school
level, in terms of proficiency). On
inspection of the grant offer materi-
als, I found.I did not qualify for the
simple reason that the government
"absolutely" did not encourage the
teaching of actual reading to pre-
schoolers.
Recognition of the letters of the al-,
phabet was the maximum acceptable
instruction.


CASANOVA NURSE, metereologist displays shirts given as
prizes during a recent visit to town. (News Photo)


4-H Council Members To

Cleanup JES Nature Trail


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

County Council 4-H members will
put on their yard clothes and gloves
to ready for a cleanup day 9 a.m.
Friday, at the Jefferson Elementary
School Nature Trail.
The majority of the cleanup in-
cludes debris from the September
hurricanes.
Besides picking up and dumping
trash, they'll be spreading mulch


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Recycling Center is
responsible for the removal of dead
animals along the roadside, Road
Superintendent David Harvey re-
ports.
The question was raised recently
by Commissioner Jerry Sutphin,
during their last regular meeting of
County Humane Society.
Members were not sure of the
current policy for carcass disposal,
but agreed that the decaying bodies
of dead animals were both un-
sightly and unsanitary, and the
proper procedure would be re-
searched.
Harvey said: "After they (recy-
clers) pick them up, the animals are
transported to the dump in Madison
for proper disposal.
"In the spirit of cooperation, if
residents call us, we send someone
out, and if the animals isn't man-
gled too badly, workers put on'
gloves, bag the animals and take it
to the Recycling Center," he added.
"Most times, if the animal is in


real bad shape, the workers will
move it to the side of the road,"
said Harvey. "That way, they (re-
cyclers) can come down with the
grapple, pick it up and dispose of
it."


*1
rtr
u"


CALL 01 VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE OUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

385-6047
Government Umployeel Insuince to 1IK GGrnr'ul In( ulon0 r 0o
Gfo Indmf nity n tii[0 Cosualtyl o aconl t (ounlly utuul1nl Co
GeiU., wOshlnlton. Do mi)0/i it 0LO bl(0


and pruning branches and bushes.
After some two hours, Council
Members will meet up with the JES
Boys and Girls Club Members to
participate in the Step Up Florida
Relay, a Health Department initia-
tive to promote healthy lifestyles
and physical activity.
The students will walk to the
Courthouse Circle for a noon cere-
mony lead by Mayor Julie Conley.
From there, some of the students
plan to take a walk around the town
with the Mayor and others.


Reverse Mortgage


Did YOU know the average person saves
$1500 a year by carpooling 3 days a week!


(Continued From Page 4)
them. to age in place when it's not
particularly advantageous for their
health, safety and quality of life."
Reverse mortgages also are not in
the best economic and political in-
terests 6f'ifiayors'of big 'cities who
should be wary about encouraging
them, he said.
A new generation of younger
homeowners is likely to want to
move closer to cities' downtown,
Golant said. They are much more
likely to make home repairs and ini-
tiate major home improvements,
which not only upgrade urban
neighborhoods but reduces poverty
and crime, and builds a stronger
property tax base, he said.
"The leadership of our major cities
should recognize that by endorsing
reverse mortgages they may be do-
ing themselves a great disservice,
because they reduce the chances
their older housing stock will be


turned over to younger homeowners
and be revitalized," he said. More
than half of the elder-owned and oc-
cupied homes in the central cities of
the Northeast and Midwest, and
about 30 percent of those in the
:South; were built before 1950, he'
said. .

Bring Bag Lunch
TO AARP Class

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Officials relate that persons wish-
ing to take the AARP Safe Driving
Class set 8:30 a.m. to 5 P.m., Satur-
day, March 5, at the County School
Board Office, 1490 West Washing-
ton Street should plan to bring a bag
lunch.
To register for the class, tailored
to the needs of drivers 50 or older,.
contact Jim Norton at 342-01-00.


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN


877-4550


Monticello Border
S2 Border 1-10


MAHAN


Find out how you can save...




Commuter Services
o North Florida a

888-454-RIDE



or visit our website at

www.commuterservices.org


Already carpooling or vanpooling?
Ask out about the guaranteed ride home program.


Create your magical


combination of Sprint services.


It's no illusion that the more Sprint services you combine, the more you can save.
And now when you have Sprint PCS' Wireless, local and long distance, you'll save
even more with unlimited calling between your Sprint PCS and home phones on the

Sprint Nationwide PCS Network. Plus, you can get it all on one convenient monthly

bill with only one number to call for all your service needs. With innovative solutions

at great savings, Sprint has the magic number for all your communications needs.


Call 1-877-SPRINT 2

Visit sprint.com/home&onthego for details


j,; g


4 Sprint.


Sprint Nationwide PCS Network reaches over 240 million people Two-year Sprint PCS Advantage Agreement required. Activation and termination fees and deposit may apply. Services not available in all areas. One bill availability subject to credit Terms and conditions apply Offer subject to change without notice ConMct Sprnt for doiiilah 200l HM t All ,Il
reserved Sprint and the diamond logo design are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L P All service marks and trademarks belong to their respective owners. 2004 EchoStar Satellite L L C All rights reserved. 1Pi //. /


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005 PAGE 5

Recycle Center Picks

Up County Roadkill


9


p--

~
i :
19;













DPAf'1 A X T'r1T9'r T T 4n TI 'P 'F. Q h l '19DDTTADV16- 266i9


Lifestyle


S. Learning Center Holds Grand


y' Opening In Marvin St. Location
E The funds will serve as seed vative Partners Coaliti<
S rStf W tie : DEBBIE SNAPP money for the after school computer Ararat AME church an(
1 ., !- .,; lStaff Writer lab. ship MB Church.
S .Freshly painted gold, the Amaryl- The goal of the Coali
3 g/ F ; ,..,'' .' The Learning Center held its-lis Garden Circle building, was bus- plement a literacy prog
Grand Opening last Monday in its tling with activity as members of the ing of volunteers
new location on Marvin Street. community dropped by to greet and certified teachers, comr
S In attendance was Community meet the staff and to offer words of bers, and other faith bas
S- President Bill Gunnels, with Capital encouragement, and share in the ex- tions, which donated
S'.City Bank. who presented a $2,500 citement of this new addition to the books for the program.
Check on behalf of the bank, to By- community. This literacy program
ron J. Bamhart. CEO of Innovative The opening of the Center was the mented in this commu


r le Partner Coalition, Inc. vision and a collaboration of Inno-


... Donna Smith Retires

- After 15 Years At JCI


BYRON BARNHART, CEO of Innovative Part-
ners Coalition, Inc. accepts a $2,500 check
from Bill Gunnels seed money for the af-
ter school computer lab and learning
center. At left, Willard Barnhart, executive


LEARNING TO MAKE corsages, are these la-
dies of the Mignonette Garden Circle. At
left: Robin Liford, Dianne Braren, Shirley


-AJ,
j- ^


director of Communities in Schools, Gun-
nels, Community President with Capital
City Bank, Gloria Cox-Jones, assistant for
the Learning Center, Byron Barnhart. (News


rnoto)


Widd, Edye Corley, Ethel Strickland,
Dottie Jenkins.


IN MEMORIAL
Dewey Edward Pri
May 11, 1927 to Feb.
A Memorial Service
giving for De\\ e 's life v
2 p.m,,,.Saturdpiy ,at, the.
rene Church in Monticelli
"A lunch will be' sei
church at 1 p.m, follow
service at 2 p.m.
Thanks to all who have
and thought about Dewey
ten months. Those pra) e
swered, even if not in tI
hoped.
Everyone is welcome a
look forward to seeing yo
For further information
369-0'276 or 997-8314.


DOTTIE JENKINS receives a corsage from Brett Winches-
ter who demonstrates how to make corsages at the Mi-
gnonette Garden Circle Meeting, recently. (News Photos)


Mignonette Circle Makes

Creative Corsages


Mignonette Garden Circle met at
the home of member Barbara Cul-
breath recently and learned how to
create corsages.
SPresenters for the program were
Brett Winchester and Edye Corley
of Monticello Florist and Gifts.
After a bit of difficulty with the
twists and turns required in creative


D.LORENA BEVIS
D. Lorena Bevis 83, a member of
First Methodist Church and, an em-
ployee at Farmers Merchants Bank
in Monticello died Thursday Febru-
ary 10, 2005, in Tallahassee.
The service was Saturday at First
Methodist Church in Monticello,
with burial at Roseland Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranch, OTP, P.O. Box 2000, Boys
Ranch, Fl. 32064. Bevis Funeral
Home in Tallahassee
(850-385-2193) is handling arrange-
She was a native of Port Lavaca,
Texas, and moved to Monticello in
1946. She was a loving wife, mother
and grandmother.

Survivors include a son, Kenneth
G. Bevis of Monticello; a sister,
Cassie M. Sauers of Lockhart,
Texas; and a granddaughter, Lorena
Logan Bevis of Monticello.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, 0. R. Bevis, and son, Ste-
-ven A. Bevis.


designing of the corsages, everyone
enjoyed the end result of their crea-
tive efforts.
"Brett and Edye were exceptional
and very professional. They were
most helpful in teaching the ladies
to make their own corsages," ex-
claims Club President Jan Wad-
sworth.


TOMMY ENYART
A private family service for
Tommy Enyart will be held at a later
date at Bevis Funeral Home, Talla-
hassee, Florida #850-385-2193.
Tommy Enyart 53, of Monticello,
was a native of Terre Haute, IN. and
had moved from Jacksonville to
Monticello.in 1987. He was in the
construction business. Died Thurs-
day, February 10, 2005 in Tallahas-
see.
He was survived by Mother Alice
Enyart of Monticello, sister Peggy
Everett and husband John of
Atlanta, Ga. and two nephews Ron-
nie Whitmire of Tallahassee, and
Brent Everett of Atlanta, Ga., and
two nieces Lauren Everett of
Atlanta, Ga. and Haley Everett of
Atlanta Ga: and other loving family
members.
Memorial contributions may be
made to American Cancer Society,
241 John Knox Rd. Suit 100, Talla-
hassee, Fl 32303.
Other Survivors: preceded in
death by his father, Walter T. Enyart
and sister, Evelyn Whitmire.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


After 15 years of service at Jeffer-
S son Correctional Institution, (JCI)
Sergeant Donna T. Smith is
retiring, at the end March.
Smith was honored last month
with a surprise early retirement
luncheon, provided by coworkers
and staff at JCI.
Earlier the same morning, Smith
was presented with a pearl pin bN
Warden Mark Redd ard Assistant
warden Howard Clark.
Among the guests at the luncheon
were her daughter Barbara
Thigpen, and brother Jim Thomas,
and his wife Sharon. Following the
luncheon, Smith was presented
with a potted plant.
and Smith began working at JCI in
1990, when the institution first
opened and she credits former
Sheriff Ken Fortune and and for-
mer County Commissioner
M .Heedley Bishop for encouraging
ce, Jr.' her to take law enforcement classes
4, 2005 atNFCC.
of Thanks-, "They encouraged me and made
vill be held me believe that I could do it," said
First Naza- Smith.
o. "I 3 al\as told my family that eve-
ved at the rybody in prison is not all Bad,," she
ved by the added. "Some are cases of being in
Sthe wrong place at the wrong time,'
prayed for and some cases could have easily
y in his last been members of my family or
r; were an- close friends."
he way we Smith said she took every oppor-
tunity she had to witness to
and we will inmates, tell them there is a little
3u. good in all the bad, and a little bad
n, call 828- in all the good.
"I can truly sa\ that I loved my
Anne Price job and I leave with mixed emo-
tions." said Smith. She added that


SMITH
arthritis has made it very difficult
for her to handle weapons on the
firing range, otherwise she would
not be leaving JCI.
"I have made some wonderful
lifetime friends during the years,
and we'll' keep in touch," she con-
cluded.
Also honored during the lunch-
eon was Officer Mary Hagan of
Greenville. She also retired after 15
years at JCI and was presented with
a plant. Her guest was daughter Di-
ane and Tommy Hester.,
I ,': A I i2


on, Inc., Mt.
d the Friend-

tion is to im-
ram, consist-
:hat include
unity mem-
sed organiza-
supplies and

am is imple-
inity without


state/local/federal funding.
"The Center will be operated by
certified educators, and will offer
computer instructions for Math, Sci-
ence, English, and Language Arts,"
said Barnhart.,
"Our hope is to eventually con-
tract a Spanish instructor," he said.
The main goal right now is to
work with the students on their
FCAT and Florida Writes tests.
Computers are being installed at
this time and Sprint is expected to
arrive soon to hook up the computer
lab to phone lines for Internet
access.
The program will run daily from
3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. A snack will be
available for the students, provided -
by Gloria Cox-Jones, Center Assis-
tant.
She adds that good nutrition is im- -
portant for the children's health and'
concentration, and eventually their
positive output. ,o
She also remarks, "I will feed
these kids after school and evenings 3
if the need is there." .
The Center will need a wheel- -
chair ramp along with a few more"
upgrades. But, is up and running at
this time. .

i41~ 1~11

a.


3acksionr' crug tore
" "Where Pharmacy is Phamily"'
'r Hoine Health Care Free Blood Pressure
SGifts Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553




v Woodmont
13v Encore Senior Living
Tallhas.see s Original Assisted Living Co(mnnunlii
Assisted Living ~ Respite & Adult Day Service
(850) 562-4123 3207- North Monroe St.~www.encoresl.con

Assisted Living Facility Licence #99 :

Eye Care Fl The EntireFam iy


SafriClb Itenaioal oudaio
8 0 0 .3 7 5 9 w .S a a r *l b u n a t o. o rg.I


TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US HWY. 221, GREENVILLE, FL, (850) 948-2840
SIf you are uninsured, you may
-. qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare, Medicaid LindaBuen,ARNP
Elizabeth & most insurance plans
Hengstebeek D.O.


I Open 8:00 AM 5:00 PM, Mon.-Fri. / 24 Hour Telephone Coverage


I A
l ,3sr


Homes Of Mourning


rAUE 6 MUIVI*TLIlELLU, (YL), NEWS, WEDU., k'k;13KUAKY 10, LUU3


I


I


s. ;~a~m~~.. .:^T
~g~g~f* ~a~8~~
~a~-;: '"
*h
:
.~-1. r
-


r .


;-P
~TF"
TLC
a
~~" p~
PL


l~c~R


,i ..
Y:i ''
~ut~iesr&;-19lpCI~~i~







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005 PAGE 7


At RED HATS Valentine meeting are from of chocolates, but hunger pangs struck
left, Jacque Langford, Pat Muchowski and and...
Irene Evans. Landford's hat contained a box


POSING for the camera at the Red Hats Val-
entine luncheon are form left: Dottie
Jenkins, Louise Jenkins and Minnie Stokley.


Ladies adorned their traditional red hats
with decorations of the season.


Takedral Gilley JCHS

Student Of Month


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Spokesperson lar: Carol Kaney .
of the United \Vd \\as the guest
speaker at the Kiwanis- meeting
Wednesday.
She informed the group that dol-
lars donated to the United Way in
the county, are directed back into
the county.







I
'I. ,,.- :.


KANEY


Among local agencies served by
the United Way agencies are: 2-1-1
Big Bend, 24-hour crisis, suicide
and HIV/AIDS hotline, Ability 1st,
which gives assistance to individu-
als with disabilities,.Area manrage-
ment Coalition for School Readi-
ness, subsidized childcare for chil-
dren ages 01-5, and the American
Red Cross, for disaster, health,


Whole Women
Present Love
Explosion Week
The XWomen of Wholeness, Int'l,
Inc. Of North Florida present 2005
Love Explosion Week, 7 p.m.
nightly, Feb. 15-18. at Harvest
Christian Center on Springhollow
Road.
The theme for the week is: "What
Kind of Love is This?" .
A Love E\plosion Banquet is
planned Saturday, at the Woman's
Club on Pearl Street.
Banquet tickets are $2:0 for adults
and $15 for children.


safety, emergency, volunteer, youth
and military services..
Other agencies include: and
America's Second Harvest of the
Big Bend. which h provides surplus
foods to the needy through non-
profit agencies, ARC, Madison-
Jefferson, which promotes opporru-
nities for people with developmen-
tal disabilities, Big Bend CARES,
which arranges education, support
and compassionate care for people
and communities impacted by
HIV/AIDS and other diseases, Big
bend Hospice, for patient and fam-
ily hospice and bereavement care,
Big Brothers. Big Sisters, supply-
ing role models for children from
single-parent families.

Also, Boy Scouts of America,
Suvwannee River Area Council.
supplying youth leadership devel-
opment and prevention programs,
Elder Care Services, a comprehein-
sive program for senior citizens in
need, Girl Scout Council of the
Apalachee Bend, for camps, inter-
city program and other programs to
encourage healthy lifestyles, Senior
Citizens Center, for providing pre-
ventative services and socialization
for seniors, Kids Incorporated of
the Big Bend, for family oriented
early childhood services, Legal
Services of North Florida, provid-
ing legal assistance and council for
lowincome persons. Refuge.
House, providing .assistance for
victims of domestic and sexual vio-
lence including safe shelter and 24-
hour crisis -hotline, and We Care,
which provides timely access to
specialty medical care for low-
income, medically under served
people.
Donations for the United Way are
still being accepted.
Pledges or donations can be
Disaster Services
Volunteers Needed
State of Florida employees are
eligible to volunteer up to 15 days
per year with full pay for disaster
relief operations for the American
Red Cross.
Contact the Capital Area Chapter of
the American Red Cross at
878-6080 or .visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.



American
Red Cross


faxed to 850-997-5512 or mailed to
Jana Grubbs, 4132 S. Jefferson La-
mont, FL 32336.
For fl theri iniforniaton abouLt the
United Wa\V. contact Kaine at -188-
8207.


Takedral Gilley have been se--
lected January Student of the Month
for the Jefferson County High
School Boys and Girl's Club.
She is the daughter of Charlita
Janmes and Issac Gilley, Sr. of Mon-
ticello, and the 15 year old sister of
Issac, Dyrell, and Teaundra.

She is a freshman at JCHS and is
actively involved in .the Jefferson
STARS program at the Boys and
Girl's Club. She presently serves as
Junior Spokesperson for the STARS
of the Jefferson County School
Board Committee.
Gilley is also a member of the
Omega Nu Ep, which is a step-team
under the Boys and Girls Club.
SShe is also an A-B Honor Roll stu-
dent.
She enjoys writing poetry and
talking on the phone.
She is interested in community
awareness, and works with Boys
and Girl's Club partners to be active
and informed about her community.
Gilley is an energetic, positive,
and focused young lady. She, has re-
spect. and love for, God and the en-
tire universe which He created,


governs, protects, and loves.
Her leaders all have the same
comments to make about her. They
consider her to be a responsible stu-
-dent, with perfect attendance and
Excellent grades.
She conducts herself appropriately,
.has a positive attitude, and is ad-
mired and cherished by all who
know her.
Gilley is a STAR student, a team
player, a leader, and is strongly sup-
ported by her family, the staff, and
by her community and friends.


"% .v't-;

'I;I
. ****-y
14*
^,..'fl^ "*,,,

1)




U ,
6~ '


GILLEY


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
Sdba


j; Jif 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
.. ~Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds
Personalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets


14 21


Lloyd


Waukeenah


Capps


Fanlew
Fanlew


Ste


4 0


S 1'4' Ashville






Monticello


Ko

Kick-off Activities
92? Kick-off Activities
,I _' . ,. .. .. .


S1200 Comments By:
Kim Barnhill
Felix Skeet Joyner
Julie Conley
12:20 Warm-upand Stretching
By Jamie's Body Works
La 12:30 Walk lead by Mayor Conley
2 n And Commissioner Joyner




p Florida 1.

Jefferson County, Florida
S February 18, 2004

Sponsored by the Jefferson County
Health Department


Kick-Off Activities at Noon

FMB Parking Lot on the

Courthouse Circle





12 16 20 24 Miles


CELEBRATING Valentine's Day at their
regular meeting are these ladies of the Red
Hats Of America. At left, Illeane Vorce,


Tammie Peck, with their stuffed animals
adorned for the occasion. (News Photos)


United Way Guest Speaker


Addresses Kiwanians


I I ~r I' ~ __ I II


C9-


r
'"











Yo


r


Financial


Specializing in:
Retirement Planning
Business and Estate Planning
Life Insurance and Annuities
Marus Wincher Long-Term Care insurance Brin Winchester
CLU. LUTCF ChFC D.R.O.P Rollovers vestment Advisor
CR1T IHED FINANCIAL PLANNER' Reprtesentatmvr
'Secutries and Investment Advisory Services offered through Sunset Financial Services, Inc. 3520 Broaduway Kansas
CGry, MO 64111, Ph. (816) 753-7000 (OS) Member NASD, SIPC Sumet Financial Services is no an afilate
or subsdiary of Winchester Financial Group, Inc.


Tax season

is here and

so are we.

Our staff can help. Our Monticello office is open
and eager to provide tax and accounting services.
Walk-ins Welcomed. Appointments Helpful.
850-997-3082 925 W. Washington Ave.



MESON
A ASSOCIATE S, PA
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


BIRD & LEINBACK


_ ./


ATTORNEYS AT LAW


T. Buckingham Bird and Bruce A. Leinback


165 E. Dogwood St.
Monticello
850-997-3503


Security


BBB


The Mark of Integrity

Good Ethics Is Good Business

www.bbbnefla.org
800-713-6661

Contact Us For
Membership Information


HOME MORTGAGE OF
NORTH, FLORIDA, INC.
SWE SPECIALIZE IN FINANCING FOR
*New Purchases
*For Sale By Owners
S *Refinances
*Manufactured Housing
*Good or Distressed Credit
Self Employed Loans
No Application Fee

Contact Jim Ayers &
Bartow Myers
228-8137ce.i
656-4055

Work with experienced mortgage brokers serving since 1986 in the area
2708 Apalachee Pkwy
656-4055


1921 Capital Cir N.E.
Tallahassee
850-942-9700


*FARM CREDIT
OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA
Your rural land financing specialists.
We offer long-term financing.


North Florida
Abstract
& Title Co. Inc

(850)997-2670


220 S. Cherry St.
Monticello
E-mail: nfabstract@cs.com


'Serving lhe area for over 25 yeaSr"

EARN

3.25
Our current Annuity Interest rate
Current rate guaranteed for one year upon issue
subject to change on policy anniversary dates. The
guaranteed rate is 3.25 for the life of your Annuity.
Southern Farm Bureau Life
Insurance Company offers a
Flexible Premium Deferred An-
nuity designed for periodic as
well as single premiums. Your
contributions accumulate
wealth for the future. A $30 an-
nual maintenance fee applies
unless the value is more than
$50,000 and no modal with-
drawals are being made. Sur-
render charges apply to with-
drawals during the first seven
policy years:7% first policy
year, scaled down 1% per year,
policy year 8 and
thereafter:0%.
FREDDY PITTS
FL1 5704@sfbclc.com
(850)997-2213
sfbll.com



Auto Home *Life
Helping You


Title LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR, STATE FARM IS THERE.
Attorneys Title WE LIVE WHERE YOU LIVE.
of
North Florida, Inc. Call or visit me today.
Tommy Surles Insurance Agency, Inc
Sn3 Tommy Surles, Agent
Telephe: 4 2425 South Jefferson St
Telephone ( 342-3216
Facsimile: (806) 342-3217 Monticello, FL 32344 P
S\ tommy.surles.bw9i@sttefarm.com
Underwritten by the Attorneys Title Insurance Fund, Inc.
1 An attorney owned title company offering competitive closing costs 850-997-8282
with added expertise."
Experienced in Standard (Closings. Probate, Heir Property, Eminent Domain, Foreclosure
LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR, STATE FARM IS THERE.
The ri,,htcou.% .shtll flourish .s the palm tree. P.9. 92:12
statefarm.com *
P026040 State Farm Insurance Companies Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois
5:. 245 East Washington Street Monticello, Florida 32344
00


PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005


r







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005 PAGE 9 ::


*-I .... ...1.
-."xF ,.-.,-. -..-


MEMBERS of the HMS Boys, Girls Club col-
lected donations for Tsunami survivors. L-R:
Lena Odom, Eric Evans, Kierra White, Halle


Boxsie, Darius Williams and Site Coordina-
tor Wilbur Davis.


HMS CLUB MEMBERS also pooled the coins
collected for the Pennies for Patients Leu-
Skemia Campaign. L-R: Richard Hawkins,


Amanda Raitchell, Raymond James, Latoria
James. (News Photos)


HMS Boys, Girls Club

Collects $366 For Charity


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Students at the Howard Middle
School Boys and Girls Club were
busy on a recent Saturday collecting
money to help with the aftermath of
the Tsunami that struck Sri Lanka.
Monies raised from all of the Big
Bend Boys and Girls Clubs will be
collected and sent for the cleanup.
The local Club pledged to raise
$250. Nine students raised more
than $366 in their handheld buckets,
as they stopped traffic around the
Courthouse Circle.
All of the coins collected from the
fundraiser, $37, went to another
charity, "Pennies For Patients," a
national campaign for patient relief
through the Leukemia Lymphoma
Society and delivered to grade six
homeroom teachers, and coordina-
tors Richard Wilfong and Carol Pye.
Leukemia impacts every area of a
patient's life and the lives of their
families. Having leukemia means
painful treatments and missed


school for the patient and emotional
challenges for the patient and their
family.
There is a heavy financial drain
for families of victims. Some exam-
ples include:
The average one night stay at
Children's Hospital is between $990
and $1,350.00, and surgery to put
in a Port-a-Cath- $1,560.00 (a Port-


a-Cath is a device' inserted under the
skin to make the administration of
chemotherapy easier.)
Examples of other services are:
special nursing, $120; surgery serv-.
ices, $1,874; lab work, $5,407; radi-
ology, $311; pharmacy, $1,733;
supplies, $2,776; emergency, $242;
lab/blood work, $1,628; cardiology-
$838; and professional fees, $3.85;


for a total cost of $22,364 to the pa-
tient.
This is why donations are so im-
portant and greatly needed.
After the HMS Boys and Girls
Club students completed their col-
lecting for the day, they were treated
to a meal of burgers and hot dogs on
a grill set up in the parking lot of the
Fred's store on North Jefferson
Street, cooked to perfection by Site
Coordinator Wilbur Davis.

Create J SAVINGS
SOf avingsI


1,W HARPER REVELL
I~ 10 ^T710eV101:i'M 1 k NS]I' IIllaerm*^


Since 1982 "' %,n ,
ALL BRANDS
SALES, SERVICE & INSTALLATION

f 877-1306
Financing Available
Maintenance Agreements 3
S~R CAC 054733
CAC 0547'


eight Time
eight Floorplan
ight Builder

$50o.00



k ,. S-.,

lf) H:;.- l ..... .40i S ri
(l ra.ii .ic ..... 5 ( S I:.I
P rch............ .200 S I.
i 'm 31 2 S.I-


2111h0231 1030000 lf 333 l3 :30110 nn me 3103033330310.1330 30C301 0 qJun:1 3103303100133300330Dm:flil nnn AO~ 330 fi 310130300


2005 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 2005 FORD F-150 REGULAR CAB
k 541 MSRP .............. $25,150 MSRP .............$22,555
SAVE .................. $7,155 SAVE ................ $5,560
NOW $17,995' NOW 16,995"


- ''


2005 LINCOLN AVIATOR
SlI 41156h MSRP ............... $41,415
SAVE ............... $9,420
NOW '31,995"


2005 FORD FREESTYLE SE
Si" 5 101 MSRP ...... ... $27,280
SAVE ................. 3,285
niy '\ NOW s23,995"


GRA


2004 FORD EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER
;,i ri. ip .,-, Pi ,., .t,,I MSRP ............... $43,020
';: ...r,,, i..R .',r -. 25% DISCOUNT...$10.755
,,,:" YOUPAY 32,265"


SEERL..


'01 Mazda Tribute ES
Rool, Leatnei Laled, IP4:b3
ONLY
'13,995"*


'03 Pntiac Grad Ami T
4 Dl A' P er.1er( lira NItel
104265 0N5
I10.995"*


LU.3 ldrJp Clean, 1440217A
iONLY
$10,588**

'03 Ford Taurus SE
Lwoil Wi ll Il .PVNI

55,995**


'04 Ford Folcus SE
A irie iyjrs Pr o Ou.ler'
IP042,84 ONLu
111,588**


Bat I Dtal Auunill 04413W6hr
ONDL
O9,995**


2005 MERCURY MARINER 2004 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED
S54014 MSRP ............. $23,075 i i i i MSRP............... $40,645
SAVE ............... 3,90 .i.r. irF i ~ 25 DISCOUNT... 10.161
... .- --. NOW 19,885' .i ~f i"" YOUPAY '30,484"
--.-.-. ....




2004 MERCURY MONTEREY Free Computer or $5O0"0o
Loaded wilh TVIDVD MSRP ............... $37,320 $2,000 R ate or 0% for 72 onths
& Mofe! SI 440418 ........... ,32 2005 FORD FOCUS
SAVE i..rl. i".. aiS2aZ 32A
NOW 24,994" -. -

S-4V-" s199ooM '

%Lr13hi a IIllN 11II U v[lflf
Plus tax, rTag i lt'iL s alli T cji i ] i iiir ulls t, :p p rl d i r,,Il r0sM i.l ra1 Mot.r Ctrl Pjymien t L ei ,-:i I; '),'lh financing elecllng 0%.
Free comiiput I lI, pur;chastri( ., 'iy 2u0:. tO'1 rocui


'02 Lincoln Towucar
Sigiialure So'es, Prir; Vifl
g101 AA.fLY



'02 Ford EUledition
(aldle barj ilRoof, 4%a ELIa

120,588**


oMFUUIM0CwCM49
54 V8 Woo!diP42?3A3

121,588**

'01 Toyota Camrv LE
VF,t. LV:i Trdde, E .bi Cln,
/5IO8i9AA iY
$12,095**


03 Ford RRl ger Suprcab
Nair.Ide, 4Or EHpe. traded'
IP4?405 O1LY
114,588**

V96 FOd F25MSuemh
T D iiSL, fP~ b~lj L-k E Nwl
112i,58 8NL"
$12,500**


12mmercyloumwnt
Vd, Leuih 310 Rovi. Loaded'
0424I10.10N
$16,995**

14 Wd F250OCrewl Mb
6Cu lSt. 4 M4 FX4 ll. MPilei
IPr424i ONLi
$36,388OW


'01 Mazda MIV ES
hgedTdi Le.3inei 35k L4 Ps
Nce' 0P124074 ONLY
s13,588"*

'04 Olds Alere
4I GL C. Al LOAHI It IP4'I414
ONLl
S91995**


" Pls lax. lag. hlle. ,Iclsudes S389 doe lee. Mav require Ford Molur Creail Financing with approved credit All relaes and discrnmrs appled. See dealer Ior derails Ne* 20104 models.


* 1




aI


A ,:' ' .


97
42


S"Motre Than Just a Builder"
R
,HOMESA we're your one stop home specialists! R
"Built to last for generations"
..._,. .Ovr 'CUSTOM PLANS QUALITY BUILT
Over 25 Floorplans To Choose
S '.: From Starting In The 60's .
22-249 G901

i B........ 60 S.. FThe Barfow" www.chrismillhomes.com "Tte Kiram
Porchi' ....... I 1S.. Lic. # CRC1327579 2404 Bemiss Road Valdosta
Total 23.4 S". F Custom built at your lot or ours! Your plan or ours.100% complete: help with financing: Investors welcome. Pictures may contain optional items.


The IV, INCOM~tllonJSICONt ea

w Ya~~s
Giant inventor
-j~' rra" U"--;I


2005 LINCOLN LS
MSRP ............... $33,780
SAVE ..........$.... 795
NOW $25,985"


I w
EverYdaV
GREffDEALS
on Hundreds of
QUALITY
Pre.owned
VENICLESI


s~ mF~ ,.--~---~g~ ----a8ll~an~---l-PI----s~b~,b.., ~P19L~*IC*ds~I~ii~- -Llsl


I V ivii 'I


IF M--


__-^^^~~~cnrn~rrc~c~crvvN000~


MLO25%- OFF
. 90


r ~y;~;(~
E^ 4


m


0


I


I


I


W,


I


C';f~.s.~-












PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005


Pole Vaulting May Return


To Jefferson County High


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After more than 22 years, the
Jefferson County High. School
track and field team may once
again add pole vaulting to list of
events.


JCHS Principal Michael Bryan
relates that it depends on whether
or not officials can raise the more
than $7,000 required to purchase
and install the equipment.
Assistant Principal and Track and
Field Coach Harry Jacobs said pole
vaulting was last offered at JCHS
when he coached it years ago.


Warriors To Compete

In Weightlifting


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Colby Roberts, of ACA, will
compete in the 199 lb weightlifting
class competition, when the season
begins next month.
This marks the first time an ACA
student will participate in weight-
lifting competition.
Coach Dave Roberts said interest
in the sport at ACA was sparked by
athletes wanting to become
stronger and faster in preparation
for the football season.
In addition to Roberts, athletes Ja-
son Holton and Billy Jackson may
also be competing in the 150 lb.
Class.
"Colby has a definite shot at plac-
ing in his weight category," said
Roberts. "His goal is to bench
press 345 pounds and at least 220


on the cling and jerk."
In the cling and jerk, the weight
lifter begins in a.squatting
position, and maintaining that posi-
tion, brings the weight to his chest.
If the judge sees that the weight-
lifter is maintaining balance and
control after a one to one and a half
second grace period, the judge
gives the signal, the athlete extends
and locks his legs straight, then lifts
the weight straight above his head,
all the time maintaining balance
and control.
A tentative schedule has been
prepared and Roberts said he may
add some more competitions to the
schedule.
The season begins against Ma-
clay, 4 p.m., March 2, there; Taylor
County, 1:30 p.m., March 7, there;
Taylor County, 3:30 p.m., March
16, there; and Maclay, 3:30 p.m.,
March 30, there.


Lady Warriors End


Season 11

FIRAN HUNT.
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors lost in the first
round of district competition Tues-
day, to Carabelle, 38-32, wrapping
up their overall season with an 11-
15 record.
Coach Daryl Adams said a re-
cent stomach virus that has been
going around at the school was,
partly responsible for the loss.
"About 60 kids were out Monday
with it, four of the girls are sick;
three were out sick the day before
the game; and a lot of them are


-15
fighting it," he explained.
"'We weren't playing like we nor-
mally do. It was as if the girls ei e
playing without any energy. We
weren't rebounding, scoring or
blocking like we normally do."
Fran Walker led the score with 12
points, 10 rebounds for a
double.double, three steals, three
blocks; and Abbey Hunt, five
points, eight defensive rebounds,
two assists, one steal.
Linsey Day, six points, seven re-
bounds; Lisa Bailey, four points,
nine rebounds, assists; Amanda
Sapp, four points, one steal; and
Brittany Hobbs, and Rikki Roccanti
each had one assist.


When he left to work at FAMU,
and could no longer coach, the
event was dropped and the equip-
ment eventually fell into disrepair
over the years.
Bryan added that the reason for
wanting to bring pole vaulting back
to track and field was that it would
draw more athletes into track and
field.
"We think we may have a way to
come up with the funds," he said.
"If we can pull it off, we could be
ordering the equipment as soon as
next week."
The funds would purchase the
pit, pads, safety gear, poles, cross
bars, helmets, the box containing
the pit and the standards (uprights).
He added that the company they
would order the equipment from is
in Ann Arbor, MI and it would
probably take a while to get here
for setup.
"We'll have to have it profe,sion-
ally installed to meet the code,"
Bryan added.
If they can obtain the equipment,
it will be set up at the .old high
school in the center of the track,
where the old one used to be.
Jacobs said he had never com-
peted in pole vaulting, but he had
read up and studied track and field,
to include pole vaulting, in both
high school and in college.
"I know how," said Jacobs.
"And I'm willing to show them,
well, at least up to six feet."
He concluded that he will send
the team into specialized training
and that there are trainers available
to help them on a personal level, at
both FAMU and FSU, if pole valut-
ing becomes a reality at JCHS.

Taylor Downs,
Tigers 92-49
Tigers lost to Ta3ilor 92-49 in bas-
ketball action last week.
Coach Omari Forts said four of
the varsity player- were out be-
cause of suspension from the team-
for inner rule violations, and it was
the first game of the season that the
Tigers played without their lead
scorer, Demario Rivers.
Leading the scoring for the Ti-
gers was Fabian Wilson with 18
points; Tim Crumity, nine points; J.
C. Fead, seven points; Lucious
Wade, six points; Marcus Brown,
five points; and Clarence. Fead and
Willie Davis each scored two
points.
The team record is now 8-18.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lad\ Warrior J\s finished their
season winning to of their three
last games for a 12-4 record
Madison Central defeated the la-
dies 36-16.
Jodie Bradford led the score with
five points; Mallory Plaines, four
points; Bethany Saunders, Savan-
nah Williams, and Tiffany Brasing-
ton, each scored two points; and
Courtney Brasington, one.
The girls blanked Branford, 16-0.
Coach Ginni Joyner said, "We


were madabout losing the Madis
Central game."
Leading the scoring was Plair
with eight points; Miranda Wic
three points; Saunders and Cou
ney Brasington each had t
poiints, and Angela McCune, one
In their final game of the seas
ACA defeated Bell, 34-15.
Plaines led the charge with
points; Tiffany Brasington,
Points; Bradford, five point
Wider, four points; Miche
Mathis, three points; and Willia
and Sydney Plummer each sco:
two points.


ACA JV Ladies Revamp

Softball Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academ\ has
totally revamped its schedule for
the junior varsity softball team,
with changes to dates, opponents,
and adding some games.
All games are at 4 p.m. unless
otherwise specified.
The season opens with a game
against Madison, 7 p.m., Feb. 17,
there.
February action continues: .La-
fayette, Feb. 18, here; Madison
Academy, Feb. 22, here; and Carra-
belle, Feb. 24, here.
In March, action includes: Ma-
clay, March 1, here; Hamilton,
March 3, here; Florida High Mid-


dle, 6 p.m., March 4 there; Madi-
son Central, March 8, here; River
Springs, March 10, here; and Flor-
ida High Middle, March 11, here.
Madison Central, 6 p.m., March
15, there; Carrabelle, March 17,
there; River Springs, March 21,
there; Madison, March 29, here;
Maclay, 5 p.m., March 31, there;
Hamilton, 5 p.m., April 7, there;
NFC, April 11, there; and NFC,
April 12, there.


In Case Of
Emergency
Dial 911


sports.


Tennis Team

Wins 3 Of

Six Matches


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


TRISHA WIRICK and Laura Kirchhoff are members of team
six in the Simply Smashing Tennis A league.

Aca Boys Defeat

Wewahitchka 58-51


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Warriors won over Wewa-
hitchka, 58-51, Monday, bringing
them to 13-10 for the season.
Coach Richard Roccanti nomi-
nated Drew Sherrod as the team's
player of the week. He had 26
points, and 12 rebounds for a
double/double, one steal.
Ridgely Plaines, who was boxed
in by the opponents, scored 12
points, 14 rebounds, also for a


double/double.
Stephen Griffin had 12 points,
two assists, three rebounds, two
steals; Daniel Roccanti, one assist,
one steal; Jeremy Tuckey, eight
points, one assist, six rebounds, one
steal; Kyle Day, four rebpunds;and
Kyle Peters, one rebound, one steal.
steal.
Warriors will play in their final
game of the regular season 6 p.m.,
Friday, against Carabelle, here.
They will compete in the district
tournament, hosted at ACA, 7 p.m.,
Tuesday, Friday and Saturday.


Simply Smashing AKA Simply
Smashed ladies tennis team, didn't,
get to play its matches in its first,
meet, because of rain, but they won
three of six matches in recent play.,.
Rather than reschedule with op-,,
ponents, the Golden Eagle Wing,,
the team decided to split the points.,
The ladies went up against the'
Thomasville Ace-N-U last week
and won three of the six matches.
Team #1, Lisa Jackson and Katie'
Brock won its first set, 6-4; lost the' "
second, 4-6; and came back to wiri
the third, 6-3. '
Team #2, Maxi Miller and Patty'"
Hardy lost its first set, 2-6; won the
second, 6-1; and lost the tiebreaker,
2-6.
Team #3, Paula Joiner and Cind; .'
Wainright, lost its sets, 2-6 and 4-6.
Team #4, Judy Faircloth and Jen- "
nifer Ellis, lost their sets, 3-6 and 2-
6. -
Team #5, Trish Wirick and Laura, l
Phillips-Kirchhoff, won its sets, 6-3.-1
and 6-4.
Team #6, Angie Delvecchio and
Susan Scarboro, won its sets, 6-4,,:1
and 7-6. {.
"These last matches should help
us get out of last place," said
Hardy.
The ladies will go up against the 1-1,
Split Steps 9:30 a.m., Thursday, at.
Tom Brown Park. ,ii


Registration For Spring Sports Ongoing


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Registration for spring sports at
the Recreation 'Park is'- ngoing
throughout February. '
Park Director Kevin Aman re-
ports that: T-ball is for children,
ages 6 and 7, who have turned at
least six, by Aug. 1, 2005.
Coach Pitch is for children ages
8 and 9, who have turned at least 8
by Aug. 1, 2005.
Little League Baseball is for
youth ages 10-12, who have turned
at least 10, by Aug. 1, 2005.
Girl's Softball is for youngsters
ages 10-12, who have turned at
least 10, by Aug. 1, 2005.


Lady Warriors Softball Roster
Aucilla Christian Academy tells Also, Jennifer Tuten, Melissa
the roster for the girl's varsity soft- Martin, Shaye Eason, Bethany
ball team. Saunders, Chelsey Kinsey and Tay-
son There are 13 Lady Warriors, lor Reichern.
which include: Cassi Anderson,
nes Kayla Gebhard, Lisa Wheeler, Keri The head coach is Roslyn Bass,
ler, Brasington, Brittany Hobbs, Joanna assisted by Ginni Joyner and Bill
urt- Cobb and Caitlin Murphy. Saunders.


wo

on,

10
six
nts;
elle
ms
red


For T-ball, Coach Pitch and Girl's
Softball, the registration fee is $30
and for Little League Baseball, the
registration fee is $35.
Registration is scheduled 9-11'
3,


a.m., Saturday, March 5, and a-
copy of the child's birth certificate;h
must be presented at registration. .l
For further information, contact
Aman at 3-12-0240. '


What's New


With JIM?

Everyone really liked the
MALIBU DEAL
(by the way, I have ONE left)
so I thought ou'd
really like these
TWO beautiful

2004 IMPALA'S!


~1










'1






4-










* ~I











Si


It


with power driver seat, power windows,
fully equipped.


$12,986*


NO MONEY DOWN& oNLY 219 .
*Selling price plus sales tax, tag. & $148 dealer fee. 72 mos. @ 6.6% APR to qualified buyers.
Roy Campbell
I "e Just Do It!"
o229-226-390 206 Moultrie Road
www.roycampbell.com Thomasville, GA
ii{ stpast 19inHwy319N)


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work' Frame Straightening



1630 E. JACKSON ST.
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)


Lady Warrior JVs

End Season 12-4


T Z'= n aR M E :n ".

ANNUAL WINTER SALE
Ski Wear and Snowboard Turtle Fur
Wigwam Apparal Ski Hats
Ski Socks from Obermeyer, 25% Off
25% Off Couloir & Black Dot
25-50% Off
Grandoe Smith
Ski Winter Clothing Goggles
Gloves 20% Off
20% Off 25-50% Off 2


MlH^B^^BB'^S^B^^^BEcml^^


WE TAKE THE
D'CNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005 PAGE 11


Warrior JVs End


Season 5-14


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA JVs wrapped up their season
Friday with a 5-14 record after los-
ing their final two games of the sea-
son.
Warriors lost to Branford, 36-28.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said the
Warriors only had one field goal
during the first half, but by then,
Branford had an 18 point lead.
Nennstiel said the Warriors didn't
really start playing basketball until
the middle of the third period.
"It's hard to come back and win
when you spot the other team by 18
points," he added. /
In the fourth period, the Warriors
fought back to make it a three-point
difference.
Kyle Peters led the score with 17
points; Wade Scarberry, six; Daniel
iGreene, four; and Kyle Barnwell,
one point.
SIn their final game of the season
Friday against Bell, the Warriors
fought hard, leading for most of the


game, but s fell 48-46.
Nennstiel said he was very im-
pressed with the performance of the
Warriors and that they played their
best game of the year.
He added that the points were the
highest of the year. "We started off
hot and led for most of the game,"
said Nennstiel. "The last time we
played against Bell, they beat us by
more than 20 points, so we really
ended on a good note.
Scarberry led the charge with 20
points, seven rebounds and shooting
10 for 13 from the free-throw line.
Peters, 13 points, four rebounds;
Barnwell, five points, five rebounds;
Connell, three points, one rebound;
Elliott Lewis, two points; Hunter
Greene, two points, three rebounds;
Michael Kinsey, one points, two re-
bounds; Rob Searcy, three
rebounds; and Jayce Davis, one re-
bound.
"We have really improved since
the beginning of the season. The
boys went out there and played to
show what they had learned," con-
cluded Nennstiel.


RP4


" ; "


-~f


LOCAL GIRLS recently participated in a ten-
nis tournament in Tallahassee for girls 12
and under. Three of the four are from Monti-

ACA's Tennis Schedule 1


Varsity Tennis at Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy begins Monday.
All match times are at 3:30 p.m.
unless otherwise specified.
The season opens with a match
against Thomasville, Feb. 15, here.
Matches continue: Munroe, Feb.
22, here; John Paul, 4 p.m., Feb.
24, there.
Matches scheduled in March in-
cldue: Brookwood, March 1, here;








HIDE AND SEEK
(R)
Fri. 2:15 -5:05 -7:45-9:55 Sat. 2:15
5:05 -7:45 -9:55 Sun. 2:15 -5:05 -
7:45 Mon. Thurs. 5:05 -7:45

IN GOOD COMPANY
(PG13)
Fri. 2:05 -4:50 -7:35 -9:50 Sat. 2:05 -
4:50 7:35 9:50 Sun. 2:20 -4:50-
7:35 Mon. Thurs. 4:50 7:35
NO PASSES
BOOGEYMAN (PG13)
Fri. 2:25-5:15-7:55-10:00 Sat. 2:25-
5:15-7:55-10:00 Sun. 2:25-5:15- 7:55
Mon. Thurs.5:15-7:55
NO PASSES
RACING STRIPES (PG)
Fri. 2:10-4:55-7:40-9:45 Sat.2:10 -
2:10-4:55-7:40-9:45 Sun. 2:10-4:55-
7:40 Mon. Thurs. 4:55-7:40


HITCH (PG13)
Fri. 2:00-4:45-7:30-9:55 Sat. 2:00 -
4:45-7:30-9:55 Sun.2:00-4:45-7:30
Mon. Thurs..4:45-7:30
NO PASSES

POOH'S HEFFALUMP
MOVIE (G)
Fri. 2:30-4:10-5:50-7:25-9:10 Sat.
2:30-4:10-5:50-7:25-9:10 Sun.2:30 -
4:10-5:50-7:25 Mon. Thurs. 5:50 -
7:25
NO PASSES

ARE WE THERE YET?
(PG)
Fri. 2:20-5:00-7:50-10:05 Sat. 2:20--
5:00-7:50-10:05 Sun. 2:20-5:00-7:50
Mon. Thurs. 5:00-7:50


.NFC, March 8, there; Munroe,
March 10, there; Maclay, March
15, here; Florida high, March 17,
there; Maclay, March 29, there; and
Florida High, 4 p.m., March 31,
here.
SIn April: John Paul, 4 p.m., April
5, here; Thomasville, April 12,
there; NFC, April 14, here; and the
district tournament, April 18-19,
times and location to be
announced.


' .


-.-



I,:. ''$


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Tiger JVs lost to NFC in
the district semifinals last week, 64-


against NFC, but we just couldn't
bring it together," said Brumfield.
"We hit the foul trouble quick and it
really hurt us."
Leading the charge for the Lady
Tigers was Shaumese Massey with
11 points, eight rebounds, three


Coach Bill Brumfield said that blocked shots,
NFC is a strong team. "They're Seabrooks, three point
20-3 for the .season," said three rebounds; and Ni
Brumfield. son, four points.
He attributed the main reason be-
hind the Lady Tigers loss to be Shanise Brooks, foue
fouls. "We had 17 fouls called dice Griffin, one poi
against us all night and NFC only bounds; Jasmine I
had six," he added. rebounds; Chandra Tu
Keandra Seabrooks, a top scorer bounds; and Alexia I
foi JCHS, immediately fouled four steal, one rebound.
times in the first period and was Brumfield added tha
fouled out until the second half. and Huggins stepped
In the third period, she fouled out good defensive games.
of the remainder of the game. The Lady Tigers wra
"The girls played a good game season with a 5-15 recc


ACA JV Tennis Action Set


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


one assist;
:s, two steals,
kidra Thomp-

r points; Kan-
nt, eight re-
Brown, two
cker, two re-
Huggins, one

t both Brooks
up, playing

Dipped up their
ord.


Maclay, Feb. 17, there; and Com-
munity Christian, 4 p.m., Feb. 24,
here.,
Mqarvh nctio/n ;in(An1hn- YArf.lnvr


Junior Varsity Tennis action be- March 8, here; Commur
gins Monday at ACA. tian, 4 p.m., March 17, tl
LAll match times are at 3:30 p.m. ida High, 4 p.m., March 2
unless otherwise specified. Matches in April: Flo
Matches scheduled for Feb. in- April 7, there; and Th
clude: Thomasville, Feb. 15, here;- April 12, there.

HMS Bees Tell Game Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Siaff Writer

Howard Middle School Bees re-
pbrt their baseball schedule.
SAll game times are at 4 p.m. un-
less otherwise specified.
S Action begins against Taylor
County, March 15, here; and Flor-

JV Tigers Lose
To Wakulla

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High School
bbdy's varsity basketball team fell to
ad 8-17 season record after losing to
Wakulla, 63-60 in recent play.
iLeading the scoring was Demario
Rivers with 23 points; Fabian Wil-
son and Tim Crumity, eight points
each; Jamal Brooks and Lucious
wade, four points each; Robert
Nealy, three points; and James Skip-
worth, one point.

:LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
The Monticello News
welcomes letters
to the Editor.
?All letters must be signed
and include phone numbers.




500 Words or Less
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, Fl 32345


: iviacay,
lity Chris-
here; Flor-
29, here;
rida High,
omasville,


ida High, March 31, also here.
In April, action continues against
Taylor County, April 4, there; Trin-
ity, April 5, there, Trinity, April 12,
here; Florida High, 4:30 p.m., April
15, there; Holy Comforter, April
19, there; and to wrap up the sea-
son, Holy Comforter, here.
Coaching the Bees is Willie
Mitchell, assisted by Steve Hall.


THEY TOOK THOUSANDS OF YEARS TO FORM.
AND TEN MINUTES TO BE REVEALED.



"',3" ." ....

,, -._*;-.'-*, -- .
, -.
"- _" ,{ ," ,, .i ",r"-. ;."" ''?'. 'i i ., . '., .z : ..". '" ,,.' "" ..
I~. . v ,_,, I:,;- ...,=.-,::- ; ., :. -. : :
.,...I:: i, ..:...:,.,... ..,...,?,.' : .,=.,.-2 ,:. ,, .. ... .


-:~
"" I &
r.; ~.. I- 1-
,S. -~


Local Girls

Play In Tennis
Tournament
Several local girls participated in
the USTA sanctioned "Super
Series" tennis tournament,held at
Maclay School, recently, and faired
well.
In the girl's division of more
than 32 participants, three of four
area girls made it to the doubles fi-
nals.
These include Caitlin Harrison,
Kaitlin Jackson and Caroline Muel-
ler, all of Monticello, and Sydney
Chick of Tallahassee.
The youth from around the region
came to compete in the tournament
to earn points for their rankings.
The tournament featured both sin-
gles and doubles competition.
Spokesperson Pam Mueller said
they were proud of the Monticello
girls for their performance, that
they did well and had a good time.


CASH NOV

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEME
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PA'

(800) 794-731(

J.G. Wentworth means CASH I
for Structured Settlements!


Sheila Williams doesn't just hike

for the exercise, she hikes for

the view. Thanks to a quick,

painless procedure at Thomasville

Eye Center, it's a crystal clear

view filled with vibrant colors

and subtle details she never thought

she'd see again. Call (229) 226-6000

for an appointment and see

the world of your memories.


0 AS V/4

C E .
e CE&^

William Z. Bridges. M.D., Michael L Haney, M.D.,
Robert D. Webb. M.D.


cello. L-R: Sydney Chick, Tallahassee; Cait-
lin Harrison, Kaitlin Jackson and Caroline
Mueller, all of Monticello.


JCHS JV Girls Fall


TO NFC 64-23


When it comes to


home loans

there's no such thing


as-one






all.

As ont cof the natioll~s
SlarIgest lendcs we
custom11izC e t1011 ins
to fit yOU 111nd yOur bludct
perfectly. Plus, we mnake
the entire process si mplc-
even pleasant. So, or Mur rC
details and 11l-reClnt r1lltcs.
call us today., BCCII SC yOU
deserve a h}ome loan tlit'S
tailored to you.
And your dreams.

ALLIED
HOME MORTGAGE
CAPITAL CORPORATION

:295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY-SUITE B1, CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327

TO GET PRE-QUALIFIED FREE TODAY CALL DEREK

(850) 933-7265 *FAX (850) 514-3259


I


No










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005
Waukeenah Highway Stripping Complete


County Road Superintendent
David Harvey said Thursday, that
the white stripping along the side
of Waukeenah Highway, was ex-
pected to be completed today.
He said that the stripping was
originally set to be completed in


January, but the contractor blamed
bad weather for the delay, and was
granted an extension on the project.
"If the contractor doesn't get it
done on time, the County can hold
up some of his money," said Har-
vey. "That's why contractors are
required to put up a bond.


"They have already had an exten-
sion on the project and there are no
more," Harvey said. "It's his re-
sponsibility to make good on the
contract."
Harvey concluded that County
Commissioner J. N. "Junior" Tuten
is overseeing the project, and he


has guaranteed that the county apd
the contractor are now one the
same page.
The resurfacing of Waukeenah
Highway, at a cost of $715,801, be-
gan in August and was completed
shortly thereafter.


Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50:
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security

575-6571


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Your Local Professional Painters!


Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced Interior Exterior
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs
101-S',iMdo8 9343 2 8
g 'in i5?stjeASc&JJ.#


Appliance Service


of Monticello
'he Name Says It All!
S"Call Andy"


-..
997-5648 (Leave Message)
Owned & Operated By Andy Rudd


Thurman Tractor Service
Mowing Harrowing Food Plots


Licensed & Insured
James Thurman, LLC


850-997-5211 850-545-0139


Northside Mower and
Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South
997-2535


Ui


CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.
"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"



Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


I


Barbwire Field Wood

I-

Jim Phillips
850-973-8117.


JOHN COLLINS FILL DIRT Licensed & Insured John A. Kuhn YOUR LOGS TO
CAC 058274 Owner JJnMIE'S BODy WORXS
LUMBER AT MY SITE MONDAY 3:30 4:15PM JUMPING JACKS & JILLS 3 o 5 YR.
J & Air Conditioning, LLC ROUGH-SAWN OAK, CHERRY, OLDS 4:15 5:00PM JUMPING JACKS & JILLS 6 TO 10 YRv
850-997-5808 A/C System and Pool Heaters AND PECAN AVAILABLE. OLDS 5:30- 6:45PM FITNESS COMBO
Service, Replacement, Upgrades, & Installations HAULING AVAILABLE FOR A FEE., TUESDAY 9:00 10:00AM PILATES
WEDNESDAY 5:30 6:45PM
Over 25 Years Experience THURSDAY 9:00 10:00AM PILATES
850-545-9964 8 0-25 -27 GLENN GRIFFIN All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers, Certified Personal
1(850) 997-4577 850-997-9947 Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor.
155 JOHN COLLINS RD. 30 Tandy Lane, Monticello, Fl. 32344 -. 997-4253






DOD 1111111
'7 (- -'H rS vC' S i. FR ONLY lN A



| DODGE CHRYSLER JEEP 1-850-576-4111 or 1-800-576-3286
S3987 W. Tennessee Street


M E'M O
Toasvie's Finest Now In Tallahassee









New & Used Sales Manager Used Car Manager
Jessie Sanders Stanley McBride
Sales Consultant Alvi Barber Sales Consultant
Finance Manager


Lo -





Evander Bend Anthony Davis
Sales Consultant aSales Consultant
Sales ConsultantJae b
Jake McKibbon
Sales Consultant


SCall For Your Best Deal On A

S Dodge/Chrysler/Jeep Or A Pre-Owned Car.

1- 800-576-8286
i| . .......... ... ...
Z llllalllll~ll~~~ll~ll 1111 ll ~~~~~~~r lll~ll~llll~ll~l~ll~


BURNETTE PLUMBING &
; WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps


li


JOHN WILSON
PAINTING SERVICE


I


S'


~irs






'a


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


Tips For Lightning,


Thunerstrom


Preparedness


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With Hazardous Weather Week
approaching, Feb. 20, County
EmeroPnrv Mananpemnt war nf f


the importance of thunderstor
lightning preparedness.
Thunderstorms are the most
mon experience of severe we
typically, 15 miles in diaa
continuing an average of 30
utes.

plannerss

(Continued From Page 1)
>


m and

Scom-
eather,
meter,
Smin-


Only get worse, once the property
* i; developed.
S"All the water that runs off his
gtlace runs onto my place now," said
,- neighboring property owner Greg-
ory Clayton. "The Department of
STransportation will have a problem
With all the water running off Jeff's
i place because there's a problem
g, ow. I'm opposed to what Jeff is
Proposingg"
Concern was also expressed about
Sthe increased traffic on SR-59, given
[; the dangerous situation that already
Sexists with speeding truckers.
SThe cited issues led the planners to
[i delay the-review another month, un-
; til Arredondo and the county's engi-
neer could look deeper into the
: situation.
SFinally, the planners approved a
Commercial horse arena on 20 of
1"i6 acres zoned agriculture-5 in the
southem part of the county.
*The arena supposedly will be lim-
ited to use by-family and friends.
Because hunters and others who
1iase the land may use the facility,
lwever, it required a commercial
review.
lThe planners approved the facility
without much ado.



county
,Continued From Page 1)
dh the availability of funds to reno-
Viate and reconfigure the various
buildings.
,"'Dollars come before dates," is the
way one participant put it.
'"The plan is to do move in phases,
systematically Commissioner J. N.
.Junior" Tuten said.
County officials are seeking
$350,000 from the Legislature for
renovation of the buildings. In addi-
tibn, they plan to sale several
county-owned buildings in the
Sdowntown area and use these mo-
nies also for renovation.
-The general idea is to concentrate
af county services in one location,
along the lines of the one-stop shop-
Spng concept, at the same time that
dA wntown buildings are freed for
commercial occupancy.
,Following the hour-long meeting,
tle department heads and others
toured the various buildings to get a
better sense of the layout of the
Available space.
'Operations expected to move
eventually to the new location in-
d eude emergency management, tax
collecting, property appraising and
building inspections.


Despite their small size, thunder-
storms are dangerous. Every thun-
derstorm produces .lightning which
kills more people each year than
tornadoes.
Heavy rain from thunderstorms
can lead to flash flooding. Strong
winds, hail and tornados are also
dangers associated with some thun-
derstorms.
Lightning occurs with all thun-
derstorms. It averages 93 deaths
and 300 injuries each year. It also
causes several hundred million dol-
lars in damage to property and for-
ests annually.
Flash floods are the number one
thunderstorm killer. Nearly 140 fa-
talities occur each year. Most flash
flood deaths occur at night, and
when people become trapped in
automobiles.
Straight-line winds are responsi-
ble for most thunderstorm wind
damage. Winds can exceed 100
miles per hour. One type of
straight-line wind that can cause
extreme damage is a "downbeat,' a
small area of rapidly descending air
beneath a thunderstorm.
"Down bursts" can reach speeds
equal to that of a strong tornado
and can be extremely dangerous to
aviation.
Hail causes nearly one billion
dollars in damage to property and
crops annually. Large hail stones
fall at speeds faster than 100 miles
per hour.
Lightning is perhaps the most
spectacular phenomenon associated
with thunderstorms. Most light-
ning deaths and injuries occur
when people are caught outdoors,
most often in the summer months
and during the afternoon and early
evening.
Chances of being struck by light-
ning can be reduced by following
safety rules.
When conditions are favorable
for severe weather to develop, a se-
vere thunderstorm watch is issued.'
When severe weather is reported by
spotters as indicated by radar, a se-
vere thunderstorm warning is is-
sued. Warnings indicate imminent
danger to life and property to those
in the path of a storm.



LEGAL NOTICE

Request for Proposal for the Provision of
Welfare Transition, Workforce
Investment Act, Food Stamp Employment
and Training and Wagner Peyser Service.
North Florida Workforce Development
Board, Inc. (NFWDB) is seeking qualified
service providers to provide a wide range
of services and activities to include
regional economic development initiatives
that serve Welfare Transition (WT),
Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Food
Stamp Employment and Training (FSET)
and Wagner Peyser (WP) customers with
multiple barriers, emphasizing job
placement and retention, academic and
technical skills and preventative methods
of welfare dependency covered in State
and Federal regulations under WT, WIA,
FSET and WP programs. The RFP is the
first step in the selection process and
designed to provide information necessary
to meet the criteria set by the NFWDB.
Bidders must be able to provide services in
existing Employment Connections One
Stop locations to eligible residents of
Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Madison,
Suwannee and Taylor counties. At the
time of this solicitation, the NFWDB
estimates that $1.5 million is available for
the provision of the services solicited with


LEGAL NOTICE
this RFP for 2005-2006. This dollar
amount is given as a planning figure only
and does not commit the NFWDB to
contracting for that amount. The NFWDB
welcomes and encourages bidders to
submit services designs that are innovative
and/or nontraditional in their approach.
NFWDB encourages participation of
Small Business Enterprises (SBE),
Minority Business Enterprises (MBE),.
Women's Business Enterprises (WBE),
Community-Based Organizations (CBO),
and labor surplus area firms.
Governmental/non-governmental agencies
and private entities are eligible to receive
grant funds under this request. For a copy
of the RFP contact: Paul Wiggins,
Contracts/Quality Assurance, North
Florida Workforce Development Board,
Inc., 400 West Base Street, 2nd. Floor,
Madison, Florida 32341, (850) 973-2672
(phone)/ (850) 973-6497 (fax) or go on to
www.nfwdb.org -> News and Events ->
News Section. ESTIMATED TIME
TABLE FOR RFP: RFP Issue Date:
Friday, February 11, 2005 MANDATORY
Bidders' Conference: Thursday, February
25, 2005 at 9:00 a.m. Eastern Time
Proposals Due: Tuesday, March 29, 2005.
Action Regarding Funding: April 19, 2005
Period of Performance: July 1, 2005 -
June 30, 2006.
2/11,16,18,23, chg

SERVICES
Home child care (in-town) 6 wk-up F/T
Professional, fun, loving atmosphere. call
Heather 519-2369
2/16,18,23,25 pd
Ours is a "seeker friendly" church. We
believe that God will meet us wherever we
are on our spiritual journey. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks N of the
courthouse. Sunday service at 10:00 A.M.
997-4116
2/16 c
Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochure! 1-800-432-0320
www.bertrogers.com
2/4,9,11,16,18,23,25
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
tfn, 4/28 .
Do you want to be just a
Christian, with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established His
Church called the church of Christ and
you can be a member of it. We are ready
to help if you are ready to learn, call
997-3466
10/1, tfn

Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19-tfn

FREE
Free Mobile Home You Move!! 2
Bedroom, 10' X 50' needs to be moved
call 997-6259
HELP WANTED

Fast Track Foods or Land O Sun Mngmt.
NOW HIRING Managers, Asst. Managers
and retail assistants in Monticello area.
Competitive pay. Call 1-352-333-3011
ext.42
12/6-tfn c
Boyd Sod Farm is looking for a CDL
licensed driver for local deliveries of
agricultural products. Contact us at (850) -
997-6622.
2/16 nc
Panhandle Restaurant looking for
experienced waitress apply in person, 3-5
p.m. M-F 322-6600
2/16,18 chg
Methodist Church Little Angels Preschool
has opening for substitute teachers.
Applicants must be Christian and have
required child care courses. Please call
997-6400.
2/16,18,23


FOR RENT
RV/Mobile Home Lot for rent @
Monticello Meadows 19' South.
850-997-1630 Park Manager Liz.
1/7 tfn, c


Jefferson Place Apartments: 1 & 2
bedroom, Central H/A Stove Refrig. -
Carpet Blinds, Laundry Room, -
Handicapped Apartments. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah, St. 850-997-6964. Equal
Housing Opportunity
1/26 s/d


2 BR, 1 B house call 997-3368
2/11,16,18,23 chg


3 BR/2BA in Monticello, extra large living
and dining room, fireplace, CH&A, lots of
kitchen cabinets, W/D hookups, huge
screened sun room, shed and carport on
quiet street. Shopping nearby. $650/mo.
No pets!smoking. 850-997-4999
2/11,16 pd
Free Lake view from your 14x20 deck
when you lease this 3 BR/2BA w/LR and
Den. Available April 1, 2005 No Pets call
G.B at 997-3151 or 544-2240
2/16,18,23,25 pd
3BR/2BA, Av.4/1/05, 2.5 MI. S of
Monticello, EX. COND., C H/A, HW
Floors, LRG. Kitchen, Carport, Approx
2300 Sqft. No Large Pets. $700/Mo 2st &
Last Month Dep., $700 Pet Dep. Ref.
Required. 800-252-2755 Days
800-535-8729 Nights.
2/16,18,23,25 pd

FOR SALE
ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS
you don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all Brands and
telephones.
12/08, tfn

GREAT DEAL! 7 Week Old German
Shepherds Priced @ $150 each "Going
Fast" call 342-1493
2/2, 4, 9, 11, pd
New Living Room Set. Suggested list
$1400, sell sofa $275, loveseat $225, chair
$175, Set $625. Hardwood frames with
lifetime warranty. 850-222-9879
1/12, tfn, c


REAL ESTATE

Homes for Sale Hwy 14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400 per
month. Call 997-4000.
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, & TW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, s/d

GREAT OPPORTUNITY!


JOIN OUR TEAM
TODAY!


-Th


a


Seeking Technician
candidates. No prior automotive
experience is required, just a
willingness to learn and a positive
attitude.
We offer competitive
compensation, plus a great
benefits package.
Please apply at any of our
locations in Tallahassee,
Crawfordville or Quincy. You
may also fax your resume to
850-222-5152
SAttn: Tech Position.

Applicants must pass a drug test.


w


HOMES


KELLY &r KELLY
PROPERTIES A "
215 N. Jefferson NEW! A Creek Runs Through It!
(850) 997-5516 Charming 3BR/2BA 2003 1,800 sq foot Home with a
Breakfast Room in a Neat Neighborhood! S139,999
NEW! Brick House on Toby Lane
Roomy, with a Brick Fireplace & Cozy Deck,
S3BR/2BA, Sits on Two Acres! S149,900
NEW! Spacious Home on 6AC
2003 Mobile Home, 4BR/2BA with a Big Family
Room & Separate Living Room, Gravel/Brick Drive-
way, Storage Shed & Much More! $129,000

See All Of Our Listings! Visit....www.cbkk.com


lirr_


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Great Buy! Pretty Pasture On Waukee-
nah Highway fenced and ready to graze
$8,500 per acre
Just Listed 6.67 wooded acres on graded
county road in eastern Jefferson County
$23,345
Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home I
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice 1
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000 i
New Listing 29 acres near town with fields
and forest asking only $10,000 per acre
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000 '
Repo Big 4.bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly fenced pas-
ture nice location near Lamont $40,000
Contract Pending Wonderful Home nice
4 bedroom 2 bath double wide with fire-
place on 1.9 acres on S. Main St. $69,500
Apartment House currently 5 could be 7
unit apartment building great potential as
a bed and breakfast with suites $240,000
Cheap!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10 ac in
planted pines, the balance in real rough
hunting land, a great buy $79,500
New Waterfront Property 4.6 wooded 1
acres in Lloyd Acres only $25,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
Space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000 I
Home Site on the edge of town on West 1
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Buyers looking for Homes and Land




II
Buyers looking for Homes and Land


Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com

Al Maryland 508-1936
Realtr Assodate

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate
i


M arshallHealth

& Rehabilitation Center


















DriePeryan se ona llot, NDo


207 Mrshal Drve erry Fl.3234







PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 16, 2005

Haugen Chosen Jan.Student Of Month


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Christopher Haugen, aka Mikey,
has been named January Student of
the Month for the St. Phillip Boys
and Girls Club.
He is the son of Stephanie Haugen
and the grandson of Juanita Slagle.
He also is the brother to Brittany, 2
and Breawnna, 10, who is also a
members of the Boys and Girls
Club.
His family is originally from Wash-


ington state.
Haugen is 8 years old and a third
grade student at the Jefferson Ele-
mentary School.
His teachers are Judy Carney and
Carol Purvis. He is frequently on the
Honor Roll and has received the
"Positive Action Recognition," for
good conduct.
Haugen attends the Abundant Life
Fellowship Church in Tallahassee,
where he is a member of the Praise
Team.
He enjoys Kickball and bike rid-
ing, is an avid reader, loves to draw,


CHRISTOPHER HAUGEN


play board games and electronic
games, and create things. He also
likes to play with his animals. He
has two dogs, Tyler and Journey;
and two cats, Jupiter and Tweety.
At the Boys and Girls Club after
school program, he especially en-
joys working in the computer lab.
He remarks that he is good on the
computer and gets great pleasure in
"shutting down" the computer sys-
tem when the day is over. He is me-
ticulous and tidy, and well organ-
ized.
His Club Leaders mention that he


is very helpful when called upon
to peform a given chore. He is al-
ways ready with the correct answers
when he is questioned.
He thinks about his answers be-
fore speaking. As an example,he
might say: "I'll have milk instead of
kool-aid because it's good for me
and will help me to grow up big and
strong," remarks Site Coordinator
Geraldine Wildgoose, "He is very
well versed."
Haugen has expressed an interest
in playing the piano. He enjoys
learning with the Stubb's music in-
structor Anthony Williams.
At home, he has chores like taking
out the trash, cleaning the bathroom,


and keeping his bedroom straight-
ened up.
He prefers outside chores and
keeps trash and debris cleaned up
around his home.


c>x

Joe Francis
CONCRETE & LANDSCAPE
SERVICE
P.O. Box 6203, Tallahassee, FL 32304
(850) 926-3475 *(Mobile) 556-3761
926-9064 556-1178


A FOUR-YEAR EDUCATION


THAT PAYS


FOR COLLEGE


r ,:I9~~~I


.... ......., ., -





1-800-USA-NAVY.


World Wide Web:

http://www.navyjobs.com


''
r

.:


''':
8~ II'
i .I
.,
1.1
r.;.; ~1~9~i~8k-*~if