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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00011
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 9, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00011
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text










County Democrats
Plan Meetings,

Fundraisers

Story, Page 3
II


( ... .. F O- R DA HISTORY
4 Li.BL ARY VEST
U:~iVERSITY OF FLORIDA
...I TLE2, FL 2611


Refuge House
Support Groul

For Abused Adu

Story, Page 5


TV Crews
Film Here For

Station ID Spots

Story, Page 6


Carlton Hill Of JCHS
To Play Football
For U OF S. Florida

Story, Photo, Page 9
I Imw-


Wednesday Morning D





Montic


ello


1,~, 1 NF O .f C I.NT Published Wednesdays & Fridays


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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2005


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LARRY BATES, Fire Rescue chief, recently
expressed concern that the board had lost
confidence in his ability to run the depart-


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LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


'-' ..County commissioners last'week
stuck to their guns in the matter of
talks with Commissioner J. the purchase of four radios for the
ruten during the budget's ambulance service.
ase. (News Photo). Commissioners had approved the
purchase of the four radios the week
before, following a testy exchange
eS with Fire Rescue Chief Larry Bates.
s N e w The radios are supposed to rees-
tablish the ambulances' ability to
communicate with Tallahassee Me-
RaS W.,,:-I Hospital (TMH), which
R o a d s changed its radio frequency effec-
tive Jan. 1.
funding allows only for the resurfac-" A combative Bates argued last
ing of the road. But absent the repair week that the radios the commis-.
of the base, the road surface will sioners were planning on buying
quickly deteriorate once it is resur- were rear radios, incapable of com-
faced, according to engineer Frank
Darabi.
Darabi advised commissioners
that if the job was worth doing, it
was worth doing right. Meaning that
the base should be redone at the
same time as the resurfacing, even if
the dollars didn't go as far.
Commissioners must convince the
DOT of the same. Or barring that,
they say they may have to forego ..
the funding, even though it repre-
sents a sizable amount. ...;:'-


ment. Here he
N. "Junior"
preparation pha


Commission Eye


Way Of Building


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County Commin:sioners are con-
sidering a pavement recycling tech-
nique that is supposed to allow for
the repair of roads at a fraction of
the cost ofthe traditional method.
-Full depth reclamation, or m-place
road recycling, as the. technique is
iiterchangeabl. called. entails
grinding up the existing asphalt. IIn-
jecting the pulverized materials v. ith
a hardening emulsion, and then put-
ting the mixture down as a new
base.
Traditionally, the Road Depart-
ment must haul tons of lime rock to
build up the base, nreparat:,r, to any
paving.
"We have a lot of solutions to help
you spread your money," Jim Pat-
terson, of Florida Highway
Products, Inc. told commissioner
last week.
Patterson said the full depth recla-
mation technique has been around
for a while, but it's only become
popular in the United States in the
last 20 cr s: .,ears .
He described the technique as an
environmentally friendly method of:


rebuilding and strengthening exist-
ing roadways. He said the technique
benefits roads that are rutted and
deeply cracked and that require ma-
jor rehabilitation.
The technique is also supposed to
prevent future reflective cracking,
enable profile grade adjustments.
and facilitate road %\ widening.
Commissioners are considering
applying the technique to a county
road that is slated for resurfacing,
provided the Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) goes along with the
idea.
The problem- is that the DOT


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Two local organizations became
beneficiaries of the city's largess
last week.
The two -- the Economic Develop-
ment Council (EDC), and the Legis-
lative Lobbying Committee -- will
receive a total of $1.000 from the


city.
Specifically, the EDC will receive
$250 and the legislative committee
will receive $750.
The money comes from a month's
worth of salary for former Council-
man Eugene Hall, elected to the
County Commission,'and from traf-
fic citations issued by the Monti-
cello Police Department.
(See Donations Page 2)


, ,,., 6 "l 1
,..w ie*' ,.


Teacher Recognition
MARILYN HALSEY at Jefferson County High, Asst. Principal Harry Jacobs, Superinten-
was named District Teacher of the Year last dent Phil Barker surprised her at the school
week. L-R: Principal Michael Bryan, Halsey, with balloons and flowers. (News Photo)


municating with the frorntof the am-
bulances.
"We have dual radios now where
we can talk from the front or the
back of the vehicle," Bates said.
"My concern is that this will give us
radios in the back, but not in the
front."
The radios, moreover, would be of
temporary use, given that the Fed-
eral Communications Commission
has mandated that emergency serv-
ices upgrade their communications
equipment come 2006, Bates said.
A more viable solution, he sug-
gested, .was for tl .: .iii-. to-.pur-
chase radios that could serve as the
foundation for the 2006 upgrade.
Granted, the radios he was recom-
mending were more expensive, he
said. But in the long run they would
make his operation more efficient






4. '4


COMMISSIONER JERRY SUTPHIN, right,
and Road Superintendent David Harvey dis-
cuss road issues following Thursday's meet-


g.
d, was eventually
nt that would al-
:e upgrade of Fire
lications system.


What he envisioned, Bates said,
could cost as high as $200,000.
Commissioners were amenable to
Bates' idea of seeking a state grant
to upgrade the communications sys-
tem. But they balked at the $3,000
price tag on the radios Bates was
proposing, versus the $900 price tag
on the radios they were wanting to
buy through a state contract.
"The state will only award what
the Florida Highway Patrol uses,
,which is $900 per radio," Commis-
sioner J. N. "Junior" Tuten said. "If
we buy Motorola like'you want at
$3,000 per radio, we have to pay the
difference."
Bates argued that the county was-
n't paying for the radios. The money
would actually come from a special
fund earmarked for the purchase of
communications equipment.
(See Radios Page 2)
,, .. ,


ing. Sutphin wants steps taken so that the
county can recoup some of the expenses for
road repairs. (News Photo)


Official Wants Loggers TO


Account For Road Damage


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioner Jerry Sutphin
wants logging operators held ac-
countable for damage they cause to
county roads.
Sutphin said upfront he recog-
nized his proposal would be un-
popular. But he thought loggers
should be made to post a bond, the
return of which would depend on
their operation's impact on county
roads.
"I'd like to see an ordinance re-
quiring the logging industry to post
a bond," Sutphin said. "For them to
retrieve the money, they would have
to get the Road Department to sign
off that they haven't destroyed the
roads.
"Or if the Road Department deter-
mines that repairs are needed, the


money should come out of the bond.
"Now, when someone comes into
Jefferson County for a logging op-
eration, they are not required to post
bond, get an operational permit or
anything..If they tear up roads, they
leave and we are burdened with the
expense of repairing the roads."
Commissioner Danny Monroe
agreed that the measure would
prove unpopular.
"You will hear from landowners
that it's their right to harvest
timber," Monroe said. "They'll say
it's the county's responsibility to
keep up roads for agricultural prod-
ucts."
Dick Bailar, a resident who regu-
larly attends commission meetings,
offered. the example of a private
subdivision he was once a member
of. The subdivision, it seems, had
had a problem with loggers tearing
up the private roads and culverts.


Bailar said the subdivision re-
solved the problem by formulating a
set of rules and requiring loggers to
post a $1,000 bond.
"Within three months, all problems
had ceased because the logging
companies started following the
rules," Bailar said. "And it didn't
cost the property owners a cent."
Others remained skeptical of the
proposal, however.
Clerk of Court Dale Boatwright
pointed out that loggers weren't the
only ones destroying the county's
roads.
"The rock mines are a,major con-
tributor to our road degradation,"
Boatwright said.
Commission Chairman Felix
"Skeet" Joyner though the board
might run into trouble, if it started
"fingering out loggers."
And Commissioner J. N. "Junior"
(See Road Damage Page 12)


Radios issue



F Continues To


Reverberate
and smooth running
Bates Not Happy With His idea, hesai
-.'to seek a state gra
Commissioners Choice lo"Resue'comm


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City Donates $1,000 To

Two Local Organizations


Addressing Road Concerns


13 7TH Y EK IN U.U, 2)U U IN 1 Z!


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005


1'


.. ,







.FIIB Relay For Life Team held and Yard and
Bake Sale over the weekend and raised
i$1,200 for cancer research. L-R: Lani How-


FMB Relay For Life cause of the quantity and quality of
items donated.
S e Nets $1200S N S Some attending the event just gave
II monetary donations, and most cus-
and for that, said Event Chair Lani tomers were quite generous with
DEBBIE SNAPP Howell. their "Keep the change" comments.
Staff Writer The remainder of items from this
The big ticket items were definitely sale was picked up by the Team
The Farmers & Merchants Bank the furniture pieces, though the from the Presbyterian Church,
Relay for Life Team held a success- clothes, books, toys, and household which is collecting now for its
ful Yard and Bake Sale Saturday, items added up to a tidy sum be- Spring Sale.


ell helps customer Gina Diehl. (News
Photo)


raising more than $1,200 to benefit
the American Cancer Society for re-
search.
Team Captain Peggy Leight said
that bank employees donated the
largest amount of items sold, but an
assortment of other items, were
brought by and dropped off from
previous fundraising efforts of Re-
lay for Life teams, such as the State
Farm Team.
Many of the items donated were
new and complete with store tags
dangling. The Team met earlier to
decide how much to charge for this


Animal Shelter Under Quarantine


IRAN HUNT
_taff Writer

SThe County Humane Society is
Under quarantine until at least Feb.
,4, because of a possible outbreak
t' Parvo, a very contagious disease,
and members warn residents to'
vaccinate their animals against the
diseasee.


During the qurantine period,
animals that would ordinarily be
brought to the shelter, should be
brought either to Leon County or
Thomasville.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
.said there is not an actual case of
parvo at the shelter, however, one
dog had been exposed to four oth-
ers which did have the disease.


Since then, two of the four had to
be euthenized, but the remaining
two, and the dog at the, shelter
show no signs.
Bautista explained that Parvo is
on the rise lately in the area, and it
is very contagious, in most cases,
fatal. "The key is vaccinating your
animals," said Bautista. "Other-
wise, the treatment can be very ex-


Lamb Referendum Ongoing


PAY CICHON
Managing Editor

SLocal Farm Service Agency Di-
rector Mark Demott, reports the
Lamb Checkoff Program Referen-
dium continues through Feb. 28, at
the local office, on North Jefferson
Street'.
To be eligible to participate, per-
sons must certify and provide docu-


Radios
(Continued From Page 1)
SIt'didn't iiattet, countered Corin-
mission Claimnilin Felix "Skeet"'.
Joyner. Why deplete the special
fund when a possibility existed that
the county could get a state grant for
the 2006 upgrade? he asked.
SA frustrated Bates tried to explain
that the radio the commissioners
were wanting to buy would make
br three radios in the rear of the
ambulances, adding to an already
stressful situation.
SBates asked commissioners to pic-
hre a typical scenario in the rear of
n ambulance: a critically injured
patient, paramedics trying to admin-
it1e r CPR, and now they would have
to: decide which of three radios was
the appropriate one to use for a par-
icular communication.
S"I'm trying to keep things simple
Snd save the county money," Bates
Said. .
i Commissioner Jerry Sutphin ob-
served that Bates' priority the previ-
Ous week had been to get radios that
'.,-,uld allow the ambulances to
communicate with the hospital. The
Commission had fixed that problem
ay agreeing to buy the four radios,
4e said.
, "Now the priority has changed,"
Sutphin said. "Seems like the prior-
y ow is for the EMTs (Emergency
medical Technicians) to reach up
and grab the right radio. I suggest
you spray paint.the radios a different
color."
4The one concession Bates got from
commissioners was their permission
to purchase an additional piece of
equipment that would allow for the
eventual conversion of the four ra-
dios into front and rear radios.
The extra piece was expected to
akd a total of S800 to the purchase
piice of the four radios.


Donations
(Continued From Page 1)
Councilman Brian Hayes pro-
posed the distribution, which the
council unanimously approved.
Qayes added that should extra, un-
anticipated revenues become avail-
able in the future, the EDC should
be first on the list of recipients.
SHe praised the two organizations
fpr their work on behalf of the com-
runity.
Both organizations seek to pro-
mote economic development
locally, either through direct solici-
tation of businesses or by lobbying
the Legislature to approve economi-
cally viable projects.


..nentation, such as a sales receipt or
remittance form, that shows they
have been engaged in the
production, feeding, or slaughtering
of lambs,, during the period of Jan. 1
to Dec. 31.
As of Jan. 31, 2005, through Feb.
28, 2005, persons may obtain form
LS-86, from the local office, to vote
in the referendum.
For those not participating in the
program, the opportunity to vote
will be provided when the person
owns or rents land.


Form LS-86 and accompanying
documentation, must be returned be-
fore the close of business, Feb. 28,
2005.
For the program to continue, it
must be approved by a majority of
voters.
The program provides for assess-
ments on the sale of lamb and lamb
products, and for an industry board
to carry out promotion, research and
information programs designed to
increase the demand for lamb and
lamb products.


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pensive and there's no guarantee
that the animal will live after re-
ceiving the treatment."
If animals at the shelter show any
signs of Parvo, the quarantine will
be extended, otherwise, adoptions
can again begin as usual Feb. 14..
Until the shelter reopens, there
will be no adoptable pet photos in
the News.




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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005 PAGE 3


Funding Available To

Help With Utility Bills
The Area Agency on Aging for Assistance Program for the Elderly
North Florida announces the avail- funds for eligible households in this
ability of Emergency Home Energy and surrounding counties.

FCAT Testing Ongoing

In District Schools


RAY HUGHES, athletic director at ACA, was spoke about past baseball championships,
guest speaker at Kiwanis Wednesday, and and the upcoming season at the school.


County Democrats Plan


Meetings, Fundraisers


The Jefferson County Democratic
Executive Committee announces
plans for meetings and fundraising
for the year.
Newly elected committeemen and
women, Dr. Bob Crew, Mayor Julie
Conley, Precinct 2; Albert Thomas,
Ramona Kinsey, Precinct 3; Dave
Watkins, Gladys Roann, Precinct 4;
County Commissioner Gene Hall,
School Board Member Beverly
Sloan, Precinct 5; Wilbert Seab-
rooks, Precinct 6; Harry Jacobs, Pre-
cinct 7; Hopkins Thompson, Jane-
gale Boyd, Precinct 8; Walter B.
Edwards, Jr., Precinct 10; Deborah
Craig, Precinct 11; Rusty Hamrick,
Beth Davis, Precinct 13; Billy Sim-
mon, Clynell Washington, Precinct
14; Darrel Johnson and Donna
Brumfield, Precinct 15, will meet
with other committee members and
guests to review the Committee's
plans for the year.
Officers previously chosen are:
Eleanor Hawkins, chair; Roger
Walker, vice-chair; Amanda Ouzts,
secretary; and Mae Eva Kyler, state
committeewoman.
SMeerings will be held quarterly,
and will include speakers from


,throughout the State, as well as re-
cently re-elected Congressman Al-
len Boyd.
The upcoming governor's race has
already started heating up, and pro-
spective candidates will be introduc-
ing themselves to the group.
Fundraising will involve dinners
and sales to support activities of the
committee, as well as local projects.
This committee, in the past, gave the
first electronic voting report sign to
the county and plans to support the
County Library this year, since that
agency is facing severe budget cuts.
The next scheduled meeting is set
7 p.m, April 13, at the County
School Board Office.
The State Democratic Party will








,Call 1-800-741-4DER
for the location near-st you.
a-. -


be sending a representative and has
donated computer equipment and
furniture to the group.
Visitors are welcome and refresh-
ments will be served.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Students in District Schools joined
students statewide in taking the
FCAT Writing Plus test Tuesday,
continuing today.
Throughout the year, teachers
have been preparing students for the
spring FCAT test, beginning Mon-
day, Feb. 28, and continuing
through March 11.
Workshops have been held in
Reading and Math as well as FCAT
preparation to help students do their
best on the tests.
School officials note that each
year the State raises the bar on the
FCAT criteria, making it difficult to
compare scores from year to year.
This year Science joins the sub-


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ESE students will also be included
in the overall school grade.
Unlike other tests, FCAT tests ap-
plication of knowledge, rather than
knowledge demonstrated as an accu-
mulation of facts.
This requires a thought process
which forces the student to apply
specific knowledge to a given situa-
tion.
To do their best work on the
FCAT, students are encouraged to:
*Eat a healthy breakfast.
*Get a good nights sleep.


To qualify, the applicant must be
60 years old or older, and have not
received any prior assistance to-
wards the payment of utility/gas bill
from October of 2004.
A benefit of up to $300 will be al-
lowed if the applicant is approved,
toward the full payment of a past or
current bill; no reimbursements are
provided.
The funding is based on a prioriti-
zation method and will be available
until funds are exhausted.
Eligibility criteria includes, but is
not limited to:
*At least one person age 60 or
more resides in the home.
*The total household income must
not exceed 150 percent of the fed-
eral poverty level.
*Proof of income of all household
members must be verifiable,
*Assistance must not have been
received on any utility/gas bills
since October, 2004.
This program can be accessed
through the Senior Center or by call-
ing the Elder Help line at 1-800-
963-5337.


NOTICE
THE MONTICELLO CITY COUNCIL
announces the following Committee meetings on
February 15, 2005:
The Cemetery Committee will meet at 6:00 pm.
The Street Committee will meet at 6:15 pm.
All meetings will take place at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street,
Monticello, Florida


NOTICE


The Jefferson County School Board
announces the regular school board
meeting to which the public is invited.

The meeting will be held at the
Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building on Monday,
February 14, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up at the district office
at 1490 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, Florida, Monday through Friday be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.


*: U


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9,2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Cemeteries Meet


VA Growing Need


REVISITING his crashed plane in a county
field in April, 1988, Pilot Larry Hartz wipes
perspiration from his brow. At left, passen-


gers Terry Brock, and Render Britton, in-
side the plane, recover personal effects.
(News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


The Department of Veterans Af-
fairs (VA) is in the midst of the larg-
est expansion of America's veterans
cemeteries since the Civil War.
Eleven new national cemeteries are
under construction around the coun-
try.
The additional burial space is
needed to meet increased demand
for burial from the aging population
of World War II veterans. Nearly
1,800 veterans die each day. Of
those, approximately 1,100 are
World War II veterans.
"We want these shrines to become
focal points for neighborhoods,
communities, towns and cities to
help preserve America's heritage
and honor those who have given so
much," said John W. Nicholson, VA
under secretary for memorial affairs.
VA is building new national
cemeteries near veteran population
centers not served by a.national or
state veterans cemetery. Today, 75
percent of veterans live within 75
miles of an open national cemetery.
After current construction, 89 per-
cent will live within the 75-mile ra-
dius.
New national cemeteries are under
construction near Sacramento and
Bakersfield, Calif.; Detroit; southern
Florida; Jacksonville and Sarasota,
Fla,; Atlanta, Ga.; Greenville/Co-
lumbia, S.C.; Birmingham, Ala.;
Pittsburgh, Pa.; and Philadelphia.
VA provides additional burial
space for veterans through its State
Cemetery Grants Program. VA of-
fers funds to build and equip the
cemeteries, and then turns them over


to the states, which operate and
maintain them. VA also provides
other burial benefits.
A U.S. Burial flag drapes the vet-
eran's coffm and is presented to the
next of kin. Funeral directors can
help submit the necessary flag appli-
cation form to VA. Flags are avail-
able at U.S. Post Offices and VA
Regional Offices and are automati-
cally provided for burials at national
cemeteries.
Presidential Memorial Certificates
honor a veteran's service to the
United States.
The gold 'embossed certificate is
inscribed with the veteran's name
arid bears the president's signature.
The certificate may be requested
in person at any VA Regional Office
or by writing to the Memorial Pro-
grams Service (41A1C) Department
of Veterans Affairs, 5109 Russell'
Road, Quantico, Va., 22134-3903.
SReqIuets must include a copy of,
the veteran's military discharge pa-
pers and death certificate.
VA also furnishes upon request, at
no charge, a government headstone
or marker for the grave of an eligi-
ble deceased veteran at any ceme-
tery throughout the world.
These headstones and markers are
shipped free of charge. Most private
cemeteries charge for setting the
headstone or marker. National
cemeteries do not.
Any deceased veteran discharged
from the U.S. Armed forces under
other than dishonorable conditions,
may be eligible for VA burial, bene-
fits, (NAPS)


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 10,1995
Jefferson County has been
awarded a matching grant of
$53,311 from the federal govern-
ment for the hiring of a new deputy
officer, part of the anti-crime bill re-
cently passed by Congress.
SLocal agricultural producers who
anticipate applying for a farm loan
from the US Department of Agricul-
ture, must obtain at least Cata-
strophic (CAT) crop insurance
coverage on all' crops of economic
significance.
The City Council got some much
needed good news Tuesday night
concerning the extravagant fees it
has been paying for the monthly
monitoring test conducted on the ef-
fluence it discharges into. Wolf
Creek swamp.'
A citizen's complaint has the City


Council looking into the possibility
of establishing an auxiliary force for
the Police Department. But with Po-
lice Chief Nelson Blount apparently
opposed to the idea, it doesn't ap-
pear it will go far.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 13, 1985
Manufacturers, commercial pesti-
cide users, farm families and other
organizations are continuing the
fight against the overuse and misuse
of pesticides.
Efforts to protect the state's
groundwater have received the
strong backing of Governor Bob
Graham and other state officials.
However, some of the burden of the
cost is being placed on the counties.
An across-the board increase for
postal service and fees will go into
effect Sunday.
(See Our Files Page 5)


Good Old Days? Maybe Not


You hear a lot of talk these days
about the "good old days." The
good old days really mean enough
time has passed so we only remem-
ber the good things and forget the
bad things.
For example, as the years pass,
former servicemen have a tendency
to talk about the good old days
when they were in the military. For-
gotten are the field drills, KP, guard
duty and other unpleasant recollec-
tions but remembered are the old
girl friends and the nights on the
town.
I remember when the Saturday
movie cost nine cents and I went
with a quarter in my pocket. Nine
cents for the show and 16 cents for
candy and popcorn \Vov.!
But I also remember mowing huge
lawns with a push mower and after
hours Of work getting the magnifi-
cent sum of 50 cents.
Two or three pennies could buy
enough candy to last a good part of
the afternoon if you had a nickel
you were in tall clover in the candy
department.
I knew the candy counter from


Publisher's

Notebook


Roan Cic/on


both sides; as a customer and as the
vendor. Working in my uncle's sun-
dry store, one of my jobs was to
take care, of the little tykes who
came in with their pennies in hand.
Several candies sold two for a
penny so the littlei'People would say
"Gimme two of those and one of
these." Then they'd change their
mind and say "No, make it one of
those and two of these."
There was an empty box on the
third shelf of the candy counter and
I would put the pennies or nickels
there. At the end of the day, the take
at the candy counter would be some-


where between 75 cents and a dollar
and a half. This was real high fi-
nance.
Then there was the terrific job I
landed irra restaurant onesummer!dc
think I got ihe job because -when-the
restaurant opened on a Saturday
morning the proprietor found me
leaning against the door. I was
afraid somebody else would get
there before me and get the job.
What a job it was! The heat in the
kitchen a constant 97 degrees, I had
to peel hundreds and hundreds of
pounds of potatoes, not to mention
carrying hundreds of bags down-


stairs to a basement store room,
scrub pots and pans for hours at a
time and in general keep things tidy,
For 40 hours of this, I received a
little over $20 a week and all I
wanted to eat so long as I didn't stop
working.
One hot afternoon (they were all
hoi) fatigue hit me and I sat down'at
a small table in the kitchen to eat nly
lunch. The owner never came in at
lunch so I felt perfectly safe violat-
ing his instructions not to stop work-
ing while eating.
Half way through my lunch, wh6
should be standing next to the tabje
but the owner. He went into a rage
reminding me he did not want me to
stop working while I ate.
I stood up to return to work aid
bumped the plate which h srhashed ri
the floor. If the owner was angry be-
fore, he really was upset now; n6t
only did I sit down to eat but now"I
broke the plate. He stormed back
and forth in the kitchen with his
hand on his brow saying "My God,
My God."
Ah, the good old days. Seems to
me the good old days were a mixed
bag, very much like today!


Are We Losing Our Liberty?


BY ALAN CARUBA
Columnist


It's something I began to notice
imperceptibly. While talking with
colleagues who write commentaries
that advocate conservative ideals,
many speak of the likelihood of
finding their names on "no-fly lists"
or incurring other kinds of problems-
resulting from criticizing the
government.
You don't have to be paranoid
these days to worry about such
things.
In recent weeks I have read
several books that address the loss
of liberties, of freedoms' we all
assume are protected by the Bill of
Rights.
The low rumble of potential gov-
ernment repression has become
more audible of late. To put it
,J


bluntly, a lot of reasonably intelli-
gent people are worried about Presi-
dent George W. Bush and what
plans he has for the next four years.
and beyond.
"The federal government is not
above the rule of law," writes Judge
Andrew P. Napolitano, in his book,
Constitutional Chaos. He then adds,
"There are no cases in American
history in which our courts have
sanctioned punishment before trial
as 'prevention' against future
crimes," nothing that only out-going
Attorney General John Ashcroft
"has ever claimed that power with a
straight face."
In his book, Good to be King, Mi-
chael Badnarik, an expert on the
Constitution, notes: "Since March 9,
1933, the United States has been in
a state of declared national emer-
gency.
In fact, there are now in effect


four presidentially-proclaimed
stated of national emergency: In ad-
dition to the national emergency de-
clared by President Roosevelt in
1933 there is also the national emer-
gency proclaimed by President Tru-
man on December 16, 1950, during
the Korean conflict, and the states of
national emergency declared by
President Nixon on March 23, 1970,
and August 15, 1971.
"These proclamations give force
to 470 provisions of Federal law,"
writes Badnarik.
"Under the powers delegated by
these statutes, the President may:
seize property, organize and control
the means of production; seize com-
modities; assign military forces
abroad; institute martial law; seize
and control all transportation and
communication; regulate the opera-
tion of private enterprise; restrict
travel; and in a plethora of particular


ways, control the lives of all Ameri-
can citizens."
Badnarik says these proclamations
and executive orders have reduced
the Constitution to being "essen-
tially a dead letter." Nowhere in the
Constitution are such presidential
powers authorized.
Which brings us to the Patriot Act,
passed without a single member of
Congress even having had the op-
portunity to read it.
It eviscerates the Fourth and Fifth
Amendments, granting the govern-
ment to spy on anyone with out a
warrant, a so-called "sneak and
peek" investigation.
The recent budget authorization
had a provision in its 600 pages that
would have permitted members of
Congress to have a look at your tax
returns.
(See Losing Liberty Page 5)


Fact, Hype On Cholesterol


Citizen Congratulates

Publisher On Careers


Dear Editor:
I noted in a recent Cichon "Short
Takes" column that he is beginning
his 30th year as owner/publisher of
.the NEWS.
To have successfully managed a
small newspaper that not only wins
'journalistic awards, but also turns a
modicum of profit, is pretty remark-
'able in these digital days.
But even more remarkable to me
is the fact that during those same
three decades, Ron Cichon has been
a faithful and providential ordained


minister.
In that Methodist ministry, he has
helped struggling churches achieve
stability, growth, and community
outreach, in the midst of a pastor's
full plate of preaching, comforting,
counseling, and incessant fundrais-
ing.
To me, as a retired minister, either
career, Publisher or Pastor, is more
than a full time job, and he has com-
bined both with elan and distinction.
Congratulations, Rev. Mr. Cichon.
Sincerely,
Dick Bailar


People are constantly bombarded
with information about the choles-
terol problem in the United States
and how to approach it.
There's often so much news, it's
easy to suffer from information
overload. To help break through the
clutter, Los Angeles-based regis-
tered dietitian and heart health ex-
pert Heidi Becker takes five popular
claims and explains what's fact and
what's just hype.
Cholesterol in our bodies only
comes from the foods we eat.
False. This is a common miscon-
ception. Most people naturally pro-
duce adequate levels of cholesterol
to meet their needs. Consumption of
animal-based products such as eggs,
cheese, butter and meats adds excess
cholesterol to our bodies, which is


why it's important to limit your in-
take of these foods.
Plant-based nutrients reduce cho-
lesterol.
True. Nutrients called plant sterols
and stanols inhibit absorption of
both dietary cholesterol and choles-
terol produced naturally in the body.
In fact, the U.S. Government rec-
ommends consumption of two
grams per day of these nutrients as
part of its Therapeutic Lifestyle
Changes (TLC) guidelines that help
lower cholesterol naturally for those
with borderline to high cholesterol.
They are found in plants, nuts,
corn and rice, but only in trace
amounts you'd have to consume
around fifty five bananas in one day
to consume the recommended two
grams.


All fiber helps manage cholesterol.
False. While all fiber has health
benefits, not all fiber helps with cho-
lesterol reduction.
Viscous soluble fiber, found in
foods such as oats, barley, psyllium
and prunes, helps reduce cholesterol
levels when eaten as part of a diet
low in saturated fat and cholesterol.
Insoluble fiber helps with regular-
ity by pushing waste through the di-
gestive tract. The American Heart
Association recommends adults con-
sume 25 to 30 grams of total fiber
per day.
Any kind of exercise counts.
True. The goal for most people is
at least 30 minutes of aerobic exer-
cise on most days. This includes
swimming, biking, walking and run-


ning.
While that may sound like a lot,
the benefits quickly out weigh the
work, and any exercise is better than
none at all.
Regular exercise has been shown
to help lower LDL cholesterol, raise
HDL cholesterol and lower blood
pressure.
Only large cholesterol reductions
make a difference.
False. A small reduction in choles-
terol levels can have a big impact
for many.
Studies show that lowering choles-
terol just 10 percent can reduce
one's risk of heart disease by 30
percent.
Becker encourages everyone to
get their cholesterol screened.


From Our Photo File


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'Refuge House To

Begin Group For

Adult Abuse Survivors


DEBBIESNAPP
.:Staff Writer

SLocal Refuge House Outreach
ill begin a support group for adult
Sr Ir. I. ':.r: of childhood sexual abuse,
,Tuesday, Feb. 15.
SThis group will run for 12-weeks,
,Tid anyone wishing to be a part of
thiss group should call 342-3518, for
iiinc, and location.
* All sessions will be held in undis-
closed locations to protect the confi-
'identially of the participant.
Child sexual abuse is an abuse of
p'... cr and trust. It is manipulating
ior forcing a child to service a sick
jld.lr It is not about sex.
The trauma of child sexual abuse
:i; real, and memories can often be
recovered with or without counsel-
i ,, I1 i s profound and pervasive and
I.l-iil- things forever.
Child abuse is a crime. It is very
i damaging to the soul and/or psyche
of the child and has long term, often
permanent, effects on the adult.
Most childhood sexual abuse is
committed by someone known to,
and often related to, the child. There
are normally severe threats associ-
ated with disclosure.
Sexual abuse often takes the form
of an adult misleading and threaten-
ing a child. There is betrayal, an
abuse of power and trust, stolen in-
nocence, violation, isolation,
'control, manipulation, and secrecy.
Abused people may feel fear, pain,
,rage, despair, humiliation, longing,
disappointment, sadness, guilt and
shame. Sexual abuse results in a
jack of trust. Survivors and wit-
,nesses live in fear. They do not have
la voice.
Sexual abuse may be denied by
.the person themselves as well as
their family and community. There
,iisoften a strong reluctance to accept
Sthe truth about sexual abuse, and it
,,loten proves easier to blame the
ciiid, rather than the perpetrator.
Survivors often feel self blame
and blame by their community.
;.Th:.-, need to e o.cpe, t. hide from


themselves. They may become self
destructive or suicidal.
Sexual abuse has many forms. It
can be so subtle that a child may not
know what is happening, just that he
or she is uncomfortable with it. It
can be verbal, physical, or emo-
tional, just like any other form of
abuse.
One of every four girls is sexu-
ally abused before her 18th
birthday.
One of every six boys is likewise
abused. Two-thirds of substance
abusers are sexual abuse survivors.
By the time a survivor of child-
hood abuse reaches adulthood, a
great deal of damage may have oc-
curred. This damage often appears
to be unrelated to the abuse. Prob-
lems that adult survivors experience
often motivate them to seek profes-
sional help.
The problems or damage from
abuse are called the 'secondary
symptoms' of abuse. Rarely do sur-
vivors seek help for the actual
abuse. It is more common for them
to seek help because of these secon-
dary symptoms.

At the heart of the secondary
symptoms, however, are the unre-
solved issues that result from being
sexually abused. These secondary
symptoms can threaten all future re-
lationships.
Many adult survivors are well into
their late 20's before they realize
they have problems. Often, by the
time they seek help, their problems
are complex; relationships are trou-
bled; and they are in chaos. Their
greatest need is to be understood,
believed, accepted, and respected.

It is possible to heal from the
pain of sexual abuse. A new life,
free from the trauma that imprisons,
awaits those who long for restora-
tion from a horrific sexual experi-
ence.
All Refuge House services are
free and confidential. Victims de-
serve a chance to heal and recover
from this horrific crime. :


Losing Our Liberty?


(Contirued From Page 4)
S'When that was discovered, Con-
grtss beat a hasty retreat from that
invasion of your privacy. What else
was in that piece of legislation?
' What else is in The Federal Reis-
ter that lists all federal regulations
now in effect? Do you have time to
read its, 60,000 to 80,000 pages?
Neither do I. Nor can anyone inside
the Internal Revenue Service accu-
rately and confidently interpret the
insane matrix of tax laws that exist.
My late' father was a CPA and
spent a lifetime trying to figure them
out.
Though Social Security is sup-
posed to be a voluntary program, it
is not. Nor is acquiring a license if
you want to drive. Now boththese
requirements will be turned into a
national identity system. Or didn't
you read the legislation that recently
"reformed" our intelligence
agencies?
And while the Second Amend-
ment clearly states you have a right
to own a gun, which implies the
right to carry one, just try purchas-
ing or carrying one without running
into any one of the 20,000 laws that
restrict this fundamental Constitu-
tional empowerrient.
As we contemplate a government


whose powers increasingly exceed
those authorized by the Constitution,
we should remind ourselves of
events such as the destruction of the
Waco, Texas, compound and a
group of people called the Branch
Dividians.

Suspected of some minor firearms
infringement, the government,yours
and mind, managed to kill over
ninety men, women and children for
exercising their Constitutional
rights.
No one in government paid a price
for that horrendous destruction of
life. A few years later, a child that
had survived an escape from Com-
munist Cuba was seized by the gov-
ernment and returned. Isn't the
United States supposed to be a ref-
uge from such tyranny? Apparently
not.
Not once since World War II has
Congress, as required by the Consti-
tution, issued a Declaration of War.
This nation has been taken into
war ever since without legal authori-
zation.
This transfers one of the most im-
portant functions,of our elected rep-
resentatives to the office of the
President. And it does so without the
sanction of the Constitution.


A .


*


SALLY MUSGROVE, with Allstate Insurance Foundation,
last week presented Fire Rescue with a $500 check for
outstanding work in the community. Accepting the check is
Fire Rescue Chief Larry Bates. (News Photo)


Our Files
(Continued From Page 4)
Circuit Judge Kenneth Cooksey
has reversed his decision on a previ-
ous order connected with constitu-
tionality of the county
comprehensive code.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 13, 1975
If you think groceries and cattle
are going up, wait 'till you see your
taxes! Steve Walker, tax assessor,
announced at the regular meeting of
the Board of County Commissioners
last Wednesday that the 1975 tax
bills were in the mail.
There will be a 14 percent increase
of county and 16 percent increase of
city taxes this year Joey and Jef-
frey Martin, John Martin, Gill
Counts, members of the 4-H Live-
stock Judging Team represented Jef-
ferson County on February 7, at the
State 4-H Livestock Judging Contest
at the Florida State Fair in Tampa.
They brought home many honors,
including third place as a team in the
All Classes category.
Debra Warren, a senior at Jeffer-
son County High School, was
named "Family Leader of Tomor-
row" for JCHS. Debra won this title
by achieving the highest score on
the Betty Crocker Family Leader of
Tomorrow." Debra is the daughter
of Mrs. Edna Warren of Wacissa.
New food production achieve-
ments for Florida Registered Hol-
stein cows have been reported by
Hoistein Friesian Association of
America. The milk production re-
cords were established under official
production testing supervision. All
three state leaders are owned by
Bassett Bros., Inc., Monticello.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 12, 1965
Misses Mary Ellen and Babs
Getch of Orlando spent the weekend
with their aunt, Mrs. George Wirick,
Mr. Wirick and family.
"Buck" Bird was in Tampa the
first of the week where he attended
the Gasparilla festivities.
Miss Charity Schierhorst, a student
at the University of Florida in
Gainesville spent the weekend with
her parents.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 9, 1945
Bobby Floyd, nine year old son of
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Floyd killed a
nine point, 200 pound buck near
Waukeenah. His picture along with.
the deer was featured on the front
page.
A drive-in mailbox was placed
near the post office for the conven-
ience of postal patrons.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005 PAGE 5

Rob Mazur Certified


Financial Planner


..-
-.i


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The Jefferson County Recycling Prog
the following items for recyc

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), m
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans -- Tin cans food cans, dog foot
etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, b


News ppers, Magazines, etc.


All cardboard products grocery bags, cerea
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc

All glass bottles,jAars, etc. (clear, brown & gre


- i,..


The Certified Financial Planner
(CFP) Board of Standards, Inc., re-
cently designated Rob Mazur, CFP
investment planner at Capital City
Securities, as a Certified Financial
Planner Practitioner.
This resignation identifies those
individuals who have met the rigor-
ous experience and ethical require-
ments, have successfully completed
financial planning course work, and
have passed the CFP Certification
Examination.
The exam covers the following ar-
eas: the financial planning process,
risk management, investments, tax
planning, and management, retire-
ment and employee benefits and es-
tate planning.
Mazur will serve residents here,
and in the counties of Madison,
Taylor, Leon, and Washington.
He is a registered representative of
INVEST Financial Corporation.


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located 9t
, 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfili
and saving.your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)
C
: Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
o chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
C accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please cal!
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.iefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the .
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.




S Visit the www.Earii9_, ; .org Recycling Information web page
..ooooooooooooooo op 0ryppppppppppopOiOOOOOOOOrBoooaoo^O^


$$ REWARD $$

My 1 yr. old Red Pitt

Bull Dog is missing

again!

(Has white on chest and neck).

Very friendly!

Please send "Willie" home.




Evenings: 997-0582
Missing from Casa Bianca Road and Hwy 259
1- j


Monticello News- Proud of Jefferson County


-- - ~ r


.- -


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005


Lifestyle


Woman's Club Hears Program


About Evolution Of Fashion


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Monticello
Woman's Club were enlightened at a
recent meeting by Guest Speaker
Larry Paarlberg from the Goodwood
Plantation Museum.
He shared a slide fashion presenta-
tion with the group illustrating how
styles and trends changed over the
years.


He told of an outfit which was
found, stored in dark nylons. The ar-
ticles of clothing were in excellent
condition and have been restored
and are now on display at the mu-
seum.
He spoke about fabrics and dyes
used in the making of clothing
through the years.
He also mentioned that Senator
Hodges was once owner of the Plan-
tation.
"Paarlberg put on an excellent pro-


gram. It was very interesting and in-
formative," reports President
Amanda Ouzts.
Lottie Berry and Emily Taylor
prepared the luncheon of Chicken
Pot Pie with rolls, vine ripened to-
matoes on a bed of lettuce, with a
side of fresh fruit including straw-
berries, cantaloupe, and sweet pur-
ple grapes. There was a selection of
homemade cakes for dessert.
Toni Lane saw to it that the tables
were decorated with fresh smelling
carnations, blended in a variety of
colors. The head table was ornate
with a colorful mixture of carnations
with added greenery. The bouquet
was displayed in an heirloom silver
vase passed down in her family.
Ouzts also related that all of the
Club's Holiday Cakes have been
sold. There will beno more made
until late October or early Novem-
ber.
A planning meeting was sched-
uled for 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb.
8, at the clubhouse.
All members are asked to attend'
this informal meeting. The purpose
of this meeting is to share ideas, ex-
press opinions, and to get some
feedback on possible future activi-
ties.
The finalizing of the Club's par-
ticipation in the Watermelon Festi-
val will also be completed at this
time.

The what, when, where, and how
of the Fashion Show/Luncheon still
remains a mystery. There needs to
be a decision and a final closure.
The District III Arts and Crafts
Meeting will be held on Saturday,
March 19 in Mayo, FL.


Kevin Hill was named Student of-
the Month at St. Phillips Boys and
Girls Club.
"He is a great help to the Club
Leaders with the younger students.
He enjoys himself while he's here
and is a pleasure to us all," are just a
few of the comments made about
Hill.
He is the son of Earnest and Ger-
aldine Hill of Monticello.
; He is a member of the Pine Grove
MB Church, where he serves as
President of the Junioi Usher Board,
and is a member of the choir.
His hobbies include: studying, and
entering competitive events such as
writing and reciting poetry. He also
enjoys watching television, and talk-
ing on the phone.
,He aspires to graduate with honors
and, is presently on the Honor Roll
with a full schedule of invigorating
classes.
.,Hill's extracurricular activities in-


Homes -Of

SDewey Edward Price, Jr.
Dewey Edward Price, Jr., 77, of
Franklin, entered into rest on Friday,
February 4, 2005.
SA Native of Taplin, West Virginia,
he was the son of Mamie Wills
Cabell' of Uneeda, West Virginia
and the late Dewey Edward Price,
Sr. In addition to his father, he was
preceded in death by a sister, Lois
Ann Price. He was a U.S. Army vet-
eran of WWII and was a retired
owner and captain of charter and
party fishing boats in Clearwater, Fl.
He attended First Presbyterian
Church of Franklin and First Naza-
rene Church of Monticello, Fl.
Dewey was a member of the
United States Amateur Ballroom
Association.
; In addition to his mother, he is
survived by his wife, Pamela Anne
Price; two daughters, Debra Koop of
Lighthouse Pt., Fl and Susan Price
of Philadelphia, PA; four step chil-
dren, Claire.Hunt of London, Eng-
land, Julia Hunt of Birmingham,
England, Edward Hunt of Isle of
Wight, England and Jeff Inman of
Peru, Ind.; two brothers, Billy Price
of Goldsboro, NC and John Price of
McMinnville, Oregon; one half sis-


LARRY PAARLBERG, of Goodwood
was guest speaker at the Woman's


Museum
Club, re-


cently, and presented a program about the
evolution of fashion.


TV Crews Film Spots


Here For Station IDS


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Representatives from both NBC-
40 and ABC-27 television were in
town Monday morning filming
around town for their regular sta-
tion ID's.
The ID's'will be shown all day
Friday on channel 40. The ID's
will also be shown periodically
through January of next year.
NBC-40 Promotions Director Joe


Sigmon said the ID's are being
made throughout many of the
smaller towns and cities outside of
Tallahassee, with one locale to be
featured each week.
Also, Channel 27 announced its
picks for the ABC News Channel
27 Storm Team Weather Watchers/
Janice Clarke and Janice and Bill
Pitz, were chosen.
Chamber President David Frisby
led the film crew around town to
destinations including several of
the historic home sites, the Cham-


ber of Commerce, and the Monti-
cello Police Department, as well as
the downtown area.
The group enjoyed lunch at the
Courtyard Cafe, where they gave
away prizes including T-shirts, and
hats.
Channel 27 Meteorologist Casa-
nova Nurse was also on hand to,
sign autographs.
"We're enjoying visiting and in-
teracting and getting to know the
people on the other side of the TV;
set," said Nurse. "It's a very cool,.
experience to get the feel of life,,
outside of the Tallahassee city lim- I


"I'm really impressed by the hos-
pitality here," he added. "Everyone
makes me feel very welcome."
When distributing prizes during
the lunch hour, Nurse quipped,,;
"Hopefully we can get a few more,
brave souls on film, seeking their,;
five seconds of fame."
He concluded that the visits and,,
filming is, the stations' way of say--,
ing thank you to the communities
that they serve,.
*


PRICE


.HILL
clude: Vice President of his Jeffer-
son County 4-H Club; Future
Business Leaders of America, par-
liamentarian; and the Jefferson
County Key Club, where he has ac-
cumulated the most hours.
His future plans include earning
degrees in Criminology and Psy-
chology.


Mourning
ter, Sharon Ruggleman of Uneeda,
West Virginia; one grandson,
Nicholas Bell; and several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral Services will be held at 1
p.m. Monday, February 7, at First
Presbyterian Church (Old Chapel).
Rev. Bob Abel and Dr. John Dodson
will officiate. Burial will be in the
Woodlawn Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 12:00 1:00 p.m. Monday, at
the Tartan Hall of First Presbyterian
Church.
Pallbearers I ill be Bill Price, Bill
Barnes, Col. Billy Brown, Charlie
Mims, Jeff Inman and Doug Price.
Honorary Pallbearers will be Tony
DeSercey, Lewis Spears, John Price,
Walt Bunso, Jack Lawley, Bob
Miley, Richard Bell and Fred
Riggleman.

Memorial donations may be made
to the Angel Home Health and Hos-
pice, 170 Church Street, Franklin,
NC. 28734 or Angel Cancer Care
Center.
Macon Funeral Home is in charge
of the arrangements.
Online condolences available
@www.maconfuneralhome.com


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A Pre-Valentine Evening of Ro-
mance and ElegaeS: for Married
Couples is planned for 5-7 p.m. Sat-
urday, at the Bethel AME Church.
The Bethel AME Church
Women's Ministry, on East York
Street, cordially invites all married
couples to an evening of marital
courtship, laughter, spiritual unity,
love, and a renewed sense of com-
mitment and joy.
Attire will be formal in colors of
red, white, or ivory, if possible.
Refreshments will be served in the
Church Annex.
Rev. Helen Jolhnson-Robinson


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flesh, "Therefore, what God has
joined together, let not man
separate."


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Hill Student Of Month

At St. Phillips Club


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Bethel AME Church Plans
Pre-Valentine Evening


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Once you experience the truly clean feeling without
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Jackson's Drug Store 1663 E. Dogwood Monticello
STEWARDS PHARMACY
and The Wellness Store
A Compounding & Natural Remedies Pharmacy
1350 E. Tennessee St., Ste. C-2
Tallahassee, Florida
850.216.1021


RAQUEL WELCH

WIG TRUNK SHOW & SALE
Friday, Feb. 11 Governor's Square Mall
Saturday, Feb. 12 Tallahassee Mall

Book your personal consultation with a
Raquel Welch WIG Stylist


AIR H~ HairUWear donated over 6,500 wigs to the
American Cancer Society, Inc. in 2003 which FW
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1~1 I
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she'll do with her winnings as yet
but she is pleased to have won
something.
The Club will continue to offer


the Lloyd Lion's Club has de- wheel chairs, walkers, and cru
cidid to continue the Community to those in need. They are j
Yard Sale on Saturdays. phone call away at 997-1754.
Vendors will be asked to make a
$10 charitable donation to the The next meeting will be h
Lian's Club for each Saturday sale. p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 15 anc
Tis will allow them to leave their feature a program from Arun
tall'es and sale items set up from dra. He will present a slide press
wiek to week should they decide to tion of his recent trip and
cdtinue their bartering with poten- project in Tamilnadu, in sou
ti~icustomers. India. He joined with other v
Ehe Flea Market has been success- teers from the United States
fuiwith 10 or more vendors return- spent three days working with i
inIeach week. vors and victims of the Tsunam
At the monthly meeting, recently, Kundra is a member of the
:h drawing for the 12 gauge shot Association in Tallahassee, v
gin and case raffle was held. The has raised more than $6,000
imting ticket holder was Dorothy continues to raise funds to be
L.Barrington. tribute fairly in the stricken are
Warrington is a vendor at the Com- The meeting will take pla
miity Flea Market and claims to the Club's location at 7337-A
hae purchased only one ticket, Lloyd Road. A lighted road
"JAt to make a donation," she adds will call attention to the U-
wth a grin. She's not sure what Storage building.


Founders Circle To

Hear Ghostly Tales


DEBIE SNAPP
Sta Writer
-vmbers'of the Founder's Garden
Circe will meet for lunch 11:30
a.m. on. Thursday, Feb. 10 at the
Rare Door Restaurant, with Betty
Davi founder, of Ghost Trackers,
sche led as the guest speaker.
She will enlighten the group
about ghost facts and the many
sight gs in Monticello.
D7 is will speak about the ghost
tours ,he conducts, as well as the
Popular Haunted Ghost Tours regu-
larly scheduled here.
Thi will also be a business meet-
ing an(}as everyone's input is valu-
able, attendance is important.
Chiitman Cindy Lee \v. il take
nominations for Chlairman and f:fr
SecretaryTreasurer for the new Cir-
cle year.'
: Lasdscaping at the Oakfield


Itches
ust a

eld 7
I will
Kun-
;enta-
work
.them
olun-
and
;urvi-
i.
India
which
and
Sdis-
eas.
Ice at
SOld
sign
-Haul


Cemetery is another issue to be ad-
dressed at this meeting.
Lee also mentions that the French
Market Bean Soup fundraising event
brought in a tidy sum for the Circle's
treasury.
The only cost to the Circle was for
the dried beans. The membership
contributed the jars, materials, and
the other items.
A variety of 10-15 different beans
were purchased. They were mixed
together, giving a pleasingly and
pleasant color combination. The
dried beans were then placed into
quart sized canning jars and lids and *
rings sealed the jars. Circles of col-
orful material decorated the jar tops.
And, recipes using the beans, dan-
gled from.the jars.
Each member was responrible for
selling five jars of beans. All mem-
bers participated in this creative
fundraiser.


lighting ideas

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TALLAHASSEE LIGH iNG
. FAN & BLIND
850-878-3271
508-C Capital Circle 5. .,
I. Tallahassee, Floridr a 323if
(3/10 of a mile soi~n o A .


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005 PAGE 7

Boys, Girls Club Help

Sponsor College Clinic


Lions To Continue


Weekly Yard Sales


This tree service is made possi-
ble by: Kids Incorporated of the Big-
Bend; Boys and Girls Club of the
Big Bend; FSU Early Head Start;:
Leon Gadsden School Readiness:
Coalition; Capital Area Healthy
Start; Capital Area Community Ac-
tion Agency; Whole Child Project:
Leon; Area Management Coalition
for School Readiness; and the
GFWC Tallahassee Junior Woman's
Club.
Childcare is available on a limited
basis at Eagles' Nest Scout Hut, for
$5 per child. Inquire about child
care when registering.
Limit transportation will be pro-
vided.


LIONS CLUB members present Dorothy Barrington, left,
with the shotgun and case she won at the club raffle. June
Campbell makes the presentation with Jerry Andrews, and
Tammy Simmons looking on. (News Photo)


?II


'it:


LLOYD LIONS CLUB will continue to operate its community
yard sale Saturdays. L-R: Carlester Fryson sells clothing,
bedding, and household goods at the event. June
Campbell, right, purchases a silk flower arrangement from
him. (News Photos)


SUNSET ILL ..
& Reception Center
NEW WITER HOURS
Si :' .. Mon., Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 11 a.m. 9 p.m.
.Saturday 8 aom. -10 p.m.
SSunday 8 a.m. 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday

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*, .Saturday Night
8 p.m. until $2s5Cover
At The Villages Of St. Marks
925-7882


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Contact Numbers:
Office: 386-754-1132
Fax: 815-361-9196 ~
Cell: 386-697-4824


jefferson High School
Boys & Girls Club


il!


I!


KRYSTAL WILSON loves participating in activities at the
Boys and Girls club. She is an avid supporter of the club
and its events. (News Photo)


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
.JL^


- TC-nwuvl Fu-eab


1{oi1Le/


L' 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
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850-997-5553:.,
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott(intern)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
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For more information, please call
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Walk-ins Welcomed. Appointments Helpful.
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Beautiful outside terrace and garden
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For reservations or information, please call
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I- .. '-. 1 -






For reservations or information, please call
386-5966 or 422-2210


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Boys and Girls Club is among
the sponsors of a Free Parents Col-
lege Clinic, 10 a.m. 3 p.m. on Sat-
urday. Feb. 19, at Tallahassee
Community College Center for Eco-
nomic and Workforce Development.
Doors will open at 9:30 a.m.
Advanced registration is required
by Feb. 15. Call 414-9800 x110, or
e-mail to info@kidsincorporated.org
The session will include work-
shops and lunch. There will also be
a parents resource room and vendors
will be available.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
i H


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9,2005
.......................................-.::.:.........'.: -


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Physical activity! It's in the house, in the yard, at the office, and even at the mall. Just 30 minutes of moderate
physical activity a day at least five days -per week is hat you need. It can boost your energy and lower your
stress and risk of chronic disease. It can be done as common activities walking, gardening, and housework.
They all count! If you think you can't do 30 minute of activity, start with shorter amounts. Get more out of
life with physical activity It's Everywhere You Go!


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Sponsored by the Jefferson County Health Department and the Centers for Disease Control and F

Remember to consult your healthcare provider before starting a physical activity program.
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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005 PAGE 9


Carlton Hill Of JCHS To


Play Football For Bulls


CARLTON HILL of JCHS signed to play foot-
ball for the University of South Florida, on
National Signing Day. L-R: Carl Ford, step-
father, Christine Hill, mother, Hill, Sylvia


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Tigers stand at a 4-14 season-
record, after losing their two final
games of the regular season.
The ladies played a close game
against Lincoln, and lost, 45-44.
In the first period the Lady Tigers
led 11-7, and both teams scored 13
in the second.
Jefferson kept the game within
one point, scoring seven in the third
to Lincoln's eight, and in the fourth
period, JCHS was outscored 17-12.
Shaumese Massey led the charge


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tiger JVs stand at a 6-9 season,
after losing a close game to Wakulla
last week, 52-51.
"'Leading the charge for the Tigers
was J.C., and Clarence Fead, each
scoring 14 points.
J. C. also had three rebounds,
.three assists, two steals, and Clar-
ence also had six rebounds, three as-


..- ,.
.-. M ,-.


Scott, sister, Alonzo Darity, brother. Back,
Athletic Director Jeff Schaum, and Asst.
Coach Maurice Johnson. (News Photo)


with 15 points, two assists, one
blocked shot, three steals; and Kean-
dra Seabrooks scored 10 points, six
rebounds, one assist, two steals.
Shanise Brooks, seven points, two
rebounds, one steal; Nikidra
Thompson, two points, four re-
bounds, one assist, two steals; Kan-
dice Griffin, four .points, four re-
bounds, one assist, two steals;
Chandra Tucker, two points, one re-
bound, one steal; and Jasmine
Brown, four points, one rebound.
Coach Bill Brumfield said the
Lady Tigers played a real good
game, however, they are still mak-


Lady Tigers Post

Softball Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High School re-
ports its schedule for the varsity
softball team.
All game times are at 4 p.m. un-
less otherwise specified.
Action in March includes:West
Gadsden, 4:30 p.m.,'there; FAMU,
March 4, there; NFC, March 8,
there; East Gadsden, March 9,
there; Maclay, March 10, there;
and Taylor, March 14, there.
Also, Rickards, 5 p.m., March 15,


there; NFC, March 17, here; Lib-
erty County, 5 p.m., March 29,
there; FAMU, March 29, here; and
West Gadsden, 4:30 p.m., March
-31, here.
April action includes: Liberty
County, 4:30 p.m., April 5, here;
Maclay, 4:30 p.m., Arpil 7, here;
Rickards, 4:30 p.m., April 12, here;
ACA, April 14, here; East
Gadsden, April 15, here; Taylor,
April 20, here; and ACA, April 15,
there.
Wrapping up the season is the dis-
trict tournament, April 25-29, at
_Maclay, times to be announced.


sists, three steals, two blocked
shots.
Willie Davis, three points, 11 re-
bounds, two steals and two blocked
shots; Marcus Brown, 10 points,
four rebounds, five assists, four
steals; Jordan Blair, four points,
five rebounds, two assists, one steal,
two blocked shots.
Paul Huggins three points, three
rebounds; Anthony Johnson, one
point, fi'.e rebounds, two assists; Ja-
mal Brooks, two points, three re-
bounds and two steals.


ing "young mistakes". "The foul
shots is what really hurt us," said
Brumfield. "We missed 12."
When they faced off against Madi-
son, they were defeated 51-29.
Seabrooks scored 18 points, two
steals,, four rebounds; Griffin, six
points, eight rebounds; Massey, five
points, six rebounds, two blocked
shots; and Thompson, three re-.
bounds.
"We didn't play very good at all,"
said Brumfield. "We only had
seven at the end of the first half and
that's the smallest score we've ever
had since I've been coaching."
He added that the girls did play
good in the second half, but by them
it was too late to make a comeback.
Brumfield concluded that the
Lady Tigers' schedule was a tough
one, playing bigger schools than
JCHS.
"We didn't .play aifiy cIupCL ke
teams," he added:
The Lady Tigers play in the first
round of the district tournament 7
p.m., Tuesday against Liberty, at
Maclay, and if they win, they go on'
to play against NFC, Thursday in
the second and final round.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A standing-room only crowd gath-
ered Wednesday to watch Jefferson
County High School's Carlton Hill,
sign a letter of commitment for a
full football scholarship to the Uni-
versity of South Florida in Tampa,
where he will quarterback for the
Bulls.
Family, friends, students, staff,
and coaches filled the room which
was decorated with the USF colors
of green and gold, balloons and
streamers.
Head Football Coach Jeff Schauin
expressed congratulations to Hill
and said, "He'll lead them into the
Big East," to the applause of the
crowd.
Hill said that recruitment was a
tough process, but he felt that he had
made a good decision signing with
USF.
His mother, Christine, said, "This
is a happy day for me and our fam-
ily. I'm proud of Carlton, he worked
hard, he deserves it and I feel that he
has made a great choice."
Commenting on Hill dressed in his
Sunday best, JCHS Principal Mi-

Lady Bees Lose

To Madison
Lady Bees lose to Madison, 41-
27, and end season with 3-7 record.
Coach Corinne Stephens said that
Madison was undefeated for the
season, and it was a tough game for
the Lady Bees.
Latoya footman led the scoring
with 12 points; Majetta Jefferson,
11 points; and Keneshia Coates,
four points.
Stephens said that Footman and
Jefferson took care of the rebound-
Sing' responsibilities. "They did a
real good job on the backboards,"
she said:
Jefferson played her best game
of the season, and both Coates and
Amanda Mitchell did and outstand-
ing job on defense, Stephens
added.


chael Bryan stated, "As a school ad-
ministrator, it's really nice to see a
young person dressed up. Many
people think that high school is the
journey, but it is more than that, and
prepares students for the rest of their
lives. Carlton is going on with the
rest of his life and we look for great
things from him."
"I've always been a Gator fan,"
said Assistant Principal Harry Ja-
cobs. "But now, it's Gators and
Bulls. Carlton has made a big jump
in his attitude. It's not just about be-
ing a great athlete, he is, but it's all
in how you carry yourself and Carl-
ton carries himself well."
Coach Maurice Johnson added,
"Today is a truly blessed day. I
have learned to respect Carlton as a
student, a person and an athlete. He
has grown into respectable young
man.,"
Hill said he plans study culinary
arts and aspires to one day be a chef.
"I've enjoyed cooking since I was
little. I intend to play football as
long as I can and maybe one day to
go pro. Whatever the future holds,
I'm thankful for the time I have had
to play in football."
After the ceremony, Hill got a


taste of what celebrity status would
hold for him when students flocked
around him, asking for his auto-
graph on anything handy, such as:
notebook paper, dollar bills, sun vi-
sors and caps.
Hill began playing the position of
Quarterback for the Tigers as. a
freshman in 2002. He had 21 pass
completions of 67 attempts for 385
yards, caught three passes for 47
yards, and rushed the ball 36 times
for 295 yards and one touchdown.
In 2003, he not only set the school
record in receptions, but he had 104
completions of 230 pass attempts
for 1,578 yards, 12 touchdowns and
12 interceptions. He rushed 54
times for a gain of 761 yards and 12
touchdowns, and defensively had
seven solo tackles, three assists and
two interceptions.
For the 2004 season, Hill rushed
145 times for a gain of 888 yards
and 12 touchdowns; completed 144
passes of 268 attempts, for a total of
1,764 yards gained; eight intercep-
tions, and 20 touchdowns.
Defensively, Hill had 12 solo
tackles, eight assists and one inter-
ception.
He was named Player of the Week
many times.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005

ACA Splits Bell,


Branford

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Warriors stand at a 12-10
season record after splitting their
last two games.
: ACA defeated Branford, 45-32.
In the first period, Branford led
ACA 12-5, but in the second period,
the Warriors came back, scoring 18
and holding Branford to eight, tying
the game at the end of the first half.
S Both teams scored eight in the
third period and the Warriors out -
scoring Branford, 17 4, in the last
quarter.
Ridgely Plaines led the charge for
the Warriors with 18 points, one as-
sist and five rebounds; Drew Sher-
rod, 13 points, two assists, four
rebounds, one steal.
Daniel Roccanti, two assists, three
rebounds, three steals; Jeremy
Tuckey, five points, one assist, six
rebounds, one steal; and Ben Gran-
tham, who injured his ankle during
the second period, four points, two
rebounds, one steal.
Stephen Griffin scored five points,
two assists, 11 rebounds, two steals;


Games
and Kyle Day, one rebound, two
steals.
The Warriors lost to Bell, 53-43.
Leading the scoring was Sherrod
with 18 points, three assists, eight
offensive, eight defensive
rebounds, three fouls, four
block/steals (B/S), three turnovers.
Tuckey, 13 points, one assist,
three offensive and two defensive
rebounds, four turnovers; and
Plaines, eight points, three assists,
three offensive, five defensive. re-
bounds, four fouls, six B/S.
Griffin, two points, six offensive
and three defensive rebounds, four
fouls, two B/S, three turnovers;
Roccanti, one assist, three offen-
sive, one defensive rebound, two
fouls, two B/S, two turnovers; and
Day, two points, four offensive,
one defensive rebound, two fouls,
four turnovers.
In their final game of the regular
season, the Warriors went up
against Wewahitchka Monday eve-
ning, however, those statistics were
not available at press time.
They will compete in the district
tournament, 7 p.m., Feb. 15, 18 and
19 at ACA.


BRITTANY HOBBS manages
goes out of bounds, during
(News Photo)


to catch the ball before it
a practice session at ACA.


Lady Warriors Split

Last Two Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Lady Warriors stand at 9-12, af-
ter splitting their last two games.
The girls lost to Munroe, 33-24.
Abbey Hunt and Lisa Bailey led
the score, each having weight
points; Fran Walker, four points,
four rebounds; and Brittany Hobbs,
four points, four steals.
Coach Daryl Adams said that
Amanda Sapp played a very strong
defensive game, often blocking
Munroe's leading scorer, also the
best in the Big Bend, in scoring.


ACA won over Community
learning Institute, 41-37.
Bailey led the score with 13
points, 10 rebounds for a
double/double; Walker, nine points,
five rebounds; Hunt, seven points,
seven rebounds, two assists, two
steals; and Hobbs, two points, two
rebounds, four assists and two
steals.


Madison Wallops Howard Bees
The Howard Middle School boy's
basketball team wrapped up their
season with a 2-10 record after be- 2x2
ing squashed by Madison for a 76- Statewide 12
26. Statewide $12
Regional or nati
Anthony McDaniel led the scoring Placement also av
with 14 points; Telvin'Norton, four; Regionis: North, Soutl
'and M!ici.,' Sco-i Shayne Broxie,i Total Circulation: 2.2
Raymond James, and Torrence:
Tucker each scored two points.


Lady Warriors wrapped up their
regular season with an 11-12 re-
cord after winning their last two
games.
The Ladies downed Branford 34-
26.
Fran Walker led the scoring with
12 points, 10 rebounds for a
double/double, three steals, five
blocked shots; Abbey. Hunt, nine
points, seven rebounds, four
assists; and Amanda Sapp, two
points, four assists.
Brittany. Hobbs, four points, five
assists; Lisa bailey, five points,
eight rebounds, three assists, two
steals; Linsey Day, two points, five
rebounds and Caitlin Murphy, one
rebound.
The Lady Warriors went con tiilh
warpath against Bell and cam out
with a 50-33 victory.
Coach Daryl Adams said it was


the girls' highest score of the year
and -they shot 22 of.32 at the free-
throw line for their best free-throw
percentage of the year.
Walker led the charge with 21
points and 11 rebounds for a
double/double, and two blocked
shots, Sapp ten points, Hunt, two
points, four rebounds and three as-
sists, Hobbs, nine points, two re-
bounds, two assists, two steals; and
Bailey, eight points, nine rebounds,
two assists:
The Lady Warriors compete in
the district tournament Tuesday
against Carrabelle, at Maclay.
Adams predicted what he called a
"Rubber match", going back and
forth.
"We're pLaed :against them
twice, we! won one by three and
lost the other by two, so it could go
either way," he said,


mw~


Happy Valentine's Day To Our

Wonderful Community!



Robert R. Plaines

County Judge


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Mon. Thurs. 4:45 7:30

COACH CARTER(PG13)
Fri. 4:50 7:35 10:15 Sat. 2:05 -
4:50 7:35 10:15 Sun. 2:20 4:50 -
7:35 Mon. Thurs. 4:50 7:35

RACING STRIPES (PG)
Fri. 4:55 7:40 9:45 Sat. 2:10 4:55
- 7:40 9:45 Sun. 2:10 4:55 7:40
Mon. Thurs. 4:55 7:40

ARE WE THINKING
YET? (PG)
Fri. 5:00 7:50 10:05 Sat. 2:20 -
5:00 7:50 10:05 Sun. 2:20 5:00 -
7:50 Mon. Thurs. 5:00 7:50
NO PASSES

THE AVIATOR (PG13)
Fri. 5:10 8:30 Sat. 1:50 5:10 8:30
Sun. 1:50 5:10 8:30 Mon. Thurs.
5:10 8:30
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Fri. 5:05 7:45 9:55 Sat. 2:15 -
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7:45 Mon. Thurs. 5:05 7:45
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F4i. 5:15 7:55 10:00 Sat. 2:25 -
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LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The.
District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday,
February 15, 2005 at 5:30 p.m. at the
Green Industries Education Institute in
Monticello Florida, 2729 W. Washington,
Street. A copy of the agenda may be.
obtained by writing: NFCC, Office of the
President, 1000 Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, FL 32340. For disability-related
accommodations, contact the NFCC Office
of College Advancement, 850-973-1653.
NFCC is an equal access/equal
opportunity employer.
2/9, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that R.Z.
Harper the holder of the following certifi-
cates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
582 Year of Issuance 1997 Description or
Property Lot 7, of AUCILLA PLANTA-
TION SUBDIVISION, Unit III, a Subdivi-
sion, as per the plat thereof filed at Plat
Book "B", Page 65, of tte Public Records
of Jefferson Coun'y, Florida. Name in
which assessed Cheiric Wallace All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such certifi-
cate or certificates will be sold to the high-
est bidder at the court house door on the
21st day of February, 2005, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 18th day of January, 2005. Carl
D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit Court of
Jefferson County, Florida.
1/19, 26, 2//2, 9 c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Leslie E.
Riley or Susan Walsh the holder of the fol-
lc-..g certificates has filed said certifi-
cates for a tax deed issue thereon. The
certificate numbers and years issuance,
the description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows: Certificate No. 643 Year of Issuance
2002 Description or Property Lot 4, Phase
1, Parkway Pines Subdivision, a Subdivi-
sion as per map or Plat thereof recorded
in Plat Nook "B", Page 86, Public Records
of Jefferson County, Florida. Name in
which assessed Federal National Mtg. As-
sociation. All of s.id property being in the
County of Jefferson, State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate or certificatess shall be
redeemed according to law the property
described in such certificate or certificates
will be sold to the highest bidder at the
court house door on the 21st day of Febru-
ary, 2005, At 11:00 A.m. Dated this 18th
day of January, 2005. Carl D. Boatwriglh,
Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson"
County, Florida.
1/19, 26, 2/2, 9 c


Statewlae zUV ..
SThe Jefferson County Board of County
Regional placement Commissioners will hold a workshop at-
also available 9:00 a.m., on Thursday, February 10.,
l1 Regions: North, South, Central 2005, at the Jefferson County High School,
Cir u l :a i.r 2.2 iiidfi" 42-5- W.. Washington Street,. Montice!lo.Q
Florida, to conduct a "walk through" of.
Sb n a ethe buildings to be leased by the Board of
County Commissioners.
2/9

r Happy Valentine's Day To Our

Wonderful Community!



Marty Bishop

Supervisor of Elections


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LEGAL NOTICE


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFER-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DI-
VISION FILE NUMBER:05-05-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF MARY ANN WALKER, De-
ceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION:
The administration of the estate of MARY
ANN WALKER, deceased, File Number 05-
05-PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Jef-
ferson County, Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is Jefferson County Court-
house, Monticello, Florida. The name and
address of the personal representative and of
the personal representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on
whom this notice is served who have objec-
tions that challenge the validity of the will,
the qualifications with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice
is served within three months after the date
of the first publication of this notice must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other credi-
tors of the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the estate of the
decedent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. AL CLAIMS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the
first publication of this Notice is February 2,
2005. Attorney For Person Representative:
T, BUCKINGHAM BIRD P. O. Box 247
Monticello, FL 32345 850-997-3503 FL Bar
ID #0006176, STEPHEN C. WALKER, SR.
P,O.Box 361 Monticello, Florida 32345.
2/2,9



II THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION; CONSECO FINANCE
SERVICING CORPORATION F/K/A
GREEN TREE FINANCIAL SERVICING
Plaintiff, vs. REGINALD ALEXANDER,
et' al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE: NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi'ial"
Judgment bf Mortgage Foreclosure dated
Jlinuary 25, 2005 and entered in Case No.
2004-288-CA of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for
JEFFERSON County, Florida wherein
,CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING
CORPORATION F/K/A GREENTREE
FINANCIAL SERVICING
CORPORATION, is the Plaintiff and
REGINALD ALEXANDER; VICKI
ALEXANDER; are the Defendants, I will
,sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at NORTH DOOR OF THE
'COURTHOUSE LOBBY IN JEFFERSON
COUNTY, MONTICELLO, FLORIDA at
011:00 a.m., on the 24th day of February,
:2005 the following described property as
'set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 10,
BLOCK "F" CHRISTMAS ACRES
WEST, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PILAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
JLAT BOOK "B", PAGE 35, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
CdUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A PERMANENT
FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO, DESCRIBED AS: A 1995
FLEETWOOD OAK KNOLL MOBILE
HOME, SERIAL NUMBER
GAFLS34A212510K21 and
FLS34B212510K21 and TILE NUMBERS
69439476 and 69439475. A/K/A 557 Cedar
Lane, Monticello, FL 32344 WITNESS
MY HAND and the seal of this Circuit
Court on January 25th, 2005 Dale
Boatwright, Clerk of the Circuit Court.
2/2,9, c


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LEGAL NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO:
05-11-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANKLIN EDWIN KINSEY, Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of FRANKLIN
EDWIN KINSEY, deceased, File Number
05-11-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Jefferson County,, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Room 10,
Jefferson County, Courthouse, Monticello,
FL 32344. The names and address of the
personal representative and her attorney
are set forth below. All interested persons
are required to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the estate
and (2) any objection by an interested
person on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction of
the Court. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this
Notice has begun on February 2, 2005.
Lillie Mae Kinsey, Michael A. Reichman,
Post Office Box 41, Monticello, Florida
32345, 850-997-5100, FL BAR NO:
183518, Attorney for Personal
Representative.
2/2, 9, c


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2/9

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800-633-221


FREE

Free Mobile Home You Moye!! 2
Bedroom. 10' X 50' needs to be moved
call 997-6259

FOR RENT
RV/Mobile Home Lot for rent @
Monticello Meadows 19' South.
.850-997-1630 Park Manager Liz.
1/7 tfn, c
Jefferson Place Apartments: 1 & 2
bedroom, Central H/A ~ Stove Refrig. -
Carpet Blinds, Laundry Room, -
Handicapped Apartments. US 19, 1468 S.
Waukeenah, St. 850-997-6964. Equal
Housing Opportunity
1/26 s/d
3 bedroom 2 bath house
$750.00 a month call 997-8011
2/9,11
FOR SALE
Dining Room table,leaf and six chairs,
$600. Sofa server table, $300.
850-222-2113.
1/12,tfn,c
Leather Sofa suggested list $1400. 100%
new, sell $500. 850-222-7783
1/12, tfn, c

Mattress set: New King pillow-top
mattress and base. In original plastic,
factory warranty, $295 850-222-2113.
1/12, tfn, c

BEDROOM SET: 6 PIECES, NEW IN
BOXES. Headboard, Frame, Dresser,
Mirror, Chest, Nightstand. $595.
850-222-9879.
1/12, tfn, c


Searching For,

High Quality Homes

At Discount Prices?


Prestige Home Centers, Inc.
2521 W. Tennessee St.,


Tallahassee, FL
(850) 576-5458 or


L Nobility Homes
.- Factory O uned S/als Center


800-576-7970


r


Monticello and Perry Florida
(850) 997-5516 or visit www. cbkk com


C 0 L DWELL


FOR SALE

NEW QUEEN Pillowtop mattress set. In
factory plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
Must sell, $175 850-545-7112.
1/12, tfn, c

CHERRY SLEIGH BED, still in box,
never used. Sacrifice $295. 850-222-7783.
1/12, tfn, c

Upright dark mahogany piano. $100.00
O.B.O. call 997-1147.


ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS
you don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all Brands and
telephones.
12/08, tfn



GREAT DEAL! 7 Week Old German
Shepherds Priced @ $150 each "Going
Fast" call 342-1493
2/2, 4, 9, 11, pd
New Living Room Set. Suggested list
$1400, sell sofa $275, loveseat $225, chair
$175, Set $625. Hardwood frames with
lifetime warranty. 850-222-9879
1/12, tfn, c

Oak bedroom set (queen), patio set,
kitchen tables/chairs, 2-dressers, stereo.
'91 Buick 4 door Best offer. Call Connie
997-2104
2/4,11


HELP WANTED

Fast Track Foods or Land O Sun Mngmt.
NOW HIRING Managers, Asst. Managers
and retail assistants in Monticello area.
Competitive pay. Call 1-352-333-3011
ext.42
12/6-tfn c

Boyd Sod Farm is looking for a CDL
licensed driver for local deliveries of
agricultural products. Contact us at (850) -
997-6622.
2/9,11


REAL ESTATE

Homes for Sale Hwy.14, Madison. Use
your tax return to make a down payment
on your own place! Owner financing. Easy
Terms. If you have a steady job and a 10%
down payment you can choose your own
interior and exterior colors. Front porch
included. Two and three bedrooms
available. Payments as low as $400 per
month. Call 997-4000.
1/19, s/d
Highgrove Subdivision: Hwy 14, Madison.
Improved lots with septic system, city
water, gas, and electric pole for sale.
Ready for your late model or new mobile
home. DW, SW, &iTW. Site built homes
welcome. Owner Financing. $1,500.00
down. Easy terms 997-4000.
1/19, s/d


BAN KE


Kelly & Kelly Properties


SERVICES
The Episcopal Church welcomes you, no
matter who you are or what you've done.
Christ Episcopal Church, three blocks N
of the courthouse. Sunday service at 10:00
AM. 997-4116.

Get Your Florida Real Estate License
ONLINE! Bert Rogers School of Real
Estate Over 600,000 Graduates Since 1958
Call for a free Brochoure!1-800-432-0320
www.bertrogers.com
2/4,9,11,16,18,23,25


Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
tfn, 4/28

Do you want to be just a
Christian, with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established His
Church called the church of Christ and
you can be a member of it. We are ready
to help if you are ready to learn, call
997-3466
10/1, tfn


Will sit with your elderly loved one. Light
housekeeping. Hours negotiable, at a
reasonable rate. Contact Gina at 342-1486
or 510-0998.
2/2,4,9,11


Home Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call for a
assessment of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19-tfn

Lightning will NOT strike if you enter our
door. We've tested it with the sinners we
already have here. Christ Episcopal
Church, three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 AM. 997-4116.


GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

JOIN OUR TEAM
TODA Y!

Seeking Technician &
Assistant Manager
candidates

We offer competitive
compensation, paid training, a
great benefits package, flexible
schedule, and more!
Please apply at any of our
locations in Tallahassee,
Crawfordville.,or Quincy. You
may also fax your resume to
850-222-5152

Valid Drivers License required.
Applicants must pass a drug test.


Buyers looking for Homes and Land



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See It All!
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!

Al Maryland 508-1936
Realer Asocate

Realtor Tim Pearv Sells Real Estate


mL


=JB=JIB=::i=JSB


- I I I I r


I.


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Living 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly fenced pas-
ture nice location near Lamont $40,000
Contract Pending Wonderful Home nice
4 bedroom 2 bath double wide with fire-
place on 1.9 acres on S. Main St. $69,500
The Partridqe House circa 1830, cur-
rently 5 could be 7 unit apartment build-
ing great potential as a bed and breakfast
with suites only $240,000
Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah Highway
fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per acre
Check the Pricell 80 acres w/ approx. 10
ac in planted pines, the balance in real
rough hunting land, a great buy $79,500
Waterfront 4.6 wooded acres in Lloyd
Acres only $25,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571


a




~3~[1~5~ ~~i~1~~[I~3








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 9, 2005

Capital City Bank Group Buys

S1st Alachua Banking Corp.

S-i Capital City Bank Group, Inc. (FNBA) has $229 million in assets, ceive $2,847.04 in cash, a
--- (CCBG) has signed a definitive seven offices located in Alachua shared of CCBG common
agreement to acquire First Alachua County: Gainesville (3), Alachua, each of the 10,186 shares
S.. .. Ai t;-A T-. Ti n e Ti noc J r;ille N TpihPewbeT rr mmn n stckrm icsued1 an


Banking Corporation (iFABC), head
quartered in Alachua, FL.
Capital City Bank has a branch
office on South Jefferson Street.
FABC's wholly owned subsidiary,
First National bank of Alachua


H1gllrg n J gllJ, JUllnes v lll, xutT l ,
and an eighth office in Hasting, FL.
FABC also has a mortgage lend-
ing office in Gainesville and a finan-
cial services division.
Subject to certain potential adjust-
ments, FABC shareowners will re-


Road Damage, Loggers
(Continued From Page 1) ,Stnhin said


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

VFW Post 251 Commander John
Nelson has been nominated as Dis-
trict Commander, with elections to
be held in May.
His final day as post commander
is June 30.
Nominated to take over Nelson's
post is Lonnie Green, current post
quartermaster and Raymond Henry,
squad leader for the Tallahassee
section of the VFW. Next month,
one of the men will be named to
the post of commander.
Winner of the Firefighter of the
Year Award is Jeffrey Benton of
County Fire Rescue, and Law En-
forcement Officer of the Year is
William ,Miasse\ of the County
Shen-fft' Department.
EMT of the Year is Carla Piggott.
A banquet is scheduled 7 p.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 19, at Howard Mid-
dle School..
Also awarded during the banquet
will be a new post award for the
Volunteer Firefighter of the Year.
Winners' are Joey Bryan of the
Wacissa Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment and Gary Alday of the Ash-
ville Area Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
'7Other awards to be presented in-
clude the winners of the Patriot's
Pen Contest; First place winner will
receive a plaque and a savings
bond for $100, second place, a
cfieck for $50 and a certificate third
place, a check for $25 and a certifi-
cate and the fourth place winner, a
check for $15 and:a certificate.
The winners of the Voice of De-

Crash Kills Man
-A Monticello man died Sunday
night in a one-vehicle accident in
the county.
According to the Florida Highway
Patrol, James Campbell, 52, was
driving east on US 27 when his
1997 Ford Ranger pickup truck
went off the road.
Campbell managed to get back on
the road, but he overcorrected in the
process and the truck began to spin
clockwise, eventually overturning.
C' dmpbcll, who was hot wearing, a
seat belt, was thrown from the vehi-
cle. The accident occurred about
930 p.m., a mile west of SR-59.
The FHP continues the investiga-
tion.


mocracy will receive, for first
place, a plaque and a check for
$150 and the second place winner
will receive an engraved digital
clock and a check for $100.
The Citizenship/Teacher of the
Year will go to Willie Saffo of
HMS and Nelson said a special
award will be given to three aspir-
ing young men who call
themselves, "The Hard Workers".
"They walk around town every
Saturday with rakes and work in
people's yards," said Nelson.
"They have shown outstanding
concern for the appearance of other
youth in the community and they
are setting an example of what
young people should be all about.*

"As young as they are, I guess
you can say they're developing
their own business," he added.

The Buddy Poppy Award will
also be presented, along with
poppy certificates in recognition of
the work post members have done.
The' Citizen's Award will be given
to a person who has given out-
standing contributions to both the
community and the VFW, and the
Commander's Star Award will be
given to the post member who have
served both the community and the
VFW.

Certificates of Appreciation will
be awarded to committee chairs for
their contributions throughout the
year.
Keynote speaker for the banquet
will be Past State Commander for
the Florida VFW Robert'Sprute and
special guest will be Billy Moore,
state chief of staff for the state of
Florida VFW.
Nelson noted that the event is al-
ready sold out.


Tuten, a cattleman, worried that the
next target might well be cattle and
Shay. He reminded the board that a
recent study by Tall Timbers'
showed that agriculture generated
far more in revenues than it required
in government services.
Still, Sutphin insisted that com-
mercial enterprises should be held
accountable for their actions.
"It shouldn't cost us money for
people who are making money,"


The item was put on the agenda
for discussion at a later day. In the
interim, Extension Office Director
Larry Halsey offered to provide
commissioners with copies of the
best management practices followed
by the silvaculture industry.
It could be that the board might
want to adopt the practices and try a
voluntary approach to resolving the
problem, Halsey said.


OVA' L.E[nTl:nr.Ev pl
CoupleI mamaqe- 10 I Champaqn Facial S6
mraintain NIealth & UlJllnie uJ11th requrllri rh:rapQF tIuc fl,joo,
Skin Care .
Facials
Massage
Manicures
Pedicures






M "''"


THEY TOOK THOUSANDS OF YEARS TO FORM.

AND TEN MINUTES TO BE REVEALED.


Now you don't need
one of these to get your
Federal payment.
Call 1-888-382-3311 to learn where
you can open an ETASM. Or visit our
Web site at www.eta-flnd.gov.

ecmn TsrAccun
&, chronic TransferAccount

A inesage fom th


and 71.176
n stock for
s of FABC
d nutmtand-


ing.
Based on Capital City's closing
market price on Nasdaq on Feb. 2,
2005, this cash and stock combina-
tion equaled aggregate consideration
of $58.2 million.
The acquisition, which is subject
to regulatory approval, the approval
of FABC shareowners and other
customary closing conditions, is
scheduled to close midyear 2005.
Excluding one time, merger re-
lated expenses, the transaction is ex-
pected to be $.02 per share dilutive
in 2005, and $.01 to $.02 per share.
accretive in 2006.
Capital City Bank Group, Inc.
President and Chief Executive Offi-
cer William G. Smith, Jr. said: "First
National Bank of Alachua has a
strong history of serving its clients
for over 97 years.
"First National's senior manage-
ment and associates have done a tre-
mendous job of providing quality
products and services to their clients


and we look forward to them joining
the Capital City team.
"We will continue to build on the
strong legacy of community service.
provided by First National Bank.
Their commitment to clients will
only be enhanced by the additional
financial products and services of-
fered by Capital City."
The completion of this acquisition
marks a significant expansion for
Capital City in north central Florida.
Capital City Bank has several of-
fices in neighboring counties sur-
rounding Gainesville, including
Bell, Bronson, Chiefland, Fanning
Springs, Keystone Heights, Palatka,
Starke, Trenton, and Williston.
The acquisition of FABC Will in-
crease Capital city's assets to $2.6
billion.
"Our customers will continue to
receive the high quality hometown
service they are receiving from our
staff," said Jerry M. Smith, presi-
dent and chairman of the Board of
FABC and FNBA.
"For nearly 100 years, we have
provided excellent service to our
customers, and I am confident this
commitment will continue under the
Capital City name. They have built
their company around customer
service and have an unprecedented
commitment to relationship
banking."


ERIN KELLY uses the time before her first class at ACA to
double check her homework assignment. (News Photo)


VFW Awards Banquet

Scheduled February 19


S BIG BEND -EUBANKS

STermite & Pest Control
"Let Us Undertake Your Pest Control Problems!"
Complete Service Commercial ~ Residential




Outside Service

Annually Monthly Quarterly
Termite Treatment
BAITING SYSTEMS AND CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1954
2522 NE Capital Circle




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Sheila Williams doesn't just hike

for the exercise, she hikes for

the view. Thanks to a quick,

painless procedure at Thomasville

Eye Center, it's a crystal clear

view filled with vibrant colors

and subtle details she never thought

she'd see again. Call (229) 226-6000

for an appointment and see

the world of your memories.


0gAS VIZ




'. CEI

William Z. Bridges, M.D., Michael L. Haney, M.D.,
Robert D. Webb, M.D.


'

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