<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00010
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: February 4, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00010
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text










Volunteer Disaster

Training Courses

Set Here

Story, Page 2
I


Ll::.i.rY rF FLOCIDA HISTORY
4^4 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
r T, 32611


Early Pre-K

Registration

Here Done Online

Story, Page 3


4-H Listening

Project

in Progress

Story, Photos, Page 6


C Friday Morning





Monticello


Host Families

Desperately Sought

For Bike Weekend

Story, Page 12
II Id


137TH YEAR NO.10, 50 CENTS -


Published Weds & d'AX V rU DA.X'7


FAR FLR. AiRADTAT C3.& A *-


I Dixie Trials Finish


Long, Record Run

S1 I n i championship is my brother, who
$1. Given II 1won it five times. And my father
also won it five times. So in total,
To 2 Top Dog Handlers we've won this championship 17
, times."


DOGS, HANDLERS, owners and others asso- the traditional winners picture. The dog on
ciated with the Continental Open All Age the left is Super Shadow, the winner. The
Championship gathered outside the man- dog on the right is Havelock Citation, the..
sion-at Dixie Plantation Tuesday evening for runner-up. (News Photo)


City Council To Take UP


Proposed Business Circle


LAZ.- RO ALEMAN
Senior Staff WVriter
-- : i'.r. ..... ... "'Z -' ..'.".' .
The business traffic circle being
proposed b, the Chamber of Com-
merce is now in the hands of the
city's street committee.
Following the Local Planning
Agency's (LPA) discussion of the
proposal last week, Police Chief
David Frisby, acting as chamber
president, presented the proposal to
the City Council on Tuesday night.
"We feel the city is desperate for
additional parking spaces," Frisby
told the council. "We think this con-
cept will provide it."
Frisby reiterated that the proposal
was only a concept, and in no way
cast in stone. He conceded that the
proposal had a few minor problems,
but nothing that couldn't be worked
opt. He maintained that the overall
proposal was sound.
Still, it would be up to the council
ultimately to decide the viability of
the proposal, he said.
"This is a concept," Frisby said.
"Take it all, or take none of it. These
are only ideas on paper. We are not
committed to any one thing."
Mayor Julie Conley opined that
the issue would no doubt require
professional guidance, preferably
from experts in the design of such
projects.
She didn't mean to offend anyone,
she said, but she didn't think that
anyone at the, chamber or on the
City Counicil or the Local, Planning
Agency had the qualifications to de-
sign such a system.


She suggested that the city might
want to take advantage of the exper-
tise of student in the appropriate
'disciplines at Florida State Univer-
- sity or the University of Florida.
Councilmen Brian Hayes, who
with Councilman Gerrold Austin
forms the street committee, agreed.
Hayes said he imagined the issue
would take several meetings to dis-
cuss and would definitely required
expert input.
.The committee scheduled a pre-
liminary meeting on the issue for 6
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 15, at City Hall.
The chamber's proposal calls for
the creation of a secondary, outer
business circle around the existing
courthouse circle.
This second circle would be de-


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Monticello Police Depart-
ment's speed-enforcement program
is getting legs.
Meaning that it may be around for
a while.
On Tuesday night, Police Chief
David Frisby presented the City
Council with-the latest results of the
program. According,to Frisby, traf-
fic citations produced $1,172.27 in
December:
Last month, Frisby presented the


and Palmer Mill Streets, each :f
which would run one way in a
countyclockwise pattern.
Angle parking would then be in-
stalled on one side of the one-way
streets and horizontal parking on the
other, similar to the existing situa-
tion on N. Cherry Street around the
area of the public library'

East Dogwood Street, meanwhile,
would be closed to vehicular traffic
between N. Jefferson and Cherry
Streets,creating a pedestrain friendly
plaza.
The proposal, say its proponents,
would better define the downtown
area, create more parking spaces,
and eventually spur capital improve-
ments in the area.


council with $2,000 that the pro-
gram had produced since its incep-
tion three months earlier.
Frisby said he saw the program
continuing another year. That's
when he expects the Legislature h\ ill
close the loophole that permits cities
to continue getting a portion of traf-
fic citations. ,
Cities and counties used to get a,
portion of all traffic citations. With
the implementation of the Article 5
reforms, however, the state diverted
these revenues to itself.
Frisby believes it'was an oversight
(See Speed Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior StaffWriter

Dixie Plantation's 110th Conti--
nental Open All-Age Championship
concluded late Tuesday, one of the
longest and most well-attended field-
trials in recent memory.
"It was extremely long," said Joe
Milligan, plantation manager 'and
.president of the Continental Field
.Trial Club. "It ran 16 days and we
,had 174 dogs entered in the derby
and the all-age championships.
Thai's 114 in the all-age and 60 in
'the derby (dogs under two years).
To my knowledge, that's the most
dogs that have ever run here during
my time "
,- "-t was a great trial," said Julie
Miller. niece .of the late Geraldine
Livingston. "It was a thrill to see a
son of Joe Shadow win. Joe Shadow
has been on these steps at least twice
before as a winner."
That son, Super Shadow, is a six-
yeai-old pointer owned by John
Neely and David Redish of Georgia
and trained and handled by
nationally-renowned handler Robin
Gates.
Winner of,a previous champion-
ship and two runner-up places, Su-
per Shadow on Tuesday won the
$8,000 purse,, which went to Gates.
The owners received an oil painting
and the revolving Geraldine Living-
ston Memorial trophy, which they
get to keep for a year.
The runner-up, Havelock Citation,
won $4,000 for handler Butch Win-
ters. Havelock Citation is owned by
Nancy Kerry and Evan Schorsch,
who received a hand-carved ivory
handle knife.
For Gates, a full-time handler with


a family tradition in the sport, the
win represented a milestone.
''This is the seventh time we've
won this championship, which is a
record," Gates said. "The closest
one to me in terms of winning this


Gates said the next step for him
and Super Shadow was the National
Championship, which starts Feb. 14
in Grand Junction, TN. After that,
he planned to continue the circuit,
(See Dixie Trials Page 2)

-.-.-,. - t
.. 1


WINNING TEAM -- Super Shadow's owners, John Neely
and David Redish, extreme left and right respectively,
stand with Robin Gates, holding dog, and Gates', assis-
tance, Hunter, following the award presentation. (News
Photo)


Event Aims To Get People


Involve In Physical Fitness


bia County is expected to enter Jef-
LAZARO ALEMAN person County on Friday, Feb. 18, at
Senior Staff Writer West Lake Road. Planned activities
for this day include a brief noon
The City Council on Tuesday-ceremony at the courthouse and a
night adopted a resolution in support walk around the town led by Mayor
of Step Up Florida, a Health Depart-
merit initiative to promote healthy
lifestyles and physical activity dur-
ing February. .
SThe way Health Department Di-
rector Kim Barnhill explained it,
Step Up Florida is a statewide effort
that seeks to get participants to
walk, jog, swim, bicycle or horse-
back ride on a designated day -- to
name but a few of the accepted
means of conveyance.
As part of the exercise, partici-
pants will carry fitness flags, which
they will pass from one to the other
until reaching the county line, where
the flags will be handed to partici- "
pants in adjoining counties.
All told, four groups will travel
across the state -- two from north
Florida and two from south Florida.
The four groups are scheduled to
converge in Orlando toward the end
of the month, when a celebration KIM BARNHILL, left, director
will be held. and Mayor Julie Conley disc
The group that started in Escam- Florida event following the could


Julie Conley.
Barnhill pointed out that obesity is
a major health concern here, as it is
in the rest of the state and the
nation, where the problem has
(See Physical Page 3)


of the Health Department,
uss the upcoming Step Up
ncil meeting. (News Photo)


Speed Enforcement Program

Continues Producing Funds


BRUCE LEINBACK, city attorney, and Steve
Rissman, a member of the Local Planning
Agency, review the proposed business traf-
"A


fic circle following Tuesday night's meeting
of the City Council. (News Photo)


II~ -' II ~-F


i -
- !


Published Wednesdays & Fridays









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4,2005


:ROTARIAN BILL BEATY shows off his Paul Harris Fellow
c-ertificate and medallion. The honor is bestowed on Ro-
Ztarians who provide "tangible and significant assistance
-for the furtherance of better understanding and friendly re-
_lations among peoples of the world." At the club level,
,Beaty has served in several capacities including club
President. (News Photo)


Historical Association Hears


Program On History Of Lloyd


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

History buffs were in for a treat on
Monday night when Dr. Rhea Miller
presented a program on the early
history of Lloyd at the annual meet-
ing of the Jefferson County Histori-
cal Association.
After prayer and a short business
meeting, Dr. Miller entertained the
group with stories and pictures of
the early beginnings of Lloyd. She
engaged the curiosity of the audi-
ence with the question: "Why is
there a Lloyd?"
Of course, ro one ventured to an-
swer, but the answer was "sand."
Sandy soil was healthier, she said.
"You may be asking, ,how much
history can there be between a stop
light and a trailer park," she said,
but then she began to show pictures
aAd early maps of the area which
dated back to the 1820's.
There were section maps showing
ownership's of many names famous
in the early history of Jefferson and


Disaster Training Courses


Set For County Volunteers


Two
ices t
Count
nffieo


'-County American Red Cross coor- Thei
dinator Roberta Maddox reports that and al
Hurricane Season begins June 1 and p.m. o
ti.ined volunteers are needed to pro- *Ih
v.ide assistance, should the County videos
again experience storm conditions, about
S"Few will forget the storms of sponse
2004, when many residents of the Clas
County experienced damaged 12.
homes, power outages, evacuations *M
aid flooding," she said. vides


Dixie Trials
(Continued From Page 1), Tod
%lhich run- riid-Jul;, to April 1 each record
year and rjnges from Canada nados
tlirough the Midwest and into Flor- trial in
id& of a bi
ITI,picall,, Gates handles about True
70 dogs during lhe summer and be- quails,
t een 35 and 40 during the winter. Dixie
, I-e ndled 21 dogs at the Continen- Teare,
tal Field Trial. Field,
catedt
Gates granted that his job entailed "Thi
extensive traveling, expensive quail,"
equipment, a great many hours in not ea
the saddle, and a lot of hard work fr th
training-and handling the dogs. But other
if one loved dogs, horses and the basi
outdoors, it was all worth the hard- Others
ships, he said. situati
"And if you're a good enough thing.'
businessman, you can make a little "Th
money," Gates said. "You won't get Teare
rich, but you can make a little trial, y
money." and.
Like most professional handlers, condit
Gates considers the Continental "the cal am
most prestigious trial in the United All
States." and th
"It's second only to the national, proved
based on its fabulous grounds, the manag
heritage of the place, all the wild. Mitl
birds' and the hospitality," Gates te
said. "There's a lot of history herethe pl
field t
;Indeed, both the Continental and lnd s
land n
Dixie Plantation enjoy a rich t
history, dating from the 1800s.
:Started in Chicago in 1895, the for vif
Continental represents the longest prolife
continuously running field trial in ation
tle United States. It came to Dixie And
Plantation in 1937 at the behest of was a
owner Gerald Livingston, a former were
New York stockbroker and descen- sai
dAnt of one of the signers of the DoI
Declaration of Independence. numb
many
Following Livingston's death in range
1951,, his wife,' Eleanor, continued their h
tlie tradition.in grand style until her Do
own death in 1977. qualify
Sin the
':The couple's youngest daughter, compel
the late Geraldine Livingston, then ning-
took up the torch until her own de-
nmise in 1994. Prior to her death,
Geraldine established the Geraldine S
Q. M. Livingston Foundation, which
cDrrently manages the 9,050-acre (Con
plantation. Geraldine instructions to that
tlie trustees was that they continue away
tlfe sport of field trials "into perpetu- of tra
ity." overs
1 Dixie Plantation, meanwhile, correct
traces its core to a pre-Civil War Fris
plantation that was once owned by gram
the great-grandson of President merci
?homas Jefferson.


o terms of basic disaster serv-
raining are scheduled at the
y Emergency Management
on North Jefferson.
re is no charge for the classes,
11 are scheduled from 6 to 9
n the dates indicated.
introduction to Disasters: pro-
fundamental information
disaster, the community re-
e, and the role of Red Cross.
ss dates are March 1 and April

4ass Care, An Overview: pro-
information and skills for


End

.a,. the planita on is generally
lized among field trinl aficio-
as the premier %% ild-bird field
Sthe country and the best test
g dog's endurance.
e, other field trials use native
but not to the degree that
does, according to Barbara
a reporter for ,American
the national publication dedi-
to the sport.
s trial is run entirely on native
'Teare says. "Native quail are
sy to handle. It's an element
ese dogs. that doesn't exist in
trials where they are run on
lly tamed or released birds.
; may simulate a wild bird
on, but they are not the same

iis is also an endurance trial,".
continues. "In an endurance
you'vee got a longer race to run
often under more grueling
ions...It makes a lot of physi-
d mental demands on a dog."
are agreed that the plantation
e Continental have greatly im-
1 in recent years, thanks to the
;ement of the foundation and
an.
a year-round job to maintain
antation in tiptop shape for the
rials. That job entails control
timber harvests and other
management practices to keep
ounds at optimum condition
sibility of the dogs and for the
ration of the wild-bird popu-

t although the bird population
I little down this year, there
still plenty of birds, Milligan

gs in the trials are scored on a
er of factors, including how
quails they find, how,far they
and how well they respond to
handlers.
gs that make the cut in the
ying rounds go on to compete
callbacks, or final phase of the
petition, where the two top win-
logs are selected.


)eed
tinued From Page 1)
the Legislature did not take
cities' right to keep a portion
ffic citations. He believes the
ight is one the lawmakers will
ct soon.
;by said the strategy of the pro-
continues to be to target com-
ial vehicles.


sheltering and mass feeding.
Class dates are March 15 and
April 26.
*Shelter Operations: prepares vol-
unteers to effectively manage a shel-
ter to meet the needs of persons
displaced by a disaster.
Class dates are March 29, and
May 10.
Volunteers are encouraged to take
.all three classes in order to be effec-
tive.
To register for classes, call 342-
0211, and leave name, address,
phone number, name and date of
class.
In related matters, Maddox notes
that the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking a lo-
cal resident to work on an r.\neri-
Corps ..grant providing diso-ter


Leon counties. These maps showed
that the property was being bought
by speculators who probably never
intended to live in the area such as
-Prince Murat, for one.
Early settlers included the Gads-
dens, Hollingsworths, Willies, Bai-
leys, Edwards, Wiricks, Coxetters,
and Laffittes.
Stories conflict about the name of
Lloyd, some say it was Bailey's Mill
in the beginning. However, Dr.
Miller has studied this, and histori-
cal documents show that they were
two different places.
There was a Bailey's Mill, a grist
mill; William Hollingsworth was a
postmaster there. He married Wini-
fred Bailey who had much land.
Their only child, Eliza, married E.
A. Willie.
"Why the name Lloyd?" she
asked? The Lloyds, Walter and
Sarah, moved to the area in 1853
and bought a lot of land. There they
pulled in two double pen cabins and
made a large 30x30 room between
them. This was used as a hospital af-


preparedness education to individu-
als and neighborhoods in Jefferson
County.
The one year contract requires
completing 1700 hours of commu-
nity service and pays a living allow-
ance and an educational stipend.
The AmeriCorps grants from the
Florida Commission on Community
Services and the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs, is helping build the
Domestic Preparedness and Re-
sponse Corps to strengthen Home-
land Security.
Service assignments range from
disaster relief to participating in pa-
rades.
Extensive disaster training is pro-
vided by the Red Cross. Should a
Disaster strike, whether natural or
nimnmnade, this person will be on the
front hnes pro iding much needed
assistance to disaster \ victims.
Interested residents should con-
tact Chris Fl:yd, ih;aster Services
Office, at (850) 878-6080.


AFFORDABLE DENTURES


$5oo00.00oo
#510 #520
Complete Upper and Lower Dentures

BEACHTON DENTURE CLINIC
NOW OFFERS '
SAME DAY SERVICE
ON

REPAIRS AND EXTRACTIONS
BY APPOINTMENT
WILLIAM T.MCFATTER, III, D.D.S., P.C.
SOFFiCE.HOURS:
.i 1-800-521-7275 M-F800E-4:30
.Li J 3- *I, .^ NO CHECKS
HWY. 319 (1 1/2 Miles Inside Ga. State Line)
L


LEON SCREENING

RX#0058378 "Serving Tallahassee with Quality.Work Since 1976"

Authorized Distributor of Superior Metal Products Co., Inc.
LCAS94001 GB32582 CRC1327280

Now you don't need one
of these to get your
Federal payment.


ter the Battle of Olustee in the War
Between the States.
Walter gave land for the right-of-
way to entice the Railroad to come
here. He also gave 3.5 acres for the
Depot.
Dr. Miller showed many pictures
of the area, some obtained from the
Florida State Archives website. She
reported that the depot burned in the
1940's, which destroyed the dock,
but the Gulf Winds Railroad Club is
trying to get a grant to rebuild the
dock as it once was.
She emphasized that this is an im-
portant historical site in Jefferson
County, and it is her hope, that the
historical sites in this county will be
linked together to be a significant
tourist draw for our area.
One story she told concerned


WOODEN
S Son
Table & Chairs

$14995&up




!i :r i ."




S e t. i
P .~-- , _E .. -
03laLg ..---.. .


LIMITED TIME
OFFER


Winifred Coxetter. Dr. Miller says
she should be in the history books as
one of the outstanding women in
Jefferson County.
She cooked for the tourists as the
train stopped for lunch. She never
knew how many, and served an en-
tire meal for .75 cents in 20 minutes.
She was head of the Red Cross dur-
ing the first World War.
Dr. Miller's book, "Lloyd, Village
at a Crossroad," tells many interest-
ing stories about Lloyd residents.
Similar programs are being
planned featuring the histories of
Waukeenah, Wacissa, Lament, and
more.
The public is invited and encour-
aged to attend, and to become mem-
bers to assist the Historical
Association in maintaining the his-
torical character of Jefferson
County.


4d
V -
(;~ :


CALL OR VIST OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

1385-6047
Gonmen, Employees Inulo.nce Co GLICO inerol InuIoanor (.o.
G( O ndIndr lyfo (n G[Oo ( uattyLo ,Colonol(ounlyM- tuutl Inn Co
1Cl(.O wro. nglon. OC 2106c U0 002 tlO'0


SEE DEALER
FOR DETAILS


COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
INCLUDES:
O r!i Jl.N Normal Installation
S-15.00 6 Months Free Tank Rental
50 Gallons of Gas
,. ..LJ ... ,, '' L : e i ,

AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


H&R BLOCK


* Instant refund.

* If you owe, we pay for you
90 days same as cash.

Electronic filing.
Best prices.

Best trained staff.

Open year round.


1267 SOUTH JEFFERSON
(WINN DIIE SHOPPING CENTER)

997-1782


April 15th may be

months away but

we're real close.



Our staffcan help. Our Monticello office is open
and eager to provide tax and accounting services.
Walk-ins Welcomed. Appointments Helpful.
850-997-3082 925 W. Washington Ave.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Si- p^^^^^^^^_--^ -------U ^
^^H^^^^^^^^^^w^^^I.
^^^QQS~f^^w. m^^^


RAY CICHON
TIanaging Editor


Call 1-888-382-3311 to learn where
you can open an EITAs. Or visit our
Web site atwww.eta-find.gov. Becrnc TransferAcaount ATES PA
OeDCLIII Pi UBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


INTRDUCORY PMA


I


I _






























LINDA LEWIS manages the WILD Bookmo- to two days per week because of budget cut
bile, which has been forced to cut services backs. (News Photo)


Early Pre-K Registration


Accomplished Online


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

District Assistant Superintendent-
for Instructional Programs Cindy
Shrestha reports that parents wish-
ing to reregister their child for Flor-
ida's Voluntary Pre kindergarten
Program should access the website:
www.VPKFlorida.com

. ,- .


This form will have a block to
click, titled "parent pre-application."
It also provides information about
the program, and answers questions.
To qualify for the free voluntary
Pre-K program, a child must be four
years old as of September, and the
parent must live in Florida.
Official registration is planned in
late spring, and the classes are
planned to begin in the fall.
*^ -~~ ~ ~ ." ,


Early signup provides the advan-
tage of assuring parents of getting
up to date information about provid-
ers, once they are approved by the
state.
Pre-registering will help provide
information about how many fami-
lies wish to participate in the pro-
gram.
Florida's Pre-K program will be
offered either as a 540 hour school
year program for some three hours
per day, or a 300 hour total summer
program.
When a list of approved providers
Sis compiled, parents will be able to
choose the public or private pro-
vider of their choice.
Some factors that may influence
the choice include:
*Public schools are more likely to
have just a summer program.
*School districts aren't allowed to
have a school year program unless
they meet 2010 goals for reducing
K-12 class sizes.
*Private schools have the option
of refusing to take any individual
child.
Shrestha said she was completing
a letter of verification to DOE, indi-
S.: a hi t i,' thi'District meets the ire-
quirements for a fil year program.
"I feel strongly we will approved,
by. DOE as, a site to offer the free
Pre-K classes," she said.
The District can accommodate
some 50 Pre-K srldents,.Shiesthl
added.
She encouraged interested parents
to access- the designated website and
pre-register their child.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005 PAGE 3 .

Budget Cutbacks The Bookmobile program reaches'


Affect Bookmobile


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Wilderness Coast Public Li-
brary (WILD) bookmobile is feeling
the crunch of recent budget cuts,
causing County residents to lose two
days of stops usually made by the
bookmobile.
Budget cuts have also caused the
loss of two assistants and one full
time staff member
WILD is reaching out to this, and
the two other counties it serves in
desperation, seeking contributions to
keep the program afloat.
Linda Lewis, Librarian and man-
ager of the bookmobile is asking for
patrons and concerned residents to
contact their county commissioners
and ask them to support the WILD
Bookmobile by finding some way to
fund the program. Current funding
will become, exhausted Sept. 30,
2005
This program has been ongoing
since 1995 and each year the costs
continue to rise. It began with four
days a week, cut back to three days,-


and now officials are looking at a
two day week.
"A $75,000 boost, split between
the three counties (Jefferson, Frank-
lin, and Wakulla,) would be such a
help. It would allow us to keep on
one 30 hour a week and one 20 hour
a week staff personnel, and a three
day rotation schedule," said Admin-
istrator Cheryl Turner.
The county libraries would benefit
from the contribution also. The per-
centage of the county's support for
the libraries would go up, making
the county eligible for a higher state
aid return for their libraries, Turner
said.


those who cannot get to mte iorary.
for whatever reason. -
Last year alone, the bookmobile
circulated some 5,671 books;
videos, CD's, Dad's and tapes to
some 4,886 people throughout the
three counties.




Joe Francis
CONCRETE & LANDSCAPE
SERVICE
P.O. Box 6203, Tallahassee, FL 32304
(850) 926-3475 (Mobile) 556-3761
926-9064 556-1178


Movie Gallery

Announces It's D VD & VHS Sales Event


BuY 2 GET 2


SA VE ON ALL PRE VIOUSL Y VIEWED

D VD's & VHS TAPES AND ALL

PREVIOUSLY PLA YED GAMES.
SALE ENDS FEB. 13


1244 S. Jefferson 997-6598


SAMMY RITTER loved his pony, Beauty. The pony died of
old age, Tuesday. She gave many local children their first
pony ride, and will be missed by her pasture buddies:
Dixie, Sox,-Jack, Grover, and Patty.


Physical
(Continued From Page 1)
reached epidemic proportions. A
product of a sedentary lifestyle, in
combination with fatty and super
sized meals, obesity is linked to
heart disease and other chronic ill-
nesses.
Recent statistics cited by the
Health Department point to extent
of the health problems locally.
Among the cited statistics: heart dis-
ease and cancer account for 50 per-
cent of the deaths here; 20 percent
of residents consider their heath
status to be fair or poor; one third of
the population does not engage in
regular physical exercise; two-thirds
consider themselves to be over-
weight or obese; 30 percent have
high cholesterol; and 35 percent of
those 65 or older are diabetic.
Health experts say one way to
combat the health problems is to eat


sensibly and exercise.
For more information about Step
Up Florida, call the Health Depart-
ment at 342-0168.


The Jefferson County
Utility Coordinating
Committee will meet
at 9:00a.m.
February 9, 2005,
at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North Mulberry
Street


-'.; ,A-. ..
,tl- .
I-- 0i* *i't. ..; ~ ~ i-


it's easy to find government
information at www.FirstGov.gov
or 1 (800) FED INFO.
FIRSTGOVgov 1
Government made easy


-. ~ ~I _t ~ i -;
..-










PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

4 MEMBR RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


4 SIO LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Diversity Makes


For Good
When we think of diversity, race
probably comes to mind first. While
it is a key factor in what makes us
different, diversity is .about much
more than race. Michael Aamodt,
professor of psychology at Radford
University, defines diversity as "un-
derstanding people and appreciating
and tolerating differences in others."
Those differences can be as obvi-.
ous as the color of one's skin or
more intrinsic, such as our religious
beliefs, or politics. Each defines
who we are and as part of a chang-
ing culture, it's inevitable that we
will cross paths with people who are
unlike us in many aspects of life, in-
cluding work.
In business, understanding diver-
sity is good for the bottom line. Pro-
fessor Aamodt says "more busi-
nesses are realizing that by under-
standing and appreciating what
makes people different, they-can in-
crease profits by increasing; their
customer base.
Over' the years, companies have
stressed diversity awareness, even
supported training programs to im-
prove employee'recruitment and re-
tention. "They have gone from a
'blame game' of acceptance to a
board acceptance," says Aamodt.
Backlash from employees to di-
versity training too narrowly fo-
cused on race and gender issues
have encouraged more companies to.
embrace initiatives that focus on a
broader range of differences that in-
clude, everything from age and


Business
where we grew ,up to our beliefs
about relationships and how we
communicate.
This focus has allowed them to
improve communications within the
workplace and marketplace. Em-
ployees who are better informed can
really impact the quality and quan-
tity of business. It all matters when
trying to gain a competitive advan-
tage.
A diverse workforce is smart busi-
ness. In a global market, the key to
staying competitive is knowing and
understanding the customer, who
may be right next door or on the
other side of the globe.
To satisfy their needs, it's impor-
tant to understand what those needs
are.
In the U.S., populations that are
today's minorities dre growing at
rates that may make them the
emerging majority in years to come.
According to the 2004 U.S. Cen-
sus, the Hispanic population will in-
crease from 36 million to 103
million by 2050, the Asian-
American population from 11 mil-
lion to 33 million and the
African-American population from
36 million to 61 million. With this
growth, come differences in lan-
guage, culture, values and beliefs -
all factors in how we do business.
Doing "business as usual" may not
be good business anymore under-
standing the changing marketplace
and appreciating what makes each
of us different is.


.Opinion & Comment


~*;9
ri.
'
I;i:
4

- "rp


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY RON CICHON
Publisher


Tom Love attended the state GOP
meeting in Orlando last week.
Relay for Life activities cranking
up with many organizations doing


Ne\xti .eek. I begin mn 3I0thl ,ea their part to raise money for the
at this newspaper. The years have fight against cancer... Visitor's
flown by and I've enjoyed 'em all. Guide produced by the Chamber is
Over these years, I've made woi- erremel:, well done and a credit to
derful friends and been privileged to the community.
live in a beautiful place. To borrow
Jackie Gleason's line, "How sweet it., Lots of local businesses bought
Jcis"e a ,,ads-to make the slick magazine pos-,
..,,sible with -FMB guaranteeing the
Top bad' tihelibrary is having to project.
cut staff. The county library ihas Rotary scribe Bill Beaty writes
been a success story as services have with a hot pen. Nothing and nobody
been expanded over the years. is spared his scathing comments. He
I've always found the staff to be could have a future as a columnist in
very helpful. one of the tabs.


Major Mike Joyner has wrapped : John Gebhard wrapped up his
up a most interesting law enforce- banking career at FMB and pur-
ment career. Enjoy retirement, chased North Florida Abstract and
Mike! Title.
Very nice turnout for the Legisla- Someone said you cannot live a
tive delegation Thursday night... perfect day without doing something
County Republican Chairman Clyde for someone who'will never be able
Simpson and State Committeeman 'to repay you.


News reports say we're gonna
have Europeans build the new Presi-
dential helicopter. Something is
wrong with this picture.
One wag said if we keep sending
our technology abroad, in case of
war we can offer to fry hamburgers
and carry luggage.

If you're having trouble losing
weight, you may need a drink of wa-
ter. Studies shom thai b6ihg justofine
or t6i percent'dehydiated cansl'o.'.
.down your metabolism and raise
stress hormones, and that can lead to
weight gain.
A report by the US Environmental
Protection Agency shows that air
quality in the nation has steadily im-
proved since the early, 1970s. Total
emissions from trucks, cars, facto-
ries, power plants and other sources
have been cut almost in half, com-
pared with 30 years ago.
Valentine's Day is among the
most emotional and romantic days
of the year. It also happens to be the


second largest gift giving occasion.
Quotable quote: "It has been said
that man is a rational animal. All my
life I have been searching for evi-
dence which could support this."
Bertrand Russell
Kiplinger warns against the soar-
ing national deficit pointing out
when money goes to service debt,
there's less for roads, schools, and
other programs that help the econ-
omy.
Date over a Chiropractic school
at FSU has caused old antagonisms
between medical doctors and chiro-
practors to surface.
In 1648, Jakob Balde, a Jesuit
priest, wrote on the dangers of to-
bacco. "What difference is there be-
tween a smoker and a suicide,
except that the one takes longer to
kill himself than the other? Because
of his perpetual smoking, the pure
oil of the lamp of life dries out and
the fair flame of life itself slickers
out and goes out all because of this
barbarous habit."


Sports Changing

But Not For Better


BY REX M. ROGERS, PH.D
Author

Sports, like everything else we hu-
ma.i beings do in life, develop a
"culture," a set of values and prac-
tices that define the experience.
American sports culture has been
changing for the worse in the past
few years: prima donna-athletes,
cheating, use of steroids and other
illegal performance enhancement
substances, abusive fans and in-
creasingly demeaning fan behavior,
alleged rapes, fights and even riots,
gambling' ;-ndals, or simply self-
ishness ,-t large on the field of
play.
The NC AA commissioned a task
team ch; ired by Edward Malloy,
president of the University of Notre
Dame, to study the impact of gam-
bling on intercollegiate athletics.
Both the NFL and NHL are on re-
cord expressing concern about gam-
bling both among players and game
officials.
Major league baseball, still feeling
the effects of the Pete Rose gam-
bling fiasco, now watches former


Detroit Tigers Cecil Fielder strug-
gle with his apparent gambling ad-
diction, even as the sport faces the
specter of home run king Barry
Bond's probable steroid use.
It's not that American sports have
never known controversy. The infa-
mous gambling debacle of the 1919
World Series is a case in point. No,
dishonesty has always existed in
competition. It's just that current
sports culture seems in danger of be-
ing overwhelmed by it.
Sport is good for American boys
and girls in so many ways. But
sports alone do not teach character .
That must be modeled by adults:
parents, coaches, officials and play -
ers.
Today's collegiate and profes-
sional players should have learned
their character lessons long before
they reached their current level of
play. They're now the adults who
Should be doing the role modeling -
and that's one of the things that's so
troubling about the changing culture
of sport.
Character counts in sport as much
as in life. It's up to us as fans to de-
mand it.


Be Agreeable In Job Search


mented and having others agree
BY CATHY KEEN .iith them, and practicing such so-
University of Florida .icial niceties can't help but make a
favorable impression in the worka-
Sucking up or apple polishing are day worle si
more likely to work in a job inter -day world, he said.
4,"One might view these ingratia-
view than boasting of one's accom- tory behaviors negatively as apple
plishments, a new University of polishing or bootlicking, but by the
Florida study finds. same token one could consider them
"Kissing up being nice and agree-
"Kissing up being nice and agree- social skills," he said. "In fact, one
ing more, than disagreeing do seem social psychologist once said that
to be effective tactics for people to', of the y findings in the his-
use when looking for a job," said one of tpsychoogicl research is- th
Tetory of psychological research is the
Timothy Judge, a UF managementsimilar-to-me bias,' which means,
professorwho did the research. similar-to-me as, w means,
professor who did the rediset arch.We like people who are like us."'
"This approach succeeds because it That similarity-attraction theory
leads recruiters and interviewers to l a attracted to
.;suggests people are attracted to
believe the applicant will fit into the those with whom they have some-
organization." thing in common, so when an appli-
The findings show there is a largecant agrees with a recruiter's opin-
social component to the workplace ons, the recruiter may believe they
despite business schools spending a share many beliefs and attitudes, he
great deal of time and effort training said.
people to master technical skills,
people to master technical skills "Judge's paper is a well-conducted
said Judge, whose study appears in .
said Judge, whose study appears intudy that gives insight into the fact
the August Journal of Applied Psy- ha i s t comp
technology. hat it is more useful to compliment
chology People like b g omp-others than it is to compliment our-


selves," said Daniel Cable, professor
of management and organizational
behavior at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, who has
studied the job choice process for
nearly a decade. "On the other hand,
agreeing outwardly with an inter-
viewer when you really disagree
could wind you up with a job where
you don't really fit the culture of the
organization."
For their research, Judge and Chad
Higgins, a University of Washington
management professor, studied 116
undergraduate students majoring in
business or liberal arts at the Uni-
versity of Iowa who were inter-
viewed for jobs they sought through
the college placement service.
The applicants completed surveys
asking them to rate on a seven-point
scale their use of various ingratia-
tory and self-promotion tactics. Ex-
amples of ingratiatory behaviors in-
cluded agreeing outwardly with the
recruiter's opinion while disagreeing
inwardly, and complimenting the in-


terviewers appearance. Self-
promotion tactics included playing
up one's accomplishments or expe-
rience levels and overstating one's
qualifications.
In turn, the recruiters were asked
to assess the applicants, including
stating how strongly they agreed or
disagreed with statements such as,
"This applicant is a good match or
fit with my organization and its cur-
rent employees" and "This appli-
cant's values reflect the values of
my organization." Ultimately, re-
cruiters were asked to rate how
likely they would be to recommend
hiring the applicant, using a seven-
point scale ranging from 'strongly
agree' to 'strongly disagree.'
While the results showed a strong
relationship between the use of in-
gratiating behaviors and favorable
attitudes on the part of recruiters,
self-promotion techniques had no
effect, Judge said.
"We know that on the job, self-
(See Be Agreeable Page 5)


Dogs Cdnsidered 'Family'


For as long as anyone can remem- jog. social life. Whether it be a new
ber. dogs have been deemed man's It's clear that dogs play an integral found friend or a significant other,
best friend. But what truth lies in and important role in our lives and, many dog owners report their
this old adage, and how deep does in most cases, are much more than pooches have played matchmaker a


the bond between people and their lu man's best friend.
four-legged friends run? In fact, 70 percent of people sur-
The makers of one popular food 'veyed said they consider their
for dogs surveyed 1,500 dog owners pooches to be a part of the family.
and lovers from across the country In addition,-71 percent admit they
to find out more about these beloved 'even talk to their dog as if he was
canine companions. From pet pam-- human and 22 percent say they in-
pering to doggie socialization and :i lude their pup in family vacations.
nutrition, the survey dug up some According to the survey, dogs
interesting "tidbits" about all things 'may play an integral role in human


time or two.
In fact, more than 50 percent of
people surveyed say they have met a
new friend or acquaintance while
walking their dogs and 15 percent
even met their spouses that way.
Can dogs really attract dates?
Does your four-legged friend know
which mate is best suited for you? It
seems some people think so.


Forty-two percent of dog owners
who participated in the survey admit
they have or say they might, take
their dog out for the sole purpose of
meeting someone of the opposite
sex.
Others take this one step further,
as 14 percent of women said they
would even take their dog's opinion
I to consideration when choosing a
mate if Fido doesn't like him, then
neither will she.
(See Dogs Page 5)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed

500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed

and include

phone number of writer


17Y d L IL L-








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005 PAGE 5


I -


'4 !;


JEFFERSON COUNTY 4-H County Council
and 4-Hers gathered Saturday, Jan 15 to


clean up a two mile stretch of Lake Road,
for its annual Adopt-A-Road Project.


ALEX FARMER, left and Brittany Harvey
were among 4-Hers cleaning up a section of


14

'.0



A1


,115 .944. -F '. -., .


ARSENIO BRIGHT, left, Michelle Keaton, Al- 4-Hers, picked up more than 100 pounds of
ana Chambers, and Charles Taylor, county trash in the Lake Road cleanup.


SIMONE WILLIAMS in the beginning sewing
class taught to 4-Hers at the Extension Of-
fice, by Gladys Neely, assistant 4-H coordi-


nator. Projects will be judged and awards
presented when classes are completed.


Dogs Are Family


(Continued From Page 4)
The survey also found that it's a
dog-gone 'good life for pups these
days. Among dog lovers surveyed,
many spoil their dogs as they would
a child. From showering their dog
with gifts, to surprising them with
unexpected treats (72 percent), peo-
ple frequently pamper their pooches.
Many even give their dogs presents
during the holidays (50 percent),
proving dogs really are another
member of the family.
Ask 1,500 people what they
named their dog(s), and you'll get
1,181 different answers. While Max,
Buddy and Bear were the most com-
mon names uncovered in the survey,
it seems dog names are as individual
as the pups.'themselves.
There were, however, some inter-
esting similarities, as "people"
names were more common than the


traditional Fido, Rufus or Spot.
In fact, of those surveyed, nearly
half (47 percent) gave their dogs a
human name, with the most com-
mon being Max, Jack, Molly and
Daisy.
Nearly all dog lovers who partici-
pated in the, survey believe .theii
dogs are happy (99 percent) and
most also report taking steps to keer
them that way.
The most common things people
do to keep their dogs in good health
include a daily romp around .the
block (55 percent ) and keeping up
with regular visits to the vet (41 per-
cent).
Dog owners surveyed also said
that their pooches motivate them to
live a healthier, more active lifestyle
(68 percent). In fact, 49 percent in-
corporate their dog into their daily
exercise regime, offering them both
a good workout.


Be Agreeable In Job Search


(Continued From Page 4)
promotion has never seemed to
work too well, probably because the
supervisor has much more of an- op-
portunity to find out the reality," he
said.
On the other hand, 'tundies have
found the use of ingra'.iating Lehav-
iors to be effective in influencing
performance ratings, he said.
Complimenting supervisors or co-
workers and agreeing with their
opinions may not be as dishonest as
it would appear; some people are
simply more agreeable by nature,
Judge said.
In order to ensure they get the
best-qualified applicants, though, re-
cruiters should strive to get more de-
tailed information from prospective
job candidates rather than simply ac-
cepting comments that are designed
to please, he said.
"A certain level of agreement and
trying to get along is fine, but I
think the interviewer needs to be
careful that there's substance behind
the style," Judge said. "There are
questions that can test that. For ex-
ample, if you asked an applicant,
'Have you broken a rule?' That may
be a way to test whether a person is
agreeing with everything that is said
or is just an agreeable person."
The results, showing that ingratia-
tion tactics have such a strong effect
during the interview process, raise
the question about whether busi-
nesses are really looking for people
with their own ideas.
"Probably if you were to ask most
managers, 'Do you want "yes" peo-


pie?' They would say, 'No, I want
people who disagree and represent
themselves,"' he said. "But if you
look at what they actually mean,
you get a different picture."


National Food Check Out Day



To Be Observed Feburary 7


Dear Editor:
By February 7, the average Ameri-
can will have earned enough income
to pay for the eifire year's food sup-
ply, and state agriculture leaders are
encouraging Floridians to remember
the efforts of the farmers who make
this feat possible.
Jefferson' County has a rich agri-
cultural heritage, and we still de-
pend on agriculture as an important
part of our economy.
"Americans enjoy the safest, most
abundant and most affordable food
supply on earth," Florida Agricul-
ture Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson said.
"Based on US Department of Agri-
culture Statistics, it takes just 37
days for the average American to
earn enough disposable income to
pay for his or her family's food sup-
ply for the entire year."
Food Check Out Day is a celebra-
tion of the bounty from America's
farms and ranches and how that
bounty is shared with American
consumers through affordable food
prices, said Carl Loop, president of
the Florida Farm Bureau Federation.
"Compared to other expenses fac--


ing America's families, food is a
bargain. While Americans must
onl\ work 37 days to pay for their
'yearly food supply. Last year they
had to work 101 days to'pay their
(cumulative) taxes."
More than 24 million American
workers, representing 17 percent of
the total US workforce, produce,
process, sell and trade the nation's
food and fiber.
However, only 4.6 million of


those people live on farms, which is
slightly less than two percent of the
total US population. There are 2.13
million farms dotting America's ru-
ral landscape.
Florida's 44,000 commercial farm-
ers grow more than 280 different
crops. Agriculture is Florida's sec-
ond leading industry, next to tour-
ism, and has an estimated overall
economic impact of more than $62
billion annually.


Agriculture and timber sales in
Jefferson County yield $240 million
in annual farm gate income.
This has a very positive impact on
the county, as these dollars are
"plowed" back into the local econ-
omy to create jobs and increase the
quality of life for all who call Jeffer-
son County home.
Stephen Monroe, president
Jefferson County Farm Bureau


Lake Road, recently. The youths were
treated to pizza at Pizza Hut afterwards.


I Iod yo


Group Fitness Schedule,.


THURSDAY


WEDNESDAY


TUESDAY


MONDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & Jills i
3 to 5 yr. olds atea


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
Fitness Combo Fitness Combo


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.












PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4,2005


Lifestyle


4-H Listening Project To


Survey Concerns Of Youth


DEBBIE SNAPP
'Staff Writer


In 1995 the 4-H County Council
conducted the first Listening
Project. Now, 10 years later, the
Council has decided to implement


The 4-H Listening Project is an in- the survey again to see if the opil
novative needs assessment/commu- ions of teens in Jefferson Cou
nity development tool. have changed about issues that c
Through the 4-H Listening Pro- cern them.
'jects, youth who are concerned Teens will be interviewed on
about pressing issues in their com- following topics: job opportunity
munity develop a community youth learning and education, youth in
survey, receive training on conflict and involvement, living in Jeffer
resolution and communication County, and recreation.
.skills, and carry out this survey.
:Surveyors work in teams of two This is not a typical survey. 0:
:people, with one person asking the communities feel "studied to dea
questions and the other recording with the collected data not reflect
ihe responses. accurately the thoughts and c


JES FCAT Study Session

Draws Good Turnout


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

More than 30 families attended the-
Math FCAT Study Session for third
grade students and parents, held
Thursday, Jan. 20, at Jefferson Ele-
mentary School, by the third grade
teaching team.
Students were accompanied by ei-
ther parents or an older sibling.
Teacher Carol Purvis reviewed
test skills that parents could work on
at home with students.
Some of the skills have yet to be
presented in class, but they are sim-
ple enough that parents or siblings
can reinforce them at home.
Many of these skills involved
larger vocabulary words such as
"congruent" and "similar."
Teachers are hopeful that some of
these students may achieve a Level
'4 or 5 on the FCAT in Math.
"We spent the first semester'teach-
ing a solid foundation for third
grade mathematics," Purvis said.
,'Now we are reinforcing these skills


1-
Inty
on-

the
ies,
Iput
son

ften
ath"
ting
con-


as we target specific FCAT tested
skills in the classroom."
During this evenings study session,
Teachers Terri Clark, Judy Carney,
-and Mary Roberts met with parents
to sign AIP's as well as assisting
parents and students with work-
sheets, and other materials.
Refreshments of popcorn and
soda were served.
"We are very pleased with the
number of parents who are inter-
ested in taking the extra steps to
help their children achieve higher
scores on the FCAT," said Roberts.
There were many positive remarks
made by parents and smiles from
students as families left the elemen-
tary school shortly before 8 p.m..
It made for a very long day for
many involved, but Carney said that
she believed it was worth it. Clark
added "I am very encouraged by the
large parent turnout and the amount
o:f.interest.sh.ow n here tonight."
The FCAT willlbe administered at
JES, during the ,week of Feb. 28
through March 5, 2005.


ABBY REAMS suffers from Cystic Fibrosis. Her eight year
old sister Kelsi held her annual hot chocolate sale fund-
raiser and raised $1,650 to be donated to the Cystic Fibro-
sis for research. (News Photo)


Homes Of Mourning


Shelly Lane
Shelly Lane 77 a retired Butcher
died Thursday, January 27, 2005 in
Tallahassee.
The service will be at 11:00, Sat-
urday February 5, 2005 at:Greater
Fellowship Missionary Baptist
Church in Monticello with burial at
-Texas Hill Cemetery, with military
honors, with Rev. Dr. Melvin Rob-
erts, officiating. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 1 30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 4, at Till-
man Funeral Home.
A native of St. Petersburg, Mr.
Lane grew up in and, graduate high
school in Monticello. He served in
the U.S. Army from 1952-1954. He
lived in New York for over 20 years
before retiring.to Monticello.
SHe was a master barber and a retired
butcher, having worked at Foodway
and Monticello Provision Co.
(Systo's) before retiring. He was a
longtime Associate at the Tillman
Funeral Home.
Mr. Lane was, very active in the
American Legion, Post 234, and at
Greater Fellowship where he sev-
ered as a deacon.
To cherish his loving memory he
leaves his wife Almeda Tillman
Lane. Others left to treasure his
memory include his sons, Elder Dr.
Willie L. Davis and wife, Crystal of


Monticello, Harold Lane, Sr. and
wife Diedra, Tallahassee, Shelly
Lane and wife Toni; and Stanley
Lane and wife, Nicole, both of Katy,
Texas; his step son, Barry Wyche
and wife Van es, of Tampa, his
daughters, Tereasa Diane Lane Ray,
winter Haven, and Barbara Huggins
of Monticello, his step daughter,
Tosca Williams of Sunrise, FL.; his
sister, Doretha L. Jones, his mother-
in-law, Mrs. Sevilla Tillman and his
former wife and mother of his sons,
Mae Lane all of Monticello, along
with several nieces, in-laws, rela-
tives, and friends and his extended
family at Post of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars and the American Le-
gion, Richard Feacher Post 234


cers of area residents.
The 4-H Listening Project in-
volves in-depth interviews and the
building of positive relationships
with the people surveyed. The inter-
viewer and the person interviewed
face the community problems to-
gether and together they find possi-
ble solutions.
A total of 200 youth will be sur-
veyed from Howard Middle School,
Jefferson County High School, and
Aucilla Christian Academy.
The purpose of this project is to:
Develop leadership and community
organizing skills in a core group of
young people who will plan, imple-
'ment, follow-up, and evaluate the
Listening Project.
Gathered information from Jeffer-
son County youth about how they
see their community and what they
think their relationship is to the
community, will be collected.
This information will be used as
a resource for Jefferson County pol-
icy makers, educators, and law en-
forcement officials, and to:
Reach out and engage young
people who may not be involved in
community activities;
Provide a national model for
4-H programs and other youth serv-
ice providers on how to involve
youth in community needs assess-
ment, program planning, and com-
munity service involvement.
The Jefferson County 4-H Listen-
ing Project will provide a profile of
the hopes, aspirations, and talents of
Jefferson County youth.
This project will provide a per-
spective too often absent when pol-
icy makers, program planners,
educators and law enforcement offi-
cials attempt to plan, implement,
and evaluate youth services.
This plan will utilize the perspec-
tives of the youth themselves.
Anyone with questions or com-
cems i '. elc:.med 'to contact 4-H
Coordinator John Lill,, at the Ext&n-
sion Office, 342-0187.

Hot Chocolate

Fundraiser

Nets $1,650

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Secbnd Annual Hot Choco--
late Sale, to benefit Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation, was a great success,
and collect $1,650 for the founda-
tion, with donations still coming in.
This year's sale took place at Wit-
mer Realty on Hwy. 221 in Green-
ville.
Eight \ear old Kelsi Reams, a sec-
ond grader at Aucilla Christian
Academy, held the fundraisifig
Seventh. The cold, rainy Saturday did
not deter her or her donors from at-
tending the event.
Her 2 year old sister, Abby, is
stricken with Cystic Fibrosis, and
this is her way of bringing attention
and awareness to this- genetic dis-
ease, and in a small way, helping
her sister.
Last year Reams raised more than
$1,800 to benefit Cystic Fibrosis.

CARD OF THANKS
The family of Edgar Thompson
wants to thank the community for
patronizing his buisness and for its
support during his illness, and the
passing of my husband and our fa-
ther.
A special thanks for your prayers,
phone calls, food, and cards.
Mrs. Edgar Thompson
and family


All About You...
about balancing food, body and
mind, the three essential components
of successful weight management.
You Can Do It!

^^^(S~~-r


YourStyle'
Live Oak Plaza 1891 Capital Circle NIE #1
Tallahassee, FL (850) 219-1700


AUDREA TYSON, left, is interviewed by Al-
ana Chambers as part of the 4-H Listening
Project designed to compare the views of



.,.



,
-., ... ..
.. --+ . ,.!


MIKE COX, left, is interviewed by Nikki Bar-
rington. The 4-H project is designed to so-


School Menus
Monday
Hamburger on Bun,
Lettuce/Tomato/Pickle, French
Fries, Fruit or Juice, Milk
Tuesday
Pizza, Whole Kernel Corn, Fruit,
Brownie, Milk
Wednesday
Ham, Macaroni & Cheese, Broccoli,
red Apple Smiles, Hot Roll, Milk
Thursday
Meat Loaf, Greens, Baked Potato,
Diced Peaches, Cornbread, Milk
Friday
Chicken Tetrazioni, Vegetable
Salad, Fruit Choices, Hot Roll, Milk

Clarification


youth today with that of those youths 10
years ago.


licit thoughts of area youths about their role
it'the community.


& Reception Center


NEW WINTER HOURS
, Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 11 a.m. 9 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 10 p.m.
lay 8 a.m. 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday

KARAOKE
Saturday Night
D.m. until S2sCover


At The Villages Of St. Marks
925-7882


Haley :-\kinmon v.as misidentified
in the dedication photo published in
Wednesday's paper. The informa-
tion was not initially provided to
the News


TURN
This is no time to turn back.
Keep MDA's lifesaving research
moving forward.
IDW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


Lose all the
weight you
want in 60 days
Sfor just $49*
Iplus the cost of food


YourStyle'

(850) 219-1700
Call today!


RAQUEL WELCH'

WIG TRUNK SHOW & SALE
Friday, Feb. 11 Governor's Square Mall
Saturday, Feb. 12 Tallahassee Mall

Book your personal consultation with a
Raquel Welch WIG Stylist


I "( HairUWearO donated over 6,500 wigs to the
EARP American Cancer Society, Inc. in 2003 which
WEAI were distributed to cancer patients at no cost.


w


I


1









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005 PAGE 7

Just For Fun Members


Enjoy Secret Pal Program


HENRY SEABROOKS participated in a computer learning
class offered by Innovative Partners Coalition at the Mt.
Ararat Church, recently.


^ ^ .:;'_*,, ,
i



THOMAS GLENN was one of eight seniors taking part in a
beginners computer class offered recently at Mt. Ararat
Church.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Just For Fun-
group (JFF) met recently at the
home of Chair Yvonne Mediate, to
meet their Secret Pals.
This Secret Pal program was full
of gift giving and surprises. Secret
Sisters were revealed in anticipation
of all those involved during this past
year.
The Secret Pal program is a
voluntary program. Secret Pals draw
a name at random and have that
Secret Pal for a year, and make her
feel special all year.
Cards and/or small gifts are given
throughout the year and especially
on special occasions, such as her
birthday and anniversary. This
program is designed to uplift and
promote lasting relationships.
Gift suggestions are: a book the'
giver has already read and feels the
Pal might find encouraging; a tape
or CD the giver wants to share; a
small plant in a pot perhaps the
giver already has; fruit in a used
basket; a handmade item; something
from the givers kitchen; fruits,
vegetables, nuts from the givers
trees or garden.

Fundraising
Dinner Set At
First Methodist

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A Valentine's Day Dinner of-,
Prime Rib, baked potato, salad,
rolls, and red velvet cake will be
served 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 11
at the Family Ministry Center of
First Methodist Church.


Or, an inexpensive or recycled
coffee cup with a small package of
her favorite coffee or tea and a note
telling her you will be thinking of
her when you enjoy your cup of
coffee or tea.
Snacks and soft drinks were
served during the evening and door
prizes were awarded.
Mediate expertly blended light
stories with more serious ones
throughout the program, adding a
mixture of excitement, intrigue, and
joy for the attendees to savor in
while visiting with one another.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Yolanda Lewis is a leader at the
St. Phillip Boys and Girls Club after
school program for students.
She has been a leader with the
Club for 5 wonderful years, and
adds that her love for the children is
what actually got her involved.

One of her goals is to keep the
.kids busy constructively, and to get
them involved in activities they en-
joy.
"This is one sure way we can help
the community and the kids. I want
them to learn and to grow into the
very best adults they can be," Lewis
states.


The North Florida District
Women's Retreat is scheduled for
the weekend of March 4-5 at the
Marriott in Jacksonville.
The group will carpool to the Re-
treat, allowing the weekend of fel-
lowship to be extended with more
time spent on visiting with one an-
other.
The Retreat will feature Vance
and Jeannie Sharpe, who will bring
their music blend of Southern and
contemporary gospel again this
year. Also, Jeannie will be speaking
on Friday evening to the congrega-
tion.


She is no stranger to the school
system or to children, and has some
25 years of food service experience
as a Cafeteria Manager at Pineview
Elementary School in Leon County.
Lewis is a graduate of Rickards
High School and is licensed through
the University of Florida as a Die-
tary Manager.
She is a certified food technician
at the local, state, and national level,
and VP of the Leon Florida Schools
Food Service Association (FSFSA).
Lewis is also a licensed minister.
'She believes in the President's "No
Child Left Behind" promise and is
eager to prove the promise a good
one. She is ready, willing, and capa-
ble to help with saving of all he chil-
dren.


Cindy Clary is another featured
speaker for this weekend Retreat.
She will share her experiences about
how God is working in her life and
how He continues to work out His
plan for her life.
When Clary is not speaking, her
interests include spending time with
her family, and attending University
of South Carolina sporting events.
She is a paralegal employed by the
state of South Carolina, and resides
in Lexington.
For information pertaining to the
Retreat, contact Judi Cleckner at
997-5659.


+-


LEWIS


Triple L Club Hears Program


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


This is a joint fundraiser for the
Relay For Life and for the Youth The Triple L Club (Live Long and
Missions of the First United Meth- Like It) heard a program about nu-
odist Church. Music and entertain- tuition, Tuesday, at their monthly
meant will be on tap. meeting, held at First Baptist
Church Hall.
The ticket cost is .$20 each, and Program speaker for hemeeting
tickets can be purchased from the s Heidi Copeland Coun mily
-.was Heidi Copeland. CouritN Family
church office, 997-5545. Deadline Consumer Extension Agent, who
for ticket sales is Wednesday, Feb. presented an update of the 84 page
9. Food and Nutrition guidelines pub-
A nursery will provide childcare. listed iJn. 12 by the USDA.
*** She discussed the changes seen in
Reapers of the Harvest Church, the new guidelines, including nutri-
will hold its Homecoming Sunday. tion facts,, calories, exercise, fruits
Service is at 10 a.m., followed by and vegetables, carbohydrates, fat,
dinner at noon. Music with a mes- salt, alcohol, and food safety.
sage begins at 2 p.m., with the Haire Copeland distributed literature on
Family. the revised food pyramid emphasiz-
e** ing calories and exercise. Also, an
Greater Fellowship MB Church adult BMI chart, and a sample
celebrates Family and Friends Day 3 USDA food guide, and the DASH
p.m., Sunday. Speaker is Rev. E. eating plan at the 2,000-calorie
Hunki,;,n n ..l,,... AMPC; ri 1 level.


COMPUTERS were donated to Mt. Ararat Church by Inno-
vative Partners Coalition during a six week computer class
offered recently.


JCHS Students Win

In FBLA Competition


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Several Jefferson County" High
School students participated and
placed in the Future Business lead-
ers of America District Competi-
tion, Monday.
Students were able to compete in
several different topics, including
Business Communications, Busi-
ness Planning, Marketing and Web
SSite Development.
In Business Communications, La-


STHESE are half of a foursome
* of 3 month old, female black
labs needing good homes.
(News Photo)


cola brooks took 'first place,
Yvonne Seabrooks, second and
Chenelle Francis, fourth.
Angela Scurry took first place in
Introduction to Business Communi-
cations, and the team of Chevarra
Ulee and Tierra Thompson took
First place for Business Plan.
Jasmine Brown and Alexia Hug-
gins took third place in Web Site
Development and Alex Farmer
won second place in Marketing.
First place winners from the com-
petition will go on to compete in
the regional competition.

Black Lab Pups
Pets Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Humane Society has
named a litter of puppies as
adoptable pets of the week.
The foursome consists of black
lab mixed, females puppies, ap-
proximately three month old.
They are all described as being
friendly, playful, extremely active
and intelligent.
They are spayed, and all vacci-
nations are up to date. The puppies
get along very well with other ani-
mals.
To adopt one of them, all of them
or to learn about the other many
available pets at the shelter, call
342-0244.


lanllllKli ui asgow urcIVlA_ uIuliII
of Boston.


Plans were discussed and are un-


It you or o loved one Ios suffered
DIABETES, Ketoacidosis, Coma, Hypoglycemia,or Death
ofter taking ZYPREXA", contact Fetterman &.Associates toll free at 1-800-924-4171.


The Law Team of Fetterman & Associates
(0 48 U .S i dl 11 ,, ,, l l 1. 1 L 1


The hiring of a lawyer is on important decision rini li, od not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written ioiniolmion about our qualifications and experience.


MAIN STREET

SATURDAY MARKET


Come One, Come All!

I. Fre for first timers, $5 after that..


Garage Sale, Baked Goods, Produce,
Gift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
'thing You Have To Sell, Including
Fainting Goats!
Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
Fund raisers more than welcome


Call Tammie Peck @ 997-6455


'*4^r~~4 -^^-V. V^^r^^^


derway for a Triple L Cookbook.
Members were asked to get together
and bring in a few of their favorite
recipes.
Feb. 10, a groupof about 30 will
be enjoying a day trip to the Talla-
hassee Junior Museum. Lunch at the
Seineyard Restaurant will follow.
March 18 the members will attend
the Easter Pageant Parade,'in Talla-
hassee; 'as a group: The plant is to
meet at the church arid carpool in
the'church vans to Tallahassee.
"There were 45 in attendance and


wonderful group participation. 'It
was a great meeting," exclaimed
president Mary Helen Andrews.
Hostesses were Ramona Macken-
zie, Barbara Sheats, Pat Carbo, ard
Thelma Birdwell.
Lunch included a variety of home-
made covered dish items brought in
bythose present..
i Andre\ nientrion, ihat .these
meetings are open to senior adults
and that there is no particular church
affiliation requirements to attend.


CASH No
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEME
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOU

(800) 794-7310

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!






LA CONCHA

A Key West Tradition


CUBAN AMERICAN
COFFEE & SANDWICH SHOP
1305 W. Washington


NOW OPEN
7 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. MONDAY- FRIDAY


BIG BEND -EUBANKS
L Termite & Pest Control
Let Us Undertake Your Pest Control Problems!"
Complete Service Commercial ~ Residential




Outside Service

Annually ~ Monthly ~ Quarterly
Termite Treatment
BAITINGSYSTEMS AND CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1954
2522 NE Capital Circle

422A-29-4223


Yolanda Lewis Leader

At St. Phillip Club


I


~.











PAE R MONTTri'TT .CETI. (F NEWS. FRT.. FEBRUARY 4. 2005


Sports


Ladies Tennis Team Wins

One Of Its Six Matches


WS M FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Simply Smashing ladies tennis
team, calling itself "Simply
Smashed," because of its frequent
losses, won one of its six matches
against the Sassy Smashers, re-
cently.
Spokesperson Patty Hardy
quipped, "We've been getting
.i: smashed every time we play, so
S, simply smashed is the joke around
Town. When we start winning we'll
n .change it back."
: Team #1, Lisa Jackson and Katie
Brock won its first set. 7-6, lost the

Rotary GOlf

Tournament
IUSA JACKSON and Katie Brock comprise team one of the
ladies tennis team, called Simply Smashing, but changing Set March 7
their name to Simply Smashed, in light of recent losses.
FRAN HUNT

Community LearningSta-W.
The Annual Rotary Sandbaggers
A Golf Tournament will be held
defeats ACA 4032 Monday, March 7, at the Country
bu'lC


F"AN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
bpy's junior varsity basketball team
l:st to Community Learning Insti-
tite Monday, 40-32, to now stand
at a 5-12 season.
SCoach Dan Nennstiel said it as a
tcugh game and the Warriors did
npt play well. "It was a sloppy
game for us, and we looked a little
slow," said Nennstiel. "It's near the
ead of the season and we're sup-
posed to be peaking our season, but
we're not peaking."
He added that the Warriors did
n'nage to keep the score fairly
clpse.
cLeadingthe scoring for the War-
ritrs was Wade Scarberry with nine
points, eight rebounds.
Bernie Henderson, six points,


Tiger JVs Sc

NFC 52-50, 1

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

SJCHS JVs squeaked past NFC
Friday night for a 52-50 in a game
with a nail biting fourth period.
Coach Ken Robinson said the Ti-
gers were ahead by 14 in the
fourth, but then NFC came back for
a four point lead over the Tigers.
JCHS scored the winning six points
in the last minute of the game.
J. C. Fead scored 14 points, two
rebounds and two steals; Anthon\


ACA Girls Beat I

Defeated By Mi

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
girl's junior varsity basketball team
split their last two games and now
stand at a 10-3 season.
The Ladies were victorious over
Maclay; 16-14.
Leading the scoring for ACA was
Mallory Plaines with five points;
Jodie Bradford, four points; Beth-



Dixie County C

Lady Tigers 51

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Tigers fell to Dixie County,
51-37, Monday.
Leading the scoring was Keandra
Seabrooks, 12 points, 11 rebounds
for a double/double two steals;
Shaumese Massey, 10 points, eight
rebounds, two blocked shots, one
assist.
;Kandice Griffin, six points. eight


five rebounds; Kyle Bamwell. five
points two rebounds; Kyle Peters,
also with five points two rebounds;
and Elliott Lewis, five points.
Michael Kinsey, two points, three
rebounds; Daniel Greene, six re-
bounds; Prateen Patel, three re-
bounds, Jayce Davis, one rebound;
and Hunter Greene, one rebound.
Nennstiel added that Hunter
played a very good defensive
game.
The Warriors play their last two
games of the season this week, both
of which Nennstiel said will have
to be played extremely well, to
come out with the wins.
The first game is against Bran-
,ford, 6 p.m., Thursday, there; and'
Bell, 5 p.m., Friday, here.
"All we can do is try to get ready
for the games," Nennstiel con-
cluded.


ueak By

Friday
J.ohnson, seven points, four re-
bounds, one steal, two assists and
one blocked shot; and Jordan Blair,
three rebounds.
Clarence Fead, three rebounds,
two steals, one assist and one
blocked shot; Jamaal Brooks, two
points, five rebounds, two steals,
two assists; Marcus Brown, 17
points, three rebounds, three steals,
two assists; and Willie Davis, 12
points, 1,5 rebounds, two steals and
five blocked shots.
The Tigers now stand at a 6-8
season.


Maclay;

inroe
any Saunders, Courtney Brasington
and Miranda Wider each scored
two points; and Tiffany Brasington,
one point.
The Ladies lost to Munroe,
16-10.
Plaines led the charge with six
points; and Savannah Williams and
Bradford each scored two.
There are two games remaining
in the season for the Lady
Warriors: Bradford, 4 p.m, Thurs-
day, there; and Bell, 4 p.m., Friday,
here.


)owns

1-37
rebounds; Chandra Tucker, three
points, four rebounds; Shanise
Brooks, two points; Jasmine
Brown, two points, three rebounds,
one steal; Nikidra Thompson, six
rebounds; and Pamela Mitchell,
three rebounds, one steal.
Coach Bill Brumfield Said the
girls continue to play bigger
schools, but in the long run, it is
good practice and should make the
Lady Tigers a much stronger team.
JCHS now stands at a 4-12 sea-
son.


, 1. .
Spokesman James Muchovej said
play will be the usual format, with
teams of four players. Golfers will
tee off at 1 p.m.
The cost is $50 per person and in-
cludes the round of golf, door
prizes and a rib eye steak dinner.
Trophies will be awarded for low
gross, low net and worst score.
Last year's ;event saw some 12
teams competing in the tournament,
-Muchovej said they could accom-
modate up to 15 teams.
"We're always looking for a big-
ger and better turnout than we had
before," said Muchovej.
For further information or to reg-
ister, call Muchovej at 997-6508.

Tiger JVs Lose
TO John Paul
Tiger JVs defeated John Paul II,
55-48, in recent action.
J. C. Fead led the score with 2
points; Clarence Fead, 11; Marcus
Brown, eight; Paul Huggins, seven;
Darnell Brooks, four; and Anthony
Johnson, three.
JCHS now has a 6-8 record.







MEET THE FOCKERS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:45 7:30 9:55 Sat. 2:00 4:45
7:30 9:55 Sun. 2:00 4:45 7:30
Mon. -Thurs. 4:45 -7:30

COACH CARTER(PG13)
Fri. 4:50 7:35 10:15 Sat. 2:05 -
4:50 7:35 10:15 Sun. 2:20 4:50 -
7:35 Mon. Thurs. 4:50 7:35

RACING STRIPES (PG)
Fri. 4:55 7:40 9:45 Sat. 2:10 4:55
7:40 9:45 Sun. 2:10 4:55 7:40
Mon. Thurs. 4:55 7:40

ARE WE THINKING
YET? (PG)
Fri. 5:00 7:50 10:05 Sat. 2:20 -
5:00 7:50 10:05 Sun. 2:20 5:00 -
7:50 Mon. Thurs. 5:00 7:50
NO PASSES

THE AVIATOR (PG13)
Fri. 5:10 8:30 Sat. 1:50 5:10 8:30
Sun. 1:50 5:10 8:30 Mon. -Thurs.
5:10 8:30
NO PASSES

HIDE AND SEEK (R)
Fri. 5:05 7:45 9:55 Sat. 2:15 -
5:05 7:45 9:55 Sun. 2:15 5:05 -
7:45 Mon. Thurs. 5:05 7:45
NO PASSES

BOGEYMAN (PG13)
Fri. 5:15 7:55 10:00 Sat. 2:25 -
5:15 7:55 10:00 Sun. 2:25 5:15 -
7:55 Mon. Thurs. 5:15 7:55
NO PASSES


second, 3-6 and lost the tiebreaker,
2-6.
Team #2, Maxi Miller and Patty
hardy lost its sets, 2-6, 0-6; and
Team #3, Cindy (Williams) Wain-
right and Paula Joiner, lost its sets,
1-6 and 2-6.
Team #4, Judy Faircloth and Jen-
nifer Ellis lost its sets, 2-6 and 4-6.
Team #5, Trisha Wirick and
Laura Phillips-Kirchhoff won its
sets, 6-2, 7-5; and Team #6, Angie
Delvecchio and Helen Thompson
lost its sets, 7-6 and 6-4.
Simply Smashed will face the
Golden Eagle Wings. 9:30 a.m.,
Thursday, at Golden Eagle Country
Club.


Package Deal!
Diesel Tractor Package low
*Diesel Tractor '
*Rotary Cutter
*Scrape Blade
*Drawbar






LASTINGER TRACTORS
"THE TRACTOR Exit 11 off 1-75114 Mile West Then Turn
PLACE" Left on White Water Road
877-249-8885 229-249-8484


io vbo'T~rr8CV8 Vb cnr~r olB 0o an b a ooT8 00 s s s8 (T 0 V8 a8 oTo owf o ssv8 0 00 6 0 a





C 1
6 *





6
'







666


| the following items for recycling:

SAll plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,Z
f laundry detergent bottles, etc.




News paers. Magazines, etc.


0, All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal,fboxes, food boxes,
%0




e residents can bring these items directly to the Recycing Center located a






1591, Waukeenah Street or they'may drop them off at any one of the
collectionthe following items for recycling:y.

Remember, every titles soda bottcle you arey sextendi, ming the lifes, ofour Labondfles,
S laundry detergent bottles, etc.










Sand savingyour County dollars infood cans, dog fHowod could, you go wrongs,
Setc.









C '*



SResidents can bring theseal items accepted atly to the Rcollecycing Censites:r located at


HousRemember, every timbage you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill







Batteries
0 *White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing .
S machinesdryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
-00












Recycle Center)
0





S*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)
/ CO





Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)
S **The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will

accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
No I
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


SThe City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents

. for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further .
information on other items fortdisposal in the City, please call
0 Don Anderson at 342-0154.
6


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http:llwww.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.htmi for the locations & hours of
Operation for each individual site. For further information please call the .
Solid Waste Department at 342-01 84.



SVisit the www.Eartn d9_i ahorg Recycling Information web page
SinfoWrha t o od (woi othetritemsfofr) o-sRfraltoirs eT Ct pa al f rezes w hi


I- C -


0,uuv IrllkYI R A 1% uv) \UuUW kW J U), IN ALL, Ty U, A' --.,


1








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005 PAGE 9


JCHS BoyS Fall To

John Paul 66-22


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School boy's varsity basketball
team fell to an 8-16 record after be-
ing slapped down by John Paul II
for a 66-42 loss.
The main reason behind the Tiger
loss, a large number of turnovers
said Coach Omari Forts.
In the first period, the Tigers led
11-10, and at the end of the first
half, they led 29-25.
In the third period, the Tigers
scored a mere seven points to John


Paul's 12, to bring the score to 37-
36, John Paul's lead.
The fourth quarter sealed the fate
of the Tigers..John Paul scored 26
while holding JCHS to nine points.
Demario Rivers led the charge
with 18 points, five rebounds, five
turnovers; Fabian Wilson, eight
points, four rebounds, four assists
and seven turnovers.
Tim Crumity, eight points, five
assists,one turnover, freshman Lu-
cious Wade, eight points, two re-
bounds, two assists and two steals;
and Robert Nealy, eight rebounds.
Tigers play Wakulla 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday.


Tigers Lose
IIIIII IIAIII % Im1


Soccer Games Played


KOunu um "i despite Weather
Soccer Tourne Despite eater


The Jefferson County High
School soccer team lost in the first
round of the district tournament
playoffs at the Hands of John Paul
II, 7-2.
The Tigers ended their season
with a 4-13 record. JCHS hosted
the games for teams remaining in
the tournament.
Jason Kirkpatrick scored the first
goal, assisted by Edwards Barren
and Barren scored the second goal
for the assisted by. Kirkpatrick.
Goal keeper Keith Silcio had 24
saves, and the Tigers had a total of
nine shots on goal.


FRAN HUNT
,Staff Writer

Despite Saturday's inclement
.;weather, the turnout and games for
the Recreation Youth Soccer Pro-
gram, went well.
Coach Phil Barker said it was
-wet, cool and there was a light driz-
zle, so player attendance was af-
fected. "Everyone didn't show up,"
said Barker. He added that when
the seventh and eighth graders
played, there was however a good
solid rain.
S "In the second and third grades,
we only had 8-9 players, so we
modified the rules and played half


the field rather than the full field,"
he added.
Barker said that because fewer-
children came to play, all the mem-
bers of each team present were able
to play at one time rather than wait-
ing their turns on the sidelines.
"We'd let them play for a while,
give them a break for a couple of
minutes, and then let them go back
in," he explained.
There are two more weekends re-
maining in the youth soccer season.
Barker said they are looking for-
ward to better playing weather this
weekend and more pleasant play
for the youth.
Teams one and two will play at 9


a.m., Saturday; teams three and
four at 10 a.m.; teams five and six,
at 11 a.m.; and teams seven and
eight at noon.


Tell it all -
Tell it well.
through an ad in
the classified!
You'll hear the
results
immediately!


Call Today!
997-3568
Monticello News


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.
Custom Homes:
Commercial and
Agriculture Buildings
Home: 997-2296
Mobile: 508-2383
Lic.-# CGC #1-507547


Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


.//t 5 g/o., <,


Allyn Si kes
Owner


1830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(650) 224-3473
(600) 541 -702
Free Delivery To
Tallahassee Hospitals &
Funeral Homes


. Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lie.
#SR09 71265


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
*Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing
THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. 1 Box 137
Lament, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


DANNY'S
COLLISION AND
CUSTOM LLC.
SERVING-ALL OF YOUR
PAINTAND BODY NEED S



Fre stmae


9E. 7-10SH
765 E. WA.SHIrGTON ST.


HOME MORTGAGE OF
NORTH FLORIDA, INC.
Since 1986
WE SPECIALIZE IN FINANCING FOR
Purchases/Refinances
*Loans For The. Self Employed
*Manufactured Housing
(Including Single & non-owner occupied 0oublewides)
.*Good or Distressed Credit
For Sale By Owners
*No Application Fee
Contact Jim Ayers
& Bartow Myers
(cell 228-8137)
656-4055
Work wit .- cer.en.t;.. r.ijg5gJ
Brokers serving this areasince 1'974
2708 Apalachee Pkwy *656-4055


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
T STARTER
H- -Y

A
SV
I Complete Auto
LL Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


Appliance

Service
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


I-10 Chevron
Marlboro $ 3.11 pk + tx
Newport $2.98 pk + tx
DTC $1.70 pk + tx
305 $1.59 pk + tx
; Women's Leather Purses' $6.99 $13.99
A very nice selection and good quality
T-shirts Christian, Florida and others
.$3.99 each or 3 for $10 + tx
Ice 4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all
manufacturer's coupon


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
rmTnrimming_, N;',o ing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging
997-0039
Licensed & Insured


Dennis' Trading
Post
1 Mile South Of 1-10
On U.S. 19
Used Items Antiques"
Collectibles
10a.m. 5p.m.
Ornamental Concrete
Open Thursdays, Fridays
& Saturday
1-850-997-8088
Mention this ad for 10% off


Register's
Mini-Storage


3 1'Wauikbenahi
Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Call For iQuality Wrk 45
Years In The Trade


Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior Exterior
Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY

(850) 997-1389 S
Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types









pt4
REALTOR

(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. -Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluf9* Tallahassec
575-7682


i


Ct.
Cm u e s 1


WE GO H-E LXTRA MILF FOR YOU!

997-6500

WHEN YOU NELL) I) SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
DIAGNOSIS REPAIR UI'(RNADLS;
INS FALL'TIONS CO.SULjnAfi CNS
CUS TO.M' COMPUTERS .' I U'I PRIAI
REMOVAL Or VIRL.,SFS, ACDWARE, SFPYW.-"K


25 years lending experience. Fully automated underwriting
for fast approvals and closings. We specialize in Jumbo
Loans. Residential and Small Commercial Lending.
Purchase and Refinance 850-577-1300
100% Financing Info@alphamortgage.us
Second Mortgages www.alphamortgage.us
Construction Loans
VA Loans 1471 Timberlane Rd., St.120-10
Consolidation/Cash Out Tallahassee, FL. 32312
No Credit/Bad Credit
Foreign National Financing


.Mr. Merchant,

This Space

Could Be

Yours For

Only $10

Per Week


REAL GOOD P.ANT
REAL GOOD PRICE
MANY COLORS
$5 PER GALLON
\5 Gallcn linununum

342-3288


Local Glass Company Border 2 Border


Accu ,oml e c"ointr'CaI Lawn & Landscaping
Accepted by All Insurance
Companies -
NO INSURANCE? F MentionThis
We'll find you a windshield at Ad & Receive I
a reasonable price! A i
W\e Install Quality A 10C%
624 Range St. Discount j

464-2500 11025 East Mahan
973-4527 877-4550


Thurman
Tractor
Service
Mowing
Harrowing
*rFood Plots

Licensed & Insured
James Thurman,LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


1150-997-511801
850-545-996(4
850-251-2911
155 JOHN
COLLINS li).


-I I I


.1 1
Yomur I./mal1 IvIudmine
Interior ~ Exterior


--- I -C -- '1 --


I


L


I ; II,, +,,,, --- I -- -


III


I `I I


- I --


I


I


- I 19 1


= I


--- --- --


I





- ~ "" -


1.


U


I


OWN
Nol


"W mw lw --mm mm- A, .









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005


Tigers Down HELP WANTED_
NC 55-48 Jefferson County Public Library hiring
NFC 55 8 part-time employee through experience


AMONG members of St. Phillip AME Church
Boys, Girls Club are Jazzmine Moore,
Shakota Hawkins, Raeshia Bellamy, sing to


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tigers won over NFC Friday
night, 55-48, standing at an 8-15
season.
Leading the scoring for the Ti-
gers was Demario Rivers with 32

game clinching free throw with less
tI / t han one minute in the game, and
r ; eight rebounds.
I .. Ai P, Fabian Wilson, eight points, two
S~". -- : _rebounds, two blocked shots; James
Skipworth, four points, six re-
',I bounds; Jonathan Dady, three
S,.steals, five rebounds, five assists,
and Darnell Brooks, four points.
In their first varsity game of the
music played by Anthony Williams at the pi- season, Robert Nealy, five points,
ano, "Don't Let The Dream Die," an original 11 rebounds and one blocked shot;
composition. and Tim Crumity with three assists
and a two point game clinching
S-- .free throw, with less than one min-
S ute remaining in the game.


works for 20-22 hours a week, minimum
wage, 55 or older and drawing social
security. Ph. 342-0206.
2/4, pd
$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED. Now
accepting applications. $50 cash hiring
bonus guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638. Ext. 107.
Www.USMailingGroup.com.
2/4, fcan

Fast Track Foods or Land O Sun Mngmt.
NOW HIRING Managers, Asst. Managers
and retail assistants in Monticello area.
Competitive pay. 1-352-333-3011 ext. 42.
1/21,-tfn
UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
2/4, fcan


HELP WANTED
Come Join the Montgomery Alabama
Police Department and enjoy great
benefits with starting pay at $28,000 and
20 year retirement. For more information
call 800-230-8937.
2/4, fcan
Food Delivery person wanted on
contractual basis. Must have knowledge of
area, valid drivers license own
transportation & auto insurance.
Weekdays 9 am. 1 p.m. Call 997-0219--
before 11 a.m. on weekdays.
REAL ESTATE Stop wasting time No
License OK. Unbelievable training NOW
with income to transition to full tine high
commission realty.
www.profitinRealty.com or (407)314-8904.
2/4,fcan
Drivers/OTR-Tanker looking for
Professional drivers! NEW 2005.
Equipment, Top Pay, BONUSES, Prepass
& EZ Pass, Rider Program & Much more! .
North American Tank Lines
(866)748-6285.
2/4,fcan


STUDENTS at St. Phillips AME Church Boys
and Girls Club learn the responsibility of
cleaning up after a day's events. Here Tyre


9. U- '
AT A RECENT 4-H Day camp for five to Deion S
seven year olds, Simirai Martin, left and they en


ACA Boys Report


Baseball Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA varsity baseball action be-
gins Feb. 25..
SAll game times are at 4 p.m. un-
less otherwise specified.
In February, Warrior:, pljy Ham-


Hill mops the floor and Damian Crum
waits his turn. (News Photo)


Siplin relax and do a bit of fishing
joy the cloudless day. (News Phot


Hamilton, 5 p.m., Mach 21, t
Carrabelle, 7 p.m., March 22, i
Vernon Tournament at C
hoochee, March 29; and Cl
hoochee Tournament, .time i
announced, March 31.


ilton, Feb. 25, here; Ware, Feb. 28,
there.
March action includes: Echols,
S5:30 p.m., March 1, there; Brooks,
March 10, there; Munroe, March
11, here; Apalachicola, March 15,
here; and John Paul, March 17,
here.
Also, Eaglesview, Mach 18, here;


Aucilla Christian Posts

Girls Softball Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy has
released their schedule for varsity
gtrl's softball action, to begin next
month.
Roslyn Bass will be coaching the
L.dy Warriors.
gAs a twist, this year the ACA
girl's have two games scheduled
against the Jefferson County High
School Lady Tigers.
i All games are at 4 p.m. unless
otherwise specified.
,The schedule is as follows; Feb.
1 Lafayette, here, Feb. 25, Apala-
chicola, there, and Feb. 28, Oakhill,
hare.
;March 1, Maclay, here, March 3,
Hamilton, here, March, 10, Apala-
clicola, here, March 11, Munroe,
hdre, March 15, Tayloi, there, 5
p.m., March 17, John Paul, here,
March 18, Oakhill, there, March
22, Carrabelle, there, 7 p.m., and
March 31, Maclay, there, 3 p.m.


April action includes April 4,
Taylor, there, April, 7 Hamilton,
there, 7 p.m., April 12, Carrabelle,
here, April 14, Jefferson, there,
April 15, Munroe, there, 7 p.m.,
April 19, John Paul, there, 5 p.m.,
April 21, Jefferson, here, April 22,
Lafayette, there, 7 p.m.
To wind down the season, the
Lady Warriors will compete in the
district tournament, April 26 and
28, here at 4 p.m.




Moniticello

News

Your Hometown
Newspaper


LEGAL NOTICE
S Notice of Application for Tax Deed: NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Sheila L.
I Erstling Trust the holder of the following
certificates has filed said certificates for a
tax deed issue thereon. The certificate
numbers and years of issuance, the de-
S scription of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follow: Cer-
tificate No. 108, Year of Issuance 1998. De-
scription of Property Lot Numbered
Twenty-three (23) of Block Numbered
Nine (9) of "Simon's Addition" ,to the
STown of Monticello, Florida, as shown by
Map or Plat of said Addition on file and of
S record in the office of Clerk of Circuit
Court of said County of Jefferson, and ref-
erence thereto is hereby made. Name in
which assessed S. Elien Tobie Hrs. All of
said property being in the County of Jef-
S ferson, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate or certificates shall be redeemed
lity according to law the property described in
Such certificate or certificates will be sold
to the highest bidder at the court house
door on the 21st day of FEBRUARY, 2005
At 11:00 a.m. Dated this 19th day of Janu-
ary 2005. Carl D. Boatwright, Clerk of
; Circuit Court of Jefferson County,
Florida.
1/21, 28, 2/4, 11, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 04-285-CA CLAUDETTE
FARMER; Plaintiff, VS. ABIGAIL INEZ
'COOPER; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
-MAMFE 'AMMIONSC'" Defendanrs.
NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ABIGAIL
INEZ COOPER and UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MAMIE AMMONS YOU
ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint for
Quiet Title has been filed against you and
others, and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on DANIEL E. MANAUSA, ESQUIRE,
SMITH, THOMFSON, SHAW &
MANAUSA, P.A.,. Plaintiffs attorneys,
3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor,
Tallahassee. Florida 32309-3469, no more
than thirty (30) days from the first
publication date of this notice of action,
and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plaintiff's
as attorneys or immediately thereafter;
o0) otherwise, a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition. DATE this 14th day
here: January. 2005. CARL D. BOATWRIGHT
there 1/21. 28. 2/4. 11. c


iata-
iana-
harta-
o be


WANTED
Looking to rent, buy. take oier payments
3 or 4 bedroom home Pets allowed. Small


In April action, Chanahoochee Acreage. Country Living. Call 5914152
Tournament, time to be announced.
continues April 2;Apalachicola,
April 5, here; Bell, April 7, here;
John Paul, April 8, there. l ..-t
Carrabelle, April 12, here; Echols, '
April 14, here; Munroe, 7 p.m.,
April 15, there; East Gadsden. 5
p.m., April 17, there; Lanier,
5 p.m., April 21, there; East Gads- m
den, April 22, here; Altha, 1 p.m.. .., 7322 West Tennessee St $1
Apri, 26, here; Lafayette at NF CC, ,ust ', r': LESr t Capta C,"r'"'c t4 NC
4:30 p.m, April 29. .$"
The Warriors will end the season TEST DRIVE R MAZDA TODAY.
with the district Tournament, May (850) 71
2, 3 and 5, at Munroe, times to be 5) -7138
announced.
Coaching is Ray Hughes.


GO TEAM

With your help, MDA
investigators are racing to
beat 40 neuromuscular diseases.
Join our team in the battle for life


GULF COAST <
METALS
ROOFING 3 WIi)E GALVALUME
31 WIDE PAINTED
Full line of 2' WIDE 5V
accessories in stock
WE HAV E METAL RUILDING(i
Special Flashings Made All Types Warranted Metal Available
C(t I Moulir d .lri'd l, /l l)hi\ Servce' Availhdlh
Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.























S .. ASK ABOUT U
OUR 3 TON
SAS izes CENTRAL
S o r CanopieS Y HEAT & AIR -
poo0 ..Ca...- ..... UNITS! .
SDOoR CANOPIES
.Yl E* ROOF COATING
S I_ (Aluminum & White)
ET PS DOORS & WINDOWS OF ALL SIZES
PLUMBING FIXTURES, FITTINGS & PIPE
5 y \ear
imited Open:
Vuarrat rMonday-Friday 7:00am-5:30pm
a Closed Saturday

Call

I=H1 576-5113
ASllr or Toll Free
e geU 1-800-633-2356
.,er \ 732 Blountstown Highway
SanY Tallahassee, FL
L(Located between Pensacola St.
& Highway 90W on Blountstown Hwy I
"FL~'ALacCn' i a.vLaLae v, w ith, atpprovei,
cerdit (ct A/C E AppickaQea "
CAC#050446 GEO#CN003927 L.P. #2406 ESUOU0151
I- I II


ISRP 820.515
AVE 43,520

16,995 /*741
$0 Down'
mmsrlerices i'wbdude r fee 'Tomrlr down WAC cTan rotinclude laxtag aMd I


MSHP '23,865
SAVE s5,97Q
NOW!
$1 789PERm
gw~ 78 /89 MONTH
$0 Down.'*, 2 ,
%tkh in 12 -&& d 4-%'4, rdnetbaa


LL~


(4) PT Physical Education Site Coordinators


Seeking energetic, enthusiastic, outgoing, patient, organized, detail-oriented in-
dividuals who are committed to healthy living and who are comfortable multi-
tasking in a fast paced club, serving kids ages 5 to 17.

Duties:
1) Supervise Physical Education Site Coordinators at each Club in the county.
2) Develop, oversee implementation, and evaluate individual and group programming that links
physical activities with issues related to health and wellness.
3) Responsible for gathering and analyzing monthly participation and individual student assessment
data, as well as formative and summative reporting.

Four part-time positions are available in Jefferson County. Hours will be Monday to Friday 2pm to
7pm, and as required by management. Hourly rate is $9-$11 per hour, based on experience.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Big Bend is a non-profit agency dedicated to providing youth with a
safe, friendly atmosphere that fosters educational, recreational, and personal development.

Apply on-line at www.BGCBIGBEND.org.








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4, 2005 PAGE 11 ;


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines,-Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$l1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
Driver Conventant Transport.Teams
and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators, Experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MOREPAY (1 -888 667 -3729).
2/4, fcan



FREE
Free mobile home. you move 2 Br, 10x50.
997-6259.
FREE scrap metal/iron from 58"X26" mo-
bile home. 4'X6' metal shed w/ wood
floor $75.524-0412.
1/21, 28, 2/4, pd


GARAGE SALE

WILKINSON a manufacturer of Fashion
Bedding & Accessories WAREHOUSE
SALE FACTORY OVERRUNS AND
SECONDS: Decorator Print Fabric,
Comforter sets, Bedspreads, Window
coverings, Pillows, Decorator Chairpads &
Placemats. Saturday, February 5th. Doors
open 8 am 12 noon, 1701 W. Gordon
Street Valdosta, GA. Call for directions
800-633-2215.

Everything Goes! Furniture, dishes,
clothes, games, appliances, lots of
miscellaneous, 17.5 ft. Bass Tracker. Some
free stuff. Bible Heritage, 415 East Palmer
Mill 'Road Rain or Shine Saturday,
February-5, @ 8 a.m. 2 p.m. 997-1119.
2/2,4, c

YARD SALE: 3 Family 401 Virginia St.
Friday 4th and Sat. 5th. 8 until.


AUTOMOTIVE

1987 Honda Accord LXI. Runs well $700.
997-4096 leave message
1/26, tfn
'97 Civic EX Coupe Full power, sunroof, 5
speed, 129 K miles, excellent condition.
$4000. obo 997-2358
1/26, 28, 2/2, 4, pd
Wilson Auto Sales 997-6066
'95 Pont. Grand AM $2,600
'97 Chev. Luminia $3,150
'96 Mustang Convertible $4,400
'97 Dodge Neon 59K miles $2,800
'96 -lercedes 220 $5,800 .,
1/28jtfn ,'.


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
2/4, fcan
AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW
$ Program FL Company offers best cash
now options Have money due from
Settlements, Annuities, or Lotteries? Call
(800)774-3113. www.ppicash.com
2/4,,fcan
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machines in 10
locations- $9,995 (800)836-3464#B02428.
2/4, fcan


FOR RENT

Jefferson Place Apartments 1 and 2
bedroom apartments. Central H/A, stove,
refrig, carpet, blinds, laundry room.
Handicapped apts.. US 19, 1468, S.
Vaukeenah St. 850-997-6964.
1/26,tfn,c

IHistoric home, a beauty. Spacious.
Downtown. Home office option. 997-3430,
251-0760.
1/28, 2/2, 4, c
a.


SFOR SALE


,Mattress set: New King Pillow Top
mattress and base. In original plastic,
factory warranty, $295, 850-222-2113.
11/14, tfn, c

feather Sofa suggested list $1400 100".,
'ew, sell $500. 222-7783
1/14, tfn, c

CHERRY SLEIGH BED, Still in box,
never used. Sacrifice $295. 850-222-7783
1/14, tfn, c

BEDROOM SET 6 pieces, new in boxes.
headboard, frame, dresser, mirror, chest,
nightstand. $595. 850-222-9879.
1/14 tfn,c


Gas Stove excellent condition asking
$125. obo, 997-5689.
1/28, 2/2, 4, pd

Small roll top desk. Suitable for adult or
youth. $50.00 Call 997-2149
2/4 pd

Oak bedroom set (queen), patio set,
kitchen table/chairs, 2-dressers, stereo, gas
whirlpool washer Best offer. Call Connie
997-2104.
2/4,11 pd

Upright dark mahogany piano. $100.
OBO. Call 997-1147.
2/2,4,9,11 pd


FOR SALE

ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS:
You don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all brands and
telephones.
1/21, tfn, c

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By Direct
From Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock
with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.
2/4,fcan

SAWMILLS -$2.695.00
-LumberMate-2000 & LumberLite-24.
Norwood Industries also manufactures
utility ATV attachments, log skidders,
portable board edgers and forestry
equipment. www.norwoodindustries.com
-Free information: (800)578-8360.
2/4,fcan

NEW QUEEN Pillowtop mattress set. In
factory plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
Must sell, $175 850-545-7112.
1/14, tfn, c

Mobile Home, fixable or for storage. In
Monticello asking $1,000 Call George at
997-2614, 508-2784.
1/28, 2/2, 4, pd


White Fiberglass Topper,'Full size pickup.
Lockable windows. Cost $900, sell for
$500 trade for item with equal value.
997-7251
2/2,4, pd

NEW LIVING ROOM SET: Suggested list
$1400, sell sofa $275 loveseat $225, chair
$175, Set $625 Hard frames with lifetime
warranty. 850-222-9879.
1/21,tfn


FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT TV SYSTEM
includes standard installation. 2 MONTHS
FREE HBO & Cinemax! Access to over
225 channels! Limited lime offer. S&H.
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
2/4, fcan

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person
spa-Loaded! Includes cover, delivery &
warranty. &2999, was $5999.
(888)397-3529.2/4,fcan

Bedroom" and living room" furniture.
miscellaneous household items. Come see,'
-make an offer, 997-3808.
1/28, 2/2, 4, pd

Dining room table, leaf, and six chairs,
$600 sofa server table, $300 222-2113.
1/14 tfn, c


SERVICES


Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

Harrowing and Mowing. Call 997-4650
and ask for George Willis
TFN,c
Will sit with your elderly loved one. Light
Housekeeping. Hours negotiable, at a
reasonable rate. Contact Gina at 342-1486
or 510-0998.
2/2, 4, 9, 11, pd
-Do you want to be just a Christian, with
no denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)

GET YOUR FLORIDA REAL ESTATE
LICENSE ONLINE! Bert Rogers Schools
of Real Estate. Over 610,000 graduates
since 1958. Call for a free brochure!
1-800-432-0320. www.bertrodgers.com.
2/4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25,c



CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


SERVICES

Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Discounts For Seniors House painting.
Int. + Ext., Low Rates, Free Estimates
most pressure washing $45 $50, 551-2000
1/7, 14, 21, 28, 2/4, 11, 18, 25, %, 11, 18, 25,
pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
DIVORCE$175-$275*COVERS children,
etc. Only one signature required!
Excludes govt. Fees! Call weekdays
(800)462-200, ext. 600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977.
2/4 fcan

GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

JOIN OUR TEAM
TODAY!

Seeking Technician &
Assistant Manager
candidates

We offer competitive
compensation, paid training, a
great benefits package, flexible
schedule, and more!
Please apply at any of our
locations in Tallahassee,
Crawfordville or Quincy. You
may also fax your resume to
850-222-5152

Valid Drivers License required.
Applicants must pass a drug test.


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2i~ $615, 37/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571


GREAT DEAL! 7 Week old German
Shepherds priced @ $150 each call
342-1493.
2/2, 4,9, 11, pd


REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Escape The heat in The cool western NC
Mountains. Homes, Cabins, Acreage, &
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty Murphy N.C. Call for Free
Brochure. (800)841-5868.,
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
2/4, fcan

Mountain Golf Homesites! Prestigious
community weaving throughout Dye
designed 18 hole championship course in
breathtaking Blue Ridge Mtns of South
Carolina. Call for pkg. (866)334-3253,
x759
2/4,fcan


SPECIALTY PROPERTY,
* ATTENTION DOG PROFESSIONALS & VETERINARIANS 9+ acres Multi-purpose property with home,
living quarters, training ponds, pool, indoor/outdoor runs, heated and cooled. Just 1-1/4 miles from 1-10. close
to Tallahassee, FL and Thomasville, GA. Too many extras to list. $450,500
HUNTING/FARM
S$259,700 -80 acres, ur tbeile aole hunting' Grea- .. your shotguns, rifles, fishing poles, horses,
dogs & family. Secluded, private s SO,. uuunry hunting & living at it's finest!
* $325,000 95- acres, horse, cow & dog heaven, high & rolling, established pasture, large live oaks & other
hardwoods. Unbelievable homesites with spectacular views.
- $305,000 86 acres, CRP pines, awesome hunting, 2 septics, well, electric, bunkhouse,
cypress pond, pond, surrounded by 3 Rivers Hunt Club and SRWMD. Close to boat landing.
* $100,000 40 acres, awesome hunting, secluded, surrounded by large property owners.
* $200,000 25+ acres, extremely unique!!! Very private, secluded, surrounded by large property
owners. High dry, rolling, breath taking stream, old hardwoods. canopy rd. system, bounus well
& electric. Just minutes from Tallahassee. FL. Exceptional homesites!!!
* $24,900 2121 acres, p sold vildlife. Madison County,
S$198,000 31 acres great for horses, farming, hunting, established pasture, hardwoods and fenced. Gorgeous
homesites, paved rd. frontage. Convenient to Tallahassee or Monticello.

COUNTRY LIVING
S116,700 Charming, cozy, 3/2 home, fenced yard for your pets. Convenient to Tallahassee, located in the
Monticello area.
2 ACRES FOR $35,000 High & dry, gorgeous oaks & other hardwoods. Charming homesite nestled in the
middle of plantation land, convenient to Tallahassee.
S$94,900 Quaint, 2BR/2BA, fireplace, big yard with fenced in area for pets, on 2.5 acres. Relaxing atmo-
sphere.
$49,900 7.44 acres with cabin & pond, small boat house.

WATERFRONT
$595,000 PER LOT 6 river lots, buy one or all! Gorgeous scenery, majestic homesites, docks permissible,
bring your boat. Located at Ormond By the Sea, Ormond Beach, FL.


KELLY & KELLY *****
PROPERTIES A
215 N. JefrIas
MantticUn, FL 5
S (850) 97-5516
N www.cbkkcom rn ri


S* NEWLISTING-Hunters Ridge: Country Club Golf Course
SViews! 3/2 House on 3+ AC, extras include Playhouse, Large Deck,
Private Backyard & Stainless Steel Appliances ............$234,000
SGreat Tallahassee Location: 3BR / 2BA Two Story Home,
SBuck Lake & Benjamin Chairs Road .........................$234,900 -
:*Homespun Charm Can Be Yours! Oaks, Pecans, Pears,
Grape Vines, 2,100 Sq Foot, 2BR / 2BA House on 2.75 Acres,
SPond & Greenhouse ............................................$165,000
llllllllIlll MlMllIl lllllllIII llMlllM
=ir ".i -atJlJl s '='i-i. Ji_ iBi 'Jkdl JI-Ja""iI =Ji d i ir I


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Livinq 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Sold Lakefront 16.54 acres on Lake Hall
in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly fenced pas-
ture nice location near Lamont $40,000
Contract Pending Wonderful Home nice
4 bedroom 2 bath double wide with fire-
place on 1.9 acres on S. Main St. $69,500
The Partridge House circa 1830, cur-
rently 5 could be 7 unit apartment build-
ing great potential as a bed and breakfast
with suites only $240,000
Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah Highway
fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per acre
Check the Pricell 80 acres w/ approx. 10
ac in planted pines, the balance in real
rough hunting land, a great buy $79,500
Waterfront 4.6 wooded acres in Lloyd
Acres only $25,000
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Sold Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath
home with screened porch at the end of the
road $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Sauare store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000










Buyers looking for Homes and Land



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See It Al!
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!

Al Maryland 508-1936
RealtrA Azeda

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


-wff-qgr-.slw= i.


"5ll 1--l


: :


~-IC~I~Flhlr









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 4,2005

Host Families Sought

Here For Bike Weekend


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


City Clerk Emily Anderson
stressed that many host families are
still needed to make the annual Bike
Tour a big success here.
The weekend of March 18 is
quickly approaching, when Monti-
cello will be hosting more than 1,000
cyclists participating in the annual
bike tour.
In preparation for the event, An-
derson is compiling a list of persons
in the area who would be interested
in providing housing for the cyclists
for one or two nights during the
weekend
The only requirements for host
families are the offering of beds and
bathroom facilities, with food op-
tional.
Housing must be in a relatively


close proximity to downtown Mon-
ticello.
"While it is not anticipated that a
fee could be charged for the use of
private homes, acting as a host fam-
ily is a great way to meet interesting
people from around the country and
the world," said Anderson, who is
compiling the list of local host fami-
lies.
Monticello was a stop on the tour
in 2002, and this'year, Monticello
was chosen as the staging area for
the event. Ride participants will be
arriving on Friday and Saturday,
March 18 and 19 and depart on the
tour the morning of March 20.
After the week-long, 300 mile
tour, the cyclists will return on Fri-
day, March 25.
To register as a host family, or for
more information about the event,
call Anderson at 342-0153 or by e-
mail at comcityclerk@earthlink.net.


~zfr


COX SOUL FOOD recently held a clothing
giveaway. Clothing was donated to be
shared with the less fortunate. At left is Le-


tha Holmes, Gloria Cox-Jones, and Mary
Ann Johnson. (News Photo)


Red Hats Set

Valentine

Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Hostesses for the Valentine's Day
meeting of the Red Hat ladies, Sat-
urday, Feb. 12, are Mary Noell and
Thelma Birdwell.
This group will meet at the Cham-
ber of Commerce-The Chamber will
be decked out in the spirit of the
Valentine's holiday, assures Director
Mary Frances Drawdy.
"A luncheon of surprise salads is
planned, with an extra special sur-
prise dessert," Drawdy said.
Ladies are asked to dress appropri-
ately for the occasion. Everyone is
expected to attend and to have a
good time.


Wear Red For Heart Awareness Day


DURING playtime, members of St. Phillips AME Church
Boys, Girls Club enjoy Bingo. Seated, left, trinity McCoy
and Aashanti Alexander. Standing, Calvette Williams.
(News Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Heidi Copeland, Family and Con-
sumer sciences Extension Agent,
reminds area women that Feb. 4 is
National Wear Red Day.
Red is worn to raise awareness
that heart disease is the number one
killer of women, of special signifi-
cance because Jefferson County is
number one in stroke and number
three in heart attack related deaths
in 67 counties.
One in three women dies of heart
disease. But heart disease can also
lead to disability and a significantly
decreased quality of life.
Statistics show that less than half
of the female population knows
that heart disease is the leading
cause of death for women.
Women don't take their risk of
heart disease seriously, or person-
ally. They often fail to make the'
connection between risk factors,
such as high blood pressure and


high cholesterol, and their own heart disease starts to rise.


chance of developing heart disease.
This campaign is especially
geared toward women, ages 40-60,
at which time a women's risk of-


The message is also important for
younger women, since heart dis-
ease develops gradually and can
begin at a young age, even in the


teenage years.
Even those who have heart dis-
ease can improve their heart health
and quality of life. Talk to your
doctor, find out your risk and take
action to lower it, Copeland urges.


Church Site Ready For Foundation


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Lamont Baptist
Church have trucked, some 150
loads of fill to the building site, and
plan to begin pouring the founda-
tion for the church, as soon as the
permit for same is issued.
Spokesman Rodney Boland said
all other site preparations have
been completed and the permit is
expected momentarily.
Spokesman Gerald Bailey said the
building committee has decided to
construct a 7,000 square foot struc-
ture made of decorative block that


is pre-finished and requires no
painting or upkeep.
He added that the church will seat
approximately 135 people and an
attractive fellowship hall has been
drawn into the plans.
Members have finalizing the fin-
ishing touches such as types of ap-
pliances, windows and floor
coverings to be used.
"We expect to see a lot of pro-
gress very quickly," Bailey said.
"We're thinking about holding
Wednesday night community din-
ners at the church once it's built."
He added that people have al-
ready begun, volunteering for the
church's finish work when the con-


struction is complete, people from
community churches, organizations
and residents. "It's not unusual to
see 40 men down there at one
time," said Bailey.
He concluded that members are
maintaining their patience and are
hanging together well and strong,
"They can see the finished product
just down the road."
The 70 year-old historic structure
destroyed totally by flames April
27 last year.

In Case Of Emergency

Dial 911


U[ck Cei' ii'


r' -... ONE SOUTH GEORGIA LOCATION
'1 .. "1 -888-327-92869 ___

50?5 E. Shotw~ell Stiret Bainbridge. GA -" ^ -00......

,fcJLLI W. aoro -ONSS E


a I Irer 011,911, .. r?


2,0, hwrlt iv