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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00004
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: January 14, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00004
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text








MLK Annual

Parade Set

Monday
See Story, Page 2


Lt^RARY OF- -rTk ^-n^--.-----.-
404 LIBRARY EST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CNFSV[IqlFm FtL 32611


Cynthia Davis
Nominated

JES Teacher Of Year

See Story, Page 3


Army Guard

Notes

Years Of Service

See Editorial, Page 4


Chamber Meeting

Covers Events

Happening Here

See Story, Page 5


SFriday Morning )





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Published Wednesdays & Fridays


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 2005


S1TNEC0A 54, MON AEYH T73

107mv

Co. Off icials Comm ict



S;!' Last Of $3.6 Million



1 Road Paving Money


THE AMNESTY PROGRAM is the brainchild of Councilman
Brian Hayes, right, here talking with Local Planning
Agency member Steven Rissman. (News Photo)


Amnesty Program


Expands City Limits


LAZARO ALEMAN,...
Senior Staff Writer

The city's annexation amnesty-
program continues to attract appli-
cants.
At the same time that the City
Council approved the annexation of
12.84 acres on the north side of
town last week, it heard about an--
other applicant to the program.
The latter application is for a 3.87-
acre property on the east side of
town between Pearl and Washing-
ton streets.
If approved next month as ex-
pected, the latest annexation -- in
combination with the earlier one --
will expand the city's boundaries by
almost 17 acres.
And the program still has another
three months to run, until April 15.
The brainchild of Councilman
Brian Hayes, the amnesty program
offers charge-free annexations to
property owners whose lands are ad-


Program
Is Good
Through I
April 15

jacent to the existing city
boundaries.
The city, in other words, will
waive the fees for filing, legal ad-
vertisements and recordings during
the six-month amnesty period,
which began Oct. 15.
To qualify for the program, appli-
cants must provide proof of property
ownership or proof of authority to
sign the annexation petition.
Applicants must also provide "a
metes and bounds description of the
property." It's also possible that a
survey will be required, if the
boundaries can't be readily deter-
mined.
(See Amensty, Page 3)


Money Was Borrowed

More Than 10 Years Ago


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The county may soon be bringing
to a conclusion the $3.6 million road
paving project it initiated more than
a decade ago.
Last week, commissioners author-
ized consultant engineer Frank Da-
rabi to proceed with the awarding of
a $792,830 contract to Peavy & Son
Construction Co., Inc., for the pav-
ing of six roads.
The roads to be paved are West
Lake, Watermill, Plantation Woods,
Clark, Casa Bianca and Briar.
Three other roads in the original
bid list had to be dropped because of
cost considerations-. That's because-
Peavy's bid for the complete project
was $1,443,545, and the county
only has $1 million to spend.
The three roads dropped were
Monticello Avenue, Goldberg Street
and Otienger Road.
Commission Chairman Felix Joy-
ner in particular pressed Darabi
about the possibility of including the
three dropped roads. Wasn't it possi-
ble to amend the specifications so
that the available funding would
cover all the roads? Joyner wanted
to know.
Darabi said he would try to fash-
ion his response as delicately as pos-
sible, although he was known for
stating his opinions rather bluntly
sometimes.
As an engineer, he prided himself
on doing quality work that lasted,
Darabi said.
"I believe that you ought to do the
job right and do it with the amount
that you can afford," he said.


But yes, if the commissioner
wanted simply to sprinkle asphalt on
the dirt roads, he would proceed to
modify the specifications, provided
the commissioner signed off on the
instructions.
"I told a commissioner one time
that black paint is very cheap," Da-
rabi said, implying that if all that
was wanted was to spread the pav-
ing dollars, paint would do very
well.
"You had a process of doing these
things by yourself before and it did-
n't work," Darabi said.
Joyner relented in his request, stat-
ing that the engineer had made his
point very convincingly.
In the end, commissioners author-
ized Darabi to proceed with the pav-
ing projects and extend the dollars
as' far they would go, but always
keeping the quality foremost. Better
to pave a short section of road and
pave it right, than to pave the entire
road and do it haphazardly, the com-
missioners instructed.
The money for the latest paving
projects comes from the interest that
accrued on the $3.5 million that
county officials borrowed in 1992 to


pave dirt roads.
The interest reportedly accrued
between 1992 and 1996, while the
money sat in an escrow account. In
1996, commissioners divided the
$3.5 million equally among the five
districts and each commissioner be-
gan paving the roads in accordance
with a priority list established
earlier.
In late 2003, the Department of
Transportation (DOT), which had
been maintaining the escrow ac-
count since 1992, informed county
officials that they needed to use the
remaining money or risk losing it.
Specifically, the state was looking at


the money with an eye to taking it
over, the DOT memo stated.
It was then that commissioners
began fashioning a new priority list.
They also decided that the accumu-
lated interest would again be di-
vided equally among the five dis-
tricts.
The reason that some districts,
such as District 2, have more money
than others is that the former did not
spend all their paving money from
the original division.
On a related issue, commissioners
instructed Darabi to apply the same
principle of quality over quantity to
(See Paving, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A plan endorsed by the Chamber
of Commerce on Tuesday seeks to
reconfigure certain downtown
streets in a bid to make the area
more pedestrian and parking
friendly.
The plan, which Chamber Presi-
dent David Frisby says was the re-
sult of many people's input and is
still in conceptual form, would cre-
ate a pedestrian mall on Dogwood
Street and a greater business circle
outside the existing courthouse cir-
cle.
' Comprising the outer business cir-
cle would be Palmer Mill, Cherry,
Pearl and Mulberry -- streets that
would be designated one-ways, with
the traffic flow directed in a coun-
terclockwise direction.
Within a one-to-two block radius
of the courthouse, in other words,
vehicles would only be able to travel
east on Palmer Mill Road, north on
Cherry Street, west on Pearl Street,


and south on Mulberry Street.
Cars, meanwhile, would be barred
from entering Dogwood Street be-
tween North Jefferson and Cherry
streets. The idea is convert this
block into a pedestrian mall, com-
plete with kiosks and other outside
vendors.
But more important, according to
Frisby, is the idea to increase the
availability of the parking spaces in
the downtown area.
"A lot of people complain about
the in-town parking," Frisby says.
"Parking is an issue. This proposal
would almost double the parking."
It would double the parking
spaces, according to Frisby, by al-
lowing the creation of both angle
and parallel parking on all the one-
way designated streets. The angle
parking would go on one side of the
street and the parallel parking on the
other, he says.
For example he cites Cherry
Street near the library, which has
angle parking on the east side and
parallel parking on the west side.
"We recognize that there are a few
problems with the plan," Frisby con-


cedes. "But we're looking for input."
Among the things to be decided is
whether the angle parking should be
30, 45.or 60 degrees. The angle of
the parking makes a difference in
terms of the number of spaces that
can be created, he points out.
Ffisby grants that the proposed
changes will create some inconven-
iences. But he holds that these are
worthwhile, given the benefits.
"This will present a minor incon-
venience for the police department,"
Frisby says. "Officers won't be able
to drive north on Mulberry when
they leave the station. But we're
willing to give up the convenience
for the greater good of the commu-
nity."
He makes clear that the proposal
has nothing to do with the county,
the state or the bypass. This is
strictly a city issue, he says. If the
City Council approves the plan, it
can be put into action almost imme-
diately.
The proposal comes before the
Local Planning Agency at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 25, at City Hall.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Remember the nationwide flu vac-
cine shortage of a few months ago.
It's history now, at least in Jeffer-
son County.
Health Department Director Kim
Barnhill reports that her clinic now
has an ample supply of the vaccine.
Barnhill encourages anyone who
has not received .a shot to call the
clinic. Particularly vulnerable are
children six years of age and


1'.


THE PARKING PROBLEMS in the downtown
and surrounding areas are at the heart of
the proposal the Chamber of Commerce en-


THE CHAMBER PLAN proposes converting
the Dogwood Street block between N. Jef-
ferson and Cherry Streets into a pedestrian


younger, adults 65 years and older,
and those with existing medical con-
ditions and pregnant women.
Influenza reportedly kills an esti-
mated 36,000 people in the United
States annually.
The nationwide vaccine shortage
resulted from the shutting down in
England of a major manufacturer of
the drug because of alleged im-
proper procedures in the production
of the medicine.
The Health Department number is
342-0168.


~



*i .* 4i~


dorsed Tuesday. The idea is to double the
parking in the area. (News Photo)


mall, complete with kiosks, and other out-
side vendors. (News Photo)


Health Department Now Has
Ample Supply Of Flu Vaccines


Chamber Plan Proposes


Mall, Increased Parking


'I =I ~I


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (EL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005






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MEMBERS of the County Boys and Girls
Club played the African Drums at a recent
Big Bend Boys, Girls Club function. Stubbs


Humane Society Reschedules


Bless The Beast Fundraiser


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society nominated.
a new Board Member at its January
meeting, and County Commis-
sioner Jerry Sutphin was unani-
mously approved.
Members also discussed the Bless
the Beast Feast, recently resched-
uled to be held on the third Satur-
day of Feb.
President Caroline Carswell told
members that there wasn't enough
time to plan the event and have it
go over successfully. Members
agreed and also agreed that there
would be no feast this year, but the


annual event will begin next Feb.
"Every step we take has to be a
firm and good one," said Carswell.
Carswell assured that the funds
generated from the feast would not
be affected, because she was pres-
ently making plans for a picnic and
raffle in the spring, as a fundraiser.
Foster Chairperson Martha Jean
Martin advised that 12 animals
were presently in foster care. These
include two puppies, three dogs,
two kittens and five cats. Martin
stressed the urgency for additional
foster homes and vowed that more
good hones would be found.
Carswell announced that the new
pledge cards and membership
forms were ready for distribution.
She urged every member to sign up


at least one new member to the so-
ciety, in a goal to increase member-
ship by 100 percent.
Spokesperson Tina Ames advised
that 17 animals were adopted in
Dec., including six puppies, five
kittens, four adult dogs, and two
adult cats. Five of those adoptions
were out of the shelter and the
other 12 adoptions were from the
adoption booths.
She requested to have the board
budget $100 to advertise adoption
booths. "I have found that when
we advertise, there are an average
of five to six more adoptions per
booth held. The board agreed to
try advertising for a two month pe-
riod to see how well it worked and
if there were positive results, they
would budget further funds.
She also advised that presently, in
house, the Humane Society shelter
has 38 cats (filling them to the fe-
line capacity), one mother dog with
five puppies, and 28 dogs. From
Jan. 1-10, animals coming in to the
shelter included the mother dog
with five puppies and 15 teline4.
Ames said the;: nro. had the op-
portunity to host four adoption
booths per month rather than r o,
but volunteers were needed to
bathe the dogs before hand, trans-
port the animals and man the
booths.
"Getting these animals adopted
through additional booths is the
only way to avoid euthanasia," said
Ames. She warned of the animal
birth boom that comes in the spring
and that euthanasia would go up if
homes weren't found for these ani-
mals.
"We also need to. start having
booths in .Monticello again." She
added that she will start the booth
training classes next week, time,
date and location to be announced.
Anyone wishing to assist with the
adoption booths can call Ames at
997-4160.
She added that fence repairs, fill
dirt and gravel are still needed and
that the washer and dryer problem
had been solved.
Karen Moore donated a washer
and dryer and Cay Curtis donated a
washer.
Members were advised of up-
coming meetings. All meetings are
at 7 p.m. at the shelter. There is a
General Membership meeting
Monday, a Board meeting Feb. 7
and another General Membership
meeting Feb. 21.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Big Bend Transit has provided the
city with the indemnity agreement
the latter requested before it would
consider entering a partnership that
could lead to the establishment of a
shuttle service here.
City Clerk Emily Anderson in-
formed the City Council last week
that Ted Waters, a manager with
Big Bend Transit, had provided the
requested documentation.
It's now up to City Attorney
Bruce Leinback and the transporta-
tion committee to review the docu-
mentation and make a
recommendation to the council.

"I think that this is a wonderful
idea," Councilman Brian Hayes said
of the proposed service. "But we
need to make sure that the indem-
nity is there."
Per Big Bend Transit's presenta-
tion, the Department of Transporta-
tion (DOT) has agreed to fund 50
percent of the project for a three-.
year period. The DOT, however, re-
quires that a public entity sponsor
the program.

That's where the city comes in. Its
role, in the words of Waters, would
be to serve as a conduit for the DOT
funding. The city, in fact, could
withhold a certain amount of the
DOT funding as a service charge if
it wanted, according to Waters.
"The way the process works, we
submit a bill to the DOT and we
send the city a copy of the invoice,"
Waters explained. "The DOT then
pays the city and the city can retain
a percentage of the funds or pass on
the entire amount."
He added that Big Bend Transit
had similar arrangements with
Madison and Taylor counties and
the partnerships worked well.






FH


City Council members here were
amenable to the .idea, but thie,
wanted assurance that the city
wouldn't inadvertently open itself to
liability.
"Sometimes, when you're a con-
duit, you're a big target," Hayes
said.
If implemented, the:shuttle would
serve seven to 11 routes in the city
and operate six days a week, 10
hours a day.
A similar shuttle supposedly oper-
ated here in 2001.



Paving
(Continued From Page 1)
Over the Lake Road, a separate pro-
ject.
Darabi explained that the road was
in extremely poor condition. What's
more, the $1.5 million the DOT was
providing was intended for resurfac-
ing, not for repairs.
Two things were possible, Darabi
said. He could proceed with the re-
surfacing and do nothing to the
base, with the understanding that the
road would quickly deteriorate.
Or he could approach the DOT,
explain the problem, and hope that
the state agency allowed the county
to repair and resurface as much of
the road as possible with the $1.5
million.
Commissioners .chose the latter
option.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The District School Board of Jefferson
County Announces A Workshop To Which
The Public Is Invited.


Date: January 20, 2005

Time: 6:00 p.m.

Place: Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building


Subjects: OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE JCHS;
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANS; ADULT
REPORT; AND OTHER SCHOOL MATTERS


MLK Annual Memorial


Celebration, Parade Set


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


toured with singer Patti LaBelle
and the Boys and Girls Club
chorus.
There will be many vendor
booths, food booths and activities
and games for the children. Ven-
dors will sell barbecue chicken and
ribs, homemade comforters, pil-
lows, among other items.
Games will include the football
throw, the bubble bounce and
more.
Hall added that WHGH hot 840
radio will be broadcasting at both
the parade and the festival in the
park.
To register for the parade call
Austin at 997-1180 or 997-8817, to
register to set up a booth at the park
for only $25 call Barbara Lamar at
599-3266 or 997-5364 and to regis-
ter for the platform events, call Hall
at 668-1377.


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574-4000 for details. Other restrictions may apply. Not available in all areas


Music Center is a partner in the venture. L-
R: Jonathan Thaddeus, Gerrold Austin, II,
Issac Gilley, Harold Ingram. (News Photo)


The NAACP 25th Annual Dr..
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Ceremony, Parade and Festival will
be hosted Sunday and Monday.
Events begin 3:30 p.m., Sunday
with the MLK Memorial service
highlighting what the community
must to "Keep the Dream Alive," at
Memorial MB Church.
Guest Speaker is Elmore Bryant,
area director for the Florida confer-
ence of NAACP branches.
The MLK Parade will be held 10
a.m., Monday. Festival Chair Diane
Hall says coordinators expect the
same parade participants as last
year parade and more.
Last year, there were 50 entries
in the parade, thus far, there are 49
this year. The parade is chaired by
Gerrold Austin, who will also serve
as the Grand Marshal, and Co-
chaired by Sandra Saunders.
Scheduled to be in the parade and
also at the platform events at the
Recreation Park, which will follow
the parade, are the Junkanoos.
Also scheduled to perform at the
platform events are the "Rhythm
Rushers" with ceremonial dance
and music, the African Drum
Corps, Anthony Williams, who



Lake Road

Cleanup Set
County 4-H Council will pick up
trash off of Lake Road on Saturday,
Jan. 15.
This road has been adopted by the
County Council and the members
are responsible for keeping it trash
free.
Members are asked to meet at the
Extension Office by 8:45 a.m. They
will leave for Lake Road at 9 a.m.
All 4-H members are invited to at-
tend and participate in this cleanup.


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Group Addresses Issue Of

Shuttle Service Liability


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005 PAGE 3


CYNTHIA DAVIS is the Jefferson Elementary
School Teacher of the Year Nominee. She


has been a kindergarten teacher at the
school for 14 years. (News Photo)


Cynthia Davis Named JES


Teacher Of Year Nominee


ership among teachers and staff that
RAY CICHON is par excellence," Joyner said
Managing Editor Joyner also said that Davis pos-
sesses many of the competencies ad-
Cynthia Davis has been named--ministrators look for in a teacher.


Teacher of the Year Nominee, at
Jefferson Elementary School.
She has taught kindergarten 14
years, nine of them in the school
District.
Former Principal Jim Norton said
of Davis: Her students were at the
top in academics, and she always
demanded respect from her students
and would not accept anything less.
Norton said Davis maintains good
rapport with parents and has an ex-
cellent relationship with her peers.
Principal Kathy Joyner said that
Davis is a consummate leader, edu-
cator and advocate for education.
"She has created a legacy of lead-


She continues to keep herself aware
of the innovative and effective
methods and materials that are con-
stantly changing.
Sandra Saunders said of Davis:
She believes in her students, and
presents academics and social skills
in a manner that a child in kinder-
garten can comprehend, and succeed
in her daily curriculum.
Davis is also an integral part in the
PTO, and shares her views as a
teacher and parent.
Davis says: "I demonstrate con-
tinuous improvement in my profes-
sion by attending educational
conferences and returning to my


4-H Public Speaking

Classroom Winners
Place; ,and Alyssa Lewis, Third
DEBBIE SNAPP Place.
Staff Writer Brenda Brown's grade four class-,
room winners are: Janeise Banks,
Classroom winners of the Tropi-- First Place; LeKedra Siplin, Second


canna 4-H Public Speaking Contest
for county school include:
In the Elementary Division, at
ACA, grade four, winners are: Had-
ley Revell, First Place; Pamela Watt,
Second Place; and Sawyer Wider,
Third Place.
Grade five winners are: Trent
Roberts, First Place; Shelby Witmer,
Second Place; and Tyler Jackson,
Third Place.
Grade six winners are: Kaitlin
Jackson, First Place; Caroline Muel-
ler, Second Place; and G.H. Liford,
Third Place.
At JES, Michelle Brogan's grade
four classroom winners are: Samiria
Martin, First Place; Dakota
McGlamory, Second Place; and Le-
norris Footman, Third Place.
Lee Anderson's grade four class-
room winners are: Noah Hamilton,
First Place; Kamarie Young, Second


Place; and Cydney Hastings, Third
Place.
Cathy Watt's grade five classroom
winners are: Kyyah Massey, First
Place; Shataviah Anderson, Second
Place; and La'Toya Jones, Third
Place.
Annie Gervin's grade five class-
room winner is: Ya'Tyra Howard,
First Place.
Judy Jones' grade five classroom
winners are: Branden Hill, First
Place; Naquita Charles, Second
Place; and Alexus Chambers, Third
Place.
Wanda Faye Wilson's grade six
classroom winners at HMS are: Jas-
mine Graham, First Place; Brandon
Whitfield, Second Place; and Ja-
corey Dixon, Third Place.
Each student participating in this
event received a-certificate for their
accomplishments.


classroom to implement the strate-_
gies I learned.
She has been a peer teacher for
student interns and saw teachers be-
come as eager to learn as the stu-
dents they taught.
She is always willing to collabo-
rate with peers to acquire techniques
and strategies for self-improvement.
Davis participates in professional
study sessions at JES, as a Strategic
Reading Team Member.
She states: "It is my belief as an
educator, that all students are special
in their own way and must be
taught.
"It is my main objective as a class-
room teacher to implement whatever
strategies and/or techniques neces-
sary into my curriculum to ensure
that every child has an equal oppor-
tunity to learn.
"I strive to prepare my students for
a global society so that they are able
to relate their education to higher
Experiences in life.






l nlinnm


Main St. To

Meet Monday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello Main Street, Inc. will
meet 6 p.m., Monday, at the Cham-
ber of Commerce.
The public is welcome to attend
this very informative meeting. More
involvement is always needed and
very much appreciated.
The group in attendance will dis-
cuss the most recent Candlelight
Christmas Tour. They will gather
the pros and cons of the event, to
decide whether it will be worthwhile
to offer next year.
An update and information about
the new Florida Main Street Coordi-
nator Joan Jefferson and her Assis-
tant Coordinator will be provided.
Coming events will be discussed,.
new and old ideas examined, and
decisions made.
Contact the Chamber for more in-
formation at 997-5552.


Amnesty
(Continued From Page 1)
In certain instances, a property
that is not presently contiguous with
the city may become so by virtue ofl
a neighboring property's annexation.
In these cases, the amnesty period
will extend beyond the April 15
deadline, should the property owner
desire to apply to the program.
Among the benefits that annexed
property owners will enjoy, accord-
ing to city officials, are improved
police protection, sewer and water
service and garbage pickup. The
downside is that properties become
subject to city ad-valorem taxes,
which may be higher.

Monticello News

Subscribe Today!

In State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00


- HONI OW N EDITION -

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

JAN. 26 30 1iETE
Wed. JAN. 26 7:00 PM
OPENING NIGHT
TICKETS $10! JAN. 26 JAN. 27 JAN. 28 JAN. 29 JAN. 3
Excluaes VIP R-oo and VIP 1100 AM
Soubl d 3:00PM 2:00PM
Cni sTARn m 7:00 PM 7.00 PM 700 PM 7:00 PM

Come one hour early to meet the performers and animals at
the All-Access Preshow FREE to all ticketholders.
For the fastest and easiest way to order tickets, go to
www.Ringling.com
ticketmaster Ticket Centers, Civic Center Box Office or call
(904) 353-3309
For Information or Groups call (850) 222-0400 or 1-800-322-3602 Toll Free
TICKET PRICES: $13 $16 $19
Limited number of VIP Floor and VIP seats available. Call for details.
(Service charges and handling fees may apply; no service charge at Civic Center Box Office.)
] I II,


SFarmers

S& Merchants

Bank Member FDIC



Will Be Closed Monday

January 17, 2005

In Observance of the

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Holiday




Regular Banking Hours

Will Resume Tuesday

January 18th


MmtaE-








PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

jE MEMBE RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor.

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Army Guard Notes


Years Of Service
SFor most Americans celebrating a serve).
40th birthday is a monumental, but The Army National Guard is com-
dreaded, occasion. posed primarily of citizen-soldiers
SFor the Army National Guard, who typically train part-time, but
commemorating its 368th birthday stand ready to serve whenever and
in 2004 was cause for celebration, wherever needed.
SDuring the month of December, The Army National Guard has
the Army National Guard celebrated more than 3,200 units located in
368 years of dedicated service. more than 2,700 communities across
To mark this occasion, units 54 states and territories.
To mark tophtefe54rstateons of the Army
cross the country participated in The federal mission of the Army
statewide swearing-in ceremonies, National Guard is to maintain prop-
welcoming new recruits to the early trained and equipped units,
Guard and highlighting the 350,000 available for prompt mobilization
men and women who serve our for war and national emergency.
country with pride and distinction. On the state level, the Guard is
"Our citizen-soldiers are at the charged to support the governor
root of peacekeeping and humanitar- with homeland security responsibili-
ian missions in this country and ties or disaster relief efforts such as
around the world," said Lieutenant responding to fight wildfires or
General Roger C. Schultz, Director helping communities deal with
of the Army National Guard. _.floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, snow-'
storms or other emergency situa-
"Since 1636, the Army National tions.
Guard has fought in every major :.- "Qid Q rganizat'io dates, baoi be-
American war and continues to meet fore the birth of our great nation in
the challenges ahead of us ,wjit, every, conflict, ,the..Guard: hasoa=p-
courage and determination." swered the call," LTG Schultz said.
The Army National Guard is one "We have the finest citizen-soldiers
of three components of the U.S. in the world and their sacrifice and
Army (the Active Army, the Arm dedication are an inspiration to all
National Guard and the Army Re- Americans."


Keep Your Resolutions

All Year With Plan


BY RON CICHON
Publisher

It appears the skirmish over locat-
ing the library in the old JCHS Me-
dia Center has been resolved, and I
think, in the best interests of the citi-
zens of the county.
In keeping with his campaign
pledge of gi\ ing ,some of his County
CoPnmission sag :to local groups,
.Je-rr Surphin presented the Cham-
ber with a $500 check Tuesday.
E iglhteen rimlj;InAmericans are
diagnosed with depression each
year... If you're watching your
weight, don't think about skipping
breakfast. When you don't eat in the
morning, chances are you'll overeat
at other meals, warn health experts.
It is so obvious, but it really
works. Hand washing is the
simplest, most effective way to pre-
vent the spread of infections.


From Our Photo File


JCHS Senior Girls on the Special Olympic
Team in Jan, 1988 include: top, L-R: Tinya
Parker, Theresa Smith, Felecia Massey,


Keechia Parrish, Bobbie Brimm, Lasinja An-
derson, Cassandra Moore. (News File
Photo)


The health risks from inhaling sec-
ondhand tobacco smoke have
spurred cities and states across the
nation to pass smoke-free workplace
legislation at an unprecedented pace..
Now, more than one third of restau-
rants across the country are smoke-
free by law.
Quotable quote: "Always remem-
ber others may hate you but those
who hate you don't win unless you
hate them. And then you destroy
yourself." President Richard Nixon
-' There are about 10 billio.f in un-
used gift cards in circulation be-
cause people who receive them
don't redeem them.
SPotentially costly e-scams such as
phishing are on the rise. Phishing in-
volves a fraudster pretending to be a
legitimate company in order to trick
a consumer into revealing personal
and financial information. Be care-
ful!
Somebody said hard work spot-


lights the character of people; some
turn up their sleeves, some turn up
their noses, and some don't turn up
at all.
The Iraq situation grows bleaker
by the day. Two weeks ago my wife
and I had lunch with two young sol-
diers who were shipping out to Iraq.
I pray those young men will return
home well and whole.
More and more subdivisions,
planned for our county, It's just the
beginning, some say. Are we,beifgg
discovered? ,,
Didja know people will accept
your ideas much more readily if you
tell them Benjamin Franklin said it
first?
In 2003, men accounted for two-
thirds of vehicle-related deaths. On
average, men drive more miles than
women. They are also more likely to
speed, drive aggressively, drive after
drinking and not wear seatbelts, sta-
tistics show.


Bobby Krebs tells me an addition
will be built on the Senior
Center...Environmental issues com-
ing up this year include rules from
the EPA to reduce mercury pollu-
tion from coal-fired power plants.
They will come on the heels of mis-
sion reduction requirements for
sulfer dioxide and nitrogen oxide.
Environmental groups will see the
rules as being too lax and are sure to
challenge them in court.
The Census Bureau estimates fhai
860,000 legal immigrants will come
to America each year from now to
2012. They will join an illegal im-
migrant population estimated at 9
million.
Some 25 percent of children over
3 drink at least one caffeinated drink
a day, including sodas and iced tea.
These children get Vz hour less sleep
per night than children not given
caffeine.


New Year's is a great time to
make changes in your life changes
for the better. New Year's resolu-
tions provide a great opportunity for
you to improve yourself, but how
can you ensure you will stick to
your plan?
Most resolutions get broken for
one reason or another. Are you go-
ing to be one of those lucky indi-
viduals who keep their resolutions
all year?
Here are a few tip to help you
weather the temptations.
Create a plan. To be successful
in staying with your resolution, you
need a specific strategy for imple-
menting your goals and sticking to
them. Think about what you will do
to keep your self on track.
Reduce your stress. Stress ad-
versely affects resolutions because
many bad habits are stress related.
One great way to reduce stress is to
get more sleep. Go to bed earlier,
and you will wake up with a whole
new perspective.
Remember why. If you are im-
proving yourself for your family,
keep a picture of them with you at
all times.


BY REX M. ROGERS, Ph.D.
Author

During the past few years, a new
phrase "the culture of sport" has
been developed by writers, com-
mentators and athletics administra-
tors to describe what's happening in
American competitive sports. "The
culture of sport" refers.to the values.
behaviors, philosophies, rules and
regulations, games, participants and
spectators in all forms of competi-
tive sports.


When you feel tempted, look at
the picture and think about how
happy they are about your
resolution.
You can also make a list of other
reasons to resist temptation.
Put the list in your pocket, on your
refrigerator door, in your car and at.
your workplace. Never forget your
promise to yourself.
Find a buddy. Everything is eas-
ier with help from other people. If
you know someone else, who has a
similar resolution, keep each other.
motivated.
Avoid tempting environments. If
you want to stop smoking or drink-
ing, don't go to bars. If you want to
lose weight, avoid fast-food restau-
rants.
Eat right. No matter what your
resolution may be, eating healthy
foods and drinking more water can
make you feel better about yourself
and your health overall.
Eating the right foods is particu-
larly important if you are trying to
lose weight. Losing weight is one of
the most common New Year's reso-
lutions people make.


. The phrase is morally neutral in
that its use implies neither right nor
wrong and encompasses both. Yet
the development of the phrase is
closely aligned with emerging con-
cerns about how American engage-
ment in athletic competition is
changing.
Specifically, the culture of sport is
typically employed by someone ex-
pressing anxiety about newly devel-
oping athlete attitudes and actions
and fan behavior.: ,i
(See Sports Need Page 5)


Peanuts Promote Good Health


BY TIM LOCKLETTE
University of Florida

Peanuts' are often thought of as
high-fat foids,'but party goers can
-feel a little better about reaching for
the roasted nuts.
Not only do peanuts contain the
so-called "good" kind of fat, but
University of Florida researchers
have found they also are high in a
wide variety of helpful antioxidants,
rivaling the fruits often sought out
by health-conscious consumers.
"When it comes to antioxidant
content, peanuts are right up there
with strawberries," said Steve Tal-
cott, an assistant professor of food
science and human nutrition at UF's
Institute of Food and Agricultural!
Sciences. "We expected a fairly
high antioxidant content in peanuts,
but we were a bit shocked to find


that they're as rich in antioxidants as
many kinds of fruit."
Talcott and other UF researchers
tested the antioxidant content of a
dozen different peanut varieties in a
'study published recently in an issue
of the journal Food Chemistry dated
May 2005.
Antioxidants are chemicals that
block the aging effects of free radi-
cals unstable molecules naturally
occurring in the human body that
damage living cells. The damage
caused by free radicals has been
linked fo heart disease, stroke, cer-
tain cancers and macular degenera-
tion of the eye:
The growing reputation of antioxi-
dants has led an increasing number
of people to include more fruits in
their diets, particularly those that are
orange or red in color, because such
foods have been found to be rich in
the health-promoting chemicals. Vi-


tamins A, C, and E are recognized
as antioxidants, and polyphenols a
family of chemicals commonly
found in foods also have strong an-
tioxidant properties.
Peanuts are a good source of Vita-
min E, but in the past they typically
have not been considered an
antioxidant-rich food, largely be-
cause of a lack of data on their poly-
phenol content.
Now UF researchers have found
that peanuts contain high concentra-
tions of polyphenols chiefly a
compound called p-coumaric acid.
And they found that roasting can in-
crease the level of p-coumaric acid
in peanuts, boosting their overall an-
tioxidant content by as much as 22
percent.
"If you compare them (peanuts) to
other foods people think of as rich
in antioxidants -- mostly fruits and
berries peanuts come out some-


where in the middle," Talcott said.
"They're no match for the foods at
the top of the scale, such as pome-
granate, but they do rival other
foods that people eat just for their
antioxidant content."
Talcott said roasted peanuts are
about as rich in antioxidants as
blackberries of strawberries, and are
far richer in the chemicals than
fruits such as apples, carrots or
beets.
The findings add to the growing
reputation peanuts are getting for
their healthy benefits.
"We already know from previous
studies that including peanuts and
peanut butter in a healthful diet can
lower cholesterol, help people lose
weight and prevent type 2 diabetes,"
said Kristen Ciuba, a nutritionist for
the Peanut Institute, a nonprofit or-

(See Peanuts Promote, Page 5)


Valentine's Day Means Romance


Valentine's Days is synonymous
with romance, of course. But of the
millions who celebrate the popular
holiday for lovers each year, how
many actually know the rich.history
behind it?
There are several competing theo-
ries on the origins of Valentine's
Day. Some say its beginnings can be
found in the Middle Ages, when
many believed that birds mated for
life on Feb. 14
To commemorate the spirit of
companionship, people would send
love letters on that day.
Others say we owe our celebration
to the ancient Roman feast of Luper-
calia, a pagan fertility festival that
was held in mid-February.


On this day, women wrote love
notes that were placed in an urn and
randomly drawn by men, who
would then pursue the note-writers
and claim them as companions for
the next year.
Early Christians preferred to asso-
ciate the holiday with the saint of ro-
mantic causes, Saint Valentine. But
there is some controversy regarding
Saint Valentine: The Catholic
Church recognizes at least three
saints named Valentine or Valen-
tinus.
The most popular candidate is a
third century priest. Legend says he
performed secret marriages against
the orders of Emperor Claudius II,
who forbade young men from mar-


trying because he believed that single
men were more likely to join the
army.
As the story goes, Valentine was
imprisoned for his misdeeds.
He then fell in love with his
jailer's daughter and sent her a note
signed "From Your Valentine" be-
fore he was executed in A.D. 270.
A little more than 200 years later,
Pope Gelasius officially recognized
Feb. 14 in honor of Valentine, the
patron saint of lovers
Some say the tradition of sending
Valentine greetings started I 1415
with a Frenchman named Charles,
Duke of Orleans.
Imprisoned in the Tower of Lon-
don after the Battle of Agincourt,


the duke reportedly passed time by
writing romantic verses for his wife.
By the 16th century, sending written
expressions of affection on Valen-
tine's' Day had become very com-
mon.
By the beginning of the 20th cen-
tury, the giving of Valentines was
accompanied with gifts of flowers
and chocolates. The red rose and
heart-shaped box of chocolates be-
came synonymous with Valentine's
Day.
Now, more than $1 billion is spent
annually on Valentine's Day candy.
The National Confectioners Asso-
ciation estimates that more than 36
million candy hearts will be sold
this year along.


.Opinion & Comment


= I Short Takes & Other Notions


Culture Of Sport


Promotes Integrity


_bo


I a --s, I


I a


itY: 4
~


..... ..








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14,2005 PAGE 5:
ward Jones To st To reserve a seat or formore i'
Edward Jones TI nost formation about the program, call
Davison at 850-997-2572.
Satellite Broadcast If you are unable to attend, addi-
tional viewing opportunities are
Colvin and Skrainka will discuss: available.
DEBBIE SNAPP How the deficit and a weak dollar N P|
Staff Writer should impact one's investing deci-
sions; What four more years of a RR
Robert J. Davison, the Edward- Bush White House may mean to in-
Jones investment representative in vestors; and How to take control of C
Monticello, will host a one hour free one's financial future. CH A G E
Satellite broadcast titled "Is the Un- ,. .. ..... -.. ... *


SPECIAL OLYMPICS Coordinator Howard Asst. Coordinator Sharon McKinney,
Pepper recently addressed the Chamber Pepper, Adam McKinney Special Olympic
about beginning a program here. From left, Athlete. (News Photo)



Chamber Meeting Covers


Events Happening Here


certainty Over?" at noon, Tuesday
at 205 E. Washington Street, Monti-
cello, Fl.
The recent presidential election
brought many issues to the
forefront, and voters have heard dif-
ferent solutions to these.
The broadcast aims to look at
what questions remain, and what
those issues mean to the markets
and to investors' portfolios in the
year ahead.
The broadcast will feature Geof-
frey Colvin, co-host of Wall Street
Week with FORTUNE, and Alan
Skrainka, Edward Jones' chief mar-
ket strategist.


This interactive event is presentcu
at select Edward Jones branch of-
fices nationwide via the firm's pri-
vate video network.


S The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


Providing a 650-Hour
Professional Massage Therapy
Training Program
OPEN HOUSE
January 16, 2005 5 pm-7 pm
Classes Beginning February 28, 2005
Call for a FREE CATALOG


CORE Institute


Tallh assee. L B
wwwcoeinttto


oem rro yin ei r m1fMO-6l-o n VIroyininoinO ininb raa lrn-" o00


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The monthly meeting of the-
Chamber of Commerce was alive
with activity and members recently.
On the program was much discus-
sion and a vote on a downtown
parking project. This project will
add more parking to the area, mean-
ing more business for the local mer-
chants.


Also discussed was Florida Bike
Week, which will begin in Down-
town Monticello from March 18-20.
The bikers will return on Friday,
March 25.
The speaker for this months meet-
ing was Howard Pepper, County
Coordinator for the Special Olym-
pics. With him was Assistant Coor-
dinator Sharon D. McKinney, and
her son Adam.
Jefferson County has not had an
active Special Olympics program in


Peanuts Promote Health


(Continued From Page 4)
ganization in Albany, Ga., funded
by the peanut industry.
The UF researchers' findings were
part of a broader study designed to
measure the nutritional differences
between traditional peanut breeds
and the growing number of high
oleic peanuts now available to pea-
nut growers.
Oleic acid is a mqnounsraurated
fat. part of a family of chemicals
sometimes referred to gs "good" fat.
A diet rich in oleic acid is believed
to lower cholesterol levels and re-


duce the chance of heart disease. In
recent years, UF and a handful of
other universities have bred new
peanut varieties that have higher-
than-average levels of oleic acid.
High-oleic peanuts also have a far
longer shelf life than other peanuts,
largely because oleic acid doesn't
oxidize as rapidly as other kind of
fat. Talcott and is fellow researchers
thought that the peanuts' high anti-
oxidant contenirfftightiob' reiSpbisiC
ble: -forp -that- effeet,-irtt th'if 'tetf
showed no significant differences in
antioxidant content between high-
oleic and traditional peanuts.


Sports Need Integrity


(Continued From Page 4)
Of primary concern is the preser-
vation and promotion of the integ-
rity of sport, because sport is noth-
ing if it lacks integrity. In other
words, if an athletic event is not
conducted fairly and honestly the
competition turns into a farce.
,Whether participants are talented
and trained athletes or simply locals
enjoying a pickup game, a competi-
tion sans integrity is no longer about
ability and execution within the
rules of the game to determine "who
is the best." It's about who wins by
cheating and thus it's about a false
result.
A second concern involves sports-
manship. E en a fair and honest ath-
letic competition can be married by
the poor sportsmanship of partici-
pants or spectators. The emergence
of selfish prima donna athletes, ex-
tremely high paid and independent
sports celebrities, riotous fan behav-
ior, and even violence in sport have


(850)386-7553
Tallahassee
1882 Capital ircle NE, Suite 103
Tallahassee, FL 32308


all contributed to the slow death of
sportsmanship in the culture of
American sport.
Given the prevalence of sports in
American life, these concerns about
the culture of sport are not child's
play. How.we play says a lot about
the character of the American peo-
ple.

Hickory Hill
4-Hers To March

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Hickory Hills 4-H
Club will march in the Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. NAACP Parade, 10
a.m., Monday.
The group will represent, the
County 4-H Clubs, and will wear its
special Club shirts, to be visible in
the crowd.


(850)875-9992
Quincy,
227 E. Jefferson St.
Quincy, Fl 32351


Toll Free: 1-877-997-8181
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be base
sole. upon jdveeli.meni. BeroTe \oZu decid... -sk the lawe,,r to send "'
re I nllien Inform3alon aboul their quiallication- and ex.penence


well over 10 years. Together they
are looking to the community to
help them reestablish the county's"
program.
"We have a lot of work to do, and
are a volunteer run organization that
relies on donations from individuals
and local businesses to operate.
We are going to be actively reach-
ing out to the community for help,"
stated Howard.
In addition to recruiting volunteers
and coaches, finding athletic facili-,
ties to host training and competition
and most of all, reaching out to find
eligible athletes to participate in the
program.
Special Olympics Jefferson
County will hold fundraisers and
such, since it is not funded by Spe-
cial Olympics Incorporated and par-
ticipation is offered free of charge to
all athletes.
A meal of chicken and dumplings
was served, prepared by Mary Fran-
ces Drawdy, with a side of English
peas and a garden salad topped with
,poppy seed dressing. .
"District 3 County Commission e
J Sutphin wasin attendance at
the meeting. He offered $500, a por-
tion of his salary, to the.Chamber.,
In addition, he said the would
give a total of $5,000 a year, for the
next four years, to five county or-
ganizations. They will be receiving
$1,000 each. The chosen organiza-
tions will change each year.
"I'm reinvesting the citizens tax
money, that's what makes my
salary," remarks Sutphin.

4-H Sewing

Classes Set


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Jefferson County-
4-H Club, have a limited number of.
openings in Beginner Sewing
Classes.
Students must be nine years old or
older to participate. There are still
openings in the class taught 3 to,.5
p.m., Thursdays.
The first class will begin Thurs-
day, Jan. 20,
To register, contact Gladys Neely
at 342-0187, or stop by the Exten-
sion Office.


lan Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III
Nakia D. PURDIE-LAWSQN
Hal Richmond, Of Counsel

Personal Injury
& Wrongful Death
* AUTOMOTIVE, TRUCK, & MOTORCYCLE
ACCIDENTS
* DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS
* MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE/MALPRACTICE
* SLIP & FALL PREMISES LIABILITY
* NURSING HOME NEGLIGENCE

SNo Fees or Costs )
until Recovery

(850)997-8181
Monticello
1307 S. Jefferson Street
'I Monticello, FL 32344


S The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts !
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, )
etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.
o e
1 News papers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc. ,:;. .
0 0 ,, '. ': '' '" ,* '., *- "' .. .....
S-All glass bottles. jarS, etc. (clear, brown & green)
.0
SResidents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at I
S1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the -
collection sites in the County.

C Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfiii
. and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong? "


. Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
0
Household garbage

0 *Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
S 'White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
.06 machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center) ,
0
*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil 4 Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

C **The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

I Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
Collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


SThe City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
Sfor recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
0 information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
i Don Anderson at 342-0154.


I Please visit the Jefferson County web page
Shttp://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.

10

.i&S Visit the www.Earth9 1 .org Recycling Information web page
o-u o oo o -0 b o o-o G ro -60 -r B -rar-or"-t -mTn--- mr-"- -fT Bo o o a a o o o narn a


Jon D.. Cminez
BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL LAWYER,


MEME


m












PAGE 6MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005


Lifestyle


Church News Notes


New Bethel AME Church will
observe its Annual Men and Women
Day worship service, 11 a.m, Sun-
day. Rev. David Williams and con-
gregation of Philadelphia AME
Church will be the guest church for
the service. Dinner will be served
after the service.
***
St. Phillip AME Church in Lloyd
will host the indoor baptism of 13
year old Arsenio Bright, Jr., 8 a.m,
Sunday. Rev. Edward Scott, II, of
Mt. Zion AME Church will perform
the ceremony.


PLEAS


Sistah 2 Sistah Revival takes place
7 p.m. nightly Jan. 14-16 at Memo-
rial MB Church, featuring Evangel-
ist Valerie Ellis.
***
Sistah 2 Sistah Prayer Breakfast 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, at Memo-
rial MB Church, featuring Sister
Janet Riley, and Evangelist Annie
Byrd.
***
Faith Family Christian Center
Praise Team service 11 a.m. Sunday
at Memorial MB Church.



CARD OF THANKS
We, the family of the late Fannie
Pleas, acknowledge with sincere
gratitude and deep appreciation for
all your acts of kindness shared with
us during our loss.
Your many prayers, telephone
calls, and other gestures of sympa-
thy have all served as a source of
healing for us.
A special thanks to the doctors,
nurses and staff at Tallahassee Me-
morial Healthcare and Big Bend
Hospice, for their excellent care of
our dear mother, and grandmother.
Also, we would like to extend a
special recognition to Al Hall and
his staff at Tillman's Funeral Home
for their untiring services rendered
to each of us in our time of need.
We pray God's blessing will be
with each of you always.
The Pleas Family


Red Hat Ladies

Hold Pajama Party


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


RED HAT LADIES enjoyed a Pajama Party at their last
meeting at the Chamber. From left, Rowena Daniel, Illeane
Vorce, Tammie' Peck.


PREPARING Mexican Soup and a Greek Salad for the Red
Hats Pajama Party is Mary Frances Drawdy.


Local members of the Red Hats of
America met recently for a soup and
salad luncheon at the Chamber of
Commerce, where they held a pa-
jama party.
Members have been enjoying this
afternoon Pajama Party for a couple
of years now. And, enjoy dressing
for the occasion, right up to their red
hats.
Queen Mum Minnie Stokley said
that because no one remembered to
bring their feather pillows, the
planned pillow fight would have to
take place at another time and loca-
tion.
They also welcomed new mem-
bers Vi Payton and Dottie Jenkins
into their fold. Jenkins moved here
recently from Michigan.
The pajama clad beauties sang
Red Hat songs, lead by Betty
Wright and Ramona Mackenzie:
The luncheon of Mexican soup
and Greek salad was prepared by
Mary Frances Drawdy. And, coco-,
nut cake was savored by all, to end a
delightful afternoon of fun and
laughter.
Mary Noell and Thelma Birdwell

In Case Of
Emergency
Dial 911


will host next months luncheon at
the Chamber. The theme of which
will be "A Valentine Day Celebra-
tion." Ladies are asked to wear the
appropriate attire.


Homes Of Mourning

Maggie L. Speed James Williams, Pastor, Officiating.
Maggie L. Speed, age 78, of 9423 Fam will recee friendvisita
South Salt Road, Lamont, Florida tion)will be-froem2:00 p.m. to-'s:3
died Wednesday, January 5 2005 at Friday. January 4, 200.5 a
Capital Regional Medical Center, ip.man Funeral Home, Monticell
Tillman Funeral Home, Monticellk
Tallahassee, Florida. and at the Church on Saturday front
Speed was a native. of Lament, noon until the service
Floridaandlived in Lamnt all her noon until the service.
Floda and lived Lamont all lifelong resident of Jeffersol
life. County, Rev. Smith was a retiree
She was a Housewife and a mem-
She was a Hself-employed farmer, pulpwoode
ber of Mount Morilla Missionary self-employed farmer, pulpwoode
and entrepreneur. He was also an as
Baptist Church.
Baptist Church. sistant pastor at his beloved Pleasan
She is survived by three sons: Le-
roy Frazier (Cynthia), and Lester. Groe Missionary Baptist Church.
A devoted and loving father an
Frazier (India) of Tallahassee, FL;
family patriarch he will be sorely
James Frazier (Dottie) Fort Lee, h
VA; two daughters: Mary Frazier- ss by h t ons, ezro
Smith (Stanley) and Rosemary Fra- Harry" Smith, Jr., Monticello, Jo
(Faye) Smith,,Thomasville, GA and
zier of Lament, FL; four sisters, four (Faye) Smith, Thomasville, GA a
zier ofla eFr Kenneth (Debbie) Smith of Atlanta
brothers, eleven grandchildren, four GA.; his daughters, Jessie Mae Fos
great grandchildren, two brother-in- te, Miami, Kay Ber S M
laws, four sister-in-laws, a host of ter, Kay Bertha Scott, Mon
nephews and sorrowing ticello, Eather Mae Williams, o
nieces and nephews and sorrowing Tallahassee, Wanda Smith, Jersey
friends. City, NJ, Catherine (Wilton) Simon
Funeral services will by Saturday,
Tampa, and Barbara (Tirn) Newbon
January 15, 2005 at 12 noon at Mt. ad Debra Hardy, both of Atlanta
Morilla M.B. Church with ReverendA
Morilla M.B. Church with Rever-end GA.; two nieces who were raised as
Kennieth B. Jones officiating. Inter- his sisters Amella (Joe) Bradley an
meant will follow at Mt. Monrlla Annie Doris Ford, and a brother-in
Cemetery. Branch Street Funeral law Dan Williams, all o
Home is handling arrangements. Monticello, 36 grandchildren, 4'
Thomie Lee Wilson
Thomie Lee Wgreat grandchildren and one grea
Thomie Lee Wilson age 68 retired great grandchild.
Courier died Tuesday, January 4, The Reverend Smith was preceded
2005 in Thomasville, Georgia. in death by several loved ones, in
The service will be at 11:00 a.m. eluding his wife Rose Lee Sneec
on Saturday, January 15, 2005 at Smith and a son, James Smith.
Bethel. AME Church in Monticello
with burial at Texas Hill Cemetery
with military honors in Monticello.
Family will receive friends (visita-

Friday, January 14, 2005 at Tillman M
Funeral Hall.
A native of Winter Haven, Mr.
Wilson grew up in Wacissa, attend-
ing school in Jefferson County. He
served in the U.S. Air Force from
1953 though 1956. He was a news-
paper distributor for the New York
Daily New in Queens, NY before re-
tiring in 1992 and retiring to Jeffer-
son County. He is survived by his
wife, Edith Bailey Wilson of Monti-
cello; his mother Mary W. Stubbs r
and his sister, Joan Myers, both of ENb oF WITep
Tampa, along with several nieces,
nephews, other relatives and friends.
Rev. Hezron Smith, Sr.
The Reverend Hezron "Neena"
Smith, age 81 a retire Farmer died
Sunday, January 9, 2005 in Monti-
cello.
The service will be at 2:00 p.m. on
Saturday, January 15, 2005 at Pleas- 230 W. WASHINGTON
ant Grove Missionary Baptist MONTICELLO
Church in Monticello with the Rev.


CARD OF THANKS
Our expressions of profound and
sincere thanks and appreciation are
expressed to each of you who have
-shared in our loss.
Your kindness, love and
5,. i\ mpabh\. through .,prayers, visits,
:) i telephone-.cai -floral arriangeents.
t food, yardss ,of condolencee, and all
o other acts both seen and unseen
Shave been a source of consolation
and strength to us during our time of
bereavement.
nd We also extend out appreciation
rand thanks to Branch Street Funeral
SHome for their outstanding service
rendered to our family.
t
Each expression will forever re-
Smain in our hearts.
May God bless you all, is our
prayer.
n The Benjamin Family

d
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VISION REVIVAL WEEKEND
WITH JOHN RILEY

WA UKEENAH UNITED METHODIST
invites everyone to join us as we welcome John Riley. John has a remarkable gift of sharing
God's word. He uses stories and humor as he shares his extensive knowledge of the Bible.
Our desire is that all who participate will find a renewed sense of God's presence in their lives
through a clearer vision of His will for them.

Service times and Opportunities:
Friday, January 21;
Spaghetti dinner starting at 6:00 p.m. Revival Services at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, January 22:
Women's Luncheon (with John) at 12:30 p.m.
Dinner starting at 6:00 p.m. Revival Services at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, January 23:
Men's Breakfast with (John) at 7:30 a.m. Fellowship and refreshments at 9:15 Youth
Gathering (with John) at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Classes for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Closing Revival Service at 10:30 Covered Dish Dinner to follow!!

All activities will be held at the facilities of WUMC For more info.
call Rev. Tolson @ 528-3645 o'fStan @ 510-4932
U


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

Trust in the
Lord with all
your heart and
lean not on
your own
understanding.
Proverbs 3:5
Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


D 6













DOORS OPEN
8:00 A.M.


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SIS
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005 PAGE 7





Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


"I Have A Dream"
August 28, 1963, Washington, D.C.


*I have a dream today!
I have a dream that one day down in Alabama with its vicious racists, with its Governor having hid lips dripping right
there in Alabama, little black boys and girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and
brothers.
*I have a dream today!
I have a dream that one day "every valley shall be exalted and every hill and mountain shall be made low. The rough places
will be made plain and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall
see it together."
This is our hope. This is tlre faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we shall be able to transform theijangling
-. discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together; to,pray ;:;
Stogegher, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we w~J be free one day. And
this will be the day. This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning. "My Country 'tis of thee,
sweet land of libery, of thee I siig. Land where my fathers died. land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountain side, let
freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must come true.
So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire: let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of
Colorado; let freedom ring from'the curvaceous slops of California. But not only that. ;'t freedom ring from Stone Mountain of
Georgia; let freedom ring from ookout Mountain of Tennessee; let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
From every mountainside, let freedom ring.
And when this happens, and when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from
every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all God's children, black men and white men, Jews and
gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:


,,Ar~;- p. 1 -,~l
'fr.li1 .Qi..T;'2.ir o 5G~,r


In Memory of Dr. King Keep The Dream Alive


Jefferson County High

School Faculty & Staff


Keep The Dream Alive!!
Branch Street

C FUNERAL HOME
^-------------*


THOMAS GRIFFIN
licensed Fuenral Director
KATHI SLOAN HANSBERRY
Licensed Funeral Director


997-2024


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Monticello


Keep The Dream Alive

Homes and Lands, Inc.
S.W. (STELLA) ELLIS, REALTOR'
Notary/Email: sellis@unr.net
www.stellaellis.com
Business (850) 997-1360
Fax (850) 997-1920
Pager (850) 657-4660
^ r_' 1623 W. WASHINGTON ST.
S MONTICELLO, FL 32344



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HOME FURNITURE -LJLO

405 S. Jefferson St. US Hwy. 19 South
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Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


Let us join hands, work together and pray together....


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SHead Center 997-5656
Annex 997-5676




Keep The Dream Alive!

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997-5655

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4
\w L ?
6 tJ"


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620 York Street, Monticello, Fl. 32345
997-5553

The Dream Lives On....Let Freedom Ring!!


Phil Barker
School Superintendent

Remember the Past, Celebrate the Present
andStrivefor a Brighter Future.
Keep The 'Dream .Alive!


"Let's make the dream come true."
Dr. Artis Johnson & Staff
Jefferson County Adult Center
342-0140

T y


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Where You Make The Difference
Specializing In All Seafood & Seasonings

S (904) 997-8211 0v
145 Chestnut St. Open Mon.-Sat.
Monticello, FL 8:30 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Leverne and Elvira Wilson, Owners
1- l


Helping to keep the dream alive!

Jefferson County Road

Department

997-2036



Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Nellie's Retired Inn

Assisted Living Facility
State Line Road, Monticello, FL
997-3422


I I II '
II -


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14,2005




Honoring A Leader


Who Spoke


For


Justice


For All People



Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


1 i,


k


&AISON
ASSOCIATE S, PA
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
925 W. Washington 4826 Kerry Forest Parkway
Monticello, FL Tallahassee, FL
997-3082 668-2228

Keep The Dream Alive

Howard Middle
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Principal & Staff


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Lawrence Grocery

Corer of Hwy 59 & Barnes St.
Lloyd, FL.
. ..IL .


Happy Martin


Luther King


4-H
S&^


James T. Surles, Agent
~425 South Jefferson St.
Monticello. FL 32344
SBus: 850-997-8282
torrunyurles bw9i@statefarm.com
LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR
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"fl Farmers
~ e& Merchants
Bank
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997-2626


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997-9628


North Florida Abstract arid Title Co. Inc
997-2670
Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I I


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120 9S. Jefferson St.
342-1050


Help Keep the Dream Alive
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Monticello, Fl.
342-3201
Helping To Keep The Dream Alive!!


A man who strives to leave the world
better than he found it is very special...
Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY DR. KING!

o Lois Howell-Hunter
C 5 t (Tax Collector


Day, From...
Jefferson County


-I,-


. ^. ''.';' ^-w^
*I ,


.~











Sports


.Lady Tigers Fell To


jWest Gadsden 55-51


I first game of the season.
FRAN HUNT Keandra Seabrooks led th
Staff Writer ing with 22 points, three
and Shaumese Massey, 15 p
Lady Tigers lost to West Gads-- 15 rebounds, three assists,
i den, 55-51, Tuesday. blocked shots and two steals.
f Coach Bill Brumfield said it was
a good game but West Gadsden Nikidra Thompson score
was one of the better teams in the points, nine rebounds; S
District and very tough to beat. brooks, six points; and K
"They've only lost one district Griffin, two points, eight reb
Gamee" said Brumfield.. The Lady Tigers .will fai
He said the main reason for the North Florida Christian, 6
loss was because two of his better Friday, here.
players and scorers were fouled out Brumfield said it would pr
Sin the final minutes of the game. be a very tough game for the
SBrumfield said the Lady Tigers Tigers. "They're (NFC) under
1 have greatly improved since their in district," he concluded.



Warriors Beat

Carrabelle 55-18
Four points; Drew Sherrod
SFRAN HUNT points, 10 rebounds; and
SStaff Writer Henderson, two points.
The Warriors will face Tal
Warriors defeated Carrabelle, 55---- 7:30 p.m., Thursday, here, in
18, Tuesday, for a 7-5 season. Coach Richard Roccanti
Kyle Day led the score for the should be a victory.
SWarriors with 13 points, 10 re- "We beat them by more th
Sounds; Jeremy Tuckey,12 points, points the last time we
six steals; and Ridgley Plaines, nine' them," said Roccanti. The w;
points, eight rebounds. will then go up against Granc
Stephen Griffin scored six points, Friday, here at 7 p.m.
Sand hit his third slam-dunk for the Roccanti said Friday's
season, and had two blocked shots. would be a tough one, "Th
SBen Grantham scored five points, time we played them, they b
0 seven rebounds; Daniel Roccanti, by nine points," he concluded



I ACA Grade 7,8 Boys

i Win Last Two Games


iFRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Dollar, four rebo
The team wei
hatchee, 30-6.
Ninp of the


ACA Grade 7,8 boy's basketball scored in the gai
team climbed to a 6-3 season after score with s
Winning -their two most recent rebounds; Witme
games, five rebounds,
The team beat Maclay 16-11. four points, fi
Matt Bishop scored six points, steals; and Joh
Eight rebounds, three steals; Luke points, five reboi
SWitmer, three points, five Anderson sc
- rebounds; Brandon Dunbar, three two steals; Joe 1M
points, four rebounds; Alex four steals; Du
SDunkle, two points, two steals. Dunkle, two poi
Casey Anderson scored two two steals; 'and
points, five rebounds; and Stephen' points, six rebou


Warrior JVs Down.

Community Christi
Kyle Peters sc
FRAN HUNT one rebound; D;
Staff Writer points, two reboi
Ssey, two points,'
I The ACA JV Boys downed Elliott Lewis, tv
I Community Christian 34-17, Tues- Jayce Davis a
da\. each had there
SPrateen Patel ha(
. Coach Dan Nennstiel said: "I'm The Warriors
very pleased with their efforts and 5 p.m., Thursd
they are still improving." Nennstiel predi
S K\.le Bamwell led the scoring' other winning ni
S\ith 11 points, two rebounds; A. J. ACA.
SConnell, seven points, one "We should w
rebound; and Wade Scarberry, six we played agai
points, three rebounds. them by 10 point

Tiger JVs Squeak By

West Gadsden 51-50
*, s'G*d0e '1


SThe JCHS JVs squeaked past
W West Gadsden, 51-50; Tuesda'
Tim Crumity scored 18 points; J.
C. Fead, eight points; Clarence
SFead, three points; Willie Davis, 12
,points; and Marcus Brown, 10
Points.
In a previous game, Tigers lost
, to Lincoln, 56-51.
. CrumitN scored 10 points; Tony
SJohnson and Jordan Blair each
Scored two points.


e scor-
steals;
points,
three

red six
Shanise
:andice
pounds.
ce
p.m.,

rove to
e Lady
defeated


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005 PAGE 9


Tigers Split Games With

Liberty County, Lincoln


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tigers split theri last two games
for a 5-11 season.
The team was determined to de-
feat Liberty County, and at 13
points behind and 1:20 left on the
clock, the Tigers roared past Lib-
erty for a 66-54 victory.
Demario Rivers led the score for
the Tigers with 35 points, 14 of
which were made in the fourth
quarter; James Skipworth, 12
points; and Fabian Wilson, eight
points.


Kelvin Frazier, six points; Jona-
than Dady, three points; and Dar-
nell Brooks and Lucious Wade
each scored one point.
In the next game, LIncoly de-
feated the Tigers 59-42.
Rivers again led the score with 20
points, eight rebounds, four assists;
Wilson, six points, four rebounds,
three steals; Frazier,12 points, three
rebounds; and Wade, four points,
five rebounds.
The junior varsity team fell to a
2-5 season after losing to Lincoln
57-51 and losing to Florida High,
59-43. No statistics were available
at press time.


HMS Bees Split Last Two Games


In


, four
Berie

lavana
n what
said

ian 10
played
warriors
I Ridge

game
he last
eat us
1.


unds, two steals.
it on to beat Stein-

S10 team players
me. Dollar led the
six points, four
er, four points,
two steals; Bishop,
ve rebounds, two
in Stephens, four
unds.
:ored three points,
Mizell, three points,
mbar, two, points;
nts, four rebounds,
Brian Scholte, two
nds.


ian
cored three points,
aniel Greene, three
unds; Michael Kin-
five rebounds; and
ro points.
nd Hunter Greene
e rebounds; and
i two rebounds.
will face Tallavana
ay, here, in what
cts should be an-
otch in the belts of

'in, as the last time
nst them, we beat
:s," Nennstiel said.


J. C. Fead led the scored with 21
points, Davis. six: Brown, eight;
and Paul Huggins. two points.
When the Tigers lost 59-43 to
Florida High, Brown scored 11
points; Blair, two.
J: C. Fead again led the score
with 16 points; Davis, 13; and Cru-
mity, one.
The Tigers will face North Flor-
ida Christian, 4:30 p.m., Friday,
here.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The HMS Bees split their last
two games and are now 2-7 season.
The Bees lost to the Shanks 42-
32 and came back to win against
Suwannee, 46-26.


FABIAN WILSON dunks the ball for the two pointers during
a recent Tiger practice session. (News Photo)


Tigers Split Last


Four Soccer Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Tiger Soccer team split the -
last four of its soccer games, mak-
ing their season 3-6.
The games scheduled against Mel-
ody Christian was canceled
when the team didn't show up for
the game.
Tigers lost S-0 against Tailor
-Counit. '
Coa6t I Earlene Knight said the
Tigers played hard, but they didn't
:,play hard enough. They only had :
three shots on goal.
The game scheduled against Port
St. Joe was rescheduled for noon,


Jan. 22, there.
In the game against South Walton,
the Tigers slipped by their oppo-
nents for a 4-3 win in what Knight
called their "A game of the
season."
The Tigers had 12 shots on goal
and Alex Lingle scored two goals
assisted by Edwardo Barron.
Barren scored one goal and J. D,.
Shi'.er shot in the winning goal
v, ith 1:210 left on the clock.
SKjiniah said that at that point, the
Tigers \\ere able to hold them from
scoring. for the \\in.
Goalie Jason Kirkpatrick had 15
saves and at the conclusion of the
game, Tigers, as is tradition, gave
Knight the Gatorade drenching.


JCHS Boys Defeat

West Gadsden 78-67
that in order to win the game, the '
FRAN HUNT Tigers would have to keep them off
Staff Writer of the offensive boards, limit their
offensive rebounds and scoring
The JCHS boy's varsity basketball-transition, and slow down their lead
team defeated West Uadsden 78- scorer, Junior Ricky Yates.


67, Tuesday, climbing to 6-11 sea-
son.
Leading scorer for the Tigers was
Demario Rivers with 38 points, 12
rebounds,three steals.
Fabian Wilson scored 23 points,
15 rebounds, four blocked shots;
and Kelvin Frazier and Jonathan
Dady each scored four points.

Damell Brooks scored five__
points; James Skipworth and Lu-
cious Wade each scored two points.
The Tigers will face North Flor-
ida Christian 4:30 p.m., Friday,
here, to vie for second place in dis-
trict.
Coach Omari Forts said NFC was
a tough district opponent and added


School Menus
Monday
Holiday (In Honor of MLK Birthday)
Tuesday
Corn DogNuggets, Potato Wedges,
Fruit Choices, Cookie, Milk
Wednesday
Oven Fried Chicken, Creamed Pota-
toes, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Milk
Thursday
Chili, Peanut Butter Sandwich, Car-
rot Sticks, Fruit Juice, Milk
Friday
Taco over Chips, Whole Kernel
Corn, Fruit, Oatmeal Muffin Square,
Milk


In the game with Shanks,
D'Vonte Graham led the score for
the Bees with 21 points, Maricio
Scott, two; Amez Ammons, two;
Anthony McDaniels, four; and De-
nontre Johnson, three points.
Graham again led the score
against Suwannee with 22 points.
McDaniels, eight; Curtis High-


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(Next to LucyHo's Oriental Court)


tower, six; Torrence Tucker, eight;
and Telvin Norton, two points.
The Bees face Shanks 5 p.m.,
Jan. 20, there.








LEMONY SNICKET'S
(PG)
Fri. 7:30 Sat. 2:00 7:30 Sun. 2:00 -
7:30 Mon. Thurs. 7:30

MEET THE FOCKERS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:20 7:05 9:30 Sat. 1:45 4:20
7:05 9:30 Sun. 1:45 4:20 7:05
Mon. Thurs. 4:20 7:05

FAT ALBERT (PG)
Fri. 4:45 9:35 Sat. 4:45 9:35 Sun.
4:45 Mon. Thurs. 4:45

WHITE NOISE (PG13)
Fri. 4:25 7:25 9:55 Sat. 1:40 4:25
7:25 9:55 Sun. 1:40 4:25 7:25
Mon. Thurs. 4:25 7:25
NO PASSES

COACH CARTER(PG13)
Fri. 4:50 -7:35 -10:15 Sat. 2:05 -
4:50- 7:35- 10:15 Sun. 2:20 4:50 -
7:35 Mon. Thurs. 4:50 7:35
NO PASSES

ELEKTRA (PG13)
Fri; 5:05 7:50 9:55 Sat. 2:20 5:05
- 7:50 9:55 Sun. 2:20 5:05 7:50
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(PG)
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Mon. Thurs. 5:00 7:45
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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005



grelri


w.*


KANDICE GRIFFIN shoots for two points during a Lady ti-
ger practice, recently. (News Photo)



Lady Tigers Beat

Liberty County 49-36


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High-
School girl's varsity basketball
team climbed to a 2-6 season, 1-3
in District 4-2A action, after a 49-
36 win against Liberty County.
Keandra Seabrooks led the scor-
ing for the Lady Tigers with 19
points, four rebounds, four assists
and seven steals.

Morris Named
Scholar Athlete

DXEBBIE SNAPP
Stalf 'riter

Danny Morris, son of Sharon and
Dan Morris of Monticello, and a
junior at Florida High, received the
"Scholar Athlete of the Year" award
at the recent Florida High Football
Awards Banquet.
He maintained the highest GPA oil
the varsity football squad during the
2004 season.
Morris played the positions of
split end and defensive back for the
Florida High Seminoles.


THE


Shaumese Massey scored 10
points, six rebounds, four assists,
five blocked shots and one steal.
Kandice Griffin scored 10 points,
five rebounds, one assist and two
blocked shots; Nikidra Thompson,
eight points, eight rebounds, one
assis, two steals; and Jasmine
Brown, two points, five rebounds.
Shanise Brooks had one rebound,
one assist and one steal; Chandra
tucker, one rebound, one steal; and
Pamela Mitchell, four rebounds.


ACA Reports Honor Roll


For Third 6 Weeks Period


Aucilla Christian Academy Prin-
cipal Richard Finlayson reports the
third six week honor roll.
Students appearing on the roll
and their grade levels are:
In K-3, receiving all A's were
Grace Beshears, Emily Forehand,
Lydia Hall, Ryan Jackson, Haylee
Lewis, Lynelle Loveless, Austin
McCord, Jacob Orr, Ayush Patel,
Chloe Reams.
Also, Skylar Reams, Megan
Schofill, Katherine Wichel, and
Mackenzie Wirick.
In K-4, receiving all A's were
Charlie Clark, Timothy Finlayson,
Jade Greene, Matthew Greene, T. J.
Hightower, Noah Hulbert, Katie
James, Carly Joiner, D. J. Key and
Ryals Lee.
Also, Abigail Morgan, Jake Prid-
geon, Quinton Thomas, Joe
Walton, Ria Wheeler and Ted Wil-
cox.
In K-5, receiving all A's were
Stephanie English, Joshua Greene,
Sarah Hall, Jenny Jackson, Donnie
Kinsey, Summerlyn Marsh, Gatlin
Nennstiel, Kristen Reagan, Will
Searcy, Natalie Sorensen, Ramsey
Sullivan, Kate Whiddon, Kirsten
Whiddon and Hank Wirick.
Earning all A's and B's were,
Meagan Beaty, Rebecca Carson,
Faith Demott, Joe Hannon, Tyler
Hutcheson, Erica Keeler, Hannah
Lewis, Emily Knowles, Lindsey
Lawson, Sarah Riley, Larrett Ter-
rell and John Thomas Walker.
In grade 1, earning all A's were
Jake Edwards, Katie Fulford, lan
Haselden, Sam Hogg, Erin Lee,
Ally Mall, Taylor McKnight, Rean
Montesclaros and Tomas Swickley.
Also, T. J. Swords, D. J. Wilkin-
son and Emma Witmer.
In grade 2, earning all A's were
Ricky Finlayson, Cheyenne Floyd,
Haleigh Gilbert, Sarah James, Win-
ston Lee and Bryce Sanderson.


Earning all A's and B's were Ty
Chancey, Abigail Floyd, Doug
Gulledge, Hunter Handley, Carson
Nennstiel, Amber Paulk, Kelsi
Reams, and Bradley Vollertsen.
In grade 3, earning all A's were
Hayley Grantham, Brandon Holm,
Rachel Lark, Aimee Love, Mary
Orr.
Earning all A's and B's were Tan-
ner Aman, Lauren Demott, Dakota
Ely, Jacob Dunbar, Kelli Evans,
Kayla Fulford, Matthew Hutchen-
son, Capas Kinsey, Jonah New-
berry Christina Reams, and
Michaela Taylor, Casey Demott,
and Annie yang.
In grade 4, earning all A's were
Jeffrey Falk, Jared Jackson, Kaley
Love, Whitney McKnight, Hadley
Revell, and Wendy Yang.
Earning all A's and B's were Ja-
men Brock, Nick Buzbee, Anthony
DeLaTorre, Jay Finlayson, Hannah
Haselden,Brooke Kinsey, Mi-
chaela Metcalfe, Sammy Ritter,
Ashley Schofill, Hans Sorensen
and Pamela Watt.
In grade 5, earning all A's were
Levi Cobb, Olivia Falk, Tyler Jack-
son and Shelby Witmer.
Earning all A's and B's were Ash-
ley Hall, Carrie Parmer, Vicki
Perry, Chris Poitevint, Austin
Ritchie, Trent Roberts, Tori Self,
Austin Shirley, Sarah Strelow.
In grade 6, earning all A's were
Anna Finlayson, Nikki Hamrick,
Kaitlin Jackson, Katherine Hogg,
Kent Jones, Devin Reams, Sarah
Sorensen and Caroline Mueller.
Earning all A's and B's were,
Taylor Baez-Pridgeon, Clark
Christy, Jessica Hagan, Lisa
Kisamore, G. H. Liford, Jacob
Newberry, Elizabeth Riley, Mar-
cus Roberts.
In grade 7, earning all A's were
Tiffany Brasington, John Stephens,
Dana Watt and Seth Whitty.


Earning all A's and B's were Clay
Fulford, Jessica Hunt, Sydney
Plummer, Samantha Roberts, Brian
Scholte and Daniel Ward.
In grade 8, earning all A's was
Rebecca Roccanti.
Earning all A's and B's were
Mark Falk, Khristian Hamilton,
Nikki Kisamore, Katelyn Levine,
Byron Love, Angela McCune, Mi-
chaela Roccanti, Kayla Williams,
Savannah Williams and Luke Wit-
mer.
In grade 9, earning all A's were
Rebekah Aman, Courtney Connell,
Linsey Day, Stephanie Dobson,
Will Hartsfield, Claire Knight, Ni-
cole Mathis, Prateen Patel, Ram-
sey Revell and Tristen Sorensen.
Earning all A's and B's were
Courtney Brasington, Benjamin
Buzbee, A. J. Connell, Jayce Davis,
Alfa Hunt, Elliott Lewis, Bethany
Saunders, Whitney Scarberry and
Hannah Sorensen.
In grade 10, earning all A's were
Joanna Cobb, Serena Harvin,
Melissa Martin, Caitlin Murphy,
Rikki Roccanti and Taylor Rykard.
Earning all A's and B's were
Courtney Kinsey, Holly Jones, Will
Knight, Jennifer Pitts, and Brittany
Williams.
In grade 11, earning all A's were
Jana Connell, Ben Grantham, Ca-


Simply Smashing Loses Five


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Simply Smashing ladies tffniis
team lost five of six matches to the
Killearn Special-K last week.
Team #1, Lisa Jackson and Katie
Brock lost its sets 0-6 and 1-6.

Team #2, Maxi Miller and Patty
Hardy lost its sets 4-6 and 1-6; and
team #3, Paula Joiner and Cindy
Williams won its first set, 6-3, lost
the second set, 0-6 and lost the tie-


MORRIS


LOVE

AN-TI-DRUG


Spending time with your kids is a proven deterrent to drug use. Listening to
them. Talking about their friends, school, activities. Asking what
they think about anything. Love. Music. Kosovo. Columbine.


* Round World


We are all individual parts of a
greater whole. Parents play a huge
role in this interconnected social
landscape. Research shows that kids
view parents as their most influen-
tial role models. A study also shows
that 74% of all fourth graders
wish their parents would talk to
them about drugs. Overwhelmingly,
research demonstrates that kids
want parents to be parents. And
that is the best deterrent in the fight
against drugs.


Dreams they may have. Research shows that knowing
your kids, who they hang out with and their parents
as well, dramatically reduces the likelihood that they
will get into trouble with drugs. Another effective
deterrent is praising and rewarding
them for good behavior. Tell
your kids you love them. Go out
for pizza instead of watching TV. Get to know the music
your kids like and talk to them about it. Keeping
kids drug-free is achieved in a
series of small, personal ways.
For more information, call 800.788.2800 or visit


www.theantidrug.com
Between 4 and 6 p.m. is when kids are most likely to try drugs. So keep them busy. Encourage them to try out for the
basketball team. Or the school play. Or band. Wha' matters is your involvement. Teenagers want to explore their independence,
and yet want the stability provided by routines. This message is brought to you by the Partnership for a Drug-Free America:

PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUG-FREE FLORIDA...AMERICA
OFFICE OF DRUG CONTROL
C/o BUSH & ASSOCIATES, INC.
1001 ALTERNATE A1A JUPITER, FL 33477




If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read It In The


Monticello News
You Can't Be Without It


m .Wxpo' .1.


sey Gunnels, Jennifer Hagan, Ka-
tie O'Steen, Alexandria Searcy and
Corie Smith.
Earning all A's and B's were Amy

Blanton, Keri Brasington, Jason
Holton, Linsey Long, Kyle Peters,
Matt Poston, Christina Reese,
Kristyn Tuckey, Chris Tuten, and
Suzanne Walker.
In grade 12, earning all A's were
Caroline Blair, Kyle Hanson, Doro-
thy Holden,Ridgley Plaines, and
Jeremy Tuckey.
Earning all A's and B's were Cas-
sie Anderson, Christopher Boykin,
Kyle Day, Justin Mabry, Danie}
Roccanti, Amanda Sapp, Drew
Sherrod, and Lisa wheeler.








CALL OR ViSIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


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breaker, 2-6.
Team #4, Cristi Beshears and Lin-
*,sey Taylor lost by forfeit. Team #5,
Tudy Faircloth and JennifeFrElis
lost its first set, 2-6; woqj e sec-
ond set, 6-4 and lost the tiebreaker,
2-6.
Team #6, Trish Wirick and Laura
Phillips-Kirchoff won its sets 7-5
and 6-3.
The ladies will play the Ace
Kickers in Winthrop Park at 9:30
a.m., Thursday.


Group Fitness Schedule


THURSDAY


WEDNESDAY


TUESDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:OOAM
Jumping Jacks & Jillsts
3 to 5 yr. olds ges ( lates


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
(Fitness Com6o Fitness Com6o


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.


MONDAY


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LEON SCREENING
YYUA l m: l --IEE& U:.kl


t..n:jSu7 "Serving Tallahassee with Quality Work Since 1976"

Authorized Distributor of Superior Metal Products Co., Inc.
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I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005 PAGE 11


County TO Participate In

Statewide 'Step Up Florida'


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
In preparation of the second an-
nual "Step. Up Florida, On Our
Way To Healthy Living Relay", the
County Health Department Chronic
Disease and Health Promotion and
Education Coordinator Marianne
Goehrig has begun taking applica-
tions for the Feb. 18 event in the
county.
She is looking for anyone who
can walk, run, jog, bicycle, roller
blade, skateboard or perform any
other type of physical activity to
take part in the event.


Florida Department of Health
Secretary John O. Agwunobi, MD,
MBA, MPH, announced the return
of the event last week and said it is
a statewide event, promoting physi-
cal activity and healthy lifestyles.
The event will sweep the state to
showcase the variety of activities
that Florida offers for physical
well-being.
"Florida's landscape is teeming
with opportunities to maintain a
healthy and active lifestyle every
day. There are many options avail-
able for fitness such as visiting our
parks and beaches, enjoying the
many trails, biking, skating, walk-
ing or jogging," said Agwunobi.


"Step Up Florida!" provides our
state with a chance to showcase
these opportunities, as well as share
their passion and commitment for
the health and well-being of Flor-
ida's many citizens and visitors."
All of Florida's counties will join
with state agencies, non profits and
community organizations during
the month-long event.
Designated as a relay, partici-
pants along four routes will pass a
"fitness flag" from county line to
county line. The routes will meet
in Orlando for a final celebration
Feb. 26.
On Feb. 1, Escambia County will
kick off the event as the route one


"Fitness Flag" begins to make it's
way along the Florida Panhandle.
Route two will launch on Feb. 3
in Madison County, winding it's
way through 21 counties to Or-
lando.
On Feb. 7, route three will begin
it's trek in Collier County and will
move up Florida's Gulf Coast to
merge with route one. The com-
bined route will then make it's way
to Orlando for the finale.
Finally, on Feb. 15, route four
will begin its journey in Monroe
County before moving up the Flor-
ida Keys, along the East Coast and
into Orlando.
A web site will provide a map of
the events a chronological look at
the progress each day and highlight
the distance covered by each leg.
Goehrig describes the event as a
noncompetitive physical event, its


goal, to get individuals of all ages
involved in physical activity. The
program hopes to help community
members begin or increase physical
activity routines.
She added that physical activity
can be fun and exciting as well as
healthy.
Goehrig listed some benefits of
exercise:
Reduces the risk of premature
death.
Reduces the risk of developing
and/or dying from heart disease.
Reduces high blood pressure or
the risk of developing high blood
pressure.
* Reduces the risk of developing
colon cancer and breast cancer.
Reduces the risk of diabetes.
Reduces or maintains body
weight or body fat equation.
* Reduces depression and anxiety.


Builds and maintain healthy
muscles, bones and joints.
* Improves psychological well-
being.
For further information or to sign
up to take part in the relay, call
Goehrig at 342-0170, ex. 220.





Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
protect Florida's
:-. c, manatees.
S myfwc.org/psm


BUSINESS





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Residential & Commercial
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Owner


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Tpllahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-3473
(800) 541-8702
Free Delivery To
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14,2005


Opening the door

to hope

Call our lifeline.
It's toll-free.

THE VOICE OF HOPE M ,
1-800-572-1717 y


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING: The
Jefferson County Planning Commission
will review and make a decision regarding
a proposed road variance and residential
subdivision on the north side of U.S.
Highway 90 and located approximately 4.5
miles west of the intersection of U.S.
Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90.
Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County Planning
Commission meeting on February 10,
2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and
U.S. Highway 90 in Monticello, Florida
32344. The meeting may be continued as
necessary. From the Florida "Government
in the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or
agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice
of meeting or hearing is required of such
board commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice
that, if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based. Interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department at
P.O. Box 1069, Monticello, FL 32345 and
provide comments. The proposal may be
reviewed during business hours at the
Department office located at 277 North
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344.
1/14, c


You may qualify for MormCars

MomCare is Medicaid Health Insurance for
Pregnant Women

Having a baby is an exciting time!

You and your baby deserve the best health care
possible

For more information, please call
(850) 342-0170 Ext. 106

U,


He might even save your
life, by sharing how he
almost lost his. With
immediate medical
attention, Ken survived
his stroke and relearned
the sax. His goal is to
help you recognize stroke
symptoms and act fast.
If you'd like to learn more,
call 1-800-AHA-USA1 or'
visit http://www.amhrt.org
on the World Wide Web.


American Heart
Associat:o:n.f*
ighdikWHo99i H M-W
a dSiok,

Th 990o prorid.9 .. 995190999 lrie. opyright 1997. A*o,,ion 9,0.1 A~ocsto9 9


LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that R.Z.
Harper the holder of the following certifi-
cates has filed said certificates for a tax
deed issue thereon. The certificate num-
bers and years of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.
582 Year of Issuance 1997 Description or
Property Lot 7, of AUCILLA PLANTA-
TION SUBDIVISION, Unit III, a Subdivi-
sion, as per the plat thereof filed at Flat
Book "B", Page 65, of the Public Records
of Jefferson County, Florida. Name in
which assessed Cheirie Wallace All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,
State of Florida. Unless such certificate or
certificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such certifi-
cate or certificates will be sold to the high-
est bidder at the court house door on the
14th day of January, 2005, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 13 day of December, 2004. Carl
D. Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit Court of'
Jefferson County, Florida.
1/14, 21, 28, 2/4. c


TAKE NOTE...


We remember

21 percent
of what we hear

and

80 percent

of what we

READ.


That's why

Newspaper

Advertising

Is the best

INVESTMENT

For Your
Business Dollar








Monticello News

'You Can't Be

Without It'


997-3568


INVITATION TO BID: Jefferson County
Mosquito Control is inviting bids on the
following equipment. One (1) new
mosquito fogger unit, with the minimum
as follows: Heavy duty aerosol generator
with an eighteen (18) horsepower electric
start and automatic throttle down engine,,
fifteen (15) gallon chemical tank with
multipurpose flow control system, electric
choke and spec monitor, three hundred
(300) CFM blower, GPS capable to record
vehicle activity (acres, area, miles, start
and stop), spray emission application, real
time and post tracking software capable.,
Software compatible to visually monitor
and record over enhanced street maps.
Unit to be installed by bidder and a
warranty shall be given on said unit and
installation. Other specifications may be
seen at the Jefferson County Mosquito
Control Office 1255 West Washington
Street, Monticello, Florida during regular
business hours. Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners reserves the right
to accept or reject any and all bids and/or
award said bids as deemed most appropril
ate and most beneficial to Jefferson
County Mosquite Control. Proposals shall
be submitted to Jefferson County
Mosquito Control 1255 West Washington
U


LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE: The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for a position in the
Wastewater Department. The applicant
must have knowledge and experience in
operating a Wastewater Collection
System, knowledge and experience in
maintenance of all electrical and
mechanical processors of wastewater
facilities which include sewer pump
stations, knowledge and experience in
SCADA Systems and PLC's in general.
This is a highly technical position that also
includes some strenuous labor.
Applications will be accepted until
January 20, 2005, 10:00 a.m. Applications
are available at City Hall, 245 Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida, Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The City
of Monticello is an equal opportunity
employer and does not discriminate
against race, color, religion, sex, ancestry,
place of birth, handicap, or national
origin. The City of Monticello is a drug
free workplace, and new employees must
pass a preemployment test.
1/14, 19, c


LEGAL NOTICE

Street Monticello, Florida 32344 Bids shall
be opened at 4 p.m. on January 28, 2005 at
the office of the Jefferson County
Mosquite Control Bidding will close
January 28 at 4 p.m.
1/14,21, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CHASE MANAHTTAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. RAY M.
LACY, et ux., et al., Defendant(s) CASE
NO. 2004-302 NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment Scheduling Foreclosure Sale
entered on January llth, 2005 in this case
now pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in the
JEFFERSON County Courthouse, North
steps of the Jefferson County Courthouse,
intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and 90,
Room 10, Monticello, FL. 32344, at 11:00
a.m. on the 10th day of February, 2005,
the following described property as set
forth in said Order or Final Judgment,
to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK C, ASHVILLE
HIGHLANDS SUBDIVISION, UNIT II, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAY
THEREOF FILED AT PLAT BOOK B,
PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ORDERED at JEFFERSON County,
Florida, this 11th day of January 2005.
Carl D. Boatwright as Clerk, Circuit
Court, JEFFERSON, Florida. SPEAR &
HOFFMAN P.A. 708 South Dixie
Highway, Coral Gables, Florida 33146,
305-666-2299.
1/14, 1/21, c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING: The
Jefferson County Planning Commission
will review and make a recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners
regarding a proposed major residential
subdivision. The subdivision is to be
located on State Highway 59
approximately 1.5 miles south of the
unincorporated community of Lloyd on
approximately 351 acres and includes
about 109 single family lots. Interested
parties may present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Planning Commission
meeting on February 10, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.
in the courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. The meeting
may be continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required of such board commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.'inteiested
persons may contact the Jeffeison County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department at
P.O. Box 1069, Monticello, FL 32345 and
provide comments. The development
proposal may be reviewed during business
hours at the Department office located at
277 North Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344.
1/14, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2004-95-CA;
HIBERNIA NATIONAL BANK, A
NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff vs. DAISY N. REDDICK, et al.
Defendants) NOTICE OF SALE: Notice
Is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure or Order dated
October 26th, 2004, entered in Civil Case
Number 2004-95-CA, in the Circuit Court
for JEFFERSON, Florida, wherein
HIBERNIA NATIONAL BANK, A
NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION
is the Plaintiff, and DAISY N. REDDICK,
et al., are the Defendants, I will sell the
property situated in JEFFERSON,
Florida, described as: Commence at the
Northwest corner of Section 14, Township
1 South, Range 3 East, Jefferson County,
Florida and run N. 89 degrees 59 minutes
E. 971.16 feet along the North boundary of
Section 14 to the Point of Beginning,
thence continue N. 89 degrees 59 minutes
E. 194.40 feet along said section line at a
point, thence due South 462.09 feet to a
point in the center of said road to a point
thence due North 434.51 feet to the Point
of Beginning. Containing 2.0 acres, more
or less, and being part of the Northwest


* Zoned R-2

-* 5 Ponds


LEGAL NOTICE
quarter of Section 14, Township 1 South,'
Range 3 East, Jefferson County, Florida.
SUBJECT TO, HOWEVER, that part
thereof contained in the maintained right-
of-way of the Old St. Augustine Road
along the southerly side thereof; at public
sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at the JEFFERSON County Court-
house Room 10, Jefferson County Court-
house, Intersection US Highways 19 and
90, Monticello, FL 32344 at 11:00 a.m. on
the 17th day of February, 2005 Dated
January 5th, 2005, Dale Boatwright, Clerk
of the Circuit Court. "In accordance with
the Americans With Disabilities Act,
persons in need of a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding shall,
within seven (7) days prior to any proceed-
ing, contact the Administrative Office of
the Court, Jefferson County Courthouse,
Intersection US Highway 19 and 90, 3302-
130, telephone 3302-130, TDD 1-800-955-
8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay
Service."
1/14, 21, c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING: The
Jefferson County Planning Commission
will review and make a recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners
regarding a proposed special exception for
an outdoor recreation development. The
development is to be located at the
intersection of Natural Bridge Road and
the Jefferson County. Leon County Line
on about 477 acres. Interested parties may
present their concerns at the Jefferson
County Planning Commission meeting on
February 10, 2005 at 7:00 p.m. in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. The meeting
may be continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required of such board commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based. Prior to
the meeting interested persons may
contact the Jefferson County Planning and
Building Department at 850-342-0223 or
write the Department at P.O. Box 1069,
Monticello, FL 32345 and provide
comments. The development proposal may
be reviewed during business hours at the
Department office located at 277 North
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344.
1/14, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Leslie E.
Riley or Susan Walsh the holder of the fol-
lowing certificates has filed said crili-
cates for a tax deed issue thereon. The
certificate numbers and years issuance,
the description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows: Certificate No. 643 Year of Issuance
2002 Description or Property Lot 4, Phase
1, Parkway Pines Subdivision, a Subdivi-
sion as per map or Plat thereof recorded
in Plat Nook "B", Page 86, Public Records
of Jefferson County, Florida. Name in
which assessed Federal National Mtg. As-
sociation. All of said property being in the


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 04-258-CA;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS
NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS
FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. Plaintiff,
vs. MARTHA A. JONES, et al.
Defendants. NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE: NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated the llth
day of January, 2005, and entered I Case
NO. 04-258-CA, of the Circuit Court of the
2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Jefferson
County, Florida, wherein MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL
NETWORK, INC. is the Plaintiff and
MARTHA A. JONES; WILLIAM
JONIS; ANNA MAE SCURRY; ANNIE
JONES; CLEVE JONES; LEO JONES;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANNA MAE
SCURRY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ANNIE JONES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF CLEVE JONES; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF LEO JONES; JOHN DOE ;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the
NORTH DOOR OF COURTHOUSE at
the Jefferson County Courthouse, in
MONTICELLO, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 10th day of February, 2005, the
following described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment, to wit: Commence
at the Southwest Corner of Original Lot
Number 5, Dilworths Addition to the town
of Monticello, Florida, as recorded in the
Public Records, Jefferson County, Florida,
and run North 50.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, said point of beginning
being 1654.7 feet North, and 22.0 feet East
of the Southwest corner of the Southeast
quarter of section 30, Township 2 North,
Range 5 East, thence run East 100.0 feet,
thence North 50.0 feet, thence West 100.0
feet, thence South 5b.0 feet to the point of
beginning. Lying and being situated in the
Northwest quarter of the Southeast
quarter of section 30, Township 2 North,
Range 5 East, Jefferson County, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), because of
their disabilities, disabled persons who,
need the ADA Coordinator at Room 10,
Monticello, FL 32344 or telephone
850-342-0218 prior to such proceeding
special accommodation to participate in
these proceeding should contact. Dated
this 11th day of January, 2005. Eleanor B.
Hawkins Clerk of the Circuit Court. Law
Office of Marshall C. Watson, 1800 NW
49th St. Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale,
Florida 33309 telephone 954-453-0365
1/14, 21, c


575-6571


Auction Site
on the Property


A Paved Road Frontage

Planted Pines

Only 2.5 miles from city limits on Hall Road
Great location for waterfront and non-water
front residential building lots
For More Information or Free Color Brochure

1-800-448-2074
Directions: From Intersection of US 19 and US 319 travel North approx. 8/10 mile to Hall Road.
Turn North on Hall Road and travel approx 2 1/2 miles to property on right. Look for Auction Signs!
Terms: 20% down day of auction, balance at closing in 30 days. 10% Buyers Premium.
Inspection:By riding the property or call Harry Plymel at (229) 224-9557 for appointment.
Auction representatives will be on the property Friday, January 28 from 10:00 a.m. to noon and 2:00
m to 5:00 p.m. Stephen F. Burton Harry Plymel
Lic RE Broker/Auctioneer Auction Manager
t_ i GALV1548AB587AU649 AL137 SC358O)R (229) 224-9557
Stan, GA ww.burtonrealtyandlauction.com ;GAL 113324


LEGAL NOTICE

County of Jefferson, State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate or certificates shall be
redeemed according to law the property
described in such certificate or certificates
will be sold to the highest bidder at the
court house door on the 14th day of Janu-
ary, 2005 at 11:00 a.m.. Dated this 8th day
of December, 2004. Carl D. Boatwright
Clerk of Circuit Court, Jefferson County.
Florida.
1/14, 21, 28, 2/4, c

HELP WANTED

NOTICE OF JOB OPENING: Jefferson
Clerk of the Circuit Court is seeking
applicants for Deputy Clerk I. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Room 10, County Courthouse.
Monticello, Florida. Salary range is
$18,470. $23,088. Minimum qualifications
are: Ability to learn court practices,
procedures and rules in a timely manner.
Knowledge of business English, spelling,
grammar and punctuation. Knowledge of
data entry typewriting and use of other
business machines. Ability to understand
and follow through on written and oral
instructions. Ability to establish and
maintain working relationships with the
public, staff judges and attorneys. Ability
to operate a CRT and PC using current.
programs and software. Typing skills.
Telephone courtesy and
information-gathering skills. Education
and experience needed: Graduation from
an accredited high school or possession of
an acceptable equivalency diploma. One
year typing and clerical experience. A
comparable amount of training, education
or experience may be substitutes for the
above minimum qualification.
Applications will be accepted until
January 19, 2005, at the Office of Clerk of;
Circuit Court, address above. Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer. Applicants with a disability
should contact the above office for
accommodation.
1/7, 1/14, c
BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT:
WANTED: Part/Full Time. Duties include
Filing, A/P posting, Inventory Receiving &
Updates, Customer Service. Strong
organizational and people skills a must.
Experience with Quickbooks, Windows
XP, MS Office applications a plus. Benefit
package available. Please call 997-0370
for appointment. All replies confidential.
1/14, tfn,c
NEEDED 55+ to provide in home services,
to the elderly in Jefferson County will
need transportation 20 hours a week. Call
Georgia Braswell 922-0023 x 320.
1/14, c
Wanted Person to work customer service
in lumber yard Saturdays only 7:30 4:00
at Jefferson Builders Mart. Apply in
Person.
1/14, tfn, c

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.

878-3957


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double

Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


Location! Location! Location!




120+ Acres Thomas Co., GA

January 29th 10:00 a.m.


IRS Public Auction Sale!!!



1 5 / acres of land on Highway 90 1 mile west of Monticello


2 210' on highway


3 Chain-link fenced with double gate


4 Old Monticello Gardens Nursery property with barns, greenhouses and pond



Date of Sale: Friday, January 14, 2005 10:00 A.M.


Place of Sale: Jefferson County Courthouse, Monticello



For more info visit www.ustreas.gov/auctions/irs or call Gary Griffin,

IRS Property Appraisal & Liquidation Specialist at 850-942-8990, X 249








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005 PAGE 13


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
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Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Frida3
Call Our Classified Department at:
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Each Additional Line $1.00


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

Use This form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail


Payment In Advance Is Required


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DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
S-' Wednesday Noon for Friday



DATES TO BE PUBLISHED
<


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WRITE YOUR AD HERE










Monticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344


HELP WANTED
$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED. Now
accepting applications. $50 cash hiring
bonus guaranteed in writing
(888)318-1638. Ext. 107.
Www.USMailingGroup.com.
1/14, fcan

Fast Track Foods or Land O'Sun Migiit.
NOW HIRING Managers. Asst..Managers
and retail assistants in Monticello area.
Competitive pay. 1-352-333-3011 ext. 42.
12/6-tfn c
UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 Ext. 3800.
1/14, fcan
ADVANCE YOUR DRIVING CAREER!
Increase in Pay Package. Contractors &
Company Needed. Flat-bed Refrigerated -
Tanker. Over-the-Road. Some Regional.
Commercial Driver's License training.
800-771-6318. www.primeinc.com
1/14 fcan
PC SUPPORT SPECIALIST: North
Florida Community College. Madison, FL
Assist manager in planning, design,
installation, implementation, operation
and maintenance of all facets of computer
networking including hardware, software
and infrastructure. Must also be willing to
serve on college committees and
participate in college and departmental
aeiiities. 'Associate degree (preferred)
plus six (6) months related paid
eTperience. Only complete applications
will be considered. Complete application
packet requires cover letter, resume and
application. Mail to Director of HR,
NFCC, 1000 Turner Davis Drive,
Madison, FL 32340 or email to
IR-Dept@nfcc.edu. Application and
complete job description available at
~.s.nfcc.edu.Deadline 121/2005.EOE
1714. 19. c
D.ri er Conventant Transport.teams and
sqlos check our new pay plan. Owner
Operators. Experienced Drivers, solos,
Teams and Graduate students. Call (888)
IVOREPAY (! -888 667 -3729).
1/14, fcan


HELP WANTED


Now Hiring 2005 Postal Positions Federal,
State and Local. $14.80/$48 + hr. No
experience necessary. Entry level full
benefits. Paid training, call 7 days
888-826-2513 x 705.
1/14 fcan


SERVICES

Heavy Equipment operator Certified.
Training at Central Florida Community
College Campus. Job Placement
Assistance 866-933-1575. Associated
Training Services. 5177 Homosassa Trail,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
1/14, fcan
Lessons in operating your home computer.
2 hr weekly basic lessons in your home.
For more info call 997-5481.
1/7, 1/14, pd
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Discounts For Seniors House painting.
Int. + Ext., Low Rates, Free Estimates
most pressure washing $45 $50, 551-2000
1/7, 14, 21, 28, 2/4, 11, 18, 25, 11, 18, 25,
pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
-Do you want to be just a Christian, with
no denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)

Home Health Care. Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn'
Harrowing and Mowing. Call 997-4650
and ask for George Willis
TFN,c


EXPERIENCED TRAVEL AGENT??

WANTED:

One experienced (with computer skills)

Travel Agent to head up our
Travel-Cruise division.

Casual working environment (office in Monticello)..
guaranteed income.., opportunity to let your talents
zoom. "Experienced Only"...



Send Resume to

charterxpress@yahoo.com -


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
1/14, fcan
AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW
$ Program FL Company offers best cash
now options Have money due from
Settlements, Annuities, or Lotteries? Call
(800)774-3113. www.ppicash.com
1/14, fcan
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machines in 10
locations- $9,995 (800)836-3464#BO2428.
1/14, fcan
Cash loans up to $1000.00. No credit
check! Cash in your checking account
within 24 hrs. Employment req. Go to
www.paychecktoday.com or call
(866)756-0600.
1/14, fcan


REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Escape The heat in The cool western NC
Mountains. Homes, Cabins, Acreage, .&
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty Murphy N.C. Call for Free
Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
1/14, fcan
Enhanced Manufactured Home .with
Land: 4 bedroom, 2 baths with Sun Room
on 1 '/ Acres beautiful count y property,
2,200 Sq. Feet plus car port, Porch, and
Covered Walks. $107,000.00 997-1093
1/7,1/14,1/21, pd

House on .54 acres+ 9ft. ceilings, recessed
lighting in kitchen, large rooms. Approx.
1800 sq ft., 3 bd, 2 ba., laundry' room,
extra room for office, crafts, etc.,.your
choice. Kitchen haslarge island, raised:
dishwasher, real wood cabinets, flat top
stove,.new appliances. Master Bedroom
has large walk-in closet, garden tub and
oversized shower, Asking 139,999. Call,
997-9619.
1/14,19, 21, 26,pd


FOR SALE
NEW QUEEN Pillowtop'mattress set. In
factory plastic with warranty, Can deliver,
Must sell, $175 850-545-7112.
1/14, tfn, c
NEW L, AYhG RQPOM SET:,Suggtesdtsli
$140.0,,Msello1.fa S75 io'eseal $225. chair
$175,, SeAtS-25 Hard frames Aith ifelinme
warranty. 850-222-9879.
Dining room table, leaf, and six chairs,
$600 sofa server table, $300 222-2113.
GREAT DEAL! 7 Week old German
Shepherds priced @ $150 each call
342-1493.
1/12, 14, 19, 21, pd
Mattress set: New King Pillow Top
mattress and base.. In original plastic,
factory warranty, $295 850-222-2113.
1/14, tfn, c
TRUCK TOPPER, Fiberglass, for small
truck. Like New cond. White. $250;
997-1245.
1/7, pd
*Leather Sofa suggested list $1400 100%
new, sell $500. 222-7783
1/14, tfn,c
CHERRY SLEIGH BED, Still in box,
never used. Sacrifice $295. 850-222-7783
Free 4 room direct TV System Includes
installation. 4 MO. FREE programming
w/NFL Sunday Ticket subscription. Over
205 channels! Limited time offer. S&H
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
1/14, fcan
BEDROOM SET 6 pieces, new in boxes.
headboard, frame, dresser, mirror, chest,
nightstand. $595. 850-222-9879.
1/14, tfn,c


QP
YyiANKO j P


FOR SALE

ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS:
You don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all brands and
telephones.
12/8, tfn, c

FOR RENT

1 bedroom Apartment New carpet and
paint. $425 monthly. Includes water and
garbage. Apt. C at 640 E. Washington ST.
Call 342-3288
978/04 tfn c
RV/Mobile Lot Home for Rent in
Monticello Meadow Park for more info.
call Liz at 997-1638
1/5 1/28 c
Charming 1882 Home. Available as 4
bedroom or 3 bedroom. 997-3430,
251-0760.
1/14, c
Pecan Manor Apartments 2 and 3
bedrooms available. $300 $400 monthly.
Please call 251-6931.
17, c

GARAGE SALE
COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET:
Saturday through January. Rent a space
for as little as $15. To reserve a space call
342-1054 or 997-1754. Hosted by the
Lloyd Lions Club at the U-Haul Sales &
Storage warehouse, 7337-A Old Lloyd Rd.
The Lions will have a food booth, bake
sale, and membership table set up.
(fn, ne



VIRGINIAG BLOW
850-509-1844
CRISTI BESHEARS
850-251-4392

OPEN HOUSE
: SUNDAY
1:00 PM 3:00 PM
1 111 Boston Hwy
1986 2 story 2,016 sq, ft.
Country Home on 2. 69 AC
$. 220,000
AND
o.0-p0, 532 Dills Rd. !
S....:' 2003 Cusyli Brick "
S2,370 sq. ft. on 5. i AC
$275,000

t ' )LDWI11.1. BANKER
KI:LI.Y & KI.LLY PRO('.



GREAT OPPORTUNITY!


JOIN OUR TEAM
TODAY Y!


a


; Seeking Technician
candidates. No prior automotive
:experience is required, just a
willingness to learn and a positive'
attitude.
We'offer competitive
compensation, plus a great
.,,; ,benefits package.... .
Please apply at any of our
locations in Tallahassee,
,Crawfordville or Quincy. You
may also fax your resume to
850-222-5152
Attn: Tech Position.

SApplicants must pass a drug test.


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES


OPEN HOUSES

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 1-3 PM

54 WOODLANE DRIVE
TAKE 19 N. RIGHT ON BOSTONH\ LEFT ON WOODLAND
(4 BED., 2 B.TH 2045 SQ. FT.)

1330 E. PEARL STREET
TAKE 90E. LEFT ON SIMiSON RIGHT ON PEARL
(3 BED., 2 BATH 1600 SQ. FT.)


Katrina
% alton


Sarah
Ann
Hofmeister
850-212-816


Monticello and Perry Florida
(850) 997-5516 or visit www. cbkk corn


COLDWELL


,I


Kelly & Kelly Properties


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Terrific Home Like new, built in 2002, 3
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch, tile
floors, cathedral ceiling, fireplace on one
acre in the country $175,000
Country Livinq 3 bedroom 2 bath home
(16'x80'), 12'x16' shed, big brick BBQ, nice
pond, chain link fence, 6. 8 acres all this an
diesel tractor w/bush hog only $80,000
Paso Farm 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Repo Big 4 bedroom 2 bath double wide
on a hill way out in the country, new carpet,
with 2 acres asking $89,900
Lakefront Under Contract 16.54 acres
on Lake Hall in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly fenced pasture
nice location near Lamont $40,000
Wonderful Home Very nice 4 bedroom 2
bath 2000 double wide with fireplace on
1.9 acres on South Main Street $69,500
The Partridge House circa 1830, cur-
rently 5 could be 7 unit apartment build-
ing great potential as a bed and breakfast
with suites only $240,000
Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah Highway
fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per acre
Check the Price!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10.
ac in planted pines, the balance in real
rough hunting land, a great buy $79,500
Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2 wooded
acres in the country, perfect for a mobile
home or cabin $7,500
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with screened porch at the end of the road
between Monticello and Lloyd $63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000
Buyers looking for Homes and Land







Buyers looking for Homes and Land



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See t All
www.TimPeary.com
Simply Me Best!

Al Maryland 508-1936


Realtor Tim Pearv Sells Real Estate


-jr-W- 10-l--ir WA 11


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 14, 2005


-' ',. .

' b -5 i


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


Jefferson Elementary and Howard
Middle Schools recently underwent
review by the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools.
Among the observations of the
team at JES were:


'. *Curriculum development has
been ongoing and has demonstrated
significant growth in student
achievement.
*JES is commended for using its
data to determine program effective-
S ness.
*The school is commended for
instructional leadership demon-
strated by the principal and assistant


principal, in addressing curriculum
needs.
The faculty's enthusiasm and com-
mitment to this endeavor has
brought about progress in student
performance.
*Staff development opportunities
are directly related to school im-
provement and are clearly stated
and focused on improving student
performance.
*The school is commended for
strong academic programs such as
SRA, Open Court Reading, Success
Maker and hiring reading and math
coaches.
In summary, the team found JES
to be an exciting place for students,
teachers, parents and community.


Dynamic leadership is evident in
every aspect of the school. It has a
dedicated staff that holds the educa-
tional welfare of students as top pri-
ority.
Among the observations of the
team at HMS were:
*Faculty, staff, and administration
are commended for analyzing the
academic needs of students and im-
plementing programs to meet those
needs, such as: Reading Explosion,
Accelerated Reader, Boys and Girls
Club Tutorial Program.
*The school is commended for
utilizing interim assessments to
monitor student progress.
*The team commends the school
for creating a positive, structured
learning climate for all members of


Peer Review Team Report


Commends HMS, JES


PLEASE take me home. I'm lovable and friendly and I like
to be fed and taken care of. You'll be glad you saw me!
(News Photo)



Humane Society Names

Bosco Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Humane Society has
named Bosco as its adoptable pet
of the week.
Bosco is a four and one half
month old black and brown Ger-
man Shepherd Mix neutered male.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes him as very intelligent
and lovable. "He learns very fast,"
she said.


Bosco is extremely playful and
gets along well with other dogs,
cats and children.
He is an indoor/outdoor animal
and is not housebroken, but will
catch on quickly to the training.
Bautista explains to whomever
adopts Bosco, that he will require
frequent bathing because of overly
active oil glands in his skin.
Anyone wishing to adopt Bosco
or any of the many other adoptable
pets at the Humane Society can'call
342-0244.


Historical Association

Schedules Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Historical
Association (JCHA) announces its
annual meeting, set for 7 p.m., Mon-
day, Jan. 24, at the Wirick-Simmons
House.
Rhea Miller, of Lloyd, has been
scheduled to speak about the his-
torical communities in the county.
Miller is a. long time resident of
Lloyd and has written a book on the
history of Lloyd. The program for
this event will discuss the early be-
ginnipgs of this community.
Miller holds a Ph.D. in literature
from FSU, and also a long time in-
terest in history.
She is a member of the Bond fam-
ily, early Lloyd settlers. Her great
grandmother was a Lloyd.
Miller lives in Lloyd, as do a num-
ber of members of her family. Her
late husband, Wm. D. Miller, was a
professor at FSU and historian.
Plans for the Spring include fund-
raising; lunches which will be
served and house tours will be given
during the Florida Bike Week, on
Saturday, March 19.
A gala dinner is also planned for
some time in the Spring. The col-


Driving under

the influence

doesn't just

mean alcohol.
Driving while impaired is a
leading cause of car accidents, but
alcohol is not the only culprit.

Drugs, including prescription
and over-the-counter drugs, can
also impair your driving.
Some medications, such as
antihistamines and anti-anxiety
medications for example, may
affect your driving skills.


elected funds will be used for the
much needed repairs to the Genea-
logical Library and for landscaping
improvements at the Wirick-
Simmons House.
JCHA reports that during Decem-
ber, 2004, the beautifully decorated
Wirick-Simmons House was open
on the' 3rd, during the Downtown
Christmas Celebration, and also for
the Main Street Candlelight Tour on
the 4th.
A reception, following the dedica-
tion ceremony of the Oakfield
Cemetery well, was also held at the
Wirick-Simmons House.
Business wise, dues for 2005 are
due at the January meeting. Atten-
dance and membership is needed
and appreciated.
Dues may be mailed to: JCHA,
c/o Sandy. Swords, Treasurer,
P.O.Box 496, Monticello, FL.
32345.
The community will be kept
posted on upcoming programs and
the activities of the JCHA.


2005 Hazardous

Weather Awareness

Poster Contest


Who May Enter
Any Florida student enrolled in fourth or fifth grades during the 2004 2005 school year.

Mailing
Posters must be packed, wrapped flat and mailed to the: American Red Cross, 187 Office Plaza
Dr, Tallahassee Fl 32301.

Deadline
Posters must be postmarked on or before Tuesday February 15 2005 and must arrive at the
American Red Cross no later than Thursday February 18 2005. Winners will be notified by mail.

Poster Specifications
1. Posters must be submitted on poster or illustration board.
2. The overall dimensions shall be approximately 15" x 20".
3. All artwork must be original and may be any media desired with the exception of pencil,
chalk, charcoal or glitter.
4. Stenciled, traced, computer-generated or commercially manufactured stick-on lettering or
graphics are prohibited.
5. All posters will become the property of the American Red Cross.
6. Posters will be judged on both the clarity of the preparedness message and the quality of the
art. Posters with misspelled words will be eliminated.

Identification
The following information should appear on the back of the poster: Artist's name, age, grade,
home address, telephone number and names of parents. School's name, address and telephone
number along with the name of the art instructor or classroom teacher if any.

Winners
First Prize $100 Savings Bond / Second Prize $50 Savings Bond / Third Prize $25 Savings Bond

The top judged poster from each County School District will be displayed in the Rotunda of the
State Capital during Florida's Hazardous Weather Awareness Week.

Sponsored by: Florida's American Red Cross Chapters, the National Weather Services, the State
of Florida Division of Emergency Management, the State of Florida Department of Education
and the Florida Emergency Preparedness Association.


+ Amer.ican
Red Cross 1
'- l'ti ^ t ^ ^.


P'nAT


.For more information about
how some drugs may impair
your ability to drive safely, visit
the National Safety Council's
websieat www.nsc.org.


the school community.
*The school is commended for its
mentoring program to enhance the
performance of students.
*The school is commended for
the collegiality that exists among the
faculty and staff.
*HMS is commended for acquir-
ing state of the art technology.
*HMS is commended for model-
ing and promoting appropriate
school attire.
In summary, the team found HMS
to be a school with a strong, skillful
leader, committed to academic ex-
cellence.
The school leadership and instruc-
tional staff are commended for us-
ing research based instructional
strategies.

The school culture supports a pro-
fessional learning community. Self
discipline and responsible citizen-
ship are emphasized.


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