<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Lifestyle
 Sports
 Classified


UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00002
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: January 7, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00002
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Sports
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST


UN
QA

Cox Soul Food
Donates 200

Holiday Dinners

See Story, Photo, Page 2


LVtl S11X U E ,l-\L\-i" n.
IN VTLLF, FL 32611

Campaign

Boosts New

Blood Donors

See Editorial, Page 4


Orlando Opera

Plans Extravaganza

At Opera House

See Story, Photo, Page 5
I C


Festival Committee

Sets Dates,

Plans Events

See Story, Page 7
I31 I-


C FFriday Morning





Montic


137TH YEAR NO.02, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


II


ews


City May Yet Join Ranks Of




internet Service Providers


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


,!i
.1iii;


CERTAIN COMPONENTS of the high-speed Internet system
are to be installed on the city's three water towers. (News
Photo)


Police Speed Control

Program Is Effective


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Monticello Police Depart-
ment's pilot speed-enforcement pro-
gram has proven so effective, the
City Council has decided to con-
tinue it.
At least, until the -speeding is
curbed. It doesn't hurt, of course,
that the program has also proven
profitable.
As Police Chief David Frisby in-
formed the council Tuesda,, night,
the program produced $2,000 in
revenues for the city during the
three-month period from September
through November. Not bad for a
$500 investment.
And October, he pointed out, was-
n't a particularly good month, given


that he lost an officer and had to re-
place the individual.
But now that the department was
back to full force, he expected that
officers would once again be able to
dedicate time to traffic enforcement,
he said.
Frisby requested that the council
reimburse him the $500 he used
from the department's investigative
account, and that it grant him an-
other $500 from the $2,000 to fund
the program another three months.
The way the program works, the
$500 is used to pay the officers
overtime for doing traffic control af-
ter regular hours.
The idea is to stop speeding
within the city, particularly among
the eighteen wheelers that race.into
the city from the north and south on
(See Speed Control Page 7)


Proponents Say Benefits

Of System Are Countless


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Megabytes, DSL, routers, portals,
intranet, BPMs ...
It could well have been a Greek
chorus reciting. Greek terminology,
given the baffled looks on some
City Council members' faces Tues-
day night.
But no, these were computer ex-
perts well versed in the technologi-
cal language of computerese, trying
to explain to council members in
layman's terms the advantages of
the city installing its own high-
speed Internet service.
As Frank Luft, a systems designer'
Tyler Ellis, a elf-jae:'..ed ,olv.... "
guru -- and the city's own computer
expert, Charlie Colvin -- explained
the vision Tuesday night, the bene-
fits of wireless broadband connec-
tivity are almost limitless.
Not only would the system pro-
vide computer users within the city.
with faster and cheaper Internet
service, citizens would also be able


to check and pay their city bills on-
line, download water usage and
other pertinent information, and ac-
quire e-mail accounts.
,As for the city, it would reap fi-
nancial rewards, as well as ensuring
more efficient and secured opera-
tions. Conceivably, the system even-
tually could be incorporated into a
citywide network that would moni-
tor pump stations and other equip-
ment and enhance law enforce-
ment's capabilities, among other
things.
Indeed, the trio painted a picture
of a near-perfect technological fu-
ture when telephone land lines will
be all but obsolete and people will
h.e able to accomplish most
communications-related tasks via
wireless gadgetry.
To put it in the words of one pre-
senter, a mother will be able to
watch her kid at the park while com-
posing or e-mailing information on
her handheld computer/cell phone or
"play a game with someone in Seat-
tle, Washington, at no cost."
The elected officials had some


DAVID HOBBS, new sheriff, ,gets his wife,
Brenda, to pin on his star, while daughter
Brittany look on. Hobbs was one of six con-


self-confessed "dumb" and "even
dumber questions". Such as: What is
the feasibility of such a system? Can
the city afford it? What will be the
cost to the average citizen?
"This is a pretty big step we're
fixing to take," Councilman Brian
Hayes observed at one point.
Hayes said he realized the discus-
sion was still at the conceptual
stage, but wasn't a feasibility study
warranted? It seemed to him that a
feasibility study would be the first
requirement of any bank the city ap-
proached to financethe project, he
said.
He was plowing old ground, City.
Superintendent Don Anderson told
Hayes. The fact was that the com-
mittee assigned to study the project
had already considered and ad-
dressed these issues.
"There's lending companies that
are hopping to lend the city the
moneyright now," Anderson said.
It was a fact, affirmed Luft, of
Graybar Financing. His company, in
fact, was ready to commit $250,000
to the city and defer the first pay-
ment until nine months after the in-
stallation of the system.
How likely was that Monticello
could interest enough customers to
make the system viable? council


stitutional officers sworn in Tuesday morn-
ing in a brief courtroom ceremony. See
additional photos on page 3. (News Photo)


Lobbying Group Scores

Points With Big Players


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


STHE POLICE DEPARTMENT ,generated three-month period. Officials have decided
$2,000 in traffic fines for the city during a to continue the program. (News Photo)


Credit the legislative lobbying
committee with raising its and the
county's profiles with the movers
and shakers in state government.
On Dec. 15, committee members
Curt Kiser, Dick Bailar, Kim Barn-
hill, David Frisby, Julie Conley and
Felix Joyner met first with Senator
Nancy Argenziano and then with Lt.
Governor Toni Jennings.
Barnhill pronounced the two
meetings positive, particularly the
one with Jennings.
"We're now on their radar
screen," Barnhill said. "Sen. Ar-


genziano has worked with us to get
our priorities and our concerns up-
front.
"We're now trying to get on the all
the legislators' radar screens so that
they know that we have issues and
concerns and that we want them ad-
dressed. We haven't really fared so
well in the past."
Barnhill said the committee's
next step is to meet with Gov. Jeb
Bush and members of his staff on
Jan. 13.
"Our strategy is to get our issues
and concern on the table so that they
know that we are here and to be
reckoned with," Barnhill said. "In
the past, we haven't been as vocal."
(See Lobbying Page 2)


members wanted to know.
If the federal and industry statis-
tics could be believed, all indica-
tions were that broadband service
commanded 53 percent of the mar-
ket in America presently and was
expect to continue growing, said the
experts. Say the city attracted but 30
percent of the available local cus-
tomers, that could well translate into
revenues of $45,000 monthly, the
said.
And the cost to the city -- the
monthly charge it would have to pay
the telephone company for provid-
ing the Internet connection -- would
be $2,060, they said.
What exactly was it that the group
was asking the council to do or try-
ing to accomplish via its presenta-
tion, Mayor Julie Conley asked after
a while.
"I'd like you to give the staff the
authority to request bids," Anderson
said.
As it was, he said, the staff had
spent over a year reviewing differ-
ent designs and had eliminated
three. The staff knew exactly what
design it wanted. It merely needed
to know how much it would cost to
implement the particular design.
"We want permission to request
(See Internet Page 5)


Oaths


Order


Of Day

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Tuesday was a day for oaths.
First it was the six newly elected
or reelected constitutional officers
who took the oath of office in a
brief ceremony 8 a.m. in the court-
room.
Then it was the taking of the oath
of office by deputies and jailers un-
der the command of the new sheriff
and by the new City Council mem-
ber appointed to replace Eugene
Hall.
Newly elected or reelected offi-
cers participating in the morning
ceremony were: Sheriff David
Hobbs, newly-elected to the office;
School Superintendent Phil Barker,
Tax Collector Lois Hunter, and
Elections Supervisor Marty Bishop,
reelected to second terms; and Clerk
of Court Dale Boatwright and Prop-
erty Appraiser David Ward, ree-
lected to third terms.
About 50 people attended the
morning ceremony, including
friends and relatives of the public
officials and a contingency of Flor-
ida Highway Patrol troopers and
various representatives of the Sher-
iffs Department.
Following the brief ceremony,
Hobbs proceeded to the Sheriffs
Office, where he administered the
oath to the deputies and correctional
officers at the jail.
"They swear to the same oath that
they swore to when they were first
hired," Hobbs said of the deputies
and jailers. "They're just making the
oath to a new supervisor."
(See Oaths Page 7)


.... ..








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005


Lobbying
(Continued From Page 1)
She stressed that the effort was a
joint one, involving the city, the
county and the School Board. Only
by presenting a united front to the
legislators can the-community hope
to succeed' in accomplishing its
goals, say the committee members.


I


Monticello News

Subscribe Today!

n State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00


I


MEMBERS of the Legislative Lobbying Committee recently genziano, Curt Kiser, Dick Bailar, Lt. Gov. Toni Jennings,
met with two key players in state government in an effort Kim Barnhill, David Frisby, Julie Conley and Felix Joyner.
to raise the county's profile. From left, Senator Nancy Ar-
S o l F o nMrs. Theodore Mack, Mrs. He
Cox Soul Food Donates Thompson, Betty Connor, Rev.


200 Christmas Dinners


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Cox's Soul Food Restaurant and
the community came together for
another "Day of Giving Back to the
Community" on Christmas day.
Some 200 dinners were prepared
and distributed to those less fortu-
nate, and to staff who were on duty
Christmas day at the Fire Depart-
ment, and at the Brynwood.and Jef-
ferson Nursing Centers.
Also distributed were toys and
clothing to residents of the commu-
nity and to the Jefferson Nursing


Center.
The traditional holiday feast' in-
cluded smoked ham and turkey,
baked turkey, fried and baked
chicken, candied yams, string beans,
macaroni and cheese, collard greens,
dressing, sweet potato pie, red vel-
vet, chocolate, and lemon cakes, in
addition to soft drinks.
Gracious volunteers and generous
donors included: Monticello Com-
munity Temple COGIC, Living
Word Gospel Church, Branch Street
Funeral Home, Coldwell 'Banker
Kelly and. Kelly Properties, Ollie
Swan, Elder and Mrs. Eddie Lee,
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Williams, Vi
Ellis, and Debi Scheiferstein.


---- --



a
P5 1 fib ;i- ......:

'' '41,


HELPING with the preparation of the Christ-
mas Day meal at Cox's Soul Food Restau-
rant were, L-R:- Debi Scheiferstein, Tami


Auditions Si

Opera HousI


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Auditions will be held 5 p.m, Sufi-
day at the Opera House for the mu-
sical Fantasticks, and. other Spring
2005 productions.
George Hook will direct the "Fan-
tastics",, whichhad its Broadway de-
but in 1969, featuring the late Jerry
Ohrbach in a leading role.
Rebecca Burkart will be Music Di-
rector for the production.
The story with book and lyrics by
Tom Jones, music by Harvey
Schmidt, is a timeless fable of love:
that manages to be nostalgic and
universal at the same time..
The cast of "Fantastics" is mostly
male, so men of all ages are encour-
aged to audition.
The show will run Friday and Sat-
urday evenings, March 4, 5, and 11,
12 with a Sunday matinee March
13.
Following the musical rehearsals
will begin for the annual Mystery
Dinner Theater which will be pre-
sented the weekends of April 28 and
May 6.
A script has not yet been selected
but cast 'members will be chosen
from those auditioning. on Jan. 9.
The search is on for individuals
and groups interested in performing
in the Second Old Time Vaudeville
Revue, to be presented March 18,
19.
Auditions for the revue will not
take place Jan. 9, but sign:ups are


Also, the Greater Fellowship MB
Church, James Thompson, Vivian
Thompson, Wilson Hamilton and
his niece, Mary Barrington, Tami
Richard, Kris Bellamy, John
Collins, Ann Adams, St. Tabernacle
COGIC, Rev. and Mrs. Melvin Rob-
erts, Allen Liquors, and Jennifer Al-
len.
Also, Lewis Produce of Thomas-
ville, Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson,
VFW Post 251, Ronnie Monroe,
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hall, Martha
Hall, Rev. and Mrs. Byron Barnhart,
Willard Barnhart, Max Bilinski, Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Thomas, David
Ward; Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Wilson,
Mr. aid Mrs. Henry Mays, Mr. and


i" "~~~' fslq;


Richard, Jennifer Allen, Kris Bellamy, Glo-
ria Cox-Jones, Rev. Melvin Roberts and Vi
Ellis.


Sun d a Fo Those interested in auditioning for
un day For1 the musical should prepare a short
musical selection, and bring sheet
e Show s music with them. Burkart will be on
hand to provide accompaniment.
Non singers need not prepare an
requested, will auditions planned at audition piece. Scripts will be pro-
a later date. vided for readings.

More People Change Their Lives in
January Than Any Other Time of the Year!
Real Estate Sales Allied Health Programs
License Preparation Medical Billing
NEW! and Coding Specialist
Principles, Practices Adv. Med. Coding
& Law Course Phlebotomy Tech.
63 Hour Pre-License course
The medical community
Full preparation for the
state exam. continues to need these
Wednesday 6-9 specializations. All of our
Saturday 9-5 programs will prepare you for
63 hrs./6-wk program national certifications.
Starts Jan 5th! Enroll NOW! New classes begin Jan 8th!

NEW ON-LINE COURSES Oracle 9i
300 COURSES TO CHOOSE FROM!!!! Becoming credentialed in this
Chose from Accounting, Grant powerful database application
Writing, Test Prep (ACT, SAT, GRE, will get an employer's
GMAT, LSAT, GED), and MANY will get an employer's
MORE!! Call to register or go to attention!
www.ed2go.com/keisercollege Data Modeling & Relational
Database Design
A+ Certification Prep. Enroll now and hold
Learn to configure, install, upgrade, your seat for the
diagnose, repair, service, and support New Year Course Start!!
microcomputers. This program prepares....
you to take 2 independent administered Custom Training
certification exams to become an Train employees at your site
A+Certified Service Technician. Customize your training content
An A+ Certification is the perfect : Competrive costs
primer for MCSE training. :. Competitive costs

'-

COLLEGE
Tallahassee Call Catie at
Department of Continuing & QfA Q^
Professional Education 90 6W90


tA21r


FROM

AmpEar

Electronics
On Site Laboratory Since 1986
HARBARA STANLtEY
hIC-Ills
Serving N:orAt loridu
Since 1972


rbert
and


Mrs. James Mack, Ann Dickey,
Sarah Bythewood and Mr. and Mrs.
Pearlie Mack.
And, a special thanks also to Lt.
and Mrs. William Massey, and to
Monticello Cleaners for their last
minute answers for help.
Proprietor Gloria Cox-Jones and
Rev. Don Jones express their appre-
ciation to all who made the event
possible.
They will continue to accept dona-
tions of money, clothing,,and blan-
kets and can be reached at 997-2359
or 997-4572 for more information.


.Hearing Evaluations
Oldest Hearing Aid-dispensing business in the this area
Faster Service Lower Prices Expert Quality

TALLAHASSEE

HEARING AID CENTER




903 N. Monroe St. 222-3902
www.amp-ear.com
Anoroved I'ctor:-trained dispenser of digital hearing aids.


FACTORY OUTLET
THOMASVILLE BEDDING COMPANY
OF GEORGIA Est.196
A Family Owned Business Where The Customer Still Counts!
In Stock -
Tempur Pedic e
S- A Mattress That Will
Meet Your Needs & Comfort -'-
-r : ',.- --. "Where The Customer Still Comes First"
Call Or Come By 671-3002
www.thomasvillebedding.com
3347 Capital Circle NE (Across from Kevin's & Home Depot)



ATTENTION JEFFERSON COUNTY HOMEOWNERS

Jefferson County is seeking applicants to participate in the Community
Development Block Grant Housing Rehabilitation program to assist homeown-
ers with repairs. This program is designed to perform general code related
repairs and improvements for low and low to moderate-income homeowners.
Items eligible for repair includes roofs, heating systems, plumbing, electrical and
other code related housing systems. Currently, Jefferson County has funds
available to assist a limited number of homeowners. Applicants must meet the
following eligibility requirements for this program:

IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING APPLY:
*. If you own or are buying your home.
*If this is your primary residence
*If your total household income is below the guidelines listed below:
*If your home is located in the unincorporated areas of the county.
(Staff will assist you in making this determination).

Household size: 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person

Annual
Household
Income: $25,700 $29,400 $33,850 $36,700 $39,650 $42,600 $45,550 S48,450

If you would like to be considered for possible assistance, call Lisa Blair at
850-877-1908 and request that an application package be nailed to you or you
may pick up an application at the Jefferson County Grants Office located at
1697 S. Jefferson (Highway 19), Monticello, Fl. Please bring completed
applications to the homeowners meeting scheduled for January 24, 2005 at 2:00
p.m. This meeting will be held at the Jefferson County Emergency Management
Office located at 1240 North Jefferson Street, Monticello, Florida.
All applications are subject to review, ranking and approval by Jefferson
County. If you cannot attend this meeting, please mail your completed
application and documents to:
Meridian Community Services Group
1206 NW 22nd Avenue
Gainesville, Fl 32601

To be considered in the initial ranking, your application must be received no later than
January 24, 2005.

Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer
Handicap Accessible Facilities


~P~d"


~ab






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005 PAGE 3


aiE
i I/i

~ i"


i 4- .. "


---- .. ..--

CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS take the oath Lois Hunter, Phil Barker, Marty Bishop,
of office Tuesday morning in the courtroom. David Hobbs. Administering the oath is
From left, David Ward, Dale Boatwright, Judge Bobby Plaines. (News Photo)


TOM VOGELGESANG takes the oath of office Vogelgesang replaces Eugene Hall, elected
Tuesday prior to the City Council meeting, to the County Commission. (News Photo)


Health Department Offers


Cervical Cancer screening
Health: Depatmef -fers




Cevia Cancer Screening
TOM--- VOGLGEAN tae th aho fic oegsn rpae uee al lce
Tue'sda r io oteCt oni etnt h onyCm iso.(esPoo
,Health_~; De at e tO f r
Cevca ane Srenn


FRAN HUNT
St a ffWriter
The Florida Department of Health-
recognizes January as Cervical
Cancer Month. Screening for cer-
vical cancer is crucial because, with
early detection, it is nearly 100 per-
cent curable.
The County Health Department
offers cancer screenings.
For information or to make an
appointment call 342-0170
"Worldwide, cervical cancer is the.
most common type of cancer
among women," Women's Health
Officer Nancy Humbert, ARNP,
MSN, said. "We are committed to
supporting cervical cancer screen-.
ing to reduce the effect of this dis-
ease for all. We encourage women
to be proactive in its detection."
Each year, approximately 15,000
women in the United States learn
they have cancer of the cervix. The
American Cancer Society reports
that between 60-80 percent of
American with newly diagnosed in-
vasive cervical cancer, have not
had a Pap smear in the past five
and may have never had one.
The unserved population groups
include older women, the
uninsured, ethnic minorities (espe-
cially Hispanic women, African
Americans and Asian Americans),


and poor women, particularly in ru-
ral areas.
" -Since the early 1970's however,
incidence of and mortality from
cervical cancer have declined
nearly 40 percent, due in large part
to early detection through increased
use of the Pap test.
A simple, painless procedure that
detects abnormal cell growth in and
around the cervix, the Pap test can
be performed in a doctor's office or
clinic. Often, such cell changes
can be treated before they become
cancerous.
Women 21 years of age or older,
and those under 21 who are sexu-
ally active, should ask that pelvic
examinations and Pap tests be in-
cluded in their physical examina-
tions at least once every three
years. Every women should dis-
cuss with her doctor what testing
schedule is right for her.

1 The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


NW


IRS Public Auction Sale!!!


1 5 /4 acres of land on Highway 90 1 mile west of Monticello

2 210' on highway

3 Chain-link fenced with double gate

4 Old Monticello Gardens Nursery property with barns, greenhouses and pond


Date of Sale:

Place of Sale:


Friday, January 14, 2005 10:00 A.M.

Jefferson County Courthouse. Monticello


For more info visit www.ustreas.gov/auctions/irs or call Gary Griffin,
IRS Property Appraisal & Liquidation Specialist at 850-942-899, X 249
4:


Blue BirdcfHomes & Lands, Inc.
Presents
Special Guests: Director from Escambia Bond
Program will speak this Saturday,
January 8th at 9:00 a.m.

We will advise you on how to obtain $10,000 for
a down payment/closing costs for a home
purchase of up to $189,682

Please Attend
Our First Time Home Buyer's Course offered
FREE the second Saturday of Each month since
1999 at the Chamber of Commerce

For future info, please call


997-1360 F
Jr Homes and Lands, Inc.


~>z h,

~Q~


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
\\ill meet at 9:00 a.m.
January 12. 2005, at
the Jefferson County
Extension Office.
275 North lMIulbe-rr
Street.









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

AE RON CICHON
r 0"ID4 Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Campaign Boosts


New Blood Donors


Each year, nearly .five million
Americans need a lifesaving blood
transfusion and 38,000 units of
blood are needed daily in this coun-
try.
Critically low inventories nation-
wide frequently result in public ap-
peals for donations.
About 60 percent of the U.S.
population is eligible to donate
blood, but only five ,percent does.
Almost 20 percent of non-donors
cite "never thought about it" as the
main reason for not giving.
'Few people realize that blood has
a shelf life-of only 42. days or that;
eligible, donors are allowed to give
blood every two months (or 56
days).
As additional donor, restrictions
are implemented and the population
ages, the country could lose more
and more willing donors, which
could cause an even greater threat to
our national blood supply.
The Advertising Council is part-
neringjwith AABB (formerly known
at the American Association of
Blood Banks), America's Blood
Centers and the American Red
Cross to launch the blood banking
community's first national, un-
branded ..public education and
awareness campaign,,
""Geared towards young adults, the
public service advertising (PSA) ini-
tiative is designed to raise awareness
about the importance of and need
for blood donation in order to foster
a new generation of lifelong donors.


S This thought-provoking new ini-
tiative was developed to catch the
attention of young adults, especially
17-24-year-olds, to increase aware-
ness of the need for regular blood
donation and to set the foundation
for lifelong donor behavior.
Created pro bono by ad agency
Euro RSCG Worldwide New York,
the campaign includes television, ra-
dio, outdoor and Internet advertising
and directs young adults to visit a
ne\, comprehensive Web' Sit,
www.bloodsaves.com, where. they
can learn more about the need for a
robust blood supply and obtain in-


DRIVER blinded by the morning sun, plowed
into an Aucilla Christian Academy school
bus in Jan, 1988. The Jaws of life helped


free occupants trapped in the car. (News
File Photo)


...Opinion & Comment


SShort Takes & Other Notions


BY RON CICHON
Publisher


formation and resources, -.10 .elp I
ormanon ana resources nep Warm weather this week is a wel-
them donate blood in their commu- .
Come change from the bitter cold of
nity. .Christmas day... Good to see young-
Titled "Save the World," the new
S t W t n sters getting the Roostertown garden
campaign features young adults dis- ready for Spring planting.
cussing the extreme lengths they
have gone to try to make a differ- Ragtime pianist Bob Milne at the
ence in the world in an effort to Opera House tonight. On Jan. 14,
show' ho" do6naig bloods i'an eas '3 li'th laando O"pera Company
way to positively and significantly retums. Everybody I know who has
make an impact. seen the Opera Company raves
PEach PSA rconcludesl' with the ta, about the show.


line, "Saving the world isn't easy.
Saving a life is. And just one pint of
blood can save up to three lives."
The PSAs are being distributed to
more than 20,000 media outlets na-,
tionwide and will air in.advertising
time and space that is donatedby, the
media.
To donate blood, one-must be
healthy, at least 17 years old, weigh
110 pounds or more and meet other
donor requirements.


Make This Year Best

With New Approaches


BY DR. KATHLEEN HALL
Stress Managemeqt~Expert

Are you overworked, overbooked
and overwhelmed? Don't panic,
with a few simple changes you can
make a huge difference in your life.
Here are ten tips' that will not only
reduce stress but %' ill allo'% you. to
find the extraordinary meaning in
everyday activities.
S1. Stress reduction in a minute.
Studies show that during the da,, as
little as five minutes of meditation,
deep breathing and yoga can lower
blood pressure, release healing hor-
mones, increase creativity and pro-
duction and help" y6ur ability to'
handle stressful situations.
2. Exercise at least 30 minutes
every other day. Walk at lunch, set a
treadmill up in your television room.
Take up Pilates. Exercise lowers
your risk of stroke, diabetes,
arthritis, cancer, heart disease, and
osteoporosis
3. Laugh as often as possible.
Laughter releases endorphins, the
body's natural pain killers. Laughter
lowers blood pressure,, reduces
stress hormones and boosts your im-
mune function.
,4. Play;. Playfulness increases
creativity and increases disease


fighting immiune"'ells'.
5. Pay attention. Become aware of
emotions (stressors and calming
forces) and how these affect your
choices, relationships, home life and
work.
6. Eat breakfast. People who eat
breakfast consume less fat and have
a higher intake of essential vitamins
and minerals, resulting in lower se-
rum cholesterol 'and a lower heart at-
tack risk.
7. Get a pet. Studies show that
owning a pet can help reduce blood
pressure. Emotional life savers, pets
help people experience intimacy and
deal with changes in their lives.
8. 'You ieed a friend. Friendship is
not a luxury, but is essential to
work-life balance and your health.
Studies show isolation decreases im-
mune functioning.
9. Maintain an attitude of
gratitude. It's impossible to be
grateful and experience stress at the
same time. Studies' tell us daily
gratitude exercise result in higher
levels of alertness, enthusiasm, de-
termination, optimism and energy.
10. Altruism and philanthropy. Al-
truism neutralizes negative emotions
and makes people feel stronger and
more energetic. It counters the
harmful effects of stress.


Letters to the Editor Welcomed

500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include

phone number of writer


Best wishes to David Hobbs as he
begins his term as our Sheriff. This
job has grown more and more com-
plex over the years... Tom Vogelge-
sang begins sen ice on the City
councill having been appointed- to
fill the unexpired term of Gene Hall
who was elected. to the County
Commission.



Holiday
Family conflicts can be exacer-
bated under the stress of the holiday
season; particularly) on the heels of a
divisive presidential' election, but a
Lirmersir of Florida expert offers
suggestions for setting aside differ-
ences and, letting love rule .during
the holidays.
"Getting through family events re-
quires a lot of flexibility and the
ability to remember that, although
you didn't .pick your family, .they
didn't pick you either," said UF psy-
chologist .Garret Evans.' "In many
fanilies,'.et en though they might ar-
gue over politics or lifestyles, when
push comes to shove, they quickly
rally to each other."


Stuff you might want to know:
McDonald's has 1.5 million em-
ployees worldwide... Indonesia con-
sists only of islands, 13,667 alto-
gether... it would take 29 million
years for a car traveling 100 miles
per hour to reach the nearest star.
Quotable quote: "Anybody can
become angry, that is easy; but to be
"angry with the right person, and to
the- right -.degree; and at the right
time, and foi (he right purpose and
in the right wa.yth'at is not v. hin
everybody's power and is not easy."
Aristotle
America's love affair with beef as
a tailgating favorite endures. Ac-
cording to a recent study by the
Weber-Stephens Company, burgers
are consumed by nearly 76 percent
of tailgaters, making them the most
popular food in the parking lot.
Over the course of the next 10


years, it's estimated that more than
31,000 new jobs will be available
annually in the service sector of the
automotive industry.
Roughly 3.1 million people will
be added to the US population each
year which will raise population
from 297 million in 2005 to 312
million in 2010 and 329 million in
2015.
The percentage of families with
children age 18 and under is declin-
ing from 56 percent in 1970 to about
44 percent now and 41 percent ex-
pected by 2010. By 2010, 46 million
families will have no children at
home, up from 35 million now.
The average caregiver is a 46-
year-old woman who spends more
than 20 hours eachweek taking care
of her mother. More than 40 'percent
of female caregivers also work full
time. Of the 39 percent of caregivers


who are men, 60 percent have full
time jobs.
More than 130 million Americans
are collecting state quarters in the
50-coin program launched by the
US Mint in 1999. Some of these col-
lectors are enjoying the hobby so
much that they've begun to collect
other coins and paper money.
Didja know Winston Churchill
was born in a ladies' room during a
dance Women blink nearly twice as
much as men? Butterflies taste with
their feet? A "jiffy" is an actual unit
of time for 1/100th of a second?
Back in 1844 the first envelopes
with gummed flaps were invented.
They took a while to catch on in
Britain, where it was thought impo-
lite to send your saliva to someone
else.
How are you doing with your New
Year's resolutions? Two people told
me they gave up already.


Stress Ups Conflict


can make family get-togethers seem
that much harder to deal with, said
Evans, an associate professor in the
family, youth and community sci-
ences department at UF's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
Anxiety associated with balancing
travel preparations, gift wrapping,
and work and home responsibilities
maybe the real reason you're loath-
ing the family weekend, not the visit
itself.
Dinner table clashes over politics,
Religion and other issues can arise
when children grow up, experience
Life on their own and come to their
own conclusions about the world,
!Evans said.


According to a 2003 Gallup sur- '
According to a 2 Gallup sur "It's tough for parents to see their
vey, 76 percent of American adults adult kids adopt their own values
I adult kids adopt their own values
r~nrfA ncnaQlp-n kftW-,nb


cportcu osing seeap between
Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve
Day. A third of those cited family
issues as the leading stressor con-
tributing to their sleep loss.
All the stresses of the season, in-
cluding preparing for travel, financ-
ing gifts and decorating the house,


and beliefs," he said. "Parents care
about how their kids view them, and
they want to be seen as the end all,
be all in their children's eyes."
Acknowledging that there are still
a lot of raw nerves after the election,
Evans recommends the topic be
avoided altogether when differing


views exist. Turning off the TV dur-
ing the evening news -helps to keep
the subject from coming up and
striking an agreement between fam-
ily members to keep certain topics
off limits works, too.
"I know families that have de-
clared a public truce to not speak
about politics," Evans said.
Another sticky issue can be relig-
ion, especially since the holidays are
very religious celebrations for many
Americans, Evans said.
"I encourage flexibility. You
haven't been to church in three
years and your mother wants you to
go? Why not give it a shot? You
love her, it will make her happy, the
music is pretty good and you will
have a chance to break out that old
turtleneck sweater Aunt Heloise
gave you four years age," he said.
To give everyone space during ex-
tended visits, Evans suggests sched-
uling an activity or two outside of
the house for just you and your
spouse or kids.
Karl Pillemer, a Cornell Univer-


Mars Project Spurs Inte


feed themselves on a mission to
BY TIM LOCKETTE Mars.
University of Florida "It's hard to find a child who isn't
.interested in space exploration,"
They've never known a worldKimberly Bellah, a graduate
without CD players, cell phones, and int in the agriculture eduation
,assistant in the agriculture education
fax machines. And for many" and communication department at
middle-school-age children in UF's Institute of Food and
America, the farm is a completely Agricultural Sciences. "Everyone
alien environment.
aen environmentwants to know what life would be
Now researchers at the University :like on a trip to another planet, and
of Florida are trying to teach sixth- what life would be like there. We
and seventh-grade students to think can use that curiosity to get kids to
about agriculture by asking them 'think about some of the fundamental
to imagine how astronauts would -_problems in agriculture things they


need to know, but might not
otherwise be interested in."
Bellah writes instructional
material for Space Agriculture in the
Classroom, a project that draws on
plans for future human missions to
the Moon and Mars to teach
children about agriculture on Earth.
Jointly funded by IFAS, NASA, and
the U.S. Department of Agriculture,
the program draws material from the
research all three agencies are now
doing to explore how crops can be
grown in space.
With NASA. considering a return


sity sociologist, said he agrees that
family stress is heightened at the
holidays.
"This may be the only time of year
that we are thrown together with our
parents and siblings," Pillemer said.
"It's helpful for everyone to ac-
knowledge that being together again
can reactivate family conflicts. Feel-
ings of ambivalence are often com-
mon, as family members feel both
strong feelings of attachment but
also irritation as the time together
continues."
But some advance planning and
mental preparation can cut down on
conflicts.
"Above all, remind yourself of
your common bonds with your fam-
ily the memories of bath time with
your brother or sister or your child's
first word or baseball game," Evans
said. "We lose touch with these
memories over time and distance.
People often say that the most fun
they have with their family is remi-
niscing and remembering the silly
things. Most family members share
more similarities than differences.



rest
to the Moon and a future mission to
Mars, researchers are growing in-
creasingly interested in carrying ag-
riculture into space. Spacebome
gardens would provide astronauts
with fresh food a long-term voyage
into space, while turning carbon di-
oxide into oxygen and helping astro-
nauts recycle waste. And many re-
searchers believe astronauts could
get more food from a garden than
they could from canned food that
takes up the same amount of weight
and volume on a spacecraft.
(See Mars Page 5)


From Our Photo File
*'^'~4sa;~gi-fas~i -a-ii m me i -6 -K.


- -- ~a


_ -~II I I


- -- a






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005 PAGE 5

Orlando Opera To Return To Opera House


ORLANDO OPERA Touring Company includes: top, left,
Janette Zilioli, Christopher Holloway, Elizabeth Ariza; bot-
tom, Aaron Pegram and Julie Tompkins.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Orlando Opera Touring Company-
returns to the Opera House by popu-
lar demand, Jan 13 and 14:
Friday, Jan. 14, the Company will
present an Opera Extravaganza, pre-
ceded by a gala champagne recep-
tion, 6:30 p.m.
Tickets for the event are $25 and
$23 for Opera House members. Res-
ervations are requested at 997-4242.
The event, a fundraiser for the
Artists in the Schools Program, will
feature an assortment of hors d'oey-
vres and complimentary champagne.
The performance begins at 8 p.m.
and will include selections from
"Romeo and Juliet," "Die Fleder-
maus," "Don Giovanni," "Candide,"'
and "Barber of Seville."
Also, "The Phantom of the
Opera," "Secret Garden," and "The
Most Happy Fella."
On Thursday and Friday
mornings, Jan. 13 and 14, students
from Jefferson Elementary and Au-
cilla Christian Academy will see the
children's presentation of "Hansel
and Gretel."
Some 14 students, from each


Capital City Bank Shareowners'

Meeting Planned In Macon, GA


For the first time in 109 years,
Capital City Bank Group will hold
its annual shareowners' meeting out-
side of Florida, 11 a.m., Tuesday
April 26, 2005, at Wesleyan College
in Macon, GA.
Capital City Bank has had an of-
fice in Jefferson County since 1979.
In his letter to William G. Smith,
Jr., Capital City Bank Group Presi-.
dent and Chief Executive Officer,
the Honorable Sonny Perdue, Gov-


ernor of Georgia, writes:
"With your rich banking history in
Georgia, Alabama, and especially
Florida, I would like to officially in-
vite Capital City Bank to visit our
great state and hold your next an-
nual shareowners' meeting in
Macon, GA."

Perdue continues: "Since Macon
in the largest Georgia community
served by Capital City, I would be


Mars Project


(Continued From Page 4)
UF researchers have long been
working on technologies that could
answer some of those questions -
dexeloping greenhouses that could
be used to grow plants on Mars,
sending plants on Space Shuttle
flights to see how they grow in
space, and exposing microbes to the
rigors of space flight to see if they
can survive.
Space Agriculture in the Class-
room draws on that work to intro-
duce students to some of the basic
concepts of agriculture: the uses of
genetic engineering, the need for
fertilizer, the ways foods are pack-
aged, and other topics.
The program provides teachers
with two weeks' worth of lesson
plans for classes revolving around
space agriculture. The lesson plans
are designed for use with "Growing
Space," a glossy, magazine-style
publication on space agriculture,
aimed at a middle-school audience.
Teachers can request a classroom set
of the magazine, as well as other


Internet
(Continued From Page 1)
bids," Anderson repeated.
At the same time, he wanted lan-
guage in the bid solicitation that
would make it clear to prospective
bidders that award of the contract
was not guaranteed. If the cost
proved too high, in other words, he
wanted the city to be able to reject
the bids.
So moved, said Hayes, whose mo-
tion was seconded by Councilman
Gerrold Austin and unanimously ap-
proved by the council.
States the city's vision statement,
in part: "the aggressive plan devel-
oped by city staff seeks to fulfill lo-
cally the mission statement of the
Federal Communication Commis-
sion and President Bush's directive
that each household in America will
have access to affordable high speed
Internet service.
"By filling the gap in broadband
availability that the private sector
cannot -- or will not -- provide, the
city has committed to eliminate the
disparity between technological in-
frastructure in urban and rural
America.
"This is to be accomplished by the
installation of a municipally-owned
system providing both, first-tier
minimum speed broad band for cas-
ual users, as well as increased speed
tiers of service for users requiring
advanced technological
applications."


teaching materials, through the pro-
ject's Web site, www.spaceag.org.
"We wanted a publication students
would enjoy reading, with lively
text that excites their imlaginaton,"
said Bellah. "We also include inter-
views with astronauts, who explain
how a good education in science can
lead to a good career in the space.
program, in agriculture, or else-
where."
During the 2003-2004 school year
- its first year in operation Space
Agriculture in the Classroom sent
materials to 395 6th-grade teachers
in five participating states. Eighty-
four percent of teachers responding
to a survey on the program reported
that they were able to integrate
space agriculture lessons into their
classes, and more than 90 percent of
those teachers reported that the pro-
gram increased their students' inter-
est in science.
The program appears to be par-
ticularly well received in urban and
suburban students about the ways
food is produced but we've found
that participation is highest in rural
and small-town schools, where the
students probably already have
some exposure to agriculture."


delighted if you would break with
your century-old tradition of meet-
ing in Florida, and allow the city of
Macon to hold your 2005 Share-
owners' Meeting.
"I have heard great things about
your corporate practice of out-
servicing your larger competitors
while offering a greater selection of
products than smaller institutions.
"What could be more appropriate
than to celebrate your successes and
play your strategies for next year
and beyond on the red clay of Ma-
con, GA."
Capital City Bank has traditionally
held its annual meeting in Tallahas-
see.
The bank has 13 offices in Bibb,
Burke, Brady, Laurens, and Troup
Counties, with a mortgage lending
office in Thomas County.
According tp, Smith, traveling to
Georgia for the meeting makes per-
fect sense.


Joyful 1

Mind

Healthy Body,
Joyful Mind

INTEGRATED
THERAPEUTIC
MASSAGE

Pamela Radcliffe,
Ph.D., L.M.T., NCTMB

510-2268
www.joyfulmind.org
325 John Knox Rd
MA#39889 MM#15277


LA CONCHA

A Key West Tradition


CUBAN AMERICAN
COFFEE & SANDWICH SHOP
.i 1305 W. Washington


NOW OPEN
7 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Monday Saturday


school, chosen by their teachers,
will take the stage with the profes-
sionals and participate in the per-
formance.
School performances are spon-
sored in part by .a grant from the
State of Florida, Department of
State, Division of Cultural Affairs
and the Florida Arts Council.


Additional funding is provided by
the County School Board, Aucilla
Christian Academy, the Geraldine
Livingston Foundation, and fund-
raisers such as the Opera Extrava-
ganza.
The evening performance in spon-
sored in part by John and Eleanor
Hawkins and Ron and Pat Cichon.


000 o Co rooar arr raesrvrresv 6ww b oBorrBro Bao oao~n ra ram ar rwswon-- o a --mr




ii
*D J

-
a





The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts E
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,









All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes, ,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles jars, etc. (clear, brown & greens, cat food cans
.0







Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.
0 '0
SRemember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


SAdditional items accepted at the collection sites:


*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)


*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioned units, etc. (not accepted at the
1 Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
^ clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)
o E
Used Oil & Oil Filters

6 Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers i
s clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Hopsehold Hazardous Waste Office will C
E accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned c
V into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
C collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
0 Don Anderson at 342-0154.

1:
? Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.iefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the.
6 Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


V ..t. R n m w
.. Visit the www.Earthn9 1.org Recycling Information web page
Ar-o0ro--a- O'BBo- B oa-aw o- o-r-o-ro-o-or-romToTrb----ba-'o-TTyo~"a-d-a iro ol a- o-nna' -


Sk"More Than just a Builder"
"HOMES We're your one stop home specialists!
"Built to last for generations"
CUSTOM PLANS QUALITY BUILT
-' ''. Over 25 Floorplans To Choose
From Starting In The 60's


U 229-249-0901


Hcad...... 16 S.F. "Te Barow" www.chrismillhomes.com "The Kilar
Garage........ 461 S.F.
P orch....... 110 S. Lic. # CRC1327579 2404 Bemiss Road Valdosta
Total 334 S.F. Custom built at your lot or ours! Your plan or ours. 100% complete: help with financing: Investors welcome. Pictures may contain optional items.


SRight Time
\ Right Floorplan
Right Builder


H aY f ....... ... 2 4 0 6 S .I
Garage. ........... 500 S I
Porch....... 200S I.
31125..


Without Advertising,
A Terrible
Thing Happens...


- 1 J 1 1 -, -, .- o


;',--e ".. .













D 6- MO NTICELL O. (1?! NEWS, FRI JANUARY 7,2005


Lifestyle


JCHS Boys, Girls Club Director Sandra
Saunders, right, checks in staff members
and participants at the recent training work-


Jr. Leaders Learn

Law Enforcement


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Chamber of Com-
merce Junior Leadership Program
met Wednesday and were educated
on law enforcement as a career.
Speakers included Police Chief
David Frisby, Sheriff David Hobbs,
and Major -Mike Joyner, Clerk of
Court Dale Boatwright, Jefferson
County Correctional Institution
Warden Mark Redd and President.
of the Jefferson County Bar Asso-
ciation President Brian Hayes.
Students were enthusias-tic and
posed a varierb of questions They
asked about being shot at while on
duty, different types of calls re-
sponded to, bulletproof vests and


shop. At left is Mildred Wilson and Krystal
Wilson. (News Photo)


Of

t*


their efficiency, training, the court
system, rules and regulations and
other aspects of law in general.
Students also toured the Monti-.
cello Police Department, the Jeffer-
son County Jail and the Jefferson
County Court House.
At the next meeting, scheduled
for Jan. 20, students will learn
about large and medium business
career opportunities.
Speakers will include. Fred
Beshears on agriculture; Davis
Revell, on large business, Gary
Wright and Bill Gunnels 'on bank-
ing and finance, Wallace' Bullock
on trades; and one speaker to ad-
dress medium 'business remains to
be scheduled by coordinator Jerry
Boatwright.


FEMA Meeting Set To

Assist Hurricane Victims


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

FEMA will hold a public meeting
to assist disaster victims 6:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, Jan. 11, at the Courthouse.
The purpose of this special meet-
ing is to help all disaster victims,
both individuals and businesses, to
understand the FE R.A process and
to assist '. ith applications. ,
At the request of the State of Flor-

Homes Of

SFreddie L. Benjamin
Minister Freddie L. Benianin, age
61, of 245 Scont St., Monticello died
December 28, 2004 in Tallahassee.
Benjamin was a native of Jefferson
County and lived in Monticello for
61 years.
He was a retired from Florida A &
M University Heating Department,
as a supervisor. He also retired from
the Florida Highway Patrol Auxil-
iary. He attended Howard Academy
where he graduated in 1962. He at-
tend Lively Vocational, Technical
SSchool where he was certified in
* Law Enforcement.
Freddie Benjamin is a member of
.' Memorial M.B. Church, where he is
an associate Minister.
He is survived by his loving and
Devoted wife of 39 /2 years, Dorothy
W. Benjamin, one son Freddie L.
Benjamin, Jr.; one daughter Debo-


ida, the Department of Homeland
Security's FEMA has extended the
application deadline for hurricane
victims disaster assistance registra-
tion, through Monday, Feb. 28.
The goal is to bring speedy disas-
ter relief to victims of Hurricanes
Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne.
The meeting' is sponsored by the
local Emergency Management Of-
fice and FEMA. .
",,For additional information, con-
tact 342-0211.

Mourning
rah M Benjamin; one
granddaughter, Breanna N. Benja-
nun, Two God Sons. Kendrick Nor-
ton and John Grayer III, rno sisters
Lucinda Benjamin of Tallahassee
Nancy Benjamin; four brothers
Theodore Benjamin, Seatle, Wash-
-ington, Henry Benjamin, St. Peters-
burg, Willie Benjamin (Sharon)
Mack Benjamin, two aunts, Amy
Cherry, of Tampa, Rose Lee Keaton
of Tallahassee, a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, friends and a
wonderful dog name Shaggy. Also
two sisters-in-law Delores Hayes,
Mary (Willie) Bennett all of Miami,
father-in-law King J. Williams of
Monticello.
Funeral services will be Saturday,
January 8, 2005 at Memorial Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, with Rev.
J.B. Duval officiating. Interment
will follow at Pallbearer Cemetery.
Pallbearers are Master Masons
Solomon Lodge #6 Monticello, FL.


MIME


4.)li '" '


REAMS

New Arrival
Hugh,.and Malissa Reams of
Monticello announce the birth of
their son Hayden Christian Reams
on Dec. 17, 2004 at 3:27 p.m. at
Tallahassee memorial Hospital.
He weighed nine pounds and
seven ounces and was 23 inches
long.
He has:a brother Devin and a sis-
ter Skylar.
Paternal grandparents are Laurie
and Carolyn Reams, of Lamont.
Maternal grandparents are Sidney
Swain of Perry and Verdie Merritt
of Tallahassee.
Paternal great-grandmother is
Hoyt Sheffield of Auburndale and
maternal great-grandmother is Far-
ris Harlow of Tallahassee.


Honorary pallbe s a re :Deacons;
and Trustees of Memnorial M.B.
Church. Brainch Street is handling
arrangements.
Edward Rhys Hughes
Edward Rhys Hughes, age 61,'
owner and operator of Boomers res-
taurant in Monticello. Died in Tho-
masville, Georgia on January 2,
2005.
A native of Sumpter, South Carol
lina, Mr. Hughes lived ini
Monticello,. Florida for 10 years;'
moved to.Tallahassee, he had lived
in Thomasville, Georgia for the last
6 months. He was of the Lutheran'
faith.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

SPlanning workshops for the Jeffer-
son County Boys and Girls Clubs
were well attended this past week by
the directors and staff members of
each club.
The event was held at the new
Jefferson County High School.
The all day inservice training in-
cluded designated staff members
from each club focusing on a par-
ticular component of the Club's five
core areas.
The day began with a welcome
and instructions from Area Director
_ Antonio Jefferson.
Presentations began with Annie

JCHS PTSO

Program Set

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Jefferson County High School
PTSO will meet 6 p.m, Monday,
Jan. 10 in the Media Center.
Nancy Wideman, reading coach,
will present a program on how to
help students prepare for the FCAT.
All interested parents andcommu-
nity members are encouraged to at-
tend.
PTSO meetings are held the Mon-
day after report cards are
distributed.
The third six weeks report cards
will be given to the students by
Monday, Jan. 10. Report cards will
not be given to students who ha e
two or more F's. Parents will ha\ e to
pick up those cards in the guidance
office at JCHS.,,., ...,
Students who haye, a 3.0 average
for the third six weeks will be in-
vited to participate in a reward ac-
tivity in January.

In Case Of
Emergency
Dial 911.


NEED A

CAREER

CHANGE?

Providing a 650-Hour
Professional Massage Therapy
Training Program
OPEN HOUSE
January 16, 2005* 5 pm-7 pm
Classes Beginning February 28, 2005
Call for a FREE CATALOG


CORE Institute
ww/ oeisiut/o


Dean, a staff member at the St. Phil-
lip Club, giving an informative pres-
entation on Club Technology.
Hattie Ruth Jordan, also with the
St. Phillip Club, gave a presentation
on the Fine Arts.
Regina Willis, with. the Jefferson
Elementary School Club, gave a
presentationon the academic pro-
gram, Project Learn.
Eric Reddick, also with the JES
Club, gave a spectacular Power
Point presentation on Club Technol-
ogy and the Five Core Areas.
Cumi Allen, with the Howard
Middle School Club, gave her pres-
entation on Health, Life Styles,
SMART Moves, and smart choices.
Derrick Bell with the Jefferson
County High School Club, did a


Church News


New Bethel AME Church will ob-
serve its first Evening Gala, 5 p.m.,
Saturday. Donation is $10 per cou-
ple or $5 per person. Dressy evening
wear is expected for this fundraising
event.
***

New Bethel, Philadelphia Bethel;
and ,Mt. Pleasant AME Churches
\\ill hold a joint quarterly confer-
ence, 2 p.m., Sunday, at Bethel
AME Church, Rev., Henry Griffin,
presiding elder oft he Quincy Dis-
trict will preach the service.
***


R E S T


presentation on: Reviving Baseball
in Inner Cities and rural areas.
Deveda Bellamy, also with the
JCHS Club, gave a Fitness and Rec-
reation, Fitness Authority Program
presentation.
And, George Nero Jr., with the
HMS Club, gave a delightful pres-
entation on Passport to Manhood.
Directors of each club evaluated
each presenter and made themselves
available for the Question and An-
swer sessions that followed each
presentation.


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

A good name
is more
desirable than
riches; to be
esteemed is
better than
silver or gold.
Proverbs 22:1
Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


Sisters


A U R


AFFORDABLE DENTURES
DENTURES


$5$500.00
#510 #520
S Complete Upper and Lower Dentures

BEACHTON DENTURE CLINIC
NOW OFFERS
SAME DAY SERVICE
ON
DENTURES, ACRYLIC PARTIAL, RELINES
REPAIRS AND EXTRACTIONS
BY APPOINTMENT
WILLIAM T. MCFATTER, III, D.D.S., P.C.
OFFICE HOURS:
1-800-521-7275 M-F8:00 4:30
NO CHECKS
HWY. 319 (1 1/2 Miles Inside Ga. State Line)


We proudly serve
exclusively
Certified Angus Beef '
product-consistently
flavorful, juicy and
tender-truly the
best-tasting beef
available today.


Before the Opera
House, after the
Opera House,
or just a
relaxing
evening out...
Three Sisters
proudly offers:


* Comfortable,
Homestyle
Atmosphere
* AVarietyCuisine
* Exclusive, Certified
Angus Beef" entrees
* International Dishes (Sal.)
* Take-out Available


370 South Jefferson Street Monticello, Florida 32344 850-342-3474


Boys, Girls Club

Staff Meet In

Planning Workshop


A N T


I


I ~iv~ v, Invl~ Il~uuuv, \r ul, r u ~ u, ----I --- --


I


511~ree


flwrC~-t


r









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005 PAGE 7

Committee Schedules Melon


Festival Dates, Activities


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The 54th Watermelon Festival
has been scheduled for June 2
through June 18, co-chaired by
Betsy Gray and Mary Frances
Drawdy.
The dates were approved at a
meeting of the Watermelon Festival
Committee held Monday at the
Chamber of Commerce.
Opening the festival is the Kickoff
dinner, June 2, at the Opera House,
followed by the increasingly popular
bed race, and live music in the Op-
era House Garden.
Capitalizing on last year's success,
it was decided to hold the Jr. Miss


and Little King and Queen Pageant,
June 4, the week before the Queen's
Pageant, again this year.
Event chairpersons in place in-
clude: Frances Yeagher, Food
Booths; Bobbie Krebs, Arts and
Crafts; Frances Yeagher and Mary
Frances Drawdy, Kickoff Dinner;
Ray Foske, Car Show; Mary Fran-
ces Drawdy, Past Queen's
Reception; Lauren Blank, Jr. Miss
and Little King, Queen Pageant; and
Amanda Ouzts, Fashion Show and
Luncheon.
Among topics of discussion were
a larger, affordable accommodation
for the Fashion Show and
Luncheon. The dilemma here is that
while the ladies are happy with
Christ Episcopal Fellowship Hall


patrons have to be turned away be-
cause of lack of space.
Other venues which afford more
space, are beyond the budget of the
Woman's Club.
The need for added police support
for the parade was recognized, with
no decision made as to how to pay
for this.
A Watermelon Carving contest
was discussed, but no decision was
made when and where it would be
held.
The committee continues to seek
chairpersons and volunteers for
various events.
It was decided that wherever
practical festival participants will be
asked to incorporate a watermelon
theme, particularly among vendors.


Elderly In Live-in

Facilities Remembered


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Spokesperson Mary Madison said-
the Monticello Toastmasters Club
9241, VFW Post 251, and the la-
dies Auxiliary joined in the third
annual Christmas Celebration and
give away, which remembers the
less fortunate in the community.
Madison said the giveaway was
focused on the elders in local niurs-
ing homes and congregate care fa-
cilities to help make their holiday


season a little more enjoyable and
satisfying.
Decorated gift bags of fruits, a va-
riety of candies, personal items,
socks, hood caps, and varied per-
sonal items of soap, deodorant,
shampoo and conditioner, made up
the gift bags.
Many of the bags were decorated
with red white and blue stars and
stripes and either red, white or blue
bows and ribbon streamers.
Madison decorated and prepared
approximately 140 gift bags and
Toastmasters Vice President


Organizers of the event hope to
FRAN HUNT provide various forms of entertain-
Staff Writer ment for the cyclists, as well as food
and merchandise booths.
Coordinators are still seeking host- The bike event is sponsored by
families for the weekend of March Bike Florida, a nonprofit organiza-
18, 2005, when Monticello will host tion.
more than 1.000 cyclists participat- Nlonticello.was a stop on the tour
ing in an annual bike tour. in 2002. and thisi-.ear. Monticello
Spokesperson Emil> Anderson \%as chosen ae'the..staging 'area for
said that plans are still being final- the event. Ride participants will be
ized and members of Main Street arriving on Friday and Saturday,
,and local businesses have begun March 18'and 19 and depart on um
meeting and planning for prepara-
tions..
A meeting is scheduled for 10:30
:a.m.. FridaN, at the Opera House. O aths A re O
and those amending the meeting \< ill
help plan and finalize events for the (Continued From Page 1)
bike tour and determine how to best He explained that the deputies
help local businesses prepare for the and jailers had to be re-s%\om be-
large number of cyclists \who will be cause they had been working under
in town during the event. the commission of former Sheriff
SVarious community organizations Ken Fortune, and now they were
aire continually' compiling a list of working under his commission.'
persons in the area who are inter- Should the deputies perform some
ested in providing housing for the official duty and not be properly
c clists for one or two nights during commissioned,' it was possible that
the weekend. attorneys could challenge the legal-
The only requirements for host ity of the action, he said.
families are the offering of beds and
bathroom facilities, with food being Sp Control
optional. Speed Control
Housing must be in a relatively (Continued From Page 1)
close proximity to do%\nto~\n Mon- US Highway 19.
ticello. Frisby said he believes the mes-
"While it is not anticipated that a sage is getting through to some of
fee could be charged for the use of the truckers. But he cautioned that
private homes, acting as a host fam- the truckers were savvy to radar,
ily is a great way to meet interesting and it was proving difficult to catch
people from around the country and many.
the world," said Anderson, who is He said his department was ex-
compiling the list. perimenting with different strategies
to produce better results.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


Education/Commander John Nelson
was responsible for delivery and
distribution of gifts on Christmas
day.

Facilities visited included Bryn-
wood, Jefferson Nursing Center,
Orchard Meadows, Nellie's Retired
Inn ACLF, Ransom and Watkins.
Health Center Congregate care Fa-
cilities.

Madison concluded that both
Toastmasters and the VFW believe
in the statement by William Bar-
clay, "In the time we have, it is our
duty to do.all the good we can, to
all the people, in all. the ways we
can." .: .


tour the morning of March 20.
After the week-long, 300 mile
tour, the cyclists will return on Fri-
day, March 25.
To register as a host family, or for
more information about the event,
call Anderson at 342-0153 or by e-
mail at comel rty lerk leajThliiik.net
SNjames anrifel'pholie numbers of
host' faniiliewwill be posted on the
Bike Florida web site, along with in-
formation about how many beds are
available per home.


order Of Day
On Tuesday night at the City
Council meeting,' Judge Bobby
Plaines administered the oath of of-
fice to Tom Vogelgesang, appointed
to fill the Group 2 seat actedd by
Hall \%hen the latter \\as elected to
the County Comnmssion.
Noteworthy also, the council Tues-
da\ night reelected Julie Conley and
Gerrold 'Austiin to second terms as
mayoi and vice mayor respectively.


Is Effective
Mayor Julie Conley
concern that the money;
of the program not overtal
intent, which was to curb s
Frisby assured her that th
mained to curb the spei
soon as that problem \\as
the program would cease
"This is for the short tim
said.


expressed
making part
ke the true
peeding. ,
ie goal re-
eding. As
corrected.

e," Frisby


When you invest in our community
through United Way,-the returns are
enormo~-u-healtliier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend rhat builds a
strong co17m7unity.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 4 14-0844


Kent Jones Wins 1st Place


In County

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Kent Jones of ACA was the first -
place winner in the Annual County
wide Spelling Bee, hosted at the
Jefferson Elementary School Media
Center Tuesday evening,
Jones will represent the County
in the' State Spelling Bee in Talla-
hassee next month.
The winner of the State Spelling
Bee will recel\e an all expence
paid trip to include one adult, to the
National Spelling Bee in Washing- .
ton, DC.
The competition included 26
youth from ACA, JES, HMS and
home schooled, grades 4-8, 'for .
about an hour and a half before
Jones emerged the winner after'
spelling the two words, "burglary"
and "cantina" correctly and con-
secutively.
Coordinator Judy Jones said she
thought the students did an excel-
lent job, "Some of the words, they
hadrnever even heard of-before,"
she said. ., : A:.
John Stephens also of ACA took
second place after misspelling the
word, "agate" and HMS student
Jasmine Francis took third place.
Following tradition, FMB do-
nated prizes consisting of letters of
deposit to winners in the amount
of: $100, first place; $50, second
place; and $25, third place.


Spelling
Capital City Bank donated the re-
spective trophies,
The caller for the evening was
Carolyn.Wright and the judges
were Jefferson County Judge
Bobby Plaines and Carol Aman.
Fourth graders from ACA in-
cluded: Jeffrey Falk, Ashley
Schofill and Pamela Watt.
JES fourth graders were: Mykalia
McIntosh, Samantha Hamilton and
Brahdon Hamilton.
ACA fifth graders were: Olivia
Falk and Austin Ritchie and from
JES was. Bradley Carlton, Simone
Williams and Lanesiya Massey.


Contest
Sixth graders from ACA were:
Kent Jones and Taylor Pridgeon,
HMS students included: Sara Mac-
Donald, Brandon Whitfield and
Jasmine Graham and home school
student Michael Starling.
The seventh grader from. ACA
was John Stephens, and from
HMS, Breyon Crumity, Kelly Par-
rish and Jasmine Francis. Kome
schooler was Jodie Cromer.
Rebecca Falk was the competing
ACA student in the eighth grade
and from HMS were Michael
Silcio, Benjamin Hudson and
Courtney Holmes.
A total of 26 students competed.


sH Nw
'CASH NOW"

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENT,.,
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOl

(800) 794-7310'

J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW.
for Structured Settlements!


Group Fitness Schedule


THURSDAY


WEDNESDAY


TUESDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:00AM 9:00-10:OOAM
Jumping Jacks & Jills G lt
3 to 5 yr. olds Pilatesates


4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
Fitness Com6o Fitness Com6o


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.


MAMnAY


TOASTMASTERS, VFW 251, and Ladies Aux- area senior citizens residing in live-in facili-
iliary assembled some 140 gift bags for ties. (News Photo)


Host Families Still Sought


For Annual Bike Tour


RedUce your
risk factors


ja m ie Is B o dy Wo rks'..


___








PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005


Homes

Graveside service will be Wednes-
day, January 5, 2005 at Ebenezer
Cemetery in Monticello, Florida be-
ginning at 2 PM.
Mr. Hughes is survived by 2 sons:
Christopher Hughes of Virginia and
Matthew Hughes of Washington
State; one brother, William Hughes
of Jacksonville, Florida; three
sisters, Jean Hughes of Yulee, Flor-
ida, Linda Meirz of Rockport, Mas-
sachusetts, and Nancy Barnhart of
Sterling, Virginia. Parents-in-law
Paul and Betty Heins, Brother and
Sister-in-law Walter and Melinda
Ramsey. He is predeceased by his
wife Kristina (Tina) Heins Hughes.

Eugene Allen Hampton
Eugene Allen Hampton, age 59,
died unexpectedly January 2, 2005.
He was born February 25, 1945 in
Monticello, Florida to Charlie Bill
Hampton and Anne Mae (Razor)
Hampton. He was married to Linda
Kearns on August 15, 1992 in Mon-
ticello, Florida. -
He graduated from high school in
Okloosa, Kansas. He joined the
army in 1968 and was stationed. in
Vietnam. In 1971 he started driving
trucks for C & H Transportation. He
started his own trucking firm the
Wild Card Express in 1990 and op-
erated it until 2000. He and Linda
moved to the Trinidad area in 1999
and he worked for various trucking
and construction firms. He loved


horses, antique cars, his friends and
was a -ver hannn nrsonn THi ni.-l.


name with his coworkers was Pappa
Smurf.
He was preceded in death by his
parents and grand parents and two
sisters.
He is survived by his wife Linda
and son Jeffrey Kimberlin, Weston,
Colorado; brothers Carl "Toby"
(Debbie) Hampton, Monticello,
Florida; Charlie Bill (Lorraine)
Hampton, Wacissa, Florida; Johnny
Hampton, Tallahassee, Florida; Ce-
cil (Barbara) Hampton, Monticello,
Florida; sisters Carol Ann Price and
Annie Louise Edrida.
Honorary pallbearers will be all
his good friends.
Visitation will be Sunday January
9, 2005 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the
Mullare-Murphy Funeral Home. Fu-
neral services will be Monday Janu-
ary 10, 2005 at 1 p.m. at the
Mullare-Murphy Funeral Home.
Fort Carson Honor Guard will per-
form military honors at the funeral
home. Private cremation will follow.
The family of Eugene Hampton
have entrusted Mullare-Murphy Fu-
neral Home with the arrangements.
The family is at 14600 County.
Road 30.
Theodore German
Theodore German age 48, of Tal-
lahassee died January 1, 2005 at
TMH.
German was a native of Leon
County and lived in Tallahassee for
many years. He was a retired Dairy-
man.
He is survived by 2 brothers Elex
German of Tallahassee; Jome Ger-
man of Hollywood; 2 sisters Daisy
Lee Mosley of Ft. Lauderdale and
Nellie Mae Washington of Ft.
Myers; 1 halve sister Betty Jackson
of Tallahassee; 1 uncle, 1 aunt; a
host of nieces, nephews, cousins and
sorrowing friends.
Funeral services will be Saturday,
January 8th 11:00 a.m. at Mission-
ary Baptist Church with Rev. Elex
German officiating. Interment will
follow at Pallbearers Cemetery.
Pallbearer are Ron German, Elex
German III, Henry German, Jr., Ed-
die Mosley, Harell Mosley, Alpha
German. Honorary pallbearers are
The Stewards of Concord. Branch,
St. Funeral Home is handling ar-
ranpni,-n--


.- -1-Y- UPFJN I-Iuil-Ullb IJJK- ranmItIe.


Humane Society Outlines


Progress Towards Its Goals


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In seven months the County
Humane Society has come a long
way towards its goal of becoming a
self-sustaining animal shelter,
rather than one that was on the
verge of fading into oblivion.
To backtrack: The shelter closed
it's doors Sept. 19, 2003 because of
the lack of volunteers and finances.
In April a meeting was held to
determine whether or not the local
shelter would merge with Extended
Circle Animal Haven, turning over
all control and assets of the shelter.
Nearly 100 concerned members
attended the meeting, which
became heated, and the merger was
rejected, and the resignation of the
board demanded.
A new board was elected to head
:the organization.
Committees were created,
chairpersons and members were
assigned to address each area and
oversee the operations of that
specific area.
Committee projects included
adoptions, clinical, kennel
operations, foster program,
facilities, membership and
volunteers, marketing and public
relations and shelter renovations.
Adoptions have grown to a total
of 20 cats and 68 dogs of the 102
dogs and 70 cats that have come
through the facility this year.
These adoptions included many
animals such as a blind cocker
spaniel found wandering the
streets, several animals found near
death in and around dumpsters, and
nursed back to heath.
The foster program has grown to a
present 17 foster homes, currently
housing 13 animals. Prom June
until the end of the year, a total of
28 animals have been through the
foster program.
Foster Program Chairperson Mar-
tha Jean Martin has a bright out-
look for the upcoming year, with
no limitations.


"I can't say enough about our fos-
ter homes, they're excellent," said
Martin. "I want to keep the pro-
gram growing and get as many
good foster homes as possible.
"I really want to streamline and
fine-tune the foster program. I can't
even imagine numbers when it
comes to the possibilities for foster
homes," she added.
"We can never have too many
loving foster homes. My goal is to
have all of the animals, whether
they be at the shelter or they're be-
ing housed through the foster pro-
gram, to all end up in the caring
and loving permanent homes that
they so richly deserve."
Membership has grown to ap-
proximately 180 and volunteers
have grown to 20-30 active volun-
teers who can be counted on to help
in a moment's notice, which in-
cludes members of Alpha Pi
Omega and the Jefferson County
High School Key Club.
Chairperson Martha Canady pre-
dicts even bigger and better num-
bers for the upcoming year, hopes
are high for more than doubling
those numbers.
Other pluses to date include the
creation of an e-mail newsletter for
members, a Humane Society web
page which will include adoptables
and facility information is currently
in the final stages of creation, a van
was donated for transporting, ani-
mals to and from adoption booths,
two adoption booths are being held
every month and society members
have a monthly spot on the WCTV
Good Morning Show for
adoptables at the shelter.
The bylaws have been updated
and more defined; a new informa-
tive pamphlet has been created;
weekly adoptable pets, information
and photos are being featured in
the News; adoption booth training
and the establishing of a $10 flat
fee for returning lost pets to their
owners plus a $2 per day boarding
charge.
Adoption fees have changed from


$100 for dogs and $75 for cats to
$75 for adults dogs and cats above
six months of age and $100 for
puppies and kittens under six
months of age and the biggest fund
raising event, the "Bless the Beast
Feast" is slated to become an an-
nual event rather than a biennual
event.
The date has also been changed
to the last Saturday in Feb. because
there is not anything much happen-
ing during that time of year.
A new sign for the Andy Frey
Shelter is in the works. A trailer
was donated as an intake facility,
which was made ready by many
hours of volunteer work to make
needed repairs.
Numerous work days and clean
up days to ready the shelter were
held, with many members and vol-
unteers donating and working hun-


dreds of hours to make renovations
and making the dream of the re-
opening of the facility a reality.
Members have been working
closer with other adoption groups
in the area and cages are now
housed at Veterinary Associates
with adoptable cats in them.
With the intake of so many un-
wanted animals, the need was seen
for two new part time helpers at the
shelter to assist with caring for the
animals and working at the facility.
Adding an additional facility, sepa-
rate from the present location, is
also on the drawing board for the
upcoming year.
There are now foster coordinators
who are responsible for checking
up periodically with those fostering
animals to see how they are getting
along.
To be heard during one of their
two monthly meetings, one must
now request to be on the meeting
agenda and the speaker has two
minutes to address a particular
topic.


F-/






PREGNANT?
No Incurancee?
You may qualify for MomCare

MomCare is Medicaid Health Insurance for
Pregnant Women
Having a baby is an exciting time!
You and your baby deserve the best health care
possible

For more information, please call
(850) 584-5807, Ext. 147


KEEP THE GREEN LIGHT SHINING
' Thanks to MDA research the future looks brighter than ever.


Muscular Dystrophy
'Association


1-800-572-1717


i


B i bend Hwwcwe / os w pice




endosice


2


0


0


'/,


Big Bend Hospice wishes to acknowledge the following individuals who have made donations in:honor or in memory of a loved one one this holiday season. Each bell and bow placed on the
Tree of Remembrance is a gift of hospice care and comfort to a family in our community. The following donations were recorded through December 23, 2004.
Big Bend Hospice extends heartfelt thanks to Capital City Bank and Farmers and Merchants Bank for hosting the 2004 Jefferson County Trees of Remembrance.


In Memory Or Honor Of:
Anna Altomaro ,
Lottie Aman
Albert V. Applegate
Gardener & Sylvia Bemis
Wallace Bentley, Sr.
SSteven Bevis
Bevis
Annie Mae Boland
Trace Boyd
'Forrest D. Brown, Sr..
Gerald Cathey
Shirley Cathey
A.C. "Buddy" Charron
A.C. "Buddy" Charron
A.C. "Buddy" Charron
Claudia Coleman
John Council
SThelma Council
Betty Crowder
Daphne Culbreath
Hugh Culbreath
H.L. Culbreath
Ailleen Elliott
Betty Fletcher
Betty Fletcher
Betty Fletcher
Uncle Fred
Richard Gilbert,
Dickie Gilbert
Hett Y. Gilbert
Michael Dale Greenhill
William E. "Bill"-Hagan
Dorothy Hansen
Gladys Holingsworth
Harold Hoxie
Marie Hoxie"


Making The Gift:
Matthew Altomaro
Van Collins
Phyllis V. Applegate
Fannie & Wilder Bemis
Herbert & Linda Demott
Farmers & Merchants Bank
Sheena Gordon
Angela Gray
Allen & Cissy Boyd
Pauline C. Brown
Patricia W. Cathey
Patricia W. Cathey
JCHS Class of '57
Annie Charron
Herbert & Linda Demott
Deborah Bullock
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Van Collins
Mike Fletcher
Brooke & Donnie Kinsey
Edwin & Melissa Kinsey
Richard Bailar
Patricia W. Cathey
Patricia W. Cathey
Patricia W. Cathey
Alice Stadin
Juanice M. Hagan
Matthew Altomaro
Kathy Hollingsworth
Janet Wadsworth
Janet Wadsworth


In Memory Or Honor Of:
Mary Hughes
Mary Hughes
Michael laukea
Yoshiko Ishikawa
Capt. Tom Kempton
Mark E. Lewis
Paul R. Lewis
William & Emma Macormack
Doris Mazola
Mutti
Janice Lee Owens
Lillian Palmer
Our Parents
Our Parents
Parents
Betty Pryor.
Fay Redfeam
Eugene Reilly
Mary Ruth "Poppy" Revell
William T Roe
William "Geechie" Roe
Helen Rouse
Franklin W. Roush, Jr.
Kobe Steinmetz
Kobe Steinmetz
Jim Suarez
Anna Mae Taylor
Lila Wadsworth
Mary Ann Walker
George W. Wallace
Myrtice Ward
Elenor Wettstein
Martha King Williams
Jessica & Corey


Making The Gift:
Ray Hughes
Ray Hughes
SConnie May
SAngela Gray
Susan Kempton Floyd
Dorothy P. Lewis
Dorothy P. Lewis
S Deborah Braddy
Herbert G. Demott
Richard Bailar
Deborah Bullock
Hillary Palmer
Harold & Mary Ellen Given
Harold & Mary Ellen'Given
Jack McCutcheon
Judy Gorga Allen
Jennifer Kinard
Allen & Della Willis
Joe Bond
Charles & Cindy Littlejohn
Linda McDonald
Melissa Taylor
Allen & Cissy Boyd
Steve Andris
Jackie Andris
Traci Buzbee
Shirley Cannon
Janet Wadsworth
Pauline C. Brown
Debbie Snapp
Castillo Ward
Jim Guerry
Dan Hamedani
Mel G. Huls


Thank You To Our Sponsors:








0 Capital City
Bank



Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'








Big Bend

Hospice


1723 Mahan Center Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32308-5428
(850) 878-5310 or (800) 772-5862
www.bigbendhospice.org


i;


~`......













Sports


Tigers Lose Five Of Six


Games In Tournament Play


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School boy's varsity basketball
team fell to a 1-10 season follow-
ing five losses out of six games,
during two recent holiday tourna-
ments.
The first tournament was the
Elk's Tournament and the Tigers
faced off against three teams,, win-
ning one.
In the first game they went up
against 'John Paul.and lost 42-26.
Demario Rivers led the scoring for
the Tigers with 13 points.
Fabian Wilson scored six points;
James Skipworth and Lamarkus
Bennett three points each, and
Jonathan Dady, two points.
: .When the Tigers went up against
Wakulla for the second time of the
season, they came out victorious,
74-61.


Coach Omari Forts said the boys
lost their first season game against
Wakulla and it felt good to make a
come back following that loss.
Rivers, led the scoring with 24
points; Skipworth, 18 points, 9 re-
bounds; Wilson, 15 points and 13
rebounds; Dady, 11 points;
Bennett, four points; and Clarence
Fead, two points.
When the Tigers faced off against
Thomasville High School, they suf-
fered an 82-57 loss.
Rivers scored 16 points; Wilson,
14 points; Skipworth, eight points;
and Dady, five points.
Bennett scored eight points; J.
C., four points; and Lucious Wade,
two points.
During the Rebok-CNS Holiday
Hoopfest, the Tigers went up,
against Thomasville Central in their'
first game.and lost. 81-51,
SForts said they played throughout,


Simply Smashing L


Ready For Spring A
-- second half of the season.
FRAN HUNT Team Captain,Patty Hardy said'
Staff Writer the ladies had been practicing over


Simply Smashing ladies A league
tennis team, comes 'back from holi-.
day vacation this week to begin the


the holiday vacation and they, hope
to play better during the Spring half
'"of the USA;Georigia-North Florida
A League., ;


'LADY TIGER Shaumese Massey decides her game plan as
she dribbles down the court. Massy scored 10 points in
;the game with Maclay. (News Photo)


Lady Tigers Defeated By

Maclay, 56-38, Tuesday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Tigers \arsiry basketball
team were defeated b,, Macia) 56-
38, Tuesday.
The ladies fell to a 1-6
.season, and 0-3 in District 4-2A.
Keandra Seabrooks led the scor-
ing for, the Lady Tigers with. 12
points, one rebound, one assist and
three steals.
SShaumese Massey scored 10
Points, five rebounds, five assists,
two blocks and one steai .
SJasmine Brow n had.three re-
;bounds; ,.Shanise Brooks, four


SPackag
Diesel Tractor Packag

*'Diesel Tractor
*Rotary Cutter
SScrape Blade :
Drawbar
.16 ft Dual Axel Trailer
- Includes Warranty
Other Pkgs Available

CHECKS $0 Down $9
LASTINGERR
"THE TRACTOR Exit 1
PLACE"
877-249-8885 *


points, two assists; Nikidra Thomp-
son, six points, nine rebounds, one
assist; and Kandice Griffin, six
points, three rebounds and one
steal.
The Lady Tigers play another
district game 6 p.m., Friday, when
they go up agaisnt Liberty County,
there.

Opening the door'

to hope .

Call our lifeline.
it's toll-free.
THE VOICE OF, HOPE M K
1-800-572-1717 Muphy


e Deal!
le $IAkAM


9/mo WAC CREDIT CARD
tTRACTORS
1 off 175 114 Mile West Then Turn
Left on White Water Road
229-249-8484


the game with only six players.
Wilson and J. C. Fead each scored
seven points; Quantez Burke, six
points; Skipworth and Rivers each
scored four points and Dady, three
points.
In the second game, the Tigers
went up against Cook County and
were slammed for a 70-55 loss.
Rivers led the scoring with 28
points; Wilson, 16 points; Skip-
worth, eight points; and Dady;
three points.
In the final game of the tourna-
ment, the Tigers went up against
Worth and lost 63-40.
Rivers scored 15 points; Wilson,
12 points; Dady, nine points; and
Skipworth, four points.
In upcoming hoop action, the Ti2
gers will face off against Liberty
County Friday and Florida Highl
Saturday. Both games are away
and at 7:30 p.m.


JCHS varsity player Jona-
than Dady practices his free
'throw. (News Photo)


a d ie s Country Club,- March' 17 is, agaisnt
the Glen Arvin Aces at Tom Brown
Park. *
SCtIo 'The ladies take a spring break
and %ill li3ae' no garns Nlarcil 24
Warm-up'tim'es begin at 9:15- and March 31 is agalsnt the Swing-
a.nm. and iatc s be in right after-. iig \Volle.. sat Foret \leadia, s.
ward., April 7 is a secon';spring break
with no" matches played in the
Action begins for the second half- l .
league' '' -'
against the Killearn Special-K April 14 is agai
te t To Bro April 14 is agaisnt Bainbridge at
team, Jan. 6 at Tom Brown Park.
the Bainbridge City Courts; April
Jan. 13 is the Ace Kickers at 21 is against the Capital City Aces
Winthrop Park; Jan. 20 is the Capi- at Tom Brown Park; and the final'
tal City Deuces' and Jan. 27 is thd matches of the season are April 28
Sassy Smashers at Forest Meadows aaisnit the Golden Eagle Talons at
Country Club. Tom Brown Park.
The Iadies in the league will cele-
Feb. 3 is the Golden.Eagle Wings brate their annual awards luncheon
at the Golden Eagle Country 'Club and Round Robin competition May
Feb. 10 is the Thomasville Ace- 5
N-U at Tom- Bro%%n Park; Feb."' "
is the Split Steps at Tom Brown
Park; and Fe.".24 is agaisnlt tdie
Drop Shot' Diyas, also at Tom
Brown Park.


March 3 is agaisnt the Glenn
ArviniAlley Cats at Golden Eagle
Country) Club: March 10 is the KII-
learn Luck\ Stars in the Killearn







NATIONAL TREASURE
(PG)
Fri. 7:00 Sat. 1:30 7:00 Sun. 1:30 -
7:00 Mon. -Thurs. 7:00

POLAR EXPRESS(G)
Fn' 4-15 Sat 4:15 Sun. 4-15 Mon.-
Thurs. 4:15

BLADE: TRINITY (R)
Fri. 4:35 9-50Sat. 4:35 9:50 Sun
4-35 Mon- Thurs 4:35

OCEAN'S '2 (PG13)
Fri. 4:30 7:10 9:40 Sat. 1:50 4:30
7:10 9:40 Sun. 1:50 4:30 7d10
Mon.- Thurs. 4:30 7:10

LEMONY SNICKET'S
(PG)
Fri. 4:45 7:30 9:45 Sat. 2:00 4:45
7:30 9:45 Sun. 2:00 4:45 7:30
Mon. Thurs. 4:45 7:00

MEET THE FOCKERS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:20 7:05 9:30 Sat. 1:45 4:20
7:05'- 9:30 Sun. 1:45 4:20 7:05
Mon. Thurs. 4:20 7:05

FAT ALBERT (PG)
Fri. 5:25 7:35 -9:35 Sat. 1:15- 3:20
5:25 7:35 9:35 Sun. 1:15 3:20-
5:25 7:35 Mon. Thurs. 5:25 7:35'
NO PASSES.

WHITE NOISE (PG13)
Fri. 4:25 7:25 9:55 Sat. 1:40 4:25
7:25 9:55 Sun. 1:40 4:25 7:25
Mon. Thurs. 4:25 7:25
NO PASSES

FLIGHT OF THE
PHOENIX(PG13)
Fri. 7:15 10:00 Sat. 1:25 7:15 -
10:00 Sun. 1:25 7:15
Mon.- Thurs. 7:15


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005 PAGE 9


l Warriors Defeat


A Branford 58-18


FRAN HUNT
,Staff Writer

The Warriors varsity basketball
team climbed to a 6-3 record Tues-
day when they defeated Branford
for a 58-18 victory.
Coach Richard Roccanti said he
was extremely pleased with the
way the Warriors played. "We
opened up the New Year with a big
win," said Roccanti. "We really
looked good out there and we're
playing better as a team."
Leading the scorers for the War-
riors was Ridgley Plaines with 21
points, eight rebounds, two assists
and three steals and Daniel Roc-
canti, two points, two assists, three
rebounds and one steal.
Jeremy Tuckey scored 10 points,


six assists, three rebounds and one
steal; Ben Grantham, two points,
two assists, eight rebounds.
Stephen Griffin knocked down
his second slam-dunk of the
season, also the first slam-dunk on
the home court. He scored 14
points, three assists, five rebounds
and two blocks.
Drew Sherrod scored seven
points, five assists, eight rebounds;
and Kyle Day, two points, one re-
bound and one steal.
The Warriors face off against
Apalachicola 7:30 p.m., Friday,
here, in district play.
Coach Roccarti said it was going
to be a tough game, but the Warri-
ors are playing better. He added
that last year, Apalachicola was
ranked second in state.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA JV basketball team fell to a
2-5 season after losing to Branford
40-21, Tuesday.
Leading scorers include: Luke
Sadler, seven points, three re-
,bounds, one steal; A. J. Connell,
five points; Kyle Peters, three
points,, four rebounds, two assists;
and Kyle Barnwell, three points.
Elliott Lewis.scored one point,


three steals; Daniel Greene, three
rebounds, one block, one steal;
Hunter Greene, one steal; and Mi-
chael Kinsey and Bernie Hender-
son each had one rebound.
The Warriors will face off agaisnt
Perry Middle for the second time of
the season, 3:30 p.m., Friday, here.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said the
first time the Warriors played Perry
they lost and that the upcoming
game would be a tough one.
"But we do have a good game
plan for Perry," he concluded.


Your Newspaper

Serving Your Community


ACA Warrior JVs Fall

To Branford 40-21


1 I '


-j MR~


- 1.w .9 .# P








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005

Boxing Trainer Troy Carter

Works With Local Youth


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Trainer Troy Carter reports the
cleanup effort of approximately 20
area youth, that went on most of
last week was a great success and
only a few details remain to com-
plete he project.
Students now meet at the lot
across from the Boys and Girls
Club to practice and play. They
then move to the new location
where the bags are re-hung daily
and the children practice their
punches, moves, jabs and
footwork.


Carter said that he is presently
checking with Oklochnee about
participating in sparring sessions
there within the near future and he
is also checking into boxing tourna-
ments for local youth.
He has been assembling the youth
playing football, sparing with each
other and having a good time since
his return to Monticello, in an ef-
fort to rekindle the boxing program
here.
Carter acquired the use of a
nearby lot and small building
owned by Angela Freeman, on
Green Street to hang the bags as
they acquire them and he and the
children have been working dili-


gently cleaning up the site for use,
cutting down trees and dragging
and burning debris.
Resident Brian Reliford wanted
to help the youth get restarted after
they lost all of their equipment, so
he has been making contributions
toward the project and he eventu-
ally wishes to help the children
with Carter.
Cherry Street Gym Founder
David Collins donated a punching
bag and ordered some gloves for
the youth to use in training.
"I'm not giving up on myself or on
these kids, I'm full of hope," said
Carter. "It may start of slow with


very little to work with, but in the
long run, it will be bigger and bet-
ter than it ever was.



climate control -
It's simple..
Heat and cool your :
home smartly with
ENERGY STARto
reduce your home
energy use.
To learn more, go to
energystar.gov AE S


Catch the Charm of
RIVERFEST 2005
|C1 JZanzuar'y 7-9

NEW SMYRNA BEACH
For Moren Inormation:
WWW.VisITNEwSMYRNA.CoM 1.800.541.9621


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Residential & Commercial
Yeager

Contracting

Co. Inc.
Custom Homes
Commercial and


Agriculture Buildings i
Home: 997-2296
Mobile: 508-2383
Lic. # CGC #1507547


Craig Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


V


1830 Thoi
Tpllahass
(850)
(800)
Free
Tallahas,
Fune


Allyn Sikes
Owner


masville Road
see, FL 32303
224-3473
541-6702
Delivery To
see Hospitals &
eral Homes


.Lot Cleaning-Driveway-
Dig Ponds-Road Build-
ing-Culvert Installation-Fill
Dirt- Limerock- Gravel
BILLY
SIMMONS, owner
Backhoe and Hauling
Septic Tank Contractor
& Excavation Contractor
(850) 997-0877
(850) 509-1465 mobile
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!
Insured D.O.H Lie.
#SR0971265


I I


SEPTIC TANK
&
LAND CLEARING
-Complete Septic
Service & Repair

*Lot Preparing &
Land Clearing
THOMAS B. SCOTT, SR.
Rt. 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
997-5536
Mobile: 933-3620


Mr. Merchant,

This Space

Could Be

Yours FOr

Only $10

Per Week


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
ELECTRIC, INC.
T STARTER
H
M
A
S
V
1 Complete Auto
LL Electric Repair
E Service
Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (On Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


DOUG'S
TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
* Trimming Mowing
*Removal
*Maintenance
*Stump Grinding
*Aerial Device
*Bush Hogging
997-0039
Licensed & Insured


Register's
Mini-Storage


315 Waukeenah
Hwy.
1/4 Mile off
US 19 South

997-2535


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465
Mobile
850-997-0877
Home
Clean Portables for
construction sites,
family reunions,
parties,
Events and Types


D.L.'S
GUN & PAWN
SHOP, INC.
CASH IN A FLASH
Highest Loans
On Your Valuables
GUNS DIAMONDS
TV'S VCR'S
STEREOS RADIOS
GOLD GUITARS
SILVER TOOLS
Mon. -Sat. 9-6
1511 Jackson Bluff* Tallahassee
575-7682


HOME MORTGAGE OF
NORTH FLORIDA, INC.
Since 1986
WE SPECIALIZE IN FINANCING FOR
Purchases/Refinances
*Loans For The Self Employed
*Manufactured Housing
(including Single & non-owner occupied Doublewides)
*Good or Distressed Credit
For Sale By Owners
*No Application Fee
Contact Jim Ayers
& Bartow Myers
(cell 228-8137)
656-4055
Work with experienced Mortgage
Brokers serving this area since 1974
2708 Apalachee Pkwy *656-4055


Appliance

Service
of Monticello
THE NAME
SAYS IT ALL!
Call Andy

997-5648
Leave A Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


Dennis' Trading

Post
1 Mile South Of 1-10
SOn U.S. 19
Used Items ~ Antiques
Collectibles
10a.m. 5p.m.
Ornamental Concrete
Open Thursdays, Fridays
& Saturday
,1-850-997-8088
Mention this ad for 10% off


I*l mI


Call For Quality Work 45
Years In The Trade

Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Interior Exterior
Residential ~ Commercial
Insured ~ License # 5948
850-997-7467
850-'544-2917


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340
www.TimPeary.com


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!

997-6500
WHEN YOU NLED 10 SOLVE
COMPUTER PROBLEMS
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY
ONSITE SERVICE
DIAGNOSIS REPAIR IUI'GRADLS
INSTALLATIONS CONSULIAfIONS
CUSTOM COMPUTERS 1 U'IORIA S
REMOVAL OF VIRUSES, AWARE, SPY'AW.IE


1-10 Chevron
Marlboro $3.00 pk + tx
Newport $2.98 pk + tx
DTC $1.70 pk + tx
305 $1.59 pk + tx
Women's Leather Purses' $6.99 $13.99
A very nice selection and good quality
T-shirts Christian, Florida. and others
$3.99 each or 3 for $10 + tx
4LB .60, 8LB .93, 20LB $2.25 + TAX
Free Crystal Lighter w/carton purchases. We accept all
manufacturer's coupon


DIXIE THOMPSON WHOLESALE

AFFORDABLE ALL WOOD CABINETRY


(850) 997-1389


Fax: (850) 997-7450
COMPLETE MOBILE SHOWROOM
Tim & Dixie Thompson
TJ Thompson
Email: dixietim@email.msn.com
Website: Dixie Thompson Wholesale.Com


I
1
S
C


'wi~yhae2MqI~La~iEgte GrOUIn


25 years lending experience. Fully automated underwriting
for fast approvals and closings. We specialize in Jumbo
Loans. Residential and Small Commercial Lending.
purchasee and Refinance 850-577-1300
00% Financing Info@alphamortgage.us
secondd Mortgages www.alphamortgage.us
construction Loans
/A Loans 1471 Timberlane Rd., St. 120-10
'onsolidation/Cash Out Tallahassee, FL. 32312


INo Credit/Bad Credit
Foreign National Financing


i 1 cwd,2
A BeprtomeApnt

Central H/C Apts.
Stove -~' Refrig.
Carpet ~ Blinds
Laundry Room
Handicapped Apts.
TTiY771
US 19, 1468 S.
I(' Waukeenah St.
850-997-6964


Mr. Merchant,

This Space

Could Be

Yours For

Only $10

Per Week


Local Glass Company Border 2 Border


Auo Huow .e cornmercia Lawn & Landscaping
Accepted by All Insurance
Companies
NO INSURANCE? Mention This
We'll find you a windshield at Ad & Receive I
a reasonable price! m m
We Install Quality A 10%
624 Range St. Discount -

464-2500 11025 East Mahan
973-4527 877-4550


Thurman
Tractor
Service
S 1 Mowing
aa Harrowing
--,Food Plots


Licensed & Insured
James Thurman,LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-1808
850-545-9964
85h0-2-51-29)11
155 JOHN
COLLINS III).


I.


Interior Exterior


34; m328
I ccsW&lisucd-li. 14 (


U


I


I -


- ..


I


-i


_


I -


L --


0


b-


I


....... |


l--m4


L


0 0 ----i


I


!


-1 ,


1,


wo-


, ; I Nv


P- /-/.


~s~s








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005 PAGE 11


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


C LAS SIFIED


Your Community' Shopping Center


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


:HELP WANTED

ZJefferson County Youth Council seeks a
Program Director for the Teen Center.
,Candidate should send resume to JCYC,
PO Box 346, Monticello, FL 32345 by Jan.
17, 2005. Documented experience working
*with youth .13-18 years. Must be
organized, self-starter. Experience
vriting/administering grants preferred..
*18-25 hr/wk after school until 7 p.m. and
frequent Saturdays. Contact Gladys
Roann (Elementary School) or Larry
Halse ,(Extension Office) for job
description.
.1/7, 1/12, c

iLOVE PARTIES?' try the business for $90
.and 90 days. reasons to become A
consultant are: Flexible Schedule,
Unlimited Income Potential. Part time or
Full lime. No Insenlory, Free and
Discounted Products. You get $350 worth
of products. catalog s and training
materials I would like to help you start
\our own Pampered Chef business. Margit
;Miller Independent Kitchen Consultant,
'The Pampered Chef 997-4478
wsiw.pamperedchef.biz/babetesfeast. Ask
me how" ou can gel started for as little as
S$50!
1/7, pd
-DAY"S INN Front Desk Clerk, Computer
Skills required. Good Pay. Apply in
person _@ 110 & US 19S behind
'McDonald's.
1/7, pd
Driver Consenient Transport. Teams
.and Solos check our new pay plan. Owner
-operators. experienced Drivers, Solos,
Teams and Graduate Students. Call (888)
MOREPA'Y (1-888-667-3729)
.1,7 fcan

$1500 \\EEKL GUARANTEED. Now
accepting applications. $50 cash hiring
bonus guaranteed in writing
1888)318-1638. Est. 107.
A \\ wB.LSMailingGroup.com.
.1.'7. fcan


.Fast Track Foods or Land O Sun Mngmi.
-NO\ HIRING Managers. xsst. Managers
-and retail assistants in Monticello area.
Compelitise pal. 1-352-333-3011 ext. 42.
-12/6-tfn c


HELP WANTED

UP To $4,000 Weekly! Exciting Weekly
Paycheck! Written Guaranteed! 11 year
nationwide company now hiring! Easy
work sending out our simple one page
brochure! Free. postage, supplies!
Awesome Bonuses! Free Information! Call
Now! (800)242-0363 E\. 3800.
1/7, fcan
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING: Jefferson'
Clerk of the Circuit Court is seeking
applicants for Deputy Clerk I. Job
description and applications may be
obtained in the Office of Clerk of Circuit
Court, Room 10, County Gourthouse.
Monticello, Florida. Salary range is
$18,470. $23,088. Minimum qualifications
are: Ability to learn court practices,
procedures and rules in a timely manner.
Knowledge of business English, spelling,
grammar and punctuation. Knowledge of
data entry typewriting and use of other
business machines. Ability to understand
and follow through, on written and oral
instructions. Ability to establish and
maintain working relationships with the
public, staff judges and attorneys. Ability
to operate a CRT and PC using current
programs and software. Typing skills.
Telephone courtesy and
information-gathering skills. Education
and experience needed: Graduation from
an accredited high school or possession of
an acceptable equivalency diploma. One
year typing and clerical experience. A
comparable amount of training, education
or experience may be substitutes for the
above minimum qualification.
Applications will be accepted until
January 19, 2005, at the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, address above. Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer. Applicants with a disability
should contact the above office for
accommodation.
1/7, 1/14, c


Monticello News is growing! We have an
opening for a person who knows how to be
a team player, can take responsibility,
possess good office and people skills and
wants above average earnings. No
dunderheads. drama queens, shirkers,
dopers, hangers-on need applI. Please call
Ron Cichon. 997-3568.


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571



Get lost... in your own backyard.

We have thousands of acres available in Florida's Great Northwest
and best of all there's only one number to call.

Toll free: 1.866.JOE.LAND (1866.563.5263)
www.stjoeland.com

SFrSTJOE
L[in W --n pm'}r-


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

Use This form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail


Payment In Advance Is Required


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

3 Lines, One Edition $4.00 Each Additional Line $1.00
3 Lines, Two Editions Wednesday/Friday $7.00
Each Additional Line $1.00
30 Characters Per Line
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
-1 Wednesday Noon for Friday



DATES TO BE PUBLISHED



CLASSIFICATION


WRITE YOUR AD HERE










Monticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344


RV/Mobile Lot Home for Rent in,
Monticello Meadow Park, for more info.
call Liz at 997-1638
1/5 1/28 c

Pecan Manor Apartmenls. 2 and 3
bedrooms available. $300 $400 monlhlh.
Please call 251-6931.
1/7, c

FOR SALE


Bed Queen orthopedic PILLO\I lOP
mattress and box. Name Brand. ne" in
plastic with warranty. can deliver.-
Sacrifice $160 850-545-7112.
11/5, tfn

Bedroom Set .Beautiful ne" all ood
cherry queen/king bed, dresser, mirror,
chest, 2 nightstand. Still in boxes, $4199
list, sacrifice $1500. 850-222-7783
11/5, tfn ,c


18 ft. International Skimmer flats boat,.
c.c., troll motor, Bimini Top, 60 HP-
Yamaha Motor, W/trailer $6,500-.
510-1663
12/3,8,10. 15. 17. 22. 29.1/7, pd

Dining Room Suite: Beautiful cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs and lighted
chine cabinet. Brand New, still boxed. Can:
deliver. Retail 43395 sacrifice $1100
850-222-2113
11/5 tfn,c

ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS:
You don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all brands and
telephones.
12/8, tfn, c

King Size'Mattress and Boxspring with
manufacturer's warranty. Brand new still
in plastic, can deliver. Sell $275
850-222-9879
11/5,tfn, c


TRUCK TOPPER, Fiberglass, for small
truck. Like New cond. White. $250.
997-1245.
1/7, pd

Free 4 room direct TV System Includes
installation. 4 MO. FREE programming
w/NFL Sunday Ticket subscription.-Over -
205 channels! Limited time offer. S&H
Restrictions Apply. (866)500-4056.
1/7, fcan


HELP WANTED

Kennel Techs needed for boarding kennel
near Lloyd. Must be able to work
weekends and holidays. Only honest,
dependable, animal oriented people need
apply. 850-877-5050, or fax resume to
877-5010.
tfn S/D 11/19, c

GARAGE SALE

Yard Sale 625 E. High St. Side Yard of
House Postpone a week if rain. 9 AM -
Until.
-II
LOST
8 Month old Poodle Silver & Black Male
goes by name of Snoopy. Last seen in
nobles subdivision please contact.
997-8283 after 3 p.m.
12/8 nc
Lost Since 12/31 Sheltie, Blue Merle
female; silver and black speckled w/white
markings) Call 997-8103.
1/7, 1/12, pd

FREE
Free mobile home. you move 2 Br, 10x50.
997-6259.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT: OFFICE SPACE, 3200
square feet of office space with 12 large
offices, two conference rooms, break
room, reception area in prime location ini
city limits. Also 640 square feet with four
offices, reception area. Both available
April 1, 2004. Phone 997-3666.3/3,tfn, nc
1 bedroom Apartment New carpet and
paint. $425 monthly. Includes water and
garbage. Apt. C at 640 E. Washington ST.
Call 342-3288
9/8/04 tfn c


Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11-tfn


-Do you want to be just a Christian, with
no denominational names, creeds ,or
practices? Jesus established His church
called the church of Christ and you can be
a member of it. We are ready to help if
you are ready to learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
Harrowing and Mowing. Call 997-4650
and ask for George Willis.
TFN,c








Fo0reCnutto


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
TradersRealty, Inc.

878-3957


EXPERIENCED TRAVEL AGENT?


WANTED:

One experienced (with computer skills)

Travel Agent to head up our

Travel-Cruise division.

Casual working environment (office in Monticello)..
guaranteed income... opportunity to let your talents
zoom. "Experienced Only"...



Send Resume to

charterxpress@yahoo.com


Meet Jefferson County's


KPROPY r KE Number One Real Estate


Virginia Blow- Broker/Associate...
850-509-1844
Katrina Walton- Sales Associate...
850-510-9512
Cadwell McCord -Sales Associate...
850-528-1079
John Hawkins -Sales Associate...
850-509-0195
Molly Jenkins -Sales Associate...
850-528-1707
Trisha Wirick -Sales Associate...
850-509-1153


Brett Kelly -Sales Associate..
850-556-1418
Cristi Beshears -Sales Associate....
850- 251-4392
Margaret Levings-Salcs Associate...
850-508-4414
Sarah Ann Hofmeister-Sales Associate
850-212-8167
Barry Kelly-Broker/Owner..
850-510-4220
Pam Kelly- Broker / Owner...
850-510-8359


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy
All for $9,995. (800)814-6323. B02000033.
Call US: We will not be undersold!
1/7, fcan
AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW
$ Program FL Company offers best cash
now options Have money due from
Settlements, Annuities, or Lotteries? Call
(800)774-3113. www.ppicash.com
1/7, fcan
#1 Cash Cow! 90 vending machines in 10
lucations- $9,995 (800)836-3464#B02428.
1/7, fcan

REAL ESTATE

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA.
Escape The heat in The cool western NC
Mountains. Homes, Cabins, Acreage, &
INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
Realty Murphy N.C. Call for Free
Brochure. (800)841-5868.
www.cherokeemountainrealty.com
1/7, fcan

Enhanced Manufactured Home with
Land: 4 bedroom, 2 baths with Sun Room
on 1 % Acres beautiful count y property,
2,200 Sq. Feet plus car port, Porch, and
Covered Walks. $107,000.00 997-1093
1/7, 1/14, 1/21, pd



SERVICES

Heavy Equipment operator Certified.
Training at Central Florida Community
College Campus. Job Placement
Assistance 866-933-1575. Associated
Training Services. 5177 Homosassa Trail,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
1/7, fcan
Lessons in operating your home computer.
2 hr weekly basic lessons in your home.
For more info call 997-5481.
1/7, 1/12, pd
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Discounts For Seniors House painting.
Int. + Ext., Low Rates, Free Estimates
most pressure washiilg $45 $50, 551-2000
1/7, 14,.21, 28, 2/4, 11, 18, 25,%, 11, 18, 25,.
pd


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Just Listed 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Lakefront Under Contract 16.54 acres
on Lake Hall in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly pasture nice
location near Lamont bring your horses
$40,000
Sold Peary Does It Again! Wacissa
River Lot with good road to the property,
it could be years before another lot be-
comes available,, only $55,000
Now $44,500
Wonderful Home Very nice 4 bedroom 2
bath 2000 double wide with fireplace on
1.9 acres on South Main Street Only
$69,500
The Partridqe House circa 1830, cur-
rently 5 could be 7 unit apartment building
with big oaks and an interesting courtyard,
great potential as a bed and breakfast with
suites only $240,000.
Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah Highway
fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per acre
Check the Price!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10
ac in planted pines, the balance in real
rough hunting land, a great buy $79,500
Investment Property SOLD Cozy 1.5 bed-
room 1 bath mobile home w/ screened
porch on the front & covered deck in back,
out buildings, quiet shaded lot $34,500
Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2 wooded
acres in the country, perfect for a mobile
home or cabin $7,500
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with screened porch at the end of the road
between Monticello and Lloyd nice yard
$63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Autilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000







Buyers looking for Homes and Land



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See It All!
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!

Al Maryland 508-1936
Reltor Aodate

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate


215 N. Jefferson St. Downtown Monticello (850)-997-5516 www.chkk.tum


4ri---.J ,,, .,i ,1,ill-.W9L91-Z i i ...J Fr


r


p-lrlbl~'Cy~c'~cd








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 7, 2005

SLloyd Artist's Work Among

Exhibits At Tallahassee Gallery
that expresses the best of westem tographed and display
DEBBIE SNAPP humanistic art traditions. "I want to She has also receive
DEBBIEfAriterthat expresses the best of western tographedan
Staff Writer express spiritual beauty in the eve- awards and honors da
ryday, via touchable art objects. 1975 and up until just


Clay Artist Catnerine Morris-
Heaps of Lloyd, will display her
works of art 5 to 9 p.m., Friday, Jan.
7, during an Open House at the "On
The Way" Gallery in Tallahassee.
Heaps artwork is well known to
.;" County residents as, she has donated
S pieces to such charitable organiza-
tions as the Humane Society.
Most recently, her "Half Torso"
piece was auctioned at the Bless the
Beast fundraiser, held at the Opera
House, and brought in a tidy sum
for the Humane Society.
clay Heaps returned to clay work, the
Passion of her youth, while a doc-
ciety toral student in art history.
to) Her work follows certain tenets


"My one of a kind figural pieces are
vehicles for highly symbolic pro-
grams derived from art historical re-
search in early science (alchemy)
and High Modernism," she explains.
Heaps began her doctoral educa-
tion- in 1987 at Syracuse University.
She transferred to Florida State Uni-
versity in 1990.
Her works have been shown at the
Ohio Craft Museum, Gallery 323 in
Madison, WI, and at the Klay Gal-
lery in Nyack, NY.
She has been recognized for her
talents and her works in a variety of
publications throughout her career.
And, her clay works have been pho-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


REV. AND MRS. DAVID EDWARDS

Employment
CONNECTIONS
Work solutions for you
GET WHAT YOU NEED
for employment success in 2005
Job Counseling Nationwide Job Listings
Job Training and Placement and Much More!
Visit your full service Employment Connections
for Jefferson and Madison counties
600 East Base St (Hwy. 90 nextto McDonald's) Madison, Florida
Mon. Fri. 8:00 AM 5:00 PM
(850) 973-9675


Driving under

the influence

doesn't lust

mean alcohol.
Driving while, impaired is a
leading cause of car accidents, but
alcohol is not the only culprit.
Drugs, including prescription
and over-the-counter drugs, can
also impair your driving.
Some medications, such as
antihistamines and anti-anxiety
medications for example, may
affect your driving skills.
For more information about
how some drugs may impair
your ability to drive safely, visit
th' Nitinnal Safer- Council's
weblitC at nv-wv.nsi.org.

:. i.- 1 .
I '^ ** ^:


Monticello

News
Your Hometown
Newspaper


The Reverend David Edwards and
wife, Twonia, formerly of
Wauchula, FL, have been appointed
as pastors of Bible Heritage (Church
of God) in Monticello.
David, a veteran pastor and evan-
gelist, has credentials from Berean
College in Springfield, MO, and is
an ordained bishop with the Church
of God in Cleveland, TN.
Twonia has served alongside her
husband and coordinated women's
ministries and Girls' Clubs
programs. She leaves the School
Board of Hardee County with more
than 16 years of service and hopes
to work in the local school system in
addition to serving the local church.


Pastor Edwards welcomes all
seeking a church home to visit Bible
Heritage located at 415 East Palmer
Mill Road.
For more information, call 997-
1119.


d.
'ed numerous
citing back to
recently, for


ner creative works of art.
The open house showing will in-
clude works by many local area art-
ists with an exquisite mix of eclectic
artists and mediums.
A Virtual Tour of the Gallery can
be taken by going on-line to
onthewaygallery.com At this time
85 pieces are on display. After the
open house, Heaps pieces, and
more, will be added to the tour.
"On The Way" gallery is Tallahas-
see's newest art gallery. It arrives
bringing with it an outstanding and
eclectic collection of artists and me-
diums. Ranging from the traditional
to the whimsical, and covering
every base in between.
The Gallery is owned and oper-
ated by long time local friends
Nancy Banks, Jyll Gandy, and
Karen Shiver.
"We've only been here open since
November," says Banks, "and every
artist who walks through the door
seems taken by the space and imme-
diately wants to show their work!
It's working out very well."
Medium represented includes pho-
tography, clay, oils, ,and turned


Sr.. O


-OT LAND?


Let's Build

,. :0T- n ,. 1



....-: "i i

Metal Roof is ophonal Copyrigh Home Store Plans and Publications
Call Today! '
(850) 224-0614 1 W
Tll Free 1-800-771-0614 PWHhornes. com
lalls A Division of Pennyworth Homes, Inc.
Visit Our New Home Design Center Today! Open Mon.- Fri. 9am-pm Saturday 9am- Ipm
93 lS WDoet Tennesse. e .lSreet Fl.l.i. #CRUB477 ,_ ,


from 650- year old silver coins,
glass, and gemstone pyramids and
so-called "multiple personality"
fused glass.
"That's something you have to see
to completely understand," Banks
says with a grin. Art lovers have
their chance with the latest Gallery
Hop this Friday night from 5-9 p.m.
The Gallery is located at 1714 S.
Monroe St., 9/10th of a mile south
from the capitol (on the same side as
the capitol and right next door to
Gandy Printers.)
Parking is available in the gallery
yard and next door to the empty car
wash or at Gandy Printers.
Every day Gallery hours are
Wed.-Fri. 11:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.,
and Sat. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Appoint-
ments are welcome any day of the
week.
The number at the Gallery is 222-
2535 or Director Nancy Banks can
be reached at 294-4980.
An Open House is held on the first
Friday of each month, with new
showings. The showings are then
displayed and enjoyed throughout
the month.




I-..-


CALL OR VISIT OUR
LOCAL OFFICE
FOR A FREE RATE QUOTE.


GEICO


LAKE ELLA PLAZA
Corner of N Monroe & Tharpe St.,
Next to Publix

S385-6047
Government mployes Isu Clonce Co. G1C(O G Cnlol Insurance Co
G1(0 Indemnify Co GUCO Casualty o o Colon, l Coounty Mutuol ns to
GEICO, Woshlngon, DC 21?d 6 ( 2002 U1ICO


GULF COAST .
METAL
ROOFING 3'WIIiE GALVALUME
3' WIDE PAINTED
Full line of 2' WIDE 5V
accessories in stock
WE HA VE METAL BUILDINGS
Special Flashings Made All Types Warranted Metal Available
Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, Fl.



A GREAT START FOR 2005
Homeownership with NO CASH out of
pocket.Home and land package.
It's never been easier.


Call Today


For Your Buying Power. Gena or
Jeff 575-9165


Tallahassee Housing Center
2520 West Tennessee Street
Tallahassee, Florida'


MAIN STREET

SATURDAY MARKET


SCome One, Come All!

i Fee for first'timers, $5 after that.


SGarage Sale, Baked Goods, Produce,
Gift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
thing You Have To Sell, Including
$ Fainting Goats!
Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
S Fund raisers more than welcome,


Call Tammie Peck @ 997-6455


You can afford a private education at
THOMAS UNIVERSITY
Call today and ask how.
Open Registration is Jan. 12-14
Classes begin Jan. 18 4.
Open enrollment policy '
Student friendly campus "
Flexible schedules ..
Evening & online classes 1
Scholarships and financial aid available
Florida residents qualify for in-state tuition
Accredited Associate, Bachelor & Master Degrees
Business Administration (Accounting, General Business,
Management, Management Information Systems, Marketing);
Counseling; Criminal Justice; Education (Early Childhood,
Education, Middle Grades, Secondary Grades Education -
Teacher Certification); General Biology and Environmental
Science; Humanities (English, Visual Arts and Music);
Liberal Studies; Medical Technology; Nursing; Paralegal;
Psychology; Recreation Management; Rehabilitation
Counseling; Rehabilitation Services; Social Studies (History
and Anthropology); Social Work
For more information and a free brochure, contact:
THOMAS UNIVERSITY
1501 Millpond Road, Thomasville, GA 31792
1-800-538-9784 229-226-1621, Ext. 214
www.thomasu.edu


nvi


All SiZes
* Door Callptes


.... '~ ASK ABOUT "J-
-OUR 3 TON --
CENTRAL
HEAT& AIR
I -;E CTUNITS! ,<
* DOOR CANOPIES ,*,
* ROOF COATING
(Aluminum & White)
* DOORS & WINDOWS OF ALL SIZES
PLUMBING FIXTURES, FITTINGS & PIPE
Open:
Monday-Friday 7:00am-5:30pm
Closed Saturday


Call

VNY 576-5113
S H1 ont" or Toll Free
GTe, BeTO 1-800-633-2356
5i'' tea\e 732 Blountstown Highway
ar'an.8 Tallahassee, FL
(Located between Pensacola St.
& Highway 90W on Blountstown Hwy )
FiV4t^CYU' &^' iC CavClerbl&e W vth, ccpproved4-
cer5mt WOC A/C' L& Appla4u6ceS"
CAC#050446 GEO#CN003927 L.P. #2406 ESUOU0151


CATHERINE MORRIS HEAPS displays a sample of her
artwork, half torso, donated to a recent Humane Soc
Fundraiser. She holds her daughter Marilee (News Pho


David Edwards New

Bible Heritage Pastor


- AA


g~- ~I"'s~Rsl~e~sg re ~ -L ~C ~qYIIY~I L~t~t~t~t~t~t~t~t~t~t~ti~a


-


or


I -





]IPllr~l~l


ugs west jennessee .5rreei


J


m


I #fk IM MKIR I&D T& LWAAfraim