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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: January 5, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00001
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Sports
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Classified
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CATr"n9TT!,T,r, FT,. 3- !1


Ragtimist Milne

At Opera House
Friday

See Story, Page 2

IErA


Healthy Start
Receives

$99,630 Grant

See Story, Photo, Page 3


Health Benefits

Up For

Wounded

See Editorial, Page 4


Citizen Donates
Van To

Humane Society

See Story, Photo, Page 5
II


Wednesday Morning


Monticell


137TH YEAR NO.01. 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2005


Library Takes $50,000 Hit


Cutback Mav Resul In budget and which this year the state .
a Rn reduced by approximately $59,000.


Reduction Of Services


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Staff and service reductions may
be in store for the county library.
Library Director Linda Hamedani,
in fact, is right now trying to figure
out exactly what services and per-
sonnel will be affected, and to what
degree.
Best case scenario -- counting all
available funding -- Hamedani fig-
ures the library is facing a $77,274
budget shortfall.
That's the difference between last
year's budget of $264,000 and the
$186,000 Hamedani can count on
hand at present. That's counting
state aide, a $6,000 federal grant,
the county's contribution, and an
extra $29,000 the County Commis-


Democrats

Elect New

Chairman

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Thie Jefferson County Democratic
Executive Committee has elected a
new slate of officers.
Elected ,without opposition at the
Dec. 4 organizational meeting of the
committee were: Eleanor Hawkins,
chair; Mae Eva Kyler, state commit-
teewoman; Franklin Hightower,
state committeeman; Roger Walker,
vice chairman; Nellie Randal, secre-
tary; and Shirley Washington, treas-
urer.
Hawkins thanked the retiring com-
mittee members for their years of'
service on behalf of the Democratic
Party. She noted that many of them
had served for decades on the com-
mittee.
Hawkins encouraged the retiring
members to continue to participate
in committee functions and to sup-
port the Democratic Party's activi-
ties. She stressed that a strong two-
party political system was important
for the county, as well as for the
state and the nation.
"It serves to maintain a system of
checks and balances as well as pro-
vide a vehicle for the introduction of
new ideas and candidates to
strengthen our democratic form of
government," Hawkins said.
The committee reaffirmed, via its
(See Democrats Elect Page 12)


HAWKINS


sion threw into the mix for good
measure.
Indeed, barring an additional in-
fusion of money by the County
Commission, the only alternative is
to tighten up on expenses,
Hamedani says.
Meaning that the part-time help.
will likely have to go and the hours
of the full-time staff will have to be
adjusted. The purchase of books and
materials too will have to be cur-
tailed.
As for the library's operating
hours, Hamedani expects that she
will be able to keep these intact. But
that's no guarantee. It's possible that
she will have to adjust the hours too,
she concedes.
Why the $77, 274 shortfall?
The answer lies with state aide,
which figures largely in the library's


"We didn't get the double dip,"
Hamedani says simply.
The simply may be a tad mislead-
ing, however, given the complex
and complicated formula the state
employs to calculate its annual con-
tribution.
Designed to encourage contribu-
tions to public libraries at the local
level, the state's contribution is
based on the amount of the local'
contribution: The higher the local
contribution, the higher the state's
contribution.
Rather than basing its contribution
on the current or past year, however,
the state bases its contribution on
the local contribution two years
prior. Meaning that the state's con-
tribution for the present year is
based on the county's 2003 contri-
bution.
To further complicate the matter,
the state takes into account the con-
_(See Library Takes Page 8)


LINDA HAMEDANI, center, library director,
discusses the purchase of materials with


her staff. From left, Doris Andrews,
Hamedani and Stephanie Montgomery.


Court Of Appeal Favors


Madison Co. On Landfill


ussry COvers FL, GA, AL, MS

HAROLD USSRY of Alabama paints the flag pole in front of
the Post Office. Postmaster Rodney Boland says he shows
up every two years to paint the pole. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The District Court of Appeals-
(DCA) last week affirmed Madison
County's right to veto the introduc-
tion of outside garbage into the re-
gional landfill.
The. DCA decision effectively
shoots down the argument of Jeffer-
son, Taylor and Dixie counties -- the
three other member counties in the
regional landfill -- that they can
amend the original contract to allow
nonmembers' garbage into the land-
fill.
County Attorney Buck Bird said
the court's decision validated Madi-
son County's argument that the
original contract superseded all
other considerations. He said it was
up to the commissions of the three
other counties to decide if they
wanted to pursue the matter further.
Bird said the next step would be to
appeal the decision to the Florida
Supreme Court. But he doubted the
three counties would want to go that
far, he said.
Madison County filed a lawsuit
against its three partner counties in
the regional landfill about two years.


Decision Bars
-Outside Trash
From Facility

ago, when the latter voted to amend
the original agreement. That agree-
ment, dating from 1992 when the
four-county landfill was established,
,gave Madison County, as the host
county, veto power over the intro-
duction of nonmembers' garbage
into the facility.
In subsequent years, however, the
three other member counties began
to reconsider the agreement, given
the escalating cost of operating the
regional facility and the potential fi-
nancial rewards of taking in outside
garbage.
A few years back, the regional
landfill board, by majority vote,
amended the contract to take away
Madison County's veto power. The
regional board argued that it power
as an autonomous body gave it
authority to amend previous agree-
ments.
Not so, argued the Madison
County Commission, which filed'


suit to overturn the decision. A-
judge in Madison County subse-
quently ruled that the decision of the
regional landfill board constituted a
breach of contract.
Dissatisfied with the judge's
ruling, the regional board, in con-
junction with the individual boards
of the three partner counties, appeal
the decision to the DCA.
Former County Commissioner
Gene Cooksey was a longtime
member of the regional landfill
board and a vocal proponent of
opening the facility to outside gar-
bage.
"One county shouldn't have' veto
power in a cooperative situation,"
Cooksey argued in support of chal-
lenging Madison County's veto
right. "If you're going to be a par-
ticipant in a group, everyone should
have the same say so."
It didn't mean that the was neces-
sarily advocating the introduction of
outside garbage into the landfill
anytime soon, Cooksey said. But he
felt strongly that the regional land-
fill board should have the right to
consider the option, if economic and
other circumstances warranted it, he
said.


Industrial Park Repairs Costly


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


scope of the work, so that the pro-
ject falls within the available found-
ing.


Commissioners have been strug-
The bids that commissioners gling with the drainage problems at
opened last week for correction of--the industrial park for more than a
the drainage problems at the indus- year. The problems surfaced in late
trial park turned out to be too high 2003, when the Department of Envi-
for award of the contract, ronmental Protection (DEP) con-
Clerk of Courts Dale Boatwright ducted an inspection of the site.
reports that three companies submit- The DEP found, among other
ted proposals, the lowest of which things, that the retention pond the
was $251,000. And that was for county constructed at the southwest
phase one of the project alone. The corer of the property when the jail
county, meanwhile, has a total of was built in 1998 had never been
$191,000 for the project, which con- properly permitted.
sists of two phases. It also found that an overflow sys-
Commissioners instructed con- tem needed to be put in place, so
sultant engineer Frank Darabi, of that the stormwater would flow into
Darabi and Associates, to revise the a nearby creek, eliminating the
plans so that the county can solicit flooding problems in the area.
new bids. The idea is to reduce the= The Natural Resources Conserva-__


tion Service (NRCS) last year
awarded the county $191,000 for
correction of the drainage problems
at the industrial park.
That money, however, must be
committed and the project com-
pleted before March, if the county is
not to lose the funding.
Fear of jeopardizing the NRCS
funding prompted commissioners to
attempt to speed up the process last
week. But now they face further de-
lays with the revision of the plans.
In other action, commissioners
authorized the volunteer engineer
John Gerren to sign the appropriate
paperwork to move the
Aucilla/Drifton Road project for-
ward.
The Department of Transportation
(DOT) awarded the county
_$900,000 for the resurfacing work.:'


WET, rainy weather characterized much of the Christmas
holidays. The weather has since improved. (News Photo)
',5 ;, 2 :-' :. :::.:-i
: ;. ..:, .. .,.... :. ,......



holidays, The weather has since improved. (News Photo)


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005


Students Prepare Garden


For Spring Planting


Persons said that there are a total
FRAN HUNT of 16 students from the Boys and
Staff Writer Girls Club now involved in the pro-
ject and there is also plenty of adult
After the holiday break, work at-heln"


WHILE Charlene Austin prepares the soil at Roostertown
Garden, Tyshonda Jordan looks on. (News Photo)


RAy CICHON
Managing Editor

:Ragtimist Bob Milne, the top-
ragtiine/boogie-woogie pianist in
theldountry, will present a concert 8
p.nr4. Friday, at the Opera House.
Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for
Opera House members, and $5 for
chiIdren under 12.
Ticket can be reserved by phone
at 997-4422, or' purchased at the
door.
The concert will be presented
downstairs, with the audience seated
at tables, where they won't just hear'
barrel house music, but will actually-
be in the barrel house atmosphere.
Milne will entertain with inside
stories on the history of American
music, and amuse the audience by
his jokes and his musical talents.
"Unbelievable," "intoxicating,"
and "virtuoso" are words critics
have applied to the music of ragti-
mist Milne.
"His dazzling piano playing leaves
no white keys, black keys, or even
cracks untouched," critics have writ-
ten.
The New York Times called him-
the "master of the boogie woogie."
A full-time solo concert pianist, he
receives rave reviews wherever he


tours, all over the US, Canada, Ja-
pan, Ireland, and into Mel\ico.
He has been given the'most dis-
tinguished honor of being inter-
-viewed about his piano playing ca-
reer by the Library of Congress, in
October, 2004, for the national ar-
chives.
Although he refers to himself as a
"saloon piano player," which is how


the Roostertown Garden will re-
sume Wednesday, with students,
members of local garden clubs and
volunteers all getting involved in
the project.
Students will meet at the site on
Monday and Wednesday each week.

Spokesperson Judi Persons said
the first thing on the agenda for the
project is to assess the frost damage
that had been done recently and to
prepare seed beds for spring plant-
ing.
Persons said that if last year was
any indication, participants will
plant about an acre of carrots.
"Last year the kids were so ex-
cited," said Persons. "They were
pulling baby carrots out of the
ground, washing them and eating
them, and none of the carrots made
it home.
"They enjoy planting the seeds,
caring for the plants and watching
them grow and then-eating the,
fruits of their labor," she added.
From the end of May until the be-
' ginning of October, no work had
been done at the garden, because of
the change in leadership at the
Boys and Girls Club and Persons
having had surgery.


House,


Thus far, 17 railroad ties have
been removed from the site, and
transported to the Boys and Girls
Club because they are changing the
walkways through the garden..
She added that volunteers had
also picked up more broken glass
on the site.
Students made a new Day Lily
bed and they rescued dozens and
dozens of "Paper Whites", .which
had grown wild.
"They were growing in the grass
and we wanted to rescue them be-
fore they got mowed down," said
Persons. Several of the volunteer
students had returned from last year
and Persons was quite impressed
with their retention of the knowl-


Clothing
Giveaway Set

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Cox's Soul Food Restaurant will
hold a "Clothing Giveaway" Satur-
day.
Tables will.be set up outside of the
business location at 490 South Rail-
Sroad Street. Anyone wishing to do-
nate to the cause can bring articles
of clothing, blanket-.. appliances, or
whatever, to be passed on to some-
one in need.


S"Quite a few things have already
he claims he honed his craft. been donated and' dropped off. We
S. -'\ant to reach as many people as
With an impressive display of ver-. possible. It would be really wonder-
satility, he plays everything from ful if all of the donated items could
melodic 19th century ballads to rag- find a new home," relates Gloria
time and piano rollstyles, from Cox-Jones. proprietor of the restau-
blues and boogie-woogie, to Harlem rant.
stride, from old Gospel and hillbill' For more information contact
to classical sounding pieces of his- Cox-Jones at 997-2359 or
own composition. 997-4572.


edge of transplanting flowers. "So
we know that they're remembering
what they were taught," she said.
She added that preparations were
also underway for a new Daffodil
and Tulip bed. Also, members
have started on the southwest quad-
rant of the garden, working on a
shade bed and a sunshine bed.
Persons said that there is a picnic


table at the site, where people can
sit and enjoy the scenery.
In the southeast quadrant, volun-
teers plan to plant additional fruit
trees and blueberry bushes.
Persons added that the Monticello
SGarden Club has approved donat-
ing $210 toward the project. The
funds will be used for rakes, shov-
els, two 100-foot garden hoses, two
heavy duty sprinklers, 20 one-
gallon Azalea plants and additional
bulbs to be planted in the garden.
Adults in charge of:he project in-
clude Persons, Boys and. Girls Club
Director Gerrold Austin and Ernest
Harvey of Green Industries.


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The Jefferson County School Board
announces the regular school board
meeting to which the' public is invited.
The meeting will be held at the
Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building on Monday January 10, 2005
at 6:00 p.m.


Agendas may be picked up at the
district office at 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, Florida, Monday
through Friday between the hours of
8:00 a.mr. and 4:00 p.m.


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Ragtimist Pianist Milne To


Perform At Opera I


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5,2005 PAGE 3

Toby Ward New Officer in


City Police Department


RECEIVING funds from the Blue Foundation
for a Healthy Florida, Inc., are from left:
Lynn Elliot, QI Consultant for Healthy Start,



Healthy Start C


$99,630 Grant


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Because Jefferson County has been -
experiencing high rates of infant
mortality (65.8 deaths per 1,000
births) and low birth weight babies
(15.8 babies per 100 births) in the
African. American community, the
Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson,
Madison, and Taylor County re-
quested consideration for grant
funding.
Low birth weight is caeimea as any
baby bom with a weight less than
5.5 pounds.
,Subsequently, the Coalition was
awarded a 99,630 grant from the
Blue Foundation for a Healthy Flor-
ida, Inc., in Aug. 2004, to create a
group prenatal care program.
These funds are being used to
conduct a Group Prenatal Care Pro-
gram to address the high mortality
rates and low birth weight rates of
babies born to African American
niuihers in Jefferson and Madison
Counties.'
The program utilizes a group set-
ting format known as "Centering
Pregnancy" that combines 10 educa-
tional sessions with scheduled pre-
natal care appointments at the Jef-
ferson and Madison County Health
Departments.
The sessions are structured to
show participants the importance of
attending prenatal and postpartum
appointments, and to provide infor-
mation on nutrition, the effects of
drugs and alcohol, parenting skills
and other aspects of pregnancy,
birth, and baby care.
State and Community organiza-
tions and services are also used to
help broaden the spectrum of infor-
mation the participants receive.


Susan Towler,
Blue Foundatio
Directors Chair



ets
? rL


Cetta Barnhart, Health Educator
hired to coordinate the activities,
states that she is working diligently
to find all services and opportunities
available throughout the state to
provide the participants with what-
ever is needed to ensure a healthy
outcome and a happy birth experi-
ence.
Two elements have been used to
attract participants to the Group Pre-
natal Care Program: free dental care
services, and an opportunity to
Scrapbook.
Dental care services, provided
through the County Health Depart-
ments, are a key element in the
health of the expectant mothers as a
link between periodontal disease
and pre-term labor has been identi-
fied.
To help eliminate this factor, serv-
ices for dental cleaning and emer-
gency extractions are provided
throughout the course of the partici-
pants' pregnancy.
Scrapbooking, gives each mother
an opportunity to documeni the ex-;
perience.of pregnancy and what she
has learned from participating in the
program. This will help pass on the
importance, of good prenatal care
practices to all with whom the
books are shared.
In the first session the County
Health Department's nutritionist,
Bonnie Mathis provided a presenta-
tion on "nutrition during pregnancy"
and the owner of the Scrapbook
market in Tallahassee, Courtney
Glazer, gave instructions on "How
to Scrapbook."
Nursing students from Florida
State University, under the instruc-
tion of Lynn Elliott, also helped by
providing additional information on'
nutrition and portion size.
The final session in April will host


Executive Director of the
n, and Eric Scott, Board of
Healthy Start.


a "Baby Party" to celebrate the birth
of the participants' healthy babies.
Each participant will receive their
completed Scrapbooks and a gift
basket from Healthy Start.
These baskets will contain items
for the new mother and baby. Dona-
tions to the baskets are welcomed.
Cribs and bassinets are also
needed for some of the new
mothers. To donate items for any or
all of the participants, contact Cetta
Barnhart at the Healthy Start Coali-
tion in Greenville at 948-2741


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Native Toby Ward, 29, has re---
cently been hired as a Monticello
Police Officer.
While in his first position as a
police officer, Ward has previous
law enforcement experience.
He became interested in becom-
ing a police officer while working
at his two previous jobs.
Ward worked at the Florida Su-
preme Court Marshall's Office in
courtroom security and dignitary
protection for seven years.
He then worked in the Georgia
Department of Corrections for
three years and served in the Flor-
Sida National Guard for three years.
Ward said he prefers being a po-
lice officer over his past jobs be-
cause he doesn't deal strictly with
"the bad guys."
"On the streets I get to meet a va-
riety of people." It's not the same
people day after day," he said.

He began his duties in Monticello
Dec. 20 and has answered a variety
of calls from stranded motorists to
an armed robbery in progress.
Ward said the most difficult part
of his job was getting to know the
names and locations of all of the


WARD


streets in town. "I have to know
them religiously," he added.
While some people complain
about their jobs at the end of their
day, Ward looks forward to being
able to say, "I helped someone to-
day."
"I would like to make a career of


his," said Ward, "and I would like
to eventually work in a training ca-
pacity in the field."
He is the son of Costillo Ward,
Jr. and a 1994 graduate of Jefferson
County High School. Ward is mar-
ried to Michelle Ballard.
They have no children, but they
do have an American Pit Bull
named "Dusty".
Ward's hobbies include riding
motorcycles, fishing and sports
hooting.





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It's easyto find government
information at www.FirstGov.gov
or 1(80oo FED INFO.
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Progress Energy, JES Club

Provide Holiday Baskets


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Progressive Energy, through rep-
resentative Brenda Register, donated
five baskets of food to the Jefferson
Elementary School Boys and Girls
Club during the holiday season.
The baskets were to be given to
families needing help to get them
through the holidays and to help
provide holiday cheer.
With the help of Director Gerrold
Austin and other staff personnel at


the Club, a list of families, in the
county was organized, and the bas-
kets were delivered.
The families were surprised, tear-
ful, and grateful for the kindness
and thoughtfulness of both Progress
Energy and the JES Boys and Girls
Club.
Also making donations of their
time and toys to the children at the.
Club were Shirley Washington and
Scotty Ebberbach.
Their generosity brought holiday
cheer to children enrolled at the
Club.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

F4 MEMBER RON CICHON
Publisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

'LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
iP.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
1Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fix. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Health Benefits


Up For Wounded


SAmerican soldiers wounded in
3raq and Afghanistan are surviving
what were once fatal injuries thanks
to high-tech body armor and rapid
medical care. Recovering from those
wounds, however, can be a long
process.
S That's why the Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA) is working
closely with the Department of De-
fense (DoD) to provide the best pos-
sible care for America's combat
wounded.
Last year, VA authorized free
health care for veterans who served
in combat after Nov. 11, 1998, for
iny conditions they feel are related
to their service. That eligibility ex-
tends for two years after separation
from the military and includes Na-
tional Guard and Reserve members
coming off active duty.
lMore than half of the U.S. military
personnel wounded in Iraq have
been unable to immediately return
to duty. Many have separated from
military service and are receiving re-
habilitation and specialty care in VA
hospitals.
Combat injuries often result in
limb loss. VA offers prosthetic serv-
ices at medical facilities across the
country.
'Physical therapists help amputees
master the latest prosthetic devices,
including computerized legs with
programmable memories and myoe-
lectric arms that respond to the
body's nerve impulses.


Behind the scenes, VA and DoD
researchers are collaborating on the
next generation of artificial limbs
with embedded microprocessors,
composite materials and neural
feedback systems.
Spinal cord injury can change a
veteran's life forever. VA's network
of 23 spinal cord injury and disorder
centers links with veterans' hospitals
and clinics throughout the country
to provide the specialized care and
support these injuries require.
VA's comprehensive blind reha-
bilitation program incorporates mul-
tidisciplinary visual impairment
service teams and blinded rehabilita-
tion outpatient specialists at VA
hospitals with 10 residential blind
rehabilitation centers where blind
and low-vision veterans learn how
to regain their independence.
Following the 1991 Gulf War, VA
and DoD established the Defense
and Veterans Head Injury Program
to provide evaluation, treatment and
rehabilitation services for veterans
who suffer traumatic brain injury
registry and regional clinical net-
work, as well as research support.
VA offers counseling for combat
veterans who experience difficulties
adjusting to civilian life at 206 Vet
Centers located in communities
across the country.
These services include confiden-
tial sessions with an experienced
counselor and group therapy with
-other combat veterans.


Child Support Goes

TO Central Location


By CARL D. BOATWRIGHT
Cl!rk of Court

',Q: I used to pay child support
through the Clerk's office for my
twg children. Why does it have to
go 'through the State Disbursement
Unit now?
X: In 1994, the Federal Govern-
ment passed the Personal Responsi-
bilty and Work Opportunity
Reconciliation Act, a federal law re-
quiting all states to have in opera-
tion by October 1, 1998, a
centralized receipting and disbursing
unit for cases being enforced by the
Tite IV-D agency and private cases.
with an income deduction order
dated on or after January 1, 1994.
Having a single address for pay-
ments made the system more effi-
cient for payers and made it easier


to track payments for parents and
the courts. To pay by mail, make
sure your payment has the right case
number, the county name and your
social security number. Mailed pay-
ments should be sent to the Florida
State Disbursement Unit at:
FLSDU
- P.O. Box 8500
Tallahassee, FL 32314-8500
In 2001, an Internet payment op-
tion was put into place. In keeping
with the technological opportunities
afforded us these days, parents who
pay child support may pay on-line at
www.myfloridacounty.com. While
payments now go to a single
address, the official case records still
reside with the Clerk of Court.
If you have any questions or com-
ments about this column, please for-
ward them to: Carl D. Boatwright,
Clerk of Court, County Courthouse,
Room 10, Monticello, FL 32344.


Hall Thanks Citizens For

Years Of Council Service


Dear Editor:
I write to express my heartfelt
thanks to all of the citizens of the
City of Monticello.
It has indeed been a pleasure to
have served on our City Council for
the past several years.

I congratulate Tom Vogelgesang
upon his selection' as my replace-
ment on the Monticello City
Council.
The citizens of Monticello and


Jefferson County continue to exem-
plify an excellent team spirit. To-
gether we have worked to recruit
many new businesses and public
sector activities to our beautiful
town.

More recent improvements in-
clude preliminary development ap-
provals for the Pecan Hills
subdivision which shall provide ap-
proximately 200 new homes within
(See Gene Hall Page 5)


From Our Photo File


PIZZA HUT Manager John Marcum cut the
ribbon at the Grand Opening of the restau-
rant in Jan, 1988. Company officials and lo-


cal businessmen were
event. (News File Photo)


on hand for the


Opinion & Comment


New Year's Plans Often Fade


If you made a New Year's resolu-
tion, congratulations, are in order.
Resolutions for a New Year are kind'
of like diets, we tend to stray rather
quickly.
A survey team checked with 213
adults in Pennsylvania to see how
they made out with resolutions the
past two years, and the results tell
you how quickly we abandon those
well intentioned resolutions.
A Whopping 77 percent of the
people polled kept their resolutions
for one week, 55 percent a month,
and 40 percent six months. Only 19
percent kept their resolutions for
two years.
You may have already abandoned
your New Year's resolution.
I haven't made a New Year's
resolution in so many years I just
can't recall the last one. New Year's
resolutions are not my thing.
If I've got to break a habit or-do
something new which is in my best
interest, then why not decide to do it
on September 23rd or July 7th?
Why wait for a New Year?
This is my logical mind at work. I


Publisher's

Notebook




-Ron Ciclion


know, but waiting for a New Year to
quit smoking, or diet, or take a night
course, or exercise regularly doesn't
make sense to me. If those things
are noble pursuits, then they' are
worthwhile any time of the year.
But if New Year's resolutions
make sense to you, then have at it.
I've got a host of friends who
started diets right after Jan. '1. I
know, 'cause they told me they
would.
Some told me at the buffet table at
parties, others told me while holding
a plateful of food on their laps, and


still others told me as they were
wolfing down a second dessert.
Do I believe them when they say,
"come the New Year, I'm going to
get serious about losing weight?"
No, I don't. Of course, I never, say I
don't believe it.
Once in a great while somebody
comes along who really does what
they say they'll do. I'd hate to be the
one who discouraged them when
they announce their plans...
Surveys show that half of the
adults make resolutions with 70 per-
cent of them health related.


If you are in the half who do make
resolutions, you have my wishes for
success.
If you are in the half who don't
plan to make resolutions, you have
my congratulations for honesty. You
probably know you won't keep any
resolutions you make anyway.
I would imagine by now you've
heard a lot of conversation from co-
workers and friends about resolu-
tions. It's the thing to talk about
right after the New Year holiday.
That kind of talk usually fades in a
week or two as the resolutions are
abandoned.
A few hints for resolution-makers
are in order.
Psychologist Ronald G. Nathan 4
advises setting one goal and work-
ing toward small but lasting
changes. He says doing that will
help people stay on target.
Psychologist John C. Norcross
says you'll have more luck if you
realize a lapse is not a relapse. If
you're trying to quit smoking but
take a few puffs, it doesn't mean
you should give up. .


Internet Phone Service Growing


BY BRAULIO L. BAEZ
Chairman

The initials VOIP stand for "Voice-
Over Internet Protocol." In simple
terms, this means using technology
to transmit voice conversations over
a network normally used for trans-
mitting data.
SThe word "protocol" in this sense
refers to a set of rules governing the
format of the messages transmitted.
The data network over which
VOIP is deployed may be the Inter-
net, a network used exclusively by a
single corporation (sometimes re-
ferred to as "Intranet), or a network


Internet or Intranet phone service
than a conventional voice network.
Use of VOIP has become increas-
ingly popular with residential con-
sumers because they can, in some
instances, make calls using the
Internet for one-third to two-thirds
less than traditional calling plans.
Internet calling may involve some
compromises, however. The quality
of Internet telephone service will de-
pend on the quality of the user's
Internet connection.
Changes in the connection speed
for any reason can result in reduced
quality of the voice signal. Because
calls are routed through Internet
servers, emergency 9-1-1 operators


managed by local and long distance' may not be able to automatically
providers. link a street address to the caller, as
The use of VOIP has increased is the case with traditional wire line
dramatically in recent years, not 'service.
only among businesses but among' Prospective users should also be
residential consumers. Businesses aware that, like cordless phones,
gravitate to the technology because Internet telephone service will not
it can be less expensive to run an function during power outages.


In addition, most VOIP systems
require a highspeed Internet connec-
tion to maximize benefits.
The advantages and low rates are
among the reasons nearly 1 million
Americans subscribe to VOIP serv-
ice. That number is expected to rise
to 10 million by the end of 2007, ac-
cording to industry estimates.
Until, recently, one of the draw-
backs to VOIP was finding a pro-
vider. Many companies providing
-the service were small, not easily lo-
cated, and offered service to smaller
niche market segments.
This began to change earlier this
year with declarations of intent by
traditional long-distance carriers to
enter a number of markets in the
United States to provide service.
A number of incumbent local ex-
change companies offer VOIP serv-
ice to businesses and large cable
television providers have announced
plans to offer service to residential
-customers.


Contamination Sites Fot


BY TIM LOCKETTE


It may be the nation's biggest
toxic mystery.
In the first half of the 20th
century, farmers across the Sun Belt
states dug thousands of pits in which
they regularly dipped their cattle in
arsenic-laden pesticides to kill ticks
that carry a dreaded cattle disease.
Still contaminated with the cancer-
causing metal, those pits now pose a
threat to drinking water supplies, en-
vironmental officials say but most
of the pits are abandoned their loca-
tions forgotten.
Now University of Florida re-
searchers have developed a tech-


nique using aerial photography and
computer technology that might
make it possible to locate even the
best-hidden vat sites.
"We need to know where all these
sites are, if only to warn people who
have wells or gardens on property
with high levels of arsenic," said
Bill Todd, a graduate student at
UF's Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences who conducted the re-
search. "If we don't find a faster,
more reliable method for locating
the vats, we'll probably never find
them all."
UF researchers used aerial photo-
graphs and computerized maps to
pinpoint the locations of 10 previ-
ously unlocated in-ground vats
where Alachua County cattle ranch-


ers once dipped cows in pesticides
to kill cattle tickets. The research re-
sults were published earlier this year
in the journal Applied Engineering
in Agriculture.
The tickets were carriers of piro-
plasmosis, a disease that once
plagued the cattle ,industry in the
Southeastern U.S., killing large
numbers of cattle and causing some
northern states to halt shipment of
cows from infected states.
In the early 1990s, dipping vats
were constructed by farmers and
state agricultural agencies across the
region. But nowhere was the prac-
tice more widespread than in
Florida, where state law required
farmers to dip their cattle twice a
week.


To use VOIP, a consumer first'
needs service usually between $20
to $40 a month for unlimited na-
tional and local calling and an,
adapter available fro electronics or,
specialty stores.
The adapter connects the phone
with the Internet connection, permit-
ting the consumer to use VOIP.
The price advantage enjoyed by
VOIP users is attributable largely to
the lack of regulation and taxes im-
posed on providers.
In Florida, the Legislature has
elected a "hands-off' approach to
regulating VOIP providers.
Congress continues to discuss the
role of federal regulation and taxa-
tion of VOIP service.
Consumers should be aware that if
regulatory costs increase at the fed-
eral, level, some of these will be;
passed on the consumers and have
the potential to nudge prices
upward.


Indrl


"Not a lot of people remember it
now, but at the time this was a huge
undertaking for the state, and a lot
of farmers resented it," said Wayne
Mishoe, a professor in the agricul-
tural and biological engineering de-
partment and co-author of the study.
Well known as a poison, arsenic
can be harmful even in trace
amounts, causing cancer and other
illnesses.
Abandoned vat sites are a matter
of serious concern to environmental
officials, who say that arsenic re-
maining in the ground under each
vat could seep into the groundwater,
contaminating audit," said !oe Ku-
lakowski, a geologist for the Florida
(See Sites Page 5)


,I -~ I ,


d~- L- I I- I LI


I 9 I


I








SMONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005 PAGE 5


SITES
(Continued From Page 4)
Department of Environmental Pro-
tection who works on cattle-vat re-
mediation projects.
Kulakowski said the state has as-
sessment data on at least 100 known
vat sites, the vast majority of which
have been linked to some form of
groundwater contamination. But
many more sites remain
unidentified. In Florida alone, state
officials have found more than
3,000 vat sites mentioned by name
in the minutes of state meetings on
the cattle tick problem but no di-
rections to any of them.
"People just didn't keep records of
that kind of thing at the time," Todd
said. "This was a rural environment
where people knew the local land-
marks. If you said a vat was at
Cooter Pond or the Adkins farm,
there was no need for directions."
The clues to vat sites were
sketchy, but Todd saw a way to turn
them into something more conclu-
sive. He sorted through Alachua
County tax records, matching the
names of known vat sites to the
names of businesses and landowners
in the early 20th century. He created
a computerized map of the county
showing all those properties, plus
the suspected sites of vats named af-
ter roads or other landmarks. Then
he narrowed the field by searching
for geographical features common
to most dipping vats.
"Cattle were often dipped before
they were shipped, so the vats were
often not far from a railroad depot,"
Todd said. "Some vats got a lot of
traffic hundreds of cows every
week so there's usually an access
road."
Then Todd pored over old aerial
photos of the suspected vat sites,
looking for the T-shaped structures
that housed the vats and corrals that
surrounded them.
The process yielded the exact lo-
cation of 10 previously unidentified
vats throughout Alachua County. He
has seven other "probable hits" -
photos showing signs that seem to
point to vats obscured by tree cover.
And his mapping method uncovered
the general locations of more than
80:,ther vats mentioned-in historical
records., ..' *. '..
The researchers said ground-
penetrating radar, or GRP, a tech-
nology often used by archaeologists
to uncover underground structures,
could be used to find vats on those
80 sites.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer,


when back f
returned to th
Martha Ca
records prior


Members of the Humane Society- seemingly los
are ecstatic to learn that a cargo
van has been donated to them to She explain
transport animals to and from the ant Mike Ike
vet and to adoption booths. the records
Carol Deeney of Havana donated attorney, and
the 1988 burgundy Chevrolet van, could relay t]
complete with new tires, CB radio, society.
AM/FM radio, automatic transinis- Canady sai
sion, power windows and locks, cently surface
TV, running boards and tinted win-
dows. ety received
dows.
wanted them.
The Blue Book value of the vehi-
cle is $3,500, and it appears to be She said tl
practically new and in excellent having the r
working condition, and stored in
Vandals had smashed the any damage.
passenger-side windows, but Better
Bodies Auto Body said it would In other ne
dontate the labor to install the win- advised that
dows. e-mailed th
In related news, the society was first official e
the recipient of good news recently the response v
,. .. .... ..

Ouilters To Resume

Work On Lilly Quilt


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Thel Crazv Onilter'" have been tak-


financial records were'
iem.
nady reported that the
Sto 2003 which were
st, have been returned.
ed that when Account-
a became ill, he turned
over to another
d Ikea died before he
his information to the

d when the records re-
Id, the Humane Soci-
a call to see if they-

iat she is working on
records filed properly_.
a safe place to avoid

ews, Kimberly Baruch
she has prepared and
he Humane Society's
-mail newsletters and
was good.

_:RN '


CAROL DEENEY of Havana donated this transportion of animals to and from adop-
1988 Chevrolet Van to the Humane Society, tion booths, and veterinary visits. (News
when she learned of its desperate need for Photo)


~r'IT~ 0 CVa 00000 VVOb a a a--aa-a abdaaa 61~6)--- 40 0 ~ 0 V Q p a Ia ab a ~-a~ Via l
o o


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles- soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat fopd cans,
etc. ,
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

News paDers. Magaiines, etc.

All cardboard Droducts grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, Shipping boxesetc."

All glass bottles. jars, etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.


Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill
and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. 'How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:
HousehoJd garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries, i
*White Goods (Which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the
Recycle Center)

*Construction Debris (which consist of) Lumber, shingles, sinks,
toilets, doors, window panes, carpet, furniture, tree & shrub
clippings, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oi( & Oil Filter

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned
into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.co.jefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations & hours of
operation for each individual site. For further information please call the .
Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Visit the www.Earth911 .org Recycling Information web page 0
/0 0 o 00 00 0 B n o 0T 0o o (ra 0 a 0 0Ta s0o o ao oaaoTo aba o Vo lrrOra nr a oa a B o0n -wro'o ,


Gene Hall ing I holiday reprieve from their
Tueday evening quilting meetings
(Continued From Page 4) untI 6 p.m.. Jan. 11, when they will
:.ur corporate limits, the completion begin working to complete the
wf the Chase Street Park, and the ex- Nbrth Carolina Lily quilt in pro-
"'tens-ion of the sidewalk along US 90 gess.
West. / The sooner they can finish the
In addition, I am proud that to- quilt, the sooner they will be able to
gether we have created conceptual ,egin to display it and sell raffle
plans for a bike trail, and the Monti- tickets for a chance to win it.
cello Office Park on Highway U/ Tickets will be sold all year and
19 south. / the drawing will be held at the 2005
Having been recently elected/to Christmas in Monticello event.
the Jefferson County Board of Cqm-
missioners, I enthusiastically ook ... ...
forward to working cooperavely Cat-ch the
with each of you in an effort to
manage growth, identify infiastruc- R IVE R
ture needs, protect the environment,
promote prosperity, and ernance a .C a .
favorable quality of life.
Respectfully submitted, NEW SM YR
Gene Hall N Sc
County Commissioner, For More I
District 2 wwW.VISITNEWSMYRN


The group will also make a deci-
sion soon as to what local organiza-
tion will receive the proceeds form
the sale of tickets.
Special thanks are extended from
the group members to Judy Miller
and to Thelma Birdwell for their do-
nations of quilting books, material,-
and quilting tools, and various other
items for the quilters in south Flor-
ida who suffered devastation from
the recent hurricanes which struck
the area.
Collections are still being accepted
by members of the group. Call
Debbie at 997-0901 to make ar-
rangements for pick up.


Charm of
FEST 2005
January 7-9


WNAISEA
zformnation:
A.COM .1.800


XH

).541.9621


Citizen Donates Van


TO Humane Society


"0






if
a
aL:


Happy

New

Year!


trom'


: ^^ ^/I^ris


** ee......**** *************0*00 *00 6*060*0..
Wonderful, fabulous, bright cheery
RESORT CLOTHING is here!

WINTER SALE TIME :

1616 Crawfordville Highway North Pointe Center
Crawfordville 9Z6-6Z41


I-r



E~id


"IA



$9




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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005


Lifestyle


Refuge House Task Force


Sponsors Party For Seniors


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Jefferson County Refuge House
Task Force members brought a bit
of Christmas cheer to local resi-
dents at the Senior Citizen Center
this past week.
Cake and other sweet treats were
on hand for seniors. Holiday bags
filled with toiletry items were given
to the women and the men received
afterh'r. Lc and ,oly e.
* The group sang songs of the sea-
son, spoke words of inspiration, and
enjoyed visiting with one another.
On hand to help the Center's staff


with the celebration were; BobbieJo
Babb, Aimee Holland, Bobbi
Mount, and Dessie Harvey.
Seniors were given bags full of
breads and pastries brought in by
America's Second Harvest of the
Big Bend. They were also encour-
aged to browse through the clothing
and household items, donated to the
Center.
The Center is in dire need of heat-
ers and blankets for local seniors.
Donations can be dropped off at the
Center or arrangements can be made
by calling the Center at 342-0242.
Refuge House involvement with
the Senior Center is through its
weekly Community Education and


support group program. This Christ-
mas party is just one of the benefi-
cial activities the Refuge House
provides during the holiday season.
A special thanks goes out to sev-
eral task force members and em-
ployees of the Jefferson County
Courthouse, the Lloyd Lions Club,
Harvest Christian Center, and to
W.B. Bamhart for their contribu-
tions to the seniors.
Through its "Adopt A Family"
program, the Refuge House was also
instrumental in helping three moth-
ers and their children during the
holiday season, families that hqave
only recently left abusive relation-
-ships


ATTENDING a recent County Community Coalition meeting
are, L-R: Bobbi Mount, regional prevention coordinator for
DISC Village, and Aimee Holland, adult prevention coun-
selor for Big Bend Regional Prevention Center. (News
Photo)


NEED A-

CAREER

CHANGE?

Providing a 650-Hour
Professional Massage Therapy
Training Program
OPEN HOUSE
January 16, 2005* 5 pm-7 pm
Classes Beginning February 28, 2005
Callfr a FREE CATALOG

CORE Institute
Schoo
223W.CaolnaStre
Talhsse L3230


REFUGE HOUSE presented Christmas gifts to seniors at
the senior center.for the holiday. L-R: BJ Babb and Maggie
Alexander. Babb helps out at the center with Refuge House
events. (News Photo)

County Coalition To

Meet January 14


'DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson County Community
Coalition meets 9:30 a.m., Friday,
Jan. 14 at the Library.
These monthly meeting allow for
local organizations, churches, and
businesses to meet one-on-one, to
pass along valuable information
about resources available to the
community, of which residents
might not otherwise be aware.
Each month, a speaker is invited


to briefly discuss the function
his/her organization.
Everyone present is encouraged
introduce themselves and menti
their affiliation and any import
piece of information they might li
to share.
Office Administrator Donna H
gan, with Healthy Start conducts tl
meetings.
Anyone interested in speaking
upcoming meetings can contact h
at 948-2741.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

C_ -.: :i'; n about the merging of
the local DC, office with the Madi-
son office has caused some delays
for pregnant women getting neces-
sary care, Contract Manager Donna
Hagan, of Healthy Start, reports.
There is still a segment of the
population who do not know that
temporary Medicaid eligibility is
available at the County Health De-
partment, Hagan said.
To help clear up the confusion,


the Coalition is running an ad in
each of the counties encompassed
by the coalition, through the month
of January.
The ad reads: Pregnant? You don't
have to wait for an' appointment to
the Madison DCF office to deter-
mine your Medicaid eligibility.
Call the Health Department at
342-0170 to receive your proof of
pregnancy and to make your ap-
pointment at the Health Department
to sign up for temporary Medicaid
today.
This option applies only to preg-.
nant applicants.


It Works Wonders.


American
Heart
Association


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
o dba

7aiba ov FWilercotlof amwp
-' ,'' 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
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850-997-5553
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Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
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This help was made possible,
thanks to the generosity of Amy and
Wayne Frye, members of the Lloyd
Lions Club, Aimee Holland and her
office staff at DISK Village, and
Ruth Harvey.

Harvest Center
I Plans Program
S The Harvest Center on Springhol-
low Road will hold a series of
Wednesday workshops, "A Study
Of God's Love."
The program begins 7 p.m., Jan. 5,
'with teacher Brother Gary Brett of
the First Baptist Church of Perry,
FL.
Sessions are also scheduled for the
Wednesday of Jan 12 and 19.
More information is available by
calling Pastor Graham at 997-7381.
Business Community
Prayer Breakfast
The Business Community Prayer
Breakfast will be held 7 a.m., Thurs-
da, at the Christ Episcopal Parish
Hall.
Guest speaker is congressman rAl. --
of len Boyd.
All are encouraged to attend and
bring a friend.


to
on
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at
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Transportation
Board To Meet

The County Transportation Dis-
advantaged (TD) Coordinating
Board will meet 10 a.m., Thursday,
Jan. 13, at the County Emergency
Management Office.
The agenda will include' a review
-of the bylaws and grievance/com-
plaint procedures,
For additional information, or to
arrange for special accommodations
at the meeting because of a disabil-
ity, or physical impairment, contact,
Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee
Regional Planning Council at (850)
674-4571.


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Free for first timers, $5 after that.


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Gift Items, Plants, Woodwork, Any-
thing You Have To Sell, Including
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Every Saturday, starts at 7 to 2 ish.
Fund raisers more than welcome,


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available at the following stores. Or call toll free 1-888-600-4642.

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Foundation Offers


Trees For Donation 3


Each person who joins the Na-
tional Arbor Day Foundation during
January, will receive 10 free flower-
ing trees, as part of the nonprofit
foundation's Trees for America
campaign.
The trees consist of two White
Flowering Dogwoods, two Flower-
ing Crabapples, Two Washington
Hawthorns, Two American
Redbuds, and two Goldenraintrees.
"These compact trees were se-
lected for planting in large' or small
spaces," said John Rosenow, Foun-
dation President.
"They will give the home the
beauty of lovely pink, white, and
yellow flowers, and also provide
winter berries and nesting sites for
songbirds."


The trees will be shipped postpaid
at the right time for planting be-
tween Feb. 1 and May 31, with en-
closed planting instructions.
The six to 12 inch trees are guar-
anteed to grow or they will be re-
placed free of charge.
To become a member of the Foun-
dation, and to receive the free trees,
send a $10 contribution to Ten Free
Flowering Trees, National Arbor
Day Foundation, 100 Arbor
Avenue, Nebraska City, NE, 68410,
by Jan. 31.
Members also receive a subscrip-
tion to the Foundation's bimonthly
publication, Arbor Day, and The
Tree Book, with information about
tree planting and care.


JUST FOR FUN Christmas party featured a singing snow-
man. L-R: Connie Dodson, Juanita Muller, and Betty Rich-
ards. (News Photo)


Homes Of Mourning Just For Fun Club


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005 PAGE 7

Magnolia Circle Plans

Coming Activities


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Magnolia Garden Circle met
for its December business meeting
at the Chamber of Commerce, to
plan for coming events.
HIostesses were Mary Frances
Drawdy and Lynn Rhymes.
Seafood and sausage gumbo was
savored by all, with fresh salad
complimenting the main course.
Lemon creme cake was dessert.
The Circle's Christmas tree at the
Opera House was decorated with
magnolias and sparkling lights.
Members also decorated the
gazebo, in the garden area in back of
the Opera House,'as they have been
doing for holiday seasons in the past
years.
Member and District III Director
Janice Scott, sold tickets for "Ann's


Balcony," a water colored painting
by Becky Clayton. The Gold framed
26 X 21 inch piece of artwork is
beautifully matted and is the main
fundraiser for District III.
Proceeds will be used for.District
III ongoing expenses.
Tickets are selling for 41 each and
the drawing will be held at the -
Spring District III Meeting in Carra-
belle the weekend of May, 13.
Clayton will pull the winning
name from the tickets sold.
Tickets can be purchased by con-
tacting Scott at 997-5298.

Without Advertising,
A Terrible
Thing Happens...


Hattie Mae Mathis
Graveside services for Hattie Mae
Mathis were held Saturday, January
2, 2005 at 3:00 p.m. at Midway
Baptist Church Cemetery. The Rev.
Frank Davis will officiate. Mrs.
Mathis died December 30, 2004 at
the Brian Center. Bor July 8, 1914
in Madison. She was the daughter of
the late Burton & David Idelle
Porier Tuten. She was married to
Calvin Mathis who preceded her in
death. Mrs. Mathis was a home-
maker and a member of Bible Heri-
tage Church in Monticello.
Survivors include son John B.
Mathis of Monticello, brother Clif-
ford Tuten of Live Oak and. sisters
Annell Mathers, Edna Tuten both of
Jasper, 9 grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren.
The family received friends on
Saturday evening from 6-8 p.m. at
Allen & Allen Funeral Home. Guest
may sign the on line register at
www.allenfh.com
Bonney Austin McClellan
Bonney Austin McClellan, age 67,-
beloved wife, daughter, mother, and
grandmother, died December 28,
2004 at her home in Monticello, FL.
Services were Friday, December
31, 2004 at Sardis United Methodist
Church with burial at Sardis Church
Cemetery. The family ask that in
lieu of flowers donations be made to
Big Bend Hospice.
A native of Burlington, Vermont,
she moved to Monticello in 1972
from West Palm Beach, Florida. She
was a member of the Sardis United


Methodist Church, she also served
as their secretary and treasurer. She
was a member of the Garden Club,
and the Daughters of the American
Revolution, she was also a proud
member of the Keystone Genealogi-
Scal Society in which she also served
as the editor of the publication.
Mrs. McClellan is survived by her
husband of 46 years, Joseph
McClellan of Monticello, her
mother Bemece Austin of Monti-
cello, one son David McClellan and
wife Laura of Rabun Gap, Georgia;
two grandchildren, Audrey and Kyle
McClellan also of Rabun Gap,
Georgia; two cousins Judy Britt and
Carol Anderson; an aunt, Phobe
Jane Mullins; and an uncle, Robert
SRyan.
Fannie Miller Pleas
Fannie Miller Pleas, age 83, a re-
tired laborer and homemaker, died
Saturday, December 25 in Tallahas-
see.
The service was at 11:00 a.m.,
Saturday, January 1 at Greater
-Elizabeth MBC in Lloyd, FL with
burial at St. Phillip AME Church
Cemetery (Centerville Road) in Tal-
lahassee. Family received friends
(viewing) from 2:00 p.m. to 7:30
p.m.,,Friday, December 31 at Till-
man Funeral Home.
A native of Leon County and
longtime resident of the Lloyd area.
She was a retired laborer and home-
maker. She is survived by eight
daughters, Millie Davis, Evelyn
(See Home Page 12).


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Enjoys Holiday Party


DEBBIE SNAP
Staff Writer

Members of the Just For Fun
(JFF) group, sponsored by the Mon-
ticello Church of the Nazarene, en-
joyed a Christmas get together
recently at the home of Marti
Mimms.
Each member brought in a cov-
ered dish to share in celebration of
the season.
S Members also brought in a
wrapped gift, for the gift exchange.
Numbers were drawn to determine
order in which gifts would be cho-:
sen.
Recipients could either keep the
gift they chose while wrapped, or
elect to choose one of those already


opened by other members.
A singing snowman and a set of
bath towels seemed to be the fa-
vored gifts of the group.
A special gift was offered to
Chairman Yvonne Mediate. in rec-
ognition for all her good works and
time spent putting together fun pro-
grams.
Before the gift exchange, Mediate
Spread to the group aan explanation of
the meaning of the T\\el\e Days of
Christmas.
After'a lot of laughing and a bit of
singing, lead by member Connie
Dodson, the group began to disperse
with happy hearts.
The next JFF meeting is scheduled
'Thursday, Jan. 20. Secret Sisters
will be revealed at the time.


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2005 Hazardous

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Poster Contest


Who May Enter
Any Florida student enrolled in fourth or fifth grades during the 2004 2005 school year.

Mailing
Posters must be packed, wrapped flat and mailed to the: American Red Cross, 187 Office Plaza
Dr, Tallahassee Fl 32301.

Deadline
Posters must be postmarked on or before Tuesday February'15 2005 and must arrive at the
American Red Cross no later than Thursday February 18 2005. Winners will be notified by mail.

Poster Specifications
1. Posters must be submitted on poster or illustration board.
2. The overall dimensions shall be approximately 15" x 20".
3. All artwork must be original and may be any media desired with the exception of pencil,
chalk, charcoal or glitter.
4. Stenciled, traced, computer-generated or commercially manufactured stick-on lettering or
graphics are prohibited.
5. All posters will become the property of the American Red Cross.
6. Posters will bd judged on both.the clarity of the preparedness message and the quality of the
art. Posters with misspelled words will be eliminated.

Identification
The following information should appear on the back of the poster: Artist's name, age, grade,
home address, telephone number and names of parents. School's name, address and telephone
number along with the name of the art instructor or classroom teacher if any.

Winners
First Prize $100 Savings Bond / Second Prize $50 Savings Bond / Third Prize $25 Savings Bond

The top judged poster from each County School District will be displayed in the Rotunda of the
State Capital during Florida's Hazardous Weather Awareness Week.

Sponsored by: Florida's American Red Cross Chapters, the National Weather Services, the State
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005


Coaches Treat

Tigers TO Barbecue


Sports


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Jefferson County
High School varsity football team,
were treated to a barbecue meal by
coaches, in appreciation of a good
season.
Assistant Coach David Collins do-
nated the chicken and ribs, along
with the paper products and head
Coach Jeff Schaum donated several
different types of salads and baked
beans.
As they boys cleaned their plates,
mahy went back for second
helpings.
Schaum said the end of the season
sendoff celebration was originally
supposed to be a State Champion-
ship celebration, but "It will be next
year," he assured.
Following the meal Collins pre-
sented each of the boys with an or-


ange and blue T-shirt bearing the
Tiger football logo.
The Tigers did have an impressive
season, beating Chiefland in Re-
gional play 14-0 and making it into
the second round of the State Finals,
where they were defeated by Ver-
non, 42-12.
As a team, offensively the Tigers
had 301 carries for the season,
which equaled out to 1,826.5 yards
gained and 19 touchdowns.
There were a total of 282 passes
which gained the Tigers another
1,807 yards, only eight interceptions
for the season and an additional 20
touchdowns.
The Tigers had 119 catches for a
gain of 1,732 yards and another 20
touchdowns.
Defensively, the Tigers hit hard
with 505 tackles and 232 assists.
"We just wanted them to know how
much we really appreciate them,"
Schaum concluded.


U.:$ i; ~
'i;
p-;i
.;.,.
; :G
.~Ii,
-~i~d~


ATTY DAVID COLLINS, serves baked beans
for Desrick Jones at the JCHS barbecue
prepared by coaches for players in recogni-
"I'.;',:.
f : ,2:, 5:

%Jil"..


tion of their hard work this season. (News
Photo)


SQUANTEZ BURKE enjoys the
s barbecue prepared for play-
ers. (News Photo)


Tiger Boosters


Seek Sponsors


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County High
School Tiger Athletic Boosters
(TAB) continue to seek sponsors
for the remainder of basketball sea-
son.
"Top Tiger" members receive
two season passes to all regular
season home games, two tickets to
the annual athletic banquet, a cor-
porate sponsorship banner which
will be displayed at home games
and an appreciation plaque.
"Tiger Club" members receive
two season passes to all regular
season basketball games, a corpo-
rate sponsorship banner to be dis-


played at basketball games, polo
shirt or equal substitute and a cer-
tificate of appreciation.
"Claw Club" members receive
two regular season passes to all
regular season home basketball
games, a polo shirt or equal substi-
tute and a certificate of apprecia-
tion.
"Backer" members receive one
season pass to all regular season
home basketball games and a sec-
ond ticket may be purchased at a 25
percent discount.
For further information or to be-
come a member, contact Athletic
Director Jeff Schaum at 997-4196.
All funds raised go toward the
JCHS athletic program.


Library Takes $50,000 Hit
(Continued From Page 1)
(Continued From Page 1) The consequence: the state re-
tributions of counties ot similar duced its state aide to $58,726.
sizes to their respective libraries. This past year, the commission
Local contributions that fail to meet contributed $122,000, which
a certain threshold -- as established Hamedani believes will put the
by the average contribution of these__county back in the state's good
like-size counties -- are denied the graces come 2006. That is, if the
double dip. contributions of other counties of
The idea is not only to help sup- similar size didn't far exceed this
port small county libraries, but to amount.
encourage ever-higher contributions But for the present, Hamedani
at the local level. The expectation, sees no solution but to take belt-
or rule of thumb, according to tightening measures. Even so, she
Hamedani, is that each year's contri- p
plans to approach the County Com-
bution should exceed the previous
S on sould e d te p mission Thursday to request more
year's contribution. funding. Her hope is that commis-
In 2002, Jefferson County contrib- sioners will see fit to sweeten the
uted $164,000 to the library, which o .
pot, however much possible.
entitled it to $164,000 in state aide
in 2004, according to Hamedani.
In 2003, however, budgetary set- Opening the door
backs caused the county to reduce l
its contribution to $97,000, which to hope
Hamedani managed to raise to p
$104,000 thanks to private contribu- Call our lifeline.
tions. As far as the state is con-
cerned, however, the county failed it's t1ll-f'ree.
to meet or exceed its previous year's THE VOICE OF HOPE *y
contribution. 1..flAn _l-l Eu7.717 sc um.lr.


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JCHS AD JEFF SCHAUM kept the ice coming for the Tigers
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005 PAGE 9


FLAG FOOTBALL CHAMPS include, top, L-R:
Coaches Richard Finlayson and Donnie De-
mott. Middle: Carson Nennstiel, Jade
Green, Hans Sorenson, Anthony Delatorre,
DJ Johnson, Dee Smiley. Bottom: Ricky Fin-


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TAKE NOTE...

We remember
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and
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That's why
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Monticello News
'You Can't Be
Without It'

997-3568


layson, Jay Harris, Casey Demott, Hunter
Handley, Alex Delatorre. Not pictured: Bri-
anna Miller, Charles Crumitie and Peanut
Ivey.


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

It is not unusual, of late, to see
approximately 20 youth playing
football, sparing with each other
and having a good time on the va-
cant corer lot located at Chestnut
and Railroad Streets .
The group is orgainzied by Troy
Carter, trainer of the former Cherry
Street Gym, who plans to restart
the program.
Carter has acquired the use of a
nearby lot and small building to
hang the bags as they acquire them
and is working diligently with
youth, cleaning up the site, cutting
down trees, and dragging and burn-
Sing debris.
Resident Brian Reliford donated
boxing mitts, to help restart the

.. ._ ...


THURSDAY


3:30-4:15PM 9:00-10:OOAM 9:00-10:00AM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
3 to 5 yr. olds .Pilates (Piates

S4:15-5:00PM
Jumping Jacks & Jills
6 to 10 yr. olds


5:30-6:45PM 5:30-6:45PM
Fitness Combo Fitness Combo


All classes taught by Jamie Cichon Rogers,

Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness

Instructor. Call 997-4253 for more information.


group, and tools for the cleanup
project.
Gym Founder David Collins has
donated a punching bag and or-
dered some gloves for the youth to
use in training.
"I'm not giving up on myself or on
these kids, I'm full of hope," said
Carter. "It may start of slow with
very little to work with, but in the
long run, it will be bigger and bet-
ter than it ever was.
Cherry Street Gym Founder
David Collins earlier offered build-
ing owner Idella Scott back rent
and to sign a one year lease so he
could again open the gym for the
youth of the community, but that
offer was apparently turned down
and the equipment, unobtainable.
"There's no hard feelings," said
Carter. "We know business and
Miss Idella made a business deci-
sion to turn down our offers."

S ,".. .


TROY CARTER, boxing trainer shows Revonte Robinson
how to use a chain saw during cleanup around the boxing
practice building. (News Photo)


Boxing Trainer Carter

Works With Youth


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Mon. 1:540 4:30 7:10 Tue. -
Thurs. 4:30- 7:10

LEMONY SNICKET'S
(PG)
Fri. Sun. 2:00 4:45 7:30 9:45 '
Mon. 2:00 4:45 7i30 Tue. Thurs-
4:45 7:30
NO PASSES

SPANGLISH (PG13)
Fri. Sun. 4:25 9:55 Mon. 4:25 Tue:
Thurs. 4:25
NO PASSES

MEET THE FOCKERS
(PG13)
Fri. Sun. 1:45 4:20 7:05 9:30 ,
Mon. 1:45 4:20 7:05
NO PASSES -

FAT ALBERT (PG)
Fri. -Sun. 1:15 -3:20 -5:25 -7:35-.
9:35 Mon. 1:15 3:20 5:25 7:35
Tue. Thurs. 5:25 7:35
NO PASSES


In Case Of
Emergency
Dial 911


You're Holding On To A Precious Freedom.



Your Local Newspaper...

Monticello News



If It Happens In Jefferson County,

You'll Read It Here!





si BodWok


Group Fitness Schedule '


I I "I rL I


I I I I I


I








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005


OVER 450 STORE LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE


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*ITO M


LEGAL NOTICE
In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Auction Jan. 22, 2005 @ 10:00 a.m. 1999
Ford Vin# 1FMZU32X3XUB98627
PUBLIC AUCTION JAN 29, 2005 @
10:00 A.M.; 1977 Cobr Vin#
S11183165CVCS; 1995 Niss Vin#
1N4BU31D1SC217158; 1986 Ford Vin#
1FTHX25L5GKB15298; 1979 Ford Vin#
U15HLDH6371 To be sold as is for
Towing & Storage charges. Conditions &
Terms at Auction. Dave's Towing -7261
East Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344
850-342-1480.
1/5, c

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
WATER USE PERMIT: Notice is hereby
given that pursuant to Chapter 373,
Florida Statutes, the following
applications) for water use permits) has
(have) been received by the Northwest
Florida Water Management District:
Application number I 06490 filed
12/20/2004 City of Monticello, 245 South
Mulberry Street, Monticello FL 32344
Requesting a maximum withdrawal of
1,256,000 gallons per day from the
Floridan Aquifer System for Public
Supply use by an existing facility. General
withdrawal locations) in Jefferson
County: T1N, R4E, Sec. 12; T2N, R5E,
Sec. 30; Interested persons may object to
or comment ,upon the applications or
submit a written request for a copy of the
staff reports) containing proposed agency
action regarding the applications) by
writing to the Division of Resource
Regulation of the Northwest Florida
Water Management District, attention
Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management
Dr., Havana, Florida 32333-9700, but such
comments or requests must be received by
5 o'clock p.m. on January 19, 2005. No"
further public notice will be provided
regarding this (these) applicationss.
Publication of this notice constitutes
constructive notice of this permit
application to all substantially affected
persons. A. copy of the staff reports) must
be requested in order to remain advised to
further proceedings and any ; public
hearing date. Substantially affected
.persons are entitled to request an,
administrative hearing regarding the
,proposed agency action by submitting a
written request according to the provisions
of 40A-1.521, Florida Administrative
Code. Notices of Proposed Agency Action
will be mailed only to persons who have
filed such requests.
1/5, c


Notice of Application for Tax Deed: NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Gary
Mitchell, Trustee the holder of the follow-
ing certificates has filed said certificates
for a tax deed issue thereon. The certifi-
cate numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names
in which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate No. 317 Year Issuance 19Q7
Description of Property: Exhibit "A"'
Commence at the Southwest corner of the
parcel of land conveyed to Elizabeth K.
Windsor by Floyd Joyner, et ux. (said
point being in the West line of the North-
west /4 of the Northwest % of Section 25
Township 1 North, Range 4 East) and run-
ning thence North a distance of 267 feet to
a point; thence running East 187 feet to a
point in the West boundary of a county
graded road; thence running in a South-
westerly direction along the West bound-
ary of said graded road, 234 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, and estimate to`
contain acre, more or less. TOGETHER
WITH: One 1969 Marlo House Trailer,
Serial NO: N-1015. Name in which as-
sessed Selma Securities LTD. All of said
property being in the County of Jefferson,


LEGAL NOTICE
State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the
property described in such certificate or
certificates will be sold to the highest bid-
der at the court house door on the 7th day
of February, 2005, At 11:00 a.m. Date this
30th, day of December, 2004. Carl D.
Boatwright, Clerk of Circuit Court of Jef-
ferson County, Florida.
1/5, 1/12, 1/19, 1/26, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Tony Na-
tivio the holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax deed is-
sue thereon. The certificate numbers and
years of issuance, the description of the
property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 29
Year of Issuance 1997. Description or
Property Town lot 1 and 2 Block num-
bered 3 of Florida Land Abstract Com-
pany addition to the town of Monticello
located in Jefferson County FloridaName
in which assessed R. Bruce Warren. All of
said property being in the County of Jef-
ferson, State of Florida. Unless such cer-
tificates shall be redeemed according to
law the property described in such certifi-
cate or certificates will be sold to the high-
est bidder at the court house door on the
28th day of January, 2005, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 23rd day of December, 2004.
Signature, Clerk of Circuit Court of Jef-
ferson County, Florida.
12/29, 1/5, 1/12,11/19, c
STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION: The
Department announces receipt of an
application for a permit from Heritage
Hills Development Company, LLC, c/o
Douglas Turner file number
33-0240796-001-DF, to construct two road
crossings over forested wetlands for a
subdivision access road. This project is
locate in Lloyd on the west side of State
Road 59 approximately one mile north of
Interstate 10, section 9, Township North,
Range 3 East in Jefferson County. This
project is located in unnamed wetlands
which are Class III Waters of the State.
This application is being processed and is
available for public inspection during
normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays, at the Northwest District,
Tallahassee Branch Office at 2851
Remington Green Circle, Suite A,
Tallahassee, Florida 32308-1513.
1/5, c
NOTICE: The Board of County
Commissioners of Jefferson County will


LEGAL NOTICE

hold a workshop on Thursday, January 6,
2005, at 1:30 p.m., in the Jefferson County
Courthouse, Courtroom, to discuss
proposed amendments to the Land
Development Code and Comprehensive
Plan. Felix "Skeet" Joyner Chairman
1/5, c
LEGAL NOTICE: The Jefferson County
Planning Commission will hold a regular
meeting on January 13, 2005 at 7:00 p.m.
The meeting will be held in the Courtroom
of the Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of US Highway
19 and US Highway 90 in Monticello, FL.
The meeting may be continued as
necessary. From the Florida "Government
in the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or
agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice
of meeting or hearing is required, of such
board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice
that if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency or


LEGAL NOTICE
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
1/5, c
Notice of Application for Tax Deed: NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DORO-
THY R. JOHNSON the holder of the
following certificates has filed said certifi-
cates for a tax deed issue thereon. The cer-
tificate numbers and years of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names
in which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate NO. 38, Year of Issuance 1996
Description of Property : Lot 5 of Larkin
Manor, a subdivision located within the
City of Monticello, Florida, as per map or
plat thereof of record in the'public records
of Jefferson County Florida, in Plat Book
"B", page 24, and to which reference is
hereby expressly directed, and being the


IRS Public Auction Sale!!!


1 5 /4 acres of land on Highway 90 1 mile west of Monticello

2 210' on highway

3 Chain-link fenced with double gate

4 Old Monticello Gardens Nursery property with barns, greenhouses and pond


Date of Sale:

Place of Sale:


Friday, January 14, 2005 10:00 A.M.

Jefferson County Courthouse, Monticello


For more info visit www.ustreas.gov/auctions/irs or call Gary Griffin,
IRS Property Appraisal & Liquidatipn Specialist at 850-942-899, X 249


- I
I I I- U


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


3l 5 3- l e L I


Appliance

Serviceff
of Monticello

The Name

Says It All!
"Call Andy"
997-5648
Leave Message
Owned & Operated By
Andy Rudd


Register's

Mini-Storage



315 Waukeenah

Hwy.

1/4 Mile off

US 19 South

997-2535


CARROLL HILL
AUTO
T ELECTRIC, INC.


0
M
A
S
V


STARTER




Complete Auto
Electric Repair
Service


Thomasville Road
115 Albany Rd. (on Carroll Hill)
229-226-0717


-- Northside Mower
and Smpll
Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan,
Homelite MTD, Cub
Cadet, Snapper,
Murray & More,
Warranty, Repairs
for all makes &
models.
Pickup & Delivery
Service Available
562-2962


__ & i- a- UI


JOHN COLLINS

FILL DIRT


850-997-58081
850-545-9964
850-251-2911

155 JOHN

COLLINS 11).


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Barbwire Field -Wood

Jim Phillips

850-973-8117

T u n e e n -W i F


Burnette Plumbing
&

Well Service
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~
Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Replaced
~ Sewer & Water Connections ~
Tanks Replaced Water Heater
Repairs All Repairs

101 S.E. Shelby St. Madison
850-973-1404
Carlton Burnette
Master Plumber
SRF00558445


Thurman
Tractor

Service

I Mowing

'eHarrowing
. Food Plots

Licensed & Insured
Jarmes Thurman,LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


Monday Jumping Jacks & Jills
3:30 4:15pm- 3 to 5 yr. olds
,- 4:15 5:00pm- 6 to 10 yr. olds
S5:30 6:45 Fitness Combo
Tuesday
9:00 10:00 Pilates
12:00 1:00pm Body Sculpting
Wednesday
5:30 6:45pm Fitness Combo
Thursday
9:00 10:00am Pilates
12:00 1:00pm Body Sculpting


Blue Sir&dT-ome &' Land, qnc.

Presents

Special Guests : Directors from
Escambia Bond Program will speak this
Saturday, January 8th at 9:00 a.m.


Please Attend
Our First Time Home Buyer's Course
offered FREE the second Saturday of each
month since 1999 at the
Chamber of Commerce


For further info, please call

997- 1360
-Homes and Lands, Inc.


Your Local Professional Painters!
Interior ~ Exterior

342=3288______


ml I I I


---f- :-rl.--
I


I


-vir


. .


I I


Straight

ine
I&
Fencing








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5,2005 PAGE 11


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
*:- 997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

same land conveyed by deed of record in
the public records of Jefferson County,
Florida, in O. R. Book 17, Page 285, and to
which reference is hereby expressly di-
rected. Name in which assessed Dorothy
Wise All of said property being in the
Country of Jelferson. State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate or certificates shall be
redeemed according to law the property
described in such certificate or certificates
will be sold to the highest bidder at the
court house door on the 7th day of Febru-
ary, 2005, At 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th
day of December, 2004. Carl D. Boat-
wright, Clerk of Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida..
1/5, 1/12, 1/16, 1/26, c
*


Notice of Application for Tax Deed NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Tony Na-
tivio the holder of the following certificates
has filed said certificates for a tax deed is-
sue thereon. The certificate numbers and
years of issuance, the description of the
property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 439
Year Issuance 1997 Description or Prop-
erty "Exhibit "A" Commence at the
Southwest corner of Section 34, Township
1 South, Range 5 East, Jefferson County,
Florida and run East 421.2 feet along the
South boundary of Section 34 to a point,
thence due North 210.0 feet to a point,
thence N. 26 degrees 09 minutes E. 217.19
feet to the Point of Beginning, thence due
West 385.0 feet to a point on the East right'
of way line of S.R. 257, thence N. 26 de-
grees 09 minutes to a point, thence S. 26
degrees 09 minutes W. 254.63 feet to the
Point of Beginning; Containing 2.02 acres,
more or less, and being a part of the
Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quar-
ter of Section, 34, Township 1 South,
Range 5 East, Jefferson County, Florida.
Name in which assessed Ervin & Lucinda
Boone. All of said property being in the
County of Jefferson, State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate or certificates shall be
redeemed according to law the property
described in such certificate or certificates
will be sold to the highest bidder at the
court house door on the 28th day of, Janu-
ary 2005, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 23rd
day of December, 2004. Signature, Clerk
of Circuit Court of Jefferson County; Flor-
ida.
12/29, 1/5, 12, 19, c

NOTICE

Thompson Radiator & Repair has closed
effective' immediately. For additional
information Call 997-0091.
12/3, 10, 17, 22, 1/5, pd
Let 2005 be the year you come back to
church. Christ Episcopal Church, three
blocks N of the courthouse. Sunday service
at 10:00 a.m. 997-4116.
-1/5, c


HELP WANTED
LOVE PARTIES? Try the business for
$90 and 90 days Reasons to become A
consultant are: Flexible Schedule,
Unlimited Income Potential, Part-time or
Full-time, No Inventory, Free and
Discounted Products; You get $350 worth
of products, catalogs and training
materials I would like to help you start
your own Pampered Chef business. Margit
Miller; Independent Kitchen Consultant,
The Pampered Chef 997-4478,
www.pamperedchef.biz/babettesfeast Ask
me how you can get started for as little as
$50!
1/5, 7, pd

A Behavioral Health Care Center is
Currently seeking: CHILDREN'S CASE
MANAGER #2195 Bachelor's degree with
a major in counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education, health
education, or a related human services'
field +1 year of experience working with
children with severe emotional distur-
bance; or other bachelor's degree + 3
years full-time experience working with
children with severe emotional distur-
bance. Regular status rate: $13.30 per
hour/excellent benefits or Temporary OPS
Status rate: $15.90 per hour/no benefits.
For more information and a complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org 850-523-3217 or
1-800-226-2931, Human Resources, 2634-J
Capital Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check An Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer Drug Free
Workplace.
1/5, c
WAREHOUSE/PART PERSON: Ring
Power is seeking individual for
Warehouse/Parts Dept. H.S. grad or equiv.
Must be dependable and have a positive
Team Player attitude. Pervious parts or
warehouse exp. a plus. Requires lifting.
Good customer and phone skills required.'
Apply M-F 8-5 at 4760 Capital Circle
N.W. Tallahassee, FL 32303 or on-line at
www.ringpower.com Drug Free
Workplace E.O.E.
12/22, 29, 1/5, 12, c
Drivers: Great Home-Time & Benefits!
Dedicated & Shorthaul Runs! 2yrs OTR
exp., 25YOA; Lease Purchase Also
Available Shelton Trucking 800-877-320L
1/5,12, c


DAY's INN: Front desk clerk, computer
skills required. Good pay. Apply in person
@ 1-10 & US 19S behind McDonald's.
1/5, pd
Kennel Techs needed for boarding kennel
near Lloyd. Must be able to work
weekends and holidays. Only honest,
dependable, animal oriented people need
apply. 850-877-5050, or fax resume to
877-5010.
tfn s/d 11/19,c


HELP WANTED

Monticello News is growing! We have an
opening for a person who knows how to be
a team player, can take responsibility, pos-
sesses good office and people skills and
wants above average earnings. No dunder-
heads, drama queens, shirkers, dopers,
hangers-on need apply. Please call Ron Ci-
chon @ 997-3568.


CLASSIFIED AD FORM

Use This form To Place Your Classified Ad In
The Monticello News By Mail


Payment In Advance Is Required


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

3 Lines, One Edition $4.00 Each Additional Line $1.00
3 Lines, Two Editions Wednesday/Friday $7.00
Each Additional Line $1.00
30 Characters Per Line
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
S Wednesday Noon for Friday



DATES TO BE PUBLISHED



CLASSIFICATION


WRITE YOUR AD HERE










Monticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida.32344
_I I I2._.LL........ I .__F __lJ


FOR RENT
Office Space, 3200 square feet of office
space with 12 large offices, two conference
rooms, break room, reception area in
prime located in city limits. Also, 640
square feet with four offices, reception
area. Both available April 1, 2004. Phone
997-3666.
tfn, nc.
RV Lot for rent @ Monticello Meadows
19' South. 850-997-1630 Park Manager
Liz.
12/10 tfn, c


FOR SALE

PROFESSIONAL JEWELRY REPAIRS.
All types. Reasonable prices. Fantasia
Jewelry & Gifts 1050 N. Jefferson

TOYS 1/2 OFF regular price!, GOLD!
Hurry while selection is still good! Radio
Shack 1050 N. Jefferson St.

Volkmann lighted plant stand. $400 firm
Call 997-2646 M-F 9-4.
tfn, s/d 12/1, c
GAMEBOY arcade pack w/gameboy/2
games/cont9pfs/case. $129.99. Radio Shack
1050 N. Jefferson St.

FSU/Gator Cheerleader Dolls! 39.95
Fantasia Jewelry & Gifts. 1050 N.
Jefferson St./Monticello

Dining Room Suite: Beautiful cherry
table, 6 Chippendale chairs and -lighted
china cabinet. Brand new, still boxed. Can
deliver. Retail $3395 sacrifice $1100,
850-222-2113
11/3, tfn,c

Bedroom Set Beautiful new all wood
cherry queen/king bed, dresser, mirror,
chest, 2 night stands, Still in boxes, $4199
list, sacrifice $15000, 850-222-7783.
11/3, tfn,c

Ear Piercing... Includes Earrings! $9.95
(Under 18 must be accompanied by adult.)
Fantasia .Jewelry & Gifts 1050 N.
Jefferson

18 foot International Skimmer flats boat,
c.c., troll motor, Bimini Top, 60HP
Yamaha Motor, w/trailer $6,500. 510-1663
12/3, 8,10, 15, 17, 22, 29, 1/5, pd


Antique 1800's Oak Roll Top Desk $800
Cherry Armoire $1500, 997-2147


FOR SALE

ATTENTION SATELLITE OWNERS
you don't have to wait for days to get your
satellite fixed. Call Peters Satellite
850-997-3377 and get one or two day
service. We repair all Brands and
telephones.
12/08, tfn


FREE

Free Mobile Home You Move!! 2
Bedroom, 10' X 50' needs to be moved by
Dec. 31st, call 997-6259


LOST
2 Great Danes lost in Lloyd area. Black
one is 1-year old, tan one is 4-years old.
Friendly. Reward. 997-2486, 459-6054.
12/29, 1/5, pd
8 month old poodle silver and Black -
Male. Goes by the name of Snoopy. Last
seen in Nobles Subdivision. Contact 997-
8283 after 3 p.m.
12/8nc


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers: 150 Single Wides & Double
Wides 2/2 @ $615, 3/2 @ $715, 4/2 @ $895, $50
dep. Pool, Free Lawn Care, Security


575-6571





EXPERIENCED TRAVEL AGENT??


WANTED:

One experienced (with computer skills)

Travel Agent to head up our

Travel-Cruise division.


Casual working environment (office in Monticello)..
guaranteed income.., opportunity to let your talents
zoom. "Experienced Only"...



Send Resume to

charterxpress@yahoo.com


* a 5 Ac on Main Avenue Quality building
: lot, quiet rural area, excellent wooded loca-
S tion, West of Monticello, convenient to Hwy*
90........................ ..... ........$.. 85,000

s 10.99 Ac. 1 Acre Pond, Fishing Dock,
C Pasture and 4 Bay Pole Barn .........$120,000:

13.29 Ac. on Freeman Road Nice
Pasture with some woods......... .$39,870

.11+ & 12+ Ac. Lots: Near Country Club,
S City Water/Sewage Avail, only $7,000 acre!
10 Acres: Dry, wooded wildlife lots,
S 11.Y ,ir KELL some pasture & oak trees. Includes well,
S 1 ROITRT I I
S215 N. Jefferson septic & existing footer for a two story
(850) 997-5516 home................. ............. 69,500
* o* *** *****o* *** O*o* oe*.* ******.


BED- Queen orthopedic PILLOW TOP
mattress and box. Name brand, new in
plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
Sacrifice $160, 850-545-7112
11/3, tfn,c

50% 70% Off selected Giftware! Great
savings! Hurry for best selection Fantasia
Jewelry & Gifts 1050 N. Jefferson

King Size Mattress and Boxspring with
manufacturer's warranty.. Brand new still
in plastic, can 'deliver. Sell $275,
850-222-9879.
11/3, tfn,c


Earrings 10K. $5.00 pair! Fashion
Earrings $1.00 pair. Fantasia Jewelry &
Gifts. 1050 N. Jefferson St. Monticello.

TRACFONe Prepaid Wireless Phones
start @ $79.99. Minutes start @ $19.99
Radio Shack 1050 N. Jefferson

STERLING SILVER INITIAL RINGS: '/
Price... Now only $10.00! Fantasia Jewelry
& Gifts 1050 N. Jefferson.

RINGS... Assorted Styles... 10K Y. Price
Reg. $39.95 Now only $19.95! Fantasia
Jewelry and Gifts. 1050 N Jefferson St.
Monticello.

Home Phone Service. No credit check!
You won't be turned down! $39.99/month.
Radio Shack 1050 N Jefferson St.

SERVICES
Child Care Service: Flexible Hours (after
school care, working hours etc.) Call
Barbara @ 997-0815.
1/5 1/31 pd
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
HOUSEKEEPER FOR HIRE! Need your
home or office cleaned? Call me
References and reasonable rates
850-997-5481
1/5, pd
Backhoe Sernice: drieaiis. roads.
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn piles.
Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
tfn, 4/28
Do \ou Aant to he just a
Christian, with no denominational names,
creeds, or practices? Jesus established His
Church called the church of Christ and
you can be a member of it. We are ready
to help if you are ready to learn, call
997-3466
10/1, tfn

Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill Medicare -
Call for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19-tfni








20ei


Realtnr Tim Pearv Sells Real Estate


-qE--qmr-jtrfu-z


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Just Listed 29 acre horse farm with big
doublewide w/ fireplace, stables, round
pen in remote location only $295,000
Lakefront Under Contract 16.54 acres
on Lake Hall in Lloyd Acres $3950 per acre
Saddle Up Six acres mostly pasture nice
location near Lamont bring your horses
$40,000
Sold Peary Does It Aqain! Wacissa
River Lot with good road to the property,
it could be years before another lot be-
comes available;, only $55,000
Now $44,500
Wonderful Home Very nice 4 bedroom 2
bath 2000 double wide with fireplace on
1.9 acres on South Main Street Only:;.:
$69,500
The Partridqe House circa 1830, cur-
rently 5 could be 7 unit apartment building
with big oaks and an interesting courtyard,
great potential as a bed and breakfast with
suites only $240,000
Pretty Pasture On Waukeenah Highway
fenced and ready to graze $8,500 per acre
Check the Price!! 80 acres w/ approx. 10
ac in planted pines, the balance in real
rough hunting land, a great buy $79,500
Investment Property SOLD Cozy 1.5 bed-
room 1 bath mobile home w/ screened
porch on the front & covered deck in back,
out buildings, quiet shaded,lot $34,500
Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2 wooded
acres in the country, perfect for a mobile
home or cabin $7,500
Near US 27 big doublewide with additions
12 rooms quiet wooded lot $56,500
Income Property On US 90 in town Retail
space, warehouse and residential space
very versatile lots of possibilities for the
investor $169,500
Prime Commercial Property, US 19
South near Pizza Hut and Jefferson Build-
ers 6+ ac sewer and water $240,000
Hard to Find nice 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with screened porch at the end of the road
between Monticello and Lloyd nice yard
$63,500
Shopping Center Jefferson Square store
for rent $650mo
Antique Shop & Home on US 19 near
Eridu, the house is off the road behind the
shop, only $120,000
Home Site on the edge of town on West
Grooverville Road with paved road front-
age $14,500
Wooded Lot 2.5 acres in Aucilla Forest &
Meadows $10,000







Buyers looking for Homes and Land



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See ItAll!
www.TimPeary.com
Simply te Best!

Al Maryland 508-1936
ResarAswilte


--T-

r







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 5, 2005


.4.
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A.
a,
4 --5


Heidi Copeland recently accepted the position of Ho
Consumer Science Agent at the Extension Office. The
sition has been vacant for about three years. (News Phot



Ewe Lamb Program

Signup Ends Jan. 13


The Farm Service Agency re-
minds producers that sign up ends
Jan. 13, for the Ewe Lamb Replace-
ment and Retention Program
(ELRRPP) which pays producers to
expand the ewe lamb breeding
stock.
The program helps the nation's
sheep operations achieve sustained
market competitiveness by increas-
ing the value and number of domes-
tic lambs.
ELRRPP will strengthen the lamb
industry by boosting the purchasing
power of producers, including their
ability to invest in larger and geneti-
cally improved breeding stocks.
ELRRPP .payments are expected
to begin at the end of January. Sub-
ject to the availability of funds, pro-
ducers will receive $18 for each
qualifying ewe lamb retained or pur-
chased for breeding purposes during
a specified period.
If the number of approved appli-
cations exceeds available funding,
USDA, will uniformly apply a na-
tional factor to reduce payments to


producers.
An eligible producer mu
purchased or retained ewe la
breeding purposes between
2003 and July 31, 2004, an
have retained the qualifyir
lambs in the herd for at le
complete offspring lambing q
The producer must not h
ceived funds under USDA
Meat Adjustment Assistan
gram for the same ewe lamb.
In addition, during at least
the base period, qualifying
ewe lambs must not have be
than 18 months and must n
produced an offspring.
Other conditions apply
vided for in the program reg
and application.
Producer must apply for
gram by completing from F
"Ewe Lamb Replacement/R
Payment Program Applicatic
This can be done at the loc
Service Agency at 1244 Nc
person St. The phone nu
997-2072.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After more than three years of
being without a Consumer Sciences
Extension Agent, the County Ex-
tension Office has filled the posi-
tion with Heidi Copeland.
S Copeland has resided in Talla-
hassee since 1988 and began her
Career working within the county as
the home economics teacher at Jef-
ferson County High School in
1989.
From 1989-2000, Copeland taught
students in areas of child develop-
ment, parenting skills, and the Job
Training Partnership Act Program
S (JTPA). From 2000 through Aug.,
2001 she worked out of her home
with the Virtual School (Florida
online school). Shortly after, she
was put on special assignment and
placed on loan to Jefferson County
where she taught ESE classes.
When the job at the Extension
Office came available, she applied
me for it and was hired. Prompting the
po- move was opportunity for advance-
to) ment, promotions and raises. "I'm
still teaching, but I teach adults
now rather than adolescents," said
Copeland.
She began working at the exten-
sion Office three weeks ago and is
quickly learning how to apply her
talents specifically to the County.
Copeland is currently trying to
find a focus needed in the area, and
ist have she has put together an advisory
mbs for group. Through this group, she
Aug 1, will learn the specific needs of the
id must community, therefore,. finding her
ng ewe focus.
east one She teaches topics covering fam-
cycle. ily and consumer affairs, child de-
have re- velopment, housing, food and
s Lamb nutrition, and energy conservation.
ce Pro- She also conducts classes for first
time home buyers on section eight
t part of housing and sees a need for contin-
female ual education in the day care cen-
en older ters here.


lot have

as pro-
ulations

the pro-
FSA-384
detention
on."
;al Farm
north Jef-
mber is


Democrats Elect New Chair


(Continued From Page 1)
review of the preamble to the or-
ganization's bylaws, the Democratic
Party's aspiration "to truly hear the
voice of those it would lead, prove
its worthiness to be trusted by trust-
ing in the people, and embodying
the best of the nation's heritage and
traditions."
The committee also vowed, in ad-
herence to its preamble, "to encour-
age voter registration without dis-
crimination."
States the preamble in part: "What
we seek for our county, state and

Homes
(Continued From Page 7)
Pleas, Hester Copeland (Junious),
Catherine Pleas, Mamie Thurman
(Alfred), Charlotte Juggers (Elder
Ricky) all of Tallahassee. Pennie
Miller and Ethel Jones, both of
Lloyd; five sons; Freddie Lee Pleas,
of Tallahassee, Sammie Bouie
(Susie) of Lloyd, Charlie Pleas, Sr.
(Lois) of Immokalee, FL, Wallace
Pleas (Mary) of Tampa and Henry
Pleas (Susan) of St. Petersburg; one
sister Margie James of Plant City;
69 grandchildren, 106 great grand-
children and 27 great great grand-
children and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and sorrowing
friends.
SShe was preceded in death by two
sons Roosevelt Pleas and Alomo
Pleas.


nation, we hope for all people: indi-
vidual freedom in the framework of
a just society; political freedom in
the framework of meaningful par-
ticipation by all citizens -- a govern-
ment that shall both preserve and
enhance the personal liberties of all
its citizens and thereby ensure the
very fullest and richest life for all
people."
The committee meets again 7 p.m.
Jan. 11 at the School Board office.
At that time, the group will consider
new committee appointments and
activities for the coming year.

Daniel Finalyson Turnbull
Daniel Finalayson Turnbull, age
87, died December 16, 2004 in At-
lanta, Georgia.
Graveside services will be Satur-
day, January 8, 2005 at Roseland
Cemetery at 11 a.m. Family will re-
ceive friends at Beggs Funeral
Home Monticello Chapel one hour
before service at 10 am.
A native of Monticello, Florida,
long time resident of Tallahassee,
Florida; in more recent years Mr.
Turnbull has made his home in Fort
Myers, Florida and Atlanta,
Georgia. He was of the .Episcopal
faith. At one time he was a member
of the Elks Club.
Mr. Turnbull was survived by one
son, Daniel Finalyson Tumbull Jr.;
one daughter, Jody Jones and hus-
band Nelson; and four
grandchildren.


Attention Parents!

Every 40 seconLds, another child
becomes lost or missing in America.
PARENTS, we owe it to our children to visit


www.PreventMissingChildren.com
Information that could save your child's life.


Copeland is also working to be-
come certified, So that when area
couples get divorced and have to
attend a four hours of a parenting
class, she will be able to teach it in
the area.
She has already conducted
classes in the community on food
safety, offers outreach programs in
the community, rural health care
and she wants to get involved with
diabetes outreach courses.
Copeland also assists Director
John Lilly by working with the 4-H
County Council, visiting area nurs-
ing homes, and with the Tropicana
Speech Contest. She also has an
outreach program at the Boys and
Girls Club.
So far, what she finds most en-
joyable about her new job are that
the people are very nice and very
:interesting. Copeland describes
herself as being creative, energetic,
compassionate, knowledgeable and
"Willing to do what it takes to do a
good job here,"'he said.
She wants people whom she has
taught to think of her as having


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MAN GEENOUE ASESASACR

ProectonAgecyandth
USDe artmntofEnrg.*


taught them something and that it-
was accurate, applicable, and infor-
mative.
Of her strong points, Copeland
said: "I have a high energy level.
I'm tenacious and I get along well
with diverse people."
Her hobbies include cooking,
sewing, reading about child devel-
opment, traveling with her family
and most of all, spending time with
her family.
Copeland was born in Chicago
and when she was in high school
her parents moved to Wisconsin.

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LAKE ELLA PLAZA
,Corne of N Monroe & Tharpe SL,
Next to Pubix

S3856047
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WE TAKE THE
T NNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


After four years in the Army, she-
found herself in Alabama, and


from, there, on to Florida.
She decided to work in her field,
because she was naturally good at
it. "I always had a knack for it,"
said Copeland. "I've had good
teachers who always encouraged
me and this is a good field to get in
to."


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening


1 1630 E. JACKSON ST.
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall'


S


Copeland New Consumer


Sciences Extension Agent


Ne-Ya'sReoution....


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