The news-leader

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Title:
The news-leader
Uniform Title:
News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title:
News leader
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication:
Fernandina Beach Fla
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates:
30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000366799
oclc - 04377055
notis - ACA5658
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID:
UF00028319:00940

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MARY MAGUIRE News-Leader An exclusive 10-year concession contract to fer r y passengers to Cumberland Island (Ga. Seashore expires in August, possibly opening the way for a ferry service from Fernandina Beach. A prospectus is being developed now, and bids on a new contract would be solicited later this spring, said National Park Service spokesperson Mar gar et Tyler, a Cumberland ranger, in inter views this week. Fernandina tour boat operator Kevin McCarthy is interested. McCarthy owns and operates Amelia River Cruises & Charters from the city marina, where he rents space for two tour boats. es, I want it, said McCar thy in a phone interview last Friday. Ive been asking to have access to Cumberland Island for 14 years, as long as Ive been in service. McCar thy said he had a meeting scheduled this week with Cumberland Islands interim park director to discuss the ferry contract. What ar e the chances that the con cession would be split between St. Marys, Ga., and Fernandina Beach? s a cr ystal ball, Magic 8 ques CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK News-Leader 1 6 0th year No. 26 C op yright, 2014 The News-Leader Fernandina Beach, FL Printed on 100% recycled newsprint with soy based ink. F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 /16 P AGES 2 S ECTIONS fbnewsleader.com FERR Y Continued on 3A fbnewsleader.com $ 1.00 I I N N D D E E X X C LASSIFIEDS ...............................5B C OMMUNITY ............................ 6A E DIT ORIAL .................................. 7A H OMES .......................................................4B M USIC N OTES .....................................2B O B ITU ARIE S ........................................... 2A O UTAND A BOUT .................2B R ELIGION .................................................. 3B S ERVICE D IRECT ORY ....................... 7B S PORTS ......................................................8A S UDOKU ......................................2B ANGELA DAUGHTRY News-Leader A special Fernandina Beach Commission meeting Tuesday to dis-c uss two competing waterfront park plans ended with no concrete decis ions but with more questions about a perceived need for parking and how to finance the project. Both plans create park space on Lots A and B at the city waterfront, a c ircular drop-off zone at the end of Centre Street, a round historic plazaa nd a covered porch addition to the M arina Welcome Center, as well as open space for concerts and othera ctivities. Commissioners did not endorse e ither plan, nor did they retract the boards previous endorsement of a plan put together by a Waterfront Advisory Group (WAG). City Manager Joe Gerrity said he w ould gather cost estimates for a modified WAG plan that would include con-s tructing a deck on the Welcome Center and re-configuring the parking i n Lot B and along the railroad tracks. Eric Bartelt, a local retired graphic d esigner, presented the plan that has previous commission approval, whichh as more parking spaces but slightly less open space than the opposing plan. T he other proposal, by architect Randy Rice, was shown to commissioners last October but did not get formal approval at the time. Both plans were presented at a r ecent regular commission meeting, but commissioners asked for the spe-c ial meeting to get more details on the proposals. R ice said he created his simplified plan because there was a vacuum in 2 013 among city officials regarding a plan for a waterfront park. He said hisi dea was to have something straightforward and affordable at the waterf ront to stimulate the Community Redevelopment Area and offer something to the community. Rices plan was estimated to cost about $1.2 million, with much of the cost covered by g rants and private fundraising. ere not looking to eliminate f uture plans, Rice told commissioners at Tuesdays meeting. Were tryi ng to honor the idea that the community is working toward a park. We need y ou to think about how to be a leader in all this. (The B Lot space, Rice said. This is where 90 p ercent of visitors and residents will want to be ... this is centrally located to the community and most advantageous to the downtown. Rices plan would have fewer parking spaces directly at t he waterfront, but would use the park next to City Hall to replace lost parkings paces, Rice said. Bartelt said the WAG proposal was City nudges ahead on waterfront park(ing) plan H EATHER A. PERRY News-Leader Imagine being plunked into the middle of an unfamiliar for eign country. Everywhere you look, the signs ar e illegible and people ar e speaking a language you cannot understand. T his experience is faced daily by p eople who settle in America fr om o ther nations. Our language is new to their ears and they struggle to understand and to make themselves under stood. English Language Learners instructor Bobbi Roberts has been in this situation. When her husband was stationed in Japan with the U.S. Marine C orps, the couple thought it would be a wonderful opportunity to enroll their youngest son in a Japanese preschool so he could learn to speak Japanese. It was very difficult watching him try to participate and learn another language when others ar ound him did n ot understand what he was saying. The frustration he experienced was felt by all of us, r e called Rober ts, who was also str uggling tr y ing to teach in a school where 90 percent of her students spoke another language. Seeing how difficult it was for her son to communicate with his classmates and for her students to com m unicate with her Roberts passion to bridge the language bar rier grew. With a masters degree in elementar y education and an ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) endorsement, K-12, Roberts is uniquely qualified for her position as instructor in the English Language Lear ners classes because the endorsement involves many hours of work in applied linguistics, cr oss-cultural communication, cur riculum and materials, meth o ds of teaching, testing and evalua t ion. O ver the past six years, her ELL students have included speakers of Chinese, Thai, Spanish, Portuguese, Kor e an, Russian, Geor gian and Italian. Its so interesting how they all work together even though they dont speak each others languages, said Roberts. Students range in age from teenagers to their 50s and Roberts sometimes has couples taking the semester -long class together Getting to know each student is an impor tant par t of helping them on their p ath to fluency A lot of countries teach English as a subject in elementar y or high school but it is more reading and writing than conversational English, said Roberts. I feel it is ver y impor tant to spend time speaking and listening to each student for the first few classes to be able to decide what level each student is on. Theres often some apprehension involved at first but once students feel comfortable, they work hard and bring many valuable stories fr om their coun tries. Roberts and her para-professional, Rosalinda Ber mudez, use a lot of visu a ls, technology, a picture dictionary and one-on-one instruction. e feel it is ver y impor tant to get all students involved in discussions during each class. ELL students all say they want to be able to communicate better in their new language. I would like to teach my sons well, s aid Midalys Rodriguez. I am their example. Reynalda Choncoa has been attending classes for about a month and says she wants to learn and speak properly. Henry Mejia hopes improving his language skills will assist in his job hunt. SUBMITTED PHOTOS Midalys Rodriguez and Reynalda Choncoa, left, study during English Language Learners classes held Monday and Wednesday evenings. Henry Mejia and Edgar Aguilar, right, work on language exer cises during class. Bridging the language barrier English learn ers MARY MA GUIRE AND MICHAEL PARNELL News-Leader A new push to launch a ferry service from Fernandina Beach to the Cumberland Island (Ga. Seashore may ride on bicycles. But the envir onmental impact of a lar ge number of bicyclists on the island, which has no paved roads, is a hurdle. Local cycling enthusiasts are behind an effort to persuade the National Park Service to split the contract for ferry service between the existing pr ovider in St. Mar ys, Ga., and one that would leave from the city marina in Fer nandina. e want equal access and we want it bike friendly, said Phil Scanlan of the Friends of the Amelia Island Trail, Inc. Scanlan, who pitched the plan last week to the Nassau County Commission, would like to see Fernandina Beach get a ferry to complete the East Coast Gr eenway bike trail. Ther e was a ferry to St. Marys but it ceased in 2010 because of too few passengers. The bike trail is a developing 2,900mile effort extending from Key West to Maine. Among its many breaks along the coast is one at the St. Mar ys River, where cyclists have to take a long detour along US 17. Thats a dangerous road, said Scanlan. Its narrow, and traffic goes by too fast. A new fer r y ser vice likely would require an increase in the number of visitors to Cumberland Island. It also would r equir e consideration of the impact of greater numbers of bicyclists on the island, which is, in part, a national wilderness that forbids Bicy cle s ma y blaze trail on Cumberland F ernan dina f err y to Cumberland? ENGLISH Continued on 3A BIKE Continued on 3A PARK Continued on 3A I w o uld lik e to teach m y sons well I am their ex ample M ID A L Y S RODRIGUE Z

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Y Y a a r r d d s s a a l l e e Hot Paws Grooming Salon, 1008 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach, will host a yar d sale on M arch 29 from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. t o benefit the Cedar Haven T ransitional House for Women. Shop for furniture, clothing (including new mens clothing and prom dresses), kitchenwar e, bric-a-brac and more. For information, call 635-9789. S S p p a a g g h h e e t t t t i i d d i i n n n n e e r r American Legion Post 54, 626 S. Thir d St., will host a spaghetti dinner from 5-7 p.m. March 29 for an $8 donation. Call 261-7900. O O s s t t o o m m y y s s u u p p p p o o r r t t The Amelia Island Ostomy Support Group will meet at 6:30 p.m. on March 31 in the boar dr oom of f the main lobby of Baptist Medical Center Nassau. Patty Langenbach of Medical Car e Pr oducts in Jacksonville will give a presentation showcasing a variety of supplies. All those with ostomies, their families, interested professionals and those wanting mor e infor mation about ostomy surgery and aftrer-care are welcome to a ttend. Parking is free and the facility is handicapped accessible. For information contact ameliaostomygr o up@gmail. com or call 310-9054. T T o o r r c c h h r r u u n n The Fernandina Beach leg o f the 31st anniversary Florida Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics will take place April 1 at 9 a.m. For 30 years, the Special Olympics Flame of Hope has traversed Florida in an intrastate relay of simultaneous routes, covering thousands of miles. Local and state law enforcement officers carry the torch all the way to the opening ceremony of Floridas annual Summer Games, which will be held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex on May 16 in Lake Buena Vista. The Law Enfor cement Torch Run is the largest awareness and fundraising event sponsored by Special Olympics of Florida and local law enforcement agencies. Lear n mor e at www .spe cialolympicsflorida.org. C C a a r r e e e e r r F F a a i i r r s s Spring Career Fairs sponsored by Florida State College a t Jacksonville Career Development Centers will be held April 1 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the AdvancedT echnology Center of the Downtown Campus, 401 W. Main St., Jacksonville, and April 10 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. at t he D-Building Courtyard of the North Campus, 4501 Capper Road, Jacksonville. The fairs are free and open to job-seeking students and community members who can meet representatives from more than 40 local employers. Employers are still being r ecr uited. Other employers interested in recruiting employment candidates or offering internships are encouraged to contact Alan Pasetti via email at apasetti@ fscj.edu or by calling (904 633-8223. W W h h a a l l e e o o f f a a S S a a l l e e Nassau County 4-H will host its fourth annual Whale of a Sale from 8 a.m.-7 p.m. April 4 and 8 a.m.-1 p.m. April 5 at the Callahan Masonic Lodge, 45085 Frank Br ookins Drive in Callahan. There will be numerous vendors including new and gently used treasures, homemade goodies and on Friday n ight, spaghetti dinners from 5-7 p.m. to support 4-H youth attending camp and other upcoming events. Contact the Nassau County Extension office to rent a table or for more information at 879-1019. B B a a g g t t h h e e B B a a g g A new local group, Bag the Bag Fer n andina, has recently formed. Help them change the language used in stores to, Did you bring your own bags? rather than Is plastic OK? Join them at their next meeting at 3:30 p.m. April 5 at Shef field s on Centr e Street in downtown Fernandina Beach. Y Y a a r r d d s s a a l l e e A yard sale will be held on April 5 from 8 a.m. until dark at New Life Church off A1A in Yulee. All proceeds will go to help a local couple after the husband was paralyzed in a bull riding accident. B B o o w w l l f f o o r r k k i i d d s s Help Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida at the Bowl for Kids Sake event April 5 at noon, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. and April 12 at 3 p.m., 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. at Batt Family Fun Center, 1838 Cassat Ave., Jacksonville. Say thank you to the volunteers who help children at risk while raising funds to help local children who benefit fr om the Big/Little program. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Nor theast Florida is a men t oring movement that connects caring, encouraging adult mentors with children fr o m low-income, single fami ly homes or in homes that oth erwise impede the childs ability to succeed. Sign up at www.bbbsnefl.org/bowling. o r contact Dawn Robbins, manager of special events, at dr o bbins@bbbsnefl.org or (904 J J u u s s t t F F r r i i e e n n d d s s d d i i n n n n e e r r If you are single and over the age of 55, the Just Friends Club monthly dinner is scheduled for April 8. It is fr ee to join this invitation only club. Call 321-1116. K K a a t t i i e e R R i i d d e e Presented by Mayo Clinic, the 10th annual Katie Ride will be held April 12, benefiting the Katie Caples Foundations or gan donor r egistration edu cation and awareness programming. The fully supported cycling event for riders of all levels has 100-, 62-, 36 and 18-mile routes with an OffRoad Ride, Family Fun Ride, 7K Walk and 7K Fun Run. The nine island coastal ride begins at the Atlantic Recr eation Center on Amelia Island and courses through Ft. Clinch, Timucuan Ecological and Historical State Preserve, Ft. Caroline and the Talbot Islands. Register at www.katierideforlife.org/register/. Fees range fr om $10 to $45. M inimum fundraising commitments apply for most events. Organizers are also seeking volunteers. Sign up at www .katierideforlife.org/takeaction/volunteer/ or call the 491-0811. A volunteer coordinator will call with details. D D e e n n t t a a l l h h e e l l p p The Nor t heast Florida Baptist Association will bring the Mobile Dental Unit to the Yulee office, 851035 US 17, for one week for free dental care for those without insurance. Medical, financial screening and appointments for clients will be held at the association on April 15 from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. on a first-come, firstserved basis. Patients must be 18 or older and must show up in person. Only clients who need fillings or extractions are seen. G G u u n n c c o o u u r r s s e e s s Gary W. Belson Associates Inc. will hold a concealed weapon license course at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. March 29 and 6:30 p.m. April 1, 7, 11, 15 and 23. A basic with defensive tactics course will be held at 7:45 a.m. Mar ch 30, April 12, 13, 19 and 20. For details and additional classes and information, contact Belson at 491-8358, (904 gbelson@bellsouth.net. Visit www .TheBelsonGr oup.com. W W o o m m e e n n s s g g r r o o u u p p Becoming the best you can be is the goal and the theme of a new Womens Empowerment Group launched by Star ting Point Behavioral Healthcare in Y ulee. The gr oup meets on the main campus ever y Tuesday from 2-3 p.m. at 463142 SR 200 in Y ulee. Topics for discussion include: healthy relationships and characteristics of unhealthy r elationships; r ec ognizing abusive relationships; asser tiveness training; str ess r eduction; cr eating bal ance and more. For infor mation call Starting Point Behavioral Healthcare at 225-8280. D arnell Adams Jr. Darnell Adams Jr. (aka Hollywood Sandhill, Florida, passed away on March 23, 2014 at his home. D arnell was born in Jacksonville, Florida and raised by Joseph and Mary Williams of F ernandina Beach. After graduating high school he served for t wo years in the United States Army. He then lived in New York for ten years working as a local truck driver. Darnell retired from Crowley Maritime after 20-plus y ears of service as a long-distance truck driver. He was a member of Saint J ames Baptist Church in Sandhill. He is survived by his loving wife of 49 years, J eanett; daughter, Tori Jordan; sisters, Darcell Hannon, Denise Brown, and Sherry Brown; sister-in-law, Gene Adams; special nephew-sons, Brandon Parish and Breone Albertie; and a host of nieces, nephews, friends and extended family. H omegoing services will be held on Saturday, March 30, 2014, 3:30 p.m., at New Zion M issionary Baptist Church in Fernandina Beach. Interment will be in Elmore Wiley Cemetery ( County Road 108) Yulee, Florida. Sunset Funeral Home Kingsland, Ga. M ichael Hickman Michael Hickman, 35, of Yulee passed away M onday, March 24, 2014. He was born February 4, 1979, in Palm Beach Gardens, and moved to Yulee in 2000 from New Hampshire. Mr. Hickman was a graduate of Florida Technical College with a degree in CADD Engineering. He loved cars and hot rods, the b each and boating. He was an avid New England Patriots and Boston Red Sox fan. H e is survived by his parents, Steven and Carol Hickman of Yulee; a sister, Pamela Hickman Figus (Jeremy) of Fernandina Beach; his girlfriend, Melissa Estes of Jacksonville; and by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephewsa nd close friends. Graveside funeral services will be held at 2 p .m. Saturday, March 29, at Green Pine Cemetery with the Rev. Jim Tippins officiating. The family w ill receive friends from 6-8 p.m. Friday at Green Pine Funeral Home. For more information and to sign Mr. Hickman s online r e gister book please visit the Green Pine website at www.greenpinefuneral.com. G r een P ine F uner al Home M arcia Lawson Knight Some knew her just as Marcia, extended family called her Marcia Gail, but most recently she was known as Mar cia Lawson Knight. Marcia was born November 1, 1949 to Effie and Paul Lawson, and was proud to call the hills of Kentucky home as a child. She spent much of herl ife in W aupaca, W isconsin with her parents and s isters and later moved to Dubuque, Iowa wher e s he attended Clarke College and raised her children. Marcia fully embraced and loved Amelia Island Life from her arrival ten years ago via the Intracoastal Waterway from Palm Beach, Florida. She mar ried W illiam Kenneth Knight December 2, 2008 at Nor th End Beach. She was devoted to K en s happiness, and partnered with him restoring their sailboat Free Bird. Simply speaking they comp leted one another. Ken loved Marcia dearly and says Marcia was sweet as the day is long. She was in Kens a rms when she had an aneurysm that lead to her death on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 and lovingly gave her organs to those in need. Those who knew Marcia may have noticed s he used big words and told long stories all of her 64 years. She was very loyal. The kids have mem-o ries of her unmatched socks with strange shoes and wild outfits. She always left everything out w here she could see it and made lists upon lists. Shed take the kids to a Bluegrass festival every chance she got while they were young. She insisted they take an instrument as part of their education. Shed sleep outside rolled up in a tarp by the campfire when she camped. She hated the inside air and said she needed an air hose to b reathe. She made stir-fry surprise or stew. She always had a great idea, and would talk someone i nto helping her. Marcia sang, played guitar, banjo and stand up bass, worked on playing the mandolin and previously enjoyed playing in a Bluegrass band. She spent time employed as a realtor, and then was a landlord who hauled an amazing amount of garbage out of many an old building. She heated many homes and boats with a woodstove, even had one made out of a teapot. She loved sea turtles and red leaves. She hated c arpet and was taught to refinish furniture and floors by her friend at The Wooddoctors, John Burns. She loved to enter into a political debate.M ost of all, she was a mother, an old hippie and a free thinker. Marcia fully joined the Island Life. She was talented and flexible in many vocations and volunteer jobs. She will be remembered being an excellent problem solver and willing worker. She loved gardening, starting seeds from all points on the island fr om the docks to the beach. Marcias business Thee Refinisher thrived for manyy ears. She was a champion to the homeless and d isadvantaged. She graciously pr ovided food, c lothing, internet resources and a kind word for those in need. She amazingly went above and beyond the human spirit of giving. Marcia loved life, always giving a positive helpful answer or solution to people. She will be greatly missed by her Fer nandina Beach Dock family. She valued education, always encouraging childr en and y oung people. She was continuing higher educ ation striving for mor e knowledge to better help o thers. She always encouraged everyone to live a healthy lifestyle and reach their potential. She and Ken helped, strengthened and encouraged many families. Marcia was very proud and often spoke fondly of her parents, children and grandchildr en Marcia is survived by her wonderful husband K enny, her children, grandchildren and their f ur r y families, who she could brag about for days o n end. Fr o m Dubuque, Iowa, Sara Alana Lawson Weaver and Chris Fiegen, their four sons Ryan, Colton, Dominic and Alex, and their shepherds. From Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Molly Melinda Lawson and Chris Gansen, their 9 children Leif, Bella, Kiara, Devontae, Dr ew Elijah, Isaiah, Chrissy and Megan, and their handsome dog. From Dubuque, Iowa, Samuel Jarad Weaver and his 3c hildr en Alexis, Dylan and T anner Fr om Iowa C ity Iowa, Jonathan Christian Paul Schmitt and Jessica Melkus. From Dubuque, Iowa, Adam Israel Raymond and Ashly Schmitt, their 4 children Kayla, Ethan, Tristan, and Hunter, and their furry pups. She is also survived by her ex-husb and, Jerry Weaver of Dubuque who she cussed many times for his cigarette smoke andN augahyde recliner, but remained best pals with throughout her life. M arcia will be reunited with her infant sister Lisa, many great relatives, and her furry friends Lady, Banjo and Ollie. She is survived by both of her parents, her daddy Samuel Paul Lawson, her mommy Ruby Effie Garland Lawson. She i s also survived by her sisters, their families and their critters: Teri Lynn Lawson Connelly & TimC onnelly, their son Joseph Paul Lawson and their large furry family. Lori Beth Lawson and her f aithful furry pals. Eva Marie Lawson Kranski and Morgan Kranski and their loving furred family. Marcia had friends from every walk of life and is especially lucky to have had in her life Peggy and Mike, who cared for her as she worked through many medical issues. Marcia a nd Kenny were amazed by the fine work of everyone from the janitor to the physicians at J acksonville Baptist and in Fernandina, where they received such magnificent care. Our Island Friend Marcia will be solely missed by everyone! Please call Peggy Day at (904 information about services. D elphine Rosalie Leavy D elphine Rosalie (Mikolajczak from September 1, 1922 until Thursday, March 6, 2014. She officially made it to 91 1/2 years old. D elphine was one of four children born to Polish immigrants and is a first generation American citizen born in the United States. She grew up in Chicago, Illinois where she attended a Polish/American Catholic elementary school. When she went to the public high school, she was on the cheerleading squad for all four years and graduated i n great academic standing. D elphine was always a prac t ical and caring person. She would help others in any way she could. Delphine met her future husband, Gilbert, just six weeks before he was deployed to sea with the U.S. Navy. They wrote each other daily for one year. Upon his r eturn, they were married and spent 59 1/2 beautiful years together They raised two child ren and provided a strong Christian upbringing f or them. They pr ovided for the needs of their chil d ren and supported them in whatever way they needed all of their lives. Delphine was a loving, giving, patient and kind mother. Her family was her top priority. She would do without material things to provide for her children. She and Gilbert pr ovided a str ong family unit making sur e the family had many interesting and fun experiences. S he and Gilbert raised their children with mess ages of confidence in themselves, faith in God a nd compassion for others. She could be count ed on in difficult times to give of herself to help others. Delphine was always an active participant in church and school activities. She was a wonderful homemaker making sur e that the family br eakfasts and dinners took place every day. Delphine and Gilbert retired to Fernandina Beach in 1986.S he continued to be active socially and in chur ch a ctivities. She and Gilber t spent much quality time taking care of and playing with two of their grandchildren, Thomas and Jillian Leavy-Steele, who lived close by. She was very active in their lives and was a very devoted grandmother. She a lso cared very deeply for her older granddaughter, Jodi (LeavyC olorado. She had fond memories of the time she was able to spend with Jodi. Delphine was a lovi ng, understanding, generous and kind wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Delphine Rosalie Leavy is survived by her son, Thomas Leavy, daughter, Patricia Leavy, son-in-law, John Steele, grandchildren, Jodi ( Leavy) Elnicki, Thomas Leavy-Steele and Jillian Leavy-Steele, and great-grandchildren,C hristopher and Casey Elnicki. Delphine Rosalie Leavy was loved dearly by her family and will be m issed daily. She will also be missed by all of the people whose lives she touched in so many wonderful ways. The funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 5, 2014 at St. Peters Episcopal Church, Fernandina Beach followed by a reception at the church and entombment ceremony at G reen Pine Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Delphine would have preferred that donations be made to y our favorite charity. To sign Mrs. Leavys online register book please visit the Green Pine Funeral Home website at www.greenpinefuneral.com. Green Pine Funeral Home Amanda Prince McFarland Mrs. Amanda Prince McFarland, 98, of F ernandina Beach, passed away on Tuesday March 25, 2014 in Fernandina Beach. She was born in Kings Ferry, on December 13, 1915, thed aughter of the late Empie and Sarah Jane (Haddockeared in Nassau County and moved to Fernandina in 1937. She attended Fernandina High School and worked at Lockwoods Drug Store. She met Henry J. McFarland who was a policeman and they mar ried on December 11, 1938. During WWII, Mr. McFarlandw ent off to join the U.S. Army a nd Mrs. McFarland joined the w orkforce at Rayonier. I n later years, she was associated with the Nassau County Sheriffs Department as a School Crossing Guard for over 30 years. Mrs. McFarland was an active member of the First Baptist Chur ch and held the honor of being the oldest continuous member She was very active i n her church work serving in various positions. M rs. McFarland enjoyed gar dening and raising b eautiful poinsettias. She is preceded in death by her husband, Henry J. McFarland, who passed away in 1992. Mrs. McFarland leaves behind her son and daughter-in-law, Jim and Kathy McFarland of Fer nandina Beach, thr ee grandchildr e n, Cathy McFarland, of Dhaka, Bangladesh, Craig M cFarland (Cristinaexas and R obin W eeks of Sher wood, Arkansas, five gr eatg randchildr e n and many nieces and nephews. Funeral Services will be held 10 a.m. Friday at the First Baptist Church with the Rev. Jeff Overton officiating. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the ser vice. She will be laid to r est with her husband at Bosque Bello Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the First Baptist Church BuildingF und, 1600 S 8th St, Fer nandina Beach, FL 32034. P lease shar e her life stor y at www .oxleyheard.com. Oxley-Heard FUneral Directors 2A F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 NEWS News-Leader CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK O BITUARIES 5 5 1 1 1 1 A A s s h h S S t t r r e e e e t t , F F e e r r n n a a n n d d i i n n a a B B e e a a c c h h , F F L L 3 3 2 2 0 0 3 3 4 4 (904) 261-3696 Fax 261-3698 W W e e b b s s i i t t e e f f o o r r e e m m a a i i l l a a d d d d r r e e s s s s e e s s : : f f b b n n e e w w s s l l e e a a d d e e r r . c c o o m m Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina Beach News-Leader 51 1 Ash Street, P .O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-9001. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 16766, Fernandina Beach, FL32035. The NewsLeader may only be sold by persons or businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director. NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly the part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprinted. All adver tising is subject to the approval of the publisher The News-Leader reserves the right to correctly classify edit or delete any objectionable wording or reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the general standard of advertising acceptance. SUBSCRIPTION RA TES Mail in Nassau County . . . . . . . . . .$39.99 Mail out of Nassau County . . . . . . . . .$69.99 NEWS DEADLINES Community News: Monday, 5 p.m. Letters to the editor: Monday, 12 p.m. ChurchNotes: Monday 5 p.m. People and Places: Thursday, 3 p.m. ADVERTISING DEADLINES WEDNESDAYNEWS-LEADERFRIDAYNEWS-LEADER Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.Tuesday, 5 p.m. Legal Notices: Friday noon N/A Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.Tuesday, 3 p.m. Monday holidays the Classified deadline wil be Friday at 5 p.m. LOOKING BACK 5 0 YEARS 25 YEARS 10 YEARS John T. Weisner, first elected in 1948, said he would seek a fifth ter m as County Superintendent of Public Instruction. Mar ch 26, 1964 State grants funds totaling $648,000 wer e released to the city of Fernandina Beach and Centre Street Waterfront Development Group for construction of a two-story restaurant at the site of the Marine Welcome Station. March 26, 1987 The state Depar tment of Envir onmental Protection gave the West Nassau Landfill a gold star inspection after months of violations at the site. March 26, 2004 WEEKLY UPDATE

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w heeled vehicles. Scanlan and his group have had recent success with publicprivate partnerships. The group helped open a bike trail last year on the south end of Amelia Island by partnering with offic ials to secure a $2 million state grant. T he trail has quickly become a popular place to ride, run and walk, though it has been criticized for an overload of traffic signs that confuse riders and detract from the lush foliage. At the board meeting, S canlan asked the commission for a resolution supporting d irect ferry service from Amelia Island to the national park on Georgias most southern barrier island. S canlan believes there is e nough interest in Cumberland I sland to support two ferry terminals. e want to complement, not compete, said Scanlan to the board. Scanlan said he has been spending 30 hours each week o ver the last few months calli ng, meeting and emailing park s ervice officials on the local, state and national level. He said he has been in touch with U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. I thought it was a little deal. Turns out to be a big deal, said Scanlan. I t has also been a long-term e ffort. Various people, from gove rnment officials to business leaders, have been pushing for a direct ferry from Fernandina for some 20 years. The boar d is in favor of the plan, voting 5-0 to support the r esolution It makes sense, said C ommissioner Steve Kelley. There cant only be one way people can gain access to a federal park. The Fer nandina Beach city commission is expected to offer support at its meeting next week, accor ding to City Mana ger Joe Ger rity A re bicycles a priority at C umberland Island? e do allow bicycles on the island, but you cant bring them on the fer r y , said Margaret Tyler, Cumberland ranger and park spokesperson. Its a safety issue because theres no way to secure them. Tyler said it is possible to c harter a smaller ferryboat from Lang Seafood, which some bicyclists do when they camp on Cumberland. But Cumberland is not a realistic alternative for a bike trail, she said. We dont have any paved surfaces on this island, only dirt roads, trails and the b each, she noted, requiring a mountain bike or beach cruiser with fat tires, not the road bikes with thinner tires that the East Coast bike trail riders use. Cumberland bike riders have a choice of Grand Avenue,a grand name for a dirt road, the River and Nightengale trails or the beach. They are not allowed in the wilderness under t erms of the federal Wilderness A ct of 1962, which specifically p rohibits wheeled devices, Tyler s aid. N ow, there are a small number of bikes on the island at any given time, Tyler said. Lang is the bike concessionaire, and private boaters may bring bikes. G reyfield Inn, which is privatel y owned lodging and operates i ts own ferry from Fernandina, r ents bikes. T he implications for wildlife and nature at Cumberland of a large number of bicycles and bicyclists remains to be studied. Bikes can cause resource damage too, just like more people can cause r esour ce dam a ge, said Tyler, pointing to nesti ng shorebirds on the beach as a n example of a threatened species. Five people fr om Greyfield on the beach isnt a big deal, she said, but 50 people bringing their bikes on the fer r y and riding in a gr oup on the beach c ould be. T he quest to make Cumb erland mor e bicycle friendly comes too late for the 2014 foundation document that represents a major revision to the parks future plans. As it celebrated its 40th anniversar y park of ficials solicited public comm ent for the foundation docum ent in 2012 and 2013. P ublication of the r e vised doc ument is imminent. mmaguire@fbnewsleader.co CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK 3A F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 NEWS News-Leader We want equal access and we want it bike friendly P HIL SCANLAN F RIENDS OF THE AMELIA ISLAND TRAIL, INC. Five people from Greyfield on the beach isnt a b ig deal. But 50 people bringing their bikes on the ferry (and riding on the beach) could be M ARGARET TYLER NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Voted Best of the Best in 2012 Insurance AgencyS S h h a a p p i i r r o o I I n n s s u u r r a a n n c c e e G G r r o o u u p phas been providing quality insurance products and excellent customer service for North Florida since 1989. From auto insurance to homeowners insurance, life insurance and businessinsurance, we provide you with the customer service you deserve.1 1 9 9 1 1 0 0 S S . 1 1 4 4t t h hS S t t r r e e e e t t , S S u u i i t t e e # # 1 1 F F e e r r n n a a n n d d i i n n a a B B e e a a c c h h , F F L L 3 3 2 2 0 0 3 3 4 4 info@insuresig . com ( ( 9 9 0 0 4 4 ) ) 2 2 7 7 7 7 2 2 1 1 3 3 5 5 www.shapiroinsurancegroup.com Toll-free 1-866-277-2135 INSURANCE GROUP P l e a s e a s k f o r P l e a s e a s k f o r l a m i n a t e d a u t o l a m i n a t e d a u t o I D c a r d s I D c a r d sDo you have the coverage you need? Do you have the coverage you need? Why be near, when you can be here! HA P P YHO U R!S u n d a y t h r u T h u r s d a y2 6W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y s s W ing it C C r r e e s s c c e e n n d d o o A A m m e e l l i i a a B B i i g g B B a a n n d d T u e s d a y A p i r l 8 2 0 1 4Live at 7 p.m. $5 Cover Open7days a week at11 am 2910 Atlantic Ave. 904-310-6904UPSTAIRS AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIESwww.sandybottomsamelia.comVisit us online or on Facebook for all the specials and event infoENTERTAINMENT Wednesday Sunday 1-2-3 Magic of Positive ParentingAhumorous look at Parenting & aserious look at DisciplineDiscipline without arguing, yelling or spanking How to control bad behavior Tips for encouraging good behavior What to do about messy rooms, bedtime, lying, homework & more How to strengthen your relationship with your childClass begins April 1 and continues for 8 weeks Class meets 5:30 6:30 p.m. at Starting Point Behavioral Healthcare 463142 State Road 200 Yulee, FL32097 904-225-8280 www.spbh.org Weekly cost is $30 per person. $50 per couple;Pre-Registration is Required the result of many hours of w ork by city staff, the Waterfronts Advisory Group and community workshops, and it also had been approved by five advisory boards and h ad commission approval in 2009 and 2012, before a m ajority of the current commission was elected. The plan B artelt presented Tuesday was scaled down from the original plan and did not include parking lots on the south end of the marina. In a f inancing proposal, he suggested using $250,000 from a Parks & Recreation impact fee fund and $200,000 in a m atching grants for Lot B, plus a public/private partnership to raise money for certain elements. Local angler Terry L acoss, who owns a fishing supply store downtown, said h e liked the proposals, but that the park plans take easy w ater access away from boaters. Fernandina is a fishing town, Lacoss said. I like the original plan that preserves m ore parking (but we still need to modify this p lan. I think its too big for the area ... On weekends (the p arking lot) is pretty much full. Id like to see a park, buti t needs to be functional. F lorida Inland Navigation District commissioner and l ocal resident Lynn Williams said a lack of parking spaces at the waterfront would be a significant problem. Williams said there was a good chance FIND would give a grant to the city for a w aterfront park, but that the p r oject would have to wait u ntil next year to get funding. Local architect John Cotner, who has served on several city boards and has worked on various iterations of waterfront park plans for year said waiting for the city t o build a waterfront park has b een frustrating. W e e stuck in the mud constantly, Cotner said. We have a tendency to put in personal preferences ... were getting off in the weeds a little bit ... we expect you guys to not get of f track. H e also suggested comm issioners stick with the origi nal plan that was appr o ved in 2012. W e need to work where we have the most public use, he added. It was never intended that the park be built in one fell swoop. eve got to have parki ng, Commissioner Pat Gass s aid. I think wer e being opti m istic about how far people will walk. Mike Zaf f ar o ni, chair of the CRA Advisory Board, pleaded with commissioners to just appr ove a park plan, any park plan. It saddens me to think I w as four years old when John C otner star t ed working on a park plan, he said to laugh ter. (The CRA Advisory Board has) been working on this for 18 months and I feel as though we need to see some things rolling. ... I believe this is one step that will help revitalize one of the jewels of our community. e ar e 250 per cent behind lets do a park, said downtown business owner Melba Whittaker. Its time to do it. Commissioner Johnny Miller said he agr eed that commissioners should get going on approval of a park plan, and added that he was leaning toward the original Waterfronts Advisory Group Plan. But Rice defended his plan again, saying it was in the best inter est of the city . Why are we using the waterfront park for parking?he said. W e should use the riverfront for what its intended for: people. .... It becomesa question of you alls commitment to turn a page. Lets ease ourselves from the notion that parking deter mines the park, Rice said. Theres lots of space along the water fr ont that is not being used. It wasnt our job to make the park happen, Bartelt said in defense of the WAG plan. e were charged with making the park right. ... The question that has always been for efr ont in my mind is, why don t we raise money for the WAG plan? The elephant in the room is that three of us (commissioners) sent the money back (for the Forward Fernandina plan), Gass said. I say we go with the plan that is approved ... we can t just send the money back and do nothing. adaughtry@fbnewsleader.com t ion, said Tyler. From where, or what the paramet ers will be is unknown because its still being discussed. Tyler said a committee would discuss the concess ion contract, though the ultimate decision maker isr egional director Stan Austin, who is based in A tlanta. Lang Seafood, based in St. Marys, has the exclusive ferry concession. The owner, Calvin Lang, has had a n exclusive deal since 1988, said Tyler, first in five-yeara greements, and since 2004 as a 10-year deal. U nder the agreement, a limit of 300 passengers can be brought to the island each day. They arrive in two groups, leaving in boats that l aunch and return at different times. Lang has not saidi f he would bid on the contract again. M cCarthy ran a ferry service from 2008-10 to St. Marys from Fernandina Beach, but said he abandoned the business when t he economy soured. Plus, no one wanted to r ide 45 minutes to St. Marys, then another 45 minutes to C umberland and back again j ust to spend a few hours on t he island, said McCarthy. I f the ferry contract to Cumberland becomes availa ble to him, he said he would be willing to make significant financial investment in new boats. He estimates that two boats would costb etween $300,000 to $500,000, and he believes the business is there to justify that cost. McCarthy said he took between 35,000 and 40,000 passengers on boat rides last year, and all they can do right now is look and wave at C umberland. He sells tickets to day and evening tours of the Amelia River and coastline online, by phone and from a small kiosk near the water at Centre and Front streets. And the question I get all day, every day is, Were t hinking of going to Cumberland Island, can you take us? said McCarthy. And every day I turn them away. Its frustrating. According to Bill Reynolds, public information officer at the National Park Services regional office in A tlanta, the gross receipts for the Cumberland Island ferry concession were $831,890 in fiscal 2013. The park service takes 10 percent. In order to expand ferry service to Fernandina, and make it profitable for the c oncessionaires, the current limit on visitors to Cumberland might have to be lifted. Georgia and St. Marys officials have lobbied for that for years, and they a re likely to get support f rom Florida officials if it meant more commercial business here. Beyond the passenger receipts for ferry service, visitors using a Fer nandina ferry would likely spendm oney locally for lodging, m eals and sundries, espe c ially downtown. mmaguire@fbnewsleader.com Edgar Aguilar said, I want to have a better com munication with people and improve my quality of life. He enjoys r eading, work i ng on the computer and talk i ng to his teachers. That has helped me a lot, he said. Classes are offered by Nassau Adult Education and are held Monday and Wednesdays from 5:30-8 p.m. a t the Team Center behind t he Nassau County School Board at 1201 Atlantic Ave. Yulee classes are held 5:30-8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at Y ulee Element ar y, 86063 Felmor Road. S tudents who have transp ortation may register for classes at one location and take classes at both sites. For information on the English Language Learners program call 548-1750. t ype@f bne wsleader.com PARK Continued from 1A BIKE Continued from 1A FERRY Continued from 1A ENGLISH Continued from 1A APublic Service Announcement by The News-LeaderDONT LITTERSPAY~NEUTER Hit, run fatality in Hilliard K ATHIE COLGROVE Community Newspapers A Glen St. Mary woman died in Hilliard Sunday night after a hit and run accident. Brittany Lynn Hoatlin, 26, d ied from injuries she suffered after she was struck by an u nidentified driver of an orange and white tractor-trailer. The accident happened just after 8:30 p.m. near Kellys RV Park on U.S. 1 South, according to a Florida Highway Patrol media release. H oatlin was a passenger in a crash that had just occurred. S he exited the disabled vehicle and was standing in the roadway near the center line in the outside travel lane as an orange and white tractor-trailer was heading southbound in the same lane, police said. T he driver of the tractortrailer swerved to avoid the c rashed vehicle, striking Hoatlin as she stood next to the disabled vehicle. Eyewitnesses told police t hat the truck stopped several h undr ed feet south of the accid ent. The driver exited the truck, walking toward the crashed vehicle and Hoatlin. Witnesses said that as they walked toward the area to assist, the driver got back into his truck and left the scene, p olice said. H oatlin was standing in the r oadway illegally, and the roadway was dark as she appeared to check for damage to the vehicles front end, police said. The investigation is ongoing to deter mine who was drivi ng the tractor-trailer. Anyone w ith infor mation about the acci d ent or the driver should con tact the FHP at (904 S S P P R R I I N N G G C C L L E E A A N N I I N N G G ? ? S S e e l l l l t t h h o o s s e e u u n n w w a a n n t t e e d d i i t t e e m m s s i i n n t t h h e e c c l l a a s s s s i i f f i i e e d d s s . 2 2 6 6 1 1 3 3 6 6 9 9 6 6 Thefoodpantryneeds donations ofnon-perishable food items all year round. For more information, call:261-70001303 Jasmine Street, Suite 101 Fernandina Beach,FL Connecting People, Help & Hope

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P ediatric Smiles offers comprehensive dental careforchildren, infants, adolescents and individuals with special needs. We strive to provide the best dental care available to your child. e enjoy seeing our patients arrive and depart with smiles on their faces said office manager Allison Patterson. T he cheerful, colorful atmosphere of the state of the art dental facility is appealing to children of all ages. Dr. Staci Suggs and Dr. Tanya Wall N unnare board certified with specialties in pediatrics. Dr.Jila Majahan is an associate with the practice, and has worked as a pedodontist several years in the Jacksonville area. In business since 2004, the practice includes certified dental assistants and front desk staff who areveryexperienced with years in the field. Pediatric Smiles is contracted with most dental insurance companies. The northside office is located at 2255 Dunn Avenue, Bldg. 700 in Jacksonville, a second practice is at 1651 Southside Connector Boulevard in the southside of Jacksonville. Business hours are Monday-Friday 8am-5pm. Phone (904 Dunn Avenue or (904 Visit www.pediatricsmiles.com or Facebook for more information.Pediatric Smiles M ARY MAGUIRE News-Leader Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper has announced a December groundbreaking for a new and long-planned administration building, but county officials still have not decided whether to pay the estimated $10 million cost with cash or a bank loan. T he county has set aside the money, but Commissioner Danny Leeper, who is also t he sheriffs brother, is pushing for a bank loan. e should not be depleting the countys reserves, said Leeper at a board meeting this month. Much like financing the courthouse and jail in Mr. Crawfords day County Clerk of Court John Crawford, w ho prefers a cash deal to avoid financing costs or using the funds to cover other oblig ations, took issue with Leepers comments. I cant help but correct you, I wasnt in office when that financing took place, said Crawford, referring to Chip Oxley, who was clerk at the time. Please dont say I financed that. But Leeper would not back down. The minutes speak for themselves, said L eeper, apparently referring to Crawfords tenure as a county commissioner. The two elected officials stopped their debate when Commission Chair Barry Holloway asked for decorum. T he discussion came after a presentation on the countys finances by an indep endent auditor. Ron Whitesides of Purvis, Gray & Co. in G ainesville assessed the countys finances as of Sept. 30, 2013, saying that the county is in good financial condition. But he noted a significant decline in revenues, saying there was a $7.3 million drop from 2012 to 2 013. You have big projects on the horizon a nd youre going to have to look at how youll pay going forward, said Whitesides. W hitesides also noted that the county spends $6 million annually on roadway maintenance, but says it may not be enough. You all have deferred capital maintenance on your infrastructure, but obviousl y thats a bill that needs to be paid, he said. mmaguire@fbnewsleader.com 4A F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 NEWS News-Leader CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK Moving ever closer to new sheriffs building MARY MAGUIRE/NEWS-LEADER Heavy rain creates large puddles last week around the parking lot at the Nassau County S heriffs Office in Yulee. 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The business world and t he animal kingdom have a lot in common. Healthy, aware, smart, agile ones survive. The analogy can move to the fact that lions eat antelopes a nd big fish feed on little fish. The United States franchisedn ew car dealer count is in the neighborhood of 17,750, d own from 30,000 not to many decades ago. Manufacturers have decided fewer and bigger works best for them. Witness N assau County with no import representation and lit-t le prospect for that to change. As long as imports p enetrate the market, they see that as the relevant goal. I will say, as of late, the big imports have seen their sales numbers soften quite a bit h ere. The exception is highlines, which have beens trong. Getting back to the declining dealership numb ers, few if any see a net gain in new car dealerships. M y motivation this week w as spurred by the Top 125 Dealership Groups In The United States, which appears in the March 17 Automotive News. The article relates that acquisition is under way and they are gaining in numbers o f franchises. They listed no t otals for all 125, and not w anting to add that many, I focused on the top 10. Collectively, these 10 dealer groups sold 1,278,455 new units, or about 8.2 percent of the total market. These 10 groups own 1,184 franchises. The biggest one, AutoNation,h as 228 dealerships, selling 2 92,922 new vehicles last y ear So, what is the relevance? First, let me say I have no bone to pick with dealer groups. I am actually affiliated with our family group, based in Charlotte. What I want tos hare with local consumers is t he landscape is changing. T hese big groups are highly sophisticated and very aggressive. T hey pay a lot of money for dealerships and have to prod uce to make itw ork. A public company c hasing quarterly results for shareholders is a different a nimal than a privately held company. The operators oft hese dealerships dont own them and are there to get a j ob done. What concerns me is where the industry may be 10 years from now. Will owner/operators be all but e xtinct? I hope not. In looking for a U.S. franchise number, Il anded on Wikipedia. They went into incredible detail of t he pitfalls and motives of auto dealers. It was nothing c lose to objective. Knowing t hat there are many well-operated, customer-driven dealerships in existence, I am always troubled by blanket perspectives. Just like attorneys dont like attorney jokes. There will almost certainly be more consolidation among d ealerships, with public and private groups buying standalone dealerships and smaller dealer groups. The big players have even gone global and a re buying dealerships abroad. M y hope is that in some ways this consolidation can h ave some residual benefits. Can our industry fine-tune our processes and be more responsive to the consumer, even as the control of the f ranchises rests in fewer hands? In the end, the cus-t omer is the boss and can have the most effect. A merican consumers are the worlds most savvy and that will have more to do with dealerships in the future than anything. I n the meantime, you have three owner-operated locald ealers, who as far as I know plan to stay that way. Spring h as sprung (kind of will appreciate your business. H ave a good week. R ick Keffer owns and operates Rick Keffer Dodge Chr y sler Jeep in Yulee. He invites questions or positive stories about automobile use and ownership. rwkcar@aol.com MARY MAGUIRE News-Leader T he Nassau County Farm Bureau helps feed a need. The organization contributed $500 to a recent shopping trip at Winn-Dixie in Yulee to pick up supplies, including milk and meat, to help stock the pantry at Journey Church. The church provides help t o some 400 families through its twice-weekly free food dist ribution. Winn-Dixie supported the program with a $150 cash donation. Some families have to choose between medicine or food and fortunately we can service the food need for t hem, said Adam Salzburg, a member of the Yulee-based c hurch and a lieutenant with Nassau County Fire Rescue based at Station 20 on the south end of Amelia Island. Until recently, we were helping 40 families, so then eed is up a lot. Last year, Journey Church distributed almost $2 million worth of food to people in need. The distribution is offere d T uesdays and Thursdays a s well as every third Saturday f rom 10 a.m. to noon within t he Victorias Place Shopping C enter at 3431 East SR 200 in Yulee. The chur c h receives donations from supermarkets throughout the area, including W inn-Dixie, Publix, Harris Teeter, Walmart and SamsC lub. This is part of the Farmers Feeding Families effort and its our way of participating in, and giving back, to the community, said local Farm Bureau board member and County Commissioner W alter Jr . Boatright. mmaguire@fbnewsleader.com CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK 5A F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 NEWS News-Leader j j o o h h n n @ @ S S e e a a H H o o r r s s e e o o f f A A m m e e l l i i a a . c c o o m m w w w w w w . S S e e a a H H o o r r s s e e o o f f A A m m e e l l i i a a . c c o o m m COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT LEASING SALES 608 S. 8th Street Fernandina Beach, Fl 32034 www.ACRFL.com(904Phil GriffinBrokerphil@acrfl.com(904 Paul Barnes, GRIResidential Sales DirectorCell 904-753-0256464.barnes@gmail.com 608 S. 8th Street Fernandina Beach, FL32034 www.acrfl.comwww.ameliaforsale.com Exceeding Expectations P P R R O O P P E E R R T T Y Y P P R R O O P P E E R R T T Y Yo f t h e W e e kForest Ridge2704 $149,900 2734 $149,500Best Value in Forest RidgeChoose one of these totally r emodeled condos for 2nd home or r ental income. All new interior SS appliances, granite counter tops, no popcorn ceilings and all new fixtur es. Pool, tennis and walk to the beach. Compare the value! (904COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT LEASING SALES 608 S. 8th Street Fernandina Beach, Fl 32034www.ACRFL.comPhil GriffinBrokerphil@acrfl.com Book Sale!Friends of the LibraryApril 3-5Thursday, 5-7 pmMembers only. Non-members may join at the door.Friday, 9:30am 6pm Saturday, 9:30am 2pmP ECK CENTER GYM518 S. 10th St. Fernandina Beach P roceeds benefit our Library At the Historic Callahan Depot Friday 1pm-8pmSaturday 10am-8pm DepotAnnex Opening Friday 1pm Food & Craft Vendors Railroad & Forestry Exhibits Antique Engines NCR Essay Contest Kids AreaHobo Day, Friday 2pm-4pm Hobo Games for KidsShriners Led RR Days Parade Saturday, March 29th, 11 am Cochranes Collision Center Classic Car Show For info: 904-879-3406 callahanrrday@aol.comwww.wnhsfl.org Farm Bureau helps to feed a real need Auto dealer groups are strengthening KEFFER CORNER RickKeffer MARY MAGUIRE/NEWS-LEADER M embers of the Nassau County Farm Bureau and J ourney Church shop at Winn-Dixie in Yulee for the c hurchs pantry that feeds some 400 local families each week. From back left are Journey Church volunteer Adam Salzburg, Farm Bureau board member and County Commissioner W alter Jr . Boatright, Farm Bureau insurance rep Amanda Pokines, Journey Church volunteer Brad Pease, Farm Bureau insurance manager Jar ed Satter white and agency colleague Kirby K itler. Keep spring debris burn from turning into a wildfire S pring Break is here and y ar d work may be on your schedule. This is a good time to get outside and clean up those pine needles, leaves and sticks that have been falling all win ter T o protect your property from wildfires, all vegetative d ebris should be r emoved and d isposed of safely There are s everal options for yar d debris disposal including composting and hauling it off to the landfill, or placing it on the curb for pickup, where applicable. Burning of yard debris is a lso an option if you live in a c ounty wher e it is permitted. The burning of yard debris in never allowed in Duval County. Debris burning is allowed in the unincorporated areas of Clay County including Keystone Heights. Burning is also allowed in Nassau, Baker Putnam and St Johns counties, as long as all of the required setbacks are met. Annaleasa Winter, wildfire mitigation specialist with the Florida For est Ser vice explained, Most spring wildfires in North Florida are caused by escaped debris bur ns. Already in 2014, debris burning has caused 91 wildfires that burned 337 acres statewide. Winter said, We are just coming into the more active part of our wildfir e season and many more fires can be expected, if we dont follow safe burning practices. Keep your good fire from turning into a bad fire by practicing these safe outdoor burning tips: Burn only clean, dry vegetative debris including grass c lippings, brush, leaves, tree l imbs, palm fr o nds, etc., no household paper or garbage. Burn after 9 a.m. and extinguish one hour befor e sun set. Never leave a fir e unat tended, and make sure it is out b efor e you leave. Keep a shovel and water h ose handy Dont burn on windy days or when the relative humidity is below 35%. Your fire must be contained to an 8-foot diameter pile o r non-combustible barrel and m ust be at least 25 feet fr om forests, 25 feet from your house, 50 feet from a paved public road and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. Clear the area around your pile to bare mineral soil. Smoke fr om debris bur n ing must not cause a hazard or a nuisance to neighbors or roadways. If your fire escapes, you may be held liable for suppression costs and damage to the property of others. Burning yard waste does not r equir e an authorization from the Florida Forest Service, but you should check with your local city, county or Florida Forest Service officials to see if there are any restrictions in your ar ea. For more information on outdoor burning, call the local Florida For est Ser vice Office. The Jacksonville District, including Nassau, Duval and Clay, can be reached at (904 266-5002. Visit www.floridaforest service.com for more information. NEWS-LEADER PUBLIC SERVICE MESSGEPost office warns businesses not to use mailboxes forfreeThe post office has notified a couple of dozen local businesses that they could be in violation of federal law by using mailboxes for advertising without paying postage. Federal law states, Whoever knowingly and willfully deposits any mailable matter such as statements of accounts, circulars, sale bills, or otherlike matter,on which no postage has been paid, in any letter box established, approved, or accepted bythe Postal Service for the receipt or delivery of mail matter on any mail route with the intent to avoid payment of lawful postage thereon, shall for each offence be fined underthis title. Postal inspectors say itsaviolation of federal law to intentionally circumvent paying postage in order to realize personal gain. The certified letters sent to violators from the Fernandina Beach post office note the fine could be in excess of $5,000. The post office charges mail advertisers $200 for an application fee, $200 for a permit fee and 27 cents per piece of mail delivered. Fernandina Beach has 17,052 possible deliveries including post office boxes and mailboxes. The certified letter was sent to several local restaurants, lawn care and pest control services and other businesses that were suspected of putting advertising circulars in mailboxes without paying postage for them. NEWS-LEADER PUBLIC SERVICE MESSGE S S P P R R I I N N G G C C L L E E A A N N I I N N G G ? ? S S e e l l l l t t h h o o s s e e u u n n w w a a n n t t e e d d i i t t e e m m s s i i n n t t h h e e c c l l a a s s s s i i f f i i e e d d s s . 2 2 6 6 1 1 3 3 6 6 9 9 6 6

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COMMUNITYCYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK FRIDAY, MARCH28, 2014/NEWS-LEADER6AT urn grief into a grin; bring good tidingsLet us go with the Word, not merely to observe, because we are on assignment to turn grief into a grin because of the glad tidings we bring. There may be times when hospital visits need to be discouraged. So many people go to see the shape the patient is in and want them to rehash what caused them to be there. Such people seldom, if ever, come with the truth that will make them free. Bless God; if we show up at a hospital to visit, the whole unit should know we are there to speak life-giving words over them. Who cares why they are there? The object is to get them out and back in their Holy Ghost saddle. It is not the quantity of time we visit with them that matters it's the quality of what we say once we appear. People don't just need to see our face; they need us to change their circumstances. That only occurs when they see Jesus' face in our face and hear His words in the words we speak. While they are under attack, instead of repeating countless times what happened to them, let's challenge us to tell those well-meaning visitors, "Glory to God: We're here because we are righteous and godly. We are here so God can work this affliction and condition for our good. It is only for the moment and will be over soon." Not only will we startle those visitors but we will utterly confuse the devil. We don't need anyone to mourn with us, and the way we can comfort anyone is with God's Word and presence in the middle of our talking about Him, His goodness and His endless mercy. We are not sent merely to observe someone in grief. We are on assignment to turn grief into a grin. Go ahead, make an appointment to visit; but through His word, take His life-giving spirit with you. Otherwise, don't go. Birthday wishes to Joshua Jones, Seatreya McLaurin, Alexander Way, Willie Pollard, William Holmes Jr., Miriam T raeye, Adrian Moxie, Sidney James, Alisha Brown and Aldo Brown Jr. NOW AND THENM aybelle Ki rkland MILITARY NEWS John P. Megna of Fernandina Beach has attained 60 years of continuous membership with Alonzo Cudworth Post #23, Milwaukee, Wis., of The American Legion, Department of Wisconsin. The American Legion continues to be one of the largest organizations for veterans' benefits and services in the world. Ron Anderson BUICK GMC CHEVROLET464054 SR 200, Yulee(904) 261-6821Classic Carpets & Interiors, Inc. Abby Carpet¨BUDDYKELLUMPresident802 S. 8th Street Fernandina Beach, FL32034(904) 261-0242 Fax (904) 261-0291F AMILYDENTISTRYFOR ADULTS & CHILDRENMost Insurances Accepted Call For Appointment2 2 6 6 1 1 6 6 8 8 2 2 6 6 Dr. Robert FriedmanA1Aat Bailey Rd. FREEMANWELLDRILLERS, INC. 261-5216Rock & Artesian Wells Pump Installations & Repair 606 S. 6th Street Fernandina Beach, FL32034 904-261-6956542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FLS teve Johnson Automotive 1505 S 14thStr eet Fe r nandina Beach,FL 904-277-9719Proudly Supporting Our Community W W e e l l c c o o m m e e t t o o G G o o d d ' s s H H o o u u s s e e Then Peter came up and said to him, "Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?" Jesus said to him, "Id o notsaytoyou seven times, but seventy times seven"R.S.V.Matthew 18:21-22 If someone from our past has done something to us which really cause us pain, there is a good chance that we may still feel some bitterness toward that person. Whether it was a painful ending to a relationship, some particularly harsh or humiliating words. Or someone taking from us something that was rightfully ours, in these situations it is perfectly natural to feel bitterness. However the dilemma is that this bitterness hurts us, sapping us of energy and trapping us in anger and resentment. Although peculiar, we seemingly r elish this bitterness, going back to it again and again in our minds, refusing to forgive or forget, in much the same way as we repeatedly probe a cut on the inside of our mouth with our tongue: it hurts, and yet we aredrawn to probe this sensitive area again and again. There may be some wisdom in remembering the words and actions of those who have harmed us so as to avoid similar future situation which would allow them to harm us again. And yet, we really must forgive them or we well forever be engulfed in bitterness. Simply stated the more people there arewhom we cannot forgive, the moreour life will be awash in bitterness. And the greater our capacity for forgivness. And the greater our capacity for forgiveness, the more love and joy that will fill our fie. So, forgive always, even if you cannot forget. Don't Be Bitter BIRTH Casey and Ashley Hendry of Yulee announce the birth of their daughter, Atleigh Nicole Hendry, born on Dec. 28, 2013, at Baptist Medical Center in Jacksonville. The baby weighed 8 pounds and measured 21 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Henry and Debbie Malone of Y ulee. The baby's paternal grandparents are Ann Smith of Ocala, Milton and Beth Hendry of Crystal River and Mark and Terri Purvis of Callahan. Relay for Life scheduled for April 5-6The American Cancer Society has issued a call for survivors to participate in the annual Relay for Life on April 5 at Yulee High School. Survivors will be presented with a special T-shirt and participate in a special ceremony to commemorate their journey and thank their caregivers. Following the opening ceremonies and survivors lap at noon, survivors and their caregivers are invited to a complimentary Survivors Luncheon. To participate, contact Relay for Life Specialist Melanie Oberkrom at American Cancer Society at 1430 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32207. Call (904) 4029053 or visit www.relayforlife.org/fernandinabeachFL. Organizers also are taking applications for the Relay for Life luminaria ceremony, which will take place April 5 at dusk at the track at Yulee High School. When the sun goes down, hope will shine brightly during the luminaria ceremony symbolizing the hope and perseverance with which all continue to fight. The suggested donation is $5 for luminaria in memory of those who have lost their fight or those who continue to battle. Mail checks with a 10word maximum message to Relay for Life of Fernandina Beach/Yulee, 1430 Prudential Dr., Jacksonville, FL 32207 or order online at r elayforlife.org/fernandinabeachfl.Relay for Life seeks honorees A Flamenco dancer performs at a previous Relay for Life. The 2014 Relay for Life, set for April 5-6 at Yulee High School, will feature a host of bands and other entertainment. JUDIE MACKIEF or the News-LeaderThe American Cancer Society, the nation's leading voluntary health organization, is holding Relay for Life of Fernandina Beach/Yulee, around the track that surr ounds the football field at Y ulee High School, on April 56. Thirteen teams and more than 50 participants have already raised nearly $15,000. For 18 hours these teams from local business, schools, churches, civic organizations and families will participate in a night under the stars while team members take turns walking or running on the track. Walking around a track is meant to symbolize that there is no finish line until we find a cure for cancer. The overnight walk is meant to reflect a cancer patient's journey through the disease; Ending with a new sense of hope as the sun rises in the morning. There will be entertainment, food, games and fun. This event is open to the public and admission is free. "I encourage everyone to join us Saturday at noon for opening ceremonies, and to cheer on cancer survivors during the Survivor's Lap," said Entertainment Coordinator Erica Kittrell. "Then, the Survivors Luncheon is at 1 p.m. We look forward to paying tribute to the tremendous personal journey that cancer survivors have been on. Every survivor is invited, whether they were diagnosed yesterday or 30 years ago." Survivors, please contact Melanie Oberkrom at (904) 391-3643, or melanie.oberkrom@cancer.or g; or just show up on the day of the event. Te ams' sites will be judged on this year's theme, "Cancer T akes a Holiday" so expect a Fall Festival, pictures with the Easter Bunny, a Resort V acation Team, and the Fernandina Pirates Club have chosen "Talk Like a Pirate Day" as their holiday. Each team's decorated float will take a lap around the track at 3 p.m., compete in a team Tug of War at 5:30 p.m. and participate in other games throughout the event. Y ou will be able to help Relay continue to raise money for the American Cancer Society by purchasing raffle tickets for great prizes like a Ritz-Carlton gift card or an overnight stay at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort. There will be pictures available with the Easter Bunny, food, games and a plethora of themed laps so even if you are not on a team, you can still join in the fun, or perhaps be crowned Miss Relay for Life 2014! Bring your best Elvis impersonation or wear feathered boas for the Viva Las V egas Lap, or share an oversized shirt with your best friend or dress like twins for the Buddy Lap. Show off your flexibility with the Limbo Lap, or maybe you will be the winner of the Scavenger Hunt that begins at 1:30 p.m. Flamenco Dancers will entertain you at 2:30 p.m., and live music takes the stage at 3:15 p.m. with Cumberland Sound. Bean School of Dance will perform at 5:45, then put on a tutu and join them as they lead a Tutu Lap around the track. Students of Paks Karate will put on a demonstration and then learn the Purple Glove Dance before the talented Jennifer Burns performs at 8 p.m. One of the highlights of the event is the Luminaria Ceremony, which begins at 9 p.m. "We invite all local cancer survivors, family and friends to attend." During the event, people may purchase a luminaria in memory, or in honor, of someone who has been touched by cancer. The luminaria bags are placed around the track and lit during an emotional memorial program, followed by a Lap of Remembrance. After the ceremony, this Celebration of Life continues with a Glow Lap as the lights of the stadium are turned back on, and Bruce Beville and the Laid Back Band will play your favorite music during themed decade laps (bring your costumes) of the 50s, 60, 70s and 80s as the event closes in on midnight with a group routine to Thriller. At midnight enjoy a New Cure's Eve Party where the entertainment and activities just keep coming. Overnight activities include a Zumbathon, a Western Lap, a Frozen T-shirt contest, a Toga Lap, a Rooster Crow Contest, line dancing, a Pajama Lap and more, including Gabriel Arnold who will play the saxophone and croon for you til dawn. No matter why you take part in Relay, one thing is clear: with every step you take, you are helping the American Cancer Society save lives. With your help, they aren't just fighting one type of cancer, they are fighting for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. Each person who shares the Relay experience can take pride in knowing that they are working to create a world where this disease will no longer threaten the lives of loved ones or claim another year of anyone's life. Having cancer is hard, finding help shouldn't be. Call (800) 227-2345, anytime day or night, or visit cancer.org. For the complete entertainment schedule, "like" them on Facebook at www. facebook.com/pages/Relayfor-Life-Fernandina-Beach Y ulee. To make a donation or create a team, visit Relayfor Life.org/fernandinabeachfl.RELAY FOR LIFEJUDIE MACKIE/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER SUBMITTED

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T T e e a a c c h h t t h h e e c c h h i i l l d d r r e e n n In response to the March 21 lett er about toy guns in the store at eye level of children and they were scary. I also happen to note the key words of Saturday night special and assault rifles that are commonly used by anti-gunners. T here will always be two sides of t he fence on the issue of gun own e rship and gun control (confiscation.) I do find it interesting though that as Florida issues more concealed weapon permits the crime rate continues to fall drastically. Georgia also is expanding the rights of their citizens to carry lawful w eapons into more areas and the c rime rate there also continues to d ip down to levels not seen in years. I say all this to lead to this point: What if instead of trying to hide the child from toy guns we teach them how to handle them safely? We could also raise them with morals and values teaching them to be good, law-abiding citizens that wouldn ot misuse firearms but use them l awfully if they choose to own them. L et s not let that oppor t unity be taken away from our children to benefit from our constitutional right to own firearms that we have as a nation enjoyed for centuries. Also, if someone would be so kind as to tell me the name of the stor e that has t hese scary toy guns, I will patroni ze the stor e r egularly R ick W a lker Y ulee S S m m a a r r t t m m e e t t e e r r s s I am disappointed that Florida Power & Light has decided to helpp ut the yoke of Big Brother on all of o ur necks by installing smar t m eters. Utility companies say smar t meters ar e safe and no more harmful than cell phones. But the W orld Health Organization (WHO fies wireless radiation as a 2B carcinogen based on studies that link cell phone use to brain tumors.T here are some cities and entire s tates (Connecticut r efused to allow these meters installed. What is the signal strength of these smart meters and where are the towers located to process or transmit their data? How many towers will be required? How much additional radiation ar e we pumping into the atmosphere? W e should all be alarmed by this action from the power company, and it is part of a nationwide push to get all consumers on the smart grid. This is part of Obamas 2009 stimulus plan. I r efuse to have one installed on my home and I urge all of you to do your own r esearch Google smar t meters side ef fects and lear n all about why these meters ar e dangerous to your health. Sherry Harrell N assau County B B e e a a c c h h i i s s t t h h e e g g e e m m The waterfront doesnt need a water fr ont park (facelift the downtown need to lose parking and time it takes for it to be built. We ar e not St. Mar ys, Ga., that needs a r iverfront park because people are waiting for a boat to go to Cumberland Island to get to the beach. What we need to do is take the gem we have in the jewel box and shine it up (Main Beachou have the parking, you have the beach that is why people come to Fer nandina Beach, for the ocean, not for downtown but to go to the beach. Later in the day the people go downtown to the shops and r estau rants and explore the downtown and walk to the marina for a sunset. Put our money wher e it will work for the whole city not just downtown, wher e you cant find a parking spot as it is. You all dont need to take parking from the marina that needs the parking spots we have and is not enough as it is. Parking lot C has a lot of room for a small park, you can look to the west and see the shrimp boats and a nice sunset or south and see Rayonier or look nor th see RockTenn all in 30 minutes, but youg ive them the beach and they will stay for a week. Thats how we the city can make mor e for the entir e island, not just downtown Allen Mills Fer nandina Beach L L o o c c a a l l c c h h u u r r c c h h n n e e e e d d s s h h e e l l p p O n Saturday evening, we enjoyed a delicious family-style dinner at what used to be the historic Baptist church downtown, featuring an array of South American specialties, from Mexico, San Salvador, Guatemala, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Ur u guay and other Hispanic countries. This was a monthly commu nity fundraiser, open to the public, at a $7 price per meal, with hopes that patrons might be even more generous towar d their cause. Currently renting the facility, Pastor Carlos and his worshipers ar e hoping to eventually buy this beautiful almost 100-year-old facility fr om First Baptist Church, and have been working for years to raise enough funds to make a down payment. He holds two services each Sunday one in the mor ning in English with Spanish translation, and another in the evening in Spanish with English translation. Because many Hispanics her e ar e employed in the r esort business and need to work on Sunday, the churcha lso holds a number of Bible studies throughout the week. The dr e am is La T i erra Prometida Hispanic Ministry, The Promised Land, a church for the Spanish-speaking people of Fer nandina and Nassau County and it needs the help of our community. This is an appeal to believers ofe stablished local churches to rally the support of their congregations towar d this dream. Many local churches are involved in church plantings outside the U.S. Here is one in our own backyard to which we should give a helping hand. The need is hear t felt. Many workers are her e alone while they support families back home. La Tierra Prometida r eaches out to them in Christian love in a setting which is comfortable to them to assist with pass ports, immigration, taxes, banking and of course their religious needs. For mor e infor mation, Pastor Carlos Serrano is available at 416 Alachua St., Fer nandina, or at (904 349-2595. The next community dinner is on Saturday, April 26. You will enjoy the Christian fellowship and the food! Ed and Mariann Weihenmayer Amelia island VOICE OF THE PEOPLE Are people really cheese and whining about too many stop signs along the bike pathway? Just when I think people cant get more ridiculous, something like this emerges and proves me wrong. F irst of all, I just want to scream: Get over it! N ext, I want to say, (like when people want to censor things like nudity on TV or dont like the political overtone of a newscast), just change the channel or dont watch it. In this case, just ignore the signs. Go ahead and ride right through them, dont read them, think about something else, like what a g reat thing it is that we have such a beautiful island and have a great bike trail to ride, allowi ng people to better appreciate the island. But for the Love of Pete (and there are several Petes that I love, by the way), quit your whining and stop being so righteously indignant. The signs arent there to annoy you personally, and they arent there to insult your intelligence. For Petes sake, its not just about Y OU. You see, Mister or Mizz Whinealot, there are actually other people who use that path, some who might be first-time visitors, s ome with small children, some who are old, some w ho have vision or hearing impairments, people who in general may not realize that there is a road, with CARS ahead, until its too late. Thats why there are stop signs! And I am s orry there are so many roads that intersect the bike p ath, but you know what, thats life. Other people live on those roads or work on them, and sometimes they might get complacent or distracted and approach the intersection with a bit of peril. And then guess what, its called an accid ent. It seems to me that with the island and county population growing in leaps and bounds, that we should be focusing our attention on the impacts of this growth, instead of telling people not to cooperate with the expans ion of a bike path. Its absurd that we should advocate against something that separates b ikes and pedestrians from vehicles, simply because people are annoyed with safety signage. And from an economic development perspective, such bike paths, especially with safety signage, actually serve to entice visitors, especially those with young children, to our s upposedly family-friendly and family-safe vacation destination. S o I suggest this to the cheese and Whiners, why not refocus in something more important, like: should the ban on Pete Rose be lifted by MLB, and should he be enshrined in the Hall of Fame. I mean, for the love of Pete, now thats an important thing to ponder! cclangshaw@gmail.com CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK 7A F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 OPINION News-Leader Oh, for goodness sake! Really? STEVE SACK/THE MINNEAPOLIS ST AR TRIBUNE F LORIDA S O LDEST W EEKLY N EWSPAPER E STABLISHEDIN 1854 The News-Leader is published with pride weekly for the people of Nassau County by Community Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe that strong newspapers build strong communities Newspapers get things done! Our primary goal is to publish distinguished and profitable community-oriented newspapers. This mission will be accomplished through the teamwork of professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, quality and hard work. F OY R. M ALOY J R ., P UBLISHER M ICHAEL P ARNELL E DITOR M IKE H ANKINS A DVERTISING D IRECTOR R OBERT F IEGE P RODUCTION D IRECTOR B OB T IMPE C IRCULATION D IRECTOR A NGELINE M UDD B USINESS O FFICE M ANAGER S I P E RRY A S SISTANT E D ITOR B ETH J ONES S PORTS E DITOR D INK N E S MITH P RESIDENT T OM W OOD C HAIRMAN T T h h e e v v i i e e w w s s e e x x p p r r e e s s s s e e d d b b y y t t h h e e c c o o l l u u m m n n i i s s t t s s a a n n d d l l e e t t t t e e r r w w r r i i t t e e r r s s o o n n t t h h i i s s p p a a g g e e a a r r e e t t h h e e i i r r o o w w n n a a n n d d d d o o n n o o t t n n e e c c e e s s s s a a r r i i l l y y r r e e f f l l e e c c t t t t h h e e v v i i e e w w s s o o f f t t h h e e n n e e w w s s p p a a p p e e r r , i i t t s s o o w w n n e e r r s s o o r r e e m m p p l l o o y y e e e e s s . COMMUNITY THANKS D D a a y y D D r r o o p p I I n n T he Newcomers Club of Amelia Island held its annual Give A Heart luncheon and raf f le on Feb. 27. Thanks to the generous support of our members and so many local businesses we raised nearly $3,000 for the Coalition for the Homeless Day Dr op-In Center. T he Day Drop-In Center provides a safe, c ompassionate and supportive environment for people who are experiencing homelessness, or at risk of homelessness. Some of the ser vices offered include: Respite from the heat and cold A hot shower and laundry services Snacks and beverages A mailing addr ess and phone number t o use on job applications Assistance applying for benefits Referrals to other agencies We wish to thank, again, our generous donors: A Taste of Wine by Steve, Amelia Musical Playhouse, Amelia River Cruises, Bacon s Select Pr oduce, Bar Zin Restaurant, B axter s Restaurant, Catty Shack Ranch and W ildlife sanctuary, Cottonways, Cross C r e ek Honey Co., Rose Didion, Don Patr on Restaurant, Fernandinas Fantastic Fudge, Four Seasons Bistro, Go Fish, Gourmet Gourmet, Harlows All Natural Products, Horizons Restaurant, Wayne Howard, Island Hair Co., Juniors Seafood restaurant, La Mancha, Lanna Thai, Magna s Salon, Miss Carolyns, Natural Wave Soap, Passion 4 P ooches, Patchington, Peppers Restaurant, S alty Pelican Restaurant, Sliders Restaurant, The Sur f Restaurant, The Branding Ir o n Restaurant, Taylors Treats, Twisted Sisters, Y Y oga. Jose Gar cia SERVING YOU City of Fernandina Beach Commissioners: Mayor: Ed Boner : 556-7554 (cell email: eboner@fbfl.org V ice Mayor: Sarah Pelican : 432-8644 (cell email: spelican@fbfl.org Charlie Corbett : 583-1767 (cell email: ccorbett@fbfl.org Pat Gass : 277-7987 (home email: pgass@fbfl.org Johnny Miller : 556-3299 (cell email: jmiller@fbfl.org OPINIONS F ROM THE GOLDFISH Coleman Langshaw Hail Mary for bills at legislative session E veryone is familiar with the long pass in the closing seconds of a football game when the quarterback throws a Hail Mary. In many ways, the third week of legislative session had a similar flavor. Although session encompasses 60 days, bills are considered dead if they have not been heard in at least one subcommittee by day 25. For many members, week three was a time to make one final effort to have bills heard in the upcoming week. I was no different and was thankful when I was rewarded with promises from two committee chairs for bill hearings. After the pr omise fr om the committee chair, it is time to begin the amendment pr ocess. No bill is per fect and each new set of eyes that r eads a bill finds new areas that need to be addressed; hence the need to amend the original bill content. In Tallahassee, everything runs on schedule and according to the calendar. There are even deadlines to file your bill amendments. Amid the deadlines, committee meetings and office visitors, the days were filled with handling many education-r elated issues. School boar d members from all across the state filled the Capitol to meet with lawmakers. I personally met with members from Brevard, Palm Beach, Duval and Seminole counties. Our Nassau County Property Appraiser Mike Hickox invested the time to make his voice hear d, as did about 50 r ealtors fr om Duval, Nassau and Clay counties. It was standing r oom only in the bor rowed conference room as they shared their legislative priorities. On W ednesday, I broke from my calendar activities to attend the memo rial service for former Gov. Reuben Askew Although meetings had to be r escheduled, I felt it was important to show respect for Floridas 37th governor. It was a beautiful well-attended memorial and I was glad that I was able to be ther e. House members spent several hours in session this week hearing six bills. One of those bills, HB 89, deals with threatened use of force. A person charged with a criminal offense in which force was used may argue at trial that he or she did so in self-defense. Florida Statute Chapter 776 contains a variety of provisions in which force may be used in self-defense. However the statute is silent on a person s threatened use of force. Although some cour ts have recognized that a threatened use of force equates to an actual use of force, the statutes are not clear. HB 89 amends Florida Statute 776 to specify that the justifications contained therein apply to thr eatened use of for ce, as well as actual use of force. In recent years there have been cases in which persons have been con victed of aggravated assault for threatening to use force and have been sentenced to mandatory terms of imprisonment pursuant to the 10-20-Life law. As a matter of law, firing a firearm into the air, even as a so-called warning shot, constitutes the use of deadly force. For example, 53-year old Or ville W ollar d was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after firing a war ning shot into a wall in r esponse to his daughters boyfriends aggressive behavior toward his daughter. The boyfriend had physically attacked Wollard earlier that day, and upon returning to Wollards house shoved Wollards daughter and punched a hole in the wall.W ollar d claimed self-defense but was convict ed and sentenced to 20 years pursuant to the 10-20-Life law Ther e are some who argue that the bill will result in more deaths. I disagree. I believe that individuals have a right to defend themselves and that right should include firing a warning shot to ward off a would-be attacker. It is important to note that supporting this bill does not take a position of suppor t or opposition to the pending case in Jacksonville of Marissa Alexander In T allahassee, we simply make the laws of our state. Juries and judges have the r esponsibility of weighing the facts to see if they meet the threshold of law established in statute. After much heated debate, HB 89 passed with a vote of 93-24, including mine. The bill now heads to the Senate for its vote. The final bill of the week was SB 156, dealing with Motor V ehicle and Mobile Home Taxes, Fees and Surcharges. The bill passed unanimously with bipartisan support and will result in Floridians seeing their registration costs reduced by $25.05 for heavyweight vehicles, $21.55 for medium-weight vehicles, and $18.55 for lightweight vehicles. The fee reductions become ef fective on Sept. 1 and it is esti mated to result in $309 million in tax relief for the 2014-15 year Annually the r eductions are expected to save taxpayers $395 million. A commitment has been made to cut taxes this legislative session by $500 million and this is a significant component of that commitment. Week four promises to be a busy week. I will be presenting several bills to subcommittees, back in meetings and welcoming mor e visitors to the Capitol. Throughout it all, I read my email and r espond as quickly as I can. As always, please let me hear fr om you. My email is below. janet.adkins@myfloridahouse.gov ST ATE REP. Janet Adkins HOW TO WRITE US Letters must include writer s name (printed and signature), addr ess and telephone number for verification. W riters are normally limited to one letter in a 30-day period. No poems will be published. Letters should be typed or printed. Not all letters are published. Send letters to: Letters to the Editor P .O. Box 16766, Fer nandina Beach, FL., 32035 E-mail: mparnell@fbnews leader .com. visit us on-line at fbnewsleader .com

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COMMUNITYCYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK FRIDAY, MARCH28, 2014/NEWS-LEADER8AT urn grief into a grin; bring good tidingsLet us go with the Word, not merely to observe, because we are on assignment to turn grief into a grin because of the glad tidings we bring. There may be times when hospital visits need to be discouraged. So many people go to see the shape the patient is in and want them to rehash what caused them to be there. Such people seldom, if ever, come with the truth that will make them free. Bless God; if we show up at a hospital to visit, the whole unit should know we are there to speak life-giving words over them. Who cares why they are there? The object is to get them out and back in their Holy Ghost saddle. It is not the quantity of time we visit with them that matters it's the quality of what we say once we appear. People don't just need to see our face; they need us to change their circumstances. That only occurs when they see Jesus' face in our face and hear His words in the words we speak. While they are under attack, instead of repeating countless times what happened to them, let's challenge us to tell those well-meaning visitors, "Glory to God: We're here because we are righteous and godly. We are here so God can work this affliction and condition for our good. It is only for the moment and will be over soon." Not only will we startle those visitors but we will utterly confuse the devil. We don't need anyone to mourn with us, and the way we can comfort anyone is with God's Word and presence in the middle of our talking about Him, His goodness and His endless mercy. We are not sent merely to observe someone in grief. We are on assignment to turn grief into a grin. Go ahead, make an appointment to visit; but through His word, take His life-giving spirit with you. Otherwise, don't go. Birthday wishes to Joshua Jones, Seatreya McLaurin, Alexander Way, Willie Pollard, William Holmes Jr., Miriam T raeye, Adrian Moxie, Sidney James, Alisha Brown and Aldo Brown Jr. NOW AND THENM aybelle Ki rkland MILITARY NEWS John P. Megna of Fernandina Beach has attained 60 years of continuous membership with Alonzo Cudworth Post #23, Milwaukee, Wis., of The American Legion, Department of Wisconsin. The American Legion continues to be one of the largest organizations for veterans' benefits and services in the world. Ron Anderson BUICK GMC CHEVROLET464054 SR 200, Yulee(904) 261-6821Classic Carpets & Interiors, Inc. Abby Carpet¨BUDDYKELLUMPresident802 S. 8th Street Fernandina Beach, FL32034(904) 261-0242 Fax (904) 261-0291F AMILYDENTISTRYFOR ADULTS & CHILDRENMost Insurances Accepted Call For Appointment2 2 6 6 1 1 6 6 8 8 2 2 6 6 Dr. Robert FriedmanA1Aat Bailey Rd. FREEMANWELLDRILLERS, INC. 261-5216Rock & Artesian Wells Pump Installations & Repair 606 S. 6th Street Fernandina Beach, FL32034 904-261-6956542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FLS teve Johnson Automotive 1505 S 14thStr eet Fe r nandina Beach,FL 904-277-9719Proudly Supporting Our Community W W e e l l c c o o m m e e t t o o G G o o d d ' s s H H o o u u s s e e Then Peter came up and said to him, "Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?" Jesus said to him, "Id o notsaytoyou seven times, but seventy times seven"R.S.V.Matthew 18:21-22 If someone from our past has done something to us which really cause us pain, there is a good chance that we may still feel some bitterness toward that person. Whether it was a painful ending to a relationship, some particularly harsh or humiliating words. Or someone taking from us something that was rightfully ours, in these situations it is perfectly natural to feel bitterness. However the dilemma is that this bitterness hurts us, sapping us of energy and trapping us in anger and resentment. Although peculiar, we seemingly r elish this bitterness, going back to it again and again in our minds, refusing to forgive or forget, in much the same way as we repeatedly probe a cut on the inside of our mouth with our tongue: it hurts, and yet we aredrawn to probe this sensitive area again and again. There may be some wisdom in remembering the words and actions of those who have harmed us so as to avoid similar future situation which would allow them to harm us again. And yet, we really must forgive them or we well forever be engulfed in bitterness. Simply stated the more people there arewhom we cannot forgive, the moreour life will be awash in bitterness. And the greater our capacity for forgivness. And the greater our capacity for forgiveness, the more love and joy that will fill our fie. So, forgive always, even if you cannot forget. Don't Be Bitter BIRTH Casey and Ashley Hendry of Yulee announce the birth of their daughter, Atleigh Nicole Hendry, born on Dec. 28, 2013, at Baptist Medical Center in Jacksonville. The baby weighed 8 pounds and measured 21 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Henry and Debbie Malone of Y ulee. The baby's paternal grandparents are Ann Smith of Ocala, Milton and Beth Hendry of Crystal River and Mark and Terri Purvis of Callahan. Relay for Life scheduled for April 5-6The American Cancer Society has issued a call for survivors to participate in the annual Relay for Life on April 5 at Yulee High School. Survivors will be presented with a special T-shirt and participate in a special ceremony to commemorate their journey and thank their caregivers. Following the opening ceremonies and survivors lap at noon, survivors and their caregivers are invited to a complimentary Survivors Luncheon. To participate, contact Relay for Life Specialist Melanie Oberkrom at American Cancer Society at 1430 Prudential Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32207. Call (904) 4029053 or visit www.relayforlife.org/fernandinabeachFL. Organizers also are taking applications for the Relay for Life luminaria ceremony, which will take place April 5 at dusk at the track at Yulee High School. When the sun goes down, hope will shine brightly during the luminaria ceremony symbolizing the hope and perseverance with which all continue to fight. The suggested donation is $5 for luminaria in memory of those who have lost their fight or those who continue to battle. Mail checks with a 10word maximum message to Relay for Life of Fernandina Beach/Yulee, 1430 Prudential Dr., Jacksonville, FL 32207 or order online at r elayforlife.org/fernandinabeachfl.Relay for Life seeks honorees A Flamenco dancer performs at a previous Relay for Life. The 2014 Relay for Life, set for April 5-6 at Yulee High School, will feature a host of bands and other entertainment. JUDIE MACKIEF or the News-LeaderThe American Cancer Society, the nation's leading voluntary health organization, is holding Relay for Life of Fernandina Beach/Yulee, around the track that surr ounds the football field at Y ulee High School, on April 56. Thirteen teams and more than 50 participants have already raised nearly $15,000. For 18 hours these teams from local business, schools, churches, civic organizations and families will participate in a night under the stars while team members take turns walking or running on the track. Walking around a track is meant to symbolize that there is no finish line until we find a cure for cancer. The overnight walk is meant to reflect a cancer patient's journey through the disease; Ending with a new sense of hope as the sun rises in the morning. There will be entertainment, food, games and fun. This event is open to the public and admission is free. "I encourage everyone to join us Saturday at noon for opening ceremonies, and to cheer on cancer survivors during the Survivor's Lap," said Entertainment Coordinator Erica Kittrell. "Then, the Survivors Luncheon is at 1 p.m. We look forward to paying tribute to the tremendous personal journey that cancer survivors have been on. Every survivor is invited, whether they were diagnosed yesterday or 30 years ago." Survivors, please contact Melanie Oberkrom at (904) 391-3643, or melanie.oberkrom@cancer.or g; or just show up on the day of the event. Te ams' sites will be judged on this year's theme, "Cancer T akes a Holiday" so expect a Fall Festival, pictures with the Easter Bunny, a Resort V acation Team, and the Fernandina Pirates Club have chosen "Talk Like a Pirate Day" as their holiday. Each team's decorated float will take a lap around the track at 3 p.m., compete in a team Tug of War at 5:30 p.m. and participate in other games throughout the event. Y ou will be able to help Relay continue to raise money for the American Cancer Society by purchasing raffle tickets for great prizes like a Ritz-Carlton gift card or an overnight stay at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort. There will be pictures available with the Easter Bunny, food, games and a plethora of themed laps so even if you are not on a team, you can still join in the fun, or perhaps be crowned Miss Relay for Life 2014! Bring your best Elvis impersonation or wear feathered boas for the Viva Las V egas Lap, or share an oversized shirt with your best friend or dress like twins for the Buddy Lap. Show off your flexibility with the Limbo Lap, or maybe you will be the winner of the Scavenger Hunt that begins at 1:30 p.m. Flamenco Dancers will entertain you at 2:30 p.m., and live music takes the stage at 3:15 p.m. with Cumberland Sound. Bean School of Dance will perform at 5:45, then put on a tutu and join them as they lead a Tutu Lap around the track. Students of Paks Karate will put on a demonstration and then learn the Purple Glove Dance before the talented Jennifer Burns performs at 8 p.m. One of the highlights of the event is the Luminaria Ceremony, which begins at 9 p.m. "We invite all local cancer survivors, family and friends to attend." During the event, people may purchase a luminaria in memory, or in honor, of someone who has been touched by cancer. The luminaria bags are placed around the track and lit during an emotional memorial program, followed by a Lap of Remembrance. After the ceremony, this Celebration of Life continues with a Glow Lap as the lights of the stadium are turned back on, and Bruce Beville and the Laid Back Band will play your favorite music during themed decade laps (bring your costumes) of the 50s, 60, 70s and 80s as the event closes in on midnight with a group routine to Thriller. At midnight enjoy a New Cure's Eve Party where the entertainment and activities just keep coming. Overnight activities include a Zumbathon, a Western Lap, a Frozen T-shirt contest, a Toga Lap, a Rooster Crow Contest, line dancing, a Pajama Lap and more, including Gabriel Arnold who will play the saxophone and croon for you til dawn. No matter why you take part in Relay, one thing is clear: with every step you take, you are helping the American Cancer Society save lives. With your help, they aren't just fighting one type of cancer, they are fighting for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. Each person who shares the Relay experience can take pride in knowing that they are working to create a world where this disease will no longer threaten the lives of loved ones or claim another year of anyone's life. Having cancer is hard, finding help shouldn't be. Call (800) 227-2345, anytime day or night, or visit cancer.org. For the complete entertainment schedule, "like" them on Facebook at www. facebook.com/pages/Relayfor-Life-Fernandina-Beach Y ulee. To make a donation or create a team, visit Relayfor Life.org/fernandinabeachfl.RELAY FOR LIFEJUDIE MACKIE/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER SUBMITTED

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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK 9AFRIDAY, MARCH28, 2014 SPORTS News-Leader FERNANDINABEACH HIGH SCHOOL T ennis April 1-2District 3-2Aat BollesTBA FERNANDINABEACH HIGH SCHOOL V arsity Baseball April 1CENTRALCARROLL7:00 April 3TERRYPARKER6:00 April 4at Paxon6:00 April 8ST. PIUS7:00 April 10at Yulee6:00 April 11at Hiliard6:00 April 14at Atlantic Coast6:30 April 16BATTERYCREEK, S.C.6:00 April 21-24DISTRICT4-4ATBA District 4-4Agames FERNANDINABEACH HIGH SCHOOL Softball April 1at Yulee7:00 April 3WESTNASSAU6:00 April 7at Ed White6:00 April 8HILLIARD6:00 April 10EPISCOPAL5:30 April 14-17District 4-4Aat West Nassau YULEE HIGH SCHOOL V arsity Baseball March 28at Suwannee6:00 March 31CARROLLTON, Ga.6:00 April 1HILLIARD6:00 April 4at West Nassau*6:00 April 10FERNANDINABEACH*6:00 April 11BALDWIN6:00 April 15SUWANNEE7:00 April 17ST. JOSEPH6:00 April 18FIRSTCOAST6:00 District YULEE HIGH SCHOOL Softball April 1FERNANDINABEACH7:00 April 3at Ribault6:00 April 8EPISCOPAL6:00 April 14-18District at West Nassau FERNANDINABEACH HIGH SCHOOL Junior Varsity Baseball March 31CAMDEN COUNTY, Ga.5:30 April 2FLEMING ISLAND6:00 April 7-11at Episcopal tourney YULEE HIGH SCHOOL W eightlifting March 28at Baker County April 12Sectional at Baker County NASSAU COUNTYSCHOOLS Flag Football April 8FBHS vs. Hilliard at Yulee5:00 W est Nassau-Yulee6:00 April 15WNHS-FBHSat Hilliard5:00 Hilliard-Yulee6:00 April 22Hilliard-WNHS at FBHS5:00 FBHS-Yulee6:00 2014 SCHEDULES K K i i d d s s f f i i s s h h i i n n g g c c l l i i n n i i c cThe Florida Wildlife Commission will offer a kids fishing clinic at Fort Clinch State Park from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 31. Lunch will be provided. Visit www.MyFWC.com/fishing.L L a a w w E E n n f f o o r r c c e e m m e e n n t t T T o o r r c c h h R R u u n nThe Fernandina Beach Leg of the 31st anniversary Florida Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics is April 1 at 9 a.m. For 30 years, the Special Olympics “Flame of Hope” has traversed Florida in an intrastate relay of simultaneous routes throughout the state, covering countless thousands of miles. The torch is carried by local and state law enforcement officers all the way to the opening ceremony of Florida’s annual State Summer Games, which will be held at the ESPN Wide W orld of Sports Complex in Lake Buena Vista May 16. The Law Enforcement Torch Run is the largest awareness and fund raising event sponsored by Special Olympics of Florida and local law enforcement agencies. Statewide the participating law enforcement officers and cadets from every branch of local, state and federal law enforcement, represent a total of 300 different agencies that serve as “Guardians of the Flame.” Visit www.specialolym picsflorida.org for information.J J a a g g u u a a r r s s   t t i i c c k k e e t t r r e e n n e e w w a a l l c c a a m m p p a a i i g g n nThe Jacksonville Jaguars kicked off their 2014 season ticket renewal campaign with an all-new, innovative experience for their season ticket holders. With the launch of their digital ebrochure allowing a seamless renewal process, as well as new stadium renovations providing five new exciting seating options and the season ticket holder rewards program Jags 365, this year’s fan experience will provide a whole new level of service and excitement. V isit www.jaguars.com for information.A A l l u u m m n n i i f f o o o o t t b b a a l l l lAlumni football is coming to Northeast Florida. Gridiron Alumni, which is planning several full-contact alumni football games, travels the nation, pitting old football rivals against each other one more time. Players are invited to register to play. Players are needed to sign up for their alma mater and the first 40 players on each team get to play. The team that gets 30 people registered first gets home-field advantage. The games are set for the spring. V isit www.gridironalumni.com to register. For information, call Chris at (530) 410-6396 or go to the website. Gridiron Alumni was founded in 2010 and has raised more than $250,000 for schools and charities using alumni football games as a fundraising vehicle.T T h h i i r r s s k k m m e e m m o o r r i i a a l l s s c c h h o o l l a a r r s s h h i i p pThe Nassau Sport Fishing Association will once again be awarding the “Johnny Thirsk Memorial Scholarship” to a worthy graduating high school senior attending one of the high schools in Nassau County. Thirsk was a driving force in the NSFAfor many years, offering his services as a board member, tournament director and in any other way he could help out. He was a friend to all. When he passed away in 2005, the club initiated a scholarship in his memory. Thirsk believed in giving back to the community. As in past years, a $1,000 scholarship will be awarded directly to an outstanding graduating high school senior. This scholarship is a renewable scholarship, paid for two consecutive years for a total of $2,000 per recipient. To be eligible for consideration this year all completed applications with all required forms and information included, must be postmarked by April 20. The certificate will be presented at the recipients’senior awards program at their school. In addition the recipient and their family will also be invited to attend a Nassau Sport Fishing Association monthly social meeting as guests of the organization. Additional information including all necessary application forms, selection criteria and instructions for all submissions are available on the NSFAwebsite at nsfafish.net. The Nassau Sport Fishing Association, founded in 1983, is a 501c3 nonprofit organization, created to develop and promote saltwater fishing in the Nassau County area while adhering to state, federal and local regulations, to encourage compliance with rules of water safety by club members and the general public and to promote youth related community and other civic minded activities. For information contact Shawn Arnold at 556-5531 or ashawnarnold@hotmail.com.B B o o w w l l i i n n g g l l e e a a g g u u e e s sA senior league bowling is offered at 9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Nassau Bowling off US 17 in Yulee. The group also meets for Christian league at 6 p.m. Thursdays. SPORTS SHORTS SUBMITTEDStudents from the Callahan Elementary School Run/Walk Club took part in the annual Gate Junior River Run March 15 in Jacksonville. The junior run is a one-mile event. Alma Bailey, the physical education teacher, took 28 students from the school to take part in the race. Students in the Run/Walk Club have been training every Wednesday after school. Bailey is very involved i n promoting a healthy lifestyle for the students of CES. Run/Walk Club is just one of the many ways kids are learning to be activ e and stay fit. Doug Alfred, the director of the race and owner of 1st Place Sports, has graciously donated the leftover T-shirts fro m the race to CES in order to hold a mock junior River Run at the school. This will be for all the students who could not attend the official race due to opening day at the ballpark or transportation issues. DRUM ROLL, PLEASE SUBMITTEDRobert Haddock Jr. hooked this 78.6-pound drum and, while fighting him, the rod broke in half and he was barely hooked. But with the help of wife Colleen Haddock and longtime fishing partner Dallis Turner and his wife Ashley Turner, the group managed to get this monster in the boat, "The Hammer Down." The big drum landed Handdock in second place in the Nassau Sport Fishing Association's annual Drum Tournament, which Haddock has competed in for 15 years. HOMELESS HOMELESS ANIMAL ANIMAL S S...THEYREDYINGFORA 2NDCHANCE.Ad opt A Companion Today.A PUBLICSERVICEANNOUNCEMENTBYTHENEWS-LEADER

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10A F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 NEWS News-Leader CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK APublic Service Announcement by The News-LeaderDONT LITTERSPAY~NEUTER K ID FUN PHOTOS BY HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER Im so proud of these kids, they really are great, says faculty advisor Dawn Karpel of Ashley and Alexis Moen, above, and all members of the Fernandina Beach High School Interact Club during the 14th annual Kids Fun Day sponsored by the club. C indy Hoy and granddaughter Kaylee Cruz admire the toy she won at the Pirates of the Caribbean game overseen by FBHS Interact member Tessa Pirkola, below.

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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK F RIDAY M ARCH 28 2014 N EWS -L EADER / F ERNANDINA B EACH F LORIDA B HEEL-N-WHEEL & BREW FEST 8 Flags Playscapes fourth annual Heel-nWhee l is se t for Mar ch 29 to suppor t c onstruction of the Pirate Playground, Fernandina Beachs first community-accessible pla y g r ound, under c on struction, right. The Community Foundation for Nor theast Florida will match all funds raised by $2 for each dollar raised. Re g is t er/check-in at the Main Beach Skate Park from 9-9:45 a.m. Ea ch t eam should brin g a dec or ated wheelchair or borrow one at the event. Teams will join in a 2-mile walk from the Skate Park to Atlantic Recreation Center and back. For information, to re g is t er a team or make a donation, go to www.8flagsplayscapes.org. Af ter the Heel-n-Wheel, the action will continue at Main Beach for the Slide Into Spring Music and Craft Beer Festival, hosted by 8 Flags Pla y scape s and the city of F ernandina B each to raise funds for the all-accessible playground. Enjo y music, craft brew tasting, food, cold refreshments, arts and crafts, fashion shows, a kids zone and more. Craft brew tasting will take place from noon-5 p .m. Enjo y li ve music all da y long, with Keller Williams closing the event from 7-9 p.m. T ick e ts are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. A limited number of VIP ticket are available for $50. Contact Jay Robertson at jrobertson@fbfl.org or 7 53-0001. RAILROAD DAYS T he W e s t Na ss au Historical Societys 2014 Railroad Days Festival is today and Mar ch 29 at the 1881 Callahan Train Depot and near b y 1856 Florida Railroad bed. T oday is Hobo Day and kids are enc our ag ed to c ome dre ssed a s the fabled riders of the rails. Live entertainment is from 2-8 p.m. on the front platform of the depot. The arts and craft area will open from 1-6 p.m. to da y and 10 a .m.-5 p.m. Saturday. The Shriner-led Railroad Days Parade is at 11 a .m. Saturday, followed by a classic car show. A large kids area with a laser maze and jump house s will run from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Live music will continue Saturday from 2-8 p.m. Steam engines, tractors and trains will be e xhibit ed outside the de pot Model train layouts and entrants from the Nassau County Record e ss a y contest will be inside the Depot Annex. Food vendors will be available both days. Visit www.wnhsfl.org or call John Hendricks or Emily B aum gar tner at (90 4) 87 93406. BOOK SALE F riends of the Fernandina Beach Library Book Sale will be held April 3-5 in the Peck Center gym, 5 1 6 S outh 10th St ., offering some 20,000 books in dozen s of cat egories, CDs, DVDs, audio and childrens it ems, most priced from 50 cents to $2 P r o ceeds sup port the Fernandina Beach library. The preview party is April 3 from 5-7 p.m. for F OL members only Non-members ma y join at the door. Public hours are April 4, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. and April 5, 9:30 a .m.-2 p.m. For questions regarding donations contact Annie Sparkle at 310-9290. O F F & O N T HE I SLAND H A ND T URNED G EORGIA P OTTERYAT G ARDEN S HOW PAGE 4B OOKING FORWARD TO SOME COOL JAZZ REBECCA L. JORDI AND AMAND A BURNETT For the News-Leader M or e and mor e people ar e considering including edi ble plants in their landscapes. Nothing is mor e rewarding then seeing a tree you planted pr oduce fr uit. You simply walk out to your yar d and pick the fruit once it is ripe. Consider adding some stone fr uit tr ees. Y ou get the benefit of a lovely shade tree in the summer and wonder ful fr uit in the spring, summer or fall. Y ou may be wondering, first of all, What is a stone fruit? Stone fruits are fruits with large hard seeds found inside such as peaches, plums, nectarines, apricots and cherries. It is thought the Spaniar ds origin ally brought peaches to Florida in the 1500s when they settled in St. Augustine. Franciscan monks wer e pr obably the first to intr o duce peaches to St. Simons and Cumberland islands in Georgia around 1571. Although cultivated peaches covered almost 4,000 acres of Florida in the 1960s into the s, har d freezes t ook a har d toll on the cold-sensitive tr ees. Since then, the University of Florida stone fr u it breeding program and other institutions such as Aubur n University have developed more cold hardy and unique varieties that are able to have lower chilling hours. Some of these varieties ar e distrib u ted around the world. One of the most notable new peach characteristics found in the local gr ocery store are varieties are called non-melting. The melting varieties are known to be ripe when they become red, soft and juicy. However these are not practical f or transpor ting from field to groc er y as the fr uit bruises easily. T he skin breaks open, which makes for problematic shipping and a short shelf-life at the retail market. T o solve those problems, non-melting varieties were d eveloped, which enables the f lesh to stay firmer even when ripe. In non-melting peach varieties, even if it is red it doesnt necessarily mean it is ripe. Smell the fr uit and lightly pr ess the end of the fruit to see if it is soft. Then you will know if i s ripe, said Dr. Mercy Olmstead, assistant pr ofessor and stone fruit specialist from the University of Florida. Produce managers should also know the specific peach variety sold in the store. Peaches with Gulf or UF in the name will be non-melt i ng varieties. You probably have also heard the of cling peaches. These are the peaches in which the flesh clings to the pit. Most of the vari eties developed by UF are cling peaches. The flesh can be very sweet but it is firmer than the melting varieties. The melting peach flesh easily separates from the pit. Befor e you buy a peach, plum or nectarine tree for planting in the landscape, you should know which variPHOTO COURTESY OF THE ISLAND CHAMBER SINGERS T he Island Chamber Singers, directed by Dr. Jane Lindberg, will present their first jazz concert, Looking Forward, at Amelia Plantation C hapel, 36 Bowman Road, Fernandina Beach, tonight at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. An opening night reception will be held in the Fellowship H all immediately following tonights performance. Lindberg has chosen the music of two popular contemporary jazz composers, Dave Brubeck a nd George Shearing. The concert will feature soloists Mary Williams and Scott Tinman as cantors. T ickets are $15 in advance at www.islandchambersingers.org; from a member of Island Chamber Singers; at the Welcome Center, 102 Centre St., 226-3542; at the AIFBY Chamber of Commerce, 961687 Gateway Blvd., Suite 101G (at A1A and Amelia Island Parkway 3 248; and at Harrisons Mercantile at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation Spa and Shops, 432-2218. Tickets are $20 at the door, and always free for all students. For information call 225-0575 on weekdays. Move over citrus hello stone fruit trees! ELIZABETH WILKES/NASSAU COUNTY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENER REBECCA L. JORDI/NASSAU COUNTY EXTENSION T op left, Muscadine grapes V itis rotundifolia Michx. Top midd le, fruit from the Flordaking Peach tree. Top right, The fruit of the Gulfbeauty plum. Far left, the fruit from the Sungold Nectarine tr ee. Left, a Gulfbeauty plum tr ee flower REBECCA L. JORDI/NASSAU COUNTY EXTENSION ELIZABETH WILKES/NASSAU COUNTY EXTENSION MASTER GARDENER REBECCA L. JORDI/NASSAU COUNTY EXTENSION Green film fest at FLT April 1-22 F ernandina Little Theatre, in partnership with the U.S. Green Building Council, North Florida Chapter and the Ray C. Anderson Foundation, is proud to present the Green Carpet film series. This Northeast Florida r egional traveling film series is designed to examine environmental issues, and foster dialogue within the communi-ty about sustainability. T he series of four critically a cclaimed and award-winning documentary films will be shown at the Fernandina Little Theatre, 1014 Beech St., each Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. b eginning on April 1 and conc luding on Ear th Day, April 2 2. T he films to be screened a re: Biophilic Design: The Architecture of Life Tuesday, April 1: Exploring innovative ways of designing the places where we live, w ork, and play Dive! T u esday, April 8: T his multi award-winning docu mentary follows filmmaker Jeremy Selfert and friends as they Dumpster dive in garbage receptacles of Los Angeles supermarkets. T apped T uesday April 15: Looks at the big business o f bottled water, and how it h as bamboozled the public a nd damaged our Ear t h. Gasland Part II T uesday, April 22: An in-depth examination of the dangers of fracking, now occurring on a global level in 32 countries worldwide. I ndividual screenings are $ 6; a pass for all four films is $ 22. T i ckets ar e available for advance purchase at The UPS Store in the Fernandina Beach Publix shopping center. FL T is a small, intimate space and patr ons are encoura ged to purchase tickets in a dvance to guarantee seating. A por t ion of the pr oceeds will benefit the U.S. Gr een Building Council, Nor th Florida Chapter For more infor mation about FLT, visit ameliaflt.or g. STONE Continued on 4B

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2B F RIDAY M ARCH 28, 2014 LEISURE News-Leader CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK SPECIAL EVENTS V FW Post 4351 will host Quesadilla Night at 5:30 p .m. tonight f or a $7 donation. Karaoke with Big Doug will follow at 7 p.m. All members and their guests are welcome. For information call 4 32-8791. T he sixth annual Nassau County Animal Expo hostedb y Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA will be held March 29 from 1 0 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Atlantic Recreation Center in Fernandina Beach. There will be over 30 animal groups and vendors with s pecial performances by the JumpinJax Flyball Club.F urry friends will be available for adoption. ASilent Auction s ponsored by Trailer Park Collectibles has items for every budget. Pastry chef Noelle Almond and Desserts by Noelle will be featured at t he Bake Sale. Meet Cats Angelsmascot Halo at theK ids Corner. Admission is free, but for every 5 pounds of d ry cat/dog food donated a t icket will be given for door p rizes. All spayed/neutered a nd well-behaved leashed pets are welcome. For more information, visit www nassauanimal.com or call Cats Angels at 321-2267. The Nassau County affilia te of NAMI (National A lliance on Mental Illness) i s hosting a free community gathering from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. March 29 at the gazebo in Central Park, 1218 Atlantic Ave. Local mental/behavioral health providers will answer any questions about local services. Refreshments willb e provided and a raffle will b e held at noon. E njoy fun and a stroll to the beach to promote awareness about the need to reduce stigma surrounding mental illness. For information call 277-1886 or email nassaunamiflorida@gmail.com.V isit nassau.nami.org. T he VFW POST 4351 will host an oyster roast March 30 at 2 p.m. for a $12 dona tion. The roast will include oysters, hamburgers, hot dogs and sides. The VFW is located at 96086 Wade Place,u nder the Shave Bridge. For i nformation call 432-8791. Florida native Dr. Peter O. Knight is among the authors and illustrators who will appear at The Book Loft, 214 Centre St., Fernandina Beach, for signings on March 30 from 1-4p .m. Admission is free and o pen to the public. K night is the author of T he Heart, a controversial novel about a devoted husband who discovers his wifes deepest secrets when during an emergency transplant he learns that her heart is literally possessed. A dozen additional authors and illustrators are coming in from other states to sign copies of their work. The book festival will include free story hours with the child rens authors and illustrators at 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.F or details visit www.hearttoheartretreat.com. Contact the B ook Loft at 261-8991 and find them on Facebook. Author Scott Braucht will present a reading from his title Into the Light: A MiddleAged Mans Recovery From D epression a t 4 p.m. April 1 at The Book Loft, 214 Centre St. F ollowing the reading, Braucht will be available for discussion and to sign copies of his book. The Amelia Island Museum of History invites y ou to its next Brown Bag Lunch on April 2 at noon. J ose Miranda will discuss the downtown Fernandina post office building. Built in 1912, this 18,000-square-foot structure originally served as Fernandinas post office, customs house, and courthouse. D elve into the historic report and feasibility study of one of d owntowns most iconic buildings. This program is free and o pen to the public. For inform ation contact Gray at 2617 378, ext. 102, or g ray@ameliamuseum.org. The National League of Junior Cotillions Nassau County Chapter will host a p arentsreception and regi stration for the 2014-15 s eason on April 8 at 7 p.m. a t the Amelia Island Museum o f History, 233 S. Third St., F ernandina Beach. The National League of Junior Cotillions is an etiquette and social dance training program that involves thousands of students nationwide. For information, callL ynn Dempsey, director of the l ocal Junior Cotillion, at (904 5 56-2916 or email lynn.dempsey@nljc.com. The Newcomers Club of Amelia Island will host its monthly coffee on April 10. W omen interested in joining t he club and who reside in N assau County (no matter h ow long they have lived here) are welcome to attend. For further information contact Lucy Bryan at (904 19 or Lcybryn@sonic.net or visit www .newcomersofamelia island.com. T he 29th annual Nassau C ounty Volunteer Centers Volunteer Awards luncheon will be held April 24 at the Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center from noon until 1:30 pm. A wards will be presented by the city of Fernandina B each (the Elsie Harper a wards for service to youth, s eniors, community enrichment and social services), the Nassau County Commission, the Amelia Island/Nassau County Association of Realtors, the town of Hilliard, the Rayonier Foundation, the Fernandina Optimist Club and the Greater W est Nassau Chamber of Commerce. Tickets for a table of eight ($160 ($85$35 a nd individual tickets ($15 may be purchased by calling the Volunteer Center at 2612771 or visiting www.volunteernassau.org. THEATER Amelia Community Theatre will hold auditions for the comedy TheF oreigner from 1-5 p.m. on April 12 at 207 Cedar St. F ive men (one can be a teen and two women are needed for the cast. The show is directed by Fran Hindsley and performances are between June 12-28. For information, visit www.ameliacommunity theatre.org or call 261-6749. A melia Community Theatre will offer a sevenweek acting course on scene study and monologues, on Tuesdays from April 15-May 27. The course, which is geared for all levels, including beginners, will be taught by S inda Nichols and limited to 10 adults age 18 and over for each session. The Tuesday afternoon session will be from 2:30-5 p.m. and the Tuesday evening session will be from 6:30-9 p.m. at 207 Cedar St. Tuition fee is $70. Sign up by calling the ACTbox office at 261-6749 or at the ACT Online Store, www.ameliac ommunitytheatre.org. For i nformation on the curriculum, c ontact Sinda Nichols at n ichols.sinda@gmail.com. The GFWC Womans Club of Fernandina Beach invites you to join them for Swinging on a Star: AnE vening of Oscar Winning Songs presented by the V oices of Amelia Musical P layhouse on April 11 at the W omans Club of Fernandina Beach, 201 Jean LaFitte Blvd. Enjoy heavy hors doeu vres with wine starting at 7 p.m. and the performance at 8 p.m. Cocktail attire. T ickets are $75 per person. Proceeds benefit the clubs scholarshipsf or high school girls and l ibrary funds for Nassau County schools. Contact Carolyn Guerrin at 261-8356 or cguerrin@bellsouth.net. Amelia Musical Playhouse, Amelia Islands newest theater at 1955 Island W alkway will hold a uditions for Stephen Sondheims Tony Awardwinning musical, Sweeney Todd, directed by Jill Dillingham. Auditions are April 13 at 1 p.m. and April 14 at 6 p.m. Performances will be Oct. 9, 10, 1 1, 17, 18, 24, 25, 26, 31 a nd Nov 1. Auditions are being held early to permit weekly music rehearsals due to the complexity of the music. Roles are for males and females ranging in age from 15 to 60. The production is based on the original Broadway version, not the movie. Auditions for lead roles will consist of two minutes of one of the following songs: Worst Pies in London, Pretty Women, Green Finch, Kiss Me, The Contest, Epiphany, or Pirelli s Magical Elixir and a one-minute monologue of your choice. Chorus auditions entail a one-minute of song of your choice. For information visit Facebook and www ameliamusicalplayhouse.com. To schedule a private audition, email jilldill@msn.com before April 13. MUSEUM Join the Amelia Island Museum of History Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. to tour four of the town s most popular, notorious or otherwise historic pubs. One ticket will get you a drink at each establishment and an earful of colorful tales. Its a great way to see Fernandina and learn about its history. Tickets are $25 per person (must be 21, must show ID); tour begins at the historic train depot downtown. Reservations required. Contact Thea at 261-7378, ext.105 or Thea@ameliamuseum.org. Guests on this tour will learn Amelia Island ghost stories as they tiptoe through dark streets and walk in the footsteps of a bygone era as the past comes alive through the skillful storytelling of your guide. This tour begins at 6 p.m. every Friday like clockwork and lasts approximately one hour Meet your guide in the cemetery behind St. Peters Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic Ave. Tickets may be purchased at the Amelia Island Museum of History for $10/adults and $5/students. Contact Thea at 261-7378, ext. 105 or Thea@ameliamuseum.org for information. J J S S O O c c o o n n c c e e r r t t s s Jacksonville Symphony tickets are available by calling (904All concerts are in Robert E. Jacoby Symphony Hall at the Times-Union Center for the Performing A rts, unless otherwise noted. For information visit jaxsymphony.org, like them at faceb ook.com/JaxSymphony or follow them on Twitter @jaxsymphony. S S p p r r i i n n g g F F e e s s t t c c o o n n c c e e r r t t Expect the Unexpected when the warmth of Brazil gently envelops Amelia Island on March 31 with the guitars and v ocals of the internationally-renowned Assad Family when they perform at the Amelia I sland Chamber Music Festivals first SpringFest concert, set for 7:30 p.m. at W alkers Landing at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation. Their repertoire includes original compositions and reworkings of folk, jazz and Latin music. Tickets are available at w ww.aicmf.com or 261-1779. The AICMFs Expect the Unexpected theme continues in M ay with 13 performances, including members of the Guarneri String Quartet, cellist Z uill Bailey, folk ensemble Canary in the Coal Mine and the Brooklyn Rider String Quartet. Visit the website for details. S S o o u u n n d d s s o o n n C C e e n n t t r r e e The Historic Fernandina Beach Association (downtown merchants announces something different for the kickoff of this seasons Sounds On Centre concert series downtown. The first concert will be April 4, 6-8 p.m. at the corner of Centre a nd Second streets, featuring the Honey Badgers Band with an all Beatles show. B ring your chair, dancing shoes and the family to enjoy great songs from perhaps the b est-known band of all time. Come early to get a good spot. The concert series is sponsored by a long list of local firms dedicated to the enrichment of downtown. The theme this season is KeepinIt Local. S S t t o o r r y y & & S S o o n n g g D on Henry and Jon Vezner have written dozens of songs together even winning a G rammy A w ard for one but have had sepa rate careers until now Their new duo, The Don Juans, backed by cellist Jeff Gilkinson, will perform at the next Evening of Story & Song, the popular concert series presented by First Coast Community Bank and hosted by Mark & Donna Paz Kaufman, onS aturday, April 12 at 7:30 p.m. Open seating b egins at 6:45 p.m. at Burns Hall, St. Peters E piscopal Parish at A tlantic A venue and Ninth St. Reservations are suggested: (904 415-1388 or eveningofstoryandsong @gmail.com. S S w w i i n n g g i i n n t t o o S S p p r r i i n n g g The Fernandina Beach High School b ands will hold their Swing into Spring f undraiser on April 12 at 6 p.m. in the multip urpose room of the school, 435 Citrona Drive. The Jazz Ensemble and Symphonic Bands will perform. T i ckets are $15 per per son and include dinner and one entry for a drawing. The grand-prize is a Samsung 43inch plasma TV. Extra tickets for the drawing are $5 each. Also enjoy a silent auction. Fort ickets and information contacct Teresa W ilson, BP A vice president, at tebewilson@ c omcast.net. T ickets must be purchased in advance. B B i i g g B B a a n n d d B B a a s s h h The Amelia Island Jazz Festivals third annual Big Band Bash is April 19 from 710 p.m. in the ballroom at the Omni AmeliaI sland Plantation Resort. E njoy the Dynamic Les DeMerle 17-piece Orchestra, featuring vocalist Bonnie Eisele and special guests, in a salute to Americas legendary big bands. AMeet and Greet the Musicians cocktail party begins at 6:30 p.m. and includes a glass of champagne. The event also will auction an original piece of jazz art donated by Park West Gallery. Dress is semi-formal. Tickets are $75 per person and proceeds benefit the festival scholarship program. Purchase tickets at www.ameliaislandjazzfestival.com, the UPS Store, 1417 Sadler Road, or at the AIFBYChamber Of Commerce, Gateway to Amelia. Call (904 504-4772 or email info@ameliaislandjazzfestival.com. J J o o h h n n L L e e g g e e n n d d The Florida Theatre, 128 East Forsyth St., downtown Jacksonville, presents John Legend in concert at 8 p.m. April 30. Tickets range from $41 to $71 and are available at the box of fice, by calling (904 TS, or at any Ticketmaster outlet. Visit www.floridatheatre.com. C C o o m m m m u u n n i i t t y y b b a a n n d d The Nassau Community Band is an ensemble of amateur musicians, retired and current music educators, even folks that have not played since high school or college. It welcomes all interested persons to join them for rehearsals at 6 p.m. Thursdays at the Yulee Middle School band room, 85439 Miner Road. Email info@nassaucommunityband.com, call band President Chuck Belinski at 277-1257 or search Nassau Community Band on Facebook. M M u u s s i i c c c c r r u u i i s s e e s s Amelia River CruisesAdult BYOB T wilight Tours are held Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $29 per person at 1 North Front S t., Fernandina Beach, or call 261-9972 or book online at www.ameliarivercruises.com. T T h h e e C C o o u u r r t t y y a a r r d d The Courtyard Pub & Eats, 316 Centre S t., John Springer on the piano ThursdaySaturday from 6:30-10 p.m. and the piano s tyling of Steve Fingers on Saturday afternoons. Call 432-7086. Join them on F acebook at courtyardpubandeats for information on special events including appearances by The Usual Suspects with Pam and Davis Turner on Sunday afternoons. You never know who may join in the fun. D D a a v v i i d d s s D avids Restaurant and Lounge, 802 Ash St., presents Aaron Bing Friday and S aturday nights. Call 904-310-6049. F F l l o o r r i i d d a a H H o o u u s s e e Florida House Inn, 22 S. Third St., hosts Open Mike Night each Thursday from 7:3010:30 p.m. in the Mermaid Bar hosted by local musician Terry Smith. Musicians perform and the audience gets to hear new talent. Appropriate for the whole family. No c over charge. Call Smith at (904 G G r r e e e e n n T T u u r r t t l l e e T he Green Turtle, 14 S. Third St., prese nts Vinyl Record Night every Tuesday from 7-11 p.m. Listen to LPs played on high-end turntables, talk about the medium and pur chase albums. Disc jockeys JG World and Jim play an eclectic mix from their personal collection of thousands of records. Call 3212324. H H a a m m m m e e r r h h e e a a d d H ammerhead Beach Bar, 2045 S. Fletcher Ave. Live music. Visit Hammerhead on Facebook. Contact Bill Childers at bill@thepalacesaloon.com. I I n n s s t t a a n n t t G G r r o o o o v v e e The Instant Groove, featuring Lawrence Holmes, Johnny Robinson, Scott Giddonsa nd Sam Hamilton, plays each Thursday n ight at The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. D ress is casual. For information call Holmes at 556-6772. P P a a b b l l o o s s Pablos, 12 N. Second St., Fernandina Beach, hosts a jazz jam from 7-10 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month. Musiciansm ay sit in for one song or the whole night. J oin the mailing list by emailing beechfly e r@bellsouth.net. P P a a l l a a c c e e S S a a l l o o o o n n The Palace Saloon, 1 17 Centre St., pres ents live music. Call 491-8999 or email kellie@lickwidmarketing.com. Join them on Facebook or visit www.thepalacesaloon.com. S S a a l l t t y y P P e e l l i i c c a a n n T he Salty Pelican Bar & Grill, 12 N. Front St., live music Thursday through Sunday. Call 277-381 1 or visit T he Salty Pelican Bar and Grill on Facebook. S S a a n n d d y y B B o o t t t t o o m m s s Sandy Bottoms at Main Beach, 2910 Atlantic Ave., the Macys from 6-9 p.m. live inside W ednesdays; and line dancing class e s with Kathy Ball inside from 6-9 p.m. Thursdays. Visit www.sandybottomsamelia. com. S S e e a a b b r r e e e e z z e e Seabreeze Sports Bar, in the Days Inn on Sadler Road, live music. S S h h e e f f f f i i e e l l d d s s Shef field s at The Palace, 1 17 Centre St., presents late night dance mixes on Fridays with DJ Refresh and Saturdays with DJ 007, and Ladies Night with Gary Ross from 6-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Call 491-8999 or email kellie@lickwidmarketing.com. Join them on Facebook or visit www.thepalacesaloon.com. S S l l i i d d e e r r s s Sliders Seaside Grill, 1998 S. Fletcher Ave., live music in the tiki bar 6-10 p.m. nightly and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, reggae W ednesdays with Pili Pili; The Macys in the lounge Friday and Saturdays 610 p.m.; shag dancing Sundays from 4-7 p.m.; music nightly 9 p.m.-1 a.m. in the Breakers Lounge. Call 277-6652. Visit www.slidersseaside.com. Join Sliders on Facebook and T witter T T h h e e S S u u r r f f The Surf Restaurant & Bar 3199 S. Fletcher Ave., presents DJ Roc on the deck Wednesdays at 6 p.m., Richard Smith Fridays at 6 p.m. and the Honey Badgers Saturdays at 6 p.m. Call 261-5711 or email kellie@lickwidmarketing.com. Join them on Facebook or visit www .thesurfonline.com. Submit items and updates for this calendar to Assistant Editor Sin Perry at sper r y@fbnewsleader.com. MUSIC NOTES Fill in the squares so that each row, column and 3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9. Solution will appear in the Wednesday B-section. Wednesday, March 26 Solution O UTAND A BOUT F F r r e e e e k k i i d d s s c c l l a a s s s s e e s s The Island Art Association Education Center, 18 N. Second St., offers free art classes for children. Upcoming classes include: March 29, Childrens Art, for ages 69, 10-1 1 a.m. and 1 1:15 a.m.12:15 p.m., led by Anne Howden Middle School Art, for ages 10-13, 12:15 p.m., led by Anne Howden March 31, Afternoon Art, for ages 612, 3:30-5:30 p.m., led by Anne Howden Classes are free with all art materials furnished. Student must be pre-registered. Call the Island Art Association Gallery at 261-7020. S S i i n n g g i i n n g g q q u u i i l l t t e e r r Singer/songwriter Cathy Miller will present a program of music and quilts at the Amelia Island Quilt Guild meeting on April 8 at 7 p.m. Miller and her husband, John Bunge, travel the world singing for quilting events. She is known as The Singing Quilter. Miller s quilts have won awards and have been exhibited internationally. Visit www.singingquilter.com. The quilt guild meets the second T uesday of the month at the Womans Club, 201 Jean LaFitte Ave. Programs are free and open to the public. Contact ART WORKS

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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK R ELIGION 3B F R IDAY M A RCH 28, 2014/News-Leader S aturday Vigil Mass 4 pm & 5:30 pm Saturday Vigil Mass 7 pm Spanish Mass Saturday 4 pm Mass at Yulee United Methodist Church Sunday Masses 8:00 am 10:00 pm 12:00 pm (noon Daily Mass 8:30am Mon, Wed,Thurs & Fri. 6 pm Tues Holy Day Masses Vigil 6 pm; Holy Day-8:30 am,6 pm Confessions: Saturday 3 pm 3:45 pm or by appt Rev.Jose Kallukalam Sunday School..................................9:30 am Sunday Worship..............................10:45 am Wednesday AWANA........................6:15 pm Wednesday Bible Study................6:30 pmPastor:Bud Long941017 Old Nassauville Road County Rd-107 SouthFernandina Beach, FL32034261-4741 www.springhillbaptistfb.org CELEBRATION BAPTIST CHURCHI nnovative Style, Contemporary Music, C asual Atmosphere85520 Miner Rd. Yulee, FL 32097 Sunday Worship 9:00am and 10:30am Nursery ProvidedKidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday Youth Program Wed. @ 6:30pmConnecting with Christ... Connecting with People.FOR MORE INFO: (904Pastor Mike KwiatkowskiWorship this week at the place of your choice...Y BC Doug Sides, Senior Pastor Morning Services 8:15 and 11:00 am Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm W ednesday Children 6:30 pm Wednesday OverflowYouth 6:30 pm N ursery Provided For All ServicesYulee, FL32097w ww.Yuleebaptistchurch.comULEE85971 Harts Rd.Y BCAPTISTVisitors Always Welcome!904 HURCH Sunday Service . .10:30 am Bible Study . . . .9:30 am Wednesday Service...7:00 pm www.thebridgeflordia.cam 85031 Landover Drive Yulee, Fl 904.225.4860 In the Heart of Fernandina9N.6thStreetDr.Wain WesberrySenior Pastor D r.Doug GanyoAssociate PastorWorship 8:30 & 11 am Sunday School 9:50 amNursery Children Youth Adults 261-3837www.first-presbyterianchurch-32034.org St. Peters Episcopal Church Welcomes You!Located at the corner of8th &Atlantic904-261-4293www.stpetersparish.org 7:30 am Service 8:15 am Breakfast 9:00 am Service 10:10 am Christian Formation 11:00 am Service Taize Service 2nd Sunday each month at6:00 pm Celtic Service 4th Sunday of each month at 6:00 pm BLACKROCKBAPTISTCHURCH96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee261-6220 John KasperPASTORSunday Morning Worship Service -10:30 amSunday School 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship Service 6:00 pm Wednesday Service 7:00 pm Nursery Provided www .blackrockbaptist.com Sunday Services 9:15 & 11:15 a.m. (904)277-4414www.ameliachapel.comAmelia Plantation / Omni Resort 36 Bowman Road Pastor Ted SchroderYou are welcome here! First Baptist ChurchFernandina BeachSUNDAY WORSHIP9:00 Life Groups 10:15 AM & 6:00 PM Wednesday 6:30 PM904-261-3617 FBFirst.com Traditional Family Worship . . . .8 am & 11 am (weekly communion at 8 am Contemporary Worship. .9:30 am in Maxwell Hall Sunday School for alll Ages. . .9:30 am & 11 am Wednesday Dinner (Aug-Maypm Discoverthe Difference atAmelia Baptist ChurchPastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton Sunday Worship Service 10:30am Bible Study 9am Nursery provided for all services Small group studies-Adults 6pm Wednesday Prayer Service 6:30pm Preschool and Children Activities961167 BUCCANEERTRAILCorner of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Fernandina BchFor More Information Call: 261-8527 WHERE FAITH EMBODIES HEART, MIND & SOUL ENew Vision Congregational Church,U U C C C CWorship Sundays at 10:00 am96074 Chester Road in YuleeNewVisionCongregationalChurch.org904-225-0539C C r r e e a a t t i i v v e e l l y y S S p p i i r r i i t t u u a a l l FIRS TMISSION AR Y B APTIS TC HUR C H 20South Ninth Street 261-4907 Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., PastorThe Church inthe Heart of the City With the Desire to be in the Heart of All PeopleSunday New Members Class 9 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Noon-day Prayer Wednesday Mid-week Service 7-9 p.m. Ministries: Bus & Van, Couples, Singles, Youth FIVE POINTS BAPTISTCome Experience the Joy of Worship & Service Psalm 100Rev. FRANK CAMAROTTI, PastorS S u u n n d d a a y y S S c c h h o o o o l l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9 : : 4 4 5 5 a a m m W W o o r r s s h h i i p p S S e e r r v v i i c c e e . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 : : 0 0 0 0 a a m m E E v v e e n n i i n n g g W W o o r r s s h h i i p p . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6 : : 0 0 0 0 p p m m W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y N N i i g g h h t t S S u u p p p p e e r r . . . . . . . 6 6 : : 0 0 0 0 p p m m E E n n c c o o u u n n t t e e r r Y Y o o u u t t h h G G r r o o u u p p . . 6 6 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m 8 8 : : 0 0 0 0 p p m m W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y P P r r a a y y e e r r S S e e r r v v i i c c e e . . . . . . 7 7 : : 0 0 0 0 p p m m7 7 3 3 6 6 B B o o n n n n i i e e v v i i e e w w R R o o a a d d 9 9 0 0 4 4 2 2 6 6 1 1 4 4 6 6 1 1 5 5 N N u u r r s s e e r r y y p p r r o o v v i i d d e e d dW W o o r r s s h h i i p p I I n n J J o o y y . c c o o m mF F i i n n d d u u s s o o n n F F a a c c e e b b o o o o k k : : F F i i v v e e P P o o i i n n t t s s B B a a p p t t i i s s t t E E n n c c o o u u n n t t e e r r Y Y o o u u t t h h YULEE UNITED METHODIST CHURCHPlease join us forSUNDAYSERVICES:Adult Sunday School 9:30AM Worship 11 AM Childrens Church 11:00 AMA1A&Christian Way, Yulee225-5381 Pastor Charlie Sward P astor Ted Schroder Sunday School . . . . . . .10am Sunday Morning Service . . .11am Sunday Evening Service . . . .6pm Wednesday Bible Study & Prayer..7pmPastor Adolfo Del Rio 820 S. 14th Street, F.B.BBCFB.COM (904Independent; Fundamental; Traditional HymnsBible Baptist Church A A d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e Y Y o o u u r r C C h h u u r r c c h h H H e e r r e e !T To o a a d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e i i n n t t h h e e C C h h u u r r c c h h D D i i r r e e c c t t o o r r y y ; ; c c a a l l l l t t h h e e N N e e w w s s L L e e a a d d e e r r a a t t2 2 6 6 1 1 3 3 6 6 9 9 6 6 Drugs, cousins and running into the Will of God When the door swung open, t hings were not as he had hoped. At first, it was hard to figure out. After a f ew minutes, it became painfully clear. Tony was no longer selling drugs. For Peter, that was bad news. He did everything he could to back up. Fortunately, for him, he was already inside. The door had closed and God had him right where he w anted him. My brother-in-law, Peter, has an a mazing testimony. The other day, God reminded me of it as I was navigating a difficult situation. As He did, Peters story brought a smile and sense of peace to my heart. I hope it does the same for you. If you looked at Peter today, youd t hink I was talking about someone else. A brilliant m an, highly respected in his f ield, Peters an amazing guy. As a youth, things werent so great. When he left his parents in his late teens, and headed t o his cool Cousin Tonys house in A rizona, Peter felt sure his life was getting ready to bea whole lot better. He was right. The only problem was, he didnt know what better was going to look like. Y ou see, somewhere between Peter leaving Mom and Dads house i n Texas, and his arrival at Tonys in Arizona, Tony had accepted Jesus C hrist as his personal savior. That was a huge change from the cool drug dealer Peter thought he would be living with. When Peter arrived, and Tony invited him in, Tony didnt hesitate to tell him all about what had happened. Before long, and with M om and Dad on their knees in Texas, Peter accepted Christ as well. F rom there, everything changed. Peter went on to get his masters degree in English. He served as a missionary for many years in South America; met his wife; moved back to the states; and put two sons through college. Hes been the head o f the language department in a prestigious private school in North C arolina, and the list goes on. When I think of Peter, I think of success. W hen I think of the path he was on, I think of the mercy and the sovereignty of God. What I find interesting about his story is how Peters plans and Gods plans were at work at the exact same time. Though Peter saw his future o ne way, God saw it completely different. The fact that Gods plan prev ailed, and Peter now likes that, is a point of encouragement to me. The way I see it, God is much bigger than all our stuff. If Hes not, were all in quite a fix. Yes, I know, we all have a free will, but so does God. Thankfully, His will is bigger and bett er than ours! While its true, Peter wasnt looking for it, if you asked him n ow, Gods plan is the best thing that ever happened to him. When I look a t my own life, I have to say the same thing. I leave you with a couple of beautiful verses that come to mind. A mans heart devises his way: but the Lord directs his steps. (Proverbs 16:9) I know that the way of man i s not in himself: it is not in man that walks to direct his steps. (Jeremiah 1 0:23) For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. (Jeremiah 29:11) Rob Goyette is pastor of Living Waters World Outreach Center. rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org RELIGION NOTES P P B B J J & & T T The three essential items always needed at The Salvation Army Hope House to put in the Emergency Food Bags are peanut butter, jelly and yes, toilet paper So this week, they again ask for these three items, along with any other nonperishable foods you find on sale or in the two for one bin. Thank you for bringing your donations t o 410 S. Ninth St., Fernandina Beach. G G o o s s p p e e l l c c o o n n c c e e r r t t The Walkers, a gospel band from P erry that sings in a distinct Southernstyle of music that is all their own, will per f orm at the Church of God of Prophecy, 101 Pine St., St. Marys, Ga., on March 30 at the 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. ser vices. Admission is free, but an offering will be taken. With 20 years ofg iving energetic live performances a cr o ss the United States, the band s inspiring and captivating countr y gospel music will leave listeners hooked and wanting for mor e. B B i i b b l l e e s s c c h h o o o o l l Living Waters World Outreach C enter announces the spring session o f the Berean School of the Bible, for a nyone wanting a mor e in-depth knowl edge of Scriptur e The spring session, Living Relationally, focuses on the impor tance of a ver t ical r e lationship with God and a horizontal r elationship with each other as was demonstrated in the lives of Paul, David and Abraham who were called friends of God. T he class will meet weekly for 10 w eeks on Sundays fr o m 6-7:30 p.m. beginning March 30 at Living Waters World Outreach Center, 96282 Brady Point Road, one mile west of the Shave Bridge on A1A. Call 321-2117 for infor mation or to r egister. The $20 fee is for materials. A certificate will be given upon completion of the class. T T u u e e s s d d a a y y w w o o r r s s h h i i p p Salvation Army Hope House hosts a worship service each Tuesday at noon. What do we do when we are persecuted? Join the Hope House April 1 as they discover what God told Paul to do in Chapter 18 of the book of Acts. For more information, call 321-0435 or stop b y 410 S. Ninth St. T T r r a a i i l l L L i i f f e e o o p p e e n n h h o o u u s s e e Faith Christian Academy invites y ou to an open house for Trail Life USA Troop 555 on April 1 at 6:30 p.m.T rail Life USA is a Christ-centered outdoor character development adventure p rogram open to boys and young men a ges 5-17. B oys will love the fun and advent ure. Parents will love the commitment to a Christian worldview and moral consistency. Join them on the campus of Faith Christian Academy, 96282 Brady Point Road, Fernandina Beach, just west of the Shave Bridge. Call 321-2137 with q uestions or find them on Facebook T rail Life Troop 555. C C h h u u r r c c h h a a n n n n i i v v e e r r s s a a r r y y Solid Rock Church of God by Faith, 86138 Palm Tree Drive, Yulee, will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Church of God by Faith. Inc., on April 12 at the Legends Center 5130 Soutel Drive, Jacksonville a t 6 p.m. The color scheme is black, w hite and silver. T he H. Alvin Green Memorial Alumni Chorale will be in concert and chur c h pioneers, living legends and trailblazers will be honored. A table of eight is $320; banquet ticket is $40. Donations ar e tax deductible. Make checks payable to C hurch of God by Faith, Inc. and mail t o 1107 Turtle Creek Drive North, J acksonville, FL 32218. For information visit the Jacksonville District Facebook page and like Solid Rock, or contact Curtis McGriff at (904 4982 or Jeannette White at (904 7334. O O p p e e n n h h o o u u s s e e S alvation Army Hope House will c elebrate its seventh year anniversary Doing the Most Good serving its neighbors right here in Nassau County. An open house celebration will take place on Satur day April 12 between 2-4 p.m. The staf f would love to see you or meet you for the first time. Come to 410 S. Ninth St., at thec or ner of Ninth and Date str eets in F ernandina. P P a a s s s s o o v v e e r r S S e e d d e e r r The Jewish Community of Amelia Island will hold a Passover Seder on Monday, April 14. For information as to cost and venue, contact Deborah Price at 310-6060 or email her at deb203@aol.com. LENT & EASTER S S u u n n r r i i s s e e c c e e l l e e b b r r a a t t i i o o n n First Baptist Churchs annual E aster Sunrise Celebration will be held at Peters Point, 1974 S. F letcher Ave., on April 20 at 6:45 a.m. Life Groups will begin at 9 a.m. followed by Easter worship service at 10:15 a.m. at First B aptist Church, 1600 S. Eighth St. V isitors welcome and always m ade to feel like family. I John 4:10 This is real love not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son as a sacrifice to take away our sins. Join First Baptist in a renewed celebration of Christs love. For details see F BFirst.com. S S p p e e c c i i a a l l s s e e r r v v i i c c e e s s First Presbyterian welcomes all to noon Lenten services with Communion each Wednesday through April 9 in the sanctuary on North Sixth Street, Fernandina Beach. Join them for prayer studies W ednesdays in Jim Thomas Hall o f First Pr e sbyterian, 9 N. Sixth S t., at 12:30 or 6:15 p.m. Nurser y and childcare available for evening study following the family dinner at 5:30 p.m. Share a meal and fellowship. Questions, call 261-3837. Special Easter events open to t he community include: Palm Sunday April 13 wor s hip at 8:30 and 11 a.m. and an ecumenical gathering of congr egations at the Nassau County Courthouse on Centre Street at 10:40 a.m., ending with a processional to each chur ch. Maundy Thursday, April 17 W orship with Communion at 7 p .m. A joint ser vice of First P r e sbyterian and Memorial United Methodist in Maxwell Hall on Nor th Sixth Str e et, followed by a performance of Exodus by Brad Sherrill from Atlanta. Nursery pr ovided at each church. Call Memorial at 261-5769 or First P r e sbyterian at 261-3837. CommUNITY Easter C elebration on Saturday, April 19, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. North Sixth Street will be closed to traffic and filled with food, fun, inflatables and egg hunts. A total of 6,000 f illed Easter eggs will be offered for gathering by children in ageg roups, as well as pictures with the Easter Bunny. The event is f ree, hosted by Memorial United M ethodist and First Presbyterian. Easter Sunday, April 20, First P resbyterian welcomes worshippers to break the fast at the annual Pancake Br e akfast served in Jim Thomas Hall following the Community Sunrise Service at Ft. Clinch. Celebrate the resurrection in worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. N ursery available. Sunday School f or all ages at 9:50 a.m. L L e e n n t t e e n n S S k k e e t t c c h h e e s s The Lenten Sketches by Joseph Martin A Cantata for Lent with full Chancel Choir and members of the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra will take place April 6 at Amelia PlantationC hapel at 10 a.m. T he cantata focuses on the f inal days of Jesus, with wor d s and music built around the frame of God s Masterpiece of Grace. The opening piece of the cantata invites the weary pilgrim to come to the garden, kneel and remember, and rest in the com-f ort of Jesus embrace. There are s ix pieces in this work, which car r ies the listener from the garden to the cross. During the per f or m ance, images created on canvas and with cameras depicting the scenes portrayed through the music will be reflected on the walls of thes anctuary. F ollowing the cantata, all ar e i nvited to the Fellowship Hall for a reception and to see the original works of ar t used during the per for mance. The Amelia Plantation Chapel is located at 36 Bowman Road. Call 277-4414 for directions. Find them on facebook.com/Amelia.P lantation.Chapel or visit w ww .ameliachapel. com. P P a a s s s s i i o o n n o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t As is the tradition at many Christian churches, The Passion of Christ will be presented during both mor ning ser v ices on Palm Sunday at Amelia Plantation Chapel, 36 Bowman Road, Amelia I sland. This year the passion story is repeated from the Gospel ofM atthew, 26:36 through 27:54. Presenters will quote scripture in t he voice of the Reader Narrator and Jesus, and the c ongregation will be asked to part icipate as the Crowd. Experience The Passion of Christ with us on Sunday April 13, the first day of Holy Week. Call 277-4414 for information, find them on facebook.com/Amelia.Plantation. C hapel or visit www.amelia chapel.com. All are welcome. G G o o o o d d F F r r i i d d a a y y m m u u s s i i c c The community is invited to Amelia Baptist Church on Good Friday, April 18, at 7 p.m. for a service of music and drama. These special services have become an annual Holy Week tra-d ition in the community and have b een well attended since their i nception in 2005. The musical centerpiece of this year s ser v ice is the Lenten canta ta, In My Place by Craig Courtney. This is a totally new work that combines music and the spoken word to convey the meaning ofw hat the narration writer Pamela S tewar t has called Christ s S acrifice of Love. Holy Communion will be observed as an integral par t of the pr o gram. This inspirational Good Friday service is presented by more than 60 talented singers from the community representing several areac hurches. The choir will be a ccompanied by an ensemble of s trings, woodwinds, brass, piano and percussion comprising twelve instr u mentalists fr o m the Nor theast Florida community all under the direction of Pam Helton, minister of music at Amelia Baptist. Ther e is no char ge for this p r esentation. Childcare (ages n ewbor n through 4 years) is availa ble at no cost with r e servations. Call the chur c h at 261-9527 for mor e information. Amelia Baptist Church is located at 961167 Buccaneer Trail, at the intersection of Buccaneer Trail, A1A and South Fletcher A venue (at the r oundabout). P ULPIT NOTES Pastor Rob Goyette

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H OMES F R IDAY M A RCH 28, 2014News-Leader 4 B CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK eties produce best in your chill unit zone. Each of these stone fr uits r equir es a cer tain number of chill units to leaf out and bud nor mally Nassau and Duval counties are high chill unit zones and get 500-600 chill units on average each w inter season. Stone fruit varieties requiring 400 or more chill units will gr ow best in Nor th Florida. oo many chill units can result in freeze damage to the blooms and tree death, said Olmstead. This will ultimately r educe the amount of fruit produced that year. Peach varieties recommended for Nor th Florida are UFGlo, JunePrince, and any in the Gulf series, which are Gulfcrest, Gulfcrimson, Gulfprince, Gulfking or Gulfsnow. Because the UF and Gulf varieties ar e patent ed they can only be purchased fr om licensed nurs eries. For mor e infor mation on these varieties and to find nurseries go to http://hos.ufl.edu/extension/stonefruit or contact your Nassau County Extension Ser vice. Unfortunately, plum and nectarine varieties cur r ently available only have chill unit requirements between 200 and 300. Therefore, plums and nectarines planted north of Orlando need to be carefully protected from prolonged bouts of cold weath er. Prune your trees twice a year. The best fruiting wood is pencil width and one year old so prune to keep wood small and young, said Olmstead. If you have problems with your trees, please bring in live specimens of insects or leaf clippings to your county Extension office for identification assistance and r ecom mendations. The main of fice hours in Callahan ar e 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Check out the University of Florida publication on stone fruit for orchards and homeowners at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ mg374. Now, we hope we have piqued your curiosity and maybe you ar e considering planting a few fruit trees. Now get out there and start digging! Rebecca L. Jordi is the County Extension Director/ Hor ticultur e Agent III and Amanda Burnett is a Agricultur e & Natural Resour ces Agent for the UF/IFAS Nassau County Extension. Homeowners with a few trees who are seeking assistance should contact Jordi. If you have a small far m with an orchard, contact Burnett. Both can be r eached at 8791019 or 491-7340. FreshJax is at the Amelia Farmers Market every Saturday, bringing a healthy twist to gourmet f oods. FreshJax is always adding new and exciting p roducts to their line, like their Maple Sunflower Seed clusters. They showcase their organic product line that includes energy bars, hot sauces, spice blends, trail mixes, mustards, dressi ngs, breads, cookies, granola, pestos and more. Their p roducts are made with 100 percent USDA organic ingredients and they never use any chemicals or preservatives. Also at the market March 29 will be Flagship Coffees, a micro-batch roaster of 100 percent organic Arabica coff ee beans sourced from Direct Trade or Certified Fair Trade farms and labeled with the roast date to ensure it is bursting with flavor. The market also is the perfect place to learn about orchids. Help and information is always available at Orchid Legends. Have a sick or tired orchid? Bring it to the market for some hands-on-help. Neals K ettle Korn has freshlyp opped Kettle Korn and oldf ashioned sodas every Saturday. And try their arepas, a South American grilled cheese sandwich, sweet yellow corn and delicious mozzarella cheese. F resh from the oven a re Spouses fruit pastries, c innamon buns, fr u it-filled cobblers, mini-pies, muf f ins and more as well as sliced multigrain bread, sourdough and a variety of focaccias and meat pies. Jon of Meteor Str eet Pr oduce s ources his produce from l ocal farms and his own g ar d en. Ever y Satur day Jon has several types of sea sonal greens, fresh tomatoes, ginger, garlic, shallots, sweet potatoes, parsnips and some fruits. This is also the per fect time of year to p ick up some herb starter p lants or on the spot c uttings. He also has teas and herbal tea blends, as well as organic dry goods such as cinnamon, chia seeds, cacao bits and vanilla beans. The market is the perfect place for all your landscaping materials atE ver Blooming Gardens. It i s the per f ect time to get your beautiful spring plant ings Robert will deliver and plant your pur chases if needed. Sign up for the E-Mail Newsletter at www .ameliafar mersmarket.com. The m arket is open ever y S aturday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. a t the Shops of the Omni Amelia Island Plantation. No pets, please. Call 491-4872 or visit www.ameliafarmersmarket.com. The Fernandina Beach Market Place far mers mar ket is open every Saturday, rain or shine, on North Seventh Street in downtown Fernandina Beach. While shoppers are encouraged to check out the f armers and their seasonal produce, bakers and their f resh pastries and breads, meat and dairy farmers specialties and more, two local chefs also are found at the Market Place. Brian Grimley of Lulus at the Thompson House, locate d on South Seventh Street, was born in the West C ountry of England. An engineer by trade, Brian is a self-taught chef who relocated to Fernandina Beach from Colonial Beach in Northern Virginia, about 35 miles from the Harry Nice M emorial Bridge into Maryland. If you have ever b een to The Old Line State, you already know, Maryland is for Crabs and Grimley orders crab for his restaurant directly from the Chesapeake Bay. A fan of local sourcing, he uses local shrimp, fruits and vegetables when he can find them. Grimley prefers the low country menus and flavors and reads new cookbooks c oming out of Charleston, S avannah and New Orleans. A n up-and-coming area he likes to watch for new trends in dining is Alabama. Lulus at the Thompson House is at the farmers market every Saturday. Grimleys wife Melanie b rings their crab cakes, and t hey also specialize in both p lain and spicy pimento cheese spr e ads that often sell out. Another local chef youll find at the market is Adam Sears, owner of Merge Restaurant on South EighthS treet. He comes to the M arket Place every other S atur d ay with his jerk chicken patties and Low Country sausage and shrimp patties. Sears has been cooking professionally since age 14, when he began grilling steaks when steaksm ade to order and all you c an eat buffets were all the r age. A culinar y graduate of Johnson and Wales University in South Carolina, Sears dishes are inspired by music and art and he is always trying new flavors and flavor combinations.M ost of all, Sears enjoys b eing a par t of an inter na tional food gr o up whose members preserve the pleasur es of the table, bring ing together the best of food and wine. Join him every other Satur day at the market and find out what seasonal d elight he is cr eating in his k itchen. T he featured nonprofit March 29 will be the Friends of the Fernandina Branch Library. Sam Bone and Hambone Stumps will provide live music. Well behaved, leashed pets are always welcome. V isit FernandinaBeachMarketPla ce.com or call 557-8229. BUSINESSCARDBILLBOARD DA V I S,MA R T I N&BE R N A R D,P.A.-AT T O R N E Y S A TLA WForeclosureDefenseBankruptcyDebtSettlementATTORNEYR o b e r t D B e r n a r d9 6 0 1 8 5 G a t e w a y B o u l e v a r d S u i t e 1 0 4 A m e l i a I s l a n d F L 3 2 0 3 4 P h o n e : ( 9 0 4 ) 2 6 1 2 8 4 8 F a x : ( 9 0 4 ) 2 6 1 4 4 7 6 E m a i l : b o b @ e i g h t f l a g s l a w c o m HOME & GARDEN BRIEFS F F o o r r t t e e v v e e n n t t Fort Clinch State Park, 2601 Atlantic Ave., will comm emorate the part that Fort Clinch played in the SpanishA merican War from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. March 29 and 9 a.m.n oon March 30. The fort will be filled with uniformed interp reters and participants will also be able to enjoy exhibits of the armament and period military equipment. Fees include $6 per vehicle park entrance fee plus $2 per person fort admission. For inform ation call 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org. N N a a t t u u r r a a l l i i s s t t c c l l a a s s s s Coastal Trader II, 2245 Sadler Road, Fernandina Beach will host its first Island Education Series on April 1 from 4-4:30 p.m. for ages 5 and u p with Wild Amelia Junior Naturalist Program author R obyn Nemes presenting information on Crab Adapt ations from the S eashore b ooklet. The cost is $10 and advance registration is required at coastaltraderii @gmail.com or by calling Susan DeWolf at 321-6369. C C o o n n t t a a i i n n e e r r g g a a r r d d e e n n i i n n g g O n April 2 at 10 a.m., M aster Gardener volunteer C arol Ann Atwood will conduct a Landscape Matters class on container gar d ening from beginning to end, including a handout of surrounding nurseries and plant identifica tion. The session will take place at the Yulee Extensiono ffice. The class is free and o pen to the public. For inform ation, see the Extension website at: http://nassau.ifas. ufl.edu/horticulture/landmatters/landmatters.html or con tact the of fice at 879-1019. G G a a r r d d e e n n S S o o c c i i a a l l F ernandina Mulch & S tone, on A1A just west of the S have Bridge, will hold its 2014 Spring Garden Social on April 3 from 4-5:30 p.m. The fr ee event will featur e guest speaker Rebecca Jor di, exten sion director for Nassau County and a UF/IF AS faculty member. Jordi will discuss p roper tree planting and how t o best r ecuperate from winter and get ready for spring. Mike Brown and his Batch 501 team will pr ovide mouth-watering bites and featur e Batch 501 s bloody Mary cocktail drink mix. Fer nandina Mulch and Stone will also give away door p rizes. Register online at w ww.fernandinamulch.com. W W i i l l d d A A m m e e l l i i a a e e v v e e n n t t s s Wild Amelia is now accepting online registrations for the Nature Photography Classes and Ecotours of the eighth annual W ild Amelia Natur e Festival, set for May 16-18 at venues on and ar ound Amelia Island. For a description of the classes, instructors and locations, visit wildamelia.com or call Dawna Moore, class coordinator, at 556-4880. Entries ar e being accepted for the sixth annual Wild Amelia Natur e Photography Contest to r ecognize outstanding photography that celebrates the natural landscapes of Amelia Island. The contest is open to adults and children. Deadline is April 4. Cash prizes will be awar ded; win ning images may be included in the 2015 W ild Amelia calen dar View the rules and download entry forms at www.wild amelia.com. W inners will be announced at 3:30 p.m. May 17 at the Atlantic Avenue Recr eation Center during the Wild Amelia Nature Festival. STONE Continued from 1A ISLAND MARKETS Q: I see the maples ar e b ursting with color r ight now. After looking c losely, I noticed a pair of seeds. What are they? MM A: The botanical term for these str uctur e s containing the maple seeds is samaras, but they are more often r efer r ed to as helicop t ers, or whirligigs. A ll maple trees produce s amaras, but red, silver and Norway maples often produce the largest quantities. Over the next few weeks, these seeds will rain down on lawns, decks, r oofs and gut ters in many locations which c an become a nuisance, e specially after we have had s uch a large number of laurel oak leaf drop within the last few weeks. But raking leaves fr om the yard and removing them fr om our gutters in the spring is a small price to pay f or having such large, beautif ul tr ees on our property. B oth oaks and maples ar e a lso the source of much of the yellow pollen we ar e seeing all over our cars lately, in addition to being the r eason for our allergic reactions to pollen. It is possible to take the seeds and propagate your own maple tr ee. Red maple trees are incredibly fast gr owers so you should have a nice size tr ee within a few years. Seed propagation would be a wonderful project for any young person. Nothing is more rewarding than seeing a tree develop fr om seed. Q: I have a very shaded lot and I am thinking of adding mor e ferns to my plant beds. What can you tell me about the Ghost fern? It sounds so intriguing. PD A: Ghost is a hybrid fern that was developed fr om a cr oss between Athyrium niponicum var. pictum and Athyrium filix-femi na. It gets the popular name Ghost because of the silvery color of the o uter edge o f the f r o nds. When temperatur es get war mer the color often gets a hint of blue. T he silv er color on t he fr o nds comes from its Japanese painted fer n parent and the upright growth of the fronds comes from its lady fern parent. Itg enerally grows to no more t han 2 1/2 feet tall, with an e ven smaller spread. The mature size makes it a wonder ful plant for small, shade gar dens. It can tolerate dap pled light, but dir ect afternoon sun here will cause brown edges and the plantw ill be very unattractive if it s ur vives. G host fer n is less sensitive to dry soils but it should not be allowed to get too dry. If you have a rabbit problem, this plant does not appear to be very appetizing to the furry creatures. However, I must warn you, if rabbits or deer get hungry enough, they will eat most any plant. I have a Ghost fer n in my garden now, and it survived the winter beautifully. In some colder climates, the fern is considered deciduous, meaning it will lose its fronds but return when temperatures are warmer. Its cold hardiness zone is 4-8. I am in cold har diness zone 9a, so those of you on the east part of Nassau County might want to add this little beauty to your landscape. Those of us on shaded lots should consider adding more ferns as they add texture and color to our beds and ar e fabulous fillers for small, tight areas. But, you know how I feel about Boston fer n please keep it in the pot and do not plant it i n the ground here. Q: I just moved here and I d iscover e d this small little tree in my backyard. Do you know what it is? SZ A: W ell, welcome to Nassau County, Florida. I am glad you brought me a twig with the leaves, whichh elped me identify it quickly. I t is called a r ed buckeye, A esculus pavia. Red Buckeye is a small Nor th American native tr e e capable of r eaching 25 to 30 feet tall in the wild though is most often at 15 to 20 feet high. Red Buckeye is mostp opular for its springtime d isplay of thr eeto six-inchl ong, upright, red flowers that are quite attractive to hummingbir ds. These blooms ar e followed by flat, r ound capsules that contain bitter and poisonous seeds. The large, dark green, p almate leaves usually offer n o gr eat color change in fall a nd often dr o p as early as late September. Red buckeye lives best in cold hardiness zone 6-9a and in full to partial shade. View a publication from the University of Florida on the Red Buckeye at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ st064. Rebecca Jordi, UF/IFAS County Extension Dir ector for Nassau County and Nassau County Horticulture Agent III, is a University of Florida faculty member. Extension locations are the satellite office at the County Building in Yulee and the main Extension Office in Callahan. The UF/IF AS Nassau County Demonstration Garden is located at the James S. Page Gover nmental Complex and demonstrates best management practices for Northeast Florida. Mail questions to Garden Talk, c/o Rebecca Jordi, Nassau County Extension, 543350 US 1, Callahan, FL 32011. Visit http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu. rljor di@ufl.edu Whirligigs a sign of spring G ARDEN T A LK Becky Jordi The Amelia Island Garden Show is pleased t o announce that Draper Underwood of Draper Underwood Clay Pottery will return to the show, set for April 19 and 20 in Central Park, downtown Fernandina Beach. Draper has been in the hand-made clay pottery business for 15 years. Much of the handturned plant and garden pottery he features is made by the Hewell family outside of Gillsville, Ga. The Hewell family has been turning pottery i n that area for over 150 years, with each piece hand-turned on one of their potters wheels. Some of the clay products are made by Cravens p ottery, which is also hand-turned in Georgia. A t the show, Draper will also have clay bird b aths made by Burley Clay in Roseville, Ohio. These garden pottery and bird baths have been m ade by Burley since 1933. Draper is proud to say that all of their clay pottery is made in America. Come celebrate nature in full bloom on the third weekend in April when Southeast Tourism S ocietys Top 20 Event, the Amelia Island G arden Show, celebrates its fifth year at Central P ark. F or two days, April 19 and 20, Mother Nature will show off her brightest colors in an a rray of botanical wonders from nurseries and growers showcasing flowers, ferns, fruit trees, palms, orchids, native plants, herbs, container gardens, succulents, bamboo, roses, butterflyfriendly plants, shrubs and more, complemented by garden accessories such as pottery, outdoor wall and fence dcor, furniture and more. For both days, on-site experts will answer y our questions about gardening and how to green your home, yard and garden. Stop for an encounter with the raptors presented by ARC, t he bird of prey rehabilitation center. ARC is d edicated to raptor rehabilitation, education a nd research, and increasing awareness of Floridas raptors and the habitats in which they l ive. Enjoy gourmet foods and the Picnic Bench Dining Court, from fresh pastries and a coffee for breakfast to taking a break for lunch. A two-day pass for Saturday and Sunday is $5. Admission for Sunday only is $4. Children u nder 12 are free and please, no pets. Visit w ww.ameliagarden.com. Call 491-4872 or visit w ww.ameliafarmersmarket.com to sign up for t he email newsletter Georgia pottery at garden show Draper U nderwood Clay Pottery w ill return to the 2014 A melia Island Garden Show with handmade clay pottery, most o f which is made by the H ewell family outside of G illsville, Ga. SUBMITTED

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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK C C C C L L A A S S L L A A S S S S S S I I I I F F F F I I I I E E E E D D D D T T o o P P l l a a c c e e A A n n A A d d , C C a a l l l l ( ( 9 9 0 0 4 4 ) ) 2 2 6 6 1 1 3 3 6 6 9 9 6 6 . T T h h e e C C l l a a s s s s i i f f i i e e d d A A d d D D e e a a d d l l i i n n e e f f o o r r W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y s s i i s s 5 5 : : 0 0 0 0 p p . m m . M M o o n n d d a a y y a a n n d d f f o o r r F F r r i i d d a a y y s s i i s s 5 5 : : 0 0 0 0 p p . m m . W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y T T H H E E N N E E W W S S L L E E A A D D E E R R S S E E R R V V I I C C E E D D I I R R E E C C T T O O R R Y Y I I S S L L O O C C A A T T E E D D B B E E L L O O W W 5B N EWS -L EADER F R IDAY M A RCH 28, 2014 1 00ANNOUNCEMENTS 1 01Card of Thanks 102Lost &Found 103In Memoriam 104Personals1 05Public Notice 106Happy Card 1 07Special Occasion 1 08Gift Shops 2 00EMPLOYMENT 201Help Wanted 202Sales-Business 203Hotel/Restaurant 2 04Work Wanted 2 05Live-in Help 206Child Care 207Business Opportunity 300EDUCATION 3 01Schools & Instruction 302Diet/Exercise 3 03Hobbies/Crafts 3 05Tutoring 3 06Lessons/Classes 400FINANCIAL 401Mortgage Bought/Sold 402Stocks &Bonds 4 03 F inancial-Home/Property 4 04Money To Loan 500FARM & ANIMAL 501Equipment 502Livestock & Supplies5 03Pets/Supplies 504Services 6 00MERCHANDISE 6 01Garage Sales 6 02Articles for Sale 603Miscellaneous 604Bicycles 605Computers-Supplies 6 06 P hoto Equipment &Sales 6 07Antiques-Collectibles 608Produce 609Appliances 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 6 11Home Furnishings 612Muscial Instruments 6 13 T elevision-Radio-Stereo 6 14Jewelry/Watches 6 15Building Materials 616Storage/Warehouses 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 618Auctions 6 19Business Equipment 6 20Coal-Wood-Fuel 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 623Swap/Trade 6 24Wanted to Buy 625Free Items 7 00RECREATION 7 01Boats &Trailers 7 02Boat Supplies/Dockage 703 Sports Equipment Sales 704Recreation Vehicles 705 Computers &Supplies 8 00REAL ESTATE 8 01 W anted to Buy or Rent 802Mobile Homes 803Mobile Home Lots 804Amelia Island Homes8 05Beaches 806Waterfront 8 07Condominimus 8 08Off Island/Yulee 8 09Lots 810Farms & Acreage 811Commercial/Retail 812Property Exchange 8 13Investment Property 8 14West Nassau County 815Kingsland/St. Marys 816Camden County 817Other Areas 8 50RENTALS 851Roommate Wanted 8 52Mobile Homes 8 53Mobile Home Lots 8 54Room 855 Apartments-Furnished 856Apartments-Unfurn. 857Condos-Furnished 8 58Condos-Unfurnished 859Homes-Furnished 860Homes-Unfurnished 8 61Vacation Rentals 862Bed & Breakfast 863Office 8 64Commercial/Retail 865Warehouse 9 01TRANSPORTATION 9 01Automobiles 902Trucks 9 03Vans 904Motorcycles 905Commercial B B U U D D D D Y Y S S P P A A I I N N T T I I N N G GQuality Work at Reasonable PricesNo Job Too Small or Too LargeLicensed Bonded Insured FREE ESTIMATES AVAILABLE225-9292 TRACTOR WORKSERVICEDIRECTORY ROOFING State Reg. Building Contractor 40 Years Experience Licensed Insured State Licensed RB0055959GARAGES ROOM ADDITIONS NEW HOMESQU ALITY GU AR ANTEED 24x24 Wood Frame Only Additional Cost for Concrete Block845-3350 BRANNANCONSTRUCTION 2-Car Garages$16,49500 GARAGE DOORS POOLSERVICE P PE E R R F F E E C C T TC CL L E E A A N N, I IN N C C. .P P l l e e a a s s e e C C a a l l l l U U s s A A t t 7 7 5 5 3 3 3 3 0 0 6 6 7 7HOMES CONDOS OFFICESBONDED,INSURED CLEANING SERVICE Steven Hair Maintenance, Inc. The local guy since 1984 Quit Paying Too Much!Operator or door replacements Broken springs Cables Transmitter replacement Stripped gears Service for all makes & models904-277-2086GARAGE DOOR & OPERATOR SYSTEMS Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty C C O O A A S S T T A A L L R R O O O O F F I I N N G G S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S SNassau Countys Largest Roofing & Siding Contractor Serving Satisfied Homebuilders & Homeowners Since 1993 Re-Roofing New Roofing Siding Soffit & Fascia261-2233Free EstimatesACoastal Building Systems Co CCC-057020 HOME REPAIRHOME INSPECTIONSSTATE CERTIFIEDLocally Owned &Operated904-491-4383 Florida GardenerLawn MaintenanceMowing, trimming,edging&blowing Pruning and weedingOrganic Fertilization All Natural Fertilization Soil Replenishment with Microbes CornGluten Lawn TreatmentsLandscapeFlower Beds and Plantings Florida Friendly Design Hydroseeding & SodSprinkler System ExpertsInstallations Tune-ups and maintenance plans Repairs and valve locating( ( 9 9 0 0 4 4 ) ) 7 7 5 5 3 3 1 1 5 5 3 3 7 7www.FloridaGardenerInc.comLicensed & Insured Call a News-Leader AD-Visor at 261-3696 and let them help you put the Service Directory to work for you. Two sizes available to meet your companys needs. PAINTING CONSTRUCTION B B o o b b s s I I r r r r i i g g a a t t i i o o n n & & L L a a n n d d s s c c a a p p i i n n g g I I n n c c . Full Service Lawn Maintenance Landscape Design & Installation Irrigation Installation & Repair Outdoor Lighting Solutions Seasonal Lighting Projects Sod Installation & Repair Concrete Pavers & Fire Pits Deck Installation & Repair Retaining Walls &Ponds Grading Services & Drainage904-261-5040ES12000919 bobsirrigationlandscape.com Scott LawsonSales ConsultantChris LoweSales ConsultantRon Anderson464054 SR 200 Yulee(904Serving Nassau County for over 20 years with WERE STILLHERE! NEW& USED CARS LAWN MAINTENANCE Place an Ad! Call 261-3696 CONCRETE Place an Ad! Call 261-3696 6Seamless Aluminum GuttersFINANCINGAVAILABLE When It Rains Be Prepared.(904261-1940LICENSED&INSUREDLowell Duster AMELIA ISLAND GUTTERS ANY TIMEWindow &House Cleaning (904) 583-6331 PRESSURE WASHINGRAYOROURKEHouses Trailers Patios Driveways etc. Exterior WindowsWood Decks Cleaned & ResealedFREEESTIMATES261-4353 PRESSURE WASHING CONSTRUCTION Patios Sidewalks & driveway add-ons, starting at$749Wewill meet or beat any reasonable quotes .Highest Quality Lowest PricesLicensed & BondedOffice: (904 Cell: (904 THIS SPACE AVAILABLEAdvertise In The News-Leader Service Directory! Call 261-3696 and find out how to put your advertising dollars to work for you! THIS SPACE AVAILABLEAdvertise In The News-Leader Service Directory! Call 261-3696 and find out how to put your advertising dollars to work for you! Place an Ad! Call 261-3696 THIS SPACE AVAILABLEAdvertise In The News-Leader Service Directory! Call 261-3696 and find out how to put your advertising dollars to work for you! 904-277-6700Weekly SWIMMINGPOOLSERVICEPool Resurfacing &Brick Paver work ANNOUNCEMENTS 1 02 Lost & Found L OTS ATLIGHTHOUSE CIRCLEAwesome view of Egans Creek & Fort Clinch St Park Single family estate lot adjacent to historic landmark Amelia Island Lighthouse. 370+/ft on Navigable side of Egans Creek and is one of the highest elevations on the east coast. $850,000 MLS# 37069 96106 WADES PLACEF ormerly the Down Under Restaurant, one of Fernandina's landmark restaurants on deep w ater w/ dock & small craft launch. Tons of potential for this truly one-of-a-kind propertyw ith endless possibilities. Also includes large d eck,"party" shed, 3 apartments and office/mgr s pace. Must see to appreciate!PROPERTYSOLD AS IS $650,000. MLS#61913 1 515 S. FLETCHER AVENUENice 3BR/2BAOcean View home, observation deck, wet bar, central atrium, and beach access across the street make this a home for entertaining! Stucco exterior, side entry garage, and unopened street on south side of lot are other features of this home. $595,000 MLS#603988 4016 ST.PAULBLVDin Lofton Oaks on large corner lot with fenced in back yard. There is additional parking in the back yard with parking pad and gated access to rear yard. Master bedroom has oversized walk-i n shower and a large walk-in closet. $127,000MLS#59700 SOUTH FLETCHER AVENUEPristine 75' Oceanfront lot on Amelia Island. Your chance to own one of the few remaining Oceanfront lots available on Amelia Island. Buy now for either investment or to build. $525,000 MLS#56671 CUSTOMIZED 3BR/2BAC ustomized 3 Br with a office/study, Split Bedroom, has transom windows for natural light in hallway, tint-e d windows in kitchen dining, custom built in shelving G ranite Countertops. Garage is heated & cooled, locate d on thesouth end of Amelia Island, home in Golfside South with a Championship golf course short walk to beachs, with community pool. Pool and beach access forGolfside is located on Ritz side of road. Whole house wired for security system.$459,000 MLS#590708 6088 RHOERLAN PLACEL arge undeveloped parcel on Lofton Creek, Feasibility study done in 2012shows 15 lots, 7on the creek is on file in our office. $540,000 MLS#60872 HISTORIC DISTRICT This 2784 appox. sq. ft. vintage home has been modified into 4 apartments.The largest apartment has a fireplace, hardwood floors, eat-in kitchen and has been well maintained. Rent all units or live in one and rent the others out. The property consists of 3-1br/1ba & 1-2br/1ba. $302,000 MLS#53575 86036 GRAHAM COURTLovely well maintained 3br/2ba split floor plan home in Page Hill. Excellent location to schools and shopping, with easy travel to U.S. 17, A1Aand close to I-95. French doors section off the office and dining rooms at the frontof the house, the kitchen flows into the living area separated by a counter. The porch on the back is screened-in leading to the fenced back yard. Thelot is almost an acre as the land extends beyond the fence.$190,000 MLS#61971RACHAELAVENUE 75x100lot $130,000 2.66 ACRE LOT in Nassauville, undeveloped and ready to build. Deeded Access to Rainbow Acres Boat Ramp and short distance fromn ew county boat ramp. $149,000 MLS #57615 COMMERCIALLOT 851018 US Why 17 (zoned CG F rontage on US Highway 17. It does have a 30X20 Block Building divided into 3 separate bays with roll up doors; which need work. T ake down the building and build to suit or renovate the building to fit your business. AWESOME VIEW of Egans Creek & Ft. Clinch State Park, single family estate lot adjacent to historic landmark Amelia IslandL ighthouse. 370+/ft. on navigable Egans Creek. One of the highest elevations on the east coast. Possible oceanview and/or view of downtown Fernandina Beach. Tree/top/boundary survey on file $850,000 M LS#37069 O cean front 75 ft lot $525,000 MLS 56671 DESIRABLE 1 ACRE Lot on the South End of the Island, Beautiful t rees and Estate sized lot make this a difficult to find property on Amelia, $250,000 for the Acre, or the corner 1/2acre for $139,000 and the inside 1/2 for $124,900.Y ULEEMINI WAREHOUSE Good opportunity to grow y our own self storage facility and/or add new retail/office. 5 70on U.S. 17, total 3.5 acres+/-. Warehouse on approx. 2acres. $ 1,575,000 R ESIDENTIALLOT 1323 Beech Street. 51 x 86 feet corner l ot at 14th street and Beech. P RIME FRONTAGE ALONG US 17 just north of A1A, High development area in the heart of Yulee. $295,000. Owner Financing Possible. Plans for an 11,00 s.f. Professional Office Building on file. 6 4 ACRES along Amelia Island Parkway for a Master Planned Development R E D U C E D LOTS COMMERCIAL& DEVELOPMENT 3028S. 8th St./A1A, Fernandina Beach, FL32035www.lasserrerealestate.com lasserrerealestate@att.net904-261-4066 Think Ill let that native land agent be my guide. LASSERREREALESTATE, INC.PA GE1 1 A pril 2014REAL ESTATESH O WCASE Help wanted at Fernandina BeachGolf Club. Positions open include server and l ine cook. Please contact Melanie Robertson at mr obertson@fer nandina beachgolfclub.com orstop by in person. LOST GOLD CHARMBRACELET 7 c harms with grandchildrens names. C all (904 I f You Have Lost Your Pet p lease check the Nassau Humane Society facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next to the airport (904 Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078 L icense Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers l icense building (904 L OST C ontemporary two-tone gold w/ solitaire diamond wedding band. Call (904 1 05 Public Notice ALL REAL ESTATE Advertised Herein is subject to the Federal F air Housing Act, which makes it i llegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or the intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. The News-Leader will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. I f you believe that you may have b een discriminated against in connection with the sale, rental or financing of housing, call the United States Department of H ousing and Urban Development HUD 1(800 the hearing impaired 1(800 9275. E MPLOYMENT 2 01 Help Wanted C DL-A TEAM OWNER OPERATORS $2500 lease incentiv e! Team dedicated routes. Great revenue & regular weekly home time! (888 Industries, nfipartners.com ANF P/T COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANT Active community association seeks excellent writer/editor to assist with content for a wide r ange of communications, e.g., reports on community meetings and e vents, weekly and monthly news to members, website updates. Proficieny in MS Word and Publisher required. Experience with business-oriented social media marketing a plus. Approximately 10 hours per week. Send resume to Barbar a T r app AIPCA, P .O Bo x 15729, F ernandina Beach, FL 3 2035 or aipcamailbo x @gmail.com. Equal Opportunity Employer B USY LADYS BOUTIQUEin the O mni Plantation Resort is looking f or an experienced part time s alesperson. Please email y o ur resume to: k ok oatlantic@hotmail.com or call t he store at (904 H AMPTON INN at the Beach accepting applications for room attendants. Apply online at www.imichotels.com. 2 01 Help Wanted 2 01 Help Wanted REGIONAL MEDIA COMPANY is looking for an Advertising Salesperson. Ideal candidate will be a self-starterw ith a proven record of successful a dvertising sales. Competitive salary with benefits package. Submit resume to: H.R., P.O. Box 16766-B, F ernandina Beach, FL 32035. D OO WOP DINER now hiring s ervers, dishwashers and line cooks. E xperienced need only apply. Apply Monday Friday only. 1120 South 14th St. (904 B ARTENDER WANTED N ow accepting applications for experienced Bartender at American Legion Post #54, 626 S. Third St., Fernandina Beach. (904 Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process medical claims from home. Call the Federal Trade Commission to find out how to spot medical billing scams.1 (877TC-HELP. A message from the N ews-Leader and the FTC. A UTO TECHNICIAN E xperienced Auto Technician/Mechanic needed. Multiple openings. No pie in the sky commission or flat rate. Steady income you can count on. Fax resume to (904 1852 Sadler Rd. EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSearn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified driv e rs. Home most weekends. ( 843)266-3731 / w ww bulldoghiw a y com EOE. ANF HIRING ALL POSITIONS Full or part-time. Turner Ace Hardware (904 261-5270. JANITOR Immediate opportunity with Martex Services on Amelia Island for a reliable janitor Work includes policing grounds in a resort community, cleaning common areas, trash removal,e tc.. Full time -must be able to work weekends and holidays. Reliable t ransportation and clean driving record required. Experience preferred. Excellent benefits and compensation. FAX resume to 904-261-0821 or call 904-261-5364. D RIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW Learn to driv e for US Xpress! Earn $700/wk. No experience needed. Local CDL training. Job ready in 15 days. 1888-368-1964. ANF EXPERIENCED A/C INSTALLER Clean driving record. Drug free. Email resume to Ameliaair@comcast.net or call (904 LANDSCAPE INSTALLER NEEDED Must be a motiv ated person with 1 year experience or more with Landscape Installation. Must have a v a lid Florida Driv ers License. Please call James (904 FRONT DESK CLERK/BREAKFAST ATTENDANT/HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED Experience preferred. Apply at Comfort Inn, 76043 Sidney Pl. Y ulee. PEDIATRIC OFFICE in Fernandina Beach hiring R e ferral Coordinator. Must have experience. Part-time hours. Fax resume to (904 DRIVERS: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! G reat P ay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on this R egional Account. W e rner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 D ENTAL HYGIENIST A friendly local family dental pr actice is looking for an energetic part-time dental hygienist. Florida RDH required. Send resume to: ameliagentledentistry@comcast.net o r A melia Gentle Dentistry 1699 S. 14th St. #21, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 THE SURF RESTAURANT is now hiring for all positions including f ront of the house management & kitchen management. Accepting applications Mon-Fri, 11am-5pm. 3199 S. Fletcher Ave. A RTISTIC FLORIST i s now i nterviewing for Part-Time Delivery Drivers and Set Ups Crew. Weekdays and Weekend late night schedule available. Must be able to lift at least5 0 lbs. Must have a clean driving record and valid driver's license. Strong Organizational skills are needed. Please apply in person ready to be interviewed. Do not call to pre-i nterview. 1430 Park Avenue, F ernandina Beach THE GOLF CLUB a t North Hampton i s looking for a part-time Golf Shop Assistant, Grille Serv e r and Kitchen Attendant. Apply at the Golf Pro Shop. N o phone calls please. Some golf or prior food & bev e r age experience p referred. 22680 North Hampton Club W ay, Yulee. MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL prefer R N license, may consider MA or LPN, f or field service work with the Healthy Start Program working with pregnant moms, infants and their families. Send resume to Loreli.R ogers@flhealth.go v o r 30 S 4th St, Fernandina, FL 32034 by 3/28/14. EEO/AA, Veterans Preference Given, Drug Screening R equired (RN level), Background S creening Required (FDLE and FBI I ncumbent may be required to work before, during and/or beyond normal work hours or days in the event of an emergency. RN/LPN for part-time position. Need someone with health care background to do assessments, counseling, & marketing. Contact Anita (904 REAL ESTATE COMPANY now hiring housekeepers. Best pay on Amelia andf lexible schedules. Saturdays mandatory. (904 NOW HIRING ELECTRICIANS & AN HVAC TECH Experienced only apply D rivers license is a must. Apply in person, 717 S. 8th St., Mon-Fri, 8-5. YOGA TEACHER WANTED Amelia Island Yoga Studio. Please call (904 3 35-0539. MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN N EEDED A partment experience a m ust. Apply at Marsh Cove-Somerset, 123 Hirth Rd. Fernandina Beach or fax resume (904 R ECEPTIONIST POSITION a v ailable in busy animal hospital. We are adding to our client service staff and are looking for a polished professional multi-tasker who loves to engage with pets and their owners. We are seeking a motivated individual with exemplary o rganizational skills. V eterinary experience is not required, but is a plus.A pplicants will be expected to learn and discuss basic veterinary products and procedures. No phone inquiries. Please bring in resume. Laurel Oaks Animal Hospital, 5775 Laurel Island P arkway, Kingsland, GA 31548. S ERVERS & COOK for fast paced family resturant. Experience required for F/T lunch & dinner schedule. EOE. Apply 2-4pm only. Sonns BBQ, Fern. Bch. P ART-TIME OPPORTUNITY f or upbeat customer service driven i ndividual with retail experience, natural foods knowledge, and a passion for healthy living. Send resume to: k immiebeaton@gmail.com or fax to (904 available at Nassau Health Foods. 204 Work Wanted NEED A MAID? Call Denise, 451-7550. S EEKING P/T OFFICE OR ADMIN WORK Excellent phone, people and o ffice skills. Highly organized. (904 206-2270 or email arlyse3@gmail.com EXPERIENCED,Licensed, Bonded & A ffordable Certified Nurses Assistant In home care, light housekeeping, & much more. Call 904548-2139. H ANDYMAN I nt. & ext. work. 15 y ears exp No job too big. Senior & war vet discounts. Call (90449-7608. FEMALE CONTRACTOR LOOKING FOR ANY WORK Ev e rything! S weat equit y DIY Fully licensed, insured. (904

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6B F RIDAY M ARCH 28 2014 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK PALMETTOWALKSHOPPINGCENTER1200 square foot. $1600 monthly Including all fees. C C a a l l l l A A l l9 9 0 0 4 4 3 3 1 1 0 0 5 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 S S T T O O R R E E F F O O R R R R E E N N T T OPEN HOUSE86190 RemsenburgDr. North HamptonSaturday, March 29th,2014 10 am 2 pmBeautiful home overlooking the 4th fairway. Lots of living space & perfect for any family .PRICED TO SELL-$290,000Offered by Roger Martin ERA Fernandina Beach Realty(904 W/D Connections Large Closets Private Patios Sparkling Pool Tennis Courts Exercise Room Close to schools &shopping. 20 minutes to JacksonvilleCall Today!(9041Bedroom Special$525/mo.37149 Cody Circle Hilliard, FLMon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30 Sat. /Sun. by Appt.Eastwood OaksAPARTMENTS 37149 Cody Circle Hilliard, FLMon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30 Sat. /Sun. by Appt.City Apartments with Country Charm! RENTALS 904.261.4066LASSERRER eal Estate, Inc.www.lasserrerealestate.comRESIDENTIAL L ONG TERM RENT ALS 3BR/2BA home on Lofton Creek 2,600 sq.ft.,dock,garage/workshop, large lot,gourmet kitchen,manyo ther bonuses.$1,950/mo.Plus utilities. 2491 Captain Hook Drive 3br 2ba $1,500 + utilitiesV A CA TION RENT AL AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/ MONTHLY 2BR/1BA Ocean-view.487 S.Fletcher.A cross the street from the beach.All util,wi-fi,TV & phone. 3BR/3BA townhome in Sandpiper L oop$1850/wk plus taxes&cleaning f ee. 1801 S.Fletcher 2BR/1BA furnished B each Cottage,monthly rental great f or extended vacations,winter rental, orlonger.Public beach access close, call office to inspect now vacant.C OMMER C IAL 13 & 15 North 3rd Street,Historic District 1500 + Sq.Ft.$2,400.00/mo. Two 800sf Office/Retail spaces,can b ejoined for one,1,600 sq ft space, A IA next to Peacock Electric $12/sq. f t +CAM & Tax Amelia Park Unit B small office (2 r ooms) with bath,576 sq.ft. $1050/mo.+ sales tax. 1839 S.8th St.adjacent to Huddle H ouse,1,800 sq.ft.$1700/mo.lease + t ax.Sale also considered. O FFICE CONDO DRASTIC $$ REDUCTION 3,500 Sq.Ft.reduced to $200,000f irm medical,sales or professional.Best priced office on A melia Island! BUSINESSES FOR SALE C afe turnkey operation ideal forowner-operator & priced tos ell. D ELI OR TAKEOUT SPACE L ow down Fully equipped r eady to go.Low lease rate Now taking offers R ETAIL BUILDING in historic d istrict Investment Income property or ideal for small retail u ser 2,000 Sq.Ft and just off C entre StreetAmelia Coastal RealtyACRFL.comC ontact: Phil Griffin T : 904.556.9140 E : phil@acrfl.com 861 Vacation Rentals OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA. C all (904 R ealtor, for special rates. 8 63 Office R ED OTTER CENTER 3 charming, ample spaces. Safe, secure, private. Call Ben (904 SPACE AVAILABLE Amelias premier business address on Sadler Rd. Fromo ne office to an entire floor. Must see. ( 904)557-1817 E XECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES Office s pace from 100 sq. ft. to 2,000 sq. ft. Includes utilities, Internet, common area receptionist, conference room, break room, & security. For info call ( 904)753-4179. 8 64 Commercial/Retail RED OTTER CENTER 1050 sq. ft. G reat visibility. Available May 15th. C all Ben (904 866 Wanted to Rent A PRIL NOV Single space garage, p referably near Plantation. Call (904 T RANSPORTATION 901 Automobiles 2003 NISSAN XTERRA 123,000 miles. One owner. $3,200. Call (904 4 15-1269. 860 Homes-Unfurnished HICKORY VILLAGE 86250 Evergreen Pl. 4BR/2BA, separate living room, dining room, great room w/fireplace, 2-car garage, new carpet& paint, window treatments. $ 1395/mo. (904 8893. 111 NORTH 14TH ST. 3BR/1BA. $ 1000/mo. + $1000 deposit. Call (904 415-2961. V ISITwww.chaplinwilliamsrentals. c om f or the most recent information on Long Term Rentals. Updated Daily. Chaplin Williams Rentals, The Area's Premier Rental Company YULEE COTTAGE 2BR/1BA, CH&A, fenced, separate storage shed. $725/m o. First & last + $1000 deposit. Call ( 904)465-0511. 8 55 Apartments F urnished 3BR/2BA PARTIALLY FURNISHED APARTMENT located in prime downtown location available July 1. Washer, dryer, utilities, satellitet elevision and internet included. $ 1,700/mo. Located next to the Hampton Inn downtown Fernandina. For more info call Bob Ramshaw at ( 904)491-4911 ext. 2106. 8 56 Apartments U nfurnished P OST OAK APTS ( 904)277-7817 Affordable living located at 996 Citrona Dr. Fernandina Beach, FL. Rent starts at $597 per month. C entral a/c. 2 bedroom apts avail. immediately. TDD Hearing Impaired number #711This institution is an equal opportunity provider and e mployer. Equal Housing O pportunit 858 Condos-Unfurnished 3BR/2BA IN STONEYCREEK Upstairs unit. 1700 sf. Washer and d ryer included. $1200/mo. plus u tilities. (904904 2953. If no answer leave message. AMELIA LAKES CONDOSLiving in P aradise 1 /1 and 2/2 deluxe condos i n gated, lakeside community with 24/7 fitness ctr, resort-style pool, tennis & more! Lots of upgrades! Starting at just $749/mo! Call Tammy for our spring special at (904 www.amelialakes.com AMELIA WOODS 2BR/2BA upstairs. 1 blk from beach, many upgrades, pool, tennis, club house, W/D hookup. No smoking. Service animals only. $950/mo + dep. Avail 4/1. 491-0112 859 Homes-Furnished 3BR/3BA FULLY FURNISHED N ewer Home Community pool, 5 minutes from island, lakefront. Svc animals only. $1300/mo. greggrental@yahoo.com A FFORDABLE LIVING B ring your RV to live on a campground for $425/ mo. All utilities included. Ask about senior citizen special. (904 SMALL 2BR MH on 1 acre with f ishing pond. Rent $650/mo. + $650 deposit. (904 8 54 Rooms F ULLY FURNISHED r oom & bath. U se of washer/dryer and kitchen. All utilities included. $500 mo. Call (904 261-3903 or (904 REAL ESTATE R ENTALS 852 Mobile Homes 4BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME on one acre located on Lil William Rd. $900/mo. + $900 deposit. (904 O N ISLAND S m eff in duplex Nottingham Dr. $145 wk, $575 mo. inc utils. 2/1 MH in park $165/wk, $675/mo + dep. Utils avail. 261-5034 YULEE Nice SW 2BR/1BA, $625/mo. water & sewer incl. Also, 2BR SW rent t o own available, $650/mo. Water incl. (904 STATIONARY RVS for rent weekly or monthly. Call (904 6 11 Home Furnishings L IKE NEW LAY-Z-BOY electronically o perated recliner chair. Beautiful Wine colored fabric. Original price $800, asking $350 (not negotiable ( 904)321-0027 for appt to view. REAL ESTATE S ALES 8 02 Mobile Homes 3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME for sale as is, on 1/2 acre. Needs a little TLC. $35,000 firm. Call (904 8 04 Amelia Island Homes 3BR/2BA 2300 sq. ft., south end, gated community. $370,000. (904 8 85-2527 8 06 Waterfront W aterfront Homes & Lots Call ( 904) 261 for information. C.H. Lasserre, Realtor. 809 Lots FOR SALE BYOWNER 1+ acres in Y ulee, Duane Rd. $29,000. Call (910 602 Articles for Sale WHITE BEDROOM FURNITURE Excellent condition. Dresser, chests (4 night stand, twin headboards (Ethan A llen), table, stools, lamps. 261-5573 FOR SALE Oak dining room table w /6 chairs, oak file cabinet w/4 drawers, king size bed, rolling tool cabinet, & work bench. Call (904 3288. 140 LBS FREE WEIGHTS 2 benches, body bands, 1 tower 200, by Jake. (904 601 Garage Sales FRI 3/28 &SAT 3/29 86068 Pamela Rd, Yulee, 8am-4pm. Lawn mowers (2ator, tiles, assorted PVC pipes, shelves, doors, lamps,e lectronics, pressure washer and stain g lass supplies. M OVING SALE E xcess displays $30-$400, desk, chairs, TV. All MUST go by Saturday 3/29. Books Plus, 107 Centre St, Fri 3/28 & Sat 3/29, 1 0am. (904 FRI. 3/28 & SAT. 3/29 from 8am1 pm. 86331 Meadowwood Dr., in Meadowfield. Many antique and vintage items such as old school maps. G ARAGE SALE F ri. 3/28 & Sat. 3/29, 8 am-1pm. 23873 Flora Parke Blvd., F.B. Bar stools, corner shelf, airline pet carrier, pictures, vases, baskets, books, C s, pillows, couch, ceramic containers, & much more. 3-FAMILY GARAGE SALE 97058 Y orkshire Dr., Yulee. Sat. 3/29, 8am2 pm. Baby items, household goods, furniture, lawn furniture, etc. ESTATE SALE 98137 Little Piney Isl. Pt., Fernandina. Household,c ollectibles, exercise, tools, hunting k nives, etc. (see Craigslist). Fri. 3/28 & Sat. 3/29, 8am. 601 Garage Sales ESTATE SALE INSPANISH VILLA Wurlitzer piano, 4 poster bed q ueen with canopy frame, 1960s m arble top tables, plant stands, 1 930s deco half moon desk matching bookcase, Scandinavian 3 leg chairs, Guatamalian ant. h andcarved door, handcarved m asks, bookcases, books, many handcarved Guatamalian items, large amount ant. glass, wall shelves, Noritake china Amity pattern, Huipile fabric & pillows (very colorful), ant. window, fishing poles, tools, tables, kitchen, Marinba music instrument, fireplace fender, l ove seat, book stand, gas grill, l arge planters, patio table/6 chairs, patio table/2 chairs, ant. wooden bench, ant. rocker, childs table/2 chairs, wooden file cab., artists Escartin, Julian Chex, Sisay, Victor Vasquez Temo; so much more. Thurs., Fri., Sat., 3/27, 28, 29, 8am3pm. 96152 Glenwood Rd., Yulee, FLout Blackrock Rd. to Cedar to G lenwood Rd. one way entrance one way exit Do not block lanes. Follow all red & white signs. Please do no block another card & do not come by boat. EGANS LANDING king brass bed, linens, tools, yard art, collectibles, jewelry, lots more good stuff! Sat. 3/29, 8am. 2804 Robert Oliver Ave. off Simmons. Rain postpones. S AT 3/29 &SUN 3/30 Household i tems, tools. 2404 Los Robles. MOVING SALE Everything must go! 76251 Long Pond Loop (Cartesian P ointe) Yulee. 3/29, 7am-4pm. Rain or S hine Furniture, washer/dryer, w omens clothing, home dcor, grill, misc. MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE Forest Parke Dr., Flora Parke subdivision. Sat. 3/29, 8am-12noon. F ARMS & ANIMALS 503 Pets/Supplies 40 GOLD FISH free to good home. For outdoor pond. 2-3 inches. In lots of 10 or more. (904 5 04 Services EXPERIENCED PET SITTER Long term only, in your home. Mature professional. Please call for appointment (904 M ERCHANDISE 601 Garage Sales BEACHWALK SUBD. off Jasmine. M ultiple families. Sat., 8am-2pm. 94034 SUMMER TRACE in Otter Run. BowFlex treadmill, Emeril Lagasse p ots & pans, golf clubs, girls clothing sz 4-10, etc. Sat. & Sun., 11am-5pm. MOVING SALE Fri. 3/28 & Sat. 3/29, 8 am. Furniture, toys, household items, e tc. 2099A Natures Bend Dr. 207 Business Opportunities N ASSAU COUNTY LEGAL LICENSE FOR SALE Call (904