The news-leader

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Material Information

Title:
The news-leader
Uniform Title:
News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title:
News leader
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication:
Fernandina Beach Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates:
30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000366799
oclc - 04377055
notis - ACA5658
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID:
UF00028319:00886

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Preceded by:
Fernandina Beach news-leader

Full Text


F L 0 R I D A 'S


OL D E S T


W WEEKLY


N EWS PAPER


NEWS mA


L


FRIDAY SEPTEMBER20,2013/20 PAGES, 2 SECTIONS "Ibnewsleadercom


beefs up


security
MARY MAGUIRE
News-Leader
County officials are installing a new
security system at the James S. Page
Governmental Complex off AMA in
Yulee.
Work has already star-ted on an
electronic card-key system to control
access to the various offices located
there and monitor the comings and
goings of people by computer Sur-
veillance.
Officials also are adding video cam-
eras inside and out, and partnering
with the sheriff's office on a security
Assessment for all county buildings.
"Safety is always a concern for
county employees, the people who
Come to the building or who attend our
public meetings," said Commissioh
Chair Danny Leeper in an interview
after the board meeting Wednesday
morning.
Leeper asked fellow board mem-
bers to support new security meas-
ures, which also will include reposi-
tioning, video cameras within the
commission chamber. Leeper says he
would like to have"a wider view of the
room. Currently, the cameras are used
to record commission meetings, pub-
lic.hearings and special programs..
County Manager Ted Selby said
the county hired a security consult-
ant almost two years ango to develop a
security protocol for county buildings.
Various components of the plan have
been implemented since that time,
andthe card-key plan is the latest
-phase of the program.
"We're about ready to turn on the
+ .
SECURITY Continued on 3A



Library


bid gets


city OK
ANGELA DAUGHTRY
Newis-Leader .
A bid from Marand Builders of
Atlantic Beach for $1.38 mi I iu n to ren-
ovate and expand the county library in
Fernandina Beach was unanimously
appi oved by city commissioners
Tuesday, to applause from the audi-
ence.
*-: "It's taken a year to get to this
point*" City MNanager Joe Gerrity said.,
He noted thI- constr auction contract
would notgo into effect until final
agreements with the county and
Friends ,f the Library have been
reached. .
SNassau County officials have com-
mitted $600,000, toward the library,
expansion project, and the Friends of
the Library nonprofit group has pro-
jected it will raise and contribute at
least '5401).0(i1) to the construction, and
hundi eds of thousands more to-fur-
nish the expanded building. The city
has committed $600,000 from its
Forward Fernandina" loan to put
toward the project, of which about
$460,000 remains.
Gerrity said the construction con-
tract includes a $38,000 contingency,
which will go for new windows and a
matched concrete sidewalk if it is not
used for cost overruns.
"I'm well aware of the amount of
money we have to spend and have no
intention of spending more than that,"
Gerrity said.
LIBRARY Continued.on 3A


FALLEN LIMB


EDGL'SCOC K.FORTHE NEWS-LEADER
According to Capt. David Bishop of the Fernandina Beach Police Department, a food service truck
making a delivery to Fernandina Beach Middle School hit a low-hanging tree limb on Beech Street
about 9 a.m. Wednesday. The tree limb, which was sagging due to heavy rains and damp weather
conditions, pulled down cable and telephone lines and apparently became lodged behind the
truck's cab, but there were no injuries. :


County enmTloy-ees urged

to s, tepP step:


MARY MAGUIRE ,"
News Leader
Hu man i nuc tp managers are
telling Nassau Cou nty employees to
take a W'alk literally.
Managers launched a new well-
ness initiative on Monday. challeng-
ing workers to take 10,000O steps each
day of the work-week for the nexi 10
weeks. "Health at Every Size" start-
ed, Monday with hundreds of work-
Iers,,clipping pedom~eters, to their


waistband in an effort to monitor
progress.
"578?," said Mitch Kelter, IT.direc-
lor for the countN clerk's office. By 2
Sp m. Monday he reported a number
that barely' covered the distance
between the parking lot and the
office. "It looks like I gotta get out
from behind my desk a little more."
And that's part of the idea, said
human resource specialist Tina
Keider. who helped organize the pro-
gram with colleague Brittany O'Neal
"We want people to get up and
move." said Keider in a phone inter-
view on Tuesday "It's a friendly chal-
lenge designed to build morale, offer
a bit ofstress relief and it's good.f-or
your heart "
SKeider is clear to explain that no
.one is being given time off for the
challenge Employees must do their
walking on their own time or in the
course of their job.
"As people get healthier, they feel
better and that reduces absenteeism,
which is an important value to tax-
payers,' said Keider. .
Peggy Snyder squeezed in a
quick walk down ,the second floor
corridor at the judicial annex on
Monday. '.
4.448," said Snyder, who works in
the Clerk of Court's Office, while.
heading towards the stairs The judi-
cial building is the ideal place-towalk,
especially in business attire.The hall-
ways are wide, filled with light and
air-conditioned. ,
S"5,910," reported Shannon Shaw,


S, PHI-1)S BY MALR\ MACLIRE'NEWS-LEADER
Nassau County employees are being asked to walk 10,000 steps
;every day for the next 10 weeks as part of a new wellness initia-
tive called Health at Every Size. George Aviles, left, a Road and
Bridge department employee, reported 2,432 steps during lunch
break Wednesday morning. Peggy Snyder, right, of the Clerk of
Court's Office had taken 4,498 steps on Monday. ,


staff attorney for the county clerk, on
Tuesday afternoon. "I'm a little ahead
of yesterday-this time." '
' The clerk's office appears to have
a lot of participation from staff, if a
random query of workers met during
a recent tour is any indication.
Special incentives are helping


Clerk of Court John Crawford, who
was not wearing a pedometer on
Monday, is letting staff that partici-
pate in the challenge wear sneakers
to the office. And he has promised
workers that take 11.000 steps each
WALKING Continued on 3A4


Impact



fees to



fix post
,.+, ,+M W ,

Soffce?



ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
r Id
Public facilities impact fees cuild
possiblybe used to renovate the down-
town post office if it is eventually
acquired by the city, according to
Deputy City Manager Marshall
McCrary.
: "-City commissioners car also lower
impact fees at any time by ordinance
with no legal justification, McCrary
said:.
McCrary gave a brief talk on the'
purpose of municipal impact fees, how:
they are collected and how they ar6
supposed to be used during a work-
shop Tuesday. "
City impact fees have been the sub
ject of controversy for years, but more
so lately because of a class-action law-
suit brought against the city regarding
its allegedly illegal use of water and:
sewer impact. fees. The city als6
returned more than $700,000 in impact
Feet increases last month because,
According to- Cityr Attorney Tammi
Bach, the increases were not proper-
ly noticed to the public '
According to MNcCrary's presenta-
tion. municipal impact fees are applied
only to new development to raise rev-
enue -oor "expansion of capital
facilities that will serve the new devel-
opment"- The funds are only to be
used for the purposes stated, and can-
not be used for maintenance or oper-
ations The ftes are restricted to cap-
ital improvements on land, buildings.
expansion and contents of buildings,
vehicles, equipment, weapons and
communications equipment that have
an expected use of at least three years,
FEE COntinued on 3A



CityOKs


budget,


4tol
ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
City commissioners voted 4-1 to
approve the final budget and operating
mill rate for fiscal year 2013-14 at a
budget hearing Tuesday, with
Commissioner Arlene Filkoff voting
against.
The final budge includes approved
voter debt of 0.2236 mills fdr Egans
Creek Greenway bonds and a final
operating "rollback" village rate of
6.2844, for a total of 6.5080.
Filkoff said she voted against the
budget and operating millage rate.
because she did not think itwas "sus-
tainable to cut (city. employees) and
raise the mileage rate year after year
after year."
S Commissioner Pat Gass also said
she was "not exactly tickled" by the
budget. .,
"Since I'm the new kid on the '
blck, I'll know better vwhat to do next
year," Gass said.
"A good, agreement is one where
no one comes out really happy," City
Manager Joe Gerrity said.
The entire budget package takes
effect with the start of the new fiscal
year Oct. 1.
adaughly3@bnewsleade,:com


All you need is ADOPT TODAY!


I[Kin
S'l NASSAU HUMANE SOCIETY
FALAFEL ROUGE SNEEZER wW. nassauhumanesociety.com


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$1.00







FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER'20,2013 NEWS News-Leader


50
YEARS


25
YEARS


10
YEARS


Thieves ransacked the concession and busi-
ness office at Fort Clinch Stat: Park, making off
with a safe and items from thevending machines.
September 19, 1963

Concrete pilings were changing ihe landscape
as the Centre Street Waterfront Group began ren,-
ovating the Fernandina Beach marina
"September 18, 1986

The Nassau County School Board said an
impact fee on new houses was the fairest way to.
fund new school construction. . .
S .September 17, 2003


OBITUARIES


- Penny Ann Briggs
Penny Ann Briggs, 62, of
Amelia Island/Fernandina
Beach, Florida passed away
peacefully, surrounded by fam-
ily, on September 14, 2013.
Penny was born on December
5,1950 in Peoria, Illinois to the
late Russell and Jeanette
(Ransom) Trumbold.
Penny is. survived.by her
husband, 'Roderick "Rod"
fBriggs, and her
kitty Schuyler;
S the two great
lovesfof her life.
Along with her
husband,
Penny is also
survived by two
step sons; Jonathan (Heather)
Briggs of Newberry, South
Carolina, and Kyle Briggs of
Gunnison, Colorado, a brother,
Max Trumbold of Chillicothe,
Illinois, and many friends in
Florida, Illinois, and around the
country.
Celebration of life services
will take place at a later date, to
be announced.
Penny retired from'
Caterpillar Inc. in Peoria, Illinois
in 2004, after more than 30 years
of service. She was an Executive
Administrative Assistant, serv-
ing many Caterpillar Vice
Presidents, over the years. In
2004, Penny moved from Illinois
to Amelia Island, Florida. ... A
location she loved for the beau-
ty, great beaches, great people
and'great weather. Penny had a
passion for Golf. She was a
member of the Amelia River
Golf Club and dearly loved to
be with her Golf Girls, hitting .
the links and enjoying spirited
conversation in the Club House.
A surprise to many, Penny was
also a skilled markswomen....'
scoring on targets at the 2nd
Amendment Pistol Range, with
her Browning BuckmarkTarget
Pistol. Penny was also a Board
Member-of the Amelia Island
Newcomers Club, most recent-
ly serving as Secretary and
other Board positions in the
past. Penny was a member of
St Michael's Catholic Church.
Penny was a woman of faith ...
lived her faith every day.
Pennywas a bubbly positive
person, with a magnetic per-
sonality. All who knew her, loved,
her ... And, loved being in her.
presence. Penny will be sorely
missed by family and friends..
But, thereis no doubi'she is
making heaven"an even better
place and enjoying reunions


with so many others she loved,
that preceded her.
Donations can be made in
her memory to: Cat's Angels,
Inc. SPCA, P.O. Box 16072,
Fernandina Beach, FL32035 or
at www.catsangels.com.
Serenity Meadows Memorial
Park. Funeral Home & Crematory
Riverview

Donald G. Brown Jr.
Mr. Donald G. Brown, Jr.,
age 42, of Fernandina Beach,
passed away on Monday morn-
ing, September 16, 2013.
Born in Jacksonville, he is
the son of Donald G. Brown Sr.
and Kathy Carlene Wilder
Bennett He grew up in Yulee
.F and as a young
man, learned
the value of
hard'work by
working at'
Stevens Hotel
and Gas Stati6n.
throughout his
high school years, He attended
Fernandina Beach High School
where he was a member of the
graduating Class of 1989. Just
weeks aftergraduation, Donald
Began a lifelong career inthe
Electrical Industry as he start-
ed work at DeBerry Electric in
North Jacksonville While work.
ing.at DeBetry, he worked his
way through Electrician School
until becoming a Journeyman
Electrician.'Over the years, he-
worked at Peacock and White
Electric in Jacksonville before
branching out on his own as a
Partner and ,Co-Owner of
Johnny's Ejlectric in Fernandina.
Beach in 2003. Donald was a
member of the Local IBEW.'
An avid Gator fan, his life
was centered-around his wife,
'Joy, and. son;' Tripp. Donald
helped coach Tripp's Baseball
team and occasionally slippel
off with Joy for- a round of golf.
Preceding him in death is
his maternal grandmother,
Geraldine Woods.
He leaves behind, his wife
of.15 years, JoyJameson Brown,
Fernandina Beach, their son,
Donald Glenn Brown III
"Tripp", Fernandina Beach, FL,
his father, Donald G. Brown,
Sr., Yulee, FL, his mother, Kathy
Bennett (Ray), Yulee, FL, his
paternal grandmother, Ruth
Brown, Fernandina Beach, FL,
his maternal grandfather,
Mallory Wilder (Lillian), Fer-
narndif'a Be Rch ,' Pr ni lAV" ,
.Tohifriy and Joyce Jameson,
,Fernandina Beach, FL, a broth-


er in law, Wade Jameson, Fern- traced and survived Malaria
andina Beach, FL, four sisters, while serving his country.
Donna Sutton (David), Fernan- After leaving the service he
dina Beach, FL, Jennifer Brown, found himself in Fernandina
Yulee, FL, Jordyn Brown, Fer- Beach where he met a pretty,
nandina Beach, FL, Jaclyn petite redhead named Ida May,
Brown, Yulee, FL, a niece, Emily also known as "Seena". It was
Davis, three nephews, Jonathan love .at first sight and they were
Davis, Asher Bryant, Garrett married a few months later.
Sutton and many friends, After the birth of their first
extended family and coworkers. daughter they moved to
Funeral services will be at Hialeah, Florida, where their
3:30 pm, today, Friday, Septem- second daughter was born.
her 20, 2013 at the Journey Whilethere, hand a brother-in-
Church on Amelia Concourse law'owned and ran a Gulf serv-
with Reverend Jimmy Flanagan, ice station for 51/2 years before
officiating, returning to Nassau County. For
His family will receive many years he worked for his.
friends on Friday, at the church, in-laws, the Zetterowers, at
from 2:00 pm until the hour of O'NeAl General Store. After
service. "retiring" from the store, Dave
He will be laid to rest in the obtained his license' to do air
,Wilder Cemetery, Nassauville. conditioning and refrigeration
Serving as active pallbear- repair.
ers will be: Captain Cris He flew planes as a hobby
SHolland, Charles Wilder, Bruce and owned two himself, after
Wilder, Christopher Wilder, earning his pilot's license from
Darrell Hickox, Matt Johnson, one of the original Blue Angels.
John Turner and Jimmy'Giles. He served as squadron leader of
Honorary pallbearers will be Fernandina Beach's original-
Jason Eubanks, Shane Burris, Civil Air Patrol 'in the early
Bobby Lott, Jason Luke, Rofin 1950's. '
Pritchard, Dominic Johnson, Dave was a member of
Chuck Sapp and'his employees Lifeline Ministries, Church,
and coworkers from Johnny's Veterans of Foreign Wars,-,
Electric Company. American'. Legion and. was a
S Please share his life story at Mason for 63 years, attaining
www.oxleyheard.com. the level of Master.
Oxley-Heard FuneralDirectors He was predeceased by his
wife of 62 years, Ida May
David Williams (Seena) Zetterower Williams in
2009 and by his youngest
David Williams', 95, passed daughter, Kathy Diane
away September 18,2013, after (Raymond) Lewis, in 1997. He
having lived a long life' filled was also predeceased by both
with love, and hard work, his parents, five brothers,.and'3
"Dave" was born,,on June 1, sisters.
1918, in Mize, Georgia, in a log ,- He is survived by his eldest
house built by his grandfather. daughter, ,Becky (Johnny)
He was ,the 7th of 10 children Snead; one granddaughter, Amy
born to James and Isabella (Pete) Evatt; 2 grandsons,
Loden Williams.. The family Stacey (Gianihna) Cooper, and
moved several times but'Dave Joshua Lewis; one great-grand-
spent most of his younger years daughter, Aleina Diane Colon;
growing up in Birmingham, and his youngest sister, Jolind
Alabama.' Bowlin, of Clinton, Tennessee,
As a young man, some of as well as several nieces and
Dave!s jobs included a paper nephews.
route, working as a construc- He spent his later years driv-
tion foreman, as a linesman for ing area roads and visiting with
the electric company, and in a friends, being totally independ-
bakery. He also had a route ent up until the last year of his
repairing and life. Dave was a friend to all and
emptying slot never had a negative thing to
machines and say about anyone.
jukeboxes. You 'Aviewing will be held today,
name it, he did Friday, September 20, from 6:00-
it a jack of all 8:00 PM., in the chapel at Green
trades He was Pine Funeral Home. Graveside,
a very intelli- funeral services will be held,
gent an hl,) s-kipped'grades in. Saturday at 11.00' A.M. at
school and was once invited to Hughes Cemetery in Yulee
join MENSA, but declined, where he will be laid to rest with
being content with simply hay- his beloved wife, Seena, and
ing been asked, daughter, Kathy
Dave served in World War II For more information and to
with a division of the Army's sign Mr. 'Williams' online regis-
841st Engineer Aviation Battal- ter book please visit the Green
ion. Their division.was respon- Pine website at www.green-
sible for clearing the lands and pinefuneral. ,
laying runways for U.S. troops. Green Pine Funeral Home
He served as radio operator and
communications chief super- .1AT .NOTICESr
vising radio, telephone, and tele- DEAIH
graph communications systems, i
as well as repairing equipment Mrs. Cprinne Freeman,
.He said he knew what was .88, Yulee, died on Wednesday,
'going on before his command- Sept 18,2013.
Ser did! His service took him to Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors
the South Pacific and places like Edith Murphy, 84,,
New: Guinea, the southern Fernandina Beach, died on
Philippines, Australia as well as Thursday, Sept 19, 2013.
other exotic areas. He con- OxIey-Heard FuneralDirectors


WEEKLY UPDATE


Cumnberlandwalk
Walkin' Nassau will hold a
S3-mile walk on the mid-island
trail of Cumberland Island,
Ga.,on Sept..21. Check in for
the ferry in downtown St.
Marys, Ga., by 11:15 a.m..
Return on the 2:45" p.m. ferry
with the group, or stay and
take the last ferry
Ferry reservations are
required at (912) 882-4335 or
877-860-6787. Fee is $20
adults and $18 seniors. Park
feeis $4, paid the day of.
Bring bottled water and a
snack. This is'a rural island
and the'trails are moderately
,difficult. For information and
to carpool, contact Jane
Bailey at dnjbailey@mind-
Sspriingcom or 261-9884.
Wa remembered
Fort Clinch State Park
Swill host a weekend event to
commemorate phe part Fort
C 'linch played in the Spanish-
*.,-American War, on Sept, 21
Sfrom 9 a.nim.-5 p n. and Sept.
.22 from 9 a.m.- p.m.
The fort will be filled with'
uniformed interpreters and
participants will also be able
to enjoy exhibits of the arma-
ment and period military
equipment Fees include the
$6 per vehicle park entrance
fee plus $2 ,per person fort
admission. ' .
Contact the park at 277-
7274 or visit www.Florida
StateParks.org.
Guncou.es
SGary W. BelsonAssoci-
ates Inc. will hold a conr
; cealedweapon license
course at 5 p.m. Sept 24 and
27 and. at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Sept 29. A basic with defen-
sive tactics course will be
held at 7:30 a.m. Sept. 28. For
details contact Belson at 491- '
8358, (904) 476-2037 or gbel-
son@bellsouth.net. Visit
www.TheBelsonGroup.com.
Garden social
Fernandina Mulch &
Stone will host its second
Garden Social on Sept 26
from 4-5:30 p.m. The topic
'will be "Preparing for Fall
Vegetable Gardening" with
Master Gardner Candy
Lester, who will demonstrate
various styles of gardening
,, ,apd give,helpfulitips on how
to prepare your garde-n for
planting. Mike Brown of
Batch501 will provide tast-
ings of several holiday
recipes with a wine sampling.
The social is free.
Register online to be entered
to win one of three door ,
prizes. To RSVP visit
www.ferinandinamulch.com
and click on the Garden
Social sunflower.
Junior naturalists
A Wild Amelia Junior.
Naturalist program for ages
8-13, presented by Wild
Amelia member Robyn .
Nemes, will be held Sept 28
at 4 p.m. at The Book Loft,
214 Centre St
Nemes will lead activities
that explore the "wild" side
of Amelia Island. Kids will
learn about identifying
shells, birds and other
wildlife. Each participant will
receive a Wild Amelia Junior
Naturalist Workbook. An


additional activity will be led '
by artist and naturalist Eliza''
Holliday, focused on sea tur- '
tles of Amelia Island. The
program is limited to the first':;
10 children to sign up. RSVP
to The Book Loft at 261-8991;:
A minimum $10 cash dona- '
tion to Wild Amelia is :':
requested.
Reunion
The Elbert and Eloise Gill,,
family will hold their fourth .
annual reunion Saturday,
Sept. 28 at the Blackshear
Masonic Lodge, #270, at the ,
corner of Park and Greenleaf"
Streets, Blackshear, Ga. ::
Early activities will begin at
noon with a horseshoes con--:"'
test. Music featuring The
Revelators will begin at 2 ,
p.m. ,Enjoy the city park,
walking areas, tennis courts :
and a playground. A covered' I
dish supper will be served at
4 p.m. For information call .
(912) 288-0109. :
StepplngOff
Stepping Off Centre 7
meets quarterly on the fifth
Monday of each month. The':;
next meeting is at 6:30-8 p.m..-
Sept. 30 at 910 S. Eighth St :,.
This networking group :
focuses on developing and ;
supporting community
improvement and social
service projects. Please -
bring food or wine to share.
The group is on Facebook .
and Twitter as "Stepping Off'-
Centre" or email centred.
women@gmail,com. Phone,,
415-2104. ;
Woman's Club
The Woman's Club of .:
Fernandina.Beach will meet'.'
Oct 2 at the Clubhouse at
201 Jean Lafitte Blvd. In
recognition of Breast 'Cancer
Awareness Month the pro- .,
gram will be presented by :
Dr. Scot Ackerman, medical,,:
director of 1st Coast Oncolo-
gy, a provider of radiation -
therapy in three facilities
across Northeast Florida.
Ackerman is hoard certi- -
fled in radiation oncology at
St Vincent's Medical Center,
one of the three radiation :1
therapy centers.,
The program is open to ,,
anyone interested in learning.
about the latest develop- :-
nmeits in radiatitn,therapy as;
Sacancer treatment This is a,
luncheon meeting. Lunch is..
$8. Reserve by Sept..30 by
calling 261-3045 or 26.1-7191 -
or mailing craftydeonas@
yahoo.com.

Appreciation
breakfast '
In observance of Domes-
tic Violence Awareness ,
Month and in recognition of
its dedicated community ,
partners, the Micah's.Place
Board of Directors invites '
the community to its "Third
Annual Appreciation and
Awareness Breakfast" Oct: 2
at the Fernandina Beach
Golf Club, 2800 Bill Melton
Road. State Sen. Aaron Bean
Swill be the guest speaker.
Breakfast is from 7:30-8 a.m.
and the program 8-9 a.m.
Show your support and wear
purple. RSVP required by
Sept. 25. Reservations limit-
ed. Call 491-6364, ext. 102.


FOR THE RECORD

A front-page story Sept. 13 referred to the city's file pro-1 '
tection rating by the Insurance Services Office (ISO).c
Feirnandina Beach has an ISO rating of 5.
The News-Leader strives for accuracy. We will promptly cor-
rect all factual errors. Please notify the editor of errors at mpar-i.
nell@fbnewsleader.com or call (904) 261-3696.
'


NEWS
LEADER


511 Ash Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904) 261-3696 Fax 261-3698
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NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday. 12p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
SCommunity
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ADVERTISING DEADLINES
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Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.'
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LOOKING BACK*


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


WALKING
Continuedfrom 1A
day for the week can wear
jeans.
Over at the James S. Page
Governmental Complex, rec-
ords manager Debbie Moody
reported 9,700 steps for Mon-
day, a bit short of the goal.
What does the pedometer
read today?
"It's under my dress and
I'm certainly not lifting it up
to look at the number," said
Moody.
Workers can make uIp the
steps on the .weekend; say
organizers but only if they
want to, because this is a vol-
unteer effort. And it has noth-
ing to do with fighting flab
'This is not a weight loss
program!" wrote County
Manager Ted Selby earlier this
month in a letter announcing
the program to the county's
633 employees. "Face it; we all
come in a variety of sizes and
Shapes. This campaign is
about getting us in the best
shape for our unique size.
That's itl"
.Before the board meeting
on Wednesday morning, Selby
said he would have to lift his
stomach to read his pedome-
ter. "I'll tell you the number
later," he said, with a big laugh.
"2,432," said George Aviles
of the road and bridge depart-
ment while walking the road-
ways near his office along SR'
200. "Health is always a good
incentive to walk."
Like all of the county's 633


SECURITY
Continued from 1A
new card system," said Selby,
jn a phone interview on
Wednesday afternoon. "We
will be able to isolate access to
the employees and people who
need to be in the office."-" '
How about metal detec-
tors?
"We haven't moved for-
ward with that yet, but it's
something that has potential
in the future."


As people get healthier, theyfeel better
and that reduces absenteeism, which is an
important value to taxpayers.'
TINAKEIDER
NASSAU COUNTY HUMAN RESOURCES


employees, Aviles was given
a pedometer to track steps,
miles and calories. They were
paid for using part of a grant
from Florida Blue (formerly
Blue Ciross/Blue Shield), the
county's health care provider.
For the last three years, the
insurance company has given
Nassau County $75,000 each
year to fund a wellness pro-
gram. (The countyspends $5.8
million'annually on health care
for its employees, according
to Budget Director Shanea
Jones.)
Managers use the wellness
money to offer a variety of pro-
grams, which have included
tai chi, line dancing, Zumba
and jazzercise. Each spring,
county workers participate in
a health fair, complete with eye
exams; hearing tests, choles-
terol screenings and nutrition
programs.
"We had a dermatologist
at the fair for the first time
last year and she identified a
couple of people with cancer-
ous cells," said Chili Pope, the
county's human resources
director.
Pope, who said she lost 30
pounds after a county wellness
program aimed at portion con-


Last fall, the sheriff's office
stationed a bailiff at the main
entry.
"If we need more staff, Ihat
will determined by the securi-
ty assessment, and of course
funding as well," said Sheriff
Bill Leeper, in a phone inter-
view on Wednesday afternoon.
The public discussion of
security comes days after a
gunman killed 12 people at the
Washington Navy Yard in
Washington, D.C.
Sheriff Leeper said securi-


trol for meals and snacks, said
keeping workers healthy
keeps them on the job.
"I can tell you first-hand
that wellness programs can
work," said Pope.
The sheriff's office, includ-
ing command officers, are also
participating in "Health at
Every Size."
"We want our employees to
get up and move because it
gives you new energy and
focus," said Diana Crigger, the
department's human resource
director. "And when employ-
ees found out that even the
sheriff himself has a pedome-
ter and is walking, it got
more people to join and it
made it more fun and compet-
itive."
Employees are competing
for prizes, as we'll as pride.
There will be weekly give-
aways, such as visors and
water bottles, and prizes val-
ued up to $100. There is a $400
grand prize (minus taxes, say
organizers).
The program ends Nov. 22,
in time for the holiday season.
'Then everyone can eat
their way into oblivion," said
Keider.
mmaguire@fbnewsleader.com


ty drills are being discussed.
County Attorney David
Hallman said he- organized a
safety drill earlier this week
for his staff. Hallman, a for-
mer naval officer, said he
reviewed escape procedures
and drew on his military'expe-
* rience.
"In the military they train
you and drill you for all' kinds
of emergencies because part
of being safe is being pre-
pared," said Hallmian.
mmaguire@fbnewsleader.com


FEE Continued from 1A
and to expandd the capacity of
the city's ability to serve the
need of new development."
McCrary said without
impact fees to expand facilities,
the result would be "reductions
in levels of service for existing
as well as future residents." The
costs of facility expansion
should not fall on existing res-
idents, but rather on the resi-
dents for whom facilities were
expanded, he said.
The city's impact fees (not
including water/sewer impact
fees) cover "impacts" to the
Nassau County school'system,
the city fire department, the
city police department, public
facilities, and Parks &
Recreation and total
$2.781/square foot for resi-
dential development and
$0.831/square foot for non-res-
idential development. These
fees are collected at the time a
building .permit is released,
McCrary said. If a structure is
demolished and rebuilt, only
the part of the new structure
that is expanded will be sub-
jecf to impact fees.
The city also at one time col-
lected a transportation fee on
behalf of the county, but that
fee was waived several years
ago. It would be replaced by a
"mobility fee," according to
McCrary, with the amount to
be determined.
Water and wastewater fees
are also referred to as impact
fees, but according to McCrary
are not usually tied to new
development but rather to con-
sumption, so they were not part
of Tuesday's workshop discus-
sion.
"You can be assessed for
these (water/wastewater) fees
without building anything new,"
McCrary said, "For example,
moving a restaurant into a for-
mer retail shop will result in
increased water/sewer con-
sumption. Fees are 'collected
based on the anticipated
increase." .'
Resident Gary Higgins
asked at the meeting why Parks
& Recreation fees take up 70
percent of impact fee costs.


Cost of city impact fees
New home with 2,451 heated square feet
Police 2,451 x 0.145 .................. $355
Fire 2,451 x 0.291 .................... $713
Public facilities 2,451 x 0.395............ $968
Parks & Rec 2,451 x 1.95 ............. $4,779
Total: .............. ............... $6,816
New business with 2,451 square feet:
Police-2,451 x 0.145................... $355
Fire -2,451 x 0.291 .................... $713
Public facilities 2,451 x 0.395........... $968
Total: .............................. $2,037


"Parks and recreational is
wonderful," Higgins said, "but
I don't know what it does for
me. How much is enough?
Seventy percent of all of this
goes to parks and recreation...
there's just something wrong
With it."
McCrary said Fernandina
Beach has extensive parks and
recreation facilities for a city its
,size, and that residents in other
municipalities pay even more
for those services.
McCrary said in a. later
email that "the fact that
(Parks & Recreation fees are)
higher is tied to both the
amount of the assets associated
with Parks & Recreation serv-
Sices and the fact that the costs
to provide these are only allo-
cated out among residential


development."
'The acquisition ofthe post
office for use as a city facility
could certainly use impact fees
related to public facilities,"
McCrary wrote. "The, (impact.
fee) ordinance advises, 'Public
buildings are the buildings
owned or leased by the city for
the purpose of 'providing
public services -within the
city excluding buildings for
fire protection and police pro-
tection.' 'Public buildings'
includes the land on which
those buildings sit, improve-
ments to land, and equipment
and cofitents of those buildings.
... Impact fee dollars could
therefore be used to rehab and
equip the post office for such
Public use."
adaughtryqfbnewsleader.com


LIBRARY
Continued from 1A
V.R.L Architects of Jackson-
ville, which recommended award-
ing the bid to Marand Builders,
designed the renovation and:
SeXpansion of the library The firm
estimated the cost at nearly'$2 mil-
lion, well above the budget-the
city gave it. but cuts later brought.
the estimate daWn to $1.436 'mil-
U


lion. The firm's plan received con- vnw unm -
ceptual approval from city corn- i.-"-cal Rawl- 60 "03
missioners in February. '.
Built in the 1970s, the u HEY'RE DYING SFOR 267
Fernandina Beach branch of the A DN HAN R
Nassau County .brary System at A 2ND CHANCE
25 N. Fourth St. is the most heav- A ,Adopt A Companion TodayO p en dysa ektg Ia
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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


Fewer petitions filed to


Value Adjustment Board


According to the Nassau
County Property Appraiser's
Office, there has been a sig-
nificant reduction in petition
filings with the Value Adjust-
ment Board for 2013.
If property owners do not
agree with their classification,
exemption or property
value, they have the right
to file a petition with the Value
Adjustment Board within 25
days-from the time.the notices
of proposed property taxes
were mailed. The filing dead-


' arnabas
the food pantry needs
donations of noneidshable
food iems all year mund.
For me information,
call:261-7000
I5t Sl nth, St. FmwmliSdFL


line this year
was Sept. 10.
Property
S. o wAppraiser t
Hickox said
he and his
staff met
with many
Hickox property
owners to
help them
better understand their value.
"Many of them just wanted to
know how we determined the
Valuee" said Hickox in a press
release. "Even after the dead-
line, we would still like prop-
erty owners to call if they have
questions concerning their
value or exemption."
"The petition process is a
gobd way for us to measure
our performance," said Chief


Deputy Kevin Lilly. "A greater
number of petitions obviously
means we are missing the
mark somewhere. We are con-
tinuously working to be equi-
table around the county."
This year, about 145 peti-
tions were filed, compared to
425 petitions filed last year.
Hickox said he is pleased
with the decreased number of
'petitions filed and commended
his staff foir hard work. "We.
will always-have tax reps fil-
ing on properties before they
review their clients'value," he
said.
The next step will be the
exchanging of evidence and
.hearings with a special
Magistrate, who will then
make recommendations to the
Nassau County Value Adjust-
ment Board.


Candidates interested


in city commission


MICHAIEL, PARNELL
News- I.eader
Two possible candidates
have expressed interest thus far
in seeking a seat on the
Fernandina Beach City
Commission this fall.
One city commissioner will
be elected in city elections'to
fill the seat now held by
Commissioner Arlene Filkoff.
City Clerk Pro Tern Kim
Briley confirmed Wednesday
that qualifying -packets for
prospective candidates have
been picked up by David B.
Austin, a local beekeeper, and
Lynn Williams, a retired busi-
nessman who unsuccessfully
sought election to the-commis-
sion in 2008.
Picking up a packet miay be
an expression of interest, but


candidate s year, two the next, then one in:"
must qualify the third year.
before their The election is scheduled
candidacies Nov. 5, with a runoff election
become offi- onDec. 11 if necessary.
cial. A straw ballot for mayor also
Qualifying will be on the ballot. The mayor
for the election is elected by the commission,
continues which by custom follows the;
Filkoff through Oct. choice of the voters. ;
________ 7. .Qualifying The new mayor and com-;
packets, may mission will take office on Dec.,
be obtained from the Office of 18. ..
the City Clerk, 204 Ash St., Also on the ballot will be a
between the hovrs of 8 a.m. and referendum that would allow:.
5 p.m., Monday through Friday expansion of the city's current
A candidate seeking to qual- Amelia ,River waterfront.
ify for a city commission seat Community Redevelopment..
must be a registered voter in Area or the creation .of new
the city; flle qualification papers CRAs. CRAs are areas that are
during fhe qualifying period; determined to be blighted.'
pay an election assessment fee, where special tax provisions are ,
$120, equal, to 1 percent 6f the in place t6 allow more public,:
annual salary of a commissipn- investment there.
er, which is $12,000; andquali- To egister"to vote or make
fy by either paying an addition- changes to current registration,
al 3 percent of the annual salary, forms are available at the fol-,
$360, or file a petition with the lowing locations: City Clerk's..
signatures of 1 percent of reg, Office, City Hall, 204 Ash St.;,,
istered voters (8,713) in the last Nassau County Supervisor of
city general election,* which-, Elections Office, Nassau County,
would be 88 valid petition sig- Courthouse, .402 Centre St.; or,
natures. The deadlineto sub- the Nassau County Supervisor,
mit petitions is noon Sept 23. : of Elections Office, 96135'
The city clerk coordinates Nassau Place, Suite 3, Yulee. "
all municipal elections with the For additional information,"
Nassau County Supervisor' of on registering to.vote, contact,
Election and is the official filing the Nassau County Supervisor
officer for candidates seeking of Elections at 491-7500 or visit
elective office in the city .Wwww.votenassau.com.
There are five city corqmis-, Check' the city website,4,
sionerg, each elected to three- www.fbfl.us, for up-to-date elec-
year terms. Two are elected one ,tiori information.


POLITICS IN BRIEF


Democratic aub '
The Democratic Club of
Amelia Island's next dinner,
meeting is scheduled at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Club,
2800 Bill Melton Road, on
Tuesday. The doors will open
at 6 p.m. with dinner served at
7. A cash bar will be'available
throughout the evening. ,
Speaker will be Tammy
Davis, a club member, whose
topic will be "Income '
Inequality, Wage Disparities
and the Minimum Wage "She
is an associate professor of
management with the Univ_.
sity o' Houston Downtown l
and is also certified-as a sen- .
ior professional in human '


resource management.
To reserve, send a check :
for $15 per person, payable to "
DCAI, to DCAI/PO. Box .
16022/Fernandina Beach FL '
32035. Checks may also be
dropped off at Democratic ,
Party Headquarters located at
the corner of Eighth andDate
streets.
For information or to
reserve by phone or email,
contact Jean DesBarres at
432-8992 orjeandesbarres@ '
gmail.com, ,
Democratic Party :
Headquarters is back to its
wirttkhedul'indih&bpehi'- "
and staffed by volunteers ":'
from 10-4 Monday-Friday arid
10-12 of Satuidays. :


U.;


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hk,6






FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 20.,2013 NEWS News-Leader


City appeals ruling


on title to parcel


next to restaurant


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
A claim by the city seek-
ing right of way on North
Front Street for a sidewalk
has been dismissed in Nassau
County Circuit Court. The city
has filed an amended com-
plaint against Marina restau-
rant owner Patricia Toundas
disputing her claim to "any
right, title, lien or interest" in
a parcel adjacent to her restau-
rant.
Judge Brian Davis on Aug.
29 dismissed with .leave to
amend the city's, original
"complaint to quiet title" filed
in March regarding a 10-foot-
wide by 100-foot-long striplof
.land next to the Marina,
Restaurant, 101 Centre St The
city's complaint was meant to,
"quiet" any claims against title
of the parcel. '
Toundas, who has been
using the land for parking for
her business for decades, has
claimed the parcel belongs to
her. Toundas has said an ordi-
nance written in 1954 states
the property was vacated by
the city.
The city's amended com-
plaint asks the court to inter-
pret the ordinance and
"declare that the intent of the
ordinance is to reserve the
described portion of North
Front Street as public right-
of-way for the use and benefit
of the public."
The complaint also states
that Front Street north of
Centre Street "directly adja-
cent to the westerly bound-
ary of Toundas' property is a
public street dedicated to the
city by virtue of the 1857 plat.
map drawn by the Florida
Railroad Company..."*
The complaint also alleges
, Toundas "has not paid ad val-
orem taxes dti the city right-of-
way.
"The city retains owner-
ship of that:portion of North
Front Street not vacated by
the ordinance described as a
.*10-foot-wide strip of land west
of Lots 1,;2,3 and 4 of Block 1
of said,,cityytlh complaInphiw,
states .... ., \-;_ ,ingt., bv.
CSX Railroad, which owns
the railroad tracks and ease-


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THEY'RE DYING FOR
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S . ;4



""?' "-L ? *
:5'


t-..
"; -.I *;' ''


Both the city and
Marina restaurant
claim the land.

ments along Front Street, has
so far chosen not to respond
to the case, Bach said. .
The Marina Restaurant has
been closed since Sept. 2 "for
mandated electrical and
plumbing upgrades," accord-
ing to signs posted in the win-
dows of the business. Bach
said Toundas' attorneys John
Cascone and Dan Brim might
choose not to answer the city's
complaint if the restaurant
remains closed.
"She may not have inter-
est at this point," Bach. said.
The Salty Pelican restau-
rant directly north of the
Marina Restaurant has' also
shown interest in the case
because its owners have
expressed a desire for a side-
walk to be built on the parcel
leading to their business from
Centre Street.
SToundas could not be
reached for comment.
adaughtry@fbnewsleader.com

ISLAND ART ASSOCIATION

FA 7 I M
18N 2nd St .Fernandina Bch.
ART GALLERY
Support Local Artists!
Paintings, photos, clay,
art glass, wood, jewelry
and other mediums.
ART CLASSES
For all ages
904-261-7020
www.islandart:org


Gen Y influences car market


Studying people is the key
to understanding each other
and more about ourselves.
For as long as I can remem-
ber, there have been genera-
tional groupings. The Great
Depression generation, the
WWII Greatest Generation,
the Baby Boomers,
Generation Xers and now the'
Gen Y group. Virtually eyery-
one alive over 16 is in one of
these subsets. And yes, we
are being studied, analyzed,
surveyed, targeted and mar-
keted to by companies big and
small. Databases exist with
every purchase we make and
every tendency we exhibit.
Purchases are almost all elec-
tronically made, creating
these profiles. The Gen Y
group doesn't carry much
cash, but they are great at
swiping a card and online
everything, notably banking,
This brings us to cars. Gen
Y (ages 16-32) likes cars, and
going to lots to look at cars.
That is, until they have to talk
to someone, a sales represen-
tative. Many, in particular the
Sunder-25 group, are uncom-
fortable with meaningful busi-
ness situations in front of a
live person. Cell phones
allowed verbal communication
without having to look some-
one in the eye. Texting takes
being verbal out of the equa-
tion and we can begin to
understand the programming
of our modern younger gener-

MELIA ISLAND
MUSEUM OF HISTORY


lSlTlli



OF FERNANDINA
DOCENT LED WALKING TOUR
TOUR FOUR HISTORIC PUBS
STARTS AT THE OLD TRAIN DEPOT ON CENTRE
THURSDAYS AT 5:30
'MUST BE 21 MUST BRING I.D
CONTACT THEA SEAGRAVES AT
EXT. 105 FOR RESERVATIONS..


action. Voice
recognition
and obots
Swill incrieas-
ingly mean
our interac-
tions will be
S with sbft-
l ware-driven
I(EFFR]'S non-humans.
Gen Y s Call me a
CORNER dinosaur, but
deaer hp I believe the
progression,
Rick Keffer above
explains some things. The
way we do business, including
buying vehicle, will change
as a result.
Gen Y shops the m6st at
3.1 dealership visits to buy a
car. Gen X (33-47) visits 2.5
dealerships to purchase.
Lastly, Baby Boomers (49-66)
get it done in 1.9 visits. Do
years of experience make it
easier for boomers? Is their
buying power at its peak? Or
are they more comfortable
with talking to a salesperson
and more efficient in their
approach? As a boomer
answering these questions, I
suspect yes.
Recent buyers of a vehicle
were surveyed about avoiding
a salesperson in the future.
The results of those who did


not want a salesperson
involved were: Gen Y 56 per-
cent, Gen X 49 percent and
Boomers 37 percent. Only
19 percent separates the
groups (37-56 percent), and a
very significant percentage of
buyers would rather not deal
with a salesperson.
As a dealer, this is a shot
ever the bow. Knowing that
every vehicle sold in America
goes through a dealer, it says
there is an opportunity for us.
Increasingly, more dealers
advertise that they have non-
commission/salary staff and a
customer-friendly environ-
ment. Do consumers buy that
and how accurate is it? Could
dealerships hand out iPads
and let consumers hit the lot
Sin a self-service mode?
Maybe, but iPads won't make'
appraisals or handle financing.
Ultimately, a person will step
in. If that person has a, "man-
agement" title, will that be
more acceptable? Something
will give if half thie buyers
want to avoid the salesperson
being involved.
The market is a reactive
thing in our industry. It may
not seem like it, because peo-
ple have had issues with auto
salespeople since World War
II, when the shortage of vehi-


cles was capitalized on by any-
one who had a car'to sell,
including private individuals.
Connectivity may have set the
stage for a more fluid car-buy-
ing process and that would be
great. It is already happening
to a good degree. Consumers,
young and old, can frontload a
lot of the purchase, but should
be wary of not getting help or
advice when needed. Gen Y is
, going to help modify car buy-
ing and those younger than 16
will have their own expecta-
tions. Regardless of your age,
embrace purchasing a new or
used car. The vehicles are
awesome and-so are many of
the people waiting to help.
Thanks to all who partici-
pated in the Ben Byrns Rally
at our local airport. Have a
good week.. .
Rick Keffer owns and oper-
ates Rick Keffer Dodge Chrysler
Jeep in Yulee. He invites ques-
tions or positive stories about
automobile use and ownership. .
rwkcar@aol.com


1 %arnabas
SI CENTER, INC
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N L,?SA .... M>N
l .- ,* a : , ^ -


r







__OPINION


FRIDAY,SEPTEMBER 20,2013 News-Leader


Cuban tree


Musings, opinions, observa-
tions, questions, and random
thoughts on island life,
Fernandina Beach and more:
When I read the first cou-
ple of paragraphs by Pete
Hamill in his introduction to
island resident Ed Kosner's
book, It's News To Me, I was
hooked. My days as a
reporter with Gannett's
Evening & Sunday Press in
Binghamton, N.Y., and the
Tampa Tribune in the 1960's
came rushing back as Hamill
described the shabby, win-
.dowless, smoke-filled news-
room, clacking news wire
tickei's,'maraal typewriters,
etc. Using Amazon.com I've
ordered copies of Kosfier's
'book, published in 2006, as
gifts for'some of my former
colleagues and friends. But
you don't have to be a journal-
ist to enjoy this fascinating
.read about a man who served
as editor of some of the most
prestigious magazines and
newspapers in this country
including The New York Post,
Newsweek, New York, Esquire


and
Yo;
Ne
had
Iro'
the
nia ]
tort
evd e
DA. ] pasi
DAVE'Syea
WORLDo inc
the
RF
David N Ma
Scott Lut
S ass
tions, the moon land
Watergate, the Vietn
Iranian hostage cris
Gulf War, 9-11, the in
of Afghanistan and I
more. It's also the st
guy who lived an en
existence growing,u
'only child who desc
New York, City plays
Vividly as Roger Kah
Br'ooklyn in his clas
Summer. Kosner's f
his friendships, mee
negotiationswith so


frogs aren
d The New world's most recognizable
rk Daily names, including Rupert
ws and Murdoch, Henry Kravis,
d a front Donald Trump, Katherine
w seat to Graham, Mort Zuckerman,
most sig- Norman Mailer, Bob
icant his- Woodward, presidents, prime
ical ministers, etc., are worth the
ents of the price of the book. And you'll
st 55 probably wince like I did
ars, when you read how, under his
eluding mother's approving gaze in
JFK, the early 1950's, he dumped
'K and two shoe.boxes of baseball
martin trading cards, including a
their King prized Ferris Fain one, down
sassina- the garbage chute, prior to .
ling, his first marriage. Our island
nam War, is full o( fascinating folks and
is, the Ed Kosner is indeed one of
nvasions them. Buy his book. You
[raq and won't regret it.
torvof * *


- - --
viable
ip asan
ribes his
ground as
hn did
sic Boys of
calling of
etings and
)me of the


I have a lot of respect for
fellow columnist Pat Foster-
Turley, who writes very flu-
ently about the critters that
roam our island as well as
local flowers, marshes, bugs,
etc.,;but she recently suggest-
ed that in order to rid 6ur
yards of invasive Cuban tree
frogs that we ambush them
with sunburn spray, pop 'em
in a baggie and then deposit
,them in our freezers. I don't
think so, Pat. A well placed
whack with a shovel, rake or
broom will eliminate any '
Cuban amphibian found on
my property, as the only
Things I put in my freezer are
those that eventually find
their way into my mouth, and
Cuban tree frogs aren't on my
grocery list. And speaking of
frogs, once while reading
over a menu, I asked the wait-
ress, "Do you have frog legs?"
"No," she replied. "My shoes
are too tight" '
, '. '-
Restaurant Whack-a-Mole:
Three downtown Centre
Street restaurants have ,
closed, all of-them saying





DON0'T4LTi

Spay!orNeute


tonm)


I'm delighted to see ii
enforced and have
employer who h


"temporarily." Don Quixote's
Manager Vanessa Garcia told
me a few months ago that her
eatery would shut down for
remodeling and a completely
revised menu and I've been
eagerly awaiting its reopening
but have been told by her dad
that its future is uncertain and
if it does open again; it'll prob-
ably contain an expanded
Peppers and that won't be
until next year if at all.
Bonito's shut its doors several
months ago for "remodeling"
but no one has seen any activ-
ity there for weeks now and
not a word from anyone in
, authority on what's going on,
so its future appears dim too.
. The Marina shuttered for
electrical and plumbing work
Sept 2 for what management
says in a letter to this paper
will be for a month or so, but
no workmen have been spot-
ted yet so we'll see. Espafla
was closed for a well-
deserved vacation but
reopened Sept. 17. And
Pepper's and the Crazy Egg
in Yulee closed their doors for
good; On the other hand
Amelia City.Stushi in the
Harris Teeter shopping cen-
ter on First Coast Highway
held its grand opening Sept. 3
but Ihaven't been inside yet
so can'tcomment on its fare.
I've heard from a number of
very reliable sources that a
downtown restaurant was
paid a visit by Immigration
and Custom Enforcement
(ICE) resulting in the entire
kitchen staff and many
servers being hauled away,
thus shuttering that eatery
temporarily and scaring ille-
gals, in other restaurants away
from work, thus forcing those
places to operate with limited
resources. Look around.
Notice any downtown restau-
rants with all new staffs? I'm'
delighted to see immigration
laws being enforced and have
no sympathy for any employ-
er who hires illegal aliens
es aliens!" look it up)


...BUDGET SUMMARY. ,

Nassau County Board of County Commissioners Fiscal Year 2013-2014

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF NASSAU COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ARE 2.2% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES. L


GENERAL COUNTY ONE-CENT
FUND TRANSPORTATION SMALL COUNTY


FUND


SURTAX


*SPECIAL
REVENUE
FUNDS


DEBT
SERVICE
FUNDS


CAPITAL
PROJECT
FUNDS


ENTERPRISE
FUNDS


MUNICIPAL.
SERVICEE
TAXING UNIT


CONSERVATION
& CONTROL
DISTRICT


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD

IAI I^VA ,n B-mi1Jfl I . I


MILLAGE


TAXES:" PER $1,000
AD VALOREM TAXES- ': 5.5670
AD:VALOREMTAXES 1.6694
.,AD VALQOREM TAXES.' 00000
S'SALES AND USE TAXES .
PERMITS, FEES & SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS
INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE- ,
CHARGES FOR SERVICES
FINES AND FORFEITURES
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES ,

TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER ,
FINANCING SOURCES'

TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND'BALANCES


EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES

GENERAL GOVERNMENT
GENERAL OPERATIONS-COURT-RELATED
PUBLIC SAFETY
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
TRANSPORTATION
ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT
HUMAN SERVICES"
CULTURE & RECREATION
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES(USES)

TOTAL EXPENDrrURES/EXPENSES ,

RESERVES

TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES .


$ 14,366,624 $




$ 29,36.0,804 $


150,000
12,000
,5,075,744
2,236,905
56,000
302,029
2,254,424


3,474,997 $




3,482,067


861,150 $
14,645
1,018,236
5,620


11,941,356 $ 14,922,644 $ 1,588,252 $ 8,847,847 $ 8,938,369 ,$ 2,990456
\- ,* ,. *


7,OC


16,336 $
, $
$


95,820 $ 25,000Q
1;846,750 '$ .45,856


$
$
$


3,476.000
957,482
.' 195,395'
771,050
99,650
80,449
1,287,658


:, ::' : '' '., $ 7,180,974

. 1,305,496 '' .-. $ 0 746,879
:.ii., $ :: .. $ ,22,i82 37,000
$ 734,657 $' 1,004,094 .'- $ 524,783
.:., *. $ '" 3.348,324 $ '121,4001.
S .* ': -' .; $ 2,600(y
$ 9,300 $: 31,965 $ '51,275 $ 55,550
$ 2,387,950 $7,100,000 $ 105,779 $ 1,981,763
.:. i, ~~ ~ ~~~':,... " " '


" '$0 $ 67,070,545


,: ,:", ,-v $ 32,842,87.1
$^ 7,180,964
*:^ $0 ./':
-' '$ 13,545,861
1 1,043,309,
*. ,:^ :i8,552,909
'";: -: ;$* *6A83,299
' ,.. ., ,$ 158,250,
S651,388
.: 4: "$ 17,010,18


$ 39,447,906 $ 7,324,288 $ 7,077,192 $ 6,867,684 $ 4,437,403 $ 8,136,059 S 3.527,560 $ 10,650.949 $0 $ 87,469,041

$ 53,814,530 $ 10,799,285 $. 19,018,548 $ 21,790,328 $ 6,025,655 $ 16,983,906 $ "' 12,465,929 $"13,641,405 .:' $0: .$ 154,539,586

'. ,' :. '


$ 5,928,619 $ 2,689,651 $ 4,437,403 $ 590,551 $ 13,646,224
$ 1,050,106 $ 1,272,944 ., 2,323,050
$ 10,084,873 $ 650,254 $ 2,008,171 $ 4,638,002 $ 6,416,723 $. 23,698,023 .
$ 338,412 $ 630,482 ; $ 232,380 $ L3,305,538 .$ 4,506,812
$ 7,466,336 $ 751,942 $ 3,367,623 $ 9,620,494 $ 5,000 $ 21,211,395
$ 246,229 $ 3,881,473 $ 4,127,702
$ 2,694,709 $ 121,415 $ 859,695 $ 3,675,819
$, 2,210,241 $ 565,966 $ 14,565 $ 2,790,772
$ 22,692,297 $ 2,479,176 $ 9,954,800 $ 844,921 $ 1,323,886 $ 3,031,722 $ 40,326,802 '

$ 45,245,486 $ 9,945,512 $ 11,356,996 $ 15,382,646. $ 4,437,403 $14,405,441 $ 4,629,424: $ t 1,9103691 $0 $116,306,599

$ 8,569,044 $ 853,773 $ 7,661,552 $ 6,407,682, $ 1,588,252 $ 2,578,465 $ 7,836,505 ..$ 2,737,714 $0 $ 38,232,9'87


$ 53,814,530 $ 10,799,285 $ 19,018,548 $ 21,790,328 $ 6,025,655 $16,983,906 12,465,929' $ 13,641,405 ..$0 $ 154,539,586\


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXINGAUTHORITYAS A PUBLIC RECORD. .


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING
/ '' :

The Nassau County Board of County
Commissioners has tentatively adopted a
budget for Fiscal Year 2013-2014.
A public hearing to make a
FINAL DECISION on the budget
SAND TAXES will be held on:
- ,' ,,' ^ ^ * ,, i-'.

Monday, September 23rd, 2013
l7:00PM~
atthe
James'S. Page Governmental Complex
96135 Nassau Place
SYulee, FL
.^ ~... :: i32097- '"- '


.TOTAL
" ALL FUNDS


---------^--list---- '*1



{groceryglist
-. college and pro football. And
owners T.J. Pelletier and Al
l"aws being Waldis have a special treat for
migrationlaws being NFL Monday night fans with
no sympathy for any two dinner specials offered
Aliens representing specialties of the
ires illegal aliens. two competing teams. For
example, during this past
Monday's match-up between
and then suffers the conse- Pittsburgh and Cincinnati the
quences. duo created a Primanti
Brothers sandwich for
Have you ever decided to Steelers fans and Skyline 4
eat at a restaurant because Chili for those cheering the
people voted it "best" based Bengals. The specials will :
on a photograph of its food? continue each Monday, and I
Me either. So as much as I guess we, can count ourselves
like George Stewart and 'fortunate that the hapless ;
Sliders why would I give a rip Jaguars aren't scheduled for a
when someone there sends Monday night appearance as
out a press release stating nobody wants a helping of: ;
that Sliders Seaside Grill "is humble pie or crow. Also on
currently number two in the Monday viewers can treat
state of Florida and eighth in themselves to 10 wings for'
the nation for America's Best, just five bucks and five-dollar.
Bloody Mary" based on an pitchers of Narragansett Beer
online voting site where the (Rhode Island) and five-dollar
"ballot" shows photos of the Train Wreck Punch. If a train .
participant's Bloody Marys goes by while you're seated at
and their recipes, but the the bar yell "train" and see if
majority of folks voting have you geta free shot. Saturday
never actually tried one. nights at the Pelican feature
What's up with that? To me the Big Ten Network and
that's a contest for best pic- from what I hear it is the only ,
ture of a Bloody Mary. Hey, tavern on the island with a
George have your best bar- combination of the Big Ten' -
keep get involved in the and a full bar. I'll be there this
friendly Sunday Bloody Mary Sunday to watch as the "
competition that currently Washington Redskins go after
involves Dog Star, Sheffield's, their first win as they play the
the Green Turtle, Salty:, Detroit Lions. And speaking "
Pelican, etc., where folks vote .of the Lions, if it wasn't for
based on taste and presenita- them and the Tigers baseball
tion. .. team, life in Motownwould '
** beas bleak for thefolks there ',
Things I wish I'said: '"I as it is for those in ,
could tell by their audible Mogadishu, Somalia. '
gasps thatthe people on the *** .-
beach were jealous of me The Nobody Tells Me
when I found'five shark teeth. Anything Department
Locating them wasn't really How comeI had to readin ::
Sthe problem, but pulling them USAToday that a tourist 'a
outofmy legwas."-Jar6d train running on the tracks of 3
Kintz, It Occurred to Me. the old St. Marys, Ga., '
* Railroad'is set to crahk up its ,
A little more than.ayear 1' 952 locomotive and startI : .
ago in this space I 'predicted hauling passengeirsaround ::.
that folk hereabouts would be the first two Saturdays in ,
vying for sunset view'-seats at October? Another issue of .
Front Street's new Salty USA Today last week high- L;,;
Pelican downtown and I was lighted Amelia Island State ,
right, as the harbor view, craft Park as one of the "10 Great
beers, solid menu, food and "; Places" in the U.S. tovisit this -'
drink specials, live music, an fall due to "the incredible
array of sports-on 1prge- .' .. .. wildlife, white sand" a4 p ?
s.creen TVs;'eto., has resulted -factthat it is possible.to.go ....
in lively local crowds packing horseback riding on the
the place, particularly during" beach there. .'
the first couple of weeks of' ' davidnscott@bellsouth,net


LbI IM I ininiL/ tVLNUutb


1,;






FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,2013 OPINION News-Leader


NEWS3

LEADER

FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854
The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties "Newspapers get things donel" Our primary
goal is to publisA distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
Swill be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work..
FoY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
SMICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR.
MIKE HANKINS,ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
SROBERT FtEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
: BOB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
ANGELINEMUDD,
S BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER .
SIAN PERRY. ASSISTANTED.ITOR ,
BETH JONES, SPORTS EDITOR
STOM WOOD DINKNESMITH
CHAIRMAN.' '. PRESIbENT
TCommunity
SNewspapers,
:. ,.' Incorporated
The viewt expressed by the columnists and
letterr writers on this page are their own
anddo notnecessarily reflect the views of
thenewspaper. Its owners br employees


VIEWPOINT/MEG MCALPINE/NASSAU COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE


Affordable Care Act: The facts


Everyone (employed full-time or part-time,
children, students, unemployed, retired before
age 65, non-working, etc.) who doesn't have
Health insurance must apply for health insur- .
ance. The government has established the
"Health Insurance Marketplace" as a new way
to get health coverage for individuals, families
and small businesses (100 or fewer full-time
employees).
On Oct. 1, the Health Insurance
Marketplace will be able to help you, if you
don't have health insurance or if you have it
but want to look at other options.
You can go online at www.healthcare.gov or
call 1-800-318-2596 (17Y: 1-855-889-4325. (The
Health Insurance Marketplace is sometimes
known as the health insurance "exchange," or
"marketplace.")
When you use the Health Insurance.
Marketplace, you will fill out an application.
and see all the health plans available in your
area. You'll provide some information about
Your household size and.income to find out if
you can get lower costs on your monthly pre-
miums (www.healthcare.gov/how-can-i-save-
money-on-marketplace-coverage) for private
Insurance plans. You'll learn if you qualify for
lower out-of-pocket costs (www.healthcare.
gov/will-i-qualify-fo-save-on-out-of-pocket-
costs). The Marketplace will also tell you if
you qualify for free or low-cost coverage avail-
able through Medicaid (www.healthcare.gov/
do-i-qualify-for-medicaid) or the Children's
Health Insurance Program (CHIP) :


The Health Insurance
Marketplace simplifies your
search for health coverage by
gathering the options available in
your area in one place -
www.healthcare.gov.


(www.healthcare.gov/are-my-children-eligible-
for-chip). ..
The Marketplace simplifies your search for
Health coverage by gatherinfig the options avail-
able in your area in one place. You can com-
pare plans based on price, benefits and other
features important to you before you make a
choice, Plans will be presented in four cate-
gories (www.healthcare.gov/how-do-i-choose-.
marketplace-insurance/) -bronze, silvergold
and platinum to make comparing them easi-
er.
Health Insurance Marketplace enrollment
begins Oct 1 aind ends March 31, 2014.
Marketplace coverage starts as soon as
January 1,2014. If you don't get health cover-
age, you may have to pay a fee with your 2014
tax return. The fee is 1 percent of a family's'
income or $95 per adult (whichever is higher)
and $47.50 per child.
If you lose your job-based health insurance,


you have two primary options for health
insurance coverage: a Marketplace plan (even
if you lose your job-based coverage after
March 31, 2014) or. COBRA continuation cov-
erage.
Uninsured people won't have to pay a fee if
they:
are uninsured for 'less than 3 months of
the year.
are determined to have very low income
and coverage is considered unaffordable.
*-are not required to file a tax return
because their income is too low.
would qualify under the new income lim-
its for Medicaid, but their state has chosen-not
to expand Medicaid eligibility (www.health-
care.gov/what-if-my-statie-is-not-expanding-
medicaid). '
are a member of a federally recognized
Indian tribe ''
(www.healthcare.gov/glossary/federall.-irec-,
ognized-tribe). .
participate in a health care sharing min-
istry. "
are a member of a recognized religious '
sect with religious&objections to' health, insur-,
anrice. .
. If you don't qualify for these situations, you .
can apply for an exemption asking not to pay.a. ;
fee. You do this in the Marketplace. ,,
(Sources: cms.gov; healthcare.gov.) .
S Meg McAlpine is the consumer sciences .
agent at the Nassau County Extension Serviice.
,connor'yufledu


Shining


spotlight
' h 't

I began my 1Ith year at the News-Leader
in April and as I am fond pof bragging, I love
my job.,Meeting so many people from all
walks of life and telling their stories is terrif-
ic enough, butgetting paidto do what love
is.the icingon this rich, delidcious cake. '
Over the years, I've interviewed people
of all ages, from a 13-year-old wunderkind
artist to four centenarians. I've met authors,
musicians and other famous folks, and even
got a hug from a famous racecar.driver.
I've profiled warriors of
all kinds ,from a soldier
deployed to Iraq four times
to vets from the Greatest
Generation, and a National
Guard soldier who had his
meal paid for by dinners at
the Down Under when he
;was home on leave.
But I've also met war-
NEWS- riors of other kinds, like
.OOM ,~,ite late 9r!geous breast-,
l1di~eiwjn~irina1wLyndJ-eto,qi ?J
V1&W or'determined Danny
--- -..-- Spradley, who battles every
HeatherA. day after a diving accident
HeathA. 'left him a quadriplegic.
Perry Shining a spotlight on
S people in need isoneof the
things I love best about my job but these
are often the stories that are hardest to
write,"like the one about a baby born with a
serious heart defect, a man in desperate ,-
need of a kidney or precious children bat-
Stling terminal or life-altering illnesses.
.A lot of times, the volunteers or exempla-
ry employees I want to feature are reluctant
to be in the spotlight, saying they're just
doing.their job or they're only one part of a
team. But it's exactly these kinds of folks I
love telling our readers about because
they'd never toot their own horn and I
believe people need to be aware'of what
. these good people are doing
Oneof the most frustrating partsof
S being a reporter is waiting for the people I
want to write about to get back to me after
I've made my initial contact. "
While I'm waiting, I do background
research and begin building the bones of
the st6ry. But there's only so much of this I
cando before I start needing real facts that
only my person can provide. '
At some point, I have to re-contact my
subject. It's a struggle to avoid being a pest
while trying to make it clear that without
Their input, I can't do'the story.
SAnd some stories don't get published
even after I've done my due diligence.
'Whether the person backs out or my editor
kills it for some reason, it's always disap-
pointing. .
I keep saying one of these days I'm
going to put together a scrapbook of all my. '
stories. I did begin one back when I first:'
started writing my three columns but it
soon became unwieldy arid hlie project was
abandoned. '
But I won't abandon you, readers. Please
feelfreeto let me know about interesting
people on our beautiful island or in'Obur rap-
idly.expanding neighbor city of Yulee. Im
eager to shine my spotlight!
Heather A.,Perry is a reporter atthe
News-Leader
.type@fbnewsleader.com


HOW TO WRITE US
SThe News-Leaderwelcomes your
letters.,
Maximum length is 500 words.
Letters must.include writer's name
(printed and signature), address and
telephone number.
* iters are normally.limited to one
letter in a 30-day period.
No. political endorsements or poems
will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed.
Not all letters/are published.
i.Send letters to:
mparnell@fbnewsleader. corn or to
the Editor, P.O. Box 16766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035
Visit us on-line at fonewsleadercom '


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Hocus-pocus B1
Your county commissioners, have, .,,
now decided not to raise the millage ,
rate. Oh, by golly, gee'. They instead
are going to rape the 1-cent tax that-'. V
was by law designated to pay for
road improvements, they will also
strip the reserves, which will lead to
a downgrade of our bonding certi-
fication. What does that mean? Well,
when they borrow the money to ,
build thenew Sheriff's Office (I do
agree this is badly needed), it will
cost us more to' finance it since we.
have a smaller reserve fund. *
Funny, they have been all con-
cerned about the Building
Department using its reserves
(which were mandated by law for
such bad times as we have had theI
last five years) to fund operations, '
while still stealing vehicles and com-
puters from that department without
remuneration (against the law)..
But the Economic Development
Board (the one that will not allow an
Impact fee since they are all builders
ia.',chitect/engineers) wilaUenipt t ;,i
.1i ,.taac nvlnce,3jisthat'e 4anaiontwil1lr1.'r( i',
.pay for itself. .
I own a house in the county, and
I have no problem with'a millage
increase. It is long overdue. You can- ed by the
not maintain services, chopped as
they are, without making up the lost
revenue. If the economy finally
comes back, we can then reduce TUSPS
the millage as the income will match
the county need. I have
On the same line, I cannot under- porter of
-stand-how the county says Terra Nelson as
Pointe will pay for the $134 million porter of
in infrastructure with the county Fernandi
designating 12 percent of its taxes to could be
pay for this. If the county diverts 12 part of ou
percent of their taxes, that means a boost. T
we, theiather county taxpayers, will Office is
have to make up this lost revenue to efficiency
Sfill the budget. Unless it's-a CDD Deringer,
'-(community development district), Crystal, c
which for all Terra Pointe is going to Ferguson
tax theresidents' (hnd businesses) higher-up
an extra 12 percent, would be accept- use a tool
able since the county has in thepast "USPS. Ur
allowed.thisi boys, our
S So what you need to understand; rain.
is thaj these politicians will vote not -
to increase the taxes so they can'be
reelected next time, but we, the tax-
payers,will inevitably pay the price, (fwrv
now or later. They have enacted laws .
to eliminate the builders from pay- As ear
ing for their development, no impact be activity
fees and CDD's. Do you want to give ing 'inivas
them a ride on your back forever? The Gre(
One more thing, to: consider, beensurv
are the roads in Terra Pointe going treatment
to be county roads or' maintain- part of th


America's Youth

, As a result of won(lderful community support,
America's Youth, Inc. had a very successful Camp
America on its new site on 11th Street this sum-
mer. The ability to provide a camp experience as
well as academic enrichment to 50 low-income
children and adolescents was made possible by
the generous donations and support of our com-
munity partners, local businesses and i'ndivid-
ual donors. All these people providing monies,
equipment, supplies, and volunteer assistance
gave us the resources to help with our mission to
empower youth by instilling positive values, char-
acter and leadership skills.
This support allowed youth to participate six
days a week from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. in rec-
reational activities, arts and crafts projects and
service projects. Youth made woven shawls and
throws and donated them to Gerri's Corner, a
local free cancer resource center for women.
Youth also provided three concert performanc-
es at the end of the summer during the Unity Day
events. With the donation of computer equip-
ment from SIG (Sourcing Interest Group), the
Community Learning Technology Center helped
with improving reading, writing and math skills,
Yes, bur kids were practicing multiplication tables
during the summer when not'working on bas-.
ketball skills!
It is with expressed gratitude, that we recog-
nize our supporters who made summer camp


..-lecaS Twici
r






I








hi } ., ...


landowners?
Sprague Owing
Yulee


Been a long-time sup-
the Honorable Sen. Bill
s he has also been a sup-
me and our family. The
na Beach postal service
a training ground for any
r postal system that-needs
he Fernandina Beach Post
a model of good will and'
y. Thank, you, Charles
and all the others, Russell,
our former carrier Cindra
, many others. Maybe the
is in 'administration could
k-see, We appreciate you,
like the big-box delivery
Things aren't'left in the'
Charles "Gus" Pantino
Fernandina Beach

iwayupdate
'ly-as Monday there may.
y on the Greenway target-
ive plant species. Why?
enway ,near Jasmine. has
'eyed and had preliminary
done by the FDOT as
heir reremediation project.'


Adl


This is great, but the
areas toward Sadler are
sive species that follow
and reload the area the
working'on. Therefore
needs to be done to slow
train bringing these pes
greenway. The areas so
FDOT treatment have
tracted to Perpetual Con
the Florida Fish and
Commission to spray ea
plant they can find thro
greenway from Jasmine
This is scheduled to coh
fall-and winter to allow tl
take up the herbicide
out at the same time i
foliage browning is occur
Why are we targeting
There are several re
Invasives tend' to ,ove
native species and chok
This causes major upsets
available for the- native
This then affects the b
friom'top to bottom.,2. T11
are nbw enough to the
there are no natural check
continued growth. Thus
quickly establish their:
culture. 3. The invasive
inferior, quality plants to
they replace. The map]
replaced by Chinese
Chinaberry. Tallow is n


COMMUNITY THANKS
possible as 'we rely solely on donations And vol-
unteers. Many thanks to the following as, any
Assistance, large or small, makes a difference iii
what we accomplish:
Dawn Evans (SIG) and Mark Evans. (Denali
Group) and their respective employees who
adopted us and have provided us with tremen-
dous resources, Rick Keffer, Ed Montgomery,
Kiwanis Club, Yulee Target, Yulee Walmart,
Danni Gamble, Becky Hardy, Gateway to Heaven,
COFB Water Department, First Community
Bank, CBC Bank, Macedonia AME, Memorial
United Methodist Church, Steve Heller, SteVe
Keller, Burger King, Optimist Club (which also
made us tables), Nassau County School Board,
(which supplied the breakfast and lunch meals),
and Ihterfaith Dinner NetworR (which we part-
ner with for dinners).
Also we would like to thank Sunrise Rotary
Club (gardening), Kathy Russell and the
Fernandina Parks & Recreation' Depattment,
Mary Cello, Nissi Crider, ShirleyJ. and Benjie S.
Hovan, Richard D. and Cathy Higginbotham,
Ms. Susan and .Bob Brown and his two friends.
We were also supported in our weekly field trips
by Hollywood Theatres in the River City
Marketplace, Skate Station on Blanding
Boulevard, and locally at the Aaron and Abby
Bean Main Beach Putt-Putt. Our bicycle repair
was provided by Cycling and Fitness (Eighth
Street near Centre). Data Busters (Northeast
Florida Community Action Agency) volunteer


W W, ,\


SKILI









* "=' ". .**' ",


I0
: I


S. MNATEBEELER/FTHE WASHINGrON EXAMINER 2


upstream wood and we would .lose the effect
fullof inva- of a windbreak. 4. Invasives tend to "'
'the creek be fast-growing and very prolific..
e FDOT is This allows them to capture the site
something quickly and even change shallow
Sthe supply water aquifers in their .quest for'I
sts into the wate r,
)uth of the This effort is'fairly extensive and
been con- may take several months to cosm-
itracting by plete the first pass. A previous study!
d Wildlife identified over 100 different species
chinvasive of invasives in the Greenway. :
ughout the Timing will be critical to be able to:
e to.Sadler. identity some of the plants as well as
iicide with catching them just before seed drop.:
he plants to and prior to spring growth. All
and brown efforts are being made to keep
he natural paths clear and equipment and
irring. chemicals secure.
ginvasives? In the FDOT replanting area
seasons: 1. there are also activities through the
ertake the fall. The contractor that was select-
e them out ed to replantthe area will continue
Sinthe food a' monthly check for growth and
creatures. mortality. The general contractor ,
iood chain for the area will be on-site monitor-.
le.invasives ing'the first two weeks of October.
e area that Last on the list is the contractorthat
cks on their 'did the invasives treatment in the
s they often" FDOT area willbe back doing fol-:
own mono- low-up treatment and checking the
Send to be site in late October to' early
Sthe plants November. The Greenway will be
les may be busy from now through Christmas,.'
Tallow or John Carr 2
ot a strong Fernandina Beach'




camp counselors were a godsend in helping us
with our many activities and helping keep our
groups smaller.,
Finally, we thank our volunteer staff, Ms.
:Areia Munday and Ms. Sharlonna Caldell. Our
apologies if we have missed someone. We thank
you all for your continued warmth, caring, and
support.
John Gilbert, CEO
America's Youth, Inc.
Fernandina Beach

Ben Byms Runway Rally
"We would like to thank all those who con-
tributed to the Second Annual Ben Byrns
Runway Rally. This event would not have been a
success without the generosity of the sponsors,
volunteers, participants and the support we
received from the city of Fernandina Beach,
McGill Aviation, Amelia Islander magazine and
the News -Leader. We would also like to thank Ed
Hardee for taking photos throughout the event.
If you participated in the rally and would like to
vieW the photos,. please follow this link:
http://mistred.jalbum.net/Ben%20Byrris%20
Runway%20Rally%209-14-2013/ .
We live in a very special community, and Ifis
our mission to give back to our community by
fostering programs that will help guide young
adults to make good choices.
The Ben Byrns Foundation, Inc.


.J.


=







FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


Women ofa certain


"Honey, I'm too old and too fat to care about
that anymore." The Sweet Young Thing who :
had wanted me to act like a 40-year-old gave
me a wide-eyed stare in. response. We both
tried to gloss over the awkward moment, but it
.didn't work. When we parted company, I'm
sure she was busy promising herself that she'd
never get old and cranky. I, on the other hand,
was experiencing yet another epiphany, a phe-
nomenon I thought I'd outgrown.
I don't remember much about the drive
home after I had frightened that poor young ,
woman, but I do remember realizing that those
of us who have reached a certain age have
attained a type of freedom few younger women
have ever contemplated.
I hit the house at a dead run and raced to
Smy desk. I wanted to start scribbling before I
forgot what I'd just figured out. Here's what my
epiphany revealed to me:
After a certain number of birthdays, we no
longer obsess about national or international
affairs -or local ones, for that matter. With
. age, we are finally brave enough or fed up
enough to cancel the newspaper and tqrn off
all the gadgets that spew out the news.Trust
me; our days have a much more pleasant start
to them.
We ladies have finally broken the code on
exercise and weight control: we must simply


burn more calories than we
take in. This rule is very haii'rd
to follow here in Paradise -
most of the neat things we do
.,' 'involve things that are tasty
to eat and drink. On the other
j', ,' ,hand, if we don't want to cut
; t. as many calories, then we're
going to have to exercise
CM_. more. Duh.
CT -After years of buying the
SIDEBAR hype, we have finally realized
..... that all of the diet, weight
control, and exercise gurus
CarM Curtin have been raking in millions
of our dollars with the latest fadsthey have
invented. I keep waiting for some archeologist
to claim that s/he's unearthed hieroglyphics
that describe what Cleopatra didlto stay so
slim. When s/he publishes this discovery,
everyone' too young to know better will race to
buy Cleopatra's Diet and Workout Book. The
archeologist will at last be able to' retire and
stop digging in the dirt.
We have also come to realize that solitude
and its attendant silence are unappreciated
commodities in today's gadget-filled world. The
young ones fill their ears and days with noise,
while we walk along behind them, pushing the
SOff buttons. Whoever said that silence is gold-


nage

en knew what s/he was talking about. Half of
the world's population is their "friend," and
they think nothing of sharing their most inti-
mate secrets with several people in Bangla-
desh. We ladies, on the other hand, remember
the days when our parents threatened us with
death if we told the neighbors juicy tidbits
about our family life.
And don't get us started on'women's fash-
ions. We ladies were taught to offer an appetiz- .
er, not lay the entire smorgasbord out there for
everyone to ogle. And any "smorgasbording"
was done behind closed doors and blinds.
To belabor the point, if we did decide to
offer up a banquet in private, we didn't go out
and tell the whole world about it afterward -
with pictures to prove it! Oh, my.
Back on the fashion front, our ankles ache
when we watch today's fashionista's totter
about on their stiletto heels. We have reached
the point where comfort has become more
important than fashion, so we have replaced
the high heels and espadrilles with lace-ups.
We now know that good judgment comes
from experience and experience comes from
bad judgment. When,the young ones come to
u for sympathy and. guidance after exercising
bad judgment,'we smack our lips and deliver a
war story or two describing hoW we learned
that same lesson several decades ago.


We have begun to both fret and rejoice at
our diminishing mental capacities. The first
one to go was our ability to remember names.'
That's why we call everyone "Honey" or
"Deanr," Next was remembering telephone
numbers. We forget the three-digit'prefix
before we've been told the last four numbers.'
On the other hand, we may not remember. :
the important stuff, but we don't remember a
lot of the trash, either. That's why we've forgot- 4
ten that our boss was a nogoodnik, but we have
complete recall of the day he tripped and fell in.
a mud puddle. That's why we sit in our Cracker b
Barrel rockers on the front porch and smile.
Unfortunately, this is all I can remember of -
my'epiphany. I'm sure it divulged several-more
bits of wisdom about the aging process, but .
they have evaporated along with the brain cells
that stored them. .
Say, we haven't had this conversation be-;
fore, have we, dear? I'd hate to repeat myself:.
Come visit with Cara at the Local Authors'
Marketplacefrom 10 a.m.-to 4p.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 28, in turnsHall at St. Peter's .
Episcopal Church. Come chat about the Wilson
Mystery Series that's set in Femrnandina Beach,
as well as City Sidebar: The Books, a collection :i
of her newspaper columns., To learn morn about a
these books and their authors, visit .
www. CaraCurtin.com..


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"We enjoy seeing our patients arrive and
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office manager.Allison Pattetson.
The cheerful, colorful atmosphere of
the state of the art dental facility is
appealing to children of all ages.
Dr. Staci Suggs and Dr. Tanya Wall


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


Teens for Change expands


KATHIECOLGROVE
Community Newspapers
Synthetic drugs are part of an increasing
stash of substancesused among area high school
students.
Although synthetic drugs like bath salts, K2
Spice and similar products were deemed illegal
in Nassau County as of July, teens can access the
products .online, according to Kerrie Albert.,
Nassau Alcohol Crime Drug Abatement Coalition
director of prevention services.,
Among the 648 sixth through 12th grade stu-
dents surveyed in Nassau County in 2012,4.8 per-
cent of high school students admitted to using
synthetic drugs within a 30-day period.
The findings are part of a Florida Youth
Substance Abuse Survey. The study tracks stu-
dents' tobacco, alcohol, marijuana; prescription'
and synthetic.drug, use, along with inhalants,
steroids and.othel' substances. -
Already active on the East Side, NACDAC,
will step utip its efforts to educate students in
West Nassau in the coming months. The organ-
ization 'received a Sober Truth on Preventing
Underage Drinking grant from Drug. Free
Communities in October 2012, with fundstotal-
ing $200,000 to be dispersed annually in $50,000
increnments for four years.
Jason Lynch, a NACDAC youth coordinator,


said West Nassau and Hilliard Middle-Senior
high schools and Sonshine Christian Academy
would sponsor Teens for Change, a student coali-
tion that promotes alcohol-free and drug-free
activities.
"The idea is we strive to work in collaboration
with law enforcement and schools and faith-
based organizations in the community to elimi-
nate drug and tobacco use among young people
and young adults and reduce the behavior that's
associated with the substance abuse," Lynch
told the Callahan Town Council on Aug.19.,
The Nassau County Sheriff's Office will edu-
cate children about the ramifications of getting
caught with or using drugs through Know the
Law discussions.
Lynch spoke, of the dangers of synthetic
drugs. The products cannot be sold in Nassau,
but can be sold elsewhere. ':
'qThere's a lot of data that supports some very
dangerous side effects to this K2 Spice and even
bath salts;" he'said. "It'sunbelievable.... It's just
something that we're embracing and dealing
with, not only here in this county It's.every-
where. We're trying to t'each these kids what
the law is and when they're out and about and not'
under the supervision of their school, hopefully'.
they'll remember. f they're trying to engage in
an activity or 'beinrig pressured they'll remem-
ber, 'Man, if I do this, it's going to'be a felony or


a misdemeanor and it could mess up n
entrance or my college entrance.'" .
Side effects include delusions and
lions that can be long-term.
"This is synthetic sprayed-on
and packages do not contain the san
and/or chemical composition in each f
you never know. what you are truly i
'Albert said. "The long-term health con
are still unknown."
Alcohol is the most commonly t
among middle and high school stuck
49.6 percent admitting to prior use
surveyed, 29.2 percent- said they dra
within a 30-day period, compared to 2
ed from a statewide sample. According
vey, after a Icohol, 22 9 percent of studio
ted, to trying marijuana in their life
7.7 percent admitting to using the d-r
30-day period.
Cigarettes are another popular drt
percent admitting to smrpoking in their li
6.6 percent of students, smoking 6igair
in a 30-day period.. .
Lynch said the organization attem
children and teens stay'aware of the(
drugs. "You':can control your decisio
your consequences," he said.'
Nassau County 4-H ,Club memrnbers
"Parents Who Host .la)se the Most"


drug effort

my military Northeast Florida Fair in October. The project is
,designed to discourage adults from hosting
I hallucina- house parties for underage teens, according to:'
Lynch.'
chemicals Albert said additional projects would raise:
ne potency awareness, including Teens for Change coali-;:
paclage so tion's, town hall meetings, a life skills training,
ingesting," class in middle schools, the Know the Law pro-'
isequences gram and presentations to local civic organiza-
-tions. Activities are open to all students and may'
used drug inccludedances, movie nights, scavenger hunts,
lents, with- -and more. ,
. 'Of those .' "We are the lead agency related to substance "
nk alcohol abuse issues in Nassau'Cpunty,"Albert said.
!4.6 includ- ; "We .offer information, eeducatibn and'
to the str- resourcess to our community. The goal of NAC-3
ents admit- DAC is to support those working in our'comn-
time while unity on issues related to health and wellness
igwithinra,. of our citizens. We provide free drug testing kits;
S for parents, free resource guides for substance'.
ug, with 26 abuse and mental health services, in addition'
ifetime'and 'tdtechnical assistance and training in the areas
.ettes with of prevention." .
: She added. "If you have an organization inter-;
.pts.to'help ested in the youth from the Teens for Change,
dangers of coaliti6ns in either Hilliard or Callahan doing a'
ns; but not volunteer project, please contactJason Lynch at.
Sjlynch@windstream.net."
will launch 'To Jearn more about NACDAC, visit nac-i
during the' dacorg. ,


Tea*cher/soldier, chronicles


experiences in Iraq war

Community Newspapers
Community Newspapers


From 'desert diaries to
karaoke-singing camels, a sol-
dier's experiences overseas are
chronicled.
U.S. Army Reserves I. Col
Bobby Hart, 'current 'West
Nassau High School English
teacher, wrote the popular
Desert Diaries" for the Nassau,,
CountyRecord and News-Leader
When he was deployed twice
-to the Middle East
Hart wrote the first "Desert
Diaries" series in 2003 and the
second in 2006-7. He told of his
adventures overseas, including
'meeting Iraqi children, and that.
no daywas complete unless he
heard explosions or gunfire. He
painted as detailed an'image as
he was allowed and bridged a
connection between his life
over the&Fe and the community,
-where he' has been a teacher
since 2000, The columns includ-
e the obstacles a s9,de_,
endures to take leave and, te -
Slifelong camaraderie that builds
Among men who were once
strangers:.
After years of procrastinat-
ing, Hart compiled his favorite
columns into Karaoke Singing
Camels? The, self-published
book fulfills a lifelong dream.
T "I have always wanted to
write a book," Hart said. "I start-
.ed out as a stringer doing-sports
for the Jacksonvillv Journal
when I was in the seventh
grade. I always enjoyed writing
-never liked talking much-
:and worked for newspapers,,
etc., throughout high school
- and college.' I've written anoth-
er book, but never published it.
I've always said that writing a
.book is like raising a kid. You
never think they are ready for
the outside world. Ithappens
fora kid nomiatter whatyou do,
but you just hang on to the
book." .
Hart waspublished via the
thesis he wrote for his master's
degree, Changing Winds: The
,Role of Military Public Affai,
in Media Coverage of Hurricane:
Andrew. The thesis. can be,,
checkedput of the University of
Florida's library. *
"Only one person had
checked it out when I looked
several years ago," Hart said.
"I did think it was pretty cool
that my .namewasonabboj'.in
the library." .
S After encouragement frorim ,
those who knew about "Desert
Diaries," he finallytook the lep
and published hisbook; which
depicts a camel "singing" on its
cover. .
"I had this great, picture of
the camel and came up with the
title from one of the articles -
against the best judgment of my
wife and others," he noted.
The book is available on
eBay and Amazon for $10, with
$1 from each book donated to
either Wounded Warriors or .the
USO.
"It includes most of the
columns that were published in
the Record and other newspa-
pers during my deployments to
Iraq in 2003 and 2006-7," Hart
said. "It also includes a photo
with each of the articles."
A picture toward the nid of
the book shows Hart next to a.
signf that reads, "Now leaving
Camp Ariljan; Kuwait."
WVith humor important
amr,hg, the. troops, Hart
indcAdes it throughout the book.
"There is an old country
song about there's nothing bet-
ter than looking at Texas in the
rearview mirror," he writes in
the caption. "The person who.


wrote that song has never been
to the Middle East."
,In addition to teaching at
WNHS, Hart teaches speech at
FSCJ ,a ad Florida Gateway
College. He taught geometry
and algebra ior a number of
'years before returning to
English, this scho l year.


I 'V,

The move'is fitting since he
is attempting to finish his first
book, which is geared toward
children. It's',titled, ",Just Plain
Bill." .
"I hope to have it written
soon and. will hiaye someone
begin illustrating it later in the
fall," Hart said. "I started back


G:ave tlde Q ate/
The 22nd for the 22nd!
Friday, November 22, 2013
22nd AnnuaJjakste of Amelia

I _, *^f< .-.
Omni Amelia Island Plantation Ballroom
6:30-9:00 p.m.
Cocktails, fine wines, culinary offerings from the
best restaurants, music, and spectacular silent
auction!

For more information, visit our website at
www.volunteernassau.org or call 904-261-2771 5





^S iU Cildrem.4 n
*r~ ef~h^^B Children,


SUB,
Hart in Iraq

when niy sons were s
They're both grown now,
>been a while. Sometime
just have to let them go."
Hart lives in Taylor wi
wife, Cheryl. After 24 ye
service, he is still active
Reserves. He was in
National Guard prior to s
ing to. the Reserives in 19
editor@nassaucountyreco.


a Advertise theciasifieds 261-396

~..BUDGET SUMMARY "
FLORIDA INLAND. NAVIGATION DISTRICT
FISCAL YEAR.2013-2014
* , :" *" *' "* ".* *7 '
"" ~.~ GENERAL FUND
CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD 58,482,589
ESTIMATED REVENUES '
Taxes: Millage pet-$1,000
Ad Valorem Taxes 0.0345 21,092,430
Interest on Investments, 250,000
Other Revenue '. : 3.939.000
TOTAL REVENUES AND
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 25.281.430
TOTAL ESTiMATED REVENUES AND BALANCES 83764.019
S EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES ,
Administration . 1,076-,021
SOperations' 31,91.4,794
MrI'TED Capital Program 10,447,630
Waterway Studies 797,396
Interlocal Agreements 0
WaterwaysAssistance Program 38,138,270
small. Cooperative Assistance Program 564,600
so it's Public Information Program 1.65,308
Ns you Tax Collection & Property Appraiser Fees 660,000.
S TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES: 83.764.:019
ith his' Fund Balance Reseyve ""01
*ars of Total Approved Expenditures & Fund
in the Balance Reserve 83,764,019
S the : : :' : '
witch- THE TENTATIVE,'ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON
)94 FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING
rd.com AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


Last year's property tax levy:

A. Initially proposed tax ly :

B. Less'tax reductions due'to ValueAdjustment.
Board and other assessment changes

,. Actual property tax levy



This year's proposed tax levy


$21,282,024



$298,349

$20,983,675



$21,954,665


This tax increase is applicable to: Nassau, Duval, St. Johns, Flagler,
Volusia, Brevard, Indian River, St. iucie,Martn, Palm Beach, Broward,.

and Miami-Dade Counties, ,


:All concerned citizens are invited to attend a publichearing on the

tax increase to be held on


September 25th, 2013

6:00 p.m.

Fellsmere Community Center

56 N. Broadway Street

Fellsmere, Florida 32948


A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the budget will be.

made at this hearing.


NOTICE OF PROPOSED TAX INCREASE


The Florida Inland Navigation.District has tentatively adopted a measure to

increase its property tax levy. ::: :.













FRIDAY SEPTEMBRR 20. 2013


1OA NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA:



FBMS Pirates ground Episcopal Eagles 36-0


Fernandina at ,."

Duval Charter,
Yulee Middle, r

at Camden .


CountyTuesday
It was a wet and rainy
night Tuesday at Pirate Field
as the-ernandinfa Beach ,
Middle. School Pirates were
able to secure a 36-0 shutout
over visiting Episcopal.
"It was ourfirst time play-..
ing Episcopal and it was good
for the boys to have a game
like this against a new oppo-
nent," FBMS head football
S coach, Cam Harrison said,
Ja*rid Lewis broke multi-
* pie tackles on his way to a 70-
yard touchdown in the first
quarter and the Pirates never
looked back. Lewis found the
end zone on the ground again
later in the first half and also .
caught a touchdown pass on.
the final play of the half. ,
'This was his first game
playing as a running back and
he played an outstanding
game. We are excited about
his prospects for the rest' of
this year and the fact that he
is only a seventh-grader so we
get him back next year makes
it even better," Harrison said.
Lantz Morris also scored
for the Pirates on a 56-yard
run and Carlos parker fin-
.ished the scoring -for the
. Pirates pn a 52-yard scamper.
''This game was a great
team effort. Coming off a
tough lossto Callahan last
week, itwas nice to get back
n the'win column. We are
looking forward'to travelling
SBDuval Charter next week;"
Farrison said.
Lewis-ended the night
With 93 yards on four carries
6nda pair.of touchdowns; ...
,tiorris had two rushes for '
.t06 yards and a score; Carlos
?erker-had onehcarryfda'; 52-
jrard score;.,Logah Hardy car-
ried the ball three times for
-8 yards.
QuarterbackJoe Lupone-
Was one-for-two for 52 yards
passing and a TD, reeled in
v, Lewis for his third. TD on.
Sthe night., ,''- '
SJordan Parker led the -'
S Pirate defense with nine tack-
les and a quarterback sack.
-osh Blizzard had'siN stops.
and Dawton Tiner and Carlos
'arker had four apiece.
SThe Pirates travel to Duval
Charter Tuesday. Kickoff is at
6p.mni
SYulee Middle School,
.vhich was idle this week,
b!eads to Camden County,
O a. Tuesday. Kickoff is set
or 5 p.m. .

* . . ,


-t


: **- **.: r .---"5 :: L**- ^. ^

The. Fernandina.Beach :..
Middle School football.
team hosted Episcopal's
Eagles Tuesday night at
SPirate Field. The host
Pirates blanked the
S" 'Eagles 36-O.-J.larrid
4! Lewis, top left, scored
three times for the
Pirates. Josh Blizzard,
.top right and above, had
six tackles for the FBMS
defense. Laniz Moiris,
above left, scored a pair
of Pirate touchdowns.
The Pirates and Eagles
in the trenches, left.
The Pirates head~t6
Duval Charter School
R^ Tuesday at 6 p.m. The
*Yulee Middle School
Hornets travel to
Camden Couity, Ga., for
a 5 p.m. matchup. '
PHOTOS'BY BETH JONES
NEWSLE DER


PIRATE VOLLEYBALL'

. '[*. r. . ^ 1


The Fernan-
dina Beach
I iigh School
girls volleyball
team hosted
Ponte Vedra
HIigh School
Tuesday night
at I'irate
Gym. Ponte
Vedra (10-1)
was victorious
wcer the Lady
Pirates (6-6).
rI' I' -' E ''
I III .I.NIz
Nl V't-I I A ,Il'I


' i.







FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 SPORTS News-Leader


NICE CATCH, COACH


S'" SUBMITTED
Yulee Middle School coaches J.T. Medley, Jim Ritsma and Jonathan Ball, from left,
enjoyed some time off over the weekend, catching their limit in slot reds and a giant
trout as well as a nice flounder, not pictured, on Sunday.




Ladies hold member-guest event


SThe Fernandina Beach Women's Golf
Association had its member-guest event
fTuesday at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club.
There were 42 ladies representing eight differ-
:ent clubs in attendance.
: Pre-round'events included a long "marsh-
,mallow" drive, which was won by Diane Flynn,
,and a.chipping contest, which'was won by BJ.,
-Murphy.
The team of Julie Hensler and Joan Martin
tookp first-place honors with, a low net of 65.
T'he three-way tie of low net of 66 for second
:was broken by a match of cards. Second were
'Mary Ann Schroeder and Melinda McGrath;:
third went to Shirley;McKain and Kathleen
.Walker. '.
SIn fourth were Kathleen Hilmer and Leslie
Geiger. In fifth place with a low net of 67'was
team Sue Lopiano and'Johnnie Enter.
The match also included four closest-to-
.he-pins. The prize money went to Carol
,Dawkins, Hilmer, Hensler and Helen Hirsch..
. The FBWGA is hosting its 27-hole tourna-


SULBMITrED
FBWGA memher-giest winners Julie
Hensler, left, and Joan Martin.


ment Nov. 19. 'If interested call the pro'shop '
at at the Fernandina Beach Golf Club at 277-
7370. '


Basketball tryouts
The Basketball Club of Florida AAU organ-
ization based in Fernandina is holding tryouts
for 11 U girls (fourth and fifth grade). Tryouts
are Oct. 19 from 9-11 a.m. at First Baptist
Church in Fernandina. Contact Coach Millar
at millarhome@bellsouth.net. Visit the BCF
website at www.bcfhoops.org.

Ma Pelicans open Injax

The NBA's Orlando Magic and New
Orleans Pelicans will kick off their 2013-14
season with a preseason game on Oct. 9 in
Jacksonville. '
SAn interactive fan venue will be located
outside ,the Jacksonville'Veterans Memorial
Arena on game day. The event will include a
salute to members of the military and veter-
Sans community, which are an integral part of
Jacksonville.
This event marks the third time the Magic
have played in Jacksonville and the first since
2008. It will be the first game in Jacksonville,
.for the newly-named Pelicans, who will debut
new uniforms.
Tickets are on sale at the'Arena ticket
office, online at JaxEvents., corn or through
' Ticketmaster, Seats start.for little as $15, With
courtside seats available for $250 each. For
information on sponsorships or VIP opportuni-
ties, contact the City of Jacksonville Sports &
Entertainment office at (904) 630-3697.

YKldsTlathdlon
Young athletes dreaming of someday win-
ning an Ironman Triathlon can begin stepping
or rather running, biking and swimming -
toward their future goal at the fffth annual Y
Kids Triathlon.Sept. 21 at 4 p.m. at the
McArthur Family YMCA, 1915 Citrbna Drive in
Fernandina Beach. The e4ent, which is open
to the public, promises to be afun-filled'day
for the entire family while also promoting a
healthy lifestyle for the kids involved.
The event is open'to children ages four to
13 with three separate age groups competing.
The four- to seven-year olds will swim 25
yards, bike one mile and run a quarter of a
mile. Eight- to 10-year-old participants will,
compete i1 a 50-yard swim, a two-mile bike
race and a half-mile run. The 11- to 13-year-
old tiathletes will swim 100 yards, bike three
miles and run a mile.
The swimming event will take place in the
safe confines of the YMCA pool with biking .
and running taking place throughout the
beautiful grounds of neighboring Amelia Park.


The cost of the event is $25 per child plus -
$10 for any additional child within the same
family. Each child will receive a Y Kids Tri T-
shirt and a medal for participating. Trophies -
will be awarded to the top three finishers in
each category during a special pancake party
at the end of the triathlon.
For information on the event or to register,
contact Karina Grego at 261-1080, ext. 108,
or kgrego@firstcoastymca.org or visit the
McArthur Family YMCA's calendar of events
at www.firstcoastymca.org.
Corporate sponsorships are still available.,
All proceeds from the event benefit the "Give
to the Y Campaign," which helps those in
rneied in Nassau County access the YMCA's
many exceptional programs.

YuleeliUttlelague
Yulee Little League will hold its annual
board meeting Sept. 26 at 6:30 p,m. in the
!gym at the Yulee Sports Complex. All volun-
teers are encouraged to attend to vote for the
2014 Board of Directors: Email yuleelittle-
league@ gmail.com for information.

Boulesub
Amelia Island Boules Club holds petangue
pickup games Saturdays at 9:30 a.m., Wed-
nesdays at 4:30 p.m. and Thursdays at 3:30
p.m. at the.Central Park courts at the corner
of Atlantic Avenue and South .11th Street: Pe-:
tanque (pay-tonk) is a cousin of both horse-
shoes and bocce, the Italian bowling game.
The public is welcome to join. Call 491-1190.

Jeff Galioway rur/waik
A local group meets Saturday mornings for
runs/walks using the Jeff Galloway.training ,
method. Train for a marathon, half-marathon'"
or 15K. Call Mike Hagel at415-6039. .:

Sailing ubmeems
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the",
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club at Ten -.
Acres. Social hour at 6:30 p.m.; meeting at
7:30 p.m. Contact Commodore Kent McKee :
at (770) 287-5606 or commdore@amel.iais- "
landsailing.org. Visit www.ameliaislandsail-
ing.org. .

Bowlingleagues
SA senior league bowling is offered at 9:30':
a.m. Wednesday at Nassau Bowling off US .
17 in, Yulee. The group also meets for
Christian league at 6 p.m. Thursday.


+ ADULT SOFTBALL


FERRNANDINA BEACHPARKS
S. &RECREATION '
DEPARTMENT.


S Recreational co-ed le
Sept. 9
KraussCare Landscaping
Martex Services


ague


Crawforeirdleys.- ;, -i
Yulee Regulators
River. Rats
Dick's Wings
KraussCare Landscaping
Crawford Jewelers
Dick's Wings
Martex Services
Logic Mountain
Yulee Regulators
Standings
KraussCare Landscaping
River Rats
Logic Mountain
Crawford Jewelers
Dick's Wings
Martex Services
Yulee Regulators
Open co-ed league
Sept. 11
San Jose Collision/AIM South
Halftime Sports Bar
Yulee Chili's
Jani-King ,


. Halftime Sports Bar
Yulee Chili's


11
10
i./ 9.
4'
14
3
18
7
'9
.. 8

19
9

2-0
1-0
1-0
1-1
1-1
0-2
0-2


17
15
13
2
12
11


Jani-K ing "
San Jose ColUsion/AIM South
Standings
Yulee Chili's
dani-King
Halftime Sports Bar
San Jose Collision/AIM South
Men's league
Sept 12
Hilliard First Assembly of God
Halftime Sports Bar


Uncle John's. Pine Straw
Murrell Construction
Kabuki
Keffer's:Crew ,
Halftime Sports Bar
Murrell Construction
Uncle John's Pine Straw
Keffer's CreW -
" 'buki


Kabuki ., '
.Hilliard First Assembly of God
S' Standinga


1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
4'.'

18
15
12
5
S12
S2

8

13
12
16 .
6


Kabuki!. : 2-0
Uncle John's Pine Straw' 2-0
Halftime Sports Bar 1-1
Hilliard First Assembly of God 1-1
Keffer's Crew 0-2
Murrell Ponstrqction 0-2
Games played at the YborAlvarez
softball fields, 3243 Bailey Rd. Visit
www.leaguelineup.coml lbflsoftball
for statistics and schedules.


,____ 2013 SCHEDULES

FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Sept. 25 at West Nassau 4:30
SVarsity Football Sept. 26 at Yulee 4:30
;Sept. 20 at Episcopal 7:00 Sept30 PROVIDENCE 4:00
'Sept, 27 at Menendez 7:00 Oct. 7 at Providence 4:00
cl FORT WHITE* 7:00 Oct. 14. District
,Oct. 11 at West Nassau 7:30 Oct 22 Regional ,
:Oct. 18 TAYLOR CO.* (HC) .7:00 '
'Nov ." at Madison County* 7:30, FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
.ic., 8 at Christ Church 7:00 '. Volleyball
SOistrict Sept 24 RAINES* 5:30/6:30
Sept 26 atBolles 5:30/6:30
S YULEE HIGH SCHOOL Oct. 1 MANDARIN, 5:30/6:30
Varsity Football Oct 3 at Yulee* 5:30/6:30
:Sept. 20. FORREST' 7:00 Oct. 8 ;FLETCHER 5:30/6:30
Sept. 27 at Wolfson" 7:00 Oct 9 JACKSON" 5:30/6:30
;Dct. 4 at Paxon* 7:00 Oct 11.12 at Bores inr.vaiiorai
MDct. 11'" RIBAULT' 7:30 Oct. 16 at Fleminal slard 5:30/6:30
bct S 18 BAKER COUNTY* .:66 Oct, 18-19 JVtoumeyat BK '
:,ct. 24 at Bishop Kenny* 7:00 Oct. 21-24 DISTRICT 4-4A.
'lov. 1 STANTON (HC) 7:00 "*District : '
.J.ov. 8 WEST NASSAU 7:30
Eu'C 'l,-. FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
YULE HG SHO Sep 2 Cro.'ss Counitry '
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL Sept, 21 ai4iiigatc.r Lave Invilte, LC
Volleyball Sept. 28 at Porite Malra Invite .
. ,Sept. 23 UNIVERSITY CHRIST. 6:30 Oct 1 Countyat Hilliard 4:30
Sept. 26 'at Camden County 6:00 Oct. 12 FSU Inrjvite, Tallahassee
Oct. 3 FERNANDINA* 6:30 Oct l9 ArELIA fln',,'ITE 8am
.Oct. 8 at AndrewJackson*' 6:30 Oci 24 Csetri-c 3.2A
"Oct. 9 CAMDEN COUNTY 6:30 Nov. 2 ., Region 1-2A at Lake City '
Oct. 10 WEST NASSAU 6:30 Nov. 9 State 2A at Tallahassee
Oct. 12 Dig Pink at Fletcher TBA
Oct. 15 at Trinity Christian 6:30 FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE
Oct. 17 at Hilliard 6:30 SCHOOL
Oct. 21-22, 24 District at FBHS Football "
District. JV matches at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 24 at Duyal Charter 6:00
Oct. 1 CHRIST'S CHURCH 6:00
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Oct. 8 CAMDEN 5:00
'Junior Varsity Football (ot. 15 at Yulee 6:00
Oct. 3 at Bolles 7:00
Oct. 10 'WEST NASSAU 6:00 YULEE MIDDLE SC400H L
Oct. 23 at Yulee 6:00 Football
Sept. 24 at Camden 5:00
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Oct. 1 CHARLTON COUNTY 5:00
Swimming Oct. 8 at Bolles 6:00
Oct. 8 at NE Florida Inv., Bolles Oct. 15 FERNANDINA BEACH 6:00
bct. 10 at Florida D&B 4:00 Oct. 22 CALLAHAN 6:00
Oct 24 District 2-2A
Nov.,.1 Region 1-2A YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
Nov. 9 State 2A at Stuart Volleyball
Sept. 20 BOLLES 5:30/7
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL Sept. 23 at Baker 5/6:30
Girls Golf Sept., 26 B team champ at CMS
SSept. 24 at Bishop Kenny 4:00 Sept.'27 County at Hilliard


Visit your local news source online

at www.fbnewsleader.com


TieIhsWe


Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
.I .Sl.) Slinnv - 83/72. 83/75 85/73 1-18473 866,75 85 74 86/72



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Last
9/26


DAY.
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New
10i/4,


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7:13a.m.
7 14 a.m.
7.14 a.m.
7.15 a.m.
7 15 a.m.
7.16 a.m.
7 17a.nm.


Sunset
7:24 p.m
7:22 p.m
7:21 p.m.
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Sept. 20, 1967 Hurricane
Beulah moved into south Texas
and its torrential 'rains turned
the rich agricultural areas oF
south Texas into a large lake.
1..urricane Beulah also spavtwned
a record 11.5 tornadoes.


Late,
9/10
9/11
9/12
9/13
9/14
9/15
9/16


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Fernandina Beach


12aA
Fri
Sat
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu


10:04 am
10:51, am
11:37 am
12:21 pm
12:40 am
1:23 am
2'07 am


LOX
3:33 am '
4:17 am
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1:49 pm
: 2:35 pm


Lon
4:01 pm
4:47 pm
5:33 pm.
6:19 prni
7:08 pm
'7:59 pm
8:53 pmr


Day
Fri
Sat
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
'Thu'


12 -'Farmer's. growing. Degree Days
Daic Dc.re D Da' Date Degree Days
9.10 -1 34 '9/14 30
9.'l1 ,. 30 9/15 30
9/12 30 9/16 32
'9/13 32
mbwig degree daysare calculted b'takidng thie average toenera--
ture fr the day ar subtracting the Fase ;erperatrx- (50 degrees)
f, fothe average to asses hOAv n anty growing days are attained


St. Mar%'s Entrance


High Low
9:28 am ,.. "'3:30 am ;
1,0:155 am 4:14 am
.11:01 mTi' 4:57 am
11:45 am 5:40 am
12:0(4 am 6:24 am
12:47 am 7:1 am
1:31 am'' 8:02 am


High-
9:53 pmn
10:38 pm
11:21 pm
None
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1:59 pm


Low
..:.3:58 pm
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5:30 pm
6:16 pm
7:05 pm
7:56 pm
8:50 pm


i *_ *, The autumnal equinox, when the sun is crossing the celestial equator southward bound, and day and night stand equal around the
4 ,world, occurs in just a week on Septembrt 22 at 4:44 p.m. EDT. Three days prior to the equinox on the 1t9th. the moqn is full,
-m-<' / and because this full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, it is named the Harvest Moon. It is probably the most famous of
*the seasonal moon names and universally recognized from mid to northern latitude locales of North America and Europe. The
^* Harvest Moon results from the shallow angle that the moon's orbit makes to the horizon during the time of the autumnal equinox.
On the nig0t of full moon, Luna rises at or very near the time of sundown. For the next few days the moon s orbital motion carries it about '13 degrees
eastward.each day, but that motion does not take it very far below the horizon, allowing the moon to rise at nearly the same time for a few days. This
situation allowed farmers to continue harvesting their crops by the light of the rising moon as daylight faded, hence the name Harvest Moon. Moon
names associated with the other months follow: January-Old Moon, Moon after Yule or Wolf Moon; Februaryl-Snow Moon or Hunger Moon;
March-Womnn Moon, Crust Moon, Sap Moon, Crow Moon, or Lenten Moon: April-Easter Moon, Paschal Moon, Pink Moon, Sprouting Grass
Moon, Fish Moon, or Egg Moon; May-Corn Planting Moon, FlowerMoon, or Milk Moon; June-Rose MoOn or Strawberv Moon: July-Thunder
Moon, Buck Moon, or Hay Moon; August-Sturgeon Moon, Red Moon, Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon; September-Harvest Moon, Corn
Moon, or Fruit Moon; October- Huntmters Moon, Blood Moon. or Sanguine Moon; November-Frosty Moon or Beaver Moon; and December-
Cold .Mon, Moon before Yule, or Long Night Moon. www.astronomy.org



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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


Circumnavigating Florida by kayak


HEATHER A. PERRY
News-Leader
n Sept. 16, Fernan-
dina Beach native
Carl Anderson com-
pleted the Florida
Circumnavigational Saltwater
Paddling Trail, commonly
known as the CT, a journey of
over 1,515 miles.
"I began the trip in the
spring of 2011, doing it in seg-
ments," said Anderson. "Most
people da the trail in seg-
ments there are 26 but
there are a few who have
done it all at once. I looked at
it as a real challenge. I
really enjoy the water and
now I had time to go out
and enjoy the wilderness and
see the Florida coastline.
When you add all the camp-
ing sites and so on, it comes
out to around 1,700, proba-
bly."
>Anderson has always been
a water baby. As a kid, his
non-school hours were spent
at the beach, surfing or fish- .
ing..
He became a lifeguard and
swimming instructor for the
city of Fernandina Beach
while still a teenager and
when he joined the Army in
the 1960s, was assigned as a
water safety instructor at Ft.
Rucker,Ala.
Back home after his stint
in the Army was completed,
Anderson returned to his
water-loving ways; adding
kayaking and canoeing to his
repertoire.
S In the early'80s, he and
his wife, Barbara, had some
success in racing mixed
recreation canoes all-around
their home state.
: In 1986 they took third
place in the annual Wild Hog
Canoe Race, a rowdy obstacle
course down the Waccasassa
River;
Somewhere along.
. the line, Anderson got the
notion-to do the CT This
1,515-mile kayaking route
includes a variety of coastal
habitats such as barrier island
dune systems, salt marshes
* and mangroves. Historical
sites and points of interest are
accessible beside the trail
Along with colorful fishing
Communities and urban cen-
* ters. .
Each of the 26 segments of
the CT is unique, ranging
from remote Big Bend Coast


I really enjoy the water and now I had time
to go out and enjoy the wilderness and
see the Florida coastline.'
CARLANDERSON


and the Everglades/Florida
Bay wilderness to the most
populated coastlines of
Pinellas County and Fort
Lauderdale.
The trail includes 20
national parks, seashores,
wildlife refuges and marine
sanctuaries, 27 Florida aquat-
ic preserves and 47 state
parks and Anderson fund
something to admire in each
segment.
"'On the Atlantic Coast, it
was the number of manatees,
dolphins and the variety of
sea birds. In the Keys, it was
the coral, big red star fish and
sea sponges.
The Gulf Coast was the
most commercial part of the
journey, noted Anderson,
while the Big Bend Area-
offered "old Florida beauty,
untouched by man."
Anderson is no stranger to
long-distance kayaking. He
enjoys extended paddles
where he packs his kayak
with all necessary supplies.
and camps along the ,
shore.
The visual splendor along'
the trail is incomparable,
notes Anderson. "The beauty
in the morning with the ,,
wildlife beginning their daily
activities. Relaxing while
enjoying the beauty of the
sunrises and sunsets. The
deeper water blues, the shal-
low water green, the clarity of
the water." '
:Anderson Watched '
dolphins and their calves-
learning how to swim and
feed and was intrigued by
how manatees sleep in the
shallows.
But circumnaVigating ,
Florida by kayak is not all
beautiful scenery 'or placid
water. There are hassles
along the way, such as rac-
coons stealing food and mana-
tees trying to flip the kayak.
And no one can control the
weather and when Hurricane
Debbie took a week out of his
journey, he had to rake
arrangements to have his
truck brought to him near


Panacea from Perry.
But Anderson came
through relatively unscath-
ed, except for a couple of
stress fractures to his left
leg, a torn bicep on his right
arm and "many cuts and
bruises."
"A few overturned boats'
and being left high and dry by
the tide. Stuck in the mud up
to my waist and having to
crawl. Just your normal,
everyday coastal-outing
adventure," he quips.
Anderson paddles a
Current Design Solstice
GT Titan Sea Touring
Kayak.
"We have 11 kayaks, sit
insides, sit on tops and combi-
nation kayak/canoes. We use
our kayaks for touring, fish-
ing and playing in the surf,
We also have a couple of our
old Mohawk canoes."
Despite encountering
gators, crocodiles and the
occasional boar, Anderson
highly-recommends the activi-
ty-
"It's a real adventure and
wellworth the time and the
effort. It makes you feel good
, about yourself when you com-
plete a goal of this magni-
tude."
Learn more about the CT
at www.floridapaddlingtrails.
com. Maps, guides and pho-
tos are available for download
on thewebsite.
A printed guide is available
for purchase ohnAmazon.com,
with proceeds going to (he
Florida Paddling Trails
Association.
Read stories of those who
have completed the entire
trail in a.single journey such
,as Mike Russo at thrupad-
.dlingfloridajimbo.com or
check out a Google Earth
map put together by thru
paddler Warren Johnson
at findingwarren.com/
gm.fct.
For questions about the
trail, contact trail coordinator
Dotig Alderson at doug.alder-
son@dep.state.fl.us.
S Cype@fbnewsleadercom


I'


7


,5altwatcr raddhing Trail

' .' ;" 9i


PHOTO COURTESY OFFICEOFGREENWAYSAND TRALS FCOPRITD'DEPAR'TiETOFNTIrENVr,"i ENiT PR,)TEC I I,:' -V .N
Carl Anderson completes segment 26 of the Florida Circumnavigarional Saltwater
Paddling Trail, landing at i ble west inlet of Fort Clinch, top. Thie 1,515-ilh Flforida
Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail, above.





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,Lelsu re-
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B SECTION


NEWS-LEADER /


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20. 2013
FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


DeMerle & Eisele return


for Jazz Fest, CD release


For the News-Leader
A after almost 16 weeks
S,.sailing the. Mediterra-
-., nean and Adriatic seas
.J tj while performing
aboard the Celebrity Equinox
cruise ship, Amelia Island Jazz
Festival Artistic Director Les
DeMerle'and his wife, vocalist
bonniee Eisele, are eager to dry
off and play for the home folks at
the 10th anniversary 2013
Amelia Island Jazz Festival.
"We had a terrific time,"
DeMerle said of their lengthy
sojourn that took them to a vari-
ety of appealing and historical


ports, including Barcelona,
Cannes, Genoa, Rome, Venice,
Naples, Athens, Mykonos,
Santoritfi, Ephesus, Malta,
Dubrovnik, Kotor and more.
"We played quartet and big band
shows almost every night, which
really helped us get fine tuned,
tight and well prepared for this,
year's Jazz Festival," he added.
The eight-day event will run
from Oct. 6-13 and headline the
ima-sers of swing, The Royal
Crown Revue, on Oct. 11 and
sensational s.ax.iphonitr Mindi
Abair on Oct. 12, plus an assort-
ment of great sounds, including
Latin jazz, blues, Dixieland and


smooth jazz brunches, jam ses-
sions, a newly established. Drum
Clinic Spectacular, Jazz At The
Movies, along with late-night
jam sessions, Jazz in ri'. lthe Schools
and Jazz for. Seniors presenta-
tions.. "
Additionally, DeMerle and
Eisele's homecoming coincides
with the release of their latest
Origin Records CD, "Feelin'
Good," a live set that was record-
ed on the Celebrity Silhouette
cruise ship last summer. 'We're
really pumped about this release
and we look forward to swinging
JAZZ Continued on 4B


.*Ulit'.ll ['TEE,
Les DeMerle and Bonnie Eisele enjoy a gondola ride in Venice, above. The pair
recently returned home to Fernandina Beach after 16 weeks performing
aboard the Celebrity Equinox cruise ship as it sailed the Mediterranean and
Adriatic seas. ":' "


Museum offers


,'Taste ofSpain'
SFernandina will celebrate older) and available at the
the 500th anniversary of Juan Amelia Island Museum of
-Porice de Leo'r;s arrival in History, 233 S. Third St., or
.Florida,:in 1513, including "A from any nmuseunm board
Taste of Spain ".hosted by member.
]spana Restaurant from 4-6 Viva Florida festivities
*p.m. on Saturday, Sepi. 28 at begin Friday, Sept. 27 at the
Plaza San Carlosin Old museum with a lecture by J.
Town. ` Michael Francis. "Murder
'. Enjoy red and white and Martyrdomi in Spanish
Spanish wines, and delicious Florida: Don Juan and the
tapas including paella, Guale Uprising of 1597," fol-
empanadas, traditional roast lowed by the opening of the
-pig and a mouth-watering new.Viva'Florida exhibit.
-tres Leches cake for a show- This event is free and open to
stopped dessert. Fuego the public,
Flamenco will provide enter- Saturday enjoy family-
fainment, led by principal friendly activities at the Plaza
instructor and cofounder San Carlos in Old Townfrom
Naomi Vail. Fuego Flamenco 10 a.m.-3 p.m., includinga'
has established a reputation representatiornf1' a Spanish
as the best andr most profes- peunia (a typical plot of land
sional Spanish dance troupe jnac .gi;dancowith the la %of
in Jacksonville, St. Augu.tint: the lI.La J LTeh- 'A i
and the surrounding area live animals.vendors selling
Tickets to this special Spanish cuisine, live music.
event are $25 (must be 21 or and docent-led town gate


A M F L I A I S A N
MUSEUMOF HISTORY


tours from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
At 3 p.m. a Middle
Passage ceremony will honor
the countless Africans who
.lost their lives being brought
across the Atlantic to be sold
into slavery The ccr-mony
will inidudc the Peck
Community Ensemble.
Queen Quet of the Gullah
Geechee Nation and Neil


Frink arid Gwen Triay, both
with longstanding ties to the
community.
Parking will be available ,
at the Dee Dee Bartels Boat
Ramp on 14th Street, with a
shunle to Old Town by
Amelia Island Tiolleys. -
Call 261-7378, vislIt www
ameliamuseum.org or email
gray'@iameliamuseu m.org.


Author David Sedans coming to Jacksonville


JACKSONVILLE David
Sedanris, best-selling author
of Naked, Me Talk Pretty One
.. Day, Dress Your Family in
Corduroy and Denim. and a
regular National Public Radio
contributor, will appear for
one night only at the Times-
SLlnion Center's Jacoby Hall
n Monday, Oct. 28 at 7:30
*.:- The evening of engaging
recollections and all-new
readings is presented by
WJCT, in association with the
' Artist Series. Tickets are on
sale now.
Sedaris is celebrating the


release of
his highly
anticipat-
ed newest
title, Let's
Explo~e
Diabetes
with Owls,
which
Se ail s debuted
pognn om at No.m 1.
l on the
New York
Times bestseller list in April.
Tweaking the familiar,-
until it warps; Sedaris mines
poignant comedy from his
peculiar childhood in North


Carolina, his bizarre career
path and his move with his
lover to France. Including his
last releases, the New York
Times' bestsellingbooks,
When You Are EngulIfed in
Flames and Squirrel Seeks'.
Chipmunk: A Modest
Bestiary, Sedaris' wickedly'
witty observations of the
ordinary-bizarre are always
.sure to.deliver'insights and
,laughs. :
One of six children in a
second-generation Greek
family, he grew up in Raleigh,
N.C. In 1977, he dropped out
of Kent State University to


hitchhike around the coun-
try. Aside from working as an
elf, Sedaris has worked a
number of charmingly quirky
jobs such as a house painter,
an apple picker;an aide in a
mental hospital, a creative
writing teacher at the Art
Institute of Chicago and an
apartment cleaner.
Sedaris made his comic
debut recounting his strange-
but-true experiences of being
a Macy's elf, reading his
"Santaland Diaries" on
National Public Radio's
SEDARIS Continued on 2B


Rock Shrimp Festival

has new attractions


ST. MARS, Ga.-'The
-l4Ist Annual Rock Shrimp
Festival continues its long-
standing tradition of family
fun on Saturday, Oct.5 in
downtown St. Marys, '
The festival presents a full
day of events including 5K
and 10Kraces, a 1-mile Kids .
Fun Run and a themed parade
featuring decorated floats, fire
trucks, tractors, golf carts
and more. I' "
The streets will'be over-
flowing with all day entertain-.
ment, demonstrations, arts
and crafts vendors a'nd food
concessionaires. A favorite for
the day will be the dinners
that include fresh rock
shrimp, the southeastern deli-
Scacy that is the festivals
namesake.
This year's theme is
-".KiwanimRocks. or-Camden
Kids" and event mascot,
"Rocky the Shrimp," will be
roaming the crowd through-
out the day. Angela Wigger,
director of tourism, said festi-
vals draw people to the his-
toric district and the Rock
Shrimp Festival is a fall
favorite on the coast.
The festival offers a home-
town feel and the crowd pro-
vides a nice economic boost.
You can also "ride the rails"
on a brand new St Marys
attraction. The "St. Marys
Express" is set to begin its
thermed train excursions at.. ,
noon on festival day with"
rides also available at 2 p.m.
and 4 p.m.
"The Great Pumpkin
Express" will leave from "
Theatre by the Trax, 1000
Osborne Road, and the '
almost 10-mile ride will last
approximately 1 1/2 hours.
Tickets are S17 for adults and


$11 for children 12 and utinder.
Kids under two ride for free.
Visit www.stmarys ::*
railroad.com for ticketsor call
(912) 200-5235 for informa-
tion.
Advance registration is
encouraged for the Kiwanis
5K and 10K runs and is
mandatory for vendors and,
parade entries. Those inter-
ested in participating can, visit
www.smkidwanis corn for reg-
istration forms and informa-
tion.
Discounted rock shrimp
dinner tickets can be pur-
chased, prior to the event, at
several locations including
the St. Marys Welcome
Center, 111 Osborne St. and
'the Kingsland Welcome
Center
The tentative festival
schedule is:.- ....,.... .
7:30 am. 5K &' 10 K.Races
Start,
8:30 a.m: 1-Mile Kids Fun
Run,0*",
9:30 a.m Race Awards
10a.m Parade Begins :
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Vendors
11 a m.-4:30 p.m. Rock
shrimp dinners
Plus all day entertainment
and demonstrations
The Rock Shrimp Festival
is organized by the Kiwanis
Club of SL Marys and sup-
ported by the city of St
.Marys and area sponsors
KIwanis President Chirs ,
Thurner said all proceeds
from the festival are spent .
locally to fund programs that
benefit children and youth in
Camden County, Ga. ,
Forinformation or ques- -
tions contact the St, Marys
Convention & Visitors
Bureau at (912) 882-4000 or
.visit www.smkiwanriis.com.


ISLAND


SPLASH BASH
STickets are on sale now for the third annual
Splash Bash, starting 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21 at
the Nassau Humane Society Dog Park. It's a party
with beerarid wine a ailable. free appetizers,
,." music and an excitingfinish to
select two $500 wiln ners.
Tickets are $10 each,' and the
winners will be chosen by Katy
the Golden Retriever,. whose
specialty iS divingfor tennis
balls. E%,e rv ticket sold will have
a n unm ber, and tennis balls with
corresponding numbers will be
awaiting Katy in the Dog Park pool.'Katy will
plunge into the pool and emerge with two tennis
balls, and if a number matches your ticket, you
win the cash. Tickets are available at the NHS '
Second Chance store at 1002 South"'14th St. in
Fernandina Beach, the Dog Park at 641 Airport
Road, and at NassauHumaneSociety.com. '
Proceeds will benefit NHS and the local Relay for
Life.
FUN DAY
SSolid Rock Church of God by Faith, 86138 Palm
TreeDrive, Yulee. will hold its annual Community


dFun Day on Sept.21 from 9 a.m.-2
N ,,p.m. on.the church grounds. This
Sday is set aside for all community
residents tocome together and
S enjoy a time of food, fun and fellow-
ship. There will be fun water and slide
activities for the children, cotton candy,
snow cones, popcorn, face painting and live enter-
tainment for all to enjoy. For more inrfor-
mation or to lend your talents to the .
event, call the church at 225-5388...

HOBO1HOEDOWN
American Legion Post 54 at 626,
S. Third St. will host a Hobo,
Hoedown from 57 p.m. Sept. 27...
Bring two cans of non perishable"
food to donate to local food pantries. One can
goes to the pantry and the other will be dumped
into a large stockpot for Hobo Stew.I
The Legion will donate the meat and broth and
after folks donate their can and dump it in the big
stew pot. organizers will wash out the can and
write their name on it. When the stew is cooked,
people pay $5 and can eat all the stew they want
from their can. There will be livemusic. "Dress
bummy" and bringyour appetite. For information


call Marge Brewer at 415-1893 or American "
Legion Post 54 at 261-7900. '

AUTHORS MARKET PLACE
The Local Author's'Market Place will be held
Sept. 28 and 29 from 10 a.m. 4 p.m. at St. Peter's
Episcopal Church, 801
Atlantic Ave' featuring
more than 30 authors.
(including Neiv York
Times bestselling
authors Wendy Wax
and Ken Burger), five
workshops, children's activities, Sonny's Bar-B-Q
and more. Visit www.localauthorsmarketplace.net
for information or call 321-6180. '
On Sept.29 from noon-2 p.m. enjoy arin Author's
Luncheon with talks byWendy Wax and Ken
Burger at Joe's 2nd Street Bistro. Lunch is a
choice of prime rib, shrimp and grits, or chicken.
beginning with soup or salad and followed by
chocolate decadentdessert. Enjoy two hours with
the authors, free books and prizes. Tickets are on
sale at Books Plus, with proceeds benefiting
Family Resource Center of Nassau County to pur-
chase books for children. For information call 261-
0303.


JEC:.77


SUDOKU ~ Music NOTES
OUT AND ABOUT
RELIGION AROUND SCHOOL
CLASSIFIED







FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,2013 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
presents a "Walk on the
Wild Side Safari" at the
Catty Shack Ranch Wildlife
Sanctuary in Jacksonville
from 6-8:30 p.m. Sept. 21.
Enjoy a guided.tour of the
sanctuary and experience the
night feeding of Siberian
tigers, lions, cougars, leop-,
ards and bobcats.
Tickets are $23 adults and
$13 for children under 11.
Complimentary dessert and
beverage will be served.
Tickets can be purchased at
Cats Angels Thrift Store, 709
S. Eighth St., through
SSaturday from 11 a.m. until 5
p.m. Or call Jan at 583-2870.
This fundraiser is tax
deductible and ben efits Cats
Angels and Catty Shack. Visit
www.cattyshack.org. Visit
www.catsangels.com.

The Alzheimer's
Association will host a Walk
to End Alzhelmer's, Sept. 21
"at 8 a.m. In Central Park.
SLearn about Alzheimer's dis-
ease and how to get involved,
from advocacy opportunities,
Research and clinical trial
enrollment.to support pro-
grams and services. In addi-
tion to the 3-mile walk, enjoy a
tribute to those who have
experienced: or are experienc-
ing Alzheimer's, Start or join a
team at www.alz.org/walk.
Funds raisedwill provide
care and support services to
area residents living with
Alzheimer's and help advance
research.

SThe American Legion
Riders, Chapter 54, will host
their monthly "Steak Night"
at the American Legion
Post 54,626 S. Third St.,
from 5-7 p.m. (or until gone)
Son Sept.21. The public is
welcome. Dinner includes
steak cooked to order, baked
potato, corn-on-the cob, salad
and a roll for an $11 donation.
STo-go dinners are available
and seating will be available in
the canteen or outside on the
patio. Live entertainment
begins at 6 p.m. in the can-
teen. All proceeds go to pro-
grams ,sponsored by the
American Legion Riders,
-Chapter 54. ,.

Cars, Coffee and
-:Conversation will meet
"tSept. 21 from,9a.m.-nopn at
Barbara Jean's restaurant,
:next to the Hess station on
SA1A at the foot of the Shave
Bridge, with an optional tour |
drive after the meeting on a
local fun road. Rain cancels.
Bring out the really fun car
from the back of the garage
and drive it. The drive is local,
short and sweet and the peo-
pie are even more interesting
than their autos. Stories will
abound and they are all true.
Coffee and brunch if you wish.
0 .
SThe American Heart
Association First Coast
2013 Heart Walk is Sept. 21
at Metropolitan Park In
Jacksonville. Festivities


begin at 8 a.m. and the walk
begins at 9 a.m. Dollars raised
will fund research, education
and community programs to
help combat heart disease
and stroke. The walk alsp wel-
comes back the "Top Dog"
contest. Walkers may bring
their able-bodied pups for the
walk.. Leashes required. Call
(904) 256-5721 or visit
www.firstcoastheartwalk.org. '
The VFW Post 4351 is
hosting Artles Irish Dell Day
on Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. Enjoy
corned beef and pastrami
sandwiches with macaroni
salad for an $8 donation. The
VFW is located at 96086
Wade's Place, under the
Shave Bridge. All members
and their guests are invited.

The ninth annual Jack-
sonville Tattoo Convention
will be held Sept. 27-29 at the
Wyndham Riverwalk, 1515
Prudential Drive, featuring
artists from Florida and all
Over the country, vendors,
contests, entertainment and
food. Visit www.convention-
prog.com. Admission is $20
single day/$35 weekend pass
with military discounts at the
door. Children 13 and under
free. Admission includes entry
to exhibit hall, shows and par-
ties.

RAIN. Humane Society
will host its annual., '
Barbecue, Bluegrass &
Boots fundraiser at the
Fernandina Beach Woman's
Club on Sept 28 from 5-8
Sp.m. Tickets are $12 and will
be sold at the door. Your ticket
will include barbecue pork din-
ner, dessert, live music and a
t silent auction. A cash bar will
also be available. All proceeds
will benefit the animals in the
care of RAIN Humane
Society.
RAIN's PawsAbility thrift
store in the Harris Teeter
shopping center will have a .
50-percent off sale Oct. 4 and
5. It Is open 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
On Oct. 1 the community
Is Invited to celebrate the
30th anniversary of the
Florida Theatre's restora-
tion and grand reopening at
Blues, Brews & BBQ pre-
sented by St. John &
: Partners. The event will honor
civic leaders who lead the
effort to save the theater.
Enjoy live entertainment by
local blues musicians includ-
ing BenSteadman, playing
under the Iconic "Florida" mar-
quee, and continuous music
on the stage by Toots Lorraine
& The Traffic, in rotation with
Grandpa's Cough Medicine;
craft beer from Aardwolf
Brewery, Intuition Ale Works
and Pinglehead Brewing
SCompany. Space is limited..
Contact Melissa White at
(904) 355-5661, ext, 243 or
visit http://fioridatheatre.
com/event/blues-brews-bbq/.

ARK of Nassau, which
supports developmentally
disabled adults, will benefit
from the "Celebrity Waiter
Luncheon" at Clao Italian


Fill in the squares so
that each row. column
and3-by-3boxI
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Wednesday
B-section:
Wednesday,
September 18,
Solution


923685471
14 3 1121918
7. 5U L 4 6.14
I .8 7 21 5 16 39 6


2 8 7164385
2-. T -.-91 6 --243 6
395276814
6 4 2 3 1 8 7 5 ,9
817549632


Bistro in downtown
Fernandina Beach at'11:30
a.m. Oct. 3 and 4, with addi-
tional sealing until 2 p.m.
On Oct. 3 State Rep. Janet
Adkins will be the maitre d'
and city commissioners the
waiters. On Oct 4, State Sen,
Aaron Bean will be the maitre*
d' and county commissioners
will be waiters. Lunch is $10.
Seating is limited. Call 206-
4311 for reservations.

Jointhe Nassau County
Council on Aging for "A
Sentimental Journey," an
Art Deco themed gala,
,' fundraiser from 7-l10 p.m.
Oct. 4 at the Omni Amelia
Island Plantation featuring
music, live and silent auctions
and more. Tickets af $75.
For information call 261-0701
mail info@coanassau.com
or visit coanastau.com.
. ,* -
The Annual Greek
Festival hpsted by Holy
Trinity Greek Orthodox
Church will be held Oct. 11-
13 at Francis Field, 29
Castlllo Drive, next to the
downtown visitor's center
parking garage In St.
Augustine. A delicious assort-
ment of Greek foods, pastries
and beverages will be served.
Enjoy nonstop entertainment.
Admission is $3 for adults
and free for those 12 and
under and active military and
their immediate family with ID,
For more information visit
www.stauggreekfest.com or
text GREEK to 22411.

A "Toast for Katie," the
thirdannual chef's dinner
benefiting the Katie Caples
Foundation, will showcase
thetalents of five local cull-
nary masters Oct. 13 at
Omni Amelia Island
Plantation. 'Enjoy-hors d'oeu-
vres and champagne followed
by af ive-course dinner with
wine pairings. A silent auction
will 'feature private dinners
With the featured chefs.,
Purchase tickets at wVww.
KatieRIdeForLife.donordrive.c
om/event/chefs2013 or con-,
tact Lance Jones at 310-5864'
or Lance@katierideforlife.org.
The Katie Caples Foundation
is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit corpo-
ration committed to increasing
the number of registered
organ donors to eliminate
the wait for individuals on the
National transplant list,

The St. Marys Downtown.
Merchants Association
announces its fifth annual
Haunted History Tour on
Oct. 18 from 6-9 p.m. Tickets
are $8 in advance and $10 on
the day of the event with
group rates of $5 each for 20
or more people. Tickets can
be purchased at Once Upon A
Bookseller (cash or check pre-
ferred), 207 Osbome St.,
downtown St. Marys, Ga. Call
(912) 882-7350.

St. Michael Academy's
fifth annual Wine Tasting
Gala is Nov. 16 at Omni
Amelia Island Plantation.
Festivities begin with a wine
and craft beer tasting, fol-
lowed by a three-course seat-
ed dinner created by national-
ly renowned chef Daven
Wardynski' Live and silent
auctions, live music and a raf-
fle for incredible prizes. Black
tie optional. To buy tickets and
donate visit www. stmichaels-
academy.org/wine.

THEATER
Auditions for Amelia
Community Theatre's holi-
day comedy "Fruitcakes"
are from 6-9 p.m. on Sept. 24 :
for adults and 10 a.m,-2 p.m.
on Sept. 28 for the youth
roles. All auditions will be held
in the studio theatre at 209
Cedar St. Four men, four
women and up to 15 children
and youth are needed. Details
and character descriptions
may be found on the'audition
page at www. ameliacommu-
nitytheatre.org. Performances
are between Nov. 29 and Dec.
14. For, information, contact
Linda McClane at actheatre
@att.net or call 261-6749.
* *
Tickets are on sale at
Amelia Community Theatre
for the season opener, "The
Love List." In this hilarious
comedy, Leon helps his buddy
Bill fill out a matchmaking list


of 10 qualities he wants in a
woman. When this ideal
woman shows up, Bill quickly
understands the wisdom of
the old adage, "Be careful
what you wish for."
Performances are at 8'
p.m. Oct. 3-5, 10-12,17-19
and at 2 p.m. Oct. 13 at 207
Cedar St. Adult tickets are $20
and student tickets through
college are $10. This show
does have adult content.
Season tickets are also on
sale for $100 for a six-show
pass or $85 for a five-show
pass. Purchase tickets online
at www.ameliacommunity the-
atre.org or call the box office
at 261-6749.


MUSIC

Charityconcert
The Veterans Farm Charity Concert 2013
is Sept, 22 at the Hwy. 17 Roadhouse Tavern,
850532 US 17 in Yulee. Headliner Blislur will
play.from 7.15-9 p.m. Doors open at 1 pom
Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the
door Enjoy tour bands, including Circle of
Influence, Black Creek RIz'n and Shell Game,
a 50/50 draw, raffles, a silent auction,
POW/MIAceremony from 5-5-30 p.m., food,
vendors, exhibits and booths. There will be
separate bike and vehicle parking areas.
Must be 21 or older to attend. Contact First
Choice Car Care at 225-2775, the tavern at
225-9211, Mike at 626-2078 or Missy
Freeman at 654-8705.
Showcase concert
The Jacksonville Sings! UNF Showcase
Concert will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Sept.
27 at Lazzara Performance Hall on the UNF
campus in Jacksonville. Admission is free.
Call the box office at'(904) 620-2878 for
directions o' details. Visit
www.unf.edu/coas/music.
Jazz for seniors
Enjoy a free jazz concert on Sept. 29 from
2-3 p.m. at Savannah Grand, 1900 Amelia
Trace Court, hosted by the Amelia Island
Jazz Festival with music by the Dynamic Les
DeMerle Trio featuring Bonnie Eisele. spon-
sored by Angel Watch Home Care and
Savannah Grand. Phone 321-0898.
Jazzseles
The 26th Annual Great American Jazz
Series presents the UNF'Jazz Studies faculty
In concert at 7:30 p.m. op Sept. 19 at
Rqblpson Theatre on the campus of UNF in
Jacksonville. Tickets are $8, $12 and $20.
Call the box office at (904) 620-2878 Visit
www.uhf.edu/coas/muslc
Sounds Cente
Soundsc orkCentre, presented by the -
HIlstordc ndtnjdlna Business Association, will
feature.Wlui artlatand "One Man Band" Ben
Pre.tageiustrpotrtstruments, on Oct. 4.
Conceftareiiihe Miar through October on
the first--rklJy r0ac&Wr ioth from 6-8 p.m.
on Centre $.tribt.iwe"i'i .Scond and Front
streets, Oon'.J'. Ro6rgr chair. All ages wel-
come. FbirMif6W)t(I.'Sontact the HFBA at
downtowfemanslnag'ihall.com or visit
wwW.downtownfemandlnabeach.com.

JacksonvIlle Symphony season tickets are
available by calIng (904) 354-5547. Single-
event tickets also are on sale. All concerts are
in Robert E. Jacoby Symphony Hall at the
Tlimes-Union Center for the Performing Arts,
unless otherwise noted. For Information, visit
jaxsymphony.org, like them at facebook.com/
JaxSymphony or follow them on Twitter
@jaxsymphony.
Upcoming concerts Include:
Opening weekend, Gershwin &
Tchaikovsky, Oct 3 at 7:30 p.m and Oct 4 .
and 5 at 8 p.rm.
0 Oct, 11 at 11 a.m., the Rising Star con-
cert with Nicholas Palmer, conductor, and
William Hagen, violin, the 2013-14 Yvonne
Charvot Barnett Young Artist. Enjoy selec-
tions from favorite composers such as
Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Gershwin, Bernstein
and more. *
The Midtown Men 4 Stars from the
Original Cast of Jersey Boys, Oct 18 and 19
at 8 p.m., will showcase Christian Hoff,
Michael Longoria, Daniel Relchard and J.
Robert Spencer, guest artists, as they reunite
to harmonize the hits of the 1960's: The Four
Seasons, The Beach Boys, The Beatles, The
Motown Sound, and more
'Goln'Coasta
"Goln' Coastal Music'Series" presents The
Lee Boys with supporting acts Parker Urban
Band and Spred The Dub on Oct. 5 at
Buccaneer Field (Pop Warner Football field),
Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the
door. Music starts at 5:30 p.m., immediately
after the city of Femrnandina Beach 5th Annual
Butts and Brisket competition. Cold refresh-
mdnt will be served. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Atlantic Recreation Center and
Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St For infor-
mation call 277-7350 or 277-8010. Join the
Facebook page for the latest updates.
JazzFest
The Amelia Island Jazz Festival Is Oct. 6-
13 with headliner concerts by noted swing
masters the Royal Crown Revue, Oct. 11,
and smooth saxophonist Mindi Abair, Oct. 12,
at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort
Concert Pavilion, as well as other exciting
events, including jazz and blues nights. For
the complete sdhedule.of shows, jam ses-
sions and venues -Or to 'purchase tickets -
go to wwwamelialslandjazzfestlval.com For
more information call(9.04) 504-4772 or email
Info@amellalslandjazzfestival.com.
A not for profit 501 (c)(3) corporation,
the Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz
Festival distributes proceeds toward a college
scholarship program for aspiring jazz musi-
cians.
Communityband
The Nassau Community Band is an
ensemble of amateur musicians,
retired and current music educators, even
folks that have not played since high school
or college. It welcomes all Interested persons
to join them for rehearsals at 6 p.m.
Thursday at the Yulee Middle School band


room, 85439 Miner Road.
Email Info@nassaucommunltyband. com,
call band President Chuck Bellnski at 277-
1257 ot search "Nassau Community Band"..
on Facebook.


SEDARIS
Continued from 1B
Morning Edition in 1992.
He is a regular contributor to
'This American Life." His sar-
donic humor and incisive
social critique have made him
one of NPR's most popular
and humorous commentators.


NOTES

Music cruises
Amelia River Cruises'Adult "BYOB"
Twilight Tours are held Friday and Saturday.
Tickets are $29 per person at 1 North Front
St., Femrnandlna Beach, or call 261-9972 or
book online at www.ameliarivercruises.com.
The Courtyard
The Courtyard Pub & Eats, 316 Centre
St., John Springer on the piano Sundays from
11 a m.-2 p.m. for Sunday brunch and
Thursday-Saturday from 6:30-10:30 p m. Call
432-7086 Join them on Facebook at court-
yardpubandeats.
David's
David's Restaurant and Lounge, 802 Ash
St., presents John Springer in the lounge
6:30 p.m.-close Tuesdays and Wednesdays;
Gabriel Arnold Thursday night: Aaron Bing
Friday and Saturday nights Call 904-310-
6049.
Dg Star Tavem
Dog Star Tavern, 10 N. Second St., pres-
ents Rebecca Day Happy Hour 5-7 p.m. and
Bread and Butter 9:30 p.m. tonight; Back
from the Brink 9.30 p.m. Sept. 21; Spade
McQuade 9 p.m. Sept. 26; Confluent 9:30
p.m. Sept. 27; and Little Mike and the
Torandos 9:30 p.m. Sept 28. There Is no cov-
erage charge.
Every Tuesday is Working Class Stiff,
where music Is played strictly from vinyl and
1000's of vinyl records are available to pur-
chase. Visit Dog Star on Facebook and
Reverbnatlon.com. Call 277-8010.
Florida House Inn
'Open Mtke Night' each Thursday from
7:30-10:30 p.m. in the Mermaid Bar hosted
by local musician Terry Smith. Musicians per-
form a couple of songs and the audience gets
to hear new talent. Appropriate for the whole
family. No cover charge. Call Smith at (904)
412-7665.
Green Turte
The Green Turtle, 14 S. Third-St., live
music. Call 321-2324.
Hammerhead Beach Bar
Hammerhead Beach Bar, 2045 S.
Fletcher Ave.. Live music. Visit Hammerhead
on Facebook. Contact Bill Childers at
blll@thepalacesaloon.com.
InstantGroove
Th e instant Groove, featuring Lawrence
Holmes, Johnny Robinson, Scott Giddons
and Sam Hamilton, plays each Thursday
night at The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island.
Dress is casual. For Information call Holmes
at 556-6772.
OKanes
O'Kane's Irish Pub and Eatery, 318 Centre
St., Jazz sty.lngs with Gabrlel Arnold, Sunday
brunch from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.: DanVolR:..; ,
S.Tuesdays-at 7 p.m.; Jim Barcaro
Wednesday at 7 p.m.; Davis Turner Band
Thursday-Saturday at 8:30 p~m.; and karaoke
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Call 261-1000. Visit
www.okanes.com.
Pablos
Pablos, 12 N. Second St., hots a jazz jam
from 7-10 p.m. the first Wednesday of each
month. Musicians may sit In for one song or
the;whole night. Join the mailing list by email-
ing beechflyer@bellsouth.nef.
PalaceSaloon
..The Palace Saloon, 117 Centre St.,
Sphnockered Sunday; Ace Winn Monday;
Buck:Smith Pj'Ject Tuesday; DJ in Uncle
-.. .sarsFridcys and Saturdays..Call Bill
lHders at49V:3332 or email bill@thep-
alacesaloon.com.
SatyPelican
The Salty Pelican Bar & Grill, 12 N. Front
St., live music Thursday through Sunday. Call
277-3811, or visit The Salty Pelican Bar and
Grill on Facebook.
Sandy Bottoms
Sandy Bottoms at Main Beach, 2910
Atlantic Ave., The Macys Wednesdays; and
line dancing and Hupp on the deck
Thursday; live music Fridays; Caribbean fla-
vor Saturdays; and The Macy's Sunday after-
noons. Visit www.sandybottomsamella.com.
Seabreeze
Seabreeze Sports Bar, In the Days Inn on
Sadler Road, live music.
Sheffieldrs
Sheffield's at The Palace, 117 Centre St.,
Speak Easy Saturdays with DJ 007 and late
night dance mixes; doors open at 3:30 p.m.;
Katie Fair on piano Tuesdays 6-10 p.m.; Gary
Ross Wednesdays 6-10 p.m.; The Decades
Band Thursdays 6-10 p.m. Call Bill at 491-
3332 or email blll@thepalacesaloon.com.
Slides *, r
Sliders Seaside Grill, 1998 S, Fletcher
Ave live music In the tiki bar 6-10 p.m. night-
ly and 1 5 p.m. Saturday a.n Sundaysreg'
gae Wednesdays with Pill Pi.i;' The Maoy"sin.
the lounge Friday and Satur.aysWI 0 pmr; -:
shag dancing Sundays fronm 4q7 pm.; mustlc.
nightly 9 p.m.-1 a.m. In the Breakers Lounge.
Call 277-6652. Visit www.slldersseaslde.cor.
Join Sliders on Facebook and Twitter. '
The Surf


The Surf Restaurant and Bar, 3199 South
Fletcher Ave., live entertainment all day
weekends and 5-9 p.m. every day on the
deck. Call 261-5711 and visit their Facebook
page.


In 2001, he was named'
Humorist of the Year by Time
magazine and received the
Thurber Prize for American
Humor.
Tickets start at $50 and
are available between 10 a.m.-
5 p.m., Monday-Friday, at 1-
888-860-BWAY and 24/7 at
www.artistseriesjax.org.


Copies of Sedaris' books
will be available for purchase:
on-site from The BookMark.
There will also be book-sign-:
ing opportunities at the show
with a purchased ticket.
Tickets are also available
online with Instant Seat
Selection by visiting
www.artistseriesjax.org.


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,2013/News-Leader ,


RELIGION


Trash, talk and cleaning


If you're like me, seeing trash
thrown on the side of the road is
bothersor'ne. I don't know- the idea
of flinging paper, plastics andcans
out my car window just seems crimi-
nal at the least. I suppose having vis-
ited countries where trash lies on .
the ground like pollen lies on our
cars in the springtime has me a bit
protective over our community.
Recently, while following behind ,
a car not far from where I live,.my.-.
feelings about trash thrown on the
ground were tested. If it hadn't been
for what happened just moments
-later, this article would have an :
entirely different ending.
I've often wondered how people
must feel as they throw trash out
their car windows. Does it even.
bother them? For the people driving
in front of me that day, apparently


PULPIT
NOTES

Pastor
Rob Goyette


not. An entire
McDonald's bag
loaded with stuff'
was launched right
out the window
with me just a few
car lengths behind
them. I would have
at least thought
those who do such
things would wait
until no one else*
was aroQund. In an
instant, I found
myself torn
between throwing
my siren on top of


my car and chasing them down
(something that if IFowned one
would have felt great to do) and the
idea of turning around and picking
the mess up. While I pondered my


options, I saw her.
With a shiny black trash bag in
one hand andspearing stick in the
other, she was heavenly. While she
shuffle her way through the Bahia
gras;, poking at people's trash and
loading it in her bag, my heart
turned. From aggravation to inspira-
tion, the shift in feelings jolted me.
Because I saw both things happen
only moments apart (those throwing
trash then the woman picking trash
up) the impact was profound. As I
drove on, it was as if someone had
sat down on the seat beside me and
began to talk.. '
There really are two different
types of people in the world- those
who throw trash and those who -
clean it up. When it comes to
things more important than paper
and plastic, I find the same thing to


things up

be.true. TFake, for instance, our
speech. Like leftover trash from a
fast food visit, some things are ours
to hold onto until we find an appro-
priate place to put them. Some
words are better kept to ourselves.
Unfortunately, there are those who
just don't care.
Though I must confess, I've made
my share of verbal mistakes,; I can
say I've done my best to go back and
clean them up. Is it always possible?
No, but the right thing nonetheless.
Let's face it; our words are some of
the most powerful things on the
planet. How we handle them mat-
t'rs. That's why the Bible instructs
us to be quick to hear and: slow to
speak ... (James 1:19). Whenwe
blurt things out at inappropriate"
times and places, we may not realize
the impact it's having on those trav-


eling just behind us. While it's
true, we may feel relief because
we've offloaded some of our stuff,
what about the impact on everyone
else?
i'm not sure who the lady was I
saw cleaning up the roadway
that day (God knows) but I would
like to say thanks. Not only did she
*make where I live look nicer,.she
helped reaffirm my commitment to
use mywords to bles- and not ctirse
others.
'The tongue of the wise uses
knowledge aright: but the mouth of
fools pours out foolishness. A whole-
some tongue is a tree of life: but per-
verseness therein is a breach in the
spirit." (Proverbs 15:2,4)
Robert L Goyette is pastor of
Living. Waters World Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersounreach.org


Sunday School .............:.,...........9.....;30 am
Sunday Worship....:.........................10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA.....................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study'................6:30 pm
S Pastor:BudLong .
941017 Old Nussauvllle Road. County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL32034
261-4741
wMw.springhiljbaptistfb.org ,*



4 Memorial
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

l1admlil l amly Wors ip .... am & 11 am
"(weeldy communion at 8 am)
Contemporary Worship .. .9:30 am In Maxwell Hall
Sunday School lor alll Ages.a... 9:30 am & 11 am
Wednaday Dflaer ilAud Maul a45 p4n
Downton Ferandin Beac
01 Cenre Stret e 904) 21-576


RELIGION NOTES


SDouble the blessing
When you see a food or
S household products' item on
"two for one .sale,The
,Salvation Army Hope House
tasks that you think of them
and pick up two anyway- one
for you and one for them. The
items they need most right
now to help fill:emergency
food bags for our Nassau
neighbors in need are: Peanut
:butter and jelly, helper meals,
canned vegetables, cashed
'fruits, condensed and ready to-
:eat soups, stews and -chili.
Items may be taken to the
,Hope House, 410 S. Ninth St.,
'or call 321-0435,
R IA-whatisit?
SIf you would like to learn
more about the Catholic faith,
become Catholic, or are '
:Catholic.and need the
Sacraments of Eucharist and
SConfirmatioh, come join the
group for the Rite of Christian
Initiation of Adults. They meet
at St. Michael's Academy on
Tuesday, from 6:45-8:15 p.m.
For information call 261-3472.
SsterisAlways
The Sister's Always
Ministry. Inc, of Fernandina
Beach 20ilhoi'tr., 20130 'q,
, *.1.' %- is Inn, fH",
Intimacy with Ldod t
*Conference-& Retreat"
through Sept. 21 at the
Saratoga Resort Villas in-Kiss-
:immee. Speakers include First
iLady Cynthia Robinson, New
lion M.B. Church, Fernan-
dina Beach;,Sis. Carrie
iMoore, National Area Field
; Director,St. John M.B.
:Church, Kansas City, Kan.;
:the Rev Brian K. Brown
Pastor, St Mark M.B. Church,
:St Petersburg; and conference
:founder arid hostess, Sis.
VictoriaRoberts, New Mount
':Zion M.B. Church, Haines
City.
SRegistration is $55 and
:includes, access to all work-'
:shops, PJ Party, luncheon


(Saturday only), conference
bags and more. The Saturday
, only session is $25. For infor-
mation contact Sis. Vickie
Roberts at 335-7357 or Sis.
Kathie Carswell at 556-5099 or
visit www.sistersalwaysmin-
istry.org. There will be a char-
ter bus from Fernandina *
Beach for those who do not
wish fo drive. To sign up, con-
tact Earline Hart at (904) 768-
60201or 207-3757.
Sermonseries
- .. Ted Schlroder will be giv-
ing a series of messages on
Dealing with Emotional Pain
- during services at Amelia
Plantation Chapel, on Sundays
through the end of October.
The:series topics include:
Sept. 22: Worry versus
Responsible Concern; Sept.
29: Worry and Relationships;
Oct 6: Anxiety and Peace;
Oct. 13: Calming Fear and
Panic; Oct. 20: Coping with
Depression; and October 27:
Growing Through Loneliness.
Sunday services are at 9.15
and 11.15 a.m. and everyone
is welcome. Amelia Plantation
Chapel is located at 36
Bowman Road, Amelia Island.
Call 277-4414. Visit
vwww.ameliachapel.com.
i'f tI10'!i :i^!,t'IJ'K!. );* rI1
A mtreatietval ')t
SThe "Great Commission
Revival" is coming to Legacy
Baptist Church in Nassauville
Sept. 23-25. Services will be
held at 7 p.m. nightly. The
"Great Commission" theme is
taken from Matthew 28:19-20.
There will be old-fashioned
preaching, praying and -
singing each night. Guest
speakers will be the Rev. Bill
Crews oq.n Monday, Donnie
Fuss-ell oin TrUedav and the '
Rev. David Broughton on*
Wednesday. The community
and neighbors are ifivited to
come o'utand enjoy an old-
fashiofined 'revival from years-
gone by. Legacy Baptist
SChurch is located in its tempo-


-ra-y home at the volunteer
'fire station on Old Nassauville
Road, Fernandina Beach. For
information call Pastor Jeff
Whitaker at 753-0731.
Tuesdayworshlp
Join the Salvation Army
Hope House for worship on
Tuesday, Sept. 24 at noon. Its
journey through the Gospel of
Luke continues in Chapter 13.
They invite you to join them
as they read, discuss and
digest God's holyWord. For
information, call 321-0435 or
stop by the Hope House;
located at 410 S. Ninth St.
Freedinner
Springhill Baptist Church
will serve meals for individu-
als and families in need in the
area on Thursday, Sept. 26..
from 5-6:30 p.m. at 941017 Old
Nassauville Road. Meals are
served on the fourth Thurs-
day of each month. The
church also delivers meals.
For information call 261-4741.
Healingservice
Prince of Peace Lutheran
Church 2600 Atlantic Ave.,
Fernandina Beach, will have a
special evening "Prayer &
Healing Service" on Sunday,
'Set. 2r) at 5 i.)m They look
fo wal d to seeing you there.
For information call the
church office at 261-6306.
Friends&family
Solid Rock Church of God
by Faith, 86138 Palm Tree
Drive, Yulee, will celebrate its
Friends and Family Day on
Sept. 29, beginning with
Sunday school'at 10 a.m.,and
Morning Worship at 11:30
a,m. Everyone is invite to
Come back to Sunday school
,and bring someone with you
for a day of fellowship and
Love. Elder Harry J. Johnson
is the keynote speaker.
Dinner will be served. For
more information, call the
church at 225-5388.'.


1,7 lt:-. H.n .I l C .:. 1 inlr, ,,cjlrs
9 N. 6" Street
SDr. Waln Wesberry,
S Senior Pastor
Dr. Doug,Ganyo
'Associate Pastor .
Worship 8:30 & 11 am'
Sunday School 9:50 am
Sf Nursery ,Children
t lf Youth Adults
kl lIl 261-3837
www.firsl-presbytenan-
S clurch-32034 o;-g

'V"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Chuirchi
Pastorc Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service 10:30am ,
Bible Study 9am '
Nursery provided for all services
SSmall group lstudies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday'-.Prayer Service 6:30p1m
Preschool aid CLildren Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccanee Trt. & Oebing Road, Ftrandina Bell
For More Information Calli: 261 -9521


IundayServces 9:15 & i1:lba.m.
PastorTed Schroder
Amelia Plantation /Omni Resort
36 BoWmanRoad
(904)277-4414 www.am.liachail.com rn


Royev. Jose Kallukalamm
Satuntay Vigil Mass -4'pm & 5:30 pm
Saturday Vigil Mass 7 pm- Spaish Mass
Saturday 4 pm* Mass al Yules Uniled Methodist Chtich
Sunday Masses .
8:00 am-10:00 pnm -12:00 pm (noon)
Daily Mass 8:30 am Mon, Wed,Thurs & Fri.
pm-Tues
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6 pm; Holy Day- 8:30 am, 6pm
Conlessions: Satunlay 3 pm 3:40 pm or by appi
Pars-- h; Teltphice;i94s21347 ; 432111911
Parllh Office: 904-261-3472; FaxgHD4-321-19D1


NewVision,
Congregational
SChurch, ucC
Worship -Sundays
at 10:00 am
9A074 C.hesier Road In \unice
N, t-, iloi&Ppnng-. l nn rCh i,"I orn
-;04-225-0539


:1 D 1


First Baptist
Church
Fernandina Beach
SUNDAY WORSHIP
9:00 Life Groups
10:15 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 6:30 PM
904-261-3617
FBFirst.com


Mandala retreat Oct. 5


New Vision Congregational Church, UCC,
96072 Chester Road in Yulee, will host a
retreat to explore the use of mandalas for
meditation and enrichment of your spiritual
journey and personal growth on Oct. 5 from
10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m: Beginning with a medita-
tion on a reading from literature or sacred
texts, participants will use color and form to
create or color mandalas with supplied art
materials. No art experience is necessary
Facilitator Marilyn Clark is a licensed clin-
ical counselor and workshop leader from
Baltimore, Md. She is an experienced
teacher in the use of mandalas, with a private
practice in pastoral counseling, hypfinothera-
py, guided imagery and the Bonny Method of
Guided Imagery and Music. Shbe is a Quaker
-and finds creative inspiration in music, art
and meditation. ,
Cost is $30 before Sept. 24 and $45 after.
To register contactJanet Streit at (410) 258-
6094 or jstreit223@gmail.com.
A family friendly mandala workshop will .


be held Oct..4' from 6:30-9 p.m. for fun and
creative exploration of mandalas. A free will
offering will be taken to offset costs.
Registration is required.


Fair Trade MarketOct. 12


TIhe Fair Trade Market will
be held at The Anchor(store-
front) on the corner 6f'Sixth
and Centre streets in down-
town Fernandina Beach on
Saturday, Oct. 12. from 9:30
a.m to 3p.rn '
'IHandmade'gilts ili mi'lude.'
baskets, pottery, jewelry,
Christmas items, scarves,
metal craft, olive wood and cof-
fee.
The vendors represented
are: SERV"(International mis-
sions);Justo Coffee (Mexico);
Bead for Life (Uganda);
Creations of Hope (Haiti);
Rahab's Rope (India)- items
made by women rescued from
the slave market in that.coun-
try and given a new life; Mayan
Works' (Central America); and
PALCraftaid (Palestine).
The proceeds will go direct-
ly to the women, who created
' the handicrafts, and represent
the year's overseas mission for
the sponsor,'the Presbyterian


Women of Fernandina Beach.
This'is a great opportunity to
begin y6ur Christmas shop-
ping early while supporting the


work of women k to help them-
selves the world over. ...
Call 261-3837 for informa-
"tion.





.." Doug Sides. Senior Paslor .
AMc-rrng Serr..': P 6r ad 11 60 om -
Sunaa Sns 9aJarn
'" Sunday Evening 6:00 pm .
Wednesday Pramyer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Children 6:30 pm
Wednesday Overalow'(outh 6:30pm
N.iurry Provided For All Servilces
85971 Haits Rd.'. 904.225.5128
Yulee, I. 32097
www.Yuleebaptistchureh.com

St. Peter's Episco)al Church
Welcomes You! a ....
Located at the corner
of th &Atlarattc
7,30 am -, Service \
8:.15 am-Breakfast D
9:00 am Service
t10:10 am Christian Formation
t1:00 am Service
Taize'Service 2nd Sunday each mouth:
S at 6:00,pm
Celtic Service 4th Suday of each month
at 6:00prom ,
904-261-4293
www.stpetersparlsh.org

j GRACE


A Ciongreation of the
I Pmabyeran Church In America.
Devoted to Chrit. to te FellowMhp
Sto.r hGeat Commilaslteto
Wontilp on Sundays at.10:45 am
lursuy and Qlidlrl's Curdch irovlded
nrace Groups met on Wednesday vnings In
Fwaandnsa Bach, Kiahgsland &YUMe.
Men's, Womaen'sa and Y'ah ministries
96038 Lofl i S auare Court. B i, fL 32097
Next to WInm'Dnda
www.gracoassaau.com


FemlMeeta Wire

Welcomes You
"14Whtem rtitfe Bible Is ouronlynuithorily"
Romans u:16 '
Worship Sqrvice Sunday 1 1;00 a.m.
Wednesday. Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
| In the Lolton Pointe Plaza
2/10 mile sotth of SR200/A1A
79a4-277-1303


YULEE UNITED
METHODIST'
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
SAdult Sunday School 9:30AM
Worship 11 AM
Children's Church 11:00 AM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 Pastor Charlie Sward


FIRST MISSIONA0 RY
BAPTIST CHURCH
20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Rev. Darien K. Boldeni Sr., Pastor
The Church
in thle Heart of the City
With the Desire to be ini the
Heart ofAll People
Sunday New Members Class 9 am.
Sunday School 9:3,0 .m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Wiutnesday Noonday Prayer
Wednesday Mid-week Service 7-9p.m.
Mintistries: Buits & Va, Couples, Singles,
Youth



( tthebridge
famft wOap centerI
Sunday Service .... 10:30 am
Bible Study....... 9:30 am
Wednesday Service... 7:00 pm
www.thebridgeflordia.cam
85031 Landover Drive
Yulee, Fl
904.225.4860


CELEBRATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
I/novaiSe Style. Contemporary.Music,
Casual Atmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowskli
85520 Miner Rd. Yule6, FL 32097.
Sunday Worship 9:00am and 10;30am
Nursery Provided .
SKidKredible Children Ministries
Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth Program Wed. 0 6:30pm
Connecting wNth Cfust...
'Concing wth Pe&l


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"Come Experience the Joy of
Worship Service- Psalm 100
Rev. PRANK CAMAROT5I. Pastor
Sunday School .............. 9:4Bam
Worship SBre .... ........11:00am
Evening Worship ............60sOOpm
Wednuday Night Supper .......6:00pma
Encounter Youth Group .6:3Opm-8:0Opm
Wedneuday Prayer Service ...... 7:00pm
736 Bonnlevilw Road '
904-2601-4615
Nursery provided
WorshlplnJoy.com
Find us on Faebook:
Five Points Baptist Encounter Youth


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH,
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Ken Westbrook
TRANSITIONAL PASTOR
Sunday Morning Worship Service 10:30 am
Sunday School 9:15 am
Sunday Evening Worship Service 6:00 pm
AWANA Wednesday 6:30 8:30 pm
Wednesday Service 7:00 pm
Nursery Provided
www biael.rockba plosoo en


ls Worship this week



^ at the place of your choice...










COMMUNITY


Kiwi wineries coming to festival


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,2013/NEWS-LEADER :


Amelia Island Wine Festiva
is pleased to announce
that two wineries from
New Zealand- Loveblock
of Awatere Valley and Dog Point
Winery of the Wairau Valley- will, be
at the festival on Oct. 12 at the
'Shops of Omni Amelia Island
Plantation.
Loveblock, founded by Eric and
Kim, is their second foray into wine
making when the couple's previous
label was sold toa Canadian bever-
age company in 2003. That label'
owned no land,'preferring to source
its grapes from contract growers.
However in 20.04, the couple's pas-
sion for winemaking drew them
back into the business when they
purchased 180 acres perched atop
the hills overlooking Marlborough's
Awatere Valley, planted several
grape varietals and launched
Loveblock.
With a deeply held belief that
they are custodians of the land,
Loveblock farms and grows grapes
in accordance with Organic
Certification standards, Sustainable
Winegrowing New Zealand ,
Principles and incorporates some
biodynamic practices. At Loveblock,
their mission is to create the best
wine they can to express their
extraordinary place and its unique
aspect. ,


1 The first Loveblock wines that '
are being released are Sauvignon
"Blanc, Pinot Gris, Riesling and
Gewurztraminer, all from the
Loveblock Marlborough vineyard,
Sand Central Otago Pinot Noir. Other
varietals planted are Pinot Blanc,
Moscato, Saint Laurent, Chenin
SBlanc Tempranillo and Arneis.
One of the earliest private vine-
yards to be established in
Marlborough is ,Dog Point
Vineyards, where wines are pro-
duced that respect the natural
integrity of the land from which they
are made and reflect the experience
and passion of the people that make
them. All fruit is estate grown, low /
cropped and hand-picked. The name
Dog Point dates back to the earliest
European settlement of
Marlborough and the introduction
of sheep to the district. These were
the days where, due to a lack of .'
fences, boundary riders used bound-
ary-keeping dogs to protect the local
flocks of sheep. Shepherds' dogs 4
sometimes became lost or wandered
off, eventually breeding to form a
marauding pack that attacked the
same flocks they were meant to be
protecting. Eventually settlers were
forced to cull the dogs and the area
was named Dog Point.
Dog Point produces four wines,
including their sauvignon blanc,


:' SiUBMITTED PHO1r)i
Eric and Kim Loveblock, above left, are owners of the organic'Lovebloc4 Winery in New Zealand, 180
acres perched atop the hills overlooking Marlborough's Awatere Valley. Above right, sheep graze amongst'
the vines at Dog Point Vineyards, also in Marlborough.


chardonnay, pinot noir and their
Section 94.
Tickets are now on sale for this .
year's "Taste the Southern
Hemisphere" which. will showcase
award-winning wines from the pre-
mier growing regions of Argentina,.
Chile, Australia, New Zealand, and
South Africa on Oct. 12 among the
moss-draped oaks and reflective
lagoon at the Shops of the Omni
Amelia Island Plafintation. .
Visitors maystroll along the
Wine Walk and sample dozens of


wines from over 20 wineries and
learn about the wines and wineries
from industry representatives- all
without a passport or jetlag.. "
Purchase a bottle or a case to pro-
long the pleasure long after you
return home.
This year, visitors who purchase
a Wine Ticket fdr wine sampling will
also be able to savor food tasting
from several local restaurants
including Ciao, Bar-Zin, Espana and
Verandah. The Wine Walk will' also
feature artisan-crafted treasures,


from artful tableware to, functional ,
pottery, handmade glass votives'and
vases, stoppers and wine acces-
sories, hatd-painted stemware and '
sterling silver and copper jewelry
mirroring the organic flow of fabric. ,':
' Visitors also can wander down .
the walk to the award-winning
Amelia Farmers Market, which will
be open regular hours Oct. 12, from
9 a.m.-l p.m. Visit www.ameliafarm-
ersmarket.com. For festival details. .
visit www.ameliawine.com or call '
491-4872.. -. ,


ARTWORKS

Sculpture garden
The Cummeir Museum of Art& Gardens, 829
Riverside Ave., announces the opening of the J.
Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Community
Sculpture Garden & Plaza on Sept. 2?1 at 10 a.m.,
marking the completion of the Landscape
Enhancement Project that launched in September
2012, and included the renovation of the entire
TRiverside Avenue portion of The Cummer campus.
'For information visit www.cummer.org.
Artistbooks
Artist Books with Eliza Holliday at Island Art
Association Education Center, 18 N. Second St., will
Sbe held Sept. 27 from 9 a.m,-5 p.m. Cost is $75, all
materials included. '
A Japanese bound blank journal will be made in
class with paste paper covers, 'as well as sevei al sup-
plemnental bindings Contact Eliza S Holliday' at
Swww.letterist.com or 556-2517.


Chamber Singers plan special concerts


To celebrate their 10th
anniversary season with style,
Island Chamber Singers will
perform Mozart's Requiem
accompanied by a 10-piece
orchestra on Nov. 22 and 24 at
the Amelia Island Plantation
Chapel.
The concert is one ofa pair
being performed this season in
which the singers.are "looking
back" in November by re-per-
forming one of its most well-
received works with a bigger
orchestra and "looking forward"
in March by performing some-".
thing entirely new, Dave
Brubeck's Mass, To Hope, a
Celebration and Songs and


Sonnets by George Shearing.
The orchestra for the Requiem
will incorporate woodwinds as
well as a string quartet, trurm-
pet, timpani and piano. .
The Requiem in D minor
was composed by Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart in 1791 in
Vienna. Mozart died on Dec. 5
that year with the work unfin-
ished. Franz Xaver Sussmayr, a
student of Mozart, completed
the requiem. In.the movie
"Amadeus," the audience is led
to believe that Mozart thought
that the piece had been anony-
mously commissioned for his
own funeral. It actually had
been commissioned by Count


Franz von Walsegg. as a tribute
to the count's wife on the .
anniversary of her death.
In addition to the Requiem,
the November concert will fea-
ture six of Mozart's vocal n c-
turn'es that were written as '
entertainment music for parties
in the 18th century.
The fall concerts will take
place at Amelia Island, .
Plantation Chapel, 36 Bowman
Road, Fernandina Beach, on
'Friday, Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. and
Sunday, Nov. 24 at 3 p.m. An
opening night reception will be
held in the Fellowship Hall
immediately following Friday
evening's performance.


Tickets are $15 for adults
when purchased in advance of
concert day. They can be pur-
chased online at www.island-
chambersingers.com, from a
Member of Island Chamber
" Singers, at the Amelia Island
Welcome Center, 102 Centre St,
'(800) 226-3542, and AIFB .
Chamber of Commerce, 961687
Gateway Blvd., Suite !Oi'G (at .
AlA and Amelia Island
Parkway), 261-3248. Tickets my -
also be purchased at the door
for $20. Tickets are always
FREE for K-12 students.
For further information,
please call (904) 225-0575 on
weekdays.


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Family Fun for All Ages'i Mon-Sat 9-5 & Sun 10-5
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, ,'


&


Ii"-


JAZZ'ICrn tieffrjn,(Th^
many of those tunes at the fes-
tival this year," DeMerle said..
DeMerle added that it was a
challenge to keep up with the
many Jazz Festival preparations
from thousands of miles away
while doing nightly shows as
well as delivering lectures about
Big Band history, based on his
wbrk as a drummer with the
Lionel Hampton and Harry
James orchestras. "We had fun
for sure the audiences are big
jazz lovers, and each night we
got a chance to talk about
Amelia Island and our festival
No doubt many of, our cruise
friends will visit the/island for
this: year's event or. in the
future."
,Among those who attended
their shows was the great.
British drummer, Mick Avory,
who played early on with the
Rolling Stones but is, better
known for his work with the
popular rock group, The Kinks.
"A great guy and fine musi-
cian," said DeMerle ,. "We
coaxed him into jamming with
Uls and had a ball! He was quite
a jazz drummer a's well."
DeMerle gives the AIJF's cur- ,
rent Board Of Directors -
Loren Lumr, Holly Germane,
,Suzanne McLeod, and Elsele -
'along with a "truly dedicated
group of volunteers," high
kudos for manning the 2013.
AIJF plans and schedules in his


The Bible tells us lhat "God is Love and
, ;he who abides in love abides in God and
God in him' and that 'We love Him
S because ie first loved u:' II IcnIn 4 6
19) These verses are true not only
between our Heavenly Famner and us
but also wnen we are involved with
others; Children will develop a love fcr
their parents because ot the unselfish love
their parents nave for them AjSo a wife
ot huttsband will develop a stronger love
S for each other viihen Tnheir love is returned
J to hem W/hen someone dislikes us :r
oftenci us, it is a natural instinct to
distance ourselves from meM. however
when someone is loving anda ind to us
S we have a tendency to want to draw
closer to Them Goda perfect love for
mankind Is exemplified by His giving co
H iis only begotten Son to die for our sins
And just as His forgiving love is always
tended to us, we should also be
forgiving or others. True forgiveness
breeds love, and
discovering the good .,-
*in othners, and
discounting their
faults, are essential for
developing a loving
relationship


and Eisele'aAaheii,' i..qti L ,Ifli
During tthuli'fme atwayrftioa d
the ship the DeMerles toured a
variety of landmarks through-
out the region, "We checked
out the David in Florence, sam-
pled original Italian pizza in
Naples and marveled at the
magnificent Dubrovnik seaport
in Croatia, We went for a gon-
dola ride in Venice," Les said,
"however, our Tavorite experi-
ence there was revisiting the
Venice Jazz Club, an intimate
spot patronized by enthusias-
. tic jazz lovers. We enjoyed sit-
ting iiwith the local musicians
too, and thb crowd responded
big time. One night they let us
bring in our whole band from
the boat, and the acoustics were
so good we actually recorded a
set at the club. It could well
turn out-to be an upcoming
release for, us." "
The 2013 AIJF will kick, off
Sunday, Oct. 6 at 10:45 aam. at
the Hoyt House downtown with
a Mardi Gras-style street
parade, led by The Spare Rib
Six with DeMerle and Eisele,
that will precede the tradition-
al Dixieland brunch at David's
Restaurant. Later that after-
noon, beginning at 4 p.m.,
TGIF, the U.S. Navy Jazz Band,
will perform a free concert in
Amelia Park. For the weekend
headliner events at the Omni
Resorts Amelia Island Planta-
tion, The Dynamic .Les De-
Merle Band with Eisele and
keyboardist Mike Levine and
trumpeter Bobby Pickwood will
open for ,The Royal Crown
Revue on Friday.:,
Super saxophonist. Jesse
'Jones Jr. will join DeMerle's'
band with Bonnie Eisele on
Saturday for "A Tribute to
Cannonball Adderley and
Nancy Wilson" preceding Min-
di Abair's show. Both nights a
second stage outside will offer
pre-show sets from groups led
by AIJF scholarship winners
Richard Roberts (trumpet),
Boyce Griffith (saxophone) and
the Next Generation Jazz Band.
DeMerle is particularly jazzed
about a new event this year, the
Drum Clinic Spectacular ,at,


BIR1


Virginia and Dallas.
Tompkins of Marysville,
Ohio, announce the birth of a
son, Jasper Stone Tompkins,
born at 11:09 a.m. July 3,.
2013, in Columbus, Ohio. The
baby weighed 5 pounds 11
ounces and measured 19
inches in length.
Paternal grandparents are
Lynn and Karen Tompkins of
Fernandina Beach. Maternal


Amelia Island -Plantation'siRac,'I
queb iPafk Conference Center .
beginning at noon on Saturday,
Oct. 12. The clinic will pay trib-
ute to legends Gene Krupa and,
Buddy, Rich and Daniel Glass,:-"
leader/drummer for The Royal.
Crown Revue, will join DeMerle
in an innovative, educational:
event. ," I1- ", .
DeMerle recently signed an
exclusive endorsement deal
with Craviotto Drumrs, which:.:
donated a "state-of-the art" set:
to the Jazz Festival. "Steve,"
Maxwell, representing the corn-::.
pafiy, will. be attending and.
emceeing the event," DeMerle
advised. Other festival events,.
include: I
Jazz at the Movies, which.
will present "Chops," an award-,
winning documentary film that-N'
features Wynton Marsalis and
follows the Douglas Anderson ,
High School Jazz Band's quest:
for honors at Lincoln Center in -
New York City. The school's:.,
band leader Ace Martin and.-,
Roberts will be 6n hand for the',
movie and a live set also,.
Tuesday, Oct. 8, in the Omni',
AlP's Heron Room.
Red White & Blues with.,
sotl blues belter DieDra Ruff.,
and the Ruff Pro Band plus a.
wine tasting on Wednesday;
A Latin Jazz Concert and,.,
Dance with percussionist Ell'
Nifio:& The Latin Jazz Knights.
on, Thursday.. Both shows will ,-.
take place at Sandy Bottoms..
The festival's final show, a,,
Smooth Jazz Brunch featuring-i
Levine, Dennis -Marks,
DeMerle and surprise special.,-
guests is Sunday, Oct. 13 at the,.
Omni AlP's Sunrise Inn. ,
For tickets, including the All ,.
Jazz Pass good for all events,'
and premier seating for the.'
headliner concerts, go to.www.
Sameliaislandjazzfestival.com,
The UPS Store in the Island',
Walk Shopping Center, 1417: i
Sadler Road, 277-0820, or the
AIFBY Chamber of Commerce,.:
961687 Gateway Blvd., #101G,,.
261-3248, :
Call the festival hotline at.i
504-4772 or email info@ameli-,.
aislandjazzfestival.com.


rH
r << 1

grandparents are Doris
Holloway of Fernandina "
Beach-and Clay Printz of :
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Great-grandparents are '.
Winifred and Morris Hollo-
way of Chattanooga, Tenn.,
and Jan Printz of Chatta- :
nooga, Tenn. The baby's :
great-great-grandmother is
Tressa Hartley of Washing- "
ton, Pa. "


*I
5 I


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OvngRlainsi


ff







FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.,2013/News-Leader


HOMES


Coastal cleanup
Beachkcepers Fernandina
Beach, Keep Nassau Beauti-
ful, Amelia Island Sea Turtle
Watch, Wild Amelia Nature
Festival and the Girl Scouts o:
Nassau will hold beach clean-
ups as part of the Internation-
al Coastal Cleanuip Sept. 21.
Amelia Island Sea Turtle
Watch will meet at 9 am. at
Main Beach in the Dolphin
Avenue parking lot. Girl
Scouts of Nassau County will
meet at 10 a.m. at the Fort
Clinch fishing pier. Wild
Amelia Nature Festival will
meet at 11 a.m. at the pier.
The public is welcome. Bags
and gloves will be provided.
Park entrance fees will be
Waived for participants in. the
Wild Amelia event. Peters
Point is also a registration
location, starting at 9 am.
Keep Nassau Beautiful,
Inc., notes that travels and
participation is encouraged
through neighborhood, river
and street cleanup as well.
For information contact KNB
at 261-0165 or 1-800-977-0162.
AmnidiaTree
Conservancy
"Protect the canopy that is
protecting'us..." The Amelia
Tree Conservancy invites all
S those interested in preserving
Amelia Island's maritime for-
est canopy to attend a meeting
at St. Petdi s Episcopal
Church Parish Hall, 801.
Atlantic Ave., on Thursday,
.Sept. 26, at 7 p.m.
Speakers will address
goals and projects regarding
otitreach programs, conserva-
Stion, tree planting and other
activities. Many opportunities
are available for members.to
lend their talent and skills to
preserve the beauty and
S. health of Amelia Island's
ecosystem. For information
visit ww.ameliatreeconser-
vancy.org or email info@ .
-,ameliatreeconseivancy.org.
GoNatve
SIn honor of National Public
Lands Day on Sept. 28, the-
Ribamifl Gluhbohusp at Forti9n i
GeotrgeIstend-dtrai-ural Ite'
Park, 11241 Fort George
Road, Jacksonville, will host
"Go Native"' day. Learn about
the impact of invasive exotic
plants on local parks, what is
being done to combat them
Sand what you can do at home
to help.
Join AmeriCorps members
and park staff at 10 a.m. for a
talk, followed by.a nature walk
at 10:45 a.m. Enjoy kid-friend-
ly invasive plantgames start-
ing at 11:45 a.m. Bring a pic-
nic lunch to enjoy on the lawri.
The event is free and open to
all ages. Visit www.florilas-
tateparks.org/fortgeorgeis-
Sland or ca1 (904) 251-2320. '
Artsmarket
The Arts Market is a farm-
ers'market with arts and-
crafts, too, on-the corner of
South 14th and Lime streets.
You'll find Jacqueline's old-
fashioned, homemade sour
cream pound cake,Harlow's
, All Natural Products; Jill -
Patten's decorative pillows
and custom artwork, apparel,
puppy accessories, handmade
jewelry, dog treats, live-music
and 'more. -
'The market has room for
new vendors and musicians.
The next market is Sept. 29.,
VisitTFernandinaBeachArts.
Market.com, find them on .
Facebook or call 557-8229.
Resiliency series
As part of tfieCity
Resiliency Series, Fernandina
Beach is hosting a seminar,
Alternative Transportation:
More than Just Cars, on Oct.
3, presented by the North
Florida Transportation


Organization. City and county
representatives will talk about
current long-range transporta-
tionri plans and the Council on
Aging will talk about public
transportation services. The
f TPO will talk about how
Nassau fits into the region,
and the publicis invited to
comment on what they would ,
like to see..
Energy Issues.in a
Changing World will be the
featured talk on Nov. 7:.. .
These lectures are free and
open to the public and also.-
held at the Peck Center, 516
South 10th St., sponsored by
the Fernandina Beach Corni- '
munity Development Depart-
ment. For information call
310-3135 or email aburke@
fbfl.org. ...
Garagesale
The FSCJ Betty PR Cook
Nassau Center Cardiovascular
Technology Student Associa-
tion will host a garage sale on
Oct. 5 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. to
benefit the American Heart '
Association, in the front park-
ing lot of the Betty P Cook
Nassau Center, 76346 William
Burgess Blvd. in Yulee.
Sale items of interest
include a trundle bed, 16-
Splace settings of Noritake .
china, a computer printer and, '"
more:Call Christie Jordan at
548-1709 for information .
Plantsale
Oct. 5 is the fall Master
Gardener Plant Sale. The pink
Jacobinia made a successful
debut at the spring Plant Sal1
and Master Gardeners have
propagated more for this sale.
It's a fairly droughttolerant
plant once established.
Jacobinia is great for color in
the shade: Also available will
be Plant Sale favorite
Scuttelaria, which has a nice
mounding, rambling growth
thatpairs well with other
perennials that enjoy sun. The
fall Master Gardener Plant
Sale is being held at the UF/
IFAS Nassau Demonstration-
Garden at the James S. Page
Governmental Complex on
Saturday, Oct 5 from 9 am.
ih until 2 p.m,-Ai gelarietyAp{tl,
ip bedding;plantsilbeibeavail4 1
able, so come early for best
selection. For information see
http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu/hor
ticulture/ plantsale.html or
call the Extension office at
(904)879-1019.
Bird dub outing
The Nassau County Bird
Club will hold a field trip to
c Huguenot Memdrial Park on
Oct 12 at 8 a.m., rain or shine.
Entrance fee to this
Jacksohfivillecity park is $1. It
is one of the best places in the
area to observe shorebirds.
SCross the Nassau Sound '
bridge and go 8.2 miles south
on A1A to the blinking light."
Turn left to enter the park. ",
Meet at the General Store &
Nature Center. Bring binocu-
lars, field guide, bug juice,
sunscreen, rain gear and
water. For information call
Carol Wyatt at 261-9272 or
email carolihewgw@aol.com.
Nature calendars
The Wild Amelia Nature
Festival's limited edition 2014
Nature Photography calen,
dars are now available at area
businesses as well as online at
www.wildamelia.com.
With images from the fifth
annual Wild Amelia Nature
SPhoto Contest, the calendars
are sold at First Federal
Savings Bank of Florida, 1500
Sadler Road and Chester Road
and AlA in-Yulee; the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center
office; Kayak Amelia, four :
miles south of the island on
A1A; y.B. Green on Second
Street, downtown Fernandina;
and the Visitor Center of-Fort
Clinch State Park. ..


COA warns seniors about critters in attic


For the News-Leader

-We all love trees and the benefits of.
both the shade and aesthetics they pro-
vide as they wrap our homes in what -
seems to be a blanket of protection from
the hot Florida sun.
As was'mentioned in an article July
17 in' the News-Leader, protective trees
can lead to big problems when limbs
break off and damage roofs. But there's
another insidious fallout from having
Streets cradle our roofs.
SThe Council on Aging. (COA> has
received numerous calls from seniors in
Sthe past regarding hearing strange nois-
es in their attics, along with complaints
Sof high electric bills, horrible odors,
electric outlets not working, ceiling
water leaks andholes in soffits near the
rooflines. Some furry friends- squirrels
-may have moved in with you and may
be responsible all of those symptoms.
Yes, squirrels want to move in with
you. They want to take refuge from hot
or inclement weather like you do, and
raise families in a secure spot. Once
they're in your home they may never
want to leave.
COA fix-it volunteer Bart Cormier"
says, "Squirrels are survivalists to the
highest order and will not go willingly,
especially when they have a good thing
going." .
SHe also says that early attention by
the homeowner is vital, hopefully before
,the furry squatters take up raising fami-
lies. : "
S.-'"What, homeowners do not under-
stand," says Cormier, "is that there's a
".tremendous potential for home dam-
age." He has noted thatsquirrels often
chew.electrical insulation, with their'
sharp rodent teeth cutting not only
through insulation, but a)so through soft
copper wiring with ease, resulting in
"dead" circuits throughout the home.
Squirrel infestation also raises the
potential for a house fire. They also
chew ductwork in the attic, which ere-
ates air leaks. In the winter, for example,
Cormier has witnessed more heated air
escaping into the attic than what is deliv-
ered into the home. Any plastic plumb-
ing Is fair game as well, resulting in air
conditioner drainpipes leaking onto the


S' SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Squirrels in the attic can damage
'wiring, above, and ductwork, left,
the Council on Aging warns.


ceiling. Then there's the attic insulation'
that provides such a comfy squirrel :
nesting opportunity. Unfortunately, you
will end up with serious hygiene issues .' -
that only get worse and ultimately. -
become a health hazard for the home-. i
owner. ,
It's absolutely essential that home-,


Paul Barnes. GRI

Sde,, Doectol

Cell 904-753-0256 608 S. 8th Sirect
464.barnes@gmail.cim Fernandina Beach. FL 32034
\m.acrfl.com
\v- %.ameliaforsale.coni "Exceeding Expectations

HOI`




-" in H artnic

wAm-scaHor4Ai 'c o n
-: ) ....... Z:I .7 SW d lerRj
-" ncel ak-1,, r-L ,2o ,*

..


608 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, Fl 32034
www.ACRFL.com
(904) 261-2770


Phil Griffin
Broker
phil@acrfl.com.
(904) 556-9140


COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT LEASING SALES


ownerstake squirrels (and any "'.
other attic invaders) seriously, '
because they are serious. Otherwise,
you're ,in a losing battle that gets more
and more costly and dangerous as time-
goes on. '
.Theattenti6n of a pest control com- -
pany right away is key to winning this
battle. Entrance holes have to-be
repaired, attics must be inspected for
damage and repaired, and access-"high-
ways" from tree limbs andupright plant-
ings need to be cut back or removed. A-
squirrel can jump 15 feet from a limb or .
bush to gain access to your r6of..That
squirrel and his future family will soon
ownyourattic. '
".'This is the'secondin a series of articles'
a. imed at raising the attention of aged:
homeownerss regarding roof-relat'd issues .
concerning trees. Thefirst article.
appeared in the News-Leader on July 17.


IPOFE

FKOEE^T


2965 14" Street
rillf brauuful cuil.)m built home is built oilh struciural rniulaBld p.rAl,
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Paul Barnes. GRI
Residential
Sales Director
r n iu 7 MU60)8 S. 8llh Strec!
Cell 904-753-0256 608 S. 81 Street
464.harnes@(gmail.com Fernandina Beach. FL 32434
wvM .acrfl.com


I,

2~U


HOME & GARDEN BRIEFS








AROUND SCHOOL


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,2013 News-Leader


YHS student to attend

youth forum in D.C.


Thaddeus Moore, a junior
at Yulee High School,-has'
been selected to attend the
six-day National Youth
Leadership Forum on National
Security in Washington,.D.C.,
in October for outstanding
high school students from
across the nation. ..'
'The forum introduces stu-
dents to careers in national
security, intelligence, the diplo-
matic corps and more; and the
curriculum is based onfactual
world events. Moore was'"
selected based on his 4.0
grade point average and his
interest in the military and
national security. Moore is
president of his class, a menm-
ber of the National Honor
Society, vice president of the
Beta Club and a member of


Thaddeugs Moore


the HiQ and Academic World
Teams. He is also second seed
on the Yulee Tennis Team.


Scholarship
semifinalistt
Hundreds of high school
students throughout Florida
joined approximately 16,000
students nationwide as semi-
finalists for the 2014 National
Merit Scholarship Program,
including Olivia G. Dawedeit
of Fernandina Beach High
School. .
National Merit
Scholarship Corporation offi-
cials recognize high school
seniors with the highest
scores bn the Preliminary
SAT/National Merit
Scholarship Qualifying Test
who meet published pro- -
Sgram participation require-:
Smenrits. Semifinalists are eligi-
ble to compete for one of
8,000 National Merit
Scholarships worth more
than $35 million.
To be considered, they
must fulfill several require-
Sments, including submitting
a detailed scholarship appli-
cation that includes their aca-
demic record throughout
high school, participation in,
school and community activi-
ties, demonstrated leader-
ship abilities and honors and
Awards received. The stu-
dent must also be recom-
mended by a high school
official, write an essay and
earn an SAT score that con-'
firms the earlier perform-
ance on the qualifying test.,
Finalists are selected based
on exceptional skills, accom-
plishments and potential for
success in college studies.
Visit www.national merit.org.

Astr challenger
Student team registration
for the third-annual Florida
Student Astronaut Challenge
.is now open to high school
Students (grades 9 through,
12). The event.focused-on'
science, technology, engi-.
Sneering and mathematics
provides an opportunity for'
students to showcase their
knowledgelthrough a series
of team-oriented experi-
ments and challenges.
To participate, teams
must register to take the
regional qualifier exam by
Sept.27. The exam.will be
given at three locations in
southern, central and north-
ern Florida on Oct. 12. The
12'highest scoring, five-per-
son teams that qualify will be
invited to compete for'first
place at the state-level cormr
petition on March 7-9, 2014,
organized by NASA at the
Kennedy Space Center.
For additional dates and
information and to register
your team, visit Florida's .
Student Astronaut Challenge
website at www. astro-
nautchallenge.com.
Homecoming
parade
The Fernandina Beach
SHigh School homecoming,
parade will be held down-
town on Oct. 18 at 4 p.m. The
community is invited to par-
ticipate. If you or your group
would like to be included,
contact Rob Hicks at
Fernandina Beach High
School at 261-5714 or robert.
hicks@nassau.kl2.fl.us.
Literacy fair
The North Campus and
Nassau Center of Florida
State College at Jacksonville
presents its 11th annual
Family Literacy Fair for resi-
dents of Duval and Nassau
counties on Sept. 21 from 10
a.m.-2 p.m. It includes oppor-
tunities for health screen-
ings. The Literacy Fair aind
"Health Extravaganza and


Mighty Teeth Day":take .
placeat the North Campus,
4501 Capper Road in Jack-
sonville (1-95 to Dunn Ave.';or
1-295.to Dunn Ave.). It is free
and open to the public;:- ,
The annual event is a cel- 1
ebration of the joys and ben-
efits of reading, especially
reading as a-family activity.
Enjoy free books (for all' .*
ages), door prizes, a light ,
lunch and fun, free and'help-
ful activities designed to fos-
ter good reading habits. In
addition to reading activities,
there will be golf lessons,
health and dental screenings
forchildren and adults, a
healthy cook demonstration
and.a.Zumba class: Demon-
".strAtionsof STARLAB, a
portable inflatable planetari- '
um by.Science First in Yulee,
will be held 10 am.-lp.m.
.Call (904) 766-6555.
Artforkids
The Island Art Associa-
tion'willoffer Introdu.tion to
Drawing & Painting Sept. 24.:
Cost is $1.i'7 per participant .
Instructor is Sarah Bash--'"..
Gleason. Kids of all ages wel-
cornou "Dres.91or~,e
paper, bi uses and'paint pro-
vided. Students will learn the.
fundamentals of drawing hAnd
sketching to transfer the," *,'
images onto canvas and cre-
'ate a work of art. Bring two,
canvases of 8 by .11 inches or
1' by 24 inches and/or an
*illustration board (less
expensive).
' Reserve your space by
mailing skyedesigns@live.
Sc.6m or call (912) 342-3677.
Space is limited. ;
', Sept 28 is Children's..
Art for ages-6-9 from 10-11
a.m. and 11:15 a.m.-12:15
'p.m. MiddleSchool Art for
10-14 is 1-2:15 p m. These
classes are free;, al supplies
" available, thanks to a dona-
tiof by'th 'Plantation'Ladies
SAssc.ciai!oniiior registra-
*tion is necessary. Call the
9. gallery at 26f7020. Classes
are held iii the Education
Center, nextlo the gallery,
18 N. Second St;,
Fernandina.
Health classes
SThe Nassau County
Health Department will hold
Sits final 4 me Teen Health
Class of the month on Sept.
26 from 3 30-5 p.m Teens
should contact Erin Cutshaw
at 5481810, ext. 5272 for
information, orto register.
Honorchorius
,.'The Jacksonville Sirngs!
.Finale Concert High School
'Invitational Honor Chprus .
will be presented at 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 28 in Lazzara Perfor-
mance Hall on0 he UNF
Campus. Admission is free.
Youngwriters
The Nassau Youth
Writers Program meets the
third Tuesday of each month
at Books Plts,,107 CentreSt.
For information contact nas-
sauyouthwriters@gmail.com.
Troop89
Boy Scout Troop 89
meets each Monday, 6:30-8
p.m., at the Adam Kelley
Scout Hut, South 13th Street.
Troop 89, sponsored by
Fernandina Beach Rotary
Club for 75 years now, has a
strong record of helping :
told boys .through team
work in camping, canoeing,
hiking, backpacking, bicy-
cling and individual endeav-
ors in communications, per-
sonal fitness and life-skill
areas. Contact Scoutmaster
Dan Matricia at 277-9611 or
come to the Scout Hut dur-
ing meeting times.


Lesson for troubled teens


EDWE1-1ENMAYER
For the News Leader
You're a parent with a
teenager who is always on the
verge of trouble.
He won't listen to
parental guidance or to the
advice of other family mem-
bers, teachers or coaches.'He
is hanging with bad friends
and following them into ques-
tioinable activities. His grades
are deteriorating and he won't
study. You are really con-
cerned that he is headed for
problems- even more fright-
ened that these problems may
ruin his life.' .
Will Bryant is that guy. At
age 16, despite many angels
in his life; he got into big trou-
ble with his so-called friends,
and went to prison for 31
years. He taught himself to
read and write while in
prison, learned how to file
legal briefs, became a
Christian and got purposeful
with his life-tough to do
while in prison.
Now he's out and
Working hard, paying
, his own bill, mentoring
South and those about to be
released from prison, atfend-
ing church and attending
classes. Despite losing
more than half his life to
incarceration, he is deter-
mined to live the second
part of his life better than the
first Will knows he.has a sec-
ond:chance at life and is tak-
ing full advantage of it. But it
didn't have to turn out even
that well.
Is your teenager on a
course for troulle?Do'es she
know that bne bad mistake
Scan ruin her life, that bad
actions can.have very bad
consequences?
-Parents and their
teenagers are invited to the
'-Boys & Girls Club in
Fernandina on Friday, Sept
27 at 6 p.m. to hear Will's dra-
matic story and. his caution
about how bad decisions can


". ,' "' FILEPHOTO,
Will Bryant, a former convict turned mentor and model
citizen, will speak to parents and teens about his experi-
ences and how bad actions can have very bad conse- '
quences, on Friday, Sept. 27 at 6 p.m. at the Boys and
Girls Club'in Fernandina Beach. Registration is required
at 491-9102. A free barbecue dinner will be served,
though donations are appreciated.


turn life into a disaster. A
Sonny's Bar-B-Q dinner will
be served (no cost but hono-


rarium suggested).
Registration is required at
491-9102.


You can finishhig school -


Yearn how at brkfast series


Family Support Services of
North Florida's Breakfast
Learning Series will highlight
three programs that help
Nassau County residents fin-
ish high school, Tuesday at 9
a.m. FSS offers the free
Breakfast Learning Series at its
Nassau County office, 87001
Professional Way in Yulee.
Networking and continental
Breakfast begin at 8:30 a.m.;
program from 9 to 10:30. a.m.
.. Register to attend at
FSS.BLS.Nassau@fssnf.org or
225-5347.
Guest speaker Roy Barker,
student affairs director, Florida
State College at Jacksonville,


will discuss programs offered
by the college to earn a high
school diploma or equivalency
diploma (GED). He will cover
details of applying 'for the pro-
grams,'eligibility criteria and
realistic goals of the programs,
He. will also provide motiva-.
tional tips to get started and
continue with educational goals.
The Breakfast Learning
Series is offered'by FSS on the
fourth Tuesday of each month.
The educational program fea-
tures a guest speaker who
shares information, trends'and:
insight, into social s services
issues and subjects ofvalue to
parents and'families.


FSS is the 'lead agency for
foster care, adoption and fami-
ly preservation in Nassau and
Duval counties. FSS serves the
Nassau County community as a
local resource center for child
protection and family preser- .
ovation services by partnering
with other area social service
agencies, such as Children's
Home Society and Micah's
Place.
The FSS- Nassau Office is
located in the Lofton'
Professional Plaza, .near the
intersection. of S.R. 200 and
SChristian Way, about 2-1/2'
miles east of US 17, by the
Lofton Creek Animal Clinic.'


PB&J Drive under way
: v .. ': "
The Nassau County Volun- Love Elementary; Fernanidina sandwiches. This year, as in the
teer Center and the Girl Scouts Middle'; Southside Elementary; past, the donations will be dis-
of Nassau tCounty have, kicked, Yulee Elementary; Yuiilee High; tributod to Nassau County Head
' off their 15th annual Peanut Winn-Dixie in Callahan, Start Programs, Barnabas
Butter and Jelly Drive. Fernandina, Hilliard and Yulee; Center and The Salvation Army
The drive ends on Friday, YMCA.Pryme Time Atlantic Hope House and Council on
Oct. 25. This project is in coor'- and Yulee locations; WW Gay; Aging Nassau.
dination with National "Make a Girl Scout .Hut in Fernandina For more information about
SDifference Day" Beach; and Ms. Kate's Pre-K. the Nassau County Volunteer
Drop-off sites include: Nas- Over the past 14 years, as Center and upcoming holiday
sau County Volunteer Center much as 6100 pounds of peanut programs for those in need, call
.(1303 Jasminie St., Suite 104D, butter and jelly have been col- the center at 261-2771, or e-mail
Ferrnandina Beach); Emma lected- enough to make 30,500 ncvcfb@aolcom.


Center


offers

new fall


classes
Registration for the fall
term Center for Lifelongr
SLearning Classes is now
open. Classes will be held at;
the Amelia Island Plantation; "
St. Peter's Episcopal Church,.
the FSCJ Betty P. Cook,
Nassau Center, and"
Reflections of Nature.,.
Amelia Island Plantation" .
classes:
Great Decisions 2013,
with facilitator David Britt,
will meet on Thursdays, 10!
a.m.-noon, Sept. 26 through&
Nov. 7 and on Wednesday,"
Oct. 30. This is the same:
course that was offered
spring term. New topics will;
begin in February 2014. :
Spanish for Busy People:
II, with Berta Arias, will meet.
on Tuesday and Thursdays,.
9:30-11:30 a.m., Oct. 1C
through Nov. 5 (class will not'
meet Oct. 17)..
How to use a Digital;
Camera, with instructor;
Wayne Howard, will meet on'
Wednesday, 10:30 .a.m.';:
noon. Two sections of thisi
beginner" class are offered; :
Oct. 9-23. (reference .X
394426) and Oct. 30-Nov. 13:
-(reference #394428). ..
St. Peter's, EpiscopaE
Church classes: ,
Henry IV- Part 1, with:
instructor Bernie McCabe:.
will meet Wednesdays, 1t
a.m.-noon, Oct. 2 through.
Nov. 20. '
Viva Florida-500 'Years
of History, with instructor
Katy White, will meet:
Monday, 10"a.m.-noon, OctE,
7 through Nov. 18 (class wil- "
not meet Nov. 11). :
Arthurian Myth, wittr
instructor Nancy Dickson;"
will meet Thursdays, 10 a.m.-
noon, Oct 3 througfi Nov. 21-
*Survival Sign Language ,
with lobyn Nemes, will meet.
oh Tuesday, 10-11:30 a.m.,:
f-'c l throixgh'Novr9Hclasss
"ilYbot meet Ocd22).
Florida State College:
Nassau Center classes: ".
How to Make a
Thanksgiving Meal in Two
Hours, with Chef Bill.
Castltberry, will meet
Tuesday arid Wednesday,
5:30-7:30 p.m., Nov. 5 and 6.:'
I Turned on the
Computer... Now What? with-
instructor Mike Hendrix, will-
meet on 'Wednesdays, 1-3:
pi.h., Oct 9 through Nov. 13..
Reflections of Nature:'
'Gardening Through the
Seasons, with instructor
James Loper, will meet
Monday, 1-2:,30 p.m., Oct. 7:
through Nov. 18 (class will
not meet Nov. 11).
The Ceniter for Lifelong
Learning program" has
served over 1;500 students.
since the fall of 2000. "
The registration fee for
each class is $50, with the
exception of How to Use a
Digital Camera and How to
Make a Thanksgiving Meal
in Two Hours, which are $40
each and Great Decisions
-2013, which is $65 but
includes the required book.
Costs of materials (books;
etc.) vary by class. Please
contact the Nassau Center at
5484432 for registration
assistance or for further infor-
mation. The Betty P. Coolk
Nassau Center is located at
76346 William Burgess Blvd.;
Yulee.
*


TENNIS ANYONE?.
TENNISY


Cliff Drysdale Tennis
instructor Scott
Colebourne provides
instruction to second-
and third-grade stu-
dents at Fernandina
Beach Christian
Academy recently.
SUBMITTED ,.


CLASS NOTES












CLASSIFIED


7B
NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 20,2013


To Place An Ad. Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 FiranIal-Homn/Pmroperty 606 Photo Equlpmren & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Prooerrv 858 Corndos-Linfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-In Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antlques-CollectiOles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Los5&8. Found 206 Cnilld Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homrnes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoram 207 Business Opponrtunir/ 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants,. Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home LOts 816 Camden Counr.y B661 Vacation Rentals
104 Personal- 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supolies 610 Air Conditioners!Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 6241 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS .863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Dier/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Warerfront 851 Roommate WVanted 864 Commerc,al/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 HobOes/Crafts 60t MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radlo-Stereo 700 RECREATION B07 Condomlnlmus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108, Gft Snops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Homne LTS 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 LorTS 854 Room 901 Automobiles
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms & Acreage 855 ApartmnentS-Furnished 902 Trucks
202 Sales-Bus-ness 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bcycles 617 Machiner,-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercal/Retail 856 Apartmenrrs-,nfurn. 903 aotorcscle
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-SuppliE.s 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnishd 905 Commercial
S90THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY I5 Commercial LOCATED BELOW
THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW,


K[of ;I IZj 14 0 k

| 102 Lost & Found
REWARD LOST MALE CHOW CHOW
Last seen Oct. 2010. Answers to
"Prince Chang". Needs medication.
Call (904)225-9940.

If You Have Lost Your Pet please
check the Nassau Hiumane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
Wt the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yuilee next to (he drivers
license building.(904')491-7440.


BACHELOR NEW IN TOWN wants
t6 meet available friends. Looking for
someone wfo is healthy, health
conscious, honest I& trustworthy.
Sharing, laughter & creativity.
(912)409-5214


ALL REAL ESTATE Advertised
Herein Is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status. or
national origin, or the Intention. to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The l News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
,for real-estate which Is In violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
'Informed" 'that all 'dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have*
been discriminated against In
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
HUD 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing Impaired 1(800)927-
9275.


m.




HOME HEALTHt, CARE AGENCY'
NEEDS Medical Billing and Coing
Assistant. Must have experience with
Medicare & Insurance billing. Please fax
resume to4(904)491-3211.


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR.
TRAINING Eulldoozrs. backhoes, ex-
cvators. 3. weks reands on program.,
Local job placement' assistance.
National 'certiricatlions G Bill benefits
eligible. I-8 ,6-362.-4a ANF' .

Earn $$$ Helping MDsI Process
Medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams:
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
NewsLeader and the FTC... -

TEACHER. Miss Kate's Pre K now
interviewing career-oriented individuals
fr teaching and after-care positions.
Teacher training and/or experience
required. Contact Kate at 321-0049 or
mlsskatesprek@yahoo.com.

EXPERIENCED 'CARPENTERS AND
FRAMERS NEEDED -, Please call
between- 8am-5pm. (904)206-1287


S 201 Help Wanted |
SEEKING FEISTY AGENT, EXPERI-
ENCED RECORDING ENGINEER &
MUSICIANS Projects Initiated by ex-
perienced composer/songwriter/drum-
mer include rock, operas, singles &
albums. Studio experience, live
performances. (912)409-5214
'DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW -
Learn to drive for US Xpress. Earn
$700/wk. No experience needed. Local
CDL training. Job ready In 15 days!
(888)368-1964. ANF
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY Landscape/
Irrigation Technician. Must Be Experi-
enced. This position requires a mini-
mum 3 years clean driving record, and
applicant must be drug-free. Qualified
applicants please call (904)261-5040
or apply In person at 474431 E. State
Road 200, Fernandlna Beach, FL.


OUTPATIENT MRI FACILITY on
Amelia Island seeks full time MRI
Technologist. Applicant must be able to
work Mon-Frl afternoons/evenings and
some Saturdays. Working knowledge of
open MRI equipment, protocols,
excellent verbal & written
communication skills. ARRT
certification, current CPR, and current
Florida State Radlologlc Technologist
certifications a must. Send resume to:
toconnorBnassauooenmrl.com or fax t'
(904)491-7701.
RESIDENTIAL ASSISTANT 7 Z4
.hqurs per week, Sat. & Sun., 8am-8pm
or Spmr8am. Apply at 941510 Old
Nassauvlle Rd., .FB on MW, F between
10am-1:3opm. (904)206-4120.'


DRIVERS $5,000 Sign-On Bonus!
Great Pay! Consistent -Freight, Great
Miles on this Regional Account. Werner
Enterprises: 1-888-567-3110
EXPERIENCED OTR, FLATBED
DRIVERS *- Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified
drivers. Home most weekends. Call
(843)266-3731 / Ibulldoghlway.com.
EOE. ANF



REMODEL/ADDITIONS/
HOME REPAIRS
No Job to small. All work guaranteed.
Call Russell Tomaslnli (904)415-1686.




FOR SALE Popular Downtown
Femandina Retil Store., $25K +
Inventory. Leased location. Serious
Buyers Only. (904)624-4783
FOR SALE Local tire & service center.
Owner retiring. Includes equipment,
real estate, and loyal customer base.
Geoff Haynes, RE/MAX Professional
SGroup (904)468-0019.


301 Schools &
Instruction
GUN SHOW Sept. 21-22. Sat., 9-5 &
Sun., 10-5. Atlanta, GA Expo Center
(3650 Jonesboro Rd) Exit 55 off 1-285.
Buy-Sell-Trade. Info (563)927-8176.
ANF .

AIRLINE CAREERS Begin Here Get
FAA approved Aviation Maintenance
Technician training. Housing & financial
aid for 'qualified students. Job
placement assistance. Call AIM
(866)314-3769.: ANF


q I


BOOK YOUR FALL & HOLIDAY
MINI SESSIONS, ,
with 'Chloe Tyler Photography. Email
chloetvlernhotooraohyvavahoo.com or
call (904)556-2477 for more Informa-
tion. Only $65. Find-usonfacebookl

IL .l... JI


PALMETTO WALK 3RD ANNUAL
COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE
Saturday, October 5th, 8am Noon.
Spaces available
Contact Lynn, (904)206-3001

CUTE KIDS CONSIGNMENT SALE -
Fri. 9/20, 10am-6pm; Sat. 9/21, 9am-
4pm. Kid's clothes, 'shoes, books, toys;
gear and morel 861653 Worthington
Dr., Yulee, Page Hill Subdivision.
www.Facebook.com/CuteKidsResale

ESTATE SALE 9/19 thru 9/21, '9am-
3pm. 85268 Blackmon Rd., Yulee.
Antique, vintage, mid-century,', & retro
furniture. Utility trailer, vintage Items,
glassware, & much more.

GARAGE SALE 96420 Blackrock Rd.
Thurs-Sat., 8am-3pm. All new Items.
Tools, Precious Moments $2-$10, box-
es of books $5, dresser, nightstands,
shoe chair, tractor attachments, marble
coffee table, more men & women
clothes still'$1 each or bag for $5,
flils, ~ tables, Habershtam cabinet,
glassware, etc. 1/2 price room or less
.for items from previous sale.






NEW CONSTRUCTION
5iWIlS/REMOIDWRNO
COUNM&HS/U.S/SHOWaOOM
904 277-3942
.CKcO47S MIP 006661
NOW HIRING
PLUMBER'S HELPERS
Apply In person
Office Hours
7:30am 4:30pm
Questions?
call 904-277-3942
474390 State Road 2001
Femandlna


ESTATE SALE Magnificent King
bed, 4 poster, Sealy mattress/box.
springs, Baldwin MCO Overture organ,;
Broyhill dining room table, 6 chairs,
server, china, :cabinet, /solid brass.
crystal chandeliers, pottery many
orienrital items; crystal glass, large lto
mirror dresser, 1930's large hassock.
lamp tables, lamps, kitchen items,
Wolfgang Puck cook-ware, sofa, large
wooden bench, re:llner, florals, glass
coffee table, large ol, very large'
sectional 3 pieces reclines, Frederic
Remington "Warrior of the Plains",
Braxton Cullen white wicker sofa,
chair, tables, patio table, 4 chairs,
com-puter desk, stuffed chairs,
Haverty love seat single sleeper,
books, records, fur coverlet bear, men
& women clothes (very nice), antique
oak server with beveled mirror,
antique oak dresser with beveled
mirror, cedar chest, white china many
pieces, Queen & King comforters,
Howard Miller grand-father clock,
many small items, ladder, workbench,
some tools. Sept. 19, 20, 21st,
Thurs., Fri., Sat., 8am-3pm. 861260
North Hampton Club Ln., .North
Hampton S.D. off Amelia Concourse
(Fernandina Beach). Please do not
block drive-ways. Follow the red 8&
white signs.

GARAGE SALE Natures Walk Subd.,
1127A Natures Walk Ct. Fri. 9/20,
10am-2pm & Sat. 9/21, 8am-12pm. -


ESTATE SALE Items previously used
for staging million dollar properties.
Outdoor Items & jewelry. 2182 Sadler
Rd. Fri. 9/20 & Sat. 9/21, 8am-12pm.
Rain or shine.




Needs volunteers to help Nassau County
families who need, food, shelter
and basic necessities.
Call: 904.261.7000 for snore Info


NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE -
Ocean Walk, off of Scott Rd. Sat. 9/21
8& Sun. 9/22, 8arm-lpm.

AMELIA ISLAND SELF STORAGE
ANNUAL MULTI-UNIT GARAGE
SALE Saturday, Sept. 21 from 8am
to 1pm. 2641 Bailey Road, Fernandina
Beach. All units are indoors and climate
controlled. Great Stuffl!
HIPPIE & ARTISAN Extravaganza -
Owl collection, costumes & clothes,
bottles & jars, textiles, scarves,
buttons, beads, shells, & nautical. 125
S., 6th St. Sat. 9/21, 9am-?

MOVING SALE 95240 Twin Oaks Ln.
(Spanish Oaks Subd). Sat. 9/21, 8am-
2pm. Household items, office furniture,
2,dinlng room sets, china cabinet, patio
furniture, tools, etc. NO EARLY BIRDS!
MULTI-HOME FURNITURE SALE 2
dining 'tables with chairs, love seat, 2
TV/entertalnment hutches, rustic style
dining room hutch, oak roll top desk,
pictures, lamps; home decor, kitchen
items. 3341B First Avenue (behind
Watson Realty and Kangaroo Station)
Saturday September 21 at 8:00am.
Packing up at noon for college football!


S 609 Appliances ',]
SAMSUNG digital refrigerator, bot-
tom freezer, black; & matching 5 burn-
er glasstop stove. w/convectlon oven.
$3700 new $1850/OBO. 583-2269

611 Home Furnishings
FOR SALE Matching sofa, love seat &
reclner, $500. Cherry dining room
table, 6 padded chairs, 2 leaves,
$1500. (904)321-2250.

S 618 Auctions,
BOAT MFG CO. Auction 9/28/13, on
site: 9am, 122 N. Cedarview Terrace,
Inverness, FL 34453. New & antique,
boats & motors, tools & equip. For
details go to: www.dedleysauction.com
ab1667"10%bp. ANF'







W U min
m m


SERVICE.,


DIRECTORY


CLEANING SERVICE


PERfECT CLANINC

S Please Call Us
At 753-3067

HOMES CONDOS OFFES
9a BONDED, INSURED



The MER-MAID
(904)206-2740
Your Local Island Cleaner
Now Accepting New Clients
OFFICES/CONDOS/RENTALS/
RESIDENTIAL
LIC/BND/1NS.



aiw TiME

Window & House
Cleaning

(904)583-6331





L EAN IG SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed Bonded Insured
SMember AIFB Chamber
FREEtESTIMATES
904-491-1971 Cell: 904-742-8430
E-mail: justforyouservgaol.com


*** O




PatiosSidewalks &
Driveway.Add-ons, starting at 599
We' will meet or beat any reasonable quotes.
Highest Quality Lowest Prices,
Umns & 1 0 MOllt:e (904) 491-4383
Licensed & Bonded Celi-i(041237-7742


40 Years Experience ,- L
Licensed Insured .
State Licensed RB005S959
GARAGES ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUlLITY GUA'RafTEED

2-Car Garages
'16,495"o
2424 Wood Foam Only .
Addiom, cosl or
Corditel Boc





dmuffa Island

Now Installing
SCREEN ENCLOSURES
Financing Available
Licensedand /nsured-
(904) 261-1940
__ Lowell Duster


Call a News-Leader AD-Visor at 261-3696 and let them

help you put the service directory to work for you.

Two sizes available to meet you company's needs.


CONSTRUCTION j



CAMELIA

I1 ISLAND'

GUTTERS
-- When It Rains
-- 1 ~Be Prepared.
6"Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
FINANCING AVAILABLE

LICENSED & INSURED Lowell Duster

(904) 261-1940





HOM INPCION



LoTsy Ownad9 491-4383
&e Operated 9





GARAGE DOOR & ~,
OPERATOR SYSTEMS A
Steven Hair Maintenance In- ',-
"The local guy" since 1984 _'
Quit Paying Too Muchl
Operatoor doorreplacemenls Transmltterreplicement
SBroken springs Stipped gears
(Ciles36 sSeie lor al makes &imodes|
904-277-2086


WE'RE STILL


' Irrigation Installation,& Repair
* OutdoorLightingSolutions s Ca"l Ss.Chii(,i
Sales Comultanto 'Sales COw~dtantr
* Seasonal Lighting Projects Serving Nassau County
* Sod Installation & Repair r over 20 years with
* Concrete Pavers & Fire Pits F t/
* Deck Installation & Repair
* Retaining Walls &'Ponds
* Grading Services &Drainage 464054 SR 200 Yulee
904-261-5040.
ES425040 1(904)261-6821
bobslrrigationlandscape.comn

Place an Ad!

Call,261-3696 b


Lawn Maintenance
* Mowing, trlmmlng,edging & blowing
; Prunln9 and weeding
Organic Fertilization
* All Natural Fertilization
* Soil Replenishment with Microbes
* Corn Gluten Lawn Treatments
Landscape
- Flower Beds and Plantings
* Florida Friendly Design
- Hydroseeding & Sod
Sprinkler System Experts
* Installations
" Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
(904) 753-1537
www.FloridaCardenerlnc.cofM
licensed s Insured


Oual1lv Work i- I
Reasonable Prices *- 'i.
'oJO Toom 5aa or Too Lmq g'
*Li-rSed )ndedJl-Insurd r -
FREE ESMATES 225
AVABLE. ,



PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses -Trailers Patios
Driveways etc.
Exterior Windows
Wood Decks Cleaned & Reseaed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353


URAGNER
Construction
Enterprises, Inc
Complete Kitchen &
Bathroom Remodeling
Fine Custom & Stock
Cabinetry
Countertops & Installations
(904)858-1744
Rex G. Wagner, Jr.
SHOWROOM
4235 St. Augustine Road
Jacksonville, FL. 32207
Certified Building Contractor
CBC 1256468




ACOASTALROOFINGL
SYA TE C

l "Re-Roofing Is Our Speciatf
Nassau County's Largest Roofing &
S SidIng Contractor Serving Satisfied S!
H omebullders & Homeowners
Re-Roofing. New Rooting
^ SldlIdqg-SoffIt & Fascla
| 261--2233,








GIVE SHAWN A CALL
BUSH HOGGING
DRIVE WAY GRAD.INQ.
LAWN MAINTENANCE
GARDEN TILLING'
904-318-3700
Insured Licensed


Florida State College at Jacksonville has the following'
Career positions Located at Betty P. Cook Nassau Center:,
* Plant, Service Worker-'Nassau Center
* Tradesworker I- Nassau Center

For a complete description and to apply, please visit us
online at: https://Jobs.FSCJ.edu'
Florida State College of Jacksonville does not discriminate
on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex,'disability,
religious belief, marital status, genetic information or veteran
status.


Private Golf
& Country Club
looking for
part-time servers
Duties, include serving/
bartending and food/beverage
event set-up. Fine dining
experience a plus, but not -
.required. Applicants must be
available to work nights,
weekends and holidays. Must
be able to pass background
check and drug screen.
Compensation; hourly.
SResume can be sent to
theath@icihomes.com



GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB


$500/Week Minimum

Guarantee fo 6Q Days! .

Rick Keffer is looking to add an energetic and outgoing person
with great communication skills to our winning team as an
express lane service advisor. If you can provide excellent
customer service and love to meet new people we have an
exciting career opportunity available. This position Is
fast-paced and requires the ability to handle multiple tasks at
the same time. You will need to be organized,' efficient, and
motivated.

We offer Health and Dental Insurance, 401k,, vacation and
holiday pay, and other benefits. Basic knowledge of
automobiles is preferred, but not required. Anyone with
customer service/restaurant experience encouraged to apply.
This position will Include training with excellent advancement
opportunities aswell as multiple bonus opportunities.

To apply send resume to aaron@rickkeffer.com.


Bob's Irrigation
& Landscapinglnc.
* Full Service Lawn Maintenance
* Landscape Design & Installation


rw


- -1


I I






8B, FRIDAY. SI I'll M ,I,. 2i. 2013 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


... ... . .............. .: ..... ................. ,
Donate A Boat 14

or Car Today!'



"2-Night Free Vacation!" ,


www.boatangel.com
A |mwdtttiha~liwlie~ain lClllBAIIB Cmila ____li_ -

















--~~l orida''^ Council on Compulsihe Gamfebi, hIn. ,
www.gamblinghelp.org

September Special
Starting at $545/month
~88 8-AMII








-~Flowda Council on Compulsive Gamuia~ng. Inc.
www~gamblinghelp.org



Se-ptember 'Special'

Starting at $545/m'onth'


I


/


* W/D Connections
* Large Closets
* Private Patios
* Sparkling Pool
Tennis'Courts
* Exercise Room


Close to: schools and shopping.
20 minutes to Jacksonville or Fernandina.



Eastwootaks with Count


Apartments

37149 Cody Circle
Hilliard, Florida
Mon.-Fri.-8:30-5:30
Sat. /Sun. by Appt.


ents
7y


Charm!

.Call Today
(904) 845-2922


SALE

S802 Mobile Homes
75586 JOHNSON LAKE Rd Yulee.
DWMH ON LAKE, 3BD/2BA, fireplace In
one of 2 lvlngrooms, Pvt office,
fishing. Ready to move in. $875 mo/+
$875 dep. Call (478)363-1066.


S 80Q6 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots Call
(904) 261-4066 for Information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.


BY OWNERS Beautiful 3/2.5.on fresh
water lake In Marsh Lakes subdivision,
very private. Two decks overlooking
lake and Intracoastal. Short distance to
community pool, tennis courts, and
playground. Call 277-0661 for
appointment ,

OCEANFRONT LOT in Jacksonville
Beach. Zoned & ready to build on:
Reduced to $589,900. (904)868-2150
Broker/Owner









* Furnished or
unfurnished
Internet service
Telephone
Conference room
Mail box service
Break room
Virtual Offices


Pricing from:
Daily $39
Weekly $99
Monthly $275
Virtual office $49


AmeliaOfficeSuites.comn


Contact: Phil Griffin
T: 904.556.9140
E: phil@acrfl.com


The average American family



has about $7,000 worth of



unused items in their homes.





Sell It!


t. \ "

. .. .... : 'I,-, ,,


'I


E W S P A P E R
N E W S P AP E R:


EWS LEA E R I,, A DER'



Call today & make

some easy extra cash!


_I___ 261-3696


F LO R I DA'S OLDEST W WEEKLY


J808 Off Island/YuleeI 852 Mobile Homes


FSBO CONDO, GATED COTTAGES AT
STONEY CREEK 2BR/2BA/1 car
garage, ground level, forest view front
and back, great pool. $126,000, (904)
310-6285

813 Investment Property
GOOD INVESTMENT PROPERTY -
1/1 house on half acre In Yulee. 85026
Durrance Ave. Great renter at
residence. Asking $33,000. Call Justin
(904)753-1517.

817 Other Areas
'LARGE ACREAGE at low prices! 65
acres for $1500 per acre. Panoramic
,mountain views & creeks. Located on
Keith Springs Mountain in TN. Call
(877)282-4409. ANF


ABSOLUTE AUCTION Seipt. 21 -
Sewanee, TN 230 acres in 3 tracts &
14 bluff/view tracts '(800)476-3939,
www.targetauction.com. TNAU #6650
'TN. '; #260531 Volunteer Land
Consultants, LLC. ANF ... .

WESTERN NC MOUNTAIN 'LOTS-
$19,000. 1+" acre, -streams, paved:
roads, water, power, both view and
valley lots. (904)310-9065

AUCTION Pensacola area real estate.
Live & online 9/26, 10am. Auction will
offer several local properties In online
catalog for viewlng/pre-blddlng.
www.CottonAuctlonsAppralssals.com
www.AuctionPensacolaRealEstate.com
AB2529 AU3284 SL3191177. ANF

BM riTB *t t'iii


851 Roommate Wanted
ROOM FOR RENT on Island. ISO
responsible, trustworthy, professional
adult. Non-smoking preferred... Must
like adorable pets. $500/mo includes
utilities, cable tv, and wifl. Call 904-
206-3115


LASSERRE
Real Estate, In~cl.
www.lasserrerealestate.ic6iii

RESIDENTIAL
LONG TERM RENTALS
*2BR/IBA mobile home, on island,
$800/mo + utilities.
*3BR/2BA home on Lofton Creek
2,600 sq.ft, Dock, garage/workshop,
Large lot, gourmet kitchen, many other
bonus's $ 1,950/mo. Plus utilities.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/ MONTHLY
2BR/I BA Ocean-view. 487 S. Fletcher.
Across the-street from the beach. All
util, wi-filTV & phone.
* 3BR/3BA'townhome in Sandpiper Loop
$1850/wk plus taxes& cleaning fee.
* 1801 S. Fletcher 2BR/lIBA furnished
Beach Cottage,; monthly rental great
for extended vacations, Winter rental,
or longer. Public' beach access close,
tall office to inspect now vacant
COMMERCIAL
*Five Points Village, 1,200 sq. ft AIA/S.
8th St. exposure Great for retail,
services, or office$ 1200/mo.+sales tax;
S850688 US HWY 17,1,210 9q.ft build-
ing with 3.8 acres of fenced property,
formerly a Nursery with some outbuild-
Ing and a green house, still on property
.Two 800sf Office/Ret'ail spaces, can be
joined for one, 1,600 sq ft space, AIA
next to Peacock Electric $1,2/sq. ft +
CAM &Tax .
*Amelia Park Unit B small office (2
roonris) with bath, 576 s.Aft.$1050/mo.
+ sales tax.
* 1839 S. 8th St. adjacent to Huddle
House, 1,800 sq.ft. $1700/mo. lease +
tax. Sale also considered.
904261406


61 a
RV RENTALS AVAILABLE in a
campground. Weekly or monthly. All
utilities & WIFI Included. (904)225-5577.
YULEE Nice 3BR/2BA $695. Nice 2BR
SW $600 rental available. Water inc.
Service animals only. Call (904)501-
5999. Possible rent to own.
3BR MH IN YULEE $800/mo. +
$800 deposit, plus $150 deposit on
electric. Service animals only. Call
(904)225-5419.
AFFORDABLE LIVING Bring your
RV to live on a campground for $425/
me. All utilities included.' Ask about
senior citizen special. (904)225-5577.'
2BR/2BA DWMH Yulee. $750/mo.
+ 1 month deposit. Please call (904)
225-5674.
ON ISLAND 2/1 SWMH In park
starting $165 wk/$675 mo + dep. Uills
avail. Off Island N'vllle 3/2 SWMH,
CH&A, $750 mo + dep. 261-5034
3BR/1.5SBA Needs some work. Will
negotiate. 152897 CR 108, Yulee. Call
(904)583-6672. .... .

854 Rooms
MASTER BEDROOM across street
from beach, S. Fletcher Ave. Private
entrance. (904)583-2456

8S6 Apartments,'
Unfurnished

APT. FOR RENT 2BR/1.5BA, new
A/C, refrig., carpet, W/D hookup. $825.
1 yr. lease w/one month deposit.
(973)903-1181 '

85 apartments
Unfurnished
705 WHITE ST, Apt.-#1. 3BR/i1BA,
gorgeous views of the Amelia River,
CH&A, W/D, kitchen apple's. Back & side
patios. New carpet. $1250/mo. +
$1250 sec. dep. AvaIl 10/1. 261-3158

POST OAK APTS (904)277-7817
Affordable living located at 996
Citrona Dr. Femandina Beach, FL.
Rent starts at $597 per month. Cen-
tral a/c. 2'bedroom apts'avail. im-
mediately. TDD Hearing Impaired
number #711"Thls institution Is an
equal opportunity provider and erm-
ployer. "'Equal Housing Opportunity"

LOVELY 1BR APT. Lg, 800sf,
modern & secure, W/D, 1 blk to beach.
$725/mo. Long term. No smoking.
Avail 10/1. 2946 First Ave. 556-6858

857 Condos-FurnishedI
MADDOX RENTALS (904)261-9129
Long Term Rentals Available
Amelia island Plantation Club Villas
and more. 2BR/2BA. Furnished.
Starting at $1400/mo. & up


_ F _


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858 Condos-Unfurnished
LONG TERM 2/2 In gated Harrison
Cove Villas @ SB. Custom throughout
w/lg screened lanai, FP, gar. Single
level. $1575/mo. + sec. dep. 556-3163


859 Homes-Furnished
FURNISHED 3BR/2BA LR, eat-in
kitchen, patio,. 3 blocks from ocean.
$1200/mo. + $600 sec. dep. Call (229)
392-4969.


860 Homes-UnfurnishM
VIsiTwww.chaplinwilllamsrentals.
com for the most recent information
on Long Term Rentals. Updated 'Dally.
Chaplin Williams Rentals, The Area's
Premier Rental Company

860 CASHEN DR. Close to shopping:.
A/C's, W/D hookups, refrigerator, small
fenced yard, rear deck, off street
parking. Just $775/mo. includes water..
Pet negotiable. Please drive by, then;
call the'number on the sgn. -

95198 WILDWOOD CIR. 3BR/2BA,
new carpet, tile & paint, 1/2 acre lot on:
quiet street. $1195/mo. (904)491-.
8893 or 335-0583.

MADDOX RENTALS (904)261-9129
Long Term Rentals Available
Arrlgo Blvd.
3BR/2BA w/offlce, unf.; $1400/mo.


861 Vacation Rentls'
VACATION CHALET in N. Carolina.
Mountains. River, overlook,' cozy, well-
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$550 a week. Call (904)757-5416.

OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA ahd 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,-
Realtor, for special rates.



EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES Office
space from 100 sq ft. to 2,;000 sq. ft.,
Includes utilities, Iternet,. common
area receptionlsl. .conference room,
break room, & -cEunl' For info call
(904)753-4179. .

BEAUTIFUL GATEWAY TO AMELIA-
Office Space All utilities CAM, & tax
included. 2 rooms;, 370sf. $695. Call
(904)75-3-0117.


866 Wanfte Rent
0156."R.

MATURE COUPLE LOOKING for
long term rental, 1700+ sq. ft.:
unfurnished home. Resident of Amelia'
since 1972., 10/31/13 move In.:
$1200/mo. (904)753-0256