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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00799
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000366799
oclc - 04377055
notis - ACA5658
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00812
 Related Items
Preceded by: Fernandina Beach news-leader

Full Text



F LO R I DAY'S


OLDEST


WEEKLY


N EW S P A P E R


EWS


WEDNESDAY JANUARY 92013/20 PAGE 2 SECTION bnewsleadercom

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 9 201.3/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS .fbnewsleader.com


S 14 .~
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S SUBMITTED
A rendering by V.R.L Architects of Jacksonville shows what an expanded Fernandina Beach branch library at 25 N. Fourth St. might look
like.



Library plan 20A% over budget


ANGELA DAIUGHTRY
News-Leader


According to an estimate by V.R.L.
Architects of Jacksonville, the reno-
vation and expansion of the
Fernandina Beaqh branch library will
cost nearly $2 million more than 20
percent over budget.
The estimated construction budg-
et of $1,988,584, which was given con-
ceptual approval by the Historic
District Council on Nov. 15, is more
than $380,000 over a projected budg-
et of $1.6 million for the renovation
project.
The architect's estimate will still
need final approval from the HDC
and the city commission before it
becomes official.
According to the architect's plan,
the expansion of 7,296 square feet is
to include an 80-seat meeting room,
children's library, self-checkout sta-
tions and a large staff area. An addi-
tional area that will be remodeled is
about 9,000 square feet, for a total
space of 16,306 square feet.
City commissioners in August
agreed to hire V.R.L. Architects for
ardhitecturaland ;.rine'ir I 'ri serv-
ices for the expansion and renovation
of the library. V.R.L at the time esti-
mated the construction cost to be
$1.43 million.
The cost of the library renovation


the island-based branch of the Nassau
County Public Library System, I am
confident that the Board of County
Commissioners will give direction to
staff regarding the nature, contours
and contents of the necessary legal
documents."
City Manager Joe Gerrity could
not be reached for comment.
Meanwhile, Friends of the Library
President Bill Flynn said in the winter
newsletter to its members, "We
remain on target to break ground
soon after the 2013 Shrimp Festival
and to complete construction by April
2014" and that "roughly two-thirds of
the estimated $2.4 million project cost
relates to construction, with the
remainiing third going toward new
equipment and furnishings."
Flynn added that the Friends are
currenIly' in the 'quiet phase" of the
fiiiinraisi ngcai paign, "speaking pri-
vately with selt-ctlid donors," and ihav
icceived 'comn.nitments. .xce-eding
$340,000;"
The Fernandina Beach branch
library. 25 N. Fourth St. \%as built in
tlih 19;'11s and ha< long b,:cn con itd-
eredlb dhe L:ir' dd f the Library to.b
L.-',,.lMlTfinr i % g'ioing numberf -
library users in both the city and .,
county. It is the most heavily u?'d
branch in the county system. Th,_- dity
LIBRARY Continued on 3A


is to be shared by the city, county and
Friends of the Libra:y group. The
city has committed $600,000 from its
Forward Fernandina loan of$1.6 mil-
lion, the county has said it will commit
$600,000 and the Friends of the
Library has projected it will raise and
contribute at least $400,000.
But a formal resolution to approve
the three-way agreement was post-
poned in December by City Manager
Joe Gerrity because County Attorney
David Hallman had suggested
. changes to the county's side of the
agreement.
One of Hallman's most significant
suggestions was that.the city would
"acquire no legal or equitable interest
in the real and personal property asso-
ciated with the project." Another
change in the agreement gave man-
agement and control of the building
project to the county rather than the
city- man-ager. Hallman also deleted
specific details about the size of the
library expansion and added a clause
stating the county's purchasing poli-
cy and state law would be followed
in awarding the construction project.


Nassau County government pays
for nearly all library services, includ-
ing staffing, books and other materi-
als, furniture and regular building
costs such as utilities. It has inter-
local agreements with municipalities
to provide the buildings for the,
libraries and a small amount for serv-
ices.
But that division of responsibili-
ties leaves the county government
obliged to finance the continuing
expenses associated with buildings
that a town or city government has
approved. That has led to difficulties
such as nine years ago when a brand-
new library building in Hilliard sat
empty for months because there was
a dispute over which entity-would pay:
to.purchase new.furniture for it .
Hallman declin-cd this week to
elaborate on any differences between
the cityandcounty regarding library -
construction. 't '
S"The citizens of Fernandina Beach
have elected a new city council,"
Hallman wrote in an email Monday.
"Once that newly constituted body
articulates its vision and proposal for


Obama



taps



Davis



again

GARRETT PELICAN
News-Leader
President Barack Obama has again
nominated Circuit Judge Brian J. Davis
to serve on the U.S. District Court for
the Middle District of Florida.
Davis, previously nominated for
the federal bench last March, was one
of 33 holdovers nominated Thursday
for federal judgeships in the 112th
Congress. Those nominees were held
up in Congress and their nominations
never formally considered.
Davis won re-election to the Fourth
Judicial Circuit in
November.
"Today, I am re-
nominating 33 high-
ly qualified candi-
dates for the federal
bench, including
many who could
have and should
have been con- Davis
firmed before the
Senate adjourned,"
Obama said in a statement.
"Several have been awaiting a vote
for more than six months, even though
they all enjoy bipartisan support. I
continue to be grateful for their will-
ingness to serve and remain confident
that they will apply the law with the
utmost impartiality and integrity. I urge
the Senate to consider and confirm
thile nrn'inees without delay, so all
American-' can have equal and timely
aclc. '.S t I'l jl'si i' "
.-.".- Davis ,, i ... .i ... I a judge
,,1r lie Fourth Judicial Circuit of
'loi ida, a position he has held since
1 .4 liwhen he replaced Henry Adams,
DAVIS Continued on 3A


Trolley service



plans expansion


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
A new expanded trolley service in
the city may eventually provide limit-
ed public transportation for residents
and visitors.
- City commissioners approved a
purchase and five-year franchise agree-
ment of the local sightseeing trolley
service with Ernie Saltmarsh, owner of
the Florida House and Green Turtle
Tavern on South Third Street. The
trolley service was previously owned
by Dave and Ellen Edwards.
Saltmarsh said after the commis-
sion meeting Jan. 2 that he is planning
to add one more trolley to the sight-
seeing service and that he would like
to find a way to also offer scheduled
public transportation to popular busi-
ness spots along South Eighth Street
and Sadler Road and the beach.
Saltmarsh also said he would like to
"work with the city" on establishing a
public trolley route, and that the key to
making it feasible would be cheap fares
up to about $3.
"People would be very interested,
but we would need some help to make
that work," he said. He suggested
some businesses that would benefit
could contribute to the public service,
as well as the city. Grants'could also be
available, he said.


He noted a transportation system
connecting the inns, hotels, city mari-
na and other businesses could also be
used by visitors to the area.
Commissioner Arlene Filkoff said at
the meeting that she would like to dis-
cuss the possibility of offering trans-
portation services from the marina to
local businesses.
"We have transient boaters who
have no other way to get around,"
Filkoff said.
Commissioner Ed Boner said he
also hoped Saltmarsh would consider
expanding the trolley route to local
businesses if the trolley service does
well.
The city is to receive $1,133 annu-
ally plus potentially a percentage of
gross revenues after one year under
the new franchise agreement.
In August 2010 the trolley service
agreement'was transferred to Amelia
Island Trolleys and Transportation,
LLC. The non-exclusive franchise had
been owned by Amelia Island
Transportation Co. Inc. since 2007.
The franchise agreement with the
city at that time was $1,100 the first
year, with a 3 percent increase each
year. The city also had the option of col-
lecting up to 5 percent of the business's
gross revenues but according to a city
TROLLEY Continued on 3A


NE WPROPERTYAPPRAISER


GARRET PELICAN/NEWS-LEADER
Dozens of supporters and officials turned out to see incoming Nassau County Property Appraiser
Mike Hickox sworn in Monday on the steps of the Nassau County Courthouse in downtown
Fernandina Beach. Hickox won the post easily in November following an August primary election vic-
tory over incumbent Tammy Stiles. Hickox was sworn in by Judge Robert Foster with his wife, Erin,
by his side.


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[ DITORIAl. ..w I ,L .... ........... 7A
LEDITORIAL .................................. 7A


FISHING/TIDES ....................... 2B
LEGAL NOTICES ....................... 7B
OBITUARIES -...........-.-..--.-... .. 2A
PEOPLE AND PLACES .......... 6B
POLICE REPORT .................... 9A
SPORTS .-..-......... .........-.. IB


The estimated construction budget of
$1.99 million is $389000 over the projected
budget of$1.6 million.


4B


.


ER 75(

. .-. -* *.. -


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WFD\ESDAY. JANUARY 9. 2013 NEWS News-Leader


OBITUARIES


Ella Sue Allen
Mrs. Ella Sue Allen, age 81,
of Fernandina Beach, FL
passed away on Sunday after-
noon, January 6, 2013 at her
home.
Born in McComas, WV, she
was the youngest of six chil-
dren born to the late Sampson
and Verlie Cora Casey
Sizemore. She grew up in
Mercer County, attending
school in
Matoaka.
Duringjunior
high school,
she met her
S future hus-
band, Robert
Bolewood
Allen. She
was a graduate of Matoaka
High School, Class of 1949.
After Mr. Allen's service and
honorable discharge from the
U.S. Air Force, they settled in
Matoaka where they added
their son and daughter to the
family. In 1962, the Allen fami-
ly moved to District
Heights/Clinton, MD area
where Mr. Allen taught school
and Mrs. Allen remained home
with their children. While rais-
ing children, Mrs. Allen was
involved with the Clinton Boys
and Girls Clubs and the Girl
Scouts. In April of 1989, Mr.
and Mrs. Allen moved to
Fernandina Beach to be near
their daughter and son.
She enjoyed being with her
family more than anything.
Mrs. Allen cared for both her
grandsons during the summer
and days. She visited with her
sister-in-law and her many
nieces and nephews in
Jacksonville, spending many
hours playing cards and enjoy-
ing their company. Mr. and
Mrs. Allen loved to dance and
were generally the spotlight of
any dance floor. She loved her
home and enjoyed gardening.
Preceding her in death is
their son, Robert B. Allen, Jr.,
who passed away in October
2006.
Mrs. Allen leaves behind,
her husband of 61 years, Robert
B. "Bob" Allen, Fernandina
Beach, FL, their daughter,
Karen Dotson (Jerry),
Fernandina Beach, FL, a sister,
Margaret Mosrie (Richard),
Atlanta, GA, two grandsons,
Anthony Allen, Boca Raton, FL,
Casey Dotson, Fernandina
Beach, FL, a great-grand-
daughter, Jaylene, and many
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
10:00 am on Friday, January 11,
2012 in the Burgess Chapel of
Oxley-Heard Funeral Home.
Her family will receive
friends on Friday from 9:00 am
until the hour of service, at the
funeral home.
SMrs. Allen will be laid to rest
in Jacksonville National
Cemetery, 4083 Lannie Road,
Jacksonville, FL.
Please share her life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard FuneralDirectors

Virginia Thomas
Becton
'Mrs. Virginia Thomas
Becton, age 81, of Yulee, FL
passed away on Wednesday
evening, January 2, 2013 at
Baptist Medical Center -
Nassau.
Born in
White Hall,
AL, she was
the daughter
of the late
Rev. Mack
and Bessie
Thomas. She
made Alabama her home until
moving to Tallahassee to attend
Florida A & M University
where she graduated with a
Bachelor Degree in Social
Work. In the late 1970s she
came to Nassau County where


NDII MONUMENT

I 0MPANY, INC,
277-4499
14'h & Atlantic


she has made her home until
her passing. Mrs. Becton had
worked as a Social Worker at
the Amelia island Care Center
in Fernandina Beach.
She enjoyed being involved
with the Council on Aging,
crossword puzzles, game
shows and her Jack Russell
Terrier, Frisco.
Mrs. Becton was a member
of the Elm Street Church of
God in Fernandina Beach
where she was a member of
the Senior Adult Choir, Usher
Board, White Rose Circle,
Mother's Ministry and Ladies
Sunday School Class.
Preceding her in death is
her husband, Miles W. Becton,
Jr., who passed away in 2000.
She leaves behind, children,
Thetford Moore (Merle),
Washougal, WA, Shelia White,
Houston, TX, Elijah White
(Hazel), Houston, TX, Andilea
White, Yulee, FL, Mary Odom
(Greg), Houston, TX, Willie
White (anet), Yulee, FL, one
adoptive daughter Ruby
Dawson of Sandhill, FL, two sis-
ters, Eugenia Forbes, and
Carrie Nelson (Phillip), both of
Houston, TX, eleven grand-
children, Kimberly Moore,
Christopher White, Andrew
White, TJ. White, Javon Black,
Jakia White, Jarrod White,
Derrick White, Keith White,
Stephen Odom, and Alicia
Hughes, several great-grand-
children and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday, January
19, 2013 from the Elm Street
Church of God with Bishop
Jimmy Campbell, officiating.
Mrs. Becton will be laid to
rest in Bosque Bello Cemetery.
Her family will receive
friends on Friday from 5:00-7:00
pm at Oxley Heard.
Please share her life story at
www.oxleyheard.icom.
Oxley-Hlea i I funeral Directors

Elsie (Ghent) Kelly
Elsie (Ghent) Kelly, 78, of
Farmington and formerly West
Hartford and Amelia Island, FL,
died Wednesday, January 2,
2013. Born in Hartford, the
daughter of the late John and
Elsie (Cotter) Ghent, she was
raised in West Hartford, attend-
ing St. Thomas the Apostle
School, Sedgwick Middle
school, grad-
'.at.ed from
4 f%. Hall ' igh
school, and
I ceived her
Bachelor's
degree from
2 Cen tet a r y
SCollege in
Hackettstown, NJ.
She was the founder and
president of The Options
Group, a personnel agency
which she operated for 18
years. Elsie was a strong advo-
Scate for women's rights and was
the managing editor of Alert
Newspaper. She served on
many boards including St.
Francis Hospital, The Greater
Hartford Chamber of
Commerce, Greater Hartford
Urban League, Downtown
Hartford Arts Council and the
Hartford Club. She was a mem-
ber of the Madison Beach Club,
Wampanoag Country Club,
Stratton Mountain Country
Club, and The Ocean Club of
Amelia Island Plantation.
She was a generous woman
with a great sense of humor.
She loved life, laughter, music,
and her friends and family,
especially her children. She will
be missed by all who knew and
loved her, but her bright spirit
will continue in all those whose
lives she touched.
She is survived by her three
children, Laura Kelly and her
fiance, Alben Puhlick of
Farmington, Philip Kelly and
his wife Deana of Amelia Island,
Maria Kelly and her husband
'George McKinley of Oregon;
five grandchildren, Jacqueline,
Julia, Charlotte, James, and
Camille; her dearest friend
Dawn Rob.erts; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
The funeral will be


Thursday at 10:00 a.m. at St.
Thomas the Apostle Church,
872 Farmington Ave., West
Hartford. Calling hours are
today, Wednesday, Jan. 9 from
4-7 p.m. at the Molloy Funeral
Home, 906 Farmington Ave.,
West Hartlord.
Online expressions of sym-
pathy may be made at
www.molloyfuneralhome.com.
Molloy Funeral Home
West Hartford. Conn.

Nancy Komninos
Nancy Komninos, 78,
passed away on January 2nd,
2013, at her home in Fernan-
dina Beach, FL. She was born
Anne Glynn Zeier on April 19,
1934 in Chicago, IL to Herbert
and Jule Hurley Zeier.
As a child, ,- -
Nancy grew
up in south-
ern Califor-
nia, earning a
Bachelor's I -1
degree from 1
Marymountl .
College in
Los Angeles, CA. While still in
college she modeled for
Harper's Bazaar.
Nancy's parents owned
"Advance Electric" in Canoga
Park, CA. Nancy ran the store
and became an excellent elec-
trician. She loved to tell stories
".about the movie stars homes
she worked in.
Nancy married William B.
Johnson and together they had
three girls. She finally found
her true love with Dr. Anthony
Komninos, "T'ny K." to many
here in Fernandina. Tony pre-
ceded Nancy in death five years
ago and she missed him dearly.
They are together once again.
How do you sum up a life
well lived? Nancy was a travel-
er, a gardener, a lover of strays
(animals and people alike), a
caretaker, caregiver, an excel-
lent cook; she loved a good
party, playing cards, a big laugh
and a glass of wine. She was a
loyal friend, a straight shooter
and one tough cookie. Nancy
was rarely without her faithful
companion and pet, Lily. She
was a loving wife, sister, daugh-
ter, grandma, great-grandma
and friend. But most of all, she
was a really great Mom who
will be missed every single day
As Nancy moves on to her
next adventure, she leaves
behind her daughters: Chris
Lynch, son-in-law Michael
Lynch and their daughter Kate
of Edgewater, NJ; Candy L.
Cook of Fernandina Beach and
Sam Cook of Belleview, FL.;
granddaughter Jessica Pounds,
her husband John Pounds, and
their daughter and Nancy's
great-granddaughter Macy
Pounds of Woodbine, GA. She
will be greatly missed by her
sister Marianne Henrikson,
nieces Amy Kaylor, Cindy Voelz
and their families, all of West
Chicago, IL.
Nancy requested no serv-
ice. In lieu of flowers,, please
send any donations to the
Nassau Humane Society at 671
Airport Rd., Fernandina Beach,
FL, 32034. The Humane Society
is a no-kill, non-profit animal
shelter and all donations are
tax deductible.
Memory site has been set
up at Oxley-Heard Funeral
Home's website; www.oxley-
heard.com, to leave memories
and messages.
Oxley-HeardFuneral Directors

Carson H. Lofts
Carson H. Lofts, 91, Ponte
Vedra Beach, FL, passed away
on January 5, 2013, at Vicar's
Landing Windsor Health Center
in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL.
There will be a private memorial
graveside service for the family.
Carson was born September
3, 1921, in Lawrence, Michigan,
to Horace and Lela (Drake)
Lofts: He spent his early child-
hood in Paw Paw, attended
Western Michigan University
High School and began college
at Western Michigan University
in Kalamiiazoo beforeenlisting in
the United States Coast Guard


511 Ash Street Fernandina Beach. FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax 261-3698
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Office hours are 830 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday


The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Femandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034.
Periodicals postage paid at Femandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900) ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this
publication in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader
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tising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any
objectionable wording or reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if it Is determined that
the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the general standard of advertising acceptance.
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NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
. Monday, 12p.m.


Church Notes:
Monday, 5p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3p.m.


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m." Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m. Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon N/A
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m. Tuesday, 3 p.m.
SMonday holidays the Classified deadline wil be Friday at 5 p.m.


during WWII.
After being discharged from
the military service in 1946,
Carson was employed in sever-
al businesses in Kalamazoo. In
1948, he met and married
Virginia Lee Holton, who died in
1990. Carson was a salesman
for Lee Holton, Virginia's father,
who owned and operated Lee
Holton Office Machines, Inc. In
1954 he purchased the compa-
ny from Holton and became the
sole proprietor. He established
a second business, Copy
Products Company. Both com-
panies sold to offices through-
out the six counties surround-
ing Kalamazoo. Carson was
active in the Elks, the Exchange
Club, and the Kalamazoo
Country Club.
Carson and Virginia moved
to Amelia Island, FL, after sell-
ing his companies in 1974-75.
He was an active member of the
Amelia Island Plantation
Owners Association and the
Amelia Island Volunteer Fire
Department, where he served
as treasurer for many years.
In 1988 they moved to the
retirement community of
Vicar's Landing in Ponte Vedra
Beach, FL In 1994 he met and
married Frances Henry
Surviving with his wife are
Carson's three children: Sue
Berner (husband Daniel) of
Lafayette, IN; Patricia DePuy
(husband Bill) of Alexandria,
VA; and Robert Lofts of
Fernandina Beach, FL; and five
grandchildren: Meghan Berner
and Joseph Berner of Lafayette,
IN; Holen Blackburn (husband
Colin) of Indianapolis, IN;,
Walker DePuy of Athens, GA;
and Cameron DePuy of
Arlington, VA.
Memorial contributions are
suggested to Vicar's Landing
Scholarship Fund (Vicar's
-Landing, 1000 Vicar's Landing
Way, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
32082) or Haven Hospice
(Haven Hospice Development
4200 NW 90th Blvd. Gainesville,
FL32606).
The family would like to
thank all the loving care from
Vicar's Landing and Haven
Hospice for the past two years.
Hardage-Giddens Funeral Home
Jacksonville Beach

Deloris Morgan
Thrift
Mrs. Deloris "Sue" Morgan
Thrift, age 78, formerly of
Fernandina Beach, FL passed
away on Sunday, December 2,
2012 at the Gilmer Nursing
Home in Ellijay, GA.
Born in Ware County,
Georgia she was the oldest of
six children born to the late
Floyd and Maggie Lou Smith
Thrift. As a
toddler, her
family came
t 0
Fernandina
Beach. She
grew up in
Fernandina,
had her four
children here and made Nassau
County her home until moving
to Ft. Myers in'the early 1990s.
While living in Fernandina
Beach, she worked as a Cashier
at Pantry Pride, Setzers and
Food Fair, as well as a Waitress
at the Blue Seas Restaurant.
Mrs. Thrift had attended
Bible Baptist Church.
In addition to her parents,
she is preceded in death by her
husbands, James E. Thrift,
Parnell Morgan, a son, Frank
T Mizell, a sister, Joyce Lovell,
and a brother, Edward Buck
Thrift.
Mrs. Thrift leaves behind,
children, Wanda Howell, Ellijay,
GA, Florence Smiley (LaDale),
Cashiers, NC, Joe Mizell,
Orange Park, FL, Vicki
Coggins, Fernandina Beach,
FL, Toni Thrift (Rick Reynolds),
Ft. Myers, FL, LarIry Morgan,
Bradenton; FL; two brothers,
Richard Thrift, Yulee,.FL, Joe
Thrift, Hobart, OK, a sister, Lois
Gordon, Blackshear, GA, six
grandchildren, nine great-
grandchildren and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday, January
12, 2013 in the Burgess Chapel
of Oxley-Heard Funeral Home.
Mrs. Thrift will be laid to
rest in the family section of
Bosque Bello Cemetery.
A reception will follow at


Oxley-Heard.
Please share her life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors

Mary PainterTill
Mrs. Mary Painter Till, age
68, of Fernandina Beach, pass-
ed away on Monday evening,
January 7, 2013 at Baptist
Medical Center Nassau.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Fernandina, she was the
daughter of the late, Charles
Hamrick and Edna Louise
Westbrook Painter. Mrs. Till'
had worked as a Customer
Service Representative for
Florida National Bank, which
later became First Union in
Fernandina Beach, for 24 years
before retir-
d l ihg in 1989.
She' later
worked as a
PBX Operator
for the Amelia
Island
Plantation
Company.
She had been a member of
Springhill Baptist Church until
her health began to decline in
the past few years.
Mrs. Till is preceded in
death by her husband, Arthur
W. Till, who'passed away in
1994.
She leaves behind her
daughter, Catherine Music
(Sean), an uncle, Vernon Jones
(Nancy), of Fernandina Beach,
FL.
Funeral services will be at
10:00 am on Friday, January 11,
2013 from the graveside in
Bosque Bello Cemetery with
Reverend Neil Thompson, offi-
ciating.
Mrs. Till will be laid to rest
beside her husband.
Honorary pallbearers will
be: Jimmy Parker, Ken Prescott,
Larry Music, Steve Music,
Steve Chartrand, Garret Gupta,
Yancey Music, Cody Music, Bill
Scott and Billy Scott.
Her family will receive
friends on Thursday from 5:00-
7:00 pm at Oxley-Heard Funeral
Home.
Please share her life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors

Deborah E
ClaneyWright
Mrs. Deborah F Claney
"Debi" Wright, age 66, fi rmer-
ly of Fernandina Beach, passed
away on Thursday morning,
January 3, 2013 at her home in
Ft. McCoy, FL
Born in Norristown, PA, she
was the daughter of the late
Robert Murdock Claney and
Fay Arlene Latshaw. Mrs.
Wright was a graduate of
Conestoga High School in
Berwyn, PA. She had worked
for Hewlett Packard as an Area
Administrative Manager.
"Debi" leaves behind her
husband of 27 years, Roland
Knight, two sisters, Patt Roscoe
.(Peter), Abington, PA, Sue
McCann, (David), Wadmalaw
Island, SC, and three nephews,
Ben, Tom and Michael.
Funeral-services will be at
2:30 pm on Saturday, January
12, 2013 in the Burgess Chapel
of Oxley-Heard Funeral Home
with Reverend Jackie Hayes,
officiating.
Her family will receive
friends from 1:30 pm until the
hour of service on Saturday, at
the funeral home.
Mrs. Wright will be laid to
rest in Bosque Bello Cemetery.
A reception for family and
friends will Ifollow at Oxley
Heard.
Please share her life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors

DEATH NOTICES
t
Mr. Robert Gerald
Braund, 87, Fernandina Beach,
died Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013.
Oxley-Heard Furieral Directors
James T. "Jim" Hudson,
83, Fernandina Beach, died
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013. A cele-
bration of his life will be held
later this year.
Eternity Funeral Homes &
Cremations- Nassau.
Timmy David Russell, 45,
Jacksonville, died Saturday, Jan.
5, 2013.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


LOOKING BACK
ang(II8F[


50
YEARS


25
YEARS


10
YEARS


A huge crowd was expected at the dedication
of the Florida Marine Welcome Station in
Fernandina Beach.
January 10, 1963

Nassau County retailers reported brisk sales
on day one of the Florida Lottery.
January 14, 1988

The Fox TV show "Texas Justice" was on
Amelia Island looking for perfect Florida land-
marks to film as lead-ins for upcoming episodes.
January 10, 2003


WEEKLY

UPDATE

Volunteers wanted
The Coalition of the
Homeless of Nassau County
is seeking volunteers for the
Point in Time Homeless
Count in January. This is a
one-day event. No experi-
ence is necessary. If you
would like to make a differ-
ence in the community,
please contact Pam Lee.at
(904) 415-2731 or
parh@chnassau.com for
more information.
Overeaters support
Overeaters Anonymous
(OA) North Florida
Intergroup will host a public
information meeting from
2:30-4 p.m. on Jan. 12 at the
Masonic Lodge in Orange
Park, 511 Kingsley Ave.
For further information
about this event or Over-
eaters Anonymous, contact
Linda C. at Iclendanielgm
@gmail.com or call (904)
376-7398. Visit
www.oanfi.org:
Boatingclasses
SThe USCG Auxiliary
Flotilla 14-1 will hold a
Boating Skills & and
Seamanship class on Jan. 12
and 19 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
These classes teach the
basics of boat handling,
weather, navigation and
rules of the waterways.
They will be taught at the
Amelia Island Lighthouse
Cottage on O'Hagen Drive.
Cost of the course is $35. If
interested, contact Scott
Pyatte at (678) 523-3374 or
scottpyatte@msn.com.
Pink Ribbon Ladies
The Pink Ribbon Ladies,
a support group in Nassau
County for survivors of
breast and other female can-
cers, will meet at 6 p.m. Jan.
14 in the Conference Room
at Baptist Medical Center
Nassau. This meeting will a
social gathering and a time
of support for members and
guests. Please bring a
dessert or a heavy hours
d'oeuvre to share. For more
information contact Joyce
Karsko at 261-2976 or Isobel
Lyle at 321-2057.
Life skillsworkshop
A Life Skills workshop
Leaders for Middle School,
will be held Jan. 14 and 15
from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. in
partnership with NACDAC
and the state Department of
Children and Fanilies.
Receive free training, hone
leadership and facilitation
skills, help young people
make healthy choices and
earn a certification that
you can use for other
groups.
All training and curricu-
lum is provided, and you
will be partnered with
another trainer. Time com-
mitment is one hour per
week for 15 weeks, plus two
days of training. The pro-
gram will be held before
school in Callahan and
Hilliard, and after school in
Fernandina Beach and
Yulee. Days and times vary
by location. You must be 21
or older and pass a back-
ground check.
For information or to
apply to be a volunteer con-
tact Theresa Duncan via
e-mail at theresaduncan@cis-
nassau.org by Jan. 11. For
program information visit
www.lifeskillstraining.com.
Job fair
In anticipation of the $85
million "Re-Imagination" set
to debut in March, Omni
Amelia Island Plantation will
add 160 new permanent
jobs and an additional 200
seasonal associates.
Omni Amelia Island
Plantation will hold job fairs
to recruit new employees
for positions such as sales
manager, pastry chef,
convention services manag-
er, assistant director of
finance, administrative
assistant and bell captain on
Jan. 14 and 28 from 9 a.m.-6
p.m., and Jan. 21 from 11
- a.m.-7 p.m. at Racquet Park.
Visit www.omniameliais-


landplantation.com for infor-
mation.


FOR THE RECORD

The portrait of local artist
Rhonda Bristol on page 1B
Friday should have been
.credited to photographer
Stephan R. Leimberg of
Amelia Island.
The News-Leader strives for
accuracy. We will promptly cor-
rect allfactual errors. Please
notify the editor of errors at
mparnell@ftnewsleadercom or
call (904) 261-3696.


NEV[ISQ
LEADEIR!






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


New rector at St. Peter s


St. Peter's Episcopal
Church has announced its new
rector, the R.ev. Stephen Iee
Nlazingo. will arrive next
month.
Mazingo. and his wife
Abigail, will join the St. Peter's
family on Feb. 11. His first pub-
lic appearance will be the
Shrov(e Tuesday Pancake
Supper on Feb. 12 and his first
services Ash Wed nesday, Feb.
13. Father Stephen's first
Sunday will be Feb. 24 with a
welcoming cvent.
He replaces the RI. Rev.
George Young, who now is the
bishop of the Diocese of East
Tennessee. The Rev. Canon
Kerry Robb has served as
interim rector since Young
ldepar ted.
Mazingo and his wife are
btolh from North Carolina and
currently live in Wilmington,
N.C. He grew up on a horse
farm in Richlands, N.C., attend-
ed Appalachian State
University and received a


degree in
philosophy,
religion and
business.
He began
his call to
the priest-
hood at the
age of 17
Mazingo and was
approved to
go to
Virginia Theological Seminary
following graduation from
ASU. While in seminary, he
became involved in interna-
tional missions to the
Dominican Republic and South
Africa. After graduating from
seminary and being ordained a
deacon, he joined the Young
Adult Service Corp through
the Episcopal Church and
served in South Africa for a
year.
He subsequently became
assistant rector and then asso-
ciate rector at St. James
Church in Wilmington, N.C.


He also served for three years
as the Spiritual Director of
Happening in the Diocese of
East Carolina.
He and his wife, who is
from Tarboro, N.C. and a reg-
istered nurse, were married in
January 2012. She currently
works for Lower Cape Fear
Hospice and is a home hos-
pice case manager. She
received her B.S. in biology
from the University of the
South in Sewanee and her
nursing degree from Duke
University.
"We are very active people
and we like to surf, hike, trav-
el and eat," Mazingo wrote the
parishioners in a statement cir-
culated Sunday. "We are
very impressed with St. Peter's
hospitality, warmth and com-
munity and are so excited to
meetyou alt. May the Blessing
of God be upon you all, and
until we meet, may you know
that you are all in our prayers
daily."


''
4-F,

AV
S.-: ." "- :. y

inr-o c....e .. ,,o l : -.,un'tee-r '.i,- .'-..r
SUBMITTED
Executive Director Brandy Carvalho, kneeling, and board President John Landregan
introduce volunteer Barbara Farnsworth to Chelly, an adoptable dog at Nassau
Humane Society, while discussing the new animal shelter capital campaign to build
enclosed kennels so dogs are not exposed to the elements.



Humane Society names


new executive director


The Nassau Humane
Society announced the appoint-
ment of its new executive direc-
tor, Brandy Carvalho. In her
new position, Carvalho will
focus on strategic fundraising,
community relations, revenue
and program development and
marketing.
In addition, Carvalho will
lead the capital campaign effort
to build a much-needed new
animal shelter.
"My immediate priority is
the capital campaign for the
new animal rescue facility that
will replace- our current dilap-
idated shelter," said Carvalho.
"We have received financial
commitments from the city of
Fernandina Beach and many
generous donors. And now we
are reaching out to the entire
community to help us raise the
funds we'll need to build an
improved shelter for the home-
less animals in our care as they
wait for their forever homes."
John Landregan, president
of the Nassau Humane Society
Board of Trustees, said
Carvalho has been a volunteer
with the.organization, show-
ing her commitment and
enthusiasm for its mission.
"We are very pleased to wel-
come Brandy to the Nassau
Humane Society team as the
new executive director. She
brings a wealth of knowledge
and experience from her suc-
cessful work with several non-


profit organizations," he said.
During her recent tenure
at the Museum of Science &
History in Jacksonville,
Carvalho managed the
fundraising and education
departments. She was respon-
sible for the organization's indi-
vidual and corporate donors
and grants, volunteer and
membership programs and
educational programming.
Carvalho is a graduate of
the.University of Florida, and
also earned a master of public
administration degree. She has
completed nonprofit leadership
training at Harvard Kennedy
School, and was in the inau-
gural class of the Non-
profit Center of Northeast
Florida's Emerging Leaders
Program. She is a local busi-
ness owner and parent of six
rescued pets.
The' Nassau Humane
Society runs a-no-kill animal
shelter and adoption center;
provides animal control serv-
ices for the city of Fernandina



TROLLEY
Continued from 1A
accountant Ii i, time, the trol-
ley operation had bi-ought in
about $3,300 over the previous
three years but the city had not
taken a percentage.
ada ugh r'yfrbnewsleadercomn


Beach; delivers community
education and spay/neuter pro-
grams; and operates the NHS
Dog Park, all located at 671
Airport Road, next to the
Fernandina Beach airport. It
also operates the Second
Chance resale store, located
in the 8 Flags Shopping Center,
1002 S. 14th St., Fernandina
Beach,
To'support or volunteer
with the Nassau Humane
Society or the capital cam-
paign, visit nassauhumaneso-
ciety.com, e-mail EDNHS@Jatt.
net or call 321-1647.
To make a donation to
Second Chance, call 321-0022.



LIBRARY
Continued from 1A
owns the building and pays
about $53,000 annually
toward library services. The
county pays the remainder
of the operational expenses
and supervises the library
director and staff.
adaughtry@fbnewsleadercomn

FREE
Buyers & Sellers
Real Estate Workshop
Tues. Jan 15'h at 6 pm
www.AmeliaWorkshops.com


TWICE AS NICE


SUBMITTED
Tiffany Watson and Andrew Wright of Bryceville are the proud parents of the first
babies born at Baptist Medical Center Nassau in 2013. They welcomed twin boys -
Colton weighing in at 7 pounds, 11 ounces at 8:18 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 2, fol-
lowed by Chase at 8:19 a.m. at 6 pounds, 3 ounces. The twins join a blended family
which includes Xavier, 8, Brian, 6, and Evony, 4, on the mother's side, and Katlin,
12, Austin, 10, and Kristopher, 8, on the father's side. To celebrate the occasion, the
hospital auxiliary presented the family with a gift bag of "onesies," stuffed animals and
other treats from the auxiliary gift shop. Also pictured are gift shop manager Rachael
Hentigan, left, and Auxiliary President Stephanie Manwell.




Local Legislative Delegation


sets second meeting Jan. 18


State Rep:Janet H. Adkins,
chair of the Nassau County
Legislative Delegation, has
announced an additional meet-
ing of the delegation to be held
on Jan. 18.
The meeting is scheduled
from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Nassau
County Commission Cham-
bers, James S. Page Govern-
mental Complex, 96135 Nassau
Place, Yulee.
Formal delegation action on
local bills will take place at the
Jan. 18 meeting.
The Nassau County
Legislative Delegation is sched-
uled to hold a General


DAVIS
Continued from 1A
who was promoted to a federal
judgeship.
Davis primarily handles civil
court cases, and his chambers
are in the Nassau County
Courthouse in Fernandina
Beach. He spearheaded efforts
to establish the Nassau County
Mental Health Court, which
handles nonviolent offenders in
need of assistance because of
mental health or lifestyle issues.
Notable cases that have
come before his court include
the city's lawsuit with McGill







Have a Broken
Denture or Partial?
Need it repaired
The same day?
Ask your dentist to send it to
Pezet Dental Lab

With over 30 years of
certification.
We also do
Same Day Relines.
In most.cases all repairs and
relines will be completed the
same day. A


Legislative
Hearing and
Public
Forum
Thursday at
5:30 p.m. in
e the county
commission
Adkins chambers,
James S.
P a g e
Governmental Complex, 96135
Nassau Place, Yulee.
The delegation will hear
public testimony during that
meeting on general issues, leg-
islation and appropriations in
preparation for the 2013


Aviation and its legal quest to
obtain easements from ocean-
front landowners for a major
beach renourishment project
Davis previously served as
chief assistant lat e anror n.v in
the State Attorney's Office for
the Fourth Judicial Circuit from
1991-94, having previously
worked in the same office as an
assistant state attorney from
1982-88.
Davis also worked at civil lit-
igation law firms on two occa-
sions during his legal career;


Legislative Session.
All Nassau County
Legislative Delegation meet-
ings are open to the public.
Questions should be direct-
ed to Adkins' office at 491-
3664.
In accordance with the fed-
eral Americans with Disabilities
Act, and Chapter 286.26,
Florida Statutes, persons in
need of special accommoda-
tions to participate in the
meeting, including agendas,
interpreters or assisted
listening devices, should con-
tact Rep. Adkins' office at
491-3664.


he worked at Brown, Terrell,
Hogan, Ellis, McClamma &
Yegelwel from 1988-91 and at
Mahoney, Hadlow & Adams PA
from 1980-82.
*I 6 i ,-:c,-,:.ld hi ;J.D. ii 1980
from the University of Florida
College of Law and his B.A. in
1974 from Princeton University.
Davis grew up in
Jacksonville and spent summer
days in his youth at American
Beach, where he now lives.
gpelican@fbnewsleadercom


LUEGRI6 5 CONCERT

TOMORROW NIGHT!
Tickets $10
at the door.
Doors open at 7pm
Showtime 8 pm

Amelia Island's Only Oceanfront TIki Bar & Children's
Playground Slidersseaside.com for all our MENU Info

SLive Music! S
Tiki Bar
Featuring Amelia Island's Finest Musicians!
"Like" us on Facebook and check out our music calendar
'Reggae' Wednesday with Pill Pill 6-10PM
Thursday Cason & Amy
Sliders Lounge
The Macy's, Fri & Sat, 6-10 PM I Hur
Trivia, Thursday 7:30 PM w/DJ Dave 4- 'r
Shag Dancing, Sunday, 4-7 PM


DATE NIGHT 1
Must have coupon to redeem
BUY ONf & GET ONE FREE
MONDAYS AND TUESDAY'S ONLY
for a Dinner Entr6e of $10 or less value
18% Gratuity will be added before discount
S Expires 1/15/13 (Eat-in only One coupon per table)
L ----- --------


LUNCH COUPON'
Must have coupon to redeem
BUY ONE & GET ONE FREE
of $10 or less value
11:00-4pm Mon-Thurs I
18% Gratuity will be added before discount
Expires 1/15/13 (Eat-In only One coupon per table)
L_-------------J
1998 5. Fletcher Ave
FREE WiFi Hotspot 277-6652
www,SlidersSeasidecorm


Come and taste some of the Island's

renma ^ Best Desserts and Treats

A NUI Live Entertainment t4 LUve/Silent Auctions


Get your Tickets Now!



1 All proceeds benefit
uI NFernandina Beach Middle School
B Students and Teachers


4 Special Performances by

s EE The FBMS Drama Dept.


T Friday, February 1st, 6-pmn
at the Atlantic Recreation Center
For Tickets: 904.491.7938 or 904.261.8919
NL/PSA






WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9. 2013/NEWS-LEADER


BUSINESS


Restaurant


Week near
From Jan. 18-27, Amelia
Island will serve up the des-
tination's fifth Restaurant
Week. The 10-day Amelia
Island Restaurant Week has
been extended in 2013 and
offers guests and residents
a delectable showcase of
island hot spots for food and
fun. Restaurant Week will fea-
ture 19 different island
restaurants, each offering a
special fixed menu (priced at
either $20.13 or $30.13)
which includes three cour-
ses and a non-alcoholic bev-
erage.
Participating restaurants
include 29 South, 277-7919;
BarZin Bistro & Wine Bar,
310-6620; Baxter's, 277-4503;
Brett's Waterway Caf6, 261-
2660; Bonito Grill and Sushi,
261-0508; Caf4 Karibo, 277-
5269; Crab Trap, 261-4749;
David's Restaurant &
Lounge, 310-6049; Espafia
Restaurant & Tapas, 261-
7700; Falcon's Nest, 491-4242;
Horizon's, 321-2430; Le Clos,
261-8100; Lu Lu's at the
Thompson House, 432-8394;
Marina Seafood Restaurant,
261-5310; Merge, 277-8797;
PLAE; 277-2132; Salty Pelican
Bar & Grill, 277-3811; Sandy
Bottoms, 310-6904; Sliders
Seaside Grill, 277-6652.
For more information on
Restaurant Week, visit
www.ameliaisland.com/yum
my.


t amabas

CENTER, INC
A private, non-profit agency that assists
Nassau County families who need food,
shelter and basic necessities.
For information, call: 904.261,7000


Building a great team


Over the last few weeks
the fans of our beloved
Jaguars again began bemoan-
ing their fate. A new owner
and a new coach came this
year, but the team was even
worse than last year. Some
fans are calling for Tim
Tebow, believing he could be
the difference. I am just glad
the owner recognized that
what they first need is a top
general manager.
The truth is that when a
professional sports team is
performing poorly, getting a
few new players usually does-
n't make the difference. In
fact, history shows teams.
with superstars who lack
committed role players usual-
ly disappoint. It's the teams
with both stars and role play-
ers, who complement the
coach and his or her system,
that win.
While most of the praise
for being a champion in pro-
fessional sports goes to the
coach and the stars, I have
always felt that not enough
praise goes to the individual
who chooses the talent.
Everyone knows the names
of Michael Jordan, Scottie
Pippen and the coach, Phil
Jackson, who led the Chicago
Bulls to six championships in
seven years. Fewer people
know the name of Jerry
Krause, who put the winning
teams together.
After their fifth losing sea-
son in a row, John Scheur-
holz was recruited by the
Atlanta Braves in 1990 from
the Kansas City Royals to
become general manager.
During his years with the
Royals, they had five winning
seasons and one World
Series championship. Ama-
zingly, since Scheurholz left
the Royals, they have only


i had three
-winning sea-
sons.
However,
his new
team, the
Braves,
have won
15-plus divi-
sion titles
COACH'S and a World
CORNER Series
... champi-
onship.
Howard Everyone
Pines recognizes
the Braves'
great players like Greg
Maddox, Tommy Glavine,
John Smoltz and Chipper
Jones, and manager Bobby
Cox, but few outside Atlanta
know it was John Schuerholz
who made it all possible.
From 1964 to 1978, the
proud franchise of the New
York Giants only won a total
of 74 games, or about a third
of the games played, and no
playoff games. The league
was so desperate for the
Giants to have a winner that
the commissioner stepped in
and convinced the Giants
owner to hire 'George Young
as GM. During the next 18
years they would go to the
playoffs many times and win
two Super Bowls. Most fans
recognize the talented coach-
es that Young hired, like Bill
Belichick, Bill Parcells and
Tom Coughlin. In addition,
the great players he drafted
like Phil Simms, Tiki Barber,
Michael Strahan and, of
course, Lawrence Taylor,
made these coaches look
pretty smart.
My sense is that, given
the'right situation, there are
many head coaches who can
win. However, winning takes
talented players willing to


sacrifice, do the scout work
and play their roles for a
leader who understands their
strengths and weaknesses.
The same is true in business.
One of my favorite CEOs was
extremely charismatic, strate-
gic and great to work with,
but the company never took
off until he brought in a num-
ber 2 who was also a great
operator and could get the
troops to execute. Since
BeamPines wasn't a house-
hold name, it was essential
that our executives were out
of the office developing rela-
tionships, selling business,
and delivering coaching. So,
to be successful, it was essen-
tial to have a peer inside man-
aging staff, process and han-
dling all the administrative
responsibilities. Convincing
my wife, Judith, to leave her
general manager position in
the advertising world and
take over operations made all
our partners very happy and
much more successful.
So the moral of the story
is the Jaguars can go out and
get Tim Tebow or whoever
else is available, but if they
don't successfully recruit a
top general manager, capable
of correctly assessing talent
and blending this talent with
a good coach, they probably
won't go anywhere but LA in
the next five years.
Amelia Island resident
Howard Pines has more than
30years experience as CEO,
chairman and founder of
BeamPines, a premier firm in
the Executive Coaching busi-
ness. He also co-founded the
BeamPines/Middlesex
University Master's Program
in Executive Coaching. Prior
to that he served as Senior VP
of Human Resources for a
Fortune 100 corporation.


*'' "'" 't
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= ,i''i


Volunteer firefighters


provide critical service


Volunteers are a special
breed, particularly those with
a hybrid objective of helping
people and also saving them.
Such is the pedigree of vol-
unteer firefighters.
Like other volunteers in
other pursuits, their interests
are pure and noble. Giving up
one's time for a humanitarian
purpose bestows a layer of
goodness in
our society.
It should be
. recognized
S S and reward-
ed.
*" Of late,
this has not
been the
case for vol-
STEVE'S unteer fire
ARKET departments
PLAC in Nassau
PLAC County. A
-. combative
Steve Nicklas process has
been initiat-
ed by a new fire chief to
require the seven volunteer
units within the county to
meet a higher degree of stan-
dards and regulation.
It is not clear what has
prompted or driven the scruti-
ny of the volunteer depart-
ments. It has not been in
response to incidents, but
instead to curious inquiry.
A few years ago, the state
approved new criteria for vol-
unteer fire departments
(involving required training,
standards for their equip-
ment, etc.), but the county
has delayed acting on these
new guidelines. The county's
strong-armed attempts thus
far to bring the volunteer fire
departments into compliance
have failed miserably.
Several of the volunteer
units have threatened to shut
down instead of comply. They
apparently feel the new
,requirements are onerous
and unnecessary.
There is a general belief
that closing the volunteer
departments would in turn
require that additional full-
time firefighters be hired and
equipment purchased. This
S would ine\.itably be ni,,I e *{,v
expensive than the current
arrangement, since new full-
time firefighters would
receive salaries, benefits and
lucrative pensions.
The only financial stipend
provided by the county to
each volunteer fire depart-
ment is about $40,000 per
year equating to just under
$300,000 for all of them. For
the volunteers' steadfast serv-


ices (providing water at fires,
traffic assistance, etc.), this is
clearly a bargain.
When you take into consid-
eration that most firefighters
work only a few days each
week (at longer hours), the
volunteers are on constant
standby. In fact, volunteer
departments substantially out-
number full-time fire depart-
ments around the U.S., espe-
cially in rural areas.
While there is a common
territorial friction between
full-time firefighters and their
volunteer counterparts, both
provide critical services. In
Nassau County, which is
small in terms of population
but large in area, the volun-
teer departments can help
fill in the gaps in many
instances.
Most fires in our area
reportedly occur in mobile
homes or trailers, which often
lack the preventative alarms
or sprinklers of many regular
homes and commercial build-
ings. And with improved
building standards, there
aren't really that many fires in
the county each year anyhow.
Meanwhile, fire chiefs in
Nassau County have changed
like the weather in recent
years, amid low-lying clouds
of controversy. One former
chief allowed his
firefighters to accumulate
overtime hours (instead of
increasing personnel) to
where some were earning
$100,000 per year from these
exaggerated wages. And since
retirement pensions are fac-
tored from a firefighter's
wages, this practice became
quite expensive.
There have been other
fires of scrutiny here. A high-
ranking county official is mar-
ried to a local firefighters, for
instance. This could create
skepticism about decisions
regarding concessions,
staffing, and other negotia-
tions with the firefighters and
their union.
And it could also work
against the volunteer fire
departments, which are obvi-
ously.pon-union. Ei.ther;,way_
the volunteer departments
are valuable, reliable and wor-
thy. They should be support-
ed, not shunned.
Steve Nicklas is a financial
advisor with a major U.S. firm
who lives and works on Amelia
Island. His business columns
appear in several newspapers
in North Florida. He can be
reached at 753-0236.
thenicklasteam2@msn.com


Baptist Health adds


digital to surgery


Baptist Health will be the
first hospital in North America
to have surgical suites equipped
with Buzz Digital OR, software
which puts 3-D images of a
. patient's brain and spine at a
doctor's fingertips by way
of a 42-inch, high-definition
touchscreen during neuro-
surgery.
Three, surgical suites
equipped with Buzz Digital OR,
developed by Brainlab, are on
the second floor of the new J.
Wayne and Delores Barr
Weaver Tower that opens next
week at Baptist Medical Center
in Jacksonville.
The operating suites for
both pediatric and adult neuro-
surgery feature an advanced
image guidance surgery (IGS)
platform the latest generation of
intraoperative MRI and CT
image guidance and Baptist is
one of only a handful of hospi-
tals in the nation with intraop-
erative models of both imaging
devices.
"We are very excited to
bring this new, innovative tech-
nology to our community and
our region," said John
Wilbanks, executive vice pres-
ident and chief operating officer
for Baptist Health. "This repre-
sents a major step forward in
Baptist Health's leadership in
providing the most advanced
neurosurgical care for adults
and children. We are confident
that outcomes will be enhanced
as a result of these capabilities
to visualize the brain and spine
while the patient is in the oper-
ating room."
Intrao'perative imaging
enables neurosurgeons to see
the brain more precisely, par-
ticularly when removing a
tumor on the brain or spine,
and helps them determine
whether or not they have


removed the entire tumor. If
neurosurgeons see any remain-
ing tumor, they can continue
the procedure until they
have removed as much of the
tumor as possible, reducing the
likelihood that the patient will
have to undergo a second sur-
gical'procedure with anesthe-
sia.
Buzz comes in by integrat-
ing all of the technology in the
room and serving as a form of
a GPS for the doctor during
brain surgery. For example,
once a brain surgery begins,
the brain can tend to shift slight-
ly. Images from the intraopera-
tive MRI and CTcan be taken in
real time and projected on the
screen to help surgeons map
out precisely where the tumor
is located and the best way to
get there, as well as checking to
see if the entire tumor has been
removed.
Those images are projected
onto a 42-inch high-definition
display controlled by a touch
screen, allowing surgeons to
scroll through and enlarge
medical images either taken
that day or downloaded from a
patient's file.
The Buzz system is an infor-
mation hub during surgical pro-
cedures that allows doctors
access to information they've
never before had inside the
operating room.
The imaging machines
and Buzz Digital OR will be
used during surgeries to
remove tumors in the brain or
spine and during procedures to
place screws or shunts in the
spine.
Surgeons at Baptist perform
the most neurologic and brain
tumor cases in the region and
Wolfson surgeons are the only
doctors in the region who work
on pediatric patients.























*4,


HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-L.EADIER
Laurie Jones never tires of hearing customers tell her
how much they love Pickers Market.


She keeps market


running smoothly


HEATHERA. PERRY
News Leader

Most people think the
Pickers Market is a small
shop.
"It looks much smaller
from the outside," said man-
ager Laurie Jones. "When
they walk into the front of
the shop, their eyes get large
and they say, 'Wow! This
place is huge!'"
SWith about 6,000 square
feet housing a wide variety of
items from 40 dealers and
consigners, the Alachua
Street space is a buyers'
dream and a dream come
true for owner Nancy
Rosenberg.
"I had a vision when we
opened the shop! I wanted it
to have plenty of light, clean
fresh booths at all times, a
view throughout the shop
and smell good," said
Rosenberg, who relies on
Jones to keep the shop run-
ning smoothly.
"I cannot say enough
about her. There is nothing
she doesn't do in the shop.
She is responsible for every
aspect of the shop. She takes
in and keeps track of all con-
signments, knows where
almost everything in the
shop is located, (does) .. .. .1.
keeping of sales tags, etc.,
helps vendors with their dis-
plays and even helps cus-
tomers make up their minds
- if that can be done!"
Although there aren't any
other employees, so to
speak, each vendor is consid-
ered staff, says Rosenberg.
'They all greet cus-
tomers, help with moving
items, collect money, answer
many, many questions, sug-
gest places to eat and visit,
and most of all, they are
knowledgeable and friendly."
Open since September
2011, the shop has vendors
and consigners from Maine
to Key West, and home
dicor in styles fi'om shabby
chic to contemporary.
'The Pickers Market is a
multi-vendor mall. Some of
them have had their own
shop, been in previous malls
and some have never done it
before. They have quality
merchandise at affordable
prices."
Nearby businesses are
encouraged to bring
brochures and business
cards for display at the large
checkout bar made from
antiqued doors, tin and prim-
itive wood.
Jones has been involved


in the consignment business
for about 10 years, finding
and refurbishing furniture
and other items and then
selling them.
"I find things at estate
sales and auctions or garage
sales," she said, adding that
each vendor has their own
style and they try to make
them all different.
Jones shares her home
with husband, Adam, and
canine companions GeGe
and Lucy.
Leisure activities for the
Nassau County native
include walking on the
beach, riding her bike and
spending time with her
grandbaby, 10-month-old
Jeremiah, son of daughter
Heather and her husband,
Justin.
Following the outdoor
flea market and yard sale,
unsold items at the Pickers
Market are donated to
Second Chance, a charity
funding the Nassau Humane
Society.
Pickers Market is located
at 201 Alachua St.,
Fernandina Beach. Business
hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Monday-Saturday and noon
to 5 p.m. Sunday. Phone 432-
7048 or like them on'
Facebook. '
typet@fbnewsleadercom


WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9. 2013 BUSINESS News-Leader



Retirement plan


limits increase


RP

~-} -M8B *
r sS^-


JASON ALDERMAN
For the News Leader

Benjamin Franklin once
declared, "Nothing can be said
to be certain, except death and
taxes." Although I don't have
any updates on the former,
where taxes are concerned I
do have news:
As it does every year, the
Internal Revenue Service
announced 2013 cost-of-living
adjustments to many of the
amounts you and your employ-
er can contribute toward your
retirement accounts. These
new limits mean most people
will be able to contribute more
money in tax-advantaged
accounts for their retirement
savings.
Here are highlights of what
will and won't change in
2013:
Defined contribution plans.
The maximum allowable annu-
al contribution you can make
to workplace 401(k), 403(b),
457(b) and federal Thrift
Savings plans increases by
$500 to $17,500. Keep in
mind these additional fac-
tors:
People over 50 can also
make an additional $5,500 in
catch-up contributions (un-
changed from 2012).
The annual limit for com-
bined employee and employer
contributions increased by
$1,000 to $51,000.
Because your plan may
limit the percentage of pay you
can contribute, your maximum
contribution may actually be
less. (For example, if the max-
imum contribution is 10 per-
cent of pay and you earn
$50,000, you could only con-
tribute $5,000.)
Individual Retirement
Accounts (IRAs). The maxi-
mum annual contribution to
IRAs increases by $500 to
$5,500 (plus an additional
$1,000 if 50 or older un-
changed from 2012). Max-
imum contributions to tradi-
tional IRAs are not impacted
by personal income, but ifyour
modified adjusted gross
income (AGI) exceeds certain
limits, the maximum amount
you can contribute to a Roth
IRA gradually phases out:
For singles/heads of
households the phase-out
range is $112,000 to $127,000


VYSTAR CELEBRATES


(increased from $110,000 to
$125,000 in 2012). Above
$127,000, you cannot con-
tribute to a Roth.
For married couples filing
jointly, the range is $178,000 to
$188,000 (up from $173,000 to
$183,000 in 2012).
Keep in mind these rules
for deducting traditional IRA
(.,i ,i i..l i i .n- on your federal
tax return:
If you're single, a head of
household, a qualifying
widower) or married and nei-
ther spouse is covered by an
employer-provided retirement
plan you can deduct the full
IRA contribution, regardless
of income.
If you are covered by an
employer plan and are single
or a head of household, the
tax deduction phases out for
AGI between $59,000 and
$69,000 (up from $58,000 to
$68,000 in 2012); if married
and filing jointly, the phase-
out range is $95,000 to
$115,000 (up from $92,000 to
$112,000 in 2012).
If you're married and aren't
covered by an employer plan.
but your spouse is, the IRA
deduction is phased out if your
combined AGI is between
$178,000 and $188,000 (up
from $173,000 to $183,000 in
2012).
For more details, read
IRS Publication 590 at www.
irs.gov.
Retirement Saver Tax
Credit: As an incentive to help
low- and moderate-income
workers save for retirement
through an IRA or company-
sponsored plan, many are eli-
gible for a Retirement Savers'
Tax Credit of up to, $1,000
($2,000 if filing jointly). This
credit lowers your tax bill, dol-
lar for dollar, in addition to any
other tax deduction you
already receive for your con-
tribution.
Qualifying income ceiling
limits for the Retirement
Savers' Tax Credit increased in
2012 to $59,000 for joint filers,
$44,250 for heads of house-
hold, and $29,500 for singles or
married persons filing sepa-
rately.
Consult IRS Form 8880 for
more information.
Jason Alderman directs
Visa's financial education pro-
grams.


DON'T LITTER

ASPAY-NEUTER,
I t A Pubic Service Announcemen by The N-Lader


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Mon & Sat 10-5


Visit us across from the Marriott near the beach.


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904-321-2430 www.horizonsameliaisland.com


IrCOUP


I


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SU'BMI'llTIE
Shannon Brown, branch vice president, and Suzan
Achan, branch supervisor, and staff celebrate as VyStar
Credit Union, the largest state-chartered financial insti-
tution in Florida and the 19th largest credit union in the
nation, marked 10 years in Fernandina Beach. The cred-
it union now serves over 414,000 members and has
over $4.6 billion in assets.








WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


George R. Fairbanks: Renaissance Man


GRAY EDENFIELD
For the News-Leader

In his time. George
Rainsford Fairbanks was
an attorney, historian, cit-
rus magnate, newspaper
editor, soldier, author and
politician. Though he was
born in New York, Fairbanks
adopted the state of Florida as
his home for most of his adult
life. He helped found the
Historical Society of Florida
and served as its first vice
president. Fairbanks was also
one of the co-founders of the
University of the South in
Sewanee, Tenn. He was a
great friend and colleague of
David Levy Yulee; his father
Moses Levy and William Pope
Duval.
Moses Levy, the owner of
significant tracts of land in'
Central Florida, engaged
Fairbanks to tend to his many
pressing legal matters.
Fairbanks also served on the
board of directors of Yulee's
Florida Railroad, and owned
stock in the company. His life-
long thirst for knowledge
made George Fairbanks one
of the brightest and most well-
rounded minds of his day and
a great chronicler not to
mention a part of- Florida's
history.
Born in Watertown, N.Y.,
on July 5,1820, George was
the second son of Jason and
Mary Massey Fairbanks.
Although born into a fairly
wealthy family, his father and
maternal grandfather had
both recently earned their
respective fortunes. Jason
Fairbanks was a self-made
man with little formal educa-
tion who parlayed his skills as
a tanner into several business
ventures, eventually employ-
ing up to 500 people. He.was
also a respected public ser-
vant, serving as a county sher-
iff and treasurer and as a U.S.
marshal for almost 30 years.
Mary Massey's father built a
lumber mill and settled his
family in the area that would'
become Watertown before it
was a city. The elder Massey
bought a great deal of proper-
ty, and with the bity's expan-
sion, became a wealthy and
powerful man.
, ,,Though his mothecil \a a
staunch anti-Carl'io ,li. G;... ,i1i .
Fairbanks was sent to s cihul
at La Petit Seminaire in
Montreal, Canada, a Catholic
school for boys which provid-


ed a top notch education.
English was banned at the
school, and George was
forced to speak only in
French. A cholera epidemic
forced him to return home in
1832, where he spent the next
four years preparing for col-
lege.
Fairbanks graduated from
Union College (the first inter-
denominational institution for
higher education in the
United States) in 1839, and
began to study law. In 1842,
he became engaged to Sarah
Wright, a judge's daughter,
and the two were married just
weeks before Fairbanks
moved to Florida to take a job
as Clerk of the Superior Court
of East Florida. Now living in
St. Augustine, Fairbanks
immersed himself in the city's
history and in the history of
Florida in general. He learned
Spanish so that he could read
first-hand accounts from con-
quistadors and early explor-
ers. In 1858, Fairbanks' first
history book was published -
The History and Antiquities of
the City of St. Augustine,
Florida. In that same year, his
wi f. Sarah 1 '-d -lf n.ibi cu lo-
si leavi,,u ii n .,,, a,- u f

later, Fairbanks married his
brother-in-law's widow, Susan
Beard Wright, combining


their households; George and
Susan had two daughters of
their own.
Fairbanks made powerful
friends while living in St.
Augustine, which led to his
becoming involved in politics.
The support of William Duval
and David Yulee helped him
win a state senate seat in 1846.
When his term was over he
returned to St. Augustine and
continued to be involved in
the community. In 1856, he
helped to found the Florida
Historical Society, and served
as its vice president. A year
later he became the city's
mayor.
When war broke out
between the states, Fairbanks
endorsed secession from the
Union. He was commissioned
an officer and served under
Gen. Braxton Bragg, with'the
rank of major. He served in
the commissary department
and spent most of the war in
Georgia overseeing Army hos-
pitals. After the war, Major
Fairbanks returned to -
Sewanee to help rebuild the
University of the South, which
had been ravaged by four-
yeqrs of conflict.
SFor the rest of his life
Fairbanks would spend at
least a portion of the year in
the cabin he built near cam-
pus dubbed "Rebel's Rest,"


Amelia National Golf & Country Club
features stunning, award winning customiz-
able home plans from Jacksonville, Florida
new hbmes builder, ICI Homes. Your search
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This truly magnificent community embodies country club hvng at its best;
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PHOTOS COURTESY'OF AMELIA ISLAND MUSEUM OF HISTORY
George R. Fairbanks, left, attorney, historian, citrus magnate, newspaper editor, sol-
dier, author and politician. His house, above, is now a bed and breakfast inn. The
Amelia Island Museum of History honors him, below.


which still stands to this day.
Fairbanks spent a great
deal of his time managing his
various land holdings. His pri-
vate records (kept at Florida
State University) indicate that
at one time he held property
in Nassau, Duval, Clay, Put-
nam, St. Johns, Volusia, Lake,
Marion, Brevard and Alachua
counties. In 1871, he complet-
ed his second book, History of
Florida, which was the first
connected and complete work
on the history of the state.
In 1880, David Yulee invit-
ed Fairbanks to move to
Fernandina to become editor
of the local paper, The Florida
Mirror Fairbanks' active role
in the Episcopal Church
allowed him to quickly make
connections with some of
Fernandina's most prominent
citizens, many of whom were
part of St. Peter's congrega-
tion. Around this same time,
Fairbanks donated a tract of
land near Gainesville to build
a church for the citizens in a
small town that was to be
named after him. He brought
in New York architect Robert
Schuyler to design the build-
ing dubbed "All Saints" at
the suggestion of Fairbanks'
wife Susan and paid for its
construction.
It was of the utmost impor-
tance to Susan Fairbanks to
have her children and grand-
children near her at all times,
and with a family as large as
the Fairbanks' this necessitat-
ed a home of substantial size.
In 1885 George turned once
again to Robert Schuyler to
design and build a home in
Fernandina that could accom-
modate the entire family. The
lavish Italianate home fea-
tured a 15-foot tower and a
fireplace in every room (10 in
all), two of which were deco-
rated with English tiles depict-
ing scenes from
Shakespeare's plays and
Aesop's fables. The Fairbanks
house was the first home in
Fernandina to have an eleva-,
tor. A longstanding local myth
is that upon seeing the house
for the first time Susan
Fairbanks was so displeased


with it, she gave it the
moniker it carries to this day,
"the folly." However, the story
passed down through the
Fairbanks family is that it was
the decoration and furnish-
ings that Susan disapproved
of, not the house itself.
Fairbanks managed much
of his business out of
Fernandina, but spent his
summers in Sewanee helping
to manage the University of
the South and ensure the insti-
tution stayed true to the origi-
nal intentions of its founders
(of which he has was the last
living). In 1898, George pub-
lished the second edition of
his History of Florida, followed
by a third in 1904 which
added chapters up to that
date. This edition was
designed for and used as a
textbook in the Florida school
system. He continued with his
devotion to the University of
the South, as a trustee, and


never lost his zeal for
researching history. He
.passed away in 1906 at the age
of 86 in his home in Sewanee.
George Fairbanks' legacy
is still alive today in the city of
Fernandina, and his impact on
his adopted state is undeni-
able. His home still stands on
South Seventh Street, now
operating as a bed and break-
fast. The coat he wore as a
major in the Confederate
Army hangs in the Amelia
Island Museum of History.
'hle Florida Historical Society
he helped found exists to this
day, and the books he wrote
about the histories of Florida
and St. Augusline are still
used as source material in text
books read by students across
the state of Florida.
Gray Edenfield is Educa-
tion Director of the Amelia
Island Museum of History.
Grayc ameliamuseum.org


Notice of Meeting
Amelia Walk
Community Development District

The regular meeting of the Board of Supervisors of the Amelia Walk
Community Development District will be held on Tuesday, January 16,
2013 at 2:30 p.m. at the Compass Group Conference Room, 961687
Gateway Boulevard, Amelia Island, Florida 32034. The meeting is open
to the public and will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of
Florida Law for Community Development Districts. A copy of the agen-
da for this meeting may be obtained from the District Manager, 475 West
Town Place, Suite 114, St. Augustine, Florida 32092 (and phone (904) 940-
5850). This meeting may be continued to a date, time, and place to be
specified on the record at the meeting. There may be occasions when
one or more Supervisors will participate by telephone.
Any person requiring special accommodations at this meeting because of
a disability or physical impairment should contact the District Office at
(904) 940-5850 at least two calendar days prior to the meeting. If you are
hearing or speech impaired, please contact the Florida Relay Service at 1-
800-955-8770, for aid in contacting the District Office.
Each person who decides to appeal any action taken at these meetings is
advised that person will need a record of the proceedings and that
accordingly, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, including the testimony and evidence upon which
such appeal is to be based.

Dave deNagy
District Manager






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9,2013 OPINION News-Leader


F i



NEWS.

LEADERS


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties- "Newspapers get things done" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished throughthe teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FOY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
ANGELINE MUDD.
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
SIAN PERRY. ASSISTANTEDITOR
BETH JONES. SPORTS EDITOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


TLI Community
Newspapers,
Incorporated

The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
and donotnecessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees



We nre not all


rednecks


down heah

Conor Knighton has been reading my
mind.
A commentator for CBS "Sunday
Morning," Knighton says cable television
seems to be obsessed with rednecks, "typi-
cally, lower-middle-class white
Southerners."
"The last few years," he said, "have
brought us 'Redneck
Rehab,' 'My Big Redneck
Wedding,' 'Rocket City
Red r,,:cks,' 'Hillbilly
Handfishin',' 'Swamp
People,' 'Redneck Island,'
'l)uck Dynasty,' 'Bayou
Billionaires,'
NMol jshin.hi s.' 'Lady
,,. Hoget-rs'. the list goes
PROM un and on."
TIHE Do you see a pattern
HOME here?
Then we have the latest
OFFICE redneck offering, "Here
--- Comes Honey Boo Boo,"
S which features a rural
PhilHudgins Georgia family whose
members and friends have graced the TV
screen with pleasant scenes and sounds of
bobbing for pigs' feet and passing gas on
cue.
"And while they're always the butt of the
joke," Knighton said, "they seem to
embrace the attention, even coining catch
phrases (You better REDNECK-ognize)."
Knighton is not making fun of the South
or rednecks even redneck games. He is
from West Virginia, and he seemed pleased
that his home state denied a tax credit to
MTV's upcoming series, "Buck Wild," fear-
ing, he said, "that the show would portray
West Virginians in a stereotypical, derogato-
ry manner."
Good for West Virginia.
Lest you think of me as a snob, allow me
a few disclosures:
I have attended what some might call a
redneck wedding.
I enjoy some of the clever games that
Southerners some of them rednecks, for
sure come up with.
I think many of Jeff Foxworthy's lines in
his "You Might Be a Redneck If..." routine
are funny.
I was a judge for a Little Miss Princess
contest one time, pageants in which little
Honey Boo Boo must be a veteran.
I would like to watch someone catch a
40-pound catfish with his bare hands, but I
don't want to do it.
I have a friend who is a former
moonshiner, a really nice guy, but he would
tell you that no moonshiner in his right
mind would allow TV cameras near the still
site.
End of disclosures.
Now, what I worry about is the same
thing Conor Knighton worries about: "that
the recent explosion of these types of shows
perpetuates outdated stereotypes."
We know, of course, why these
shows multiply. Like most so-called reality
shows, they are fairly easy and inexpensive
to produce. The shows' stars get paid for
making fools of themselves. And, most
important; there must be a demand for
them.
But, we also know this: they aren't
really reality; few reality shows are.
And the characters are being exploited.
Knighton cleverly called it "redneck-sploita-
tion."
Many folks in Rabun County, Ga., my old
stomping grounds, were offended when
"Deliverance," the movie, came out 40 years
ago. I understand why.
I am offended by the proliferation of
Southern redneck shows. Rednecks, after
all, are everywhere, not just in the South.
And in the interest of fairness, I'd be willing
to share our redneck fame with other
deserving parts of the country.
Phil Hudgins is the senior editor for
Community Newspapers Inc., the media com-
pany that owns the News-Leader
phudgins@cninewspapers.com.


VIEWPOINT/PETER JOHNSON, ROBERT WEINTRAUB



Energy politics, clima


Global warming's impact rising sea levels,
more violent weather events, changing climate
- has created a local threat we can continue to
ignore only at our peril. This creates a chal-
lenge: with our unabated thirst for energy and
increasing supplies of fossil fuels, we must deal
with the cataclysmic effects of global warming
as part of a comprehensive energy policy.
The first part of this essay, which appeared
in the News-Leader's Jan. 2 issue, stated the
challenge: This second part takes a look at
solutions and required actions.
A shift from fossil fuels to other energy
sources is imperative. Because the impact of
global warming on living standards is gradual,
one generation can miss the effect. Measured
over two or three generations the gradual dif-
ferences become real and obvious. If we have
the foresight to understand and communicate
how our living standards will be affected in two
to three decades we can begin to make an
impact now. Solutions at the local, national and
international levels require strong leadership
and aware interest groups that actively support
mitigation efforts.
All current alternative energy "solutions"
have significant difficulties; the question is will
the American public accept the costs necessary
to find new technology and if government has
the political courage to lead.
Current alternate energy sources present
serious questions:
Solar power needs very large collection
arrays and storage technology is limited. But
local efforts, such as the Gainesville residential
solar incentive, have been effective. More
power companies and governments should
encourage residential solar generation wherein
surplus energy is bought by the utility.
Wind power does well in some places,
such as the southern volcanic stretches of
Hawaii or the North Dakota plains, but has run
into stiff opposition in populated areas such as
Florida's east coast. Understanding the value of
wind power in a comprehensive energy policy
will lead to greater public acceptance.
Biofuels have done well where there is a
large amount of biological waste, such as
Brazil's sugar cane refuse. But biofuel genera-
tors that rely on cutting down forests, such as
one being built in Gainesville, are controver-
sial. Using corn to make ethanol for auto fuel


NAMI
The National Alliance on Mental
Illness (NAMI) Consumer Support
Group meets on Fridays at 11 a.m.
at the Council on Aging, 1367 South
18th St., Fernandina Beach, across
from the Baptist Medical Center
Nassau. The groups are facilitated
by psychiatric nurses andare free of
charge; .10 ..
Nassau NAMI holds business
meetings on the third Thursday of
each month at 5:30 p.m. in the con-
ference room of the Northeast
Florida Community Action Agepcy,
1303 Jasmine St., Suite 100,
Fernandina Beach. Everyone is wel-
come to attend.
Family support meetings for
family members of an individual
with a mental health diagnosis are
,held at St. Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina
Beach, once a month at 7 p.m. The
meetings are free of charge.
Contact Lisa Mohn at 277-1886
for more information about any of
the meetings listed above.
Traci Fuglestad
Yulee


Child advocates
The staff of the Child Advocate
Rapid Response Team (C.AR.RT.),
a child advocate program with the
Nassau County School Board, wants
to thank the many organizations for
their generous contributions to the
C.A.R.R.T. program during the hol-
iday season. 'Thank you" to our
friends at the Mason's Lodge in
Callhhan, Mark's Automotive in
Hilliard, Powell Nursery in Callahan,
Elementary Education in Nassau
County, Tree House Bar and
Lounge in Hilliard, GFWC Women's
Club of Fernandina, the Pirates Club
in Fernandina, our friends who are
members of the Eastern Star in
Callahan, VFW in Fernandina,
Callahan Country Kids 4'H in
Callahan, and our many anonymous
donors. Thanks to your generosity
we were able to provide
Thanksgiving and Christmas to chil-
dren that are involved with the
C.A.R.R.T. Program in Nassau
County. The families are deeply
grateful and would like to express,
their appreciation as well for remem-
bering them during the holiday sea-
son.
Again, "thank you" from the
staff of C.A.R.R.T. and may you
have a Happy and Prosperous New
Year.
Wanda Nichols
Child Advocate Rapid
Response Team
Yulee

For the children
"A crisis is a terrible thing to
waste," Rahm Emanuel reportedly
stated four years ago. He consid-
ered it an opportunity to do great
things.
When everyone's attention is riv-
eted to a situation, perhaps he has a
point.
Fair enough. The massacre of
innocents in Connecticut last month
certainly warrants much thought
and discussion, the best that's in us.
Could we attempt to consider all


Part: What we can do

has proven to be counter-productive by both
raising the cost of food and using as much
energy to produce as it creates. Without a sus-
tainable and economic source of biofuel, this is
not a viable option.
Nuclear has been shown to have unac-
ceptable risks by the Fukashima tragedy. A
number of countries are rethinking nuclear pol-
icy; Germany is planning to abandon nuclear
over the next decade or so.
The increasing abundance of natural gas
could lead to a reduction in coal-fired electric
generation, but the cost of laying pipelines and
refitting coal plants will be considerable and
there are significant environmental costs.
Natural gas is not a long-term solution to global
warming.
What is needed are new technologies. The
R&D will be extraordinarily expensive, howev-
er.
Does the public have the political will to
spend that kind of money? Are people willing to
make personal sacrifices now to make a better
future world? The public needs incentives now
to encourage choices that will lead to future
solutions. Europe discovered long ago that
higher petrol prices force people into more effi-
cient cars. Costly oil has led to more efficient
electric-producing technologies.
One answer would be to increase energy
prices so they reflect the true cost including .
the cost of pollution and climate change. Such
an increase will not only provide incentives to
reduce fossil fuel use but also would raise
money needed for development and implemen-
tation of new technology.
"Cap and trade," by which emission targets
are set and those unable to meet them can buy
credits from those who can, is doing well in
California (where the first auction of pollution
credits has just occurred) and internationally
(where more than $25 billion has been trans-
ferred from pollution emitters to green energy
developers under a provision of the Kyoto
Protocol).
And there is the carbon tax that makes peo-
ple pay more for using fossil fuels. This idea


te change

has been gaining credence recently in both
political camps in Congress and a national dis-
cussion is taking place.,
We must find away to persuade the public
that its best interests can be served with high-
er energy costs and that money generated by
these higher costs will be used to finance a
government/private industry partnership to
create new technologies to solve the greater
energy issue. Only with public support will the
politicians have the political will to make it hap-
pen.
Every president since Richard Nixon has
cited global warming as an issue to be
addressed yet no administration has had the
political courage to take strong action. The
United States still lacks a comprehensive long-
term energy policy despite 50 years of discus-
sion. Our political leaders need to know that
the public is concerned and demands quick
action. There is no time left. We need action
now! '
While the nation and the world grapple with
energy policy, how do we deal with global
warming's impact? The lessons of Sandy and
Katrina tell us that urban areas such as Amelia
Island are not prepared for the kind of destruc-
tion that coastal populations can experience.
On the one hand, our community must begin
to consider our own growth and its conse-
quences. We need sophisticated growth man-
agement that limits building in wetlands, main-
tains dune systems, strengthens coastal high
hazard area rules so storm surges can be
absorbed. We need to review our comprehen-
sive plans, both county and city, to assure they
reflect the clear local implications of global
warming.
We also must prepare to be resilient so we
can recover from a natural disaster. We must
build a strong community that is prepared to
work together to manage damage and collabo-
rate with adjacent counties and state and feder-
al agencies to rebuild as quickly as possible.
A public/private sector task force is needed
that brings together the various interest groups
that bear on these issues. Both New Orleans
and New York/New Jersey have vital lessons
for our coastal community.
While we urge our national leaders to take
strong, quick action, we have our own issues to
attend to here at home.


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


S, JEFF PARKER/FLORIDA TODAY


of the possible factors that may have
contributed to it and not narrow our
discussion to fit any agenda?
For example, the non-stop vio-
lence and degradation of people in
our movies and videogames. What
contributions have they made to the
coarsening of our culture? To the
desensitization of our emotions and
moral code?
In front of our eyes and into our
brains: blood, guts, beatings, shoot-
ings, explosions, knifings, rapes and
much more parade across the
screen.
Videogames, whose entire goal is
to rack up a high score,.often based
on the ability of the "player" to
destroy people and things. Play time
has a whole new meaning for today's
kids.
"It's not real, so where's the
harm," we're asked? While others
say, "If you don't like it, don't watch
it."
My question: If what we watch
doesn't affect our behavior, then
why did businesses and vendors in
the USA spend $144 billion on adver-
tising in 2011?
As for simply not watching, how
does that protect our kids from
someone who did?
Something else to consider: Do
our mentally ill deserve improved
oversight and medical care?
Someone commented on television
yesterday that too many of them are
homeless or in prison. It seems cruel
not to protect them better from
doing harm to themselves or pos-
sibly to others.
One last thought while we're
thinking about the little ones' safety:
How often do we witness a passing
automobile, with helpless children
strapped in, piloted by a driver under
the influence of anger, alcohol,
drugs or apathy?
Our National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration reports that


automobile accidents are the leading
cause of children's deaths.
In 2010, there were 32,885 high-
way deaths in America, and many
were children. Plus, almost 200,000
are injured each year in automobile
accidents; that's approximately 500
per day. Where's the outrage? The
new legislation?
God bless our children;
every soft, cuddly and very vulner-
able one.
L. Raye Dalton
Fernandina Beach

Read the scriptures
Self-defense is a God-given right.
Please consider God created us
and in us He gave us a sense of sur-
vival if we or one of our loved ones'
lives is in danger.
(Eph 5:25) Husbands, love your
wives, just as Christ loved the
church and gave Himself for her.
So we are to protect our wife and
family up to and including giving
our life for them.
(1Ti 5:8) But if any provide not
for his own, and specially for those
of his own house, he hath denied the
faith, and is worse than an infidel.
This also means giving your life
for them. But we must have the tools
to protect, hem with.
Jesus believed in self-defense and
the right to carry Consider the fol-
lowing verses.
(Joh 18:10) Then Simon Peter
having a sword drew it, and smote
the high priest's servant, and cut
off his right ear. 'The servant's name
was Malcus.
(oh 18:11) Then said Jesus unto
Peter, "Put up thy sword into the
sheath: the cup which my Father
hath given me, shall I not drink it?"
Notice Jesus did not tell Peter to
turn it into the Roman government.
Just put it back into its sheath.
(Luk 22:35) And He said to them,


"When I sent you without money
bag, knapsack, and sandals, did you
lack anything?" So they said,
"Nothing."
(Luk 22:36) Then He said to
them, "But now, he who has a
money bag, let him take it, and like-
wise a knapsack; and he who has
no sword, let him sell his garment
and buy one."
I know some people will say the
sword is not like the guns we have
today. Believe me if they had what
we have today, that is what Jesus
would have told them to buy and
carry.
Now about the mass murder in
our school children. Sure, that is
bad. But what about the millions
that are murdered by the abortion
mills?
(Eze 18:20) The soul that sin-
neth, it shall die. The son shall not
bear the iniquity of the father, nei-
ther shall the father bear the iniquity
of the son: the righteousness of the
righteous shall be upon him, and
the wickedness of the wicked shall
be upon him.
Because of one nut mass mur-
der, the Government will use that as
an excuse to disarm the rest of us.
Read the scriptures above.
If they really want to protect our
school kids they would do like some
schools in Texas has already done,
trained the teachers how to use guns
and give them the right to carry. It
is a fact in every school shooting if
the teachers would have been
armed they could have saved a lot of
lives.
The same thing if the pilots and
stewards would have been armed
the twin towers woukl have still been
standing.
Question: was there ever a
school shooting before the govern-
ment took prayer out of the schools?
Jesse Knight
Yulee







WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9, 2013 NEWS News-Leader


Walk more


- eat less


Three laps around the prome-
nade deck on the Holland
America Noordam cruise ship
equal one mile, or so they said.
On our holiday cruise I tried to
get some walking in on those
days we were not in port, but it
was tough going.
First off, on our clays "at sea"
there was not much to look at as
I went round and round the ship.
Sure there were other cruisers to
watch, reading their books in
long rows of lounge chairs, but
not much going on there. Each
trip around the deck, the same
people were motionless, with a
book or tablet in their laps.
But this soon got boring to
watch.
At two different areas of the
deck crewmembers were paint-
ing the railings. Each time I
passed them I noticed a bit of
progress in their efforts. But let's
face it; watching paint dry is not
very interesting no matter how
much I tried to make it so. Here
and there were signs saying
"painter" but I gather that was
referring to some sort of rope on
-the boat and not these hard-
working gentlemen.
And there was, of course, the
sea to look at. But not much
going on there either it was flat
calm. If I stared long enough at
the sea on my laps, if I was lucky
I might see some whitish flying
fish gliding over the surface.
Sometimes way out on the hori-
zon a ship would be visible. I
looked for dolphins, of course,
and whales that winter in the
Caribbean, but my walks were
fruitless. Far out in the sea even
seabirds were non-existent as far
as I could tell.
Walking around the ship in
endlesss circles I longed-for the


WILD
WAYS

Pat
Foster- Turley


beaches of
Amelia Island.
At home I easily
walked six miles
or so without
getting bored
for a minute.
What with the
sea life at my
feet, the dol-
phins and peli-
cans in the
water and the
active humans
playing in the
water, building
sand castles,


tossing footballs, there is so
much to look at and the miles
just fly by.
But on the ship, let's face it,
the walking was uninspiring to
say the least. By the end of about
five laps not even two miles I
was done with it. I'd seen all I
could see, and it wasn't going to
get any more interesting, I knew
that.
Besides, it was time to eat!
Now this is where the cruise ship
life excels! At any moment on
board there were delicacies to
look forward to. Up until about
10:30 a.m. I could indulge in eggs
benedict served just the way I
like them, with both spinach and
Canadian bacon. Or omelets or
specialty waffles made to order
and mountains of bacon and
fresh carved ham.
And no sooner did breakfast
end then lunch began and contin-
ued all day. Each day a different
Asian cuisine was offered -
Indian, Thai, Szechuan,
Indonesian and yes I had to try
them all. But I couldn't skip the
huge salad bar, the delicious
soups, the pizza and pasta sta-
tion, hot entrees of all sorts


either. And then there was the
ice cream station, open all day
with 10 different flavors and all
the toppings you could dream of.
But that was right next to the
desert area. How could I pass up
the key lime pie?
Then, around happy hour, all
the many bars and lounges
onboard served tasty little snacks
to go with our beverages. And
before I knew it, it was time for
dinner, with leg of lamb and beef
wellington and all sorts of other
wonderful dishes I would never
cook for myself. Oh, and did I
mention the deserts? I'll have
another piece of key lime pie,
please.
The indulgences of the cruise
ship were a wake-up call. The
sedentary eating life was easy to
slide into. Walk around the deck?
No, too boring. I'll just settle with
my book in a lounge chair and
watch the sea go by, biding time
until my next huge meal. I looked
around me at all the overweight
passengers and realized 1 fit right
into the mold. And I realized if I
kept at this pace, I would out-
weigh many of them!
So, this decadent cruise
brought me my New Year's reso-
lution. I vowed that once I got
home again to Fernandina Beach
I would up my activity level.
There are no excuses to prevent
me from taking long walks on the
beach, in the Greenway, in Fort
Clinch and Talbot State Parks.
And along with this, I would
tighten my belt. After all, alas,
there's no beef wellington or
eggs benedict waiting my atten-
tion at home.
And so, this is my New Year's
resolution: "Walk more and eat
less." It's worth a try.
parandbucko@yahoo.com


PAT FOSTER-TURLEY/FORTHE NEWS-LEADER
The Noordam awaits our return from a day at the beach on Grand Turk.


V EARTHTALK



Extreme weather events -


what do they mean?


Dear EarthTalk: What is
the scientific consensus on all
the extreme weather we've been
having -from monster torna-
does to massive floods and
wildfires? Is there a clear con-
nection to climate change?
And ifso what are we doing to
be prepared? -Jason Devine,
Summit, Pa.
.'"Extreme weather-loes e t
o:ive the existence of global
warming, but climate change
is likely to exaggerate it by
messing with ocean currents,
providing extra heat to form-
ing tornadoes, bolstering heat
waves, lengthening droughts
and causing more precipita-
tiop and flooding.
"A changing climate leads
to changes in the frequency,
intensity, spatial extent, dura-
tion and timing of extreme


weather and climate events,
and can result in unprece-
dented extreme weather and
climate events," reports the
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC), an
independent group of leading
climate scientists convened
by the United Nations to pro-
vide the world with a clear sci-
);'enti'fi vie' on thegcurrent
state of knowledge in climate
change and its potential envi-
ronmental and socio-econom-
ic impacts.
While most scientists don't
Dispute the link between glob-
al warming and extreme
weather, the once skeptical
public is now starting to come
around especially following
2011, when floods, droughts,
heat waves and tornadoes
took a heavy toll on the U.S.


According to a poll conducted
by researchers at Yale
University's Project on
Climate Change
Communication, four out 6f
five Americans reported per-
sonally experiencing one or
more types of extreme weath-
er or a natural disaster in.
2011, while more than a third
were personally harmed
either a great deal or a moder-
ate amount by one or more of
these events. And a large
majority of Americans believe
that global warming made
several high profile extreme
weather events worse, includ-
ing record high summer tem-
peratures nationwide,
droughts in Texas and
Oklahoma, catastrophic
Mississippi River flooding,
Hurricane Irene and an
*


unusually warm winter.
The IPCC wants world
leaders to err on the side of
caution in preparing their citi-
zens for extreme weather
events that will likely become
more frequent; last year they.
released a report entitled
"Managing the Risks of
Extreme Events and
Disasters to Advance, i.,' ,;-;
Climate Change Adaptation"'
to help policymakers do just
that. The report is considered
a must-read in coastal, arid
and other especially vulnera-
ble areas.
S As for the U.S. govern-
ment, the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA)
tracks weather and storms,
while the Federal Emergency
Management Agency


(FEMA) deals with the
impacts of extreme weather
and other disasters. But crit-
ics would like to see Congress
and the White House do more
to increase Americans' pre-
paredness. 'The U.S. (in
2011) experienced a record
14 weather-related disasters
each in excess of a billion dol-
lairs- and mamy'mnar disasi vm
tears of lesser magnitudes,"
reports the non-profit Climate
Science Watch (CSW). "Yet
the U.S. has no national cli-
mate change preparedness
strategy; and federal efforts to
address the rising risks have
-been undermined through
budget cuts and other
means." CSW and others are
calling for the creation of a
new cabinet-level agency
called the National Climate


Service to oversee both cli-
mate change mitigation as
well as preparedness for
increasingly extreme weather
events.
CONTACTS: IPCC report,
www.ipcc-wg2.gov/SREX/
images/uploads/SREX-SPM
brochureFINAL.pdf; Yale
Project, http://environment.
yale&edu/climate,files/Extre,'
me-Weather-Climate-Prepare
dness.pdf; FEMA, www.fema.
gov; NOAA, www.noaa.gov;
Climate Science Watch, www.
climatesciencewatch.org.
EarthTalk is written and
edited by Roddy Scheer and
Doug Moss and is a registered
trademark ofE The
Environmental Magazine
(www.emagazine.com). Send
questions to: earthtalk@emag
azine.com.







WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 NEWS News-Leader 9A



POLICE REPORT


This was written by Garrett
Pelican ofthe News-Leaderfrom
oral and written reports by the
Nassau County Sheriffs Office,
the city of Fernandina Beach
Police Department and other
agencies. Arrest indicates suspi-
cion of a crime, not guilt.
Anyone with information
about criminal activity can con-
tact the Fernandina Beach
Police Department at 277-7342
or the Nassau County Sheriff's
Office anonymously by calling
225-0147 in Yulee and Fernan-
dina Beach or 879-2136 in
Callahan, Hilliard and Bryce-
ville. The "We Tip"program 1-
800-78CRIME also allows
callers to leave anonymous tips.

Callahanshooting
A Callahan couple was hos-
pitalized Sunday evening after
a shooting at an Eggers Place
residence, according to an inci-
dent report from the Nassau
County Sheriff's Office.
One resident told investiga-
tors that James F Callahan had
shot his wife, Daisy B. Callahan,
before turning the gun on him-
self, the report said. Daisy
Callahan was taken to St.
Vincent's Hospital for treatment
of a non-life threatening gun-
shot wound to the leg, accord-
ing to the report.
James Callahan was trans-
ported to Shands Jacksonville
with an apparent gunshot
wound to the face, the report
said. His condition was not
known.

Stolen jewelry
A caretaker accused of steal-
ing nearly $9,000 worth of jew-
elry from her elderly client was
arrested on a list of theft
charges Jan. 2, according to a
deputy's report.
Police said Deborah Boggs
Lane of Jacksonville is sus-
pected of stealing several pieces
of gold jewelry, a pair of sun-
glasses, cash and prescription
pills, valued at a combined
$8,900 from a Hammock Drive
residence in Fernandina Beach.
.Lane, 48, provides home
health care to a resident there,
who reported the items stolen
Dec. 27, the report said.
On Dec. 18, Lane sold sev-
eral pieces of jewelry to a sec-
ond-hand metal dealer in
Jacksonville within two hours of
leaving her client's home. She
received: $1,000for theijewel-v
ry and signed the items 69er
using her personal information,


her state-issued driver's license
and a thumbprint, the report
said.
Though Lane initially denied
stealing the items Jan. 2, she
confessed to pilfering the jew-
elry once investigators con-
fronted her with transaction
slips from the metal dealer, the
report said. She is charged with
grand theft and dealing in
stolen property.

Shots fired
A Fernandina Beach man
accused of drunkenly pointing
and firing a pistol Jan. 1 was
arrested on a list of weapons
charges, according to a police
report.
Witnesses told police that
Marcus Finnell Williams of
Fernandina Beach approached
a couple sitting in a car about
1:30 a.m., pulled a black and
silver handgun from a brown
leather holster and pointed it
at the pair. Before fleeing on
foot, Williams allegedly fired a
couple of rounds toward the
couple and a South 10th Street
residence, the report said.
Police later subdued
Williams, 41, outside his moth-
er's South 11th Street residence
and found a brown leather pis-
tol holder in his pants pocket,
according to the report.
Williams appeared to be drunk,
stumbling and smelled of alco-
hol, police said.
His mother told police
Williams was drunk and had
been behaving strangely. She
said she owned a black and sil-
ver revolver that she keeps
loaded and hidden inside the
home in a brown leather
sheath, the report said.
Williams, of 212 South 11th
St, is charged with aggravated
assault with a firearm, posses-
sion of a firearm by a convicted
felon and discharging a firearm
while intoxicated.

False imprisonment
A Fernandina Beach man
accused of forcing himself on a
neighbor was arrested on a
charge of false imprisonment
after the neighbor phoned
police for help Dec. 30, accord-
ing to a police report.
The victim called police to a
South Fletcher residence about
4 a.m. and reported that a man
was trying to rape her. She told
police on scene that she had
invited. iMare Piro, whom-she
had met h day prior, over to talk
but wanted him to leave after he


repeatedly tried to force himself
on her and threatened to hurt
her, the report said.
At one point, Pirc, 55,
allegedly forced the victim onto
her bed and touched her geni-
tals against her will, she told
police. Pirc "made several
threats to physically harm her
if she moved," the report said.
Pirc, vho was lying on a
couch inside her home, told
police he was "going to kill" the
woman after learning he would
be arrested, the report said. He
denied the woman's allegations,
police said. Pirc has three prior
convictions for battery, the
report said.
Pirc, of 96034 Nickleson
Ave., #8, Fernandina Beach, is
charged with false imprison-
ment and battery. He remains
at Nassau County Jail on a
$10,000 bond.

Stun gunused
A man accused of resisting
police with violence was
stunned and arrested Jan. 1
after a brief altercation outside
a Yulee residence, according
to a deputy's report.
Deputies said Vaughn
Bernard Yarber of Yulee and
another man were drunk and
walking in the street near a
Long Leaf Loop residence
when Sgt. Jon Slebos confront-
ed the pair. Yarber, 37, alleged-
ly started arguing with Slebos,
who repeatedly told Yarber to
leave the scene, the report said.
Slebos drew his stun gun and
stunned Yarber in the chest
after Yarber raised his fists "in
a fighting manner" and chal-
lenged him to fight, according
to the report.
Both Yarber and the other
man were "heavily intoxicated"
and smelled of alcohol, deputies
said. Deputies were called to
the residence about 2 a.m. after
a neighbor reported loud bang-
ing noises outside his home
and found the pair in his yard,
the report said.
Yarber, of 76180 Long Leaf
Loop, Yulee, is charged with
resisting an officer with vio-
lence, simple assault on a law
enforcement officer and disor-
derly .intoxication in a public
place causing a disturbance.
* *
A Fernandina Beach woman
accused of stealing more than
$1,000 of items from an ex-
boyfriend was stunned and
arrested on theft'charges Dec.
29, -according to a'deputy's
report.


COURT REPORT


The following report was compiled by Angela
Daughtry, News-Leader staff, from the Jan. 3 court
docket of Circuit Court Judge Robert M. Foster
Michael Devon Altman was served an affi-
davit and denied a violation of probation being
served for battery.
Leeann Marie Benway pleaded not guilty
to battery on a law enforcement officer, disor-
derly intoxication, obstructing or opposing a'
police officer without violence and burglary of a
dwelling.
Gerome Berry pleaded not guilty to four
counts of sale, manufacture, purchase or delivery
of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a church, business
or school, altering, destroying or concealing evi-
dence in the process of an investigation, pos-
session of cocaine, possession of drug para-
phernalia and obstructing or opposing a police
officer without violence.
Michael David Blue Jr. pleaded not guilty
to sale, manufacture, purchase or delivery of
cocaine within 1,000 feet of a church, business or
school.
Ryan Keith Brown pleaded guilty to an
amended charge of conspiracy to traffic in a con-
trolled substance and was adjudicated guilty. He
was sentenced to 366 days in a state prison with
credit for 18 days served, followed by three years
drug offender probation. After release he must
undergo a drug/alcohol evaluation within 60
days, random urinalysis and complete 100 hours
of community service or be enrolled full-time in
college. He was ordered to pay $498 in court
costs, $150 to the Public Defender's Office and
$100 to the State Attorney's Office.
Amber Lynn Buchanan was served an affi-
davit and denied two counts of violation of pro-
bation being served for petit theft and uttering
forged bills.
Aaron Trent Devereaux pleaded guilty to
burglary to a structure or conveyance and grand
theft and adjudication was withheld. He pleaded
guilty to driving with a license suspended,
revoked or canceled with knowledge and was
adjudicated guilty. He was not prosecuted on
two counts of dealing in stolen property. He was
sentenced to five days time served on the driv-
ing charge. On the burglary and theft charges he
was sentenced to two years drug offender pro-
bation, a drug/alcohol evaluation within 60 days,
random urinalysis and 100 hours of community
service at five hours per month. He was ordered
to pay a total of $796 in court costs, $300 to the
Public Defender's Office and $200 to the State
Attorney's Office.
James Richard Drumheller Jr. was served
an affidavit and denied a violation of probation
being served for two counts of grand theft, deal-
ing in stolen property and burglary of a structure
or conveyance. He pleaded not guilty to felony
driving with license suspended or revoked, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia and obstructing or
opposing a police officer without violence.
Robert Clark Guthrie pleaded not guilty to
altering, destroying or concealing evidence in the
process of an investigation and possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis.
Jacob Lee Hicks was served an affidavit and
denied a violation of probation being served for


grand theft motor vehicle.
Jennifer Lee Hoffman admitted to a viola-
tion of probation being served for forgery, utter-
ing a forged instrument and grand theft motor
vehicle, and was adjudicated guilty. Probation
was revoked and terminated and she was sen-
tenced to 180 days in Nassau County Jail with
credit for time served since Nov. 14. She was
ordered to pay $1,803.20 in outstanding costs.
Zachary Verdier Jamison pleaded not guilty
to three counts of sale or delivery of cocaine.
Wiley Jason King pleaded not guilty to
fraudulent use of a credit card, sale,.manufacture
or deliver a controlled substance, possession of
marijuana with intent to sell, manufacture or
deliver within 1,000 feet of a school and burgla-
ry to a structure or conveyance.
Timothy Michael KozloWski was served an
affidavit and denied three counts of violation of
probation being served for depositing a check
with intent to defraud.
M Robin Wayne Linton pleaded not guilty to
obtaining or attempting to obtain a controlled sub-
stance by withholding information.
Shawn William Marcum Jr. was served an
affidavit and denied a violation of probation being
served for dealing in stolen property.
Joseph Antonio McMannes pleaded not
guilty to two counts of petit theft, grand theft, bur-
glary of a structure or conveyance and three
counts of burglary of a dwelling.
John Marcus Santora pleaded guilty to four
counts of uttering forged bills and adjudication
was withheld. He pleaded guilty to petit theft
and was adjudicated guilty. He was sentenced to
'three months in Nassau County Jail with credit
for 67 days served, followed by 24 months pro-
bation with the special conditions of no victim
contact after release, no return to the victim's res-
idence with the exception of a one-time visit with
police escort to get personal belongings, a men-
tal health evaluation and follow-up. On a charge
of petit theft he was adjudicated guilty and sen-
tenced to time served. He was ordered to pay
$1,775 in restitution to First Community Bank,
$398 in court costs, $150 to the Public Defender's
Office and $100 to the State Attorney's Office.
Brandon Clairbourne Shepherd was served
an amended affidavit and denied two counts of
violation of probation being served for use or pos-
session of another's ID without consent and driv-
ing while license suspended or revoked.
Eric Joseph Sievers pleaded guilty to resist-
ing arrest with violence and disorderly intoxi-
cation and was adjudicated guilty. On the arrest
count he was sentenced to three months in
Nassau County Jail with credit for 52 days served.
On the disorderly count he was sentenced to
time served. He was ordered to pay $398 in court
costs, $150 to the Public Defender's Office and
$100 to the State Attorney's Office.
Antonio Devon Singleton pleaded not guilty
to three counts of sale, manufacture, purchase or
delivery of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a church,
business or school, sale or delivery of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a public park and sale or
delivery of cocaine.
Jill A. Wilds pleaded not guilty to two counts
of sale or delivery of cocaine.


The victim told deputies on
Dec. 29 that his ex-girlfriend,
Jennifer Lynn Fine, had bro-
ken into his home through a
glass door and stolen several
items, totaling $1,200 in value.
He had a voice mail recording
- of Fine allegedly yelling, "I have
your (stuf) and you're never
getting it back," the report said.
Located at her South
Seventh Street residence, Fine
"appeared to be under the influ-
ence of alcohol" and grew loud
and combative with deputies,
the report said. After fetching
some of the stolen items from
inside her residence, Fine resis-
ted deputies' attempts to arrest
her, prompting them to stun
her several times, the report
said.
Fine, of 214 S. Seventh St., is
charged with unarmed burgla-
ry to an unoccupied residence,
grand theft and resisting offi-
cers without violence.

Felony arrests
Tammy Lynn Howard, 53,
54103 Plantation Road, Calla-
han, Jan. 6, possession of a con-
trolled substance without a pre-
scription, domestic battery.
Kenneth Michael Placz-
kowski, 50, 95352 Douglas
Road, Fernandina Beach, Jan. 6,
Madison County warrant, vio-
lation of probation aggravated
battery on victim 65 years or
older, no bond.
Nikita Clinton Geter, 51,
96060 Lonnie's Lane, Fernan-
dina Beach, Jan. 5, driving while
license suspended or revoked -
habitual traffic offender.
Kiretta Macr, 26, Tampa,
SJan. 5, 'Camden County, Ga.,
warrant, fugitive from justice,
driving while license suspend-
ed or revoked.


5
a
tj




I
1
;i


Sandra Barnes Chapman,
43,37292 W. Fifth St., Hilliard,
Jan. 4, Nassau County warrant,
violation of probation grand
theft, failure to appear driving
while license suspended or
revoked.
Jennifer Renee Embree,
32, 95102 Douglas Road, Fer-
nandina Beach, Jan. 4, Nassau
County warrant, obtain con-
trolled substance by fraud,
bond $10,000.
Richard Lee Turner, 32,
Jacksonville, Jan. 4, violation of
probation felony battery, no
bond.
Joshua Dean Boston, 21,
Jacksonville, Jan. 4, violation of
probation sale of marijuana,
no bond.
Jeremiah Daniel Kirby,
27, 2219 South Fletcher Ave.,
Fernandina Beach, Jan. 4,
Nassau County warrant, viola-
tion of probation fleeing and
attempting to elude law enforce-
ment officers, no bond.
Mary Francis Spivey, 44,
96001 Brighton Place, Yulee,
Jan. 2, Nassau County warrant,
exploitation of the elderly,
fraudulent use of a credit card,
bond $5,000.
Leotis Diocletian Wil-
liams, 39, 76111 Briarwood
Ave., Yulee, Jan. 2, bond sur-
render, sale and delivery of
cocaine, possession with intent
to sell cocaine, bond $15,000.
Tabitha Lynn Riggins, 23,
85181 Terry Road, Yulee, Jan. 2;
aggravated battery.
Kimberly Mae Dubberly,
32, 95069 Ellis Landing Road,
Fernandina Beach, Jan. 1,
Nassau County warrant, failure
to appear driving while license
suspended or revoked habit-
ual traffic offender, no bond.
Brent Alex Preisinger, 18,
West Palm Beach, Dec. 30,


aggravated child abuse.
Travis Brennen Draw-
bond, 41, 58280 Rowland Hills
Way, Hilliard, Dec. 29, child
abuse, domestic battery.
Billy Jack Hale Jr., home-
less, Dec. 29, theft.
Zarenia Dorsey, 43, Jack-
sonville, Dec. 29, driving while
license suspended or revoked.
Calvin Browning, 85315
Wesley Road, Yulee, Dec. 29,
driving while license perma-
nently revoked.
Amber Lynn Mencner,
22,37138 W. Third St., Hilliard,
Dec. 28, principal in first
degree.
Kenneth Majadi Fox II,
21,226 Division St., Fernandina
Beach, Dec. 28, sale and deliv-
ery of marijuana.
Misty Jean Sullivan, 33,
44020 Ada Elizabeth Lane,
Callahan, Dec. 28, child cruel-
ty, contributing to the delin-
quency of a minor, domestic
battery.
gpelican@fbnewsleader.com


A benefit for
Take Stock In
Children


.Sponsored by OrmniAAmelia Island Plantation,
The News-Leader and Arlington Toyota
The Children of Take Stock Thank all who attended!

Sow appre irovv to- the/ foUoswi -
who- pp ote' LiCht up a, Litfe:


Advanced Muscle Therapy
Amelia Community Theater
Amelia Insurance
Amelia Island
Chamber Music Festival
Amelia Island Club
Amelia Island
Concours D' Elegance
Amelia Island Marketplace
Amelia Island Trading Co.
Amelia Links
Amelia River Cruises
Amelia River Golf Club
Amelia Shotgun Sports
Amelia's Wheels of
Omni AlP,
Applebee's"
Arlington Toyota
BarZin
Baxter's
Bonitos
BowTops
Caf6 Karibo
Chaplin Williams Realty
Dee Chaplin
Chili's
Ciao
Computer Guys of Amelia
Cormier Studios.
Courson & Stam
Crawford Jewelers
Denise Roberts Scheffer,
CPA
Dome Healing Center
Drysdale Tennis/Omni
Ecomotion Tours
Elements Salon
Elizabeth Trading Co.
Espaia
Evelyne Talman
Fancy Sushi
Fantastic Fudge
Fernandina Beach Golf Club
Fernandina Beach
News-Leader
Fernandina Massage
Florida Forum
Florida State College
Jacksonville


Friends of the Library
FSCJ Artist Series
Gennaro's
Gourmet Gourmet
.Great Harvest Bread Co.
Greyfield Inn
H&H Tire and Service
Center
HalfTime Sports Bar & Grill
Hana Japanese Cuisine
Harbor Lights
Horizon's
Images Salon
Island Flowers
Jacksonville- Symphony
Orchestra
Jade's Bistro
Joe's 2nd St. Bistro
John T. Ferriera Insurance
Kayak Amelia
Keller Williams Realty
Dbug Mackle
Kelley's Courtyard Caf6
Le Clos
Lemongrass
Lulu's
Magna's- A Full Body Salon
Maharaj Tennis
McGinty-Gordon &
Associates
Nature Center @ Omni AlP
NY Nails
Omni Amelia Island
Plantation
Ops Pizza Kitchen & Caf6
Petanque America
Peterbrooke Chocolates
Pilates of Amelia
Plantation Photography
Ponte Vedra Plastic Surgery
Red Otter Outfitters
Redbones
ReMax Professional Group
Geoff Haynes
Pam Meyer
Renee Westmoreland
Janie Westmoreland
Robison Jewelry
Salt at The Ritz-Carlton
Extra Special Thanks to:


Tim Digby and the Staff and Manag
Omni Amelia Island Plantation and Or
Ashley Robinson, Take Stock Nassau
Mike Weinstein, former President of Take Stoc
And the Light up a Life Benefit Committee an
Thank you for helping our futures





Take StocI


Childri


Sandy Bottoms
Shoe Visions
Slider's
Summer Beach Properties
Marcy Mock
Talbots.
Tasty's Fresh Burgers &
Fries
The Angler's Mark
The Crab Trap
The Happy Tomato Caf6
The Plantation Shop
The Travel Agency
Tony Crawford, LMT
Vida Fitness
Adelaide & Davison
Thompson
Allison Watson
Amy Wolff
Bob & Pat Henderson
Carol Kimmel
Donna Pearce
Dot Williams
Doug Mowery
Edwin T. Mosher
Mary & Herb Jervis
Jane & Ted Preston
Jeanne Andruske
Jim Draper
Jody & Doug Mackle
Char & John Zimmerman
John Bunker
Judy & Bob Schmonsees
Judy & David Easterly
Leslie Ritter
Lyn King
Lynne Anderson
Marty Wright
Mary Brannen
Mary Kay Payne
Michele Giltmeier
Nancy Wolff
Patt C. Corbin
Paul Ladnier
Richard Olderman
Sue Hughes
Susan Langford Art
Susan Smeeton


)ment of
mni Hotels
alumna and
ck in Children, Inc.
d other volunteers
look bright!





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JOE

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BAIL

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JOSEPH B PARRISH
Owner/Agenl
463241 E. SR 200
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(904) 225-4855






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9.2013 YULEE'S ABUZZ News-Leader


JUDICIAL DAY

Youth Leadership Nassau students met
for Judicial Day at the Nassau County
Courthouse. The students witnessed juve-
nile trials and were able to spend time ask-
ing questions of Judge Brian Davis on Dec.
12.
The youth learned more about Teen
Court and the role Clerk of Court John
Crawford plays in Nassau County, and
toured other departments housed within
the Nassau County Courthouse prior to a
tour and lunch at the Nassau County deten-
tion facility.
After learning a great deal of information
from Nassau County Sheriff's Office Lt.
Nye, the youth met Deputy Clark and his
canine companion Fash.
"A new addition to this day was a brief
tour of the Nassau County Emergency
Operations facility and although the stu-
dents were away from school, they said the
educational opportunities they were
exposed to in this one day alone were over-
whelming and would make a lasting
impression in their lives," said Amanda
Thien, Nassau County Extension Agent and
4-H Youth Development coordinator, who
sends a special thank you to all of the indi-
viduals involved in making the day educa-
tional for future leaders of Nassau County.
SUBMITTED


ROBOTS


.;l $' .

SUBMITTED
Lt. Bruce Batteson of the Navy Bomb Squad at Kings Bay, Ga., Naval Submarine
Base demonstrates robots for the gifted students of Y YuleeElement
Primary, Emma Love Hardee and Southside Elementary at the Full Service School
in Yulee.




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HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Maegan Bowen teaches students at Yulee Baptist Learning Center.


Sharing God's love with kids


HEATHER A. PERRY
News-Leader

Maegan Boweri has grown
up a lot since Yulee Baptist
Learning Center director
Chrystal Lewis babysat her as
a little girl.
Now Bowen is one of the
caring adults looking after the
little ones at the center.
"Maegan is one of my
hardest working teachers. She
loves heq students and fami-
lies. She has only been with
us a little over a year and has
done a wonderful job as our
four-year-old teacher. Thank


you, Maegan!"
A lifelong Yulee resident,
Bowen says the best part
about working at YBLC is
being able to share God's love
wilitthe 111i11. '
"I enjoy getting up for
work. What is better than
spending time with children?"
The children are always
saying or doing something
funny, says Bowen.
"Today a little boy was
telling me how his car got
great gas mileage," she
laughed.
Bowen is blessed to be
able to keep her almost three-


year-old son Brantley with-
her at work because the little
guy has a congenital heart
defect. She and her husband
Justin, a law enforcement offi-
ci-, aie expecting a little girl
in May.
Bowen graduated from
Yulee High School in 2010 and
is a member of the Mended
Hearts Association.
Bowen gets her lesson
plans from the Weekly Early
Education Learn Series pub-
lished by Lifeway Christian
Resources and other texts.
Every Wednesday, the
director leads all but the
infants through VPK-in
Chapel, where they go over a
pledge and a Bible story. The
children also sing and learn
hand motions to different
songs about Jesus.
On Friday, three-year-olds
may participate in Soccer
Shots.
"We are dedicated to help-
ing our children develop spiri-
tually, intellectually, physical-
ly, emotionally and socially,"
said Lewis.
YBLC offers free VPK
Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-to
noon, and after-school care for
students up to fourth grade.
Yulee Baptist Learning
Center is located at 85967
Harts Road, across from the
Yulee post office. Business
hours are 6:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Phone 225-9196 or visit
www.yuleebaptistchurch.com.
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SPORTS


B SECTION


HENRY INARMY BOWL


1. I W i *- ..Z..' ., o e -s --r .
PHOTOS COURTESY OF U.S. ARMY ALLAMERICAN BOWL
Derrick Henry of Yulee scored the opening touchdown and then tacked on the two-point conversion on the game-winner
Saturday during the UI.S. Army All-American Bow. The East squad defeated the West 13-8 in front of bowl-record 40,133 in San
Antonio. Texas. The win gave the East a 7-i series lead. East wide receiver James Quick (Louisville, Ky./Trinity) was named the
game's most valuable player. He caught the game-winning score with 3:59 remaining in the contest and finished'with a game-
high 71 yards receiving. Henry, No. 2 top, led all rushers with 53 yards on 10 carries. Derrick Green (Richmond,
Va./Hermitage), No. 27 top, busted off the biggest run of the day of 23 yards and finished with 49 yards. Also pictured are Greg
Bryant ard the trio of running backs' coach.HIenry before and during the game, above.


/ /1


OUTDOORS / TIDES


RiqR--~. *w


r BASKETBALL


Bolles, Baldwin

defeated Pirates
The Pirates dropped two last week, losing
to Baldwin Thursday and BollesFriday.
In Thursday's 64-40 loss to Baldwin, the
h., ,t Indians had a 25-21 lead at halftime but
came on strong in the second half with a 30-
p. int third quarter.
Fabian Petravic and Aaron Weihe steered
the Fernandina Beach High School boys bas-
ketball team with nine points each. D.J.
W'oten had eight boards. John Zimmerman
had four steals.
The Pirates were edged 46-40 by Bolles on
Friday night in Pirate Gym. The Pirates led 23-
19 at halftime and the game was knotted at 33-
33 after three quarters. The'visiting Bulldogs
outscored the Pirates 13-7 in the fourth for the
win.
Petravic was again the top scorer with 16
points. Zimmerman had seven rebounds.
The Pirates traveled to University
Christian Tuesday. They play at Yulee Friday.


PHOTOS BY BILL DICKSON/SPECIAL
The annual Pirates on the Run is slated for Feb. 9 in Fernandina Beach. The start of last year's race, left. Pirates will be on hand for the festivities, right.


Argh! Annual Pirates on the Run 5K/10K slated for Feb. 9


ED HARDEE
For the News-Leader


One of North Florida's most fes-
tive running events is returning to
Fernandina Beach soon. The 10th
annual Pirates on the Run is set for
Feb. 9, featuring a pancake break-
fast, '.. '-n.,ii.il ii:iio e-trail routes and
pirates awarding Mardi Gras beads
to I i -;-hi I -
The Ned Tyson Memorial Pirates
on the Run 5K/10K starts at 8:30
a.m. Feb. 9 with thd start and finish
lines at St. Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave.
"Our event offers a unique oppor-
tunity for runners and walkers to
experience the beautiful scenery
through Egans Creek Gieenway,"
said Toby Lentz, volunteer race
director for the Amelia Island
Runners club. "With i.-c-ir .ii i .n


fees as low as $15 for AIR members
and $20 for non-members, this is
one of the best bargains that run-
ners and walkers will find in our
community, because they can enjoy
a pancake breakfast, receive a color-
ful short-sleeve technical shirt and
be eligible for a number of door
prizes and giveaways on race day."
The first 500 people to register
will receive a technical-fabric T-shirt.
Walkers are welcome as well as run-,
ners and all registered entrants get a'
free pancake breakfast after the
race. Breakfasts for guests who
aren't registered in the run will be
$5 each.
Both the 5K and 10K courses run
through Fernandina Beach's streets
and onto the Egans Creek Green-
way, where runners will enjoy beau-
tiful views of nature and wildlife
through a grass cross-country route.


The Greenway nature trail is hard-
packed, but portions will be muddy
if there's been rain.
Members of the Fernandina
Pirates Club in full regalia will be on
hand to start the race with their
pirate cannon, of course and
cheer the runners and walkers.
Scoring will be done with Cham-
pion Chip timing and runners must
wear a chip on their shoe to be
timed in the race results. Disposable
chips will be used this year, so they
don't need to be returned after the
race. You can pick up your chip at
the same time you get your race
packet and, if you have your own
chip, you can preregister with your
chip number and deduct $2 from
your entry fee. Personal chips can't
be used if you sign up on race day.
Strollers and dogs aren't I ... -. I
on the race course and headphones


are discouraged. The Greenway sur-
face is especially non-conducive to
strollers.
The event is run and walked in
memory of Ned Tyson, who came
up with the idea for the race in 2004
and helped nurture it for its first
three years. The Amelia Island Run-
ners club assumed management of
the event in 2007 and it has become
one of the community's most popu-
lar races.
Awards go to the overall male
arid female winners, masters (age 40
and up) and grandmasters (50 and
up) and to the top three male and
female finishers in 15 age groups.
There won't be duplicate awards.
Registration is $20 per person
through Jan. 2: and $25 per person
from Jan. 24 through race day.
Members of Amelia Island Runners
get a $5 discount (not available with


online registration). Proceeds will
benefit Amelia Island Runners'
youth scholarships and St. Peter's
Episcopal Church mission trips.
Entry forms are available at
Current Running, 815 S. Eighth St.,
the McArthur Family YMCA on
Citrona Drive, Club 14 Fitness on
South 14th Street and at Amelia
IslandRunners.com, where online
registration and further details arc
also available. For information, visit
the website or call (904) 412-5069.
"We encourage everyone to come
out to St. Peter's Episcopal Church
on Saturday, Feb. 9, and run like a
pirate although doing so with eye
patches isn't recommended," Lentz
said. "If you aren't able to participate
this year, we've love to see our com-
munity come out to find a place
along the course to cheer for every-
one running or walking."


;.?~runivprsruranarrY~aar~u~~ara~r*


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9. 2013
N-WS-LI:ADER/ FERNANDINA BEACH. FLORIDA


v WRESTLING


Nassau takes


three of top


four at Parker

In the 2013 U.S. Army wrestling duals
Steam against team) over the weekend at
'Terry Parker High School, Nassau County
took home three of the top four places. With
16 teams, competition was tough.
Fletcher won the event. West Nassau fin-
ished second, Yulee third and Fernandina
Beach fourth.
A. The 16 teams were split into two eight-
team pools. On Friday, the West Nassau
Warriors defeated Stanton Prep, Interlachen
and Baker County. On Saturday pool competi-
: tion continued with West Nassau defeating
Fernandina Beach, Palatka, Terry Parker and
Andrew Jackson to go undefeated in the pool
1.:".....:. competition.
West Nassau and Fernandina Beach fin-
ished first and second in that pool, respective-
ly. In the other pool, Fletcher and Yulee were
first and second after d i'-fe -'ii ri. Englewood,
Paxon, Raines, Forrest and Wolfson.
After pool ....ip.liirn: i i. 1,, were
crossed over and Fletcher defeated West
Nassau for first-place overall and Yulee defeat-
ed Fernandinra Beach for third place.
According to West Nassau Coach Forrest
WV heeler, the West Nassau Warriors wrestled
-2 different wrestlers in the tournament and
wr: stied eight different lineups during the
'.i.rupetition.
"We wrestled very aggressive and were
Sv y physical throughout the weekend,"' he

Fhe Warriors were at Folkston Tuesday
I n I host Duval Charter Jan. 15. They travel to
ih st Coast Jan. 17 and Bartram Trail Jan. 19.
['he FBHS Pirate L; :iplrl. co.mp.etdl at
ii st Coast Monday.'They er l ir I h.
\Wildcat Duals Jan. 19 in Kingsland, Ga.









OUTDOORS


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9,2013 SPORTS News-Leader


Shark attacks on hooked
fish are frequent when
fishermen target large con-
centrations of reef fish.
Bob Kissenger, above, was
reeling in this gag grouper
when a'large pelagic shark
made a meal of his catch.
Large sharks like this
948.48-pound tiger shark
caught by Tyler Kennedy
off Pensacola, far right,
have always intrigued fish-
ermen. Kennedy's huge
tiger shark set a record
during the 2012 Outcast
Mega Shark fishing tour-
nament. This past week a
16-foot great white shark,
.like the one in the photo,
'right, was swimming just a
few miles offshore of St.
Andrews Sound in an area
fishermen call the "Hole."
"Mary Lee" measures 16
feet and weighs 3,456
pounds.
SPECIAL PHOTOS


'Mary Lee,' th


"Dad, you are not going to be-
lieve this," my daughter Mary Lee
Forehand said. "Its all over Face-
book. A 16-foot great white shark
has been tracked just offshore of
Fernandina Beach and they are call-
ing the 3,456-pound shark 'Mary
Lee.'"
Actually two great white sharks
were captured off Cape Cod, Mass.,
by Ocearch (Ocean Search). On
Sept. 13, Ocearch captured a 15-foot,
2,500-pound female great white
shark and, on Sept. 17, a second 16-
foot, 3,456-pound female great white
was also captured. Both sharks had
tracking devices attached, to their
large dorsal fins in order to better
understand,where great white
sharks migrate during the fall and
winter.
The smaller 15-foot great white
shark was named "Geni" and has
pretty much stayed out in deep


water, where her
track has taken her
south along the
deep edges of the
Continental Shelf.
However, the
much larger 16-foot
S great white shark
V named "~ary Lee"
has migrated much
OUTDOORS closer to land,
-...- where her track,
TeryLacoss has taken her as far
south as Nassau
Sound and as close as 1-2 miles from
the beaches. However, the big stir
recently as Sunday, "Mary Lee" was
located just a mile or so offshore at
St. Andrews Sound.
I had a call from Joe O'Keefe,
who lives in Carolina Shores, N.C.,
and has been following both great
white sharks' winter migration.
'Terry, I have been following the


e great

migration of both great white sharks
and am very interested in why
'Genie' is taking a track out'in deep
water along the Continental Shelf
and 'Mary Lee' has been migrating
closer to shore," O'Keefe said. "It
appears that 'Mary Lee' is waiting
for the right whales td calf and
maybe discovers a dead calf to feed
on. I am certainly interested in the
area of St. Andrews Sound called the
'Hole.'"
The "Holq" is actually a deep
drop approximately one mile off-
shore at St. Andrews Sound, where a
narrow portion of the channel falls
off into a deep drop-off. You can
actually visit www.ocearch.org and
go to shark tracking and see where
the narrow channel runs through a
series of shallow sandbars and then
leads into a deep drop-off, where the
sound actually greets open ocean
waters.


white shark


Great white sharks have been,
known in past years to follow the
right whale migration from their
summer home waters off Nova
Scotia, taking them to Georgia and
Northeast Florida coastal waters
during the winter months. Great
white sharks have not been known
to attack large whales but they often
feed on stillborn right whale babies.
.On the west coast, great white
sharks regularly feed on seals and,
during attack, roll their eyes back to
their tail to protect their eyes during
the attack. Great white sharks have
extremely keen eyesight and can
smell one part of blood in ten billion
parts of water. They can weigh up to
6,600 pounds and mature at 12-14
years of age.
I personally have never seen a
great white shark while fishing off-
shore of Amelia Island but a few
fishermen have. Many encounters


have come while reeling in large red
snapper to the boat. During the win-
ter fishing season, a massive great
white shark will intercept the
angler's catch.
"My guest was reeling in a nice
20-pound gag grouper when a very
large great white shark opened its
wide jaws, secured the grouper in its
large mouth and shot right out of
the water, eating the grouper with
loud teeth-snapping sounds while
sending sheets of saltwater over our
shocked fishing charter," Capt. Allen
Mills said.
Great white sharks and many
other species of sharks are now pro-
tected and not legal to catch. Visit
www. myfwc.com and www.noaafish
ery.com for information on which
species of sharks are legal to catch
and keep. To follow the tracking for
both "Mary Lee" and "Genie," visit
www.ocearch.org.


FERNANDINA BEACI TIDES
Tides, Sun &Moon:January 9-16,2013


Sun. Sunrise 7:24A Low 3:IOA -0.92'
Moonrise 8:32A High 957A 7.83'
S/1 unset 5:45P Low 3:48P -0.75'
SMoonset 8:09P High I0:I4P 7.08'

M on. Sunrise 7:23A Low 4.00A -0.67'
Moonrise 9:12A High 10:45A 7.56'
1/14 Sunset 5:46P Low 4:35P -0.57'
Moonset 9:12P High I1.04P 6.98'

Tue Sunrise 7:23A Low 4:50A -0.29'
e Moonrise 9:49A High ll:30A 7.17'
S/ Sunset 5:47P Low 5:22P -0.29'
1/ Moonset 10:12P High 1:52P 6.79'
e Sunrise 7:23A Low 5:42A 0.17'
ed. Moonrise 10:24A
SSunset ,5:48P High 1116P 6.73'
1/16 Moonset ,,:IOP Low 6:1IP 0.04'


Tide calculations are for Amelia River, Fernandina Beach. No corrections are necessary.
Moon events ar also calculated for Fernandlna Beach, although actual times may vary because of land masses.


OUTDOOR BRIEFS


Bassmasers meet
Nassau Bassmasters, asso-
ciated with the Florida Bass
Federation, the Bass Federa-
tion and the FLW, meets the
first Tuesday of every month
at the Pig Bar-B-Que restau-
rant in Callahan at 7 p.m.
Membership into the club is
open to anyone 16 years old.
Call Bob Schlag at (912)
729-2282 in Kingsland, Aaron
Bell at (904) 545-5092 in


Callahan or Tim McCoy at
261-3735 in Fernandina
Beach for more information
on the Nassau Bassmasters.

Auxiliary meets
The U.S. Coast Guard Aux-
iliary, Amelia Island Flotilla
14-1, meets the first Thursday
of each month in the Amelia
Island Lighthouse Cottage,
located on O'Hagan Lane,
between 215 and 217 Light-


house Circle. Call 261-1889
for information.

NSFAmeets
The Nassau Sport Fishing
Association meets at 7 p.m.
the second and fourth
Wednesday of the month at
the Ten Acres Kraft Athletic
Club. Call Deborah Biggs at
206-0817 or visit www.fishns-
fa.com for information on the
NNFA.


RECREATION ROUNDUP


The city of Fernandina Beach Recreation
Department (www.fbfl.us) offers:
Yogapod flow classes are the Peck Center
Tuesday, Wednesdays and Thursdays from
12:30-1:30 p.m. Yogapods and round yoga
pads are provided. Sunrise beach yoga class-
es are also available from 7:30-8:30 a.m.
Tuesday at beach access No. 9. Cost is $7
per class or $30 for five classes for city resi-
dents; $8 per class or $35 for five classes for
non-city Contact Brenda Kayne at 548-3224 or


bckayne @yogapod.net.
Open basketball is Mondays, Wednes-
days and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.,
Tuesday and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Peck
Gym, based on court availability.
Adult volleyball is from 7-9 p.m. Tuesday
and Fridays at Peck Gym.Cost is $2 per day
for city residents ($5 non). Youth volleyball is
from 3-5 p.m. Tuesday and Friday. Cost is $2
per day for city residents ($5 non-city).


e Moonrise :01A High 620A 7.43'
W e Sunrise 7:24A Low 1222P -0.11'
/9 Moonset 3:41P H 634 6.48'
I/9 Sunset 5:42P Hih 63

T h Moonrise 6:02A Low 1228A -0.68'
Ihu Sunrise 7:24A High 7:19A 7.73'
/I Moonset 4:47P Low 1:18P -0.42'
/1 Sunset 5:42P Hig 7:33P 6.74'
M oonrise 6:58A Low 1:25A -0.89'
Fr Sunrise 7:24A High 8:14A 7.92'
NewMoon 2:45P
S Sunset 5:43P LOW 211 IP -0.67'
Moonset 5:55P Hih 829P 6.96'
,- Sunrise 7:24A LOW 2I19A -0.99'
Sat* Moonrise 7:48A High 906A 7.96'
sunset 5:44P Low 3,00P -0.79'
/12 I Moonset .7:03P High 9:22P 7.08'


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I




r ?


WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9.2013 SPORTS News-Leader


Abee tops blitz on Wednesday


GOLF NEWS f


Sixty players came out for
last Wednesday's blitz at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Club.
Bill Abee (80, plus 12) took
top honors. Second was Mi-
chael Kaufman (85, plus 8).
Two tied for third at plus 7 -
Tom Roberts (77) and Tom
Wurtz (87).
First-place team included
Abec, Kent Johnson (79, plus
5), Mike Lovejoy (85, plus 5)
and Carl Galpin (85, minus 5).
Second went to Kaufman,
Matt Baker (75, plus 3), Dick
Peterson (96, plus 1) and Lee
Murray (85, minus 1).
Third place went to Char-
lie Kicklighter (81, plus 5),
Bill McKeown (100, plus 2),
Marc Spindler (84, plus 1)
and Jim McFarland (96,
even). Wurtz, Ed Lormand
(98, plus 1), Ernie Barry (92,
even) and John LaFear (77,
minus 1) teamed up for
fourth place.
Forty-four players showed
for Friday's blitz with Bob
Gerth (91, plus 10) taking
first place. Second went to
Jerry Dean (73, plus 9) and
third was Larry Luett (81,
plus 7).
First-place team title went
to Doug Wolfe (82, plus 6),
Troy Therriault (86, plus 5),
Bill Larrabee (89, even) and
Jody Greene (81, even). In
second were Dean, John Bray
(86, plus 2), Tom Gray (91,
even) and Larry Gallo (95,
minus 2).
Gerth, Carl Galpin (82,
plus 1), Jim McFarland (95,
plus 1) and Tom Wurtz (95,
minus 4) teamed up for third
place. In fourth were Benny
Fallon (85, plus 5)., Dan
Bruner (92, plus 2), Ernie
.Barry (91, plus 1) and Lee
Murray (88, minus 1).

Queenofdubs
The Golf Club of Amelia
Island has two more monthly


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Nancy Carpenter, left, and Sharon Badenock are
crowned queens at the Golf Club of Amelia Island.


Queen of Clubs to participate
in the Queen of Clubs Shoot-
out in May.
The December queen is
Sharon Badenoch; she won
by shooting a net 67. Nancy
Carpenter is the January
queen of clubs after shooting
a net 71.

Museum golfouting
The Amelia Island Mu-
seum of History's annual golf
outing will be Feb. 8. Regi-
stration brochures are also
available at the museum, 233
South Third St., and at local
golf courses.
In addition to cart and
green fees, prizes for all par-
ticipants, awards presentation
with heavy hors d'oeuvres,
wine and beer, silent auction,
etc., the event will again fea-
ture the pre-tournament
reception for all participants
and their guests on Thursday
evening at SunTrust Private
Wealth.

Super Bowl tourney
Amelia River Golf Club will
host the first day of the annu-
al Super Bowl Invitational Jan.
26. The final round will be .


played Jan. 27 at the Fernan-
dina Beach Golf Club. Shot-
gun start is at 11 a.m. both
days.
Format is a four-man
scramble for the two-day, 36-
hole event. Pairings will be
done by computer Jan. 25 at 5
p.m. at Amelia River.
Anyone interested in pur-
chasing a par-mutual ticket
for a team may do so from 5-7
p.m. Friday or 8-10:30 a.m.
Saturday at Amelia River.
Price of ticket is $10.
Anyone with a verified
handicap is eligible to play.
Handicap is from 0-30. All
pros are welcome. Team cap-
tain selects the best tee ball
and all players hit their next
shot from that spot. Play con-
tinues, selecting the best shot
until holing out. Best ball
score is recorded as team
score.
Entry fee is $150 per play-
er, cash only. With at'least 80
players, 25 percent of the field
will be paid out.
For information on the
tournament, contact Jim
Raffon'e at (904) 614-5037 or
Buddy Boyd at 753-1438.
Deadline to enter the
event is Jan. 23 at 5 p.m.


TENNIS NEWS


The new tennis schedule
has been posted and classes
are under way, keeping
USPTA instructors Vishnu
Maharaj,-Rod Gibson, Karen
Rembert and Tracy Smythe
busyointhe .iduits. :, .-i
Information on classes,
instruction, tennis equipment,
area leagues, etc., is available
by contacting the city Parks
and Recreation Department
or by contacting Michele
Maharaj at 548-1472 or
michelemaha@msn.com.
Tennis classes resume
at the Yulee Sports Complex
today. Nassau County Home
Educators classes are held
Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. Private lessons and cus-
tom clinics are also available.
More information can be
found on the Yulee Tennis
Foundation website at
www.YuleeTennisFoundation.
corn or by mailing
michelemaha@msn.com.
The 2013 Nassau
County Men's Doubles 7.5


League begins in February.
Team entries are being
accepted. The league is open
to male players rated 3.5-4.0.
The season kickoff is Feb.
lii. ih., .:i ;.In v ill run
-hluuhh April 2.' Team nia-i
mitments are due Jan. 25.
Each team must have a mini-
mum of six players for the
three-line format of play.
Cost pet person is $25.
Anyone interested in entering
a team or needing further
information may contact
Michele Maharaj at
michelemaha@msn.com.
KraftTennis Players
Outreach program along with
Maharaj Tennis, the Yulee
Tennis Foundation, Omni
Amelia Island Plantation and
Ciao Bistro are hosting a
Charity Round Robin Jan. 27
to support a local food pantry.
Entries are now being
accepted for the men's and
women's doubles round
robin. Entry fee is one bag of
non-perishable food items


2013 SCHEDULES


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Basketball
Jan. 11 at Yulee 4:30/7
Jan. 14 atTrinity 6/7:30
Jan. 15 EPISCOPAL 6/7:30
Jan. 18 WEST NASSAU 6/7:30
Jan. 22 at West Nassau 6/7:30
Jan 24 at BishopSnyder 6/7:30
Jan 25 YULEE 6/7'30
Jan. 28 at Terry Parker TBA
Feb. 1 HILLIARD 6/7:30
Feb 5 DISTRICTSEMIFINAL 7"00
Feb 8 DISTRICTCHAMP 7.00
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Basketball
Jan. 10 BALDWIN 6/7:30
Jan 11 at Yulee' 6:00
Jan 14 EPISCOPAL 6/7:30
Jan 17 WEST NASSAU' 6/7"30
Jan 24 at Oakleaf 6/7:30
Jan. 25 atTrinity Christian 6:00
Jan. 29 District 4-4A at Yulee TBA


Jan. 10
Jan 11
Jan 14
Jan 15
Jan 17
Jan 22
Jan 24
Jan 25
Jan 29
Feb 1


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Basketball
TRINITY
FERNANDINA BEACH
WEST NASSAU
TERRY PARKER
BAKER COUNTY
BALDWIN
at Ponte Vedra
STANTON
DISTRICT SEMIFINAL
DISTRICT CHAMP


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Soccer
Jan 9 RIDGEVIEW 5"30/7'20
Jan. 11 at Paxon 5:30/7:20
Jan 12 Episcopal JV tourney TBA
Jan 14 at Providence 5:30/7:20
Jan 15 at Wolfson 5:30/7:20
Jan. 17 TERRYPARKER 6:00
Jan 21-25 District 3-2A at West Nassau


Jan 11
Jan 14
Jan 17
Jan 18
Jan 21
Jan 22
Jan 25


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Basketball
FERNANDINA 4:30/7.30
at University 6/7:30
at Ribault 6/7"30
at Keystone Heights 6/7 30
MLK Classic at EW College
at Camden 6/7 30
at Fernandina Beach 6/7 30


Jan 28
Jan. 29
Jan. 31
Feb. 5


BOLLES 6/7:30
at Episcopal 6/7:30
UNIVERSITY (seniors) 6/7:30
District playoff at FBHS


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Soccer
Jan. 10 at St Augustine 600
Jan. 14 DISTRICT 3-2A quarterfinal
Jan. 15 DISTRICT 3-2A semifinal
Jan. 17 DISTRICT3-2Achamp 6:00
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Wrestling
Jan. 9 First Coast Duals 5:00
Jan. 19 Wildcat Duals-Kingsland 6:00
Jan. 23 at Fletcher 5:00
Feb. 2 District3-1A at Episcopal 9am
Feb. 8-9 Region 1-1A at Bolles 10am
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Soccer
Jan. 9 at Nease 530
Jan. 11 at Trinity Christian 530
Jan. 14-18 District at FBHS
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Soccer
Jan. 10 at Fleming Island 7:20
Jan. 11 at TrinityChristian 7:20
Jan. 17 at Mandarin Christian 7:00
Jan. 14-18 District tournament
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE
SCHOOL
Boys & Girls Basketball
Jan. 11 at Yulee (in-school) 2:30-
Jan. 12 at Hilliard 4:30-
Jan 14 -at Callahan 5/6.30
Jan 17 YULEE (in-school) 2-30/4
Jan. 18 COUNTYSEMIFINALS TBA
Jan. 19 County finals at Yulee TBA
Jan. 22 at Camden 4/5:00
Jan. 24 at St Marys 4/500
Jan. 29 CAMDEN 4/530
Jan. 31 ST. MARYS 4/5 30
YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
Boys & Girls Basketball
Jan. 10 BOLLES 5/630
Jan. 11 FERNANDINA 2:30/4
Jan. 14 CHARLTON COUNTY4.30/5:30
Jan. 15 HILLIARD 430/6:30
Jan. 17 at Fernandina 2:30/4
Jan. 18 Semifinals at FBMS 4:00-
Jan 19 COUNTYCHAMP 12/1:30


that will be turned in to a
local food pantry at the con-
clusion of the event.
Deadline to enter the
event is Jan. 23.
Email entries to
n hIr I-' i l i m.i :'"i' I .ir . oI
The Kraft Tennis Play-
ers memberships are avail-
able by contacting Bo McCol-
lum at 321-2233 or mailing
KTPBoard@gmail.com.


SPORTS SHORTS


Yulee Little League
Yulee Little League will hold sign-ups at
the Yulee Sports Complex on Goodbread
Road in Yulee for the spring softball and base-
ball seasons from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 12,
Jan. 19 and Jan. 26 and from 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Jan. 28 through Feb. 1. Tryouts are from 4:30-
6:30 p.m. Feb. 14 and from 10 a.m: to 1 p.m.
Feb. 2. Cost is $85 per child. Three proofs of
residency and original birth certificate required
for children ages 4-16.

Register forYMCAspringsports
The McArthur Family YMCA has opened
registration for spring sports, flag football, vol-
leyball and soccer. At registration, parents are
encouraged to note the site closest to home
(Fernandina or Yulee).
Practices will be held on Tuesdays at the
team's home field; games will be held on
Friday and can be scheduled at either site.
Practices begin March 5 with games begin-
ning March 15.
Flag football and volleyball begin March 4
with games beginning March 14. All seasons
end the week of May 6. Participants will
receive a jersey and commemorative trophy.
Early bird fee until Jan. 13 is $55 for mem-
bers and $110 for non-members. Regular fees
Jan. 14-19 are $65 for members and $120 for
non-members. Visit the McArthur Family to
register or call 261-1080 for questions.

Sign up for soccer
Registration for the spring season for
Amelia Island Youth Soccer is now open. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com. Register in person from
10 a.m. tonoon Saturday at the concession
stand at the Bailey Road fields.

Free-throwcompetition
Boys and girls ages 10-14 are invited to
participate in the local level of competition for
the 2013 Knights of Columbus Free-Throw
Championship. The local competition will be
held from noon to 4 p.m. Jan. 27 at the Peck
Center gym, 510 S. 10th St., Fernandina
Beach.
All boys and girls age 10-14 are eligible
and will compete in their respective age divi-
sions. Last year more than 170,000 sharp
shooters participated in more than 3,000 local
competitions.
All contestants on the.local level are recog-
nized for their participation in the event. There
is no entry fee but parents are required to fur-
nish proof of age and written consent.
For entries or information, call Tom Smee-
ton at 321-4139 or Tom Sintes at 277-4007.

ProwresftllnginYulee
Continental Championship Wrestling re-
turns Jan. 19 to Yulee High School with a 7:30
p.m. belltime. The 21st annual Stampede will
feature a 20-man top rope battle; the winner
will receive $10,000 and the Southern States
Championship lille l.o CCW .:h-rapic;n
Johnathan WelIs ,ill pul h s rile on tin line
against "Flash and Cash Hayden Pnce, Juli-
an Marcs will take on one-half of the tag team
champs "The Revelator" Kevin Tool; "Rock
and Roll" Chris Turner will be battling against
"Big" Rob Justice.


This card will also feature a three tag
team-elimination match along with Cuzin
Ricky J., Romeo de la Guerra, Maddogg
Miller, John Douglas and, returning to the ring,
Jamie McKinnon, and Mark Bass.
Tickets are $8 at the door and $7 in
advance from the Yulee wrestling team. For
information visit www.ccwrestling.biz.

Train fE262 with Donna
Team Nirvana is once again in training for
the 26.2 with Donna under the guidance of Liz
Kawecki of Y Yoga, who has set up walk and
run training schedules for individuals of all
ages and physical abilities.
Every Saturday morning until Feb. 17,
2013, the team meets to stretch, field informa-
tion on correct walk and run practices and
build new friendships. All are welcome to join
and the training is free. Contact Kawecki at
S415-9642 or visit www.yyoga.com.

Senior, Christianbowlingleagues
A senior league bowling is offered at 9:30
a.m. Wednesday at Nassau Bowling off US
17 in Yulee. The group also meets for
Christian league bowling at 6 p.m. Thursday.

Jackonvlleto host Davis Cup match
Jacksonville has been selected as the site
for the 2013 Davis Cup by BNP Paribas first-
round match between the United States and
Brazil Feb. 1-3. The matches will be played at
the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena,
which will have an expected capacity of
approximately 13,000.
The event is being organized, staged and
promoted by the USTA. Tickets will go on sale
to the general public in early December. For
information, call (888) 484-8782 or visit www.
usta.com/daviscup.
The matchup with Brazil will be the first
home tie for the U.S. since the 2011 quarterfi-
nals in Austin, Texas, and just the third home
tie for the U.S. since 2009. In that time, the
U.S. team has played seven road matches -
.all on clay. The best-of-five match series
begins Feb. 1 with two singles matches fea-
turing each country's No. 1 player against the
other country's No. 2 player.
Saturday's schedule features the pivotal
doubles match and the final day of play on
Sunday includes two "reverse singles" match-
es, where the No. 1 players square off fol-
lowed by the No. 2 players going head-to-
head. All matches are best-of-five sets until
one country wins three matches.
This match will mark the fifth meeting
between the U.S. and Brazil in Davis Cup:
The U.S. leads the'overall series 3-1 with its
last victory against Brazil coming in the 1997
first round in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil, when
Courier and MaliVai Washington led the U.S.
to a 4-1 win.
Tennis Channel will present live daily cov-
erage of the match. The site selection is sub-
ject to final approval by the International
.... Tennis Federation -..
The U.S -Brazil wvnnerwvllt face lth r .;a.,,
Serbia or Belgium in the quarlerinals -pril 5-
7. Should the U.S. advance, they would host
the quarterfinal match. Davis Cup is the
world's largest annLual international men's
team competition with 122 nations competing.


.PRO GOLF WEEKLY UPDATE

S. Golf News, Tips, Trivia & Stats

.~i~S- j I I, aJ I II vll a mIId
Each January the Sony Open in .Last weeks The Tournament of Champions did not start due to
Waialae Country Club Hawaii attracts 144 of the world's high winds Thursday through Saturday. The wind came roaring
Honolulu, Hawaii greatest golf professionals to the down the Plantation Course at Kapalua again on Sunday, leaving
7,068 yards, Par 70 Waialae Country Club on the island officialsnochoicebuttostopplay andtrytostartagain on Monday.
efending:JohnsonWagner of Oahu. Two notable events have Remaininginthegripsofahigh-pressureweatherpattemthathas hovered
Winning Score: 13-underpar happened at the Sony Open. In the over the northem portion of Mauith resort area continues to be battered
SEarnings: $990,000 1983 Sony Open, Isao Aoki became by northeast winds consistently at 20 mph to 30 mph, but its the 40-mph
Japan's first winner on the PGA gusts that have made golfimpossibleat the Plantation Course, high in the
Tour. He holed out a wedge shot on the 72nd hole to beat Jack hills above the ocean. With more manageable wind in the forecast, the
Renner by a stroke. In 2007, at the age of 16 years and 4 days, plan is to play 36 holes Monday and finish with 18 holes Tuesday. As of
amateur Tadd Fujikawa became the second youngest player ever to presslime Monday, Rickie Fowler is scheduled to hit the opening tee shot
make a 36-hole cut in an official PGA Tour event, of the 2013 season, for the third time this week.


Sony Open in Hawaii Rory Mcllroy, from Northern Johnson Wagner
Day Time Network \-t. Ireland, is eligible to compete for Turned Professional: 2002
Thu, 1/10 7:00pm-10:30pm GOLF either Britain or Ireland when golf World Ranking: 52nd
Fri, 1/11 7:00pm-10:30pm GOLF retums to the Olympics in Rio 2012 PGA Earnings: $2,225,007
Sat, 1/12 7:00pm-10:30pm GOLF de Janeiro. He said he could miss the games PGA Tour Wins: 3
Sun, 1/13 -7:00pm-10:00pm GOLF to avoid having to choose between the two. "fl I s1 o R-a .....
could and there was a Northem Irish team I'd play Through Jan 6,2013
for Northern Ireland," he said. "It's a tough one, Through Jan.6,2013
whatever decision I make whether it's play for 1) Rory Mcllroy
What golfer's worst finish at the Ireland, play for Britain or not play at all, maybe, 1322pts
British Open from 966 to 980 just because I don't want to upset too many 2) Luke Donald
was sixth? people." Mcllroy, who has twice represented 8.62 pts
a) Arnold Palmer c) Jack Nicklaus Ireland at the World Cup, was asked whether
b) Greg Norman d) Ben Hogan he regretted saying last year that he felt more m. 3) Tiger Woods
British. "It was a moment, I don't want to say of 8.53 pts.
Answer: c) Jack Nicklaus weakness, butof frustration with it all," he said. 4) J R

6.42 pts.
f Some high-handicap golfers don't break 100 because they are weak on their short 5) Adam Scott
Same. A good place to practice this short game is to play a testy Par 3 course. 6.21 pts.
Here you will use mostly your #7, #8, #9 and wedgbs. A round or two each week
on this format will surely sharpen your skill with short irons. Concentrate on the World Golf Rankings continued...
club selection and lear-when to pitch and when to chip. Good shots here make Plaver ePints
easier putts and better scores. Set-up properly in comfort. Watch as the ball 6)Louft Oosthuizen 6.14
comes off the cubface, down the line to the pin. Think pin. It works better than thinking water 7) Lee Westwodd 6.03
or bush. A little quick hint: Always tee up on a par three. This allows you to strike the ball safely 8) Bubba Watson 5.29
avoiding all-too-common thin hits. Think positive, If you think you can, you will. 10) Brandt SDedeker 5.23
10 rnt$gdkr 52


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PAGE: 4B


CROSSWORD/SUDOKU
PEOPLE & PLACES
PETS


WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9. 2013
NEWS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH. FL


The challenges of spring cleaning in January


Christmas has been put to bed.
Lights untangled from the outdoor
tree. Sparkly decorations packed in
their boxes. My collection of Santa's
is tucked away. With a new year
comes a passionate determination to
clean out closets, cabinets and draw-
ers. It is like spring cleaning but in
January.
First the kitchen and the jam-
packed cupboard with its accumula-
tion of cans and stuff bought in good
faith for recipes tried and never to
be made again. There are always
mystery cans and packages that
both the Big Guy and I deny pur-
chasing the alien cans somehow
got on our shelves. Out they go and
to a community food pantry. Order
out of chaos. What a great feeling.
We do not go so far as alphabetizing
but things look a lot better and we
can actually find that can of mush-


room soup we may
need for a recipe.

biggest challenge.
We all have them. It
Sis the place we
stick the flotsam of
life that we are not
S sure what to do
FROM with. Contents vary
FROM ~depending on the
THE room. The Idtchen
PORCH drawers, the draw-
ers to beat all draw-
ers, are not gender
Dickie sensitive. We are
Anderson not necessarily
proud of the collec-
tion, but it is the heart of our
Kitchen. There are the organized
drawers that contain our cutlery,
napkins and dish towels. Then there
are the drawers that are chock full.


Currently they contain two wine bot-
tle openers, two can openers (one
that works and one neither of us can
figure out), a lighter, fondue forks,
garlic press, melon baller, cheese
grader, my best scissors, old grocery
lists, a ball of string, tdoth picks,
expired coupons, measuring
spoons, wine bottle corks and busi-
ness cards of various workers or
contractors who have passed
through our lives.
There are guy drawers and girl
drawers. Guy drawers reveal the
habits and hobbies of their owners.
It may be golf stuff- old score
cards, tees, ball markers, imprinted
and mostly useless items "won" at
various golf tournaments along the
way. There is always lots of change
in guy drawers. When pockets are
emptied at the end of a day, the
change ends up on the dresser or in


the drawer. Guy drawers usually
have nail clippers, at least one pair,
an electric razor and batteries of all
sizes and, of course, a pocket knife.
Girl drawers contain nail files,
half bottles of nail polish, partial lip-
sticks, a single earring waiting for its
partner, tags from clothes with bits
of thread or buttons and, maybe, a
sewing kit.
Desk drawers are a different
story. Where to start? Paper clips,
dried up magic markers, envelopes,
business cards of people long forgot-
ten, stamps that are out of date, tape,
a stapler, staple remover, mystery
computer cords, cartridges for print-
ers, warranties and directions to
equipment functioning and some
long gone, return labels, sticky
notes, at least one calculator and
more batteries.
Once the drawers are tackled


(more or less) we turn to our
closets. Go carefully, closets like
drawers can be sacred ground.
Closets are personal space. Never
again will I question the number of
golf shirts that fill one closet. I cer-
tainly do not want an inspection of
my closet with its can't get rid
of but never wear collection.
When I do face the closet my strate-
gy is take everything out of a closet
than put back the very essentials.
What doesn't make it back in the
closet needs to go immediately to a
nonprofit. Never look back. Don't
look at the pile in the back seat.
Keep moving.
Next? The garage. Wish us luck!
Dickie Anderson welcomes your
comments. Books are available at
local book and gift stores or online at
www.dickieanderson. com.
dickie.anderson@gmail.com


CIOM UNTIr IP B T 11 -4


SUBMITTED
Bingo forARK
In December, the Community Service Committee, a part of the Amelia Island
Newcomers Club, hosted a bingo party for ARK (the former ARC), whose clients are
developmentally challenged adults. Above, Susan Tracey, Donna Addio, Roz Riggio
and Linda Weller are pictured with a table of bingo prizes donated by Newcomers
members. These prizes were enthusiastically received by winners at the bingo game
held in the ARK Yulee facility. These bingo games have been sponsored by the
Newcomers Club every two months for the last seven years. Not pictured are Betty
Bell and Jan Cote-Merow.


SUBMITTED
Injuy prevention
Brent Emmett, Kohl's district manager, presents the Kohl's Cares 2013 grant check
for $114,153 to The Players Center for Child Health at Wolfson Children's Hospital
staff during a holiday event for Healthy Start Nassau County in Yulee last month. The
money will fund year-round injury prevention outreach to families with children in
Northeast Florida.


Libraryupdate
The Kiwanis Club was hon-
ored to have of Bill Lynch,
past president of the
Friends of the library, pres-
ent a program concerning
the proposed expansion
of the Fernandina Beach
branch library. The city com-
mission and county commis-
sion have each agreed to
contribute $600,00 towards
the $1.6 million expansion
and renovation that will near-
ly double the space of the
current building. The 7,300
square foot addition will cre-
ate a separate children's
library, young adult center,
technology center, reading
room, local history, genealo-
gy room and new community
meeting room. The Friends
of the Library is leading a
fundraising effort for the rest
of the cost. Lynch, left, is
pictured with Kiwanis Vice
President Scott Scruggs.
SUBMITTED


Waterproject
In early 2012, The
Fernandina Beach
Rotary Club joined
forces with other ,
District 6970 clubs to.
fund the construction
of new water lines and
a water tank in El Y
Granadillo, 1 i A
Nahauterique,
Honduras. The club's
$1,000 contribution,
along with another
$6,000 raised from
district clubs, was used
to secure a grant from
Rotary International.
This multiplied nearly
tenfold the dollars
raised to complete the '
$50,000 project, which i.
also included $25,000
of labor donated by the
people of El ..
Granadillo. Fernandina
Beach Rotary Club ~l?
Foundation Chair Dr.
David Page worked
with non-governmental
organizations, the
National Rural Water SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Association and Agua y
Desarrolla Comunitario in Honduras, which handled engineering and construction
management of the new water system. The project, successfully completed in the fall,
provides clean drinking water to 200 houses in El Granadillo.
The Fernandina Beach Rotary Club meets every Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. at the Florida House Inn. Visit www.fernandinabeachrotaryclub.org.


New member
Madeline Richard, broker
of Citrona Homes on
South Eighth Street, was
inducted into the General
Federation Women's Club
(GFWC) of Fernandina
Beach recently and is pic-
tured with her sponsor,
Karen Gildenston.
"I was looking for a volun-
teer commitment for
2013," said Richard in a
press release. "In 2012, I
was the chair of the
Historic Fernandina
Business Association's
Sounds on Centre and pre-
viously helped establish
the Cold Night Shelter
with the Coalition for the
Homeless of Nassau
County. It is important for
a balanced life to give back
to your community. I'm
excited about the GFWC
because they do so many
great things locally. My
primary focus is to work
with their publicity, travel
and fundraising."
SUBMITTED







WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9,2013 AROUND TOWN News-Leader


LITERARY LEANINGS


Authors wanted
The 2013 Amelia Island
Book Festival will be held in
Fernandina Beach April 26-28.
More than 30 authors have
committed to attend, but there
is room for more since book
sales will be held at the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center auditorium. To
reserve a table to promote
and sell your book go to
ameliaislandbookfcstival.com
and click on Author Submis-
sion, scroll down to Online
Applications or Printable
Applications and click on the
one that suits you. Space at a
table and one chair is $50. A
full table with four chairs is
$125. The deadline to reserve
space is March 1.
FOLbookdub
The Friends of the Library
Book Club meets at 7 p.m. on
the second Thursday of every
month in the parlor room of
St. Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave., with moder-
ators Marilyn and Norman
Wesley. New members are
always welcome.
The next discussion is Jan.
10, featuring Ransom by David
Malouf. Feb. 14 will feature
Suite Francaise (in English)
by Irene Nemirovsky and
March is a planning meeting.
Viva Booksl
Join the Amelia Island
Book Festival and celebrate
Viva Books! 2013, the 2013
Membership Launch Party at
a private home on Amelia
Island Plantation, on Jan. 22
from 5-7 p.m. Enjoy martinis
and tapas. Details will be
released soon.
For reservations contact
info@ameliaislandbookfesti-
val.com.
Civil War series
The Nassau County Public
Library, Fernandina Beach
branch, will once again host
the "Let's Talk About It:
Making Sense of the
American Civil War Book
Discussion series."
Civil War scholar Bobbie
Fost will lead the 5-part '
series. Discussions will take
place on Wednesdays at 7
p.m. Jan. 23-30 and Feb. 6-13-
20. Each participant will
receive a kit including one set
of books for the discussion:
March by Geraldine Brooks,
Crossroads of Freedom
Antietam by James M.
McPherson and America's
War by Edward L. Ayers, a
folder with the project essay
and reading assignments, and
a decorative bookmark. A free
insulated lunch bag will be
given to the first 24 to register
for the series. Books ai'e avail-
able for pickup from the
Fernandina Beach Branch
Library.
Register as materials are
limited. Additional copies of
the books are available to bor-
row from the library. Door
prizes and refreshments pro-
vided.
The final program on Feb.
20 will be an online exhibit
including photographs of the
war, letters and diaries. All are
invited to the online photo
exhibit. For information or to
register, visit www.nassau
reads.com, or call 277-7365.
Literaryluncheon
Award-winning artist/
author ofAQUIFERious,
Margaret Ross Tolbert, will
discuss Florida's bountiful
freshwater springs and water-
ways at the Friends of the
Fernandina Beach Library's
annual Litera-ry Luncheon at
noon Jan. 25 at Bonito Grill
and Sushi on Centre Street.
Tolbert's presentation will
feature paintings, sketches,
photographs, scientific and
historical information about
the remarkable 100,000-
square-mile aquifer that feeds
more than 700 springs
throughout Florida.
Purchase your tickets at
the library by Jan. 21. Cost is
$25 for Friends of the Library
members and $35 for non-
members and includes a
choice of tempura fish or
chicken bento box.
Literacy fundraiser
The Oceans of Fun


Literacy Program's fundraiser
will be held from noon-2 p.m.
Jan. 26 at $25 per ticket. Price
includes lunch, a copy of
Dickie Anderson's new book,
Great Homes of Fernandina,
Architectural Treasure's of
Amelia Island's Golden E;a,
and an entertaining presenta-
tion by Anderson as Emma
Goddard, a lively Victorian
lady visiting Amelia Island in
the late 1800s.
Tickets are available at St.
Peter's Episcopal Church
office (9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-
Friday) or by contacting Paige
Schlenker at 277-5264 or
paigeanddale@comcast.net.


Food, nutrition class forming
Would you like to develop Master Food and Nutrition Training will include topics
in-depth knowledge in the Volunteer is a title given to such as basic nutrition and
areas of food preservation, individuals who receive in- health, food safety, food prepa-
food safety and nutrition? Are depth food and nutrition train- ration and the latest food
you concerned about children ing from County Extension preservation updates. Your
being overweight and the Family and Consumer local agent will be teaching
increase in chronic health dis- Sciences agents. In return, and attending each workshop,
eases among adults in your participants agree to give vol- and will be able to transport up
community? Then consider unteer service to their local to four individuals.
taking the Master Food and County Extension Office dur- There is a registration fee
Nutrition Volunteer Training ing the next year. of $75 to cover materials and
Program provided through Master Food and Nutrition lab supplies for the course.
the University of Florida Coop- Volunteer training will be held For further information or
erative Extension Service. at the Duval County Extension an application contact Meg
This program is designed to office on Wednesdays, begin- McAlpine, your Nassau
provide food and nutrition ning Feb. 13 and ending April County Extension agent, at
training for selected individu- 3. Training sessions begin at 491-7340. Application deadline
als in Northeast Florida. 9:30 a.m. and last until 4 p.m. is Feb. 1.


Free tax

VITA (Volunteer Income
Tax Assistance) is pleased to
provide free electronic (E-File)
and paper income tax filing
assistance for low to moder-
ate income, and elderly tax fil-
ers, again this season.
VITA has been assisting fil-
ers inNassau County for over
10 years; helping more than
400 people in need of assis-
tance each year. VITA volun-
teers are tested and certified
by the Internal Revenue
Service. This free service is
provided by the IRS, the Real
Sense Prosperity Campaign,
a United Way Initiative, and in
partnership with Ihe Nassau
County Public Library.


filing assistance

Tax filing assistance begins Filers cannot work from year-i
Jan. 22 and will go through end documents.
April 11. Tax filers who elect to Hours and dates are:
have their returns E-filed and Atlantic Rec Center, 2500
are due a refund can expect Atlantic Ave., main auditori-
their refund within three days um,Jan. 22-April 11,Tuesdays
to two weeks with direct and Thursdays 1-5 p.m. Call
deposit. 277-7365. Walk-ins OK.
Appointments for the Peck Center, 516 South
Atlantic Rec Center and the 10th St., reception foom, Jan.
Peck Center can be made by 23-April 10, Wednesdays 4-7
calling the Nassau County p.m., call 277-7365. Walk-ins
Public Library, Fernandina OK.
Beach branch at 277-7365. WorkSource, 96042
Walk-ins are welcome and will Lofton Square, Yulee, will also
be assisted after appointments. provide tax filing assistance
Please bring photo identifica- Tuesday-Thursday from 9
tion, your 2011 tax return and a.m.-3 p.m., Jan. 17-April 12.
all 2012 tax documents such as Call 432-0009, ext. 2660 for
W-2s, 1099s and SSA-1099s. reservations.


HOME & GARDEN BRIEFS


Sierra Group
On Jan. 10 at 7 p.m.
Nassau Sierra Group will
present a program on the
Florida Master Naturalist
Program. Come to the
Council on Aging Building,
1367 Sout 18th St., and learn
more about this University of
Florida training for volun-
teers who wish to give-back
to the community.Natural-
ists will share their experi-
ences and instructor Chris-
tina Nelson will be on hand
to answer questions. Free,
open to the public, refresh-
ments served. Call 277-4187
for more information.
Camera course
Wild Amelia, in partner-
ship with the Fernandina
Beach Parks and Recreation
Department, will offer a 7-
hour photography course,
"Demystifying Camera
Buttons and Dials," on Jan.
12 at the Atlantic Recreation
Center Teen Room at 2500
Atlantic Ave., from 9 a.m.-5,
p.m.
Maria Struss, a national
award-winning ph.otogra-
pher, will explain in simple
terms all the functions and
settings of SLR cameras, as
well as those of some point
and shoot cameras. The
course is $75, and partici-
pants should bring their
lunch. Pay by cash, check or
credit card. Register by
phone, using a credit card,
by calling the Rec Center at
277-7350. For more informa-
tion call Steve Leimberg at
491-0474. Visit Struss's web-
site at www.mountain-
toseaphotography.com.
Farmers markets
The Fernandina Beach
Market Place is featuring
Cabbage Creek Farm on Jan.
12. This Florida farm is locat-
ed in northwest Nassau
County between Cabbage
SCreek and the St. Marys
River.
Ava Ferguson and Nakoa
Cooley have done an admira-
ble job creating Cabbage
Creek Farm. This small, sus-
tainable farm shows care for
the land by following the


principals of organic farm-
ing. Every Saturday they
share their tasty and healthy,
locally grown produce at the
downtown Fernandina
Beach farmers' market.
They are proof that it is pos-
sible to enjoy a responsible
way of farming, while make a
living, without using synthet-
ic fertilizers, herbicides or
pesticides.
This week the Fernan-
dina Beach Market Place is
home to a couple of local
celebrities as well. Two of
the exhibitors, Lulu's at the
Thompson House and
Merge, are participating in
Amelia Island Restaurant
Week. While you are at the
farmers market, visit Adam
and Melanie to learn more
about this fixed price, fine
dining opportunity.
Located on North
Seventh Street between
Centre and Alachua streets,
the market is open every
Saturday from 9 a.m.-l p.m.
Call (904) 557-8229.
* *
Serving the community
for 10 years, the not-for-profit
Amelia Farmers Market is
open every Saturday from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. at the Shops at
Omni Amelia Island Planta-
tion. Shoppei-s can mingle
with farmers and entrepre-
neurs as they wander
through a selection of fruits
and vegetables harvested
just before market day.
Shoppers will also discov-
er gourmet baked goods
from crusty breads to delec-
table desserts, and prepared
foods such as soups, jellies,
relishes and marinades. The
market is also the perfect
location to choose from a
wide variety of specialty trop-
ical and landscape plants.
Parking is plentiful. No pets.
Call 491-4872 or visit
www.ameliafarmersmarket.c
om.
Tie the knot
Knots aren't just for tying
your shoes. Untangle the
history of knots and how to
tie some of the basic knots
that everyone should know
at the Ribault Club on Fort
George Island Cultural State


Park on Jan. 12 at 2 p.m. No
reservations are necessary
and the program is free.

Arbor Day
celebration
On Jan. 15 at 10 a.m.,
Rebecca Jordi, County Ex-
tension Director/Horticul-
ture Agent, will conduct at
Landscape Matters session
of tree planting. Following
the Landscape Matters ses-
sion, at 11 a.m. she will plant
a River Birch tree in memo-
ry of Steve Gaul, lJassau
Agriculture Agent who
passed away this summer.
The activities commemorate
Florida's Arbor Day celebra-
tion.
For information call (904)
879-1019. Master Gardeners
are on phorie duty Fridays,
at 491-7340.
'Evening ofStarz
In partnership with the
Fernandina Beach Parks and
Recreation Department, Fort
Clinch State Park, the
Northeast Florida Astronom-
ical Society and Science
First/Starlab, Wild Amelia
will host an evening of
stargazing Jan. 18.
The event will be held at
the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center auditori-
um from 3:30-7:30 p.mn and
outdoors at Fort Clinch State
Park from 8-10 p.m., weather
permitting. Both events are
free and open to the public.
The first event will show-
case "Starlab," an inflatable
dome planetarium from
ScienceFirst ofYulee,.with
20-minute presentations
inside the lab and a "side
show" of scientific/ecology
exhibits.
From 8-10 p.m., the
Northeast Florida Astrono-
mical Society (NEFAS) will
have large telescopes at Fort
Clinch. Arrive between 7 and
7:30 p.m., dress for the
weather and bring chairs
and insect spray. In the event
of rain or cloud, Wild Amelia
will announce postponement
on its Facebook page after 4
p.m., or contact the fort
office for updates. Visit
www.wildamelia.com.


PET PROJECTS


Special tours
Join Cats Angels for an introductory tour
of its feline family at Cats Angels Adoption
Center on South Eighth Street. They wel-
come anyone who is interested in seeing the
center or learning about different type of vol-
unteer opportunities. Tours are being given
several times a week. Call Jan for informa-
tion on days and times at 583-2870.
Dogwalkers
Gdtexercise andl help a homeless dog
with human companionship and quality time
outdoors at the Nassau Humane Society's
volunteer dog walks Mondays and Fridays at
9 a.m. and Wednesdays at 3 p.m. at the NHS
shelter, 671 Airport Road. Dress comfort-
ably. Ages 18 and under welcome to accom-
pany a parent or adult guardian. Call 321-
1647 or stop by the NHS adoption center at
dog-walk times or 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-
Friday and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.
Free spay/neuters
PetSmart Charities has given Nassau
County Animal Services a grant to spay and


neuter cats and dogs in these zip codes:
32009 Bryceville, 32011 Callahan, 32046
- Hilliard and 32097 Yulee.
Free/spay and neuter surgeries and free
rabies vaccinations are available to all dogs,
cats and feral cats in the program zip codes.
Feral cats must arrive in a humane trap. All
animals must have a current Nassau County
license tag or one must be purchased for $10
at the time of surgery. To make an appoint-
ment contact FirstCoast No More Homeless
Pets at (904) 425-0005 and mention the Spay
West Program.
Paw-Jama Party
RAIN has a Paw-Jama Party program,
where volunteers foster a Nassau County
Animal Services pet overnight, prior to
transport on the RAIN Train.
Volunteers pick up the pet around 4:30-5
p.m. and return them in time for departure
on the "train" the next day so they are feel-
ing and looking their best for the trip and
their arrival at the receiving shelter.
Register with RAIN Humane Society
prior to a transport at www.rainhumanesp-
ca.org.


Hi! My name is Ivy. I am a
two-year-old female Plott
Hound. I have a beautiful
brindle coat with white high-
lights. We think she might
have a little greyhound in her.
She gets along well very with
other dogs, walks great on a
leash and is very smart and
alert. The best part about her
is that she is heartworm neg-
ative and available for adop-
tion. The adoption fee
includes her spay, a one-year
rabies vaccine and a micro-
chip. You should go to our
websites www.petango.com
and www.nassaucountyfl.com
and see the video of her inter-
acting with our great volun-
teers. You will see what a
great dog she is. Then you
can come to the 'shelter and


Cats Angels is determined
to help our older felines find
"forever" homes this year. An
older cat is a good choice if
you want a quiet and less
active companion. The mature
cats are comfortable with
their routines and you can see
what type of "purrsonality"
they have before you adopt
Bandi is a sweet calico cat
who enjoys her catnaps and
likes to munch on Fancy
Feast dry cat food during the
day. She gets along with other
cats, but really likes people
and especially to curl up on
your lap. Bandi once had a
home but was abandoned.
This kitty deserves to have a
second chance and a place to
call her own with a loving per-
son or family. Cats Angels has
adult cats of every size and
description who have been
with us for too long. They all
deserve to find a "forever"
home.
Please consider opening
your hearts and homes to one
of these special felines. Visit
www.catsangels.com or our -
Adoption Center.
The Cats Angels Thrift
Store/Adoption Center at 709
S. Eighth St. is open Monday
through Saturday from 11


see her for yourself.
She has been here since
August so she is ready for her
turn for a loving family of her
own.
Ivy can be seen at the
Nassau County Animal
Services, 86078 License Road,
Yulee, 491-7440, Tuesday
through Friday 11 a.m. to 4
p.m., Saturdays 11 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. and closed Sundays
and Mondays and holidays.


a.m. to 5 p.m. Donations of
clean items in working order
are accepted during business
hours. Supplies to help take
care of our cats are greatly
appreciated and we can use
paper towels, bleach, deter-
gent, vinegar, clay litter and
cat food:We also recycle alu-
minum.cans in our parking lot
bin.
Now is the time to have
animals in your care or area
spayed or neutered. Please be
responsible and don't wait
until unwanted litters appear.
Cats Angels can help you with
lower cost options on these
services. Call 321-2267 for
more information. We can
humanely trap feral cats. Spay
and neuter the responsible
solution.


NASSAU HUMANE SOCIETY


Diamond has a face like an
Oreo cookie, and a personali-
ty that's just as sweet! She is a
2 1/2-year-old bulldog mix
who lived in a home, but her
owners couldn't keep her or
her daughter anymore. She's
housetrained and was in a
home with kids, and really
likes people. She's very social
and also likes other dogs. She
has a great smile and a nice
soft coat that you'll love to
pet! She loves to play and we
think she'd be a great run-
ning or jogging partner for an
active owner. Or, you could
take her to the dog park -
when you adopt a dog from
NHS you get a free month's
membership in the NHS Dog
Park next door.
You can see videos of our
great adoptable dogs and cats
at our website,
NassauHumaneSociety.com.
Chloe is an affectionate
young Domestic Short Hair
mix who loves to play with
toys! She arrived at our shel-
ter with her kittens Kit and
Kat, and was a very good
mom to them. They've been
adopted and Chloe has been


spayed, so now it's time for
her to find a loving forever
home too. She's only.about a
year old, and now she's re-
learning how to be a kitten
herself and play. She might do
best as the only pet in the
house; she gets along with
other cats in the cattery but
she would prefer to have your
undivided love and attention!
She has a lovely gray and
brown coat, with gorgeous
green eyes.
Our Second Chance store
is going strong in its new
location, in the 8 Flags
Shopping Center at 1002
South 14th Street! Thank you
to all of our volunteers who
made the move so seamless,
and thanks to our supporters
who donate new or gently
used merchandise, and those
who shop with us!
We hope you'll check out
our new location, open
Monday-Saturday from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. We have lots of
great "finds" at bargain
prices, and proceeds benefit
the homeless cats and dogs at
our shelter. For information
please call 321-0022.


STARS


Daisy, a Jack Russell terri-
er, is 7 years old, 18 pounds,
loves children, is energetic
but not hyper. She rarely
barks and is very loving. She
came from a 2 dog family but
prefers to be the only one!
She is looking for a new home
because her owner can no
longer care for her.
Save the Animals Rescue
Society does not run a shelter.
Animals are fostered by
STARS members until a suit-
able and caring home is
found. STARS needs new fos-
ter homes in order to rescue
more animals and increase
adoptions.
If you are interested in


adopting a STARS dog, please
visit our website at www.star-
sofamelia.org and fill out an
adoption application. Thank
you.


NASSAU COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES


CATS ANGELS


C-1 111- L11-1 -1 -11.


............... 1








WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9.2013 AROUND TOWN News-Leader


PEOPLE &PLACES


SPECIAL EVENTS

Freedom comes
On Jan. 11 at 6 p.m. the
Amelia Island Museum of
History, 233 S. Third St., is
proud to launch a brand new
exhibit, "Freedom Comes to
Fernandina." The exhibit will
highlight the achievements of
African Americans in this area
directly before and after the
Emancipation Proclamation,
and will explore the role that
Amelia Island played in the
struggle for emancipation.
Freedom Comes to
Fernandina profiles the first
African American soldiers to
fight in the Civil War, along
with other key historical figures
like Harriet Tubman, and
explores their connection to
local history.
Guest speaker Frank Ofeldt
will deliver a presentation dis-
cussing the experiences of
African American soldiers on
Amelia Island. Afterwards
enjoy a reception and unveil-
ing of the new exhibit. This
program .is open to the public,
with a suggested donation of
$5 for members and $10 for
non-members. For information
contact Gray at 261-7378, ext.
102.
Special concert
Arts Alive Nassau will wel-
come Dr. Kathy Price and
Reginald Bouknight back to
perform "My Favorite Things,"
a benefit performance for Arts
Alive Nassau on Jan. 20 at the
Amelia Plantation Chapel at 3
p.m. with a reception to follow.
Accompanied by piano virtu-
oso Deidre Singleton, the pro-
gram will feature opera arias
and duets, spirituals and
favorites from Broadway musi-
cals.
Tickets are $25 and avail-
able by calling the office at
277-ARTS and leaving a mes-
sage, or at the door.
Arts Alive Nassau is com-
mitted to promoting the arts in
Nassau County by providing
after-school arts programs in


(E StatePoint Media
Twentieth Century

ACROSS
1. Alfred Hitchcock
in his movie, e.g
6. *Banned insecti-
cide
9. *Infamous
weapon in
SPersian Gulf War
13. *"The
Hitchhiker's
Guide to the
Galaxy" author
14. Two halves
15. Chummy
16. Site of witch-
craft trials
17. Fred Flintstone
to Barney
Rubble, e.g.
18. Stupid or sily
19. *Code name for
detonation of first
nuclear device
21. *1945-1990
antagonism
23. Batman and
Robin, e.g.
24. *Rock and
25. Unit of
absorbed radia-
tion
28. Manufactured
30. Stubbornly
unyielding
35. Primadonna
problems
37. Clever
39. Used to indicate
compliance over
radio
40.,It hovers
41. Red Cross sup-
ply
43. Like something
that can't fit any-
more
44. Stay clear
46. *Emest


the schools. Currently, the
group sponsors the elemen-
tary band at Emma Love
Hardee School and a dulcimer
program at Yulee Elementary.
Plans for the spring semester
include visual arts offerings
and a possible drama pro-
gram.
Ensemble concerts
ARIAS will bring a special
concert to Amelia Island, per-
formed by a string quartet and
brass quintet from the Jack-
sonville Symphony Orchestra,
on Jan. 22 at 7 p.m. at First
Baptist Church, 1600 S.
Eighth St., Femandina Beach,
beginning with a pre-reception
at 6:30 p.m.
The musicians will interact
with the audience and
announce the musical selec-
tions. The string quartet will
open the program, offering a
mix of classical and popular
music, including movements.
by Haydn, Mozart, Borodin
and the tango from the movie
"Scent of a Woman." This will
be followed by the brass quin-
tet after intermission. Their
performance will feature clas-
sical and jazz tunes, including
works by Debussy, Brahms
and Fats Waller.
Tickets are $20 and avail-
able at The Book Loft, Amelia
Island Visitors Bureau
("Railway Express building")
.and The Golf Club of Amelia
Island. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Ocean
Clubhouse, Amelia Island
Plantation, payable only by
check. Tickets will also be
sold at the door the evening of
the concert (ARIAS members
can get discounted tickets for
$15 at the door).
THIS WEEK

Gerr's Comer
Gerri's Corner of Comfort,
a nonprofit resource center for
women with cancer, answers
questions in a confidential set-
ting, provides support group
information, brochures, refer-
ence materials, a lending


Hemingway's
nickname
47. Blue-green
48. *Split by a wall
50. Like Dr. Evil's
tiny self
52. Hog heaven?
53. Openmouthed
astonishment
55. Recipe amount
57. *Salk's discov-
ery
61. Sea dog
65. Last
Night," movie
66. *Shock and
68. Wide open
69. One who
it like it is"
70. 100 Ibs.
71. Attach to, as in
a journalist
72. Editor's mark
73. Lamb's mother
74. Plural of lysis

DOWN
1. Those in a play
2. Purim's month
3. French Sudan
after 1960
4. Correct
5. Heaviest known
metal
6. Showing stupidity
7. *Its discovery
had a huge
impact on crime
investigation
8. *Ma Bell, e.g.
9. Equivalent to
hands on clock?
10. Eagle's talons,
e.g.
11. Long forearm
bone
12. Textile worker
15. talk
20. A despicable
person, pl.


22. *Hemingway's
"The Man
and the Sea"
24. Sometimes
done to an argu-
ment
25. Betty Ford
Center, e.g.
26. Type of nectar
27. Sorrow
29. Like a billion-
aire's pockets
31. Received on
special occasions
32. They can be
Super or Krazy
33. Enthusiastic
approval
34. *First cloned
mammal
36. Potting need
38. South American
Indian people
42. Kind of ray
45. 20 on a human
body
49. *A Bobbsey twin
51. *Newly-founded
state, 1948
54. 'Gerald
Holtom's sign
56. Unusually small
individual
57. Giant kettles
58. Lend a hand
59. *First African-
American to host
a TV show
60. *Branch
Davidians or
Heaven's Gate,
e.g.
61. "Out usually
follows it
62. Captures
63. D'Artagnan's
weapon of choice
64. 'Bolsheviks
67. *A huge web


library and more through
trained volunteers. It offers
stylish head coverings, hair-
pieces, sleep caps, chemo
bags with necessities and
comfort pillows free of charge.
Open Monday-Friday from
noon to 4 p.m. in Maxwell Hall
at Memorial United Methodist
Church on North Sixth Street,
downtown Femandina Beach.
Call 277-0099.
Faithlink Encounters
Faithlink Encounters, A
Biblical View of Current
Events, are weekly open dis-
cussions about issues/events
in our community, state,
nation and world. Groups
meet at 6:15 p.m. at The
Partin Center (601 Centre St.,
white house next to the
church) and O'Kanes Pub
(Centre Street ask for
Memorial's group). For infor-
mation contact Pastor Hollie
at'hollie@mumconline.com.
All are welcome.
Genealogy group
Genealogy group meetings
are held at Yulee United
Methodist Church, 86003
Christian Way, Yulee, the sec-
ond and fourth Wednesday of
each month from 9-11 a.m.
New members are welcome.
Call 225-5381 or Paulette
Murrin at 548-9752 for infor-
mation.
Maritime Museum
The Maritime Museum of
Amelia Island hosts a pro-
gram on a current topic every
Friday at 6 p.m. The programs
are jointly sponsored by the
museum and Amelia
Research and Recovery, LLC,
the Amelia-based company
that searches for and recov-
ers sunken treasure from
Spanish Galleons. The muse-
um is located at 1335 S.
Eighth St. No reservations are
needed. Call (904) 838-6688
or (904) 838-6619.
Meditation group
The Insight Meditation
Sitting Group (Sangha) meets
every Tuesday at the Dome
Healing Center, Amelia Island,
'from 7:30-9:15 p.m. They start
with a 45-minute silent sitting
then read a verity of material
about the practice and philos-
ophy of Insight Meditation.
Anyone interested is invited to
attend.
For information call Willow
Embry at 261-9143 or email
willowembry@gmail.com.
Bingo
SThe public is invited to play


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tO StatePoint Media

Fill in the squares so
that each row. column
and 3-by-3 box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Friday, January 4
Solution


bingo every Thursday at the
Legion, 626 S. Third St.,
Fernandina Beach, in the
large smoke-free meeting hall.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and
Early Bird Games start at 6:05
p.m., with regular play begin-
ning promptly at 6:30 p.m.
The bingo session is nine
games for $20, with multiple
jackpots being paid out.
Refreshments are available.
For questions email
post54bingo@yahoo.com.
Proceeds go back into pro-
grams sponsored by the
American Legion.
Brown bag lunch
The Amelia Island
Museum of History invites you
to attend its next Brown Bag
Lunch today at noon. Guest
speaker Nancy Dickson will
deliver a program entitled
"Thank you Rachel Carson,"
profiling the late marine biolo-
gist and conservationist who
penned the widely influential
book Silent
Spring, draw-
ing attention to
the plight of the
pelican, the
bald eagle and
the osprey who
were driven
'almost to extinction by the
overuse of DDT and other
pesticides. Carson's pioneer-
ing efforts in environmental
conservation helped to inspire
the creation of the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency, and she was posthu-
mously awarded the
Presidential Medal of
Freedom by Jimmy Carter in
1980. This program is free
and open to the public. For
information contact Gray at
261-7378, ext. 102 or
gray@ameliamuseum.org.
Newcomers meet
The Newcomers Club of
Amelia Island will host its
monthly coffee on Jan. 10 at
10:30 a.m. All women who
reside in Nassau County (no
matter how long they have
lived here) are welcome to
attend. For further information,
contact Lulu Elliott at luluel-
liott@hotmail.com dr 548-
9807; or visit http://newcomer-
sclubofameliaisland.com.
Musical resolution
Have you thought, "Gee, I
really want to start playing my
(insert instrument here) again.
I wonder if there is a local
group of musicians I could
join?" Look no further. Make
2013 the year you join the
Nassau Community Band.
They welcome woodwind,
brass and percussion instru-
mentalists. Meet Jan. 10 in
the Yulee Middle School band
room at 6 p.m. Send your
questions to info@nas-
saucommunityband.com.
Genealogy course
The Amelia Island
Genealogical Society (AIGS)
will conduct a Beginner
Genealogy Course for those
interested in researching their
family history. Five sessions
will be held at the Femandina
Beach Police Station
Community Room at 1525
Lime St. from 9:30 a.m. to


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noon on Saturdays Jan 12, 19
and 26 and Feb 2 and 9.
Topics include Census and
Civil Vital Records; Church
and Cemetery Records;
Courthouse, Military and
Immigration Records;
Effective use of Libraries and
Archives; Digital Books and
Newspaper Research, and
Organizational Technioues.
Each student will also
receive two hours of one-on-
one assistance using Internet
resources in researching their
own ancestors. The fee for the
full course is $30/person
(includes one-year single
AIGS membership) or
$45/couple (includes a one-
year AIGS family member-
ship). Register at any Nassau
County Library or call Marie at
321-3460.
Pancake breakfast
Fernandina Boy Scout
Troop 701 will host a pancake
breakfast fundraiser at
Applebee's on Jan. 12 from 8-
10 a.m. The Scouts are rais-
ing money to attend summer
camp. Tickets can be pur-
chased from a Scout in
advance or by calling 206-
2031.
Dances of peace
Dances of Universal Peace
will be hosted by New Vision
Congregational Church on
Jan. 12 from 4-6 p.m. at
96072 Chester Road in Yulee.
The dances will be led by
DiAnahita Kanoy, dance men-
tor and retreat leader. Kanoy
is also professor emeritus of
public speaking at Central
Florida College.
No musical or dance expe-
rience is required. Everyone is
welcome and dancers do not
need a partner. Participation is
invited through simple folk
dance movements done in a
circle. Wear comfortable cloth-
ing and socks. A donation of
$5 per person is suggested.
The dances will be followed
by a simple potluck meal. For
more information about the
dances visit www.DancesOf
UniversalPeace.org. Visit
www.NewVisionCongregation
alChurch.org or contact the
Rev. Mary Moore at (904)
238-1822.
Art walk
Island Art Association
announces its January fea-
tured Artist of the Month is
Gretchen Williams, who has
ovdr 50 years evrcen.:e in '
the art field. Each year she
participates in many shows.
Her works show her love of
nature, historical sites and
homes, land and seascapes
and tropical views using vivid
colors and historical accuracy.
She started her career in
Pennsylvania moving to
Florida where she and her
husband found a quaint sea-
side cottage and transformed
it into a perfect seaside
escape. Gretchen has been
doing photography nearly as
long as she has been paint-
ing. Just recently she has pre-
pared many of her favorite
subjects into framed artwork.
She hopes that the public will
enjoy them as much as she
does.
The Meet the Artist recep-
tion from 5-8 p.m. Jan. 12 at
the Island Art Association, 18
N. Second St., is open to the
public.
* *
The Seventh Street Gallery
has the pleasure of introduc-
ing the paintings and photo-
graphs of James Widerman in
his first Amelia Island show,
"Vision over Time."
Widerman finds inspiration
in subway graffiti and
Amsterdam cafe life, in the
serenity of green meadows
and men at work, which hang
next to explosions of emotion
in line, color and texture.
Expect the unexpected.
The reception is Jan. 12
from 5-8 p.m. at the Seventh
Street Gallery, 14 S. Seventh
St. (across from Lulu's). The
show can also be seen the
following two Saturdays dur-
ing the farmers' market hours.
As this is a historic property, it
is not handicap accessible.
For questions, directions or
alternative viewing times, call
432-8330.

NEXT WEEK

Insight meditation
An introduction to Insight


Meditation, a free 10-week
workshop, will be offered
starting Jan. 13 through
March 17 from 5-7 p.m. at the
Dome Healing Center on
Amelia Island.
Willow Embry, who has
been practicing Insight
Meditation for eight years, is
offering the free workshop that
will include short, guided med-
itations, discussion, Q&A and
at-home practice. The boxed
set workbook for the course -
Insight Meditation, A Step by
Step Course in How to
Meditate by Sharon Salzberg
and Joseph Goldstein is
about $20 and available


through Amazon.com or at the
first gathering. For information
or to register call 261-9143 or
email willowembry@gmail.
com. The course is appropri-
ate for both beginners and
those with some meditation
experience.
Arts meeting
The Island Art Association
general meeting is Jan. 15 at
7 p.m. at the Education
Center, 18 N. Second St., fea-
turing artist Billie McCray, who
turns discarded items from the
trash dump or thrift stores into
treasured pieces. Her influ-
ences include Memphis
Woods. McCray uses buttons,
broken jewelry, rope, threads,
beads, fabric and many other
items to create her richly col-
orful pieces. She is a
renowned fiber artist and has
shown her wall hangings, bas-
kets, dolls, birds and other
works at places such as
NASA, the Ritz Theatre and
LaVilla Museum, The
Cummer Museum of Art &
Gardens and MOCA
Jacksonville.
General meetings are
always open to the public.
Contact Denise Murphy at
310-6931 or murphy-david
@comcast.net if you are inter-
ested in speaking, demon-
strating or have someone you
would like to recommend for
future general meetings.
Genealogical society
The Amelia Island
Genealogical Society meet
Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. at the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department Community
Room, 1525 Lime St. Peter
Mullen will present "Civil War
Feuds: A Family Tradition."
The program will cover histori-'
cal, political and cultural
aspects of notorious feuds of
Kentucky, Virginia, West
Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia
and Florida, some of which
lasted well into the 20th centu-
ry. Mullen, an.FSCJ profes-
sor, is a Callahan resident,
Kentucky native and has
degrees from the University of
Louisville and Western
Kentucky University. Public
welcome.
Men's Newcomers
The Men's Newcomers
Club of Amelia Island will hold
its lunch-meeting on Jan. 17
at the Femandina Beach Golf
Club at 11:30 a.m. Speaker
Sie-.'ve WVrglev, Action' News
WTEV Jacksonville CBS47,
WAWS Jacksonville FOX30,
will discuss the Jaguars and
general sport topics.
Tickets are $15 byJan. 12
and $17 at the door. For
reservations, call Bob
Wesche, 310-9055. All men,
whether new or longtime
Nassau .County residents, are
welcome to attend the meet-
ing and join the club. For infor-
mation visit www.mensnew-
comersclub.org.
Alzheimer'ssupport
The Alzheimer's Associa-
tion Caregiver Support Group
for Nassau County meets the
third Thursday each month.
The next meeting is Jan. 17
from 2:30-3:30 p.m. at the
Adult Day Care at the Council
on Aging, across from Baptist
Medical Ceriter Nassau. This
meeting is open to the public
and everyone who has an
interest is invited to attend.
For information call Debra
Dombkowski, LPN, at 261-
0701.
Paintingworkshop
"In Living Color Painting
Workshop" for all level artists
is Jan. 18, 21 and 25 from 9
a.m. to noon. Cost is $100 for
all three sessions, $40 for
individual sessions. $his work-
shop will focus on helping you
understand how color works
and how you can best use
color to increase the emotion-
al response to your work.
Instructor is Sharon Haffey. To
register or for information
email sshaffey@aol.com or
call 310-9194.
Creative kids fest
Recording artist "Mrs.
Kate" Carpenter will kick off
the inaugural Creative Kids
Festival on Jan. 19, filling the
Fernandina Little Theatre with
her lively Florida folk music.
The show is geared to chil-


dren ages 4-11, and seating is
limited. FLT, 1014 Beech St.,
is the headquarters for the
festival, which will offer work-
shops for ages 4-15 from 9:30
a.m.-5 p.m. with sessions in
theater arts, visual arts,
dance, photography, music,
and film art at several venues
in downtown Fernandina
Beach. The evening session
from 6-10 p.m. will be "A Night
at the Museum" at theAmelia
Island Museum of History, 233
S. Third St.
Adriission to individual fes-
tival events is $6/child.
Festival passes can be pur-
chased in advance at The

PEOPLE Continued on 7B


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013 AROUND TOWN News-Leader


PEOPLE
Continued from 6B
UPS Store in the island Publix
shopping center. A Days
Events Pass (5 sessions) is
$29/child; a "Night at the
Museum" Pass (includes
pizza dinner) is $25/child; an
All Events Pass is $50/child.
For festival information visit
www.ameliaflt.org. For more
on Carpenter, visit www.Mrs
Kate.com.

COMING UP

DAR meeting
The Amelia Island Chapter
National Society Daughters of
the American Revolution will
meet at 10:30 a.m. Jan. 23 at
the Golf Club of Amelia. Vice
Regent Marie Santry will tell
about life in Fernandina 200
years ago as they experi-
enced it during the Patriot
War. All members of NSDAR
and prospective members are
invited. Luncheons are $17
per person. RSVP by Jan. 18
to Amy Schnell at 556-3486
amyschnelldar@ gmail.com.


Dinner of Dinners

The Amelia Community
Theatre Guild presents the
fourth annual Dinner of
Dinners fundraising event, "An
Evening of Cole Porter," on
Jan. 26 at the GFWC
Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach, 201 Jean LaFitte
Blvd. Tickets include a silent
auction of dinner parties
donated by theater support-
ers, a delicious four-course
dinner and entertainment fea-
turing the music of Cole
Porter as directed by Mary
Williams.
The reception will begin at
6 p.m. (cash bar donation)
with dinner at 7 p.m. Tickets
are $55 per person, and
reservations can be made at
www.ameliacommunitythe-
atre.org or by calling the box
office at 261-6749 and leaving
a message. Your call will be
returned, and reservations will
be confirmed on or before
Jan. 16. No tickets will be sold
at the door. This event sells
out early, so make your reser-
vations now.


Cinderella'atACT

Amelia Community
Theatre's Teen Troupe, known
as ACTeen, will present
Rodgers and Hammerstein's
musical, "Cinderella." This
enchanting family entertain-
ment for adults and children
age 5 and up, will have 5 per-
formances: Jan. 31, Feb. 1
and 2 at 7:30 p.m. with mati-
nees on Feb. 2 and 3 at 2
p.m. Cinderella will be per-
formed at ACT's Studio 209
Theatre, 209 Cedar St. All
show tickets are $10 and
seating is open, not reserved.
On Feb. 2 from 12:30-1:30
p.m. there will be a special
"Prince and Princess Party"
for children ages 5 to 10 in the
Main Stage Lobby at 207
Cedar St. Cost is $5 for chil-
dren, with no charge for
accompanying adult. To pur-
chase a party ticket, you niust
purchase a ticket to any per-
formance of "Cinderella." At
the party there will be refresh-
ments, games, and favors for
the children, who are encour-
aged to dress as a prince or


princess. Party tickets are lim-
ited and may be purchased
along with show tickets online
at www.ameliacommunitythe-
atre.org or call the box office
at 261-6749. All messages will
be returned. ACTeen's pro-
duction of "Cinderella" is
directed by Teen Troupe
Coordinator Toni D'Amico.

Sweet evening
The 17th annual Desserts
of Amelia benefiting the staff
and students of Fernandina
Beach Middle School will be
held from 6-8 p.m. Feb. 1 at
the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center, 2500
Atlantic Ave., Fernandina
Beach. Along with a variety of
desserts donated by area
restaurants enjoy live and
silent auctions. Entertainment
by the FBMS Drama
Department will feature "Willy
Wonka and the Chocolate
Factory."
To purchase a ticket,
donate or volunteer call the
school at 491-7938. Students
also are selling tickets. Make
checks payable to "FBMS


Desserts of Amelia." The
school is located at 315
Citrona Drive. Tickets are $10
in advance and $12 at the
door. Contact Paul Martinez,
PTO president, at (323) 610-
1080 or call at 491-7938 or
261-8919 for information.

Concert pianist
The Rotary Club of
Fernandina Beach will bring
Italian classical concert pianist
Francesco Attesti to Amelia
Island for a performance at 7
p.m. on Feb. 3 at St. Peter's
Episcopal Church.
Attesti is considered one of
the finest interpreters of both
the Romantic and early 20th
century composers. Attesti's
repertoire includes such mas-
ters as Chopin, Bach, Mozart
and Liszt as well as the music
of Gershwin.
Tickets are $25 per person
or $40 for two and available in
advance at Vystar Credit
Union and the Amelia Island-
Fernandina Beach-Yulee
Chamber of Commerce. For
more information or to reserve
tickets, call Shannon Brown at


(904) 908-2463.

Acing passes
Amelia Community
Theatre will have an eight-
week series of acting classes
called Twelve Things Every
Actor Wants to Know and
Enjoy Doing. Sinda Nichols is
the instructor. The classes, for
ages 16 and up, will be held
on Tuesday from 2-4 p.m.
from Feb. 5 through March 26
at 209 Cedar St. Tuition fee is
$70 for participants or $30 to
audit the sessions. There is a
class limit of 10 per category.
The series will focus on
developing vocal and physical
tools, imagination, concentra-
tion, relaxation, listening,
character development and
text analysis. Week eight will
be a showcase performance
for family and friends.
Enroll at the ACT Store at
www.ameliacommunitythe-
atre.org or by calling the the-
atre at 261-6749. For more
information, email the instruc-
tor at nichols.sinda@gmail.
com or the theater at acthe-
atre@att.net.


LEGAL NOTICES


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
FIRST COAST INC
The hold' of the following
certifcate(s) has filed sa:d cer-
tificate(s) for a tax deed to be
issued thereon.The certificate
numbers) and year of
issuance, the description of
the prope-ty. and the name(s)
In which t is assessed are as
follow
File Number 2012-058-TD
Certificate Number 2564
Parcel Numoer 14-3N-28-0000-
0001-0000
Year of Issuance 2010
Description of Property: PT OF
OR 410/664 & OR 563/40 & PT
OR 665/1541 & PT 679/1922 PT
OR 837/131 & PT OR 957/325
L/E PT OR 1306/659 MARSH
LAND
Assessed To JACKSON J
WOODARD, HERBERT WM FISH-
LER, HAIDE BELL K THOMPSON,
JACKSON J WOODWARD, HER-
BERT WM FISHLER, HAIDE BELL K
THOMPSON
All of the above property is
located in Nassau County in
the State of Florida.
Unless such certificates)
shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property
described in such certificate or
certificates will be sold to the
Highest Bidder at the MAIN
ENTRANCE OF THE NASSAU
COUNTY JUDICIAL ANNEX,
76347 VETERANS WAY, YULEE,
FL on the 22nd day of January
2013, between the hours of
11 00 a.m. and 2"00 p.m. The
Clerk of Court's Office Policy is
to hold the sale at 11:30 a.m.
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
NASSAu .'.L ,IT
CLERK r .
RHODA GOODWIN,
DEPUTY CLERK
If you are a person with dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator at (904) 548-
4600 press 0, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days, i you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711,
4t 12-19-26-2012 & 01-02-09-
2013
1102

NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
GERMAN AMERICA CAPITAL
CORP
The holder of the following
certificates) has filed said cer-
tificate(s) for a tax deed to be
Issued thereon.The certificate
numbers) and year of
issuance, the description of
the property, and the names)
in which It is assessed are as
follows:
File Number: 2012-059-TD
Certificate Number 2648
Parcel Number: 41-3N-28-1250-
0098-0000
Year of Issuance: 2010
Description of Property LOT 98
IN OR 1375/1480 UGHTHOUSE
POINTE #2 PB 7/145
Assessed To TOMAS FRENES,
RONALD GROSSMAN, J W
CORDRAY
All of the above property is
located in Nassau County, In
the State of Florida.
Unless such certificates)
shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property
described n such certificate or
certificates will be sold to the
Highest Bidder at the MAIN
ENTRANCE OF THE NASSAU
COUNTY JUDICIAL ANNEX,
76347 VETERANS WAY, YULEE,
FL on the 22nd day of January,
2013, between the hours of
11.00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The
Clerk of Court's Office Policy is
to hold the sale at 11:30 a.m.
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
NASSAU COUNTY
CLERK OF COURT
RHODA GOODWIN,
DEPUTY CLERK
If you are a person with dis-
ablity who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate In this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain asss-
tance, Please contact the
ADA Coordinator at (904) 548-
4600 press 0, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days, if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711.
4t 12-19-26-2012 & 01-02-09-
2013
1103

NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
GERMAN AMERICA CAPITAL
CORP
The holder of the following
certificates) has filed said cer-
tificate(s) for a tax deed to be
issued thereon.The certificate
numbers) and year of
issuance, the description of
the property, and the name(s)
In which It is assessed are as
follows
File Number 2012-060-TD
Certificate Number 882
Parcel Number 10-1 N-25-2880-
0003-0070
Year of Issuance 2010
Description of Property BLOCK
3 LOT 7 R 107810 IN OR 653 PG


1176 NASSAU PLANTATIONS
UNR
Assessed To: DONALD E HICKS
JR, DONALD E HICKS JR
All of the above property is
located in Nassau County, in
the State of Florida.
Unless such certificates)
shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property
described in such certificate or
certificates will be sold to the
Highest Bidder at the MAIN
ENTRANCE OF THE NASSAU
COUNTY JUDICIAL ANNEX,
76347 VETERANS WAY, YULEE,
FL onthe 22nd day of January,
2013, between the hours of
11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The
Clerk of Court's Office Policy Is
to hold the sale at 11 30 a.m.
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
NASSAB COUNTY
CLERK OF COURT
RHODA GOODWIN,
DEPUTY CLERK
If you are a person with dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator at (904) 548-
4600 press 0, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or Immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711.
4t 12-19-26-2012 & 01-02-09-
2013
1104
----------
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
I i .: l: Hi:I-I: -' i :- rJ ir -1 .
,-71 1- 1 -r, 111 i -1 I Pi -i.
CORP
The holder of the following
certificates) has filed said cer-
tificate(s) for a tax deed to be
issued thereon.The certificate
numbers) and year of
issuance, the description of
the property, and the name(s)
in which it is assessed are as
follows.
File Number 2012-062-TD
Certificate Number: 1032
Parcel Number 09-2N-25-0000-
0003-0010
Year of Issuance: 2010
Description of Property. PT OF
OR 607 PG 528
Assessed To: RONALD D BRAD-
DOCK LISSA K BRADDOCK
All of the above property Is
located in Nassau County, in
the State of Florida.
Unless such certificite(s)
shall be redeemed accord-
Ing to law, the property
described In such certicate or
certificates will be sold to the
Highest Bidder at the MAIN
ENTRANCE OF THE NASSAU
COUNTY JUDICIAL ANNEX,
76347 VETERANS WAY, YULEE,
FL on the 29th day of January,
2013, between the hours of
11:00 a.m. and 2'00 p.m. The
Clerk of Court's Office Policy is
to hold the sale at 11:30 a.m.
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
NASSAU COUNTY
CLERK OF COURT
RHODA GOODWIN,
DEPUTY CLERK
If you are a person with dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate In this proceeding, you
are entitle, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator at (904) 548-
4600 press 0, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or Immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call'711.
4t 12-26-2012 & 01-02-09-16-
2013
1118
----------
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TA( DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
GERMAN AMERICAN CAPITAL
CORP
The holder of the following
certficate(s) has filed said cer-
tificate(s) for.a tax deed to be
issued thereon:The certificate
numbers) and year of issuan-
ce, the description of the prop-
erty, and the name(s) in which
it is assessed are as follows:
File Number 2012-061-TD
Certificate Number: 938
Parcel Number. 37-1N-25-
296A-0007-000
Year of Issuance 2010
Description of Property TRACT
7 R224018 CASE #2007-CP-
0182 & IN OR 1558/178 & OR
1558/181 & OR 1558/184 LEE
STONER SHORES 1 UNR
Assessed To GaryTapley
All of the above property is
located in Nassau County In
the State of Florida.
Unless such certificates)
shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property
described in such certificate or
certificates will be sold to the
Highest Bidder at the MAIN
ENTRANCE OF THE NASSAU
COUNTY JUDICIAL ANNEX,
76347 VETERANS WAY, YULEE,
FL on the 29th day of January
2013, between the hours of
11 00 a.m. and 200 p.m. The
Clerk of Court s Office Policy s
to hold the sale at 11 30 a.m.
JOHN A CRAWFORD
NASSAU COUNTY
CLERK OF COURT
RHODA GOODWIN,
DEPUTY CLERK
If you are a person with dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation In order to partci-


pate In this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator at (904) 548-
4600 press 0, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion If the time before the
I scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; If you are hearing
or voice Impaired, call 711.
4t 12-26-2012 & 01-02-09-16-
2013
1117
----------
LEGAL NOTICE
We will sell or otherwise dis-
pose of the contents of the
following units to satisfy the
delinquent storage lien placed
in accordance with the state
of Florida Statue 83.806.
1008 Michael Petty
General Household Goods
1012 Shara Lynn Svoboda
SGeneral Household Goods
1043 Denise Hill
General Household Goods
1045 Aaron Arnold Goodson
General Household Goods
1055 Gllberto S. Silva
General Household Goods
1143 Shelby Lelgh
Cunningham
General Household Goods
2121 Carol Williams Woollery
General Household Goods
Sale will be conducted at
AIA Stow-A-Way Storage,
463915 State Road 200,Yulee,
Florida 32097 at 10:00 am on
January 18, 2013. Open door
sale, cash only. A cleaning
deposit will be taken. (904)
225-1940. This sale Is open to
the public,
I, I I. ..i- _i.I
----------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR NASSAU
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.:
45-2009-CA-000207-
AXXX-YX
SEC.:
BUTTON LOAN SERVING LP
Plaintiff,
v
WILLIAM LIPFORD, JR.;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
WILLIAM UPFORD JR.,; WILLIAM
LIPFORD III; HERON ISLES OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC., AS
NOMINEE FOR HOMEAMERI-
CAN MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION; UNKNOWN PERSONS)
IN POSSESSION OFTHE SUBJECT
PROPERTY
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order Resetting
the Foreclosure Sale dated
December 13, 2012 entered
In Civil Case No. 45-2009-CA-
000207-AXXX-YX of the Circuit
Court of the Fourth Judicial
Circuit in and for Nassau
County, Florida, wherein the
Clerk of the Circuit Court will
sell to the highest bidder for
cash on 18th day of January
2013, at 11:30 a.m. at the
Nassau Judicial Annex, Nassau
County Courthouse, the prop-
erty situated in Nassau County,
Florida, 76347 Veterans Way,
Yulee, Florida 32097, relative
to the following described
property as set forth In the Find
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 43, HERON ISLES PHASE
ONE ACCORDING TOTHE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 40-46, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF NASSAU
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an
Interest In the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date
of the Ls Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the
sale.
ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation In order to
participate In this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you. to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:
ADA Coordinator, Nassau
County FL
Phone. (904) 630-2564
crtintrp@coj.net
DATED AT YULEE, FLORIDA
THIS 20th DAY OF DECEMBER,
2012.
/s/ Arielle Wilson
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
CLERK OFTHE CIRCUIT COURT
NASSAU COUNTY FLORIDA
2t01-02-09-2013
1125

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 12-CP-251
DIVISION: A
IN RE ESTATE OF MICHAEL E.
STEBLER, III,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of MICHAEL E. STEBLER,
IIl, deceased, File Number 12-
CP,251, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Nassau
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is Nassau County Courthouse,
76347 Veterans' Way, Suite 456,
Yulee, Florida 32097. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTI-
'FIED THAT
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons hav-


Ing claims or demands against
decedents estate on whom
a copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHSAFTER THE DATE
OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMSAND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of fist Publication of
this Notice-is January 2nd,
2013.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:'
KATHRYN KNEE, Esquire
Florida Bar No.: 849571
KATHRYN KNEE, RA.
1027 South 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904) 491-1781
Personal Representative:
MARGARET L. STEBLER
1134 North Fletcher Avenue
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
2t 01-02-09-2013
1126

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR NASSAU
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.:
45-2012-CA-000733
NEWEST BANK, F.S.B
Plpint ff.

DEBORAH D. CHAPUN,AS PER-
SONAL REPRESENTATIVE OFTHE
ESTATE OF ALLOYD B. LUTZ,
DECEASED; DEBORAH D.
CHAPLIN; KEITH ALLEN LUTZ;
BAMBI LYNN EMMET; BRAN-
DON BARTLETT WALTERS; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE HEIRS, BEN-
EFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY,THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
ALLOYD B. LUTZ, DECEASED;
COLETAYLOR COMPANY, INC.;
OCEAN VILLAGE NEIGHBOUR-
HOOD ASSOC. INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2 ALL OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
INTEREST BY,THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR AUVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: KEITH ALLEN LUTZ
Last Known Address.
Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
Previous Address: Unknown
TO: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE,
HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THE
ESTATE OF ALLOYD B. LUTZ7
DECEASED;
whose residence Is
unknown If he/she/they be liv-
ing; and if he/she/they be
dead, the unknown defen-
dants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, ilenors, creditors,
trustees, and all parties claim-
Ing an interest by, through,
under or against the
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and dl parties having or clam-
ing to have any right, title or
interest In the property
described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.
TO: ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR AUVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
whose residence is unknown if
he/she/they be living; and if
he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who
may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees.
lienors, creditors, trustees, and
all parties claiming an interest
by through, under or against
the Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive.
and dl parties having or dalm-
ing to have any right, title or
interest in the property
described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following prop-
erty in Nassau County, Florido
LOT 38, OCEAN VILLAGE
UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 19 AND
20, PUBUC RECORDS OF NAS-
SAU COUNTY FLORIDA
This property Is located at
the Street address of 1768
Village Court, Fernandina
Beach, Florida 32034
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve
a copy of your written defens-
es on or before February 8th,
2013 a date which Is within 30
days after the first publication,


If any on Elizabeth R. Wellborn,
PA., Plaintiff's Attorney, whose
address Is 350 Jim Moran Blvd.,
Suite 100, Deerfield Beach.
Forida 33442, and file the orig-
inal with this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
Attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint orPetition.
This Notice shall be pub-
Ilshed once a week for two
consecutive weeks in The
News Leader.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of the court on December 26,
2012.
JOHN A. CRAWFORD
CLERK OF THE COURT
By /s/ Earlene S. Lane
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Randolph H. Clemente, Esq.
Jacquelyn C. Herrman, Esq.
Elizabeth R. Wellborn, PA.
350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442
Telephone: (954) 354-3544
Facsimile (954) 354-3545
Primary email rclemente@er
wlaw.com
Secondary email: service-
complete@erwlaw.com
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, if you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to provisions of certain
assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator at (904) 548-
4600 (then press 0) at least 7
working days before your
scheduled court appearance,
or 'iT i -I 1i., I-- '
thL 1r :, r
before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; If you
are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
2t 01-02-09-2013
1129

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR NASSAU
COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.:
45-2012-CA-000698
SEC.:
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
MICHELLE L GARDNER, et od
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDING-PROPERTY
TO:
JOSHUA D. GARDNER,
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS IS:
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 8800
US HIGHWAY 301 NORTH
BRYCEVILLE, FL 32009
Residence unknown f living,
Including any unknown spouse
of the said Defendants, if either
has remarried and if either or
both of said Defendant(s) are
dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors,
Ilenors, and trustees, and all
other'persons claiming by,
through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the
aforementioned named
Defendants) and such of the
aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the
aforementioned unknown
Defendants) as may be
infants, Incompetents or oth-
erwise not sul jurls.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been com-
menced to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following real
property, lying and being and
situated in NASSAU County,
Florida, more particularly
described as follows
A PORTION OF SECTION 19,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 24
EAST, NASSAU COUNTY, FLORI-
DA BEING MORE PARTICULAR-
LY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FOR A POINT OF REFER-
ENCE, COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 19; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 26 MINUTES 13 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 19, A DISTANCE OF 294.13
FEET TO A POINT LOCATED ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
UNE OF CSX TRANSPORTATION
RAILROAD (A 200 FOOT RIGHT-
OF-WAY AS NOW ESTAB-
LISHED); THENCE SOUTH 18
DEGREES 28 MINUTES 50 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG SAID EAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DIS-
TANCE OF 2115.55 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 71
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
436.28 FEET TO A POINT OF
BEGINNING, THENCE CONTIN-
UE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 32 MIN-
UTES 14 SECONDS EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 369.16 FEET TO A
POINT LOCATED ON THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 301 (A 230
FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY AS NOW
ESTABUSHED) SAID POINT ALSO
BEING ON THE ARC OF A
CURVE CONCAVE OF THE
NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING
A RADIUS OF 17058.74 FEET.
THENCE AROUND AND
ALONG SAID CURVE AND
RIGHT-OF-WAY UNE, AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 134.75 FEET (SAID
ARC BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF SOUTH 14 DEGREES
45 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST,
134.75 FEET) TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES
32 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 341 00 FEETTO


A POINT; THENCE NORTH 03
DEGREES 07 MINUTES 33 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
139.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH AND SUB-
JECT TO A 30 FOOT EASEMENT
FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS
BEING A PORTION OF SECTION
19,TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST, NASSAU COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS'
FOR A POINT OF REFER-
ENCE, COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 19; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 26 MINUTES 13 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY UNE OF SAID SEC-
TION 19, A DISTANCE OF 294.13
FEET TO A POINT LOCATED ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
UNE OF CSXTRANSPORTATION
RAILROAD (A 200 FOOT RIGHT-
OF-WAY AS NOW ESTAB-
LISHED), THENCE SOUTH 18
DEGREES 28 MINUTES 50 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG SAID EAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY UNE,A DIS-
TANCE OF 2115.55 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE SOUTH 71
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
805.44 FEET TO A POINT LOCAT-
ED ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 301 (A 230 FOOT RIGHT-
OF-WAY, AS NOW ESTAB-
LISHED), SAID POINT ALSO
BEING ON THE ARC OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING
A RADIUS OF 17058.74 FEET;
THENCE AROUND AND
ALONG SAID CURVE AND
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, AN ARC
Cl-T'rI-E OF 297!98 FEET TO'
in- : ii OF'BEGINNING(SAID
ARC BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF SOUTH 15 DEGREES
01 MINUTES 37 SECONDSWEST,
297.97 FEET); THENCE SOUTH
74 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 21
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 30.00 FEET TO THE FORMER
WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 301 (A
200 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY), SAID
POINT BEING ON THE ARC OF
A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING
A RADIUS OF 17088.74 FEET;
THENCE AROUND AND
ALONG SAID CURVE, AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 30.05 FEET (SAID
ARC BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF SOUTH 15 DEGREES
34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST
30.05 FEET) TO A POINT;
THENCE NORTH 74 DEGREES
22 MINUTES 19 SECONDSWEST.
A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEETTO A
POINT ONTHE WESTERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY UNE OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 301 (A 230 FOOT RIGHT-
OF-WAY, AFOREMENTIONED.
SAID POINT BEING ON THEARC
OF A CURVE CONCAVETOTHE
NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING
A RADIUS OF 17058.74 FEET;
THENCE AROUND AND
ALONG SAID CURVE AND
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET (SAID
ARC BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD BARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF NORTH 15 DEGREES
34 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST,
30.00 FEET) TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ALSO TOGETHER WITH AND
SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS BEING IN A PORTION
OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST, NAS-
SAU COUNTY FLORIDA, BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FOR A POINT OF REFER-
ENCE, COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 19; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 26 MINUTES 13 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG THE
NORTHERLY UNE OF SAID SEC-
TION 19,A DISTANCE OF 294.13
FEET TO A POINT LOCATED ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
UNE OF CSX TRANSPORTATION
RAILROAD (A 200 FOOT RIGHT-
OF-WAY, AS NOW ESTAB-
LISHED), THENCE SOUTH 18
DEGREES 28 MINUTES 50 SEC-
ONDS WEST, ALONG SAID EAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY UNE, A DIS-
TANCE OF 2115.55 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 71
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
805.44 FEET TO A POINT LOCAT-
ED ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 301 (A 230 FOOT RIGHT-
OF-WAY, AS NOW ESTAB-
LISHED), SAID POINT ALSO
BEING ON THE ARC OF A
CURVE CONCAVE OF THE
NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING
A RADIUS OF 17058.74 FEET,
THENCE AROUND AND
ALONG SAID CURVE AND
RIGHT-OF-WAY, AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 134.75 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING (SAID
ARC BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF 14 DEGREES 45 MIN-
UTES 01 SECONDS WEST, 134.75
FEET), THENCE CONTINUE ON
SAID CURVE AND RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE, AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 308.68 FEET (SAID ARC
BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF SOUTH 15 DEGREES
29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST,
308.68 FEET). THENCE CONTIN-
UE ON SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, SOUTH 15 DEGREES 58
MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST,
29 61 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE
NORTH 71 DEGREES 32 MIN-
UTES 14 SECONDS WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 60.06 FEET TO A
POINT. THENCE NORTH 15


DEGREES 58 MINUTES 54 SEC- RECORDS OF NASSAU COUN-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF TY, FLORIDA
27.04 FEET TO THE BEGINNING has been filed against you
OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE and you are required to serve
NORTHWESTERLY AND HAVING a copy of your written
A RADIUS OF 16998.74 FEET; defense, if anyto iton Kelly M.
THENCE AROUND AND Williams, Esquire, Brock & Scott,
ALONG SAID CURVE, AN ARC PLLC., the Plaintiff's attorney,
DISTANCE OF 311.27 FEET(SAID whose address is 1501 N.W.
ARC BEING SUBTENDED BY A 49th. Street, Suite 200, FT.
CHORD BEARING AND DIS- Lauderdale. 33309, within 30
TANCE OF NORTH 15 DEGREES days after the date of the first
29 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, publication of this notice, and
311.26 FEET) THENCE SOUTH 71 file the original with the Clerk
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 14 SEC- ofthis Courteither before serv-
ONDS EAST, 60.11 FEET TO THE Ice on Plaintiff's attorney or
POINT OF BEGINNING, Immediately thereafter; oth-
COMMONLY KNOWN AS: erwise a default will be
* 8800 US HIGHWAY 301 NORTH, entered against you for the
BRYCEVILLE, FL 32009 relief demanded In the cornm-
This action has been filed plaint or petition.
against you and you are DATED on December 26th,
required to serve a copy of 2012.
your written defense, If any, John Crawford
such Morris Hardwick As Clerk of fhe Court
Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for 2t 01-02-09-2013
Plaintiff, whose address Is 5110 1131
Elsenhower Blvd, Suite, 120,
Tampa, FL 33634 on or before IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
February 8th, 2013, and file the FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
original with the clerk of this IN AND FOR NASSAU
Court either before service on COUNTY, FLORIDA
Plaintiff's attorney or immedi- CIVIL ACTION
ately there after,-otherwise a CASE NO.:
defadt will be entered against 45-201 -CA-000323
you forthe relief demanded in DIVISION:
the Complaint. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
WITNESS my hand and seal LON FKA THE BANK OF NEW
of this Court on the 26th day of YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CER-
December, 2012. TIFCATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC.,
John A. Crawford ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-
Clerk of the Circuit Court OA19, MORTGAGE PASS-
By: /s/ Earlene S. Lane THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
Deputy Clerk 2006-OA19,
If you are a person with a dis- Plaintiff,
ability who needs any accom- vs.
modation in order to partici- PAUL W. GALIPEAUet al,
-- t ,-. ti-,: : .- .ii-. /ou ,Defenda nt(s).
,- --.il edr c -.: .: -1 :- ,ou, ; NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED '
-: : Ir : :-,ia,.,-, ssis-' FORECLOSURESALI
tance. Please contact the NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
ADA Coordinator crtintrp@coj. pursuant to an Order
net or (904) 630-2564 at least Rescheduling Foredosure Sale
working days before your dated December 12, 2012
scheduled court appearance, and entered in Case No. 45-
or immediately upon receiving 2011 -CA-000323 of the Circuit
this notification If the time Court of the FOURTH Judicial
before the scheduled appear- Circuit In and for NASSAU
once Is less than 7 days; If you County, Florida wherein, THE
are hearing or voice Impaired, BANK OF NEWYORK MELLON
call 711. FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK
2t 01-02-09-2013 AS TRUSTEE,FOR THE CERTIFI-
1130 CATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC.,
--.--.---- ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-
NOTICE OF PUBUC SALE OA19, MORTGAGE PASS-
A1A Towing gives notice of THROUGH CERTIFICATES. SERIES
foreclosure of len and Intent 2006-OA19 Is the Plaintiff and
to sell vehicles, pursuant to PAUL W. GAUPEAU; MADA J.
subsection 713.78 of the GALIPEAU A/K/A M'ADA J.
RorldaStatutes.on1/26/13,at GAUPEAU; HOME EQUITY OF
10:00 amAt 86196 Overstreet AMERICA INC.; FLORA PARKE
Ln., Yulee, FL. AIA Towing HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION.
reserves the right to accept INC.; are the Defendants, The
or reject any and ca bids. Clerk of the Court will sell to
1999 CHEVROLET the highest and best bidder
VIN1#GNCT18W9XK145952 for cash at NASSAU JUDICIAL
2007 FINN TRAILER ANNEX 76347 VETERAN'S WAY,
VIN#1F9SS17187F135065 YULEE, FLORIDA at 11:30AM,
1995TOYOTA on the 18th day of January,
VIN#4TI SK12E4SU482030 2013, the following described
1t 1-09-2013 property as set forth in said
1134 Find Judgment: .
---------. LOT 104, FLORA PARKE, UNIT
NOTICE OF PUBUC SALE 2A. ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
BILL'STOWING gives Notice THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
of Foreclosure of Uen and PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 239, 240
intent to sell these vehicles on AND 241 OF THE PUBLIC
01/21/2013, 8:30 am at 425 S RECORDS OF NASSAU COUN-
8TH ST FERNANDINA, FL 32034- TY FLORIDA.
3609, pursuant to subsection A/K/A 30489 FOREST PARKE
713.78 of the Florida Statutes. DRIVE FERNANDINA BEACH, FL
BILL'S TOWING reserves the 32034
right to accept or reject any Any person claiming an
and/or all bids. interest in the surplus from the
1FALP6537SK116534 1995 sale, If any, other than the
FORD property owner as of the date
1G3NL52T7VM321079 1997 'of the Us Pendens mustfile a
OLDSMOBILE claim within sixty (60) days
1t 1-09-2013 after the sale.
1135 WITNESS MY HAND and the
-----.-----seal of this Court on
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE December 28,2012.
Notice is hereby given that John A. Crawford
on 2/5/13 at 1000A.M., or Clerk of the Circuit Court
thereafter, at CubeSmart By: /s/ Amanda Steam
#0323, 1678 S. 8th St., in the city Deputy Clerk
of Fernandina Beach, state of See Americans with
Florida. The undersigned, Disabilities Act
CubeSmart #0323 will sell at If you are a person with a dis-
Public Sale by competitive ability who needs any accom-
bidding, the personal proper- modafion in oraer to patici-
ty heretofore stored with the pate in th:s proceeding, you
undersigned by are entitled, at no cost to you,
Space # A5 to the provson of certain asss-
Erick G Knight tance please contact the cr-
Space # J3 cult court at (904) 321-5709.
Kristi M Goldsmith 2t 01-09-16-2013
Soace# M46 1132


William A Mclaughlin
Space# 1201
Heather S Joyce
All items In storage contain
household items unless other-
wise mentioned
It 1-09-162013
1136

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR NASSAU
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No.: 12-CA-0706
CitiMortgage. Inc.
Plaintiff.
vs.
Michael O. Santos. Christina
Lynn Santos, Settler's Ridge at
Calcco Homeowners Assoc a-
tion. Inc.. Community First
Credit Union of Florida,
Unknown Tenant #1, Unknown
Tenant #2
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION -
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO MICHAEL SANTOS
Last known Address 32215
Setters Ridge Drrve, Brycevlle,
FL 32009
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property.
LOT 17. SETTLER'S RIDGE AT
CALICO, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 243
AND 244. OF THE PUBLIC


BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA
INVITATION TO BID
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Boaro of County
Comm:ss'oners of Nassau
County Florda nnvtes sealed
Olds for
ROADWAY STRIPING AND
PAVEMENT MARKING
Ba No.NC13-001
For detailed nfo-aotion
regarding the old cue date,
o'a soeccot o-s, and 'equ e-
ments for this ITB, lease vist
the Nassau County's weoste
at http //www.,assouco.n-
tyfl.com or contact the
Contract Management
Department at 904-491-7377.
Bid information is also aval-
able at http //www.oemanc-
starcom
ATTEST
JOHN A CRAWFORD
EX-OFFICIO CLERK
DANIEL B. LEEPER
CHAIR
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
NASSAU COUNTY FLORIDA
It 01-09-2013
1133


LEGAL NOTICE DEADLINE
NOON FRIDAY.
261-3696














B CLASSIFIED


NEWS-LEADER
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9.2013


To PLACE AN AD, CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financal-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lbst & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM &ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipmen- 802 rhibli- Hl.,m,: 815 Kii.gsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurished
103 In Memoriam 207 BusinessOpportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilize- e83 rif,. t,:..,-r L.t 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade e0al cm-Iaa I 1ar,3 r-..rrrn-,- 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 8r. eea:r,-; 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Vi,'ertr.:r., 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Co-,frr,;,-;.'mu. .852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 lewelry/Watches 701 Boats &'Trailers 808 Oiff lni.r.,d j iu 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATIONmobiles
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 lessons/Classes 602 Artrcies for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 e.:..,r -uFFpp.I; Doca(.ae 809 Lots 854 Room 902 Trucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 t.la~:ellInreuI 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 'i. c u.T-Er..jr.-i is.l-O Il Farm-z ?. A.rFjOig 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Iicr-eron. ,,I,:,l 81 C.:.rmmrncrr,' i i 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 60 Corrmpurier-.uppi,-_. 618 Auctions 705 C.&rmpuerz Suppli;-:, i Frrc.F.-r, tE,:hsng. 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW


S 102 Lost & Found
CHOCOLATE LAB found near O'Neil.
Call (904)261-0686.
If You Have Lost Your Pet please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
LOST LADIES GOLD, ENGRAVED
WEDDING BAND while shopping in
Yulee on 12/26. Please call (512)451-
4141 if found. Reward.



% amabas
CENTER, INC
The New to You Resale Store is an
excellent place to recycle your household
goods. For info, call: 904.321.2334
930 .140H S^Torr woR4NDiA Bj SF. FF32004


105 Public Notice

ALL REAL ESTATE Advertised
Herein is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which .makes It
illegal to advertise any prefer-ence,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national
origin, or the intention to make any
such. preference, limitation or
discrimination.
The News-Leader will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real
estate which is In violation of the
law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an equal
opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the United
States Department of Housing and
Urban Development HUD -
1(800)669-9777, or for the hearing
impaired 1(800)927-9275.


JOB FAIR
-- I- i--


Monday, January 14,2013 9 am 6 prm
Omni Amelia Island Planation's Racquet Park
6800 First Coast Highway Amelia island, FL
OmniAmelialslandJobs.com [904) 277-5919

pin to ecian t t our Re-ogi'i notior, rernirn
I d 50eki ng emp oync pporiti Mary,
Srececiioft, .gie .svice~ fr toffie, houS kp and rore-



Q .MNI HOTELS & RESORTS'
amelia island plantation
EOE/M/F/D/V Drug Free Workplace


The City of Fernandina Beaci is


currently accepting


employment applications/resumes


for the position of City Clerk.


Apply on www.fbfl.us/jobs,


or mail resume to:



CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH

Attn: Human Resources

204 ASH STREET

FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034

EEO/M/F/D/VP


201 Help Wanted
LOCAL LAW FIRM seeking full time
administrative assistant/receptionist.
Qualified candidates must have
experience in Excel, Microsoft Word
and handling mutliple phone
lines. Prior legal experience a plus!
Resumes accepted by email only to
lodydp(acomcast.net.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT
A busy medical practice is looking for
an experienced Certified Medical
Assistant for Femandina office. MUST
have previous experience and a great
attitude. Monday-Friday with great
benefits. Apply by sending resumes.to
sdavis0 l(@bclinic.com. -

DRIVERS Class A Flatbed, home
every weekend! Pay 37cpm, both
ways, full benefits. Requires 1 yr OTR
flatbed exp. Call (800)572-5489 x227,
SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL.
ANF

Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Cbmmission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-IELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.

TIRED OF LIVING Paycheck to
Paycheck? There's great earning
potential as a Professional Truck
Driver! The avg Professional Truck
Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day
CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster!
Approved for Veterans Training. Call
today (866) 467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012.
ANF

P/T BOOKKEEPER/RECEPTIONIST -
for busy church office. Accounts
payables/receivables as well as
computer skills a must. Fax resume to
Sandy (904)277-8323.

DRIVER Daily or weekly pay. $0.01
increase per mile after 6 mos & 12
mos. $0.03 quarterly bonus. Requires
3 mos recent exp. (800)414-9569,
www.driveknight.com. ANF


WE HIRE TOP
NOTCH PEOPLE!
APPLY TODAY:
www.satillatemps.com
OR CALL Stephanie, Kim, or Mary
904-261-5004

TIL'LAj



TEMPS
RECORDS CLERK
COURT CLERK
IT CARD SYSTEM
COORDINATOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ACCOUNTING CLERK
CALL CENTER MSR
OFFICE MANAGER
W/QUICKBOOKS
Succ ss dru. sren reouLseLdI OEVM/FV.H


S 201 Help Wanted


MANAGEMENT POSITION available
for Westgate Resort. Full benefit
package. Salary + commission. Yulee
location. Sales experience a plus. Call
Ed Newman (904)540-2313 or email
ed_newman@wgresorts.com

EXPERIENCED CABINET INSTALLER
Wanted Must have experience in
custom cabinets. FT w/benefits. Pay
based on experience. Valid driver's
license required. Install Helper Also
Needed FT w/benefits. Heavy lifting.
Valid driver's license required. Drug
Free Workplace. No calls, apply in
person only, Mooney's Custom
Woodworks, 1854 S 8th Street,
Fernandina
SECURITY OFFICERS NEEDED
Fernandina Beach. Current "D" lie.,
clear background, DL & DMV req.,
phone, Diploma/GED. Pay $9.75/hr +
benefits. DFWP--EEO/M/F/V/H. Apply
at: www.dsisecurity.com BB9100030

IMMEDIATE NEED
CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS,
HOME HEALTH AIDS
Want to work for the premier home
care company in Femandina? 'Short or
long hours, private duty. Excellent pay
and working conditions. Live Long Well
Care, call (904)432-1187.

TOP PAY for limited experience.
34cpm for 1 mo OTR exp plus benefits,
new equip & 401K. (877)258-8782,
www.ad-drivers.com. ANF

FOUR SEASONS BISTRO accepting
applications for positive attitude, drug
free kitchen staff. No walk-ins. Email
resume to:
fourseasonsbistrolivahoo.com
'1
A VPK DIRECTOR is needed at
Step By Step Learning Center II. Must
have required credentials. Apply in
person, 95734 Amelia Concourse.
GOT PERSONALITY? A positive
attitude? A great work ethic? Know
retail? You're hired! Apply at
nassauhealthfoods.net
.

SEEKING QUALITY CONSCIOUS
MARINE MECHANIC with high work
ethic. Must be honest, reliable, and
have a neat/clean appearance and a
positive attitude. Must have general set
of marine service tools for mechanical
service repairs on marine engines and
systems. Effective customer relation
skills in addition to possessing the
ability to up-sell our services. Any
portfolio showing work experience,
factory certification, industry awards,
skills, accomplishments, etc. are a
plus. Earn an aggressive salary while
loving what you do. Full time position
with 'great benefit package.. Drug,
testing required. If you do not posses
these qualities you need not apply.
Equal opportunity employer. Send in
resumes via e-mail at
marinemechaniciob(aomail.com.
SERVER & DISHWASHER for
breakfast/lunch. Must be experienced.
Call for appointment (904)206-2486.

DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW -
Leam to drive for Schneider National.
Earn $700/wk. No exp needed. Local
CDL training. Job ready in 15 days!
(888)368-1964. ANF
AUDITION to be our famous LADY
LIBERTY Energy & enthusiasm is a
must. Seasonal marketing opportunity.
Call Liberty Tax Service at 310-6273.


1I 201 Help Wanted


CAN YOU DIG IT? Heavy Equipment
School. 3 wk training program.
Backhoes, bulldozers, excavators. Local
job placement asst. VA benefits
approved. 2 National Certifications.
(866)362-6497. ANF

204 Work Wanted
CERTIFIED NURSES-AIDE seeking
a live-in position 3-4 days per week.
I'm unencumbered/personable. I have
reliable transportation/will travel. Top
ref's& background (321)438-5013
HOUSEKEEPER I WILL CLEAN
YOUR HOUSE: Dust & mop floors,
laundry, clean windows. Call (904)
415-0041 or 225-9459

207 Business
Opportunities

FOR SALE
50% SHAREHOLDER INTEREST
in local Real Estate Company with
proven sales record. Company has
two office locations; (1) on Island
(1) O'Neal area off Island with
Property Management. In 2010 &
2011 Company had the highest
number of closed transactions in
Nassau County and continues to be
successful with over 200 closed
sales during 2012. Serious
Inquiries ONLY.
Please contact:
Marlene Frost, CO-OWNER at
MarleneFrostRealtor@gmail.com
START NOW! Open Red Hot Dollar,
Dollar Plus, Mailbox, Discount Party,
$10 Clothing Store, Teen Store, Fitness
Center .from $51,900 worldwide.
www.drss20.com (800)518-3064. ANF




301 Schools &
Instruction
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from
home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal
Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement
assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV
authorized. www.CenturaOnline.com.
Call (888) 203-3179. ANF

NURSING CAREERS Begin Here -
Train in months, not years. Financial
aid if qualified. Housing available. Job
placement assistance. Call Centura
Institute Orlando (877)206-6559. ANF
MEDICAL CAREERS begin here
Train online f:r .111-': 3 ii H.: r '. 'l.I,.i.- l
Management. Job placement assist-
ance. Computer avail. Financial aid if
qualified. SCHEV certified. (838)203-
3179, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF
AIRLINE CAREERS Become an
Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing available. Job
placement assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (866)314-
3769. ANF

306 Lessons/Classes
JAZZ UP YOUR SOCIAL LIFE Start
with a free ballroom dance class,
Friday January 4th & 11th, 6pm, at
Bean School of Dance, 25 North 3rd
Street.


c


Excellent opportunity to join a great local business. Full time
position with bonuses available. Clean driving record a must.
Experienced automotive sales a must! Please bring your resume
in person or e-mail it to: mikebrown@prolinemotors.com
EOE, DFWP
C I h8tSret *Frnnina eac


SERVICE DIRECTORY


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAIN

Please Call Us
At 753-3067

HOMES CONDOS OFFICES
a BONDED, INSURED



CONCRETE \






Patios Sidewalks &
Driveway Add-ons, starting at '599
We will meet or beat any reasonable quotes.
Highest Quality Lowest Prices
Ollice: (904) 491-4383
Licensed & Bonded Cell: (904) 237-7742



Place an Ad!
Call 261-3696


BRANNAN

CoNSTRUcTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages

$16,495w
2244 WoodFramOnly
Addll enl CosI for
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AAMELIA

ISLAND

GUTTERS
SI When It Rains
-- Be Prepared.
6"Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
Now Installing Screened Rooms
FINANCING AVAILABLE

LICENSED & INSURED Lowell Duster

(904) 261-1940


HOME RlP*.- I


~,'I 904-491-4385


KNAPPS
STUCCO
SERVICES, LLC.
(904).753-3777
Shell. Synlhetic, EIFS Stone
Removal of Stucco

MilhaelKmapp AnvSizmJob
15 Years Exerience free Eslimals


CHARLES MILNER
CONSTRUCTION, INC
NEW CONSTRUCTION
HOME REPAIRS/REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICES
PAINTING
904-536-8007
LIC. # CBCB50037




THIS SPAC


1
GARAGE DOORS


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In -
"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much! ,1
SOiperalol r door replay menB Transmllter replacemeni
n roken spnlln s Sipped geared
* Cbles Smnle or ai l likes & ms iele
904-277-2086

L\.1\N NIA NTENANCE

Bob's Irrigation

& Landscapinglnc.
+ Full Service Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design & Installation
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Outdoor Lighting Solutions
Seasonal Lighting Projects
Sod Installation & Repair
+ Concrete Pavers & Fire Pits
+ Deck Installation & Repair
+ RetainingWalls& Ponds
Grading Services& Drainage

904-261-5040
ES 12000919
bbbsirrigationlandscape.com


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you'


NF\\ & USED C\RS


Scrot Lawson Chris .Lowe
nse-,,': ,,I 1 1a S n u ;
Serving Nassau County
for over 20 years with





464054 SR 200 Yulee

(904) 261-6821

P\MNTING




Quality Work at
Reasonable Prices
"V,.i t lp 'it n o i l n, 'l I ] i "
* IJcensed Bondedl Insured
FRI;ESTI1A 225 9292Q


PRESSURE \.~ASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses Trailers Patios
Driveways etc.
Exterior Windows
Wood Decks Cleaned & Reseaed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353

ROOFING


UCOASTAL.ROOFING
SYSTEMS


k "Re.Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest Roofing &
Siding Contractor Serving Satisfied
Homebullders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing New Roofing
Siding Soffit& Fascia

S 261-2233
S Free Estimates
SA Cons al Bulding Systems Co
CCC-057020


'lrrfllllll/////lyftHl4lll1k


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directoryl
Call 261-3696 and find
out howv to put your
advertising dollars
to work for your


BALED STRAW CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION


-1


I


601 Garage Sales
RUMMAGE SALE St. Peter's
Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic Ave.
Sat. 1/12, 8am-2pm.
HANDYMAN GARAGE SALE at 410
S. 14th St., FB. Sat 1/12, 8am 2pm.
DON'T MISS THIS GARAGE SALE! -
96608 Sweetbriar Ln., Yulee. Sat. 1/5,
8am-3pm. Tons of baby items, high
chairs, car seats, baby girl clothes, nice
home items, men's/women's/teen's
clothes, name brand purses & jeans.
(F)
HUGE YARD SALE Longaberger
baskets & accessories, bedroom &
assorted furniture, quality clothing,
lighting fixtures, aquariums, fishing
poles, HEPA air purifier, CD's, DVD's,
books, many other household items.
Sat. 1/12 from 8 AM, Flora Parke,
30435 Forest Parke Dr. Follow signs.
MOVING SALE Table/chairs, futon,
coffee/end tables, lawn equipment,
household items. Fri. & Sat., 8am-lpm.
712 San Fernando ,

602 Articles for Sale
CORN HOLE GAMES Any color, any
team, $110. Call Ralph (904)225-!309.

S 603 Miscellaneous
GOT RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS? -
Local doctors researching study drug
for rheumatoid arthritis. Free study
drug & care, & up to $1200
compensation. Please call (866)653-
4703. ANF
PRE-LUBRICATED CATHETERS for
men. Fast & easy to use, less pain, less
discomfort. Covered by Medicare &
insurance. Free sample if qualified.
(888) 280-9787, www.cathbest.com.
ANF
CATHETERS just for women.
Individually pre-lubricated in discreet
attractive containers & covered by
Medicare & most insurance. Free
sample if qualified. www.catheasy.com
(888) 257-1031. ANF

611 Home Furnishings
SOLID WOOD BUNK BEDS with
built in shelves/drawers and desk.
Excellent condition. $500. Call
(904)556-1120.
LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET new,
never used, $975. CHERRY
BEDROOM SET solid wood, new in
factory boxes, $895. Orig. price $6500.
Can deliver. Bill (813)298-0221., ANF





805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.

806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.


I


A local research study may offer free
investigational rheumatoid arthritis medication.
Compensation up to $1200







WLDNF.SDAY. JANUARY 9, 2013 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 9B


817 Other Areas
20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for
40 acre price/payment. $0 down $168/
mo. Money back guarantee. No credit
checks. Beautiful views, West Texas.
www.sunsetranches.com 1(800)843-
7537 ANF


SEA

851 Roommate Wanted
MATURE PERSON to share 3BR/1BA
house on island near main beach. WiFi.
Dog OK. Prefer no smoking. $400/mo.
+ $200 dep. 904-277-0040

852 Mobile Homes
3BR/2BA DW ON LAKE 75586
Johnson Lake Rd. $850/mo. + $700
deposit. Call (470)216-7113 or (478)
363-1066
FOR RENT 3BR mobile home, Yulee.
$700/mo. + $350 deposit..References
& background check. (904)225-5419
AFFORDABLE LIVING Bring your
RV to live on a campground for $425/
mo. All utilities included. Ask about
senior citizen special. (904)225-5577.
RV RENTALS AVAILABLE in a
campground. Weekly or monthly. All
utilities & WiFi included. (904)225-
5577.
SW w/CH&A 3BR/2BA on 1 acre of
land very private. Dependable, clean
renters only need apply. $185 per
week, no lease required. $600 deposit
and 1st weeks rent to move in
immediately. Call 904-753-3356.
VERY NICE 3BR/2BA DW In great
condition. Clean & bright. Laundry
room, garden tub, quiet area. 97030
Topaz Ct., Yulee. $950/mo. + dep.
(904)491-3197


HOMELESS


ANIMALS...

THEY'RE DYING FOR

A 2ND CHANCE,
ADOPT COMPANION TODAY.




J" .. .


I PAei na Anteoamriir ite Nlo8mbr


854 Rooms
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in my
5BR DW in Yulee. $400/mo (904)849-
7598.
3 ROOMS completely furnished, has
pvt entrance, pvt bathroom, & pvt
kitchen facilities. 1322 S. 3rd St.
$125/wk. Also, trailer and trailer lot
for rent. (904)572-6089, 261-7638.

855 Apartments
Furnished
LARGE 2 BEDROOM CH&A, washer/
dryer, hardwood floors. Near ocean.
$800/mo. Call (904)491-6136.
SMALL EFFICIENCY APT. 3 minutes
from beach. Utilities included. Partly
furnished. $500/mo. + deposit. Call
(904)310-5977.


855 Apartments
Furnished
1BR/1BA, DINING/KITCHEN -
Carport, elect., water, garbage, w/d,
cable TV. All furnished, in Nassauville.
6 mo. lease. $500/mo, $300/dep. 277-
3819
ON ISLAND 1BR at beach, IBR at
212 S. 14th, 3BR at N. 10th, 2/2
SWMH in park. Includes utils. Starting
$225-$275/wk + dep. (904)261-5034


t Iamabas N
CENTER, INC
Th e food panry needa d.lonti of
non-p_ i h ifod it m- 1ll ye.r ro u d.
I -or oe informion c: 904. 2.7000


Countryside Apartments
1&2 Bedroom Units

Tues, Thurs & Fri 8 am 5 pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103 TDD 1-800-955-8771
This inslilulion is an Equal Opportunity provider and employer


SIPSPO(UN 70


Yulee Villas
1, 2&3 Bedroom Units
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
Mon, Wed and Fri 8am 5pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810 TDD 1-800-955-8771
This inslilulion is an Equal Opporltnily provider and employer o PORTU


Saves Lives





i C .I





C c e Ico a


ServingAllofAmliI n d


205 THE RESIDENCE OCEAN PLACE
Beautifully furnished Mediterranean style ocean- Ocednfront at It's finest! 2 and 3 bedroom
front villa, Just steps to the pool and to the ocean. units located on the south side of The Ritz-
Health inspiring fitness area and tennis courts. Carlton at Summer Beach. Investors
.. ....... welcome. Prices start at $489,000


$599,000


MLS# 58284


HAMMOCK DRIVE HARRISON COVE VILLAS
Beautifully wooded lot backing up to a pre- Beautifully furnished 2br/2ba villa in gated
serve area. Great lot to build onl Short walk community. Golf club memberships)
or bike ride to beach, available.
$234,900 MLS# 56098 $284,900 MLS# 571.09


-e- #. .


THE VILLAS
Beautiful townhomes in gated community in
Summer Beach. Just a short stroll to the community
pool or down to the beach,
Prices start at $349,900


RIEiATIA
Come build your dream home on this fabu-
lous lot in the private gated community in
Golfside South at Summer Beach.
$269,900 MLS# 56049


ELUKaBuYKT LANu
Beautiful Townhome on cul-de-sac. End unit with
lots of privacy. Unit comes with full club member-
ship and one of the island's most beautiful com-
munity pools,
$349,900 MLS9f 57232


LCALIUN. UUNEt
Executive Upscale Oceanfront condos at
Summer Beachlocated north of the Ritz-
Carlton.
Prices start at $1,100,000


VIRTUAL TOURS AVAILABLE AT WWW.REALTOR.COM
Summer Beach is our address not our boundary!


MAIN SALES OFFICE
(800) 322-7448
(904) 261-:0624


MMRCAL ANY OF OUR
SALES AGENTS
S EA MARCY MOCK
iE .. . .ANDREW SANDS
SAnmeiliasn', BFI ,RENDA


5456 First Coast Highway Amelia Island, FL 32034






The 'Til Just Have

One More" Martini



3 oz. gin or vodka

1/2 oz. dry vermouth

3 olives

S1 automobile

I long day

1 diminishing attention span

1 too many





Combine ingredients. Drink.

Repeat. Mix with sharp turn,

telephone pole




Never underestimate "just a few".
Buzzed driving is drunk driving.









A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
"LoDRI A 0n OL { FsI W. V N.WI PALP N I w rAr

NEWS M LEADER




p mo wf


INOW-AVAILABLE


I








10B WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9.2013 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


1997 FORD EXPLORER XLT
V6, Automatic, A/C, Power Windows, Power
Locks, Cruise & Tilt, Premium Sound, Alloy
Wheels, Very nice condition, Low Miles, Come
and See Me!
PURRFECTLY PRICED AT ONLY $5950


200 DODGE STRATUS
2.5L, V6, Automatic, A/C, Power
Package, Remote Entry, Up Grade
Stereo, Very Nice Car, Look only Y3K
miles, Don't Miss This one!!


1995 OLOSMO BILE CUTLASS
Supreme Model. Only 106K on this very Well
maintained family sedan. Ice cold AC, Power
windows, locks, cruise and tilt. White exterior
with cloth interior. Fully serviced And inspected.
PURRFECTLY PRICED AT ONLY $4,950


2004 FORD RA/VGER XLT
SUPER CAB
Flair' side, V6, Automatic, A/C, Power
Locks, Power Windows, Cruise & Tilt,
Chrome Wheels, Back Doors open, Very
Nice Truck, Only 94K miles.


PURRFECTLY PRICED AT ONLY $7450 PURRFECTLY PRICED AT ONLY $10,950

WE HAVE OVER 62 CARFAX CERTIFIED, SERVICED AND SAFETY
INSPECTED VEHICLES READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY!



Ask about our


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Libby ants you to GET
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Please See Albert.'


*All Prices Plus Tax, Title, Registration t & 299.00 Customer Service Fees.*



"Think I'll let that native land agent be my guide."


CURTISS H. LASSERRE"'L REAE
3032 S. 8th St/A1A, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035 904-26 -406
www.lasserrerealestate.com info@lasserrerealestate.com 904 -2 1-406I


LIGHTHOUSE CIRCLE hELL Kfl'T HOIf-if N \ sIi.U'1 l I I
AWESOME VIEW OF EGAN'S CREEK & WOODED LOT, just a short walk from the
Fort Clinch St Park. Single family estate lot beach or the Ritz-Carlton. Updated and
adjacent to historic lAndmark Amelia Island upgraded this home has been. converted from
Lighthouse. 370+/- ft on Navigable side of a duplex to a single family home, providing a
Egan's Creek and is one of the highest eleva- split floor plan. Dethatched building is heat-
tions on the east coast. Possible Ocean views ed/air conditioned currently being used as a
pottery studio.
$995,000 MLS# 37069 $235,000 MLS#58472


LEfrO N CkLjI I ROTNTGE I..-le-
on Avant Road. Split floor plan wl open
kitchen, great room, and dining area. Kitchen
is equipped w/ high-end appliances and coun-
ters must see to appreciate. Master bedroom
has larger doors and a walk-in shower w/
handicap access. Yard is fenced w/ fruit trees
and kennel area for a large dog.
$479.900 MLSP# 56099


I !


.OI_, H FLf rI:HR L E NI ,i
Pristine 75' Oceanfront lot on Amelia Island.
Your chance to own one of the few remaining
Oceanfront lots available on Amelia Island.
Buy now for either investment or to build.
$449,000 MLS#56671


WEILMAINTAINED HOME that has lots of
charm. Eat in kitchen with vaulted ceilings and
its own entrance, Master bath is luxurious with
dual vanities, whirlpool tub and separate show-
er. Gas fireplace in the great roon is charming
and inviting. Large (dining room, Large feced in
back yard with a playhouse and shed that stays
wilt the property.
$169.500 MLS#58556

^ i




NORTH 5TH STREET
This,2784 approximate sq 0t vintage home
has been modified into 3 apartments. The
largest has a fireplace, huadwood floors,
eat-in kitchen. Needs to be up-dated and
renovated.
$325,000 MLS# 56107


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

ACROSS FROM OCEAN 2BR/2BA,
tile, recent paint, W/D, ceiling fans.
Includes water, sewer & garbage.
$975/mo. + $975 dep. Available
immediately. Call (904)277-7622.

2BR/1BA OCEAN VIEW $935/mo.
Water, sewer & garbage included $600
sec. dep. Service animals only. 847-
639-0648 or ghr56@aol.com

3BR/1BA LUXURY OCEANVIEW
APT. Tile throughout, central AC, DW,
W/D. 927 N. Fletcher Ave., down.
$1095/mo. + deposit. (904)386-1005

SMALL 1BR 200 feet from beach. No
smoking. $650/mo. incl. water + $500
deposit. Electric paid by renter.
References. Call (904)335-1665.


858 Condos-Unfurnishedj
AMELIA LAKES 2BR/2BA, gated, &
includes all amenities. Very nice 2nd
floor unit on lake. $975/mo. Available
January. (904)535-5352

FERNANDINA SHORES Unfurnished
2BR/1BA, ground floor Pool, tennis,
clubhouse, 1 block from beach. Year
lease. Deposit. $875. (904)261-5630
2BR/2BA FOR RENT $875/mo.
Gated community on island.
Includes washer/dryer. Available
immediately. Please call (904)277-
1983.

860 Homes-Unfurnished

2BR HOME ON ISLAND CH&A,
washer/dryer hookups. Outside city
limits. $875/mo. Call The Realty
Source, Inc. (904)261-5130.


I57 do 3BR NORTH HAMPTON Hither Hills,
P57 Condos-Furnished available now. No smoking. (904)703-
4265


NICELY FURNISHED 2BR/1BA, one
block from beach. Utilities included.
$995/mo. Call (904)261-0816 or cell
557-1682.

2BR/2BA EXECUTIVE TOWNHOME -
Nicely furnished, with 2-car garage,
pool, tennis courts. $1250/mo., utilities
incl. Call (904)261-0816 or 557-1682.



j-farnabas
B CENTER, INC







GREAT DEALS THIS WEEK
+1699 S 14" St
Amelia Crossing
Class A retail 1,200 sf to
10,000 sf Clean space- end
cap w/safe available @ $12 psf
& move in allowance

+626 S8th St
1,500 sf,great visibility $1300/mo

+1002 S. 8th Street
2,400 sf auto repair shop
Lease or sale @ only 199K

+Caf across from Lowe's
Turnkey-Lease at $1,600 mo

+629 S 8th St Retail/Warehouse
4 Sale @ 650K or lease @ $5 psf
NN 15,500 sf- will build to suit

We offer buyer and
tenant representation
Please contacts for
your commercial
real estate needs to
buy, sell or lease.







Phil Griffin
SBroker GRI
904-556-9140
608 S. 8th St. Fernandina Beach, FL
ACRFL.com


(jialphin





Wi^^mI hW


4BR/2BA w/lg den, 1500sf, remod-
eled, CH&A, Ig comer lot. 304 N. 10th
St. $1200/mo. + dep. Ideal. for 2
families. Available now. (904)261-
5034


3BR/2BA HOME 1 block from the
beach. Lawn care included. $1350/mo.
Call (904)583-1900.


TOWNHOME OCEAN VIEW 2168B
First Ave. 1750sf, 3BR/3.5BA, double
garage. One year lease. $1,500/mo.
Available 1/1/13. (904)206-0238
812 SAN FERNANDO 1BR/1BA, w/d
hookup, CH&A, dishwasher. $775 sec.
dep. $775/mo. (904)261-3158.
Available Feb 1.


CURTISS H.
LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.
www.lasserrerealesta te.corn

RESIDENTIAL
LONG TERM RENTALS
*433 N. Fletcher Ave 4BR/2BA Home
$1,600/mo.+ Utlities
*224 N. 2nd Street IBR/IBA Apt. $700.00
includes Water. Sewer, and Garbage.
SStoncy Creek Condo 3BR/2BA 1650 sq.ft.
$1.,100/mo. until .
-Timber Creek 5BR/3BA with Den/Office
and 2-car garage. Like new! & 1,600/mo +ual.
*2500 First Avenue 2BR/2BA apartment
with single car' garage, small deck,
office/bonus room, tile and laminate floor-
ing, second floor with just a peek of the
ocean! $1,200/mo.
S305 S 17th Street, 2BR IBA house $850 a
month + utilities
*3423 S. Fletcher. 2BR/IBA, downstairs of
duplex $890/mo includes water, sewer and
garbage
*Azalea Point Home 4BR/3BA 2700 sq. ft.
$2100/mo.+uril.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/ MONTHLY
2BR/IBA Ocean-view. 487 S. Fletcher.
Across the street from the beach. All until,
wi-fiTV & phone.
*3BR/ 3BA townhome in Sandpiper Loop
$1450/wk plus taxes & cleaning fee.

COMMERCIAL
STwo 800sf Office/Retail spaces, can be joined
for one. 1.600 sq ft-space. AIA next to
Peacock Electric $12/sq.ft+ CAM andTax
SAmelia Park Unit B small office (2 rooms)
with bath. 576 sq. ft. $1050/mo. + sales tax
Five PointsVillage 1,200 sq.ftAIA/S 8th St.
exposure Great for retail, services, or
office. $1.200/mo +sales tax.
Amelia Park Unit E (14th St frontage) 910
approx. sq.ft., 3 offices, reception area.
kitchen and bathroom.$1450/mo.+ utilities.
S1839 S. 8th St. adjacent to Huddle House,
1.800 sq.ft $1700/mo lease + tso. S also
considered.

904.261. 4066


860 Homes-Unfurnished
4BR/3BA near Fernandina Beach
airport. Large lot. Custom built in
2004. Rent $1250/mo. Call 556-2573.
MARSH LAKES 3BR/2.5BA T.H.
1860sf 95130 Village Dr. Fireplace, lake
view, garage. $1,350/mo. Call
(904)556-3705.
LAKE FRONT Marsh Lakes Patio
Home; sweeping views across the lake!
3BR/2BA, screened porch, all one level,
HOA tennis & pool, yard maint. & pest
control incl. $1525/mo. No smoking.
(303)995-1018

861 Vacation Rentals
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.

863 Office
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES Office
space from 100 sq ft. to 2,000 sq. ft.
Includes utilities, Internet, common
area receptionist, conference room,
break room, & security. For info call
(904)753-4179.

19 ;1j UiiiiI,


901 Automobiles


MERCEDES WAGON 2004.
Excellent. 53,000 miles. $13,300. Call
(904) 321-0597.

903 Vans
HONDA ODYSSEY EXL 2004 filly
loaded in very good condition. $5,750.
Call 277-2932













*N. PIKE LANE 3BR/2BA
home. 2 car garage, 1350 sq.ft..
$1.075/mo. Available now.

S. 7TH STREET 3BR/2B/
home in Historic District. 1,600
sq.ft. $1,400/mo. Available now.

INVERNESS ROAD 2BR/
2BA home in Lakewood. 1.300
sq.ft. 2 car garage. $1,095/mo.
Available now.

*SONOIMA DRIVE 4BR/
3BA home located in
Woodbridge. 3 car garage. 2,700
sq.ft. $1.450/no. Available now.

*LONG LEAF LOOP -
3BR/2BA home located in
Timber Creek. 2 car garage.
2.200 sq.ft. $1,300/mo.
Available now.

MORGAN'S WY 3BR/
2BA home in Pirate's Woods. 2
car garage. 1,400 sq.ft.
S 1.07 5/mo. A\ ailablc now.

Arml iia,- RAX .


(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax
1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 Amelia Island, FL 32034
Over 25 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company

Visit us at www. GALPHINRE.coM


FURNISHED ON ISLAND SINGLE FAMILY HOMES OFF ISLAND) (cont)
3200 S. Fletcher Avenue, #C-2 (Ocean Dunes Condominiums) 96097 Ridgewood Circle (Lofton Pointe Subdivision) 1600sf
2BR/2BA'- Enjoy the evenings on the covered back deck with beau- 3BR/2BA Open floor plan with fireplace in living room. Laundry
tiful ocean views. Spend cool evenings relaxing by the fireplace. Two room includes washed and di yer. Scieened back porch ove looking
Master baths, Dining in living/great room. Carpet, vinyl and hard- pond. $1295
wood flooring. Condo located in gated comnunuity with swimming
pool. ($200.00) flat fee for electric. Water and trash included. $1450
3200 S. Fletcher Avenue, Unit D-1 (Ocean Dunes CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
Condominiums) 1210sf 2 BR/2BA Nicely furnished condo 1582 Park Lane (Amelia Park Subdivision) 400sf- Cute stuho
right on the beach. Ground floor unit with fantastic view of the apartment with efficiency kitchen. Tile floors in kitchen and bath-
Atlantic. Dining in living/great room, fireplace in family room. car room. $650
pet flooring and community pool. $1450 2741 Forest Ridge Drive, Unit #1-1 (Forest Ridge
Condominiums)'- 21H/2BA 2 Master iBallirooms. each with tub
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES ON ISLAND and shower. dining it family room. carpet. cer.umic tile :and vinyl
2164 Natures Gate South (Natures Gate Subdivision) 1806sf flooring. One block to the Beach, pool & tennis. Available January
4BR/2BA-Master bath.has garden tub and walk-in shower, guest 31st $795
bath has tub/shower, dining in family room, eat-in kitchen, closet 340 Tarpon Avenue, 800sf 2BKR1.SBA Recently vemodeeld
pantry, carpet and ceramic tile. Private yard/courtyard and unit located one block from the Beach, open living/dining area. lnll
patio/deck. Rear yaid backs up to greenway. Lawn care. water and Master bath, eat-in kitchen. vinlI floors throughout. Washer/dryer.
sewer included. 2-car garage. $1450 water/sewer included. Mandatory trash fee of S25 S850
734B Tarpon Avenue, 1000sf- 2BICUJBA Downstairs unit only 2
SINGLE FAMILY OMEES OFF ISLAND blocks front the Beach. Ceranlic tiled loois tlhoughout and eat-in
97364 Pirates Point Road (Pirates Wood Subdivision) 1432sf kitchen. Water and sewer included in'rent. S1100
3BR/2BA -Two Master baths, dining in living/great room with 2850 S. Fletcher Upstairs unit with great Ocean views' -
wood burning stove, patio/deck, clubhouse andl community pool. 3BR'1BA Full Master bath ;and eat-in kitclihn carpet n.d vinyl
Home has private dock. 2-car garage. $1100 flooring. Watei, sewer and trash included \Yrd watering system.
86004 Cathedral Lane (Lofton Oaks Subdivision) 1483sf Driveway parking. Available February 15th S1150
3BR/2BA, Beautilul partially fenced lot and open floor plan. New car-
pet. linoleum and interior paint. Ten minutes from Amelia Island and
convenient to Jacksonville International Airport. Fireplace in family
room and 2-car garage. 1/2 OFF First Month's Rent $1200
86366 Cartesian Pointe Drive (Cartesian Pointe Subdivision) OFFICE/RETAIL,
1886sf 3BR/2BA Home in deed restricted community between Amelia Park Town Center 1000 to 2200 sq. ft.
A1A and Highway 17. and 95. House has formal living room, fanli-
lyroom and eat-in kitchen. Large Master bedroom with walk-in clos- 001 Atlantic Avenue 450 sq. ft.
et, Master bath and tub \withjets. Carpet and vinyl flooring. Laundry Jasmine Center 2300 sq. ft.
room and 2-car garage. Community playground and baseball dia-
i mond. $1250


Let us put your vacant property to work...
We can effectively market your properly and rent to thoroughly screened tenants.
Your relationship with a professional property management company and its staff of trained managers
means excellence in the management of your property. Contact our professional property managers at 904-277-6597



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$448,000 4701 Rigging Drive S98,500 95623 Arbor Lane
3BR/2BA 2667 sf- MLS#56095 3BR/1.5BA MLS#58175


5234,900 409 So. 6th Street
3BR/1Full 2 Part BA MLS#57831


$225,000 Meadowfield Bluff Road
Waterfront lot approx. 1.75 acre MLS#56849


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