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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00770
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000366799
oclc - 04377055
notis - ACA5658
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00770
 Related Items
Preceded by: Fernandina Beach news-leader

Full Text


N NEWSPAPER


LEA


ER 75


FRIDAY AUGUSTIO, 2012/24 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleader.com


FIRSTDAY OF SCHOOL


PHOTOS BY HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Proud grandniother Mary Gentz brings new third-grader Mackenzie Gentz to Yulee Elementary School
for her first day of school Wednesday; top left. Valerie Raudales and her mom Marilyn, above left,
arrive for the first day of class at Yulee Elementary. Micahya Walker, top right, is all smiles as mother
Tasheena picks her up following her first day in kindergarten at Southside Elementary School. "She
had a great first day,'! says paraprofessional Leslie Campbell as Ansleigh McCannell picks up daugh-
ter Erin from pre-kingerten at Southside, below right. More photos on 8A.


to create


industrial park'
GARRETT PELICAN trict differs from the two other indus-
News-Leader trial districts Industrial Warehouse
and Heavy Industrial in that it is
In their efforts to attract manufac- "meant for very large scale projects."
turning jobs to Nassau County, county While Industrial Warehouse deals with,
officials and Rayonier are stepping up "enclosed" developments and Heavy
their game. Industrial is geared toward "heavy
At their meeting Monday, commis- industrial" uses the Yulee Tradeplex
sioners could rezone the Crawford is an example of those two zones the
Diamond to the newly created new district demands that a develop-
Industrial Park (IP) District, also sched- ment is at least 100 contiguous acres in
uled for discussion Monday. The rezon- size and must be located near a major
ing from Open Rural, which county transportation conduit, such as a thor-
staff and the Planning & Zoning Board oughfare, rail access or a port,
have recommended, would make the McDowell said.
site the county's first true industrial Companies looking to relocate favor
park. locations where the process has been
Rezoning the 1,814-acre site would streamlined for them because "time is
enable a variety of uses and make the money," said Dan Camp, senior project
property, a swathe of land located manager for TerraPointe.
southwest of Callahan and owned by McDowell said the site, which has
Rayonier's real estate arm TerraPointe been billed as an economic hub
Services, more attractive to manufac- because it straddles two major rail-
turers, said Mike Mullin, attorney for roads and sits near four deepwater
Rayonier. ports, two interstate highways and an
"Businesses want the shovel-ready international airport, is a prime location
location that they don't have to go for manufacturers.
through a multitude of rezoning hear- "It gives a lot of flexibility within
ings or other hearings with, so hope- the site for a large manufacturer to
fully it will bring in a lot more jobs to come in and do what they need to do,"
the county," said Mullin, who added McDowell said.
that the rezoning would make the Steve Rieck, executive director for
Crawford Diamond much more com- the Nassau Economic Development
petitive in the site selection process. Board, said the rezoning would be the
Doug McDowell, a strategic planner latest in a series of steps to recruit a
with the Growth Management
Department, said'the new zoning dis- COUNTY Continued on 3A




City hires architect


for library expansion


ANGELA DAUGHTER '
News-Leader
A plan to expand the Fernandina
Beach branch of the Nassau County
Library System got a significant go-
ahead at Tuesday's city commission
meeting.
Commissioners agreed 3-2 to hire
V.R.L. Architects of Jacksonville for
architectural and engineering servic-
es in the expansion and renovation of
the library at 25 N. Fourth St. in
Fernandina Beach.
Commissioners Sarah Pelican and
Charles Corbett once again voted
against the firm, as they had previ-
ously when V.R.L. presented its qual-
ifications before commissioners last
month.
According to a city document, the
budget for the entire project is $1.6
million. V.R.L Architects has estimat-
ed the construction value to be
$1.43 million, and its architec-
tural/engineering fee is 9.16 percent


of that, or $131,000.
Cost of the library renovation is to
be shared by the city, county and
Friends of the Library group. The city
has committed $600,000 from its
Forward Fernandina loan of $1.6 mil-
lion, the county has said it will commit
$600,000 and the Friends of the Library
has projected it will contribute
$400,000.
But Pelican said she had concerns
about "basic necessities" for the library,
including $82,000 allocated for com-
puters.
"All we're paying for is the brick
walls and fixing what we should have
fixed 20 years ago," Vice Mayor Jeff
Bunch said. "Here's our shell. We're
paying $600,000 and the county is pay-
ing $600,000. We pay for some main-
tenance and for operations."
Pelican also asked about $90,000
that was included in the 2012-13 budg-
et for a new air conditioning system
LIBRARY Continued on 3A


Voters to choose


new sheriff Tuesday


Tuesday is Election Day, and
Nassau County voters will choose a
new sheriff, two county commissioners
and two school board members.
Voters also will choose district
judges. Republicans will choose their
candidate for property appraiser, state
senator and state representative, and
both Republicans and Democrats have
statewide candidates to pick.
Early voting continues until 6 p.m.
Saturday at Fernandina Beach City
Hall, 204 Ash St.; the Supervisor of
Elections Office, James S. Page
Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau
Place, Conference Room A, Yulee;


Callahan branch library, 450077 SR
200, Suite 15; and the Hilliard branch
library, 15821 CR 108.
Voters must cast ballots at assigned
polling places on Tuesday. Polls are
open from 7 am. to 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Voters should bring a current and
valid photo and signature identifica-
tion in order to vote. If voters do not
have the required identification, they
will be allowed "to vote a provisional
ballot.
Candidates on the ballot include:
Former highway patrol officer
ELECTION Continued on 3A


5 qualify for city commission


Qualifying for candidates to seek
a seat on the Fernandina Beach City
Commission in the November elec-
tion ends at 5 p.m. today.
Five candidates have qualified
thus far Commissioner Tim Poynter
has been challenged by Ed Boner,
and John Campbell Elwell, Pat Kelley
Gass and Jim B. Higginbotham will
compete for Commissioner Jeffrey
Bunch's seat.
Bunch told commissioners
Tuesday he would not seek reelec-
tion.
Poynter, a local businessman,
seeks a second three-year term.
Boner is a Fernandina native and
local businessman.
Higginbotham is a former county
commissioner and former city public


works director Elwell, a retired busi-
nessman, ran unsuccessfully for a
city commission seat in 2011. Gass,
whose brother, Steve Kelley, is a
county commissioner, is a former
employee of the Nassau County Tax
Collector's Office who helped her
son, a chef, open a local restaurant.
The general election is scheduled
for Nov. 6. Two of the five commission
seats are to be decided this year.
There would be a runoff election
Dec. 11 if no candidate obtains a
majority in the first election.
Qualifying packets may still be
obtained from the City Clerk's Office
at 204 Ash St. Questions may be
directed to 277-7305.
Candidates must be registered
voters in the city of Fernandina


Beach. To qualify, they must pay a
filing fee of $384.
There is also a straw ballot for
mayor in November. The city com-
mission chooses the mayor, but fol-
lows the. straw ballot by custom.
Incumbents whose terms are con-
tinuing are eligible for the straw bal-
lot; that includes the current mayor,
Arlene Filkoff, and commissioners
Charles Corbett and Sarah Pelican.
Commissioners are elected to
three-year terms, with a two-term
limit.
The new commission will take
office on Dec. 18.
For information about voting, visit
www.votenassau.com.
For information about city gov-
ernment, visit www.fbfl.us.


CHRIS I NEED YOUR VOTE ON AUGUST 14th


HARTL EY NO MORE POLITICS AS USUAL


FOR NASSAU COUNTY SHERIFF
N@w s&@dfshi), Not O flO


* NO MORE GOOD OLD BOY NETWORKS

Political advertisement paid for and approved by, Chris Hartley, Republican, for Sheriff


News-Leader
158th
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k I INDEX
I, F ,' ,I I,,' ii|' '"I l''I ll [I IiI i ' I 'i


OBITUARIES -............_. 2A
OLT AND ABOLT ................ 2B
RELIGION .....................---.... 3B
SERVICE DIRECTORY ............... 7B
SPORTs ----....--.... .. .. 14A
SUDOKU ..................................... 2B


SEATURTIE NESrTNG SEASON
2012 Nests: 214 Hatchlings: 3.641
2011 Nests 154 Hatchling,9.014
Please umnq foredclightsshung
direty on the beach Fora detailedcount
seewtwu eliadsl andseaturtewatchcom.


I


W WEEKLY


F LO R I DAY'S


OLD EST







FRIDAY. AUGUST 10.2012 NEWS News-Leader


Charles Henry
Clinch Sr.
On Sunday, July 29 at the St.
Luke Hospital of Jacksonville,
Fla., Mr. Charles Henry Clinch
Sr., also known as "Track", of
1012 Calle Corta Street, Fern-
andina Beach, Florida, depart-
ed this earthly habitation. He
was born on January 4, 1930, to
Charlie and Maybelle Clinch.
He was the last of his siblings.
Charles "Track" worked at
the ITT Rayonier Mill for a
great number of years before
retiring from
i the company.
He loved fish-
ing, spending
time with his
friends, and he
especially loved
being with his
family.
He leaves to mourn his pass-
ing 4 daughters, 1 son and a
host of other family members
including: grand's, great-
grand's, nieces, nephews,
cousins and many sorrowing
friends.
Services will be held at 11:00
am, Saturday, August 11, 2012,
at the New Zion Missionary
Baptist Church, 10 S. 10th
Street in Fernandina Beach,
Florida. The Rev. Jeremiah
Robinson Jr. is the Pastor.
The viewing will be held at
the Huff & Battise Funeral
Home on 410 S. Beech Street,
today, Friday, August 10th, from
5 pm until 8 pm.
Huff& Battise Funeral flHome

Eugene Fachko
Mr. Eugene "Gene" Fachko,
age 84, of Yulee, passed away
on Tuesday morning, August
7, 2012 at his home.
Born in West Deer
Township, PA, he was the son
of the late John David and Anna
Kunka Fachko.
At the age of three, his fam-
ily moved from the coal mines
of PA to Callahan, FL to begin
a new life of rural farming. After
g r a d u at i n g
from Callahan
High School,
Mr. Fachko .
began a long y .*
career in the
Pulp and Paper
Industry at
Container Corporation of
America in Fernandina. Shortly
thereafter he was drafted into
the U.S. Army, serving in
Germany during the Korean
Conflict. After being honorably
discharged, he returned home
to continue his work with CCA.
In 1952, at the age of 24, he saw
and met a young lady on the
streets of Fernandina, Regina
Katherine Rutishauser. On
February 2, 1953, they were
married in the family home of
Henry and Kate Cook at the
corner of 15th Street and
Atlantic Avenue. They made
their home in Fernandina and
in 1954 their son, David, was
born. Mr. Fachko continued to
work at CCA as tour Foreman,
from where he retired in 1985.
An avid outdoorsman, Mr.
Fachko enjoyed hunting and
fishing and as a younger man,
enjoyed scuba diving; retriev-
ing many ballast stones from
the waters of the St. Marys
River which were used to con-
struct his present fireplace.
Mr. Fachko had been a
member of the Yulee Baptist
Church for over forty years,
serving on various committees
and as a Deacon.
He leaves behind his wife of
59, years, Regina Fachko,
Yulee, FL, their son, David
Fachko (Martha), Yulee, FL, a
sister, Irene Saye, Jacksonville,
FL and two grandsons, Daniel
and Jackson Fachko.


NEWS
LEADER


Funeral services will be at
10:00 am today, Friday, August
10, 2012 from the Yulee Baptist
Church with Pastor Doug
Sides, officiating.
Mr. Fachko will be laid to
rest in Bosque Bello Cemetery.
His family received friends
on Thursday from 5:00-7:00 pm
at the Oxley-Heard Funeral
Home.
Please share his life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors

Dennis Lee Fryer
Dennis Lee Fryer, age 59,
of Fernandina Beach, FL
passed away at his home on
Saturday evening, August 4,
2012.
Dennis enjoyed life like most
of us will never experience. His
adventures brought him to
Alaska, Outer Banks of North
Carolina and
finally home at
Seymore Point,
Fernandina
Beach, FL.
Dennis was
a self-employed
master crafts-
man whose honesty, integrity
and fairness kept him smiling
and always gainfully employed.
His life was uncomplicated
and very rewarding to the ben-
efit of his many friends.
He enjoyed cooking for all of
us and never hesitated to lend
a helping hand to whoever was
in need.
Special thanks to Jamie
Deonas and all of his devoted
staff at Best Friends Companion
Care. They were responsible
for allowing Dennis the quality
of his last days at home with
special loving care!!!
Dennis was dealt with "a bad
hand" but he handled it with
strength and dignity. He leaves
behind numerous loved friends.
Most of all his best friend and
love of his life, Susan Wells of
Gum Neck, NC.
.. In February his buddy Ron
McNeal and close Outer Banks
friends will let him soar in the
skies of West Yellowstone,
Montana.
We would like to invite all of
you who were impacted by
Dennis to enjoy a gathering at
his home at 95059 Shurwall
Lane, Fernandina Beach, FLat
3:00 pm on Saturday, August
18th. Please bring your favorite
photo and story. For directions,
call Eddie at 491-0510 or 945-
2139.
Dennis had no children but
loved his rescue dogs, Kodiak
and Sassy, more than anything.
In lieu 6f flowers a contribution
to the Nassau Humane Society
in Dennis's name would be a
great tribute: Nassau Humane
Society, 671 Airport Road,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034.
PEACE BE WITH YOU
OUR FRIEND.
Please share his life story
'and leave your personal mem-'
ories at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


DEATH NOTICE

Mr. Robert H. "Bob"
Lauber, age 85, of Fernandina
Beach died on Wednesday
evening, Aug. 8, 2012. Funeral
services are tentatively planned
for 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug.
18 in the Burgess Chapel of
Oxley-Heard Funeral Home.
Complete arrangements will be
announced.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors
Carolyn Joyce Manis, age
64, of Fernandina Beach died
on Saturday, Aug. 4, 2012.
Memorial services will be
announced.
Eternity FuneralHomes &
Cremations -Nassau


511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach. FL 32034
(904) 261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for email addresses:
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The
Femandina Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Femandina
Beach, FL 32034. Penodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS
189-900) ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without wntten permission from the publisher are prohibited.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
Part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ................... $39.00
Mail out of Nassau County ................ $65.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3p.m.

CNI com ..ty,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


Experts warn of social media pitfalls


For the News-Leader


Social media sites like Facebook con-
nect users with old friends, new acquain-
tances and everyone in between.
However, studies are revealing an
inverse link with online connections and
deeper, face-to-face relationships.
Norwegian researchers recently
developed a test for networking sites,
called the Bergen Facebook Addiction
Scale, which likens'inordinate amounts
of time spent on the networking site to
drug and alcohol abuse. The test meas-
ures how often people use the site, if
they do so to forget their problems and
how using the site negatively affects
their personal and working lives.
Researchers found the following
groups of people most at risk for
Facebook addiction:
Women, who are more social than
men,
Young people, who are more tech
savvy than older people
Anxious or socially insecure people
"Social media, and the new emphasis
on the importance of 'multitasking,' have
helped drive a wedge between family
members," says psychologist Gregory
L. Jantz, author of Hooked: The Pitfalls of
Media, Technology and Social
Networking (www.drgregoryjantz.com).
Ironically, people become less social
the more time they spend on social
sites, and they tend to get less done


while multitasking
because they do not
focus on completing
one task at a time, he
I says.
S "When people
abuse drugs and
alcohol, they are try-
ing to feel better, yet they are worsening
their situation. We're finding this is also
true for those who spend excessive
amounts of time on social networking
sites," he says. "Perhaps the hardest hit
from social media addiction is the family
unit."
Parents should monitor their own
time online to ensure it's not further lim-
iting the already shrinking amount of
time available with their children, Jantz
says. And they need to safeguard their
children by monitoring their time, as
well. Jantz suggests these questions for
parents to ask themselves in gauging
their kids' media usage:
How much time do your kids
spend with various forms of media?
There are plenty of distractions from
homework. Estimate how much time
your child spends with the television,
Internet, social networking sites, cell
phone, Blu-rays and game systems. The
more time spent with media, the lower a
child's academic performance, accord-
ing to a Kaiser Family Foundation-study.
How much time do your kids
spend with you versus online media?


LOOKING BACK


MJ. "Hooks" and Claddie Waddell, who managed
Whidden's Cottages on North Fletcher Avenue in
Fernandina Beach, are seen in this circa 1960's photo
from the collection of Laurie A. Kurlin of Yulee. The
cottages seven in a row, all built exactly the same -
were a popular vacation destination.
The News-Laler, 511 Ash St, Fenandina Beach, wd-
comes Ialdvg Backnlhm 'InnThey also maybe nailedtD
SianPfeny, sm nmtlewaleader~cmn .




Tailgate cook-off


deadline nears


The Great Southern
Tailgate Cook-off on Amelia
Island is taking entries for the
third annual beachside barbe-
cue event, Aug. 24-25. Teams
can register through
Wednesday and pay online at
www.gstailgatecookoff.com.
A Kansas City Barbeque
Society sanctioned event and
Florida State
Championship contest, the
Great Southern Tailgate Cook-
off will be held at
Main Beach. A mix of pro-
fessional and amateur (back-
yard) teams will compete for
more than $20,000 in prize
money and trophies.
Fee is $115 per backyard
(amateur) team and $265 for
each professional team. The


professional competition will
consist of four meat categories:
chicken, ribs, pork butts and
brisket, while the backyard
teams will compete in chick-
en and ribs. Enter a Best Sauce
and Best Dessert category for'
an additional $25. A People's
Choice prize of $200 will be
awarded to one team.
The event will also feature
live entertainment, headlined
by Australia's Little River
Band, which will perform Aug.
25 at 7 p.m., a kids' area and
more.
To register a team or for
information visit www.gstail-
gatecookoff.com. Follow
AmeliaIslandBBQ on Twit-
ter or like AmeliaIslandBBQ
on Facebook for updates.


LOOKING BACK


50
YEARS


25
YEARS


10
YEARS


Groundbreaking ceremonies were announced
for the new Florida Waterway Welcome Station at
the Fernandina Harbor Marina.
August 9, 1962

Willie Mae Ashley published Far From Home,
the story of Emma B. Delaney's two mission jour-
neys to Africa from 1902-1922.
August 6, 1987

The court ordered the Nassau County
Sheriff's Office to halt an investigation of three
deputies' behavior at a party after they filed a peti-
tion saying their rights were violated.
August 9, 2002


Social media, and the
new emphasis on the impor-
tance ofmultitasking. have
helped drive a wedge
between family members.
PSYCHOLOGIST GREGORY L. JANTZ

Remember, simply being in the same
room isn't necessarily interacting. The
less the scales tip in favor of human-to-
human interaction, the more likely there
may be a problem.
Do you know how each device
works and how it can be used?
Familiarity with your children's gadgets
gives you a better perspective of what
their habits may be like.
What are the consequences of
their tech habits, and what should be
changed? Make a list of the good and
the bad consequences of your family's
technology use. After comparing the two
lists, consider changes that can turn
negatives into positives.
'Technology continues at its acceler-
ating pace, and we are in uncharted ter-
ritory," Jantz says. "Increasingly, social
networking infiltrates our personal lives,
but we need to remember that it is creat-
ed to'serve us, and not the other way
around."


WEEKLY UPDATE


Exhibitcanceled
bsibley -A
Retros-pective," a special
reception and exhibit cele-:
brating Harvey Sibley's lif
in air that was scheduled'fdr
noun-2 p.m Saturday at
Eile,-n's Art& Antiques
Centre on Centre Streethas
been canceled due to the :
artist's illness. For informa-
ion cn tact 277-2717.

Airport photos
wanted
The Friends of
Fernandina Aviation, in con-
junction ith the Amelia
Island hi museum of History, is
creating a historical pictorial
display of the Fernandina
Beach airport, beginning
with its conception as a mili-
tary training base in 1942.
Anyone wishing to donate
(or have reproduced) photos
. of the airpprjjpl.as-._contact
.-Paiiul GrinU ati.21-408)6 -o
Jei ry Kawecki.it 261 .8752

Puppy kisses
Aug 11 is "Puppy Kisses"
day at Redbones Dog
Bakery and Boutique, 809 S.
Eighth St., from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. Hold an adorable, adopt-
able puppy from the Nassau
Humane Society and for $1
donation get slathered in
puppy kisses. Call Redbones
at 321-0020 for information.

Pink Ribbon
Ladies
The Pink Ribbon Ladies,
a support group in Nassau
County for survivors of.
breast and other female can-
cers, will hold its annual pool
party at the home of one of
its members on Aug. 13 at
5.30 p.m. Contributions
towards the purchase of
pizza will be gratefully
accepted. For information
and to RSVP, call 432-8146.
AARP meets
The local Chapter of the
AARP #4608 vill meet Aug.
14 at 1 p.m. at the Council on
Aging building, across from
Baptist Medical Center
Nassau. Members are urged
to attend and enjoy the day
and learn about recent notes
from the AARP

Alzheimer's
support
The Alzheimer's Associ-
ation Caregivers Support
Group for Nassau County
meets the third Thursday
each month. The next meet-:
ing is Aug. 16 in the Adult':
Day Health Care room.at.
The Council on Aging. The
time has been changed this
month to 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Call Debra Dombkowski at
261-0701, ext 113.
Gun courses
Gary W. Belson Associ-
ates Inc. will hold concealed
weapon license courses at 6
p.m. Aug. 15, 21, 24 and 30. A
basic with defensive tactics
course'will be held at 7:45
a.m. Aug. 18 and 25. For
scheduling contact Belson at
491-8358, (904) 476-2037 or:
gbelson@bellsouth.net. Visit
www.TheBelsonGroup:com.
Dinner & movie
Enjoy dinner and a movie,
'The Secret Life of Bees," on
Aug. 24 at Caf6 Karibo, 27 N.
Third St., as part of the Adult


Summer Reading Program
sponsored by the Friends of
the Fernandina Beach
Library. A Southern-style
* dinner will be served at 6
p.m. and the movie, "The
Secret Life of Bees," starts at
7 p.m. Tickets are $25 and
available at the library, 25 N.
Fourth St. There will be
drawings for reading pro-
gram grand prizes and door
prizes.

Blood drive
& more
The Fernandina Pirates
Club will host a blood drive
on Aug. 25 from 9 a.m.- 3
p.m. at Publix in Fernandina
Beach. All donors will be
entered into a raffle drawing
for the following admissions
tickets: four Jaguar pre-sea-
son game tickets for the
Falcons on Aug. 30 at 6:30
p.m.; Amelia Island Blues
SFstival; Amelia'Islaiid
Museum of History; Amelia
River Cruises; Island Falls
golf; and the Jacksonville
Zoo and Gardens. Melon
slices, hot dogs and drinks
will be provided to the first
100 donors.
Healing camp
Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida will host
Camp Healing Powers Sept.
7-9.
Specialists in grief and
bereavement lead activities
that help children identify
and express their feelings
and learn skills to navigate
the grief journey in a safe,
supportive and fun environ-
ment For children ages 7-17
whose loss has occurred at
least three months prior to
the camp. A $35 deposit is
returned upon completion of
camp, held at the Marywood
Retreat and Conference
Center in northern St. Johns
County. Space is limited. Call
(904) 407-6222 to learn more
and schedule an appoint-
ment for a camp assessment.
Rotary walk
The Rotary Club of
Amelia Island Sunrise pres-
ents the first annual COA
Walk-A-Thon to honor grand-
parents on Sept. 8 (the day
before Grandparent's Day).
This event is a fundraiser for
services the Council on
:Aging offers to seniors and
caregivers as well as anyone
classified as "transportation
disadvantaged" (unable to
drive and without other
Means of mobility).
Check-in will be at9 a.m.
.at the COA's new Transpor-
tation Center, 102 North
13th St. (next to Oxley-Heard
Funeral Home). Individuals
and groups will step off at 10
a.m., departing from and
returning to the center. The
total distance is 3 miles or
5K. Individual registration is
$20 and teams are $150.
Make checks payable to
COA, 1367 South 18th St.,
Fernandina Beach, EL
32034. Call 261-0701 for cred-
it card donations over the
phone. Visit www.coanassau.
com/events for online regis-
tration information.
NAMI support
The National Alliance for
Mental Illness Consumer
Support Group meets on
Friday at 11 a.m. at the
Council on Aging, 1367
South 18th St., Fernandina
Beach, across from Baptist
Medical Center Nassau.


OBITUARIES


DON'T LITTER

,ioSPAY NEUTER
A Public Service Announcement by The
News-Leader







FRIDAY, AUGUST 10.2012 NEWS News-Leader


COUNTY
Continued from 1A
major manufacturer.
Toyota, Rieck said, consid-
ered the site for one of its
plants seven years ago, but
ultimately settled in
Mississippi. Rieck said a man-
ufacturer could create 750 jobs
in the county if it relocated to
the Crawford site.
Rezoning would be a "huge
step in the right direction"
because manufacturers would
not be limited if they wanted to
expand for "satellite uses,"
Mullin said. Under the IPzon-
ing, he said, an auto plant
might be followed soon by a
bumper plant and so on.
"It would be a significant
factor in attracting job-creat-
ing industries to Nassau
County," Mullin said.
With the Florida
Department of Transportation
widening a stretch of US 301
from Baklwin to Callahan,
transportation is no longer a
cause for concern. But utilities
remain a lingering hurdle for
the site.
While gas lines and power
service are available, the
Crawford Diamond still lacks
water and sewer lines. JEA,'
which contractually supplies
water and sewer service to



ELECTION
Continued from 1A
and Fernandina Beach mayor
Bill Leeper, sheriff's deputy
Garland "Bubba" Rhoden and
and former police officers
Chris Hartley and Steve
Whitley each seek to replace
retiring Sheriff Tommy
Seagraves. There is no provi-
sion for a runoff election, so
the one with the most Votes
wins. .
Commissioner Walter.
(r.) Boatright faces challenger
Kenneth Bruce Overstreet.
Pat Edwards and Ronnie
Stoots are vying to succeed
Commissioner Stacy Johnson.
Commissioner Danny Leeper
is unopposed.
Incumbent Gail Cook
faces challengers Carl Ford
Cahill and John Pulice for her
seat on the Nassau County
School Board. Kimberly
Fahlgren, who was appointed
last year by Gov. Rick Scott to
fill an unexpired term, com-
petes with challengers Russell
Johnson, Tracy Range-Ketchie
and Richi,, d \ ilihain' fo;h.ler
Property Appraiser Tam-
my C. Stiles is challenged for
reelection in the Republican
primary by local appraiser and
real estate broker Mike
Hickox.
Republicans also will
choose between incumbent
state Rep. Janet Adkins and
Cord Byrd and between for-
mer state representative Aaron
Bean and current state Rep.
Mike Weinstein for a state sen-
ate seat held now by retiring
Sen. Stephen Wise.
CircuitJudge Brian Davis
seeks to retain his seat against
challengers Melina Buncome;'




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Nassau, has told county offi-
cials it can't economically jus-
tify building a new plant near
Crawford at this time, Rieck
said.
"There's several different
ways to skin that cat, so we're
working with (the town of
Callahan), with JEA and with
(TerraPointe)" to address that
issue, Rieck said. "We're pret-
ty confident that we'll be there
before the end of this calen-
dar year."
TerraPointe has retained
McCallum Sweeney to help
with the mega-site certifica-
tion process, Mike Bell, a
spokesman for Rayonier, said.
Rieck said the proposed rezon-
ing would be a step toward a
megasite designation.
"The idea is that you want
the site to be as close to fully
entitled as you can get it,"
Rieck said.
In that way, the process
often works as a "site elimina-
tion process," Camp said, as
it weeds out sites based on
their capabilities and the users'
needs. But the Crawford
Diamond is unique, Bell said,
as it is.the only site in Florida
with access to two major rail
lines, a prized attribute that
only six sites in the nation
share.
gpelicanri@bnewsleadercom


Gr-eg Messore, Donald Mairs
an'd Gerald Wilkerson.
Prosecutor Mark Borello and
practicing attorney A.
Wellington "Al" Barlow are
competing for another judge-
ship. Incumbent CircuitJudge
John Merrett squares off
against challenger Suzanne
Bass, a family and personal
injury attorney.
Nassau County constitu-
tional officers who have no
competition in the Republican
primary election Aug. 14 and
thegeneral election Nov. 6 are
Clerk of Court John Crawford,
Superintendent of Schools
John Ruis, Tax Collector Johni
Drew and Supervisor of
Elections Vicki Cannon.
For election information,
to research candidates, locate
polling places and more, visit-
the Supervisor of Elections
website at www.votenassau.
com or contact the office at
491-7500, toll free (866) 260-
4301 r TDD (904) 491-7510.


into three tiers tier 1 for con-
tiguous zoned areas of 100
acres or more, tier 2 for 200
acres or more, and tier 3 for
500 acres or more., Due to its



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Industrial park a


new zoning use
Before commissioners can size, the Crawford Diamond
approve a zoning change for near Callahan would fall under
the Crawford Diamond, they the latter, McDowell said.
must first approve the Tier 1 offers a wide array of
Industrial Park Zoning District uses, ranging from restaurants
at its second public hearing to auto parts manufacturers,
on Monday: while tiers 2 and 3 delve into
To be zoned under the new industrial uses on a larger
district, which aims to encour- scale, such as heavy machin-
age multi-use developments, ery production and oil refin-
property must be at least 100 ery. If a property has been
acres in size and in areas con- zoned tier 2, it allows tier 1
ducive to transportation, such uses, and so with tier 3 allow-
as highways, railroads or ing the uses of tiers 1 and 2,
ports. but a tier 1 property could not
Doug McDowell, strategic be used for tier 3 purposes.
planner with the county's Tier designation would
Growth Management Depart- depend on how intensive the
ment, said that staff is pro- planned use of a site would be,
posing this district to attract McDowell said.
new employers and manufac- Property owners and users
during jobs to the county. can also use zoned property
"This is intended to be a for accessory uses, such as
district that could be used any- parking garages.. But the dis-
where in the county that meets trict does not allow commer-
those standards," he said. cial mining operations or sex-
The creation of an ually oriented businesses of
Industrial Park zone puts any kind.
Nassau on an even playing On top of that, the growth
field with surrounding coun- management staff has includ-
ties, said Mike Mullin, a for- ed a series of buffers that will
mer county attorney. scale depending on the size of
"Enterprise Florida told the the development to mitigate
Economic Development any noise, odor or other
Board, "We noticed you'don't unforeseen impacts on its sur-
have zoned industrial parks, roundings.
and you really need to consid- "We want to try and pro-
er that to be competitive,' and tect existing uses surround-
they're right," Mullin said. ing the site as much as possi-
The district is segmented ble," McDowell said.


LIBRARY
Continued from 1A
and new roof for the library.
Commissioners at previous
meetings had discussed
whether to make such minor
improvements to the library
before deciding to expand and
renovate it.
"It's not in this year's budg-
et," City Manager Joe Gerrity
said. "We'll take a look at that
and square it away."
"We'll eliminate that
$90,000," Mayor Arlene Filkoff
said. "If we go ahead with this
(plan) all we're committing is
$600,000, which is part of what
we borrowed for Forward
Fernandina.... We need to have
it documented so we won't have
an argument about it later."
"If the Friends of the Library
has a whole list of what they
want, the fee goes up," said
Stephen Lazar, executive vice
president of V.R.L. Architects.
"(The cost) is based on con-
struction value, that's all ...
We'll invoice monthly based on
a percentage of the work we
do."
"In this bidding climate, it's.
a little volatile right now," Lazar
said. "There's a lot of hungry
contractors out there, but that
won't last forever because those
hungry contractors aren't out
there any more."
"You're committed to $1.4
million," Corbett said. "If it's
higher, would the city be
responsible?"
"That's between you, the


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I AM:
/ A college graduate with a 5th year teaching
specialist degree
/ A previous Teacher/Coach at West Nassau High
Schooland Femandina Beach High School with a
total of6 years ofpersona/classroom experience.
/ A resident, a worker and taxpayer in Nassau
,County, and have been for 33 years.
/ A business leader in Nassau County
/ The Broker/Manager ofAmelia Realty for 24 years,
having helped hundred of families in our
c~. c tmunities prqcure homes.
SExperiOnce with budgets, contract negotiations,
and all strata ofpeople.
I The proud father of two children educatedin
Nassau County Pubic Schools K-12, with
advanced college degrees and licenses. Jay is
a PSM (Professional Surveyor and Mapper) and
Ashley isa CPA (Cenlifid PublicAccountant.)
I Entering politics for the first tine.
/ Ready to lead with innovative ideas
/ The man with a career resume and skill set
required to serve the public. *

I AM NOT:
X A career politiian looking for the next ob. My two
opponents combined have been in elected office
in Nassau County for 32 years.

Qualifications Matter.
Innovative Ideas,
Not Old Politics.
Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Pulice,
Candidate for Nassau County School Board, District 2


---- --


county and the Friends of the
Library," Lazar said.
According to a city docu-
ment, "the city commission
will have the opportunity to
review conceptual renderings
that visually depict the proposed
renovation and/or expansion of
the library building at different
phases of the design before
the design plans are complet-
ed."
The Fernandina Beach
branch library, built in the
1970s, is considered unsuitable
for the growing population of
users in both the city and the
county, and is the heaviest-used
branch in the county system.
The city and county share
responsibility for it, but the city
owns the building' and pays
about $53,000 annually toward
library services. The county
pays for most of the operational
expenses.
The Nassau County
Commission made a commit
ment last year to set aside
$600,000 toward a new library
within city limits, and the city
committed the same amount.
Commissioners last year
considered purchasing a build-
ing on Centre Street for a new
library, but a local businessman
purchased it instead. Commis-
sioners have since decided to
expand and renovate the exist-
ing library site.
According to Gerrity, the
county has not yet made a writ-
ten commitment for its $600,000
share.
adaughtry@fbnewsleader.com


t






FRID\'Y. A A ,; I t0. 2012 NEWS News-Leader


PROPOSED MILLAGE 2012
001 002 003 004 005 006 007
TAXING AUTHORITY CALAHAN FERN BCH HILLARD UNINCORP UNINCORP ISL DRAIN DIST PINEY ISLAND

NASSAU COUNTY 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670
REC-WATER CONSERV DIST 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
MUNICIPAL SERV FUND 1.6694 1.6694 1.6694 1.6694
ST JOHNS RIVER WMD 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313
AMELIA ISLAND MOSQUITO 0.1453 0.1453
PINEY ISLAND MOSQUITO 0.1453
SCHOOL BOARD
STATE REQUIRED 5.4720 5.4720 5.4720 5.4720 5.4720 5.4720 5.4720
LOCAL BOARD 2.2480 2.2480 2.2480 2.2480 2.2480 2.2480 2.2480

F.I.N.D. 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345

COUNTY SUBTOTALS 13.6528 13.7981 13.6528 1.3222 154875 153222 154675
TOWN OF CALLAHAN 3.6159
CITY OF FERN BCH 6.0277
VOTER APPROVED DEBT 0.2724
TOWN OF HILLIARD 0.5826
TOTAL PROPOSED MILLAGE 172687 20.0982 142354 15.3222 154675 15.3222 15.4675


DJ WAYNE

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JA ET -.N
FOCUSED ON GROWING OBS
& IMPROVING EDUCATION
ELECTED EADERSHIPENDBOSEMENTS:
e Governor JEB BUSH County Commissioner Barry Holloway
Speaker Designate Will Wealherlord County Commissioner Danny L eeper
State Senator Steve Wise Mayor Shirley Graham
State Senalor John Thrasher Port Commissioner Brian Reaves
State Attorney Angela Corey Port Commissioner Carroll Franklin
Clerk ol Courts John Crawford School Board Member Amanda Young
Business Endorsements:
Jax Bit Jacksonville Chamber Northeast Florida Builders Association
Florida Retail Federation Northeast Florida Realtors Association
Associated Industries of Florida Associated Builders and Contractors
Fonda Chamber of Commerce Health Care Endorsements:
First Coast Manufacturing Association Florida Medical Association

Pro-ifte Enlorsements: GunR NIgts:
Fibrida Right-to-l ie *A Rated by the NRA

Vote REPUBLICAN
JANET ADKINS Lers Get It DONE!
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uhiiwa~l sEuwflaspmeiU IiDuR wE IMw .lsKu rlhs~mlit d11a t gi n vsine ss


The proposed millage rates by local governments for 2012, left, compared to the final
millage rates approved by those governments in 2011, as provided by the Nassau
County Property Appraiser's Office. Final property tax rates will,be set by local gov-
ernments after public hearings in September.


School Board votes, 3-2,


to OK budget, tax rate


News-Leader
The Nassau County School
Board voted 3-2 on July 30 to
adopt a tentative $152.9 million
budget and tentative property
tax rate in 2012-13. Members
Amanda Young and Kimberly
Fahlgren dissented.
Most of the property tax
rate; 5.472 mills, is state
required. The board unani-
mously approved that portion,


which provides the bulk of sup,
port for the annual budget.
A local discretionary mill-
age, 0.748 mills, also was unan-
imously approved.
But Young and Fahlgren
opposed a tentative capital
improvement rate of 1.5 mills.
Among the projects it would
support are a $2.5 million ren-
ovation of the school adminis-
tration building, which was crit-
icized as unnecessary in


difficult economic times.
Fahlgren and Young ulti-
mately were opposed in the
final votes on both the tenta-
tive budget and tentative tax
rates. Members Kathy Burns,
Gail Cook and Donna Martin
voted in the majority.
A final public budget hear-
ing is scheduled for 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 10 at the administration
building, 1201 Atlantic. Ave.,
Fernandina Beach.


DON'T LITTER

SPAY NEUTER'
A Public Service Announcement by The News-Leader


C1 OX
PROPERTY APPRAISER



PROVEN LEADERSHIP

* Past President of Local Association of Realtors

* Past District Vice President of Florida
Association of Realtors

* Past Chairman of Professional Standards
Committee

* State Certified Appraiser since 1992

* Past Director of the Amelia Island Chamber of
Commerce
* Current Director of the Local Association of Realtors

* Chaired Arbitrations and held Mediations that kept
disputes out of the court system
~ -e-------- xll/,:


My Promise to You...
"I will be Fair and Accessible.
The Office will be Open, Transparent
and operated Lawfully with
Consistent application ofAppraisal
Methodology. It would be an honor to
serve you and I ask for your
vote on August 14th!"


Polihcal advertisement paid bor and approved by Mike Hickox,
Republican for Property Appraiser


FINAL MILLAGE 2011
001 002 003 004 005 006 007
TAXING AUTHORITY CALLAHAN FERN BCH HILLIARD UNINCORP UNINCORP ISL DRAIN DIST PINEY ISLAND

NASSAU COUNTY 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670 5.5670
REC-WATER CONSERV DIST 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
MUNICIPAL SERV FUND 1.6694 1.6694 1.6694 1.6694
ST JOHNS RIVER WMD 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313 0.3313
AMELIA ISLAND MOSQUITO 0.1372 0.1372
PINEY ISLAND MOSQUITO 0.1372
SCHOOL BOARD
STATE REQUIRED 5.8170 5.8170 5.8170 5.8170 5.8170 5.8170 5.8170
LOCAL BOARD 1.9910 1.9910 1.9910 1.9910 1.9910 1.9910 1.9910

F.I.N.D. 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345 0.0345

COUNTY SUBTOTALS 13.7408 13.B780 13.7408 15.41i2 15.5474 15.4102 15.5144
TOWN OF CALLAHAN 3.2860
CITY OFFER BCH 5.1759 "
VOTER APPROVED DEBT 0.2576
TOWN OF HILLIARD 0.5521
TOTAL FINAL MILLAGE 17,0268 13115 14.2929 15.4102 15.5474 15.4102 155474.


A j
r :' ;
; :' : . :" "
i;.; ---------~., ~-,-: .






FRIDAY, AUGUST 10,2012 NEWS News-Leader


HEATHER. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Community Footprints volunteers Caitlin Geiger, Brendan Mangan, Kerry Morse,
Ernesto Rosas, Ryan Bickel and Susan Kalcevic serve lunch at the annual Boys and
Girls Club carnival.


Serving their community
HEATHER A. PERRY
News-Leader
News-Leader 'Serving our guests every day is a
Day campers at the Miller pleasure, serving the children from the
Club and Fernandina Beach B s and Girls Club isa privilege.'
Boys and Girls Club are treat- B an rl l pr le.
ed to a carnival at the end of BRENDAN MANGAN, FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR
summer where they enjoy
water slides' and games, and THE RITZ-CARLTON. AMELIA ISLAND
savor a delicious lunch catered
by The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island. Amelia Island pledge their eating;- front desk and
The volunteers who serve involvement in the Community concierge employees provide
that lunch are members of Footprints program. instruction oh social skills; and
Community Footprints, a serv- They make monthly dona- trainers coach kids on how to
ice organization within The tions for needed items for the work together.
Ritz-Carlton corporation. The Barnabas Center, perform The children also are intio-
volunteers also oversee the environmental projects for Fort duced to the importance of giv-
games and help with other Clinch State Park, do mainte- ing back to their community
aspects of the carnival. nance projects for Safe Harbor by performing service projects
"The original mission state- Home for Boys and work on .themselves.
ment of The Ritz-Carlton service projects for the Boys Once the kids have com-
Company stated that The Ritz- and Girls Clubs. pleted all the facets of their
Carlton Hotels will be known "Volunteers work on main- program, they go through a
as positive, supportive mem- tenance projects at the (Miller) graduation ceremony and
bers of their community and Center, volunteer for tutoring, receive a certificate of com-
will be sensitive to the envi-. work the annual summer car- pletion.
ronment. It reflects a culture of nival, the Guardian Luncheon The Ritz-Carlton volunteers
building a legacy of extraordi- and the B&W Gala fundraiser. get a lot out of their work with
nary service," says Barbara We also run a Succeed the Boys and Girls Clubs, said
Smith, assistant director of Through Service program Smith.
Human Resources atThe Ritz- that teaches skills needed to "The biggest thrill is see-
Carlton, Amelia Island. gain employment, etiquette, ing the smiles on the chil-
Community Footprints teambuilding, corrtmunication dren's faces and the satisfac-
identifies opportunities and and other components," said tion that comes from knowing
schedules outreach programs Smith, who. oversees all they made a difference."
that meet the charter of skills training, hotel visits and The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia'
hunger and poverty relief, well- the children's community proj- Island is located at 4750
being of,children and environ- ects. Arn.-iilii Il. nrid Pkwy. Phone
menal conser.vationi -. Ritz-Carlton LI., i,-,c. 7-i*) -110)I0vi-'www.ritzcarl-
" All 600 ladies and gentle- BoysandGirlsClub,kid l.a:b,,Ltt Iln o rn amneliaisland.
men of The Ritz-Carlton, safe food handling and healthy cype@fbnewsleader.com


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Pelicans and selling cars


Many business people will
say, "Nothing happens until
you sell something." Having
earned a living during my
career for generating sales, I
buy into this thought process.
Talk to an engineer or con-
troller and you will probably
get a modified perspective.
Sales is a great occupation
that the majority of people
don't give a chance to consid-
er. Whether it is the uneven
income or the fear of rejec-
tion, they shun sales as a
choice. Most six-digit
incomes are not straight
salary. Sales and the
earnings they generate influ-
ence the world of higher
incomes. It takes a mindset to
allow yourself to be a sales-
person.
We all like analogies, with
sports/life comparisons being
the most common. We'are
going to take a trip to the ani-
mal kingdom to illustrate the
make-up of a salesman. For
probably 20 years, I have
been a pelican fal. They
remind me of salespeople.
They are usually in groups -
salespeople like to have com-
pany around they are social.
They.start every day needing
to acquire food. We watch
them dive for fish and often
come up empty. It requires
persistence on their part, just
as it does to sell a product.
Auto sales is similar to
baseball, in that selling 3 in 10
prospects (batting .300) is a
great average. Twenty per-
cent is more the typical clos-
ing ratio for car sales. Good
car salespeople, pelicans and
batters can handle having *
more misses than successes.
For years, I have shared


my apprecia-
tioIn for Ithe
pelican and
to auto sell-
.- ing. iThll
: ,-reactions
""' vary,
Because not
a lot of 1po-
REFFER 'S pl under-
CORNER. stand a sales
... mentality. It
is usually
RickKejfer thought of
as amusing
more than anything. We can
take things further and admit
there are hard-working peli-
cans that fish the ocean and
earn a healthy reward. Then
there are the pelicans that
want to hang out at the
seafood dock and get hand-
outs without putting in the
effort. They risk getting fat
and lazy. Good pelicans are
the majority and a thing of


beauty to behold gliding over
the surf.
Three of the four members
of my family have voted and
the other is sending in a bal-
lot. Get out Tuesday and vote
in this important election. I
have to share that 15 years
ILo when my goal was to
move here, Aaron Bean was
helpful as 1he could be and
didn't know me from
Adam. It has been a privilege
to know him and his family
ever since. While usually fly-
ing below the political radar
as a retailer, I have no trouble
encouraging people to vote
Tuesday for this local guy
with a big heart. Have a good
week.
Rick Keffer owns and
operates Rick Keffer Dodge
Chrysler Jeep in Yulee. He
invites questions or positive
stories about automobile use
and ownership.
Srwkcar@aolcom


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FRIDAY. AUGUST 10. 2012 NEWS News-Leader


POLITICS IN BRIEF
' ~ al .


SUBMIITED
At a recent Nassau County Sheriff candidates debate the Marine Corps League was
presented with a $200 check, by the Nassau Patriots Tea Party, for their effort to re-
install the American Flag on Sadler Avenue. An additional $86 was donated by the
audience at the debate. Pictured above, from left, are Larry Murray, the Marine Corps
League commandant, Susan Lane and Morgan Thomas.


- ^DON'T LITTERS
5' SPAY- NEUTER


Today sandplay. Tomorw moondust


l/








What they learn today will shape their tomorrow.



I.i


Endorsements
Nassau County Clerk of
Courts John Crawford and
Nassau County Commission-
er Stephen'Kelley have
announced their endorse-
ments of Suzanne Bass for
Circuit Court Judge for the
Fourth Judicial Circuit of
SFlorida.
"Northeast Florida needs
as its next judge a candidate
who will bring consistency
and balanced experience to
the bench," said Kelley. "I
know Suzanne Bass will work
tirelessly to do just that. That
is why I am endorsing
Suzanne Bass for circuit
judge and asking you to join
me in my support of her can-
didacy."
For more information;
visit www.SuzanneBassFor
Judge.com.
Meet the Mayor
Mayor Arlene Filkoff will
meet wTth rtle public at 10:30
a.m. Wednesday at Seaside
Park. All-city residents are
Invited to come discuss issues
of importance to them.


Island tourist destinations


gain good traveler reviews


Ten Amelia Island proper-
ties have received TripAdvis
or's Certificates of Excellence,
according to the Amelia Island
Convention & Visitors' Bureau.
The Certificate of Excel-
lence is awarded to approxi-
mately 10 percent of accom-
modations listed on Trip
Advisor and honors those with
outstanding traveler reviews
on the web site.
The following Amelia Island
properties have been awarded
the 2012 Certificate of
Excellence: Addison on
Amelia, Amelia Hotel at the
Beach, Fairbanks House,
Florida House Inn, Elizabeth
Pointe Lodge, Hampton Inn &
Suites, Hoyt House, Residence
Inn Amelia Island, The Ritz-
Carlton, Amelia Island, and
Williams House.
The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island has earned North
America's most prestigious
travel award, the AAA Five
Diamond travel designation,
for its resort and premier
restaurant, Salt. There is only
one other hotel in Florida that
have been awarded two AAA


Five Diamond awards: The
Four Seasons, Palm Beach.
Additional information is avail-
able at www.ritzcarlton.conm/
ameliaisland.
The Hoyt House is now an
approved Select Registry
Property, becoming one of less
than 400 inns in the nation to
earn this distinction. Select
Registry carries out a quality
assurance inspection of each
of its properties and ensures a
high quality stay. The Hoyt
House joins Amelia Island
Williams House, Elizabeth
Pointe Lodge and Fairbanks
House on this Select Registry
list. Visit www.hoythouse.com
for m6re information.
The Residence Inn -Amelia
Island received a Diamond
Award for 2011 from the
Marriott hotel brand for pro-
viding the ultimate in home-
away-from-home accommoda-
tions. Marriott's highest level
of distinction, the honor was,,
shared with only two other,
Residence Inn properties in
the U.S. Visit www.residence'
innameliaisland.com for irtfor-
mation about the property.


Two Amelia Island resorts
were listed in Conde Nast
Traveler's Top 121 Golf Resorts
in the World, appearing in the
April 2012 issue. The Ritz-
Carlton, Amelia Island (#5) and
Omni Amelia Island Plantation
(#15) were among the top 20
golf resorts in Florida.
In July, the Amelia Com-
munity Theatre received a
national award from the
American Association of
.Community Theatre at the
annual convention in New
York. The Twink Lynch Award
honors a community theater
for successfully completing
major steps in new directions,
expanding services to the
community, and moving to the
next level of organizational
development. Amelia
Community Theatre is in its
31st season and built a new
facility in 2010. For informa-
tion about the Amelia
-Community Theatre or its per-
formances, visit www. amelia-
Scommunitytheatre.org.
For additional information
about Amelia Island, visit
wiw.ameliaisland.com. .-


Report: More Floridians use


wireless telephone


TALLAHASSEE Florida
consumers have a broad range
of communications choices,
according to the Florida Public
Service Commission's annual
Report on the Status of Com-
petitipn in the Telecommuni-
cations Industry.
"Industry competition has
helped consumers reap the
benefits of state-of-the-art tele-
communications services at
affordable prices," said PSC
Chairman Ronald A. Bris6.
"Competition is also encour-
aging companies to create even
more innovative services and
pricing packages and to invest
in telecommunications infra-
structure, all very important
for Florida's economic devel-
opment."
For the first time since 1995,
when Florida's Legislature
began requiring the report,
wireline business access lines


exceed residential lines.
According to the report, incum-
bent local exchange company.
(ILEC) wirelines decreased by
8 percent from Dec. 31, 2010,
with Florida's three largest
ILECs, AT&T, Verizon, and
CenturyLink, all reporting
reductions. Competitive local
exchange carriers' market
share of all wireline access lines
(residential and business) in
Florida increased from 18 to
20 percent in 2011.
The report indicated that
wireless and Voice over Inter-
net Protocol (VoIP) services
now compete with traditional
wireline service and represent
a significant portion of today's
communications market in
Florida. As of J'un6 2011,
approximately 17.6 million wir2e
less handsets were in service in
the state. Lastyear, there were
an estimated,2.4 million VoIP


service
subscribers in lorida, a 20 per-
cent increase over the 1.9 mil-
lion estimated in 2010.
Federal Communications
Commission statistics in the
report show 42 percent of
Florida households have a fixed
broadband connection with
download speeds of at least 3
megabits per second (Mbps)
and 73 percent have fixed
broadband connections of 200
kilobits per second (kbps).
Approximately 93 percent
of Floridians have some sort
of communications service,
indicating that "an over-
whelming majority of Florida
residents are able to afford tele-
phone service."
For the entire report, go to
w w v i., ,,1:1- l .1.. '- I I' ibli f -
" ti&ins/p f/tele6dridi/20120730
MasterComp.pdf.
For additional information;
visit www.floridapsc.com


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 2012 OPINION News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
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ANGELINE MUDD.
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
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BETH JONES. SPORTS EDITOR


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CNI Community
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The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on thispage are their own .
and do not necessary reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees


French fri

Musings, opinions, observations, questions
and random thoughts on island life,.
Fernandina Beach and more:
William "Bill". Maurer, local architect, artist
and Francophile, told me over a beverage at
Centre Street's Amelia Island Coffee recently
that any local citizen interested in French cul-
ture is invited to join him and other island
dwellers in the 'Alliance Francaise de
Jacksonville, an organization that promotes
French culture and its language and also par-
takes in its food and wines. To qualify you
don't need to speak French or be a sommelier
as eating a French fry at least once in your life-
time, plus a small check, qualifies you.
UAlliance board member Maurer, who spent
many years in North Africa and France plying
his architectural and painting skills, says the
group is also active with the local island
p6tanque club. Monsieur Maurer can be
reached at 261-8276 or
w.maurer@comcast.net.
* *
Joe's 2nd Street Bistro has had a change in
ownership with Marl and Ricky Pigg, the son
of the late island water color artist Ray, who
passed away last December, taking over as of
June 25 and not missing a beat by continuing
the proven menu and good will generate by
the previous owners. Ricky, a Fernandina
Beach High grad, is providing some unique
daily specials and may add some additional
seating, but says he won't dramatically mess
with an already successful menu .formula with
my favorite being the grouper filet grilled in a
corn husk with roasted jalapeno, lime and
cilantro butter. Many of his late dad's water
colors are on exhibit in the restaurant, includ-
ing some of the restaurant itself, so treat your-
self to a gourmet meal, a tempting wine list,
enjoy a sunset from the early 1900's cottage's


:s and Italian dressing

I upstairs porch, welcome Rick minute details such as painting, hiring the best
back and have a look around. suppliers, kitchen equipment, etc., are perfect.
SCall 321-2558 for a reserva- When complete this will be a destination you'll
S tion. want to stand in line to get into. lThe upstairs
,0 i- 'iica n VI F ... T11 ...v I -cn tn I i L tI rI g i .yit.caI


te Coming and/or going?
SThere are whisperings that
... the folks that run the upscale
Matthews Restaurant in
Jacksonville have been scout-
DAVE'S ing locations on Centre
WORLD Street for a location, but
nothing verifiable yet. If so,
the former Italian eatery
David N. Gennaro's location on down-
Scott town's South Second Street
is empty and available. And I
keep hearing rumors that the pilings under
the pier in the downtown marina that support
Brett's are about ready to crumble and that it
may disappear soon, possibly before the end
of the year. And Ernie Saltmarsh, owner of the
Florida House Inn, confirms that he has pur-
chased the next-door Green Turtle and says
he has no plans to make any major changes to
an already successful formula, but may look to
add a more consistent food menu. Longtime
restaurateur Mario Pompeo Manganaro is
tossing in his pasta maker and closing, but I've
heard from reliable folks that the Yulee-based
Ciao Italian Bistro.will be moving into
Pompeo's quarters, thus filling the Centre
Street Italian gap.
* *
The long-awaited opening of Front Street's
Salty Pelican Bar & Grill is just around the cor-
ner as TJ. Pelletier and Al Waldis are applying
the finishing touches, including testing the 17
draught beer taps, seven of which are devoted
exclusively to Florida craft brews, training a .
staff of 35 employees and making sure all last-


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Within our means
Re: "Restored depot might include
statue of Yulee," Aug. 3).-
I can't believe it. Our city commis-
sioners "still" don't get it! Forward
Fernandina is rushing us back to the
Dark Ages. Return the balance of the
unused borrowed $2.1 million and
enjoy our city as it now is. Money will
be just as cheap to borrow next year
should the economy begin to improve.
The island has been covered with
tourists all summer without spending
frivolously. Let's pay our expected and
incurred debts for now. Lack of all
these "nice to have (statues depot
repair on a building that is in 'sound
structural condition' Forward
Fernandina ideas) will not cost us the
loss of one single visitor. Stop spend-
ing money we don't have or can't
afford and then perhaps city taxes
wniii' l:e\', to be raised .. .
W\\'iI hi :city commissioners learn-
to liHe within our means?
Terry Jones
Fernandina Beach

Dialogue rhetoric
oropinion?
I'm not sure if this letter to the edi-
tor will be considered dialogue or rhet-
oric; however, it is my opinion. I guess
it will depend on the reader, conser-
vative reader it's dialogue, or liberal
reader it's rhetoric. One thing I am
certain, of is that the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act will become
an absolute failure and a national
tragedy. Anyone with a modicum of
intelligence or a small amount of crit-
ical thinking ability understands that
by placing government between
patients (willing buyers) and the
health care industry (willing sellers)
will not solve the problems of health
care cost In fact it will do the exact
opposite.
In the long run, or even in the short
Trun, the cost of this law will go up as
the quantity and quality of available
health care goes down. It is a case of
basic economics that unfortunately
some people have a limited under-
standing of.
It is a shame that we as a nation did
not start teaching our children back in
the late 1960's and early 1970's to be
responsible and independent of gov-
ernment by showing them how to plan
for future needs with items like a
Medical Savings Account. These citi-
zens today would have large amounts
of money to purchase premium med-
ical insurance plans. Instead we have
taught dependence on government
and introduced the absurd notion that
you have a right to health care. One
might as well just go up to your doctor
and say, "I have a right to your time
and money." You do not!
Politicians and pundits on the issue
never talk about the real drivers of
health care cost. The biggest factor
by far is the fact that our medical sys-
tem, being the best in the world, has
been tremendously successful and
people live much longer as well as bet-
ter lives. That last 20 years of extra
life is expensive and you go to the doc-
tor a lot. The second biggest factor is
that people are not responsible Tor
themselves by taking good care of
their health and planning for future


medical needs. The third driver of cost
is a dysfunctional medical insurance
industry that has had its marketplace
interfered with by a host of federal
and state laws. Remove these barri-
ers (an actual proper application of
the "Commerce Clause" within our
U.S. Constitution) and the medical
insurance companies would be better
able to compete and provide the right
product to the right customer with the
result being premium costs dropping
dramatically for most people.
Let me wrap up with some random
thoughts on this topic. People should
be responsible by planning for and
paying up front for routine health care
and insure themselves for unexpected
and catastrophic events. Safety nets
for people who are poor or with pre-
existing conditions should be
addressed at the state level, not the
federal level. For me it is obviously
immoral for, a politician and their
l., cii-,.I i.i"- to be involved to any
degree in my health care. I find it to be
an assault on my person, obscene and
unacceptable. There is no doubt in my
mind that if government controls my
health care they control me and I
strongly believe this law is about con-
trol for most politicians. We do not
live in the land of the free if govern-
ment can mandate or dictate that you
spend your money on a good or serv-
.ice. As to the constitutionality of the
"Patient Protection and Affordable
Care Act," someone forgot the original
intentions of our "Federal Constitu-
tion" or simply forgot to read it, espe-
cially the Ninth and 10th Amendments.
This law is not "constitutional" and
anyone who has read our supreme
law of the land knows this.
Finally, socialized medicine will not
solve the cost or access issues. It will
cause extreme rationing of health care.
It will also guarantee the bankruptcy
of our already bankrupted nation
($16 trillion debt and growing by $4-
plus billion every day). Thomas
Jefferson said some 230 plus years
ago, 'The problem with socialism is
thatyou too soon run out of other peo-
ple's money."
David R. Mills, Jr.
Fernandina Beach

Walk-A-Thon
I am on a mission and I need your
help! My club, The Rotary Club of
,Amelia Island Sunrise, is sponsoring a
5K Walk-A-Thon Sept. 8 honoring
Grandparents Day (Sept. 9) for COA
for their services to the elderly com-
munity.
The program my Mama is in is the
Adult Day Health Care and it is awe-
some for her and for me as her care-
giver! She is one of about a dozen
clients that attend. They enjoy arts
and crafts, sing and dance, exercise,
play bingo and other games, go on
field trips and so much more. That
program is in serious financial jeop-
ardy and we need to raise $20,000 to
save it until more funding (i.e., grants)
arrives. Did you know it is the only
adult day care in Nassau County? For
us regular folks who don,t have a
big nest egg, this program allows
Mama to still live at home with us, yet
go to a structured LPN supervised
program 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. This gives
me respite time for my business and


JEFF I'ARI'ER/FI.ORIDA TODAY


personal needs.
We hope for at least a couple hun-
dred to actually walk versus just
donate. Visit www.coanassau.com/
events for the registration flyer with a
map of the 5k route. Our event starts
at 9 a.m. and will end around lunch.
The route takes walkers from the new
COA transportation building on North
13th east down Centre Street to the
marina and back west to Egans Creek
and back east to the transportation
center again. Envision walkers carry-
ing Rotary and COA Walk-A-Thon
signs to raise awareness in the com-
munity for both organizations and
raise dollars for COA.
It is $150 for a team of 10 and $20
Sfor individuals. It would be awesome
to have businesses, churches, organ-
izations, etc., all participate with their
S eamn shirts as team walkers, donors,
sponsors or just offer water, fruit
stands, etc. Everybody gets exercise,
S'community service and philanthropic
joy! It's truly a win-win-win opportu-
nity!
There will be awards for the most
money raised and hot dogs, ham-
burgers and sweets for sale afterward!
Please share this letter with everyone
you know and let us know of any sug-
gestions to make it even more suc-
cessful. Please help us help COA serv-
-ices'stay afloat!
Suzanne McLeod
Sergeant at Arms
Rotary Club of Amelia Island
Sunrise

Assault rifles ban
Phil Scanlan's eloquent and per-
suasive letter (Viewpoint, Aug. 3)
admirably addresses the question:
"Why renew the ban on assault
weapons?" But I would offer a differ-
ent qu.'sli.'n "Why not ban assault
rifles.
What purpose do these weapons
serve? They were invented and are
produced for one reason only: to kill
and maim humans.
Who is benefited by their continued
ready availability? No one but the com-
panies that manufacture these deadly
devices and their dealers.
Is our constitutional right to bear
arms diminished by banning their
availability? The U.S. Supreme Court


held that such a ban was perfectly con-
stitutional in the 10 years before 2004
when the ban was in effect -just like
the existing ban on fully automatic
weapons.
Will prohibiting the sale and own-
ership of assault rifles stop senseless,
criminal attacks on people? Of course
not, but it may make those attacks
less horrific and less costly in human
life.
Are assault rifles the only way peo-
ple are killed? How about the slaugh-
ter that cars inflict on the highways?
Or gasoline or explosives that can be
used in multiple killings? The point is
that no other devices except assault
rifles (and handguns) are designed
and produced only for killing people.
Many things can be misused to kill
but only these weapons have no other
purpose.
Will making sale and ownership of
assault rifles illegal immediately elim-
inate their use? Not immediately, but
criminalizing ownership will make it
easier for law enforcement to appre-
hend and frustrate those who are bent
on mass killings.
It is beyond belief that the NRA,
which sponsors classes on safe han-
dling of weapons, should continue to
oppose a.ban on assault rifles. The
only reason that makes sense is the
financial support NRA receives from
manufacturers and dealers of these
weapons. Let's us citizens withhold
financial support from NRA and with-
hold votes from those politicians who
march to the NRA tune.
Alan Donaldson
Amelia Island

Credit due
Give Phil Scanlan credit for hav-
ing the "guts" to say what many of us
are thinking ("Renew assault weapons
ban," Aug. 3) intimidation sometimes
rules the day. Aside from law enforce-
ment officials and the military, who
on earth needs to have an assault
weapon?
Robert B. Howat
Fernandina Beach

Keep it dean
Congratulations to all the partici-
pants in the recent Jacksonville Sprint


Triathlon Series.
It is becoming frustrating, though,
as I see the many energy gel foil packs
and plastic water bottles that are now
part of the landscape of Fletcher and
Amelia Island Parkway. These foil
packs can easily enter the ocean and
adversely affect the wild and marine
life in the area.
My suggestion would be to have a
group of volunteer racers complete
the course again while picking up the
trash and foil packs. Or perhaps ban-
ning foil packs from the events and
allowing only liquid provisions
throughout the event. In addition, des-
ignated "bag drop" areas could be
established for additional provisions.
Jonathan Felsen
Fernandina Beach

In the eye of the beholder
I am responding to a letter pub-
lished in your "Voice ofthe People" on
July 16 concerning the "eyesore"
advertising on the property located at
the corner of Blackrock and A A. My
only comment to both of these women
is: Shame on you! In this economical-
ly hard decade we are living in, it
would behoove you both to just mind
your own business and shut up. With
all the extra taxes imposed on small
businesses, and all the hardships many
are in and those struggling to survive,
how dare you spread negative com-
ments like this.
Those signs you are clowning were
professionally made and only used
temporarily to advertise new busi-
nesses. Your noses ai, stuck so high
in the air that you think you're better
than most. Well, I take your comment
defensively because I am- onie of those
businesses that spent thousands of
dollars having them printed, paid
someone to hang them and pail for
the permits to place them on our own
properties.
So, lntil you walk in someone else's
shoes, or pay the taxes we pay to run
a business, tl)en you need to keep your
opinions to yourselves. What goes
around comes around, so watch out,
ladies! God doesn't like "Ugly."
Karen Boney
Early Impressions
Development Center
Yulee


HOW TO WRITE US
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Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, PO. Box 766. Fernandina
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visit us on-line atfbnewsleadercomn


Pelican Perclh orch, the landscaping by local
artist Doug Gales and (the renovated building
by local contractor Neil Douglas of louglas &
Terras are worth a visit so watch this space for
opening dates and menu Iselections.
* *
When a person signs a contract that has
been negotiated and agreed upon in good faith
by all parties, how can one of those parties
come back later and demand that the agree-
ment be renegotiated as is currently happen-
ing with Jacksonville Jaguar running back
Maurice Jones-Drew, who has two years left
on a $31 million pact he signed in 2009. Didn't
he, his agent, advisors, etc., all agree four
years ago that this was the deal he wanted?
But it appears that his word is no good and he
wants more, in which case I'd tell him to take a
hike, and if the rest of the NFLI instant million-
aires are any example he'll be broke in a few
years anyway. I've had it with these greedy
oafs with Rockefeller bank accounts, rap
sheets longer than their stat sheets and IQ's
lower than that of a barrel of hair.

Odds and ends: Some of the benefits of liv-
ing on Amelia Island include going to a super-
market or convenience store and shopping
alongside gals in bikinis; wearing shorts
everywhere, even to some of the churches on
Sunday morning; nothing.is too far away that
you can't get to it on your bike; people that you
have never seen before starting a conversation
with you and actually having something inter-
esting to say; a hot summer day, an ocean,
breeze and an ice cold beer.
davidnscolttbellsouth.net







FRIDAY. AUGUST 10. 2012/NEWS-LEADER


COMMUNITY


School district brings home the gold for


While U.S. athletes are racking up gold
medals at the London Olympics, the Nassau
County School District has earned a golden
award of its own.
The district is among just three in the state to
achieve the ranking of "Gold Level Florida
Healthy School Districts"- the first time gold sta-
tus has been awarded to any school district
in the state. The other winners were Palm
Beach in South Florida and Santa Rosa in the
Panhandle.
Research shows that when school districts
and schools have effective policies and practices
that support the health of their students and
staff, student and staff absenteeism decreases,
student concentration improves, student behav-
ior problems are reduced and children and ado-
lescents establish life-long health promoting
behaviors, the Florida Coordinated School Health


Partnership said in a pressr-elease.
In 2009, the agency recognized eight districts
as Florida Healthy School Districts. In 2010, an
additional eight districts were recognized, and
Florida Action for Healthy Kids (FLAFHK)
became a cosponsor of the award.
In 2011, Orange and Santa Rosa counties
were recognized as Silver Florida Healthy
Schools Districts. In 2012, 18 districts applied and
were awarded Healthy School District custom-
ary two-year status.
Recognition is determined by submission of
the Florida Healthy School District Self-
Assessment. The self-assessment tool is based.on
sustainable infrastructure, policy, programs and
practices identified from national and state guide-
lines, best practices and Florida statutes:
The tool serves as a needs assessment and
planning instrument. Implementing the policies


and processes in the tool provides stuck
staff the opportunity to reach their
potential by reducing/eliminating the b
learning and supporting academic achi
The agencies also named 13 Silv
Award winners and twq Bronze Levw
winners. All three of the Gold Districts -
Palm Beach and Santa Rosa, along with
County had perfect or nearly perfect
creating district infrastructure that can
sustainable change.
This underscores the value of a stron
istratively supported infrastructure that
A comprehensive district wellne
based onCoordinated School Health
Healthy School Teams representing
components of CSH in all schools
A district level staff person wh
nates the teams


health program
lents and Regularly apprising the school board and
personal superintendent of health related issues
barriers to District-level commitments in the form of
evement. staff, training and other resources
'er Level A strong, active School Health Advisory
el Award (SHAC) and Wellness Policy Committee that
- Nassau, contain all eight components of CSH, and equal
Brevard representation from the county health depart-
scores in ment, school district and community, and meets
produce at least quarterly.
Districts are encouraged to involve school
ig, admin- superintendents, school boards, school admin-
includes: istrators, component area experts, parents and
'ss policy the SHAC and Wellness Policy Committee in
the assessment process, and to use the results
the eight to plan and advance health related programs.
To learn more about the self-assessment tool
o coordi- and how to implement the CSH approach go to
www.healthydistrictcom.


Mobile pantry

offers free food

The Hunger Coalition of Nassau County, in
partnership with Secohd Harvest, will distribute
free food at three locations in Nassau County this
month:
Each mobile pantry will provide fresh pro-
duce, meat, dairy and bakery items. The mobile
pantry is open to all Nassau County residents
and will begin at 1 p.m. at all locations and con-
tinue until all food has been distributed.
Dates and locations are:
Aug. 13 at the Peck Center Auditorium; 516
South 10th St., Fernandina Beach.
Aug. 20 at Yulee United Methodist Church,
86003 Christian Way, Yulee.
Aug. 23 at First Baptist Church of Callahan,'
45090 Green Ave.
The Hunger Coalition of Nassau County was
formed in an effort to meet the fresh food needs
ofindividuals and families of Nassau County.
Over 80 volunteers have distributed approxi-
mately 120,000 pounds of food to over 5,000 peo-
ple. The Hunger Coalition of Nassau County is
made up of nonprofits, churches and volunteers
from all over Nassau County.
If you would like to volunteer or contribute to
the Hunger Coalition of Nassau County effort,
call (904) 206-8433 or email
4hunger@gmail.com. You can also follow its
news on Facebook.


Dinner networks
The Interfaith Dinner Network provides a hot,
nutritious dinner four nights a week at the
Salvation Army Hope House, Ninth and Date
streets, for the island's homeless and needy. The
IDN <. .ni.pi ;--s 11 local churches. The group is
looking for more churches that would like to
serve dinners one night a month. Small churches
can partner with others. Call Ailene Wood at 491-
4900 for information.
The Yulee Interfaith Dinner Network, spon-
sored by the Coalition for the Homeless of
Nassau County, serves a healthy dinner to any-
one in need every Tuesday and Thursday from 5-
7 p.m.
The Yulee IDN is located behind the Old
Yulee Middle School, at US 17 and Pages Dairy
Road. Look for the banner and signs. For infor-
mation or to volunteer, call 556-2496 or visit their
website, www.clicked.com/yuleeidri.
YBCpantry
Yulee Baptist Church Food Pantry, 85971
Harts Road in Yulee, is open to everyone to assist
with food needs. Hours are Tuesdays from 6:30-
8:30 p.m., and Wednesday and Thursday from 2-4
p.m. For information call 225-5128.
Emergencypantry
O'Neal Memorial Baptist Church, 474257 SR
200 East, offers an emergency food pantry for
families and individuals in crisis. No income eligi-
bility required. For assistance call 277-2606 or
261-4186.


Welcome to

Sod's House

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FAMILY DENTISTRY
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN Badcock
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Call For Appointment (
281 -5826
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
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FREEIVAN
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installarions & Repair


606 S. 6th Street
Femandina Beadi, FL32034


I


Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


FIRSTOFMANY


"i


PHOTOS BY HEATHER. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Austin Holloway is eager to tell his mother Rebekah all about
his first day of school at Southside Elementary, above.
Top, paraprofessional Donna Kelley supervises lunchtime in
the Southside cafeteria on the first day of school.


I-- -I -



We orie-n wL:E for granie.J Ihc ylcnT-
-nd abtlile,: th[a mothr- rr .uut p-:.-: C:
in order to rainse heir children -rnjd run,
tneir households ,uccen;iull] ,nd enir,
/ 3 goad mother and housew, I riequlr- .
LconsanI Jl [entin Ito e need ji e rcr
famly. and to!! oa, en tbefore .,r,.
consideration i giren lc r.cr w.1n,
I need Alrhough thc se atrlnDue: m.,,
seem to conle naTur.illy iE 'pct:'ial
a ity lt v put hers ri r Ir u.1ujll, .
S. labor of lo'e rh r..: jntinI ll ,.:nr~,dj
During the p3asing c .r'. orq
S i. ottierhood Many h.:u'ehn.:.d
S* responsibitleme irmluadng prep'rin,3
mealsk wdshinrg io:lothei 3 ma.nn.i
D eds. ma. seerm l Dce rlih.,nr .:r:.r.-
aIr re peri.c~rm O Ath ':'ur r :ec-ri.:r
because of he-r i.e fi,3 nr ii,, e :r :
mrohers are .iwar, Of L he o: i!lrLqn.
espomsibtwhiry of psreit r nI:T
c'hildren [C beco-me o,':, Pcrd ,nJ
honest adults Ihno
kn-', the imprtrnc,
of devovn and
corrrmiTmert to God
and to f3mil,,y The-
constanE concern ,and
a~r4


DON'T LITTER



) SPAY ~ NEUTER
A Public Service Announcement by The News-Leader


Students encouraged


to join Teen Court


Nassau County Teen Coiirt
will be held Aug. 14 and 21 at
the Nassau County Judicial
Annex located at 76347
Veterans Way in Yulee.
Sessions begin promptly at 6
p.m.
Students from all middle or
senior high schools (ages 11-
18) are invited to come out and
participate as volunteers.
All interested students wish-
ing to be on the volunteer jury
or act as attorneys, court clerks
as well as bailiffs can sign up
through their school guidance
.offices, or by attending court
and signing up then. To partic-
ipate as an attorney, see Teen.
Court Coordinator Charles
Griffin and he will assign you as
he rotates these positions.
Volunteers need to arrive
between 5:30 and 6 p.m.
All students earn two hours
of community service credit
that can be used for the Florida
Scholarship p6rgram, local 4-
H programs, Scouts and other
such programs requiring com-
munity-based service hours.


Also, with prior approval some
teachers give grade credit for
attendance and participation.
Students enrolled in Nassau.
County schools, public or pri-
vate, are invited to participate.
Participating high school sen-
iors are eligible to apply for the
Teen Court scholarships award-
ed each year.
'Students and parents also
are invited to join the court
audience as spectators.
Teen Court is a program
Srun by teens for teens. Youths
ages 11 to 18 who have com-
mitted a misdemeanor crime
have their cases heard by ajury
Sof their peers. The volunteer
teens perform the roles of pros-
ecuting attorney, defense attor-
ney, court clerks as well as
bailiff for the court. Judge
Robert M. Foster and Senior
Judge Robert E. Williams pre-
side over the court.
Teen Court is administrated
by Nassau County Clerk of
Courts John A. Crawford.
For information call 548-
4611 and ask for Griffin.


Orientation session


for home educators


The Nassau County Home
Educators will sponsor a
Humeschool Orientation for
fani lies interested in home-
.s hioling on Aug. 28 at7 p.m.
at Springhill Baptist Church.
Leaders of the group will
provide information on the
legal aspects of homeschool-
ing, different curricula and
contmmunity support. Veteran
homeschoolers will be avail-
able to answer questions and
I he group will also have print-
ed "information packets"
available.
Nassau County Home


Educators comprises more
than 70 families in the area
who work together to provide
a co-op, field trips, programs,
support meetings and many
other types of cooperative
aids to homeschooling.
Springhill Baptist Church
is located at 941017 Old
Nassauville Road in
Nassauville. For more infor-
mation on homeschooling or
this meeting, call NCHE pres-
identJane McDonald at 277-
2798. You can also visit the
NCHE website at www.home-
school-life.com/fl/nche.


G.OKLDS.
The Nassau County
Volunteer Center's Corporate
Volunteer Council (CVC)
through its 12th annual
G.O.K.I.D.S. (Giving Our Kids
Important Daily Supplies)
project is collecting school
supplies and donations for
local students who need them
the most.
SThe project runs through
Aug. 13, with distribution to
the schools on Aug. 16. Most
needed are pencils, pens,
pocket folders, wide-ruled
notebook paper or spiral note-
books, crayons, glue sticks,
clear or mesh backpacks (no
wheels), dry-erase markers,
and white or color copy paper.
Drop off donations at:
Omni Amelia Island
Plantation (Associate
Services), Century 21/John T.
Ferreira Insurance, city of
Fernandina Beach (City HalD),
Nassau County Volunteer
Center, Amelia Dental Group,
First Coast Community Bank,
First Federal Bank of Florida,
Golf Club of Amelia Island,"


VyStar Credit Union, CBC
National Bank, Callahan loca-
tions: Callahan Town Hall,
Westside Journal, Nassau
County Record, Walgreen's
Drug Store, Callahan library,:
Dollar General, Winn-Dixie,
as well as Hilliard and Bryce-
ville libraries, Hilliard Town
Hall, Hilliard Recreational
Center and Hilliard Pharmacy.
The drive is also supported by
Rayonier and RockTenn.
For information call 261-
277.1 or email ncvcfb@
aol.com.
StgfftheBus
The Salvation Army Hope
House is accepting applica-
Stions to help income qualify-
irig families obtain school sup-
plies for their children
through its Stuff the Bus
School Supply Drive.
If you, your church, club
or group would like to help,
needed are backpacks, three-
ring binders and subject
dividers.
To apply for assistance or
to donate, call 321-0435 or
Stop by 410 S. Ninth St


Dental help for young students


The Nassau County Health
Department has received a
$25,000 grant as part of the
School-Based Dental Sealant
Program to improve access to
dental sealants for disadvan-
taged populations, especially
low-income children.
The project will focus on
first- through third-grade stu-
dents in schools with significant


populations of high-risk stl-
dents, identified by the per-
centage of children on the free
and reduced lunch program.
Approximately 500 students will f
participate in the sealant pro- -
gram in the 2012-13 school year.
The grant runs through March
31. For more information call
the health department's dental
program at 548-1849.


SCHOOL SUPPLY DRIVES


_ C_ -_ I ~ I~IPPD -


^a^
m^^^^nip






FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 2012 COMMUNITY News-Leader


HELP FOR BARNABAS


Prince of Peace Lutheran Church was honored to present a check for $3,500 from
this year's Shrimp Festiv both proceeds to the Barnabas Center to continue its
work helping those in tie in Jassau County. Pastor Ida Iverson presented the check
on Sunday, July 22 to- Banaoas' Executive Director Wanda Lanier. Others present
included Council President Yvonne Bowman,, Ted Wessel, Bruce Malcolm, Margaret
Pfeiffer, Bill Maule and Ted and Angie Richardson, who were just some of the mem-
bers that worked in the bopth for outreach in the community.


'SAVE THE CHILDREN'


SUBMITTED
Bryceville library branch manager Diane Johnson, above right, receives a ribbon of
appreciation for making school visits to read to the preschoolers when she worked
as the Fernandina Beach branch library's children's at librarian the annual "Save
the Children Day" program at O'Neal Memorial Baptist Church, 474257 SR 200
East on Sunday, July 15. This year's program celebrated the 20th anniversary of
Rose-Lennie Developmental Learning Center.


PREPARED


As local health depart-,
ments nationwide strike to
protect the public from,
infectious diseases, hipter-,.
rorism, natural disasters
and other public health ,,
threats, the National 1 ..
Association of County and .,
City Health Officials ha,.; ,
recognized the Nassau: ,, I
County Health Department
(right) for its ability to pre-
pare for and respond to
public health emergencies,
Nassau County Health
Department met the com-
prehensive preparedness
benchmarks required to
be recognized by Project
Public Health Ready, a
partnership between NAC-
CHO and the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention. Nassau
County Health Department
joins nearly 300 local
health departments across
the odsoantiiytat havedis '
tinguished.their agencies'
preparedness efforts.
"We are proud to have
the Health Department
recognized by Project
Public Health Ready for
our high level of prepared-
ness," said Danny Hinson,
director, Nassau County
Emergency Management.
"This project confirms the
efforts by not only the
Nassau County Health
Department, but the ongo-
ing collaboration with
many community partners,
and supports the commit-
ment to continually
improve our capability to
quickly and effectively
respond to any public
health crisis in Nassau
County."
"NACCHO commends
Nassau County Health
Department for being a
model of public health
emergency preparedness,"
said Robert Pestronk,
executive director of NAC-
CHO. "The public health
system is making great
strides thanks to the good
-work of leaders in local
public health prepared-
ness such as Nassau
County Health
Department."
PPHR required Nassau
County Health Department
to meet a set of national
standards for public hoafth
preparedness in three'Key ;
areas: preparedness ;te
ning; workforce comet ''
cy; and demonstration oF
all-hazards readiness ; "
through exercises or a' ,'iA1'
response to a real everit.' ''t
PPHR recognition con -:.
firms that Nassau County 'I
Health Department ha a '
thorough and coordinated
emergency response plan
in place, that agency stif
members are trained,'alid
that the agency exercises
the plan and uses it during
public health emergencies.
For more information
on Project Public Health
Ready, including recog.-
nized sites, project tools
and resources, visit
www.naccho.org/PPHR or
www.doh.state.fl.us/chd/n
assau/.


I'amabas'
CENTER, INC
The New to You Resale Store is an
excellent place to recycle your household
goods. For info, call: 904.321.2334
9305. 14TH STI [ FERNANDIA BACIL FL320-4


T, .s.


SUBMITTED


NOTICE OF

PUBLIC HEARING

AUGUST 20, 2012

7:00 P.M.

Ordinance 2012-001

The Town of Collahan Florida proposes to
adopt an ordinance adopting the EAR
(Evaluation and Appraisal Report) based
amendments to the Callahan Compre-
hensive Plan.
A public hearing on the second and final
reading of ordinance 2012-o01 adopting
the amendments will be held Monday,
August 20, 2012, @ 7:00 p m. @ the
Callahan Town Hall.
An ordinance of the Town Council of the
Town of Callahan. Florida. repealing and
replacing sections of the Comprehensive
Plan of the Town of Callahan, Florida that
govern future land use. development of
public facilities, and protective natural
resources under the community planning
act (chapter 163 part II, florida statutes),
including those sections that contain the
transportation, housing, public facilities,
conservation, recreation and open
space, intergovernmental coordination,
capital improvements, and future land
use maps; providing for repealer sever-
ability, and setting an effective date.
The proposed ordinance is on file @ the
Callahan Town Hall, 542300 US HWY 1,
Callahon, Florida and may be examined
by interested parties prior to said public
hearing, during normal business hours. All
parties that have any interest in the pro-
posed ordinance will be afforded on
opportunity to be heard at the public
hearing, If a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the town council
with respect to any matter considered at
Sthe hearing, and they will need a record
of the proceedings for such purposes,
. they may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.


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HOMES


FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 2012 News-Leader


Select right crape myrtle to avoid fungus


Q .I found this in my
.neighbor's yard. It
grows about waist height -
can you tell me what it is? My
friend says it is a hibiscus but
it doesn't look like the leaf of
any hibiscus I know. TO
A .I am using your photo,
*which helped me
tremendously in identifying
this plant. I thought it might
be a swamp mallow but I
believe it is most likely a Red-
leafed hibiscus so your
friend is correct.
This
hibiscus may
be one of the
common
varieties
called
S Panama Red,
Panama

Red Shield.
GARDEN It is a short-
TALK lived peren-
nial that
blooms fiom
BeckyJordi the spring
through the
fall. It grows well in full sun to
partial shade in cold hardi-
ness zones 8-11. It does not
tolerate long dry spells so be
prepared to apply some occa-
sional irrigation.
It only reaches heights up
to 4 feet but it spreads up to 6
feet The color of the flowers
range from rose to pink to
cream but the real reason for
getting this plant is the
foliage. The color of the
leaves ranges from burgundy
to a shiny bronze. The leaves
are deeply lobed and the
edges are serrated. Flower
blooming may be somewhat
sporadic. It will die back
when the cold temperatures
arrive but it should return for
a few years in the spring.
.Can you give me the
.names of crape myrtles
that are not susceptible to
powdery mildew? I am ready
to get rid of the tree I now
have and replace it because it
never looks healthy. SG

A .The best way to avoid
.powdery mildew is to


The Red-leafed
hibiscus, above,
is a short-lived
perennial that
blooms from the
spring through
the fall. The
dwarf red crape
myrtle, below, is
one of the culti-
vars that has
proven resistant
to powdery
mildew.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS


plant one of the cultivars
bred and selected for resist-
ance to powdery mildew.
Additionally, crape myrtle
should be planted in sunny
locations allowing free air
movement so that wet foliage
dries quickly.
The following cultivars are
showing excellent or good
resistance to powdery
mildew: Semi-dwarf (15 feet)
-Acoma (white), Caddo
(pink), Hope (blush-white),
Pecos (pink), and Tonto
(red). Intermediate (up to 20
feet) Apalachee (orange),
Centennial Spirit (dark red),
Christiana (deep red),
Comanche (coral pink), Hopi
(pink), Lipan (red-lavender),
Near East (pink), Osage
(pink), Osage Blush (pink),
Sioux (pink), and Yuma
(lavender).
Full tree (over 20 feet) -
Basham's Party Pink (laven-
der pink), Biloxi (pink),
Choctaw (pink), Fantasy
(white), Kiowa (white),
Miami (pink), Muskogee
(lavender pink), Natchez
(white), Townhouse (white),


Tuscarora (coral pink),
Tuskegee (pink), Twilight
(dark purple), and Wichita
(lavender).
One other point I want to
discuss is the importance of
having a confirmed diagnosis
before applying any pesticide.
A fungus causes the condition
on your crape myrtle, there-
fore usinginsecticides would
not be.beneficial. The improp-
er application of pesticides
means we are not following
the guidelines set by the fed-
eral government on the pesti-
cide label. In essence, we are
breaking the law. Improper
pesticide application wastes
time and moiTey and can con-
tribute to the pest resistance.
I know it is sometimes dif-
ficult to drop specimens by
the Extension office but it is
essential for us to provide the
correct chemical for manage-
ment. For any of your plant
problems; attend the free
plant clinics at the Yulee
office (86026 Pages Dairy
Road) the dates are listed
on our website at http://nas-
sau.ifas.ufl.edu.


.My neighbor has a red
.crape myrtle but she
does not remember the name
of it. Can you identify the
name for me? VD
.It is difficult to identify
.plants down to the culti-
var or variety, especially
when the environment can
alter the-way a particular
characteristic of a tree or
shrub will manifest.
However, I can give you the
name of several red crape
myrtle varieties and that
should get you started.
The red flowering pro-
duces blooms throughout the
summer into early fall. The
first true red crape myrtle
was bred and introduced in
1997 by Dr. Carl Whitcomb
called Dynamite. Dr.
Whitcomb continued his
breeding and later introduced
Red Rocket, Tightwad Red
and Siren Red, each maturing
at a different size than
Dynamite.:
The U.S, National
Arboretum also has an impor-
tant Lagerstroemia breeding
program and recently ...
released red-flowered
Arapaho and Cheyenne. A
few older selections have
long been recognized for
their good red flower color,
but.they never achieved the
acclaim and notoriety of these
later, improved selections.
Thanks to the popularity of
Dynamite, red crape myrtles
new and old are now
very popular and widely
available.
RebeccaJordi, UF/IFAS
County Extension Directorfor
Nassau County and Nassau
County Horticulture: Agent III,
is a, University of Floida facul-
ty member Extension locations
are the satellite office at the
County Building in Yulee and
the main Extension Office in
Callahan. Mail questions to
Garden Talk; c/o Rebecca
Jordi, Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1,
Callahan, FL 32011. Visit
http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu.
rljordi@ufl.edu


LEADERSHIP SCHOOL


PHOTO BY BEA WALKER/FORTHE NEWS-LEADER
Local Master Gardener vol-
unteer Shirley Lohman, above
left, recently attended the
Master Gardener Leadership
School in Ocala. She visited
Kingswood Nurseries and
secured two donations for the
Nassau County Demonstration
Garden, including this "Red
Byrd" Viburnum, presented
by Darrian Dukes of
Kingswood Nurseries. This .
cultivar was propagated and
grown at.the nursery and is
named in honor of their 91-
S year-old propagator, Algie
, Byrd DeVane.
Left, Master Gardener vol-
unteer Bea Walker gives a
presentation on Nassau
County Extension's
"Landscape Matters" program
during the 'Teaching from the
Heart of the Garden" segment
at the school, where Master
Gardeners from 58 counties
were represented.
PHOTO BY SHIRLEY LOHMAN
FORTHE NEWS-LEADER


Farmers market
The award-winning
Fernandina Farmers Market
is open every Saturday from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. at Seventh and
Centre streets with farm fresh
produce and a variety of
organic products and specialty
foods. Discover gourmet
baked goods from crusty
breads to delectable desserts
and prepared foods such as
jellies, relishes and mari-
nades. The market also offers
a wide variety of specialty
tropical and landscaping
plants, including orchids,
herbs and flowers. No pets,
please. Call 4914872 or visit
www.fernandinafarmersmar-
ket.com. For information on
the newest event, the Amelia
Island Wine Festival Oct.13 at
the downtown waterfront, visit


www.ameliawine.com.
Seaturdes
Join a park ranger and
learn about the lifecycle of the
sea turtle and the importance
of these creatures on Aug. 11
at 2 p.m. at the Ribault Club
on Fort George Island
Cultural State Park. No reser-
vations are necessary and the
program is free. Contact the
Talbot Islands Ranger Station
at (904) 251-2320.
Shore cleanup
Sustainable Fernandina, in
partnership with Fort Clinch
State Park and Keep Nassau
Beautiful, will hold an Adopt-a-
Shore cleanup on Aug. 18
along the waterfront from the
former pogy plant to Fort
Clinch.
The groupwill meet at 2


HOME & GARDEN BRIEFS


p.m. on Aug. 18 at the Dee
Dee Bartell Nature Center/
North End Boat Ramp off
North 14th Street. Trash bags
will be provided. Participants
will return to the boat ramp.
The public is invited to attend.
For information, call the
city Community Development
Department at 277-7325 or
contact Len Kreger at
l.kreger@comcast.net.
Band yard sale
The Fernandina Beach
High School Mighty March-
ing.Pirates Band Yard Sale
Fundraiser will be held on
Aug. 18 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. in
the school cafeteria. All are
welcome.
Plant clinic
Master Gardeners will con-
duct a Plant Clinic on Aug. 20,


from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the
Yulee Extension Office, A1A
and Pages Dairy Road. All
county residents are invited to
bring plant samples showing
problems in their landscapes.
Problems will be identified
and solutions offered for cor-
rection. There is no fee for
this service. For information
call (904) 879-1019. Master
Gardeners are on phone duty
Friday at 491-7340.

White Oak
breakfast
The'Wildlife Conservation
Center at White Oak is offer-
ing "Breakfast with the
Beasts" Sept. 1 from 9-11 a.m.
featuring a gourmet breakfast
buffet at the Riverside
Pavilion, a cheetah run
demonstration and an abbrevi-


ated tour to view the other ani-
mal species that call White
Oak. home. The 600-acre cen-
ter is a premiere wildlife
breeding, research and train-
ing facility located along the
St. Marys River in Yulee. Call
225-3285. Visit www.wocen-
ter.org.
Botanical garden
The Paul and Suzi Schutt
Florida Native Botanical
Garden invites Scouts, church
grotips, youth and school
groups, neighborhoods and
clubs to reserve the space at .
no charge. Amenities include
a large screened sunset gaze-
bo with tables and chairs, ice-
maker, barbecue grill and grill
tools and a fire pit.
Horseshoes and bocce ball
equipment are nearby, along
with a restroom. To reserve,
contact Paul Schutt at 261-
0987 or Nassau County .
Extension office at (904)-879-
1019.
Yard recognition
Nassau County Extension
Sis now participating in the


Florida Yafids &
Neighborhoods (FYN)
Homeowner Program and its
Florida Friendly Landscape
(FFL) Yard Recognition pro-
gram. The FYN Homeowner
Program recognizes environ-
mentally friendly gardeners
with official FFL Yard
Recognition signs. Nassau
County Yard Advisor Bea
Walker will conduct home vis-
its and use the homeowner
checklist to determine
whether your yard is eligible
for Gold or Standard recogni-
tion. For information visit
http://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/home-
owner.htm, or visit the
Extension website, http://nas-
sau.ifas.ufl.edu/, and access
the link for FYN-Homeowner
Program; or call (904) 879-
1019 or 491-7340.
Recycling
Do you have 1- or 3-gallon
- or even 7- or 15-gallon plant
-containers left over from
planting? Lowe's is now a
recycling location for plant
containers. For information
call Lowe's at 277-5000.


Air Amelia


S"Come Fly With Us"
-. Call for Reservations

Lessons also available
Call I-877-wedofy
71 www.wedofly.com


PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
Monday, August 13, 2012, 10:00 AM
Peck Center Reception Room
516 South 11th Street, Fernandina Beach, FL
The City of Femandina Beach will hold a Public Hearing to discuss applying to tile
Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) for a grant opportu-
nity to fund the renovation of the Central Park tennis courts.
A Public Hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application
for this grant will be held in the Reception Room at the Peck Center, located at 516
South 1lth Street, Femandina Beach, FL 32034 on Monday, August 13, 2012 at
10:00 AM. A draft copy of parts of the application will be available for review at that
time. A final copy of die application will be made available at the City of Fernandina
Beach City Hall, Monday thru Friday between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
STo obtain additional information concerning the application and the Public Hearing,
contact Cheryl Nichols, Grants Administrator at (904) 277-7305 ext.243.
The Public Hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location.
Persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations in order to participate
should contact the City Clerk at 277-7305 77T 277-7399for all city offices. Ifyou
are hearing or speech inpaied, please contact the Florida Relay Service by using
thefollowing numbers: 1-800-955-8770 (voice) or 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). "


904-277-8665 www.opspizza.co .'-'-
2030 South 8th St. Femandina Beach, FL.;"
Open 7 days a week ', .







FRIDAY. AUGUST 10.2012 NEWS News-Leader


Condo reim agined' at the Plantation

Amidst the energy .
ofOmniAmelia
Island Plantation's R. ;
"re-imagination"
campaign is a story ,
on a smallerscale.
One couple learned JW M W:
fivekeystosuccess
thire coo .W.L;<. .
while renovating i .
theirnew condo. .


DIANETERRY
For the News-Leader
S year ago,.we bought
a three-bedroom,
three-bath condo at
Club Villas. Built in
1974, the property was show-
ing its age. Like a kindly
grandmother, it had raised
two generations of (vacation-
ing) offspring and was tired;
The plumbing was corroded;
the floorboards were sagging
and the ceilings were low,,-,.,
water stained and "pop-
corned." Nothing was wroilg
with' the "bones" per se, butit
was an interior sliding into-
disrepair.
Our challenge was to bring
it online as a high-quality, 21st
century, amenity-laden rental
property within two months.
We missed our goal by two
weeks the contractors
arrived on Monday, May 9
and departed on Friday, July
22. It took us 10 weeks to
complete a project others'
speculated would take.10
months.
Add to the mix that we did-
n't know any local contrac-
tors, processes or supplies' -
and we had to manage the
project, furnish the unit and
re-equip it while living 1,000
miles away in Connecticut.
As we look back, knowing
what we know now, we see
five keys to success over
and above normal project
management that may help
new or existing property own-
ers in their own condo "rede-
velopment, re-imagining and
renewal."
1. Get your condo associa-
tion and Amelia Island


After the remodeling the living room, left, and dining room in an Amelia Island Plantation cdndo.


Management on board early.
The key reason for our
success was the early and per-
sonal involvement of our AIM
property manager (Steve
Mehas) and members of our
condo association manage-
ment team (ohn Cook and
Tom Hollingsworth). They all
worked together to help iden-
tify and remove (potential)
roadblocks. Approvals were a
breeze with this "A" team at
our backs.
'And-when the time came
to deal with our landscaping
challenge (aka our overgrown
front courtyard), Steve
Mehas recommended we use
Martex. Working with them,
we redesigned the courtyard,
pulling out all the overgrown
plants, turning off the auto-
matic sprinklers and installing
a rock garden and two huge
planters with cdrip feeders to
reduce the amount of water


consumed. We created a
maintenance-free outdoor
space, welcoming and func-
tional perfect for nonresi-
dents like ourselves. And
we did it economically and
quickly.
2. Stay on property during
the demolition process and
the first week of framing.
As the walls came down,
the "gotchas" surfaced. By
renting a small condo nearby,
we were within earshot of the.
contractor to facilitate the
decision-making process.
Most of the important consid-
erations and decisions arose
during the first two weeks.
Our general contractor,
Dewayne Crews, (DCI
Dewayne Crews, Inc.) was
recommended to us by the
staff at Amelia's Attic. This
was the first of many local
referrals.
It was our intent to remove


two key walls between the
kitchen and dining room so
that we could-open up the
entire space to the marsh
view. Once the walls were
down, we worked together
with Crews and his cabinet-
maker (Mike Corbitt, Corbitt
Cabinet, Manor, Ga.) to lay
out the kitchen island and
cabinets. We also thought
through the costs and impli-
cations of re-piping for an
island wet bar and raising the
ceiling to open up the space
and add recessed lighting:
Being on-site those first
few weeks saved us needless
time, frustration and cost.
3. Get to know your neigh-
bors.
Nothing grabs a communi-
ty's attention like a dumpster
parked outside a condo unit.
Within days, neighbors began
to circle the property, creep-
ing closer and closer espe-


cially in the early evening
After the contractors had left.
It was great fun to be inside
the unit and watch people
step.gingerly across the patio,
cup their hands around their
faces and peer inside at the
mess. Oftentimes we were in
the unit during these expedi-
tions and would surprise our
guests by opening the slider
and saying "hi."
Getting to know our neigh-
bors and enlisting their sup-
port, insight And experience
was essential to our project.
We were not the first to reno-
Svate a Club Villa, and our
neighbors led us through
many other units showing us
(and our contractor) how sim-
ilar challenges had been met.
The "local" knowledge about
the structure and its idiosyn-
crasies saved us time and
money.
We also made friends


who've become even better
friends as we begin to spend
more and more time down
here. Often in the evening, we
sit outside on our patio and
people drop by to chat, catch
up and share a glass of wine.
It's a magical time, a story
repeated (no doubt) year after
year in the life of the
Plantation..
4. Bring in real estate and
rental professionals to give
advice.
As newcomers to the area
who'd never owned and rent-
ed out a vacation home, we
knew we needed help. Even
before the closing, we invited
a small sample of local
experts to tour the condo and
advise us on the "must haves"
for rental and'sales success.
The results surprised us:
spend your money on "soft"

CONDO Continued on 16A


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house keeping, meal preparation, laundry
medication minders, errands and much more
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FRIDAY. AUGUST 10. 2012 NEWS News-Leader


,SUBMITTED
Under the leadership of fifth-grade teacher YaKeshia Elmore, second row center, 29 Yulee Elementary School AAA Safety Patrol members and their chaperones visit our
nation's Capitol.






Safety Patrol visits Washington, D.C.


HEAT'- ERA. PERRY
News-Leader '

When Yulee Elementary
Safety Patrol students went to
Washington, D.C., last spring,
some of their number had to
be left behind, heartbroken.
As a reward for good'
grades and hard work, 29 fifth
graders and 21 chaperones
boarded a bus for the journey
to Washington, D.C., May 14.
They spent a week visiting
the nation's Capitol under the
leadership and direction of
fifth-grade teacher and Safety
Patrol sponsor, YaKeshia
Elmore.


"I'm happy to bring the
fifth-grade Safety Patrol pro-
gram to Nassau County. It's
an awesome educational
opportunity for the students
and for many it's a once in a
lifetime experience."
SThe program develops
leadership skills and Elmore
requires a high level of excel-
lence and responsibility in her
Safety Patrol students.
"They are held to high
standards and act as role
models for other students,"
she said. "They have to main-
tain 4n A in citizenship."
Yulee Elementary School
was the'only school in Nassau


j:5-'i : A rm- rsB- i sta ...: ".._
County to participate in the
national AAA Safety Patrol
field trip during.which they
visited the White House, most
of the top memorials, the
Washington National
Cathedral and the Capitol
building. They also visited
Arlington National Cemetery


v alee's



.I Ab zz


... ** L Y tCC
. .; .'.... T. .L 1 -.w' : ;' .. .-'_: ,,'''.'
where they saw the Kennedy
gravesites and watched the
changing of the guard at the
Tomb of the Unknown
Soldier.
The $640 per child cost
paid for chartering a bus,
food and accommodations for
a week, as well as guide serv-


ices. Chaperones paid their
own way.
The trip culminated a year
of hard work by the Safety
Patrol, who assist faculty and
staff with morning drop-offs
and afternoon dismissal, cam-
pus beautification, second-
grade orientation and daily .
flagduty, to name just a few of
their many tasks.
Parents held a variety of
fundraisers to come up with
the necessary money, but
their final tally was not
enough to make it possible
for all Safety Patrol students
to make the trip. .
"This is an invaluable


experience for these kids and
we really need the community
and maybe some businesses
to get involved so next year,
kids don't have to be left
behind. The kids work hard
throughout the year because
they have to be on the AB
Honor Roll to be nominated
for the Safety Patrol and that
should be rewarded," said
Katherine Parker, a chaper-
orre whose grandson Grayson-
Pope was one of those lucky
enough to make the trip..
Yulee Elementary School
is located at 86063 Felmor
Road. Phone 491-7943.
type@fbnewsleadercom


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I~eAvu)w4k(AJ(6oqZ~ral~ttee&


t7te 2011-20/. /datev o/'


J, If a fe 6Co V e (/a oV1/ -'l0le
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The 2011-2012 graduating class of FSCJ held two commencement ceremonies on May 5, 2012 at
the Veteran's Memorial Arena in Jacksonville, Florida. Jacksonville's Mayor, Alvin Brown,
addressed the 1,600 graduates attending the ceremonies. Graduates earned Technical & Workforce
Certificates, Associate of Arts, Associates of Science and Bachelor's Degrees. Listed below are the
names of our graduates from Amelia Island, Femandina Beach and Yulee.


FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE
. . .. ... i c si<' A Ru ..L

Betty P. Cook Nassau Center, 76346 William Burgess Boulevard
Yulee, Florida 32097 (904) 548-4432


-Key:
HH = High Honors
CL= Cum Laude
SCJ = Summa Cum Laude


H = Honors


Last Name First Name Middle Name Degree/Certificate
AMELIA ISLAND/FERNANDINA BEACH


WILLIAMS SARAH LYNCH
CHRISTOPHER JUSTINE ADELINE
H VADNAIS SAMANTHA MARIE
HH LUSARDI ROBERT
ARMSTRONG FERNE TRACEY
BROWN AMANDA
MITCHELL SHANNON DAWN.
LAWSON HEATHER M
BROCK KAY ELLEN
RAWLS STEVE BRYAN
WILLITS KIMBERLY
ZODEL KENNETH M
H STRIPLING AMBER NICOLE
HH MCDONALD HOLLI NICHOLE
CAMACHO TIFFANY LOURDES HOKA
RICHARDS CHRISTINA KENYADA
VINCENT BRANDON RUSSELL
COLON WENDY SUSAN
BARNES ASHLEY NICHOLE
RITZ LILLIAN KAITLYN
WILLIAMSON JASON LYLE
HH TESTON JOSEPH RYAN
KELLER RYAN P
MUNOZ RUTH MICHELE
WHITEHEAD STELLA
ARIAS LAUREN CHELSEA
PATTERSON DYANA MARIE
DORAIS KRISTIN
PORTEGIES-ZWART NICOLE ALEXANDRA
WILLIAMS JOSHUA
HH SLOAN MARY TENNETTE
SMITH HELEN ROSE
SMITH .STEPHANIE MARIE
H WILLIAMS ANNA ELIZABETH
ROGERS KATHLEEN LAURA
HUNT VALECIA LATARA
SPRUILL CHRISTOPHER ALLEN
SUTTON NEELIE BRIGMIAN
RICHARDSON MATTHEW COREY
ASHE MIRANDA BRAE
H MANDRICK KRISTEN KAREN
H STIDHAM MELISSA CARRIE
STEDDOM MACKENZIE MAE
H CURTIS VALERIE ANN
ALLEN DWAIN BRENT
EIDSON BRITTANY M
CLIFTON ASHLEY MARIE
STEWART SYMONE NICOLE
KILLEN JARROD
KUBLBOCK CHRISTOPHER RYAN
BARBER JESSICA, LAURA
TAYLOR GLYNDA
KNOWLES REBECCA ANN
CARDONA CHRISTOPHER DAVID
SILVA WILUAM SHANE
FOSTER MATTHEW ALAN
MCCARTHY ERIN REBECCA
HH GREGORY CHELSEY KATHERINE
HOOK AMBER LYNN
FITZPATRICK JOHN N
SCHUBERT MATTHEW THOMAS
MURRAY MCKENZIE
TUCKER LAUREN ELIZABETH
BINKLEY TIFFANY LOUISE
BACHMAN ANDREA A
POLLARD STARLEATHA JONES
DECKER GREG M
PEPPER AMANDA
DYER PROMISE E
CLEMONS WHITNEY STYLES
LAMAR WHITNEY WILCOX
HH HUTCHINSON MICHAEL LOUIS
H JACKSON BRENDA JOYCE
DZIEDZIC AMANDA GONZALES
H CANERDAY STACY L
STEWART STACY LORRAINE
H MCDUGALD ASHLEY
HH CHMIEL RACHEL CORBIN
HH' BLEICKEN KIMBERLY DIANE
HR DAVIS KATHERINE VICTORIA
HH ANHEIER NANCY LYNNE
H DIAL KEITH FERRELL
ST JEAN THOMAS JOSEPH
CAMPBELL VANESSA FAITH


Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
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Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
.Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Nursing R N
Nursing R N.
Nursing R N.
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Nursing R N
Nursing R.N
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Networking Services Technology
Radiation Therapy Specialist
Early Childhood Management
Business Administration
Criminal Justice Technology
Culinary Management
Office Administration


DELILLE SUMMER
GATES DAVID
H DAQUINO RYAN
POORE COREY
.BARRETT CHARLES
H SIMMONS SARA
COWART DANIEL
SMITH GREGORY
BENNETT THERESA
HYERS LESLIE
BRITT DANIEL
PIKE THOMAS
NEWTON CAROL
HAMILTON KEITH
MCCAA ERICA
MYERS CHRIS
DOPSON RANDI
HYERS JOSHUA
PAOLILLO KELLAM
S.WEATT AMY
.MCDONNELL AMANDA
WAGNSTROM WARREN
GATES DAVID
GOSSETT ALLISON
DALLAS EUGENIA
THOMPSON-DAVIS GINA
DEBERRY BRANDY
DALLAS EUGENIA
CAMPBELL VANESSA
HODGE NIKKI
DALLAS EUGENIA
CAMPBELL VANESSA
BERG JUSTIN
COOK BRIAN
WRENN HANNAH
GRAVES MATTHEW
WAY MARK
DUNCAN RYAN
CROESE MICHAEL
CHMIEL RACHEL
WATSON DAVID
DAQUINO RYAN
POORE COREY
BARRETT CHARLES
CARROLL JESSICA

H MILLER EMILY
LAMAR JARED
CAMPBELL VANESSA
PEEPLES TONI
SCHOTT DUSTIN
-PORTEGIES-ZWART NICOLE
DREITH KATIE
WALTERS MEGAN

YULEE


ADAMS
ANDERSON
AXLEY
BLADE
COMPANION
HH CONKLIN
CONLEY
CRUIKSHANK
DAUGHERTY
DAVIS
DICKERSON
DIENER
DILLMAN
EDWARDS
EVERS
FEDERICO
H FORGACOVA
FRIDAY
H GALL
GARDEN
GIBBS
HH GOOGE
H HARWOOD
H HENDREN
HILL
'lEANBAPTISTE
JORDAN
JOWERS
KELLUM
KREFT
LACHAPELLE
H MALONE
MCGEE
MCKIMM
MCKNIGHT


CAROLYN
JOSIAH
BRANDON
TAYLOR
ROBERT
SUSAN
KRISTEN
ELIZABETH
SEAN
ROBERT
NIAM
RAINA
SHONNA
RONALD
CAMBERLEE
CHRISTINA
MICHAELA
DWAYNE
JESSE
DIANA
ALISHA
TAYLOR
ANDREW
ASHLEY
BRIGETTE
ANN
KALI
KIMBERLY
STEPHANIE
JENNIFER
ANGELA
MATTHEW
HEATHER
JACOB
REX


SUZANNE
M

E
EDWARD
ELLEN
*RAY
ANDREW
COLLEEN
JENEE
JOSEPH
BROUGHTON
ELIZABETH


S
AMBER
BRUCE
EDWARD
A
LYNN
KEITH
M
NICOLE
CHAVELLE
MARIA
NICHOLE
CHAVELLE
,FAITH
MARIE
CHAVELLE
FAITH
CONRAD
K
MARIE
ALAN
ANDREW

ANDREW
CORBIN
G

E
EDWARD
RENEE

REBECCA

FAITH
MARIE
KARL
ALEXANDRA
DIANE
N


ELIZABETH
DANIEL
TAYLOR
L
THEODORE
RENEE
MONIOUE
VALENA
PATRICK
HAMPTON
NAUFEES
N
LYN
CHRISTOPHER
APRIL
MARIE

DERRICK
LEE

LAUREN
LYNN
TYLER
MARIE

LAURY

ELAINE
LEA
ROSE
CLAIRE
HENRY
NICOLE
KENNETH


Dental Hygiene
Engineering Technology
Aviation Operations
Aviation Operations
Aviation Operations
Occupational Therapy Assistant
Commercial Vehicle Driving
Electricity
Medical Assisting
Surgical Technology
Fire Fighter II
Fire Fighter II
Insurance General Lines Agent
Life Insurance Marketing
Insurance Custmer Service Rep.
Insurance Claimes Adjustor
Cosmetology
Correctional Officer
Law Enforcement Officer
Logistics and Distribution
Autocad Foundations
Autocad Foundations
Engineering Technology
Guest Services Specialist
Office Support
Office Support
Office Specialist
Office Specialist
Office Specialist
Accounting Technology Specialist
Office Management
Office Management
Emergency Medical Technician
Emergency Medical Technician
Emergency Medical Technician
Emergency Medical Technician
Digital Media/Multimedia Production
Information Technology Technician
Information Technology Technician
Computer Forensics Technology
Customer Support Specialist
Air Traffic Control.
Air Traffic Control
Air Traffic Control
Pathways Academy
High School Diploma
Physical Therapy Assistant
Emergency Medical Services
Office Administration
Medical Coder/Biller
Education Preparation Institute
BAS Supervision And Management
BAS Supervision And Management
BAS Supervision And Management


Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate ln Arts
Associate n Arts
Associate n Arts
Associate n Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts
Associate In Arts


MCPHERON
MILLAN
MORENO
NORMAN
O QUINN
OPACHICH
PARKER
PERKINS
RICHARDSON
SELLERS
SPRUEIL
THOMAS
WALKER
WALKER
WALTHOUR
WARD
WARREN
WILDER
WIRTZ .
MOUGHTON
H PARKS
PEARCE
H SMITH
TAYLOR
THORNTON
HH BURRIS
FRANKLIN
GAMBLE
KOON
MILLER
BEASLEY
H WARD
ADAMS
PARKS-NAZARIO
BURCHETT
ELLIOTT
COLEMAN
MITCHELL
PEOPLES
STEELE
AUSTIN
DINEEN
TEASTER-BURCH
HALL

GILDER
ARMSTRONG
CALHOUN
MASON
JARRETT
PORTILLO
BREELAND
HEALY
BLISS
CUMMINGS
DONLEY
MASON
DEVANE

MASON

THIRSK

WALTON
MURPHY
WARD
MURPHY
WARD
MURPHY
MCCLELLAN
BREELAND
DRAKUS
MCCLELLAN
DAVIS
HETH
LEWIS
BURRIS
GAMBLE
KOON
IVERSON
LOTT
GALLAGHER
SCL KOSSAKOWSKI
MACK
SWEAT
VINES
HETH

CL LOWDENSLAGER

JONES


TSCHARNER MARIE Associate In Arts
BROOKE Associate In Arts
MARIA. ISABEL Associate In Arts
DONNA MELISSA Associate In Arts
KAYLA MICHELLE Associate In Arts
NANCY DIANE Associate In Arts
WALTER LEE. Associate In Aits
JACQUELYN Associate In Arts
REGINALD E Associate In Arts
VASHRONDA LATOSHA Associate In Arts
NICHOLE RENEE Associate In Arts
KIMBERLY A Associate In Arts
RIKKI MARIE Associate In Arts
SAVANNAH LEIGH Associate In Arts
INDIA EURASIA Associate In Ails
PETRA KAROLINE Associate In Arts
ROBERT JASON Associate In Arts
MALLORY ANNE Associate In Arts
CHELSEY R Associate In Arts
ROBERT WILUAM Nursing R N.
MACHESTEA SHANE' Nursing R N.
JAMIE ELIZABETH Nursing R N
JENNIFER DIANE Nursing R N
BRADLEY NEAL Nursing R N
MATTHEW Nursing R N
STEVEN MICHAEL Computer Information Technology
BARRY ALAN Comphter Iniormation Technology
STEPHEN JAMES Computeo Infoimation Tehnology
MICHAEL J Computer Information Technology
STEVEN CRAIG Computer Information Technolog/
MICHAEL TERRENCE Business Administration
JOSHUA BRUCE Business Administration
CAROLYN ELIZABETH Respiratory Care
ALEXANDRA Respiratory Care
DELMAR LEE Emergency Medical Services
DIANE Health Information Management
STEPHEN LEE Aviation Operations
JEFFREY DAVID Occupational Therapy Assistant
GERLINDE STEPHANIE Commercial Vehicle Driving
MICHAEL Commercial Vehicle Driving
MELVIN J Seaport Security Officer
MICHAEL Seaport Security Officer
AMBER DAY Nursing Assistant Articulated
FREDERICK N Air Conditioning Refrigeration &
Heating Technology
SHANDY KAY Practical Nursing
ERIN ASHLEY Massage Therapy
LEE CHAPMAN Massage Therapy
CHAUNCY C Correctional Officer
TIFFANY MARIE Facials Specialty
YANIRA Facials Specialty
MATTHEW Fire Fighter II
GREGORY BOYCE Fire Fighterll
REBECCA MAY Life Insurance Marketing
CASSEY NICOLE Cosmetology
RYAN MICHAEL Correctional Officer
CHAUNCY C Correctional Officer
RYAN JAMES Crossover Correctional Officer To
Law Enforcement Officer
CHAUNCY C Crossover Correctional Officer To
Law Enforcement Officer
KEVIN M Crossover Correctional Officer To
Law Enforcement Officer
CHRISTOPHER SHANE Law Enforcement Officer
STEPHANIE DAWN Accounting Technology Specialist
JOSHUA BRUCE Accounting Technology Specialist
STEPHANIE DAWN Accounting Technology Operations
JOSHUA BRUCE Accounting Technology Operations
STEPHANIE DAWN Accounting Technology Management
JOHN BRANDON Paramedic
MATTHEW Emergency Medical Technician
TRACY CORWIN Emergency Medical Technician
JOHN BRANDON Emergency Medical Technician
PRESTON Information Technology Technician
WILLIAM THOMAS Information Technology Technician
ROBERT ADAM Information Technology Technician
STEVEN MICHAEL Customer Support Specialist
STEPHEN JAMES Customer Support Specialist
MICHAEL J Customer Support Specialist
GARRETT Network Support Technician
HEATHER HARVEY Respiratory Care
ELIZABETH A Educator Pieparation Institute
KIM ELIZABETH Bachelor of Science Nursing
KIMBERLY COOPER BAS Suipcrlision And Management
KELLIE LOYD BAS Supervision And Management
DANA JEANNETTE BAS Supervision And Management
WILLIAM THOMAS BAS Computer Systems
Network & Telecommunications
SHERRI LYNN BAS Computer Systems Neolwlk
Network & Tilecomnlinnications
WHITNEY NICOLE Bachelor Of Science
Earl Childlhod Elducaiti'.,


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F!, \,l, !AL i 10. 2012 NEWS News-Leader


Financial aid available to fi


13A



cogongrass


D I'\\ I10 I.IO1:
N'Jsuau C iuntlty t i r1cv'
The Florida Forest Service is currently
accepting applications )o financially assist prop-
erty owners to herbicide cogolngrass.
To identify cogongrass, look for something
similar to marsh grass. It's often found growing
on road shoulders and near bridges, culverts or
other disturbed areas. It thrives in full sun and
is most frequently spread to new locations by soil
movement and root growth. Upon close inspec-
tion, one will notice a single blade with an offset
midrib or vein. The blade is also slightly rough
on the edges.
Although it's not everywhere in Nassau
County, large infestations can be found
along Highway 2, at the north end of Kings
Ferry Road and scattered along Old Dixie
Highway.
Cogongrass is frequently described as one of
thl worst weeds in the world because it spreads
quickly, forms dense thickets, displaces forage


material utilized by w ildlife and livestock, inclreas-
es the fire hazard, makes piOne regeneration near-
ly impossible, lowers real estalt value and is
labor-intensive to mow. Although parts of the
plant have reportedly been used in some
countries for roof thatching, medicine and food,
until such practices are being employed
in Nassau County, my suggestion is to get
rid of it.
For information on cogongrass or to apply for
the program, call (904) 845-7238 before Aug. 28.
Here are details on the Cogongrass
Treatment Cost-Share Program:
This program is available to non-industrial
private landowners (including non-forest land) -
basically including all landowners except public
entities and corporations with publically traded
stock.
It reimburses 7 percent of the cost to treat
cogongrass with herbicides for two years, up to
$100 per acre per year If the total area to be treat-
ed is less than an acre, then the maximum pay-
ment bottoms out at $100/year.


The landowners may hire a contractor or
spray it themselves.
The best time to spray cogongrass is late
summer through fall, but it must be treated dur-
ing the active growing season (before the first
frost). They can also choose to spray earlier in
the spring or summer, but then it must be re-
checked in the late season (Aug. 15-Oct. 20) and
any re-sprouts treated then.
We give a recommendation to use
glyphosate and/or imazapyr, and require that
at least 95 percent of the infestation is visibly wilt-
ed at 6 weeks after treatment, confirmed by visu-
al inspection by the county forester.
Important: The program will not pay to
partially treat any given "spot" of cogongrass. If
the infestation to be treated crosses the proper-
"ty boundary, then the landowner must get a hold
harmless agreement signed by the adjacent
landownerss, allowing them to treat the entire
contiguous spot. This requirement may be lifted
if the adjacent landowner is also enrolled to treat
'i .- i 1-,- portion, or if it occurs in a public right-


of-way in which the responsible agency com-
mits (in writing) to treat their portion.
A practice map must be made and includ-
ed with the application. Find templates at:
S:\(;IS\FI()OREST_MANA(; GE';MN'I\CIFA\Map
Templates\CFA Cost-share.
A new requirement from the I)epartment
of Financial Services is that all applicants must
register their taxpayer II) information with the
Florida Substitute W-9 form. They require that
anyone with Internet access submit their infor-
mation online at https://flvendor.myfloridac-
fo.com/. If the applicant has no Internet access,
they can submit a paper form. Some county
foresters have been helping applicants register
using their office computers, and giving their
FDACS email address to receive the confirma-
tion emails.
The applicants should also receive an
Herbicide Application Record Form, where they
record details about their treatments (to be
included when requesting payment).
Dave. lolleyC)freshfromfnlorida.com


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SPORTS


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NEws-LEADER/F


FRI DAY, AUGUST 10. 2012
ERNANDINA BEACH. FLORIDA


BACK TO THE GRIDIRON


Fernandina
Beach High
School's
Chachi Moses,
above left, and
Cole Willis, far
left, and Yulee
High's Derrick
Henry, above
right, returned
to the field
Monday for the
first official day
of practice.
Thursday was
the first day in
full gear.
Kickoff
Classics are
slated for Aug.
24 with the
season kicking
off Aug. 31.
FILE PHOTOS BY BETH
JONES/NEWS-LEADER


Trio of lifters take gold at Junior Olympics


Since 1967, the Amateur
Athletic Union has been dedi-
cated to the promotion and
development of amateur
sports and physical fitness
programs for youth. This year
the AAU's annual Junior
Olympic Games coincided
with the 30th Olympiad
Summer Games being held in
London.
The Junior Olympic
Games brought 16,000 youth
athletes to Houston, Texas, to
compete in 18 different
sports, including Olympic
sports such as track and field,
diving and weightlifting and
non-Olympic sports jump
rope and cup stacking.
Eight youth athletes from
Fernandina Beach, Yulee and
surrounding areas traveled to
the games July 27-30 to com-
pete as ambassadors for LIFT
Florida in the sport of
weightlifting.
Each received a medal for
their placing with three of
them winning first place in
their division.
One of the most impres-
sive performances of the
meet came from Cody Byrd, a
freshman at Fernandina
Beach High School. He com-
peted at the Youth Nationals
in Detroit, Mich., just three
weeks prior, setting personal
records in that meet.
At the Junior Olympics,
Byrd shattered his personal
bests by nearly 30 pounds.
"Cody gave the crowd
quite a performance," head
coach Doug Lane said. "A 30-
pound increase in weight lift-
ed in only three weeks is
unheard of in the sport of
,.. J 1 iil;i- mi....
"le is growing so fast at
14 years old that the sky is
the limit right now. He is at
the perfect age to make some
of the best gains of his life."
Byrd, 14, competed at 153
pounds. HIe had a 163-pound
lift and a 198-pound. clan-and-
jerk.
Also completing in the
event was Emma (Godfrey,
who defended her title as the
women's 58 kg 14- to 1l5-vyar-
old champion. Godfrey is the(
only female, in Nassau C county
history to be a tw o-time AA1
champion and gold medal
winner in weightlifting.
Godfrey, '1, competed in
the 126-1)(Ound class. She had


a lift of 97 pounds and a clean-
and-jerk of 150 pounds.
Also taking gold were Seth
and Ryan. Seth, 15, won gold
in the 260-pound weight class
with a 161-pound lift and 209-
pound clean-and-jerk.
Ryan, 19, competed at 226
pounds. He had a lift of 176
pounds and a clean-and-jerk
of 227 pounds for a 403-pound
total.
Alec Cosentino, 14, com-
peted at 112 pounds with a
117-pound snatch and 136-
pound clean-and-jerk for
third; Will S., 14, 150-pound
class, 110-pound lift and 161-
pound clean-and-jerk for fifth
place; Stone Lakey, 17, 165-
pound division, 194-pound lift
and 255-pound clean-and-jerk
for third; Brandon, 18, 183-
pound class, 242-pound lift for
first place.
The sport of Olympic-style
weightlifting is the only form
of weightlifting recognized in
the Olympic Games. The
sport is comprised of two lifts
- the snatch, in which a bar-
bell is lifted from the floor to
arm's length overhead in a
single, continuous motion;
and the clean-and-jerk, where
a barbell is lifted first to the
shoulders and then, after a
pause, to arm's length over-
head.
Athletes have three
attempts in each event'to suc-
cessfully lift as much weight
as possible. The highest
amount of weight lifted in the
snatch and the clean-and-jerk
are added for a total with the
highest total weight lifted
named the winner.
Strength, flexibility, explo-
siveness, balance and proper
technique defines the move-
ments of this sport. Both men
and women compete in
weightlifting with weight cate-
gories and barbell amount
measured in kilograms (1
kilogram is equivalent to 2.2
pounds).
The origins of modern
competition date back to 18th-
and 19th-century strongman
contests. The first three
Olympics (1896, 1900 and
1904) included weightlifting
as have all games after 1920.
IJIF Florida, Inc, a non-
profit organization dedicated
to the development of student
athletes in the sport of Olym-
pic i.., Il;lif;i L. sponsored


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Alec Cosentino, 14, above, took the bronze medal in the 112-pound class in the AAU Junior Olympics July 20-30 in
Houston, Texas. Cody Byrd, 14, below right, took fourth place at 153 pounds. Emma Godfrey, 14, below left, cap-
tured gold in the 126-pound division.


the team's trip to Houston.
LIFT Florida provides young
athletes the opportunity to
build self-oonfidence and faith
in their abilities in sport and
in life, enhance youth aware-
ness of health and fitness and
give young athletes a positive,
character-building experi-


ence.
LIFT Florida provides,
through fundraising, dona-
tions and sponsorships, assis-
tance with equipment pur-
chase, weightlifting club
membership, club uniforms,
weightlifting shoes and sup-
plies (chalk, tape, ice packs,


scissors, etc.) as well as assis-
tance with weightlifting team
travel expenses.
LIFT Florida has many
branches throughout the
state and is growing each
month. Sandbox Athletics of
Fernandina Beach is head-
quarters for LIFF Florida.


The student-athletes practice
most days after school: appli-.
cations are being accepted.
1,IF Floi ida offers schol-
arships through its non-profit
programming. Visit www.lift-
flFrida.org or contact Dawn
Williams at presidentv@lift-
florida.org for information.


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FRIDAY. AUGUST 10. 2012 SPORTS News-Leader


FBHS hall offame nominations
Fernandina Beach High School is accept-
ing nominees for the 2012 Hall of Fame class.
Criteria is for alumni and former staff and
includes excellence in athletics, one's trade or
profession or as a member of society in the
form of community service or leadership.
This year's class will be inducted at the
FBHS homecoming Oct. 12. More criteria and
applications are available online under the
alumni section of www.fernandinahigh.com or
at the school.
For information contact Rob Hicks at
robert.hicks@nassau.kl2.fl.us.

Fortheftunofit
The next Putt-Putt BusinessLeague starts
Aug. 21 and runs for seven weeks. Join par-
ticipating teams for fun, fellowship and net-
working. Four people compete each week for
a team. Cost is $259 plus tax per team.
There is also a doubles tournament every
Friday starting at 7:30 p.m. Putt-Putt at Main
Beach is a tour stop for the Professional
Putters of America for the Florida State Putt-
Putt Championship in September.

Litde Pirate cheerprogram
The Femandina Beach High School cheer-
leaders will offer their mascot program for the
2012 football season. Registration will be
from 6-7 p.m. Aug.14 in Building 22 behind
the middle school.
The cost for the program is $150 and will
include two clinics and uniforms. Participants
will cheer at five home football games.

YMCA allsports
The McArthur Family YMCA has extended
registration for fall until Aug. 15. Sports in- -
clude volleyball and flag football in Fernan-
dina Beach and soccer in Yulee. The season
will begin Aug. 20 and will run through Oct.
19. Contact Jenna Scott at 261-1080, ext.
110, or jscott@firstcoastymca.org.

ProwresdlingAug25
Continental Championship Wrestling
retums to the Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center Aug. 25 with a 7:30 p.m. bell time. The
card includes a rematch for the Southern
States title as "Flash and Cash" Hayden Price
battles Scotty Biggs.
In an unsanctioned tag team street fight,
the Marcs Brothers will take on the Army of
Darkness. In the main event there is a triple
threat for the CCW championship between
"The Future" Johnathari Wells, "Mr. Saturday
Night" Jarod Michaels and "Rock and Roll"
Chris Turner.
Also appearing will be Dante "The Dragon"
Steele, "The Revelator" Kevin Toole, "The
Machine" Fred Avery, Cuzin Ricky J, Romeo
Da La Guearra, "Sir" lan Shire, John Douglas
and a host of other stars.
Jazz recording artist Willie Hunter will be
playing his rendition of the National Anthem.
-Portions of the proceeds will benefit Shiny
Badges, Inc. Visit www.ccwrestling.biz.

Sign upforPopWarner
Fernandina Beach Pop Warner is holding
registration for football and cheerleading
through Aug. 19. Registration is online only
through Aug. 19 at www.leaguelineup.com/
fbpwa. Fees are $150 for the first child and
$125 per sibling. Contact Lisa Haddock at
lisahaddock@hotmail.com or 225-9931.

Piratedscountcards
The Femandina Beach High School foot-
ball team is selling its $10 cards for discounts
at local businesses. The sale will run through
Aug. 13..Community blitz is from 5-7 p.m.
Aug. 14; players wear jerseys after practice
and hit the town to sell remaining cards. Do-
nations will also be accepted. Call 261-5713.

Upward Basketbal
First Baptist Church is offering Upward
Basketball and cheerleading in the Family Life
Center on South Eighth Street for youth from
kindergarten through sixth grade. Register
children online at FBFirst.com. The Upward
Basketball season includes one-hour prac-
tices each week. Sign up online or stop by the
church at 1600 South Eighth St.

TurteTrotonLaborDay
Amelia Island's traditional Labor Day
Weekend run has a new date this year -
Labor Day itself. The race switched days
because the tides will be more favorable. The
incoming tide should be a bit more than a
third of the way in when the race starts.
Again this year the run and walk will be
entirely on the beach, with a 5K out-and-back
course that heads south from Main Beach.
Race-day headquarters will be at Main
Beach Park, and the event will be a 5K bnly,
with half-mile and one-mile kids' fun runs
afterward. The run/walk will start at 7:30 a.m.
Sept. 3, on the beach at Sandy Bottoms.
As always, the race will raise money for
Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch and turtle
patrols inside Fort Clinch State Park. Runners
and walkers may be able to see sea turtle
nests along the route.
The race T-shirts, featuring original sea-
turtle art by Sandra Baker-Hinton, will go to all
pre-registered runners and walkers, and to
race-day registrants as available. The first
50q'finishers will also get a coffee mug.
Rupiners and walkers must present their bib to
receive a mug.


Awards categories will include the top
male and female finishers overall and the top
three in each of 15 age groups and the
awards again will be special Turtle Trot beach
towels. There will also be drawings for door
prizes at the post-race awards ceremony.
Registration for the 5K is $20 per person
through Aug. 25 or $15 for members of
Amelia Island Runners (AIR member discount
not available on Active.com). After Aug. 26,
the fee will be $25. Fees are $10 per child for
the-half-mile and one-mile kids' runs, which
will start on the beach at 8:30 a.m.
Entry forms are available at Current
Running, 815 S. 8th St.; the McArthur Family
YMCA, 1915 Citrona Drive; Club 14 Fitness,
1114 S. 14th St.; Pak's Karate Academy,


96549 Parliament Drive; and online at
AmelialslandRunners.com, where online reg-
istration is also available. Forms may be
mailed to AIR or returned to Current Running.
The deadline to register in advance of the
race is Sept. 1 at 6 p.m. Registration will be
going on from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. that day at
Current Running.
People who have pre-registered can pick
up their race packets at that time, or at the
race site Sept.'3, starting at 6:30 a.m.
There will also be race-day registration at
the race site from 6:30-7:15 a.m.
Kids' run registration on race day will con-
tinue to about 8:15 a.m. Preregistered youth
runners will get a T-shirt and all finishers get a
ribbon. Parents are encouraged to run with
their kids for free, just fill out a registration
form.
For information on the annual Turtle Trot,
visit the Amelia Island Runners website or call
(770) 655-0865.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic.Club at Ten
Acres. Social hour starts at 6 p.m., dinner at
6:30 p.m. and meeting at 7:30 p.m. Sailors,
powerboaters and interested parties are wel-
come.
For information, contact Commodore
Charlie Monroe at charlie@digitalvillager.net
or 261-9263 or visit www.ameliaislandsail-
ing.org.

Flyngdubforms
Amelia Island Light Sport Flying Club
memberships are available for anyone with a
minimum of 200 hours PIC and who want to
fly for less than $50/hour. The AILS is a newly
formed flying club based at Fernandina
Beach Municipal Airport.
AILS is currently in the evaluation process
to consider specific models of aircraft for club
lease and/or purchase. Become a principal
member now and be involved in this impor-
tant decision. Principal'memberships are limit-
ed to 20 qualified pilots.
Contact Mickey Baity at 277-8360 or Lew
Eason at 491-8638 for information.

Gator Bowl gae set
The 68th annual TaxSlayer.com Gator
Bowl will be played at Everbank Field in Jack-
sonville Jan. 1, 2013. Kickoff is at noon; the
game will be televised nationally on ESPN2.
The game will pair the fifth selection after
the BCS from the Southeastern Conference
and the third selection after the BCS from the
Big Ten Conference. For information, visit
www.gatorbowl.com.

Bouleslub
Amelia Island Boules Club holds petanque
pickup games Saturdays at 9:30 a.m., Wed-
nesdays at 5:30 p.m. and Thursdays at 3:30
p.m. on the Central Park petanque courts at
the corner, of Atlantic Avenue and South 11th
Street.
Petanque (pay-tonk) is a cousin of both
horseshoes and bocce, the Italian bowling
game. The public is always welcome to join.
Call 491-1190 for information.

Oganzedbike rides
There are organized bicycle rides in
Fernandina Beach and around Amelia Island
Thursday starting at 9 a.m. and Saturdays
starting at 8:30 a.m., weather permitting. All
rides start from Main Beach. Park near the
miniature golf course.
Cyclists of all abilities are welcome. The
ride will be around 30 miles with rest stops
along the way and loops back to the starting
point at around 10 miles before continuing on
the remaining 20 miles of the route. Lunch
after the ride is optional.
Bicycle helmets and a bicycle in good
working condition are mandatory. Rides are
led by Don Eipert in conjunction with the
North Florida Bicycle Club. Call him at 261-
5160 or visit www.ameliaislandcycling.com or
www.nfbc.us.

WalktoEndAlzheimer's
The Alzheimer's Association's Walk to End
Alzheimer's will take place Nov. 17 at Central
Park in Fernandina Beach. Nearly 200 people
from the Fernandina Beach/Nassau area are
expected at this year's event to raise aware-
ness and funds to fight Alzheimer's disease.
Alzheimer's Association Walk to End
Alzheimer's participants will participate in a
three-mile walk and will learn more about
Alzheimer's disease, advocacy opportunities,
clinical trial enrollment and support programs
and services of the Alzheimer's Association.
Each walker will also join in a meaningful trib-
ute ceremony to honor those affected by
Alzheimer's disease.
Start or join a team at alz.orgiwalk or by
calling (904) 281-9077.

Beanumpire
Baseball and softball umpires can join the
fastest growing umpires association in
Northeast Florida, the River City Umpires
Association. River City Umpires is currently
recruiting men and women interested in offici-
ating baseball and softball.
If you live or work in Baker, Bradford, Clay,
Duval, Putnam, St. Johns or Nassau County,
contact Terry Padgett at (904) 879-6442 or
visit www.rivercityumps.com.

Challenger Bowling


Nassau Challenger Bowling League for
the physically and mentally challenged meets
the second Saturday each month from 3-5
p.m. at the Nassau Bowling Center in Yulee.
Call Melinda Willaford at 261-3136 for infor-
mation.

Sports association
Nassau County Sports Association meets
at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday at the county build-
ing, Yulee. Call 261-1075 or 277-1609 for
information.
To submit an item for this column, contact
Beth Jones at 261-3696 or email to
bjones@fbnewsleader. com.


LADYANGLER


S 'BMIFTTED
Kristi Turner, flanked by son Dallis, left, and husband Dale, won lady angler honors
during the 30th annual Fernandina Beach Kingfish Tournament & Fishing Rodeo over
the weekend. The "Just in Time" fishing team placed third in the general tournament.


JUNIOR OLYMPIAN


Haylie Wallace, 12, of
the Fernandina Beach
Flyers swim team com-
peted in the Long
Course Junior Olmpics
at the University of
Florida in Gainesville
July 19-22. She compet-
ed in four events,
achieving personal best
times in three of them.
Wallace swam the 100-
yard backstroke in a
time of 1:19.15, beating
her seed time by seven
seconds. She swam the
50-yard back in a time
of 35.03, beating her
seed time by 3.5 sec-
onds and qualifying for
the finals in the event.
The 50-yard butterfly
she swam in a time of
35.32, bettering her
seed time by 4.24 sec-
onds.
SUBMITrED


FHSAA standards help protect



student-athletes from the heat


The Florida High School
Athletic Association has set
new standards that have been
put in place to safeguard the
health and well-being of stu-
dent-athletes.
Preseason practice official-
ly began Monday for those
competing for their; schools in
football, golf, swimming and
girls volleyball and new pro-
cedures are in place to pro-
tect the youths from the heat,
inadequate hydration and
concussions.
Cross country and bowl-
ing practices begin one week
later.
"For coaches, parents and
everyone else associated with
high school athletics, nothing
is more important the safety
of the students," said FHSAA
Executive Director Dr. Roger
Dearing. "At the FHSAA, we
are committed to making
sure our members under-
stand what they must do to
ensure that competitors have


safe, enjoyable experiences as
high school athletes."
The FHSAA's Board of
Direc-tors adopted new heat-
related policies in June,
designed tQ ensure that
young athletes drink plenty of
water and do not practice too
many hours each week.
Under the new policies,
schools must:
Limit weekly practice
time to 18 hours during the
first two weeks of practice to
allow student-athletes to
adapt to conditions
Ensure for every 30 min-
utes of practice, student-ath-
letes get a minimum five-
minute rest and hydration
break
Require unrestricted
access to water for student-
athletes at all times
Require coaches and
others in authority to never
deny a student-athlete access
to water if requested.
The FHSAA also adopted a


new concussion and heat-
related illness form intended
to create safety awareness
among students and their
caretakers by explaining the
risks and symptoms associat-
ed with each problem.
A concussion action plan
developed by the FHSAA's
Sports Medicine Advisory
Subcommittee and adopted
by the Board requires that:
Any student-athlete who
exhibits signs, symptoms or
behaviors consistent with a
concussion such as loss of
consciousness, headache,
dizziness, confusion or bal-
ance problems must be
immediately removed from
the competition and cannot
return to play until he or she
is cleared by an appropriate
health care professional.
All head coaches and
other paid coaches are
required to view an online
education course about con-
cussions.


The city of Fernandina
Beach Recreation Depart-
ment (www.fbfl.us) offers:
Summer swimming les-
sons for ages three and up
are held mornings Monday
through Friday at the Atlantic
Center pool and evenings at
MLK Center. Register at At-
lantic Center. American Red
Cross levels 1-2 (one-week
sessions) are $35 for city resi-
dents and $43.75 non-city.
Levels 3-4 (two-week ses-
sions) cost $50 for city resi-
dents, $62.50 non-city.
Open basketball is Mon-
days, Wednesdays and
Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7
p.m., Tuesdays and Fridays
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. at Peck Gym, based on
court availability.
Peck Gym weight room is
open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday through Friday and
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Satur-
day and Sunday. Cost is $3 a
day, $25 a month for city resi-
dents ($31.25 non-city), $120
for sixth months ($150 non-
city) or $180 for 12 months
($225 non-city). Personal
training is available; $30 per
session, $75 per week (three
sessions) or $200 a month
(two sessions per week).
Dietary analysis and food pro-
gram. Call Jay at 277-7364 for
information.
Lap swim from 6-9 a.m
and noon to 3 p.m. Monday
through Friday at Atlantic


Center. Cost is $2 a day.
Adult volleyball is from 7-
9 p.m. Tuesday and Fridays
at Peck Gym. Cost is $2 per
day for city residents ($5 non).
Youth volleyball is from 3-
5 p.m. Tuesday and Friday at
Peck Gym. Cost is $2 per day
for city residents ($5 non-city).
Coed exercise is from
6:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday at the MLK Center.
Fee is $2 per class (city), $3
(non-city).
Fernandina Beach Scuba
Club meets at 6 p.m. the sec-
ond Friday at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center.
Call Kathy Russell, 753-1143,
or email krussell@fbfl.org.
Atlantic Center pool pub-
lic swim is from from 3-6 p.m.
weekdays ($2) and from noon
to 5 p.m. weekends ($3).
Men's slow pitch "dice"
tournament is Aug. 11 at the
Ybor Alvarez softball fields.
USSSA rules. Umpire rolls
one die before a game, which
will be the home run limit.
Double elimination; one-hour
time limit. Teams supply their
own Classic M softballs. Entry
fee is $220. Contact Jason at
277-7256 or jbrown@fbfl.org
for information.
Fall co-ed softball league
registration will be held
through Aug. 20 at the Atlantic
Center. Recreational co-ed
(ASA rules, aluminum bat rule
for men, Mondays and
Wednesday) and open co-ed
(ASA rules, Mondays and


Wednesday) leagues
offered. Team fee of $275 is
due Aug. 20. Refundable two-
game forfeit fee ($72) due by
Sept. 7. Umpire fees are $18
per game, paid on game
nights. Captain's meeting is at
6:30 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Atlan-
tic Center. Season begins
Sept. 10. Call Jason at 277-
7256 or email jbrown@
fbfl.org or visit www.league-
lineup.com/fbflsoftball.
Fall men's softball league
registration will be held
through Aug. 20 at the Atlantic
Center. USSSA rules, games
on Thursday. Team fee of
$275 is due Aug. 20. Refund-
able two-game forfeit fee
($72) due by Sept. 7. Um-
pires fees are $18 per game,
paid on game nights. Cap-
tain's meeting is at 6:30 p.m.
Aug. 23 at the Atlantic Center.
Season begins Sept. 13. Call
Jason at 277-7256 or email
jbrown@ fbfl.org or visit www.
leaguelineup.com/fbfisoftball.
Fall women's softball
league registration is through
Aug. 20 at the Atlantic Center.
ASA rules, games Thursdays.
Fee of $275 is due Aug. 20.
Refundable two-game forfeit
fee ($72) due by Sept. 7.
Umpire fees are $12 per
game, paid on game nights.
Captain's meeting is at 6:30
p.m. Aug. 23 at Atlantic Cen-
ter. Season begins Sept. 13.
Contac Jason at 277-7256 or
jbrown@fbfl.org or visit www.
leaguelineup.com/fbflsoftball.


SPORTS SHORTS


RECREATION ROUNDUP





























































~r&



Law


Senra
Serta Safford
Serta-Pedic Plush


1699
Queen Set
Twin 2-pc set-..499
Full 2-pc. set--..599
King 3-pc. set...2899


Beautyrest Plush


'599
Queen Set
Twin 2-pc set....'499
Full 2-pc. set..-..-549
King 3-pc. set...1849


Solld t
Sera Dreamtime
Euro Top


$399
Qu, en Sct
Twin 2-pc se1....'349
Full 2-pc. set......i449
King 3-pc. set.....579


FRDAY. AL< 0. 201ti2 NEWS Ncevs-Leader


ARTHUR FASCIANI/FORTHE NEWS-LEADER
After the remodeling the dining room, left, and kitchen
in an Amelia Island Plantation condo.

CONDO Continued from HA Local contractor list


et. M s.N....t S K- ,y es' Pe rfc
;s ',. ,. ...,

.' "


5 9





'49. r549

in 2 c s ... 9 T in 2-pc st....'
1-'j '.. *
.: '" ' .. '1 ..' 6 "'- -. *. r "-e





King 3- set ........... 99 King 3-p. set...-. .799
Se; -i . ..-.. ..*, ,. a' .

Choice of Plush or Firm Sleeper Plush Firm





Queen St Queen Set
Twin 2-tc se-.....349 Twin 2p s .... .399
Full 2-pc. setL. .'449 Full 2-pc. set......!499
King 3 pc. set....:~799 King 3 pc. set......799


SerTa
Beautyrest True Energy Serta ICOMFORT
Becca Plush Firm Memory Foam Insight

I1399 I1074
Que.n S-;. Qu.j n set
Twin 2-pc set.....999 Twin 2-pc set .749
Full 2-pc. set ... 1299 Full 2-pc. set ....:899
King 3-pc. set...: 1899 King 3-pc. set..... 1399


Tempur- Pedic Simplicity
Choice of 3 Firmness


sl499
cQuen Set
Twin 2-pc set....t899
Full 2-pr. set .....1 349
King 3-pc. set.... I 899


12 month interest free financing
* with purchase of $599 or more


Waycross, GA
401-406 Mary Street
912-283-6350
Fernandina Beach, Florida
1112 South 14' Street
Eight Hlags Shopping Center
904-261-6333 .


materials (bedding and
drapes), wall-mounted
HDTVs, and don't worry too
much about a baking or roast-
ing facility in the kitchen
because renters go out for
dinner regularly.
Though it was hard to con-
template reselling our new
property, inviting a real estate
salesperson to advise us on
how to get the biggest bang
for our renovation dollar was,
to us, as important as long-
term care insurance. Equally
important was the invitation
to the manager of OMNI's
long-term rental program to
assess the location and suit-
ability of our new condo for
their monthly rental program
- a program we'd used many
times in the past to "sample
the lifestyle."
5. Ask local business own-
ers for recommendations on
non-competing services.
Word-of-mouth references,
especially in a small town
with which you're unfamiliar,
are a no-brainer. While shop-
ping for furniture and acces-
sories, we'd ask for advice on
countertops and get referred
to a local shop eager for busi-
ness Savage Stone, owned
by Brenda Savage. Or while
looking at shower doors at
Lee & Cates Glass, we'd ask
about pavers and patios and
get directed to Lynda Dahl,
the owner of Imetry, Inc., a
place which had been supply-
ing stone to local properties
so long that they knew the ins
and outs of the architectural
review board process. Talk
about a timesaver!
We're not "big box" fans
and much prefer working
with local shops and services.
We also like the concept of
recycling "things" and
bought half of our living room



t amabas
t ^ CENTER, INC

TIle food I ill
neet s donations of
non-perishable food
itrems all year round.
For more information,
S.llI 904.261.7000


FIrnandi. Ifeha ch
t ": I


General Coniractor -
DCI. Dewayne Crews Inc
SYulee, 557-84'06
Patio Imetry Inc.
Lynda Dahli, Fernandina
Beach. 75.3-3380
Furniture'Ccnsignment
-Amelia's Atrc:. Jennifer
Gedeon Crews Fernandina
Beach. 277-2095
Granite Countertops -
Savage Stone. Brenda
Savage, Fernandina
Beac-i. 277-3524
Kichen and Bath
SCabinetry Corbit Cabinet
Mike Corbttt Manor Ga
912 2685-8601


furniture from a local con-
signment shop, Amelia's
Attic. Jennifer Gedeon Crews,
the store owner's daughter,
worked with us to outfit our
new space. Using consign-
ment furniture alongside new
furniture and favored items
from up north, we created a
funky, comfortable environ-
ment.
Throughout the process
we came to know each and
every street corner on
Eighth, 14th, Sadler and
Centre streets a wonderful
way to begin to call a place
our own. Now, a year later, we
know all the shortcuts and
many of the proprietors by
name. It's a nice feeling and
really makes our second
home a "home."
A takeaway thought the
biggest difference between
renovating a condominium
and a single-family home,
while obvious to many, was
less apparent to us. All our
life we'd lived in single-family
homes; when it came time to
renovate, we'd do whatever
we wanted with little consid-
eration of anything but the
local building codes and our
own ideas.
It's different with a condo-
minium, however especially
one in a larger community
like Amelia Island Plantation.
There are guidelines,
covenants, approvals and
process to deal with. Only in
hindsight did we discover
that by turning first to our
condo board and Amelia
Island Management, we'd
taken the guesswork out of
our project, thus saving our-
selves time, money and
aggravation.
Diane Terry is originally
from New England (Connec-
ticut and Massachusetts). She
and photographer Arthur
Fasciani bought their condo at
Amelia Island Plantation in
May 2011 while vacationing
on the Plantation.



HOME SS NIIMILS..

THEY'RE DYING FOR

A 2ND CHANCE
Adopt A Companion Today
















Ant
MT'r


Visit Us At Our Website: a :v&., i. .s ; r. ', "'- .:.r













..eisure

B SECTION. ... .



Photographer holds first island show


SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
Music NOTES
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY.AUGUST 10.2012
NEr\\ -I.J \DLR / FIRNANDINA BEACH. 'FLORIDA


.'". melia Island resident and well-
.-- known photographer Kenneth
Cain began what would become
his career as a child with a
Brownie camera. He started taking pictures
of his home life. This was the beginning of a
lifetime of recording his family and ;hl..,,.
spaces i i-j..'l photography.
When his dad, the'senior Kenneth Cain
(an artist himself) returned from fighting
Korea, he moved the family from Illinois to
Florida and son Kenneth's photographic fas-
cination was encouraged and his education
continued.
Cain attended Arizona State University,
where he decided photography was his life's
work. In addition to the professors at ASU,
he had the opportunity to work with.lumi-
naries Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock, Minor
White, Ralph Gibson and Jack Welpott.
Exhibits of Cain's photographs have been
shown throughout Arizona, California,
Oregon, Florida and Chicago, where Cain


Openingreception
',vr.' -nth Street Gallery invites you to
meet local resident and well-known.pho-
tographer Kenn.th Cain as he displays
his pl i sonal photographic work for the
fii -t rin-i on Aml:Tia Island. Cain v. il alsa,
be irtr,,ducing and signing a handsome
limirkld -ditirn v',lume of his photo-
Sraph.,
Thr opening I-tr eptin 'Iiiill br hl, i at
the galli 14 1 ', v.-,thi I s ic i u iom
Lulu'-) on Sarurda h'l.nom 5' p m ',r
ql-Sion;, direction a. n, ru .iet u p n: JIt'r-r
nnte viewing tinkm call 43-2'*.. '.

was the Museum Conservation Photograph-
er at the Newberry Library for 15 years.
Abroad, Cain has exhibited in Prague, and
worked with well-known Czech photogra-
phers Jan Pohribny and Pavel Banka.
Cain has made Amelia Island his home


since 1998; most island residents know him
for his talent in capturing the joy of family
events. He has photographed well over 350
weddings and more than 200 family portraits
during this time operating his business
Kenneth Cain Photography (www.kenneth-
cain.com).
What is unique about Cain's show on
Saturday is that he is displaying his personal
work. Work he has never shown. Work he
loves. Work of which is he is most proud.
He is also introducing his first book, a
handsome limited edition volume of 50 black
and white photographic images, which can
be purchased and which he would be happy
to autograph.
Seventh Street Gallery, 14 S. Seventh St.,
invites you to Kenneth Cain's first show on
Amelia Island, Saturday from 5-8 p.m., for
his opening and book-signing. As this is a
historic property, it is not handicap accessi-
ble. For questions, directions, or to set up
an alternate viewing time, call 432-8330.


PHOTO BY STEVE LEIMBERG
Photographer Kenneth Cain.


Join the Blue Door Artists for Art Walk
on Saturday, where the featured artist for
the month of August is Theresa Daily.
She will be introducing new work in
acrylics inspired by the natural beauty of
Amelia Island. In her signature watercolor
style, these will include new expressionis-
tic and stylized pieces, as well as additions
to her ongoing "Horizons" series. Enjoy
an open studio tour and visit the creative
spaces of all nine artists that represent
the Blue Door Artists Studio/Gallery.
Regular hours are Monday-Saturday from
11 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, call
Theresa at 556-7783.


,7.


a

k

- --- ..


Just in time for hurricane
season, Carol Winner will be
unveiling a new painting in her
ongoing series of whimsical
watercolor paintings, "Hurricane
Season," during the Art Walk on
Saturday from 5-9 p.m. Winner's
gallery, Gallery C, is located at
218-B Ash St., up the painted
stairs. Regular hours are 11
a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday-Tuesday,
closed Wednesdays. Also on
view are Winner's new acrylic
and oil paintings, handbags, jew-
.elry and mixed media.


The Island Art Association, 18 N. Second
St., will feature the Nouveau Art show "World
of Books" at the Second Saturday Artrageous
Art Walk reception on Saturday from 5-8 p.m.
.Jane Carrington won Best of Show for "A
Private Reading," left. Featured artist will be
Sharon Haffey.
The theme of Haffey's show is "Road
Trip," an appropriate title for someone who
has lived in 13 states and traveled extensively.
Haffey has been painting in oils and acrylics
for more than 30 years and finds inspiration in
the awesome and the ordinary. Her paintings
are colorful, bold and playful and designed
not to depict a realistic image, but a sense of
-place. Call 261-7020 or visit
www.islandart.org.


~pv '


The new Turtle Trot painting is on display at Amelia
"aanJon Gallery as Sandra Baker-Hinton, owner and
artist, has been preparing for a two-person show at the
Art League of Daytona. Each year Baker-Hinton creates a
new artwork for the 5K Labor Day race that supports
Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch and turtle patrols inside
lort Clinch State Park. The turtle painting will adorn the
official race T-shirts. During the Art Walk Saturday from
5 30-8:30 p.m. guests will also be able to view Baker-
Hinton's other hew works before they head south to
Ilaytona for a month. Come see it along with some new
1960s-70s glass bead jewelry. The gallery is located at
.18A Ash St. Call 491-8040.


.-kOONIr


SHRIMP DINNER


The American
Legion Auxiliary Unit
54 will serve Shrimp
Scampi. salad, bread and
dessert for a $10 donation on Aug. 11
from 5-7 p.m. at the Legion Post, 626
S. Third St. The public is welcome to
eat in the smoke-free meeting hall or
pick up plates to go. All proceeds go
back into programs supporting vet-
erans and the community.

THIRD FRIDAY
The Amelia Island Museum of
History, 233 S. Third St., invites you
to its next 3rd Friday on 3rd Street
presentation on Aug. 17 at 6 p.m. fea-
,.: during Lori


__ _. .... a ',
.i .!



Just like healthy eating can boost your
energy every day, making a few small
changes at home can save you energy
every month.

S Start by skipping the heated dry cycle
S on your dishwasher. Then call FPU at
888.220.9356 and learn more ways to
saveenergywith ourfreeenergycheck-up,
including our free weatherization kit.
o


-i


F-RI3A PUBUCL
U T I L I T I E S
U T ILIT IE S
... ...q ,, ,


Miranda and
"Dwelling in the
Past: Build your


j -_'-B M house's genealo-
gy." A local archi-
tect and Amelia Island Genealogical
Society member, Miranda will teach
guests how to research the history of
a house using famous local homes
from the museum's own Holiday
Homes Tour as examples. Free for
members and a suggested donation
of $10 for non-members. Contact
Gray at 261-7378, ext 102. or
gray@ameliamuseum.org.

' 1 :AL; C:ONC(IERT
Historic Macedonia African
Methodist Episcopal Church pres-
ents The H. Alvin Green Memorial


Alumni Chorale in concert on Aug.
18 at 4 p.m.at202 S. Ninth St..
Fernandina Beach.All are welcome
to enjoy an evening of praise and
worship in music. Donation is $15.
The chorale honors the memory
of Professor Green. revered music
teacher at Edward Waters College. It
is composed
of alumni :_" .-.. ::.
and friends ,
from Edward "--
Waters, Bethune Cookman. FSU.
Albany State and others. The
chorale is known throughout Florida
and Georgia and has recorded two
CDs.
STORY & SONG
Grammy Award-winning
singer/songwriter Don Henry will
perform at the next"Evening of
Story & Song," the concert series
presented by First Coast
Community Bank and hosted by
Mark& Donna
Paz Kaufman, on
Aug. 18. Henry
has been called
"the next Randy
Newman" for his
songs.that come
across as mini-
movies, from the whimsical "Harley"
to the poignant tribute to Martin
Luther King. "Beautiful Fool." His
Grammy-winning "Where've You
Been." recorded by Kathy Mattea.
was the first to receive every major
award in the same year. Visit
DonHenry.com or call 277-2664.


--- ---~~;k7
*. -I


I i~


bjU


1 U







FRIDAY. AUGUST 10, 2012 LEISURE News-Leader


SPECIAL EVENTS

Join Cats Angels Inc.,
SPCA at its annual Walk
and Vigil to commemorate
Homeless Animals Day on
Aug. 18 from 6-8 p.m. at the
gazebo in Central Park. The
two-mile walk begins at 6 p.m.
and concludes with a candle-
light vigil.
Since 1992, organizations
around the world have come
together on the third Saturday
of August to raise awareness
about the pet overpopulation
epidemic. Visit www.catsan-
gels.com to learn more.

The Amelia Island
Genealogical Society will
meet at 7 p.m. Aug. 21 at the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department Community
Room, 1525 Lime St.
Patricia Charpentier will
present "Writing Your Life"
focusing on different methods
of preserving family history
and how to take facts of
ancestral information -
names, places and dates -
and turn them into interesting
and enjoyable stories without
fictionalizing material. She will
discuss ways to look at histori-
cal data with an eye for story
and how to apply the ele-
ments of creative writing -
characterization, detail and
description, setting, plot -to
factual records.
Charpentier is the author of
the award-winning book,
Eating an Elephant: Write
Your Life One Bite at a Time,
and teaches, writes, edits and
ghostwrites personal and fam-
ily history and offers courses.
Public welcome.
*. .*
Cats Angels will host a
wur of the historic Bailey
House on Ash Street a
grand Victorian with whim-
sical carousel horses on the
wraparound porch on
Aug. 25 from 1-5 p.m.
Tickets are $15 (children
under 18 free) and include
gourmet cookies, recipes and
lemonade. Cats Angels will
receive 100 percent of the
proceeds.
Tickets are available at the
Cats Angels Thrift Store, 709
S. Eighth St., Monday-
Saturday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.,
.through PayPal at www.cat-
sangels.com (use the donate
button and bring your printed
receipt), at the event or con-
tact Jan Cote-Merow at 583-
2870 for delivery.
Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA is
a 501 (c)3 charity dedicated to
prevention of cat overpopula-
tion through spaying and
neutering in Nassau County.
The all-volunteer organization
is supported entirely by
donations, grants and
fundraising.

The Australian rock band
Little River Band will head-
line the musical entertain-
ment at the third annual
Great Southern Tailgate
Cook-off, Aug. 24-25 at Main
Beach. The group will per-
form Aug. 25 at 7 p.m., offer-
ing new energy and arrange-
ments as well as classic hits.


Fill in the squares so
that each row. column
and 3-by-3 box
contain the numbers
I through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Wednesday
B-section.

Wednesday, August 8
Solution


The Great Southern
Tailgate Cook-off is a free,
two-day event offering live
entertainment and more than
50 professional and backyard
(amateur) teams competing
for more than $20,000 in prize
money and trophies. Teams
can register through Aug. 15
and pay online at www.gstail-
gatecookoff.com. For informa-
tion or to register a backyard
team visit www.gstailgate-
cookoff.com.

Barnett Bank of Nassau
County Reunion will be held
from 6-9 p.m. Aug. 25 at
Sliders Seaside Grill (Sadler
at S. Fletcher). Bring your
spouse or special date. Cash
bar and food. RSVP to cmu-
sic35@gmail.com.

Blue Moon Bash, a low-
country boil under the stars.
to benefit Meals on Wheels
for Pets, will be held Aug.
31 at 6:30 p.m. at the Amelia
River Golf Course, 4477
Buccaneer Trail.
Enjoy dinner, music, a
cash bar and golf cart shuttles
to the venue, all to help feed
the pets of seniors receiving
Meals on Wheels. Attire is
casual.
Tickets are $25 and avail-
able at www.mow4pets
nassau.com, the Amelia River
Golf Course, Council on Aging
and the Nassau Humane
Society's Second Chance
Store. Or call (352) 284-6106
for tickets and information.

Fernandina Beach High
School Class of 1983 is
planning a Labor Day week-
end reunion.
Join your classmates for
an evening at Amelia National
Golf Club on Sept. 1 from
6:30-10:30 p.m. for a buffet
dinner followed by specialty
desserts. Tickets are $25 per
person.
Send your payment
and contact information to
FBHS Class of 1983, Attn:
Serena Floyd, 931 South 10th
St., Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Join the group on
Facebook at FBHS Class of
1983.

The Fernandina Beach
High School Class 1957 will
celebrate its 55th class
reunion Sept. 28-30. This
year activities have been
planned to accommodate the
needs of classmates. Letters
have been mailed to each
member and guests with com-
plete itinerary and costs. For
further questions contact
Carolyn.

The Council on Aging of
Nassau County will hold its
ninth annual Fall Gala on
Oct. 7. Tickets are $125. For
tickets or information on dona-
tions and sponsorship, call
261-0701 or visit
www.coanassau.com.

Ballroom Dance Amelia
hosts Salsa Night on
Wednesday at The
Courtyard on Centre
Street, with a beginner
salsa class at 7 p.m., fol-


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BBQ&Bluegrass
RAIN Humane Society will present BBQ,
& Bluegrass on Aug. 11 from 5-8 p.m. at the
Fernandina Woman's Club. Tickets are $10
and include dinner and live music by the
Amelia River Ramblers. Enjoy a cash bar
with beer and wine and a silent auction with
weekend getaways and event tickets. For
information visit www.rainhumanespca.org.
BluesFest
The second annual Amelia Island Blues
Festival is scheduled for Sept. 14-16 at Main
Beach. Roger "Hurricane" Wilson will open
the Saturday lineup with his "Blues in
School" program and will hang out all week-
end providing musical introductions and
insight. Blues sensation Shemekia Copeland
will close Saturday night. The festival lineup
includes Sean Chamber. S'hanre D.Aiqhi
J P Soars Ther NoJu'.eaux? H.:rnki,-l -- ir
Flannel Church Aith CDuane Tru.: I- I.:. name'-
a few
For information and likCei :e '.st
w w amrneliaslaridbluedseslI corn
Stringquartet
Tc'ORv S, ring Quaret will retire aT The cin-
clusion ol the :01 i2-1 3 se;t :, an,-l tihei
Amelia Island Chamber Music Fer.-t.al
(AICMFI is included -:n the ensernble's
farewell rour The perl':imnance CI. 5 .al
p m. will be held al Amella Planialilon
Chapel 36 Bowman Road Tickets I.cr prermi
um seating which includes a pcsl-''crncerl
champagne reception with The anrist are
$10i General admission tickets are 150
Visit www aicml com or call 261-1779

Drum circle
The Fernandina Bach Drum Circle m-eeis
the first Monday of each month irirri 7-9 p n
at the DeeDee Bartel Nature Center and
North End Boat Ramp Insirumenrialilcn ,en-
ters on drums and percussion but ma',
include other instruments such as Ilu1e-
didgeridoos and other rnon-percussaon insru-
menis Dancers are welcome also. C all
Barbara Hill at 190-) 556-219 c.r Dcug
Byron at 261-5387 for inforralion
Jazz jam
A jazz lam is held at Pablos. 1 1 J
Second S Fernandina Beach ticn m '-1,
p m the first Wednesday ot each mc:rlnlh
Musicians are invited to si in tlor one- suonl cr
ie whole night Join the mailing listl b
mailing beechllyer 'o'bells.uth nel
Amelia River Cruises
Amelia River Cruises'Adult BYOB"
Twilight Tours are held Fiiday and Salurcla.',
Tickets are $29 per person at 1 N.:.rTnh Fro.n
SI Fernandina Beach, or call 261.i-9972 c
book online at wwwameliarivercruis;es com
The Courtyard
The Courtyard Pub & Eals 31', Cnertr.
St.. features open mic night Monda' a, -
p m Latin dance ni.hi Wejneca.:rl a- 1.
p m 1$5 tor lessons), Zane live Thursdas -it
7 p m. Kevin Barron Fridays al 7p rnr
Jahmen Reggae Band Saturdays at 6 1p .
Doggy Hour Monday Wednesday and
Friday. 4-7 p m Icouryard is always dcg-
triendlvi Call 432-70C,3 Join them on
Facebook

Dog StarTavem
Dog Star Taverm lr N Secc.nd St ,
Vegabond Swing tonight, the Dropper' Aug


lowed by Latin dancing. Cover
is $5.
Contact Aimee Marshall for
details at (617) 312-1932 or
ballroomdanceamelia@ gmail.
com.

THEATER

Carmike Amelia Island 7
Cinema, 14th and Lime
streets, Fernandina Beach,
features ballet and opera
companies streamed live
from Europe including
Norma (Teatro Antico) Aug. 12
at 2 p.m. and Aug. 21 at 7
p.m. Tickets are $25 per per-
son. Contact the Carmike
Theatre at 261-9867.

Amelia Community
Theatre presents God's
Favorite by Neil Simon,
directed by Geoffrey King.
In this laugh-out-loud retelling
of the story of Job, a modern-


11; Flannel Church Aug. 17; and Badman
Aug. 18. Every Tuesday is "Working Class
Stiff" when thousands of vinyl records are for
sale and available to listen to. Visit Dog Star
on Facebook and Reverbnation.com. Call
277-8010.
Florida House Inn
"Open Mike Night" is each Thursday from
7:30-10:30 p.m. in the Mermaid Bar with
local musician Terry Smith hosting a jam ses-
sion. Musicians perform a couple of songs
and the audience gets to hear new talent.
Appropriate for all members of the family. No
cover charge. Call Smith at (904) 412-7665.
Hammerhead Beach Bar
H-irmerhed Be-ah Bar 20415 S
Flet,:le6 A. Dl He.ay Hess Sunda.ys Visit
H anilrrn-ihe.adl F-:aceb,:ok Contiact Bill
Ch l,,elj"- ,Il b ill'~i~I palacesaloon corn
Instant Groove
TI inslintr Gricocv, featuring Lavrence.
H..rln,-e .Jo'hnr Pnv RF:binn 5:c:t' Giddons
ar-dici a-i HamnilTn plays each Thursday
nialii ai The Riiz-Carillon. Arrelia Island
Die ~ i- c,:;asual Fur information call Holmes

O'Kanes
C Kane s ? ih Fub- ,nd Eaieri 31
C entire S' Iree Irl. 1a eacll Monday at 7-30
:. m wvne la'ling Ire lhild Tuesday/ a 6 3'0
p m wiih 1, airnes rl or $10 along wihll
.'he1s e a-ra d cracl.ers and live erilenainrnenl.
dai Tournament eve'r.' Tuesday at 7 30 p m .
Dan 'voll Tuesdays Irm 7 3'7 11 ?.0 p m the
Da,is Ti. nei Band Thursday from 8 30 p.m -
rni:lni.jh and Friday and Salurday Irom 8 30
p rn -12; 3 Ca m Call 261 1000 VisoT
W.,AW -a inePs c rn
Palace Saloon
The F'alace Saloon 117 Cenlre St live
erntenaminrenl nightly Call Bill Clilders as
4-1 1-- ?2 o'r ermall
bill ilh1epa la..esaloro n corn

Sandy Bottoms
Sandy Bonc ,ms at Main Beach, 2910
A.lanii.:c A.e live entertainment every nilhl
ani:1l 1 ,J.ay ,Dn lhe tveekends, sleel drum
t:..nr,d -..rl, Salurday staying al 7 pm See
Ith- lineup c.nline at 'aWw and, bon om-
SImclia ':'3m
Sliders Seaside Grill
:-.liders *.e aside G: ill 1998 5 Fletll'er
A.e kaiao:ke Sundays 9 p m wnh DJ Dave;
i',.e rniusic' in iIme TIki Bar 6-10 p m nightly
and 1 -5 p m weekends and reggae with Pil,
Piii 6. -11 pr m Wednesdays live music in the
I.:urnie by TIhe Macy's Friday and Saturday
.6-1,: p rn srha, dancing Sunday 4-7 pm .
_nd Irr.s a Thursdays at 7 30 p m with DJ
D_ ie, lrv muli: inB Breakers Lounge from 9
p rn -1 a n nightly, Call 277-1652. Visit
wf'w .'lderizsea-ide ,com Join Sliders on
F :i.:,ebi:",k and Twitter
Tr cSurf
The Sud R-:l.aurant and Bar. 3199 Scouth
Fl.ir:h.r '.Ae Larry & The Backlracks
t.l-nr'Jhl cGary Keniston Aug 11- Richard
Siarinn 1 -5 p m and DJ PRoc 6-10 p m Aug
12, Slevie Fingerz' Aug 13. Andy Haney
Aug 14, .DJ Roc Aug 15; and Ernie & Debi
Evans Auc 16 Enerlainment is 5-9 p m
Mornday-Triursday 6-10 pm Friday and
Saiurda' and 1-5 pm and 6-10 pm
Sunday Call 261-5711


day tycoon is visited by a
messenger from God and
soon undergoes a series of
trials and tribulations testing
his faith.
Performances are at 8
p.m. today and Aug. 11 and
Aug. 16-18 and.2 p.m. Aug.
12. Tickets are $20 adults and
$10 students. Call or.stop by
the Box Office at Amelia
Community Theatre, 207
Cedar St., 261-6749,
Thursday-Saturday, 1.1 a.m.-1
p.m. (or 90 minutes before'
curtain). Tickets may also be
purchased online at
www.ameliacommunitythe-
atre.org.

MUSEUMS

Join the Amelia Island
Museum of History
Thursday at 5:30 p.m. to
tour four of the town's his-
toric pubs and bars. One


ticket will get you 6ne drink at
each establishment and an
earful of colorful tales. Tickets
are $25 per person (must be
21, must show ID); tour
begins at the historic train
depot in downtown
Fernandina Beach.
Reservations required.
Contact Thea at 261-7378,
ext.105 or Thea@ameliamu-
seum.org.

Guests on the ghost tour
will learn Amelia Island
ghost stories as they tiptoe
through dark streets and
walk in the footsteps of a
bygone era. The tour begins
at 6 p.m. every Friday. Meet
your guide in the cemetery
behind St. Peter's Episcopal
Church, 801 AtlanticAve.
Tickets are $10/adults and
$5/students. Contact Thea at
261-7378, ext. 105 or
Thea@ameliamuseum.org.


Cultural corridor plan seeks review


The Gullah Geechee
Cultural Heritage Corridor
Commission's Management
Plan is available for public
review and comment through
Aug. 17. Management Plan
copies can be viewed electron-
ically at libraries throughout
the corridor.
The long-awaited docu-
ment is 272 pages, with a CD
of appendices. It provides a
description of Gullah Geechee
people and culture and a brief
historical overview.
In addition, it highlights
examples of important cultur-
al resources throughout the
corridor, summarizes the
natural resources of the
corridor, discusses land own-
ership and land cover and
briefly touches on the socioe-
conomic conditions within the
corridor.
The plan also provides
readers with a basic level of
information about the corri-
dor to facilitate a better under-


standing of the future imple-
mentation that is outlined in
the management approach.
The commission's implemen-
tation theme is I 11,,i l. 1 and
Empower Gullah Geechee
People to Sustain the
Culture."
"This very significant doc-
ument was produced as a col-
lective effort by the Gullah
Geechee Cultural Heritage
Commission and National
Park Service (NPS) partner-
ship since 2007, with develop-
mental assistance from
Denver Service Center," said
Ronald Daise, commission
chairman.
"We commissioners are
very proud of the Manage-
ment Plan's development and
are confident it II intrigue
the public, stakeholders,
prospective partners and
Gullah Geechee community
and grassroots organizations.
It is based ..i..i...l on
feedback provided by each


group. The commission is par-
ticularly interested in feed-
back from youths high
schoolers and Generation
Y'ers to ensure that the
Management Plan's informa-
tion targets their needs and
views. After all, the plans
voiced in this document very
soon will sustain their culture
and that of their descen-
dants."
Written comments may be
submitted by:
1) Visiting the NPS PEPC
(Planning, Environment and
Public Comment) website at
http://parkplanning.nps.gov/
guge.
2) Or mailing to Gullah
Geechee Cultural Heritage
Corridor Commission, c/o
Commission Chairman, 1214
Middle St., Sullivan's Island,
SC 29482.
Information on the Gullah
Geechee Cultural Heritage
Corridor is available at www.
gullahgeecheecorridlororrg.


OUT AND ABOUT


Free Children's Art
Classes are Aug. 25 for
ages 6-9 and 10-13. Sign up at
the gallery or by calling 261-
7020.
The next Nouveau Art
exhibition will have the theme
"Fantastic Florida."
Submissions will be accepted
from 9 a.m.-noon Oct 1. Each
show lasts for two months
and is open to all artists and
all mediums. IAA member-
ship is not required. For
details visit
www.islandart.org.
For a complete list of
events call 261-7020.


MUSIC NOTES


ART WORKS


Sketching classes
Sketch outdoors down-
town with William Maurer
every Thursday at 9 a.m.
Meet at the Amelia Island
Coffee Shop. Watercolor
painting classes with Maurer
are every Friday from 10
a.m.-12:30 p.m. at St. Peter's
Episcopal Church. Call Bill at
261-8276 for information.
Beginner's welcome.
Kool-Coolshow
Plantation Artists Guild
and Gallery, 94 Amelia Village
Circle in The Spa and Shops
at Omni Amelia Island
Plantation, will host a "Kool-
Cool" show through Nov. 3.
Guest artist is Marilyn
Antram of Jacksonville, who
works in acrylics, layering
colors and painting rapidly.
An opening reception will be
held Aug. 17 from 5:30-8 p.m.,
sponsored by Osprey Village.
Wine and light snacks will be
served. Antram will give a
painting demonstration on
Aug. 22 from 7-8 p.m. All are
welcome. The gallery is open
Wednesday-Saturday from 11
a.m.-4 p.m. Call 432-1750.
Please RSVP for the gallery
reception Aug. 17 by calling
277.8222 or mailing
Concierge@Osprey-
Village.com by Aug. 13.

Logo contest
The Northeast Florida
Fair invites the community to
design a new logo for the fair
to be used on publications,
ribbons, marketing and other
locations. It should be origi-
nal artwork and reflect the
different attractions the fair
offers. The winning designer
Will receive $100 and a family
four-pack of passes to this
year's fair Oct. 18-28.
Entries should be on 81/2
by 11 paper and postmarked
before Aug. 10 to: Northeast
Florida Fair Logo Contest,
PO. Box 1070, Callahan, FL
32011. Include your name,
address and phone number
on the entry. For information
call (904) 879-4682, visit the
fair Facebook page or email
info@neflfair.org.
ArtWorkshop
Amelia Island Artists
Workshop opens its fall sea-
son with watercolorist Pat
Weaver in a three-day work-
shop that will cover mixing
color using limited palettes
and include Alla Prina paint-
ing, an uncomplicated
approach to composition and
design.
Weaver has taught
throughout the U.S., Italy,
France, Mexico and the
Caribbean. The class is Sept.
14-16 and costs $325, with a
$25 early-bird discount before
Aug. 13. Contact Sandra
Baker-Hinton at 491-8040 dur-
ing business hours or at 557-
1195, or Mikolean Longacre
at 415-3900.
Island Art events
The Island Art Associa-
tion, a cooperative, nonprofit
developed to sustain interest
and enjoyment in and of the
visual arts, is located at 18 N.
Second St. Events include:
Nouveau Art juried exhi-
bition "World of Books" -
through September, Jane
Carrington, Best of Show win-
ner.
First Coast Community
Bank Satellite Gallery, fea-
tured artists: Bonnie
Cameron, Steve Leimberg,
Susan Henderson and Andrea
Mateer.
Learn how to sculpt ani-
mals and people in a work-
shop with sculptor Charles
"Chuck" Oldham on Aug. 18
from 10 a.m.-noon. Cost is $95
and includes modeling clay,
tools and workshop materials
that you take home with you.
Contact Oldham at whatisas-
culpture@gmail.com.
Oldham (voted one of
eight "Titans of Bronze" by
Arizona Art Life'Magazine, 12
years head wildlife sculptor
and sculptor of presidential
and head-of-state gifts) will
help each student create
something that will be sure to
surpass their expectations -
especially novices. Each stu-
dent can expect to complete a
proportional animal or figure
model to take home.


PRESENTED BY





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FRIDAY.'ALGUST 10,2012/News-Leader


RELIGION


Talking to strangers


keeping the focus on God


"Who were you just talking to?"
His sharp voice startled me. In my
gut, I knew I should keep walking.
Ignoring him wasn't easy. "Hey," he
demanded again. "I'm talking to
you." Still, something didn't seem
right. If it hadn't been for the badge
he was waiving, I wouldn't have
thought twice about stopping.
At that time, Nairobi, Kenya, was
one of the most dangerous cities in
the world. Its nickname,
"Nairobbery," was well earned. I
was alone and, well, a little ignorant.
With thousands of people clogging
its streets, one obnoxious man didn't
seem that big a threat. On the other
hand, one obnoxious man waiving a
badge did have me wondering.
"Who was that you were talking
to?" he demanded again. Finally, I
replied. "Someone I bought a sand-


which for." My
short, crisp answer
surprised him.
Quickly he recov-
cred and pressed
for more informna-
tion. "How do you
know him? Come
over here so I can
talk to you," he per-
PULPIT sisted. For a
NOTES moment, I almost
caved in. If it hadn't
been for the little
Pastor guy in my gut
Rob Goyeute jumping up and
down and saying,
"Get out of here," there's no telling
how things would have turned.
With my hotel now within sight, I
decided to keep walking. The armed
security guard at the hotel's door


somehow seemed the answer to all
my problems. As the stranger per-
sisted, waiving his badge in my face,
I too persisted toward what I knew
to be a legitimate and trustworthy ,
authority.
Ultimately, my persistence paid
off. he closer I got to the hotel and
the security officer standing at its
door, the less confident the man fol-
lowing me became. In time, his so-
called authority collapsed. His cha-
rade was over. For me, watching
him turn back into the swarm of
people was a huge relief. The little
guy leaping in my gut.thought so
too.
I later learned the technique was
a common one. A counterfeit badge,
a bold approach, an attempt to get
you to pull aside for questioning; all
of it a plot to rip you off. It reminds


me of how the devil seeks to steal
from us.
Masquerading as a real authority,
his questioning always have an
agenda attached. Anytime we
follow his demands, the trap is set.
Pull aside, and he has you. The
remedy; just like I did that day, put
your eye on what you know to be
true and keep walking. If the voices
that are talking to you are legitimate,
they'll have no problem following
you toward othbr legitimate authori-
ty. If they're not, eventually they'll
flee.
Scripturally speaking it goes like
this: "Submit yourselves therefore to
God. Resist the devil, and he will flee
from you." (James 4:7) I find a direct
connection between these two ideas.
Like me focusing on the hotel's
armed security guard that (lay,


Focusing on God is always the right
thing to do. The closer we get to
Him, the clearer the wiles of the
devil become. Actually, submniting
to God is what empowers us to 'resist
the devil and all his evil deeds.
Though it's been some time since
I've been back to Nairobi, being
accosted by lying voices continues.
Thankfully, that day I learned a valu-
able lesson. Submit to what you
know to be true and keep walking
toward it. In time, what is true will
remain. What is not will flee.
"Beloved, believe not every
spirit, but try the spirits whether
they are of God: because many false
prophets are gone out into the
world." (1 John 4:1)
Robert L. Goyette is pastor of
Living Waters World Outreach Center
I ,1, .. I ,' ," ,r .- ., -I ,..! . h 1


Budget workshop
Impact Your World Church will host a
"How To Budget" workshop open to all
ages from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 11 at
Country Inn and Suites, 462577 State Road
200 in Yulee (behind Burger King).
Come early to secure your seat. Space
is limited. A love offering will be taken,
with proceeds going to Impact Your World
Church Youth Outreach and Scholarship
Fund. Kalvin R. Thompson is pastor of the
church, which meets Sundays for a 10 a.m.
Bible study and 11 a.m. for a family wor-
ship service. Call 261-9072 to RSVP for the
workshop.
New pastor
On June 10, the members of First
Presbyterian Church of Fernandina Beach
voted to extend a call to the Rev. Dr.
William Wain Wesberry to become their
new pastor. They look forward to welcom-
ing Wesberry and his family wife Sarah
and children Will and Aubrey June to
Amelia Island. His first sermon at First
Presbyterian, 9 N. Sixth St., will be on Aug.
12. Services are at 8:30 and 11 a.m. Call
261-3837 for more information.

Friends& Family
Friendship Baptist Church will cele-
brate Friends and Family Day at 5 p.m. on
Aug. 12. Guest speaker will be Willie O.
Tucker of Jacksonville. For questions call
Bernice Walker at 225-5627.

Fun day
A Community Fun Day will be held
Aug. 18 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on the
grounds of Solid Rock Church of God by
Faith, 86138 Palm Tree Drive in Yulee.
Enjoy face painting, games, free food,
music, live entertainment, bouncy house,
balloon sculptures, first responders and
much more. For information call 225-5388.

Chorale concert
Historic Macedonia African Methodist
Episcopal Church presents The H. Alvin
Green Memorial Alumni Chorale in con-
cert on Aug. 18 at 4 p.m. at 202 S. Ninth St.
Enjoy an evening of praise and worship in
music. Donation is $15.

Free dinner
Springhill Baptist Church will serve
meals for individuals and families in need
in the area on Thursday, Aug. 23 from 5-


6:30 p.m. at the church, 941017 Old
Nassauville Road. Meals are served on the
fourth Thursday of each month. The
church also delivers meals to those who
cannot come. For information call 261-
4741.
Jewish services
The Jewish Community of Amelia
Island/Nassau will gather to observe Rosh
Hashanah on Monday, Sept. 17 and Yom
Kippur on Wednesday, Sept. 26.
Rabbi Robert Goodman will conduct
services at the Ocean Clubhouse at the
Omni Amelia Island Plantation. The group
will gather pit 9:30 a.m. both days, with
services at 10 a.m. sharp. A luncheon buf-
fet will follow the Rosh Hashanah service,
and a "break-fast" potluck will be held on
Yom Kippur. If you are willing to host the
"break-fast," call Debbie Price at 310-6060.
The cost to attend services, as well as
the optional luncheon, will be announced
next month, with reservations and pay-
ment due by Sept. 14.

Supplies needed
The Fernandina Beach Interfaith
Dinner Network is in need of donations of
paper goods and cleaning supplies. Items
may be dropped off at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church parish office, 801 Atlantic Ave.,
Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m.-4
p.m. '
Faithlink Encounters
Faithlink Encounters, A Biblical View of
Current Events, are weekly open discus-
sions about what is taking place in our
community, state, nation and world.
Groups meet at 6:15 p.m. at two different.
locations, The Partin Center (601 Centre
St., white house next to the church) and
O'Kanes Pub (Centre Street ask for
Memorial's group). For more information
contact Pastor Hollie at hollie@mumcon-
line.com. All are welcome.

Unity services
The Rev. Betty Sikking of the Unity
Spiritual Enrichment Center of
Jacksonville will hold a class/service at the
Board of Realtors building, 910 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach, at 7 p.m. the last
Wednesday of each month through
September, to help establish a Unity
Church locally. For information call
Chris Dillon at 310-6502 or Marcia Brown
at 415-0822.


Community Bible Study enrolling


Would you like to grow in the
knowledge and relationship with
the living God through individ-
ual study? Small group discus-
sions? Listening to the teaching
director, a trained lay leader who
seeks-to clarify the weekly Bible
passage?
Would you like to experience
fellowship/develop new friend-
ships on a weekly basis and dur-
ing scheduled functions?
Well, look no further -
Community Bible Study provides
a 30-week interdenominational
Bible study for women, men,
teens and children.
CBS welcomes those who are
seeking God for the first time and
welcomes'those who are seek-
ing to know Him more.
For information, contact the
appropriate class coordinator:


Kick-offdinner
The Amelia Island Wo.:r-.n S- E..-reniing Comrm un iin lbli- Study
Invites you 10 its Kick-(OH Dinnrit a 6 p Iin M.-.ndA,. Aug 2' at
Amelia Baptist Church 9a6167 Bu,:carnee Tiail Sign-ups v ill
be laken for the in-depth study :f the Wisdom ofl olomorn and
the Gospel of Mark beqinninr Sectr 10 S RS'/ tro Claudene
Drummond ai 32-0293


Ladies Day Class (newborn-
teen core groups) Wednesdays
from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Amelia
Baptist Church, starting Sept. 12.
Call Kathleen Minor, 225-8125.
Ladies Evening Class. Mon-
days from 7-8:30 p.m. at Amelia
Baptist Church, starting Sept. 10.
Call Claudette Drummond, 32.1-
0293.
Men's Evening Class. Mon-
days from 7-8:30 p.m. at Amelia
Baptist Church, starting Sept. 10.


Call Tony Taylor, 321-0785.
The ladies and men's classes
will study Proverbs, Ecclesiastes
and Song of Solomonand in
January in the book of Mark.
Eteen (middle school CBS
Class) and teen CBS, grades 6-12,
are Monday evenings at First
Baptist Church of Fernandina
Beach, starting Sept. 17. These
classes will study 1 and 2 Samuel.
Please call Bobbie Burch after
today, 415-0365.


SpecialMass forHaitan Catholics
The Haitian Catholic commu- Haitian community, mates there are about a quarter
nity in Jacksonville will celebrate "I find the people in the South million Haitians living in Florida.
their eighth anniversary with a have a good sense of humor and Wenski has also been instru-
special Mass concelebrated by they are easier to approach," mental in helping the U.S. church
Bishop Felipe Est6vez of St. Lemaine said of his experience respond to the 2010 Haiti earth-
Augustine and Archbishop in Jacksonville thus far. He quake that damaged about 20 per-
Thomas Wenski of Miami on expects to be in Florida at least cent of the country, caused more
Wednesday. The Mass begins at five years, than 300,000 deaths and left at
7 p.m. at Prince of Peace Catholic The local Haitian Catholic least 1 million people homeless.
Church, 6320 Bennett Road, community is especially excited In June, he and other mem-
SIn January, Est6vez appoint- about this year's anniversary bers of the United States
ed Father Calonge Lemaine to Mass because Wenski will be join- Conference of Catholic Bishops
serve as the chaplain of the ing them in their festivities. met in Washington, D.C. for the
Haitian Catholic Ministry for the Wenski, fluent in Creole, has long One Table, Many Partners
Diocese of St. Augustine. His been deeply involved in Haitian National Solidarity Conference.
presence, and the addition of a ministry and affairs. The conference brought together
weekly Sunday Mass at 5 p.m. at "The commtinity probably felt hundreds of people from the U.S.,
Prince of Peace Parish, has ener- a little incomplete, even aban- Haiti and other countries for a
gized Haitian Catholics as min- doned, without a Haitian-born program on the church's mission
istry leaders continue to reach priest among them in North in Haiti. The U.S. bishops,
out to invite more Haitians in-the Florida," said Wenski. "The best Catholic Relief Services and the
community to attend the weekly way to make someone feel at Haitian bishops' conference are
Mass and various events, home in your house is to receive administering $33 million donat-
Born in a town 60 miles south them in their mother tongue." He ed by U.S. Catholics to help
of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Lemaine added, "The Jacksonville area rebuild the church in Haiti.
arrived in Jacksonville in January now joins most other regions of For additional information
following nearly a decade of the state with at least one or more about the Haitian Catholic com-
parish work in Brooklyn, N.Y., Haitian clergy serving various munity, call Jonel Laguerre at
where he served as an associate communities. This is a sign of (904) _'- -i'.-.' or email
pastor and chaplain to the local their having arrived." Wenski esti- jonel.laguerre@cchjax.com.


Sunday School ............................. 9:30 am
Sunday Worship...........................10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA. ...................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study ................6:30 pm
Pastor:Bud Long
941017 Old Nassauville Road County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org



GRACE

A Congregation of the Presbyterlan Church In
America Devoted to Christ, to the Fellowship &
to the Great Commission
Worship on Sundays at 10:45 am
Nursery and Children's Church provided
Grace Groups meet on Wednesday evenings
in Fernandina Beach, Kingsland &Yulee.
Men's. Women's and Youth Ministries
85439 Minmr Rd., Yulee
(Yulee Middle School)
www.gracenassau.com
904.491.0363



Memorial
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

TraditionalFamilyWorship.......8:30am& 11am
ContemporaryWorship ...9545am in Maxwell Hall
Sunday Schoolforallages. .....9:45am&I11am
Wednesday Oinner(Aug-May)... .5:15pm-630pm

Downton Ferandin Beac


In the heart of Fernandina
9 N. 6" Street
Dr. Wayne Wesberry
Senior Pastor
Dr. Doug Ganyo
Associate Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 1 lam
Sunday School 9:50am
Nursery
Children
Youth Adults
261-3837 .
www.lirsl-presbylerian-church-32034.org


"Discover thie Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worslup Service 10:30am
Bible Study 9amn
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studics-Adults 6pm
Wednesday Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of BucTneer r & Gertbng Road, FPrnand--in BO
For More Information Call: 261-9527


S__._ AMELA
PLAyNTATION
'" -"- CHAPEL
Ted Schroder, Pastor
Sunday Worship: 9:15 & 11:15 am
All are Welome
36 Bowman Road, 277-4414
OffAlA at entrance to Omni Resort
Amelia Island Plantation
www.ameliachapel.com
facebrar.conlarielia.jvlantation.chaLpe


Rev. Jose Kallukalam"

Saturday Vigil Mass 4 pm & 5:30 pm
Saturday 4 pm Mass at Yulee United Methodist Church
Sunday Masses 8am- 10am 12 noon
Daily Mass- 8:30am Mon., Wed., Thurs & Fr.
6 pm Tuesday
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6:00 pm; Holy Day 8:30 am
Confessions. Saturday 3.00pm 3:45 pm or by appt
Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number 904-277-6556



Living Waters
world-ontreachi ,
Contemporary Worship
SAT .. .5:00 pm
SUN ..9:30am
i WED ..7:00pm
Youth, Nursery
& Children' Ministries
Rb & Chrli,90 oy1 eti
....,P....u 321-Z 1 17
On A1A 1 mile west olAmelia Island
www.IlvingWatersOutreach.org
Ioin us LIVE on the Web Sunday


New Vision
Congregational
Chun rch. UCC
\\irship Sunday
dr I('l ll1 In
**'-.r71 II hF h Rol .' ir. 1 l- 't
.1 i i .r-n .. itll l n.i '..l r ', -,rl,


CELEBRATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
Innovative S./yl, Contemporary Music,
CasualAtmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd. Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 9:00am and 10:30am
Nursery Provided
KidKredible Children Ministries
Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth Program Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting wtit Chest..
Connwectg fh Peop/l



J YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH

P/ease/oin us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9.30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM

A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 Pastor Charlie Sward


FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
The Church
in the Heart of the City
With the Desire to be in the
Heart of All People
Sunday New Members Class 9 a.m.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:30 am. e.ry Sunday
Wednesday Noon-day Prayer
Wednesday y Mlid-week Service 7-9 p.m.Minitniers:
Bus & Van, (Coples, Singles, Youth




f ini
-r thebridge
family worsip enter
Sunday Service . .10:30 am
Bible Study ...... 9:30 am
Wednesday Service... 7:00 pm
www.thebridgeflordia.cam
85031 Landover Drive
Yulee, Fl
904.225.4860


Y EULEE

"f Vlrffo~AaysiaoicHolo
Sunday School 9 30 am
Morning Worship,8:15 am and 11 00 am
Sunday Evening 6 00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6 15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6.30 pm
Classes For All Age
Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All
Servicewww.Yuleebapbstchu ch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-612B
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
Dr. Bill Yeldell. Interim Pastor
Sadly anool) ....... . ..:4a
worsitp Srmnl .... ............ ... 11:00
l..stng Wors ..... ............. :O00p.
Wednelday r Il-bhlp Suppr ........... .:Obpm
Bcountar Youth Qrop ......... 6.:Opm-a:OOpm
W sdi.day Pry.,r I9 ...... ....... .7;00p.
736 Bonnieview Road
904-261-4615
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptlstchurch.org
Find us on Facebook:
8 Points Baptist Encounter Youth


First Baptist
Church
Fernandina Beach
SUNDAY WORSHIP
9:00 Life Groups
10:15 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 6:30 PM
904-261-3617
FBFirst.com


BLACKROCK BAPT1IST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Sunday Morning Worship Service -10 30 am
Sunday School 9'15 am
Sunday Evening Worship Service 600 pm
AWANA Sunday 5"00 7"00 pm
Wednesday Service 7"00 pm
Nursery Provided
wwwblactLockbaplist.com


St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes You!
Located at the corner
of 8th &Atlantic
-U
8:30 a.m. Service .
10:00 p.m. Service
6 p.m. Celtic \orshislp 4th Sunday
6 p.m. TAIZE 2nd Sunday |
904-261-4293
www.stpetersparish.og



Advertise Your

church Here!

T' s'J. itn : ek ..








C,-minmm nir' Baf ti,[
Church
85326 Winona Bayview Road
Yulee, FL
904-225-0809
Bro. Hartford Peeples, Paslor
Sunday School ....... 9:45 am
Morning Worship ..... 11:00 am
Evening Worship ...... 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer .....6:00 pm
Bible Study-Thursdays... 10:00 am
"Serving the Lord With Gladness"


tLa Tierra Prometida
!The P'romis, Iandm)
TCispanic NMinistry
Sunday-11:00 am English
7:00 pm Spanish
Wednesday-7:00 pm Spanish
& English
416 Alachua Street
(904) 349-2595
www.Th ePromiseLandChurch.us


RELIGION NOTES


SWorship

this week


Sat the place


of your choice


_ ~ __ II~ ~ ~CI _*C_








FRIDAY.t. At'GUT 10. 2012 News-Leader


AROUND SCHOOL


Parents urged to enroll children in VPK


Tallahassee 'lhe 2012-13
school year is under way and
the Department of Education is
encouraging parents to enroll
their lour-year-old children in
the state's Voluntary Pre-
kindergarten (VPK) Education
Program.
Florida's VPK program is a
free educational program cre-
ated to.prepare every four-year-
old in Florida for kindergarten
and build a strong foundation
for educational success. In
2011-12, Florida VPK Education
programs served 81 percent of
children across the state, and
the program continues to grow
each school year.


are for" years old by Sept. 1 of
the program year. Florida's
VPK program is provided in
two formats the 540-hour
program, which is available dur-
ing the school year (usually
August through May), and the
300-hour program, which is
available during the sum-
mer. Florida VPK is offered
through public and private
providers.
In Florida, each county (or
area of counties) has an Early
Learning Coalition that serves
as a resource to help families
locate early care and education
programs that meet their
needs. Parents may find more


information about VPK
providers through their local
Early Learning. Coalition
(www.floridaearlylearning.com
/Early learning/( )OEL__Coalitio
is_CoalitionsI)irector y.htiml).
Resources
FI)()E Early Learning
Parent Resources: www.fldoe.
org/earlylearnling/vpktpar-
ent.asp
Florida Early Iearning and
Developmental Standards for
Four-Year-Olds: www.fldoe.
org/earlylearning/perbform.asp
VPK Parent Website:
www.floridaearlylearning.com/
EarlyLearning/O E,_Parents_
ProgramsServices_VPK.html


Band yard sale
The Fernandina Beach
High School Mighty March-
ing Pirates Band Yard Sale
Fundraiser will be held on,
Aug. 18 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. in
the school cafeteria.
Suicide prevention
If you are interested in
the prevention and elimina-
tion of underage drinking
and other drug use within
Nassau County. NACDAC
meets the third Tuesday of
the month, and this month's
meeting will be held Aug. 21
at 4 p.m. in the community
room above Scott & Sons
Fine Jewelry, 9900 Amelia
Island Pkwy.
Diana Rosito of Daniel
and the Florida Youth Sui-
cide Prevention Project will
discuss the important topic
of suicide prevention and the
available resources and serv-
ices. Rosito will be joined by
the Fernandina Beach High
School suicide prevention
students who will promote
their campaign "1, One is
Too Many." Visit www.nac-
dac.org or call Susan Wood-
ford at 261-5714, ext. 2616.
4-H open house
Interested in learning
more about the Nassau
County 4-H program? Mark
your calendar for open house
on Aug. 21 from 3:30-6 p.m.
at the Nassau County Exten-
sion Service in Callahan'(on
the Northeast Florida
Fairgrounds). Club leaders
will have table-tops advertis-,
ing upcoming opportunities
for children and parents can
enroll them and select proj-
ect books. For information
call (904) 879-1019.
SAC meeting
The School Advisory
Council of Fernandina Beach
High School will hold an
organizational meeting for
the 2012-13 school year at
3:30 p.m. Aug. 23 in the main
office conference room. For.
any questions and/or con-
cerns, contact Spencer G.
Lodree at 261-5713.
Open house
Fernandina Beach Middle
School will hold an open
house for families on Aug. 27
at 7 p.m. in the auditorium.
Children's chorus
The East Nassau County
Children's Chorus, organ-
ized in May under the direc-
tion of Nanette S. Autry, wel-
comes students in kinder-
garten through fifth grades.
Registration has begun for
students interested in joining
the chorus for the fall 2012
semester. Email nononan
45@hotmail.com or call (904)
310-5403 for information.
Continuing ed
The Florida School for
the Deaf and the Blind is
accepting eligible Florida stu-
dents ages 18-22 who are
deaf, hard of hearing, blind
or visually impaired to enroll
in its Continuing Education
program, a free three-year
program for students who
have been awarded a Special
Diploma in Florida's school
districts and are looking to
expand and enhance their
academic and vocation skills.
Contact Mary Lou
Hofmann-Sitten, FSDB prin-
cipal, Blind Department and
Continuing Education and
Transition Department, at
(904) 827-2700 or hofman-
nm@fsdb.kl2.fl.us.
YMCAVPK
The McArthur YMCA is
enrolling VPK students at
the Atlantic Kids Campus in
Fernandina. Extended after-
school care available. Space


"Building a solid foundation
for learning is the key to suc-
cess for Florida's students,"
said Commissioner of Educa-
tion Gerard Robinson. "Our
state's VPK program helps chil-
dren develop essential skills so
that they can perform better


CLASS NOTES

islmte.Cl 58- 1608 fo


is limited. Call. 583-1608 for
details on this free program.

YMCA
Pryme Time
YMCA before and after
school care is now enrolling
countywide for ages 5-12. It
also now offers middle
school programs at the
Atlantic and Yulee Kids cam-
puses. Call 261-1080 for
details.
Jack and Jill
Jack and Jill Preschool is
enrolling for 2012-13 school
year for two-year-olds, K3
and K4 classes. The first day
of school will be Aug. 20.
The curriculum challenges
children and promotes the
love of God and the love of
learning. J&J has two teach-
ers per classroom. Call 261-
0881 to schedule a visit.
Co-op preschool
Amelia Island Parent Co-
Operative Preschool, 5040
First Coast Hwy. (next to the
Dome Healing Center), is
registering students for the
2012-13 school year. AIPCP
offers a quality education for
two- and three-year-olds. The
two-year-old class is Tues-
days and Thursdays from
9:15 a.m.-12:15'p.m. The
three-year-old class is on
Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday from 9:15 a.m.-12:15
p.m. Visit www.aipcp.org or
call 261-1161.
Upward sports
First Baptist Church is
offering Upward Basketball
& Cheerleading in the
Family Life Center on South
Eighth Street for children in
kindergarten-sixth grade.
Register at FBFirst.com.
Early registration has -
begun. Sign up online or stop
by the church at 1600 S.
Eighth St. during regular
business hours to receive a
brochure and form.
Ogburn School
The Ogburn School, a
SACS-CASI private school on
Amelia Island, is accepting
applications for ndw students
in grades 8-12 for the 2012-13
school year. Students meet
two to five days per week in
settings of 8-12 with individu-
ated curriculum and person-
alized instruction. Hybrid
programs offer a combina-
tion of attendance and online.
Attendance programs are
offered for grades 8-12;
online programs are avail-
able for grades 6-12. McKay
Scholarships accepted.
Call 491-6233, email
info@ogburn.org or visit
www.ogburn.org.

Classical
Conversations
Homeschool program
Classical Conversations is
enrolling Nassau County stu-
dents in K4-6th grade for the
2012-13 school year. It aims
to lead the home-centered
education movement by
equipping parents and stu-
dents with the classical tools
of learning needed to discov-
er the order and beauty of
God's creation. Go to
www.classicalconversations.c
om and contact Tabitha
Mudd at 556-6757 or
tabithamudd@yahoo.com.
Lamb day care
Lamb Christian Day Care
is enrolling ages six weeks to
four years old. It is an
accredited program by
APPLE and in partnership
with the United Way Success
by 6 Program. The day care
is located in the educational
building of Memorial United
Methodist Church, 601
Centre St. Call 261-5301.


and be successful in kinder-
garten and later in life. I encour-
age Florida's families to take
this opportunity to enrich their
child's education by starting
early with VPK."
The VPK program is avail-
able at no cost to children who


SUBMITTED
Ed Krass,-Boys State chairman, left, and Legionnaire Woodrow "Woody" Scruggs,
right, with 2012 Florida Boys State program participants Joshua Smith, Tanner
Reeves, Seth Harbin and Benjamin Venerdi.


Students attend Boys State'


The American Legion Boys
State program is held each
year on the Florida State
University campus in
Tallahassee.
A unique program, it is
designed to mirror the opera-
tion and structure of Florida's
state government.
This year the American
Legion Post 54 of Fernandina
Beach selected once again four
outstanding students to attend
the session, held July 8-14.
The competition for these


four spots was spirited, and
the final decision was a difficult
one to make.
In the actual selection
process, merit and ability are
the two most important fac-
tors considered. Enrollment
fees or "tuition" is paid for by
the American Legion, with no
expense to the student or their
family.
The Sons of the American
Legion, Squadron 54, donated
"pocket money" for each of the
four students attending Boys


State.
Seth Harbin, Tanner
Reeves and Benjamin Vernerdi
from Fernandina Beach High
School, along with Joshua
Smith from Yulee High.School,
were selected to attend this
year.
While there, all four
entered election races for city,
county and state level posi-
tions. They also met the mayor
of Tallahassee and Gov. Rick
Scott addressed the boys via a
video message.


Southside unbelievable fundraiser


Students, teachers and vol-
unteers at Southside '
Elementary School came
together during the 2011-12
school year to raise $1,100 in
the Pennies for Patients
fundraising program.
The program, a School and
Youth Program fundraising
effort for the Leukemia and
Lymphoma Society (LLS),
raised more than $660,000 in
the Northern and Central
Florida Chapter during the
2011-12 school year. Funds
raised support blood cancer
research and patient services.
"It's almost unbelievable to
me that one school can raise so
much money to help find a
cure for blood cancers," said


Kelley Lesperance, executive
director of the Northern and
Central Florida Chapter of the
Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society. "We're honored that
Southside Elementary School
put forth so much effort to be
the winning school in Nassau
County this year,.and we're
proud to partner with the
,school.to make such an impact
on research and patient serv-
ices."'
Nationally, more than
27,000 schools engaged in
service, leadership and team-
work on behalf of the
Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society to raise money to
help save lives. 1Through
these programs, students


connected with the LLS mis-
sion, collected spare change,
and learned they could make
a real difference in the lives
of others. Across the nation,
the LLS School & Youth .
Programs raised more than
$26 million.
Pennies for Patients is a
coin collection and classroom
competition program that
encourages service learning,
team work, and philanthropy
while raising significant funds
for blood cancer research and
patient services.
For more information
about the program, or to learn
how your school can partici-
pate, visit www.schoolandy-
outh.org/ncfl.


GIRL & CUB SCOUTS


Girl Scouts of Nassau
County are recruiting for the
upcoming year and will hold
recruitments at the
Fernandina Beach Girl Scout
Hut, located at 11 South 13th
St., on Aug. 15 and 16 from 5-
7 p.m. They also will hold a
recruitment at Fernandina
Party and Play, 1852 Sadler
Road, on Aug. 18 from 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Girls that register
and their siblings will receive
half-price admission to the
entertainment venue during
the recruitment
Contact Toni Freeman for
further information at 583-
1541 or girlscoutsnassau @
aol.com.


If you like meeting new
friends, helping others,
learning new things, camp-
ing, hiking, archery, learning
about critters, how to care
for the environment while
learning citizenship and hav-
ing fun, then Cub Scouts is
for you. Many Cub Packs all
over the county are holding
roundups.
Boys who are entering
first grade to fifth grade or
are 6-10 years o'f age can join
Cub Scouts at various loca-
tions during the next few
weeks. Parents and youth
can all sign up to help as
well. If you cannot make


these dates, visit the council
website at
www.nfcscouting.org or con-
tact District Executive
Michael Moore at 1-800-232-
0845. Roundups will be held:
Pack 549 at Yulee
Elementary on Tuesday,
Aug. 21 at 7 p.m.
Pack 353 at Southside
Elementary in Fernandina
Beach on 'Thursday, Aug. 23
at 6:30 p.m.
Pack 351 at Callahan
Elementary on Thursday,
Aug. 23 at 7 p.m. in the cafe-
teria.
Pack 171 at Hilliard
Elementary on Thursday,
Sept. 6 at 7 p.m.


Boys & Girls Clubs enrolling

Miller Freedom Center and the new Fernan-
dina Beach Boys & Gi-ls Club are open for fall reg-
istration in after-school programs that start Aug.
13. Both clubs provide a safe, structured learning
and fun experience for ages 6-16. The daily cur-
riculum emphasizes academics, character clevel- -
opment, athletics, leadership and arts. Both clubs
have computer labs with learning software (level-
oped by Microsoft specifically for BGC America. ":Ill
For information on the Miller Freedom Club
on Old Nassauville Road, call Jamie Thompson
at 261-1075. For details on the new Roberts
Learning and Achievement Center on Lime Street
in Fernandina Beach, call Walter Cromartie at
491-9102.


'Our state's VPKprogram helps children
develop essential skills so that they can
perform better and be successful in
kindergarten and later in life.'
COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION GERARD ROBINSON


9161 to learn more.
Access Broadway premiered
in 1999 as the very first "All
inclusive" Broadway
Experience, Performing Arts
Event, featuring competition,
workshop and talent search in
dance, acting and voice.
Company founder, Broadway
veteran performer Ron DeVito,
developed the program while
performing on Broadway in
shows such as "Cats," "42nd
Street" and "Starlight Express."


_ C _ _ _ II ~ I~ _ ____ 1__~1~ ~


SCHOOL SUPPLY
DRIVES

GOJLD.S.
The Nassau County
Volunteer Center's Corporate
Volunteer Council (CVC)
through its 121h annual
G.O.K..D).S. (Giving Our Kids
Important Daily Supplies)
project is collecting school
supplies and donations for
local students who need them
the most.
The project runs through
Aug. 13, with distribution to
the schools on Aug. 16. Most
needed are pencils, pens,
pocket folders, wide-ruled
notebook paper or spiral note-
books, crayons, glue sticks,
clear or mesh backpacks (no
wheels), dry-erase markers,
and white or colbr copy paper.
Drop off donations at:
Omni Amelia Island
Plantation (Associate
Services), Century 21/John T
Ferreira Insurance, city of
Fernandina Beach (City Hall),
Nassau County Volunteer
Center, Amelia Dental Group,
First Coast Community Bank,
First Federal Bank of Florida,
Golf Club of Amelia Island,
VyStar Credit Union, CBC
National Bank, Callahan loca-
tions: Callahan Town Hall,
West side Journal, Nassau
County Record, Walgreen's
Drug Store, Callahan library,
Dollar General, Winn-Dixie,
as well as Hilliard and
Bryceville libraries, Hilliard
Town Hall, Hilliard Recrea- '
tional Center and Hilliard
Pharmacy. The drive is also
supported by Rayonier and
RockTenn.
For information call 261-
2771 or e-mail ncvcfb@aol.
con.
Stuff the Bus
The Salvation Army Hope
House is accepting applica-
tions to help income qualify-
ing families obtain school sup-
plies for their children
through its Stuff the Bus
School Supply Drive. If you,
your church, club or group
would like to help, needed are
backpacks, three-ring binders
and subject dividers. To apply
for assistance or to donate,
call 321-0435 or stop by 410 S.
Ninth St.




Call for


dancers,


singers

ST MARYS, Ga. Camden's
leading performance arts stu-
dios are collaborating to build a
performing arts competition
team to represent Coastal
Georgia in the prestigious
"Access Broadway" competi-
tion to be held in 2013 in
Orlando.
Lisa Allen's Danceworks,
The Friese Studio of Music and
Dina Barone's Vocal Studio
have teamed up to give area tal-
ent an opportunity to perform
in a regional arena that could
lead to national recognition.
The "Encore Performing
Arts Competition Team" will
represent Camden County, Ga,
with actors, singers, dancers
and some entries could be com-
binations of all three. According
to Barbara Ryan, director of the
St. Marys Little Theatre, this
is exactly the kind of program
that can place. Southeast
Georgia at the foreflront in the
area of arts education and per-
formance.
In order to be a member of
the Encore team, you must
audition and be enrolled this
fall semester in either music
and/or dance studio taking pri-
vate or group classes in dance,
music theater, acting and/or
singing. The competition is
open to all ages children and
adults.
'he team practice will be on
Saturday" throughout the
school year.
Parents and students should
plan to be at the auditions on
Aug. 18 for the entire 2 hours
(10 a.mr. to noon) at Lisa Alien
D)anceworks, 10880 Colerain
Road, St. Marys, Ga. Call Lisa
Allen Danceworks at (912) 673-





FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 2012 News-Le-ader


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a little of this...


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CLASSIFIED


NEWS-LEADER / FRIDAY. AUGUST 10.2012


To PLACE AN AD. CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.


100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Finanoal-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment&Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REALESTATE 813 InvestmentProperty 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money Tb Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 ''.rr.d toBuy orRent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 r.l,:it Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 BusinessOpportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 r It-,,. Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 1,r,.i,.j llar,.J m.:.in,. 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 6a,_re' 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 .; ,.:r,rr 851 Roommate Wanted '864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 C. :imm 852 Mobile Homes 865 WarehouseTAT
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 if i._r,,'l ,ub:.: 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 Automobiles
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Bodt Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 902 Trucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports EquipmentSales 810 F3rmn;, '.-rv. ;r', 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 C:-mrnT..-,, -:I31 856 .90rr, ,.v: iir,,r,, 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 AuCtions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 .: Cl...i Furrn,- r..J 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY IS LOCATED BELOW


102 Lost & Found
If You Have Lost Your Pet please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.


104 Personals
ADVERTISE YOUR WAY to Success!
Call now to grow your business. Get
your classified ad in 119 newspapers
with one order. Advertising networks of
Florida--(866)742-1373. ANF


105 Public Notice

ALL REAL ESTATE Advertised
Herein is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated 'against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
HUD 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.





201 Help Wanted

DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW -
Learn to drive for Stevens Transport.
Earn $700/wk. No experience needed.
Local CDL training. Job ready in 15
days! (888)368-1964. ANF


201 Help Wanted
NOW HIRING Full Time Plumber -
Must have experience in new
construction, residential/commercial,
remodels, and repipes. Must have a
valid CLEA driving record. Stop in and
apply, see one of our associates for
details. Dave Turner Plumbing, 474390
E. SR 200, FB. (904)277-3942

SERVICE TECHNICAL Experienced
in construction equipment repair (gas,
diesel, hydraulic) & small engine repair
in St Marys, Georgia. Own tools. Fax
resume (912)576-1903 or Email
trilaneadmin@ntds.net.
EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED
DRIVERS Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified
drivers. Home most weekends. Call
(843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com.
EOE. ANF
CERTIFIED PILATES INSTRUCTOR -
2 years teaching experience, at least 3
evenings, and 1 mat class per week
opportunity for 20+ private equipment
hours/week. Please email resume
(including 2 references).
chiro8888@yahoo.com
WANTED SHUTTLE DRIVERS AM &
PM shifts. Clean MVR-drug test. Must
be Island resident. (904)583-7500
ROOFING REPAIRMAN WANTED-
Local roofing company looking for a full
time, dependable roofing repairman.
Must be skilled in all areas of roofing,
including: shingles, metal, flat, com-
mercial and residential. Must have
dependable truck with valid drivers
license. Drug free workplace. Com-
pensation $15-$18 per hour plus fuel
reimbursement. Fax resume to (904)
379-3560.
STEVE JOHNSON AUTOMOTIVE
LOOKING FOR AN ASE CERTI-
FIED TECHNICIAN $30 per hour
commission. Apply in person at
Steve Johnson Automotive, 1505
South 14th Street or email:
stevejohnsonauto@aol.com

RESIDENCE INN Experienced
Housekeepers, Front Desk, & Breakfast
Host. No phone calls please.
Accepting applications at 2301 Sadler Rd.

ATTENTION: DRIVERS Drive 4 Us.
Top pay & CSA friendly equip. 401K &
great insurance. 2 mos CDL Class A
driving exp. (877)258-8782. ANF


201 Help Wanted
TRANSFER DRIVERS Need 20 con-
tract divers (over the road). CDL A or
B to relocate vehicles to & from various
locations thru-out U.S. (800)501-3783,
www.mamotransportation.com ANF
INSURANCE AGENCY Growing, fast
paced local insurance office needs FL
Licensed Customer Service or Agents
for Full and Part time opportunities in
PC and CL. Excellent growth opportun-
ities and team atmosphere Email
qualifications, experience, availability
and salary requirements in confidence
to insurancelob@oearthlink.net.
PT/FT MEDICAL INSURANCE Billing
Position for doctor's office. Must
have previous experience in doctor's
office. Fax resume to (904)261-0732.

DRIVERS Hiring experienced/inexp-
erienced tanker drivers. Great benefits
& pay. New fleet Volvo tractors. 1 year
OTR exp. req'd. Tanker training avail.
Call today (877)882-6537 ANF
RESIDENTIAL ASSISTANT Part-
Time Weekend Shift. Apply in person
at 941510 Old Nassauville Road, FB
32034. Phone (904)206-4120.

COUNTER CLERK Construction
equip. knowledge for front desk in St.
Marys. Answer phone, open rental
contracts, accept pymts, explain equip.
operation. Fax resume to (912)576-
1903 or email trlaneadmin@tds.net.

ELIZABETH POINTE LODGE Front
desk representative. Must work
weekends. Apply in person, 98 S.
Fletcher Ave.

STYLISTS NEEDED Cormler Hair
Studio. Booth rent. Expect to be busy.
Call Heidi (904)583-4722.
PT & FT RECEPTIONIST NEEDED -
for busy Yulee medical specialty
practice. Experience preferred. Please
fax resume to (912)673-6896.

BE A U.S. MERCHANT MARINER -
See the world, room & board, work on
ships, tugboats, crew & supply boats.
No previous exp req'd.
www.BeaMerchantMarine.com,
gwisdom2@col.com ANF

DRIVERS/FLATBED CLASS A Get
home weekends. Southeast Regional.
Earn up to 39i/mile. 1 year OTR
flatbed exp req'd. (800)572-5489
x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC. ANF


201 Help Wanted
DRIVERS Refrigerated & dry van
freight. Daily or weekly pay. $0.01
raise per mile after 6 mos. CDL-A, 3
mos current OTR exp. (800)414-9569,
www.drivcknight.com. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
'(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.

204 Work Wanted
OFFICE CLUTTER BUSTER! -
www.yourexpertsupport.com, for all
your clerical needs. Call Sylvie
(904)206-2551

SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN
Small jobs welcomed. (904)583-1465





301 Schools &
Instruction
MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -
Train online for Allied Health & Medical
Management. Job placement assist-
ance. Computer avail. Financial aid if
qualified. SCHEV certified. (888)203-
3179, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for
hands on Aviation Maintenance Career.
FAA approved program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing avail. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (866)314-
3769. ANF
MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE -
Get trained in months, not years.
Financial aid if qualified. Housing avail.
Job placement assistance. Call Centura
Institute (877)206-6559. ANF
MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEED-
ED Become a Medical Office Assistant
at SC Train. No experience needed.
Online training gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & 'PC/Internet needed.
(888)374-7294. ANF

306 Lessons/Classes
FREE TUITION TAX SCHOOL Earn
extra income after taking course.
Flexible schedules, convenient loca-
tions. Register now! Courses start
09/10/2012. Call 310-6273. Puberty"
Tax Service. Small fee for books. .


503 Pets/Supplies

HAPPY JACK DuraSpot Latest
technology in flea, tick, mosquito &
mite control on dogs. Patented. At
farm, feed & hardware stores.
Distributed by Fuller Supply (205)343-
3341. www.happyjackinc.com. ANF




601 Garage Sales
HERON ISLES 96115 Yellowtail Ct.
Clothes, Furniture, DVDs, dishes, etc.
Sat. 8/11, 8am-12pm.

BIG YARD SALE Sat. 8/11, 9am-
3pm. 85438 Dick King Rd., Yulee.
Something for everyone. Too much to
list. No reasonable offer refused.
Everything must go. Rain cancels.

MOVING SALE Loft bed, leather
couch, dresser, clothes, toys, etc.
2759 Ocean Oak Dr. N:, Fern. Bch.
Sat. 8/11 & Sun. 8/12, 8am-? Rain
may change date to the following
weekend.

YARD SALE 86495 Yulee Hills Rd.
Women's clothing & some children's
clothing, misc. household items. Sat.,
8am-2pm. Rain cancels.

GARAGE SALE Sat. 8/11, 8am-10am.
1501 Lake Park DI:, Amelia Park.
Antique outboard engines, racing bike,
sewing machine, misc. household items.

YARD SALE 1605 Highland St. Fri.
8/10 & Sat. 8/11, 9am-lpm. House-
wares, books, clothing, dehumidifier,
small TV, Christmas, Halloween items,
remote game chair, toys, misc. items.

BACK TO SCHOOL MULTIPLE UNITS
ESTATE SALES!! College furniture &
supplies, military art, antiques, jewelry,
NEW bath & beauty & cosmetics,
glass/crystal, motorcycle helmets...too
much to list! see craigslist for pictures!
AAAA Storage next to STAPLES 8TH ST
FERNANDINA! FRIDAY 8/10 1PM-5P,
SATURDAY 8/12 9AM-2PM.


601 Garage Sales
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE
Clothing, Guy Harvey t-shirts, fishing
items, books, 2005 Yamaha Victory
King Pin motorcycle, & misc. items.
Sat. 8/11, 8am-2pm. 882 Sanborn
Lane, off of Amelia Rd.

YARD SALE Sat. 8/11, 7:30am-
1:30pm. Plenty cI useful items, some
old & some new. 763(' l..-na I.raf Loop,
Timber Creek, Yulee. : ,, ':.545
HUGE MOVING SALE 86209
Hampton Bays Dr., North Hampton.
(904) 225-8554. Fri. 8/10, 3pm-? and
Sat. 8/11, 8am-7 EVERYTHING must
go. ALL furniture and household items.
Keeping nothing!!
FRI. & SAT. 96165 Marsh Lakes Dr.
Household goods, kitchen items, golf
clubs, lawn chairs, TV, futon, some
furniture. 8:30am-lpm.

GARAGE SALE AMELIA PARK, 1662
Field St. (corner Field & Gardenia):
Sat. 8/11, 8am to 1pm. Antiques,
accessories, vases, baskets, tools,
refrigerator, table, chairs, garden
implements, household items.
HUGE YARD SALE Everything must
'go. Exercise equipment, dining room
set, TV's, gas grill, washer/dryer, mudh
more. Fri. 8/10 & Sat. 8/11, 7am-lpm.
4973 Spanish Oaks Cir.
MOVING OUT OF STATE! 514 S.
14th St., comer of 14th & Fir. Sat 8/11,
8am-2pm. Rain date Sun 8/12.
Fumiture, lawn mower, hammock &
stand, camping gear, arts & craft
supplies, books, clothes and lots more.

602 Articles for Sale
FOR SALE 1996 Ford Boom Crane
Truck. Also, 2005 Polaris 700 Camo.
Call (904)219-5960.

603 Miscellaneous
MEET SINGLES right now! No paid
operators, just real people like you.
Browse greetings, exchange messages
& connect live. Try it free. Call now
(888)744-4426. ANF

609 Appliances
REFRIG 25CF Side by side, ice &
water in door $250, Dishwasher, 1 yr
old, $150, Glass top stove 30", $100,
Micro/Hood $50. Cash. (904)753-0730


1 Bedroom Special

Starting at 500/mo.

with $99 security deposit


City Apartmen t
with Coniorny
Charm!
Clo e in tchol.>'i. A
Inliiipting.
ll mimit hin
lacA ickniill


Eastwoo t aks
ApLillLInnlt


I .0, C.,ni .rtinn
* tIr7_e Cl. -.ce
* Prioal Parios
Ssparl ltng iForn
* frnni us.ris
T CIiL I lrn


"'.9Y (o. (.I irc T- Hlli-ard. Fl.
Ml.n.-Fri. 8.:301-5:311
sun. IunI. 1\Appl.


Due to the rapidly increasing market,
we now have:

New Sales Representative Position
Self-motivated, honest and dependable with sales
'experience, top pay, great work schedule, award-winning
team. (Recent applicants need not apply.)
Positions offer 401K, Health Insurance,
Great work schedule, pay, and work environment.


Friday Aiugust 24th' 11 a.m.
I A.,,,T.. I Ho l Id Om e '._lmi Ired na uol.lhl "
* Corporate Office with Beautiful Views
* 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath Newly Renovated Home for Guest/Manager House
* 6 Stall Stallion Barn w/Breeding Shed and Office/Apartment
* 18 Stall Custom Show Stable w/Apartment, Air Conditioned Tack Room,
Saddling Station & Arena. 60' Covered Round Pen w/Viewing Stand
For Property Information Contact: Joan Pletcher, Realtor, 352-266-9100
Rowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388
Ai A M "OS A 3109" 1r BL"PT ,lii--4A ., ai -1,
AUCTIONS ., ' ,. ,, , i. .


IFI



SERVICE DIRECTORY


%R.L'Di 411 lIL F VN IllNTEN'%N N & I Rl


B LLFD STR.11
1 _


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRIW GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bae at a time through
hard work and ijntgyrit over 18years."
Fast, Friendly Servie-Installaion Available

'(ONt'RErTE






Patios Sidewalks &
Driveway Add-ons, starting at '599
We will meet or beat any reasonable quotes.
Highest Quality Lowest Prices
Ollice: (904) 491-4383
Licensed & Bonded cell: (904) 237-7742


C(LE. ING, SERVE I'E



PERFECTCLEANINC

Please Call Us
At 753-3067 ,

HOMES CONDOS OTFFES
4 BONDED, INSURED



Place an Ad!
Call 261-3696







THISI S PA


BRANNAN

CONsUCTIONo
SState Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Ucensed Insured
State Licensed RB00559591
GlR4GES ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUlRANHTEED

2.Car Garages










-AMELIA


ISLAND

GUTTERS
ii When It Rains
Be Prepared.
6"Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
Now Installing Screened Rooms
FINANCING AVAILABLE

LICENSED & INSURED Lowell Duster

(904) 261-1940


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In
"The local guy" since 198 L
Quit Paying Too Much!
Operatr or doa: replacements Transmi lir teplacments
R Bloen springs ripped gears
Cabl es Seife f"; all mr es & nokw l

904-277-2086


L[.A N M.\IMIEN.AN('E


t. :



Full Service Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design & Installation
Flowereds, Mulch, Cleanups
Irrigation Repairs & Installations
Hydroseeding & Sod
All Natural Fertilization Program
Soil Repair

(904) 753-1537
www.FloridaGardenerlnc.com






THS -P







out ow t -.Lyuu


Bob's Irrigation

& Landscapinglnc.
Full Service lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design & Installation
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Outdoor Lighting Solutions
SSeasonal Lighting Projects
SSod Installation & Repair
+ Concrete Pavers & Fire Pits
+ Deck Installation & Repair
+ Retaining Walls & Ponds
Grading Services & Drainage

904-261-5040
FS12000919
bobsirrigationlandscape.com




LUXURY
LANDSCAPE
"For the Luxury You Deserve"
*Lawn Maintenance*
*Landscape Installation*
*Irrigation Installation*
*Mulch & Pine Straw*
Clean-Up *
*Shrub Trlmmmlng*
*Sod Installatlon*
Free Estimates and
Great Prices!
since 1992

(904) 525-0176


WE'RE STILL HERE!






Srott Lawson Ciris Lowe
Sal,. Csialnt Sall, Cc""1suitw
Serving Nassau County
for over 20 years with





464054 SR 200 Yulee

(904) 261-6821

I'N NFING



avmrs Pd G
Quality r,. iv
Reasonable Prices
lo Il,,.If'nW l,orl,'?Lr,,

,I .111 225-9292





PRESSIJRE \\ \SHING

PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses- Trailers Patios
Driveways etc.
Exterior Windows
Wood Decks C/eaned & Reseaed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353




Place an Ad!
Call 261-3696


COASTAL ROOFING

S SYSTEMS


S"ReRoofing Is Our Special"
Nassau County's Largest Roofing &
Siding Contractor Serving Satisfied
Homebullders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing New Roouting
Siding Soffit & Fascia

261-2233
Free Est/imstes
A C.as11a1 lt1idlli S3 r i'd s CM






cLONc' LOT

PREPARATION
Tractor Work Top Soil
Gravel Driveways
Parking Areas
(H)(904) 261-5098
(C) (904) 415-6077
Fred Long,owic d
[R.\( I OR ,\V(RK


GRASS TOO TALL?
GIVE SHAWN A CALL!
BUSH HOGGING
DRIVEWAY GRADING
LAWN MAINTENANCE
GARDEN TILLING

904-318-3700
Insured Licensed


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The INews-Leader
Service Directory'
Call 261-3696 and find
:xjt how to p t ycur!
advertti9ng dollars
tc worf for youi


IILI X 1 "Al I.,i .


I \RAGE Da S


L.All' IN 1% 1 [11 IN 1 V. IN A IN k... .








FRIDAY AUGUST 10. 2012 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 7B


611 Home Furnishings
FURNITURE LIQUIDATION SALE N
JAX Quality products 50-80% off
retail. Queen mattress sets $150.
Sofa/Love $399. 5pc Bed set $399.
House/Condo packages $1799. Call
(904)245-9397.





802 Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME For Sale. 1979
Skyline, 12x61, 2BR/1BA, very good
condition. Have title & ready to move.
$4,500. (904)583-4459
3BR/2BA TRIPLE WIDE sitting on 4
acres on Lofton Creek. Close to YMS
and YHS. $104,900. (904)583-2009.
WESLEY RD. 3BR/2BA DWMH. Very
clean on one acre. $795/mo. (904)
277-0006.

804 Amelia Island Homes
OLDER HOUSE Needs repair. Large
lot. 132 S. 13th St. $75,000/OBO.
(904)583-2045

805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.corn for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.

806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.

807 Condominiums
FSBO 2/1.5 Condo in Forest Ridge
Village. 1.5 blocks from beach.
Completely renovated! $132,000/OBO.
(912)269-3940

808 Off Island/Yulee
YULEE BY OWNER 3BR/2BA com-
pletely remodeled, stucco, detached
garage w/room above, fenced yard,
near schools. $146,000. 904-583-0095


REALELSTATE



851 Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED to share Is-
land home. Professional, drug free, de-
pendable, quiet, male or female. $500
+ utilities Please call (904)277-3933.

852 Mobile Homes
RV RENTALS AVAILABLE in a
campground. Weekly or monthly. All
utilities & WiFi included. (904)225-
5577-
YULEE NICE 3BR/2BA SW tile &
laminate floors, water inc., sm pets,
$795/mo. Call (904)501-5999. Pos.
rent to own.
4BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE on 1 acre
lot in Yulee. $850/mo. (904)225-2195

855 Apartments
Furnished

3BR/2BA APARTMENT available in
great downtown location. Semi-furn-
ished, office, WIFI and utilities includ-
ed. Adjacent to the Hampton Inn and
Suites, 19 South 2nd St., Femandina
Beach. Lease and references required.
$1600/month. Contact Bob Ramshaw
at 904-557-2106.

856 Apartments
Unfurnished
POST OAK APARTMENTS
Affordable Living Rent from $560-
&747 for eligible persons/families. 1 &
2 Bedrooms. Post Oak Apartments
(904)277-7817. Handicap Accessible
apartments available. *This institution
is an equal opportunity provider, and
employer. TDD: 711

ACROSS FROM QUIET North Beach
Park Completely renovated, 1BR
spacious studio, full kitchen, laundry
center. Year lease w/ref's & dep.
$745/mo. + utilities. (904)557-1690


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
For Rent 2BR/1.5BA TH apt. CH&A,
stove, refng., D/W, carpet. Service
animals only. $795/mo. 828
Nottingham Dr Call (904)261-3035.


857 Condos-Furnishe
FOR RENT Gorgeous oceanfront
2BR/2BA, Amelia island. Furnished
Private access to pool, pier, gated
parking. $1500/mo. (912)674-1766

2BR/2BA Furnished or unfurnished.
$1,000 negotiable. Pool, tennis court,
close to beach. Airappliances included.
Call (904)557-5823.

FURNISHED 2BR 2-STORY CLUB
VILLA at A.I.P. Pool. Service
animals only. $1200/mo + utilities.
(904)491-5906

2BR/2BA EXECUTIVE TOWNHOME -
Nicely furnished, with 2-car garage,
pool, tennis courts. $1095/mo. Call
(904)261-0816 or (904)557-1682.


860 Homes-Unfurnished
BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA HOME close
to beach. $1350/mo. Lawn care
included. Call Michelle (904)583-1900.

STUCCO/BLOCK HOME for rent in
Yulee off Pages Dairy Rd. 3BR/1BA with
2 bonus rooms, fenced yard, back patio
& Lg. storage shed. Close to schools &
shopping. No smoking. $975 + dep.
(904)955-4032 8am-8pm.

3BR/2BA AI home. Fenced yard, tile
floors, 2-car garage. Pets ok. $1,400/
mo. 1 yr lease. 1st, last & dep req'd.
(858)354-8221 or (503)781-0752.


860 Homes-Unfurnished
3BR/2.5BA on Piney Island. $1,200/
mo. No smoking. (904)463-2770

4BR/2.5BA GREAT HOME hard-
wood floors, spacious rooms, room for
boat/RV, hot tub, across from Sunrise
Park. 1903 Sunrise Dr $1900/mo.
(904) 206-2929

4BR/3BA SEASIDE HOME Ig yard,
2-car garage, hardwood floors,
spacious kitchen w/pantry, on island,
close to beach. $1750/mo. (904)491-
6152

2BR/1BA den, carport, Ig workshop,
Ig fenced backyard, patio w/brick FP
grill. 1st & last + security. $800/mo.
(904)491-5282, call after 3pm.

2BR/2BA SINGLE FAMILY HOME -
on large lot, near hospital. $950/mo.
Call (904)261-0816 or (904)557-1682.


861 Vacation Rentals
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.

VACATION CHALET in N. Carolina
Mountains. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495 a week. Call (904)757-5416.


863 Office
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES Office
space from 100 sq. ft. to 2,000 sq. ft.
Includes utilities, Internet, common
area receptionist, conference room,
break room, & security. For info call
(904)753-4179.

VARIOUS OFFICES 600-1500sf.
2382 Sadler Rd. behind Amelia
Insurance. (904)557-5644


_BEAUTIFUL GATEWAY TO AMELIA
NEWLY RENOVATED Large 3BR/ Office Space All utilities, CAM, & tax
2BA home on island. $1100/mo. Call included. 2 rooms, 370sf. $695. Call
Greg (904)556-2573. (904)753-0117.


863 Office
HISTORIC CENTRE STREET Office
Suite. Hardwood floors, brick
exposures, new windows, recept-
ion area and more. (3) Offices, (2)
Bathrooms. Must see! $1250/mo.
(904)261-9556

864 Commercial/Retail
1500 SQ. FT. OFFICE/RETAIL
SPACE FOR LEASE US 17 & A1A in
Yulee. (904)225-2195

865 Warehouse
WAREHOUSE/OFFICE 2400sf ware-
house w/12'X15' office & bath. Two
12X12 roll up doors. Amelia Island In-
dustrial Park, 2424-B Lynndale Rd. Call
Jim Deal 261-6230 or cell 415-0423.




901 Automobiles
CLASSIC 1995 MERCEDES S500 4-D
SEDAN White, 213,000 miles,
meticulously maintained at Mercedes
service dealer. Cost $86,000 new, sell
at $4,900. Call (904)261-0385.

903 Vans
1990 FORD CAMPER VAN Drive it,
or use roof A.C., refrigerator, sink,
microwave, engine, etc. in your
vehicle. 2813 Amelia Road, Glenn
(904)556-4308. $850 cash.




t arnabas
CENTER, INC

The New to You Resale Store is an
excellent place to recycle your household
goods. For info, call: 904.321.2334
930 14[H STRAIT FHIFANDINAI BACH, H 32034


CURTISS H.
LASSERRE
Real Esta te, In c.
www. lascS-ercrea lcsta te .cI m

RESIDENTIAL
LONG TERM RENTALS
- 28205 First Ave 2R8/ .5BA Townhouse with
garage $875 + utlrutes.Available 9' i12
*3423 S Fletcher Avenue-2BR' IA across
from the beach Nice Deck. Fumrlihed w-di
washer and dryer: $ 1000/mo utlnes
*514 S. l4th Siee 3BRilBA Nice luge
fenced yard. Available Sept ist $950 'rm
+utilities
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave. 3BR/25BA with 2880
sq.fL GRAND OLD BEACH house with
unusual flooi plan and lots of parking
$1,650/mo. plus utilities.
S23820 Flora Park Blvd IBR'2BA 1988 approx
sq.ft. hpme. $1.350/mo plus utl. Avail
8/01/12
76129 Long Pond Loop 3BR/2BA 1723 sqft
$1.200 plus utilities
BEACH COTTAGEIMONTHLY RENTAL
*2BR/IBA furnished 1801 S. Fletcher Ave
$1.650/mo. includes most utilities, vl.ter
sewe; garbage, cable and internet Available
late August
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY' MONTHLY
2BR/ IBA Ocean-view 487 S. Fletcher Across
the street from the beach.Alt utilwi-fiTV &
phone.
*3BRI 3BA townhome in Sandpiper Laop
S1850/wk plus taxes & cleaning fee.
COMMERCIAL
*Amelia Park Unit B small office (2 rooms)
with bath. 576 sq. ft. $1050mo. + sales tax
* Five Points Village 1,200 sq. ft.AIA/S 8th St
exposure Great for retail services, cr office.
$1,200/mo saless tax.
*Amelia Park Unit E (14th St frontage) 910
approx. sq.fL, 3 offices, reception area. kitchen
and bathroom $1450/mo.+ utilities.
* 1839 S. 8th St adjacent to Huddle House,
1,800 sq.ft $1700/mo. lease + tax. Sale also
considered.
.4U *W .4&"# -1-


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RESIDENTIAL LONG TERM RENTALS


404 Georgia Avenue 2257 sf 4BR/2BA home in
the Portside community. Hardwood and tile
flooring throughout the living areas. Large Living
Room with Fireplace! Formal Dining Room.
Kitchen with Butler's pantry and Corian counter
tops. Well sized Master Suite with separate Garden
Tub and Shower. Screened Lanai. Pets ok. On
Island. $1,750/mo.
2605 Portside Drive 2229 sf. 4BR/3BA bright
Florida style home in the Ocean Cay
neighborhood. Large Family room with fireplace,
formal dining room and kitchen with breakfast
area. Large fully screened back porch. Pets ok. On
Island. $1,650/mo.
3322 Fairway Oaks 1,456 sf 2BR/2BA Omni
Amelia Island Plantation villa located on the
Fairway. Recently remodeled with updated Kitchen
and appliances. Generous living spaces with
Living/Dining Room combined. Master suite with
private bath. Optional AIP membership available.
Washer & Dryer. Pets ok. On Island. $1,450/mo.
76391 Deerwood Drive 1764 sf 3BR/2BA home
in the Timbercreek community. Spacious galley
style Kitchen with Corian counters! Huge screened
Porch overlooking backyard and preserve. Family
Room has surround sound! $1,350/mo.
96015 Hickory Place 1543 sf, 3BR/2BA home
on C-D-S lot in Otter Run subdivision. Extremely
well maintained with heated/cooled sunporch. Tile
throughout main living area. Large family room
with fireplace and vaulted ceilings. Stainless
appliances in eat in kitchen. Fenced in backyard
with fruit trees and a shed. Water softener and
irrigation system. Off island. Small dog ok. NO
CATS. $1,250/mo.


.59.. -


Brian Woolard
General Manager


Lee Richardson
Leasing


2343 Cashen Wood Drive 1416 sf 3BR/2BA
Fernandina home in the Cashen Wood. neighborhood.
Large, kitchen overlooking Family room with breakfast
nook. Master suite with private bath. Convenient
location to almost everything Island life has to offer.
Pets ok. On Island. $1,100/mo.
23525 Bahama Point, #1621 1435 sf. 3BR/2BA
Second floor unit with vaulted ceilings and amazing
views of the lake from the Master Suite, Kitchen,
Dining Room and Porch. Living Room features a wood
burning fireplace with stone surround! Large open
Kitchen withBreakfast bar overlooks Dining and Living
areas. Large screened porch overlooks the lake and has a
dedicated storage room! Pets ok. Off Island. $1,100/mo.
30936 Paradise Commons #227 1143 sf 2BR/2BA
totally renovated Amelia Lakes condo with custom
paint and fixtures. This 2nd floor .unit is withineasy
walking distance to pool and other amenities. Pets ok.
Off Island. $900/mo.
75170 Johnson Lake Rd 816 sf2B1890 sf. 3BR/2BA
home in the quiet country setting of Johnson Lake.
New carpet, paint and more! Iarge fenced yard with
views of the spring fed lake. Florida room overlooking
lake and screen porch in front. Pets ok. Off Island. $950
31010 Paradise Commons, #423 Second floor unit
close to pool and workout center. Unit has screened
porch with ceiling fan and storage room.Over sized rubs
in bathrooms. Fireplace and vaulted ceiling in family
room. Pets ok. OffIsland. $900/mo.
837B Mary St. 816 sf 2BD/1BA first floor duplex
located on the North end of Amelia Island. Bright and
open with large yard and carport..Pets ok. On Island.
$850/mo.


Maintenance


Accounting


BLACKBEARDS WAY NORTH 14TH STREET OCEANFRONT DREAM '.11 1 ,''I i I I, I I I I
You will say WOW! HOME I)RI\
Deep WaterHome on Bells River Completely rebuilt 2800 sf 3738 SF of luxury on.77 acre lot, Amazing waterfront hote on
w/dock. Downstairs remodeled home has hardwood floors, grand entrance, great kitchen. thile .of(on Creek' fuslon
with gourmet kitchen of your huge master suite, upgraded inground heated'pool, 3 HVAC home is 3,347 sf plus 700 sf
dreams, upstairs has 2nd kitchen, kitchen on an acre on Amelia systems, hurricane slluters, cen- workshop/cotlage. Dock has
lots of decks. Island. tral vac & more cedlar screened ruiln & honil.
1157737 $494,500 #57735 $329,000 #57707 $1.799.000 #57756 $775,1)000







\ M .'Ill I F1 m m 1% I1 i


t IRN \[iL1\ i sti t LONG BEACI
Fully furnished 3/2.5 town- Beautiful lakefrot
home 2 blocks from the beach end of cul-de-sav
has updated baths, tile floors Haunpton. Oversi;
downstairs. MBR balcony. fobrthe family che
!.rgo P I f'lin r pl;n n nilpli-Y quitee extir lono d:







I o I Ir., IIo a
CALLE CORTA Long Point
Recently renovated 3/2 in es ab-
lished Ameba Island neighborhood N. Fletcher Avenue
New roof, new kitchen w/.SS appli-
ances, new carpel, new tile & vam,- S. FletcherAvenue
ties in baths. Clinch Drive
#57937 $124.901)


Blackrock Road
Blackrock Road
X IBlackrock Road
Edwards Road
HISTORIC HOME Edwards Road
Lovely restored 1920's humle
Sw/garage in Fernandina's East SR 200 iComm)
Historic District on I 00ix O Gravel Creek Dr
lot. Includes separate
IBR/1BA guest cottage Little Piney Island
w/garage #57648 $359.9l00


H DRIVE FLORA PARKE AMELIA HBY THE SEA
nt home at Vacation in your backyard' Owner financing available il
c in North Inground pool w/brick paver this recently updated Lcond
zed kitchen paio. beautifulgardens, immac- floor end unit. Gnutit c .un-
fnice MBR late home w/wood-buring terms, tile & nes cabint.i
I R Feplace, all appliance. i g pr
rivewav. ihing pier ,p. ite


MELIA ISLAND
1.'l I' .* i,: I :lh .l, , ,'


S560,000 Ocean Avenue
S150,000 S. Flelcher Avenue
S529,000 S. 20th Street
S255,900 Manucy Road


OFF-ISLAND
$37.000 Middle Road
S260,000 Miner Rd (15acres)
S30,000 Napeague Drive
S42,500 Pages Dairy Rd (5
S39,900 Parrish Drive
S425,000 Sail Wind Way
S55.000 Serenity Lane
S169,000 Pirates Wood (4 lot


5300.000 LAM .LIA L\ANDIN G
ftoailyi renlodeic!d ; p ll>.' rcid
$890 000 unit i ,s IurIl l l Iun h -,,,ll
S175.000 surface coinllcr,; nIc ,ip
$89.900 ances. ic i; ,
9. screened Ic.
:677-15 $147j)(1II


$250.000
$37orooo lr| 1
S570.000 .4 WWI@
S$65,300
ces, $175 000
$32 500 Ill, \\1XI I 1 \ 10) \I)
Vere nice rcmodclid D \V.M1
$55,000 in N., a ill hi \'.,' lk ,
C55 i ll0r inis ,Cy l0i.Ili, 2
s 55.2 00 3 isi le i r,l shcd, ,, ,.pplh-
s) S245.360 ances.
4571, $59,.5oo


Chapn Wilias Retal
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