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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00677
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach Fla
Publication Date: 9/2/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
Coordinates: 30.669444 x -81.461667 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000366799
oclc - 04377055
notis - ACA5658
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00677
 Related Items
Preceded by: Fernandina Beach news-leader

Full Text






NEWSPAPER


NEWS__7LEADER.5
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FRIDAY. September 2 2011/18 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE AMELIA ISLAND MUSEUM OF HISTORY
David Levy Yulee, above left, whose Florida railway connecting Fernandina to Cedar Key opened in March 1861, just as
the Civil War got under way. Confederate Major-General Fitzhugh Lee and staff in Fernandina, above right. Below right,
George Latham, standing fourth from left, and fellow Civil War veterans. Latham was one of the port's original harbor
pilots.


The first year of the



Civil War in Fernandina


JIM LONGACRE
For theNews-Leader
Jf you could go back in time 150 y,-.,ir ago.
today, to what is now Fernandina Beach,
you would not be impressed. Fernandina
then was a sleepy and insignificant port,
isolated from the rest of the United States,
poor, rough, seedy and ramshackle. Only
about! 1,300 men, women and children lived
here, two-thirds black and one-third white. Its
population had not grown since the first
Census was taken in 1813.
The town was still mostly centered on what
we call Old Town, but that was changing. For a
decade, David Yulee's men, mostly leased
slaves, had been laying track through the
largely uninhabited swamps of central Florida,
connecting the west Florida coastal communi-
ty of Cedar Key with Fernandina. Many died
at their labors, from snake bites and disease
and accidents.
While the railway advanced across Florida,
Yulee and his agents were quietly buying up
the land that is now the historic district. When
the track had been laid to the depot at the foot
of Centre Street, Yulee announced that it
would go no further as the swampy land sur-
rounding Old Town was too dri ii f,. i ,cross.
This was obviously untrue; he had crossed
much 'vorse. His plan was to move the town,
and make a profit from reselling the land .he
had just purchased. His scheme worked,
although not all at once, and the town relocat-
ed gradually.
Yulee's railway was finished and open for


Civil War talk
.. As pad of its Civil War Series, the Amelia
Island Mu-eumr L.I Himliy Mill r.re--ent a lec-
ture byAaam Goodheart, auilior of the best
selling book, 1861: The C,, 1 at Awaken-
''uo at theAtlantic Avenue Recreation'
Center on Sept. 10 at 4 p.m.
Goodheart will sign copies of his book
after the lecture and at the Book Loft, 214
Centre St., from 10 a.m. to noon Sept. 10.
Tickets are $25 for members; $30 for non-
members; and $15 for youth under 19, at the
museum, 233 S. Third St. Call 261-7378, ext
102. Visit ameliamuseum.org.

business by March of 1861 but the timing was
bad. Lincoln's election a few months previous
had roiled the South and Florida was the third
state to depart the Union. Enthusiasm for the
secession was low in the town of Fernandina,
which in many ways was more tied economi-
cally to the North than to the rest of Florida. It
was in fact easier to travel from New York City
to Fernandina by boat, than to travel from
inland Florida to the town, by wagon or horse.
At the same time, another local construc-
tion project was progressing the building of
Fort Clinch. At the time of secession, the fort
was tir,rli, i-I 1, and more importantly, had no
guns. It was indefensible, and the few Union
soldiers there simply abandoned the half-built
fort. The Florida militia then took over the
fort, scraped together a few cannon, and pre-


pared for any attempt on the part of the Union
to attack the fort
The Union strategy at the beginning of the
Civil War was set by Gen. Winfield Scott, the
hero of the Mexican War. He devised a grand
plan that he dubbed the Anaconda Strategy.
The idea was that the ships of the Union Navy
would blockade the Southern ports, prevent-
ing weapons from being imported and cotton
from being exported, strangling the South like
in the coils of a giant snake.
Early in March of 1861, the largest
amphibious armada in.the history of the
United States assembled near Hilton Head,
15,000 soldiers on 20 ships that sailed south to
attack Amelia Island. The reason for the mas-
sive force was not that the town had any strate-


gic value, it clearly did not, but rather that it
was a perfect coaling station to refill the
bunkers of the Union ships blockading south-
eastern ports.
The Confederacy made the decision to
abandon the island as too peripheral to
Confederate strategy, and the last residents
and troops were on Yulee's train headed off-
island as the armada neared. There was a brief
exchange of gunfire between one of the Union
ships and the train. Two boys sitting on a
flatbed car were killed in this exchange, likely
the only Civil War fight between a train and
ship. Otherwise, the landing of the Unio.n
troops on March 4, 1862 was unopposed.
WAR Continued on 3A


Childers: Raise,



don't lower, pay,

ANGELA DAUGHTRY i mission will restore
News-Leader (the salary) to its
current levels."
Second-term city commissioners Childers, who
should get a 33 percent pay raise, to recently lost this job
$16,000, according to Commissioner -, -at a car dealership,
Eric Childers, a rate that would make also wrote that it is
the job "a little more attractive" for "unhealthy to posi-
commissioners considering a second tion our commission
term. Childers in such a way that
Childers' first three-year term on only retired people
the commission expires this fall and he or the highly suc-
has not yet publicly said whether he cessful find it attractive to run for
will seek a second term. office. I believe we need a diverse com-
Childers wrote in a statement on mission to best represent our com-
his website, ericchilders.com, and in munity."
an email to constituents that it would Of the five commissioners cur-
be a "mistake" to reduce commis- rently in office, Jeffrey Bunch,
sioners' $12,000 a year salaries by 20 Arlene Filkoff and Susan Steger are
percent, as was suggested at a recent retired. Tim Poynter owns a local


commission meeting, because "it is
highly 11111 .. I'- that any future com-


CHILDERS Continued on 3A


Commissioners OK tax hike,



agree to give to nonprofits


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader


At their last budget workshop of
the year, city commissioners Monday
agreed to a property tax increase over
the rollback rate, but a smaller
increase than they adopted in July.
The 0.3 mill increase over the oper-
ating rollback rate brings the total to
5.1759, and requires a four-fifths vote
by state law. Commissioners had pre-
viously approved a 0.5 mill increase
over the rollback rate.
The so-called rollback rate is cal-
culated to keep the same amount of
property tax revenues coming in as
last year no matter the total property
valuation. When house prices were
booming and property values rose,
that served to keep taxes in check.
Now that property values are lli, .


Budget hearings
The first public hearing for
final approval of the 2011 -2 cil
budget will be Tuesday at City
Hall, 204 Ash St., at 5 ,:15 p.m.
The second and final hearing will
be at 5:05 p.m. Sept. 20 at City
Hall. The new fiscal year begins
Oct. 1.

it serves to keep taxes close to the
same level as the previous year. A rate
higher than the rollback rate thus rais-
es property taxes for most homeown-
ers.
Commissioners also agreed at the
Monday meeting to give $62,500 to
local nonprofit human service
,,g.,;,i. ,ii,,,. Previously, they had
decided to not donate any city funds to


local nonprofits.
Commissioner Eric Childers said
Monday he was especially concerned
about the city having enough money
for beach renourishment within the
next few years. He asked City
Manager Michael Czymbor how
"comfortable" he was that the city
could set aside the necessary funds.
Czymbor noted the city has bud-
geted more than the recommended
reserve fund of 25 percent, and that
beach renourishment was "a priority"
for the city. He added the city would
also have "dedicated funds" to cover
the project, which, he said, could Ibe
delayed until the ir, ... .. ,ti.t to raise
its share. Earlier this year, a study by
an engineer showed the renourish-
ment project scheduled for 2013 could
CITY Continued on 3A


1 84264 00013 3


News-Lea
157A
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ader ININDEX
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O BITUARIES .......................................... 2A
OUT AND ABOUT ................. 2 B
SERVICE DREcroRY ............. 5B
SPoIT's .................................................... 10A
SUDOKU ...................................... 2B


. .. 2 .. ... . .


F L 0 R I D A 'S


OLDEST


W E E K L Y


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Yulee's

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FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.2011 NEWS News-Leader


OBITUARY


Herbert W. Owen
Herbert W. Owen passed away Saturday
evening, August 27,2011 at Osprey Village
Assisted living Facility on Amelia Island,
FL, at the age of 96. He was born July 6,
1915 in Brooklyn, New York, the son of
Herbert R. Owen and Calla MacAdam
Owen. Herb had a full, productive, and
happy life blessed with many good friends.
"Red" Owen as he was
often called spent most of
S. his life in Connecticut. In
S...' his early years, he became
nationally known as a
model airplane builder. He
pioneered the development
%' of "microfilm" as a material
used in the construction of model airplane
wings. This led to an official National
Aeronautical Association world record.
Herb then attended Wesleyan University
in Middletown, Connecticut where he
majored in Economics and set a track
record in pofe vaulting.
After college, he was employed by the
3M Company as a salesman for a brand
new product called "Scotch Tape." This job
later launched his lifetime career in the
paper business. Unfortunately, the start of
WWII put a halt to his career. In 1942, he
enlisted in the United States Army Signal
Corp. for special training in secret code
machines at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey.


He was sent over to England on the Queen
Elizabeth to continue his military training
in London. Not long after, he landed on the
beaches of Normandy on the second day of
the invasion. His 1st Army unit then went
onto Cherbourg and later joined up with
Patton's 3rd Armored Army in St. Lo. Herb
was awarded 5 battle citations for his hero-
ic efforts.
When the war ended in 1946, he
returned to the United States and to his
beloved wife, Allie. He resumed his sales job
at the 3M Company in Connecticut. In 1949,
he left the.3M Company to join the Chatfield
Paper Company in New Haven, Connecticut
where he eventually became president and
Chairman of the board. In 1981, Herb
retired and established a winter residence
at the Ocean Reef Club in Key Largt,
Florida. His summers were spent at their
home in Old Say Brook, Connecticut.
During his lifetime, Herb cared deeply
for others both in his business life and com-
munity life. He was a trustee of the Old
Lyme Congregational Church for many
years. He and his wife shared a love-for
deepwater sailing. They spent many years
racing and cruising sailboats. Their pas-
sion for sailing included a 25 ft racing sail-
boat and rebuilding 1 35 ft cruising sail-
boat. This hobby took them to, many
beautiful places including: Bermuda, the
Baltic Sea, the Virgin Islands, the Bahamas,
and the inland waterway from Maine to


Key West. Herb was an active member of
the New York Yacht Club, the Essex Yacht
Club, the Milford Yacht Club, the Card
Sound Sailing Club and others. He was
also, commodore of the prestigious Off
Soundings Club, known for deepwater rac-
ing.
Aside from sailing, golf, and skiing, Herb
had another hobby that he taught himself
while walking back and forth to school in
his early days. This was whistling. He used
to say he was blessed with "good ears and
good lips." In his later years, he created
both whistling tapes and CD's for his friends
during the holidays. He was still '.'.l,;liir,
well into his nineties at various dinner par-
ties.
His beloved wife of 62 years, Alice,
passed in 2004, and he was also preceded
by his brother, Donald Owen of Nashville,
TN. He is survived by his sister, Calla Ross
of Charlotte, NC, his nieces, Jeannie
Schiavone and Sandy Ross, and his
nephews Donald R. Ross and William M.
Ross. His marriage to his wife, "Allie" in
1941, was the highlight of his life!
A Memorial Service will be held at the
Amelia Plantation Chapel in the near future.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to Community Hospice, 4114 Sunbeam Rd.,
Jacksonville, FL, 32257.
Please share his life story at www.oxley-
heard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


Yulee Baptist plans special 9/11 events


For the News-Leader .

On Sunday, Sept. 11 Yulee
Baptist Church, 85971 Harts
Road in Yulee, will have three
special worship services to
commemorate the events of
9/11. On this day the Yulee
Baptist Church is also working
to assist a local firefighter's fam-
ily that is facing the expenses of
a recently diagnosed cancer.
Paul Kayis a Nassau County
firefighter. His son, who was
diagnosed with a rare form of
bone cancer, has been on the
prayer list at Yulee Baptist
Church for many weeks. As
part of their special services
and 9/11 activities, the church


is involved in raising funds to
help this family. Several busi-
nesses have already partnered
with the church and have
pledged upwards of $1,500 and
more are signing up. Those that
attend the 9/11 activities will
also have an opportunity to
donate toward the expenses the
family will face as they battle
the 14-year-old's medical chal-
lenges.
Emergency responders,
honor guards, eclc'cied officials,
community leaders and special
patriotic music will be featured
as the church gathers the com-
munity for worship on Sept. 11.
Each of the three worship serv-
ices (8:30 a.m., 9:45 a.m. and


11 a.m.) will commemorate not
only the loss our nation expe-
rienced on that day but will also
celebrate the continued free-
doms God has blessed our
nation with. There will also be
two special Bible Study times
(9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m.) provid-
ing biblical answers that we
often ask in times of crisis. How
do we reconcile human tragedy
against a loving and merciful
God? This Bible study will help
those in attendance to better
* understand such events.
On Sept. 11 at 6 p.m., the
church will hold a "Freedom
Celebration" with free food, fun,
activities, bounce houses, pony
rides, special guest speakers,


special guest musicians includ-
ing Mrs. Kate Carpenter and
much, much more.
"We have so much to cele-
brate," said Pastor Doug Sides.
"We will celebrate the freedoms
our forefathers fought to secure
for our citizens, and we will cel-
ebrate the freedoms our mili-
tary men and women continue
to stand guard to protect! I
think it is appropriate to both
memorialize this day as we will
during our morning worship
services, and then celebrate
our freedoms as we will do that
evening."
For information call 225-
5128 or visit www.yuleebsp-
tistchurch.com.


9/11 SERVICES & EVENTS


First Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach, 1600 S.
Eighth St., will hold a special
service, "America: We Must
Not Forget," at 10:15 a.m. on
Sunday, Sept. 11 in the main
worship center to mark the
10th anniversary of the ter-
rorist attacks on the United
States.
Visit fbfirst.com or call
.261-3617 for information. All
denominations are welcome.

Blackrock Baptist Church,
96362 Blackrock Road, Yulee,
invites everyone to its 10-year
anniversary remembrance
tribute to those killed on
September 11, on Sunday,
Sept. 11 at 10:30 a.m. The
church will honor local
heroes past and present from
fire-rescue, law enforcement,


air medical services and
those who have served or are
serving in the military. Fire
and rescue units, police units
and the Trauma One helicop-
ter will be on display in the
south parking lot.
Pastor Frank Camarotti
will be guest speaker. Call the
church at 261-6220 for infor-
mation.

Savannah Grand Assisted
Living, 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Fernandina Beach, will
host a Hometown Heroes
Patriotic Barbecue on Sept. 12
at noon for all firefighters and
paramedics, with Mayor
Susan Steger. At 3 p.m. join a
talk about September 11. For
information call 321-0898.

The Don Thompson


Chorale will host two con-
certs entitled "Freedom ... A
Patriot's Dream" to commem-
orate the 10th anniversary of
September 11, on Sept. 11 at 7
p.m. at Penney Memorial
Church, Penrney Farms, and
Sept. 18 at 3 p.m. at Riverside
Presbyterian Church, 849
Park St., Jacksonville. Both
concerts are free.
The centerpiece will be
Randall Thompson's
Testament of Freedom, a
powerful setting of selected
writings of Thomas Jefferson.
Special guest Dr. Al Harding
will accompany on piano, with
Lester McCullough conduct-
ing.
The Chorale will perform
a variety of other American
and patriotic selections,
including spirituals and songs


of consolation. For informa-
tion call (904) 358-0196 or
email choraleoholics@mind-
spring.com.

The city of Jacksonville
and the Jacksonville Human
Rights Commission with the
Jacksonville Sheriff's Office,
the Jacksonville Fire and
Rescue Department and
OneJax will host a 10th year
commemoration of the
attacks of September 11 on
Sept. 6 at 6:30 p.m. at The
Jacksonville Landing, 2
Independent Drive.
The free program, emceed
by WJCT's Melissa Ross, will
feature remarks from federal,
state and local officials, an
interfaith prayer, candlelight
vigil, 21-rifle salute and
"Taps."


Tow to Go program offers free rides home


TAMPA AAA Auto' Club
South and Budweiser will help
protect roadways throughout
the Labor Day weekend with
the Tow to Go program. Tow
to Go has safely removed more
than 14,000 drunk drivers off
roadways since the program
began in 1998. Anyone, AAA
member or not, can call for a


NpLE MOMENT
COMPANY, INC.
277-4499
,14h &Atlantic


NEWSAD
LEADER \


Tow to Go ride, starting Friday
and lasting through Monday.
Tow to Go provides a confi-
dential ride and tow home from
any bar or restaurant -free of
-charge to anyone who may
have had too much to drink by
calling 1-800-AAA-HELP (4357).
Services are offered through-
out all of Florida, Georgia and
West and Middle Tennessee.
"Labor Day weekend is the
unofficial end of summer and
with so many people enjoying
barbecues or going out to
restaurants, it means many
could be drinking," said Joanna
Newton, Tow to Go program


511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach. FL 32034
(904)2613696 Fax261-3698
Website for email addresses:
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The
Fernandina Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina
Beach, FL 32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS
189-900) ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in
whole or in part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader october only be sold by persons
or businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County .................... $37.00
Mail out of Nassau County ........... ... .. .$63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.


CALL FOR SPECIAL
HOLIDAY DEADLINE
INFORMATION FOR THE
WEDNESDAY SEPT. 7 ISSUE
NI community
C I Newpapers,
Incorporated


manager, AAA Auto Club South.
"Don't wait until a few drinks
into your evening to decide how
you are going to get home.
Have a plan in place for a des-
ignated driver or cab before you
have your first drink, so you can
have a good time and mknow that
everyone will make it home
safely."
AAA and Budweiser encour-
age individuals to plan for a safe
celebration by being or choos-
ing a designated driver, or call-
ing Tow to Go for a safe ride
home, rather than allowv anyone
to drive whose sobriety, is in
question.
If you are at a bar or restau-
rant and need Tow to Go:
Call 1-800-222-4357 and tell
the operator this is a call for


Tow to Go service
Operator will ask for your
first name and the address of
your location
Expect a AAA tow truck
service technician to come into'
the establishment and ask for
you
AAA service technician
will then collect your keys and
load your vehicle while you wait
inside the establishment
AAA Service Technician
will then take you and your vehi-
cle home safely-no questions
asked
AAA Auto Club South is the
third largest affiliate of AAA,
with 78 branch offices serving
4.1 million members in Florida,
Georgia, West and Middle
Tennessee and Puerto Rico.


DISCOVER

MEN THE MAN
-, UGOD CREATED


YOU TO BE.


Starts Wednesday, September 7
from 6:00 am-7:30 am


To register or for more info
contact Ben Hall:
ben@thejourneyfamily.com
Or Call:
904.261.8310
Or Text: 904.556.1661


This 24-session study focuses on the primary issues that
shape a man's life, explores in depth the biblical concept
of manhood, and finally provides practical building blocks
for any man to use to construct for himself a nobler, more
satisfying manhood.


- ii


Cost: $10 workbook


AAmeetings
Alcoholics Anonymous
meetings for people who
have, or think they may
have, a drinking problem are
held Mondays at noon and
Saturday at 10 a.m. at
Prince of Peace Lutheran
Church, on Atlantic Avenue
across from Fort Clinch
State Park. Please enter the
meetings through the side
door.
Fill the boots
Members of the Nassau
County Career and Volunteer
Fire Departments will hit the
streets to fill their fire boots
with donations to benefit the
Muscular Dystrophy
Association at SR 200 and US
17, US 1 and 301 and Arrigo
and SR 200 today through
Sept. 5.
The Nassau County Local
3101 and Volunteer Fire
Department raised over
$31,000 for MDA last year.
The International Associa-
tion of Fire Fighters is a
national sponsor of MDA,
and thousands of firefighters,
nationwide have been con-
tributing to MDA in various
capacities since 1954. For
information about the "Fill
the Boot" campaign or MDA,
contact Lauren Herringdine
at the Jacksonville East
District office at (904) 296-
7434, or visit www.mda.org.
Salsa band
Picante Grill, Rotisserie
and Bar, 464073 SR 200,
Suite 2, Yulee, has live music
every first and last Saturday
of the month. Sept. 3 will fea-
ture a live salsa band from 7-
10 p.m. Call 310-9221. Visit
www.picantenassau.com.
Libraries closed
The Nassau County
Public Library System will,
be closed on Sept. 5 for the
Labor Day holiday. The book
drops will remain open.
Band rehearsals
The Nassau Community
Band will resume rehearsals
Sept. 8 at 6 p.m. in the Peck
Center. Anyone who played
in high school or college is
welcome to join. For infor-
mation contact the Amelia
Arts Academy at 277-1225.
AARP meets
The local chapter of the
AARP will meet Sept. 13 at 1
p.m. at the Council on Aging.
Speaker will be BJ
Szwedzinski of Project
Chance, a nonprofit that
trains and pairs service dogs
with children with autism.
Szwedzinski will bririg one of
her dogs. Members are
urged to attend and bring a
friend. Dues are $7.50 per
year. Guests are also wel-
come to attend. The chapter
will not meet in October.
Marine Corps
The Marine Corps
League Everett P Pope
Detachment will meet Sept.
13 at 7 p.m. at American
Legion Post 54, 626 S. Third
St., Fernandina Beach. The
League includes those serv-
ing in the U.S. Marine Corps
and those who have been
honorably discharged, along
with Navy Corpsmen who
have served with the Fleet
Marine Forces.
Focus on bulbs
On Sept. 14 at 10 a.m. at
the Nassau County
Demonstration Garden,
Master Gardener Shirley
Lohman will discuss select-
ing and growing flowers
from bulbs, including daf-
fodils and other flowers.
Focus will be on bulbs that
do well in Florida without
much care. She'll offer tips
on care, feeding and over-
wintering of bulbs. For infor-
mation see the Extension
website at: http://nassau.
ifas.ufl.edu/horticulture/lan
dmatters/landmatters.html,
or call the Extension office at
491-7340..,
Purple Stride'
The Pancreatic Cancer
Action Network will host
Purple Stride Jacksonville on


50
YEARS


25
YEARS


10
YEARS


Sept. 17 in Jacksonville
Beach. Events include a 5K
timed run and a 1-mile fun
run/walk plus music,
refreshments, children's
activities and more. Find out
more at
www.purplestride.org.
Weight loss talk
Nassau County Athena
Cafe6 (formerly the Nassau
Women's Information
Exchange), in partnership
with the FSCJ Rosanne R.
Hartwell Women's Center,
the FSCJ Betty P Cook
Nassau Center and the
Nassau County Public
Library System, will present
Weight Loss for Women:
What Works? with Dr. Linda
Banister on Sept. 22 from
noon-1 p.m. at the Amelia
Island Museum of History
conference room, 233 S.
Third St.
This program is free and
open to the public. Brown-
baggers are welcome. Reser-
vations are suggested for all
participants by calling your
local branch library..Box
lunches by The General
Store may be purchased for
$11 and prepaid by noon
Sept. 16. Order from any
branch library. Make checks
payable to FSCJ. Call the
Fernandina branch at 277-
7365.
Foreclosure
workshop
The nonprofit
Neighborhood Community
Foundation will hold a free
foreclosure prevention work-
shop on Sept. 22 from 7-9
p.m. at the Clarion Hotel,
2101 Dixie Clipper Drive,
Jacksonville.
David Candler Hicks, a
foreclosure defense attorney,
will share free legal advice
about common errors and
violations found in loan docu-
ments and explain the laws
that protect homeowners fac-
ing foreclosure eviction.
Homeowners will receive
information from nonprofit
agencies to help them assess
a course of action for their
needs.
To register visit www.-
Neighborhood-Communi
ty.org or call 877-306-5299.
Caregiverworkshop
Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida will hold
"Caring for the Veteran's
'Caregiver" on Sept. 23 at its
Charles M. Neviaser
Educational Institute, 4266
Sunbeam Road, Building
100, Jacksonville.
This free workshop will
help caregivers connect with
professionals and resources
to support them in their
caregiving journey. National
speakers include Deborah
Grassman, ARNP, Bay Pines
VA Healthcare System, and
Nicole Johnson, Veteran's
Administration's Caregiving
Support Program. A compli-
mentary breakfast and lunch
will be provided, and
exhibitors will offer informa-
tion on community services
and products.
Registration begins at
8:30 a.m. and the program
will take place 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
To RSVP or to request
free care for a loved on dur-
ing the workshop, call (904)
407-6790 by Sept. 20.
Griefworkshop
Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida will hold a
"New Grief: Good Grief'
workshop on Sept. 24 from
11 a.m.-noon in the board-
room at Baptist Medical
Center Nassau, 1250 South
18th St., Fernandina Beach.
The workshop is for the
newly bereaved and is
designed to be helpful to
those who have experienced
a loss within the last 90 days,
and are at least 18 years old.
Attendees learn to identify
physical and emotional reac-
tions to the loss; ways to alle-
viate grief-related stress; the
difference between grief and
depression and become
familiar with the healing
process. To register call
Marci Moss at (904) 407-
6355.


The Palace Saloon on Centre Street,
Fernandina Beach, touted as the oldest in the
state, was featured in the.Sunday Miami Herald.
August 31, 1961

Despite a city ordinance saying he must retire
after 30 years, Chief James Graves received per-
mission to remain Fernandina's fire chief for one
more year to groom his replacement.
September 4, 1986

The Nassau County Commission voted 4-1 to
approve an ordinance protecting scenic tree
canopies.
August 31, 2001


WEEKLY UPDATE


LOOKING BACK













FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2. 2011 NEWS News-Leader


Nonprofits funded
Nonprofit organizations that will ecir.'-e .:ti,' tuird. next fiscal year, based on the average of
amounts suggested by city commissioners:
Keep Nassau Beautiful .......... . .......... ............ ........ $1,000
Council on Aging .......................... ................... $16,100
Episcopal Children's Services ...................... ............... .. ... $3,400
Boys & Girls Club of Nassau . ..... . ............................... $1,600
Nassau Mental Health .......................................... $8,400
Micah's Place, Inc . .... .......................... ............... $600
Barnabas Center .. ......... ...................................... $2,100
Amelia Island Museum ...... . . ........................ $2,100
Coalition for the Homeless ................... ...................... $500
Social Services for the A'-je,:. Poor ir.:ry s. af s-ugg.-i3.j .:.i ...................... $ 25, t0

Budget notes
-'; t,,lanaqier r i.:hael Cz'b,n :i mb frol ,c'i n a' l i 1-,r i -1 h ,i? p -.-*ed bu, l.q i which :,rnm s-
-.- re *ill ,:onsider in Ihe nOeC lw weekses lt hlude-. 'a re.dic.lJlI-r :., 1 lull me f-p',tl"'rins from a
i.:.ial J\ 1l:, irn the pri ,.ous fiscal eartht l) l .2 in lih cal year 2_1in -i- 1
The pari-tiirne head co.urnt wa.3s reduced tr:rn 6.i 10 45 acoidiJin'I ti... C rr-nboi, and there willI
Lbe j i.--.; rlanizin' and ,:.,c'rnt.'olidahrij of the par ,:epai ent, ta i'-ln ainlenanr.e, streCts
l-: iiin'litr and Heel d .'i si ri, .hi.:li will ile ull in ". 5-li.gl t ,; ij.,-i,:,o n i i :.. all 1C;.-'Sl
,' Z'iL 'rt also noled the police depaiimeni \'.3 i :till ,.t.:.: -I:e tl 'vh tIer I.c. reduce a 4 per-
- .:1e .-:I, lr.ng raise hi a 2 percent raise Flte :le:p.arhl._o .-[mtpl,',-e: a' r eed a 2 percent
a: a lieh r d A'n fromrn 4 percent Ge'n.er.-il uni.rn erpl,.: ,..ill -e a 3 _pe,': eni ,:co t of lh.-
i-..g i as.e and all ':.iy e .- pl.:,ees will be eligible tol ri erit pat I.-i-S:'
IThe ,-i, manager tolhd o mrrniss.i'ner', at th-,e :nd ci b d.- L e rn. eein f.Tlr,1nid.ay Ihat tthe
I-.lltn, :, Iree- .,.n ir.' p.r,:,pet ,iy or prflit was n.:,. inclui.td in the 1 Il 12 .:udge-l
I I,:is, tand" or Luls about lhat CzyrnbL r 'aid]


CITY Continued from 1A
be delayed as long as the beach
is closely monitored.
"It's fiscally irresponsible not
to pay (for beach renourish-
ment)," Vice Mayor Tim
Poynter said. "I think it makes
sense to take the money and put
it in a lock box ... if we don't start.
planning now, everyone's going
to go crazy (saying) why didn't
we prepare for this."
Czymbor said after the meet-
ing the city's share for upcoming
beach renourishment was esti-
mated at somewhere between
$680,000 and $900,000, with a
total project cost, shared by the
city, county and state, of $12-16
million. Permitting and design
for the project in the coming fis-
cal year will cost about $40,000,
he said. A portion of funds
i' ,,t',: from the new millage
rate could be set aside for the
project, Czymbor said at the
meeting,'as well as revenues
from a potential paid parking
plan.
Commissioner Arlene Filk-
off said she would rather see a
0.3 mill increase above the roll-
back rate for major projects like
stormwater management and
beach renourishment than an
extra fee added to residents' util-
ity bills.
But Childers contended
installing pervious surfaces
around the island would begin to
solve the problem of storm-
". JI.., i, ,"i i L. m.ui which has
been brought up for discussion
several times in the last few
years. A proposed utility fee to
fund the project was routinely
voted down by commissioners
each time.
-"I don't see a critical need
for that (stormwater manage-
ment) project," Childers said.
"We're at sea level and we're on
an island." Constructing pervi-
ous surfaces, he said, was
expensive 'but nevertheless
something the commissioners
should look at.
"Eric, the one thing you did
say is, it's expensive," Poynter
said, "so we'll need the dollars.
The last few commissions have
kicked the can down the road ....
We can say we're going to get
this kitty (for stormwater man-
agement and beach renourish-
ment). If we decided not to do
stormwater this year, use it for
beach renourishment."
"We have to do something,"
Commissioner Jeffrey Bunch
said. "When something like
(Hurricane) Irene comes over
the beach, you should be able to
handle that. .... We can't right
now.
"It might be environmental-
ly mandated, but I'm not sure
it's the time," Childers said. "I'm
going to need some convincing,
with global warming, we won't
even be above water in 40
years."
"(Stor water management)
needs to be supported by a fee,"
said city Streets Superintendent
Rex A. Lester. "We can only do
so much with what we have."
"I supported this the first two
times around," Childers said.
'I'm -. 1ii,: i ., my threshold for
what I want to saddle citizens
with."
"We keep saying we need
dollars, but we don't want to
raise faces Poynter said. "(But)
we're government. Everything


AMELIA ISLAND
MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENTS ADAM GOODHEART


comes from the taxpayer."
"I don't want to cut any more
out (of the budget)," Bunch said.
"I want to say shame on the (pre-
vious) commissioners for not
doing something (about storm
management). If citizens, want
the streets to drain they need
to understand it costs money."
Poynter repeated his asser-
tion that beach renourishment
and stormwater management
would eventually need their own
reserves in the budget. "We con-
tinue to look at it as, we'll do it
next year," he said. "We didn't
save during those heydays. The
city is (..'.... less money
(from'property taxes) and we're
in a pickle right now. We're
going to the rollback every year.
This is the one time to set the
millage to where we should have
two years ago."
Czymbor said after the meet-
ing hewas planning to '-.,a I1i.
stormwater project, and possi-
blef.-. -.. ; t i 1ill it, back
for discussion some time in the
next fiscal year, which begins
Oct. 1.


CHILDERS
Continued from 1A
restaurant and brewpub
downtown.
"I believe we need a
diverse commission to best
represent our community,"
Childers wrote. "We are a
port town, a mill town, a mil-
itary town, a retirement com-
munity and a tourist town.
No one can argue that
$12,000 per annum is exor-
bitant."
Childers also suggested
"by election we can decide
whether or not a commis-
sioner deserves a raise."
Childers' and Steger's
terms expire in November.
The qualifying period to seek
election begins Sept. 9 and
ends Oct. 7. '
Qualifying packets may
be obtained from the Office
of the City Clerk, 204 Ash St.,
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
adaughtry@fbnewsleader.com


BrightW Bv of Fernandina Beach
INSURANCE
Welcomes
Jessica E. C.p. VcKinnon,
A life-long resident and long-time
Insurance Agent of Fernandina Beach.
2.106 SadleirSqiar'e ~ ,04)491-7622
Jessica.McKinnon@Brightway.com



),tw.


TUESDAY Hupp Live 6-10
WEDNESDAY- The Macy's Live 6-9
THURSDAY- Reggae Night with Chillakaya
BOGO Pizza 5-8
FRIDAY The Bo-Cats 7-1 I
SATURDAY Dan Voll I-5,JC & Mike 7-11
SUNDAY The Bush Doctors Duo 1-5
The Bush Doctors 7-1 I


S1- P

II







0..i:,i. i, *,.:ni, i .:t it 'r'st N ., tuCa s
COURTESY OFTHE AMsELIA ISLAND MUSEUM OF HISTORY
Federal troops marching through the streets of Fernandina.


WAR Continued from 1A
As the Union Army set-
tled into occupation, slaves
began escaping onto the
island from the surrounding
Confederate-held territory
seeking freedom, sometimes
at great risk. At first, these
runaway slaves were
returned to their masters.
Soon, however, the Union
reached a consensus that
runaway slaves should not
be returned to aid the
enemy, but rather be put to
work for the Union Army.
'Some were hired at a modest
salary to complete Fort
Clinch.


The summer of 1862 saw
-the nadir of the Union cause.
Linfcoln, realizing that his -
manpower needs could not
be met just from levies of
white northerners and
swayed by Fredrick
Douglas's pleas that his peo-
ple could and would fight,
made the decision to free.
and, more importantly, arm
the ex-slaves. Amelia Island
became one of the first
recruitment stations for ex-
slaves into the Union Army
and Navy.
On Sept. 10 Adam
Goodheart, a distinguished
scholar and author will, at
the invitation of our Amelia


Island Museum of History,
speak about that critical first
year of the Civil War and
how events elsewhere affect-
ed what happened here. This
event is graciously spon-
sored by John Hudson of
Raymond James &
Associates. For more infor-
mation visit www.ameliaimu-
seum.org or call 261-7378,
ext. 102.
Jim Longacre, a patent
attorney, is an active Amelia
Island Museum of History vol-
unteer and local historian
whose research interests
include black history, Civil
War history and the
Reconstruction Era.


LABOR DAY SALE


& CLEARANCE


FOR HER
K. j 30%-50% OFF


Through Monday StL-tI
SValidon Red Dot Clearance items. Camnnotbe
Take an cbinedwithother coupon offers on these ims.
Not valid on previously purchased merchandise.
EXTRA Excludes on purchases. May be used wth
Ta a fStein Mart Masteraw* Rewards certificates
SCo-ipoan mustbo suorendored at time of sale.
f Clt fer valid through 0YW5/11 in participating stores.
o S si Copon cannotbo eduopicated. Excludes Shoes.
S All Red Dotr

i II I III ill I oIII I IIII |
Ule ancinC 7002001050902114


SThrough Monday
S. Onetimneuse per transaction. Valid on cne
regular pnce cr sale item. Cannot be combined wth
Sothr coupon offers on ths item. Excludes Red Dot
Take an earance, Panache Gift Cards, Fabuus Finds,
SBOGO merchandise and onine purchases. Not vakd on
SEXTRA previouslypurchased merchandise, May be used with
: FF jStenMart MasterCarc Rewards Certficates. Coupon
20FF mustbe surrendered al time of sale. Offer validthrcugh
9/511 in prticipatng stores. Coupon cannot be
A rn'i () Bi e R eglar dicaiadI Not fctuse by Sterri Mart associates.
Any One Regular ||i n |
SPrice or Sale Item iII l I II III 11 II
Price OrSale Item 7002001020990215


: Through Monday S=u 6l
2 One time seOper transaction. Valid en co
LCurarI r,,'e o-sale tem. Cannot be combnedwith
O 'fe C,^ .M n c Ot f{ on t s Ite-.1F Excudes Red Dot
Take an a .. ,Pn icneGitCad ,FaLbuousFind-. ,
in -p c rdr lnie arnd ontine pjrdriaseis Not vard on
EXTRA r, c hasimediar-,ds. May r oe edwth ,
C. \CC" 'iO -Kin ,'t, sowardPosrCe.icates. Cor ponr 0
20 O FF mr vtf be tu'f rlIed at mil of llo. 0!ear valid thracugh

Any O ne Regular "|||". | | .|| .
: Price or Sale "ten' Ii iii 1II II1I1 III II
ice or Sale Ite I 7002001020990215 .

PLUS
Tah,. -n ealra o10 o OFF ,.our i.rn.r p,.jrcI.As-:- lihen you usoe our Stelin Mart Mastl.rCard"
,I ,..,I ' I. F 1 i ll -11l' 1I .., I.
For your nearest Stein Mart store visit www.steinmart.com or call 1-888-steinmart


PECAN ROLL






A real neighborhood Bakery, located
near Historic Downtown Fernandina
Beach. Featuring sweet and savory
pastries, cookies, cakes, breads and
more! We are always coming out with
new tasty treats, and love to
celebrate holidays it-th festive sweet
and savory' desserts and snacks.
Everything is made from scratch.
Come see what's coming

out of the ovens!


Wed Fri 6:30 am 4:00 pm
Sat & Sun 7:00 am 4:00 pm
122 South 8"' Street Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
904-491-9815
; .. 0 .


I










FtID \. S-,EPTEMBER 2.2011 NEWS News-Leader


Shop the business, not just the bargain
In Nassau CounIy, unlike cy and trust mind. Having
imeltrpoln tllarea's, we are not .-_ _. that influ- ment and hope
prone to move or g"t trans- ence our It is quality. reputation. consistency and trust son to deal wit]
frricd. Odds are we will be doing busi- makes forabe
here lor lha ;Vy years aild trade """ ness with the that influence our doing business with the Repeat bu
wilh im ovr a period professions professions. It works for our families and is lifeblood of an
of time t hs most esrtemed .. It works for They are the
relationships we may have are" our families comforting to have these relationships,. tomers we ha
with a prinmry caCre doctor, a and is com- of serving. Th
dent.il prlacti'- d an attorney for ting to "seldom believe
" .. .. a medical, dental, or REFFER'S have these ture and appliances get a little time to purchase a vehicle that even when the


legal need ar ises, we head to
lir off tice iled put our faith
Iand coulidence in them.
Occ ., ,' with a serious
.. cha.lleutg-, we get a sec-
Ooid opinioil,. 1 t1t tllis is not usu-
1 1. our primary ci' are physician,
it is i ll Ih specialist arena. So
our tfmily doctor, our dentist
and our local attorney exem-
plify the best examples of doing
business over a period of
decades. .,i-;, a premium on
their delivering an important
service.
'1ley are not sending us dis-
count offers for 40 percent off
a physical, half- price cavity
refilling or pay for two legal
hours and get one free. It is
quality, reputation, consisten-


CORNER relation-
ships.
Can this
RickKeffer thought
process


work in other areas where we
, do business? Absolutely, it can,
and for many people does.
Many experience it at a .bank
branch, an insurance agency,
a department store, a dry-clean-
er's, a grocer, a restaurant and
countless other fine businesses.
Now let me say there is nothing
wrong with a good value.
Grocers have weekly specials,
two-for-ones and coupon'offers
that are terrific. Restaurants
have a buy-one entree and get
a second free, which is also a
clear value. Things like furni-


trickier, but they have invento-
ry on special also.
As you head up-market to
real estate and cars, you get
closer to the typical profes-
sionals mentioned earlier in the
article. I could argue that a real-
tor (office and agent) is the
most important economic
choice to be made. Spending
usually a six-digit amount and
signing a 3r\-year note is a big
commitment. Professional
guidance can be the difference
between long-term satisfaction
or regret.
You can guess that I was
getting around to auto dealers.
As a certainty, there are a lot of
good deals made every day.
Wouldn't it be nice if when it is


there is someone familiar and
enjoyable to reward with your
business? It is possible and still
happens in this "deal of the
day" world.
Cars are actually bought by
consumers in a fairly close
range of transaction prices.
There is no buy-one, get-one
free offer. When surveyed after
the sale, one in six buyers say
price was the determining fac-
tor. People want a good price,
but they want much more. A
good experience buying the
product and the product itself
are the keys. Beyond that, hav-
ing traded there before is
invaluable. Knowing what to
expect from the service and
parts teams creates peace of


TNT .AIM !'TRIES. INC.

Join 115 this Sunday, September 4th


(d' '-: 15 a m. and 11:15 a.m. to hear

Gue4t Speaker, Tony Nolan as he

revca- I h,, w he enemv uses the fear


t[ keep


. 3


us from


discoverinlg what truly lies on the


other side.



Tony reccncly served as Tour Pastor

and Gospel Communicator for

Castlncj Crowns Lifesong Tour and

\\ int.:r Jam. the largest Christian

(ncCl ci t,,ur in America.


friends and fami lyto

exciting services this


Current Series: Serial Killers

- Jesus warned us that killers


16*a'. o- Sdlr oa'0ex t6te'-o
S.. S SOSx;n,#;co

26110 .


sales manage-
efully a salesper-
h that you know
tter experience.
business is the
.y organization.
happiest cus-
ve the privilege
ie deal chasers
e they got one
vy did, and make


I


Holloway McCollum



2 named to

FCCJ board
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick
Scott has announced three reap-
pointments and three appoint-
ments to the District Board of
Trustees, Florida State College
at Jacksonville.
They include Candace
"Candy" Holloway, 59, of
Bryceville, director of medical
education for the American
Lung Association of the
Southeast, who succeeds Linda
Asay and is appointed for a term
ending May 31, 2014.
Since 1984, Holloway has
also directed the Southeast
Thoracic Association. She has
been a member of the Florida
COPD Coalition Steering
Committee since 2008 and the
Pediatric Pulmonary Commu-
nity Advisory Board for the
University of Florida since 2007.
She has received the American
Lung Association and Florida
Thoracic Society Award for
Excellence in Educational
Programs.
Her husband, Barry
Holloway, is a Nassau County
commissioner.
James E. McCollum, 64, of
Fernandina Beach, a retired
regional director for BellSouth,
was reappointed for a term end-
ing May 31, 2015.
McCollum served as chair
of the Business Advisory
Councils of the University of
North Florida and the' Florida,
State College Technology
Center. He served in'the U.S.
Army from 1970 to 1972 and in
the U.S. Army Reserve from
1972 to 1976. He received his
bachelor's degree from Florida
State University and a master
of business administration from
the University of West Florida.
The appointments are sub-
ject to confirmation by the
Florida Senate.


WAREHOUSE SALE



40-70% OFF
Art, Lamps,Furniture,
Accessories
277-2660 *
3 16 Ash Street Sept I Sept 4
Downtown /4 a Oam-5pm


New Shipment of Lamps & Artlt



JOE'S PRODUCE
Now Located In Dave Tuirners Deerwalk Plaza




END OF SEASON SPECIAL!
$5 Basket of
Juicy Peaches
Come get some delicious
hand picked produce!
MONTHLY COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET SEPTEMBER 17~
REGISTER NOW FOR FREE SPACE

VOTED "BT OF THE BEST' DANCE STUDIO 201(1 2011


Bean
School of Dance

Fall classes have started--
We ARE still accepting
new students!


BIG DANCEWEAR SALE -
Buy any 3 items and
get a 20% discount
AND a FREE DANCE BAG!

Lots of classes available for
adults & children

Come by and take a look at
our schedule or check our website.
www.beandance.com

261 DABiN C
25 Norh 3rd treet ernandna Bea hF


'is


(ofI


t^.

j_

IF


**


I \ii [ v' ,ur
OiDL (i T li
011 Of ) Oli

W'\. c (- .


it a chore, not the exciting
opportunity it should be.
Take a page out of your pro-
fessional relationship playbook
and add a car dealer and realtor
to the mix. Find companies to
trade with and stick with them
when possible. Your life will be
better for it.
Irene missed us, but gosh,
do we need rain. Keep you fin-
gers crossed for a September
with evening showers and no
hurricane disruptions. Have a
good week.
Rick Keffer owns and oper-
ates Rick Keffer Dodge Chrysler
Jeep in Yulee. He invites ques-
tions or positive stories about
automobile use and ownership.
rwkcar@aol.com


POLITICS IN BRIEF

Tea Party
Nassau Patriots Tea
Party will host its First
Saturday Coffee at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday at Murray's Grille,
463852 State Road 200.
Morgan Thomas, a vet-
eran firearms and security
advisor, will discuss ways to
insure and improve person-
al security -
Contact Susan Lane at
753-0445 or www.nassaupa-
triots.ning.com for more
information.
Drewto speak
Nassau County Tax
Collector John Drew will be
the guest speaker at the
Sept. 9 Federated Republi-
can Women of Nassau
luncheon at the Golf Club
of Amelia Island.
Contact Gail Biondi by
Tuesday with your reserva-
tion at 261-8793, or email at
GJI [iondi@comcast.net.


-


, .- ,








FRiiD)AT. SLPT lMBlR2. 2011 NEWS Ncx .s.cac


Sawgrass Marriott Resort


still faces difficult recovery


One posh resort in North Florida has taken an
assured step in the right direction, while anoth-
er has stumbled but not quite fallen.
The Omni Amelia Island Plantation and the
Sawgrass Marriott Resort are heading in some-
what different directions. Both are premier des-
tinations that fell on hard times, but only the
Plantation has truly regained its footing.
When TRT Holdings Inc., the parent of Omni,
outbid several other prominent suitors to acquire
the Plantation's amenities, it was truly a deep-
pocketed knight in shining armor. TRT Holdings
and its billionaire owner Robert Rowling desired
an oceanfront resort to complement their portfolio
of 50 Omni hotels in North America.
And the Omni is just beginning to make its
footprint. After buying the resort last year for
$67 million, the Omni reportedly will invest almost
that much to significantly expand the flagship
Amelia Inn and renovate other parts of the 40-
year-old property.
It is a happy development to what had the
makings of a financial tragedy. While the Planta-
tion, located on the south end of Amelia Island,
sought bankruptcy protection, another major
employer was experiencing similar pains on the
north end the Smurfit Stone Contai-ner mill.
Smurfit's trials also ended happily, with the cor-
porate acquisition by RockTenn Co. As with the
Plantation, the mill is again humming along with
its box-making operations.
The Sawgrass Marriott has not fared as well.
In a recent development within the bankruptcy
proceedings, the real estate arm of financial jug-
gernaut Goldman Sachs may take over the Ponte
Vedra Beach resort.
Goklman Sachs is the major lender on the
property, currently valued at $130 million by the
courts. The hope is that Goldman would in turn
invest into necessary improvements in the resort
- if for no other reason than to dress it up for a


'" '^ . future sale.
-. The Goldman Sachs deal is
really one of last resort. The
two Irish investment groups
S" (RQB Resort LP and RQB
.,. Develop-ment LP) that owned
Sawgrass Marriott have been
unable to recapitalize the prop-
erty through the bankruptcy
courts. The property could now
STEVE'S be turned over to Goldman
MARKET Sachs within 60 days.
PLACE Also, on Sept. 8, a hearing
will reportedly be held on
-whether Sawgrass Marriott will
Steve Nicklas retain its long-standing name.
Either way, Goldman Sachs
would likely be able to continue a relationship
with the Marriott if and when it takes control.
An attorney representing Marriott reported-
ly cast a positive spin on the proposed Goldman
Sachs arrangement. If nothing else, the new
direction is certainly an improvement over the
uncertainties of bankruptcy.
The new plan was filed last week in U.S.
Bankruptcy Court in Jacksonville. RQB bought
the resort for $220 million in 200 and still owed
$193 million on the mortgage with Goldman
Sachs when it filed for bankruptcy. RQB hopes to
have the plan confirmed by the court in mid-
October.
Maybe there will be happy endings for both of
these storied and prestigious resorts in North
Florida. It would be enough to make the com-
munities of Amelia Island and Ponte Vedra Beach
smile.
Steve Nicklas is a financial advisor with a
major Wall Street firm who lives on Amelia Island.
His business columns appear in four newspapers in
North Florida. He can be reached at 753-0236.
thenicklasteam2@mnsn.com


Slow, steady wins race


]ASON AIDI'kRMA\N
for the 'ctNews l.xi'ii
Budgets are like diets: No
single approach works for
everyone; overly comnplicait:d
plans rarely work for long; and
sometimes it takes a few tries
before you gel it right.
One common stuinblirn
block is thinking of budgets as
punishment rather than a
means to achieve your life's
goals. Say you dream of buy-
ing a house: A budget should-
n't serve as a constant reminder
that you can't afford a down
payment; but rather, as a tool to
help identify where the money
goes each month so you cant
adjust spending and saving -
accordingly.
If you're new to budgeting
or you haven't been successful
in the past, start slowly First,
for a few months write down
every cent you spend: mort-
gage/rent, utilities, food, gas,
medical co-payments, bii thday
presents, credit card interest,
allowances the works Don't
forget annual expenses like
insurance and income tax. It
sounds tedious, but I guarantee
you'll be amazed by the bottom
line.
At the same time, track your


i1t1'0 '. C o0liljC:rig 0 onllley
coimling in vers-s ioeiu'y .going
out Ia be quile ( nilightilening.
Breaking even or losing money
each iionitlh mavy mean you
need to rind additional income
sources and/or aog.re'ssively
alter your' spendihig habits.
I;lid!uetinig tools. You can go
the pencil-and-paper route by
do\ unloading a budget template
((Coogle "Budget ..i -. I ).
hiteractive, online budgeting
calculators to help plan for
expenses also are widely avail-
able.
Once you're ready for the
next level, romany software pack-
ages and online account man-
agement services are available
- some are free. while others
charge a one-time or monthly
.fee. Features include:
Account ... -' o i,,,, -
import transaction information
and balances from bank, cred-
it card and ilnve(.st melnt and
other accounts into one com-
mon database.
Transfer money. between
accounts; some 'also allow
online bill payment.
Track, categorize and anno-
tate transactions-also helpful
when calculating income taxes.
Interactive charts and
graphs to help visualize


changes in spending and sav-
ings habits.
Start jotting down your
short- and long-term financial
goals buying a new car or
house, saving for retirement
and vacations, paying off debt,
financing college, building an
emergency fund, etc. You won't
solve all these financial chal-
lenges at once, but start whit-
tling away at them; over time
you'll notice gradual improve-
ments and be encouraged to
up the ante.
Here are a few suggestions:
Look for items that stand
out as extravagances you can
trim or eliminate, at least tem-
porarily.
Reduce insurance premi-
ums by raising deductibles.
Always pay at least mini-
mum loan and credit card bal-
ances to avoid late charges.
List accounts by interest
rate and pay off those with the
highest rates first.
Create separate 'savings
accounts for different long-term
goals and have contributions
automatically deducted from
your paycheck or checking
account even if it's only a
small amount each month.
Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education programs.


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FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2. 2011 OPINION News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties -"Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish .distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
-MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE I-IANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE, PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
ANGELINE MUDD.
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
SIAN PERRY. ASSISTANT EDITOR
BETH JONES. SPORTS EDITOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


I Community
C N I Newspapers,
C Incorporated


Nursing a

I I .. ni,, was a guest of Baptist Medical
Center Nassau. Medically speaking, I was
a patient, but the treatment I got from the
staff there was nothing short of royal.
It began with a cold that morphed into a
nasty little case of pneumonia. We Southern-
ers tend to heavily accent both syllables and
pronounce it New-Monia. As if there was an
Old-Monia. Or maybe we are saying it correct-
ly, since proper English was invented here in
the Deep South.
The difference between Old-Monia and
New-Monia is the current strain doesn't
respond as well to antibiotics as it used to.
Combine it with an attack of asthma and a
body already worn down by weeks of cough-
ing and hacking and you have a doctor's pre-
scription for intravenous antibiotics. And to
get those, you have to be admitted to the hos-
pital, which is how I ended up in Baptist
Medical Center Nassau for a few days last
week.
My oxygen blood saturation was pretty low
when my old friend and family physician Dr.
David Page admitted me. A calm, unflappable
man of science and medicine, he didn't like
the looks of something he saw on a chest X-
ray and wanted me to get a CAT scan of my
lungs while there. He suspected a dreadful lit-
tle condition, the name of which I won't even
attempt to spell, as the culprit behind the
pneumonia. A few minutes later, I was wheeled
into the Intensive Care Unit. Being a heart
patient, they don't like to fool around with
depressed blood oxygen saturation levels and


Cup of Joe


I



I-


mine was heading south in a
*r. ', hurry. In addition, the asth-
f ma I thought I only recently
developed was getting worse
S. by the minute and needed
immediate steroidal interven-
tion.
'iThe ICU room was like a
really nice hotel suite. Nice
big, comfy bed with a mat-
CUPOF tress that keep inflating and
JOE deflating in sections to
accommodate my weight and
the shifting thereof. I became
Joe Palmer the property of a registered
nurse named Lanie, who kept


telling me she's seen me somewhere before
but couldn't recall just where. Turns out, she
used to babysit for us when our kids were lit-
Stie. She ended up getting the gig when one of
our regular sitters bailed, which might or
might not have had something to do with a
cold winter day, a fireplace, some logs and a
small amount of gasoline pilfered from the
garage to get it started. Boy did it, too. Thank
Jehovah the house didn't catch fire.
Lanie took possession of my pale, hacking
self with the authority of a Marine Corps drill
instructor. In a few minutes short, I was punc-
tured, plugged in and hooked up to monitors
galore. The steroids gave me a roaring case of
1 the munchies and Lanie, yielding to my heart-
wrenching begging and pleading, plied me
with Graham crackers and milk, the pleasures
of which I'm denied at home because She


EDITORIAL

County: Stop


paying stipends

Nassau County should cease paying
stipends to members of the Planning and
Zoning Board and Conditional Use and
Variance Board.
We recently learned that in addition to
paying mileage for volunteer board mem-
bers who travel to meetings, the county pays
a stipend a salary, really for members of
these two boards.
We don't object to travel reimbursements
for gas mileage; some of these board mem-
bers live in far reaches of the county and
there is a cost to them to travel to Yulee for
board meetings.
But $150 a month stipends? No.
The sums aren't huge $1,800 a year per
board member. But it adds up.
County commissioners just agreed to set
aside more than $26,000 to continue paying
the stipends.
What's $26,000?
A salary, for one. The county is laying off
employees; might not that money be better
spent on keeping a worker on the payroll?
Malintnirr:n, ,- of bicycle lanes for another.
The county commission has balked at pay-
ing $25,000 a'year to maintain' $2 million of
bike lanes that are to be built by the state,
jeopardizing that project. We think the
$26,000 could be better spent on bike lanes
than planning board stipends.
Commissioners wondered how hard it
might be to get good planning board mem-
bers if the stipends were eliminated. How
would we know? Some of those planning
board members have been there for years
with no effort to replace them.
Perhaps turnover would be good, trading
longtime experience for a fresh look at how
the county should be planned as its popula-
tion grows.
We think there are plenty of talented;
eager people in Nassau County willing to
volunteer their time to attend these board
meetings.
Dump the stipend and put the money to
better use.


COMMUNITY THANKS

Flea and Tick Sale
The Nassau Humane Society wishes to
send a big "thank you" to Sean McGill and
crew for the use of the airport hangar for
our summer Flea & Tick sale held Aug. 19-
20. Thank you to everyone who contributed
books and merchandise for the. sale. A big
hug for all of our wonderful volunteers who
worked the sale in the heat without com-
plaint, helping to raise money to help our
homeless animals at the shelter until they
find their permanent homes. Finally, a spe-
cial "thanks" to all those shoppers who
came out and supported the sale. We appre-
ciate your generosity and loyalty.
Kathy Warner for the
Nassau Humane Society
Board of Directors



HOW TO WRITE US
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ters.
Maximum length is 500 words.
Letters must include writer's name
(printed and signature), address and
telephone number.
Writers are normally limited to one
letter in a 30-day period.
No political endorsements or poems
will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed.
Not all letters are published.
Send letters to:
mparnell@fbnewsleader. coin or to
the Editor, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina
Beach, FL 32035
Visit us on-line at fbnewsleadercom

The views expressed by the columnists and letter
writers on this page are their own and do not nec-
essarily reflect the views of the newspaper, its
owners or employees


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Short sales and
foreclosures
Florida law requires the
Property Appraiser to assess all
property at market value as of Jan.
1 each year. To accomplish this,
sales and market data from the prior
year are used.
In recent years, short sales and
foreclosures have become a more
prevalent feature of the market,
leading to questions as to whether
they should be used in assessing
property values for tax purposes.
These concerns have prompted
the Florida Department.of Revenue
(DOR), which oversees all Florida
county property appraisers, to issue
S lea memo about
short sales and
foreclosures.
The DOR
notes that while
both short sales
and foreclosures
can affect the
market, and
Stiles both are "associ-
ated with sales
under duress,"
foreclosures cannot be regarded as
"arms length" real estate transac-
tions. Thus, they are to be exclud-
ed per the Florida Department of
Revenue. As such, short sales, when
no "qualified" sales exist, "may be"
used to determine,market value
after careful review and absence of
any qualified sales.
There are presently economic
conditions that have increased the
frequency of transactions associat-
ed with sales under duress. While a
variety of circumstances exist, a
large number share the common
feature of the seller selling a prop-
erty for a price that is less than the
outstanding debt secured by the
property. These transactions have
come to be known as short sales.
Short sales provide a way for home-
owners to avoid the formal foreclo-
sure process and still be able to pay
off their loan by settling with lender.
In a short sale the seller may:
1. Negotiate with the lender to
write off the difference in the bal-
ance owed on the mortgage and
that collected at closing. This offers
the lender the advantage of avoiding
the additional expense of foreclos-
ing on the' property. These transac-
tions involve a great deal of due dili-
gence on the lender's part which
may include multiple appraisals on
the property; or
2. Bring the difference between
the balance owed on the mortgage
and those funds collected at the sale
to complete the transaction.
Even though either situation
likely involves duress and may lead
to disqualification, merely identify-
ing a transaction as a short sale is
not evidence enough for qualifica-
tion decisions. It is also imperative
to note, while a short sale may
involve a seller under duress, it also
involves the approval of a lender
that has the incentive to require a
market price to limit their losses.
This additional circumstance to a
short sale makes it particularly
important to evaluate the sale
beyond one involving a more tradi-
tional distressed seller situation.
Tammy Stiles
Nassau County Property
Appraiser

Roundabouts
The new roundabouts on Amelia
Island have proven to be practical,
convenient, safe and attractive traf-
fic engineering installations.
Europeans figured this out over a
century ago.
Five roundabouts have been
installed between the airport and
14th Street intersection and the
south end of Amelia Island on A1A.
All, except the one where A1A inter-
sects Buccaneer Trail, Gerbing
Road and Fletcher Avenue, have
been very attractively landscaped.


.1. ~. I


NATE BEELER/THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER


paint the Tea Party as backward
people who are against everything
and want to put the country into
default, what were you trying to
say?
I know sometimes you have a
little trouble with the facts, such as
the country would go into default.
We.have the money to service the
debt. Turbo Tax Tim the Treasury
Secretary would be the one in
charge of dispensing the money
and if he chose not to pay the inter-
est on the debt we would default.
Were you confused thinking he was
in the Tea Party?
Other than smearing the Tea
Party and distorting the facts, just
what was the point of your article?
The processor in the head of
many left-wing lunatics seems to be
severely damaged. Their logic mod-
ule appears to be burned to a crisp
too. Please upgrade to Tea Party
4.0.
David Scandaliato
Fernandina Beach

National Cholesterol
Education Month
High cholesterol affects more
than 65 million Americans, yet many
are untreated. Whether someone
is unaware of having high choles-
terol or unwilling to treat the con-
dition, high cholesterol is a serious
health risk. It. is easy to screen for
this condition, which has no symp-
toms. Since no one "feels" high cho-
lesterol, the only way to check for it
is a simple blood test.
Hyperlipidemia, or high choles-
terol, is known to lead to an increase
in cardiovascular events, such as
heart attacks and strokes.
Fortunately, there are easy steps to
lower cholesterol and, therefore,
lower the risk of serious events.
Some risk factors are considered
modifiable, which means that they
can be changed. Others are non-
modifiable, which means they can-
not be changed.
Modifiable risk factors include
smoking, activity level, body weight
and diet. Quitting smoking is
arguably the most important step
toward lowering the risk of heart
disease. For those that are seden-
tary, a simple program of gentle
physical exercise may improve cho-
lesterol numbers. Not only does the
exercise itself improve metabolism,
but after taking the time and effort
to exercise, it is easier to stay moti-
vated on a heart-healthy diet. Diets
low in saturated fats and high cho-
lesterol foods may also improve cho-
lesterol levels. Since being over-


weight is another risk factor for
heart problems, working toward
achieving a normal body weight
helps lower LDL (the bad choles-
terol) and raise HDL (good choles-
terol).
Non-modifiable risk factors can-
not be changed. If family members
have a history of heart disease, it is
even more important to improve
health in areas that can be changed,
as listed above. Men tend to have
slightly higher rates of heart dis-
ease in younger years, but women
start to catch up later in life. Both
men and women do have a higher
risk of heart attacks and strokes
with advancing age.
Target cholesterol levels vary
slightly depending on other health
issues. For example, for an other-
wise healthy individual without
other risk factors, an LDL of 100-129
may be considered acceptable.
However, for a smoker with high
blood pressure whose father had a
heart attack at age 40, the LDL
should be under 100. With diabetes
and some other conditions, the LDL
should be under 70.
Not knowing your cholesterol
level is no pilL ,l'i;,,ij What you
don't know can, in fact, hurt you. If
it has been a while since you have
thought about your cholesterol,
blood pressure, blood sugar or can-
cer risks, visit your doctor and talk
about what needs to be done. Take
time in September to find out where
you stand. There is no time like the
present to take charge of your
health.
Diana R. Twiggs, MD
Baptist Primary Care
Fernandina Beach

Bullying at school
I would just like to remind stu-
dents of all ages that calling names,
making snide remarks towards
another, tripping someone, making
remarks about someone's gender,
income level, etc., is consider bul-
lying, and you never know what that
child is going through at home, he
may be mourning the death of a
loved one, he may be taunted at
home, he may have alcoholics as
parents. Having to deal with anxi-
eties at home makes it 100 times
worse at school having to deal with
children that bully other children.
Remember the child that you are
bullying may be contemplating sui-
cide, have fun in school while you're
young, don't let a schoolmate be
left behind.
Vida Murphy
Fernandina Beach


By comparison, it looks conspicu-
ously unfinished. It remains a weed-'
infested and sign-littered eyesore, a
blight on this heavily trafficked part
of our beautiful island. Over one
year ago, our community associa-
tion reached an agreement in prin-
ciple, which has been recently reaf-
firmed, with FDOT Urban
Transportation Development and
Nassau County Engineering. In this
agreement FDOT would install
attractive low-maintenance land-
scaping, after entering into a main-
tenance agreement with Nassau
County Engineering for its future
maintenance. To enable this, FDOT
has already installed a sleeve for.
drip-line water irrigation. Ongoing
maintenance is minimal after the
landscaping has been established.
Many local residents have voiced
their frustration regarding the delay
in completing this roundabout land-
scaping project, including those
speaking for Omni Amelia Island '
Plantation, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island, Amelia Baptist Church,
Amelia Island Trail Group, Harris
Teeter and small businesses.
We urge FDOT to increase the
priority for scheduling this greatly
needed roundabout landscape
installation and we urge the County
to enter into the proposed round-
about landscape maintenance agree-
ment with FDOT, so that there will
be no further unnecessary delay in
completing this important project.
Samuel Jefferson Kennard
Amelia City Beautification
Association

Pet partners
Yulee's Petco store recently par-
ticipated in.the 2nd Annual Pet
Cancer Awareness month long
fundraiser and won first place!
Manager Shellie Tandarich said
they raised almost $4,000 to earn.
the honor of top fundraising Petco
store. Also, Shellic personally raised
enough money to be in a lottery
that she won! Her reward was a
$1,000 split between her store and
Cats Angels. Thank you, Shellie!
The Pet Cancer Awareness
fundraiser is held yearly and spon-
sored by Petco and Blue Buffalo
holistic products that are sold in
the Petco stores,
Wills Shores
Yulee

Time to upgrade
Re: "Flat Earth People" (Aug.
17).
Other than trying your best to


Who Must Be Obeyed says it makes me get
fat. I was feeling better already.
As it turns out, Dr. John Muir, the best
dang lung specialist around, decided, after two
hours of intense probing and questioning all
the way back to earliest childhood memory,,
that the so-called spells of bronchitis I'd been
plagued with as a child was really asthma. It
went dormant in my teens and young adult-
hood and has now decided, as is apparently
common, to make a guest appearance in my
later years. From henceforth, every time I
catch a cold, I have Mr. Asthma to look for-
ward to. The CAT scan also showed a left lung
so badly scarred that it doesn't even move air
properly and the bottom lobe of which could
eventually warrant removal if all else fails and
the infections continue to recur. Ouch.
After Lanie was done administering to me
and getting me stabilized, they moved me
down to a nice room on the floor, where a pas-
sel of other nurses and "associate care
providers" (they used to call them practical
nurses when I was a kid) took over.
So here's a shout-out to the angels in
scrubs who made my stay bearable and who
fattened me up on peanut butter, Graham
Crackers and milk: To Lanie, Linda, Kim,
Becky, Lori, Brenda and Tanya, thanks for the
pampering and the treats, the 4 a.m. wakeup
calls for blood, the smiles, the farting dog-sto-
ries and the movie reviews of flicks available
on Red Box I need to see.
You guys are the best. More milk, please?
;n.. m .' *'1-. n. ; .. ; ii. *









COMMUNITY


FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.2011/NEWS-LEADER


Annual Gos


We've come together to
make a joyful noise unto
the Lord. We're going to
give Him glory, honor and
praise. This is the (lay He has made. We
are rejoicing in it, lifting up His holy
name. He is truly worthy of all of our
praises, so come, let's give Him His
glory.
The annual Gospel Explosion being
held at First Missionary Baptist Church
will be at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 10. A typo
appeared in the first letters of invitation
for Sept. 11. A letter of correction fol-
lowed. The service will be on Saturday
evening, not Sunday. We will have a
high time in the Lord. We look forward
to seeing you there.
More than 30 churches from our
local and surrounding areas of Florida
and Georgia have been invited to come
share their love for God with us. Holy
Ghost filled deacons, praise teams,
praise dancers, male choruses and
choirs, all exploding to the glory and


BUICK
*GMC *CHEVROLET
464054 SR 200, Yulee
(904) 261-6821


pel Explosion

. .i; honor of God. You too churches
are invited to come er for the
take part, just in case Even if y
some may have forgot- we didn't
S-- ten to R.S.V.P. or You are p
maybe we missed your and we n
I call. You are i
We all have some- Semoria
thing to praise God for. Maybelle
We are truly blessed in we do for
NOWAND this area. So we wor- The fa
THEN ship Him because wor- Jamison,
... ship is the fruit of our Haywooc
lives and praise is the and than
Maybelle fruit of our lips. shown to
Kirkland When the word of loved one
the Lord come to us, it blessings
is not only a promise Birth(
through God's word, but it may also be Hunt, Gil
delivered by a still, small voice speaking Willie Sc
inside us or a divine messenger through Bostick,
words or a song of praise. The Alexande
Explosion says, "Thank you, God, for all Henry, F
you have done." Ardee Ha
There is not a limit to how many Raysor ar


Classic Carpets
& Interiors, Inc.
AbbyCarper BUDDY KELLUM
Abby Carpet5 President
802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291


FAMILY DENTISTRY B ad oc
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN OM Uacc Uck
Most Insurances Accepted H O M EPFURNT 'U ,,R E
Call For Appointment ( lTO r
261-6826
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
Al A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL
FREEIVIA% N Steve Johnson Automotive
WELL DRILLERS, INCI 1505 S 14th Street
Rock & Artesian Wells Fernandina Beach, FL
Pump Insalabons& .Repair 904-277-9719'
606 S 6th Streetr yg u u
Femandna Bead, EL 32034 Proudly Supporting Our Community


U.
~ '~'6 ('('41 C "~ /v'd /5


Sept. 10

s or groups are coming togeth-
e sake of exploding for Christ.
ou didn't get an invite, maybe
t know your address, come on.
part of the body of Christ too
eed you to explode with us.
invited. For information call
Charles at 556-6567 or
e Brown at 277-3285. Only what
SChrist will last.
families of the late Lewis
Johnnie Johnson and Fred
I express sincere appreciation
ks for all acts of kindness
them during the loss of their
es. They pray God's continued
Supon you.
day wishes to Cynthia Ann
na Perkins, Rodney Bacon,
ott, Nikita Geter, Arzell
Curtis Collins, Reginald
er Sr., Josiah Johnson, Sierra
lorenda Jones, India Rainey,
arris, Shamika Alberta, Shalene
nd Deena Raysor.


Peck alumni committee seeks former students


The Peck High School Alumni
Committee is pleased to announce
the formation of an action committee
for the purpose of verifying an inclusive
roster for a complete and accurate mail-
ing list.
This committee will make an all-out
attempt to contact all former students
and family members of the Peck com-
munity by canvassing Nassau, Duval
and surrounding Soptheast Georgia
counties. Its number one goal is to iden-
tify all eligible members and to follow up
with a vigorous informational campaign
of activities, goals, planning and eligibili-
ty for active membership.
The action committee will not be


Its number one goal is to
identify all eligible members
and to follow up with a
vigorous informational
campaign.


restricted to the local geographical area.
It is simultaneously expanding its
efforts by establishing out-of-area and
out-of-state representatives to assist in
targeted geographical areas, especially
South Florida, Metro Atlanta, New York


CHIRP
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and California where significant num-
bers of alumni/attendees reside. These
areas are high on the priority list. As a
first step, the committee seeks your sup-
port, cooperation and any constructive
suggestions to assist it in achieving this
goal.
It also asks that people consider
throwing their hat in the ring to serve as
an officer or standing committee mem-
ber. The meeting for nominating and
selecting new officers and committee
*members will convene Oct. 8 at noon at
the Peck Center. Organizers are looking
for a record turnout. For information
contact Mickey Mullen at (912) 576- -
2559 or sailorsupreme@tds.net.


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WEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS


Miss Yates, Mr. McEwen

Yates-McEwen
Sarah Elizabeth Yates and
David'James McEwen IV,
both of St. Simons Island, Ga.,
will be married at 6 p.m.
March 24, 2012, on the Sail-
maker lawn at Summer
Beach. The reception will fol-
low at The Golf Club of Ame-
lia Island at Summer Beach.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Victor and Mary
Yates of Yulee. The bride-
groom-elect is the son of
David and Susan McEwen of
Fernandina Beach.

LecaiCteIamer
Jessica Lorin LeClair and
Benjamin Broward. Creamer
Jr., both of Fernandina
Beach, will be married at 2
p.m. Oct. 16, 2011, at the
Florida House Inn with Judy
Williams officiating.'
A light reception will fol-
low the ceremony at the
Florida House Inn with a
cocktail reception following at
the local VFW'Post 4351.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Pamela LeClair of
Fernandina Beach and
Murray LeClair of Niota,
Tenn. She is a graduate of
Fernandina Beach High
School and is currently a
learning coach at the Cafe


Mr. Creamer, Miss LeClair


Mr. and Mrs. Thornton

4750 of The Ritz-Carlton,
Amelia Island.
The bridegroom-elect is
the son of Benjamin Creamer
Sr. and Rochelle Creamer of
Fernandina Beach. He is a
senior housing consultant for
Save On Homes of Florida.
Benny received his A.A.
degree from Florida State
College at Jacksonville and is
currently pursuing a degree
in sales and sales manage-
ment from Western
Governors University.

Thomton-Hogue
Joyce Hogue and Robert
(Bdbby) Thornton, both of
Fernandina Beach, were mar-
ried at 9 a.m. July 8, 2011, at
the Nassau County Court-
house on Centre Street in
Fernandina Beach.


Army Pvt. Eustache
Mine II has graduated from
.Basic Combat Training at
Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla.
During the nine weeks of
trailing, the soldier studied
the Army mission and re- .-
ceived instruction and train-
ing exercises in drill and cere- -
monies, Army history, core
values and traditions, military
courtesy, military justice,
physical fitness, first aid, rifle
marksmanship, weapons use,
map reading and land naviga-
tion, foot marches, armed and'
unarmed combat and field
maneuvers and tactics.
He is the son of Robin


Richmond of Fernandina
Beach.
N Charmell L. Mitchell
has been promoted to the
rank of master sergeant in the
U.S. Air Force:. -
.Mitchell, a traffic manage-
ment journeyman with 19
years of military service, is
assigned to the 425th Air.
Base Squadron at Izmir Air
Station, Turkey.
She is the daughter of
Charles L. and Grace Mitchell
of Fernandina Beach.
Her grandmother, Beatrice
Thompson, resides in .
Hilliard.,


BIRTH

N Stephen and Hope Do- Paternal grandparents are
ver of Fernandina Beach an- Jack and Debbie Dover of
nounce the biirth of a daugh- Yulee. Maternal grandparents
ter, Braelyn Avery, born at are Danny and Terry Bryant
9:53 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 18, of Yulee.
2011, at Shands in Jackson- The great-grandparents
ville. The baby weighed 8 are Clara Bass and Milby
pounds 4 ounces and meas- Smith, both of Yulee, and Jack
ured 20.5 inches in length, and Carole Dover of Jackson-
She joins brother Dash, 6. ville.



Movies under stars Saturday


On Saturday, families and
friends are invited to join the
Amelia Island Film Festival,
Stella Artois and Kmart for
free movies, a live band and a
chance to win two $50 gift
cards.
Bring your chairs and blan-
kets to the parking lot of
Kmart, 1525 Sadler Road, and
enjoy live classic rock by the
band Slow Show beginning at
6:30 p.m., followed by screen-


ings at 8 p.m. of the
Academy Award-winning
short "God of Love," Amelia
Island Film Festival People's
Choice winner "Butterfly
Circus" and winner of
five film festival awards,
"Jesusito de mi vida" (Dear
Child Jesus). These films are
rated PG.
There will be raffles, give-
aways and refreshments and
popcorn for sale.


Summer is here, so is humidity and frizzy hair. Here at
Madi's we have the solution; Keratin complex smoothing
therapy gives you smooth and silky hair with less drying
time. The perfect prescription for summer hair.

We would like ... '.- -.,-: .. .i Dovis,. .. Core specialist,
'he i' ", r' .'jr 'r j "- ? .-' r- nCC r l n / 1 ''" i"' ... in i'.
-II ,: 1,h,:, : l l ,.-,;( ; .i ,' i ,rih', *r. +, F ,.- ,+ ,, ,-,t ', _,, 'r ,1 ,.J2



We are looking for a stylist that would enjoy a friendly
work environment to hang their shears.


Welcome to

QGods House


MILITARY NEWS


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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2.2011/News-Leader


RELIGION


Bicycles, stress and 1


The pressure I was feeling was
unmistakable. Though often subtle
in the way it gets on me, I've gotten
better at recognizing it. Shortness of
breath, heart rate elevated, not sleep-
ing so well, for me, those are all
signs that I'm carrying things that
only God can fix. On top of that
(here's a bit of a confession), I don't
exercise like I know I should.
Anyway, on this particular day, I
was feeling covered up. "I'm going to
the beach with my bike," I
announced to my wife. "I've got to
get some exercise." "OK," she
replied, a bit surprised, seeing that
taking the bike to the beach was a
first. And off I went.
As I walked and rolled my
Walmart mountain bike through the
soft sand to a place suitable for rid-


PULPIT
NOTES

Pastor
Rob Goyette


ing, the warm salt
air, morning sun
and moderate sea
breeze all reached
out to greet me.
"Why do I put this
kind of stuff off?"
said to myself; and
with that, I threw
my leg over the
seat. It was clear;
being there was
just what the doct
had ordered.
Between pedal
prayers and deep,
meaningful


breaths, I slowly began to feel somi
of the pressure I was under peel
away. Actually, it wasn't until I decide
ed to turn around that I realized jus


getting God choose the
t how far I had gone. Another impor- there. That's the one I've chosen for
tant revelation was that the you. You can do it" In my heart, I
whole time I had been riding, the knew it was Him speaking. As I
d wind was at my back. Yep, you got it. looked down the beach at the vast
The ride home was not going to be distance before me, the pressure of
s so easy. the new gear and stiff sea breeze
I Thankfully, my Walmart moun- now on my face brought me to an
d tain bike has a wide selection of interesting revelation: God's
gears for just such occasions. I chose view of what I could handle and my
the one that I thought was doable, view of what I could handle were dif-
and then decided I would push ferent.
myself by going even one gear high- While I pedaled, God talked. It
tor er. I must admit, I was feeling pretty didn't take me long to figure out
good about myself and my new com- what He was saying. All the pres-
Is, mitment to physical fitness. sures I had been experiencing
That's when it happened. had been His way of pushing me
Somehow the tougher gear I had toward my full potential. Though I
e chosen suddenly skipped and don't like to admit it, it's true. Left to
jumped up to an even harder one. myself I'll choose a gear that's
d- When I reached forward to adjust it, doable, but not demanding of what
At I heard the Lord speak. "Leave it could be. The idea that God would


gear
bump the gear up and let the wind
blow against me, and all that at a
time when I was just trying to go
home, initially seemed a bit insensi-
tive of Him. When I finally figured
out it was His way of saying, "I see
something in you you don't yet see in
yourself," my attitude changed.
Incidentally, I'm happy to announce
that, by His grace, I made it all thU
way back to my car. A little rubbery
in my legs of course, but blessed by
the fact that He had pushed me to a
new level.
"For our light affliction, which is
but for a moment, works for us a far
more exceeding and eternal weight
of glory" (2Corinthians 4:17)
Robert L. Goyette is pastor of
Living Waters World Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Teen ensemble
Allegiance is a four-part
harmony touring group from
Amelia Island. This ensemble
of teens, grades six through
12, are from a variety of
churches and schools in
North Florida. The group
rehearses on Sundays from
6:15-7:45 p.m. in the education
building of the sponsoring
church, Amelia Baptist,
across from Harris Teeter.
They have worked and per-
formed from Florida to New
York in such venues as rescue
missions, schools, churches,
4 assisted living facilities, parks
and children's homes. Their
short dramas and music selec-
tions vary, from spiritual to
classical to contemporary
Christian styles. For informa-
tion call Amy Scott or Pam
Helton at Amelia Baptist
Church, 261-9527.
Upward Basketball
First Baptist Church is
offering Upward Basketball &
Cheerleading in the facility on
Eighth Street for kids in
kindergarten to sixth grade.
Register now at FBFirst.com.
The Upward Basketball sea-
son includes one-hour prac-
tice each week where coach-
es will teach skills like' .- ,
dribbling, oh,,, liii.g and pass-
ing. Cheerleaders can
improve their skills during
the one-hour practice each
weekwhere coaches teach
stances, motions, jumps and
cheers. First Baptist will
broadcast the games online.
Sign up online or stop by the
church at 1600 S. Eighth St.
during business hours to
receive a brochure and form.
Evaluation begins Sept. 10.

Cancer Support
Cirde
Wednesday, Sept. 7 will be
the beginning of a new min-
istry at Memorial UMC. Dr.
Nadine Vaughan will facilitate
a Cancer Support Circle for


Sunday School ........... ............. 9:30 am
Sunday Worship......................1.... 0:45 am
Wednesday AWANA.....................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study ................6:30.pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL32034
.261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org


La Tierra Prometida
,(The Promsle Land)
'ffsyansc Ministry
Hours:
.Sunday Wednesday
11am 7:30 pm 730 pm
l am the way, the truth yosoyvd caminoylaverdad,
ad thel5es ylavidamadksleead PIadre,,
NOsan cometh unto the sinopot mL
r ier,.butbyme.
Pastor Carlo a. the oldv Baptl t Chprch)
Serrano 416 Alachua St.
Fernandina Beach, FL
Church (904) 277-8455 32034
Cell (904) 349-2595 pastorcarlosserrano5151
@yahoo.com






U/


jfM^ Icc


those whose lives. have been
touched by cancer, directly or
indirectly. This will be a confi-
dential setting and will be
held in the Partin Center of
Memorial UMC, Wednesdays
at 6:15 p.m. For information
and to register contact Mary
in the office at 261-5769.
Newservice
Living Waters World
Outreach Center will conduct
Saturday evening services
beginning Sept. 10. Worship
begins at 6 p.m. with nursery
and children's ministry pro-
vided. Sunday morning serv-
ices will remain at 9:30 a.m.,
with nursery and children's
ministry provided as well. All
are welcome. The church is
located at 96282 Brady Point
Road, just west ofthe Shave
Bridge on AlA. Call 321-2117
or visit www.livingwater-
soutreach.org.
All about Purpose
LaVerne Mitchell
Ministries, Inc. will host a
free empowerment seminar
for women on Sept. 10 from
10 a.m.-i p.m. at the Amelia
Island Museum of History,
233 S. Third St. Enjoy a "Girls
Day Out" with a purpose. Let
your hair down, have.fun, be
empowered and inspired to'
function in the purpose you"
were designed to live.
Speakers are Angela
Spears, former news anchor
and currently deputy of com-
munications for Jacksonville
Mayor Alvin Brown, and Deb
Cottle, motivational speaker.
To RSVP and for details con-
tact Valerie Baker a 635-8789.
Rehearsals to begin
Pam Helton, music minis-
ter at Amelia Baptist Church,
announces the start of
rehearsals for the 14th annual
presentation of An Evening in
December. Performances will
be Dec. 9 and 11 at 7 p.m.
Rehearsals will be from 5-6
p.m. at Amelia Baptist Church
starting Sept. 18.


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service 10:30am
Bible Study 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pmr
Wednesday Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccanerer Tr. & Gbing Road, Femandna Bel
For More Information Call: 261-9527


SAMELIA
PLANTATION
CHAPEL
Ted Schroder, Pastor
Sunday Worship: 9:15 & 11:15 am
All are Welcome
36 Bowman Road, 277-4414
OffA1A at entrance to Omni Resort
Amelia Island Plantation
www.ameliachapel.com
facebook.comn/amelia.plantation.chapgel


The theme this year is
"The Heart of Christmas."
The program will feature the
stories behind a variety of
favorite Christmas songs told
through narration and
vignettes.
An instrumental ensemble
of local musicians including
strings, woodwinds, brass
and percussion will support
the choir. Singers from
throughout the area are
encouraged to attend the first
rehearsal Sept 18 to review
the music and find out more.
For information contact
Helton at 261-9527 or Allen
Lennon at 261-8799. Amelia
Baptist Church is located at
961167 Buccaneer Trail.
Free dinner
Springhill Baptist Church
will serve meals for individu-
als and families in need in the
area on Thursday, Sept 22,,
from 5-6:30 p.m. at the
church, 941017 Old
Nassauville Road.
Meals are served on the
fourth Thursday of each
month. In October,
November and December
they will be on the third
Thursday due to the holidays.
The church also delivers
meals to those who cannot
come. On the day of the meal
if possible, anyone attending,
or needing a meal delivered,
should call 261-4741, ext 110
in advance. For information,
call Robyn Stuckey at 583-
3280.
Homecoming
The Mount Olive
Historical and Restoration
Society invites the community
to the first Homecoming
Celebration of Little Mount
Olive of Nassauville on Sept.
24 at 11 a.m. Guest speaker
will be the Rev. Ulysses
Jackson of Jacksonville.
Dinner will be served on the
grounds. For more informa-
tion contact Sis. L. Rhodes at
225-5226 or Sis. A. Brooks at
(904) 764-6226.


Rflv. lliol[I
nov. JoasA I


Saturday Vigil Mass 4 pm & 5:30 pm
Saturday 4 pm Mass at Yulee United Methodist Church
Sunday Masses 8:00am, 10:00am,, & 12:00pm
Daily Mass- 8:30am Mon., Wed., Thurs & Fri.
6 pm '- Tuesday
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6:00pm;
Holy Day 8:30am, 6:00pm
Confessions: Saturday 3:15pm 3:45 pm or by appt
Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 9S4-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566




Living Waters
w oriL outreach
Coiramorary Worshp
Alll SUN 9;30am
a j W E D 7: 00pm
V vuth. Nursery d
S. Chirrein' innstries,
321 -2117
0b I tII..A, I-E
l.,,r 1m OnA1AIrlr5ddiatnti

Join u LIVE c.n the WVeb Sunda',


New Vision !'
Congregational
Church, UCC
Worship Sundays
al I 0:00 am
96074 I liesv r lHod in Valei
j .,:,noCang .allionaJ( urlt. ..,rg
904-225-0539



t^Eoawi


BIBLE STUDIES


Bible seminar
Meet key Bible characters
up close in a kind Bible semi-
nar that is fun and life chang-
ing, led by an instructor from
the National Ministry for
Walk Thru the Bible. In only
a few hours participants will
understand the New
Testament like never before.
Everyone is welcome to
the Walk Thru the Bible
Seminar on Sept. 11 at Prince
of Peace Lutheran Church.
Join worship service at 11
a.m.
After worship lunch will
be provided, followed by the
seminar at 1 p.m. and run-
ning through the afternoon.
Prince of Peace Lutheran
Church is located at 2600
Atlantic Ave., Fernandina"
Beach.
A $20 registration fee cov-
ers lunch and take home
"Walk Thru" materials. For
information or to register call
261-6306.

Men's Bible study
Community Bible Study
for men in Northeast Nassaiu
County will meet from 7-8:30
p.m. each Monday beginning
Sept. 12 at Amelia Baptist
Church, 961167 Buccaneer
Trail. The 30-week class will
study the New Testament
books of Hebrews, Galatians
and Philippians.'
Community Bible Study is
a non-denominational study
for the community, with peo-
ple from a variety of back-
grounds and all depths of
experience. Its mission is "to
make disciples of the Lord
Jesus Christ in our communi-
ties through caring, in-depth
Bible study, available to all."
Classes are structured
around a four-point approach
to scripture study; home,
study, small group discus-
sion, class summary applica-
tion and take home lessons.
There are numerous
opportunities for both
planned and informal fellow-


y1ULEE
BelU"CH"
^L,' VisttmysWelmmal
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15 am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Cleases For All Age
Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All
Servicewww.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
8S971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-.128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


CELEBRATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
Innovative Sty/a, Contemporary Music,
CasualAtmosphere'
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd. Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 9:00am and 10:30am
Nursery Provided
KidKredlble Children Ministries
Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth Program Wed. @ 6:30pm
Cosnnecng With' Chist..
Connec'fng wit People.



4 YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH

Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM

A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 Pastor Charlie Sward


FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
The Church
in the Heart of the City
With the Desire to be in the
Heart of All People
Sunday New Members Class 9a.m.r
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. every Sunday
Wednesday Noon-day Prayer
Wednesday tMid-week Service 7-9 p.m.Ministries:
Bus & Van, Couples, Singles, Youth


ship. All men are invited.,
Contact Norman Purdue at
206-0588 or Russ Hughes at
491-1734.

CBSdasses
CBS is a non-denomina-
tional Bible study where
men, women and children
across the nation and interna-
tionally are growing spiritual-
ly as they study God's Word.
Experience a caring, in-depth
study available to all. Local
classes include:
Ladies Day
Class/Children's Program
(newborns through eighth
grade), Wednesdays, 9:30-
11:30 a.m. at Amelia Baptist
Church starting Sept. 7. Call
Kathleen Minor at 225-8125.
Ladies EveningiClass,
Monday, 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church start-
ing Sept. 12. Call Claudette
Drummond at 321-0293.
Men's Evening Class,
Monday, 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist'Church start-
ing Sept. 12. Call Tony Taylor
at 321-0785.
Teen CBS (grades 9-
12), Mondays, 6:30 p.m. (din-
ner provided) at The Anchor
(First Presbyterian, Centre
and Sixth streets) starting
Sept. 12. Call Jeanne Scott at
* 491-9849. "
E-Teen Class iarly 'i
teens, grades 6-S), Mondays,
6:30 p.m. (dinner provided)
at First Baptist Church on
South Eighth Street. Call for
start date: Bobbie Birch, 415-
0365.
Capstone (college and
professionals), Thursdays at
7:30 p.m. at The Anchor
(First Presbyterian, Centre
and Sixth streets) starting
Sept. 15. Call Jeannie Langley
at 261-7658.
Chapd classes
Starting in September at
the Amelia Plantation Chapel:
"Reading the Bible for Life"
by George Guthrie discusses
the basic tools and attitudes
needed to read the Bible


SChrist
[ _- Fellowship
SChurch
17982 N. Main Street, Jacksonville
(just south of Yulee on US 17)
Sunday School 9:30AM '
Morning Worship 10:30 AM
Tuesday Bible Study 6:30,PM
Wednesday Choir Practice 7:00 PM
Dr. Dave Lawson
\ christfellowshipfl.com


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH. WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School.............. 9:45A.M.
Worship Service............ 10:55A.M.
Discipleship Training ......... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship ............ 6;:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper. .. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ..... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnlevlew Road (across from Sadlr Rd.)
904-.Z61-461S (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptstchurch.org


First Baptist
Church
Fernandina Beach
SUNDAY WORSHIP
9:00 Life Groups
10:15 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 6:30 PM
904-261-3617
FBFirst.com


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Sunday Morning Worship Services-10:30 am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided Bus Ministry Available
www blackrockbaptist.com


more effectively.
This study, led by Pastor,
Ted Schroder, begins Sept. 4
at 10:30 a.m.
Looking for an evening
Bible study? On Sept. 8 at
6:30 p.m. the chapel will
begin the study of Ephesians
using Watchman Nee's book,
Sit, Walk, Stand.
All men are invited to
study Hebrews with James
Reapsome's book, Hebrews:
Race to Glory, beginning
Sept. 13 at 11 a.m.
A Beth Moore Ladies'
Bible Study, "Beloved
Disciple, the Life and
Ministry of John," begins
Sept. 13 at 10 a.m.
Call the office at 277-4414
for information and to pur-
chase your study guide.
Teen study
Teen Community Bible
Study, a non-denominational
study of God's Word for high
school students, grades 9-12,
meets on Monday nights at
The Anchor (First
Presbyterian Church) at
^ Sixth and Centre streets in
Fernandina Beach. Join the
group starting Sept. 12 at
6:30 p.m. for dinner, praise
and worship, small group dis-
cussion and fun and fellow-
ship,. This year they will
study i h:- b i.k of Genesis.
For information contact
Jeanne Scott at 491-9849.
E-Teen study
Community Bible Study
for students in grades 6-8 is
called E-Teens and meets on
Monday nights at First
Baptist Church on Eighth
Street in Fernandina. This
year they will study the
books of Esther, I John and
Colossians.
The group will meet from
6:30-8:30 p.m. for dinner,
praise and worship, small
group discussion and fun and
fellowship.
For information contact
Bobbi Birch at 415-0365 or
Jeanne Scott at 491-9849.

St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes You!
Located at the corner
of 8th &Atlantlc
8:30,a.m. Holy Euchailst
9:15 a;m. Breakfast -Burns Hall
10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist
6 p.m. Celtic Worship 4th Sunday
6 p.m. TAIZE' 2nd Sunday
904-261-4293
www.stpetersparish.org



SMemorial
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


Traditional Family Worship.......8:30am & Ilam
Contemporary Woanhip...9E45am in Maxwell Hall
Youth Breakway......... 945am in Youth Center
Sunday School forall ages ....... 945am& 1am
WeIIdn IyDiner(A-May.....5:15pm-6:30pm





Dongtcan church
Sunday Services
Sunday HolyCommunion 8:00&10:00am
5th Sunday Morning Prayer -10:00 am
Sunday Children's Bible Class- 10:00 am
Wednesday Holy Communion -12:15 pm
Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
1830 Lake Park Dr, (Amelia Park acrsross roYMCA))
904-491-6082, oinOHolyTdnilyAligcan.org
We use Ihe ilurgy [rom lie 1928 Bookof Comono Prayer


Worship this week


at the place of your choice


M11R














SPORTS


N


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER2.2011
10A NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


It's gameday for hosting Pirates, Hornets



Union at FBHS, h-- W


Gainesville is

atYulee tonight
BETH JONES
News-Leader .
The 2011 season opens
tonight for high school foot-
ball teams and both Fernan-
dina Beach and Yulee are
hosting their openers.
The FBHS Pirates host
Union County tonight.
Kickoff is slated for 7:30 p.m.
Fernandina won its pre-
season Kickoff Classic 26-14
last week over Williston.
Tai Dunwood carried the
ball 20 times for 120 yards
and a trio of touchdowns to
lead the offense. Cole Willis
completed 2-of-5 passes for 60
yards and rushed nine times
for another 54 yards.
Trey Morris picked off a
pass and returned it 54 yards
for a touchdown.
The Pirate defense, forced
seven turnovers and gave up
just seven points. Williston
scored the final touchdown
with just 12 seconds left in
the game.
"Our special teams played
well," said Travis Hodge, first-
year head football coach at
FBHS. "Four touchbacks, 2-
of-4 on extra points, which we
must improve on. Connor
Nelson did an outstanding job
punting the football. He aver-
aged 37.3 yards a punt.
"We played well. Didn't
play great. We have a long
way to go. I am very proud
though of how hard the kids
are working. We're on the
right path we just have to con-
tinue to get better everyday."
The Yulee Hornets also
won their preseason match-
up, defeating Robert E. Lee
High School's Generals 44-22
last week.
Junior Derrick "Shocka"
Henry scored four times for
Yulee, accumulating 232
yards on 17 carries. He also
caught two passes for another
45 yards.
Teammate Kelvin, Rainey
scored for Yulee, returning a
fumble for a score.
Yulee hosts Gainesville
High tonight at 7 p.m. in its
2011 season opener.
Yulee will take the show
on the road next week, head-
ing to Atlanta to take on
Buford, defending state
champs, on Sept. 9 at 8:30
p.m. The game, which will be


.... :I.. H ..' ', '

/'" '... ,I-A
PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER
The Fernandina Beach High School football team in action in the spring, clockwise from top left: The defense wraps up a running back; Tai
Dunwood carries the ball; Cody Cosper tackles an opponent; quarterback Cole Willis; and Riley Hall wraps up a player.


televised nationally on
ESPNU, was originally sched-
uled for Sept. 10 but moved
up a day.


According to Donna
Jackson, athletic director at
Yulee, a charter bus is open
to all parents and fans inter-


ested in making the trip to
Atlanta. Cost for a seat on the
Hornet "spirit bus" is $35 per
person.


Call Jackson at Yulee High
School, 225-8641, to reserve a
spot.
The Yulee junior varsity


football team added a game to
its schedule and will host
Clay County at 6 p.m.
Thursday.


PIRATES, HORNETS OPEN SEASONS


-' ~tr~r
-I#Ib~J.


9


IJ'il l 1 1


~' Jr
~J,4


PHOTOS 1Y BY i'.I ONEIR;NE WS-Il.K A)H
It was opening day for both the Yulee and Fernandina Beach high
schools' volleyball teams Tuesday. Yulee's Lady Hornets hosted the
Fernandina Beach Lady Pirates. FBIIS won. Top right, Caroline Garner
and Savannah Young man the net for the Lady Pirates. Celeste Dawson
manages the ball at the net for Yulee, left. Kim Archer, above, is the
head coach this season for Yulee. Aiyssa Whitfield and Emmalee Bales,
right, share a laugh between plays.


fA
it:. z


-r


W;


. . Mvl aJWlISiMO 4f '^ "4
: . ,^ .


^**ji H rev.,<








FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.2011 SPORTS News-Leader


SPORTS SHORTS


Cheeeaderswashingcars
The Femandina Beach High School
cheerleaders are having a carwash from
9 a.m. to noon Sept. 3 at Kmart. Tickets
are $5.

Yulee Utde League
Yulee Little League will hold its annu-
al board meeting at 6 p.m. Sept. 21 in
the gym at the ballpark on Goodbread
Road. The 2012 elections will be held.


The McArthur Family YMCA is offer-
ing mini indoor soccer for children ages
3-4. The program is twice a week and
runs for five weeks from Oct. 17 through
Nov. 18.
Registration ends Sept. 15. The price
is $30 for members and $60-for non-
members. Each participant will receive a
T-shirt and a trophy.
For more details, call 261-1080 or
e-mail tchristenson@ firstcoastymca.org.

Getonthebus,Hornetfans
Yulee High School is arranging a
charter bus for parents and fans interest-
ed in traveling to Atlanta Sept. 9 for the
8:30 p.m. matchup between the Hornets
and Buford. The cost is $35 per person.
If interested, contact Donna Jackson at
YHS at 225-8641.

Laettnerhoops clinic
The Christian Laettner Basketball
Academy basketball clinic will be held
Oct. 1 at Peck Gym. Ages 7-9 go from 9-
10:30 a.m.; ages 10-12 from 11 a.m. to 1'
p.m.; and ages 13-15 frort 2-4 p.m. Fee
is $40 with a $10 discount for each addi-
tional sibling.
Laettner is a two-time NCAA champi-'
on, 1992 Olympic Dream Team member
and former NBA All-Star.
Pre-register at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center by Sept. 28. For infor-
mation, contact Jay at 277-7350, ext.
2013, or jrobertson@fbfl.org.

TurtleTrot
The Turtle Trot, Amelia Island's annu-
al Labor Day weekend run and walk, will
be run entirely on the beach with a 5K
out-and-back course starting and finish-
ing at Main Beach. Race-day headquar-
ters will be at Main Beach park and the
event will be a.5K only with half-mile and
one-mile kids' fun runs afterward. The
run/walk will start at 7:30 a.m. Sept. 3 on
the beach just south of Sandy Bottoms.
This is the 10th anniversary year for
the Turtle Trot and the race will raise
money for Amelia Island Sea Turtle
Watch and turtle patrols inside Fort
Clinch State Park. The race T-shirts will
feature original sea turtle an by Amelia
Island anisi Sandra Bater-Hinton. And to
mark the anniversary, there's a "retro"
touch from Jacksonville-area beach
races of days gone by the first 500


ED HARDEE/SPECIAL
The first 500 finishers in Saturday's annual Turtle Trot 5K will receive a
commemorative coffee mug. Displaying the mugs are Mary Duffy, presi-
dent of Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch; and Toby and Robin Lentz, presi-
dent and vice president of Amelia Island Runners.


finishers will receive a commemorative
coffee mug.
The Turtle Trot was the first race on
Amelia Island to use professional elec-
tronic timing with ChampionChips and
that tradition will also continue.
Awards categories will include the top
male and female finishers overall and
the top three in each of 15 age groups.
There will also be drawings for door
prizes at the post-race awards geremo-
ny. "Goodies" for pre-registered 5K run-
ners and walkers will include free passes
to the Main Beach Putt-Putt.
Registration fee for the 5K is $25 per
person. Fee is $10 per child for the half-
mile and one-mile kids' runs, which will
start on the beach at 8:30 a.m. Pre-reg-
istered youth runners will get a T-shirt
and all finishers get a ribbon. Parents
are encouraged to run with their kids for
free; just fill out a registration form.
Race-day registration will be from
6:30-7:15 a.m. at Main Beach Park. Visit
AmelialslandRunners.com or call (904)
303-3483. *

Blaze needs players
The North Florida Blaze girls traveling
softball 14-and-under and 12-and-under
teams are looking to fill their rosters.
Contact Ben Fouse at 225-0288.

PatriotDayshoot
The 2011 Patriot Day sporting clay
shoot is at 10 a.m. Sept. 9 at Shotgun
Sports, 86300 Hot Shot Trail in 'Yulee.
- This is the fourth year the Nassau
County Fire/Rescue Professionals,,Local
3101, has organized the shoot, an
important source of funding for the -Boys
& Girls Clubs of Nassau County.
Clay. shooting competition will be pre-
sented for'five-person teams, rotating
between 10 stations with awards for best
scores: The day includes breakfast and
lunch fresh from the grill after the shoot-


ing, donated by Gourmet Gourmet, plus
a raffle drawing.
he field is limited to 150 shooters.
Visit the website at www.patriot-
dayshoot.com or call Chris Gamble at
753-4644.

Putt-Puttfall league
Join the Putt-Putt Business League
for fun, fellowship and networking. The
fall league starts Sept. 6 at 7 p.m.
Play a team of four each week to
compete for prizes and bragging rights
over a seven-week schedule on
Tuesday at 7 p.m. Limited spots avail-
able. Fee is $259 plus tax per team and
includes ice cream for all team players
each week. For information or to reserve
a spot, call Aaron Bean at 753-0517.

Upward basketball
First Baptist Church, Fernandina
Beach is again offering Upward basket-
ball and cheerleading for children in
kindergarten through sixth grade in the
facility on Eighth Street. Register online
at www.FBFirst.com.
The season includes a one-hour
practice each week and coaches will
teach important skills like dribbling,
shooting and passing. Cheerleaders
also practice an hour each week and will
learn skills like stances, motions, jumps
and cheers. Register online or drop by
the church, 1600 South Eighth St., dur-
ing regular business hours. Evaluation
begins Sept. 10.

Salingubmeets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets
the first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic
Club at Ten Acres. Social hour at 6:30
l:nm; meeting at 7:30 p.m. Contact
Commodore Bill Bass at 277-4398 or
wwbass@bellsouth.net or visit
www.ameliaislandsailing.org.


2011 SCHEDULES


FERNANDINA BEACH
HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Golf
Sept. 9 MATANZAS 3:30
Sept. 14 BISHOP KENNY 3:45
Sept. 28 BISHOP KENNY 4:00
Sept. 30 at Matanzas 3:30
Oct. 4 at Bishop Kenny 4:00
Oct. 11 at Bolles 4:00
Oct. 17 District 5-1 A
Oct. 24 Region 2-1 A at UF
Nov. 1-2 State 1A
FERNANDINA BEACH
HIGH SCHOOL
Cross Country
Sept. 10 Border Clash, Jekyll
Sept. 17 Katie Caples Invitational
Sept. 29 GREENWAY INV. 4:00
Oct. 8 Ponte Vedra Invitational
Oct. 15 Pre-state, Dade City
Oct. 25 COUNTY 4:00
Oct. 29 Last Chance, Gainesville
Nov. 3 District 3-2A
Nov. 12 Region 1-2A, Lake City
Nov. 19 State 2A, Dade City


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Football
Sept. 2 GAINESVILLE
Sept. 9 at Buford, Ga.
Sept 16 SOUTH LAKE
Sept. 23 at Jackson
Oct. 7 at'Femandina
Oct. 14 at First Coast
Oct. 21 WEST NASSAU
Oct. 28 Trinity Christian *
Nov. 4 at Calvary Christ.
Nov. 11 HAMILTON**
* Homecoming
** Senior night

YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Junior Varsity Football
Sept. 8- CLAY COUNTY
Sept. 13 at Fernandina .
Sept. 22 at Baker County
Sept. 29 CORNERSTONE
Oct. 6 at St. Augustine
Oct. 13 CAMDEN (grade 9)
Oct. 20 at West Nassau
Oct. 25 FERNANDINA
FERNANDINA BEACH


Sept. 2
Sept. 9
Sept. 16
Sept. 23
Sept. 30
0ct. 7
Oct. 14
Oct. 21
Nov. 4
Nov. 10
* District


HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Football
UNION COUNTY
at Keystone Heights
Eagle's View
at Cocoa Beach
at Hilliard
YULEE*
at Matanzas
FORT WHITE**
at West Nassau
OAKLEAF


8:30
4:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:30
7:00
7:00
7:30
T:00




6:00
6:30
6:00
6:00
6:00
6:00
6:00
6:00


** Homecoming
FERNANDINA BEACH
HIGH SCHOOL
Junior Varsity Football
Sept. 8 KEYSTONE
Sept. 13 YULEE
Sept. 22 WEST NASSAU
Oct. 6 at Episcopal
Oct. 13 at Bolles
Oct. 27 at Yulee
FERNANDINA BEACH


Sept. 6
Sept. 15
Sept. 21
SepI 27
Sepi 29
Oct. 5
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 17


HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Golf
TRINITY
at Bishop Kenny
at West Nassau
PROVIDENCE
BISHOP KENNY
WEST NASSAU
at Trinity
at Providence
District 5-1A


4:00'
4:00
4:00
4:00
4:00
4:00
2:00.
4:00.


Oct. 24 Region 2-1A, E. Harbor
Oct. 31-Nov 2 State 1A, Tavares
FERNANDINA BEACH
HIGH SCHOOL
Swimming
Sept. 6 at St. Johns Co. Day 4:00
Sept. 10 Bulldog Inv., Bolles 8am
Sept. 13 ST. JOSEPH 4:00
Sept. 20 at Florida D&B 4:30
Sept. 22 at West Nassau 4:30
Sept. 24 at Lake City 9am
Sept. 27 at Baldwin 4.30
Sept. 29 PROVIDENCE 4:30
Oct. 4 NE Florida, Bolles 4:00
Oct. 8 FSPA, Orlando 8am
Oct. 11 COUNTY 4:00
Oct. 13 FLORIDA D&B 4:00
Oct. 20 BALDWIN 4:00
Oct. 27 District 2-1 A 9am
Nov. 3 Region 1-1A, Bolles 9am
Nov. 11 State 1A, Orlando 8am
FERNANDINA BEACH
HIGH SCHOOL
Volleyball
Sept. 6 at Episcopal 6:30
Sept 8 WEST NASSAU* 6:30
Sept. 12 at Bartram Trail 6:30
Sept. 13 CAMDEN COUNTY 6:30
Sept. 16-17 OVA in Orlando
Sept. 20 ORANGE PARK 6:30
Sept. 22 PROVIDENCE 6:30
Sept. 27 BISHOP KENNY 6:30
Sept. 29 at Pedro Menendez 6:30
Oct. 4 at Bolles I 6:30
Oct. 6 MANDARIN 6:30
Oct. 7-8 Bolles tournament
Oct. 13 at Providence 6:30
Oct. 14 JV tourney at BK
Oct. 18 PONTE VEDRA 6:30
Oct. 19 at Middleburg 6:30
Oct. 25-27 DISTRICT 4-4A
*District
FERNANDINA BEACH
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Football
Sept. 8 at St. Marys 6:30
Sept. 13 ST. MARYS 5:00
Sept. 20 CAMDEN 5:00
Sept. 27 CAMDEN 5:00
Oct. 4 CALLAHAN 6:30
Oct. 11 atYulee 6:30
Oct. 18 at Camden55:00
Oct. 24-25 Florida-Georia champs
YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
Football
Sept. 6 .at St. Marys 5:00
Sept. 13 HILLIARD 6:30
Sept. 20 ST MARYS 5:00
Sept. 27 at Camden 5:00
Oct. 4 at Charlton 5:00
Oct. 11 FERNANDINA .6:30
Oct. 18 Florida champ. 6:00
Oct. 24-25 Florida-Georgia champ.


Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep


YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
Volleyball
t. 5 WILKINSON (
t. 8 HILLIARD 6
)t. 12 FERNANDINA
t. 15 atHilliard
t. 16 CALLAHAN
t. 19 BAKER COUNTY
t. 20 at Wilkinson
t. 26 at Fernandina
t. 29 COUNTY 4-7


3:30
3:30
2:00
6:30
63:30
3:30
6:45
2:00
7:00


FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE
SCHOOL
Volleyball
Sept. 8 CALLAHAN 6:30
Sept. 12 at Yulee 2:00
Sept 15 BAKER .6:30
Sept 19 at Hilliard 6:30
Sept. 22 at Callafian 6:30
Sept 26 YULEE 2:30
Sept. 29 County al Yulee 4-7:00


You're invited to the SAO 9/11 Memorial Ceremony



Help us honor the bravery of America's First Responders


Doors Open 10am Saturday, Sept. 10th


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS


1:00 Color Guard, marches in

110 Children will begin

Pledge of Allegiance

1-15 National Anthem


S O
,4


1:20 Folding of the Flag

S130 Color Guard marches off

to Amazing Grace

1:40 21 gun Salute by the Color Guard

2:00 "Hug a Hero" DJ will thank and

ask for everyone present to find

and thank one of our local law

enforcement, fire rescue or military

Spersonel for their services.

3:00 We will announce the winners

of the raffles for free guts,

accessories, t-shirts, memberships, etc...




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She has a heart



for local families


IIlEATER A. PERRY
News Leader
-.1 ... i- ,,;,.; fam ilies is
our main focus," said Katrina
Acosta Bearden of Family
Support Services in Yulee.
The non-profit agency was
created to perform the duties
of Lead Agency in the Com-
munity Based Care project in
Duval County and Nassau
County.
As the Lead Agency,
Family Support Services of
North Florida provides all
child protection services pre-
viously performed by the
Department of Children and
Families.
"We hope to be able to
start a parent support group,"
said Bearden, who also hopes
her office will be able to offer
a food pantry in the future.
Bearden's role is to work
with families to create case
plans and help them with
budgeting and parenting
skills.
"Every clay is different
because every family has dif-
ferent needs. I cover the
entire county. Usually I visit
three or four families during a
typical day," she said.
The agency's goal is to
keep families together
11i 1.... *i11 education, reunifica-
tion, referral services and
training.


S .- "We try to
'" -' I help remove
barriers,"
f, said Bearden,
. r,,k by offering
parenting
.; -,. classes, budg-
'V eting help
Bearden and assis-
tance with
substance
abuse and mental health
issues.
"It's very: .lr-n. but it
also takes a lot out of you
because it's hard to see people
n..... i;, It feels like a blessing
when you can help," said
Bearden, adding that the holi-
days are 1 -1i".' ; i1 fulfilling
because the agency can see
how grateful the families are
for special help they receive at
that time.
"It changes your perspec-
tive on ili;,,.:. It's touching to
see so many people give."
Leisure activities include
spending time at the beach
with friends and family and
arts and crafts.
Family Support Services
also deals with adoption and
foster care. The office is locat-
ed at 87001 Professional Way
across from Yulee United
Methodist Church. Phone
225-5347. Business hours are
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Visit www.fssjax.org.
hperryfyuleesabuzz.com


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HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEAD)ER
"There are many great churches in Nassau County. My prayer is that everyone finds a Christian church and
makes it their home," says Pastor Tony Edgy, inset, of The Carpenter's House, above.



New home for Carpenter's House


HEATH ERA. PERRY
I News Leader


"Now we have a home,"
said Pastor Tony Edgy
after his Carpenter's House
C 1.-o.2',,_. .. moved one
mile from their previous
location to a new larger
campus.
The church started out in
the Tyler Plaza shopping cen-
ter on March 15, 2009, with a
group of 78 people.
In March 2010 the non-
denominational Christian
church moved into the
Yamaha building next to the
'. -i; ,, alley on US 17, but
when the -_ r.: ;,...,i;,, grew
to its current:,.i 1,.. i -I-,;, of
250, that building proved too
small. Then a miracle hap-
pened, said Edgy.
"God opened up a door for
our church to have a perma-





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nent home with buildings,
property and worship facili-
ties," he explained.
The large Family Life
Center on the new campus
boasts classrooms for all age
levels and a fully equipped
kitchen. A special area for
youth where they can get
homework help and enjoy a
video arcade and Interi-nt
caf6 is set to open in
December.
"We want Element Youth
to be a place where they can
come have fun but also learn
about Jesus."
Edgy says the congrega-
tion's youth are already enjoy-
ing the small skate park set
up on the expansive six-acre
property.
"We want to meet the
needs of every generation.
We have a Men's I 11-11,ii
directed by Greg Lea. Our


women's group meets for
prayer and is active in fixing
meals in times of need
(such as) funerals, baby and
bridal showers, and a core
group of ladies are always
there with a listening ear
over coffee. Nursery is pro-
vided at every service," said
Edgy.
There's a full children's
church every Sunday under
the direction of Keven
Wilkinson and Chad Lee and
children's classes on
Wednesday night run by
Mark and Evelyn McKie.
Youths enjoy free pizza
after their 'o.'..... -I 1% night
service in the Family Service
Building.
"Our men's ministry
has decided to help widows,
the elderly and handicapped
Sby doing what we call a
'Day of Blessing' where we


help clean a house or
yard or build a wheel-
chair ramp for the handi-
capped."
Long-term plans for the
property include building a
new sanctuary.
"God has blessed us to
grow and sent us people with
a 'mind to work' as the Bible
says ... and as God gives the
direction, we will move for-
ward in His timing," said
Edgy
Times of worship are
10:30 a.m. Sunday and
Wednesday at 7 p.m. for Bible
study and prayer meeting for
adults, and kids classes and
Element Youth.
The Carpenter's House is
located at 850987 US 17
North on the campus of the
former Nassau Nazarene
Fellowship. Phone 557-3049.


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i.f

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SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
Music NOTES
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2.2011
NEWS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH. FLORIDA


B SECTION


SUBMITTED
Jeff Goldberg and Karen Antworth lead a strong cast in
Fernandina Little Theatre's production of Patrick
'Hamilton's suspenseful melodrama "Angel Street,"
opening Saturday at 1014 Beech St., Fernandina Beach.


FLT set to kick off 20th season
For the News Leader Asked to describe the 15 years she theater can be," said Hart.
m h;b hpeen a nerlormer. crew member and Hart said the line-up for the 20th sc


For Karen Antworth, making her
debut with the Fernandina Little Theatre.
was a dream come true.
She realized her long-held dream of
being a stage actress when she was cast
as Luciana in the fledgling theater's 1996
production of Shakespeare's "The
Comedy of Errors," which was per-
formed in local courtyards around down-
town Fernandina.
Now Antworth is the leading lady of
"Angel Street," the atmospheric thriller
that opens Fernandina Little Theatre's
20th season on Saturday.


audience member at FIT, what came to
mind for Antworth was a line spoken in
"Outward Bound" by Mrs. Midget, one
of her favorite characters. "'It's heaven,
that's what it is, it's heaven!'"'
Modeled on the intimate "black box"
and Equity-waiver theaters of Los
Angeles and New York, Fernandina Little
Theatre has sought to provide entertain-
ing and challenging theatrical experi-
ences for both volunteers and theater-
goers, said founder and Managing
Artistic Director IKate Hart. "Our goal
has been to redefine what a community


son reflects the theatrical diversity FLT
has striven for over the years. "Angel
Street" is a classic melodrama of the
Broadway stage that made Vincent Price
a star in the 1930s and was adapted later
into the classic film "Gaslight" starring
Ingrid Bergman. It will be followed by
"Doubt: A Parable," John Patrick
Shanley's provocative drama that won
the 2005 Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award.
For the holidays, FLT will stage Barbara
Robinson's beloved "Best Christmas
FLT Continued on 3B


For the love of dogs (and people too)


ED HARDER
For the News-Leader
A walk to help save lives of both
people and animals is set for
Next weekend, inspired by a
. are-giver named Jester.
The "Bark for Life" dog-walk will
start at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, at
Central Park. Supporters can walk with
or without their dogs, on a one-mile
route into downtown Fernandina Beach.
Proceeds will benefit the Nassau
Humane Society and teams in the
American Cancer Society's upcoming
Fernandina Beach/Yulee Relay for Life.
Registration is $10 per dog in
advance or $15 on event day, including a
doggie bandana and goodie bag. You
can register now at the NHS Dog Park
on Airport Road, Redbones Dog Bakery
on South Eighth Street or online at
NassauHumaneSociety.com. Event-day
registration starts at 8 a.m. Sept. 10 at
Central Park.
Jester was a dog whose life was inter-
twined with cancer treatment and care.
His owners were Dr. Robert Joyce, a
Fernandina Beach oncologist, and his
wife Becky, a former oncology nurse.
The Weimaraner puppy came'rnr t.. th,;r
:I, i .h 'In 1.-l .- '-Lit from their chil- -
dren in 2002, a few months after Becky


. ...... ..--,2 ,7 7 7 ; -
\.-, ur > -n ,f hi .-
otf, bAu.ide tle_ 1.1nd
Stay \winth his framnil in
gs, a fct .- e.l he _frli -
Robert .iyice. l-ft,. t
Haieu. a .unIrui- r fr
.ife Aug. 1;.


would walk along tlih beac-.Ih vitli
Jester, who would listen as she shared
her feelings, anid -1,..., her with puppy
BARK Continued on 3B


lost her mother to breast cancer.
; "He was such a comforting compan-
. ion and such good therapy for me and
the whole family after my mom had


WALL MURAL


Undulating waves of colorful
mosaics seem to grow overnight
on the surface of the walls like colorful
vines at the Island Art Association
Education Center at 18 N. Second St.
See story, 3B.
PHOTOS BY PAULA PORTERFIELD IZZO
WWW.SEASCAPEPORTRAITS.COM


.1 '. SUBMITTED
Grammy Award-winning Zydeco artist Buckwheat
Zydeco, aka Stanley Dural, will headline the Amelia
Island Jazz Festival on Oct. 8.


Buckwheat Zydeco:


'Get ready
MICHAEL ROTHSCHILD
For the News-Leader
Grammy Award-winning
Zydeco artist Buckwheat
Zydeco promises a' high-pow-
ered performance for every-
one during his first-ever
appearance in Fernandina
Beach for the 2011 Amelia
Island Jazz Festival.
"We have played all over
Florida, so we know the folks
over there like to keep it mov-
ing," he said during an exclu-
sive interview for the News-
Leader. "We look forward to
making it a really fun night."
His high-powered seven-
piece group, which the New
York Times recently called
"one of the nation's best party


to party
bands," will perform Saturday,
Oct 8 within an expanded
courtyard seating arrange-
ment at St Peter's Episcopal
Church beginning at 8 p.m.
Zydeco, a distinctive form
of American roots music that
evolved in Southwest
Louisiana, was originally cre-
ated in the 19th century for
house dances where families
and friends gathered to social-
ize. Stanley Dural, aka
Buckwheat Zydeco, absorbed
much of it from his father's
best friend, accordionist
Clifton Chenier, whose popu-
larity in the 1950s propelled
the music towards the
American mainstream.
JAZZ Continued on 2B


ONTHE


Sounds on Centre }i.MLnL LANP
presents The Beech
Street Blues Band t c,
tonight in partnership B A
with the Amelia Island
Blues Festival, sched-
uled for Sept.16 and 17
at Main Beach. Enter
for a chance to win VIP
festival tickets during
the raffle and meetT- ,L'ptE.[ ,,aLb ,tit,& o17 011
Bone. the official festi-
val mascot. Visit www.ameliaislandbluesfest.com.
The monthly outdoor concerts, sponsored by
the Historic Fernandina Business Association,
are free to the public and held on Centre Street
between Front and Second streets from 6-8 p.m.
Bring a chair and your dancing shoes. For infor-
mation, sponsorship opportunities or to volun-
teer contact Loren Lum at 321-1605 or loren-
lump5pro.com.
Tn . ..,

The Sons of the American
Legion will hold a barbecue on
Sept. 3 starting at 11 a.m. at I
American Legion Post 54.626


S. Third St. Enjoy beef brisket and two sides for a
$10 donation. Proceeds go to programs that help
veterans and the community.


Looking for something to do on Saturdays with
the kids? The Amelia ...
Island Museum of '
History invites you to -
Story Time at the
Museum.
Beginning at 10:30
,a.m. every first and third Z::
Saturday of the month, -- ---
the program features different stories geared
toward 5- to 8-year-olds. The program is free and
open to the public. Contact Alex at 261-7378. ext.
102.

----
Join Nassau Sierra
Club Sept.7 at 7 p.m. at
the Council on Aging,
1367 South 18th St.. for a *.- -
Meet and Greet Potluck "
Dinner. As an added
attraction, the club will
screen the 40-minute


film "Green Porno," a scientifically graphic view of
the mating habits of insects and sea creatures,
narrated with deadpan earnestness by Isabella
Rosellini. Bring a dish to share and your mature
sense of humor. Free and open to the public. Call
277-4187 for information.



Walkin' Nassau will walk the north beach of


Amelia Island on Sept.
6 at 6 p.m. Meet at East
Ninth and North
Fletcher.
At Main Beach turn
right onto Atlantic,
take the second right
on to Tarpon Avenue.


I.
p*Jl


'~
t,',.:


turn right on Dolphin
then the first left on North Fletcher. Continue to
East Ninth Street where you will see parking on
the right. Look for people wearing Walkin' Nassau
T-shirts. Walking is free and all are welcome.
Dinner will follow at Sandy Bottoms for anyone
in terested. RSVP for dinner so organizers can
reserve space. Contact Jane Bailey at dnjbai-
ley@mindspring.com or 261-9884.
Submit items to Sian Perry at
sperry@fbnewsleader. com.


lester, abo,
:i favorite -p,
I'. where he'd
the evening
his pa.sing,
Hecl.- %f and
the Splash
the Nssaitl
Relay for L


ea-


's
.
, .--.
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FRIDAY. SEPILIMB R 2.2011 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS
The Amelia Island
Museum of History invites you
to its next Brown Bag Lunch
Lecture on Wednesday,
Sept. 7 at noon. This month
features Jim Longacre pre-
senting, The Road Less
Traveled, which will chronicle
the very different lives of three
individuals living in slavery
around Amelia Island before
and during the Civil War. This
program is free and open to
the public.
Contact Alex at 261-7378,
ext. 102 or alexbuell@a'melia-
museum.org.
The Newcomers Club of
Amelia Island will host its
monthly coffee on Sept. 8 at
10:30 a.m. All women who
reside in Nassau County (no
matter how long you have
lived here) are welcome to
attend. For information con-
tact Debbie Price at
deb203@aol.com or 310-
6060; or visit httpi/newcomer-
sclubofameliaisland.com.
The Rotary Club of
Amelia Island Sunrise is
working with Rotary Clubs
of Joplin, Mo., to benefit the
Joplin tornado victims with
a motorcycle Poker Run
Sept. 10 starting at Murray's
Grille in Yulee. Registration
and check-in is from 8-10 '
a.m., with a Blessing of the
Bikes at 8:30 a.m.
Registration fee is $35 per
rider and $10 per passenger
and includes morning coffee,
donuts and juice and a box


lunch from Sonny's Bar-B-Q
for the rider and passenger.
The ride will include stops in
Florida and Georgia and ends
at 3 p.m. at Sonny's in
Femandina Beach. The
awards ceremony, including
cash prizes, will be held at
3:30 p.m. Visit www.Amelia
IslandRotary.com.
Morocco Shrine 25th
'Annual Fall Arts & Crafts
Show will be held Sept. 10
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. and Sept.
11 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the
Morocco Shrine Center, 3800
St. Johns Bluff Road South,
Jacksonville.
The event showcases
more than 140 booths of
craftspeople from across the
region and attracts thousands
of visitors looking for a quality
gift or keepsake. Admission is
$3 for adults and kids under
12 are free. Handcrafted
woodwork, quilts, pottery, art-
work and more will be avail-
able as well as end-of-sum-
mer specials. For information
call (904) 642-5200, ext. 30.
* *
The Terpsichorean
Dance club will hold a
dance Sept. 10 from 7:30-
11:00 p.m. at the Woman's
Club of Fernandina Beach,
201 Jean Lafitte Blvd. Enjoy
music by Pender & Snow and
table snacks arid set-ups pro-
vided by the club. BYOB. The
theme is "Back to School" -
wear your school colors.
Dress is casual. Guests may
attend for a temporary mem-
bership fee of $40 per couple
in advance or $45 at the door.


2

8 3 7 9 61 2Z

1 7



9 4852

65 3 4 8

-6-8--l.---
68 9 7

192 6 87

4 3 6 1 9


'02011. StatePoint Media, Inc.

Fill in the squares so
that each row. column
and 3-by-3box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.
Wednesday, August 31
Solution


6 5 9 1 8 4 273
2 7 8 3 5 9-461
1 3 4 7 6 2 9 5 8
48721 3596.

9 1 2 6 7 5 3 8 4
54 3 8 9 7 61 2

8 91 426735


Call 491-1294 or email bon-
niesbeach @ bellsouth.net.
WIN WIN will meet Sept.
12 at 6:30 p.m. at 1310
North 14th St., hosted by
Natalie Blackwell. Please
bring a $10 check payable to
Rescuing Animals in Nassau
and an appetizer or dessert to
share. Non-alcoholic drinks
provided, bring wine to share,
,.and business cards to distrib-
ute. Door prizes optional.
Donations are tax-deductible.
Women in Nassau Helping
Women in Need is a local net-
working and fundraising
group. To RSVP contact
Natalie Blackwell at 261-2618
or natalierhea@live.com. Visit
www.winwinnassau.com.
* *
The Amelia Island Quilt
Guild will meet at 7 p.m.
Sept. 13 at the Woman's
Club, 201 Jean LaFitte Ave.
The program will offer practi-
cal guidance for using color in
the creation of a design. The
guilt guild meets the second
Tuesday and invites interest-
ed quilters, beginners or
advanced, to join. Programs
are free and open to the pub-
lic. For information visit aiquil-
ters.com.
The Men's Newcomers
Club of Amelia Island will
hold its first lunch meeting
of the 2011/12 year on Sept.
15 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Club.
The speakers will be Capt.
Brian Edwards of Nassau
County Fire Rescue and
Interim Chief Jason
Higginbotham of Fernandina
Beach Fire Rescue.
Tickets are $15 by Sept.
10 or $17 at the door. For
reservations call Bob Keane
at 277-4590. All men, whether
new or longtime Nassau
County residents, are wel-
come to attend and join the
club. Visit www.mensnew-
comersclub.org.

ART/GALLERIES
"Artistic Concoctions" of
O'Neal is accepting student
registration for piano and
vocal techniques, with
tutoring in language arts
and reading available for all
grades and abilities, as well
as adult enrichment classes in
a variety of artistic areas. See
Artistic Concoctions on
Facebook and contact
Nanette Autry at
nononan45@ hotmail.com for
information.
The Island Art
Association Gallery, 18 N.
Second St., is now open


JAZZ Continued from 1B
"He took me under his wing," Dural said,
"and I joined his bind in 1975 as an organ
player." Dural established Buckwheat
Zydeco in 1979 and
has since become the genre's most
popular performer. "It's like a
gumbo," he explained about his material.
"We draw our sounds from a soulful con-
coction of jazz, rhythm and blues,
Caribbean beats and New Orleans Brass
Bands, among others. But really, we call
what we do simply 'down home party
music.' Tell everyone to make sure they
bring two pairs of shoes to our show!," he
added.
Opening for Buckwheat Zydeco will
be Good Vibes, with AUF Scholarship
winners Nathan Skinner on vibes and
saxophonist John Sheard, and True Blue,
a tribute to the great Jimmy Smith, fea-
turing Scott Giddens, organ, and Don
Zentz, tenor sax, with special guest Barry


Story& Song
Mississippi native Tricia Walker will per-
form on Sept. 3 at the next "Evening of Story
& Song," the concert series hosted by Mark
and Donna Paz Kaufman and sponsored by
First Coast Community Bank and Mixed
Media Doors open at Bums Hall at St
Pete, Episc.p.al Parish at 7 15 pm n show
stars al 8 p m A .15 id,:cntirn O1 the
an-ii s requested Visn TriciaWalker xom or
can 2"--2e*-j '
Drum circle
The Ferrirdirna Beach Drum Circle
meets ihe iirst M.-rndav of each month from
.7- p n- a irhe DeeDee Barel Nalture Center
and North End Boal Ramp Next meeting is
Sep- 5 Call Bartbara Hill al l0-14) 556-3219
Oc Doug Eyron at 190u4i 556-1606
BBQ & Bluegrass
RAIN Humane Sccier, will host BBO &
Bluegrass Sepl 17 from 5-8 p m at Conron-
Eyed J.,es. A $10 donation includes barbe-
cue dinner Wah dessert. iced tea and music
and dancing Full cash par will be available
and a silent auciion is planned Enjoy banlo
playing veterinarian Dr Jim OCBrien and his
hillbilly band of pickers and grinnners Tickeis
sold al the d'co.r the day of Ihe event
Amelia Island Coffee
Amelia Island C.otee. 207 Centre Sl ,
hosts a music circle on Saturdays from 7 30-
C10 p m Admission is tree, all are welcome
Amelia River Cruises
Amelia River Cruises' Adult "BYOB" Twi-
lighi Tours Irom 7-9 p m. Tickets are $29 at 1
North Front St or call 261-9972 or book
online at www ameliarivercruises corn
Tonight is Gray Edentield, Sept 3 is Larry
LeMier Sept 4 is Hupp Huppman. Sept 5 is
Dan Voll and Sept 9 is Gray Edenfield
Cafe Karibo
Cafe Karibo 27 N Third St live music
Friday and Saturday from 6-9 p m on the
patio outside. live music Sundays '.from 5-6
p m Call 277-5269
DogStarTavem
Dcg Siar Tavern, 10 N Second St. live
music Call 277-8010
Green Turtle
The Green Turtle 14 S Third St live
music Call 321-2324
The Hammerhead
The Hammerhead. 2045 South Fletcher
Ave. karaoke on Sunday nights with Daddy
'0" DJ Follow The Hammerhead on
Facebock at Hammerheadbar Islandbbq"
Instant Groove
The Instant Groove plays each Thursday
nighl al The RrOz-Carllon, Amelia Island


after being closed for sever-
al days of renovation. On
view is the latest juried
Nouveau Art Show, "It's Five
O'Clock Somewhere."


Indigo Alley
Indigo Alley, 316 Centre St., Gabe's Jazz
Jam the first Tuesday of every month; other
three Tuesdays, Acoustic in the Round at 7
p.m.; second and third Wednesdays at 7,
p.m., Indigo Film Club; open mike night
Thursday at 7 30 p m live music Fridays
and Saturdays at 8 p m Call 261-7222
O'Kanes
,'Kane's Insh Pub and Eatery. 318
Centre St, free trivia each Monday at 7 30
p m wine tasting the third Tuesday at 6:30
pm with 10 wines for $10 along with
cheese and crackers and live entertainment,
dart tournament every Tuesday at 7 30 p.m.
Dan Voll Tuesdays from 7 30-11 30 pm the
Turner London Band Thursday from 8 30
p m -midnight and Friday and Saturday from
8-30 pm -12 30 a m Call 261-1000 Visit
www.okanes com
Palace Saloon
The Palace Saloon 117 Centre S1. enter-
lainment most nights The Labor Day
Weekend White Parry Sept 3 invites patrons
to dress in white and their sunglasses to
enloy tree entry and complimentary cocktails
until 10 pm Call Bill Childers at 491-3332 or
e-mail billifthepalacesaloon com to reserve
VIP seating Mondays reggae with Pili Pili
and C hillakaya One, Tuesdays Buck Smith
Proect:i Wednesdays Wes Cobb, Thursdays
Hupp & Rob in the Palace & DJ Buca in
Sheftield's. Friday and Saturdays regional
bands and DJ Anonymous at Sheffield's
Sandy Bottoms
Sandy Bottoms at Main Beach, 2910
Allantic Ave live entertainment every night
Call 310-6904 Visit
www SandvBottomsAmelia cornm
Sliders Seaside Grill
Sliders Seaside Grill, 1998 S Fletcher
Ave The Macy's in the lounge trom 6-10
pm Tonight and 7-11 p m Sepl 3. shaggin'
in the lounge Sundays from 4-7 p m: Pili Pili
in the tiki bar Wednesdays from 5 30-9 30
p m.. live music in the bar all weekend Call
277-6652 Visit www slidersseaside cornm
Snapper's
Snapper's Bar & Seafood Grill, 960062
Gateway Blvd Ladies Night on Thursdays at
7pm Call 491-6588
The Surf
The Surf Restaurant and Bar, 3199 South
Fletcher Ave Gary Keniston tonight. Pam
Atfronti Sept 3. Shc-Nuf 1-5 p m and DJ
Roc 6-10 p m. Sept 4 Andy Haney Sept. 5,
Richard Smrlh Sept 6 DJ Rock Sept 7,
Larry & The Backtracks Sept 8. and Richard
Stratton Sept 9 Music is 5-9 p m..Monday
through Thursday 6-10 p m Friday and Sa-
furday and noon-4 p.m and 5-9 p m Sun-
day. unless otherwise noted Call 261-5711
.' t -'. U i.- . -. '-.'. .


Featured artist for August is
Sharon Haffey, oil and acrylic
painter. Come see the new
look and enjoy all the artwork.
Visit www.islandart.org for


Greene, guitar, and Festival Artistic
Director Les DeMerle, drums.
The festival, scheduled for Oct. 2-9 in
Fernandina Beach, will also present the
internationally acclaimed and sultry jazz
songstress Nicole Henry with her eight-
piece group on Fi-iday, Oct. 7. The week
will kick off with its now infamous free
concert, Sunday, Oct. 2 in Amelia Park
with "VIP," the U.S. Navy Band
Southeast.
Other highlights will include
"Gypsy Rendezvous," a tribute to
the late, great fiddler and Django
Reinhardt accompanist, Stephane
Grapelli, featuring Virgin Records
recording artist, violinist Doug Cameron,
as special guest with the Dynamic Les
DeMerle Band plus vocalist Bonnie
Eisele on Oct. 7, an Oct. 5 Blues
Night at Sandy Bottoms showcasing
exciting jump blues artists, Toots
Lorraine and the Traffic, and the annual
Latin Night show and dance with the pop-


information.
The Island Art
OFF Continued on 3B


ular Jacksonville'combo, Impacto Latino,
Thursday, Oct. 6.
Both the Friday and Saturday evening
shows will close with late night jam ses-
sions at St. Peter's. Dixieland Jazz
Brunches with the Spare Rib Six will
round out the week on Sunday, Oct. 9 at
the Beech Street Grill.
Complete information and tickets for
all shows are available online at
www.aneliaislandjazzfestival.com.
A not-for-profit 501(c) (3) corporation,
the Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz
Festival distributes proceeds toward a
scholarship program to fund college edu-
cations for aspiring jazz musicians.
For more information, contact the
Festival Hotline at (904) 504-4772 or
email info@ameliaislandjazzfestival.com.
Michael Rothschild of Fernandina
Beach is president and owner of Landslide
Records in Atlanta, Ga., and serves on the
Amelia Island Jazz Festival board of direc-
tors.


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MUSIC NOTES


PRESENTED BY'




VolunteerMatch.org
Where volunteering begins.










FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2. 2011 LEISURE News-Leader


BARK Continuedfrom 1B
kisses. She watched as he playfully chased the ocean
foam, and be introduced her to fellow beachgoers.
"After two or three weeks I felt much better," she says.
"It was wonderful therapy." But Jester's work as a family
therapy dog had only begun.
In August 2007, Becky discovered a lump in her
breast She had the support of her family through the
surgery, chemo, radiation and recovery and she also
had Jester, who stayed by her side. "Life goes on, your
family has to get back to work, but your pet is always
there for you," she says. "Dogs are very sensitive to
what you're going through. You can be yourself with
them."
"He would nuzzle me and give me kisses," she wrote
in a tribute to her friend. "I knew he was thinking: 'Get
better; we need to go to the beach!'"
Becky did get better and now is a cancer survivor.
She and Jester resumed their beach walks. But in
September 2009, the gentle gray Weimaraner was diag-
nosed with kidney cancer.
Treatments gave him 10 months of quality time, but
"the day came when he couldn't get up to go to the
beach with me, he just wagged his tail," Becky says. "I
called the doctor, and said, 'I think it's time.'"
Cancer cases in both humans and dogs are increas-
ing "as we both get older," Dr. Robert Joyce says.
"There's much emphasis in oncology on the importance
of companionship, on care-givers," he says. "Husbands,
wives, children., best friends, friends at work we all
become care-givers.
"But we've overlooked animalsA've seen it over and
over, so many times dogs substitute as companions
when people can't, or won't."
Jester inspired the Joyces to help bring animals' care-
giving role to light. First they sponsored an office
fundraiser for the Relay for Life, which celebrates cancer
survivors and pays tribute to lost loved ones. They called
it 'The Bark for the Cure." Then Dr. Joyce, board chair-
man of the Cancer Society's Nassau County unit, decid-
ed to take it a step further or, actually, many steps.
"The Relay for Life also celebrates care-givers, the
people who support people with cancer," he says. "Pets
also fill that support role, and not just for people with
cancer, but with conditions like impaired sight or partial
paralysis. There are therapy dogs, companion dogs;
there are also homeless dogs, dogs who need help. We
decided we'd like to see the dogs get some kind of bene-
fit."
And so the Bark for Life was set up for Sept. 10 as an
early fundraiser for teams in the Relay for Life, which
will be held Nov. 5-6 at Yulee High School. Proceeds
from the "Bark" walk will also benefit the homeless pets
at the Nassau Humane Society on Airport Road.
The Joyces hope evei-yone who supports either cause
will take part in the event at Central Park. Jester will be
with them in spirit. "He was happy and pleasant and just
a sweetheart to the end," Becky says. "He was an inspi-
ration."
And his inspiration lives on.
Ed Hardee is a member of the Nassau Humane Society
Board of Directors and an active shelter volunteer.


Community called to help with mural


For the News Leader


Lately, whenever you drive by the Island
Art Association on North Second Street, it
looks different. There is a new Education
Center, a beautiful garden, newly refin-
ished Art Gallery and now, the incredible
undulating waves of colorful mosaics that
seem to grow overnight on the surface of
the walls like colorful vines.
The inspiration for this project began
when Denise Murphy visited a municipal
revitalization project in Vienna. Denise is a
fused glass and mosaic artist so, naturally,
she was attracted by the beautiful, abstract,
mosaic patterns created on the walls, side-
walks and streets. The town asked an
architect and artists to use their creativity
to rejuvenate a block. It is so colorful and
artistically appealing that the area draws
busloads of visitors daily and the town is



ULT Continued from 1B
Pageant Ever," about six unruly children
who teach a whole church about the true
meaning of Christmas. Next up will be
Tennesee Williams' delicate memory play
'The Glass Menagerie," followed by
Shakespeare's rollicking "Much Ado About
Nothing." Hart says a yet-to-be-determined
sixth play, a comedy, will finish up the sea-
son in the spring.
Outside of the formal season, FLT will
present a dinner theater production at the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center in
March, as well as host an encore presenta-
tion of "The Belle of Amherst" starring
Sinda Nichols.
. From its gypsy beginnings as a theatri-
cal production company performing in
courtyards, at the Palace Saloon and even
in the historic courtroom in the post office
on Centre Street, FLT has been based
since 1997 at 1014 Beech St. For many vol-


OFF Continued from 2B
Association will hold its
General Meeting Sept. 6 at 7
p.m. in the Education Center,
18 N. Second St., with the
"Mosaic Project" inspiration,
planning and demonstration,
with audience participation. The


flourishing as a result.
Armed with pictures, and enthusiasm,
Murphy approached a group of artists. It
took seconds to win the support of her fel-
low artists. Designs were created by Pain
Bennett and Susi Sax, and IRhonda l0Bristol
gave a colorful presentation to the Historic
District Council. Approval was given by the
HDC and the artists were now able to
begin to transform a common looking
building into a jewel that would give the
IAA a new vitality to attract art lovers from
all around.
The designs on the walls lake on a life
of their own. To date there have been more
than 25 volunteers creating mosaic boards,
applying them to the walls and then filling
in the spaces directly on the walls. Each
section is the creation of many artists
working together. Glass, pottery, china and
mementos have been donated as tesserae


unteers and audience members, the small
scale of the theater is one( of its biggest
assets. Annette Rawls, who also is appear-
ing in "Angel Street," said, "I like FLT.for
its people and for its down-to-earth feel.
Everyone has been warm and I. ,...1]1.
both on stage and in the audience. I tl
close, family environment makes it '...i so
intimidating to try new things'."
Providing children a place to explore
the theater has also been one'of the goals
of FIT from the beginning, said Hart, an
early childhood educator who is the direc-
tor of Miss Kate's Pre K. The Fernandina
Little Theatre this year has launched its
Youth Education Series, or YES! Under the
direction of Leslie Diaz, the young partici-
pants in YES! will perform a play for'chil-
dren at FIT on Oct. 8 and 9.
And in November, the theater on Beech
Street will host the inaugural Fernandina
Beach International Film Festival spon-
sored by the Amelia Island Film Society.


next Artrageous Artwalk Sept.
10 will feature Billie Parker and
Mary Borshard at a reception
from 5-8 p.m. Visit
www.islandart.org.
* *
Book Artist Eliza Holliday
will a hold a series of Artists
Books classes at the Island


Arts Ed nation Center this
fall, starting with a two-day
bookbinding class on
Saturday Sept. 10 and 17.
Participants will make a multi-
signature bank book with hard
board covered covers,' as well
as several smaller book proj-
ects. The Island Arts Education


from many people in the community. A liv-
ing legacy is being formed right before
your eyes, as friendships blossom and
tokens of memories are placed on the walls
as part of the waves of color.
Thanks to the many people that have
made contributions of time, effort and
materials, this project has been made possi-
ble. As the artists continue they will need
tesserae and other supplies. To contribute,
contact Murphy at murphy-david@com-
cast.net. For information about the project
visit www.islandart.org. Work will begin
again after summer.
To learn about this project and partici-
pate in making some panels to be used in
the next phase, all are welcome to attend
the IAA General Meeting at 7 p.m. Sept. 6
in the Education Center, 18 N. Second St.
Bring a memento to incorporate. This
meeting is free and open to the public.


Volunteer Doris Davis said she values
the bpportunityi,FLT provides local.resi-
dents to explore their creativity. "Young
and old child, teen, adult and seniors -
are welcomed to take a chance, live out a
dream or walk on the wild side by stepping
onto a stage that allows,and encourages
creative expression to grow and flourish
into magical moments of new identity
through story, character, costume and
emotion," Davis said. "Every day, ordinary
people like you and me are offered a safe
place to become a star, a villain, a diva or a
duck. It is a sanctuary for the limitless spir-
it of self expression."
FLT season tickets are still available at
$65 for six productions. General admission
tickets for "Angel Street" 'piI. f i an111.-
dates Sept. 3-10) are available at FLT, or in
advance at The UPS Store in the Publix
shopping center. Patrons are encouraged
to purchase tickets in advance, to guaran-
tee seating. Visit ameliaflt.org.


Center is at 18 N. Second St.
Holliday has been teaching
calligraphy and book arts
throughout the United States,
including workshops for librari-
ans arid.educators. To hold'
your place or for information
contact her at.556-2517 or
eliza@ letterist.com.


I TICKETS ON SALE NOW! I


Post-Labor Day Sale!
September 6th, 7th & 8th

50%F ALL
PRINTED
OFFTOPS


Business Hours
Mon-Fri 10-6pm
Sat 9-1pm


474301 E ST RD.200,
Fernandina.Beach. FL
904-277-8785


AMELIA ISLAND BLUES FESTIVAL TICKET OUTLETS


Hampton Inn
Amelia Island at Fernandina Beach
2549 Sadler Road
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 321-1111
Amelia Hotel at the Beach
1997 South Fletcher Avenue
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 206-5600
Amelia Island Liquors & Fine Wines
North Location.- 1411 Sadler Road
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
261-7708
Amelia Island Liquors & Fine Wines
South Location 4800 1st COast Highway
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 261-7701
Books Plus
107. Centre Street
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904261-033
Club 14
1114 South 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 261-0557


Palace Saloon
113 Centre Street
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904-491-3332
Fast Signs
1925 S 14th Street, Suite 7
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 261-0340
Red Otter
90 Amelia Village ,r 0l"
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 310-6500
Days Inn Hotel and Suites at the Beach
2707 Sadler Road
Fernandinn Braich. Florida 32034/
904 277-2300
Retail Therapy
732 South 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 277-1248
Sonny's Real Pit BBQ
2742 East State Road 200
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 261-6632


Fernandina Mulch and Stone
474415 East State Road 200
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 261-7177
Murray's Grille
463852 State Road 200
Yulee, Florida 32097
904 261-2727
Prosperity Bank
1458 Sadler Road
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 321-2811
Jerry Lee's Music & Artisans Emporium
101 West Saint Patrick Street
Saint Marys, Georgia 31558
912 576-4401
Red Otter
1012 Atlantic Avenue
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 206-1012
Sunoco Gas
2135 Sadler Road
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
904 277-2384


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I hiirsday, Septcrheur 1- lMonda.', .Spt" Aher 5


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. .... ... ^






Twilight Cruises

2011
Join us for a relaxing,' adult-oriented BYOB sun-
set cruise with live local entertainment and views
of the spectacular sunsets and rustically beautiful
landscape that make northeast Florida so unique.
$29 per person plus sales tax of 7%
BYOB; Adult-oriented Cruise
Live, local entertainment
(visit www.ameliarivercruises.com for the
line up of artists)
Local drink specials included
with the purchase of. your ticket
Departing every night from Fernandina Harbor
Marina at 7 p.m. 9 p.m.

Call now to reserve your seats!
904-261-9972











FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2. 201 I/NEws-LEADER


HOMES


Farmers market
Clean Ridge Soap
Company will be at the
Fernandina Farmers Market
on Sept. 3 and 24 with its bar
soaps made with the finest
essential oils, honey and
plants from local farms, olive,
jojoba, palm and coconut oils,
beeswax and rosemary oil
extract as its preservative.
Clean Ridge also offers liquid
soaps, lip balms, lotions and
shampoos. All are made by
hand with all-natural ingredi-
ents and essential oils of
geranium, lavender, lemon,
lime, peppermint and rose-
mary as well as ground vanil-
la beans, almonds, oats,
annotto seeds, ultramarine
oxides and parsley for col-
orants. There is no animal
testing.
Also at the market on
Saturday will be Olive My
Pickle and Gabriela's
Tamales. To sign up for the


E-Mail Newsletter, go to
www.fernandinafarmersmar-
ket.com. The award-winning
Fernandina Farmers Market,
open every Saturday from 9
a.m.-l p.m. at Seventh and
Centre streets, features farm
fresh produce as well as a-
variety of organic products,
specialty foods, baked goods
and prepared foods and a
wide variety of plants and
flowers. No pets, please.
Call 491-4872 or visit
www.fernandinafarmersmar-
ket.com. Visit www.amelia-
garden.com for information
about the 2012 Amelia Island
Garden Show on March 3
and 4.
Forest anniversary
Enjoy the 75th anniver-
sary celebration of Florida's
State Forests at Cary State
Forest, 7465 Pavilion Drive,
Bryceville on Sept. 10 from 5-
-10 p.m. with state forest his-
tory, sunset fire tower tours,


guided nature and night
hikes, hay rides, wildlife
exhibits, children's activities,
free hotdogs and other
refreshments. Limited camp-
sites available for overnight
stays. Call (904) 266-5021 or
email devon.mcfall@fresh-
fromflorida.com to RSVP
Visit www.fl-dof.com.
Fruits of the sea
Enjoy a "Fruits of the
Sea" lunch Sept. 24 from
noon-1 p.m. at The Florida
House Inn on South Third
Street, prepared by Chef
Susannah Sands. Speaker
Theresa Pierno is executive
vice president of the National
Park Conservation
Association. Tickets are $40
at Red Otter Outfitters or
www.ameliaislandcoastalcon-
nections.com. This is a High
Tide Women's Weekend
event in collaboration with
the National Park
Conservation Association.


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New Wildlife Habitat in Yulee


RESTON, Va. The
National Wildlife Federation
(NWF) announces that the
UF/IFAS Nassau County
Demonstration Gardens at
the James S. Page
Governmental Complex and
the Yulee Extension office
gardens have both become
Certified Wildlife Habitat
sites.
Both sites attract a variety
of birds, butterflies and other
wildlife by providing a
wildlife-friendly landscape.
The award-winning
UF/IFAS Nassau County
Demonstration Garden was
established in the fall of 2007.
The original 50-foot by 70-foot
garden has been expanded
over the years to include the
parking lot medians and
islands adjacent to the build-
ing that houses the
Supervisor of Elections and
other county offices'- the
Palm Demonstration Garden;
Trees for Urban settings an
initiative that received fund-
ing from the State Forestry
Department last year.
The Yulee Extension office
gardens were established in
2009 and were recently
expanded to include three
examples of raised beds for
citrus trees.
NWF began the Wildlife
Habitat certification program
in 1973 and has since
certified almost 150,000
habitats nationwide. The
UF/IFAS Nassau County
Demonstration Garden and
the Yulee Extension office
gardens are among more
than 3,000 schools and hun-,
dreds of business and
community sites that have
been certified. The:average
habitat is between 1/3 and
1/2 an acre, but certified sites
range from urban balconies to
those with many acres.
Any habitat enthusiast can
create a certified habitat and
learn the rewards of garden-
ing for wildlife. NWF teaches
the importance of environ.-
mental stewardship by provid-
ing'guidelines for making
landscapes more hospitable
to wildlife. In order to become
certified, a property, must pro-
vide the four basic elements
that all wildlife need: food,
water, cover and places to
raise young; and must employ
sustainable gardening prac-
tices. In addition to providing
for wildlife, certified habitats
conserve our natural
resources by reducing or
eliminating the need for fertil-
izers, pesticides and/or irriga-
tion water,,which ultimately
protects the air, soil and
water throughout our commu-
nities.
Habitats not only nurture
year-round resident birds but
also migratory birds by pro-
viding stopover sites for birds
traveling between their sum-
mer and winter ranges.
County Extension
Director/Horticulture Agent
Rebecca L Jordi sought certi-
fication for the county gar-
dens because of the synergy
between the Florida-Friendly


PHOTO BY REBECCA L. JORDI/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER
At the UF/IFAS Nassau County Demonstration Garden,
Crape Myrtle trees, Oakleaf Hydrangea and Schilling's
Holly shrubs provide ample "places to raise young" a
component of Wildlife Habitat certification.


Unlike lawns,
wildlife-friendly
native plants don't
need constant main-
tenance from gas
guzzling lawn mow-
ers or fertilizers that
require fossil fuels to.
manufacture. .


Landscaping program of the
University of Florida and the
National Wildlife Federation.
One of the nine principals of
Florida-Friendly Landscaping
is: attracts wildlife.,
'The County
Demonstration Gardens are
beautiful, but we need to
remind our citizens that the
gardens are also examples of,
good horticultural practices
with an emphasis 6n responsi-
ble stewardship of our natural
.resources," stated Jordi.
Creating habitats not only
helps wildlife, it can help
reduce global warming, pollu-
tion and'save energy costs as
well. Vicki Cannon,, county'
supervisor of elections,
recently reported a significant
reduction in the A/C energy
usage at her offices due
to the shade provided by
trees and shrubs in the
Demonstration Garden at the
James S. Page Governmental
Complex.
Homeowners, schools and
businesses can all participate
in creating environments by
replacing lawns with strategi-
cally located trees, and other
native vegetation can insulate
our homes from heat, cold
and wind, reducing our heat-
ing and cooling needs and
thus our carbon dioxide emis-
sions.
Unlike lawns, wildlife-
friendly native plants don't
need constant maintenance


from gas guzzling lawn mow-
ers or fertilizers that require
fossil fuels to manufacture.
An additional benefit is that
plants actually absorb carbon
dioxide, helping to further
reduce the amount of green-
house gases in the atmos-
* phere.
All of this adds up to
increased areas available for
wildlife habitats, reductions in
levels of carbon dioxide that
cause global warming, and
reduced energy costs. More
information about how gar-
deners can reduce the effects
of global warming can be
found at www.nwf.org/gar-
denersguide.
Participants who achieve
certification receive member-
ship in the National Wildlife
Federation, including a one-
year subscription to the
award-winning National
Wildlife magazine with inspir-
ing wildlife articlesand amaz-
ing nature photography. They.
also receive a personalized
certificate and quarterly e-
newsletters and are eligible to
purchase NWF's special out-
door sign designating their
yard or gardenias wildlife-
friendly.
NWF currently offers the
most comprehensive guideto
date on gardening for wildlife,
authored by David.
Mizejewski, NWF Naturalist
and spokesperson. The 128-
page Attracting Birds,
Butterflies and Other
Backyard Wildlife won the
Independent Book Publishers
Association 2005 award for
Best Gardening/Agriculture
Book of the Year. It is full of
,practical, how-to information
to make your yard a wildlife
haven and certify your prop-
erty as an official NWF
Wildlife Habitat site. The
book costs $12.95 and is avail-
able at www.shopnwf.org.
More information'about
gardening for wildlife and ,
how to have your yard certi-
fled is available at
www.rwf.org/habitat or by
calling 1-800-822-9919.


HOME & GARDEN BRIEFS


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without

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38 billion plastic bottles /
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wIte 800-356-7971,
www.clearwatersystems.com
Since 1946 L. K..tic 6


'CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH
HISTORIC DISTRICT COUNCIL
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Historic District Council of the City of Fernandina
Beach, Florida, will hold a Quasi-Judicial public hearing on Thursday. September 15,2011 at
5:00 PM in the City Commission Chambers. 204 Ash Street. Fernandina Beach. Florida to
review the following Certificate of Appropriateness applications:
CERTIFICATE OFAPPROPRIATENESS
OLD BUSINESS
CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH COMFORT STATION. 102 CENTRE STREET (HDC
2008-28). RENOVATION AND ADDITION TO EXISTING COM FORT STATION.
(Quasi-Judicial)
NEW BUSINESS
CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH. MARINE STREET (IDC 2011-29). PLACEMENT OF
BENCH IN.CITY RIGHT-OF-WAY AT MARINE STREET (Quasi-Judicial)
ROGER KING AND KAREN VARNEY. 111 S. 7th STREET (HDC 2011-30). DEMOLITION
OF DECK ON SOUTH ELEVATION OF PRIMARY STRUCTURE AND DEMOLITION
OF ACCESSORY STRUCTURE. (Quasi-Judicial)
VARIANCE
ROGER KING AND KAREN VARNEY. Ill S.7th STREET (HIDC 2011-27). REQUEST
FOR DEVIATION FROM lAND DEVELOPMENT CODE SECTION 4.02.01 REGARD-
ING MINIMUM LOT WIDTH REQUIREMENTS AND LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE
SECTION 4.02.03 REGARDING MINIMUM SETBACKS. (Quasi-Judicial)
A copy of the application may be inspected in thc .-I. .. of thc Planning Department. City
Hall. 204 Ash Street. between the hours of 7:30 AM 5:00PM. Monday through Friday. For
information on the application, please contact the Planning Departmeni at 277-7325.
INTERESTED PARTIES MAY APPEAR AT SAID HEARING AND BE HIIEARD AS '()I TIl:E ADVIS)\BI.ITY OF ANY
ACTION.WHICH MAY BE CONSIDERED. ANY PERSONS WITH DISA3BILITIL.S RIEQUIIRING ACCOMMODA-
TIONS IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROGRAM OR ACTIVITY SH1OUD CONTACT 277 7305. TTY 277-
7399, (TTY NUMBER FOR ALL CITY OFFICES) OR THROUGH I TH I: IORI DA RII,,Y SiRVICEAT I 800 955 8771
AT LEAST 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE TO REQUEST SUCH ACCOMMODAF IpN
IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY f- IE BOARD/CM MISSI( )N WITFH RESPECT
TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH HEARING. S/iHE WILL NEED TO ENSU RE I1AT A VERBA'IM
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE. WHICH RECORD INCLUDES Tl H: I LSTIMIIONY 'AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.


*-\

















CLASSIFIED


5B
NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.2011


To Place An Ad, Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Finandal-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 81? [r,..eST. Er, P-,o:,er, 85 ',nO.--LirurU'.-.,-hed
101 Card of Tnansnk 205 .Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to 6u, ,or R- r.r 14- West Nrassau Cou-,nty1 59 Homes-Fursr, ed
102 LOSt E, FOund 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Hornes; 915 Klngsland'Sr. llars mC. Horr,s-ULnfur1nr-;rdn
103 In r.le-nor,arr. 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Hon-, i:.r-- 81i, Camnaen Countr/ 661 vaao,- Re.,,tai
10-14 Personai 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Islar-i.j Hc,n-r,-- 6 l Clirr.r Areas 62, B r & eBr.akFas[
105 PuDbli. rJ.r,,-. 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 8 ? Office"'
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfronr 851 6 Roo'mmate Wanted BE CWrrmerc,aioue Ea,
10? SpEcoa Oc-caso,. 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE* 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condomin,.nu 6852 rlobe H-.mes 901 TRANSPORTATION
108 Gft Snops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 J.ewelry/Watches 701 Boats &Trailers 808 Orf iiand ',J.lee 5 rl.:o,iDe ome L..r-: 901 Autorr.nBi es
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 L.:.[- 54 Por..'T. 902 Truc5ks
201 Help WanIted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farmn _. 8:re a_ .,5 apartmenri-FurrihLed .-03 vani
202 Sales-us,r,neFs 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Cor,,,-ner.:,-i'R.ra,I a56 6Srpair.amen i-UrLnuri,- ?14 T-lt.r.cclcs
203 Hotei,'Restaurant '402 Stocks & Bonds 605. Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Prop.|,-r, E,:r.a-cange 5' C.:-,r,do.s-Frn.ehd, 905 Commer.:,ai

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW


102 Lost & Found I
If You Have Lost Your Pet please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.


105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein Is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes It
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination. .
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
Informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
HUD 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.






201 Help Wanted
NEEDED Part-time hairstylist, full
time nail tech, and part-time facialist.
Please call (904)557-5829.
WANTED FT FRONT DESK Coordin-
ator/Administrative Assistant in a
medical clinic in FB. Preferably 2 yrs
experience. Must be able to multi-task
& be a team player. Fax resume to
(904)879-4986. No phone calls please!
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE CLEANER
NEEDED Part Time: Office/business
or residential Cleaning experience is
preferred. $8.00 $12.00.
ACScleaing.com (click on Apply for
Job) or call 912-920-6230.
Earn $$$ Helping MDsl Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
LOCAL APARTMENT COMPLEX is
currently seeking a professional Maint-
enance Technician with outstanding
service skills. Duties will include unit
turnovers and make readies, general
maintenance and repair of apartments
to Include basic plumbing, electrical
work, appliance and AC repair. Duties
will also include on-call emergency
services as needed. Please submit
resumes & salary requirements to:
fernandinamaintenanceiob(@vahoo.com
or mail to: Fernandina Maintenance
Job, 300 Willowbend Rd., Suite 200,
Peachtree City, GA 30269.
LAWN TECH WORKING SUPERVIS-
OR Must have excellent driving
record and irrigation & landscaping
experience. References checked. Drug
free workplace. (904)277-6700 .
BOOTH RENTAL AVAILABLE FOR
HAIR STYLIST at a modem, trendy
full service salon in Yulee, FL on SR-
200. Fixed weekly rent or 60% of
income to you. Call (904)419-3490.
JOIN OUR TEAM of dedicated
professionals and enjoy coming to
work. We seek a self-directed clinical
orthodontic assistant who will appre-
ciate our high-quality, patient-centered
orthodontic practice. Must have exc-
ellent communication and manual dex-
terity skills. Orthodontic experience is
a plus. Bring resume to 2400 Saint
Marys Rd. Ste. A, St. Marys, GA.


201 Help Wanted
LIBRARY ASSISTANT II
Nassau County has an opening for a
Library Assistant II in the Library
Department at $11.34 hourly. Requires
high school diploma or GED and one to
two years of general library, customer
service and/or office experience. Must
possess valid driver's license. Applica-
tions will be accepted thru September
8, 2011 and can 'be obtained in the
Human Resources Department located
at 96135 Nassau, Place, Suite 5, Yulee,
FL.32097. Phone (904)491-7332 or fax
(904)321-5797. www.nassaucountvfl.
corn. EOE/M/F/D/V Drug Free Work-
place

FREE TAX SCHOOL Earn extra
income after taking course. Flexible
schedule. Register now, course starts
mid-September. Call (904)3'10-6273,
Liberty Tax Service. Small free for
books.
BENEFITS SPECIALIST
Nassau County has an opening for a
Benefits Specialist in the Human
Resources office at $12.70 hourly plus
benefits. Requires high school diploma
or GED and six years of responsible
clerical or secretarial work experience.
Three years insurance and or benefits
experience preferred. Must possess
valid driver's license. Applications will
be accepted thru September 8, 2011.
Application and job' description can be
obtained from the Human Resources
Department located at 96135 Nassau
Place, Suite 5, Yulee, FL 32097. Tel-
ephone (904)491-7332, fax (904)321-
5797 or www.nassaucountyfl.com

OUR ST. MARY'S, GA DENTAL TEAM -
is searching for an exceptionally skilled
dental chairside assistant with experience
to join us. Candidates should have an
upbeat personality and strong
organizational ability. Expanded functions
would be helpful and strong listening and
communication skills are essential. If you
are mature, health-centered in your
lifestyle, personally stable, a hard worker,
and committed to learning, we want to
hear from you. .You may email your
resume ,to smilel2@tds.net or fax to
(912)882 7564.

BUSY MEDICAL PRACTICE in
Fernandina Beach seeking a full time
front office person. Minimal 1 year exp-
erience required. Fax: (904)261-7790

DRIVERS TEAMS: $6,000 Team
Sign-On Bonus when you team drive
for Werner Enterprises! Call Now for
details! 1-888-880-5902

Attn: Southeast Regional Drivers
Tired of running to the-Northeast?
Currently Hiring CO and I/C
-to run in the Southeast
Home Weekly!! Great Benefits!i
Must have 1 year T/T exp.
CDL-A Drivers; Driver Unload
Ask about Dedicated Opportunities
in your Area
EPES TRANSPORT
877-983-0202
www.epestransport,comr

204 Work Wanted
GOT ROT? Siding & wood replace-ment,
leak repair, -drywall repair home repairs.
Licensed carpentry. (904)206-0005

HOMEOWNER'S HELPER Int./Ext.
painting, carpentry, cleaning, install
doors, windows, and fixtures. 40 yrs
exp., reliable. Call Jim (904)583-3485.

TAMMY'S HOUSEKEEPING. Amelia
& Fernandina. Weekly or bi-weekly.
Free estimates. Please call 502-7409.
Ref. available.

505 INTERNET MARKETING now
helping small business owners get on
Google in the Fernandina Beach area.
http://www.505internetmarketing.com


207 Business
Opportunities
CAFE 4 SALE Small easy to run
operation, owner will train & finance for
right buyer. Call Phil @ Amelia Coastal
Realty 904-261-2770.


305 Tutoring
AFTER SCHOOL & HOME SCHOOL
TUTORING Many options available.
Flexible schedule. Exp'd home-school
parent and tutor. (904)310-6126 OR
virtualhomeschoolcoachtlamail.comrn

1306 Lessons/Classes
GUITAR LESSONS All styles. First
lesson free. Lessons tailored to
student. $15 per 30 minutes or $25
per hoar. Call (904)415-8992.
DO YOUR OWN TAXES? Not sure if
you're doing them correctly? Come to
Liberty Tax and we'll explain how to get
the most from your self-prepared
return. 5 week class. Cost $50.
(904)310-6273

503. Pets/Supplies
AKC DOBERMAN PUPS Lrg. Amer/
Slovak/Russian bloodlines. 2 Black
males; 2 Red males; 1 Red fern. (904)
583-5486
LAB PUPPIES FOR SALE All colors,
male and female. Only to good homes.
Some shots and wormed. No papers.
Full blooded. 557-4770 or 225-4813.

p I:J!MJpm


601 Garage Sales


WE GOT IT! Tools & boxes,
mechanics air impact wrenches, air
comp(s), books, Ig stainless steel deep
fry, small boat, call for info., utility
trailer boat trailer. .96334 Duval Rd.
Ph. 415-4655, 491-8511
LABOR DAY ESTATE SALE! -
Handyman's Delight! Hand & power
tools, Baja motorbike, Briggs &
Stratton pressure washer, antiques,
Kinkaid art, glass, furniture, Mary Kay,
Avon jewelry & cosmetics, cedar hope
chests, much more!! In F.B. from 8th
street see signs, in AAAA Storage bldg.
Sat. 9/3, 9am-?
SAT., 8AM-? Furniture, antiques,
collectibles, lots of miscellaneous.
1615 Broome St.
2-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat. 9/3.
2120 Highland Street near the
lighthouse. 8am sharp til it's all gone.
SAT., 8AM-3PM 551 S. Fletcher,
across frohi Amelia Oceanfront Bed
& Breakfast Inn. 100+ TY Beanies;
CDs & MOVIES. $1 or 10/$5; BOOKS
50 to $1;- INFANTS/TODDLERS clothes
& misc; TEEN girls/boys SZ S-L;
Computer games; Back packs $5;
Scooter $30; Skateboards $10;
Helmets $3; LADIES: SZ XL $75/large
box; Oriental cabinet/table $100/ea;
10'X12' Oriental rug $950/OBO;
Antique planter $100 FIRM; Gateway/
flat screen $50; 'Vette wheels $100/
set, and much more! 261-9390
YULEE ANTIQUE BARN Re-Opening
Soon Inside vendor & outside flea
market spaces for rent. (904)225-1952
Yuleeantiquebarn.com
WAREHOUSE SALE for Front &
Centre- Everything 40%-70% off. Art,
lamps, bakers racks, accent tables,
pillows, screens, decorative accessor-
ies. Find your bargains. 316 Ash St.,
downtown. 10am-5pm, Thurs. 9/1-
Sun. 9/4.


601 Garage Sales I
HUGE FAMILY YARD SALE 95056
Jentry Ln., Fernandina Beach. Fri. 9/2,
Sat. 9/3 & Sun. 9/4, 8am-4pm. Kids
clothes & toys, adult clothing, tools,
household items, & lots of misc. stuff.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE in
Hickory Village. Sat. 9/3, 8am-2pm.
86299 Evergreen Place, Yulee. Work
tools, Kelty child carrier backpack,
paintings, other items.
ANTIQUE '& COLLECTIBLE SALE! -
Fri. 9/2, Sam-10am. 1317 Ridge Ct.
(off Citrona).


GARAGE SALE Baby items,
furniture, stereo equip., & much more.
Sat. 9/3, 8am-12 noon. 98130 Little
Piney Island Pt.
BIG YARD & TENT SALE 731
Tarpon Ave. Sat. 9/2, 9am-? Antiques,
coins, Shabby Chic furniture, & lots
more. Look on Craig's List this week
for pics & more details.
YARD SALE Sat. 9/2, 8am-? 756
Wall St., off Amelia.Rd. near Pizza Hut.
Washing machine, table w/4 chairs,
small wood cabinet, & other misc.
items.

602 Articles for SaleI
FOR SALE Pride lift chair, like new,
$250. Thomasville entertainment
center, $250. Call (904)556-2892.


603 Miscellaneous


CAST NETS FOR SALE Taped nets
for shrimping, or nets without tape.
Call (800)473-5971. (Hilliard)

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL Window units & ice ma-
chines, used all sizes w/warr. Repairs
to central & window AC's, refrigerators
I& freezers. Kish's (904)225-9717.


802 Mobile Homes
TRAILER FOR SALE 1979 Skyline,
12x61, 2BR/1BA, very good condition.
Have title & ready to move. $5,000.
(904)583-4459

805 Beaches


OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.


I 806 Waterfront


Waterfront Homes & Lots Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.


LOCATION, LOCATION
Live on the lake & be only 5
minutes from the ocean. Go to:
www.oceanridgeonamelia.com


807 Condominiums
COTTAGES AT STONEY Creek
3BR/2BA deluxe condo in quiet, gated
community. Great location. All new,
appliances. Furnished or unfurnished.
$1100/mo. with $1000 security
deposit. For more info, call 904-753-
1833 or iohnmvcelx@qmail.com


809 Lots
MARSH FRONT LOT with tidal creek.
Approximately 3/4 acre. $49K or owner
financing with $500 down & $279/mo.
Call (904)234-8986.


814 West Nassau County
HILLIARD 1326 SQ FT 3/2
Handicap accessible home, built in '01
on landscaped 1 acre lot off Co. Rd.
108. Great room setup, must sacrifice
at 59K, also will consider owner finance
at $425/mo. (904)589-9585





851 Roommate Wanted
ROOM FOR RENT in Five Points
area. Private Bedroom and Bath with
use of kitchen and living room. Non-
smoker. Electric & Cable included.
$500 month with deposit required.
Call 206-1058 for details & appt.
$500/MO. Utilities included. $250
deposit. Nice, quiet neighborhood
located in small subdivision in
Nassauville area. Call (904)583-1695.


.I I 852 Mobile Homes I


EXTRA NICE 2BR/2BA w/CH&A,.
screened porch, carport, located on 1
acre in Yulee. $700/mo. + $500 dep.
(904)335-7276
RV RENTALS AVAILABLE in a
campground. ,Weekly or monthly. All
utilities & WiFi included. (904)225-5577.
95114 GENTRY LN. Nassauville,
3BR/2BA, porches, water conditioner.
$950/mo. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc.
(904)277-0006
ON ISLAND 1, 2 & 3BR SWMH, in
park, clean, remodeled: Starting
$150/wk, $600/mo + dep. Utils avail.
2BR/2BA Duplex includes utils.
261-5034
3BR MOBILE HOME in trailer park in
Yulee. $575/mo + $400/dep. Call
Candy at 904-239-9559.
3BR/2BA MOBILE HOMES.- for rent
starting at $800/mo. Call 753-2155 or
753-2156
PRIVATE 3BR/1.SBA MH $700,
$350 deposit. Call (904)225-5419.
3BR/2BA 14X70 MH on 1 acre in
Yulee. $625/mo. +' $625 dep. Service
animals only. Lawn care included.
(904)225-5214


611 Home Furnishings i rWant Unlimited Earning Potential?


DRESSER W/MIRROR good condi-
tion, $85. Table w/leaf, 6 chairs, good
condition, $175. Gold's Gym RX60
weight machine, excellent condition
$175. Call 321-0371 & leave message.
FOR SALE Solid oak dining room
table, 6 chairs, china cabinet, washer &
dryer, king size mattress & box springs,
and more. Call 225-8089.


613 Television
Radio-Stereo
27" PHILLIPS TV $50.00 each @
Comfort Suites. Call Kapil @ (904)261-
0193, (51 Sets Available).

617 Machinery
Tools & Equip.
FOR SALE 1995 Ford Crane. Call
904-219-5960.
624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & SCRAP METAL
Call Junior at 879-1535 or 237-5293.


Do you need flexibility?

Obtain your Real Estate License!


Watson School of Real Estate


Join Us!

3321 South Fletcher Avenue
Fenandina Beach

October 8th-9th

October 15th-16th

October 22nd-23rd


Start your new career today!

Call Eric Eppley

904.718.8534




1/ sla Blly Eq. RII T.ORS'
l. IFADINGC RF.ALFSTATF
.* COMPANIES., T/THt WORLD'

RealEstateCareersFlorida.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STIRAw.4


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years.'
Fast, Friendly Service-Installaion Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEANING

Please Call Us
At 753-3067

HOMES CONDOS OFF, ES
0 BONDED, INSURED


CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Slamred ConcLete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694




^CQN, RE1,4 IN.

Patios Sidewalks & Starting at
Driveway Add-ons s599
(904) 491-4383
Licensed & Bonded (904) 237-7742


CONSTRl ( I'ONI


BRANNAN

CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARRGES ROOM flDDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUAfLITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages

S 6,495"
2 I4i lI
















AVA'IABLE J


CONSTRUCTION


AMELIA

ISLAND

GUTTERS
When It Rains
Be Prepared.

6"Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
Now Accepting Major Credit Cards

LICENSED & INSURED Lowell Duster

(904) 261-1940



KNAPPS STUCCO
SERVICES, LLC.
Smooth, shell, & synthetic-
old & new. Replace wood rot
& old stucco all sizes.
Chimney inspections & repair.
Owner/Ogerator 15ili. Experlnce
MIchael Knapp on Island
753-3777 Ftr Estimafies


GARAGE DOORS_


i l HOME I1PROV'ERIENT


Mold ir!spE.tioris
1M01d Rem-rn-diir.ioron
Miri': & M0ior
H',rMt Repaiirs

: .: '..," 904-491-4383

L.AV\ II0NTEN _NCE _


Florida Gardener
Residential, Commercial, Associations
Full service Lawn Maintenance
Flowerbeds, Mulch, Cleanups
Irrigation Repairs & Installs
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
floridagardenerinc.com
Licensed & Insured





You Grow It. We Mow It
Free Estimates /Affordable, Quality Work
Jeffrey Justice (904) S57-6214
Licensed & Insred
Lawn Care, Shrub Prep & Mulch Replacement
Edging, Hedge and Winter Maintenance
Irrigation, Sod Replacement, Tree Trimming


NEW & USED CARS

WE'RE STILL HERE!-






Scott Lawsso Chris Lowe
Sales Consultant Sales Consultant
Serving Nassau County
for over 20 years with





464054 SR 200 Yulee

(904) 261-6821


PAINTING





p I .. .I.. h.. I ,


111 1 i 2i ii -9 2lil
. *'1. 'rii 22 5929


ROOFING


|. COASTAL BUILDINGi
~ud~i~SYTEMS


Sm"ReRoofing Is Our Specialfty"
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
Serving Satisfied
SHomebuilders & Homeowners R
Since 1993
SRe-Roofing New Roofing
SVinyl Siding Soffit & Fascia

S 261-2233
SFree Estimate
CCC-057020


STORAGE



,tiaUl Cmitia 9 &taead
24 haJ ascc 7dayrlia a h
S-Ara Ca-mu
Ccn&dAe'W WASAdatme

261-9210
143 J1wu ,AStut
{fino &'iffbci ai a ffafftq@AaAt~t(,iuucoM


PRESSURE -ASHING TRACTOR WORK


2BR/2BA VILLA Top floor & end
"CHRISTMAS NEIGHBORHOOD" unit. Best view in complex closest to
YARD SALE Sat. 9/3, 8am-noon. beach. Fully furnished. $329K ($15K
Northridge Ln., off Citrona. rebated to buyer). Call (904)234-8986.


PEPPERTREEVILLAGE
ELDERLY, HANDICAP/DISABLED
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS RENT BASE ON INCOME
904-261-6600
0"n TDD 1-800-374-4463
OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:OOAM 5:00PM
1200 SOUTH 15TH STREET FERNANDINA BEACH, FL


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance In..
"The local guy" since 1984 i: -
Quit Paying Too Much!
*0prlr .Jr d r ieplacrre nts Trin S iter ri pl:ei ent
S...m n ;pr.i3 Sirlpii Ieari

904-277-2086


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses Trailers Patios
Driveways etc,
Exterior Windows
Wood Decks C/eaned & Resea/ea
FREE ESTIMATES '
261-4353


GRASS TOO TALLP
GIVE SHAWN A CALL
*BUSH HOGGING
DRIVEWAY GRADING
LOTS TO LAND
LAWN MAINTENANCE

904-318-3700
LICENSED*INSURED


-q I


-14


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6B FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.2011 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.
www.lasserrerealestate.com


RESIDENTIAL
LONG TERM
* 322 S. 6th St.. 4BPJ2BA Historic home district,
$1,000/mo.,+utit&dep.
* 619 .S.14th Street -3BR/IBA$975/ma.+ utiaies.
*3423 S. Fletcher Upstairs 2BR/IBA
Furnished $12001mo. + utilities.
* 1334 Atlantic Ave. 3BRIIBA, approx. 1.243
sq.ft$12001mo. + utilities.
BEACH COTTAGE
*2BR/IBA furnished 1801 S. Fletcher Ave.
$1,650/mo + util excludes electric-
Avail. Sept. Ist.
VACATION RENTAL
* AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/ MONTHLY 2BRI
I BA Ocean-view. 487 S- Fletcher. Across the
street from the beach.All utl, wi-fiTV & phone.
COMMERCIAL
* Five Points Village 1,200 sq. ft. $1.680/mo +
sales tax.
* 1334 Atlantic Ave. 3BR/IBA, approx. 1.243
sq.fLt. $1200/mo.+ utilities.
* Amelia Park 910 approx. sq.ft, 3 offices,
reception area, kitchen and bathroom.
$14501mo.+ utilities.
* 1839 S. 8th St. adjacent to Huddle House.
1,800 sq.ft. $2250/mo. lease + tax. Sale also
considered.
* BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. Landscaping Co.
or Nursery. Office, greenhouse, shade houses
with a fenced, irrigated outside space
for plants. Excellent location with high visibility.
COMMERCIAL SALE/INVEST
* Office Complex w/tenant for sale / excellent
nvesntm 1941 Citrona Dr-4690 sqrft.incud-
ingadditional lot. Call for more info 261-4066

904.261.4066


1 854 Rooms I
FURNISHED ROOM Cable, laundry,
kitchen privileges, all furnished. Prefer
disabled veteran or social security. Call
Glen at 904-548-9707.


855 Apartments
I Furnished
AT BEACH 1BR $185/wk + dep.
Utils incl. Also, 2 & 3BR SWMH in park,
clean, remodeled. Starting $165/wk,
$660/mo + dep. Utils avail. 261-5034

2BR 2ND FLOOR OCEANFRONT
APT. Deck, private, boardwalk to
beach. Available after Labor Day.
$950/mo. 261-5069 or 504-7452


856 Apartments
Unfurnished


POST OAK APARTMENTS
Affordable Living Rent from $560
&747 for eligible persons/families. 1
2 Bedrooms. Post Oak Apartment
(904)277-7817. Handicap Accessibl
apartments available. *This institution
is an equal opportunity provider, an
employer. TDD: 711



tarnabas
CENTER, INC
A private, non-profit agency that assists
Nassau County families who need food,
shelter and basic necessities.
For information, call: 904.261.7000


O-
&


B57 Condos-FurnishedI 1860-Homes-Unfurnished 11860 Homes-UnfurnishedI


CLOSE TO OCEAN CONDO North
Pointe, 2BR/2.5BA, 1200sf, end unit.
$950/mo. Prefer long term. Great
ocean breezes. (904)753-0256.
FURNISHED CONDO 2BR/2BA, fully
furnished 1st floor condo, SS
appliances, granite counters,
washer/dryer, etc. Centrally located on
island in gated community w/pool.
Non-smoking unit. Service animals
only. $1,150/mo. w/1 me. security
dep. Call: 904-261-6025
AMELIA LAKES CONDOS Beautifully
remodeled and luxury furnished 2/2
deluxe condo in gated, lakeside
community with 24/7 fitness ctr,
resort-style pool, tennis & more! Call
Tammy at (904)415-6969 for a
showing. www.amelialakes.com


DOWNTOWN AREA 3 bedroom,
central air, laundry room. Available in
Sept. 403 N. 4th St. $795. Drive by
and then call 904-607-3121.


4BR/ 2BA 2000 Sq. ft. home on
water. Nassau Lakes, fenced back-
yard. Stainless appliances, fireplace,
window blinds, ceiling fans, $1,000
down, $1350/mo. (904)742-1352.

Ask about FREE RENT! 3/2. 2-story,
central air, laundry room, wood deck
upstairs, CLEAN & BRIGHT!!! Go see,
call 904-607-3121. 86074 Peeples Rd.


BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS, WELL-
MAINTAINED HOME in Egans
Landing. Close to beach. 3BR/2BA, 2-
car garage, low maintenance yard.
Large kitchen, all appliances. Dogs ok.
$1800/mo. (904)557-6501

ON ISLAND 2BR/1.SBA on cul-de-I
sac, close to everything. Credit check
& references req. $750/mo + dep.
(904)430-2605 or (904)415-9416.

FOR RENT OR SALE on Island
3BR/1BA, close to high school, fenced
backyard, W/D hook-up. $900/mo +
$900/dep. (904)321-6492

CALLAHAN 2280 SQ FT 4/2 home
built in '03. Lv. rm, den, F/P, mom. rm,
& dream kitchen on 2 In acre com-
pletely shaded lot. Will consider owner
finance at $780/mo. (904)589-9585 .

NEWLY REMODELED 3BR/2BA on 1
acre in Yulee. Pets ok. $950. Call Phil
(904)556-9140.,

1BR COTTAGE Downtown area.
Deposit plus security, references.
Available 9/1/11. $675/mo. Call (904)
415-0311.


861 Vacation Rentals
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.

VACATION CHALET in N. Carolina
Mountains. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495 a week. Call (904)757-5416.


COTTAGES AT STONEY CREEK -
3BR/2BA, washer/dryer, 1-car garage,
gated, community pool, walk to Super
WalMart, one level walkup. $1100/mo
+ utilities. Call (904)753-4147 or 321-
3444.


2BR/1 BA + 1 CAR GARAGE Direct-
S ly across street from beach access.
" $900/mo. Available September 18.
S (904)277-9768

2BR & 3BR Immediate availabil-
ity. On island, gated community,
starting at $825/mo. & $925/mo.
Call (904)277-1983.
AMELIA LAKES CONDOS Living in
Paradise. 1/1 and 2/2 deluxe condos in
gated, lakeside community with 24/7
fitness ctr, resort-style pool, tennis &
more! Live the Amelia Lakes life.
Starting at just $749/mo! Call Tammy
for our fall special at (904) 415-6969
for a showing. www.amelialakes.com


FLORA PARKE Lg 4BR family home.
Hdwd floors thru-out, formal dining rm,
separate office, screened porch, fenced
yard on pond. $1300/mo. 753-1820


BEAUTIFUL 3/2 96686 Chester Rd.
Totally remodeled on 1+ acres.
Includes all appl's. $1095/mo. + dep.
(904)491-6008 or (904)910-5913.


4BR/3BA SINGLE FAMILY near
beach In quiet cul-de-sac. Large 2 car
garage w/storage. All modern applianc-
es, breakfast area, Pergo wood floors,
fireplace, large deck & BBQ area,
fenced private lot. $1685/mo. (land-
scaping not incl) Avail Sept 1st. Pets
ok. Write to mmcaowns(aivahoo.com
with phone #. Virtual tour avail.


OI wn A Vacant Home?


S;it y it to work for you


by renting!

We're making it easier & more profitable

than ever to rent your home. Our proven

property management system reduces vacancies,

increase revenue & provides hassle free

satisfaction for you and your tenants. Call

261-0604 today for a free rental analysis!


95330 Spinaker 3792 sf. 4BR/3.5BA gorgeous ocean view
home located in the exclusive Amelia Island community of
Summer Beach. Grand two story living room with fireplace,
private library/office w/fireplace, gourmet kitchen with high end
appliances. Master Suite offers separate sitting room facing the
ocean. Master bath features separate vanities, large shower and
oversized jetted' tub. Community Pool. Available fully
furnished. On Island. $3,950/mo.
Ocean View Villas #3C 2486 sf. 3BR/3.5BA Ocean View,
Villas located directly across from Main Beach. Unusually
spacious with plenty of room for entertaining and family.
Gourmet kitchen with stainless appliances and granite counter
tops. Living room has a wall of windows overlooking the ocean!
Pets ok. On Island. $2,300/mo.
Ocean View Villas #2C 2128 sf. 3BR/3.5BA Ocean View
Villas located directly across from Main Beach. Unusuilly
spacious with plenty of room for entertaining and family.
Gourmet kitchen with stainless appliances and granite counter
tops. Living room has a wall of windows overlooking the ocean!
Pets ok. On Island. $2,200/mo.
5059 Summer Beach Blvd. 3BR/2BA patio home with pool
located in gated Summer Beach. Offered furnished or
unfurnished with with two master suites. Pets allowed. On
Island, $1,650/mo.
3409 Sea Marsh Road 1710 sf. 3BR/2BA Fiddlers Bend
condo on gated Omni Amelia Island Plantation. Marsh views
from many rooms. Fireplace in living room. Great deck and
balcony areas. Pers ok. On Island. $1,600/mo.
95392 Sonoma Drive 2641 sf4BR/25BA two story home in
Woodbridge community. Screened lanai overlooks large fully
fenced backyard. Upgraded kitchen with plenty of cabinet space
opens to big family room. Master suite upstairs. Well
landscaped with irrigation system. Pets ok. Off Island.
$1,575/mo.


657 N Fletcher Avenue.- 1568 sf. 3BR2.5BA two story
townhouse with awesome ocean views from the Living
and Dining Rooms and Balcony. Fireplace plus two car
garage. Pets ok. On Island, nl.wlai.,...
96086 Sea Winds Drive 2155 sf. 4BR/2BA light &
bright brick home located in the Sea Winds community.
Open living with a split floor plan that's great for
entertaining! Open kitchen with Formica counter tops and
a casual dining bar overlooking the family room. Large
master suite with trey ceiling, double windows and tiles
master bath. No pets. On Island. $1,450/mo.
75035 Morning Glen Ct. 2400 sf. 3BR/2BA home
located in River Glen. Bonus room, family room and
office/den. Tile il main living area. Covered lanai.
Colnmmunity pool and Water Park. Pecs ok. Off Island.
$ 1,450/mo,
76015 Deerwood Dr. 1858 sf. 3BR/2BA house in
Timbercreek Plantation. Corner lot with large backyard.
Custom paint throughout. Upgraded Kitchen with tile
floor. Huge Master Suite with separate tub & shower.
Irrigation and security systems. Community pool and
playground. Dogs ok. Off Island. $1,250/mo.
2119 Beach Wood 1210 sf. 2BR/2BA Omni Amelia
Island Plantation condo located just one block from the
beach! Offered furnished or unfurnished. No pets. On
Island. $1,250/mo.
1325 Marian Drive 1892 sf. 4BR/2BA home on large
fenced in lot. Backs up to Amelia River Golf Course. Short
walk to Marsh. Brand new carpet, screened in porch,
W/D. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,200/mo.
31010 Paradise Commons #412 1143 sf. 2BR/2BA
:,',,urJ f.-.', unit in Amelia Lakes. Large bedrooms with
ceiling fans. Kitchen overlooking living room. Screen
porch with storage. Close to pool and workout center. Pets
ok. Off ,i r.J. $900/mo.


SMALL BUSINESS STORE FRONTS
INSANELY LOW PRICES AND ZERO MOVE IN COSTS in the Soath End Small Business Offict Padk!
est office space deal OB Amelia Iland! As low as $700 a month.


ChaplInWlamInc.
Prem^^ieRt&PptMamtei
(904) 261-0604


Gialphin


I. 1


(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax
1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103
Amelia Island, FL 32034


Over 25 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company

Visit us at www.GALPHINRE.coM


FURNISHED HOMES ON ISLAND SINGLE FAMILY HOMES OFF ISLAND (cont.)
403 Tarpon Avenue, Unit #403 (Ocean Park Condominiums) 1665 s.f. 97056 Carpenter Ridge Court (Arnold Ridge Subdivision) 2582 s.f -
3BR/2BA Very short walk to the beach. Master bath with double sinks, trash 4BR/3BA Three Master Baths, dingin in living/great room, closet pantry, car-
compactor, closet pantry, carpet and ceramic tile. Community pool, pet and ceramic tile, mini blinds, wooden fenced-in back yard, private
patio/deck/balcony, elevator, storage closet, barbecue gills in common area. 1- yard/courtyard, 2-car garage and driveway parking. Association fees are includ-
car garage. Washer/Dryer, pest control, water, sewer & trash and Association ed Available September 1st $1500
fees are included. $1700 86272 Riverwood Drive (Meadowfield).1600 s.f. 3BR/2BA, Home with
* 2005 Beachwood Road (Amelia Island Plantation) 1700 s.f. FUR- open floor plan, eat-in kitchen plus.fonual dismg room. Back patio overlooks
NISHED OR UNFURNISHED 3BR/3.5BA, Each bedroom has its own bath, pond. Convenient to A1A and 1-95, close to shopping. $1200.
9 miles of walking & bike tradls, 2.5 miles of beach. Gated community w/guard CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
posted, ocean/lake views, dock access, patio/deck and playground. 2418 First Avenue, Unit S, l08sf 2BR/11 5BA Three story duplex only
Washer/Dryer, lawn care, pest control & Association fees included. $2100 one block from the beach. Full Master bath, eat-in kitchen, carpet & vinyl, 1-
403 Tarpon Avenue #322 (Ocean Park Condominiums) 1432 s.f.- 2BR/2BA car carport underneath unit. Available Now $925
Community pool, barbecuene grills in common area, full master bath with double 1854 Carnation Street (Amelia Park) 1700sf 3ER/2 1/2BA Townhome in
sinks, dining in living/great room, closet pantry panty. tracompactor, patio/deck bal- the centerofdesirableAmeliaPark ullMasterbathwith separateshowerandtub
i *3 ..i One-car garage. Ocean views, only a with double sinks, dining in living/great room, eat-in kitchen, breakfast bar/nook,
L -, water, seer r, trash, pest control and kitchen island, closet pantry, carpet, ceramictile and hardwood floors, dothblinds
Association fees are included. Home also on Sales Market. $1500 and wood shutters, alarm system, cable/internet ready, water softener, 2-car garage
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES ON ISLAND and driveway parking. Lawn care included. Available October 1st $1195
1387 S. Fletcher Avenue 1522sf 3BR/2BA Recently remodeled home 2332B First Avenue 1315sf- 2B-R/2.5BA Townhouse duplex one block from
across the street from the Beach, 2 Master Baths, dining in family room, carpet the Beach. Open beach house with lots of naturallight. 2 Master baths, dining
and vinyl tile, drapes, washer/dryer included, 2-car garage. $1695 in living/great room, kitchen island, carpet, ceramic tile and vinyl, vertical and
2805 S. Fletcher Drive 1200 sf- 3BR/2BA Gorgeous ocean views!! cloth blinds, fireplace in living room with vaulted ceilings, patio/deck, 2-car
Remodeled beach house with ceramic tile throughout Enjoy the sunrise or sun- garage and drive-way parking. Available October 1st $1100
set watching the waves roll in Full master bath, Dining in living/great 31217 Paradise Commons, Unit #823 (Amelia Lakes) 2BR/2BA Two
room/family room, breakfast room, ceramic tile, mini and metal blinds, 1-cai Master Baths, eat-in kitchen, kitchen island,'wood fireplace, community pool,
garage. $1050 tennis courts, exercise room, barbecue grills in common areas, gated cormmuni-
2403 Los Robles (Selve Verde Subdivision) 2128sf 3BR/2.5BA Golf ty. clubhouse and playground Washer/Dryer, lawn care, pest control, trash &
course subdivision. 2 and ? Master baths, formal dining area, closet pantry, car- Association fees are included in rent $900
pet and vinyl tile, drapes and mini blinds, fireplace in family room, patio/deck 2705 Dolphin Av,.nue, Unit #2A (Occan View Villas) 2535sf -
and 2-car garage Available October 1st $1250 3BR/3.5BA, Full Master bath with separate tub and shower, double sinks, car-
2123 Cicra Lane (The Arbors Subdivision) 1503sf 3BR/2BA Large pet & ceramic tile, wood-burning stove and gas fireplace, covered patio/deck
kitchen with closet pantry, irrigation system and 2-car garage. Available withbeautifuloceanview AvailableNow $1995
September 1st $1250 2741 Forest Ridge Drive, Unit 1-1 (Forest Ridge Condominiums) 2BR/2BA
1863 W. Perimeter Park Road (Amelia Park) 2539sf 3BR/2 5A -Wood Two Master bathrooms, each with tub and shower, dining in family room, open
frame two story with two Master baths and partial bath, formal dining area, eat- kitchen with closet pantry, carpet, ceamuic tale and vinyl, mini blinds,' covered
in kitchen, kitchen island and closet pantry, fireplace, upgraded granite coun- patio/deck Clubhouse, tennis courts and community pool. $850
tertops, cabinets & fixtures. Community playground and picnic area 2-car 23615 Balamn Point (Amelia Lakes) 1181 s.f 2BR/2BA Deluxe floor
garage. Association fees are included. $2300 plan. Wood-burning fireplace in large living room, tilly loaded kitchen with full
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES OFF ISLAND sized pantry D i i . ., I. ,i .
97364 Pirates Point Road (Pirates Wood Subdivision) 1432sf- 3BR/2BA overloolIng lake . i
Waterfront lot with private dock. Two Master baths, dining in living/great with work out area, tennis courts, community pool and car care center $925
room, drapes, mini blinds and vertical blinds, one fireplace, patio/deck, commu- 1582 Park Lane (Amelia Park) 400 s.f. IBR/1BA Cute studio apartment
nity pool and 2 cnr garage Available Now $1100 with efficiency kitchen. Tile floors in kitchen and bathroom Receritly painted
* 86190 Remsenburg Drive (North Hampton Subdivision) 2900 sf and new carpet Lawn care included. $675
4BR/3BA Wood frame, full Master Bath, formal dining area, eat-m kitchen, COMMERCIAL R.ENTALS
carpet & ceramic tile, fireplace, community pool, clubhouse, playground, bar- Amelia Parke Towne Center Office space, 4,500 s f. will dvide andbuld
beque grills and 2-car garage. Cable or satellite TV and Association fees are to tenant's specs
included inrent. $175 Atlantic Ave @ 14th 1,600sf office $1,300/mo
* 97493 Cutlass Way (Pirates Woods Subdivision) 2460 s.f. 3BR/2BA 502 Centre St (Maxwell Bldg) individual offices
Two Master Baths, formal dining area, eat in kitchen, wiak-in pantry, remodeled Centre Street & 4th (Swan Bldg) individual offices
with vaulted ceilings, carpet and ceramic tile, patio/deck, wood fenced-rm yard. 1799 US HWY 17 1196sfCommercialbuilding, $1,500/mo.
$1550 Sadler Road Commercial Building 625 sfbuilding on 1 acre lot $1,500

BUSINESS IS GOOD! If you are interested in renting your property contact our
professional property managers 904-277-6597


r WA U -~ U.


il II ill lB


U.- REAL ESTATE PROPERTIES


Property backs up to lake. Close to beach, walk-
way to thebeach nearby. Lowtraffic area near cul-
de-sac. Great for permanent or vacation home.
Public water and sewer available to site, but must
be hooked up. Plans by Donna Lynn builders for
2460 sq ft home. Screened porch facing the lake.
Home to be 3 bedroom-2 bath.


$229,000 mls#52483


5ean -%able
(904) 753-0807
SE- 0Omc s qla,.r.unaty drar Opdr-t- l


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S, ,1,,1 ,,. I ,. ., CRS, GRI',, 'J
c-s-, 904.753. I 0696 .


Wood floors, wood burning fireplace with built ins
around. Granite counters in kitchen! 2 pantries.
Master bedroom with screened doors to covered
deck, partially screened facing century old live
oaks. Nice back yard with room for pool and work
shop/storage building. Great location! No fees.
Home was custom built by local builder...Come
see this lovely home!! New AC unit Dec 2010
w/exlended warranty. New washer & dryer in Dec
2010. Termite control.


S- ''"-- `" Z4Sea,000ooo mls#845408

nr 21" 5ean -iable
"..... ... (904) 753-0807
500C-retre Seet 5
Femana B-ach. R- 32034 /u sHLO OB


Locatled approximately 2 blocks from the beach, this 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath unit gives new meaning to the term "move
in ready". It has been fully remodeled, everything is brand
new. Wood laminate throughout, new carpet upstairs, new
stainless appliances, fully furnished. Features a large open
living room, and balcony off the master bedroom. Just
bring your toothbrush and you are home.


Phil Griffin
Broker
phil@acrfl.com
904.261.2770


I.,


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".a Lois lost,I..,, SEA

Phone. 9C4-572-1788 1 )R .E
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AUGUST TOP PRODUCERS

SHARON SILVA Top Listing Agent

TERI STEVENS Top Selling Agent

474303 E. SR 200 (904) 321-4001


t & .-


,AWW Fernandina Beach Really
NNE 474262 SR 200


BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY!
Brick hsie neslled in a peaceful selling on one acre
surrotinded by nature, Iuoge oaks. Leyland cypress
Irees & flowers lanily room. kitchen and dining
room are open and spacious All bedrooms are over-
sized Slone wood Diilning fireplace in great room,
ac, mosl el appliances, ter liealer. roo,& drain
NlMid have all ecen replaced in last 5 years. lHome is
reedylo enjoy llo eis convenient tboeach, schools,
,Jacksonville and Georgia [)i' Miner lid approx I
rile di n on r lell boii re school.
MLS55713 $239,000


CherylHolt

904-742-4649


PINEY ISLAND 4BR/3BA on
858Condos-Unfurnished secluded waterfront acre and a half.
$1550/mo. Call (904)753-1057.


Gnhv21.

500 C en treS-r. t
Femandina -. -h, FL 3203.1


I 863 Office
TWO-ROOM OFFICE SUITE above
Amelia Insurance, Sadler Rd. $550/mo.
600-1500sf 2382 Sadler Rd. behind
Amelia Insurance. (904)557-5644
GATEWAY TO AMELIA OFFICE
SUITES no long term commitment,
move in today. Call Phil at Amelia
Coastal Realty (904)261-2770.

1864 Commercial/Retail
LOWEST SHOPPING CTR RATES IN
NASSAU CO. 1,500 SF on up. 626
S. 8th St. High visibility & low rates.
Call Phil @ Amelia Coastal Realty (904)
261-2770
PRIME RETAIL SPACE Approx.
1000sf next to Red Otter. Excellent
visibility and traffic flow. Light & freshly
painted. $14 PSF. (904)583-2779.

865 Warehouse
800SF WAREHOUSE with 12x12 roll
up door & personnel door. Call Jim
Deal at 261-6230 or cell 415-0423.




901 Automobiles
1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE One
owner, 4X4, V8, tow package, 150K
miles, good paint & interior. $3,500.
Call (904)261-0001.

S902 Trucks
2000 NISSAN FRONTIER TRUCK -
57,000 miles. Runs great. $3,600. Call
(904)607-7786.


-I


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M.


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