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FRIDAY, November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader



Courage with a


smile in fight



against cancer


HEATHER'A PERRY/NEWS-LE
"I'm very honored to have the award and to think tha
people think that much of me," said Joan Jordan, 20
American Cancer Society Courage Award recipient.


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HEATHER A. PERRY
News-Leader

American Cancer Society
Unit Chair Joni Reid describes
Joan Jordan as "a remarkable
woman who has shown much
courage and always has a smile
on her face."
At the annual American
Cancer Society dinner last
month, Joan Buchanan Jordan
received the 2009 Courage
Award, which recognizes indi-
viduals who have shown great
courage in their personal bat-
tle with cancer.
The award is given to those
who possess a positive attitude,
EADER the ability to lead life as nor-
it. mally as possible, and who are
09 inspirational to others battling
this dreadful disease.
Although she was pleased
and thrilled to receive the
- , award, Jordan could not be
blamed if she wished she'd not
had to receive it because it sym-
bolizes a struggle she never
dreamed she'd face - twice.
After battling breast cancer
in 2005, Jordan was diagnosed
in 2008 with pancreatic cancer.
"I think you start with 'why
me?' but you end up with, 'Yes,
me! It's not gonna get me! I'm
gonna kick its ass!"
Jordan chose M.D. Ander-
son Cancer Center in Houston,
Texas, for her battleground.
Husband, Lewis, lived in
Houston years ago and had
heard many good things about
the center. When his brother-in-
law went there for treatment of
prostate cancer, his faith in the
center's success was validated.
"On a Friday he told me we
were going there and by
Tuesday, we were on a plane
headed for Houston," said
Jordan. 'Their whole system is
one of total patient care."
Looking around the dining


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room at Jesse H. Jones Rotary
House International, a hotel
exclusively for M.D. Anderson
patients and their families,
Jordan noted there was a bald
person in pajamas, attached to
an IV pole and pump, and anoth-
er person in street clothes sit-
ting with his family. At her own
table with her husband, she
realized they all had something
in common besides the cancer
- "a kick-ass attitude."
In addition to a fighting spir-
it, a strong support network dur-
ing her two battles was extreme-
ly important.
"Family and friends help you
get through it. All they want to
do is help. They just want you to
get better," Jordan said, adding
that good friends who are like
family also played a critical part
in her recovery; ":
"You have to have people
who will pray for you. Prayer
will help to heal your body and
your soul. Always look for the
'up' side and thank God for
every minute of every day."
After winning her battle with
breast cancer, Jordan thought
she was finished with the dis-
ease.
"God had a different plan for
me. I hope that I can follow
through with what He has
planned for me."
Speaking to others about the
challenges they'll face is one.
possibility being considered.
Another was doing -the
Survivors -Lap at Relay for Life.'
A nurse for 42 years and
operating room .director at
Baptist Nassau for 16 years,
Jordan says she has good days
and bad ones.
At the one-year anniversary
of her surgery, she maintains a
positive attitude, determination
to enjoy each and every
moment and a ready smile.
type@fbnewsleader.com


HEATHER A PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Yulee High School senior Dakota Blair, with mentor
John Zimmerman.

V TOGETHER WE CAN


Dreams come true


HEATHER A. PERRY
News-Leader


Take Stock in Children has
been awarding scholarships to
children from low-income fam-
ilies since 1995. Locally raised
funds are used to purchase
two- and four-year tuition plans
through the Florida Prepaid,
College Foundation.
To date, 84 local high
school graduates have been
awarded scholarships. Hoping
for the same reward are 146
middle and high school stu-
dents in the program.
One of those students is 18-
year-old Dakota Blair, a senior
at Yulee High School.
Accepted into the program as
a sixth'grader, Blair is looking
forward to achieving his
dream of a college education.
"I feel blessed knowing that
I have an opportunity most
people wish for. Knowing that
I am able to go to college with
the help of this scholarship
means that I will be able to
have a successful career
planned out and not have to
struggle with only a high
school diploma," said Blair.
Mother Michelle Taylor
echoes her son's praise for the
program.
"'Take Stock has given my
son the opportunity that I


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Kathleen & William R.
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would not be able to give him
Sand I look forward to seeing
my son achieve his goals."
John Zimmerman has been
Blair's mentor since he first
enrolled in the program.
"When we started, he was
quite shy and I would say he
was not that serious about
school. He had a lot of unex-
cused absences and wasn't
turning in his homework and
therefore his grades suffered
accordingly," said
Zimmerman.
"He has consistently
improved and now in his sen-
ior year, his last grading peri-
od he got two As and two Bs
and is working to improve
those grades further."
Helping students like Blair
achieve their dreams is what
drives Program Director Jody
Mackle.
'Take Stock in Children's
importance is about the future
of our country and its youngest
citizens," said Mackle.
'Take Stock offers hope for
the future to children who
have the ability to pursue post-
secondary education but need
a helping hand in order to pur-
sue their education and career
goals after high school. Abet-
ter education means a better
job with a promise of a better
'future for this young genera-
tion and generations to come."
SA committee of 20 commu-
nity volunteers reviews appli-
cations from sixth, seventh and
eighth graders in September
and October to select the most
appropriate students.
New scholars sign their
agveementsjuil;the manmna
awards celabratitn:ITheRnext
6ne Will tak6 place oriApril 20.
As part of the program, stu-
dents are asked to sign a con-
tract stating they will go to
school every day, maintain a
GPA of 2.5 or higher and have
weekly meetings with their
mentor.
Students also agree to stay
out of trouble both in school
and outside, avoiding drugs
and crime. Parents and
guardians have a contract as
well, agreeing to see to it that
their children keep up their
end of the bargain.
Currently there are men-
tors for all 146 students in
Nassau County, but a mini-
mum of 35 more mentors will
be needed in April, when new
middle school students are
enrolled in the program.
For information call 548-
4464 or visit www.takestock-
inchildren.com.
type@fbnewsleader.com


Claudia Watts


BUSINESS CARD BILLBOARD


Ovr.I3milin n ,Isc .5lC i 2 09


I


I







FRIDAY. November 27.2009 NEWS News-Leader


The few,

n World War II they domi-
nated Iwo Jima, con-
quered adversaries at the
Landing of Inchon during
Sthe Korean War, and put a
chokehold on the enemy at
Da Nang in Vietnam.
"First to fight" has been a
U.S. Marine Corps motto for
ages, and these events are
only a few of the hundreds of VE
battles fought by members CO
who make up the pride of the
Corps. This month, we cele-
brated the 234th anniversary D
of this prestigious organiza-
tion's beginning. It was on
Nov. 10, 1775, when a resolu- always
tion by the Continental play. It
Congress called for two battal- the Ma
ions of Marines able to fight The st
for independence at sea and are no
on shore was approved, hence Marini
forming the Continental earned
Marines. for life
The adage "A Few Good Acc
Men" is also something car- www.l]
ried forward for over 200 websit
years when in March 1779, "Marir
USMC Capt. William Jones ... Afte
advertised for "a few good tough
men" to enlist in the Corps for it trans
naval duty. His ad implied only memb
a few good men would be most n
needed to handle any situa- The C
tion. His theory has been test- ture of
ed, survived and been synony- icons s
mous with U.S. Marines ever Corps,
since, earned
They're called leather- When
necks and jarheads. ment t
Leatherneck is a longstanding lenged
nickname going back to the interest
leather neckpiece which was times
part of the Marine uniform crisis c
from 1775 to 1875. The leather Corps
bands around their throats on the
were intended to ensure that first to
Marines kept their heads earned
erect. The jarhead phraseolo- "Amer
gy came from sailors as early nation'
as World War II, referring to The M
members of the Corps in their respon
dress blues uniform, with its air and
high collar having a likeness approa
to a mason jar. Marine
"Oorah!" for the Marines is States'
similar to the Army's "hooah" force."
and the Navy's hoorahh." It's a The
verbal greeting or expression most r
of enthusiasm and it's hymn
reserved only for those song in
employing the core values of Forces
Honor, Courage and sacrifice
Commitment. It would be a have sl
faux pas to use the term oorah It is an
by anyone not in the Corps. Marine
In 1883, the motto Semper starts
Fidelis, since shortened to Monte;
Semper Fi, took root, signify- Tripoli
ingrmorethan just dedication A "I
to-acause:IJt's.Ltin for always recruit
faithful. It exemplifies a broth- opport
erhood that lasts for life and future ]


Marines to
remain
faithful to
the mis-
sion, to
each other,
to the
Corps and
to country,
ERANS no matter
IRNER what This
is also
S where the
ebbie phrase
ialsh "Once a
Marine
s a Marine" comes into
's the official motto of
marine Corps League.
atement means there
ex-Marines or former
es. Once the title is
i, one remains a Marine

cording to
Marines.mil, the official
e of the USMC,
ies are made, not born.
r twelve weeks of the
est training in the world,
forms civilians into
ers of the United States'
notable brotherhood.
corps has a distinct cul-
traditions, symbols and
surrounding the Marine
and every Marine has
I a place within it.
our nation's commit-
o democracy is ch'al-
, when our national
its are threatened, in
of international disaster,
or war, the Marine
is ready. They'll be first
scene, first to help and
fight They've also
Sthe reputation as
ica's 911 Force" - our
s first line of defense.
arine Corps is ready to
id on the ground, in the
Sby sea. This integrated
ch distinguishes the
e Corps as the United
premier expeditionary

SMarines' Hymn is the
recognizable military
and the oldest official
I the U.S. Armed
. It is a reminder of the
:e and courage Marines
shown on the battlefield.
important part of
SCorps culture and
with, "From the halls of
zuma, to the shores of
..."
Boot" is a Marine Corps
, and recently I had the
unity to visit with a few
Marines outside their


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There are angels among us,
Old and frail,
There are angels among us,
Wrinkled and pale.
Angels among us,
Aged and Wise,
Angels among us,
Missing yesterday's ties.
These angels among us
Rely on our care,
They need touches of love,
That you can share.
Provide a little something extra,
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Ageless angels among us,
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Contact the Activities Department for
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(904) 261-0771

ti-ae - veRy joyouS
H10LIDY SeASON ,


roud...
recruiting office in Yulee.
After only a few minutes,
I got the impression Matt
Marshall, a 2008 graduate
from Hilliard, and Casey
Jones, a 2009 Yulee High
School graduate, might easily
be compared to young squires
attending to the Knights of
the Round Table. They were
gearing for battle. Of course,
they were there preparing for
their weekly PT (physical
training), prepping for the rig-
ors of boot camp. I asked why
they picked the Marine Corps
over other services. They
both had history of relatives
being in other branches of the
service, but it all came down
to the fact that the Corps was
their idea of what a soldier
really represents. Once again,
the concept of brotherhood
has won out.
So to the new probies of
the Corps, good luck. From
what I hear, Marine boot
camp will definitely be a chal-
lenging experience, one to
prepare you for the future. It
will be a learning tool in
discipline and teamwork, one
you'll never regret, nor easily,
forget.
Brotherhood seems to
have won out with the Clifton
family of Fernandina too. I
spoke to a female Marine,
Sheila Clifton, who told me
her father and grandfather
were Marines. She married a
Marine, Bob Clifton, and their
son Brian is a Marine. Brian
has since left the Corps, but
he told me there's a different
aura about the Corps. Its
brotherhood, the bonding, is
different from all other servic-
es.
Ronald Reagan probably
said it best "Some people live
an entire lifetime and wonder.
if they have ever made a dif-
ference in the world. The
Marines don't have that prob-
lem."
So to the few good men
(and women) who have
served our nation every-
where, from the poles to the
tropics and have dedicated
themselves to upholding the
Eagle, Globe and Anchor, I
thank you for your dedicated
service to our great nation.


DEBBIE WALSH/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER
SFamily photos
of the Clifton
family of
Fernandina
Beach - Bob,
Brian, Sheila
Clifton - a fami-
ly within the
Family of the
United States
Marine Corps.
Right, Brian's
graduation into
the Cdrps.
SUBMITrED PHOTO


My dad, Norm Barker,
,was a Navy Corpsman
attached to the Marines and a
Purple Heart recipient of the
Korean War. If he were here
today, he'd most generously
say, Happy Birthday to a
branch of the military whose
readiness reflects pride,
responsibility and challenge -
the United States Marine
Corps.
Debbie is a 22-year veteran,
retired Senior Master Sergeant
in the Air Force and a Life
Member ofAmerican Legion
Post 54, Fernandina Beach.
whitelabaron(@yahoo.com


. . . . . . .


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N EWS PAP E R


NEWS


LEADER


FRIDAY November27 2009/22 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom


Olympic gold


HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Barbara Ann Scott, 19, displays her Olympic Gold medal for figure skating awarded at the 1948
Winter Games in St. Moritz, Switzerland, left. Tom and Barbara Scott King, right, will journey to
Ottawa, Canada next month where she will carry the Olympic torch for the 2010 Vancouver Winter
Games.

Canadians still carry torch for local woman


-L rn ,cnti-
a AOL






"0












Copyrighted Material
' Syndicated Content .
Available from Commercial News Providers


HEATHER A. PERRY
News-Leader
You would never guess it to meet her, but 61 years after
she skated to gold in the 1948 Winter Olympics, Barbara
Ann Scott King,still has the hearts of millions of Canadians
and that same number of figure skating fans firmly in her
grasp, as evidenced by her being asked to take part in the
Olympic Torch run for the 2010 Wiiter Olympic Games.
"It makes me feel very humble," said King of her Dec.
13 torch rut. I mean; the fact that at 81 they still remem-
ber me. It's overwhelming."
King and her husband, Tom, have made Amelia Island
their home for 13 years, moving here from Chicago. Next
month they will return to the ice champion's hometown
of Ottawa so she can speed-walk the nearly half-mile,
300-meter portion of the Olympic torch's journey to
Vancouver for the Winter Games.
Dubbed "Canada's Sweetheart," the petite skater first
took to the ice at age seven at the Minto Skating Club.
"We called it 'dear oldtin Minto,'" said King. "Because
the building was so old that sometimes when it snowed,
the snow would come through the walls and it was even
colder inside than it was outside."
Practicing eight hours a day, King started racking up
skating credits at age 11 when she claimed the National
Junior title.


At age 13, she became the first female to land a dou-
ble Lutz in competition.
Over the years, King added to her list of honors.
"You. talk about Tiger Woods winning four majors in
a year, Barbara Ann won five: Canadian, North American,
European, World and Olympics," said Tom King of his
wife.
King downplays all these records, saying simply, "I was
in the right place at the right time."
She was definitely in the right place at the right time
in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in 1948 when she became the
first and only female Canadian singles competitor to win
a gold medal in figure skating at the Fifth Olympic Winter
Games.
Never one to let silly superstitions or naysayers affect
her performance, King shrugged off the supposed jinx of
a pre-Olympic Time magazine cover and the fact that her
coach had drawn her number 13 in the competition line-
up.
Even the pitted ice that had been ripped up by a prior
hockey game didn't phase King as she skated her way to
a gold medal and into the record books.
Many awards and honors followed that Olympic medal
and King cherishes each and every one, displaying them
with a mixture of humility and pride in her Amelia Island
OLYMPICS Continued on 3A


Advice to kids: 'Whatever


you be, be good at it'

MICHAEL PARNELL
News-Leader L.
Since Carla Harris left her North � .
Jacksonville home 30 years ago, she
has become a successful investment
banker - a partner in Morgan Stanley,
no less - and a gospel singer with a
book, two CDs and a Carnegie Hall
concert to her credit.
The "bright, eager optimistic young
woman who wanted to conquer her'
world" is now a "seasoned" pro on top
of it. How did she get there?
She learned, "It is in your power to
define your world and your place in it.
. . You have the power, and you can
and should excel."
But all people need others "to rein-
-force that.... I had people in my life
who made the investment in me,"
Harris told more than 400 in atten-
,dance Nov. 21 at the 3rd Annual
Speakers Forum for the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Nassau County Foundation.
The forum, held in the new Talbot
ballroom of The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island, attracts those who share the
view of Harris that an investment in
children is perhaps the greatest invest-
ment of all. "When that child goes to
touch other lives, and other.people,
(there is a) multiplier effect," she told
them.
Harris had people who would SUBMIrTED
Carla Harris urges children at the Fernandina Beach Boys & Girls
HARRIS Continued on 3A Club on Friday to reach for their maximum potential.


IIII 111

1 84264 0001


A


................... 4 B
DOKU ..... 2B
................... 7A
................. 14 A
.......................... IB


I k ~ e m


PHOTOS BY RYAN SMITH/NEWS-LEADER
Commissioner Mike Boyle, left, was named 2010 chair of the com-
mission Monday. Commissioner Walter Boatright was named vice
chair.


County commission


chooses new officers


RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
The Nassau County Commission
chose its chair and vice-chair for 2010
on Monday. Current Vice Chair Mike
Boyle will take the gavel from Chair
Barry Holloway next year, and
Commissioner Walter Boatright will
become vice chair.
Commissioner Danny Leeper nom-
inated Boyle and Boatright for the
positions. The commission voted unan-
imously to accept the nominations.
Prior to the vote, however,
Commissioner Stacy Johnson asked
for clarification regarding the roles
and responsibilities of the chair. Boyle
said that while the role isn't merely
ceremonial, the chair has no more leg-
islative authority than the rest of the
board.
"I want to thank Commissioner
Leeper for the nomination and assure


OBITUARIES ........................................... 2A
OUT AND ABOUT ................. 2B
SCHOOLS .................................. 10A
SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B
SPORTS ................................................... 13A


11/27

62/,. .41
62/41


Commissioner Johnson that as far as
I'm concerned, everyone has an equal
voice," he said.
Holloway said that while the chair
has duties in addition to those of the
rest of the commission, he is on an
equal footing with the rest of the
board.
'There's a lot that goes on behind
the scenes, but there's nothing that
takes away any power from us a col-
lective body," he said.
Boatright said he looks forward to
serving as vice chair.
"I appreciate the vote of confi-
dence," he said. "... I hope to do an
outstanding job. Of course, the vice
chair's the one you hope you never
hear from.
"Yeah, but nobody wants to shoot
the vice chair," Holloway joked.
Boyle and Boatright will step into
their new roles in January.
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


11/28


63/46


11/29


70/56


1.lrn
11/30


71/55


Tue
12/1


68/52


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OL D E ST


F LO R I D A 'S


WE E K L Y








FRIDAY. November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader


OLYMPICS
Continued from LA
home.
There's even a Barbara
Ann Scott doll in her collec-
tion, which includes memora-
bilia and photos with figure
skating stars from teammate
and fellow Olympian Dick
Button to a more recent gold
medal gathering including
many champions such as
Katarina Witt, Brian Boitano
and Scott Hamilton.
It was after turning profes-
sional, skating with the
Hollywood Ice Review in
Chicago, that she met publi-
cist Tom King, whom she mar-
ried in 1955.
Although she gave up skat-
ing at that point, she contin-
ued to fuel her competitive


HARRIS
Continued from 1A
affirm her achievements and
affirm her dreams, including
her parents and grandmother.
Her father, a commercial fish-
erman, and mother, an educa-
tor, instilled a belief "it was the
norm for me to excel." Her
grandmother told her,
"Whatever you be, be good at
it."
From Bishop Kenny High
School to Harvard, where she
not only earned a degree in
economics, she excelled -
magna cum laude - and then
Harvard Business School,
Harris learned that "good
things come from giving your
all."
Jacksonville attorney Steve
Pajcic, who has a home on
Amelia Island and who intro-
duced Harris, gave the bright
young woman a job in his firm
in the summer of 1981. "He
couldn't see the multiplier
effect. I couldn't see the mul-
tiplier effect. But look what
happened," she said.
Each person has the "time,
talent and treasure" to offer a
child or young person, Harris
said. "'We must each embrace
the power that we have to
make a difference... to truly
impact children."
Children learn from
observing the triumphs and
failures of adults. They will
model what they see, Harris
said. "Kids have to see the
example of compassion if we
want them to be compassion-
ate," she said.
Harris, whose book is enti-
fle( -f~fttcio,,ti'nf-sees the
;kl:l half tuU 5bhe ( esees a
rebound on Wall Stheet from
the debacle of 2008 and


spirit by showing horses, win-
ning over 400 first-place rib-
bons.
Meanwhile, Tom King fol-
lowed a musical course and
recently released his 10th CD
with his classical jazz band,
The Royal Chicagoans, "One
More Time Vol. X," featuring
timeless hits like "I'm Glad
There's You," "What is This
Thing Called Love" and
"Melancholy Baby." All pro-
ceeds from the CDs go to the
National Multiple Sclerosis
Society and The Myelin
Project.
He, too, cherishes his col-
lection of memorabilia, includ-
ing photos of Bob Hope and
other top entertainers.
The two recently celebrat-
ed their 54th wedding anniver-
sary and say they absolutely


adore their island home.
"This is heaven on Earth,"
said Tom King. "This is Our
home forever."
Now honing her athletic
prowess for her Olympic run,
King has been doing speed
walking "for about half a mile"
in preparation.
"When they ask you do to
this, they give you the option
of walking, running, speed
walking or even riding in a
wheelchair."
"My 81-year old body keeps
asking, 'What are you doing
to me?'"
"She doesn't look 81,"
quipped Tom.
The still lovely ice queen
replied with a beaming smile,
"We have a mutual admiration
society."
type@fbnewsleader.com


.SUBMITrED
Carla Harris seeks to inspire children at the Miller
Boys & Girls Club in Nassauville on Friday.


brighter days ahead for the
United States.
Especially pepplerepem-
'rkatbnsair,,s ongr,
hel 6geher. Giving your all
always pays dividends, partic-


ularly when you do it for some-
one else," she said, before dos-
ing, with- a -arenditijn ,of
�Amgerifca the Beautifujl"that
brought down the house.
mparnell@fbnewsleader.com


( nsun'r mi nk rK c tail


Copyrighted Material .
Syndicated Content .
Available from Commercial News Providers


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F.rro.ariro.a EBcr. FL
*Cniistmas Gtrts Galore
* Wrearns/Chilsrmos
Ornaments
-Lots ol looa and Baked
Goods
Something lor everyone
No admission charge
open ro the puoic


w vv-oun upen I I;ouam
A Christmas Carol In 3D
(12:30), (2:50), *5:10, 7:30,9:50
2012 PG-13
(12:20),3:40,7:00,10:20
Blind Side PG-13
(1:10), 4:10,7:10,10:10
Planet 51 PG
(12:05), (2:30), *5:00,7:25,9:45
New Moon PG-13
(1:00), 4:00,7:00, 9:50
Fantastic Mr. Fox PG
(12:00), (2:30), '4:45,7:05,9:40
Old Dogs (PG)
(12:00), (2:30), '4:45,7:05,9:40
Advance tickets available now for
AVATAR IN 3D
Popcorn 1.00o - Drink 51.00


k4LC4 U4i^ E&-u m, A"4ud


"We're Proud of Ford Motor Company.

America's Top Car Company."


Ford Is On A Roll. And With NO Bailout Money.

Just Read For Yourself. Top Media Experts Agree.


THE NEW YORK TIMES "
Thursday, November 19, 2009
Ford Today


ic e tu iUork Miunw
t|.Ela ihr V.llJd,'


".....For decades, Henry Ford's company was 'the No. 2 automaker, a strong runner-up
to General Motors and a pillar of American corporate stability. In early 2009, it
emerged as the sole American automaker in a position to survive the steepest sales
downturn in decades without a government bailout....."

8\^g^' ^ ^^sa- ^S^^ ^Ng)*^dL- ^ '^^^^l~


THE DETROIT NEWS
November 2009


The De~roit N
detnew.com


2010 Ford Fusion Named
Motor 'Trend's Car of the Year'
Magazine's staff cites Ford's improvements, sedan's broad appeal
"....Ford has proven it's resilence in these tough times by delivering to the market a car with broad
appeal to a broad range of consumers, "said Motor Trend Editor-In-Chief Angus MacKenzie.
"The Fusion range has matured into a competitive roster of midsize sedans, able to compete with
sales jaggernauts such as the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord."



USA TODAY
November 2, 2009
Ford Reports $1B 3Q Profit, Forecasts Faster Turnaround
BY CHRIS WOODYARD - USA TODAY
"Ford Motor issued a robust earnings report Monday, showing $997 million in profit in the third
quarter.....Ford, the only U.S. Automaker that avoided bankruptcy court and is publicly traded,
recorded its first pre-tax operating profit since the first quarter of 2008. Perhaps more significantly,
Ford saw a turnaround in its toughest market: the USA and Canada. North American operations
posted a $357 million pre-tax operating profit, the first since the first quarter of 2005.".



2009 FORD ESCAPE EARNS 'TOP SAFETY PICK'; TOPS TOYOTA,
HONDA IN COMBINED SAFETY AND FUEL EFFICIENCY RATINGS
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) named the 2009 Ford Escape, Mercury
Mariner and their hybrid models as "Top Safety Picks". Escape and Mariner SUV's also
earned the government's top 5-star crash ratings - topping Toyota RAV-4 in both
independent crash tests and beating Honda CR-V in combined crash safety and fuel
efficiency ratings. Ford has produced more IIHS Top Safety Picks than any other brand.

Escape also helps Ford equal Honda and Toyota quality by earning a Top Three spot
in the J.D. Power and Associates 2008 Initial Quality Study SM (IQS).


If t_,.


904-225-3673
www.pcford.net


Paul Clark~
IFord-Mercury


The food pantry needs donations of
non-perishable food items all year round.
For more information, call: 904.261.7000
menummammemmummmmma


Illll~lils""~aaeasaa~a~saaass~an~~


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CLASSIFIED


NEWS-LEADER / FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 27,2009


To PLACE AN AD, CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE - WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Fr,ar,.:,al-Homrr- Properr, 606 Pnhoo EQu.pme.n' & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
131 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Irlone, To Loan 607 Antrque;-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 85: Hornm,-Furrnised
1.2 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Producie 621 Garden.Lawn Equipmerr 802 Mr-l.bl 1-n.,r-,e 115 krrglard. t r.1.r, boJla Honme-Unt urrrlShed
1j3 In r-lemorlam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipmert 609 Appliances 622 Plants Sees.'Ferrilizer 803 fr.10lloe Homer Liot q l , Cmden ir rc.unr, Bi ,:r, l k
13-4 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livescocr & SuDplies 610 Air Con,rooner,HeaterC 623 SwapTrrade 804 Amrni,3 Iland Ho:..T, 81.- Oher "reas 8623 Bero Brekt
10:5 Publ.c Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supples 611 Home Furn.shings 624 Wanted to Buy1 805 Eeaches 850 RENTALS 4 .3 On,,T r Reta
10r: Happy Card 302 DIet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Iluscal instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waerfro.rnt 851 -omr ,:omate war 8 5 :mrer.c-Retai
10 7 SpectalOccasion 303 HobBles/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 T~r.e.i.ion-Radaio.Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 C,-,ndominlm.i, 8.. Il.le i Homk 901 TRANSPORTATION
108 Girt Shops 305 TUtoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Je,.-lr,'Watches '01 BoaLt & Trailers 8038 Of IsanO ',ui.ee e53 rlobiie Home LtI: 901 A IrulArDnies
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Buildang ratrienals 702 Boar Supplies/Dockage 809 Loir- 854 Room 902 Trucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 r-ascellareouxs 616 Sr:oraoe Warhnouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 610F Farm Sucir-eagce S5 Apanmrteris.-urn. ned 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage BoughtSold 604 Bicvcle. 617 Machninr, -TcrOIsEquip -14 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commnercal.,Retal 856 Apartmenri-.Unfurn 904 r.le,-rrccies
.0: Hotel. Restaurant 402 Stocks& Bonds 605 Cori-uters-Supplie F.18 Aucc.ns 705 Crompurers.& Supplies 12 Propert, Evy-n.anue 5. C, Oi.-.:Furri.:red. 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 4B


102 Lost & Found
LOST CAT - Pastel tabby. Small,
approx. 6 Ibs. Lost behind high school
in Fernandina. PIs call (904)206-0760.
FOUND TWO SMALL DOGS - One Lab
mix, one Beagle mix. Call (904)583-
8331 or Nassau Humane Society.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
FOUND LAB PUPPY - Yulee. (904)
261-9155

104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida - Advertising
Networks of Florida. Put us to work for
You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com. ANF


201 Help Wanted
ARTISTIC FLORIST POSITIONS:
Floral Designer Positions - open
part-time and full time. Experience in
professional Florist required. Apply by
e-mail artisticfldrist@bellsouth.net
PTL OTR DRIVERS - New pay pkg.
Great miles. Up to 46cpm. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262. www.ptl-lnc.com. ANF
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need employ-
ees to assemble products at home. No
selling, any hours. $500 wkly potential.
Info 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-1380.

ADVANCED HOMECARE - needs RNs
in Nassau Co. to provide home care.
FT/per visit oppty. Excellent $$. Fax
470-4799 call 470-5000. Tom
AUTO DETAILER POSITION
Skills & exp in fine auto detailing. Must
have- good attitude, references and
transportation. Part-time. $6/hr. Call
904-548-0979, appt.


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED




Saturday * November 28"


1 till 4 pm





ON ISLAND




85067 ST. THOMAS - LOFTON OAKS



SUBD. - 3BR/2BA



1124 ASF.- $148,900


201 Help Wanted
RV Delivery Drivers Needed - Deliv-
er RVs, boats & trucks for PAY! Deliver
to all 48 states & CN. For details log on
to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
HOTEL FRONT DESK CLERK - Night
audit & daytime positions open.
Experience required. Apply at Holiday
Inn Express, 76071 Sidney PI., Yulee.
ADOPTION & VOLUNTEER
COORDINATOR
Nassau County has an opening for an
Adoption & Volunteer Coordinator in
the Animal Care and Control
Department. Annual starting salary is
$32,027 plus a competitive benefits
package. Graduation from high school
or equivalent, supplemented by three
years experience in the area of animal
care in a shelter/center environment
and two years of direct public customer
service. Must possess a valid State of
Florida driver's license. Applications
will be accepted through Wednesday,
December 9, 2009 and can be obtained
in the Human Resources Department
located at 96161 Nassau Place, Yulee,
FL 32097-6r by phone (904)491-7332
or fax (904)321-5926. EOE/M/F/D/V.
Drug Free Workplace.
HOUSEKEEPER: Greyfield Inn
Cumberland Island. In residence
position, dining experience required.
$24,500 per annum. Apply 6 North 2nd
Street, Suite 300, Fernandina Beach or
call 261-6408 for application. -
RAVEL, TRAVEL, TRAVEL - $500
sign-on bonus. Seeking sharp guys &
gals, Rock-n-Roll atmosphere, blue
jean environment. Call Ally (800)716-
0048 today. ANF
SPORTS ACTIVE, DIVORCED,
RETIRED GENTLEMAN - looking for
light home help. Part or Full time, up to
$500 per week, room & essentials
provided, including college tuition if
requested. Ideal for a student. Andy
(904)772-9813, Jacksonville, FL.
ECO-FRIENDLY CLEANING COMP-
ANY - looking for a dependable clean-
ing professional P/T. High quality work
& proven experience req'd! Email resu-
me to: hr@thegreencleaningpros.com


301 Schools &
Instruction

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance Car-
eer. FAA approved program. Financial
aid if qualified - Housing avail. Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-
5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
accounting, criminal justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer avail.
Financial aid if qualified. (888)203-
3179, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF


601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - Sat. 11/28, 8am-lpm.
801 San Fernando St., (904)310-6672.
Couch, futon, TV, kids/baby stuff,
bikes, housewares, collectibles, micro-
wave, & much more.
YARD SALE - Fri. & Sat., 8am-3pm.
2605 Benz Place.
YARD SALE - Antiques, fishing stuff,
collectibles. Fri. 11/27 & Sat. 11/28,
8am-lpm. 505 S. 9th St.
GARAGE/MOVING SALE - 3580 1st
Ave. Sat. & Sun., 8am-? Antique
Singer sewing machines, lots of sewing
stuff, lots of arts & crafts, household
items, outdoor stuff, books, antique
books, & more. Too much stuff to list!


1 306 Lessons/Classes I 602 Articles for SaleI


CLASSES - Tutoring in Spanish,
Italian, French. Private & group
lessons. Call Anna or Lucia (904)403-
1982.
ARTISTS WANTED - Seeking working
Artists who are interested in Sharing
Studio Space in an established Gallery
located in downtown Fernandina. All
interested please call - (904)261-7039.



403 Finance
Home/Property

BIG PLANS - being held up by the
economy? Turn court settlement,
annuity, or lottery winnings into the
cash you need. Call Chris (816)582-
1193 or chris@yourcashout.com. ANF




502 Livestock
& Supplies

'09 BERMUDA HAY -:Horse quality.
Large square bales in barn, $3.50/bale.
Cow hay $2.50/bale. Patterson, GA.
Alvin Strickland, (904)335-7463.


204 Work Wanted 503 Pets/Supplies


SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN -
Small jobs welcomed. (904)277-4777
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


1/2 AMERICAN, 1/2 ENGLISH
BULLDOG - Free to good home. Super
cool, fun loving guy. Owner off to
college. (904)556-4604

liJ=J! JI^


CARPET REPAIRS - and restretching " '6 .. ""' ...
and Installing. 35+ years experience. 601 Garage Sales
Call (904)753-1243.


WE BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT - We'll pick up. (904)
879-1535 or (904)237-5293
CHIMNEY SWEEP
Don't burn your house down because
of an unsafe fireplace. Call Lighthouse
Chimney Sweeps 261-8163 for a safe
warm winter.

207 Business
'Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF
HOST A GOLD PARTY - in your
house. We supply refreshments & know
how. Instant money making
opportunity. 583-6152


NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE - Sat
11/28 @ 8am till ? Day bed, house-
hold items, toys, 15" tires, women's/
teen clothing, books, dishes, Christmas
deco. and more. Forest Parke Dr., Flora
Parke, next to Super Wal-Mart.
SAT., 8AM-12PM - 1st & Simmons.
Wood futon, brass bed/mattress, oak
dinette & chairs, bicycles, more.
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 11/28, 8am-
11am. 1012 Ocean Oaks Dr. S.
Furniture, TV, movies, girl's bike, toys,
children's books, & misc.
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 11/28, 9am.
96031 Springwood Ln. (Spanish Oaks).
Household/misc. items, books, tools,
Christmas deco. Good stuff!
YARD SALE - Sat. 11/28, 8:30am-7
85035 St. John Ct., Yulee (Lofton Creek
Subdivision). Boy clothes sizes 5-18,
toys, books, DVDs, bikes, computer
games, microwave, TVs, & much more.


105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
,of the law. All persons are hereby
Informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW CONCRETE _GOLD & SILVER I LOCKSMITH PAINTING


]_ SALON & SPA


CLEANING SERVICE CONSTRUCTION | HOIE IMPROVEMENT NEW & USED CARS -1


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At a
753-3067 ---

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES




CLEANING SEICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed * Bonded* Insured
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904-491-1971* Cell: 904-742-8430
E-mail: justforyouserv@aol.com





Patricia Christmas

Commercial * Residential * Rental
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
583 -2099






S ( -_ ri c c_ D i ic x T Ic r


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duster
(94)261-1940





CONSTRUCTiON
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed � Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GOROGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARRAONTEED

2-Car Garages

'16,495"
24x24 Wood Fme Only
Addiional Cons tor
Cnc rete BlotckO


GARAGE DOORS

GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In.
"The local guy" since 198
Quit Paying Too Much!
* Operator or door replacements Transmiller replacemin
SBroken springs Stripped gears
*Cables Service for all makes & models
904-277-2086


FIT HOME IMPROVEMENT INC
Quality Workmanship
We Do It Right The First Time
Termite & Wood Rot Repair
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors
Doors Windows * Custom Decks
Custom Trim * Crown Moulding
321-0540 * 557-8257
UWudiAUM' U iinl iNfell iai i I



ODWORKUIG, I.C
CUSTOM CABINETSI ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
BOOKCAEI TRIM CARPENTER
HONE REPAIRS REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICES
LICENSED A ISSUED
SCOTT RUDOIPH 90f-557-3100

JEWELRY

jewelry Repair,
Cleaning, Inspection,
Appraisals & Layaway



1472 SADLER ROAD
277-4910


Florida Gardener
Residential, Commercial, Associations
* Full service Lawn Maintenance
* Flowerbeds, Mulch, Cleanups
* Irrigation Repairs & Installs
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
I censed & Insured


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 * Yulee

(904) 261-6821

PAINTING .



Quality Work at
Rcas najblc Pric i.
"No f. TOo Irroiml Or Io olaim '"
S Licensed.-Bonded' Insured
FREE ESTIMATES 22592,Fq9:
AVAILABLE .*J .


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The Nevvs-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITY PAINING,INC.,
"Call the Professionals"
(904) 753-1689
*RESIDENTIAL
*COMMERCIAL
*INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
*SPECIALIZED FINISHES
*PRESSURE WASHING
& WATER PROOFING

LICENSED * BONDED * INSURED
*PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP AT
AFFORDABLE PRICES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
FREE ESTIMATE
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


PRESSULIRE \'ASHlING

PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
WoodDecks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353

L_ ROOFING
4(/// lllll ll //I / l//,

SI COASTAL BUILDING
SYSTEMS


URe-Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia

261-2233
Free Estimate
Sl /ccc/-/osqo5
N /////./////////// ,,


Jawt


,; .


REMODEL YOUR
LOOK!
DISCOVER THE
DIrrERENCE....
HAIR- COLOR-
PIDI-MANICUR-S
WAX, MAKEUP
250 sadllr Road, Ste.10
Sremandina Beach,
Z 61-241-


TREE SERVICEj

Insured Bonded


VetituI TrT

Good Price Specializing
Great Service in all your
Free Estimates tree's needs
Johnny Bass 904-753-3496


Mac's Tree Service, Inc
AFree Estimates
ATrimming
ARemoval
AStump Grinding
AHauling
Fully Insured Workman's Comp
(904)282-9061
(904)838-8359


Trimming & Removal


Girgis Tree Service
Licensed * Insured
22 Years Experience

Roger Giris
Free Eshlltios (904)229-8098







(DIt DWtD LAY(kir-~m
aIdvertisiri d Ilars


HARVARD WOOD FOOTBALL TABLE
- Elec. scoreboard, cup holders on each
end of table. Like new, barely used,
great Christmas gift. $150. 261-0057'
LrTTLE TYKES SPIRAL BOUNCER -
New in box, inflatable bouncer w/slide.
Retails for $500, asking $250/OBO.
(904)491-3520
Drastically Reduced Cosmetic Sale
- Open House 11/14, 21 & 28,*12-4pm
or call for personal appt. 87188 Raddin
Rd., Chester area. (904)225-7500
WHITEWASH 5-PC. QUEEN
BEDROOM SET - $450/OBO. Call
(904) 556-1919

607 Antiques
& Collectibles
50% OFF LARGE FURNITURE ITEM
- Different item each week till end of
year. Come by & see. Old Flood Store,
Yulee. oldfloodstore.com

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating I

HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.

614 Jewelry/Watches
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS
Crawford Jewelers, 1472 Sadler Rd.
(904)277-4910

|15 8uildingMif trials
METAL ROOFING TAX-CREDIT - 40
yr warranty. Direct from manufacturer.
30 colors in stock. Quick turn around.
Delivery available. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupolv.com. ANF

618 Auctions
www.abalauction.com - Auction -
Online biding: 1974 Corvette, 2002
Honda VTX 1800 motorcycle, 2006
Laredo by Keystone 29' fifth wheel RV,
furn., zero-turn mowers, chainsaws,
weedeaters, lawn tools, plus much
more. www.abalauction.com, joe@aba
lauction.com, (850)510-2501 AB2387,
AU3239. ANF

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bae ata time tb ogh
hard work and integrity over 18 years
Fast, FiendlySeavic-Instauladon Available


ICK ISABELLA, INC,
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694


The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK (56251
Locked Out?
Car, House, Office
24/7 Service $30.00
Keys Made, Auto, Home, Office


1-


Coins ~~~- Slewae-Jeer
SABR



21 etr tet 0-2700









FRI'MDA. NOVtLMBEk 27. 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


704 Recreation Vehicles
PUBLIC AUCTION - 400+ FEMA
mobile homes & campers. All selling no
reserve Dec. 5th, Gonzales, LA
www.hendersonauctions.com (225)
686-2252 LA lic 136-09. ANF




802 Mobile Homes
2005 4BR/2BA - on 1 acre. Must sell
due to foreclosure. Low down,
$750/mo. Call (904)589-9585.
FORECLOSEDI - New manufactured
homes on land. Ready to move in 3, 4
& 5 bedroom homes w/low down.
$750/mo. (904)589-9585
804 Amelia Island Homes
UNWRAP THE HOME
you've always wanted!
Oceanfront Log Cabin - $899,000
2,389 sf home in Yulee - $189,900
Condo by the beach - $155,000
Charming Cottage - $130,000
Egans Bluff III 2159 sf - $294,000
Amelia Coastal Realty
(904)261-2770
ask for Santa!
1711 PARK AVE. - Amelia Park.
2115sf, 3BR/2BA, pool, privacy fence,
2-car garage. $425,000. Call for more
details (904)583-3732.
CHARMING DOWNTOWN COTTAGE
- Energy Star Hurricane Resistant Pre-
const., $175K. (904)556-1905
FSBO or RENT - Great 1939
commercial building with living
quarters. 1700 sq. ft. 226 S. 9th St.
(904)261-4801

805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.


806 Waterfront
I -06Watrf ��n !


S810 Farms & Acreage I


HUGE SAVINGS - 20 Ac only $72,900.
Wooded in Coastal GA. Excellent Week-
end retreat/Awsome hunting/Subdi-
vision potential. Only 3.5 miles from
Wal-Mart. Owner Financing Available.
Call Owner Now! (912)674-2700

817 Other Areas
Foreclosed Home Auction - 300+
Florida homes. Auction 12/5. REDC /
View full listings www.Auction.com RE
No. CQ1031187. ANF
Foreclosed Home Auction - 300+
Florida homes. Auction 12/5. REDC /
View full listings www.Auction.com RE
No. CQ1031187. ANF
AUCTION - Santa Rosa Co., FL. Sat.
12/12, 11am. The Moors Golf &
Racquet Club Milton, FL. 66 beautiful
lots - 20 lots will sell absolute. Gated
comm., clubhouse, pool, tennis, courts,
workout center. Walking distance to
championship golf course. More info
(205)822-4229 Redmont Auction Eddie
Propst AU2051 Bob Vagi Auctioneers &
Realty, Inc. AB177 AU331. ANF





851 Roommate Wanted
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED - 2BR apt. to share in Courtney
Isles. Call for details (904)206-0884.
ROOMMATE - Beautiful condo on
Plantation. 2BR/2BA. Prefer young
professional. $450/mo. Pool & tennis.
Contact (678)386-4331.
UF OR SFC STUDENT - who is looking
for 1BR/1BA in 2/2 apt in NW Gaines-
ville in Spring. Prefer female student to
share w/local student. 5 mins to SFC,
15 mins to UF. (904)27.7-6951.

852 Mobile Homes


DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME -
3BR/2BA on 1 acre. Great location.
$850/mo. + dep. Call (904)321-7454.


Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
904) 261-4066 for Information, C.H, BLACKROCK AREA - 2BR/1BA.
04) 261-66or information. .H. 500/m. + $500 deposit. Call (904)
Lasserre, Retor 261-9729
807 Condominiums STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577


CLUB VILLA AIP - This two-story villa
has been renovated ceiling to floors
and wall to wall! New kit. and 3 new
bathrooms. Call for appointment to
preview. 491-5906. $258,000
808 Off Island/Yulee
3BR/2.5BA ENERGY EFFICIENT
HOME - Granite countertops, hard-
wood floors, ceramic tile, spa tub, 2-
car garage. In gated community.
$329,900. Call (904)491-4383 or
(904)237-7324.
S809 Lots
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION LOTS
* Lot 29 - Beachwood Rd. near tennis
center & beach club, great location,
$335,000.
* Lots 13 & 14 - Sound Point, deep
water, best deal on Plantation,
$795,000.
* Lot 101 - Belted Kingfisher, wooded
patio lot, very private, $248,000.
Call (904)545-3017 for more details.
LOT FOR SALE - #10 Blackrock Rd.
.55 acre, geared, filled, well drilled,
between Pirates Wood entrances.
$59,000. (912)506-1035


3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - in
Blackrock Rd. area. $700/mo. + $400
sec.dep. (904)753-1691
BLACKROCK AREA - 2BR/1BA in
small, very quiet trailer park. Water,
garbage, sewer & lawn service
provided. $550/mo. + $500 dep. 261-
6486
3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE - on one
acre. $850/mo. + $800 deposit. (904)
753-2155
2BR/2BA - Beautiful new decor. $500-
$675/mo. Includes water, lawn.
Possible RTO. (904)315-1757 or 613-
8401
3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME - on 1 acre off Wilson Neck Rd.
$800/mo. + $500 deposit. - Call (904)
725-7293.
On Island - 2/1 SWMH in park
starting $165 wk/$660 mo. + dep.
Utilities available. Also, At Beach -
effic. apt., $145 wk incl utils/cable.
261-5034
3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE - Available
12/1. $600/mo. + $600 deposit. Call
(904)583-2576, leave message & I will
return your call.


Fall Move-In Special

2 MONTHS FREE
Call for Details
/, A~ * W/D Connections
F * Large Closets
* Private Patios
* Sparkling Pool
- Tennis Courts
S Exercise Room
* � Close to shopping
-i. ' -- . " 20 minutes to Jacksonville
� ,. 1 or Femrnandina.
City Apartments with Country Charm!
dl (904) 845-2922
E 1 37149 Cody Circle Hilliard, Florida
Eastwoot ak Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30
Apartments SatLSun.byAppt.






Countryside Apartments
1&2 Bedroom Units
Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904)277-2103
O O N This Institution Is an Equal Opportunity provider and employer.

Yulee Villas ''
1,2&3 Bedroom Units
Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810
This Institution is an Equal Opporlunily provider and employer "".HoUs

pOT T


HOMELESS



ANIMALS...



THEY'RE DYING

FOR

A IND CHANCE,


Adopt A Companion Todag,


A PUBLI SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE
NEWS-LEADER


852 Mobile Homes I


ON ISLAND - 3BR/1BA SWMH.
Screened porch w/carport. $700/mo. +
deposit. (904)261-5559
TWO DWMHs - Nassauville 3/2, $825
+ dep. 3/2 off Radio, $825 + dep. Pets
OK. Call (904)206-3423
BLACKROCK RD. AREA - 2BR/1BA
mobile home for rent. Available 12/1.
Must have references. $500/mo. +
deposit. Call (904)277-8522.

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5 min-
utes from beach. Private bath, private
entrance. $100/wk. + $200 dep. Call
10am-6pm, (904)624-5084 anytime.
ROOM FOR RENT - 1902 Beech St.
Call (904)261-5621.


855 Apartments
Furnished
SMALL 1BR APT. - in Nassauville.
Furnished. Twin bed, electricity, A/C,
DirecTV. $650/mo. + $650 deposit.
Cute, cozy, quiet & In good
neighborhood. Service animals only.
References required. Please call
(904)206-3241, & leave message.
WATERFRONT - Cozy 1BR, can be
furnished except bed. Some utilities.
Great fishing & boating. (904)703-
4265
ACROSS FROM OCEAN - 57 S.
Fletcher Ave. 2BR/2BA completely
furnished. Washer/dryer, d/w, dispos-
al, TV, ceiling fans. $875/mo. + utili-
ties. Deposit $875. Call (904)277-7622
to schedule walk through.
2 APTS. - Fully furnished. A.I., gated,
all utilities, beach access. Short term
rental. No smoking. $750 & $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262
OCEANVIEW BEAUTIFUL APT
FOR RENT
Beautiful ocean views. Furnished. 2BR,
Spacious, all Brand-new appliances,
Hardwood floors. $750/month. (904)
277-3050.
631 TARPON AVE. - Fernandina
Shores. 2/2, furnished, pool, tennis
courts, clubhouse, steps to the beach.
$895. nick Deonas Realty, Inc.
(904)277-0006
At Beach - Remodeled effic $125 wk,
ind utils/cable. Also On Island -
2&3BR SWMH in park starting $165
wk/$660 mo + dep. 261-5034


F LORIDA'S O L D E ST WEE K LY N EWS PA P ER



NEWS LEADER



Presents




-IF cM~------I --



a~avi~~grg i


as


Help the Barnabas Center

fill its shelves with non

perishable food items


Save Up To $10��



On An Annual Paid Subscription!


Bring your in-date packaged or canned food

to 511 Ash Street, Fernandina Beach and

receive $1.00 off your NEW or RENEWED

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? ^1' !I ^~j i^ i^ ry.l ^^ rI :^i,


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their food supply during this holiday season PLUS save

on your 'Local News Source' the News-Leader.

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^ ^ ^ '.- -- ^ ^ / ^ -:E, ----- ^
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FW s1925 S. 14" St., Suite 4
, nl * Amelia Island, FL
Sales (904)277-9700
h k - L 'Property Management
SDoro t Trent (904)277-0907 Larr Coleman
Surfside Properties, Inc. Realtor www.ameliasurfside.com Realtor'

-r -T






WON'T LASTI A-127 Amelia NORTH 14TH STREET 4BR/1.5BA S. 12TH ST. Affordable cottage style
Surf & Racquet. 2 bedroom 2 block home-on island, needs TLC. homes, on island. 2 bedroom, 2bath
bath 2 balconies $409,900 $129,000 MLS #47266 MLS #50059 & #50066

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS
ON ISLAND ON ISLAND. Cont
* 2618 Delorean. 3BR 28A n * 338C S Tarpon Ave , IBER BA .'
screened d back porch 2 car 2 bluck'. I.. ocean r.r150l0,mo
* 340.B Tarpon 2BRi2BA 1 blk Irom
garage 4 all Dec 1 S 1100/m1r bejr.c $850 me A,ad Dec 1Ib
* 536-A N. Fletcher, 2BR-2BA.
2 bl,:.cks ir.-.m tnieah $975 mrni OFF ISLAND
* 536-B N Fletcher 2BR.2BA. 2 *o 51412 Barbara s Place ,BR' 2A
blocks form beach, $850,mo $950/mo. Avail Dec. 1st
* 53 5 5..8th Street, upstairs apt. * 35 Teal Court (Townhome in 11TH ST, 2 homes under construc-
2BR/1 BA $550/mo. Marsh Lakes), 3BR/2.5BA, 2 car 2 bath $149,900. MLS #50109.
garage, $1295/mo. Avail Dec. 1st 2 bath $1 .


1u 0 " - =, -.-


$30m0












FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 27, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


VATO& T ORXMO/ TH








Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 Ibedr.,,nm to\nhouse isrn l
3 bedroom garden unrts * Mar-h viewss
Swimming pool * Dishwasher * Laundry facilities
Washer/dryer connections* Wa'shier dryer units available'
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675." per month
*Some features not available in all innms

�IC t�a& DNw A- *- A44 At.4 O4 S0 ^ti
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you can \alk to tie shops
& restaurants at The Gateway to .nelia Center!


(ce dU4 (904) 261-0791
.\lv .11 tcdlfe\el o lpmen t.conI














PROPERTIES


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-CRS, GRI MLS"1 0
904.753.0696
Each Office s Independently Owned and Opermted


North Hampton Golf &
Country Club!!
4 bedroom 3 bath, cabinet
lined kitchen, open to
family room with fire-
place!! Preservation lot!

. MLS#51005 $330,000



303Centre Sireel DC / A Kathy White
Fernandina Beach / CDPE
Florida 904-321-1999 904-753-2705


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

1BR/1BA - $700/mo. includes utilities
+ $700 deposit. Across from beach,
949 5. Fletcher. (904)215-9935

For Rent - 2BR/1.5BA townhouse apt.
Newly rebuilt. CH&A, stove, refrig.,
d/w, carpet. $750/mo. + dep. & ref's.
828 Nottingham Dr. (904)261-3035
NORTH BEACH AREA - Quiet. 2BR/
1.5 duplex, upstairs, ocean view.
$800/mo. + 1/2 utilities. Call (904)
206-2281.
Affordable Living - for eligible low-
income persons/families. 1 & 2
bedrooms. Rent based on income.
Apply at Post Oak Apts., 996 Citrona
Dr., Fernandina Beach; (904)277-7817.
Handicap Accessible apts available.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
OCEANFRONT 2BR/1BA - Patio,
CH&A, private beach access. $750/mo.
+ $850 dep. 270 S. Fletcher. Yearly
lease. (904)556-5722
ENJOY FANTASTIC SUNSETS -
Riverfront Loft Apt. in old Town.
2BR/1BA, patio, stainless kitchen
appl's, custom cabinets, laundry h/u.
$995. (904) 206-1292
WATERFRONT - Cozy 1BR, can be
furnished except bed. Some utilities.
Great fishing & boating. (904)703-
4265
BEACHES CHOICE - 2BR oceanvlew
townhome. Freshly painted, new
carpet, ceiling fans, CH&A, W/D conn.
Svc pets only.,No smk. $875/nrrio. Wtr/
sew incl. 737 N. Fletcher. 261-4127
925 TARPON - North Pointe, 2BR/
2.5BA, close to beath, pool, covered
parking. $850/mo. Nick Deonas Realty,
Inc. (904)277-0006
_ _ - - - _ _


I 857 Condos-Furnished 1858 Condos-UnfurnishedI 860 Homes-UnfurnishedI


1BR/1BA - Amelia Woods. Beautifully
furnished. Vaulted ceilings. $840/mo.
Call (770)789-2965 for details. Also
listed for sale - Century 21.
FOR RENT - Fernandina. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. Utils incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
POOLVIEW BEAUTIFUL CONDO
FOR RENT
Amelia Landings 1F. Top floor. Beau-tiful view
of pool, lagoon and tennis courts. Fumished.
2BR/2BA. Washer/ Dryer all appliances. Nicely
fumished. $850/month. (904)277-3050.


NOVEMBER SPECIAL
AMELIA LAKES
1 & 2 Bed Luxury Condos in gated,
waterfront community. Resort-style
pool, tennis court, 24/7 fit ctr, volley-
ball & more! Garden tubs, walk-in
closets, & lots of upgrades! Call Jessica
(904)415-6969. Starting at $799/mo!
www.amelialakes.com
jessica@amelialakes.com


DUPLEX @ 2184-A FIRST AVENUE -
Close to the beach & Sliders! 3BR/2BA
townhome w/1 car garage. $1300/mo
incl. yard service. Call Robin (904)261-
6651 or (912)270-3239
1711 PARK AVE. - Amelia Park.
2115sf, 3BR/2BA, pool, privacy fence,
2-car garage. $1800/mo. . w/pool &
lawn svc. Call for more details
(904)583-3732.


I I ON AMELIA ISLAND - 2069 Bonnie
859 Homes-Furnished Oaks Dr., 3BR/2BA. $1000/mo. +
$$1100 deposit. (386)365-8543


2BR/2BA - on Amelia Island FULLY FURNISHED HOUSE FOR RENT - Nice little house.
Plantation. $1200/mo. for 6 months. 3BR/2BA + bonus room in Lofton 3BR/1BA located on Gum St. Newly
Call AMELIA RENTALS (904)261-9129. Pointe. For information call Ana remodeled. Call (904)753-1346.
(904)403-1982. _r...............
...VI.IT.....lnwl",-,m1 co- --- ror


858 Condos-Unfurnished 1860 Homes-Unfurnished


3165 S. FLETCHER - (Sea Castles).
3/2.5, washer/dryer, garage, com-
munity pool, steps to beach. $895. nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
LUXURY CONDO - 2BR/2BA, garage,
pool, gated community, ground level.
The Villas at Summer Beach. Unfurn-
ished. $1150/mo + util. 277-3206
3BR/2BA - $1395/mo. + utilities.
Short term or long term, or weekly.
Pets OK with a fee. (912)552-8601
FERNANDINA SHORES - 3BR/2BA
ground floor, pool, tennis, clubhouse,
dishwasher. Year lease, ref's, deposit.
Avail November. $950/mo. 261-5630
2BR/2BA - Close to beach, 1200 sq.
ft., tile floors, recent renovation,
washer/dryer. Pet considered.
$950/mo. Call (904)430-7802.
1/2 MONTH FREE - The Palms at
Amelia 2BR/2BA starting at $825/mo.
3BR/2BA starting at $900/mo. Call
(904)277-1983.
AMELIA LAKES CONDO - 2BR/2BA,
lake/pool view. $850/mo. Call (904) 583-0322.
THE COLONY - 2BR/2BA, bonus room,
garage, W/D, pool, tennis courts.
$900/mo. Available 12/1/09. Call


CURTISS H. (904557-1s07.
CURTISS H. CONDOS FOR RENT HOTLINE - Ask
LASSERRE about our FREE RENT SPECIAL,
LASS IER Darlington Realty, Inc. (904)261-8030.
Real Estate, Inc. ICURTISS H.


- A. aLASSERRE
- Re al Estate+ Inc*


LONG TERM
*3BR/2.5BA w/pool , unfurnished
95109 Hildreth Ln NO SMOKING
$1750 + until. Includes yard & pool
maintenance.
*730 S 14th. - 3BR/IBA home
w/fenced backyard, $875/mo. + until.
- 322 S.6th St. 4BR/2BA $ 1, 100 + until.
S2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side),.
3-4 BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft.Home. Lots
of parking. Unfurnished $1,400 + util.
*19 S. 14th St., 2/I, $900/mo. + until ,
security deposit $1,000.
* 3BR/2.5BAVery nice 2500 sq.ft. home
at Florence Point $1,45Q/mo. + util.
Avail 1/1/2.010
*3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island
with beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,750/mo. + Util. Includes yard
maintenance
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. +
until. Security deposit of $1,000.
S2801 Bizabeth St - 3/2 upstairsApt. Great
DeckOceanview$950/ma+ until.
*3BR/2BA on First Ave. w/one car
garage. Like new with a partial ocean
view $1,150/mo + until.

VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/ IBA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher.
Call for more information


.1 t 2E-0. -.


S2000 sf +/- in busy Five Points Plaza at

frontage with heavy foot traffic an'd
vehicle exposure.$3,800/mo incl. rent
CAM, and taxes
* 850785 US 17Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq. ft. building & large paved
parking lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & until.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term
lease. $2400/mo includes CAM + tax.
*Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and
Peacock Electric in O'Neil, good
exposure on AIA. Great for show
room or office space $1350/mo + tax
+utilities.
*Approx 1800 s.f. 1839 S. 8th' St
Adjacent to Huddle House $2,250/mo
lease + tax, also considering sale.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing locat-
ed at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2,500/mo + tax +
until
* DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 Imo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent
FREE with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo
includes all other fees/costs except
utilities. One mo. FREE rent w/ signed
lease.
SFive Points Village 2250 5 8th St. Old
West Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample
parkingAIA exposure. Great for retail
or large office space. Call for details.


YULEE --4BR/2BA, 1854sf. $1,100/
mo. Call Don Brown Realty (904)
225-5510 or (904)571-7177.

WORTHINGTON DR. - in Page Hill,
Yulee. 3/2, stove, fridge, DW, disposal,
washer/dryer, water softener, mower,
pest control. $1095. Nick Deonas
Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
3BR/1BA BLOCK HOME - Yulee.
Callaway Dr. CH&A, upgraded kit. w/
dw, storage garage with w/d. $800/
mo + dep. 225-9890 or 225-6084.
HOUSE FOR RENT - on Fernandina
Beach, FL. 1748 Lewis St. Call (904)
312-2686 to show house.


3BR/2BA HOUSE -2-car gar., all
appl's, upgraded kitchen, vaulted
ceilings, cable included. Mins from Jax,
A.I., Kings Bay & beaches. $1150/mo.
Available 12/15. (904)334-0806
ON THE ISLAND - 3BR/2BA, 3630 1st
Ave. Garage, large back deck, near the
beach. $1200/mo. + $1000 dep. Call
(386)961-8672 or (866)606-8443.
YULEE COTTAGE - 2BR/1BA,
completely refurbished, CH&A, tile
bath. $750/mo., 1st & last + $700
security. Call (904)465-0511.
ON ISLAND AT SEASIDE: 2,400 sq.
ft. 4-bedroon 3-full baths. Walk or
cycle to the beach, Ft. Clinch or town.
2-car garage, sprinkler system, smoke
and security alarms, fitted for internet,
phones & cable. Fully equipped
kitchen, with breakfast nook, formal
dinning area, and storage area,
laundry room with washer/dryer.
$1,650' month. 904/206-0817 or
770/493-9664.
SUMMER BEACH BLVD. - 3BR/2BA
unfurnished home. . $1700/mo. Call
AMELIA RENTALS (904)261-9129.
2150 CAPTAIN KIDD - Very clean
3BR/2BA home. 1700sf w/fenced in
backyard. In Lakewood Subd. behind
Food Lion Shopping Ctr. $1200/mo. +
dep & 1 yr lease. Call (904)753-4559.
3BR/2BA - w/garage & screened
porch. Villages of Marsh Lakes. $1100/
mo. 1st & security required. (904)753-
0379.







Club
Apartments
BestAddiress in Fertnandina Beach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details
(90-4)277-2500


VISIT ChaplinWilliams.com - tor
Nassau County's largest selection of
long term rentals! (904)261-9311
33379 SUNNY PARKE CIR. - Flora
Parke. 4/2, 2300 sq. ft. Stove, fridge,
DW, microwave, FP, water softener,
sprinkler system. Must see. $1395.
Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. 277-0006

861 Vacation Rentals

OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.


863 Office

Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - In the
historic district downtown. Lots of foot
traffic. Some utilities are included.
Please phone (904)261-8249 to
preview these offices.
OFFICE SPACE - for rent. Office within
an office. Desk, chair, bookcase,
utilities included, & some extras. 753-
4077
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
402 Centre St. 1000-9000SF
1 North 4th St (Swan Bldg)
155-170SF
501 Centre St (Maxwell Bldg)
120-190SF
Atlantic Ave @ 14th St 500-2100SF
117 S. 9th St 1200SF
1405 Park Ave 918SF
Galphin R/E Svc - (904)277-6597
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT - Desk,
bookcase, chair, all utilities, & some
extras. $500/mo. 753-4077
BUSINESS SUITES - in Professional
Office Park located between Harris
Teeter and AIP along AlA. Several
offices to choose from.. GREAT
PRICES! Call Chaplin Williams Rentals
904-261-0604

864 Commercial/Retail

DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
ft. . 463179 A1A, Yulee. Permits
available for alcoholic beverages. (904)
557-5004
CENTRE ST. RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
- for rent. 7450sf, will subdivide.
(904)556-5722.




901 Automobiles

FSBO - Classic 2dr EIDorado '91
Cadillac $950. '97 Saturn $1900. '91
Dodge PU $2500 & '85 2dr S10 Blazer
$1200. All good running condition.
261-5034
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY LE - White.
33,000 miles. $15,000. 583-9348
2005 DODGE SRT-4 (Turbo)
$10,000. (904)277-3821

S 904 Motorcycles
2004 SUZUKI BURGMAN 400 - 7300
miles. Like new. Full windshield. 50
mpg. $3,400/OBO. (904)753-0998


p- Visit us at.www.galphinre.com

a P I (904) 277-6597 Business
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. "VICES, '. (904) 277-4081 Fax

Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company 1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32(


034


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
S4242 S. Fletcher Ave - 3BR/3BA Fully furnished beautiful beach cot-
tage with its own beach access. Many windows to enjoy the ocean
views. $2000
95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered patio
and well maintained lawn. ome has separate dining and fireplace in
living room. $1595
S4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in presti-
gious gated community where amenities include a community swim-
ming pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and Golf Club of
Amela just across the street. $1795
S1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country liv-
ing at its iest. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land
with beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm evenings in the
florida room or cozy up by tile fireplace on the cold winter nights. Either
way tills one is a charmer. $1495
S829 Mary St - :3BR/3BAl including mother-in-law suite on first floor.
Walk to the beach from thiss 3-story home on large corner lot. Approx.
2,310 sq.ft. living space and over 1340 sq.ft of exterior decks on 3 sides
of the house with ocean views. Open floor plan with vaulted ceilings.
Fireplaces in living room and master bedroom. Two car garage. Water
and lawn maintenance included. $1795
* 4941 Windward Place (Windward Cove)- 3BR/2BA on South end of
tile island, close to the beach. Open family room with built-ins and
wood laminate flooring throughout. Large inaster both with garden
tub. Two car garage and fenced in back yard. $1395
* 1542 Lisa Avenue - 2BR/2BA Fully furnished home on the North end
of Amelia Island. Stainless steel appliances. Open floor plan, ceiling
fans, tile floors. Two car garage. $1450
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
S87073 Raddin Road, Yulee - 3R /2BA Modular home with large par-
tially fenced yard. Interior tiattires fireplace, washer/dryer, island bar,
bonus room. $995
CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 966 Chad Street - 3BR/21iA Townhome close to schools, shopping.
IBright open floo plan with loift area. Vaulted great room, separate din-
ing. $975
* 2040 Village Lane- 3BR/2BA Cetrally located townhouse on cul-de-
sac, close to schools and shopping. Features gas fireplace, 2 car garage,
washer/diver, and enclosed sunroom. $1250


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS con't
* 2700 Mizell Avenue Unit 404A (Amelia Woods) - 2BR/2BA
Downstairs unit opens up to community pool and tennis court.
Walking distance to the ocean. Water, sewer, and garbage service
included. $850.
S1833 Perimeter Park Road (Amelia Park)- 2BR/2BA Newly con-
structed, never been occupied. Centrally located on Amelia Island.
Ceramic tile, granite countertops, W/D hookups. Separate tub and
shower in master. Close to schools and shopping. $1225
* 1841 Perimeter Park Road (Amelia Park)- 3BR/2BA Centrally
located on Amelia Island. Ceramic tile, stainless steel appliances, gran-
ite countertops, washer and dryer. Close to schools and shopping. $1350
* 3165 South Fletcher Unit 12 (Sea Castle) - 3BR/2.5 Condo with
community pool at rear of condo. $1095
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town home
located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal waterway.
Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service. $2,475
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/IBA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1095 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front
and rear yard. $1395
S31135 Paradise Commons #621 (Amelia Lakes) - 2BR/ 2BA
Upstairs unit in gated community.Wood burning fireplace in living
room, walk-in closets, screened balcony overlooking pond. $925
* 2700 Mizell 401B - 3BR/2BA in Amelia Woods. Fully furnished unit
overlooking community pool and.tennis court. 3 month lease mini
mum. $1095
S2811 Atlantic Ave Unit 201 (Fernandina Cay) - 3BIt/31A
Beautiful, fully furnished with great ocean views. Private elevator
entrance into tiled foyer. Nice upgrades throughout including crown
molding, Corian countertops, recessed lighting, double oven in large
kitchen and plenty of storage Walk across the street to beach and Main
Beach Park. $1895
* 1320 Martin Luther KingJr. Street - 2BR/2BA on the corner of 14th
Street. Partially furnished duplex includes washer and dryer. Garage
converted into an office and separate storage room, Open patio and
screened porch. Fenced in backyard. $950
* 3200 Fletcher Ave Unit D-1 (Ocean Dunes) - 2BR/2BA Nicely fur-
nished ground floor unit. Ocean front patio with beautiful ocean views,
steps from the beach. Located across from the Surf Restaurant.
Community pool. $1395
* 4743 St. Marc Court (The Colony)- 2BR/2BA Townhome on South
end of Aielia Island. Fireplace in living room, large 2 Car garage with
W/D hookups. Community pool nid tennis courts. Locatedoff AA
near shopping and beach access. $950


Aea a a [ ado








Deluxe Two Bedroom Condos On The Island-

Located in the heart of idyllic Fernandina Beach and just a
short stroll to the post office, YMCA, shopping and the
beach is the condominium community of Amelia Green.
These spacious 1700 square foot, two bedrooms, two and
a half bath homes are now available for long term leasing.
Featuring 10' ceilings, a fireplace, granite countertops,
stainless steel appliances, attached garage and either . *
travertine or carpet flooring. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,100/mo

Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists


95155 Bermuda - 3038 sf. 5BR/4BA golf and lake
front home located in Amelia National. Master
down with bonus/media room. Three car garage.
Social amenities included. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,995/mo

5209 Village Way - 1789 sf. 3BR/2BA in Ocean
Village. Furnished or unfurnished. Community pool
with beach access and Summer Beach membership
available for small fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On
Island. $1,950/mo

330 S. 7th - 1592 sf. completely renovated
3BR/2BA with master suite upstairs Ind upgraded
kitchen. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,450/mo

918 White - 1040 sf. 2BR/3BA with loft. Hardwood
floors, granite countertops, commercial kitchen.
Wrap around porch with beautiful back yard. W/D.
Half month rent off with 12 monlh lease. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,400/mo

95024 Barclay Place #1C - 2200 sf. 3BR3/3.51BA
town home located in Harrison Cove. Tile. foors in
main living area. Master suite down. Screened lanai.
Pets allowed. On Island. $1,300/mo

86624 Cartesian - 1890 sf. 3 BR/2BA home with
fenced in backyard. Covered patio with hot tub.,
Two car garage. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,250/mo

2108 Natures Lane - 1942 sf. 3BR/2BA home will
hardwood floors in dining, kitchen and study.
Fenced backyard. W/D plus lawn care. Pels
allowed. On Island. $1,200/mo

2184A First - 1530 sf. 31BR/2BA will maslcr suite
upstairs and guest suite clown. One ca r garage.
Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,200 mo

76087 Long Pond - 1590 sf. 31iBR213A honce locat-
ed in Cartesian Point. Fenced hacky:ard. Covered
lanai. Security and irrigation. W/I). Pels allowed.
Off Island. $1,175/mo

Amelia Woods #603A - 1700 sf. 311B 21A ground
floor condo just one block from headlc. Ilenovated
with tile throughout. CoImmunlity potol. :urinishnled or
unfurnished. W/D and walker included. I'Pes
allowed. On Island. $1,125/moo


823 N. Fletcher - 1960 sf. 2BR/1BA furnished
upstairs condo. Ocean view with sunroom. Water
included. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,100/mo

1010A Natures Walk - 1526 sf. 3BR/2.5BA town
home. Walking distance to middle school and high
school. Located off Citrona. Lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,100/mo

85134 St. John - 1500 sf. 3 BR1/2BA brick home
located in Lofton Oaks with large fenced backyard.
W/1) included. Pets allowed. Off Island. $1,050/mo

710 N. 15th - 1460 sf. 3BR/2BA home with fenced
in hack yard and patio/deck. Great for entertaining.
Pets allowed. On Island. $1,050/mo

1908 Beech - 1141 sf. 3BR/2BA with fenced back
yard. Pets Allowed. On Island. $1,050/mo

Amelia Lakes #1422 - 1143 sf. 2 BR/2 BA second
floor condo in gated commusLnity. Vaulted ceiling in
family room with fireplace. Community pool, tennis
and workout facility. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$950/mo
86030 Palm Tree - 1700 sf. 3BR/2BA home on two
acres. Screened porch on front and sun room in
hack. Pets allowed. Off Island. $925/mo

408 S. 15th - 108i sf. 3BR/1.5BA home with fenced
in back yard. Tiled main living area. Pets allowed.
On Island. $900/mo

5437 Leonard - 1332 sf. 21BR,/2BA home in Historic
American Beach. Large outdoor entertainment area
for cookouts and family gatherings. Pets allowed.
Off Island. $8H50/nmo
86088 Santa Barbara - 1200 sf. 2BR/2BA home
located in l.ollon Oaks with fenced backyard. Great
rooimmiate plan. IOne car garage. Pets allowed. Off
Islandll $850,mo

823 N. Fletcher -- 1960 sf. 2BR/113BA duplex just
sleps fom (lithe bIacI' h on North end of Amelia
Island. iDownstairss unil. Water included. Pets
allowed. On Island $810/mo

86317 Callaway - 1000 sf. 2BR/IBA house on large
lot. Wood floors with updated kitchen. Pets
allowed. 01f Island. $695/mo


Fitl proper), details, photos (am/d commercial lisi/sis available iat Chapl)iniWiUlliams.com


Fern.n Kn., ich. Fl- i'4l


I I 1M ,I .I _ K .mLYR9 n.V, . I


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I Rentals Rentals Rentals Rentals I


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I C�Y^nSales ^Sales Sales Sales Sales^








FRIDAY. November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader


50 YEARS AGO

The Hibiscus Garden
Club announced it would
once again sponsor the
Fernandina Beach Outdoor
Christmas Lighting Contest.
November26, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

Damage to island beach-


mo 4g


es was estimated at $30 mil-
lion following a
Thanksgiving storm.
November 28, 1984

10 YEARS AGO

Hilliard became the site
of the county's first shooting
fatality of the year.
December 1, 1999


LOOKING BACK


-~~~ - -~ ~


-~ - - -- --
.~ -a-,-


40 l


Jeff, closest to the
whale, and Brett
Whitaker, age 6 and
4, examine a whale
while wading in the
ocean in the 1400
block of South
Fletcher Avenue in
this photo taken in
1965. The whale had
beached and later
died. The Whitaker
family owns
Robison's Jewelry on
Centre Street.
The News-Leader,
511 Ash St., Fernandina
Beach, welcomes
Looking Back submis-
sions. They also may be
e-mailed to Sian Perry,
sperry@fbnewsleader.
com.


Manage diab

Today is Black Friday, the start of the
"shop 'til you drop" season. But for the .
S 24 million Americans living with dia-
betes, it is critical to plan beyond getting
the best sale to ensure diabetes doesn't
interfere with holiday shopping.
Marc Wolf, registered pharmacist and
� CEO of Diabetic Care Services
S(www.DiabeticCareServices.com), pro-
vides the following tips to help people
with diabetes prepare for the holiday
shopping season.
1. Dress for success. Crowded
- parking lots and long lines are a given
when holiday shopping. It is important to
wear comfortable, supportive closed-toe
shoes and special diabetic socks to pro-
tect feet.
Also, be sure to give careful consider-
Sation to how you will carry extra dia-
0 betes testing supplies and medications.
4 With numerous shopping bags to tote
during an extended shopping trip, con-
sider storing supplies in a purse or
satchel with a long strap that you can
sling over across your chest. Securing
your bag this way will help you avoid set-
ting it down at a cash register and acci-
dentally leaving it behind.


iees while holiday shopping

2. Arm yourself to ers and-pharmacies like Diabetic
battle lows. In addi- Express, www.DiabeticExpress.com, sel
tion to diabetes test- items that make great holiday gifts,
' ing supplies and med- including fashion-forward diabetes sup-
ications, pack several ply cases and the latest meters.
healthy snacks that 6. Relax. According to the American
are proven to quickly Diabetes Association, stress hormones
battle low blood glu- can directly alter blood glucose levels.


cose levels. If you feel a low coming on
while in a store that does not allow food
or drink, products like Glucose
RapidSpray deliver glucose in spray form
that is quickly absorbed'.
3. Make a list - and check it twice!
Cut down on the time and energy, spent
holiday shopping by preparing a list of
items before leaving the house. To shave
even'more time off your trip, comparison
shop opline to determine.which stores
,ihie ftie prices and selections you want.
4. Balance is key. Before embarking
on a shopping trip, eat a balanced meal
that includes protein and fat. Protein and
fat help balance energy and prevent low
blood sugar.
.- 5. Multi-task. When shopping for
friends or family members that also have
diabetes, shop for gifts and for yourself
at the same time. Online diabetes suppli-


Incorporate small tasks into your shop-
ping routine that make the process less
stressful, including:
* Read advertisements carefully to
ensure you understand limitations on
special deals.
* ,Only use cash to avoid spending
more than you should.
* Always ask for a gift receipt.
* Schedule shopping trips at the
beginning of the week and later in the
day, when stores are less crowded.
Diabetic Care Services, headquartered
in Cleveland, Ohio, is one of the nation's
leading mail order durable medical equip-
ment suppliers dedicated exclusively to dia-
betes supplies and prescription medica-
tionsfor both Medicare and private
insurance customers. For more informa-
tion, call 1-800-633-7167 or visit
www.DiabeticCareServices. com.


,19%,


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SSCopyrighted Material

. - - Syndicated Content
0-


Available from Commercial News Providers


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511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904) 261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for email addresses
fbnewsleader.com


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Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Femandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Femandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Femandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Femandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............... $36.00
Mail out of Nassau County .............. $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
CNI Community
CNI Newspapes,,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


0 4


- __

S


a -


OBITUARIES


JoeySorrells
" Mr. J6ey Sotells, age 53,'of
Fernandina Beach, FL pra1,d-l
away on Monday afternoon,
November 23, 2009 after a
valiant fight with cancer and
related complications.
Born in Covington, Georgia,
he was the son of the late Billy
Charles and Peggy Latish Mills
Sorrells. Growing up in
Covington, he was a graduate of
Newton County High School,
Class of 1974.
Joey lived in the Southeast
his entire life, he moved to
Fernandina Beach approxi-
mately twenty years ago. He
was successful and hardwork-
ing in Sales, various business
ventures and as an investor
throughout his career. While in
Georgia he worked with J.B.
Hunt Transport of Atlanta as a
Driver Recruiter, had owned
and sold FAS-CO Industries of
Valdosta and was an investor in
the early days of cell phone tow-
ers, also in Valdosta.
After moving to Florida he
traveled extensively while work-
ing in home improvement sales
and for the past fourteen years
has been a principal partner in
Atlantic Custom Exteriors of
Amelia Island.
An avid outdoorsman, Joey
enjoyed big game hunting, fish-
ing and traveling to destinations


including
Central
' America, Africa"!
and Europe. In
'* .1 007 he fished
off the coast of
Hawaii, catch-
ing a 427-pound
Marlin.
He was a supporter and
investor of Amelia Research and
Recovery, Ducks Unlimited, the
American Numismatic
Association and the National
Rifle Association.
Mr. Sorrells leaves behind,
his wife, Lea Sorrells, Fernan-
dina Beach, FL, his daughter,
Holley Sorrells, Chicago, IL,
three brothers, Dana Bruce
Sorrells, Covington, GA,
Charles Barry Sorrells, Oxford,
GA, and William Brian Sorrells,
Monroe, GA Eight nieces and
nephews and numerous loving
family and close friends.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday from the
Burgess Chapel of Oxley Heard
Funeral Home, Fernandina :i
Beach, FL.
The family will receive
friends from 10:00 am on
Saturday until the hour of serv-
ice at the funeral home.
A reception will follow the
service at his home.
Please share his life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


DEATH NOTICE

Mr. Donald C. Broxton, age 72, of Yulee died on Wednesday
morning, Nov. 25, 2009 at St. Vincent's Medical Center,
Jacksonville.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors



WEEKLY UPDATE


Cruise fundraiser 662-2360 or smcleod@teleco
mmanagement.us; or travel
The Rotary Club of Amelia professional Valerie Gossett
S- - . Island Sunrise is taking reser- at (904) 710-9170 or Valerie@
- - - vations for its fundraiser, premier-resources.net.
-- "Cruising For A Cause For Thankslgiwingserice
- ,- Polio Plus," a four-day cruise
to the Bahamas aboard the Friendship Baptist Church
Carnival Fascination, depart- on Miner Road in Yulee will
8 B M on m ent t3ing March 11, fromJackson- - host a community Thanksgiv-
M nB &m on s o ville. The cruise is open to ing service at 8 a.m. Nov. 26.
960T85 Gateway Blvd., Suite 101 anyone. Reservations of $150 ole R*rvi ng'
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 deposit will be taken up to e ve RecyLlhg
(904) 277-2742 Jan. 4." Join the city of Fernan-
\ - Contact group leader 'dina Beach for "Festive
Largest Selection In-Stock * Engraving Done On-Site Suzanne McLeod at (904) Recycling" from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Dec. 5 at Eighth and Lime
Streets.
SOx-w�eera!' O ..o. .W " Visit fbflus/recycle for
Information on city recycling.
S 'For information about the
Seventy Eight Years of Compassion to our community event, contact eremiah
SVisit Our Life Stories At lw'uuiOxleyHeard.com n Glisson at 277-7389 or jglis-
ik. _ son@fbfl.org.


LOOKING BACK


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NEWS
LEADER\


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FRIDAY. November 27,2009/NEWS-LEADER


OPINION


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44


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ka Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Provide







"� pr


S The recent release of the
S film "Pirate Radio" rekindled
4 some pent-up teenage aggres-
sion inside me that had been '
dormant for some time. The
movie obviously seeks to cap-
ture a slice of the rebellion that
4 4 fueled the halcyon days of rock
'n' roll and propelled it as a
giant missile aimed directly at
establishment "squares."
Whether it succeeds or not is
rs irrelevant - hell, I haven't even
seen the movie - but what it
brings to light is a problem.
music aficionados have either
become numb, indifferent, or
downright oblivious to. I do
know that the film is based on a
true story involving ships sta-
tioned off the coast of England
that broadcast transmissions of
S rock music over "pirate radio"
to the stuffy, conservative-con-
S trolled London of the 1960s.
Apparently the socially
oppressive powers-that-be didn't
allow for rock music on the air-
waves, tending toward talk and
jazz. Luckily, those rebellious
seafaring gents were happy to
oblige, creating countless future
ers British musicians, slipping in
dd. free rock 'n' roll onto the radio
nber dial.
nit- But where are today's youth
to turn? Sure, there are illegal
polit- downloads, streaming music
b- sites and pay-to-download virtu-
:ed. al stores on the web, but they all
.rs feel so cold and detached.
There is a whole generation
walking around that will never
truly experience the spectacle
of rock radio in all its glory.
That's because rock radio is
dead - the victim of a homicide


live rock (radio)...


NEWS-
ROOM
VIEWS

Jason
Yurgartis


perpetrated by
corporate
greed - and
we all missed
the funeral.
Some-
where
between the
mid-1970s,
when Black
Sabbath
declared it
had sold its
soul for rock
'n' roll, and
now, when
rock 'n' roll
has long since


sold its soul to advertisers, cor-
porate pigs and anyone else
with a buck in their hand, the
final nail was driven into the cof-
fin of rock radio.
Gone are the days ,f ljirl, .!
edgeable radio deejays picking
and choosing songs based oh
their quality, without bowing to
an industry-approved playlist or
being confined to corporate-
imposed formatting. Seemingly
here to stay is flavor-of-the-
week, cookie-cutter, watered-
down pop drivel hatched by
some A&R exec and played ad
nauseam on corporatized radio
stations that simply care about
the bottom line.
Deejays are now handcuffed
and forced to march lockstep to
the beat of the corporate drum
or walk the proverbial plank, :
which hangs firmly over an
ocean of unemployment. That
is, if their radio station hasn't
already turned to automated
playlists.
And now you can't just listen


to music; you have to choose
from "classic rock" or "new-
rock" or "alternative rock." Do
you like Neil Young and The
White Stripes? Sorry, you'll
need to listen to two different
stations and pray either artist is
on their approved playlist.
While you weren't looking,
some suit decided what you like
and how it will be presented
(neatly packaged into subjective
genres to maximize sales to a...
wait for the buzzword ... "target
audience"), and it's been that
way for years.
And so what if radio stations
play the same song six times a
day? As long as ad revenue is
high, it's a victory for compa-
nies like Cox Radio and Clear
Channel, who could care less
about music in the first place.
For those who don't spend
time actively seeking out music,
modern FM radio must be a
monotonously endless cycle. If
you're like me and you used to
bubble with excitement every
time you arrived in a new city -
chomping at the bit to twist that
radio dial and immerse yourself
in the variety of sounds emanat-
ing from the partially blown-out
speakers of a wood paneled sta-
tion wagon - you know how I
feel.
SSee, I was raised on rock 'n'
roll radio. But unfortunately, I
was abandoned by my musical
surrogate sometime in the latter
days of my youth; left for dead
on the doorstep of a similarly
extinct independent record
store. Don't even get me started
on the death of record stores -
but I'll say this, rock music was-


n't meant to be bought at Wal-
Mart, where censorship is OK,
but treating workers equitably
is out of the spectrum of
Christian values. Nor was it
meant to be purchased sans
packaging and delivered via
electronic transmission.
But I digress. Though you
might not be as frustrated as I
am, my point is that we've let
something that was uniquely
fun, important and rebellious
get taken over by the same guys
we're supposed to be rebelling
against. But may I suggest to
you, as citizens of a city and sur-
rounding county that have an
overwhelming affinity for
pirates, that there is still room
for rebellion on the airwaves -
for the good of rock 'n' roll.
Sure, commandeering a ship
and a radio tower might be
infeasible, but the real piracy
takes place by not listening to
FM radio at all. If the corporate
giants see that no one is listen-
ing to their stations, they'll be
forced to change their format. If
advertisers don't pay them,
they'll be forced to find a new
medium for revenue.
Support independent record
stores (the few that are left) and
keep downloading. Let's do to
these media conglomerates that
run the stations what they did to
rock 'n' roll radio..Keep your
'hands off the dial:and their cor-
porate minions will go back to
cold-calling heads of house-
holds to sell timeshares in
Sarasota.
Jason Yurgartis is a reporter
at the News-Leader. E-mail him
at jyurgartis@lbnewsleadercom.


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FRIDAY. November 27.2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS
Faith Christian Academy
presents its 10th Annual
Father/ Daughter Ball at The
Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island
Grand Ballroom on Feb. 6,
2010 from 7-10 p.m. This
year's theme is "Cinderella."
Tickets are $85 for father and
daughter and $40 for each
additional daughter and
include a gift bag and memory
book. There will be hours
d'oeuvres, live music featuring
Les DeMerle and professional
photography. Fathers and
daughters of all ages are wel-
come. Seating is limited.
SFor tickets visit Faith
Christian Academy, 96282
Brady Point Road,
Femandina Beach, or call
321-2137.

A bridge club for seniors
will meet Mondays and
Thursday from 1-3 p.m. at
the Peck Center, 511 South
11th St., Femandina Beach.
The club is free and no part-
ner is necessary. Equipment
is furnished. For more infor-
mation, call 277-7350.
* * *
The Mount Olive
Historical Restoration
Society invites the communi-
ty to join the Hooper family of
Nassauville in a
Thanksgiving praise service
and history presentation on
Nov. 28 at 4 p.m. at Little
Mount Olive Baptist Church
on Old Nassauville Road.
Following the service, the
society will present part three
of its series on the Rural
Black History of Nassau
County with a discussion on
rural education in the early
20th century.
All who wish to join the
worship and share their mem-
ories of'rural education are
welcome. The program is pre-
sented in cooperation with the
Gullah/Geechee Cultural
Heritage Committee of
Northeast Florida. For infor-
mation call (904) 502-1992.

A radio-controlled fun
sail and exhibition will be
held Nov. 28 from 1-3 p.m. at
the Amelia Village Shops
pond, behind Marche Burette.


All model boats are welcome,
working or not, finished or not,
except gas powered.
Spectators, including super-
vised children, especially wel-
come. See great works of art
and have the opportunity to
sail them on the high seas.

Enjoy a wine tasting at
Brett's Waterway Caf6 Nov.
29 from 4-6 p.m. Eleven wine
distributors will offer unique
and unusual wines along with
the restaurant's hors d'oeu-
vres. Tickets are $15 per per-
son or $25 per couple.
Proceeds benefit Micah's
Place. Call 491-6364, ext.
102.

Gerri's Corner and
Women in Nassau helping
Women in Need (WIN WIN)
are sponsoring a grand prize
drawing celebration Dec. 1
to announce the winners of
four prize packages valued at
$495-1,930 being raffled to
raise money for Gerri's
Comer. Tickets are $7 each or
$30 for five. Donations are
tax-deductible and go directly
to Gerri's Comer, a cancer
resource center for women.
The celebration starts at 5
p.m. with refreshments at
Divine Finds and Heron's
Swim &Sport in the Palmetto
Walk Shopping Center.
Starting at 5:30 p.m. a win-
ner will be drawn every 30
minutes. Grand prize lists may
be viewed and raffle tickets
purchased at Fifi's Fine
Resale on South Eighth
Street, Centre Street
Treasures downtown and at
Divine Finds.

RAIN Humane Society
will hold a garage sale Dec. 4
and 5 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at
Seventh and Centre streets in
downtown Femandina Beach,
around the comer from
Eileen's Art and Antiques.
There will be many holiday gift
items and decorations avail-
able. If you have items to
donate, call Rosemary at 321-
4316 or Marilyn at 491-8819.
Proceeds benefit RAIN
Humane Society, SPCA.

Cats Angels Inc., SPCA
presents its second annual


"Rescue Me" fundraiser
Dec. 5 from 7-11 p.m. at the
Florida House Inn, 22 S. Third
St., Femandina Beach. Enjoy
a silent auction, cash bar,
savory appetizers, sweet
desserts, wine table, door
prizes and music by Doc
Mojo starting at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $20 and avail-
able at the Thrift Store/
Adoption Center, 709 S.
Eighth St., or call 321-2267.

The Fernandina Pirates
will descend upon the Third
Annual Great Camden
County Chili Cook Off &
Craft Fair Dec. 5 at Waters
Edge subdivision on Haddock
Road in Kingsland, Ga., from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Local builder
W.H. Gross Construction
hosts the event to support the
Humane Society and Habitat
for Humanity.
Teams of two or more may
register in advance and have
their chili scored by local
judges. Categories include
Judges' Choice, Best
Vegetarian Chili, Best White
Chili and Most Creative. The
People's Choice award is
decided by public vote.
The Homemade for the
Holidays Craft Fair will feature
a visit by Santa and his elves,
exhibits, live music and a pet
costume parade and contest
at 2 p.m. Register for events
online at www.teamchili.org or
contact Diane Maurer at (912)
729-4393 or
diane.maurer@yahoo.com.

Phantasia South's $5
Jewelry Sale will be held
from 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Dec. 11 at
the Baptist Medical Center
Nassau Conference Room,
1250 South 18th St.,
Femandina Beach, sponsored.
by the auxiliary.
In addition to jewelry will
be watches for children,
women and men, fashion
accessories such as purses
and belts as well as small gifts
at the affordable price of $5
plus tax for each item. For
more information call 321-
3818.

Do something different -
exciting team trivia with
Maggie the Trivia Meister on
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the
Crab Trap in downtown
Femandina Beach. Enjoy a
special trivia menu and drinks,
win prizes and listen to music
while you improve your mem-


ory and get smarter. Free and
open to the public.

THEATRE

The Cummer Museum of
Art & Gardens.presents
Reader's Theater: Native
Florida, performed by Players
by the Sea, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m.
Catch a glimpse into the past
through an evening of native
Florida history as actors
Aaron Marshall and Shirley
Sacks narrate stories from
Florida's indigenous cultures.
After hearing narratives of
the Timucua, attendees are
invited to view pictorial depic-
tions of their life and sur-
roundings in the exhibition
Discoveries in Detail: Jacques
Le Moyne and Theodor de
Bry, which features botanical
watercolors and engravings of
the Timucua and the Fort
Caroline Huguenot settle-
ment.
Cost is $7. The Cummer is
located at 829 Riverside Ave.,
Jacksonville. Call (904) 355-
0630.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold auditions
for the musical comedy
"The Pirates of Penzance"
at 2 p.m, Dec. 5 and 6 at 209
Cedar St.
The five principal roles for
men have an age range of 20-
60. There are five principal
roles for women, with the age
range of the daughters being
from 18-30 and the role of the
nurse being from 30-60.
There is also a pirates' chorus
and a policemen's chorus for
male singers, and a daugh-
ters' chorus for women ages
18-30. Please prepare one-
minute of a song. An accom-
panist will be available for
those who bring sheet music.
Auditioners will also leam a
movement/dance sequence
and read from the script.
Performances will be in ACT's
new theater from April 8-24,
and rehearsals begin in
January. Toni D'Amico is the
director and Jill Dillingham is
musical director. For informa-
tion contact ACT at 261-6749.

ART/GALLERIES

The Nouveau Art Juried
Show, Island Festivals, con-
tinues at the Island Art
Association Gallery until
Dec. 6. Susi Sax will be fea-
tured artist for December and


January. The gallery is locat-
ed at 18 N. Second St. Call
261-7020 or visit
www.islandart.org.
A new show at the First
Coast Community Bank on
14th Street will be on display
until mid-February.
The artists displaying their
work, include Jackie Humes,
Sherry Ferber, Bill Kinney and
Joan Durden.

Artist Susi Sax is offering
stained glass classes with a
holiday theme. For informa-
tion call 321-1330.

A fused glass jewelry
workshop will be held Nov.
28 from 9 a.m.-noon at
Designs On Gallery, 11 N.
Third St., Fernandina Beach.
Learn the fundamentals of
glass fusing and create one-
of-a-kind jewelry to wear or
give as gift. No prior experi-
ence is necessary. Fee is $75
and includes materials for
three pendants and firing.
Contact Cecilia at 583-7723
to register.

The IAA Nouveau Art
Show at the Co-op Gallery,
"Scapes," runs Dec. 7-Jan.
31. An opening reception
will be held Dec. 12 from 5-8
p.m. The gallery, 18 N.
Second St., Fernandina
Beach, is offering 10 percent
off all artwork through
December. Call 261-7020.

A Jewelry Making
101/Earrings class will be
held at the Leaming
Community of North Florida.
Leam to develop unique jew-
elry designs using a variety of
materials. Meets Dec. 7 and
14, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Call (904)
430-0120 to register or regis-
ter online at www.tlcnf.com.

Eight Flag
Needlepointers are hosting a
workshop with master
teacher Joan Thomasson
March 5-7, 2010, on Amelia
Island. Thomasson will teach
"Marigolds and Moorish Tiles"
stitched on 24-count congress
cloth. The cost of the program
includes all materials and
lunch on Friday and Saturday;
$220 for chapter members;
$300 for non-members.
Registration deadline is Dec.
15. Space is limited. For infor-
mation or to register contact
Linda Kurtz at Imkurtz@bell-
south.net.


Watercolor Art work-
shops with William Maurer
are forming for all levels,
Friday from 9:30 a.m.-noon
at the Florida House Inn. Call
261-8276. Kathy Hardin and
Bill Maurer will offer an Art
Workshop one Saturday a
month starting in January for
all levels and mediums Call
261-8276.
Hardin is registering stu-
dents for January acrylic
painting instruction, all lev-
els. Call her for a syllabus of
information or e-mail
kathi.h@comcast.net or call
261-8276.

MUSEUM

One ticket, four pubs, a
wealth of historical information
about downtown Fernandina
and a good time for all. Join
the Amelia Island Museum
of History Thursdays at 5:30
p.m. to tour four of the
town's most popular, notori-
ous or otherwise historic
pubs and bars.
One ticket will get you one
drink at each establishment
and an earful of colorful tales
about the places you visit as
well as those you see along
your way. It's a great way to
see Femandina and leam
about its history.
Tickets are $25 per person
(must be 21, must show ID),
tour begins at the historic train
depot in downtown Feman-
dina Beach. Reservations
required. Contact Thea at
261-7378, ext.105 or
Thea@ameliamuseum.org.
Call for holiday schedules.

Guests on the Amelia
Island Museum of History's
ghost tour will learn Amelia
Island ghost stories as they
tiptoe through dark streets
and walk in the footsteps of a
bygone era as the past comes
alive through the skillful story-
telling of your guide.
This tour begins at 6 p.m.
every Friday like clockwork
and lasts approximately one
hour. Meet your guide in the
cemetery behind St. Peter's
Episcopal Church, 801.
Atlantic Ave.
Tickets may be purchased
at the Amelia Island Museum
of History for $10/adults and
$5/students. Contact Thea at
261.7378, ext. 105 or
Thea@ameliamuseum.org for
more information.


I .. * ZEYDES
Continued from IB
* " 0 � Meadows Trailhead.
* . Carrying backpacks and
eventually the clothes we
peeled off as it got warmer
during the day, we panted five
miles up the trail, increasing
* * * * our elevation over 3,000 feet.
* * *


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a moraine checkk so, joined by an English cou-
y) on pie that happened by, we pro-
nent Peak. (Those ceeded up the trail, figuring
the peak were the bears would want to avoid
d because they such a crowd. Alas, we never
'as a path up to saw the bears, but later, Eric
peak, Grand identified likely bear paw
ration 13,770 feet - prints on a side window of his
wasn't.) SUV.
always looking At 10,000 feet, we came to
especially bears, a plateau surrounded by high-
saw chipmunks, er mountains. It was danger-
d a few deer, ous to approach the precipi-
ne full-antlered tously slopping edges around
ping away at vege- us, making it difficult to look
: 10 feet off the below. After a short break, we
ently he was used descended to Amphitheater
s happened often Lake (elevation 9,648 feet),
e hikes, younger clear and pristine surrounded
a bunch of bare- by mountains and pine forest.
ien in shorts) car- There we relaxed and
little, if anything, snacked. Eric pointed to the
n the trail at what steep terrain across the lake
* high speed. We where, at age 20, he lost his
* woman (not bare footing after climbing
ake our picture. Disappointment Peak and
her again when bounced and slid down until
ming down. She some big rocks knocked him
a large black bear out and broke his fall and a
caller ones, and few teeth. Ah, nostalgia!
I for safety to turn There were few people at the
anted to see bears lake, because it can only be
reached by a good hike. It
was an idyllic scene, and I
could have relaxed there for
hours if we had the time but,
alas, I was over-ruled and
had maybe half an hour.
S S Shortly into our five-mile
descent we passed, not sur-
P prisingly, beautiful, pristine
Surprise Lake (elevation
9,540 feet). We were told a
black bear had recently
stopped by for a drink (water,
f not ale). A little farther, we,
came upon more wildlife, a
Downey woodpecker pecking
the base of a tree.

SWednesday we returned to
Yellowstone to see Lake
Lodge on Yellowstone Lake
O where Eric had worked (bus-
boy, porter, window washer
and more) four summers,
starting during Eisenhower's
first term when Eric was 17.
5 We came upon the Fishing
Bridge, so-called because
fishing was so good people
used to fish elbow to elbow
from the span; but no more -
* * * fishing was declared illegal
because cutthroat trout, a
valuable food for local preda-
* * tors, come there to spawn.
We wandered around over-
looks on the north side of the
* Grand Canyon of the
Yellowstone and saw an
osprey nest (with osprey and
* * young) perched away from
predators on a very tall post-
like rock formation. We


watched little mud volcanoes
at Hayden Valley. At the
northern entrance to
Yellowstone in Gardinei,
Mont., we drove through the
Roosevelt Arch dedicated by
President Teddy in 1903. We
dined in a small historic town
called Mammoth.

Thursday, a 5-minute boat
ride across Jenny Lake pre-
ceded a half-mile hike up to
Hidden Falls. On the way up
we passed a woman, surely
over 80, who was coming
down. Why not? Eric and I
also went another quarter
mile up to Inspiration Point
(elevation 7,200 feet) over-
looking Jenny Lake where we
talked to a woman carrying a
one-month-old. Two Amish
couples carried little children
while other kids tailed
behind. While we hiked,
David fly-fished and enjoyed
it so much that he booked a
cabin for next summer.
Later, we ate dinner at the
upscale Jackson Lake Lodge,
where Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke and
the world's other central
bankers had met just a few
weeks earlier to decide whom
to give gobs of our money to
and other more important
matters.

Friday, Eric, Burt and I
saw antelope and bison and
hiked at String.Lake while
David and Larry went fly-fish-
ing with the guide.
Saturday, we checked out
and flew home - except Eric,
who drove.
This year's adventure was
another success. The weather
couldn't have been better -
warmer than expected with
no rain. Long underwear had
been packed in vain. We did-
n't get to see bears, but other
four-legged animals sighted
included deer, elk, moose,
bison, antelopes, coyotes,
marmots, squirrels and chip-
munks. Birds (usually not on
the wing) included a Downey
woodpecker, ravens, osprey,
eagles, Canadian geese, blue
grouse, seagulls and a peli-
can. We ate and drank well,
sampling local brews like
Snake River Ale and Moose
Drool Beer (Burt's favorite)
from Montana.
The main thing, though,
Swas proving that we zeydes
still have a lot of youth in us
and that we haven't slipped
into geezerhood yet. May we
prove it again next year.


*1







FRIDAY, November 27.2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
ANGELINE MUDD,
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
SIAN PERRY. ASSISTANT EDITOR
BETH JONES. SPORTS EDITOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


Community
N I| Newspapers,
C Incorporated
The views expressed by the columnists and-
letter writers on this page are their own
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees


COMMUNITY THANKS

Taste ofAmelia
On Friday, Nov. 6, the exclusive Amelia
Island Plantation glittered as it rang in the
2009 Holiday Season with the 18th annual'
'Taste of Amelia Island," a culinary feast to
benefit the Nassau County Volunteer Center.
Over 400 culinary enthusiasts were treated
to excellent cuisine, fine wines and great music
and an array of unique items in a silent auction.
Seventeen restaurants and wine purvey-
ors donated food, wine and staff to make the
evening a success. The Nassau County
Volunteer Center wants to thank the following
organizations and individuals that contributed
to the success.
* Chefs and restaurants: 29 South, Amelia
Island Food Concepts, Amelia Island
Plantation, Beech Street Grill, Crab Trap,
Fancy Sushi, Gourmet Gourmet, Harris Teeter
Super Markets, Horizon's Continental Cuisine,
O'Kane's Irish Pub and Eatery, Ops Pizza
Kitchen and Cafe, Peppers Mexican Cantina,
Peterbrooke Chocolatier and Winn-Dixie
Supermarkets.
* Wine purveyors: Premier Beverage,
National Republic Distributing and Southern
Wine & Spirils.
I * il l jtaon donors: Amelia Island
Plantation, Elizabeth Pointe'Lodge, Amelia
Hotel at the Beach, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island, Greyfield Inn, Kayak Amelia, Robison's
Jewelry, Nassau Diamond, White Oak
Plantation, Golf Club of Amelia, Amelia
Shotgun Sports, Bobby and Carol Ferreira,
Milton Shirley, Hugh Graham, Kathy Brooks,
Maria Struss, Island Photography, Sonny's
Barbecue, Bonito's Grill and Sushi, Grace
Lipman, Kathy and John Brooks, Plantation
Shop and The Travel Agency.
* Raffle Item Donors: Bo & Mike's, Cafe
Karibo, Amelia River Cruises, Residence Inn,
Terpsichorean Dance Club, Rayonier and
Amelia Island Coffee Shop. -
Special thanks for sponsorship of the band
to Bobby and Carol Ferreira, and advertising
sponsorship to Bobby and Carol Ferreira and
First National Bank of Nassau.
Also, thanks for in-kind donations to Amelia
Island Graphics; Bill Dickson, Hamilton Press,
Mark Deaton and J&L Graphics.
Avery special thanks to the News-Leaderfor
its support and the Amelia Island Plantation for
a stellar job in hosting the event.
The 'Taste of Amelia Island" is an annual
event that the citizens of Nassau County and
surrounding counties look forward to each
year. The Nassau County Volunteer Center
Board of Directors and staff are proud to be the
recipients of this tremendous community sup-
port and urge those supporters to patronize the
restaurants and businesses whose donations
made the event so successful and thank them
for their generosity.
We hope to see our friends next year at
the 19th annual "Taste of Amelia Island."
Please call the Volunteer Center at 261-2771 or
visit our brand new website at volunteernas-
sau.org to learn more about our organization.
Let us take this opportunity to wish all of
you from all of us at the center a happy and
healthy holiday season.
Gail Shults
Executive Director


SERVING YOU

Nassau County Commissioners:
Danny Leeper, District 1-Fernandina Beach,
261-8029 (h), 430-3868 (cel),
email: dleeper@nassaucountyfl.com
Mike H. Boyle, District 2-Amelia Island,
Nassauville, 491-1908 (h), 753-1409 (cell),
email: mboyle@nassaucountyfl.com
Stacy Johnson, District 3-Yulee,
583-2746 (cell),
email: sjohnson@nassaucountyfl.com
Barry Holloway, District 4- Hilliard, Bryceville,
Boulogne, 879-3230 (h), 753-1072 (cell), e-mail:
bholloway@nassaucountyfl.com
Walter J. Boatright, District 5-Callahan,
879-2564 (h), 753-0141 (cell),
email: wboatright@nassaucountyfl.com
City of Fernandina Beach
Commissioners?
SMayor Susan Steger:261-4372,
email: ssteger@fbfl.org
Vice Mayor: Eric Childers: 261-0116,
ericchilders.comemail: echilders@fbfl.org
Ken Walker: 261-9875, email: kwalker@fbfl.org
Tim Poynter: 415-6533 (cell) tpoynter@fbfl.org
Jeff Bunch: 415-4902 (cell) jbunch@fbfl.org


VIEWPOINT/STEVE RIECK/NASSAU COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD


Amendment 4 still not the answer


sioner Ron Sapp shared with readers

Former Fernandina Beach city commis-
('"Thankful for our quality of life," Nov.
18) a half-dozen things for which he's
grateful during this Thanksgiving season.
Among his "stop and think about" items was
"All those people who worked to get the
Hometown Democracy - Amendment 4 -
issue on next fall's ballot."
Commissioner Sapp has a long and distin-
guished record of service to our community
and I am grateful for his service. But I believe
he's totally wrong on Amendment 4. By his
own words, Mr. Sapp says, "Amendment 4
requires the people of the community to
approve any change to the local government's
comprehensive plan, the community's plan for
managing growth." This "hometown democra-
cy" has all the allure of phrases like "apple pie
and motherhood." Who could be against home-
town democracy? And that's precisely the prob-
lem. If Amendment 4 were to be approved next
November, the process of how we make critical
decisions about managing growth in Nassau
County will be reduced to catchy phrases and
sound bites rather than sound planning prac-'
tices.
Proponents of Amendment 4 say this initia-
tive was made necessary by rampant growth
across Florida during the past'decade. They


define "growth" as popula-
:. tion growth and all the
negative things that popu-
lation growth brings with
it. As Orlando economist
0,' Hank Fishkind made abun-
L Q dantly clear to Nassau
County commissioners last
year, an economy based on
Rieck population growth is
unsustainable. Our com-
missioners and other elect-
ed leaders get that. That's why the Nassau
County Economic Development Board has
been working aggressively with our locally
elected leaders to diversify our economic base
and bring quality jobs and capital investment to
Nassau County. A growing economy will help
to keep our taxes low, and bringing new jobs
here will reduce the need for people to drive to
jobs outside the county.
We will succeed in achieving our objectives,
but it will take "working the comprehensive
plan" carefully to do so. Every unit of local gov-
ernment is required to have its own compre-
hensive plan, so in Nassau County there are
four comp plans - one for the county, and one
each for Fernandina Beach, Callahan and
Hilliard. As the national economy begins to
recover and economic activity rebounds in


Nassau County, adjustments to these comp
plans will be necessary and frequent. If
Amendment 4 controls that process, then vot-
ers will have to decide the fate of each and
every change, no matter how complex or mun-
dane.
Last week, the Palm Beach Post wrote that
the Palm Beach County Commission adopted a
change to its comprehensive plan. Here's what
county staff said about the change: 'The
change would revise the comprehensive plan's
'Future Land Use Element and Introduction &
Administration Element' to eliminate refer-
ences to the Central Western Communities
Sector Plan in the text and the Special Planning
Areas Map, LU 3.2." 'This is a housekeeping
amendment," county staff wrote, "with no poli-
cy implications ... as the board has previously
made the decision to no longer pursue a sector
plan for this area." As the Palm Beach Post
asked, "Would voters believe that? Would the
jargon befuddle them? Would they bother to
vote?" It wouldn't matter. Amendment 4 would
require referendums on even the most incon-
sequential of changes. Amendment 4 would
bring desirable growth in Florida to a screech-
ing halt. Do we really want to go down that
road?
Steve Rieck is executive director of the Nassau
County Economic Development Board.


UK U 1 Nft


Welcome sight
The day could have not been
more perfect. The sky was clear
blue, and the walls of the building
about to be opened, blended exact-
ly with what Mother Nature had
supplied overhead. The gathering
crowd awaiting the ceremony was all
in a festive mood.
After several speeches and the
cutting of the ribbon, the Marine
Welcome Center was open for visi-
tation. Inside, the saltwater tank bub-
bled as the live shrimp suspiciously
observed the activity outside the
glass wall.
Overhead, in contrast to the
white ceiling, Fernandina's famous
eight flags hting ceremoniously in
two rows of four, secured by cop-
per holders. The walls of the room
were adorned with information of
our local marine species and the his-
tory of our island.
In the corners were century-old
relics, recently found in the marina
during the dredging. And there was
the large model of a shrimp boat,
donated by Angelo Tringali, the son
of one of the original founding fam-
ilies of the modern shrimping indus-
try.
It is only a beginning. as the
Welcome Center is still in its infan-
cy, awaiting glass casings to secure
the exhibits, so that the facility can
be open during the day, with or with-
out a docent. It is also waiting for
more items to arrive, that will fur-
ther whet the appetite of visitors,
encouraging them to go and explore
'the wonderful sites, activities
and facilities upon our island com-
munity.
Fort CJinch has a display of a
uniform, accoutrement and pictures
of the natural beauty of the park
and wild and scenic Florida. The
Amelia Island Museum of History
has an exhibit featuring an array of
historical items, from the time of
the Native Americans to early this
century. The city's Parks and
Recreation Department has been
developing a marine environmental
educational component of the center,
and has enlisted the aid of high
school students with the saltwater
tank.
We have come a long way from
the beginning of the journey. Years
ago, the marina and the waterfront
were a disheveled and sad gateway
to Florida and our community.
When the city took back the
marina, it was an absolute mess. It
was full of mud, the docks were
breaking apart, the fuel system was
antiquated and falling apart, and the
bathrooms were an embarrassment.
Even the parking lot at the foot of
Centre Street was horrible, and the
bulkhead was falling in, threaten-
ing cars parked next to it. The
shrimp dock at the foot of Centre
Street was also collapsing, and had
to be barricaded so people wouldn't
get hurt on it, and every year we
had to put up orange fencing during
Shrimp Festival so people wouldn't
fall in.
Now, we have new and renovat-
ed docks, a new fire suppression
system, dredg, a new boardwalk
from the very north end to the very
south end, a state-of-the-art fueling
system, a renovated boaters' facility
(lounge, office, laundry room and
bathrooms) and, of course, our new
Welcome Center.
The marina has a new look, and
boaters are returning in droves. The
Boaters' Lounge, as this is being
written, is occupied with a half dozen
people, some of them are Americans
and the others Swiss.
If you have not been down to the
waterfront lately, please come down
soon. The Parks and Recreation
Department has worked feverishly
to build the first phases of the water-
front redevelopment and park.
There is grass, trees, sun shelters
and a great view of the quickly filling
marina.
The best time of all, to see this
amazing transformation is, of course,
at sunset.


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Syndicated Content 1

Available from Commercial News Providers


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We have now arrived with a new
jewel that welcomes visitors and res-
idents alike to a place we can all be
proud and can enjoy.
Coleman Langshaw,
Director, City Marina

Secret Santa
The Christmas season is fast
Approaching and for many this year
will be a special holiday because of
how they have been impacted by
the slow down in the economy and
the rise in unemployment. There is
no doubt that things are tougher
this year than ever and the economic
slow down has also affected many of
the programs that serve the low
income and the needy.
Dayspring Village, Inc. is a
licensed 94-bed limited mental
health assisted living facility
designed to serve the needs of
adults with schizophrenia and
schizo-affective disorders. It is the
mission of the staff and manage-
ment to assist each resident with a
continuous course of redirection in
their daily living skills. This mission
is accomplished by the impact of a
targeted array of community-
based services aimed at reducing
symptoms and improving quality of
life.
Dayspring Village, Inc. provides
a residential setting that is connect-
ed to an array of community-based
services which include mental.
health case management, access to
social rehab services, on-site lab
services, on-site mobile X-ray serv-
ices, on-site psychiatric care and pri-
mary care. The facility also offers a
homeless diversion program and a
Christian Life Ministry aimed at pro-
viding support and promoting recov-
ery.
Perhaps the most important pro-
gram we have is the annual Secret
Santa Project This is a program that
is now in its 19th year and has been
a major source of support for the
residents. For many of the mentally
ill residents who call Dayspring
Village their home, this program
allows them to receive socks, under-
garments, jackets and warm cloth-
ing that otherwise they would not
have or be able to receive.
The true gift of Christmas is the
gift we make in the life of another.
The chance to give a gift that will
help share the joy of this special hol-
iday is a way to pass along the true
meaning of Christmas. For many of
the mentally ill residents we serve
the gift of Christmas truly creates a
connection to the community that is
lasting and communicates the love
and joy that comes with the words
"Merry Christmas."
If you would like to have a dif-
ferent sort of Christmas experience
this year, please consider becoming
a "Secret Santa" and join us in shar-
ing the love and joy of the Christmas


season with the mentally ill resi-
dents at Dayspring Village. Whether
you can buy a small gift or share
your talents or perhaps just bake a
few homemade snacks all these gifts
would be greatly appreciated and
would help us bring joy to the holi-
day.
Please call our Secret Santa
Coordinator Denise Cumbus at
(904) 845-7501 or contact her at
dayspring06@windstream.net. If
you become a "Santa," you will be
given one or more names and all
you need to do is have a wrapped gift
back to Denise no later than Dec
23. Nassau County is a community
that is filled with good people who
care and make a difference in so
many ways. We thank you for your
support and'hope you have a Merry
Christmas.
Doug Adkins, Executive Director
Dayspring Village Inc.

Live and let live
When misinformation is printed
and remains unchallenged it can in
the minds of some become fact,
especially when attributed to two
"Professor Harrisons" ("Who's the
mob?" on Nov. 20). I do not imply
or attribute this to a deliberate
prevarication or even an equivoca-
tion but simply an ignorance of the
facts.
For the sake of accuracy, item
one incorrectly says that the state
offered unbuildable property for'
sale and considered it so. If that
were the case, no one would pur-
chase property that was unusable.
The only ones who considered them
unbuildable were you folk. That was
your erroneous opinion. The state's
list was published and available for
anyone who requested a copy.
Interested applicants had a due
process to follow, namely filling out
required forms - ordering a survey
at your own expense and a certified
appraisal to determine the value. It
was all at the applicant's expense
and later signs were posted for the
pieces not initially selected.
Due diligence, as on any real
estate purchase, is recommended,
and I began due diligence by seek-
ing advice of my son, Jonathan
Rowe, Esq., U of F business gradu-
ate and Nova law and a Jax attor-
ney. He looked into it and gave me
a "go." I spoke also to a zoning con-
sultant who was very knowledge-
able about substandard lots of
record. I received another positive
response - in the meantime anoth-
er local attorney got wind of this
investment opportunity by buying
the remaining piece.
My middle son, James Rowe,
then the liaison between Exxon
Mobil and 26 Latin American coun-
tries as a procurator investor and
lax specialist/C.P.A., who I also
sought his opinion, said, "Mom,


that's a'no-brainer' - Ithas a million-
dollar view;'n a paved road and it's
commercial. If you don't buy it, I
will."
Opportunity only knocks once
and softly at that This was a time of
unbridled exuberance in procuring
real estate and the desire to get "in
on it" resulted in escalating prices
clouded by poor judgment People
paid whatever was asked, unsup-
ported by change or improvement to
justify the hikes in prices. Old Town
was not a "gated" restricted area in
the south end. On the contrary, this
area was noted for being laid back
and relaxed, thus unrestricted
unpaved roads, far from shops and
groceries and too close to a very
ugly and sometimes smelly mill,
boats and trailers parked in the
yards - not too many driven to have
a manicured lawn but more inclined
to seize the moment and post the
"gone fishing ' sign. Nothing wrong
with that!
The paradox is that in spite of
the bare-faced facts, there is a charm
that comes, borne naturally by the
breezes from the oceans, the sound
of masts clanging, the voices of the
seabirds and activities of the fisher-
men that encourages one to throw
caution to the wind and invest in a
dream. Hopefully, two new houses in
prominent locations will add to the
balance and benefit O.T. and the
improvements planned for the main
corridor will incite interest in new
activity. Mr. Rowe and I are deter-
mined to construct a new home that
will grace that corner for 100-plus
years with its modest simplicity. I
hope the old-timers remain the same
and we will adjust and mind our own
business. Live and let live. There
were no laws broken. There are
legal exceptions. To say otherwise is
libelous.
The Community Development
staff and the Historical District
Council showed themselves to be
very gracious in their comportment
in spite of the innuendos and self-
serving statements addressed by
some present Item seven and eight
in your opinion are those you selec-
tively solicited with the sole purpose
of framing mischief. I have been
approached by many of my new
neighbors apologizing for our recep-
tion.
Apparently there is an opinion
that city personnel all the way to the
top are selected and given these
jobs without benefit of specialized
education, law degrees, manage-
ment degrees, etc. Could they pos-
sibly know more than their self-
appointed critics? Each man
deserves his "due." Theirs is respect
and honor even when their deci-
sions don't please or benefit us per-
sonally. Bottom line: Who can stand
before jealousy?
Carolyn Rowe
Fernandina Beach








FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 27, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


COMMUNITY


Appreciate food,

L et us give thanks unto the a rain
Lord. Remember his mar- end, r,
velous works he has done. are on
He will increase his people that in
greatly and make them stronger will all
than their enemies. have k
We should be thankful for every- just ne
thing we have experienced in this strong
life of ours, for all we have found the supply
answer in his words. for us.
Be thankful for the tears we have NOWAND derso
cried, for they have taught us to THEN regard
appreciate lots of laughter anid given - --- ever t
us the ability to seethe joy that stance
comes after. Through the tears we Maybelle A
have come.to know His Holy Spirit Kirkland for all
in our lives, how He is always there ships,
to comfort through our many strifes, as well as the bad? The:
Give thanks for the storms we life to our emotions and
have encountered, knowing there is of what we have had. O
able relationship is that


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sharing and all life's little things

ow at the our Father. We know that we His grace, the provision that it home, where his spirit is free to for-
alizing they can trust Him, we cannot trust any brings, how it has provided for ever roam. We miss you, but you will
y temporal, other. us in all things. Be thankful unto always be in our hearts from wife,
time they Be thankful for all the pains we Him, and bless His name, for the son, daughter, brothers, sisters, fam-
mend. We have known, for they have given a Lord is good; his mercy is everlast- ily and friends. It has been nine
arned we compassion for the suffering, an ing; and his truth endureth to all years; where did the time go?
ed to be ability to reach out to others and an generations. Birthday wishes to Cassandra
for God will appreciation of all the little things. As we enter into this holiday sea- Dennard, Maurice Fields, Elaine
the strength The greatest of God's love gives an son, take time to give thanks unto Overstreet, Corliss Brown, Mother
He shoul- understanding of the pains He suf- God, for without Him, we would not Bessie Reeves, Joel Gilbert, Derica
ir burdens, fered for us and how He endured all be where we are today. Nothing you Benson, Vivian Hardy, Ivy Dennison,
less of what- things so that we could be free. have done or can say, only God Tara Rainey, Tyrone Johnson,
e circum- Always be thankful for the made it possible. Be thankful. Sandra Walthour, Neshia Johnson-
; may be. hunger and thirst we have had to go In memory of our brother Joe Smith, Ernest White, Cameron
we thankful through to appreciate having food White. God gave him one step at a Jones, Louise Ford, Zenoria
he relation- and sharing it with others too. God time. Following God's word, he held Johnson, Regina Smith, Patrick
or the good gave Himself as our food and drink onto faith, hope and love. Believing Cribb, Melissa Moore, Terin Dallas,
have given to make sure we were truly fed. His in every word he heard, his spirit Theo Smith, Paula Evans, Anita
appreciation blood was shed for our drink and traveled on the wings of a dove, Holzendorf, Evangeline Smith,
r most valu- His body broken for our bread. guiding him toward the stairway to Sandra Palmer and Lexie Chatman.
with God, Most of all, we are thankful for heaven, where he found his eternal Have a blessed holiday season.


Up next

Tea and


home tour

Next week is the third
annual Amelia Island
Museum of History Holiday
Home Tour in Fernandina, on
Dec. 4 and 5.
Five professionally deco-
rated private homes in the
historic district will be on dis-
play. Homes will be open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; tea will be
served at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Tour
tickets are
$25 per per- . '
son in .
advance and
$30 on tour
days. The
Victorian tea
at the Bailey
House tickets
are $15 per
person and PANTATION
space is limit- N
ed.
For more **
information Lauren Lowe
please visit arry
www.amelia- Barry
museum.org
or call 261-7378, ext. 100.
Proceeds will continuethe
work on major renoVations at
the museum. -' .. '
Also next week is the.
Amelia Community Theatre
Guild's "Evening of Holiday
Music," featuring the Sine
Nomine Choir directed by Jill
Dillingham, Mary Williams
and Nanette Autry..
Performances are Dec. 3 and
4 at 8 p.m. at the Amelia
Community Theatre, 209
Cedar St.
Not only will you hear:holi-
day music but also a reading
of Truman Capote's A
Christmas Memory with Ron
Kurtz and Judy Tipton.
Refreshments will be provid-
ed by the ACT Guild. This
benefit is being held to raise
funds for the serving kitchen
at the new theater, set to open
next year.
Tickets are $15 for adults
and $10 students. Please call
the box office at 261-6749 for
reservations.
Ocean Ladies Bridge win-
ners for November were
Lynn Meyer and Bev Arnold
- 1st place, Vicky Peters and
Jane Quinby - 2nd place, and
Adele Dalton and Marge
Andreason - slam prize win-
ners. Congratulations
ladies! The next play date is
Dec. 13 and you must sign up
yourself at the Ocean
Clubhouse on the bridge
sign-up sheet.


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MEDAL

OF MERIT

Former Mayor
Bruce Malcolm, above
left, and Mayor Susan
Steger, far right,
acept the American
Legion Medal of Merit
on behalf of the city of
Fernaitdina Beach.
. 'Te .award was pre-
sented by American
Legion Department of
Florida Commander
Phil Hearison, next to
Malcolm, and
National Sergeant-at-
Arms Paul Martel,
right, at the dedica-
tion of American
Legion Post 54's new
building at 626 S.
Third St.
PHOTOS BY RYAN SMITH
NEWS-LEADER


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


Bunco Amelia meets at 7
p.m. the last Tuesday of the
month at traveling locations.
Ladies of all ages are invited
to join for a fun time, no
experience necessary.
Contact Marjorie at 491-
8622.

Byrd Wallace Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post meets at
7:30 p.m. the second
Monday at Kraft Athletic
Club-Ten Acres, 961023
Buccaneer.Trail,
Fernandina Beach. Call Post
Quartermaster Pat Beamer
at 261-6416.
*O*


Welcome to

Qod's House


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200,Yulee
(904) 261-6821


Classic Carpets
& Interiors, Inc.
Abbyrpet BUDDY KELLUM
AbbyCLIMpe* President
02 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
FemandinaBeachRFL2034 Fax (904) 261-0291


Centre'd Women is a
proudly disorganized group
of wonderful women that
meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Monday at Art & Antiques,
702 Centre St., Fernandina
Beach. Call Eileen Moore at
277-2717.
**
Cumberland Sound
Woodcarving Guild is for all
expertise levels and meets
at 6:30 Wednesday at vari-
ous locations. Call Bob
Schlag at,(912) 729-2282.
* **
Eight Flags Charter
Chapter of the American
Business Women's


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a


Association is a organi-
zationi of women with
diverse occupations who
gather together to provide
opportunities to help them-
selves and others grow per-
sonally and professionally
through leadership, educa-
tion, networking support,
national recognition and
community service.
The group meets at 6
p.m. the fourth Thursday of
every month at the
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club.
Call Susan Sturges at
(904) 206-2580 for meeting
reservations or information.


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LITERARY LEANINGS


Book signing
Ben Walker will host a
book signing for his
novel, Winds of the South,
at Books Plus, 107 Centre St.
in Fernandina on Nov. 28
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Cookbooktastings
The public is invited to
special tasting from the new
cookbook, A Savory Place,
Culinary Favorites ofAmelia
Island. Cookbook sales bene-
fit Micah's Place, Nassau
County's domestic violence
center.
Tastings will be held Nov.
29, noon-5 p.m. at At Home
Amelia; Dec. 5, 9 a.m.-1 p.m:,
at the Fernandina Farmers
Market; Dec. 10, 3-7 p.m. at
Chico's; Dec. 12, 9 am.-1 p.m.
at Eileen's Art & Antiques;
I)ec. 12, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at
The Plantation Shop; and
Dec. i5, 3-4:30 p.m. at Osprey
Village.
A Savory Place is a full-
color, 8 by 10 inch book, pub-
lished by Favorite Recipes
Press, Nashville, Tenn., ISBN
9780-615-29646-3. It retails for
$24.95.
Book signing
American Beach
author, Annette McCollough
Myers, will.siga cpies.,
of her books, The Shrinking
Sands ofan African American
Beach (written for the
preservation of Florida's his-
toric resources), and The Big
Sand Dune and The Beach
Lady at Books Plus, 107
Centre St., Dec. 2 from 11
a.m.-3 p.m.
Book Loft dub
The Book Loft Book
Club's book for this month is
The Guernsey Literary and
Potato Peel Pie Society by
Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie
Barrows, a tale of the island
of Guernsey during the
German occupation, and of a
society as extraordinary as its
name.
The book club is open to
everyone and all avid readers
are encouraged to attend. The
discussion will be held at the
Book Loft, 214 Centre St.,
Dec. 7 at 5 p.m.
Library dub
The Friends of the Library
Book Club of Fernandina.
Beach meets at 7:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of each
month in the parlor room of
,St Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave.
Meetings are moderated
by retired English professors,
Marilyn and Norman Wesley,
and new members are always
welcome.
They will discuss People of
the Book by Geraldine Brooks
Dec. 10.
Poet laureate search
The Nassau County
Writers and Poets Society, in
conjunction with the
Fernandina Beach and
Nassau County commissions,
announces a competition to
select the next Poet Laureate
of Nassau County.
The contest will run to
Dec. 15, with the new poet
laureate installed during the
Amelia Island Book Festival
Feb. 12-13, 2010. The contest


is open to all Nassau County
residents ages 17 to 117.
Submit 3 to 5 original poems
reflecting life in the county.
Submit two copies of each
poem, one with a name and
contact information, the other
without.
For information and to
submit electronic entries, con-
tact www.wordsmythe
@net-magic.net. Mail hard
copy entries or queries to
POET LAUREATE, 1417
Sadler Road #134, Fernan-
dina Beach, Florida 32034.
Entries must be postmarked
by Dec. 15.
Conroy event
The Amelia Island
Book Festival annoupces
that the Melissa and Pat
Conroy event, A Night With
Poppy, has been moved to
Saturday night.Feb. 13,
2010 at 7 p.m. toa larger
venue, the Old First
Baptist Church in Fernandina
Beach.
Tickets, at $50 each and
limited to two per person, are
available at the Visitor
Center/Train Depot in down-
town Fernandina Beach,
Books Plus and the Golf
Club of Amelia. By mail write
to AIBF/Poppy's Pants, PO.
Box 824, Amelia Island, FL
32035.u J i%"n l sI Sv;i
Book fest breakfast
The Amelia Island Book
Festival will partner with
Micah's Place, Nassau
County's certified domestic
violence center, and novelists
Janis Owens and Cassandra
King at an 8 a.m., Feb. 13
breakfast at the Fernandina
Woman's Club.
Micah's Place Auxiliary's
cookbook. A Savory Place,
Culinary Favorites ofAmelia
Island, will be available for
sale to help support the many
programs Micah's Place
offers.
Breakfast tickets are $30
and available at The Purple
Dove, Books Plus and the
Golf Club of Amelia. For infor-
mation visit www.asavory-
place.com.
The Amelia Island Book
Festival is Feb. 12-14. Visit
wwwAmeliaislandbookfestiva
l.com.
Writers'workshop
Tickets are now on sale for
the Amelia Island Book
Festival and Florida State
College at Jacksonville
Writers' Workshop Feb. 12,
2010 at the Betty P. Cook
Center, Yulee.
The event will include
writer sessions, hands-on
workshops and a panel dis-
cussion on "Putting the South
in Southern Writing." Authors
include: Rick Bragg, Sonny
Brewer. Cassandra King,
Janis Owens and Jeff Shaara,
along with local writers, pro-
fessors and industry profes-
sionals.
Cost is $90 by Dec. 15 or
$95 after. Florida State
College at Jacksonville and
area high school students are
admitted free but must pre-
register.
For information and
registration visit www.ameli-
aislandbookfestival.com or
call Dickie Anderson at
556-6455.


* Air Force Airman
Martell Roberts graduated
from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas. The airman
completed an intensive, eight-
week program that included
training in military discipline
and studies. Air Force core
values, physical fitness and
basic warfare principles and
skills.


Airmen who complete
basic training earn four cred-
its toward an associate in
applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Felicia
Roberts of Callahan and Dr.
Timothy Roberts of
Fayetteville, N.C.
Roberts is a 2009 graduate
of Orange Park High School.


FAMILY DENTISTRY adcock
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN dck
Most Insurances Accepted H O M IT R
Call For Appointment e
26a'I -6a6a 6
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
A1 A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1i Callahan, FL
FREE IAN , Steve Johnson Automotive
WELL DRILLERS, INC. 1505 S 14th Street
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells Fernandina Beach, FL
Pump Installaions & Repair 904-277-9719
606 S. 6thStreel
Femandina Beach, FL 32034 Proudly Supporting Our Community


MILITARY NEWS


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FRIDAY, November 27.2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Temporal things, eteral things and relationships
The door opened and in he provision, time in their daily routine He longs to have a deeper
ran, the routine a familiar one. I couldn't when my wife would normally relationship with us? You
Happy - that's the name of help but place his bowl on the ground, might not agree, but I think
one of our cats - though nor- chuckle as I instead, she bent down and so. Like my wife with our cat,
mally a bit skittish, has never F- watched the looked him right in the face. God loves it when we talk to
been bashful when it comes two of them "What is it Happy?" she said, Him. Though at times we may
to receiving his morning interact. All knowing just what he wanted. feel like we speak a whole dif-
meal. This particular day he r he seemed Her momentary delay in giv- ferent language, trust me, He
seemed overly excited about interested in ing him his food only caused understands the language of
getting his food. was getting him to talk all the more; our heart.
"Good morning Happy," my PULPIT his morning something, by the way, my Now some may say that
wife spoke to him in her typi- NOTES meal. My wife absolutely loves to hear. seems kind of mean; you
cal affectionate tone. His wife, on the "OK," she said, as if under- know, delaying things for a
response was one I have no other hand, standing his every word. moment for the purpose of
idea how to articulate on the Pastor was all "Here you go," and with that building a relationship. But,
written page. A series of Rob Goyette about the placed his bowl on the ground to me, if the end result meets
strange guttural noises, purrs relationship. so he could start eating. In an my eternal need, and not just
and what I'm sure is some As she carried his bowl out instant, I saw something. my temporal one, it's not
kind of special cat language the side door and onto our Could it be that God, the One mean at all. Actually, it's quite
filled our kitchen, as my wife wooden porch, he and all his who supplies all our daily loving.
reached for his bowl and strange noises followed her. needs, sometimes delays Perhaps it's just my opin-
began pouring out his daily That's when it happened. At a things for a moment because ion, but so much of what we


that make a difference


call "having a relationship
with God" is all centered on
things that one day will rust,
rot and pass away. The way I
see it, God loves us too much
to let our lives be defined by
such shallow things. He
knows that without a mean-
ingful relationship with Him,
in the end, we all will perish.
It's for this cause that He has
given us a Savior.
Just like my wife bending
down to look into our cat's
face, so God, in the person of
Jesus Christ, has stooped
down to look into each one of
ours. I know, the analogy is a
little funny, but you get the
point.
The bottom line: God loves
us. He cares not just about
I


our temporal needs, which
are here today and gone
tomorrow, but also about
things that will last forever. I
leave you with Jesus' words
that are real food for those
who take them in.
"Don't keep worrying about
having something to eat or
drink. Only people who don't
know God are always worry-
ing about such things. Your
Father knows what you need.
But put God's work first and
these things will be yours as
well." (Luke 12:29-31
Contemporary English
Version)
Robert L. Goyette is pastor
of Living Waters World
Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Bus ministry
Blackrock Baptist Church has
started a bus ministry in the Yulee
area, for children and their families,
including a fantastic learning experi-
ence in Sunday School followed by
children's church and more exciting
games. Adults go to regular worship.
The bus route covers every house
between I-95 in Yulee and the Shave
Bridge. The bus runs on Sunday
mornings.
Sunday School starts at 9:15 a.m.
Worship services start at 10:30 a.m.
The church is located at 96362
Blackrock Road in Yulee. For infor-
mation, call 261-6220.
Sounds ofChristmas
Bell ringing for The Salvation
Army Hope has begun. Organizers
are still in need of bell ringers both
on the island and in Yulee. If you,
your club, group or ministry can
donate just two hours of time show-
ing the love of Jesus with your smile
and a joyful "Merry Christmas"
greeting, the Salvation Army needs
you. Call Mary Moore or Susan Lane
at 321-0435 to schedule.
Mount Olive celebration
The Mount Olive Historical
Restoration Society invites the com-
munity to join the Hooper family of
Nassauville in a Thanksgiving praise
service and history presentation on
Nov. 28 at 4 p.m. at Little Mount
Olive Baptist Church on Old I


Nassauville Road. Following the
service, the society will present part
three of its series on the Rural Black
History of Nassau County with a dis-
cussion on rural education in the
Early 20th century. All who wish to
join the worship and share their
memories of rural education are wel-
come. The program is presented in
cooperation with the Gullah/Gee-
chee Cultural Heritage Committee of
Northeast Florida. For information
call (904) 502-1992.
Bishop's visit
The Rt Rev. Royal U. Grote Jr.,
Bishop Ordinary of the REC Diocese
of Mid-America, a founding Province
of the Anglican Church of North
America, will visit Holy Trinity
Anglican Church, 1830 Lake Park
Drive in Amelia Park, on Nov. 29.
Grote will preach during the 10 am.
service as well as officiate at the
sacrament of Confirmation. There
will be a reception for the bishop and
confirmands after the service in the
Parish Hall. For further information
call 491-6082.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope
House each Tuesday at noon for its
Weekly Worship Service and
Fellowship Lunch. On Dec. 1, Brent
Alberta, a local evangelist, will testify
to the power of the Gospel to change
lives. For information call 321-0435
or stop by the Hope House, 410
SouthlDateSt.:ir wv:!


'God Speaking
In celebration of the birth of
Jesus, the Worship Choir of Yulee
Baptist Church will present "God
Speaking" Dec. 6 at 6 p.m.
The musical will include drama
(by Chris Lathrop and Eric Schmidt),
solos (by Patty Coulter and Bonnie
Vance). "old favorite" Christmas
songs and the message that God
wants to speak to you in the hustle
and bustle of the season, He cares
About your loneliness, relationship
concerns, health issues and financial
woes. All are welcome. For informa-
tion call the church at 225-5128.
Pastor anniversary
O'Neal Memorial Baptist Church,
474257 SR 200 East, will observe its
church and pastor anniversary cele-
bration with services on Dec. 11 and
13. The Rev. Pauline Tucker, pastor
of Prince Chapel AME Church of
Nassauville, will deliver the sermon
for the Friday evening worship that
begins at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, the
program will begin at 3 p.m. The Rev.
Cornell Denson, pastor of Harper
Baptist Church of Yulee, will bring
the message. Call 277-2606 for infor-
mation.
Hanukkah party
The Jewish Community of Amelia
Island will celebrate the spirit of the
season with a "Down-home
Hanukkah Party" Dec. 12. Alice
Goldman is chairing the committee
' : U. ,


'"Worship this week at the


pYace of your choice"


to organize the festivities and food. I
you're able to volunteer, call
Goldman at 548-1100.
Women's retreat
All women and teenage girls are
invited to a woman's retreat with
Grace Community Church, Jan. 22-
23 at Coquina Presbyterian Church
in Ormond Beach. Early registration
is $40 due by Dec. 1. Retreat broc-
hures and information is available b:
contacting Signe or Tabitha at 491-
0363 or office@gracenassau.com.
Revival
Blackrock Baptist Church will
hold a revival at 7 p.m. Jan. 24-27.
Join for praise and spiritual growth
through song and message. Michae
Combs, gospel recording artist, will
worship through song each evening
and Rick Coram, evangelist, will
bring a Spirit-led message. For infor
nation call 261-6220.
Harbor Shores
Harbor Shores Ministries is a
non-profit organization that is accept
ing tax-deductible donations to help
local community needs. Your items
may be given to a family in need or
liquidated to supply food, clothes,
shelter, utilities, diapers, etc. To
donate clothes or items for the action
center, call 225-0963. Also needed ai
racks, hangers and shelving.
Compassion in action
The Coalition for the Homeless


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6'" Street
Dr. Holton Seigling
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:50 a
Nursery
SChildren
Youth
Adults
261-3837


Rev. Brian Eburn Pastor
Saturday Viil Mass - 4 pm & 5:30 pm
Saturday 4 pm Mass at Yulee United Methodist Church
Sunday Masses 8:00 & 10.:00 am & 12 Nooon
ally Mass- 8:30am Mon., Wed, Thurs& Fd.
6 pm - Tuesday
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6:00 pm; Holy Day 8:30 am
Confessions: Saturday 3:15pm - 3:45 pm or by appt
Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number 904-277-6566,
also cn ll 904-277-0550


f has started a cold night shelter to
provide a warm and safe overnight
facility for the homeless and those
without adequate heat, on nights
when temperatures fall below 40
degrees. A Fernandina Beach
church has volunteered its space.
The Jewish Community of Amelia
Island is raising funds for mats and
S blankets as well as hoping to staff
the shelter (only if it is open that
y night) on a specific night Two team
leaders are needed to organize the
community's volunteers (3-5 people).
Everyone will receive training and
the Coalition for the Homeless will
continue to support and coordinate
the entire effort For information on
this interfaith community project,
1 contact Dani Gammel at 261-8081 or
dani326@bellsouth.net.
Small group studies
- Memorial United Methodist
Church offers fellowship, learning,
prayer and mission in small group
settings for women, men and cou-
ples' groups with a variety of studies
t- offered. In the past The Shack and
Same Kind of Different as Me were
read. For information call Jane
Holzkamp at 321-4321.
Playgroup
n MOM,ME meets every Wednes-
re day from 9:30-11 a.m. in Noah's
Place, First Presbyterian's nursery
and preschool classrooms. Everyone

RELIGION Continued on 12A


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
Innovative Style, Cotemporary Music, Casual Atmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowskl
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 9:00am and 10:30am
Nursery Provided
KidKredible Children Ministries
Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth Program Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ..Connecting with People.


www.isItpesliaaDauco m*


Christwalk
Church

Sunday Celebration
10:00 am
"Kidswalk 10:00 am
'Takeout Wed.630pm
2920 Bailey Road
261-7120 thechrlstwalkcom



eapiOst Church

Sunday School..........................................9:30 am
Sunday Worship ....................................10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA .........................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study ................... 6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.or9


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
An Interdenominational
Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
November 29, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.
Advent I
MESSAGE "Waiting'
Sunday School Classes:
10-30 AM - The Pilgrim's Progress"
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-
The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
(904) 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes Youl
Located at the corner
of 8th &Atlantic
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist \
8:45 a.m. Breakfast - Burns Hall
9:30 a.m. Christian formation for all.
10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist
6 p.m. Celtic Worship - 4th Sunday
6 p.m. TAIZE' - 2nd Sunday
904-261-4293
www.stpetersparlsh.org


YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF HRIST
Come Worship with us where
:he Bible Is our only Authority.
Church Services: 1 lam
YMCA on Cllrona / 225-5368
wuv a amailais8 ar.a, nuorcrolh,:r.n. rom


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services-10:30 am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Bus Ministry Available
www.blackrockbaptist.com


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH. WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor: Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... 9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training .......... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service .......7:00P.M.
736 Bonnlevlew Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-Z61-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spolntsbaptlstchurch.org


'E.a


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adulls 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pmn
Preschool and Children Activities'
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gcrbing Road, Fenlandina Bch.
For More Iformation Call: 261-9527


Living Waters
world outreach
Contemporary Worship
SUN 9:30am
S WED 7:00pm
Youth, Nursery &
Children's Ministries
.o c n. 321-2117
Senior Pastoen OnAAl I ni S ttfAmfI elia Island
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org


Fernandina Beach
Church of Christ
1005 S 14th St
904-261-9760
www.cocfb.org
Worship times:
Sun: 9:30am Bible Class
10:30am Worship
Wed: 7:00pm BibleClass


VULEE
JL"APTIST
D"HURCH

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:1p pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
wvlw.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
20 South Ninth Street * 261-4907
Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
The Church in the
Heart of the City
With the Desire to be in the
Heart ofAll People
Sunday New Members Class 9 am.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worshi 11 aam.
Wednesday Noon-day Pra�vr
Wednesday Mid-week Service 7-9 p.m.
Minitries: Bus & Van, Couples, Singies. ltrth


ai c� rOC


angPljl
Having Trouble Stretching Your Dollar?
Angel Food Ministries Is a non-profit food
co-op providing high quality food at a low cost!
Boxes are $30 and feed a family of four for about a week.
Items vary by month, but Include fresh/frozen items, meats,
fruits,.vegetables, dairy etc. With no income restrictions,
everyone can participate
Contact Fernandina Beach Church of Christ for
Information or to place an order - 904-261-9760


Rev. Ray Ramsburg. Pastor

-- Every Sunday --
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services


Across from Fon Clinch Stale Park
261 6306
sww poplcamella org






F,,. F..I e.r I !-.�l .
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(/i nre f ii"'"' <,>-


JHoty Trinity Angican Cflurchi





.Angcan Churcfi of'North America
Our pro\ since is a founding member of the Anglican Church
of North America
.4s Anglicans uwe believe:
* the Bible Is the inspired Word of God
* In God the Father who created us
* In Jesus Christ His Son who saved us
* In the Holy Spirit who sanctifies us
A ,Angliacns wt worship using the Iradldonal Ulurgy in the
19'b rs.ok iof Common Prayer, Afflimlng ihe Nicene and the Aposle's C-eed.
Sunday services
I Iol Cominmunion 8i0anl In 0011 an, trillh muslk
Mlrllllng Praser IIh Nunda ,i oleachli ninlllh in 00 am
Rn\ I Mllkhnael Hotlha. Rleclr
1830 Lake Park Dr. (Amelia Park) Fernandina Beach
90.1-491-6082 * wvww.lolyTrlinltyAngllcan.org


A4NCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
515 Centre Street


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FRIDAY. November 27.2009/NEWS-LEADER


HOMES


HOME AND GARDEN BRIEFS


Farmers market
Capt. Jack's Crab Cakes,
featuring a crab cake special-
ty using.real lump crabmeat
with a blend of unique sea-
sonings, has expanded its
menu at the Fernandina
Farmers Market.
Shoppers will also be able
to enjoy crab biscue pack-
aged for ease to take home.
Also, a new crab dip is on the
menu - perfect to sample at
the market. All crab cakes
are made fresh and then
frozen for ease taking home.
Shoppers are reminded that
Platt's Meats will be at the
market Dec. 5 and
Thompson Pork Dec. 12.
The Fernandina Farmers
Market is open every
Saturday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
at the corner of Seventh and
Centre streets. Call 491-4872
or visit www.fernandinafarm-
ersmarket.com.
Beach cleanup
Talbot Islands State Parks
need your help to clean up
the parks. Volunteer your
time to help protect this pris-
tine landscape at 9 a.m. Nov.
28 at Amelia Island State
Park on Heckscher Drive.
Take a leisurely walk
around the southern point of
Amelia Island while cleaning
ip the beach. Garbage bags
and gloves will be provided.
Remember to bring water
and sunscreen.
For information, call
(904) 251-2320. For more
information about Florida
State Parks, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org.
Sprinkler
demonstration
Nassau County Fire
Rescue will host a demon-


station of a room with a
sprinkler system versus one
without, side-by-side, to
show the effectiveness of a
residential fire sprinkleisys-
tem. In conjunction with
Simplex/Grinnell, two mock-
up living rooms will be set on
fire Dec. 5 at noon in The
Home Depot parking lot on
A1A in Yulee.
Rightwhale
celebration
A celebration of the annu-
al return of the critically
endangered North Atlantic
right to the coast of the
Southeast U.S. will be held
along the shores of the only
known right whale calving
area at the beginning of their
calving season.
Many activities will take
place during the festival at
Sea Walk Pavilion in Jackson-
ville Beach on Dec. 5 from 10
a.m.-4 p.m., including a silent
auction, kids' activities and
exhibitions from many local
organizations. Join a beach
cleanup at 9 a.m. or the
beach run at 3 p.m. Enjoy
live music by Florida-based
The Hip Abduction and
Hours Eastly all afternoon.
Exhibitors include the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration,
Jacksonville Zoo, Ocean
Conservancy, Keepers of the
Coast and many others.
For information visit
www.rightwhalefestival.org.
Register for the beach run at
www.performancemultispor
ts.com/rightwhale5k.htm.
Turtle center outing
The Sierra Club Nassau
Chapter will host an outing
Dec. 22 to Jekyll Island, Ga.,
including a visit to the
Georgia Sea Turtle Center at


A benefit fD ,I;--
TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN
A mentoring and scholarship program
for Nassau County students


An evening of fine


11 a.m. and 1 p.m., where a
trained educator will give a
90-minute presentation and
patient update program.
Admission is $10. Optional
activities include a self-guid-
ed tour of the historic district
(free), a guided tram tour
(90 minutes, $16), biking on
20 miles of paved trails (bike
rental is $8 for four hours)
and nature walks (free).
Optional activities along with
travel to Jekyll Island are "on
your own," with all fees paid
directly to the concession.
There is a $5 per car
entrance fee. The outing is
open to the public. For more
information and to RSVP,
contact Len Kregerat
Len.Kreger@rocketmail.com
or (904) 432-8389.
Kayaktrip
A guided kayak/canoe
trip from Little Talbot State
Park (Kayak Amelia) to Fort
George Island will be con-
ducted by the Nassau Sierra
Club on Jan. 9.
The three- to four-hour
trip will depart the Kayak
Amelia concession on Little
Talbot State Park at 11 a.m.
for a three- to four-mile easy
paddle in calm water.
Participants with their own
kayaks must have a flotation
device. Or rent a kayak at
$30 single/$45 tandem from
Kayak Amelia, which is waiv-
ing the launch fee and offer-
ing a 10 percent rental dis-
count. Bring sun protection,
insect repellent, food and
drinking water. A
Participants must sign a
liability waiver. The outing is
free and open to the public
and led by Len Kreger, a cer-
tified Sierra Outings Leader.
RSVP by Jan. 6 to
Len.Kreger@rocketmail.com
or call (904) 432-8389.


STake Stock in

IChildren

Trhusday, December 3, 2009,
6pm ~ 9pm
Amelia Isand Plantation, Executive Conference Csntec

wine, a splendid buffet


and a silent auction of unusual items.

Advance purchase $50 ~ At the door $60
Tickets available: Frst Coast Community Bank, he NewalLeader,
The Nassau County Recovd, Cafe Kavibo, Resoct To Home and
The Ocean Clubhouse at Amelia Island Plantation.
Oc... change by phone at 904-548-4432 (Flocida State College)
For more information call Take Stock in Children 904-548-4464


FrneliaAIland lmantationr
FLORIDA'S NATURAL ISLAND DESTINATION


NEWS , LEADER


TAKE STOCK IN CHILDRENINASSAU IS AFFILIATED WITH FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE AT JACKSONVILLE AND THE FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOUNDATION. AN IRS APPROVED 501 (C)(3).


Oleander moth active


even in cool weather


Q My oleander is covered
.in caterpillars. What can
I do to get rid of them? GP
A .I have seen the oleander
-. moth recently, therefore
we know she is continuing to
lay eggs. We should not be
lulled into thinking because
the weather is somewhat cool-
er the Oleander moth is not
active.
Once the caterpillar reach-
es lengths over one inch, little
can be done except to manual-
ly remove
them..This of
course means
you must
- hand pick
them off. If
you cannot
r bring yourself
to hand pick
them off,
GARDEN then consider
TA=I pruning out
some of the
S branches,
Becky ordi which are
heavily infest-
ed. Do not burn the branches
as this plant will give off a poi-
son gas that can be deadly to
humans and pets. The branch-
es can be bagged but be sure
the bag is securely tied as
these caterpillars have a natu-
ral tendency to crawl upward.
If the bag is not tied tightly,
they will escape and all your
work will be for nothing.
You can apply the insecti-
cide Bacillus thuringiensis or
Bt but it only works well when
the caterpillars are small.
Although the shrub looks ter :
rible it will eventually re-grow
Its leaves; the defoliation will
not kill the shrub.
A publication from the
University of Florida on the
Oleander moth that will pro-
vide more information can be
found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/IN135.

S - r




DO'T LITTER


aSpay or Neuter

* or .::


Q .My next door neighbor
.told me to stop watering
my St. Augustine lawn. Right
now I water two and three
times a week. But it is still
warm and if I do not water my
grass looks terrible. Is he giv-
ing me good advice? JW
A Three times a week is
*excessive no matter
what time of year. St.
Augustinegrass prefers to be
watered deeply, but less often.
Watering it frequently and
shallowly makes for a weak
root system.
Right now St. Johns River
Water Management (SJRWM)
recommends watering once a
week if we do not receive suf-
ficient rainfall. Addresses with
odd numbers can water on
Saturday and even-numbered
homes water on Sunday.
Therefore, you should cut
back your irrigation system to
once a week. If your grass is
wilting between watering it
may be the result of poor root
growth or root disease.
SYou can contact me for an
Appointment to look at the
grass in my office. I would
need a specimen about the
size of a piece of notebook
paper. I would need to see
roots, runners (stolon), leaves
(blades) and soil. Call me at
the office at 548-1116 for a
consultation. I will discuss the
best maintenance practices for
your lawn. This professional
consultation is free but you
must make an appointment.
QI found this beetle in my
*decaying tree. What is
it? WC
A You are the second per-
.A son who wanted me to
'identify this insect. I suppose
they are moving about now.
The insect you brought me
is one of the young stages of
the common Florida woods
cockroach. The young stages


An oleander
larva, above, and
the Florida
woods cock-
roach, left.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS


look very similar to the adult
but the adults can grow up to
2 inches in length.
I know you do not want to
hear this, but this insect is
actually very important to the
environment. They feed on
decaying material. We do not
recommend using any type of
insecticide on them. If, howev-
er, they enter into the home
you can either kill them or, if
possible, sweep them up and
put them back outside.
The best way to keep out-
door insects out of the home
is to provide a protective barri-
er around the perimeter of the
house.
There are several pesticide
companies that make these
types of pesticides, check for
them at your local garden cen-
ters. Remember to read and
follow the labels of any pesti-
cide you use around your
home and in your garden. The
label is the law. A publication
from the University of Florida
on the Florida woods roach
that will provide more infor-
mation can be found at
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
MG225.
Rebecca Jordi, UF/IFAS
Nassau County Horticultural
Extension Agent, is a
University of Florida faculty
member Extension locations
are the satellite office at the
County Building in Yulee and
the main Extension Office in
Callahan. The UF/IFAS
Nassau County Demonstration
Garden is located at the James
S. Page Governmental
Complex and demonstrates best
management practices for
Northeast Florida. Mail ques-
tions to Garden Talk, c/o
Rebecca Jordi, Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1,
Callahan, FL 32011. Visit
http://nassau. ifas. ufl. edu.
rljordi@ufl.edu


Z,;' SPONSORED BY FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE, BETTY P. COOK NAss
THE NEWS-LEADER AND NASSAU COUNiTY REc





I, I




SAtThe Lewis "Red" Bean Nassau Room
at the Florida State College Betty P. Cook Nassau Center, Yulee
E 76346 William Burgess Blvd., LOCATED 1/2 MILE EAST OF 1-95 INTERSECTION

Nassau County Holiday

Music & Fine Arts Festival
Friday, December 4


D


Front Gates Open at 6:45p.m. Starts at 7 p.m.
Featuring Public School Performing Groups

YUILEE PRIMARY -NGA YULEE ELEMENTARY
DOLPHIN SINGERS ,HE.,,,,R ,C :ER PANTHER SINGE
DIRECTORR - GAY FOOTE AND E ELIGIBLE FOR DIRECTOR - VALERIE JO
4 DOOR PRIZEIF
YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL - YULEE MIDDLE SCHOC
CHORUS DRAMA TEAM
DIRECTORR - ANDY SHEPARD DIRECTOR - ERIN MACAB


RS
NES

IL

ITAS


CALLAHAN INTERMEDIATE CHORUS & MALLET MASTERS DIRECTOR - MARY ANN SAIS
Light refreshments will be available but individuals may bring their own.
Alcoholic beverages are not permitted. Event is free & open to the public.
Call 548-4400 for information.
l- 1.0( ALS INTERESTED IN PERFORMINGAT FUTURE COURTYARD
." '* ", NIGHTS CAN CALL DON HUGHES AT 548-4481.
. -..: . NL/PSA


3rd flnnuOl fmtlia Island Museum of tlistorg


flolidgay ionm Tour


In fistorie fe andina Bach

eember 4 &5, 2009

10:00 am until 4:00 pm


.............


Y.






FRIDAY, November 27.2009 NEWS News-Leader


II




Ir


Buying All Rolex Buying Gold Sterling Silver
& Premium Watches & Platinum We Buy All Forms of Silver


* Rolex * Patek Phillipe
* Cartier * Tiffany * Breitling
SOmega * LeCoultre * Vacheron
SConstantin * Pkcet & Wristwatches
* Railroad Watches


* Bracelets and Rings
SBroken Jewelry
* Class Rings and Fraternal Pins
* Jeweler's Scrap and Dental Gold


* Tea Sets * Flatware
* Trophies * Candlesticks
* Coins & Silver * Trays
SBracelets * Necklaces,. Jewelry
*


Buying Diamonds
* All Diamond Jewelry
* Engagement Rings
* Chipped and Broken Diamonds
*Diamonds over One Carat
SGIA-Certified Diamonds
* Canary, Blue and Pink Diamonds


Buying All Jewelry
* Platinum, Gold and Silver Jewelry
* Diamond Jewelry and pearls
*Bvlgari, Webb and Van Cleef
* Cartier, Tiffany and Gerog Jensen
* All Types of Real Jewelry
* All styles and in any condition


a
US(S) S~kS]I~F-i


STATES


USED


NEW


$1.00 $150.00 & UP ....$$
$2.50 $150.00 & UP ....$$
$3.00 $500.00 & UP ....$$
$5.00 $250.00 & UP ....$$
$10.00 $500.00 & UP ....$$
$20.00 $1000.00 & UP ....$$


Buying 1964 & Older
DIMES ... .$0.90 & UP....$$
QUARTERS .$2.25 & UP....$$
HALVES .. .$4.50 & UP....$$
SDOLLARS . .$10.00 & UP....$$
, CLAD HALVES (1965.199) $1.50 & UP...$$


A'' II~~~1~I(llnru





SEAE BREEZ, IGHET


UNITED


1







FRIDAY. November 27.2009 NEWS News-Leader


RELIGION Continued from 9A
is welcome to participate in the
mom and baby/toddler playgroup
that has evolved into an interest-
ing group of moms and children
growing and nurturing, network-
ing and socializing, sharing and
caring with all who come. This
ministry is open-to the public. No
reservations are needed.
Food ministries
Angel Food Ministries and
Fernandina Beach C'lutili of
Christ are offering food relief for
the community. For more informa-
tion contact Thomas Kessel or
Tom Gilday at 277-2517 or e-mail
fbangelfoo@,@gmail.com. The
church is located at 1005 South
14th St. Visit wwwv.cocfb.org and
www.angelfoodministries.com.
* * a
The Bridge Family Worship
Center in Yulee is offering Angel
Food Ministries discounted food.
Open to anyone, this opportunity
allows you to feed your family for
a fraction of the normal cost. A
family of four can eat for a week
for only $30. The ministry is offer-
ing boxes of restaurant quality
food at a greatly discounted rate.
Visit www.thebridgeflorida.com or
call 2254860.


Senior Angel Tree
As you begin thinking of how you
will give back this holiday season,
consider sponsoring a low-income
senior citizen for Christmas. Pur-
chasing a little something from a
Senior Angel's wish list will help
bring joy, hope and a sense of impor-
tance into the lives of the often alone
and forgotten. For information or to
adopt a Senior Angel, call Mary
Moore at 321-0435 or stop by The
Salvation Army Hope House at the
corner of Ninth and Date streets.
Adventjourney
Join Memorial United Methodist
Church as they journey through
Advent and approach Christmas.
Each Sunday night of Advent will
offer a different program for all ages.
Kindermusik educator Sarah Flint
will lead a Musical Christmas Story-
time for ages 3-5. CarolOlson will
lead older children, with a different
event each week. UMYF begins at 5
p.m. with dinner and then games, a
program and worship.
At 5 p.m. in the sanctuary Nov. 29,
Dec. 6 and 13, adults may spend
reflective time in the spirit of the sea-


son. Themes include Nov. 29, Devel-
oping a Thankful Heart; Dec. 6, Glad
Tidings; and Dec. 13, Service of
Healing.
On Dec. 20 at 4:30 p.m. enjoy
church-wide Christmas caroling and
return to Maxwell Hall at 6 p.m. for a
Birthday Party for Jesus. All are
invited to attend any and all of these
events. For information, contact
Pastor Hollie at 261-5769.
Christmas musical
Start your Christmas celebration
with a children's Christmas musical,
"Legacy of Love," Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. at
the Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ, corner of 14th and Jasmine
streets. Admission is free. Children
of all ages are welcome to this musi-
cal that shows how to share God's
love in their everyday lives.
First Baptistevents
Fernandina First Baptist Church
welcomes everyone to their
Christmas celebrations in Decem-
ber, beginning with the Toyland
Concert Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. Admission
is a new, unwrapped toy to benefit
the Marine Corps Toys for Tots.
On Dec. 13 the Worship Choir


will present "Everything Glorious,"
an anointed praise and worship musi-
cal full of Christmas favorites, best-
loved praise and worship choruses
and new songs. It begins at 6 p.m.
On Dec. 20 at 6 p.m., the chil-
dren's choir will present "Miracle on
Main Street," a musical drama that
addresses political correctness at
Christmas as only children can.
On Dec. 24, at 5:30 p.m. celebrate
Christmas Eve with the annual
Carols, Candles and Communion
Service, a family tradition at FBC.
For more information contact the
church office at 261-3617.
Messiah Sing
The second annual Clay County
Messiah Sing will be held Dec. 6 at
Island View Baptist Church in
Orange Park. This annual event fea-
turing Handel's masterwork was
revived last year by the Clay County
Church musicians' group and the
Jacksonville Masterworks Chorale.
All area singers are invited to join in
rehearsal at 1:30 p.m, The communi-
ty is invited to the concert at 3 p.m.
Island View Baptist Church is
located at 900 Park Ave. The concert
is free, a collection will be taken to


CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS


defray expenses. For information call
(904) 264-2241, ext. 236.
'Christmas Homecoming'
The community is invited to expe-
rience "A 1940's Christmas Home-
coming" Dec. 11 and 13 at 7 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church. This is a
musical drama about love and sacri-
fice set in wartime 1940's and filled
with upbeat, Big Band arrangements
bringing the period fully to life along
with carols that depict the true mean-
ing of Christmas. At the end of the
program active and inactive military
personnel will be honored.
The performance includes a
drama cast, singers from area chur-
ches and a 13-piece 1940's Big Band.
Admission is free. Childcare for
infants to age 4 is available with
reservations. Call the church office
at 261-9527. Amelia Baptist Church is
located at 961167 Buccaneer Trail.
Blackrock musical
Blackrock Baptist Church will
present a musical, "The Night Christ
was Born," at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 20.
Everyone is welcome. The church is
located at 96362 Blackrock Road in
Yulee. For information, call 261-6220.


New Cabinets... ? ?
* To create a new kitchen
* To house a new fat'screen TV
* To make a master bath into a spa
STo organize an office for the new year

COME IN AND LET US DESIGN
SOMETHING FOR YOU!

YOUR HOLIDAY WISHES

CAN COME TRUE!



Mon-llri. %Ip ii


Put Your

BusinessIn

The

Spotlight!


"We really rin t lirten ito the ciustor to help meet their jvewclr
cineeds.' sa\s .-4la's Fine Jewelry owner. Gigi Gnibner.
Precious Gems and treasures at
Amelia's Fine Jewelry
Gigi Grubner has been involved in the jewelry industry since
1991, working i her familN's jeweln store in upstate New York.
Armed with a college degree in Fine Arts ith courses in business
management, marketing and ad\ertiming. Grubner began Amela's
Fine Jewelry in 2007 with "i50 and a dream."
A full service jeweler. Grubner and employees Caroline Sosnoslk
and Gianinna Cooper offer custom designed jewelry. redesign of
existing pieces, and repairs and remounts. They also buy gold and
do select e consignment jewelry
"We carry net and estate jewelry," said Grubner. "Estate jew-
elry pieces hase fascinating histories."
Ameba's Fine Jew elry also came pieces by renowned jewel-
ry arnsts such as Simon G and Denny Wong, as well as pieces hand-
crafted by local and regional artists
A ne\w offenng for coin collectors is America's first siler dol-
lar used and accepted as legal tender in the American colonies.
Treasure hunters might be interested in authentic sunken treas-
ure from the l l0-foot Spanish galleon, the Nuestra Sefiora De
Alocha, a Mel Fiher find % which sank off the Florida Keys in 1622
Another oceanic uejasure Grubnei sock is je elry made \% ith
the rare and beautiful Lanmar stone Thi, one source gemstone
from the Dominican Republic re-min-
eralizes from \ olcanic rock to I
unique aqua blue color.
The star ol the
show is a spectall\
commissioned charm in
the shape ol Amelia
Island, % ith jd Jiamrnd
denoung the hiion tc ditnci
Giubner runs her sh.,p in a
related .ilin.'phere. Iree of high
pressure tactics. With 19 .Cars in the
jewclri industry, .he finds her career.
re% adding and wants' to continue to oter
unique, fine quality jeelrn and exceptional
customer service. >

Amelia's Fine Jewelry is located at
3 17 Centre Street. Phone 277-06ti5


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SPORTS


Strasser finishes seconds behind 2A


:1


BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER
Stephanie Strasser, senior at Fernandina
Beach High School, was runnerup at the
2A state cross country meet Saturday.


BETH JONES
News-Leader
Stephanie Strasser owns'one
state title, but she wanted another
one.
"I really wanted to win, of
course," Strasser said. "Winning
state either happens or it doesn't.
It's not like you did anything wrong.
It just wasn't meant to be. That's
the way I see it."
Strasser, a senior at Fernandina
Beach High School, finished sec-
ond in the 2A state cross country
meet Saturday. She crossed the fin-
ish line just four seconds behind
defending champion Stephanie
Schappert of Pope John Paul I.
"We actually have a bit of a rival-
ry going on," Strasser.said."We.
went to the same camp this sum-'
mer. We're always really close in
all the races. I think it's ironic her
name's Stephanie. . v:": , �.,'
"I did my best. I'm real Hiapy
with my race. It was definitely a
tough race. Stephanie, Nicole
(Carpio, the third-place finisher)
and I, we were elbowing each other


a bit. I was trying to break away
during the second mile, really push-
ing the pace.
"Stephanie had a really big surge
at the beginning of the last mile.
She got some distance between us."
. In her battle at the end with
Carpio, "I almost ended up catching
Stephanie," Strasser said. "It was
right there."
Strasser, who ran Saturday's
race in 18:02.88, was the county,
district and region girls champion
this season.
"It was almost a perfect season,"
Strasser said.
Strasser was third in the state
last year in cross country. She'll
take two weeks off and begin
preparing for the spring track sea-
son. Last year, she was the two-mile
state champion.
Her success has earned her a
scholarship offer to run at the
University of Florida. She has ver-
bally committed to UF, but still plans
to visit Florida State and Georgia.
"I'm keeping my options open,"
she said.
"Sthephanie just.came up a little


short, but
son could
her," FBHE
"She was
pointed aft
is the most
is, but she
and all of ti
work habit
for Stephai
Strasset
ifier for the
team quali
"It is kir
"We are dis
disappointed
challenging,
was to mal
that. We w
ish above I
tude, the s
to'state in 1
"The sta
lenging co
and trained
n't our da
learned or
important 1
you just car
have to be


OUTDOORS / TIDES


13A


Wrestlers


win five
BETH JONES
News-Leader
Despite forfeiting four
weight classes, the Fernandina
Beach High School wrestling
team defeated West Nassau,
Bishop Snyder, -University
Christian and St. Augustine
Saturday in the North Florida
Duals at Bishop Snyder.
Beau Jarrett, 103 pounds,
won all five of his matches by
pin. Preston York, 112, won by
decision in his matches against
Bishop Snyder, St. Augustine
and Ed White but lost against
West Nassau and University
Christian.
SOmar Lopez, 119. won his
i'natchfIl agaiitt :-'U.i niv.'er;ity
Christian by pin. Ben B:owman.
135, won by pin against Bishop
Snyder and St. Augustine.
Jason Lovitt, 140, went 2-3
on the day with with wins
against Ed White ipini and
University Christian decisionn.
Both Pit LeBrun. 145. and
Michael Hawthorne, 171. wen t
5-0 on the day, winning all by
pin.
Toby Williams, 152, went 4-
0, collecting wins by pin over
Bishop Snyder, St. Augustine
and West Nassau. He won by
decision against Ed White.
Sean Watkins, 189, and
heavyweight Conner Lawrence
also won all five of their match-
es by pin.
"We really liked what we
saw and continue to see on a
daily basis from our younger
guys like freshmen Beau Jar-
rett and Preston York as well as
our sophomore Omar Lopez,"
FBHS Coach John Williams
said. 'They have really picked
up on the mat intensity that we
stress in practice and on match
day. We don't have the amount
of participation we would like
right now in order to keep
building our program to the
place where we want it to be.
We hope with our early success
and hopefully a successful sea-
son well get more guys inter-
ested in Pirate wrestling."


SEASON TIP-OFF


PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER
The season kicked off Tuesday for the Fernandina Beach High School boys basketball team. The
Pirates hosted Bishop Snyder and former FBHS Coach Lou Pereira. The Pirates won 62-36.
Carlos Holcey, right, led the Pirates' offensive attack with 12 points. Sean Jowers, left, led in
rebounds with eight and also chipped in seven points. The Pirates allowed the visiting Cardinals
just four points in the first quarter and led 32-17 at halftime. Zach Rocheleau had 11 points for
the Pirates, including a trio of three-pointers. Terin Dallas, Andrew Vrancic, Stacey Lynch and
Chris Keffer all had six points. Keffer had six rebounds and Patrick Garvin had five. The Pirates
are back in action Friday, hosting St. Francis out of Gainesville. Tip-off is 7:30 p.m. for the varsi-
ty; 6 p.m. for junior varsity. FBHS hosts Hilliard Monday at the same times.


Sixth annual


Reindeer Run


set for Dec.12

ED HARDEE
For the News-Leader
Santa Claus is lacing up his running shoes for
the sixth annual Reindeer Run 5K/10K, walk
and kids' runs, set for Dec. 12 in Fernandina
Beach.
The race features a beautiful, shaded route
through Fort Clinch State Park, along with pro-
fessional electronic timing by 1st Place Sports in
Jacksonville. Santa's also bringing goodies for all
preregistered walkers and 5K/10K runners,
including holiday-themed T-shirts and coupons
good for a free breakfast at the Elizabeth Pointe
Lodge.
. * Door prizes at the post-race awards ceremo-
ny will include a four-day, three-night stay at the
Amelia Island Plantation.
Out-of-town runners can take advantage of
free showers after the race (bring your own tow-
els) and participants can use their race bibs for
free admission to Fort Clinch State Park after the
event. And runners and walkers will get jingle
bells to wear on their shoes.
The 5K/10K run starts at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 12
at the Atlantic Recreati6n Center, 2500 Atlantic
Ave. in Fernandina Beach.
At 8;35 a.m., walkers will step off behind the
runners; two walk distances are being offered
this year, 1.5 miles and 3.1 miles.
At 9:45 a.m., Santa will join children age 10
and younger for half-mile and one-mile fun runs.
Registration forms are available at www.
AmeliaIslandRunners.com and at the McArthur
Family YMCA, 1915 Citrona Drive in Fernandina
Beach and Pak's Karate Academy, 96549
Parliament Drive.
Online registration is also available at the
website.
Fees for the 5K/10K and walks are $20 per
person through Dec. 6, or $15 for members of
Amelia Island Runners, the local running club
that organizes the event. From Dec. 7 through
race day, the fee is $25 for everyone.
The fee for the children's fun runs (age 10
and younger) is $5 per person, which includes
a T-shirt for preregistered runners. Parents are
encouraged to run with their kids for free.
Race proceeds will benefit the Healthy
Start/Healthy Families programs of the Nassau
County Health Department, which provide sup-
port services for pregnant women, young chil-
dren and families; and Friends of Fort Clinch.
For information on the annual Reindeer Run,
visit the Amelia Island Runners website or call
277-8365 or 491-0369.


You are what

A s you age, making smart dietary
choices becomes more critical.
Once you enter your 30s, the meta-
bolic rate slows approximately 1
percent every four years. On average, each
decade you will put on three pounds of fat
while losing three pounds of muscle mass.
This loss of muscle mass is directly related to
a reduction of physical activity as well as a
reduction of testosterone levels in men that
decreases with age. In order to maintain mus-
cle mass, weight bearing exercise is a must
and you must ensure proper protein intake
with such items as steak and tuna fish.
Blood pressure also tends to begin to
creep upward as you enter your 30s.
Scientists from the Netherlands have shown
that, in addition to regular exercise, maintain-
ing a good daily intake of potassium is helpful
in combating hypertension. Potassium is
readily available in bananas, beans or raisins.
Keep your body in its fat burning mode by
eating smaller, more frequent meals higher in
protein,, such as cheese and almonds, and low
in carbohydrates and sugars. Researchers
found that eating a lunch that avoided bread,
rice or pasta led to a "fat burning mode" for
four hours longer than those who ate a lunch
containing those items. Adding broccoli and
bell peppers, high in vitamins C and E, is


ou eat, especially as you age
helpful as well for muscle So, it is quite possible as you are entranced
recovery post-workouts. the movie, you may have engorged yourself
As one ages, facing dis- on 1,600 calories.
ease becomes more of a "That's like eating six scrambled eggs
reality. In men under the with cheddar cheese, four bacon strips and
age of 45, accidents are the four sausage links before the lights come uj
leading cause of death; how- the researchers wrote.
ever, after age 45, heart dis- The results showed Regal's large pop-
S ease becomes the number corns packed the biggest punch with each
one killer. Each year, some containing 20 cups of popcorn, 1,200 calorie
36,000 men in their 40s die and 60 grams of saturated fat. That's the
SPORTS from heart disease, accord- equivalent of two Pizza Hut Personal Pan pe
ing to the American Heart peroni pizzas plus an extra two days' worth
MEDICINE Association. Lowering blood saturated fat. Both Regal and AMC popped
GREGORY pressure and cholesterol their popcorn in coconut oil, which contains
levels and maintaining phys- 90 percent saturated fat, while Cinemark is
SMITH. M.D. ical fitness is the best way to the only major chain to pop its popcorn in
--.- combat heart disease. non-hydrogenated canola oil.
... So skip the popcorn.
According to new research from the This column is written to discuss issues
Center for Science in the Public Interest, regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is no
movie theater popcorn continues to be partic- intended to serve as a replacementfor treat-
ularly unhealthy. Researchers found movie ment by a doctor It is only designed to offer
theater popcorn offerings from Regal, AMC guidelines on the prevention, recognition and
and Cinemark range from 400 to 1,200 calo- care of injuries and illness. Specific concerns
ries with one to three days' worth of saturat- should be discussed with a physician. Mail
ed fat and up to 1,500 milligrams of sodium. questions to Gregory Smith, M.D., 1250 S.
With the combo package you could add 300 18th St., Suite 204, Fernandina Beach, FL
to 1,110 empty calories worth of candy and 32034. Call 261-8787 or visit
another 150 to 500 calories from a soft drink. www.gsmithmd.com.


in
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FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 27,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA



state champion

I and Coach (Roy) Ben- rifices and put the work in to
not be more proud of achieve your goals.
S Coach Mark Durr said. "They will have this feeling and
of course a little disap- this knowledge for the rest of their
:er the race because she lives. The school really got behind
competitive athlete there these guys the last couple of weeks
has such a bright future because the students were seeing
he natural tools as wellas the same things in these guys that
s that the sky is the limit I was.
nie." 'These senior athletes really
r was the lone state qual- came together to make the perfect
girls, but the-entire boys team. Chris Keffer and Jazz (Tomas-
fied. They finished 19th. setti) are natural born leaders who
nd of strange," Durr said. lead by example. Landon (Kovalick)
appointed, but we're not and Adam (Buechler) are the gifted
ed. We set out with a very and talented athletes who proved
g goal this year and that that, with hard work and doing the
ke it to state and we did right preparation, even the best can
would of course like a fin- get better.
19th. That is just our atti- "Darren and Bradley (Bunch)
ame attitude that got us were the ones who were always
the first place. there to provide the boost of spirit
ate course is a very chal- and energy that might be lacking
urse and we knew that with the team on a given day. Joey
d for that, but it just was- Collins, our junior sensation, has
y. But these guyshave big shoes to fill nextyear, but we are
at least proved a very really excited with his progress and
ife lesson and that is that the progress of Austin Nicklas to be
n'tjust want success, you a real solid base on which to con-
willing to make the sac- tinue building next year."


GIRLS HOOPS


BE1TH JONES/NEWS-I.EADI
Tevin Thompson shoots while Jennifer
Drummond defends Monday when the
Yulee High School girls basketball team
hosted the Fernandina Beach High
School Lady Pirates. Yulee won 32-26.
Quanisha Garrett led all scorers with 20
points, including 17 in the second half.
Brittany Register added eight with a pair
of three-pointers in the second half.









FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 27.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


YuleePop Warner
Yulee Pop Warner will hold its 2010 coach-
es and board member elections at 7 p.m. Jan.
29 in the green room at the Yulee Sports
Complex on Goodbread Road.


Join a bowling league
Strikers Family Bowling Center in Yulee
offers Tuesday Night Strikers League at 6:30
p.m. starting in January. The 18-week season
runs from Jan. 5 to May 4.
A league meeting will be held at 6 p.m.
Jan. 5. Everyone who plans to bowl in the
league must attend. Cost and prizes will be
determined. Cost will be a minimum of $12.
Prize will be either a ball or cash league or a
trophy. Call 225-1077 for information.


Cycling course with Lane
Doug Lane of CrossFit Amelia Island will
join Harvey Newton, 1984 USA Olympic
weightlifting coach, for a cycling course from
6:30-9 p.m. Dec. 3 at Open Road Bicycles,
4460 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Register
by Dec. 1 and the course is $39; afterwards
it's $49. Topics include weight training for
power in the offseason, designating a season
with perfect periodization, peaking for "A"
races and common offseason training mis-
takes. For information call (904) 636-7772 or
visit www.openroadbicycles.com.


Register for soccer
Amelia Island Youth Soccer is registering
players online for the spring season. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com. All new players will have
to mail a copy of their birth certificate to 863
Atlantic View Drive, FernandinaBeach, FL
32034 to complete the registration process.
Call Raquel at 753-0602.


Weeklybikeride
Club 14 Fitness is hosting a weekly
Saturday morning bike ride open to the com-
munity. The ride is designed with B and C
cyclists in mind. Meet at Club 14 Fitness in
the 8 Flags Shopping Center by the movie
theatre every Saturday at 8 a.m. and ride to
Fort Clinch state park (with $2 park entry fee).
Participants have the open of one or two
loops. Helmets required. Call Club 14 Fitness
at 206-4414 or visit www.clubl4fitness.com.


Walk. run under the lights
Amelia Island Runners sponsors a weekly
community run and walk under the lights at
the Fernandina Beach High School track from
6-7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to
everyone and free water and Gatorade will be
provided. Runners and walkers can partici-
pate at their own pace, individually or with AIR
members and friends. The track is inside the
football stadium at 435 Citrona Drive.
The lighted track runs are being offered in
cooperation with the Nassau County school
system as a service to runners and walkers in
this area. Amelia Island Runners is paying for
electricity use and related costs.
Track runs are planned roughly once a
week, depending on availability. Dates will be


posted on the club's website, www.Amelia
IslandRunners.com. AIR members will be
available to provide training tips for beginning
runners or run at "race pace" with experi-
enced racers. Participate with partners or indi-
vidually. Visit AIR's website or call 277-8365.


Train now for262 with Donna
Y Yoga is starting the walk/run training for
the Run 26.2 with Donna for Breast Cancer in
February. The group will meet regularly Satur-
days at 9:30 a.m. at Main Beach or Peters
Point. Training is free and open to all regard-
less of age, sex or fitness level. The group
walks/runs as "Team Nirvana." Call 415-9642
or visit www.eteamz.com/ teamnirvanal.


Challenger Bowling
Nassau Challenger Bowling League for
the physically and mentally challenged meets
the second Saturday each month from 3-5
p.m. at Strikers Family Bowling Center on US
17 in Yulee. Call Melinda Willaford, 261-3136.


Winterwrestlng
USA Wrestling's Fernandina Beach team
for students in grades 6-8 will hold its winter
session through January. Practices are
Monday and Wednesdays from 5:30-7 p.m.
at the auto shop building behind Fernan-dina
Beach Middle School.
Participants must have a USA Wrestling
card ($35), otherwise there are no club fees.
Wrestling shoes are mandatory and head,
gear and singlet are optional. Get a card at
www.floridausawrestling. org. Call Randy
Middlebrook at (970) 319-8222.

Gobbler shootNov.29
Amelia Shotgun Sports will hold tour tour-
naments, shoot either or both, Nov. 29 at
86300 Hot Shot Trail in Yulee. NSCA regis-
tered shoots with 100 targets in the morning
and 100 in the evening shoot. Register from
8-9:55 a.m. for the first tournament. Be on the
course no later than 10 a.m. Scorecards must
be in by noon. Register for the second tourna-
ment from 1-2:30 p.m.
Fees for each are $60 for NSCA and
hunter, $45 for junior and sub-juniors and $7
for warm-ups from 8-10 a.m. Fee includes
sausage sandwich breakfast, lunch and
awards. Call 753-4619 or 548-9818 or e-mail
clyde@ameliashotgunsports.com.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club. Social
hour at 6:30 p.m; meeting at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Steinkamp, 261-5213, or
visit www.ameliaislandsailing.org.


Umpires sought
River City Umpires Association is recruit-
ing men and women interested in officiating
baseball and softball. If you live or work in
Baker, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Putnam, St.
Johns or Nassau counties, call Aaron
Knowles at (904) 962-7184 or Terry Padgett
at (904) 879-6442 or visit www.riverci-
tyumps.com.


COUNTY CHAMPS


PHOTOS BY JULIE HALL/SPECIAL
The Fernandina Beach Middle School girls, above, and boys soccer teams captured
the Nassau County championships Saturday at Fernandina Beach High School. The
girls defeated Callahan 6-0 and the boys edged Yulee 1-0 in overtime.


2009-10 SCHEDULES


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Wrestling
Nov. 28 Deltona Duals 8am
Dec. 4-5 F-5 Bradford IBT 2:30/8am
Dec. 9 Fletcher Tri Duel 4:00
Dec, 11-12 Mat Classic at St. Joseph's
Dec. 12 Fletcher JV tournament 8am
Dec. 16 COUNTY (seniors) , . 4:30,
Dec. 19 Holiday Duels at Camder B amr
Jan 8-9 Terry Palker IBT 2 00/8aml
Jan. 13 Andrew JacksonTri Duel 4:30
Jan. 22-23 Five Star at Raines
Jan. 29-30 Camden quad duel 5:0017am


HO thDA "We S yll O .Fun!".
PERFORMANCE FIRST" W e e Fun!" PERFORMANCE FIRST'"

Exit 3 Off 1-95 - Kingsland, GA - 912-729-8686

Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat 9-4 Closed Sunday

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9am


Feb. 6 District at Raines
Feb. 12-13 Region
Feb. 19-20 State at Lakeland


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Soccer
Nov. 27-28 T-Day Toumament, Patton
Dec. 1 BOLLES' 5'30"`20
Dec. 3 at Yulee
Dec. 4 at Keystone Heights 7:20 (V)
Dec. 7 FIRST COAST CHR. 7:20 (V)
Dec. 9 PONTE VEDRA 5:30/7:20
Dec. 11 at Bishop Snyder 6/7:20
Dec. 14 at West Nassau 7:20
Jan. 5 EPISCOPAL' 5:30/7:20
Jan. 7 CLAY 5:30/7:20
Jan. 11 at Stanton 6/8:00
Jan. 14 at Orange Park 6:30 (V)
Jan. 21 WOLFSON 5:30/7:20
Jan. 26-30 District 3-3A at Episcopal
SDistrict
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Basketball
Nov. 27 ST. FRANCIS 6/7:30
Nov. 30 HILLIARD 6/7:30
Dec. 4 at Bishop Kenny 6/7:30
Dec. 8 at Yulee* 4:30/7:30
Dec. 11 WEST NASSAU 6/7:30
Dec. 14 BRADFORD COUNTY 6/7:30
Dec. 17-19 at Glynn Academy toumey
Dec. 19-20 JV tourney at West Nassau
Dec. 29 at University Christian 6/7:30
Jan. 2 .at Trinity 6/7:30
Jan. 5 RIBAULT 6/7:30
Jan. 7 at Providence 6/7:30
Jan. 8 BOLLES* 6/730
Jan. 12 at Episcopal* 6/7:30
Jan. 15 YULEE 6/7:30
Jan: 19 TRINITY 6/7:30
Jan. 22 RAINES 6/7:30
Jan. 26 at Bolles 6/7:30
Jan. 28-29 Johnny T Smith at WNHS
Feb. 2 at Bishop Snyder 6/7:30
Feb. 4 PROVIDENCE 6/7:30
Feb. 5 UNIVERSITY CHRIST. 67:30
Feb. 9, 12-13 District at Ralnes
*District
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Basketball
Nov. 30 at Ralnes' 6/7:30
Dec. 1 BISHOP SNYDER 6/7:30
Dec. 4 at St. Johns Co. Day 6:00 (V)
Dec. 8 HILLIARD 6/7:30
Dec. 10 at Ribault* 6/7:30
Dec. 15 BOLLES* 6:00
Dec. 18 ST JOHNS CO. DAY 6:00 (V)
Jan. 7 at Bishop Snyder 6:00 (V)
Jan. 8 at Episcopal* 6/7:30
Jan. 12 at Hlllard 6/7:30
Jan. 14 YULEE 6:00 (v)
Jan. 19 at West Nassau .6/7:30
Jan. 21 at Bolles 6/7:30
Jan. 25 at Trinity 6:00 (V)
Jan. 26 BAKER COUNTY 6/7:30
Feb. 3-6 District 3-3A at Ribault
SDistrict
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Soccer
Nov. 30 RIBAULT 5:30
Dec. 4-5 Timberwoll Classic, Tallahassee
Dec. 8 at Bolles 7:00
Dec. 10 UNIVERSITY CHRIST 7:00
Dec. 14 at West Nassau 5:30
Dec. 15 NEASE 6:00
Dec. 17 at Yulee 6:00
Jan. 4 EAGLE'S VIEW 5:30
Jan. 13 STANTON 6:00
Jan. 15 at Bishop Kenny 6:00
Jan. 20-23 District 3-3A at Bolles
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Wrestling
Dec. 2 FLETCHER 6:00
Dec. 4-5 Terry Parker tourney TBA
Dec. 9 BISHOP KENNY 3:00
Dec. 11-12 St. Joseph tournament 3:00
Dec. 16 Nassau County at Yulee 5:00
Jan. 8-9 Rotary toumey at Clay 3:00
Jan. 15-16 Suwannee Duals 3:00
Jan. 22-23 Five Star tourney, Raines 3:00
Feb. 6 District 3-1A
Feb. 12-13 Region 1-1Aat Clay
Feb. 19-20 State at Lakeland


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Bowling
Dec. 3 Yulee at Strikers 5:00
Dec. 8 West Nassau at Strikers 5:00
Dec. 14 Hilliard at Strikers 5:00
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Basketball
Dec. 1 . 'at Ralnes'': '' ' 6 00
Dec 3 CREEKSIDE 6.00
Dec. 4 BAKER 6:00
Dec. 7 BRADFORD 6:00
Dec. 8 BOLLES 6:00
Dec. 10 at Bishop Snyder 6:00
Dec. 14 PONTEVEDRA 6:00
Dec. 17 vs. West Nassau, WNHS 8:00
Dec. 18 vs. Baldwin, WNHS 5:30
Jan. 5 at Bolles 6:00
Jan. 7 WEST NASSAU 6:00
Jan. 11 at Bradford 6:00
Jan. 13 at Ponte Vedra 6:00
Jan. 14 at Fernandina Beach 6:00
Jan. 19 at Episcopal 6:00
Jan. 21 at West Nassau 6:00
Jan. 26 at Hilliard 6 00
Jan. 28 at Baker 6:00
Jan. 29 HILLIARD 6:00
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Soccer
Nov.30 at West Nassau 7:30
Dec. 1 RIBAULT 5:30
Dec. 2 ST AUGUSTINE 6:00
Dec. 9 at St. Joe's 5:30
Dec. 11 EAGLE'S VIEW 5:30
Dec. 14 at St. Augustine6:00
Dec. 17 FERNANDINA BEACH 5:30
Jan. 2 at Mandarin Christian 1:00
Jan. 7 at Trinity Christian 5:30
Jan. 8 WEST NASSAU 5:30
Jan. 15 at Keystone 5:30
Jan. 20 District at Episcopal TBA
*District
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Boys Soccer
Nov. 30 at West Nassau 5.30
Dec. 2 at Ribault 5.00
Dec. 3 FERNANDINA BEACH 7:20
Dec. 7 . at Clay 7:30
Dec. 9 RIBAULT 5:30
Dec. 11 at Forrest 5:30
Dec. 14 at Lee 5:30
Dec.16 ST AUGUSTINE 7:00
Dec. 18 MANDARIN'CHRISTIAN 7:00
Jan. 2 at Mandarin Christian 3:00
Jan. 7 at Trinity Christian 7:20
Jan. 8 WEST NASSAU (seniors) 7:30
Jan. 15 at Keystone 7.30
Jan. 19 LEE 5:30
Jan. 21 CLAY 7:30
Jan. 22 FORREST 5:30
Jan, 25-29 District at Bolles
SDistrict
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Junior Varsity Boys Soccer
Dec. 2 ST AUGUSTINE 5:30
Dec. 3 FERNANDINA BEACH 5:30
Dec, 7 at Clay 5:30
Dec, 14 at St. Augustine 5:30
Dec. 16 ST AUGUSTINE 5:30
Jan. 21 at Clay 5:30
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Basketball
Dec. 3 HILLIARD 5/6:30
Dec. 10 CALLAHAN 6 30/7:45
Dec. 15 at Yulee 2/3'45
Dec. 17 at Hilliard 5/6:30
Jan. 7 at Callahan 6:30/7:45
Jan. 12 YULEE 2/3:45
Jan. 19 B team county tournament
Jan. 26 A team county tournament
YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
Basketball
Dec. 1 FERNANDINA 2:30/3,45
Dec. 7 at Callahan 2:30/3:45
Dec 8 HILLIARD 5/6:30
Dec. 17 CALLAHAN 3:45/2.30
Dec. 18-20 St. Johns Country Day tourney
Jan. 5 ORANGE PARK 5:30/7
Jan. 12 at Fernandina 2/3:45
Jan. 19 B tourney at FBMS
Jan. 26 County at Callahan


SOFTBALL SCORES


FERNANDINA BEACH PARKS
& RECREATION
Adult Co-ed Softball

Nov. 23
Recreational League
Half-Time Sports Bar 16
Morrow Insurance 5

Half-Time Sports Bar 13
Moon River Pizza 5
Championship game at 7:30p.m. Nov 30
between Half-Time Sports Barand Moon
River Pizza.

Standings
Competitive League Tournament
Kabuki (league champs) 4-0


Woody's BBQ
Suncoast/AII-American
G2 Computer Consultants
Slider's Seaside Grill
Sun Gallery
Regional Trailer Repair


4-2
1-2
2-2
1-2
0-2
0-2


Recreational League Tournament
Half-Time Sports Bar 4-1
Moon River Pizza 3-1
Morrow Insurance 3-2
Stevenson Collision/Kofe Hous 2-2
Coker Crane 1-2
John T. Ferreira Insurance 1-2
O'Kane's Irish Pub 0-2
Convergence Employee Leasing 0-2
Team and individual statistics at
www.leaguelineup.com/fbflsoftball.


SPORTS SHORTS








FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


PHOTOS BY TERRY LACUS/SPECIAL
Kara Riggs caught this pair of keeper specks recently while fishing with her husband Bill Riggs at the mouth of the
Nassau River.



Sea trout holding at Shave Bridge


'Trout are biting every-
where you cast your live
shrimp and trout float setup,"
Capt. Terry David Lacoss
said. "The best trout action is
coming during the incoming
tide while fishing in water
depths from 4-10 feet, particu-
larly where
there are
deep pockets
of water
located next
to creek
Mouths,
bridges,
docks or oys-
terbars.
ON THE "Many of
the trout we
WATER are catching
TERRY on our back-
LACOSS charters are
measuring
just under
the legal 15-inch minimum
size limit. However, my
clients are also catching their
share of legal trout."
Some of the larger sea
trout are holding at the Shave
Bridge and at the mouth of
Sawpit Creek in Nassau
Sound. Once again, live finger
mullet are the key for catch-
ing "gator" size sea trout
when fished deep under a
float or fished right on the


A trout boat anchors off a large oysterbar at the mouth
ofEgans Creek during a falling tide.


bottom of a deep hole using a
one-ounce egg sinker.
Bluefish are running in
both the St. Marys and
Nassau inlets during the high
falling tide. Look for diving
birds where blues are feeding
on schools.of finger mullet on
the surface. Some of the
more popular saltwater lures
for taking bluefish include the
"Crocodile Spoon," the popu-
lar "Sea Hawk" or the 52-M
SM pt tSre.
* ,, H",h . . .'


Redfish are running dur-
ing the falling tide, which
should take running at day-
light right up to 11 a.m. in the
backwaters.
The St. Marys jetty rocks
are very consistent redfish
waters while fishing right up
close to the jetty rocks with
cut mullet on the bottom.
Bull whiting are running
in the surf and in the deep
holes at both Nassau and
Cumberland Sounds. Fish
I=


right on the bottom of a deep
hole with fresh shrimp or in
the breaking surf during the
morning falling tide.
Offshore bottom fishing
this weekend should harbor
excellent red snapper,
grouper and black sea bass
action. A sure bet during late
fall is Schultz' Fish Market,
which is located some five
miles offshore of the south
end of Amelia Island.
Fresh local squid are very
dependable baits for black sea
bass. However, when target-
ing large red snapper and
grouper, fish with live pinfish,
grunts, menhaden or cigar
minnows dead on the bottom.
Stripers are running in the
Supper reaches of the St
Marys and Nassau river sys-
tems during the high falling
tides at the 1-95 bridges,
where they span both popular
striper rivers.

The News-Leader encour-
ages local anglers to submit
photographs of their catches. E-
mail photos to bjones@fbnews
leader.com, mail them to P.O.
Box 766, Fernandina Beach,
FL 32035, or drop them by the
office at 511 Ash St. in Fern-
andina Beach. Call Beth Jones
at 261-3696for more informa-
tion.


OUTDOOR BRIEFS


Bassmastersmeet
Nassau Bassmasters,
associated with the BASS
National Federation and the
Florida BASS Federation,
meets the third Thursday in
Yulee.
Membership is open to
anyone at least 16 years old.
For information on the
Nassau Bassmasters, call
Bob Schlag at (912) 729-2282
or Billy Kittrell at 225-0267.
The club's next tourna-
ment is on the St. Marys
River Dec. 19.

Newboatinglaws
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and other law
enforcement agencies are
alerting Floridians of new
laws and enhancements to
existing laws that deal with
boating under the influence,
boating safety education,
waterway markers, posses-
sion of gasoline on a vessel
and destruction of coral.
The enhanced penalty for
BUI is the same as it is for
driving under the influence.
The blood-alcohol level or
breath-alcohol level of 0.20
that was a violation in the
.past has changed to 0.15.
Beginning Jan. 1, any
boater born on or after Jan.
1, 1988, will be required to
take an approved boating
safety course and possess an
FWC-issued boating safety
identification card. And if
they purchase a boat they
have 90 days from to obtain
a boating safety ID card.
Another prohibited activi-:
ty is placement and use of a
waterway marker that does
not conform to the U.S. Aids
to Navigation System nor
have an FWC permit
It's also unlawful for
boaters to moor to govern-
ment-placed waterway mark-
ers or lawfully placed water-
way markers except in
emergency situations or with
written consent of the mark-
er's owner.
It is illegal to possess or
operate a vessel with non-
conforming or unapproved
gasoline containers or to
transport gasoline in an
unventilated or improperly
ventilated compartment
Laws regarding titling, num-
bering and registration now
'apply to any vessel operated,


used or stored on state
waters except vessels lawful-
ly stored at a dock or mari-
na. Visit MyFWC.com/
Boating for details.

NSFAmeets
The Nassau Sport
Fishing Association meets
the second Wednesday of
each month at 7:30 p.m. and
the fourth Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Ten Acres Kraft
Athletic Club. Membership
is open to the public. Call
261-9481 or visit www.fishns-
fa.com for information on
the NSFA.

Boatcrewtrainees
Boat crew trainees are
being sought by the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary,
Flotilla 14-1, Amelia Island.
Participants must be at least
17 years of age and a U.S.
citizen.
Crew training consists of
shore-side and on-the-water
activities aimed at teaching
new volunteers the neces-
sary theory and practical
skills required to become a
fully qualified boat crew
member. Training is given
by qualified Coast Guard
Auxiliary and active duty
instructors on Coast Guard
Auxiliary vessels.
Successful completion of
the Boat Crew training per-
mits the auxiliarist to crew
any U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary boat within their
district and the potential to
serve on board many differ-
ent U.S. Coast Guard ves-
sels. Crew qualified auxil-
iarists may also advance to
the highest on-water qualifi-
cation of coxswain, the small
boat skipper. This course
includes heavy weather sea-
manship, advanced boat han-
dling, advanced navigation,
search and rescue and
advanced towing. Successful
completion of the coxswain
training permits the auxil-
iary member to skipper any
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
boat within their district
STraining for both the
crew and coxswain positions
is free. Certain uniforms and
safety equipment are
required and not reim-
bursed, but may be tax-
deductible. For information,
call 261-1889 or visit
http://Cgaux7-14-1.org.


RECREATION ROUNDUP


The city of Fernandina Beach Recreation
Department (city website www.fbfl.us) offers
the following:
* Adult volleyball is from 7-9 p.m. Tuesday
and Fridays at Peck Gym. Cost is $1 per day
for city residents ($3 non-city).
* Register for adult basketball from Dec. 14
through Feb. 5 at the Atlantic Avenue Recrea-
tion Center. New 20 plus-game season format
replaces two separate seasons. End-of-season
tournament and all-star game included. Games
will be played Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday nights at Peck Gym beginning Feb.
15. Team fee is $600. Call Jay at 277-7350,
ext. 2013, or e-mail jrobertson@fbfl.org.
* Open basketball is Mondays and Wednes-
days from 11 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., Thursdays
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays and Sun-
days from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at PeckGym.
* Peck Gym weight room is open from 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sundays.
Cost is $2 a day or $25 a month for city resi-
dents ($5 a day or $30 non-city). Personal
training is available. Fee is $30 per session,
$75 per week (three sessions) or $200 a
month (two sessions per week for four weeks).
Monthly packages come with dietary analysis
and food program. Call Jay at 277-7364 for a
free introductory appointment.
* Fitness classes at Peck Gym are
Monday and Wednesdays from 6-7 p.m.
Each class is a full body workout with resist-
ance bands, light dumbbells and more. All lev-
els welcome. Fee is $3 a class. Call Jay at
277-7364 or e-mail jrobertson@fbfl.org.


* Swim/snorkel with the manatees in Crystal
River Dec. 21. Open to families, adults and
children ages 10 and up. Depart from the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center at 5 a.m.
and return at 6 p.m. Registration fee is $50 and
includes manatee experience, transportation
and snorkeling gear if needed. Register at the
Atlantic Center. Call Kathy Russell at 277-7350
or e-mail krussell@fbfl.org.
* Berke's Tennis junior clinics are offered at
Central Park on Tuesdays and Thursdays with
instructor Jason Berke. Beginner (ages 5-7)
from 2:30-3:30 p.m.; $10 per hour for city resi-
dents, $12 non-city. Intermediate (ages 7-12)
from 3:30-4:30 p.m.; $10 per hour for city resi-
dents, $12 non-city. Advanced (ages 12-17)
from 4:30-6 p.m.; $15 per session for city resi-
dents, $17 non-city. Maximum of six students
per court for junior clinics. Also, private lessons
are scheduled on availability (recommended
for competitive junior tournament players). Call
Berke at 556-9304 or visit www.berkes tennis.
com. Register for classes at the Atlantic
Center.
* Berke's Tennis adult clinics are offered at
Central Park Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday with instructor Jason Berke. Beginner
clinics on Mondays at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Intermediate clinics on Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Advanced clinics on Fridays at 10
a.m. and 6 p.m. Cost is $12 per hour for city
residents, $14 non-city. Private lessons avail-
able (recommended for competitive tourna-
ment and league players). Customized clinics
for league teams and hitting sessions also
offered. Call Berke at 556-9304 or visit


www.berkestennis.com. Register for classes at
the Atlantic Center.
* Coming soon: Berke's Tennis Sundry
Shop at the Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center,
featuring tennis racquets, bags, apparel, grips,
stringing and more.
* Check out Central Park tennis court keys
at Atlantic Center ($5 deposit, refundable if
returned within a year).
* Coed exercise is from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at the MLK Center.
Fee is $2 per class (city), $3 (non-city).
* Annual skate park decals are available
free of charge to families who qualify for free or


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FRIDAY, November 27.2009 NEWS News-Leader


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CROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2009
NEWS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


B SECTION


-I- - - - - - - - -- - -




The 5 zeydes hike again,


(And discover nationalparks can be wild)

MARVIN PERLMAN
For the News-Leader

This year it was hiking the Grand Tetons of Wyoming, with two side trips to Yellowstone :
National Park. The "five zeydes" (grandfathers) were at it again - challenging the wilds of
nature (national parks can be wild) and our health, if not survival. For last year's adventure,
we zeydes hiked the Dolly Sods area of the Monongahela National Forest of West Virginia,
and the year before, we hiked across the Grand Canyon, south rim to north rim. Let -- - -
others surrender to age and suffer from nature deficit disorder, not us.


, Five grizzlies (Burt Bright of Fernandina
Beach and his friends David Shapiro, Eric
Mendelsohn, Larry Lessin and myself) who
began their bonding during the Roosevelt and
Truman administrations, who have survived
the turbulence of life, who among them have
experienced medical problems from cancer to
hair loss, packed their hiking boots, backpacks,
hiking poles, Camelbacks, cold and warm
weather clothes and, yes, medications, and then
by airplane (Eric by SUV) gathered at Jackson
Hole, Wyo., on Sept. 3,
Our adventure began by checking into the
49er Inn and Suites Motel, watching the town's
reenactment of a Wild West shootout, having
beer and ale at the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar,
eating dinner at the Sweetwater Caf6, begin-
ning to acclimate to the higher elevation (6,237
feet) and sharing the anticipation of the chal-
lenges to come.
Friday, before leaving Jackson Hole, we rode
the Teton Village Tram (for skiers in winter) to
Rendezvous Peak (where cell phones worked!)
for a view of the vast valley and surrounding
mountains. Afterwards we drove north, stop-
ping at Jenny Lake and along the way saw our
first wildlife, a coyote, about 100 feet off the
highway. We checked into Signal Mountain
Lodge and slept the next eight nights in a 14 by
30 foot log cabin with one bathroom (one bath-
room for five old prostates!). Our toilet needs
were supplemented at the nearby lodge and
restaurant. Nobody shaved all week (no change
for Eric and Larry). It was crowded. We man-
aged. From the front porch we could see Lake
Jackson across the road, beyond a few cabins
by the lake.
Saturday, from'Colter Bay Village, we.set out
Son our first hike, a mostly flat 8.8 mile loop past
Hermitage Point, mostly along Lake Jackson
(elevation 6,772 feet) and bordered on the other
side by the tall snow-patched and glaciated
Grand Teton mountains. Unlike our hike across
the Grand Canyon, the morning temperature
when we started was cool (mid 30s), and
instead of massive rock with limited vegetation,
the trail passed through dense forest. The high-
light was sighting a cow moose standing in
Swan Lake eating lily pads, her calf nearby. We
kept our distance, knowing a 1,000-plus pound
beast with calf could be aggressive. At the end
of the day, still adjusting to the elevation, we
were tired.
Sunday's hike was shorter but more vertical,
three miles to an elevation 1,000 feet above the
valley, to Signal Mountain Summit. Of course,
the return was another three miles back down.
David, who is certainly strong, dropped out on
the way up. After dumping his backpack in the
cabin, he rented a kayak and paddled out to the
island in the middle of the lake - not a bad sub-
stitute for huffing and puffing uphill. This trail,


like the others, was a manmade ribbon rough
cut through the forest. The surface often
included rocks and boulders we had to maneu-
ver over and around. Scat was deposited often
along the path, indicating that wildlife frequent-
ed the same trails as people. There was no need
to leave any trail, and we didn't, but Larry
brought a GPS anyway.
The forest was surprisingly quiet. Rarely did
we hear a bird speak. Even the chubby chicken-
like blue grouse running along the ground
were silent. The trees were mostly pine. Some
were dead from attacks by pine bark beetles
and various diseases, maybe some from fires
(similar dead trees were seen on other hikes).
Larry pointed out that some of the logs on the
ground showed claw marks from bears digging
for grubs. Leaves on Aspen trees oscillated ran-
domly, revealing a gentle breeze. Frequent
views of the vast valley below showed large
patches of pine forests and occasional lakes.
The aptly named Snake River meandered
through the middle of the valley. At the top, we
found spectacular views of the valley and sur-
rounding mountains, I believe some of the best
in the area. Some of us were surprised to dis-
cover that tourists had reached the top by car.
Later in the week Eric and Burt drove David up
for the views.
Monday was a needed day off from hiking,
which we used to explore Yellowstone National
Park and other sights to the north. For the first
time, some of us saw Old Faithful do her thing
and saw other geysers, too. We stopped at
Lewis Falls and Yellowstone Lake. We walked
around West Thumb Geyser Basin, watching
steam bubbling from the Earth. Burt regularly
started conversations with strangers (couple or
group) by offering to take their pholo with their
camera, so they could all be in the picture. We
lunched at the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone.
Later we also visited the Indian Art Museum
at Colter Bay, where a guide with Native
American Indian heritage gave us an outstand-
ing lecture with personal stories of learning
from his grandfather (I don't think he called
him "zeyde"). Afterwards, we watched a docu-
mentary on wolves being reintroduced into
Yellowstone Park, showing their competitive
social dynamics and how well they cared for
their young. Ranchers are not delighted and
shoot wolves that wander out of the park
because of their threat to livestock.
. **-*
Tuesday, breakfast was at John Colter's
Restaurant Ranch House-Bar. We returned
there a number of times during the week, espe-
cially for the "healthy breakfast." This day's
hike would be the toughest. David wisely hired
a guide and went fly-fishing on the Snake River
(inhabited by trout: rainbow, cutthroat and
brown). The hike began at the Lupine


The "five
Szeydes" -
Larry Lessin,
Dave Shapiro,
.. Marvin
Perlman, Burt
Bright and
Eric
Mendelsohn -
challenge the
wilds of
nature on a
trip to the
Grand Tetons
of Wyoming
this summer.
SUBMITtED PHOTOS


Eric pointed to the steep terrain across the lake where, at age
20. he lost his footing after climbing Disappointment Peak and
bounced and slid down until some big rocks knocked him out
and broke hisfall and a few teeth. Ah. nostalgia!


ZEYDES Continued on 2B


OFrONAT ND


PAgJA PARTY --
The Annual Pajama Party
Sale & Contest will be held
in downtown Fernandina
Beach starting at 8 a.m.
today. Shoppers are invited
to don their pajamas to
enjoy special deals and dis-
counts at shops and eateries,
along with fresh juice, coffee
and pastries. Enter the con-
test for "Best Dressed
Individual Shopper in Pajamas" and "Best
Dressed Shopping Group in Pajamas."
Participants must have their free photo taken at
the judges' booth in the 100 block of Centre Street
before 11 a.m. For more information, visit
www.downtownfernandina.com, e-mail
slpricebellsouth.net or call 206-0756.

TREE LIGHTING
A:A full day of entertain-
ment leads up to the city of
Fernandina Beach
Christmas tree lighting Nov.
28 at 6 p.m. at the foot of
Centre Street.
. iiSlrlilng at noon, carolers.


choirs, dancers and singers will entertain visitors.
Santa Claus will arrive at 2 p.m. at the Fernandina
Harbor Marina aboard the Ye Olde Pirate charter
boat. Santa and Mrs. Claus will meet and take pic-
tures until 5 p.m. at the depot. Photos with pets
will also be available.
The event is hosted by the city of Fernandina
Beach, Historic Fernandina Business Association
and Shiny Badges Ball, Inc. Contact Sandy Price
at 206-0756 or e-mail slprice�bellsouth.net.

AIDS DAY BANQUET
The Coalition for the
Reduction/Elimination
of Ethnic Disparities in
Health (CREED) will host ,,b ,
its second annual Board
of Directors World AIDS
Day Banquet Dec. 1 from 6-9 p.m.
at St. Peter's Episcopal Church. 801 Atlantic Ave.,
Fernandina Beach.
The speaker is Rod L. Brown, prevention
training consultant with the Florida Department
of Health Area 4 AIDS Program Office. Donation
is $35.
This year's theme is "Universal Access and
Human Rights: Care and Support - Access for
All." It provides an opportunity to address
HIV/AIDS disparities, stigma and blame, and


spark dialogue about stopping the spread of
HIV/AIDS among all populations.
For more information contact Betty
Drummond-Wilson, RN, BSN, at 261-5100 or
Jennett Wilson-Baker, RN. BSN, at 556-3363.

PARADE OF PAWS
Redbores Dog Bakery
and Boutique will host its
10th Annual "Parade of
Paws" Dec. 5.
Pre-register now at
Redbones. Late registration
will begin on-site at 10 a.m.
in the Citizens Bank park-
ing lot, Eighth and Centre
streets. Minimum donation is $10 and all pro-
ceeds benefit the Nassau Humane Society.
Lineup begins at 10:30 a.m. and the parade starts
at 11 a.m. Prizes and trophies will be awarded for
best holiday outfit, the dog that most looks like its
owner, and cutest personality. After the parade at
Redbones enjoy free doggie treats, pictures and
special guest, chocolatier Kendall Taylor, who will
sell her home-made candies with sales donated to
the Nassau Humane Society. Fairy Tails Mobile
Grooming will offer free nail trimming and
touchups. Visit www.redbonesbakery.com or call
321-0020.


If IKim.,










FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 27.2009 LEISURE News-Leader


Kinderstudios
The dance students of
Kinderstudios, located at 1897
Island Walk Way, will perform
Nov. 28 at 5:30 p.m. at the
lighting of the Christmas tree
in downtown Fernandina
Beach; and Dec. 12 at 5 p.m.
during the lighted holiday
parade.
Santa Claus will visit
Kinderstudios on Dec. 12
from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Students
will enjoy hot chocolate, cook-
ies and a gifts exchange. For
information e-mail Alexandra
Carroll at Alexandra.kinder-
musik@comcast.net.
Light Up a fe
Take Stock in Children
presents Light Up A Life from
6-9 p.m. Dec. 3 at the Amelia
Inn Conference Center on
Amelia Island Plantation.
Enjoy an evening of fine wine,
a buffet and silent auction.
Advance tickets are $50 and
available at First Coast
Community Bank, the News-
Leader, Nassau County
Record, Caf6 Karibo, Resort
to Home and the Ocean
Clubhouse at Amelia Island
Plantation. Or charge by
phone at 548-4432 (Florida
State College). Tickets will be
$60 at the door.
Holiday music
The Amelia Community
Theatre Guild presents "An
Evenifig of Holiday Music"
Dec. 3 and 4 at 8 p.m. at 209
Cedar St.
Music will be performed
by the "Sine Nomine Choir"
under the direction of Jill
Dillingham, Nanette Autry
and Mary Williams. Ron
Kurtz and Judy Tipton will
perform a reading of Truman
Capote's A Christmas
Memory. Holiday refresh-
ments will be served. Tickets
are $15 for adults and $10 for
students. Call 261-6749 for
reservations.
Holiday Follies
Tickets are on sale for
"Holiday Follies," a seasonal
potpourri of stories and songs
by Fernandina Little Theatre.
Performances are Dec. 4 and
5 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 6 at
2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 and a
donation of canned goods for
the needy.
Tickets can be purchased
at The UPS Store in the
Publix shopping center and at
FLT, 1014 Beech St.
Courtyard Nights
The next Courtyard
Nights at the Florida State
College Betty P Cook Nassau
Center is at 7 p.m. Dec. 4, fea-
turing the Nassau County
Holiday Music and Fine Arts
Festival. Performing will be
the Yulee Primary Dolphin
Singers, Yulee Middle School
Chorus, Yulee Elementary
Panther Singers, Yulee
Middle Drama Team and


Callahan Intermediate
Chorus and Mallet Masters.
Bring a can of food for the
Barnabas Center and be eligi-
ble for a door prize.
The Courtyard Nights
Series is free and open to the
public. Light refreshments
will be available but individu-
als may bring their own. No
alcohol allowed. Lawn chairs
are encouraged.
Performances will be in the
Lewis "Red" Bean Technical
Center. Call 548-4432.
Christmas Glow
The Annual Christmas
Glow sponsored by the
Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach will be held Dec. 4
from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at the
Woman's Club Clubhouse at
201 Jean Lafitte Blvd. (behind
the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center). Just fol-
low the luminaries to the
clubhouse. There will be face
painting, entertainment and
visits with Santa. Chili, hot
dogs, chips and colas will be
served for a fee. Cookies and
punch will be free. This is the
Woman's Club's gift to the
community. All ages are invit-
ed. Call 261-4885.
Craft show
The 14th Annual
Christmas Craft Show is from
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 5 in the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center's main auditorium.
There will be Christmas gift,
ornaments, wreaths and
other handmade crafts.
Admission is free. Call 716-
7668.
Petphotos
The annual Pet Photos
with Santa is Dec. 5 starting
at 10 a.m. at Bark Avenue Pet
Boutique, 97 Amelia Village
Circle. Cost is $20 per photo
and appointments are
required.
Photographer Holly Allain
is donating her time.
Proceeds benefit Project
Chance, which supplies guide.
dogs to children with autism
in Northeast Florida. To
schedule an appointment, call
the store at 261-2275.
Holidayclasses
The Learning Community
of North Florida classes for
the holidays include: Holiday
Wreaths and Garlands - Dec.
5, 11 a.m.; Holiday Party
Appetizers - Dec. 5, 1:30 p.m,;
Holiday Brunch - Dec. 6, 11
a.m.; Holiday Wine and
Cheese Party - Dec. 9, 3:30
p.m.; Gourmet Dipped Apples
- Dec. 9, 6 p.m.; Easy Edible
Holiday Gifts - Dec. 12, 11
a.m.; Holiday Pies and Cakes
- Dec. 13, 11 a.m.; Holiday
Candle Making - Dec. 10, 3
p.m.; Christmas Cookies -
Dec. 19, 1 p.m.; Holiday Pet
Treats - Dec. 19, 3:30 p.m.
For information or to register,
visit www.tlcnf.com or call
(904) 430-0120


HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS


Fort Clinch holiday
Fort Clinch State Park
Union Holiday Encampment
Dec. 5-6 will feature re-enac-
tors decorating the fort for
Christmas. Volunteers in Civil
War-era costumes place fresh
greenery on the mantle, deco-
rate a period Christmas tree
and portray daily life as it was
in the winter of 1864.
The ladies string berries
and popcorn while fires burn
in the fireplaces and soldiers
answer questions about what
it is like to be stationed at
Fort Clinch.
The event is from 9 a.m.-5
p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m.-
noon on Sunday. Call 277-
7274, or visit www.floridas-
tateparks.org/fortclinch.
Holidaytea
Enjoy a Holiday Tea and
the reading of Dylan Thomas'
A Child's Christmas in Wales
Dec. 8 at 3:30 p.m. at Eliza-
beth Pointe Lodge on South
Fletcher Avenue.
Tickets are $25 for Friends
of the Library and $30 for
non-members and available at
the Fernandina Beach library.
Ticket includes tea and a
copy of the book.
HolidayPops
ARIAS (Amelia Residents
In Action for the Symphony)
is sponsoring its annual
Holiday Pops Concert pack-
age on Dec. 11. The evening
starts with dinner at the
Ocean Clubhouse on the
Amelia Island Plantation, fol-
lowed by roundtrip bus trans-
portation to Jacoby Sympho-
ny Hall in the Times-Union
Center for the concert. If you
do not already have tickets,
they can be ordered as part of
the package. The orchestra,
joined by the Jacksonville
Symphony Chorus and the
Jacksonville Children's
Chorus, performs wonderful
melodies with symphonic
yuletide favorites. For reser-


nations call the Ocean


vations call the Ocean
Clubhouse at 321-5099.

'Christmas
Homecoming
The community is invited
to experience "A 1940's
Christmas Homecoming"
Dec. 11 and 13 at 7 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church.
This is a musical drama
about love and sacrifice set in
wartime 1940's and filled with
upbeat, Big Band arrange-
ments bringing the period
fully to life along with carols
that depict the true meaning
of Christmas.
At the end of the program
active and inactive military
personnel will be honored,
with special recognition of
war veterans.
The performance includes
a 7-member drama cast and
45 singers from five area
churches accompanied by a
13-piece 1940's Big Band.
Admission is free.
Childcare for infants to age 4
is available with reservations.
Call the church office at 261-
9527. Amelia Baptist Church
is located at 961167
Buccaneer Trail.
Paws and Caus
The Nassau Humane
Society will host pet photos
with Santa Dec. 12 from 11
a.m.-2 p.m. on the front porch
of the Dog Park, across from
the city airport. Cost is $8 per
photo and proceeds benefit
the animals at the Humane
Society and its programs.
Lighted parades
The Lighted Holiday Land
Parade & Fernandina Harbor
Marina Holiday Lighted Boat
Parade will be held Dec. 12
beginning at 6 p.m.
The parade along Centre
Street is presented by
America's Youth. Parade
applications are available at
the Northeast Florida Com-
munity Action Agency at the


Peck Center and at the Cham-
ber of Commerce at Gateway
Boulevard in Fernandina
Beach. Entry is free.
The Fernandina Harbor
Marina Holiday Lighted Boat
Parade will follow the land
parade, presented by the
Historic Fernandina Business
Association, beginning in the
harbor at the foot of Centre
and Ash streets. Bring your
chairs and blankets to view
the,parade downtown, then
move to the boardwalk at the
marina to see the lighted
boats.
For information about the
boat parade contact Sandy
Price at 206-0756 or e-mail
slprice@bellsouth.net.

YuleeHoliday
Festival
The 5th Annual Yulee
Holiday Festival and Parade
will be held at the Yulee
Sports Complex on
Goodbread Drive in Yulee on
Saturday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.4
p.m. The parade will begin at
10 a.m., with the theme
'Through a Child's Eyes,"
followed by a festival offering
food, art and craft vendors,
live music and entertainment
for all ages. Pictures will be
taken with Santa in the
Winter Wonderland through-
out the day.
If you are interested in
participating in the parade or
providing entertainment, call
Connie at 225-2516. To
reserve a booth, call Julie at
225-5237.
'Paws for a Cause'
River City Community
Animal Hospital (RCCAH), a
501 (c) (3) non-profit mobile
veterinary clinic, will host a
fundraising festival Dec. 12 at
the Howard Gilman Memorial
Park in St. Marys, Ga.
The "Paws for a Cause,
Holiday Pet Walk-a-thon and
Festival" is from 11 a.m.-6
p.m. and will feature a chil-


dren's area with a jump
house, baked goods and bev-
erages for a donation, many
animal-related organizations
and a special demonstration
from the Kingsland, Ga., K9
unit, among other activities.
RCCAH also will offer
microchips for $25, which
includes the lifetime registra-
tion fee. A walk-a-thon for
pets and/or their owners
begins at 4 p.m. Registration
forms are available for down-
load at www.rccah.org. Visit
the website for more informa-
tion.
Chem Cell dinner
The Chem Cell Club
Christmas dinner will be held
Dec. 12 at 6 p.m. Members
and their immediate families
are welcome.

'Christmas
Spectacular'
Kinderstudios presents its
fourth annual "Christmas
Spectacular" musical produc-
tion for the community on
Dec. 19 at the Fernandina
Beach Middle School audito-
rium. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
,Tickets are $5.
For information e-mail
Alexandra Carroll at
Alexandra.kindermusik
@comcastnet. Kinderstudios
is located at 1897 Island Walk
Way, Fernandina Beach.
NewYear's party
Sheffield's at the Palace,
117 Centre St., will host a
New Year's Eve party Dec. 31
with Impacto Latino playing a
variety of Latin music.
Tickets are $30 per person
or $50 a couple and include a
tapas-style buffet, party favors
and a champagne toast.
Reserved table packages start
at $200 and VIP packages for
10 are $90 per person.
Packages require reserva-
tions.
Call Bill Childers, general
manager, at 491-3332.


HOLIDAY HELPERS


Sounds of Christmas
Bell ringing for The
Salvation Army Hope House
has begun. Organizers still
need bell ringers both on the
island and in Yulee. If you,
your club, group or ministry
can donate just two hours of
your time, the Salvation Army
needs you. Call Mary Moore
or Susan Lane at 321-0435 to
schedule.
Stress relief
The Council on Aging has
partnered with Maria
Murphy, a licensed mental
health counselor, to present
"Holiday Stress Relief for
Caregivers" Dec. 3 from 1:30-
3:30 p.m. at the Fernandina
Beach Senior Center (across
from Baptist Medical Center
Nassau). Free adult day care
available with pre-registra-
tion. For information or to
register, call Debra Domb-
kowski at 261-0701, ext. 113
or Maria Murphy at 261-7022.
Toy drive
Maurices at The Shoppes
at Amelia Concourse, 463721
SR 200, Yulee, is holding a toy
drive to benefit Toys for Tots
through Dec. 10. Drop off
donations Monday-Saturday,
9 a.m.-10 p.m., and Sunday
noon-7 p.m. Donors will
receive a coupon for 20 per-
cent off one regular-priced
item for each donation, limit
10 per person.
ShopWith Cops
The Fernandina Beach
Shop With Cops program will
be held Dec. 16 for needy
children ages 1-11 to shop
with a city police officer at
Wal-Mart in Fernandina
Beach. The program hopes to
serve 150 youngsters, at $100


per child. Send contributions
to Capt. Jim Coe, "Shop With
Cops Program," 1525 Lime
St., Fernandina Beach, FL
32035-0668. All donations are
tax deductible. Contact volun-
teer program chairman Don
Monahan at shopwithcops@
aol.com or 277-2091.
Giftoflife
Support the TLC
Pregnancy Center during a
Christmas fundraiser Dec. 18
as 12 local businesses make a
donation from that day's busi-
ness to the center. They are:
Chick-fil-A; Janet's Salon;
Hooked On Facials; Cindy's
Nail and Hair Salon; Changes
Salon; Deena Classic Salon;
Amelia Massage Associates,
Inc.; The New U; Island Hair
Co.; Robison Jewelry Co.;
Beech Street Grill; and
American Flooring.
TLC Pregnancy Center is a
501(c)3 not-for-profit, tax-
exempt organization.
Secret Santas
Dayspring Village, Inc., a
licensed 94-bed limited men-
tal health assisted living facili-
ty in Hilliard serving adults
with schizophrenia, needs
help with its "Secret Santa"
program that provides its resi-
dents with Christmas gifts.
Contact Denise Cumbus at
Dayspring Village at (904)
845-7501 or e-mail
dayspring06@windstream.net
for a list of one or more resi-
dents and their needs and
then have the gift wrapped
and back to the facility by
Dec. 23.
Donations of baked goods,
time or talents, such as music,
also are always appreciated
and help brighten the holiday
season. Also visit www.day
springvillage.org.


HO&E
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-"Ii-
--" 5. -th S-re.t.Ph ,- G rifi
jCOMMECIAL-(04)o26-27707


608 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FI 32034
www.ACRFL.com


Phil Griffin
Broker
phll@acrfl.com


(904) 261-2770
COMMERCIAL * INVESTMENT * LEASING * SALES



"I ', I;I I


F f




Anne Friend
Realtor'
(904) 415-1558
affriend@ahellsouth.net


Ameli ty
961687 Gatenay Boulevard - Suie IOIA
Amelia Island, FL 32034
904-261-6116- 1-800-940-6116
website: www.ameliarealtyinc.om


Kon PraImquist
Realtor1
(904) 206-1945
r mI~qdisnh wA wtn


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This 3 BR/2 BA home on a large lot would make a perfect home
for the boater/fisherman. Just a few minutes to the
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A . 'k ler, OmIer
lyHH .t mrclld lm
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Aml LA +;A <.'';


Tea Party
As part of the Third
Annual Amelia Island
Museum of History's
Holiday Home Tour,
guests are invited to enjoy
the tradition of afternoon
tea at the Bailey House,
which will be offered at 2,
3 and 4 p.m. Dec. 4 and
5. With limited seating
available, advance ticket
purchase is recommend-
ed.
Tea tickets are $15 and
available at the Amelia
Island Museum of History
or by calling 261-7378,
ext. 100. Home tour tick-
ets are $25 in advance.
Sampling the sweets
and savories that will be
served are, from left, Judy
Pillans, Victorian Tea co-
chair, Anne Kelly, Holiday
Home Tour co-chair, and
Trish Dooley, Holiday
Home Tour co-chair.
SUBMITrED


... ........




The news-leader
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00491
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach, Fla
Creation Date: November 27, 2009
Publication Date: 1980-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04377055
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00491
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MAGENTA BLACK


F L 0 RIDA'S


OLDEST


WEEKLY N


EWS PAP ER


NEWS)


LEADER


0-AMLA SLN -FRNNDN*BACm YLE NSAUCONY .


FRIDAY November27 2009/22 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom


Olympic gold


HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Barbara Ann Scott, 19, displays her Olympic Gold medal for figure skating awarded at the 1948
Winter Games in St. Moritz, Switzerland, left. Tom and Barbara Scott King, right, will journey to
Ottawa, Canada next month where she will carry the Olympic torch for the 2010 Vancouver Winter
Games.

Canadians still carry torch for local woman


HEATHER A. PERRY
News Leader
You would never guess it to meet her, but 61 years after
she skated to gold in the 1948 Winter Olympics, Barbara
Ann Scott King still has the hearts of millions of Canadians
and that same number of figure skating fans firmly in her
grasp, as evidenced by her being asked to take part in the
Olympic Torch run for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games.
"It makes me feel very humble," said King of her Dec.
13 torch run. "I mean, the fact that at 81 they still remem-
ber me. It's overwhelming."
King and her husband, Tom, have made Amelia Island
their home for 13 years, moving here from Chicago. Next
month they will return to the ice champion's hometown
of Ottawa so she can speed-walk the nearly half-mile,
300-meter portion of the Olympic torch's journey to
Vancouver for the Winter Games.
Dubbed "Canada's Sweetheart," the petite skater first
took to the ice at age seven at the Minto Skating Club.
"We called it 'dear old tin Minto,'" said King. "Because
the building was so old that sometimes when it snowed,
the snow would come through the walls and it was even
colder inside than it was outside."
Practicing eight hours a day, King started racking up
skating credits at age 11 when she claimed the National
Junior title.


At age 13, she became the first female to land a dou-
ble Lutz in competition.
Over the years, King added to her list of honors.
"You talk about Tiger Woods winning four majors in
a year, Barbara Ann won five: Canadian, North American,
European, World and Olympics," said Tom King of his
wife.
King downplays all these records, saying simply, "I was
in the right place at the right time."
She was definitely in the right place at the right time
in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in 1948 when she became the
first and only female Canadian singles competitor to win
a gold medal in figure skating at the Fifth Olympic Winter
Games.
Never one to let silly superstitions or naysayers affect
her performance, King shrugged off the supposed jinx of
a pre-Olympic Time magazine cover and the fact that her
coach had drawn her number 13 in the competition line-
up.
Even the pitted ice that had been ripped up by a prior
hockey game didn't phase King as she skated her way to
a gold medal and into the record books.
Many awards and honors followed that Olympic medal
and King cherishes each and every one, displaying them
with a mixture of humility and pride in her Amelia Island
OLYMPICS Continued on 3A


Advice to kids:'Whatever


you be, be good at it'

MICHAEL PARNELL
News Leader"
Since Carla Harris left her North
Jacksonville home 30 years ago. she .


has become a successful investment
banker - a partner in Morgan Stanley,
no less - and a gospel singer with a
book, two CDs and a Carnegie Hall
concert to her credit.
The "bright, eager optimistic young
woman who wanted to conquer her
world" is now a "-_. ,,.n._d 'pro on top
of it. How did she get there?
She learned, "It is in your power to
define your world and your place in it.
... You have the power, and you can
and should excel."
But all people need others "to rein-
force that.... I had people in my life
who made the investment in me,"
Harris told more than 400 in atten-
dance Nov. 21 at the 3rd Annual
Speakers Forum for the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Nassau County Foundation.
The forum, held in the new Talbot
ballroom of The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island, attracts those who share the
view of Harris that an investment in
children is perhaps the greatest invest-
ment of all. "When that child goes to
touch other lives, and other people,
(there is a) multiplier effect," she told
them.
Harris had people who would
HARRIS Continued on 3A


SUBMITTED
Carla Harris urges children at the Fernandina Beach Boys & Girls
Club on Friday to reach for their maximum potential.


Shoppers 'cautious'



again this holiday


University ofFlorida
GAINESVILLE - Florida's retail-
ers are in for a repeat of last year's
dismal holiday season, with consumers
expecting to spend about the same
amount of money on gifts, a new
University of Florida survey finds.
"People are going to be very cau-
tious about spending because of con-
tinued uncertainty over the economy,
job security and housing values," said
Hyunjoo Oh, research director of the
David E Miller Center for Retailing
Education and Research at UE The
survey was conducted by the center
and UF's Bureau of Economic and
Business Research and based on tele-
phone interviews with 553 Floridians
in October.
Concern over jobs prompted a drop
in Florida's consumer confidence this
month, according to another survey by
the bureau. (Story, 3A)
Surprisingly, consumers are opti-
mistic about their shopping intentions,
with 58 percent of those surveyed say-
ing they plan to spend as much or
more than they did last year, com-
pared with 52 percent who said the
same thing in 2008, Oh said.
But the average amount they pre-
dict spending over the holiday season
- $1,071 - amounts to only $6 more
than the $1,065 they anticipated paying
for presents last year, she said.
The contradiction may be explained
by people being in the mood to splurge
because they spent less last year, Oh
said. "Even though they are willing to
spend, they're going to be very con-
servative by looking for more practical
gifts and trying to find ways to save
money," she said.
Still, retailers may be unprepared
for this year's holiday shoppers
because of slim inventories, which
could cause them to run out of popu-


Plentyto
enjoy
downtown,
1B


lar items, Oh said. Last year retailers
were left with a large amount of unsold
inventory they were forced to liqui-
date, placing some in financial jeop-
ardy, she said.
"In light of consumers' concerns
about the economy, retailers have been
reducing this year's inventories below
the level of 2008, a holiday season that
was the worst retailers experienced
in more than 50 years," she said. "If it
turns out that some products are real-
ly 'hot items' in their appeal to con-
sumers, retailers may not be able to
respond to the demand."
Online retailers may be best off in
these tough economic times because
many shoppers like to search for deals
on the Internet, Oh said. Online retail-
ers have prepared for bargain hunters
by packaging gift ideas for different
budgets, creating and displaying pro-
SHOPPERS Continued on 3A


PHOTOS BY RYAN SMITH/NEWS-LEADER
Commissioner Mike Boyle, left, was named 2010 chair of the com-
mission Monday. Commissioner Walter Boatright was named vice
chair.


County commission


chooses new officers


RYAN SMITH
News Leader
The Nassau County Commission
chose its chair and vice-chair for 2010
on Monday. Current Vice Chair Mike
Boyle will take the gavel from Chair
Barry Holloway next year, and
Commissioner Walter Boatright will
become vice chair.
Commissioner Danny Leeper nom-
inated Boyle and Boatright for the
positions. The commission voted unan-
imously to accept the nominations.
Prior to the vote, however,
Commissioner Stacy Johnson asked
for clarification regarding the roles
and responsibilities of the chair. Boyle
said that while the role isn't merely
ceremonial, the chair has no more leg-
islative authority than the rest of the
board.
"I want to thank Commissioner
Leeper for the nomination and assure


Commissioner Johnson that as far as
I'm concerned, everyone has an equal
voice," he said.
Holloway said that while the chair
has duties in addition to those of the
rest of the commission, he is on an
equal footing with the rest of the
board.
"There's a lot that goes on behind
the scenes, but there's nothing that
takes away any power from us a col-
lective body," he said.
Boatright said he looks forward to
serving as vice chair.
"I appreciate the vote of confi-
dence," he said. "... I hope to do an
outstanding job. Of course, the vice
chair's the one you hope you never
hear from.
"Yeah, but nobody wants to shoot
the vice chair," Holloway joked.
Boyle and Boatright will step into
their new roles in January.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


News-Leader INDEX P Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
155thyearNo 95 CLASSIFIEDS .............................. 4B OBITUARIES ....... ......... 2A A 11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 12/1
Copyright2009 l CROSSWORD/SUDOKU.....2B OUT AND ABOUT ............ 2B ,
The News-Leader ,e EDITORIAL .................................. 7A SCHOOLS ............................................... 10A . L% - -._" '""
Fernandina Beach. FL FISHING ................... 14A SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B , "
1 84264 0001 3 Printed on 00 recycled LEISURE ....................................... IB SPORTS .................................................... 13A 2 62/411 63/46 70/56 71/55 68/52
1 8 426400 3 newsprint with soy based ink


i







FRIDAY, November 27, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


es was estimated at $30 mil-
lion following a
Thanksgiving storm.
November 28, 1984


10 YEARS AGO

Hilliard became the site
of the county's first shooting
fatality of the year.
December 1, 1999


Today's Weather


Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 12/1


62/41
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
low 40s.


Sunrise:
7:03 AM
Sunset:
5:25 PM


63/46
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
mid 40s.


Sunrise:
7:04 AM
Sunset:
5:25 PM


70/56
Mix of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 70s and
lows in the
mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:04 AM
Sunset:
5:25 PM


Florida At A Glance


p


71/55
Cloudy
Highs in the
low 70s and
lows in the
mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:05 AM
Sunset:
5:25 PM


68/52
Showers
possible.
Highs in the
upper 60s
and lows in
the low 50s.


Sunrise:
7'06 AM
Sunset:
5:25 PM


I'-,
/


Area Cities


Clearwater 63
Crestview 60
Daytona Beach 64
Fort Lauderdale 71
Fort Myers 70
Gainesville 64
Hollywood 71
Jacksonville 63
Key West 70
Lady Lake 65
Lake City 62
Madison 62
Melbourne 66
Miami 70
N Smyrna Beach 64


mst sunny
mst sunny
sunny
mst sunny
sunny
sunny
mst sunny
sunny
windy
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
mnstsunny
sunny


Ocala 66
Orlando 65
Panama City 62
Pensacola 61
Plant City 67
Pompano Beach 72
Port Charlotte 68
Saint Augustine 62
Saint Petersburg 63
Sarasota 66
Tallahassee 63
Tampa 65
Titusville 65
Venice 67
W Palm Beach 70


39 sunny
43 sunny
43 mst sunny
44 mst sunny
43 mst sunny
54 mstsunny
46 sunny
43 sunny
51 mnstsunny
47 mnstsunny
37 mst sunny
45 mstsunny
44 sunny
47 mst sunny
52 sunny


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


32 sunny
39 rain
32 pt sunny
48 cloudy
33 sunny
51 cloudy
47 pt sunny
55 mst sunny


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis


29 pt sunny
41 rain
49 mst sunny
39 rain
40 rain
39 sunny


Washington, DC 51 38 rain


Moon Phases






First Full Last New
Nov 24 Dec 2 Dec 9 Dec 16
UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 12/1
4 4 I 4 3 | 4
Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 0 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
�2009 American Profile Hometowvn Content Service


NEWS

LEADER


511 Ash Street,
Femandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax261-3698
Website for email addresses
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............. . . .$36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ............. $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
CNI Comrmuity
Newspapers,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


LOOKING BACK


-- -
-. - ____


S


50 YEARS AGO

The Hibiscus Garden
Club announced it would
once again sponsor the
Fernandina Beach Outdoor
Christmas Lighting Contest.
November 26, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

Damage to island beach-


Manage diabetes while holiday shopping


Today is Black Friday, the start of the
"shop 'til you drop" season. But for the
24 million Americans living with dia-
betes, it is critical to plan beyond getting
the best sale to ensure diabetes doesn't
interfere with holiday shopping.
Marc Wolf, registered pharmacist and
CEO of Diabetic Care Services
(www.DiabeticCareServices.com), pro-
vides the following tips to help people
with diabetes prepare for the holiday
shopping season.
1. Dress for success. Crowded
parking lots and long lines are a given
when holiday shopping. It is important to
wear comfortable, supportive closed-toe
shoes and special diabetic socks to pro-
tect feet.
Also, be sure to give careful consider-
ation to how you will carry extra dia-
betes testing supplies and medications.
With numerous shopping bags to tote
during an extended shopping trip, con-
sider storing supplies in a purse or
satchel with a long strap that you can
sling over across your chest. Securing
your bag this way will help you avoid set-
ting it down at a cash register and acci-
dentally leaving it behind.


A= ,


A: ""


2. Arm yourself to
battle lows. In addi-
tion to diabetes test-
ing supplies and med-
ications, pack several
healthy snacks that
are proven to quickly
battle low blood glu-


cose levels. If you feel a low coming on
while in a store that does not allow food
or drink, products like Glucose
RapidSpray deliver glucose in spray form
that is quickly absorbed.
3. Make a list - and check it twice!
Cut down on the time and energy spent
holiday shopping by preparing a list of
items before leaving the house. To shave
even more time off your trip, comparison
shop online to determine which stores
have the prices and selections you want.
4. Balance is key. Before embarking
on a shopping trip, eat a balanced meal
that includes protein and fat. Protein and
fat help balance energy and prevent low
blood sugar.
5. Multi-task. When shopping for
friends or family members that also have
diabetes, shop for gifts and for yourself
at the same time. Online diabetes suppli-


Holiday sweep



targets pet stores

TALLAHASSEE - Florida said. For example, some
Agriculture and Consumer breeds of dogs may be less
Services Commissioner appropriate if there are infants
Charles H. Bronson said his or young children in a home.
department is conducting a Likewise, consumers may
sweep of pet stores during the want to think twice before pur-
next five weeks to ensure that chasing a large animal if they
such establishments are com- live in a small dwelling.
plying with regulations that Bronson offered the fol-
protect consumers in the pur- lowing tips to consumers who
chase of pets. are considering or planning to
I'. i , bring a great deal of purchase a dog or cat:
joy to families and are often a * Don't buy on impulse.
considerable investment," Research the size and breed of
Bronson said. "So it's impor- the animal for suitability with
tant to do business with a rep- your lifestyle and circum-
utable pet store or dealer who stance.
knows and follows the law to * Examine the health cer-
avoid problems after a pur- tificate that is required to be
chase of an animal." presented upon sale for com-
Toward that end, inspec- pleteness and compliance with
tors are visiting numerous pet the law.
stores and pet dealers between * If there is a problem with
now and Jan. 1 to make sure your pet after purchase, con-
that a store or dealer is com- tact the seller immediately.
plying with Florida Statute The department's Division
828.29, a law that imposes cer- of Animal Industry assists con-
tain obligations on sellers and sumers, veterinarians and pet
offers recourse to consumers dealers in educating them
in the event problems arise, about the pet law and making
Under the law, dogs and sure that its provisions are fol-
cats must be at least eight lowed. For additional infor-
weeks of age when sold or mation or to file a complaint,
offered for sale, and each ani- consumers can call 1-800-
mal must be accompanied by HELPFLA (1-800-435-7352) or
a Florida health certificate (850) 410-0900. During the last
signed by a licensed and four years, consumers who
accredited veterinarian with- have sought assistance from
in the past 30 days document- Bronson's office for alleged
ing required vaccinations, tests violations of the law have
and treatments for internal or received restitution totaling
external parasites. about $80,000.
In addition, the law requir- Editor's note: Before pur-
es a dealer to provide a pur- chasing a pet, consider adopting
chaser with information on the one of the hundreds ofhomeless
buyer's rights under the law, animals available at local shel-
which includes the right to ters. Agencies in Nassau County
return, exchange or receive include: Nassau CountyAnimal
reimbursement for veterinary Care and Control in Yulee, 491-
expenses if an animal is deem- 7440; the Nassau Humane
ed unfit by a licensed veteri- Society in Fernandina Beach,
narian within 14 days of pur- 321-1647; Cats Angels Inc.,
chase. SPCA, 321-2267; STARS of
Aside from making sure Amelia, www.starsofamelia.org;
that a dealer is complying with Rescuing Animals in Nassau
the law, consumers should also Humane Society (RAIN),
consider suitability when pur- (904) 879-5861; and 8 C's Big
chasing an animal, Bronson DogRescue, (904) 716-0309.


8&5 Monuments
960185 Gateway Blvd., Suite 101
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904) 277-2742
Largest Selection In-Stock * Engraving Done On-Site


ers and pharmacies like Diabetic
Express, www.DiabeticExpress.com, sell
items that make great holiday gifts,
including fashion-forward diabetes sup-
ply cases and the latest meters.
6. Relax. According to the American
Diabetes Association, stress hormones
can directly alter blood glucose levels.
Incorporate small tasks into your shop-
ping routine that make the process less
stressful, including:
* Read advertisements carefully to
ensure you understand limitations on
special deals.
* Only use cash to avoid spending
more than you should.
* Always ask for a gift receipt.
* Schedule shopping trips at the
beginning of the week and later in the
day, when stores are less crowded.
Diabetic Care Services, headquartered
in Cleveland, Ohio, is one of the nation's
leading mail order durable medical equip-
ment suppliers dedicated exclusively to dia-
betes supplies and prescription medica-
tions for both Medicare and private
insurance customers. For more informa-
tion, call 1-800-633-7167 or visit
www.DiabeticCareServices.com.


OBITUARIES


Joey Sorrells
Mr. Joey Sorrells, age 53, of
Fernandina Beach, FL passed
away on Monday afternoon,
November 23, 2009 after a
valiant fight with cancer and
related complications.
Born in Covington, Georgia,
he was the son of the late Billy
Charles and Peggy Latish Mills
Sorrells. Growing up in
Covington, he was a graduate of
Newton County High School,
Class of 1974.
Joey lived in the Southeast
his entire life, he moved to
Fernandina Beach approxi-
mately twenty years ago. He
was successful and hardwork-
ing in Sales, various business
ventures and as an investor
throughout his career. While in
Georgia he worked with J.B.
Hunt Transport of Atlanta as a
Driver Recruiter, had owned
and sold FAS-CO Industries of
Valdosta and was an investor in
the early days of cell phone tow-
ers, also in Valdosta.
After moving to Florida he
traveled extensively while work-
ing in home improvement sales
and for the past fourteen years
has been a principal partner in
Atlantic Custom Exteriors of
Amelia Island.
An avid outdoorsman, Joey
enjoyed big game hunting, fish-
ing and traveling to destinations


inclIuding
Central
America, Africa
and Europe. In
2007 he fished
off the coast of
Hawaii, catch-
ing a 427-pound
Marlin.
He was a supporter and
investor of Amelia Research and
Recovery, Ducks Unlimited, the
American Numismatic
Association and the National
Rifle Association.
Mr. Sorrells leaves behind,
his wife, Lea Sorrells, Fernan-
dina Beach, FL, his daughter,
Holley Sorrells, Chicago, IL,
three brothers, Dana Bruce
Sorrells, Covington, GA,
Charles Barry Sorrells, Oxford,
GA, and William Brian Sorrells,
Monroe, GA. Eight nieces and
nephews and numerous loving
family and close friends.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday from the
Burgess Chapel of Oxley Heard
Funeral Home, Fernandina
Beach, FL.
The family will receive
friends from 10:00 am on
Saturday until the hour of serv-
ice at the funeral home.
A reception will follow the
service at his home.
Please share his life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


+


DEATH NOTICE


Mr. Donald C. Broxton, age 72, of Yulee died on Wednesday
morning, Nov. 25, 2009 at St. Vincent's Medical Center,
Jacksonville.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors




WEEKLY UPDATE


Cruise fundraiser
The Rotary Club of Amelia
Island Sunrise is taking reser-
vations for its fundraiser,
"Cruising For A Cause For
Polio Plus," a four-day cruise
to the Bahamas aboard the
Carnival Fascination, depart-
ing March 11, from Jackson-
ville. The cruise is open to
anyone. Reservations of $150
deposit will be taken up to
Jan. 4."
Contact group leader
Suzanne McLeod at (904)


Gxv9ur-9ar1 enera1i �Zitaaiect

Seventy Eight Years of Compassion to our community
Visit Our Life Stories At www.OxleyHeard.com


662-2360 or smcleod@teleco
mmanagement.us; or travel
professional Valerie Gossett
at (904) 710-9170 or Valerie@
premier-resources.net.
Thanksgiving service
Friendship Baptist Church
on Miner Road in Yulee will
host a community Thanksgiv-
ing service at 8 a.m. Nov. 26.
'Festive Recycling
Join the city of Fernan-
dina Beach for "Festive
Recycling" from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Dec. 5 at Eighth and Lime
streets.
Visit fbflus/recycle for
information on city recycling.
For information about the
event, contact Jeremiah
Glisson at 277-7389 or jglis-
son@fbfl.org.


LOOKING BACK


CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


Jeff, closest to the
whale, and Brett
Whitaker, age 6 and
4, examine a whale
while wading in the
ocean in the 1400
block of South
Fletcher Avenue in
this photo taken in
1965. The whale had
beached and later
died. The Whitaker
family owns
Robison's Jewelry on
Centre Street.
The News-Leader,
511 Ash St., Fernandina
Beach, welcomes
Looking Back submis-
sions. They also may be
e-mailed to Sian Perry,
sperry @fbnewsleader.
com.


Fernandina Beach
62/41
- - - _ Tallahassee ' Jacksonville
ensacola, - ,'. . " \ 63/44
1-1 -



I Orlando. .
65143.




Tampa ,

I. .
. Miami-


I City Hi Lo Cond. I




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader


OLYMPICS
Continued from 1A
home.
There's even a Barbara
Ann Scott doll in her collec-
tion, which includes memora-
bilia and photos with figure
skating stars from teammate
and fellow Olympian Dick
Button to a more recent gold
medal gathering including
many champions such as
Katarina Witt, Brian Boitano
and Scott Hamilton.
It was after turning profes-
sional, skating with the
Hollywood Ice Review in
Chicago, that she met publi-
cist Tom King, whom she mar-
ried in 1955.
Although she gave up skat-
ing at that point, she contin-
ued to fuel her competitive


HARRIS
Continued from 1A
affirm her achievements and
affirm her dreams, including
her parents and grandmother.
Her father, a commercial fish-
erman, and mother, an educa-
tor, instilled a ,. I.. ii . .,, the
norm for me to excel." Her
grandmother told her,
"Whatever you be, be good at
it."
From Bishop Kenny High
School to Harvard, where she
not only earned a degree in
economics, she excelled -
magna cum laude - and then
Harvard Business School,
Harris learned that "good
things come from giving your
all."
Jacksonville attorney Steve
Pajcic, who has a home on
Amelia Island and who intro-
duced Harris, gave the bright
young woman a job in his firm
in the summer of 1981. "He
couldn't see the multiplier
effect. I couldn't see the mul-
tiplier effect. But look what
happened," she said.
Each person has the "time,
talent and treasure" to offer a
child or young person, Harris
said. "We must each embrace
the power that we have to
make a difference..., to truly
impact children."
Children learn from
observing the triumphs and
failures of adults. They will
model what they see, Harris
said. "Kids have to see the
example of compassion if we
want them to be compassion-
ate," she said.
Harris, whose book is enti-
tled Expect to Win, sees the
glass half full. She foresees a
rebound on Wall Street from
the debacle of 2008 and


spirit by showing horses, win-
ning over 400 first-place rib-
bons.
Meanwhile, Tom King fol-
lowed a musical course and
recently released his 10th CD
with his classical jazz band,
The Royal Chicagoans, "One
More Time Vol. X," featuring
timeless hits like "I'm Glad
There's You," "What is This
Thing Called Love" and
"Melancholy Baby." All pro-
ceeds from the CDs go to the
National Multiple Sclerosis
Society and The Myelin
Project.
He, too, cherishes his col-
lection of memorabilia, includ-
ing photos of Bob Hope and
other top entertainers.
The two recently celebrat-
ed their 54th wedding anniver-
sary and say they absolutely


adore their island home.
"This is heaven on Earth,"
said Tom King. "This is our
home forever."
Now honing her athletic
prowess for her Olympic run,
King has been doing speed
walking "for about half a mile"
in preparation.
"When they ask you do to
this, they give you the option
of walking, running, speed
walking or even riding in a
wheelchair."
"My 81-year old body keeps
asking, 'What are you doing
to me?'"
"She doesn't look 81,"
quipped Tom.
The still lovely ice queen
replied with a beaming smile,
"We have a mutual admiration
society."
type@fbnewsleadercom


SUBMITTED
Carla Harris seeks to inspire children at the Miller
Boys & Girls Club in Nassauville on Friday.


brighter days ahead for the
United States.
Especially if people remem-
ber that bonds are stronger if
held together. "Giving your all
always pays dividends, partic-


ularly when you do it for some-
one else," she said, before clos-
ing with a rendition of
"America the Beautiful" that
brought down the house.
mparnell@fbnewsleadercom


Consumer confidence falls


University ofFlorida

GAINESVILLE - Florida's
consumer confidence fell in
November amid continued con-
cerns over the state's high
unemployment rate, according
to a new University of Florida
survey.
"We had expected con-
sumer confidence to fluctuate ...
for the next several months, so
a decline was not a surprise,"
said Chris McCarty, survey
director of UF's Bureau of
Economic and Business
Research. "There are reasons
for growing pessimism, partic-



SHOPPERS
Continued from 1A
motional categories for prod-
ucts that are less than $25, for
example, or between $25 and
$50, she said.
"Online retailers have col-
lected information from shop-
pers' online search behavior
about what are the 'hot items' to
better prepare their merchan-
dise for packaging," she said.
"Because such information
helps retailers prepare the
right merchandise with the
right quantity, online retailers
or multi-channel retailers
who have both online offer-
ings and stores are in a
better position than stores
that are strictly brick and mor-
tar."


ularly lingering employment
issues that are expected to get
worse over the next several
months."
Florida's unemployment
level increased to 11.2
percent in October, the high-
est rate in 34 years, McCarty
said.
"Perhaps more disturbing
is the rising percentage of the
long term unemployed -those
who are unemployed for six
months or more - who are
dependent on an extension of
unemployment benefits and
may have continued difficulty
finding work," he said.



Online shopping is expec-
ted to draw more visits from
high-income households,
with 74 percent of those with
family incomes over $100,000
planning to shop as much or
more than they did last year on
the Internet, compared with
only 35 percent of those with
incomes less than $30,000, she
said.
Fifty-nine percent of shop-


Saturday
December 5, 2009
9am to 4pm
Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center
In the main auditorium
Fernandina Beach, FL
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"The biggest surprise in this
report was the very sharp
decline in perceptions of the
economy in the long run,"
McCarty said. "Florida con-
sumers may be wondering
whether the effects of this
downturn will last longer than
usual, or perhaps some aspects
of this downturn are perma-
nent."
McCarty said he expects
holiday retail sales to remain
flat compared with a year ago,
and he foresees no clear
improvement in consumer con-
fidence before the second quar-
ter of 2010, if not later.



pers from middle-income
households - those earning
between $30,000 and $60,000 -
plan to spend more or the
same amount that they did
last year, as do 60 percent of
those with upper-middle
incomes.
As expected, the lowest
income group expects to spend
the least, an average of about
$500, Oh said.








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cigs


"We're Proud of Ford Motor Company.

America's Top Car Company."


Ford Is On A Roll. And With NO Bailout Money.

Just Read For Yourself. Top Media Experts Agree.


".....For decades, Henry Ford's company was the No. 2 automaker, a strong runner-up
to General Motors and a pillar of American corporate stability. In early 2009, it
emerged as the sole American automaker in a position to survive the steepest sales
downturn in decades without a government bailout....."


THE DETROIT NEWS
November 2009
2010 Ford Fusion Named
Motor 'Trend's Car of the Year'


The DeotmtN�w
detnew.com


Magazine's staff cites Ford's improvements, sedan's broad appeal
.....Ford has proven it's resilence in these tough times by delivering to the market a car with broad
appeal to a broad range of consumers, " said Motor Trend Editor-In-Chief Angus MacKenzie.
"The Fusion range has matured into a competitive roster of midsize sedans, able to compete with
sales jaggernauts such as the Toyota Camryand Honda Accord."



USA TODAY
November 2, 2009
Ford Reports $1B 3Q Profit, Forecasts Faster Turnaround
BY CHRIS WOODYARD - USA TODAY
"Ford Motor issued a robust earnings report Monday, showing $997 million in profit in the third
quarter.....Ford, the only U.S. Automaker that avoided bankruptcy court and is publicly traded,
recorded its first pre-tax operating profit since the first quarter of 2008. Perhaps more significantly,
Ford saw a turnaround in its toughest market: the USA and Canada. North American operations
posted a $357 million pre-tax operating profit, the first since the first quarter of 2005.".



2009 FORD ESCAPE EARNS 'TOP SAFETY PICK'; TOPS TOYOTA,
HONDA IN COMBINED SAFETY AND FUEL EFFICIENCY RATINGS
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) named the 2009 Ford Escape, Mercury
Mariner and their hybrid models as "Top Safety Picks". Escape and Mariner SUV's also
earned the government's top 5-star crash ratings - topping Toyota RAV-4 in both
independent crash tests and beating Honda CR-V in combined crash safety and fuel
efficiency ratings. Ford has produced more IIHS Top Safety Picks than any other brand.

Escape also helps Ford equal Honda and Toyota quality by earning a Top Three spot
in the J.D. Power and Associates 2008 Initial Quality Study SM (IQS).




www.pcford.net

/ | Pau Clark 5


The food pantry needs donations of
non-perishable food items all year round.
For more information, call: 904.261.7000


THE NEW YORK TIMES
Thursday, November 19, 2009
Ford Today


BLACK


^


OCNov flork to', ill 10
Expect the WorldO




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader



Courage with a


smile in fight


against cancer


HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
"I'm very honored to have the award and to think that
people think that much of me," said Joan Jordan, 2009
American Cancer Society Courage Award recipient.

----------------------------------------------


Tidewater Outfitters



ORvIS DEALER


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TWO DAYS ONLY!
Fri, 11/27 and Sat, 11/28
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| 60% off Porch Sale Items
Mon-Sat 10:00am to 5:30pm
Entrance of Amelia Island Plantation* (904) 261-2202
Central F s s e a


HEATHER A. PERRY
News Leader
American Cancer Society
Unit Chair Joni Reid describes
Joan Jordan as "a remarkable
woman who has shown much
courage and always has a smile
on her face."
At the annual American
Cancer Society dinner last
month, Joan Buchanan Jordan
received the 2009 Courage
Award, which recognizes indi-
viduals who have shown great
courage in their personal bat-
tle with cancer.
The award is given to those
who possess a positive attitude,
the ability to lead life as nor-
mally as possible, and who are
inspirational to others battling
this dreadful disease.
Although she was pleased
and thrilled to receive the
award, Jordan could not be
blamed if she wished she'd not
had to receive it because it sym-
bolizes a struggle she never
dreamed she'd face - twice.
After battling breast cancer
in 2005, Jordan was diagnosed
in 2008 with pancreatic cancer.
"I think you start with 'why
me?' but you end up with, Yes,
me! It's not gonna get me! I'm
gonna kick its ass!"
Jordan chose M.D. Ander-
son Cancer Center in Houston,
Texas, for her battleground.
Husband, Lewis, lived in
Houston years ago and had
heard many good things about
the center. When his brother-in-
law went there for treatment of
prostate cancer, his faith in the
center's success was validated.
"On a Friday he told me we
were going there and by
Tuesday, we were on a plane
headed for Houston," said
Jordan. "Their whole system is
one of total patient care."
Looking around the dining


room at Jesse H. Jones Rotary
House International, a hotel
exclusively for M.D. Anderson
patients and their families,
Jordan noted there was a bald
person in pajamas, attached to
an IV pole and pump, and anoth-
er person in street clothes sit-
ting with his family. At her own
table with her husband, she
realized they all had something
in common besides the cancer
- "a kick-ass attitude."
In addition to a fighting spir-
it, a strong support network dur-
ing her two battles was extreme-
ly important.
"Family and friends help you
get through it. All they want to
do is help. They just want you to
get better," Jordan said, adding
that good friends who are like
family also played a critical part
in her recovery.
"You have to have people
who will pray for you. Prayer
will help to heal your body and
your soul. Always look for the
'up' side and thank God for
every minute of every day."
After winning her battle with
breast cancer, Jordan thought
she was finished with the dis-
ease.
"God had a different plan for
me. I hope that I can follow
through with what He has
planned for me."
Speaking to others about the
challenges they'll face is one
possibility being considered.
Another was doing the
Survivors Lap at Relay for Life.
A nurse for 42 years and
operating room director at
Baptist Nassau for 16 years,
Jordan says she has good days
and bad ones.
At the one-year anniversary
of her surgery, she maintains a
positive attitude, determination
to enjoy each and every
moment and a ready smile.
type@fbnewsleadercom


"II


bath zonee HVAC large covered porch whith summer marsh views make it anideai spot tocapture a suse at the
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Contact Claudia Watts of
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303 Centre Street, Suite 102
Located in Historic Downtown Fernandina Beach On Amelia Island
904-321-1999 OFFICE OR
904-556-4000 CELLULAR/BLACKBERRY
E-MAIL: claudiacw@remax.net
Website: www.propertiesofameliaislandflorida.com


I Ov~~~er ilo ncoe ae n20


A --.
, [


KATHLEEN HARDIN
Local Artist since 1979
with many awards from
the Eight Flags Shrimp
Festival
Kathleen & William R.
Maurer - Thursday & Friday
-ART CLASSES-
Adding once a month
Classes on Saturdays
starting January 2010
with Kathleen & William
Call 261-8276
kathi.h@comcast.net
1464 Sadler Road
Fernandina 32034


HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Yulee High School senior Dakota Blair, with mentor
John Zimmerman.

V TOGETHER WE CAN


Dreams come true


HEATHER A. PERRY
News Leader


Take Stock in Children has
been awarding scholarships to
children from low-income fam-
ilies since 1995. Locally raised
funds are used to purchase
two- and four-year tuition plans
through the Florida Prepaid
College Foundation.
To date, 84 local high
school graduates have been
awarded scholarships. Hoping
for the same reward are 146
middle and high school stu-
dents in the program.
One of those students is 18-
year-old Dakota Blair, a senior
at Yulee High School.
Accepted into the program as
a sixth grader, Blair is looking
forward to achieving his
dream of a college education.
"I feel blessed knowing that
I have an opportunity most
people wish for. Knowing that
I am able to go to college with
the help of this scholarship
means that I will be able to
have a successful career
planned out and not have to
struggle with only a high
school diploma," said Blair.
Mother Michelle Taylor
echoes her son's praise for the
program.
"Take Stock has given my
son the opportunity that I


"No, It's NOT a
picture"...She's
done it again!
Downtown original acrylic
on canvas - "Leaving the Marina"
at j &S Frame Gallery


&Si


J-

&aral e-r(


would not be able to give him
and I look forward to seeing
my son achieve his goals."
John Zimmerman has been
Blair's mentor since he first
enrolled in the program.
"When we started, he was
quite shy and I would say he
was not that serious about
school. He had a lot of unex-
cused absences and wasn't
turning in his homework and
therefore his grades suffered
accordingly," said
Zimmerman.
"He has consistently
improved and now in his sen-
ior year, his last grading peri-
od he got two As and two Bs
and is working to improve
those grades further."
Helping students like Blair
achieve their dreams is what
drives Program Director Jody
Mackle.
'Take Stock in Children's
importance is about the future
of our country and its youngest
citizens," said Mackle.
'Take Stock offers hope for
the future to children who
have the ability to pursue post-
secondary education but need
a helping hand in order to pur-
sue their education and career
goals after high school. A bet-
ter education means a better
job with a promise of a better
future for this young genera-
tion and generations to come."
A committee of 20 commu-
nity volunteers reviews appli-
cations from sixth, seventh and
eighth graders in September
and October to select the most
appropriate students.
New scholars sign their
agreements at the annual
awards celebration. The next
one will take place on April 20.
As part of the program, stu-
dents are asked to sign a con-
tract stating they will go to
school every day, maintain a
GPA of 2.5 or higher and have
weekly meetings with their
mentor.
Students also agree to stay
out of trouble both in school
and outside, avoiding drugs
and crime. Parents and
guardians have a contract as
well, agreeing to see to it that
their children keep up their
end of the bargain.
Currently there are men-
tors for all 146 students in
Nassau County, but a mini-
mum of 35 more mentors will
be needed in April, when new
middle school students are
enrolled in the program.
For information call 548-
4464 or visit www.takestock-
inchildren.com.
type@fbnewsleadercom


+


Claudia Watts


BUSINESS CARD BILLBOARD


$1 40 1.II. lS.I MLS 1 2, 2


BLACK


mIwoh,

40 0vt-
nlalm;(i




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader


The few,

In World War II they domi-
nated Iwo Jima, con-
quered adversaries at the
Landing of Inchon during
the Korean War, and put a
chokehold on the enemy at
Da Nang in Vietnam.
"First to fight" has been a
U.S. Marine Corps motto for
ages, and these events are
only a few of the hundreds of VET
battles fought by members CC
who make up the pride of the
Corps. This month, we cele-
brated the 234th anniversary D
of this prestigious organiza- \
tion's beginning. It was on
Nov. 10, 1775, when a resolu- always
tion by the Continental play. I
Congress called for two battal- the M
ions of Marines able to fight The s
for independence at sea and are no
on shore was approved, hence Marir
forming the Continental earne
Marines. for lift
The adage "A Few Good Ac
Men" is also something car- www.
tried forward for over 200 websi
years when in March 1779, "Mari
USMC Capt. William Jones ... Aftc
advertised for "a few good tough
men" to enlist in the Corps for it tran
naval duty. His ad implied only mem1
a few good men would be most
needed to handle any situa- The C
tion. His theory has been test- ture o
ed, survived and been synony- icons
mous with U.S. Marines ever Corps
since. earne
They're called leather- When
necks and jarheads. ment
Leatherneck is a longstanding lenge.
nickname going back to the intere
leather neckpiece which was times
part of the Marine uniform crisis
from 1775 to 1875. The leather Corps
bands around their throats on the
were intended to ensure that first tc
Marines kept their heads earne
erect. The jarhead phraseolo- "Ame
gy came from sailors as early nation
as World War II, referring to The 1
members of the Corps in their respo
dress blues uniform, with its air an
high collar having a likeness appro
to a mason jar. Marir
"Oorah!" for the Marines is States
similar to the Army's "hooah" force.
and the Navy's hoorahh." It's a Th
verbal greeting or expression most
of enthusiasm and it's hymn
reserved only for those song i
employing the core values of Force
Honor, Courage and sacrif
Commitment. It would be a haves
faux pas to use the term oorah It is a:
by anyone not in the Corps. Marir
In 1883, the motto Semper starts
Fidelis, since shortened to Mont(
Semper Fi, took root, signify- Tripo
ing more than just dedication A'
to a cause. It's Latin for always recru
faithful. It exemplifies a broth- oppor
erhood that lasts for life and future


M]
rE


)e
W,


the pt
guides
Marines to
remain
faithful to
the mis-
sion, to
each other,
to the
Corps and
to country,
ERAN'S no matter
RNER what. This
is also
where the
ebbie phrase
Walsh "Once a
Marine


s a Marine" comes into
t's the official motto of
marinee Corps League.
statement means there
o ex-Marines or former
ies. Once the title is
d, one remains a Marine
e.
cording to
Marines.mil, the official
te of the USMC,
nes are made, not born.
er twelve weeks of the
hest training in the world,
nsforms civilians into
bers of the United States'
notable brotherhood.
Corps has a distinct cul-
of traditions, symbols and
surrounding the Marine
,, and every Marine has
d a place within it.
[ our nation's commit-
to democracy is chal-
d, when our national
:sts are threatened, in
of international disaster,
or war, the Marine
s is ready. They'll be first
e scene, first to help and
o fight. They've also
d the reputation as
rica's 911 Force" - our
I's first line of defense.
Marine Corps is ready to
nd on the ground, in the
d by sea. This integrated
ach distinguishes the
ie Corps as the United
s' premier expeditionary

he Marines' Hymn is the
recognizable military
and the oldest official
in the U.S. Armed
es. It is a reminder of the
ice and courage Marines
shown on the battlefield.
n important part of
ie Corps culture and
with, "From the halls of
ezuma, to the shores of
li ..."
"Boot" is a Marine Corps
it, and recently I had the
rtunity to visit with a few
Marines outside their


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of Fernandina Beach

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Old and frail,
There are angels among us,
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Aged and Wise,
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*HOLIDAY SEASlON


roud...
recruiting office in Yulee.
After only a few minutes,
I got the impression Matt
Marshall, a 2008 graduate
from Hilliard, and Casey
Jones, a 2009 Yulee High
School graduate, might easily
be compared to young squires
attending to the Knights of
the Round Table. They were
gearing for battle. Of course,
they were there preparing for
their weekly PT (physical
training), prepping for the rig-
ors of boot camp. I asked why
they picked the Marine Corps
over other services. They
both had history of relatives
being in other branches of the
service, but it all came down
to the fact that the Corps was
their idea of what a soldier
really represents. Once again,
the concept of brotherhood
has won out.
So to the new probies of
the Corps, good luck. From
what I hear, Marine boot
camp will definitely be a chal-
lenging experience, one to
prepare you for the future. It
will be a learning tool in
discipline and teamwork, one
you'll never regret, nor easily
forget.
Brotherhood seems to
have won out with the Clifton
family of Fernandina too. I
spoke to a female Marine,
Sheila Clifton, who told me
her father and grandfather
were Marines. She married a
Marine, Bob Clifton, and their
son Brian is a Marine. Brian
has since left the Corps, but
he told me there's a different
aura about the Corps. Its
brotherhood, the bonding, is
different from all other servic-
es.
Ronald Reagan probably
said it best. "Some people live
an entire lifetime and wonder
if they have ever made a dif-
ference in the world. The
Marines don't have that prob-
lem."
So to the few good men
(and women) who have
served our nation every-
where, from the poles to the
tropics and have dedicated
themselves to upholding the
Eagle, Globe and Anchor, I
thank you for your dedicated
service to our great nation.


Family photos
of the Clifton
family of
Fernandina
Beach - Bob,
Brian, Sheila
Clifton - a fami-
ly within the
family of the
United States
Marine Corps.
Right, Brian's
graduation into
the Corps.
SUBMITTED PHOTO


My dad, Norm Barker,
was a Navy Corpsman
attached to the Marines and a
Purple Heart recipient of the
Korean War. If he were here
today, he'd most generously
say, Happy Birthday to a
branch of the military whose
readiness reflects pride,
responsibility and challenge -
the United States Marine
Corps.
Debbie is a 22-year veteran,
retired Senior Master Sergeant
in the Air Force and a Life
Member ofAmerican Legion
Post 54, Fernandina Beach.
whitelabaron@yahoo.com


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BLACK


E D C A L L A S E R




CYAN MAGENTA


1" OPINION


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


Dry Bones ANGELS

BC I NTH 1 E "PEACE IN THE
SIXTIES THEY USED ORLDO I
TO SAY J nl (v


DryBonesBlog.com
YAAKOV KIRSCHEN/THE JERUSALEM POST


live rock (radio)...


The recent release of the
film "Pirate Radio" rekindled
some pent-up teenage aggres-
sion inside me that had been
dormant for some time. The
movie obviously seeks to cap-
ture a slice of the rebellion that
fueled the halcyon days of rock
'n' roll and propelled it as a
giant missile aimed directly at
establishment "squares."
Whether it succeeds or not is
irrelevant - hell, I haven't even
seen the movie - but what it
brings to light is a problem
music aficionados have either
become numb, indifferent, or
downright oblivious to. I do
know that the film is based on a
true story involving ships sta-
tioned off the coast of England
that broadcast transmissions of
rock music over "pirate radio"
to the stuffy, conservative-con-
trolled London of the 1960s.
Apparently the socially
oppressive powers-that-be didn't
allow for rock music on the air-
waves, tending toward talk and
jazz. Luckily, those rebellious
seafaring gents were happy to
oblige, creating countless future
British musicians, slipping in
free rock 'n' roll onto the radio
dial.
But where are today's youth
to turn? Sure, there are illegal
downloads, streaming music
sites and pay-to-download virtu-
al stores on the web, but they all
feel so cold and detached.
There is a whole generation
walking around that will never
truly experience the spectacle
of rock radio in all its glory.
That's because rock radio is
dead - the victim of a homicide


perpetrated by
corporate
greed - and
we all missed
the funeral.
Some-
where
between the
mid-1970s,
when Black
NEWS- Sabbath
ROOM declared it
VIEWS had sold its
soul for rock
'n' roll, and
Jason now, when
Yurgartis rock 'n' roll
has long since
sold its soul to advertisers, cor-
porate pigs and anyone else
with a buck in their hand, the
final nail was driven into the cof-
fin of rock radio.
Gone are the days of knowl-
edgeable radio deejays picking
and choosing songs based on
their quality, without bowing to
an industry-approved playlist or
being confined to corporate-
imposed formatting. Seemingly
here to stay is flavor-of-the-
week, cookie-cutter, watered-
down pop drivel hatched by
some A&R exec and played ad
nauseam on corporatized radio
stations that simply care about
the bottom line.
Deejays are now handcuffed
and forced to march lockstep to
the beat of the corporate drum
or walk the proverbial plank,
which hangs firmly over an
ocean of unemployment. That
is, if their radio station hasn't
already turned to automated
playlists.
And now you can't just listen


to music; you have to choose
from "classic rock" or "new-
rock" or "alternative rock." Do
you like Neil Young and The
White Stripes? Sorry, you'll
need to listen to two different
stations and pray either artist is
on their approved playlist.
While you weren't looking,
some suit decided what you like
and how it will be presented
(neatly packaged into subjective
genres to maximize sales to a ...
wait for the buzzword ... "target
audience"), and it's been that
way for years.
And so what if radio stations
play the same song six times a
day? As long as ad revenue is
high, it's a victory for compa-
nies like Cox Radio and Clear
Channel, who could care less
about music in the first place.
For those who don't spend
time actively seeking out music,
modern FM radio must be a
monotonously endless cycle. If
you're like me and you used to
bubble with excitement every
time you arrived in a new city -
chomping at the bit to twist that
radio dial and immerse yourself
in the variety of sounds emanat-
ing from the partially blown-out
speakers of a wood paneled sta-
tion wagon - you know how I
feel.
See, I was raised on rock 'n'
roll radio. But unfortunately, I
was abandoned by my musical
surrogate sometime in the latter
days of my youth; left for dead
on the doorstep of a similarly
extinct independent record
store. Don't even get me started
on the death of record stores -
but I'll say this, rock music was-


n't meant to be bought at Wal-
Mart, where censorship is OK,
but treating workers equitably
is out of the spectrum of
Christian values. Nor was it
meant to be purchased sans
packaging and delivered via
electronic transmission.
But I digress. Though you
might not be as frustrated as I
am, my point is that we've let
something that was uniquely
fun, important and rebellious
get taken over by the same guys
we're supposed to be rebelling
against. But may I suggest to
you, as citizens of a city and sur-
rounding county that have an
overwhelming affinity for
pirates, that there is still room
for rebellion on the airwaves -
for the good of rock 'n' roll.
Sure, commandeering a ship
and a radio tower might be
infeasible, but the real piracy
takes place by not listening to
FM radio at all. If the corporate
giants see that no one is listen-
ing to their stations, they'll be
forced to change their format. If
advertisers don't pay them,
they'll be forced to find a new
medium for revenue.
Support independent record
stores (the few that are left) and
keep downloading. Let's do to
these media conglomerates that
run the stations what they did to
rock 'n' roll radio. Keep your
hands off the dial and their cor-
porate minions will go back to
cold-calling heads of house-
holds to sell timeshares in
Sarasota.
Jason Yurgartis is a reporter
at the News-Leader. E-mail him
at jyurgartis@fbnewsleader corn.


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CYAN MAGENTA


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
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COMMUNITY THANKS

Taste of Amelia
On Friday, Nov. 6, the exclusive Amelia
Island Plantation glittered as it rang in the
2009 Holiday Season with the 18th annual
"Taste of Amelia Island," a culinary feast to
benefit the Nassau County Volunteer Center.
Over 400 culinary enthusiasts were treated
to excellent cuisine, fine wines and great music
and an array of unique items in a silent auction.
Seventeen restaurants and wine purvey-
ors donated food, wine and staff to make the
evening a success. The Nassau County
Volunteer Center wants to thank the following
organizations and individuals that contributed
to the success.
* Chefs and restaurants: 29 South, Amelia
Island Food Concepts, Amelia Island
Plantation, Beech Street Grill, Crab Trap,
Fancy Sushi, Gourmet Gourmet, Harris Teeter
Super Markets, Horizon's Continental Cuisine,
O'Kane's Irish Pub and Eatery, Ops Pizza
Kitchen and Cafr, Peppers Mexican Cantina,
Peterbrooke Chocolatier and Winn-Dixie
Supermarkets.
* Wine purveyors: Premier Beverage,
National Republic Distributing and Southern
Wine & Spirits.
* Silent auction donors: Amelia Island
Plantation, Elizabeth Pointe Lodge, Amelia
Hotel at the Beach, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia
Island, Greyfield Inn, Kayak Amelia, Robison's
Jewelry, Nassau Diamond, White Oak
Plantation, Golf Club of Amelia, Amelia
Shotgun Sports, Bobby and Carol Ferreira,
Milton Shirley, Hugh Graham, Kathy Brooks,
Maria Struss, Island Photography, Sonny's
Barbecue, Bonito's Grill and Sushi, Grace
Lipman, Kathy and John Brooks, Plantation
Shop and The Travel Agency.
* Raffle Item Donors: Bo & Mike's, Caf6
Karibo, Amelia River Cruises, Residence Inn,
Terpsichorean Dance Club, Rayonier and
Amelia Island Coffee Shop.
Special thanks for sponsorship of the band
to Bobby and Carol Ferreira, and advertising
sponsorship to Bobby and Carol Ferreira and
First National Bank of Nassau.
Also, thanks for in-kind donations to Amelia
Island Graphics, Bill Dickson, Hamilton Press,
Mark Deaton and J&L Graphics.
A very special thanks to the News-Leader for
its support and the Amelia Island Plantation for
a stellar job in hosting the event.
The "Taste of Amelia Island" is an annual
event that the citizens of Nassau County and
surrounding counties look forward to each
year. The Nassau County Volunteer Center
Board of Directors and staff are proud to be the
recipients of this tremendous community sup-
port and urge those supporters to patronize the
restaurants and businesses whose donations
made the event so successful and thank them
for their generosity.
We hope to see our friends next year at
the 19th annual "Taste of Amelia Island."
Please call the Volunteer Center at 261-2771 or
visit our brand new website at volunteernas-
sau.org to learn more about our organization.
Let us take this opportunity to wish all of
you from all of us at the center a happy and
healthy holiday season.
Gail Shults
Executive Director


SERVING YOU

Nassau County Commissioners:
Danny Leeper, District 1-Fernandina Beach,
261-8029 (h), 430-3868 (cel),
e-mail: dleeper@nassaucountyfl.com
Mike H. Boyle, District 2-Amelia Island,
Nassauville, 491-1908 (h), 753-1409 (cell),
e-mail: mboyle@nassaucountyfl.com
Stacy Johnson, District 3-Yulee,
583-2746 (cell),
e-mail: sjohnson@nassaucountyfl.com
Barry Holloway, District 4- Hilliard, Bryceville,
Boulogne, 879-3230 (h), 753-1072 (cell), e-mail:
bholloway@nassaucountyfl.com
Walter J. Boatright, District 5-Callahan,
879-2564 (h), 753-0141 (cell),
e-mail: wboatright@nassaucountyfl.comn
City of Fernandina Beach
Commissioners:
Mayor Susan Steger:261-4372,
e-mail: ssteger@fbfl.org
Vice Mayor: Eric Childers: 261-0116,
ericchilders.comemail: echilders@fbfl.org
Ken Walker: 261-9875, e-mail: kwalker@fbfl.org
Tim Poynter: 415-6533 (cell) tpoynter@fbfl.org
Jeff Bunch: 415-4902 (cell) jbunch@fbfl.org


FRIDAY, November 27,2009 NEWS News-Leader

VIEWPOINT/STEVE RIECK/NASSAU COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD



Amendment 4 still not the answer


Former Fernandina Beach city commis-
sioner Ron Sapp shared with readers
("Thankful for our quality of life," Nov.
18) a half-dozen things for which he's
grateful during this Thanksgiving season.
Among his "stop and think about" items was
"All those people who worked to get the
Hometown Democracy - Amendment 4 -
issue on next fall's ballot."
Commissioner Sapp has a long and distin-
guished record of service to our community
and I am grateful for his service. But I believe
he's totally wrong on Amendment 4. By his
own words, Mr. Sapp says, "Amendment 4
requires the people of the community to
approve any change to the local government's
comprehensive plan, the community's plan for
managing growth." This i..ii ,..oi... democra-
cy" has all the allure of phrases like "apple pie
and motherhood." Who could be against home-
town democracy? And that's precisely the prob-
lem. If Amendment 4 were to be approved next
November, the process of how we make critical
decisions about managing growth in Nassau
County will be reduced to catchy phrases and
sound bites rather than sound planning prac-
tices.
Proponents of Amendment 4 say this initia-
tive was made necessary by rampant growth
across Florida during the past decade. They


define "growth" as popula-
tion growth and all the
negative things that popu-
lation growth brings with
- lit. As Orlando economist
Hank Fishkind made abun-
dantly clear to Nassau
County commissioners last
year, an economy based on
Rieck population growth is
unsustainable. Our com-
missioners and other elect-
ed leaders get that. That's why the Nassau
County Economic Development Board has
been working aggressively with our locally
elected leaders to diversify our economic base
and bring quality jobs and capital investment to
Nassau County. A growing economy will help
to keep our taxes low, and bringing new jobs
here will reduce the need for people to drive to
jobs outside the county.
We will succeed in achieving our objectives,
but it will take "working the comprehensive
plan" carefully to do so. Every unit of local gov-
ernment is required to have its own compre-
hensive plan, so in Nassau County there are
four comp plans - one for the county, and one
each for Fernandina Beach, Callahan and
Hilliard. As the national economy begins to
recover and economic activity rebounds in


Nassau County, adjustments to these comp
plans will be necessary and frequent. If
Amendment 4 controls that process, then vot-
ers will have to decide the fate of each and
every change, no matter how complex or mun-
dane.
Last week, the Palm Beach Post wrote that
the Palm Beach County Commission adopted a
change to its comprehensive plan. Here's what
county staff said about the change: "The
change would revise the comprehensive plan's
'Future Land Use Element and Introduction &
Administration Element' to eliminate refer-
ences to the Central Western Communities
Sector Plan in the text and the Special Planning
Areas Map, LU 3.2." "This is a housekeeping
amendment," county staff wrote, "with no poli-
cy implications ... as the board has previously
made the decision to no longer pursue a sector
plan for this area." As the Palm Beach Post
asked, "Would voters believe that? Would the
jargon befuddle them? Would they bother to
vote?" It wouldn't matter. Amendment 4 would
require referendums on even the most incon-
sequential of changes. Amendment 4 would
bring desirable growth in Florida to a screech-
ing halt. Do we really want to go down that
road?
Steve Rieck is executive director of the Nassau
County Economic Development Board.


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Welcome sight
The day could have not been
more perfect. The sky was clear
blue, and the walls of the building
about to be opened, blended exact-
ly with what Mother Nature had
supplied overhead. The gathering
crowd awaiting the ceremony was all
in a festive mood.
After several speeches and the
cutting of the ribbon, the Marine
Welcome Center was open for visi-
tation. Inside, the saltwater tank bub-
bled as the live shrimp suspiciously
observed the activity outside the
glass wall.
Overhead, in contrast to the
white ceiling, Fernandina's famous
eight flags hung ceremoniously in
two rows of four, secured by cop-
per holders. The walls of the room
were adorned with information of
our local marine species and the his-
tory of our island.
In the corners were century-old
relics, recently found in the marina
during the dredging. And there was
the large model of a shrimp boat,
donated by Angelo Tringali, the son
of one of the original founding fam-
ilies of the modern shrimping indus-
try.
It is only a beginning, as the
Welcome Center is still in its infan-
cy, awaiting glass casings to secure
the exhibits, so that the facility can
be open during the day, with or with-
out a docent. It is also waiting for
more items to arrive, that will fur-
ther whet the appetite of visitors,
encouraging them to go and explore
the wonderful sites, activities
and facilities upon our island com-
munity.
Fort Clinch has a display of a
uniform, accoutrement and pictures
of the natural beauty of the park
and wild and scenic Florida. The
Amelia Island Museum of History
has an exhibit featuring an array of
historical items, from the time of
the Native Americans to early this
century. The city's Parks and
Recreation Department has been
developing a marine environmental
educational component of the center,
and has enlisted the aid of high
school students with the saltwater
tank.
We have come a long way from
the beginning of the journey. Years
ago, the marina and the waterfront
were a disheveled and sad gateway
to Florida and our community.
When the city took back the
marina, it was an absolute mess. It
was full of mud, the docks were
breaking apart, the fuel system was
antiquated and falling apart, and the
bathrooms were an embarrassment.
Even the parking lot at the foot of
Centre Street was horrible, and the
bulkhead was falling in, threaten-
ing cars parked next to it. The
shrimp dock at the foot of Centre
Street was also collapsing, and had
to be barricaded so people wouldn't
get hurt on it, and every year we
had to put up orange fencing during
Shrimp Festival so people wouldn't
fall in.
Now, we have new and renovat-
ed docks, a new fire suppression
system, dredg, a new boardwalk
from the very north end to the very
south end, a state-of-the-art fueling
system, a renovated boaters' facility
(lounge, office, laundry room and
bathrooms) and, of course, our new
Welcome Center.
The marina has a new look, and
boaters are returning in droves. The
Boaters' Lounge, as this is being
written, is occupied with a half dozen
people, some of them are Americans
and the others Swiss.
If you have not been down to the
waterfront lately, please come down
soon. The Parks and Recreation
Department has worked feverishly
to build the first phases of the water-
front redevelopment and park.
There is grass, trees, sun shelters
and a great view of the quickly filling
marina.
The best time of all, to see this
amazing transformation is, of course,
at sunset.


We have now arrived with a new
jewel that welcomes visitors and res-
idents alike to a place we can all be
proud and can enjoy.
Coleman Langshaw,
Director, City Marina

Secret Santa
The Christmas season is fast
approaching and for many this year
will be a special holiday because of
how they have been impacted by
the slow down in the economy and
the rise in unemployment. There is
no doubt that things are tougher
this year than ever and the economic
slow down has also affected many of
the programs that serve the low
income and the needy.
Dayspring Village, Inc. is a
licensed 94-bed limited mental
health assisted living facility
designed to serve the needs of
adults with schizophrenia and
schizo-affective disorders. It is the
mission of the staff and manage-
ment to assist each resident with a
continuous course of redirection in
their daily living skills. This mission
is accomplished by the impact of a
targeted array of community-
based services aimed at reducing
symptoms and improving quality of
life.
Dayspring Village, Inc. provides
a residential setting that is connect-
ed to an array of community-based
services which include mental
health case management, access to
social rehab services, on-site lab
services, on-site mobile X-ray serv-
ices, on-site psychiatric care and pri-
mary care. The facility also offers a
homeless diversion program and a
Christian Life Ministry aimed at pro-
viding support and promoting recov-
ery.
Perhaps the most important pro-
gram we have is the annual Secret
Santa Project. This is a program that
is now in its 19th year and has been
a major source of support for the
residents. For many of the mentally
ill residents who call Dayspring
Village their home, this program
allows them to receive socks, under-
garments, jackets and warm cloth-
ing that otherwise they would not
have or be able to receive.
The true gift of Christmas is the
gift we make in the life of another.
The chance to give a gift that will
help share the joy of this special hol-
iday is a way to pass along the true
meaning of Christmas. For many of
the mentally ill residents we serve
the gift of Christmas truly creates a
connection to the community that is
lasting and communicates the love
and joy that comes with the words
"Merry Christmas."
If you would like to have a dif-
ferent sort of Christmas experience
this year, please consider becoming
a "Secret Santa" and join us in shar-
ing the love and joy of the Christmas


season with the mentally ill resi-
dents at Dayspring Village. Whether
you can buy a small gift or share
your talents or perhaps just bake a
few homemade snacks all these gifts
would be greatly appreciated and
would help us bring joy to the holi-
day.
Please call our Secret Santa
Coordinator Denise Cumbus at
(904) 845-7501 or contact her at
dayspring06@windstream.net. If
you become a "Santa," you will be
given one or more names and all
you need to do is have a wrapped gift
back to Denise no later than Dec
23. Nassau County is a community
that is filled with good people who
care and make a difference in so
many ways. We thank you for your
support and hope you have a Merry
Christmas.
Doug Adkins, Executive Director
Dayspring Village Inc.

Live and let live
When misinformation is printed
and remains unchallenged it can in
the minds of some become fact,
especially when attributed to two
"Professor Harrisons" ("Who's the
mob?" on Nov. 20). I do not imply
or attribute this to a deliberate
prevarication or even an equivoca-
tion but simply an ignorance of the
facts.
For the sake of accuracy, item
one incorrectly says that the state
offered unbuildable property for
sale and considered it so. If that
were the case, no one would pur-
chase property that was unusable.
The only ones who considered them
unbuildable were you folk. That was
your erroneous opinion. The state's
list was published and available for
anyone who requested a copy.
Interested applicants had a due
process to follow, namely filling out
required forms - ordering a survey
at your own expense and a certified
appraisal to determine the value. It
was all at the applicant's expense
and later signs were posted for the
pieces not initially selected.
Due diligence, as on any real
estate purchase, is recommended,
and I began due diligence by seek-
ing advice of my son, Jonathan
Rowe, Esq., U of F business gradu-
ate and Nova law and a Jax attor-
ney. He looked into it and gave me
a "go." I spoke also to a zoning con-
sultant who was very knowledge-
able about substandard lots of
record. I received another positive
response - in the meantime anoth-
er local attorney got wind of this
investment opportunity by buying
the remaining piece.
My middle son, James Rowe,
then the liaison between Exxon
Mobil and 26 Latin American coun-
tries as a procurator investor and
tax specialist/C.PA., who I also
sought his opinion, said, "Mom,


that's a 'no-brainer' - It has a million-
dollar view, on a paved road and it's
commercial. If you don't buy it, I
will."
Opportunity only knocks once
and softly at that. This was a time of
unbridled exuberance in procuring
real estate and the desire to get "in
on it" resulted in escalating prices
clouded by poor judgment. People
paid whatever was asked, unsup-
ported by change or improvement to
justify the hikes in prices. Old Town
was not a "gated" restricted area in
the south end. On the contrary, this
area was noted for being laid back
and relaxed, thus unrestricted
unpaved roads, far from shops and
groceries and too close to a very
ugly and sometimes smelly mill,
boats and trailers parked in the
yards - not too many driven to have
a manicured lawn but more inclined
to seize the moment and post the
"gone fishing " sign. Nothing wrong
with that!
The paradox is that in spite of
the bare-faced facts, there is a charm
that comes, borne naturally by the
breezes from the oceans, the sound
of masts clanging, the voices of the
seabirds and activities of the fisher-
men that encourages one to throw
caution to the wind and invest in a
dream. Hopefully, two new houses in
prominent locations will add to the
balance and benefit O.T. and the
improvements planned for the main
corridor will incite interest in new
activity. Mr. Rowe and I are deter-
mined to construct a new home that
will grace that corner for 100-plus
years with its modest simplicity. I
hope the old-timers remain the same
and we will adjust and mind our own
business. Live and let live. There
were no laws broken. There are
legal exceptions. To say otherwise is
libelous.
The Community Development
staff and the Historical District
Council showed themselves to be
very gracious in their comportment
in spite of the innuendos and self-
serving statements addressed by
some present. Item seven and eight
in your opinion are those you selec-
tively solicited with the sole purpose
of framing mischief. I have been
approached by many of my new
neighbors apologizing for our recep-
tion.
Apparently there is an opinion
that city personnel all the way to the
top are selected and given these
jobs without benefit of specialized
education, law degrees, manage-
ment degrees, etc. Could they pos-
sibly know more than their self-
appointed critics? Each man
deserves his "due." Theirs is respect
and honor even when their deci-
sions don't please or benefit us per-
sonally. Bottom line: Who can stand
before jealousy?
Carolyn Rowe
Fernandina Beach


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


81 COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


Appreciate food,

L et us give thanks unto the a rain
Lord. Remember his mar- end, re
velous works he has done. are on
He will increase his people that in
greatly and make them stronger will all
than their enemies. -> have l1
We should be thankful for every- just ne
thing we have experienced in this strong
life of ours, for all we have found the supply
answer in his words. fNOWAN or us.
Be thankful for the tears we have NOW AND ders o
cried, for they have taught us to THEN regard
appreciate lots of laughter and given ...- ever tl
us the ability to see the joy that stance
comes after. Through the tears we Maybelle Are
have come to know His Holy Spirit Kirkland for all
in our lives, how He is always there ships,
to comfort through our many strifes. as well as the bad? They
Give thanks for the storms we life to our emotions and
have encountered, knowing there is of what we have had. O


able relationship is that w


ib
ea
ly
11
e[
ee
,I




u




U
dl
he
es
e
tt
fo


u


sharing and all life's little things

ow at the our Father. We know that we His grace, the provision that it home, where his spirit is free to for-
alizing they can trust Him, we cannot trust any brings, how it has provided for ever roam. We miss you, but you will
y temporal, other. us in all things. Be thankful unto always be in our hearts from wife,
time they Be thankful for all the pains we Him, and bless His name, for the son, daughter, brothers, sisters, fam-
mend. We have known, for they have given a Lord is good; his mercy is everlast- ily and friends. It has been nine
arned we compassion for the suffering, an ing; and his truth endureth to all years; where did the time go?
ed to be ability to reach out to others and an generations. Birthday wishes to Cassandra
for God will appreciation of all the little things. As we enter into this holiday sea- Dennard, Maurice Fields, Elaine
the strength The greatest of God's love gives an son, take time to give thanks unto Overstreet, Corliss Brown, Mother
He shoul- understanding of the pains He suf- God, for without Him, we would not Bessie Reeves, Joel Gilbert, Derica
ir burdens, fered for us and how He endured all be where we are today. Nothing you Benson, Vivian Hardy, Ivy Dennison,
ess of what- things so that we could be free. have done or can say, only God Tara Rainey, Tyrone Johnson,
e circum- Always be thankful for the made it possible. Be thankful. Sandra Walthour, Neshia Johnson-
may be. hunger and thirst we have had to go In memory of our brother Joe Smith, Ernest White, Cameron
we thankful through to appreciate having food White. God gave him one step at a Jones, Louise Ford, Zenoria
he relation- and sharing it with others too. God time. Following God's word, he held Johnson, Regina Smith, Patrick
or the good gave Himself as our food and drink onto faith, hope and love. Believing Cribb, Melissa Moore, Terin Dallas,
have given to make sure we were truly fed. His in every word he heard, his spirit Theo Smith, Paula Evans, Anita
appreciation blood was shed for our drink and traveled on the wings of a dove, Holzendorf, Evangeline Smith,
r most valu- His body broken for our bread. guiding him toward the stairway to Sandra Palmer and Lexie Chatman.
with God, Most of all, we are thankful for heaven, where he found his eternal Have a blessed holiday season.


Up next:


Tea and


home tour

Next week is the third
annual Amelia Island
Museum of History Holiday
Home Tour in Fernandina, on
Dec. 4 and 5.
Five professionally deco-
rated private homes in the
historic district will be on dis-
play. Homes will be open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; tea will be
served at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Tour
tickets are
$25 per per-
son in
advance and
$30 on tour
days. The
Victorian tea
at the Bailey
House tickets
are $15 per
person and PLANTATION
space is limit- N
ed.
For more '
information Lauren Lowe
please visit Barry
www.amelia- arry
museum.org
or call 261-7378, ext. 100.
Proceeds will continue the
work on major renovations at
the museum.
Also next week is the
Amelia Community Theatre
Guild's "Evening of Holiday
Music," featuring the Sine
Nomine Choir directed by Jill
Dillingham, Mary Williams
and Nanette Autry.
Performances are Dec. 3 and
4 at 8 p.m. at the Amelia
Community Theatre, 209
Cedar St.
Not only will you hear holi-
day music but also a reading
of Truman Capote's A
Cirbi.-', . Memory with Ron
Kurtz and Judy Tipton.
Refreshments will be provid-
ed by the ACT Guild. This
benefit is being held to raise
funds for the serving kitchen
at the new theater, set to open
next year.
Tickets are $15 for adults
and $10 students. Please call
the box office at 261-6749 for
reservations.
Ocean Ladies Bridge win-
ners for November were
Lynn Meyer and Bev Arnold
- 1st place, Vicky Peters and
Jane Quinby - 2nd place, and
Adele Dalton and Marge
Andreason - slam prize win-
ners. Congratulations
ladies! The next play date is
Dec. 13 and you must sign up
yourself at the Ocean
Clubhouse on the bridge
sign-up sheet.


MEDAL

OFMERIT

Former Mayor
Bruce Malcolm, above
left, and Mayor Susan
Steger, far right,
accept the American
Legion Medal of Merit
on behalf of the city of
Fernandina Beach.
The award was pre-
sented by American
Legion Department of
Florida Commander
Phil Hearlson, next to
Malcolm, and
National Sergeant-at-
Arms Paul Martel,
right, at the dedica-
tion of American
Legion Post 54's new
building at 626 S.
Third St.
PHOTOS BY RYAN SMITH
NEWS-LEADER


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


Bunco Amelia meets at 7
p.m. the last Tuesday of the
month at traveling locations.
Ladies of all ages are invited
to join for a fun time, no
experience necessary.
Contact Marjorie at 491-
8622.

Byrd Wallace Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post meets at
7:30 p.m. the second
Monday at Kraft Athletic
Club-Ten Acres, 961023
Buccaneer Trail,
Fernandina Beach. Call Post
Quartermaster Pat Beamer
at 261-6416.
***


| Welcome to


SQod's House

SA Classic Carpets
S & Interiors, Inc.
CHEVROLET * BUICK BUDDY KELLUM,
PONTIAC * GMC Abby Carpet PreBUDDsidentL
464054 SR 200, Yulee 802 S. 8th Stret (904) 261 0242
(904) 261-6821 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291
FAMILY DENTISTRY "3 1 1
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN BadRCOCK
Most Insurances Accepted H OME fFURNI U
Call For Appointment m I m el
26i -6826sae -Aa .av�
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
Al A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL
FREEMAN Steve Johnson Automotive
WELL DRILLERS, INC. 1505 S 14th Street
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells Fernandina Beach, FL
Pump Installations & Repair 904-277-9719
606 S. 6th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Proudly Supporting Our Community


^V. *'t.* '.NE'A
S" Best Friends 47
1( V c.ard s Gifts & Party t
Your Party Headquarters ',
n" with Unqiue Gifts
at Affordable Prices
j .,i Most Greeting Cars .2/$100
S ext to Publi * 277-0144 ee y
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Centre'd Women is a
proudly disorganized group
of wonderful women that
meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Monday at Art & Antiques,
702 Centre St., Fernandina
Beach. Call Eileen Moore at
277-2717.

Cumberland Sound
Woodcarving Guild is for all
expertise levels and meets
at 6:30 Wednesday at vari-
ous locations. Call Bob
Schlag at (912) 729-2282.

Eight Flags Charter
Chapter of the American
Business Women's


Association is a organi-
zation of women with
diverse occupations who
gather together to provide
opportunities to help them-
selves and others grow per-
sonally and professionally
through leadership, educa-
tion, networking support,
national recognition and
community service.
The group meets at 6
p.m. the fourth Thursday of
every month at the
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club.
Call Susan Sturges at
(904) 206-2580 for meeting
reservations or information.


Thanksgiving is a special holiday in the United
States during which God is thanked for the
blessings of the past year As I think about this
aspect of Thanksgivlng, I wonder how we would
feel if we were thanked only once a year, on the
fourth Thursday of November for all the things


that we were involved in Everydayweshould
be thankful and express our gratitude to God for
His many blessings, and being thankful to God is
a good .reminder to ourselves of His goodness
and love for us The true spirit of Thanksgiving,
like that of Mothers Day, Fathers Day, or even
Valentines Day, should be reflected in our attitude
more than just once.each year We should not
need a holiday to remind us to be thankful, or
when to honor someone special, or to show
kindness to someone So, perhaps this year, we
O could invite a neighbor or friend who may be
hLodalone to share Thanksgiving with us And, while
we are passing the
turkey and cranberry
j VP 1. sauce, or having another
pieceiof pumpkin pie,
we will be sharing God s
blessingwithothers
.1


Book signing
Ben Walker will host a
book signing for his
novel, Winds of the South,
at Books Plus, 107 Centre St.
in Fernandina on Nov. 28
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Cookbook tasting
The public is invited to
special tasting from the new
cookbook, A Savory Place,
Culinary Favorites ofAmelia
Island. Cookbook sales bene-
fit Micah's Place, Nassau
County's domestic violence
center.
Tastings will be held Nov.
29, noon-5 p.m. at At Home
Amelia; Dec. 5, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
at the Fernandina Farmers
Market; Dec. 10, 3-7 p.m. at
Chico's; Dec. 12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
at Eileen's Art & Antiques;
Dec. 12, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at
The Plantation Shop; and
Dec. 15, 3-4:30 p.m. at Osprey
Village.
A Savory Place is a full-
color, 8 by 10 inch book, pub-
lished by Favorite Recipes
Press, Nashville, Tenn., ISBN
978-0-615-29646-3. It retails for
$24.95.
Book signing
American Beach
author, Annette McCollough
Myers, will sign copies
of her books, The Shrinking
Sands of an African American
Beach (written for the
preservation of Florida's his-
toric resources), and The Big
Sand Dune and The Beach
Lady at Books Plus, 107
Centre St., Dec. 2 from 11
a.m.-3 p.m.
Book Loft club
The Book Loft Book
Club's book for this month is
The Guernsey Literary and
Potato Peel Pie Society by
Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie
Barrows, a tale of the island
of Guernsey during the
German occupation, and of a
society as extraordinary as its
name.
The book club is open to
everyone and all avid readers
are encouraged to attend. The
discussion will be held at the
Book Loft, 214 Centre St.,
Dec. 7 at 5 p.m.
Library club
The Friends of the Library
Book Club of Fernandina
Beach meets at 7:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of each
month in the parlor room of
St. Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave.
Meetings are moderated
by retired English professors,
Marilyn and Norman Wesley,
and new members are always
welcome.
They will discuss People of
the Book by Geraldine Brooks
Dec. 10.
Poet laureate search
The Nassau County
Writers and Poets Society, in
conjunction with the
Fernandina Beach and
Nassau County commissions,
announces a competition to
select the next Poet Laureate
of Nassau County.
The (,iii. ,.,il .'l run to
Dec. 15, with the new poet
laureate installed during the
Amelia Island Book Festival
Feb. 12-13, 2010. The contest


* Air Force Airman
Martell Roberts graduated
from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas. The airman
completed an intensive, eight-
week program that included
training in military discipline
and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness and
basic warfare principles and
skills.


is open to all Nassau County
residents ages 17 to 117.
Submit 3 to 5 original poems
reflecting life in the county.
Submit two copies of each
poem, one with a name and
contact information, the other
without.
For information and to
submit electronic entries, con-
tact www.wordsmythe
@net-magic.net. Mail hard
copy entries or queries to
POET LAUREATE, 1417
Sadler Road #134, Fernan-
dina Beach, Florida 32034.
Entries must be postmarked
by Dec. 15.
Conroy event
The Amelia Island
Book Festival announces
that the Melissa and Pat
Conroy event, A Night With
Poppy, has been moved to
Saturday night, Feb. 13,
2010 at 7 p.m. to a larger
venue, the Old First
Baptist Church in Fernandina
Beach.
Tickets, at $50 each and
limited to two per person, are
available at the Visitor
Center/Train Depot in down-
town Fernandina Beach,
Books Plus and the Golf
Club of Amelia. By mail write
to AIBF/Poppy's Pants, PO.
Box 824, Amelia Island, FL
32035.
Book fest breakfast
The Amelia Island Book
Festival will partner with
Micah's Place, Nassau
County's certified domestic
violence center, and novelists
Janis Owens and Cassandra
King at an 8 a.m., Feb. 13
breakfast at the Fernandina
Woman's Club.
Micah's Place Auxiliary's
cookbook, A Savory Place,
Culinary Favorites ofAmelia
Island, will be available for
sale to help support the many
programs Micah's Place
offers.
Breakfast tickets are $30
and available at The Purple
Dove, Books Plus and the
Golf Club of Amelia. For infor-
mation visit www.asavory-
place.com.
The Amelia Island Book
Festival is Feb. 12-14. Visit
www.Ameliaislandbookfestiva
l.com.
Writers' workshop
Tickets are now on sale for
the Amelia Island Book
Festival and Florida State
College at Jacksonville
Writers' Workshop Feb. 12,
2010 at the Betty P. Cook
Center, Yulee.
The event will include
writer sessions, hands-on
workshops and a panel dis-
cussion on "Putting the South
in Southern Writing." Authors
include: Rick Bragg, Sonny
Brewer, Cassandra King,
Janis Owens and Jeff Shaara,
along with local writers, pro-
fessors and industry profes-
sionals.
Cost is $90 by Dec. 15 or
$95 after. Florida State
College at Jacksonville and
area high school students are
admitted free but must pre-
register.
For information and
registration visit www.ameli-
aislandbookfestival.com or
call Dickie Anderson at
556-6455.


Airmen who complete
basic training earn four cred-
its toward an associate in
applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Felicia
Roberts of Callahan and Dr.
Timothy Roberts of
Fayetteville, N.C.
Roberts is a 2009 graduate
of Orange Park High School.


BLACK


LITERARY LEANINGS


+


- aiet 2580OSacller RoaJ
r~e ernanclina beack

Iam i'earfuII~ aJ
5p. wonclerF'ul~ maje


MILITARY NEWS


.I




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION 9


Temporal things, eternal things and relationships
The door opened and in he provision, time in their daily routine He longs to have a deeper
ran, the routine a familiar one. I couldn't when my wife would normally relationship with us? You
Happy - that's the name of help but place his bowl on the ground, might not agree, but I think
one of our cats - though nor- chuckle as I instead, she bent down and so. Like my wife with our cat,
mally a bit skittish, has never watched the looked him right in the face. God loves it when we talk to
been bashful when it comes two of them "What is it Happy?" she said, Him. Though at times we may
to receiving his morning - interact. All knowing just what he wanted. feel like we speak a whole dif-
meal. This particular day he he seemed Her momentary delay in giv- ferent language, trust me, He
seemed overly excited about interested in ing him his food only caused understands the language of
getting his food. was getting him to talk all the more; our heart.
"Good morning Happy," my PULPIT his morning something, by the way, my Now some may say that
wife spoke to him in her typi- NOTES meal. My wife absolutely loves to hear. seems kind of mean; you
cal affectionate tone. His wife, on the "OK," she said, as if under- know, delaying things for a
response was one I have no other hand, standing his every word. moment for the purpose of
idea how to articulate on the Pastor was all "Here you go," and with that building a relationship. But,
written page. A series of Rob Goyette about the placed his bowl on the ground to me, if the end result meets
strange guttural noises, purrs relationship. so he could start eating. In an my eternal need, and not just
and what I'm sure is some As she carried his bowl out instant, I saw something. my temporal one, it's not
kind of special cat language the side door and onto our Could it be that God, the One mean at all. Actually, it's quite
filled our kitchen, as my wife wooden porch, he and all his who supplies all our daily loving.
reached for his bowl and strange noises followed her. needs, sometimes delays Perhaps it's just my opin-
began pouring out his daily That's when it happened. At a things for a moment because ion, but so much of what we


that make a difference


call "having a relationship
with God" is all centered on
things that one day will rust,
rot and pass away. The way I
see it, God loves us too much
to let our lives be defined by
such shallow things. He
knows that without a mean-
ingful relationship with Him,
in the end, we all will perish.
It's for this cause that He has
given us a Savior.
Just like my wife bending
down to look into our cat's
face, so God, in the person of
Jesus Christ, has stooped
down to look into each one of
ours. I know, the analogy is a
little funny, but you get the
point.
The bottom line: God loves
us. He cares not just about


our temporal needs, which
are here today and gone
tomorrow, but also about
things that will last forever. I
leave you with Jesus' words
that are real food for those
who take them in.
"Don't keep worrying about
having something to eat or
drink. Only people who don't
know God are always worry-
ing about such things. Your
Father knows what you need.
But put God's work first and
these things will be yours as
well." (Luke 12:29-31
Contemporary English
Version)
Robert L. Goyette is pastor
of Living Waters World
Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Bus ministry
Blackrock Baptist Church has
started a bus ministry in the Yulee
area, for children and their families,
including a fantastic learning experi-
ence in Sunday School followed by
children's church and more exciting
games. Adults go to regular worship.
The bus route covers every house
between 1-95 in Yulee and the Shave
Bridge. The bus runs on Sunday
mornings.
Sunday School starts at 9:15 a.m.
Worship services start at 10:30 a.m.
The church is located at 96362
Blackrock Road in Yulee. For infor-
mation, call 261-6220.
Sounds of Christmas
Bell ringing for The Salvation
Army Hope has begun. Organizers
are still in need of bell ringers both
on the island and in Yulee. If you,
your club, group or ministry can
donate just two hours of time show-
ing the love of Jesus with your smile
and a joyful "Merry Christmas"
greeting, the Salvation Army needs
you. Call Mary Moore or Susan Lane
at 321-0435 to schedule.
Mount Olive celebration
The Mount Olive Historical
Restoration Society invites the com-
munity to join the Hooper family of
Nassauville in a Thanksgiving praise
service and history presentation on
Nov. 28 at 4 p.m. at Little Mount
Olive Baptist Church on Old


Nassauville Road. Following the
service, the society will present part
three of its series on the Rural Black
History of Nassau County with a dis-
cussion on rural education in the
early 20th century. All who wish to
join the worship and share their
memories of rural education are wel-
come. The program is presented in
cooperation with the Gullah/Gee-
chee Cultural Heritage Committee of
Northeast Florida. For information
call (904) 502-1992.
Bishop's visit
The Rt. Rev. Royal U. Grote Jr.,
Bishop Ordinary of the REC Diocese
of Mid-America, a founding Province
of the Anglican Church of North
America, will visit Holy Trinity
Anglican Church, 1830 Lake Park
Drive in Amelia Park, on Nov. 29.
Grote will preach during the 10 a.m.
service as well as officiate at the
sacrament of Confirmation. There
will be a reception for the bishop and
confirmands after the service in the
Parish Hall. For further information
call 491-6082.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope
House each Tuesday at noon for its
Weekly Worship Service and
Fellowship Lunch. On Dec. 1, Brent
Alberta, a local evangelist, will testify
to the power of the Gospel to change
lives. For information call 321-0435
or stop by the Hope House, 410
South Date St.


'God Speaking
In celebration of the birth of
Jesus, the Worship Choir of Yulee
Baptist Church will present "God
Speaking" Dec. 6 at 6 p.m.
The musical will include drama
(by Chris Lathrop and Eric Schmidt),
solos (by Patty Coulter and Bonnie
Vance), "old favorite" Christmas
songs and the message that God
wants to speak to you in the hustle
and bustle of the season, He cares
about your loneliness, relationship
concerns, health issues and financial
woes. All are welcome. For informa-
tion call the church at 225-5128.
Pastor anniversary
O'Neal Memorial Baptist Church,
474257 SR 200 East, will observe its
church and pastor anniversary cele-
bration with services on Dec. 11 and
13. The Rev. Pauline Tucker, pastor
of Prince Chapel AME Church of
Nassauville, will deliver the sermon
for the Friday evening worship that
begins at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, the
program will begin at 3 p.m. The Rev.
Cornell Denson, pastor of Harper
Baptist Church of Yulee, will bring
the message. Call 277-2606 for infor-
mation.
Hanukkah party
The Jewish Community of Amelia
Island will celebrate the spirit of the
season with a "Down-home
Hanukkah Party" Dec. 12. Alice
Goldman is chairing the committee


to organize the festivities and food. If
you're able to volunteer, call
Goldman at 548-1100.
Women's retreat
All women and teenage girls are
invited to a woman's retreat with
Grace Community Church, Jan. 22-
23 at Coquina Presbyterian Church
in Ormond Beach. Early registration
is $40 due by Dec. 1. Retreat broc-
hures and information is available by
contacting Signe or Tabitha at 491-
0363 or office@gracenassau.com.
Revival
Blackrock Baptist Church will
hold a revival at 7 p.m. Jan. 24-27.
Join for praise and spiritual growth
through song and message. Michael
Combs, gospel recording artist, will
worship through song each evening
and Rick Coram, evangelist, will
bring a Spirit-led message. For infor-
mation call 261-6220.
Harbor Shores
Harbor Shores Ministries is a
non-profit organization that is accept-
ing tax-deductible donations to help
local community needs. Your items
may be given to a family in need or
liquidated to supply food, clothes,
shelter, utilities, diapers, etc. To
donate clothes or items for the action
center, call 225-0963. Also needed are
racks, hangers and shelving.
Compassion in action
The Coalition for the Homeless


has started a cold night shelter to
provide a warm and safe overnight
facility for the homeless and those
without adequate heat on nights
when temperatures fall below 40
degrees. A Fernandina Beach
church has volunteered its space.
The Jewish Community of Amelia
Island is raising funds for mats and
blankets as well as hoping to staff
the shelter (only if it is open that
night) on a specific night. Two team
leaders are needed to organize the
community's volunteers (3-5 people).
Everyone will receive training and
the Coalition for the Homeless will
continue to support and coordinate
the entire effort. For information on
this interfaith community project,
contact Dani Gammel at 261-8081 or
dani326@bellsouth.net.
Small group studies
Memorial United Methodist
Church offers fellowship, learning,
prayer and mission in small group
settings for women, men and cou-
ples' groups with a variety of studies
offered. In the past The Shack and
Same Kind of Different as Me were
read. For information call Jane
Holzkamp at 321-4321.
Playgroup
MOM,ME meets every Wednes-
day from 9:30-11 a.m. in Noah's
Place, First Presbyterian's nursery
and preschool classrooms. Everyone

RELIGION Continued on 12A


"Worship this week at the


place of your choice"


in I M. - . .__ _


OWwChristwalk
OChurch

Sunday Celebration
10:00 am
"Kidswalk" 10:00 am
Takeout" Wed 630pm
2920 Bailey Road
261-7120 thechristwalk.com



Sl."p..;t Church
Sunday School..................................... 9:30 am
Sunday Worship ............................... 10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA ......................... 6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study................... 6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org


/ \

AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
An Interdenominational
Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
November 29, 2009 - 9:15 a.m.
Advent I
MESSAGE: Waiting"
Sunday School Classes:
10:30 AM- The Pilgrim's Progress"
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-
The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
,'9041 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


ANCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @1 1:00
515 Centre Street


II IL


St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes You!
Located at the corner E..
of 8th &Atlantic
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist \|
8:45 a.m. Breakfast - Burns Hall
9:30 a.m. Christian formation for all.
10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist
6 p.m. Celtic Worship - 4th Sunday
6 p.m. TAIZE' - 2nd Sunday
904-261 -4293
www.stpetersparish.org
YULEE UNITED
- METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship with us where
the Bible is our only Authority.
Church Services: 11am
YMCA on Citrona / 225-5368
wwwnn, amelaislandchulrchofchrist com


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6th Street
Dr. Holton Seigling
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:50 a
Nursery
t Children
7 Youth
Zb Adults
261-3837
www.1 stpress-fb.com


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services-10:30 am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
Bus Ministry Available
www.blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Corner of Buccaneer Tr & Gerbing Road, Fernandina Bch
For More Information Call: 261-9527


7 Iils 1iiillllIil His
Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor






Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-19011
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566,
aln r call 904-277-0550


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... .9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. . 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training ........... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ....... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnieview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptistchurch.org


.1. 4


Living Waters
world outreach
Contemporary Worship
SUN 9:30am
WED 7:00pm
, F ** Youth, Nursery&
Children's Ministries
321-2117
Rob & Christie Goyette
Senior Pastors OnAiA1 mile wstof Amelia Island
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org


Fernandina Beach
Church of Christ
1005 S 14th St
904-261-9760
www.cocfb.org
Worship times'
Sun 930am Bible Class
10 30am Worship
Wed 7'OOn BibleClass


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
innovative Style, Contemporary Music, Casual Atmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 9:00am and 10:30am
Nursery Provided
KidKredible Children Ministries
Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth Program Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ...Connecting with People.


yITLEE

IBCHliRdLJI

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd.,West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225*0809


FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
20 South Ninth Street * 261-4907
Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
The Church in the
Heart of the City
With the Desire to be in the
Heart ofAll People
Sunday New Members Class 9 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Wednesday Noon-day Prayer
Wednesday Mid-week Service 7-9 p.m.
Ministries: Bus & Van, Couples, Singles, Youth


angelfood
Having Trouble Stretching Your Dollar?
Angel Food Ministries is a non-profit food
co-op providing high quality food at a low cost!
Boxes are $30 and feed a family of four for about a week.
Items vary by month, but include fresh/frozen items, meats,
fruits, vegetables, dairy etc. With no income restrictions,
everyone can participate!
Contact Fernandina Beach Church of Christ for
Information or to place an order - 904-261-9760


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor

--- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services


Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.poplcamelia.org

I-frovruence ^':
bes6yterian
(furcfi -LOlrDA us1-
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corner Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.providenceyulee.com
providenceyulee@comcast.net


HoCy tty ngcan Cfhurc






A4gdcan Church of!orti America
Our province is a founding member of the Anglican Church
of North America
As Anglicans we believe:
* the Bible is the inspired Word of God
* In God the Father who created us
* In Jesus Christ His Son who saved us
* In the Holy Spirit who sanctifies us
As Anglicans we worship using the traditional Liturgy in the
1928 Book of Common Prayer, Affirming the Nicene and the Apostle's Creed.
Sunday Services
Holy Communion 8:00 am & 10:00 am (with music)
Morning Prayer 4th Sunday of each month 10.00 am
RevJ. Michael Bowhay, Rector
1830 Lake Park Dr. (Amelia Park) Fernandina Beach
904-491-6082 * www.HolyTrinityAnglican.org


BRfADCAST LUVE
ON THE INrFRETE
FOR TROOPS OVERSEAS




First Baptist ChMurch
1600 S. 8th Streetb 6 etrStet15
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-261-3617
WWW. FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton, Sr Pastor


-- - -,III,*-IIIIROl *l-"[O] lFO MORE INFO:l l )225-0777


11


BLACK


I i I - '




CYAN MAGENTA


10A HOMES


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


HOME AND GARDEN BRIEFS


Farmers market
Capt. Jack's Crab Cakes,
featuring a crab cake special-
ty using real lump crabmeat
with a blend of unique sea-
sonings, has expanded its
menu at the Fernandina
Farmers Market.
Shoppers will also be able
to enjoy crab bisque pack-
aged for ease to take home.
Also, a new crab dip is on the
menu - perfect to sample at
the market. All crab cakes
are made fresh and then
frozen for ease taking home.
Shoppers are reminded that
Platt's Meats will be at the
market Dec. 5 and
Thompson Pork Dec. 12.
The Fernandina Farmers
Market is open every
Saturday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
at the corner of Seventh and
Centre streets. Call 491-4872
or visit www.fernandinafarm-
ersmarket.com.
Beach cleanup
Talbot Islands State Parks
need your help to clean up
the parks. Volunteer your
time to help protect this pris-
tine landscape at 9 a.m. Nov.
28 at Amelia Island State
Park on Heckscher Drive.
Take a leisurely walk
around the southern point of
Amelia Island while cleaning
up the beach. Garbage bags
and gloves will be provided.
Remember to bring water
and sunscreen.
For information, call
(904) 251-2320. For more
information about Florida
State Parks, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org.
Sprinkler
demonstration
Nassau County Fire
Rescue will host a demon-


station of a room with a
sprinkler system versus one
without, side-by-side, to
show the effectiveness of a
residential fire sprinkler sys-
tem. In conjunction with
Simplex/Grinnell, two mock-
up living rooms will be set on
fire Dec. 5 at noon in The
Home Depot parking lot on
A1A in Yulee.
Rightwhale
celebration
A celebration of the annu-
al return of the critically
endangered North Atlantic
right to the coast of the
Southeast U.S. will be held
along the shores of the only
known right whale calving
area at the beginning of their
calving season.
Many activities will take
place during the festival at
Sea Walk Pavilion in Jackson-
ville Beach on Dec. 5 from 10
a.m.-4 p.m., including a silent
auction, kids' activities and
exhibitions from many local
organizations. Join a beach
cleanup at 9 a.m. or the
beach run at 3 p.m. Enjoy
live music by Florida-based
The Hip Abduction and
Hours Eastly all afternoon.
Exhibitors include the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration,
Jacksonville Zoo, Ocean
Conservancy, Keepers of the
Coast and many others.
For information visit
www.rightwhalefestival.org.
Register for the beach run at
www.performancemultispor
ts.com/rightwhale5k.htm.
Turtle center outing
The Sierra Club Nassau
Chapter will host an outing
Dec. 22 to Jekyll Island, Ga.,
including a visit to the
Georgia Sea Turtle Center at


A benefit for
TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN'
A mentoring and scholarship program
for Nassau County students


An evening of fine


11 a.m. and 1 p.m., where a
trained educator will give a
90-minute presentation and
patient update program.
Admission is $10. Optional
activities include a self-guid-
ed tour of the historic district
(free), a guided tram tour
(90 minutes, $16), biking on
20 miles of paved trails (bike
rental is $8 for four hours)
and nature walks (free).
Optional activities along with
travel to Jekyll Island are "on
your own," with all fees paid
directly to the concession.
There is a $5 per car
entrance fee. The outing is
open to the public. For more
information and to RSVP,
contact Len Kreger at
Len.Kreger@rocketmail.com
or (904) 432-8389.
Kayaktrip
A guided kayak/canoe
trip from Little Talbot State
Park (Kayak Amelia) to Fort
George Island will be con-
ducted by the Nassau Sierra
Club on Jan. 9.
The three- to four-hour
trip will depart the Kayak
Amelia concession on Little
Talbot State Park at 11 a.m.
for a three- to four-mile easy
paddle in calm water.
Participants with their own
kayaks must have a flotation
device. Or rent a kayak at
$30 single/$45 tandem from
Kayak Amelia, which is waiv-
ing the launch fee and offer-
ing a 10 percent rental dis-
count. Bring sun protection,
insect repellent, food and
drinking water.
Participants must sign a
liability waiver. The outing is
free and open to the public
and led by Len Kreger, a cer-
tified Sierra Outings Leader.
RSVP by Jan. 6 to
Len.Kreger@rocketmail.com
or call (904) 432-8389.


Take Stock in

Children

Thursday, December 3, 2009
6pm- 9pm
Am a Island Plantation, Executive Conference Center

Wine, a splendid buffet


YULEE PRIMARY
DOLPHIN SINGERS
DIRECTOR - GAY FOOTE

YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
CHORUS
DIRECTOR - ANDY SHEPARD


YULEE ELEMENTARY
PANTHER SINGERS
DIRECTOR - VALERIE JONES

YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
DRAMA TEAM
DIRECTOR - ERIN MACABITAS


CALLAHAN INTERMEDIATE CHORUS & MALLET MASTERS DIRECTOR - MARY ANN SALIS
Light refreshments will be available but individuals may bring their own.
Alcoholic beverages are not permitted. Event is free & open to the public.
Call 548-4400 for information.
LOCALS INTERESTED IN PERFORMINGAT FUTURE COURTYARD
NIGHTS CAN CALL DON HUGHES AT 548-4481.
NL/PSA


Oleander moth active


even in cool weather


Q :My oleander is cov
.in caterpillars. Wha
I do to get rid of them? G
A. I have seen the olea
- moth recently, there
we know she is continuing
lay eggs. We should not 1
lulled into thinking becau
the weather is somewhat
er the Oleander moth is i
active.
Once the caterpillar r
es lengths over one inch,
can be done except to ma
ly remov
them. Th
course m
you mus
S hand pic
them off
* you cann
bring yo
to hand
them off
GARDEN then con
TALK pruning
some of t
branches
BeckyJordi which ar
heavily in
ed. Do not burn the bran
as this plant will give offa
son gas that can be deadly
humans and pets. The br
es can be bagged but be
the bag is securely tied a
these caterpillars have a
ral tendency to crawl upw
If the bag is not tied tight
they will escape and all yo
work will be for nothing.
You can apply the inse
cide Bacillus thuringiens
Bt but it only works well
the caterpillars are small.
Although the shrub looks
rible it will eventually re-g
its leaves; the defoliation
not kill the shrub.
A publication from the
University of Florida on t
Oleander moth that will p
vide more information ca
found at http://edis.ifas.t
edu/IN135.

_ pp




DON'T LITTER

I Spay or Neutei


, }" .7


ered
at can
;P
wander
before
ng to
be
use
cool-
not
each-
little
ce
his of . My next door neighbor
neans Q .told me to stop watering
t my St. Augustine lawn. Right
k now I water two and three
I. f times a week. But it is still
lot warm and if I do not water my
urself grass looks terrible. Is he giv-
pick ing me good advice? JW
f, A Three times a week is
isider .excessive no matter
out what time of year. St.
the Augustinegrass prefers to be
s, watered deeply, but less often.
*e Watering it frequently and
nfest- shallowly makes for a weak
ches root system.
a poi- Right now St. Johns River
y to Water Management (SJRWM)
anch- recommends watering once a
sure week if we do not receive suf-
s ficient rainfall. Addresses with
natu- odd numbers can water on
vard. Saturday and even-numbered
ly, homes water on Sunday.
our Therefore, you should cut
back your irrigation system to
*cti- once a week. If your grass is
is or wilting between watering it
when may be the result of poor root
growth or root disease.
s ter- You can contact me for an
grow appointment to look at the
will grass in my office. I would
need a specimen about the
size of a piece of notebook
he paper. I would need to see
?ro- roots, runners (stolon), leaves
n be (blades) and soil. Call me at
ufl. the office at 548-1116 for a
consultation. I will discuss the
best maintenance practices for
your lawn. This professional
consultation is free but you
must make an appointment.
SI found this beetle in my
I ^ * decaying tree. What is
it? WC
A You are the second per-
.: . son who wanted me to
"/ ': identify this insect. I suppose
they are moving about now.
' The insect you brought me
is one of the young stages of
the common Florida woods
cockroach. The young stages


An oleander
larva, above, and
the Florida
woods cock-
roach, left.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS


look very similar to the adult
but the adults can grow up to
2 inches in length.
I know you do not want to
hear this, but this insect is
actually very important to the
environment. They feed on
decaying material. We do not
recommend using any type of
insecticide on them. If, howev-
er, they enter into the home
you can either kill them or, if
possible, sweep them up and
put them back outside.
The best way to keep out-
door insects out of the home
is to provide a protective barri-
er around the perimeter of the
house.
There are several pesticide
companies that make these
types of pesticides, check for
them at your local garden cen-
ters. Remember to read and
follow the labels of any pesti-
cide you use around your
home and in your garden. The
label is the law. A publication
from the University of Florida
on the Florida woods roach
that will provide more infor-
mation can be found at
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
MG225.
Rebecca Jordi, UF/IFAS
Nassau County Horticultural
Extension Agent, is a
University of Florida faculty
member Extension locations
are the satellite office at the
County Building in Yulee and
the main Extension Office in
Callahan. The UF/IFAS
Nassau County Demonstration
Garden is located at the James
S. Page Governmental
Complex and demonstrates best
management practices for
Northeast Florida. Mail ques-
tions to Garden Talk, c/o
Rebecca Jordi, Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1,
Callahan, FL 32011. Visit
http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu.
rljordi@ufl.edu


3rd finnaal fmilia Island Masum of tlistorg


tlolidag tiom� Tour


In historic frnandina B:aeh

Deember 4 & 5,2009

10:00 am until 4:00 pm


+


arnd a silent auction of unusual items.

Advance purchase $50 ~ At the door $60
Tickets available: first Coast Community Bank, The NewsLeader,
The Nassau County Record, Cafe Kavibo, Resort To Home and
The Ocean Clubhouse at Amelia Island Plantation.
Oc... change by phone at 904-548-4432 (Flovida State College)

For more information call Take Stock in Children 904-548-4464

iml nIsland Plantat NEWS"h LEADER


L7_ LRuIDrLA'SNATUIRAL ISLAND DESTbINAIONU ~r


TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN/NASSAU IS AFFILIATED WITH FLORIDA STATE COLLEGEAT JACKSONVILLE AND THE FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOUNDATION, AN IRS APPROVED 501 (C)(3)

MW SPONSORED 3Y FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE, BETTY P CnnK NqIqiai CfMWRn: * v
.-'' ~ THE NEWS-LEAIDER AND NASSAU C'- tii i- Rt :,'F E,
( ( DOVE E 6 . U









^ At The Lewis "Red" Bean Nassau Room
'iat the Florida State College Betty P. Cook Nassau Center, Yulee i
e* 76346 William Burgess Blvd., LOCATED 1/2 MILE EAST OF 1-95 INTERSECTION '

Nassau County Holiday

Music & Fine Arts Festival
Friday, December 4
Front Gates Open at 6:45p.m. Starts at 7 p.m.
Featuring Public School Performing Groups


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


BUIG ELIG9OD


Buying All Rolex Buying Gold Sterling Silver
& Premium Watches & Platinum We Buy All Forms of Silver


* Rolex * Patek Phillipe
* Cartier * Tiffany * Breitling
* Omega * LeCoultre * Vacheron
* Constantin * Pkcet & Wristwatches
* Railroad Watches


* Bracelets and Rings
* Broken Jewelry
* Class Rings and Fraternal Pins
* Jeweler's Scrap and Dental Gold


* Tea Sets * Flatware
* Trophies * Candlesticks
* Coins & Silver * Trays
* Bracelets * Necklaces * Jewelry


Buying Diamonds
* All Diamond Jewelry
* Engagement Rings
* Chipped and Broken Diamonds
* Diamonds over One Carat
* GIA-Certified Diamonds
* Canary, Blue and Pink Diamonds


Buying All Jewelry
* Platinum, Gold and Silver Jewelry
* Diamond Jewelry and pearls
*Bvlgari, Webb and Van Cleef
* Cartier, Tiffany and Gerog Jensen
* All Types of Real Jewelry
* All styles and in any condition


UNITED


GOLD/COIN


STATES


USED


r .

NEW


$1.00 $150.00 & UP ....$$
$2.50 $150.00 & UP ....$$
$3.00 $500.00 & UP ....$$
$5.00 $250.00 & UP ....$$
$10.00 $500.00 & UP ....$$
$20.00 $1000.00 & UP ....$$


Buying 1964 & Older
' DIMES... .$0.90 & UP....$$
QUARTERS .$2.25 & UP....$$
HALVES .. .$4.50 & UP....$$
DOLLARS ..$10.00 & UP....$$
CLAD HALVES �19651969 $1.50 & UP....$$


SE BEEE IGHSTPICES


U.S. S~1I LVERCINS~


Vt.
~f- ,.~


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


RELIGION Continued from 9A
is welcome to participate in the
mom and baby/toddler playgroup
that has evolved into an interest-
ing group of moms and children
growing and nurturing, network-
ing and socializing, sharing and
caring with all who come. This
ministry is open to the public. No
reservations are needed.
Food ministries
Angel Food Ministries and
Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ are offering food relief for
the community. For more informa-
tion contact Thomas Kessel or
Tom Gilday at 277-2517 or e-mail
fbangelfood@gmail.com. The
church is located at 1005 South
14th St. Visit www.cocfb.org and
www.angelfoodministries.com.
* * *
The Bridge Family Worship
Center in Yulee is offering Angel
Food Ministries discounted food.
Open to anyone, this opportunity
allows you to feed your family for
a fraction of the normal cost. A
family of four can eat for a week
for only $30. The ministry is offer-
ing boxes of restaurant quality
food at a greatly discounted rate.
Visit www.thebridgeflorida.com or
call 225-4860.


Senior Angel Tree
As you begin thinking of how you
will give back this holiday season,
consider sponsoring a low-income
senior citizen for Christmas. Pur-
chasing a little something from a
Senior Angel's wish list will help
bring joy, hope and a sense of impor-
tance into the lives of the often alone
and forgotten. For information or to
adopt a Senior Angel, call Mary
Moore at 321-0435 or stop by The
Salvation Army Hope House at the
corner of Ninth and Date streets.
Advent journey
Join Memorial United Methodist
Church as they journey through
Advent and approach Christmas.
Each Sunday night of Advent will
offer a different program for all ages.
Kindermusik educator Sarah Flint
will lead a Musical Christmas Story-
time for ages 3-5. Carol Olson will
lead older children, with a different
event each week. UMYF begins at 5
p.m. with dinner and then games, a
program and worship.
At 5 p.m. in the sanctuary Nov. 29,
Dec. 6 and 13, adults may spend
reflective time in the spirit of the sea-


son. Themes include Nov. 29, Devel-
oping a Thankful Heart; Dec. 6, Glad
Tidings; and Dec. 13, Service of
Healing.
On Dec. 20 at 4:30 p.m. enjoy
church-wide Christmas caroling and
return to Maxwell Hall at 6 p.m. for a
Birthday Party for Jesus. All are
invited to attend any and all of these
events. For information, contact
Pastor Hollie at 261-5769.
Christmas musical
Start your Christmas celebration
with a children's Christmas musical,
"Legacy of Love," Dec. 5 at 4 p.m. at
the Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ, corner of 14th and Jasmine
streets. Admission is free. Children
of all ages are welcome to this musi-
cal that shows how to share God's
love in their everyday lives.
First Baptist events
Fernandina First Baptist Church
welcomes everyone to their
Christmas celebrations in Decem-
ber, beginning with the Toyland
Concert Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. Admission
is a new, unwrapped toy to benefit
the Marine Corps Toys for Tots.
On Dec. 13 the Worship Choir


will present "Everything Glorious,"
an anointed praise and worship musi-
cal full of Christmas favorites, best-
loved praise and worship choruses
and new songs. It begins at 6 p.m.
On Dec. 20 at 6 p.m., the chil-
dren's choir will present "Miracle on
Main Street," a musical drama that
addresses political correctness at
Christmas as only children can.
On Dec. 24, at 5:30 p.m. celebrate
Christmas Eve with the annual
Carols, Candles and Communion
Service, a family tradition at FBC.
For more information contact the
church office at 261-3617.
Messiah Sing
The second annual Clay County
Messiah Sing will be held Dec. 6 at
Island View Baptist Church in
Orange Park. This annual event fea-
turing Handel's masterwork was
revived last year by the Clay County
Church musicians' group and the
Jacksonville Masterworks Chorale.
All area singers are invited to join in
rehearsal at 1:30 p.m. The communi-
ty is invited to the concert at 3 p.m.
Island View Baptist Church is
located at 900 Park Ave. The concert
is free, a collection will be taken to


defray expenses. For information call
(904) 264-2241, ext. 236.
'Christmas Homecoming
The community is invited to expe-
rience "A 1940's Christmas Home-
coming" Dec. 11 and 13 at 7 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church. This is a
musical drama about love and sacri-
fice set in wartime 1940's and filled
with upbeat, Big Band arrangements
bringing the period fully to life along
with carols that depict the true mean-
ing of Christmas. At the end of the
program active and inactive military
personnel will be honored.
The performance includes a
drama cast, singers from area chur-
ches and a 13-piece 1940's Big Band.
Admission is free. Childcare for
infants to age 4 is available with
reservations. Call the church office
at 261-9527. Amelia Baptist Church is
located at 961167 Buccaneer Trail.
Blackrock musical
Blackrock Baptist Church will
present a musical, "The Night Christ
was Born," at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 20.
Everyone is welcome. The church is
located at 96362 Blackrock Road in
Yulee. For information, call 261-6220.


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A new offering for coin collectors is America's first silver dol-
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the rare and beautiful Larimar stone. This one source gemstone
from the Dominican Republic re-min-
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the shape of Amelia
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relaxed atmosphere, free of high
pressure tactics. With 19 years in the
jewelry industry, she finds her career
rewarding and wants to continue to offer
unique, fine quality jewelry and exceptional
customer service.
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OUTDOORS / TIDES


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


Strasser finishes seconds behind 2A state champion


BETH JONES
News-Leader

Stephanie Strasser owns one
state title, but she wanted another
one.
"I really wanted to win, of
course," Strasser said. "Winning
state either happens or it doesn't.
It's not like you did anything wrong.
It just wasn't meant to be. That's
the way I see it."
Strasser, a senior at Fernandina
Beach High School, finished sec-
ond in the 2A state cross country
meet Saturday. She crossed the fin-
ish line just four seconds behind
defending champion Stephanie
Schappert of Pope John Paul I.
"We actually have a bit of a rival-
ry going on," Strasser said. "We
went to the same camp this sum-
mer. We're always really close in
all the races. I think it's ironic her
name's Stephanie.
"I did my best. I'm real happy
with my race. It was definitely a
tough race. Stephanie, Nicole
(Carpio, the third-place finisher)
and I, we were elbowing each other


a bit. I was trying to break away
during the second mile, really push-
ing the pace.
"Stephanie had a really big surge
at the beginning of the last mile.
She got some distance between us."
In her battle at the end with
Carpio, "I almost ended up catching
Stephanie," Strasser said. "It was
right there."
Strasser, who ran Saturday's
race in 18:02.88, was the county,
district and region girls champion
this season.
"It was almost a perfect season,"
Strasser said.
Strasser was third in the state
last year in cross country. She'll
take two weeks off and begin
preparing for the spring track sea-
son. Last year, she was the two-mile
state champion.
Her success has earned her a
scholarship offer to run at the
University of Florida. She has ver-
bally committed to UF, but still plans
to visit Florida State and Georgia.
"I'm keeping my options open,"
she said.
"Sthephanie just came up a little


short, but I and Coach (Roy) Ben-
son could not be more proud of
her," FBHS Coach Mark Durr said.
"She was of course a little disap-
pointed after the race because she
is the most competitive athlete there
is, but she has such a bright future
and all of the natural tools as well as
work habits that the sky is the limit
for Stephanie."
Strasser was the lone state qual-
ifier for the girls, but the entire boys
team qualified. They finished 19th.
"It is kind of strange," Durr said.
"We are disappointed, but we're not
disappointed. We set out with a very
challenging goal this year and that
was to make it to state and we did
that. We would of course like a fin-
ish above 19th. That is just our atti-
tude, the same attitude that got us
to state in the first place.
'The state course is a very chal-
lenging course and we knew that
and trained for that, but it just was-
n't our day. But these guys have
learned or at least proved a very
important life lesson and that is that
you just can't just want success, you
have to be willing to make the sac-


rifices and put the work in to
achieve your goals.
'They will have this feeling and
this knowledge for the rest of their
lives. The school really got behind
these guys the last couple of weeks
because the students were seeing
the same things in these guys that
I was.
"These senior athletes really
came together to make the perfect
team. Chris Keffer and Jazz (Tomas-
setti) are natural born leaders who
lead by example. Landon (Kovalick)
and Adam (Buechler) are the gifted
and talented athletes who proved
that, with hard work and doing the
right preparation, even the best can
get better.
"Darren and Bradley (Bunch)
were the ones who were always
there to provide the boost of spirit
and energy that might be lacking
with the team on a given day. Joey
Collins, our junior sensation, has
big shoes to fill next year, but we are
really excited with his progress and
the progress of Austin Nicklas to be
a real solid base on which to con-
tinue building next year."


Wrestlers


win five

BETH JONES
News-Leader

Despite forfeiting four
weight classes, the Fernandina
Beach High School wrestling
team defeated West Nassau,
Bishop Snyder, University
Christian and St. Augustine
Saturday in the North Florida
Duals at Bishop Snyder.
Beau Jarrett, 103 pounds,
won all five of his matches by
pin. Preston York, 112, won by
decision in his matches against
Bishop Snyder, St. Augustine
and Ed White but lost against
West Nassau and University
Christian.
Omar Lopez, 119, won his
match against University
Christian by pin. Ben Bowman,
135, won by pin against Bishop
Snyder and St. Augustine.
Jason Lovitt, 140, went 2-3
on the day with with wins
against Ed White (pin) and
University Christian (decision).
Both Pit LeBrun, 145, and
Michael Hawthorne, 171, went
5-0 on the day, winning all by
pin.
Toby Williams, 152, went 4-
0, collecting wins by pin over
Bishop Snyder, St. Augustine
and West Nassau. He won by
decision against Ed White.
Sean Watkins, 189, and
heavyweight Conner Lawrence
also won all five of their match-
es by pin.
"We really liked what we
saw and continue to see on a
daily basis from our younger
guys like freshmen Beau Jar-
rett and Preston York as well as
our sophomore Omar Lopez,"
FBHS Coach John Williams
said. 'They have really picked
up on the mat intensity that we
stress in practice and on match
day. We don't have the amount
of participation we would like
right now in order to keep
building our program to the
place where we want it to be.
We hope with our early success
and hopefully a successful sea-
son we'll get more guys inter-
ested in Pirate wrestling."


SEASON TIP-OFF


PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER
The season kicked off Tuesday for the Fernandina Beach High School boys basketball team. The
Pirates hosted Bishop Snyder and former FBHS Coach Lou Pereira. The Pirates won 62-36.
Carlos Holcey, right, led the Pirates' offensive attack with 12 points. Sean Jowers, left, led in
rebounds with eight and also chipped in seven points. The Pirates allowed the visiting Cardinals
just four points in the first quarter and led 32-17 at halftime. Zach Rocheleau had 11 points for
the Pirates, including a trio of three-pointers. Terin Dallas, Andrew Vrancic, Stacey Lynch and
Chris Keffer all had six points. Keffer had six rebounds and Patrick Garvin had five. The Pirates
are back in action Friday, hosting St. Francis out of Gainesville. Tip-off is 7:30 p.m. for the varsi-
ty; 6 p.m. for junior varsity. FBHS hosts Hilliard Monday at the same times.


Sixth annual


Reindeer Run


set for Dec. 12

ED HARDEE
For the News-Leader

Santa Claus is lacing up his running shoes for
the sixth annual Reindeer Run 5K/10K, walk
and kids' runs, set for Dec. 12 in Fernandina
Beach.
The race features a beautiful, shaded route
through Fort Clinch State Park, along with pro-
fessional electronic timing by 1st Place Sports in
Jacksonville. Santa's also bringing goodies for all
preregistered walkers and 5K/10K runners,
including holiday-themed T-shirts and coupons
good for a free breakfast at the Elizabeth Pointe
Lodge.
Door prizes at the post-race awards ceremo-
ny will include a four-day, three-night stay at the
Amelia Island Plantation.
Out-of-town runners can take advantage of
free showers after the race (bring your own tow-
els) and participants can use their race bibs for
free admission to Fort Clinch State Park after the
event. And runners and walkers will get jingle
bells to wear on their shoes.
The 5K/10K run starts at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 12
at the Atlantic Recreation Center, 2500 Atlantic
Ave. in Fernandina Beach.
At 8:35 a.m., walkers will step off behind the
runners; two walk distances are being offered
this year, 1.5 miles and 3.1 miles.
At 9:45 a.m., Santa will join children age 10
and younger for half-mile and one-mile fun runs.
Registration forms are available at www.
AmelialslandRunners.com and at the McArthur
Family YMCA, 1915 Citrona Drive in Fernandina
Beach and Pak's Karate Academy, 96549
Parliament Drive.
Online registration is also available at the
website.
Fees for the 5K/10K and walks are $20 per
person through Dec. 6, or $15 for members of
Amelia Island Runners, the local running club
that organizes the event. From Dec. 7 through
race day, the fee is $25 for everyone.
The fee for the children's fun runs (age 10
and younger) is $5 per person, which includes
aT-shirt for preregistered runners. Parents are
encouraged to run with their kids for free.
Race proceeds will benefit the Healthy
Start/Healthy Families programs of the Nassau
County Health Department, which provide sup-
port services for pregnant women, young chil-
dren and families; and Friends of Fort Clinch.
For information on the annual Reindeer Run,
visit the Amelia Island Runners website or call
277-8365 or 491-0369.


You are what you eat, especially as you age


As you age, making smart dietary
choices becomes more critical.
Once you enter your 30s, the meta-
bolic rate slows approximately 1
percent every four years. On average, each
decade you will put on three pounds of fat
while losing three pounds of muscle mass.
This loss of muscle mass is directly related to
a reduction of physical activity as well as a
reduction of testosterone levels in men that
decreases with age. In order to maintain mus-
cle mass, weight bearing exercise is a must
and you must ensure proper protein intake
with such items as steak and tuna fish.
Blood pressure also tends to begin to
creep upward as you enter your 30s.
Scientists from the Netherlands have shown
that, in addition to regular exercise, maintain-
ing a good daily intake of potassium is helpful
in combating hypertension. Potassium is
readily available in bananas, beans or raisins.
Keep your body in its fat burning mode by
eating smaller, more frequent meals higher in
protein, such as cheese and almonds, and low
in carbohydrates and sugars. Researchers
found that eating a lunch that avoided bread,
rice or pasta led to a "fat burning mode" for
four hours longer than those who ate a lunch
containing those items. Adding broccoli and
bell peppers, high in vitamins C and E, is


helpful as well for muscle
recovery post-workouts.
As one ages, facing dis-
ease becomes more of a
reality. In men under the
age of 45, accidents are the
leading cause of death; how-
ever, after age 45, heart dis-
ease becomes the number
one killer. Each year, some
36,000 men in their 40s die
SPORTS from heart disease, accord-
ing to the American Heart
MEDICINE Association. Lowering blood
GREGORY pressure and cholesterol
levels and maintaining phys-
SMITH, M.D. ical fitness is the best way to
combat heart disease.
... So skip the popcorn.
According to new research from the
Center for Science in the Public Interest,
movie theater popcorn continues to be partic-
ularly unhealthy. Researchers found movie
theater popcorn offerings from Regal, AMC
and Cinemark range from 400 to 1,200 calo-
ries with one to three days' worth of saturat-
ed fat and up to 1,500 milligrams of sodium.
With the combo package you could add 300
to 1,110 empty calories worth of candy and
another 150 to 500 calories from a soft drink.


So, it is quite possible as you are entranced in
the movie, you may have engorged yourself
on 1,600 calories.
'That's like eating six scrambled eggs
with cheddar cheese, four bacon strips and
four sausage links before the lights come up,"
the researchers wrote.
The results showed Regal's large pop-
corns packed the biggest punch with each
containing 20 cups of popcorn, 1,200 calories
and 60 grams of saturated fat. That's the
equivalent of two Pizza Hut Personal Pan pep-
peroni pizzas plus an extra two days' worth of
saturated fat. Both Regal and AMC popped
their popcorn in coconut oil, which contains
90 percent saturated fat, while Cinemark is
the only major chain to pop its popcorn in
non-hydrogenated canola oil.

This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacement for treat-
ment by a doctor. It is only designed to offer
guidelines on the prevention, recognition and
care of injuries and illness. Specific concerns
should be discussed with a physician. Mail
questions to Gregory Smith, M.D., 1250 S.
18th St., Suite 204, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Call 261-8787 or visit
www.gsmithmd.com.


GIRLS HOOPS


BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER
Tevin Thompson shoots while Jennifer
Drummond defends Monday when the
Yulee High School girls basketball team
hosted the Fernandina Beach High
School Lady Pirates. Yulee won 32-26.
Quanisha Garrett led all scorers with 20
points, including 17 in the second half.
Brittany Register added eight with a pair
of three-pointers in the second half.


BLACK








FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


YuleePop Warner
Yulee Pop Warner will hold its 2010 coach-
es and board member elections at 7 p.m. Jan.
29 in the green room at the Yulee Sports
Complex on Goodbread Road.


Join a bowling league
Strikers Family Bowling Center in Yulee
offers Tuesday Night Strikers League at 6:30
p.m. starting in January. The 18-week season
runs from Jan. 5 to May 4.
A league meeting will be held at 6 p.m.
Jan. 5. Everyone who plans to bowl in the
league must attend. Cost and prizes will be
determined. Cost will be a minimum of $12.
Prize will be either a ball or cash league or a
trophy. Call 225-1077 for information.


Cycling coursewith Lane
Doug Lane of CrossFit Amelia Island will
join Harvey Newton, 1984 USA Olympic
weightlifting coach, for a cycling course from
6:30-9 p.m. Dec. 3 at Open Road Bicycles,
4460 Hendricks Ave., Jacksonville. Register
by Dec. 1 and the course is $39; afterwards
it's $49. Topics include weight training for
power in the offseason, designating a season
with perfect periodization, peaking for "A"
races and common offseason training mis-
takes. For information call (904) 636-7772 or
visit www.openroadbicycles.com.


Register for soccer
Amelia Island Youth Soccer is registering
players online for the spring season. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com. All new players will have
to mail a copy of their birth certificate to 863
Atlantic View Drive, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034 to complete the registration process.
Call Raquel at 753-0602.


Weeklybike ride
Club 14 Fitness is hosting a weekly
Saturday morning bike ride open to the com-
munity The ride is designed with B and C
cyclists in mind. Meet at Club 14 Fitness in
the 8 Flags Shopping Center by the movie
theatre every Saturday at 8 a.m. and ride to
Fort Clinch state park (with $2 park entry fee).
Participants have the open of one or two
loops. Helmets required. Call Club 14 Fitness
at 206-4414 or visit www.clubl 4fitness.com.


Walk run under the lights
Amelia Island Runners sponsors a weekly
community run and walk under the lights at
the Fernandina Beach High School track from
6-7:30 p.m. The event is free and open to
everyone and free water and Gatorade will be
provided. Runners and walkers can partici-
pate at their own pace, individually or with AIR
members and friends. The track is inside the
football stadium at 435 Citrona Drive.
The lighted track runs are being offered in
cooperation with the Nassau County school
system as a service to runners and walkers in
this area. Amelia Island Runners is paying for
electricity use and related costs.
Track runs are planned roughly once a
week, depending on availability. Dates will be


posted on the club's website, www.Amelia
IslandRunners.com. AIR members will be
available to provide training tips for beginning
runners or run at "race pace" with experi-
enced racers. Participate with partners or indi-
vidually. Visit AIR's website or call 277-8365.


Train now for 262 with Donna
Y Yoga is starting the walk/run training for
the Run 26.2 with Donna for Breast Cancer in
February The group will meet regularly Satur-
days at 9:30 a.m. at Main Beach or Peters
Point. Training is free and open to all regard-
less of age, sex or fitness level. The group
walks/runs as "Team Nirvana." Call 415-9642
or visit www.eteamz.com/teamnirvanal.


Challenger Bowling
Nassau Challenger Bowling League for
the physically and mentally challenged meets
the second Saturday each month from 3-5
p.m. at Strikers Family Bowling Center on US
17 in Yulee. Call Melinda Willaford, 261-3136.


Winter wrestling
USA Wrestling's Fernandina Beach team
for students in grades 6-8 will hold its winter
session through January Practices are
Monday and Wednesdays from 5:30-7 p.m.
at the auto shop building behind Fernan-dina
Beach Middle School.
Participants must have a USA Wrestling
card ($35), otherwise there are no club fees.
Wrestling shoes are mandatory and head
gear and singlet are optional. Get a card at
www.floridausawrestling. org. Call Randy
Middlebrook at (970) 319-8222.


GobblershootNov.29
Amelia Shotgun Sports will hold tour tour-
naments, shoot either or both, Nov. 29 at
86300 Hot Shot Trail in Yulee. NSCA regis-
tered shoots with 100 targets in the morning
and 100 in the evening shoot. Register from
8-9:55 a.m. for the first tournament. Be on the
course no later than 10 a.m. Scorecards must
be in by noon. Register for the second tourna-
ment from 1-2:30 p.m.
Fees for each are $60 for NSCA and
hunter, $45 for junior and sub-juniors and $7
for warm-ups from 8-10 a.m. Fee includes
sausage sandwich breakfast, lunch and
awards. Call 753-4619 or 548-9818 or e-mail
clyde@ameliashotgunsports.com.


Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club. Social
hour at 6:30 p.m; meeting at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Steinkamp, 261-5213, or
visit www.ameliaislandsailing.org.


Umpiressought
River City Umpires Association is recruit-
ing men and women interested in officiating
baseball and softball. If you live or work in
Baker, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Putnam, St.
Johns or Nassau counties, call Aaron
Knowles at (904) 962-7184 or Terry Padgett
at (904) 879-6442 or visit www.riverci-
tyumps.com.


COUNTY CHAMPS


PHOTOS BY JULIE HALL/SPECIAL
The Fernandina Beach Middle School girls, above, and boys soccer teams captured
the Nassau County championships Saturday at Fernandina Beach High School. The
girls defeated Callahan 6-0 and the boys edged Yulee 1-0 in overtime.


2009-10 SCHEDULES


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Wrestling
Nov 28 Deltona Duals 8am
Dec 4-5 F-5 Bradford IBT 2 30/8am
Dec 9 Fletcher Tn Duel 4 00
Dec 11-12 Mat Classic at St Joseph's
Dec 12 FletcherJVtournament 8am
Dec 16 COUNTY(seniors) 430
Dec 19 Holiday Duels at Camden 8am
Jan 8-9 Terry Parker IBT 2 00/8am
Jan 13 Andrew Jackson Tn Duel 430
Jan 22-23 Five Star at Raines
Jan 29-30 Camden quad duel 5 00/7am


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Feb 6 District at Raines 9am
Feb 12-13 Region
Feb 19-20 State at Lakeland
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Soccer
Nov 27-28T-Day Tournament, Patton
Dec 1 BOLLES* 530/720
Dec 3 at Yulee 5 30/720
Dec 4 at Keystone Heights 720 (V)
Dec 7 FIRST COAST CHR 7 20 (V)
Dec 9 PONTE VEDRA 5 30/7 20
Dec 11 at Bishop Snyder 6/720
Dec 14 at West Nassau 720
Jan 5 EPISCOPAL* 530/720
Jan 7 CLAY 530/720
Jan 11 at Stanton 6/800
Jan 14 at Orange Park 630 (V
Jan 21 WOLFSON 530/720
Jan 26-30 Distnct 3-3A at Episcopal
District
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Basketball
Nov 27 ST FRANCIS 6/730
Nov 30 HILLIARD 6/730
Dec 4 at Bishop Kenny 6/7 30
Dec 8 at Yulee* 430/730
Dec 11 WEST NASSAU 6/730
Dec 14 BRADFORD COUNTY 6/730
Dec 17-19 at Glynn Academy tourney
Dec 19-20JVtourneyat West Nassau
Dec 29 at University Christian 6/730
Jan 2 at Trinity 6/730
Jan 5 RIBAULT* 6/730
Jan 7 at Providence 6/7 30
Jan 8 BOLLES* 6/730
Jan 12 at Episcopal* 6/730
Jan 15 YULEE 6/730
Jan 19 TRINITY 6/730
Jan 22 RAINES* 6/730
Jan 26 at Bolles 6/730
Jan 28-29 JohnnyT Smith at WNHS
Feb 2 at Bishop Snyder 6/7 30
Feb 4 PROVIDENCE 6/730
Feb 5 UNIVERSITY CHRIST 6/730
Feb 9, 12-13 District at Raines
*Distnct
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Basketball
Nov 30 at Raines* 6/7 30
Dec 1 BISHOP SNYDER 6/730
Dec 4 at St Johns Co Day 600(V)
Dec 8 HILLIARD 6/730
Dec 10 at Ribault* 6/730
Dec 15 BOLLES* 600
Dec 18 ST JOHNS CO DAY 600(V)
Jan 7 at Bishop Snyder 6 00 (V)
Jan 8 at Episcopal* 6/7 30
Jan 12 at Hilliard 6/730
Jan 14 YULEE 600(v)
Jan 19 at West Nassau 6/730
Jan 21 at Bolles 6/730
Jan 25 atTrinity 600(V)
Jan 26 BAKER COUNTY 6/730
Feb 3-6 District 3-3A at Ribault
*Distnct
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Soccer
Nov 30 RIBAULT 530
Dec 4-5 Timberwolf Classic, Tallahassee
Dec 8 at Bolles 700
Dec 10 UNIVERSITY CHRIST 700
Dec 14 at West Nassau 530
Dec 15 NEASE 600
Dec 17 at Yulee 600
Jan 4 EAGLE'S MEW 530
Jan 13 STANTON 600
Jan 15 at Bishop Kenny 600
Jan 20-23 Distnct 3-3A at Bolles
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Wrestling
Dec 2 FLETCHER 600
Dec 4-5 Terry Parker tourney TBA
Dec 9 BISHOP KENNY 300
Dec 11-12 St Joseph tournament 300
Dec 16 Nassau County at Yulee 500
Jan 8-9 Rotary tourney at Clay 300
Jan 15-16 Suwannee Duals 300
Jan 22-23 Five Star tourney Raines 300
Feb 6 District 3-1 A
Feb 12-13 Region 1-1A at Clay
Feb 19-20 State at Lakeland


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Bowling
Dec 3 Yulee at Stnrikers 500
Dec 8 West Nassau at Strikers 500
Dec 14 Hilliard at Strikers 500
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Basketball
Dec 1 at Raines 600
Dec 3 CREEKSIDE 600
Dec 4 BAKER 600
Dec 7 BRADFORD 600
Dec 8 BOLLES 6 00
Dec 10 at Bishop Snyder 600
Dec 14 PONTE VEDRA 6 00
Dec 17 vs West Nassau, WNHS 800
Dec 18 vs Baldwn, WNHS 530
Jan 5 at Bolles 600
Jan 7 WEST NASSAU 600
Jan 11 at Bradford 600
Jan 13 atPonteVedra 600
Jan 14 at Fernandina Beach 600
Jan 19 at Episcopal 600
Jan 21 at West Nassau 6 00
Jan 26 at Hilliard 6 00
Jan 28 at Baker 600
Jan 29 HILLIARD 600
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Soccer
Nov 30 at West Nassau 7 30
Dec 1 RIBAULT 530
Dec 2 ST AUGUSTINE 6 00
Dec 9 at St Joe's 5 30
Dec 11 EAGLE'S VIEW 530
Dec 14 atSt Augustne600
Dec 17 FERNANDINA BEACH 530
Jan 2 at Mandarin Christian 1 00
Jan 7 at Trinity Christian 530
Jan 8 WEST NASSAU 530
Jan 15 at Keystone 530
Jan 20 Distnct at Episcopal TBA
* District
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Boys Soccer
Nov 30 at West Nassau 5 30
Dec 2 at Ribault 5 00
Dec 3 FERNANDINA BEACH 720
Dec 7 at Clay 730
Dec 9 RIBAULT 530
Dec 11 at Forrest 5 30
Dec 14 at Lee 530
Dec 16 ST AUGUSTINE 700
Dec 18 MANDARIN CHRISTIAN 700
Jan 2 at Mandarin Christian 3 00
Jan 7 at Trinity Christian 720
Jan 8 WEST NASSAU (seniors) 7 30
Jan 15 at Keystone 730
Jan 19 LEE 530
Jan 21 CLAY 730
Jan 22 FORREST 530
Jan 25-29 Distnct at Bolles
* District
YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Junior Varsity Boys Soccer
Dec 2 ST AUGUSTINE 5 30
Dec 3 FERNANDINA BEACH 530
Dec 7 at Clay 530
Dec 14 atSt Augustine 530
Dec 16 ST AUGUSTINE 530
Jan 21 at Clay 530
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Basketball
Dec 3 HILLIARD 5/6 30
Dec 10 CALLAHAN 630/7 45
Dec 15 at Yulee 2/345
Dec 17 at Hilliard 5/630
Jan 7 at Callahan 630/7 45
Jan 12 YULEE 2/345
Jan 19 B team county tournament
Jan 26 Ateam county tournament
YULEE MIDDLE SCHOOL
Basketball
Dec 1 FERNANDINA 230/345
Dec 7 at Callahan 230/345
Dec 8 HILLIARD 5/6 30
Dec 17 CALLAHAN 345/2 30
Dec 18-20St Johns Country Day tourney
Jan 5 ORANGE PARK 5 30/7
Jan 12 at Fernandina 2/345
Jan 19 B tourney at FBMS
Jan 26 County at Callahan


SOFTBALL SCORES


FERNANDINA BEACH PARKS
& RECREATION
Adult Co-ed Softball

Nov. 23
Recreational League
Half-Time Sports Bar 16
Morrow Insurance 5

Half-Time Sports Bar 13
Moon River Pizza 5
Championship game at 7:30 p.m. Nov 30
between Half-Time Sports Barand Moon
River Pizza.

Standings
Competitive League Tournament
Kabuki (league champs) 4-0


Woody's BBQ 4-2
Suncoast/AII-American 1-2
G2 Computer Consultants 2-2
Slider's Seaside Grill 1-2
Sun Gallery 0-2
Regional Trailer Repair 0-2

Recreational League Tournament
Half-Time Sports Bar 4-1
Moon River Pizza 3-1
Morrow Insurance 3-2
Stevenson Collision/Kofe Hous 2-2
Coker Crane 1-2
John T. Ferreira Insurance 1-2
O'Kane's Irish Pub 0-2
Convergence Employee Leasing 0-2
Team and individual statistics at
www.leaguelineup.com/lbflsoftball.


SPORTS SHORTS


CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


4




MAGENTA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


PHOTOS BY TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
Kara Riggs caught this pair of keeper specks recently while fishing with her husband Bill Riggs at the mouth of the
Nassau River.



Sea trout holding at Shave Bridge


'Trout are biting every-
where you cast your live
shrimp and trout float setup,"
Capt. Terry David Lacoss
said. 'The best trout action is
coming during the incoming
tide while fishing in water
depths from 4-10 feet, particu-
larly where
there are
deep pockets
of water
located next
to creek
mouths,
bridges,
docks or oys-
terbars.
ON THE h"Many of
ON THi the trout we
WATER are catching
on our back-
TERRY water fishing
LACOSS charters are
....- - measuring
just under
the legal 15-inch minimum
size limit. However, my
clients are also catching their
share of legal trout."
Some of the larger sea
trout are holding at the Shave
Bridge and at the mouth of
Sawpit Creek in Nassau
Sound. Once again, live finger
mullet are the key for catch-
ing "gator" size sea trout
when fished deep under a
float or fished right on the


-- r-
i.
\ * " ^ (~ l^ rA - 'Wr.r f-,' m . �


A trout boat anchors off a large oysterbar at the mouth
of Egans Creek during a falling tide.


bottom of a deep hole using a
one-ounce egg sinker.
Bluefish are running in
both the St. Marys and
Nassau inlets during the high
falling tide. Look for diving
birds where blues are feeding
on schools of finger mullet on
the surface. Some of the
more popular saltwater lures
for taking bluefish include the
"Crocodile Spoon," the popu-
lar "Sea Hawk" or the 52-M
Mirrorlure.


Redfish are running dur-
ing the falling tide, which
should take running at day-
light right up to 11 a.m. in the
backwaters.
The St. Marys jetty rocks
are very consistent redfish
waters while fishing right up
close to the jetty rocks with
cut mullet on the bottom.
Bull whiting are running
in the surf and in the deep
holes at both Nassau and
Cumberland Sounds. Fish


right on the bottom of a deep
hole with fresh shrimp or in
the breaking surf during the
morning falling tide.
Offshore bottom fishing
this weekend should harbor
excellent red snapper,
grouper and black sea bass
action. A sure bet during late
fall is Schultz' Fish Market,
which is located some five
miles offshore of the south
end of Amelia Island.
Fresh local squid are very
dependable baits for black sea
bass. However, when target-
ing large red snapper and
grouper, fish with live pinfish,
grunts, menhaden or cigar
minnows dead on the bottom.
Stripers are running in the
upper reaches of the St.
Marys and Nassau river sys-
tems during the high falling
tides at the 1-95 bridges,
where they span both popular
striper rivers.

The News-Leader encour-
ages local anglers to submit
photographs of their catches. E-
mail photos to bjones@fbnews
leader.com, mail them to P.O.
Box 766, Fernandina Beach,
FL 32035, or drop them by the
office at 511 Ash St. in Fern-
andina Beach. Call Beth Jones
at 261-3696 for more informa-
tion.


OUTDOOR BRIEFS


Bassmasters meet
Nassau Bassmasters,
associated with the BASS
National Federation and the
Florida BASS Federation,
meets the third Thursday in
Yulee.
Membership is open to
anyone at least 16 years old.
For information on the
Nassau Bassmasters, call
Bob Schlag at (912) 729-2282
or Billy Kittrell at 225-0267.
The club's next tourna-
ment is on the St. Marys
River Dec. 19.

Newboatinglaws
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and other law
enforcement agencies are
alerting Floridians of new
laws and enhancements to
existing laws that deal with
boating under the influence,
boating safety education,
waterway markers, posses-
sion of gasoline on a vessel
and destruction of coral.
The enhanced penalty for
BUI is the same as it is for
driving under the influence.
The blood-alcohol level or
breath-alcohol level of 0.20
that was a violation in the
past has changed to 0.15.
Beginning Jan. 1, any
boater born on or after Jan.
1, 1988, will be required to
take an approved boating
safety course and possess an
FWC-issued boating safety
identification card. And if
they purchase a boat they
have 90 days from to obtain
a boating safety ID card.
Another prohibited activi-
ty is placement and use of a
waterway marker that does
not conform to the U.S. Aids
to Navigation System nor
have an FWC permit.
It's also unlawful for
boaters to moor to govern-
ment-placed waterway mark-
ers or lawfully placed water-
way markers except in
emergency situations or with
written consent of the mark-
er's owner.
It is illegal to possess or
operate a vessel with non-
conforming or unapproved
gasoline containers or to
transport gasoline in an
unventilated or improperly
ventilated compartment.
Laws regarding titling, num-
bering and registration now
apply to any vessel operated,


used or stored on state
waters except vessels lawful-
ly stored at a dock or mari-
na. Visit MyFWC.com/
Boating for details.

NSFAmeets
The Nassau Sport
Fishing Association meets
the second Wednesday of
each month at 7:30 p.m. and
the fourth Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Ten Acres Kraft
Athletic Club. Membership
is open to the public. Call
261-9481 or visit www.fishns-
fa.com for information on
the NSFA.

Boat crew mranees
Boat crew trainees are
being sought by the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary,
Flotilla 14-1, Amelia Island.
Participants must be at least
17 years of age and a U.S.
citizen.
Crew training consists of
shore-side and on-the-water
activities aimed at teaching
new volunteers the neces-
sary theory and practical
skills required to become a
fully qualified boat crew
member. Training is given
by qualified Coast Guard
Auxiliary and active duty
instructors on Coast Guard
Auxiliary vessels.
Successful completion of
the Boat Crew training per-
mits the auxiliarist to crew
any U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary boat within their
district and the potential to
serve on board many differ-
ent U.S. Coast Guard ves-
sels. Crew qualified auxil-
iarists may also advance to
the highest on-water qualifi-
cation of coxswain, the small
boat skipper. This course
includes heavy weather sea-
manship, advanced boat han-
dling, advanced navigation,
search and rescue and
advanced towing. Successful
completion of the coxswain
training permits the auxil-
iary member to skipper any
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
boat within their district.
Training for both the
crew and coxswain positions
is free. Certain uniforms and
safety equipment are
required and not reim-
bursed, but may be tax-
deductible. For information,
call 261-1889 or visit
http://Cgaux7-14-1.org.


RECREATION ROUNDUP


The city of Fernandina Beach Recreation
Department (city website www.fbfl.us) offers
the following:
* Adult volleyball is from 7-9 p.m. Tuesday
and Fridays at Peck Gym. Cost is $1 per day
for city residents ($3 non-city).
* Register for adult basketball from Dec. 14
through Feb. 5 at the Atlantic Avenue Recrea-
tion Center. New 20 plus-game season format
replaces two separate seasons. End-of-season
tournament and all-star game included. Games
will be played Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday nights at Peck Gym beginning Feb.
15. Team fee is $600. Call Jay at 277-7350,
ext. 2013, or e-mail jrobertson@fbfl.org.
* Open basketball is Mondays and Wednes-
days from 11 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., Thursdays
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays and Sun-
days from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Peck Gym.
* Peck Gym weight room is open from 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sundays.
Cost is $2 a day or $25 a month for city resi-
dents ($5 a day or $30 non-city). Personal
training is available. Fee is $30 per session,
$75 per week (three sessions) or $200 a
month (two sessions per week for four weeks).
Monthly packages come with dietary analysis
and food program. Call Jay at 277-7364 for a
free introductory appointment.
* Fitness classes at Peck Gym are
Monday and Wednesdays from 6-7 p.m.
Each class is a full body workout with resist-
ance bands, light dumbbells and more. All lev-
els welcome. Fee is $3 a class. Call Jay at
277-7364 or e-mail jrobertson@fbfl.org.


4246 S. Flelcher * 3-29-08:00 2.050.000
1 ,0 :4 , lI . lllll ..l I.. ..ll lllll J I ... :.lll l . . I I 1h . 1. I . 1
I I I I .1 . .. .. an I .- I I I . 1 1 Ii .. . I . ..i n .. -. I I I. .1 . -i 1 . ..11 ..IIIi 1 . .


6523 Spyglass 11 * .L87000 $1.649.000
I! III1. ." . .l1 1 .1 . I1 . , ] 1.. 11. . 1.1 E l:. I . l ai n .III I II I]1:1.1


* Swim/snorkel with the manatees in Crystal
River Dec. 21. Open to families, adults and
children ages 10 and up. Depart from the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center at 5 a.m.
and return at 6 p.m. Registration fee is $50 and
includes manatee experience, transportation
and snorkeling gear if needed. Register at the
Atlantic Center. Call Kathy Russell at 277-7350
or e-mail krussell@fbfl.org.
* Berke's Tennis junior clinics are offered at
Central Park on Tuesdays and Thursdays with
instructor Jason Berke. Beginner (ages 5-7)
from 2:30-3:30 p.m.; $10 per hour for city resi-
dents, $12 non-city. Intermediate (ages 7-12)
from 3:30-4:30 p.m.; $10 per hour for city resi-
dents, $12 non-city. Advanced (ages 12-17)
from 4:30-6 p.m.; $15 per session for city resi-
dents, $17 non-city. Maximum of six students
per court for junior clinics. Also, private lessons
are scheduled on availability (recommended
for competitive junior tournament players). Call
Berke at 556-9304 or visit www.berkes tennis.
com. Register for classes at the Atlantic
Center.
* Berke's Tennis adult clinics are offered at
Central Park Mondays, Wednesdays and
Friday with instructor Jason Berke. Beginner
clinics on Mondays at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Intermediate clinics on Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Advanced clinics on Fridays at 10
a.m. and 6 p.m. Cost is $12 per hour for city
residents, $14 non-city. Private lessons avail-
able (recommended for competitive tourna-
ment and league players). Customized clinics
for league teams and hitting sessions also
offered. Call Berke at 556-9304 or visit


602 Ocean Club -*$.996-BW fr$1. 795.000


778 S. Flelcher * .2t O 0 $949.000
i ,i,- ,I I',,- ,, h ,u , i~ h I,-h , ..h .,h... ,- . .,,-.'.Ih , l ' .I , , 1


c(qFgF/g T fp4 jy~
ofAmefia Isfanf
www. oceanfrontamelia. com
"The Oceaenfront Expert"
Reduced Commission, 3 %- 4.5 %, Call for details.
Bob Gedeon When You Call, I Will Personally Answer The Phone
Island resident since 1962 No Menus, Voicemail or Phone Tag.
Real Estate Broker since 1972 Local 904.261.8870 Toll Free 877.261.8870


www.berkestennis.com. Register for classes at
the Atlantic Center.
* Coming soon: Berke's Tennis Sundry
Shop at the Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center,
featuring tennis racquets, bags, apparel, grips,
stringing and more.
* Check out Central Park tennis court keys
at Atlantic Center ($5 deposit, refundable if
returned within a year).
* Coed exercise is from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at the MLK Center.
Fee is $2 per class (city), $3 (non-city).
* Annual skate park decals are available
free of charge to families who qualify for free or


*CALL TO MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR
LUNCH AND TO OPEN YOUR ACCOUNT:
904.321-2337 EZT. 3585


6 MONTH CD

AT


2.10% APY


ON $1.000 AND UP*


reduced lunch programs or on a case-by-case
basis dependent on income. Visit Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center.
* Shotokan karate classes for ages 6 and
up with instructor Jerry Williamson are from
3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesdays at
the Atlantic Recreation Center. Fee is $40
monthly for city residents ($45 for non-city).
Uniforms are available through the instructor.
Register at Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center.
* Atlantic Center pool public swim hours are
from from 3-5 p.m. weekdays ($2), from noon
to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 1-6 p.m.
Sunday ($3). Passes are available.


I


-77W~ T7~


Y'7LEE OPE

SWEEPSTA
(CORNER OF AIA AND CHESTER RD.)

COMlE V/SIT OLR NEWBFRANCP

ANvP EXrTER 0TowI!A

A $1,0So �A1OP-r6.Ay-MFAtTlg1rr*


hi


*6 Month CD - Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective as of 10/30/09 and is subject to change. Balance tier is $1,000 - $250,000:
2.10% APY. Maximum Amount per tax identification number is $250,000. First Federal checking account with an electronic debit or
credit transaction is required. Must be a new CD. Interest credited quarterly - may compound to CD or be credited to another First
Federal Account. Automatic renewal at first maturity as a 12 month CD at current effective 12 month interest rate as of maturity date.
Account must be open 7 days prior to one time"No Penalty"withdrawal. Normal penalties required after first withdrawal.
"Yulee Open Sweepstakes - Drawing for one $1,500 Mortgage Payment will be on 12/02/09. Come in to Yulee or Amelia Island
branches to register and for copy of Official Sweepstakes rules. Or call 904321.2337 for rules and how to send in registration to FFBF
Yulee Sweepstakes, PO Box 2029, Lake City, FL 32056. No purchase or obligation necessary in order to win. Must be a Florida resident,
live or work in Nassau County, Florida, and be 18 years of age as of 09/01/09. See mortgage loan prize requirements in Official
Sweepstake rules. Member
SLENDER FDIS


SPEND LESS TIME WORRYING
ABOUT MONEY AND BILLS.

IT TAKES JUST 15 MINUTES OF YOUR LUNCH TIME TO
IMPROVE THE WAY YOU BANK AND HAVE LUNCH ON USI


BLACK


t'�0�41 c�,emel�


t




MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


$Voted t4e Zews 4eade&t'


Sete


Barbara Jean's
Cooking at Home


Looking for a great holiday
gift idea? Visit Barbara
Jean's On-Line Store! We
ship our famous Crab
Cakes as well as our She
Crab Soup, Chocolate
Stuff, and Pumpkin Bread!
Don't forget Barbara
Jean's Cookbooks, Gift
Cards, and T-Shirts too!"


+


Barbara Jean's
Barbara Jean's Cookbook


There are plenty of reasons we've been voted Best of the Best
for 7 consecutive years, but here are just a few!
* We make our signature breads from scratch every day in our restaurant so that we can
serve them hot and fresh to you! Pumpkin Bread, Jalapeno Cornbread, and Wheat Rolls!
* 15 fresh veggies and side dishes every day!
* We bake our desserts fresh, from scratch daily including our wildly popular Chocolate Stuff!
Try our Key Lime Tarts and Fruit Cobblers too!
* We hand batter and cook to order all of our fried seafood, chicken fingers, and chicken
fried steak in our kitchen every day! Try our popular Buttermilk Battered Shrimp, Coconut
Shrimp, Fried Catfish, and Fried Fish Fillets!
* Our soups are awesome! Its not just our popular She Crab Soup, we do our Cheese
Broccoli Soup and a Soup of the Day fresh, from scratch in our kitchen every day!
Some of our favorites include Potato Cheese, Crab Stew, Tomato Basil, Lentil,
and Chicken & Rice among others!
* And of course, don't forget our famous Crab Cakes! Southern Living said,
"....these were the best!" And they aren't the only ones who've raved about them!


Try our breakfast!
Served weekends and major holidays from 8 AM - 11


AM


WWW.BARBARAJEANS.COM


Voted "Best of the Best"


ON AMELIA ISLAND- 960030 GATEWAY BLVD.


(904) 277-3700


- FROM 11AM DAILY


f4x


6onsecutie yfewad


BLACK


Fea


Fee




MAGENTA BLACK


B SE




B SECTION NEWS-LEADER,


-ROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2009
/ FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


The 5 zeydes hike again


(And discover national parks can be wild) r

MARVIN PERLMAN
For the News-Leader

This year it was hiking the Grand Tetons of Wyoming, with two side trips to Yellowstone
National Park. The "five zeydes" (grandfathers) were at it again - challenging the wilds of I
nature (national parks can be wild) and our health, if not survival. For last year's adventure,
we zeydes hiked the Dolly Sods area of the Monongahela National Forest of West Virginia,
and the year before, we hiked across the Grand Canyon, south rim to north rim. Let i
others surrender to age and suffer from nature deficit disorder, not us.


Five grizzlies (Burt Bright of Fernandina
Beach and his friends David Shapiro, Eric
Mendelsohn, Larry Lessin and myself) who
began their bonding during the Roosevelt and
Truman administrations, who have survived
the turbulence of life, who among them have
experienced medical problems from cancer to
hair loss, packed their hiking boots, backpacks,
hiking poles, Camelbacks, cold and warm
weather clothes and, yes, medications, and then
by airplane (Eric by SUV) gathered at Jackson
Hole, Wyo., on Sept. 3.
Our adventure began by checking into the
49er Inn and Suites Motel, watching the town's
reenactment of a Wild West shootout, having
beer and ale at the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar,
eating dinner at the Sweetwater Cafe, begin-
ning to acclimate to the higher elevation (6,237
feet) and sharing the anticipation of the chal-
lenges to come.
Friday, before leaving Jackson Hole, we rode
the Teton Village Tram (for skiers in winter) to
Rendezvous Peak (where cell phones worked!)
for a view of the vast valley and surrounding
mountains. Afterwards we drove north, stop-
ping at Jenny Lake and along the way saw our
first wildlife, a coyote, about 100 feet off the
highway. We checked into Signal Mountain
Lodge and slept the next eight nights in a 14 by
30 foot log cabin with one bathroom (one bath-
room for five old prostates!). Our toilet needs
were supplemented at the nearby lodge and
restaurant. Nobody shaved all week (no change
for Eric and Larry). It was crowded. We man-
aged. From the front porch we could see Lake
Jackson across the road, beyond a few cabins
by the lake.
Saturday, from Colter Bay Village, we set out
on our first hike, a mostly flat 8.8 mile loop past
Hermitage Point, mostly along Lake Jackson
(elevation 6,772 feet) and bordered on the other
side by the tall snow-patched and glaciated
Grand Teton mountains. Unlike our hike across
the Grand Canyon, the morning temperature
when we started was cool (mid 30s), and
instead of massive rock with limited vegetation,
the trail passed through dense forest. The high-
light was sighting a cow moose standing in
Swan Lake eating lily pads, her calf nearby. We
kept our distance, knowing a 1,000-plus pound
beast with calf could be aggressive. At the end
of the day, still adjusting to the elevation, we
were tired.
Sunday's hike was shorter but more vertical,
three miles to an elevation 1,000 feet above the
valley, to Signal Mountain Summit. Of course,
the return was another three miles back down.
David, who is certainly strong, dropped out on
the way up. After dumping his backpack in the
cabin, he rented a kayak and paddled out to the
island in the middle of the lake - not a bad sub-
stitute for huffing and puffing uphill. This trail,


like the others, was a manmade ribbon rough
cut through the forest. The surface often
included rocks and boulders we had to maneu-
ver over and around. Scat was deposited often
along the path, indicating that wildlife frequent-
ed the same trails as people. There was no need
to leave any trail, and we didn't, but Larry
brought a GPS anyway.
The forest was surprisingly quiet. Rarely did
we hear a bird speak. Even the chubby chicken-
like blue grouse running along the ground
were silent. The trees were mostly pine. Some
were dead from attacks by pine bark beetles
and various diseases, maybe some from fires
(similar dead trees were seen on other hikes).
Larry pointed out that some of the logs on the
ground showed claw marks from bears digging
for grubs. Leaves on Aspen trees (-..i. 1l. i.d ran-
domly, revealing a gentle breeze. Frequent
views of the vast valley below showed large
patches of pine forests and occasional lakes.
The aptly named Snake River meandered
through the middle of the valley. At the top, we
found spectacular views of the valley and sur-
rounding mountains, I believe some of the best
in the area. Some of us were surprised to dis-
cover that tourists had reached the top by car.
Later in the week Eric and Burt drove David up
for the views.
Monday was a needed day off from hiking,
which we used to explore Yellowstone National
Park and other sights to the north. For the first
time, some of us saw Old Faithful do her thing
and saw other geysers, too. We stopped at
Lewis Falls and Yellowstone Lake. We walked
around West Thumb Geyser Basin, watching
steam bubbling from the Earth. Burt regularly
started conversations with strangers (couple or
group) by offering to take their photo with their
camera, so they could all be in the picture. We
lunched at the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone.
Later we also visited the Indian Art Museum
at Colter Bay, where a guide with Native
American Indian heritage gave us an outstand-
ing lecture with personal stories of learning
from his grandfather (I don't think he called
him "zeyde"). Afterwards, we watched a docu-
mentary on wolves being reintroduced into
Yellowstone Park, showing their competitive
social dynamics and how well they cared for
their young. Ranchers are not delighted and
shoot wolves that wander out of the park
because of their threat to livestock.
Tuesday, breakfast was at John Colter's
Restaurant Ranch House-Bar. We returned
there a number of times during the week, espe-
cially for the "healthy breakfast." This day's
hike would be the toughest. David wisely hired
a guide and went fly-fishing on the Snake River
(inhabited by trout: rainbow, cutthroat and
brown). The hike began at the Lupine


ZEYDES Continued on 2B


OFFONTHE ISLAND


The "five
zeydes" -
Larry Lessin,
Dave Shapiro,
Marvin
Perlman, Burt
Bright and
Eric
Mendelsohn -
challenge the
wilds of
nature on a
trip to the
Grand Tetons
of Wyoming
this summer.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS


PAJAMA PARTY
The Annual Pajama Party
Sale & Contest will be held
in downtown Fernandina
Beach starting at 8 a.m.
today. Shoppers are invited
to don their pajamas to
enjoy special deals and dis-
counts at shops and eateries,
along with fresh juice, coffee
and pastries. Enter the con-
test for "Best Dressed
Individual Shopper in Pajamas" and "Best
Dressed Shopping Group in Pajamas."
Participants must have their free photo taken at
the judges' booth in the 100 block of Centre Street
before 11 a.m. For more information, visit
www.downtownfernandina.com, e-mail
slprice�bellsouth.net or call 206-0756.

TREE LIGHTING

A full day of entertain-
ment leads up to the city of
Fernandina Beach
Christmas tree lighting Nov.
28 at 6 p.m. at the foot of
Centre Street.
Starting at noon, carolers,


choirs, dancers and singers will entertain visitors.
Santa Claus will arrive at 2 p.m. at the Fernandina
Harbor Marina aboard the Ye Olde Pirate charter
boat. Santa and Mrs. Claus will meet and take pic-
tures until 5 p.m. at the depot. Photos with pets
will also be available.
The event is hosted by the city of Fernandina
Beach, Historic Fernandina Business Association
and Shiny Badges Ball, Inc. Contact Sandy Price
at 206-0756 or e-mail slprice@bellsouth.net.

AIDS DAY BANQUET
The Coalition for the
Reduction/Elimination
of Ethnic Disparities in
Health (CREED) will host a .,,
its second annual Board
of Directors World AIDS
Day Banquet Dec. 1 from 6-9 p.m.
at St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic Ave.,
Fernandina Beach.
The speaker is Rod L. Brown, prevention
training consultant with the Florida Department
of Health Area 4 AIDS Program Office. Donation
is $35.
This year's theme is "Universal Access and
Human Rights: Care and Support -Access for
All." It provides an opportunity to address
HIV/AIDS disparities, stigma and blame, and


spark dialogue about stopping the spread of
HIV/AIDS among all populations.
For more information contact Betty
Drummond-Wilson, RN, BSN, at 261-5100 or
Jennett Wilson-Baker, RN, BSN, at 556-3363.

PARADE OF PAWS
Redbones Dog Bakery
and Boutique will host its
10th Annual "Parade of
Paws" Dec. 5.
Pre-register now at
Redbones. Late registration
will begin on-site at 10 a.m.
in the Citizens Bank park-
ing lot, Eighth and Centre
streets. Minimum donation is $10 and all pro-
ceeds benefit the Nassau Humane Society.
Lineup begins at 10:30 a.m. and the parade starts
at 11 a.m. Prizes and trophies will be awarded for
best holiday outfit, the dog that most looks like its
owner, and cutest personality. After the parade at
Redbones enjoy free doggie treats, pictures and
special guest, chocolatier Kendall Taylor, who will
sell her home-made candies with sales donated to
the Nassau Humane Society. Fairy Tails Mobile
Grooming will offer free nail trimming and
touchups. Visit www.redbonesbakery.com or call
321-0020.


Eric pointed to the steep terrain across the lake where, at age
20, he lost his footing after climbing Disappointment Peak and
bounced and slid down until some big rocks knocked him out
and broke his fall and a few teeth. Ah, nostalgia!




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, November 27, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS
Faith Christian Academy
presents its 10th Annual
Father/ Daughter Ball at The
Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island
Grand Ballroom on Feb. 6,
2010 from 7-10 p.m. This
year's theme is "Cinderella."
Tickets are $85 for father and
daughter and $40 for each
additional daughter and
include a gift bag and memory
book. There will be hors
d'oeuvres, live music featuring
Les DeMerle and professional
photography. Fathers and
daughters of all ages are wel-
come. Seating is limited.
For tickets visit Faith
Christian Academy, 96282
Brady Point Road,
Fernandina Beach, or call
321-2137.

A bridge club for seniors
will meet Mondays and
Thursday from 1-3 p.m. at
the Peck Center, 511 South
11th St., Fernandina Beach.
The club is free and no part-
ner is necessary. Equipment
is furnished. For more infor-
mation, call 277-7350.

The Mount Olive
Historical Restoration
Society invites the communi-
ty to join the Hooper family of
Nassauville in a
Thanksgiving praise service
and history presentation on
Nov. 28 at 4 p.m. at Little
Mount Olive Baptist Church
on Old Nassauville Road.
Following the service, the
society will present part three
of its series on the Rural
Black History of Nassau
County with a discussion on
rural education in the early
20th century.
All who wish to join the
worship and share their mem-
ories of rural education are
welcome. The program is pre-
sented in cooperation with the
Gullah/Geechee Cultural
Heritage Committee of
Northeast Florida. For infor-
mation call (904) 502-1992.

A radio-controlled fun
sail and exhibition will be
held Nov. 28 from 1-3 p.m. at
the Amelia Village Shops
pond, behind Marche Burette.


All model boats are welcome,
working or not, finished or not,
except gas powered.
Spectators, including super-
vised children, especially wel-
come. See great works of art
and have the opportunity to
sail them on the high seas.

Enjoy a wine tasting at
Brett's Waterway Cafe Nov.
29 from 4-6 p.m. Eleven wine
distributors will offer unique
and unusual wines along with
the restaurant's hors d'oeu-
vres. Tickets are $15 per per-
son or $25 per couple.
Proceeds benefit Micah's
Place. Call 491-6364, ext.
102.

Gerri's Corner and
Women in Nassau helping
Women in Need (WIN WIN)
are sponsoring a grand prize
drawing celebration Dec. 1
to announce the winners of
four prize packages valued at
$495-1,930 being raffled to
raise money for Gerri's
Corner. Tickets are $7 each or
$30 for five. Donations are
tax-deductible and go directly
to Gerri's Corner, a cancer
resource center for women.
The celebration starts at 5
p.m. with refreshments at
Divine Finds and Heron's
Swim & Sport in the Palmetto
Walk Shopping Center.
Starting at 5:30 p.m. a win-
ner will be drawn every 30
minutes. Grand prize lists may
be viewed and raffle tickets
purchased at Fifi's Fine
Resale on South Eighth
Street, Centre Street
Treasures downtown and at
Divine Finds.

RAIN Humane Society
will hold a garage sale Dec. 4
and 5 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at
Seventh and Centre streets in
downtown Fernandina Beach,
around the corner from
Eileen's Art and Antiques.
There will be many holiday gift
items and decorations avail-
able. If you have items to
donate, call Rosemary at 321-
4316 or Marilyn at 491-8819.
Proceeds benefit RAIN
Humane Society, SPCA.

Cats Angels Inc., SPCA
presents its second annual


"Rescue Me" fundraiser
Dec. 5 from 7-11 p.m. at the
Florida House Inn, 22 S. Third
St., Fernandina Beach. Enjoy
a silent auction, cash bar,
savory appetizers, sweet
desserts, wine table, door
prizes and music by Doc
Mojo starting at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $20 and avail-
able at the Thrift Store/
Adoption Center, 709 S.
Eighth St., or call 321-2267.

The Fernandina Pirates
will descend upon the Third
Annual Great Camden
County Chili Cook Off &
Craft Fair Dec. 5 at Waters
Edge subdivision on Haddock
Road in Kingsland, Ga., from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Local builder
W.H. Gross Construction
hosts the event to support the
Humane Society and Habitat
for Humanity.
Teams of two or more may
register in advance and have
their chili scored by local
judges. Categories include
Judges' Choice, Best
Vegetarian Chili, Best White
Chili and Most Creative. The
People's Choice award is
decided by public vote.
The Homemade for the
Holidays Craft Fair will feature
a visit by Santa and his elves,
exhibits, live music and a pet
costume parade and contest
at 2 p.m. Register for events
online at www.teamchili.org or
contact Diane Maurer at (912)
729-4393 or
diane.maurer@yahoo.com.

Phantasia South's $5
Jewelry Sale will be held
from 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Dec. 11 at
the Baptist Medical Center
Nassau Conference Room,
1250 South 18th St.,
Fernandina Beach, sponsored
by the auxiliary.
In addition to jewelry will
be watches for children,
women and men, fashion
accessories such as purses
and belts as well as small gifts
at the affordable price of $5
plus tax for each item. For
more information call 321-
3818.

Do something different -
exciting team trivia with
Maggie the Trivia Meister on
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the
Crab Trap in downtown
Fernandina Beach. Enjoy a
special trivia menu and drinks,
win prizes and listen to music
while you improve your mem-


ory and get smarter. Free and
open to the public.

THEATRE

The Cummer Museum of
Art & Gardens presents
Reader's Theater: Native
Florida, performed by Players
by the Sea, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m.
Catch a glimpse into the past
through an evening of native
Florida history as actors
Aaron Marshall and Shirley
Sacks narrate stories from
Florida's indigenous cultures.
After hearing narratives of
the Timucua, attendees are
invited to view pictorial depic-
tions of their life and sur-
roundings in the exhibition
Discoveries in Detail: Jacques
Le Moyne and Theodor de
Bry, which features botanical
watercolors and engravings of
the Timucua and the Fort
Caroline Huguenot settle-
ment.
Cost is $7. The Cummer is
located at 829 Riverside Ave.,
Jacksonville. Call (904) 355-
0630.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold auditions
for the musical comedy
"The Pirates of Penzance"
at 2 p.m. Dec. 5 and 6 at 209
Cedar St.
The five principal roles for
men have an age range of 20-
60. There are five principal
roles for women, with the age
range of the daughters being
from 18-30 and the role of the
nurse being from 30-60.
There is also a pirates' chorus
and a policemen's chorus for
male singers, and a daugh-
ters' chorus for women ages
18-30. Please prepare one-
minute of a song. An accom-
panist will be available for
those who bring sheet music.
Auditioners will also learn a
movement/dance sequence
and read from the script.
Performances will be in ACT's
new theater from April 8-24,
and rehearsals begin in
January. Toni D'Amico is the
director and Jill Dillingham is
musical director. For informa-
tion contact ACT at 261-6749.

ART/GALLERIES

The Nouveau Art Juried
Show, Island Festivals, con-
tinues at the Island Art
Association Gallery until
Dec. 6. Susi Sax will be fea-
tured artist for December and


January. The gallery is locat-
ed at 18 N. Second St. Call
261-7020 or visit
www.islandart.org.
A new show at the First
Coast Community Bank on
14th Street will be on display
until mid-February.
The artists displaying their
work, include Jackie Humes,
Sherry Ferber, Bill Kinney and
Joan Durden.

Artist Susi Sax is offering
stained glass classes with a
holiday theme. For informa-
tion call 321-1330.

A fused glass jewelry
workshop will be held Nov.
28 from 9 a.m.-noon at
Designs On Gallery, 11 N.
Third St., Fernandina Beach.
Learn the fundamentals of
glass fusing and create one-
of-a-kind jewelry to wear or
give as gift. No prior experi-
ence is necessary. Fee is $75
and includes materials for
three pendants and firing.
Contact Cecilia at 583-7723
to register.

The IAA Nouveau Art
Show at the Co-op Gallery,
"Scapes," runs Dec. 7-Jan.
31. An opening reception
will be held Dec. 12 from 5-8
p.m. The gallery, 18 N.
Second St., Fernandina
Beach, is offering 10 percent
off all artwork through
December. Call 261-7020.
* * *
A Jewelry Making
101/Earrings class will be
held at the Learning
Community of North Florida.
Learn to develop unique jew-
elry designs using a variety of
materials. Meets Dec. 7 and
14, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Call (904)
430-0120 to register or regis-
ter online at www.tlcnf.com.

Eight Flag
Needlepointers are hosting a
workshop with master
teacher Joan Thomasson
March 5-7, 2010, on Amelia
Island. Thomasson will teach
"Marigolds and Moorish Tiles"
stitched on 24-count congress
cloth. The cost of the program
includes all materials and
lunch on Friday and Saturday;
$220 for chapter members;
$300 for non-members.
Registration deadline is Dec.
15. Space is limited. For infor-
mation or to register contact
Linda Kurtz at lmkurtz@bell-
south.net.


Watercolor Art work-
shops with William Maurer
are forming for all levels,
Friday from 9:30 a.m.-noon
at the Florida House Inn. Call
261-8276. Kathy Hardin and
Bill Maurer will offer an Art
Workshop one Saturday a
month starting in January for
all levels and mediums Call
261-8276.
Hardin is registering stu-
dents for January acrylic
painting instruction, all lev-
els. Call her for a syllabus of
information or e-mail
kathi.h@comcast.net or call
261-8276.

MUSEUM

One ticket, four pubs, a
wealth of historical information
about downtown Fernandina
and a good time for all. Join
the Amelia Island Museum
of History Thursdays at 5:30
p.m. to tour four of the
town's most popular, notori-
ous or otherwise historic
pubs and bars.
One ticket will get you one
drink at each establishment
and an earful of colorful tales
about the places you visit as
well as those you see along
your way. It's a great way to
see Fernandina and learn
about its history.
Tickets are $25 per person
(must be 21, must show ID),
tour begins at the historic train
depot in downtown Fernan-
dina Beach. Reservations
required. Contact Thea at
261-7378, ext.105 or
Thea@ ameliamuseum.org.
Call for holiday schedules.

Guests on the Amelia
Island Museum of History's
ghost tour will learn Amelia
Island ghost stories as they
tiptoe through dark streets
and walk in the footsteps of a
bygone era as the past comes
alive through the skillful story-
telling of your guide.
This tour begins at 6 p.m.
every Friday like clockwork
and lasts approximately one
hour. Meet your guide in the
cemetery behind St. Peter's
Episcopal Church, 801
Atlantic Ave.
Tickets may be purchased
at the Amelia Island Museum
of History for $10/adults and
$5/students. Contact Thea at
261.7378, ext. 105 or
Thea@ameliamuseum.org for
more information.


THANKSGIVING

ACROSS
1. Just off the eye-
brows
6. Fifth note
9. Lightning
McQueen movie
13. *After much
turkey, many are
not this
14. Santa winds
15. Home of famous
shroud
16. Reputation-
damaging gos-
sip
17. Circle of flowers
18. Rival of
Carthage
19. *Seasonal yield
21. Support for logs
in fireplace
23. Up to present
time
24. Barrel
25. Grass "carpet"
28. Tropical edible
root
30. Courage to
carry on
35. Contains the iris
37. Rip or pull
39. " never
work in this town
again!"
40. "Buddenbrooks"
author
41. Make reference
to
43. Popular
Scandinavian
name
44. Madison Square
Garden, e.g.
46. Capital of Peru
47. Drink garnish
48. The Six Million
Dollar Man, e.g.
50. Claim of rights
52. Faux


53. To trick
55. Ciao in the U.S.
57. *Many won't
even try them
61. *Celebrant at
first
Thanksgiving
65. Half-wit
66. Gorilla or orang-
utan
68. Establish validity
69. Look forward to
70. It makes your
nose grow?
71. The Little
Rascals'"
Woman Hater
Club"
72. They oppose
the yeahs
73. '80s band "
At Work"
74. "I won't
for it!"

DOWN
1. Party
2. -Ata,
Kazakhstan
3. -do-well
4. *It usually goes
on last
5. 48th or 49th in
New York, e.g.
6. *Found on the
table or at sea
7. Smallest whole
number
8. Israelean port
9. " as a but-
ton!"
10. Describes
Arizona in sum-
mer
11. Puerto__
12. Tear in panty-
hose
15. *Main course
20. One Beatle
22. Marxism or
Taoism, e.g.


24. Tell confidential-
ly
25. Same as Poison
ivy or Poison
oak
26. Estrogen pro-
ducer
27. Brightest star in
Cygnus
29. Virginia folk
dance
31. A hammer but
not nail, e.g.
32. Tiptoe around
it?
33. It looks like a
humpless camel
34. *After
Thanksgiving
they get busy at
North Pole
36. Domini
38. Married to
Ashton
42. Synagogue
teacher
45. Fervent
49. *Too much
turkey and this
expands
51. Mythological
beings believed
to inhabit air
54. Religious song
56. White heron
57. FBI agent
58. Hawkeye state
59. Donkey cry
60. Fictional Lane
61. Part of a ham-
mer
62. "Rome" in Italy
63. Hollywood pro-
ducer Reitman
64. "Cobbler, cob-
bler, _ my
shoe"
67. *It follows the
meal


ZEYDES
Continued from 1B
Meadows Trailhead.
Carrying backpacks and
eventually the clothes we
peeled off as it got warmer
during the day, we panted five
miles up the trail, increasing
our elevation over 3,000 feet.


SOLUTION 11.25


Corps of Engineers


Fill in the squares so
that each row, column
and3-by-3box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2009
Sudoku Difficult
Puzzle #1641D


We were on a moraine (check
your geology) on
Disappointment Peak. (Those
who named the peak were
disappointed because they
thought it was a path up to
the highest peak, Grand
Teton - elevation 13,770 feet -
but found it wasn't.)
We were always looking
for wildlife, especially bears,
but mostly saw chipmunks,
squirrels and a few deer,
including one full-antlered
buck chomping away at vege-
tation about 10 feet off the
trail. Apparently he was used
to hikers. As happened often
during these hikes, younger
people (e.g. a bunch of bare-
midriff women in shorts) car-
rying very little, if anything,
passed us on the trail at what
seemed like high speed. We
stopped one woman (not bare
midriff) to take our picture.
We ran into her again when
she was coming down. She
had spotted a large black bear
and two smaller ones, and
had decided for safety to turn
back. We wanted to see bears


981 6 2 7 3 5 4
2 5 3 4 9 1 768
4 7 6 5 8 3 9 2 1
5 3 9 2 4 8 6 1 7
1 24976835

768 1 3 5 2 4 9
81 7 3 6 4 5 92
3 9 5 7 1 24 8 6
64285 9 1 7 3


so, joined by an English cou-
ple that happened by, we pro-
ceeded up the trail, figuring
the bears would want to avoid
such a crowd. Alas, we never
saw the bears, but later, Eric
identified likely bear paw
prints on a side window of his
SUV.
At 10,000 feet, we came to
a plateau surrounded by high-
er mountains. It was danger-
ous to approach the precipi-
tously slopping edges around
us, making it difficult to look
below. After a short break, we
descended to Amphitheater
Lake (elevation 9,648 feet),
clear and pristine surrounded
by mountains and pine forest.
There we relaxed and
snacked. Eric pointed to the
steep terrain across the lake
where, at age 20, he lost his
footing after climbing
Disappointment Peak and
bounced and slid down until
some big rocks knocked him
out and broke his fall and a
few teeth. Ah, nostalgia!
There were few people at the
lake, because it can only be
reached by a good hike. It
was an idyllic scene, and I
could have relaxed there for
hours if we had the time but,
alas, I was over-ruled and
had maybe half an hour.
Shortly into our five-mile
descent we passed, not sur-
prisingly, beautiful, pristine
Surprise Lake (elevation
9,540 feet). We were told a
black bear had recently
stopped by for a drink (water,
not ale). A little farther, we
came upon more wildlife, a
Downey woodpecker pecking
the base of a tree.

Wednesday we returned to
Yellowstone to see Lake
Lodge on Yellowstone Lake
where Eric had worked (bus-
boy, porter, window washer
and more) four summers,
starting during Eisenhower's
first term when Eric was 17.
We came upon the Fishing
Bridge, so-called because
fishing was so good people
used to fish elbow to elbow
from the span; but no more -
fishing was declared illegal
because cutthroat trout, a
valuable food for local preda-
tors, come there to spawn.
We wandered around over-
looks on the north side of the
Grand Canyon of the
Yellowstone and saw an
osprey nest (with osprey and
young) perched away from
predators on a very tall post-
like rock formation. We


watched little mud volcanoes
at Hayden Valley. At the
northern entrance to
Yellowstone in Gardiner,
Mont., we drove through the
Roosevelt Arch dedicated by
President Teddy in 1903. We
dined in a small historic town
called Mammoth.

Thursday, a 5-minute boat
ride across Jenny Lake pre-
ceded a half-mile hike up to
Hidden Falls. On the way up
we passed a woman, surely
over 80, who was coming
down. Why not? Eric and I
also went another quarter
mile up to Inspiration Point
(elevation 7,200 feet) over-
looking Jenny Lake where we
talked to a woman carrying a
one-month-old. Two Amish
couples carried little children
while other kids tailed
behind. While we hiked,
David fly-fished and enjoyed
it so much that he booked a
cabin for next summer.
Later, we ate dinner at the
upscale Jackson Lake Lodge,
where Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke and
the world's other central
bankers had met just a few
weeks earlier to decide whom
to give gobs of our money to
and other more important
matters.

Friday, Eric, Burt and I
saw antelope and bison and
hiked at String Lake while
David and Larry went fly-fish-
ing with the guide.
Saturday, we checked out
and flew home - except Eric,
who drove.
This year's adventure was
another success. The weather
couldn't have been better -
warmer than expected with
no rain. Long underwear had
been packed in vain. We did-
n't get to see bears, but other
four-legged animals sighted
included deer, elk, moose,
bison, antelopes, coyotes,
marmots, squirrels and chip-
munks. Birds (usually not on
the wing) included a Downey
woodpecker, ravens, osprey,
eagles, Canadian geese, blue
grouse, seagulls and a peli-
can. We ate and drank well,
sampling local brews like
Snake River Ale and Moose
Drool Beer (Burt's favorite)
from Montana.
The main thing, though,
was proving that we zeydes
still have a lot of youth in us
and that we haven't slipped
into geezerhood yet. May we
prove it again next year.


+


SUDOKU


1 2 3 4 5


6 2 7 3

7 4 8

S4 9 2

S3 1

8 63

37 _ 8

57 64

9 8 61 5


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


Kinderstudios
The dance students of
Kinderstudios, located at 1897
Island Walk Way, will perform
Nov. 28 at 5:30 p.m. at the
lighting of the Christmas tree
in downtown Fernandina
Beach; and Dec. 12 at 5 p.m.
during the lighted holiday
parade.
Santa Claus will visit
Kinderstudios on Dec. 12
from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Students
will enjoy hot chocolate, cook-
ies and a gifts exchange. For
information e-mail Alexandra
Carroll at Alexandra.kinder-
musik@comcast.net.
Light Upa Life
Take Stock in Children
presents Light Up A Life from
6-9 p.m. Dec. 3 at the Amelia
Inn Conference Center on
Amelia Island Plantation.
Enjoy an evening of fine wine,
a buffet and silent auction.
Advance tickets are $50 and
available at First Coast
Community Bank, the News-
Leader, Nassau County
Record, Caf6 Karibo, Resort
to Home and the Ocean
Clubhouse at Amelia Island
Plantation. Or charge by
phone at 548-4432 (Florida
State College). Tickets will be
$60 at the door.
Holiday music
The Amelia Community
Theatre Guild presents "An
Evening of Holiday Music"
Dec. 3 and 4 at 8 p.m. at 209
Cedar St.
Music will be performed
by the "Sine Nomine Choir"
under the direction of Jill
Dillingham, Nanette Autry
and Mary Williams. Ron
Kurtz and Judy Tipton will
perform a reading of Truman
Capote's A CiO.,...,
Memory. Holiday refresh-
ments will be served. Tickets
are $15 for adults and $10 for
students. Call 261-6749 for
reservations.
'Holiday Follies'
Tickets are on sale for
"Holiday Follies," a seasonal
potpourri of stories and songs
by Fernandina Little Theatre.
Performances are Dec. 4 and
5 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 6 at
2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 and a
donation of canned goods for
the needy.
Tickets can be purchased
at The UPS Store in the
Publix shopping center and at
FLT, 1014 Beech St.
Courtyard Nights
The next Courtyard
Nights at the Florida State
College Betty P. Cook Nassau
Center is at 7 p.m. Dec. 4, fea-
turing the Nassau County
Holiday Music and Fine Arts
Festival. Performing will be
the Yulee Primary Dolphin
Singers, Yulee Middle School
Chorus, Yulee Elementary
Panther Singers, Yulee
Middle Drama Team and


Callahan Intermediate
Chorus and Mallet Masters.
Bring a can of food for the
Barnabas Center and be eligi-
ble for a door prize.
The Courtyard Nights
Series is free and open to the
public. Light refreshments
will be available but individu-
als may bring their own. No
alcohol allowed. Lawn chairs
are encouraged.
Performances will be in the
Lewis "Red" Bean Technical
Center. Call 548-4432.
Christmas Glow
The Annual Christmas
Glow sponsored by the
Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach will be held Dec. 4
from 5:30-8:30 p.m. at the
Woman's Club Clubhouse at
201 Jean Lafitte Blvd. (behind
the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center). Just fol-
low the luminaries to the
clubhouse. There will be face
painting, entertainment and
visits with Santa. Chili, hot
dogs, chips and colas will be
served for a fee. Cookies and
punch will be free. This is the
Woman's Club's gift to the
community. All ages are invit-
ed. Call 261-4885.
Craft show
The 14th Annual
Christmas Craft Show is from
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 5 in the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center's main auditorium.
There will be Christmas gift,
ornaments, wreaths and
other handmade crafts.
Admission is free. Call 716-
7668.
Petphotos
The annual Pet Photos
with Santa is Dec. 5 starting
at 10 a.m. at Bark Avenue Pet
Boutique, 97 Amelia Village
Circle. Cost is $20 per photo
and appointments are
required.
Photographer Holly Allain
is donating her time.
Proceeds benefit Project
Chance, which supplies guide
dogs to children with autism
in Northeast Florida. To
schedule an appointment, call
the store at 261-2275.
Holiday classes
The Learning Community
of North Florida classes for
the holidays include: Holiday
Wreaths and Garlands - Dec.
5, 11 a.m.; Holiday Party
Appetizers - Dec. 5, 1:30 p.m.;
Holiday Brunch - Dec. 6, 11
a.m.; Holiday Wine and
Cheese Party - Dec. 9, 3:30
p.m.; Gourmet Dipped Apples
- Dec. 9, 6 p.m.; Easy Edible
Holiday Gifts - Dec. 12, 11
a.m.; Holiday Pies and Cakes
- Dec. 13, 11 a.m.; Holiday
Candle Making - Dec. 10, 3
p.m.; Christmas Cookies -
Dec. 19, 1 p.m.; Holiday Pet
Treats - Dec. 19, 3:30 p.m.
For information or to register,
visit www.tlcnf.com or call
(904) 430-0120


Fort Clinch holiday
Fort Clinch State Park
Union Holiday Encampment
Dec. 5-6 will feature re-enac-
tors decorating the fort for
Christmas. Volunteers in Civil
War-era costumes place fresh
greenery on the mantle, deco-
rate a period Christmas tree
and portray daily life as it was
in the winter of 1864.
The ladies string berries
and popcorn while fires burn
in the fireplaces and soldiers
answer questions about what
it is like to be stationed at
Fort Clinch.
The event is from 9 a.m.-5
p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m.-
noon on Sunday. Call 277-
7274, or visit www.floridas-
tateparks.org/fortclinch.
Holiday tea
Enjoy a Holiday Tea and
the reading of Dylan Thomas'
A Child's Christmas in Wales
Dec. 8 at 3:30 p.m. at Eliza-
beth Pointe Lodge on South
Fletcher Avenue.
Tickets are $25 for Friends
of the Library and $30 for
non-members and available at
the Fernandina Beach library.
Ticket includes tea and a
copy of the book.
Holiday Pops
ARIAS (Amelia Residents
In Action for the Symphony)
is sponsoring its annual
Holiday Pops Concert pack-
age on Dec. 11. The evening
starts with dinner at the
Ocean Clubhouse on the
Amelia Island Plantation, fol-
lowed by roundtrip bus trans-
portation to Jacoby Sympho-
ny Hall in the Times-Union
Center for the concert. If you
do not already have tickets,
they can be ordered as part of
the package. The orchestra,
joined by the Jacksonville
Symphony Chorus and the
Jacksonville Children's
Chorus, performs wonderful
melodies with symphonic
yuletide favorites. For reser-


vations call the Ocean
Clubhouse at 321-5099.

'Christmas
Homecoming
The community is invited
to experience "A 1940's
Christmas Homecoming"
Dec. 11 and 13 at 7 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church.
This is a musical drama
about love and sacrifice set in
wartime 1940's and filled with
upbeat, Big Band arrange-
ments bringing the period
fully to life along with carols
that depict the true meaning
of Christmas.
At the end of the program
active and inactive military
personnel will be honored,
with special recognition of
war veterans.
The performance includes
a 7-member drama cast and
45 singers from five area
churches accompanied by a
13-piece 1940's Big Band.
Admission is free.
Childcare for infants to age 4
is available with reservations.
Call the church office at 261-
9527. Amelia Baptist Church
is located at 961167
Buccaneer Trail.
Paws and Claus
The Nassau Humane
Society will host pet photos
with Santa Dec. 12 from 11
a.m.-2 p.m. on the front porch
of the Dog Park, across from
the city airport. Cost is $8 per
photo and proceeds benefit
the animals at the Humane
Society and its programs.
Lighted parades
The Lighted Holiday Land
Parade & Fernandina Harbor
Marina Holiday Lighted Boat
Parade will be held Dec. 12
beginning at 6 p.m.
The parade along Centre
Street is presented by
America's Youth. Parade
applications are available at
the Northeast Florida Com-
munity Action Agency at the


Peck Center and at the Cham-
ber of Commerce at Gateway
Boulevard in Fernandina
Beach. Entry is free.
The Fernandina Harbor
Marina Holiday Lighted Boat
Parade will follow the land
parade, presented by the
Historic Fernandina Business
Association, beginning in the
harbor at the foot of Centre
and Ash streets. Bring your
chairs and blankets to view
the parade downtown, then
move to the boardwalk at the
marina to see the lighted
boats.
For information about the
boat parade contact Sandy
Price at 206-0756 or e-mail
slprice@bellsouth.net.

Yulee Holiday
Festival
The 5th Annual Yulee
Holiday Festival and Parade
will be held at the Yulee
Sports Complex on
Goodbread Drive in Yulee on
Saturday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.-4
p.m. The parade will begin at
10 a.m., with the theme
"Through a Child's Eyes,"
followed by a festival offering
food, art and craft vendors,
live music and entertainment
for all ages. Pictures will be
taken with Santa in the
Winter Wonderland through-
out the day.
If you are interested in
participating in the parade or
providing entertainment, call
Connie at 225-2516. To
reserve a booth, call Julie at
225-5237.
'Paws for a Cause'
River City Community
Animal Hospital (RCCAH), a
501 (c) (3) non-profit mobile
veterinary clinic, will host a
fundraising festival Dec. 12 at
the Howard Gilman Memorial
Park in St. Marys, Ga.
The "Paws for a Cause,
Holiday Pet Walk-a-thon and
Festival" is from 11 a.m.-6
p.m. and will feature a chil-


HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS


HOLIDAY HELPERS


Sounds of Christmas
Bell ringing for The
Salvation Army Hope House
has begun. Organizers still
need bell ringers both on the
island and in Yulee. If you,
your club, group or ministry
can donate just two hours of
your time, the Salvation Army
needs you. Call Mary Moore
or Susan Lane at 321-0435 to
schedule.
Stress relief
The Council on Aging has
partnered with Maria
Murphy, a licensed mental
health counselor, to present
"Holiday Stress Relief for
Caregivers" Dec. 3 from 1:30-
3:30 p.m. at the Fernandina
Beach Senior Center (across
from Baptist Medical Center
Nassau). Free adult day care
available with pre-registra-
tion. For information or to
register, call Debra Domb-
kowski at 261-0701, ext. 113
or Maria Murphy at 261-7022.
Toy drive
Maurices at The Shoppes
at Amelia Concourse, 463721
SR 200, Yulee, is holding a toy
drive to benefit Toys for Tots
through Dec. 10. Drop off
donations Monday-Saturday,
9 a.m.-10 p.m., and Sunday
noon-7 p.m. Donors will
receive a coupon for 20 per-
cent off one regular-priced
item for each donation, limit
10 per person.
Shop With Cops
The Fernandina Beach
Shop With Cops program will
be held Dec. 16 for needy
children ages 1-11 to shop
with a city police officer at
Wal-Mart in Fernandina
Beach. The program hopes to
serve 150 youngsters, at $100


per child. Send contributions
to Capt. Jim Coe, "Shop With
Cops Program," 1525 Lime
St., Fernandina Beach, FL
32035-0668. All donations are
tax deductible. Contact volun-
teer program chairman Don
Monahan at shopwithcops@
aol.com or 277-2091.
Giftof life
Support the TLC
Pregnancy Center during a
Christmas fundraiser Dec. 18
as 12 local businesses make a
donation from that day's busi-
ness to the center. They are:
Chick-fil-A; Janet's Salon;
Hooked On Facials; Cindy's
Nail and Hair Salon; Changes
Salon; Deena Classic Salon;
Amelia Massage Associates,
Inc.; The New U; Island Hair
Co.; Robison Jewelry Co.;
Beech Street Grill; and
American Flooring.
TLC Pregnancy Center is a
501 (c)3 not-for-profit, tax-
exempt organization.
Secret Santas
Dayspring Village, Inc., a
licensed 94-bed limited men-
tal health assisted living facili-
ty in Hilliard serving adults
with schizophrenia, needs
help with its "Secret Santa"
program that provides its resi-
dents with Christmas gifts.
Contact Denise Cumbus at
Dayspring Village at (904)
845-7501 or e-mail
dayspring06@windstream.net
for a list of one or more resi-
dents and their needs and
then have the gift wrapped
and back to the facility by
Dec. 23.
Donations of baked goods,
time or talents, such as music,
also are always appreciated
and help brighten the holiday
season. Also visit www.day
springvillage.org.


SSEA

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(904) 261-2770
COMMERCIAL * INVESTMENT * LEASING * SALES



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Tea Party
As part of the Third
Annual Amelia Island
Museum of History's
Holiday Home Tour,
guests are invited to enjoy
the tradition of afternoon
tea at the Bailey House,
which will be offered at 2,
3 and 4 p.m. Dec. 4 and
5. With limited seating
available, advance ticket
purchase is recommend-
ed.
Tea tickets are $15 and
available at the Amelia
Island Museum of History
or by calling 261-7378,
ext. 100. Home tour tick-
ets are $25 in advance.
Sampling the sweets
and savories that will be
served are, from left, Judy
Pillans, Victorian Tea co-
chair, Anne Kelly, Holiday
Home Tour co-chair, and
Trish Dooley, Holiday
Home Tour co-chair.
SUBMITTED

dren's area with a jump
house, baked goods and bev-
erages for a donation, many
animal-related organizations
and a special demonstration
from the Kingsland, Ga., K9
unit, among other activities.
RCCAH also will offer
microchips for $25, which
includes the lifetime registra-
tion fee. A walk-a-thon for
pets and/or their owners
begins at 4 p.m. Registration
forms are available for down-
load at www.rccah.org. Visit
the website for more informa-
tion.
Chem Cell dinner
The Chem Cell Club
Christmas dinner will be held
Dec. 12 at 6 p.m. Members
and their immediate families
are welcome.

'Christmas
Spectacular'
Kinderstudios presents its
fourth annual "Christmas
Spectacular" musical produc-
tion for the community on
Dec. 19 at the Fernandina
Beach Middle School audito-
rium. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5.
For information e-mail
Alexandra Carroll at
Alexandra.kindermusik
@comcast.net. Kinderstudios
is located at 1897 Island Walk
Way, Fernandina Beach.
New Year's party
Sheffield's at the Palace,
117 Centre St., will host a
New Year's Eve party Dec. 31
with Impacto Latino playing a
variety of Latin music.
Tickets are $30 per person
or $50 a couple and include a
tapas-style buffet, party favors
and a champagne toast.
Reserved table packages start
at $200 and VIP packages for
10 are $90 per person.
Packages require reserva-
tions.
Call Bill Childers, general
manager, at 491-3332.


www.ACRFL.com pi~cf~o


...j


BLACK


Phil Griffin
Broker
philOacrfl.com














4B CLASSIFIED


NEWS-LEADER/FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2009


To PLACE AN AD, CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE - WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 901 Automobiles
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms & Acreage 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercial/Retail 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 4B


I 102 Lost & Found
LOST CAT - Pastel tabby. Small,
approx. 6 lbs. Lost behind high school
in Fernandina. PIs call (904)206-0760.
FOUND TWO SMALL DOGS - One Lab
mix, one Beagle mix. Call (904)583-
8331 or Nassau Humane Society.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
FOUND LAB PUPPY - Yulee. (904)
261-9155

104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers
throughout Florida - Advertising
Networks of Florida. Put us to work for
You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com. ANF


201 Help Wanted
ARTISTIC FLORIST POSITIONS:
Floral Designer Positions - open
part-time and full time. Experience in
professional Florist required. Apply by
e-mail artisticflorist@bellsouth.net
PTL OTR DRIVERS - New pay pkg.
Great miles. Up to 46cpm. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com. ANF
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need employ-
ees to assemble products at home. No
selling, any hours. $500 wkly potential.
Info 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-1380.

ADVANCED HOMECARE - needs RNs
in Nassau Co. to provide home care.
FT/per visit oppty. Excellent $$. Fax
470-4799 call 470-5000. Tom
AUTO DETAILER POSITION
Skills & exp in fine auto detailing. Must
have good attitude, references and
transportation. Part-time. $6/hr. Call
904-548-0979, appt.


I 01 Help Wanted I
RV Delivery Drivers Needed - Deliv-
er RVs, boats & trucks for PAY! Deliver
to all 48 states & CN. For details log on
to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
HOTEL FRONT DESK CLERK - Night
audit & daytime positions open.
Experience required. Apply at Holiday
Inn Express, 76071 Sidney PI., Yulee.
ADOPTION & VOLUNTEER
COORDINATOR
Nassau County has an opening for an
Adoption & Volunteer Coordinator in
the Animal Care and Control
Department. Annual starting salary is
$32,027 plus a competitive benefits
package. Graduation from high school
or equivalent, supplemented by three
years experience in the area of animal
care in a shelter/center environment
and two years of direct public customer
service. Must possess a valid State of
Florida driver's license. Applications
will be accepted through Wednesday,
December 9, 2009 and can be obtained
in the Human Resources Department
located at 96161 Nassau Place, Yulee,
FL 32097 or by phone (904)491-7332
or fax (904)321-5926. EOE/M/F/D/V.
Drug Free Workplace.
HOUSEKEEPER: Greyfield Inn
Cumberland Island. In residence
position, dining experience required.
$24,500 per annum. Apply 6 North 2nd
Street, Suite 300, Fernandina Beach or
call 261-6408 for application.
RAVEL, TRAVEL, TRAVEL - $500
sign-on bonus. Seeking sharp guys &
gals, Rock-n-Roll atmosphere, blue
jean environment. Call Ally (800)716-
0048 today. ANF
SPORTS ACTIVE, DIVORCED,
RETIRED GENTLEMAN - looking for
light home help. Part or Full time, up to
$500 per week, room & essentials
provided, including college tuition if
requested. Ideal for a student. Andy
(904)772-9813, Jacksonville, FL.
ECO-FRIENDLY CLEANING COMP-
ANY - looking for a dependable clean-
ing professional P/T. High quality work
& proven experience req'd! Email resu-
me to: hr@thegreencleaningpros.com


SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN
Small jobs welcomed. (904)277-4777
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance Car-
eer. FAA approved program. Financial
aid if qualified - Housing avail. Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-
5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
accounting, criminal justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer avail.
Financial aid if qualified. (888)203-
3179, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF


1/2 AMERICAN, 1/2 ENGLISH
BULLDOG - Free to good home. Super
cool, fun loving guy. Owner off to
college. (904)556-4604

l mlN.!MJ3m


CARPET REPAIRS - and restretching
and installing. 35+ years experience. 601 Garage Sales
Call (904)753-1243.


WE BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT - We'll pick up. (904)
879-1535 or (904)237-5293
CHIMNEY SWEEP
Don't burn your house down because
of an unsafe fireplace. Call Lighthouse
Chimney Sweeps 261-8163 for a safe
warm winter.

207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 BO02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF
HOST A GOLD PARTY - in your
house. We supply refreshments & know
how. Instant money making
opportunity. 583-6152


NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE - Sat.
11/28 @ 8am till ? Day bed, house-
hold items, toys, 15" tires, women's/
teen clothing, books, dishes, Christmas
deco. and more. Forest Parke Dr., Flora
Parke, next to Super Wal-Mart.
SAT., 8AM-12PM - 1st & Simmons.
Wood futon, brass bed/mattress, oak
dinette & chairs, bicycles, more.
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 11/28, 8am-
11am. 1012 Ocean Oaks Dr. S.
Furniture, TV, movies, girl's bike, toys,
children's books, & misc.
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 11/28, 9am.
96031 Springwood Ln. (Spanish Oaks).
Household/misc. items, books, tools,
Christmas deco. Good stuff!
YARD SALE - Sat. 11/28, 8:30am-?
85035 St. John Ct., Yulee (Lofton Creek
Subdivision). Boy clothes sizes 5-18,
toys, books, DVDs, bikes, computer
games, microwave, TVs, & much more.


I 01 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - Sat. 11/28, 8am-lpm.
801 San Fernando St., (904)310-6672.
Couch, futon, TV, kids/baby stuff,
bikes, housewares, collectibles, micro-
wave, & much more.
YARD SALE - Fri. & Sat., 8am-3pm.
2605 Benz Place.
YARD SALE - Antiques, fishing stuff,
collectibles. Fri. 11/27 & Sat. 11/28,
8am-lpm. 505 S. 9th St.
GARAGE/MOVING SALE - 3580 1st
Ave. Sat. & Sun., 8am-? Antique
Singer sewing machines, lots of sewing
stuff, lots of arts & crafts, household
items, outdoor stuff, books, antique
books, & more. Too much stuff to list!


I 306 Lessons/Classes 111602 Articles for Sale


105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.


HARVARD WOOD FOOTBALL TABLE
- Elec. scoreboard, cup holders on each
end of table. Like new, barely used,
great Christmas gift. $150. 261-0057
LITTLE TYKES SPIRAL BOUNCER -
New in box, inflatable bouncer w/slide.
Retails for $500, asking $250/OBO.
(904)491-3520
Drastically Reduced Cosmetic Sale
- Open House 11/14, 21 & 28, 12-4pm
or call for personal appt. 87188 Raddin
Rd., Chester area. (904)225-7500
WHITEWASH 5-PC. QUEEN
BEDROOM SET - $450/OBO. Call
(904) 556-1919

607 Antiques
& Collectibles
50% OFF LARGE FURNITURE ITEM
- Different item each week till end of
year. Come by & see. Old Flood Store,
Yulee. oldfloodstore.com

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.

614 Jewelry/Watches
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS -
Crawford Jewelers, 1472 Sadler Rd.
(904)277-4910

615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING TAX CREDIT - 40
yr warranty. Direct from manufacturer.
30 colors in stock. Quick turn around.
Delivery available. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupplv.com. ANF

S 618 Auctions
www.abalauction.com - Auction -
Online biding: 1974 Corvette, 2002
Honda VTX 1800 motorcycle, 2006
Laredo by Keystone 29' fifth wheel RV,
furn., zero-turn mowers, chainsaws,
weedeaters, lawn tools, plus much
more. www.abalauction.com, joe@aba
lauction.com, (850)510-2501 AB2387,
AU3239. ANF

S 624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At F
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES




CLEANIG SE ICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed * Bonded * Insured
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904-4911971 * Cell: 904742 8430
E mail: justforyouserv@aol.com





Patricia Christmas
Commercial * Residential * Rental
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
583 -2099

THIS[ ] gA6 --'E 1
-AVAJL-- A--BlE

[ l .,1 q .1 L l il'C L_
JLE


CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
� _ _ LICENSE #694


CONSTRUCTION


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duste
(904) 261-1940



BRANNAN
CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS

"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much!
* Operator or door replacements � Transmntter replacement
SBroken springs Stripped gears
S Cables Service for all makes & models
904-277-2086


GOLD & SILVER











HOME IMPROVEMENT

FJT HOME IMPROVEMENT INC
Quality Workmanship
We Do It Right The First Time
Termite & Wood Rot Repair
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work* Hardwood Floors
Doors * Windows * Custom Decks
Custom Trim * Crown Moulding
321-0540 * 557-8257
LiCenseda insured * Sering Nassau CoumySince 2003


OTTO'I CUSTOM
WOODWORKING, INCK.
CUSTOM CABINET ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
BOOKCAIEI TRIM CARPENTRY
HOME REPAIR REMODEUNG
HANDYMAN IERVICEI
LICENSED t, INSURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 904-557-3100

JEWELRY

jewelry Repair,
Cleaning, Inspection,
Appraisals & Layaway



1472 SADLER ROAD
277-4910
1 1

Florida Gardener
Residential, Commercial, Associations
* Full service Lawn Maintenance
* Flowerbeds, Mulch, Cleanups
* Irrigation Repairs & Installs
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


LOCKSMITH


The Lock Doctor
904-321-LOCK (56251
Locked Out?
Car, House, Office
24/7 Service $30.00
Keys Made, Auto, Home, Office


NEW & USED CARS


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 * Yulee

(904) 261-6821

PAINTING






N O 1 1 1 . , I'.1 I .. 1'. I , .1 I h , .

225-9292



THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


PAINTING

AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITY PAINTING, INC.,
"Call the Professionals"
(904) 753-1689 A
*RESIDENTIAL
*COMMERCIAL
*INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
SPECIALIZED FINISHES
*PRESSURE WASHING
& WATER PROOFING
LICENSED * BONDED * INSURED
*PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP AT
AFFORDABLE PRICES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FORYOUR
FREE ESTIMATE
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


PRESSURE WASHING

PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353


ROOFING


|-\A COASTAL BUILDING |

SYSTEMS �

� "Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest
R Roofing & Siding Contractor
� Serving Satisfied
S Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
� Re-Roofing * New Roofing
SVinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia
261-2233
,k Free Estimate
SCCC-057020
-,,fffff/ff/f4'f/f/f/fffmimj


SALON & SPA


REMODEL YOUR
LOOKI

It DISCOV~tRTH-1t
IlCDIFFERENCE:....
HAIR -COLOR.
P~zDI-MANICUJR~z
[JAO � " WAX - MAXff-UP
2380 SaAle R~aA, Sbe.102
Pr emancdina Beach,
.b -41-7 -5r


TREE SERVICE

Insured Bonded




Good Price Specializing
Great Service | in all your
Free Estimates tree's needs!
Johnny Bass 904-753-3496


Mac's Tree Service, Inc
AFree Estimates
ATrimming
ARemoval
AStump Grinding
AHauling
Fully Insured -Workman's Comp
(904)282-9061
(904)838-8359


Trimminq & Removal


Girgis Tree Service
Licensed * Insured
22 Years Experience

Roger Giris
Free Estimates (904)229-8098


CLASSES - Tutoring in Spanish,
Italian, French. Private & group
lessons. Call Anna or Lucia (904)403-
1982.
ARTISTS WANTED - Seeking working
Artists who are interested in Sharing
Studio Space in an established Gallery
located in downtown Fernandina. All
interested please call - (904)261-7039.



403 Finance
Home/Property
BIG PLANS - being held up by the
economy? Turn court settlement,
annuity, or lottery winnings into the
cash you need. Call Chris (816)582-
1193 or chris@yourcashout.com. ANF




502 Livestock
& Supplies
'09 BERMUDA HAY - Horse quality.
Large square bales in barn, $3.50/bale.
Cow hay $2.50/bale. Patterson, GA.
Alvin Strickland, (904)335-7463.


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED




Saturday * November 281


1 till 4pm




ON ISLAND




85067 ST. THOMAS - LOFTON OAKS


SUBD.- 3BR/2BA


1124 ASF. -$148,900


204 Work Wanted I1I 503 Pets/Supplies


+




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


704 Recreation Vehicles
PUBLIC AUCTION - 400+ FEMA
mobile homes & campers. All selling no
reserve Dec. 5th, Gonzales, LA
www.hendersonauctions.com (225)
686-2252 LA lic 136-09. ANF




802 Mobile Homes
2005 4BR/2BA - on 1 acre. Must sell
due to foreclosure. Low down,
$750/mo. Call (904)589-9585.
FORECLOSED! - New manufactured
homes on land. Ready to move in 3, 4
& 5 bedroom homes w/low down.
$750/mo. (904)589-9585
804 Amelia Island Homesl
UNWRAP THE HOME
you've always wanted!
Oceanfront Log Cabin - $899,000
2,389 sf home in Yulee - $189,900
Condo by the beach - $155,000
Charming Cottage - $130,000
Egans Bluff III 2159 sf - $294,000
Amelia Coastal Realty
(904)261-2770
ask for Santa!
1711 PARK AVE. - Amelia Park.
2115sf, 3BR/2BA, pool, privacy fence,
2-car garage. $425,000. Call for more
details (904)583-3732.
CHARMING DOWNTOWN COTTAGE
- Energy Star Hurricane Resistant Pre-
const., $175K. (904)556-1905
FSBO or RENT - Great 1939
commercial building with living
quarters. 1700 sq. ft. 226 S. 9th St.
(904)261-4801

805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.


806 Waterfront I
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.


HUGE SAVINGS - 20 Ac only $72,900.
Wooded in Coastal GA. Excellent Week-
end retreat/Awsome hunting/Subdi-
vision potential. Only 3.5 miles from
Wal-Mart. Owner Financing Available.
Call Owner Now! (912)674-2700

817 Other Areas
Foreclosed Home Auction - 300+
Florida homes. Auction 12/5. REDC /
View full listings www.Auction.com RE
No. CQ1031187. ANF
Foreclosed Home Auction - 300+
Florida homes. Auction 12/5. REDC /
View full listings www.Auction.com RE
No. CQ1031187. ANF
AUCTION - Santa Rosa Co., FL. Sat.
12/12, 11am. The Moors Golf &
Racquet Club Milton, FL. 66 beautiful
lots - 20 lots will sell absolute. Gated
comm., clubhouse, pool, tennis, courts,
workout center. Walking distance to
championship golf course. More info
(205)822-4229 Redmont Auction Eddie
Propst AU2051 Bob Vagi Auctioneers &
Realty, Inc. AB177 AU331. ANF





851 Roommate Wanted
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE WANT-
ED - 2BR apt. to share in Courtney
Isles. Call for details (904)206-0884.
ROOMMATE - Beautiful condo on
Plantation. 2BR/2BA. Prefer young
professional. $450/mo. Pool & tennis.
Contact (678)386-4331.
UF OR SFC STUDENT - who is looking
for 1BR/1BA in 2/2 apt in NW Gaines-
ville in Spring. Prefer female student to
share w/local student. 5 mins to SFC,
15 mins to UF (904)277-6951.

852 Mobile Homes


DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME -
3BR/2BA on 1 acre. Great location.
$850/mo. + dep. Call (904)321-7454.


BLACKROCK AREA - 2BR/1BA.
$500/mo. + $500 deposit. Call (904)
261-9729.


807 Condominiums STATIONERY RV FOR RENT- Weekly
I I I & monthly rates. (904)225-5577


CLUB VILLA AIP - This two-story villa
has been renovated ceiling to floors
and wall to wall! New kit. and 3 new
bathrooms. Call for appointment to
preview. 491-5906. $258,000
808 Off Island/Yulee
3BR/2.5BA ENERGY EFFICIENT
HOME - Granite countertops, hard-
wood floors, ceramic tile, spa tub, 2-
car garage. In gated community.
$329,900. Call (904)491-4383 or
(904)237-7324.
809 Lots
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION LOTS
* Lot 29 - Beachwood Rd. near tennis
center & beach club, great location,
$335,000.
* Lots 13 & 14 - Sound Point, deep
water, best deal on Plantation,
$795,000.
* Lot 101 - Belted Kingfisher, wooded
patio lot, very private, $248,000.
Call (904)545-3017 for more details.
LOT FOR SALE - #10 Blackrock Rd.
.55 acre, cleared, filled, well drilled,
between Pirates Wood entrances.
$59,000. (912)506-1035


3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - in
Blackrock Rd. area. $700/mo. + $400
sec. dep. (904)753-1691
BLACKROCK AREA - 2BR/1BA in
small, very quiet trailer park. Water,
garbage, sewer & lawn service
provided. $550/mo. + $500 dep. 261-
6486
3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE - on one
acre. $850/mo. + $800 deposit. (904)
753-2155
2BR/2BA - Beautiful new decor. $500-
$675/mo. Includes water, lawn.
Possible RTO. (904)315-1757 or 613-
8401
3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME - on 1 acre off Wilson Neck Rd.
$800/mo. + $500 deposit. Call (904)
725-7293.
On Island - 2/1 SWMH in park
starting $165 wk/$660 mo. + dep.
Utilities available. Also, At Beach -
effic. apt., $145 wk incl utils/cable.
261-5034
3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE - Available
12/1. $600/mo. + $600 deposit. Call
(904)583-2576, leave message & I will
return your call.


Fall Move-In Special

2 MONTHS FREE
Call for Details
. W/D Connections
. *. Large Closets
Private Patios
PSparkling Pool
Tennis Courts
* Exercise Room
* Close to shopping
* 20 minutes to Jacksonville
or Fernandina.
City Apartments with Country Charm!
S(904) 845-2922
EastS 37149 Cody Circle Hilliard, Florida
astwoo aks Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30
Apartments Sat. /Sun. by Appt.






Countryside Apartments
1&2 Bedroom Units
Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
^ 1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103
qUALHOUSING This institution is an Equal Opportunity provider and employer.

Yulee Villas "
R1,2&3 Bedroom Units |
Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues &Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810
This institution is an Equal Opportunity provider and employer TUL YSN
_____________________OPP__RTUNITY_


HOMELESS



ANIMALS...



THEY'RE DYING

FOR

A 2ND CHANCE,


Adopt A Companion Today,


A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE
NEWS-LEADER


ON ISLAND - 3BR/1BA SWMH.
Screened porch w/carport. $700/mo. +
deposit. (904)261-5559
TWO DWMHs - Nassauville 3/2, $825
+ dep. 3/2 off Radio, $825 + dep. Pets
OK. Call (904)206-3423
BLACKROCK RD. AREA - 2BR/1BA
mobile home for rent. Available 12/1.
Must have references. $500/mo. +
deposit. Call (904)277-8522.

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5 min-
utes from beach. Private bath, private
entrance. $100/wk. + $200 dep. Call
10am-6pm, (904)624-5084 anytime.
ROOM FOR RENT - 1902 Beech St.
Call (904)261-5621.


855 Apartments
Furnished
SMALL 1BR APT. - in Nassauville.
Furnished. Twin bed, electricity, A/C,
DirecTV. $650/mo. + $650 deposit.
Cute, cozy, quiet & in good
neighborhood. Service animals only.
References required. Please call
(904)206-3241, & leave message.
WATERFRONT - Cozy 1BR, can be
furnished except bed. Some utilities.
Great fishing & boating. (904)703-
4265
ACROSS FROM OCEAN - 57 S.
Fletcher Ave. 2BR/2BA completely
furnished. Washer/dryer, d/w, dispos-
al, TV, ceiling fans. $875/mo. + utili-
ties. Deposit $875. Call (904)277-7622
to schedule walk through.
2 APTS. - Fully furnished. A.I., gated,
all utilities, beach access. Short term
rental. No smoking. $750 & $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262
OCEANVIEW BEAUTIFUL APT
FOR RENT
Beautiful ocean views. Furnished. 2BR,
Spacious, all Brand-new appliances,
Hardwood floors. $750/month. (904)
277-3050.
631 TARPON AVE. - Fernandina
Shores. 2/2, furnished, pool, tennis
courts, clubhouse, steps to the beach.
$895. nick Deonas Realty, Inc.
(904)277-0006
At Beach - Remodeled effic $125 wk,
incl utils/cable. Also On Island -
2&3BR SWMH in park starting $165
wk/$660 mo + dep. 261-5034


A.$4di14wm


Dorothgy Trent
Surfside Properties, Inc. Realtor'


1925 S. 14TH St., Suite 4
Amelia Island, FL
Sales (904)277-9700
Property Management
(904)277-0907 Larry Colen
www.ameliasurfside.com Realtor'


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS
ON ISLAND ON ISLAND Cont


* 2618 Delorean, '1E.F, _,-,, ..,
screened back porch, 2 car
garage. Avail. Dec. 1 $1100/mo.
* 536-A N. Fletcher, 2BR/2BA,
2 blocks from beach. $975/mo.
* 536-B N. Fletcher, 2BR/2BA, 2
blocks form beach, $850/mo
* 531 S. 8th Street, upstairs apt.
2BR/1 BA $550/mo.


* 338 C S Tarpon Ave, i ,iF, I ,-.
2 blocks to ocean. $500/mo.
* 340-B Tarpon, 2BR/2BA, 1 blk from
beach $850/mo Avail Dec. 1 st


OFF ISLAND
* 5142 Barbara's Place, 3BR/2BA,
$950/mo. Avail Dec. 1st
* 35 Teal Court (Townhome in
Marsh Lakes), 3BR/2.5BA, 2 car
garage, $1295/mo. Avail Dec. 1st


I1


11TH ST, 2 homes under construc-
tion, affordable, on Island 3 bedroom
2 bath $149,900. MLS #50109.


810 Farms & Acreage I I 852 Mobile Homes


F LORIDA'S OLDEST W WEEKLY N NEWSPAPER



NEWS LEADER



Presents



FPcoocil FTCJoxr


To Benefit





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CENTER, INC



Help the Barnabas Center

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for the upcoming

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


2 bedroom garden units * 2 bedroom townhouse style
3 bedroom garden units * Marsh views
Swimming pool * Dishwasher � Laundry facilities
Washer/dryer connections* * Washer/dryer units available*
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675.oo per month
*Some features not available in all units

t e�e s ca4 * Ad' Al<4 Ou . 4 st !
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you can walk to the shops
& restaurants at The Gateway to Amelia Center!


04m tAq! (904) 261-0791
www.atedevelopment.com















ROPERTIES





ViYnl cn bring ir pot qlong ,-hon you
I I , , . , 1 .I I o n e-
, i . ,. ,,. i ,nelia

I, .I I Ih, , 3203.. ..4 h 11 ' d fo

, i ,,,.ll., ,,, h ,t Id" " ' ' , I f ee s

O .,I,,. 1i .. . i . dc




CRS. GRII
500 ch 3e203' 904.753.0696
Fe dmBahL32034 Each Office is Independently Ovwned and Operated



North Hampton Golf &
Country Club!!
4 bedroom 3 bath, cabinet
lined kitchen, open to
family room with fire-
place!! Preservation lot!





I0, entire street S, Iathy White
Fernandina Beach CDPE
Florida 904-321-1999 904-753-2705


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

1BR/1BA - $700/mo. includes utilities
+ $700 deposit. Across from beach,
949 S. Fletcher. (904)215-9935

For Rent - 2BR/1.5BA townhouse apt.
Newly rebuilt. CH&A, stove, refrig.,
d/w, carpet. $750/mo. + dep. & ref's.
828 Nottingham Dr. (904)261-3035
NORTH BEACH AREA - Quiet. 2BR/
1.5 duplex, upstairs, ocean view.
$800/mo. + 1/2 utilities. Call (904)
206-2281.
Affordable Living - for eligible low-
income persons/families. 1 & 2
bedrooms. Rent based on income.
Apply at Post Oak Apts., 996 Citrona
Dr., Fernandina Beach; (904)277-7817.
Handicap Accessible apts available.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
OCEANFRONT 2BR/1BA - Patio,
CH&A, private beach access. $750/mo.
+ $850 dep. 270 S. Fletcher. Yearly
lease. (904)556-5722
ENJOY FANTASTIC SUNSETS -
Riverfront Loft Apt. in old Town.
2BR/1BA, patio, stainless kitchen
appl's, custom cabinets, laundry h/u.
$995. (904) 206-1292
WATERFRONT - Cozy 1BR, can be
furnished except bed. Some utilities.
Great fishing & boating. (904)703-
4265
BEACHES CHOICE - 2BR oceanview
townhome. Freshly painted, new
carpet, ceiling fans, CH&A, W/D conn.
Svc pets only. No smink. $875/mo. Wtr/
sew incl. 737 N. Fletcher. 261-4127
925 TARPON - North Pointe, 2BR/
2.5BA, close to beach, pool, covered
parking. $850/mo. Nick Deonas Realty,
Inc. (904)277-0006


857 Condos-Furnished 1858 Condos-Unfurnishedl 1860 Homes-Unfurnishedl


1BR/1BA - Amelia Woods. Beautifully
furnished. Vaulted ceilings. $840/mo.
Call (770)789-2965 for details. Also
listed for sale - Century 21.
FOR RENT - Fernandina. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. Utils incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
POOLVIEW BEAUTIFUL CONDO
FOR RENT
Amelia Landings 1E Top floor Beau-tiful view
of pool, lagoon and tennis courts. Furnished.
2BR/2BA. Washer/ Dryer all appliances. Nicely
furnished. $850/month. (9041277-3050.


NOVEMBER SPECIAL
AMELIA LAKES
1 & 2 Bed Luxury Condos in gated,
waterfront community. Resort-style
pool, tennis court, 24/7 fit ctr, volley-
ball & more! Garden tubs, walk-in
closets, & lots of upgrades! Call Jessica
(904)415-6969. Starting at $799/mo!
www.amelialakes.com
jessica@amelialakes.com


DUPLEX @ 2184-A FIRST AVENUE -
Close to the beach & Sliders! 3BR/2BA
townhome w/1 car garage. $1300/mo
incl. yard service. Call Robin (904)261-
6651 or (912)270-3239
1711 PARK AVE. - Amelia Park.
2115sf, 3BR/2BA, pool, privacy fence,
2-car garage. $1800/mo. w/pool &
lawn svc. Call for more details
(904)583-3732.


I859 Homes-Furnishe: d ION AMELIA ISLAND - 2069 Bonnie
859 Homes-Furnished Oaks Dr., 3BR/2BA. $1000/mo. +
I $1100 deposit. (386)365-8543


2BR/2BA - on Amelia Island FULLY FURNISHED HOUSE FOR RENT - Nice little house.
Plantation. $1200/mo. for 6 months. 3BR/2BA + bonus room in Lofton 3BR/1BA located on Gum St. Newly
Call AMELIA RENTALS (904)261-9129. Pointe. For information call Ana remodeled. Call (904)753-1346.
(904)403-1982. remodeled. Call (904)753-1346.


858 Condos-UnfurnishedI
3165 S. FLETCHER - (Sea Castles).
3/2.5, washer/dryer, garage, com-
munity pool, steps to beach. $895. nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
LUXURY CONDO - 2BR/2BA, garage,
pool, gated community, ground level.
The Villas at Summer Beach. Unfurn-
ished. $1150/mo + util. 277-3206
3BR/2BA - $1395/mo. + utilities.
Short term or long term, or weekly.
Pets OK with a fee. (912)552-8601
FERNANDINA SHORES - 3BR/2BA
ground floor, pool, tennis, clubhouse,
dishwasher. Year lease, ref's, deposit.
Avail November. $950/mo. 261-5630
2BR/2BA - Close to beach, 1200 sq.
ft., tile floors, recent renovation,
washer/dryer. Pet considered.
$950/mo. Call (904)430-7802.
1/2 MONTH FREE - The Palms at
Amelia 2BR/2BA starting at $825/mo.
3BR/2BA starting at $900/mo. Call
(904)277-1983.
AMELIA LAKES CONDO - 2BR/2BA,
lake/pool view. $850/mo. Call (904) 583-0322.
THE COLONY - 2BR/2BA, bonus room,
garage, W/D, pool, tennis courts.


$ uu/mo. Available 1z/1/u0 . call
UT ISS H (904)557-1507.
CURTISS H. CONDOS FOR RENT HOTLINE - Ask
LASSERRE about our FREE RENT SPECIAL,
LlASR ~Darlington Realty, Inc. (904)261-8030.

Real Estate, Inc. CURTISS H.



LASSERRE
IReal E=1 tatl-- Tie


LONG TERM
* 3BR/2.5BA w/pool unfurnished
95109 Hildreth Ln NO SMOKING
$1750 + until. Includes yard & pool
maintenance.
*730 S 14th. - 3BR/IBA home
w/fenced backyard, $875/mo. + util.
* 322 S.6th St. 4BR/2BA $ 1, 100 + util.
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side),
3-4 BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots
of parking. Unfurnished $1,400 + util.
* 19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo. + util.,
security deposit $1,000.
* 3BR/2.5BAVery nice 2500 sq.ft. home
at Florence Point $1,450/mo. + util.
Avail 1/1/2010
*3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island
with beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,750/mo. + Util. Includes yard
maintenance
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. +
util. Security deposit of $1,000.
* 2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairsApt. Great
DeckOceanview $950/mo. + util.
*3BR/2BA on First Ave. w/one car
garage. Like new with a partial ocean
view $1,150/mo + util.

VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/ I BA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher.
Call for more information


I I ,A. J_4 C3t L Itt J ct. I


*2000 sf +/- in busy Five Points Plaza at
AIA and Sadler Rd. Great retail
frontage with heavy foot traffic and
vehicle exposure. $3,800/mo incl.rent,
CAM, and taxes
*850785 US 17Yuleel- 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq. ft. building & large paved
parking lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & util.
* 1200 s.f.at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term
lease. $2400/mo includes CAM + tax.
*Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and
Peacock Electric in O'Neil, good
exposure on AIA. Great for show
room or office space $1350/mo + tax
+utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. 1839 S. 8th St
Adjacent to Huddle House $2,250/mo
lease + tax, also considering sale.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing locat-
ed at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2,500/mo + tax +
util
* DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent
FREE with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo
includes all other fees/costs except
utilities. One mo. FREE rent w/ signed
lease.
* Five Points Village 2250 S 8th St. Old
West Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample
parkingAIA exposure. Great for retail
or large office space. Call for details.


860 Homes-Unfurnished

YULEE - 4BR/2BA, 1854sf. $1,100/
mo. Call Don Brown Realty (904)
225-5510 or (904)571-7177.

WORTHINGTON DR. - in Page Hill,
Yulee. 3/2, stove, fridge, DW, disposal,
washer/dryer, water softener, mower,
pest control. $1095. Nick Deonas
Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
3BR/1BA BLOCK HOME - Yulee.
Callaway Dr. CH&A, upgraded kit. w/
dw, storage garage with w/d. $800/
mo + dep. 225-9890 or 225-6084.
HOUSE FOR RENT - on Fernandina
Beach, FL. 1748 Lewis St. Call (904)
312-2686 to show house.
3BR/2BA HOUSE - 2-car gar., all
appl's, upgraded kitchen, vaulted
ceilings, cable included. Mins from Jax,
A.I., Kings Bay & beaches. $1150/mo.
Available 12/15. (904)334-0806
ON THE ISLAND - 3BR/2BA, 3630 1st
Ave. Garage, large back deck, near the
beach. $1200/mo. + $1000 dep. Call
(386)961-8672 or (866)606-8443.


YULEE COTTAGE - 2BR/1BA,
completely refurbished, CH&A, tile
bath. $750/mo., 1st & last + $700
security. Call (904)465-0511.
ON ISLAND AT SEASIDE: 2,400 sq.
ft. 4-bedroon 3-full baths. Walk or
cycle to te beach, Ft. Clinch or town.
2-car garage, sprinkler system, smoke
and security alarms, fitted for internet,
phones & cable. Fully equipped
kitchen, with breakfast nook, formal
dinning area, and storage area,
laundry room with washer/dryer.
$1,650 month. 904/206-0817 or
770/493-9664.
SUMMER BEACH BLVD. - 3BR/2BA
unfurnished home. $1700/mo. Call
AMELIA RENTALS (904)261-9129.
2150 CAPTAIN KIDD - Very clean
3BR/2BA home. 1700sf w/fenced in
backyard. In Lakewood Subd. behind
Food Lion Shopping Ctr. $1200/mo. +
dep & 1 yr lease. Call (904)753-4559.
3BR/2BA - w/garage & screened
porch. Villages of Marsh Lakes. $1100/
mo. 1st & security required. (904)753-
0379.







Club

Apartments
BestAddress in Fernandina Beach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms

/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
V Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details C
(904)277-2500 /


VISIT ChaplinWilliams.com - for
Nassau County's largest selection of
long term rentals! (904)261-9311
33379 SUNNY PARKE CIR. - Flora
Parke. 4/2, 2300 sq. ft. Stove, fridge,
DW, microwave, FP, water softener,
sprinkler system. Must see. $1395.
Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. 277-0006


1861 Vacation Rentals

OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.


S 863 Office

Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - in the
historic district downtown. Lots of foot
traffic. Some utilities are included.
Please phone (904)261-8249 to
preview these offices.
OFFICE SPACE - for rent. Office within
an office. Desk, chair, bookcase,
utilities included, & some extras. 753-
4077
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
402 Centre St. 1000-9000SF
1 North 4th St (Swan Bldg)
155-170SF
501 Centre St (Maxwell Bldg)
120-190SF
Atlantic Ave @ 14th St 500-2100SF
117 S. 9thSt 1200SF
1405 ParkAve 918SF
Galphin R/E Svc - (904)277-6597
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT - Desk,
bookcase, chair, all utilities, & some
extras. $500/mo. 753-4077
BUSINESS SUITES - in Professional
Office Park located between Harris
Teeter and AIP along AIA. Several
offices to choose from. GREAT
PRICES! Call Chaplin Williams Rentals
904-261-0604

864 Commercial/Retail

DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on AIA in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
ft. 463179 AIA, Yulee. Permits
available for alcoholic beverages. (904)
557-5004
CENTRE ST. RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
- for rent. 7450sf, will subdivide.
(904)556-5722.




901 Automobiles

FSBO - Classic 2dr ElDorado '91
Cadillac $950. '97 Saturn $1900. '91
Dodge PU $2500 & '85 2dr S10 Blazer
$1200. All good running condition.
261-5034
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY LE - White.
33,000 miles. $15,000. 583-9348
2005 DODGE SRT-4 (Turbo)
$10,000. (904)277-3821

S 904 Motorcycles

2004 SUZUKI BURGMAN 400 - 7300
miles. Like new. Full windshield. 50
mpg. $3,400/OBO. (904)753-0998


(alphin


REAL EST %TF SERVI(' ,. INC.
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company


Visit us at www.galphinre.com

(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax

1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32034


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 4242 S. Fletcher Ave - 3BR/3BA Fully furnished beautiful beach cot-
tage with its own beach access. Many windows to enjoy the ocean
views. $2000
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered patio
and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and fireplace in
living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in presti-
gious gated community where amenities include a community swim-
ming pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and Golf Club of
Amelia just across the street. $1795
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country liv-
ing at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land
with beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm evenings in the
florida room or cozy up by the fireplace on the cold winter nights. Either
way this one is a charmer. $1495
* 829 Mary St - 3BR/3BA including mother-in law suite on first floor.
Walk to the beach from this 3-story home on large corner lot. Approx.
2,300 sq.ft. living space and over 1340 sq.ft. of exterior decks on 3 sides
of the house with ocean views. Open floor plan with vaulted ceilings.
Fireplaces in living room and master bedroom. Two car garage. Water
and lawn maintenance included. $1795
* 4941 Windward Place (Windward Cove)- 3BR/2BA on South end of
the island, close to the beach. Open family room with built-ins and
wood laminate flooring throughout. Large master bath with garden
tub. Two car garage and fenced in back yard. $1395
* 1542 Lisa Avenue - 2BR/2BA Fully furnished home on the North end
of Amelia Island. Stainless steel appliances. Open floor plan, ceiling
fans, tile floors. Two car garage. $1450
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 87073 Raddin Road, Yulee - 3BR/2BA Modular home with large par-
tially fenced yard. Interior features fireplace, washer/dryer, island bar,
bonus room. $995
CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 966 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA Townhome close to schools, shopping.
Bright open floor plan with loft area. Vaulted great room, separate din-
ing. $975
* 2040 Village Lane- 3BR/2BA Centrally located townhouse on cul-de-
sac, close to schools and shopping. Features gas fireplace, 2 car garage,
washer/dryer, and enclosed sunroom. $1250


$699,000 - Sandpiper Loop - MLS#49621
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$495,000 -
3BR,
Nip


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS con't
* 2700 Mizell Avenue Unit 404A (Amelia Woods) - 2BR/2BA
Downstairs unit opens up to community pool and tennis court.
Walking distance to the ocean. Water, sewer, and garbage service
included. $850.
* 1833 Perimeter Park Road (Amelia Park)- 2BR/2BA Newly con-
structed, never been occupied. Centrally located on Amelia Island.
Ceramic tile, granite countertops, W/D hookups. Separate tub and
shower in master. Close to schools and shopping. $1225
* 1841 Perimeter Park Road (Amelia Park)- 3BR/2BA Centrally
located on Amelia Island. Ceramic tile, stainless steel appliances, gran
ite countertops, washer and dryer. Close to schools and shopping. $1350
* 3165 South Fletcher Unit 12 (Sea Castle) - 3BR/2.5 Condo with
community pool at rear of condo. $1095
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town home
located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal waterway.
Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service. $2,475
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1095 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front
and rear yard. $1395
* 31135 Paradise Commons #621 (Amelia Lakes) - 2BR/ 2BA
Upstairs unit in gated community.Wood burning fireplace in living
room, walk-in closets, screened balcony overlooking pond. $925
* 2700 Mizell 401B -3BR/2BA in Amelia Woods. Fully furnished unit
overlooking community pool and tennis court. 3 month lease mini
mum. $1095
* 2811 Atlantic Ave Unit 201 (Fernandina Cay) - 3BR/3BA
Beautiful, fully furnished with great ocean views. Private elevator
entrance into tiled foyer. Nice upgrades throughout including crown
molding, Corian countertops, recessed lighting, double oven in large
kitchen and plenty of storage. Walk across the street to beach and Main
Beach Park. $1895
* 1320 M. ., I ..I.. I,., i. i.I , i /2BAon the comerof 14th
Street., .. ...... . .., i ... i.. washer and dryer. Garage
converted into an office and separate storage room. Open patio and
screened porch. Fenced inbackyard. $950
* 3200 Fletcher Ave Unit D-1 (Ocean Dunes) - 2BR/2BA Nicely fur-
nished ground floor unit. Ocean front patio wifthbeautiful ocean views,
steps from the beach. Located across from the Surf Restaurant.
Community pool. $1395
* 4743 St. Marc Court (The Colony)- 2BR/2BA Townhome on South
end of Amelia Island. Fireplace in living room, large 2 Car garage with
W/D hookups. Community pool and tennis courts. Located off A1A
near shopping and beach access. $950


$340,000 - Reserve Court - MLS#48982
4BR/2BA in Reserve at Old Bluff
Nin Galohin - 277-6597


$210,000 Martinique Ct. - MLS#50361
2BR/2BA - In The Colony
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


Fernandina Cay - MLS# 43544 $1,295,000 1000 S. Fletcher-MLS#45255 $177,000 - Timber Creek PLantation - MLS#50131
/3BA - Great Ocean View Great Rental History, Sits on (2) 50' buildable lots 2,307 sq.tt. Brick/Stucco, SS Appliances,
p Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 904-261-6166 Brad Goble - 261-6166


�g P "HH I III1





275,000 MLS#49508 $510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365 $150,000 - Cartesian Pointe - MLS#50160
2600 S F. - across from the Bells River 4BR/3BA - 2578sf - In Seaside Subdivision 1,928 sq.ft. Can close before Nov. 30th.
CBrad Goule u9042616166 Nip Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597
* S. Fletcher Lot 50 X 100 $425,000 Brad Goble 261-6166
*3280 S. Fletcher, 95x400, R-3, MLS#49357, $450,000 Nip Galphin 277-6597


Deluxe Two Bedroom Condos On The Island'

Located in the heart of idyllic Fernandina Beach and just a
short stroll to the post office, YMCA, shopping and the
beach is the condominium community of Amelia Green.
These spacious 1700 square foot, two bedrooms, two and
a half bath homes are now available for long term leasing.
Featuring 10' ceilings, a fireplace, granite countertops,
stainless steel appliances, attached garage and either
travertine or carpet flooring. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,100/mo

Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists


95155 Bermuda - 3038 sf. 5BR/4BA golf and lake
front home located in Amelia National. Master
down with bonus/media room. Three car garage.
Social amenities included. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,995/mo

5209 Village Way - 1789 sf. 3BR/2BA in Ocean
Village. Furnished or unfurnished. Community pool
with beach access and Summer Beach membership
available for small fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On
Island. $1,950/mo

330 S. 7th - 1592 sf. completely renovated
3BR/2BA with master suite upstairs and upgraded
kitchen. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,450/mo

918 White - 1040 sf. 2BR/3BA with loft. Hardwood
floors, granite countertops, commercial kitchen.
Wrap around porch with beautiful back yard. W/D.
Half month rent off with 12 month lease. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,400/mo

95024 Barclay Place #1C - 2200 sf. 3BR/3.5BA
town home located in Harrison Cove. Tile floors in
main living area. Master suite down. Screened lanai.
Pets allowed. On Island. $1,300/mo

86624 Cartesian - 1890 sf. 3 BR/2BA home with
fenced in backyard. Covered patio with hot tub.
Two car garage. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,250/mo

2108 Natures Lane - 1942 sf. 3BR/2BA home with
hardwood floors in ,Il....... kitchen and study.
Fenced backyard. W/D plus lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,200/mo

2184A First - 1530 sf. 3BR/2BA with master suite
upstairs and guest suite down. One car garage.
Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,200/mo

76087 Long Pond - 1590 sf. 3BR/2BA home locat-
ed in Cartesian Point. Fenced backyard. Covered
lanai. Security and irrigation. W/D. Pets allowed.
Off Island. $1,175/mo

Amelia Woods #603A - 1700 sf. 3BR/ 2BA ground
floor condo just one block from beach. Renovated
with tile throughout. Community pool. Furnished or
unfurnished. W/D and water included. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,125/mo


823 N. Fletcher - 1960 sf. 2BR/1BA furnished
upstairs condo. Ocean view with sunroom. Water
included. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,100/mo

1010A Natures Walk - 1526 sf. 3BR/2.5BA town
home. Walking distance to middle school and high
school. Located off Citrona. Lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,100/mo

85134 St. John - 1500 sf. 3 BR/2BA brick home
located in Lofton Oaks with large fenced backyard.
W/D included. Pets allowed. Off Island. $1,050/mo

710 N. 15th - 1460 sf. 3BR/2BA home with fenced
in back yard and patio/deck. Great for entertaining.
Pets allowed. On Island. $1,050/mo

1908 Beech - 1141 sf. 3BR/2BA with fenced back
yard. Pets Allowed. On Island. $1,050/mo

Amelia Lakes #1422 - 1143 sf. 2 BR/2 BA second
floor condo in gated community. Vaulted ceiling in
family room with fireplace. Community pool, tennis
and workout facility. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$950/mo

86030 Palm Tree - 1700 sf. 3BR/2BA home on two
acres. Screened porch on front and sun room in
back. Pets allowed. Off Island. $925/mo

408 S. 15th -1084 sf. 3BR/1.5BA home with fenced
in back yard. Tiled main living area. Pets allowed.
On Island. $900/mo

5437 Leonard - 1332 sf. 2BR/2BA home in Historic
American Beach. Large outdoor entertainment area
for cookouts and family gatherings. Pets allowed.
Off Island. $850/mo

86088 Santa Barbara - 1200 sf. 2BR/2BA home
located in Lofton Oaks with fenced backyard. Great
roommate plan. One car garage. Pets allowed. Off
Island $850/mo

823 N. Fletcher - 1960 sf. 2BR/1BA duplex just
steps from the beach on North end of Amelia
Island. Downstairs unit. Water included. Pets
allowed. On Island. $810/mo

86317 Callaway -1000 sf. 2BR/1BA house on large
lot. Wood floors with updated kitchen. Pets
allowed. Off Island. $695/mo


Fullproperty details, photos and commercial listings available at(C.,//,,il ,,,/,'.."



Chaplin Williams 5472 First Coast Hi way #1|


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