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FRIDAY August28. 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS fbnewsleadercom


GWINEE TA DE WATA'


AIA repairs called dire need
RYAN SMITH rating the plan. Amelia Island. It also provides
News-Leader "(AIA) really is the roadway into access to the Port of Ferna


Repairs to A1A were the topic of a
special meeting hosted Wednesday
by State Rep. Janet Adkins with
Florida Department of Transportation
District 2 Secretary Charles Baldwin.
Nassau County officials asked
Baldwin how soon repairs to the
stressed road could be implement-
ed. Baldwin said resurfacing of the
road was scheduled for 2010 and
2011, but would not commit to accel-


Fernandina Beach," Adkins said. "It
seems like in many places along A1A,
it's turning into gravel. I would have
to say that A1A is one of the most
important issues in Nassau County."
"It affects tourism, public safety,"
said Larry Williams; Adkins' legisla-
tive aide. "We're a fairly residential
community. Fifty-five percent of
Nassau residents work outside of the
county and use A1A to make their
commutes. It is the main route to


direct
ndina


Beach. ... It's also the primary evac-
uation route for about 25,000 resi-
dents."
Williams said there had been 190
crashes on A1A between 2005 and
2008. In the same period, there were
five traffic fatalities and 168 injuries,
he added,
"Certainly as we see continued
degradation of A1A, those numbers
A1A Continued on 4A


STORM CLOUDS


LEAI I WIiLS/PORTHE NEWS-LEADI)I
Stormy weather often makes for beautiful sunsets, as this photo of the bridge at the south end of
Amelia Island on Saturday shows after Hurricane Bill passed offshore. Tropical Storm Danny may
bring similar sights as it passes by this weekend. Boaters and swimmers should be alert to high tides
and rip currents.

LEISURE .................
S. ... ........................3B OBITUARIE .


S4 2 64 0 1 3 newsprint with sy based nk............--- ---


County dilemma:



higher tax rate



or less spending?


RYAN SMITH
News-Leader


Nassau County Commissioners are
still wrestling with whether to raise
taxes to support additional spending in
the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.
Debate arose again among com-
missioners Monday over whether to
raise the county's property tax rate in
next year's budget. At a budget work-
shop meeting, Commissioner Mike
Boyle proposed some spending -
including contributions to non-profit
groups and repairs to the judicial
annex - that could require an increase
in millage from this year's rate of 7.23.
The commission, by a 3-2 vote, set
its maximum rate at a higher 7.644
mills Aug. 10, but Commissioner
Danny Leeper and Chair Barry
Holloway reiterated their support for
the lower tax rate.


Public hearing
The first of two public hearings
on the county's 2009-10 budget is
scheduled at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at
the James S. Page Governmental
Complex, 96135 Nassau Place,
Yulee. A date has not been set for
the second hearing.

"If we can do any of this with what
we approved back in July, that's fine,
but if its going to mean an increase in
millage, then I can't support it," Leeper
said.
Although no decisions were made
at the workshop meeting, Boyle
brought forward funding requests
from non-profit groups for later con-
sideration at the two public meetings
COUNTY Continued on 3A


City to levy more



for youthsports


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
In an effort to balance its budget for
upcoming fiscal year 2009-10, the city
has informed local youth sports
leagues there will be increased costs
to use city sports facilities.
An unsigned Aug. 12 letter from
the city to league representatives
informed them it was "staggering to
see the amount that the city was sub-
sidizing" their organizations, includ-
ing "payroll, utilities and supplies."
According to City Manager
Michael Czymbor, the city paid about
$67,000 last year to keep the sports
facilities going for several youth
leagues, including Pop Warner
Football, Amelia Island Youth-Soccer,
Elm Street Little League and the Babe
Ruth League.
The city, he said, got only about
. $2,000 back from those groups.
' In order to recoup some of those
costs, the city has developed two
options the leagues can choose from.
SOne option would be a revenue-shar-
ing agreement, in which city partici-
pants would give 15 percent of rev-
enues to the city, and non-city
participants would give, 25 percent of


revenues.
Another option
would be a "facility-
care alternative," in
which the league
would be solely
responsible to main-
tain the areas it uses.
The city would con-
Czymbor tinue to subsidize
utility costs, which
would include lights
for the fields and electricity for the
concession stands.
Czymbor said that after city staff
met with representatives of several
sports leagues Aug. 20, it was deter-
mined that the city would provide
those groups with more detailed infor-
mation on the costs to run the sports
facilities. The city, he said,-would con-
tinue to work with groups until a mutu-
al agreement is reached regarding
reimbursement of costs.
Scott Mikelson of the city Parks &
Recreation Department, who' attended
the meeting, said in an e-mail that "the
league representatives seem to under-
stand that the amount of money the
city spends on the utilities, chemicals,
YOUTH Continued on 3A'


Arts groups to lose


$10,000 in city funds


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader


If the city budget for 2009-10 is
approved in September, local non-prof-
it groups will receive nearly $10,000
less in city funding compared to this
year.
City commissioners agreed with
staff at their Aug. 24 budget workshop
that social service groups such as the
Barnabas Center, Council on Aging
and Boys and Girls Club of Nassau
should receive apprxiinmatelh a; s i uch
funding as they did in the past,
But the arts did not fare as well.
Using commissioner input, city staff
recommended that the Amelia Arts
Academy, Amelia Island Film Festival
and Arts Council all receive less,
money this year from the city. With a
few minor adjustments, commission-
ers approivd the staff recommenda-


........................................ 1B
.................................... 2 A
oIT 27R


U/LU I ) A \OILABJ-U il t I............4.... .,
SERVICE DIRECTORY ..................... 4B
SPORTS ............................................... 12A
SUDOKU ................................................... 2B


Public hearings
The first public hearing of the
S2009-10 city budget will be
Tuesday, Sept. 15. The second
* public heanng, and final vote, has
been scheduled for Tuesday,
Sept, 22, Both meetings will be at
- 5:05 p.m. at City Hall, 204 Ash
St., Fernandina Beach.

tions for funding non-profits.
At first, Vice Mayor Eric Childers
objected to the Episcopal Children's
Services getting any funds at all,
because the group was late submit-
ting its request. He added that he
would like to see mental health serv-
ices receive $400 more from the city,
for a total of $7,900.
ARTS Continued on 3A


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FRIDAY, August 28.2009 NEWS News-Leader


ARTS Continuedfrom 1A
But Mayor Susan Steger
noted that Episcopal Children's
Services - which runs the Head
Start Program at the Peck
Community Center - is part of
the United Way.
"I think Gandhi said, 'A
measure of society is how we
take care of our weakest mem-
bers,"' Childers said.
Commissioner Tim Poynter
said he agreed the city should
contribute to the care of chil-
dren and the elderly. "If the
organizations were not here,
the city would have to take care
of it," said Poynter.
Poynter added that he had
objections to giving money to
groups such as the film and
book festivals. "I don't think
that taxpayer dollars should go
to those organizations," he
said. "I'm all for tourists and
festivals," he said, "but I think
private people should be
stepping up to the plate ... the
city shouldn't have to fund
them."
Commissioner Jeffrey
Bunch suggested "some kind of
time limit" for funding non-prof-
its.
"I think you need to wean
some of these (non-profits) off
gradually," Steger said. "We
need to focus on social service
organizations. That's the way
we should look at it in the
future."
"We can make a decision
after this year," Steger went on.
"(We can) give them notice we
will be weaning them."
Childers said Micah's Place
was "fiscally very strong" and
suggested the city take $100
from them and give it to mental
health. 'They need it a lot less
than some of these other organ-
izations," he said.
"I was a strong supporter of
the Amelia Arts Academy," said
Poynter. "You can take (money)
out of that for the mental health
center."
Steger suggested taking
$200 from the arts academy
and $200 from the Amelia
Island Film Festival, leaving
them with $3,800 and $800
respectively.
"That would be fine," said
Childers.
Commissioners also dis-
cussed budget amendments
and how to keep a required 25
percent general fund "reserve."
As was discussed in previous
budget meetings, the sale of
city land, an increase in elec-



YOUTH Continued from 1A
equipment and payroll ... for
the upkeep of these facilities
needs to be subsidized. There
was no decision made by the
leagues on the options that
were given. Another meeting
will be scheduled in the near
future."
Scott Moore 6f the Babe
Ruth League, who also attend-
ed the Aug. 20 meeting, said
the league's board was meet-
ing Thursday to discuss ideas
on reimbursement costs.
adaughtry@fb~newsleadercom


4dayworkweek?
Fernandina Beach Commissioners are considering the pos-
sibility of a four-day workweek for city employees.
Commissioner Jeffrey Bunch suggested the city could go
to a four-day workweek to save on utility costs. He noted that
the school system closes on Fridays during tile summer, sav-
ing "hundreds "f thousands of dollars."
City Manager Michael Czymbor conceded that while the
Commissioners had good -suggestions, the city had already
cut back on many costs. "I don't think (cutting down on ener-
gy) will immediately solve our budget issues," he said.
"The bottom line on a four-day work week is determining
critical services that would have to be open," Czymbor went on.
I "The state of Utah did it for the last two years and saved 13 per-
cent ... we're willing to consider it."
"We need to re-educate the public," said Commissioner
Eric Childers. "It's not that big a deal. I had a four-day job and
it was wonderful. There's a lot of success stories out there if
you look .. we have two more meetings. It it looks viable, I'd
be willing to jump on that bandwagon."
adaughiryfbneuwseadercom


tric franchise fees for residents
and parking meters were dis-
cussed as ways to plug a possi-
ble $1.4 million shortfall in the
upcoming fiscal year.
Steger said the commission
should also look at city employ-
ee medical benefits and retire-
ment plans, "to see if what we
give them is too rich."
Steger gave an example of a
private business that had pre-
viously matched a retirement
fund up to 7.5 percent, but has
decreased it to 3.5 percent.
"It's happening all over the
place," Steger said: "It needs to
happen in city government as
well. ... Is (the benefit package)
too rich? The city needs to look
at it for taxpayers."
But, said Bunch, "the bene-
fits are what keep employees
here, and helps with hiring of
employees. ... A lot of people
on the bottom don't make good
money."
Human Resources Director
Robin Marley said she had
planned for a 12 percent
increase in health insurance
costs for city employees, but as
of Aug. 21 the increase came to
11.34 percent. Marley said
the city is looking at other
health insurance options, and
the increase could be even
lower.
Marley said that because
city employees will receive no
pay increases in the coming
year, and because they are
required to contribute to a
retirement fund, their benefits
package is "not excessively







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rich."
Although no definitive deci-
sions were made, commission-
ers also discussed raising elec-
trical franchise fees by half a
Percent, and lowering city
electrical use by having city
employees go to a four-day
work week. ,':
"I'm uncomfortable with
raising franchise fees," said
Steger. She suggested lower-
ing city electrical costs by 10
percent "as a symbolic gesture
... we could raise the air condi-
tioner (temperature) in this
room right now."
"Budgets .adjust all year
long," said Poynter. "Right now
we have to adjust budget mov-
ing forward. I'm a supporter of
at least trying parking meters.
... If we try something just a lit-
tle unique, we may not have to
add that half percent to the fran-
chise fee."
'There's no magic bullet,"
said Commissionier Ken
Walker. "You've got to decide
what services are necessary
and what you cut ... it's always
a competition and argument.
You either increase revenues
or cut revenues ... as long as
we try to maintain a 25 percent
reserve, and don't go drasti-
cally over or under.... As long
as we stay approximately close
to that. ... We've gone from
almost no reserve to the 25 per-
cent we have now."
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COUNTY
Continued from 1A
where next year's budget will
be finalized - the first of which
is scheduled for Sept. 14.
One such funding request
came from the Boys and Girls
Club. Already funded by the
county at $50,000, the club has
requested an additional
$25,000.
"I think this reaches a
broad spectrum of people in
this community, which is why
I'm bringing it forward," Boyle
said.
County Budget Director
Ted Selby pointed out that the
club only started receiving
county funding within the last
year 'Ihey got zero in 2007-08,
$50,000 for '08-09, and now
they're asking for an addition-
al $25,000," he said.
Most commissioners felt
the requested increase was far
too high.
"I could understand asking
for 10 percent or 5 percent,
but to ask for half again what
you're already getting is a bit
astronomical," Commissioner
Walter Boatright said.
One funding increase the
commissioners did support
was to Sutton Place Behavioral
Health. Making up for a


I 3A


Boyle


Leeper


decrease in state funding, the
county's extra money would
qualify Sutton Place to receive
federal funds.
'They have requested an
additional $19,000, and this is
only so they will qualify for
matching funds," Boyle.said.
For qualified mental health
programs, the federal govern-
ment would contribute funds
three times the amount of
Sutton Place's contribution,
Selby added.
"I've seen what Sutton
Place has done for the com-
munity," Commissioner Stacy
Johnson said. "... If the return
on investment is 3-1, I could
support the $19,000."
Funding for maintenance
at the Nassau County Judicial
Annex was also discussed. The
annex's plumbing needs work
and its brickwork needs water-
sealing, according to Building


Maintenance Director Daniel
Salmon. However, Leeper
again said he would not sup-
port a tax increase to pay for it.
"If it's an emergency we
need to address it, but at this
point I'm willing to trade- I'm
not willing to add," he said.
Boyle urged the other com-
missioners not to reject tax
increases out of hand.
"The reason I came up with
these plans this year is that I
think we can do these without
undue burden on the taxpay-
ers," he said. "If property val-
ues continue to go down - and
I don't see anything to indicate
they won't - we're going to be
behind the 8-ball come budget
time next year. I understand
no one wants to raise millage
rates. It's not popular. ... Just
keep in mind this is going to
have consequences."
S"(The millage increase)
may be minimal, but I'm look-
ing out for that single mother
who may need that $50,"
Leeper said.
"I think we need to be as fis-
cally conservative a govern-
ment as we can," Holloway
said. '"That's why in these
times, if we can give the tax-
payers an extra $10 to buy a
Happy Meal, I want to do that"
rsmithfobnewsleadercom


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Love thy Neighbor Day
Sept 11,2001 / Friday, Sept 11,2009
Flowers by Shirley Page
S will be giving wrapped
1/2 dozen roses to friends and businesses in
our community with the understanding that
they keep one rose and pass each of the other
five roses on to their friends and neighbors.
The Local Fire/Rescue Truck will be there from 11-2pm
Passing out fire hats to the kids.
Bubbles is giving customer appreciation cards,
discount coupons & cookies.
Mega Bite is giving free anti-virus screening.
Tony Ryals Art of Hope will demonstrate his talent
and skill, by painting with his mouth.
Surrounding businesses are also participating. Come & seel
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(904) 261-3855


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FRIDAY. August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


Wreck knocks out power in city


JASON YURGARTIS
News-Lcader

A car collided with a truck
driven by a man suspected of
DUI after he struck a utility
pole on South Eighth Street and
knocked out power in a wide
area of the city early Monday
morning.
According to a Nassau
County Sheriff's Office report,
James Edward Johnston, 54, of
South Carolina left the roadway
in a 2006 Ford F-150 and
bounced off a utility pole in
front of 2990 S. Eighth St. just
after midnight Aug. 25. The col-
lision caused significant dam-
age to the truck and caused the
pole to lean over the road.
Johnston's truck came to
rest in the roadway, blocking
both eastbound lanes.
Witnesses in a nearby building
heard the noise of the wreck
and walked out to find Johnston
exiting his truck, the report
stated. They yelled to him to
get out of the roadway, which
was darkened due to the power
outage, but an oncoming car
traveling east was unable to
avoid his truck.
The front driver's side of a
1995 Ford, driven by Johana
Danielle Berry, 23, of Yulee col-
lided with the front passenger


SUBMITrED
This photo, taken by a witness, shows the aftermath of a crash that took place just
after midnight Aug. 25 on South Eighth Street. The accident led to the driver's arrest
for DUI, a trip to the hospital for the passenger of another car that struck the truck
and a temporary power outage in the area.


side of Johnston's truck, caus-
ing damage that incapacitated
both cars until a wrecker serv-
ice arrived. One passenger in
Berry's car was injured and
taken to Baptist Medical Center
Nassau.
According to the report,
Johnston, who claimed to have
Shad two beers at the Palace


Traffic alert in Yulee


The Nassau County.
Sheriff's Office has asked
motorists to be aware of a new,
traffic pattern at Yulee
Primary School on Goodbread
Road.
The traffic pattern for drop-
ping off' and picking up stu-
dents has changed.
Motorists are not allowed
to go north on Goodbread
Road between Koen Road and


the school between 7:15-8 a.m.
and 1:45-2:15 p.m. Monday-
Friday.
Only school buses, school
staff arid Nassau County
School Board employees will
be allowed through during
those times.
Nassau County Sheriff's
deputies are temporarily
directing traffic to familiarize
and educate the public.


Saloon prior to the accident,
stated he was unsure what hap-
pened and didn't know where
he was. except that he was
going home.
According to the report,
Johnston was taken to the
Nassau County Jail after he
failed a sobriety test, then a
breath test, initially blowing a


0.117. The breath alcohol con-
tent limit for drivers in Florida
is 0.08 percent.
Both Johnston and Berry
were wearing seatbelts and
their vehicles sustained an esti-
mated $10,000 and $5,000 dam-
age respectively, the report stat-
ed.
jyurgartis@fbnewsleader.com


GOP decries mailer


TALLAHASSEE - Repub-
lican Party of Florida Chairman
Jim Greer has condemned a
mailer regarding absentee bal-
lot request forms for the GOP
primary election to replace
deceased State Sen. Jim King.
"As Chairman of the
Republican Party of Florida, I
condemn both the content of
your mailer and your use of the
Republican indicia to imply an
affiliation with the Republican
Party," said Greer in a letter to
Erin DiCesare, leader of the
group responsible for circulat-
ing the mailer, which used
Black Panther images and
President Obama. "Florida law
prohibits you from using the
name or symbols of a political
party without first obtaining the
written approval of that party's
state executive committee."


"The fact that you are a
Democrat who resides in Leon
County leads me to seriously
question your involvement in
a Republican primary in Duval
County," wrote Greer. "Why is
a Democrat collecting Republi-
can absentee ballots requests?
Why are the requests going to
a P.O. box instead of the
Supervisor of Elections? Who is
financing this rogue group?"
"The Republican Party of
Florida is exploring all avail-
able legal options to ensure that
eligible voters are not misled
or disenfranchised by the activ-
ities of you or your organiza-
tion," wrote Greer.
The mailer from the "Con-
servative Voters' Coali-tion" was
sent to Republicans, including
those on Amelia Island, last
week.


'We allsee that the key segmentfor
resurfacing is from 1-95 in. But we have the
Shave Bridge to Atlantic Avenue scheduled
for this (fiscal)year. Is there any possibility
of swapping those projects?'
SCOTT HERRING
NASSAU COUNTY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIRECTOR


A1A Continued from LA
will continue to grow," he said.
"... From 2003 to 2006, traffic
increased on A1A by 2.97 per-
cent. From 2006 to 2008 it
increased by 7.2 percent."
Williams said A1A is des-
perately in need of repair.
"We're seeing rocks and grav-
el, seeing it literally disinte-
grate under the wheels of the
vehicles that are going
through," he said.
FDOT Urban
Transportation Development
Manager James Bennett said
the portion of A1A on Amelia
Island, from the Shave Bridge
to Atlantic Avenue, is sched-
uled for resurfacing in 2010.
However, the section between
1-95 and the island, considered
the most critical by most who
attended the meeting, is not
scheduled for repairs until
2011.
"My concern is when you
get the kind of traffic we have
on A1A, along with the grav-
eling we're seeing and our
afternoon thunderstorms, it
becomes a public safety issue,"
Adkins said.
"We all see that the key
segment for resurfacing is
from 95 in," said Nassau
County Engineering Services
Director Scott Herring. "But
we have the Shave Bridge to
Atlantic Avenue scheduled for
this (fiscal) year. Is there any
possibility of swapping those
projects?"
"No. That's the short, sim-
ple answer," Baldwin said.
'The main problem on the
road is the ruts. It is a safety
issue," Nassau County
Commissioner Stacy Johnson
said. "When I'm in my large
SUV it's not a big deal, but
when there's any rain on the
road and you're in a smaller
vehicle and try to change
lanes, the pull is amazing."
Baldwin said the Shave
'Bridge to Atlantic project will
be bid in March.
"How long will it take to
I A -nRg'-,d n,'v*


pick a contractor, and how
long roughly to start work?"
Adkins asked.
"We'llprobably award itby
the end of March, and you'll
see them start shoving mate-
rial around within 60 or 70
days," Baldwin said. 'The west
section (between 1-95 and the
island) will be let in February
of 2011. So we're going to.
screw up your traffic with con-
struction for a year."
"Actually, we prefer to say
we're going to provide eco-
nomic stimulus and jobs to the
community for a year,"
Bennett said.
Adkins said requesting
bids on the west section earli-
er could save money. As the
economy continues to recover,
she said, bids will be higher.
Therefore, it makes sense to
start work earlier.
"If we let that project earli-
er you might get, even a
greater economy of value," she
said.
"If we let it in December or
January?" Baldwin said.
"Yes."
"We can look at that,"
Baldwin said.
"Do you know when that
design (for the west section) is
scheduled to be completed?"
Adkins asked.
Baldwin said the design
phase of the west section
resurfacing should be com-
pleted around October of
2010. "If you look at the
February let and back up five
months, there's your design,"
he said.
Baldwin said that while he
understands A1A is in need
of repairs, he cannot promise
any greater speed from FDOT
in affecting repairs.
"With the west component
I can look at moving it forward
and see. We won't have that
answer today," he said. "We're
doing the best we can with
what we've got We're aware
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FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 NEWS News Leader


American Legion Auxiliary 174

is now accepting members


The American Legion
Women Auxiliary Unit 174 is
now accepting applications for
auxiliary members.
Women who are eligible
for the auxiliary are the moth-
ers, wives, daughters, sisters,
granddaughters and grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and
deceased veterans who served
during World War I, World
War II, the Korean War,


Vietnam War, Grenada/Leba-
non and Panama or in the
Merchant Marines from
Dec. 7, 1941, through Aug. 15, ,
1945.
The membership applica-
tion fee and annual dues is
$30.
For information contact
Wanda Blue, secretary, 261-
4638, or Courtney Tyson-
Shelby, first vice president,
491-3419.


Fourth Congressional
District Vietnam-era veterans
will receive certificates of spe-
cial recognition from Congres-
sman Ander Crenshaw in a
ceremony slated for Nov. 10
at Naval Air Station
Jacksonville.
The application deadline to
receive the honor is Oct.13.
In the past two years,
Crenshaw has recognized
nearly 500 Vietnam veterans
eligible for either the Vietnam
Service Medal or the Vietnam'
Campaign Medal.
This year's ceremony will
recognize the contributions of
all who served in the U.S.
Armed Forces, including the-
Coast Guard and the
Merchant Marines, during the
dates of the Vietnam War
(March 1, 1961 to March 28,
1973.)
Armed forces members
who qualified for the Armed
Forces Expeditionary Medal
by service in Vietnam between
July 1, 1958 and July 3, 1965
will also be recognized.
Foreign Service Officers
with the U.S. Diplomatic
Corps members serving in
Southeast Asia during the peri-


ods above are also eligible for
special recognition.
If you are a Vietnam War-
era veteran, live in the Fourth
Congressional District, and
would like to participate, con-
tact Congressman Crenshaw's
district offices in Jacksonville
at (904) 598-0481) or go to the
Congressman's web site at
www.Crenshaw.house.gov to
obtain an application. Click on
Constituent Services, then.
Special Events & Notices and
last on the Vietnam Veterans
Recognition Ceremony to
download the press release
and application.
Completed applications
and documentation should be
mailed to 1061 Riverside Ave.,
Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL
32204.
To determine eligibility for
the certificate, veterans must
complete an application and
submit a copy of their service
discharge document or proof
of service in the Diplomatic
Corps or Merchant Marines.
Veterans must be alive and a
current resident of the Fourth
Congressional District of
Florida-to participate in this
program.


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Children make


Children might ask tons of
questions like, "Why do we fly
the American flag," or "Why do
we say the Pledge of
Allegiance," but one thing's for
sure - most youngsters put
their whole heart into patriotic
events. They also don't dispute
whether it's right or wrong.
Have you ever watched a
small child vie for the opportu-
nity to stretch taller than the
next and square their shoulders-
while keeping their hand cen-
tered over their heart during
the playing of the national
anthem? Kids practically bend
over backwards eyeing the flag
as it's raised up the pole and
always want to be up front wav-
ing their miniature flags during
time-honored parades.
Their excitement is always
so palpable and never fails to
extend to those nearby. They
love the excitement of singing
patriotic songs and probably
know better than most spirited
ditties like "Yankee Doodle."
For these reasons, I believe our
youth of today make the best
patriots.
I recently read two items
which sparked my interest
about child patriots, Both high-
ly influenced me when selecting
a subject fqr this week's article.
One was a letter from Dr. Lu
Cain from Woodbine Elemen-
tary in Woodbine, Ga. During a
ceremony on the first day of
school, Cain recapped how
crewmembers from the USS
Maryland, present for the cer-
emony, snapped to attention for
the raising of the American flag.
It followed saying, "I thought
of the children who stood so
reverently as they soaked up
the events and knew that they
would hold them in their mem-
ories forever ...
The second item was
"Fostering a Work Ethic," by
'Richard Bromfield. He stated,


**


*


VETERAN'S
CORNER


Debbie
Walsh


"Teaching
your chil-
dren how to
work is a
lesson that
will benefit
them
throughout
their lives."
Though
his strategy
tools were
geared to
teaching
children
good work
ethics, I


believe these same concepts
should be used to nurture
young, inquisitive minds in the
art of citizenship. Start early,
teach, have expectations, work
with them, pay reasonably and
be a good model.
With the new school year in
high gear, there won't be a bet-
ter time to nab the attention of
our future leaders and instruct
them on the facts and traditions
of our great nation. Kids are
buzzing with enthusiasm and
their eager, energetic willing-
ness to participate can be con-
tagious. This is a great time to
get our children involved in.the
Americanism Program by con-
ducting simple, entertaining
projects that will promote a life-
time of patriotic involvement.
The formative years of life
are the most impressionable
and when starting early, young
citizens learn what it's like to
grow up in a democratic socie-
ty. Learning begins at their first
parade when the American flag
makes her maiden pass down
the street or at a ballgame when
everyone stands f6r the nation-
al anthem. Learning to be a
patriot is not a difficult under-
taking when you're instilled
with the values of "love thy
country" early on in life.
I believe youngsters need


. best patriots

guidance in learning what is enthusiasm as money.
patriotic and what is not. They Other help may be co
need to see examples, hear the soon also. I'm proud to
whys and why nots and receive attended a recent Ame
our encouragement to freely Legion Post 54 meeting
express those questions. I sus- month when a recommend
pect most people chuckle at was made to purchase
their constant inquisitiveness Americanism coloring b
unless of course, you're a parent, for our grade school prog
who hears these questions a Needless to say, there w.
gazillion times a day, hesitation on the part ofa
. Working in the classroom is dees. In less than 60 sec
a tremendous responsibility and attendees voted to accer
a task not all people are cut out recommendation. Boy, if
for. To teachers who have cho- all issues of the world cou
sen this profession I applaud handled so promptly.
you, but know that there's help For 6-12 graders 1
out there when teaching citi- should be trips to historic
zenry in the classroom, like Fort Clinch and vis
Most military service organ- facilities servicing our h
izations have Americanism pro- talized veterans. They sl
grams. It's available to the learn the ins and outs of v
young and old, so take advan- in local and national election
tage of the military veteran well as the prerequisite
whose past personal commit- participating in youth scl
ments attest to his true patriot- ship programs sponsor
ic nature. He's out there and various military affiliated c
willing to expand that corner- izations.
stone initially established by our Children look up t(
forefathers. For the older stu- adults in their lives to give
dents, there's the Veterans in sound leadership skills.'
the Classroom project to help the only ambassadors
young, inquisitive minds get know and respect. We
answers to the more intricate have to bombard them wil
"why" and "how come." tistics, but parents, fa
For our kindergarten friends and teachers sl
through fifth graders learning lead by example and be
can be fun and it's pretty simple good American is no exce
to accomplish with coloring Since 9/11 the pl
books, word search challenges "United We Stand" has
and puzzles with a patriotic on n6w meaning. So let's
theme. Students should be Mr. Bromfield's suggest
taught about the American flag, heart and start early, t
its beginning and the back- have expectations, work
ground behind the stars and them, pay reasonably
stripes and should be educated be a good role model. If t
on proper etiquette in saying all it takes to build a
the pledge honoring our nation. American citizen, we'll hav
With the current state of the the bag.
economy, budgets are tight, but Debbie is a 22-year vei
most kids don't require expen- retired SeniorMaster Serge
sive gifts for a good job done. the AirForce, and a Lfe M
Certificates, miniature flags and' of American Legion Pos
individual'accolades are almost Fernandina Beach.
always accepted with the same whitelabaron@ayahc


ming
say I
rican
This
nation
S300
books
gram.
as no
atten-
:onds
pt the
Only
lid be

there
1 sites
its to
lospi-
hould
votingg
ns, as
es for
holar-
ed by
organ-

o the
them
We're
they
don't
th sta-
amily,
should
-ing a
option.
phrase
taken
Stake
ons to
each,
:with
and
his is
loyal
e itin

teran,
ant in
ember
st 54,

0o.com


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FRIDAY. August 28, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


Rheumatoid arthritis can be treated


Almost everyone knows someone
who suffers with arthritis. In my
family my mother and father, "may
they rest in peace," both had arthri-
tis. We are a family of 12 - Eight
males, four females - and we all
have some level of osteoarthritis,
which is the common form of arthri-
tis, except for my youngest sister,
who suffers from rheumatoid arthri-
tis.
My mother called her "my
change of life baby." My mother
thought that she was going through
her change of life, but several
months later found out that at almost
50 she was pregnant with her last
child. Well, needless to say, this
change of life baby was spoiled by
everyone including me. I saw this
new baby as my own personal life-
size doll.
My baby sister first started feel-
ing sick in her early 30s; 10 years
and countless doctor visits later, she
was diagnosed with rheumatoid
arthritis. My sister is now in her
early 40s and is receiving the proper
treatment she needs. Praise the
Lord, "He gives physicians the abili-


r ty to heal."
SRheumatoid
arthritis affects 1.3
million Americans
," - and three times as
S many women as
men. The major dis-
tinguishing charac-
teristics of rheuma-
toid arthritis are
WELLNESS that it is:
CORNER * Autoimmune,
which describes an
immune-system
Elsa Cintron attack that the body
launches upof
itself.
*. Chronic autoimmune attacks
can continue indefinitely.
* Systemic, affecting the whole
Body.
* Inflammatory.
When white blood cells of the
immune system attack the synovial
membrane they begin to release the
same poisonous substances that kill
bacteria and viruses during an infec-
tion.
The development of rheumatoid
arthritis still continues to elude


Ifyou thinkyou have symptoms, find a rheumatologist.
a doctor who specializes in arthritis. He will have
extensive training in diagnosing and treating these dis-
eases and will recognize subtle clues that are the key to
an accurate and early diagnosis.


researchers, however there are
some factors that may increase a
person's risk of developing the dis-
ease:
* Genetics. HLA-DR4 and family
genes, other genes linked (see
"Rheumatoid Arthritis" in John
Hopkins medicine 2009).
* Infections, several types of
arthritis.
* Exposure to certain bacteria or
viruses.
* Lyme disease (Lyme arthritis).
* Heavy smoking and heavy sec-
ondhand smoke exposure.
* High -protein foods and a diet
rich in red meat..
Preventing rheumatoid arthritis
is difficult because its cause is
unknown. Researchers are examin-


ing the role of hormones in trigger-
ing the disease. Scientists have been
working to develop a vaccine that
might prevent the autoimmune reac-
tions that cause rheumatoid arthri-
tis.
Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
are inflammation, flares, prolonged
stiffness and advanced effects.
It is very difficult for doctors to
diagnosis patients with rheumatoid
arthritis because it mimics the symp-
toms of osteoarthritis, the flu and
other viral illnesses.
It is crucial to receive early diag-
nosis and immediate aggressive
treatment; there is only a brief win-
Sdow of opportunity to prevent perma-
nent disability and lifelong complica-
tions.


If you think you have symptoms,
find a rheumatologist, a doctor who
specializes in arthritis. He will have
extensive training in diagnosing and
treating these diseases and will rec-
ognize subtle clues that are the key
to an accurate and early diagnosis.
Unfortunately, there is no cure
for rheumatoid arthritis, but disease-
Smodifying anti-rheumatic drugs can
produce long-term remission. The
goal of treatment is to relieve pain,
maintain function, reduce inflamma-
tion and prevent systemic illness and
joint damage.

This column should be used as a
useful adjunct to other available med-
ical and educational resources related
to rheumatoid arthritis and other
future topics described herein; it
should not be used as an alternative
to personal consultation with a physi-
cian.

Elsa Cintron is a physical thera-
fist and owner of Cintron Rehab and
Wellness Center Visit www.cintronre-
habandwellnesscenter com.
elsacin @gmail,com


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Carpets and Interiors is a full service decoration center
Ever)lhing for your lionme in one convenient location, .flooring.
window treatment center, custom bedspreads and dniperies We
also have a local contractor who does renovations and painting.
The bases, of redoing any area in your home are the elements
and knowing the use of the product. We at Carpets anrd Interiors
can assist you in that decision by educating you on the products
we carry in the largest showroom ill Nassau County. Our pro'l-
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Wood and laminate are two of the most popular products on
thle market. They are versatile and come in a number ot colors.
sizes and finishes. Engineered wood- being the best product I1(
our area because the consItruction is more structurally stable,
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home. It can be installed above or below grade giving you a
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Laminate is a product thai is a look-alike for wood or tile. Tlhi
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We also carry ceramic and h1av
qualified in-house professional '
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The staff at Carpet and Interiors invites
you to visit our showroom.
Free estimates are available on all product- a
we offer after hour appointments too. The Shn.w
open Mon- Fri 9-5 Sat 10-2.
We are located at 2248 S. 8th St.
Phone 277-0901. Toll free 888-611 1707 .


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


COMMUNITY


First Baptist

In view of call, the music search com-
mittee of First Baptist Church,
Fernandina Beach, had unanimously
recommended Steve Buchanan to come
in view of a call Aug. 9 as worship pas-
tor. On August 7, the Celebration Choir
rehearsed with him. Then on Aug. 8, a
time of fellowship was enjoyed with
Steve and his family of four children and
lovely wife. A meal was also served.
Then on Aug. 9 at the 10:15 a.m. serv- H
ice, they had an opportunity to vote. I
Steve accepted the call. Al
The many ministries of the church
lined the church foyer with booths and
information to give everyone an oppor-
tunity to get involved. This was to let Hi1
people know how God could use them. .
to "build the church." of gr
The Steve Buchanan family comes to and 1
us from Buford, Ga. Steve and Robin W
were married in 1990 and have four chil- each
dren, Ashton, Kaitlyn, Landon and teers
Mason. Ashton begins college this fall, nigh
Kaitlyn and Landon are in high school' craft
and Mason is in middle school. Steve ries,
was born Jan. 29, 1962. hidd
He has a bachelor of church music A
from Shorter College, Rome, Ga. His for ti
principal applied instrument is vocal and Bapt
piano. He also plays acoustic and elec- "they
tric guitar, keyboard and bass guitar. He Corb
enjoys time with his family, golf, hunt- puppy
ing, reading and motorcycles, bless
Steve's passion and purpose: "God's O
work encourages us to worship Him roon
with music. Psalm 92:1 says, 'It is good Red
to praise the Lord and make music to with
your name, Oh, most High.' However, it and
is my belief that worship and music are ' Je
not necessarily the same thing. Biblical, requ
authentic worship is the surrendering to and 1
God all of that which controls our hearts Pasti
and forms our desires. We are called to spok
glorify God, not just in what we sing, but used
the way we speak, think and act. Whe
My life purpose is to be used of God . - idea
to impact my family, my church, my in th
community and the world through lead- P
ing, teaching and developing lifestyle try a
worshipers; leading through modeling: He e
teaching through motivating; and devel- need
oping through mentoring. closi
During the Christmas break of my pray
senior year at Shorter College, God our 1
spoke clearly to my heart and spirit and J(
called me to full-time music/worship for o
ministry, pared
In 1989, Ileft full-time staff ministry 0
and formed "Highest Love Ministries," a tiona
concert music ministry. God called my chur
wife and I out of this ministry in 1992 lunch
and back into full-time staff work, where roon
we have served faithfully, because of His -Beye
faithfulness, ever since! God bless!" A
Student Bible studies continue to was (
meet at First Baptist Church. The guys Schc
meet Mondays at Dr. Henry's'home at 7 unte
p.m. Girls meet withAshley ScottiA pare
Thursday at 5 p.m. in the cafe. Bible mak
studies are for students in grades 6-12. saus
Pastors Pals kickoff event at the St. fruit
Marys Aquatic Center on July 31 had to blan]
be rescheduled for Aug. 21. Cost was ed tc
still $10 per family for admission with a ter B
T-shirt for the kids. This event was for and 1
kindergarteners through fifth graders what
and their families. Back to school picnic, S
an annual tradition here at First Baptist at W
Church, was Aug. 26 at Peters Point In Calla
case of rain, they were having the picnic R
at the Family Life Center. at 5
It was a beautiful day Aug. 11 for the Bapt
ladies of the Hazel Allen Circle to get T
out and go to their monthly covered eon
dish meeting at First Baptist Church, enjo:
Fernandina Beach. June Grase was the C
interesting speaker. Nigh
Joyce Peacock hosted the Ruth Cox p.m.
Circle meeting at her home Aug. 13. or m
On Sept. 20, the Old Timers at First ship]
Baptist Church joined Springhill's G
Senior Saints for the quarterly luncheon nar/
meeting. Those ladies go all out to deco- the
rate and entertain their visitors! Larry 'valui
Williams and his lovely wife, Jewel, throu


welcomes Buchanan


enjoy working with this
group at First Baptist
Fernandina.
A big thank you
goes out to Amy
Crosby and her team of
volunteers for a suc-
cessful and exciting
2009 Vacation Bible
School program at
ILIM 'S Springhill Baptist
HEAR- Church. All the kids
BOUTS enjoyed learning about,
the things hidden in
."" God's word, specifical-
Hilda ly in five parables -
ginbotam thelost sheep, the
prodigal son, the pearl
eat price, the what and the tears
the sower.
re had between 50 and 60 children
Night along with dozens of volun-
s. Around 70 kids came at least one
t and 35 came all five nights. From
s to snacks to songs to Bible sto-
the kids enjoyed learning about the
en treasures in God's Word.
s our Senior Saints began arriving
heir July luncheon at Springhill
ist Church, Norma Beyer writes,
y found Joe Merrit and Mack
>itt busy preparing fish and hush
pies. Our faithful fishermen are a
sing.'
)ur 40 seniors found the dining
i decorated for Independence Day.
table clothes adorned each table
red, white and blue decorations
patriotic placemats.
enny Corbitt asked for prayer
ests. Mae Sauls opened with prayer
then introduced guest speaker
or Wayne Shelton. Pastor Wayne
:e of Queen Esther and how God
Sher to save the Jewish people .
n she became queen, she had no
God had a special purpose for her
e future.
astor Wayne also spoke of our coun-
nd the trying times we face today
emphasized that, as Christians, we
I to spend more time in prayer. In
ng, he said we need to pray, pray,
for our country and stand up for
,eliefs.
)hn Ballard led in a prayer of thanks
ur food and for those who had pre-
d it We enjoyed a delicious lunch.
)n Aug. 20 we hosted the assoca-
il meeting and luncheon in our
ch. Sept 3 is our next Senior Saints
heon in the small kitchen dining
i of the FLC. Contributed by Norma
Sr.
Teacher Appreciation Breakfast
enjoyed at West Nassau High
>ol, Callahan, Aug. 17. Student vol-
ers were'needed to help serve and
nts or 'stdents'were tiieded to
e one of the following: muffins,
age balls, quiche, cinnamon buns,
, a breakfast casserole, pigs-in-a-
ket What a great menu! They need-
Sfeed about 80 people. Youth minis-
Irother Todd Carr helped plan this
told those attending to let him know
They were taking.
ee you at the pole Sept 23 at 8 a.m.
est Nassau High School and
than Middle School.
each "Kidz Choir" kickoff is Aug. 30
p.m. at the Family Life Center, First
ist, Callahan.
he Senior Saints Alive adult lunch-
of Callahan First Baptist was
yed Aug. 10.
ollege/Career Ministry, Thursday
it Live, takes place Thursdays at 7
in the chapel. Its for adults, single
tarried, who are interested in wor-
ping God passionately.
;rief Share is a special weekly semi-
support group for people grieving
death of someone close. Youll learn
able information that will help you
ugh. The meetings are at 6:45 p.m.


Wednesday. Doug Hodges, Malcolm
Adams.
Have you ever wondered how the
week-to-week administration of the
church happens? There are several
important church committees you
should meet. Trustees are in charge of
the physical property of the congrega-
tion. They make sure everything stays
maintained in good working order.
Chairperson is Willis Galliher.
Finance oversees the finances of the
congregation. They monitor both
income and expenses, prepare financial
reports, develop budgets, establish
stewardship programs, etc. Chairperson
is Terry Powell.
Staff Parish Relations Committee is
responsible for personnel. They work
with the pastors and the church staff.
They are also responsible for develop-
ing job descriptions, evaluations and
offering support to pastors and staff.
Chairperson is Don Twiggs.
Administrative Council is made up of
church leaders who oversee the min-
istries of each of the above committees
and the program committees. In
essence, the job of the church council is
to develop and carry out the mission of
the congregation, to make sure each
committee is equipped to carry out the
mission of the church. Chairperson is
Chris Twiggs.
Vacation Bible School 2009 was a fan-
tastic success! With'96 children and 65
volunteers, this was our biggest VBS in
five years at Memorial United Methodist
Church. We studied the apostle Paul,
purple cloth merchant, Lydia and Rome
and the underground church. I want to
thank all who worked and played and
enjoyed the VBS as well as all the chil-
dren who were blessed by the work of
the volunteers. Thank you, Carol Olson,
director of Christian Education, and
Deena Wolfe, director of VBS.
Monday prayer and communion are
at 11:30 a.m. Staff and members meet in
the sanctuary for this brief service.
September circle meetings at UMW:
Lucille Bennett, Sept 8, church parlor,
Jean Sydnor, 261-8755; Kathleen Davis,
Sept. 14, church parlor, Willis Galliher,
277-4053; Ann Dickens, Sept. 8, 4418
Titleist Drive, Gail Shave, 491-3713;
Ivalee Hamilton, Sept. 14, Hope House,
410 S. Ninth St., Georgia Wert, 321-
1323; Alice Nolan, to be determined;
Florence Partin, Sept 14, 86015 Sand
Hickory Trail, Sandi Anderson, 225-
5560.
UMW news: "We will start back in
September after a great summer with
our executive meetings in Maxwell Hall
on Sept. 1 at 10 am. All officers and cir-
cle chairmen, please plan to attend with
your ideas for the coming year. '"
T'le September unit meeting will be'-'
held Sept 28 at 6 p.m. in Maxwell Hall
with the Florence Partin Circle as host-
ess. This will be a covered dish and
membership recognition and all new
members of the church and prospective
members are invited. LU.C.K. Circle
and any new members who need child
care, please contact president Catherine
Eleazer at 277-3439 or Jeanie Houston at
261-5215 and we will make arrange-
ments with the nursery. Mark your cal-
endars. Let's have a great year in mis-
sions and God's work.
Many get well wishes to the Rev.
Frank Camarotti, who is with His lovely
wife, Diane, doing mission work in Ro-
mania. He had to have some heart sur-
gery recently. We're glad Diane is with
him. Please send us an update on your
progress, Brother Frank! Well be anx-
ious to hear from you two. God bless.
Amelia-Missions, thank you. The fish
fry raised $1,054 and the yard sale
raised $625 for the West Virginia mis-
sion project.
"May our Great Heavenly Father
continue to keep us in His loving.care."


CAMPUS NOTES

N Danya Friedman, for- U Ross Friedman, former- Friedman recently the University of North Flori-
merly of Fernandina Beach, ly of Fernandina Beach, has returned from a six-month da, Jacksonville, with a
graduated from the been inducted into Phi Beta study program in Istanbul, degree in criminal justice. He
University of Georgia this Kappa honor fraternity at Turkey. minored in psychology.
spring at the age of 19. She Emory University in Atlanta, N Jared David Brown Brown is the son of Jesse
currently resides in Chicago. Ga. graduated July 31, 2009, from and Charene Brown of Yulee.


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464054 SR 200, Yule 802 S 8th treet (904)26 aware of His goodness because we are
4054 SR 200 YSteet (904) 281-0242 to Invved all te concerns and
Sthe achhieas of the day However. an
(904) 261-6821 FemendinaBeach, FL32034 Fax(904)281-0291 a:
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Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956 * being.can all be atnnbulBd to Goda gmc.lnesa
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WEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS

Sciacca-Moody
lisa Marie Moody of
Tampa and Adam Milton
Sciacca of Fernandina Beach
were married Aug. 1,2009, at
The White Room in St: 'A
Augustine.
The bride is the daughter
of Dennis and Michele
Moody of Tampa and the -
groom is the son of John and
Pamela Sciacca of Fernandina
Beach. Mr. and Mrs. Sciacca

Morehouse-Anagnostou
Brandee Jeannette
Morehouse and Nicholas
Michael Anagnostou, both of
Fernandina Beach, will be
married at 3 p.m. April 25,
2010, at The Ritz-Carlton,
Amelia Island. The reception
will follow at Amelia Island �
Plantation.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Letty and Edward
Morehouse of Fruitland Park. Miss Morehouse, Mr.
The groom-elect is the son of Anagnostou
Lisa and Kostas Anagnostou
of St. Augustine.

Mdntyre-White
Shaneka Monique
McIntyre and Mlichael Terrell
White, both of Yulee, will be
married at 4 p.m. Sept. 12,
2009, at Amelia Island
Plantation with Elder Emory
Wingard Sr. officiating. The
reception will follow.
The bride-elect is the Miss McIntyre, Mr. White
Daughter of Elijah and
Monica Rainey of Yulee. The
groom-elect is the son of 2010. Ceremony details will
Peter and Betty Williams of be announced at a later date.
Atlanta, Ga. The bride-elect is the
daughter of Joan Southerton
and the late Edmond
Godfr'y-MilSteady Southerton of Yulee. The
Joni Beth Godfrey and groom-elect is the son of Rick
Timothy Paul Milstead, both and Donna Milstead of
of Yulee, will be married June Jacksonville.


MILITARY NEWS

E Air Force Airman applied science
Alexander G. Maphey' gradu- degree
ated from basic military train- through the
ing at Lackland Air Force Community
Base, San Antonio, Texas. College of the
The airman completed an Air Force.
intensive, eight-week pro- He is the
gram that included training in son of Kimber-
military discipline and stud- . ly Maphey of
ies, Air Force core values, Maphey Watertown,
sical tp war- h plhey
Airmen wno omIete orernandmna Deach.
basic training earn four cred- Maphey is a 2006.graduate of
its toward an associate in Watertown High School.


GARDEN BRIEFS


* Manzie & Drake Land
Surveying is holding a "Lar-
gest live Oak Tree" in Nas-
sau County contest through
Oct 31. The last time this
event was held in 2001, there
was a tie between 573 Marsh
Hen Lane and CR 108 north
of Lessie Road, which each
had trees measuring 98.5
inches in diameter.
Entries are encouraged
from all over Nassau County.
The winner receives a plaque
with a photo, latitude and lon-
gitude, size and location.
Call Manzie & Drake at
491-5700, 888-832-7730,or e-
mail mikemanzie@gmail.com.
* Proper Pie Company,
the Fernandina Farmers
Market vendor specializing in
authentic British and Irish
meat pies, London bangers,
sausage rolls and Scotch
eggs, will be introducing a
new pie each week. In addi-
tion to the very popular Steak
and Potato with Guhiness Pie,
Shepherd's Pie, Lemon
Chicken Pie with fresh herbs,
and Chicken and Asparagus
Pie, two new pies have
already been introduced.
Be sure to try the new
Lamb Hot Pie and the Steak
and Onion and Cheese Pie;
both have become new
favorites of shoppers and.are
selling out fast. Soonto be
introduced will be a Chicken
Marinara Pie with a Parme-
san/Herb Crust. Derek and
Beverly started making these
individual-sized pies on the
suggestion of one of their cus-
tomers and, to continue the
tradition of listening to their
customers, shoppers are
encouraged to make sugges-
tions for new pies. They will
make it, put it on the menu


and see how well the new pie
sells.
The Fernandina Farmers
Market, open every Saturday
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Seventh
and Centre streets, features
farm fresh produce as well as
a variety of organic products,
specialty foods and plants.
Call 491-4872 or visit www.fer
nandinafarmersmarketcom..
* Nassau Sierra Club will
host a guided kayak/canoe
trip to Simpson Creek (Little
Talbot Island) on Aug. 29.
This trip is open to the public.
The three- to four-hour trip
will depart the Kayak Amelia
concession at Little Talbot
State Park at 9 a.m.'It will be
about a five-mile paddle with a
stop for lunch on the sandbar
or Bird Island. Those without
kayaks can rent either single
($30) or tandem ($45). Kayak-
Amelia will waive the launch
fee and offer renters a 10 per-
cent discount. The paddle is
suitable for beginners.
A personal flotation device
is required and can be rented
from Kayak Amelia. Bring
sun protection, insect repel-
lent, food.and drinking water.
Len Kreger will lead the trip.
RSVP to LKreger@comcast.
et: or (904) 432-8389.
* The Nassau County Bird
Cliib vill hold a field trip to
Huguenot Park on Sept. 5 at 8
a.m., rain or shine.'Entry fee
is $1 per car. Meet at the
General Store parking lot
Target birds are the Piping
Plover, Oystercatcher, Whim-
brel Reddish Egret, Gulls and
Terns. Bring binoculars, field
guide, gug juice, sunscreen,
rain gear, sunglasses, layered
clothing and water. Contact
Carol Wyatt at 261-9272 or
caroliewy @aol.com.


YC_


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ReitrNw
N-ew..h. e Fetr ing






FRIDAY, August 28.2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Raging rivers, tree roots and getting a


His feet slipped and in
he went. He was
without excuse. Our
parents had con-
stantly warned us about the
dangers of the Winooski
River, and now this. To make
matters worse, my friend John
was all alone. One would have
thought he would have been
more careful, seeing he had
grown up by the very river
that was now trying to claim
his life.
As he frantically struggled
to stay afloat, his cries for help
seemed in vain. Only the trees
lining the river's banks were
there to hear and watch as the
strong current carried him
away. Years of his parents'


warnings
raced
through his
mind. How
did it all hap-
S pen so quick-
ly? Was it too
late to even
matter?
My friend
tULPIT John was
NOTES one of those
guys that
hardly any-
Pastor one in our
Rob Goyette sixth grade
class even
noticed. He wasn't good look-
ing. He wasn't extremely tal-
ented. And, at the same time,
he never caused a bunch of


trouble. He was just your aver-
age guy; somewhat lost in the
crowd. I suppose that's what I
liked about him. Not a lot 6f
fluff. What you saw was what
you got. Actually, he seemed
quite content not being
noticed, except on the day he
fell in the river that is.
If it hadn't been for the
lone tree root sticking out
from the muddy bank, this
article would have to end a lot
more tragically. Miracu-lously,
John's hand found the root
and he was able to pull him-
self out I can only imagine
what it felt like to lay hold of
something so solid at a time
when no one else was there to


I'm sure if I asked John
today to repeat the story it
would come out with the same
amount of gratitude and sobri-
ety as it did the first day he
told it -gratitude for the lone
tree root hanging in the water;
sobriety because he had
underestimated the dangers
of playing around the river's
edge. Let me explain.
John learned the hard way
that anytime we hang out in
places that we really shouldn't
be, it's only a matter of time
before we fall in. He also
learned that, though there's
no guarantee that there will
always be a root in the water
to help us out, God is merciful
and if our repentance is real


so will His help be.
These two essential princi-
ples - sobriety and gratitude -
constitute what I believe to be
some of the most vital rules
for successful living. If we
choose not to heed the coun-
sel and warnings of our heav-
enly Father, like John with his
parents, we shouldn't be sur-
prised if we find ourselves
swept away and in jeopardy of
losing everything we have.
That being said, if that's
you, I'd liked to extend to you
the tree root of heaven - Jesus
Christ. I know, maybe my
analogy sounds a little hpkey
to some of you but it really
doesn't matter. When no one
else is around, and you realize


ho
an
thi
be
to
say
my
res
se]
me
kn

JeA
of
for
(R
Ac

of
Ow


grip

w desperate for help you
e, Jesus is the only solid
rng to grab onto. Having
en there, I'm not ashamed
declare it. I can honestly
y that the gratitude I feel in
y heart and the growing
aspect I have for God's coun-
I and guidance have given
e a quality of life I didn't
ow existed.
According to the Bible,
sus is the root of the house
David and is the only way
r mankind to be saved.
revelations 22:16, Isa. 11:10,
:ts 4:10-12)
Robert L. Goyette is pastor
Living Waters World
itreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Mothers Under Grace
Grace Community Church has a
support and mentoring group for
mothers of all ages and stages. The
group is open to mothers in Nassau,
Camden and beyond. The group will
host monthly outings and play dates
for the kids. It's a causal and fun
group for moms to fellowship. Events
and community discussion begin
online at Facebook, wwwfacebook.
com/group.php?gid=126007469898.
Spanish services
The Promised Land Church offers
worship services on Sunday from 10
am.-noon, Sunday School at 2 p.m.
and evening service at 7:30 p.m. On
Tuesday, there is Bible study at 7:30
p.m. for men, women and youth.
General Bible study is offered from
7:30-9 p.m. on Wednesday.,Free
Spanish and English classes are
offered from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on
Thursday, beginning Sept 3. Youth
Activities take place at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, and there is a prayer meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
The Promised Land Church is at
312 S. Eighth St Call 349-2595.
Newservice
First Corinth Missionary Baptist
Church, 1124 Hickory St, invites the
community to its new Thursday night
service at 7:30 p.m. Come be healed,
be delivered and be set free.
Food giveaway
L feliti Mitries, 1897 Islgnd 7
WakS4 i , Wld a USDAfood give-
away from 10a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 29. For
information call 491-5401.
Newmusic programs
The Music Ministry at Memorial
United Methodist Church invites you
to join it this fall. It is adding two new


groups - Beginning Bells (intergen-
erational) and Liturgical Dance for ,
ages 5-7. Or join one of the many
other groups - Cherub Choir, Kids'
Choir, Youth Choir, Liturgical Dance,
Campanelli Dolci, Bellissimo Bells,
Orchestra, Praise and Worship Team,
Ladies' Ensemble, Worship Choir
and Chancel Choir. Call Beth
Jurovcik, director of Music
Ministries, at 261-5769, or e-mail
beth@mumconline.com.
Tireproof screening
Amelia Baptist Church will host a,
screening of the movie "Fireproof'
on Aug. 29 at 6 p.m. This inspira-
tional contemporary film looks at
what a couple does to save and
restore their marriage. Guests from
the community are invited to attend.
Dinner for all and child care through
age 12 will be provided at no cost.
RSVP your child care to 261-3042.
Mom to Mom
A new Mom to Mom group is
starting at The Journey Church on
Sept 2. Mom to Mom meets the first
and third Wednesday of the month
from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Childcare is pro-
vided for birth-five years. Fee is a
donation. Come to The Journey
Women's Expo on Aug. 29 from 10
a.m. till noon to sign up.
E-mail momtomom@thejourney-
family.com or call 261-8310.
'Gods Active Men'
Historic Macedonia African
- tistt scopal-Chprch, 202 S.
RE FgP t'ddhiaftiacl, presto,
ei' 'God's Active Men" at 11 a.m.
Aug. 30. The call is out to all men and
their families to join the men of
Fernandina Beach as they give
thanks and praise to God. There will
be scripture, a gospel jubilee, gospel
choir and praise band, and a word


,from.God by Pastor Ewing. Everyone
.is welcome. Call 2614114 or (904)
310-6377.
Promotion ceremony
Grace Community Church will
hold a promotion ceremony as chil-'
dren graduate to new church classes
Aug, 30.
.New curriculum for children's
programming starts Sunday. This
year, every class, regardless of age,
learns the same Bible lesson. In addi-
tion, the new curriculum provides
.corresponding in-home, family wor-
ship materials for review.
, Grace Community Church wor-
ships Sundays at 10:30 a.m. at Yulee
Middle School's caf6torium, 85439
Miner Road. Contact Pastor Dave
Bradsher at pastor@gracenassau.
com, 491-0363 or http://gracenas-
sau.com.
Familyday
IThe pastor and congregation of
Franklintown United Methodist
Church, 1415 Lewis St, American
Beach invite the community to
"Friends and Family Ity" Aug. 30 at
11 a.m. The church opens its doors
to the community as it celebrates
coming together in "Prayer, Praise
and Purpose." Dinner will be served
in the Gabriel Means Fellowship Hall
following the service. Call 277-2726.
Catholic class
St. Michael Catholic Church is
sponsoring an inquiry class for those
who wish to know more about the
: -Roman Catholic faith and what
Catholics believe. The program, call-
ed RC.IA, will start on Sept 1 and
continue each week through Easter
2010. There is no cost and the first
session will meet in the St Michael
Academy library at 6:45 p.m. Sept. 1.
Call 261-3472 for information.


20s& 30s Bible Study
Grace Community Church,
invites Nassau County residents
under 40 years old to a special
Bible study for those in their 20s
and 30s.
The small group meets weekly
in Yulee and it is open to the pub-
lic. Come join the fun, fellowship
and food while meeting new people
and discussing important issues
related to your specific generation
and life stage. Contact Pastor Dave
Bradsher at 491-0363 or www.gra-
cenassau.com.
You,may also sign-up online at
www.facebook.com/eventphp?eid
=119614596646.
Community study
Community Bible Study is an
interdenominational organization
committed to helping people of
every age grow in their knowledge
and love of Jesus Christ.
Individuals from all backgrounds
and levels of Bible knowledge are
invited to join one of the weekly
classes that begin in September.
For information contact the appro-
priate class coordinator:
* Wednesday morning women
and children (infant and home
schooled): Kathleen Minor 225-
8125.
* Monday evening men: Tony
Taylor, 321-0785
* Monday evening.women:
Linda Bell, 261-0569
,. N'lMondayl yningee,epls;Inn
;Jeanneg SicQt4 h49%W%" elt:ir-q
* Monday evening E-teen (mid-
dle school): Bobbie Burch, 261-
2533
Women's study
The Amelia Island Women's
Evening Community Bible Study


invites you to join an in-depth, non-
denominational study of the Book
of Acts.
,. Meetings will be Monday
:evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church, 961167
Buccaneer Trail across from
Harris Teeter. The study begins
Sept. 14 and continues through
May 3.
For more information and to
register, call Michal Polese at 548-.
9971 or Linda Bell at 261-0569.
Visit www.communitybiblestudy.
org and www.ameliaislandevecbs.
org.
Beth Moore study
Amelia Plantation Chapel will
begin an eleven-week Beth Moore
women's Bible study - Jesus The
One And Only - starting Sept. 22 at
10 a.m.
This is an in-depth study of the
life of Jesus based on the book of
Luke. Through video and group
study, participants will join Moore
on a life-changing journey that
leads through the hills of Galilee
with the Teacher, across the lake
with the Master, and finally on the
road toward the cross with the
Savior - getting to know Jesus inti-
mately, as though walking with
Him during His earthly ministry.
The study includes a workbook for
a cost of $15. A nursery will be pro-
vided upon advance notice. For
information or to register call the
chapel office, 277-4414, or e-mail
t yphndySbaway4 i@ellsouth.net . ,,r,
Amteailidsmudy i
The Amelia Island Small Group
of Grace Community Church
meets Tuesday evenings on the
south end of the island for Bible
study, fellowship and food. For
more information, call 491-0363.


'"Worship this week at the place of your choice"


0 Christwalk
Church

Sunday Celebration
10:00 am
M1idswalK' 1000 am
Takeout' Wed 630opm
2920 Bailey Road
261-7120 thechristwalkcom



S "Bgaptist Church
Sunday School..........................................9:30 am
Sunday Worship ....................................10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA ..............................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study........................6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.sprinahillbaptistfb.ora


a


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
a.n Interdenominational
Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
August 30, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.
MESSAGE
"Hey Buddy. Do You Have TimeT
Guest Preacher. Chaplain Jim Tipplns
MUSIC "At the Rver'
"I waited for the Lord"
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-.
The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
(904) 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


ANCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday 011:00
5i 5 Centre Street


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor
- Every Sunday -
Traditional Worship: 8AM & IAM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
- Vacation Bible School -
July 12 thru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.poplcamella.org


(Pesiyterian zk J
7 1 4 ' 1 - *
I Ur'ft n'R*D 'u s -$ '
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps :
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corner Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.pr ovidnceyulee.coin
pnrvidenceyulee@comicast.net


St. Peter's Episcopal Church I ntie heort df CELEBRATION BAPTIST
Welcomes Fernancdin Rev. Brian Eburn Pastor CHURCH
Youl N- 6I'Sfr! EmoavatiSrtkI Ce9MnpSoraryMus9 Cass/alAenospnare
Dr. -Holton Seg19tr Saturday Vigil Mass- 4 pm & 5:30 pm
Located at the , Saturday 4 pm Mass at Yule United Methodist Chunh Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
corner of 8th . & . .W l, 3.t i 1 SundayMasses: 0L& 10.:00 am & 12 Nooon
Atlantic wo h^p 8:0&1 i a Daily Mass - 8:30 am Men.. Wed., lu S Fri. 85520 Miner,-d
.|dSunay $c h !.90I pm- Tuesday Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday nursery Holy Day MassesVii 6:00 pm; Hoy Day 8:30 am Sunday Worship 10:30
Holy Eucharist . Confessions: Saturday 3:15pm -3:45 pm or by appt Nursery Provided
8:30 am &10:00 am j ' 'Yuth - Small groip bible study Sunday mor. @ 9.15am
Adults Telphones Number: KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Wednesday Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901 Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Holy Eucharist 904-261-4293 261 -3837 Emsrely Number 90427-6566 Connecng with Chist..Connecting iPeople.
12:10 pm www.tpety E t 93 .h.og vrw\. Istpres-fb con also all 904-277-06501 -
12:10 pm www.stpeterspadsh.org I.. . .la lFOR M -EINFO- (904)225-0777


4 YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please jon us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


AMILIA IS16AND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship With us where
the Bible is our only Authority.
Church Services 1 1am
YMCA on Citrona / 225-5368
W'a mcimi31:nlsr, m l:hur'nc l",rlIi ,om


Holy trinity Aigtican Chfurci





.nglican Church of ortih Anerica
Our province Is a founding member of the. nglican Church
of North America
.Is Anglicans we believe:
* the Bible 14 Ith Inspired Word of God
* In God the Father who created us
* In Icus Christ His Son who saved us
* In the Holy Spirit who sanctifles us
As Angllcan. we worship using the tradidonal [iIurgy In the
192B Book ofCommon Praevr. Affrming Ihe Nicene and ihe Apostlo' Creed.
Sunday Services
i ,, *- Holy Communion 8:00 am & 10:00 am (with music)
Morning Prayer 4th Sunday of each month 10.00 am
Rev I. Michael Bowhay, Rector
1830 Lake Park Dr. (Amelia Park) Fernandina Beach
904-491-6082 * www.HolyTrinltyAngllcan.org


te _________________________________________


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Chlldrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
wwW.blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9im
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pnr
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAiL
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Femandina Bcl
Fnr NMre ]nfnrmatinn fCll- 261-9527


BASKETBALL
CHEERLEADING
K5 - 6th Grade
Sign-up online
@ FBFirst.net
Evaluations start
September 12th!
GAMES BROADCAST
LIVE ON THE WEB
First Baptist Church
1600 8S.th Street
Fernandlna Beach. FL
904-261-3617
Rev. Jeff Overton, Sr Pateor


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor: Dr. -Alan Brown
Sunday School ......... :..... 9:4SA.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:SSA.M.
DiscipleshIp Training............. 6:00PM.
Evening Worship....;..... . .. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ...... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnleview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spolntsbaptlstchurch.org


Living Waters
worl~doutreach
Contemporary Worship
SUN 9:30am
WED 7:00pm
' l Youth, Nursery &
Children's Ministries
321-2117
Rob & Chrllstl e oyetta
Senior Pastore On A 1mi le vestof Amelia island


YULEE
I"APTIST
CI-IHURCIIl

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship'8:15Sai and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79'Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth.
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yule., FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


FIRST MISSIONARXBAMTIST
20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Rev. Daurle K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
The Ch arch1idthe
Hartof the City
With the Desre to being the
a twa of All People,
SaadalyltwMembers Class 9a.m.
SnUldaySchoolY9:30a.m.
Mornim Worship Ila.m.
Wodesday&.Nooa dtyPryvr
Wdn. w si lisyMi )b vic 7-9p.m.
MIhtre..B;'.-Z Cis..lt s.later. Yorth


BIBLE STUDY CLASSES


I _ _I


~- -- -------


www ivig~aers~trech rgP
Memorial~~~~ UntdMtoitCuc


Maki", iscplesofl m Cris t] roigh�wrsip�Sh~Y, en ie& ommnit


- - - - - - - -


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FRIDAY, August 28.20()09/NI:ws-LEADIR


AROUND SCHOOL


CLASS NOTES

PrymeTime
enrolling
YMCA Prymne Time is now
registering for quality before-
and after-school programuns
countywide. For questions and
details contact Jen at 261-1080.
Homeschoolsupport
Two Wings Homeschool
Support Group welcomes
homeschool families and inter-
ested families to its back to
school informational get
together on Aug. 28 and Sept.
4 at Central Park from 1:30-3
p.m. Experienced home-
schooling families will be
there to offer support. For
information call 277-1841.
Aviation classes
Florida State College at
Jacksonville is offering fall
term Aviation and Air Traffic
Control classes at the Betty P
Cook Nassau Center. Registra-
tion is in progress for the fol-
lowing classes that begin the
week of Aug. 31 and end the
week of Dec. 18. Classes are
held in the state-of-the-art avia-
tion lab. Aviation Weather is
Tuesday from 6-9 p.m.;
Environment of the Air Traffic
Controller is Wednesdays
from 6-9:15 p.m.
* To register for classes or
for information call the Nassau
Center at 548-4432.
FBMS open house
Fernandina Beach Middle
School will hold an open
house beginning at 7 p.m.
Sept. 14 in the auditorium. For
information call 491-7938.
Literacyfair
Florida State College at
Jacksonville will present its
Seventh Annual Family Liter-
acy Fair for residents of Duval
and Nassau counties at the
North Campus, 450i Capper
Road in Jacksonville on Sept.
19 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. It is
free and open to the public.
The fair will feature interac-
tive games and music, face
painting, JSO equipment, Mr.
Wizard, music, storytelling,
games, prizes and surprises.
There will be live performanc-
es and demonstrations by an
illusionist, a ventriloquist and
book .charactr, asweRLas. fe
oppptuniiify'irrqj 4n- 'ii ra
level sessmeit A detail
presentation and vision
a screening will be available.
Lunch will be provided.
For more information call
(904) 766-6553.
Supplies giveaway
Nassau County teachers
and paraprofessionals are
invited to a free supplies give-
away from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sept.
22 at ARC/Nassau, 86051
Hamilton SE, off US 17 north
in Yulee. For information call
Rhonda Barcus at 225-9355.
You may fill three bags with
supplies for your classroom.
Bring an ID identifying you as
an educator (old pay stub,
etc).
Mentor training
Training for those interest-
ed in becoming mentors in
Take Stock in Children of
Nassau County will be held.
Sept. 22, 1-4 p.m., in room T-
126 at the Florida State
College Betty P Cook Nassau
Center, 76346 William
Burgess Blvd. in Yulee. The
training class is sponsored by
Take Stock in Children and is
free. Call Jody Mackle, Take
Stock Program director, at
548-4464 to reserve a seat.

Nassau Center
classes
Classes starting the week
of Sept. 28 at the Betty P. Cook
Nassau Center include: Life in
its Biological Environment,
Biology Lab, Introduction to
Criminology, Introduction to
Information Technology,
English Comp. I and II, Intro-
duction to Business, Human-
ities, Introduction to Outdoof
Adventure Leadership, Intro-
ductiorl to Literature, Elemen-
tary Algebra, Intermediate
Algebra, College Algebra, Pre-
Calculus Algebra, General
Psychology, Strategies for
Success in College, Career
and Life, Fundamentals of
Public Speaking, and Introduc-


tion to Sociology.
To register for classes or
for information call the Nassau
Center at 548-4432.
Coop enrolling
The Amelia Island Parent
Co-Op Preschool is enrolling
now for fall 2009 preschool
classes for ages 2 and 3. Call
261-1161 or visit www.aipcp.
org. The Co-Op is located at
5040 First Coast Hwy..


State issues'Xtreme Cuisine' challenge


TALLAHASSEE - Florida teachers
and other youth activity coordinators
with students ages 10-15 can enter to
win a cooking session to learn "Xtreme
Cuisine" techniques for preparing
healthy, kid-friendly recipes.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services in
recent years has introduced youths
around the state to the world of cooking
and good nutrition through its "Xtreme
Cuisine" program. Cooking schools for
middle-school students have been held
in Tampa, Miami, Orlando, Tallahassee,
Pinellas Park, Ocala and Naples.
Using the "Xtreme Cuisine" cur-
riculum, students learn to prepare
whole-wheat pizzas, fruit parfaits and
other nutritious and tasty treats, They
also learn how Florida fruit and veg-
etables used in these recipes provide
vitamins and minerals that can help pre-
vent heart disease and other obesity-
related illnesses.
In addition, students learn the dan-
gers caused by excessive amounts of
salt, sugar and fats in their diet, and
how fiber could eliminate their desire for
high-calorie, low-nutrition snack foods.
They also learn how many calories are
needed for their age and gender, the
vitamin and mineral content of many
Florida fruits and vegetables, and how
to read a food nutrition label.


Instead of automatically reaching forjunk foods.
we want (students) to explore healthy alternatives
by using fresh Florida fruit and vegetables as
ingredients for fun and delicious snacks.'
FLORIDA AGRICULTURE COMMISSIONER CHARLES H. BRONSON


"Many children often prepare their
own after-school snacks when they
come home each afternoon," Florida
Agriculture Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson said. "We want to help them
change their snacking habits. Instead of
automatically reaching for junk foods,
we want them to explore healthy alter-
natives by using fresh Florida fruit and
vegetables as ingredients for fun and
delicious snacks."
Now in its second year, the "Xtreme
Cuisine Chef Demo Contest" provides
teachers who conduct and document
their own cooking class locally, an oppor-
tunity to win a complimentary session
with the department's "Xtreme Cuisine"
chef. These students will learn advanced
cooking techniques. All food and pro-
motional items will be supplied for the
winning classes of up to 75 students.
To enter, teachers must set up and
conduct an "Xtreme Cuisine" class with
at least 10 students in which the stu-


dents prepare at least two "Xtreme
Cuisine" recipes using at least six total
fresh Florida fruits and vegetables. The
classes must use the existing curricu-
lum, which can be ordered online at
www.Florida-Agriculture.com/educa-
tion/xtreme.htm, and must be held
between Sept. 30 and Dec. 31.
At the completion of the classes,
teachers must fill out the "Xtreme
Cuisine Chef Demo Contest Entry" and
submit it with the required accompa-
nying documents and photographs,
specifying the categories they are enter-
ing.
A winning class will be selected in
the following categories:
L.. L First -The first completed entry
to be postmarked with accompanying
documents will win.
2. Great- The coordinator with the
greatest number of participating stu-
dents will win.
3. Smart - The class that demon-


states the most impressive knowledge
gained from the local class will win.
Student essays, photos, quotes, draw-
ings and other descriptions are encour-
aged.
Classes can be organized'by public
and private school teachers, agriscience
teachers, school food and nutrition man-
agers, and youth activity coordinators
with County Cooperative Extension
Offices, FFA chapters, Florida Farm
Bureau groups and other related areas.
Entries must be postmarked on or
before Dec. 31. The winner will be noti-
fied on or before Jan, 30, 2010, and the
"Xtreme Cuisine Chef Cooking Demo"
will be held prior to May 31, 2010.
'The nutritional information provid-
ed at the 'Xtreme Cuisine' events helps
students make healthy eating choices as
they become adults," Bronson said.
"Learning the importance of good nutri-
tion at a young age is the key to a
healthy future."
In 2009 more than 180 students in
the three winning classes were treated
to chef demonstrations.
For more information contact:
Arlette Roberge, Xtreme Cuisine,
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, 407 South Calhoun
St., Room 429ATallahassee, FL 32399-
0800. Call (850) 922-9828 or e-mail rober-
ga@doacs.state.fl.us.


BURNS FAMILY HONORED


SUBMnTTED
The Fernandina Beach High School Foundation recently held a ribbon cutting for the Paul and Annie Burns Mentoring Center, with benches
being placed in their honor. Attending the ceremony were, from left, Jim Burns, son, Ella and Megan Burns, granddaughters, Elizabeth Purvis,
daughter, Mitch Purvis, grandson, and Abigail Purvis, great-granddaughter. The FBHS Foundation is a non-profit organization that raises
money to enhance academics at FBHS and oversees an endowment fund for that same purpose. The Burns family has been involved in the
FBHS Foundation for many years and was recognized for their generous contributions with the benches being placed in their memory.


ArtsAcademy enrolling now


For the News-Leader

Classes for all ages begin next week at
the Amelia Arts Academy, 516 South 10th
St, Fernandina Beach, including:
* Community Drum Circle - Mondays
from 5-6 p.m., an introduction to percus-
sion, composition and recording that is
perfect for all ages and all walks of life.
Join a community of varying ages and
skill levels to create and play rhythms.
Bring your own drum, or play one of the
academy's. Cost is $60 for the 5-week
course.
* Introduction to Celtic Music -
Wednesdays from 1-2 p.m., learn to play
the Pennywhistle and see why the ancient
art form of Celtic music has so much
modern-day popularity. Cost is $100 for
the 8-week course.
* Mommy & Not Me?, Saturdays from
10-11;30 a.m. Family time is wonderful,
but sometimes everyone needs a break.
Mom, dad, grandma, grandpa, nannies
and even older siblings can get a much-
needed break while kids have a great
time, too!
* The Art of Dream Catching, Sept.
27. Kids will enjoy,creating dreamy art
projects while the adults work with
award-winning author and speaker Tara
Meyer-Robson to learn how to turn their
dreams into reality!
S * Portraiture, Oct. 24. Preserve your
memories for many generations by learn-
ing to paint portraits of your loved ones.
Kids will enjoy a separate portraiture
class that focuses on drawing and paint-


ing skills. Cost is $30 for an adult/child
pair, $20 per person.
* Miss D's Elementary Band. All chil-
dren, ages 9-12, are invited to participate.
No experience is a plus! The first rehears-
al is Sept. 8 at 4:15 p.m. Students will have
a chance to explore the many instru-
ments available and choose one for them-
selves.
Cost is $50 per month, or $25 per
month for students enrolled in private les-
sons.
Join the academy's community of
musicians. Stop by and purchase your
membership card and receive exclusive
benefits such as: Participation in the New
Horizon's Concert Band, Academy
Strings & Chamber Music Orchestra,
Academy Jazz Collection, Musician's
League, discounts on classes and pro-
grams.
For more information on any of these
classes, call 277-1225.
Amelia Arts Academy is a 501(c)3 non-
profit organization and one of only four
certified Community Schools of the Arts
in Florida. Its mission is to provide educa-
tion in the arts at affordable rates to all
interested persons, regardless of age,
race, religion, ethnic origin, financial
means or level of ability. The academy
has been carrying out this mission since
1992 through individual instruction,
group lessons and ensembles, after-
school art and dance workshops, pro-
grams for the disabled and disadvan-
taged, creative arts programs for seniors,
community entertainment, guest per-


ISO student special
The live symphonic sound of Sound Check Card by Sept. 17
the Jacksonville Symphony will receive free admission to the
Orchestra is as pure as it gets. dress rehearsal of the JSO's up-
Aid now students of all ages can coming production of "Oklaho-
enjoy the Jacksonville Symphony ma!" Thursday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.m.
in all its brilliance with the Sound Sound Check Cards will be
Check Card. available for purchase in the
For $25, any student can be- Times-Union Center lobby start-
come a Sound Check cardhold- ing at 6 p.m. Students may also
er, gaining admission to every purchase Sound Check Cards in
JSO Masterworks, Friday Fusion advance through the JSO box
and Coffee series concert for an office by calling (904) 354-5547, or
entire season. The card also online at www.jaxsymphony.org.
allows two friends admission for For more information, call the
$10. Parents of Sound Check Jacksonville' Symphony music
cardholders also can join their education department at (904)
children for just $10. 354-5657, or e-mail education
Students who order their @jaxsymphony.org.


Scouting round-ups


Boys between the ages of 6 to
10 or in the first through the fifth
grade can come check out Scout-
ing during signups all over-
Nassau County.
If you love learning new
things, camping, fishing and earn-
ing badges you are more than
welcome to join.
If you cannot make the initial
signup you still can join any time.
The North Florida Council of the
Boy Scouts of America will be
glad to hook you up with a pack of
Cub Scouts or a troop of Boy


Scouts. Please note the time and
place nearest you. Check out the
web site at: www.nfcs zcouting.org
or call 1-800-232-0845.
Round-up dates include:
* Emma Love Hardee: Sept.
10 at 7 p.m.
* Yulee Elementary: Sept. 1
'at 7 p.m.
* Callahan Elementary: Sept.
3 at 6:30 p.m.
* Hilliard Elementary: Oct. 8
at 7 p.m.
* Bryceville Elementary: Sept
9 at 7 p.m.


Clay shoot to raise funds for Nassau Boys & Girls Club


Nassau County Fire/Rescue
Professionals, Local 3101, is holding its
second annual Sporting Clay Shoot
on Sept. 11 (Patriot Day) at Amelia
Shotgun Sports, 86300 Hot Shot Trail,
in Yulee.
Proceeds gathered from the event
will be donated to benefit the Boys and
Girls Clubs of Nassau County.
The competition consists of five-per-
son teams rotating and shooting at 15
different stations. Awards will be dis-
tributed for teams with the best overall
scores.


The event will begin at 10 a.m. with
a shotgun start and conclude with a
barbecue dinner, presentation of awards
and raffle prize drawings. Skill levels
of all types are invited to participate.
The Fire/Rescue professionals
selected the Boys and Girls Clubs of
Nassau County as beneficiary for this
event because "we really are impressed
with the role Boys & Girls Clubs serve
in helping local youth," said Chris
Gamble, Fire/Rescue Professional and
event organizer. "We've visited club-
sand have helped the kids with fire safe-


ty; we believe as professionals in our
county that our organization should give
back to our future and community."
"Last year's Sporting Clay Shoot was
a fun and really well-run event," report-
ed Dan Powell, board member of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Nassau County
Foundation and special liaison to the
fire/rescue union for this event. "It's a
going to be a good time for both experts
and novices, and a great way to help
children in Nassau County. Boys and
Girls Clubs is pleased to again be the
beneficiary of this community effort."


Tickets for those that register before
Sept. 1 are $80 for an individual slot or
$400 for a team of five; registration
includes the shoot, dinner and refresh-
ments. After Sept. 1 the price will be
$100 for an individual or $500 per team.
Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze spon-
sorship opportunities also are available
from $100 to $2,000.
For information, contact any Nassau
County Fire/Rescue union member or
Chris Gamble at 753-4644. More infor-
mation and online registration is also
available at www.NCFRD.com.













FRIDAY. August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


PONTE VEDRA BEACH


See the natural beauty of Northeast Florida at its best


by JENNIFER
KNOECHEL
STAFF WRITER
Whether you're kayaking
alongside dolphins in the
Guana River, or walking
across towering dunes to
the beach, Guana River
State Park offers the natural
beauty of Northeast Florida
at its best.
Guana River State Park is
part of the Guana
Tolomato Matanzas
National Estuarine
Research Reserve (GTMN-
ERR), located off State Road
A1A in Ponte Vedra Beach.
Recreational activities at
Guana are primarily based
around the variety of natu-
ral resources and include
hiking, biking, fishing,
kayaking or canoeing,
horseback riding and bird
watching.
Guided beach walks, trail


walks, sunset kayak tours
and kayak fishing tours are
also available.

NATURE TRAILS
Hiking and biking are
available along the nearly
10 miles of nature trails
and old service roads that
wind through the ham-
mock, scrub and flatwoods
in the interior portion of
the GTMNERR.

BEACH
There are three beach
parking lots on the west
side of A1A. Park here and
walk across A1A to the
beach dune walkovers that
lead to a coquina sand
beach (there are no life-
guards at the beach). The
South beach parking lot is
wheelchair accessible. Pets
on a leash are allowed on
the hiking trails only.
- No pets are allowed on


the beach.

EDUCATION CENTER
A right whale hanging
from the ceiling is the first
thing you'll notice when
you enter the 21,000
square-foot Environmental
Education Center at GTM-
NERR. The Education
Center includes interpre-
tive exhibits, aquariums,
classrooms, teaching and
working laboratories, an
auditorium, and an out-
door amphitheater over-
looking the Guana River
Aquatic Preserve.
There is a "'scavenger
hunt" available to com-
plete as well as a 15-minute
introductory video. There
is also a nature store which
helps support the GTM
Reserve's education, stew-
ardship and research pro-
grams.
Educational program-


ming is also available, such
as weekend guided nature
walks and Family Fun
Hour, held on the third
Wednesday of each month
with additional events dur-
ing the summer. The next
family fun hour will be
held Aug. 19 from 2:30 to


3:30 p.m., and features the
book, "Danny & Daisy
Dolphin" by Suzanne Tate.
The story will be followed
by a dolphin craft activity
for participants to take
home. Participation is free,
but registration is required
by contacting the Reserve
at 904-823-4500. All mate-
rials for the event will be
supplied.

LOCATION
Driving south on A1A
you don't need a sign to
know when you've reached
the Guana Reserve. Homes
lining either side of A1A
give way to the natural
beauty of the area. The
GTM Research Reserve and
Guana River Road are
located off A1A, seven
miles north of Vilano
Beach, 10 miles south of
Micklers Road in Ponte
Vedra and 17 miles sooth
of J.T. Butler Boulevard.
The beach access points
are a few miles north of
Guana River Road on the
west side of A1A.


The beach access park-
ing areas are open from 8
a.m. until sunset. The GTM


Guana River Trails are
open for hiking and biking
activities from 8 a.m. until
sunset. The GTM Guana
River Dam Use Area is open
for fishing 4 a.m. to 11
p.m.
The education center is
open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
seven days a week (closed
on state holidays).

ENTRANCE FEES
$3 per vehicle with up to
eight people; $1 per pedes-
trians, bicyclists, extra pas-
sengers'in vehicle beyond
eight.
Education Center:
$2 for'adults 18 and
ovdr; $1 for children 11-17;
free for children ages 10
and under. (Groups of 10
or more must make reser-
vations before visiting the
EEC).
GTM Research Reserve
annual passes are available
and can be purchased at
the EEC seven days a week
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for
$53 (price includes tax).

INFORMATION
For, more information;
cawww.gtm23ne50 or vis.
www.gtmnerr.org.


Advertising in the News-Leader can increase
help build your business.


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results in increased business! The customer response has
been terrific since we started advertising more. Especially
in slow economic times, businesses must choose
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The News-Leader has inspired us to continue to discover
more importantly how advertising creates interest and
increases visibility to your audience. It pays off to "have a
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Our customers are important to us, and since we only
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representative from the News-Leader to keep a fresh,
remaining presence, as "The Pleasures of Fine Art" are
important to us at J & S Frame Gallery.

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__ PORTS


12A


FRIDAY. AUGUST28,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


IT'S SHOWTIME!


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The 2009 season opens tonight for Florida high school
football teams. The Yulee Hornets are heading to
Baldwin tonight while the Fernandina Beach Pirates
head to Ponte Vedra for preseason Kickoff Classics.
Kickoff is at 7 p.m. for both games. The regular season
gets under way next week. On Sept. 4, the Hornets host
Arlington Country Day and the Pirates head to Hilliard
for a long-awaited regular-season matchup with the
Flashes. Schedules, 13A. The Hornets were in action
Wednesday preparing for tonight's unveiling of this
year's team. Derrick "Shocka" Henry, top row left, will
be in his first high school uniform as a Yulee freshman.
Jonathan Knauss, top row right, tries to shake off a
,teammate during a kick return. Quarterback Conner
Petty, above left, gets the throw off under pressure.
Byron Alderman, a transfer from Hilliard, is wrapped up
by defenders, above center. Offensive tackle Devron
Wingard in action Wednesday. A pair of Hornets try to
bring down Jeremy DeBerry, left. Sophomore Kelvin
Rainey reels in a pass, right.
PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER


Hotheadfor hot heads


Warner football for the first time
and loves it, despite the hot after-
noon practices. Policies are in
place to make sure the kids do not overheat,
including frequent rest periods and water
breaks. Still, I have advised him there is a dif-
ference between hot and "dizzy hot," as we
call it. Heat-related illness is a very serious
condition and, since 1995, 39 football players
from Pop Warner to the pros have died from
heat-related causes.
But a new device could help make heat-
related deaths in football a thing of the past.
'There's a problem with heat in football
and we feel like we have a solution to that
problem," said Jay Buckalew, founder and
CEO of Hothead Sports.
The'Hothead is a heat sensor designed to
work inside football helmets. When a player's
body temperature reaches concerning levels,
the sensor sends a signal to the sideline med-
ical staff. Cost for each individual device is
about a $100.
. While widespread use may not be feasible
at the community level, placing one in the
helmet of a player known to be particularly
sensitive to the heat or with a past history of
heat-realted illness should be considered ...
Appalachian State senior quarterback
Armanti Edwards, who gained national fame
two years ago when he led the Mountaineers
to a stunning victory of the Michigan
Wolverines, has now gained national attention
for an unusual reason. The three-time All-
American will miss 2-4 weeks after running a
lawn mower over the top of his foot last week;
it rolled down a steep hill back at him.
Edwards was mowing the lawn at his off-
campus residence when the incident
occurred. Thankfully, Edwards apparently
does not have any injuries to bones or ten-
dons, but received stitches for deep cuts.


Teammate and roommate
Brian Quick transported
Edwards to Watauga
Medical Center, where he
was treated and released.
Edwards, the 6-foot-1 and
180-pound senior, has led
Appalachian State to two
Football Championship
Series (formerly known as
Division I-AA) titles in three
SPORTS years and last season won
the Walter Payton Award as
MEDICINE the top offensive player in
GREGO the FCS. He is 32-5 as a
REGORY starter, threw for 2,902
SMITH, M.D. yards, rushed for 941 yards
- and had a combined 41
touchdowns.
"We are all fortunate and grateful that
Armanti wasn't more seriously injured in this
accident," Appalachian State coach Jerry
Moore said. "I'm confident that he'll be back
on the field with his teammates as soon as
possible."
Moore said Edwards is scheduled to grad-
uate in December, after just 3 1/2 years. The
Mountaineers open their season Sept. 5
against East Carolina, leaving Edwards' start
in jeopardy. Last year, he was 196 of 306 pass-
ing for 2,902 yards, threw 30 touchdowns and
rushed for 941 yards and 11 touchdowns.
This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacementfor treat-
ment by your regular doctor It is only designed
to offer guidelines on the prevention, recogni-
tion and care of injuries and illness. Specific
concerns should be discussed with your physi-
cian. Mail your questions to Gregory Smith,
M.D., Sports Medicine, 1250 S. 18th St., Suite
204, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Call 261-
8787 or visit www.gsmithmd.com.


ATHLETE INACTION


- .

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SUBMrrrED PHOTO
Jeremy Schreiber of Fernandina Beach has spent his summer playing basketball in
Israel and returns home Sept. 3. He is pictured on the Mount of Olives with the old
city of Jerusalem and the Dome of the Rock behind him.


Schreiber takes his game to Israel


. BETH JONES
News-Leader
Jeremy Schreiber grew up
around the game of basketball.
His father, Matt, has spent
decades coaching the sport and
is currently the head boys
coach at Fernandina Beach
High School.
Schreiber, 26, graduated
from FBHS in 2002 and was the
county's most valuable player
that season. He went on to play
at three different colleges, cul-
minating his career at Webber
International University in Bab-
son Park, where he is current-


ly an assistant coach for the
men's basketball team.
This summer the sport he
loves took Schreiber around
the world. He played in the
Palestinian Basketball Associa-
tion and also spent time with
Upwards League, a basketball
program for Palestinian chil-
dren ages 7-14, through the pro-
gram Athletes in Action. ,
"We do skills-type stuff to
try to actually teach basketball
to the kids in a culture where
there are not many people who
know a lot about basketball,"
Schreiber said in an e-mail. "It
becomes frustrating at times,


but the kids really do enjoy us
taking the time to try to help
them.
"I think a lot of it has noth-
ing to do with basketball. I
think it has more to do with
someone actually taking the
time to show that they care
about them, something they
are not used to due to what they
would call fhe 'Israeli Occupa-
tion' of Palestine."
Summers helping his father
with the Pirate basketball camp
could have never prepared
Schreiber for his experiences
ISRAEL Continued on 13A


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 28,2009 SPORTS News-Leader


SPORTS SHORTS


Try out for Amelia Elite
Amelia Elite is having a tryout for new
members for the 2009-10 team. This is a
competition team open to Nassau County stu-
dents in grades 6-10. The tryout will be at
6:30 p.m. Sept. 3 at the cheerleading facility
behind Fernandina Beach Middle School.
Call Debbi Roland at FBHS at 261-5713
for information.

Sign up for Girls on the Run
The Girls on the Run deadline for fall 2009
registration is Sept. 4. The program begins
Sept. 12. Sign up at www.gotrneflorida.org.
Registration forms dan also be found at all
GOTR site locations.
GOTR is looking for new coaches.
Training will be held Aug. 29 from 8 a.m. to
noon and on Sept. 1 from 5-9 p.m. at the
Brooks YMCA, 10423 Centurion Parkway,
Jacksonville. Dinner will be provided. One
four-hour training session is mandatory. Past
coaches who have not attended training in
three seasons are required to attend the first
two hours of one training as a refresher. If
interested, call (904) 737-1999 to register for
training, or e-mail Beth Neale, volunteer coor-
dinator, at GOTRBeth@gmail.com.

BabeRuth fallball
Femandina Beach Babe Ruth is holding
registration for fall ball softball and baseball
online at www.leaguelineup.com/fernandina.
The annual general meeting is at 6 p.m.
Sept. 9 at the Peck Center reception room.

Turtle Trot Sept 5
An earlier start and some free extras are in
store for participants in this year's Turtle Trot
5K/1OK race and 1.5-mile walk on Labor Day
weekend. The annual event will begin at 7:30
a.m. Sept. 5, a half hour earlier than last year.
After the race, runners can freshen upwith
a free shower at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center and spend the rest of the
day on Amelia Island. Those who use the
showers should bring their own towels.
Runners and walkers can present their race
bib for free admission to Fort Clinch State
Park for the remainder of the day. An awards
.ceremony with door prizes will follow the
event with a grand prize of a four-day, three-
night stay at the Amelia Island Plantation.
The race will again feature professional
scoring from 1st Place Sports in Jacksonville,
using an electronic chip-timing system. The
5K, 10K and 1.5-mile non-competitive walk
will start and finish at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center with'the last half of the 10K
running through Fort Clinch State Park.
Half-mile and one-mile fun runs for chil-
dren 10 and younger will begin at 9 a.m. In
another change this year, the kids' runs will be
free. The goal is to encourage young people
to run and make the entire event more afford-
able for families; Hill said. Registration is
required and youth finishers wilLve a rib- "
bon at the end ol their run.
A popular feature is returning this year -
original T-shirt artwork by Fernandina Beach
artist and sea turtle volunteer Sandra Baker-
Hinton. All pre-registered walkers and 5K/10K
runners will receive a T-shirt with shirts avail-
able on race day while supplies last.
Proceeds benefit the Amelia Island Sea Turtle
Watch and sea turtle patrols inside Fort Clinch
State Park along with the running club's youth
running programs.
Entry fees through today will be $20 per
person or $15 for members of Amelia Island
Runners. After today through race day, the
fee will be $25 for everyone. Pre-registration
ends at 2 p.m. Sept. 3, but there will be race-


day registration from 6-7 a.m. at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center.
Entry forms and online registration are
available at www.AmelialslandRunners.com.
Forms are also available at Club 14 Fitness,
Red Otter Outfitters and other locations. Visit
the AIR website or call 277-3676.

Pro wrestling atYulee High School
Continental Championshp Wrestling
returns to Nassau County Sept. 5 at Yulee
High School. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bell
time 7:30 p.m. The main event for the evening
is a six-man tag team match as CCW champi-
on "Rock 'n' Roll" Chris Turner teams up with
the CCW tag team champions the Marcs
Brothers against Kevin Toole and Picture
Perfect.
Also on the card, MMA fighter turned pro-
fessional wrestling superstar Cheyne Miles
gets a shot at the CCW Southern States title,
held by Scotty Biggs and The Dynasty. Also
scheduled to appear are The Wranglers, "Mr.
Saturday Night," Jarrod Micheals, Buck
Buchanan, Mad Dog Miller, Riot and
Samantha Steele.
Partial proceeds to benefit the Yulee High
School football team. Tickets are $7 at the
door. Advanced tickets are $6 through the
YHS football team and on Aug. 30 at the Wal-
Mart Super Center in Yulee from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. For information, visit ccwrestling.org.

Mad Sunday Shoot
Amelia Shotgun Sports will host two tour-
naments in the Mad Sunday Shoot. Shoot
either or both, morning or evening. The event
will be held Aug. 30 at 86300 Hot Shot Trail in
Yulee for NSCA registered shooters.
Fees are are $60 for NSCA and hunter,
$45 for junior and sub-junior and $7 for warm-
ups. Fees include breakfast, lunch and
awards. For information, call 753-4619 or
548-9818 or e-mail clyde@ameliashotgun-
sports.com.

Freedom Playground Wheelathon
The Freedom Playground Wheelathon will
be held Sept. 26 at Central Park off of Atlantic
Avenue. The Wheelathon is an awareness
event intended to raise money for Freedom
Playground.
Team and open registration are from 9-10
a.m. The walk is from 10-11 a.m. from Central
Park to the downtown marina and back, using
one wheelchair per team. Live music, food by
Sonny's, demonstration events (wheelchair
softball, tennis and basketball) will be held
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Register in advance at
www.firstgiving.com/ freedomplayground. For
information, contact Aaron Morgan at (904)
335-7253 or e-mail him at
aaronmorgan4@gmail.com.

Patriot Day shoot
- .Nassau Cournty Fire/esc.u&..I..aa fs als
Local 3101 will hold the second annual Patriot
Day Sporting Clay Shoot at Amelia Shotgun
Sports, 86300 Hot Shot Trail, Yulee, on Sept.
11.
Proceeds benefit the Boys and Girls Club
of Nassau County. The event consists of five-
person teams shooting at 15 different sta- .
tions. The teams with the three highest aver-
ages will receive awards. Dinner, awards and
raffle will follow the competition.
The event begins at 10 a.m. There is a
limit of 150 people for 30 teams. Pre-registra-
tion of $80 will be accepted until Sept. 1. After
Sept. 1, the fee is $100. The event is on a first
come, first served basis. Call Chris Gamble at
753-4644.


ISRAEL From 12A
with the youth league in Israel.
"On Thursdays, we let the
kids play games," he said. "As
much as we try to keep the
games organized by the use of
the scoreboard and referees, it
usually turns ihto chaos. But at
least it's a chaos that involves
the kids having fun and smil-
ing."
But it wasn't all fun for
Schreiber. He played in the
"first division" of the PBA. His
Steam, Terrasanta, went 6-3 for
the "tournament" - Schreiber
said "seasons are called tour-
naments here" - and now
advances to the uper. legue.
which begins in January.
"I am set to return to play
with my team for this league,"
Schreiber said.
Terrasanta also played in
the 29th Shuhada Tournament,
the'biggest in Palestine. Of the
16 teams invited, two were from
Gaza, "invited as a gesture to
show that the rest of Palestine
is thinking of them even
through they are not allowed
to travel through Israel into the
West Bank," Schreiber said.
His team went 1-1 in the first
round and lost by two in the


Jeremy Schreiber is pictured at the
Nativity Church in Bethlehem, which is
where Jesus Christ is said to have been
born, above. Left, he is in Jericho in front
of the tree thought to be the one
Zaccheus climbed up in to see Jesus.
Below, Schreiber with his teammates and
coaches during a timeout this summer.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS


single-elimination second
round, ending the team's
games for summer.
"The primary goal of the
summer, from a basketball per-
spective, was to qualify my
team for the super league,
which I was successful in help-
ing them to do," Schreiber said.
"Perhaps we could have been
more successful in the other
tournaments. That would have
been icing on the cake."
Schreiber also played with
his team in the .Palestinian
American Solidarity Tourna-
ment, which included seven
teams from the super league
and two from the first division.
S"We went.0 . ~S. diS't
advance," Schreiber said.
But he played well, averag-
ing around 30 points a game.
"Most of the games were
pretty close," Schreiber said.
"We just had trouble pulling out
a win."
Playing hoops in the U.S. is
different from his experience
over the summer, Schreiber
said.
"The work ethic, skill level,
fitness and overall dedication,
and importance of basketball
in Palestine is far below that of
the U.S., so it has been frus-.


treating for me in that sense,"
Schreiber said. "However, it is
rewarding to get to play in
games where so much pride is
on the line between teams.
Palestine is small, so teams are
close in proximity and rela-
tionships, so they care a lot
about the games. It's awesome
to help them win and see how
much it means to them."
While Schreiber was teach-
ing basketball, he was learning
about another culture.
"It's really incredible getting
to meet people from so many
different backgrounds, Arab-
Christians, Arab-Muslims,
Jews, Jewish-Christians, to
na..x.e a ew." Schreiber said. "I
had a completely distorted view
of faiths outside of Christianity
before coming on this trip.
Interacting with people from
these other faiths has really'
been the biggest blessing of
this summer.
"It's just been really reas-
suring to come here and see
that ... people from this part of
the world aren't as dangerous
and hateful as it seems we are
all led to believe."
Schreiber leaves Israel
Sunday and returns to Fernan-
dina Beach Sept 3.


2009 SCHEDULES


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Football
Aug. 28 Kickoff at Ponte Vedra 7:00
Sept. 4 at Hilliard 7:30
Sept. 11 BRADFORD 7:30
Sept. 18 PROVIDENCE 7:30
Sept. 25 at West Nassau* 7:30
Oct. 2 BOLLES' 7:30
Oct. 9 EPISCOPAL* 7:30
Oct. 23 INTERLACHEN* 7:30
Oct. 30 at University Christian* 7:30
Nov. 6 at Yulee* 7:00
Nov. 13 at Matanzas 7:00
* District games
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Junior Varsity Football
Sept. 10 at Yulee 7:00
Sept. 17 HILLIARD 7:00
Sept. 24 WEST NASSAU 7:00
Oct. 1 at Bolles 7:00
Oct. 8 at Camden County 5:00
Oct. 15 at Stanton 6:00
Oct. 22 BISHOP KENNY 7:00
Oct. 29 YULEE 7:00


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Football
Aug. 28 Kickoff at Baldwin 7
Sept. 4 ARLINGTON CO. DAY 7
Sept. 11 at Englewood 7
Sept. 18 MATANZAS 7
Sept. 25 at Episcopal' 7
Oct. 9 WEST NASSAU* 7
Oct. 16 at Bolles* 7
Oct. 23 UNIVERSITY CHRIST.* 7
Oct. 30 at Interlachen* 7
Nov. 6 FERNANDINA* 7
Nov. 13 at Paxon 7
*District games
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL


Volleyball
Aug. 28 Preseason at Menendez
Aug. 31 at Baker County
Sept. 1 at West Nassau
Sept. 3 at Raines* (varsity)
Sept. 8 BAKER COUNTY
Sept. 10 at Hilliard
Sept. 11-12 Tourney in Orlando (V)
Sept. 15 RIBAULT* (varsity)
Sept. 17 at Episcopal*
Sept. 21 HILLIARD (Dig Pink)
Sept. 22 BOLLES (dV)


5:30/6:30
5:30/6:30
5:30
5:30/6:30
5/6/7
TBA
5:30
5:30/6:30
5/6/7
5:30


Sept. 23 ORANGE PARK 5:30/6:30
Sept. 29 at Yulee* 5:30/6:30
Oct. 1 at Menendez 5:30/6:30
Oct. 3 Dig Pink-Stanton (varsity) TBA
Oct. 5 at Middleburg 5:30/6:30
Oct. 8 at Bolles* 5:30/6:30
Oct. 13 YULEE 5:30/6:30,
Oct. 19 WEST NASSAU" 5:30/6:30
Oct. 26-29 District at Episcopal TBA
* District games
* Senior night
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Cross Country,
Sept. 12 GREENWAY TRIALS'- 8am
Sept. 19 at Katie Caples Invite 6:00
Sept. 26 at Bob Hans Open 8am
Oct. 2 at FIRunners.com Open 8am
Oct. 10 at Asics Classic 8am
Oct. 17 CIS Open 4:00.
Oct. 24 at Bronco Bob Open 7am
Oct. 29 COUNTY 4:30
Nov. 5 District 2-2A
Nov. 14 Region 1-2A, Tallahassee
Nov. 21 State 2A meet, Dade City 8am


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Golf
Sept. 3 at Ponte Vedra/EpisCopal 4:30
Sept. 8 BOLLES 4:00
Sept. 10 at Trinity 4:00
Sept. 14 TRINITY 4:00
Sept. 15 at Bolles 4:00
Sept. 17 BISHOP KENNY 4:00
Sept. 21 PROVIDENCE 4:00
Sept. 22 EPISCOPAL 4:15
Sept. 28 at West Nassau 4:00
Oct. 6 at Providence 4:00
Oct. 14 WEST NASSAU 4:00
Oct. 15 Bishop Kenny TBA 4:00
Oct. 19 or 20 District
Oct. 26 Region, Haile Plantation
Oct. 27-29 State in Lakeland
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Golf
Sept. 1 BOLLES/PROVIDENCE 4:00
Sept. 2 at Orange Park 4:00
Sept. 9 BISHOP KENNY 4:00
Sept. 11 OAK HALL 4:00
Sept. 16 at Ponte Vedra 3:30.
Sept. 23 at Providence 4:00
Sept. 24 ORANGE PARK, 4:00
Sept. 29 at Bishop Kenny 4:00


Sept. 30 BOLLES 4:00
Oct. 1 at Episcopal 4:15
Oct. 7 Bolles TBA . 4:00
Oct 8 PONTEVEbRA 4:00
Oct. 12 at Oak Hall 4:00
Oct. 19 or 20 District
Oct. 26 .Region at UF
Nov. 2-4 State at Lakeland
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Football
Sept. 8 at Callahan 6:00
Sept. 15 HILLIARD 6:00
Sept. 22 atYulee 6:00
Sept. 29 CALLAHAN 6:00
Oct. 6 at Hilliard 6.00
Oct. 13 PROVIDENCE 4:30
Oct. 20 YULEE 6:00
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Volleyball
Sept. 10 at Hilliard , 5:00
Sept. 15 at Callahan 5/6:00
Sept. 17 YULEE 2:15/3:15
Sept. 21 HILLIARD 5:00
Sept. 24 CALLAHAN 5/6:00
Sept. 28 . at Yulee . 5/6:00
Oct. 1 County at Hilliard


........... . *. . III...


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The owners & staff of


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Z1Z F1(&tk Sco'"s


To bur family



O.K., we confused our announcement

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We are confirming we bought The Frugal Scot's

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The Frugal Scot's

Still trying to live up to our name













FRIDAY, AUGUST 28.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


Josie
Freeman
caught
this red
on a fish-
ing trip
with her
father
Aug. 15.
It was
caught
behind
Rayonier.
SUBMITTED


Our local heritage has practically vanished...a lifestyle alive only in the
memory of our citizens, Your children will now have a chance to learn
about the history of their city, and perhaps see some of their relatives in
this one-of-a-kind book. Ideal for collectors, ,Christmas gifts, history buffs
and family history, this book with more than
250 photographs will be of library quality, printed on archival paper
and bound with a beautiful hard cover.

ONLY LIMITED NUMBER WILL BE AVAILABLE
RETURN ORDER BLANK TO RESERVE YOUR COPY

Please enter my order for: A Pictorial History of Fernandina Beach, Florida

copies) STANDARD EDITION @ $24.95 + $1.75 tax

Scop(ies) LIMITED EDITION @ $75.00 + $5.25 tax
O I am enclosing payment in full.
O Please ship my books) to the address below. I have enclosed an additional $7.00 for each hook shipped.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE . ZIP
PHONE
MAIL TO: The News-Lcader, 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 261-3696


OUTDOOR BRIEFS


HuntNassauWMA
If you are looking for a place to hunt this
fall, you still have a chance to get a recre-
ational use permit for the Nassau Wildlife
Management Area in Nassau County during
the upcoming hunting season.
Nassau WMA is 13,892.acres near
Callahan. All users must possess a Nassau
recreational use permit to hunt on this area.
Nassau WMA is a still-hunt area only, but
hunters may use bird dogs during the migra-
tory bird and waterfowl hunting seasons.
For those willing to pay $385 to hunt the
area, Nassau WMA provides hunting oppor-
tunities during eight months of the year.
Archery is from Sept. 26 through Oct. 25;
muzzleloading gun season runs from Oct. 31
through Nov. 8; general gun season is from
Nov. 14 through Jan. 10, 2010; small game is
from Jan. 11 through March 7,2010; spring
turkey season runs from March 20 through
April 25, 2010; and trapping can be done from
Jan, 11 through March 1, 2010.
To apply for a recreational use permit to
hunt on Nassau WMA, go to MyFWC.com.
Except for hunting, permit holders and
their spouses or dependent children may par-
ticipate in other activities on designated
WMAs. Only permit holders and one depend-
ent child (under age 16) may hunt. If spouses
or more than one dependent child (under age
16) wish to hunt, they must purchase a recre-
ational use permit. Recreational use permits
also include a management area permit when
hunting public lands not in the recreational
use program.
Recreational use permits do not apply to
other recreational use program areas. Once
permits are issued, they can be renewed
annually for two additional years, essentially
making them a three-year permit. Permit
renewals are mailed May 1. Eligible appli-
cants have until May 31 to renew their recre-
ational use permits for the next season.
Permits not renewed by May 31 will be for-
feited and they will be made available to the
public on a first-come, first-served basis.
Permits are issued individually on a first-
come, first-served basis in June. Applications


may be submitted online at www.wildlifeli-
cense.com or take a completed worksheet to
a tax collector's office or any license agent
and they will submit the application. Work-
sheets are available online at MyFWC.com, at
FWC regional offices and tax collectors'
offices in counties surrounding a specific
WMA.

Boating course
' The Coast Guard Auxiliary at Amelia
Island will be conducting a six-week boating
course Sept. 8 through Oct. 15. The classes
will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7-
9 p.m. at the Amelia Island Lighthouse cot-
tage in Fernandina Beach.
This course is excellent for both the
beginning boater, who needs to understand
the fundamentals of boating, and for the
experienced boater, who may be in need of a
refresher. The basics of boat handling, weath-
er, navigation, electronics, use of radios and
rules of the waterways are some of the sub-
jects that will be covered. This class satisfies
state boater education requirements. The
enrollment fee is $35 and textbook materials
will be provided.
For information or to register, contact
Steve Filkoff at 491-8629 or e-mail at scarf@
bellsouth.net. For information on boating
safety classes, visit the Flotilla 14-1 website,
http://cgaux7-14-1.org.

Bassmastersmeet
Nassau Bassmasters, associated with the
BASS National Federation and the Florida
BASS Federation, meets the third Thursday
in Yulee. Membership is open to anyone at
least 16 years old. Call Bob Schlag at (912)
729-2282 or Billy Kittrell at 225-0267.

NSFAmeets
The Nassau Sport Fishing Association
meets the second Wednesday of each month
at 7:30 p.m. and the fourth Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Ten Acres Kraft Athletic Club.
Membership is open to the public. Call 261-
9481 or visit www.fishnsfa.com.


TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
Largemouth bass are schooling in some of the lakes and ponds throughout Northeast
Florida during the mid-morning hours in open waters of the lakes and ponds. Roland
Martin took this nice bass on a floating plastic worm.



Bring cut bait for redfish


S"Dad, there is a big shark
cruising in the creek. Can
you rig up a fishing pole so I
can catch it?" Max Blackmon
asked his father, Brandon.
Brandon secured a king-
fish rod that had braided fish-
ing line spooled on the reel
and a wire kingfish leader
was quickly
attached to
the terminal
end of the
fishing line.
Both king-
fish treble
hooks were
baited with
cut chunks
ON THE ofribbonfish,
ONTHE which are
SWATER premier
kingfish
TERRY baits. Max
LACOSS returned to
.... the creek to
catch the
shark and, after a fw ziinutes
of fishing, shouted to his
father to come and take a
look at his big catch. Max was
holding a big red in his arms
that was quickly pho-
tographed and released back
into the creek.
So, if you are going red-
fishing this weekend, bring
along plenty of cut baits, rib-
bonfish that is.
Redfish are schooling dur-
ing the low tide, which
arrives Saturday at 10:24 a.m.
at the mouth of the Amelia
River. Fish the deep sides of
oysterbars or where large
mud flats drain into a deep
slough. Fish on the bottom
with cut bait, live shrimp or
finger mullet.
Some of the more produc-
tive flats are located in West
Jackson and Langsford
creeks.
Bruce Comrie has been
catching redfish also on the
high tide while working the
flooded oysterbars in Tiger
Basin while fishing with live
shrimp under a "popping"
cork. The key is to keep mov-
ing from one oysterbar to the


--SPECIAL
Max Blackmon thought he saw a large shark cruising in
the creek behind his home and had his father iig up a
fishing rod and reel. A fairly large red for the small
creek.was caught and released.


next until you find mullet that'
attract redfish.
Two- to three-pound sea
trout are also running during-
Sthe first few hours of the
incoming tide while.fishing
deep sloughs located next to
oysterbars, boat docks or
creek mouths in 5-15 feet of
water. Fish with live shrimp
deep under a trout float or
simply free-line a live shrimp
without-a float or weight into
the deep waters of the sea
trout's hideout.
Offshore fishing continues
to showcase gag grouper at
FA and FC fish havens. Fish
on the bottom with live men-
haden, finger mullet, cigar
minnows or Spanish sardines.
Bull reds are holding at
the tip of the St. Marys north
and south jetty rocks and tak-
ing cut bait fished on the bot-


toim. Bass fishermen are
reporting schooling bass
action during the mid-morn-
ing in open areas of lakes,
where shad are schooling.
One of the best lures for
schooling bass is a white
finesse worm fished without
any weight retrieved with a
slow twitching action.
Surf fishermen should get
an early start with the high
falling tide arriving at sunrise.
Whiting, .pompano, blues and
sea trout are now running in
the surf.
The News-Leader encour-
ages local anglers to submit
photographs of their catches. E-
mail photos to bones@
ftnewsleadercom, mail them
to PO. Box 766, Fernandina
Beach, FL 32035, or drop
them by the office at 511 Ash
St. in Fernandina Beach.


SSupport the 4I
Yulee High School

Football program join the



"InZone Club"

Annual membership is only $25!

Mail your check payable to The InZone Club
and membership information to:

The InZone Club

P.O. Box 1463, Yulee, FL 32041


Name:


Phone:


Address/State/Zip:
Email Ifor info form web site):

TEAM (Together Everyone Accomplishes More)
Please Join Today!


BIG RED


- - i
















_iLsure-


B SECTION


CROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, AUGUST 28.2009
NEWS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA
c


Tales of Wales in story


For the News-Leader


Coal dust and the small coal-mining val-
leys of South Wales supplied a down-to-earth
upbringing for David Llewellyn - values and
early life lessons he still holds dear. But at 17,
with little more than a jacket and guitar in
hand, he left home to begin a successful
career as a singer in the same working-man's
clubs that bred stars like Tom Jones.
When the music scene in the United
Kingdom was taken over by computer tech-
nology and drum machines; Llewellyn found
the appeal of a more organic heartfelt
approach to music to be irresistible, and
moved to Nashville in 1991. It was 10 years
before he would return to Wales.


Ticket information
Welsh singer/songwriter David
Uewellyn will perform in Bums Hall at St.
Peter's Episcopal Church in Fernandina
Beach on Sept. 5 at 8 p.m. General admis-
sion tickets are available at the door for
$15. "An Evening of Story & Song," the
popular singer/songwriter concert series
hosted by Mark and Donna Paz Kaufman,
is made possible by the Founders of St.
Peter's and the generosity of First Coast
Community Bank. Call 277-2664.

"As soon as I took my first breath of the
valley's air," said Llewellyn, "I knew that


nd song
although the wonderful songwriting cities of
Austin arid Nashville may have honed my
skills and taught me the 'craft,' it was Wales -
its Celtic traditions and working-class com-
munities - that I had to draw upon for my
inspiration, and that has increasingly drawn
me back to my roots. I was part of the first
generation not to go down the mines, and I've
always felt thankful for, that."
One of Llewellyn's original songs about a
young child's first day working underground,
and his father's heart-breaking thoughts,
touched a nerve and gained Llewellyn a win-
ning spot in the "New Folk" competition at
the 2007 Kerrville Folk Festival.
SONG Continued on 2B


Welsh singer-songwriter David liewellyn
performs 8 p.m. Sept. 5 at St. Peter's
Burns Hall in the next "Evening of Story &
Song.


A Barbadian
marketplace at
Amelia Island
Plantation Sept. 5
from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. will feature
steel pan bands,
above,.and stilt
walkers, right. It
is free and open
to the public.


Barbados
For the News-Leader
Amelia Island Plantation is
teaming up with the island
of Barbados in a cultural
and tourism exchange set
for Labor Day weekend, Sept. 4-7.
The Plantation employs a host of
workers from Barbados, which gave
birth to the idea for the exchange
that will feature a "Bridgetown
Market" at the Spa & Shops on Sept.
5 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. that is free and
open to the public.
The weekend is hosted by "Team
Barbados at Miami," which'consists
of the Consulate General of Barbados
at Miami, Barbados Tourism
Authority and Barbados Liaison
Service together with the Barbados-
USA Chamber of Commerce and
Invest Barbados.
"One of the many objectives of
this event is to show appreciation to


coming
the resort's management for their
confidence in employing Barbadian
workers over theyears and at the
same time showcase Barbadian talent
and culture through performances
by our artistes, while displaying
some of our art and products of our
culture," the tourism authority said in
a press release.
"It is also our.intention to promote
Barbados as a premier destination
and investment location, not only in
the Caribbean but in the world. Our
prime minister will be in attendance
and hosting our main attraction,
which is a formal cocktail reception,
dinner and dance on Saturday
evening. Also in attendance will be
several members of the Diplomatic
Corps from here in the U.S., Canada
and the U.K and other dignitaries
from the governments of Barbados
and U.S."
Saturday's s marketplace will '"


o Amelia
include a mini parade, hair braiding,
free rum and alcohol tasting,
Barbadian food, arts and crafts for
sale, steel pan performances, cook-
ing demonstrations by Barbadian
celebrity chef, Chef Paul, stilt walk-
ers and more.
On Sept. 6, enjoy the formal
cocktail reception, dinner and dance
from 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Tickets are $i25
and include a three-course dinner
featuring pan seared, free range
chicken with Bajan spice rub and pani
seared fish with lime Beurre
Blanc; live entertainment by The
Mighty Gabby and Dj Beat; cash .
bar; and official launch of Network
Barbados by Invest Barbados and an
address by the prie minister of.
Barbados.
To purchase dinner tickets, go to
www.barbados-amelia.com. For more
inform ion .call 491-1646 or visit
www.blu'badosabtneli.ap_ r.,.? 'i'. 4


ANNIE'
.. AUDITIONS .
Nassau County Schools in conjunc-
tion with Community in Schools will
hold auditions for "Annie" on
Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in the
Fernandina Beach Middle School
auditorium. Needed are boys and
girls in grades. 4-12. Students may
obtain reading scripts and music in
the front office at FBMS. They should
be prepared to sing and dance.
Rehearsals will begin Monday from 3-
5 p.m. The orphans will rehearse
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday after-
noons from 3-5 p.m.
All proceeds will benefit the
Community in Schools program in
Nassau County. Volunteers are need-
ed to help with props, costumes, set
design and nightly study halls.
Performances will be Oct. 9:11. Judy
Tipton is the director, Mary Eagen,
stage manager, Rene6 Thompson,
executive producer, Jim Tipton, set
design, and Jayme Tipton, choreogra-
pher. For more information or to vol-
unteer call Judy Tipton at 753-1583
or 277-2429.


SUBMITTED


JAZZ FESTIVAL PREVIEW


*l-A'iLL L OLJ*-- n Ul~riruJ r in-. i.,w.uL..ur.
The Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz Festival kicked off its season with a
rousing preview show at the newly renovated Palace Saloon Aug. 20. The
program showcased the various styles of jazz that will be heard throughout
the 2009 event, which runs Oct. 2-11 at various venues on Amelia Island.
See story, 2B.


OF&FONIE sND


COMMUNITY DANCE
The Amelia Island Ballroom Youth Academy
will hold a community dance on Aug. 29 at the
Peck Center auditorium, A
complimentary class starts
at 7 p.m., followed by the
dance from 8-11 p.m,
Students of the academy al,
will present a dance exhibi-
tion. Tickets are $10.
Children 17 and under
accompanied by an adult
admitted free. Proceeds wil
benefit the academy, a non-profit 501c3 organize
tion that offers local students in grades 1-12 free
ballroom classes. For information contact Felix:a
(904)707-6762.

CATFISH FESTIVAL
The Annual
Kingsland Catfish
Festival will be held in
downtown Kingsland,
Ga., Sept. 5-7.
The festival opens Sept. 5th with a 5K run. Ar
antiques, crafts and collectibles booths will opera
at noon on Saturday and Sunday, and 9 a.m. on
Labor Day. There will be a children's amusemen


area, free entertainment and a smorgasbord of
food. Farm-raised catfish dinners and nuggets go
on sale at noon Saturday and Sunday and 11 a.m.
on Labor Day: Other menu items Include deep-
fried onion blossoms, oriental fare, barbecue,
hamburgers and hot dogs and homemade ice
cream. For information call (912) 882-1950, e-mail
admin�kingslandcatfishfestival.com or visit
so www.KingslandCatfishFestival.com.

DION AT BLUE DOOR
The Blue Door
SArtists will feature
new paintings by
Elizabeth Dion for the
t month of September. .
Dion's colorful con- ,
temporary works are
inspired by the lush 'AV
complexity of nature,
especially the marshes and beach surrounding
Amelia Island. Visit her and the other artists in
their studios during the Artrageous Artwalk.
Sept. 12 from 5-8:30 p.m.
The gallery/studios are located at 2051/2
t, Centre St. in downtown Fernandina Beach.
S Regular hours are Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
For more information, call 583-4676 or see the
t website at www.bluedoorartists.com.


SHINY BAIGES BALL
The 4th Annual Shiny Badges Ball will be held '
Sept. 12 at the Golf Club of Amelia Island with a
"Legends of Hollywood" theme. The night will
begin with a
complimenta-
ry wine recep-
tion from 6-7
p.m., with din- "TH *""U"HIN """" ""L
ner at 7 p.m. w
Music will be
byThe
Melanie DiLorenzo Trio. Guests are encouraged
to dress as their favorite Hollywood star. or in
their favorite Oscar winning attire. Prizes.will be
awarded to the "Best Dressed Stars."
Tickets are $75 per person, or $525 for a table
of eight. Active or retired law enforcement and
firefighters receive a discount. Tickets can be pur-
chased in Fernandina Beach at Rowland's
Upholstery Plus, 1120 S. Eighth St., Amelia Hotel
at the Beach, 1997 S. Fletcher Avenue, or online at
www.shinybadgesball.com. For more information,
contact Marty Scott at 753-4467 or Arlene Scott
at 753-8774. Shiny Badges Ball Inc. is a 501(c) 3
non-profit organization. Donations are tax,
deductible.
Submit information to Sin Perryatsperry@lbnewsleader.com


.....:..


_ . ..-,,.7..





I An


CLASSIFIED


3B

NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, August 28 2009


To Place An Ad Call (904) 261- p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday


100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Flnanclal-Home/Property 606 Photo EqulpmenLt & Sales 619 Business Equipment. 800 REAL ESTATE �_13 r,.,.ln,:n[ Propeps, 358 C.ndos-unrurrnisnrl1
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 AntIques-CollectIbles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent I 14 ..jcz. rJa:sau Co unt, 859 Hrr.es-FurniShe,
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes [15 ilr,.,ls58n60 St. rlar,- 866r HomrrF-lnfri,,.,lan.
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertllizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 1- ,Camon Coun, dtI vci, Ren
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 AirConditioners/Heii-,.23 Si.p Trade b04 A1',4il'i ii,-.Hres t- I ,tr,._r Arp3s 862 Be,: & Breal.tasr
105 Public Notice 301 C,.nool; & Instruicon 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Hion. Furlshir,.~s 62,-1 Salted t1 Bu, 805 Beac:re6 850 RENTALS 663 CC
106 Happy Card 302 Di t E;,rclse 504 Services 612 r.lj.:i.,i IlstLurllen-t ,25 Fr.-e ir ,m i0t, Watedfro,,r Rmm'te Warted 86 Cc.mmarhoa.Retal
107 SpecialOccasion 303 HobbrE 'Clalts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 TLI.-..ii a,', l,1ji1i.ri. 700 RECREATION au7 C'nc.o.nrrnu. 2 t.l Homes . 965 WarehSouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 j j.ilr, ..rr.Ec 7ij01 Bo.at 1. Traillrs _806 OJlr 1, , l.. _r3 lol3 e Home Ls 901 TRANSPORTATONb
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Material 2 Oat r, :,eS . DI 809 L,-Lr l P e HrneL' , 102 Trubcks i
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Sora�r., artn.u-.,e- ml03 Spor.rniEulrnr SE , lal e 10 F810Far,_-.. ,.rr.:r.-i.Fn j ans
202 Sales-Business 431 .lortagge Bouotr,1.'Sola 604 Bic,: , rr,.r,-T. quip 4 Rrear.Vencles 1 Cl . prens-Lfurn 90 -ltor,le
203 Hotel/Restaurant. 4.52 tcck Bornd 605 C.:,mput.rs-supples 61S . tuac[inra . ompurers. , SuHrjle 2 Frperr, E..:l-,,,- p5r , oands-Furnisned 905 Commercal

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW


102 Lost & Found
FOUND- Friendly male Koon cat near
beach. Call to identify (904)556-6825.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.


104 Personals

CRIMINAL RECORD? - Misdemeanor,
felony? Have them expunged for
$99.95, 30 to 60 days including DUI's.
Get a fresh start today. (800)621-4889
24/7 days. ANF
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF

105 Public Notice


All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes It
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,'
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that. all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.


PUBLIC NOTICE
Fernandina Beach Housing Authority
Housing Assistance Program
Public Housing Program
Applications for the Public Housing
Rental Assistance Program for three
and four bedroom units will be open to
all family. P fW aflljiction pr �&-'rWilll
be opet duri gthe ours ofql AQgpm
and 4:00pmr - .
Tuesday, September 8, 2009
Thursday, September 10, 2009
Any eviction or felony conviction of a,
family member within 5 years of
application will make the applicant
ineligible. Crimes by family members
who would live in the household,
involving physical violence to persons
or property, will make applicant
ineligible for 5 years. Crimes involving
drug activity will make the applicant
ineligible.
A criminal history verification from the
Nassau County Sheriff's Office or
Sheriff's Office in which the applicant.
resides must be returned with your
application before application becomes
valid.
The Housing Authority for the City of
Fernandina Beach
1300 Hickory Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-5051
Equal Housing Opportunity


I105 Public Notice 201 Help Wanted 11204 Work Wanted I


EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.





201 Help Wanted

Earn $$$ Helping MDsI Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.

PTL OTR DRIVERS - New pay pkg.
Great miles. Up to 46cpm. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262. www.ptl-lnc.com. ANF
MEDICAL ASSISTANT' - Medical
Assistant position open in a specialty
medical office. Exp. w/injectlons, EKG
& blood draws necessary. Flexible
hours, very friendly practice. Apply to:
MA Position, P.O. Box 15214,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need
employees to assemble products at
home. No selling, any hours. $500
wkly potential. Info 1-985-646-1700
DEPT. FL-1380.
LMT Position Available - in
expanding Chiropractic & Wellness
Center. 2 years minimum experience
required. Please call (912)882-8888.
RETAIL SALES MANAGER
Looking for a change?
Do you love handbags?
Do you have lots of energy?
We are a new store getting ready to
open.
EOE. Fax to 321-1790
FOOD SERVICE
WORKER SUPERVISOR
for Trident Lakes Golf Course aboard
Kings Bay Naval Base. Criminal
background check required. Looking for
an individual with strong supervisory
skills and food service background.
Must be able to train and schedule
employees, order and inventory.
supplies. Starting pay $11.08. For
j.iagtipp Irlljctl Urnaaon visit, ,
USAJOBS.GOV or ca n MWR Personnel
at (912)57Y- 'sB bF-8 72:."* :

EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor'Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity.. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-Spm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.


DENTAL ASSISTANT - P/T. Pis call
(904)261-6826 or send resume to
(904)261-8181. Robert H. Friedman,
DMD, 2896 S. 8th St., FB 32034.


HOUSE CLEANING - 10 years
experience. Honest and excellent
references. Clean houses, condos
weekly or bi-weekly. Luci (904)415-
2169


IRONING LADY NEEDED - Must do
good work & be reasonable. Call (904) WILL DO ALTERATIONS - In my
210-6191. home. On Island. Call (904)261-6217,
Dot.


FREE TAX SCHOOL AT LIBERTY TAX
SERVICE - Earn extra income after
taking the course. Flexible schedules.
Register Now! Courses start 9/15/09.
Call '904)310-6273. Small book fee.
BILINGUAL LOGISTICS EMPLOYEE
NEEDED ASAPI - MUST be fluent In
Spanish & English. Knowledge of AES
Direct a plus. Will negotiate truck, rail,
barge, & ocean rates for all US & Int'l
movements. Emall resumes to
olvsteeltradina.ijbsioolvsteel.com or
fax to (904)491-8688 EOE M/F/D/V


RV Delivery Drivers Needed -
Deliver RVs, boats & trucks for PAY!
Deliver to all, 48 states & CN. For
details log on to
www.RVdellveryjobs.com. ANF
NURSING VACANCY - Nassau County
Health Department, Healthy Start
program. Provide services to pregnant
women/babies. FT position w/ benefits.
Hours flexible, can be Part-Time.
Position requires the following skills:
assessment, education, developmental
testing and work w/medically high risk
prenatal women, and high risk Infants.
Work includes nursing assessment and
case management. Special focus on
medial, education and supportive
services which complement regular OB
Care. Job includes in-county travel, and
home visitation. To apply go to
myflorida.com. Position closes on
9/01/09.
The State of Florida is an
EEO/AA Employer.
WE ARE SEEKING - a Maintenance
Tech & a Housekeeper (part-time).
Apply at www.osprey-village.com

Under About Us, Select Career Center

1204 Work Wanted
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs
experience. Low prices, work
guaranteed. Small jobs welcomed.
10% discount with ad. Call Tom
(904)491-9992.
HARD WORKERS II - House cleaning
and painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.













Looking for one outgoing &
self-motivated Associate.

$45-$80k I Year
401k, Health Ins.
Email resume to Angelo Fafelli
Gen. Mngr. fanellikeffer@ao.0com
464037 STATE RD 200 YULEE
FL 32097,904-277-6969


I DO ALTERATIONS - In my home.
Betty, formerly at Granny's Alterations.
Call (904)321-1395 or (904)753-3159.
SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN -
Small jobs welcomed. (904)277-4777
JUST SEW ALTERATIONS WASH &
FOLD - 2 locations. FB 277-2451 &
Yulee 548-1141. Six pants special:
Bring in 6 hems, get one free.

207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 802000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF




301 Schools &
Instruction

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial aid if qualified. Call
(866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF


306 Lessons/
Classes

PRIVATE GUITAR INSTRUCTION -
beginning to adv. students. Acoustic,
electric, fingerstyle. Banjo instruction
also avail. Terry Thrift (904)704-2011.
STARTING NEW NON-FICTION
BOOK CLUB - i.e. History and cultural
differences. Call Natalie for details, cell
(904)753-7310.
SPANISH, ITALIAN, FRENCH -
Private & group classes. Also, tutoring
on Spanish. Call Lucia or Anna (904)
403-1982.




404 Money To Loan
JUDGMENT ENFORCEMENT
We specialize in locating debtors and
their assets to collect-civil judgments.
Turn that worthless piece of paper into
cash. Call Breeze Judgment Recovery
(904)225-8348




503 Pets/Supplies

YORKIE PUPPIES - for sale. 8 weeks
old. 2 male, 2 female. $500/each. Call
(904)742-3227
2 FREE JACK RUSSELL - Females 5
months old. Prefer them to go
together. (904)849-7433




601 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/29, 8am-until.
Baby bed, strollers, play yards, toys,
treadmill exercise bike, lots of misc.
items. 201 N. 15th Street.


601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - Sat. 8/29, 8am-2pm.
Junior Miss clothes, men's clothes, LRG
& XL, Glass wear, household items, all
good con'd. 32393 Grand Parke Blvd,
Fernandina Beach.
MOVING SALE - 705 Whitest. Sat.
8/29 - Sun. 8/30, 8am-4pm. 14th St
past Bosque Bella Cemetery. Many
household Items, furniture, clothes,
TVs, video equip, IT'S ALL GOT TO GO!
Phone 310-6363.
GARAGE SALE - Saturday, Aug. 29th,
8am-lpm, 2705 Delorean St., off Will
Hardee Rd. Furniture and much more.
YARD SALE - 111 S. 4th St. Fri. 8/28
& Sat. 8/29, 8am-lpm.
HUGE ESTATE/GARAGE SALE - Nice,
clean Items: furniture, little boy
clothes, toys, housewares, decor, kids
books, more. Sat. 8/29, 8am-3pm,
2001 Sunrise Dr., FB.
WAREHOUSE SALE - 50% off
everything In Front & Centre's
warehouse. Consoles, art, baker's
racks, lamps, accessories, Christmas,
etc. Fri., Sat., & Sun., 9am-5pm. 316
Ash St., downtown. (904)277-2660
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/29, from 9 to
2. Books, household, toys clothes,
much more. 96728 Commodore Point
Drive (Heron Isles off Chester Rd.),No
early birds. Rain cancels.'
AZALEA POINTE - Neighborhood.Yard
Sale. Sat. 8/29, 8am-3pm. Tools,
plants, rugs,' home decor, costume
jewelry, and much more!

EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHNS PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company builtone bale at a timethrough
ad work and inregriy over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-lnsralladon Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At _i
753-3067 -

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES



ANV TIME

Window & House

Cleaning

(904) 583-6331





TLEANING#SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed Bonded Insurance
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904-491-1971 *Cell: 904-742-8430
E-mail: justforyouserv�aol.com


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directoryl
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for youl


I CONCRETE FARMERS MARKET LAWN MAINTENANCE ]


NICK ISABELLA, INC
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks. Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE P694 -A


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duste
(904) 261-1940

CONSTRUCTION i




CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages
'16,49500
24 1 iood Fram 5
ConceteBlocka




GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In.
"The local guy" since 198 L
Quit Paying Too Much!
SOperator or door replacements Transmilter replacement
Broken springs Stripped gears
Cables Serice for all makes & models
904-277-2086


Downtown
Saturday
Mornings
at
Centre &
7th
9am-I pm


HOME IMPROVEMENT


right l F1'7 "
Repair Rebuild * Remodel
Specializing In Hardie board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors - Doors
Windows * Custom Decks - Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 -557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003


TOI o I2TOM

WOOWOOORING, INC.
CIITOM CABINETS ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
BOOKCASES TRIM CARPENTRY
HOME REPAIRS REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICE
LICENSED A INIURED
SCOTT UDOLP 90 -557-3100





Iadve r isi | g Ic ! 1I"r


BIG DAWd'S
LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Owned and Operated
by: GregVining
Please call: 703-2433
for Free Estimate


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants & flowers, trees, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation ,tf.
* Sprinkler Installation ESIgal s
* Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354


WELBORN
IRRIGATION
Do It right Ihe first time.
Complete system designs
SRepairs & modifications
SSystem tune ups * 10 years experience
Warranty on new Installs.
Beat any written estimate * Licensed/Insured
Free estimates * 904-277-8231


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The Nevs-Leader
Service Directoryl
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for youl





The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK 156251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


NEW& SEDgCAS i PRESSURE WASHING

PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
DriveWays - etc..
Roofs ,
Wood Decks Cleaned & Resea/ed

tlA FREE ESTIMATES
ScottLawson ChriLowe 261 4353
Sales Consultant Sales Consultant


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 Yulee

(904) 261-6821










Mo.lb tA oimli Or roo L Wti it
* lb:..r. i d.. r'. T i. ur
I PIT M\T 22 -9292



AMELA ISLAND
QUALITY PAINTING, INC.,
"Call the Professionals"

(904) 753-1689
*RESIDENTIAL
*COMMERCIAL
*INTER1OR/EXTERIOR
Pl'lCIALIZED FINISIHS
*PRESSURE WASHING
& WAl'R IPROOFING

l.ICIENSEDI) * ONDED)* INSURlED
*li'1OI'LiSSIONAI. CIAFiI'SMANSIIIP AT
AFFOIRDABL.E PR ICES
SERVINGG NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CAII.TODAY FORYOUR
Fl'M EE ESTIMATE ,
"'Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


MELIA
ROOFING , C.

333-64960
100% FINANCING
UP TO 130 MPH
METAL / SHINGLE CE
FREE EST.
CCC-055600



COASTAL BUILDINGS

SYSTEMS


"ReO-0fimg Is Our Specialty
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
S Serving Satisfied I
. Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing
� Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia

261-2233
Free Estimate
SCCC-osro5
; |7 WE ACCEPT A CS1/SA W-7,s-




Grass Too Taff.>
GIVE SHAWVN A CALL!
BUSH HOGGING SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Insured * Licensed

904-318-3700


_


alf








,fl


r -n-i-r-I I


ut.













FRIDAY, August 28.2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


601 Garage Sales
HUGE MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE -
Sat. 8/29, 9am. 85642 Joann Rd.,
Yulee. Knick-knacks, lamps, recliner,
clothes XL-3X, tables, school stuff,
shoes, etc. Everything must go
(cheap)l
GARAGE/MOVING SALE - Sat. 8/29,
9am. 2159 S. Natures Gate. (2) lawn
vacs, garden tools, ladders, ext. cords,
folding bridge table/chairs, vacuum
cleaner, knick-knacks, & more.


602 Articles for Sale]
FOR SALE.- Maytag washer and dryer
excellent shape, $250. 5 piece dining
room set--2 arm chairs and two regular
chairs, Walnut, w/2 leafs. Call
(904)261-8055


610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's
(904)225-9717.

611 Home Furnishings
COMPLETE MATCHING BAMBOO
ROOM - (2) sofas, red leather chair &
ottoman, (2) end tables, (2) lamps,
cocktail & sofa tables, media console,
(2) large frames & prints, and a sisal
rug. $3,500. (904)491-6832 or (336)
972-4041

1612 Musical Instruments


CORVETTE WHEELS - $200/OBO. Set BLUERIDGE GUITAR BR-180 - with
of 4, 16' 1987 factory wheels. Good case. Like new, $650. Call Hunter
condition. 261-9390 (904)261-2723.


HIGH BAY LIGHTS - Mercury vapor
'400 watt, $25/each or free with
installation. (904)753-6565


603 Miscellaneous
MAYTAG ELECTRIC RANGE - Almost
brand new. Rattan furniture. Call
(904)321-1838
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF


615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupolv.com. ANF

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628


701 Boats & Trailers
10FT BOAT W/ 16FT Trailer - and
6HP Volvo motor. $1400 or make an
offer. Will sell pieces separately.
(904)321-2657

A


802 Mobile Homes
2/1 ON 1 ACRE - in quiet area.
Central air & washer/Dryer. 5 mins
from 2 boat docks. $575/mo, 1 month'
dep. Avail immed. (904) 373 8366

804 Amelia Island Homes
HIGHEST POINT ON THE ISLAND -
4BR/3BA. 2500sf home with extra
family room & screened in porch. 806
Amelia Drive. Call (904)491-4290.
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY - 1795
Arbor Drive, Parkway South
subdivision, ACRealty 904-556-0140
SUMMER BEACH - 2028sf. Short
distance to beach. $415K. ACRealty
261-2770.

805 Beaches
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled
porches, hot tub. $339,900. (904)556-
4500


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED


Saturday * August 29nd * 1 till 4 pm


ON ISLAND

1795 ARBOR DR - 3BR/2BA - 2028 asf.

51115 Parkway - $415,000


81 SEA MARSH RD - 3BR/3BA -3467 asf.

Amelia Island Plantation $975,000



MAINLAND

86061 EVERGREEN PL - 4BR/3BA - 2389 asf.

Hickory Village - $219,900


\ * " -












FRIDAY. August 28.2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader SB


805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT CONDO - 2BR/2BA,
fully furnished, 3rd floor end unit. Best
view in Sand Dollar Villa complex.
$399K. Call (904) 234-8986.
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
OCEANFRONT - LOG cabin R-3
income property. Remodeled. $975K.
ACRealty 261-2770

806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.

808 Off Island
Yulee
NEW 3BR/2BA - 2270 sq. ft., 2-car
garage on 1/2 acre. Granite counter
tops, oak cabinets, tile throughout,
covered lanai, many custom features.
Must see. $295,000. Owner financing
w/down payment. (904)753-'2155
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY - 86061
Evergreen PI., Hickory Village
subdivision, ACRealty 904-583-2721

813 Investment
Property
OCEANVIEW - Home needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. ACRealty 261-
277Q.
Foreclosed Home Auction - 500+
Florida home REDC/Free brochure.
www.Auction.com RE No. CQ1031187.
ANF

817 Other Areas.
LAKEFRONT SALE - 3+ ac waterfront
only $34,000. Dockable! 8/29/09 Save
$10,000. Wooded park-like setting on
one of Alabama's top recreational
lakes. All amenities complete. Boat to
Gulf of Mexico. Exc fin. (866)952-5339.
www.grandviewharbor.com. ANF
Owner Must Sell - 4+ acres $57,300.
Nice oak trees, pvt access to lake. All
utilities in. Ready to build when you
are. Financing avail. (866)352-2249.
www.filandbargains.com. ANF






851 Roommate
Wanted

HOUSEMATES - off island. Private
home. No pets. Responsible,
professional, clean. $400/mo. +
deposit. Utilities included. Call
(904)557-1659.


ROOM FOR RENT - $500/mo. Utilities
included. Quiet neighborhood, beautiful
home. Call (904)583-0037 for details.
3BR/2BA DWMH - Private lot, Middle
Rd Callahan area. $750/mo + $700
dep. Credit check required. No
Smoking. Service-Animals ONLY. 879-
1022
2BR/1BA - $600/mo. + $300 security
deposit.-Call (904)753-1691.
SEVERAL CLEAN PRIVATE homes for
rent - 3/2 DW - Blackrock Rd, $850.
Large 2/3 w/garage - Nassauville,
$860. 2/1 SW - Ch.=st-- Pd., 660..-
z2,r sw-' '.. .,..... i1 ',.-5. w
206-3423M-r7 ' >
3BR/2BA NEW HOME - for rent.
$1400/mo. + $1400 deposit. Gated
community off island. Please call (904)
491-4383 or (904)237-7324.


852 Mobile Homes
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
$450-$625 - 2BR mobile homes. Easy
move-in. Yulee. Call Gregg (904)376-
5190.

853 Mobile Home
Lots

30/50 AMP HOOKUPS - for RVs or
campers. Electric included. $400/mo.
Located Sandpiper Mobile Home Court,
5052 First Coast Hwy. (904)261-6957

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5
minutes from beach. Private bath,
private entrance. $100/wk. + $200
dep. Call 10am-6pm, (904)335-2086
anytime.
FURNISHED ROOM - New bed, TV,
VCR/DVD, cable. Male only. Yulee/
Hedges area. $400/mo. Glenn (904)
548-9707.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT - in a
4BR home on the Island. Pool &
covered lanai area. Renter must like
pets. Renter will share 2nd bathroom.
Prefer non-smoker unless smoking is
done outside the home. All util. incl.
Asking $425/mo. Call 753-3380

855 Apartments
Furnished
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071or 321-4262
At Beach Remodeled - Sm effic.
$145/wk. Incl utils/cable. Also on
island 2BR MH in park $185
weekly/$695 mo + dep. 261-5034
OCEANFRONT 2BR/1BA - Private
beach access. Reasonable. 261-5069


855 Apartments
Furnished

SMALL 1BR APT. - in Nassauville.
Furnished. Twin bed, electricity, A/C,
DirecTV. $650/mo. + $650 deposit.
Cute, cozy, quiet & in good
neighborhood. Service animals only.
References required. Please call
(904)206-3241, & leave message.

856 Apartments
Unfurnished

1ST AVE. DUPLEX - Garage, 2BR/
1.5BA, all appliances, fresh paint, nice
carpet, partially furnished if desired.
$950/mo. (904)277-2301


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
$725/MO. - 3BR/1BA. 402 S. 11th St.
Call 753-0256.
HISTORIC DISTRICT - 1BR w/screen
porch. No smoking. $675 Inc. util. +
dep. (904)277-6763 or 583-0862.


858 Condos 860 Homes-Unfurnished 860 Homes-Unfurnished
Unfurnished HOUSE FOR RENT - South end of 3BR/2BA - 1800 sq.ft. Tile floors,
Island. Large, private backyard, gorgeous fenced yard, all appliances.
NOW LEASING - Cape Sound 3BR/2.5BA. $1500/mo. References 2046 Marlin CT. $1400/mo. + dep.
Townhomes from $1400/mo. required. Call Tammy, 321-2394, (858)354-8221


Darlington Realty, Inc. (904)261-
8030
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated!
Amenities Incl. $875/mo + sec dep,
Call 912-269-3960.


BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N AMELIA LANDING 2BR/2BA -
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D. Updated, very nice. Pool, tennis,
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005 private. $700/mo. Avail Sept. 3rd. Call
(904)557-6501


A 4BR/3BA - $217/mo. HUD home.
3BR only $199/mo. Stop renting. 5%
dn, 15 yrs @ 8% apr. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext. 5669. ANF
JASMINE PLACE - 2BR/1.5BA
townhouse Includes water. $800/mo.
(912) 240-1388 or (912)367-9804
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
hookup. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
BRAND NEW LUXURY APTS
Affordable prices PLUS GREAT MOVE IN
SPECIALS! Spacious firplns. Close to
EVERYTHING! Walk to shopping!
Located just minutes from Fernandina
Beach and 1-95. Waived App Fees when
you mention this ad! Call Courtney
Isles for more info at 866-906-9419 or
visit us I online at
www.courtneyisles.com.
OCEANFRONT 1BR - $675, utilities
included. 2BR, $850 + utilities.
Available Sept. 1st. (847)867-3163
For Rent - 2BR/1.5BA townhouse apt.
Newly rebuilt. CH&A, stove, refrig.,
d/w, carpet. $795/mo. + dep. & ref's.
828 Nottingham Dr. (904)261-3035
2BR/1BA DUPLEX - near American
Beach/Ritz Carlton. CH&A, W/D, stove
& refrigerator, pets ok. $795/mo.
(404)523-6136
2BR/1BA - Near beach. $725/mo. +
$725 dep. Call (904)583-3811.
2BR/1BA - S. Fletcher duplex near
Simmons. W/D, all appliances. $900/
mo. + dep. Call (904)489-1645.
FURNISHED 2BR/1BA - Lower unit
on north end of Island. Close to beach.
Water & sewer Included. $850/mo +
$850 dep. (904)753-2155
57 Condos

Furnished
FURNISHED TOWNHOUSE -
2BR/2.5BA. Pool and beach. Call
(912)921-8976 or (912)414-2556.

AMELIA PLANTATION - Oceanfront
condo, 2BR/2BA. $900/wk. Monthly
rate. Reduced price. Call (708)612-
6106 or (708)692-6106.

3BR/3BA IN SUMMER BEACH -
2100sf, 2-car garage, short distance to
beach. Furnished. $1550/mo. ACRealty
261-2770.


Features cule:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 bedroom townhouse style
3 bedroom garden units * Marsh views
Swimming pool * Dishwasher * Laundry facilities
Washer/dryer connections' * Washer/dryer units available*
Water,'garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675.� per month
*Some features not available in all units

Stf cti^i Dis4. un *. Ask IAbout 0ou SperJA
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you can walk to the shops
"' & resturbtts at 'rhe.Gatewai'S mAmelia GOter!.

(O?, & q! (904) 261-0791
\'\-v'..atcdevelopmnent.com


AMELIA LAKES SUMMER SPECIAL
1 & 2 Bed Luxury Condos In gated,
waterfront community. Resort-style
pool, tennis court, 24/7 fit ctr,
volleyball & more! Condos include
garden tubs, walk-in closets, and lots
of upgrades Call Jessica at (904)415-
6969. Starting at $799/mo!
www.amelialakes.com

2BR/2BA TOWNHOME - 2-car
garage, washer & dryer. Swimming
pool & tennis court. $895/mo. Call
(904) 415-8256.


859 Homes-Furnished
THE COLONY - 4830 Gulfstream Ct.
2BR/2BA, fully furnished including Wifi,
cable, long distance calling. $1400/mo.
Contact phone # (904)838-1969 .
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
HOME - Beautiful backyard on cul-de-
sac close to beach. $3200/mo util. not
incl. (904)310-6360

860 Homes-Unfurnished

HOUSE FOR RENT - in Yulee.
2BR/1BA, CH&A. $600/mo., 1st & last
month up front. Call (904)207-0199 or
(386)538-0279.
426 S. 6TH ST. - 3BR/1BA house for
rent. $850/mo. + $850 dep. Includes
city garbage & sewer fees. Call (904)
261-5827 & leave message.
FSBO - Family home 3BR/2BA. Fenced
backyard, eat-in kitchen, vaulted
ceilings, all appliances included.
$145,000. (904)277-6791


1100 Lime Street * Fernandina Beach, FL 32034

(904) 277-0000

48 Units * 2BR Apartments * Central H&A
Refrigerator * Stove * Carpet * Miniblinds * Playground
$0 - $696
RentalAsslsltance A vai/ab/e
S "THIS INSTITUTION IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVIDER AND EMPLOYER."
S HOURS: 8AM-4PM M-F FRC TTY 1-800-955-8770


It pays to learn!

Ask us about our Back-to-School

FREE RENT SPECIAL
* W/D Connections
- * Large Closets
SPrivate Patios
f * Sparkling Pool
S*Tennis Courts
SExercise Room
os Close to shopping
* 20 minutes to Jacksonville
or Fernandina.

City Apartments with Country Charm!

(904) 845-2922
Eastw o aks 37149 Cody Circle Hilliard, Florida
EastwooC s Mon.-Fri.8:30-5:30
Apartments Sat./Sun. by Appt.


', 1925 S. 14T St., Suite 4
Amelia Island, FL

Sales (904)277-9700

Surfide Proerties, IncDothyTrent Property Management Angel VanZant
Surfide Properties, Inc. to(904)277-007 tor


PROPERTIES FOR SALE


11th St 2 homes under construc- NORTH t4TH STREET 3/2 MOBILE HOME on over 3 R / 2 BA IN SPANISH OAKS. Nice
tion, affordable, on Island 3 bed- 4BR/1.5BA block home on an acre. Comer lot and fenced. neghbohood. 2,174 q. Beautifully
maintained home. Mature shade trees.
room 2 bath with car garage island, needs TLC. S137.500 Great setting. $89,900 MLS Fonida room (31 x 12) $257.900
$149,900. MLS# 50109. MLS# 47266 #48333 MLS #49711

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS.
ON ISLAND
* 536-A N. Fletcher, 2BR/2BA,
2 blocks from beach. $975/month
* 531 S. 8th Street, upstairs apt.
2BR/1BA $600/month Li I


S. 12th St. (2) homes Under con- ON ISLAND custom built
struction, affordable cottage style 3BR+Office/2.5BA, 2,250 sq. ft.
homes, on Island. 2 bedroom, 2 on .62 ac. lot Upgrades galore.
bath with 2 car garage $139,900. $349,900 MLS #48981
MLS#50059 & #50066.


NORTH HAMPTON EUSE ROAD . PERSIMMON CIRCLE
Custom modified 5/4 Beazer 3/2 Yulce home has' a secret Ideal Amelia Island location
home has all the upgrades passage to a hidden rodm for this 2004 sf upgraded
imaglnablel Oversized fenced behind a bookcasel Fenced home In Simmons Cove. Nice
brlk paver patio landscapep yard. Home Warranty. Close to layout, tiled & screened
ing surround spa. US 17 & 1-95. , porch. Home Warranty.
#50235 $499,900 #50165 $185.900 #50296 $289,000


SEA HAWKPLACE
Custom-built 4/3,5 marsh-
front home w/inground pool
overlooking the Intercoatal
Waterway. 3064 sf built In
2006.
#49964 $625,000


ILots & Acreaoe


Off-Island
Amberwood Ln $58,300 Marc Anthony $46,800
Bennelt Ave $225,500/$350,000 Napeague Dr. $165,000
Brady Point Rd. $480,000 Plum Loop $49,900/$66,000
Burmoisler Rd. $37,000 Redbud Lane $199,000
Cayman Circle $69,000/$134,900 Reserve at Deer Run
Edwards Road $59,000 $55,000-$75,000
Gravel Creek $69,900 Roses Bluff $29,900
High Poinle $119,900 Southern Heritage $155,000
Lalitte's Way $89,900 US Highway 17 $350,000
Little Piney Island $300,000 Wesley Rd., 13.61 acres
$899,900


UtrEANVIEW nHUME
Great price on thils light &
bright beach cottage on S.
Fletcher Ave. Steps to the beach
access. Zoned for duplex and
easily expanded.
#50061 $350.000


HIGH POINTE
1,2 .cre wooded lots In
gated subdivision off FLORIDAAVENUE
Barnwell Road. Bring Perl'ct. starter or retirement
your own builder with home In Yulce. Remodeled
no timelimittobutld, kitchen & bath, tile & lami-
. i nate. new HVAC.

. $119,900 #49929 $109,900


OFF ISLAND
* 86356 Calloway Dr 36k IBA
block home $750/month
* 85399 Brooke St., 3BR/2BA mobile home.
Now Available $800/month


d tnelia Island lantatioan

Real Estate Sales



Exclusive eListings

Living at Arneli Island Plantation offers a whole tnew Ifestyle
andi no one kiaoru's this (oniinuiiily belier than uwed o
Ve offer the best electionn of hloites, Iionmesitts and 'illas on Amelia Island.


1 RED MAPLE

. ' 4 BD/3 BA home' features fireplace,
t screened-in porch, living and
.IWe family room, two master suites

and views of the Oak Marsh

golf course. $789,000



View our wide variety of properties and prices at


wwlVl.Vauipfl. comlrealestate


800-597-8108 * 277-5980
- 6800 First Coast Highway Amelia Island FL 32034
", , Prices subject to change without notice.


I I -- I- �


I


0-
















6B FRIDAY, August 28.2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


P A
REAL=MESTATE
**^[STf~


Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroonr Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810


860 Homes-Unfurnished
A Bank Repo - 5BR/3BA $317/mo.
3BR foreclosure $199/mo. 5% dn 15
yrs @ 8% apr. For listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5853. ANF

BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1375/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
HOME - Beautiful backyard on cul-de-
sac close to beach. $2400/mo util. not
included. (904)310-6360
4BR/2BA/2-CAR GARAGE - 76097
Tideview Lane, TimberCreek, 1 mile
west of 1-95 on A1A, $1350/mo.
(904)521-9792.
www.infotube.net/158370.


860 Homes-Unfurnished
ON ISLAND - 3BR/2BA w/large family
room & fenced backyard on south end
of Island. Available 9/1 at $1375 +
utilities, flexible terms. (904)261-
0347
WORTHINGTON DR. - Page Hill.
3BR/2BA. Water conditioner, W/D,
fireplace, & microwave. $1095/mo.
Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-
0006.
CARTESTIAN POINTE - Easy access
to 1-95 & Amelia Island. 3BR/2BA, 2-
car gar., fenced backyard,' covered
patio, tile thru-out, W/D & water
softener included. $1050/mo.
(904)206-2841
ON ISLAND - 223 S. 9th St.
remodeled 2/1 house. $185/wk or
$795/mo + dep. Available now.
(904)261-5034
3BR/3.5BA SUMMER BEACH VILLA
- granite, W/D, water softner, 2 car
garage, fireplace, 2100 sq. ft., lawn
maintenance, & cable included. $1500/
mo. (912)682-8118


4BR/2BA/2-CAR GARAGE - on
island. $1400/mo. 2,000 sq. ft Pets 861 Vacation Rentals
OK. Available 9/1. (904)677-0248 1


NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call.
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177


SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - Furn.
home. 38R/2BA, 2-car gar., gated
comm w/pool, 5 min/beach. Avail Sept-
Nov. 261-6204, 206-0035
CABIN IN THE SMOKY MOUNTAINS
- near Cherokee. Sleeps 8-10. $500/
week. Enjoy North Carolina seasons
changing leaves. (904)261-5195.
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.
VACATION CHALET - In N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416


S 863 Office


'R*jS( 0 AIIIO


AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for 901 Automobiles
more information.


I


FOR SALE - 1998 Mitsubishi Eclipse
(3) OFFICE SPACES - Historic Old Spyder. Top does need to be
Schoolhouse, 914 Atlantic Ave. Utilities reupholstered, otherwise great car.
included. Contact Rhonda at 261-8249. (904)899-2287


SEE THE INSIDE, THEN DECIDE -
Low rent. 1200sf, 200 + loft, 8th &
Gum Sts. 321-1651 or 261-2770
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY
BUILDING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single
office i:o 3500sf. Call Manager,
(770)444-9800.
I 86 Ofi.e I
S863 Office
3 ROOM OFFICE SUITE - utilities
furnished. $625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd.
behind Amelia Insurance. Call George,
(904)557-5644.
NEED HELP? - Amelia Coastal Realty
offers commercial tenant/buyer
representation. CALL US TODAY! Lease
rates starting at $8/psf. www.acrfl.com
or 261-2770.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE -
Downtown & 14th Street. 150sf to
1500sf., Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-
6597

864 Commercial/Retail|
COMMERCIAL SPACE RENTAL -
462487 SR 200, Yulee, in BP Gas
Station. Call (808)753-6433 for details.
NEED HELP? - Amelia Coastal Realty
offers commercial tenant/buyer
representation. CALL US TODAYI Lease
rates starting at $8/psf. www.acrfl.com
or 261-2770.
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A In O'leal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.


RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
CU TISS H ft. 463179 A1A, Yulee. Permits
C available for alcoholic beverages. (904)

LASSERRE 557-500
Real Estate, Inc. CURTISS H.


SLASSERRE
S= Real Estate. Inc.


LONG TERM
*2607 Portside Circle 4BR/3BA
with 2-car garage $1,450/mo. +util.
* 2137 Nature's Gate Ct, 3BR/2BA
$1,500/mo. +util.
*322 S.6th St. 4BR/2BA $ 1,300 + util.
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side),
3-4 BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home.
Lots of parking. Unfurnished $ 1,500
*19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo. + util.
security deposit $1,000. Avail.
August 2009.
* 4BR/2.5BA Very nice 2500 sq.ft.
home at Florence Point $1,450/mo.
+ until.
* 3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island
with beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,850/mo. + Util. Avail Sept. I"
S3BR/2BA Home w/ pool,
Dunewood PI., close to beach and
golf course $1350/mo + util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn,
unit in Amelia Lakes, smoke free,
lots of amenities. $950/mo.
* 514 S. 14th St.- 3BR/I BA $875/mo.
+ until. security deposit $1,000.
*619 S.14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo.
+ util. Security deposit of $1,000.
*2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt.
Great Deck-Oceanview$ 1,000/mo.
+ util.
*3BR/2BA on First Ave. w/one car
garage. Like new with a partial
ocean view $1,150/mo + util.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/IBAOceanview.487 S.Fletcher.Call
for more information

i.o .TW'z ' e --


*850785 US 17Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq. ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & until.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$2400/mo includes CAM + tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent $300/mo. + tax.
* Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
S2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for cRetail. Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2,500/mo + tax + util
*DEER WALK - 1.250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units ranke from $1.750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with oneyear signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent wLsigned Jease.. ,--..
* Five PointVillage 2250 S-8th St. Old West
Marine space. 2.900 HSF. ample parking,'
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $3 100mo includes rent + tax

T 0.g r -a- .rB. ,


EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.

1998 FORD EXPLORER SPORT - V6,
automatic, cold A/C, 160K miles,.
$850. Call (904)557-8707.
1998 MERCEDES SUV320 - Smoke
free. One owner. Very good condition.
106,230 mi. Silver. $7500. 261-9204
Acura Integra - '98 $500. Honda
Civic '01 $550. Nissan Altima '99 $500.
Toyota Corolla '02 $500. Police
Impounds. For listings call (800)366-
9813 ext 9275. ANF
1998 MUSTANG - Good cond., runs
great, stick shift, COLD A/C, new tires
& brakes, recent oil change.
$2,200/OBO. 583-1315 or 556-6084

902 Trucks
FSBO - '91 Dodge PU $2500. "94
Dodge PU $600. '95 Tracker 4x4
$3000. '99 GMC PU $6900. All running.
261-5034.

904 Motorcycles
2006 SUZUKI VINSON 500 - Winch,
ITP tires & wheels, $4000/OBO. 2004
SUZUKI 250 2-STROKE DIRT BIKE -
$2700/080. Call (904)321-6819.
2006 SUZUKI MOTORCYCLE -
650'CC, 900 miles. Lots of extras.
$3495. GM new (still in the box) utility
rack/tool box/cargo management
system. Fits GM Pick-ip truck, extended
cab and 4-door trucks. For less than
1/2 price new, $650. 225-5621 or 583-
3745 or 225-2568.


FOR RENT
*1414 lan, 2/1,singlewide $575
* 553 Pine Road, 3/2,FP,$925
S 111-A S. 4th St. - 2/1, $750
*205 S.9th St.,3/1,close to downtown $750
* 96757 Blackrock Rd.
3/2 DW on 1 Ac. $850
* 723 S. 9th St., 1/1, $475
Sandy-Mick
Palm III, Property Management
321-0457








club
Apartments
BestAddressinFernrandinaBeach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
SPool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Reta ls
(904)277-2500,


Nasa Cony' aretSeetino


jialphin


Over 24 Years AS AmelIa sld'1 Proerty M t C
Over 24 Years As Amelia island's #1 Property Management Company


Visit us at www.galphinre.com

(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax

1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 i Amelia Island, FL 32034


42 i' t.db-lrn - 22Sq 8 li - Bik 4 5 IH52 (Yrcan ilagc - 2BR-. fA home 8 (15' Rt~er.hurg - 15gi'l | Ifi 5BDR2L.
Itx.oJintn'mnmmrrr .ijti lilt. highiii st id,1 AilhsrcnJli.uaLd hiio rub ii:uaJ in Njlh Ill.n.pinn aI. m~ljt hIlrd
and large bonus room. Screened lanai. 2 car :crlIoildng i .'.mj La n car & ,' inleirtI. in luJedlit ll' .11, one inhl.a
garage and community pool. Lawn care and \enle trslp. ! Jlad i.le fl.rn fe IP't .li IM1 ni.',nllieae isc . it'~L !i ed c Or I'slamin
W/D. Pels allowed, On Island. $1,750/o a Ullmed. On Island. $1,650/mo $1,300/mo
N-'.. uAu CoL nn''s Premier Propcernt AInriageme'nt Specalists


2'4 I ie.ii. F '- in-2842 ii "q'011 rit h'.\ hume l[,,.jictJ in (.Xrjn
.iilll un-jlli .ilittn, T10, bcjh il:rc-tned lul lith p:,l on rgans
Creek. Vbdfloors andt ile in kitchen and bath. Lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,950hno

95155 Bennuda- 3038 sq. ft. 5BR4 A golfand lake front home
locaiid %i talij KiL ti.al .1MaILu 4, widi bonuil mia lL ro:, in
e.u yrige. tuc .x . Jt ,,d m.:ris Inlits.di'.net OFF lfl.snd
.';2,i',li.m

95425 lrm-ull n .il "i II 4BR,3BA home located inAmelia
National. Sun room and screened patio. upgraded kitchen overlooks
huge family room. Single story with 3 car garage. Social amenities
and lawn care included. Pets allowed. Off Island. $1995/mo
r i.illjL.. V, -"-i-.,1 . iB f RB\ tW,,t.Jin at-in -illagc
if rr.lI . .l ,' in in .h ,l I N.1 rii ni hI . ll n . I.i h l Ii t.l is. .isjnJ l
Sumnk. L'(.I.J-I I- t1ils.l i & hll .I.h.iL-hlh -i.r ` IIIl ICl IJ1nni urlt i r .S
allowed. On island. $1,950/mo
' I I .' J .Jp.yr, - Ij:ln1 if 21Il ? 4ik,-teAnf.,:.nt mondo wdll
d'i:(k h r I.,kinin .x-in FuirnhihJii Iu nlfurr'hcdl I tliui.
indudJid N,'o b I ,I n .ilnI fI,1I. me

95208 1bodbery - 2258 sq. ft. 4BR/3,5BA located in Summer
Beach. Tile throughout and large bonus room. Screened lanai. 2 car
garage and community pool. lawn care and W/D, Pets allowed. On
Island, $1,750/mo
1832 Ocean Village - 1944 sq. ft. 2B1V2.5BA home located In Ocean
Village (Summer Beach). Srteened lanai and hot tub overlookiog
pond. Sitting area in master bedroom. lawn care & WD.
Membership available for small fee. Pets allowed. On Island.
.51 A 11. ni

18 N. 18th Street - 2072 sq. ft. 3BH/2BA home with study.'llle floors,
'..nl's sit, l .i|plhrI .L' g,'I it ,in ' .I Ii n I',, I'. rti.nrs n il, nl .ani
I'lik lki.ithil .'_..r t.'.,qt Lt.iiin ...i r I'l is il.i*,,s l hi n1.J.mnl
$1,550/mo

96153 Ridgewood - 2373 sq, ft. 4BR/3BA home lotated in Loflon
Point. Screened patio and wraparound deck. Master down and
)onus/BR up with full bath. Fenced backyard. Pets allowed, lawn
care. Offisland. $1,'i75/n/o ,

330 S. 7th - 3R1V2BA located in Old Town. Built in 1929 and
completely renovated. Master suite upstairs, upgraded kitchen.
Within walking distance of Centre Street. Pets allowed, On Island.
$1,450/mo


989 Ocean Overlook- 2260 sq. ft, 4BIR2BA home located in
Ocean Sound backing up to pond. Short walk tobeach. Tile loors
throughout maii living areas. Screened lanail lawn care, Pets
allowed, On Island, $1,4A(0hio
918 Whiie- 1040 sq. ft. 2BI3BA located In Old Ibwn with loft.
liHnin,.iJ ir.Aro, granite counicnrip',, inmmcrtial kidchen o'Ap
.uv fud pdiinh il bb.-sullft td.s iani ris ciAhinel '1.1) On
bljnJ 1,1i.,ime

96113 Ridgewood - 2332 sq. ft. 4B/3BA home located in lafton
Pointe. Boons room with full bath up. fenced backyard and
covered patio. Large master suite down. Pels allowed. Off Island.
$1,395/mo
;.'ii:~' lm .scihuig- 1l'e iq f bR2h h\,,iM.ii.j lin N.-,,ill
. i] ltni',hM l.1i1 lj1-i 1itmh l n Iil1udal i|ill ,111| n 1t ,i0 n.11d
l-ast. sh 2mI. mIiili lj. mr P .cill.wcI tl sm, $ I, il n .no
2'..20 I lor.aiPrke- 161. sq It IlR21A\ lioc.i .in I .n IH. , uke
Co,:cred pIjli elldls present .uta in bick D and L;.in care Pek-
allontd OllIsl.nd $1l,.'i.i.mo

96679 Arrigo 1600 sq. ft. 3B1/2HA home located In Beechway.
Split floor plan with covered lanai. Pets allowed, Off Island.
$1,000/mo
117 N 2i'll - I .�i .q' 1 I iR I inBA ,Iink-e ..iined oti.llA lii
d, IO| dIJr.niI,,an F irn.jndTirUA Beah anil rl All Ill,. lio.:.rs.
upgradcil Uidichn avlh s ni-r inuuniL.i i' .. ,Ihd eul in.ksicel
jllppli.ih. i. Iti. ill.-,1 Ot iI I.alut. il nlliii mi.
"?.!l N I I:]ls:h r- Jt,',l'. - h li ill(] '.\ [Uti ilh], ]i ipsilair ou ndi*.
Cki n , car, wnrlli snmui n 11dl m:,nih Ire allth 12 mrinih
renewal. Pets allowed. Water included. On Island. $1,100/mo
F8sl rii '.i I I. - 'liii'0 1 II i (? lA.ill all l:k l.li].nc 5illirgt.'n
(ie .ii ,n.is 'Lrt nrld p.vn I ur,, Ir. nI .ndirs n r..,iii 1n |.1 Ik I L'
ill.," d lliklnd iv'siknl.

54'37 .eonard - 1332 s(l. ft. 2BR/2BA iomrt loclted In American
Beach. Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Ovesilzed yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $8010/mo
314 S. 14th-836 sq. ft. 2BR/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in
back yard and deck. Pets allowed. On Island, i$80/mo

939 N. Fletcher (Ulpslais) - 3BR/I1BA with great ocean views and
just steps from dhe beacl. Pets allmred. On Island. $650/imo

939 N. Fletcher (Downstairs) - 2Bli BA uss steps from the beach.
Pets allowed. On Island. $650/mo


Rentals Rentals... . -tal..... .


*95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home
with covered patio and well maintained lawn. Home
has separate dining and fireplace in living room.
$1595
*4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) -
3BR/2BA Located in prestigious gated-community
where amenities include a community swimming
pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and
Golf Club of Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home
Walking distance to the ocean, hard wood floors,
fenced rear yard and garage. $1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home
located in Ocean Sound subdivision. Fireplace in
Family room, screened in back patio and 2 Car
garage. $'1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is
charming country living at its best. Located in
Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land with
beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm
evenings in the florida room or cozy up by the fire-
place on the cold winter nights. Either way this one
is a charmer. $1500
* 2379 Captain Kidd Dr. (Pirates Bay) -
3BR/2BA, new carpet, rear patio, 2-car garage, cor-
ner lot. Locatd near beach, shopping & schools
$1250

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home
on the #2 'Green in the North Hampton Golf
Community with club house/aquatic center, basket-
ball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with
canoe/kayak lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer,
Cable television, High Speed Internet, Monitored
Security System included. $1400.


CONUU/TOWNHOUME/APAKRTME.NTS
S2012-A West Natures Lane - 3BR/2.5BA, 2 car
garage, family room w/fireplace, close to schools &
shopping $1100
.*2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community fea-
tures include swimming pool, tennis court, and
park. $850
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo
with community pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4770 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with
fireplace: Great south end location. Large 2 car
garage. This unit is ,in eiel1 condition.
Community Pool all ,t ' Wt minutes from
the ocean, gok lUns nU J31iN minutes from
Jacksonville idJR h'eis'rely :drive on A1A
through S tat rks along the ocean and intra-
coastal waterway. $925
* 95048 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beau-
tiful town home located in a gated community off
A1A off of the Intercoastal waterway. Rent
includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service.
$2,475
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean
views upstairs. $1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2
BR/1 BA w/bonius room, fenced front and rear yard.
$1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fire-
place in family room. Home is only one block from
the ocean. $850
S2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/ heatedd only 2
blocks from the.,,'Tlih3 new carpet!
Community tt c .d f ming pool,
tennis court Hft joIn and Bar-B-Q area.
$750


SalesSales Sales _Sales__Sales


$699,000 - Sandpiper Loop - MLS#49621
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphin - 277-6597

I I 'l I l:11l:.l! : 1 it




$725,000 - Fernandlna Cay - MLS# 43544
3BR/3BA - Greal Ocean View
Nip Galphin - 277-6597






375,000 - MLS#49508
2600 S.F. - across from the Bells River
Call me or your agent qulcklyl
Brad Goble - 904-261-6166


$340,000 - Reserve Court - MLS#95069
4BR/2BA In Reserve at Old Bluff
NIn Galnhin - 277-6597


$595,000 - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lol - MLSI 45255
Buy now, Build later, use of exislng home
Brad Goble -261-6166


,IM -.,T -VT11u

$510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365
4BR/3BA - 2578s1- In Seasilde Subdivision
Nip Galphln - 277-6597


$425,000 - S. Fletcner LOt *- 50'U '
Ready to build - Plans Available 2700 s.f.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$199,500 - Timber Creek PLantation - MLSI50131
2,307 sq.f. BrlcdISlucD, SS Appllances,
Brad Goble - 261-6166







$150,000 - Cartesian Pointe - MLS#50160
1,928 sq.f. Best price In neighborhood.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
*1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphln - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


REA ESTIAT

RENTALSj~


113 4.11E El infl.Y L


VX n T4MR - ON E IIAND


i












FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


LOOKING BACK


50 YEARS AGO

Local scuba divers sal-
vaged a boat and motor
worth $1,800 at Kingsley
Lake near Starke.
August 27, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

Nassau County's emer-
gency medical services pro-
gram faced serious prob-


S


lems, including ina
training and equipi
Medical Director D
Ullah reported.
Augus
10 YEARS

Developers and
missioners discuss
posed 180-day build
moratorium on all
mentally sensitive 1
Augus


OM b soa


W7w


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Prov




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* *
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* *
* *


*


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511Ash Street,
Femandiria Beach. FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax 261-3698
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it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
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NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
TT Community
CNI nc.p..
norpNew.pap
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday,,5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m:
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


Boatwak

adequate ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Boat
nent, wakes - those long, frothy, V-
)r. Farid shaped waves trailing from
the stern of a powerboat as it
;t 24, 1984 slices through the water -
have a sinister side. When
AGO other vessels encounter
them, they can hurt people.
city com- They can make people angry
ed a pro- and they can bring the wrath
ding of law enforcement, for good
environ- reason.
lands. Boat Owners Association
st 25, 1999 of The United States
(BoatU.S.) recently looked
into the issue of boat wakes
by combing through the
insurance claims case files,
Where swampings, broken
teeth and back injuries are
3 found.
"You avoid being the
recipient of gestures from
other skippers by using a lit-
Stle common sense and cour-
tesy," says BoatU.S. Director
9 of Damage Avoidance Bob
Adriance. "This means com-
ing completely off plane
when you enter a no wake
zone or anywhere your wake
could compromise the safety
of other boats," he adds.
Here are some tips to help
Prevent boat wake injuries to
you and other boaters:
T Slow early: Boat wakes


es cause anger, injury


travel
dis-
2 tances,
S so slow


- - you
'='--- reach a
slow-speed zone, not as you
pass the marker.
Just a little slowing down
isn't good enough: Upon
entering a no wake zone,
some boaters react by only
slowing the vessel slightly,
and then plow through with
the bow way up and stern
dug down, actually increas-
ing the wake. Come com-
pletely off plane.
* Make her.level: Without
using trim tabs, a slowed ves-
sel should be level in the
water. With smaller boats,
shifting passengers around
can help, as too much weight
aft increases wake size.
* Watch the shallows:
Shallow water increases
wake size. i .,.
* Small boats aren't inno-
cent: Wakes are not just a big
boat issue - small vessels in
the stern-down position can
throw surprisingly large
wakes.
* When approaching a


wake, slow down but don't
stop: Motorboats are more
stable when under way, so
stopping could make things
worse. Avoid taking a wake.
on the beam or head on. The
best approach is at a slight
angle. This will keep your
passengers in.your boat.
* Take care of older crew:
The BoatU.S. insurance
claims files show that per-
sons over the age of 50 have
the most personal injuries,
mostly as a result of being
seated near the bow when
the boat slams into a wake.
It's best to seat passengers -
especially older passengers -
amidships.
* Warn the crew: A sim-
ple "Hold-on. Boat wake"
should do the trick, just as
long as you shout the warn-
ing well before the wake
arrives.
BoatU.S. - Boat Owners
Association of The United
States - is the nation's leading
advocate for recreational
boaters providing its 600,000
members with government
representation, programs and
money saving services. For
membership information visit
www.BoatUS.com or call 800-
395-2628.


WEEKLY UPDATE


AA meetings
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings for peo-
ple who have, or think they may have, a drink-
ing problem are held Mondays at noon and
Saturday at 10 a.m. at St Peter's Episcopal
Church, corner of Eighth Street and Atlantic
Avenue. All meetings are held in classroom
204 behind the church, park in the rear.
Rivermeeting


The St. Marys River Management
riders Committee will meet Aug. 31 at 7 p.m. in the
i r County Building, 45401 Mickler St, Callahan.
Booksigning
Local resident Jane Turney has written a
children's story, The Secret of Yellow Creek
Valley, a tale of adventure, fantasy, history and
nature set in the late 1800s. Turney is a for-
mer resident of the area where the story
takes place. Color photos of the valley and
creek, as well as original drawings, are includ-
ed in the book. There will be a book signing
at Books Plus on Centre Street Sept 4.
Libraries closed


The Nassau County Public Library Systiem.
I -vill' e clbsedSeptb 7 in observance of Labor ..
Day. Book drops will remain open..
Survivalcelebration
On Sept. 8 First Coast Oncology - Nassau
will host its inaugural Celebration Of Survival
event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the office at 1340
South 18th St. in Medical Building A, Suite
103.
This program provides the opportunity to
celebrate cancer patients who were treated at
First Coast Oncology - Nassau and who have
become cancer survivors. In addition, there
will be an educational component that will
delve into what life is like after cancer. The
event is free and light refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by First Coast
Cancer Foundation. For more information, or
to RSVP, please call (904) 387-5312.
Just Friends cruise
Just Friends (boomers and beyond who
are single) member are invited to join the
fundraiser cruise to St. Marys, Ga. on Sept. 13
to benefit the new Meals on Wheels for Pets
program. The club will meet one hour before
cruise time. Price is $25 per person, payable
to Nassau Humane Society. Send checks to
Helene Scott, 1631 Blue Heron Lane,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 by today.
Bicycles permitted by reservation. Call 321-
1116. Donations are tax deductible.
PlantCdinic
On Sept. 14 from 10 a.m.-2 p.n. Becky
Jordi, Nassau County Horticulture Extension
agent, will conduct a Plant Clinic at the Yulee
Extension Office (A1A and Pages Dairy
Road).
All county residents are invited to bring
plant samples showing problems in their land-
scapes. Problems will be identified and solu-
tions offered for correction. There is no fee
for this service. For information call 548-1116.


Stroke screenings
St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic
Ave., will host Life Line Screening on Sept 14.
Appointments will begin at 9 a.m.
Screenings identify potential cardiovascu-
lar conditions such as blocked arteries and
irregular heart rhythm, abdominal aortic
aneurysms, and hardening of the arteries in
the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart
disease. A bone density screening to assess
osteoporosis risk is also offered.
Packages start at $139. All five screenings
take 60-90 minutes to complete. For more
information call 1-877-237-1287 or visit
www.lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is
required.
Studycicles
Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation Study
Circles will be held from Oct. 1-Nov. 14 at St
Peter's Episcopal Church. A diverse group of
people, lead by impartial facilitators, will meet
each week to discuss issues of importance to
all. This is open to anyone and free of charge.
For more information contact Sharon Stanley
..at 583-67,2 or, il sh 0

The family of Allison Taylor Schmidt, born
prematurely on July 31 at Wolfson Children's
Hospital in Jacksonville with Hypo Plastic Left
Heart; Syndrome, is accepting donations from
the community for her heart surgeries and
care. She currently is at Shands Children's
Hospital in Gainesville and underwent her
first of three scheduled open-heart surgeries
on Aug. 12.
Donations may be made by visiting any
Bank of America location and donating to the'
Allison Taylor Schmidt Family Assistance
Fund. Visit http://allisontaylor.multiply.com
for more information.
Shriners Hospitals
Shriners Hospitals for Children is a
one-of-a-kind international health care system
dedicated to improving the lives of children
by providing specialty pediatric care, innova-
tive research and outstanding teaching pro-
grams.
Children up to the age of 18 with
orthopaedic conditions, burns, spinal cord
injuries and cleft lip and palate are eligible for
admission and receive all care in a family-cen-
tered environment at no financial obligation to
patients or families.
If you know of a child who may be helped
by Shriners hospitals care, call 1-800-237-5055..
For more information, visit http://shriner-
shq.org/Hospitals.
Food drive
Florida Public Utilities and its employees
are holding a food drive for those in need in
the community. Food can be donated Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at FPU's
office at 911 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach,
the Nassau County Amelia Island Board.of
Realtors, and the Fernandina Beach police
and fire departments, in addition to several
rotating locations throughout the island. Call. .
261-3663 for details.
* : 4 . ;.��t '!


VOLUNTEERS,


Hospice help
Community Hospice of Northeast Florida
needs volunteers to help at Nassau County
residences, long-term care or assisted living
facilities, Community Hospice's inpatient care
centers or Community Hospice's Yulee office
at 96084 Victoria's Place. Schedules are flexi-
ble and there are a variety of volunteer oppor-
tunities. Call (904) 407-7064.
Truck needed
Micah's Place needs a box truck to pick
up donated furniture and other items to be
used by survivors of domestic violence or at
its resale center.
SAs a 501(c) (3) organization, the donation
of a truck is tax deductible. Please call 491-
6364, ext. 102.


?* I '-- J ,~.


RAINTrain
Rescuing Animals in Nassau has launched
the RAIN Train to transport pets from shel-
ters in Nassau County to shelters in higher-
population centers where they stand a better
chance of adoption. Anyone planning a trip to
the west coast of Florida (Tampa/Lakeland)
or the Ft. Lauderdale area can help by trans-
porting an animal or two when they go.
RAIN supplies everything needed (crate,
paperwork, directions, etc.). Drivers go to
the shelter before heading to their final desti-
nation; shelter staff will meet them and
unload the animal.
E-mail Susan Davis Perry at susandavis-
perry@yahoo.com or call 557-6501 for infor-
mation and so she can contact the receiving
shelter ahead of time.

SJT.


OBITUARIES

Rev. Lathern Jones
Rev. Lathern Jones, 83,
entered into eternal rest August
20, 2009.
He leaves to cherish his
memories: a loving & devoted
wife of 61 years, Sis. Alice C.
:Jones; children, Charity (Aaron)
SDurham, Jessie M. Moore,
..Linda M. Wiley, Darryl
B"Hardtime"
Jones, Darryl
E Jones; a spe-
cial grandson,
Barnard Jones;
siblings, Elder
Alfonso
(Marie) Jones,
Edwin "Buddy" Dempsey, Louis
(Angelia) Williams, Missouri
Williams, ten other sisters and
brothers, additional relatives
and friends.
Funeral service will be held
Saturday, August 29, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. at Greater
Mt Pleasant Baptist Church,
45031 Historical Lane, Callahan,
FL 32011, Rev. Jerald Thomas,
officiating. The Wake Service
will be held at Greater Mt.
Pleasant Baptist Church today
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
Interment in Callahan
Community Cemetery by the
Northside Chapel of Marion
Graham, 1504 Gandy Street,
Jacksonville, FL 32208.
Marion Graham
Jacksonville

June Stewart
Mrs. June Stewart, age 93, of
Fernandina Beach, passed away
on Friday morning, August 21,
2009 at Baptist Medical Center-
Nassau.
Born in Rushville, Indiana,
she was the daughter of the late
James Ernest Staida and Rubie
Edith Pike.
Mrs. Stewart was a 1939
graduate of the Christ Hospital
School of Nursing in Cincinnati,
OH. After graduation, she prac-
ticed at Christ Hospital in
Cincinnati, as an Operating
Room Charge Nurse in
Charleston, WV and after mov-
ing to Fernandina, she worked
with Dr. Panos. After moving
to Fernandina, with her hus-
band's job at Container, in 1954
she not only worked with Dr.
Panos but also at the Nassau
County School Board.
---In the-mid-1~ 60s-she-joined
the First Baptist Church of
Fernandina where--she- was
active in her Sunday School
class. Mrs. Stewart was a 50
years member of the Order of
the Eastern Star where she was
Past Worthy Matron. After
retirement she enjoyed tending
her plants and daily visiting
friends that were shut ins.
Mrs. Stewart is preceded in
death by her husband, Philip
C. Stewart, who passed away
in December of 1994.
She leaves behind, their son,
Stanley Stewart and his wife
Chris, Fernandina Beach, FL, a
grandson, Philip N. Stewart,
Munich, Germany, 2 great-
granddaughters, Madeleine and
Lucienne Stewart and two
nieces and four nephews.
Funeral services were at
11:00 am on Wednesday, from
the graveside in Bosque Bello
Cemetery with Reverend Jeff
Overton, officiating.
Mrs. Stewartwas laid to rest
beside her husband.
Guests and friends were
invited to visit on Tuesday from
5:00-7:00 pm at the funeral
home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Women's Missionary Union
at First Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach.
Please share her life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
SOxley-HeardFuneralDirectors

t:DEATH NOTICE
�, Mr. Waymon Simmons,
',age 70, of Yulee, died on
Wedinesday morning, Aug. 26,
S2009 at St. Vincent's Medical
Center in Jacksonville.
Arrangements will be
announced.
aOxley-HeardFuneralDirectors



, FOR THE RECORD

~d'There are no plans to close
* Atlantic Self Storage, 464017 E
State Road 200, Yulee, to make


way for a new facility, contrary
to a story on page 3A
Wednesday.
The News-Leader strives for
accuracy. We will promptly cor-
rect all factual 'errors. Please
notify the editor of errors at
mparnell@fbnewsleadercom or
call (904) 261-3696.


Vcf euteavt iunelat Yifuec worw..


Serving All of Nassau County foi- almost Eighty Years
Visit Our Life Stories At wuw.OxleyHeard.com


. amabas
CENTER, INC
A private, non-profit agency Ihat assists
Nassau County families who ieed food,
shelter and basic necessities.
For information, call: 904.261.7000
mrrr~ann~onwomemmmmanum


I


- 4 D


r


r
r


NEWS
LEADER


i'.





FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS'

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OL.EI:ST \'' :KI V NI \\ SPAII l
ESTABLISH' lED IN 1854-

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BoB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
ANGELINE MUDD.
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
SIAN PERRY. ASSISTANT EDITOR
BETH JONES. SPORTS EDITOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN N


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


Community
N I newspapers,
Incorporated
The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
anddo notnecessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees


COMMUNITY THANKS


Thanks tobusinesses not city
I would like to respond to one point in the
letter Aug 26. questioning the funding source
for what he called "First Friday music down-
town." I believe he is referring to Sounds On
Centre, the free street concert held on the
first Friday of months March through October
(except Shrimp Festival weekend). He seems
to believe that city funds are involved in the
presentation of this event.
I would like to let him and all the residents
and visitors who enjoy the music know that
this is sponsored by the Historic Fernandina
Business Association, and supported by the
Convention and Visitors Bureau and many
generous corporate sponsors, as well as bev-
erage, T-shirt and raffle ticket sales. The
HFBA pays for all city permits and police per-
sonnel, and staffs the event with many dedi-
cated volunteers.
There are two more concerts in the 2009
series. The band Touch of Gray will perform
Friday, Sept 4 (Labor Day weekend) and our
'final event will showcase Les DeMerle and his
6-piece Jazz All-Star Band featuring Bonnie
Eisele, as well as the 7-piece TGIF Dixieland
Jazz Band, for a New Orleans Style street cel-
ebration. Please mark your calendars and join
Sus for the music, and the;~j~gigoB
and dining in our treasuriistBfic.
business establishments, -
Loren Lum, Chairman
Sounds on Centre
Fernandina Beach

Woofstock
The Nassau Humane Society's "Woofstock
at the Dog Park" Aug. 15 was a far-out party
and an awesome success! Special thanks go to
musicians Alan Huppmann, Ray Hetchka and
Frank Basile for donation of their time and tal-
ent
Additional thanks go to Wadsworth's Fine
Menswear, Wal-Mart Supercenter, Harris
Teeter, Amelia Liquors, Costco, The Ritz-
Carlton, Amelia Island, the city of Fernandina
Beach, the Sign Shoppe, McGill Aviation,
Outback Services, Blue Moon Silkscreen,
Nassau Liquors and Patrick Higgins for their
many contributions.
To all the volunteers who worked the event,
and to all of our friends in the community
who attended, an enormous thank you from all
of us at Nassau Humane Society and the home-
less animals in our care.
Dane Carmichael
Nassau Humane Society

Back-to-school giveaway
Minister Coverdell and the Coalition for the
Reduction/ Elimination of Ethnic Disparities
in Health (CREED) thank all of you who
helped to spread the word and volunteered to
assist with the back to school supply give-
away, physical and vision screenings, which
were held on Saturday, Aug. 22 at the Martin
Luther King Center.
A special thanks to our physicians, nurses
and Wal-Mart Vision Center who volunteered
their time and energy to make available
screenings to the young people of Nassau
County. We were able to provide 102 screen-
ings, which doesn't include the adults who
received vision and B/P screenings.
We also give kudos to Trinity United
Methodist Church, Baptist Medical Center
Nassau along with Yulee Wal-Mart
Supercenter for providing equipment and
school supplies.
We are already in the process of planning
for next year's event and would like to ask
for more assistance from our local business
and medical community. With additional help
we will be able to offer service to more chil-
dren.
Jennett Wilson Baker
CEO, CREED


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words. Letters
must include writer's name (printed and sig-
nature), address and telephone number for
verification. Writers are normally limited to
one letter in a 30-day period. No political
endorsements or poems will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed. Not all let-
ters are published. Send letters to: Ietters to
the Editor, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach,
FL., 32035. E-mail: mparellne wsleader.
com. visit us on-line at fbnewsleadercom


VIEWPOINT/MIKE BOYLE/AMELA ISLAND CONVENTION & VisrroRS BUREAU



Positive news for local tourism


T here is no use denying the facts:
Amelia Island's tourism industry -
like the rest of Florida and the United
States - is feeling the adverse effects
of a struggling global economy. Yet despite the
downturn, Amelia Island has enjoyed recent
trend-defying growth and improvement of our
local tourism product, which is a very positive
development, and a sign of our local industry's
health and resilience.
In previous columns regarding the tourism
industry and our local Tourist Development
Council, I have tried to highlight the critical
role tourism plays in our Nassau County econo-
my. One in five jobs and one in four businesses
are tourism related, and tourism generates
more than $346 million in total sales, and 36
percent of the sales tax in the county.
But there is another side to the local
tourism picture that may escape your attention,
and that is the construction piece, the actual
"bricks and mortar" of our businesses. At a
time when new construction and renovations
have been extremely hard-hit, a lot has been
happening right here on our own island.
On Aug. 20, the new Marriott Residence Inn
Amelia Island opened its doors on Sadler Road,
becoming the island's newest hotel. Ideal for
leisure and corporate customers, the 133-suite
hotel in Fernandina Beach can accommodate
small and large meetings. Fernandina's his-
toric harborfront Hampton Inn & Suites is
beginning an extensive renovation of guest
rooms, meeting space and common areas. On
the other end of the island, the multimillion
dollar ballroom addition at The Riti-Carlton,
Amelia Island is nearly finished. When com-
pleted this fall, the project will add 12,000
square feet of new meeting spacet.o the luxury


I property, making it one of
the largest conference
hotels in the region.
, r -_: It's important to under-
stand that these new proj-
., ' ects will not only help
attract future tourism dol-
lars to our community, but
their construction gave an
immediate shot in the arm
Boyle to our lagging construction
industry. In addition to cre-
ating badly needed jobs;
the new constriction, renovations and expan-
sions represent a combined $45 million in
spending which circulated several times
through the local economy in a time of need.
Helping to weather the current storm, the
Amelia Island Convention & Visitors Bureau
(CVB), in conjunction with our tourism part-
ners, is working harder than ever to promote
Amelia Island as the attractive, affordable desti-
nation so many leisure and business travelers
have come to love. The CVB's aggressive mar-
keting efforts play a critical role in maintaining
the island's position in an increasingly competi-
tive marketplace, and seeing to it that our own
community emerges from this downturn as
quickly as possible.
In recent months, the CVB has been attract-
ing attention and generating exposure for
Amelia Island through new vacation package
offers, consumer promotions, advertising
placements, social media efforts and feature
articles. A new "Seaside Salute" discount has
just been announced through print and online
media channels, with 13 of the island's resorts,
hotels and inns offering huge discounts for
*active duty, reserve and retired military.


Other consumer promotions have proven
successful this year, including the "Pack Your
Bags" promotion, which gives visitors a credit
to offset checked baggage fees being charged
by the airlines, and the "Free Night, Any
Night" which provides visitors a free night
after booking a qualifying stay. Additionally,
more than 50 area merchants are now offering
discounts through the Amelia Island Value
Card, which has been distributed to more than
10,000 overnight visitors. All of these programs
are designed to generate additional tourist rev-
enue for our destination, and are funded by
"tourist dollars," not local "tax dollars."
On another positive note, the state of
Florida has seen an increase in travel from its
domestic feeder markets of Atlanta, Nashville,
Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham and in Florida
itself, all of which are key to our destination. In
addition, the U.S. Travel Association has pre-
dicted a modest recovery in travel in 2010.
And let's not forget the enduring popularity
of our product. When it comes to finding recov-
ery projects that are "shovel-ready," our beauti-
ful island is ideal for the investment of tourism
dollars. Amelia Island has been voted one of
the Top 10 North American Island's in Conde
Nast.Traveler's "Reader's Choice.Awards" for
two consecutive years.
These will no doubt be remembered as
some of the most challenging times in Florida
tourism. But we believe these positive develop-
ments, along with outstanding industry sup-
port and the tireless efforts of the CVB, its
staff and marketing partners, will help Amelia
Island emerge stronger than ever in the global
travel marketplace.
Mike Boyle is chairman, Amelia Island
Convention & Visitors Bureau.


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Offensive mailer
Recently Republican voters in
Nassau County who reside, bn
Amelia Island have been receiving
political mail from an organization
called "Conservative Voters
Coalition." The mailer was an over-
sized jumbo card that was aimed at
encouraging Nassau Republican to
complete a form that would trigger
a request for an absentee ballot. The
absentee ballot request cards in this
mail piece are directed to a post
office box in Jacksonville as opposed
to being sent to the Supervisor of
Elections Office here in Nassau
County. At the last Republican
Executive Committee meeting last
week several members brought
these mail pieces and raised con-
cerns about this organization.
According to a news article in
the Orlando Sentinel, a 527 group
was created by a Tallahassee lawyer
a ed Ramba. The group is-
d o ida State Un~veritynr
adunc pfesor named' Erih
Dicesare. It is clear that the tone
and statements made in this mail
piece are designed to create a neg-
ative view of various organizations
and individuals shown in the pic-
ture. The mail piece is controver-
sial and is inappropriate in many
ways in that it seeks to create inflam-
mation that is centered on race
issues.,
The Republican Party of Florida
and the local party has worked hard
to reach out to minorities and the
youth to help build a stronger base
for conservative principles. In no
way does this mail piece reflect the
values 'and principles of the local
Republican Party nor the Republican
Party of Florida. I object to the neg-
ative tone and the misperception
that was created by this mail.
As your Republican State
Committeeman I have asked the
RPOF Chairman Jim Greer to work
with us to surface the people respon-
sible for this offensive mail. While
the people who have prepared the
mail have a legal right of free
speech, we also have a right to
object to its approach. It is clear this
type of election communication is
offensive to many and is not helpful
to voters. The constant drumbeat
of negative messages all around us,
from the economy to taxes, the
deficit and unemployment, are the
real issues that concern all voters
and should be the topics that cam-
paigns focus on.
The Republican Party does not
control nor does it approve what
campaigns or their 527 operations
say and do in promoting a candi-
date or position for and against. The
tone of politics often drifts away from
the issues that matter most to the cit-
izens and starts to become entan-
gled in the politics of personalities.
Through our recent Drive the
Discussion 2010 forums we have
worked hard to ensure that the GOP
is listening and responding to peo-
ple.
Voters in Nassau County are
encouraged to seek their absentee
ballot from the Supervisor of
Elections Office or to participate in
early voting as a way to ensure that
their voice is heard in the Senate
District 8 campaign. The voters in
Nassau County are intelligent citi-
zens who will look at the facts and
weigh the positions of the people
working to become their next sen-
ator and will make a choice that
reflects what is best.
Please make plans to cast your
ballot on Sept. 15 in the Republican
primary for state senate. Your local
Republican Party encourages you
to review the candidates and select
the person that will best represent


"* *





Copyrighted Material


Syndicated l ontews Providers

Available from Commercial News Providers


.A


your views. R'nmtt


Douglas D. Adkins
State Committeeman,
Republican Party of
Nassau County
Chairman,
4th Congressional Caucus
Republican Party of Florida

Serve and protect
I am writing in response to the
article that.ran Aug. 21 regarding
"Sheriff laments 'power struggle' -
wants respect,"
I would first like to say that my
husband'is a city police officer and
has been going on 21 years now.
This article made my blood boil! I
have to agree 100 percent with
James Kerrigan in the statement he
made regarding the drug issue - if
the sheriff is so concerned then
why doesn't he do something about
the area where drugs are being
sold if he has knowledge of the deal-
ings as well as genuine concern and
feels enough is not being done?
Since he is, as the Attorney General
ruled, officer for the whole county,
then isn't Fernandina in Nassau
County?
I have listened to the ridiculous
politics for a long time and find it a
real shame that county and city can-
not work together. Do not think for
one minute that these city officers
do not do their jobs every time they
go out on the streets, because they
do, they are very dedicated. The
NCSO officers do as well; we have
several friends in that department.
The county has plenty of issues to
deal with I am sure, just as I am
sure any department does. All of
our officers, city and county, have
heart and soul in this community
even though some of these officers
were not born here, so give credit
where credit is deserved.
It would be nice to see the two
agencies work together and I doubt
I am the only one that feels this way,
even as an officer's spouse. I am
sure the help would be very appre-
ciated if it were offered sincerely
and not condescendingly. To earn
the respect you are requesting, you
have to give it as well.
Thank you to all of our officers
that serve and protect, city and coun-
ty!
Lori H. Burling
Fernandina Beach


What idiot came up with the idea
of blackouts for the Jaguars games?
I understand this is a NFL rule for
all teams, but where is the logic?
How can anyone become a fan of a
team that they can only watch a few
times a season? I say we boycott all
Jaguar merchandise until they
change the rules. The NFL gets a
slice od everything sold with the
Jaguar logo on it, so I say stop buy-
ing the merchandise.
Bob Hutchinson
SFernandina Beach

Health care control
There is no doubt in my mind
that reforming our health care is
something that we all can agree.
Health care costs are zooming and
we are hearing everyday about hos-
pitals and other medical centers in
financial disarray (banks are not the
only institutions having problems).
It takes money to operate a hospital
and to pay for medical procedures
and its providers. Revenue and
expenses, umm - sounds like a busi-
ness corporation. A hospital and a
doctor's office is as much a busi-
ness as it is a provider of much need-
ed services. What are we to do?
I have been in the medical field
for nearly 40 years and although I
have an MBA degree I would much
rather be working with and helping
patients than to spend my life
crunching numbers or sitting
behind a desk. But it seems to me
that Congress and the president are
proposing a totally different
upheaval in our health care deliv-
ery than we need. Reform yes, con-
trol no.
Give us portability so we can take
our insurance coverage wherever
we go, give us no pre-existing limi-
tations, give us a cafeteria-style
choice so that we can pick and chose
what kind of insurance coverage we
want, give us tort reform so that
physicians no longer have to prac-
tice CYA medicine are just some
examples. The single-payer option
should be given a proper burial
because the needed reform will then
become an unnecessary control
where our options will disappear.
By far the majority of Americans
feel that they have adequate insur-
ance and are satisfied with their


health care. Some "nip and tuck"
here and a few changes there would
make ouirsystem look much pretti-
er. Let's concentrate on a few
changes and stop dividing our coun-
try. Reform our system but don't
destroy it. What about the oppos-
ing health care reform bills that have
been introduced already in
Congress? Several of these alterna-
tive bills go to the heart of the prob-
lem and have been shown to pay
for itself instead of putting us deep-
er and deeper into debt Fix what is
broken but don't destroy what we
have.
Kennard R. Beard, BS,
MBA, RDMS, RVT
Fernandina Beach

ion of the Senate'
I and many millions of Ameri-
cans were saddened to learn of the
death of Massachusetts Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy. It is a major
loss to the U.S. Senate and to the
country as a whole. I had the privi-
lege to work f6r the senator on his
foreign policy staff for one year in
the late 1980's and witnessed first-
hand his dedication and hard work,
which earned him the respect and
affection of his fellow senators on
both sides of the aisle. For example,
his friend Republican Sen. Orrin
Hatch referred to him as an iconic,
larger than life U.S. senator whose
influence cannot be overstated.
A tireless worker on behalf of
the less fortunate in our society,
Sen. Kennedy was also willing to
strive for compromise to achieve
real results. It is tragic that he
passed on before health care reform
could be accomplished, a goal to
which he had dedicated himself
throughout his Senate career. The
only one of the four Kennedy broth-
ers not to die violently in service to
our country, he proudly carried for-
ward his family's dedication to pub-
lic service.
He will be warmly remembered
in our history as is that earlier
"Lion of the Senate" from New
England, also frustrated in his
presidential ambitions, who asked
"How stands the Union," Daniel
Webster. Sen. Kennedy will be sore-
ly missed.
George Chester, Memiber
Nassau County Democratic.
Executive Committee











FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

The Rotary Club of
Amelia Island Sunrise is tak-
ing reservations for its
fundraiser, "Cruising For A
Cause For Polio Plus," a
four-day cruise to the
Bahamas aboard the Carnival
Fascination, departing March
11, 2010 from Jacksonville.
Rotary Sunrise will receive
$90 for each cabin sold to
help in Rotary International's
mission to eradicate polio.
The cruise is open to anyone.
A $50 deposit is due Sept. 2,
and a second deposit of $100
by Nov. 4. Final payment is
due Jan. 4, 2010.
Call Suzanne McLeod at
(904) 662-2360 or
smcleod @ telecommanage-
ment.us; or travel professional
Valerie Gossett at (904) 710-
9170 or Valerie @premier-
resources.net.

A Passion 4 Pooches Pet
Spa, 1881 South 14th St., is
holding a Suds 4 Shelters
Bath-A-Thon event on Aug.
29 beginning at 8 a.m. All the
proceeds from dog baths that
day will benefit the Nassau
Humane Society. To schedule
your dog's beauty appoint-
ment, call 491-1767.

The Camden/Kings Bay
Council, Navy League of the
United States will meet Sept.
10 at 6 p.m. in the Overlook
Room at Osprey Cove Golf
Club in St. Marys, Ga.
The program will feature
the council welcoming Rear
Admiral Barry Bruner,
Commanding Officer,
Submarine Group 10, to the
Kings Bay Naval Submarine
Base.
Dinner is $25 and reserva-
tions are required by Sept. 7.
Call (912) 729-7327 or e-mail
navyleaguedinner@yahoo.co
m.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
.First Coast Cormunity Bank
in Yulee or mailed.to FCCB-.


Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Femandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event. All 1970-75 FBHS
students and faculty/staff are
invited.

.Rescuing Animals in
Nassau (RAIN) will hold a
sidewalk sale Sept. 5 from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. on'Seventh
Street (around the comer from
Eileen's Art and Antiques). If
you have gently used house-
hold items, small furniture,
home decor, CDs, DVDs,
books, dishes or glassware
you would like to donate, call
Marilyn at 491-8819. All pro-
ceeds benefit the animals in
RAIN's care and its programs.

Fernandina Beach High
School Class of 1965 wil
meet and eat at 11:30 a.m.
on Sept. 12 at Sandy
Bottoms on Main Beach. This
will be a time of fellowship
and also the start of making.
plans for the 45th reunion
next year.

Rollin' on the River, a
scenic Sunday cruise to St.'
Mary's, Ga., sponsored by
Amelia River Cruises to ben-
efit Meals on Wheels for
Pets, a partnership project
between the Counqil on Aging
Meals on Wheels program
and Nassau Humane Society,
will be held Sept. 13.
Tickets are $25 round-trip
and tax deductible. Ferry will
depart the city marina at
10:30 a.m. and leave St.
Marys at 1:45 p.m. Take a
tram tour for $2.50, or bring
your bike to cycle through the
historic downtown. The ferry
is pet friendly.
Call Amelia River Cruises
at 261-9972 or e-mail
info @ameliarivercruises.com
to reserve a spot and advise
whether you are bringing a
bike.

The Men's Newcomers
,Club of Amelia Island will
:hold its first luncheon meeting


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For the News-Leader

The Les DeMerle Amelia
Island Jazz Festival kicked
off its season with a rousing
preview show at the newly
renovated Palace Saloon
Aug. 20.
With strong performanc-
es and innovative arrange-
ments from drummer
DeMerle's dynamic all-star
unit, the program showcased
the various styles of jazz that
will be heard throughout the
2009 event, which runs Oct.
2-11 at various venues on
Amelia Island.
DeMerle's group opened
with a spirited modern jazz
version of Benny Golson's
"Killer Joe" highlighted by
multi-instrumentalist Dr. Bill
Prince's superb solos on
both flute and alto saxo-
phone plus a dazzling up
tempo finish. DeMerle spoke
about this year's schedule of
events, which will begin Oct.
2 with his Dixieland group at
a Sounds On Centre concert
and street party, before the
band blasted through a terrif-
ic Prince arrangement of the
New Orleans Jazz classic,


of the 2009-10 year on Sept.
17 at the Fernandina Beach
Golf Club at 11:30 a.m. The
speaker will be State Rep.
Janet Adkins, who will speak'
about the current state of the
Florida economy and give an
overview of the 2009 legisla-
tive session. Prior to her cur-
rent position, Adkins served
10 years as a member of the
Nassau County School Board.
All men are invited. Tickets
are $15 in advance and $j7
at the door. Reservations, call
Bob Keane at 277-4590. For
information visit www.men-
snewcomersclub.org.

Nassau Women's
Information Exchange pres-
ents "The First Pancake: a
Recipe for Delectable Life
Transitions" luncheon with
Tory Wilcox on Sept. 17 at
O'Kane's Irish Pub and
Eatery, 318 Centre St.,
Femandina Beach.
This program is free and
open to the public. Call your
library branch to make reser-
vations. Box lunches by
O'Kane's are $12 and may be
ordered at any local branch
library and prepaid by noon
Sept. 11.
The Nassau WIE is a part-
nership between the FCCJ
Rosanne R. Hartwell
Women's Center, the Florida
State College at Jacksonville
Betty P. Cook Nassau Center
and the Nassau County
Public Library System. Call


I . :7



-"'ii




.I
#0


"Limehouse Blues."
DeMerle followed with a
fresh rendition of "St Louis
Blues" and dedicated his
vocal to former St. Louis resi-
dents, Lynne and Jack
Ruppel, who were celebrat-
ing their 50th wedding
anniversary.
Prince's stellar arrange-
ments on a cool jazz version
of"The Girl From Ipanema"
and the Duke Ellington stan-
dard, 'Take The A Train,"
preceded a sweet set of
songs from vocalist Bonnie
Eisele that included a Latin-
tinged take of "Bye Bye
Blues."
The modern sounds of
Herbie Hancock's
"Cantaloupe Island" closed
the first set. During inter-
mission the crowd enjoyed a
festival DVD, produced by
local filmmaker and AIJF
board member Stan Cottle,
which presented several
clips of the fall event's hdad-
liner, David Sanborn.
DeMerle also announced
the full schedule of events,
which will include an Oct. 3
program at the Palace Saloon
with jazz scholarship winner


the Yulee branch library at
548-4467 or the Femandina
Beach branch at 277-7365.

The Terpsichorean
Dance Club's next dance is
7-11 p.m. Sept. 19 at the
Woman's Club, 201 Jean
Lafitte Blvd. The dance theme
is "Football Time" - wear your
favorite teams colors. Hors
d'oeuvres and soft drinks will
.be served. Guest fee is $35
per couple. Music will be by
Harry and Sally. BYOB and
setups will be provided. For
information contact Margaret
Zvoch at 261-9717.

The second annual Texas
BBQ will be held by the
Nassau Sierra Club at Caf6
Karibo, 27 N. Third St.,
Femandina, on Sept. 20 from
5-9 p.m. Cost is $35 per per-
son or $60 per couple.
The event will feature bar-
becued beef and pork ribs
from Lowell Hall's Island BBQ;
country and western dance .
music by Soutffirtfff*i--e "
featuring Ray Odom and
Michael Howerton; a Texas
two-step dance lesson by
Joan Bean. Beer.and wine
from Caf4 Karibrew's brew-
pub will be available.
Deadline to buy tickets is
Sept. 14. Tickets are available
at Island BBQ, Sadler and
South Fletcher; Bean School
of Dance, 25 N. Third St.;
Island Tobacco/Indigo Alley,
316 Centre St.; and Amelia
Home Health Services on
A1A across from Lowe's or by
calling 277-0655.
* * *
Women in Nassau help-
ing Women in Need is spon-
soring A Cup of Comfort
Fashion Show and Tea
Party to benefit Gerd's Comer
on Sept. 20 from 2-4 p.m. at
Savannah Grand Assisted
Living,' 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Femandina Beach.
Tickets are $30 or $35 at
the door, if not sold out.
Tickets can be purchased at
Fifi's Fine Resale on Eighth
Street, Gauzeway and
Pineapple Patch on Centre
Street, Patchington on Sadler
Road, Elizabeth's in the Harris
Teeter plaza, and Heron's


Available from Commercial News Providers


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Jawren Walton's lively mod-
ern jazz band, a free Oct. 4
afternoon concert in Amelia
Park with the 18-piece U.S.
Navy Big Band Southeast,
the now traditional Latin
Night, Oct. 8, at the Palace
with Impacto Latino, Oct. 9
and 10 shows starring
Sanborn with The Midifight
Blue Band at the new First
Baptist Church auditorium,
and a traditional Sunday, Oct.
11, Dixieland brunch at the
Beech Street Grill.
The second set continued
the show's torrid pace,
beginning with a breakneck
tempo version of
"Mississippi Mud" that was
powered by DeMerle's
exceptional drum licks. The
group segued into a cha-cha,
with DeMerle singing the
Dean Martin hit, "Sway," that
was enhanced by a spot on
solo from trumpeter Marvin
Ferebee. Eisele returned for
an Ellington medley, then set-
tled into a gorgeous rendition
of "Embraceable You." Band
members Ferebee on trum-
pet, Prince, superb pianist
Doug Matthews, trombonist
Dr. Marc Dickman, and


Swim &.Sport in the Palmetto
Walk Shopping Center.
To make a donation or
assist with the event, contact
Diane at 548-9750.

The Nassau Humane
Society will hold Chip In for
Paws Casino Night on Sept.
26 from 7-10 p.m. at the
Femandina Beach Women's
Club. The event will feature
blackjack, roulette and craps
and beer and wine, soft drinks
and pizza for a donation. Win
prizes with your winning chips
at the live auction. Tickets are
$50 and include chips for free
plhy. Tickets are available at:
Red Bones Dog Bakery, Bark .
Avenue, Cat Clinic of
Femandina and NHS Dog
Park. Bring cat and dog food
or bleach and paper towels
for extra chips at the door.
Call 491-1511 for information.
* * *
Dogs and owners are invit-
ed to the next Dog Park Day
is Sept. 26from 11 a.m.-2
p'.. at Dd Ceg
Productions in Femandina
Beach. Lunch will be provid-
ed and local artist John Walsh
will play acoustic and contem-
porary music. Cost is a $20
donation per family, cash or
check at the gate the day of
the event. All proceeds benefit
the Project CHANCE
Fqundation, a charitable
organization dedicated to pro-
viding an assistance dog to
children with autism in
Northeast Florida. Visit
www.projectchance.com.
*. * *
Enjoy "Trivia with
Maggie" on Wednesdays at
7:30 p.m. at the Crab Trap in
downtown Femandina Beach.
Enjoy a special trivia menu,
drink, win prizes and listen to
music while you improve your
memory and get smarter.
Free and open to the public.

FIWMITEATER

Amelia Baptist Church
will host a screening of the
movie "Fireproof" on Aug.
29 at 6 p.m. This inspirational
contemporary film looks at
what a couple does to save
and restore their marriage.
The community is invited.
Dinner for all and child care
through age 12 will be provid-
ed at no cost, RSVP your
child care needs to the church
at 261-3042.

The next Free Movie in
Central Park, sponsored by
Prosperity Bank, is "Karate
Kid" on Aug. 29 at 8:30 p.m.
Bring your blankets and lawn
chairs, concessions will be
available for purchase.
* * *


Tickets are now on sale for
Norman Beim's comedy,
"Archie's Comeback," the
opening production of the
Fernandina Little Theatre's
18th season.
Believing that her husband
Archie drowned, Lily has
decided to remarry after
seven lonely years - but sud-
denly, in pops Archie, freshly


bassist Ernie Ealum, showed
off their well-honed "chops'
with brilliant solos through-
out the evening.
DeMerle let the crowd
into the act via his raucous
vocal on Cab Calloway's
"Minnie The Moocher" that
had everyone scatting along
to the "hi de ho" nonsensical
lyrics.
'For a finale, the venerable
"When The Saints Go
Marching In" brought the
audience to their feet once
more and sparked an
impromptu "second line"
parade around the room.
A not-for-profit 501(c) (3)
corporation, the Les DeMerle
Amelia Island Jazz Festival
distributes proceeds toward a
scholarship program to fund
college educations for aspir-
ing jazz musicians.
This year's festival will
take place Oct. 2-10. To pur-
chase tickets, get more infor-
mation or to learn about
sponsorship and volunteer
opportunities, visit the web-
site: www.ameliaislandjaz-
zfestival.com or contact the
festival hotline at (904) 504-.
4772.


rescued from a desert island
where he's been having a
wonderful time!
Performances are Sept. 5,
10, 11 and 12 at 7:30 p.m.
and Sept. 6 at 2:30 p.m.; tick-
ets are $16. A special
'Tuesdays for Twelve" per-
formance is Sept. 8 at 7:30
p.m. for $12. Tickets can be
purchased at The UPS Store
in the Publix shopping center
and at FLT, 1014 Beech St.

Amelia Commurnity
Theatre presents "The Dixie
Swim Club," directed by
Barry Ralston and featuring
Celeste Amos, Wendy Gilvey,
Karen Harper, Linda McClane
and Kay Stephens.
Five Southern women,
who were once teammates on
their college swim team,
reunite every summer fora
weekend in August at a North
Carolina beach cottage. They
catch up, laugh, and meddle
in each other's lives. These
'ruonipps continue for 33,.,
years:,proving that some
friendships last forever!
Performances are at 8
p.m. Sept. 10-12, 17-19 and
24-26, and at 2 p.m. Sept. 20.
Tickets are $17 adults and
$10 students and available at
Amelia Community Theatre,
209 Cedar St. Call 261-6749.
Box office hours are Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday, 11
a.m.-1 p.m., and two hours
before curtain

ART/GAULEIES

The First Coast
Community Bank show,
"Visual Rhythms," features
artwork by Island Art
.Association members Carol
Beck, Rhonda Bristol,
Theresa Daily and Sandra
Pinneault. This show is open
during banking hours.

An Introduction to kin
formed glass will be held
Sept. 5 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Designs On Gallery, 11 N.
Third St., Femandina Beach.
Participants in this hands-on
workshop will leam the funda-
mentals of creating decorative
and functional objects with
glass. Fee is $120 and
includes materials. Contact
Cecilia at 583-7723.

The public is invited to the
general meeting of the
Island Art Association on
Sept. 8 at 7 p.m., 18 N.
Second St. Award-winning
potter Mike Clemens will talk
about the "Potters for Peace"
program in Nicaragua and will
share how a small group of'
potters can do so much to
help others. Call 261-7020.
Visit www.islandart.org.

Suzl Sax will teach a
stained and straight-line
bevel glass class on
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. starting in
early September.
Space is limited. Call 321-
1330 to reserve a spot. Cost
is $225 and includes glass
and tools.


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SONG Continuedfrom 1B


S. .* - . * * His first CD, released in
S* * * * * * the U.S. in 2004, quickly
gained top 10 radio plays on
- * * * * * the Folk DJ charts. Two years
S- . * *, * ago, Llewellyn released a new
CD made up of songs about
* * * * * * * his upbringing in Wales, and
S* - . * . . * won the folk category in the
2008 John Lennon
* * * * Songwriting Contest.
S * , * , * Fresh off an international
tour with performances


throughout the UK, Scandina-
via and Greece, Llewellyn has
accepted an invitation from
Mark & Donna Paz Kaufman
to perform at "An Evening of
Story and Song" on Saturday,
Sept. 5 at 8 p.m. In his signa-
ture rich baritone, Llewellyn
paints a vivid picture of life in
Wales - reminding us all of
where we've come from, what
we value most, and all the
ways we embrace this place
we call "home."


Palace show hints at festival to come


IRMO - B.,



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The news-leader
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00465
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach, Fla
Creation Date: August 28, 2009
Publication Date: 1980-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
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MAGENTA BLACK


Fri
8/28



87/73


F L 0 RIDA'S


OLDEST


WEEKLY N


EWS PAP ER


NEWS'


L EADER


FRIDAY August28, 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom


'G WINE TA DE WA TA'


Leaders of the
Gullah/Geechee
Nation, including
Queen Quet, above,
lead a procession
Sunday from
American Beach to
the Atlantic Ocean to
pay homage to ances-
tors that arrived via
coastal ports in
Florida. A sacred
drum ceremony was
held at the beach,
right. The
Gullah/Geechee
Nation International
Music & Movement
Festival began in
Brunswick, Ga., and
included a tribute at
American Beach hon-
oring "sacred ances-
tor MaVynee Betsch,
The Beach Lady."
KUMARL. GOODWINE-KENNEDY
FOR THE NEWS-LEADER


KWAME SHA/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER


AIA repairs called dire need
RYAN SMITH rating the plan. Amelia Island. It also provides
News Leader "(A1A) really is the roadway into access to the Port of Ferna


Repairs to AIA were the topic of a
special meeting hosted Wednesday
by State Rep. Janet Adkins with
Florida Department of Transportation
District 2 Secretary Charles Baldwin.
Nassau County officials asked
Baldwin how soon repairs to the
stressed road could be implement-
ed. Baldwin said resurfacing of the
road was scheduled for 2010 and
2011, but would not commit to accel-


Fernandina Beach," Adkins said. "It
seems like in many places along A1A,
it's turning into gravel. I would have
to say that A1A is one of the most
important issues in Nassau County."
"It affects tourism, public safety,"
said Larry Williams, Adkins' legisla-
tive aide. "We're a fairly residential
community. Fifty-five percent of
Nassau residents work outside of the
county and use A1A to make their
commutes. It is the main route to


direct
ndina


Beach ... It's also the primary evac-
uation route for about 25,000 resi-
dents."
Williams said there had been 190
crashes on A1A between 2005 and
2008. In the same period, there were
five traffic fatalities and 168 injuries,
he added.
"Certainly as we see continued
degradation of A1A, those numbers
A1A Continued on 4A


STORM CLOUDS


LEAH WELLS/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER
Stormy weather often makes for beautiful sunsets, as this photo of the bridge at the south end of
Amelia Island on Saturday shows after Hurricane Bill passed offshore. Tropical Storm Danny may
bring similar sights as it passes by this weekend. Boaters and swimmers should be alert to high tides
and rip currents.


County dilemma:



higher tax rate



or less spending?


RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
Nassau County Commissioners are
still wrestling with whether to raise
taxes to support additional spending in
the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.
Debate arose again among com-
missioners Monday over whether to
raise the county's property tax rate in
next year's budget. At a budget work-
shop meeting, Commissioner Mike
Boyle proposed some spending -
including contributions to non-profit
groups and repairs to the judicial
annex - that could require an increase
in millage from this year's rate of 7.23.
The commission, by a 3-2 vote, set
its maximum rate at a higher 7.644
mills Aug. 10, but Commissioner
Danny Leeper and Chair Barry
Holloway reiterated their support for
the lower tax rate.


Public hearing
The first of two public hearings
on the county's 2009-10 budget is
scheduled at 7 p.m. Sept. 14 at
the James S. Page Governmental
Complex, 96135 Nassau Place,
Yulee. A date has not been set for
the second hearing.

"If we can do any of this with what
we approved back in July, that's fine,
but if it's going to mean an increase in
millage, then I can't support it," Leeper
said.
Although no decisions were made
at the workshop meeting, Boyle
brought forward funding requests
from non-profit groups for later con-
sideration at the two public meetings
COUNTY Continued on 3A


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
In an effort to balance its budget for
upcoming fiscal year 2009-10, the city
has informed local youth sports
leagues there will be increased costs
to use city sports facilities.
An unsigned Aug. 12 letter from
the city to league representatives
informed them it was "staggering to
see the amount that the city was sub-
sidizing" their organizations, includ-
ing "payroll, utilities and supplies."
According to City Manager
Michael Czymbor, the city paid about
$67,000 last year to keep the sports
facilities going for several youth
leagues, including Pop Warner
Football, Amelia Island Youth Soccer,
Elm Street Little League and the Babe
Ruth League.
The city, he said, got only about
$2,000 back from those groups.
In order to recoup some of those
costs, the city has developed two
options the leagues can choose from.
One option would be a revenue-shar-
ing agreement, in which city partici-
pants would give 15 percent of rev-
enues to the city, and non-city
participants would give 25 percent of


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
If the city budget for 2009-10 is
approved in September, local non-prof-
it groups will receive nearly $10,000
less in city funding compared to this
year.
City commissioners agreed with
staff at their Aug. 24 budget workshop
that social service groups such as the
Barnabas Center, Council on Aging
and Boys and Girls Club of Nassau
should receive approximately as much
funding as they did in the past.
But the arts did not fare as well.
Using commissioner input, city staff
recommended that the Amelia Arts
Academy, Amelia Island Film Festival
and Arts Council all receive less
money this year from the city. With a
few minor adjustments, commission-
ers approved the staff recommenda-


revenues.
Another option
would be a "facility-
care alternative," in
which the league
would be solely
responsible to main-
tain the areas it uses.
The city would con-
Czymbor tinue to subsidize
utility costs, which
would include lights
for the fields and electricity for the
concession stands.
Czymbor said that after city staff
met with representatives of several
sports leagues Aug. 20, it was deter-
mined that the city would provide
those groups with more detailed infor-
mation on the costs to run the sports
facilities. The city, he said, would con-
tinue to work with groups until a mutu-
al agreement is reached regarding
reimbursement of costs.
Scott Mikelson of the city Parks &
Recreation Department, who attended
the meeting, said in an e-mail that "the
league representatives seem to under-
stand that the amount of money the
city spends on the utilities, chemicals,
YOUTH Continued on 3A


Public hearings
The first public hearing of the
2009-10 city budget will be
Tuesday, Sept. 15. The second
public hearing, and final vote, has
been scheduled for Tuesday,
Sept. 22. Both meetings will be at
5:05 p.m. at City Hall, 204 Ash
St., Fernandina Beach.

tions for funding non-profits.
At first, Vice Mayor Eric Childers
objected to the Episcopal Children's
Services getting any funds at all,
because the group was late submit-
ting its request. He added that he
would like to see mental health serv-
ices receive $400 more from the city,
for a total of $7,900.
ARTS Continued on 3A


News-Leader INDEX LEISURE ........................................................ B SA TUR NESTING SEASON
155th year No 69 . CLASSIFIEDS ...................... 3 B OBITUARIES ........................................... 2A 2009 Nests: 89 Hatchlings:4273
Copyright 2009 CROSSWORD .................... 2B OUT AND ABOUT ............ 2B 2nestslostduetostorms
The News Leader EDITORIAL .................................. 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ......................4B . Please turn offorredirectlightsshining
Fernandina BeachFL FISHING ..................................... 14A SPORTS .................................................... 12A directly on the beach Fora detailed count
1 4264 00013 3 wsrinwisoybasd nk SCHOOLS...............................................10A SUDOKU....................................................2B seeww .ameliaislandseaturtlewatchcom.


Sat
8/29



88/74


School News
PAGE IOA


Cultural

Exchange
PAGE 1B


City to levy more



for youth sports


Arts groups to lose


$10,000 in city funds







FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


50 YEARS AGO

Local scuba divers sal-
vaged a boat and motor
worth $1,800 at Kingsley
Lake near Starke.
August 27, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

Nassau County's emer-
gency medical services pro-
gram faced serious prob-


lems, including inadequate
training and equipment,
Medical Director Dr. Farid
Ullah reported.
August 24, 1984

10 YEARS AGO

Developers and city com-
missioners discussed a pro-
posed 180-day building
moratorium on all environ-
mentally sensitive lands.
August 25, 1999


Today's Weather
a 5- o. ea - .
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
8/28 8/29 8/30 8/31 9/1


87/73
Variable
clouds with
scattered
thunder-
storms. High
87F.


Sunrise:
7:01 AM
Sunset:
7:54 PM


88/74
Partly cloudy
with a stray
thunder-
storm.



Sunrise:
7:01 AM
Sunset:
7:52 PM


88/74
Partly cloudy
with a stray
thunder-
storm.



Sunrise:
7:02 AM
Sunset:
7:51 PM


86/71
Scattered
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 70s.

Sunrise:
7:02 AM
Sunset:
7:50 PM


86/71
Isolated
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
low 70s

Sunrise:
7:03 AM
Sunset:
7:49 PM


Florida At A Glance
Fernandina Beach
_.5 ' -_._ : _ _ ___ ', 87/73
Ss--, . - OTallahassee_ , Jacksonville
Pensacola .w-" 'I \ 90/75




Orlando
92/74 ..




Tampa *. A


S Miami
'-


~:> :
I


Area Cities


Clearwater 88
Crestview 85
Daytona Beach 90
Fort Lauderdale 89
Fort Myers 89
Gainesville 89
Hollywood 90
Jacksonville 90
Key West 89
Lady Lake 89
Lake City 89
Madison 89
Melbourne 91
Miami 90
N Smyrna Beach 89


t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


Ocala 90
Orlando 92
Panama City 89
Pensacola 87
Plant City 89
Pompano Beach 90
Port Charlotte 90
Saint Augustine 86
Saint Petersburg 86
Sarasota 88
Tallahassee 88
Tampa 88
Titusville 91
Venice 88
W Palm Beach 90


72 t-storm
74 t-storm
72 t-storm
73 t-storm
75 t-storm
77 t-storm
75 t-storm
73 t-storm
79 t-storm
75 t-storm
70 t-storm
76 t-storm
73 t-storm
76 t-storm
77 t-storm


National Cities


Atlanta 78
Boston 72
Chicago 71
Dallas 93
Denver 81
Houston 94
Los Angeles 91
Miami 90
Moon Phases


rain
cloudy
t-storm
pt sunny
mst sunny
t-storm
mst sunny
t-storm


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


71 52
73 67
109 82
85 62
71 59
80 64
77 69


t-storm
rain
sunny
pt sunny
rain
t-storm
t-storm


First Full Last New
Aug 27 Sep 4 Sep 12 Sep 18

UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
8/28 8/29 8/30 8/31 9/1

Very High Very High Very High Very High Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 -11 number scale, 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
�2009 American Profile Hometowvn Content Service


NEWS

LEADER


511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for e-mail addresses
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............. . . .$36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ............. $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
NI Commuity
Newspapers,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


Boat wakes cause anger, injury


ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Boat
wakes - those long, frothy, V-
shaped waves trailing from
the stern of a powerboat as it
slices through the water -
have a sinister side. When
other vessels encounter
them, they can hurt people.
They can make people angry
and they can bring the wrath
of law enforcement, for good
reason.
Boat Owners Association
of The United States
(BoatU.S.) recently looked
into the issue of boat wakes
by combing through the
insurance claims case files,
where swampings, broken
teeth and back injuries are
found.
"You avoid being the
recipient of gestures from
other skippers by using a lit-
tle common sense and cour-
tesy," says BoatU.S. Director
of Damage Avoidance Bob
Adriance. "This means com-
ing completely off plane
when you enter a no wake
zone or anywhere your wake
could compromise the safety
of other boats," he adds.
Here are some tips to help
prevent boat wake injuries to
you and other boaters:
* Slow early: Boat wakes


travel
dis-
tances,
so slow
down
before
you
reach a
slow-speed zone, not as you
pass the marker.
Just a little slowing down
isn't good enough: Upon
entering a no wake zone,
some boaters react by only
slowing the vessel slightly,
and then plow through with
the bow way up and stern
dug down, actually increas-
ing the wake. Come com-
pletely off plane.
* Make her level: Without
using trim tabs, a slowed ves-
sel should be level in the
water. With smaller boats,
shifting passengers around
can help, as too much weight
aft increases wake size.
* Watch the shallows:
Shallow water increases
wake size.
* Small boats aren't inno-
cent: Wakes are not just a big
boat issue - small vessels in
the stern-down position can
throw surprisingly large
wakes.
* When approaching a


wake, slow down but don't
stop: Motorboats are more
stable when under way, so
stopping could make things
worse. Avoid taking a wake
on the beam or head on. The
best approach is at a slight
angle. This will keep your
passengers in your boat.
* Take care of older crew:
The BoatU.S. insurance
claims files show that per-
sons over the age of 50 have
the most personal injuries,
mostly as a result of being
seated near the bow when
the boat slams into a wake.
It's best to seat passengers -
especially older passengers -
amidships.
* Warn the crew: A sim-
ple "Hold-on. Boat wake"
should do the trick, just as
long as you shout the warn-
ing well before the wake
arrives.
BoatU.S. - Boat Owners
Association of The United
States - is the nation's leading
advocate for recreational
boaters providing its 600,000
members with government
representation, programs and
money saving services. For
membership information visit
www.BoatUS.com or call 800-
395-2628.


WEEKLY UPDATE


AA meetings
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings for peo-
ple who have, or think they may have, a drink-
ing problem are held Mondays at noon and
Saturday at 10 a.m. at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church, corner of Eighth Street and Atlantic
Avenue. All meetings are held in classroom
204 behind the church, park in the rear.
River meeting
The St. Marys River Management
Committee will meet Aug. 31 at 7 p.m. in the
County Building, 45401 Mickler St., Callahan.
Booksigning
Local resident Jane Turney has written a
children's story, The Secret of Yellow Creek
Valley, a tale of adventure, fantasy, history and
nature set in the late 1800s. Turney is a for-
mer resident of the area where the story
takes place. Color photos of the valley and
creek, as well as original drawings, are includ-
ed in the book. There will be a book signing
at Books Plus on Centre Street Sept. 4.
Libraries closed
The Nassau County Public Library System
will be closed Sept. 7 in observance of Labor
Day. Book drops will remain open.
Survival celebration
On Sept. 8 First Coast Oncology - Nassau
will host its inaugural Celebration Of Survival
event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the office at 1340
South 18th St. in Medical Building A, Suite
103.
This program provides the opportunity to
celebrate cancer patients who were treated at
First Coast Oncology - Nassau and who have
become cancer survivors. In addition, there
will be an educational component that will
delve into what life is like after cancer. The
event is free and light refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by First Coast
Cancer Foundation. For more information, or
to RSVP, please call (904) 387-5312.
Just Friends cruise
Just Friends (boomers and beyond who
are single) member are invited to join the
fundraiser cruise to St. Marys, Ga. on Sept. 13
to benefit the new Meals on Wheels for Pets
program. The club will meet one hour before
cruise time. Price is $25 per person, payable
to Nassau Humane Society. Send checks to
Helene Scott, 1631 Blue Heron Lane,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 by today.
Bicycles permitted by reservation. Call 321-
1116. Donations are tax deductible.
Plantclinic
On Sept. 14 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Becky
Jordi, Nassau County Horticulture Extension
agent, will conduct a Plant Clinic at the Yulee
Extension Office (AlA and Pages Dairy
Road).
All county residents are invited to bring
plant samples showing problems in their land-
scapes. Problems will be identified and solu-
tions offered for correction. There is no fee
for this service. For information call 548-1116.


Stroke screenings
St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 801 Atlantic
Ave., will host Life Line Screening on Sept. 14.
Appointments will begin at 9 a.m.
Screenings identify potential cardiovascu-
lar conditions such as blocked arteries and
irregular heart rhythm, abdominal aortic
aneurysms, and hardening of the arteries in
the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart
disease. A bone density screening to assess
osteoporosis risk is also offered.
Packages start at $139. All five screenings
take 60-90 minutes to complete. For more
information call 1-877-237-1287 or visit
www.lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is
required.
Study circles
Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation Study
Circles will be held from Oct. 1-Nov. 14 at St.
Peter's Episcopal Church. A diverse group of
people, lead by impartial facilitators, will meet
each week to discuss issues of importance to
all. This is open to anyone and free of charge.
For more information contact Sharon Stanley
at 583-6272 or e-mail sharon.vod@gmail.com.
Donations sought
The family of Allison Taylor Schmidt, born
prematurely on July 31 at Wolfson Children's
Hospital in Jacksonville with Hypo Plastic Left
Heart Syndrome, is accepting donations from
the community for her heart surgeries and
care. She currently is at Shands Children's
Hospital in Gainesville and underwent her
first of three scheduled open-heart surgeries
on Aug. 12.
Donations may be made by visiting any
Bank of America location and donating to the
Allison Taylor Schmidt Family Assistance
Fund. Visit http://allisontaylor.multiply.com
for more information.
Shriners Hospitals
Shriners Hospitals for Children is a
one-of-a-kind international health care system
dedicated to improving the lives of children
by providing specialty pediatric care, innova-
tive research and outstanding teaching pro-
grams.
Children up to the age of 18 with
orthopaedic conditions, burns, spinal cord
injuries and cleft lip and palate are eligible for
admission and receive all care in a family-cen-
tered environment at no financial obligation to
patients or families.
If you know of a child who may be helped
by Shriners hospitals care, call 1-800-237-5055.
For more information, visit http://shriner-
shq.org/Hospitals.
Food drive
Florida Public Utilities and its employees
are holding a food drive for those in need in
the community. Food can be donated Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at FPU's
office at 911 S. Eighth St., Fernandina Beach,
the Nassau County Amelia Island Board of
Realtors, and the Fernandina Beach police
and fire departments, in addition to several
rotating locations throughout the island. Call
261-3663 for details.


VOLUNTEERS


Hospice help
Community Hospice of Northeast Florida
needs volunteers to help at Nassau County
residences, long-term care or assisted living
facilities, Community Hospice's inpatient care
centers or Community Hospice's Yulee office
at 96084 Victoria's Place. Schedules are flexi-
ble and there are a variety of volunteer oppor-
tunities. Call (904) 407-7064.
Truck needed
Micah's Place needs a box truck to pick
up donated furniture and other items to be
used by survivors of domestic violence or at
its resale center.
As a 501(c) (3) organization, the donation
of a truck is tax deductible. Please call 491-
6364, ext. 102.


RAINTrain
Rescuing Animals in Nassau has launched
the RAIN Train to transport pets from shel-
ters in Nassau County to shelters in higher-
population centers where they stand a better
chance of adoption. Anyone planning a trip to
the west coast of Florida (Tampa/Lakeland)
or the Ft. Lauderdale area can help by trans-
porting an animal or two when they go.
RAIN supplies everything needed (crate,
paperwork, directions, etc.). Drivers go to
the shelter before heading to their final desti-
nation; shelter staff will meet them and
unload the animal.
E-mail Susan Davis Perry at susandavis-
perry@yahoo.com or call 557-6501 for infor-
mation and so she can contact the receiving
shelter ahead of time.


LOOKING BACK


way for a new facility, contrary
to a story on page 3A
Wednesday.
The News-Leader strives for
accuracy. We will promptly cor-
rect all factual errors. Please
notify the editor of errors at
mparnell@fbnewsleadercom or
call (904) 261-3696.



arnabas
CENTER, INC
A private, non-profit agency that assists
Nassau County families who need food,
shelter and basic necessities
For information, call: 904.261.7000


OBITUARIES

Rev. Lathern Jones
Rev. Lathern Jones, 83,
entered into eternal rest August
20, 2009.
He leaves to cherish his
memories: a loving & devoted
wife of 61 years, Sis. Alice C.
Jones; children, Charity (Aaron)
Durham, Jessie M. Moore,
Linda M. Wiley, Darryl
" Hard time"
Jones, Darryl
E Jones; a spe-
cial grandson,
Barnard Jones;
siblings, Elder
Al fon so
(Marie) Jones,
Edwin "Buddy" Dempsey, Louis
(Angelia) Williams, Missouri
Williams, ten other sisters and
brothers, additional relatives
and friends.
Funeral service will be held
Saturday, August 29, 2009 at
11:00 a.m. at Greater
Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church,
45031 Historical Lane, Callahan,
FL 32011, Rev. Jerald Thomas,
officiating. The Wake Service
will be held at Greater Mt.
Pleasant Baptist Church today
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
Interment in Callahan
Community Cemetery by the
Northside Chapel of Marion
Graham, 1504 Gandy Street,
Jacksonville, FL 32208.
Marion Graham
Jacksonville

June Stewart
Mrs. June Stewart, age 93, of
Fernandina Beach, passed away
on Friday morning, August 21,
2009 at Baptist Medical Center-
Nassau.
Born in Rushville, Indiana,
she was the daughter of the late
James Ernest Staida and Rubie
Edith Pike.
Mrs. Stewart was a 1939
graduate of the Christ Hospital
School of Nursing in Cincinnati,
OH. After graduation, she prac-
ticed at Christ Hospital in
Cincinnati, as an Operating
Room Charge Nurse in
Charleston, WV and after mov-
ing to Fernandina, she worked
with Dr. Panos. After moving
to Fernandina, with her hus-
band's job at Container, in 1954
she not only worked with Dr.
Panos but also at the Nassau
County School Board.
In the mid 1960s she joined
the First Baptist Church of
Fernandina where she was
active in her Sunday School
class. Mrs. Stewart was a 50
years member of the Order of
the Eastern Star where she was
Past Worthy Matron. After
retirement she enjoyed tending
her plants and daily visiting
friends that were shut ins.
Mrs. Stewart is preceded in
death by her husband, Philip
C. Stewart, who passed away
in December of 1994.
She leaves behind, their son,
Stanley Stewart and his wife
Chris, Fernandina Beach, FL, a
grandson, Philip N. Stewart,
Munich, Germany, 2 great-
granddaughters, Madeleine and
Lucienne Stewart and two
nieces and four nephews.
Funeral services were at
11:00 am on Wednesday, from
the graveside in Bosque Bello
Cemetery with Reverend Jeff
Overton, officiating.
Mrs. Stewart was laid to rest
beside her husband.
Guests and friends were
invited to visit on Tuesday from
5:00-7:00 pm at the funeral
home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Women's Missionary Union
at First Baptist Church of
Fernandina Beach.
Please share her life story at
www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


DEATH NOTICE

Mr. Waymon Simmons,
age 70, of Yulee, died on
Wednesday morning, Aug. 26,
2009 at St. Vincent's Medical
Center in Jacksonville.
Arrangements will be
announced.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors



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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


ARTS Continued from L4
But Mayor Susan Steger
noted that Episcopal Children's
Services - which runs the Head
Start Program at the Peck
Community Center - is part of
the United Way.
"I think Gandhi said, 'A
measure of society is how we
take care of our weakest mem-
bers,'" Childers said.
Commissioner Tim Poynter
said he agreed the city should
contribute to the care of chil-
dren and the elderly. "If the
organizations were not here,
the city would have to take care
of it," said Poynter.
Poynter added that he had
objections to giving money to
groups such as the film and
book festivals. "I don't think
that taxpayer dollars should go
to those organizations," he
said. "I'm all for tourists and
festivals," he said, "but I think
private people should be
stepping up to the plate ... the
city shouldn't have to fund
them."
Commissioner Jeffrey
Bunch suggested "some kind of
time limit" for funding non-prof-
its.
"I think you need to wean
some of these (non-profits) off
gradually," Steger said. "We
need to focus on social service
organizations. That's the way
we should look at it in the
future."
"We can make a decision
after this year," Steger went on.
"(We can) give them notice we
will be weaning them."
Childers said Micah's Place
was "fiscally very strong" and
suggested the city take $100
from them and give it to mental
health. "They need it a lot less
than some of these other organ-
izations," he said.
"I was a strong supporter of
the Amelia Arts Academy," said
Poynter. "You can take (money)
out of that for the mental health
center."
Steger suggested taking
$200 from the arts academy
and $200 from the Amelia
Island Film Festival, leaving
them with $3,800 and $800
respectively.
"That would be fine," said
Childers.
Commissioners also dis-
cussed budget amendments
and how to keep a required 25
percent general fund "reserve."
As was discussed in previous
budget meetings, the sale of
city land, an increase in elec-



+ YOUTH Continued from 1A
equipment and payroll ... for
the upkeep of these facilities
needs to be subsidized. There
was no decision made by the
leagues on the options that
were given. Another meeting
will be scheduled in the near
future."
Scott Moore of the Babe
Ruth League, who also attend-
ed the Aug. 20 meeting, said
the league's board was meet-
ing Thursday to discuss ideas
on reimbursement costs.
adaughtry@fbnewsleadercom


tric franchise fees for residents
and parking meters were dis-
cussed as ways to plug a possi-
ble $1.4 million shortfall in the
upcoming fiscal year.
Steger said the commission
should also look at city employ-
ee medical benefits and retire-
ment plans, "to see if what we
give them is too rich."
Steger gave an example of a
private business that had pre-
viously matched a retirement
fund up to 7.5 percent, but has
decreased it to 3.5 percent.
"It's happening all over the
place," Steger said. "It needs to
happen in city government as
well.... Is (the benefit package)
too rich? The city needs to look
at it for taxpayers."
But, said Bunch, "the bene-
fits are what keep employees
here, and helps with hiring of
employees. ... A lot of people
on the bottom don't make good
money."
Human Resources Director
Robin Marley said she had
planned for a 12 percent
increase in health insurance
costs for city employees, but as
of Aug. 21 the increase came to
11.34 percent. Marley said
the city is looking at other
health insurance options, and
the increase could be even
lower.
Marley said that because
city employees will receive no
pay increases in the coming
year, and because they are
required to contribute to a
retirement fund, their benefits
package is "not excessively







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rich."
Although no definitive deci-
sions were made, commission-
ers also discussed raising elec-
trical franchise fees by half a
percent, and lowering city
electrical use by having city
employees go to a four-day
work week.
"I'm uncomfortable with
raising franchise fees," said
Steger. She suggested lower-
ing city electrical costs by 10
percent "as a symbolic gesture
... we could raise the air condi-
tioner (temperature) in this
room right now."
I:...d�;.I. adjust all year
long," said Poynter. "Right now
we have to adjust a budget mov-
ing forward. I'm a supporter of
at least trying parking meters.
... If we try something just a lit-
tle unique, we may not have to
add that half percent to the fran-
chise fee."
"There's no magic bullet,"
said Commissioner Ken
Walker. "You've got to decide
what services are necessary
and what you cut ... it's always
a competition and argument.
You either increase revenues
or cut revenues ... as long as
we try to maintain a 25 percent
reserve, and don't go drasti-
cally over or under. ... As long
as we stay approximately close
to that. ... We've gone from
almost no reserve to the 25 per-
cent we have now."
adaughtry@fbnewsleadercom


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4-day workweek?
Fernandina Beach Commissioners are considering the pos-
sibility of a four-day workweek for city employees.
Commissioner Jeffrey Bunch suggested the city could go
to a four-day workweek to save on utility costs. He noted that
the school system closes on Fridays during the summer, sav-
ing "hundreds of thousands of dollars."
City Manager Michael Czymbor conceded that while the
commissioners had good suggestions, the city had already
cut back on many costs. "I don't think (cutting down on ener-
gy) will immediately solve our budget issues," he said.
"The bottom line on a four-day work week is determining
critical services that would have to be open," Czymbor went on.
"The state of Utah did it for the last two years and saved 13 per-
cent ... we're willing to consider it."
"We need to re-educate the public," said Commissioner
Eric Childers. "It's not that big a deal. I had a four-day job and
it was wonderful. There's a lot of success stories out there if
you look ... we have two more meetings. If it looks viable, I'd
be willing to jump on that bandwagon."
adaughtry@fbnewsleadercom


COUNTY
Continued from 1A
where next year's budget will
be finalized - the first of which
is scheduled for Sept. 14.
One such funding request
came from the Boys and Girls
Club. Already funded by the
county at $50,000, the club has
requested an additional
$25,000.
"I think this reaches a
broad spectrum of people in
this community, which is why
I'm bringing it forward," Boyle
said.
County Budget Director
Ted Selby pointed out that the
club only started receiving
county funding within the last
year. "They got zero in 2007-08,
$50,000 for '08-09, and now
they're asking for an addition-
al $25,000," he said.
Most commissioners felt
the requested increase was far
too high.
"I could understand asking
for 10 percent or 5 percent,
but to ask for half again what
you're already getting is a bit
astronomical," Commissioner
Walter Boatright said.
One funding increase the
commissioners did support
was to Sutton Place Behavioral
Health. Making up for a


decrease in state funding, the
county's extra money would
qualify Sutton Place to receive
federal funds.
"They have requested an
additional $19,000, and this is
only so they will qualify for
matching funds," Boyle said.
For qualified mental health
programs, the federal govern-
ment would contribute funds
three times the amount of
Sutton Place's contribution,
Selby added.
"I've seen what Sutton
Place has done for the com-
munity," Commissioner Stacy
Johnson said. "... If the return
on investment is 3-1, I could
support the $19,000."
Funding for maintenance
at the Nassau County Judicial
Annex was also discussed. The
annex's plumbing needs work
and its brickwork needs water-
sealing, according to Building


Maintenance Director Daniel
Salmon. However, Leeper
again said he would not sup-
port a tax increase to pay for it.
"If it's an emergency we
need to address it, but at this
point I'm willing to trade - I'm
not willing to add," he said.
Boyle urged the other com-
missioners not to reject tax
increases out of hand.
"The reason I came up with
these plans this year is that I
think we can do these without
undue burden on the taxpay-
ers," he said. "If property val-
ues continue to go down - and
I don't see anything to indicate
they won't - we're going to be
behind the 8-ball come budget
time next year. I understand
no one wants to raise millage
rates. It's not popular. ... Just
keep in mind this is going to
have consequences."
"(The millage increase)
may be minimal, but I'm look-
ing out for that single mother
who may need that $50,"
Leeper said.
"I think we need to be as fis-
cally conservative a govern-
ment as we can," Holloway
said. "That's why in these
times, if we can give the tax-
payers an extra $10 to buy a
Happy Meal, I want to do that."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


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Love thy Neighbor Day
Sept 11,2001 / Friday, Sept11, 2009
Flowers by Shirley Page
will be giving wrapped
1/2 dozen roses to friends and businesses in
our community with the understanding that
they keep one rose and pass each of the other
five roses on to their friends and neighbors.
The Local Fire/Rescue Truck will be there from 11 -2pm
Passing out fire hats to the kids.
Bubbles is giving customer appreciation cards,
discount coupons & cookies.
Mega Bite is giving free anti-virus screening.
Tony Ryals Art of Hope will demonstrate his talent
and skill, by painting with his mouth.
Surrounding businesses are also participating. Come & see!
96110 Lofton Square Ct (Winn - Dixie Shopping Center)
(904) 261-3855


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


Wreck knocks out power in city


JASON YURGARTIS
News Leader

A car collided with a truck
driven by a man suspected of
DUI after he struck a utility
pole on South Eighth Street and
knocked out power in a wide
area of the city early Monday
morning.
According to a Nassau
County Sheriff's Office report,
James Edward Johnston, 54, of
South Carolina left the roadway
in a 2006 Ford F-150 and
bounced off a utility pole in
front of 2990 S. Eighth St. just
after midnight Aug. 25. The col-
lision caused significant dam-
age to the truck and caused the
pole to lean over the road.
Johnston's truck came to
rest in the roadway, blocking
both eastbound lanes.
Witnesses in a nearby building
heard the noise of the wreck
and walked out to find Johnston
exiting his truck, the report
stated. They yelled to him to
get out of the roadway, which
was darkened due to the power
outage, but an oncoming car
traveling east was unable to
avoid his truck.
The front driver's side of a
1995 Ford, driven by Johana
Danielle Berry, 23, of Yulee col-
lided with the front passenger


SUBMITTED
This photo, taken by a witness, shows the aftermath of a crash that took place just
after midnight Aug. 25 on South Eighth Street. The accident led to the driver's arrest
for DUI, a trip to the hospital for the passenger of another car that struck the truck
and a temporary power outage in the area.


side of Johnston's truck, caus-
ing damage that incapacitated
both cars until a wrecker serv-
ice arrived. One passenger in
Berry's car was injured and
taken to Baptist Medical Center
Nassau.
According to the report,
Johnston, who claimed to have
had two beers at the Palace


Traffic alert in Yulee


The Nassau County
Sheriff's Office has asked
motorists to be aware of a new
traffic pattern at Yulee
Primary School on Goodbread
Road.
The traffic pattern for drop-
ping off and picking up stu-
dents has changed.
Motorists are not allowed
to go north on Goodbread
Road between Koen Road and


the school between 7:15-8 a.m.
and 1:45-2:15 p.m. Monday-
Friday.
Only school buses, school
staff and Nassau County
School Board employees will
be allowed through during
those times.
Nassau County Sheriff's
deputies are temporarily
directing traffic to familiarize
and educate the public.


Saloon prior to the accident,
stated he was unsure what hap-
pened and didn't know where
he was except that he was
going home.
According to the report,
Johnston was taken to the
Nassau County Jail after he
failed a sobriety test, then a
breath test, initially blowing a


0.117. The breath alcohol con-
tent limit for drivers in Florida
is 0.08 percent.
Both Johnston and Berry
were wearing seatbelts and
their vehicles sustained an esti-
mated $10,000 and $5,000 dam-
age respectively, the report stat-
ed.
,. ,, *..k. . ' , ',, , . ' ." ' ,. .. , .. ".


GOP decries mailer


TALLAHASSEE - Repub-
lican Party of Florida Chairman
Jim Greer has condemned a
mailer regarding absentee bal-
lot request forms for the GOP
primary election to replace
deceased State Sen. Jim King.
"As Chairman of the
Republican Party of Florida, I
condemn both the content of
your mailer and your use of the
Republican indicia to imply an
affiliation with the Republican
Party," said Greer in a letter to
Erin DiCesare, leader of the
group responsible for circulat-
ing the mailer, which used
Black Panther images and
President Obama. "Florida law
prohibits you from using the
name or symbols of a political
party without first obtaining the
written approval of that party's
state executive committee."


"The fact that you are a
Democrat who resides in Leon
County leads me to seriously
question your involvement in
a Republican primary in Duval
County," wrote Greer. "Why is
a Democrat collecting Republi-
can absentee ballots requests?
Why are the requests going to
a P.O. box instead of the
Supervisor of Elections? Who is
financing this rogue group?"
"The Republican Party of
Florida is exploring all avail-
able legal options to ensure that
eligible voters are not misled
or disenfranchised by the activ-
ities of you or your organiza-
tion," wrote Greer.
The mailer from the "Con-
servative Voters' Coali-tion" was
sent to Republicans, including
those on Amelia Island, last
week.


'We all see that the key segment for
resurfacing is from 1-95 in. But we have the
Shave Bridge to Atlantic Avenue scheduled
for this (fiscal) year. Is there any possibility
of swapping those projects?'
SCOTTHERRING
NASSAU COUNTY ENGINEERING SERVICES DIRECTOR


AIA Continued from 1A
will continue to grow," he said.
"... From 2003 to 2006, traffic
increased on AIA by 2.97 per-
cent. From 2006 to 2008 it
increased by 7.2 percent."
Williams said A1A is des-
perately in need of repair.
"We're seeing rocks and grav-
el, seeing it literally disinte-
grate under the wheels of the
vehicles that are going
through," he said.
FDOT Urban
Transportation Development
Manager James Bennett said
the portion of AlA on Amelia
Island, from the Shave Bridge
to Atlantic Avenue, is sched-
uled for resurfacing in 2010.
However, the section between
1-95 and the island, considered
the most critical by most who
attended the meeting, is not
scheduled for repairs until
2011.
"My concern is when you
get the kind of traffic we have
on A1A, along with the grav-
eling we're seeing and our
afternoon thunderstorms, it
becomes a public safety issue,"
Adkins said.
"We all see that the key
segment for resurfacing is
from 95 in," said Nassau
County Engineering Services
Director Scott Herring. "But
we have the Shave Bridge to
Atlantic Avenue scheduled for
this (fiscal) year. Is there any
possibility of swapping those
projects?"
"No. That's the short, sim-
ple answer," Baldwin said.
"The main problem on the
road is the ruts. It is a safety
issue," Nassau County
Commissioner Stacy Johnson
said. "When I'm in my large
SUV it's not a big deal, but
when there's any rain on the
road and you're in a smaller
vehicle and try to change
lanes, the pull is amazing."
Baldwin said the Shave
Bridge to Atlantic project will
be bid in March.
"How long will it take to


pick a contractor, and how
long roughly to start work?"
Adkins asked.
"We'll probably award it by
the end of March, and you'll
see them start shoving mate-
rial around within 60 or 70
days," Baldwin said. "The west
section (between 1-95 and the
island) will be let in February
of 2011. So we're going to
screw up your traffic with con-
struction for a year."
"Actually, we prefer to say
we're going to provide eco-
nomic stimulus and jobs to the
community for a year,"
Bennett said.
Adkins said requesting
bids on the west section earli-
er could save money. As the
economy continues to recover,
she said, bids will be higher.
Therefore, it makes sense to
start work earlier.
"If we let that project earli-
er you might get even a
greater economy of value," she
said.
"If we let it in December or
January?" Baldwin said.
"Yes."
"We can look at that,"
Baldwin said.
"Do you know when that
design (for the west section) is
scheduled to be completed?"
Adkins asked.
Baldwin said the design
phase of the west section
resurfacing should be com-
pleted around October of
2010. "If you look at the
February let and back up five
months, there's your design,"
he said.
Baldwin said that while he
understands A1A is in need
of repairs, he cannot promise
any greater speed from FDOT
in affecting repairs.
"With the west component
I can look at moving it forward
and see. We won't have that
answer today," he said. "We're
doing the best we can with
what we've got. We're aware
that A1A is a critical compo-
nent."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


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news source on-line fbnewsleader.com


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


American Legion Auxiliary 174

is now accepting members


The American Legion
Women Auxiliary Unit 174 is
now accepting applications for
auxiliary members.
Women who are eligible
for the auxiliary are the moth-
ers, wives, daughters, sisters,
granddaughters and grand-
mothers of members of the
American Legion and
deceased veterans who served
during World War I, World
War II, the Korean War,


Vietnam War, Grenada/Leba-
non and Panama or in the
Merchant Marines from
Dec. 7, 1941, through Aug. 15,
1945.
The membership applica-
tion fee and annual dues is
$30.
For information contact
Wanda Blue, secretary, 261-
4638, or Courtney Tyson-
Shelby, first vice president,
491-3419.


Fourth Congressional
District Vietnam-era veterans
will receive certificates of spe-
cial recognition from Congres-
sman Ander Crenshaw in a
ceremony slated for Nov. 10
at Naval Air Station
Jacksonville.
The application deadline to
receive the honor is Oct.13.
In the past two years,
Crenshaw has recognized
nearly 500 Vietnam veterans
eligible for either the Vietnam
Service Medal or the Vietnam
Campaign Medal.
This year's ceremony will
recognize the contributions of
all who served in the U.S.
Armed Forces, including the
Coast Guard and the
Merchant Marines, during the
dates of the Vietnam War
(March 1, 1961 to March 28,
1973.)
Armed forces members
who qualified for the Armed
Forces Expeditionary Medal
by service in Vietnam between
July 1, 1958 and July 3, 1965
will also be recognized.
Foreign Service Officers
with the U.S. Diplomatic
Corps members serving in
Southeast Asia during the peri-


ods above are also eligible for
special recognition.
If you are a Vietnam War-
era veteran, live in the Fourth
Congressional District, and
would like to participate, con-
tact Congressman Crenshaw's
district offices in Jacksonville
at (904) 598-0481) or go to the
Congressman's web site at
www.Crenshaw.house.gov to
obtain an application. Click on
Constituent Services, then
Special Events & Notices and
last on the Vietnam Veterans
Recognition Ceremony to
download the press release
and application.
Completed applications
and documentation should be
mailed to 1061 Riverside Ave.,
Suite 100, Jacksonville, FL
32204.
To determine eligibility for
the certificate, veterans must
complete an application and
submit a copy of their service
discharge document or proof
of service in the Diplomatic
Corps or Merchant Marines.
Veterans must be alive and a
current resident of the Fourth
Congressional District of
Florida to participate in this
program.


DON'T LITTER

| SPAY~ NEUTER
A Public Service Anouncement by The News-Leader


Children make


Children might ask tons of
questions like, "Why do we fly
the American flag," or "Why do
we say the Pledge of
Allegiance," but one thing's for
sure - most youngsters put
their whole heart into patriotic
events. They also don't dispute
whether it's right or wrong.
Have you ever watched a
small child vie for the opportu-
nity to stretch taller than the
next and square their shoulders
while keeping their hand cen-
tered over their heart during
the playing of the national
anthem? Kids practically bend
over backwards eyeing the flag
as it's raised up the pole and
always want to be up front wav-
ing their miniature flags during
time-honored parades.
Their excitement is always
so palpable and never fails to
extend to those nearby. They
love the excitement of singing
patriotic songs and probably
know better than most spirited
ditties like "Yankee Doodle."
For these reasons, I believe our
youth of today make the best
patriots.
I recently read two items
which sparked my interest
about child patriots. Both high-
ly influenced me when selecting
a subject for this week's article.
One was a letter from Dr. Lu
Cain from Woodbine Elemen-
tary in Woodbine, Ga. During a
ceremony on the first day of
school, Cain recapped how
crewmembers from the USS
Maryland, present for the cer-
emony, snapped to attention for
the raising of the American flag.
It followed saying, "I thought
of the children who stood so
reverently as they soaked up
the events and knew that they
would hold them in their mem-
ories forever ..."
The second item was
"Fostering a Work Ethic," by
Richard Bromfield. He stated,


VETERAN'S
CORNER

Debbie
Walsh


"Teaching
your chil-
dren how to
work is a
lesson that
will benefit
t h e m
throughout
their lives."
Though
his strategy
tools were
geared to
teaching
children
good work
ethics, I


believe these same concepts
should be used to nurture
young, inquisitive minds in the
art of citizenship. Start early,
teach, have expectations, work
with them, pay reasonably and
be a good model.
With the new school year in
high gear, there won't be a bet-
ter time to nab the attention of
our future leaders and instruct
them on the facts and traditions
of our great nation. Kids are
buzzing with enthusiasm and
their eager, energetic willing-
ness to participate can be con-
tagious. This is a great time to
get our children involved in the
Americanism Program by con-
ducting simple, entertaining
projects that will promote a life-
time of patriotic involvement.
The formative years of life
are the most impressionable
and when starting early, young
citizens learn what it's like to
grow up in a democratic socie-
ty. Learning begins at their first
parade when the American flag
makes her maiden pass down
the street or at a ballgame when
everyone stands for the nation-
al anthem. Learning to be a
patriot is not a difficult under-
taking when you're instilled
with the values of "love thy
country" early on in life.
I believe youngsters need


: best patriots

guidance in learning what is enthusiasm as money.
patriotic and what is not. They Other help may be co
need to see examples, hear the soon also. I'm proud to
whys and why nots and receive attended a recent Ame
our encouragement to freely Legion Post 54 meeting
express those questions. I sus- month when a recommend
pect most people chuckle at was made to purchase
their constant inquisitiveness Americanism coloring b
unless of course, you're a parent for our grade school prof
who hears these questions a Needless to say, there w
gazillion times a day, hesitation on the part ofa
Working in the classroom is dees. In less than 60 sec
a tremendous responsibility and attendees voted to accept
a task not all people are cut out recommendation. Boy, if
for. To teachers who have cho- all issues of the world cou
sen this profession I applaud handled so promptly.
you, but know that there's help For 6-12 graders i
out there when teaching citi- should be trips to historic
zenry in the classroom, like Fort Clinch and vis
Most military service organ- facilities servicing our h
izations have Americanism pro- talized veterans. They si
grams. It's available to the learn the ins and outs of v
young and old, so take advan- in local and national election
tage of the military veteran well as the prerequisite
whose past personal commit- participating in youth scl
ments attest to his true patriot- ship programs sponsored
ic nature. He's out there and various military affiliated o
willing to expand that corner- izations.
stone initially established by our Children look up t(
forefathers. For the older stu- adults in their lives to give
dents, there's the Veterans in sound leadership skills.
the Classroom project to help the only ambassadors
young, inquisitive minds get know and respect. We
answers to the more intricate have to bombard them wit
"why" and "how come." tistics, but parents, fa
For our kindergarten friends and teachers si
through fifth graders learning lead by example and be
can be fun and it's pretty simple good American is no exce
to accomplish with coloring Since 9/11 the ph
books, word search challenges "United We Stand" has 1
and puzzles with a patriotic on new meaning. So let's
theme. Students should be Mr. Bromfield's ,., -..-. ,_i ,
taught about the American flag, heart and start early, te
its beginning and the back- have expectations, work
ground behind the stars and them, pay reasonably
stripes and should be educated be a good role model. If t
on proper etiquette in saying all it takes to build a
the pledge honoring our nation. American citizen, we'll hav
With the current state of the the bag.
economy, budgets are tight, but Debbie is a 22-year vet
most kids don't require expen- retired Senior Master Sergea
sive gifts for a good job done. the Air Force, and a Life Me
Certificates, miniature flags and of American Legion Pos
individual accolades are almost Fernandina Beach.
always accepted with the same whitelabaron@yaho


ming
say I
rican
g this
nation
300
books
gram.
as no
atten-
conds
t the
f only
[ld be

there
l sites
its to
lospi-
hould
oting
ns, as
es for
holar-
ed by
organ-

0 the
them
We're
they
don't
h sta-
amily,
should
ing a
ption.
phrase
taken
s take
* -, to
each,
with
and
his is
loyal
e it in

teran,
ant in
ember
t 54,

o.com


B a n School of Dance
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THE ODD COUPLE THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE
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June 10 - 26, 2010 August 12 - 28, 2010
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CYAN MAGENTA


6A FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader



Rheumatoid arthritis can be treated


Almost everyone knows someone
who suffers with arthritis. In my
family my mother and father, "may
they rest in peace," both had arthri-
tis. We are a family of 12 - Eight
males, four females - and we all
have some level of osteoarthritis,
which is the common form of arthri-
tis, except for my youngest sister,
who suffers from rheumatoid arthri-
tis.
My mother called her "my
change of life baby." My mother
thought that she was going through
her change of life, but several
months later found out that at almost
50 she was pregnant with her last
child. Well, needless to say, this
change of life baby was spoiled by
everyone including me. I saw this
new baby as my own personal life-
size doll.
My baby sister first started feel-
ing sick in her early 30s; 10 years
and countless doctor visits later, she
was diagnosed with rheumatoid
arthritis. My sister is now in her
early 40s and is receiving the proper
treatment she needs. Praise the
Lord, "He gives physicians the abili-


ty to heal."
Rheumatoid
arthritis affects 1.3
million Americans
and three times as
many women as
men. The major dis-
tinguishing charac-
teristics of rheuma-
toid arthritis are
WELLNESS that it is:
CORNER * Autoimmune,
which describes an
immune-system
Elsa Cintron attack that the body
launches upon
itself.
* Chronic autoimmune attacks
can continue indefinitely.
* Systemic, affecting the whole
body.
* Inflammatory.
When white blood cells of the
immune system attack the synovial
membrane they begin to release the
same poisonous substances that kill
bacteria and viruses during an infec-
tion.
The development of rheumatoid
arthritis still continues to elude


Ifyou think you have symptoms, find a rheumatologist,
a doctor who specializes in arthritis. He will have
extensive training in diagnosing and treating these dis-
eases and will recognize subtle clues that are the key to
an accurate and early diagnosis.


researchers, however there are
some factors that may increase a
person's risk of developing the dis-
ease:
* Genetics. HIA-DR4 and family
genes, other genes linked (see
"Rheumatoid Arthritis" in John
Hopkins medicine 2009).
* Infections, several types of
arthritis.
* Exposure to certain bacteria or
viruses.
* Lyme disease (Lyme arthritis).
* Heavy smoking and heavy sec-
ondhand smoke exposure.
* High -protein foods and a diet
rich in red meat.
Preventing rheumatoid arthritis
is difficult because its cause is
unknown. Researchers are examin-


ing the role of hormones in trigger-
ing the disease. Scientists have been
working to develop a vaccine that
might prevent the autoimmune reac-
tions that cause rheumatoid arthri-
tis.
Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
are inflammation, flares, prolonged
stiffness and advanced effects.
It is very difficult for doctors to
diagnosis patients with rheumatoid
arthritis because it mimics the symp-
toms of osteoarthritis, the flu and
other viral illnesses.
It is crucial to receive early diag-
nosis and immediate aggressive
treatment; there is only a brief win-
dow of opportunity to prevent perma-
nent disability and lifelong complica-
tions.


If you think you have symptoms,
find a rheumatologist, a doctor who
specializes in arthritis. He will have
extensive training in diagnosing and
treating these diseases and will rec-
ognize subtle clues that are the key
to an accurate and early diagnosis.
Unfortunately, there is no cure
for rheumatoid arthritis, but disease-
modifying anti-rheumatic drugs can
produce long-term remission. The
goal of treatment is to relieve pain,
maintain function, reduce inflamma-
tion and prevent systemic illness and
joint damage.

This column should be used as a
useful adjunct to other available med-
ical and educational resources related
to rheumatoid arthritis and other
future topics described herein; it
should not be used as an alternative
to personal consultation with a physi-
cian.

Elsa Cintron is a physical thera-
pist and owner of Cintron Rehab and
Wellness Center Visit www.cintronre-
habandwellnesscenter com.
elsacin@gmail.com


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Commercial & Residential

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Carpets and Interiors is a full service decoration center.
Everything for your home in one c.i.1., d. , i.,. ii. ii '! .,,,, 11 ,-.
window treatment center, custom bedspreads and draperies. We
also have a local contractor who does renovations and painting.
The bases of redoing any area in your home are the elements
and knowing the use of the product. We at Carpets and Interiors
can assist you in that decision by educating you on the products
we carry in the largest showroom in Nassau County. Our prod-
ucts are clearly marked and our prices are the most competitive
in our area.
Wood and laminate are two of the most popular products on
the market. They are versatile and come in a number of colors,
sizes and finishes. Engineered wood- being the best product for
our area because the construction is more structurally stable,
and wood is the only flooring product that adds value to your
home. It can be installed above or below grade giving you a
warm rich look. It goes with any decor with a price for most
budgets.
Laminate is a product that is a look-alike for wood or tile. This
is a product that is more serviceable for families with children or
animals. A product the do-it yourselfers find easy to install. This
is a floating product that goes over a
pad. The pad should have a mois-
ture barrier and your
pad will make a dif-
ference in the sound
you hear when walking oi,
the floor. We welcome do-,i-
yourselfers with great dis-
counts.
We also carry ceramic and have
qualified in-house professional
installers for all products.
The staff at Carpet and Interiors invites
you to visit our showroom.

we offer after hour appointments too. The ..,
open Mon- Fri 9-5 Sat 10-2.
We are located at 2248 S. 8th St.
Phone 277-0901. Toll free 888-611-1707


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CYAN MAGENTA


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR., PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL, EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIMPE. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
ANGELINE MUDD,
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
SIAN PERRY, ASSISTANTEDITOR
BETH JONES, SPORTSEDITOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


CNI Community
Newspapers,
C NI Incorporated

The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
r and do not necessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees


COMMUNITY THANKS


Thanks to businesses, not city
I would like to respond to one point in the
letter Aug 26. questioning the funding source
for what he called "First Friday music down-
town." I believe he is referring to Sounds On
Centre, the free street concert held on the
first Friday of months March through October
(except Shrimp Festival weekend). He seems
to believe that city funds are involved in the
presentation of this event.
I would like to let him and all the residents
and visitors who enjoy the music know that
this is sponsored by the Historic Fernandina
Business Association, and supported by the
Convention and Visitors Bureau and many
generous corporate sponsors, as well as bev-
erage, T-shirt and raffle ticket sales. The
HFBA pays for all city permits and police per-
sonnel, and staffs the event with many dedi-
cated volunteers.
There are two more concerts in the 2009
series. The band Touch of Gray will perform
Friday, Sept. 4 (Labor Day weekend) and our
final event will showcase Les DeMerle and his
6-piece Jazz All-Star Band featuring Bonnie
Eisele, as well as the 7-piece TGIF Dixieland
Jazz Band, for a New Orleans Style street cel-
ebration. Please mark your calendars and join
us for the music, and then enjoy shopping
and dining in our treasured historic district
business establishments.
Loren Lum, Chairman
Sounds on Centre
Fernandina Beach

Woofstock
The Nassau Humane Society's "Woofstock
at the Dog Park" Aug. 15 was a far-out party
and an awesome success! Special thanks go to
musicians Alan Huppmann, Ray Hetchka and
Frank Basile for donation of their time and tal-
ent.
Additional thanks go to Wadsworth's Fine
Menswear, Wal-Mart Supercenter, Harris
Teeter, Amelia Liquors, Costco, The Ritz-
Carlton, Amelia Island, the city of Fernandina
Beach, the Sign Shoppe, McGill Aviation,
Outback Services, Blue Moon Silkscreen,
Nassau Liquors and Patrick Higgins for their
many contributions.
To all the volunteers who worked the event,
and to all of our friends in the community
who attended, an enormous thank you from all
of us at Nassau Humane Society and the home-
less animals in our care.
Dane Carmichael
Nassau Humane Society

Back-to-school giveaway
Minister Coverdell and the Coalition for the
Reduction/ Elimination of Ethnic Disparities
in Health (CREED) thank all of you who
helped to spread the word and volunteered to
assist with the back to school supply give-
away, physical and vision screenings, which
were held on Saturday, Aug. 22 at the Martin
Luther King Center.
A special thanks to our physicians, nurses
and Wal-Mart Vision Center who volunteered
their time and energy to make available
screenings to the young people of Nassau
County. We were able to provide 102 screen-
ings, which doesn't include the adults who
received vision and B/P screenings.
We also give kudos to Trinity United
Methodist Church, Baptist Medical Center
Nassau along with Yulee Wal-Mart
Supercenter for providing equipment and
school supplies.
We are already in the process of planning
for next year's event and would like to ask
for more assistance from our local business
and medical community. With additional help
we will be able to offer service to more chil-
dren.
Jennett Wilson Baker
CEO, CREED


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words. Letters
must include writer's name (printed and sig-
nature), address and telephone number for
verification. Writers are normally limited to
one letter in a 30-day period. No political
endorsements or poems will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed. Not all let-
ters are published. Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, PO. Box 766, Fernandina Beach,
FL., 32035. E-mail: mparnell@fbnewsleader.
com. visit us on-line at fbnewsleader.corn


FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader 7

VIEWPOINT/MIKE BOYLE/AMELIA ISLAND CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU



Positive news for local tourism


T here is no use denying the facts:
Amelia Island's tourism industry -
like the rest of Florida and the United
States - is feeling the adverse effects
of a struggling global economy. Yet despite the
downturn, Amelia Island has enjoyed recent
trend-defying growth and improvement of our
local tourism product, which is a very positive
development, and a sign of our local industry's
health and resilience.
In previous columns regarding the tourism
industry and our local Tourist Development
Council, I have tried to highlight the critical
role tourism plays in our Nassau County econo-
my. One in five jobs and one in four businesses
are tourism related, and tourism generates
more than $346 million in total sales, and 36
percent of the sales tax in the county.
But there is another side to the local
tourism picture that may escape your attention,
and that is the construction piece, the actual
"bricks and mortar" of our businesses. At a
time when new construction and renovations
have been extremely hard-hit, a lot has been
happening right here on our own island.
On Aug. 20, the new Marriott Residence Inn
Amelia Island opened its doors on Sadler Road,
becoming the island's newest hotel. Ideal for
leisure and corporate customers, the 133-suite
hotel in Fernandina Beach can accommodate
small and large meetings. Fernandina's his-
toric harborfront Hampton Inn & Suites is
beginning an extensive renovation of guest
rooms, meeting space and common areas. On
the other end of the island, the multimillion
dollar ballroom addition at The Ritz-Carlton,
Amelia Island is nearly finished. When com-
pleted this fall, the project will add 12,000
square feet of new meeting space to the luxury


property, making it one of
, . . the largest conference
hotels in the region.
It's important to under-
stand that these new proj-
ects will not only help
' attract future tourism dol-
lars to our community, but
their construction gave an
immediate shot in the arm
Boyle to our lagging construction
industry. In addition to cre-
ating badly needed jobs,
the new construction, renovations and expan-
sions represent a combined $45 million in
spending which circulated several times
through the local economy in a time of need.
Helping to weather the current storm, the
Amelia Island Convention & Visitors Bureau
(CVB), in conjunction with our tourism part-
ners, is working harder than ever to promote
Amelia Island as the attractive, affordable desti-
nation so many leisure and business travelers
have come to love. The CVB's aggressive mar-
keting efforts play a critical role in maintaining
the island's position in an increasingly competi-
tive marketplace, and seeing to it that our own
community emerges from this downturn as
quickly as possible.
In recent months, the CVB has been attract-
ing attention and generating exposure for
Amelia Island through new vacation package
offers, consumer promotions, advertising
placements, social media efforts and feature
articles. A new "Seaside Salute" discount has
just been announced through print and online
media channels, with 13 of the island's resorts,
hotels and inns offering huge discounts for
active duty, reserve and retired military.


Other consumer promotions have proven
successful this year, including the "Pack Your
Bags" promotion, which gives visitors a credit
to offset checked baggage fees being charged
by the airlines, and the "Free Night, Any
Night" which provides visitors a free night
after booking a qualifying stay. Additionally,
more than 50 area merchants are now offering
discounts through the Amelia Island Value
Card, which has been distributed to more than
10,000 overnight visitors. All of these programs
are designed to generate additional tourist rev-
enue for our destination, and are funded by
"tourist dollars," not local "tax dollars."
On another positive note, the state of
Florida has seen an increase in travel from its
domestic feeder markets of Atlanta, Nashville,
Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham and in Florida
itself, all of which are key to our destination. In
addition, the U.S. Travel Association has pre-
dicted a modest recovery in travel in 2010.
And let's not forget the enduring popularity
of our product. When it comes to finding recov-
ery projects that are "shovel-ready," our beauti-
ful island is ideal for the investment of tourism
dollars. Amelia Island has been voted one of
the Top 10 North American Island's in Conde
Nast Traveler's "Reader's Choice Awards" for
two consecutive years.
These will no doubt be remembered as
some of the most challenging times in Florida
tourism. But we believe these positive develop-
ments, along with outstanding industry sup-
port and the tireless efforts of the CVB, its
staff and marketing partners, will help Amelia
Island emerge stronger than ever in the global
travel marketplace.
Mike Boyle is chairman, Amelia Island
Convention & Visitors Bureau.


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Offensive mailer
Recently Republican voters in
Nassau County who reside on
Amelia Island have been receiving
political mail from an organization
called "Conservative Voters
Coalition." The mailer was an over-
sized jumbo card that was aimed at
encouraging Nassau Republicans to
complete a form that would trigger
a request for an absentee ballot. The
absentee ballot request cards in this
mail piece are directed to a post
office box in Jacksonville as opposed
to being sent to the Supervisor of
Elections Office here in Nassau
County. At the last Republican
Executive Committee meeting last
week several members brought
these mail pieces and raised con-
cerns about this organization.
According to a news article in
the Orlando Sentinel, a 527 group
was created by a Tallahassee lawyer
named David Ramba. The group is
chaired by a Florida State University
adjunct professor named Erin
Dicesare. It is clear that the tone
and statements made in this mail
piece are designed to create a neg-
ative view of various organizations
and individuals shown in the pic-
ture. The mail piece is controver-
sial and is inappropriate in many
ways in that it seeks to create inflam-
mation that is centered on race
issues.
The Republican Party of Florida
and the local party has worked hard
to reach out to minorities and the
youth to help build a stronger base
for conservative principles. In no
way does this mail piece reflect the
values and principles of the local
Republican Party nor the Republican
Party of Florida. I object to the neg-
ative tone and the misperception
that was created by this mail.
As your Republican State
Committeeman I have asked the
RPOF Chairman Jim Greer to work
with us to surface the people respon-
sible for this offensive mail. While
the people who have prepared the
mail have a legal right of free
speech, we also have a right to
object to its approach. It is clear this
type of election communication is
offensive to many and is not helpful
to voters. The constant drumbeat
of negative messages all around us,
from the economy to taxes, the
deficit and unemployment, are the
real issues that concern all voters
and should be the topics that cam-
paigns focus on.
The Republican Party does not
control nor does it approve what
campaigns or their 527 operations
say and do in promoting a candi-
date or position for and against. The
tone of politics often drifts away from
the issues that matter most to the cit-
izens and starts to become entan-
gled in the politics of personalities.
Through our recent Drive the
Discussion 2010 forums we have
worked hard to ensure that the GOP
is listening and responding to peo-
ple.
Voters in Nassau County are
encouraged to seek their absentee
ballot from the Supervisor of
Elections Office or to participate in
early voting as a way to ensure that
their voice is heard in the Senate
District 8 campaign. The voters in
Nassau County are intelligent citi-
zens who will look at the facts and
weigh the positions of the people
working to become their next sen-
ator and will make a choice that
reflects what is best.
Please make plans to cast your
ballot on Sept. 15 in the Republican
primary for state senate. Your local
Republican Party encourages you
to review the candidates and select
the person that will best represent


JEFF PARKER/FLORIDA TODAY


your views.
Douglas D. Adkins
State Committeeman,
Republican Party of
Nassau County
Chairman,
4th Congressional Caucus
Republican Party of Florida

Serve and protect
I am writing in response to the
article that ran Aug. 21 regarding
"Sheriff laments 'power struggle' -
wants respect."
I would first like to say that my
husband is a city police officer and
has been going on 21 years now.
This article made my blood boil! I
have to agree 100 percent with
James Kerrigan in the statement he
made regarding the drug issue - if
the sheriff is so concerned then
why doesn't he do something about
the area where drugs are being
sold if he has knowledge of the deal-
ings as well as genuine concern and
feels enough is not being done?
Since he is, as the Attorney General
ruled, officer for the whole county,
then isn't Fernandina in Nassau
County?
I have listened to the ridiculous
politics for a long time and find it a
real shame that county and city can-
not work together. Do not think for
one minute that these city officers
do not do their jobs every time they
go out on the streets, because they
do, they are very dedicated. The
NCSO officers do as well; we have
several friends in that department.
The county has plenty of issues to
deal with I am sure, just as I am
sure any department does. All of
our officers, city and county, have
heart and soul in this community
even though some of these officers
were not born here, so give credit
where credit is deserved.
It would be nice to see the two
agencies work together and I doubt
I am the only one that feels this way,
even as an officer's spouse. I am
sure the help would be very appre-
ciated if it were offered sincerely
and not condescendingly. To earn
the respect you are requesting, you
have to give it as well.
Thank you to all of our officers
that serve and protect, city and coun-


Lori H. Burling
Fernandina Beach


Boycott
What idiot came up with the idea
of blackouts for the Jaguars games?
I understand this is a NFL rule for
all teams, but where is the logic?
How can anyone become a fan of a
team that they can only watch a few
times a season? I say we boycott all
Jaguar merchandise until they
change the rules. The NFL gets a
slice of everything sold with the
Jaguar logo on it, so I say stop buy-
ing the merchandise.
Bob Hutchinson
Fernandina Beach

Health care control
There is no doubt in my mind
that reforming our health care is
something that we all can agree.
Health care costs are zooming and
we are hearing everyday about hos-
pitals and other medical centers in
financial disarray (banks are not the
only institutions having problems).
It takes money to operate a hospital
and to pay for medical procedures
and its providers. Revenue and
expenses, umm - sounds like a busi-
ness corporation. A hospital and a
doctor's office is as much a busi-
ness as it is a provider of much need-
ed services. What are we to do?
I have been in the medical field
for nearly 40 years and although I
have an MBA degree I would much
rather be working with and helping
patients than to spend my life
crunching numbers or sitting
behind a desk. But it seems to me
that Congress and the president are
proposing a totally different
upheaval in our health care deliv-
ery than we need. Reform yes, con-
trol no.
Give us portability so we can take
our insurance coverage wherever
we go, give us no pre-existing limi-
tations, give us a cafeteria-style
choice so that we can pick and chose
what kind of insurance coverage we
want, give us tort reform so that
physicians no longer have to prac-
tice CYA medicine are just some
examples. The single-payer option
should be given a proper burial
because the needed reform will then
become an unnecessary control
where our options will disappear.
By far the majority of Americans
feel that they have adequate insur-
ance and are satisfied with their


health care. Some "nip and tuck"
here and a few changes there would
make our system look much pretti-
er. Let's concentrate on a few
changes and stop dividing our coun-
try. Reform our system but don't
destroy it. What about the oppos-
ing health care reform bills that have
been introduced already in
Congress? Several of these alter na-
tive bills go to the heart of the prob-
lem and have been shown to pay
for itself instead of putting us deep-
er and deeper into debt. Fix what is
broken but don't destroy what we
have.
Kennard R. Beard, BS,
MBA, RDMS, RVT
Fernandina Beach

'Lion of the Senate'
I and many millions of Ameri-
cans were saddened to learn of the
death of Massachusetts Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy. It is a major
loss to the U.S. Senate and to the
country as a whole. I had the privi-
lege to work for the senator on his
foreign policy staff for one year in
the late 1980's and witnessed first-
hand his dedication and hard work,
which earned him the respect and
affection of his fellow senators on
both sides of the aisle. For example,
his friend Republican Sen. Orrin
Hatch referred to him as an iconic,
larger than life U.S. senator whose
influence cannot be overstated.
A tireless worker on behalf of
the less fortunate in our society,
Sen. Kennedy was also willing to
strive for compromise to achieve
real results. It is tragic that he
passed on before health care reform
could be accomplished, a goal to
which he had dedicated himself
throughout his Senate career. The
only one of the four Kennedy broth-
ers not to die violently in service to
our country, he proudly carried for-
ward his family's dedication to pub-
lic service.
He will be warmly remembered
in our history as is that earlier
"Lion of the Senate" from New
England, also frustrated in his
presidential ambitions, who asked
"How stands the Union," Daniel
Webster. Sen. Kennedy will be sore-
ly missed.
George Chester, Member
Nassau County Democratic
Executive Committee


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


81 COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


First Baptist welcomes Buchanan


In view of call, the music search com-
mittee of First Baptist Church,
Fernandina Beach, had unanimously
recommended Steve Buchanan to come
in view of a call Aug. 9 as worship pas-
tor. On August 7, the Celebration Choir
rehearsed with him. Then on Aug. 8, a
time of fellowship was enjoyed with
Steve and his family of four children and
lovely wife. A meal was also served.
Then on Aug. 9 at the 10:15 a.m. serv-
ice, they had an opportunity to vote.
Steve accepted the call.
The many ministries of the church
lined the church foyer with booths and
information to give everyone an oppor-
tunity to get involved. This was to let
people know how God could use them
to "build the church."
The Steve Buchanan family comes to
us from Buford, Ga. Steve and Robin
were married in 1990 and have four chil-
dren, Ashton, Kaitlyn, Landon and
Mason. Ashton begins college this fall,
Kaitlyn and Landon are in high school
and Mason is in middle school. Steve
was born Jan. 29, 1962.
He has a bachelor of church music
from Shorter College, Rome, Ga. His
principal applied instrument is vocal and
piano. He also plays acoustic and elec-
tric guitar, keyboard and bass guitar. He
enjoys time with his family, golf, hunt-
ing, reading and motorcycles.
Steve's passion and purpose: "God's
work encourages us to worship Him
with music. Psalm 92:1 says, 'It is good
to praise the Lord and make music to
your name, Oh, most High.' However, it
is my belief that worship and music are
not necessarily the same thing. Biblical,
authentic worship is the surrendering to
God all of that which controls our hearts
and forms our desires. We are called to
glorify God, not just in what we sing, but
the way we speak, think and act.
My life purpose is to be used of God
to impact my family, my church, my
community and the world through lead-
ing, teaching and developing lifestyle
worshipers; leading through modeling;
teaching through motivating; and devel-
oping through mentoring.
During the Christmas break of my
senior year at Shorter College, God
spoke clearly to my heart and spirit and
called me to full-time music/worship
ministry.
In 1989, I left full-time staff ministry
and formed "Highest Love Ministries," a
concert music ministry. God called my
wife and I out of this ministry in 1992
and back into full-time staff work, where
we have served faithfully, because of His
faithfulness, ever since! God bless!"
Student Bible studies continue to
meet at First Baptist Church. The guys
meet Mondays at Dr. Henry's home at 7
p.m. Girls meet with Ashley Scott on
Thursday at 5 p.m. in the caf6. Bible
studies are for students in grades 6-12.
Pastors Pals kickoff event at the St.
Marys Aquatic Center on July 31 had to
be rescheduled for Aug. 21. Cost was
still $10 per family for admission with a
T-shirt for the kids. This event was for
kindergarteners through fifth graders
and their families. Back to school picnic,
an annual tradition here at First Baptist
Church, was Aug. 26 at Peters Point. In
case of rain, they were having the picnic
at the Family Life Center.
It was a beautiful day Aug. 11 for the
ladies of the Hazel Allen Circle to get
out and go to their monthly covered
dish meeting at First Baptist Church,
Fernandina Beach. June Grase was the
interesting speaker.
Joyce Peacock hosted the Ruth Cox
Circle meeting at her home Aug. 13.
On Sept. 20, the Old Timers at First
Baptist Church joined Springhill's
Senior Saints for the quarterly luncheon
meeting. Those ladies go all out to deco-
rate and entertain their visitors! Larry
Williams and his lovely wife, Jewel,


enjoy working with this
group at First Baptist
Fernandina.
A big thank you
goes out to Amy
Crosby and her team of
volunteers for a suc-
'b'vpv cessful and exciting
2009 Vacation Bible
School program at
HILDA'S Springhill Baptist
HEAR- Church. All the kids
ABOUTS enjoyed learning about
the things hidden in
God's word, specifical-
Hilda ly in five parables -F
Higginbotham the lost sheep, the
prodigal son, the pearl
of great price, the what and the tears
and the sower.
We had between 50 and 60 children
each night along with dozens of volun-
teers. Around 70 kids came at least one
night and 35 came all five nights. From
crafts to snacks to songs to Bible sto-
ries, the kids enjoyed learning about the
hidden treasures in God's Word.
As our Senior Saints began arriving
for their July luncheon at Springhill
Baptist Church, Norma Beyer writes,
"they found Joe Merrit and Mack
Corbitt busy preparing fish and hush
puppies. Our faithful fishermen are a
blessing."
Our 40 seniors found the dining
room decorated for Independence Day.
Red table clothes adorned each table
with red, white and blue decorations
and patriotic placemats.
Jenny Corbitt asked for prayer
requests. Mae Sauls opened with prayer
and then introduced guest speaker
Pastor Wayne Shelton. Pastor Wayne
spoke of Queen Esther and how God
used her to save the Jewish people.
When she became queen, she had no
idea God had a special purpose for her
in the future.
Pastor Wayne also spoke of our coun-
try and the trying times we face today.
He emphasized that, as Christians, we
need to spend more time in prayer. In
closing, he said we need to pray, pray,
pray for our country and stand up for
our beliefs.
John Ballard led in a prayer of thanks
for our food and for those who had pre-
pared it. We enjoyed a delicious lunch.
On Aug. 20 we hosted the associa-
tional meeting and luncheon in our
church. Sept. 3 is our next Senior Saints
luncheon in the small kitchen dining
room of the FLC. Contributed by Norma
Beyer.
ATeacher Appreciation Breakfast
was enjoyed at West Nassau High
School, Callahan, Aug. 17. Student vol-
unteers were needed to help serve and
parents or students were needed to
make one of the following: muffins,
sausage balls, quiche, cinnamon buns,
fruit, a breakfast casserole, pigs-in-a-
blanket. What a great menu! They need-
ed to feed about 80 people. Youth minis-
ter Brother Todd Carr helped plan this
and told those attending to let him know
what they were taking.
See you at the pole Sept. 23 at 8 a.m.
at West Nassau High School and
Callahan Middle School.
Reach "Kidz Choir" kickoff is Aug. 30
at 5 p.m. at the Family Life Center, First
Baptist, Callahan.
The Senior Saints Alive adult lunch-
eon of Callahan First Baptist was
enjoyed Aug. 10.
College/Career Ministry, Thursday
Night Live, takes place Thursdays at 7
p.m. in the chapel. It is for adults, single
or married, who are interested in wor-
shipping God passionately.
Grief Share is a special weekly semi-
nar/support group for people grieving
the death of someone close. You'll learn
valuable information that will help you
through. The meetings are at 6:45 p.m.


Wednesday. Doug Hodges, Malcolm
Adams.
Have you ever wondered how the
week-to-week administration of the
church happens? There are several
important church committees you
should meet. Trustees are in charge of
the physical property of the congrega-
tion. They make sure everything stays
maintained in good working order.
Chairperson is Willis Galliher.
Finance oversees the finances of the
congregation. They monitor both
income and expenses, prepare financial
reports, develop budgets, establish
stewardship programs, etc. Chairperson
is Terry Powell.
Staff Parish Relations Committee is
responsible for personnel. They work
with the pastors and the church staff.
They are also responsible for develop-
ing job descriptions, evaluations and
offering support to pastors and staff.
Chairperson is Don Twiggs.
Administrative Council is made up of
church leaders who oversee the min-
istries of each of the above committees
and the program committees. In
essence, the job of the church council is
to develop and carry out the mission of
the congregation, to make sure each
committee is equipped to carry out the
mission of the church. Chairperson is
Chris Twiggs.
Vacation Bible School 2009 was a fan-
tastic success! With 96 children and 65
volunteers, this was our biggest VBS in
five years at Memorial United Methodist
Church. We studied the apostle Paul,
purple cloth merchant, Lydia and Rome
and the underground church. I want to
thank all who worked and played and
enjoyed the VBS as well as all the chil-
dren who were blessed by the work of
the volunteers. Thank you, Carol Olson,
director of Christian Education, and
Deena Wolfe, director of VBS.
Monday prayer and communion are
at 11:30 a.m. Staff and members meet in
the sanctuary for this brief service.
September circle meetings at UMW:
Lucille Bennett, Sept. 8, church parlor,
Jean Sydnor, 261-8755; Kathleen Davis,
Sept. 14, church parlor, Willis Galliher,
277-4053; Ann Dickens, Sept. 8, 4418
Titleist Drive, Gail Shave, 491-3713;
Ivalee Hamilton, Sept. 14, Hope House,
410 S. Ninth St., Georgia Wert, 321-
1323; Alice Nolan, to be determined;
Florence Partin, Sept. 14, 86015 Sand
Hickory Trail, Sandi Anderson, 225-
5560.
UMW news: "We will start back in
September after a great summer with
our executive meetings in Maxwell Hall
on Sept. 1 at 10 a.m. All officers and cir-
cle chairmen, please plan to attend with
your ideas for the coming year.
The September unit meeting will be
held Sept. 28 at 6 p.m. in Maxwell Hall
with the Florence Partin Circle as host-
ess. This will be a covered dish and
membership recognition and all new
members of the church and prospective
members are invited. L.U.C.K. Circle
and any new members who need child
care, please contact president Catherine
Eleazer at 277-3439 or Jeanie Houston at
261-5215 and we will make arrange-
ments with the nursery. Mark your cal-
endars. Let's have a great year in mis-
sions and God's work.
Many get well wishes to the Rev.
Frank Camarotti, who is with His lovely
wife, Diane, doing mission work in Ro-
mania. He had to have some heart sur-
gery recently. We're glad Diane is with
him. Please send us an update on your
progress, Brother Frank! We'll be anx-
ious to hear from you two. God bless.
Amelia Missions, thank you. The fish
fry raised $1,054 and the yard sale
raised $625 for the West Virginia mis-
sion project.
"May our Great Heavenly Father
continue to keep us in His loving care."


CAMPUS NOTES

* Danya Friedman, for- 0 Ross Friedman, former- Friedman recently the University of North Flori-
merly of Fernandina Beach, ly of Fernandina Beach, has returned from a six-month da, Jacksonville, with a
graduated from the been inducted into Phi Beta study program in Istanbul, degree in criminal justice. He
University of Georgia this Kappa honor fraternity at Turkey. minored in psychology.
spring at the age of 19. She Emory University in Atlanta, 0 Jared David Brown Brown is the son of Jesse
currently resides in Chicago. Ga. graduated July 31, 2009, from and Charene Brown of Yulee.



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WEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS

Sciacca-Moody


Lisa Marie Moody of
Tampa and Adam Milton
Sciacca of Fernandina Beach
were married Aug. 1, 2009, at
The White Room in St.
Augustine.
The bride is the daughter
of Dennis and Michele
Moody of Tampa and the
groom is the son of John and
Pamela Sciacca of Fernandina
Beach.

Morehouse-Anagnostou
Brandee Jeannette
Morehouse and Nicholas
Michael Anagnostou, both of
Fernandina Beach, will be
married at 3 p.m. April 25,
2010, at The Ritz-Carlton,
Amelia Island. The reception
will follow at Amelia Island
Plantation.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Letty and Edward
Morehouse of Fruitland Park.
The groom-elect is the son of
Lisa and Kostas Anagnostou
of St. Augustine.

Mdntyre-White
Shaneka Monique
McIntyre and Michael Terrell
White, both of Yulee, will be
married at 4 p.m. Sept. 12,
2009, at Amelia Island
Plantation with Elder Emory
Wingard Sr. officiating. The
reception will follow.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Elijah and
Monica Rainey of Yulee. The
groom-elect is the son of
Peter and Betty Williams of
Atlanta, Ga.

Godfrey-Milstead
Joni Beth Godfrey and
Timothy Paul Milstead, both
of Yulee, will be married June


Mr. and Mrs. Sciacca


Miss Morehouse, Mr.
Anagnostou


Miss McIntyre, Mr. White

2010. Ceremony details will
be announced at a later date.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Joan Southerton
and the late Edmond
Southerton of Yulee. The
groom-elect is the son of Rick
and Donna Milstead of
Jacksonville.


MILITARY NEWS


* Air Force Airman
Alexander G. Maphey gradu-
ated from basic military train-
ing at Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week pro-
gram that included training in
military discipline and stud-
ies, Air Force core values,
physical fitness and basic war-
fare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four cred-
its toward an associate in


applied science
degree
through the
Community
., College of the
S Air Force.
He is the
son of Kimber-
ly Maphey of
Maphey Watertown,
N.Y., and
Phillip Maphey
of Fernandina Beach.
Maphey is a 2006 graduate of
Watertown High School.


GARDEN BRIEFS


* Manzie & Drake Land
Surveying is holding a "Lar-
gest Live Oak Tree" in Nas-
sau County contest through
Oct. 31. The last time this
event was held in 2001, there
was a tie between 573 Marsh
Hen Lane and CR 108 north
of Lessie Road, which each
had trees measuring 98.5
inches in diameter.
Entries are encouraged
from all over Nassau County.
The winner receives a plaque
with a photo, latitude and lon-
gitude, size and location.
Call Manzie & Drake at
491-5700, 888-832-7730 or e-
mail mikemanzie@gmail.com.
* Proper Pie Company,
the Fernandina Farmers
Market vendor specializing in
authentic British and Irish
meat pies, London bangers,
sausage rolls and Scotch
eggs, will be introducing a
new pie each week. In addi-
tion to the very popular Steak
and Potato with Guinness Pie,
Shepherd's Pie, Lemon
Chicken Pie with fresh herbs,
and Chicken and Asparagus
Pie, two new pies have
already been introduced.
Be sure to try the new
Lamb Hot Pie and the Steak
and Onion and Cheese Pie;
both have become new
favorites of shoppers and are
selling out fast. Soon to be
introduced will be a Chicken
Marinara Pie with a Parme-
san/Herb Crust. Derek and
Beverly started making these
individual-sized pies on the
*1.1.L L. ii..,, of one of their cus-
tomers and, to continue the
tradition of listening to their
customers, shoppers are
encouraged to make sugges-
tions for new pies. They will
make it, put it on the menu


and see how well the new pie
sells.
The Fernandina Farmers
Market, open every Saturday
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Seventh
and Centre streets, features
farm fresh produce as well as
a variety of organic products,
specialty foods and plants.
Call 491-4872 or visit www.fer
nandinafarmersmarket.com.
* Nassau Sierra Club will
host a guided kayak/canoe
trip to Simpson Creek (Little
Talbot Island) on Aug. 29.
This trip is open to the public.
The three- to four-hour trip
will depart the Kayak Amelia
concession at Little Talbot
State Park at 9 a.m. It will be
about a five-mile paddle with a
stop for lunch on the sandbar
or Bird Island. Those without
kayaks can rent either single
($30) or tandem ($45). Kayak
Amelia will waive the launch
fee and offer renters a 10 per-
cent discount. The paddle is
suitable for beginners.
A personal flotation device
is required and can be rented
from Kayak Amelia. Bring
sun protection, insect repel-
lent, food and drinking water.
Len Kreger will lead the trip.
RSVP to L.Kreger@comcast.
net or (904) 432-8389.
* The Nassau County Bird
Club will hold a field trip to
Huguenot Park on Sept. 5 at 8
a.m., rain or shine. Entry fee
is $1 per car. Meet at the
General Store parking lot.
Target birds are the Piping
Plover, Oystercatcher, Whim-
brel Reddish Egret, Gulls and
Terns. Bring binoculars, field
guide, bug juice, sunscreen,
rain gear, sunglasses, layered
clothing and water. Contact
Carol Wyatt at 261-9272 or
carolinewy @aol.com.


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28, 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Raging rivers, tree roots and getting a grip


he went. He was
without excuse. Our
parents had con-
stantly warned us about the
dangers of the Winooski
River, and now this. To make
matters worse, my friend John
was all alone. One would have
thought he would have been
more careful, seeing he had
grown up by the very river
that was now trying to claim
his life.
As he frantically struggled
to stay afloat, his cries for help
seemed in vain. Only the trees
lining the river's banks were
there to hear and watch as the
strong current carried him
away. Years of his parents'


warnings
raced
through his
mind. How
did it all hap-
pen so quick-
ly? Was it too
. late to even
matter?
My friend
PULPIT John was
NOTES one of those
..... guys that
hardly any-
Pastor one in our
Rob Goyette sixth grade
class even
noticed. He wasn't good look-
ing. He wasn't extremely tal-
ented. And, at the same time,
he never caused a bunch of


trouble. He was just your aver-
age guy; somewhat lost in the
crowd. I suppose that's what I
liked about him. Not a lot of
fluff. What you saw was what
you got. Actually, he seemed
quite content not being
noticed, except on the day he
fell in the river that is.
If it hadn't been for the
lone tree root sticking out
from the muddy bank, this
article would have to end a lot
more tragically. Miracu-lously,
John's hand found the root
and he was able to pull him-
self out. I can only imagine
what it felt like to lay hold of
something so solid at a time
when no one else was there to
help.


I'm sure if I asked John
today to repeat the story it
would come out with the same
amount of gratitude and sobri-
ety as it did the first day he
told it -gratitude for the lone
tree root hanging in the water;
sobriety because he had
underestimated the dangers
of playing around the river's
edge. Let me explain.
John learned the hard way
that anytime we hang out in
places that we really shouldn't
be, it's only a matter of time
before we fall in. He also
learned that, though there's
no guarantee that there will
always be a root in the water
to help us out, God is merciful
and if our repentance is real


so will His help be.
These two essential princi-
ples - sobriety and gratitude -
constitute what I believe to be
some of the most vital rules
for successful living. If we
choose not to heed the coun-
sel and warnings of our heav-
enly Father, like John with his
parents, we shouldn't be sur-
prised if we find ourselves
swept away and in jeopardy of
losing everything we have.
That being said, if that's
you, I'd liked to extend to you
the tree root of heaven - Jesus
Christ. I know, maybe my
analogy sounds a little hokey
to some of you but it really
doesn't matter. When no one
else is around, and you realize


how desperate for help you
are, Jesus is the only solid
thing to grab onto. Having
been there, I'm not ashamed
to declare it. I can honestly
say that the gratitude I feel in
my heart and the growing
respect I have for God's coun-
sel and guidance have given
me a quality of life I didn't
know existed.
According to the Bible,
Jesus is the root of the house
of David and is the only way
for mankind to be saved.
(Revelations 22:16, Isa. 11:10,
Acts 4:10-12)
Robert L. Goyette is pastor
of Living Waters World
Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Mothers Under Grace
Grace Community Church has a
support and mentoring group for
mothers of all ages and stages. The
group is open to mothers in Nassau,
Camden and beyond. The group will
host monthly outings and play dates
for the kids. It's a causal and fun
group for moms to fellowship. Events
and community discussion begin
online at Facebook, www.facebook.
com/group.php?gid= 126007469898.
Spanish services
The Promised Land Church offers
worship services on Sunday from 10
am.-noon, Sunday School at 2 p.m.
and evening service at 7:30 p.m. On
Tuesday, there is Bible study at 7:30
p.m. for men, women and youth.
General Bible study is offered from
7:30-9 p.m. on Wednesday. Free
Spanish and English classes are
offered from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on
Thursday, beginning Sept. 3. Youth
Activities take place at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, and there is a prayer meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.
The Promised Land Church is at
312 S. Eighth St. Call 349-2595.
Newservice
First Corinth Missionary Baptist
Church, 1124 Hickory St., invites the
community to its new Thursday night
service at 7:30 p.m. Come be healed,
be delivered and be set free.
Food giveaway
Lifeline Ministries, 1897 Island
Walkway, will hold a USDA food give-
away from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 29. For
information call 491-5401.
New music programs
The Music Ministry at Memorial
United Methodist Church invites you
to join it this fall. It is adding two new


groups - Beginning Bells (intergen-
erational) and Liturgical Dance for
ages 5-7. Or join one of the many
other groups - Cherub Choir, Kids'
Choir, Youth Choir, Liturgical Dance,
Campanelli Dolci, Bellissimo Bells,
Orchestra, Praise and Worship Team,
Ladies' Ensemble, Worship Choir
and Chancel Choir. Call Beth
Jurovcik, director of Music
Ministries, at 261-5769, or e-mail
beth@mumconline.com.
'Fireproof screening
Amelia Baptist Church will host a
screening of the movie "Fireproof'
on Aug. 29 at 6 p.m. This inspira-
tional contemporary film looks at
what a couple does to save and
restore their marriage. Guests from
the community are invited to attend.
Dinner for all and child care through
age 12 will be provided at no cost.
RSVP your child care to 261-3042.
Mom to Mom
A new Mom to Mom group is
starting at The Journey Church on
Sept. 2. Mom to Mom meets the first
and third Wednesday of the month
from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Childcare is pro-
vided for birth-five years. Fee is a
donation. Come to The Journey
Women's Expo on Aug. 29 from 10
a.m. till noon to sign up.
E-mail momtomom@thejourney-
family.com or call 261-8310.
'God's Active Men'
Historic Macedonia African
Methodist Episcopal Church, 202 S.
Ninth St., Fernandina Beach, pres-
ents "God's Active Men" at 11 a.m.
Aug. 30. The call is out to all men and
their families to join the men of
Fernandina Beach as they give
thanks and praise to God. There will
be scripture, a gospel jubilee, gospel
choir and praise band, and a word


from God by Pastor Ewing. Everyone
is welcome. Call 261-4114 or (904)
310-6377.
Promotion ceremony
Grace Community Church will
hold a promotion ceremony as chil-
dren graduate to new church classes
Aug. 30.
New curriculum for children's
programming starts Sunday. This
year, every class, regardless of age,
learns the same Bible lesson. In addi-
tion, the new curriculum provides
corresponding in-home, family wor-
ship materials for review.
Grace Community Church wor-
ships Sundays at 10:30 a.m. at Yulee
Middle School's caf6torium, 85439
Miner Road. Contact Pastor Dave
Bradsher at pastor@gracenassau.
com, 491-0363 or http://gracenas-
sau.com.
Familyday
The pastor and congregation of
Franklintown United Methodist
Church, 1415 Lewis St., American
Beach invite the community to
"Friends and Family Day" Aug. 30 at
11 a.m. The church opens its doors
to the community as it celebrates
coming together in "Prayer, Praise
and Purpose." Dinner will be served
in the Gabriel Means Fellowship Hall
following the service. Call 277-2726.
Catholic class
St. Michael Catholic Church is
sponsoring an inquiry class for those
who wish to know more about the
Roman Catholic faith and what
Catholics believe. The program, call-
ed R.C.I.A., will start on Sept. 1 and
continue each week through Easter
2010. There is no cost and the first
session will meet in the St. Michael
Academy library at 6:45 p.m. Sept. 1.
Call 261-3472 for information.


20s &30s Bible Study
Grace Community Church
invites Nassau County residents
under 40 years old to a special
Bible study for those in their 20s
and 30s.
The small group meets weekly
in Yulee and it is open to the pub-
lic. Come join the fun, fellowship
and food while meeting new people
and discussing important issues
related to your specific generation
and life stage. Contact Pastor Dave
Bradsher at 491-0363 or www.gra-
cenassau.com.
You may also sign-up online at
www.facebook.com/event.php?eid
=119614596646.
Community study
Community Bible Study is an
interdenominational organization
committed to helping people of
every age grow in their knowledge
and love of Jesus Christ.
Individuals from all backgrounds
and levels of Bible knowledge are
invited to join one of the weekly
classes that begin in September.
For information contact the appro-
priate class coordinator:
* Wednesday morning women
and children (infant and home
schooled): Kathleen Minor 225-
8125.
* Monday evening men: Tony
Taylor, 321-0785
* Monday evening women:
Linda Bell, 261-0569
* Monday evening teens:
Jeanne Scott, 491-9849
* Monday evening E-teen (mid-
dle school): Bobbie Burch, 261-
2533
Women's study
The Amelia Island Women's
Evening Community Bible Study


invites you to join an in-depth, non-
denominational study of the Book
of Acts.
Meetings will be Monday
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church, 961167
Buccaneer Trail across from
Harris Teeter. The study begins
Sept. 14 and continues through
May 3.
For more information and to
register, call Michal Polese at 548-
9971 or Linda Bell at 261-0569.
Visit www.communitybiblestudy.
org and www.ameliaislandevecbs.
org.
Beth Moore study
Amelia Plantation Chapel will
begin an eleven-week Beth Moore
women's Bible study - Jesus The
One And Only - starting Sept. 22 at
10 a.m.
This is an in-depth study of the
life of Jesus based on the book of
Luke. Through video and group
study, participants will join Moore
on a life-changing journey that
leads through the hills of Galilee
with the Teacher, across the lake
with the Master, and finally on the
road toward the cross with the
Savior - getting to know Jesus inti-
mately, as though walking with
Him during His earthly ministry.
The study includes a workbook for
a cost of $15. A nursery will be pro-
vided upon advance notice. For
information or to register call the
chapel office, 277-4414, or e-mail
sandyshawaifl@bellsouth.net.
Amelia Island study
The Amelia Island Small Group
of Grace Community Church
meets Tuesday evenings on the
south end of the island for Bible
study, fellowship and food. For
more information, call 491-0363.


"Worship this week at the ypace of your choice"
1 I


Christwalk
Church

Sunday Celebration
10:00 am
'Kidswalk" 10:00 am
lTakeout" Wed 630pm
2920 Bailey Road
261 7120 thechristwalkcom



S.jp..;t Church
Sunday S chool..........................................9:30 am
Sunday W orship ................................ 10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA .......................... 6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study .................... 6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org


/ \
AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
I4n Interdenominationaf
Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
August 30, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.
MESSAGE:
"Hey Buddy, Do You Have Time?"
Guest Preacher, Chaplain Jim Tippins
MUSIC: "At the River"
"I waited for the Lord"
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-
The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
(904) 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes
You!
Located at the
corner of 8th &

Sunday
Holy Eucharist
8:30 am &10:00 am


Wednesday
Holy Eucharist


904-261-4293


12:10 pm www.stpetersparish.org


YULEE UNITED
- METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


.9 --


SLANCHOR

_Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
515 Centre Street


- 1 I I J


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor
--- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
---Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.poplcamelia.org

Provuience .
(Pres6yterian
C(jurci VLORMDA * S'-
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corner Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.providenceyulee.com
providenceyulee@comcast.net


U


ww.DiaJoCIpi i


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship with us where
the Bible is our only Authority.
Church Services: 11am
'r..1Ckon Citrona / 225-5368
www.ameliaislandchurchofchrist.com


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6m Street
Dr. Holton Slegling
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:50a
Nursery
Children
Youth
Adults
261-3837
www. 1 stpres-fb.com


M St. Minwdef1fl CtoirEChrch.Iuj


Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor


I I. I. d, I l

Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566,
asin call qn4-277-n5In


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
innovative Style, ContemporaryMusic, CasuaAtmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday morn. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10'30am Sunday
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ.. Connecting with People.


IoieA7 FOR ORE NFO (90)225077


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www blackr~okbatistfc om


"Discover the Differ
Amelia Ba
Churcl
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil
Sunday Worship Service -
Bible Study - 9am
Nursery provided for all s
Small group studies-Adul
Wednesday - Prayer Service
Preschool and Children Ac
961167 BUCCANEE
Corner of Buccaneer Tr, & Gerbing Roa
For More Information Call: 26


BASKET
CHEERLEA!
K5 - Bth GO

Sign-up or
@ FBFirst

Evaluations
September 1
GAMES BROAD
LIVE ON THE
First Baptist Chi
1600 S.8th Str
Fernandina Beat
904-261-36
Rev. Jeff Overton, S


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... .9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. . 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training ........... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ....... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnieview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Snointsbantistck

yUTLEE
DPTIST aa
DCHUTRCHi

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904o225-5128


tait IV I ate r s FIRSTMISSIONARYBAPTIST
ptist Living WatersCHURCH
I world outreach 20 South Ninth Street 2614907
* Contemporary Worship Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
Helton SUN 9:30am The Church in the
10:30dam SUN : E 70r Heart of the City
cesWED 7:00pm With the Desire to be in the
ts 6pm Youth, Nursery & Hearts of All People
e6:30pm " J Chldfren's Ministfories SundayNewMembers Class 9 a.m.
ce 321-2117 Moi.n Worsp I1a.m.




tiurtchs SniddyMe hodis:30hurc
:R TRAIL Rob & Christie Goyette Wrdneaayooday Prayer
d, Femandina Bch Senior Pastors On A IA mile wst of Amlia Islad WednesdayMid-wee Service 7- p.m.
1-9527 www.LivingWatersOutreach.org Miist.es:Bus& Va, Couples, Sigles. Youth







ALL S .. ... .. .








S2th! ! ho ( d. . ..... : i

�CAST Oen H easO Mn Oen Doors

lurch
reet Mu ic*pogrms nd*mal grupsav i
ch. FL

r Pastor


BIBLE STUDY CLASSES


oC y Trciuty rngacan Church





tAnglcan Churck oforti America
Our province is a founding member of the Anglican Church
of North America
As Anglicans we believe:
* the Bible is the inspired Word of God
* In God the Father who created us
* In Jesus Christ His Son who saved us
* In the Holy Spirit who sanctifies us
As Anglicans we worship using the traditional Liturgy in the
1928 Book of Common Prayer, Affirming the Nicene and the Apostle's Creed.
Sunday Services
Holy Communion 8:00 am & 10:00 am (with music)
Morning Prayer 4th Sunday of each month 10.00 am
Rev J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
1830 Lake Park Dr. (Amelia Park) Fernandina Beach
904-491-6082 * www.HolyTrinityAnglican.org


111 - - - - -11 1o=


7 77=77


1 0 ffz/ I/ //JP" I


il - - -- - - - - -- - - - - -- --. - -


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


10A AROUND SCHOOL


FRIDAY, August 28,2009/NEWS-LEADER


CLASS NOTES

PrymeTime
enrolling
YMCA Pryme Time is now
registering for quality before-
and after-school programs
countywide. For questions and
details contact Jen at 261-1080.
Homeschool support
Two Wings Homeschool
Support Group welcomes
homeschool families and inter-
ested families to its back to
school informational get
together on Aug. 28 and Sept.
4 at Central Park from 1:30-3
p.m. Experienced home-
schooling families will be
there to offer support. For
information call 277-1841.
Aviation classes
Florida State College at
Jacksonville is offering fall
term Aviation and Air Traffic
Control classes at the Betty P
Cook Nassau Center. Registra-
tion is in progress for the fol-
lowing classes that begin the
week of Aug. 31 and end the
week of Dec. 18. Classes are
held in the state-of-the-art avia-
tion lab. Aviation Weather is
Tuesday from 6-9 p.m.;
Environment of the Air Traffic
Controller is Wednesdays
from 6-9:15 p.m.
To register for classes or
for information call the Nassau
Center at 548-4432.
FBMS open house
Fernandina Beach Middle
School will hold an open
house beginning at 7 p.m.
Sept. 14 in the auditorium. For
information call 491-7938.
Literacy fair
Florida State College at
Jacksonville will present its
Seventh Annual Family Liter-
acy Fair for residents of Duval
and Nassau counties at the
North Campus, 4501 Capper
Road in Jacksonville on Sept.
19 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. It is
free and open to the public.
The fair will feature interac-
tive games and music, face
painting, JSO equipment, Mr.
Wizard, music, storytelling,
games, prizes and surprises.
There will be live performanc-
es and demonstrations by an
illusionist, a ventriloquist and
book characters, as well as the
opportunity to take a reading-
level assessment. A dental
presentation and vision
screening will be available.
Lunch will be provided.
For more information call
(904) 766-6553.
Supplies giveaway
Nassau County teachers
and paraprofessionals are
invited to a free supplies give-
away from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sept.
22 at ARC/Nassau, 86051
Hamilton St., off US 17 north
in Yulee. For information call
Rhonda Barcus at 225-9355.
You may fill three bags with
supplies for your classroom.
Bring an ID identifying you as
an educator (old pay stub,
etc).
Mentor training
Training for those interest-
ed in becoming mentors in
Take Stock in Children of
Nassau County will be held
Sept. 22, 1-4 p.m., in room T-
126 at the Florida State
College Betty P. Cook Nassau
Center, 76346 William
Burgess Blvd. in Yulee. The
training class is sponsored by
Take Stock in Children and is
free. Call Jody Mackle, Take
Stock Program director, at
548-4464 to reserve a seat.

Nassau Center
classes
Classes starting the week
of Sept. 28 at the Betty R Cook
Nassau Center include: Life in
its Biological Environment,
Biology Lab, Introduction to
Criminology, Introduction to
Information Technology,
English Comp. I and II, Intro-
duction to Business, Human-
ities, Introduction to Outdoor
Adventure Leadership, Intro-
duction to Literature, Elemen-
tary Algebra, Intermediate
Algebra, College Algebra, Pre-
Calculus Algebra, General
Psychology, Strategies for
Success in College, Career
and Life, Fundamentals of
Public Speaking, and Introduc-


tion to Sociology.
To register for classes or
for information call the Nassau
Center at 548-4432.
Coop enrolling
The Amelia Island Parent
Co-Op Preschool is enrolling
now for fall 2009 preschool
classes for ages 2 and 3. Call
261-1161 or visit www.aipcp.
org. The Co-Op is located at
5040 First Coast Hwy..


State issues'Xtreme Cuisine' challenge


TALLAHASSEE - Florida teachers
and other youth activity coordinators
with students ages 10-15 can enter to
win a cooking session to learn "Xtreme
Cuisine" techniques for preparing
healthy, kid-friendly recipes.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services in
recent years has introduced youths
around the state to the world of cooking
and good nutrition through its "Xtreme
Cuisine" program. Cooking schools for
middle-school students have been held
in Tampa, Miami, Orlando, Tallahassee,
Pinellas Park, Ocala and Naples.
Using the "Xtreme Cuisine" cur-
riculum, students learn to prepare
whole-wheat pizzas, fruit parfaits and
other nutritious and tasty treats. They
also learn how Florida fruit and veg-
etables used in these recipes provide
vitamins and minerals that can help pre-
vent heart disease and other obesity-
related illnesses.
In addition, students learn the dan-
gers caused by excessive amounts of
salt, sugar and fats in their diet, and
how fiber could eliminate their desire for
high-calorie, low-nutrition snack foods.
They also learn how many calories are
needed for their age and gender, the
vitamin and mineral content of many
Florida fruits and vegetables, and how
to read a food nutrition label.


'Instead of automatically reaching for junk foods,
we want (students) to explore healthy alternatives
by using fresh Florida fruit and vegetables as
ingredients for fun and delicious snacks.'
FLORIDA AGRICULTURE COMMISSIONER CHARLES H. BRONSON


"Many children often prepare their
own after-school snacks when they
come home each afternoon," Florida
Agriculture Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson said. "We want to help them
change their snacking habits. Instead of
automatically reaching for junk foods,
we want them to explore healthy alter-
natives by using fresh Florida fruit and
vegetables as ingredients for fun and
delicious snacks."
Now in its second year, the "Xtreme
Cuisine Chef Demo Contest" provides
teachers who conduct and document
their own cooking class locally, an oppor-
tunity to win a complimentary session
with the department's "Xtreme Cuisine"
chef. These students will learn advanced
cooking techniques. All food and pro-
motional items will be supplied for the
winning classes of up to 75 students.
To enter, teachers must set up and
conduct an "Xtreme Cuisine" class with
at least 10 students in which the stu-


dents prepare at least two "Xtreme
Cuisine" recipes using at least six total
fresh Florida fruits and vegetables. The
classes must use the existing curricu-
lum, which can be ordered online at
www.Florida-Agriculture.com/educa-
tion/xtreme.htm, and must be held
between Sept. 30 and Dec. 31.
At the completion of the classes,
teachers must fill out the "Xtreme
Cuisine Chef Demo Contest Entry" and
submit it with the required accompa-
nying documents and photographs,
specifying the categories they are enter-
ing.
A winning class will be selected in
the following categories:
1. First - The first completed entry
to be postmarked with accompanying
documents will win.
2. Great - The coordinator with the
greatest number of participating stu-
dents will win.
3. Smart - The class that demon-


states the most impressive knowledge
gained from the local class will win.
Student essays, photos, quotes, draw-
ings and other descriptions are encour-
aged.
Classes can be organized by public
and private school teachers, agriscience
teachers, school food and nutrition man-
agers, and youth activity coordinators
with County Cooperative Extension
Offices, FFA chapters, Florida Farm
Bureau groups and other related areas.
Entries must be postmarked on or
before Dec. 31. The winner will be noti-
fied on or before Jan. 30, 2010, and the
"Xtreme Cuisine Chef Cooking Demo"
will be held prior to May 31, 2010.
'The nutritional information provid-
ed at the 'Xtreme Cuisine' events helps
students make healthy eating choices as
they become adults," Bronson said.
"Learning the importance of good nutri-
tion at a young age is the key to a
healthy future."
In 2009 more than 180 students in
the three winning classes were treated
to chef demonstrations.
For more information contact:
Arlette Roberge, Xtreme Cuisine,
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, 407 South Calhoun
St., Room 429A Tallahassee, FL 32399-
0800. Call (850) 922-9828 or e-mail rober-
ga@doacs.state.fl.us.


BURNS FAMILY HONORED


+


UUIMITI'D
The Fernandina Beach High School Foundation recently held a ribbon cutting for the Paul and Annie Burns Mentoring Center, with benches
being placed in their honor. Attending the ceremony were, from left, Jim Burns, son, Ella and Megan Burns, granddaughters, Elizabeth Purvis,
daughter, Mitch Purvis, grandson, and Abigail Purvis, great-granddaughter. The FBHS Foundation is a non-profit organization that raises
money to enhance academics at FBHS and oversees an endowment fund for that same purpose. The Burns family has been involved in the
FBHS Foundation for many years and was recognized for their generous contributions with the benches being placed in their memory.


Arts Academy enrolling now


For the News-Leader

Classes for all ages begin next week at
the Amelia Arts Academy, 516 South 10th
St, Fernandina Beach, including:
* Community Drum Circle - Mondays
from 5-6 p.m., an introduction to percus-
sion, composition and recording that is
perfect for all ages and all walks of life.
Join a community of varying ages and
skill levels to create and play rhythms.
Bring your own drum, or play one of the
academy's. Cost is $60 for the 5-week
course.
* Introduction to Celtic Music -
Wednesdays from 1-2 p.m., learn to play
the Pennywhistle and see why the ancient
art form of Celtic music has so much
modern-day popularity. Cost is $100 for
the 8-week course.
* Mommy & Not Me?, Saturdays from
10-11;30 a.m. Family time is wonderful,
but sometimes everyone needs a break.
Mom, dad, grandma, grandpa, nannies
and even older siblings can get a much-
needed break while kids have a great
time, too!
* The Art of Dream Catching, Sept.
27. Kids will enjoy creating dreamy art
projects while the adults work with
award-winning author and speaker Tara
Meyer-Robson to learn how to turn their
dreams into reality!
* Portraiture, Oct. 24. Preserve your
memories for many generations by learn-
ing to paint portraits of your loved ones.
Kids will enjoy a separate portraiture
class that focuses on drawing and paint-


ing skills. Cost is $30 for an adult/child
pair, $20 per person.
* Miss D's Elementary Band. All chil-
dren, ages 9-12, are invited to participate.
No experience is a plus! The first rehears-
al is Sept. 8 at 4:15 p.m. Students will have
a chance to explore the many instru-
ments available and choose one for them-
selves.
Cost is $50 per month, or $25 per
month for students enrolled in private les-
sons.
Join the academy's community of
musicians. Stop by and purchase your
membership card and receive exclusive
benefits such as: Participation in the New
Horizon's Concert Band, Academy
Strings & Chamber Music Orchestra,
Academy Jazz Collection, Musician's
League, discounts on classes and pro-
grams.
For more information on any of these
classes, call 277-1225.
Amelia Arts Academy is a 501(c)3 non-
profit organization and one of only four
certified Community Schools of the Arts
in Florida. Its mission is to provide educa-
tion in the arts at affordable rates to all
interested persons, regardless of age,
race, religion, ethnic origin, financial
means or level of ability. The academy
has been carrying out this mission since
1992 through individual instruction,
group lessons and ensembles, after-
school art and dance workshops, pro-
grams for the disabled and disadvan-
taged, creative arts programs for seniors,
community entertainment, guest per-


JSO student special
The live symphonic sound of Sound Check Card by Sept. 17
the Jacksonville Symphony will receive free admission to the
Orchestra is as pure as it gets. dress rehearsal of the JSO's up-
And now students of all ages can coming production of "Oklaho-
enjoy the Jacksonville Symphony ma!" Thursday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.m.
in all its brilliance with the Sound Sound Check Cards will be
Check Card. available for purchase in the
For $25, any student can be- Times-Union Center lobby start-
come a Sound Check cardhold- ing at 6 p.m. Students may also
er, gaining admission to every purchase Sound Check Cards in
JSO Masterworks, Friday Fusion advance through the JSO box
and Coffee series concert for an office by calling (904) 354-5547, or
entire season. The card also online at www.jaxsymphony.org.
allows two friends admission for For more information, call the
$10. Parents of Sound Check Jacksonville Symphony music
cardholders also can join their education department at (904)
children for just $10. 354-5657, or e-mail education
Students who order their @jaxsymphony.org.



Scouting round-ups


Boys between the ages of 6 to
10 or in the first through the fifth
grade can come check out Scout-
ing during signups all over
Nassau County.
If you love learning new
things, camping, fishing and earn-
ing badges you are more than
welcome to join.
If you cannot make the initial
signup you still can join any time.
The North Florida Council of the
Boy Scouts of America will be
glad to hook you up with a pack of
Cub Scouts or a troop of Boy


Scouts. Please note the time and
place nearest you. Check out the
web site at: www.nfcs zcouting.org
or call 1-800-232-0845.
Round-up dates include:
* Emma Love Hardee: Sept.
10 at 7 p.m.
* Yulee Elementary: Sept. 1
at 7 p.m.
* Callahan Elementary: Sept.
3 at 6:30 p.m.
* Hilliard Elementary: Oct. 8
at 7 p.m.
* Bryceville Elementary: Sept.
9 at 7 p.m.


Clay shoot to raise funds for Nassau Boys & Girls Club


Nassau County Fire/Rescue
Professionals, Local 3101, is holding its
second annual Sporting Clay Shoot
on Sept. 11 (Patriot Day) at Amelia
Shotgun Sports, 86300 Hot Shot Trail,
in Yulee.
Proceeds gathered from the event
will be donated to benefit the Boys and
Girls Clubs of Nassau County.
The competition consists of five-per-
son teams rotating and shooting at 15
different stations. Awards will be dis-
tributed for teams with the best overall
scores.


The event will begin at 10 a.m. with
a shotgun start and conclude with a
barbecue dinner, presentation of awards
and raffle prize drawings. Skill levels
of all types are invited to participate.
The Fire/Rescue professionals
selected the Boys and Girls Clubs of
Nassau County as beneficiary for this
event because "we really are impressed
with the role Boys & Girls Clubs serve
in helping local youth," said Chris
Gamble, Fire/Rescue Professional and
event organizer. "We've visited club-
sand have helped the kids with fire safe-


ty; we believe as professionals in our
county that our organization should give
back to our future and community."
"Last year's Sporting Clay Shoot was
a fun and really well-run event," report-
ed Dan Powell, board member of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Nassau County
Foundation and special liaison to the
fire/rescue union for this event. "It's a
going to be a good time for both experts
and novices, and a great way to help
children in Nassau County. Boys and
Girls Clubs is pleased to again be the
beneficiary of this community effort."


Tickets for those that register before
Sept. 1 are $80 for an individual slot or
$400 for a team of five; registration
includes the shoot, dinner and refresh-
ments. After Sept. 1 the price will be
$100 for an individual or $500 per team.
Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze spon-
sorship opportunities also are available
from $100 to $2,000.
For information, contact any Nassau
County Fire/Rescue union member or
Chris Gamble at 753-4644. More infor-
mation and online registration is also
available at www.NCFRD.com.


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28,2009 NEWS News-Leader


PONTE VEDRA BEACH


See the natural beauty of Northeast Florida at its best


by JENNIFER
KNOECHEL
STAFF WRITER
Whether you're kayaking
alongside dolphins in the
Guana River, or walking
across towering dunes to
the beach, Guana River
State Park offers the natural
beauty of Northeast Florida
at its best.
Guana River State Park is
part of the Guana
Tolomato Matanzas
National Estuarine
Research Reserve (GTMN-
ERR), located off State Road
A1A in Ponte Vedra Beach.
Recreational activities at
Guana are primarily based
around the variety of natu-
ral resources and include
hiking, biking, fishing,
kayaking or canoeing,
horseback riding and bird
watching.
Guided beach walks, trail


walks, sunset kayak tours
and kayak fishing tours are
also available.

NATURE TRAILS
Hiking and biking are
available along the nearly
10 miles of nature trails
and old service roads that
wind through the ham-
mock, scrub and flatwoods
in the interior portion of
the GTMNERR.

BEACH
There are three beach
parking lots on the west
side of A1A. Park here and
walk across A1A to the
beach dune walkovers that
lead to a coquina sand
beach (there are no life-
guards at the beach). The
South beach parking lot is
wheelchair accessible. Pets
on a leash are allowed on
the hiking trails only.
No pets are allowed on


the beach.

EDUCATION CENTER
A right whale hanging
from the ceiling is the first
thing you'll notice when
you enter the 21,000
square-foot Environmental
Education Center at GTM-
NERR. The Education
Center includes interpre-
tive exhibits, aquariums,
classrooms, teaching and
working laboratories, an
auditorium, and an out-
door amphitheater over-
looking the Guana River
Aquatic Preserve.
There is a "scavenger
hunt" available to com-
plete as well as a 15-minute
introductory video. There
is also a nature store which
helps support the GTM
Reserve's education, stew-
ardship and research pro-
grams.
Educational program-


ming is also available, such
as weekend guided nature
walks and Family Fun
Hour, held on the third
Wednesday of each month
with additional events dur-
ing the summer. The next
family fun hour will be
held Aug. 19 from 2:30 to


3:30 p.m., and features the
book, "Danny & Daisy
Dolphin" by Suzanne Tate.
The story will be followed
by a dolphin craft activity
for participants to take
home. Participation is free,
but registration is required
by contacting the Reserve
at 904-823-4500. All mate-
rials for the event will be
supplied.

LOCATION
Driving south on A1A
you don't need a sign to
know when you've reached
the Guana Reserve. Homes
lining either side of A1A
give way to the natural
beauty of the area. The
GTM Research Reserve and
Guana River Road are
located off A1A, seven
miles north of Vilano
Beach, 10 miles south of
Micklers Road in Ponte
Vedra and 17 miles south
of J.T. Butler Boulevard.
The beach access points
are a few miles north of
Guana River Road on the
west side of A1A.

HOURS
The beach access park-
ing areas are open from 8
a.m. until sunset. The GTM


Guana River Trails are
open for hiking and biking
activities from 8 a.m. until
sunset. The GTM Guana
River Dam Use Area is open
for fishing 4 a.m. to 11
p.m.
The education center is
open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
seven days a week (closed
on state holidays).

ENTRANCE FEES
$3 per vehicle with up to
eight people; $1 per pedes-
trians, bicyclists, extra pas-
sengers in vehicle beyond
eight.
Education Center:
$2 for adults 18 and
over; $1 for children 11-17;
free for children ages 10
and under. (Groups of 10
or more must make reser-
vations before visiting the
EEC).
GTM Research Reserve
annual passes are available
and can be purchased at
the EEC seven days a week
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for
$53 (price includes tax).

INFORMATION
For more information,
call 904-823-4500 or visit
www.gtmnerr.org.


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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


_ PORTS


12A


FRIDAY, AUGUST 28,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


IT'S SHOWTIME!


The 2009 season opens tonight for Florida high school
football teams. The Yulee Hornets are heading to
Baldwin tonight while the Fernandina Beach Pirates
S '.head to Ponte Vedra for preseason Kickoff Classics.
. . .............. Kickoff is at 7 p.m. for both games. The regular season
...... .-".." "gets under way next week. On Sept. 4, the Hornets host
. ... �.. Arlington Country Day and the Pirates head to Hilliard
..for a long-awaited regular-season matchup with the
" Flashes. Schedules, 13A. The Hornets were in action
",-.:. � Wednesday preparing for tonight's unveiling of this
year's team. Derrick "Shocka" Henry, top row left, will
,- ""be in his first high school uniform as a Yulee freshman.
Jonathan Knauss, top row right, tries to shake off a
teammate during a kick return. Quarterback Conner
Petty, above left, gets the throw off under pressure.
Byron Alderman, a transfer from Hilliard, is wrapped up
by defenders, above center. Offensive tackle Devron
Wingard in action Wednesday. A pair of Hornets try to
A bring down Jeremy DeBerry, left. Sophomore Kelvin
Rainey reels in a pass, right.
PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER


Hothead for hot heads


My son Parker is playing Pop
Warner football for the first time
and loves it, despite the hot after-
noon practices. Policies are in
place to make sure the kids do not overheat,
including frequent rest periods and water
breaks. Still, I have advised him there is a dif-
ference between hot and "dizzy hot," as we
call it. Heat-related illness is a very serious
condition and, since 1995, 39 football players
from Pop Warner to the pros have died from
heat-related causes.
But a new device could help make heat-
related deaths in football a thing of the past.
'There's a problem with heat in football
and we feel like we have a solution to that
problem," said Jay Buckalew, founder and
CEO of Hothead Sports.
The Hothead is a heat sensor designed to
work inside football helmets. When a player's
body temperature reaches concerning levels,
the sensor sends a signal to the sideline med-
ical staff. Cost for each individual device is
about a $100.
While widespread use may not be feasible
at the community level, placing one in the
helmet of a player known to be particularly
sensitive to the heat or with a past history of
heat-realted illness should be considered ...
Appalachian State senior quarterback
Armanti Edwards, who gained national fame
two years ago when he led the Mountaineers
to a stunning victory of the Michigan
Wolverines, has now gained national attention
for an unusual reason. The three-time All-
American will miss 2-4 weeks after running a
lawn mower over the top of his foot last week;
it rolled down a steep hill back at him.
Edwards was mowing the lawn at his off-
campus residence when the incident
occurred. Thankfully, Edwards apparently
does not have any injuries to bones or ten-
dons, but received stitches for deep cuts.


Teammate and roommate
Brian Quick transported
Edwards to Watauga
Medical Center, where he
.. w, was treated and released.
Edwards, the 6-foot-1 and
180-pound senior, has led
Appalachian State to two
Football Championship
Series (formerly known as
Division I-AA) titles in three
SPORTS years and last season won
the Walter Payton Award as
MEDICINE the top offensive player in
GREGORY the FCS. He is 32-5 as a
REGRY starter, threw for 2,902
SMITH, M.D. yards, rushed for 941 yards
and had a combined 41
touchdowns.
"We are all fortunate and grateful that
Armanti wasn't more seriously injured in this
accident," Appalachian State coach Jerry
Moore said. "I'm confident that he'll be back
on the field with his teammates as soon as
possible."
Moore said Edwards is scheduled to grad-
uate in December, after just 3 1/2 years. The
Mountaineers open their season Sept. 5
against East Carolina, leaving Edwards' start
in jeopardy. Last year, he was 196 of 306 pass-
ing for 2,902 yards, threw 30 touchdowns and
rushed for 941 yards and 11 touchdowns.
This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacement for treat-
ment by your regular doctor. It is only designed
to offer guidelines on the prevention, recogni-
tion and care of injuries and illness. Specific
concerns should be discussed with your physi-
cian. Mail your questions to Gregory Smith,
M.D., Sports Medicine, 1250 S. 18th St., Suite
204, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Call 261-
8787 or visit www.gsmithmd.com.


A ATHLETE INACTION


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Jeremy Schreiber of Fernandina Beach has spent his summer playing basketball in
Israel and returns home Sept. 3. He is pictured on the Mount of Olives with the old
city of Jerusalem and the Dome of the Rock behind him.


Schreiber takes his game to Israel


BETH JONES
News Leader
Jeremy Schreiber grew up
around the game of basketball.
His father, Matt, has spent
decades coaching the sport and
is currently the head boys
coach at Fernandina Beach
High School.
Schreiber, 26, graduated
from FBHS in 2002 and was the
county's most valuable player
that season. He went on to play
at three different colleges, cul-
minating his career at Webber
International University in Bab-
son Park, where he is current-


ly an assistant coach for the
men's basketball team.
This summer the sport he
loves took Schreiber around
the world. He played in the
Palestinian Basketball Associa-
tion and also spent time with
Upwards League, a basketball
program for Palestinian chil-
dren ages 7-14, through the pro-
gram Athletes in Action.
"We do skills-type stuff to
try to actually teach basketball
to the kids in a culture where
there are not many people who
know a lot about basketball,"
Schreiber said in an e-mail. "It
becomes frustrating at times,


but the kids really do enjoy us
taking the time to try to help
them.
"I think a lot of it has noth-
ing to do with basketball. I
think it has more to do with
someone actually taking the
time to show that they care
about them, something they
are not used to due to what they
would call the 'Israeli Occupa-
tion' of Palestine."
Summers helping his father
with the Pirate basketball camp
could have never prepared
Schreiber for his experiences
ISRAEL Continued on 13A


4


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


SPORTS SHORTS


Tryout forAmeliaElit
Amelia Elite is having a tryout for new
members for the 2009-10 team. This is a
competition team open to Nassau County stu-
dents in grades 6-10. The tryout will be at
6:30 p.m. Sept. 3 at the cheerleading facility
behind Fernandina Beach Middle School.
Call Debbi Roland at FBHS at 261-5713
for information.

Sign up for Girls on the Run
The Girls on the Run deadline for fall 2009
registration is Sept. 4. The program begins
Sept. 12. Sign up at www.gotrneflorida.org.
Registration forms can also be found at all
GOTR site locations.
GOTR is looking for new coaches.
Training will be held Aug. 29 from 8 a.m. to
noon and on Sept. 1 from 5-9 p.m. at the
Brooks YMCA, 10423 Centurion Parkway,
Jacksonville. Dinner will be provided. One
four-hour training session is mandatory. Past
coaches who have not attended training in
three seasons are required to attend the first
two hours of one training as a refresher. If
interested, call (904) 737-1999 to register for
training, or e-mail Beth Neale, volunteer coor-
dinator, at GOTRBeth@gmail.com.

Babe Ruth fall ball
Fernandina Beach Babe Ruth is holding
registration for fall ball softball and baseball
online at www.leaguelineup.com/fernandina.
The annual general meeting is at 6 p.m.
Sept. 9 at the Peck Center reception room.

TurtleTrotSept.5
An earlier start and some free extras are in
store for participants in this year's Turtle Trot
5K/10K race and 1.5-mile walk on Labor Day
weekend. The annual event will begin at 7:30
a.m. Sept. 5, a half hour earlier than last year.
After the race, runners can freshen up with
a free shower at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center and spend the rest of the
day on Amelia Island. Those who use the
showers should bring their own towels.
Runners and walkers can present their race
bib for free admission to Fort Clinch State
Park for the remainder of the day. An awards
ceremony with door prizes will follow the
event with a grand prize of a four-day, three-
night stay at the Amelia Island Plantation.
The race will again feature professional
scoring from 1st Place Sports in Jacksonville,
using an electronic chip-timing system. The
5K, 10K and 1.5-mile non-competitive walk
will start and finish at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center with the last half of the 10K
running through Fort Clinch State Park.
Half-mile and one-mile fun runs for chil-
dren 10 and younger will begin at 9 a.m. In
another change this year, the kids' runs will be
free. The goal is to encourage young people
to run and make the entire event more afford-
able for families, Hill said. Registration is
required and youth finishers will receive a rib-
bon at the end of their run.
A popular feature is returning this year -
original T-shirt artwork by Fernandina Beach
artist and sea turtle volunteer Sandra Baker-
Hinton. All pre-registered walkers and 5K/10K
runners will receive a T-shirt with shirts avail-
able on race day while supplies last.
Proceeds benefit the Amelia Island Sea Turtle
Watch and sea turtle patrols inside Fort Clinch
State Park along with the running club's youth
running programs.
Entry fees through today will be $20 per
person or $15 for members of Amelia Island
Runners. After today through race day, the
fee will be $25 for everyone. Pre-registration
ends at 2 p.m. Sept. 3, but there will be race-


day registration from 6-7 a.m. at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center.
Entry forms and online registration are
available at www.AmelialslandRunners.com.
Forms are also available at Club 14 Fitness,
Red Otter Outfitters and other locations. Visit
the AIR website or call 277-3676.

Pro wrestling atYulee High School
Continental Championshp Wrestling
returns to Nassau County Sept. 5 at Yulee
High School. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bell
time 7:30 p.m. The main event for the evening
is a six-man tag team match as CCW champi-
on "Rock 'n' Roll" Chris Turner teams up with
the CCW tag team champions the Marcs
Brothers against Kevin Toole and Picture
Perfect.
Also on the card, MMA fighter turned pro-
fessional wrestling superstar Cheyne Miles
gets a shot at the CCW Southern States title,
held by Scotty Biggs and The Dynasty. Also
scheduled to appear are The Wranglers, "Mr.
Saturday Night," Jarrod Micheals, Buck
Buchanan, Mad Dog Miller, Riot and
Samantha Steele.
Partial proceeds to benefit the Yulee High
School football team. Tickets are $7 at the
door. Advanced tickets are $6 through the
YHS football team and on Aug. 30 at the Wal-
Mart Super Center in Yulee from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. For information, visit ccwrestling.org.

Mad Sunday Shoot
Amelia Shotgun Sports will host two tour-
naments in the Mad Sunday Shoot. Shoot
either or both, morning or evening. The event
will be held Aug. 30 at 86300 Hot Shot Trail in
Yulee for NSCA registered shooters.
Fees are are $60 for NSCA and hunter,
$45 for junior and sub-junior and $7 for warm-
ups. Fees include breakfast, lunch and
awards. For information, call 753-4619 or
548-9818 or e-mail clyde@ameliashotgun-
sports.com.

Freedom Playground Wheelathon
The Freedom Playground Wheelathon will
be held Sept. 26 at Central Park off of Atlantic
Avenue. The Wheelathon is an awareness
event intended to raise money for Freedom
Playground.
Team and open registration are from 9-10
a.m. The walk is from 10-11 a.m. from Central
Park to the downtown marina and back, using
one wheelchair per team. Live music, food by
Sonny's, demonstration events (wheelchair
softball, tennis and basketball) will be held
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Register in advance at
www.firstgiving.com/freedomplayground. For
information, contact Aaron Morgan at (904)
335-7253 or e-mail him at
aaronmorgan4@gmail.com.

PatriotDayshoot
Nassau County Fire/Rescue Professionals
Local 3101 will hold the second annual Patriot
Day Sporting Clay Shoot at Amelia Shotgun
Sports, 86300 Hot Shot Trail, Yulee, on Sept.
11.
Proceeds benefit the Boys and Girls Club
of Nassau County. The event consists of five-
person teams shooting at 15 different sta-
tions. The teams with the three highest aver-
ages will receive awards. Dinner, awards and
raffle will follow the competition.
The event begins at 10 a.m. There is a
limit of 150 people for 30 teams. Pre-registra-
tion of $80 will be accepted until Sept. 1. After
Sept. 1, the fee is $100. The event is on a first
come, first served basis. Call Chris Gamble at
753-4644.


Jeremy Schreiber is pictured at the
Nativity Church in Bethlehem, which is
where Jesus Christ is said to have been
born, above. Left, he is in Jericho in front
of the tree thought to be the one
Zaccheus climbed up in to see Jesus.
Below, Schreiber with his teammates and
coaches during a timeout this summer.
SUBMITTED PHOTOS


ISRAEL From 12A
with the youth league in Israel.
"On Thursdays, we let the
kids play games," he said. "As
much as we try to keep the
games organized by the use of
the scoreboard and referees, it
usually turns into chaos. But at
least it's a chaos that involves
the kids having fun and smil-
ing."
But it wasn't all fun for
Schreiber. He played in the
"first division" of the PBA. His
team, Terrasanta, went 6-3 for
the "tournament" - Schreiber
said "seasons are called tour-
naments here" - and now
advances to the super league,
which begins in January.
"I am set to return to play
with my team for this league,"
Schreiber said.
Terrasanta also played in
the 29th ShuhadaTournament,
the biggest in Palestine. Of the
16 teams invited, two were from
Gaza, "invited as a gesture to
show that the rest of Palestine
is thinking of them even
through they are not allowed
to travel through Israel into the
West Bank," Schreiber said.
His team went 1-1 in the first
round and lost by two in the


single-elimination second
round, ending the team's
games for summer.
"The primary goal of the
summer, from a basketball per-
spective, was to qualify my
team for the super league,
which I was successful in help-
ing them to do," Schreiber said.
i'. i li:ip, we could have been
more successful in the other
tournaments. That would have
been icing on the cake."
Schreiber also played with
his team in the Palestinian
American Solidarity Tourna-
ment, which included seven
teams from the super league
and two from the first division.
"We went 0-4 so we didn't
advance," Schreiber said.
But he played well, averag-
ing around 30 points a game.
"Most of the games were
pretty close," Schreiber said.
"We just had trouble pulling out
a win."
Playing hoops in the U.S. is
different from his experience
over the summer, Schreiber
said.
"The work ethic, skill level,
fitness and overall dedication
and importance of basketball
in Palestine is far below that of
the U.S., so it has been frus-


treating for me in that sense,"
Schreiber said. "However, it is
rewarding to get to play in
games where so much pride is
on the line between teams.
Palestine is small, so teams are
close in proximity and rela-
tionships, so they care a lot
about the games. It's awesome
to help them win and see how
much it means to them."
While Schreiber was teach-
ing basketball, he was learning
about another culture.
"It's really incredible getting
to meet people from so many
different backgrounds, Arab-
Christians, Arab-Muslims,
Jews, Jewish-Christians, to
name a few," Schreiber said. "I
had a completely distorted view
of faiths outside of Christianity
before coming on this trip.
Interacting with people from
these other faiths has really
been the biggest blessing of
this summer.
"It's just been really reas-
suring to come here and see
that ... people from this part of
the world aren't as dangerous
and hateful as it seems we are
all led to believe."
Schreiber leaves Israel
Sunday and returns to Fernan-
dina Beach Sept. 3.


2009 SCHEDULES


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Football
Aug. 28 Kickoff at Ponte Vedra 7:00
Sept. 4 at Hilliard 7:30
Sept. 11 BRADFORD 7:30
Sept. 18 PROVIDENCE 7:30
Sept. 25 at West Nassau* 7:30
Oct. 2 BOLLES* 7:30
Oct. 9 EPISCOPAL* 7:30
Oct. 23 INTERLACHEN* 7:30
Oct. 30 at University Christian* 7:30
Nov. 6 at Yulee* 7:00
Nov. 13 at Matanzas 7:00
* District games
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Junior Varsity Football
Sept. 10 at Yulee 7:00
Sept. 17 HILLIARD 7:00
Sept. 24 WEST NASSAU 7:00
Oct. 1 at Bolles 7:00
Oct. 8 at Camden County 5:00
Oct. 15 at Stanton 6:00
Oct. 22 BISHOP KENNY 7:00
Oct. 29 YULEE 7:00


YULEE HIGH SCHOOL
Varsity Football
Aug. 28 Kickoff at Baldwin 7:00
Sept. 4 ARLINGTON CO. DAY 7:00
Sept. 11 at Englewood 7:00
Sept. 18 MATANZAS 7:00
Sept. 25 at Episcopal* 7:30
Oct. 9 WEST NASSAU* 7:00
Oct. 16 at Bolles* 7:30
Oct. 23 UNIVERSITY CHRIST.* 7:00
Oct. 30 at Interlachen* 7:30
Nov. 6 FERNANDINA* 7:00
Nov. 13 at Paxon 7:00
* District games
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Volleyball
Aug. 28 Preseason at Menendez
Aug. 31 at Baker County 5:30/6:30
Sept. 1 at West Nassau 5:30/6:30
Sept. 3 at Raines* (varsity) 5:30
Sept. 8 BAKER COUNTY 5:30/6:30
Sept. 10 at Hilliard 5/6/7
Sept. 11-12 Tourney in Orlando (V) TBA
Sept. 15 RIBAULT* (varsity) 5:30
Sept. 17 at Episcopal* 5:30/6:30
Sept. 21 HILLIARD (Dig Pink) 5/6/7
Sept. 22 BOLLES (JV) 5:30


Sept. 23 ORANGE PARK 5:30/6:30
Sept. 29 at Yulee* 5:30/6:30
Oct. 1 at Menendez 5:30/6:30
Oct. 3 Dig Pink-Stanton (varsity) TBA
Oct. 5 at Middleburg 5:30/6:30
Oct. 8 at Bolles* 5:30/6:30
Oct. 13 YULEE 5:30/6:30
Oct. 19 WEST NASSAU** 5:30/6:30
Oct. 26-29 District at Episcopal TBA
* District games
** Senior night
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Cross Country
Sept. 12 GREENWAYTRIALS 8am
Sept. 19 at Katie Caples Invite 6:00
Sept. 26 at Bob Hans Open 8am
Oct. 2 at FIRunners.com Open 8am
Oct. 10 at Asics Classic 8am
Oct. 17 CIS Open 4:00
Oct. 24 at Bronco Bob Open 7am
Oct. 29 COUNTY 4:30
Nov. 5 District 2-2A
Nov. 14 Region 1-2A, Tallahassee
Nov. 21 State 2A meet, Dade City 8am


FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Boys Golf
Sept. 3 at Ponte Vedra/Episcopal 4:30
Sept. 8 BOLLES 4:00
Sept. 10 at Trinity 4:00
Sept. 14 TRINITY 4:00
Sept. 15 at Bolles 4:00
Sept. 17 BISHOP KENNY 4:00
Sept. 21 PROVIDENCE 4:00
Sept. 22 EPISCOPAL 4:15
Sept. 28 at West Nassau 4:00
Oct. 6 at Providence 4:00
Oct. 14 WEST NASSAU 4:00
Oct. 15 Bishop Kenny TBA 4:00
Oct. 19 or 20 District
Oct. 26 Region, Haile Plantation
Oct. 27-29 State in Lakeland
FERNANDINA BEACH HIGH SCHOOL
Girls Golf
Sept. 1 BOLLES/PROVIDENCE 4:00
Sept. 2 at Orange Park 4:00
Sept. 9 BISHOP KENNY 4:00
Sept. 11 OAK HALL 4:00
Sept. 16 at Ponte Vedra 3:30
Sept. 23 at Providence 4:00
Sept. 24 ORANGE PARK 4:00
Sept. 29 at Bishop Kenny 4:00


Sept. 30 BOLLES 4:00
Oct. 1 at Episcopal 4:15
Oct. 7 Bolles TBA 4:00
Oct. 8 PONTE VEDRA 4:00
Oct. 12 at Oak Hall 4:00
Oct. 19 or 20 District
Oct. 26 Region at UF
Nov. 2-4 State at Lakeland
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Football
Sept. 8 at Callahan 6:00
Sept. 15 HILLIARD 6:00
Sept. 22 at Yulee 6:00
Sept. 29 CALLAHAN 6:00
Oct. 6 at Hilliard 6:00
Oct. 13 PROVIDENCE 4:30
Oct. 20 YULEE 6:00
FERNANDINA BEACH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Volleyball
Sept. 10 at Hilliard 5:00
Sept. 15 at Callahan 5/6:00
Sept. 17 YULEE 2:15/3:15
Sept. 21 HILLIARD 5:00
Sept. 24 CALLAHAN 5/6:00
Sept. 28 at Yulee 5/6:00
Oct. 1 County at Hilliard


Bob Gedeon
Island resident since 1962
Real Estate Broker since 1972


McW[O[T fRJLq9
^ www. oceanfrontamelia.com
"The Ocecanfrott Expert"
Reduced Commission, 3% - 4.5 %, Call for details.
When You Call, I Will Personally Answer The Phone
No Menus, Voicemail or Phone Tag.
Local 904.261.8870 Toll Free 877.261.8870


The owners & staff of


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BLACK




MAGENTA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


Josie
Freeman
caught
this red
on a fish-
ing trip
with her
father
Aug. 15.
It was
caught
behind
Rayonier.
SUBMITTED


Our local heritage has practically vanished...a lifestyle alive only in the
memory of our citizens, Your children will now have a chance to learn
about the history of their city, and perhaps see some of their relatives in
this one-of-a-kind book. Ideal for collectors, Christmas gifts, history buffs
and family history, this book with more than
250 photographs will be of library quality, printed on archival paper
and bound with a beautiful hard cover.
ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER WILL BE AVAILABLE
RETURN ORDER BLANK TO RESERVE YOUR COPY

Please enter my order for: A Pictorial History of Fernandina Beach, Florida

__ copies) STANDARD EDITION @ $24.95 + $1.75 tax

__ copies) LIMITED EDITION @ $75.00 + $5.25 tax
0 I am enclosing payment in full.
0 Please ship my books) to the address below. I have enclosed an additional $7.00 for each book shipped.
NAME
ADDRESS


CITY


STATE


PHONE

MAIL TO: The News-Leader, 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 261-3696


OUTDOOR BRIEFS


HuntNassauWMA
If you are looking for a place to hunt this
fall, you still have a chance to get a recre-
ational use permit for the Nassau Wildlife
Management Area in Nassau County during
the upcoming hunting season.
Nassau WMA is 13,892 acres near
Callahan. All users must possess a Nassau
recreational use permit to hunt on this area.
Nassau WMA is a still-hunt area only, but
hunters may use bird dogs during the migra-
tory bird and waterfowl hunting seasons.
For those willing to pay $385 to hunt the
area, Nassau WMA provides hunting oppor-
tunities during eight months of the year.
Archery is from Sept. 26 through Oct. 25;
muzzleloading gun season runs from Oct. 31
through Nov. 8; general gun season is from
Nov. 14 through Jan. 10, 2010; small game is
from Jan. 11 through March 7, 2010; spring
turkey season runs from March 20 through
April 25, 2010; and trapping can be done from
Jan. 11 through March 1, 2010.
To apply for a recreational use permit to
hunt on Nassau WMA, go to MyFWC.com.
Except for hunting, permit holders and
their spouses or dependent children may par-
ticipate in other activities on designated
WMAs. Only permit holders and one depend-
ent child (under age 16) may hunt. If spouses
or more than one dependent child (under age
16) wish to hunt, they must purchase a recre-
ational use permit. Recreational use permits
also include a management area permit when
hunting public lands not in the recreational
use program.
Recreational use permits do not apply to
other recreational use program areas. Once
permits are issued, they can be renewed
annually for two additional years, essentially
making them a three-year permit. Permit
renewals are mailed May 1. Eligible appli-
cants have until May 31 to renew their recre-
ational use permits for the next season.
Permits not renewed by May 31 will be for-
feited and they will be made available to the
public on a first-come, first-served basis.
Permits are issued individually on a first-
come, first-served basis in June. Applications


may be submitted online at www.wildlifeli-
cense.com or take a completed worksheet to
a tax collector's office or any license agent
and they will submit the application. Work-
sheets are available online at MyFWC.com, at
FWC regional offices and tax collectors'
offices in counties surrounding a specific
WMA.

Boatingcourse
The Coast Guard Auxiliary at Amelia
Island will be conducting a six-week boating
course Sept. 8 through Oct. 15. The classes
will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7-
9 p.m. at the Amelia Island Lighthouse cot-
tage in Fernandina Beach.
This course is excellent for both the
beginning boater, who needs to understand
the fundamentals of boating, and for the
experienced boater, who may be in need of a
refresher. The basics of boat handling, weath-
er, navigation, electronics, use of radios and
rules of the waterways are some of the sub-
jects that will be covered. This class satisfies
state boater education requirements. The
enrollment fee is $35 and textbook materials
will be provided.
For information or to register, contact
Steve Filkoff at 491-8629 or e-mail at scarf@
bellsouth.net. For information on boating
safety classes, visit the Flotilla 14-1 website,
http://cgaux7-14-1.org.

Bassmastersmeet
Nassau Bassmasters, associated with the
BASS National Federation and the Florida
BASS Federation, meets the third Thursday
in Yulee. Membership is open to anyone at
least 16 years old. Call Bob Schlag at (912)
729-2282 or Billy Kittrell at 225-0267.

NSFAmeets
The Nassau Sport Fishing Association
meets the second Wednesday of each month
at 7:30 p.m. and the fourth Wednesday at 7
p.m. at the Ten Acres Kraft Athletic Club.
Membership is open to the public. Call 261-
9481 or visit www.fishnsfa.com.


TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
Largemouth bass are schooling in some of the lakes and ponds throughout Northeast
Florida during the mid-morning hours in open waters of the lakes and ponds. Roland
Martin took this nice bass on a floating plastic worm.



Bring cut bait for redfish


"Dad, there is a big shark
cruising in the creek. Can
you rig up a fishing pole so I
can catch it?" Max Blackmon
asked his father, Brandon.
Brandon secured a king-
fish rod that had braided fish-
ing line spooled on the reel
and a wire kingfish leader
was quickly
attached to
the terminal
end of the
fishing line.
Both king-
fish treble
hooks were
baited with
cut chunks
ON THE of ribbonfish,
which are
WATER premier
kingfish
TERRY baits. Max
LACOSS returned to
the creek to
catch the
shark and, after a few minutes
of fishing, shouted to his
father to come and take a
look at his big catch. Max was
holding a big red in his arms
that was quickly pho-
tographed and released back
into the creek.
So, if you are going red-
fishing this weekend, bring
along plenty of cut baits, rib-
bonfish that is.
Redfish are schooling dur-
ing the low tide, which
arrives Saturday at 10:24 a.m.
at the mouth of the Amelia
River. Fish the deep sides of
oysterbars or where large
mud flats drain into a deep
slough. Fish on the bottom
with cut bait, live shrimp or
finger mullet.
Some of the more produc-
tive flats are located in West
Jackson and Langsford
creeks.
Bruce Comrie has been
catching redfish also on the
high tide while working the
flooded oysterbars in Tiger
Basin while fishing with live
shrimp under a "popping"
cork. The key is to keep mov-
ing from one oysterbar to the


SPECIAL
Max Blackmon thought he saw a large shark cruising in
the creek behind his home and had his father rig up a
fishing rod and reel. A fairly large red for the small
creek was caught and released.


next until you find mullet that
attract redfish.
Two- to three-pound sea
trout are also running during
the first few hours of the
incoming tide while fishing
deep sloughs located next to
oysterbars, boat docks or
creek mouths in 5-15 feet of
water. Fish with live shrimp
deep under a trout float or
simply free-line a live shrimp
without a float or weight into
the deep waters of the sea
trout's hideout.
Offshore fishing continues
to showcase gag grouper at
FA and FC fish havens. Fish
on the bottom with live men-
haden, finger mullet, cigar
minnows or Spanish sardines.
Bull reds are holding at
the tip of the St. Marys north
and south jetty rocks and tak-
ing cut bait fished on the bot-


tom. Bass fishermen are
reporting schooling bass
action during the mid-morn-
ing in open areas of lakes,
where shad are schooling.
One of the best lures for
schooling bass is a white
finesse worm fished without
any weight retrieved with a
slow twitching action.
Surf fishermen should get
an early start with the high
falling tide arriving at sunrise.
Whiting, pompano, blues and
sea trout are now running in
the surf.
The News-Leader encour-
ages local anglers to submit
photographs of their catches. E-
mail photos to bjones@
fbnewsleadercom, mail them
to P.O. Box 766, Fernandina
Beach, FL 32035, or drop
them by the office at 511 Ash
St. in Fernandina Beach.


Name:


Phone:


BIG RED


4


Support the l

Yulee High School

Football program join the



"InZone Club"

Annual membership is only $25!

Mail your check payable to The InZone Club
and membership information to:

The InZone Club

P.O. Box 1463, Yulee, FL 32041


Address/State/Zip:
Email (for info form web site):.


TEAM (Together Everyone Accomplishes More)
Please Join Today!


I


BLACK




MAGENTA BLACK


B SECTION NEWS-LEADER


-ROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
CLASSIFIED



FRIDAY, AUGUST 28,2009
/ FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


Tales of Wales in story


For the News Leader


Coal dust and the small coal-mining val-
leys of South Wales supplied a down-to-earth
upbringing for David Llewellyn - values and
early life lessons he still holds dear. But at 17,
with little more than a jacket and guitar in
hand, he left home to begin a successful
career as a singer in the same working-man's
clubs that bred stars like Tom Jones.
When the music scene in the United
Kingdom was taken over by computer tech-
nology and drum machines, Llewellyn found
the appeal of a more organic heartfelt
approach to music to be irresistible, and
moved to Nashville in 1991. It was 10 years
before he would return to Wales.


Ticket information
Welsh singer songw iiei David
Llewellyn will p'eilim in Bunms Hall al SI
Peiei's Epic.,pal C.huichi in Feinandina
Beach ,:.n Sepi 5 at . p i1m Geneial admis-
sic.n IickeIS aie available al tlie d'., '.i
$15 An Evening of Si:y & S..ng' lie
plOpular singer con..gw ilei cc'.nceil se-in
hiosied by Lai k and Donna Paz Kauitman
is made possible by the FO:undeis ,o SI
Peleir' and the generouiry :f FirJ i CoaEii
COUmmIunity Bank Call 277*-26'..4

"As soon as I took my first breath of the
valley's air," said Llewellyn, "I knew that


ind song
although the wonderful songwriting cities of
Austin and Nashville may have honed my
skills and taught me the 'craft,' it was Wales -
its Celtic traditions and working-class com-
munities - that I had to draw upon for my
inspiration, and that has increasingly drawn
me back to my roots. I was part of the first
generation not to go down the mines, and I've
always felt thankful for that."
One of Llewellyn's original songs about a
young child's first day working underground,
and his father's heart-breaking thoughts,
touched a nerve and gained Llewellyn a win-
ning spot in the "New Folk" competition at
the 2007 Kerrville Folk Festival.
SONG Continued on 2B


Welsh singer-songwriter David Llewellyn
performs 8 p.m. Sept. 5 at St. Peter's
Burns Hall in the next "Evening of Story &
Song.


Barbados
For the News Leader
A melia Island Plantation is
teaming up with the island
of Barbados in a cultural
and tourism exchange set
for Labor Day weekend, Sept. 4-7.
The Plantation employs a host of
workers from Barbados, which gave
birth to the idea for the exchange
that will feature a "Bridgetown
Market" at the Spa & Shops on Sept.
5 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. that is free and
open to the public.
The weekend is hosted by "Team
Barbados at Miami," which consists
of the Consulate General of Barbados
at Miami, Barbados Tourism
Authority and Barbados Liaison
Service together with the Barbados-
USA Chamber of Commerce and
Invest Barbados.
"One of the many objectives of
this event is to show appreciation to


coming t
the resort's management for their
confidence in employing Barbadian
workers over the years and at the
same time showcase Barbadian talent
and culture through performances
by our artistes, while displaying
some of our art and products of our
culture," the tourism authority said in
a press release.
"It is also our intention to promote
Barbados as a premier destination
and investment location, not only in
the Caribbean but in the world. Our
prime minister will be in attendance
and hosting our main attraction,
which is a formal cocktail reception,
dinner and dance on Saturday
evening. Also in attendance will be
several members of the Diplomatic
Corps from here in the U.S., Canada
and the U.K and other dignitaries
from the governments of Barbados
and U.S."
Saturday's marketplace will


o Amelia
include a mini parade, hair braiding,
free rum and alcohol tasting,
Barbadian food, arts and crafts for
sale, steel pan performances, cook-
ing demonstrations by Barbadian
celebrity chef, Chef Paul, stilt walk-
ers and more.
On Sept. 6, enjoy the formal
cocktail reception, dinner and dance
from 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Tickets are $125
and include a three-course dinner
featuring pan seared, free range
chicken with Bajan spice rub and pan
seared fish with lime Beurre
Blanc; live entertainment by The
Mighty Gabby and DJ Beat; cash
bar; and official launch of Network
Barbados by Invest Barbados and an
address by the prime minister of
Barbados.
To purchase dinner tickets, go to
www.barbados-amelia.com. For more
information call 491-4646 or visit
www.barbados-amelia.com.


ANNIE'
AUDITIONS
Nassau County Schools in conjunc-
tion with Community in Schools will
hold auditions for "Annie" on
Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in the
Fernandina Beach Middle School
auditorium. Needed are boys and
girls in grades 4-12. Students may
obtain reading scripts and music in
the front office at FBMS. They should
be prepared to sing and dance.
Rehearsals will begin Monday from 3-
5 p.m. The orphans will rehearse
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday after-
noons from 3-5 p.m.
All proceeds will benefit the
Community in Schools program in
Nassau County. Volunteers are need-
ed to help with props, costumes, set
design and nightly study halls.
Performances will be Oct. 9-11. Judy
Tipton is the director, Mary Eagen,
stage manager, Rene6 Thompson,
executive producer, Jim Tipton, set
design, and Jayme Tipton, choreogra-
pher. For more information or to vol-
unteer call Judy Tipton at 753-1583
or 277-2429.


SUBMITFIBD


JAZZ FESTIVAL PREVIEW


CAKULINE BLUHIllNb(hK/U(K 1RHE INEWS-LEAUEK
The Les DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz Festival kicked off its season with a
rousing preview show at the newly renovated Palace Saloon Aug. 20. The
program showcased the various styles of jazz that will be heard throughout
the 2009 event, which runs Oct. 2-11 at various venues on Amelia Island.
See story, 2B.


OFfNTHE ISLAND


COMMUNITY DANCE
The Amelia Island Ballroom Youth Academy
will hold a community dance on Aug. 29 at the
Peck Center auditorium. A
complimentary class starts
at 7 p.m., followed by the
dance from 8-11 p.m.
Students of the academy also
will present a dance exhibi-
tion. Tickets are $10.
Children 17 and under
accompanied by an adult
admitted free. Proceeds will
benefit the academy, a non-profit 501c3 organiza-
tion that offers local students in grades 1-12 free
ballroom classes. For information contact Felix at
(904)707-6762.

CATFISH FESTIVAL
The Annual
Kingsland Catfish
Festival will be held in
downtown Kingsland,
Ga., Sept.5-7.
The festival opens Sept. 5th with a 5K run. Art,
antiques, crafts and collectibles booths will open
at noon on Saturday and Sunday, and 9 a.m. on
Labor Day. There will be a children's amusement


area, free entertainment and a smorgasbord of
food. Farm-raised catfish dinners and nuggets go
on sale at noon Saturday and Sunday and 11 a.m.
on Labor Day. Other menu items include deep-
fried onion blossoms, oriental fare, barbecue,
hamburgers and hot dogs and homemade ice
cream. For information call (912) 882-1950, e-mail
admin�kingslandcatfishfestival.com or visit
www.KingslandCatfishFestival.com.

DION AT BLUE DOOR
The Blue Door
Artists will feature -
new paintings by
Elizabeth Dion for the _. --.
month of September . ...,
Dion's colorful con- . . -
temporary works are .
inspired by the lush
complexity of nature,
especially the marshes and beach surrounding
Amelia Island. Visit her and the other artists in
their studios during the Artrageous Artwalk,
Sept. 12 from 5-8:30 p.m.
The gallery/studios are located at 2051/2
Centre St. in downtown Fernandina Beach.
Regular hours are Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
For more information, call 583-4676 or see the
website at www.bluedoorartists.com.


SHINY BADGES BALL
The 4th Annual Shiny Badges Ball will be held
Sept. 12 at the Golf Club of Amelia Island with a
"Legends of Hollywood" theme. The night will
begin with a
complimenta-
ry wine recep-
tion from 6-7


p.m., with din
ner at 7 p.m.


ST" MANUALL SHIMY "iAOOEB aLJL.
LEGENDS OF HOLLYWOOD


Music will be - -'"5 ijWj 9
by The
Melanie DiLorenzo Trio. Guests are encouraged
to dress as their favorite Hollywood star, or in
their favorite Oscar winning attire. Prizes will be
awarded to the "Best Dressed Stars."
Tickets are $75 per person, or $525 for a table
of eight. Active or retired law enforcement and
firefighters receive a discount. Tickets can be pur-
chased in Fernandina Beach at Rowland's
Upholstery Plus, 1120 S. Eighth St., Amelia Hotel
at the Beach, 1997 S. Fletcher Avenue, or online at
www.shinybadgesball.com. For more information,
contact Marty Scott at 753-4467 or Arlene Scott
at 753-8774. Shiny Badges Ball Inc. is a 501 (c) 3
non-profit organization. Donations are tax-
deductible.
Submit information to Sidn Perryat sperry@Abnewsleader.com


A Barbadian
marketplace at
Amelia Island
Plantation Sept. 5
from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. will feature
steel pan bands,
above, and stilt
walkers, right. It
is free and open
to the public.




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

The Rotary Club of
Amelia Island Sunrise is tak-
ing reservations for its
fundraiser, "Cruising For A
Cause For Polio Plus," a
four-day cruise to the
Bahamas aboard the Carnival
Fascination, departing March
11, 2010 from Jacksonville.
Rotary Sunrise will receive
$90 for each cabin sold to
help in Rotary International's
mission to eradicate polio.
The cruise is open to anyone.
A $50 deposit is due Sept. 2,
and a second deposit of $100
by Nov. 4. Final payment is
due Jan. 4, 2010.
Call Suzanne McLeod at
(904) 662-2360 or
smcleod@telecommanage-
ment.us; or travel professional
Valerie Gossett at (904) 710-
9170 or Valerie@premier-
resources.net.

A Passion 4 Pooches Pet
Spa, 1881 South 14th St., is
holding a Suds 4 Shelters
Bath-A-Thon event on Aug.
29 beginning at 8 a.m. All the
proceeds from dog baths that
day will benefit the Nassau
Humane Society. To schedule
your dog's beauty appoint-
ment, call 491-1767.

The Camden/Kings Bay
Council, Navy League of the
United States will meet Sept.
10 at 6 p.m. in the Overlook
Room at Osprey Cove Golf
Club in St. Marys, Ga.
The program will feature
the council welcoming Rear
Admiral Barry Bruner,
Commanding Officer,
Submarine Group 10, to the
Kings Bay Naval Submarine
Base.
Dinner is $25 and reserva-
tions are required by Sept. 7.
Call (912) 729-7327 or e-mail
navyleaguedinner@yahoo.co
m.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -


15. Shade of pur-
ple
16. Between Rive
Droite and Rive
Gauche
17. *Navigational
tool in geogra-
phy class
18. Caused from
worry?
19. *Chemistry or
biology, e.g.
21. *Roll call list
23. DNA transmit-
ter
24. Creator of Willy
Wonka
25. Health resort
28. Storm in
"Fantastic Four"
movie
30. * school
or junior high
35. Skiers' ride
37. *What libraries
do
39. Whimpers
40. Prefix for air
41. Type of wood
resistant to rot
43. *Assigned spot
44. Sol-fa-sol-fa-
sol-fa, e.g.
46. *Unwelcome
visitors that can
spread quickly in
classroom
47. Lottery-like
gambling game
48. Regard or


Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event. All 1970-75 FBHS
students and faculty/staff are
invited.
* * *
Rescuing Animals in
Nassau (RAIN) will hold a
sidewalk sale Sept. 5 from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. on Seventh
Street (around the corner from
Eileen's Art and Antiques). If
you have gently used house-
hold items, small furniture,
home decor, CDs, DVDs,
books, dishes or glassware
you would like to donate, call
Marilyn at 491-8819. All pro-
ceeds benefit the animals in
RAIN's care and its programs.

Fernandina Beach High
School Class of 1965 will
meet and eat at 11:30 a.m.
on Sept. 12 at Sandy
Bottoms on Main Beach. This
will be a time of fellowship
and also the start of making
plans for the 45th reunion
next year.

Rollin' on the River, a
scenic Sunday cruise to St.
Mary's, Ga., sponsored by
Amelia River Cruises to ben-
efit Meals on Wheels for
Pets, a partnership project
between the Council on Aging
Meals on Wheels program
and Nassau Humane Society,
will be held Sept. 13.
Tickets are $25 round-trip
and tax deductible. Ferry will
depart the city marina at
10:30 a.m. and leave St.
Marys at 1:45 p.m. Take a
tram tour for $2.50, or bring
your bike to cycle through the
historic downtown. The ferry
is pet friendly.
Call Amelia River Cruises
at 261-9972 or e-mail
info @ ameliarivercruises.com
to reserve a spot and advise
whether you are bringing a
bike.

The Men's Newcomers
Club of Amelia Island will
hold its first luncheon meeting


respect
50. Not friends
52. Bobby sox
dance
53. Equal parts
white and black
55. Victory sign
57. *A welcome
break
60. *Head of class
64. Outlaw
65. One little piggie
67. Loot
68. Alleviated
69. I have
70. Satisfy
71. Hemorrhaged
72. St. Louis foot-
ball player
73. *High school-
ers, e.g.
DOWN
1. Lad's counter-
part
2. Jack on "30
Rock"
3. 8 to Caesar
4. Comic strip "Li'l

5. Earth-tone pig-
ment
6. Feeble
7. Turkish military
leader
8. Dried coconut
meat
9. "He's not worth
his "7
10. Playwright
Clare Booth

11. Affirm with con-
fidence
12. __capita
15. Islam follower
20. Type of lily
22. Unit of electri-
cal resistance
24. Make one
resemble a


dandy
25. "Wipe the
clean"
26. Docks
27. Spirits below
level of angels
and devils in
Islamic mytholo-
gy
29. *It means start
or end of class
31. *Work area
32. *Nerd
33. Treeless plain
34. Bar by estop-
pel
36. Enameled met-
alware popular in
18th century
38. Art _ style,
popular in the
1920s
42. "Superman"
Christopher
45. Beowulf, e.g.
49. Robinson to
"The Graduate"
51. Same as sea
moss
54. On the move
56. *School to
Madeline,
French
57. Genuine
58. Other than
what's implied
59. *Includes girls
and boys
60. Move in large
numbers, as in
bees
61. Golfer's desti-
nation
62. Distinctive ele-
gance
63. Sun beams
64. Valentine's Day
mo.
66. Female repro-
ductive cells


For the News Leader

The Les DeMerle Amelia
Island Jazz Festival kicked
off its season with a rousing
preview show at the newly
renovated Palace Saloon
Aug. 20.
With strong performanc-
es and innovative arrange-
ments from drummer
DeMerle's dynamic all-star
unit, the program showcased
the various styles of jazz that
will be heard throughout the
2009 event, which runs Oct.
2-11 at various venues on
Amelia Island.
DeMerle's group opened
with a spirited modern jazz
version of Benny Golson's
"Killer Joe" highlighted by
multi-instrumentalist Dr. Bill
Prince's superb solos on
both flute and alto saxo-
phone plus a dazzling up
tempo finish. DeMerle spoke
about this year's schedule of
events, which will begin Oct.
2 with his Dixieland group at
a Sounds On Centre concert
and street party, before the
band blasted through a terrif-
ic Prince arrangement of the
New Orleans Jazz classic,


of the 2009-10 year on Sept.
17 at the Fernandina Beach
Golf Club at 11:30 a.m. The
speaker will be State Rep.
Janet Adkins, who will speak
about the current state of the
Florida economy and give an
overview of the 2009 legisla-
tive session. Prior to her cur-
rent position, Adkins served
10 years as a member of the
Nassau County School Board.
All men are invited. Tickets
are $15 in advance and $17
at the door. Reservations, call
Bob Keane at 277-4590. For
information visit www.men-
snewcomersclub.org.

Nassau Women's
Information Exchange pres-
ents "The First Pancake: a
Recipe for Delectable Life
Transitions" luncheon with
Tory Wilcox on Sept. 17 at
O'Kane's Irish Pub and
Eatery, 318 Centre St.,
Fernandina Beach.
This program is free and
open to the public. Call your
library branch to make reser-
vations. Box lunches by
O'Kane's are $12 and may be
ordered at any local branch
library and prepaid by noon
Sept. 11.
The Nassau WIE is a part-
nership between the FCCJ
Rosanne R. Hartwell
Women's Center, the Florida
State College at Jacksonville
Betty P. Cook Nassau Center
and the Nassau County
Public Library System. Call


Fill in the squares so
that each row, column
and3-by-3box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2009
Sudoku Difficult
Puzzle #1548D


"Limehouse Blues."
DeMerle followed with a
fresh rendition of "St Louis
Blues" and dedicated his
vocal to former St. Louis resi-
dents, Lynne and Jack
Ruppel, who were celebrat-
ing their 50th wedding
anniversary.
Prince's stellar arrange-
ments on a cool jazz version
of 'The Girl From Ipanema"
and the Duke Ellington stan-
dard, "Take The A Train,"
preceded a sweet set of
songs from vocalist Bonnie
Eisele that included a Latin-
tinged take of "Bye Bye
Blues."
The modern sounds of
Herbie Hancock's
"Cantaloupe Island" closed
the first set. During inter-
mission the crowd enjoyed a
festival DVD, produced by
local filmmaker and AIJF
board member Stan Cottle,
which presented several
clips of the fall event's head-
liner, David Sanborn.
DeMerle also announced
the full schedule of events,
which will include an Oct. 3
program at the Palace Saloon
with jazz scholarship winner


the Yulee branch library at
548-4467 or the Fernandina
Beach branch at 277-7365.

The Terpsichorean
Dance Club's next dance is
7-11 p.m. Sept. 19 at the
Woman's Club, 201 Jean
Lafitte Blvd. The dance theme
is "Football Time" - wear your
favorite teams colors. Hors
d'oeuvres and soft drinks will
be served. Guest fee is $35
per couple. Music will be by
Harry and Sally. BYOB and
setups will be provided. For
information contact Margaret
Zvoch at 261-9717.

The second annual Texas
BBQ will be held by the
Nassau Sierra Club at Cafe
Karibo, 27 N. Third St.,
Fernandina, on Sept. 20 from
5-9 p.m. Cost is $35 per per-
son or $60 per couple.
The event will feature bar-
becued beef and pork ribs
from Lowell Hall's Island BBQ;
country and western dance
music by Southern Phried
featuring Ray Odom and
Michael Howerton; a Texas
two-step dance lesson by
Joan Bean. Beer and wine
from Cafe Karibrew's brew-
pub will be available.
Deadline to buy tickets is
Sept. 14. Tickets are available
at Island BBQ, Sadler and
South Fletcher; Bean School
of Dance, 25 N. Third St.;
Island Tobacco/Indigo Alley,
316 Centre St.; and Amelia
Home Health Services on
A1A across from Lowe's or by
calling 277-0655.

Women in Nassau help-
ing Women in Need is spon-
soring A Cup of Comfort
Fashion Show and Tea
Party to benefit Gerri's Corner
on Sept. 20 from 2-4 p.m. at
Savannah Grand Assisted
Living, 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Fernandina Beach.
Tickets are $30 or $35 at
the door, if not sold out.
Tickets can be purchased at
Fifi's Fine Resale on Eighth
Street, Gauzeway and
Pineapple Patch on Centre
Street, Patchington on Sadler
Road, Elizabeth's in the Harris
Teeter plaza, and Heron's


1 7 8 2 3 9 6 4 5
5 2 3 6 1 4 9 7 8
9 4 6 7 5 8 1 2 3


3 6 9 1 8 2 7 5 4
251 4 7 6 8 3 9


8 9 5 3 2 7 4 1 6
6 3 7 9 4 1 582
~7 Q ~ .....-3 ~ ~ ~


Jawren Walton's lively mod-
ern jazz band, a free Oct. 4
afternoon concert in Amelia
Park with the 18-piece U.S.
Navy Big Band Southeast,
the now traditional Latin
Night, Oct. 8, at the Palace
with Impacto Latino, Oct. 9
and 10 shows starring
Sanborn with The Midnight
Blue Band at the new First
Baptist Church auditorium,
and a traditional Sunday, Oct.
11, Dixieland brunch at the
Beech Street Grill.
The second set continued
the show's torrid pace,
beginning with a breakneck
tempo version of
"Mississippi Mud" that was
powered by DeMerle's
exceptional drum licks. The
group segued into a cha-cha,
with DeMerle singing the
Dean Martin hit, "Sway," that
was enhanced by a spot on
solo from trumpeter Marvin
Ferebee. Eisele returned for
an Ellington medley, then set-
tled into a gorgeous rendition
of "Embraceable You." Band
members Ferebee on trum-
pet, Prince, superb pianist
Doug Matthews, trombonist
Dr. Marc Dickman, and



Swim & Sport in the Palmetto
Walk Shopping Center.
To make a donation or
assist with the event, contact
Diane at 548-9750.

The Nassau Humane
Society will hold Chip In for
Paws Casino Night on Sept.
26 from 7-10 p.m. at the
Fernandina Beach Women's
Club. The event will feature
blackjack, roulette and craps
and beer and wine, soft drinks
and pizza for a donation. Win
prizes with your winning chips
at the live auction. Tickets are
$50 and include chips for free
play. Tickets are available at:
Red Bones Dog Bakery, Bark
Avenue, Cat Clinic of
Fernandina and NHS Dog
Park. Bring cat and dog food
or bleach and paper towels
for extra chips at the door.
Call 491-1511 for information.

Dogs and owners are invit-
ed to the next Dog Park Day
is Sept. 26 from 11 a.m.-2
p.m. at Dog Leg
Productions in Fernandina
Beach. Lunch will be provid-
ed and local artist John Walsh
will play acoustic and contem-
porary music. Cost is a $20
donation per family, cash or
check at the gate the day of
the event. All proceeds benefit
the Project CHANCE
Foundation, a charitable
organization dedicated to pro-
viding an assistance dog to
children with autism in
Northeast Florida. Visit
www.projectchance.com.

Enjoy "Trivia with
Maggie" on Wednesdays at
7:30 p.m. at the Crab Trap in
downtown Fernandina Beach.
Enjoy a special trivia menu,
drink, win prizes and listen to
music while you improve your
memory and get smarter.
Free and open to the public.

FILM/THEATER

Amelia Baptist Church
will host a screening of the
movie "Fireproof" on Aug.
29 at 6 p.m. This inspirational
contemporary film looks at
what a couple does to save
and restore their marriage.
The community is invited.
Dinner for all and child care
through age 12 will be provid-
ed at no cost. RSVP your
child care needs to the church
at 261-3042.

The next Free Movie in
Central Park, sponsored by
Prosperity Bank, is "Karate
Kid" on Aug. 29 at 8:30 p.m.
Bring your blankets and lawn
chairs, concessions will be
available for purchase.

Tickets are now on sale for
Norman Beim's comedy,
"Archie's Comeback," the
opening production of the
Fernandina Little Theatre's
18th season.
Believing that her husband
Archie drowned, Lily has
decided to remarry after
seven lonely years - but sud-
denly, in pops Archie, freshly


SONG Continued from 1B
His first CD, released in
the U.S. in 2004, quickly
gained top 10 radio plays on
the Folk DJ charts. Two years
ago, Llewellyn released a new
CD made up of songs about
his upbringing in Wales, and
won the folk category in the
2008 John Lennon
Songwriting Contest.
Fresh off an international
tour with performances


bassist Ernie Ealum, showed
off their well-honed "chops'
with brilliant solos through-
out the evening.
DeMerle let the crowd
into the act via his raucous
vocal on Cab Calloway's
"Minnie The Moocher" that
had everyone scatting along
to the "hi de ho" nonsensical
lyrics.
For a finale, the venerable
"When The Saints Go
Marching In" brought the
audience to their feet once
more and sparked an
impromptu "second line"
parade around the room.
A not-for-profit 501(c) (3)
corporation, the Les DeMerle
Amelia Island Jazz Festival
distributes proceeds toward a
scholarship program to fund
college educations for aspir-
ing jazz musicians.
This year's festival will
take place Oct. 2-10. To pur-
chase tickets, get more infor-
mation or to learn about
sponsorship and volunteer
opportunities, visit the web-
site: www.ameliaislandjaz-
zfestival.com or contact the
festival hotline at (904) 504-
4772.



rescued from a desert island
where he's been having a
wonderful time!
Performances are Sept. 5,
10, 11 and 12 at 7:30 p.m.
and Sept. 6 at 2:30 p.m.; tick-
ets are $16. A special
"Tuesdays for Twelve" per-
formance is Sept. 8 at 7:30
p.m. for $12. Tickets can be
purchased at The UPS Store
in the Publix shopping center
and at FLT, 1014 Beech St.

Amelia Community
Theatre presents "The Dixie
Swim Club," directed by
Barry Ralston and featuring
Celeste Amos, Wendy Gilvey,
Karen Harper, Linda McClane
and Kay Stephens.
Five Southern women,
who were once teammates on
their college swim team,
reunite every summer for a
weekend in August at a North
Carolina beach cottage. They
catch up, laugh, and meddle
in each other's lives. These
reunions continue for 33
years, proving that some
friendships last forever!
Performances are at 8
p.m. Sept. 10-12, 17-19 and
24-26, and at 2 p.m. Sept. 20.
Tickets are $17 adults and
$10 students and available at
Amelia Community Theatre,
209 Cedar St. Call 261-6749.
Box office hours are Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday, 11
a.m.-1 p.m., and two hours
before curtain

ART/GALLERIES

The First Coast
Community Bank show,
"Visual Rhythms," features
artwork by Island Art
Association members Carol
Beck, Rhonda Bristol,
Theresa Daily and Sandra
Pinneault. This show is open
during banking hours.

An introduction to kin
formed glass will be held
Sept. 5 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Designs On Gallery, 11 N.
Third St., Fernandina Beach.
Participants in this hands-on
workshop will learn the funda-
mentals of creating decorative
and functional objects with
glass . Fee is $120 and
includes materials. Contact
Cecilia at 583-7723.

The public is invited to the
general meeting of the
Island Art Association on
Sept. 8 at 7 p.m., 18 N.
Second St. Award-winning
potter Mike Clemens will talk
about the "Potters for Peace"
program in Nicaragua and will
share how a small group of
potters can do so much to
help others. Call 261-7020.
Visit www.islandart.org.

Suzi Sax will teach a
stained and straight-line
bevel glass class on
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 6:30-8:30 p.m. starting in
early September.
Space is limited. Call 321-
1330 to reserve a spot. Cost
is $225 and includes glass
and tools.



throughout the UK, Scandina-


via and Greece, Llewellyn has
accepted an invitation from
Mark & Donna Paz Kaufman
to perform at "An Evening of
Story and Song" on Saturday,
Sept. 5 at 8 p.m. In his signa-
ture rich baritone, Llewellyn
paints a vivid picture of life in
Wales - reminding us all of
where we've come from, what
we value most, and all the
ways we embrace this place
we call "home."


Palace show hints at festival to come


+


SUDOKU


1 2 3 4

5 3 6 7

6 8 9 3

7 4 8

3 8


S9 3 1

4 7 3 2

3 4 5 9

6 2 4 7


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


CLASSIFIED


3B
NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, August 28,2009


To Place An Ad, Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 90Au Torucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms & Acreage 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercial/Retail 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW


102 Lost & Found
FOUND- Friendly male Koon cat near
beach. Call to identify (904)556-6825.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.


104 Personas

CRIMINAL RECORD? - Misdemeanor,
felony? Have them expunged for
$99.95, 30 to 60 days including DUI's.
Get a fresh start today. (800)621-4889
24/7 days. ANF
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF

105 Public Notice]

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.

PUBLIC NOTICE
Fernandina Beach Housing Authority
Housing Assistance Program
Public Housing Program
Applications for the Public Housing
Rental Assistance Program for three
and four bedroom units will be open to
all families. The application process will
be open during the hours of l:00pm
and 4:00pm
Tuesday, September 8, 2009
Thursday, September 10, 2009
Any eviction or felony conviction of a
family member within 5 years of
application will make the applicant
ineligible. Crimes by family members
who would live in the household,
involving physical violence to persons
or property, will make applicant
ineligible for 5 years. Crimes involving
drug activity will make the applicant
ineligible.
A criminal history verification from the
Nassau County Sheriff's Office or
Sheriff's Office in which the applicant
resides must be returned with your
application before application becomes
valid.
The Housing Authority for the City of
Fernandina Beach
1300 Hickory Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-5051
Equal Housing Opportunity


105 Public Notice

EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.





201 Help Wanted
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
PTL OTR DRIVERS - New pay pkg.
Great miles. Up to 46cpm. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com. ANF
MEDICAL ASSISTANT - Medical
Assistant position open in a specialty
medical office. Exp. w/injections, EKG
& blood draws necessary. Flexible
hours, very friendly practice. Apply to:
MA Position, P.O. Box 15214,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need
employees to assemble products at
home. No selling, any hours. $500
wkly potential. Info 1-985-646-1700
DEPT. FL-1380.
LMT Position Available - in
expanding Chiropractic & Wellness
Center. 2 years minimum experience
required. Please call (912)882-8888.
RETAIL SALES MANAGER
Looking for a change?
Do you love handbags?
Do you have lots of energy?
We are a new store getting ready to
open.
EOE. Fax to 321-1790
FOOD SERVICE
WORKER SUPERVISOR
for Trident Lakes Golf Course aboard
Kings Bay Naval Base. Criminal
background check required. Looking for
an individual with strong supervisory
skills and food service background.
Must be able to train and schedule
employees, order and inventory
supplies. Starting pay $11.08. For
application information visit
USAJOBS.GOV or call MWR Personnel
at (912)573-4583 or 8572.

EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.


201 Help Wanted 204 Work Wanted


DENTAL ASSISTANT - P/T. PIs call
(904)261-6826 or send resume to
(904)261-8181. Robert H. Friedman,
DMD, 2896 S. 8th St., FB 32034.
IRONING LADY NEEDED - Must do
good work & be reasonable. Call (904)
210-6191.
FREE TAX SCHOOL AT LIBERTY TAX
SERVICE - Earn extra income after
taking the course. Flexible schedules.
Register Now! Courses start 9/15/09.
Call (904)310-6273. Small book fee.
BILINGUAL LOGISTICS EMPLOYEE
NEEDED ASAP! - MUST be fluent in
Spanish & English. Knowledge of AES
Direct a plus. Will negotiate truck, rail,
barge, & ocean rates for all US & Int'l
movements. Email resumes to
olysteeltradinq.Eobs(olvsteel.com or
fax to (904)491-8688 EOE M/F/D/V
RV Delivery Drivers Needed
Deliver RVs, boats & trucks for PAY!
Deliver to all 48 states & CN. For
details log on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF
NURSING VACANCY - Nassau County
Health Department, Healthy Start
program. Provide services to pregnant
women/babies. FT position w/ benefits.
Hours flexible, can be Part-Time.
Position requires the following skills:
assessment, education, developmental
testing and work w/medically high risk
prenatal women, and high risk infants.
Work includes nursing assessment and
case management. Special focus on
medial, education and supportive
services which complement regular OB
Care. Job includes in-county travel, and
home visitation. To apply go to
myflorida.com. Position closes on
9/01/09.
The State of Florida is an
EEO/AA Employer.
WE ARE SEEKING - a Maintenance
Tech & a Housekeeper (part-time).
Apply at www.osprey-village.com

Under About Us, Select Career Center

204 Work Wanted
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs
experience. Low prices, work
guaranteed. Small jobs welcomed.
10% discount with ad. Call Tom
(904)491-9992.
HARD WORKERS II - House cleaning
and painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.


HOUSE CLEANING - 10 years
experience. Honest and excellent
references. Clean houses, condos
weekly or bi-weekly. Luci (904)415-
2169
WILL DO ALTERATIONS - in my
home. On Island. Call (904)261-6217,
Dot.
I DO ALTERATIONS - in my home.
Betty, formerly at Granny's Alterations.
Call (904)321-1395 or (904)753-3159.
SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN
Small jobs welcomed. (904)277-4777
JUST SEW ALTERATIONS WASH &
FOLD - 2 locations. FB 277-2451 &
Yulee 548-1141. Six pants special:
Bring in 6 hems, get one free.

207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF


KIE A�


306 Lessons/
Classes

PRIVATE GUITAR INSTRUCTION -
beginning to adv. students. Acoustic,
electric, fingerstyle. Banjo instruction
also avail. Terry Thrift (904)704-2011.
STARTING NEW NON-FICTION
BOOK CLUB - i.e. History and cultural
differences. Call Natalie for details, cell
(904)753-7310.
SPANISH, ITALIAN, FRENCH
Private & group classes. Also, tutoring
on Spanish. Call Lucia or Anna (904)
403-1982.




404 Money To Loan
JUDGMENT ENFORCEMENT
We specialize in locating debtors and
their assets to collect civil judgments.
Turn that worthless piece of paper into
cash. Call Breeze Judgment Recovery
(904)225-8348



S503 Pets/Supplies I


301 Schools & '-'- I
. I YORKIE PUPPIES - for sale. 8 weeks
Instruction old. 2 male, 2 female. $500/each. Call
S(904)742-3227


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial aid if qualified. Call
(866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF


2 FREE JACK RUSSELL - Females 5
months old. Prefer them to go
together. (904)849-7433



S601 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/29, 8am-until.
Baby bed, strollers, play yards, toys,
treadmill exercise bike, lots of misc.
items. 201 N. 15th Street.


601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - Sat. 8/29, 8am-2pm.
Junior Miss clothes, men's clothes, LRG
& XL, Glass wear, household items, all
good con'd. 32393 Grand Parke Blvd,
Fernandina Beach.
MOVING SALE - 705 Whitest. Sat.
8/29 - Sun. 8/30, 8am-4pm. 14th St
past Bosque Bella Cemetery. Many
household items, furniture, clothes,
TVs, video equip. IT'S ALL GOT TO GO!
Phone 310-6363.
GARAGE SALE - Saturday, Aug. 29th,
8am-lpm, 2705 Delorean St., off Will
Hardee Rd. Furniture and much more.
YARD SALE - 111 S. 4th St. Fri. 8/28
& Sat. 8/29, 8am-lpm.
HUGE ESTATE/GARAGE SALE - Nice,
clean items: furniture, little boy
clothes, toys, housewares, decor, kids
books, more. Sat. 8/29, 8am-3pm,
2001 Sunrise Dr., FB.
WAREHOUSE SALE - 50% off
everything in Front & Centre's
warehouse. Consoles, art, baker's
racks, lamps, accessories, Christmas,
etc. Fri., Sat., & Sun., 9am-5pm. 316
Ash St., downtown. (904)277-2660
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/29, from 9 to
2. Books, household, toys clothes,
much more. 96728 Commodore Point
Drive (Heron Isles off Chester Rd.) No
early birds. Rain cancels.
AZALEA POINTE - Neighborhood Yard
Sale. Sat. 8/29, 8am-3pm. Tools,
plants, rugs, home decor, costume
jewelry, and much more!

EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.


707 Osborne Street


39676 Squ Ftm

Great Investment Opportunity


F O Ft In Downtown St. Marys, Ga.
This property was recently


A rezoned from C-2 to C-1.
P lea se ca 11912-882-4927 f or m ore
information or to view the building.


Askincy



$3259000


Looking for one outgoing &
self-motivated Associate.
$45-$80k / Year
401k, Health Ins.
Email resume to Angelo Fanelli
Gen. Mngr. fanellikeffer@aol.com
464037 STATE RD 200 YULEE
FL 32097, 904-277-6969


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES



dNV TIME

Window & House

Cleaning

(904) 583-6331




(LEANINGSERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed � Bonded * Insurance
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904 4911971 � Cell: 904-742-8430
E mail: justforyouserv@aol.com


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
_ICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duster
(904) 261-1940


FARMERS MARKET

Downtown
Saturday
Mornings m
at a
Centre &
7th "r T


9am- pm


HOME IMPROVEMENT


CONSTRUCTION


BRANNAN
CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages

$16,49500
I 24x24 Wo FramerOnly
SConcrete Block




GARAGE DOOR & T
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, Inc
"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much!
Operator or door replacements -Transmitter replacement
*Broken springs *Stripped gears
*Cables Sevceforallmakes&models
904-277-2086


Repair* Rebuild * Remodel
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 * 557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003


OWI (CUMIO
WOODWORKING, INC.
CUSTOM CABINETS o ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
BOOKCAIEI TRIM CARPENTRY
HONE REPAIR M REMODELING
HANDIMAN SERVICES
LICENSED t INSURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 904-5571-100

TH/-"IS S [-] "o_'E]


LAWN MAINTENANCE



BIG DAWG'S
LAWN " "-' o
MAINTENANCE
Owned and Operated
by: GregVining
Please call: 703-2433
for Free Estimate


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants & flowers, trees, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation ffff
* Sprinkler Installation Sflt"(
* Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354


WELBORN
IRRIGATION
Do it right the first time.
* Complete system designs
* Repairs & modifications
* System tune ups * 10 years experience
Warranty on new installs
Beat any written estimate * Licensed/insured
Free estimates * 904-277-8231


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how^ to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!

LOCKSMITH


The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK (56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


NEW & USED CARS


Scott Lawson Chris Lowe
Sales Consultant Sales Consultant



CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 * Yulee

(904) 261-6821


PAINTING


' lu III . iil I




I I I . . II I I
1111^1' 1225-9



AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITYPAINTING, INC.,
"Call the Professionals"
S (904) 753-1689
*RESIDENTIAL
*COMMERCIAL
*INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
*SPECIALIZED FINISHES
*PRESSURE WASHING
& WATER PROOFING

LICENSED * BONDED * INSURED
*PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP AT
AFFORDABLE PRICES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
FREE ESTIMATE
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


PRESSURE WASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
WoodDecks Cleaned &Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353

ROOFING


MELIA
ROOFING, TNC.

333-6496
100% FINANCING
UP TO 130 MPH 3
METAL I/SHINGLE
FREE EST.
CCC-055600



COASTAL BUILDING

�A SYSTEMS

"Re.Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
� Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing i
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia

261-2233
Free Estimate
CCC-057020 i
I I1 4 L'L ' ' I'L'V ,.S 4 Vi ,i


TRACTOR WORK

Grass Too Tatt?
GIVE SHAWN A CALL!
BUSH HOGGING SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Insured * Licensed

904-318-3700


BLACK


r/A K N X r- K,.)
MARKEI




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


601 Garage Sales I
HUGE MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE -
Sat. 8/29, 9am. 85642 Joann Rd.,
Yulee. Knick-knacks, lamps, recliner,
clothes XL-3X, tables, school stuff,
shoes, etc. Everything must go
(cheap)!
GARAGE/MOVING SALE - Sat. 8/29,
9am. 2159 S. Natures Gate. (2) lawn
vacs, garden tools, ladders, ext. cords,
folding bridge table/chairs, vacuum
cleaner, knick-knacks, & more.

602 Articles for Sale
FOR SALE - Maytag washer and dryer
excellent shape, $250. 5 piece dining
room set--2 arm chairs and two regular
chairs, Walnut, w/2 leafs. Call
(904)261-8055


610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's
(904)225-9717.

611 Home Furnishings
COMPLETE MATCHING BAMBOO
ROOM - (2) sofas, red leather chair &
ottoman, (2) end tables, (2) lamps,
cocktail & sofa tables, media console,
(2) large frames & prints, and a sisal
rug. $3,500. (904)491-6832 or (336)
972-4041

1612 Musical Instruments


CORVETTE WHEELS - $200/OB0. Set BLUERIDGE GUITAR BR-180 - with
of 4, 16' 1987 factory wheels. Good case. Like new, $650. Call Hunter
condition. 261-9390 (904)261-2723.


HIGH BAY LIGHTS - Mercury vapor
400 watt, $25/each or free with
installation. (904)753-6565


603 Miscellaneous
MAYTAG ELECTRIC RANGE - Almost
brand new. Rattan furniture. Call
(904)321-1838
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF


615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupplv.com. ANF

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628


701 Boats & Trailers
10FT BOAT W/ 16FT Trailer - and
6HP Volvo motor. $1400 or make an
offer. Will sell pieces separately.
(904)321-2657

A


802 Mobile Homes
2/1 ON 1 ACRE - in quiet area.
Central air & washer/Dryer. 5 mins
from 2 boat docks. $575/mo, 1 month
dep. Avail immed. (904) 373 8366
1804 Amelia Island Homesl
HIGHEST POINT ON THE ISLAND -
4BR/3BA. 2500sf home with extra
family room & screened in porch. 806
Amelia Drive. Call (904)491-4290.
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY - 1795
Arbor Drive, Parkway South
subdivision, ACRealty 904-556-9140
SUMMER BEACH - 2028sf. Short
distance to beach. $415K. ACRealty
261-2770.

805 Beaches
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled
porches, hot tub. $339,900. (904)556-
4500


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED


Saturday * August 29nd * 1 till 4 pm


ON ISLAND

1795 ARBOR DR - 3BR/2BA - 2028 asf.

51115 Parkway - $415,000


81 SEA MARSH RD - 3BR/3BA - 3467 asf.

Amelia Island Plantation $975,000



MAINLAND

86061 EVERGREEN PL - 4BR/3BA - 2389 asf.

Hickory Village - $219,900


+


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader 5B


REA ESTATE �~I


852 Mobile Homes I
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577


856 Apartments
Unfurnished


I 925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
$450-$625 - 2BR mobile homes. Easy 2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
805 Beaches move-in. Yulee. Call Gregg (904)376- Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
I 5190.


OCEANFRONT CONDO - 2BR/2BA,
fully furnished, 3rd floor end unit. Best
view in Sand Dollar Villa complex.
$399K. Call (904) 234-8986.
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
OCEANFRONT - LOG cabin R-3
income property. Remodeled. $975K.
ACRealty 261-2770

1806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.

808 Off Island
Yulee
NEW 3BR/2BA - 2270 sq. ft., 2-car
garage on 1/2 acre. Granite counter
tops, oak cabinets, tile throughout,
covered lanai, many custom features.
Must see. $295,000. Owner financing
w/down payment. (904)753-2155
OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY - 86061
Evergreen Pl., Hickory Village
subdivision, ACRealty 904-583-2721

813 Investment
Property
OCEANVIEW - Home needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. ACRealty 261-
2770.
Foreclosed Home Auction - 500+
Florida home REDC/Free brochure.
www.Auction.com RE No. CQ1031187.
ANF

S817 Other Areas
LAKEFRONT SALE - 3+ ac waterfront
only $34,000. Dockable! 8/29/09 Save
$10,000. Wooded park-like setting on
one of Alabama's top recreational
lakes. All amenities complete. Boat to
Gulf of Mexico. Exc fin. (866)952-5339.
www.grandviewharbor.com. ANF
Owner Must Sell - 4+ acres $57,300.
Nice oak trees, pvt access to lake. All
utilities in. Ready to build when you
are. Financing avail. (866)352-2249.
www.fllandbargains.com. ANF






851 Roommate I
Wanted

HOUSEMATES - off island. Private
home. No pets. Responsible,
professional, clean. $400/mo. +
deposit. Utilities included. Call
(904)557-1659.

ROOM FOR RENT - $500/mo. Utilities
included. Quiet neighborhood, beautiful
home. Call (904)583-0037 for details.
3BR/2BA DWMH - Private lot, Middle
Rd Callahan area. $750/mo + $700
dep. Credit check required. No
Smoking. Service Animals ONLY. 879-
1022
2BR/1BA - $600/mo. + $300 security
deposit. Call (904)753-1691.
SEVERAL CLEAN PRIVATE homes for
rent - 3/2 DW - Blackrock Rd, $850.
Large 2/3 w/garage - Nassauville,
$850. 2/1 SW - Chester Rd., $650.
2/1 SW - Nassauville $575. (904)
206-3423.
3BR/2BA NEW HOME - for rent.
$1400/mo. + $1400 deposit. Gated
community off island. Please call (904)
491-4383 or (904)237-7324.


853 Mobile Home
Lots
30/50 AMP HOOKUPS - for RVs or
campers. Electric included. $400/mo.
Located Sandpiper Mobile Home Court,
5052 First Coast Hwy. (904)261-6957

S 854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5
minutes from beach. Private bath,
private entrance. $100/wk. + $200
dep. Call 10am-6pm, (904)335-2086
anytime.
FURNISHED ROOM - New bed, TV,
VCR/DVD, cable. Male only. Yulee/
Hedges area. $400/mo. Glenn (904)
548-9707.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT - in a
4BR home on the island. Pool &
covered lanai area. Renter must like
pets. Renter will share 2nd bathroom.
Prefer non-smoker unless smoking is
done outside the home. All until. incl.
Asking $425/mo. Call 753-3380

1 855 Apartments
Furnished
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262
At Beach Remodeled - Sm effic.
$145/wk. Incl utils/cable. Also on
island 2BR MH in park $185
weekly/$695 mo + dep. 261-5034
OCEANFRONT 2BR/1BA - Private
beach access. Reasonable. 261-5069


855 Apartments
Furnished I

SMALL 1BR APT. - in Nassauville.
Furnished. Twin bed, electricity, A/C,
DirecTV. $650/mo. + $650 deposit.
Cute, cozy, quiet & in good
neighborhood. Service animals only.
References required. Please call
(904)206-3241, & leave message.

856 Apartments
I Unfurnished

1ST AVE. DUPLEX - Garage, 2BR/
1.5BA, all appliances, fresh paint, nice
carpet, partially furnished if desired.
$950/mo. (904)277-2301


$725/MO. - 3BR/1BA. 402 S. 11th St.
Call 753-0256.
HISTORIC DISTRICT - 1BR w/screen
porch. No smoking. $675 inc. util. +
dep. (904)277-6763 or 583-0862.


858 Condos
Unfurnished
NOW LEASING - Cape Sound
Townhomes from $1400/mo.
Darlington Realty, Inc. (904)261-
8030
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated!
Amenities incl. $875/mo + sec dep.
Call 912-269-3960.


BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N. AMELIA LANDING 2BR/2BA
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D. Updated, very nice. Pool, tennis,
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005 private. $700/mo. Avail Sept. 3rd. Call
(904)557-6501


A 4BR/3BA - $217/mo. HUD home.
3BR only $199/mo. Stop renting. 5%
dn, 15 yrs @ 8% apr. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext. 5669. ANF
JASMINE PLACE - 2BR/1.5BA
townhouse includes water. $800/mo.
(912) 240-1388 or (912)367-9804
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
hookup. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
BRAND NEW LUXURY APTS
Affordable prices PLUS GREAT MOVE IN
SPECIALS! Spacious flrplns. Close to
EVERYTHING! Walk to shopping!
Located just minutes from Fernandina
Beach and 1-95. Waived App Fees when
you mention this ad! Call Courtney
Isles for more info at 866-906-9419 or
visit us online at
www.courtneyisles.com.
OCEANFRONT 1BR - $675, utilities
included. 2BR, $850 + utilities.
Available Sept. 1st. (847)867-3163
For Rent - 2BR/1.5BA townhouse apt.
Newly rebuilt. CH&A, stove, refrig.,
d/w, carpet. $795/mo. + dep. & ref's.
828 Nottingham Dr. (904)261-3035
2BR/1BA DUPLEX - near American
Beach/Ritz Carlton. CH&A, W/D, stove
& refrigerator, pets ok. $795/mo.
(404)523-6136
2BR/1BA - Near beach. $725/mo. +
$725 dep. Call (904)583-3811.
2BR/1BA - S. Fletcher duplex near
Simmons. W/D, all appliances. $900/
mo. + dep. Call (901)489-1645.
FURNISHED 2BR/1BA - Lower unit
on north end of Island. Close to beach.
Water & sewer included. $850/mo +
$850 dep. (904)753-2155

857 Condos
Furnished
FURNISHED TOWNHOUSE -
2BR/2.5BA. Pool and beach. Call
(912)921-8976 or (912)414-2556.

AMELIA PLANTATION - Oceanfront
condo, 2BR/2BA. $900/wk. Monthly
rate. Reduced price. Call (708)612-
6106 or (708)692-6106.

3BR/3BA IN SUMMER BEACH -
2100sf, 2-car garage, short distance to
beach. Furnished. $1550/mo. ACRealty
261-2770.


Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 bedroom townhouse style
3 bedroom garden units * Marsh views
Swimming pool * Dishwasher* Laundry facilities
Washer/dryer connections* * Washer/dryer units available*
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675.00 per month
*Some features not available in all units

5�M ca3t DN M46 - Ad f Alouta 0.4 5tc -!
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you can walk to the shops
& restaurants at The Gateway to Amelia Center!

C4_ 4UA\Y! (904) 261-0791
www.atedevelopment.com


AMELIA LAKES SUMMER SPECIAL
1 & 2 Bed Luxury Condos in gated,
waterfront community. Resort-style
pool, tennis court, 24/7 fit ctr,
volleyball & more! Condos include
garden tubs, walk-in closets, and lots
of upgrades! Call Jessica at (904)415-
6969. Starting at $799/mo!
www.amelialakes.com

2BR/2BA TOWNHOME - 2-car
garage, washer & dryer. Swimming
pool & tennis court. $895/mo. Call
(904) 415-8256.


859 Homes-Furnished
THE COLONY - 4830 Gulfstream Ct.
2BR/2BA, fully furnished including Wifi,
cable, long distance calling. $1400/mo.
Contact phone # (904)838-1969 .
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
HOME - Beautiful backyard on cul-de-
sac close to beach. $3200/mo until. not
incl. (904)310-6360

860 Homes-Unfurnished

HOUSE FOR RENT - in Yulee.
2BR/1BA, CH&A. $600/mo., 1st & last
month up front. Call (904)207-0199 or
(386)538-0279.
426 S. 6TH ST. - 3BR/1BA house for
rent. $850/mo. + $850 dep. Includes
city garbage & sewer fees. Call (904)
261-5827 & leave message.
FSBO - Family home 3BR/2BA. Fenced
backyard, eat-in kitchen, vaulted
ceilings, all appliances included.
$145,000. (904)277-6791


860 Homes-Unfurnished 860 Homes-Unfurnished

HOUSE FOR RENT - South end of 3BR/2BA - 1800 sq.ft. Tile floors,
Island. Large, private backyard, gorgeous fenced yard, all appliances.
3BR/2.5BA. $1500/mo. References 2046 Marlin CT. $1400/mo. + dep.
required. Call Tammy, 321-2394. (858)354-8221




1100 Lime Street * Fernandina Beach, FL 32034

(904) 277-0000

48 Units * 2BR Apartments * Central H&A
Refrigerator * Stove * Carpet * Miniblinds * Playground
$0 - $696
Renta/Asslstance Ava//ab/le
S"THIS INSTITUTION IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVIDER AND EMPLOYER."
HOURS: 8AM-4PM M-F FRC TTY 1-800-955-8770


It pays to learn!

Ask us about our Back-to-School

FREE RENT SPECIAL
* W/D Connections
* Large Closets
Private Patios
Sparkling Pool
STennis Courts
SExercise Room
* Close to shopping
* 20 minutes to Jacksonville
or Fernandina.
City Apartments with Country Charm!

(904) 845-2922
37149 Cody Circle Hilliard, Florida
Eastwoo aks Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30
Apartments Sat. /Sun. by Appt.


1925 s. 14T st., Suite
Amelia Island, FL

Sales (904)277-9700

Surfside Properties, In. Dorothy Trent Property Management
Realtor (904)277-0907

PROPERTIES FOR SALE


Angel VanZant
Realtor'


11th St, 2 homes under construe- NORTH 14TH STREET 3/2 MOBILE HOME on over 3 BR / 2 BA IN SPANISH OAKS. NI,
tion, affordable, on Island 3 bed- 4BR/1.5BA block home on an acre. Corner lot and fenced. neighborhood. 2,174 sq. ft. Beautiful
oom 20bat w 2mar garae . aLntaLneo home Mature shaoe tree
14om2batMLwh102car garage island, needs TLC. $137,500 Great setting. $89,900 MLS Floria room (31x 12) $257 90
$149,900. MLS# 50109. MLS# 47266 #48333 MLS #49718


LOFTON OAKS NORTH HAMPTON AMELIA SOUTH LANCEFORD
Priced to sell and not a short Beautiful 3/2 on cul-de-sac Furnished oceanfront 2/2 Incredible tidal creek location
sale! Move- in ready 3/2 has '- fi:- 11. 42"cabinets, condo with good rental histo for this custom-built 2-story
tile & hardwood, stainless i. i' 1,1. great room, ry. 5th floor location, corian w/dock & boat lift. Abundant
appliances, fenced yard, dining & living rooms. Short counters, new paint, carpet, upgrades & wonderful land
screened lanai. sale! doors & lighting, scaping, 1.17 acres.
#50239 $181,500 #50242 $194,900 #50237 $399,900 #50190 $595,000








NORTH HAMPTON ELISE ROAD PERSIMMON CIRCLE SEA HAWK PLACE
Custom modified 5/4 Beazer 3/2 Yulee home has a secret Ideal Amelia Island location Custom-built 4/3.5 marsh
home has all thr up--l passage to a hidden room for this 2004 sf upgraded front home w/inground pool
imaginable! (* ., . i ..... I behind a bookcase! Fenced home in Simmons Cove. Nice overlooking the Intercoatal
brick paver patio landscapep yard, Home Warranty, Close to layout, tiled & screened Waterway. 3064 sf built in
ing surround spa. US 17 & I 95. porch, Home Warranty. 2006.
#50235 $499,900 #50165 $185,900 #50296 $289,000 #49964 $625,000


NATURES GATE DEAL OF THE DAY! HIGHLAND DRIVE
Custom 3/3 concrete block Fenced 1/2 acre lot in Yulee Spacious 3/3 brick home on
home built in 2003 has w/AS-IS DWMH. New roof & double lot has new kitchen,
inground pool, double lot. new siding in 2007. Home wood floors, tile, new paint.
Home has oversized MBR, SS needs work but has great
appliances & granite tops. potential.
#49900 5370,000 #49852 $65,000 #49979 $429,000




Avery Rd $45,000 Long Point $575,000
Barrington $119,900 Opal Ave $395,000
Blackboard's Way $1,065,000 Pinedale Road $69,000
Calhoun St. $99,500 Someruelus $99,000
First Ave $295,000 S. Fletcher $995,000
S.FLETCHER AVENUE lan Drive $45,000 10th Street $48,000
Spectacular 3 year old ocean
view home sits on a double lot Off-Island
and has every imaginable Of- island
upgrade Call for details Amberwood Ln $58,300 Marc Anthony $46,800
Bennett Ave $225,500/$350,000 Napeague Dr $165,000
#48550 $1,550,000 Brady Point Rd $480,000 Plum Loop $49,900/$66,000
Burmeister Rd $37,000 Redbud Lane $199,000
Cayman Circle $69,000/$134,900 Reserve at Deer Run
Edwards Road $59,000 $55,000-$75,000
Gravel Creek $69,900 Roses Bluff $29,900
High Pointe $119,900 Southern Heritage $155,000
Lafitte's Way $89,900 US Highway 17 $350,000
Little Piney Island $300,000 Wesley Rd, 13 61 acres
$899,900
HIGH POINTE
OCEANVIEWHOME 1.2 acre wooded lots in
Great price on this light & gated subdivision off
bright beach cottage on S Barnwell Road. Bring
FletcherAve Steps to the beach your own builder with
access Zoned for duplex and no time limit to build.
easily expanded
#50061 $350,000 $119,900


GRANDE OAKES
Spectacular riverfront living
in this brand new 5/4 beauty.
Gourmet kitchen, 3-car
garage & more.
#44921 $689,000








HIGH POINTE
Magnificent4/3 brick home in
gated community. Tons of
upgrades, cul-de sac lot, handi-
cap accessible.

#49970 $439,000








FLORIDAAVENUE
Perfect starter or retirement
home in Yulee. Remodeled
kitchen & bath, tile & lami
nate, new HVAC.
#49929 $109,900


S^flmelia Island lantation"


Seal Estate Salek



TExclusive Listings

Living at.rnmelia Island Plantation offers a whole new lifestyle
and no one knows this community better than uwe do.
W\e offer the best selection of homes, homesites and villas on Amelia Island.


1 RED MAPLE

4 BD/3 BA home features fireplace,
screened-in porch, living and

family room, two master suites
and views of the Oak Marsh

golf course. $789,000


View our wide variety of properties and prices at


www aipfl.co m/reatestare


800-597-8108 * 277-5980
-J 6800 First Coast Highway *Amelia Island, FL 32034
Prices subject to change without notice.


I


4








6B FRIDAY, August 28, 2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810

m 1 I '1 I '1 m I '1


REAL ESTATE
RENTALS
1 1


REAL ESTATE
RENTALS
1 1


I 863 Office


AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000 I
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.


rI TRAN PORATO I


901 Automobiles I


FOR SALE - 1998 Mitsubishi Eclipse
(3) OFFICE SPACES - Historic Old Spyder. Top does need to be
Schoolhouse, 914 Atlantic Ave. Utilities reupholstered, otherwise great car.
included. Contact Rhonda at 261-8249. (904)899-2287


860 Homes-Unfurnished
A Bank Repo - 5BR/3BA $317/mo.
3BR foreclosure $199/mo. 5% dn 15
yrs @ 8% apr. For listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5853. ANF
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1375/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
HOME - Beautiful backyard on cul-de-
sac close to beach. $2400/mo util. not
included. (904)310-6360
4BR/2BA/2-CAR GARAGE - 76097
Tideview Lane, TimberCreek, 1 mile
west of 1-95 on AIA, $1350/mo.
(904)521-9792.
www.infotube.net/158370.
4BR/2BA/2-CAR GARAGE - on
island. $1400/mo. 2,000 sq. ft. Pets
OK. Available 9/1. (904)677-0248
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177


OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
861 Vacation Rentals Downtown & 14th Street. 150sf to
S Vacation Rentals i5oosf. Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-
6597


SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - Furn.
home. 3BR/2BA, 2-car gar., gated
comm w/pool, 5 min/beach. Avail Sept-
Nov. 261-6204, 206-0035
CABIN IN THE SMOKY MOUNTAINS
- near Cherokee. Sleeps 8-10. $500/
week. Enjoy North Carolina seasons
changing leaves. (904)261-5195.
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416


1864 Commercial/Retail


860 Homes-Unfurnished
ON ISLAND - 3BR/2BA w/large family
room & fenced backyard on south end
of island. Available 9/1 at $1375 +
utilities, flexible terms. (904)261-
0347
WORTHINGTON DR. - Page Hill.
3BR/2BA. Water conditioner, W/D,
fireplace, & microwave. $1095/mo.
Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-
0006.
CARTESTIAN POINTE - Easy access
to 1-95 & Amelia Island. 3BR/2BA, 2-
car gar., fenced backyard, covered
patio, tile thru-out, W/D & water
softener included. $1050/mo.
(904)206-2841
ON ISLAND - 223 S. 9th St.
remodeled 2/1 house. $185/wk or
$795/mo + dep. Available now.
(904)261-5034
3BR/3.5BA SUMMER BEACH VILLA
- granite, W/D, water softner, 2 car
garage, fireplace, 2100 sq. ft., lawn
maintenance, & cable included. $1500/
mo. (912)682-8118


I 1I11998 MUSTANG - Good cond., runs
COMMERCIAL SPACE RENTAL - great, stick shift, COLD A/C, new tires
462487 SR 200, Yulee, in BP Gas & brakes, recent oil change.
Station. Call (808)753-6433 for details. $2,200/OBO. 583-1315 or 556-6084


NEED HELP? - Amelia Coastal Realty
offers commercial tenant/buyer
representation. CALL US TODAY! Lease
rates starting at $8/psf. www.acrfl.com
or 261-2770.
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on AIA in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.


RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
- CURT ISS H ft. 463179 AIA, Yulee. Permits
* available for alcoholic beverages. (904)

LASSERRE 557-5004
Real Estate, Inc. CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
I Real Estate. Inc.


LONG TERM
*2607 Portside Circle 4BR/3BA
with 2-car garage $1,450/mo. +util.
* 2137 Nature's Gate Ct., 3BR/2BA
$1,500/mo. +util.
*322 S.6th St. 4BR/2BA $1,300 + util.
* 2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side),
3-4 BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home.
Lots of parking. Unfurnished $1,500
* I19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo. + util.,
security deposit $1,000. Avail.
August 2009.
*4BR/2.5BA Very nice 2500 sq.ft.
home at Florence Point $1,450/mo.
+ util.
* 3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island
with beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,850/mo. + Util. Avail Sept. I"
* 3BR/2BA Home w/ pool,
Dunewood PI., close to beach and
golf course $1350/mo + util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn,
unit in Amelia Lakes, smoke free,
lots of amenities. $950/mo.
* 514 S. 14th St.- 3BR/l BA $875/mo.
+ util. security deposit $1,000.
619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo.
+ util. Security deposit of $1,000.
*2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairsApt.
Great Deck-Oceanview$1,000/mo.
+ util.
*3BR/2BA on First Ave. w/one car
garage. Like new with a partial
ocean view $1,150/mo + util.
VACATION RENTAL
* AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/I BA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher. Call
for more information

IhIzzB .'['I !.md. '


S850785 US 17Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq.ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & util.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$2400/mo includes CAM + tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
*Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2,500/mo + tax + util
* DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St Old West
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $3100/mo includes rent + tax

* Sg^ ggT


902 Trucks
FSBO - '91 Dodge PU $2500. "94
Dodge PU $600. '95 Tracker 4x4
$3000. '99 GMC PU $6900. All running.
261-5034.

S 904 Motorcycles
2006 SUZUKI VINSON 500 - Winch,
ITP tires & wheels, $4000/OBO. 2004
SUZUKI 250 2-STROKE DIRT BIKE -
$2700/OBO. Call (904)321-6819.
2006 SUZUKI MOTORCYCLE
650CC, 900 miles. Lots of extras.
$3495. GM new (still in the box) utility
rack/tool box/cargo management
system. Fits GM Pick-ip truck, extended
cab and 4-door trucks. For less than
1/2 price new, $650. 225-5621 or 583-
3745 or 225-2568.


FOR RENT
*1414 lan, 2/1,singlewide $575
* 553 Pine Road, 3/2,FP,$925
*111-AS. 4th St. - 2/1, $750
* 205 S.9th St.,3/1 close to downtown $750
* 96757 Blackrock Rd.
3/2 DW on 1 Ac. $850
*723 S. 9th St., 1/1, $475
Sandy Mick
Palm III, Property Management
321-0457









Apartments
Best Address in Femandina Beach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
A Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details (


+


"alphin


OverE 2L e TA SlaVF E , INC.
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company


Visit us at www.galphinre.com

(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax

1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32034


95208 wooaDerry - Z)5 sq. It. KiBR/3.BA
located in Summer Beach. Tile throughout
and large bonus room. Screened lanai. 2 car
garage and community pool. Lawn care and
W/D. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,750/mo


1832 Ocean Village - 2BR/2.5BA home
located with screened lanai and hot tub
overlooking pond. Lawn care & W/D.
Membership available for small fee. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,650/mo


2741 Ocean Oaks - 2862 sq. ft. 5BR/3BA home located in Ocean
Walk Walking distance to beach. Screened lanai with pool on Egan's
Creek. Wood floors and tile in kitchen and bath. Lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,950/mo
95155 Bermuda - 3038 sq. ft. 5BR/4BA golf and lake front home
located in Amelia National. Master down with bonus/media room. 3
car garage, use of social amenities. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$2,050/mo
95425 Bermuda- 3004 sq. ft. 4BR/3BA home located in Amelia
National. Sun room and screened patio, upgraded kitchen overlooks
huge family room. Single story with 3 car garage. Social amenities
and lawn care included. Pets allowed. Off Island. $1995/mo
5209 Village Way-1789 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA located in Ocean Village.
Furnished or unfurnished. Community Pool with beach access and
Summer Beach membership available for small fee. lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,950/mo
95118 Sandpiper- 1218 sq. ft. 2BR/2.5BA oceanfront condo with
deck over looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities
included. No Pets. On Island. $1,895/mo
95208 Woodberry- 2258 sq. ft. 4BR/3.5BA located in Summer
Beach. Tile throughout and large bonus room. Screened lanai. 2 car
garage and community pool. lawn care and W/D. Pets allowed. On
Island. $1,750/mo
1832 Ocean Village - 1944 sq. ft. 2BR/2.5BA home located in Ocean
Village (Summer Beach). Screened lanai and hot tub overlooking
pond. Sitting area in master bedroom. Lawn care & W/D.
Membership available for small fee. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,650/mo
18 N. 18th Street - 2072 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA home with study. Tile floors,
stainless steel appliances, granite countertops. Porches on front and
back. Detached 2 car garage. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,550/mo
96153 Ridgewood - 2373 sq. ft. 4BR/3BA home located in Lofton
Point. Screened patio and wraparound deck. Master down and
bonus/BR up with full bath. Fenced backyard. Pets allowed, lawn
care. OffIsland. $1,475/mo
330 S. 7th- 3BR/2BA located in Old Town. Built in 1929 and
completely renovated. Master suite upstairs, upgraded kitchen.
Within walking distance of Centre Street. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,450/mo


86059 Remsenburg- 1500 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA
located in North Hampton. Large back yard.
Internet included. Half off one month lease
with 12 month lease. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,300/mo


989 Ocean Overlook- 2260 sq. ft. 4BR!2BA home located in
Ocean Sound backing up to pond. Short walk to beach. Tile floors
throughout main living areas. Screened lanai. Lawn care. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,400/mo
918 White - 1040 sq. ft. 2BR/3BA located in Old Town with loft.
Hardwood floors, granite countertops, commercial kitchen. Wrap
around porch with beautiful backyard. Pets allowed. W/D. On
Island. f1,400/mo
96113 Ridgewood - 2332 sq. ft. 4BR/3BA home located in Lofton
Pointe. Bonus room with full bath up. fenced backyard and
covered patio. Large master suite down. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,395/mo
86059 Remsenburg- 1500 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA located in North
Hampton. Large backyard. Internet included. Half off one month
lease with 12 month lease. Pets allowed. Off Island. $1,300/mo
23626 Flora Parke -1607 sq. ft. 4BR/2BA located in Flora Parke.
Covered patio with preserve area in back WD and Lawn care. Pets
allowed. Off Island. $1,250/mo
96679 Arrigo - 1600 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA home located in Beechway.
Split floor plan with covered lanai. Pets allowed. Off Island.
$1,000/mo
117 N. 20th -1404 sq. ft. 3BR/1.5BA home located off Atlantic
dose to downtown Fernandina Beach and Beach. All tile floors,
upgraded kitchen with granite counter tops and stainless steel
appliances. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,000/mo
823 N. Fletcher -1960 sq. ft.2BR/1BA furnished upstairs condo.
Ocean view with sunroom. Half month free with 12 month
renewal. Pets allowed. Water included. On Island. $1,100/mo
86030 Palm Tree - 1700 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA all brick home sitting on
over 2 acres. Screened porch on front and sun room in back. Pets
allowed. Off Island. $975/mo
5437 Leonard - 1332 sq. ft. 2BR/2BA home located in American
Beach. Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Oversized yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $800/mo
314 S. 14th - 836 sq. ft. 2BR/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in
backyard and deck. Pets allowed. On Island. $800/mo
939 N. Fletcher (Upstairs) - 3BR/1BA with great ocean views and
just steps from the beach. Pets allowed. On Island. $650/mo


939 N. Fletcher (Downstairs) - 2BR/1BA just steps from the beach.
Pets allowed. On Island. $650/mo





542Fis Cat ihwy#


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
*95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home
with covered patio and well maintained lawn. Home
has separate dining and fireplace in living room.
$1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) -
3BR/2BA Located in prestigious gated community
where amenities include a community swimming
pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and
Golf Club of Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home
Walking distance to the ocean, hard wood floors,
fenced rear yard and garage. $1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home
located in Ocean Sound subdivision. Fireplace in
family room, screened in back patio and 2 Car
garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is
charming country living at its best. Located in
Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land with
beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm
evenings in the florida room or cozy up by the fire-
place on the cold winter nights. Either way this one
is a charmer. $1500
* 2379 Captain Kidd Dr. (Pirates Bay) -
3BR/2BA, new carpet, rear patio, 2-car garage, cor-
ner lot. Locatd near beach, shopping & schools
$1250

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home
on the #2 Green in the North Hampton Golf
Community with club house/aquatic center, basket-
ball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with
canoe/kayak lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer,
Cable television, High Speed Internet, Monitored
Security System included. $1400


$699,000 - Sandpiper Loop - MLS#49621
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$725,000-
3BR
N


Fernandina Cay - MLS# 43544
/3BA - Great Ocean View
lip Galphin - 277-6597


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2012-A West Natures Lane - 3BR/2.5BA, 2 car
garage, family room w/fireplace, close to schools &
shopping $1100
* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community fea-
tures include swimming pool, tennis court, and
park. $850
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo
with community pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with
fireplace. Great south end location. Large 2 car
garage. This unit is in excl condition.
Community Pool a.r'llt minutes from
i... . 'I l ,,, ey i minutes from
-3,,, 3lA', , 'rely drive on AlA
through Statrarks along the ocean and intra-
coastal waterway. $925
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beau-
tiful town home located in a gated community off
AlA off of the Intercoastal waterway. Rent
includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service.
$2,475
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean
views upstairs. $1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2
BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front and rear yard.
$1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fire-
place in family room. Home is only one block from
the ocean. $850
* 2778 Forest Rid-.I . i .. only 2
blocks from the '4 l',i' carpet!
Community 'tld ming pool,
tennis courjl_ 1_4ron"w and Bar-B-Q area.
$750


$340,000 - Reserve Court - MLS#95069
4BR/2BA in Reserve at Old Bluff
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$595,000 - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lot - MLS# 45255
Buy now, Build later, use of existing home
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$425,000 - S. Fletcher Lot - 50'x100'
Ready to build - Plans Available 2700 s.f.
Brad Goble - 261-6166







$199,500 - Timber Creek PLantation - MLS#50131
2,307 sq.ft. Brick/Stucco, SS Appliances,
Brad Goble - 261-6166


-......m.....

375,000 - MLS#49508 $510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365 $150,000 - Cartesian Pointe - MLS#50160
2600 S.F. - across from the Bells River 4BR/3BA - 2578sf- In Seaside Subdivision 1,928 sq.ft. Best price in neighborhood.
BradGoble 9042616166 Nip Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


MAGENTA


BLACK


Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists


SEE THE INSIDE, THEN DECIDE -
Low rent. 1200sf, 200 + loft, 8th &
Gum Sts. 321-1651 or 261-2770
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY
BUILDING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single
office to 3500sf. Call Manager,
(770)444-9800.

1 863 Office
3 ROOM OFFICE SUITE - utilities
furnished. $625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd.
behind Amelia Insurance. Call George,
(904)557-5644.
NEED HELP? - Amelia Coastal Realty
offers commercial tenant/buyer
representation. CALL US TODAY! Lease
rates starting at $8/psf. www.acrfl.com
or 261-2770.


EARLY CLASSIFIED
DEADLINES

Labor Day Holiday
In observance of Labor Day,
the News-Leader will be
closed on Monday, September
7th. Our deadline for classified
line ads for the Wednesday,
September 9th edition will be
Friday, September 4th at 5pm.

1998 FORD EXPLORER SPORT - V6,
automatic, cold A/C, 160K miles,.
$850. Call (904)557-8707.
1998 MERCEDES SUV320 - Smoke
free. One owner. Very good condition.
106,230 mi. Silver. $7500. 261-9204
Acura Integra - '98 $500. Honda
Civic'01 $550. Nissan Altima '99 $500.
Toyota Corolla '02 $500. Police
Impounds. For listings call (800)366-
9813 ext 9275. ANF


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