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F LOR I DA' S


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: FRIDAY Augustl4, 2009/18 PAGES, 2 SECTIONS fbnewsleadercom




City may raise fees to help balance budget


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader

Fernandina Beach Commissioners
and staff began thrashing out ways to
cut spending and raise-revenues at a
budget workshop Monday.
Commissioners debated whether
:to implement paid parking, add a new
stormwater fee for residents and busi-
nesses, increase fees on residents' elec-
tric bills, assess fees to organizations
that use city ballfields, charge nonres-
idents more to use city facilities and sell


city property for condo development.
They indicated they may not
approve pay raises for city employees
and will take new steps to cut
nonessential city spending.
The commission did not respond
to seven non-profit organizations that
appealed for funding at the meeting.
There will be at least one more
budget workshop on Aug. 24 at 5:30
p.m. at City Hall, 204 Ash St. Two pub-
lic hearings on the proposed budget for
the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 will fol-
low in September.


( 'l M.111..., i Michael Czymbor, inl
an overview of the proposed budget,
told commissioners that property tax
changes and the economic climate
were i - p'. .-ihli for significant budg-
et shortfalls. Rising electrical and fuel
costs and an increase in city pension
contributions have also depleted funds,


among otheli factors, lhe said.
In addition to pitlliing a freeze on "all
non-critical measures" back ill
February, Czyllmor and slilf h;iav
come up will a luulllber of budget cut-
backs as well as some "creative" rev-
enlle opportllnilies.
One of those revenue teilratorsl


was a proposal to erect parking kiosks,
ii,. iii;~i. at.lhe beach and downtown
- a. proposal that has proven particu-
larly unpopular with residents. Most
commissioners, however, said they
would not be completely opposed to
parking kiosks somewhere in the city.
Commissioner Tim Poynter,'even
though he owns a restaurant down-
town, said lie would be in favor of a
pilot program for paid parking, as long
as it was at no cost to the city. "We
CITY Continued on 3A


ENJOYING THE SOUNDS


Hundreds of peo-
ple enjoy Sounds
on Centre on a
warm Friday night
in downtown
Fernandina Beach
a week ago, above.
Face for Radio
played and people
- and dogs, left, -
danced to the
music. The free
community con-
certs are held the
first Friday of each
month during the
warm weather and
are sponsored by
the Historic
Fernandina
Business
Association and
local business
sponsors.
PHOTOS BY ROBERT FIEGIE
NEWS-LEAD)ER


County lobbyists



'earn' 135,000


RYAN SM IF1
iNe'As Llead'r
The Nassau County Commuission
renewed Monday tlIe contracts of its
state and federal lobbyists for a com-
binedl \i., hliinI of $135,(00..
The law firm of Jacobs, Scholz amnd
Associates, hired last year to lobby at
the federal level, was given a new con-
tract worth $75,000 for the next fiscal
year.
State lobbyist Mark -Anderson's
$60,000 contract also was renewed.
Nassau County received higher fed-
eral stimulus funding per capital this
year thmu any of the surroundings cotun-
ties -about 88(76i p'r person compared
to I)uvai1' 3 s tl'3. Cl yv'. t>,l :iod Sl.
Johns' 80,, according to Ith c.onullis-
sion. Nassau is ranked second
statewide in per capital federal flud-
ing, behind Marin County.
That's because $55 million of
Nassau's $61 million in federal funds is
slated for one project long on the coun-
ty's wish list - additional lanes and
repair along A1A near Callahan.
Commissioners said Nassau


County's extra
funds were directly
attributable to the
efforts of the lob-
byists. They dis-
missed the idea
that the money,
from President
Obama's American
Jacobs Reinvestment and
......--..-- Recovery Act,
would have come
to the county in the same amount with-
out the lobbyists' efforts.
"I think they've made quite record
of accomplishment," said Commission-
er t. 1 : Boyle. "One of the things I've
heard ;rund th e community is, 'Well,
t. he moe\y.was colning here anyway.
Arc they really responsible for this?'...
I.think surrounding counties are prob-
ably wondering, 'How did Nassau
County get all this money?'"
"We've gathered all the facts', all
the figures, and brought them togeth-
er," said lobbyist Buddy Jacobs. "'Tha's
what we do."
CO! ;'A7 Continued on 3A


RYAN SMITH
News Leader

Nassau County Fire Chief Chuck
Cooper has been directed to issue a
formal apology to a firefighter under
his command.
Nassau County Commissioners
instructed Cooper to apologize to Lt.
Curtis Bollinger after they upheld
Wednesday part of a grievance filed by
Bollinger in May. This is a separate
complaint against Cooper; who was
accused in July of endangerment and
abusive conduct by the firefighters'
union.
Bollinger's grievance claimed
Cooper violated his rights under the
Firefighter's Bill 1 Il Ji.h l .'. , 1 ii.' .' illi
Nassau County rules and regulations,
during an int'., -ii:.ii.ii the fire chief
conducted into I;,''lIl I's qualilica-


Cooper


lions to teach a class for firefighters.
The investigation began in April
when Cooper received word Bollinger
was teaching a Firefighter 1 class,
which requires a state-certified instruc-
tor, and possibly accepting money to
do so. Those charges were subse-
iqu, i l, determined to be unfounded
FIRE Continued on 3A


Council on Aging moves ahead on new


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader

The Council on Aging relocation
project approved by city commission-
ers in 2008 has quite a few hurdles to
jump, but according to executive direc-
tor Ken Willette, will still meet its 2011
deadline.
, Because it must vacate its current
location at South 18th Street by the
end of 2011, a suitable spot for the
senior services center was found at
the corner of Atlantic Avenue and


North 14th Street, where the Nassau
County Annex building is now located.
Also the site of the former Humphrey's
Memorial Hospital, the property
belongs to Nassau County but a lease
with the city is being negotiated.
Willette, who became executive
director of the senior center last
January, says the county wishes to
retain ownership of the property, and
both city and county attorneys have
been working on drafting a lease. And
because the center is using a capital
grant from the Department of Elder


Affairs, a restrictive covenant also is
being written that will guarantee the
property is used for senior services.
Willette says an environmental
analysis has been completed, which
showed the site was clean of certain
hazardous materials, bul since both
lead-based paint and asbestos have
been found in Ihe building, it muist be
demolished. Demolition, lie said,
would be funded by both Itlie city of
Fernandina Beach and. Nassau County.
"The building has alsolhad break-
ins and vandalism," said Willelle. "It's


not cost-effective to keep the old build-
ing."
The grant from DEA is $500,0)00.
but Willette says total cost for con-
struction will be about $2.1 million.
. The center is looking toward state alnd
federal grants, charitable founlidaiolls
and fiundraising efforts to cover the
cost. The city also has coItmmillted to
$150,0()0 over three years for thie enlire
project.
Willelle says lIe economy )has
affected charitable louidalions,
because manlly of Ithele are "at Ihe


building

iercy of investments." Fundraising
also has been difficult, he said,
because "even people that have money
are being cautious ... we're all kind of
in a sim ilar boat." Willette added, how-
ever, that : ..l. il "things are begin-
ning to pick up."
'TIhere is no federal stimulus money
available for the relocation project,
said Willette, hilipli.uh the center is
under contract to receive $30,000 in
sltitnulus money for elderly nutrition.

AG;ING Continued on 3A


FL . A
S) i ' i ' .' " * .. ' .V '" ' . ..,
1 ': ; ,-1';: f u s, " ," . / ..:, .


1 84264 6l000


....... ............ 4 B
;...................... 2 B
...................... 7A
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...................I: OA


LaISIJI ....................I ...... ............ ... 11
OBITUARIES ........................................... 2A
OLJ ANI AB\UT ................ 2BL
SERvi CI: D : ro .........................4B
S I rolT s ...................................................... IA
S ul) o lU ................................................... 2 B


SEA TURTLE NESTING SEASON
2001) Nests: 79 Hatchlings: 1587
2 nests lost due to storms
Please tum offorredirectlightsshning
direct on the beach Fora detailed count
see wwmameliaislandeatmiurdewa om.


New fees could be levied for parking, stornmwater
collection, electricity use and parks and recreation.


Board admonishes


county fire chief


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FRIDAY, August 14, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


COUNTY
Continuedfrom 1A
"I think this is a testament
to the hard work you've
done," said Commissioner
Walter Boatright.
"I' ve
seen first- "
hand how 1
these peo- .,
pie do their
job from -
Washing-
ton, D.C.,
to Tallahas Boatright
see, so I'm
probably a
bit biased in their favor,"
Commission Chair Barry
Holloway said.
Holloway also praised
Anderson's efforts at the state
level.
"I've spent quite a lot of
time in Tallahassee with Mr.
Anderson, and I can
tell you he works hard," he
said.
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


AGING Continued from 1A
Those funds will go toward the
center's Meals on Wheels pro-
gram as well as meals in senior
centers.
Federal stimulus funds were
available for medical facilities,
Willette said, but center did not
qualify for those.
Elderly services are becom-
ing more crucial, Willette says,
because of the aging baby
boomer population. "The fore-
cast for the future is astound-
ing," he said, noting that in 2030
more than 30 percent of the
population would be over 65
years old, while the number of
people over 80-will quadruple in
that same time period. 'The
need is growing at a rapid rate,"
he said.
Willette said he was not wor-
ried about the 2011 deadline for
the new building. 'There's still
adequate time, but we need to
be making significant progress
... there are separate but
connected issues that have to


come to a
head simulta-
neously."
A 10-mnem-
-/ ber board of
directors and
steering coin-
mittee are
Willette helping with
the search for
grants. Local
architect Jose Miranda has
been chosen to design the new
facility.
The Nassau CountyCouncil
on Aging has one facility on
South 18th Street in Fernandina
Beach, which is owned by
Baptist Medical Center, and its
own facility in Hilliard. The cen-
ters offer in-home services,
transportation, health care,
adult daycare and meals to the
area's senior citizens. The
Council on Aging also coordi-
nates services with many other
local agencies to offer legal aid,
emergency referrals and many
other services.
adaughtry@fbnewsleader.com


F were violated," Bollinger said. "I office and given me all the per-
F E Continued from IA believe that thechief willfully tinent documentation, we
- Bollinger was training fire- departed from the truth, and wouldn't be here. If my rights
fighters, but only in accordance he did omit information that he hadn't been violated. we would-
with his duties as a lieutenant - knew.... The possible outcome n't be here.
and the investigation was of this investigation based on "... (But) every time it was,
dropped. that omitted information could 'Here's another paper, here's
However, Bollinger claimed have endangered my career, another paper, here's another
Cooper violated his rights by and thatwould have devastated paper.' I never knew what was
withholding information about me and my family." around the corner. I felt cor-.
the complete nature of the Bollinger did take money nered and coerced."
charges before questioning him from Waite for a registration The commission voted unan-
and by not telling Bollinger who fee, but passed it along to imously to uphold Bollinger's
made the complaint against him Waite's instructor of record, he contention that his rights were
until asked. said. violated. However, they dis-
Bollinger's grievance was Cooper said his hope during missed the charges of violating
denied by Deputy Chief Sam the investigation was to clear Nassau County policy and pro-
Young, who was present at the Bollinger, whom both he and cedures. They reinstated two
interrogation in April, Cooper Young described as one of the leave days Bollinger had taken
and County Coordinator best firefighters in the depart- during the investigation and
Edward Sealover before corn- ment. instructed Cooper to write a let-
ing before the commission. "The information that was ter of apology to Bollinger.
"My ruling was basically given to Lt. Bollinger by me was rsmith@/bnewsleadercom
this: Lt Bollinger alleged that a broad-brush view of the inves-
Chief Cooper willfully violated tigation," he said. "I believe the
the Firefighters Bill of Rights.... information I gave. was suffi-
My ruling was that he did not cient.... I did not withhold any-
violate them," Sealover said thing from Lt. Bollinger."
Monday. "I spoke to the chief Commissioner Danny
about the interview and the Leeper, a former Fernandina
investigation - about how it was Beach fire chief, disagreed. "I
conducted and how it should believe you purposely withheld
be conducted in the future.... I information to induce himn to
notified Lt. Bollinger that no make a statement, and I don't
documents relating to the inves- believe that your letter of the
tigation would be placed in his 29th identifies you as the com-
personnel file, and I restored plainant," he said.
one day of leave to him." After Cooper's testimony,
Bollinger insisted his rights Bollinger was allowed a rebuttal
were violated, however, and statement .
appealed. "Make no mistake - I don't I
In a letter dated April 29, believe my department heads iy*s uVor Bir day
Cooperoinformed-BellingerAhaL or mysuperwviors, n't have.. i.... .. r-- .
he.wouldrhel questionedaboutiL th right to qustippsiamething:.,.; . .. .* rUlUSI
whether he was teaching'a' they feel:iS'improper," he said: -Have f Great Day!!!
Firefighter 1 class. The letter "If they had called me into the
did not address whether
Bollinger received compensa-
tion or name the complainant
who made the charges.
"This was the only piece of
paper I was given when the
investigation started," Bollinger
said.
Cooper began by asking
Bollinger about the class, but
soon veered into another line
of interrogation, Bollinger said.
"It changed from, 'Are you
teaching classes?' to, "Are you
being compensated?' I replied
that I was not," he said. "At this
point I finally asked who my
complainant was. According to
my Firefighter's Bill of Rights,
before the first question is asked
they are required to tell me who A nlversary &.M trthday
my complainant is. They did not en
do that, and I finally had to ask." Oelebration
The complainant was Matt A . 20 h Alic Aams ha
Waite, a volunteer in the Nassau t August 4th.2009.Ralph and Alice Adams had a
County Fire Rescue reserve double Celebration, 67 years of marriage arid Ralph's 94th
program, who was taking class- birthday. They celebrated with a dinner in their honor at
es under Bollinger. According to Barbara Jean's. Celebrating with them were daughters Mrs.
Bollinger's grievance, Cooper Xernna Da is (0 illiam) Irom Ptusburg Pennsylvania. Ms.
said Waite made the complaint , n DC ad rs .e Fk
of his own accord. However, Be.erl\ Nantz ':f \ashmgi" DC and Mrs jyceFrink(Nell)
Bollinger said Waite told him ol Fernandlna Beach Ralphs Fa\orlte place McDonald's, had
he was asked to come to a birthday cake andbanner from friends.-He received many
Cooper's office and felt pres- cards and telephone calls Ralph is a retired electrician and
sured to make a statement.
sure to make a statement. Alice is a retired school teacher The Adams reside In Yulee.
"Before I was questioned, I
think it's pretty clear my rights

* M"


CITY Continued fom 1A
could start on Centre Street,"
Poynter said. "Most of thle peo-
ple who park on Centre Street
work in the stores and live
above them.... They would
leave the parking for visitors
and park somewhere (else)."
"We need new revenue
sources," said Poynter. "We
could earmark (parking)
money for improvements ... it
would be much more salable
(to business owners)."
Poynter also noted that the
parking lot behind his restau-
rant, Caf6 Karibo, is underuti-
lized. "We just need people to
drive around the block and
walk," he said.
Czymbor said he didn't
want to "get into the gory
details (of paid parking)
because it's been overblown."
However, he added, "I reject
that this community is different
from other communities ... we
should look at provable tech-
niques, not just because it's a
revenue source ... (we could)
put out an RFP and ask to do a
pilot program at no cost to the
city, with some revenue shar-
ing."
Commissioner Jeffery
Bunch said he agreed with
Poynter about earmarking the
money from paid parking. "The
money should be put back into
parking and stormwater (col-
lection)," he said. "We could
build a two-story parking
garage right here."

ing) just yet," said Mayor
Susan Steger. "We're going to
have 12 ugly kiosks on Centre
Street." She noted that park-
ing meters could prevent eld-
erly people'from going down-
town, but did concede that "we
have an issue with (downtown)
employees parking where they.
shouldn't be."


1:45, *4:20, 7:10, 9:45
JULIE AND JULIA PG-13
J:35, '4:15, 7:00, 9:45
G.I. JOE PG-13
1:30, *4:15, 7:05, 9:45
G-FORCE IN 3D PG
12:20, 2:35, *4:50, 7:05, 9:20
TIME TRAVELERS WIFE PG-13
12:45, 3:00, *5:15, 7:30, 9:45
THE UGLY TRUTH R
12:25, 2:40, *4:55, 7:10, 9:25
FUNNY PEOPLE R
*4:05 10:15
HARRY POTTER 6 PG :.
12:30, 7:00
"' Tuo.dy Stimulus Oal
Popcorn i\ 00 - Drink S1 00
IU'!q''l~l'l.'IH'll~ll: llJtl l IHMIllj aUi'.'i.'.'llllll-mIIIB


Another
potential rev-
enue source
would be to
Increase a
Sa Florida Pub-
lic Utilities
franchise fee
Czymbor up to 6 per-
cent.
"I'm re-
luctant on the franchise fee
increase," said Commissioner
Ken Walker. "That's going to
add a couple bucks ... a person
on a fixed income might feel it.
I would generally be against
that."
Commissioner Eric Child-
ers said that, at $1.50 per $100,
the increase was not as signif-
icant as he first thought. "I'm
inclined to approve that," he
said, but added that "the dis-
enfranchised and those on a
fixed income will be able to
afford it least."
Selling some of the city's
surplus real estate could poten-
tially bring in $1.8 million,
Czymbor said. Most of that
unused real estate is property
that has reverted back to the
city because of taxes. The 10
parcels in question are resi-
dential-zoned, he said, and
have water and sewer in place.
Czymbor also noted that the
buildable lots could be devel-
oped with condos or duplexes,
which would provide another
revenue source for the city.
Bunch said he was not
against selling property, and
said he would like to see which
property the city owns on a
map - but added, "once we sell
property we can't get it back."
"I'd like to talk about selling
real estate," said Poynter.
"(But) who's going to buy this
stuff?"
Most commissioners seem-
ed to be in favor of increasing
nonresident fees to use city


Parks & Recreation programs.
The city also could start charg-
ing "user fees" to organizations
that use city fields.
Czymbor said the city could
see up to $17,000 in increased
funds, but that still would not
be close to covering city main-
tenance fees.
Bunch said the city could
require each league to main-
tain its own fields, thus freeing
city workers to do other jobs.
The city also could collect
increased stormwater fees by
establishing a Stormwater
Utility Fund. The fees would
be calculated, said Czymbor,
according to the pervious and
impervious surfaces of all res-
idential and commercial prop-
erties and could amount to $4-
8 a month per residence.
Czymbor also brought up
several ways the city could
decrease expenditures, includ-
ing no wage increases for
employees except those under
a union contract.
"I'm not for giving a raise at
all this year," said Childers.
"Everybody else is sucking it
up. I think city employees
should, too."
"I think we have fabulous
city employees," said Steger,
"(but) I'm opposed to any pay
increases this year. ... If you
call banks in the area, they
would say no one is getting a
raise ... it's a reality check."
Poynter went a step further,
saying the commissioners
themselves should take a pay
cut. "We're asking people to
take pay cuts. Maybe we
should do the same," he said.
Non-profit organizations
asking for funds included the
Amelia Island Museum of
History, Chamber Music
Festival, Family Support
Services, Amelia Island Film
Festival, Council on Aging and
Boys and Girls Club.


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FRIDAY, August 14.2009 NEWS Ncws-Lcadcr


West Side schools


get better grades
KATHIECOLGROVE He added that administra-
Community Newspapers tors and teachers would focus
on improving the grades of stu-
Both West Side high dents in the lower quartile,
schools won state appeals to another factor in the C grade.
have their FCAT scores raised "We still know the lower
a letter grade. quartile is a group we need to
West Nassau High School's work with," Booker said.
grade rose from a D to a C, "We're relieved and felt confi-
while Hilliard Middle-Senior dent the appeal would be
High School's B went to approved."
an A. Hilliard's improved grade
Administrators from each delighted former principal
school filed appeals with the Dale Braddock. "That put us
Florida Department of repeat, those two As, back-to-
Education last month, back in Hilliard," he said.
An appeal for WNHS was The school was eligible for
filed after a data review 10 bonus points, but did not
revealed an error in the llth receive them because the ESE
and 12th grade retake column, students' scores were not con-
resulting in a loss of points sidered when calculating the
necessary to give the school a percent of juniors and seniors
C letter grade, who passed the retake exams.
"We were one point from a "They had excluded our
B initially. This score gives us ESE students and we appealed
10 bonus points which puts us that because that's discrimi-
at a C," said WNHS Principal natory," Braddock said.
Ron Booker Tuesday. "One With the school now receiv-
point, one student makes the ing an A, the teachers will be
difference." eligible for recognition funds.
The appeal asked that Overall, Braddock, in his
bonus points be recalculated new role as director of sec-
after removing a student that ondary education, said,
had already passed the grad- "Everybody should be happy
nation requirements and for the West Side."
ACT/SAT tests, according to Hilliard resident Brent
an Aug. 11 letter from the state Tilley began serving, as
education department. HMSHS principal July 1.
"We had indicated that on The changes are reflected
our report to the Florida at www.schoolgrades.fldoe.
Department of Education. org.


They forgot to take him.out It
was a mistake," said Booker.


kcolgrove@ nassau
countyrecord.com


State DCF moves to

new office in Yulee


The Florida Department of
Children and Families office
in Nassau County has moved
to a new location in Yulee.
The new location is 463688
SR 200, Suite 3, Yulee, adja-
cent to the UPS store.
The same services that
have been available at the
Ferandina Beach site will also
be offered at the Yulee site.
These services include the
department's ACCESS Florida
programm for Food Stamps,
Temporary Cash Assistance
and Medicaid.
Computers will be available
for persons who need to apply
for these services. However,
it is notnecessary to come to
the office to apply for any of
these services. Persons can


apply for public assistance on
any computer with Internet
access by going to www.myflo
rida.com/accessflorida.
People who are already
receiving food stamps or other
economic assistance from the
department and have ques-
tions about their services can
call 1-866-762-2237. They can
also go online to myflorida.
com/accessfloridas.
Additionally people are
encouraged to sign up for the
"My ACCESS Account" serv-
ice at the website. This service
provides convenience for those
receiving food stamps and eco-
nomic assistance.
Those who need to contact
the Family Safety office can
call 548-9300.


Ik9(-IdIIU^


NEW INSTRlCTOS Fl
Miss BlIv bfmllCrym almN lt
Miss Emily: ,FrlesuI- I- =hTmg ragh
r. Frstl: Niln ChIS SNgwhlilWiM tIeUlm W �
Kinderstudlos * 415-0954
www.Mknderstudlos.com


Counterfeiting (

JASON YURGARTIS ,,
News-Leader'


Charges have been dropped
- at least temporarily - against
a Fernandina Beach man and
two Georgia residents arrest-
ed in Collier County on July 17
for possessing 10 or more coun-
terfeit bills and fraud to obtain
property under $20,000.
The state was unable to file
charges Aug. 7 in Collier
County Circuit Court against
Joseph Edward Rimes, 35, of
Fernandina Beach, William
David Rodeffer III, 32, a former
Fernandina resident who now
lives in Folkston, Ga., and
Valerie Marietta Carver, 25, of
Alma, Ga.
I The State Attorney's Office
of the 20th District, which han-
dled the case, cited insufficient
evidence as the reason.
Collier County Sheriff's
Office Public Information
Officer Michelle Batten said
the detective handling the case
was to meet Thursday with the
prosecutor to discuss why the
charges were dropped.
"Whether there will be addi-
tional charges filed depends on


1 ~ 0~pi~ ~ low


SRims'
Rimes


Rodeffer


what comes out of this meet-
ing," she said.
Rodeffer's attorney, Naples-
based Rodolfo Linares, said his
client is "an upstanding citizen
and justice was served."
Linares, who did not repre-
sent Rimes or Carver, said, "It's
my understanding that (the
prosecution) didn't have
enough evidence to prove their
case."
The arrests were made
when authorities alleged they
found 42 counterfeit $100 bills,
two counterfeit $20 bills, a lap-
top, two printers, crayons, col-
ored pencils and a laptop bag
with documents belonging to
Rimes - including test patterns
for the counterfeit U.S. cur-
rency - inside Rodeffer's white
2006 GMC pickup.


chargess dropped

According the group was out at sea,
to reports, Rodeffer's truck was parked in
Rimes said he the woman's driveway and was
and his girl- obstructing entry to the home.
friend, Carver, As part of a standing agree-
reprinted the ment, owners of vehicles
S money in parked in the driveway for fish-
Rodeffe r's ing trips are required to leave
Carver truck as the an ignition key for easy move-
three were ment if necessary.
heading south According to reports, the
for an overnight offshore fish- woman looked in the unlocked
ing trip to the Dry Tortugas. truck for the key, and upon
Rimes said he got the idea to opening the glove box, saw sev-
wash $1 bills with a household eral washed out bills and some
cleaner, then print $100 cur- suspicious looking $100 bills.
rency on them after watching a She then notified local author-
Chris Hansen undercover spe- ities.
cial on the NBC show On July .17, the group
"Dateline'" that described a sim- returned to land, at which time
ilar scheme in Las Vegas, detectives from the Collier
reports stated. County Sheriff's Office
Carver reportedly told Economic Crimes and
police she spent about $1,000 of Surveillance Units along with
the counterfeit money to pur- agents from the U.S. Secret
chase food and other items and Service made a traffic stop on
Rodeffer allegedly admitted to the pickup due to the license
washing, producing and spend- plate being completely
ing the counterfeit currency, obscured by a non-transparent
The Collier County Sheriffs cover. Rodeffer consented to a
Office was tipped off July 16 search of the vehicle and the
about the trio's alleged scheme contraband was confiscated,
by the mother of the man who authorities reported.
guided their fishing trip. While jyurgartis@fbnewsleadercom


HEATHER A PERRY
News-Leader
Five years ago, an eye
exam revealed that Marsha
Riley had the beginnings of
age-related macular degenera-
tion (AMD).
"Thankfully, after four
years of monthly injections
into both eyes, my vision has
been saved as I continue
receiving them. I look for-
ward to the next medical
breakthrough," said Riley,
whose mother was not quite
so lucky. Her AMD was diag-
nosed at age 82 and she is
now legally blind.
Riley has been involved in
the Nassau Council of the
Visually Impaired and Blind
since its creation in 2007 and
is currently serving a two-
year term as president of its
board.
"Being a volunteer has
been a catalyst for my own
healing," said Riley. "Learning
the news that you are going
blind is hard to take - cata-
strophic! Since I am visually
impaired also, my understand-
ing and compassion of the tri-
als of others similarly handi-
capped, is acute."
These men and.women
are enjoying life as they learn
to accept the handicap and
work with it My life is
enriched by being able to help
them accomplish the things
they didn't realize they could
still do."


HEATHER. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
President Marsha Riley addresses a meeting of the Nassau Council for the Visually
Impaired and Blind on Aug. 3.


Originally from Prince
William County in Northern
Virginia, Riley "fell in love
with Amelia" after visiting her
sister in 1993.
She and her husband,
Bob, moved to Fernandina
Beach in 2000. They share
their Fernandina abode with a
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Tzu, Patches.
Anyone, whether visually
impaired or blind or not, can
join the council, which is a
member of the Florida
Council of the Blind.
Membership fees are $10 per
year.
Group members have
varying degrees of visual
impairments, caused at birth
or by injuries and disease.
They inspire one another with
life stories, discuss advances
in eye care, learn Braille, lis-
ten to books on tape and learn
about computers. The group
also plans social events such
as fishing, visiting museums
or going out to lunch.


Volunteers are welcomed
as members. Drivers are
always needed, as are com-
puter gurus who can teach
basic skills on two computers
donated by the Council on
Aging.
Tax-deductible donations
are welcome and may be'
mailed to NCVIB, c/o Council
on Aging, 1367 South 18th St
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034.
Meetings are held the first
Monday of each month
except July from 1 to 3 p.m. at
the Council on Aging. For
information call Riley at 583-
1317 or e-mail ncvib@com-
cast.net.
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FRIDAY, August 14,2009 NEWS News-Leader


'The War of Wars


Three years, eight months
and seven days after the brutal
attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec.
7, 1941, Americans would expe-
rience the finale to their second
World War. A little after noon-
time on Aug. 15, 1945, Tokyo
time, (Aug. 14, North American
time) the Emperor of Japan
announced over the radio
Japan's unconditional surren-
der to Allied Forces. This day in
history is known as V-J Day,
Victory over Japan, the day the
Japanese Empire surrendered
in defeat, ending World War II
in the Pacific.
On the days following, ban-
ner headlines around the world
proclaimed this auspicious vic-
tory. The Aug. 15, 1945, New
York Times cited a bold, quadru-
ple-tiered headline which read,
"Japan Surrenders, End of
War! Emperor Accepts Allied
Rule; M'Arthur Supreme
Commander; Our Manpower
Curbs Voided."
Weeks later on Sept. 2
aboard the USS Missouri in
Tokyo Bay a formal, uncondi-
tional surrender ceremony was
performed.
World War II was the dead-
liest and most expensive war in
human history. Financial costs
totaled an estimated one trillion
dollars. It was a war conducted
in both Europe and the Pacific
where two opposing military
alliances, the Allies and the Axis
powers, embarked on a cam-
paign that would eventually
record the mobilization of 100
million military personnel
worldwide. It was also a war
where the United States would
mourn the loss of over 400,000
American lives.
For years the United States
persisted in its impartiality and
vowed neutrality towards the
war in Europe which began in
1939. The Selective Training
and Service Act of 1940 requir-
ing men ages 21-30 to register
with local draft boards indicated
Americans were preparing for
the possibility of war. The Lend-
Lease Act of 1941, allowing the
U.S. to supply Allied nations
with vast amounts of war mate-
rials signified the U.S sympa-
thized with Allied powers. The
Atlantic Charter between the
U.S. and Britain of 1941 estab-
lished a vision for a post-World
War I world, despite the fact
that the United States had yet to
enter the war. All these indica-
tions had the Axis powers.
assuming the United States
would no doubt enter the fight.
And while the war in Europe


i

VETERAN'S
CORNER


Debbie
Walsh


continued,
the Japan-
ese Empire
started its
own act
toward ret-
ribution.
The
horrific and
devastating
bombing of
Pearl Har-
bor official-
ly severed
America's
neutral
stance and


on Dec. 8, 1941 the U.S.
declared war on Japan. Two
days later, Germany declared
war on the United States.
The U.S. would never be the
same after Pearl Harbor and
soon after in February 1942
President Roosevelt signed an
executive order directing appro-
ximately 120,000 people of
Japanese descent living in the
U.S. to be placed in internment
camps. The rampant fear that
many of those people were or
would be spies for the Japanese
Empire set the fate of these peo-
ple and would see them impris-
oned until the end of the war.
A too-close-for-comfort event
occurred on April 11, 1942 when
an American tanker carrying
fuel oil from Texas to New York
was torpedoed and exploded
into flames just four miles off
Jacksonville Beach. -
As World War II continued
we would see many wins and
losses. One of those wins
occurred in Europe on June 6,
1944, when the world saw the
largest seaborne invasion of his-
tory involving three million
troops from 12 countries. That
day is known as D-Day.
Allied victories at the strate-
gic locations of Iwo Jima in
February and March 1945, fol-
lowed by Okinawa in March
through June of 1945, insured
the U.S. was within striking dis-
tance of Japan's mainland.
European victories also esca-
lated. On May 7-8, 1945, V-E
Day, Victory over Europe, Allied
Forces formally accepted the
unconditional surrender of Nazi
Germany and the end of Third
Reich was now fact. Nazi
Germany and the Axis powers
had been defeated.
Since the war in Europe had
ended, the Pacific now took full
attention. In June 1945, Presi-
dent Truman approved plans
for the inva'Sibn of Japan and
numerous mainland Japan
bombings occurred. The Pots-


dam Declaration established
terms for an unconditional
Japanese surrender. It was
issued on July 26, 1945 by
Harry Truman, Winston
Churchill and Chiang Kai-shek.
Though the Japanese losses
were staggering, the Japanese
refused to concede, flatly reject-
ing the proclamation.
On Aug. 6, 1945 U.S. radio
stations began playing a pre-
pared statement from President
Truman. 'The United States has
dropped an entirely new type
of bomb on the Japanese city
of Hiroshima - an atomic
bomb." He warned if Japan still
refused an unconditional sur-
render, the United States vowed
to attack additional targets with
more devastating effect.
More pressure was added
when on Aug. 8 the Soviet
Union declared war on Japan.
On Aug. 9, a second nuclear
bomb was dropped, this time
on Nagasaki, Japan, and on Aug.
14 Japan surrendered.
By the end of World War II
records show 248,000 Floridians
had served in both Europe and
the Pacific. Accounts also reflect
3,540 of those soldiers died
serving their country.
Some historians say World
War II should claim the title
"The War of Wars" since it
involved a global military con-
flict of the majority of the
world's nations. For me and oth-
ers of my generation it is not
difficult to empathize with what
our parents and grandparents of
the World War II era had to deal
with regarding an attack on our
homeland. All we have to do is
think of 9/11.
Today; Aug. 14, we'll com-
memorate the anniversary of
the end to this blockbuster war..
I was very dismayed to see so
little media coverage regarding
the anniversaries of the bomb-
ing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki,
and I only hope V-J Day will
hold more significance. Either
way, we the veterans and fami-
ly members of veterans will
always remember and contin-
ue to mourn the loss of hun-
dreds of thousands. To soldiers
still living that fought this War
of Wars, thank you. We appre-
ciate your sacrifices, the losses
you incurred and your patriot-
ism to a nation that is a leader
among leaders.
Debbie Walsh is a 22-year vet-
eran, retired Senior' Master
Sergeant in the Air Force and a
Life Member of The American
Legion Post #54, Fernandina
Beach. whitelabaron@yahoo.com


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RYAN SMITH/NEWS-LEADER
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and Plant Sale Saturday at the Fernandina Beach airport Proceeds from the sale
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6A FRIDAY. August 14, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


POLITICS IN BRIEF


Fair Tax meeting
The Nassau County section of the
Florida Fair Tax Education Associa-
tion is scheduled to meet at 11:30
a.m. Saturday in the meeting room at
the city airport.
The meeting will last about an
hour with a general discussion of the
fair tax, questions and answers and a
discussion on the impact of eliminat-
ing the federal Internal Revenue
Service.
All Americans are welcome to
attend regardless of political persua-
sion.
Low Country Boil
The Nassau County Democratic
Party's llth Annual Low Country
Boil will be held Saturday at Kraft
Athletic Ten Acres, 961023
Buccaneer Trail, on Amelia Island.
The event will begin at 6:30 p.m.
with a Low Country Boil menu, bar-
.becue, music and a silent auction.
State Sen. Dan Gelber of Miami
Beach, a candidate for attorney gen-
eral, will be the keynote speaker.
Others attending will be candidate
for governor Michael E. Arth of


Deland and commissioner of agricul-
ture candidates Eric Draper of'lalla-
hassee and Randy Hatch of Branford.
Tickets are $50 and can be pur-
chased by calling NCDEC Chairman
Jay Paul Thibault at 556-4105 or by e-
mailing info@nassaudems.org.
For information, visit www.nas-
saudems.org or e-mail info@nas-
saudems.org.
Special elections set
The Florida Division of Elections
has called for special elections to fill
the vacancy of the Senate District 8
seat formerly held by the late Sen.
Jim King The special primary elec-
tion will be on Sept. 15, and the spe-
cial general election will be Oct. 6 for
Nassau County Precincts 101, 102,
202 and 204 on Amelia Island.
Candidates interested in qualify-
ing for the state senate seat must do
so by the petition process or by pay-
ing the qualifying fees. Petitions for
candidates qualifying by the petition
method must be submitted to the
supervisor of elections in the county
in which signatures are collected no
later than 5 p.m. Monday in order
that the supervisor of elections can


verify the signatures and certify the
results to the division of Elections in
Tallahassee.
Interested candidates may qualify
to fill the current vacancies begin-
ning at 8 a.m. Aug. 20 and ending at
noon Aug. 21.
Qualifying by petition requires
854 valid signatures. Qualifying by
fees requires $1,915.92 for party-affil-
iated candidates and $1,277.28 for
non-party-affiliated candidates.
In order to vote in the special pri-
mary election, Nassau County citi-
zens in Precincts 101, 102, 202 and
204 on Amelia Island must be regis-
tered on or before Monday.
Call the Supervisor of Elections
office at 491-7500, 904-491-7510
TDD, or visit www.voteriassau.com
to update your voter record or to
receive information about the
upcoming elections.
GOPtomeet
The Republican Party of Nassau
County executive committee will
hold its monthly meeting at 7.p.m.
Thursday at the County Building on
Pages Dairy Road. Guest Speaker
will be Ken Mertz, who will speak


on the "Fair Tax."Please refer to
www.nassaugop.org for information.
All Republicans are invited.
Health care reform
A "Federal Healthcare Reform
Conversation" will be hosted by State
Rep. Janet Adkins, the Health Plan-
ning Council of
Northeast Florida,
Inc., and Florida
CHAIN from 6-8
p.m. Aug. 27 at
Florida Community
College at
Jacksonville, Betty
P Cook Nassau Adidns
Center in Yulee.
For more infor-
mation, contact Amanda Young at
491-3664.
College fund-raiser
The Florida State College
Foundation will host a fundraiser for
scholarships by "roasting" state Sen.
Steve Wise on Sept. 17.
There will be a VIP Sponsorship
Reception at 5:30 p.m., general
reception at 6 p.m. and the roast will
be 7-9 p.m.


The event is at the Wilson Center
Theater, South Campus, Florida
State College at Jacksonville, 11901
Beach Blvd., Jacksonville.
The purpose is to provide
scholarships for promising jobs for
Florida's students preparing to grad-
uate from Pathways Charter School
(a return-to-school initiative located
at Florida State College at
Jacksonville).
Gold tickets are $2,500, which
includes four tickets to VIP reception
and event, logos displayed on screen
in the theater, preferred seating at
the roast and program recognition.
Silver tickets are $1,000, which
includes four tickets to VIP reception
and event, preferred seating at the
roast and program recognition.
Bronze tickets are $500, which
includes two tickets to VIP reception
and event, preferred seating at the
roast and program recognition.
Individual tickets are $100.
Checks should be made payable
to Florida State College Foundation,
501 W. State St., Jacksonville, FL
32202 and with the exception of the
food, contribution's will be tax
deductible.


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COMMUNITY


FRIDAY. AUGUST 14.2009/NEWS-LEADER


'Living Proof Live' at First Baptist


Beth Moore is bringing "Living Proof
Live" to her hometown of Green Bay,
Wis., Aug. 28-29. Thanks to simulcast
technology, she'll spend that weekend
here at First Baptist Church too as she
speaks on "Coming Home to the Heart
of Our Desires" from Psalm 37.
"Living Proof Live" is a weekend
you'll never forget. And you wor't even
have to leave town. For information or
to purchase tickets, contact the church
office at 261-3617.
It's more than a sport, it's more than
a game, it's Upward basketball and
cheerleading. Upward is an evangelistic
sports ministry specifically designed for
kindergarten through sixth grade boys
and girls that promotes salvation, char-
acter and self-esteem in every child.
Early registration cost is $65 per child.
After Sept. 1, cost is $75. To sign up or
get information call First Baptist at 261-
3617.
Mark your calendars. The annual
meeting is Oct. 8 at Amelia Baptist
Church, 96117 Buccaneer Trail,
Fernandina Beach. "Service in the
Midst of Adversity." Business meeting is
at 5 p.m.; finger foods and fellowship at
6 p.m.; second session at 7 p.m.
Mobile Dental Unit is Sept. 28
through Oct. 2 at First Baptist, Callahan,
45090 Green Ave., Callahan.
Appointments are Sept. 21-23 from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Call 225-5941.
Training for medical and financial
screeners will be Sept. 15 at the associa-
tion office. All screeners must be
trained by the Florida Department of
Health before screening patients.
Who qualifies to be seen in unit? If
you are an adult at least 18 years of age;
you have no dental insurance; your
household is in the 200 percent poverty
level; you only need basic dental work,
either fillings or extractions.
From our Director of Missions Dr.
David Drake: "Key Leader Workshop is
at First Baptist Church on Aug. 27 from
6-8:45 p.m. Evangelism strategies for the
21st century, led by Will McRanev.
Prayer ministry "Building Praying
Churches" led by Rich Shepherd.
Stewardship "Consider your Ways" led
by Ken Westbrook. Music led by Terry
Williams. Discipleship "Making
Disciples Who Make Disciples" led by
Bill Carmichael. Ministry assistant/sec-
retary "Office Teamwork" led by Lynn
Stone. Deacon training "How Deacons
Help Manage Church Conflict" led by
Roy Lee Saint. "Women's Missions and
Ministries" led by Cindy Goodwin..
"Passion in Leadership Spanish" led by


,Deris Coto.
Service anniver-
saries: Zandra Tison
has 17 years as min-
l., * istry assistant at Gray
S�- ' Gables First Baptist;
Pastor Steve
Wolgamott, pastor of
S Live Oak Baptist for 10
years; Louise Weaver,
HILDA'S administrative assis-
HEAR- tant/minister to chil-
ABOUTS dren at Blackrock
Baptist Church for 12
S years; Jim Curtis, pas-
Hilda tor for six years at
Higginboham Eastport; Laurie
Warren, ministry assis-
tant at Cedar Bay for nine years; Bruce
Jernigan, minister of children for 15
years at Dunns Creek; Dorothy
Coleman, financial secretary 12 years at
Five Points Baptist Church; Theresa
Scanion, ministry assistant 10 years at
Amelia.
Who knew Bible study and worship
could be so much fun? First Baptist
Church.
If God should tarry for 150 more
years, what will our legacy be? I want to
invite you to step up and take your place
of service on "Build the Church Day" on
Aug. 30. As we honor God with our com-
mitment to live for Him. Then join us for
homecoming on Sept. 27. This year is
made even more special as we celebrate
the 150th anniversary of First Baptist.
The new church address is 1600 S.
Eighth St. Phone: 261-3617.
God is faithful and he calls us to fol-
low Him. This God who have us this
wonderful post will lead to a glorious
future. Let's commit to do whatever it
takes to honor Him. In His love, Pastor
Jeff.
"Sam's Stanzas." We began to look
and listen to our Christmas music
Wednesday. We have books and CDs for
those who wish to be part of the tree.
Trish and Kay will be asking some of
you to step forward for very special
parts. Sue is busy keeping our feet to
the fire. This will be the most moving
message of all our presentations. You
will want to be part of it.
All music Sunday evening is Aug. 30.
Special guest musicians plus our own
people leading us in worship.
Global Impact Celebration runs
through Sunday at First Baptist Church,
Callahan. Gary Crawford spoke
Wednesday evening. He has been senior
pastor of Westside Baptist Church in
Gainesville for 27 years. He has served


as president of the Florida State Board
of Missions and as a trustee of the
International Mission Board
Convention. His church is very active in
missions.
Tom Williams was the Sunday morn-
ing and evening speaker. He is the
regional leader for Western Europe for
the Southern Baptist Convention. He
served as a missionary to Thailand from
1981-4 and as mission administrator in
Bangkok from 1990-5. He served as
associate area director, Southern Asia
and the Pacific, from 1996-7 and as
regional leader for Western Pacific from
July 1997 to June 2004.
Our Global Impact Celebration musi-
cal guest was Michael O'Brien. He is a
gifted singer, songwriter and musician.
You can listen to his music and more
about him on his website at
michaelo.org.
"And you shall be witnesses to me in
Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria
and to the end of the earth." Acts 1:8.
Grief Share, led by Doug Hodges
and Malcom Adams, begins Aug. 26 at
6:45 p.m. in Room C203 This is a week-
ly seminar/support group for people
grieving the death of someone close.
First Baptist Church, Callahan, 45090
Green Ave.
Angie McClellan is choir music adult
minister at Yulee Baptist Church. Pray
before every worship service as you're
getting ready for the service, traveling
to the service, waiting for the service to
begin and throughout the service, espe-
cially during the invitation time. Confess
any known sin to God and to others, if
needed. Play worship music throughout
your home while getting ready for
church and in the car on the way.
Worship is our response to who God
is and what He has done. Gerry Bre-
shears states that "Jesus said, 'Worship
is an ongoing, unbroken life of commun-
ion empowered by the Holy Spirit and
informed by the truth.'" God wants to
spend time with us and wants to tell us
things that will help us glorify Him.
Are we listening? Are we then
responding to what we are told? Expect
that you will encounter God in a person-
al way. As a worship leader, I am expect-
ed to prepare for the worship service, as
is the pastor. I work hard each week to
prepare for the worship service, to pre-
pare the music that will bring each one
of us closer to God. However, the most
important preparation is that of my own
heart for my own encounter with Him.
And just think, God is right there in our
midst. Expect to meet with Him.


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


* Amelia Island Chess Club meets
from 2-5 p.m. the first and' third
Saturday at Cafe Karibo, 27 N. Third St.,
Fernandina Beach. Call Dan Doulet at
261-0070.
* Amelia Island Genealogical Society
for anyone interested in tracing ances-
try meets the third Tuesday at 7 p.m. at
the Community Room at the Fernandina
Beach Police Department on Lime
Street. Call Marie Santry 321-3460.
* Amelia Masonic Lodge #47 meets
every second and fourth Tuesday at the
Masonic Lodge, 1101 S. 14th St.,
Fernandina Beach. All Master Masons
are invited to attend. For information,
contact Gene Botts, secretary, at 261-
6394. Orlando Avila, Worshipful Master.
E-mail ameliamason@bellsouth.net or
visit www.mastermason.com/Amelia.
* Amelia Island Group of Narcotics
Anonymous for anyone needing help
dealing with drugs meets at 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and Sundays at
First Assembly of God Church, 302
South 14th St. Call 800-576-4357. Visit
firstcoastna.org.
* Amelia Island Quilters Guild meets
at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday from
September to June at the Woman's Club,
201 Jean LaFitte Blvd., Fernandina
Beach. Call Pam Wise at 321-4118 or
visit aiq.homestead.com.
* Amelia Cruizers Car Club service
organization for car enthusiasts meets at
7 p.m. the second Tuesday and from 6-9
p.m. the second Friday for a cruise-in at
Murray's Grille, 3134 E. SR 200, Yulee,


and fourth Saturday from 5:30-8:30 at
Do Wop Diner, 461379 SR 200, Yulee.
Call Gary Marlow 277-8693.
* Amelia Island Sailing Club meets
at 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday at The
Kraft Athletic Club-Ten Acres, 961023
Buccaneer Trail, Fernandina Beach.
Call Commodore Charles Steinkamp at
261-5213 or Vice-Commodore Joe
Bowen at 277-1614.
* American Legion Post #54 veterans
organization meets at 7:30 p.m. the first
Monday at 12 Sputh 1lth St. Call Tom
Gora at 583-4597.
* Books Plus Book Club for those
interested in book discussions meets at
Books Plus, 107 Centre St., Fernandina
Beach. Call Don Shaw for scheduling
and book information at 261-0303.
* Bosom Buddies breast cancer sup-
port group meets the first Wednesday at
5:30 p.m. at the Community Room at the
Fernandina Beach Police Department
on Lime Street. Call Betty Armenti at
225-0067.
* Bunco Amelia meets at 7 p.m. the
last Tuesday of the month at traveling
locations. Ladies of all ages are invited
to join for a fun time, no experience nec-
essary. Call Marjorie at 491-8622.
* Byrd Wallace Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post meets at 7:30 p.m. the second
Monday at Kraft Athletic Club-Ten
Acres, 961023 Buccaneer Trail,
Fernandina Beach. Call Post
Quartermaster Pat Beamer at 261-6416.
* Centre'd Women is a proudly dis-
organized group of wonderful women


.. -....'- r i i
. . ,' -. 4 ..' " .- (


Advertse your business &
to support your local church
Call hoe .1em sl'afder - 261-3696


that meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Monday at Art & Antiques, 702 Centre
St., Fernandina Beach. Call Eileen
Moore at 277-2717.
* Cumberland Sound Woodcarving
Guild meets at 6:30 Wednesday at vari-
ous locations. Call Bob Schlag at (912)
729-2282.
* Eight Flags Charter Chapter of the
American Business Women's Associa-
tion is a organization of women with
diverse occupations who gather togeth-
er to provide opportunities to help them-
selves and others grow personally and
professionally through leadership, edu-
cation, networking support, national
recognition arid community service.
The group meets at 6 p.m. the fourth
Thursday at the Fernandina Beach Golf
Club. Call Esther Schindler at 491-5790
or e-mail ABWA8flagsinfo@gmail.com.
* Eight Flags Needlepointers/Amer-
ican Needlepoint Guild to promote inter-
est in needlepoint as an art meets at 10
a.m. the third Saturday. Call Chris
Bryan at 261-5444.
* Fernandina Pirates Club meets at
7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of every
month at Ten Acres. Call Jerry or Billie
at 548-1163.
* The Optimist Club of Fernandina
Beach meets every Wednesday at noon
in the banquet room at Sliders. Join and
become associated with other civic-
minded men and women in activities
dedicated to voluntary, constructive
service to youth and community.
Contact Pierre LaPorte at 261-7803.


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FREE MA
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installations & Repair
606 S. 6th Street ,
Femandina Beach, FL 32034
Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


TumrerCotner
Allison Marie Cotner and
Nathan Franklin Turner of
Fernandina Beach were mar-
ried at 7 p.m. Friday, June 12,
2009, in a beach service on
the north end of Amelia
Island.
The bride is the daughter
of Patsy and Edwin Carter
and Charles Cotner, all of
Fernandina Beach.
The groom is the son of
Ronnie and Diana Turner of
Milton, formerly ofYulee.
The bride's maternal
grandparents are Gertie
Schreffler of Fernandina
Beach and Mark Schreffler of
Lewisburg, Pa.
The bride's paternal
grandparents are Lloyd and
Jane Cotner of Fernandina
Beach (the couple was mar-
ried on the Cotners' 61st wed-


* Julia Michael UB)
Belcher, along with other out-
standing high school scholars
from around the world, partic-
ipated in the Global Young
Leaders Conference, which
took place in Vienna, Austria,
Budapest, Hungary, and
Prague, Czech Republic, from
July 4-14.
Students interacted with
key leaders and newsmakers
with powerful inhuence over
i lptilitics, finance', ictutW e and :
"diplomacy and took'iart in a
carefully designed curricu-
lum, which included thought-
provoking simulations that
build leadership skills.
"The Global Young
Leaders Conference aims to
provide scholars with the
opportunity to collaborate
with their peers from around
the world to both study and
resolve global conflict," said


Mr. and Mrs. Turner


ding-anniversary).
The Turners reside on
Amelia Island with their dogs,
Britney and Miley.


BIRTHS


* Debrah and Steve Ritter
are proud to announce the
birth of a son, Jack McKane
Ritter, born on July 31, 2009,
at the Women's Center
Northside Hospital in Atlanta,
Ga. Jack weighed 8 pounds 1
ounce and measured 211/2
inches long.
Maternal grandparents are
Marty and Myra Goldapple of
Miami. Paternal grandparents
are Rankin and Adeline Willis
Morris of Panama City and
Carold Ritter of Charleston,
S.C.

* Moriah and Chris
Everson of Jacksonville
announce the birth of a


daughter, Maggie Danielle,
born at 1:18 p.m. Friday, July
31, 2009, at St Vincent's
Medical Center in
Jacksonville. The baby
weighed 7 pounds 10 ounces
and measured 18 inches in
length. She joins big sister,
Eden, 2.
Paternal grandparents are
Jane Everson of Jacksonville
and Andy Everson of
Conyers, Ga. Maternal grand-
parents are Donnie and
Kathie Foster of Nassauville.
Great-grandparents are Ed
Cook and the late Stella Cook
of Nassuville, Peg Poulton
and the late George Everson
of Killingworth, Conn.


Marguerite C. Regan, dean of
academic affairs for the
Congressional Youth
Leadership Council, the
organization that sponsors
GYLC. "When ideas and
points of view are shared, the
true results of the conference
are realized."
GYLC culminated with the
Global Summit, in which stu-
dents applied what they
learned throughout the con-
'!~'fed-r e as thL)Pty5B'atP!r-"
negotiated and built c6tlibtis
dealing with issues such as
foreign aid, global warming,
cooperative efforts in space,
terrorism and human rights.
Belcher is a senior at
Fernandina Beach High
School, a member of the
National Honor Society and
Lady Pirates basketball team
and president of FBHS
Student Government


HELPERS


* For people who struggle
to lose weight, Take Off
Pounds Sensibly meets at 5
p.m. on Mondays in the com-
munity room of the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department on Lime Street.
Call Loretta Clark at 261-4041.
* The Nassau County
Veterans' Service Office at
the Nassau County Judicial
Annex in Yulee serves veter-
ans and the surviving spous-
es. For information or
appointments, call John E
Martin at 548-4670 or e-mail
jmartin@nassaUtclerk.com.
Hours are Monday through
Thursday 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and
Friday 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
* Al-Anon Family Group, a
support group for family
members and friends of alco-
holics meets each week at the
Alachua Club, 32 N. Third in
Fernandina Beach at 11 a.m.
on Sunday, Monday,
Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday and at 7 p.m. on
Thursday. For information,
call 261-7175 or 261-1813.
* The Alzheimer's/De-
mentia Support Group for
Nassau County meets the
third Thursday from 1:30-2:30
p.m. at the Council on Aging,
1367 South 18th St.,
Fernandina Beach. No pre-
registration is required and
meetings are open to anyone
who has an interest. Call Ann
Smith, R.N., at 491-3222.
* Amelia Island Group of
Narcotics Anonymous for
anyone needing help dealing
with drugs meets at 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and
Sunday at First Assembly of
God Church, 302 South 14th
St. Call 800-5764357. For
additional meeting times or
information visit firstcoast-
na.org and click on meetings.
* American Cancer
Society services available in
Nassau County include free
transportation to and from
cancer treatment; support
groups for breast cancer and
prostate cancer survivors/pa-


tients and a program that
teaches techniques to people
undergoing cancer treatment
to help combat appearance-
related side effects. Programs
for men, women and teens.
Volunteers are needed.
Call (904) 249-0022 or e-mail
mariann.reid@cancer.org.
* The Association for
Retarded Citizens of Nassau
County is the only non-profit
organization located in Yulee
providing adult day training,
employment opportunities,
personal care services and
community inclusion for indi-
viduals with developmental
disabilities. Call Faye Johnson
at 225-9355 or visit www.arc-
nassau.org.
* Barnabas Center, 11
South 11th St, Fernandina
Beach, provides food, cloth-
ing, household goods, med-
ical and dental care and subsi-
dies that cover rent and
utilities to the needy in the
community. It also operates
the New to You resale store at
930 South 14th St Contact
Carol Reader at 321-2334. E-
mail Barnabas Center@com-
castnet or visit www.barn-
abascenterinc.org.
* The Bereavement
Support Group meets on the
second Thursday of each
month from 5-6:30 p.m. at St.
Peter's Episcopal Church,
corner of Eighth Street and
Atlantic Avenue. Call Kathy
Washburn, 491-1753.
* Big Brothers, Big
Sisters seeks qualified adults
to mentor children one-on-
one in the community and
school programs. Also need-
ed are Little Brothers and
Little Sisters. Call 261-9500.
* Bosom Buddies of
Amelia Island offers support,
education and friendship to
breast cancer survivors.
Meetings are the first Wed-
nesday at 5:30 p.m. in the
Community Room, Fernan-
dina Beach Police Depart-
ment on lime Street. Call
Betty Armenti at 225-0067.


WEDDING


CAMPUS NOTES


Welcome to


Qod's House

SAClassic Carpets
& Interiors, Inc.
CHEVROLET * BUICK BUDDY KELLUM
PONTIAC * GMC Abby Carpet, President
464054 SR 200, YuleP
464054 SR 200, Yulee 802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
(904) 261-6821 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291
FAMILY DENTISTRY
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN Ba cock
Most Insurances Accepted H 0 M N I T U R
Call For Appointment or
261 - ea 2 6
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
AlA at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL


I


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1


11381
~P*~"''ZtG









FRIDAY. August 14.2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Passing the test and embracing your future


"Are you afraid of heights?" he
asked, eying me carefully for my
response.
"Not a whole lot," I replied.
"Good," he said. "I need to be
sure though. Come with me." With
that, I jumped into his golf cart and
off we went.
I was getting ready to be the per-
sonal assistant of the paper mill's fire
chief. Looking back, I had absolutely
no clue what that meant - other than
a paycheck, of course. To this day I
still don't know why it was me they
chose instead of.one of the other
new employees, but either way I was
grateful for the opportunity.
As we drove further away from
the comforts of the guard shack, the
fire chiefs question about my capaci-
ty for heights began to make me


think, "I wonder
what I'm going to
be doing?" That
was just about the
S time I figured it out.
As we came around
the corner and
entered the huge
storage building,
my eye fell on the
PUPIT g lone piece of equip-
NOTES ment standing in
the middle of the
room - a cherry
Pastor picker. You know,
Rob Goyette one of those four-
wheel vehicles with
an extension arm that lifts people
into the air. This particular one had
the ability go extremely high.
"Come on," the chief said, "get in.


We've got to check some pipes." And
so we did. Now let me tell you, it's
one thing to get into a little basket
and extend several stories up into
the air while you're standing still, but
it's another thing altogether to be up
that high and then start driving
around the entire building.
As we bounced up and down and
jerked from side to side, I could see
the fire chief looking at me out of
the corner of his eye. Though he
took the opportunity to show me a
few leaking pipes, his real goal was
to see if I could handle the height.
Actually, I think he bounced us
around a whole lot more than was
necessary but, I suppose, that's why
we were there. He needed to be sure
that I was the guy for the job. And,
as it turns out, by God's grace I


passed the test.
Now that brings me to the focus
of this article - passing the test.
Let's just say it. At times life can be a
little scary. With all its ups and
downs and jerking back and forth,
you can't help but wonder what the
guy who is driving this whole thing
is really up to. I know it's not always
the case, but I've come to believe
that a lot of life's hard rides are real-
ly God's way of qualifying us for our
future. It's just that simple. If you
can hang on and trust God when
things seem out of control, then
you're ready to be promoted to the
next level of God's grace and bless-
ing for your life.
I suppose for me what really
made the difference was the fact
that the fire chief was in the basket


with me. I concluded that if he felt
we were safe, then I should too.
Though I realize that not every
human being can be trusted - God
can be. As the Apostle Paul said so
well in the book of Romans, chapter
8:31, 38 and 39, "What shall we then
say to these things? If God be for us,
who can be against us?" And again,
"For I am persuaded, that neither
death, nor life, nor angels, nor prin-
cipalities, nor powers, nor things
present, nor things to come, nor
height, nor depth, nor any other
creature, shall be able to separate us
from the love of God which is in
Christ Jesus our Lord."
Robert L. Gdyette is pastor of
Living Waters World Outreach
Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Donations needed
The Salvation Army Hope House,
410 South Date St, is in need of the
following types of donations:
* Personal hygiene items: tooth-
brushes, toothpaste, deodorant, dis-
posable razors, shaving cream, femi-
nine products and toilet paper
* Canned foods not requiring
cooking: non-condensed soups, pas-
tas, beanie weenies, tuna, chicken,
fruits, fruit juices and powdered milk
* Starchy foods: rice, instant
mashed potatoes, pastas, cereals and
breakfast bars.
Call 321-0435.
Community orchestra
If you would like to be part of the
Community Orchestra at Memorial
United Methodist Church as it pre-
pares for Christmas, call Director of
Music Ministries Beth Jurovcik at
261-5769, ext. 3, or e-mail
beth@mumconline.com. Rehearsals
begin Sept. 8 from 7-8:30 p.m. Call or
e-mail to have a part waiting for you.
Newmember weekend
Grace Community Church is
offering a membership weekend
seminar for those interested in join-
ing the church. The seminar begins
at 6:30 p.m. tonight and continues
from 8:30 am.-noon on Aug. 15.
Alterigtaj~*~-�gi l timeseialso ba

According to Grace Community
Church, the Christian scriptures
instruct believers to join a local
church to place themselves under
the spiritual care of its leadership.
The church worships Sundays at
10:30 am. at Yulee Middle School's
caf6torium, 85439 Miner Road. It is
a mission church for the
Presbyterian Church in America's


North Florida Presbytery. There is
no fee to join. Contact Pastor David
Bradsher at pastor@gracenassau.
com, 491-0363 or http://gracenas-
sau.com.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope House
each Tuesday at noon for its Weekly
Worship Service and Fellowship
Lunch. Pastor Ray Ramsburg of
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church
will share the Gospel message on
Aug. 18. For more information, call
321-0435 or 410 South Date St.
Yard sale
Solid Rock Church of God by
Faith will host a yard sale from 7
a.m.-noon Aug. 15.
'OneHeart'
First Assembly of God will feature
"One Heart," a Southern gospel
group with a deep love for God and a
great music ministry on Aug. 16 at
10:45 a.m. at the church, 302 South
14 St. Call 261-6448.
MinistryFair
First Presbyterian Church will
host a Ministry Fair on Aug. 23 in
Jim Thomas Hall from 9:30 a.m.-
12:45 p.m. Booths representing the
missions, ministries, studies, events
and opportunities available at First
I 'Peshbytriamnirill fillithe hll. There
i; wiilbe'tmees, door'piizes, lots of
food, an Ugly Tie Contest Nursery
and preschool available.
living Proof simulcast
On Aug. 28-29 Beth Moore is
bringing living Proof Live to her
hometown of Green Bay, Wis.
Thanks to simulcast satellite technol-
ogy, she'll spend that weekend at
First Baptist Church, too. Tickets are


Community study
Community Bible Study Is an
interdenominational organization
committed to helping people of
every age grow in their knowledge
and love of Jesus Christ '
Individuals from all backgrounds
and levels of Bible knowledge are
invited to join one of the weekly
classes that begin in September.
For further information, contact
the appropriate class coordinator:
* Wednesday morning women
and children (infant and home
schooled): Kathleen Minor 225-
8125.
* Monday evening men: Tony
Taylor, 321-0785
* Monday evening women:
Linda Bell, 261-0569
* Monday evening teens:
Jeanne Scott. 491-9849
* Monday evening E-teen (mid-
dle school): Bobbie Burch, 261-
2533
Women's study
The Amelia Island Women's
Evening Community Bible Study
invites you to join an in-depth, non-
denominational study of the Book
of Acts. '
Meetings will be Monday
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at


$10 and may be purchased at the
church. Call 261-3617.
God's Active Men'
Historic Macedonia African
Methodist Episcopal Church, 202 S.
Ninth St, presents "God's Active


Amelia Baptist Church, 961167
Buccaneer Trail across from
Harris Teeter. The study begins
Sept. 14 and continues through
May 3.
For information and to register.
call Michal Polese at 548-9971 or
Linda Bell at 261-0569. Visit
www.communitybiblestudy. org
and www.ameliaislandevecbs. org
Beth Moore study
Amelia Plantation Chapel will
begin an eleven-week Beth Moore
women's Bible study - Jesus The
One And Only - starting Sept. 22 at
10 a.m.
This is an in-depth study of the
life of Jesus based on the book of
Luke. Through video and group
study, participants will join Moore
on a life-changing journey that
leads through the hills of Galilee
with the Teacher, across the lake
with the Master, and finally on the
road toward the cross with the
Savior- getting to know Jesus inti-
mately, as though walking with
Him during His earthly ministry.
The study includes a workbook for
a cost of S15. A nursery will be pro-
vided upon advance notice. For
.ifoJloation or to regiWter eaU he&
chapel office, 277-4414, or e-mail
sandyshawail@bellsouth.net.


Men" at 11 am. Aug. 30. The call is
out to join the men of Fernandina
Beach as they give thanks and praise
to God. There will be scripture, a
gospel jubilee, gospel choir and
praise band, and a word from God by
Pastor Ewing. Everyone is welcome.


For information call 261-4114 or
(904) 310-6377.

Grace promotion
ceremony
Grace Community Church will
hold a promotion ceremony as chil-
dren graduate to new church classes
on Sunday, Aug. 30. In addition, the
children's ministry is expanding with
an additional class.
New curriculum for children's
programming starts that Sunday.
Contact Pastor Dave Bradsher at
pastor@gracenassau.com, 491-0363
or http://gracenassau.com.
'Rally Day'
Rally Day for children and youth
will be Aug. 30 at First Presbyterian,
beginning at 9:50 a.m. Nursery, tod-
dlers, preschool and kindergarten
will meet in their classrooms in
Noah's Place. First and second
graders will meet in the Power Lab
and third through fifth graders will
meet in the Kidmo theater. Middle
school students will meet in the
Skate Room in the Youth Center.
Senior high youth will meet in Faith
Cafe at 12:15 p.m. for lunch and
Bible study.
Parents, call the church office to
confirm your attendance no later
than Aug. 27.
Catholic class
St Michael Catholic Church is
sponsoring an inquiry class for those
who wish to know more about the
Roman Catholic faith and what
Catholics believe. The program,
called R.C.IA., will start on Sept. 1
and continue each week through
Easter 2010. Call the churchoffice at
261-3472 for more information or to
register.


'"Worship this week at the pace of your choice"


CIAPEL -Fei~d o Rev. Brian Ebum, Pastor CHURCH
| N. ^fiI B l�im sem/oSeW animCovaM Casual*Am.splbe..
a, n I po f-, r Saltrday Vgil Mass - 4 pm & 530 pmi
Cnmwy S~ y pmC ar Masst Yu United Methdist Church Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
oorphi p8: WITH Wo ~ :am3 . Sdy Mam .on, W.,mm h urri 85520 Miner Rd
AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL BLOG WITH US 6pm-Tusday Yulee, FL 32097
An lnterdenominational. Share your opinions with Pastor Ted Nym Hl HlyolyMisstVil opmt;HotlyDay:am SundayWorship 10:30
Community Church Schroder of Amelia Plantation ' onesio: atrdy 35pm pmor byte study Sunday moded. @9:15am
SUNDAY WORSHIP Ch Ace:amellachapel.com Telephone Nlmbers KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
August 9, 209 * 9:15 am. Pastor's Corner, and then ITed's Blog. A lts Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901 Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
SAugust , 200 a . Faith-based subjects that make us all -3 3 . Emelrgeiy Number 904-T7-6566, Connecig Hit. Chsi .Cnnecting, wit People.
MESSAGE "Prayers for the time thnk also call 904-2T7-0550
you have no words, * =
______________________ MEssAEpraersf.orhd ______________ _____ g . __i_______ .-Aa - .s .
MU e s. L St. Peter's Episcopal Church BLACKROCK BAPTIST FIVE POINTS BAPTIST ULEE
MUSC We yours. Lord Welcomes K CHURCH MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY" LflAPTIS TI,
(Nursery Provided) You! 96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee Pastor :HDr. Alan Brown HURCH.
p rt-A Church -ALL ARE WELCOME- Located at the 261-6220 Sunday School ..... ........ 9:45A.M. % I .as 'T P v,
___Sclcorner of 8th &... .......
Sunday School 9:30am cornr of 8th Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen Worship Service ............ 10:S5A.M. Sunday School 9:30 am
unday Sch ........................................ amChapel d behind Atlantic Sunday Morning Worship Services Discpleship Training ........... 6:00M. Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
nday W ..................... 5 m The Spa & Shops at Sunday 10:30am * Evening Worship.............. 6:OOP.M. Sunday Evening 600pm
dnesday . ............10Spa Shops at mSunday Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
SAmelia Island Plantation Holy Eucharist Sunday School 915am Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:0P.M. Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study.................6:30 pm Bo Road 8:30 00 am Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana Wednesdy Payer Service .......7:P.M Wednesday 179 Youth 6:30 pm
941017 Old Nssuvill Rod County Rd-107 South wman Worship Service 10:30 (Chlldrens Church) 736 Bonnlevlew Road (across from Sadler Rd.) Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 (904) 277- 4414 Wednesday Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m 904-261-461S (church office) Nursery Provided For All Services
261-4741 Holy Eucharst 904-261293 Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m. EVERYONE WELCOME www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
inahill tfb.oro www.ameliachael.com Holy Eucharst 904-261-4Nursery Provided Nursery provided 85971 HartsRd.,West 904.225.5128
wwwsprinhillbaptistfb.or a 12:10 pm www.stpetersparlsh.org www.blackrockbaptlst.com Spolntesapt Ltchurch.org Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809
"i: U. hU DffIL1L r"


ANCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
51 Centre Street


Rev. Raev Ramsbur . Pastor
- Every Sunday -
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
- Vacation Bible School -
July 12 thru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.oooicamella.ora


K 'Jo lyTrinimy
Jnglican Curcdh
SI tt
'Isi'oop (lOmnrtrei

Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


(B tYridence . .,
(Pesi6yteriu '
ftirclih ,'i a *
Everyone is welcome
Re, R.obecrr Phelp:.
'6517 F 'rlaimerr Dri, . Y'ulec
r i-. _ 4-.r h'. . l " ' IT.
'",,4 4� . i . l.
-. .h..-. ,. ...L-. - .... .. .r


YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
P/ease join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11'AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
In Amelia Park
1830 Lake Park Drive
(across from the YMCA)
Sunday worship times
8:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. (with music)
904-430-0274
www.holytrinityangllcan.org


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship with us where
the Bible is our only Authority
Church Services 1 lam
YMCA on Cirona ' 225-5368
AwA ani.?11l ,In,:ina . -... , s. -n rll t .:.m


I II u


Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small gmup studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Femandina Bch.
For More Information Call: 261-9527


BETH MOORE
LIVING PROOF UVE
August 28-29
Tickets $10
For 2-Day Event
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach. FL
904-261-3617
www. FB First.net
Rev. Jeff Overton. Sl Paslor


Living Waters
world outreach
ContemporaTy Worship
SUN 9:30am
WED 7:00pm
YOUh, Nurse/y &
Children's M/nistnios
321-2117
Rob & Chrlsae Goyette 3
senior Pastor On A1A I mile irest of Amelia Island
wIwwrl, ii ;i;lngWatArCreOltr~aPph nra


FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH
20 South Ninth Street 21-4907
Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pator
The Church in the
Heartofthe City
With the Desire to be lnthe
HeartsofAll People
Sunday New Members Css 9a.m.
SandayScwhool9:30a.m.
Morning Worship II.s.
WedarntadNoowa-dayPra*r
Wednesday Jd-wa Sratc 7-9 p.m.
51nltarls.. Blns&.Van Cnoaler Sh w ans Tth


BIBLE STUDY CLASSES


II/


I


Memria Unge Methodist Churc














HOMES


FRIDAY, August 14. 2009/NEWS-LEADER


Laurel wilt find


ITAIAHASSEE - Florida
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson has
announced the confirmation of
laurel wilt disease in an avoca-
do sample from Homestead.
"This find is alarming for
the avocado industry," Bronson
said. "Since laurel wilt disease
was first found in North
Florida, the department has
been working cooperatively
with other agriculture agencies
to track the spread of this dis-
ease and beetle, and retard arti-
ficial movement. Despite these
efforts this unwanted pest/dis-
ease complex has spread rap-
idly via redbay trees within
Florida."
Laurel wilt is a destructive
disease of redbay, avocado and
other trees in the laurel family
(Lauraceae). The disease is
caused by a fungus (Raffaelea
lauricola) that infects the sap-
wood of host trees, restricting
the flow of water, causing the
leaves to wilt and the trees to
die.
The fungus is carried into
trees by a non-native insect, the
redbay ambrosia . beetle
(Xyleborus glabratus), that was
first detected in the United
States near Savannah in 2002
and subsequently found in
Jacksonville in September 2007.
Laurel wilt has caused high lev-
els of mortality in redbay trees
in South Carolina, Georgia and
Florida - including Nassau
County - and has affected sev-
eral other hosts including sas-
safras and avocado.
Laurel wilt was discovered
in an avocado tree that showed


signs of wilt in a com
grove in southern Mian
County.
A University of Flori
tute of Food and Agri
Sciences (UF-IFAS) res
in Miami-Dade County
ed the sample, which w
firmed as laurel wilt.
Currently, there a
additional suspect s
from three avocado gr
Homestead that have lai
symptoms, but these s
have not yet been cor
by laboratory diagnosis
Working group of i
members, agriculture a
and local agriculture
was assembled earlier tI
to review and chart au
tive management stra
mitigate the potential in
the redbay ambrosia be
laurel wilt on Florida's a
industry. As part of this
UF-IFAS is currently v
on treatment and mana�
recommendations. The
commendations will be a
at http://trec.ifas.ufl.ec
Since June 2007
Cooperative Agricultur
Survey (CAPS) progr;
monitored traps in eight
counties from Pensa(
Miami. The traps are
with a tree oil that is at
to the beetles. The tr
checked once a mon
processed at Gainesvill
quarters of the
Department of Agricult
Consumer Services, D
of Plant Industry. A d
tion map showing count
laurel wilt disease syn
can be found at www


'alarming'
mercial state.fl.us/pi/enpp/patholo-
ni-Dade gy/laurel_wiltdisease.html.
The Florida Agricultural
da Insti- Statistics Service reports the
cultural avocado industry represents a
earcher production value of $12.7 mil-
collect- lion with over 6,500 production
ras con- acres located in Miami-Dade
County and Collier County.
re four The public can help prevent
amples the spread of the redbay am-
roves in brosia beetle and laurel wilt by
urel wilt following these suggestions:
samples * Become familiar with the
firmed signs of laurel wilt disease and
s. redbay ambrosia beetle and be
industry on the lookout for evidence of
agencies the pest/disease on your trees.
groups For photos and information
his year visit www.doacs.state.fl.us/
n effec- pi/enpp/pathology/laurel_wilt
tegy to _disease.html.
npact of * Use local firewood only.
etle and Do not transport firewood from
avocado other states because destruc-
Sgroup, tive pests and diseases, such
working as redbay ambrosia beetle and
gement laurel wilt, can hitchhike into
ese rec- Florida on infested firewood.
available View video atwww. doacs.state.
du/. fl.us/pi/videos.html.
7, the * Do not transport host
-al Pest trees (redbay, swamp bay, avo-
am has cado, sassafras, pondspice,
Florida pondberry and others in the
cola to Lauraceae family) unless pur-
baited chased from a registered nurs-
tractive ery.
aps are * If your Lauraceae-family
th and tree dies, use one of UF/IFAS's
e head- recommended methods of dis-
Florida posal.
ure and If you suspect your trees
divisionn may be infected withlaurel wilt
istribu- or you think you have found a
ieswith redbay ambrosia beetle, please
nptoms contact the DPI helpline at 1-
.doacs. 888-397-1517.


Farmers market
Capt. Jack's Crab Cakes has joined the
Fernandina Farmers Market as a vendor. Many
shoppers will recognize Derek of Proper Pie
who has started a new booth featuring his crab
cake specialty using real lump crabmeat and
his blend of unique seasonings.
Capt. Jack's will have jumbo crab cakes that
are perfect for dinner. For appetizers, mini crab
cakes and shrimp-stuffed mushrooms are also
available. All crab cakes are made fresh and
then frozen for ease in taking home and the
convenience of just popping in the oven for a
few minutes to enjoy.
Also at the market on Aug. 15, Checkers
Cracker Cookin' with their unique Southern
fare and Reflections of Nature with herb plants.
The market is open Saturdays from 9 a.m.-
1 p.m. at Seventh and Centre streets. Call 491-
4872 or visit www.fernandinafarmersmarket.
com.
BirdingWalk
Join Our Greenway on Aug. 15 at 8 a.m. for
a birding walk on the Greenway. You can
expect to see a variety of wading and songbirds
as well as birds of prey. Visit www.ourgreen-
way.org to download a Greenway specific bird
list. Participants are encouraged to bring
binoculars, water, sun protection, bug juice,
comfortable walking shoes and optionally field
guides and spotting scopes.
Meet in the parking lot at the entrance to
the Greenway behind the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center, 2500 Atlantic Ave. The walk
is free and open to the public. For information
call 277-7350 or visit www.ourgreenway.org.
Bird dub
The Nassau County Bird Club will hold a
field trip to Huguenot Memorial Park on Aug.
15 and Sept. 5 at 8 a.m., rain or shine. Park
entry is $1 per car.
The park is located off Heckscher Drive
about 8 miles south of the Nassau Sound
bridge. Meet in the parking lot of the general
store. Target birds include the Piping Plover,
Oystercatcher, Whimbrel, Reddish Egret, gulls
and terns. Bring your binoculars, field guide,
bug juice, sunscreen, rain gear, sunglasses, lay-
ered clothing and water.
For information call Carol Wyatt at 262-9272
or e-mail carolinewy@aol.com.
Mortgage specialist
Ray Seeley, reverse mortgage specialist, will
speak about how to finance home repairs with
Unity Mortgage - a reverse mortgage special-
ist company - on Aug. 19 from 9:45-10:45 a.m.
at the Council on Aging Senior Center located
at 1367 South 18th St., across from Baptist
Medical Center Nassau. For more information
call Frances Bartelt at 261-0701, ext 102.
Kayak/canoeMtrip
Nassau Sierra Club will host a guided
kayak/canoe trip to Simpson Creek (Little


On Saturday,
. enjoy Capt.
Jack's Crab
w- Cakes at the
Fernandina
Farmers
Market.
SUBMITTED

Talbot Island) on Aug. 29. This trip is open to
the public.
The three- to four-hour trip will depart the
"Kayak Amelia" concession at Little Talbot
State Park at 9 a.m. It will be about a five-mile
paddle, with a stop for lunch on the sandbar or
Bird Island.
Paddlers will experience maritime forests,
desert-like dunes, undisturbed salt marsh and.
a variety of wildlife and native and migratory
birds. Little Talbot is one of the few remaining
underdeveloped barrier islands.
Participants with their own boats can launch
at Kayak Amelia; those without kayaks can rent
either single ($30) or tandem ($45). Kayak
Amelia will waive the launch fee and offer
renters a 10 percent discount.
The paddle will be in calm water and is suit-
able for beginners. A personal flotation device
is required; they can be rented from Kayak
Amelia. Also recommended are sun protection,
insect repellent, food and drinking water.
The trip will be led by Len Kreger, a certi-
fied Sierra Outings Leader; RSVP at
LKreger@comcast.net or (904) 432-8389.
Landscape workshop
On Sept. 29 the Extension Service will offer
a Limited Certification Workshop for
Commercial Landscape Maintenance. Trainers
are Rebecca L Jordi, Erin Eckhardt and Ray
Zerba, extension agents for Nassau, Duval and
Clay counties.
Register by Sept 18 by e-mailing Rebecca
Jordi at rljordi@ufl.edu, or call 548-1116. The
workshop will be held at the FCCJ Betty P.
Cook Campus. Sessions are 8:45 a.m.-3:45
p.m.; a full six-hour day required to sit for the
LCLM test.
A partial session is offered for recertifica-
tion from 8:45 a.m.-1:30 pm. Recertification
requirement is 4 CEUs. Full day cost is $50 and
includes 2 textbooks, notebook, handouts and
lunch; the half-day session costs $25 and
includes handouts, refreshments and lunch.
Once payment is received, the participant
will be registered. Make checks to Nassau
County Extension, and mail to: Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1, Callahan, FL 32011.
This class is required by the state of Florida
in order to sit for the Limited Commercial
Landscape Maintenance test. A passing grade
on the test will enable the licensee to apply pes-
ticides to flower beds and ornamental plants
No money will be accepted at the door.


Rmol artil 71"J inAllAW'AU I I I JF r;EW -- r 1
6523 Spyglass 11 * LT foF8 51.649 000 778 S. Fletcher * L20-MO $949.000
(J.-.. " . I h, lA T i, *: . l 1" : T I mlij ) r. i'i] Fl i'I l i '- " o r. ,"3-r.T i , 1:.j i �1 [1, . 3 r, r. ,ij,'p din [.r lll Am '11,-1. . Tr :. [,rar ojT , .' (0lr,. 10ulI3 ir11,
V..- i ' ",I " - " r;r " " ; : j..jlCdI . f- -6i' i mh'n j ,ird jiM r Oi ,' virA, Ijy, c 1 'l, iJf'l N 4 CJ.i' i:i.>rr1 ' n l 1l




S....www. oceanfrontamella.com
ii "The Oceanfront Expert"
Reduced Commission, 3 %- 4.5 %, Call for details.
Bob Gedeon When You Call, I Will Personally Answer The Phone
Island resident since 1962 No Menus, Voicemail or Phone Tag.
Real Estate Broker since 1972 Local 904.261.8870 Toll Free 877.261.8870


Florida honey has new standard'


TALLAHASSEE - Florida
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson has
announced that his department
has instituted the first regula-
tion in the nation - and perhaps
the world - prohibiting any
additives, chemicals or adul-
terants in honey that is pro-
duced, processed or sold in
Florida.


The regulation, which went
into effect July 14, provides the
first-ever "Standard of Identity"
for honey.
"We want to assure con-
sumers that the product that
they are buying is pure,"
Bronson said. 'Too often in the
past, honey has been cut with
water or sugar, and sometimes
even contaminated with insec-
ticides or antibiotics. In the
future, when you're paying for
honey.in this state, pure honey
is what you will get"
The new law came after
state honey producers sought
regulation as a result of a flood
of adulterated honey from over-
seas into Florida in 2006.
Under terms of the new reg-
ulation, honey containing any-


thing other than the "natural
food product resulting from the
harvest of nectar by honey-
bees" is considered an adulter-
ated or mislabeled product.
Such products are subject to a
"stop sale" order in which a
manufacturer, processor or
merchant would be served with
an order prohibiting the prod-
uct's sale. Repeat offenders
would face fines of up to $500
per violation.
Florida is the fourth-leading
honey producing state in the
country with cash receipts to
beekeepers of more than $15
million in 2008 and an indus-
try that has an economic impact
estimated at $40 million a year.
It employs more than 500
Floridians.


HOME AND GARDEN BRIEFS


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SPORTS


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,4, - t7


FRIDAY. AUGUST 14,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA







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PHOTOS BY ED HARDEE/SPEOIAL
Chris Igou, left, and Zack Miller compete Saturday in a surf contest just south of Slider's restaurant. The First Coast District of the Eastern Surfing Association held the tourna-
ment and has another one planned for Aug. 29. Below, contestants in the water Saturday.


ished in first. Hatton was second, Kellogg was
third and Todd Burwell placed fourth.
Long took first place in the masters long-
board division. Leary was second, Conger third
and Blake was fourth.
In the open shortboard class, Miller was
first, Hatton was second, Igou was third, Leary
was fourth, Obszarski was fifth, Coombs was
sixth, Isabella was seventh and Dunham placed
eighth.


The First Coast District of the Eastern Surfing
Association held another contest of the summer
Saturday just south of Slider's restaurant.
The next contest will be at 8 a.m. Aug. 29, also
just south of Slider's. For information on the
Eastern Surfing Association, contact Brad Long
at 415-6033.
In the menehune division (11 and under),
Sutton Kerlin took first place, Gage Kropff was
second, Scotty Rivenbark finished third and


Gavin Johnson was fourth.
Bradley Dunham won the boys division. Matt
Kane was second and Jessie Chapman finished
third.
Walter Obszarski took first place in the jun-
ior division. Toby Williams was second.
In men's shortboard, Chris Igou was first.
Nick Isabella was second, Jake Coombs placed
third, Zack Miller was fourth, Chance Bennett
placed fifth and Scott Kellogg finished sixth.


Eric Hatton took first place in the masters divi-
sion.
In senior men, Long was first, followed by
Kyle Conger.
Kevin Leary won the grand masters division.
Frank Blake was second.
Leslie Baker took first place in women's and
women's longboard divisions.
Williams was first in junior longboard.
In the men's longboard division, Isabella fin-


death in as
short as 24-
48 hours
after injury.
si which
- ooccur on
the water
should be
thoroughly
cleaned
SPORTS withsoap
and water.
MEDICINE Ifit is deep
GREGORY or a pene-
a treating
SMITH. M.D. puncture
wound, this
should be
evaluated by a doctor to
determine the need for pos-
sible surgical treatment and
antibiotics. Small wounds
are often left open to facili-
tate drainage should an
infection develop despite
antibiotic treatments.
Especially in situations of
potential foreign body pene-
tration, such as a shell or
fish spine, X-rays should be
performed to make sure
nothing was left behind.
This column is written to
discuss issues regarding
sports, medicine and safety. It
is not intended to serve as a
replacementfor treatment by
a doctor It is only designed to
offerguidelines on the preven-
tion, recognition and care of
injuries and illness. Specific
concerns should be discussed
with a physician. Mail ques-
tions to Gregory Smith, M.D.,
1250 S. 18th St., Suite 204,
Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Call 261-8787for
appointments or visit
www.gsmithmd.com.


Living where we do,
we are surrounded
by water and have
the opportunity for
many marine-based activi-
ties. Surfing, fishing, boat-
ing and skiing are a few
examples of how we have
fun on the water. However,
the water also provides a
unique environment for the
development of infections.
For example, one can easily
become cut while climbing
into a boat or from the shells
on the shore. Fisherman are
susceptible to getting stuck,
not only by hooks, but also
by the spines of fish. These
types of injuries can cause
serious infections and, there-
fore, they should be taken
seriously and properly treat-
ed.
Wounds which occur in
water-based situations have
much higher infection rates
than similar injuries which
occur on land. Lakes,
streams and the ocean con-
tain multiple bacteria. For
example, there are likely 100
million bacteria contained
within a liter of seawater. So,
when a wound does occur
here, it should be consid-
ered contaminated and
potentially infected.
While there are common
bacteria such as staph and
strep in water-based environ-
ments, there are also differ-
ent bacteria in the water
than those commonly found
on land, and these can be
much more aggressive. One
such bacteria species, called
Vibrio, produces severe skin
infections that can lead to
rapid skin destruction and


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Sunday Mornin' Jazz
crosses paths with Jade
during the recent Poker
Run, left. Bob Canon,
above, captain of Jade,
displays his winning cer-
tificate for a four-day,
three-night stay at Amelia
Island Plantation.


envelope with the participating boat's name
on it. After the all boats completed the
course, the crews met at the Amelia Island
Yacht Basin, which was concurrently cel-
ebrating Clean Harbor Day with a cookout.
After feasting on hamburgers, hot dogs
and all the trimmings, the committee
chairman, Joe Bowen, called the crews
together. With the crews assembled, he
handed sealed envelopes containing seven
playing cards to each boat captain. When
so directed, the captains opened the
envelopes and, choosing the best five cards,
they played their "poker hand."
Bob Canon, captain of the sailboat Jade,
with two pair (aces high), won first prize,
a three-night, four-day stay at Amelia Island
Plantation. It should be noted that Jade
and the Mary Wanderer with Conunodore
Charles Steinkamp were the only sailboats


to actually sail part of the course. All oth-
ers chose to simply enjoy the wonderful
weather and motor the,eight miles.
Of course, part of the decision to motor
might have been the fact that, during Poker
Run, the participating boats were also com-
peting in a fishing contest, using artificial
lures trolled behind the boats. As usual it
became clear why they call it fishing and
not catching. The fish just did not cooper-
ate. However, Capt. John Burns aboard
the sailboat Mast Confusion succeeded in
landing the only fish hooked, a three-foot
shark.
Canon and crew hooked but did not
land the Outer Range Marker.
Anyone with questions concerning the
Amelia Island Sailing Club or who wishes
to participate in club races or cruises
should contact Steinkamp at 583-3156.


'JOHN BURNS
For the News-Leader

The Amelia Island Sailing Club held its
annual Poker Run, co-sponsored by Amelia
Island Yacht Basin, on Saturday. Unlike its
other races, the Poker Run is more of a
social event, where sailboaters and power-
boaters participate together. Heck, if one so
chose, they could row the course.
The committee chairman chose an
eight-mile course, starting at the down-
town marina, around the outer range mark-
er in Cumberland Sound, out to buoy 20
and then a similar return course, finish-
ing at buoy 10 near the downtown marina.
Every time a boat passes one of the
designated buoys, rules require the cap-
tains to radio the committee boat of their
progress and a playing card is dealt to an


ESA surf contest held Saturday just south of Slider's


Treat those water


injuries with care


POKER RUN


Amelia Island Sailing Club holds Poker Run








FRIDAY. AUGUST 14.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


PHOTOS BY TERRY IACOSS/SPECIAL
A jetty boat is pictured anchored close to the jetty rocks during an incoming tide and
fishes for a variety of inlet species, including redfish, shark, cobia and more.



Best action at the jetties


Jetty fishing has picked up during the last
few days and should produce excellent fish-
ing action this weekend for area fishermen.
Some of the best action is coming from the
tip of the St. Marys north jetties, where big
schools of redfish are holding weighing to 25
pounds. Look for the larger, "bull," reds to be
holding close to the rocks in deep water
while the smaller schooling size reds, weigh-
ing from 5-10 pounds, are holding over the
flooding jetty rocks and close to the rocks as
well in deep water.
Sea trout are also holding
at the very tip of the St.
Marys south jetty rocks dur-
ing the high falling tide.
Drift a live shrimp under a
sea trout float over the flood-
ed rocks so the depth of the
live shrimp is adjusted to
drift just above the sub-
ON THE merged rocks.
A few reds and king
WATER mackerel are holding at the
tip of the St. Marys south
TERRY jetty rocks during the incom-
LACOSS, ing tide as well. Live mullet
or menhaden continue to be
prime kingfish baits when
fished right on the surface with the aid of a
balloon or corks attached to the terminal fish-
ing line.
Keeper-size red drum are taking live men-
haden fished with a one-ounce led head jig
cast to the shallow edge of the jetty rocks.
Barb the live menhaden up through the bot-
tom of the mouth and right through the top
of the mouth. Bump the live bait combo slow-
ly over the submerged jetty rocks out into
deep water and hang on.
Menhaden schools have been holding just
north of Atlantic Avenue and close to the
breakers. During last year's summer fishing
season, Capt. Benny Hendrixguided his fish-
ing charter to a 16-pound flounder at the tip
of the St. Marys south jetty rocks while fish-
ing with live menhaden on the bottom.
Best bet for offshore fishing includes FC
and FA fish havens, where grouper, red snap-
per, cobia and sea bass continue to please


Live mullet are excellent baits when
fished on the bottom close to jetty rocks
when targeting cobia, red drum, floun-
der, tarpon and sharks. Chris Forehand
is pictured with a successful net full of
mullet.

drift fishing boats. Big schools of cobia have
been sighted holding just off the surf south
of the St Johns inlet, where beach fishermen
have been hooking up to more than 20 cobia
per fishing trip. Apparently the schools of
cobia have been migrating south, but may
change their migration plans and migrate
north, so be prepared.
The best kingfish bite has been coming
north from Doboy Sound and in 20 feet of
water, where king mackerel fishing boats are
hooking up to more than 20 kingfish weigh-
ing to 35 pounds in just a half day of kingfish-
ing.
The News-Leader encourages local anglers
to submit photographs of their catches. E-mail
photos to bjones@fbnewsleadercom, mail them
to PO. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035, or drop them by the office at 511 Ash
St. in Fernandina Beach. Call Beth Jones at
261-3696 for more information.


SPORTS SHORTS


Time tocheer
The Fernandina Beach High School cheer-
leaders will hold their first practices for the
2009-10 school year from 8-9:30 a.m. Aug. 20
and 21 in the multipurpose room. Once school
starts, conditioning will be held from 3:15-3:45
p.m. Monday and Wednesdays and practices
will be held from 3:15-4:15 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Uniform fees ($40) are due the first
day of school, Aug. 24.
A parent meeting will be held from 6-7 p.m.
Aug. 25.

Backto School beach run
The second annual Back to School Beach
Fun Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K (one mile)
will be held Oct. 17 at Peters Point on A1A.
The event starts at low tide, 4 p.m. Registration
information will be available in August. The day
includes music, food and awards. Begin train-
ing now. Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit Communities in Schools.

Run Wildl at White Oak Plantation
Run Wild! at White Oak Plantation in Yulee,
which benefits Girls on the Run of Northeast
Florida, will be held Oct. 25 beginning at 8:30
a.m. Registration closes Oct. 20. The field is
limited to the first 65. No event-day registration.
Fee is $150. No refunds. All participants must
be 18 or older. All runners are required to sign
a waiver the day of the race.
The adventure includes entry to the 10-mile
run (approximately 10.5 miles) through the
trails of an unspoiled, natural setting; swim-
ming in the pool after the race; picnic lunch;
raffle; tour on an open-air bus through Wild
Oak's wildlife preserve; goody bag. Visit
GOTRneflorida.org or call (904) 619-6763.

Mad SundayShoot
Amelia Shotgun Sports will host two tourna-
ments in the Mad Sunday Shoot. Shoot either
or both, morning or evening. The event will be
held Aug. 30 at 86300 Hot Shot Trail in Yulee
for NSCA registered shooters. Fees are are
$60 for NSCA and hunter, $45 for junior and
sub-junior and $7 for warm-ups. Fees include
breakfast, lunch and awards
For information, call 753-4619 or 548-9818
or e-mail clyde@ameliashotgunsports.com.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club. Social
hour is at 6:30 p.m; meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
Call Commodore Charlie Steinkamp at 261-
5213 or visit www.ameliaislandsailing.org.

TurtleTrotSept5
An earlier start and some free extras are in
store for participants in this year's Turtle Trot
5K/10K race and 1.5-mile walk on Labor Day
weekend. The annual event will begin at 7:30
a.m. Sept. 5, a half hour earlier than last year.
After the race, runners can freshen up with
a free shower at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center and spend the rest of the
day on Amelia Island. Those who use the
showers should bring their own towels.
Runners and walkers can present their race
bib for free admission to Fort Clinch State Park
for the remainder of the day. An awards cere-
mony with door prizes will follow the event with
a grand prize of a four-day, three-night stay at
the Amelia Island Plantation.
The race will again feature professional
scoring from 1st Place Sports in Jacksonville,
using an electronic chip-timing system. The
5K, 10K and 1.5-mile non-competitive walk will
start and finish at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center with the last half of the 10K
running through Fort Clinch State Park.
Half-mile and one-mile fun runs for children
10 and younger will begin at 9 a.m. In another
change this year, the kids' runs will be free.
The goal is to encourage young people to run
and make the entire event more affordable for
families, Hill said. Registration is required and
youth finishers will receive a ribbon at the end
of their run:
A popular feature is returning this year -
original T-shirt artwork by Femandina Beach
artist and sea turtle volunteer Sandra Baker-
Hinton. All pre-registered walkers and 5K/10K
runners will receive a T-shirt with shirts avail-
able on race day while supplies last. Proceeds
benefit the Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch and
sea turtle patrols inside Fort Clinch State Park
along with the running club's youth running
programs.
Entry fees through Aug. 28 will be $20 per
person or $15 for members of Amelia Island
Runners. After Aug. 28 through race day, the
fee will be $25 for everyone. Pre-registration
ends at 2 p.m. Sept. 3, but there will be race-


day registration from 6-7 a.m. at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center.
Entry forms and online registration are
available at the club's website,
www.AmelialslandRunners.com. Forms are
also available at Club 14 Fitness, Red Otter
Outfitters and other locations. Visit the AIR
website or call 277-3676.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports Association
meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee. Call 261-1075 or
277-1609 for information.

Soccer referee course offered
The following soccer club is hosting the
Grade 8 (entry level) referee course. Visit
http://fsr-inc.com/ Welcome.aspx to register.
Contact Mike Goodman, director of coaching
of Amelia Island Youth Soccer, at
aiydoc@aiysoccer.com with questions.
Jacksonville.Soccer Club from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Aug. 22 and from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 23 (test
night) at Chuck Rogers soccer park behind
First Christian Church of Jacksonville, 11924
San Jose Road, Jacksonville.

Yogadasses
* Y Yoga, 961687-201E Gateway Blvd.,
offers a stretch and strengthening class,
pilates, yin, yoga core ball, yoga for longevity,
beach yoga and basic yoga. Call 415-9642.
* Dome Healing Center, 5024 First Coast
Hwy., offers Sivananda/Amrit style yoga for all
levels and meditation and relaxation classes.
For information, call 277-3663 or visit dome-
healingcenter.com.
* Anytime Fitness, 463646 SR 200 Suite 4
in Yulee. Call 225-8400 or visit www.anytimefit-
ness.com.
* Island Rejuvacations offers yoga and
lunch at Nassau Health Foods, 833 T.J.
Courson Road. Call 277-3158.
* Go Yoga, Inc. offers Power Vinyasa at
Bean School of Dance, 25 N. Third St. Call
(904) 335-0539 or visit www.goyogainc.com.

Zumba classes
* Kinderstudios, 1897 Island Walkway. Call
Alexandra Carroll at 415-0954.
* Bean School of Dance, 25 N. Third St.
Call 261-DANC.
* A Chance To Dance, 474378 SR200. Call
753-3407 or email buffyactd@gmail.com.
* Anytime Fitness, 463646 SR 200 Suite 4
in Yulee. Call 225-8400 or visit www.anytimefit-
ness.com.
* Club 14 Fitness, 1114 South 14th St.,
Femandina Beach. Call 261-0557.

Fitness programs
* Anytime Fitness, 463646 SR 200 Suite 4
in Yulee, offers step and sculpt, strength train-
ing and abs, body sculpt and step aerobics.
Call 225-8400 or visit www.anytimefitness.
com. FitKidz for ages 4-11 is also offered. Call
699-5408 or e-mail reedntoni@aol.com,
* Club 14 Fitness, 1114 South 14th St:;
offers nutritional counseling, personal training,
group fitness and cycling, strength training and
cardio, childcare, juice bar, tanning and
saunas. Visit www.clubl4fitness.com.
* The McArthur Family YMCA, 1915 Citrona
Drive, offers various fitness programs. Call
261-1080. Visit www.firstcoastymca.org.
Programs are also offered in Yulee (call 225-
2550) and Hilliard (call (904) 845-2733).
* Amelia Island Personal Fitness, Amelia
Parkway Medical Plaza, 2416. Lynndale Road,
Suite 100, is a personal training studio dedicat-
ed to promoting lifelong health and fitness
through appropriate exercise and nutrition,
focusing on preventing diabetes, cancer and
heart disease. Call 261-0698 for information.

Challenger Bowling
Nassau Challenger Bowling League.for the
physically and mentally challenged meets the
second Saturday of the month from 3-5 p.m. at
the Strikers Family Bowling Center in Yulee.
Call Melinda Willaford at 261-3136.

Umpires recruited
Baseball and softball umpires can earn
extra cash by joining the fastest growing
umpires association in Northeast Florida, the
River City Umpires Association. Contact Terry
Padgett at (904) 879-6442 or Aaron Knowles
at (904) 962-7184.
River City Umpires is currently recruiting
men and women interested in officiating base-
ball and softball and live or work in Baker,
Bradford, Clay, Duval, Putnam, St. Johns or
Nassau county. Visit www.rivercityumps.com.















L leisure


B SECTION


CROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
MUSIC NOTES
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH. FLORIDA


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE JACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
This season the JSO welcomes, among others, Dirty Martini, above, and Itzhak Perlman, right.


JSO season a reason to celebrate


PAUL WITKOWSKI
For the News-Leader


This is certainly
Jacksonville's year to cele-
brate a legacy of great
music, from awe-inspiring
classics to fabulous guest artists
and entertainers to a landmark 60th
Anniversary Concert with Itzhak
Perlman.
Undeniably the reigning virtu-
oso of the violin, Perlman is synony-
mous with landmark events and
crowning artistic achievements.
The 60th Anniversary Celebration
Concert featuring Perlman with the
Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra
takes place on Jan. 9, 2010, in
Jacoby Symphony Hall.
Over the decades, the
Jacksonville Symphony has elevated
the community with the highest
quality of artistry. And for the past
10 years, Music Director and


Principal Conductor Fabio Mechetti
has collaborated with JSO to contin-
ually reach new heights.
Some of the highlights with
Mechetti at the helm for next sea-
son's Fidelity National Financial
Masterworks series include
Tchaikovsky's "Path6tique,"
Beethoven's "Eroica," the Van
Cliburn Gold Medalist Debut,
Pictures at an Exhibition and a
Fiesh Ink World Premiere. We also
welcome to the stage such stellar
guest artists as conductor JoAnn
Falletta, violinist Chee-Yun, cellist
Alisa Weilerstein and pianist
Arnaldo Cohen.
Enjoying the finest in live sym-
phonic entertainment is what
Northeast Florida audiences have
come to expect, and the JSO's 2009-
10 Blue Cross.and Blue Shield of
Florida Pops Series is no exception,
JSO Continued on 3B


Music Director and Principal Conductor Fabio Mechetti, above.


Jazz at Palace offers musical potpourri'


For the News-Leader
The Dynamic Les'DeMerle Jazz
All Stars are set to swing in a variety
of jazz styles for its preview of the
2009 Les DeMerle Amelia Island
Jazz Festival, Thursday from 7-9
p.m. at the newly renovated Palace
Saloon in Fernandina Beach.
The event, which will benefit the
educational programs and concerts
of the festival, will present a crack
seven-piece jazz ensemble led by
DeMerle on drums and will feature
some of the country's finest musi-
cians, including multi-instrumental-
ist Dr. Bill Prince, formerly with,
among others, Buddy Rich and
Clark Terry, trumpeter Marvin
Ferebee, University of North
Florida music professor Marc
Dickman on trombone, the dexter-
ous and ever exciting pianist Doug
Matthews, bassist Ernie Ealum and
sizzling vocalist Bonnie Eisele.


This year's Palace show promis-'
es to be another fun-filled and
informative evening in the festival
tradition which will showcase a pot-
pourri of music -big band, be-bop,
Dixieland and smooth - along with
announcements of all festival activi-
ty, events and schedules.
A special DVD presentation, pro-
duced by festival board member
Stan Cottle, will be shown which
includes footage of the 2009 head-
liner David Sanborn. The Amelia
Island Jazz Festival runs 10 days
from Oct. 2-11, and Sanborn will
appear two nights, Oct 9 and 10, at
the new First Baptist Church
Auditorium, 1600 S. Eighth St.
DeMerle and Eisele, who recent-
ly returned to Fernandina Beach
from a three-month European
cruise schedule via Celebrity
Cruises, are excited to be back
home and primed to kick off the
Jazz Festival season.


"We always have a great time at
the Palace show, and this year will
be truly special," said DeMerle. "It
was fun making so many new fans
and friends while performing on the
ship, some of whom hope to attend
the festival," he added. "But there's
nothing like playing in front of our
home crowd."
Advance tickets to "Jazz At The
Palace" can be purchased for $25 at
the UPS Store iri the Island Walk
Shopping Center, 1417 Sadler Road,
277-0820, at the UPS Store, 46368
State Road 2000, Suite 1,Yulee, 225-
8840, online at www.ameliaislandjaz-
zfestival.com, or at the door if not
sold out prior to the show.
From 6-7 p.m. before the show,
Amelia Island Carriages will be
offering complimentary carriage
rides around the downtown area to
all ticket holders.
All proceeds benefit the Amelia
Island Jazz Festival, a not-for-profit


David Sanborn will perform:at
this year's Amelia Island Jazz
Festival.

501(c)3 corporation, and its newly
established jazz scholarship pro-
JAZZ Continued on 2B


New Zealand

sauvignon

blanc still

outshines

ROBERT M. WEINTRAUB
For the News-Leader
Judging a wine by someone
else's opinion; regardless of how
expert. candrive you nuts!
Nothing beats your own taste and
preferences, which reinforces my
oft' stated mantra: Never fear a
new wine.
Sauvignon blanc has been one
of tly favorite white wines (and
that of many others, judging from
the reac-
tion to
E last
month's
chardon-
OTNE% nay
Exposee. I
recently came across a column in
the New York Times that lamented
a decline in New Zealand sauvi-
gnon blanc. A panel of "experts"
sampled 25 kiwi SBs and "found
too many wines that seemed aimed
at being commercially inoffensive
..." and "the style has definitely
changed."
6 Curious, and always prepared
to challenge my assumptions, we
assembled a panel of six ranging
from expert to novice to sample
nine locally found SBs recom-
mended by aficionados. (I had win-
nowed the list from 15 as several
were not up to my standard.)
Included in the selection were
three from New Zealand, three
from South Africa, one from Chile
and two from California. They
were priced between $7 and $18.
French Sancerre and Pouilly-Fum6 .
were more than $20 and so were
not included.
For those who rave about New
Zealand sauvignon blanc and fret
[. over the Times' experts' declama-
_,-.tions, have no fear. The three
wines from the South Island were
the clear favorites, with Chilean
and Napa contestants close
behind. One of the South Africans
is our Best Buy.
The sauvignon blanc grape
owes a lot to New Zealand. Thirty
-years or so ago it was virtually
unknown. While it is a component
of white Bordeaux, and it makes
delicious white wines in the Loire
Valley, particularly in Sancerre and
Pouilly-Fum6, and it is part of the
blend in the great sweet wines of
Sauternes, the grape's name never
appears on those French labels. I
discovered Sancerre a half century
ago and loved is crisp, citrus fla-
vor; but it was only recently that I
discovered sauvignon blanc wines
from New Zealand as French
wines became too pricey and hard
to find in Ndrtheast Florida.
Robert Mondavi didn't help. He
WINE Continued on 2B


GULLAH/GEECHEE FESTIVAL
The Gullah/Geechee Nation International
Music & Movement Festival
will take people on a historic
three-day journey to the
Golden Isles Aug. 21-23. This
annual celebration, which
culminates with events on
Aug. 23 inO'Neil,
Nassauville and American
Beach, highlights authentic
presentations of .
Gullah/Geechee culture by
natives of the Gullah/Geechee Nation. It starts in
Savannah, with events also at St. Simons Island,
Jekyll Island and Brunswick, Ga.
Fbr more details, including group discounts.
call (843) 838-1171 or e-mail GullGeeCo,: aol.corn
or AMPTurnItUp�aol.com.
.... , -C , "I-fI r- " . -
BACY TO.' S-lGH�, ( V.,


Enjoy a back to school
weekend from 8 a.m.-5 p.m
Aug. 21 at the MLK Center.
1200 Elm St., Fernandina
Beach, including a
school supplies give-
away and cookout under


.r D
Ui B


:1S^M^


the pavilions courtesy of Trinity United
Methodist Church and Pastor Mark Garvin.
There will be free physical and free vision
screenings from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., courtesy of the
Wal-Mart Vision Center. and from 9-11 p.m., enjoy
the movie "Free Willy" by the pool.

MUSIC AND S1ATE i
A "Back 2 Skool Rock-N-
Rollers Musik Fest & Skate
Demo" will be held Aug. 22
from 5 p.m. to dusk at the
Skate Park at Main Beach in
Fernandina Beach.
Performers include Dear
Dakota, The Shoreline,
American Science and Love Always. Admission
is free.

QUILT SHOW
A Yulee Quilt Group fundraiser. Traditions and
Treasures quilt show, will be held at Yulee United
Methodist Church on Aug. 21 from 5-9 p.m. A $12
donation includes the quilt show (over 50 quilts),
door prize ticket, one raffle ticket for a full/queen
quilt. plus a catered dinner (parmesan crusted
chicken plus dessert buffet) and Julie's trunk
show, "A Florida Quilt Collage." Seating is limited.
Call or e-mail for tickets. Proceeds go to the


Health Ministry at
YUMC, toward the pur-
chase of a heart defibril-
lator machine.
Contact Julie Mainor
at (904) 571-9172 or
cheezdoodle02�
yahoo.com.

SPAGHETT DINNER
Rescuing Animals in Nassau, or RAIN, will
hold its annual spaghetti dinner fundraiser from
4-8 p.m. Aug.22 at the
Atlantic Avenue . *


Recreation
Center in
Fernandina
Beach.
'Tickets
are $10 and


w w


include spaghetti with sauce of choice, salad,
bread, drink and dessert. There will also be a
silent auction and entertainment.
Tickets are on sale at the Fernandina Beach
Animal Clinic. Lofton Creek Animal Clinic,
Nassau Veterinary Clinic, Bark Avenue Pet
Boutique and Bucky's Best Friends Card and Gift.
For information call RAIN at (904) 879-5861 or e-
mail rainhumane�yahoo.com.


.40 T-fu r�17 |O ,NT. *.









FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009 LEISURE News-Leader


iSO Continuedfrom 1B
with Principal Pops
Conductor Michael Krajewski
and headliners such as Sandi
Patty and Pink Martini, and
tributes to Charlie Chaplin,
Ray Charles, John Williams
and modern Broadway.
The JSO's annual opera
production continues with
Mozart's lighthearted Cosi
fan tutte (Feb. 13, 2010), and
its musical theater collabora-


tion with the cast of the
Alhambra Theatre features a
semi-staged concert version
of Rodgers and
Hammerstein's "Oklahoma!"
(Sept. 18-20, 2009).
This season also commem-
orates the Jacksonville
Symphony Chorus' 25 years
of great music with Orff's
impassioned Carmina Burana
(Nov. 5-7, 2009), and we honor
the 10th season of the majes-
tic Bryan Concert Organ in


Jacoby Symphony Hall with
Saint-Saens "Organ
Symphony" (lan. 15-16, 2010).
A new Friday Fusion series
features a tasteful variety of
symphonic gems, introduced
from the stage by our artists.
Programs include German,
French, Italian and Latin
musical evenings and audi-
ences can get a taste of the
evening's theme with food
before the concert (for an
additional price). The bar will


stay open afterward for audi-
ences and musicians to min-
gle. Plans are in the works for
visual art, jazz and acoustic
music and more entertaining
elements.
Michael Butterman
returns to the podium as JSO
resident conductor. Currently
serving as music director of
the Boulder Philharmonic
Orchestra and principal con-
ductor for education and out-
reach of the Rochester


Philharmonic Orchestra,
Butterman returns to the JSO,
where he served as associate
conductor from 2000-7, to con-
duct a series of concerts,
including Beethoven's
"Eroica," "German'Fusion,"
First Coast Nutcracker,
Handel's Messiah and com-
munity concerts throughout
the area.
Widely regarded as one of
country's finest concert halls,
Robert E. Jacoby Symphony


Hall at the Times-Union
Center for the Performing
Arts delivers an acoustically
superior live symphonic expe-
rience. And in today's eco-
nomic climate, the JSO offers
a significant value for live per-
forming arts.
Information and tickets are
available through the box
office at (904) 354-5547 and at
www.jaxsymphony.org,
including the season
brochure.


SCHOLARSHIPS


Qjyy:iZ


MENTORS & HOPE


Thanks to You.


TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN - 2008-2009
Take Stock in Children is a scholarship and mentoring program that provides academically
promising children from deserving families in Nassau County with scholarships
to college or vocational school and guidance from caring mentors.

HIGHLIGHTS of 2008-2009 -


* 98% students enrolled remain in Take Stock
* 19 Take Stock graduates received scholarships
* 43 new students given Take Stock opportunity
* State-wide Excellence in Mentoring Award
* Over 2500 volunteer hours donated
* 5th "Hollar for a Dollar" benefit by FCCJ Staff


* 3rd Annual Mentor-Student Luncheon
* Field Trip to Florida State College
at Jacksonville North Campus
* 13th Annual Awards Celebration Event
* 5th Light Up a Life Benefit at
Spa & Shops of Amelia Island Plantation


2008-09 Take Stock in Children Scholars
Callahan Middle School Fernandina Beach Middle School
Austin Anderson, Lindsey Coppola, Brandi Cunliffe, Emmie Clark, Deonna Clinton, Haley DeVol, Bo Garner,
Georgia Lavender, Ashley Ponce, Camila Gomez, Wendall McGahee, Taniya McNeil,
Dalton Rapoza, Shelby Wolfe Nicholas Vopitta, Carter Williams, lyana Williams


Hilliard Middle/Senior High School
Kory Bryant, Megan Caudill, Andrew Coiro, Johanna Diaz,
Miriah Durrance, Devin Emery, Dustin Emery, Kalyn Frazier,
Morgan Harris, Raegan Hodges, Katie Kennedy,
Nora Prestigiacomo, Emmalee Smith, Tabitha Spencer


Shayona Alderman, HMS/HS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville



\"//





Cnisc 'ordonwYH s
:o' FobdiidState Cditejge -
at Jacksonville










Cassandra Craft, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


Cierra Green, YHS
University of West Florida


Daneen Johnson, FBHS
University of Central Florida


Joyce Aldrich
W.L Amos, MD
Sylvie & Dooley Baxter
Betty & David Berkman
Julie & Jeffrey Blake
Sheila & Bill Braddock
Mary & Rod Brannen
Anne & Tom Burns
Sylvia Cherry
Margaret & Neil Childs
Lucille Dean
Grada & Wallj Drew
Patricia .eo_npd Ermold
Judy & David Easterly
Judy Easterly's Family
Cherry & Dan Gallagher
Pat & Fred Gieg, Jr.
JoAnn & Bill Gingrich
Gayle & Bill Gower
Andrea & Corky Hoffman
Dorothy & Dean Houk


Gail Cook
Ann Buchanan
Joan Conner
Rita Kirkland
Barbara Leech
Kay Ronveaux
Dottie Ruis
Stuart Smith
Kerry Woods
Merritt Carlton
Barbara Fowler-
Browning
Niel Hampton
Bill Hansberry
Greg Jones
John Landregan
Penny Landregan
Signe Lupfer
' Patsy Page
Mary Alice Southwick
Rita Tiensch
John Zimmerman
Ted Combs
Pam Fleming
Doug Gates


Susan Howard
Suzanne Hughes
Leena & Jaswant jadeja
Dianne & Richard Johnson
Sandy & Luke Karlovec
Suzanne Keith &
Don McCurry
Lorraine & Tom King
Lee & Roger Kintzel
Laura Kitson, DMD
Kevin Koons
Lois & Brien Laing
,, Karen & Coleman Langshaw
Mary Ellen & Norm Ledwin
Mary & Brad Lesher
Claudette Lowary
Jody & Doug Mackle
Sandy & Donn Mann
Mary & Walter Maupay, Jr.
Enid & Curtis Meltzer
Michael & Stuart Moore


Eve Jones
Phil Patton
Jane Preston
Cheryl Raulerson
Elisa Simpson
Doris Smith
Haley Spiers
Kevin Webb
Dotti Williams
Larry Jones
Phillip Allen
Margaret Allen'
Carrie Mizell
Marissa Chenoweth
Rachel Davis
Dana FitzGerald
Ginger Hill
Constance Holmes
Bev Keigwin
Am Kroll
Carol Kimmel
Mary Ellen Ledwin
Deann Loum
Dennis Murray
Ed O'Rourke


Yulee Middle School
Tristyn Bennett, Austin Bernard, Micheala Bowen,
Garrett Gagnon, James Gardner, Jessimine Gonzalez,
Carrie Hicks, Victoria Lockett, Destiny Mullikin,
Kaitlyn Pietrusiak, Jennifer Portillo, Joseph Turner


Contributors
Jean D. Pitcher
Jennifer & Reinhold Priek
Jane & Ted Preston
Dianne & Charles Rice
jackye & Gary Rubin
Sherri Sears
Rachel & Clayton Smith
jan & Stuart Smith
Beverly & Robert Stormoen
Anthony Stubits, DO
Barbara Webster
Mike Weinstein
Campaign Fund
Ashley Woolley
Jean & Joseph Wyatt
Charlotte & John
Zimmerman
Amelia Insurance Agency
Amelia Island Plantation
Amelia Island Tennis
Committee

Mentors


Kay Shea
Jackye Rubin
Sue Thornton
Shelley Walker
Rosalie Wessel
Gene Canal
Theresa Cushman
Steve Fahlgren
Stephanie Gregory
Vickie & Jim Grethe
Jennifer Hall
Susan Mowery
Phyllis Holmes
Charlie Holmes
Donald Humphreys
Pauline Kawchak
William Lorick
Diane & Dennis
MacDonell
Joan Meserve
Betty Nielsen
Julie & David Smith
Forrest Wheeler
Debra Sutton
Lynn Thomas


Advanced Rehabilitation-FB
Advanced Rehabilitation-GA
Bank of America
Brandies Hardware
Cafe Karibo
Classic Carpets
Cotner & Associates
Dome Healing Center
Farm Credit of North Florida
Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Fernandina Beach
Animal Clinic
First Coast Community Banks
First Coast Workforce Dev.
First National Bank
Florida State College
at Jacksonville
Florida State College
Foundation, Inc.
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation


Dee Torre
Kristin Pickett
Beth Reynolds
Jeremy Reynolds
John Page
Dawn West
Lee Ann Rhoden
Diane Williams
Rhonda Lowe
Adam Kaufman
Donna Cappucio
Charlie Houk
Robyn Nemes
Marge Wilson
Hal Schwartz
Amanda Bishop
Barbara Stokes
Audra Parden
Lynne Anderson
Wilma Allen
Jill Powers
Beverly Hall
David Keay
Gail Sansafar
Arlene Filkoff


Ted Preston
Janet de Tamowsky
Neil Childs
Rebecca Cofield
Sara Benzel
Alan Donaldson
Judy Easterly
Cecy Koppel
Ashley Mclntyre
Don Millen
Kristi Nighbert
Jessie Pickett
Wanda Saunders
Joyce Thomas
Sara Warr
Anita Zeidman
Lynda Smith
Chris Craig
Mike Cole
Emily Broughton
Kay Stokes
Kristi Nighbert
Mary Ellen Carroll
Joe Putnam
Brandon Young


GFWC Woman's Club
Kiwanis Club of
Fernandina Beach
LeClos of Amelia Island
Owens, Van Etta &
Kitson, PA
Merck Partnership of Giving
Nassau County Record
Nassau County School Board
Nassau County Builder's
Association
Michael Paul's FormalWear
S Pilates of Amelia
Property Management
Systems .
Publix Super Markets, Inc.
Southeastern Banks
Staff of Florida State College
at Jacksonville Nassau Center
Town of Hilliard
Optimist Club of Yulee


Valerie Johnson
Mimi Elwell
Joan Krull
Ashley Woolley
Nancy Maxwell
Adriana Vasquez
Ted Dinwiddie
Joe Shephard
Christian Lyons
Karen Lyons
Paul Whittenburg
Michelle Carlyle
Nancy O'Rourke
Danyelle Minchew
Dan Sanford
Natalie Millien
Noelle Perry
Betsy Griffin-Forkey
Tony Wilson
Billy Robertson
Leslie Ritter
Karen Goertler
Doug Grant
Marilyn Gordon


Tutors

Math ~~ Mike Cipriano, Donna DiConstanza, Ted Preston


Leadership Council ~ SARA BENZEL - Chair
Mary Brannen, Mary Duffy, David Easterly, Cherry Gallagher, Betty Holland, Don Hughes, Larry Jones,
Susan Mowery, jane Preston, jackye Rubin, Dr. John Ruis, Stuart Smith, Dee Torre, Dotti Williams, John Zimmerman

Take Stock in Children of Nassau County in affiliation


with Florida State College at Jacksonville and the
Florida State College Foundation, Inc.

Florida State College at Jacksonvil

Betty P. Cook Nassau Center
76346 William Burgess Boulevard
Tillt ITQ( II Yulee, FL 32097 904.548.4464
I I JODY MACKLE, Program Director
(HipLD INI Student Advocates - Joanne Roach, Donna Givens and Barbar


le


a Leech


Kayla Kahre, YHS
Flagler College


JaKarra Kemp, HM/SHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville











Anna Pollard, FBHS
University of Central Florida











Cory Prescott; WNHS
Florida State College -
at Jacksonville


Adrieanna Robinson, FBHS
Tallahassee Community
College


William Trent, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville










Kristin Varnes, HM/SHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


.?' .







India Walthour, YHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville



.






Ashley Wheeler, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


Casey Wingate, YHS
Florida State College at Jacksonville


Kenny Zodel, HM/SHS
Florida State College at Jacksonville


Amanda Woods, FBHS
Univeristy of West Florida


--


NL/PSA


















4 CLASSIFIED


NEWS-LEADER / FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009


To PLACE AN AD. CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE - WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 F.nancialI Hiorm.t ropet, 606 lPhi.oo tEQupnitif. . .1i. r1 Bursin-s Equpnent 800 REAL ESTATE 813 In.retmn'ent Prcpert, i58 C.nor,,-':-r, fur.lsr,nea
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 r1lne,' To Loanr 607 4n~rlu. ;.-Cllerib es: 620 Coji-.VC.ood3-Fu.I 801 Wanted [ Buj, or Pent 811i weit rlassau Counr 859 Homes-Furnlsrie
102 Lost & Found 2066 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Pro'duce 621 Gar.d.r, Lar, tEquipment 802 lHc.bile Homes 815 Kingslanr,.Sr -lar,; 860 HOnme-Unfurn.m~ne
103 in -rlen,.:r;arr, 207 Bu.iness 5Oppurtun, 501 Equipment 619 i:.i:.lrces 622 Plants Seeds.Fertill2er 803 t1..olle Home Lot:i 16 Caimden count,. B6 1 Vaci.,or, Rentals
104 -'ersonals 300 EDUCATION 502 Li.estockl 8 SupOpriEs h t611 Air Co:.rinr.eri HCtIeri 6,23 Swap. Trade 804 Amella Island Homes 817 Other Areas 62 Bed B reakfa;t
105 Public Notice 301 Sr.nols & Instructron 5 03 Pets'Supple 611 H e n Furnr,,-.qr 624- Wanted to Buy 805C Bearnes 850 RENTALS 863 O'fice
106 HJapc, Crd -102 Dilet'Erer.ie 504 Servics 612 fi lMu.:. l i;trumner,[ 625 Fre items 806 atrfrnt 85L oommn ate Wanted f4 .ornrircil'Retall
107 Special Occ-- i.?.-n 203 Hubbie/'Craffts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 T-it.lIn.-Rajdlic,-'Fereo7 700 RECREATION 607 Cunacmrnlmu- 852 MoblOle Homes 805 T'jrANSu RTAT
108 'Ift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sale- 614 Je_.-ir, W'tcnes '"0 Boats & Trailer,; 808 Off Island lui-e 853 Mobile Home Lotis ; t0 Automrr., lS
200 EMPLOYMENT 306f. Lesso~ns,ClaIs.s 602 Arr.cles rtr Sale 615 Bui.injg flaterials '02 Boat Suppies'DoCkage 809 LO5 85-4 R.-Ornm 902 Trucks
201 H"lp Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 r.h 1cellar.er.us 616 :,r3e arehou-ens 7 03 Si.rt.i EquiFlTpmiir Sals B610 Farms. & Acreage 855 Aoartr.enrts-Furnishe.ol g 3 .anr
202 Sales-Business -4l Mortgage B~ughtjSld j F.-1 B. 4 .cies C61 rlj.:nir,.r, T...OIS Equip . .04 Recr-raticn 'Vhicle 811 Commercial RertaI 856 AAparrments-Jrfurn 904 r- orrc/ices
203 Hotel Restauranr, 402 Stocks & Bords 605 Comiputers-Suppli;e 681 auct:ini 05 Compurter; S Sup iir.s 812 Properr, Exchange 857 Cond.ousFurnlshed 905 Commer-lal

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY IS LOCATED ON PAGE 4B


102 Lost & Found
DOG MISSING - since Sat. night from
Hart Terrace & Lem Turner, Callahan.
Sm 10-lb male Dachshund mix, black
w/2 wht hairs on rt shoulder, no collar.
Name "Jet". Small reward. No quest-
ions asked. Pis call (904)879-1182.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.


104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF

105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.


is seeking the following positions:
* EXPERIENCED
HOUSEKEEPERS, SUPERVISORS
* EXPERIENCED FRONT DESK
ASSOCIATES - ALL SHIFTS

Cone join our enthusiastic family,
where we will knowyour name.
Background check required
No pagers or cell phones
Apply in person
2707 Sadler Rd.
Fernandina Beach, FL
NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE


107 Special Occasion
FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF IRENE
SMITH - will be celebrating her 90th
birthday at Amelia Walk Clubhouse on
August 15th.

I .


201 Help Wanted
LOGISTICS EMPLOYEE NEEDED
ASAP! - *MUST KNOW AES DIRECT
FOR EXPORT DOC FILING *WILL
NEGOTIATE TRUCK, RAIL, BARGE, &
OCEAN RATES FOR ALL DOM & INT'L
MOVEMENTS. *BILINGUAL SPANISH/
ENGLISH IS A. PLUS. EMAIL RESUMES
TO OLYSTEELTRADING.JOBS(iOLY
STEEL.COM OR FAX TO (904)491-8688
EOE M/F/D/V
BONITO GRILL & SUSHI - now hiring
for Hostess & Assistant Manager. Apply
between 2:30-3:30pm. Call 261-0508.
CONTRACT FOR BID - General
Cleaning: Approx. 5,000 sq. ft. 17
offices, 5 bathrooms & 2 kitchens.
Please submit bid to Family Support
Services, 86004 Christian Way, Yulee,
FL 32097. Bid closure date is 8-25-09.
Phone #(904) 225-5347, Fax
#(904)225-5349.
RV Delivery Drivers Needed - De-
liver RVs, boats & trucks for PAY! De-
liver to all 48 states & CN. For details
log on to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com.
ANF
SUBSTITUTE FOOD SERVICE
WORKERS
The Nassau County School Board is
currently accepting applications for
substitute Food Service Workers.
Salary is $7.25 per hour and the hours
will vary depending on the school.
Contact Allyn Graves, Food Service
Director, at (904)491-9924 or
(877)813-2298 for further information.
HEAT & AIR TECHS - have recession
proof careers. 3WK training
accreditation. EPA/OSHA certified.
Local job placement assistance.
Financing available. May qualify for
GI/VA benefits. (877)994-9904. ANF
YMCA NOW HIRING - After School
Program part time child care positions
in the Fernandina/Yulee area. DCF
certification encouraged; seeking pro-
fessional, positive, and energetic lead-
ership. Please submit an application/
resume to the McArthur YMCA, 1915
Citrona Drive, Fernandina. 261-1080.
OTR DRIVERS - for PTL. Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced NE. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262 www.otl-inc.com. ANF
DENTAL ASSISTANT - P/T. Pis call
(904)261-6826 or send .resume to
(904)261-8181. Robert H. Friedman,
DMD, 2896 S. 8th St., FB 32034.


201 Help Wanted
NOW RECRUITING - Offshore oil/gas
industry. Captains, engineers, cooks,
galleyhands, tankermen, riggers &
entry level. Sign up for training (850)
424-2605 www.offshoremarineindust
ries.com. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
FINAL EXPENSE - Regional Mgr.
opportunity. TV leads, newspaper
inserts, direct mail, lead financing,
exclusive territories, 75% commission
advances. Old American Ins. Co.
(888)344-4003. ANF
ELEMENTS SALON
Hiring an Esthetician. Flex hours. Must
be professional & experienced. (904)
491-0991, ask for Summer or Jessica.
LMT Position Available - in
expanding Chiropractic & Wellness
Center. 2 years minimum experience
required. Please call (912)882-8888.


204 Work Wanted
SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN
Small jobs welcomed. (904)277-4777
HOUSE CLEANING - I have openings
to clean your home, weekly, bi-weekly,
or monthly. Experienced and refer-
ences. Call for a bid. (904)261-0780
HARD WORKERS II - House cleaning
and painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059,
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


206 Child Care
BABYSITTER/NANNY AVAILABLE -
w/experience to watch your children.
Full time or part-time. Very reliable &
flexible. Call Rebecca (904)557-8328.


207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF


301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnllne.com. ANF

305 Tutoring
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.
PIANO LESSONS - Private Lessons,
Beginner - Intermediate Ages 5-99.
Limited spaces available. Enrolling
now. Walter Parker (904)347-1587.



502 Livestock
& Supplies
HORSE BOARDING - in Yulee. Full
Board $350 per month. Multiple Horse
discount. 583-0278

S 503 Pets/Supplies
SIAMESE/PERSIAN MIX KITTENS -
Free to good home. (904)225-9940
3 VERY COOL PUPPIES FOR SALE -
Yorkie/Maltese Mix. 8 weeks old. Mom
and Dad CKC registered, on premises.
$375/each. (904)536-3072




601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - located at 86282
Hickory Trail, Yulee, Florida in Hickory
Village Subdivision (off of Miner Road).
From 8am-12pm. Join us for great
bargain prices[
COMMUNITY YARD SALE - Bells
River Estates, 3 miles down Chester.
Sat. 8/15, 8am.
BIG MOVING SALE - Yard Eouip,,n.ri
appliances, toddler children.', ~r r. r
including bikes, toys, strollers, clothes.'
Sat. 8/15, -8am-12pm. 861516
Worthington Dr., Page Hill Subd.
MULTI FAMILY SALE - Fri., Sat.,
Sun., 8/14 - 8/16. This is a don't miss.
Lots of great items!!!! (904)753-7557.
95003 Petunia Court across from store
in Nassauville.
GARAGE SALE - Fri. & Sat., 8:30am-
4pm. Antiques, dishes, books, clothes,
tools, fishing gear, what-nots, & many
other items. 2.4 miles down Blackrock.
Look for Signsl RAIN CANCELS.
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE - Fri.
8/14 & Sat. 8/15, 8am-? Furniture,
clothes, china cabinet. 85155 Tinya
Rd., Yulee.
YARD SALE - Sat. 8/15. Abaco Island
Dr., off Old Nassauville Rd. Antiques,
golf clubs, & misc items of all kinds.
Must see. 8am-lpm.
YARD SALE - off Bamwell Rd., 95207
Twin Oaks Ln. 8am-lpm. Lots of stuff.


601 Garage Sales 1615 Building Materials


HUGE 8-FAMILY YARD SALE - at
Kelley Pest Control on the corner of
10th & Lime. Fri. & Sat., 8am-2pm.
Rain or shine.
GARAGE SALE - Fri. 8/14, Sat. 8/15,
& Sun. 8/16, 8am-? 86369 Jean Rd.
New guns,' freezer, refrig., knick-
knacks, old pictures, dryer, furniture,
misc. 45 cal carbine rifle NIB, 308
tactical NIB, 22 with scope NIB. Rain
dates 22nd, 23rd, 24th.
LOTS OF NEAT STUFF - Fri. 8/14 &
Sat. 8/15, 8am-3pm. 96108 Speckled
Trout Trail off Barnwell Rd.
YARD SALE - Fri. 8/14 &' Sat. 8/15,
9am-2pm. Books, glass, toys. Too
much to list. 96728 Commodore Point
Dr. (Heron Isles off Chester Rd, in
Yulee). Rain cancels.
YARD SALE - 3141 Bailey Rd. Fri.
8/14 & Sat. 8/15, 8am-5pm.
NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALE
Fri. 8/14, 1-5pm & Sat. 8/15, 10am-
2pm. No early birds. Natures Walk
Subdivision. Multiple families. Rain or
shine.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE -
1216 Fir St. Sat. 8/15, 8am-?.
YULEE YARD SALE - Thurs. 8/13, Fri.
8/14, & Sat. 8/15, 8am-4pm. Off
Harts Rd., west to 86204 Hayley PI.
Lots of stuff!
I�


METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, wall accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSuoolv.com. ANF

616 Storage/Warehouses
STEEL BUILDING SALE - Priced to
sell. Quick delivery. Easy do-it-yourself
construction. 25x40 $5,990. 30x40
$6,900. 35x50. $9,750. 40x60
$11,600. 48x90 $23,400. End optional.
Others. Pioneer (800)668-5422. ANF

618 Auctions
LIVE TELEVISED - RE Auctions 3pm
EST, 8/22. 70+ home sell absolute. Bid
online: williamsuction.com/absolute.
Watch on Dish network Ch. 217 *
DirecTV Ch. 347. (800)801-8003. ANF

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628

625 Free Items


1602 Articles for Sale FREE RABBIT CAGE - Holds about 30
1602Ar_______i__lesfoSrabbits. Call (904)491-4970.


KING MATTRESS - No box spring.
Restonic Heirloom pillow top.. Rarely
used, absolutely dean. $200. Rich
(904)502-3521.
GOLF CART - 2007 Precedent 48 volt.
Like new. $2,800. (904)631-5822
LG FRIG - & microwave, stainless
steel, like new, $900. Other items:
cushioned barstools w/back, $25/ea.
Ent. center, $25. Local (706)669-0151
GUN SHOW - Sat. 08/15, 9-5 & Sun.
08/16, 9-4. The Morocco Shrine", 3800
St. Johns Bluff Rd., Jax. North Florida
Arms Collectors, (904)461-0273.


S 701 Boats & Trailers
BOAT, TRAILER & MOTOR - $1400.
Will sell separately. Negotiable. Call
(904)321-2657.


SALES


I 603 Miscellaneous | 1804 Amelia Island HomesI


Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcfinfo. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to rentral & window AC's,
refrigerators ' i.'."- ' Kish's (904)
225-9717.

611 Home Furnishings
NEW .SLEEPER SOFA, $450. Kitchen
table set, $175. Washer & dryer, $150.
Call (201)650-4908.


612 Musical Instruments I


ELECTRIC GUITAR - & amp, Epiphone
Studio Goth, black. Line 6 Spider
Modeling amp, hard shell case. Steal
them - $450. Rich (904)502-3521.

613 Television
Radio-Stereo

60" PHILIPS MAGNAVOX BIG
SCREEN TV - $400/OB. Works great.
Too big for my living room. Call 225-
2927 or 753-0721.


2BR/1BA NORTH END HOME -
Detached garage, washer/dryer. Pets
ok. $1000/mo. (253)232-6236
OCEANFRONT - Log Cabin R-3
income. Property remodeled $975K.
Oceanview - Homes needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. Summer
Beach - 2028sf. Short distance to
beach. $415K. Amelia Coastal Realty
261-2770

805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
'Visit wawv.OceanfrontAmella:com 'for a
complete list, or call Bob Gec[eon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scm'd tiled porch-
es, hot tub. $339,500. (904)556-4500


I 806 Waterfront I


Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for Information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.

o08 Off Island/Yul
FSBO LOFTON OAKS - Cute family
home, 3BR/2BA, fireplace, fenced
backyard, all appliances. $145,000 oi
$1000 to Rent. 277-6791
BEAUTIFUL 2400SF 4BR/3BA -
Hickory Village. $260,000 w/$10,000
bonus to buyer at closing. Call
(904)318-6018.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW CONCRETE | FARMERS MARKET


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"Acompany built one bale ata time through
had work and integrity over 18 yeas."
Fast, Friendly Sevie-Installaion Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At a
753-3067 -

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES/


Xeleey CCeaning &Mgt.
Services Inc.
Bonded Insured
We offer "green cleaning"
fon-renta property rgmt.
CalKCCXefey (904)335-137o
'EmaiKXeCleyCcMS@yahoo.com




9iVV TIME

Window & House

Cleaning

(904) 583-6331




CLEANING SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed Bonded - Insurance
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904491-1971 *Cell: 9014742 8430
E-mail: justforyouserv'aol.com


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios.
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694 -


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duster
(904)261-1940

CONSTRUCTION


BRANNAN

CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed - Insured
Slate Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GIUAIRANTEED

2-Car Garages

'16,49500
2424 WI Fd am f Only






GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance In
"The local guy" since 198'
Quit Paying Too Much! .-4?'. "-
SOperatoror doo replacements * Transmitter replacement
* Broken springs * Sipped gears
Sables Serco or all makes & models
904-277-2086


Downtown
Saturday
Mornings
at
Centre &
7th
9am- Ipm


HOME IMPROVEMENT



#tPJ Workmaz,







Repair* Rebuild * Remodel
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 � 557-8257
Serving Nassau Count Sinco 2003



orro's CuSTOM
WOODWORKING, IC.
CUITOM CABINETS ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
BOOKCAESI e RIM CAIIPENITRY
HOME REPAIR REMODELING
HANDYMAN IBEVICES
LCENIED & INIURED
SCOTT RUDOIPH 904-557-310

-TH.IS ." [.- ,zC i

AVAILABLE

bLclvrtis ll]' l [- 1


LAWN MAINTENANCE |



Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc,
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants & flowers, tree, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, mountains
* Sprinkler Inetallation TfSl 1
* Sprinker inspection and repair








a Repairs & modt lalcloens
SSystem taun lips * 10 years experience
Warranty on new Installs
Beat any written estimate * Licensed/lnsured
Free estimates * 904-277-8231

-".. LCOCKSMITIH- .



The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK [56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


NEW & USED CARS i PRESSURE WASHING


mm


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 Yulee

(904) 261-6821






ovoorsamc
Quali\ VS:rl i i
Rea ,'njblle Prices
NO/iI Tor ~ralll Or I o Lon.
S b..r. :', rimC J - b . ..l.i - ,uin- .;,1
14115225.9292




AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITY PAINTING, INC.,
"Call the Professionals"
(904) 753-1689
*RESIDi)ENTIAL
COMMERCIALI
' INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
.SPECIALIZE) FINISIIES
*PRESSUREWASIIING
&WATER PROOFING

LICENSED * BONDED * INSURED
PROFESSIONALI. CRAFSMANSI IP AT
AFFORDABLE 1'1ICCES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
FREE ESTIMATE
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks C/eaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353



ROOFING C

505 ROOFING, |NC.

333-6496
100% FINANCING
UP TO 130MPH 5.K
METAL I SHINGLE
FREE EST.
CCC-055600



COASTAL BUILDING,

SYSTEMS

SRe.Roofing Is Our Specialty" "|
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor ,
Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia
| 261-2233
Free Estimate
SCCC-oS70201
09 HA "CCEPT .1 7L i LSA .


TRACTOR WORK

Grass Too Tallt
GIVE SHAWN A CALL!
BUSH HOGGING SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Insured * Licensed

904-318-3700


P MI


I I


2707 Sadler Rd.
Femandina Beach, FL
320M
(904) 2T7-23N
Fax: (904) 277-1839


FARMERS
MARKE 0tI [0T O)j











FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


S808 Off Island/Yulee
Recently Foreclosed, Special
Financing Available, Any Credit,
Any Income - Vacant Land, 3.9 Acres,
located at Harts Rd., Yulee. $320,000.
Visit www.roselandco.com/7R8.
Drive by then call (866)957-4918.
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
house semi-secluded 1 acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095
NEW 3BR/2BA - 2270 sq. ft., 2-car
garage on 1/2 acre. Granite counter
tops, oak cabinets, tile throughout,
covered lanal, many custom features.
Must see. $295,000. Owner financing
w/down payment. (904)753-2155
HERON ISLES - Renovated 3BR/2BA,
1213 sq. ft., new landscaping, paint,
tile, carpet. $114,900. Make offer.
(904)277-8845.

809 Lots
LOWEST PRICED FULL SIZE LOT - in
Amelia -Island Plantation. Cul-de-sac.
On marshside. Approved house plans
available. $199,900. Claudia, RE/MAX
Professional Group. (904)556-4000

814 West Nassau County
FSBO - 55030 Deer Run Rd. 1.02 ac.,
3BR/2.5BA, fireplace, nice neighbor-
hood, Callahan. $333,000. (904)631-
5822 after 5pm.

817 Other Areas
LAKE ACCESS BARGAIN - 1.7 ac Free
boat slips $12,900 (was $29,900).
Unbelievable deal! Beautiful hdwd sett-
ing w/deeded access to pvt lake. Enjoy
common area w/boat ramp, pavilion,
picnic area, hiking trails. Paved rd w/
utils. Exc fin. Won't last (888)792 5253
x3120. www.indianlaketn.com. ANF
NEW ON MARKET - Lake view bargain
2.11 ac $82,300 was $189,900. Estate
size bldg site w/panoramic big lake
views. Bonus: bounded by 2.53 ac
fishing pond. Enjoy end of cul-de-sac
privacy, easy to build land wall utility
h/u's on site. Prime FL location in
upscale WF comm. Exc fin. (866)352-
2249 www.fllandbargains.com. ANF
ABSOLUTE AUCTION - No minimums.
No reserves. 114� ac in Keaton Bch,
FL. 10 properties in Steinhatchee, FL.
S/F homes, RV Resid'l-Comm'l. Sat:
8/28, 10am. Steinhatchee Landing
Resort at Keaton Bch., the property is
less that 1 mi from public boat ramp,
some properties have comm'l or resid'l
potential. Online Bidding. Call the
auctioneers for info. Pay 20% dn,
10%BP, Broker participation 2%. For
detailed info johndixon.com (800)479-
1763 FLAL #AU2049 FL R/E 1005528
John Dixon & Assoc. Auctions-Mktg.
ANF
NEW RETIREMENT COTTAGE - ready
for your finishing touches. Fabulous gof
comm in Carolina mtns. Short drive
from Asheville $199,900 (866)334-
3253 x2315. www.scgolfhome.com.
ANF







2 Br, 2 Ba Condo with
view of #2 West Nine
Golf Course, Sawgrass
Country Club. 2 car
garage.

Owner interested in
either sale ($289,000,
all reasonable offers
considered) or trade
for comparable, prop,-..
erty on'Amfneli&afsland,


CALL g


851 Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3BR/2BA
home. $650/mo. + 1/2 utilities. No
pets. No smoking. (904)583-5895

852 Mobile Homes
3BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE - on one
acre. $700/mo + $700 dep. 3/2
Doublewide - on one acre $800 +
$800 deposit. (904)753-2156
On Island/In Park - Remodeled eff
w/yard incl utils $125/wk, $495/mo. +
dep. Plus - 2&3BR starting $165/wk.,
$660/mo. + dep. Utils avail. 261-5034
3BR/2BA DWMH - Private lot on
Blackrock Rd. W/D, dishwasher. $825/
mo. + dep. (2) 2BR MH's also
available, $575 & $625.(904)206-3423
SMALL MOBILE HOME - 2BR
remodeled on 1 acre lot. Hardwood
floors, on pond, great fishing. $625.
And one for $650. Call (904)491-8768
or (904) 321-7062.
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on 1/2
acre lot in Yulee. $700/mo. + $700
dep. Available now. Call (904) 491-
4383 or 237-7324.
$450-$625 - 2BR mobile homes. Easy
move-in. Yulee. Call Gregg (904)376-
5190.
HILLIARD - 2BR/2BA, 14X70 single
wide. 32252 CR 121 near Tompkins
Landing Rd. $475/mo. + $500 sec.
dep. Small pets OK. (904)708-0731

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5 min-
utes from beach. Private bath, private
entrance. $100/wk. + $200 dep. Call
10am-6pm, (904)335-2086 anytime.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT - for
male. $70 per week. Call (904)261-
3806.

855 Apartments
Furnished

OCEANFRONT 2BR/1BA - Private
beach access. Reasonable. 261-5069
EFFICIENCY - with huge bathroom/
jacuzzi. Off Atlantic Ave. $600/mo.
(904)556-9372
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or.321-4262
SMALL 1BR APT. - in Nassauville.
Furnished. Twin bed, electricity, A/C,
DirecTV. $650/mo. + $650 deposit.
Cute, cozy, quiet & in good
neighborhood. Service animals only.
References required. Please call
(904)206-3241, & leave message.


855 Apartments
Furnished

At Beach Remodelled - Sm effic.
$135/wk. Sm 1BR $175/wk. Lg 1BR
$195/wk. + dep. Incl utils/cable. Also
2BR MH in park $165 up. 261-5034


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

1ST AVE. DUPLEX - Garage, 2BR/


FOR RENT
*1414 lan, 2/1,singlewido $575
S553 Pine Road, 3/2,FP.$925
*111-A S. 4th St. - 2/1, $750
*205 S.91h St.,3/1,close to downtown $750
* 96757 Blackrlck Rd. - 3/2 DW on 1 Ac.
$850
Sandy Mick
Palm II, Property Management
321-0457


1.5BA, all appliances, fresh paint, nice C RT SS c
carpet, partially furnished If desired. URTISS H.
$950/mo. (904)277-2301 LASSERRE


CURTISS H. Real Estate, Inc.

LASSERRE -


IReal Estate, Inc.


LONG TERM
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side).. 3-4
BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots of park-
ing. Unfurnished $1,500.00,
* 19 S. 14th St.. 2/1. $900/mo. + utl., securi-
ty deposit $1,000.Avail.August 2009.
* 4BR/2.SBAVery nice 2500 sq.ft. home at
Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
* 3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island with
beautiful view of Egans Creek. $1,850/mo.
+ Util. Avail Sept. I"
* 3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood PI.,
close to beach and golf course $1350/mo
+ until
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit In
Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of ameni-
ties. $950/mo.
S514 S. 14th St. - 3BR/I BA $875/mo. + until.
security deposit $1,000. Avail.
.619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. + until.
Security deposit of $1,000.
S2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt. Great
Deck - Oceanview $ 1,000/mo. + until.
S3BR/2BA on First Ave. w/one car garage.
Like new with a partial ocean view
$1,150/mo + util.

VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/I BA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher. Call
for more information

90 - 26 o.-.


*850785 US 17 Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq. ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & until.
S1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$2400/mo includes CAM + tax.
S1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
SApprox 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Nell, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
S$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2,500/mo + tax + util
*DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water.
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
SFive PointVillage 2250 S 8th St. OldWest
Marine space. 2,900 HSF ample parking.
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $3100/mo includes rent + tax


I


HOMELESS



ANIMALS...


THEY'RE DYING

FOR

A 2ND CHANCE.

Adopt A Comipalnion Today.


1.A Pi i . 1 - : i:.
NI.A':, I. �lf Ll"l1


A

NATURES GATE AMELIA SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE
lee Custom 3/3 concrete block Furnished 2/2 "end unit' Perfect starter or retirement
f& home built in 2003 has. w/Southern exposure. home in Yulcc. Remodcled
me Inground pool. double lot. Oceanfront pool and great kitchen & bath. tile & laminate.
cat Home has oversized MBR.SS vacation rental possibilities, new HVAC.
appliances & granite tops.

)00 o40 WO1371)(i0 # 501)19 $4Moni00O 4992 2 S1- 900


OCEAN PLACE SAILMAKER HIGHLAND DRIVE
Fabulous furnished 2/2 offers Absolutely beautiful 3/2 has Spacious 3/3 brick home on
1341SF of oceanfront luxury been completely redone top to double lot has new kitchen.
living next to the Ritz-Carlton. bottom. Evcrything is new and wood floors, ile. new paint.
Great vacation rental! all on one floor
#50004 $689.000 #49992 $472.000 #49979 $429.000


a 1925 S. 14'" St., Suite 4
Amelia Island, FL
ASales (904)277-9700
Ac^t ~Property Management
Surfside Properties, Inc. (904)277-0907

PROPERTIES FOR SALE


110 71L-'"


11th St, 2 homes under construc- NORTH 14TH STREET 3/2 MOBILE HOME on over
tion, affordable , on Island 3 bed- 4BR/1.5BA block home on an acre. Corner lot and fenced.
room 2 bath with 2 car garage island, needs TLC. $137,500 Great setting. $89,900 MLS
5149,900. MLS# 50109. MLS# 47266 #48333

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS


5. 12th St. (2) homes Under con-
struction, affordable cottage style
homes, on Island. 2 bedroom, 2
bath with 2 car garage $139,900.
MLS#150059 & #50066.
,1


3 BR / 2 BA IN SPANISH OAKS. N
nelghbiorood. 2,171 sq,. ii eautlf
maintained home. Malure shade tra
Floridai room (31 x 12) 1257,9
MLS i149718


I OFF ISLAND, Cont


* Corner of 8th & Beech, office
space available. 1,200 sq. ft.


CLUB VILLA BLACKROCK HAMMOCK NORTH HAMPTON
Serene marsh view condo in 5454 SF of luxury living in this Beaulllul 4/3 two-story over-
Amelia Island Plantallon. 6/6.5 executive homcl looks lihe 4th fairway. Three
Steps to pool and close to Screened & heated pool. sum bedrooms upstairs & guest
Amelia Links GollfClub. mer kitchen. guest suite and suitedown.
RV/boat garage.
#47011 $345.000 #50073 $659,000 #49533 $315.000


L ots & Acreay


Amelia Island
lli, m rl I , . I, . ;, 1 I ,'ll,':, 1.11 IN'1 F h ..,J ,:l l I , ,1 ir I II.II I
Fi 1 l/.u , 9iU U :. l. Al.:l ! : '!-. 1:11
Galnes Ln. $110,000 10th Street $48,000
lan Drive $45,000


Amborwood Ln $67,500
Bonnoll Ave $225,500/$3
Brady Point Rd. $480,000
Cayman Circle $69,000/$
Edwards Road $59,000
Gravel Creek $69,900
High Polnte $119,900
Lafltle's Way $89,900
Lina Road $417,900
Little Piney Island $300,1


S* * OCEANVIEW HOME
Great price on this light &
bright beach cottage on S.
ON ISLAND custom built Fletcher Ave Stepst tihe beach
3BR+Office/2.5BA, 2,250 sq. ft. access. Zoned lor duplex asnd
on .62 ac. lot. Upgrades galore. easily expanded
$349,900 MLS 1148981 #50061 $350.000


Off-Island
Marc Antliony $46,800
50,000 Napeague Dr $165,000
Plum Loop $49,900/$66,000
134,900 Rodbud Lane $199,000
Reserve at Oeor Run
$55,000-$75,000
Ross Blul $29,900
Soullern Hertllago $155,000
US Highway 17 $350,000
000 Wesley Rd., 13.61 acres
$899,900
HIGH POINTE
1.2 acre wooded lots in
gated, subdivision off
Barnwell Road. Bring
your own builder with
- no time limit to build.

$119.900


HIGH POINTE
Magnificent 4/3 brick home
in gated community. Tons of
upgrades. cul-de-sac lot. handi-
cap accessible.

#49970 $439.000







GRANDEOAKES
Spectacular riverroni living
in this brand new 5/4 beauty.
Gourmet kitchen. 3 car
garage & more.
#44921 $689.000








LOFTON POINTE
Pride of ownership showslin klls
wcll-appolnted 4/3 home. Bonus
room wtlllh full bath over garage.






holo se warIny. uil 2008







and in perfect shape
#48541 $173900

RIVER GLEN
Nearly new ,I/2 home on nicely
sysIeCm In new D.rolly nclghllnr'
hood Jose to 1 95. Bulh In 20)OS
.ind In pcrl'cl shalpe
#48541 $177.000


Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810


6 IM T.TE-lS .IT


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE


PUBLIC INVITED


Saturday * August 15th * 1 till 4 pm

ON ISLAND


1795 Arbor Ln. - 5115 Parkway,


I ON ISLAND
* 536 A N. Fletcher. 2eri e,

* 210 S 10th Street 2 t-,Jr...:.ri,
1 ba,.h %..jl Noj, 15?5 ni. .,rrh


I OFF ISLAND

S85399 Brooke St., 3BR/2BA mobile
home. Now Available $800/mo


-1


i


-.4


i i


I-


-i


=l


~ _~ ~_~ I


I - _












6B FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N.
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D.
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005

2BR/1BA - Near beach. $725/mo. +
$725 dep. Call (904)583-3811.
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
hookup. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904.)662-2360
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. -$895, Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
For Rent - 2BR/1.5BA townhouse apt.
Newly rebuilt. CH&A, stove, refrig.,
d/w, carpet. $795/mo. + dep. & ref's.
828 Nottingham Dr. (904)261-3035


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
A 4BR/3BA - $217/mo. HUD home.
3BR only $199/mo. Stop renting. 5%
dn, 15 yrs @ 8% apr. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext. 5669. ANF
1BR/1BA - Washer/dryer, private
porch, all utilities Included. $650/mo.
(904)468-0411
Oceanfront 2BR/1BA - Utilities
included. Near Main Beach. Service
animals only. $850/mo. + $600 sec.
dep. Call for showing (847)867-3163.

857 Condos-Furnished
AMELIA PLANTATION - Oceanfront
condo, 2BR/2BA. $900/wk. Monthly
rate. Reduced price. Call (708)612-
6106 or (708)692-6106.


858 Condos-Unfurnished
NOW LEASING AMELIA LAKES
CONDOS - Private & gated luxury
community featuring resort style
swimming pool, tennis court, fitness
center, beach volleyball, & more.
Overlooking a spring fed lake. 1 & 2BR
homes starting at $799/mo. Call today
for a showing (904)415-6969.
www.amellalakes.comn
THE PALMS AT AMELIA - 2BR/2BA
starting at $800/mo. Call about our
early move-In special. (904)277-1983
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated! Ameni-
ties Incl. $900/mo + sec dep. Call
912-269-3960.
2BR/2BA REMODELED CONDO -
Appliances & washer/dryer included.
Pool, tennis included. $750/mo. Amelia
Landings (904)557-6501.
3 STORY - new, 2800 sq ft Amelia
townhome close to beach - 3BR's + 2
study areas, sitting area in MBR, 3.5
bath with 2 car attached garage,
patios, inside home elevator. Rent on a
lease; will consider a lease purchase.
Non-smoking please. $1,500 monthly
- first, last and deposit upfront 904
962-7477 or 904-827-9900
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $900/mo. (904)206-
2313
2BR/2BA COLONY UNIT - 2-car gar.,
newly remodeled, pool & tennis court.
No smoking. $975/mo. + dep. & utils.
(904)548-0774, (904)556-5457.

859 Homes-Furnished
SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - 3BR/
2BA, 2-car gar., gated, patrolled comm
@ pool, 5 min/beach, incl utilities,
Avail Sept-Nov. 261-6204, 206-0035

860 Homes-Unfurnished
2855 OCEAN DR. - Close to beach,
4BR/3BA home. $1400/mo. Available
9/1. Call Jody (904)583-9597.


860 Homes-Unfurnished
2BR/2BA - with extra room. Pirates
Wood subdivision. Fenced In yard. Pool
access. $975/mo. Security deposit
required: (904)335-0116
BEAUTIFUL AMELIA WALK - Spac-
ious new 3BR/2BA home, formal LR,
DR, great room, & office or TV room.
Open floor plan. Tile walk-in shower,
Corlan countertops, fireplace. Pool,
tennis court, fitness center. $1800/mo.
+ utilities. Call (850)774-4566.
QUAINT 1BR COTTAGE - Downtown.
Fenced In yard, office, appliances,
washer/dryer included. Pet OK. $700/
mo. Available 9/1. (904)557-6501
NICE HOME - on Island, 3BR/2BA,
$965/mo. Available now. References
req'd. (904)206-1370
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
A Bank Repo - 5BR/3BA $317/mo.
3BR foreclosure $199/mo. 5% dn 15
yrs @ 8% apr. For listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5853. ANF
3014A S. FLETCHER AVE. -
Oceanfront with pool, 3BR/3BA
townhouse. $1700/mo. Available 9/1.
Call Jody (904)583-9597.
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177
MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
2012 #2 BRIDAL RD. - Quiet
neighborhood living. 2BR/1BA patio
home. $800/mo. Available 9/1. Call
Jody (904)583-9597.
2200SF 3BR/2BA remodeled DWMH.
Must see to believe. Hdwd floors,
ceramic tile, new appl's, & FP. Floor to
ceiling windows & loft that overlooks
1.3 acre property. $1100/mo. 1st, last
& dep req'd. Call 206-1162 & Iv msg
CARTESTIAN POINTE - Easy access
to 1-95 & Amelia Island. 3BR/2BA, 2-
car gar., fenced backyard, covered pat-
io, tile thru-out, W/D & water softener
included. $1050/mo. (904)206-2841
TIMBERCREEK PLANTATION
3BR/2BA, 2-car garage. New home.
Available 9/1. $1100/mo. Call (904)
553-3445.
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1375/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177
3BR/2BA BLOCK HOUSE - Low utili-
ties, W/D, garage, fenced back yard,
on Island, open floor plan. $1050/mo.
Please call Angela (904)753-3639
2870 1ST AVE. - Newly remodeled
3BR/2BA, all new spacious kitchen,
hardwood floors. $1200/mo. Available
now! Call Jody (904)583-9597
29 S. 11TH ST. - Convenient to
downtown. 2BR/1.5BA ' townhouse.
$800/mo. Available now! Call Jody
(904)583-9597.


860 Homes-Unfurnished
ON ISLAND - 3BR/2BA w/large family
room & fenced backyard on south end
of island. Available 9/1 at $1375 +
utilities, flexible terms. (904)261-0347
QUAINT HOUSE - in Old Town with
Amelia River views. IBR/1BA, modern
kitchen, W/D, CH&A, carport, private
back patio. 712 San Fernando St.
$775/mo. + $775 sec. dep. 261-3158.
Available now.
4BR/2BA/2-CAR GARAGE - on
island. $1400/mo. 2,000 sq. ft. Pets
OK. Available 9/1. (904)677-0248
REDUCED! - 3BR/2BA LIKE NEW
HOME on 1/2 acre with w/d. Best deal
in Yulee. $995. (904)536-6379
3BR/3.5BA VILLA - at Summer
Beach. Pool, cable included. $1500/mo.
Call (912)682-8118.
THE COLONY - 4830 Gulfstream Ct.
2BR/2BA, fully furnished, Wifi, cable,
phone, utilities included. $1450/mo.
Contact phone # (904)838-1969 .


861 Vacation RentalsI
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
OCEANFRONT - 2BR/1BA available
Oct - March. $2,000/mo. + utilities.
(904)556-9402 owner/agent.
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.

S 863 Office
3 ROOM OFFICE SUITE - utilities
furnished. $625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd.
behind Amelia Insurance. Call George,
(904)557-5644.
SEE THE INSIDE, THEN DECIDE -
Low rent. 1200sf, 200 + loft, 8th &
Gum Sts. 321-1651 or 261-2770
(3) OFFICE SPACES - Historic Old
Schoolhouse, 914 Atlantic Ave. Utilities
included. Contact Rhonda at 261-8249.
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.
TURNKEY CLASS A OFFICE SPACE -
in Gateway To Amelia complex
available for professional service firm
on an office sharing basis. If interested
contact Sue Armstrong at (904)277-
2788.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597


Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 bedroom townhouse style
3 bedroom garden units * Marsh views
Swimming pool * Dishwasher * Laundry facilities
Washer/dryer connections* * Washer/dryer units available*
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675." per month
*Some features not available in all untn.

Seniomr Dit. untr4 ,. As Af,at Om .pe.t !
Less than 2 miles from thebeach and you can walk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gate\,a) to Amelia center'

QCA1 U (904) 261-0791
ywwv.watcdevelopment.com


863 Office
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
SADLER RD. - Office/retail space
avail. $900/mo. 8th & Gum - 1200sf
+ loft at $1200/mo. 1105 S. 8th -
1065sf $1000/mo. 6400sf $4500/mo.
Beech Street - Former Restaurant
Lease. $1700/mo. Buy $195K. Down-
town - 1900sf at $2000/mo. 1280-
3200sf - Tyler Plaza, Yulee. $14psf.
Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770

864 Commercial/Retail
1667 S. 8TH ST. - 1000sf, CH&A,
restroom. High traffic area. $1100/mo.
+ sec. (904)415-0377
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
ft. 463179 A1A, Yulee. Permits
available for alcoholic beverages. (904)
557-5004
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.



901 Automobiles
CLASSIC 1984 CHRYSLER NEW
YORKER - AC, PS, PB, PW. 73,000
actual miles. $3500. Call (904)261-
3811.
BUY POLICE IMPOUNDS - '99 Honda
Civic $400. '97 Honda Accord $500. For
listings call (800)366-9813 ext 9271.
ANF
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS - Cars,
trucks, SUV's from $500. Honda,
Toyota, Chevy & more. For listings
(800)366-9813 ext. 9499. ANF
1987 RED PORSCHE 944 - Project
car, partial restoration. Over $10,000
invested. Must sell. $3,000/OBO. Call
(904)310-6725.
Acura Integra - '97 $800. Honda
Civic '01 $550. Ford Taurus '00 $900.
Toyota Camry '98 $850. Police
Impounds. For listings call (800)366-
9813 ext 9275. ANF
2005 WHITE PT CRUISER
CONVERTIBLE - Under 15,000 miles,
In super condition, one owner. $7,500.
Call (904)321-1608.

902 Trucks
1996 TOYOTA T-100 - Long bed, 2.7,
5-speed, A/C, stereo. New radiator,
battery, hoses, belts. Great work truck,
Cheap on gas. $1,850. (904)277-8108

903 Vans

SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034


U" Club
Apartments
BestAddresss in Ferandina Beach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
$ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details
(904)277-2500.,


i. Visit us at www.galphinre.com

a lp hF I (904) 277-6597 Business
S_(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
-.. . ,"A.T ..,V, INC, (904) 277-4081 Fax

Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company 1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 321


Rentals Rn Rets nals


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles- 3BR/2.5BA Bring your golf clubs and walk the
golf course. Single family traditional home with 2 car garage.
Living room and dining room at front of house. Fireplace in fami-
ly room which exits to large screened porch. Master bedroom has
entry to screened porch for early morning coffee and bird watch-
ing in a natural setting. Conveniently located to shopping, schools
and dining just off Amelia Island Parkway. $1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered
patio and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and
fireplace in living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in
prestigious gated community where amenities include a communi-
ty swimming pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and
Golf Club of Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking dis-
tance to the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage.
$1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home located in
Ocean Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in
back patio and 2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country
living at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres
of land with beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm
evenings in the florida room or cozy up by the fireplace on the
cold winter nights. Either way this one is a charmer. $1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA - 2795 sq. ft., granite
counter tops, maple 'cabinets, stainless steel appliances,
washer/dryer included, centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green
in the North l Iampton Golf Community with club house/aquatic
center, basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with
canoe/kayak lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television,
Iigh Speed Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400


* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced lot, satellite-
dish, tool house Ten minutes from Amelia Island and convenient
toJacksonville International Airport. $1150

CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include'
swimming pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools
and shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with communi-
ty pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Great
south end location. Large 2 car garage. This unit is in excellent con-
dition. Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the
ocean, golf and shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking
a leisurely drive on A1A through State Parks along the ocean and
intracoastal waterway. $925
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town
home located in a gated community off AA off of the Intercoastal
waterway. Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service.
$2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as
well as golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful
brick paver walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/L BA w/bonus room, fenced
front and rear yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family
room. Home is 6nly one block from the ocean. $900
* 2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1BA Located only 2 blocks from the
beach. Home has new carpet! Community features include swim-
ming pool, tennis court, play ground and Bar-B-Q area. $750

FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A -.2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnished.1
block from the beach. $750


S_ _ l_ _ _e _ _ __Sale_ _S__Sales Sals


2"l4 i, .n . hi'1 i ..ini- 52(9Village W\ - 3BR/2BA located *',:. tnd i- .hR III \ ill I & ILe
located il Ocean Walk. ''lkingdistance in Ocean Village. Furnished or not. t tfr..i hrn e in 'el, N,n.nn nJ m:rer
to beach. Screened in Ia-ii with pool oni Communuity Pool with beacd access. dow vi id bonus /media troom pi.s BR
Etgans Creek. Wood floors and tile in .awn care. Pets allowed. On Island. and full bath up, 3059 i. i. 1 .,r e- ,mt.
Idtchen and bath. Lawn care. On Island. $1,950/mo use of amenities.. Of IIi. 'I. , iu
$2,200/mo Nassau Counts Premier Property Mangemnent Specialists


2741 Ocean Oaks- 5BR/3iBA home located in Ocean Walk.
Walking distance to beach. Screened in lanai with pool on
gan's Creek. Xbod floors and tile in kitchen and bath.
Lawn care. On Island. $2,200/,no

95155 Bermuda- 5BR4BA golf and lake front home located
in Amelia National. Master down with bonusimnedla room
plus BR and full bath up /iIs' sill air garage, use of
social amenities. Off l.nd $2,1111 m

5209 llage W'y - 3BR/2BA Iocated in Ocean Village,
Rimisthedor unfurnished. Community Pool with beach
access and Summer Beach membership available for small
fee. Lwn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,950/mo

95118 Sandpiper- 2B1/2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck
over looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities
included. No Pets. On Island. $1,895Ano

952ii8 \:aidr.i1rr l ( 41R 1i A ( im i ti ' i Lt.L , k . ,11i- t1 wilih
tile iltglihoiul and l.Irg buis Iu' lum st i. iiel ittlanai, 2
car gara e and community pool. lawn care and W/). On
Island., 1,750/mno

2851 rIrdin.ind - Ni \v' 3BR/2BA home in Isle De Mai with 12'
Ceilings overlooking presertion area with pond. Screened
in lanai. Community ool. Lawn care, Pets allowed., alf off
rent I month with 12 month lease, On Island. $1,650/nmo

1812 Ocean Village - Summer Beach 2BR12.5BA home
1.vj:.tdii in tijn \Vill.gL 'crnrtnel InI bihO.il I -il tub
Siii .], . ing p,.,ndl lt ing tJrt .in'l tilling, .I t.i in ii Isef r
bL( dr.stiiI \\ I.IJ ll.i I tl. . Irt M liibt1 .h1 *h .i', ii i 11 11l I;.
small fee. On Island. $1;650/mo

989 Ocean Overlook - 4BR/2BA home located in Ocean
Sound l.ii,.k ing up~ li i il d ' ,lii' ,,ill. I, ' Ist..ilh 'ile floors
IhLiu.hT iil it n iin limng 'sn.td.i itll.i.ll i.Ti i ti . 011
li, ht ! 1,5in niIO .
, a i Ridtlgewood - 4BIV3BA home located in lofton Point
with screened patio and wraparound deck, 2373 sq ft,
master down and bonus/BR up with full bath, fenced
backyard, laminate flooring upgrades throughout house,
pels allowed, lawn care, Off Isluad. $1,475/mo


918 White - 2Bi'3BA located In Old 'lbwn with loft that
could be used as 3rd bedrom. lHardwood floors, granite
countertops, commercial kitchen. \rap around porch with
beautiful back yard.. W On Island. $i,400nmo

96816 Arrigo - 31BR2BA home located in Beachwriy with
oversized lenced backyard.l Many upgrades with lawn care,
Pets allowtl. Off island. $1325nmo

86059 ReIosenburg - 3BR/2BA North Hampton 1,500 sq. ft.
home. Huge back yard. Wireless access. Pets allowed. Half
of one month rent with uill lease, Off Island. $1 ,30(no

96928 Buccaneer itail 3BR/2BA home with Italian tile
floors and cypress wxxd throughout . car garage., I
and lawn care. On Island. $1,3t00/mo

1994 Amelia Green- New 2BR/2.5BA townhome with loft
and one car garage. Close to shopping and beach. Pets
allowed. On slatnd. $1,100/nmo

1969 Amelia Green - 2BR/2.5BA townhome with tile floors
throughout main living. Grnite countertops, stainless
steel appliances. Close to shopping and beach. Pets
Allowed, lawn care. On Island, $1300,lO o

96679 Anrgo - 3BR12BA home located In 'ecchway 1600
sq iI, split floor plan, covered lanai. Off Island. $1,150(mo

823 N. Fletcher- 2BWIBIA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean
view with sunroom. Water/scer included. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,100lhno

86184 Augutus - 3BR2BA house located in Cartesian
Pointe with fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2
car garage. Off Island. l$,100Ano

5437 L.conard - 2BR2BA1 home located in Amerian Beach.
Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Ovrsizet yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $950/mo

314 S. 1th - 2B1R/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in
back yard and deck. Pets allowed. Half month free with
12/mlo lease. On Island. $850/mo


Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most Eromn Your lnvesunen Property
Give Us A. Call Todayl


5472 Airst C Highay #1


MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free LimitedTime
' W/D Connections
* \Large Closets
\ Pirvate Pations
SL i . , , Sparkling Pool
* Tennis Courts
- 'f Exercise Room
SClose to Shopping
S* Twenty Minutes to
, I ' 1 Jacksonville & Fernandina
City Apartments with Country Charm

j (904) 845-2922
37149 Cody Circle
Eastwoo jaks Hilliard, Florida
APARTMENTS Mon.-Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


I ^:'lsi"1 is now offering




. . REPAIRS





S|lplllllHab as. * -rlF
t numeMvs S.




on major rIepr5







463495 E SR 200 YULEE. FLORIDA
. I ~904-225-2504 , ..


Nassau County's Largest Selection of

Long Term Rentals.


Easy 'Application Process, Eyert Service & Grreat.prices


034


I















50 YEARS AGO

Dr. G.B. Brewton, county
physician, announced he
would resign effective Sept.
L
September 1, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

State officials rejected a
proposal by Amelia Island
Waterworks to dump treated


wastewater into the south
Amelia River.
August 15, 1984

10 YEARS AGO

Home sales in Florida
jumped 16 percent over the
same month the previous
year, according to the
Florida Association of
Realtors.
August 11, 1999


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NEWS'
LEAD


511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach. FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for e-mail addresses:
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader Is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Femandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, PO. Box 766, Femandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Femandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163411. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.
POSTMASTER: Send, address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
SFemandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

SNOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
Part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof Is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County .... ........... $36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ............ $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
M ounlly
CNI Nco'"pldn,
, Incorporntd


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will-move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


FRIDAY, August 14.2009 NEWS News-Leader



E-scams on rise as economy slumps


JACKSONVILLE -'In the
face of the current economic
slump, consumers are more
concerned about being duped
by scams. Scammers are still
relying on old phone and
Internet tricks - and even
applying old scams to new
technologies. AT&T is educat-
ing consumers by sharing
information about the most
common communication
scams and threats, along with
Stips to keep them from falling
victim to fraud.
According to the 2008
Internet Crime Report, the
total dollar loss from all
referred cases of fraud was
$264.6 million in 2008 - up
from $239.1 million in 2007.
To protect themselves,
consumers should be aware of
the following top scams:
* Phishing:
Also known as "spoofing,"
phishing is a common trick
Internet scammers use to
"fish" for consumers' financial
information and password
data using fake company e-
mails and websites. The scam-
mers send e-mails that appear
to be from well-known compa-
nies but contain links to fraud-
ulent web pages disguised to
look nearly identical to legiti-
mate companies' sites. The '
sites ask consumers to enter
current financial and personal
information such as user IDs,
Social Security numbers, bank
or credit card account num-
bers and ATM passwords.
Use caution if you receive
any e-mail requesting person-
al and/or credit card account
information. AT&T never
sends e-mail requests to its
customers asking for personal


Account or
credit card
informa-
- 0 . tion. Make
- sure a
S . website is
S ' 7 secure by
checking
to see whether there is an "s"
after the "http" in the address
and a lock icon at the bottom
of the screen. Both are indica-
tors that the site is secure.
* SMiShing:
Phishing scammers have
even taken the leap from
wired services to wireless,
with the cell phone equivalent
dubbed "SMiShing." This new
form of identity theft also.
attempts to compromise con-
sumers' financial information
and password data by direct-
ing them to a counterfeit web-
site or to a toll free number.
Consumers receive text mes-
sages (also known as SMS
messages) that direct them to
the counterfeit website trying
to get their personal informa-
tion.
Avoid clicking on links in
an unsolicited text message.
* Cramming:
Cramming occurs when
unauthorized charges appear
on consumers' wireless or
home phone bills. To avoid
being a victim of cramming,
consumers should pay close
attention to their bills. When
consumers believe they are
victims of cramming, they
should call the service
provider associated with the
charge and dispute the
charge. It is necessary for the
consumer to contact the actu-
al service provider to conclu-
sively resolve the issue and to


avoid possible collection
actions.
Consumers should pay
close attention to their bills. If
unauthorized charges appear,
customers should first call the
vendor to have the charges
removed from their bill.
* Slamming:
Much like cramming,
"slamming" involves changes
to customers' phone service
without their knowledge, in
this case by switching their
communications providers.
Scammners will call and mis-
represent themselves to cus-
tomers and ask questions
about their account informa-
tion.
When a caller offers to
switch your phone service to a
new provider or requests sen-
sitive information, ask ques-
tions. Always verify the identi-
ty of the company, what it
offers and at what price, and
get contact information for the
service representative.
* 809 Area Code:
The 809 area code is a
legitimate area code for the
Dominican Republic.
However, in this scam, con-
sumers usually receive a mes-
sage telling them to call a
phone number with an 809,
284 or 876 area code in order
to collect a prize or find out
information about a sick rela-
tive. The caller assumes the
number is a typical three-digit
U.S. area code, but the caller
is actually connected to a
phone number outside the
United States, often in Canada
or the Caribbean, and charged
international call rates.
Unfortunately, consumers
don't find out until they


WEEKLY UPDATE


Aviation classes
Florida State College at Jacksonville is
offering fall term Aviation and Air Traffic
Control classes at the Betty P Cook Nassau
Center. Registration is in progress for the fol-
lowing classes that begin the week of Aug. 31
and end the week of Dec. 18. Classes are held
in the state-of-the-art aviation lab. Aviation
Weather is Tuesdays from 6-9 p.m.;
Environment of the Air Traffic Controller is
Wednesday fror 6-9:15 p.m.
To register for classes or for information
call the Nassau Center at 5484432.
NACDAC meets
Members of the community interested in
the prevention and elimination of underage
drinking and drug use within Nassau County
are invited to attend this month's Nassau
Alcohol, Crime and Drug Abatement Coali-
tion (NACDAC) meeting on Aug. 18 at 4 p.m.
NACDAC is a non-profit coalition created
to support and encourage drug-free lifestyles
for the youth of Nassau County. It meets the
third Tuesday of every month at 4 p.m. at the
County Building at 86026 Pages Dairy Road,
Yulee. For information, visit www.nacdac.org
or call Jean Bardes at 753-2551.
Diabetes education
The Nassau County Health Department is
offering a series of four, two-hour diabetes
classes on Wednesdays Aug. 19, 26, Sept 2
and 9 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Callahan Tax
Collector's office, 45401 Mickler St, Callahan.
Registration fee is $20 and $10 for NCSD
employees. For questions or to register con-
tact Jen Nicholson, RD, LD/N, Healthy
Communities Healthy People program man-
ager at 548-1853 or e-mail
Jennifer_Nicholson@doh.state.fl.us.
Stroke support
A Stroke Support Group meeting will be
held at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 19 at Savannah Grand
of Amelia Island, 1900 Amelia Trace Court,
Fernandina Beach.
Guest speaker Rick Davis will talk about
"Preventing a New or Recurrent Stroke." *
Davis was president of the Salt Lake City
Convention & Visitors Bureau, preparing to
host the 2002 Winter Olympics, when he had
a stroke. He made a long and remarkable
recovery, eventually hiking across the Grand
Canyon, and is currently president of The


OLEY Foundation, a national non-profit asso-
ciation for patients with chronic conditions.
He recently moved to Amelia Island. Call
Renee Stoffel at 321-0898 for information.
Alzheimers support
The Alzheimer's/Dementia Support
Group for Nassau County meets 1:30-2:30
p.m. the third Thursday of each month at the
Council on Aging, 1367 South 18th St The
next meeting is Aug. 20 with Heather
Wellman, Events and Community Outreach
coordinator for the Alzheimer's Association
who will discuss plans to organize a commu-
nity event to promote Alzheimer's Awareness,,
If youthrave an interest in helping plan an..: :- : .
event, please attend to give your input.ThiS
meeting is open to the public. For informa-
tion, call Ann Smith, R.N. at 491-3222.
Homeless coalition
A membership meeting of the Coalition for
the Homeless of Nassau County will be held
Aug. 20 at 9:30 a.m. at the Peck Center. For
information about the coalition or the meeting
call Tom Washburn at 491-1753.
Health talk
A "Federal Healthcare Reform
Conversation" hosted by State Rep. Janet
Adkins, the Health Planning Council of
Northeast Florida, Inc. and Florida CHAIN, in
cooperation with Florida Community College
at Jacksonville, has been rescheduled to Aug.
27 from 6-8 p.m. at the Betty P Cook Nassau
Center in the "Red" Bean Technical Career
Center, Room T126, 76346 William Burgess
Blvd., Yulee. The public is invited to attend..
For more information, contact Amanda
Young, communications director, at 491-3664.
Healing retreat
A Rachel's Vineyard Retreat is scheduled
for the Jacksonville area the weekend of Sept.
11-13. This weekend retreat offers men and
women a supportive, confidential and non-
judgmental environment to express, release
and reconcile painful post-abortive emotions
and to begin the process of restoration,
renewal and healing.
To register call (904) 221-3232 or e-mail
rachelsvineyardjax@yahoo.com. Other loca-
tions and dates for retreats throughout
Florida and the U.S. can be viewed at
www.rachelsvineyard.org or call 1-877-HOPE
4 ME.


VOLUNTEERS


Drivers needed
The Council on Aging is
in need of volunteer drivers
to deliver Meals on Wheels
to clients living on the West
Side of the county.
The meals would be
picked up at the Senior
Center in Hilliard on Tuesday
mornings and delivered in
the Callahan, Hilliard and
Bryceville areas.
Call Frances Bartelt at
261-0701, ext. 102 for infor-
mation.
Hospice help
Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida needs vol-
unteers to help at Nassau
County residences, long-term
care or assisted living facili-


ties, Community Hospice's
inpatient care centers or
Community Hospice's Yulee
office at 96084 Victoria's
Place. Schedules are flexible
and there are a variety of vol-
unteer opportunities. Call
(904) 407-7064.
Truck needed
Micah's Place needs a box
truck to pick up donated fur-
niture and other items to be
used by survivors of domes-
tic violence or at its resale
center. As a 501(c) (3) organi-
zation, the donation of a
truck is tax deductible.
Please call 491-6364, ext. 102.
RAINTrain
Rescuing Animals in
Nassau's RAIN Train trans-


ports pets from shelters in
Nassau County to shelters in
higher-population centers
where they stand a better
chance of adoption.
Anyone planning a trip to
the west coast of Florida
(Tampa/Lakeland) or the Ft.
Lauderdale area can help by
transporting an animal or two
when they go.
RAIN supplies every-
thing needed. Drivers go to
the shelter before heading to
their final destination;
shelter staff will unload the
animal.
E-mail Susan Davis Perry
at susandavisperry@
yahoo.com or call 557-6501
for information and so she
can contact the receiving
shelter ahead of time.


C9�rl4�-fEard Taneral �2/i ir ctoi

Nassau County's Only Full Service Funeral Home Since 1931.
Visit Our Life StoriesAt www.OxleyHeard.com


receive their bill.
AT&T advises customers
to return calls to familiar num-
bers only. They may call direc-
tory assistance or long dis-
tance operator to check the
area code location.
* E-mail viruses and
worms:
The recent Conficker
worm is just the latest exam-
ple. Viruses and worms are
computer programs that may
arrive in an e-mail attachment
and can be destructive to com-
puters. Viruses can hide in a
computer's program or sys-
tem files, and often look like
something they are not, such
as a picture, screen saver or
even a web link. Worms are
software components capable
of infecting a computer and
then using that computer to
infect another computer,
spreading rapidly without
assistance.
AT&T offers e-mail protec-
tion that customers can con-
figure so that it detects virus-
es and worms before the
e-mail is delivered to the com-
puter, and also offers down-
loadable PC protection for
AT&T high speed Internet
customers.
Customers can also make
sure they are safeguarded
against e-mail viruses by mak-
ing sure their software is
always up-to-date.
To learn more about pro-
tecting yourself, visit
www.attcom/safety.
The Internet Crime
Report, www.ic3.gov/media/
annualreport/2008_IC3Report
.pdf, is published by the
Internet Crime Complaint
Center (IC3).



OBITUARY

Ronald F. Shenk
Mr. Ronald E Shenk, age 80,
of Fernandina Beach, passed
away on, Tuesday morning,
August 11, 2009. He was a res-
ident of Quality Health Care
since October,
2005.
Born in
Schuylkill
Haven, PA, he
had been a
Fernandina
. .,Beachresident
, since.inoving:fromr Lahnester,-
PA-in 1994.' . . ' "".
Mr. Shenk had worked in
the Retail Store Display
Industry for many years. He
worked for Macy's Federated
Department Stores in New
York City as a Display Manager
and in later years owned Ed
Ron Fixtures of New York.
He was Episcopal by faith.
He was the only child born to
Robert Shenk and Ulrica
(Walker) Shenk, who prede-
ceased him.
He leaves behind, his com-
panion, Ron Kurtz, Fernandina
Beach, FL
A private service is planned
at a later date.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-HeardFuneralDirectors


DEATH NOTICE

Dusfin James Crone, 19,
died Saturday, Aug. 8,2009. He
was a native and lifelong resi-
'dent of Jacksonville. Funeral
services were held at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 11 in the
Stephens Chapel at Green Pine
Funeral Home with the Rev.
Gary Blanton officiating.
Interment followed in Ferreira
,Cemetery.
Green Pine Funeral Home


Playground

board seeks

applicants
The First Coast Freedom
project is expanding its board
and accepting applicants with
an interest in having a univer-
sally accessible playground in
the city of Fernandina Beach.
It is the organization's dream
to have a place to play in
Northeast Florida for people of
all abilities and ages. The park
design takes local history, art
and nature into consideration.
The project has been granted
use of land by the city of
Fernandina next to Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center, and
designs have been produced by
a landscape architect with expe-
rience designing accessible
playgrounds. Supporters are in
the fundraising stages.
S Anyone is encouraged to
apply - the only qualification is
that you must share the dream
to have a place to play for peo-
ple of all abilities. ContactAaron
Morgan at 335-7253 or aaron-
morgan4@gmail.com.


LOOKING BACK


- 4W.W















NEWS

LEADER


FIORIDA'S OL.0)'SIW \V;KI..KY N EW\S'PAl'lR
EST.ABLLISiIED IN 1854
The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIME, CIRCULATION DIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


TC N I T Conununity
Newspapers,
I Incorporated
The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
and do not necessary reflect the views of
Sthe newspaperits owners or employees


COMMUNITY THANKS

Paw Prints book sale
The Nassau Humane Society's annual "Paw
Prints Book Sale" Aug. 7-8 was a fantastic suc-
cess!
Special thanks go to Steve and Mary
Stubbs of First Coast Storage for donation of
the storage units, Sean McGill and his staff for
use of the hangar and facilities, and to Publix,
Winn Dixie and Harris Teeter for supplying all
the banana boxes.
To all the volunteers who worked so dili-
gently in the heat to organize the event, and
to all of our friends in the community who.
.attended and gave us such generous and
heartwarming support, a huge thank you
from all of us at Nassau Humane Society and
the homeless animals in residence.
Sandra Terry, Gail Sasanfar,
Marie Korta
Nassau Humane Society

Life after cancer
On Tuesday, Sept.8, First Coast Oncology
- Nassau will host its inaugural "Celebration
Of Survival" event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the First
Coast Oncology office located at 1340 South
18th St in Medical Building A, Suite 103.
This prQgraIn provides the opportunity to
'ca;ela~8i ed tui:e'r~fatien~ if jwer'trfik dd' ' o
First Coast Oncology - Nassau and who have
become cancer survivors. In addition, there
will be an educational component that will
delve into what life is like after cancer. The
event is free and light refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by First Coast
Cancer Foundation. For more information,
or to RSVP - please call (904) 387-5312.
At the First Coast Cancer Foundation, we
understand that each cancer patient faces a
unique journey. We strive to make a difference
in the lives of patients and their families affect-
ed by cancer.
The foundation is committed to providing
cancer patients with necessary financial assis-
tance, supportive resources and educational
programs to pave the way for a successful
journey toward survival.
Kathleen Garrett
First Coast Oncology


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words. Letters
must include writer's name (printed and
signature), address and telephone number
for verification. Writers are normally limited
to one letter in a 30-day period. No political
endorsements or poems will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed. Not all
letters are published. Send letters to:
Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL., 32035. E-mail:
mparnell@fbnewsleader. com.
visit us on-line atfbnewsleadercom


FRIDAY, August 14.2009 NEWS News-Leader


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VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Cats need us
It has been said that man's inhu-
manity to man is exceeded only by
his inhumanity to animals. At no
time has that ever been more true
than now. As the economy contin-
ues to flatline, people are tossing
out their pets like yesterday's news-
papers - with little to no thought
as to what will become of the animal
once it's left to fend for itself. Once
secure in knowing they would be
fed tomorrow, these poor creatures
find themselves wandering the
streets, confused and disoriented,
with no idea what they have done
wrong or how they will find their
next meal.
I have long been involved in cat
rescue.Itfs not that I don't like dogs;
I do. But it is cats' helplessness,
their very vulnerability, that speaks
to me. Scan any newspaper and
you'll see the headlines: Kittens
used to train pit bulls. Man arrest-
ed for torturing, killing cat. I cannot
read them. Just the headlines bring
tears to my eyes.
The upside is that I am not alone.
Increasingly, animal cruelty is sim-
ply not tolerated. (Yet at the same
time, in neifter Jacksonville nor
"F'riWdfn i a is there an SPCA chap-
ter to address the all too many cru-
elty cases that still DO exist) And
as I go about my rounds, feeding
colonies of castoffs grateful for a
handout and a simple kind word,
and as I hear of yet another case of
a tiny kitten being thrown from the
window of a speeding truck, I can
bear it, but barely, knowing that at
least there are a lot of good people
out there who share my concern.
They share my concern because
they know these gentle, helpless
creatures have virtually no chance
of making it on their own. They
share my concern, because they
know there is nowhere for these
animals to go. And on the streets it
is only a matter of time before they
meet an untimely death. The cards
are simply too stacked against them.
It heartens me that throughout
the country, caring groups and indi-
viduals are doing what they can.
More and more, people are devot-
ing their time, energy and resources
.to provide safe havens for aban-
doned and unwanted cats. A sanc-
tuary in South Florida, founded in
2002 to address the problem of the
state's overcrowded shelters, cur-
rently houses some 600 felines. Says
its owner: "These guys are all
healthy and beautiful. But (in a shel-
ter) they would all be killed. Here at
the sanctuary, they can live out the
rest of their lives."
There is no such sanctuary in


* 6-
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Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Northeast Florida. One is sorely
needed. With real estate sales at a
standstill, there must be property
available. Anyone interested in
donating land or funds, or who sim-
ply wishes to share ideas on how to
improve the life of abused and aban-
doned cats in Northeast Florida, is
invited to contact Patti Connor at
patticll21@aol.com. Donations are
tax deductible.
Patti Connor
Fort Caroline

Where arewe?
I recently read a story in Folio
Weekly about Felix the vendor. The
story referenced an "out of towner"
that enquired about opening a hot
dog stand and complained that Felix
could vend but they could not.
I believe that person would be
me, however, the second part of the
story would be incorrect as I did
not even know who Felix was.
I had visited the island on spring
break and decided I would spend
the summer here as I found it very
beautiful. I enquired about a set-
ting up a little Vienna hotdog stand
downtown and was told it was not
allowed because the town did not
want to "dirty up" the streets with


vendors. This was the end of it I
never said anything about Felix as
one, I did not even know of him and
two, I was actually hoping to find
someone exactly like him to run
said hotdog stand!
This story really saddened me.
To think that my inquiry may have
been an impetus for the town trying
to make Felix leave is a sin. I'm not
really surprised however. When I
came here at the beginning of the
summer, I experienced racism at
its finest
My friend drove down here with
us and spent the first week. I took
her shopping downtown and I
watched as many store owners
watched her as if she was a thief.
One in particular who did not know
we were together followed her
everywhere. I was shocked. My
friend is African-American. We are
from Chicago and we usually do
not face this type of thing at home.
My friend said the best way to deal
with racist people is to ignore them,
but it really bothered me that she
had to be treated as if she was a
common thief.
My friend is a reporter for a
major Chicago newspaper. She was
not fazed by this at all, rather used
to it in fact It made me really, real-


ly sad that she was treated this way
in a town I now called my own.
"We are in the South," she said
accepting this. Yes, but isn't is still
America?" I thought
Michelle DiGiacomo
Chicago

Racism
Last fall I participated in a pro-
gram called "Study Circles on
Racism." The sessions were held
at St Peter's Episcopal Church in
Fernandina Beach. Group mem-
bers varied in age, sex and skin
color. No'one I knew was involved
when I joined the program. That
soon changed.
Now I've learned that this pro-
gram willbe offered again this com-
ing fall. Itoffers a unique opportu-
nity to exchange ideas with folks
from diverse backgrounds. They
live nearby, but you may not have
had the chance to exchange ideas in
an informal small group setting.
Here's that opportunity!
Look for specific information
about the meetings on community
bulletin boards, church bulletins
and the News-Leader.
Jo Merman
Amelia Island


A love affair with


So I got myself a little gadget a few
months back, and I have to admit that it
has immeasurably lowered my produc-
tivity. The little gadget is called a
Kindle, and I have become addicted to it.
For those of you not in the know, a Kindle is
an electronic reading device manufactured by
online bookstore Amazon.com. The way it
works is this: You order books either online or
directly from the Kindle, and Amazon magical-
ly beams them to your device. The gizmo holds
literally hundreds of books - a deadly tempta-
tion for a guy like me. I can sit in my favorite
coffee shop and think, "What should I read
today - Pope's translation of the Odyssey,
Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
or Shatner's autobiography?"
I have never been faced with a choice like
that before, and the sense of power it gives me
is intoxicating. Gibbon's or Shatner? The lady
or the tiger? Now I can actually have both.
Wherever I go, in a package the size of a paper-
back, I carry an entire library. Books, books,
books, shelf upon shelf of them, all crammed
into a few ounces of plastic and wiring.
My love affair with books began early,
though not as early as my English-teacher
mother and newsman father would have liked.
Much to their horror, I hated reading when I
was in the first grade. Loathed it. My teacher,


who to my
looked old
God's moth
on teaching
1940s-era "
primers. I j
up a lot of e
Dick, Jane
dog Spot. I
and Spot ra
NEWS- didn't care.
ROOM As a ma
VIEWS to actively I
wasn't too i
S Jane, either
Ryan Smith morons, an
wasting his
that stupid red ball. My vitric
insipid trio translated, event
ing hatred for the written wo
And the very next year, al
I still remember the book
Illustrated Classics edition ol
Worlds. It was a pocket-sized
and squat. Its cover featured
Martian tripod terrorizing a
background of a bizarre pini
I started the book grudgi
er's insistence. I finished it ii
zy, then went to my mother


books goes digital

six-year-old eyes something else, anything else, to read. read up on
enough to be From that moment, I was hooked. I to the nove
ler-in-law, insisted devoured Illustrated Classics so quickly my Hammett a
g the class from mother couldn't keep up with me, and was Space Odys
Dick and Jane" reading adult novels by the fourth grade for Clarke's no
ust couldn't work the simple reason that I couldn't find enough to the fanta
enthusiasm about children's books to keep me occupied. Verne.
and their stupid The addiction has never waned. From poli- A movie
)ick threw the ball tics to criminal psychology to poetry, from the. sequel insp
n after it, and I just Bible to Beowulf to TS. Elliot, Herman Melville tion at seeing
to Stephen King, the written word has become you leave tl
tter of fact, I came my lifeline. I don't care if it's high literature or your next n
hate Spot - and I trashy pulp fiction, as long as the story sucks on reality te
fond of Dick and me in. Like the man said, as long as it's got a with good t
r. The kids were good beat and you can dance to it. trash becor
id that dog was I am always shocked and even vaguely poisonous t
; life running after offended by people - of my generation, espe- abiding dis
ol toward this cially, I am ashamed to say - who flat-out ment, and r
ally, into a burn- admit, as if they're proud of it, that they hate to like 'Trans:
)rd itself. read. How empty your life must be, I want to audience. Ii
i that changed. say, when there's not a television nearby. How you exactly
That did it: an crippled your imagination if beautiful words for your ow
f War of the cannot stimulate it. How little of wonder must final reel.
1 paperback, thick you know if you've never finished a book and A book d
an illustration of a felt you were somehow a different person than what to third
city, all against the the one who began reading it. beautiful pa
k sky. Our disposable 21st century culture doesn't the work, w
ngly, at my moth- help. Other forms of entertainment once led there is up
n a white-hot fren- back to books. As recently as a few years ago, Ryan Sn
and asked for a movie like "Memento" might inspire you to


cognitive psychology, or lead you
ls of early noir masters like
nd Chandler. Kubrick's "2001: A
ssey" might lead you to Arthur C.
vel, and on through Isaac Asimov
stic heights of H.G. Wells and Jules
like this year's "Transformers"
ires nothing but a visceral satisfac-
ng stuff blowed up real good, and
he theater thinking of nothing but
neal. And don't even get me started
television. There's nothing wrong
rash in its proper place, but when
nes the predominant art form, it is
:o thought. And therein lies my
trust of such disposable entertain-
ny abiding love of books. A movie
former" requires nothing of its
t does all the work for you; it tells
what to think. It leaves no room
n imagination to take over after the

doesn't do that. A book tells you not
ik, but simply, think. And that's the
Irt - because if you're willing to do
killing to think, where you go from
to you.
nith is a reporter at the News-Leader
rsmithIfbnewsleader.chmn


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FRI)tAY. August 14. 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT
"'


SPECIAL EVENTS

Join Team Seth Atkins for
a Spirit Night at Chick-fll-A
in Yulee to bring awareness
and support to Down syn-
drome from 5-8 p.m.
tonight. A portion of sales
inside or through the drive-
through will be donated to the
Down Syndrome Association
of Jacksonville in the name of
Team Seth. There will also be
raffles for all ages to partici-
pate in as well as face paint-
ing and a craft.
* * *
American Beach author,
Annette McCollough Myers,
will sign copies of her latest
book, The
Big Sand ll
Dune and
The Beach " ^'e
Lady, at
Books Plus,
S107 Centre
St.,
Femandina
Beach today and Aug. 15
from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Aug. 16 from noon-5 p.m.
This is a fascinating his-
toric non-fiction storybook nar-
rative for children to adults
ages 100-plus about the'his-
tory of American Beach, the
big sand dune named "Nana"
and MaVynee the "Beach
Lady."
Contact the author at
annettemmyers @ bellsouth.ne
t or 261-4396.

Celebrate the 40th
Anniversary of Woodstock
with Woofstock at the
Nassau Humane Society
Dog Park on Aug. 15 from 5-
10 p.m. Enjoy mellow music
by Hupp and Ray. Admission
is $15 for adults and $10 for
kids and includes catfish and
hotdogs, coleslaw, fries and
dessert. Beer and wine will be
available for purchase. Best-
dressed wins a prize.
Tickets are available at the
Dog Park (across from the
Femandina Beach airport)
and Redbones Dog Bakery
on South Eighth Street in the
,Pelican Palms Plaza.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
will hold its annual Walk and
Candlelight Vigil commemo-
rating Intemational:Homeless


* * * *
* * * 0
. . . * *
0 0
���0


Animals Day on Aug. 15 at
Central Park on Atlantic
Avenue in Fernandina Beach.
The two-mile walk starts at
6:30 p.m. and is followed by a
candlelight vigil. Contact Cats
Angels at 321-2267, e-mail
catsangels@bellsouth.net or
visit the Thrift Store and
Adoption Center at 709 S.
Eighth St.

Miss Kate's Pre K, 1303
Jasmine St., Femandina
Beach, is offering "I'm Ready
for Kindergarten," a two-day
refresher session for children
entering kindergarten, Aug. 17
and 18 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Fee is $22; enrollment is
limited. Parents provide lunch.
To register your child, contact
Miss Kate at 321-0049 or at
misskatesprek@yahoo.com.

The next WIN WIN meet-
ing is Aug 17 at 6:30 p.m.,
hosted by Karen Lee of
Heron's Swim & Sport and
Judy Richardson of Divine
Finds, 4924 First Coast Hwy.,
Amelia Island.
Women in Nassau helping
Women in Need is a network-


ing group
dealing wi
Gerri's Co
Bring a
to WIN W
dinner anc
RSVP cor
0745 or e-
winnassat

On Au
General J
Camp 74E
the Confe
muster at
Callahan.
and guest
complete t
the program
Guest
power ger
Michael L.
Jacksonvi
"Confeder
Self Defer
music and
1865 peric
1177.

Savanr
Amelia Isl
Community
Party" on
entertainer


0 *


" '


MUSIC NOTES


WhitbyQuinn
Whitby Ouinn will perform the New
Hollywood Songs roman 8-11 p.m. tonight at
Cafe Kanbrew, corner of Alachua and North
Third streets
As Whilby Ouinn, Fernandina Beach
songwriters, Robert H. Sanders (lead
vocalacoustic guitar) and Michael J.
Howerton (vocals'acoustic and electric guitar)
combine their performance and songwriting
talents in an acoustic eclectic sound that is
reminiscent of America, the Eagles and
James Taylor.
The duo's CD "She's Gone" will be avail-
able for a special pnce, when you ask for the
"Hollywood" deal. Come hear some of the
new songs to be released on the upcoming
project, "Down In Hollywood."

Jazz and wne
The Intercoastal Wine Company, 10 N.
Second St., will present Femandina's own,
Gabriel Amold, a saxophone soloist who
brings a diversified blend of styles ranging
from classic jazz, swing to Latin and R&B on
Aug. 15 from 7-9 p m. Couple his sax music
with the great art of Susi Sax, for the makings
for a great evening. Call 321-1300.

Summerjazz series
The Hislonc American Beach "Summer
Jazz Senes" continues its free concerts with
SInstant Groove The band will provide great


to benefit women "Pearls of the Pacific"
ith cancer, through Polynesian dancers and din-
>mer. ner at 5 p.m.
a $35 check payable Cost is $5. Reservations
IN, which includes are required. RSVP to Wendy
d a beverage. To at 321-0898 by Aug. 17.
intact Connie at 759- * * *
-mail connie@win- On Aug. 22, Redbones
u.com. Dog Bakery and Boutique
S* * will host its next free dog
g. 17 at 7 p.m. the wash and pet adoption from
loseph Finnegan 10 a.m.-4 p.m., along with
5 and the Order of specials on its baked dog
ederate Rose will treats. All donations benefit
t the Pig BBQ in the Nassau Humane Society.
Some members Redbones is located at 809 S.
s come earlier to Eighth St. in the Pelican
their meal before Palms shops. Call 321-0020.
im begins. *
speaker, electrical Join the Nassau Humane
aeration engineer Society on Aug. 25 anytime
SThomton of from 5-10 p.m. at Chili's
lie will share restaurant in Yulee for the
ate Thoughts on Give Back' Night supporting
ise." There will be the non-profit shelter.
I poetry of the 1861- Ten percent of your bill will
od. Call (904) 571-' be donated to the Nassau
Humane Society. Flyers will
S* * be provided via e-mail, at the
nah Grand of Dog Park, local merchants,
and Assisted Living the Chamber of Commerce,
y will hold a "Luau and at the restaurant. They
Aug. 21, with must be attached to your din-
ient at 4 p.m. by ing bill for the rebate.
, For information call Sandy
SBalzer at 491-6146.

S Nassau County Gators
S* * * will gather for a social and
� * dinner at Sliders Seaside Grill
on Fletcher Avenue,
S* * Femandina Beach, Aug. 27
at 6 p.m. At 7:15 p.m. guest
speaker Dan Hicken, First
Coast News sportscaster and
radio talk show host, will
, * * * * share his insight and humor


jazz among the ocean breezes at Bumey
Park (corner of Gregg and Bumey) at
American Beach from 5-8 p.m on Aug. 22.
Bnng your chairs to enjoy this free event at
the beach, with food by Woody's BarBO of
Yulee. For information call 277-7960.
Donations to Amencan Beach Property
Owner's Association (ABPOA) for outstanding
projects are appreciated.

Story& Song
The next Evening of Story & Song in
Burns Hall at St. Peter's Episcopal Church on
Sept. 5 will feature award-winning Welsh
singerisongwriter David Llewellyn.
Coal dust and the small coal mining val-
leys of South Wales supplied a down to earth
upbnnging whose values and early lessons
Llewellyn still holds dear. But at 17, with a
jacket and guitar in hand he left home to
begin what has been a lifelong passion. In
2007, he won the Kerrvllle Folk Festival "New
Folk" Competition, and last year, won the
prestigious John Lennon Songwnting
Contest.
Enjoy the wine bar before the show Doors
open at 7:15 p.m. and the show is at 8 p.m.
Proceeds benefit St. Peter's. Tickets are $15,
and may be purchased in advance at First
Coast Community Bank on South 14th Street
(across from Wal-Mart), or at St. Peter's
Administration Office.
Presented by The Founders of St. Peter's
and Mark and Donna Paz Kauffman.


about the National Champion
Gators. All fans are welcome.
Contact Tommy Roberts at
277-4111 or (904) 335-7326.

The Amelia Island
Ballroom Youth Academy
will hold a community dance
on Aug. 29 at the Peck
Center auditorium. A compli-
mentary class starts at 7 p.m.,
followed by the dance from 8-
11 p.m. Students also will
present a dance exhibition.
Tickets are $10. Children 17
and under accompanied by
an adult admitted free.
Proceeds will benefit the
academy. Contact Felix at
(904) 707-6762.

A Passion 4 Pooches Pet
Spa is holding a Suds 4
Shelters Bath-A-Thon event
on Aug. 29 beginning at 8
a.m. All the proceeds from
dog baths that day will benefit
the Nassau Humane Society.
To schedule your dog's beau-
ty appointment, call 491-1767.
A Passion 4 Pooches Pet Spa
is located at 1881 South 14th
St. in Femandina.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations arid payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Femandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable


to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560. This is an
alcohol-free event. All 1970-
75 FBHS students and facul-
ty/staff are invited.
* * *
On Sept. 8 First Coast
Oncology - Nassau will
host its inaugural
Celebration Of Survival
event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the
office at 1340 South 18th St.
in Medical Building A, Suite .
103.
This is an opportunity to
celebrate cancer patients who
were treated at First Coast
Oncology - Nassau and who
have become cancer sur-
vivors. There will be an edu-
cational component that will
delve into what life is like after
cancer. The event is free and
light refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by
First Coast Cancer
Foundation. For more infor-
mation, or to RSVP, please
call (904) 387-5312.

FIf*/tHEATER

The Bryceville Library
and the Bryceville Friends
of the Library will be hosting
free movie nights. The first
movie is "Hotel For Dogs"
on Aug. 20 from 5-7 p.m. at
the library, 7280 Motes Road,
Bryceville. The movie is free
and open to everyone and
soft drinks and popcom will be


available for purchase. For
more information call the
library at 266-9813.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold auditions
for "Educating Rita" at 4
p.m. Aug. 22 and 23 at 209
Cedar St. One man and one
woman are needed for the
cast of this English comedy
about a disillusioned profes-
sor who agrees to take Rita, a
hairdresser who's hungry for
an education, as a private stu-
dent. Performances are
between Nov. 5-21. Call 261-
6749 for more information or
to check out a script.

Fernandina Little Theatre
will hold auditions for two
short classic suspense sto-
ries, "The Tell-Tale Heart"
and "The Lottery" on Aug.
22 at 11:15 a.m. and Aug. 25
at 7:15 p.m. The productions
require minimal rehearsal.
Performers are needed, no
previous experience required,
ages 16 and up, five women
and six men; and ages 8-12,
three to four boys and girls.
Five performances are sched-
uled Oct. 24, 25, 29, 30 and
31. E-mail
fltbiz@peoplepc.com.

The next Free Movie in
Central Park, sponsored by
Prosperity Bank, is "Karate
Kid" on Aug. 29 at 8:30 p.m.
Bring your blankets and lawn
chairs, concessions will be
available for purchase.

Tickets are now on sale for
Norman Beim's comedy,
"Archie's Comeback," the
opening production of the
Femandina Little Theatre's
18th season.
Believing that her husband
Archie drowned, Lily has
decided to remarry after
seven lonely years - but
suddenly, in pops Archie,
freshly rescued from a desert
island where he's been hav-
ing a wonderful time
Regular performances are
Sept. 5, 10, 11 and 12 at 7:30
p.m. and Sept. 6 at 2:30 p.m.;
tickets are $16. A special
"Tuesdays for Twelve" per-
formance is Sept. 8 at 7:30
p.m. for $12.Tickets can be
purchased at The UPS Store
in the Publix shopping center
and at FLT, 1014 Beech St.

ART/GAI.ERIES

Si-4land Art A�SpiAEW5D
merncr Susi Saxa,qcl select-
ed works by Sid Sax, in retro-
spect, will be on exhibit at the
Intercoastal Wine Company
during August, September
and October. The show is
titled, "Bowl of Lemons,"
the art of Sid Sax and "the
not-so-square-mind" of
Susi Sax.
An Artist Reception will be
held Aug. 27 from 5:30-7:30
p.m. at 10 N. Second St.


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dumbed down sau
blanc wine to a bla
generic white and
Fume Blanc, borr
the famous Pouilly
the Loire. Some C,
vintners challenge
Mondavi trend ant
sauvignon blanc or
ket, and one of the
rated No. 4 in our
Only when Nem
successfully produ
pungent, refreshing
gnon blanc wines
of the world embra
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from 1B began making delicious sauvi-
gnon blancs. ,
vignon Sauvignon blanc is a
under, more green-skinned grape that
called it originates from Bordeaux. It
owing from gets its name from the
r-Fum of French sauvage ("wild") and
alifornia blanc ("white") due to its ori-
*d the gins as an indigenous grape.
d put classic When slightly chilled this
n the mar- wine pairs well with fish or
nm was cheese. It is also one of the
tasting. few wines that go well with
w Zealand sushi. The Sicilian Contessa
iced bold, matched our SBs with spiced
ig sauvi- shrimp, deviled oysters and
did the rest ahi tuna. The wirie is usually
ace the consumed young, as it does
a and Chile not benefit from aging, except
for some oak-aged white
Bordeaux that can age up to
15 years.
Sauvignon blanc has a tart
citrus pungency. It is an
instantly recognizable flavor
that combines lemon, lime or
grapefruit and tropical fruit
S with a grassy herbaceous-
ness. The climate in which it
is grown plays an important
0 4 role, as does the ground in
which the vines are rooted.
ers Cool maritime climate
(Bordeaux, Marlborough and
the Cape of Good Hope)
bring out the vibrancy of the
grape. The gravel and chalk
marl of the Loire adds a min-
erality and floral quality to
Sancerre and Puilly-Fum .
that sets these wines apart.
Our tasting panel had diffi-
culty choosing between the
three New Zealand wines.
Whitehaven ($15 at Harris
5 Teeter) had the edge. It is
introduced by a strong floral
citric aroma with a touch of �
peach; a burst of grapefruit
flavor fills the mouth and it
* held up best with full-flavored
food. Despite the sharp initial
taste it smoothes out quickly
* * and its long finish blended


nicely with the ahi tuna.
3 Stones ($15 at Amelia
Liquors) was preferred by
two of our tasters who pre-
ferred its smoothness over
the sharper flavor of
Whitehaven. It was also
judged to have slightly more
fruit on the pallet, which con-
tributed to the smoothness.
Kim Ciawford ($18 locally
but $15 in Jacksonville) was
very similar to Whitehaven,
but several panelists felt there
was a slight bitterness in the
finish.
Anakena ($8 at Total
Wines), from Chile, was quite
different than the others: A
luscious flowery nose, full of
peach, jasmine, orange blos-
som; strong fruit flavors dom-
inated by grapefruit; a long
aftertaste. Three tasters had
rated it best before they sam-
pled the New Zealand wines.
It was considered more of an
aperitif wine than a food wine,
however.
St. Clements ($11 at
Amelia Liquors), a traditional
sauvignon blanc from Napa
Valley, was rated third best by
two of the tasters because its
length held up well with food.
It would have been the Best
Buy when compared with the
New Zealanders except for
the South African Douglas
Green ($7 with a $1 coupon at
Harris Teeter), which scored
high with three panelists, but
rejected by two others
because of bitterness with the
ginger/garlic marinated
shrimp.
Which only proves that for
each of us to find the "best"
wine we have to sample many
and (at the risk of losing my
job) not depend on the word
of "experts"; what is delicious
to some can be bitter to oth-
ers.


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For more information,
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val.com.
E-mail info@ameliaisland-
jazzfestival.com.


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The news-leader
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00461
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach, Fla
Creation Date: August 14, 2009
Publication Date: 1980-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04377055
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00461
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NEWS'


L EADER'


FRIDAY, August14, 2009/18 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom



City may raise fees to help balance budget


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
Fernandina Beach Commissioners
and staff began thrashing out ways to
cut spending and raise revenues at a
budget workshop Monday.
Commissioners debated whether
to implement paid parking, add a new
stormwater fee for residents and busi-
nesses, increase fees on residents' elec-
tric bills, assess fees to organizations
that use city ballfields, charge nonres-
idents more to use city facilities and sell


city property for condo development.
They indicated they may not
approve pay raises for city employees
and will take new steps to cut
nonessential city spending.
The commission did not respond
to seven non-profit organizations that
appealed for funding at the meeting.
There will be at least one more
budget workshop on Aug. 24 at 5:30
p.m. at City Hall, 204 Ash St. Two pub-
lic hearings on the proposed budget for
the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 will fol-
low in September.


City Manager Michael Czymbor, in
an overview of the proposed budget,
told commissioners that property tax
changes and the economic climate
were responsible for significant budg-
et shortfalls. Rising electrical and fuel
costs and an increase in city pension
contributions have also depleted funds,


among other factors, he said.
In addition to putting a freeze on "all
non-critical measures" back in
February, Czymbor and staff have
come up with a number of budget cut-
backs as well as some "creative" rev-
enue opportunities.
One of those revenue generators


was a proposal to erect parking kiosks,
including at the beach and downtown
- a proposal that has proven particu-
larly unpopular with residents. Most
commissioners, however, said they
would not be completely opposed to
parking kiosks somewhere in the city.
Commissioner Tim Poynter, even
though he owns a restaurant down-
town, said he would be in favor of a
pilot program for paid parking, as long
as it was at no cost to the city. "We
CITY Continued on 3A


ENJOYING THE SOUNDS


Hundreds of peo-
ple enjoy Sounds
on Centre on a
warm Friday night
in downtown
Fernandina Beach
a week ago, above.
Face for Radio
played and people
- and dogs, left, -
danced to the
music. The free
community con-
certs are held the
first Friday of each
month during the
warm weather and
are sponsored by
the Historic
Fernandina
Business
Association and
local business
sponsors.
PHOTOS BY ROBERT FIEGE
NEWS-LEADER


Count lobbyists



'earn' 135,000


RYAN SMITH
News Leader
The Nassau County Commission
renewed Monday the contracts of its
state and federal lobbyists for a com-
bined expenditure of $135,000.
The law firm of Jacobs, Scholz and
Associates, hired last year to lobby at
the federal level, was given a new con-
tract worth $75,000 for the next fiscal
year.
State lobbyist Mark Anderson's
$60,000 contract also was renewed.
Nassau County received higher fed-
eral stimulus funding per capital this
year than any of the surrounding coun-
ties - about $876 per person compared
to Duval's $163, Clay's $136 and St.
Johns' $80, according to the commis-
sion. Nassau is ranked second
statewide in per capital federal fund-
ing, behind Marin County.
That's because $55 million of
Nassau's $61 million in federal funds is
slated for one project long on the coun-
ty's wish list - additional lanes and
repair along A1A near Callahan.
Commissioners said Nassau


County's extra
funds were directly
attributable to the
efforts of the lob-
byists. They dis-
missed the idea
that the money,
from President
Obama's American
Jacobs Reinvestment and
Recovery Act,
would have come
to the county in the same amount with-
out the lobbyists' efforts.
"I think they've made quite a record
of accomplishment," said Commission-
er Mike Boyle. "One of the things I've
heard around the community is, 'Well,
the money was coming here anyway.
Are they really responsible for this?'...
I think surrounding counties are prob-
ably wondering, 'How did Nassau
County get all this money?'"
"We've gathered all the facts, all
the figures, and brought them togeth-
er," said lobbyist BuddyJacobs. "That's
what we do."
COUNTY Continued on 3A


RYAN SMITH
News Leader
Nassau County Fire Chief Chuck
Cooper has been directed to issue a
formal apology to a firefighter under
his command.
Nassau County Commissioners
instructed Cooper to apologize to Lt.
Curtis Bollinger after they upheld
Wednesday part of a grievance filed by
Bollinger in May. This is a separate
complaint against Cooper, who was
accused in July of endangerment and
abusive conduct by the firefighters'
union.
Bollinger's grievance claimed
Cooper violated his rights under the
Firefighter's Bill of Rights, along with
Nassau County rules and regulations,
during an investigation the fire chief
conducted into Bollinger's qualifica-


Bollinger


tions to teach a class for firefighters.
The investigation began in April
when Cooper received word Bollinger
was teaching a Firefighter 1 class,
which requires a state-certified instruc-
tor, and possibly accepting money to
do so. Those charges were subse-
quently determined to be unfounded
FIRE Continued on 3A


Council on Aging moves ahead on new building


ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
The Council on Aging relocation
project approved by city commission-
ers in 2008 has quite a few hurdles to
jump, but according to executive direc-
tor Ken Willette, will still meet its 2011
deadline.
Because it must vacate its current
location at South 18th Street by the
end of 2011, a suitable spot for the
senior services center was found at
the corner of Atlantic Avenue and


North 14th Street, where the Nassau
County Annex building is now located.
Also the site of the former Humphrey's
Memorial Hospital, the property
belongs to Nassau County but a lease
with the city is being negotiated.
Willette, who became executive
director of the senior center last
January, says the county wishes to
retain ownership of the property, and
both city and county attorneys have
been working on drafting a lease. And
because the center is using a capital
grant from the Department of Elder


Affairs, a restrictive covenant also is
being written that will guarantee the
property is used for senior services.
Willette says an environmental
analysis has been completed, which
showed the site was clean of certain
hazardous materials, but since both
lead-based paint and asbestos have
been found in the building, it must be
demolished. Demolition, he said,
would be funded by both the city of
Fernandina Beach and Nassau County.
"The building has also had break-
ins and vandalism," said Willette. "It's


not cost-effective to keep the old build-
ing."
The grant from DEA is $500,000,
but Willette says total cost for con-
struction will be about $2.1 million.
The center is looking toward state and
federal grants, charitable foundations
and fundraising efforts to cover the
cost. The city also has committed to
$150,000 over three years for the entire
project.
Willette says the economy has
affected charitable foundations,
because many of them are "at the


mercy of investments." Fundraising
also has been difficult, he said,
because "even people that have money
are being cautious ... we're all kind of
in a similar boat." Willette added, how-
ever, that recently "things are begin-
ning to pick up."
There is no federal stimulus money
available for the relocation project,
said Willette, although the center is
under contract to receive $30,000 in
stimulus money for elderly nutrition.

AGING Continued on 3A


News-Leader INDEX LEISURE ............................. .................. B SA TUR LE NESTING SEASON
155th year No 65 CLASSIFIEDS ............................. 4B OBITUARIES ........................................... 2A 2009Nests:79 Hatchlings:1587
Copyright 2009 F L ' CROSSWORD .................... 2B OUT AND ABOUT ........... 2B 2 nestslostdueto storms
The News Leader EDITORIAL.............................. 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ......................4B . Please turnofforredirectlightsshining
Fernandina BeachFL FISHING ..................................... 12A SPORTS ...................................................... 11lA directly on the beach Fora detailed count
1 84264 0001 33 newsprintwthsoybased nk HOMES.....................................................10A SUDOKU .................................................... 2B seewww.ameliaislandseaturtlewatchcom.


Fri
8/14



86/74


Sat
8/15



88/76


Go
fish
PAGE 12A


Symphony
celebration
PAGE lB


New fees could be levied for parking, stormwater
collection, electricity use and parks and recreation.


Board admonishes


county fire chief







FRIDAY, August 14, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


50 YEARS AGO

Dr. G.B. Brewton, county
physician, announced he
would resign effective Sept.
1.
September 1, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

State officials rejected a
proposal by Amelia Island
Waterworks to dump treated


wastewater into the south
Amelia River.
August 15, 1984

10 YEARS AGO

Home sales in Florida
jumped 16 percent over the
same month the previous
year, according to the
Florida Association of
Realtors.
August 11, 1999


Today's Weather
L . 5i .Fo - .
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
8/14 8/15 8/16 8/17 8/18


86/74
Mixed
clouds and
sun with
scattered
thunder-
storms. High
86F.

Sunrise:
6:52 AM
Sunset:
8:09 PM


88/76
Scattered
thunder-
storms pos-
sible.



Sunrise:
6:53 AM
Sunset:
8:08 PM


90/76
Partly cloudy
with a stray
thunder-
storm.



Sunrise:
6:53 AM
Sunset:
8:07 PM


89/75
Partly
cloudy,
chance of a
thunder-
storm.


Sunrise:
6:54 AM
Sunset:
8:06 PM


Florida At A Glance


' *.sc3a- ..-QTallahassee -J
Pensacola ",, o .. i1




I 9

(U-,


Tampa1








Area Cities


Clearwater 87
Crestview 90
Daytona Beach 89
Fort Lauderdale 91
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 86
Hollywood 90
Jacksonville 87
Key West 89
Lady Lake 89
Lake City 85
Madison 87
Melbourne 88
Miami 90
N Smyrna Beach 88


t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


90/75
Partly cloudy
with a stray
thunder-
storm.



Sunrise:
6'55 AM
Sunset:
8:05 PM


Fernandina Beach
l-. 86/74


Ocala 89
Orlando 91
Panama City 88
Pensacola 89
Plant City 90
Pompano Beach 90
Port Charlotte 91
Saint Augustine 86
Saint Petersburg 89
Sarasota 90
Tallahassee 85
Tampa 88
Titusville 90
Venice 90
W Palm Beach 90


t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


69 mst sunny
64 sunny
65 mst sunny
77 pt sunny
59 t-storm
74 pt sunny
61 ptsunny
82 t-storm


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


sunny
mst sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
rain
sunny
pt sunny


Moon Phases




A* . ^
Last New First Full
Aug 13 Aug 20 Aug 27 Sep 4
UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
8/14 8/15 8/16 8/17 8/18

Very High Very High Very High Very High Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 -11 number scale, O 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
�2009American ProfileHomeowvn ContentService


NEWS

LEADER


511 Ash Street
Femandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for email addresses
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina
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NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
CNI Commuity
Newspapers,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


E-scams on rise as economy slumps


JACKSONVILLE - In the
face of the current economic
slump, consumers are more
concerned about being duped
by scams. Scammers are still
relying on old phone and
Internet tricks - and even
applying old scams to new
technologies. AT&T is educat-
ing consumers by sharing
information about the most
common communication
scams and threats, along with
tips to keep them from falling
victim to fraud.
According to the 2008
Internet Crime Report, the
total dollar loss from all
referred cases of fraud was
$264.6 million in 2008 - up
from $239.1 million in 2007.
To protect themselves,
consumers should be aware of
the following top scams:
* Phishing:
Also known as "spoofing,"
phishing is a common trick
Internet scammers use to
"fish" for consumers' financial
information and password
data using fake company e-
mails and websites. The scam-
mers send e-mails that appear
to be from well-known compa-
nies but contain links to fraud-
ulent web pages disguised to
look nearly identical to legiti-
mate companies' sites. The
sites ask consumers to enter
current financial and personal
information such as user IDs,
Social Security numbers, bank
or credit card account num-
bers and ATM passwords.
Use caution if you receive
any e-mail requesting person-
al and/or credit card account
information. AT&T never
sends e-mail requests to its
customers asking for personal


account or
Credit card
informa-
N * tion. Make
sure a
website is
secure by
checking
to see whether there is an "s"
after the "http" in the address
and a lock icon at the bottom
of the screen. Both are indica-
tors that the site is secure.
* SMiShing:
Phishing scammers have
even taken the leap from
wired services to wireless,
with the cell phone equivalent
dubbed "SMiShing." This new
form of identity theft also
attempts to compromise con-
sumers' financial information
and password data by direct-
ing them to a counterfeit web-
site or to a toll free number.
Consumers receive text mes-
sages (also known as SMS
messages) that direct them to
the counterfeit website trying
to get their personal informa-
tion.
Avoid clicking on links in
an unsolicited text message.
* Cramming:
Cramming occurs when
unauthorized charges appear
on consumers' wireless or
home phone bills. To avoid
being a victim of cramming,
consumers should pay close
attention to their bills. When
consumers believe they are
victims of cramming, they
should call the service
provider associated with the
charge and dispute the
charge. It is necessary for the
consumer to contact the actu-
al service provider to conclu-
sively resolve the issue and to


avoid possible collection
actions.
Consumers should pay
close attention to their bills. If
unauthorized charges appear,
customers should first call the
vendor to have the charges
removed from their bill.
* Slamming:
Much like cramming,
"slamming" involves changes
to customers' phone service
without their knowledge, in
this case by switching their
communications providers.
Scammers will call and mis-
represent themselves to cus-
tomers and ask questions
about their account informa-
tion.
When a caller offers to
switch your phone service to a
new provider or requests sen-
sitive information, ask ques-
tions. Always verify the identi-
ty of the company, what it
offers and at what price, and
get contact information for the
service representative.
* 809 Area Code:
The 809 area code is a
legitimate area code for the
Dominican Republic.
However, in this scam, con-
sumers usually receive a mes-
sage telling them to call a
phone number with an 809,
284 or 876 area code in order
to collect a prize or find out
information about a sick rela-
tive. The caller assumes the
number is a typical three-digit
U.S. area code, but the caller
is actually connected to a
phone number outside the
United States, often in Canada
or the Caribbean, and charged
international call rates.
Unfortunately, consumers
don't find out until they


WEEKLY UPDATE


Aviation classes
Florida State College at Jacksonville is
offering fall term Aviation and Air Traffic
Control classes at the Betty P. Cook Nassau
Center. Registration is in progress for the fol-
lowing classes that begin the week of Aug. 31
and end the week of Dec. 18. Classes are held
in the state-of-the-art aviation lab. Aviation
Weather is Tuesdays from 6-9 p.m.;
Environment of the Air Traffic Controller is
Wednesday from 6-9:15 p.m.
To register for classes or for information
call the Nassau Center at 548-4432.
NACDAC meets
Members of the community interested in
the prevention and elimination of underage
drinking and drug use within Nassau County
are invited to attend this month's Nassau
Alcohol, Crime and Drug Abatement Coali-
tion (NACDAC) meeting on Aug. 18 at 4 p.m.
NACDAC is a non-profit coalition created
to support and encourage drug-free lifestyles
for the youth of Nassau County. It meets the
third Tuesday of every month at 4 p.m. at the
County Building at 86026 Pages Dairy Road,
Yulee. For information, visit www.nacdac.org
or call Jean Bardes at 753-2551.
Diabetes education
The Nassau County Health Department is
offering a series of four, two-hour diabetes
classes on Wednesdays Aug. 19, 26, Sept. 2
and 9 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Callahan Tax
Collector's office, 45401 Mickler St., Callahan.
Registration fee is $20 and $10 for NCSD
employees. For questions or to register con-
tact Jen Nicholson, RD, LD/N, Healthy
Communities Healthy People program man-
ager at 548-1853 or e-mail
Jennifer_Nicholson@doh.state.fl.us.
Stroke support
A Stroke Support Group meeting will be
held at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 19 at Savannah Grand
of Amelia Island, 1900 Amelia Trace Court,
Fernandina Beach.
Guest speaker Rick Davis will talk about
"Preventing a New or Recurrent Stroke."
Davis was president of the Salt Lake City
Convention & Visitors Bureau, preparing to
host the 2002 Winter Olympics, when he had
a stroke. He made a long and remarkable
recovery, eventually hiking across the Grand
Canyon, and is currently president of The


OLEY Foundation, a national non-profit asso-
ciation for patients with chronic conditions.
He recently moved to Amelia Island. Call
Renee Stoffel at 321-0898 for information.
Alzheimefs support
The Alzheimer's/Dementia Support
Group for Nassau County meets 1:30-2:30
p.m. the third Thursday of each month at the
Council on Aging, 1367 South 18th St. The
next meeting is Aug. 20 with Heather
Wellman, Events and Community Outreach
coordinator for the Alzheimer's Association
who will discuss plans to organize a commu-
nity event to promote Alzheimer's Awareness.
If you have an interest in helping plan an
event, please attend to give your input. This
meeting is open to the public. For informa-
tion, call Ann Smith, R.N. at 491-3222.
Homeless coalition
A membership meeting of the Coalition for
the Homeless of Nassau County will be held
Aug. 20 at 9:30 a.m. at the Peck Center. For
information about the coalition or the meeting
call Tom Washburn at 491-1753.
Health talk
A "Federal Healthcare Reform
Conversation" hosted by State Rep. Janet
Adkins, the Health Planning Council of
Northeast Florida, Inc. and Florida CHAIN, in
cooperation with Florida Community College
at Jacksonville, has been rescheduled to Aug.
27 from 6-8 p.m. at the Betty P Cook Nassau
Center in the "Red" Bean Technical Career
Center, Room T126, 76346 William Burgess
Blvd., Yulee. The public is invited to attend.
For more information, contact Amanda
Young, communications director, at 491-3664.
Healing retreat
A Rachel's Vineyard Retreat is scheduled
for the Jacksonville area the weekend of Sept.
11-13. This weekend retreat offers men and
women a supportive, confidential and non-
judgmental environment to express, release
and reconcile painful post-abortive emotions
and to begin the process of restoration,
renewal and healing.
To register call (904) 221-3232 or e-mail
rachelsvineyardjax@yahoo.com. Other loca-
tions and dates for retreats throughout
Florida and the U.S. can be viewed at
www.rachelsvineyard.org or call 1-877-HOPE
4 ME.


VOLUNTEERS


Drivers needed
The Council on Aging is
in need of volunteer drivers
to deliver Meals on Wheels
to clients living on the West
Side of the county.
The meals would be
picked up at the Senior
Center in Hilliard on Tuesday
mornings and delivered in
the Callahan, Hilliard and
Bryceville areas.
Call Frances Bartelt at
261-0701, ext. 102 for infor-
mation.
Hospice help
Community Hospice of
Northeast Florida needs vol-
unteers to help at Nassau
County residences, long-term
care or assisted living facili-


ties, Community Hospice's
inpatient care centers or
Community Hospice's Yulee
office at 96084 Victoria's
Place. Schedules are flexible
and there are a variety of vol-
unteer opportunities. Call
(904) 407-7064.
Truck needed
Micah's Place needs a box
truck to pick up donated fur-
niture and other items to be
used by survivors of domes-
tic violence or at its resale
center. As a 501(c) (3) organi-
zation, the donation of a
truck is tax deductible.
Please call 491-6364, ext. 102.
RAINTrain
Rescuing Animals in
Nassau's RAIN Train trans-


ports pets from shelters in
Nassau County to shelters in
higher-population centers
where they stand a better
chance of adoption.
Anyone planning a trip to
the west coast of Florida
(Tampa/Lakeland) or the Ft.
Lauderdale area can help by
transporting an animal or two
when they go.
RAIN supplies every-
thing needed. Drivers go to
the shelter before heading to
their final destination;
shelter staff will unload the
animal.
E-mail Susan Davis Perry
at susandavisperry@
yahoo.com or call 557-6501
for information and so she
can contact the receiving
shelter ahead of time.


( ,9 .-ar 1w tAwnerat1 �Zi ectr

Nassau County's Only Full Service Funeral Home Since 1931.
Visit Our Life Stories At www.OxleyHeard.com


receive their bill.
AT&T advises customers
to return calls to familiar num-
bers only. They may call direc-
tory assistance or long dis-
tance operator to check the
area code location.
* E-mail viruses and
worms:
The recent Conficker
worm is just the latest exam-
ple. Viruses and worms are
computer programs that may
arrive in an e-mail attachment
and can be destructive to com-
puters. Viruses can hide in a
computer's program or sys-
tem files, and often look like
something they are not, such
as a picture, screen saver or
even a web link. Worms are
software components capable
of infecting a computer and
then using that computer to
infect another computer,
spreading rapidly without
assistance.
AT&T offers e-mail protec-
tion that customers can con-
figure so that it detects virus-
es and worms before the
e-mail is delivered to the com-
puter, and also offers down-
loadable PC protection for
AT&T high speed Internet
customers.
Customers can also make
sure they are safeguarded
against e-mail viruses by mak-
ing sure their software is
always up-to-date.
To learn more about pro-
tecting yourself, visit
www.att.com/safety.
The Internet Crime
Report, www.ic3.gov/media/
annualreport/2008_IC3Report
.pdf, is published by the
Internet Crime Complaint
Center (IC3).



OBITUARY

Ronald F.Shenk
Mr. Ronald E Shenk, age 80,
of Fernandina Beach, passed
away on, Tuesday morning,
August 11, 2009. He was a res-
ident of Quality Health Care
since October,
2005.
Born in
Schuylkill
Haven, PA, he
had been a
Fernandina
Beach resident
since moving from Lancaster,
PA in 1994.
Mr. Shenk had worked in
the Retail Store Display
Industry for many years. He
worked for Macy's Federated
Department Stores in New
York City as a Display Manager
and in later years owned Ed
Ron Fixtures of New York.
He was Episcopal by faith.
He was the only child born to
Robert Shenk and Ulrica
(Walker) Shenk, who prede-
ceased him.
He leaves behind, his com-
panion, Ron Kurtz, Fernandina
Beach, FL.
A private service is planned
at a later date.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


DEATH NOTICE

Dustin James Crone, 19,
died Saturday, Aug. 8, 2009. He
was a native and lifelong resi-
dent of Jacksonville. Funeral
services were held at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 11 in the
Stephens Chapel at Green Pine
Funeral Home with the Rev.
Gary Blanton officiating.
Interment followed in Ferreira
Cemetery.
Green Pine Funeral Home


Playground

board seeks

applicants
The First Coast Freedom
project is expanding its board
and accepting applicants with
an interest in having a univer-
sally accessible playground in
the city of Fernandina Beach.
It is the organization's dream
to have a place to play in
Northeast Florida for people of
all abilities and ages. The park
design takes local history, art
and nature into consideration.
The project has been granted
use of land by the city of
Fernandina next to Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center, and
designs have been produced by
a landscape architect with expe-
rience designing accessible
playgrounds. Supporters are in
the fundraising stages.
Anyone is encouraged to
Supply - the only qualification is
that you must share the dream
to have a place to play for peo-
ple of all abilities. Contact Aaron
Morgan at 335-7253 or aaron-
morgan4@gmail.com.


LOOKING BACK


CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


+


I city H! Lo Cond.


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 14,2009 NEWS News-Leader


COUNTY
Continued from 1A
"I think this is a testament
to the hard work you've
done," said Commissioner
Walter Boatright.
"I've
seen first-
hand how
these peo-
ple do their 2
job from
Washing-
ton, D.C.,
to Tallahas- Boatright
see, so I'm
probably a
bit biased in their favor,"
Commission Chair Barry
Holloway said.
Holloway also praised
Anderson's efforts at the state
level.
"I've spent quite a lot of
time in Tallahassee with Mr.
Anderson, and I can
tell you he works hard," he
said.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


FIRE Continued from 1A4
- Bollinger was training fire-
fighters, but only in accordance
with his duties as a lieutenant -
and the investigation was
dropped.
However, Bollinger claimed
Cooper violated his rights by
withholding information about
the complete nature of the
charges before questioning him
and by not telling Bollinger who
made the complaint against him
until asked.
Bollinger's grievance was
denied by Deputy Chief Sam
Young, who was present at the
interrogation in April, Cooper
and County Coordinator
Edward Sealover before com-
ing before the commission.
"My ruling was basically
this: Lt. Bollinger alleged that
Chief Cooper willfully violated
the Firefighters Bill of Rights....
My ruling was that he did not
violate them," Sealover said
Monday. "I spoke to the chief
about the interview and the
investigation - about how it was
conducted and how it should
be conducted in the future.... I
notified Lt. Bollinger that no
documents relating to the inves-
tigation would be placed in his
personnel file, and I restored
one day of leave to him."
Bollinger insisted his rights
were violated, however, and
appealed.
In a letter dated April 29,
Cooper informed Bollinger that
he would be questioned about
whether he was teaching a
Firefighter 1 class. The letter
did not address whether
Bollinger received compensa-
tion or name the complainant
who made the charges.
'This was the only piece of
paper I was given when the
investigation started," Bollinger
said.
Cooper began by asking
Bollinger about the class, but
soon veered into another line
of interrogation, Bollinger said.
"It changed from, 'Are you
teaching classes?' to, "Are you
being compensated?' I replied
that I was not," he said. "At this
point I finally asked who my
complainant was. According to
my Firefighter's Bill of Rights,
before the first question is asked
they are required to tell me who
my complainant is. They did not
do that, and I finally had to ask."
The complainant was Matt
Waite, a volunteer in the Nassau
County Fire Rescue reserve
program, who was taking class-
es under Bollinger. According to
Bollinger's grievance, Cooper
said Waite made the complaint
of his own accord. However,
Bollinger said Waite told him
he was asked to come to
Cooper's office and felt pres-
sured to make a statement.
"Before I was questioned, I
think it's pretty clear my rights


AGING Continued from 1A
Those funds will go toward the
center's Meals on Wheels pro-
gram as well as meals in senior
centers.
Federal stimulus funds were
available for medical facilities,
Willette said, but center did not
qualify for those.
Elderly services are becom-
ing more crucial, Willette says,
because of the aging baby
boomer population. "The fore-
cast for the future is astound-
ing," he said, noting that in 2030
more than 30 percent of the
population would be over 65
years old, while the number of
people over 80 will quadruple in
that same time period. "The
need is growing at a rapid rate,"
he said.
Willette said he was not wor-
ried about the 2011 deadline for
the new building. 'There's still
adequate time, but we need to
be making significant progress
... there are separate but
connected issues that have to


were violated," Bollinger said. "I
believe that the chief willfully
departed from the truth, and
he did omit information that he
knew.... The possible outcome
of this investigation based on
that omitted information could
have endangered my career,
and that would have devastated
me and my family."
Bollinger did take money
from Waite for a registration
fee, but passed it along to
Waite's instructor of record, he
said.
Cooper said his hope during
the investigation was to clear
Bollinger, whom both he and
Young described as one of the
best firefighters in the depart-
ment.
"The information that was
given to Lt. Bollinger by me was
a broad-brush view of the inves-
tigation," he said. "I believe the
information I gave was suffi-
cient. ... I did not withhold any-
thing from Lt. Bollinger."
Commissioner Danny
Leeper, a former Fernandina
Beach fire chief, disagreed. "I
believe you purposely withheld
information to induce him to
make a statement, and I don't
believe that your letter of the
29th identifies you as the com-
plainant," he said.
After Cooper's testimony,
Bollinger was allowed a rebuttal
statement.
"Make no mistake - I don't
believe my department heads
or my supervisors don't have
the right to question something
they feel is improper," he said.
"If they had called me into the


come to a
head simulta-
neously."
A10-mem-
ber board of
directors and
steering com-
mittee are
Willette helping with
the search for
grants. Local
architect Jose Miranda has
been chosen to design the new
facility.
The Nassau County Council
on Aging has one facility on
South 18th Street in Fernandina
Beach, which is owned by
Baptist Medical Center, and its
own facility in Hilliard. The cen-
ters offer in-home services,
transportation, health care,
adult daycare and meals to the
area's senior citizens. The
Council on Aging also coordi-
nates services with many other
local agencies to offer legal aid,
emergency referrals and many
other services.
adaughtry@fbnewsleadercom


office and given me all the per-
tinent documentation, we
wouldn't be here. If my rights
hadn't been violated, we would-
n't be here.
"... (But) every time it was,
'Here's another paper, here's
another paper, here's another
paper.' I never knew what was
around the corner. I felt cor-
nered and coerced."
The commission voted unan-
imously to uphold Bollinger's
contention that his rights were
violated. However, they dis-
missed the charges of violating
Nassau County policy and pro-
cedures. They reinstated two
leave days Bollinger had taken
during the investigation and
instructed Cooper to write a let-
ter of apology to Bollinger.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Uhiii Oh
t's Four Birthday
dugust 16
Have d Great Day!!!


CITY Continued from 1A
could start on Centre Street,"
Poynter said. "Most of the peo-
ple who park on Centre Street
work in the stores and live
above them. ... They would
leave the parking for visitors
and park somewhere (else)."
"We need new revenue
sources," said Poynter. "We
could earmark (parking)
money for improvements ... it
would be much more salable
(to business owners)."
Poynter also noted that the
parking lot behind his restau-
rant, Cafe Karibo, is underuti-
lized. "We just need people to
drive around the block and
walk," he said.
Czymbor said he didn't
want to "get into the gory
details (of paid parking)
because it's been overblown."
However, he added, "I reject
that this community is different
from other communities ... we
should look at provable tech-
niques, not just because it's a
revenue source ... (we could)
put out an RFP and ask to do a
pilot program at no cost to the
city, with some revenue shar-
ing."
Commissioner Jeffery
Bunch said he agreed with
Poynter about earmarking the
money from paid parking. "The
money should be put back into
parking and stormwater (col-
lection)," he said. "We could
build a two-story parking
garage right here."
"I can't buy into (paid park-
ing) just yet," said Mayor
Susan Steger. "We're going to
have 12 ugly kiosks on Centre
Street." She noted that park-
ing meters could prevent eld-
erly people from going down-
town, but did concede that "we
have an issue with (downtown)
employees parking where they
shouldn't be."






DISTRICT 9 R
1:45,*4:20, 7:10, 9:45
JULIE AND JULIA PG-13
1:35,*4:15, 7:00, 9:45
G.I. JOE PG-13
1:30, *4:15, 7:05, 9:45
G-FORCE IN 3D PG
12:20, 2:35, *4:50, 7:05, 9:20
TIME TRAVELERS WIFE PG-13
12:45, 3:00, *5:15, 7:30, 9:45
THE UGLY TRUTH R
12:25, 2:40, *4:55, 7:10, 9:25
FUNNY PEOPLE R
*4:05 10:15
HARRY POTTER 6 PG
12:30, 7:00_ " o
Tuesday Stimulus Deal
Popcorn $1 00 * Drink $1 00
Ii ,1i E )1i iiii 1ij hi DiiiiRiw t j'jImI:I


Another
potential rev-
enue source
would be to
c 4 increase a
Sa Florida Pub-
lic Utilities
franchise fee
Czymbor up to 6 per-
cent.
"I'm re-
luctant on the franchise fee
increase," said Commissioner
Ken Walker. "That's going to
add a couple bucks ... a person
on a fixed income might feel it.
I would generally be against
that."
Commissioner Eric Child-
ers said that, at $1.50 per $100,
the increase was not as signif-
icant as he first thought. "I'm
inclined to approve that," he
said, but added that "the dis-
enfranchised and those on a
fixed income will be able to
afford it least."
Selling some of the city's
surplus real estate could poten-
tially bring in $1.8 million,
Czymbor said. Most of that
unused real estate is property
that has reverted back to the
city because of taxes. The 10
parcels in question are resi-
dential-zoned, he said, and
have water and sewer in place.
Czymbor also noted that the
buildable lots could be devel-
oped with condos or duplexes,
which would provide another
revenue source for the city.
Bunch said he was not
against selling property, and
said he would like to see which
property the city owns on a
map - but added, "once we sell
property we can't get it back."
"I'd like to talk about selling
real estate," said Poynter.
"(But) who's going to buy this
stuff?"
Most commissioners seem-
ed to be in favor of increasing
nonresident fees to use city


Parks & Recreation programs.
The city also could start charg-
ing "user fees" to organizations
that use city fields.
Czymbor said the city could
see up to $17,000 in increased
funds, but that still would not
be close to covering city main-
tenance fees.
Bunch said the city could
require each league to main-
tain its own fields, thus freeing
city workers to do other jobs.
The city also could collect
increased stormwater fees by
establishing a Stormwater
Utility Fund. The fees would
be calculated, said Czymbor,
according to the pervious and
impervious surfaces of all res-
idential and commercial prop-
erties and could amount to $4-
8 a month per residence.
Czymbor also brought up
several ways the city could
decrease expenditures, includ-
ing no wage increases for
employees except those under
a union contract.
"I'm not for giving a raise at
all this year," said Childers.
"Everybody else is sucking it
up. I think city employees
should, too."
"I think we have fabulous
city employees," said Steger,
"(but) I'm opposed to any pay
increases this year. ... If you
call banks in the area, they
would say no one is getting a
raise ... it's a reality check."
Poynter went a step further,
saying the commissioners
themselves should take a pay
cut. "We're asking people to
take pay cuts. Maybe we
should do the same," he said.
Non-profit organizations
asking for funds included the
Amelia Island Museum of
History, Chamber Music
Festival, Family Support
Services, Amelia Island Film
Festival, Council on Aging and
Boys and Girls Club.


St
















,_nflniversary & �/irthday
Celebration
On August 4th, 2009 Ralph and Alice Adams had a
double Celebration, 67 years of marriage and Ralph's 94th
birthday. They celebrated with a dinner in their honor at
Barbara Jean's. Celebrating with them were daughters Mrs.
Xernna Davis (William) from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Ms.
Beverly Mantz of Washington, DC and Mrs. Joyce Frink (Neil)
of Fernandina Beach. Ralph's Favorite place, McDonald's, had
a birthday cake and banner from friends. He received many
cards and telephone calls. Ralph is a retired electrician and
Alice is a retired school teacher. The Adams reside in Yulee.
_ *


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 14,2009 NEWS News-Leader


West Side schools


get better
KATHIE COLGROVE
Community Newspapers

Both West Side high
schools won state appeals to
have their FCAT scores raised
a letter grade.
West Nassau High School's
grade rose from a D to a C,
while Hilliard Middle-Senior
High School's B went to
an A.
Administrators from each
school filed appeals with the
Florida Department of
Education last month.
An appeal for WNHS was
filed after a data review
revealed an error in the 11th
and 12th grade retake column,
resulting in a loss of points
necessary to give the school a
C letter grade.
"We were one point from a
B initially. This score gives us
10 bonus points which puts us
at a C," said WNHS Principal
Ron Booker Tuesday. "One
point, one student makes the
difference."
The appeal asked that
bonus points be recalculated
after removing a student that
had already passed the grad-
uation requirements and
ACT/SAT tests, according to
an Aug. 11 letter from the state
education department.
"We had indicated that on
our report to the Florida
Department of Education.
They forgot to take him out. It
was a mistake," said Booker.


'grades
He added that administra-
tors and teachers would focus
on improving the grades of stu-
dents in the lower quartile,
another factor in the C grade.
"We still know the lower
quartile is a group we need to
work with," Booker said.
"We're relieved and felt confi-
dent the appeal would be
approved."
Hilliard's improved grade
delighted former principal
Dale Braddock. "That put us
repeat, those two A's, back-to-
back in Hilliard," he said.
The school was eligible for
10 bonus points, but did not
receive them because the ESE
students' scores were not con-
sidered when calculating the
percent of juniors and seniors
who passed the retake exams.
"They had excluded our
ESE students and we appealed
that because that's discrimi-
natory," Braddock said.
With the school now receiv-
ing an A, the teachers will be
eligible for recognition funds.
Overall, Braddock, in his
new role as director of sec-
ondary education, said,
"Everybody should be happy
for the West Side."
Hilliard resident Brent
Tilley began serving as
HMSHS principal July 1.
The changes are reflected
at www.schoolgrades.fldoe.
org.
kcolgrove@ nassau
countyrecord.com


State DCF moves to

new office in Yulee


The Florida Department of
Children and Families office
in Nassau County has moved
to a new location in Yulee.
The new location is 463688
SR 200, Suite 3, Yulee, adja-
cent to the UPS store.
The same services that
have been available at the
Fernandina Beach site will also
be offered at the Yulee site.
These services include the
department's ACCESS Florida
program for Food Stamps,
Temporary Cash Assistance
and Medicaid.
Computers will be available
for persons who need to apply
for these services. However,
it is not necessary to come to
the office to apply for any of
these services. Persons can


apply for public assistance on
any computer with Internet
access by going to www.myflo
rida.com/accessflorida.
People who are already
receiving food stamps or other
economic assistance from the
department and have ques-
tions about their services can
call 1-866-762-2237. They can
also go online to myflorida.
com/accessfloridas.
Additionally people are
encouraged to sign up for the
"My ACCESS Account" serv-
ice at the website. This service
provides convenience for those
receiving food stamps and eco-
nomic assistance.
Those who need to contact
the Family Safety office can
call 548-9300.


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Counterfeiting charges dropped


JASON YURGARTIS
News Leader

Charges have been dropped
- at least temporarily - against
a Fernandina Beach man and
two Georgia residents arrest-
ed in Collier County on July 17
for possessing 10 or more coun-
terfeit bills and fraud to obtain
property under $20,000.
The state was unable to file
charges Aug. 7 in Collier
County Circuit Court against
Joseph Edward Rimes, 35, of
Fernandina Beach, William
David Rodeffer III, 32, a former
Fernandina resident who now
lives in Folkston, Ga., and
Valerie Marietta Carver, 25, of
Alma, Ga.
The State Attorney's Office
of the 20th District, which han-
dled the case, cited insufficient
evidence as the reason.
Collier County Sheriff's
Office Public Information
Officer Michelle Batten said
the detective handling the case
was to meet Thursday with the
prosecutor to discuss why the
charges were dropped.
"Whether there will be addi-
tional charges filed depends on


what comes out of this meet-
ing," she said.
Rodeffer's attorney, Naples-
based Rodolfo Linares, said his
client is "an upstanding citizen
and justice was served."
Linares, who did not repre-
sent Rimes or Carver, said, "It's
my understanding that (the
prosecution) didn't have
enough evidence to prove their
case."
The arrests were made
when authorities alleged they
found 42 counterfeit $100 bills,
two counterfeit $20 bills, a lap-
top, two printers, crayons, col-
ored pencils and a laptop bag
with documents belonging to
Rimes - including test patterns
for the counterfeit U.S. cur-
rency - inside Rodeffer's white
2006 GMC pickup.


According
Sto reports,
Rimes said he
and his girl-
friend, Carver,
reprinted the
money in
N Rodeffer's
Carver truck as the
three were
heading south
for an overnight offshore fish-
ing trip to the Dry Tortugas.
Rimes said he got the idea to
wash $1 bills with a household
cleaner, then print $100 cur-
rency on them after watching a
Chris Hansen undercover spe-
cial on the NBC show
"Dateline" that described a sim-
ilar scheme in Las Vegas,
reports stated.
Carver reportedly told
police she spent about $1,000 of
the counterfeit money to pur-
chase food and other items and
Rodeffer allegedly admitted to
washing, producing and spend-
ing the counterfeit currency.
The Collier County Sheriff's
Office was tipped off July 16
about the trio's alleged scheme
by the mother of the man who
guided their fishing trip. While


the group was out at sea,
Rodeffer's truck was parked in
the woman's driveway and was
obstructing entry to the home.
As part of a standing agree-
ment, owners of vehicles
parked in the driveway for fish-
ing trips are required to leave
an ignition key for easy move-
ment if necessary.
According to reports, the
woman looked in the unlocked
truck for the key, and upon
opening the glove box, saw sev-
eral washed out bills and some
suspicious looking $100 bills.
She then notified local author-
ities.
On July 17, the group
returned to land, at which time
detectives from the Collier
County Sheriff's Office
Economic Crimes and
Surveillance Units along with
agents from the U.S. Secret
Service made a traffic stop on
the pickup due to the license
plate being completely
obscured by a non-transparent
cover. Rodeffer consented to a
search of the vehicle and the
contraband was confiscated,
authorities reported.
,?',.._ ., ... J,'.../'. ,.,,,


V HELPING OTHERS


She helps those with low vision

HEATHER A. PERRY .
News Leader


Five years ago, an eye
exam revealed that Marsha
Riley had the beginnings of
age-related macular degenera-
tion (AMD).
"Thankfully, after four
years of monthly injections
into both eyes, my vision has
been saved as I continue
receiving them. I look for-
ward to the next medical
breakthrough," said Riley,
whose mother was not quite
so lucky. Her AMD was diag-
nosed at age 82 and she is
now legally blind.
Riley has been involved in
the Nassau Council of the
Visually Impaired and Blind
since its creation in 2007 and
is currently serving a two-
year term as president of its
board.
"Being a volunteer has
been a catalyst for my own
healing," said Riley. "Learning
the news that you are going
blind is hard to take - cata-
strophic! Since I am visually
impaired also, my understand-
ing and compassion of the tri-
als of others similarly handi-
capped, is acute."
These men and women
are enjoying life as they learn
to accept the handicap and
work with it. My life is
enriched by being able to help
them accomplish the things
they didn't realize they could
still do."


President Marsha Riley addresses a meeting of the Nassau Council for the
Impaired and Blind on Aug. 3.


Originally from Prince
William County in Northern
Virginia, Riley "fell in love
with Amelia" after visiting her
sister in 1993.
She and her husband,
Bob, moved to Fernandina
Beach in 2000. They share
their Fernandina abode with a
five-year-old rescued Shih


Tzu, Patches.
Anyone, whether visually
impaired or blind or not, can
join the council, which is a
member of the Florida
Council of the Blind.
Membership fees are $10 per
year.
Group members have
varying degrees of visual
impairments, caused at birth
or by injuries and disease.
They inspire one another with
life stories, discuss advances
in eye care, learn Braille, lis-
ten to books on tape and learn
about computers. The group
also plans social events such
as fishing, visiting museums
or going out to lunch.


Volunteers are welcomed
as members. Drivers are
always needed, as are com-
puter gurus who can teach
basic skills on two computers
donated by the Council on
Aging.
Tax-deductible donations
are welcome and may be
mailed to NCVIB, c/o Council
on Aging, 1367 South 18th St.
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034.
Meetings are held the first
Monday of each month
except July from 1 to 3 p.m. at
the Council on Aging. For
information call Riley at 583-
1317 or e-mail ncvib@com-
cast.net.
type@fbnewsleadercom


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 14,2009 NEWS News-Leader


'The War of Wars


Three years, eight months
and seven days after the brutal
attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec.
7, 1941, Americans would expe-
rience the finale to their second
World War. A little after noon-
time on Aug. 15, 1945, Tokyo
time, (Aug. 14, North American
time) the Emperor of Japan
announced over the radio
Japan's unconditional surren-
der to Allied Forces. This day in
history is known as V-J Day,
Victory over Japan, the day the
Japanese Empire surrendered
in defeat, ending World War II
in the Pacific.
On the days following, ban-
ner headlines around the world
proclaimed this auspicious vic-
tory. The Aug. 15, 1945, New
York Times cited a bold, quadru-
ple-tiered headline which read,
"Japan Surrenders, End of
War! Emperor Accepts Allied
Rule; M'Arthur Supreme
Commander; Our Manpower
Curbs Voided."
Weeks later on Sept. 2
aboard the USS Missouri in
Tokyo Bay a formal, uncondi-
tional surrender ceremony was
performed.
World War II was the dead-
liest and most expensive war in
human history. Financial costs
totaled an estimated one trillion
dollars. It was a war conducted
in both Europe and the Pacific
where two opposing military
alliances, the Allies and the Axis
powers, embarked on a cam-
paign that would eventually
record the mobilization of 100
million military personnel
worldwide. It was also a war
where the United States would
mourn the loss of over 400,000
American lives.
For years the United States
persisted in its impartiality and
vowed neutrality towards the
war in Europe which began in
1939. The Selective Training
and Service Act of 1940 requir-
ing men ages 21-30 to register
with local draft boards indicated
Americans were preparing for
the possibility of war. The Lend-
Lease Act of 1941, allowing the
U.S. to supply Allied nations
with vast amounts of war mate-
rials signified the U.S sympa-
thized with Allied powers. The
Atlantic Charter between the
U.S. and Britain of 1941 estab-
lished a vision for a post-World
War II world, despite the fact
that the United States had yet to
enter the war. All these indica-
tions had the Axis powers
assuming the United States
would no doubt enter the fight.
And while the war in Europe


VETERAN'S
CORNER

Debbie
Walsh


continued,
the Japan-
ese Empire
started its
own act
toward ret-
ribution.
The
horrific and
devastating
bombing of
Pearl Har-
bor official-
ly severed
America's
neutral
stance and


on Dec. 8, 1941 the U.S.
declared war on Japan. Two
days later, Germany declared
war on the United States.
The U.S. would never be the
same after Pearl Harbor and
soon after in February 1942
President Roosevelt signed an
executive order directing appro-
ximately 120,000 people of
Japanese descent living in the
U.S. to be placed in internment
camps. The rampant fear that
many of those people were or
would be spies for the Japanese
Empire set the fate of these peo-
ple and would see them impris-
oned until the end of the war.
A too-close-for-comfort event
occurred on April 11, 1942 when
an American tanker carrying
fuel oil from Texas to New York
was torpedoed and exploded
into flames just four miles off
Jacksonville Beach.
As World War II continued
we would see many wins and
losses. One of those wins
occurred in Europe on June 6,
1944, when the world saw the
largest seaborne invasion of his-
tory involving three million
troops from 12 countries. That
day is known as D-Day.
Allied victories at the strate-
gic locations of Iwo Jima in
February and March 1945, fol-
lowed by Okinawa in March
through June of 1945, insured
the U.S. was within striking dis-
tance of Japan's mainland.
European victories also esca-
lated. On May 7-8, 1945, V-E
Day, Victory over Europe, Allied
Forces formally accepted the
unconditional surrender of Nazi
Germany and the end of Third
Reich was now fact. Nazi
Germany and the Axis powers
had been defeated.
Since the war in Europe had
ended, the Pacific now took full
attention. In June 1945, Presi-
dent Truman approved plans
for the invasion of Japan and
numerous mainland Japan
bombings occurred. The Pots-


dam Declaration established
terms for an unconditional
Japanese surrender. It was
issued on July 26, 1945 by
Harry Truman, Winston
Churchill and Chiang Kai-shek.
Though the Japanese losses
were staggering, the Japanese
refused to concede, flatly reject-
ing the proclamation.
On Aug. 6, 1945 U.S. radio
stations began playing a pre-
pared statement from President
Truman. "The United States has
dropped an entirely new type
of bomb on the Japanese city
of Hiroshima - an atomic
bomb." He warned if Japan still
refused an unconditional sur-
render, the United States vowed
to attack additional targets with
more devastating effect.
More pressure was added
when on Aug. 8 the Soviet
Union declared war on Japan.
On Aug. 9, a second nuclear
bomb was dropped, this time
on Nagasaki, Japan, and on Aug.
14 Japan surrendered.
By the end of World War II
records show 248,000 Floridians
had served in both Europe and
the Pacific. Accounts also reflect
3,540 of those soldiers died
serving their country.
Some historians say World
War II should claim the title
"The War of Wars" since it
involved a global military con-
flict of the majority of the
world's nations. For me and oth-
ers of my generation it is not
difficult to empathize with what
our parents and grandparents of
the World War II era had to deal
with regarding an attack on our
homeland. All we have to do is
think of 9/11.
Today, Aug. 14, we'll com-
memorate the anniversary of
the end to this blockbuster war.
I was very dismayed to see so
little media coverage regarding
the anniversaries of the bomb-
ing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki,
and I only hope V-J Day will
hold more significance. Either
way, we the veterans and fami-
ly members of veterans will
always remember and contin-
ue to mourn the loss of hun-
dreds of thousands. To soldiers
still living that fought this War
of Wars, thank you. We appre-
ciate your sacrifices, the losses
you incurred and your patriot-
ism to a nation that is a leader
among leaders.
Debbie Walsh is a 22-year vet-
eran, retired Senior Master
Sergeant in the Air Force and a
Life Member of The American
Legion Post #54, Fernandina
Beach. whitelabaron@yahoo.com


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PAW PRINTS SALE


Terry Simmons of Fernandina Beach inspects a birdhouse at the Paw Prints Book
and Plant Sale Saturday at the Fernandina Beach airport. Proceeds from the sale
went to the Nassau Humane Society.











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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


6A FRIDAY, August 14, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


POLITICS IN BRIEF


Fair Tax meeting
The Nassau County section of the
Florida Fair Tax Education Associa-
tion is scheduled to meet at 11:30
a.m. Saturday in the meeting room at
the city airport.
The meeting will last about an
hour with a general discussion of the
fair tax, questions and answers and a
discussion on the impact of eliminat-
ing the federal Internal Revenue
Service.
All Americans are welcome to
attend regardless of political persua-
sion.
Low Country Boil
The Nassau County Democratic
Party's 11th Annual Low Country
Boil will be held Saturday at Kraft
Athletic Ten Acres, 961023
Buccaneer Trail, on Amelia Island.
The event will begin at 6:30 p.m.
with a Low Country Boil menu, bar-
becue, music and a silent auction.
State Sen. Dan Gelber of Miami
Beach, a candidate for attorney gen-
eral, will be the keynote speaker.
Others attending will be candidate
for governor Michael E. Arth of


Deland and commissioner of agricul-
ture candidates Eric Draper of Talla-
hassee and Randy Hatch of Branford.
Tickets are $50 and can be pur-
chased by calling NCDEC Chairman
Jay Paul Thibault at 556-4105 or by e-
mailing info@nassaudems.org.
For information, visit www.nas-
saudems.org or e-mail info@nas-
saudems.org.
Special elections set
The Florida Division of Elections
has called for special elections to fill
the vacancy of the Senate District 8
seat formerly held by the late Sen.
Jim King The special primary elec-
tion will be on Sept. 15, and the spe-
cial general election will be Oct. 6 for
Nassau County Precincts 101, 102,
202 and 204 on Amelia Island.
Candidates interested in qualify-
ing for the state senate seat must do
so by the petition process or by pay-
ing the qualifying fees. Petitions for
candidates qualifying by the petition
method must be submitted to the
supervisor of elections in the county
in which signatures are collected no
later than 5 p.m. Monday in order
that the supervisor of elections can


verify the signatures and certify the
results to the Division of Elections in
Tallahassee.
Interested candidates may qualify
to fill the current vacancies begin-
ning at 8 a.m. Aug. 20 and ending at
noon Aug. 21.
Qualifying by petition requires
854 valid signatures. Qualifying by
fees requires $1,915.92 for party-affil-
iated candidates and $1,277.28 for
non-party-affiliated candidates.
In order to vote in the special pri-
mary election, Nassau County citi-
zens in Precincts 101, 102, 202 and
204 on Amelia Island must be regis-
tered on or before Monday.
Call the Supervisor of Elections
office at 491-7500, 904-491-7510
TDD, or visit www.votenassau.com
to update your voter record or to
receive information about the
upcoming elections.
GOP to meet
The Republican Party of Nassau
County executive committee will
hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday at the County Building on
Pages Dairy Road. Guest Speaker
will be Ken Mertz, who will speak


on the "Fair Tax."Please refer to
www.nassaugop.org for information.
All Republicans are invited.
Health care reform
A "Federal Healthcare Reform
Conversation" will be hosted by State
Rep. Janet Adkins, the Health Plan-
ning Council of
Northeast Florida,
Inc., and Florida.
CHAIN from 6-8
p.m. Aug. 27 at
Florida Community
College at
Jacksonville, Betty
P Cook Nassau Adkins
Center in Yulee.
For more infor-
mation, contact Amanda Young at
491-3664.
College fund-raiser
The Florida State College
Foundation will host a fundraiser for
scholarships by "roasting" state Sen.
Steve Wise on Sept. 17.
There will be a VIP Sponsorship
Reception at 5:30 p.m., general
reception at 6 p.m. and the roast will
be 7-9 p.m.


The event is at the Wilson Center
Theater, South Campus, Florida
State College at Jacksonville, 11901
Beach Blvd., Jacksonville.
The purpose is to provide
scholarships for promising jobs for
Florida's students preparing to grad-
uate from Pathways Charter School
(a return-to-school initiative located
at Florida State College at
Jacksonville).
Gold tickets are $2,500, which
includes four tickets to VIP reception
and event, logos displayed on screen
in the theater, preferred seating at
the roast and program recognition.
Silver tickets are $1,000, which
includes four tickets to VIP reception
and event, preferred seating at the
roast and program recognition.
Bronze tickets are $500, which
includes two tickets to VIP reception
and event, preferred seating at the
roast and program recognition.
Individual tickets are $100.
Checks should be made payable
to Florida State College Foundation,
501 W. State St., Jacksonville, FL
32202 and with the exception of the
food, contributions will be tax
deductible.


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IT WAS JUST A FENDER BENDER.


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1. Do you have headaches you haven't had before?
2. Do you have numbness or tingling in your arms or legs?
3. Do you have neck, back or muscle pain?
Even if it seems minor, you should seek the advice of a professional.
Don't risk your health. Even what seems to be a minor accident could
cause injuries that require treatment. Your health and well being is just
too important to risk. Call 310-6248 and be sure.

_ 904 - 310 - 6248 _ ..
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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 14,2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR., PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL, EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE, PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIMPE, CIRCULATION DIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


C I Community
Newspapers,
CI BIncorporated

The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper. its owners or employees.



COMMUNITY THANKS

Paw Prints book sale
The Nassau Humane Society's annual "Paw
Prints Book Sale" Aug. 7-8 was a fantastic suc-
cess!
Special thanks go to Steve and Mary
Stubbs of First Coast Storage for donation of
the storage units, Sean McGill and his staff for
use of the hangar and facilities, and to Publix,
Winn Dixie and Harris Teeter for supplying all
the banana boxes.
To all the volunteers who worked so dili-
gently in the heat to organize the event, and
to all of our friends in the community who
attended and gave us such generous and
heartwarming support, a huge thank you
from all of us at Nassau Humane Society and
the homeless animals in residence.
Sandra Terry, Gail Sasanfar,
Marie Korta
Nassau Humane Society

Life after cancer
On Tuesday, Sept. 8, First Coast Oncology
- Nassau will host its inaugural "Celebration
Of Survival" event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the First
Coast Oncology office located at 1340 South
18th St. in Medical Building A, Suite 103.
This program provides the opportunity to
celebrate cancer patients who were treated at
First Coast Oncology - Nassau and who have
become cancer survivors. In addition, there
will be an educational component that will
delve into what life is like after cancer. The
event is free and light refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by First Coast
Cancer Foundation. For more information,
or to RSVP - please call (904) 387-5312.
At the First Coast Cancer Foundation, we
understand that each cancer patient faces a
unique journey. We strive to make a difference
in the lives of patients and their families affect-
ed by cancer.
The foundation is committed to providing
cancer patients with necessary financial assis-
tance, supportive resources and educational
programs to pave the way for a successful
journey toward survival.
Kathleen Garrett
First Coast Oncology


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words. Letters
must include writer's name (printed and
signature), address and telephone number
for verification. Writers are normally limited
to one letter in a 30-day period. No political
endorsements or poems will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed. Not all
letters are published. Send letters to:
Letters to the Editor, RO. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL., 32035. E-mail:
mparnell@fbnewsleader. com.
visit us on-line at fbnewsleader.com


Wounded warriors need help


This past week, I was fortunate to play
in the Wounded Warrior charity golf
tournament. This commendable proj-
ect aims to raise awareness and
enlist the support of the public's aid for severe-
ly injured servicemen and women while at the
same time creating an environment of support
that allows these injured heroes to recuperate
with high-quality care and treatments.
As a result of our Global War on Terror,
nearly 35,000 United States service personnel
have been seriously wounded in combat.
Shockingly, out of the 755,000 veterans of the
Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the Department of
Veterans Affairs says more than 181,000 are
collecting disability benefits of some type -
many requiring grueling physical therapy and
continuing care in an attempt to get about with
their daily lives. And not surprisingly, many
young men and women are returning with
emotional scars that may take years to uncov-
er and resolve.
Only half of the wounded are able to return
to duty. The rest of these courageous veterans
who have suffered so much not only deal with
the physical loss, but also the loss of their
livelihood and community. This difficult transi-
tion requires not only the support of family
and friends, but also practical training and
tools.
These men and women have put their lives


MAKING
SENSE


Michael
Reagan


on the line and have sacri-
ficed so much to keep us
safe. Yet too often, sitting in
the comfort and safety they
fought to provide, those of us
back home forget the sacri-
fices made and allow these
valiant individuals to slip into
obscurity.
One of the young men I
met over the weekend was
golfing with a prosthetic
device. He lost his leg to an
IED explosion. When I see
that sacrifice, how can I not
respond with gratitude and
with action?


The Wounded Warrior Project, and others
like them, has put their full resources behind
advocating for these heroes. It's time to ensure
that not only are our veterans given the
resources they need, but also that those of us
who benefited from the protection of our
armed forces work not only for the quality of
their medical care, but also their quality of life.
This includes support for continued GI Bills,
for caregiver relief, family support, counseling
and job training.
In the defense of our nation, a small share
of our citizenry continues to sacrifice so much
for the greater good. Now it is our time - as


neighbors, as Americans - to ensure that each
of these patriots and their families receive the
care necessary to live their lives to the fullest.
Over the last several months, so many
politicians have felt the need to apologize for
America. After participating in an event yester-
day where so many people came out to show
their support for our wounded heroes, it makes
you realize why we are better off applauding
America.
We have a chance to serve our wounded
warriors, not simply out of a sense of duty, but
in celebration of the freedom and nobility of
this country and those who have bled to make
it so. I am honored to stand beside these men
and women in any way I can, knowing that
while our roles have been different, our fight is
the same, and this great country is our shared
heritage.
I ask each of you to visit www.woundedwar-
riorproject.com to learn more about their
efforts. As your situation allows, I ask that you
take the extra step of volunteering your time or
donating to their effort. Those who have
fought for us, who continue to fight for us,
must never be forgotten.
Mike Reagan, the elder son of the late
President Ronald Reagan, is chairman and
president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation
(www.reaganlegacyfoundation.org).
Reagan@caglecartoons.com.


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Cats need us
It has been said that man's inhu-
manity to man is exceeded only by
his inhumanity to animals. At no
time has that ever been more true
than now. As the economy contin-
ues to flatline, people are tossing
out their pets like yesterday's news-
papers - with little to no thought
as to what will become of the animal
once it's left to fend for itself. Once
secure in knowing they would be
fed tomorrow, these poor creatures
find themselves wandering the
streets, confused and disoriented,
with no idea what they have done
wrong or how they will find their
next meal.
I have long been involved in cat
rescue. It's not that I don't like dogs;
I do. But it is cats' helplessness,
their very vulnerability, that speaks
to me. Scan any newspaper and
you'll see the headlines: Kittens
used to train pit bulls. Man arrest-
ed for torturing, killing cat. I cannot
read them. Just the headlines bring
tears to my eyes.
The upside is that I am not alone.
Increasingly, animal cruelty is sim-
ply not tolerated. (Yet at the same
time, in neither Jacksonville nor
Fernandina is there an SPCA chap-
ter to address the all too many cru-
elty cases that still DO exist.) And
as I go about my rounds, feeding
colonies of castoffs grateful for a
handout and a simple kind word,
and as I hear of yet another case of
a tiny kitten being thrown from the
window of a speeding truck, I can
bear it, but barely, knowing that at
least there are a lot of good people
out there who share my concern.
They share my concern because
they know these gentle, helpless
creatures have virtually no chance
of making it on their own. They
share my concern, because they
know there is nowhere for these
animals to go. And on the streets it
is only a matter of time before they
meet an untimely death. The cards
are simply too stacked against them.
It heartens me that throughout
the country, caring groups and indi-
viduals are doing what they can.
More and more, people are devot-
ing their time, energy and resources
to provide safe havens for aban-
doned and unwanted cats. A sanc-
tuary in South Florida, founded in
2002 to address the problem of the
state's overcrowded shelters, cur-
rently houses some 600 felines. Says
its owner: "These guys are all
healthy and beautiful. But (in a shel-
ter) they would all be killed. Here at
the sanctuary, they can live out the
rest of their lives."
There is no such sanctuary in


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JOHN COLE/THE SCRANTON (PA.) TIMES-TRIBUNE


Northeast Florida. One is sorely
needed. With real estate sales at a
standstill, there must be property
available. Anyone interested in
donating land or funds, or who sim-
ply wishes to share ideas on how to
improve the life of abused and aban-
doned cats in Northeast Florida, is
invited to contact Patti Connor at
patticll21@aol.com. Donations are
tax deductible.
Patti Connor
Fort Caroline

Where arewe?
I recently read a story in Folio
Weekly about Felix the vendor. The
story referenced an "out of towner"
that enquired about opening a hot
dog stand and complained that Felix
could vend but they could not.
I believe that person would be
me, however, the second part of the
story would be incorrect as I did
not even know who Felix was.
I had visited the island on spring
break and decided I would spend
the summer here as I found it very
beautiful. I enquired about a set-
ting up a little Vienna hotdog stand
downtown and was told it was not
allowed because the town did not
want to "dirty up" the streets with


vendors. This was the end of it. I
never said anything about Felix as
one, I did not even know of him and
two, I was actually hoping to find
someone exactly like him to run
said hotdog stand!
This story really saddened me.
To think that my inquiry may have
been an impetus for the town trying
to make Felix leave is a sin. I'm not
really surprised however. When I
came here at the beginning of the
summer, I experienced racism at
its finest.
My friend drove down here with
us and spent the first week. I took
her shopping downtown and I
watched as many store owners
watched her as if she was a thief.
One in particular who did not know
we were together followed her
everywhere. I was shocked. My
friend is African-American. We are
from Chicago and we usually do
not face this type of thing at home.
My friend said the best way to deal
with racist people is to ignore them,
but it really bothered me that she
had to be treated as if she was a
common thief.
My friend is a reporter for a
major Chicago newspaper. She was
not fazed by this at all, rather used
to it in fact. It made me really, real-


ly sad that she was treated this way
in a town I now called my own.
"We are in the South," she said
accepting this. "Yes, but isn't is still
America?" I thought.
Michelle DiGiacomo
Chicago

Racism
Last fall I participated in a pro-
gram called "Study Circles on
Racism." The sessions were held
at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in
Fernandina Beach. Group mem-
bers varied in age, sex and skin
color. No one I knew was involved
when I joined the program. That
soon changed.
Now I've learned that this pro-
gram will be offered again this com-
ing fall. It offers a unique opportu-
nity to exchange ideas with folks
from diverse backgrounds. They
live nearby, but you may not have
had the chance to exchange ideas in
an informal small group setting.
Here's that opportunity!
Look for specific information
about the meetings on community
bulletin boards, church bulletins
and the News-Leader.
Jo Merman
Amelia Island


A love affair with books goes digital


months back, and I have to admit that it
has immeasurably lowered my produc-
tivity. The little gadget is called a
Kindle, and I have become addicted to it.
For those of you not in the know, a Kindle is
an electronic reading device manufactured by
online bookstore Amazon.com. The way it
works is this: You order books either online or
directly from the Kindle, and Amazon magical-
ly beams them to your device. The gizmo holds
literally hundreds of books - a deadly tempta-
tion for a guy like me. I can sit in my favorite
coffee shop and think, "What should I read
today - Pope's translation of the Odyssey,
Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
or Shatner's autobiography?"
I have never been faced with a choice like
that before, and the sense of power it gives me
is intoxicating. Gibbons or Shatner? The lady
or the tiger? Now I can actually have both.
Wherever I go, in a package the size of a paper-
back, I carry an entire library. Books, books,
books, shelf upon shelf of them, all crammed
into a few ounces of plastic and wiring.
My love affair with books began early,
though not as early as my English-teacher
mother and newsman father would have liked.
Much to their horror, I hated reading when I
was in the first grade. Loathed it. My teacher,


who to my six-year-old eyes
looked old enough to be
God's mother-in-law, insisted
on teaching the class from
1940s-era "Dick and Jane"
primers. I just couldn't work
up a lot of enthusiasm about
Dick, Jane and their stupid
dog Spot. Dick threw the ball
and Spot ran after it, and I just
NEWS- didn't care.
ROOM As a matter of fact, I came
VIEWS to actively hate Spot - and I
wasn't too fond of Dick and
Jane, either. The kids were
Ryan Smith morons, and that dog was
wasting his life running after
that stupid red ball. My vitriol toward this
insipid trio translated, eventually, into a burn-
ing hatred for the written word itself.
And the very next year, all that changed.
I still remember the book that did it: an
Illustrated Classics edition of War of the
Worlds. It was a pocket-sized paperback, thick
and squat. Its cover featured an illustration of a
Martian tripod terrorizing a city, all against the
background of a bizarre pink sky.
I started the book grudgingly, at my moth-
er's insistence. I finished it in a white-hot fren-
zy, then went to my mother and asked for


something else, anything else, to read.
From that moment, I was hooked. I
devoured Illustrated Classics so quickly my
mother couldn't keep up with me, and was
reading adult novels by the fourth grade for
the simple reason that I couldn't find enough
children's books to keep me occupied.
The addiction has never waned. From poli-
tics to criminal psychology to poetry, from the
Bible to Beowulf to T.S. Elliot, Herman Melville
to Stephen King, the written word has become
my lifeline. I don't care if it's high literature or
trashy pulp fiction, as long as the story sucks
me in. Like the man said, as long as it's got a
good beat and you can dance to it.
I am always shocked and even vaguely
offended by people - of my generation, espe-
cially, I am ashamed to say - who flat-out
admit, as if they're proud of it, that they hate to
read. How empty your life must be, I want to
say, when there's not a television nearby. How
crippled your imagination if beautiful words
cannot stimulate it. How little of wonder must
you know if you've never finished a book and
felt you were somehow a different person than
the one who began reading it.
Our disposable 21st century culture doesn't
help. Other forms of entertainment once led
back to books. As recently as a few years ago,
a movie like "Memento" might inspire you to


read up on cognitive psychology, or lead you
to the novels of early noir masters like
Hammett and Chandler. Kubrick's "2001: A
Space Odyssey" might lead you to Arthur C.
Clarke's novel, and on through Isaac Asimov
to the fantastic heights of H.G. Wells and Jules
Verne.
A movie like this year's "Transformers"
sequel inspires nothing but a visceral satisfac-
tion at seeing stuff blowed up real good, and
you leave the theater thinking of nothing but
your next meal. And don't even get me started
on reality television. There's nothing wrong
with good trash in its proper place, but when
trash becomes the predominant art form, it is
poisonous to thought. And therein lies my
abiding distrust of such disposable entertain-
ment, and my abiding love of books. A movie
like "Transformers" requires nothing of its
audience. It does all the work for you; it tells
you exactly what to think. It leaves no room
for your own imagination to take over after the
final reel.
A book doesn't do that. A book tells you not
what to think, but simply, think. And that's the
beautiful part - because if you're willing to do
the work, willing to think, where you go from
there is up to you.
Ryan Smith is a reporter at the News-Leader
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com.


BLACK


JOH COETESRNO P.-IE-RBN




CYAN MAGENTA


COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


'Living Proof Live' at first Baptist


Beth Moore is bringing "Living Proof
Live" to her hometown of Green Bay,
Wis., Aug. 28-29. Thanks to simulcast
technology, she'll spend that weekend
here at First Baptist Church too as she
speaks on "Coming Home to the Heart
of Our Desires" from Psalm 37.
"Living Proof Live" is a weekend
you'll never forget. And you won't even
have to leave town. For information or
to purchase tickets, contact the church
office at 261-3617.
It's more than a sport, it's more than
a game, it's Upward basketball and
cheerleading. Upward is an evangelistic
sports ministry specifically designed for
kindergarten through sixth grade boys
and girls that promotes salvation, char-
acter and self-esteem in every child.
Early registration cost is $65 per child.
After Sept. 1, cost is $75. To sign up or
get information call First Baptist at 261-
3617.
Mark your calendars. The annual
meeting is Oct. 8 at Amelia Baptist
Church, 96117 Buccaneer Trail,
Fernandina Beach. "Service in the
Midst of Adversity." Business meeting is
at 5 p.m.; finger foods and fellowship at
6 p.m.; second session at 7 p.m.
Mobile Dental Unit is Sept. 28
through Oct. 2 at First Baptist, Callahan,
45090 Green Ave., Callahan.
Appointments are Sept. 21-23 from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Call 225-5941.
Training for medical and financial
screeners will be Sept. 15 at the associa-
tion office. All screeners must be
trained by the Florida Department of
Health before screening patients.
Who qualifies to be seen in unit? If
you are an adult at least 18 years of age;
you have no dental insurance; your
household is in the 200 percent poverty
level; you only need basic dental work,
either fillings or extractions.
From our Director of Missions Dr.
David Drake: "Key Leader Workshop is
at First Baptist Church on Aug. 27 from
6-8:45 p.m. Evangelism strategies for the
21st century, led by Will McRanev.
Prayer ministry "Building Praying
Churches" led by Rich Shepherd.
Stewardship "Consider your Ways" led
by Ken Westbrook. Music led by Terry
Williams. Discipleship "Making
Disciples Who Make Disciples" led by
Bill Carmichael. Ministry assistant/sec-
retary "Office Teamwork" led by Lynn
Stone. Deacon training "How Deacons
Help Manage Church Conflict" led by
Roy Lee Saint. "Women's Missions and
Ministries" led by Cindy Goodwin.
"Passion in Leadership Spanish" led by


Deris Coto.
Service anniver-
saries: Zandra Tison
has 17 years as min-
- istry assistant at Gray
S Gables First Baptist;
Pastor Steve
.. Wolgamott, pastor of
Live Oak Baptist for 10
years; Louise Weaver,
HILDA'S administrative assis-
HEAR- tant/minister to chil-
ABOUTS dren at Blackrock
Baptist Church for 12
years; Jim Curtis, pas-
Hilda tor for six years at
Higginbotham Eastport; Laurie
Warren, ministry assis-
tant at Cedar Bay for nine years; Bruce
Jernigan, minister of children for 15
years at Dunns Creek; Dorothy
Coleman, financial secretary 12 years at
Five Points Baptist Church; Theresa
Scanion, ministry assistant 10 years at
Amelia.
Who knew Bible study and worship
could be so much fun? First Baptist
Church.
If God should tarry for 150 more
years, what will our legacy be? I want to
invite you to step up and take your place
of service on "Build the Church Day" on
Aug. 30. As we honor God with our com-
mitment to live for Him. Then join us for
homecoming on Sept. 27. This year is
made even more special as we celebrate
the 150th anniversary of First Baptist.
The new church address is 1600 S.
Eighth St. Phone: 261-3617.
God is faithful and he calls us to fol-
low Him. This God who have us this
wonderful post will lead to a glorious
future. Let's commit to do whatever it
takes to honor Him. In His love, Pastor
Jeff.
"Sam's Stanzas." We began to look
and listen to our Christmas music
Wednesday. We have books and CDs for
those who wish to be part of the tree.
Trish and Kay will be asking some of
you to step forward for very special
parts. Sue is busy keeping our feet to
the fire. This will be the most moving
message of all our presentations. You
will want to be part of it.
All music Sunday evening is Aug. 30.
Special guest musicians plus our own
people leading us in worship.
Global Impact Celebration runs
through Sunday at First Baptist Church,
Callahan. Gary Crawford spoke
Wednesday evening. He has been senior
pastor of Westside Baptist Church in
Gainesville for 27 years. He has served


as president of the Florida State Board
of Missions and as a trustee of the
International Mission Board
Convention. His church is very active in
missions.
Tom Williams was the Sunday morn-
ing and evening speaker. He is the
regional leader for Western Europe for
the Southern Baptist Convention. He
served as a missionary to Thailand from
1981-4 and as mission administrator in
Bangkok from 1990-5. He served as
associate area director, Southern Asia
and the Pacific, from 1996-7 and as
regional leader for Western Pacific from
July 1997 to June 2004.
Our Global Impact Celebration musi-
cal guest was Michael O'Brien. He is a
gifted singer, songwriter and musician.
You can listen to his music and more
about him on his website at
michaelo.org.
"And you shall be witnesses to me in
Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria
and to the end of the earth." Acts 1:8.
Grief Share, led by Doug Hodges
and Malcom Adams, begins Aug. 26 at
6:45 p.m. in Room C203. This is a week-
ly seminar/support group for people
grieving the death of someone close.
First Baptist Church, Callahan, 45090
Green Ave.
Angie McClellan is choir music adult
minister at Yulee Baptist Church. Pray
before every worship service as you're
getting ready for the service, traveling
to the service, waiting for the service to
begin and throughout the service, espe-
cially during the invitation time. Confess
any known sin to God and to others, if
needed. Play worship music throughout
your home while getting ready for
church and in the car on the way.
Worship is our response to who God
is and what He has done. Gerry Bre-
shears states that "Jesus said, 'Worship
is an ongoing, unbroken life of commun-
ion empowered by the Holy Spirit and
informed by the truth.'" God wants to
spend time with us and wants to tell us
things that will help us glorify Him.
Are we listening? Are we then
responding to what we are told? Expect
that you will encounter God in a person-
al way. As a worship leader, I am expect-
ed to prepare for the worship service, as
is the pastor. I work hard each week to
prepare for the worship service, to pre-
pare the music that will bring each one
of us closer to God. However, the most
important preparation is that of my own
heart for my own encounter with Him.
And just think, God is right there in our
midst. Expect to meet with Him.


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


* Amelia Island Chess Club meets
from 2-5 p.m. the first and third
Saturday at Caf6 Karibo, 27 N. Third St.,
Fernandina Beach. Call Dan Doulet at
261-0070.
* Amelia Island Genealogical Society
for anyone interested in tracing ances-
try meets the third Tuesday at 7 p.m. at
the Community Room at the Fernandina
Beach Police Department on Lime
Street. Call Marie Santry 321-3460.
* Amelia Masonic Lodge #47 meets
every second and fourth Tuesday at the
Masonic Lodge, 1101 S. 14th St.,
Fernandina Beach. All Master Masons
are invited to attend. For information,
contact Gene Botts, secretary, at 261-
6394. Orlando Avila, Worshipful Master.
E-mail ameliamason@bellsouth.net or
visit www.mastermason.com/Amelia.
* Amelia Island Group of Narcotics
Anonymous for anyone needing help
dealing with drugs meets at 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and Sundays at
First Assembly of God Church, 302
South 14th St. Call 800-576-4357. Visit
firstcoastna.org.
* Amelia Island Quilters Guild meets
at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday from
September to June at the Woman's Club,
201 Jean LaFitte Blvd., Fernandina
Beach. Call Pam Wise at 321-4118 or
visit aiq.homestead.com.
* Amelia Cruizers Car Club service
organization for car enthusiasts meets at
7 p.m. the second Tuesday and from 6-9
p.m. the second Friday for a cruise-in at
Murray's Grille, 3134 E. SR 200, Yulee,


and fourth Saturday from 5:30-8:30 at
Do Wop Diner, 461379 SR 200, Yulee.
Call Gary Marlow 277-8693.
* Amelia Island Sailing Club meets
at 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday at The
Kraft Athletic Club-Ten Acres, 961023
Buccaneer Trail, Fernandina Beach.
Call Commodore Charles Steinkamp at
261-5213 or Vice-Commodore Joe
Bowen at 277-1614.
* American Legion Post #54 veterans
organization meets at 7:30 p.m. the first
Monday at 12 South 11th St. Call Tom
Gora at 583-4597.
* Books Plus Book Club for those
interested in book discussions meets at
Books Plus, 107 Centre St., Fernandina
Beach. Call Don Shaw for scheduling
and book information at 261-0303.
* Bosom Buddies breast cancer sup-
port group meets the first Wednesday at
5:30 p.m. at the Community Room at the
Fernandina Beach Police Department
on Lime Street. Call Betty Armenti at
225-0067.
* Bunco Amelia meets at 7 p.m. the
last Tuesday of the month at traveling
locations. Ladies of all ages are invited
to join for a fun time, no experience nec-
essary. Call Marjorie at 491-8622.
* Byrd Wallace Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post meets at 7:30 p.m. the second
Monday at Kraft Athletic Club-Ten
Acres, 961023 Buccaneer Trail,
Fernandina Beach. Call Post
Quartermaster Pat Beamer at 261-6416.
* Centre'd Women is a proudly dis-
organized group of wonderful women


0 Lor d, hiow mnfolda
th Iywrk!hnris
hatthumdetemal


This Space Avai/able
Advertise your business &
to support your local church
Call thfe NewsLeader - 261-3696


that meets at 6:30 p.m. the third
Monday at Art & Antiques, 702 Centre
St., Fernandina Beach. Call Eileen
Moore at 277-2717.
* Cumberland Sound Woodcarving
Guild meets at 6:30 Wednesday at vari-
ous locations. Call Bob Schlag at (912)
729-2282.
* Eight Flags Charter Chapter of the
American Business Women's Associa-
tion is a organization of women with
diverse occupations who gather togeth-
er to provide opportunities to help them-
selves and others grow personally and
professionally through leadership, edu-
cation, networking support, national
recognition and community service.
The group meets at 6 p.m. the fourth
Thursday at the Fernandina Beach Golf
Club. Call Esther Schindler at 491-5790
or e-mail ABWA8flagsinfo@gmail.com.
* Eight Flags Needlepointers/Amer-
ican Needlepoint Guild to promote inter-
est in needlepoint as an art meets at 10
a.m. the third Saturday. Call Chris
Bryan at 261-5444.
* Fernandina Pirates Club meets at
7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of every
month at Ten Acres. Call Jerry or Billie
at 548-1163.
* The Optimist Club of Fernandina
Beach meets every Wednesday at noon
in the banquet room at Sliders. Join and
become associated with other civic-
minded men and women in activities
dedicated to voluntary, constructive
service to youth and community.
Contact Pierre LaPorte at 261-7803.




- An1Inordnate
^^^^B~jFondnss^^^
fo^rS Beetles


" ,, , . . " , I ,,, ,,,,' 1 11"


separate chambers, the combination of
which produces a blast of hot gas that is very
effective at warding off predators Creationists and
Evolutionists sometimes quarrel about such
seemingly well-designed defenses, because it isn't
readily apparent how such a complicated system
could evolve in small incremental steps Perhaps
the opposition between creationism and evolution is
unnecessary Could not God have created a universe
in which evolution works to continually create new
species9 Many biologists have thought so, and thus
they see their work as unraveling the incredible and
ongoing mystery of creation When we learn something
new about nature, in the
process we get a glimpse into
the mind of God


FREEMAN
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installations & Repair
606 S. 6th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


Turner-Cotner
Allison Marie Cotner and
Nathan Franklin Turner of
Fernandina Beach were mar-
ried at 7 p.m. Friday, June 12,
2009, in a beach service on
the north end of Amelia
Island.
The bride is the daughter
of Patsy and Edwin Carter
and Charles Cotner, all of
Fernandina Beach.
The groom is the son of
Ronnie and Diana Turner of
Milton, formerly of Yulee.
The bride's maternal
grandparents are Gertie
Schreffler of Fernandina
Beach and Mark Schreffler of
Lewisburg, Pa.
The bride's paternal
grandparents are Lloyd and
Jane Cotner of Fernandina
Beach (the couple was mar-
ried on the Cotners' 61st wed-


* Julia Michael (JB)
Belcher, along with other out-
standing high school scholars
from around the world, partic-
ipated in the Global Young
Leaders Conference, which
took place in Vienna, Austria,
Budapest, Hungary, and
Prague, Czech Republic, from
July 4-14.
Students interacted with
key leaders and newsmakers
with powerful influence over
politics, finance, culture and
diplomacy and took part in a
carefully designed curricu-
lum, which included thought-
provoking simulations that
build leadership skills.
'The Global Young
Leaders Conference aims to
provide scholars with the
opportunity to collaborate
with their peers from around
the world to both study and
resolve global conflict," said


Mr. and Mrs. Turner


ding anniversary).
The Turners reside on
Amelia Island with their dogs,
Britney and Miley.


BIRTHS


* Debrah and Steve Ritter
are proud to announce the
birth of a son, Jack McKane
Ritter, born on July 31, 2009,
at the Women's Center
Northside Hospital in Atlanta,
Ga. Jack weighed 8 pounds 1
ounce and measured 211/2
inches long.
Maternal grandparents are
Marty and Myra Goldapple of
Miami. Paternal grandparents
are Rankin and Adeline Willis
Morris of Panama City and
Carold Ritter of Charleston,
S.C.

* Moriah and Chris
Everson of Jacksonville
announce the birth of a


daughter, Maggie Danielle,
born at 1:18 p.m. Friday, July
31, 2009, at St. Vincent's
Medical Center in
Jacksonville. The baby
weighed 7 pounds 10 ounces
and measured 18 inches in
length. She joins big sister,
Eden, 2.
Paternal grandparents are
Jane Everson of Jacksonville
and Andy Everson of
Conyers, Ga. Maternal grand-
parents are Donnie and
Kathie Foster of Nassauville.
Great-grandparents are Ed
Cook and the late Stella Cook
of Nassuville, Peg Poulton
and the late George Everson
of Killingworth, Conn.


Marguerite C. Regan, dean of
academic affairs for the
Congressional Youth
Leadership Council, the
organization that sponsors
GYLC. "When ideas and
points of view are shared, the
true results of the conference
are realized."
GYLC culminated with the
Global Summit, in which stu-
dents applied what they
learned throughout the con-
ference as they debated,
negotiated and built coalitions
dealing with issues such as
foreign aid, global warming,
cooperative efforts in space,
terrorism and human rights.
Belcher is a senior at
Fernandina Beach High
School, a member of the
National Honor Society and
Lady Pirates basketball team
and president of FBHS
Student Government.


HELPERS


* For people who struggle
to lose weight, Take Off
Pounds Sensibly meets at 5
p.m. on Mondays in the com-
munity room of the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department on Lime Street.
Call Loretta Clark at 261-4041.
* The Nassau County
Veterans' Service Office at
the Nassau County Judicial
Annex in Yulee serves veter-
ans and the surviving spous-
es. For information or
appointments, call John E
Martin at 548-4670 or e-mail
jmartin@nassauclerk.com.
Hours are Monday through
Thursday 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and
Friday 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
* Al-Anon Family Group, a
support group for family
members and friends of alco-
holics meets each week at the
Alachua Club, 32 N. Third in
Fernandina Beach at 11 a.m.
on Sunday, Monday,
Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday and at 7 p.m. on
Thursday. For information,
call 261-7175 or 261-1813.
* The Alzheimer's/De-
mentia Support Group for
Nassau County meets the
third Thursday from 1:30-2:30
p.m. at the Council on Aging,
1367 South 18th St.,
Fernandina Beach. No pre-
registration is required and
meetings are open to anyone
who has an interest. Call Ann
Smith, RN., at 491-3222.
* Amelia Island Group of
Narcotics Anonymous for
anyone needing help dealing
with drugs meets at 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursdays and
Sunday at First Assembly of
God Church, 302 South 14th
St. Call 800-576-4357. For
additional meeting times or
information visit firstcoast-
na.org and click on meetings.
* American Cancer
Society services available in
Nassau County include free
transportation to and from
cancer treatment; support
groups for breast cancer and
prostate cancer survivors/pa-


tients and a program that
teaches techniques to people
undergoing cancer treatment
to help combat appearance-
related side effects. Programs
for men, women and teens.
Volunteers are needed.
Call (904) 249-0022 or e-mail
mariann.reid@cancer.org.
* The Association for
Retarded Citizens of Nassau
County is the only non-profit
organization located in Yulee
providing adult day training,
employment opportunities,
personal care services and
community inclusion for indi-
viduals with developmental
disabilities. Call Faye Johnson
at 225-9355 or visit www.arc-
nassau.org.
* Barnabas Center, 11
South 11th St., Fernandina
Beach, provides food, cloth-
ing, household goods, med-
ical and dental care and subsi-
dies that cover rent and
utilities to the needy in the
community. It also operates
the New to You resale store at
930 South 14th St. Contact
Carol Reader at 321-2334. E-
mail Barnabas Center@com-
cast.net or visit www.barn-
abascenterinc.org.
* The Bereavement
Support Group meets on the
second Thursday of each
month from 5-6:30 p.m. at St.
Peter's Episcopal Church,
corner of Eighth Street and
Atlantic Avenue. Call Kathy
Washburn, 491-1753.
* Big Brothers, Big
Sisters seeks qualified adults
to mentor children one-on-
one in the community and
school programs. Also need-
ed are Little Brothers and
Little Sisters. Call 261-9500.
* Bosom Buddies of
Amelia Island offers support,
education and friendship to
breast cancer survivors.
Meetings are the first Wed-
nesday at 5:30 p.m. in the
Community Room, Fernan-
dina Beach Police Depart-
ment on Lime Street. Call
Betty Armenti at 225-0067.


BLACK


WEDDING


CAMPUS NOTES


Welcome to

Qod's House

J Classic Carpets
CHEVeROE BIC . & Interiors, Inc.
CHEVROLET * BUICK BUDDY KELLUM
PONTIAC * GMC AbbyCarpet� President
464054 SR 200, Yulee 802 S.8th Street (904) 261-0242
(904) 261-6821 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291
FAMILY DENTISTRY
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN Badcock
Most Insurances Accepted HOME U R NIT U RE
Call For Appointment
261 -682 0
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
Al A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 14, 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Passing the test

"Are you afraid of heights?" he think, "I wo
asked, eying me carefully for my what I'm go
response. be doing?"
"Not a whole lot," I replied. was just ab
"Good," he said. "I need to be I time I figure
sure though. Come with me." With As we camc
that, I jumped into his golf cart and the corner
offwe went. entered the
I was getting ready to be the per- storage bui
sonal assistant of the paper mill's fire my eye fell
chief. Looking back, I had absolutely PULPIT lone piece
no clue what that meant - other than NOTES ment stand
a paycheck, of course. To this day I _ _ the middle
still don't know why it was me they room - a ci
chose instead of one of the other Pastor picker. You
new employees, but either way I was Rob Goyette one of those
grateful for the opportunity. wheel vehi,
As we drove further away from an extension arm that lifts p(
the comforts of the guard shack, the into the air. This particular o
fire chief's question about my capaci- the ability go extremely high
ty for heights began to make me "Come on," the chief said


and embracing your future


underr
)ing to
That
out the
ed it out.
e around
and
huge
lding,
on the
of equip-
ing in
of the
cherry
know,
e four-
cles with
people
one had
h.
d, "get in.


We've got to check some pipes." And
so we did. Now let me tell you, it's
one thing to get into a little basket
and extend several stories up into
the air while you're standing still, but
it's another thing altogether to be up
that high and then start driving
around the entire building.
As we bounced up and down and
jerked from side to side, I could see
the fire chief looking at me out of
the corner of his eye. Though he
took the opportunity to show me a
few leaking pipes, his real goal was
to see if I could handle the height.
Actually, I think he bounced us
around a whole lot more than was
necessary but, I suppose, that's why
we were there. He needed to be sure
that I was the guy for the job. And,
as it turns out, by God's grace I


passed the test.
Now that brings me to the focus
of this article - passing the test.
Let's just say it. At times life can be a
little scary. With all its ups and
downs and jerking back and forth,
you can't help but wonder what the
guy who is driving this whole thing
is really up to. I know it's not always
the case, but I've come to believe
that a lot of life's hard rides are real-
ly God's way of qualifying us for our
future. It's just that simple. If you
can hang on and trust God when
things seem out of control, then
you're ready to be promoted to the
next level of God's grace and bless-
ing for your life.
I suppose for me what really
made the difference was the fact
that the fire chief was in the basket


with me. I concluded that if he felt
we were safe, then I should too.
Though I realize that not every
human being can be trusted - God
can be. As the Apostle Paul said so
well in the book of Romans, chapter
8:31, 38 and 39, "What shall we then
say to these things? If God be for us,
who can be against us?" And again,
"For I am persuaded, that neither
death, nor life, nor angels, nor prin-
cipalities, nor powers, nor things
present, nor things to come, nor
height, nor depth, nor any other
creature, shall be able to separate us
from the love of God which is in
Christ Jesus our Lord."
Robert L. Goyette is pastor of
Living Waters World Outreach
Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Donations needed
The Salvation Army Hope House,
410 South Date St., is in need of the
following types of donations:
* Personal hygiene items: tooth-
brushes, toothpaste, deodorant, dis-
posable razors, shaving cream, femi-
nine products and toilet paper
* Canned foods not requiring
cooking: non-condensed soups, pas-
tas, beanie weenies, tuna, chicken,
fruits, fruit juices and powdered milk
* Starchy foods: rice, instant
mashed potatoes, pastas, cereals and
breakfast bars.
Call 321-0435.
Community orchestra
If you would like to be part of the
Community Orchestra at Memorial
United Methodist Church as it pre-
pares for Christmas, call Director of
Music Ministries Beth Jurovcik at
261-5769, ext. 3, or e-mail
beth@mumconline.com. Rehearsals
begin Sept. 8 from 7-8:30 p.m. Call or
e-mail to have a part waiting for you.
New member weekend
Grace Community Church is
offering a membership weekend
seminar for those interested in join-
ing the church. The seminar begins
at 6:30 p.m. tonight and continues
from 8:30 a.m.-noon on Aug. 15.
Alternate dates and times are also
available.
According to Grace Community
Church, the Christian scriptures
instruct believers to join a local
church to place themselves under
the spiritual care of its leadership.
The church worships Sundays at
10:30 a.m. at Yulee Middle School's
caf6torium, 85439 Miner Road. It is
a mission church for the
Presbyterian Church in America's


North Florida Presbytery. There is
no fee to join. Contact Pastor David
Bradsher at pastor@gracenassau.
com, 491-0363 or http://gracenas-
sau.com.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope House
each Tuesday at noon for its Weekly
Worship Service and Fellowship
Lunch. Pastor Ray Ramsburg of
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church
will share the Gospel message on
Aug. 18. For more information, call
321-0435 or 410 South Date St.
Yard sale
Solid Rock Church of God by
Faith will host a yard sale from 7
a.m.-noon Aug. 15.
'One Heartf
First Assembly of God will feature
"One Heart," a Southern gospel
group with a deep love for God and a
great music ministry on Aug. 16 at
10:45 a.m. at the church, 302 South
14 St. Call 261-6448.
'Ministry Fair
First Presbyterian Church will
host a Ministry Fair on Aug. 23 in
Jim Thomas Hall from 9:30 a.m.-
12:45 p.m. Booths representing the
missions, ministries, studies, events
and opportunities available at First
Presbyterian will fill the hall. There
will be games, door prizes, lots of
food, an Ugly Tie Contest. Nursery
and preschool available.
'Living Proof simulcast
On Aug. 28-29 Beth Moore is
bringing Living Proof Live to her
hometown of Green Bay, Wis.
Thanks to simulcast satellite technol-
ogy, she'll spend that weekend at
First Baptist Church, too. Tickets are


Community study
Community Bible Study is an
interdenominational organization
committed to helping people of
every age grow in their knowledge
and love of Jesus Christ.
Individuals from all backgrounds
and levels of Bible knowledge are
invited to join one of the weekly
classes that begin in September.
For further information, contact
the appropriate class coordinator:
* Wednesday morning women
and children (infant and home
schooled): Kathleen Minor 225-
8125.
* Monday evening men: Tony
Taylor, 321-0785
* Monday evening women:
Linda Bell, 261-0569
* Monday evening teens:
Jeanne Scott, 491-9849
* Monday evening E-teen (mid-
dle school): Bobbie Burch, 261-
2533
Women's study
The Amelia Island Women's
Evening Community Bible Study
invites you to join an in-depth, non-
denominational study of the Book
of Acts.
Meetings will be Monday
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at


$10 and may be purchased at the
church. Call 261-3617.
'Gods Active Men
Historic Macedonia African
Methodist Episcopal Church, 202 S.
Ninth St, presents "God's Active


Amelia Baptist Church, 961167
Buccaneer Trail across from
Harris Teeter. The study begins
Sept. 14 and continues through
May 3.
For information and to register,
call Michal Polese at 548-9971 or
Linda Bell at 261-0569. Visit
www.communitybiblestudy. org
and www.ameliaislandevecbs. org.
Beth Moore study
Amelia Plantation Chapel will
begin an eleven-week Beth Moore
women's Bible study - Jesus The
One And Only - starting Sept. 22 at
10 a.m.
This is an in-depth study of the
life of Jesus based on the book of
Luke. Through video and group
study, participants will join Moore
on a life-changing journey that
leads through the hills of Galilee
with the Teacher, across the lake
with the Master, and finally on the
road toward the cross with the
Savior - getting to know Jesus inti-
mately, as though walking with
Him during His earthly ministry.
The study includes a workbook for
a cost of $15. A nursery will be pro-
vided upon advance notice. For
information or to register call the
chapel office, 277-4414, or e-mail
sandyshawaifl@bellsouth.net.


Men" at 11 a.m. Aug. 30. The call is
out to join the men of Fernandina
Beach as they give thanks and praise
to God. There will be scripture, a
gospel jubilee, gospel choir and
praise band, and a word from God by
Pastor Ewing. Everyone is welcome.


For information call 261-4114 or
(904) 310-6377.

Grace promotion
ceremony
Grace Community Church will
hold a promotion ceremony as chil-
dren graduate to new church classes
on Sunday, Aug. 30. In addition, the
children's ministry is expanding with
an additional class.
New curriculum for children's
programming starts that Sunday.
Contact Pastor Dave Bradsher at
pastor@gracenassau.com, 491-0363
or http://gracenassau.com.
'Rally Day
Rally Day for children and youth
will be Aug. 30 at First Presbyterian,
beginning at 9:50 a.m. Nursery, tod-
dlers, preschool and kindergarten
will meet in their classrooms in
Noah's Place. First and second
graders will meet in the Power Lab
and third through fifth graders will
meet in the Kidmo theater. Middle
school students will meet in the
Skate Room in the Youth Center.
Senior high youth will meet in Faith
Cafe at 12:15 p.m. for lunch and
Bible study.
Parents, call the church office to
confirm your attendance no later
than Aug. 27.
Catholic class
St. Michael Catholic Church is
sponsoring an inquiry class for those
who wish to know more about the
Roman Catholic faith and what
Catholics believe. The program,
called R.C.I.A., will start on Sept. 1
and continue each week through
Easter 2010. Call the church office at
261-3472 for more information or to
register.


"Worship this week at the ylace of your choice


l ri..;t Church
Sunday School... ............................ 9:30 am
Sunday W worship ....................................10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA ..............................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study........................6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org


Rev. RavyRamsburci.Pastor
--- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
--- Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17
Ol.111-1 Mi IM
Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
�.=nirnlin r


IF N I r . .. w


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
4An Interdenominational
Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
August 9, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.

MESSAGE "Prayers for the time
you have no words."
MUSIC: "We are yours. Lord"
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-

The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
(904) 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


, _ AMELIA PLANTATION
CHAPEL
/ \ A ntenominational
Community Church
BLOG WITH US
Share your opinions with Pastor Ted
Schroder of Amelia Plantation
Chapel. Access:ameliachapel.com
Pastor's Corner, and then Ted's Blog.
Faith-based subjects that make us all
think!


St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes
You!
Located at the
corner of 8th &
Atlantic
Sunday
Holy Eucharist
8:30 am &10:00 am
Wednesday
Holy Eucharist 904-261-4293
12:10 pm www.stpetersparish.org


YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
In r-n1elia Fiarn
1:.: ;.0 La, e I'r!. I-r, e
a,: ros. froi Ihie i ,h " i
E.undv ,:o.rhip tiimeES

C 0i0 a in i ,ilh ll.iCI I

*W .- 4- 'l'1, l7
I I rl.:.l , lr irlt, ar allr: l n .:.i 'I


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6'" Street
Dr. Holton Slegling
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:50a
Nursery
Children
Youth
Adults
261-3837
www. 1 stpres-fb.com


'U -.


. - l 1 . - -. - '- ..


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
1 0:3Oam
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www.blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Coner of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, FernmandinaBch.
For More Information Call: 261-9527


II


BETH MOORE
LIVING PROOF UVE
August 28-29
Tickets 51 0
For 2-Day Event
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach. FL
904-261-3617
www.FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton. Sr Pastor


Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor




i I, II I I

Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566,
also call 904-277-0550


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... .9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. . 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training ....... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ....... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnieview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptistchurch.org


Jol rinity
Anglican Ciurch

l Vorsdp Commuty


Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


www.
p
o
p
came a.or
y --


J r F L i/ r ck rck


Bovidence .,.,
Plres6yterian B
hurcf I LgOA �as=
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corner Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.providenceyulee.com
providenceyulee@comcast.net


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
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CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
innovative Stye, Contemporary Music, CasuaAtmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday morn. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10'30am Sunda
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ...Connecting with People


IIine:1*�---- FO -MREIN O: .90)25-77


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Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225*0809


Living W waters FIRSTMISSIONARYBAPTIST
world outreach 20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Contemporary Worship Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
SUN 9:30am The Church in the
WED 7:00pm Heart of the City
With the Desire to be in the
Youth, Nursery & Hearts ofAll People
S Children's Ministries Sunday NewMembersClass 9a.m.
W0 0Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Rob & ChristIe Goyette W3 2 1 rsai, p Ia.m
Senior Pastors On AMA I mile west of Amelia Island Wednesad"-w Sm y p.m.
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org Mistries:Bus& , Cpes, Siles, Youth









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BIBLE STUDY CLASSES


ANCHOR

Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
515 Centre Street


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CYAN MAGENTA


101 HOMES


FRIDAY, August 14, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


Laurel wilt find


TALIAHASSEE - Florida
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson has
announced the confirmation of
laurel wilt disease in an avoca-
do sample from Homestead.
"This find is alarming for
the avocado industry," Bronson
said. "Since laurel wilt disease
was first found in North
Florida, the department has
been working cooperatively
with other agriculture agencies
to track the spread of this dis-
ease and beetle, and retard arti-
ficial movement. Despite these
efforts this unwanted pest/dis-
ease complex has spread rap-
idly via redbay trees within
Florida."
Laurel wilt is a destructive
disease of redbay, avocado and
other trees in the laurel family
(Lauraceae). The disease is
caused by a fungus (Raffaelea
lauricola) that infects the sap-
wood of host trees, restricting
the flow of water, causing the
leaves to wilt and the trees to
die.
The fungus is carried into
trees by a non-native insect, the
redbay ambrosia beetle
(Xyleborus glabratus), that was
first detected in the United
States near Savannah in 2002
and subsequently found in
Jacksonville in September 2007.
Laurel wilt has caused high lev-
els of mortality in redbay trees
in South Carolina, Georgia and
Florida - including Nassau
County - and has affected sev-
eral other hosts including sas-
safras and avocado.
Laurel wilt was discovered
in an avocado tree that showed


signs of wilt in a com:
grove in southern Mian
County.
A University of Flori
tute of Food and Agric
Sciences (UF-IFAS) resin
in Miami-Dade County
ed the sample, which w
firmed as laurel wilt.
Currently, there at
additional suspect s.
from three avocado gr
Homestead that have lai
symptoms, but these s
have not yet been con
by laboratory diagnosis
Working group of ii
members, agriculture a�
and local agriculture
was assembled earlier ti
to review and chart ai
tive management stra
mitigate the potential in
the redbay ambrosia bec
laurel wilt on Florida's a
industry. As part of this
UF-IFAS is currently w
on treatment and mana�
recommendations. The
ommendations will be a
at http://trec.ifas.ufl.ec
Since June 200'
Cooperative Agricultur
Survey (CAPS) progrn
monitored traps in eight
counties from Pensa(
Miami. The traps are
with a tree oil that is at
to the beetles. The tr;
checked once a mon
processed at Gainesvill
quarters of the
Department of Agricultt
Consumer Services, D
of Plant Industry. A d
tion map showing count
laurel wilt disease syry
can be found at www


'alarming'
mercial state.fl.us/pi/enpp/patholo-
ni-Dade gy/laurelwiltdisease.html.
The Florida Agricultural
da Insti- Statistics Service reports the
cultural avocado industry represents a
archer production value of $12.7 mil-
collect- lion with over 6,500 production
vas con- acres located in Miami-Dade
County and Collier County.
re four The public can help prevent
samples the spread of the redbay am-
oves in brosia beetle and laurel wilt by
urelwilt following these .,...-.- ..i,.
samples * Become familiar with the
firmed signs of laurel wilt disease and
s. redbay ambrosia beetle and be
industry on the lookout for evidence of
agencies the pest/disease on your trees.
groups For photos and information
hisyear visit www.doacs.state.fl.us/
n effec- pi/enpp/pathology/laurel_wilt
tegy to _disease.html.
pact of * Use local firewood only.
etle and Do not transport firewood from
avocado other states because destruc-
s group, tive pests and diseases, such
working as redbay ambrosia beetle and
gement laurel wilt, can hitchhike into
ese rec- Florida on infested firewood.
available View video at www. doacs.state.
du/. fl.us/pi/videos.html.
7, the * Do not transport host
ral Pest trees (redbay, swamp bay, avo-
am has cado, sassafras, pondspice,
Florida pondberry and others in the
cola to Lauraceae family) unless pur-
baited chased from a registered nurs-
tractive ery.
aps are * If your Lauraceae-family
th and tree dies, use one of UF/IFAS's
e head- recommended methods of dis-
Florida posal.
ure and If you suspect your trees
divisionn may be infected with laurel wilt
istribu- or you think you have found a
ies with redbay ambrosia beetle, please
mptoms contact the DPI helpline at 1-
.doacs. 888-397-1517.


Farmers market
Capt. Jack's Crab Cakes has joined the
Fernandina Farmers Market as a vendor. Many
shoppers will recognize Derek of Proper Pie
who has started a new booth featuring his crab
cake specialty using real lump crabmeat and
his blend of unique seasonings.
Capt. Jack's will have jumbo crab cakes that
are perfect for dinner. For appetizers, mini crab
cakes and shrimp-stuffed mushrooms are also
available. All crab cakes are made fresh and
then frozen for ease in taking home and the
convenience of just popping in the oven for a
few minutes to enjoy.
Also at the market on Aug. 15, Checkers
Cracker Cookin' with their unique Southern
fare and Reflections of Nature with herb plants.
The market is open Saturdays from 9 a.m.-
1 p.m. at Seventh and Centre streets. Call 491-
4872 or visit www.fernandinafarmersmarket.
com.
Birding Walk
Join Our Greenway on Aug. 15 at 8 a.m. for
a birding walk on the Greenway. You can
expect to see a variety of wading and songbirds
as well as birds of prey. Visit www.ourgreen-
way.org to download a Greenway specific bird
list. Participants are encouraged to bring
binoculars, water, sun protection, bug juice,
comfortable walking shoes and optionally field
guides and spotting scopes.
Meet in the parking lot at the entrance to
the Greenway behind the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center, 2500 Atlantic Ave. The walk
is free and open to the public. For information
call 277-7350 or visit www.ourgreenway.org.
Bird club
The Nassau County Bird Club will hold a
field trip to Huguenot Memorial Park on Aug.
15 and Sept. 5 at 8 a.m., rain or shine. Park
entry is $1 per car.
The park is located off Heckscher Drive
about 8 miles south of the Nassau Sound
bridge. Meet in the parking lot of the general
store. Target birds include the Piping Plover,
Oystercatcher, Whimbrel, Reddish Egret, gulls
and terns. Bring your binoculars, field guide,
bug juice, sunscreen, rain gear, sunglasses, lay-
ered clothing and water.
For information call Carol Wyatt at 262-9272
or e-mail carolinewy@aol.com.
Mortgage specialist
Ray Seeley, reverse mortgage specialist, will
speak about how to finance home repairs with
Unity Mortgage - a reverse mortgage special-
ist company - on Aug. 19 from 9:45-10:45 a.m.
at the Council on Aging Senior Center located
at 1367 South 18th St., across from Baptist
Medical Center Nassau. For more information
call Frances Bartelt at 261-0701, ext 102.
Kayak/canoe trip
Nassau Sierra Club will host a guided
kayak/canoe trip to Simpson Creek (Little


So. 2. T- On Saturday,
"enjoy Capt.
Jack's Crab
Cakes at the
Fernandina
Farmers
Market.
SUBMITTED

Talbot Island) on Aug. 29. This trip is open to
the public.
The three- to four-hour trip will depart the
"Kayak Amelia" concession at Little Talbot
State Park at 9 a.m. It will be about a five-mile
paddle, with a stop for lunch on the sandbar or
Bird Island.
Paddlers will experience maritime forests,
desert-like dunes, undisturbed salt marsh and
a variety of wildlife and native and migratory
birds. Little Talbot is one of the few remaining
underdeveloped barrier islands.
Participants with their own boats can launch
at Kayak Amelia; those without kayaks can rent
either single ($30) or tandem ($45). Kayak
Amelia will waive the launch fee and offer
renters a 10 percent discount.
The paddle will be in calm water and is suit-
able for beginners. A personal flotation device
is required; they can be rented from Kayak
Amelia. Also recommended are sun protection,
insect repellent, food and drinking water.
The trip will be led by Len Kreger, a certi-
fied Sierra Outings Leader; RSVP at
L.Kreger@comcast.net or (904) 432-8389.
Landscape workshop
On Sept. 29 the Extension Service will offer
a Limited Certification Workshop for
Commercial Landscape Maintenance. Trainers
are Rebecca L. Jordi, Erin Eckhardt and Ray
Zerba, extension agents for Nassau, Duval and
Clay counties.
Register by Sept. 18 by e-mailing Rebecca
Jordi at rljordi@ufl.edu, or call 548-1116. The
workshop will be held at the FCCJ Betty P
Cook Campus. Sessions are 8:45 a.m.-3:45
p.m., a full six-hour day required to sit for the
LCLM test.
A partial session is offered for recertifica-
tion from 8:45 a.m.-1:30 pm. Recertification
requirement is 4 CEUs. Full day cost is $50 and
includes 2 textbooks, notebook, handouts and
lunch; the half-day session costs $25 and
includes handouts, refreshments and lunch.
Once payment is received, the participant
will be registered. Make checks to Nassau
County Extension, and mail to: Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1, Callahan, FL 32011.
This class is required by the state of Florida
in order to sit for the Limited Commercial
Landscape Maintenance test. A passing grade
on the test will enable the licensee to apply pes-
ticides to flower beds and ornamental plants.
No money will be accepted at the door.


Florida honey has new 'standard'


TALLAHASSEE - Florida
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson has
announced that his department
has instituted the first regula-
tion in the nation - and perhaps
the world - prohibiting any
additives, chemicals or adul-
terants in honey that is pro-
duced, processed or sold in
Florida.


The regulation, which went
into effect July 14, provides the
first-ever "Standard of Identity"
for honey.
"We want to assure con-
sumers that the product that
they are buying is pure,"
Bronson said. 'Too often in the
past, honey has been cut with
water or sugar, and sometimes
even contaminated with insec-
ticides or antibiotics. In the
future, when you're paying for
honey in this state, pure honey
is what you will get."
The new law came after
state honey producers sought
regulation as a result of a flood
of adulterated honey from over-
seas into Florida in 2006.
Under terms of the new reg-
ulation, honey containing any-


thing other than the "natural
food product resulting from the
harvest of nectar by honey-
bees" is considered an adulter-
ated or mislabeled product.
Such products are subject to a
"stop sale" order in which a
manufacturer, processor or
merchant would be served with
an order prohibiting the prod-
uct's sale. Repeat offenders
would face fines of up to $500
per violation.
Florida is the fourth-leading
honey producing state in the
country with cash receipts to
beekeepers of more than $15
million in 2008 and an indus-
try that has an economic impact
estimated at $40 million a year.
It employs more than 500
Floridians.


SEA
. HOP E


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PROPERTY




yo/^^^t


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Broker
phil@acrfl.com


(904) 261-2770
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A CBl


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


SPORTS_


OUTDOORS / TIDES


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


PHOTOS BY ED HARDEE/SPECIAL
Chris Igou, left, and Zack Miller compete Saturday in a surf contest just south of Slider's restaurant. The First Coast District of the Eastern Surfing Association held the tourna-
ment and has another one planned for Aug. 29. Below, contestants in the water Saturday.


� . * , � . . - " . I - ,. .-











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ESA surf contest held Saturday just south of Slider's

The First Coast District of the Eastern Surfing Gavin Johnson was fourth. Eric Hatton took first place in the masters divi- ished in first. Hatton was second, Kellogg wa


Association held another contest of the summer
Saturday just south of Slider's restaurant.
The ri. \i % . iii. - i . I ll be at8 a.m.Aug. 29, also
just south of Slider's. For information on the
Eastern Surfing Association, contact Brad Long
at 415-6033.
In the menehune division (11 and under),
Sutton Kerlin took first place, Gage Kropff was
second, Scotty Rivenbark finished third and


Bradley Dunham won the boys division. Matt
Kane was second and Jessie Chapman finished
third.
Walter Obszarski took first place in the jun-
ior division. Toby Williams was second.
In men's shortboard, Chris Igou was first.
Nick Isabella was second, Jake Coombs placed
third, Zack Miller was fourth, Chance Bennett
placed fifth and Scott Kellogg finished sixth.


sion.
In senior men, Long was first, followed by
Kyle Conger.
Kevin Leary won the grand masters division.
Frank Blake was second.
Leslie Baker took first place in women's and
women's longboard divisions.
Williams was first in junior longboard.
In the men's longboard division, Isabella fin-


third and Todd Burwell placed fourth.
Long took first place in the masters long-
board division. Leary was second, Conger third
and Blake was fourth.
In the open shortboard class, Miller was
first, Hatton was second, Igou was third, Leary
was fourth, Obszarski was fifth, Coombs was
sixth, Isabella was seventh and Dunham placed
eighth.


Treat those water


injuries with care


Living where we do,
we are surrounded
by water and have
the opportunity for
many marine-based activi-
ties. Surfing, fishing, boat-
ing and skiing are a few
examples of how we have
fun on the water. However,
the water also provides a
unique environment for the
development of infections.
For example, one can easily
become cut while climbing
into a boat or from the shells
on the shore. Fisherman are
susceptible to getting stuck,
not only by hooks, but also
by the spines of fish. These
types of injuries can cause
serious infections and, there-
fore, they should be taken
seriously and properly treat-
ed.
Wounds which occur in
water-based situations have
much higher infection rates
than similar injuries which
occur on land. Lakes,
streams and the ocean con-
tain multiple bacteria. For
example, there are likely 100
million bacteria contained
within a liter of seawater. So,
when a wound does occur
here, it should be consid-
ered contaminated and
potentially infected.
While there are common
bacteria such as staph and
strep in water-based environ-
ments, there are also differ-
ent bacteria in the water
than those commonly found
on land, and these can be
much more aggressive. One
such bacteria species, called
Vibrio, produces severe skin
infections that can lead to
rapid skin destruction and


death in as
short as 24-
48 hours
after injury.
-..._, Wounds
which
S occur on
the water
should be
thoroughly
cleaned
SPORTS with soap
and water.
MEDICINE If it is deep
GREGORY or a pene-
trating
SMITH, M.D. puncture
wound, this
should be
evaluated by a doctor to
determine the need for pos-
sible surgical treatment and
antibiotics. Small wounds
are often left open to facili-
tate drainage should an
infection develop despite
antibiotic treatments.
Especially in situations of
potential foreign body pene-
tration, such as a shell or
fish spine, X-rays should be
performed to make sure
nothing was left behind.
This column is written to
discuss issues regarding
sports, medicine and safety. It
is not intended to serve as a
replacement for treatment by
a doctor It is only designed to
offer guidelines on the preven-
tion, recognition and care of
injuries and illness. Specific
concerns should be discussed
with a physician. Mail ques-
tions to Gregory Smith, M.D.,
1250 S. 18th St., Suite 204,
Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Call 261-8787for
appointments or visit
www.gsmithmd.com.


POKER RUN


IL..
SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Sunday Mornin' Jazz
crosses paths with Jade
during the recent Poker
Run, left. Bob Canon,
above, captain of Jade,
displays his winning cer-
tificate for a four-day,
three-night stay at Amelia
Island Plantation.


Amelia Island Sailing Club holds Poker Run


JOHN BURNS
For the News Leader

The Amelia Island Sailing Club held its
annual Poker Run, co-sponsored by Amelia
Island Yacht Basin, on Saturday. Unlike its
other races, the Poker Run is more of a
social event, where sailboaters and power-
boaters participate together. Heck, if one so
chose, they could row the course.
The committee chairman chose an
eight-mile course, starting at the down-
town marina, around the outer range mark-
er in Cumberland Sound, out to buoy 20
and then a similar return course, finish-
ing at buoy 10 near the downtown marina.
Every time a boat passes one of the
designated buoys, rules require the cap-
tains to radio the committee boat of their
progress and a playing card is dealt to an


envelope with the participating boat's name
on it. After the all boats completed the
course, the crews met at the Amelia Island
Yacht Basin, which was concurrently cel-
ebrating Clean Harbor Day with a cookout.
After feasting on hamburgers, hot dogs
and all the trimmings, the committee
chairman, Joe Bowen, called the crews
together. With the crews assembled, he
handed sealed envelopes containing seven
playing cards to each boat captain. When
so directed, the captains opened the
envelopes and, choosing the best five cards,
they played their "poker hand."
Bob Canon, captain of the sailboat Jade,
with two pair (aces high), won first prize,
a three-night, four-day stay at Amelia Island
Plantation. It should be noted that Jade
and the Mary Wanderer with Commodore
Charles Steinkamp were the only sailboats


to actually sail part of the course. All oth-
ers chose to simply enjoy the wonderful
weather and motor the eight miles.
Of course, part of the decision to motor
might have been the fact that, during Poker
Run, the participating boats were also com-
peting in a fishing contest, using artificial
lures trolled behind the boats. As usual it
became clear why they call it fishing and
not catching. The fish just did not cooper-
ate. However, Capt. John Burns aboard
the sailboat Mast Confusion succeeded in
landing the only fish hooked, a three-foot
shark.
Canon and crew hooked but did not
land the Outer Range Marker.
Anyone with questions concerning the
Amelia Island Sailing Club or who wishes
to participate in club races or cruises
should contact Steinkamp at 583-3156.


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


_-_- a- - .. .I"---
PHOTOS BY TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
A jetty boat is pictured anchored close to the jetty rocks during an incoming tide and
fishes for a variety of inlet species, including redfish, shark, cobia and more.



Best action at the jetties


Jetty fishing has picked up during the last
few days and should produce excellent fish-
ing action this weekend for area fishermen.
Some of the best action is coming from the
tip of the St. Marys north jetties, where big
schools of redfish are holding weighing to 25
pounds. Look for the larger, "bull," reds to be
holding close to the rocks in deep water
while the smaller schooling size reds, weigh-
ing from 5-10 pounds, are holding over the
flooding jetty rocks and close to the rocks as
well in deep water.
Sea trout are also holding
at the very tip of the St.
Marys south jetty rocks dur-
ing the high falling tide.
Drift a live shrimp under a
sea trout float over the flood-
ed rocks so the depth of the
live shrimp is adjusted to
drift just above the sub-
ON THE merged rocks.
A few reds and king
WATER mackerel are holding at the
tip of the St. Marys south
TERRY jetty rocks during the incom-
LACOSS ing tide as well. Live mullet
or menhaden continue to be
prime kingfish baits when
fished right on the surface with the aid of a
balloon or corks attached to the terminal fish-
ing line.
Keeper-size red drum are taking live men-
haden fished with a one-ounce led head jig
cast to the shallow edge of the jetty rocks.
Barb the live menhaden up through the bot-
tom of the mouth and right through the top
of the mouth. Bump the live bait combo slow-
ly over the submerged jetty rocks out into
deep water and hang on.
Menhaden schools have been holding just
north of Atlantic Avenue and close to the
breakers. During last year's summer fishing
season, Capt. Benny Hendrix guided his fish-
ing charter to a 16-pound flounder at the tip
of the St. Marys south jetty rocks while fish-
ing with live menhaden on the bottom.
Best bet for offshore fishing includes FC
and FA fish havens, where grouper, red snap-
per, cobia and sea bass continue to please


Live mullet are excellent baits when
fished on the bottom close to jetty rocks
when targeting cobia, red drum, floun-
der, tarpon and sharks. Chris Forehand
is pictured with a successful net full of
mullet.

drift fishing boats. Big schools of cobia have
been sighted holding just off the surf south
of the St. Johns inlet, where beach fishermen
have been hooking up to more than 20 cobia
per fishing trip. Apparently the schools of
cobia have been migrating south, but may
change their migration plans and migrate
north, so be prepared.
The best kingfish bite has been coming
north from Doboy Sound and in 20 feet of
water, where king mackerel fishing boats are
hooking up to more than 20 kingfish weigh-
ing to 35 pounds in just a half day of kingfish-
ing.
The News-Leader encourages local anglers
to submit photographs of their catches. E-mail
photos to bones@ fbnewsleader.com, mail them
to P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035, or drop them by the office at 511 Ash
St. in Fernandina Beach. Call Beth Jones at
261-3696 for more information.


SPORTS SHORTS


Timeto cheer
The Fernandina Beach High School cheer-
leaders will hold their first practices for the
2009-10 school year from 8-9:30 a.m. Aug. 20
and 21 in the multipurpose room. Once school
starts, conditioning will be held from 3:15-3:45
p.m. Monday and Wednesdays and practices
will be held from 3:15-4:15 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Uniform fees ($40) are due the first
day of school, Aug. 24.
A parent meeting will be held from 6-7 p.m.
Aug. 25.

Back to School beach run
The second annual Back to School Beach
Fun Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K (one mile)
will be held Oct. 17 at Peters Point on A1A.
The event starts at low tide, 4 p.m. Registration
information will be available in August. The day
includes music, food and awards. Begin train-
ing now. Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit Communities in Schools.

Run Wildl atWhite Oak Plantation
Run Wild! at White Oak Plantation in Yulee,
which benefits Girls on the Run of Northeast
Florida, will be held Oct. 25 beginning at 8:30
a.m. Registration closes Oct. 20. The field is
limited to the first 65. No event-day registration.
Fee is $150. No refunds. All participants must
be 18 or older. All runners are required to sign
a waiver the day of the race.
The adventure includes entry to the 10-mile
run (approximately 10.5 miles) through the
trails of an unspoiled, natural setting; swim-
ming in the pool after the race; picnic lunch;
raffle; tour on an open-air bus through Wild
Oak's wildlife preserve; goody bag. Visit
GOTRneflorida.org or call (904) 619-6763.

Mad Sunday Shoot
Amelia Shotgun Sports will host two tourna-
ments in the Mad Sunday Shoot. Shoot either
or both, morning or evening. The event will be
held Aug. 30 at 86300 Hot Shot Trail in Yulee
for NSCA registered shooters. Fees are are
$60 for NSCA and hunter, $45 for junior and
sub-junior and $7 for warm-ups. Fees include
breakfast, lunch and awards
For information, call 753-4619 or 548-9818
or e-mail clyde@ameliashotgunsports.com.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club. Social
hour is at 6:30 p.m; meeting is at 7:30 p.m.
Call Commodore Charlie Steinkamp at 261-
5213 or visit www.ameliaislandsailing.org.

TurtleTrotSept 5


An earlier start and some free extras are in
store for participants in this year's Turtle Trot
5K/10 OK race and 1.5-mile walk on Labor Day
weekend. The annual event will begin at 7:30
a.m. Sept. 5, a half hour earlier than last year.
After the race, runners can freshen up with
a free shower at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center and spend the rest of the
day on Amelia Island. Those who use the
showers should bring their own towels.
Runners and walkers can present their race
bib for free admission to Fort Clinch State Park
for the remainder of the day. An awards cere-
mony with door prizes will follow the event with
a grand prize of a four-day, three-night stay at
the Amelia Island Plantation.
The race will again feature professional
scoring from 1st Place Sports in Jacksonville,
using an electronic chip-timing system. The
5K, 10K and 1.5-mile non-competitive walk will
start and finish at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center with the last half of the 10K
running through Fort Clinch State Park.
!. Half-mile and one-mile fun runs for children
10 and younger will begin at 9 a.m. In another
change this year, the kids' runs will be free.
The goal is to encourage young people to run
and make the entire event more affordable for
families, Hill said. Registration is required and
youth finishers will receive a ribbon at the end
of their run.
A popular feature is returning this year -
original T-shirt artwork by Fernandina Beach
artist and sea turtle volunteer Sandra Baker-
Hinton. All pre-registered walkers and 5K/10OK
runners will receive a T-shirt with shirts avail-
able on race day while supplies last. Proceeds
benefit the Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch and
sea turtle patrols inside Fort Clinch State Park
along with the running club's youth running
programs.
Entry fees through Aug. 28 will be $20 per
person or $15 for members of Amelia Island
Runners. After Aug. 28 through race day, the
fee will be $25 for everyone. Pre-registration
ends at 2 p.m. Sept. 3, but there will be race-


day registration from 6-7 a.m. at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center.
Entry forms and online registration are
available at the club's website,
www.AmelialslandRunners.com. Forms are
also available at Club 14 Fitness, Red Otter
Outfitters and other locations. Visit the AIR
website or call 277-3676.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports Association
meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee. Call 261-1075 or
277-1609 for information.

Soccer referee course offered
The following soccer club is hosting the
Grade 8 (entry level) referee course. Visit
http://fsr-inc.com/ Welcome.aspx to register.
Contact Mike Goodman, director of coaching
of Amelia Island Youth Soccer, at
aiydoc@aiysoccer.com with questions.
Jacksonville Soccer Club from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Aug. 22 and from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 23 (test
night) at Chuck Rogers soccer park behind
First Christian Church of Jacksonville, 11924
San Jose Road, Jacksonville.

Yoga classes
* Y Yoga, 961687-201E Gateway Blvd.,
offers a stretch and strengthening class,
pilates, yin, yoga core ball, yoga for longevity,
beach yoga and basic yoga. Call 415-9642.
* Dome Healing Center, 5024 First Coast
Hwy., offers Sivananda/Amrit style yoga for all
levels and meditation and relaxation classes.
For information, call 277-3663 or visit dome-
healingcenter.com.
* Anytime Fitness, 463646 SR 200 Suite 4
in Yulee. Call 225-8400 or visit www.anytimefit-
ness.com.
* Island Rejuvacations offers yoga and
lunch at Nassau Health Foods, 833 T.J.
Courson Road. Call 277-3158.
* Go Yoga, Inc. offers Power Vinyasa at
Bean School of Dance, 25 N. Third St. Call
(904) 335-0539 or visit www.goyogainc.com.

Zumba classes
* Kinderstudios, 1897 Island Walkway Call
Alexandra Carroll at 415-0954.
* Bean School of Dance, 25 N. Third St.
Call 261-DANC.
* A Chance To Dance, 474378 SR200. Call
753-3407 or email buffyactd@gmail.com.
* Anytime Fitness, 463646 SR 200 Suite 4
in Yulee. Call 225-8400 or visit www.anytimefit-
ness.com.
* Club 14 Fitness, 1114 South 14th St.,
Fernandina Beach. Call 261-0557.

Fitness programs
* Anytime Fitness, 463646 SR 200 Suite 4
in Yulee, offers step and sculpt, strength train-
ing and abs, body sculpt and step aerobics.
Call 225-8400 or visit www.anytimefitness.
com. FitKidz for ages 4-11 is also offered. Call
699-5408 or e-mail reedntoni @aol.com.
* Club 14 Fitness, 1114 South 14th St.,
offers nutritional counseling, personal training,
group fitness and cycling, strength training and
cardio, childcare, juice bar, tanning and
saunas. Visit www.clubl4fitness.com.
* The McArthur Family YMCA, 1915 Citrona
Drive, offers various fitness programs. Call
261-1080. Visit www.firstcoastymca.org.
Programs are also offered in Yulee (call 225-
2550) and Hilliard (call (904) 845-2733).
* Amelia Island Personal Fitness, Amelia
Parkway Medical Plaza, 2416 Lynndale Road,
Suite 100, is a personal training studio dedicat-
ed to promoting lifelong health and fitness
through appropriate exercise and nutrition,
focusing on preventing diabetes, cancer and
heart disease. Call 261-0698 for information.

Challenger Bowling
Nassau Challenger Bowling League for the
physically and mentally challenged meets the
second Saturday of the month from 3-5 p.m. at
the Strikers Family Bowling Center in Yulee.
Call Melinda Willaford at 261-3136.

Umpires recruited
Baseball and softball umpires can earn
extra cash by joining the fastest growing
umpires association in Northeast Florida, the
River City Umpires Association. Contact Terry
Padgett at (904) 879-6442 or Aaron Knowles
at (904) 962-7184.
River City Umpires is currently recruiting
men and women interested in officiating base-
ball and softball and live or work in Baker,
Bradford, Clay, Duval, Putnam, St. Johns or
Nassau county. Visit www.rivercityumps.com.


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MAGENTA BLACK


C







B SECTION NEWS-LEADER


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THEJACKSONVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
This season the JSO welcomes, among others, Dirty Martini, above, and Itzhak Perlman, right.


JSO season a reason to celebrate


PAUL WITKOWSKI
For the News Leader


T his is certainly
Jacksonville's year to cele-
brate a legacy of great
music, from awe-inspiring
classics to fabulous guest artists
and entertainers to a landmark 60th
Anniversary Concert with Itzhak
Perlman.
Undeniably the reigning virtu-
oso of the violin, Perlman is synony-
mous with landmark events and
crowning artistic achievements.
The 60th Anniversary Celebration
Concert featuring Perlman with the
Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra
takes place on Jan. 9, 2010, in
Jacoby Symphony Hall.
Over the decades, the
Jacksonville Symphony has elevated
the community with the highest
quality of artistry. And for the past
10 years, Music Director and


Principal Conductor Fabio Mechetti
has collaborated with JSO to contin-
ually reach new heights.
Some of the highlights with
Mechetti at the helm for next sea-
son's Fidelity National Financial
Masterworks series include
Tchaikovsky's "Path6tique,"
Beethoven's "Eroica," the Van
Cliburn Gold Medalist Debut,
Pictures at an Exhibition and a
Fresh Ink World Premiere. We also
welcome to the stage such stellar
guest artists as conductor JoAnn
Falletta, violinist Chee-Yun, cellist
Alisa Weilerstein and pianist
Arnaldo Cohen.
Enjoying the finest in live sym-
phonic entertainment is what
Northeast Florida audiences have
come to expect, and the JSO's 2009-
10 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of
Florida Pops Series is no exception,
JSO Continued on 3B


Music Director and Principal Conductor Fabio Mechetti, above.


'Jazz at Palace' offers musical 'potpourri'


For the News Leader
The Dynamic Les DeMerle Jazz
All Stars are set to swing in a variety
of jazz styles for its preview of the
2009 Les DeMerle Amelia Island
Jazz Festival, Thursday from 7-9
p.m. at the newly renovated Palace
Saloon in Fernandina Beach.
The event, which will benefit the
educational programs and concerts
of the festival, will present a crack
seven-piece jazz ensemble led by
DeMerle on drums and will feature
some of the country's finest musi-
cians, including multi-instrumental-
ist Dr. Bill Prince, formerly with,
among others, Buddy Rich and
Clark Terry, trumpeter Marvin
Ferebee, University of North
Florida music professor Marc
Dickman on trombone, the dexter-
ous and ever exciting pianist Doug
Matthews, bassist Ernie Ealum and
sizzling vocalist Bonnie Eisele.


This year's Palace show promis-
es to be another fun-filled and
informative evening in the festival
tradition which will showcase a pot-
pourri of music - big band, be-bop,
Dixieland and smooth - along with
announcements of all festival activi-
ty, events and schedules.
A special DVD presentation, pro-
duced by festival board member
Stan Cottle, will be shown which
includes footage of the 2009 head-
liner David Sanborn. The Amelia
Island Jazz Festival runs 10 days
from Oct. 2-11, and Sanborn will
appear two nights, Oct. 9 and 10, at
the new First Baptist Church
Auditorium, 1600 S. Eighth St.
DeMerle and Eisele, who recent-
ly returned to Fernandina Beach
from a three-month European
cruise schedule via Celebrity
Cruises, are excited to be back
home and primed to kick off the
Jazz Festival season.


"We always have a great time at
the Palace show, and this year will
be truly special," said DeMerle. "It
was fun making so many new fans
and friends while performing on the
ship, some of whom hope to attend
the festival," he added. "But there's
nothing like playing in front of our
home crowd."
Advance tickets to "Jazz At The
Palace" can be purchased for $25 at
the UPS Store in the Island Walk
Shopping Center, 1417 Sadler Road,
277-0820, at the UPS Store, 46368
State Road 2000, Suite 1,Yulee, 225-
8840, online at www.ameliaislandjaz-
zfestival.com, or at the door if not
sold out prior to the show.
From 6-7 p.m. before the show,
Amelia Island Carriages will be
offering complimentary carriage
rides around the downtown area to
all ticket holders.
All proceeds benefit the Amelia
Island Jazz Festival, a not-for-profit


David Sanborn will perform at
this year's Amelia Island Jazz
Festival.

501(c)3 corporation, and its newly
established jazz scholarship pro-
JAZZ Continued on 2B


ROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
MusIc NOTES
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009
/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


New Zealand

sauvignon

blanc still

outshines

ROBERT M. WEINTRAUB
For the News-Leader
Judging a wine by someone
else's opinion, regardless of how
expert, can drive you nuts!
Nothing beats your own taste and
preferences, which reinforces my
oft' stated mantra: Never fear a
new wine.
Sauvignon blanc has been one
of my favorite white wines (and
that of many others, judging from
the reac-
& tion to
qINE o& last
month's

NERS chardon-
expos6). I
recently came across a column in
the New York Times that lamented
a decline in New Zealand sauvi-
gnon blanc. A panel of "experts"
sampled 25 kiwi SBs and "found
too many wines that seemed aimed
at being commercially inoffensive
..." and "the style has definitely
changed."
Curious, and always prepared
to challenge my assumptions, we
assembled a panel of six ranging
from expert to novice to sample
nine locally found SBs recom-
mended by aficionados. (I had win-
nowed the list from 15 as several
were not up to my standard.)
Included in the selection were
three from New Zealand, three
from South Africa, one from Chile
and two from California. They
were priced between $7 and $18.
French Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume
were more than $20 and so were
not included.
For those who rave about New
Zealand sauvignon blanc and fret
over the Times' experts' declama-
tions, have no fear. The three
wines from the South Island were
the clear favorites, with Chilean
and Napa contestants close
behind. One of the South Africans
is our Best Buy.
The sauvignon blanc grape
owes a lot to New Zealand. Thirty
years or so ago it was virtually
unknown. While it is a component
of white Bordeaux, and it makes
delicious white wines in the Loire
Valley, particularly in Sancerre and
Pouilly-Fum6, and it is part of the
blend in the great sweet wines of
Sauternes, the grape's name never
appears on those French labels. I
discovered Sancerre a half century
ago and loved is crisp, citrus fla-
vor; but it was only recently that I
discovered sauvignon blanc wines
from New Zealand as French
wines became too pricey and hard
to find in Northeast Florida.
Robert Mondavi didn't help. He
WINE Continued on 2B


OFNTHE ISLAND


GULLAH/GEECHEE FESTIVAL
The Gullah/Geechee Nation International
Music & Movement Festival
will take people on a historic
three-day journey to the B
Golden Isles Aug. 21-23. This
annual celebration, which
culminates with events on *
Aug.23 in O'Neil,
Nassauville and American
Beach, highlights authentic
presentations of
Gullah/Geechee culture by
natives of the Gullah/Geechee Nation. It starts in
Savannah, with events also at St. Simons Island,
Jekyll Island and Brunswick, Ga.
For more details, including group discounts,
call (843) 838-1171 or e-mail GullGeeCo�aol.com
or AMPTurnItUp�aol.com.

BACK TO SCHOOL WEEKEND


Enjoy a back to school
weekend from 8 a.m.-5 p.m
Aug. 21 at the MLK Center.
1200 Elm St., Fernandina
Beach, including a
school supplies give-
away and cookout under


Ssuc
U Y
U !:A
SCHOOL


the pavilions courtesy of Trinity United
Methodist Church and Pastor Mark Garvin.
There will be free physical and free vision
screenings from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., courtesy of the
Wal-Mart Vision Center, and from 9-11 p.m., enjoy
the movie "Free Willy" by the pool.

MUSIC AND SKATE DEMO
A"Back 2 Skool Rock-N-
Rollers Musik Fest & Skate
Demo" will be held Aug. 22
from 5 p.m. to dusk at the
Skate Park at Main Beach in
Fernandina Beach.
Performers include Dear
Dakota, The Shoreline,
American Science and Love Always. Admission
is free.

QUILT SHOW
A Yulee Quilt Group fundraiser, Traditions and
Treasures quilt show, will be held at Yulee United
Methodist Church on Aug. 21 from 5-9 p.m. A $12
donation includes the quilt show (over 50 quilts),
door prize ticket, one raffle ticket for a full/queen
quilt, plus a catered dinner (parmesan crusted
chicken plus dessert buffet) and Julie's trunk
show, 'A Florida Quilt Collage." Seating is limited.
Call or e-mail for tickets. Proceeds go to the


Health Ministry at
YUMC, toward the pur-
chase of a heart defibril- T
lator machine.
Contact Julie Mainor F
at (904) 571-9172 or
cheezdoodle02@
yahoo.com.
SPAGHETTI DINNER
Rescuing Animals in Nassau, or RAIN, will
hold its annual spaghetti dinner fundraiser from
4-8 p.m. Aug. 22 at the
Atlantic Avenue
Recreation
Center in
Fernandina
Beach.e
Tickets
are $10 and
include spaghetti with sauce of choice, salad,
bread, drink and dessert. There will also be a
silent auction and entertainment.
Tickets are on sale at the Fernandina Beach
Animal Clinic, Lofton Creek Animal Clinic,
Nassau Veterinary Clinic, Bark Avenue Pet
Boutique and Bucky's Best Friends Card and Gift.
For information call RAIN at (904) 879-5861 or e-
mail rainhumane�yahoo.com.




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, August 14, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

Join Team Seth Atkins for
a Spirit Night at Chick-fil-A
in Yulee to bring awareness
and support to Down syn-
drome from 5-8 p.m.
tonight. A portion of sales
inside or through the drive-
through will be donated to the
Down Syndrome Association
of Jacksonville in the name of
Team Seth. There will also be
raffles for all ages to partici-
pate in as well as face paint-
ing and a craft.

American Beach author,
Annette McCollough Myers,
will sign copies of her latest
book, The
Big Sand
Dune and
The Beach ' " .

Books Plus, ,
107 Centre
St.,
Fernandina
Beach today and Aug. 15
from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Aug. 16 from noon-5 p.m.
This is a fascinating his-
toric non-fiction storybook nar-
rative for children to adults
ages 100-plus about the his-
tory of American Beach, the
big sand dune named "Nana"
and MaVynee the "Beach
Lady."
Contact the author at
annettemmyers@bellsouth.ne
t or 261-4396.

Celebrate the 40th
Anniversary of Woodstock
with Woofstock at the
Nassau Humane Society
Dog Park on Aug. 15 from 5-
10 p.m. Enjoy mellow music
by Hupp and Ray. Admission
is $15 for adults and $10 for
kids and includes catfish and
hotdogs, coleslaw, fries and
dessert. Beer and wine will be
available for purchase. Best-
dressed wins a prize.
Tickets are available at the
Dog Park (across from the
Fernandina Beach airport)
and Redbones Dog Bakery
on South Eighth Street in the
Pelican Palms Plaza.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
will hold its annual Walk and
Candlelight Vigil commemo-
rating International Homeless


CATS & DOGS
ACROSS
1. Describes
Michael
Douglas'
instinct?
6. Sis' sibling
9. TV classic

13. Popular
Russian female
name
14. Baseball player
Gehrig
15. Brawl
16. Capital of
Jordan
17. -Wan
Kenobi
18. Reason by
deduction
19. *" cats
and dogs"
21. *Popular sports
car
23. Compass point
between NE and
E
24. Often taken
with bible
25. Cousin to "The
Addams Family"
28. European sea
eagles
30. Principles of
right and wrong
35. *They often
need to be cut
out
37. Voice in elec-
tion
39. Luxurious ride
40. Viking name
41. Spooky
43. *It's where the
tail is
44. Movie"
Last Night"
46. Italian money
47. Artist's inspira-


Animals Day on Aug. 15 at
Central Park on Atlantic
Avenue in Fernandina Beach.
The two-mile walk starts at
6:30 p.m. and is followed by a
candlelight vigil. Contact Cats
Angels at 321-2267, e-mail
catsangels@bellsouth.net or
visit the Thrift Store and
Adoption Center at 709 S.
Eighth St.

Miss Kate's Pre K, 1303
Jasmine St., Fernandina
Beach, is offering "I'm Ready
for Kindergarten," a two-day
refresher session for children
entering kindergarten, Aug. 17
and 18 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Fee is $22; enrollment is
limited. Parents provide lunch.
To register your child, contact
Miss Kate at 321-0049 or at
misskatesprek@yahoo.com.

The next WIN WIN meet-
ing is Aug 17 at 6:30 p.m.,
hosted by Karen Lee of
Heron's Swim & Sport and
Judy Richardson of Divine
Finds, 4924 First Coast Hwy.,
Amelia Island.
Women in Nassau helping
Women in Need is a network-
ing group to benefit women
dealing with cancer, through
Gerri's Corner.
Bring a $35 check payable
to WIN WIN, which includes
dinner and a beverage. To
RSVP contact Connie at 759-
0745 or e-mail connie@win-
winnassau.com.

On Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. the
General Joseph Finnegan
Camp 745 and the Order of
the Confederate Rose will
muster at the Pig BBQ in
Callahan. Some members
and guests come earlier to
complete their meal before
the program begins.
Guest speaker, electrical
power generation engineer
Michael L. Thornton of
Jacksonville will share
"Confederate Thoughts on
Self Defense." There will be
music and poetry of the 1861 -
1865 period. Call (904) 571-
1177.

Savannah Grand of
Amelia Island Assisted Living
Community will hold a "Luau
Party" on Aug. 21, with
entertainment at 4 p.m. by


tion
48. Picture with
many pieces
50. A rate or tax
52. Seat in church
53. Deep wound
55. All good things
do this?
57. Bad rep
60. *Turf of rodent
"dog"
64. Positive elec-
trode
65. Double-decker,
e.g.
67. Pay hike
68. Humbler
69. 1/6 inch in
printing, pl.
70. Grassy _ ,
suspected site of
JFK's assassin
71. Title for Turkish
leader
72. Mob snitch
73. Fills to satisfac-
tion
DOWN
1. Brian Urlacher,
e.g.
2. mater
3. 18-wheeler
4. Foolish
5. *Dog tooth?
6. Web journal
7. Actor Lowe, e.g.
8. Spirit communi-
cator
9. Carte du jour
10. Romeo
11. Tiresias in
"Oedipus Rex",
e.g.
12. H in HMS
15. Mouse
20. Impulse trans-
mitter
22. "He and
drank the pre-
cious words..."


24. Big bird
25. Girder with "I"
cross section
26. Speed-up but-
ton
27. Many sets of
three
29. " , Born is
the King of
Israel!"
31. Stay out of its
way
32. Frost over
33. *Some dogs do
it to cats or cars
34. Spread by
scattering
36. Arctic jaeger
38. Irish name of
Ireland
42. One who
relieves
45. *Cat of the
Hundred Acre
Wood
49. Twin _, as in
engine
51. L. Carroll and
J. Heller's char-
acters
54. * Tooth
Tiger of the Ice
Age
56. The People's
Princess
57. Tear in panty-
hose
58. Baloney
59. It comes to
mind
60. " , over
here"
61. Something
that's very funny
62. of Man
63. Electric fish
64. Arabic garment
66. *"The Truth
About Cats and
Dogs" star


MUSIC NOTES


Whitby Quinn
Whitby Quinn will perform the New
Hollywood Songs from 8-11 p.m. tonight at
Cafe Karibrew, corner of Alachua and North
Third streets.
As Whitby Quinn, Fernandina Beach
songwriters, Robert H. Sanders (lead
vocal/acoustic guitar) and Michael J.
Howerton (vocals/acoustic and electric guitar)
combine their performance and songwriting
talents in an acoustic eclectic sound that is
reminiscent of America, the Eagles and
James Taylor.
The duo's CD "She's Gone" will be avail-
able for a special price, when you ask for the
"Hollywood" deal. Come hear some of the
new songs to be released on the upcoming
project, "Down In Hollywood."

Jazz and wine
The Intercoastal Wine Company, 10 N.
Second St., will present Fernandina's own,
Gabriel Arnold, a saxophone soloist who
brings a diversified blend of styles ranging
from classic jazz, swing to Latin and R&B on
Aug. 15 from 7-9 p.m. Couple his sax music
with the great art of Susi Sax, for the makings
for a great evening. Call 321-1300.
Summer jazz series
The Historic American Beach "Summer
Jazz Series" continues its free concerts with
Instant Groove. The band will provide great


"Pearls of the Pacific"
Polynesian dancers and din-
ner at 5 p.m.
Cost is $5. Reservations
are required. RSVP to Wendy
at 321-0898 by Aug. 17.

On Aug. 22, Redbones
Dog Bakery and Boutique
will host its next free dog
wash and pet adoption from
10 a.m.-4 p.m., along with
specials on its baked dog
treats. All donations benefit
the Nassau Humane Society.
Redbones is located at 809 S.
Eighth St. in the Pelican
Palms shops. Call 321-0020.

Join the Nassau Humane
Society on Aug. 25 anytime
from 5-10 p.m. at Chili's
restaurant in Yulee for the
Give Back' Night supporting
the non-profit shelter.
Ten percent of your bill will
be donated to the Nassau
Humane Society. Flyers will
be provided via e-mail, at the
Dog Park, local merchants,
the Chamber of Commerce,
and at the restaurant. They
must be attached to your din-
ing bill for the rebate.
For information call Sandy
Balzer at 491-6146.

Nassau County Gators
will gather for a social and
dinner at Sliders Seaside Grill
on Fletcher Avenue,
Fernandina Beach, Aug. 27
at 6 p.m. At 7:15 p.m. guest
speaker Dan Hicken, First
Coast News sportscaster and
radio talk show host, will
share his insight and humor


jazz among the ocean breezes at Burney
Park (corner of Gregg and Burney) at
American Beach from 5-8 p.m. on Aug. 22.
Bring your chairs to enjoy this free event at
the beach, with food by Woody's BarBQ of
Yulee. For information call 277-7960.
Donations to American Beach Property
Owner's Association (ABPOA) for outstanding
projects are appreciated.

Story&Song
The next Evening of Story & Song in
Burns Hall at St. Peter's Episcopal Church on
Sept. 5 will feature award-winning Welsh
singer/songwriter David Llewellyn.
Coal dust and the small coal mining val-
leys of South Wales supplied a down to earth
upbringing whose values and early lessons
Llewellyn still holds dear. But at 17, with a
jacket and guitar in hand he left home to
begin what has been a lifelong passion. In
2007, he won the Kerrville Folk Festival "New
Folk" Competition, and last year, won the
prestigious John Lennon Songwriting
Contest.
Enjoy the wine bar before the show. Doors
open at 7:15 p.m. and the show is at 8 p.m.
Proceeds benefit St. Peter's. Tickets are $15,
and may be purchased in advance at First
Coast Community Bank on South 14th Street
(across from Wal-Mart), or at St. Peter's
Administration Office.
Presented by The Founders of St. Peter's
and Mark and Donna Paz Kauffman.


about the National Champion
Gators. All fans are welcome.
Contact Tommy Roberts at
277-4111 or (904) 335-7326.

The Amelia Island
Ballroom Youth Academy
will hold a community dance
on Aug. 29 at the Peck
Center auditorium. A compli-
mentary class starts at 7 p.m.,
followed by the dance from 8-
11 p.m. Students also will
present a dance exhibition.
Tickets are $10. Children 17
and under accompanied by
an adult admitted free.
Proceeds will benefit the
academy. Contact Felix at
(904) 707-6762.

A Passion 4 Pooches Pet
Spa is holding a Suds 4
Shelters Bath-A-Thon event
on Aug. 29 beginning at 8
a.m. All the proceeds from
dog baths that day will benefit
the Nassau Humane Society.
To schedule your dog's beau-
ty appointment, call 491-1767.
A Passion 4 Pooches Pet Spa
is located at 1881 South 14th
St. in Fernandina.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable


SOLUTION 08.12 WINE Continued from lB

Catching Z's dumbed down sauvignon
M I M ED A T I T L Ts blanc wine to a blander, more
E C 0 N O M M NA UN I T generic white and called it
L 0 A|D 0o F BUN K GALA Fume Blanc, borrowing from
TNT DIEL T EGG I E\R the famous Pouilly-Fum6 of
RAIZ E LE A R D the Loire. Some California
BR A D S TA LA G vintners challenged the
REM IS iO NEME TER Mondavi trend and put classic
EA L LIEN T 0 R EP sauvignon blanc on the mar-
L RR INPN|E SPACES ket, and one of them was
ORDERS AC H ES rated No. 4 in our tasting.
SOnly when New Zealand
S LE A T HAK successfully produced bold,
R A0 T TE SD SA TU pungent, refreshing sauvi-
GA RAT E E EARAC K gnon blanc wines did the rest
G ATE ENT E R I E of the world embrace the
HE RSA EEDS grape. South Africa and Chile


SUDOKU


1 O2

2 34 56

3 781 94
.5
I 9_ _











3 6
| 8 3





4 6 1 8 9



I3 6


Fill in the squares so
that each row, column
and3-by-3box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2009
Sudoku Difficult
Puzzle #1534D


8 9 5 1 3 7 2 6 4
3 7 6 4 8 2 5 1 9
4 2 1 9 6 5 3 7 8
648 3 51 7 92
2 1 7 8 9 6 4 5 3


1 6 4 5 2 9 8 3 7
7 8 2 6 1 3945
5 3 9 7 4 8 1 26


to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560. This is an
alcohol-free event. All 1970-
75 FBHS students and facul-
ty/staff are invited.
* * *
On Sept. 8 First Coast
Oncology - Nassau will
host its inaugural
Celebration Of Survival
event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the
office at 1340 South 18th St.
in Medical Building A, Suite
103.
This is an opportunity to
celebrate cancer patients who
were treated at First Coast
Oncology - Nassau and who
have become cancer sur-
vivors. There will be an edu-
cational component that will
delve into what life is like after
cancer. The event is free and
light refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by
First Coast Cancer
Foundation. For more infor-
mation, or to RSVP, please
call (904) 387-5312.

FILM/THEATER

The Bryceville Library
and the Bryceville Friends
of the Library will be hosting
free movie nights. The first
movie is "Hotel For Dogs"
on Aug. 20 from 5-7 p.m. at
the library, 7280 Motes Road,
Bryceville. The movie is free
and open to everyone and
soft drinks and popcorn will be



began making delicious sauvi-
gnon blancs.
Sauvignon blanc is a
green-skinned grape that
originates from Bordeaux. It
gets its name from the
French sauvage ("wild") and
blanc ("white") due to its ori-
gins as an indigenous grape.
When slightly chilled this
wine pairs well with fish or
cheese. It is also one of the
few wines that go well with
sushi. The Sicilian Contessa
matched our SBs with spiced
shrimp, deviled oysters and
ahi tuna. The wine is usually
consumed young, as it does
not benefit from aging, except
for some oak-aged white
Bordeaux that can age up to
15 years.
Sauvignon blanc has a tart
citrus pungency. It is an
instantly recognizable flavor
that combines lemon, lime or
grapefruit and tropical fruit
with a grassy herbaceous-
ness. The climate in which it
is grown plays an important
role, as does the ground in
which the vines are rooted.
Cool maritime climate
(Bordeaux, Marlborough and
the Cape of Good Hope)
bring out the vibrancy of the
grape. The gravel and chalk
marl of the Loire adds a min-
erality and floral quality to
Sancerre and Puilly-Fum6
that sets these wines apart.
Our tasting panel had diffi-
culty choosing between the
three New Zealand wines.
Whitehaven ($15 at Harris
Teeter) had the edge. It is
introduced by a strong floral
citric aroma with a touch of
peach; a burst of grapefruit
flavor fills the mouth and it
held up best with full-flavored
food. Despite the sharp initial
taste it smoothes out quickly
and its long finish blended



JAZZ Continued from 1B
gram.
For more information,
contact the festival hotline at


available for purchase. For
more information call the
library at 266-9813.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold auditions
for "Educating Rita" at 4
p.m. Aug. 22 and 23 at 209
Cedar St. One man and one
woman are needed for the
cast of this English comedy
about a disillusioned profes-
sor who agrees to take Rita, a
hairdresser who's hungry for
an education, as a private stu-
dent. Performances are
between Nov. 5-21. Call 261-
6749 for more information or
to check out a script.

Fernandina Little Theatre
will hold auditions for two
short classic suspense sto-
ries, "The Tell-Tale Heart"
and "The Lottery" on Aug.
22 at 11:15 a.m. and Aug. 25
at 7:15 p.m. The productions
require minimal rehearsal.
Performers are needed, no
previous experience required,
ages 16 and up, five women
and six men; and ages 8-12,
three to four boys and girls.
Five performances are sched-
uled Oct. 24, 25, 29, 30 and
31. E-mail
fltbiz@peoplepc.com.

The next Free Movie in
Central Park, sponsored by
Prosperity Bank, is "Karate
Kid" on Aug. 29 at 8:30 p.m.
Bring your blankets and lawn
chairs, concessions will be
available for purchase.

Tickets are now on sale for
Norman Beim's comedy,
"Archie's Comeback," the
opening production of the
Fernandina Little Theatre's
18th season.
Believing that her husband
Archie drowned, Lily has
decided to remarry after
seven lonely years - but
suddenly, in pops Archie,
freshly rescued from a desert
island where he's been hav-
ing a wonderful time!
Regular performances are
Sept. 5, 10, 11 and 12 at 7:30
p.m. and Sept. 6 at 2:30 p.m.;
tickets are $16. A special
"Tuesdays for Twelve" per-
formance is Sept. 8 at 7:30
p.m. for $12. Tickets can be
purchased at The UPS Store
in the Publix shopping center
and at FLT, 1014 Beech St.

ART/GALLERIES

Island Art Association
member Susi Sax and select-
ed works by Sid Sax, in retro-
spect, will be on exhibit at the
Intercoastal Wine Company
during August, September
and October. The show is
titled, "Bowl of Lemons,"
the art of Sid Sax and "the
not-so-square-mind" of
Susi Sax.
An Artist Reception will be
held Aug. 27 from 5:30-7:30
p.m. at 10 N. Second St.



nicely with the ahi tuna.
3 Stones ($15 at Amelia
Liquors) was preferred by
two of our tasters who pre-
ferred its smoothness over
the sharper flavor of
Whitehaven. It was also
judged to have slightly more
fruit on the pallet, which con-
tributed to the smoothness.
Kim Crawford ($18 locally
but $15 in Jacksonville) was
very similar to Whitehaven,
but several panelists felt there
was a slight bitterness in the
finish.
Anakena ($8 at Total
Wines), from Chile, was quite
different than the others: A
luscious flowery nose, full of
peach, jasmine, orange blos-
som; strong fruit flavors dom-
inated by grapefruit; a long
aftertaste. Three tasters had
rated it best before they sam-
pled the New Zealand wines.
It was considered more of an
aperitif wine than a food wine,
however.
St. Clements ($11 at
Amelia Liquors), a traditional
sauvignon blanc from Napa
Valley, was rated third best by
two of the tasters because its
length held up well with food.
It would have been the Best
Buy when compared with the
New Zealanders except for
the South African Douglas
Green ($7 with a $1 coupon at
Harris Teeter), which scored
high with three panelists, but
rejected by two others
because of bitterness with the


ginger/garlic marinated
shrimp.
Which only proves that for
each of us to find the I . '"
wine we have to sample many
and (at the risk of losing my
job) not depend on the word
of "experts"; what is delicious
to some can be bitter to oth-
ers.



(904) 504-4772 or visit
www.ameliaislandjazzfesti-
val.com.
E-mail info@ameliaisland-
jazzfestival.com.


+


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009 LEISURE News-Leader


JSO Continued from 1B
with Principal Pops
Conductor Michael Krajewski
and headliners such as Sandi
Patty and Pink Martini, and
tributes to Charlie Chaplin,
Ray Charles, John Williams
and modern Broadway.
The JSO's annual opera
production continues with
Mozart's lighthearted Cosi
fan tutte (Feb. 13, 2010), and
its musical theater collabora-


tion with the cast of the
Alhambra Theatre features a
semi-staged concert version
of Rodgers and
Hammerstein's "Oklahoma!"
(Sept. 18-20, 2009).
This season also commem-
orates the Jacksonville
Symphony Chorus' 25 years
of great music with Orff's
impassioned Carmina Burana
(Nov. 5-7, 2009), and we honor
the 10th season of the majes-
tic Bryan Concert Organ in


Jacoby Symphony Hall with
Saint-Saens "Organ
Symphony" (Jan. 15-16, 2010).
A new Friday Fusion series
features a tasteful variety of
symphonic gems, introduced
from the stage by our artists.
Programs include German,
French, Italian and Latin
musical evenings and audi-
ences can get a taste of the
evening's theme with food
before the concert (for an
additional price). The bar will


stay open afterward for audi-
ences and musicians to min-
gle. Plans are in the works for
visual art, jazz and acoustic
music and more entertaining
elements.
Michael Butterman
returns to the podium as JSO
resident conductor. Currently
serving as music director of
the Boulder Philharmonic
Orchestra and principal con-
ductor for education and out-
reach of the Rochester


Philharmonic Orchestra,
Butterman returns to the JSO,
where he served as associate
conductor from 2000-7, to con-
duct a series of concerts,
including Beethoven's
"Eroica," "German Fusion,"
First Coast Nutcracker,
Handel's Messiah and com-
munity concerts throughout
the area.
Widely regarded as one of
country's finest concert halls,
Robert E. Jacoby Symphony


Hall at the Times-Union
Center for the Performing
Arts delivers an acoustically
superior live symphonic expe-
rience. And in today's eco-
nomic climate, the JSO offers
a significant value for live per-
forming arts.
Information and tickets are
available through the box
office at (904) 354-5547 and at
www.jaxsymphony.org,
including the season
brochure.


SCHOLARSHIPS


MENTORS & HOPE


0 ..


Thanks to You.


TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN ~ 2008-2009
Take Stock in Children is a scholarship and mentoring program that provides academically
promising children from deserving families in Nassau County with scholarships
to college or vocational school and guidance from caring mentors.


HIGHLIGHTS of 2008-2009


* 98% students enrolled remain in Take Stock
* 19 Take Stock graduates received scholarships
* 43 new students given Take Stock opportunity
* State-wide Excellence in Mentoring Award
* Over 2500 volunteer hours donated
* 5th "Hollar for a Dollar" benefit by FCCJ Staff


* 3rd Annual Mentor-Student Luncheon
* Field Trip to Florida State College
at Jacksonville North Campus
* 13th Annual Awards Celebration Event
* 5th Light Up a Life Benefit at
Spa & Shops of Amelia Island Plantation


Malikah Akbar, FBHS
Florida Memorial University


Shayona Alderman, HMS/HS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


Chris Cardona, YHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville




I''





Cassandra Craft, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville










Cierra Green, YHS
University of West Florida


2008-09 Take Stock ii
Callahan Middle School
Austin Anderson, Lindsey Coppola, Brandi Cunliffe,
Georgia Lavender, Ashley Ponce,
Dalton Rapoza, Shelby Wolfe

Hilliard Middle/Senior High School
Kory Bryant, Megan Caudill, Andrew Coiro, Johanna Diaz,
Miriah Durrance, Devin Emery, Dustin Emery, Kalyn Frazier,
Morgan Harris, Raegan Hodges, Katie Kennedy,
Nora Prestigiacomo, Emmalee Smith, Tabitha Spencer


Joyce Aldrich
W.L. Amos, MD
Sylvie & Dooley Baxter
Betty & David Berkman
Julie & Jeffrey Blake
Sheila & Bill Braddock
Mary & Rod Brannen
Anne &Tom Burns
Sylvia Cherry
Margaret & Neil Childs
Lucille Dean
Gracia & Wally Drew
Patricia & Leonard Ermold
Judy & David Easterly
Judy Easterly's Family
Cherry & Dan Gallagher
Pat & Fred Gieg, Jr.
JoAnn & Bill Gingrich
Gayle & Bill Gower
Andrea & Corky Hoffman
Dorothy & Dean Houk


Gail Cook
Ann Buchanan
Joan Conner
Rita Kirkland
Barbara Leech
Kay Ronveaux
Dottie Ruis
Stuart Smith
Kerry Woods
Merritt Carlton
Barbara Fowler-
Browning
Niel Hampton
Bill Hansberry
Greg Jones
John Landregan
Penny Landregan
Signe Lupfer
Patsy Page
Mary Alice Southwick
Rita Tiensch
John Zimmerman
Ted Combs
Pam Fleming
Doug Gates


Susan Howard
Suzanne Hughes
Leena & Jaswant Jadeja
Dianne & Richard Johnson
Sandy & Luke Karlovec
Suzanne Keith &
Don McCurry
Lorraine & Tom King
Lee & Roger Kintzel
Laura Kitson, DMD
Kevin Koons
Lois & Brien Laing
Karen & Coleman Langshaw
Mary Ellen & Norm Ledwin
Mary & Brad Lesher
Claudette Lowary
Jody & Doug Mackle
Sandy & Donn Mann
Mary & Walter Maupay, Jr.
Enid & Curtis Meltzer
Michael & Stuart Moore


Eve Jones
Phil Patton
Jane Preston
Cheryl Raulerson
Elisa Simpson
Doris Smith
Haley Spiers
Kevin Webb
Dotti Williams
Larry Jones
Phillip Allen
Margaret Allen
Carrie Mizell
Marissa Chenoweth
Rachel Davis
Dana FitzGerald
Ginger Hill
Constance Holmes
Bev Keigwin
Arn Kroll
Carol Kimmel
Mary Ellen Ledwin
Deann Loum
Dennis Murray
Ed O'Rourke


n Children Scholars
Fernandina Beach Middle School
Emmie Clark, Deonna Clinton, Haley DeVol, Bo Garner,
Camila Gomez, Wendall McGahee, Taniya McNeil,
Nicholas Vopitta, Carter Williams, lyana Williams

Yulee Middle School
Tristyn Bennett, Austin Bernard, Micheala Bowen,
Garrett Gagnon, James Gardner, Jessimine Gonzalez,
Carrie Hicks, Victoria Lockett, Destiny Mullikin,
Kaitlyn Pietrusiak, Jennifer Portillo, Joseph Turner


Contributors
jean D. Pitcher
Jennifer & Reinhold Priek
Jane & Ted Preston
Dianne & Charles Rice
Jackye & Gary Rubin
Sherri Sears
Rachel & Clayton Smith
Jan & Stuart Smith
Beverly & Robert Stormoen
Anthony Stubits, DO
Barbara Webster
Mike Weinstein
Campaign Fund
Ashley Woolley
jean & Joseph Wyatt
Charlotte & John
Zimmerman
Amelia Insurance Agency
Amelia Island Plantation
Amelia Island Tennis
Committee

Mentors


Kay Shea
jackye Rubin
Sue Thornton
Shelley Walker
Rosalie Wessel
Gene Canal
Theresa Cushman
Steve Fahlgren
Stephanie Gregory
Vickie & Jim Grethe
Jennifer Hall
Susan Mowery
Phyllis Holmes
Charlie Holmes
Donald Humphreys
Pauline Kawchak
William Lorick
Diane & Dennis
MacDonell
Joan Meserve
Betty Nielsen
Julie & David Smith
Forrest Wheeler
Debra Sutton
Lynn Thomas


Advanced Rehabilitation-FB
Advanced Rehabilitation-GA
Bank of America
Brandies Hardware
Cafe Karibo
Classic Carpets
Cotner & Associates
Dome Healing Center
Farm Credit of North Florida
Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Fernandina Beach
Animal Clinic
First Coast Community Banks
First Coast Workforce Dev.
First National Bank
Florida State College
at Jacksonville
Florida State College
Foundation, Inc.
Florida Prepaid College
Foundation


Dee Torre
Kristin Pickett
Beth Reynolds
jeremy Reynolds
John Page
Dawn West
Lee Ann Rhoden
Diane Williams
Rhonda Lowe
Adam Kaufman
Donna Cappucio
Charlie Houk
Robyn Nemes
Marge Wilson
Hal Schwartz
Amanda Bishop
Barbara Stokes
Audra Parden
Lynne Anderson
Wilma Allen
Jill Powers
Beverly Hall
David Keay
Gail Sansafar
Arlene Filkoff


Ted Preston
Janet de Tarnows
Neil Childs
Rebecca Cofielc
Sara Benzel
Alan Donaldsor
Judy Easterly
Cecy Koppel
Ashley Mclntyr
Don Millen
Kristi Nighbert
Jessie Pickett
Wanda Saundei
Joyce Thomas
Sara Warr
Anita Zeidman
Lynda Smith
Chris Craig
Mike Cole
Emily Broughto
Kay Stokes
Kristi Nighbert
Mary Ellen Carrc
Joe Putnam
Brandon Youn


GFWC Woman's Club
Kiwanis Club of
Fernandina Beach
LeClos of Amelia Island
Owens, Van Etta &
Kitson, PA
Merck Partnership of Giving
Nassau County Record
Nassau County School Board
Nassau County Builder's
Association
Michael Paul's FormalWear
Pilates of Amelia
Property Management
Systems
Publix Super Markets, Inc.
Southeastern Banks
Staff of Florida State College
at Jacksonville Nassau Center
Town of Hilliard
Optimist Club of Yulee


Valerie Johnson
sky Mimi Elwell
Joan Krull
d Ashley Woolley
Nancy Maxwell
n Adriana Vasquez
Ted Dinwiddie
Joe Shephard
e Christian Lyons
Karen Lyons
Paul Whittenburg
Michelle Carlyle
rs Nancy O'Rourke
Danyelle Minchew
Dan Sanford
Natalie Millien
Noelle Perry
Betsy Griffin-Forkey
Tony Wilson
)n Billy Robertson
Leslie Ritter
Karen Goertler
oll Doug Grant
Marilyn Gordon
g


Daneen Johnson, FBHS
University of Central Florida


Domonic Jones, YHS
The Citadel


Tutors

Math ~~ Mike Cipriano, Donna DiConstanza, Ted Preston


Leadership Council ~ SARA BENZEL - Chair
Mary Brannen, Mary Duffy, David Easterly, Cherry Gallagher, Betty Holland, Don Hughes, Larry Jones,
Susan Mowery, Jane Preston, Jackye Rubin, Dr. John Ruis, Stuart Smith, Dee Torre, Dotti Williams, John Zimmerman

Take Stock in Children of Nassau County in affiliation
with Florida State College at Jacksonville and the
Florida State College Foundation, Inc.

Florida State College at Jacksonville


ANli STOH II1

(H I I Ri


Betty P. Cook Nassau Center
76346 William Burgess Boulevard


Yulee, FL 32097


Kristin Varnes, HM/SHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville










India Walthour, YHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


904.548.4464


JODY MACKLE, Program Director
Student Advocates ~ Joanne Roach, Donna Givens and Barbara Leech


Ashley Wheeler, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


Casey Wingate, YHS
Florida State College at Jacksonville


Kenny Zodel, HM/SHS
Florida State College at Jacksonville


-nvrsy fWs loiaFoid tt oleea acsnil


JaKarra Kemp, HM/SHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville











Anna Pollard, FBHS
University of Central Florida


Cory Prescott, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville










Adrieanna Robinson, FBHS
Tallahassee Community
College


William Trent, WNHS
Florida State College
at Jacksonville


BLACK


Amanda Woods, FBHS
Univeristy of West Florida


NL/PSA














4 CLASSIFIED


NEWS-LEADER / FRIDAY, AUGUST 14,2009


To PLACE AN AD, CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE - WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 901 Automobiles
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms & Acreage 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercial/Retail 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 4B


102 Lost & Found
DOG MISSING - since Sat. night from
Hart Terrace & Lem Turner, Callahan.
Sm 10-lb male Dachshund mix, black
w/2 wht hairs on rt shoulder, no collar.
Name "Jet". Small reward. No quest-
ions asked. PIs call (904)879-1182.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.


S 104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF


105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.










is ..I .,, rh . I II .,, .r . ' ,
* EXPERIENCED
HOUSEKEEPERS, SUPERVISORS
* EXPERIENCED FRONT DESK
ASSOCIATES-ALL SHIFTS

Come join our enthusiastic family,
where we will know your name.
Background check required
No pagers or cell phones
Apply in person
2707 Sadler Rd.
Fernandina Beach, FL
NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE


107 Special OccasionI
FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF IRENE
SMITH - will be celebrating her 90th
birthday at Amelia Walk Clubhouse on
August 15th.




201 Help Wanted
LOGISTICS EMPLOYEE NEEDED
ASAP! - *MUST KNOW AES DIRECT
FOR EXPORT DOC FILING *WILL
NEGOTIATE TRUCK, RAIL, BARGE, &
OCEAN RATES FOR ALL DOM & INT'L
MOVEMENTS. *BILINGUAL SPANISH/
ENGLISH IS A PLUS. EMAIL RESUMES
TO OLYSTEELTRADING.JOBSU@OLY
STEEL.COM OR FAX TO (904)491-8688
EOE M/F/D/V
BONITO GRILL & SUSHI - now hiring
for Hostess & Assistant Manager. Apply
between 2:30-3:30pm. Call 261-0508.
CONTRACT FOR BID - General
Cleaning: Approx. 5,000 sq. ft. 17
offices, 5 bathrooms & 2 kitchens.
Please submit bid to Family Support
Services, 86004 Christian Way, Yulee,
FL 32097. Bid closure date is 8-25-09.
Phone #(904) 225-5347, Fax
#(904)225-5349.
RV Delivery Drivers Needed - De-
liver RVs, boats & trucks for PAY! De-
liver to all 48 states & CN. For details
log on to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com.
ANF
SUBSTITUTE FOOD SERVICE
WORKERS
The Nassau County School Board is
currently accepting applications for
substitute Food Service Workers.
Salary is $7.25 per hour and the hours
will vary depending on the school.
Contact Allyn Graves, Food Service
Director, at (904)491-9924 or
(877)813-2298 for further information.
HEAT & AIR TECHS - have recession
proof careers. 3WK training
accreditation. EPA/OSHA certified.
Local job placement assistance.
Financing available. May qualify for
GI/VA benefits. (877)994-9904. ANF
YMCA NOW HIRING - After School
Program part time child care positions
in the Fernandina/Yulee area. DCF
certification encouraged; seeking pro-
fessional, positive, and energetic lead-
ership. Please submit an application/
resume to the McArthur YMCA, 1915
Citrona Drive, Fernandina. 261-1080.
OTR DRIVERS - for PTL. Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced NE. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262 www.ptl-inc.com. ANF
DENTAL ASSISTANT - P/T. PIs call
(904)261-6826 or send resume to
(904)261-8181. Robert H. Friedman,
DMD, 2896 S. 8th St., FB 32034.


201 Help Wanted
NOW RECRUITING - Offshore oil/gas
industry. Captains, engineers, cooks,
galleyhands, tankermen, riggers &
entry level. Sign up for training (850)
424-2605 www.offshoremarineindust
ries.com. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
FINAL EXPENSE - Regional Mgr.
opportunity. TV leads, newspaper
inserts, direct mail, lead financing,
exclusive territories, 75% commission
advances. Old American Ins. Co.
(888)344-4003. ANF
ELEMENTS SALON
Hiring an Esthetician. Flex hours. Must
be professional & experienced. (904)
491-0991, ask for Summer or Jessica.
LMT Position Available - in
expanding Chiropractic & Wellness
Center. 2 years minimum experience
required. Please call (912)882-8888.


S 204 Work Wanted
SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN
Small jobs welcomed. (904)277-4777
HOUSE CLEANING - I have openings
to clean your home, weekly, bi-weekly,
or monthly. Experienced and refer-
ences. Call for a bid. (904)261-0780
HARD WORKERS II - House cleaning
and painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


1 206 Child Care
BABYSITTER/NANNY AVAILABLE -
w/experience to watch your children.
Full time or part-time. Very reliable &
flexible. Call Rebecca (904)557-8328.


207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF


301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF

305 Tutoring
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.
PIANO LESSONS - Private Lessons,
Beginner - Intermediate Ages 5-99.
Limited spaces available. Enrolling
now. Walter Parker (904)347-1587.



502 Livestock
& Supplies
HORSE BOARDING - in Yulee. Full
Board $350 per month. Multiple Horse
discount. 583-0278

503 Pets/Supplies
SIAMESE/PERSIAN MIX KITTENS -
Free to good home. (904)225-9940
3 VERY COOL PUPPIES FOR SALE -
Yorkie/Maltese Mix. 8 weeks old. Mom
and Dad CKC registered, on premises.
$375/each. (904)536-3072




S 601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - located at 86282
Hickory Trail, Yulee, Florida in Hickory
Village Subdivision (off of Miner Road).
From 8am-12pm. Join us for great
bargain prices!
COMMUNITY YARD SALE - Bells
River Estates, 3 miles down Chester.
Sat. 8/15, 8am.
BIG MOVING SALE - Yard equipment,
appliances, toddler children's items
including bikes, toys, strollers, clothes.
Sat. 8/15, 8am-12pm. 861516
Worthington Dr., Page Hill Subd.
MULTI FAMILY SALE - Fri., Sat.,
Sun., 8/14 - 8/16. This is a don't miss.
Lots of great items!!!! (904)753-7557.
95003 Petunia Court across from store
in Nassauville.
GARAGE SALE - Fri. & Sat., 8:30am-
4pm. Antiques, dishes, books, clothes,
tools, fishing gear, what-nots, & many
other items. 2.4 miles down Blackrock.
Look for Signs! RAIN CANCELS.
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE - Fri.
8/14 & Sat. 8/15, 8am-? Furniture,
clothes, china cabinet. 85155 Tinya
Rd., Yulee.
YARD SALE - Sat. 8/15. Abaco Island
Dr., off Old Nassauville Rd. Antiques,
golf clubs, & misc items of all kinds.
Must see. 8am-lpm.
YARD SALE - off Barnwell Rd., 95207
Twin Oaks Ln. 8am-lpm. Lots of stuff.


601 Garage Sales |
HUGE 8-FAMILY YARD SALE - at
Kelley Pest Control on the corner of
10th & Lime. Fri. & Sat., 8am-2pm.
Rain or shine.
GARAGE SALE - Fri. 8/14, Sat. 8/15,
& Sun. 8/16, 8am-? 86369 Jean Rd.
New guns, freezer, refrig., knick-
knacks, old pictures, dryer, furniture,
misc. 45 cal carbine rifle NIB, 308
tactical NIB, 22 with scope NIB. Rain
dates 22nd, 23rd, 24th.
LOTS OF NEAT STUFF - Fri. 8/14 &
Sat. 8/15, 8am-3pm. 96108 Speckled
Trout Trail off Barnwell Rd.
YARD SALE - Fri. 8/14 & Sat. 8/15,
9am-2pm. Books, glass, toys. Too
much to list. 96728 Commodore Point
Dr. (Heron Isles off Chester Rd. in
Yulee). Rain cancels.
YARD SALE - 3141 Bailey Rd. Fri.
8/14 & Sat. 8/15, 8am-5pm.
NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALE -
Fri. 8/14, 1-5pm & Sat. 8/15, 10am-
2pm. No early birds. Natures Walk
Subdivision. Multiple families. Rain or
shine.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE
1216 Fir St. Sat. 8/15, 8am-?.
YULEE YARD SALE - Thurs. 8/13, Fri.
8/14, & Sat. 8/15, 8am-4pm. Off
Harts Rd., west to 86204 Hayley PI.
Lots of stuff!


615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupply.com. ANF

616 Storage/Warehouses
STEEL BUILDING SALE - Priced to
sell. Quick delivery. Easy do-it-yourself
construction. 25x40 $5,990. 30x40
$6,900. 35x50 $9,750. 40x60
$11,600. 48x90 $23,400. End optional.
Others. Pioneer (800)668-5422. ANF

S 618 Auctions
LIVE TELEVISED - RE Auctions 3pm
EST, 8/22. 70+ home sell absolute. Bid
online: williamsuction.com/absolute.
Watch on Dish network Ch. 217 *
DirecTV Ch. 347. (800)801-8003. ANF

S 624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628

1 625 Free Items


602 Articles for Sale FREE RABBIT CAGE - Holds about 30
rabbits. Call (904)491-4970.


KING MATTRESS - No box spring.
Restonic Heirloom pillow top. Rarely
used, absolutely clean. $200. Rich
(904)502-3521.


RECREATION


GOLF CART - 2007 Precedent 48 volt. I I
Like new. $2,800. (904)631-5822 701 Boats & Trailers


LG FRIG - & microwave, stainless
steel, like new, $900. Other items:
cushioned barstools w/back, $25/ea.
Ent. center, $25. Local (706)669-0151
GUN SHOW - Sat. 08/15, 9-5 & Sun.
08/16, 9-4. The Morocco Shrine, 3800
St. Johns Bluff Rd., Jax. North Florida
Arms Collectors, (904)461-0273.

603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating I
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.

1611 Home Furnishings
NEW SLEEPER SOFA, $450. Kitchen
table set, $175. Washer & dryer, $150.
Call (201)650-4908.

612 Musical Instruments
ELECTRIC GUITAR - & amp, Epiphone
Studio Goth, black. Line 6 Spider
Modeling amp, hard shell case. Steal
them - $450. Rich (904)502-3521.

613 Television
Radio-Stereo

60" PHILIPS MAGNAVOX BIG
SCREEN TV - $400/OBO. Works great.
Too big for my living room. Call 225-
2927 or 753-0721.


BOAT, TRAILER & MOTOR - $1400.
Will sell separately. Negotiable. Call
(904)321-2657.





804 Amelia Island Homes
2BR/1BA NORTH END HOME -
Detached garage, washer/dryer. Pets
ok. $1000/mo. (253)232-6236
OCEANFRONT - Log Cabin R-3
income. Property remodeled $975K.
Oceanview - Homes needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. Summer
Beach - 2028sf. Short distance to
beach. $415K. Amelia Coastal Realty
261-2770

805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled porch-
es, hot tub. $339,900. (904)556-4500


L


+


806 Waterfront


Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.

1808 Off Island/Yulee
FSBO LOFTON OAKS - Cute family
home, 3BR/2BA, fireplace, fenced
backyard, all appliances. $145,000 or
$1000 to Rent. 277-6791
BEAUTIFUL 2400SF 4BR/3BA -
Hickory Village. $260,000 w/$10,000
bonus to buyer at closing. Call
(904)318-6018.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrityover 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED ,'

Please Call Us At
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES


Xeeley Cleaning &Mgt.
Services Inc.
Bonded Insured
'We offer "green cleaning"
Non-rental property mgmt.
Ca fXeCley (904)335-1370
EmaitCXelfeyCM S@yahoo.com




dNV TIME

Window & House

Cleaning

(904) 583-6331




CLEANINGISERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed e Bonded * Insurance
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
9044911971 * Cell: 904-742-8430
E-mail: justforyouserv@aol.com


CONCRETE


'NICK ISABELLA, INC
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
S LICENSE #694 -A


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duste
(904) 261-1940


CONSTRUCTION


BRANNAN

CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES

QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages,,

s16,495C
24x ,F ,ood " F m ly






GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, Inc "
"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much!
operator or door replacements *Transmitter replacement
SBroken springs Stripped gears
Cables Service for all makes & models
904-277-2086


FARMERS MARKET


9am-lpm


mu


HOME IMPROVEMENT


Repair* Rebuild * Remodel
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 * 557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003



OTwl CUSTOM
WOODWORKING, INC.
CUSTOM CABINET o ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
BOOK(CASE TRIM CARPENTRY
HOME REPAIRS REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICES
LICENSED t INSURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 904-551-300

TH :IS[,"][,"] .,_-E 1
AVAl-- A I lE_ : I=
i rtise -. In
The N11 -1,,1 -L eacV' I ilr
Service Direcoclly
Cal 6136 6 nc1fnc


LAWN MAINTENANCE



Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc.
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants & flowers, trees, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation f fiff
* Sprinkler Installation (S1rT -S
* Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354



WELBORN
IRRIGATION
Do it right the first time.
* Complete system designs
* Repairs & modifications
*System tune ups * 10 years experience
Warranty on new installs
Beat any written estimate * Licensed/insured
Free estimates * 904-277-8231


LOCKSMITH


NEW & USED CARS


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 * Yulee

(904) 261-6821


PAINTING


NWl M111 Ilk 4 ll FLYbilKt'
I ItI I I I , . I , I



225.9292



AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITYPAINTING, INC.,
"Call the Professionals"
(904) 753-1689
*RESIDENTIAL
*COMMERCIAL
*INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
*SPECIALIZED FINISHES
*PRESSURE WASHING
& WATER PROOFING

LICENSED * BONDED * INSURED
*PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP AT
AFFORDABLE PRICES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
FREE ESTIMATE
Marc Lawing- Owner/Operator


PRESSURE WASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned & Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353

ROOFING


0 MELIA
ROOFING, NC.

333-6496
100% FINANCING
UP TO130 MPH N
METAL / SHINGLE Certified
FREE EST.
CCC-055600



COASTAL BUILDING



SRe.-Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
S Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing N
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia

261-2233
S Free Estimate
SCCC-057020
@.I II/\l E 4 L *E I I S* 4is VI


TRACTOR WORK

Grass Too Taff?
GIVE SHAWN A CALL!
BUSH HOGGING SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Insured * Licensed

904-318-3700


The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK (56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
*Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank




CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


I 808 Off Island/Yulee
Recently Foreclosed, Special
Financing Available, Any Credit,
Any Income - Vacant Land, 3.9 Acres,
located at Harts Rd., Yulee. $320,000.
Visit www.roselandco.com/7R8.
Drive by then call (866)957-4918.
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
house semi-secluded 1 acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095
NEW 3BR/2BA - 2270 sq. ft., 2-car
garage on 1/2 acre. Granite counter
tops, oak cabinets, tile throughout,
covered lanai, many custom features.
Must see. $295,000. Owner financing
w/down payment. (904)753-2155
HERON ISLES - Renovated 3BR/2BA,
1213 sq. ft., new landscaping, paint,
tile, carpet. $114,900. Make offer.
(904)277-8845.

S 809 Lots
LOWEST PRICED FULL SIZE LOT - in
Amelia Island Plantation. Cul-de-sac.
On marshside. Approved house plans
available. $199,900. Claudia, RE/MAX
Professional Group. (904)556-4000

814 West Nassau County
FSBO - 55030 Deer Run Rd. 1.02 ac.,
3BR/2.5BA, fireplace, nice neighbor-
hood, Callahan. $333,000. (904)631-
5822 after 5pm.

817 Other Areas
LAKE ACCESS BARGAIN - 1.7 ac Free
boat slips $12,900 (was $29,900).
Unbelievable deal! Beautiful hdwd sett-
ing w/deeded access to pvt lake. Enjoy
common area w/boat ramp, pavilion,
picnic area, hiking trails. Paved rd w/
utils. Exc fin. Won't last (888)792 5253
x3120. www.indianlaketn.com. ANF
NEW ON MARKET - Lake view bargain
2.11 ac $82,300 was $189,900. Estate
size bldg site w/panoramic big lake
views. Bonus: bounded by 2.53 ac
fishing pond. Enjoy end of cul-de-sac
privacy, easy to build land w/all utility
h/u's on site. Prime FL location in
upscale WF comm. Exc fin. (866)352-
2249 www.fllandbargains.com. ANF
ABSOLUTE AUCTION - No minimums.
No reserves. 114� ac in Keaton Bch,
FL. 10 properties in Steinhatchee, FL.
S/F homes, RV Resid'l-Comm'l. Sat.
8/28, 10am. Steinhatchee Landing
Resort at Keaton Bch., the property is
less that 1 mi from public boat ramp,
some properties have comm'l or resid'l
potential. Online Bidding. Call the
auctioneers for info. Pay 20% dn,
10%BP, Broker participation 2%. For
detailed info johndixon.com (800)479-
1763 FLAL #AU2049 FL R/E 1005528
John Dixon & Assoc. Auctions-Mktg.
ANF
NEW RETIREMENT COTTAGE - ready
for your finishing touches. Fabulous gof
comm in Carolina mtns. Short drive
from Asheville $199,900 (866)334-
3253 x2315. www.scgolfhome.com.
ANF







2 Br, 2 Ba Condo with
view of #2 West Nine
Golf Course, Sawgrass
Country Club. 2 car
garage.

Owner interested in
either sale ($289,000,
all reasonable offers
considered) or trade
for comparable prop-
erty on Amelia Island.


CALL


851 Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3BR/2BA
home. $650/mo. + 1/2 utilities. No
pets. No smoking. (904)583-5895

S852 Mobile Homes
3BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE - on one
acre. $700/mo + $700 dep. 3/2
Doublewide - on one acre $800 +
$800 deposit. (904)753-2156
On Island/In Park - Remodeled eff
w/yard incl utils $125/wk, $495/mo. +
dep. Plus - 2&3BR starting $165/wk.,
$660/mo. + dep. Utils avail. 261-5034
3BR/2BA DWMH - Private lot on
Blackrock Rd. W/D, dishwasher. $825/
mo. + dep. (2) 2BR MH's also
available, $575 & $625.(904)206-3423
SMALL MOBILE HOME - 2BR
remodeled on 1 acre lot. Hardwood
floors, on pond, great fishing. $625.
And one for $650. Call (904)491-8768
or (904) 321-7062.
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on 1/2
acre lot in Yulee. $700/mo. + $700
dep. Available now. Call (904) 491-
4383 or 237-7324.
$450-$625 - 2BR mobile homes. Easy
move-in. Yulee. Call Gregg (904)376-
5190.
HILLIARD - 2BR/2BA, 14X70 single
wide. 32252 CR 121 near Tompkins
Landing Rd. $475/mo. + $500 sec.
dep. Small pets OK. (904)708-0731

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5 min-
utes from beach. Private bath, private
entrance. $100/wk. + $200 dep. Call
10am-6pm, (904)335-2086 anytime.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT - for
male. $70 per week. Call (904)261-
3806.

855 Apartments
Furnished

OCEANFRONT 2BR/1BA - Private
beach access. Reasonable. 261-5069
EFFICIENCY - with huge bathroom/
jacuzzi. Off Atlantic Ave. $600/mo.
(904)556-9372
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262
SMALL 1BR APT. - in Nassauville.
Furnished. Twin bed, electricity, A/C,
DirecTV. $650/mo. + $650 deposit.
Cute, cozy, quiet & in good
neighborhood. Service animals only.
References required. Please call
(904)206-3241, & leave message.


855 Apartments
Furnished

At Beach Remodeled - Sm effic.
$135/wk. Sm 1BR $175/wk. Lg 1BR
$195/wk. + dep. Indcl utils/cable. Also
2BR MH in park $165 up. 261-5034



856 Apartments
Unfurnished

1ST AVE. DUPLEX - Garage, 2BR/


Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810


FOR RENT
* 1414 lan, 2/1 ,singlewide $575
* 553 Pine Road, 3/2,FP,$925
* 111-AS. 4th St. - 2/1, $750
* 205 S.9th St.,3/1,close to downtown $750
* 96757 Blackrock Rd. - 3/2 DW on 1 Ac.
$850
Sandy Mick
Palm III, Property Management
321-0457
isxxxxxxxxxxxx


1.5BA, all appliances, fresh paint, nice I
carpet, partially furnished if desired. CURTISS H.
$950/mo. (904)277-2301LASSERRE


CURTISS H. Real Estate, Inc.

LASSERRE -


Real Estate. Inc.


LONG TERM
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side)., 3-4
BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots of park-
ing. Unfurnished $1,500.00.
* 19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo.+ util., securi-
ty deposit $1,000.Avail.August 2009.
* 4BR/2.5BAVery nice 2500 sq.ft home at
Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
* 3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island with
beautiful view of Egans Creek. $1,850/mo.
+ Util. Avail Sept. I'
* 3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood PI.,
close to beach and golf course $1350/mo
+ util
* 2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit in
Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of ameni-
ties. $950/mo.
*514 S. 14th St. - 3BR/I BA $875/mo. + util.
security deposit $1,000. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo.+ util.
Security deposit of $ 1,000.
* 2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt. Great
Deck - Oceanview $ 1,000/mo. + util.
* 3BR/2BA on First Ave. w/one car garage.
Like new with a partial ocean view
$1,150/mo + util.

VACATION RENTAL
* AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/I BA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher. Call
for more information


*850785 US 17 Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq.ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & util.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$2400/mo includes CAM + tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
* Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses.$2,500/mo + tax + util
* DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St Old West
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space.$3100/mo includes rent + tax


I


HOMELESS



ANIMALS...


THEY'RE DYING

FOR

A 2ND CHANCE.

Adopt A Companion Todag.

A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE
NEWS-LEADER


DEAL OF THE DAYI NATURES GATE AMELIA SOUTH FLORIDAAVENUE
Fenced 1/2 acre lot in Yulee Custom 3/3 concrete block Furnished 2/2 "end unit" Perfect starter or retirement
w/AS-IS DWMH. New roof& home built in 2003 has w/Southern exposure. home in Yulee. Remodeled
new siding in 2007. Home inground pool, double lot. Oceanfront pool and great kitchen & bath, tile & laminate,
needs work but has great Home has oversized MBR, SS vacation rental possibilities, new HVAC.
potential, appliances & granite tops.

#49852 565,000 #49900 $370,000 #50009 $460.000 #49929 $122,900


1925 S. 14T St., Suite 4
Amelia Island, FL .

Sales (904)277-9700
Property Management


Surfside Pro erti c


..... . ....., .... 0t4)i277-0907 S. 12th St. (2) homes Under con-
struction, affordable cottage style
PROPER T ES FRa S homes, on Island. 2 bedroom, 2
PROPERTIES FOR SALE bathwith 2 car garage $139,900.
MLS#50059 & #50066.


OCEAN PLACE SAILMAKER HIGHLAND DRIVE
Fabulous furnished 2/2 offers Absolutely beautiful 3/2 has Spacious 3/3 brick home on
1341SF of oceanfront luxury been completely redone top to double lot has new kitchen,
living next to the Ritz-Carlton. bottom. Everything is new and wood floors, tile, new paint.
Great vacation rental! all on one floor!

#50004 $689.000 #49992 $472,000 #49979 $429,000








CLUB VILLA BLACKROCK HAMMOCK NORTH HAMPTON
Serene marsh view condo in 5454 SF of luxury living in this Beautiful 4/3 two story over-
Amelia Island Plantation. 6/6.5 executive home! looks the 4th fairway Three
Steps to pool and close to Screened & heated pool. sum bedrooms upstairs & guest
Amelia Links Golf Club. mer kitchen, guest suite and suite down.
RV/boat garage.
#47011 $345,000 #50073 $659,000 #49533 $315,000


Lot &Aceg


Amelia Island
Avery Rd $45,000 Long Point $575,000
Barrington $119,900 Opal Ave $395,000
Blackbeard's Way $1,065,000 Pinedale Road $69,000
Calhoun St. $99,500 Someruelus $99,000
First Ave $295,000 S. Fletcher $995,000
Gaines Ln. $110,000 10th Street $48,000
lan Drive $45,000


h St, 2 homes under construc- NORTH 14TH STREET 3/2 MOBILE HOME on over 3 BR / 2 BA IN SPANISH OAKS. Ni,
i, affordable , on Island 3 bed- 4BR/1.5BA block home on an acre. Corner lot and fenced neighborhood. 2,174 sq. ft. Beautiful
maintained home. Mature shade tree
m 2 bah wih 2 car garage island, needs TLC. $137,500 Great setting. $89,900 MLS Flonda room (31 x 12) $257,9C
49,900. MLS# 50109. MLS# 47266 #48333 MLS #49718

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS I F 17


I ON ISLAND
* 536-A N. Fletcher, 2BR/2BA,
2 blocks from beach. $975/mo.
* 210 S. 10th Street 2 bedroom
1 bath Avail Now $575 a month.


Spectacular 3 year old ocean
view home sits on a double lot



I S. FLETCHERAVENUE
and has every imaginable
upgrade Call for details
#48550 $1.550,000


I OFF ISLAND, Cont.


* 86356 Calloway Dr. 3BR/1BA - -Little Piney Island
block home $775/month
| COMMERCIAL I :*
--, - OCEANVIEW HOME
SE Great price on this light &
bright beach cottage on S
ON ISLAND custom built Fletcher Ave Steps to the beach
3BR+Office/2.5BA, 2,250 sq. ft. access Zoned for duplex and
on .62 ac. lot. Upgrades galore, easily expanded
* Corner of 8th & Beech, office $349,900 MLS #48981 #50061 $350,000
space available. 1,200 sq. ft.


Amberwood Ln $67,500
Bennett Ave $225,500/$3
Brady Point Rd $480,00
Cayman Circle $69,000/$
Edwards Road $59,000
Gravel Creek $69,900
High Pointe $119,900
Lafitte's Way $89,900
Lina Road $417 900


$300,


Off-Island
Marc Anthony $46,800
350,000 NapeagueDr $165,000
0 Plum Loop $49,900/$66,000
$134,900 Redbud Lane $199,000
Reserve at Deer Run
$55,000-$75,000
Roses Bluff $29,900
Southern Heritage $155,000
US Highway 17 $350,000
000 Wesley Rd, 13 61 acres
$899,900


HIGH POINTE
1.2 acre wooded lots in
gated subdivision off
Barnwell Road. Bring
your own builder with
no time limit to build.


$


119.9


00


HIGH POINTE
Magnificent 4/3 brick home
in gated community. Tons of
upgrades, cul de sac lot, handi-
cap accessible.

#49970 $439,000


GRANDE OAKES
Spectacular riverfront living
in this brand new 5/4 beauty.
Gourmet kitchen, 3 car
garage & more.

#44921 $689.000








LOFTON POINTE
Pride of ownership shows in this
well appointed 4/3 home Bonus
room with full bath over garage
home warranty
#48773 $239,900








RIVER GLEN
Nearly new 4/2 home on nicely
landscaped lot with sprinkler
system in new family neighbor
hood close to 195 Built in 2008
and in perfect shape
#48541 $177,000


Wc*Tg ===3i


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED



Saturday * August 15th * 1 till 4 pm


ON ISLAND


1795 Arbor Ln. - 5115 Parkway


3BR/2BA,2028 asf $415,000


OFF ISLAND ]

* 85399 Brooke St., 3BR/2BA mobile
home. Now Available $800/mo


lanA'11)1717 nnn'7









6B FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N.
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D.
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005

2BR/1BA - Near beach. $725/mo. +
$725 dep. Call (904)583-3811.
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
hookup. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
For Rent - 2BR/1.5BA townhouse apt.
Newly rebuilt. CH&A, stove, refrig.,
d/w, carpet. $795/mo. + dep. & ref's.
828 Nottingham Dr. (904)261-3035


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
A 4BR/3BA - $217/mo. HUD home.
3BR only $199/mo. Stop renting. 5%
dn, 15 yrs @ 8% apr. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext. 5669. ANF
1BR/1BA - Washer/dryer, private
porch, all utilities included. $650/mo.
(904)468-0411
Oceanfront 2BR/1BA - Utilities
included. Near Main Beach. Service
animals only. $850/mo. + $600 sec.
dep. Call for showing (847)867-3163.

857 Condos-Furnished
AMELIA PLANTATION - Oceanfront
condo, 2BR/2BA. $900/wk. Monthly
rate. Reduced price. Call (708)612-
6106 or (708)692-6106.


858 Condos-Unfurnishedl 11860 Homes-Unfurnished 1860 Homes-UnfurnishedI


NOW LEASING AMELIA LAKES
CONDOS - Private & gated luxury
community featuring resort style
swimming pool, tennis court, fitness
center, beach volleyball, & more.
Overlooking a spring fed lake. 1 & 2BR
homes starting at $799/mo. Call today
for a showing (904)415-6969.
www.amelialakes.com
THE PALMS AT AMELIA - 2BR/2BA
starting at $800/mo. Call about our
early move-in special. (904)277-1983
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated! Ameni-
ties incl. $900/mo + sec dep. Call
912-269-3960.
2BR/2BA REMODELED CONDO -
Appliances & washer/dryer included.
Pool, tennis included. $750/mo. Amelia
Landings (904)557-6501.
3 STORY - new, 2800 sq ft Amelia
townhome close to beach - 3BR's + 2
study areas, sitting area in MBR, 3.5
bath with 2 car attached garage,
patios, inside home elevator. Rent on a
lease; will consider a lease purchase.
Non-smoking please. $1,500 monthly
- first, last and deposit upfront 904
962-7477 or 904-827-9900
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $900/mo. (904)206-
2313
2BR/2BA COLONY UNIT - 2-car gar.,
newly remodeled, pool & tennis court.
No smoking. $975/mo. + dep. & utils.
(904)548-0774, (904)556-5457.

1859 Homes-Furnished
SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - 3BR/
2BA, 2-car gar., gated, patrolled comm
@ pool, 5 min/beach, incl utilities.
Avail Sept-Nov. 261-6204, 206-0035

860 Homes-Unfurnished
2855 OCEAN DR. - Close to beach,
4BR/3BA home. $1400/mo. Available
9/1. Call Jody (904)583-9597.


2BR/2BA - with extra room. Pirates
Wood subdivision. Fenced in yard. Pool
access. $975/mo. Security deposit
required. (904)335-0116
BEAUTIFUL AMELIA WALK - Spac-
ious new 3BR/2BA home, formal LR,
DR, great room, & office or TV room.
Open floor plan. Tile walk-in shower,
Corian countertops, fireplace. Pool,
tennis court, fitness center. $1800/mo.
+ utilities. Call (850)774-4566.
QUAINT 1BR COTTAGE - Downtown.
Fenced in yard, office, appliances,
washer/dryer included. Pet OK. $700/
mo. Available 9/1. (904)557-6501
NICE HOME - on Island, 3BR/2BA,
$965/mo. Available now. References
req'd. (904)206-1370
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
A Bank Repo - 5BR/3BA $317/mo.
3BR foreclosure $199/mo. 5% dn 15
yrs @ 8% apr. For listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5853. ANF
3014A S. FLETCHER AVE.
Oceanfront with pool, 3BR/3BA
townhouse. $1700/mo. Available 9/1.
Call Jody (904)583-9597.
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177
MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
2012 #2 BRIDAL RD. - Quiet
neighborhood living. 2BR/1BA patio
home. $800/mo. Available 9/1. Call
Jody (904)583-9597.
2200SF 3BR/2BA remodeled DWMH.
Must see to believe. Hdwd floors,
ceramic tile, new appl's, & FP. Floor to
ceiling windows & loft that overlooks
1.3 acre property. $1100/mo. 1st, last
&dep req'd. Call 206-1162 & lv msg
CARTESTIAN POINTE - Easy access
to 1-95 & Amelia Island. 3BR/2BA, 2-
car gar., fenced backyard, covered pat-
io, tile thru-out, W/D & water softener
included. $1050/mo. (904)206-2841
TIMBERCREEK PLANTATION -
3BR/2BA, 2-car garage. New home.
Available 9/1. $1100/mo. Call (904)
553-3445.
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1375/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177
3BR/2BA BLOCK HOUSE - Low utili-
ties, W/D, garage, fenced back yard,
on island, open floor plan. $1050/mo.
Please call Angela (904)753-3639
2870 1ST AVE. - Newly remodeled
3BR/2BA, all new spacious kitchen,
hardwood floors. $1200/mo. Available
now! Call Jody (904)583-9597
29 S. 11TH ST. - Convenient to
downtown. 2BR/1.5BA townhouse.
$800/mo. Available now! Call Jody
(904)583-9597.


ON ISLAND - 3BR/2BA w/large family
room & fenced backyard on south end
of island. Available 9/1 at $1375 +
utilities, flexible terms. (904)261-0347
QUAINT HOUSE - in Old Town with
Amelia River views. 1BR/1BA, modern
kitchen, W/D, CH&A, carport, private
back patio. 712 San Fernando St.
$775/mo. + $775 sec. dep. 261-3158.
Available now.
4BR/2BA/2-CAR GARAGE - on
island. $1400/mo. 2,000 sq. ft. Pets
OK. Available 9/1. (904)677-0248
REDUCED! - 3BR/2BA LIKE NEW
HOME on 1/2 acre with w/d. Best deal
in Yulee. $995. (904)536-6379
3BR/3.5BA VILLA - at Summer
Beach. Pool, cable included. $1500/mo.
Call (912)682-8118.
THE COLONY - 4830 Gulfstream Ct.
2BR/2BA, fully furnished, Wifi, cable,
phone, utilities included. $1450/mo.
Contact phone # (904)838-1969 .


1861 Vacation Rentals
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
OCEANFRONT - 2BR/1BA available
Oct - March. $2,000/mo. + utilities.
(904)556-9402 owner/agent.
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.


S863 Office
3 ROOM OFFICE SUITE - utilities
furnished. $625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd.
behind Amelia Insurance. Call George,
(904)557-5644.
SEE THE INSIDE, THEN DECIDE -
Low rent. 1200sf, 200 + loft, 8th &
Gum Sts. 321-1651 or 261-2770
(3) OFFICE SPACES - Historic Old
Schoolhouse, 914 Atlantic Ave. Utilities
included. Contact Rhonda at 261-8249.
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.
TURNKEY CLASS A OFFICE SPACE -
in Gateway To Amelia complex
available for professional service firm
on an office sharing basis. If interested
contact Sue Armstrong at (904)277-
2788.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597


Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 b,...lr, , m i t, twnhi ,us. t\ ..
3 bedroom garden unit, * Ml,,trh 11%.'ic
Swimming pool * Dishwash..-r * Laiiiun..r\ tacilti..-'
Washer/dryer connections* * W -lih...r '.1 r .-r unita ,, a I'l, !.l..
Water, garbage & pest control included in r..-nt
Prices starting at $675.oo per month
*Some features not available in all units
5Di^co Cu3I- �4C Akou -u A4 4 04- 5�� !
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you ., i n , .ilk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gateway to Annii., center!

M t4u! (904) 261-0791
www.atcdeveh lpimnt. com


l I


If" Club
Apartments
BestAddress in Fernandina Beach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details
(904)277-2500OJ


ialphin


I: .1-. ESTATE '1A CES, INC.
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company


Visit us at www.galphinre.com

(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax

1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32034


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles- 3BR/2.5BA Bring your golf clubs and walk the
golf course. Single family traditional home with 2 car garage.
Living room and dining room at front of house. Fireplace in fami-
ly room which exits to large screened porch. Master bedroom has
entry to screened porch for early morning coffee and bird watch-
ing in a natural setting. Conveniently located to shopping, schools
and dining just off Amelia Island Parkway. $1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered
patio and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and
fireplace in living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in
prestigious gated community where amenities include a communi-
ty swimming pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and
Golf Club of Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking dis-
tance to the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage.
$1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home located in
Ocean Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in
back patio and 2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country
living at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres
of land with beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm
evenings in the florida room or cozy up by the fireplace on the
cold winter nights. Either way this one is a charmer. $1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA - 2795 sq. ft., granite
counter tops, maple cabinets, stainless steel appliances,
washer/dryer included, centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green
in the North Hampton Golf Community with club house/aquatic
center, basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with
canoe/kayak lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television,
High Speed Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400


$725,000 - Fernandina Cay - MLS# 43544
3BR/3BA - Great Ocean View
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


375,000 - MLS#49508
2600 S.F. - across from the Bells River
Call me or your agent quickly!
Brad Goble - 904-261-6166


* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced lot, satellite-
dish, tool house. Ten minutes from Amelia Island and convenient
to Jacksonville International Airport. $1150

CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include
swimming pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools
and shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with communi-
ty pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Great
south end location. Large 2 car garage. This unit is in excellent con-
dition. Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the
ocean, golf and shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking
a leisurely drive on ALA through State Parks along the ocean and
intracoastal waterway. $925
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town
home located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal
waterway. Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service.
$2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as
well as golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful
brick paver walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced
front and rear yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family
room. Home is only one block from the ocean. $900
* 2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1BA Located only 2 blocks from the
beach. Home has new carpet! Community features include swim-
ming pool, tennis court, play ground and Bar-B-Q area. $750

FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A - 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnished.1
block from the beach. $750


$595,000 - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lot - MLS# 45255
Buy now, Build later, use of existing home
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365
4BR/3BA - 2578sf - In Seaside Subdivision
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


r 1
$199,500 - Timber Creek PLantation - MLS#50131
2,307 sq.ft. Brick/Stucco, SS Appliances,
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$150,000 - Cartesian Pointe - MLS#50160
1,928 sq.ft. Best price in neighborhood.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


2741 Ocean Oaks - 5BR/3BA home 5209 Village Way - 3BR/2BA located 95155 Bermuda - 5BR/4BA golf & lake
located in Ocean Walk. Walking distance in Ocean Village. Furnished or not. front home in Amelia National, master
to beach. Screened in lanai with pool on Community Pool with beach access, down with bonus/media room plus BR
Egan's Creek. Wood floors and tile in Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. and full bath up, 3059 sq ft, 3 car garage,
kitchen and bath. Lawn care. On Island. $1,950/mo use of amenities. Off Island. $2,050/mo
$2,200/mo Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists


2741 Ocean Oaks - 5BR/3BA home located in Ocean Walk.
Walking distance to beach. Screened in lanai with pool on
Egan's Creek. Wood floors and tile in kitchen and bath.
Lawn care. On Island. $2,200/mo

95155 Bermuda - 5BR/4BA golf and lake front home located
in Amelia National. Master down with bonus/media room
plus BR and full bath up. 3059 sq ft, 3 car garage, use of
social amenities. Off Island. $2,050/mo

5209 Village Way- 3BR/2BA located in Ocean Village.
Furnished or unfurnished. Community Pool with beach
access and Summer Beach membership available for small
fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,950/mo

95118 Sandpiper - 2BR/2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck
over looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities
included. No Pets. On Island. $1,895/mo

95208 Woodberry - 4BR/3.5BA Summer Beach home with
tile throughout and large bonus room. Screened in lanai, 2
car garage and community pool. Lawn care and W/D. On
Island. $1,750/mo

2851 Ferdinand- New 3BR/2BA home in Isle De Mai with 12'
ceilings overlooking preservation area with pond. Screened
in lanai. Community Pool. Lawn care. Pets allowed. Half off
rent 1 month with 12 month lease. On Island. $1,650/mo

1832 Ocean Village - Summer Beach 2BR/2.5BA home
located in Ocean Village. Screened in lanai and hot tub
overlooking pond. Living area and sitting area in master
bedroom. W/Dplus lawn care. Membership available for
small fee. On Island. $1,650/mo

989 Ocean Overlook - 4BR/2BA home located in Ocean
Sound backing up to pond. Short walk to beach. Tile floors
throughout main living. Screened lanai. Lawn care. On
Island 1,500/mo

96153 Ridgewood - 4BR/3BA home located in Lofton Point
with screened patio and wraparound deck, 2373 sq ft,
master down and bonus/BR up with full bath, fenced
backyard, laminate flooring, upgrades throughout house,
pets allowed, lawn care. Off Island. $1,475/mo


918 White - 2BR/3BA located in Old Town with loft that
could be used as 3rd bedroom. Hardwood floors, granite
countertops, commercial kitchen. Wrap around porch with
beautiful backyard. W/D. On Island. $1,400/mo

96816 Arrigo - 3BR/2BA home located in Beachway with
oversized fenced back yard. Many upgrades with lawn care.
Pets allowed. Off Island. $1,325/mo

86059 Remsenburg - 3BR/2BA North Hampton 1,500 sq. ft.
home. Huge backyard. Wireless access. Pets allowed. Half
of one month rent with full lease. Off Island. $1,300/mo

96928 Buccaneer Trail - 3BR/2BA home with Italian tile
floors and cypress wood throughout. 3 car garage. W/D
and lawn care. On Island. $1,300/mo

1994 Amelia Green - New 2BR/2.5BA townhome with loft
and one car garage. Close to shopping and beach. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,100/mo

1969 Amelia Green - 2BR/2.5BA townhome with tile floors
throughout main living. Granite countertops, stainless
steel appliances. Close to shopping and beach. Pets
Allowed. Lawn care. On Island. $1,100/mo

96679 Arrigo - 3BR/2BA home located in Beechway. 1600
sq ft, split floor plan, covered lanai. Off Island. $1,150/mo

823 N. Fletcher - 2BR/1BA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean
view with sunroom. Water/sewer included. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,100/mo

86184 Augstus - 3BR/2BA house located in Cartesian
Pointe with fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2
car garage. OffIsland. $1,100/mo

5437 Leonard - 2BR/2BA home located in American Beach.
Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Oversized yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $950/mo

314 S. 14th - 2BR/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in
back yard and deck. Pets allowed. Half month free with
12/mo lease. On Island. $850/mo


Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most From Your Investment Property.
Give Us A Call Today!





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MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free Limited Time
SW/D Connections
I Large Closets
* Pirvate Pations
* ') *Sparkling Pool
�* 1L * Tennis Courts
* Exercise Room
* Close to Shopping
* Twenty Minutes to
Jacksonville & Fernandina
City Apartments with Country Charm

S(904) 845-2922
37149 Cody Circle
Eastwoo O aks Hilliard, Florida
APARTMENTS Mon.- Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


I I





.ii -I mi


is now offering




REPAIRS


to the public at


Competitive rates.


Financing available


on major repairs.



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463495 E SR 200 YULEE. FLORIDA
904-225-2504


+


* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


I 863 Office I
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
SADLER RD. - Office/retail space
avail. $900/mo. 8th & Gum - 1200sf
+ loft at $1200/mo. 1105 S. 8th -
1065sf $1000/mo. 6400sf $4500/mo.
Beech Street - Former Restaurant
Lease. $1700/mo. Buy $195K. Down-
town - 1900sf at $2000/mo. 1280-
3200sf - Tyler Plaza, Yulee. $14psf.
Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770

864 Commercial/Retail
1667 S. 8TH ST. - 1000sf, CH&A,
restroom. High traffic area. $1100/mo.
+ sec. (904)415-0377
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
ft. 463179 AIA, Yulee. Permits
available for alcoholic beverages. (904)
557-5004
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on AIA in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.




901 Automobiles
CLASSIC 1984 CHRYSLER NEW
YORKER - AC, PS, PB, PW. 73,000
actual miles. $3500. Call (904)261
3811.
BUY POLICE IMPOUNDS - '99 Honda
Civic $400. '97 Honda Accord $500. For
listings call (800)366-9813 ext 9271.
ANF
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS - Cars,
trucks, SUV's from $500. Honda,
Toyota, Chevy & more. For listings
(800)366-9813 ext. 9499. ANF
1987 RED PORSCHE 944 - Project
car, partial restoration. Over $10,000
invested. Must sell. $3,000/OBO. Call
(904)310-6725.
Acura Integra - '97 $800. Honda
Civic '01 $550. Ford Taurus '00 $900.
Toyota Camry '98 $850. Police
Impounds. For listings call (800)366-
9813 ext 9275. ANF
2005 WHITE PT CRUISER
CONVERTIBLE - Under 15,000 miles,
in super condition, one owner. $7,500.
Call (904)321-1608.

902 Trucks
1996 TOYOTA T-100 - Long bed, 2.7,
5-speed, A/C, stereo. New radiator,
battery, hoses, belts. Great work truck,
Cheap on gas. $1,850. (904)277-8108

1 903 Vans
SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034


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