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FRIDAY. July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


FIRE Conmtinued from 1A
actions at a house fire on Amelia
Island last month endangered
the lives of firefighters inside
the structure.
"While these firefighting
crews were inside, Chief
Cooper, as incident commander r
made the tactical decision to
move two fire trucks. In order to
move an apparatus, the pump
must be completely shut off,"
Waggoner wrote. "This action
directly resulted in removing
the only water source from the
crews inside the burning build-
ing. These firefighters were
without water for an extended
amount of time. The potential
for five firefighters to die at this
point was astronomically high."
Cooper denied that his deci-
sion endangered the firefight-
ers.
"Firefighting is a very dan-
gerous occupation, and I think
we all know that," he'said
Wednesday. "I don't think that
one single command I gave
would have put anyone's life into
any more danger than it was
already in. In fact, the com-
mands I gave were to alleviate
danger."
Waggoner also alleged that
Cooper violated the union's col-
lective bargaining agreement
by not providing meals and fluid
replacement during the blaze.
"The crews were on this
scene for approximately six
hours," he wrote. "If not for the
gracious actions of the commu-
nity, rehab would not have been
provided. The lack of rehabili-
tation on scene may directly
result in heat stress."
Waggoner claimed that as a
result of the failure to provide
fluid replacement, two fire-
fighters were treated at the
scene for heat-related illness
and one was sent to the emer-
gency room for heat-related ill-
ness and smoke inhalation.
"Water was there with what
was on the fire engines," Cooper
responded. "At that point, there
was a local merchant that pro-
vided water at the scene - an
abundance of water. That asset
was being taken care of by a
good-hearted local merchant.
There were no complaints on
the fire ground. There was more
than adequate drinking water
available."
He also took issue with
Waggoner's estimate of the time
crews were on the scene.
"I believe the call came out at
6 p.m., and most of the units
were back in the station by 11.
That still doesn't add up to six
hours."
.,,Waggo.ner :-,also. accused
Cooper of sending text mes-
sages to duty captains while
driving to emergency scenes,
which he called a "serious safe-
ty issue." Cooper admitted that
he had sent such messages in
the past, but had discontinued
the practice and ordered the
rest of the department to do the
same.
In fact, in a June 16 memo-
randum Cooper expressly for-
bade the use of cell phones for
either talking or texting while
operating firefighting apparatus
or vehicles.
"I think it's an agenda-driven
letter," he said. "We had already
taken a proactive stance on
that."
Cooper wouldn't comment
on Waggoner's accusations of
verbal abuse, one of which dates
back to November 2007. In that
instance, Waggoner wrote,
Cooper ordered a firefighting
crew to enter a burning building
after a roof collapse had already
injured one firefighter.
"The lieutenant of that crew
was belittled by the chief for
voicing his concerns about a
secondary collapse and the
endangerment of his crew," he
wrote.
Waggoner claimed that.
Cooper consistently used abu-
sive language toward subordi-
nates, including "the screaming
of obscenities."
Sealover said he was con-




Pedestrian

killed in

Jacksonville
A 60-year-old Fernandina
Beach man was struck and
killed early Thursday morning
while walking along Main
Street in Jacksonville, the


Florida Highway Patrol said.
Gerald Derrell Shedd, Sr.,
was pronounced dead apt 2:16
a.m. after being struck by a
southbound vehicle on Main
Street, which is US 17.
Shedd's address was listed
as Fernandina Beach, though
he had lived in Jacksonville
most of his life.
Obituary. 2A


I-1 arnabas N
| |CENTER, INC

For lor -. Infornall onI, :111:904.261.7 0()0


ducting an investigation into the
matter. "I started it (Tuesday) in
the meeting I had with (union
representatives) to go over
some of the issues they had
raised," he said Wednesday.
"One of the issues they had
raised was the most recent fire
on the island. I will gel both the
video and audio tapes of the
incident."
Sealover said he felt the
union should have been more
proactive about their concerns
prior to contacting him.
"I asked them if there was a
safety committee meeting after
(the fire last month), and they
said there was not. I asked
them, frankly, why not?" he
said. He posed the same ques-
tion "when they were bringing
up the event in 2007: 'Why was
this not brought forward then?"'


FEES Continued from 1A
process is working the way it's
supposed to work," he said.
"... This is a very fast turn-
around compared to what
we've seen. There's never an
excuse for not spending
impact fees that were collect-
ed legally. I'm pleased with the
cooperation level we've had
from the county."


TENNIS Continued from 1A
recreation contracts, for karate
and computer lessons, will not
be put out to bid because they
generate less than that,
Mercer said.
All other city recreation
activities, such as swimming
lessons, are taught by city
employees, according to Parks
and Recreation Director Nan


SThursday 4-11 pm
S 30 Wings
$10 Domestic
Buckets of Beer


-


Cooper said he looked for-
ward to addressing the union's
concerns. "I can only hope (the
union's) agenda is that we look
forward to increasing every
opportunity we have to bring
more safety to the firefighters,"
he said. "I'm the chief - no
matter what, I'm responsible. I
have a great understanding of
that.
"... There are decisions
made on the fire ground that
are made in seconds - others
can armchair quarterback it and
say how they would have done
it for a lifetime," he added. "But
at no time in my life have I ever
put firefighters' lives at risk, and
I think my record shows that
they have the best of everything
to protect their lives so they can
go home to their families."
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


Commissioner Stacy
Johnson agreed. "I'm just
thrilled we're finally spending
them," she said."'They've been
sitting in the bank for years,
and it's time we spent them.
Jonathan stepped it up, and he
really made it happen. ... I'm
glad that people are going to
start seeing progress in the
county."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Voit.
Tom R. Gibson and Berke
Tennis, both of Fernandina
Beach, have submitted bids
for the tennis job.
Those bids were to be eval-
uated Tuesday, after which the
results will go before the city
commission for final approval.
According to the city's written
request for proposals, the new
contract is to start Sept. 1.






12:40, 2:50. *5:00, 7:10, 9:30
HARRY POTTER 6 PG
12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15
THE ORPHAN R
1:30, '4:20, 7:10, 10:00
G-FORCE IN 3D PG
12:20,2:35, '4:50, 7:05, 9:20
ALIENS IN THE ATTIC PG
1:05,3:15,, 5:25, 7:35, 9:45
THE UGLY TRUTH R
12:25, 2:40, '4:55, 7:10, 9:25
FUNNY PEOPLE R
1:00, *4:05, 7:10, 10:15
ADVANCED TICKETS ON SALE FOR:
GI JOE * DISTRICT 9
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Popcorn S1.00 - Drink $1S00 .
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Happy Hour
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MARINA
Continued from 1A
Vinings Marine Group pro-
poses a base rent to the city of
$280,000 the first year; which is
to increase to $487,000 by the
fifth year. That amount
includes fuel sales and gross
revenue, plus 10 percent for
capital improvements for
dredging, painting and other
improvements that would go to
the company.
Vinings' plan to increase
revenues also involves attract-
ing more fishermen during the
slow months and new market-
ing ploys for the charter fleet.
The company also says it wil
offer annual contracts for
boaters, so there will be more
of a balance between local and
transient boaters.
Vinings did not give an esti-
mate of total yearly revenues
the proposed plan would bring
in.
Community involvement is
another aspect of Vinings' plan,
and would include annual
"marina day celebrations,"
boating safety classes and a
benefit regatta.
Vinings Marina Group was
organized in 2007 and man-
ages 7,000 East Coast slips and
15 marinas in Alabama,
Virginia, New York, Kansas,
Georgia, Maryland, Iowa,
North Carolina and Michigan.
Operations management staff


would include a general man-
ager, an operations manager, a
maintenance manager, a chief
mechanic and administrative
assistant, plus store clerks and
dockhands.
Westrec was founded in
1987 and operates over $300
million in salt- and freshwater
marina facilities in California,
Arizona, Nevada, Georgia and
Illinois.
Seven ofWestrec's marinas
are located in Florida. They
also operate ancillary facilities
such as restaurants, bars, ban-
quet facilities, hotels, ship's
stores, waterfront office space,
fuel docks, launch ramps and
boat rentals.
In its proposal, Westrec
also outlines staffing for the
marina, which would include a
marina manager, a dockmas-
ter, an office manager, an
accountant, plus several
retail/fuel dock clerks/dock-
hands and a few security
guards.
City commissioners agreed
in January to seek qualifica-
tions .from private firms to
operate the city's downtown
marina.
According to City Clerk
Mary Mercer, the RFQ com-
mittee will be interviewing the
two bidders today, and will
bring their recommendation
to the city commission at the
end of August.
adaughtrygf/bnewsleader.com


Mayport


ferry gets


$3 million

Community Newspapers
A total of $3 million in fed-
eral stimulus funding will go
to upgrade the Mayport
Ferry.
"All the money will go to
the modernization of our
ramps," said Nancy Rubin,
communications director
for the Jacksonville Port
Authority. "Our ramp system
had worked fine for many
years, but it was starting
to cost quite a bit to upkeep
it."
The $3 million worth of
stimulus funding is part
of $60 million awarded
to the Federal Highway
Administration for its
Ferry Boat Discretionary
Program.
'The boats are in good
shape and ready to serve the
people who depend on
them," Rubin said.
The ferry connects the
St. Johns River town of
Mayport with St. George's
Island on AlA south to the
beaches in Duval County.


. )





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Possible projects
The following projects are under consideration for impact
fee funding:
* 14th Street at Lime Street: Right-turn lanes.
" 14th Street at Simmons Road: Left-turn lanes,
* US 301 at Ford Road: Right-turn lanes.
*Lem Turner Road at Spring Lake Drive: Left- and right-
turn lanes. .
. Chester Road: Widening, northbound left-turn lane onto
Pages Dairy Road, eastbound nght-turn lane otff Pages
Dairy Road onto Chester Road, reconstruct nght-turn
lanes at Heron Isles Parkway and Starfish Drive.


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FRIDAY, July 31,2009 NEWS News-Leader


Self-esteem - do


you have enough?


Or too much?


Self esteem - do you
have enough? Do you
have too much? Let's
look at a definition of
self-esteem. "A person's sense
of worth or value." That's sim-
ple enough, but it involves and
affects so many things about
how we function day to day,
it's worth a closer look.
The health of one's self-
esteem includes not only the
way they see themselves, but
also trust in themselves and
others, autonomy and inde-
pendence and the ability to be
nui-turing to
self and oth-
ers. We
won't be
happy with-
out a healthy
level of
esteem for
ourselves,
which can
I Vthen be
transferred
to others we
Linda are in rela-
Gamble tionship
with. Along
those lines, it really is true:
you can't love someone else
until you love yourself. And
that love for yourself must be
healthy. It's easy to fall prey to
false sources of self-esteem;
addictive relationships, materi-
alism, overachievement; but
these things do not lead to the
qualities listed above that
make a person's self esteem
strong. In fact they inhibit the
development of a genuine pos-
itive regard for ourselves and
others.
Let's look at how self-
esteem develops. Traditional
psychological theory holds
that it develops from birth
through childhood in various
stages. Our earliest lessons as
a newborn have to do with
learning to trust or mistrust
our care giving environment,
and it continues through the
school ages where we learn
autonomy and initiative. In
other words, if our needs for
food and shelter, contact and
safety are met as an infant, we
go on to grow and explore the
world of hildhood with
curiosity and courage, learn-
ing that we can do things.
This goes on until about age
11 or 12, assuming we have
not experienced any abuse or
other trauma that will derail
our development. But then an
odd thing happens.
When we enter adoles-
cence, our self-esteem crashes
and goes into hiding for many
teens. Because of other devel-
opmental events, we become
extremely vulnerable to
media, peers and the cultural
ideas of what is important.
This is a time when many bad
decisions are made out of
wanting to "fit in" and not be
seen as different. Most teens
experience a fragile sense of
self-esteem even when achiev-
ing well in school, sports,
work and peer relationships.


You can't love
someone else until
you love yourself

When we survive that era of
development, we move into
young adulthood, which is typ-
ically a time of defining our-
selves and our futures. It is
now when we may notice most
acutely the health of our self-
esteem.
If we have not successfully
learned those lessons in infan-
cy and childhood, that the
world is a place we can be safe
and successful in, we will like-
ly enter into unhealthy rela-
tionships, fail at our education
or employment and struggle
to feel "happy" which can lead
to mood disorders, substance
abuse and worse. In contrast,
sometimes a false sense of
overly inflated self-esteem is
the result; creating self-cen-
tered individuals who have as
many, if not more difficulties.
So what can we do to pro-
mote healthy self-esteem? As
adults, we obviously can't go
back to infancy. But we can
revisit the lessons there. We
can put ourselves in situations
where we will learn trust,
where we can risk being inde-
pendent, and where we can
take more initiative. We can
explore areas of ourselves that
need nurturing whether it is
hobbies, spirituality or physi-
cal health. We can surround
ourselves with others who
have healthy selfe-steem and
learn from them. And we can
reach out to our dreams, goals
and aspirations, holding them
in a place of esteem as impor-
tant elements of our identities.
A therapist can help design
the path toward these steps.
For those of us who are
parents, we can try to stay
aware of the differing develop-
mental needs of our children
at different ages in order to
allow their self-esteem to
flourish. There is a lot of infor-
mation on the Internet and in
book stores to help with this
Ongoing responsibility.
Parents can find gender and
age specific tips on how to
increase their children's self-
esteem and give them a leg up
on a successful young adult-
hood. Fortunately or unfortu-
nately, as parents we are pro-
foundly influential in our
child's self-esteem health.
Most importantly, we can
begin to take care of our-
selves. The first step is learn-
ing what behaviors we have
that are self-defeating, and
change them. Self-esteem will
develop from there as we
become more competent care-
.takers of ourselves.
Linda Gamble, LMHC, is a
psychotherapist in private prac-
tice in Fernandina Beach. For
more information visit www.fl
oridacounselingmediation.com,
or call (904) 206-1761.


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BEARLYtItBCODAUON OF

CN~BB


FDOT asserts eminent domain power


RYAN SMITII
News-Leader
The Florida Iepartment of
Transportation is using its emi- ,
nent domain powers to take
possession of small sections of
private property in order to
install new traffic signals on
Eighth Street. The $1.8 million
project is scheduled for 2009-
10.
The Flash Foods store at
1982 S. Eighth St., along with
Mutt's Motors, 1815 S. Eighth
St., have both been notified
that FDOTwill take small por-
tions of their properties for the
project.
"These are very small
parcels for signalization proj-
ects. We call them corner


clips," said Ralph Maxon, attor-
ney for FDOT's Eminent
Domain Department. "It's a
whole lot different than taking
large acreage for a pond.
Generally, plans are made and
(engineers) determine
whether a project can be built
with existing right of way or if
they need additional right of
way."
In this case, however,
FDOTs claim is going to court
The owners of both properties
have been ordered to appear at
the Nassau County
Courthouse on Nov. 6.
Maxon said eminent
domain cases go to court for a
variety of reasons, although
the specifics of each case are
confidential until after the case


is settled.
"There's a group here at
DOT in the Right-of-Way
Department that goes out to
negotiate with the property
owners to buy the property, or
else they take a permanent
easement," Maxon said. "They
make an offer and they nego-
tiate with the owner or owners
of the property in order to
acquire it. Sometimes they're
unable to consummate a deal
for several reasons. A decision
is made if it can't be negotiated
for whatever reason, to put the
acquisition project into suit.
"Under the eminent domain
statutes, we seek a'quick take'
for the property," Maxon
added. "That means once we
establish a need for the prop-


erty and make a good-faith esti-
mate of the value, the judge
can grant us immediate pos-
session of the property upon
payment of that good faith
amount into the court registry.
"That doesn't mean that
that's all the owner gets. ..
SFrom that point on there would
be further negotiations with
the owner and his attorney,
and they certainly have the
right to get their own apprais-
al of the property. ... That gen-
erally results in a coming
together on a price that's rea-
sonable to both parties. If that
doesn't happen - and that's a
very small minority of cases -
there could be a trial on the
issue."
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


Il aOhc.
it lii II


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2008


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FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST \WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED) IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties -"Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


N I Community
Newspapers,
Incorporated
The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
anddo notnecessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper its owners or employees


EDITORIAL


Bear down
The Florida Wildlife Service has chosen,
wisely we think, to give wide berth to a black
bear roaming Amelia Island. We recommend
you do the same.
The bear has caused some damage to
fences but has not become a major nuisance
insofar as we know. He apparently feeds most-
ly at Fort Clinch State Park on fish, crabs and
palm hearts, not backyard trashcans. Here is
advice offered by the wildlife experts:
* If you see a bear, remain calm. Don't run
away. Walk calmly toward a building or vehi-
cle and get inside. If you have children or pets,
bring them inside.
* Encourage the bear to leave. Bang pots
and pans or blow an air horn or whistle.
* If a bear is in a tree, leave it alone.
Remove people and dogs from the area. It
usually will come down and leave after dark.
* Keep barbecue grills clean. Birdfeeders
and grills should be stored in a secure place.
Garbage should be placed outside on morning
of pickup. Don't leave pet dishes outside. Pick
ripe fruit or vegetables.
Soon enough, our friend will move on. Until
he does, live and let live.


[ VIEWPOINT/JOE GERRITY/FERNANDINA BEACH


7 ways for

T he News-Leader quoted our city man-
ager as saying, "We can't keep doing
business the way we've been doing
it." Well Mr. Czymbor, it has finally
happened. For the first time in over three years
I finally agree with you. The only problem is
we have been doing business your way for the
last three budget years.
The budgets you presented the city com-
mission have passed largely unchanged by
votes of 4-1, 3-2 and 5-0. Despite signs of an
economic slowdown, your budgets were full of
new job positions and salary increases for
existing employees and noticeably lacking any
improvements to our infrastructure. As a mat-
ter of fact, your first budget was so lacking in
street re-surfacing funds that three citizens
publicly shamed the commission into adding
another $200,000 to that line item.
As I said three years ago the signs of a slow-
ing economy were out there, even in our com-
munity. Real estate sales and new construction
had slowed considerably. We had two condo
projects that had stopped construction halfway
from completion. Other approved projects
never got started. Three years ago house val-
ues were already beginning to decline, and
people in the construction trade were begin-
ning to tighten their belts.
But not our city! We were like kids in candy
store, spending every cent we could get our
hands on, and more. Most city permit fees
were tripled and now you want to charge for
parking at Main Beach and in the downtown.
Someone told me the city manager invited
the citizens to participate in the budget process
this year. Taking up the invitation, I have the
following suggestions for helping cope with the
projected shortfalls.
* 1. Form a budget waste committee of
employees to recommend areas of excessive
spending. The members of this committee
should be from the rank and file employees,
not department heads. After all, when was the
last time a department head appeared before a
budget hearing and said his/her department
was overfunded and overstaffed and they could
do with less? It never happened during my six
years on the commission. And committee
members do not need to be picked by depart-
ment heads either. Committee members need
to be assured that there will be no repercus-
sions from any suggestions they make.
* 2. During the 2007-8 budget hearings the
commission set aside $50,000 to begin the
process of doing outside efficiency audits on
each department, beginning with the police
department. To my knowledge, the city manag-
er never initiated that process. During my time
at McDonald's the corporation sent a consult-
ant into each restaurant for a two-day visit each
year to critique restaurant operations. As a
crew person I loved those visits, because I
knew my bosses were going to get their hands
slapped, at least a little bit. As a manager I did
not like the audits one bit, but they were a part
of the job. As a supervisor and later on as an


city to save money


owner I came to appreciate
those visits and the sugges-
tions on how to better
serve my customers, and at
the same time increase effi-
ciency in my restaurants.
And before people think
. I am picking on the police
- department there are
sound and logical reasons
Gerrity to start with that depart-
ment. First of all, the PD
has by far the largest budg-
et of any department. The guy with the biggest
piece of the pie gets the most attention.
Second, most elected officials know very little
about law.enforcement, and that goes for city
managers also. Both elected officials and city
managers are reluctant to say no to the public
safety, and as a result police departments
become a bloated bureaucracy. I don't know if
this is the case in Fernandina Beach, but we
have a real live example in our own recent past.
For years we were told that we needed eight
new police cars each year. Finally in 2005 the
commission said no, and since then we have
averaged 3-4 new police vehicles each year. At
over $42,000 per vehicle that is quite a savings
each year, and the police department seems to
have no complaints or vehicle problems. With
an audit, commissioners have an objective
report in hand that can help guide them in
making these decisions.
* 3. Use the 2005-6 city budget as a starting
point. That is the last pre-Czymbor budget and
it served the citizens well, with a few excep-
tions.
* 4. Review each and every department's
staffing and programs. With the slowdown in ,
building, now might be the time to contract
with the county for building inspection servic-
es. Do we still need to run daycare services, or
is that a carryover from the days that there
were few private daycare centers in the city?
Should we still be running scuba trips to the
Keys? What programs have served their pur-
pose and are no longer needed? These are just
a few areas that should be addressed.
* 5. Reopen union contracts and eliminate
cost-of-living adjustments and raises. It is not
fair to deny administrative staff pay increases,
but to give union employees raises. We need to
be fair with everyone. No raise sure beats no
job.
* 6. No city-owned "take home" vehicles
should leave the island. This may be a little dif-
ficult with the police department, but other
departments can comply. If someone lives off
island and must drive back here to report for
an emergency a few extra minutes to pick up a
vehicle at the city public works yard won't
make a difference, but the savings of mileage
on city vehicles will be substantial, not to men-
tion fuel savings.
* 7. Don't privatize the marina. Eliminate
the director position of that fund and bump the
airport director position back down to part-


Despite all the obvious signs
over the last three years, the
administration and the majority
ofcity commissioners created a
bureaucracy that was both
unnecessary and unsustainable
over the long haul.


time, as it was a couple years ago. These are
both troubled enterprise funds and need a
fresh approach. The director of facilities main-
tenance is retiring in December, so let's hire an
engineer/manager to take his place and put
the marina and airport as part of his depart-
ment.
Get rid of the new trailer at the airport. For
an ailing enterprise fund, the trailer and associ-
ated expenses are a waste of valuable
resources. If I remember correctly, the last set
of hangars we built had an office for city use.
Paying the new director in part from the two
enterprise funds will ease some of the strain on
the general fund, as well as allowing more cash
flow to both the airport and marina.
Eliminating the city engineer position will also
take pressure off the general fund.
I could go on with more cost-saving ideas,
but I am running out of space. These sugges-
tions include some difficult decisions, and I
have true compassion for any employee affect-
ed by whatever budget decisions are made.
Despite all the obvious signs over the last three
years, the administration and the majority of
city commissioners created a bureaucracy that
was both unnecessary and unsustainable over
the long haul. We have ignored many of our
infrastructure needs, yet we always have
money for more time off for our highest paid
employees and to expand our workforce.
This economic crisis is not a one-year
occurrence. We still have at least a year of
declining property values before real estate
prices (and the tax base) stabilize. Some eco-
nomic experts think that Florida may take
longer to recover because of the high number
of foreclosures.
The prevalent problem solving approach at
City Hall consists of three options. Raise fees,
throw tax dollars at the problem and when they
fail, privatize. We pay enough taxes and way
too much in fees in our city. It is time for city
government to find a new way to do business,
and it is apparent that the vision, leadership
and action will have to come from the city com-
mission. Mr. Czymbor is correct, the city can't
continue to do business the way we've been
doing it But it has been the way he has guided
us for the last three years. Change isn't com-
ing. It is here, and will be here for quite some
time.
Joe Gerrity is a former city commissioner.


S' 'V t OF THE PEOPLE


GoffinsvillePark
I would just like to take a moment to thank
everyone involved in the beautiful renovations
made to Goffinsville Park in Nassauville ("County
park now a reality," July 24). My family and I were
able to visit and enjoy the park. What a great
place to spend the day without spending a lot of
money, especially with the state of our economy.
Please remember not to litter, place debris in
the cans, pick up after our pets, dispose of fish-
ing line properly and always supervise our chil-
dren, especially near the water.
KellyAnne Tucker
Fernandina Beach

What an asset
Goffinsville Park - what an asset for our com-
munity, city and county.
There were thrills galore at the opening cel-
ebration dedicating the park and facility I've
been familiar with all my life ("County park now
a reality," July 24).
The Goffin family alwayshas been profitable
to our economic way of life. I don't want to be
redundant in my recollection of facts concerning
the history of Goffinsville. My mother, father
and grandmothers were the recipients of finan-
cial gains made possible by the exploits of Mr.
Saul Goffin. My experience was childhood in
nature due to the fact that Mr. Coffin did not have
time for childhood play. He was very serious at
all times. There were homes lined along
Goffinsville Road leading to and from the area.
Quite a few people are alive today because of Mr.
Goffin's economic mind.
My mother walked from the Christopher
Creek area with her babies in a little red wagon,
helped by me pushing the wagon, which helped
ease the burden of the load before and after
work. Dad gathered oysters during the early
days of the productions. The factory was always
an asset because it provided financial relief to
families due to inadequate means of transporta-
tion.
Today we can still be profited from the park
due to the ecology of the area. Food can be
obtained from the banks along the river through
the sport of fishing at a very low cost. Children
can enjoy the playgrounds along with the beau-
tiful vegetation that accompanies it. The ecology
of the park gives a person a place of solitude to
observe God's handiwork of nature. The park is

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dear to me because my grandfather, Prince
Albert, established a small church called Prince
Chapel AM.E., inspired by Richard Allan and this
plot of land (fenced-in area) donated by the
Goffins.
I am grateful for Mr. Coffin and family for
being so thoughtful toward the future of people
of today. Let's continue to make this legacy prof-
itable by enjoying the park, which has been
given through the labors of forefathers. We must
thank the Nassau County Commissioners and
Parks and Recreation for such creativity of ajob
well done. We thank the Coffins, Ms. Doris
Mellion arid County Administration for such
great work done.
Charles L. Albert, Jr.
Fernandina Beach

Greed
I have never seen anything like the greed on
Amelia Island. When my husband and I moved
here two years ago, we rented a house and paid
only $50 for our first electric bill. Now we rent an
apartment and our last electric bill was $214.
This is the most we have ever paid for electrici-
ty and we are not alone.
We have friends on the island who are trying
to get their electric bills down by turning off
their air conditioners in the middle of summer
and drying their clothes on clotheslines. Property
taxes are sky high, grocery prices are outra-
geous and now we may even have to pay to park
at Main Beach. Where will the greed end?
Those who wish to run the working people off
the island may have a small problem when they
finally achieve their goal. Who will care for their
needs when all the service workers can no longer
afford to live here? With gas prices so high, few
will be able to commute. What will the island elite
do then?
Kim Lehman
Fernandina Beach

Circle of Friends
How thrilled we all are at the Council on
Aging for the heartwarming article Dickie
Anderson wrote on the behalf of our Circle of
Friends telephone reassurance project July 22).
Actually, our entire community can be thankful;
because as our elderly citizens feel safe we will
all sleep better!
Dickie Anderson is such an asset to your
newspaper and to the community we share. We
are all winners with her From the Porch article.
Jane Holzkamp
Council on Aging

Health insurance
I am writing concerning the letters (about
proposed health insurance reforms) in last
week's paper (July 24).
As I understand it, you will keep your own
insurance and let the price keep going right on
up? I'm all for it. They are so scared that the lit-
tle person (the workingman) might get insurance
and then they would have to foot the bill. That
way everyone can get it and they can pay for it.
Think about the person that worked all his life
- and his family has no insurance and he has no


job. There are two ways to go about it. One is
leave it as is and go to the emergency room
instead of the doctor when a person is sick since
he has no insurance and no job and had cancer
a few years back so he needs to be checked, or
his wife and kids need to be checked if they
have cancer, a broken leg or whatever. So the
insurance that you want to keep will go up
because the hospital has to go up on rates or
either the taxpayer can foot the bill, but that is
what some of you want. So that's what you get.
You also have the construction people who
have been laid off since two years ago who are
maybe 30 years old or younger with six kids. We
can pay that one too. No one in the USA should
go without insurance or food. They paid for it all
the years they have worked. This is a fact. Or you
can have the health department of nurses and
doctors, who are the best any county or state
could have, take care of them instead of doing
their job, which is to keep us from getting dis-
eases or our child from dying, because they had
to treat a patient instead of doing their job keep-
ing down diseases.
Or we can give the people the right to buy
insurance at what they can afford. Wouldn't that
be the right wvay to do it? So the taxpayer would-
n't have to foot the bill or the insurance compa-
nies would have to makeup the difference. Isn't
this the American way?
Is it your way? Either way, you are going to
pay for it. Or you can let him buy it? For the
first time you have a choice and I hope the peo-
ple will stop and think about that.
Oh, by the way, when you went to the emer-
gency room, it was full of sick people with colds,
etc. You took your kid because he was really ill
or had a broken bone and then wait your turn.
Remember, you want it that way. You remember
the flu! You didn't want the little man to buy


insurance for his family so he could have gone
to the doctor instead. So pay the bill and not
gripe, or let the man or single mom have the right
to buy the insurance that they can afford. It's an
easy choice..
Remember, "If a free society cannot help the
many who are poor, it cannot save the few who
are rich,' (John F Kennedy inaugural address,
Jan. 20, 1961)
linda C. Hicks Spencer
Hilliard

legal Crooks'
First, let me pointout that the only reason you
know what has happened is because of the
reporting of the news media, bias or not
("Unbelievable," July 24). I personally dislike
them. But they report. The Congress had no
choice other than give "'he Bad Guys" the power
to go to war. Try to remember 9/11. As much as
you hate the two "Idiots" who kept us safe and
retaliated against a horrific attack, the media is
why you are apparently amazed.
Well, wake up, the Congress is on your side.
Had they been as radical as you are now we
would have thanked them for 9/11. Now we
have media coverage and you are apparently not
realizing that your very liberal and far left polit-
ically controlled government does not under-
stand that you are trying to run our country into
the greatest depression ever. How long before
the new messiah takes responsibility?
I would continue with the new controversies,
but I trust "You" will learn this from the "Media."
How weird. Wow, are you kidding me, how did
you know all this negative information? I trust
you will not read this.
Paul Brungard
Amelia Island


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FRIDAY, JULY 31.2009/Ni-:ws- LEADER


COMMUNITY


Mr. and Mrs. Taylor


and Margaret Russo of St.
Augustine.

Taylor-Donohue
Nancy Donohue and
Raymond Taylor Jr. of Crystal
River were married at 6:30
p.m. June 27, 2009, at the
Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach with the Rev. Paul Rizzi
officiating. The reception fol-
lowed the ceremony.


MILITARY NEWS

* Air Force Airman Justin discipline and studies, Air
D. West gradu- _ Force core values, physical
ated from basic fitness and basic warfare prin-
military train- ciples and skills.
ing at Lackland Airmen who complete
Air Force Base, basic training earn four cred-
San Antonio, its toward an associate in
Texas. applied science degree
The airman through the Community
completed an College of the Air Force.
intensive, West He is the son of Melanie
eight-week pro- West of Callahan. West is a
gram that 2007 graduate of West Nassau
included training in military High School, Callahan.


BIRTH

* James and Lindsay Claire and Harold Shepherd
Crummey of Yulee announce of Yulee and Alan Crummey
the birth of a daughter, Kayce of Fernandina Beach.
Leigh Crummey, born July Maternal grandparents are
14, 2009, at Memorial Conrad and Carol Hermann
Medical Center. The baby of Deer River, Minn.
weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces Great-grandparents are
and measured 19 inches in Harriet Ross of St Marys,
length. She joins siblings Ga., Cliff and Cathy
Caidyn Ryan, 6, and Conner Crummey of Jesup, Ga., and
James, 3. .. Richard and Marie Middleton
Paternal griadpar-ents are ' of Old Town.


HELPERS


* The Nassau Council of
the Visually Impaired &
Blind, a newly formed, tax-
exempt organization, meets
the first Monday of each
month from 1-3 p.m. at the
Council on Aging, 1367 South
18th St, Fernandina Beach.
For information, contact
Marsha Riley at 583-1317 or e-
mail ncvib@comcast.net
* National Alliance on
Mental Illness-Nassau meets
on third Thursday at 7 p.m. in
the conference room at the
McArthur Family YMCA off
Citrona Drive. The Consumer
Support Group meets weekly
on Friday at 11 am. at the
Council On Aging across
from Baptist Medical Center
Nassau. Family support meet-
ings are held the fourth
Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room
204 at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church. Call 277-1886 for
information.
* The Overeaters
Anonymous 12-step program
meets at 1 p.m. Thursday at
St. Peter's Episcopal Church.
For information, directions, a
carpool/ride or help starting
more OA meetings, contact


Sheila at 261-7467 or Ilona at
261-9361.
* Judy Schiffman, director
of Panic Relief, Inc., offers a
program for anyone suffering
from panic, anxiety and ago-
raphobia to cope with these
disorders. Learn how atti-
tudes and current thoughts
affect panic and anxiety.
Programs are held locally.
Call PRI at (732) 940-9658.
* The Pink Ribbon Ladies,
a breast cancer support
group, meets the second
Monday at 6 p.m. in Dining
Room 2, next to the cafeteria
at Baptist Medical Center
Nassau.
* Miracle on Wheels
makes available electric pow-
ered wheelchairs to non-
ambulatory senior citizens
(65 years and up) and the per-
manently disabled of any age,
if they qualify.
Usually there is no charge
or out-of-pocket expense for
the power wheelchair, includ-
ing shipping and delivery to
the home by a technician who
makes the final adjustments
to fit the individual. Call 1-866-
200-6924.


Welcome to

Sod's House

S; / ,N Classic Carpets
CHEVROLT & Interiors, Inc.
CHEVROLET * BUICK B KLM
PONTIAC * GMC AbbyCarpet BUDrY KELLUM
464054 SR 200, Yule 802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
(904) 261-6821 Femandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291
FAMILY DENTISTRY TB c
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN BaDcock
Most Insurances Accepted H O M E F R I T U RE
Call For Appointment (or
261 -6828
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
A1 A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL


FREEMAN,
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
FR .-., ,n,:,,, , ',rll.

Fe ' r. ],' .. , : " F . ' i 1

Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


T_


.-7/; . Sw Al .? I 1
Adverthe your business &
to support your local church
Call the NVe\sLeader . 261-3696


Methodist volunteers in mission


WEDDING/ENGAGEMENT







'- . ' -


John Cripps has presented a concept
for a new community mission to provide
.food for those in need. He has offered
his backyard to be cultivated as a veg-
etable garden for the produce to be
donated to Barnabas Center.
Students of the United Methodist will
help work the garden under the direc-
tion of experienced gardeners in our
church, including Brad Hamilton and
Laurie Russell. The plan is to prepare
the garden area this summer for fall
planting. We have also gleaned (pun
intended) ideas from Meagan Burns,
who developed St. Peter's community
garden and who has been very helpful
in our planting. Contact Andy Foote at
the church office if you are interested.
Everyone is looking for ways to save
money these days. Kate Smith and Janet
Plumer of River Road Baptist Church
near Hilliard have made a ministry of it.
On July 18, they went to show the ladies
of First Baptist Church, Callahan, how
they have learned to buy hundreds of
dollars of groceries for pennies on the
dollar and used the savings to bless
their families and others.
College/Career Ministry meets at 7
p.m. Thursday at the Chapel of
Callahan First Baptist Church for adults,
singles or married, who are interested
in worshipping God passionately.
Congratulations to Amelia Baptist
Church. They now have a director of
family ministries, Dave Parker, and a
permanent student minister, Nathan
DeFalco.
What a great place of worship! I
recently completed my ninth year as
your minister of education and it has
been a great nine years. You folks have
embraced me and my family with love
and encouragement. I thank you for the
many opportunities you have given me
to grow in my knowledge and faith. I
came here as 54-year-old rookie and you
have allowed me to make mistakes and
yet you continue to love me. You have
also provided additional blessings to my
family.
You, through the West family, provid-
ed my son with a great wife and the
Brunettis a new daughter. Through that,
we know have four "grand kids" and
they are a continual blessing. It doesn't
get much greater than that!
As I sit back and consider all the
things that God has allowed me to
become through my association with
this great group of people at Amelia
Baptist Church, I can do nothing less
than praise Him! Thank you. Willie and
Lee Brunetti, education/outreach minis-
ter.
Allegiance Welcome Home Concert
was enjoyed at AYhelia Baptist Church
July 5. Adult choir, ladies ensemble,
men's ensemble, thank you for your
faithfulness to rehearsals throughout
the summer months. What a blessing
you are! The beautiful patriotic music


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


* Men's Newcomer Club of Amelia
Island is a social organization that meets
at 11:30 a.m. the third Thursday of most
months at the Fernandina Beach Golf
Club clubhouse. Call Richard Rothrock
at 491-6868 or Bob Keane at 277-4590.
* Military Officers Association of
America service and social organization
serving active duty and retired military
officers meets at 6:30 p.m. the second
Thursday of some months, other
months for Sunday brunch at Ocean
Breeze Conference Center at Mayport
Naval Station. Call president Rob Judas
at (904) 249-1475.
* The Modelers' Club for modelers
interested in cars, planes, ships and
trains meets from 7-9 p.m. the fourth
Monday at St. Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach.
Call Hal Mather at 261-6420.
* Moms Group for Stay-at-home-
Moms, moms offering moms support,
meets with the kids at kid-friendly loca-
tions. Call Amy at 261-0554 or e-mail
amarasco@bellsouth.net to receive a list
of the next meet-ups.
* Nassau Challenger Bowling
League for the physically and mentally
challenged meets from 3-5 p.m. the sec-


ond Saturday at the bowling alley on US
17 in Yulee. Call Melinda Willaford at
261-3136.
* Nassau County Boys & Girls Club
after-school agenda offers programs for
youths ages 6-17 at the Miller Club, one
mile south of AA on CR 107 (Old
Nassauville Road). Hours are 2-8 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Staff and volun-
teers provide homework help, computer
classes, arts and crafts, music and
drama, sports and games, teen pro-
grams, gardening, health and fitness,
cooking and life skills classes. Call the
office at 261-1075 after 2 p.m. weekdays
for information and enrollment details.
* Nassau Civitan Club service organ-
ization meets at noon the second and
fourth Thursdays at Slider's. Call
Norma Norris at 491-9996 or Joyce
Menz at 321-2526.
* Nassau County 4-H is open to
youth ages 5-18 and adult volunteers
excited to learn more about leadership,
citizenship and life skills. For informa-
tion on becoming a member or adult vol-
unteer, contact the Nassau County
Extension Service at (904) 879-1019 or
visit Nassau.ifas.ufl.edu.
* Nassau County Group of the Sierra


DaningLsdi,"�i


This Is my
commandmen
that you love o.
another as I ha
loved you.
R.S.V John 15:1


A wise man once said that unusual travel
suggestions are likened to dancing lessons
from God. The point of this, I suppose, is that
we might learn more about life by traveling
to unusual places or by traveling in unusual
1 ways. For instance, going to Australia instead
of DisneyWorld, or traveling by bus Instead of
byplane are more likely to be life-enhancing,
consciousness-expanding experiences;
in short, a dance lesson with God. Another
lesson to be taken from this is that moving
throughlife should be more like dancing than
simply taking a walk, which means we should
try to move gracefully and beautifully as well as
joyfully. How should we dance through life?
The simplest and most beautiful way to do this
t, is through love. By opening our heart to love,
and loving those
around us, the world is
VO transformed from a
dark, cold and dreary
place to one of light,
'2 warmth and joy.


Club is an environmental organization
that meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday
at the Council on Aging building, 1367
South 18th St, Fernandina Beach. Call
Joan Altman at 277-2274.
* Nassau County Home Educators
Support Group for home-schooling par-
ents meets the third Thursday at 7 p.m.
Call 225-9160 for location or visit geoci-
ties.com/nassaucountyhomeeducators.
* Nassau County Master Gardener
volunteers are trained by County
'Horticultural Extension agents and are
required to serve 75 volunteer hours
year one of their accreditation and 35
volunteer hours and 10 advance training
hours annually in all subsequent years
to maintain their certification as Master
Gardeners. For information on the
Master Gardener program and applica-
tion requirements, contact Becky Jordi,
horticultural extension agent, at 548-
1116 or rljordi@ufl.edu.
* Nassau County NAACP civil rights
organization meets at 6 p.m. for the
executive committee meeting and 7 p.m.
fbr the branch meeting the second
Monday at the Peck Center, 516 South
10th St., Fernandina Beach. Call
Courtney Tyson-Shelby at 491-3419.,


CAMPUS NOTES

* Charles Maurice ' Hampden-Sydney College
Booker III has been accepted first enrolled students in
by Hampden-Sydney College 1775. A private men's college,
and will enroll with a dean's . it is known for its liberal arts
award in August 2009. curriculum, the honor code
Booker is a graduate of which stresses individual and
Fernandina Beach High collective responsibility, a
School and is the son of Mr. focus on the needs of young
and Mrs. Ron M. Booker of men, and a nurturing environ-
Fernandina Beach. ment.


YULEE STUDENTS FROM
FBHS (1970-1975)
REUNITE LABOR DAY
WHEN: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH, 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM.
MEAL SERVED AT NOON.
WHERE: CHEM CELL, CHEM CELL ROAD (AIA TO AMELIA
ISLAND PKWY; 3RD RD ON R)
COST. $20 PER PERSON; RESERVATIONS/PAYMENT BY
SEPTEMBER 1ST AT FIRST ROAST COMMUNITY BANK, YULEE,
OR MAIL TO FCCB, ATTN: SUSAN MURRAY, P.O. BOX 1739,
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32035. CHECK PAYABLE TO
YULEE/FBHS CLASSES OF 1970-1975.
WHO: ALL 1970-1975 FBHS STUDENTS &
1958-1970 FACULTY/STAFF
ALCOHOL-FREE EVENT. DRESS: CASUAL. BRING
SPOUSE/FRIEND. NO INVITATIONS ARE BEING MAILED.
Questions: e-mail yulee..fbhs.gettogether@yahoo.com or call
Kathy Splvey, 225-9560 with questions.
I .5~aMtaaaaaae


July 5 was also a bless- 8:45 p.m. Evangelism Strategies for the
ing. The Amelia's Got 21st century led by Will McRanev;
Talent night was a suc- prayer ministry: "Building Praying
cess due to the many Churches" led by Rich Sheperd; stew-
talents shared and par- hardship: "Consider Your Ways" led by
- ' ents and youth who Ken Westbrook;'music led by Terry
served our delicious Williams; discipleship: "Making
S"pancake supper. Disciples Who Make Disciples" led by
.In the past weeks, Bill Carmichael; ministry assistant/sec-
the elders of Springhill retary: "Office Teamwork" led by Lynn
HILDA'S Baptist Church have Stone; deacon training: "How Deacons
HEAR- been talking to and Help Manage Church Conflict" led by
ABOUTS interviewing different Roy Lee Saint; women's mission and
prospects to fill the ministries led by Cindy Goodwin.
S role of interim pastor; Senior adult fall jubilee Sept. 28-30 in
Hilda completed the plans . Gatlinburg, Tenn., for the Gray Gables
Higginbothar started for Pastor Group is sold out. New dates: Sept. 30
iggin a Jackie and his family's through Oct. 2. Please contact Phyllis
good-bye party (we had a number of you Holmes or L.L. Braddock for more infor-
share memories with them that mation if you are interested in going.
evening); and simply carried on the Our deacons are here to glorify the
oversight and direction of Springhill . Lord through faithful service. If you are
Baptist Church. in need of prayer or help, please do not
We are pleased to report that you hesitate to call your deacon - Tom
gave generously to the pastor's home Pornovets, chairman; Ken Jones, Terry
office project and they were very pleas- Horton, Mark Wynn,'Roland Benoit,
antly surprised. Pastor Jackie is already Brad Braddock, Dana Webber, Bryan
playing with his new computer and we Hall, David McKendree, Billy Ray
believe we have enough funds available Jackson, Mike Cobb, L.L. Braddock.
to purchase the computer credenza and Pastor's cell phone is (904) 545-0501.
file cabinets that Kathy told us he need- Returning to Memorial United
ed. All of the above items will be Methodist Church for the third time in
installed in or delivered to their home. as many years, nationally known singer,
In addition, money was set aside as a storyteller and folk theologian Ed
gift to Kathy from Springhill. Kilbourne was the featured guest
On the search for an interim pastor, Sunday morning in worship and for
we have talked with many potential can- three evenings July 19-21. Over the
didates and met with some as well. We years, Ed has been recognized and
are not ready yet to present to you a rec- acclaimed for his ability to use his gifts
ommendation concerning someone to as a musician and communicator in con-
serve as interim pastor for your review cert and worship settings. He began his
and hopeful approval. Whenever we performing journey in folk groups while
have a viable candidate as either the in high school and college.
interim or theaeventual full-time pastor, Following his graduation from semi-
it will be our intent to present him first nary, Ed set out on a professional career
to our Grace group leaders and Sunday and has now made over 8,000 appear-
school teachers for their review and ances during the last 40 years in every
hopeful approval. region of the United States. Ed has 23
Then we will afford the congregation recordings on the Fly-By-Night label,
the opportunity, during a regular including the new release, "A World of
Sunday school hour, to ask questions Love."
and view the credentials of the candi- "Christ Hath Made Me Free!" was
date proffered to you as either the inter- Rev. Mark Tuso's sermon subject July 5
im pastor or the man whom we feel is at First Baptist Church, Gray Gables.
called by God to serve as our full-time His scripture reading was Galatians 5:1.
pastor. Then, and only then, will he be Aug. 15 at 7 a.m. is the Awana Kick-
formally presented to you as a candidate Off Day Volunteer Breakfast and Prayer
and, at the end of a morning service, we at Gray Gables Church Fellowship Hall.
will ask for your vote of affirmation or Aug. 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. is
denial. Awana registration, kick-off kids singing
In the interim, we beseech you to session, gospel message, lunch and field
join us each Friday night for prayer as day. See Chris Reinolds for questions or
we seek God's will for our congregation- more information.
al family. Though the old sanctuary will Senior adults of First Baptist Church
be open from 6-8 p.m., you may join us Fernandina Beach met at their church
for whatever length of time'and1 at a y . July 16 for their monthly program, and
*, time durin-Rgthcsc hours:y~a hheh thiF~th" 2'ih h. Larry Williams ^s-grIqjbb
opportunity that evening. ' ' as their chairman. His lovely wife, Jewel,
From the NorthEaster, Dr. David is right by his side to assist him.
Drake, DOM: Make plans to attend Key "May our Great Heavenly Father
Leader Workshop, First Baptist Church continue to watch over us and keep us
of Fernandina Beach, Aug. 27 from 6- in His Loving Care."


Mr. Russo, Miss DeFee


DeFee-Russo
Megan Charene DeFee of
Yulee and Robert Douglas
Russo of St. Augustine will be
married at 2 p.m. Aug. 8,
2009, at the home of the bride
with Dolton Robertson offici-
ating. The reception follows.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Daniel and Kelly
DeFee of Yulee. The groom-
elect is the son of Douglas


I __ __


I


I_�C � �









FRIDAY, July 31,2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Kids camp
Faith Christian Academy
presents Kids Choice Camp
2009 from 7 a.m.-6p.m.
through Aug. 12 at 96282
Brady Point Road, Fernandina
Beach. Camp is for ages 3-12
years. Call 321-2137.
Donations needed
The Salvation Army Hope
House, 410 South Date St.,
Fernandina Beach, is in need
of the following types of dona-
tions:
* Personal hygiene items:
toothbrushes, toothpaste,
deodorant, disposable razors,
shaving cream, feminine prod-
ucts and toilet paper
* Canned foods not requir-
ing cooking: non-condensed
soups, pastas, beanie weenies,
tuna, chicken, fruits, fruit
juices and powdered milk
* Starchy foods: rice,
instant mashed potatoes, pas-
tas, cereals and breakfast
bars.
For more information, call
321-0435.
Catholic dass
St. Michael Catholic
Church is sponsoring an
inquiry class for those who
wish to know more about the
Roman Catholic faith and
what Catholics believe. The
program, called RC.IA, will
start on Sept 1 and continue
each week through Easter
2010.
The sessions are open to
those who have never been
baptized, or have been bap-
tized in another faith or to
Catholics who have not
received the Sacraments of
First Eucharist or
Confirmation. There is no
cost and the first session will
meet in the St Michael
Academy library at 6:45 p.m.
on Sept 1.
Call the church office at
261-3472 for more information
or to register.

First Missionary
show
"Behold the Bridegroom


Golf tournament
First Baptist Church is
hosting a Golf Tournament/
Clinic Aug. 1 featuring
renowned golf pro Wally
Armstrong, who will be guest
speaker as well as offer a clin-
ic before the tournament
While he has played profes-
sionally and taught golf since
1968, Armstrong's true pas-
sion is sharing his faith with
others through the game of
golf.
Cost is $75 per person and
includes dinner. Everyone is
invited that evening as
Armstrong shares stories
about his career in.golf and
his faith'journey in life. For
more information or to sign
up, call 261-3617 or contact
Scott Womble at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Club.

Friends &
FamilyDay
Friendship Baptist Church
in Yulee will celebrate Friends
and Family Day on Aug. 2 at 4
p.m. Speaker will be Elder
Eddie Lawrence. For more
information call 225-5627.
Bible marathon
living Waters World
Outreach Center is hosting
the seventh annual Genesis to
Revelation Non-Stop-Around-
The-Clock-Bible Reading
beginning at 6 am. Aug. 3 and
ending sometime late
Thursday afternoon, Aug. 6.
The Bible is read in 15-minute
increments, and you can sign
up in the church sanctuary or
by calling the church office at
321-2117. All are welcome to
read or just come and listen.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope
'House each Tuesday at noon
for its Weekly Worship
Service and Fellowship
Lunch. On Aug. 4, case work-
er and evangelist Anita Richo
will share the Gospel mes-
sage. For more information,
call 321-0435 or stop by the
Hope House, 410 South Date
St.


Cometh" will be presented by 'Faith atthe Movies'
First Missionary Baptist
Church, 20 S. Ninth St, Memorial United Metho-
Fernandina Beach, on Aug. 1 dist Church is hosting a film
at 5 p.m. All are welcome to series titled Faith at the
jopiin thiscelebration., , Moy,.,,, Moyies. This is a brand new.,.:
"Garage sale . -i::"! I series designedito explore ;!l -
issues of faith through popu-
Rock Church of Northeast lar movies. There will be a
Florida will hold a garage sale simultaneous movie and pro-
on Aug. 1 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at gram for children, as well as
the church, 850893 US 17 nursery. All are welcome.
North, Yulee (next to Mead's Movies start at 6:30 p.m. in
Framery in the Crossroads Maxwell Hall.
Shopping Plaza). The final movie is "The


COVETED AWARD GIVEN
Linda Laine, right, was pre- ,
sented with an Honorary
Life Membership in
Presbyterian Women,
Presbyterian Church (USA) | ff ", /
during a Providence . .
Presbyterian Church serv-
ice. Jo Brumund presented
the certificate and pin that
are conferred upon an indi-
vidual in recognition of sig-
nificant, faithful service in
some area of the church's 'I
work.
The pin and the certificate
have the symbol of the but-
terfly. The butterfly repre-
sents newness in Christ and
the emergence of a new cre- . ..
ation, Presbyterian Women. SUBMITEI)
Laine was honored with this
membership in recognition of her work in creating and nurturing the development of
Presbyterian Women at Providence Presbyterian Church through the IAFF Circle, and
her diligent work in the development of Providence's worship and music ministry. The
Honorary Life Membership also recognizes her upcoming position as the incoming
Moderator of Presbyterian Women in the St. Augustine Presbytery.


I U2charist'at St Peter's


St. Peter's Episcopal church, 801 Atlantic Ave., will host
U2charist and Potluck on Aug. 9, a celebration of the Eucharist
that features the music of band U2 and a message about God's
call to rally around the Millennium Development Goals.
Several people will share personal stories and experiences
related to Millennium Development Goals service and action,
including John and Alice Holliday, Mark Kaufman and Donna
Paz and Brenda Commandeur.
The music in the service is replete with the message of glob-
al reconciliation, justice for the poor and the oppressed and the
importance of caring for your neighbor. Led by global MDG
ambassador, Bono, U2 is calling people worldwide to deeper
faith and engagement with God's mission. The U2charist
seeks to be an extension of this ministry.
Potluck and information begins at 5 p-m. and U2charist at
6 p.m. For information call the church at 261-4293.


Ultimate Gift" on Aug. 7.
Summer Bible study
On Aug. 14 Providence
Presbyterian Church will host
summer Bible studies, using
sermons from renowned
preachers Fred Craddock,
Barbara Brown Taylor and
Tom Long as the basis for
conversation about the scrip-
ture. Call 432-8118 for infor-
mation. Everyone's welcome.
The church is located at 96537
Parliament Drive.
Summer reading
S,,, All are welcome to join the
members and friends of,"
Providence Presbyterian
Church in reading and dis-
cussing Barbara Brown
Taylor's newest-book, An
Altar in the World, on Aug. 19.
Call 432-8118 for informa-
tion or to order the book. The
church is located at 96537


Parliament Drive, just off Old
Nassauville Road.
Ministry Fair'
First Presbyterian Church
will host a Ministry Fair on
Aug. 23 in Jim Thomas Hall
from 9:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Booths representing the mis-
sions, ministries, studies,
events and opportunities avail-
able at First Presbyterian will
fill the hall. There will be
games, door prizes, lots of
food, an Ugly Tie Contest and
fellowship. Nursery and pre-
school will be available.

. uMngProof , ;
simulcast
On Aug. 28-29 Beth
Moore is bringing Living
Proof Live to her hometown of
Green Bay, Wis. Thanks to
simulcast satellite technology,
she'll spend that weekend at


First Baptist Church, too.
Tickets are $10 and may be
purchased at the church. For
information, call 261-3617.
Rally Day
Rally Day for children and
youth will be Aug. 30 at First
Presbyterian, beginning at
9:50 a.m. Nursery, toddlers,
preschool and kindergarten
will meet in their classrooms
in Noah's Place. First and sec-
ond graders will meet in the
Power Lab and third through
fifth graders will meet in the
Kidmo theater. Middle school
students will meet in the
Skate Room in the Youth
Center. Senior high youth will
meet in Faith Cafe at 12:15
p.m. for lunch and Bible study.
Parents of all children,
nursery through senior high,
are invited to Breakfast &
Conversation in Jim Thomas
Hall at 10 a.m., hosted by the
Christian Education Commit-
tee. Parents, call the church
office to confirm your atten-
dance no later than Aug. 27.
Women's study
The Amelia Island
Women's Evening Community
Bible Study invites you to join
an in-depth, non-denomina-
tional study of the Book of
Acts. , ,
Meetinsd' .^nijay
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church,
961167 Buccaneer Trail
across from Harris Teeter.
The study begins Sept. 14 and
continues through May 3.
For more information and
to register, call Michal Polese


at 548-9971 or Linda Bell at
261-0569. Visit www.communi-
tybiblestudy.org and
www.ameliaislandevecbs.org.
Playgroup
MOM,ME meets every
Wednesday from 9:30-11 a.m.
in Noah's Place, First Presby-
terian's nursery and pre-
school classrooms. Everyone
is welcome to participate in
the mom and baby/toddler
playgroup that has evolved
into an interesting group of
moms and children growing
and nurturing, networking
and socializing, sharing and
caring with all who come.
This group meets year round.
This ministry is open to the
public. No reservations are
needed, just drop in. Park
your stroller out front.
Stuffthe Bus'
The Salvation Army Hope
House is accepting applica-
tions to help income qualify-
ing families obtain school sup-
plies for their children as part
of its Stuff the Bus School
Supply Drive. If you wish to
volunteer to take applications
or have questions, call 321-
0435. Applications will be
accepted on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays from
1-4 p.m., through July 31.
Food program
Yulee Baptist Weekday
Ministry, 85967 Harts Road, is
now participating in the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's
Child Care Food Program.
Meals will be available at no
separate charge to eligible
children enrolled in the min-
istry's day care program.
Parents or guardians must
complete an application. For
information, call 225-9196.
Food ministries
Angel Food Ministries and
Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ are offering food relief
for the community. For more
information contact Thomas
Kessel or Tom Gilday at 277-
2517 or e-mail fbangelfood@
gmailcom. The church is
located at 1005 South 14th St
Visit www.cocfb.org and www.
angelfoodministries.com.

The Bridge Family
Worship Center in Yulee is
offering Angel Food
Nli rgs,�91%ted food.
Open to anyone, this opportu-
nity allows you to feed your
family for a fraction of the nor-
mal cost. Family of four can
eat for a week for only $30.
For information, visit
www.thebridgeflorida.com or
call 2254860.


'Worship this week at the yace of your choice"


Bap~p.st Church
Sunday School..........................................9:30 am
Sunday Worship ....................................1045 am
Wednesday AWANA ,.............................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study ...................6:30 pm
941017 Old Nossauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.sorinahillbaptistfb.org


II . - - �1 I� U I.~ .~..


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
.Jn Interfenominationaf
Community Cliurch
SUNDAY WORSHIP
August 2, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.
MESSAGE:"Prayer in the Spirit"
MUSIC "Here I am Lord'
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-


The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road

(904) 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


AMELIA PLANTATION
CHAPEL
An lnterd nominationa
Community CAurc
BLOG WITH US
Share your opinions with Pastor Ted
Schroder of Amelia Plantation
Chapel. Access:ameliachapel.com
Pastor's Corner, and then Ted's Blog.
Faith-based subjects that make us all
think!

St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes
Youl
Located at the
corner of 8th &
Atlantic
Sunday,
Holy Eucharist
8:30 am &10:00 am'
Wednesday
Holy Eucharist 904-261-4293
12:10 pm www.stpetersparlsh.org


i I. - ... ............... - .... - . ..


In th hehort of
.Fernondfino
9 N. 6- Strcet
Dr. Holton S egllng
Senior Poslor
Worship 8:30 & .l a
Sunday School 9:50a
Nursery
Children
Youth
Adults
S21 -3837
*mwvi. 1 stpres-tb corn


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Chlldrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www.blackrockbaptist.com


_ *__


. C... .. R
ANCHOR

Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
S1 5 Centre Street


Rev. Rev Ramsburg. Pastor
- Every Sunday --
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
-- Vacation Bible School --
July 12 tnru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306


YULEE UNITED
, METHODIST
CHURCH
P/ease join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


"Discover the Difference":at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Heltpn
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAII
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Fcrnandina Bch
For More Information Call: 261-9527


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH. WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor: Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... 9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:55A.M.
Discipleship Training .. ........ 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowstlp Supper .... 6:00RM.
Wednesday Prayer Service ...... . 7:00P.M,
736 Bonnlevlew Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spolntsbaptlstchurch.org


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
hmwva#es yls, CmpoiayM&s4c Cass uaAlmovplv
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday mom. @ 9:15am
KhdKredlble Chldren Ministries Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Conne gig i C, hi..Connecng iMt Peop/e.


y'ULEE "
A APTIST
BCHURCHj

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:1Sam and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm , �
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Yputh 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


Living Waers STMSST
world outreach 20 SOa.t6hat Str 2614907
Contemporary Worship Rev. Da~Rsn K Bolden Sr., Pstor
SUN 9:30ami Th thchiAin the
W' 7I:Odpm eartoftlihCity
A the ** ith die ti t be winlthe
Youth, Nursety& 9ertofAlPeople
C/ Chifldren's Ministries sl/irN wI�rcru.9.a
321-2117 M s.,Wr ..L
Rob & Christle Goyette 21l-2117 W .* VW ._r , u=
. snlorPsor OnimAIMle Y eStofAmefa slanid ' , , Is
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org yloiuthh'fV C�leM,Shle, rotli


I ___________
Holy Trinity Anglican Church


+I 1 , , _ ,..� ,h



Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parisn
The Rev J Michael Bowhay Rector
Come Grow Wilh Us


www.popiucamell.oIi I


II


lo-.idien,-e ,....

C n," ' ' *
-o


Everyone is welcome
[.-, R<.:.t rr rh-,lp:
' r53 , P ,ri ,mcni Er i, c 'ilc

I , . .
i r i h ,..: ,, , " , *,. r . l


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
in Amelia Park
1830 Lake Park Drive
(across from the ' MCA)
Sunday worship times
8 00 a m
10 00 a m with music
9134-430-0 74
wwvw eholylriniyariglican org


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
C'omnie Worship wilh us here
Ihe Bible is Our only Autllorily
Churcl Services- 1 larn
VMlCA on Cilrona ,'225-5368
-AI.. mIrI l.:,lalri ' ur.I I : I. : 1.:rr I : .:.I:.


'I


II Sl


Rev. Brian Ebum, Pastor
E Saturayvnly Ma. 4 pm 2 5:30pm
Sauray 4pm Mass atYulse United Metodist Church
Sunday Masses 8:00 & 1000 am& 12 Nooon
Daily Mass - 8:.30 am Mn., Wed. Tus & Fri.
6 pm - Tuesday I
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6:00 pm; Holy Day :30 am
Confessions: Salurday 3:15pm -345 pm or by appt
Telephone Numbers:
Parlsh Offlce: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number. 904-277-566,
also call 904-277-0550


il lmn - I ;*- e*-F-SIOR IF O:(0) S225-0777


BETH MOORE
LIVING PROOF UVE
August 28-29
Tickets $10
For 2-Day Event
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-261-3617
www. FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton. Sr Pastor


I N


-F


-1








FRIDAY. July 31. 2009 NEWS News-Lcader


4L.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tubers enjoy themselves as they drift down the Ichetucknee River at a relaxing pace. The river runs slowly, providing a calm, relaxing atmosphere to its visitors. Ichetucknee State Park
attracts nearly 200,000 visitors each year for scuba diving, tubing, kayaking and canoeing.




Journey down Ichetucknee River
A , Z" .






. - --- ---.---


. ........ ....-...,.....


Tubers enjoy themselves as they drft down the Ichetucknee River at a relaxing pace. The river uns slowly, provide ng a calm, relaxing atmosphere to its visitors, Ichetucknee State Park
attracts nearly 200,000 visitors each year for scuba diving, tubing, kayaking and canoeing,




Journey down Ichetucknee River


Columbia
County, in
north Florida,
is home to
three easily
accessible rivers: the
Suwannee River borders
the county to the north,
the Ichetucknee River
and Springs is on the.
county's western border
and the scenic Santa Fe
River borders the county
to the south.
Of the three, the
Ichetucknee River,
located in Ichetucknee
State Park, attracts
nearly 200,000 visitors
each year who journey to
the river to tube down its
serene, but chilly length.
The river travels
slowly through scenic,
shaded hammocks that
stand guard over the six


miles of wetlands and
cypress trees until the
Ichetucknee joins the
equally beautiful Santa
Fe River.
In 1972, the U.S.
Department of the
Interior declared the
head spring of the river,
located near its north
entrance, a National
Landmark.
In addition to tubing
the Ichetucknee, visitors
can enjoy picnicking,
snorkeling, canoeing,
swimming, hiking and
wildlife viewing. Picnic
areas, equipped with
tables and grills, are
available throughout the
park and a full-service
concession offers food,
refreshments and
outdoor products from
Memorial Day through


Labor Day.
October through
March, scuba diving
is available in the Blue
Hole for cave-certified
divers only.
The Ichetucknee is
a year-round tourist
attraction, and once
summer's heat begins to
dissipate into fall's cool
prelude, it is the perfect
season for visitors and
local residents to become
acquainted with the
natural environment that
frames the river.
There is plenty to
see as the park comes
alive with the first blush
of autumn colors and
fall's early moderate
temperatures invite a
peaceful walk in the
park.
It's an ideal time of


year for a leisurely
stroll along the park's
nature trails and to get
reacquainted with fresh
air, leaves rustling in
the treetops and, for the
sharp-eyed, a chance
to catch a glimpse of
the furry and feathered
residents of the park.
Whitetail deer,
raccoons, wild turkeys,
wood ducks and great
blue herons can be seen
from the river year-
around.
Yet the view from
a canoe or kayak
as it slowly carries
it occupants lazily
downstream provides
the viewer with a slowly
changing panorama of
the park that can only
be appreciated from 'the
water.


About Ichetucknee Springs State Park


a Address: 12087 S.W.
U.S. Highway 27, Fort
White, Fl. 32038. (386) 497-
4690.
* Hours: 8 a.m. until
sundown 365 days a year.
* Driving Directions:
From the north, take 1-75
south to exit 423. Take SR
47 south, turn on CR 238
and follow the park signs.
From the south, take 1-75
north to exit 399. Take US
441 north to the city of High
Springs. Take US 27 north
to Ft. White, stay on US 27
north approximately 4 miles
to the South Park Entrance.

* Admission: $6 per
vehicle. Limit two to eight
people per vehicle. No river
use. $4 single occupant
vehicle. $2 pedestrians,


bicyclists, extra passengers,
passengers in vehicle with
holder of Annual Individual
Entrance Pass.
n River Use Fees: $5
per person: canoeing. $5
per person, tubing from
north entrance during
summer season (begins the
Saturday before Memorial
Day through Labor Day).
Children 5 and under are
free. $5 per person, tubing
from south entrance during
summer season. Children 5
and under are free.
$6 per group of two to
eight people, tubing from
south entrance off season
(Begins the Tuesday after
Labor Day through the
Friday before Memorial
Day).


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3 questions you should ask
if you've been in an accident.
1. Do you have headaches you haven't had before"
2. Do you have numbness or tingling in your arms or legs'
3. Do you have neck, back or muscle pain?
Even if it seems minor, you should seek the advice of a pre.;,ioIal
Don't risk your health. Even what seems to be a minor accidJcm could
,. A..u. iniiui, :. that require crealmen! . Your health and well blc.iiii' I. jut
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Pareos * Jewelry
Sunglasses & Sun Readers
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Located in Historic Downtown
317 Centre Street
(904) 310-6086


CARPETS & INTERIOR
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Commercial & Residential


2248 S. 8th Street (904) 277-0901
Fernandina Beach, FL















SPORTS

. . ,"., :' - ." ..- -*/ ^ ^ ^P:-;',. . V .... '",.


FRIDAY. JULY 31.2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH. FLORIDA


12A


SOUTHEAST REGIONAL TOURNEY


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PHOTOS BY\ BETHHJONIES/NiEWlS-1.ADER
Fernandina Beach Babe Ruth is hosting the 14-and-under Southeast Regional Allstar
Tournament this week at Buccaneer Sports Complex and games got under way
Thursday morning. Twelve teams are participating, including Fernandina Beach,
which was scheduled to take on the defending champions of Greenville, N.C.,
Thursday before the rains came. Prior to the first pitch of that game, Longwood took
on Bahamas, Nassau, in the first round of the tournament. Above, a Longwood pitcher
fires from the pitcher's mound and, below, a Bahamas runner rounds third base.
Right top, a Bahamas batter reacts to a strike. Right center, a Bahamas pitcher on the
mound. Right bottom, another Bahamas batter takes a swing. Games continue through
Wednesday. For information, visit www.leaguelineup/fernandina. Admission to games
for ages 13 and up is $20 for a week pass or $5 a day.


9


-'-. 41


* , '


"",:i:


Stringer suits continue: Riddell latest defendant


* y son told me the other day that
he doesn't like wearing a hat
when he is at tje beach because it
makes him hot. This seems pretty
obvious, doesn't it? If you wear something on
your head, it is going to be hotter. By the way,
my son is nine.
This brings me to Korey Stringer. As you
may recall Stringer was the 27-year-old, 335-
pound Minnesota Vikings All-Pro tackle who
died during training camp in July 2001 due to
heat stroke. Stringer's temperature reached
108.8 degrees when he collapsed on the field
and died the next day.
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition
that can occur with exercise in the extreme
temperatures. Body temperature of over 104
degrees can cause the body's internal ther-
mometer to fail so heat is not disposed of ade-
quately and the body cannot cool down in the
usual way.
Kelci Stringer, the wife of Korey Stringer,
filed a $100 million lawsuit against the NFL,
the Vikings and the team doctors, citing
wrongful death. She has since settled with the
NFL and the Vikings for an undisclosed'
amount of money. The NFL also agreed to sup-
port the creation of a heat illness prevention
program for athletes of all ages. She has also


Settled with the physicians
involved with the care of
Viking players.
She is now suing the
Si Riddell Corporation, the
maker of the helmet Stringer
was wearing that day, saying
the company should have
warned him his helmet could
make him hotter and, thus,
put him at increased risk for
SPORTS heat stroke and, therefore,
cofitributed to his death.
MEDICINE Much to my surprise, a
GREGORY judge agrees that she has a
legitimate claim. A U.S. dis-
SMITH. M.D. trict court judge in Ohio has
called for a jury trial to deter-
mine whether the Riddell hel-
met manufacturer is legally responsible in
Stringer's death. The judge concluded Riddell
had a duty to warn Stringer his helmet could
make him hotter when wearing it in warm con-
ditions and, therefore, could potentially con-
tribute to heatstroke.
Stringer played football for years. You
mean, we are supposed to believe he didn't
know wearing a helmet made you hotter?
What player doesn't know wearing a helmet


makes you hotter? They all know it. My nine-
year-old son knows it.
The preliminary judge wrote it was "rea-
sonably foreseeable that a user of Riddell's hel-
mets and shoulder pads during extremely hot
and humid conditions might suffer from a heat
stroke and, thus, Riddell owed Stringer a duty
to warn."
I have a really nice ski jacket. It is down-
filled. Now, if I chose to wear it in July and
went out and exercised, it could make me hot
- I mean really hot to the point where my
body temperature could climb to dangerous
conditions. But should there be a warning
label on my jacket for just such a thing? Does
the jacket maker owe me a duty to warn?
The trial is set to take place in November
and, regardless of the outcome, Stringer's
spokesman James Gould believes this is
already a landmark decision because it makes
the connection between the equipment and
heat stroke.
"The best way to uphold Stringer's legacy
is to make sure what happened to Korey does-
n't happen to any other football player, from
the NFL all the way down to kids in Pop
Warner," Gould said.
He went on to say "any manufacturer who
sells football helmets and shoulder pads, and


any league, coach or equipment manager who
uses such equipment without a heat stroke
warning does so at his own peril."
I spoke with Jeffrey Reel, who teaches a
sports law course as an adjunct professor at
the Florida Coastal School of Law, for a legal
opinion on this matter.
"When you're dealing with products liabili-
ty, the plaintiff can claim that the manufacturer.
owed a duty to warn consumers about a poten-
tially dangerous aspect of the product," Reel
said. "Of course, you're going to have to con-
vince a jury that a reasonable person would
need such a warning and that not providing
such a warning was one of the main factors
that caused the injury, or death in this case.
Those will be difficult arguments to make in
the Stringer case."
This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacement for treatment
by your regular doctor It is only designed to offer
guidelines on the prevention, recognition and
care of injuries and illness. Specific concerns
should be discussed with your physician. Mail
your questions to Gregory Smith, M.D., Sports
Medicine, 1250 S. 18th St., Suite 204,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Call 261-8787
or visit www.gsmithmd.com.


`' ��.lt

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vGOLF


Tourney


today and


Saturday
The fifth annual ALS
Amelia Island Golf Classic,
held in memory of John Louis
O'Day, will be held July 31 at
Long Point Golf Club at the
Amelia Island Plantation.
Proceeds benefit the ALS
Association, Florida chapter.
Registration is at 10:30
a.m. and shotgun start is at
12:30 p.m. Format is a four-
person scramble. Buffet
lunch is from 11 a.m. until the
start of play.
Cocktail reception,
awards, raffle and silent auc-
tion are from 5-7 p.m. Players
receive a complimentary raf-
fle ticket; winners must be
present to claim prizes.
Entry fee is $150 per play-
er or $600 per foursome. The
reception only is $75 per per-
son.
Contests include hole-in-
one, longest drive (men and
women), closest to the pin
(men and women), putting on
putting green. Awards go to
first through fifth net team
and first and second gross
team.
Often referred to as Lou
Gehrig's disease, Amyotro-
phic Lateral Sclerosis is a pro-
gressive and usually fatal neu-
romuscular disease that robs
the body of its ability to walk,
speak, swallow and breathe.
For information, contact
Mark O'Day at 553-0576 or
odaym25@aol.com or visit
www.ALSGolfAmelia.com.

Armstrong event
Fernandina Beach Golf'
Club is hosting a golf tourna-
ment and clinic featuring
renowned golf pro Wally
Armstrong.
SArmstrog. I t be the -
guest speaker as well as offer
a clinic before the tourna-
ment While he has played
professionally and taught golf
since 1968, Armstrong's true
passion is sharing his faith
with others through the game
of golf.
This event takes place
Aug. 1. Cost is $75 per person
and includes dinner.
Everyone is invited as
Armstrong shares about his
career in golf and his faith
journey in life. For informa-
tion or to sign up, call the
church office at 261-3617 or
contact Scott Womble at the
golf course at 277-7370.

Upcoming scrambles
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club will host a scramble for
the Fernandina Beach Men's
Golf Association Aug. 8. The
event is a backward tourna-
ment. Another scramble will
be held Sept. 19.
The final two events of
2009 for the FBMGA are the
October Four Ball Oct 3-4 -
a two-day, 36-hole, two-man
team competition - and the
Christmas Scramble - an 18-
hole ABCD team competition
with a 12:30 p.m. shotgun
start.
For information, call 277-
7370.


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FRIDAY. JULY 31.2009 SPORTS News Lcadcr


Sign up for soccer
Amelia Island Youth Soccer online registra-
tion is still open through Aug. 2. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com.

Elm Street awards banquet
Elm Street Little League will hold its award
banquet at 2 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Martin Luther
King Jr. Center. For information, contact
Wayne Peterson at 753-1663.

Round robin tennis tourney at AlP
To raise additional funds for the Interfaith
Dinner Network, which benefits Hope House
clients, Amelia Island Plantation will be spon-
soring a round robin tennis tournament Aug. 8.
The tournament is open to players of all levels,
men and women, for $30 per person, including
lunch. The tournament will be divided into
social and competitive players with a grand
prize of a new Head tennis racquet plus a 20
percent discount for participants at Amelia
Island Plantation's tennis pro shop.
Courts open for warm-up at 9 a.m. and play
begins at 9:30 a.m. Lunch with overview of IDN
is at noon. After lunch, courts open to all partic-
ipants at no extra charge for additional play
Call the Pro Shop 277-5145 to register.
Payment may be made upon arrival with all
profits donated directly to the IDN.
IDN is a non-profit organization as a part of
the Homeless Coalition of Nassau County,
which works with the ministerial association to
offer dinners to the homeless and hungry and
those in need of temporary help within the
community. This pilot project involves 12
churches on Amelia Island with dinners pre-
pared and served at the Salvation Army's Hope
House at Ninth and Date streets. The teams
have served more than 3,000 plates in 2009.
They are expanding the program to include
Yulee and Callahan.

Umpires recruited
Baseball and softball umpires can earn
extra cash by joining the fastest growing
umpires association in Northeast Florida, the
River City Umpires Association. Contact Terry
Padgett at (904) 879-6442 or Aaron Knowles
at (904) 962-7184.
River City Umpires is currently recruiting
both men and women who are interested in
officiating baseball and softball and live or work
in Baker, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Putnam, St.
Johns or Nassau county. For information, visit
www.rivercityumps.com.

Back to School beach run
The second annual Back to School Beach
Fun Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K (one mile)
will be held Oct. 17 at Peters Point on A1A.
The event starts at low tide, 4 p.m. Registra-
tion information will be available in August. The
day includes music, food and awards. Begin
training now. Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit Communities in Schools of
Nassau County.

Baseb*8Edfit Hessohs"' I
Baseball and softball lessons are being
offered by Coach Shelly Hall for ages five to
high school. Call 583-0377 for information.

YMCA flagfootball
The McArthur Family YMCA teams up with
the Jacksonville Jaguars and NFL Flag
Football for its fall youth flag football program,
Register through Aug. 8. Practices begin the
week of Aug. 24. The season, kicks off Sept. 5
and the last game will be held Oct. 24. All
games will be played Saturday mornings.
Games and practices will be held at the fields
behind Kmart in Fernandina Beach.
The league is open to anyone ages 4-14 as
of Aug. 1. Cost is $50 for YMCA members and
$100 for non-members (financial assistance is
available). All players receive a NFL Flag
Football jersey and an end-of-the-season
award. Call 261-1080 or visit http://www.first-
coastymca.org/mcarthur-branch.

YMCA falvolleyball
The McArthur Family YMCA is introducing a
new fall volleyball league. Register through
Aug. 8. Practices start the week of Aug. 24.
The season runs Sept. 10 through Oct. 29. All
games and practices will be held in the
McArthur YMCA gymnasium with games on
Thursday nights.
The league is open to anyone ages 8-14 as
of Aug. 1. Cost is $50 for YMCA members and
$100 for non-members (financial assistance is
available). All players receive a volleyball jer-
sey and an award at the end of the season.
Call 261-1080 or visit http://www.firstcoastym-
ca. org/mcarthur-branch.


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YMCAtennis camp
The McArthur Family YMCA is teaming up
with Amelia Island Plantation to hold a tennis
skills camp this summer. The camp is available
for kids ages 8-14. Cost is $85 for members;
$100 for non-members. There will be two ses-
sions in August, Aug. 10-14 and Aug. 17-21.
The camp will be held at the Amelia Island
Plantation tennis facility and will be led by the
AlP tennis pros. For registration information,
contact the YMCA at 261-1080 or e-mail tchris-
tenson@firstcoastymca.org.

Soccer referee course offered
The following soccer clubs are hosting the
Grade 8 (entry level) referee course. Visit
http://fsr-inc.com/ Welcome.aspx to register.
Contact Mike Goodman, director of coaching
of Amelia Island Youth Soccer, at
aiydoc@aiysoccer.com with questions.
* First Coast Soccer Club from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Aug. 1, from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 2 (test day) at
Kumon Math & Reading Center, 13947 Beach
Blvd., Ste. 109, Jacksonville.
* Westside Soccer Club from 8:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. Aug. 8 and from 1-4:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at
Venetia Terrace Baptist Church (by Westside
Soccer fields), 5284 118 St., Jacksonville.
* Creeks Soccer Club from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Aug. 15 and from noon to 5 p.m. Aug. 16
(test day) at Veterans Park (Creeks Soccer
complex), 1332 Veterans Parkway,
Jacksonville.
SJacksonville Soccer Club from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Aug. 22 and from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 23 (test
night) at Chuck Rogers soccer park behind
First Christian Church of Jacksonville, 11924
San Jose Road, Jacksonville.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports Association
meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee. Call 261-1075 or
277-1609 for information.

TurtleTrot Sept 5
An earlier start and some free extras are in
store for participants in this year's Turtle Trot
5K/10K race and 1.5-mile walk on Labor Day
weekend. The annual event will begin at 7:30
a.m. Sept. 5, a half hour earlier than last year.
After the race, runners can freshen up with
a free shower at the Atlantic Recreation Center
and spend the rest of the day on Amelia Island.
Runners and walkers can present their race
bib for free admission to Fort Clinch State Park
for the remainder of the day. An awards cere-
mony with door prizes will follow the event with
a grand prize of a four-day, three-night stay at
the Amelia Island Plantation.
The race will again feature professional
scoring from 1st Place Sports in Jacksonville,
using an electronic chip-timing system. The
5K, 10K and 1.5-mile non-competitive walk will
start and finish at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center with the last half of the 10K
running through Fort Clinch State Park.
Half-mile and one-mile fun runs for children
10 and younger will begin at 9 a.m. In another
change this year, the kids' runs will be free.
The goal is to encourage young people to run
and make the entire event more affordable for
families, Hill said. Registration is required and
youth finishers will receive a ribbon at the end
of their run.
A popular feature is returning this year -
original T-shirt artwork by Femandina Beach
artist and sea turtle volunteer Sandra Baker-
Hinton. All pre-registered walkers and 5K/10K
runners will receive a T-shirt with shirts avail-
able on race day while supplies last. Proceeds
benefit the Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch and
sea turtle patrols inside Fort Clinch State Park
along with the running club's youth running
programs.
Entry fees through Aug. 28 will be $20 per
person or $15 for members of Amelia Island
Runners. After Aug. 28 through race day, the
fee will be $25 for everyone. Entryforms and
online registration are available at the club's
website, www.AmelialslandRunners.com.
Forms are also available at Club 14 Fitness,
Red Otter Outfitters and other locations. Visit
the AIR website or call 277-3676.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club. Social
hour is at 6:30 p.m; meeting is.at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Steinkamp at 261-5213 or
visit www.ameliaislandsailing.org.

Challenger Bowling
Nassau Challenger Bowling League for the
physically and mentally challenged meets the
second Saturday of the month from 3-5 p.m. at
the Strikers Family Bowling Center in Yulee.
Call Melinda Willaford at 261-3136.


Don't Miss

Nassau County Night
with the at the


Monday, August 17
Game Time at 7:05, Festivities begin at 6:00
Enjoy the Monday Night
Belly Buster Buffet!
For just $20 geta Homeplate Boxticket plus an
all-you-con-eat buffet of hot dogs, hamburgers, popcorn
ice cream treats and softdrinksfrom 6:00-9:00 PMI
Sponsored By:
Golf Club of North Hampton
The Island Chamber
Clyde W. Davis, PA Prudential Realty
Rick Keffer Dodge Chrysler Jeep Woody's BBQ
AdvancedDisposol/ Fer nondina Beach MemorialUMC
Statelne Animal Hospital Paul Clark Ford Mercury
Amaela Hotel ot the Beach Griswold Concrete Pinch-A-Penny
AmeliaRiver Excursions MedicalWeight Prudential Realty
Dick's WingsandGrill Managemen Clnics T&A Sports
Cat^l~il 358-286 or vsit wwwBjxsuns�cmE~i


FISHING COUSINS


Cousins
Chad
Schreck,
above, and
Vett
Sanders,
left, Caught
these fish
July 21.
Schreck
caught a 24-
pound bar-
racuda and
Sanders
landed a 12-
pound king
mackerel in
the waters
off Amelia
Island.
SUBMITTED
PHOTOS


COLLEGE BOUND


i--1


---0'oE~ -C


SUBMITTED
Recent Swain County High School graduate Nick Lancaster signed a scholarship to
play baseball at the collegiate level for Southern Utah University after an astounding
four-year career with the Maroon Devils in Bryson City, N.C., that included two con-
ference championships and two all-conference recognition. The hard-working first
and third baseman is the son of Todd and Janene Lancaster and the grandson of
Don and Gail Lancaster, who reside in Fernandina Beach. Taking part in the signing
were Lancaster's coaches, who have helped him progress throughout the years, front
row from left, SCHS baseball coach David Peterson, SCHS athletic director Frank
Maennle, Chuck McMahan, Jim Hipp, Todd Lancaster, Kevin AUman and Perry
Shuler. A special thanks goes to the Burbank family of Fernandina Beach for the
excellent batting cages that contributed to his success.


Beautiful hardbound collectors' edition will be printing on acid-free paper.
This pictorial history will contain up to 96 pages, over 100 years in words and
pictures, utilizing more than 250 photographs.SAVE BY ADVANCE ORDER,
Your cost is only $24.95 plus $1.75 tax per copy. Only those who order in
advance are assured of obtaining a copy. After publication, remaining copies
will sell for $34.95 plus $2.45 tax per copy. Delivery is scheduled for Fall 2009.
A gift you know will be appreciated and cherished. This history in words and
pictures will analyze Fernandina Beach and outline the many urban changes.
r T~I--~~~~slsRX-


We need to borrow your old pictures for the publication of this book!

RETURN ORDER BLANK TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
Please enter my order for: A Pictorial History of Fernandina Beach, Florida

Scop(ies) STANDARD EDITION @ $24.95 + $1.75 tax

copies) LIMITED EDITION @ $75.00 + $5.25 tax
O I am enclosing payment in full.
O Please ship my books) to the address below. I have enclosed an additional $7.00 for each book shipped.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
PHONE

MAIL TO: The News-Leader, 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 261-3696


SPORTS SHORTS






FRiIDAY, jUiY 31.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


David Thompson of Atlanta, Ga., fished on Jim Wilson's "Gray Beard" sport fishing
boat and boated this 34-pound king mackerel. The big king hit a live pogy fished on
the top between St Marys channel markers one and two. Charlie Hooks was also fish-
ing aboard the "Gray Beard."


Whether buying or selling,
speak with the realtor who
ka$s mn#de it happen since 1995.
$7 million in closed sales
year-to-date 2009.

Viewi the best listings in the
Amei~ia .sand Mfarket....
wft o vprope rtiesofameliaislandflorida. corn


I
Claudia Watts


Claudia Watts of a
RE/MAX Professional Group
303 Centre Street, Suite 102
Located in Historic Downtown Fernandina Beach
On Amelia Island
904-321-1999 OFFICE OR 904-556-4000 CELLUL 4RBLACKBERRY
E-MAIL: claudiacw@viremax.net
toasfl? e a'wv pioperliesofam'li.ell.sl.ri dllorldl coum


SPECIAL PHOTOS
Steve Pickett's "4/0" kingfish team took home this brand new 15-foot Carolina Skiff,
Mercury outboard and a Loadmaster boat trailer when Spencer Lesage reeled in his
winning 37.4-pound king mackerel. Pictured, from left, standing, are Steve Pickett,
William Lesage, Walker Palmer and Steve Pickett, Jr.; in the boat, from left, are
Charlie Palmer, Spencer Lesage, Carter Pickett and Colby Lesage. Not pictured:
Jimmy Pickett.


Drum at south jetty rocks

school of red drum holding at the tip dines.
of the St. Marys south jetty rocks Surf fishermen will find
during the incoming tide. Flynn has an excellent tide this week-
also been leading his charter clients to St. end with a high falling tide
Marys jetty tarpon weighing to just over 100 arriving at sunrise. Beach
pounds. Both red drum and tarpon are taking fishermen are reporting bon-
live pogies fished on the bottom with 30- to 50- rethead sharks running in
pound class fishing tackle. the surf and measuring up to"
With a high tide arriving at 5:48 a.m., both three feet in length. Great
tarpon and red bass fishermen will miss a ON THE sport for the young surf fish--
morning rising tide. The last few hours of the .WATER ermen. Small sharks are tak-
falling tide historically produce both tarpon .WTER ing fresh shrimp and cut
and red drum while anchoring on the river TERRY baits. Whiting weighing to
side at the tip of the St. Marys south jetties LACOSS two pounds are also running.
and also fishing right on the bottom with live in the surf and taking fresh -
pogies. - - shrimp fished on a No. 1


FA is still a good bet this weekend for a
variety of pelagic species, including king
mackerel, cobia, barracuda, grouper and red
snapper. Some of the more successful sport
fishing boats are anchoring over a rock ledge
and fishing on the bottom with live cigar min-
nows, mullet or menhaden for grouper and
red snapper. Live baits are also drifted off from
the stern for king mackerel, cobia and the
occasional sailfish or dolphin.
Large menhaden schools continue to hold
just off the beaches at the north end of ,
Cumberland Island and just off the beaches of
Amelia Island from Main Beach to Amelia
Island Plantation. The St. Marys sea buoy is a
good bet for jigging up a livewell full of cigar


kahle hook.
Backwater fishermen will experience a per-.
fect high falling tide while targeting redfish,
sea trout and those hard fighting jack crevalle-.
with topwater plugs. Some of the more pro-
ductive topwater plugs include the Chug Bug,-'
Devil's Horse, Skitter Walk and the Top Dog
in mullet color patterns.
The News-Leader encourages local anglers tod .
submit photographs of their catches. E-mail pho-:
tos to bjones@fbnewsleader.com, mail them to
PO. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035, or
drop them by the office at 511 Ash St. in Fern- .
andina Beach. Call Beth Jones at 261-3696 for':
information.


Display Advertising deadline for Wednesday is 3 p.m. Friday
SClassified Advertising deadline Is 5:00 p.m. Monday.
NEWJS Display Advertising deadline for Friday is 3 p.m. Tuesday
LEADE Classified Advertising deadline is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.
Please call 261-3696 to place your advertisement.


NEWS LEADER BEST OF BEST

Just take a moment and fill out our Reader's Survey of your favorite places and become eligible for a $250 cash drawing on August 8.2009. All survey forms
must be received at the News Leader no later than August 7. 2009. All entries must include name. address, and phone number. Mail Entries to:
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CROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
MUSIC NOTES
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, JULY 31,2009
NEWS-LEADER / FER'NANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


'Learning Community' opens Saturday


JASON YURGARTIS
News-Leader
H ave you ever wanted to start
your own business, make
money selling collectibles
on eBay or plan your own
special events? Do you want to learn
how to make homemade sushi, brush
up on your digital photography skills
or grow and cultivate plants in your
own garden?
It might sound like a transcript of
a late night infomercial, but if you
answered yes to any of these ques-
tions, you need not order instruction-
al DVDs, stock up on how-to books or
travel to a university, because contin-
uing education will soon be offered
by the local community for the local
community.
On Saturday, The Learning
Community, located at the corner of
Eighth and Gum streets, will open its
doors. And it will offer more than 50
classes in fields ranging from busi-
ness and cooking to art and fitness -
all aimed at providing educational
opportunities for adults that foster
personal development, enhance a
sense of community and encourage
social interaction, according to TLC
founder and president Nancy
Rossiter.
With the help of a couple of
investors, Rossiter is trying to keep
things cost-effective and pass the sav-
ings on to interested members of the
community.
"We're trying to bootstrap our way


Enjoy night

of jazz at

the Palace
For the News-Leader
A swinging jazz concert
will preview the 2009 Les
DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz
Festivalon.Aug. 20 from 7-9
p.m. at the Palace Saloon in
Fernandina Beach.
The event, which will ben-
efit the educational programs
and concerts of the festival,
will feature The Dynamic Les
DeMerle Jazz All Stars, with
vocalist Bonnie Eisele, along
with a special guest, multi-
instrumentalist Dr. Bill
Prince.
A former player with,
among others, Buddy Rich
and Clark Terry, Prince is
professor emeritus of music
at the University of North
Florida.
The Palace show has
become a fun-filled festival
tradition that showcases
some of the musicians sched-
uled to play, along with the
various styles of jazz to be
performed, at this year's
JAZZ Continued on 2B


Learn more
lt you're interested in taking a
class, want to look at a course cat-
alog or have expertise you wish
to share by teaching a class, visit
The Learning Community web-
site at tlcnf.com or contact Nancy
Rossiter at nancy@tlcall.coni.

to keep our classes really affordable,"
she said. "They run from about $50
for a single class to a little more
expensive for the continuing classes
that meet over a period of six weeks."
Classes offered as one-time meet-
ings might later be adapted to more
specific areas of interest or extended
for more in-depth learning. Feedback
from students is the primary way
Rossiter will gauge the nature and
scope of class offerings.
"The idea is if we offer a market-
ing class as a one shot deal and
there's interest in a specific aspect of
marketing like direct marketing, we
can focus on that and offer it the next
time the catalog comes out and we
can get someone to teach that kind of
class," she said.
And if the current offerings aren't
a hit, Rossiter said the course catalog
could also be adjusted as different
classes are offered on a quarterly
basis.
"At this point our art classes and
our fitness classes are our most popu-
lar," she said. "We've had a lot of reg-


istrations coming basically from our-
website - they've been filling up pret-
ty quickly along with some of the
writing classes. So we may find that
there just isn't a huge demand for the
business classes and we can just
switch focus."
But Rossiter said this adaptability
wouldn't be possible without the sup-
port of the instructors, from whom
she said she has received an over-
whelmingly positive response.
"Maybe it's something about peo-
ple that are successful want to give


President and
founder of The
Learning
Community Nancy
Rossiter stands
next to a sign that
will hang outside
the company's
building on the
corner of Eighth
and Gum streets.
JASON YURGARTIS/
NEWS-LEADER
back," Rossitelr aid. "But just about
everyone I contacted, whether I knew
them or it was a cold call, was inter-
ested. A lot of our instructors don't
even want to get paid -tlcnf.com we
pay our instructors - but they're just
like, 'Don't worry about it, we'd love
to do it, it sounds like a lot of fun.'
And that helps us out a lot with our
bootstrapping."
Even her landlord, Phil Griffin,
has been supportive, allowing them

TLC Continued on 2B13


HEAVENLY

COMEDY'
"Forever Plaid," an Off-
Broadway '50's musical, runs
through Aug. 30 at the
Alhambra Dinner Theatre,
12000 Beach Blvd.,
Jacksonville. You may remem-
ber such '50's singing groups
as The High Lows, The Crew
Cuts and The Four Freshmen.
You probably won't remember
The Four Plaids. As the story
goes, they were run over by a
busload of schoolgirls enroute
to hear The Beatles on the Ed
Sullivan Show. Now, back
from heaven, The Plaids have
returned to perform the show
they never got to do. For
reservations and information
call (904) 641-1212.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
TIARA PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO


Film festival accepting submissions for winter event


For the News-Leader
Amelia Island Film Festival
will hold its second annual
"Festival for Filmmakers" Feb.
25-28 in Fernandina Beach,
The AIFF is now accepting
films in the categories of


Feature (longer than 40 min-
utes), Short (1 minute and
shorter than 40 minutes),
Animation, Documentary,
Narrative Fiction, Other Than
English, Northeast Florida &
Southeast Georgia Special
Interest, Action, Adventure,


Comedy, Drama, Educational,
Horror, Musical, Romantic
Comedy, Satire SocialIssue
and Sci-Fi. Do you have an
Amelia Island home video?,
Organizers would love to see,
it. Visit www.ameliaisland-
filmfestival.org to download


the application form.
Sponsors also are a crucial
financial backbone for the fes-
tival. Visit www.ameliaisland-
filmfestival.org to learn more,
or contact Tony McAdoo or
Che Cantrell at (904) 335-1110
or 753-0987.


Gullah/

Geechee

Nation

celebration

Festival Aug. 21-23
For the News-Leader
The official festival of the
Gullah/Geechee Nation, the
Gullah/Geechee Nation
International Music &
Movement Festival, will take
people on a historic three-day
journey to the Golden Isles
Aug. 21-23.
This
annual cele-
bration,
which c
includes
events in
Yulee, i
Nassauville
and
American Queen Quet
Beach, high-
lights authen-
tic presentations of
Gullah/Geechee culture by
natives of the
Gullah/Geechee Nation.
A special ancestral tribute
will be held at noon Aug. 21 in
Savannah, Ga., at the African
American statue on River
Street and continue on the
water as the attendees
process over to Hutchinson
Island, which is part of the
unique Gullah/Geechee
story. A Gullah/Geechee
Tour of Savannah will follow.
On Aug. 22 in Brunswick,
Ga., celebrate Gullah/Gee-
chee Reunion Day in celebra-
tion of "Queen Quet Day"
beginning at 9 a.m. with a his-
toric Gullah/Geechee Tour of
Brunswick, Jekyll and St
Simons islands. An ancestral
tribute will be held at the site
of the WVanle-i r Memorial.
The Wanderer was the last
enslavement vessel docu-
mented as coming into the
Georgia area of what is now
the Gullah/Geechee Nation.
Gullah/Geechee culture
came about due to the hard-
ships of one of the greatest
crimes against humanity -
chattel enslavement Yet,
from hardship came a rich
African traditional culture that
continues to exist in spite of
the odds against it.
The true existence of the
culture will be represented
through the various artistic,
musical and historic presenta-
tions that will take place at
Howard Coffin Park in
Brunswick, Ga., beginning at
noon on Satuiday.
The event will end at 6
p.m. to allow the attendees to
GULLAH Continued on 2B


,' -',s


ONrTI HEi1


BENEFIT SHOW
The first benefit show on Amelia Island for the '
Harvest of Hope Foundation will be held at Ca fe
Karibo, 27 North 3rd St.. Aug. 1 from 6:30 9:30
p.m.
Cafe Karibo has agreed to donate half the prof-
its from its pub beer and homemade sangria to
the Harvest of Hope
Foundation. Established in
1997, the foundation provides
emergency and educational
financial aid to migrant farm-
workers across the country.
Performing will be the
Mike Bernos Trio of
Jacksonville. The three-member band will play
acoustic selections from their upcoming album
"With These Hands," which features two songs
about migrant farmworkers.

tAlW IiN'IS SALE Nassau Humane
Society will hold its annu-
al Paw Prints Book and
Plant Sale on Friday, Aug. as .
7 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Saturday, Aug. 8 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the
Fernandina Beach airport. Please drop off your


unwanted books, CDs, DVDs, artwork or other
items atthe shelter located at 671 Airport Road.
All donations are tax deductible.
Contact Gail 206-4092 or Sandra 321-2319 With
questions.

LEMONADE STAND
Visit Petco in Yulee Aug. I from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. for
the kickoffofCats
-/ - Angels'"Alter
Nassauville" program
and PETCO's
"Operation Alteration"
spay and neuter proj-
" ect.
S ',/ ' Teens from Disney
Friends for Change, a
group dedicated to helping the environment, will
sell lemonade to help raise funds for the pro-
grams.
Cats Angels will have cats and kittens, and even
a few dogs, available for adoption, and will sell
tickets for its Super Raffle.
The drawing is Aug. 15.

dWWEVE AUAT
The Island Art Association's next Nouveau
Art show, "Vibrant Colors." will run from Aug. 3-


Sept. 30.
An opening reception
will be held Aug. 8 from
5-8 p.m. at the gallery 18
.N. Second St.,
Fernandina Beach. For
information call 261-7020.

SHAKESPEARE AT ACT
Tickets are on sale at Amelia Community
Theatre for a touring production of the energetic
comedy "The Complete
Works of William
Shakespeare, Abridged."
Performances are at 8 p.m:
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m.and 8 p.m.
Aug. 8 at the theater, 209
Cedar St. Adult tickets are
$15: student tickets are $10.
The show is a mix of
"pratfalls, puns, clunky
female impersonations, clean-cut ribaldry and
broad burlesque. The gung-ho vitality is impossi-
ble to resist" says the New York Times
Call 261-6749 for tickets and information, or
come by the box office between 11 a.m.-l p.m. on
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays.
Submit items to Sldn Perry, sperry@ifbnewsleader.com


B SECTION










FRIDAY, July 31,2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

Kinderstudlos will hold
registration from 3:30-6:30
p.m. today for ages 2 to adult
in musical theater, classical
ballet, hip hop, drama,
ballet/tap/jazz combination
classes and tumbling. Call
415-0954 or visit www.kinder-
studios.com.

A radio controlled model
boat fun sail and exhibition
will be held Aug. 1 from 10
a.m. to noon at Amelia
Island Plantation. All model
boats are welcome, working
or not, finished or not, except
gas powered. Spectators,
including supervised children,
especially welcome.
Call Hal Mather at 261-
6420 for details and to
arrange for a pass at the
security gate.

Ballroom dance lessons
with Felix Soils start Aug. 4
at 7:30 p.m. at Club 14
Fitness on 14th Street and
meet each Tuesday in August.
Cost is $60 per couple/$30
individuals for members and
$100 and $50 respectively for
non-members. Contact
Kristen M. DeRoo at 206-
4414 to reserve your spot.

"The Second Chances,"
a documentary television-
like magazine show about
those challenged by adversity,
will be screened at 6:45 p.m.
Aug. 4 at Long Point
Clubhouse, 2 Long Point
Drive, Amelia Island
Plantation.
Refreshments and hours
d'oeuvres will be served
beginning at 6 p.m.
The short program fea-
tures Femandina Beach resi-
dent KCJ Szwedzinski, a for-
mer drug addict who with her
mother BJ created Project
Chance, which specializes in
raising and training service
dogs for children with autism.
For information, call 261-6161
or visit thesecondchances.
com.

The Association for
Retarded Citizens will hold
an open house at 6 p.m. on
Aug. 6 at ARC/Nassau,
86051 Hamilton St. in Yulee.


Tickets are on sale for
"Seven Days of Fine
Dining," a drawing to win
seven dinner-for-two gift
certificates to local restau-
rants. A tax-deductible dona-
tion of $50 enters you in the
drawing, with proceeds bene-
fiting the TLC Pregnancy
Center, 410 S. Ninth St., dedi-
cated to empowering women
and men to make informed
decisions about pregnancy
and sexual integrity. Call the
center at 321-2008 to make a
donation and enter the draw-
ing, which will be held Aug. 7.
Only 100 tickets will be sold.
* * *
The Baptist Medical
Center Nassau Auxiliary will
host a Fuzzy Bean Candle
and Health Fair from 7 a.m.-
4 p.m. Aug. 14 in the confer-
ence room of the hospital,
featuring unique candles and
interesting health products. All
visitors will be treated to a free
mini-massage.

Celebrate the 40th
Anniversary of Woodstock
with Woofstock at the
Nassau Humane Society
Dog Park on Aug. 15 from
5-10 p.m. Enjoy mellow music
by Hupp and Ray. Admission
is $15 for adults and $10 for
kids and includes catfish and
hotdogs, coleslaw, fries and
dessert. Beer and wine will be
available for purchase. Best-
dressed wins a prize. Bring
your lawn chairs - but not
your dogs - and be ready to
party!
Tickets are available at the
Nassau Humane Society Dog
Park (across from the
Femandina Beach airport)
and Redbones Dog Bakery on
South Eighth Street in the
Pelican Palms Plaza.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
will hold its annual Walk and
Candlelight Vigil commemo-
rating International
Homeless Animals Day on
Aug. 15 at Central Park on
Atlantic Avenue in Femandina
Beach.
The two-mile walk starts at
6:30 p.m. and is followed by a
candlelight vigil. Contact Cats
Angels at 321-2267, e-mail
catsangels @ bellsouth.net or


MUSIC

WhitbyQuinn
Robert Sanders and
Michael J. Howerton will per-
form as Whitby Quinn on
Aug. 1 from 7-10p m at
Indigo Alley, located at 316
Centre St
As Whitby Quin. the
Fernandina Beach songwrit-
ers, Sanders (lead
vocat'acoustic guitar) and
Howerton ivocals/acoustic
and electnc guitar) combine
their performance and song-
wnting talents in an acoustic
eclectic sound Ihat is remi-
niscent of America, Eagles
and James Taylor.
Whilby Ouinn's show
composes mainly original
music with blend of familiar
cover tunes. The duo's CD
"She's Gone" will be avail-
able at a special show price.
Surflineup
The Surf Restaurant and
Bar. 3199 S. Fletcher Ave.,
Reggue Lee 6-10 p.m. tonight
and 1-5 p.m. Aug. 1; Gary
Keniston 6-10 p.m. Aug. 1
and noon-4 p m. Aug. 2;
Reggie Lee 5-9 p.m. Aug. 2;
Andy Haney 5-9 p.m. Aug. 3;
Stevie "Fingers" 5-9 p.m.
Aug 4: and DJ Roc 5 p.m. till
late Aug. 5. Call 261-5711.
Emery In concert
Post-hardcore band,
Emery, will perform at the
Murray Hill Theatre in
Jacksonville on Aug. 4. Their
newest album, "In Shallow
Seas We Sail," released
June 2. debuted at number
50 on Billboard's Top 200
chart. For more information
visit www emerymusic.com.
Sounds on Centre
The next "Sounds on


visit the Thrift Store and
Adoption Center at 709 S.
Eighth St.
The Intemational Society
for Animal Rights, or ISAR,
sponsored the first National
Homeless Animals Day in
1992 by launching a crusade
to enlighten society, elected
officials and the media
about the urgent need to spay
and neuter companion ani-
mals in an effort to halt the
killing of millions of unwanted
dogs and cats each year in
the nation's shelters. It has
since grown into an intema-
tional event. For more infor-
mation, visit
www.isaronline.org.


NOTES
Centre" concert and street
dance, hosted by the Historic
Femandina Business
Association, as from 6-8 p m.
Aug. 7 with music by Face
For Radio.
Bring your lawn chairs
and dancing shoes. Snacks
and beverages will be avail-
able and there will be draw-
ings for prizes.
Gene Knaga
Gene Knaga plays from
8-10 p.m. Wednesday at
the Kofe Hous, 822 Sadler
Road, with acoustic rendi-
tions of today's (and yester-
day's) popular contemporary
Christian songs. Call 277-
7663.
Instant Groove
The Instant Groove plays
from 8 p.m. to midnight each
Thursday at The Ritz-
Cariton, Amelia Island.
"Evoluton'
Evolution, with acoustic
rock and ballads, plays every
Friday and Saturday from 6-
9 p.m. at Sandy Bottoms,
2910 Atlantic Ave., Feman-
dina Beach. Call 310-6904.
DJfun
Enjoy Karaoke at the 1 th
Frame Lounge in Yulee
Bowling Center Saturdays 9
p.m.-close and at the Palace
Saloon Sundays 10 p.m.-1
a m. with DJ Lamar & DJ
Rock Candy. Ladies Night
Out (Party with Rock Candy)
is at the 11th Frame Lounge
in the Yulee Bowling Center
on Tuesday 8 p.m.-close.
For information, contact
DJ Lamar at (904) 349-1405,
djlamarmail@yahoo.com or
myspace.com/djlamarspace.


The Intergalactic Bead &
Jewelry Show will be held
from 10 a.m.-5 p.mr. Aug. 15-
16 at the Morocco Shrine
Auditorium, 3800 Saint
Johns Bluff Road S., Jackson-
ville. For information and a
discount admission coupon
visit www.beadshows.com.
Admission is $5 Saturday, $4
Sunday and children 12 and
under, free.

Tickets are on sale for
Cats Angels annual Super,
Raffle to support its
spay/neuter/education pro-
grams. More than 50 prizes
are donated by area mer-


chants, restaurants and indi-
viduals, including jewelry, art-
work, a 3-night stay for two at
Amelia Island Plantation, a
one-night stay at Elizabeth
Pointe Lodge, salon services,
golf packages and more.
Tickets are $1 each, $5 for
seven, $10 for 15 or $30 for
50 and available at the Thrift
Store and Adoption Center,
709 S. Eighth St., and by mail
to Cats Angels, P.O. Box
16072, Femandina Beach, FL
32035. Include your name,
phone number, number of
tickets and check. Call 321-
2267. The drawing will be
held Aug. 15. You need not
be present to win.

The next WIN WIN meet-
ing is Aug 17 at 6:30 p.m.,
hosted by Karen Lee of
Heron's Swim & Sport and
Judy Richardson of Divine
Finds, 4924 First Coast Hwy.,
Amelia Island.
Women in Nassau helping
Women in Need is a women's
networking group established
to benefit women dealing with
cancer, through Gerri's
Comer.
Bring a $35 check payable
to WIN WIN, which includes
dinner and a beverage. Get a
$5 discount if you bring a door
prize to be raffled at the
Fashion Show on Sept. 20.
Donations are tax deductible.
To RSVP contact Connie at
759-0745 or e-mail
connie@winwinnassau.com.
Visit winwinnassau.com.

Rescuing Animals In
Nassau, or RAIN, will hold its
annual spaghetti dinner
fundraiser from 4-8 p.m.
Aug. 22 at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center in
Femandina Beach.
Tickets are $10 and
include spaghetti with sauce
of choice, salad, bread, drink
and dessert. There will also
be a silent auction and enter-
tainment.
Tickets go on sale starting
Aug. 1 at Femandina Beach
Animal Clinic, Lofton Creek
Animal Clinic, Nassau
Veterinary Clinic, Bark Avenue
Pet Boutique and Bucky's
Best Friends Card and Gift.
For information call RAIN at
(904) 879-5861 or e-mail rain-
humane@yahoo.com.

Ever wonder what
Facebook, Twitter and blog-
ging are? The Amelia Island
,..MseumoQf History, 233.S. ;
Third St.;is offering "Facing
Facebook," an introductory
seminar on using today's
online social networking tools,


JAZZ Continued fro
event
Saxophonist David
born will headline the
festival, which will ru


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Oct 2-11. Additional players
m 1B and a full schedule of shows
and programs will be announ-
d San- ced at the Palace concert.
e 2009 Advance tickets to "Jazz At
n from The Palace" can be purchased
for $25 at the UPS Store in
- the Island Walk Shopping
I Center, 1417 Sadler Road,
277-0820, at the UPS Store



S GULA Continuedfrom lB
,, support evening activities
in the area.
On Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. the
participants will depart
Georgia together in a historic
procession into Florida. Many
Gullah/Geechees on the
southern coast of Georgia
used to cross into Florida for
trade, worship and to.connect
S with family. This will be the
largest family reconnection as
the group proceeds to Yulee,


0
I,.


* .- -


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. - .


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46368 State Road 2000, Suite
1,Yulee, 225-8840, online at
www.ameliaislandjazzfesti-
val.com, or at the door if not
sold out From 6-7 p.m. before
the show, Amelia Island
Carriages will offer compli-
mentary rides around the
downtown area to all ticket
holders.


Nassauville and Amelia Island
to conclude with a tribute to
MaVynee "The Beach Lady"
Betsch at historic American
Beach.
The celebration will con-
clude with a traditional wor-
ship service at Little Mt
Olive, drumming, ancestral
tributes and tributes through
the spirituals. "The Beach
Lady" is one of the sacked
ancestors of the Gullah/
Geechee Nation and was one
of the first to be placed in the
Gullah/Geechee Nation Hall
of Fame. Additional Hall of
Fame inductees will be
announced on Saturday at the
events in Brunswick, Ga.
The craft artisans are also
natives of the area and people
learn from them the tradi-


TLC Continued from 1B


Sto use a second building
on the property, which will be
outfitted with restaurant
Equipment for cooking class-
es at no extra cost in
exchange for fixing it up. And
O Griffin's wife, a photographer,
* * is going to teach a photogra-
4 phy class.
Rossiter said though the
startup of classes has been
O going smoothly, with an out-
pouring of interest from a
Variety of experts looking to
share their skills with stu-
dents, she has run into some
minor issues with the city.
* 0 * 0 After going through the steps
* * * * * to obtain a local business
license, Rossiter was awaiting
* word to make it official and in
o* * * the meantime hung up signs
outside the buildings to
* 0 advertise The Learning
* * * * Community.
"We put up a sign Sunday
* 0 afternoon and I get a call
* * * * Monday, and they said they
were ready to issue the busi-
* ness license, but said since


All proceeds benefifthe
Amelia Island Jazz Festival, a
not-for-profit 501(c)3 corpora-
tion, and its newly established
jazz scholarship program.
For information, call (904)
504-4772, visit www.ameliais-
landjazzfestival.com or e-mail
info@ameliaislandjazzfesti-
val.com.


tions behind the crafts before
purchasing the items.
Books, CDs, and
Gullah/Geechee cuisine are
also a part of the "Living
Marketplace" that will be in
Brunswick and American
Beach.
Founders of the event,
Queen Quet, Chieftess
of the Gullah/Geechee
Nation and Kwame Sha of All
Mobile Productions (AMP)
invite you to come out and
share the culture of your com-
munity or reconnect with
your culture if you are
Gullah/Geechee.
For more details including
group discounts call (843)
838-1171 or e-mail
GullGeeCo@aol.com or
AMPTurnItUp@aol.com.


we put up signs, they couldn't
issue it" she said. "Because
we needed the license, we
had to take the signs down in
order to get it and pay $103
for a sign permit - even
though they were the exact
same signs that had previous-
ly hung outside, just repaint-
ed."
Despite that slight set-
back, Rossiter said after
months of planning, things
are starting to come
together.
"Our goals are to pay our
bills first - as with most start-
ups," she said. "We need to
get through the first stage,
which is the survival stage.
Our investors are looking to
maybeopen a few other facili-
ties in North Florida and the
possibility of franchising has
also come up. Our primary
goal is to find out what people
want as far as classes and
offer those classes in an
affordable and community
setting, then just go from
there."
jyurgartis@fbnewsleadercom


* m 4
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at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 27. For
more information, contact the
museum at 261-7378.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Femandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@ yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with any
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event.
All 1970-75 FBHS stu-
dents and faculty/staff are
invited. No invitations are
being mailed.

FILM/THEATER

Amelia Community
Theatre presents "Six Dance
Lessons in Six Weeks,"
directed by Toni D'Amico and
starring Carey Dresser and
Arlene Filkoff.
SLilly Harrison, retired and
living in a condo in Florida,
hires Michael, a cynical dance
instructor, to give her lessons
in the privacy of her own
home. If these two people
can't settle their many differ-
ences, the first dance may be
the last.
Remaining performances
, are at 8 p.m. tonight and
Aug. 1. Admission is $16
adults and $10 students.
Amelia Community Theatre is
located at 209 Cedar St. Call:
261-6749.

The world premiere of
the feature film
"Chiaroscuro, Baby" will be
held at the Florida Theatre
Nov. 4, black tie required.
� Tickets go on sale Aug. 7 at
the Florida Theatre box office
as well as Ticketmaster.
Christopher Bolla, Chris-
tianna L. White and Milan
Alley star in the film, produced
entirely in Jacksonville. The
story follows an aspiring
painter who compromises his
ambition for his seductive girl-
friend, only to be tom when
his new muse reignites his
passion.
See the trailer at .
www.youtube.com/kitlacozzy.
Visit http://www.chiaroscurob-
aby.com for information about
the premiere.


I


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3B
NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, JULY 31.2009


CLASSIFIED


To . An Ad, Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 C .,-d.:.i.iir,,;.r h,.J
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 H,rmer--Furn,'r,-.j
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Klngsland/St. Marys 860 H..r,. --,,ur,,r,.d
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 _.:,r,.. r ,rl
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 EC.'J i Brtl- i5_i
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Honie Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 CO'r.-r.
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 MuscialInstruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted u'. .,:nr.-., Fur..l
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 901 TRANSPORTATN.,
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TurrANSPR.TAl T
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room .3 Tru,: -
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farm- , :,A. -.-.- 355 Apartments-Furmihpd aed -
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 60- Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 C..mmne.r.-iais l .,i 80 c.,-rmnt--.-,tjr,-, 904 r t:,,.:
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks& Bonds :05 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers &Supplies 812 F..:.pEri.E, -.-r,-~n -5 C..-r:. --Fujr,-neId , ,-...,r..na

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 3B


102 Lost & Found
LOST "TOM-TOM" - Big gray tabby
cat, white toes, neutered, no collar.
Lost on Barnwell Rd. in early June,
(904)674-4163 or 261-6074.
FOUND 4G MEMORY CARD
w/photos taken March-May 2009.
Contains movie of Okefenokee Swamp
Park - lots of children/family photos.
(912) 294-4778
LOST DOG - Male, part Collie/
Shepherd. Name is "Shema". Please
call (904)556-1291.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
LOST BASSETT HOUND PUPPY -
Male, 4 mos. old, black & tan, lost
vicinity of Edwards Rd., Yulee. Call
225-8586 or 225-5516.

104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
infg@national-classifieds.com. ANF
TAX MATTERS - and then-some.
Thomas Avery Blair (Tom "the
TAXMAN") = federally-licensed Enrolled
Agent providing services in tax
preparation/ taxpayer representation.
29 years experience in taxation
matters. Call toll-free 1-888-250-5687
or visit htto://www.TomBlairEA.com

105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
bI i *ii- I-i.. te.il 39gajist in
- . - r �- * .; .. e... r-n..** i
United States Department bf
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.






201 Help Wanted
HAIRSTYLIST AND NAIL TECH
NEEDED - Commission or booth rent-
al. Call (904)321-2826 for interview.

EXPERIENCED MEDICAL FRONT
OFFICE - Part-time. Busy dermatology
practice. Fax resume to Summer
(904)261-2166.


APARTMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN
-We have an exciting career
opportunity for a Service Technician at
Nassau Club in Fernandina Beach.
The ideal team member will have prior
general maintenance and repair
experience. Apply online today at
www.concordrents.com. Excellent
Benefits!

Earn $1000-$3200 a Month
to drive new cars with ads.
www.YouDriveJobs.com
LAWN MAINTENANCE TECH NEED-
ED - Experience preferred. Driver's
license required. Drug free workplace.
(904)261-0728 or 583-1946

A JANET LYNNE SALON & SPA - is
accepting applications for a stylist/
colorist for a booth rental position.
Discover the difference in our relaxing,
non-competitive environment. Call
Janet at 556-1687 for a confidential
interview. Serious inquiries only.
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
RN - with MDS experience needed.
Competitive pay with benefits. EOE/
Drug Free Workplace. Apply in person,
1625 Lime St.
AMELIA ISLAND YACHT BASIN
251 Creekside Drive
Weekends & Holidays Mandatory
Store Clerk & Dock Hand/Mechanic
Part-Time Position
Ships Store Clerk: answer
telephones, book reservations, store
sales, inventory, cleaning store, and
general office duties.
Mechanic/Dock Hand: Service Yard
- bottom painting and mechanical
experience helpful. Other duties:
upkeep of grounds, cleaning restroom
facilities, fueling and docking boats.
Excellent customer service skills
required.
Apply in person.
No telephone calls please.
ADMINISTRATIVE/CUSTOMER SER-
VICE ASSISTANT - needed ASAP!
Olympic Steel has an immediate
opening for an administrative /
customer service job in Fernandina.
Position Qualifications *Excellent
computer, phone, and time
management skills and ability to multi-
task in a fast paced environment.
Position Requirement *Bilingual-
Spanish/English Interested candidates
please fax/email resumes to 904-491-
8688 olvsteeltradino.iobs(&
olvsteel.com. EOE m/f/d/v
TIMES UNION MOTOR ROUTE -
avai4abte-inYfeee. Exeetlent pertaime
fCYJBl" e oi es4er_, "flTl &
1 'j.: ".A . 3 a -po roximately 4 hours
. a, ,'.u T.uil[ hae dependablee
transportation & current insurance. To
apply, please contact Jason Green at
225-9170 ext. 3.
OTR DRIVERS - for PTL. Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced NE. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262 www.otl-inc.com. ANF
ROOM FOR RENT - in salon/spa. Call
(904)491-0991, ask for Jessica or
Summer.
RV Delivery Drivers Needed -
Deliver RVs, boats & trucks for PAY!
Deliver to all 48 states & CN. For
details log on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF
HELP WANTED - Join Wil-Trans Lease
or Company Driver Program. Enjoy our
strong freight network. Must be 23.
(866)906-2982. ANF


NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.
Office Assistant/Customer Service
- Part-time 25-30 hrs/week assisting
customer, processing jobs. Detail
oriented, multi-taked. Call Emily (904)
261-0740, Amelia Island Graphics.
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need employ-
ees to assemble products at home. No
selling, any hours. $500 wkly potential.
Info 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-1380.

LAMB CHRISTIAN DAY CARE - now
hiring (2) part-time positions. Apply in
person at 601 Centre St.
$140,000
$89,000
That Is the '08 income of the top
23% and top 55% of our agents
respectively at Reserve National Ins.
Co. Our agents enjoy: free direct mail
leads fantastic contest and exotic
trips among the top commissions
and renewels in the industry.
Alan Thomas (904)891-9787
athomas@unitrin.com
LMT Position Available - in
expanding Chiropractic & Wellness
Center. 2 years minimum experience
required. Please call (912)882-8888.

204 Work Wanted
PART-TIME EXPERIENCED HOUSE-
KEEPER - Energetic, detail-oriented,
team player. Must be flexible on hours,
occasional weekends. Condos, offices,
residential. Must have transportation!
Great pay! Serious inquiries only!
References required. (904)261-2747
HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
LIVE IN CAREGIVER/NANNY JOB
WANTED - Spanish lady (Hablo
Espanol). Have good experience &
references. Call (912)674-6781.
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 BO2000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF



301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF

305 Tutoring
www.abclearnlngresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.



503 Pets/Supplies
SIAMESE/PERSIAN MIX KITTENS -
Free to good home. (904)225-9940
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES - 9 weeks old.
$100/each. Mother & father on site.
(904)261-7504 or (904)206-3449
YORKIE - Female, registered, 1 year
old. Needs loving home, prefer fenced
yard. $400 firm. Call (904)491-5644.
FREE TO GOOD HOME - Cairn Terrier/
Shitzu Mix female dog. Approx. 1&1/2
yrs. old. All shots/wormed. Spayed.
Contact Carl or Jen at (904)310-6016.




S 601 Gbrage Sales
PATIO SALE FOR CHARITY - 7/29
thru 8/5, 8am-7pm. 1636 Highland
St., Fernandina. Porcelain dolls, yarn,
clothing, lots more. Low prices!


Nassau County
* '! n- .. ;. -. (Temporary Position)

Applicant must possess college credits in pursuit of
Sociology or Psychology degree, or related fields
with a minimum of three years experience in social
service or an acceptable combination of education
and experience; must have knowledge of various
computer software packages and their operation.

Apps/resumes may be mailed or faxed to NFCAA
A&tn. HR Dept., PO. Box 52025,
Jacksonville, FL 32201
or FAX. (904) 398-7480.
Phone: (904) 398-7472
Closing date of application is 8/4/09


601 Garage Sales


SAT. 8/1 - 96007 Hidden Marsh Ln.,
in Fiddlers Walk Subd. off Barnwell Rd.
Household items, clothes, VHS tapes
(.50) most items $1.00. 8am until
noon.
MOVING SALE - Everything must go.
Lots of furniture, home decor, & kid's
items. 18 N. 18th St. Sat. 8/1, 8am-?
YARD SALE - 95350 Karen Walk. Fri.
7/31, Sat. 8/1, & Sun. 8/2, all day.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE - Sat.
& Sun., 8am-4pm. 76237 Long' Pond
Loop (off William Burgess Rd. in Yulee -
follow signs). Baby items, laptop, TV's,
clothes, & more.
HUGE SALE - Sat. 8/1, 8am-? 87509
Creekside Dr, Yulee (off Roses Bluff).
Furniture, fridge, youth baseball equip.,
PS2, (2)DS lite, gamecube & games for
all, boys clothes sz 12-16, and too
much more to mention!
EGANS BLUFF - Sat & Sun, 7am-3pm.
MULTI-FAMILY. SoLfh side of Simmons,
1921 Lakeside Dr. North. See list on
Craigslist - search 'Fernandina'

YARD SALE - Sat., 8am-12pm. 877
Diane Dr., off S. 14th St. Women's &
men's clothes 1-2-3X, some furniture,
lamps, household misc., electric hand
tools.
YARD SALE - Fri. 8/1, Sat. 8/2, &
Sun. 8/3, 8am-? Lots of good stuff.
85250 Theresa Rd., off of Miner Rd.
KID GOING TO COLLEGE? - Yard sale
with bedding, lamps, flatware, lots of
clothes including summer dresses, &
much more. Sat. 8/1, 8:30am. 96074
Ridgewood Cir. (Lofton Point subdiv.,
across from North Hampton).


S11 601 Garage Sales


OTTER RUN HOMEOWNERS
COMMUNITY YARD SALE
Sat. 8/1, 8am-lpm.
YARD SALE - 1605 Highland St. Fri.
7/31 & Sat. 8/1. Furniture,
housewares, toys, men's & children's
clothes, electronics, books, much
more.
YARD SALE - Sat. 8/1, 8am-? Girls 9
yrs & under toys & clothes, boys 6 yrs
& under toys & clothes. Home
furnishings, yard stuff, etc.
4160/96190 Rivernrarsh Bend, off of
Barnwell Rd. in Riverside subdivision.
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/1, 8am-lpm.
97340 Castle Ridge Dr. in Arnold Ridge
Subdivision off Chester Rd. Tools, lawn
mower, clothes, household items.
GARAGE SALE - Toys, furniture, lots
more. 1636 Ocean Forest Dr. (Ocean
Forest Subdivision). Sat. 8/1, 8am-?
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/1 & Sun. 8/2,
8am-3pm. 95024 Greenberry Rd.
SR107, right on Hendricks, right on
Greenberry. Back to school sale.
FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS - 7/17 &
7/18; 7/24 & 7/25; 7/31 & 8/1. 9am -
? Off A1A to Harts Rd W. to 86204
Hayley PI., follow signs. Jerri's This-N-
That Antiques and Collectibles + yard
sale items. Shoes, clothes, dolls,
furniture, fishing, books, China,
vintage fashion jewelry. If the price
isn't right, make a fair offer. Let's make
a deal. Everyone welcome.

602 Articles for Sale
GOLF CART - 2007 Precedent 48 volt.
Like new. (904)631-5822


HONDA FOREMAN 500 4-WHEELER
FLORA PARKE NEIGHBORHOOD - garage kept, very clean, less than 15
YARD SALE - Saturday, Aug. 1st. hrs., $4000. TRACKING UNIT - $500.
8AM-NOON. (904)548-2232 or (904)553-7982


MOVING SALE - 1440 Scott Rd behind
the Healing Dome. Large furniture
including; a couch, love seat, twin bed
frame, 2 wood chests, 2 wood china
cabinets, Bistro table with 4 bar stools,
Antique library wood card file. Also
have misc. home decor and antiques
like; 2 area rugs, a toy wood rocker
train, accent pillows and much more.
Everything must Go! 8am-3pm Sat 8/1
GARAGE SALE - Flora Parke Subd.,
31083 Grassy Parke Dr. Sat. 8/1,
8am-lpm. Electronics, piano, clothing,
& much more.


603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF
NEW DIRT BIKE - Suzuki DR-Z125/L.
Asking $2500/OBO. Goggles, boots,
and helmet included. (904)261-0936


~r 77IE-"r-~

Lntiques& Collectibles Auction
Sunday, August 2, 2009
, -r r or . Br5,t j "'"... . . . - - - -; . 5- - ." t
Preview 10 AM - .uu .rion 'l .AM'-W "
jfrank'1 Rntiqueg & Luttiont
U.S. HWY. 1 Hilliard, FL.
Art including: Fitch, Macmillan,Yale, McDougan &
Spencer. OakTelephones,Telephone Stocks &
Signs. Furniture. Sculptured Birds. Fossils.
Gold Coins, Coins, & Currency.
Many more Quality items.
PUBLIC WELCOME
To View On-Line www.auctionzio.com
ID #4730. Credit Cards accepted 13%
Buyers Premium Discounted to 10 % for Cash or Check
Sale by: Barbara Speal Bus. Lic.#366
For information call: (904) 845-2870
Auctioneer: Don Elliott Lie #1487.
A -'.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE

277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Fiedly Serice-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE ]


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At r -
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES


Xefley Cleaning &Mgt.
Services Inc.
Bondied Insuredr
"We offer "green cCeaning"
. on-rentalproperty mgmt.
CaClKeCCey (904)335-1370
EmailX'KelleeyCCMS @yahoo.com




aNV TIME

Window & House

Cleaning

(904) 583-6331





Th eslealer
Service Directory[li
Call 61-396 an frnl


CONCRETE GARAGE DOORS


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Dustel
(904)261-1940


CONSTRUCTION I


BRANNAN

CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GflRflGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages

'16,49500
24x24 Woodrame ay
n ca o', r c--i 1 !
C-rele Block





THIS SPACE
AVAjLABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for youl


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In.
"The local guy, since 198a
Quit Paying Too Much!
SOperator or door replacements Transmiller replacement
SBroken springs Stripped gears
SCables Service lor all makes & models
904-277-2086

HOME [MPROVEMlENT


Repair* Rebuild * Remodel
Specializing In Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 * 557-8257
Serving Nassa County Since 2003'



OTfff CUTO
WOOWORlW1IG, INC.
CUSTOM CABINET $ ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
BO0KCASEI * TRIM CARPENTRY
HOME REPAIRS REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICE
LICENSED & INSURED
ICOTT RUDOLPH 904-557-100


LA%%N NL4INTENANCE



Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc.
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
SPruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants & flowers, trees, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation Ftf
* Sprinkler Installation ES iB ES
* Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354



S WELBORN
IRRIGATION
Do iI right the first time.
* Complete system designs
SRepairs & modifications
* System lune ups *10 years experience
Licensed/insured
Warranty on new Installs
Free estimates * 904-277-8231


LOCKsiiTi .' . I


The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK (56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


NEW & USED CARS |


PRESSURE WASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned & Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353


ROOFING


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200 *Yulee

(904) 261-6821


PAINTING





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Pc.vinnjblc Pri,-c
NotP li1 intll ot Ttoot Lar'


f225-9292
A' lL-% I UEIQL



AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITYPAINTING, INC.,
"Call the Profcssionals"

(904) 753-1689
RESIDENTIALA.
sCOMMIE'RCIAI,
*INTIERIORI/EXTEIRIOR
*SPECIALZEID FINISHES
*I'IRESSURIiI WASIIING
& WATER IPRlOOFING

LICENSED * BONDED) * INSIIRE1)
*PROFESSIONAL CIAFI'SMNANSIIP Al'
AFFOiDAIHI.I I'RICES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALLTODAY FOR YOURl
FREEi ESTIMATED

Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


* j *


SQ ROOFING, NC.

333-6496
100% FINANCING
UP TO 130 MPH
METAL /SHINGLE ..i..j. .
FREE EST.
CCC-055600



COASTAL BUILDING

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"Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty
SNassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
Serving Satisfied
SHomebuilders & HomeownersI
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia

261-2233
Free Estimate
S EA CCEPT .I,.,S'.'t r , 3 4
////////////////f//1/fII


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directoryl
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for youl


201 Help Wanted 201 Help Wanted


-- .


___










4B FRIDAY. JULY 31, 2009 CLASSIFIED Ncws-Lcader


cd rI0 Ir I I Iii.B




~fio Real jI UIh .114 " - 4 -"-. 8.. 3",3 -ALt26i0%R
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802 Mobile Homes
FERNANDINA BEACH - 1987 Omni
cloublewide, 1.05 acre. New paint, tile,
carpet, textured walls, flower beds,
fruit trees, two out buildings, carport,
12x28 concrete pad w/50 amp power.
Make offer. Appraised at $96,000. Call
(904)491-4367, (904)753-0360.
804 Amelia Island Homes
OCEANFRONT - Log Cabin R-3
income. Property remodeled $975K.
Oceanview - Homes needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. Summer
Beach - 2028sf. Short distance to
beach. $415K. Amelia Coastal Realty
261-2770
HIGHEST POINT ON THE ISLAND -
4BR/3BA. 2500sf home with extra
family room & screened in porch. Call
(904)491-4290.
FERNANDINA BEACH
Open Sunday, 1-4pm
534 Tarpon Ave, Unit A. $319,900.
38R/2BA townhome, near water's
edge, ocean view and breezes. Betty
Carter (904)945-3376. ZipRealty

805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled porch-
es, hot tub. $344,900. (904)556-4500


806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 fpr information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.

607 Antiques
& Collectibles
BASEBALL CARDS - collected from
last 25-30 years. 6 baseball albums
plus 1 carton full of cards, some
unopened. Call Pam (904)849-3662.
609 Appliances
APPLIANCES FOR SALE - Washer,
dryer, stove. $100/each. Call cell #
(828)550-4202. (Appliances are in
Fernandina Beach).
610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.
615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupolv.com. ANF
624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628


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-$325,000


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FRIDAY. JULY 31, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5'B


808 Off Island/Yule
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. -IBR/2BA
house semi-secluded I acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095


809 Lots
MAKE AN OFFER
Was $97,0N0. Now make an offer on a
building lot in Old Town and buy it at
your price. Must be sold. Owner
financing. Call 753-3219 for details.
LOWEST PRICED FULL SIZE LOT - in
Amelia Island Plantation, Cul-de-sac.
On marshside. Approved house plans
available. $199,900. Claudia, RE/MAX
Professional Group. (904)556-4000
1 ACRE DRY LOT with SWMH (of little
value) - Raintree Lane, F.B. $78,000.
Call (904)321-1159.

814 West Nassau County
FSBO - 55030 Deer Run Rd. 1.02 ac.,
3BR/2.5BA, fireplace, nice neighbor-
hood, Callahan. $333,000. (904)631-
5822 after 5pm.

817 Other Areas
LAKEFRONT - Grand opening sale!
8/15/09 only. 10 acre dockable lake-
front only $49,900. Wooded park-like
setting on one of Alabama's top recre-
ational lakes. All amenities complete.
Boat to Gulf of Mexico! Exc. financing.
(866)952-5302 ext. 1514. ANF
Absolute Auction - 214+/- acre farm,
house. Pike County near Troy, AL.
Offered in parcels, combinations &/or
entirely. 8/13, 1pm. www.gtauctions.
corn (800)996-2877. Granger, Thagard
& Assoc., Inc. Jack F. Granger #873.
ANF
Lakefront Steal - 1.2 acres $49,892.
(In lieu of foreclosure on builder.)
Gently sloping lakefront estate on
private bass lake. Gorgeous unspoiled
setting. No crowds, no noise. Abutting
lakefronts sold for $69,900 & $64,900
- not 1/2 as nice as this one! Exc.
financing. (888)792-5253 ext. 2341.
ANF


817 Other Areas
NC Mountains Closeout Sale - Cabin
shell, 2+ acres with great view, very
private, big trees, waterfalls & large
public lake nearby. $99,500. Bank
financing. (866)275-0442. ANF





851 Roommate Wanted
ROOM FOR RENT - at beach for
stable, mature person. $500/mo. +
$500 dep. Utilities included. (904)310-
6392

852 Mobile Homes
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on 1/2
acre lot in Yulee. $700/mo. + $700
dep. Available now. Call (904) 491-
4383 or 237-7324.
SMALL MOBILE HOME - 2BR remod-
eled on 1 acre lot. Hardwood floors, on
pond, great fishing. $625. And one for
$650. Call (904)491-8768 or (904)
321-7062.
3BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE - on one
acre. $750/mo + $750 dep. 3/2
Doublewide - on one acre $850 +
$800 deposit. (904)753-2156
3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on quiet
private property, Roses Bluff area.
Great location. Call for details. $750/
me. + dep. 261-0728 or 583-1946
YULEE 2BR SINGLEWIDES
Teakwood Mobile Home Park. $500-
$550. Call Marie (904)225-5378.
2 to 3BR - Nice new decor. $600-
$675/mo. Includes water, lawn.
Possible RTO. (904)315-1757 or 613-
8401
3BR/2BA - on 25 acres on Little St.
Marys River. Great hunting/fishing.
Tidal water. Near White Oaks Planta-
tion in Yulee. Fully furnished, all new
appliances, new paint. $900/mo. +
dep. ALSO - 3BR/2BA fixer upper on 4
acres, w/fireplace. Great hunting/fish-
ing. $700/mo. + dep. (904)845-3885
3BR/2BA DWMH - Private lot on
Blackrock Rd. Washer/dryer, dishwash-
er. $825/mo. + dep. (904)206-3423


852 Mobile Homes
On Island/In Park - Long term. 1,2&
3BR starting $150/wk. $600/mo.+delp.
ULlls avail. Off Island - 2/2 MH, $175/
wk. or $695/mo + dep. 261-5034.
2BR/1BA SW - In Nassauvlllc.
Remodeled. Rent $550/mo - $550
dep. Service animals only. (904)583-
2009.
3BR/2BA DWMH - Llna Rd.,
Fernandina. 1 acre, fenced backyard.
$800/ mo. (904)557-1253
NICE 2BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE
MOBILE HOME - in Yulee. CH&A,
carport. $750/mo. + deposit &
references. (904)335-7276
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
FOR RENT - (3) 2BR trailers in mobile
home park. $500/mo. + $250 deposit.
Call Debi (904)759-3897.









2 Br, 2 Ba Condo with
view of #2 West Nine
Golf Course, Sawgrass
Country Club. 2 car
garage.

Owner interested in
either sale or trade for
comparable property
on Amelia Island.

CAL

(904)759-9000


Fincd The News-Leader on the World Wide Web
www.vfbnewvsleader.corm
Read the news. e-mall the staff, check the
classlfieds. or subscribe to
Florida's Oldest Weekly Newspaperl


1


n lj7JJE Mariann

' i4 Dahl i: ,ah

f mariann@uniqueameliaisland.com * www.uniqueameliaisland.com
J^p ~ 3955 Amelia Island Pkwy * Amelia Island, FL r
S(904) 261-3900 * (800) 940-3955

AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
e.., .. "







BEST VIEW IN SYPGLASS! SPECTACULAR SUNSETS
6546 Spyglass Offered at $1595,000 3418 Fiddlers Bend * Offered at $475.000
Oceanfront 3 bedroom/} bath and over 2,400 square fet. Decorator quality on Amelia Island Plantation. Furniture
Garage. large balcony. Fully remodeled. included. 3bedroom/3bath. Many upgrades and in excellent



,�~. _ '
N, condition,








FINE EXECUTIVE DEEP WATER ON AIP
LIVING ON THE MARSH 50 Marsh Creek Offered at $1550,000 Virtual Tour
98 Sea Marsh *Offered at$2.495.000 Virtual Tour A rareopportunty on Amelia Island Plantation. Private home
"- Serene marshlront & Intracoastal views in thisexecutive home on marsh with a dock Featured in the Home Garden Tour.
Si boasting 5.177 square feet of living space luxury Icaturcs largee deck runs Icngth of home. Hgh ceilings and ligh oak
V1, abound Gourmci kitchen. large master suite. spa like master loors to let in the vieW!
oaii .iih u , i i,, I i, , u id ,- i ..... o r .. c,.CS


^3?^^^'OWNER ''i� F IGAVAIASS LaE'ssA^^ a


ilA : W . - 1 t ' il
SOUTHERN GLIN WAY NORTH 14TH STREET 3. 2 MOBILE HOME en o...
HILLIARD 3/2 great home with 4BR/1.5BA block home on an acre. Corner lot and fenced.
vaulted ceilings, eatin kitchen and island, needs TLC. $137,500 Great setting. $89,900 MLS
2 cr garae. Motate eler. MLS#47266 #48333
S#05,900 MLS #49226


SCorner of 8th & Beech, office I I
space available. 1,200 sq. ft.


I Ren als en alsRn alsRnas.


OCEAN PLACE SAILMAKER HIGHLAND DRIVE HIGH POINTE
Fabulous furnished 2/2 offers Absolutely beautiful 3/2 has Spacious 3/3 brick home on Magnificent 4/3 brick home
1341SF of oceanfront luxury been completely redone top to double lot has new kitchen, In gated community. Tons ol
living next to the Ritz-Carlton. bottom. Everything Is new and wood floors, tile, new paint. upgrades, cul-de-sac lot. handle
Great vacation rental! all on one floor! cap accessible.

#50004 $689.000 #49992 $472.000 #49979 $429.000 #49970 $439.000








CLUBVILLA BLACKROCK HAMMOCK NORTH HAMPTON GRANDEOAKES
Serene marsh view condo in 5454 SF of luxury living in this Beautiful 4/3 two-story over- Spectacular riverfront living
Amelia Island . Plantation. .6/6.5 executive home looks the 4th fairway. Three in this brand new 5/4 beauty.
Steps to pool and close to Screened & heated pool. sum bedrooms upstairs & guest Gourmet kitchen. 3-car
Amelia Links Goll Club. mer kitchen, guest suite and suite down. garage & more.
RV/boat garage.
#47011$345.000 #50073 $659.000 #49533 $315,000 #44921 $689,000



Amelia Island
Avery Rd $45.000 Long Point $575,000
Barrington $119,900 Opal Ave $395,000
- Blackbeard's Way $1,065,000 Pinedale Road $69,000
Calhoun St. $99,500 Someruelus $99,000
First Ave $295,000 S. Fletcher $995,000
S. FLETCHER AVENUE Gaines Ln. $110,000 10th Street $48,000 LOFTON POINTE
Spectacular 3 year old ocean lan Drive $45,000 Pride of ownership shows In this
view home sits on a double lot Off-i slan well-appointed 4/3 home. Bonus
and has every imaginable " - room with full bath over garage
upgrade. Call for details. Amberwood Ln $67,500 Marc Anthony $46,800 home warranty.
Bennettll Ave $225,500/$350,000 Napeague Dr. $165,000
#48550 $1,550.000 Brady Point Rd. $480,000 Plum Loop $49.900/$66,000 #48773 $239,900
Cayman Circle $69,000/$134,900 Redblid Lane $199,000


Edwards Road $59,000
Gravel Creek $69,900
High Pointe $119,900
Lalitte's Way $89,900
Lina Road $417,900
Little Piney Island $300,000


OCEANVIEW HOME
Great price on thls lgnhl &
hrlght bIeach collage in S.
Flrecher Ave. Steps ii the I)each
idCuCe. Zncld Iar dlup)lx Indi
easily exp0anirded,
#50061 $350.000 . 'M:


Reserve at Doer Run
$55,000-$75,000
Roses Blufl $29.900
Southern Heritage $155,000
US Highway 17 $350,000
Wesley Rd., 13.61 acres
$899,900
HIGH POINTE
1.2 acre wooded lots In
gated subdivision off RIVERGLEN
ewell Road i Nearly new 4/2 home on nicely
Barnwell Road. Bring landscaped lot with sprinkler
your own builder with system In new family neighbor.
no time limit to build. hood close to 195. Built In 2008
and in perfect shape.
$119.900 #48541 $177.000


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles- 3BR/2.SBA Bring your golf clubs and walk the
golf course. Single family traditional home with 2 car garage. Living
room and dining room at front of house. Fireplace in family room
which exits to large screened porch. Master bedroom has entry to
screened porch for early morning coffee and bird watching in a natu-
ral setting. Conveniently located to shopping, schools and dining just
off Amelia Island Parkway. $1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered patio
and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and fireplace in
living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in pres-
tigious gated community where amenities include a community swim-
ming pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and Golf Club of
Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking distance
to the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage. $1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice hdme located in Ocean
Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in back patio
and 2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This hlome is charming country liv-
ing at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land
with beautiful trees all around, Sit back and relax warm evenings in
the florida room or cozy up by the fireplace on the cold winter nights.
Either way this one is a charmcr,'$1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA - 2795 sq. ft., granite count-
er tops, maple cabinets,' stainless steel appliances, washer/dryer
included, centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green in
the North Hampton Golf Community with club house/aquatic center,
basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with canoe/kayak
lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television, High Speed
Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400
* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced, lot, satellite
dish, tool house. Teln minutes from Amtelia IslAnd and convenient to
Jacksonville International Airport. $1150


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS

* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include
swimming pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools
and shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with community
pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Great
south end location. Large 2 car garage. This unit is in excellent condi-
tion. Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the ocean, golf
and shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking a leisurely
drive on A1A through State Parks along the ocean and intracoastal
waterway. $925
* 2012A West Natures Lane-3BR/2.5BA-Lovely townhome centrally
located on the island. Minutes to shopping, schools and the
beach.$1100
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town home
located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal'water--
way. Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service. $2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as well
as golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautifid brick
paver walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front
and rear yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA fownlhbme with fireplace in family
room. Homp is only one block from the ocean. $900

FURNISHED- ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A - 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furntshed.l block
front the beach. $750
* 2770 Mizell10-2B- 2R/2BA in Amtelia Woods. Fully furnished unit
with community pool and tennis court. One block from the beach.
Avail Sept lst. $900


I M - * *- - . , -, - - --.


$340,000 - Reserve Court
4BR/2BA in Reserve at Old Bluff
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$569,000 - S. Fletcher, 60' Boach Lot - MLS8 45251
Buy now, Build later, use ol existing home
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$510,000 Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365
4B1R3BA - 2578sf- In Seaside Subdivision
Nip Galphln - 277-6597 �


$799,000 - Sandpiper Loop
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphln - 277-6597







$725,000 - Fernandina Cay - MLS# 43544
3BR/3BA - Great Ocean View
Nip Galphin - 277-6597
WC1- -q-- -H1


2600 S.F. - across from the Bells River
Call me or yoTr agent qulcklyl
Brad Goble - 904-261-6166


SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


$425,000 - S. Fletcher Lot 50'x100'
Ready to build - Plans Available 2700 s.I.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$142,000 - The Palms - MLS# 45243
2BR/2BA - Many Upgrades
Brad Goble - 261-6166







$150,000 - 1311 Broome- MLS 47106
1375 s.f. Open Floor Plan
Brad Goble - 261-6166


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE




PUBLIC INVITED



Saturday * August 1st * 1 till 4 pm



ON ISLAND


1738 Leslie Ct. - 3BR/2BA - 1617 asf.- $499,500





NORTH HAMPTON

85121 Bostick Wood Dr - 4BR/3BA - 2145 asf. - $308,000

86181 Eastport Dr - 4BR/3BA - 2271 asf. - $340,000

Reduced

861384 Hampton Club Way W - 3BR/2.5BA - 2521 asf. $329,000

85259 Nageaque Dr - 4- 4BR/4BA - 4527 as. $709,900


* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphln - 277-6597


CF.


ANN


--- --- ----


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6g FRioDAY. JuY 31. 2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Lcader


853 Mobile Home Lots
CAMPER/RV SPACE AVAIL - 50/30
AMP l!ec. incl., $360/mro. Stationary
camper for one person, $100/wk. Elec
& gas incl. Sandpiper Ciour 261-6957

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - $500/mro, Utilities
included. Washer & dryer. (904)415-
5712

855 Apartments
Furnished
AT BEACH - Effic., 1 & 2BR starting
$145/wk. + dep., utils incl. ON
ISLAND - 2-3BR MH's in park 5150/
wk. up or $600/mo. + dep. 261-5034
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2/2 flat,
next to tennis courts/pool. Long term.
$900. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)
277-0006.


855 Apartments
Furnished

2BR/1BA APT. - on S. Fletcher.
Completely furnished. $750/mo, +
$250 deposit. Background check req'd.
(904)321-4366 or (904)557-8220
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo0.
(90.1)206-1071 or 321-4262



856 Apartments
Unfurnished

SMALL UPSTAIRS 2/1 DUPLEX - on
Clinch Dr. CH&A, new carpet. Quiet
marsh view. $650/mo. + $300 dep.
Lease required. References. (904)583-
0803 after 4pm.
1BR/1BA DOWNTOWN - All utilities
included. $650/mo. (904)468-0411
1BR/1BA DOWNTOWN - Private bal-
cony overlooking Fairbanks' House. 6.
6th & Cedar. W/D, water, garbage incl.
Svc dogs only. $675 + dep. 556-3002
2BR/1BA - Near beach. $795/mo. +
$795 dep. Call (904)583-3811.


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

A 4BR/3BA - $217/mo. HUD h6me.
3BR only $199/mo. Stop renting. 5%
dn, 15 yrs @6 8% opr. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext, 5669, ANF
925 TARPON AVE.- North Pointe
28R/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
Doonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
ISLAND STUDIO APT. - 422 Pincdale
Rd., Fernandina Beach, 800 sq ft.
$600/mo, I month deposit. Incl.
garbage. No Smoking. Available Aug.
1, call M-F 9am to 5pm 904-277-5606
leave message after 5pnm.
BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N.
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/18A, CH&A, W/D.
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
included. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
OCEAN VIEW 2BR - No lease. Service
animals only. $750/mo. + security
deposit. Call (904)261-7750 after 6pm.
SMALL 1BR - at the beath. Quiet. No
smoking. Service animals only. Utilities
included. References, $500 deposit
required. $650/mo. (904)335-1665


. . ......... ...
I I S "


I I , L . I1.1, 1 .l l. ....II : I- ' l , -. , rl l .- ,II ' t. i , . : I i t..h h ,,... ' , i I: 2 l' ', 1. ., '
office suritc';. Iicarud nc. A1 \A and suits to choose frotu. Located in the in sle De Mlai with screened in Innai
lrighlway l' ,'.\\ Wireles intcrern and resort district and close to AIR Visir fcing pond. ConmunitIPIool. 1 awn
sccuri sysrcm provided. From n ParkPlaceot.mcnelin.com for: details and carr. I'Pers allowed. IHalf of.f t1 month rent
S2 4. to S430.00limoi pricing. Resrarant space available, with fil lease,. ( )n island . Sl,650/nou
Nassau Countsy Premier Property lManagement Specialists


5209 Village va - 3BR,2BA located in Ocean Village.
Fumished or unlumished. Community Pool with beach
access and Summer Beach membership available ftor small
fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,950'no

1913 Perimeter Park - 3BR2.5BA with formal living and
dining. Master with garden tub & granite counter tops. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,995,mo

95118 Sandpiper - 2BR,2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck
over looking ocean. IFumished or unfurnished. Utilities
included. No Pets. On Island. $1,895/mo

95208 xWoodxbrr - 4BRI3.5BA Summer Beach home with
tile floor throughout and large bonus room. Screened in
lanai, 2 car garage and community pool. lawn care and
washer dryer. On Island. $J,750imno

2851 Ferdinand - Brand new 3BR'2BA home in Isle De Mai
with screened in lanai. Overlooking pond. Community Pool.
lawn care Pets allowed. 1 alla of rent one month rent with
12 month lease. On Island. , I i ll.:,

95015 Sea Wdk - Beautiful 3BR'2BA home located in Sea
Walk off Scott Road. Split floor plan with large oversized back
yard and short walk to beach. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On
Island. S1,550.rno

96153 Ridgewood - 4BR3BA home located in Lofton Point
with screened patio and wraparound deck, 2373 sq ft,
master down and bonusBR up with full bath, fenced
backyardlaminate flooring, upgrades throughout house,
pets allowed, lawn care included. Offlslaind. $1,475/mn

95141 Amalfi - 3BR2.5B.A town home located in the Villas of
Summer Beach with community pool. Short walk to beach.
lawn care and washer/dryer. Screened lanai. Pets allowed.
On Island. Si i i 1 ,,.1

96816 Arrigo - 3BR,2BA home located in Beachway with
oversized fenced back yard. Many upgrades with lawn care.
Pets allowed. OffIsland. $1,325/mo


86059 Remsenburg- 3BR'2BA North Hnampton 1,500 sq.
ft. home. uge back vard. Wireless access. Pets allowed.
Half of one month rent with full lease. Off Island.
$1,300/'mo

96928 Buccaneer - 3BR'2BA home with Italian tile floors
and cedar wood throughout. 3 car garage. 1W) and lawn
care. On Island. $1,300/mo

1994 Amelia Green - Brand new 2BR-2.5BA townhome
with loft and or. c.ir C.,r tr. Cl... ro shopping and beach.
Pets allowed. lii ,hrn .'I. l in ' ,,

1969Amelia Green - 2BR,2.5BA townhome with tile tfors
throughout main living. Granite countertops, stainless steel
appliances. Close to shopping and beach. Pets Allowed.
lawn care. On Island. $1,2(00mo

2651 Delorean - 3BRW2BA located offWill lardee - close to
schools, shopping and beach, lawn care incld. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1, 175,mo

9679 Arrigo - 3BR2BA home located in Becehwav. 1600
sq ft, split tloor plan, covered lanai. Off Island. $ ,150/nmo

823 N. Fletcher- 2BR'1BA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean
view with sunroom. Water/sewer included. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,100/mno

86184 Augustus - 3BR'BA house located in Cartesian
Pointe with fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2
car garage..Offlsland. $1, (00imo

5437 Leonard - 2BR,2BA home located in American Beach.
Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Oversized yard. Pets slowedd. On Island. $950/mo

314 S. 14th - 2BRi1.5BA hone with oversized fenced in
back yard and deck. Pets allowed. Half month free with
12ino lease. Half month off with 12 month lease. On
Island. $850,no


857 Condos-Furnished I 858 Condos-Unfurnishedl


Beautiful Oceanfront - fully furnish-
ed 3BR/31A. Ocean Place (@ Summer
Beach. $3000/mo., Incl, all utils. Avail.
10/1. Call Marcy, (904)753-6500,
AMELIA LANDINGS - Furnished 2BR/
2BA, water/sewer & -il'rln" included.
Pool. Non-smoking,. ., :. animals
only. $1995/mo, + $995 deposit. Call
(90'1)759-1105 or (904,)838-1969.
FOR RENT - Feinandina. FurLnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. Utls Incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
AMELIA WOODS - 1BR/1BA. Beautl-
fully furnished with vaulted ceilings.
Close to beach access. $840/mo. Call
for details (770)789-2965.

858 Condos-Unfurnished
NOW LEASING AMELIA LAKES
CONDOS - Private & gated luxury
community featuring resort style
swimming pool, tennis court, fitness
center, beach volleyball, & more.
Overlooking a spring fed lake. 1 & 2BR
homes starting at $799/mo. Call today
for a showing (904)415-6969.
www.amellalakes.com
2BR/2BA COLONY UNIT - 2-car gar.,
newly remodeled, pool & tennis court.
No smoking. $975/mo. + dep. & utils.
(904)548-0774, (904)556-5457.
NICE 1BR/1BA CONDO - Newly
painted, garden tub, screened porch, Ig
rooms. Gated community w/ amenities,
$750/mo. Call (904)432-8359
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $950/mo. (904)206-
2313
THE PALMS AT AMELIA - 2BR/2BA
starting at $800/mo. Call about our
early move-in special. (904)277-1983
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated Ameni-
ties Incl. $900/mo + sec dep. Call
912-269-3960.


T' Club
Apartments
Rest/Addn.vin i -aerndiaIReachr/

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.




LONG TERM
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side).. 3-4
BR/2.BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots of park-
ing. Unfurnished $1,500.00.
* 19 S. 14th St.,2/l. $900/mo + until. securi-
ty deposit $1,000.Avail. August 2009.
* 4BR2.SBA Very nice 2500 sq.ft. home at
Florence Point $1.4SO/mo. + Utl.
* 3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island with
beautiful view of Egans Creek. $1.850/mo.
+ Uil. Avail Sept. I"
* 3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood PL,
close to beach and golf course $1350/mo
+ until
* 2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit in
Amelia Lakes. smoke free, lots of ameni-
ties. $950/mo.
S514 S. 14th St- 3BR/IBA $875/mo + until.
security deposit $1,000. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. + utiL
Security deposit of $1,000.
* 2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt. Great
Deck - Oceanview I$,000/mo.+ until.
* 3BR/2BA on FirstAve. w/one car garage.
Like new with a partial ocean view
$1.150/mo+ util.

VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/IBA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher. Call
for more information

904-26-1-4066


3BR/2BA BEACH CONDO - All new.
$800/mo. Annual unfurnished rental.
(904)41t5-1313
AMELIA LAKES - 1BA/1BA condo.
Personally owned, well kept, very clean
unit, nice amenities. Best value on
property. Great landlord. $725/mo.
Call Tim (386) 846-2951.

860 Homes-Unfurnished

MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
2BR/1BA DUPLEX IN YULEE - Newly
remodeled. $750/mo. + deposit. Avail-
able now. (912)467-3654 or (904)237-
0692.
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1425/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177
NORTH HAMPTON UNFURNISHED
HOME - 3BR/2BA, large backyard.
$1300/mo. One month free with year
lease. Call (912)270-3239.
2BR/1BA/1-CAR GARAGE BEACH
BUNGALOW - 2295 S. Fletcher Ave.
Ocean view, beach access. $1095/mo.
+ deposit. Call (904)759-1105.
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177
3BR/2BA - 1800 sq.ft. Tile floors,
gorgeous fenced yard, all appliances.
2046 Marlin CT. $1375/mo. + dep.
(858)354-8221
4BR/3BA Foreclosure! - $11,500.
Only $217/mo. 5% down 15 years @
8% apr. Buy 3BR $199/mo. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5798. ANF
TIMBERCREEK PLANTATION - 3BR/
2BA, 2-car garage. New home. Avail-
able 9/1. $1100/mo. Call (904) 553-
3445.
NICE 2BR/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE -'on
island. 10x12 storage, fenced yard.
$825/mo. (904)556-1663


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.



S850785 US 17 Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq. ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & until.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$19.00 PSF + 3.5 CAM + Sales tax.
S1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate enr $300/mo. + tax.
* Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1.800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2.250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail. Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2500/mo + tax + udl
*DEER WALK - 1.250 s.f..retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2.000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent wl signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St. OldWest
Marine space. 2,900 HSF ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $12 per sf + tax.

.EMIM 5,-.1S ZMm II -


ml J


Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810 mun,







Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 hedronnm townhouse style
3 bedroom garden units - Marsh views
Swimming pool Dishwasher - Laundry facilities
Washer/dryer connections' - Washer/drver units available*
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675."' per month
"S irnt lt.1liret-i nut .i,';lill in ill iunli
Senc Ci3ti Discount A4 AFl.t Ow Spe"JU!
Lebss than 2 miles frnm the he.ach and vou can \vidk to the
shops and restaurants ea Tih (;Iate\'way to Amelia center!

Ael sd.! (904) 261-0791
www.atcde\elopment.com




MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free imitedTim
" ' 'W/D Connections
V , * Large Closets
' I fi," , -/ * ,- Pirvate Pations
. . * Sparkling Pool
, Tennis Courts
K,''*" Exercise Room
, ? * Close to Shopping
* Twenty Minutes to
I'T Jacksonville & Fernandlna
City Apartments with Country Charm

(904) 845-2922
37149 Codv Circle
Eastwoo aks " Hilliard, Florida
APARTM ENTS Mon.- Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most From Your Investnent Propertyr
Give Us A Call Today!


860 Homes-Unfurnished
YULEE - Rent, rent to own. 3BR/2BA,
2-car gar., 2 workshops, lots of
storage, studio, on marsh, 2-story
stucco, no deed restrictions, 1 ac
private. Avail now. $1300/mo. Yearly
or short term. 1(865)429-0287
3BR/2BA - like new home with huge
yard. 2 car garage, W/D and garden
tub. Page Hill subdivision in Yulee.
$1100/mo. (904)536-6379.
ROBINHOOD - 1538sf, 3BR/2BA. 2-
car garage, fenced rear yard.
$1200/mo. Amelia Coastal Realty 261-
2770.
3BR/2BA BLOCK HOUSE - Low utili-
ties, W/D, garage, fenced back yard,
on island, open floor plan. $1050/mo.
Please call Angela (904)753-3639
BRAND NEW HOME - 58R/4BA, 4000
sf, custom made kitchen, bathrooms,
granite, SS appl's, vaulted ceilings, sits
on 1 acre of land, w/option to buy.
$1975/mo. OBO. (904)509-6167
2BR/2BA - with extra room. Pirates
Wood subdivision. Fenced in yard. Pool
access. $975/mo. Security deposit
required. (904)335-0116

861 Vacation Rentals
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.

863 Office
SADLER RD. - Office/retail space
avail. $900/mo. 8th & Gum - 1200sf
+ loft at $1200/mo. 1105 S. 8th -
1065sf $1000/mo. 6400sf $4500/mo.
Beech Street - Former Restaurant
Lease. $1700/mo. Buy $195K. Down-
town - 1900sf at $2000/mo. 1280-
3200sf - Tyler Plaza, Yulee. $14psf.
Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Cehter. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
TURNKEY CLASS A OFFICE SPACE -
in Gateway To Amelia complex avail-
able for professional service firm on an
office sharing basis. If Interested con-
tact Sue Armstrong at (904)277-2788.
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
3 ROOM SUITE - utilities furnished.
$625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd. behind
Amelia Insurance. Call George, (904)
557-5644.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597


864 Commercial/Retail
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
ft. 463179 A1A, Yulee. Permits
available for alcoholic beverages. (404)
557-5004
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on AIA in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.






Acura Integra - '95 $500. Honda
Civic '99 $400. Ford Taurus '01 $750.
Toyota Camry '98 $850. Police
Impounds. For listings call (800)366-
9813 ext 9275. ANF
BUY POLICE IMPOUNDS - '97 Honda
Civic $400. '97'RH6oi A&cord $800.'for
Iistings'call (800)366-9813 ext 9271.
ANF
CLASSIC 1984 CHRYSLER NEW
YORKER - AC, PS, PB, PW. 73,000
actual miles. Call (904)261-3811.

S903 Vans

SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034









Altering
Nassauville


'f.


Sat
8/1



90/76


Getting along
Switha bear
PA GE 7A


F LOR IDA' S


OLDEST


W E E KLY


N EW S PA P E R


-. �.".�.". . ." . ''. " ."M'S ' !
. . :


FRIDAY July 31,2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS fbnewsleadercom


COLORFUL GUARD IN YULEE


HEATHER A. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
The Yulee High School Hornets color guard gathers Wednesday for summer band camp at the music room. Proudly displaying their color-
ful silks are, first row from left, Natalie Watt, Jessica Flynn, Kamre Rothwell and Savannah DeMasi; second row, Samantha Peavey, Katie
Dampler, Suzie Lamb, Bridgett Cook and Vanna Adams; and last row, Katie Pelfrey, Kala Truman and Chelsea Ward.


No bid for


tennis job


by coach

ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
The city has received two bids for
the job that has belonged to tennis
coach Lanny Kalpin for the last four
years. Kalpin was not one of the bid-
ders.
Kalpin was informed earlier this
month that the city, rather than renew-
ing his contract, would put his job out
for bid. Several dozen of Kalpin's sup-
porters protested publicly against the
city's surprising and sudden move that
could mean the end of the popular
coach's lessons at Central Park.
Kalpin, who said
the job was put out to
bid after he asked for
city health insurance,
S declined to comment
further.
However, City
Manager Michael
Czymbor said at a
Czymbor July 21 city commis-
sion meeting that he
was "disappointed,
shocked and surprised" that Kalpin did
not submit a bid proposal for the tennis
pro job.
Kalpin, who has been the city's ten-
nis coach since 2005, signed his latest
contract in December 2008 to use the.
city's Central Park tennis courts for
lessons and tournaments. The contract
states that Kalpin was to pay the city 20
percent of the gross revenue. Kalpin
said the city's share amounted to about
$15,000 a year.
There is no expiration date or time
limit on Kalpin's 2008 contract.
According to Kalpin, users of his tennis
program pay the city directly, and the
city then gives Kalpin 80 percent of the
proceeds.
According to City Clerk Mary
Mercer, Kalpin's contract was put out
to bid because his venture generates at
least $15,000 a year. The other two city


TENNIS Continued on 3A


2 companies bid for right


to operate city's marina
*ANGELA DAUGHTRY year of marina ly, daily and commercial. Th
News-Leader ii management pany also suggests a 10 p(


Two companies have submitted
bids to the city in response to a
request for proposals for manage-
ment of the city marina.
Vinings Marine Group of Atlanta
and Westrec Marinas, based in
Encino, Calif., each submitted pro-
posals.
Those proposals are being evalu-
ated by a city-appointed marina/lease
RFQ (requestfor qualifications) com-
mittee that comprises City Manager
Michael Czymbor, Marina Director
Coleman Langshaw, Finance
Director Patti Clifford, Dave Lott of
the Waterfronts Florida Partnership
Committee and Bill Flynn of Friends
of the Library. Purchasing Director
Deni Murray also attends the meet-
ings, but is not on the committee.
Westrec's proposal estimates the
city's yearly revenues during its first


could be more
S I than $800,000 after
Westrec's expens-
es. That number
provides for a 6
percent manage-
ment fee from
Langshaw dockage, lease
income and fuel
sales, plus 50 per-
cent of retail revenue that will go to
Westrec. The company also esti-
mates $1.2 million in dockage fees
and nearly $50,000 in mooring rev-
enues will come in the first year.
Westrec also estimates marina
revenues will increase every year,
and that the city's share of revenues
will be more than $1 million by the
fifth year.
Westrec's management plan
includes dividing available dockage
space into three categories: month-


e com-
ercent


increase in' monthly dockage rates,
and elimination of weekly rates. Rates
for daily/transient and commercial
boats would remain constant.
Other improvements include a
new, expanded retail store.
Westrec's management plan
would also incorporate the new mari-
na welcome center as a resource for
ecotourism programs to highlight
the area's natural beauty and
resources. Fuel and retail prices
would also be kept down by
Westrec's connections in the marina
industry and "network purchasing
power." A new retail store would
"entice transient boaters, cruisers
and tourists to the waterfront," and
additional services such as bike
rentals would further attract cus-
tomers, according to Westrec's plan.
MARINA Continued on 3A


Police seek man in sexual battery,


knife assault on teenaged girl


MICHAEL PARNELL
News-Leader


Fernandina Beach Police were searching Thursday
night for a man that sexually assaulted a teenaged girl
and cut her with a knife in her townhome off Sadler Road.
Police Chief Jim Hurley said the attack occurred
Thursday afternoon after the girl had been jogging in her
neighborhood.
Home alone, she was confronted by the intruder
there, he said. She was sexually assaulted and cut dur-
ing the battery, he said.
It was believed the girl suffered minor knife wounds,
but she was still being treated at Shands Jacksonville
Thursday afternoon.
The assailant was described as a "very skinny" white
male, age 40-50 with "a scruffy reddish-brown and gray
beard and nearly shoulder-length hair. He was last seen
wearing a dirty yellow Polo shirt and khaki shorts to the
knees," Hurley said in a press statement about 5 p.m.


The assailant was described as a "very
skinny"white male, age 40-50 with "a
scruffy reddish-brown and gray beard
and nearly shoulder-length hair."

Police used a Jacksonville Sheriff's Office tracking
dog to seek the man. They chased one man partly fitting
the description in Egans Creek Greenway and stopped
him for questioning, but no arrests had been made
Thursday afternoon.
Fernandina Beach Police detectives are asking the
public for help in their attempt to identify the suspect.
If anyone observed a suspicious person or vehicles on
Thursday afternoon in the Sadler Road area or north of
there along Egans Creek Greenway, they should contact
police at 277-7342.


Union



rips



fire



chief
RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
The president of the Nassau County
firefighters union has leveled allega-
tions of endangerment and abusive
conduct at Fire Chief Chuck Cooper.
In a July 17 letter to County
Coordinator Ed Sealover, Nassau
County Fire Rescue Professionals Local
3101 President
Matthew Waggoner
alleged that Cooper's
actions at a number
of structure fires
have caused concern
for firefighters' safety.
Waggoner also
charged Cooper with
"a consistent pattern Cooper
of abusive language
used toward subor-
dinate employees."
Sealover is investigating the alle-
gations. Cooper has denied them.
Waggoner alleged that Cooper's
FIRE Continued on 3A


County OKs


impact fees


for roads
RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
The Nassau County Commission
has approved the use of $2.8 million in
impact feesfor road improvements
throughout the county. The proposed
improvement projects, for the most
part, involve adding turn lanes. Roads
up for improvement include 14th Street,
US 301, Lem Turner Road and Chester
Road.
Impact fees, which are charged to
builders for new construction, are used
to fund local projects such as roads
and parks. However, Florida statute
requires the fees be spent only on new
growth - a nebulous definition that has
made justifying fee expenditures diffi-
cult in the past. Nassau County cur-
rently has about $10 million in unspent
impact fees. However, county ordi-
nance stipulates that the fees must be
used within six years or else refunded
upon request.
The county historically has had trou-
ble finding projects that qualified for
impact fee funding. At the county com-
mission's July 13 meeting, however,
County Attorney David Hallman
praised Interim Engineering Services
Director Jonathan Page for pushing
fee proposals through since taking over
after the resignation of county engi-
neer Douglas Seaman in February.
"Jonathan and (administrative assis-
tant) Denise (Swan) have done a fan-
tastic job," Hallman said. "They've
taken a project that's languished for
five or six years and, in the short time
Jonathan's beer the interim engineer-
ing services director, totally turned it
around."
"I've been pushing for this since
I've been elected," commission Chair
Barry Holloway said. "... There's a big
elephant sitting in the room called
impact fees, and we're finally starting
to take a bite out of the issue."
Clerk of Court John Crawford said
he was happy to see viable impact fee
projects finally in the works. "The
FEES Continued on 3A


1 84264 11 1111110001


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LEISURE .................................................1B
OBITUARIES ................. ...................... 2A
O UT AND ABOUT ................. 2B
SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B
SPORTS ................................................... 12A
SUDOKU ................................................... . 2B


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NEWS LEAD75ER


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FRIDAY. July 31.2009 NEWS News-Leader


50 YEARS AGO

State Rep. TlH. "Tommy"
Askins said 1959 was "the
greatest fruit-bearing ses-
sion in the annals of
Florida's legislative history."
July 30, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

Local members of United
Paperworkers International


began voting on a co
proposal to end a nil
strike at I'TI Rayoni
Augus
10 YEARS Al

Florida Secretary
Katherine Harris wr
ter asking the Nassa
County Commission
approve a site plan fi
Mart Supercenter o0
Island. August


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NEWS
LEADER\


11 Ash Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904) 261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for email addresses:
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Femandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Femandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Femandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility f6r typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............... $36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ............. $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
CNI communy
S Incorponlcd


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
, Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


)ntract
ic-week
-r.


Start calculating now for retirement


JASON ALDERMAN
For the News Leader


t 1, 1984 When the stock market and housing
f Prices were soaring not so long ago,
0 many baby boomers figured they could
retire early and live comfortably on their
, of State profits. Today that situation has
ote a let- reversed: Many folks are now postpon-
;u ing their retirement or even being forced
not to to reenter the workforce, either to sup-
or a Wal- plement diminished savings or because
n Amelia they underestimated how expensive
t 2, 1999 retirement would be.
In fact, according to the Department
of Labor, the number of people over 55
still working has increased by more than
800,000 since the recession began,
- despite rising overall unemployment.
If you are wondering about the right
time to retire, here are a few considera-
.. tions:
* How much will you need? Financial
planners often suggest people may need
, 70 to 90 percent of pre-retirement
income to maintain their current
Lifestyle, but individual circumstances
make it hard to generalize. For example,
some folks downsize their housing or
retire to less expensive areas and there-
fore may need less. Others can anticipate
high medical bills or other heightened
expenses.
Crunch the numbers. Start estimating
your retirement needs by using online
interactive calculators, including:


WEEKLY UPDATE


Health talk
rescheduled
A "Federal Healthcare
Reform Conversation" host-
ed by State Rep. Janet
Adkins, the Health Planning
Council of Northeast Florida,
Inc. and Florida CHAIN, in
cooperation with.Florida
Community College at Jack-
sonville, has been resched-
uled to Aug. 27 from 6-8 p.m.
at the Betty P. Cook Nassau
Center in the "Red" Bean
Technical Career Center,
Room T126, 76346 William
Burgess Blvd., Yulee. The
P public is invited to attend the
healthcare conversation.
For information, contact
Amanda Young at 491-3664.
Book signing
Ben Walker will hold a
book signing for his new
novel, Winds of the South, at
Books Plus, 107 Centre St.,
Fernandina Beach. on Aug. 1
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Sundaes on
Sunday
Fifi's Fine Resale of
Amelia Island is holding a
canned food drive for the
Barnabas food pantry each
Sunday in August. Bring in a
canned good and receive an
ice cream sundae treat for
free. Fifi's, 1853 S. Eighth St.,
will be open noon-4 p.m. each
Sunday in August. Call 277-
4430. Visit www.myspace.
com/fifis_amelia and www.
twitter.com/ResaleRocks.

Visually
impaired meet
SThe Nassau Council of
Visually Impaired and Blind
will meet Aug. 3 from 1-3
p.m. at the Council on Aging
Senior Center, 1367 South


* Social Security's
Retirement Estimator
now automatically
enters your own earn-
ings information from
Sits records to esti-
mate your projected
Social Security bene-
fits under different scenarios, such as
age at retirement, future earnings projec-
tions, etc. (www.ssa.gov/estimator).
They also have a more detailed calcula-
tor you can download to make more pre-
cise estimates.
* Check whether your 401(k) plan
administrator's website has a calculator
to estimate how much you will accumu-
late under various contribution and
investment scenarios. If not, use the
401(k) calculator at www.bankrate.com
under the "Retirement" tab. They also
provide calculators to estimate the
impact of retirement plan contributions
on your current take-home pay, mini-
mum IRA distributions, and much more.
* AARP offers a calculator designed
to help determine your current financial
status and what you'll need to save to
meet your retirement needs (see
www.aarp.org/money/financial.planning
under 'Tools").
* Another good resource for retire-
ment planning information is Visa Inc.'s
free personal financial management site,
Practical Money Skills for Life, which
features several games and calculators to


18th St.
Guest speaker Michael
Koulouvaris, low vision prod-
uct specialist, will present
and demonstrate desktop
magnifiers and digital book
player recorders and other
low vision equipment. A rep-
resentative from Pipeline
Surf Shop will demonstrate
and sell Fitover Sunglasses.
For information, call
Frances Bartelt at 261-0701,
ext. 102. Need a ride? Call
Cheryl at 277-8070.
Quit smoking
Quit Smoking Now!,
brought to you by the
Nassau County Health
Department and AHEC, is a
six-week class designed to
help you beat the addiction to
tobacco. Classes begin Aug.
3 from noon-1:30 p.m. in the
conference room at Baptist
Medical Center Nassau, 1250
South 18th St. For more
information or to registercall.
Jennifer Emmons, 548-1867,
or e-mail jennifercnmmons@.
doh.state.fl.us.
YappyHour
The next Yappy Hour, a
pet-friendly happy hour, will
be held Aug. 5 from 6-8 p.m.
at the Falcon's Nest at
Amelia Island Plantation.
Donations are accepted for
RAIN at all Yappy Hours.
Individuals also can purchase
tickets for the RAIN Train for
$10 each. Each ticket pays
for the transportation of one
"at risk" animal in our area to
a larger shelter in Florida
where it has a much better
chance of being adopted
quickly. More than 100 ani-
mals have been transported
to date and all have been
adopted out within one week.
For more information about
Yappy Hour, call Bark
Avenue at 261-2275.


Playground board expanding
The First Coast Freedom Avenue Recreation Center, and
project is expanding its board designs have been produced
and accepting applicants with by a landscape architect with
an interest in having a univer- experience designing accessi-
sally accessible playground in ble playgrounds. Supporters
the city of Fernandina Beach. are in the fundraising stages of
It is the organization's this project.
dream to have a place to play Anyone is encouraged to
in Northeast Florida for people apply - the only qualification is
of all abilities and ages. The that you must share the dream
park design takes local histo- to have a place to play for peo-
ry, art and nature into consid- ple of all abilities. Contact
eration. The project has been Aaron Morgan at 335-7253 or
granted use of land by the city aaronmorgan4@ gmail.com.
of Fernandina next to Atlantic


Medicare help
The Medicare supplemen-
tal policy reform bill that
comes into effect Oct. 1 has a
huge impact on the disabled
who have Medicare Part A and
B. Before they could not get a
supplemental policy if there
were under age 65.
A supplemental policy pays
for all the co-pays and
deductibles that Medicare
does not cover.
Guaranteed Issued Policy
means that the individual has
six months from the time they
get their Medicare A and B to
join a Supplemental Policy and
they will not be charged high-
er policy rates or denied a pol-


icy due to their past health or
current health problems.
House Bill 675-Medicare
Supplement reform is effec-
tive Oct. 1.
The bill revises Florida
Statute 627.6741 to require an
open enrollment period for
individuals that become eligi-
ble for Medicare PartA and B
due to disability, including end
stage renal disease (ESRD).
If you need assistance
understanding and selecting
a Supplemental/Medicap
Policy contact your local
University of Florida
Extension Agent Meg
McAlpine at 548-1116.


OBITUARIES

William W "Bill" Miller


Mr. William W. "Bill" Miller,
age 52, of Callahan, passed
away after a courageous battle
on Wednesday morning, July
29, 2009 at the McGraw Center
for Caring in Jacksonville.
Born in Jacksonville, he had
been a lifelong resident of
Jacksonville before moving to
Callahan in 1990. A graduate of
Florida Junior College of
Jacksonville, Mr. Miller fol-
lowed in his father's footsteps as
a career Police Officer for the
City of Jacksonville. He started
working with the Department
of Corrections, eventually
becoming a Patrol Officer in
the Springfield/Downtown
District and eventually work-
ing as an Evidence Technician
before retiring from the
Personnel Department. He was
a member of the Fraternal
Order of Police, Jacksonville
Consolidated Lodge 5-30 and
the First Baptist Church of
C allahan.
He leavesbehind,.his wife of
12 years, Michele Higgin-both-
am Miller, Callahan, FL, two


sons, William Wade Miller, II,
Callahan, FL, Christopher
Wade Miller, Jacksonville, FL,
his father, Ripley J. Miller,
Jacksonville, FL, his mother,
Joann Ridenour, Jacksonville, a
brother, Ralph Ridenour
(Christina), Jacksonville, FL, a
sister, Linda Acosta (Rick),
Carmel, IN, and several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday, from the
Burgess Chapel with Reverend
Bobby Richardson, and
Chaptain Clarence Jarrell, offi-
ciating.
Mr. Miller will be laid to rest
in Bosque Bello Cemetery with
Police Honors.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit from 5:00-7:00 pm
tonight at the funeral home.
If so desired memorial con-
tributions may be made in his
memory- to Community
Hospice, 4715 Worrall Way,
Jacksonville, FL 32224.
'-.'Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


Gerald Derrell Shedd, Sr.,
60, passed away suddenly on
Thursday July 30, 2009.
He was born February 14,
1949 in Duluth, GA and has
lived in Jacksonville most of his
life.
He was preceded in death
by his parents. Survivors
include 3 sons, Derrell Shedd,
Jr., Glenn Casey & Tony Shedd;
2 daughters, Andrea Gonyeau
& Angie Townsend; 2 brothers;
3 sisters; 14 grandchildren.


Mr. Anthony Duane
Simmons, age 41, beloved son,
brother, friend, Christian and
servant in our community of
Fernandina Beach, passed
away on Monday, July 27, 2009
at the Mayo Clinic 'in
Jacksonville, after a long and
courageous battle.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Fernandina Beach, he
was a graduate
of Fernandina
Beach High
School where
he was a mem-
ber of the Brass
Section of the.
Pirates Marc-
hing Band. He had worked for
approximately 10 years at Winn
Dixie on 8th Street in Fernan-
dina and atthe Yulee Store near
Murray's Grille. Hewill be most
remembered for his Krispy
Kreme Donut sales to many
local businesses over the past
15 years.
An avid Football fan, he was
a passionate follower of the
Jacksonville Jaguars and the
Florida State Seminoles. Mr.
Simmons had followed his
father's ministry for many years
in Instrumental, Audio/Visual
and Media department.
He is preceded in death by
his mother, Mary Ann
Simmons,
He leaves behind, his father
and mom, Eddie and Char-


C9v/ ; 9Ceaz1 Simevwl, 0rectofw/

Serving All of Nassau County for almost EightyYears
Visir Our Life Stories At www. OxleyHeard.com


Funeral services will be held
on Saturday August 1, 2009 at 1
pm in the chapel of Cedar Bay
Funeral Home, 405 New Berlin
Road, with Pastor Perry
Fruscella officiating. Interment
will follow in New Berlin
Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends beginning at 11 am until
the hour of service at the funer-
al home, 714-1110.
Cedar Bay FuneralHome.
Jacksonville


maine Simmons, Yulee, FL, four
brothers, Eddie Lamar, Yulee,
FL, Kevin James Simmons,
Miami, FL, Travis Latrelle
Simmons, Greenville, SC, Larry
Michael Wilson, Tallahassee,
FL, four sisters, Shawn Shuman
(Arthur), Yulee, FL, Tracy
Webb, Yulee, FL, Sharon
Simmons, Yulee, FL, Christina
Furlow, Jacksonville, FL and
numerous nieces, nephews and
great-nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday, August 8,
2009 at the First Assembly of
God, 302 South 14th Street,
Fernandina Beach with Pastor
Charles Buck of Kingsland,
Georgia, officiating.
The cortege will assemble
and depart from 86220
Pinewood Drive, Yulee, Florida.
Mr. Simmons will be laid to
rest beside his mother in O'Neil
Cemetery.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit from 5:00 - 7:00 pm
tonight, Friday, August 7, 2009
at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, the family
asks for donations in his mem-
ory to VyStar Credit Union, PO.
Box 45085, Jacksonville, FL
32232-5085; to account number
SU-0702782840, payable to
Charmaine Simmons, c/o
Anthony Simmons.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard FuneralDirectors



CENTER, INC
A private,, nonprofit agency that assists
Nasau County families who need food,
shelter and hIasic necessities.
For Information, call: 904.261.7000


LOOKING BACK


Copyrighted Material "
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers



i b


Gerald DerrellShedd Sr.


Anthony Duane Simmons


estimate retirement needs (www.practi-
calmoneyskills.com/retirement).
* Consult a professional. After you've
explored various retirement scenarios, it
might make sense to invest in a few ses-
sions with a financial planner to help you
work out a specific investment and sav-
ings game plan. Ask around for referrals,
or visit www.plannersearch.org to begin
your search.
* Drawing Social Security while
working. If you begin drawing reduced
benefits between age 62 and your full
retirement age (65 for those born before
1938 and gradually increasing thereafter)
while still working, your benefit could be
significantly reduced, depending on your
total income. However, those reductions
aren't truly lost since your benefit will be
recalculated at full retirement age. Read
"How Work Affects Your Benefits" at
www.ssa.gov for more details.
Also remember that Social Security
benefits may be taxable on federal
income taxes, depending on your income
level. Publication 915 at www.irs.gov has
full details.
Don't wait until thelast minute to plan
your retirement date: Start crunching
the numbers now so you'll have plenty of
options if the economy should change
course again.
Jason Alderman directs Visa's finan-
cial education programs. Sign up for his
free monthly e-Newsletter at www.practi-
calmoneyskills. com/newsletter


mommimml








FRIDAY, July 31.2009 NEWS Ncws-Lcadcr


Alter Nassauville


ay, neuter cats


SIAN PERRY
Nc�,s-Leader

Two ambitious projects aim
to put an end to pet overpopu-
lation in Nassau County once
and for all - and it couldn't be
easier, or cheaper, for residents
to participate.
"Alter Nassauville" - a pro-
gram to spay or neuter every
cat in Nassauville by the end
of 2009 - was launched last
month by Cats Angels and First
Coast No More Homeless Pets,
which this spring opened a
state-of-the-art clinic and shelter
on Jacksonville's north side.
The Nassau Humane
Society also has teamed up with
the Jacksonville non-profit to
offer low-cost spaying and neu-
tering to pet owners.
The agencies note that shel-
ters and rescue organizations
cannot simply adopt their way
out of pet overpopulation, which
is why more than three million
cats and dogs are euthanized
each year nationwide (visit
www.hsus.org and click on the
Pets link to read about "Issues
Affecting our Pets").
The cost of not altering your
pet is enormous, said Wills
Shores, a Cats Angels volun-
teer, especially when you con-
sider that one unsprayed female
cat and her offspring can repro-
duce 420,000 cats in seven
years and one unsprayed
female dog and her offspring,
67,000 puppies in six years.
As Nassau County has wit-
nessed, the majority of these


Lemonade stand
Local teens will host a
lemonade stand outside of
PETCO in Yulee on
Saturday to benefit "Alter
Nassauvllle." a program by
Cats Angels Inc.. SPCA to
spay and neuter every cat
in Nassauville at no or low
cost. For information, con-
tact Cats Angels at 321-
2267.

animals end up at the local shel-
ter, with never enough funds,
space or adoptable homes to
accommodate them. According
to First Coast No More
Homeless Pets, of the 71
unwanted cats and dogs that
enter local shelters each day,
53 are euthanized.
Cats Angels was formed in
2001 to help deal with the prob-
lem, launching an aggressive
trap and release program to
spay or neuter feral cats and
return them to their caregivers.
To date, it has treated 8,300
felines and found homes for
another 4,345.
In the course of their work,
the non-profit's volunteers
noticed many of the cats they
rescue from the county shelter
as well as from the street are
from Nassauville, so they decid-
ed to target that area, said vol-
unteer Becky Delp.
"I know there are many
other streets that are overrun
with unwanted cats - Nassau-
ville just seemed like a good


PHOTO COURTEICSY OF CATS AN(;ELS
These kittens were rescued as part of Cats Angels "Alter
Nassauville" campaign, which seeks to stop cat overpop-
ulation through a targeted free and reduced-cost
spay/neuter program.


place to start," added Delp.
"We will set the traps and
pick up the cats,"-she said. All
the resident has to do is call,
though Delp said "it would be
nice if the people would like to
drive them to No More Home-
less Pets to be spayed and
neutered, or to the Cats Angels
Thrift Store and Adoption
Center (at 709 S. Eighth St.).
Any assistance is appreciated."
Cats Angels will cover the
full cost if the pet owner is finan-
cially unable, said Delp, though
contributions are always wel-
come - "even $5 or $10 a


month."
At 'the Nassiu Humane
Society, 671 irpibrt'Road in
Fernandina Beach, residents
can take advantage of low-cost
spaying and neutering, thanks
again to a program with No
More Homeless Pets, whose
mission is to eliminate the
killing of dogs and cats through
its free and low-cost programs.
Dog spays are $50 and
neuters are $40, regardless of
size, and cat spay or neuters
are $30. The cost also includes
rabies vaccinations, said Janet
Kourie, president of the Nassau


You can help
Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA and First Coast No More
Homeless Pets need the support of the community to reach
their goal of altering every cal in Nassauville by taking simple
steps such as
* Tell your friends and neighbors about the project:
* Contact Cats Angels at 321-2267 if you see a cat run-
ning loose on your street;
* Don't ignore cats that are running free - it is not their
lault they were dumped or abandoned;
* Contribute to the cost of a spay or neuter for the pet of a
neighbor who needs financial assistance:
* Hold a fundraiser, such as a neighborhood garage sale
(or. for children, a lemonade stand) to raise money to spay or
neuter a Nassauville cat. Also place your spare change in
one of the Cats Angels donation jars at stores and reslau-
rants throughout the county.
Contact Cats Angels at 321-2267 or First Coast No More
Homeless pets at (904) 425-0005. Visit www.catsangels.com
Ib share the progress of the "Aller Nassauville" program.
Learn more about First Coast No More Homeless Pets at
wwwv.fcnmhp org or call 866-580-SPAY (77291.

The RAINTrain
Helping the homeless animals already in our midst,
Rescuing Animals in Nassau has launched the RAIN Train to
transport pets from shelters in Nassau County to shelters in
higher-population centers where they stand a better chance
of adoption.
RAIN has reached out to other Humane Societies and
SPCAs from Connecticut to Miami to move 71 animals in
May and 68 in June.
Tickets are $10 each or $200 to sponsor an entire "train."
The donations help cover the van rental, gas and food.
Drivers are always needed, as well as help to prepare the
pets for the trip.
For more information on how to help, call (904) 879-5861.
or e-mail rainhumane@yahoo.com.


Humane Society.
Call the shelter at 321-1647
for information and to sign up


your pet. Visit nassauhumane-
society.com.
sperry@Ibnewsleader.com


No federal COPS grants for local law agencies - yet


JASON YURGARTIS
News-Leader


Three Northeast Florida law
enforcement agencies were
awarded grant money Tuesday
to put more officers on the
street from the U.S. Justice
Department's Community
Oriented Police Services. But


despite applying, both the
Nassau County Sheriffs Office
and the Fernandina Beach
Police Department have yet to
be awarded funding through
the COPS program.
* The Jacksonville Sheriff's
Office was awarded $9.2 mil-
lion through COPS - enough
to hire 50 new officers. Palatka


INVITATION TO BID
The City of Fernandina Beach will receive sealed competitive Bids for requirements of
the following until no later than 10:00 am, August 14th..2009.
ANNUAL BID - MAINTENANCE/STREETS DEPT
#09-17 CENTERLINE PAINTING, MARKERS & THERMOPLASTIC
#09-18 STREETASPHALT PATCHING
#09-19 2500 & 3000 PSI CONCRETE
Bid Documents and Specifications are available to download from the City of
Fernandina Beach website, www.fbfl.us, Bids and Purchasing web page. Questions
regarding the bid package can be directed to Deni Murray, Purchasing Agent at
dmurray@fbfl.org or (904) 277-7311 x2035.
CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH
204 ASH STREET
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034


received $170,694 and Green
Cove Springs got $160,271,
which will pay for one new offi-
cer per agency. Applications
were submitted for Clay and St.
Johns counties, but both juris-
dictions were denied.
Nassau County Sheriff
Tommy Seagraves said his
agency was denied, but did


receive $368,917 through anoth-
er Justice Department grant
that will be used to beef up polic-
ing on the West Side.
Fernandina Beach Police
Chief Jim Hurley said he was
hopeful his department would
be awarded funding for an addi-
tional officer in the next wave of
grant announcements, which


he anticipates in October.
"We're keeping our fingers
. crossed," Hurley said. "We did
get a notification that (not being
included in this round of) award
announcements does not mean
we've been denied."
If it is awarded, the COPS
grant could be the first accept-
ed by the city of Fernandina
Beach since 1998, and one of
only four awarded to the
jurisdiction since the program's
inception in 1994, according
to Department of Justice statis-
tics.
Hurley said the funding
would pay for an officer that
would serve th entire county,;
splitting; tinteevenly between,
the Fernandina Beach Police
Department and the State
Attorney's Office, with whom
the application was jointly sub-
mitted, in an investigative role.
The grant would pay for the first
three years of the newly-created
position.
"Our application is innova-
tive, creative and serves our
agency, the State Attorney's
Office and the county," Hurley
said. "And it allows for a 50/50


split of manpower to a State
Attorney investigative team that
lost more than half their staff."
Seagraves said the grant
.staff at the Nassau County
Sheriff's Office applied for the
grant, like most law enforce-
ment agencies in the state,
but did not get funding. He said
no reasons were given for the
denial, but much needed re-
sources will be supplied where
extra protection is needed -
the West Side - by another
grant.
"We got grant funding for
four positions from the
Department of Juistice which
Swill be utilized onl the 'W stSide
- in Hilliardani. ,Callahan,'i,
Seagraves said. "The positions
will be funded by the grant for
two-and-a-half years and the
funding will be available Octl."
The Nassau County
Commission approved acceptance
of $368,917 in funds Monday
from the 2009 Recovery Act
Edward Byrne Memorial
Justice Assistance Grant pro-
gram, which will be used to cre-
ate the four officer positions.
jyurgartis@ifbnewsleadercom


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OPINION


FRIDAY. July 31. 2009/NEWS-LEADER


4


Linda SO cCoy
Selling Amelia Island (and Beyond) Since 1981
.... (904) 206-0726 . ..






OCEANVIEW TOWNHOME WATERFRONT ESTArI AMELIA RIVER TOWNHOME
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VIEWPOINT/SHELLY ANDERSON/AMELIA ISLAND '


' Health insurance reform:


I Donft reinvent the wheel


ST health insurance con-
tinues to be a burn-
ing issue at every
' level. Having been in
the insurance business all my
professional career and now
focused on "senior planning,"
I am stunned by the over-
Swhelming need for reform
and the ramifications of the
simplest of changes. No easy
answers.
My business helps clients
protect their families, them-
selves and their assets. We
strive to find cost-effective
ways of pro- ;
viding for
0 long-term
care, a guar- - .
S'anteed life 'I
income and ..
health care
coverage. A -L
portion of my Anderson
time is spent
trying to find
health care solutions for my
clients. The challenges grow
as insurance coverage is
declined for pre-existing con-
ditions. As an independent
broker, my first concern is for
my client. The best care for
the least amount of expense
with the best provider.
Most people in their mid-
dle years have some health
history that may result in cov-
erage exclusions or being
totally declined by reputable
insurance companies. The
insurance companies simply
cannot and will not cover an
individual when they may
have to pay out hundreds of
thousands of dollars in
claims. This has to change.


Home and auto insurance are not
nationalized and it works. It is not necessary
to socialize medicine. To do so in our country
would create nightmares.


Pre-existing conditions such
as cancer, heart disease and
diabetes need to be covered.
To do this insurance com-
panies must be able to spread
the risk over a broader popu-
lation base to provide a bigger
pool of insured people. This is
Insurance 101. Like home
insurance and car insurance,
health insurance should not
be a choice. In addition, we
need to implement compre-
hensive medical liability
reform.
Home and auto insurance
are not nationalized and it
works. It is not necessary to
socialize medicine. To do so
in our country would create
nightmares. People would
wait months for critical tests,
surgery and medical care. It
is not necessary to reinvent
the wheel. Major health
insurance companies have
said that they will insure peo-
ple with pre-existing condi-
tions if all people have cover-
age. .
There are 46 million unin-
sured people in America. Ten
million are not U.S. citizens
and another 18 million could
afford health insurance but
choose to go uninsured. If
those people have a health
crisis or accident, who pays?
Our hospitals and doctors do.


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CCopyrighted Material
SSyndicated Content
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I 5.a


(I


And we do. Uninsured people
who don't pay drive up costs.
Yes, we do need to find a way
to cover these people who
have no options - inability to
pay and critical health needs.
This can be accomplished
through Medicaid and low-
income assistance,
What about the rest of the
uninsured population? As pro-
posed health reform is debat-
ed, the public has become
more and more wary of the
lack of option choices and
increases in taxes. :, '
Despite the trillions of
dollars projected, there has
been little information about
actual premiums, prescription.
formularies and policy
specifics.
Some states offer pro-
grams that attempt to address
some pf the most critical of
health care needs. Recently,
Florida has initiated its
"Cover Florida" program,
which is an inexpensive
health care program provid-
ing guaranteed coverage. It is
limited both in expense and
coverage. It's a start.
We cannot walk away. It is
not an option. None of us wel-
comes a house fire or an auto-
mobile accident but if the
worst happens, we are cov-
ered by insurance.
I talk to clients every day.
My heart goes out to those
people who cannot qualify for
any health insurance. Things
have to change. We do not
need another national experi-
ment. We need reforms to our
existing system.
Sheldon "Shelly"Anderson,
-."LL..CLzFQA4"&r Xh e
ATndrson Croup, an independ-
ent insurance agent offering
life, long-term care and health
insurance based on Amelia
Island.


I


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10 HOMES


l'1 iYJ. July 31. 2009/NEWS-LEADER


HOME AND GARDEN BRIEFS


Arts at market
Thel Fernandina Farmers
.Markct Booth With A Cause
pirograi will host the Amelia
Arts Academy Aug. 1.
As one of four certified
Conlunuity Schools of the
Arts in Florida, the Arts
Academy has been offering
tlducation in the arts at afford-
able rates to all interested per-
sons through individual
instruction, group lessons,
after-school art and dance
workshops, creative arts pro-
grams for seniors and more
since 1992.
At the market, the Arts
Academy will give shoppers
an opportunity to "See Them-
selves in the Arts!" with a free
children's craft table and pur-
chase personalized screen
printed items. Shoppers can
choose from several designs
and watch as their shirts, flags
and T-shirts are made right
before their eyes!
Also on Aug. 1, Thompson
All-Natural Pork will be at the
market with its perfect for
summer barbecuing ribs and
various cuts of chops as well
as bacons, sausages and ten-
derloins.
The market, open every
Saturday from 9 a.m.-l p.m. at
Seventh and Centre streets,
features farm fresh produce
as well as a variety of organic
products, specialty foods and
plants. Call 491-4872 or visit
www.fernandinafarmersmar-
ket.com.
Florida sea turtles
Join a park ranger and
learn about the lifecycle of.


the sea turtle and the impor-
tance of these creatures on
Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. at pavilion one
on Little Talbot Island. No
reservations are necessary.
For information call (904)
251-2320.
Manatee talk
Manatees are slow-moving,
non-aggressive, curious crea-
tures and many love grazing
in our shallow, warm summer
waters. Learn what is fact and
fiction about the manatee that
is now more imperiled than
ever. Jim Reid, a wildlife biolo-
gist with the Gainesville U.S.
Geological Survey office, will
share his experiences from
more than 25 years working
with manatees at the next
Nassau County Sierra Club
meeting Aug. 5 at 7 p.m. at the
Council on Aging, 1367 South
18th St. The public is wel-
come.
Animal signs
Join a park ranger for a
presentation and leisurely
guided hike through different
Florida ecosystems on a quest
Sto characterize tracks left by
an assortment of critters on
Aug. 8 at 10 a.m. at the Ribault
Club on Fort George Island
Cultural State Park. No reser-
vations are necessary and the
program is free. For informa-
tion call (904) 251-2320.
Bird club
The Nassau County Bird
Club will hold a field trip to
Huguenot Memorial Park on
Aug. 15 and Sept. 5 at 8 a.m.,
rain or shine. Park entry is $1
per car.


The park is located off
Heckscher Drive about 8
miles south of the Nassau
Sound bridge. Meet in the
parking lot of the general
store. Target birds include the
Piping Plover, Oystercatcher,
Whimbrel, Reddish Egret,
gulls and terns. Bring your
binoculars, field guide, bug
juice, sunscreen, rain gear,
sunglasses, layered clothing
and water.
For information call Carol
Wyatt at 262-9272 or e-mail
carolinewy@aol.com.
Kayak/canoe trip
Nassau Sierra Club will
host a guided kayak/canoe
trip to Simpson Creek (Little
Talbot Island) on Aug. 29.
This trip is open to the public.
The three- to four-hour trip
will depart the "Kayak
Amelia" concession at Little
Talbot State Park at 9 a.m. It
will be about a five-mile pad-
dle, with a stop for lunch on
the sandbar or Bird Island.
Paddlers will experience
maritime forests, desert-like
dunes, undisturbed salt marsh
and a variety of wildlife and
native and migratory birds.
Participants with their own
boats Can launch at Kayak
Amelia; those without kayaks
can rent either single ($30) or
tandem ($45). Kayak Amelia
will waive the launch fee and
offer a 10 percent discount.
The paddle will be in calm
water and is suitable for
beginners. The trip will be led
by Len Kreger, a certified
Sierra Outings Leader; RSVP
at L.Kreger@comcast.net or
(904) 432-8389.


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Butterfly pea good



choice for area gardens


Q . I have this pretty vine
*in a wooded area
behind my house. The flow-
ers are purple and they are
about an inch long. They
look similar to a large pea
flower. Do you have any idea
what they might be? KR
A The flowers you
. described are probably
one of the butterfly pea vines
,in the genus Centrosema or
Clitoria.
This decidu-
ous vine pro-
duces flow-
S " ers from late
spring
' . through the
summer.
Butterfly
pea grows in
GARDEN full sun to
TAL, partial shade
which
attracts
Becky ordi wildlife such
as birds and
butterflies. Just today, as I
was identifying trees in one
of our local parks, I saw a
zebra longwing drawing nec-
tar from its flower.
Butterfly pea prefers acid,
sandy soils commonly found
in this area. You can propa-
gate it easily by collecting
seeds. If you decide to plant it
in your yard, it might be best
to keep it away from sprin-
kler heads. Consider giving
the butterfly pea plenty of
room to grow or a trellis to
climb. This plant can be
found as far west as Illinois,


PHOTO COURTESY OF REBECCAJORDI, UF/IFAS
The butterfly pea vine produces pretty, pink flowers.


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FLORIDA
NURSERY, GROWERS AND
LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION
'The pineapple guava is
listed as one of the top
plants for 2009.


north to New Jersey and tings. Pineapple guava can be
south to the Virgin Islands. used as a hedge or allowed td
form a tree reaching heights
Q .What can you tell me of 15 feet with an equal,
*about pineapple spread. Edible fruit is pro-
guava? SD duced, which apparently
tastes somewhat like pineap-
A Every year, Florida ple, although I have not had
SNursery, Growers and the privilege of tasting it yet.
Landscape Association A University of Florida publi-
(FNGLA) put out a list of top cation by Dr. Ed Gilman and
plants of the year. This year, the Forestry Department can
Feijoa sellowiana, or pineap- be found at http://hort.ufl.
pie guava, was on the list. edu/trees/FEISEIA.pdf.
Several others listed such as The following website
perennial peanut, autumn , contains FNGLA's listing the
fern, firebush, silver saw pal- 2009 Plants of the Year: www.
metto, Summer Wav epas-i;-rz,: la.orij�l le/viewArtic -
winged elm, and Walter's e.asp?articlelD=805.
viburnum (compact) can be Perennial peanut can be seen
grown in this area. at two of Nassau County's
Pineapple guava has gray- Extension demonstration gar-
green evergreen leaves and it dens: Nassau County
produces pretty, pink spring Extension Yulee satellite
flowers. Pineapple guava tol- office and the.Nassau County
rates most any type of soil Courthouse in Fernandina
condition providing it is well Beach. The Walter's vibur-
drained. It can be planted in num can be seen at the
full sun or partial shade Nassau County Demonstra-
although too much shade tion Garden located at the
reduces the production of James S. Page Governmental
flowers and fruit Pineapple Complex in Yulee along with
guava is highly drought and dozens of other easy to grow
salt spray tolerant. It can be plants for this area.
propagated by seed or cut- For more information on
the demonstration sites
please contact Rebecca Jordi
at 548-1116 or e-mail at rljor-
di@ufl.edu.
Q I know I should know
.the answer to this-
question, but I do not. What
are the insects making the


loud noises from dinner time
until it is dark? I do not really
notice the noise during the
day. DO

A The insect is probably
-.the cicada. Which one
is it? Well, identifying it
might be a little tough since
there are almost 20 different
species of cicada found in
Florida.
I have tried capturing
them for my insect collection
but have had very little suc-
cess thus far. Cicadas can be
identified by their "song" and
this website from the
University of Florida might
help you: www.entnemdept.
ufl.edu/walker/buzz/c700fll.
htm. I listened to the dusk
singing cicada, Tibicen
auletes (Germar), which
might be the cicada you are
hearing especially since it
sings at dusk.
Some cicadas have long
life cycle periods and emerge
in 13- or 17-year intervals.
These cyclical or periodical
cicadas do not live in Florida;
cicadas are produced here
annually. Cicadas rarely
cause any significant damage
to vegetables or ornamental
plants in Florida. Although
their size, which can but over
2 1/2 inches long, makes
them somewhat menacing,
we need not be afraid of them
as they do not sting or bite.
Cicadas are ani'iporilrit" ---
part of the food chain in for-
est and home landscapes as
they are a source of food for
birds and small mammals.
Rebecca Jordi, UF/IFAS
Nassau County Horticultural
Extension Agent, is a
University ofFlorida faculty
member Extension locations
are the satellite office at the
County Building in Yulee and
the main Extension Office in
Callahan. The UF/IFAS
Nassau County
Demonstration Garden is
located at the James S. Page
Governmental Complex and
demonstrates best manage-
ment practicesfor Northeast
Florida. Mail questions to
Garden Talk, c/o Rebecca
Jordi, Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1,
Callahan, FL 32011. Visit
http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu.
rljordi@ufLedu


Gardens bloom as economy struggles


Burlington, NJ. - A recent
market research survey con-
ducted by the National
Gardening Association shows
that 43 million Americans will
be growing a garden this year
as opposed to 36 million in 2008.
"It's not surprising," says
avid gardener and author of the
book Vegetable Gardening for
the Average Person, Michael
Podlesny. "People are looking
for ways to save money in this
down economy, and growing
your own food is a great way."


According to the United
States Department of Agricul-
ture, $50 in seeds can produce
over $1,200 in produce.
Even first lady Michelle
Obama has started a vegetable
garden at the White House.
With the help of school chil-
dren, the first lady's garden will
become the first since Eleanor
Roosevelt's victory gardens to
feed the families of troops.
SPodlesny's book is available
from his website, Average
PersonGardening.com.


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SlD Olhllalivislea onl. l^




The news-leader
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00457
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach, Fla
Creation Date: July 31, 2009
Publication Date: 1980-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04377055
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00457
 Related Items
Preceded by: Fernandina Beach news-leader

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7/31



89/76


F LORIDA'S


OLDEST


WEEKLY N


E W S P


AP ER


NEWS


LEADER


FRIDAY July31, 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom


No bid for


tennis job


by coach
ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
The city has received two bids for
the job that has belonged to tennis
coach Lanny Kalpin for the last four
years. Kalpin was not one of the bid-
ders.
Kalpin was informed earlier this
month that the city, rather than renew-
ing his contract, would put his job out
for bid. Several dozen of Kalpin's sup-
porters protested publicly against the
city's surprising and sudden move that
could mean the end of the popular
coach's lessons at Central Park.
Kalpin, who said
the job was put out to
bid after he asked for
city health insurance,
declined to comment
further.
However, City
Manager Michael
Czymbor said at a
Czymbor July 21 city commis-
sion meeting that he
was "disappointed,
shocked and surprised" that Kalpin did
not submit a bid proposal for the tennis
pro job.
Kalpin, who has been the city's ten-
nis coach since 2005, signed his latest
contract in December 2008 to use the
city's Central Park tennis courts for
lessons and tournaments. The contract
states that Kalpin was to pay the city 20
percent of the gross revenue. Kalpin
said the city's share amounted to about
$15,000 a year.
There is no expiration date or time
limit on Kalpin's 2008 contract.
According to Kalpin, users of his tennis
program pay the city directly, and the
city then gives Kalpin 80 percent of the
proceeds.
According to City Clerk Mary
Mercer, Kalpin's contract was put out
to bid because his venture generates at
least $15,000 a year. The other two city
TENNIS Continued on 3A


2 companies bid for right


to operate citys marina
ANGELA DAUGHTRY year of marina ly, daily and commercial. The


News Leader


Two companies have submitted
bids to the city in response to a
request for proposals for manage-
ment of the city marina.
Vinings Marine Group of Atlanta
and Westrec Marinas, based in
Encino, Calif., each submitted pro-
posals.
Those proposals are being evalu-
ated by a city-appointed marina/lease
RFQ (request for qualifications) com-
mittee that comprises City Manager
Michael Czymbor, Marina Director
Coleman Langshaw, Finance
Director Patti Clifford, Dave Lott of
the Waterfronts Florida Partnership
Committee and Bill Flynn of Friends
of the Library. Purchasing Director
Deni Murray also attends the meet-
ings, but is not on the committee.
Westrec's proposal estimates the
city's yearly revenues during its first


management
could be more
than $800,000 after
Westrec's expens-
es. That number
provides for a 6
percent manage-
ment fee from
Langshaw dockage, lease
income and fuel
sales, plus 50 per-
cent of retail revenue that will go to
Westrec. The company also esti-
mates $1.2 million in dockage fees
and nearly $50,000 in mooring rev-
enues will come in the first year.
Westrec also estimates marina
revenues will increase every year,
and that the city's share of revenues
will be more than $1 million by the
fifth year.
Westrec's management plan
includes dividing available dockage
space into three categories: month-


e com-


pany also suggests a 10 percent
increase in monthly dockage rates,
and elimination of weekly rates. Rates
for daily/transient and commercial
boats would remain constant.
Other improvements include a
new, expanded retail store.
Westrec's management plan
would also incorporate the new mari-
na welcome center as a resource for
ecotourism programs to highlight
the area's natural beauty and
resources. Fuel and retail prices
would also be kept down by
Westrec's connections in the marina
industry and "network purchasing
power." A new retail store would
"entice transient boaters, cruisers
and tourists to the waterfront," and
additional services such as bike
rentals would further attract cus-
tomers, according to Westrec's plan.
MARINA Continued on 3A


Police seek man in sexual battery,


knife assault on teenaged girl
AITCHACT DADMCTI I


News Leader


Fernandina Beach Police were searching Thursday
night for a man that sexually assaulted a teenaged girl
and cut her with a knife in her townhome off Sadler Road.
Police Chief Jim Hurley said the attack occurred
Thursday afternoon after the girl had been jogging in her
neighborhood.
Home alone, she was confronted by the intruder
there, he said. She was sexually assaulted and cut dur-
ing the battery, he said.
It was believed the girl suffered minor knife wounds,
but she was still being treated at Shands Jacksonville
Thursday afternoon.
The assailant was described as a "very skinny" white
male, age 40-50 with "a scruffy reddish-brown and gray
beard and nearly shoulder-length hair. He was last seen
wearing a dirty yellow Polo shirt and khaki shorts to the
knees," Hurley said in a press statement about 5 p.m.


The assailant was described as a 'very
skinny"white male, age 40-50 with "a
scruffy reddish-brown and gray beard
and nearly shoulder-length hair."

Police used a Jacksonville Sheriff's Office tracking
dog to seek the man. They chased one man partly fitting
the description in Egans Creek Greenway and stopped
him for questioning, but no arrests had been made
Thursday afternoon.
Fernandina Beach Police detectives are asking the
public for help in their attempt to identify the suspect.
If anyone observed a suspicious person or vehicles on
Thursday afternoon in the Sadler Road area or north of
there along Egans Creek Greenway, they should contact
police at 277-7342.


Union



rips



fire



chief
RYAN SMITH
News Leader
The president of the Nassau County
firefighters union has leveled allega-
tions of endangerment and abusive
conduct at Fire Chief Chuck Cooper.
In a July 17 letter to County
Coordinator Ed Sealover, Nassau
County Fire Rescue Professionals Local
3101 President
Matthew Waggoner
alleged that Cooper's
actions at a number
of structure fires
have caused concern
for firefighters' safety.
Waggoner also
charged Cooper with
"a consistent pattern Cooper
of abusive language
used toward subor-
dinate employees."
Sealover is investigating the alle-
gations. Cooper has denied them.
Waggoner alleged that Cooper's
FIRE Continued on 3A


County OKs


impact fees


for roads
RYAN SMITH
News Leader
The Nassau County Commission
has approved the use of $2.8 million in
impact fees for road improvements
throughout the county. The proposed
improvement projects, for the most
part, involve adding turn lanes. Roads
up for improvement include 14th Street,
US 301, Lem Turner Road and Chester
Road.
Impact fees, which are charged to
builders for new construction, are used
to fund local projects such as roads
and parks. However, Florida statute
requires the fees be spent only on new
growth - a nebulous definition that has
made justifying fee expenditures diffi-
cult in the past. Nassau County cur-
rently has about $10 million in unspent
impact fees. However, county ordi-
nance stipulates that the fees must be
used within six years or else refunded
upon request.
The county historically has had trou-
ble finding projects that qualified for
impact fee funding. At the county com-
mission's July 13 meeting, however,
County Attorney David Hallman
praised Interim Engineering Services
Director Jonathan Page for pushing
fee proposals through since taking over
after the resignation of county engi-
neer Douglas Seaman in February.
"Jonathan and (administrative assis-
tant) Denise (Swan) have done a fan-
tastic job," Hallman said. "They've
taken a project that's languished for
five or six years and, in the short time
Jonathan's been the interim engineer-
ing services director, totally turned it
around."
"I've been pushing for this since
I've been elected," commission Chair
Barry Holloway said. "... There's a big
elephant sitting in the room called
impact fees, and we're finally starting
to take a bite out of the issue."
Clerk of Court John Crawford said
he was happy to see viable impact fee
projects finally in the works. "The
FEES Continued on 3A


News-Leader INDEX LEISURE ........................................................ B SATUR E NES ING SEASON

Copyright 2009 % CROSSWORD ........................... 2B OUT AND ABOUT ................. 2B 2lostduetorecentstorms
The News Leader EDITORIAL .................................. 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B Pleaseturn offorrediretlighsshining
Fernandina Beach, FL FISHING ..................................... 14A SPOTS .................................................... 12A directly on the beach Fora detailedcount
1 4 64 00013 3 newspritwith soybased nk HOMES ........................................O............. 0A SUDOKU .................................................... 2B see wwv .ameliaislandseaturtlewatchcom.


Sat
8/1



90/76


Altering . "
Nassauville
PAGE 4A .o


Getting along
with a bear
PAGE 7A


MAGENTA BLACK


S41.


COLORFUL GUARD IN YULEE


HEATHER. PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
The Yulee High School Hornets color guard gathers Wednesday for summer band camp at the music room. Proudly displaying their color-
ful silks are, first row from left, Natalie Watt, Jessica Flynn, Kamre Rothwell and Savannah DeMasi; second row, Samantha Peavey, Katie
Dampler, Suzie Lamb, Bridgett Cook and Vanna Adams; and last row, Katie Pelfrey, Kala Truman and Chelsea Ward.


-------- - --------- I ---- -- ---- - - - - - I - - - --- -1 1 - - ---- -- - -- - -- - -- - - --- -- -







FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


began voting on a contract
proposal to end a nine-week
strike at ITT Rayonier.
August 1, 1984
10 YEARS AGO

Florida Secretary of State
Katherine Harris wrote a let-
ter asking the Nassau
County Commission not to
approve a site plan for a Wal-
Mart Supercenter on Amelia
Island. August 2, 1999


Today's Weather
* . I. * - .
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
7/31 8/1 8/2 8/3 8/4


89/76
Variable
clouds with
scattered
showers and
thunder-
storms,
mainly in the
aft.
Sunrise:
6:44 AM
Sunset:
8:21 PM


90/76
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.
Highs in the
low 90s and
lows in the
mid 70s.

Sunrise:
6:44 AM
Sunset:
8:20 PM


90/76
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.
Highs in the
low 90s and
lows in the
mid 70s.

Sunrise:
6:45 AM
Sunset:
8:20 PM


Florida At A Glance


-s-. -- O Tallahassee
Pensac.ola .-. , -


-
89/76
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.




Sunrise:
6:46 AM
Sunset:
8:19 PM


89/76
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.




Sunrise:
6:46 AM
Sunset:
8:18 PM


Fernandina Beach
'.. 89/76


Tampa _- _

..~M a
Miami



^^ <


Area Cities
Clearwater 91 77 t-storm
Crestview 88 70 t-storm
Daytona Beach 89 75 t-storm
Fort Lauderdale 93 81 pt sunny
Fort Myers 95 75 t-storm
Gainesville 89 74 t-storm
Hollywood 92 79 pt sunny
Jacksonville 90 78 t-storm
Key West 91 84 pt sunny
Lady Lake 89 74 t-storm
Lake City 88 74 t-storm
Madison 90 74 t-storm
Melbourne 90 76 t-storm
Miami 92 80 ptsunny
N Smyrna Beach 89 76 t-storm
National Cities
IL lJI = Illr:~'~


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


t-storm
t-storm
sunny
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
pt sunny
pt sunny


ucala 90
Orlando 92
Panama City 89
Pensacola 86
Plant City 93
Pompano Beach 92
Port Charlotte 94
Saint Augustine 87
Saint Petersburg 90
Sarasota 93
Tallahassee 87
Tampa 91
Titusville 91
Venice 93
W Palm Beach 92


Minneapolis 79 61
New York 81 68
Phoenix 105 81
San Francisco 73 55
Seattle 86 63
St. Louis 83 66
Washington, DC 87 70


74 t-storm
76 t-storm
77 t-storm
77 t-storm
74 t-storm
79 pt sunny
75 t-storm
75 t-storm
81 t-storm
77 t-storm
73 t-storm
77 t-storm
75 t-storm
77 t-storm
78 pt sunny


mst sunny
t-storm
sunny
pt sunny
mst sunny
sunny
t-storm


Moon Phases






First Full Last New
Jul 28 Aug 6 Aug 13 Aug 20
UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
7/31 8/1 8/2 8/3 8/4

Very High Extreme Extreme Extreme Extreme
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
�2009American Profile Hometown Content Service


A,

NEWS

LEADER


511 Ash Street
Ferandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax261-3698
Website for email addresses
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Office hours are 830 a.m. to5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina
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32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
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NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES
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NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
CNI ommunit
Newspapers,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


Start calculating now for retirement


JASON ALDERMAN
For the News Leader


50 YEARS AGO

State Rep. TH. "Tommy"
Askins said 1959 was "the
greatest fruit-bearing ses-
sion in the annals of
Florida's legislative history."
July 30, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

Local members of United
Paperworkers International


WEEKLY UPDATE


Health talk
rescheduled
A "Federal Healthcare
Reform Conversation" host-
ed by State Rep. Janet
Adkins, the Health Planning
Council of Northeast Florida,
Inc. and Florida CHAIN, in
cooperation with Florida
Community College at Jack-
sonville, has been resched-
uled to Aug. 27 from 6-8 p.m.
at the Betty P. Cook Nassau
Center in the "Red" Bean
Technical Career Center,
Room T126, 76346 William
Burgess Blvd., Yulee. The
public is invited to attend the
healthcare conversation.
For information, contact
Amanda Young at 491-3664.
Booksigning
Ben Walker will hold a
book signing for his new
novel, Winds of the South, at
Books Plus, 107 Centre St.,
Fernandina Beach, on Aug. 1
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Sundaes on
Sunday
Fifi's Fine Resale of
Amelia Island is holding a
canned food drive for the
Barnabas food pantry each
Sunday in August. Bring in a
canned good and receive an
ice cream sundae treat for
free. Fifi's, 1853 S. Eighth St.,
will be open noon-4 p.m. each
Sunday in August. Call 277-
4430. Visit www.myspace.
com/fifis_amelia and www.
twitter.com/ResaleRocks.

Visually
impaired meet
The Nassau Council of
Visually Impaired and Blind
will meet Aug. 3 from 1-3
p.m. at the Council on Aging
Senior Center, 1367 South


When the stock market and housing
prices were soaring not so long ago,
many baby boomers figured they could
retire early and live comfortably on their
profits. Today that situation has
reversed: Many folks are now postpon-
ing their retirement or even being forced
to reenter the workforce, either to sup-
plement diminished savings or because
they underestimated how expensive
retirement would be.
In fact, according to the Department
of Labor, the number of people over 55
still working has increased by more than
800,000 since the recession began,
despite rising overall unemployment.
If you are wondering about the right
time to retire, here are a few considera-
tions:
* How much will you need? Financial
planners often suggest people may need
70 to 90 percent of pre-retirement
income to maintain their current
lifestyle, but individual circumstances
make it hard to generalize. For example,
some folks downsize their housing or
retire to less expensive areas and there-
fore may need less. Others can anticipate
high medical bills or other heightened
expenses.
Crunch the numbers. Start estimating
your retirement needs by using online
interactive calculators, including:


18th St.
Guest speaker Michael
Koulouvaris, low vision prod-
uct specialist, will present
and demonstrate desktop
magnifiers and digital book
player recorders and other
low vision equipment. A rep-
resentative from Pipeline
Surf Shop will demonstrate
and sell Fitover Sunglasses.
For information, call
Frances Bartelt at 261-0701,
ext. 102. Need a ride? Call
Cheryl at 277-8070.
Quit smoking
Quit Smoking Now!,
brought to you by the
Nassau County Health
Department and AHEC, is a
six-week class designed to
help you beat the addiction to
tobacco. Classes begin Aug.
3 from noon-l:30 p.m. in the
conference room at Baptist
Medical Center Nassau, 1250
South 18th St. For more
information or to register call
Jennifer Emmons, 548-1867,
or e-mail jennifer_emmons@
doh.state.fl.us.
YappyHour
The next Yappy Hour, a
pet-friendly happy hour, will
be held Aug. 5 from 6-8 p.m.
at the Falcon's Nest at
Amelia Island Plantation.
Donations are accepted for
RAIN at all Yappy Hours.
Individuals also can purchase
tickets for the RAIN Train for
$10 each. Each ticket pays
for the transportation of one
"at risk" animal in our area to
a larger shelter in Florida
where it has a much better
chance of being adopted
quickly. More than 100 ani-
mals have been transported
to date and all have been
adopted out within one week.
For more information about
Yappy Hour, call Bark
Avenue at 261-2275.


Playground board expanding
The First Coast Freedom Avenue Recreation Center, and
project is expanding its board designs have been produced
and accepting applicants with by a landscape architect with
an interest in having a univer- experience designing accessi-
sally accessible playground in ble playgrounds. Supporters
the city of Fernandina Beach. are in the fundraising stages of
It is the organization's this project.
dream to have a place to play Anyone is encouraged to
in Northeast Florida for people apply - the only qualification is
of all abilities and ages. The that you must share the dream
park design takes local histo- to have a place to play for peo-
ry, art and nature into consid- ple of all abilities. Contact
eration. The project has been Aaron Morgan at 335-7253 or
granted use of land by the city aaronmorgan4@ gmail.com.
of Fernandina next to Atlantic


Medicare help
The Medicare supplemen-
tal policy reform bill that
comes into effect Oct. 1 has a
huge impact on the disabled
who have Medicare Part A and
B. Before they could not get a
supplemental policy if there
were under age 65.
A supplemental policy pays
for all the co-pays and
deductibles that Medicare
does not cover.
Guaranteed Issued Policy
means that the individual has
six months from the time they
get their Medicare A and B to
join a Supplemental Policy and
they will not be charged high-
er policy rates or denied a pol-


L


icy due to their past health or
current health problems.
House Bill 675-Medicare
Supplement reform is effec-
tive Oct. 1.
The bill revises Florida
Statute 627.6741 to require an
open enrollment period for
individuals that become eligi-
ble for Medicare Part A and B
due to disability, including end
stage renal disease (ESRD).
If you need assistance
understanding and selecting
a Supplemental/Medicap
Policy contact your local
University of Florida
Extension Agent Meg
McAlpine at 548-1116.


* Social Security's
A Retirement Estimator
now automatically
enters your own earn-
ings information from
its records to esti-
mate your projected
Social Security bene-
fits under different scenarios, such as
age at retirement, future earnings projec-
tions, etc. (www.ssa.gov/estimator).
They also have a more detailed calcula-
tor you can download to make more pre-
cise estimates.
* Check whether your 401(k) plan
administrator's website has a calculator
to estimate how much you will accumu-
late under various contribution and
investment scenarios. If not, use the
401(k) calculator at www.bankrate.com
under the "Retirement" tab. They also
provide calculators to estimate the
impact of retirement plan contributions
on your current take-home pay, mini-
mum IRA distributions, and much more.
* AARP offers a calculator designed
to help determine your current financial
status and what you'll need to save to
meet your retirement needs (see
www.aarp.org/money/financial_planning
under "To, .! )..
* Another good resource for retire-
ment planning information is Visa Inc.'s
free personal financial management site,
Practical Money Skills for Life, which
features several games and calculators to


OBITUARIES


William W "Bill" Miller


Mr. William W. "Bill" Miller,
age 52, of Callahan, passed
away after a courageous battle
on Wednesday morning, July
29, 2009 at the McGraw Center
for Caring in Jacksonville.
Born in Jacksonville, he had
been a lifelong resident of
Jacksonville before moving to
Callahan in 1990. A graduate of
Florida Junior College of
Jacksonville, Mr. Miller fol-
lowed in his father's footsteps as
a career Police Officer for the
City of Jacksonville. He started
working with the Department
of Corrections, eventually
becoming a Patrol Officer in
the Springfield/Downtown
District and eventually work-
ing as an Evidence Technician
before retiring from the
Personnel Department. He was
a member of the Fraternal
Order of Police, Jacksonville
Consolidated Lodge 5-30 and
the First Baptist Church of
Callahan.
He leaves behind, his wife of
12 years, Michele Higgin-both-
am Miller, Callahan, FL, two


sons, William Wade Miller, II,
Callahan, FL, Christopher
Wade Miller, Jacksonville, FL,
his father, Ripley J. Miller,
Jacksonville, FL, his mother,
Joann Ridenour, Jacksonville, a
brother, Ralph Ridenour
(Christina), Jacksonville, FL, a
sister, Linda Acosta (Rick),
Carmel, IN, and several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday, from the
Burgess Chapel with Reverend
Bobby Richardson, and
Chaplain Clarence Jarrell, offi-
ciating.
Mr. Miller will be laid to rest
in Bosque Bello Cemetery with
Police Honors.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit from 5:00-7:00 pm
tonight at the funeral home.
If so desired memorial con-
tributions may be made in his
memory to Community
Hospice, 4715 Worrall Way,
Jacksonville, FL 32224.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


Gerald Derrell Shedd, Sr.,
60, passed away suddenly on
Thursday July 30, 2009.
He was born February 14,
1949 in Duluth, GA and has
lived in Jacksonville most of his
life.
He was preceded in death
by his parents. Survivors
include 3 sons, Derrell Shedd,
Jr., Glenn Casey &Tony Shedd;
2 daughters, Andrea Gonyeau
& Angie Townsend; 2 brothers;
3 sisters; 14 grandchildren.



Anthony Duane Simmc
Mr. Anthony Duane
Simmons, age 41, beloved son,
brother, friend, Christian and
servant in our community of
Fernandina Beach, passed
away on Monday, July 27,2009
at the Mayo Clinic in
Jacksonville, after a long and
courageous battle.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Fernandina Beach, he
was a graduate
of Fernandina
Beach High
School where
he was a mem-
ber of the Brass
Section of the
Pirates Marc-
hing Band. He had worked for
approximately 10 years at Winn
Dixie on 8th Street in Fernan-
dina and at the Yulee Store near
Murray's Grille. He will be most
remembered for his Krispy
Kreme Donut sales to many
local businesses over the past
15 years.
An avid Football fan, he was
a passionate follower of the
Jacksonville Jaguars and the
Florida State Seminoles. Mr.
Simmons had followed his
father's ministry for many years
in Instrumental, Audio/Visual
and Media department.
He is preceded in death by
his mother, Mary Ann
Simmons,
He leaves behind, his father
and mom, Eddie and Char-


Oxly,9�ar1 W9ianera1 �iictor

Serving All of Nassau County for almost Eighty Years
Visit Our Life Stories At www.OxleyHeard.com


Funeral services will be held
on Saturday August 1, 2009 at 1
pm in the chapel of Cedar Bay
Funeral Home, 405 New Berlin
Road, with Pastor Perry
Fruscella officiating. Interment
will follow in New Berlin
Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends beginning at 11 am until
the hour of service at the funer-
al home, 714-1110.
Cedar Bay FuneralHome
J ,,,. . ... . ,//.



ons
maine Simmons, Yulee, FL, four
brothers, Eddie Lamar, Yulee,
FL, Kevin James Simmons,
Miami, FL, Travis Latrelle
Simmons, Greenville, SC, Larry
Michael Wilson, Tallahassee,
FL, four sisters, Shawn Shuman
(Arthur), Yulee, FL, Tracy
Webb, Yulee, FL, Sharon
Simmons, Yulee, FL, Christina
Furlow, Jacksonville, FL and
numerous nieces, nephews and
great-nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be at
11:00 am on Saturday, August 8,
2009 at the First Assembly of
God, 302 South 14th Street,
Fernandina Beach with Pastor
Charles Buck of Kingsland,
Georgia, officiating.
The cortege will assemble
and depart from 86220
Pinewood Drive, Yulee, Florida.
Mr. Simmons will be laid to
rest beside his mother in O'Neil
Cemetery.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit from 5:00 - 7:00 pm
tonight, Friday, August 7, 2009
at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, the family
asks for donations in his mem-
ory to VyStar Credit Union, PO.
Box 45085, Jacksonville, FL
32232-5085; to account number
SU-0702782840, payable to
Charmaine Simmons, c/o
Anthony Simmons.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


sarnabas
;CENTER, INC
A private, non-profit agency that assists
Nassau County families who need food,
shelter and basic necessities
For information, call: 904.261.7000


LOOKING BACK


CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


estimate retirement needs (www.practi-
calmoneyskills.com/retirement).
* Consult a professional. After you've
explored various retirement scenarios, it
might make sense to invest in a few ses-
sions with a financial planner to help you
work out a specific investment and sav-
ings game plan. Ask around for referrals,
or visit www.plannersearch.org to begin
your search.
* Drawing Social Security while
working. If you begin drawing reduced
benefits between age 62 and your full
retirement age (65 for those born before
1938 and gradually increasing thereafter)
while still working, your benefit could be
significantly reduced, depending on your
total income. However, those reductions
aren't truly lost since your benefit will be
recalculated at full retirement age. Read
"How Work Affects Your Benefits" at
www.ssa.gov for more details.
Also remember that Social Security
benefits may be taxable on federal
income taxes, depending on your income
level. Publication 915 at www.irs.gov has
full details.
Don't wait until the last minute to plan
your retirement date: Start crunching
the numbers now so you'll have plenty of
options if the economy should change
course again.
Jason Alderman directs Visa's finan-
cial education programs. Sign up for his
free monthly e-Newsletter at www.practi-
calmoneyskills.com/newsletter


+


Gerald Derrell Shedd Sr.


ICyiLiCon.aIn




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


FIRE Continued from 1A
actions at a house fire on Amelia
Island last month endangered
the lives of firefighters inside
the structure.
"While these firefighting
crews were inside, Chief
Cooper, as incident commander,
made the tactical decision to
move two fire trucks. In order to
move an apparatus, the pump
must be completely shut off,"
Waggoner wrote. "This action
directly resulted in removing
the only water source from the
crews inside the burning build-
ing. These firefighters were
without water for an extended
amount of time. The potential
for five firefighters to die at this
point was astronomically high."
Cooper denied that his deci-
sion endangered the firefight-
ers.
"Firefighting is a very dan-
gerous occupation, and I think
we all know that," he said
Wednesday. "I don't think that
one single command I gave
would have put anyone's life into
any more danger than it was
already in. In fact, the com-
mands I gave were to alleviate
danger."
Waggoner also alleged that
Cooper violated the union's col-
lective bargaining agreement
by not providing meals and fluid
replacement during the blaze.
"The crews were on this
scene for approximately six
hours," he wrote. "If not for the
gracious actions of the commu-
nity, rehab would not have been
provided. The lack of rehabili-
tation on scene may directly
result in heat stress."
Waggoner claimed that as a
result of the failure to provide
fluid replacement, two fire-
fighters were treated at the
scene for heat-related illness
and one was sent to the emer-
gency room for heat-related ill-
ness and smoke inhalation.
"Water was there with what
was on the fire engines," Cooper
responded. "At that point, there
was a local merchant that pro-
vided water at the scene - an
abundance of water. That asset
was being taken care of by a
good-hearted local merchant.
There were no complaints on
the fire ground. There was more
than adequate drinking water
available."
He also took issue with
Waggoner's estimate of the time
crews were on the scene.
"I believe the call came out at
6 p.m., and most of the units
were back in the station by 11.
That still doesn't add up to six
hours."
Waggoner also accused
Cooper of sending text mes-
sages to duty captains while
driving to emergency scenes,
which he called a "serious safe-
ty issue." Cooper admitted that
he had sent such messages in
the past, but had discontinued
the practice and ordered the
rest of the department to do the
same.
In fact, in a June 16 memo-
randum Cooper expressly for-
bade the use of cell phones for
either talking or texting while
operating firefighting apparatus
or vehicles.
"I think it's an agenda-driven
letter," he said. "We had already
taken a proactive stance on
that."
Cooper wouldn't comment
on Waggoner's accusations of
verbal abuse, one of which dates
back to November 2007. In that
instance, Waggoner wrote,
Cooper ordered a firefighting
crew to enter a burning building
after a roof collapse had already
injured one firefighter.
"The lieutenant of that crew
was belittled by the chief for
voicing his concerns about a
secondary collapse and the
endangerment of his crew," he
wrote.
Waggoner claimed that
Cooper consistently used abu-
sive language toward subordi-
nates, including "the screaming
of obscenities."
Sealover said he was con-




Pedestrian

killed in

Jacksonville
A 60-year-old Fernandina
Beach man was struck and
killed early Thursday morning
while walking along Main


Street in Jacksonville, the
Florida Highway Patrol said.
Gerald Derrell Shedd, Sr.,
was pronounced dead at 2:16
a.m. after being struck by a
southbound vehicle on Main
Street, which is US 17.
Shedd's address was listed
as Fernandina Beach, though
he had lived in Jacksonville
most of his life.
Obituary. 2A


i arnabas 1
%" CNTER.INC I
The food pantry needs donations of
non-perishable food items all year round.
For more information, call: 904.261.7000


ducting an investigation into the
matter. "I started it (Tuesday) in
the meeting I had with (union
representatives) to go over
some of the issues they had
raised," he said Wednesday.
"One of the issues they had
raised was the most recent fire
on the island. I will get both the
video and audio tapes of the
incident."
Sealover said he felt the
union should have been more
proactive about their concerns
prior to contacting him.
"I asked them if there was a
safety committee meeting after
(the fire last month), and they
said there was not. I asked
them, frankly, why not?" he
said. He posed the same ques-
tion "when they were bringing
up the event in 2007: 'Why was
this not brought forward then?'"


FEES Continued from 1A
process is working the way it's
supposed to work," he said.
"... This is a very fast turn-
around compared to what
we've seen. There's never an
excuse for not spending
impact fees that were collect-
ed legally. I'm pleased with the
cooperation level we've had
from the county."



TENNIS Continued from 1A
recreation contracts, for karate
and computer lessons, will not
be put out to bid because they
generate less than that,
Mercer said.
All other city recreation
activities, such as swimming
lessons, are taught by city
employees, according to Parks
and Recreation Director Nan


Cooper said he looked for-
ward to addressing the union's
concerns. "I can only hope (the
union's) agenda is that we look
forward to increasing every
opportunity we have to bring
more safety to the firefighters,"
he said. "I'm the chief - no
matter what, I'm responsible. I
have a great understanding of
that.
"... There are decisions
made on the fire ground that
are made in seconds - others
can armchair quarterback it and
say how they would have done
it for a lifetime," he added. "But
at no time in my life have I ever
put firefighters' lives at risk, and
I think my record shows that
they have the best of everything
to protect their lives so they can
go home to their families."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Commissioner Stacy
Johnson agreed. "I'm just
thrilled we're finally spending
them," she said. "They've been
sitting in the bank for years,
and it's time we spent them.
Jonathan stepped it up, and he
really made it happen. ... I'm
glad that people are going to
start seeing progress in the
county."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Voit.
Tom R. Gibson and Berke
Tennis, both of Fernandina
Beach, have submitted bids
for the tennis job.
Those bids were to be eval-
uated Tuesday, after which the
results will go before the city
commission for final approval.
According to the city's written
request for proposals, the new
contract is to start Sept. 1.






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ALIENS IN THE ATTIC PG
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FUNNY PEOPLE R
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7/31/1919
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We love you and
wish you many
more years...
Your Children,
Grands & Extended
Family



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11:30 am - Midnight
O' 'S Fri & Sat: 11:30- 2 am
Sun: Noon - Midnight
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SHistorical Downtown
Fernandina Beach
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MARINA
Continued from 1A
Vinings Marine Group pro-
poses a base rent to the city of
$280,000 the first year, which is
to increase to $487,000 by the
fifth year. That amount
includes fuel sales and gross
revenue, plus 10 percent for
capital improvements for
dredging, painting and other
improvements that would go to
the company.
Vinings' plan to increase
revenues also involves attract-
ing more fishermen during the
slow months and new market-
ing ploys for the charter fleet.
The company also says it will
offer annual contracts for
boaters, so there will be more
of a balance between local and
transient boaters.
Vinings did not give an esti-
mate of total yearly revenues
the proposed plan would bring
in.
Community involvement is
another aspect of Vinings' plan,
and would include annual
"marina day celebrations,"
boating safety classes and a
benefit regatta.
Vinings Marina Group was
organized in 2007 and man-
ages 7,000 East Coast slips and
15 marinas in Alabama,
Virginia, New York, Kansas,
Georgia, Maryland, Iowa,
North Carolina and Michigan.
Operations management staff


would include a general man-
ager, an operations manager, a
maintenance manager, a chief
mechanic and administrative
assistant, plus store clerks and
dockhands.
Westrec was founded in
1987 and operates over $300
million in salt- and freshwater
marina facilities in California,
Arizona, Nevada, Georgia and
Illinois.
Seven ofWestrec's marinas
are located in Florida. They
also operate ancillary facilities
such as restaurants, bars, ban-
quet facilities, hotels, ship's
stores, waterfront office space,
fuel docks, launch ramps and
boat rentals.
In its proposal, Westrec
also outlines staffing for the
marina, which would include a
marina manager, a dockmas-
ter, an office manager, an
accountant, plus several
retail/fuel dock clerks/dock-
hands and a few security
guards.
City commissioners agreed
in January to seek qualifica-
tions from private firms to
operate the city's downtown
marina.
According to City Clerk
Mary Mercer, the RFQ com-
mittee will be interviewing the
two bidders today, and will
bring their recommendation
to the city commission at the
end of August.
adaughtry@fbnewsleadercom


Mayport


ferry gets


$3 million

Community Newspapers

A total of $3 million in fed-
eral stimulus funding will go
to upgrade the Mayport
Ferry.
"All the money will go to
the modernization of our
ramps," said Nancy Rubin,
communications director
for the Jacksonville Port
Authority. "Our ramp system
had worked fine for many
years, but it was starting
to cost quite a bit to upkeep
it."
The $3 million worth of
stimulus funding is part
of $60 million awarded
to the Federal Highway
Administration for its
Ferry Boat Discretionary
Program.
"The boats are in good
shape and ready to serve the
people who depend on
them," Rubin said.
The ferry connects the
St. Johns River town of
Mayport with St. George's
Island on A1A south to the
beaches in Duval County.


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Possible projects
The following projects are under consideration for impact
fee funding:
* 14th Street at Lime Street: Right-turn lanes.
* 14th Street at Simmons Road: Left-turn lanes.
* US 301 at Ford Road: Right-turn lanes.
* Lem Turner Road at Spring Lake Drive: Left- and right-
turn lanes.
* Chester Road: Widening, northbound left-turn lane onto
Pages Dairy Road, eastbound right-turn lane off Pages
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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


Alter Nassauville'


SIAN PERRY
News Leader

Two ambitious projects aim
to put an end to pet overpopu-
lation in Nassau County once
and for all - and it couldn't be
easier, or cheaper, for residents
to participate.
"Alter Nassauville" - a pro-
gram to spay or neuter every
cat in Nassauville by the end
of 2009 - was launched last
month by Cats Angels and First
Coast No More Homeless Pets,
which this spring opened a
state-of-the-art clinic and shelter
on Jacksonville's north side.
The Nassau Humane
Society also has teamed up with
the Jacksonville non-profit to
offer low-cost spaying and neu-
tering to pet owners.
The agencies note that shel-
ters and rescue organizations
cannot simply adopt their way
out of pet overpopulation, which
is why more than three million
cats and dogs are euthanized
each year nationwide (visit
www.hsus.org and click on the
Pets link to read about "Issues
Affecting our I'.. .
The cost of not altering your
pet is enormous, said Wills
Shores, a Cats Angels volun-
teer, especially when you con-
sider that one unsprayed female
cat and her offspring can repro-
duce 420,000 cats in seven
years and one unsprayed
female dog and her offspring,
67,000 puppies in six years.
As Nassau County has wit-
nessed, the majority of these


Lemonade stand
Local teens will host a
lemonade stand outside of
PETCO in Yulee on
Saturday to benefit "Alter
Nassauville," a program by
Cats Angels Inc., SPCA to
spay and neuter every cat
in Nassauville at no or low
cost. For information, con-
tact Cats Angels at 321-
2267.

animals end up at the local shel-
ter, with never enough funds,
space or adoptable homes to
accommodate them. According
to First Coast No More
Homeless Pets, of the 71
unwanted cats and dogs that
enter local shelters each day,
53 are euthanized.
Cats Angels was formed in
2001 to help deal with the prob-
lem, launching an aggressive
trap and release program to
spay or neuter feral cats and
return them to their caregivers.
To date, it has treated 8,300
felines and found homes for
another 4,345.
In the course of their work,
the non-profit's volunteers
noticed many of the cats they
rescue from the county shelter
as well as from the street are
from Nassauville, so they decid-
ed to target that area, said vol-
unteer Becky Delp.
"I know there are many
other streets that are overrun
with unwanted cats - Nassau-
ville just seemed like a good


-spay, neuter cats


You can help


PHOTO COURTESY OF CATS ANGELS
These kittens were rescued as part of Cats Angels "Alter
Nassauville" campaign, which seeks to stop cat overpop-
ulation through a targeted free and reduced-cost
spay/neuter program.


place to start," added Delp.
"We will set the traps and
pick up the cats," she said. All
the resident has to do is call,
though Delp said "it would be
nice if the people would like to
drive them to No More Home-
less Pets to be spayed and
neutered, or to the Cats Angels
Thrift Store and Adoption
Center (at 709 S. Eighth St.).
Any assistance is appreciated."
Cats Angels will cover the
full cost if the pet owner is finan-
cially unable, said Delp, though
contributions are always wel-
come - "even $5 or $10 a


month."
At the Nassau Humane
Society, 671 Airport Road in
Fernandina Beach, residents
can take advantage of low-cost
spaying and neutering, thanks
again to a program with No
More Homeless Pets, whose
mission is to eliminate the
killing of dogs and cats through
its free and low-cost programs.
Dog spays are $50 and
neuters are $40, regardless of
size, and cat spay or neuters
are $30. The cost also includes
rabies vaccinations, said Janet
Kourie, president of the Nassau


Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA and First Coast No More
Homeless Pets need the support of the community to reach
their goal of altering every cat in Nassauville by taking simple
steps such as:
* Tell your friends and neighbors about the project;
* Contact Cats Angels at 321-2267 if you see a cat run-
ning loose on your street;
* Don't ignore cats that are running free - it is not their
fault they were dumped or abandoned;
* Contribute to the cost of a spay or neuter for the pet of a
neighbor who needs financial assistance;
* Hold a fundraiser, such as a neighborhood garage sale
(or, for children, a lemonade stand) to raise money to spay or
neuter a Nassauville cat. Also place your spare change in
one of the Cats Angels donation jars at stores and restau-
rants throughout the county.
Contact Cats Angels at 321-2267 or First Coast No More
Homeless pets at (904) 425-0005. Visit www.catsangels.com
to share the progress of the "Alter Nassauville" program.
Learn more about First Coast No More Homeless Pets at
www.fcnmhp.org or call 866-580-SPAY (7729).

The RAIN Train
Helping the homeless animals already in our midst,
Rescuing Animals in Nassau has launched the RAIN Train to
transport pets from shelters in Nassau County to shelters in
higher-population centers where they stand a better chance
of adoption.
RAIN has reached out to other Humane Societies and
SPCAs from Connecticut to Miami to move 71 animals in
May and 68 in June.
Tickets are $10 each or $200 to sponsor an entire "train."
The donations help cover the van rental, gas and food.
Drivers are always needed, as well as help to prepare the
pets for the trip.
For more information on how to help, call (904) 879-5861
or e-mail rainhumane@yahoo.com.

Humane Society. your pet. Visit nassauhumane-
Call the shelter at 321-1647 society.com.
for information and to sign up .I.. .*!.'.,,,. ..' ..'....


No federal COPS grants for local lai


JASON YURGARTIS
News Leader


Three Northeast Florida law
enforcement agencies were
awarded grant money Tuesday
to put more officers on the
street from the U.S. Justice
Department's Community
Oriented Police Services. But
0 M


despite applying, both the
Nassau County Sheriff's Office
and the Fernandina Beach
Police Department have yet to
be awarded funding through
the COPS program.
The Jacksonville Sheriff's
Office was awarded $9.2 mil-
lion through COPS - enough
to hire 50 new officers. Palatka


received $170,694 and Green
Cove Springs got $160,271,
which will pay for one new offi-
cer per agency. Applications
were submitted for Clay and St.
Johns counties, but both juris-
dictions were denied.
Nassau County Sheriff
Tommy Seagraves said his
agency was denied, but did


receive $368,917 through anoth-
er Justice Department grant
that will be used to beef up polic-
ing on the West Side.
Fernandina Beach Police
Chief Jim Hurley said he was
hopeful his department would
be awarded funding for an addi-
tional officer in the next wave of
grant announcements, which


w agencies -
he anticipates in October. split of manp
"We're keeping our fingers Attorney inves
crossed," Hurley said. "We did lost more thai
get a notification that (not being Seagraves
included in this round of) award staff at the
announcements does not mean Sheriff's Offic
we've been denied." grant, like m
If it is awarded, the COPS ment agencies
grant could be the first accept- but did not get
ed by the city of Fernandina no reasons we
Beach since 1998, and one of denial, but rr
only four awarded to the sources will b
jurisdiction since the program's extra protect
inception in 1994, according the West Sid
to Department of Justice statis- grant.
tics. "We got g
Hurley said the funding four position
would pay for an officer that Department
would serve the entire county, will be utilized
splitting time evenly between - in Hilliard
the Fernandina Beach Police Seagraves said
Department and the State will be funded
Attorney's Office, with whom two-and-a-hal
the application was jointly sub- funding will b(
mitted, in an investigative role. The Na
The grant would pay for the first Comission app
three years of the newly-created of $368,917 ii
position. from the 200
"Our application is innova- Edward By
tive, creative and serves our Justice Assist
agency, the State Attorney's gram, which w
Office and the county," Hurley ate the four of
said. "And it allows for a 50/50 ,


yet
power to a State
tigative team that
n half their staff."
said the grant
Nassau County
ce applied for the
ost law enforce-
es in the state,
Funding. He said
ere given for the
nuch needed re-
e supplied where
ion is needed -
e - by another

rant funding for
Ins from the
of Justice which
on the West Side
and Callahan,"
d. "The positions
Sby the grant for
f years and the
Available Oct.1."
issau County
proved acceptance
n funds Monday
9 Recovery Act
rne Memorial
tance Grant pro-
rill be used to cre-
'ficer positions.
.i - ..


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INVITATION TO BID
The City of Fernandina Beach will receive sealed competitive Bids for requirements of
the following until no later than 10:00 am, August 14th, 2009.
ANNUAL BID - MAINTENANCE/STREETS DEPT
#09-17 CENTERLINE PAINTING, MARKERS & THERMOPLASTIC
#09-18 STREET ASPHALT PATCHING
#09-19 2500 & 3000 PSI CONCRETE
Bid Documents and Specifications are available to download from the City of
Fernandina Beach website, www.fbfl.us, Bids and Purchasing web page. Questions
regarding the bid package can be directed to Deni Murray, Purchasing Agent at
dmurray@fbfl.org or (904) 277-7311 x2035.
CITY OF FERNANDINA BEACH
204 ASH STREET
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034


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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


Self-esteem - do


you have enough?


Or too much?


have enough? Do you
have too much? Let's
look at a definition of
self-esteem. "A person's sense
of worth or value." That's sim-
ple enough, but it involves and
affects so many things about
how we function day to day,
it's worth a closer look.
The health of one's self-
esteem includes not only the
way they see themselves, but
also trust in themselves and
others, autonomy and inde-
pendence and the ability to be
nurturing to
self and oth-
ers. We
won't be
happy with-
out a healthy
level of
esteem for
ourselves,
which can
then be
MIND YOU then be
MIND Y transferred
to others we
Linda are in rela-
Gamble tionship
with. Along
those lines, it really is true:
you can't love someone else
until you love yourself. And
that love for yourself must be
healthy. It's easy to fall prey to
false sources of self-esteem;
addictive relationships, materi-
alism, overachievement; but
these things do not lead to the
qualities listed above that
make a person's self esteem
strong. In fact they inhibit the
development of a genuine pos-
itive regard for ourselves and
others.
Let's look at how self-
esteem develops. Traditional
psychological theory holds
that it develops from birth
through childhood in various
stages. Our earliest lessons as
a newborn have to do with
learning to trust or mistrust
our care giving environment,
and it continues through the
school ages where we learn
autonomy and initiative. In
other words, if our needs for
food and shelter, contact and
safety are met as an infant, we
go on to grow and explore the
world of childhood with
curiosity and courage, learn-
ing that we can do things.
This goes on until about age
11 or 12, assuming we have
not experienced any abuse or
other trauma that will derail
our development. But then an
odd thing happens.
When we enter adoles-
cence, our self-esteem crashes
and goes into hiding for many
teens. Because of other devel-
opmental events, we become
extremely vulnerable to
media, peers and the cultural
ideas of what is important.
This is a time when many bad
decisions are made out of
wanting to "fit in" and not be
seen as different. Most teens
experience a fragile sense of
self-esteem even when achiev-
ing well in school, sports,
work and peer relationships.


You can't love
someone else until
you love yourself.

When we survive that era of
development, we move into
young adulthood, which is typ-
ically a time of defining our-
selves and our futures. It is
now when we may notice most
acutely the health of our self-
esteem.
If we have not successfully
learned those lessons in infan-
cy and childhood, that the
world is a place we can be safe
and successful in, we will like-
ly enter into unhealthy rela-
tionships, fail at our education
or employment and struggle
to feel "happy" which can lead
to mood disorders, substance
abuse and worse. In contrast,
sometimes a false sense of
overly inflated self-esteem is
the result; creating self-cen-
tered individuals who have as
many, if not more difficulties.
So what can we do to pro-
mote healthy self-esteem? As
adults, we obviously can't go
back to infancy. But we can
revisit the lessons there. We
can put ourselves in situations
where we will learn trust,
where we can risk being inde-
pendent, and where we can
take more initiative. We can
explore areas of ourselves that
need nurturing whether it is
hobbies, spirituality or physi-
cal health. We can surround
ourselves with others who
have healthy selfe-steem and
learn from them. And we can
reach out to our dreams, goals
and aspirations, holding them
in a place of esteem as impor-
tant elements of our identities.
A therapist can help design
the path toward these steps.
For those of us who are
parents, we can try to stay
aware of the differing develop-
mental needs of our children
at different ages in order to
allow their self-esteem to
flourish. There is a lot of infor-
mation on the Internet and in
book stores to help with this
ongoing responsibility.
Parents can find gender and
age specific tips on how to
increase their children's self-
esteem and give them a leg up
on a successful young adult-
hood. Fortunately or unfortu-
nately, as parents we are pro-
foundly influential in our
child's self-esteem health.
Most importantly, we can
begin to take care of our-
selves. The first step is learn-
ing what behaviors we have
that are self-defeating, and
change them. Self-esteem will
develop from there as we
become more competent care-
takers of ourselves.
Linda Gamble, LMHC, is a
psychotherapist in private prac-
tice in Fernandina Beach. For
more information visit www.fl
oridacounselingmediation.com,
or call (904) 206-1761.


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FDOT asserts eminent domain power


RYAN SMITH
News Leader

The Florida Department of
Transportation is using its emi-
nent domain powers to take
possession of small sections of
private property in order to
install new traffic signals on
Eighth Street. The $1.8 million
project is scheduled for 2009-
10.
The Flash Foods store at
1982 S. Eighth St., along with
Mutt's Motors, 1815 S. Eighth
St., have both been notified
that FDOT will take small por-
tions of their properties for the
project.
"These are very small
parcels for signalization proj-
ects. We call them corner


clips," said Ralph Maxon, attor-
ney for FDOT's Eminent
Domain Department. "It's a
whole lot different than taking
large acreage for a pond.
Generally, plans are made and
(engineers) determine
whether a project can be built
with existing right of way or if
they need additional right of
way."
In this case, however,
FDOT's claim is going to court.
The owners of both properties
have been ordered to appear at
the Nassau County
Courthouse on Nov. 6.
Maxon said eminent
domain cases go to court for a
variety of reasons, although
the specifics of each case are
confidential until after the case


is settled.
"There's a group here at
DOT in the Right-of-Way
Department that goes out to
negotiate with the property
owners to buy the property, or
else they take a permanent
easement," Maxon said. "They
make an offer and they nego-
tiate with the owner or owners
of the property in order to
acquire it. Sometimes they're
unable to consummate a deal
for several reasons. A decision
is made if it can't be negotiated
for whatever reason, to put the
acquisition project into suit.
"Under the eminent domain
statutes, we seek a 'quick take'
for the property," Maxon
added. "That means once we
establish a need for the prop-


erty and make a good-faith esti-
mate of the value, the judge
can grant us immediate pos-
session of the property upon
payment of that good faith
amount into the court registry.
"That doesn't mean that
that's all the owner gets. ..
From that point on there would
be further negotiations with
the owner and his attorney,
and they certainly have the
right to get their own apprais-
al of the property.... That gen-
erally results in a coming
together on a price that's rea-
sonable to both parties. If that
doesn't happen - and that's a
very small minority of cases -
there could be a trial on the
issue."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


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BLACK


TWO SUPER



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A.mw




CYAN MAGENTA


OPINION


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


JEFF PARKER/FLORIDA TODAY


S inda 4 cCoy
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VIEWPOINT/SHELLY ANDERSON/AMELIA ISLAND


Health insurance reform:


Don't reinvent the wheel


Health insurance con-
tinues to be a burn-
ing issue at every
level. Having been in
the insurance business all my
professional career and now
focused on "senior planning,"
I am stunned by the over-
whelming need for reform
and the ramifications of the
simplest of changes. No easy
answers.
My business helps clients
protect their families, them-
selves and their assets. We
strive to find cost-effective
ways of pro- p
viding for -
long-term
care, a guar-
anteed life
income and
health care
coverage. A
portion of my Anderson
time is spent
trying to find
health care solutions for my
clients. The challenges grow
as insurance coverage is
declined for pre-existing con-
ditions. As an independent
broker, my first concern is for
my client. The best care for
the least amount of expense
with the best provider.
Most people in their mid-
dle years have some health
history that may result in cov-
erage exclusions or being
totally declined by reputable
insurance companies. The
insurance companies simply
cannot and will not cover an
individual when they may
have to pay out hundreds of
thousands of dollars in
claims. This has to change.


Home and auto insurance are not
nationalized and it works. It is not necessary
to socialize medicine. To do so in our country
would create nightmares.


Pre-existing conditions such
as cancer, heart disease and
diabetes need to be covered.
To do this insurance com-
panies must be able to spread
the risk over a broader popu-
lation base to provide a bigger
pool of insured people. This is
Insurance 101. Like home
insurance and car insurance,
health insurance should not
be a choice. In addition, we
need to implement compre-
hensive medical liability
reform.
Home and auto insurance
are not nationalized and it
works. It is not necessary to
socialize medicine. To do so
in our country would create
nightmares. People would
wait months for critical tests,
surgery and medical care. It
is not necessary to reinvent
the wheel. Major health
insurance companies have
said that they will insure peo-
ple with pre-existing condi-
tions if all people have cover-
age.
There are 46 million unin-
sured people in America. Ten
million are not U.S. citizens
and another 18 million could
afford health insurance but
choose to go uninsured. If
those people have a health
crisis or accident, who pays?
Our hospitals and doctors do.


And we do. Uninsured people
who don't pay drive up costs.
Yes, we do need to find a way
to cover these people who
have no options - inability to
pay and critical health needs.
This can be accomplished
through Medicaid and low-
income assistance.
What about the rest of the
uninsured population? As pro-
posed health reform is debat-
ed, the public has become
more and more wary of the
lack of option choices and
increases in taxes.
Despite the trillions of
dollars projected, there has
been little information about
actual premiums, prescription
formularies and policy
specifics.
Some states offer pro-
grams that attempt to address
some of the most critical of
health care needs. Recently,
Florida has initiated its
"Cover Florida" program,
which is an inexpensive
health care program provid-
ing guaranteed coverage. It is
limited both in expense and
coverage. It's a start.
We cannot walk away. It is
not an option. None of us wel-
comes a house fire or an auto-
mobile accident but if the
worst happens, we are cov-
ered by insurance.
I talk to clients every day.
My heart goes out to those
people who cannot qualify for
any health insurance. Things
have to change. We do not
need another national experi-
ment. We need reforms to our
existing system.
Sheldon "Shelly"Anderson,
CLU, ChFC, operates The
Anderson Group, an independ-
ent insurance agent offering
life, long-term care and health
insurance based on Amelia
Island.


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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR., PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL, EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE, PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIMPE, CIRCULATIONDIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


C I T Community
S C N I| Newspapers,
SIncorporated
The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
Sthe newspaper, its owners or employees.


EDITORIAL


Bear down
The Florida Wildlife Service has chosen,
wisely we think, to give wide berth to a black
bear roaming Amelia Island. We recommend
you do the same.
The bear has caused some damage to
fences but has not become a major nuisance
insofar as we know. He apparently feeds most-
ly at Fort Clinch State Park on fish, crabs and
palm hearts, not backyard trashcans. Here is
advice offered by the wildlife experts:
* If you see a bear, remain calm. Don't run
away. Walk calmly toward a building or vehi-
cle and get inside. If you have children or pets,
bring them inside.
* Encourage the bear to leave. Bang pots
and pans or blow an air horn or whistle.
* If a bear is in a tree, leave it alone.
Remove people and dogs from the area. It
usually will come down and leave after dark.
* Keep barbecue grills clean. Birdfeeders
and grills should be stored in a secure place.
Garbage should be placed outside on morning
of pickup. Don't leave pet dishes outside. Pick
ripe fruit or vegetables.
Soon enough, our friend will move on. Until
he does, live and let live.


t VIEWPOINT/JOE GERRITY/FERNANDINA BEACH


i ways ror
The News-Leader quoted our city man-
ager as saying, "We can't keep doing
business the way we've been doing
it." Well Mr. Czymbor, it has finally
happened. For the first time in over three years
I finally agree with you. The only problem is
we have been doing business your way for the
last three budget years.
The budgets you presented the city com-
mission have passed largely unchanged by
votes of 4-1, 3-2 and 5-0. Despite signs of an
economic slowdown, your budgets were full of
new job positions and salary increases for
existing employees and noticeably lacking any
improvements to our infrastructure. As a mat-
ter of fact, your first budget was so lacking in
street re-surfacing funds that three citizens
publicly shamed the commission into adding
another $200,000 to that line item.
As I said three years ago the signs of a slow-
ing economy were out there, even in our com-
munity. Real estate sales and new construction
had slowed considerably. We had two condo
projects that had stopped construction halfway
from completion. Other approved projects
never got started. Three years ago house val-
ues were already beginning to decline, and
people in the construction trade were begin-
ning to tighten their belts.
But not our city! We were like kids in candy
store, spending every cent we could get our
hands on, and more. Most city permit fees
were tripled and now you want to charge for
parking at Main Beach and in the downtown.
Someone told me the city manager invited
the citizens to participate in the budget process
this year. Taking up the invitation, I have the
following i.i- n i., .ri., for helping cope with the
projected shortfalls.
* 1. Form a budget waste committee of
employees to recommend areas of excessive
spending. The members of this committee
should be from the rank and file employees,
not department heads. After all, when was the
last time a department head appeared before a
budget hearing and said his/her department
was overfunded and overstaffed and they could
do with less? It never happened during my six
years on the commission. And committee
members do not need to be picked by depart-
ment heads either. Committee members need
to be assured that there will be no repercus-
sions from any .i.. -.i ;, ii , they make.
* 2. During the 2007-8 budget hearings the
commission set aside $50,000 to begin the
process of doing outside efficiency audits on
each department, beginning with the police
department. To my knowledge, the city manag-
er never initiated that process. During my time
at McDonald's the corporation sent a consult-
ant into each restaurant for a two-day visit each
year to critique restaurant operations. As a
crew person I loved those visits, because I
knew my bosses were going to get their hands
slapped, at least a little bit. As a manager I did
not like the audits one bit, but they were a part
of the job. As a supervisor and later on as an


city to save money


r


owner I came to appreciate
those visits and the sugges-
tions on how to better
serve my customers, and at
the same time increase effi-
ciency in my restaurants.
And before people think
I am picking on the police
department there are
sound and logical reasons
Gerrity to start with that depart-
ment. First of all, the PD
has by far the largest budg-
et of any department. The guy with the biggest
piece of the pie gets the most attention.
Second, most elected officials know very little
about law enforcement, and that goes for city
managers also. Both elected officials and city
managers are reluctant to say no to the public
safety, and as a result police departments
become a bloated bureaucracy. I don't know if
this is the case in Fernandina Beach, but we
have a real live example in our own recent past.
For years we were told that we needed eight
new police cars each year. Finally in 2005 the
commission said no, and since then we have
averaged 3-4 new police vehicles each year. At
over $42,000 per vehicle that is quite a savings
each year, and the police department seems to
have no complaints or vehicle problems. With
an audit, commissioners have an objective
report in hand that can help guide them in
making these decisions.
* 3. Use the 2005-6 city budget as a starting
point. That is the last pre-Czymbor budget and
it served the citizens well, with a few excep-
tions.
* 4. Review each and every department's
staffing and programs. With the slowdown in
building, now might be the time to contract
with the county for building inspection servic-
es. Do we still need to run daycare services, or
is that a carryover from the days that there
were few private daycare centers in the city?
Should we still be running scuba trips to the
Keys? What programs have served their pur-
pose and are no longer needed? These are just
a few areas that should be addressed.
* 5. Reopen union contracts and eliminate
cost-of-living adjustments and raises. It is not
fair to deny administrative staff pay increases,
but to give union employees raises. We need to
be fair with everyone. No raise sure beats no
job.
* 6. No city-owned "take home" vehicles
should leave the island. This may be a little dif-
ficult with the police department, but other
departments can comply. If someone lives off
island and must drive back here to report for
an emergency a few extra minutes to pick up a
vehicle at the city public works yard won't
make a difference, but the savings of mileage
on city vehicles will be substantial, not to men-
tion fuel savings.
* 7. Don't privatize the marina. Eliminate
the director position of that fund and bump the
airport director position back down to part-


P07


r


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Goffinsville Park
I would just like to take a moment to thank
everyone involved in the beautiful renovations
made to Goffinsville Park in Nassauville ("County
park now a reality," July 24). My family and I were
able to visit and enjoy the park. What a great
place to spend the day without spending a lot of
money, especially with the state of our economy.
Please remember not to litter, place debris in
the cans, pick up after our pets, dispose of fish-
ing line properly and always supervise our chil-
dren, especially near the water.
KellyAnne Tucker
Fernandina Beach

What an asset
Goffinsville Park -what an asset for our com-
munity, city and county.
There were thrills galore at the opening cel-
ebration dedicating the park and facility I've
been familiar with all my life ("County park now
a reality," July 24).
The Goffin family always has been profitable
to our economic way of life. I don't want to be
redundant in my recollection of facts concerning
the history of Goffinsville. My mother, father
and grandmothers were the recipients of finan-
cial gains made possible by the exploits of Mr.
Saul Goffin. My experience was childhood in
nature due to the fact that Mr. Goffin did not have
time for childhood play. He was very serious at
all times. There were homes lined along
Goffinsville Road leading to and from the area.
Quite a few people are alive today because of Mr.
Goffin's economic mind.
My mother walked from the Christopher
Creek area with her babies in a little red wagon,
helped by me pushing the wagon, which helped
ease the burden of the load before and after
work. Dad gathered oysters during the early
days of the productions. The factory was always
an asset because it provided financial relief to
families due to inadequate means of transporta-
tion.
Today we can still be profited from the park
due to the ecology of the area. Food can be
obtained from the banks along the river through
the sport of fishing at a very low cost. Children
can enjoy the playgrounds along with the beau-
tifulvegetation that accompanies it. The ecology
of the park gives a person a place of solitude to
observe God's handiwork of nature. The park is


HOW TO WRITE US
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dear to me because my grandfather, Prince
Albert, established a small church called Prince
Chapel AM.E., inspired by Richard Allan and this
plot of land (fenced-in area) donated by the
Goffins.
I am grateful for Mr. Goffin and family for
being so thoughtful toward the future of people
of today. Let's continue to make this legacy prof-
itable by enjoying the park, which has been
given through the labors of forefathers. We must
thank the Nassau County Commissioners and
Parks and Recreation for such creativity of a job
well done. We thank the Goffins, Ms. Doris
Mellion and County Administration for such
great work done.
Charles L. Albert, Jr.
Fernandina Beach

Greed
I have never seen anything like the greed on
Amelia Island. When my husband and I moved
here two years ago, we rented a house and paid
only $50 for our first electric bill. Now we rent an
apartment and our last electric bill was $214.
This is the most we have ever paid for electrici-
ty and we are not alone.
We have friends on the island who are trying
to get their electric bills down by turning off
their air conditioners in the middle of summer
and drying their clothes on clotheslines. Property
taxes are sky high, grocery prices are outra-
geous and now we may even have to pay to park
at Main Beach. Where will the greed end?
Those who wish to run the working people off
the island may have a small problem when they
finally achieve their goal. Who will care for their
needs when all the service workers can no longer
afford to live here? With gas prices so high, few
will be able to commute. What will the island elite
do then?
Kim Lehman
Fernandina Beach

Circle of Friends
How thrilled we all are at the Council on
Aging for the heartwarming article Dickie
Anderson wrote on the behalf of our Circle of
Friends telephone reassurance project (uly 22).
Actually, our entire community can be thankful;
because as our elderly citizens feel safe we will
all sleep better!
Dickie Anderson is such an asset to your
newspaper and to the community we share. We
are all winners with her From the Porch article.
Jane Holzkamp
Council on Aging

Health insurance
I am writing concerning the letters (about
proposed health insurance reforms) in last
week's paper (uly 24).
As I understand it, you will keep your own
insurance and let the price keep going right on
up? I'm all for it. They are so scared that the lit-
tle person (the workingman) might get insurance
and then they would have to foot the bill. That
way everyone can get it and they can pay for it.
Think about the person that worked all his life
- and his family has no insurance and he has no


,.AYOU WO riNP lN M cPAZ WHAcKo IWAS uIFTVoUTo
oR CUMA1T c-ANeET1- '4.... 'c5sM e AlttS V PIP.
DAVID FITZSIMMONS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR


job. There are two ways to go about it. One is
leave it as is and go to the emergency room
instead of the doctor when a person is sick since
he has no insurance and no job and had cancer
a few years back so he needs to be checked, or
his wife and kids need to be checked if they
have cancer, a broken leg or whatever. So the
insurance that you want to keep will go up
because the hospital has to go up on rates or
either the taxpayer can foot the bill, but that is
what some of you want. So that's what you get.
You also have the construction people who
have been laid off since two years ago who are
maybe 30 years old or younger with six kids. We
can pay that one too. No one in the USA should
go without insurance or food. They paid for it all
the years they have worked. This is a fact. Or you
can have the health department of nurses and
doctors, who are the best any county or state
could have, take care of them instead of doing
their job, which is to keep us from getting dis-
eases or our child from dying, because they had
to treat a patient instead of doing their job keep-
ing down diseases.
Or we can give the people the right to buy
insurance at what they can afford. Wouldn't that
be the right way to do it? So the taxpayer would-
n't have to foot the bill or the insurance compa-
nies would have to make up the difference. Isn't
this the American way?
Is it your way? Either way, you are going to
pay for it. Or you can let him buy it? For the
first time you have a choice and I hope the peo-
ple will stop and think about that.
Oh, by the way, when you went to the emer-
gency room, it was full of sick people with colds,
etc. You took your kid because he was really ill
or had a broken bone and then wait your turn.
Remember, you want it that way. You remember
the flu! You didn't want the little man to buy


insurance for his family so he could have gone
to the doctor instead. So pay the bill and not
gripe, or let the man or single mom have the right
to buy the insurance that they can afford. It's an
easy choice.
Remember, "If a free society cannot help the
many who are poor, it cannot save the few who
are rich." (John E Kennedy inaugural address,
Jan.20, 1961)
Linda C. Hicks Spencer
Hilliard

'Legal Crook'
First, let me point out that the only reason you
know what has happened is because of the
reporting of the news media, bias or not
("Unbelievable," July 24). I personally dislike
them. But they report. The Congress had no
choice other than give 'The Bad Guys" the power
to go to war. Try to remember 9/11. As much as
you hate the two Id, I ," who kept us safe and
retaliated against a horrific attack, the media is
why you are apparently amazed.
Well, wake up, the Congress is on your side.
Had they been as radical as you are now we
would have thanked them for 9/11. Now we
have media coverage and you are apparently not
realizing that your very liberal and far left polit-
ically controlled government does not under-
stand that you are trying to run our country into
the greatest depression ever. How long before
the new messiah takes responsibility?
I would continue with the new controversies,
but I trust "You" will learn this from the "Media."
How weird. Wow, are you kidding me, how did
you know all this negative information? I trust
you will not read this.
Paul Brungard
Amelia Island


BLACK


Despite all the obvious signs
over the last three years, the
administration and the majority
of city commissioners created a
bureaucracy that was both
unnecessary and unsustainable
over the long haul.


time, as it was a couple years ago. These are
both troubled enterprise funds and need a
fresh approach. The director of facilities main-
tenance is retiring in December, so let's hire an
engineer/manager to take his place and put
the marina and airport as part of his depart-
ment.
Get rid of the new trailer at the airport. For
an ailing enterprise fund, the trailer and associ-
ated expenses are a waste of valuable
resources. If I remember correctly, the last set
of hangars we built had an office for city use.
Paying the new director in part from the two
enterprise funds will ease some of the strain on
the general fund, as well as allowing more cash
flow to both the airport and marina.
Eliminating the city engineer position will also
take pressure off the general fund.
I could go on with more cost-saving ideas,
but I am running out of space. These sugges-
tions include some difficult decisions, and I
have true compassion for any employee affect-
ed by whatever budget decisions are made.
Despite all the obvious signs over the last three
years, the administration and the majority of
city commissioners created a bureaucracy that
was both unnecessary and unsustainable over
the long haul. We have ignored many of our
infrastructure needs, yet we always have
money for more time off for our highest paid
employees and to expand our workforce.
This economic crisis is not a one-year
occurrence. We still have at least a year of
declining property values before real estate
prices (and the tax base) stabilize. Some eco-
nomic experts think that Florida may take
longer to recover because of the high number
of foreclosures.
The prevalent problem solving approach at
City Hall consists of three options. Raise fees,
throw tax dollars at the problem and when they
fail, privatize. We pay enough taxes and way
too much in fees in our city. It is time for city
government to find a new way to do business,
and it is apparent that the vision, leadership
and action will have to come from the city com-
mission. Mr. Czymbor is correct, the city can't
continue to do business the way we've been
doing it. But it has been the way he has guided
us for the last three years. Change isn't com-
ing. It is here, and will be here for quite some
time.
Joe Gerrity is a former city commissioner




CYAN MAGENTA


COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


Mr. Russo, Miss DeFee


DeFee-Russo
Megan Charene DeFee of
Yulee and Robert Douglas
Russo of St. Augustine will be
married at 2 p.m. Aug. 8,
2009, at the home of the bride
with Dolton Robertson offici-
ating. The reception follows.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Daniel and Kelly
DeFee of Yulee. The groom-
elect is the son of Douglas


* Air Force Airman Justin
D. West gradu-
ated from basic
military train-
ing at Lackland
Air Force Base,
San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman
completed an
intensive, West
eight-week pro-
gram that
included training in military


Mr. and Mrs. Taylor


and Margaret Russo of St.
Augustine.

Taylor-Donohue
Nancy Donohue and
Raymond Taylor Jr. of Crystal
River were married at 6:30
p.m. June 27, 2009, at the
Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach with the Rev. Paul Rizzi
officiating. The reception fol-
lowed the ceremony.


discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness and basic warfare prin-
ciples and skills.
Airmen who complete
basic training earn four cred-
its toward an associate in
applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Melanie
West of Callahan. West is a
2007 graduate of West Nassau
High School, Callahan.


BIRTH


* James and Lindsay
Crummey of Yulee announce
the birth of a daughter, Kayce
Leigh Crummey, born July
14, 2009, at Memorial
Medical Center. The baby
weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces
and measured 19 inches in
length. She joins siblings
Caidyn Ryan, 6, and Conner
James, 3.
Paternal grandparents are


Claire and Harold Shepherd
of Yulee and Alan Crummey
of Fernandina Beach.
Maternal grandparents are
Conrad and Carol Hermann
of Deer River, Minn.
Great-grandparents are
Harriet Ross of St. Marys,
Ga., Cliff and Cathy
Crummey of Jesup, Ga., and
Richard and Marie Middleton
of Old Town.


HELPERS


* The Nassau Council of
the Visually Impaired &
Blind, a newly formed, tax-
exempt organization, meets
the first Monday of each
month from 1-3 p.m. at the
Council on Aging, 1367 South
18th St, Fernandina Beach.
For information, contact
Marsha Riley at 583-1317 or e-
mail ncvib@comcast.net.
* National Alliance on
Mental Illness-Nassau meets
on third Thursday at 7 p.m. in
the conference room at the
McArthur Family YMCA off
Citrona Drive. The Consumer
Support Group meets weekly
on Friday at 11 a.m. at the
Council On Aging across
from Baptist Medical Center
Nassau. Family support meet-
ings are held the fourth
Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room
204 at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church. Call 277-1886 for
information.
* The Overeaters
Anonymous 12-step program
meets at 1 p.m. Thursday at
St. Peter's Episcopal Church.
For information, directions, a
carpool/ride or help starting
more OA meetings, contact


Sheila at 261-7467 or Ilona at
261-9361.
* Judy Schiffman, director
of Panic Relief, Inc., offers a
program for anyone suffering
from panic, anxiety and ago-
raphobia to cope with these
disorders. Learn how atti-
tudes and current thoughts
affect panic and anxiety.
Programs are held locally.
Call PRI at (732) 940-9658.
* The Pink Ribbon Ladies,
a breast cancer support
group, meets the second
Monday at 6 p.m. in Dining
Room 2, next to the cafeteria
at Baptist Medical Center
Nassau.
* Miracle on Wheels
makes available electric pow-
ered wheelchairs to non-
ambulatory senior citizens
(65 years and up) and the per-
manently disabled of any age,
if they qualify.
Usually there is no charge
or out-of-pocket expense for
the power wheelchair, includ-
ing shipping and delivery to
the home by a technician who
makes the final adjustments
to fit the individual. Call 1-866-
200-6924.


Methodist volunteers in mission


John Cripps has presented a concept
for a new community mission to provide
food for those in need. He has offered
his backyard to be cultivated as a veg-
etable garden for the produce to be
donated to Barnabas Center.
Students of the United Methodist will
help work the garden under the direc-
tion of experienced gardeners in our
church, including Brad Hamilton and
Laurie Russell. The plan is to prepare
the garden area this summer for fall
planting. We have also gleaned (pun
intended) ideas from Meagan Burns,
who developed St. Peter's community
garden and who has been very helpful
in our planting. Contact Andy Foote at
the church office if you are interested.
Everyone is looking for ways to save
money these days. Kate Smith and Janet
Plumer of River Road Baptist Church
near Hilliard have made a ministry of it.
On July 18, they went to show the ladies
of First Baptist Church, Callahan, how
they have learned to buy hundreds of
dollars of groceries for pennies on the
dollar and used the savings to bless
their families and others.
College/Career Ministry meets at 7
p.m. Thursday at the Chapel of
Callahan First Baptist Church for adults,
singles or married, who are interested
in worshipping God passionately.
Congratulations to Amelia Baptist
Church. They now have a director of
family ministries, Dave Parker, and a
permanent student minister, Nathan
DeFalco.
What a great place of worship! I
recently completed my ninth year as
your minister of education and it has
been a great nine years. You folks have
embraced me and my family with love
and encouragement. I thank you for the
many opportunities you have given me
to grow in my knowledge and faith. I
came here as 54-year-old rookie and you
have allowed me to make mistakes and
yet you continue to love me. You have
also provided additional blessings to my
family.
You, through the West family, provid-
ed my son with a great wife and the
Brunettis a new daughter. Through that,
we know have four "grand kids" and
they are a continual blessing. It doesn't
get much greater than that!
As I sit back and consider all the
things that God has allowed me to
become through my association with
this great group of people at Amelia
Baptist Church, I can do nothing less
than praise Him! Thank you. Willie and
Lee Brunetti, education/outreach minis-
ter.
Allegiance Welcome Home Concert
was enjoyed at Amelia Baptist Church
July 5. Adult choir, ladies ensemble,
men's ensemble, thank you for your
faithfulness to rehearsals throughout
the summer months. What a blessing
you are! The beautiful patriotic music


July 5 was also a bless-
ing. The Amelia's Got
Talent night was a suc-
cess due to the many
S talents shared and par-
I ents and youth who
S served our delicious
. pancake supper.
In the past weeks,
the elders of Springhill
HILDA'S Baptist Church have
HEAR- been talking to and
ABOUTS interviewing different
prospects to fill the
role of interim pastor;
Hilda completed the plans
Higginbotham started for Pastor
Jackie and his family's
good-bye party (we had a number of you
share memories with them that
evening); and simply carried on the
oversight and direction of Springhill
Baptist Church.
We are pleased to report that you
gave generously to the pastor's home
office project and they were very pleas-
antly surprised. Pastor Jackie is already
playing with his new computer and we
believe we have enough funds available
to purchase the computer credenza and
file cabinets that Kathy told us he need-
ed. All of the above items will be
installed in or delivered to their home.
In addition, money was set aside as a
gift to Kathy from Springhill.
On the search for an interim pastor,
we have talked with many potential can-
didates and met with some as well. We
are not ready yet to present to you a rec-
ommendation concerning someone to
serve as interim pastor for your review
and hopeful approval. Whenever we
have a viable candidate as either the
interim or the eventual full-time pastor,
it will be our intent to present him first
to our Grace group leaders and Sunday
school teachers for their review and
hopeful approval.
Then we will afford the congregation
the opportunity, during a regular
Sunday school hour, to ask questions
and view the credentials of the candi-
date proffered to you as either the inter-
im pastor or the man whom we feel is
called by God to serve as our full-time
pastor. Then, and only then, will he be
formally presented to you as a candidate
and, at the end of a morning service, we
will ask for your vote of affirmation or
denial.
In the interim, we beseech you to
join us each Friday night for prayer as
we seek God's will for our congregation-
al family. Though the old sanctuary will
be open from 6-8 p.m., you may join us
for whatever length of time and, at any
time during these hours, you have the
opportunity that evening.
From the NorthEaster, Dr. David
Drake, DOM: Make plans to attend Key
Leader Workshop, First Baptist Church
of Fernandina Beach, Aug. 27 from 6-


8:45 p.m. Evangelism Strategies for the
21st century led by Will McRanev;
prayer ministry: "Building Praying
Churches" led by Rich Sheperd; stew-
ardship: "Consider Your Ways" led by
Ken Westbrook; music led by Terry
Williams; discipleship: "Making
Disciples Who Make Disciples" led by
Bill Carmichael; ministry assistant/sec-
retary: "Office Teamwork" led by Lynn
Stone; deacon training: "How Deacons
Help Manage Church Conflict" led by
Roy Lee Saint; women's mission and
ministries led by Cindy Goodwin.
Senior adult fall jubilee Sept. 28-30 in
Gatlinburg, Tenn., for the Gray Gables
Group is sold out. New dates: Sept. 30
through Oct. 2. Please contact Phyllis
Holmes or L.L. Braddock for more infor-
mation if you are interested in going.
Our deacons are here to glorify the
Lord through faithful service. If you are
in need of prayer or help, please do not
hesitate to call your deacon -Tom
Pornovets, chairman; Ken Jones, Terry
Horton, Mark Wynn, Roland Benoit,
Brad Braddock, Dana Webber, Bryan
Hall, David McKendree, Billy Ray
Jackson, Mike Cobb, L.L. Braddock.
Pastor's cell phone is (904) 545-0501.
Returning to Memorial United
Methodist Church for the third time in
as many years, nationally known singer,
storyteller and folk theologian Ed
Kilbourne was the featured guest
Sunday morning in worship and for
three evenings July 19-21. Over the
years, Ed has been recognized and
acclaimed for his ability to use his gifts
as a musician and communicator in con-
cert and worship settings. He began his
performing journey in folk groups while
in high school and college.
Following his graduation from semi-
nary, Ed set out on a professional career
and has now made over 8,000 appear-
ances during the last 40 years in every
region of the United States. Ed has 23
recordings on the Fly-By-Night label,
including the new release, "A World of
Love."
"Christ Hath Made Me Free!" was
Rev. Mark Tuso's sermon subject July 5
at First Baptist Church, Gray Gables.
His scripture reading was Galatians 5:1.
Aug. 15 at 7 a.m. is the Awana Kick-
Off Day Volunteer Breakfast and Prayer
at Gray Gables Church Fellowship Hall.
Aug. 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. is
Awana registration, kick-off kids singing
session, gospel message, lunch and field
day. See Chris Reinolds for questions or
more information.
Senior adults of First Baptist Church
Fernandina Beach met at their church
July 16 for their monthly program and
lunch. Larry Williams does a great job
as their chairman. His lovely wife, Jewel,
is right by his side to assist him.
"May our Great Heavenly Father
continue to watch over us and keep us
in His Loving Care."


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


* Men's Newcomer Club of Amelia
Island is a social organization that meets
at 11:30 a.m. the third Thursday of most
months at the Fernandina Beach Golf
Club clubhouse. Call Richard Rothrock
at 491-6868 or Bob Keane at 277-4590.
* Military Officers Association of
America service and social organization
serving active duty and retired military
officers meets at 6:30 p.m. the second
Thursday of some months, other
months for Sunday brunch at Ocean
Breeze Conference Center at Mayport
Naval Station. Call president Rob Judas
at (904) 249-1475.
* The Modelers' Club for modelers
interested in cars, planes, ships and
trains meets from 7-9 p.m. the fourth
Monday at St. Peter's Episcopal Church,
801 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach.
Call Hal Mather at 261-6420.
* Moms Group for Stay-at-home-
Moms, moms offering moms support,
meets with the kids at kid-friendly loca-
tions. Call Amy at 261-0554 or e-mail
amarasco@bellsouth.net to receive a list
of the next meet-ups.
* Nassau Challenger Bowling
League for the physically and mentally
challenged meets from 3-5 p.m. the sec-


ond Saturday at the bowling alley on US
17 in Yulee. Call Melinda Willaford at
261-3136.
* Nassau County Boys & Girls Club
after-school agenda offers programs for
youths ages 6-17 at the Miller Club, one
mile south ofA1A on CR 107 (Old
Nassauville Road). Hours are 2-8 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Staff and volun-
teers provide homework help, computer
classes, arts and crafts, music and
drama, sports and games, teen pro-
grams, gardening, health and fitness,
cooking and life skills classes. Call the
office at 261-1075 after 2 p.m. weekdays
for information and enrollment details.
* Nassau Civitan Club service organ-
ization meets at noon the second and
fourth Thursdays at Slider's. Call
Norma Norris at 491-9996 or Joyce
Menz at 321-2526.
* Nassau County 4-H is open to
youth ages 5-18 and adult volunteers
excited to learn more about leadership,
citizenship and life skills. For informa-
tion on becoming a member or adult vol-
unteer, contact the Nassau County
Extension Service at (904) 879-1019 or
visit Nassau.ifas.ufl.edu.
* Nassau County Group of the Sierra


Club is an environmental organization
that meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday
at the Council on Aging building, 1367
South 18th St., Fernandina Beach. Call
Joan Altman at 277-2274.
* Nassau County Home Educators
Support Group for home-schooling par-
ents meets the third Thursday at 7 p.m.
Call 225-9160 for location or visit geoci-
ties.com/nassaucountyhomeeducators.
* Nassau County Master Gardener
volunteers are trained by County
Horticultural Extension agents and are
required to serve 75 volunteer hours
year one of their accreditation and 35
volunteer hours and 10 advance training
hours annually in all subsequent years
to maintain their certification as Master
Gardeners. For information on the
Master Gardener program and applica-
tion requirements, contact Becky Jordi,
horticultural extension agent, at 548-
1116 or rljordi@ufl.edu.
* Nassau County NAACP civil rights
organization meets at 6 p.m. for the
executive committee meeting and 7 p.m.
for the branch meeting the second
Monday at the Peck Center, 516 South
10th St., Fernandina Beach. Call
Courtney Tyson-Shelby at 491-3419.


Welcome to


Qod's House

A J Classic Carpets
H VRLE B& Interiors, Inc.
CHEVROLET * BUICK BUDDY KELLUM
PONTIAC * GMC AbbyCarpeto President
464054 SR 200, Yulee 802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
(904) 261-6821 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291
FAMILY DENTISTRY
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN Badcock
Most Insurances Accepted HOM U R NITU RE
Call For Appointment m re
261-68260
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
A1 A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL


FREEMAN
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installations & Repair
606 S. 6th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


c7 S^ AS .11e 1
Ahis Space Avaifable
Advertse yourbusiness &
to support your local church
Call the NewsLeader - 261-3696





juYUMo


V o





a ^




This is my
commandment,
that you love one
another as I have
loved you.
R.S.V John 15:12


A wise man once said that unusual travel
suggestions are likened to dancing lessons
from God. The point of this, I suppose, is that
we might learn more about life by traveling
to unusual places or by traveling in unusual
ways. For instance, going to Australia instead
of DisneyWorld, or traveling by bus instead of
byplane are more likely to be life-enhancing,
consciousness-expanding experiences;
in short, a dance lesson with God. Another
lesson to be taken from this is that moving
throughlife should be more like dancing than
simply taking a walk which means we should
try to move gracefully and beautifully as well as
joyfully. How should we dance through life?
The simplest and most beautiful way to do this
is through love. By opening our heart to love,
and loving those
around us, the world is
transformed from a
dark cold and dreary
place to one of light,
warmth and joy.


CAMPUS NOTES

* Charles Maurice Hampden-Sydney College
Booker III has been accepted first enrolled students in
by Hampden-Sydney College 1775. A private men's college,
and will enroll with a dean's it is known for its liberal arts
award in August 2009. curriculum, the honor code
Booker is a graduate of which stresses individual and
Fernandina Beach High collective responsibility, a
School and is the son of Mr. focus on the needs of young
and Mrs. Ron M. Booker of men, and a nurturing environ-
Fernandina Beach. ment.


YULEE STUDENTS FROM
FBHS (1970-1975)
REUNITE LABOR DAY
WHEN: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH, 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM.
MEAL SERVED AT NOON.
WHERE: CHEM CELL, CHEM CELL ROAD (AIA TO AMELIA
ISLAND PKWY; 3RD RD ON R)
COST: $20 PER PERSON; RESERVATIONS/PAYMENT BY
SEPTEMBER 1 ST AT FIRST COAST COMMUNITY BANK, YULEE,
OR MAIL TO FCCB, ATTN: SUSAN MURRAY, PO. BOX 1739,
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32035. CHECK PAYABLE TO
YULEE/FBHS CLASSES OF 1970-1975.
WHO: ALL 1970-1975 FBHS STUDENTS &
1958-1970 FACULTY/STAFF
ALCOHOL-FREE EVENT. DRESS: CASUAL. BRING
SPOUSE/FRIEND. NO INVITATIONS ARE BEING MAILED.
Questions: e-mail yulee fbhs.gettogether@yahoo.com or call
Kathy Spivey, 225-9560 with questions.


WEDDING/ENGAGEMENT


BLACK


MILITARY NEWS


Dancing Lessons


I




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Kids camp
Faith Christian Academy
presents Kids Choice Camp
2009 from 7 a.m.-6p.m.
through Aug. 12 at 96282
Brady Point Road, Fernandina
Beach. Camp is for ages 3-12
years. Call 321-2137.
Donations needed
The Salvation Army Hope
House, 410 South Date St.,
Fernandina Beach, is in need
of the following types of dona-
tions:
* Personal hygiene items:
toothbrushes, toothpaste,
deodorant, disposable razors,
shaving cream, feminine prod-
ucts and toilet paper
* Canned foods not requir-
ing cooking: non-condensed
soups, pastas, beanie weenies,
tuna, chicken, fruits, fruit
juices and powdered milk
* Starchy foods: rice,
instant mashed potatoes, pas-
tas, cereals and breakfast
bars.
For more information, call
321-0435.
Catholic class
St. Michael Catholic
Church is sponsoring an
inquiry class for those who
wish to know more about the
Roman Catholic faith and
what Catholics believe. The
program, called R.C.I.A, will
start on Sept. 1 and continue
each week through Easter
2010.
The sessions are open to
those who have never been
baptized, or have been bap-
tized in another faith or to
Catholics who have not
received the Sacraments of
First Eucharist or
Confirmation. There is no
cost and the first session will
meet in the St. Michael
Academy library at 6:45 p.m.
on Sept. 1.
Call the church office at
261-3472 for more information
or to register.

First Missionary
show
"Behold the Bridegroom
Cometh" will be presented by
First Missionary Baptist
Church, 20 S. Ninth St.,
Fernandina Beach, on Aug. 1
at 5 p.m. All are welcome to
join in this celebration.
Garage sale
Rock Church of Northeast
Florida will hold a garage sale
on Aug. 1 from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at
the church, 850893 US 17
North, Yulee (next to Mead's
Framery in the Crossroads
Shopping Plaza).


Golftournament
First Baptist Church is
hosting a Golf Tournament/
Clinic Aug. 1 featuring
renowned golf pro Wally
Armstrong, who will be guest
speaker as well as offer a clin-
ic before the tournament.
While he has played profes-
sionally and taught golf since
1968, Armstrong's true pas-
sion is sharing his faith with
others through the game of
golf.
Cost is $75 per person and
includes dinner. Everyone is
invited that evening as
Armstrong shares stories
about his career in golf and
his faith journey in life. For
more information or to sign
up, call 261-3617 or contact
Scott Womble at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Club.

Friends &
Family Day
Friendship Baptist Church
in Yulee will celebrate Friends
and Family Day on Aug. 2 at 4
p.m. Speaker will be Elder
Eddie Lawrence. For more
information call 225-5627.
Bible marathon
Living Waters World
Outreach Center is hosting
the seventh annual Genesis to
Revelation Non-Stop-Around-
The-Clock-Bible Reading
beginning at 6 am. Aug. 3 and
ending sometime late
Thursday afternoon, Aug. 6.
The Bible is read in 15-minute
increments, and you can sign
up in the church sanctuary or
by calling the church office at
321-2117. All are welcome to
read or just come and listen.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope
House each Tuesday at noon
for its Weekly Worship
Service and Fellowship
Lunch. On Aug. 4, case work-
er and evangelist Anita Richo
will share the Gospel mes-
sage. For more information,
call 321-0435 or stop by the
Hope House, 410 South Date
St.
'Faith at the Movies'
Memorial United Metho-
dist Church is hosting a film
series titled Faith at the
Movies. This is a brand new
series designed to explore
issues of faith through popu-
lar movies. There will be a
simultaneous movie and pro-
gram for children, as well as
nursery. All are welcome.
Movies start at 6:30 p.m. in
Maxwell Hall.
The final movie is '"The


CO VETED A WARD GIVEN
Linda Laine, right, was pre-
sented with an Honorary
Life Membership in
Presbyterian Women,
Presbyterian Church (USA) t
during a Providence
Presbyterian Church serv-
ice. Jo Brumund presented
the certificate and pin that
are conferred upon an indi-
vidual in recognition of sig-
nificant, faithful service in
some area of the church's
work.
The pin and the certificate
have the symbol of the but-
terfly. The butterfly repre-
sents newness in Christ and ,
the emergence of a new cre-
ation, Presbyterian Women. SUBMITTED
Laine was honored with this
membership in recognition of her work in creating and nurturing the development of
Presbyterian Women at Providence Presbyterian Church through the LAFF Circle, and
her diligent work in the development of Providence's worship and music ministry. The
Honorary Life Membership also recognizes her upcoming position as the incoming
Moderator of Presbyterian Women in the St. Augustine Presbytery.


'U2charist at St Peter's
St. Peter's Episcopal church, 801 Atlantic Ave., will host
U2charist and Potluck on Aug. 9, a celebration of the Eucharist
that features the music of band U2 and a message about God's
call to rally around the Millennium Development Goals.
Several people will share personal stories and experiences
related to Millennium Development Goals service and action,
including John and Alice Holliday, Mark Kaufman and Donna
Paz and Brenda Commandeur.
The music in the service is replete with the message of glob-
al reconciliation, justice for the poor and the oppressed and the
importance of caring for your neighbor. Led by global MDG
ambassador, Bono, U2 is calling people worldwide to deeper
faith and engagement with God's mission. The U2charist
seeks to be an extension of this ministry.
Potluck and information begins at 5 p.m. and U2charist at
6 p.m. For information call the church at 261-4293.


Ultimate Gift" on Aug. 7.
Summer Bible study
On Aug. 14 Providence
Presbyterian Church will host
summer Bible studies, using
sermons from renowned
preachers Fred Craddock,
Barbara Brown Taylor and
Tom Long as the basis for
conversation about the scrip-
ture. Call 432-8118 for infor-
mation. Everyone's welcome.
The church is located at 96537
Parliament Drive.
Summerreading
All are welcome to join the
members and friends of
Providence Presbyterian
Church in reading and dis-
cussing Barbara Brown
Taylor's newest book, An
Altar in the World, on Aug. 19.
Call 432-8118 for informa-
tion or to order the book. The
church is located at 96537


Parliament Drive, just off Old
Nassauville Road.
'Ministry Faif
First Presbyterian Church
will host a Ministry Fair on
Aug. 23 in Jim Thomas Hall
from 9:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Booths representing the mis-
sions, ministries, studies,
events and opportunities avail-
able at First Presbyterian will
fill the hall. There will be
games, door prizes, lots of
food, an Ugly Tie Contest and
fellowship. Nursery and pre-
school will be available.

Living Proof
simulcast
On Aug. 28-29 Beth
Moore is bringing Living
Proof Live to her hometown of
Green Bay, Wis. Thanks to
simulcast satellite technology,
she'll spend that weekend at


First Baptist Church, too.
Tickets are $10 and may be
purchased at the church. For
information, call 261-3617.
'Rally Day
Rally Day for children and
youth will be Aug. 30 at First
Presbyterian, beginning at
9:50 a.m. Nursery, toddlers,
preschool and kindergarten
will meet in their classrooms
in Noah's Place. First and sec-
ond graders will meet in the
Power Lab and third through
fifth graders will meet in the
Kidmo theater. Middle school
students will meet in the
Skate Room in the Youth
Center. Senior high youth will
meet in Faith Cafe at 12:15
p.m. for lunch and Bible study.
Parents of all children,
nursery through senior high,
are invited to Breakfast &
Conversation in Jim Thomas
Hall at 10 a.m., hosted by the
Christian Education Commit-
tee. Parents, call the church
office to confirm your atten-
dance no later than Aug. 27.
Women's study
The Amelia Island
Women's Evening Community
Bible Study invites you to join
an in-depth, non-denomina-
tional study of the Book of
Acts.
Meetings will be Monday
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church,
961167 Buccaneer Trail
across from Harris Teeter.
The study begins Sept. 14 and
continues through May 3.
For more information and
to register, call Michal Polese


at 548-9971 or Linda Bell at
261-0569. Visit www.communi-
tybiblestudy.org and
www.ameliaislandevecbs.org.
Playgroup
MOM,ME meets every
Wednesday from 9:30-11 a.m.
in Noah's Place, First Presby-
terian's nursery and pre-
school classrooms. Everyone
is welcome to participate in
the mom and baby/toddler
playgroup that has evolved
into an interesting group of
moms and children growing
and nurturing, networking
and socializing, sharing and
caring with all who come.
This group meets year round.
This ministry is open to the
public. No reservations are
needed, just drop in. Park
your stroller out front.
'Stuff the Bus
The Salvation Army Hope
House is accepting applica-
tions to help income qualify-
ing families obtain school sup-
plies for their children as part
of its Stuff the Bus School
Supply Drive. If you wish to
volunteer to take applications
or have questions, call 321-
0435. Applications will be
accepted on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays from
1-4 p.m., through July 31.
Food program
Yulee Baptist Weekday
Ministry, 85967 Harts Road, is
now participating in the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's
Child Care Food Program.
Meals will be available at no
separate charge to eligible
children enrolled in the min-
istry's day care program.
Parents or guardians must
complete an application. For
information, call 225-9196.
Food ministries
Angel Food Ministries and
Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ are offering food relief
for the community. For more
information contact Thomas
Kessel or Tom Gilday at 277-
2517 or e-mail fbangelfood@
gmail.com. The church is
located at 1005 South 14th St.
Visit www.cocfb.org and www.
angelfoodministries.com.
* * *
The Bridge Family
Worship Center in Yulee is
offering Angel Food
Ministries discounted food.
Open to anyone, this opportu-
nity allows you to feed your
family for a fraction of the nor-
mal cost. A family of four can
eat for a week for only $30.
For information, visit
www.thebridgeflorida.com or
call 225-4860.


"Worship this week at the pace of your choice"


S.ip;..t Church
Sunday School.........................................9:30 am
Sunday Worship ........................... 10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA .......................... 6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study .................... 6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org


/ \
AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
An Interdenominational
Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
August 2, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.
MESSAGE:"Prayer in the Spirit"
MUSIC: "Here I am Lord"
(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-


The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at
Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road

(904) 277- 4414
www.ameliachapel.com


___________.5j


ANCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
515 Centre Street


I I '


Rev. Rav Ramsburci. Pastor
-- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
--- Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306


J fHoy Trinity
Angican Churc




Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


www.upopcamelUa.uoru


~o~r c/i


L.Urovidence
res6yterian ^
Church -3ORIDA 's '
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corer Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.providenceyulee.com
providenceyulee@comcast.net


~II I� i ,r�u I�~lu1 1


AMELIA PLANTATION
CHAPEL
/ A. n Intertenominationa
Community Church
BLOG WITH US
Share your opinions with Pastor Ted
Schroder of Amelia Plantation
Chapel. Access:ameliachapel.com
Pastor's Corner, and then Ted's Blog.
Faith-based subjects that make us all
think!


St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Welcomes
You!
Located at the
corner of 8th &
Atlantic

Holy Eucharist
8:30 am &10:00 am
Wednesday
Holy Eucharist 904-261-4293
12:10 pm www.stpetersparish.org


YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6m Street
Dr. Holton Slegllng
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:50a
Nursery
Children
Youth
Adults
261-3837
www. 1 stpres-fb.com


IS~i


I Ii


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www.blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service 10:30am
Bible Study 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccaneer Tr & Gerbing Road, Ferandina Bch
For More Information Call: 261-9527


Holy Trinity Anglican Church .
In � -lll, 'ia FI' r
1. '.C' Lake 1-ark '-ri e
a': r':'c E. [ r,:,Ii t he l ill: -,

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AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
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bEIH MUUKt
LIVING PROOF UVE
August 28-29
Tickets $10
For 2-Day Event
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-261-3617
www. FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Ovenon. Sr Pastor


Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor


SI I , , , ,, , i, I



Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566,
also call 904-277-0550


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
innovative Style, ContemporaryMusic, Casua/Atmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday morn. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10'30am Sunday
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ.. Connecting with People


IdelI81[1 :O M := I N .FI; (904) 225- 0


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... 9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training .......... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship .............. 6:OOP.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:OOP.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ....... 7:OOP.M.
736 Bonnieview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptistchurch.org


yULEE
_\ PTl ISl |_J


Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225*0809


Living W waters FIRSTMISSIONARYBAPTIT
world o u reach 20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Contemporary Worship Rev. Darien . Bolden Sr., Pastor
SUN 9:30am The Church in the
WED 7:00pm Heart of the City
SYouth Nu & With the Desire to be in the
You, Nursery & Hearts ofAllPeople
S Childrens Ministfries SuandayNew Members Class 9 a.m.
Sun da ySchool 9:30a.m.
321-2117 / Mori.mgWiirsfopl.m.
Rob & Christle Goyette W3d2n21ag n - a.m.
seniorPastors OnA IAmilewestofAmelialsland Wednesd Noo-dweekSea p.m.
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org Ministries:Bus& Va, Coples, Singles, Youth














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BACK




CYAN MAGENTA


10A HOMES


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


HOME AND GARDEN BRIEFS


Arts at market
The Fernandina Farmers
Market Booth With A Cause
program will host the Amelia
Arts Academy Aug. 1.
As one of four certified
Community Schools of the
Arts in Florida, the Arts
Academy has been offering
education in the arts at afford-
able rates to all interested per-
sons through individual
instruction, group lessons,
after-school art and dance
workshops, creative arts pro-
grams for seniors and more
since 1992.
At the market, the Arts
Academy will give shoppers
an opportunity to "See Them-
selves in the Arts!" with a free
children's craft table and pur-
chase personalized screen
printed items. Shoppers can
choose from several designs
and watch as their shirts, flags
and T-shirts are made right
before their eyes!
Also on Aug. 1, Thompson
All-Natural Pork will be at the
market with its perfect for
summer barbecuing ribs and
various cuts of chops as well
as bacons, sausages and ten-
derloins.
The market, open every
Saturday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at
Seventh and Centre streets,
features farm fresh produce
as well as a variety of organic
products, specialty foods and
plants. Call 491-4872 or visit
www.fernandinafarmersmar-
ket.com.
Florida sea turtles
Join a park ranger and
learn about the lifecycle of


the sea turtle and the impor-
tance of these creatures on
Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. at pavilion one
on Little Talbot Island. No
reservations are necessary.
For information call (904)
251-2320.
Manatee talk
Manatees are slow-moving,
non-aggressive, curious crea-
tures and many love grazing
in our shallow, warm summer
waters. Learn what is fact and
fiction about the manatee that
is now more imperiled than
ever. Jim Reid, a wildlife biolo-
gist with the Gainesville U.S.
Geological Survey office, will
share his experiences from
more than 25 years working
with manatees at the next
Nassau County Sierra Club
meeting Aug. 5 at 7 p.m. at the
Council on Aging, 1367 South
18th St. The public is wel-
come.
Animal signs
Join a park ranger for a
presentation and leisurely
guided hike through different
Florida ecosystems on a quest
to characterize tracks left by
an assortment of critters on
Aug. 8 at 10 a.m. at the Ribault
Club on Fort George Island
Cultural State Park. No reser-
vations are necessary and the
program is free. For informa-
tion call (904) 251-2320.
Bird club
The Nassau County Bird
Club will hold a field trip to
Huguenot Memorial Park on
Aug. 15 and Sept. 5 at 8 a.m.,
rain or shine. Park entry is $1
per car.


The park is located off
Heckscher Drive about 8
miles south of the Nassau
Sound bridge. Meet in the
parking lot of the general
store. Target birds include the
Piping Plover, Oystercatcher,
Whimbrel, Reddish Egret,
gulls and terns. Bring your
binoculars, field guide, bug
juice, sunscreen, rain gear,
sunglasses, layered clothing
and water.
For information call Carol
Wyatt at 262-9272 or e-mail
carolinewy@aol.com.
Kayak/canoe trip
Nassau Sierra Club will
host a guided kayak/canoe
trip to Simpson Creek (Little
Talbot Island) on Aug. 29.
This trip is open to the public.
The three- to four-hour trip
will depart the "Kayak
Amelia" concession at Little
Talbot State Park at 9 a.m. It
will be about a five-mile pad-
dle, with a stop for lunch on
the sandbar or Bird Island.
Paddlers will experience
maritime forests, desert-like
dunes, undisturbed salt marsh
and a variety of wildlife and
native and migratory birds.
Participants with their own
boats can launch at Kayak
Amelia; those without kayaks
can rent either single ($30) or
tandem ($45). Kayak Amelia
will waive the launch fee and
offer a 10 percent discount.
The paddle will be in calm
water and is suitable for
beginners. The trip will be led
by Len Kreger, a certified
Sierra Outings Leader; RSVP
at L.Kreger@comcast.net or
(904) 432-8389.


. eaI I -
-. -� - .� ... �


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Reduced Commission, 3 % - 4.5 %, Call for details.

Island resident since 1962 No Menus, Voicemail or Phone Tag.
Real Estate Broker since 1972 Local 904.261.8870 TollFree 877.261.8870


Butterfly pea good



choice for area gardens


Q :I have this pretty vine
Sin a wooded area
behind my house. The flow-
ers are purple and they are
about an inch long. They
look similar to a large pea
flower. Do you have any idea
what they might be? KR
A The flowers you
. described are probably
one of the butterfly pea vines
in the genus Centrosema or
Clitoria.
This decidu-
ous vine pro-
duces flow-
ers from late
z l g spring
7 through the
summer.
Butterfly
pea grows in
GARDEN full sun to
TALK partial shade
which
attracts
BeckyJordi wildlife such
as birds and
butterflies. Just today, as I
was identifying trees in one
of our local parks, I saw a
zebra longwing drawing nec-
tar from its flower.
Butterfly pea prefers acid,
sandy soils commonly found
in this area. You can propa-
gate it easily by collecting
seeds. If you decide to plant it
in your yard, it might be best
to keep it away from sprin-
kler heads. Consider giving
the butterfly pea plenty of
room to grow or a trellis to
climb. This plant can be
found as far west as Illinois,
north to New Jersey and
south to the Virgin Islands.


Q What can you tell me
:about pineapple
guava? SD

. Every year, Florida
. Nursery, Growers and
Landscape Association
(FNGLA) put out a list of top
plants of the year. This year,
Feijoa sellowiana, or pineap-
ple guava, was on the list.
Several others listed such as
perennial peanut, autumn
fern, firebush, silver saw pal-
metto, Summer Wave pansy,
winged elm, and Walter's
viburnum (compact) can be
grown in this area.
Pineapple guava has gray-
green evergreen leaves and it
produces pretty, pink spring
flowers. Pineapple guava tol-
erates most any type of soil
condition providing it is well
drained. It can be planted in
full sun or partial shade
although too much shade
reduces the production of
flowers and fruit. Pineapple
guava is highly drought and
salt spray tolerant. It can be
propagated by seed or cut-


PHOTO COURTESY OF REBECCA JORDI, UF/IFAS
The butterfly pea vine produces pretty, pink flowers.


- -
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FLORIDA
NURSERY, GROWERS AND
LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION
The pineapple guava is
listed as one of the top
plants for 2009.


tings. Pineapple guava can be
used as a hedge or allowed to
form a tree reaching heights
of 15 feet with an equal
spread. Edible fruit is pro-
duced, which apparently
tastes somewhat like pineap-
ple, although I have not had
the privilege of tasting it yet.
A University of Florida publi-
cation by Dr. Ed Gilman and
the Forestry Department can
be found at: http://hort.ufl.
edu/trees/FEISELA.pdf.
The following website
contains FNGLA's listing the
2009 Plants of the Year: www.
fngla.org/articles/viewArticl
e.asp?articlelD=805.
Perennial peanut can be seen
at two of Nassau County's
Extension demonstration gar-
dens: Nassau County
Extension Yulee satellite
office and the Nassau County
Courthouse in Fernandina
Beach. The Walter's vibur-
num can be seen at the
Nassau County Demonstra-
tion Garden located at the
James S. Page Governmental
Complex in Yulee along with
dozens of other easy to grow
plants for this area.
For more information on
the demonstration sites
please contact Rebecca Jordi
at 548-1116 or e-mail at rljor-
di@ufl.edu.

Q (I know I should know
.the answer to this
question, but I do not. What
are the insects making the


loud noises from dinner time
until it is dark? I do not really
notice the noise during the
day. DO

A The insect is probably
*the cicada. Which one
is it? Well, identifying it
might be a little tough since
there are almost 20 different
species of cicada found in
Florida.
I have tried capturing
them for my insect collection
but have had very little suc-
cess thus far. Cicadas can be
identified by their "song" and
this website from the
University of Florida might
help you: www.entnemdept.
ufl.edu/walker/buzz/c700fll.
htm. I listened to the dusk
singing cicada, Tibicen
auletes (Germar), which
might be the cicada you are
hearing especially since it
sings at dusk.
Some cicadas have long
life cycle periods and emerge
in 13- or 17-year intervals.
These cyclical or periodical
cicadas do not live in Florida;
cicadas are produced here
annually. Cicadas rarely
cause any significant damage
to vegetables or ornamental
plants in Florida. Although
their size, which can but over
2 1/2 inches long, makes
them somewhat menacing,
we need not be afraid of them
as they do not sting or bite.
Cicadas are an important
part of the food chain in for-
est and home landscapes as
they are a source of food for
birds and small mammals.
RebeccaJordi, UF/IFAS
Nassau County Horticultural
Extension Agent, is a
University of Florida faculty
member Extension locations
are the satellite office at the
County Building in Yulee and
the main Extension Office in
Callahan. The UF/IFAS
Nassau County
Demonstration Garden is
located at the James S. Page
Governmental Complex and
demonstrates best manage-
ment practices for Northeast
Florida. Mail questions to
Garden Talk, c/o Rebecca
Jordi, Nassau County
Extension, 543350 US 1,
Callahan, FL 32011. Visit
http://nassau.ifas.ufl.edu.
rljordi@ufl.edu


(904) 261-2770
COMMERCIAL * INVESTMENT LEASING * SALES











RealtorA RealtorR
Anne Fried A I PI, 32034 Ron Palmquist
Realtor 904-261-6116 1-800-940-6116 Ret
(904) 415-1558 websie: www amelarealync.com (904) 206-1945
affriend@bellsouth.net rpalmquistl@bellsouth.net


SEA
HO E5E


-- - . i n l-irtrih



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FOR SALE
Enjoy the ocean breeze while sitting on the back deck of this
oceanfront log home. This log home has been recently
remodeled with new bathrooms, decks and more. With R-3
zoning, this property is ideal for residential needs or as an
income-based property. Call for more details!


Phil Griffin
Broker
phil@acrfl.com


(904) 261-2770
COMMERCIAL * INVESTMENT * LEASING * SALES


slim
608 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, Fl 32034
www.ACRFL.com


Gardens bloom as economy struggles
Burlington, NJ. - A recent According to the United
market research survey con- States Department of Agricul-
ducted by the National ture, $50 in seeds can produce
Gardening Association shows over $1,200 in produce.
that 43 million Americans will Even first lady Michelle
be growing a garden this year Obama has started a vegetable
as opposed to 36 million in 2008. garden at the White House.
"It's not surprising," says With the help of school chil-
avid gardener and author of the dren, the first lady's garden will
book Vegetable Gardening for become the first since Eleanor
the Average Person, Michael Roosevelt's victory gardens to
Podlesny. "People are looking feed the families of troops.
for ways to save money in this Podlesny's book is available
down economy, and growing from his website, Average
your own food is a great way." PersonGardening.com.



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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tubers enjoy themselves as they drift down the Ichetucknee River at a relaxing pace. The river runs slowly, providing a calm, relaxing atmosphere to its visitors. Ichetucknee State Park
attracts nearly 200,000 visitors each year for scuba diving, tubing, kayaking and canoeing.




Journey down Ichetucknee River


olumbia
County, in
north Florida,
is home to
three easily
accessible rivers: the
Suwannee River borders
the county to the north,
the Ichetucknee River
and Springs is on the
county's western border
and the scenic Santa Fe
River borders the county
to the south.
Of the three, the
Ichetucknee River,
located in Ichetucknee
State Park, attracts
nearly 200,000 visitors
each year who journey to
the river to tube down its
serene, but chilly length.
The river travels
slowly through scenic,
shaded hammocks that
stand guard over the six


miles of wetlands and
cypress trees until the
Ichetucknee joins the
equally beautiful Santa
Fe River.
In 1972, the U.S.
Department of the
Interior declared the
head spring of the river,
located near its north
entrance, a National
Landmark.
In addition to tubing
the Ichetucknee, visitors
can enjoy picnicking,
snorkeling, canoeing,
swimming, hiking and
wildlife viewing. Picnic
areas, equipped with
tables and grills, are
available throughout the
park and a full-service
concession offers food,
refreshments and
outdoor products from
Memorial Day through


Labor Day.
October through
March, scuba diving
is available in the Blue
Hole for cave-certified
divers only.
The Ichetucknee is
a year-round tourist
attraction, and once
summer's heat begins to
dissipate into fall's cool
prelude, it is the perfect
season for visitors and
local residents to become
acquainted with the
natural environment that
frames the river.
There is plenty to
see as the park comes
alive with the first blush
of autumn colors and
fall's early moderate
temperatures invite a
peaceful walk in the
park.
It's an ideal time of


year for a leisurely
stroll along the park's
nature trails and to get
reacquainted with fresh
air, leaves rustling in
the treetops and, for the
sharp-eyed, a chance
to catch a glimpse of
the furry and feathered
residents of the park.
Whitetail deer,
raccoons, wild turkeys,
wood ducks and great
blue herons can be seen
from the river year-
around.
Yet the view from
a canoe or kayak
as it slowly carries
it occupants lazily
downstream provides
the viewer with a slowly
changing panorama of
the park that can only
be appreciated from the
water.


About Ichetucknee Springs State Park


* Address: 12087 S.W.
U.S. Highway 27, Fort
White, Fl. 32038. (386) 497-
4690.
* Hours: 8 a.m. until
sundown 365 days a year.
* Driving Directions:
From the north, take 1-75
south to exit 423. Take SR
47 south, turn on CR 238
and follow the park signs.
From the south, take 1-75
north to exit 399. Take US
441 north to the city of High
Springs. Take US 27 north
to Ft. White, stay on US 27
north approximately 4 miles
to the South Park Entrance.

* Admission: $6 per
vehicle. Limit two to eight
people per vehicle. No river
use. $4 single occupant
vehicle. $2 pedestrians,


bicyclists, extra passengers,
passengers in vehicle with
holder of Annual Individual
Entrance Pass.
* River Use Fees: $5
per person: canoeing. $5
per person, tubing from
north entrance during
summer season (begins the
Saturday before Memorial
Day through Labor Day).
Children 5 and under are
free. $5 per person, tubing
from south entrance during
summer season. Children 5
and under are free.
$6 per group of two to
eight people, tubing from
south entrance off season
(Begins the Tuesday after
Labor Day through the
Friday before Memorial
Day).


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3 questions you should ask
if you've been in an accident.
1. Do you have headaches you haven't had before?
2. Do you have numbness or tingling in your arms or legs?
3. Do you have neck, back or muscle pain?
Even if it seems minor, you should seek the advice of a professional.
Don't risk your health. Even what seems to be a minor accident could
cause injuries that require treatment. Your health and well being is just
too important to risk. Call 310-6248 and be sure.

S 904 - 310 - 6248
817 S.F ighth St.
, 11.111..l ll .. Ik . l
\ E N N \A "1,,IIh ,i l . ,I I
SENAN .
I I I I I I I I I


Located in Historic Downtown
317 Centre Street
(904) 310-6086


CARPETS & INTERIORS

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Commercial & Residential
2248 S. 8th Street (904) 277-0901
Fernandina Beach, FL


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


SPORTS


12A


FRIDAY, JULY31,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


SOUTHEASTREGIONAL TOURNEY


PHOTOS BY BETH JONES/NEWS-LEADER
Fernandina Beach Babe Ruth is hosting the 14-and-under Southeast Regional Allstar
Tournament this week at Buccaneer Sports Complex and games got under way
Thursday morning. Twelve teams are participating, including Fernandina Beach,
which was scheduled to take on the defending champions of Greenville, N.C.,
Thursday before the rains came. Prior to the first pitch of that game, Longwood took
on Bahamas, Nassau, in the first round of the tournament. Above, a Longwood pitcher
fires from the pitcher's mound and, below, a Bahamas runner rounds third base.
Right top, a Bahamas batter reacts to a strike. Right center, a Bahamas pitcher on the
mound. Right bottom, another Bahamas batter takes a swing. Games continue through
Wednesday. For information, visit www.leaguelineup/fernandina. Admission to games
for ages 13 and up is $20 for a week pass or $5 a day.


vGOLF


Tourney


today and


Saturday

The fifth annual ALS
Amelia Island Golf Classic,
held in memory of John Louis
O'Day, will be held July 31 at
Long Point Golf Club at the
Amelia Island Plantation.
Proceeds benefit the ALS
Association, Florida chapter.
Registration is at 10:30
a.m. and shotgun start is at
12:30 p.m. Format is a four-
person scramble. Buffet
lunch is from 11 a.m. until the
start of play.
Cocktail reception,
awards, raffle and silent auc-
tion are from 5-7 p.m. Players
receive a complimentary raf-
fle ticket; winners must be
present to claim prizes.
Entry fee is $150 per play-
er or $600 per foursome. The
reception only is $75 per per-
son.
Contests include hole-in-
one, longest drive (men and
women), closest to the pin
(men and women), putting on
putting green. Awards go to
first through fifth net team
and first and second gross
team.
Often referred to as Lou
Gehrig's disease, Amyotro-
phic Lateral Sclerosis is a pro-
gressive and usually fatal neu-
romuscular disease that robs
the body of its ability to walk,
speak, swallow and breathe.
For information, contact
Mark O'Day at 553-0576 or
odaym25@aol.com or visit
www.ALSGolfAmelia.com.

Armstrongevent
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club is hosting a golf tourna-
ment and clinic featuring
renowned golf pro Wally
Armstrong.
Armstrong will be the
guest speaker as well as offer
a clinic before the tourna-
ment. While he has played
professionally and taught golf
since 1968, Armstrong's true
passion is sharing his faith
with others through the game
of golf.
This event takes place
Aug. 1. Cost is $75 per person
and includes dinner.
Everyone is invited as
Armstrong shares about his
career in golf and his faith
journey in life. For informa-
tion or to sign up, call the
church office at 261-3617 or
contact Scott Womble at the
golf course at 277-7370.

Upcomingscrambles
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club will host a scramble for
the Fernandina Beach Men's
Golf Association Aug. 8. The
event is a backward tourna-
ment. Another scramble will
be held Sept. 19.
The final two events of
2009 for the FBMGA are the
October Four Ball Oct. 3-4 -
a two-day, 36-hole, two-man
team competition - and the
Christmas Scramble - an 18-
hole ABCD team competition
with a 12:30 p.m. shotgun
start.
For information, call 277-
7370.


Stringer suits continue: Riddell latest defendant


he doesn't like wearing a hat
when he is at the beach because it
makes him hot. This seems pretty
obvious, doesn't it? If you wear something on
your head, it is going to be hotter. By the way,
my son is nine.
This brings me to Korey Stringer. As you
may recall Stringer was the 27-year-old, 335-
pound Minnesota Vikings All-Pro tackle who
died during training camp in July 2001 due to
heat stroke. Stringer's temperature reached
108.8 degrees when he collapsed on the field
and died the next day.
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition
that can occur with exercise in the extreme
temperatures. Body temperature of over 104
degrees can cause the body's internal ther-
mometer to fail so heat is not disposed of ade-
quately and the body cannot cool down in the
usual way.
Kelci Stringer, the wife of Korey Stringer,
filed a $100 million lawsuit against the NFL,
the Vikings and the team doctors, citing
wrongful death. She has since settled with the
NFL and the Vikings for an undisclosed
amount of money. The NFL also agreed to sup-
port the creation of a heat illness prevention
program for athletes of all ages. She has also


settled with the physicians
involved with the care of
Viking players.
She is now suing the
ay ^ Riddell Corporation, the
maker of the helmet Stringer
S was wearing that day, saying
the company should have
warned him his helmet could
make him hotter and, thus,
put him at increased risk for
SPORTS heat stroke and, therefore,
contributed to his death.
MEDICINE Much to my surprise, a
GREGORY judge agrees that she has a
legitimate claim. A U.S. dis-
SMITH, M.D. trict court judge in Ohio has
... called for a jury trial to deter-
mine whether the Riddell hel-
met manufacturer is legally responsible in
Stringer's death. The judge concluded Riddell
had a duty to warn Stringer his helmet could
make him hotter when wearing it in warm con-
ditions and, therefore, could potentially con-
tribute to heatstroke.
Stringer played football for years. You
mean, we are supposed to believe he didn't
know wearing a helmet made you hotter?
What player doesn't know wearing a helmet


makes you hotter? They all know it. My nine-
year-old son knows it.
The preliminary judge wrote it was "rea-
sonably foreseeable that a user of Riddell's hel-
mets and shoulder pads during extremely hot
and humid conditions might suffer from a heat
stroke and, thus, Riddell owed Stringer a duty
to warn."
I have a really nice ski jacket. It is down-
filled. Now, if I chose to wear it in July and
went out and exercised, it could make me hot
- I mean really hot to the point where my
body temperature could climb to dangerous
conditions. But should there be a warning
label on my jacket for just such a thing? Does
the jacket maker owe me a duty to warn?
The trial is set to take place in November
and, regardless of the outcome, Stringer's
spokesman James Gould believes this is
already a landmark decision because it makes
the connection between the equipment and
heat stroke.
'The best way to uphold Stringer's legacy
is to make sure what happened to Korey does-
n't happen to any other football player, from
the NFL all the way down to kids in Pop
Warner," Gould said.
He went on to say "any manufacturer who
sells football helmets and shoulder pads, and


any league, coach or equipment manager who
uses such equipment without a heat stroke
warning does so at his own peril."
I spoke with Jeffrey Reel, who teaches a
sports law course as an adjunct professor at
the Florida Coastal School of Law, for a legal
opinion on this matter.
"When you're dealing with products liabili-
ty, the plaintiff can claim that the manufacturer
owed a duty to warn consumers about a poten-
tially dangerous aspect of the product," Reel
said. "Of course, you're going to have to con-
vince a jury that a reasonable person would
need such a warning and that not providing
such a warning was one of the main factors
that caused the injury, or death in this case.
Those will be difficult arguments to make in
the Stringer case."
This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacementfor treatment
by your regular doctor It is only designed to offer
guidelines on the prevention, recognition and
care of injuries and illness. Specific concerns
should be discussed with your physician. Mail
your questions to Gregory Smith, M.D., Sports
Medicine, 1250 S. 18th St., Suite 204,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Call 261-8787
or visit www.gsmithmd.com.


4


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


Sign up for soccer
Amelia Island Youth Soccer online registra-
tion is still open through Aug. 2. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com.

Elm Street awards banquet
Elm Street Little League will hold its award
banquet at 2 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Martin Luther
King Jr. Center. For information, contact
Wayne Peterson at 753-1663.

Round robin tennis tourney atAIP
To raise additional funds for the Interfaith
Dinner Network, which benefits Hope House
clients, Amelia Island Plantation will be spon-
soring a round robin tennis tournament Aug. 8.
The tournament is open to players of all levels,
men and women, for $30 per person, including
lunch. The tournament will be divided into
social and competitive players with a grand
prize of a new Head tennis racquet plus a 20
percent discount for participants at Amelia
Island Plantation's tennis pro shop.
Courts open for warm-up at 9 a.m. and play
begins at 9:30 a.m. Lunch with overview of IDN
is at noon. After lunch, courts open to all partic-
ipants at no extra charge for additional play
Call the Pro Shop 277-5145 to register.
Payment may be made upon arrival with all
profits donated directly to the IDN.
IDN is a non-profit organization as a part of
the Homeless Coalition of Nassau County,
which works with the ministerial association to
offer dinners to the homeless and hungry and
those in need of temporary help within the
community. This pilot project involves 12
churches on Amelia Island with dinners pre-
pared and served at the Salvation Army's Hope
House at Ninth and Date streets. The teams
have served more than 3,000 plates in 2009.
They are expanding the program to include
Yulee and Callahan.

Umpires recruited
Baseball and softball umpires can earn
extra cash by joining the fastest growing
umpires association in Northeast Florida, the
River City Umpires Association. Contact Terry
Padgett at (904) 879-6442 or Aaron Knowles
at (904) 962-7184.
River City Umpires is currently recruiting
both men and women who are interested in
officiating baseball and softball and live or work
in Baker, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Putnam, St.
Johns or Nassau county For information, visit
www.rivercityumps.com.

Back to School beach run
The second annual Back to School Beach
Fun Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K (one mile)
will be held Oct. 17 at Peters Point on Al A.
The event starts at low tide, 4 p.m. Registra-
tion information will be available in August. The
day includes music, food and awards. Begin
training now. Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit Communities in Schools of
Nassau County.

Baseball softball lessons
Baseball and softball lessons are being
offered by Coach Shelly Hall for ages five to
high school. Call 583-0377 for information.

YMCAflagfootball
The McArthur Family YMCA teams up with
the Jacksonville Jaguars and NFL Flag
Football for its fall youth flag football program.
Register through Aug. 8. Practices begin the
week of Aug. 24. The season kicks off Sept. 5
and the last game will be held Oct. 24. All
games will be played Saturday mornings.
Games and practices will be held at the fields
behind Kmart in Fernandina Beach.
The league is open to anyone ages 4-14 as
of Aug. 1. Cost is $50 for YMCA members and
$100 for non-members (financial assistance is
available). All players receive a NFL Flag
Football jersey and an end-of-the-season
award. Call 261-1080 or visit http://www.first-
coastymca.org/mcarthur-branch.

YMCAfallvolleyball
The McArthur Family YMCA is introducing a
new fall volleyball league. Register through
Aug. 8. Practices start the week of Aug. 24.
The season runs Sept. 10 through Oct. 29. All
games and practices will be held in the
McArthur YMCA gymnasium with games on
Thursday nights.
The league is open to anyone ages 8-14 as
of Aug. 1. Cost is $50 for YMCA members and
$100 for non-members (financial assistance is
available). All players receive a volleyball jer-
sey and an award at the end of the season.
Call 261-1080 or visit http://www.firstcoastym-
ca.org/mcarthur-branch.


HOMELESS
ANIMALS...
THEY'RE DYING FOR
A 2ND CHANCE.
ADOPT A COMPANION TODAY.








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* If you thought you could not refinance
due to equity issues, we may be able
to lower your rate drastically without
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* We only care that you don't have any
late mortgage payments in the last 12
months
* Convert your Arm's or Interest Only
loans into fixed rates
Call Now For Details!
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Fran Holland 904.753-1862
FAMB Member


YMCAtenniscamp
The McArthur Family YMCA is teaming up
with Amelia Island Plantation to hold a tennis
skills camp this summer. The camp is available
for kids ages 8-14. Cost is $85 for members;
$100 for non-members. There will be two ses-
sions in August, Aug. 10-14 and Aug. 17-21.
The camp will be held at the Amelia Island
Plantation tennis facility and will be led by the
AlP tennis pros. For registration information,
contact the YMCA at 261-1080 or e-mail tchris-
tenson @firstcoastymca.org.

Soccer referee course offered
The following soccer clubs are hosting the
Grade 8 (entry level) referee course. Visit
http://fsr-inc.com/ Welcome.aspx to register.
Contact Mike Goodman, director of coaching
of Amelia Island Youth Soccer, at
aiydoc@aiysoccer.com with questions.
* First Coast Soccer Club from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Aug. 1, from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 2 (test day) at
Kumon Math & Reading Center, 13947 Beach
Blvd., Ste. 109, Jacksonville.
* Westside Soccer Club from 8:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. Aug. 8 and from 1-4:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at
Venetia Terrace Baptist Church (by Westside
Soccer fields), 5284 118 St., Jacksonville.
* Creeks Soccer Club from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Aug. 15 and from noon to 5 p.m. Aug. 16
(test day) at Veterans Park (Creeks Soccer
complex), 1332 Veterans Parkway,
Jacksonville.
* Jacksonville Soccer Club from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Aug. 22 and from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 23 (test
night) at Chuck Rogers soccer park behind
First Christian Church of Jacksonville, 11924
San Jose Road, Jacksonville.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports Association
meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee. Call 261-1075 or
277-1609 for information.

TurdeTrotSept5
An earlier start and some free extras are in
store for participants in this year's Turtle Trot
5K/10K race and 1.5-mile walk on Labor Day
weekend. The annual event will begin at 7:30
a.m. Sept. 5, a half hour earlier than last year.
After the race, runners can freshen up with
a free shower at the Atlantic Recreation Center
and spend the rest of the day on Amelia Island.
Runners and walkers can present their race
bib for free admission to Fort Clinch State Park
for the remainder of the day. An awards cere-
mony with door prizes will follow the event with
a grand prize of a four-day, three-night stay at
the Amelia Island Plantation.
The race will again feature professional
scoring from 1st Place Sports in Jacksonville,
using an electronic chip-timing system. The
5K, 10K and 1.5-mile non-competitive walk will
start and finish at the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center with the last half of the 10K
running through Fort Clinch State Park.
Half-mile and one-mile fun runs for children
10 and younger will begin at 9 a.m. In another
change this year, the kids' runs will be free.
The goal is to encourage young people to run
and make the entire event more affordable for
families, Hill said. Registration is required and
youth finishers will receive a ribbon at the end
of their run.
A popular feature is returning this year -
original T-shirt artwork by Fernandina Beach
artist and sea turtle volunteer Sandra Baker-
Hinton. All pre-registered walkers and 5K/10K
runners will receive a T-shirt with shirts avail-
able on race day while supplies last. Proceeds
benefit the Amelia Island Sea Turtle Watch and
sea turtle patrols inside Fort Clinch State Park
along with the running club's youth running
programs.
Entry fees through Aug. 28 will be $20 per
person or $15 for members of Amelia Island
Runners. After Aug. 28 through race day, the
fee will be $25 for everyone. Entry forms and
online registration are available at the club's
website, www.AmelialslandRunners.com.
Forms are also available at Club 14 Fitness,
Red Otter Outfitters and other locations. Visit
the AIR website or call 277-3676.

SailingClubmeets
The Amelia Island Sailing Club meets the
first Tuesday at the Kraft Athletic Club. Social
hour is at 6:30 p.m; meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Steinkamp at 261-5213 or
visit www.ameliaislandsailing.org.

Challenger Bowling
Nassau Challenger Bowling League for the
physically and mentally challenged meets the
second Saturday of the month from 3-5 p.m. at
the Strikers Family Bowling Center in Yulee.
Call Melinda Willaford at 261-3136.


Don't Miss

Nassau County Night
with the at the
4jt $i.A- GR'OUN
,g~h e^^^


Monday, August 17
Game Time at 7:05, Festivities begin at 6:00
Enjoy the Monday Night
Belly Buster Buffet!
For just $20 geta Homeplate Boxticket plus an
all-you-can-eat buffet of hot dogs, hamburgers, popcorn,
ice cream treats and soft drinksfrom 6:00-9:00 PM!
Sponsored By:
Golf Club of North Hampton
The Island Chamber
Clyde W. Davis, PA Prudential Realty
Rick Keffer Dodge ChryslerJeep Woody's BBQ
Advanced Disposal/ Fernandina Beach Memorial UMC
Stateline Animal Hospital Paul ClarkFord Mercury
Amelia Hotel atthe Beach Griswold Concrete Pinch-A-Penny
Amelia RiverExcursions MedicalWeight Prudential Realty
Dick'sWingsand Grill Management Clinics T&ASports
Cal35-86 rvsi0wwjxune o


FISHING COUSINS


Cousins
Chad
Schreck,
above, and
Vett
Sanders,
left, Caught
these fish
July 21.
Schreck
caught a 24-
pound bar-
racuda and
Sanders
landed a 12-
pound king
mackerel in
the waters
off Amelia
Island.
SUBMITTED
PHOTOS


COLLEGE BOUND


SUBMITTED
Recent Swain County High School graduate Nick Lancaster signed a scholarship to
play baseball at the collegiate level for Southern Utah University after an astounding
four-year career with the Maroon Devils in Bryson City, N.C., that included two con-
ference championships and two all-conference recognition. The hard-working first
and third baseman is the son of Todd and Janene Lancaster and the grandson of
Don and Gail Lancaster, who reside in Fernandina Beach. Taking part in the signing
were Lancaster's coaches, who have helped him progress throughout the years, front
row from left, SCHS baseball coach David Peterson, SCHS athletic director Frank
Maennle, Chuck McMahan, Jim Hipp, Todd Lancaster, Kevin Allman and Perry
Shuler. A special thanks goes to the Burbank family of Fernandina Beach for the
excellent batting cages that contributed to his success.


Beautiful hardbound collectors' edition will be printing on acid-free paper.
This pictorial history will contain up to 96 pages, over 100 years in words and
pictures, utilizing more than 250 photographs.SAVE BY ADVANCE ORDER.
Your cost is only $24.95 plus $1.75 tax per copy. Only those who order in
advance are assured of obtaining a copy. After publication, remaining copies
will sell for $34.95 plus $2.45 tax per copy. Delivery is scheduled for Fall 2009.
A gift you know will be appreciated and cherished. This history in words and
pictures will analyze Fernandina Beach and outline the many urban changes.
L. -EaMK __


We need to borrow your old pictures for the publication of this book!

RETURN ORDER BLANK TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
Please enter my order for: A Pictorial History of Fernandina Beach, Florida

_ copies) STANDARD EDITION @ $24.95 + $1.75 tax

_ copies) LIMITED EDITION @ $75.00 + $5.25 tax
) I am enclosing payment in full.
) Please ship my books) to the address below. I have enclosed an additional $7.00 for each book shipped.

NAME

ADDRESS


CITY


STATE


PHONE

MAIL TO: The News-Leader, 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 261-3696


SPORTS SHORTS


BLACK




MAGENTA


141 FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader














SPECIAL PHOTOS
Steve Pickett's "4/0" kingfish team took home this brand new 15-foot Carolina Skiff,
Mercury outboard and a Loadmaster boat trailer when Spencer Lesage reeled in his
winning 37.4-pound king mackerel. Pictured, from left, standing, are Steve Pickett,
William Lesage, Walker Palmer and Steve Pickett, Jr.; in the boat, from left, are
S -. Charlie Palmer, Spencer Lesage, Carter Pickett and Colby Lesage. Not pictured:
Jimmy Pickett.



David Thompson of Atlanta, Ga., fished on Jim Wilson's "Gray Beard" sport fishing 1 a t so u th jetty ro ck s
boat and boated this 34-pound king mackerel. The big king hit a live pogy fished on apt. Danny Flynn reports a nice minnows and Spanish sar-
the top between St Marys channel markers one and two. Charlie Hooks was also fish- school of red drum holding at the tip dines.
ing aboard the "Gray Beard." of the St. Marys south jetty rocks Surf fishermen will find
During the incoming tide. Flynn has an excellent tide this week-
also been leading his charter clients to St. end with a high falling tide
ie. at 4 a f 1Marys jetty tarpon weighing to just over 100 arriving at sunrise. Beach
Whether r buying or selling pounds. Both red drum and tarpon are taking fishermen are reporting bon-
sp k it tli r l live pogies fished on the bottom with 30- to 50- nethead sharks running in
speak ith the realpound class fishing tackle. the surf and measuring up to
SS With a high tide arriving at 5:48 a.m., both three feet in length. Great
has made it happen. tarpon and red bass fishermen will miss a ON THE sport for the young surf fish-
h a m .ade ' ' ha p morning rising tide. The last few hours of the WATER ermen. Small sharks are tak-
$7 million it n CO . falling tide historically produce both tarpon W E ing fresh shrimp and cut
. . ' and red drum while anchoring on the river TERRY baits. Whiting weighing to
Sea r- to-d ' rVside at the tip of the St. Marys south jetties LACOSS two pounds are also running
and also fishing right on the bottom with live in the surf and taking fresh
Vie be it f' ' ," " pogies. shrimp fished on a No. 1
W the eSt lSt FA is still a good bet this weekend for a kahle hook.
Sme ia / ' ~ '' ". '" variety of pelagic species, including king Backwater fishermen will experience a per-
e(i a' . mackerel, cobia, barracuda, grouper and red fect high falling tide while targeting redfish,
snapper. Some of the more successful sport sea trout and those hard fighting jack crevalle
www.propertieso(ant and rida.corn fishing boats are anchoring over a rock ledge with topwater plugs. Some of the more pro-
-.' , " and fishing on the bottom with live cigar min- ductive topwater plugs include the Chug Bug,
nows, mullet or menhaden for grouper and Devil's Horse, Skitter Walk and the Top Dog
'.!. red snapper. Live baits are also drifted off from in mullet color patterns.
7t. the stern for king mackerel, cobia and the
occasional sailfish or dolphin. The News-Leader encourages local anglers to
Claudia WattLarge menhaden schools continue to hold submit photographs of their catches. E-mail pho-
la dia Wats o just off the beaches at the north end of tosto bjones@fbnewsleadercom, mailthem to
RE/MAX Professional GroaUp Cumberland Island and just off the beaches of PO. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035, or
R.H, .a Amelia Island from Main Beach to Amelia drop them by the office at 511 Ash St. in Fern-
303 Centre Street, Suite 102 Island Plantation. The St. Marys sea buoy is a andina Beach. Call Beth Jones at 261-3696for
Located in Historic Downtown Fernandina good bet for jigging up a livewell full of cigar information.
On Amelia Island __.
904-321-1999 OFFICE OR 904-556-4000 CELLULAR/BCIK E'RRY - . Display Advertising deadline for Wednesday is 3 p.m. Friday
"-' E-MAIL: claudiacw@remax:net Classified Advertising deadline is 5:00 p.m. Monday.
. Website: www.propertiesofameliaislandflorida.com \NEW/S Display Advertising deadline for Friday is 3 p.m. Tuesday
Claudia Watts LEADER' Classified Advertising deadline is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.
Please call 261-3696 to place your advertisement.

FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

NEWS LEADER EST OF THE BEST

Just take a moment and fill out our Reader's Survey of your favorite places and become eligible for a $250 cash drawing on August 8,2009. All survey forms
must be received at the News-Leader no later than August 7,2009. All entries must include name, address, and phone number. Mail Entries to:
The News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. NO PHOTO COPIES, PLEASE.
All survey forms must be mailed (only one per envelope), and no entries will be accepted over the counter.
-- -------------------------------- El Iy
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Best Bait & Tackle Shop Best Massage Therapist __
Best Bank/Credit Union Best Nail Salon
Best Bar/Lounge or NightclubBest Nassau County Teacher
Best Bar-B-Q _______Best Nursing Home/Assisted Living Facility ____
Best Bed 'n' Breakfast Best Asian Restaurant__ I
Best Breakfast Best Pastor/Priest _
Best Builder Best Pest Control Company
Best Car Dealer Best Pharmacist___________________
Best Carpet/Floor Covering Store Best Philly Cht_ Steak______
I Best Consignment Shop Best Pizza ,v S
_ Best Chicken Wings Best Plumber 1"_ I
Best Chiropractor ___Best Real Estate Agent ;
Best Church Best Real Estate Office
Best Coffee Shop Best Restaurant With a Vic w\
Best Copy & Printing Center Best Salad Bar I_
Best Dance Sudio Best Seafood Restaurant _
Best Day Care Best Steak in Town ____
Best Dell Best Storage Unit
Best Dentist Best Tanning Salon _
Best Department Store Best Tire Store_
Best Dessert in Town Best Travel Agency _


Best Doctor Best Upholstery Shop I Y
Best Drug Store Best Veterinarian_
Best Dry Cleaners - PLEASE INCLUDE NAME, ADDRESS, AND PHONE NUMBER
Best Electrician/Heating/Air Name I
Name
Best Florist Address
Best Fried Chicken Address .
Best Golf Course__City
Best Hair Salon _State Zip
Best Hardware Store _Phone ___
IBest Home Accessory & Gift Store ___One Entry Per Person Per Week, Please!
Best HitIl/\ Ilutl/Rcirt ____Must Complete 75% of Categories To Be Eligible.

S--------------- F $----------------250 - m
CASH DRAWING FOR $250- ENTER AND WIN1


BLACK




MAGENTA BLACK


yudsure_

B SECTION NEWS-LEADER



'Learning Community' opens Saturday


JASON YURGARTIS
News Leader
H ave you ever wanted to start
your own business, make
money selling collectibles
on eBay or plan your own
special events? Do you want to learn
how to make homemade sushi, brush
up on your digital photography skills
or grow and cultivate plants in your
own garden?
It might sound like a transcript of
a late night infomercial, but if you
answered yes to any of these ques-
tions, you need not order instruction-
al DVDs, stock up on how-to books or
travel to a university, because contin-
uing education will soon be offered
by the local community for the local
community.
On Saturday, The Learning
Community, located at the corner of
Eighth and Gum streets, will open its
doors. And it will offer more than 50
classes in fields ranging from busi-
ness and cooking to art and fitness -
all aimed at providing educational
opportunities for adults that foster
personal development, enhance a
sense of community and encourage
social interaction, according to TLC
founder and president Nancy
Rossiter.
With the help of a couple of
investors, Rossiter is trying to keep
things cost-effective and pass the sav-
ings on to interested members of the
community.
"We're trying to bootstrap our way


Enjoy night

of jazz at

the Palace
For the News Leader
A swinging jazz concert
will preview the 2009 Les
DeMerle Amelia Island Jazz
Festival on Aug. 20 from 7-9
p.m. at the Palace Saloon in
Fernandina Beach.
The event, which will ben-
efit the educational programs
and concerts of the festival,
will feature The Dynamic Les
DeMerle Jazz All Stars, with
vocalist Bonnie Eisele, along
with a special guest, multi-
instrumentalist Dr. Bill
Prince.
A former player with,
among others, Buddy Rich
and Clark Terry, Prince is
professor emeritus of music
at the University of North
Florida.
The Palace show has
become a fun-filled festival
tradition that showcases
some of the musicians sched-
uled to play, along with the
various styles of jazz to be
performed, at this year's
JAZZ Continued on 2B


LeaT more




,l, . ,,I I, . . . : I I 1\ ,,I .I . i. I
l Zi. hl 'I h l -l l '.l I ,, .. iln. l 1 '.v,- .



to keep our classes really affordable,"
she said. "They run from about $50
for a single class to a little more
expensive for the continuing classes
that meet over a period of six weeks."
Classes offered as one-time meet-
ings might later be adapted to more
specific areas of interest or extended
for more in-depth learning. Feedback
from students is the primary way
Rossiter will gauge the nature and
scope of class offerings.
"The idea is if we offer a market-
ing class as a one shot deal and
there's interest in a specific aspect of
marketing like direct marketing, we
can focus on that and offer it the next
time the catalog comes out and we
can get someone to teach that kind of
class," she said.
And if the current offerings aren't
a hit, Rossiter said the course catalog
could also be adjusted as different
classes are offered on a quarterly
basis.
"At this point our art classes and
our fitness classes are our most popu-
lar," she said. "We've had a lot of reg-


President and
founder of The
Learning
Community Nancy
Rossiter stands
next to a sign that
will hang outside
the company's
building on the
corner of Eighth
and Gum streets.
The grand opening
is Saturday.
JASON YURGARTIS/
NEWS-LEADER


istrations coming basically from our
website - they've been filling up pret-
ty quickly along with some of the
writing classes. So we may find that
there just isn't a huge demand for the
business classes and we can just
switch focus."
But Rossiter said this adaptability
wouldn't be possible without the sup-
port of the instructors, from whom
she said she has received an over-
whelmingly positive response.
"Maybe it's something about peo-
ple that are successful want to give


back," Rossiter said. "But just about
everyone I contacted, whether I knew
them or it was a cold call, was inter-
ested. A lot of our instructors don't
even want to get paid -tlcnf.com we
pay our instructors - but they're just
like, 'Don't worry about it, we'd love
to do it, it sounds like a lot of fun.'
And that helps us out a lot with our
bootstrapping."
Even her landlord, Phil Griffin,
has been supportive, allowing them

TLC Continued on 2B


'HEAVENLY

COMEDY'
"Forever Plaid," an Off-
Broadway '50's musical, runs
through Aug. 30 at the
Alhambra Dinner Theatre,
12000 Beach Blvd.,
Jacksonville. You may remem-
ber such '50's singing groups
as The High Lows, The Crew
Cuts and The Four Freshmen.
You probably won't remember
The Four Plaids. As the story
goes, they were run over by a
busload of schoolgirls enroute
to hear The Beatles on the Ed
Sullivan Show. Now, back
from heaven, The Plaids have
returned to perform the show
they never got to do. For
reservations and information
call (904) 641-1212.
PHOTO COURTESY OF
TIARA PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO


Film festival accepting submissions for winter event


For the News-Leader


Amelia Island Film Festival
will hold its second annual
"Festival for Filmmakers" Feb.
25-28 in Fernandina Beach.
The AIFF is now accepting
films in the categories of


Feature (longer than 40 min-
utes), Short (1 minute and
shorter than 40 minutes),
Animation, Documentary,
Narrative Fiction, Other Than
English, Northeast Florida &
Southeast Georgia Special
Interest, Action, Adventure,


Comedy, Drama, Educational,
Horror, Musical, Romantic
Comedy, Satire Social Issue
and Sci-Fi. Do you have an
Amelia Island home video?
Organizers would love to see
it. Visit www.ameliaisland-
filmfestival.org to download


the application form.
Sponsors also are a crucial
financial backbone for the fes-
tival. Visit www.ameliaisland-
filmfestival.org to learn more,
or contact Tony McAdoo or
Che Cantrell at (904) 335-1110
or 753-0987.


-ROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
MUSIC NOTES
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, JULY31,2009
/ FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


Gullah/

Geechee

Nation

celebration

Festival Aug. 21-23

For the News Leader
The official festival of the
Gullah/Geechee Nation, the
Gullah/Geechee Nation
International Music &
Movement Festival, will take
people on a historic three-day
journey to the Golden Isles
Aug. 21-23.
This
annual cele-
bration,
which
includes
events in
Yulee,
Nassauville
and
American Queen Quet
Beach, high-
lights authen-
tic presentations of
Gullah/Geechee culture by
natives of the
Gullah/Geechee Nation.
A special ancestral tribute
will be held at noon Aug. 21 in
Savannah, Ga., at the African
American statue on River
Street and continue on the
water as the attendees
process over to Hutchinson
Island, which is part of the
unique Gullah/Geechee
story. A Gullah/Geechee
Tour of Savannah will follow.
On Aug. 22 in Brunswick,
Ga., celebrate Gullah/Gee-
chee Reunion Day in celebra-
tion of "Queen Quet Day"
beginning at 9 a.m. with a his-
toric Gullah/Geechee Tour of
Brunswick, Jekyll and St.
Simons islands. An ancestral
tribute will be held at the site
of the Wanderer Memorial.
The Wanderer was the last
enslavement vessel docu-
mented as coming into the
Georgia area of what is now
the Gullah/Geechee Nation.
Gullah/Geechee culture
came about due to the hard-
ships of one of the greatest
crimes against humanity -
chattel enslavement. Yet,
from hardship came a rich
African traditional culture that
continues to exist in spite of
the odds against it.
The true existence of the
culture will be represented
through the various artistic,
musical and historic presenta-
tions that will take place at
Howard Coffin Park in
Brunswick, Ga., beginning at
noon on Saturday.
The event will end at 6
p.m. to allow the attendees to
GULLAH Continued on 2B


FONTHE ISLAND


BENEFIT SHOW
The first benefit show on Amelia Island for the
Harvest of Hope Foundation will be held at Cafe
Karibo, 27 North 3rd St., Aug. 1 from 6:30-9:30
p.m.
Cafe Karibo has agreed to donate half the prof-
its from its pub beer and homemade sangria to
the Harvest of Hope
SFoundation. Established in
1997, the foundation provides
emergency and educational
financial aid to migrant farm-
workers across the country.
Performing will be the
Mike Bernos Trio of
Jacksonville. The three-member band will play
acoustic selections from their upcoming album
"With These Hands," which features two songs


about migrant farmworkers.

PAW PRINTS SALE


* LP*


Nassau Humane *
Society will hold its annu-
al Paw Prints Book and
Plant Sale on Friday, Aug.
7 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Saturday, Aug. 8 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the
Fernandina Beach airport. Please drop off your


unwanted books, CDs, DVDs, artwork or other
items at the shelter located at 671 Airport Road.
All donations are tax deductible.
Contact Gail 206-4092 or Sandra 321-2319 with
questions.

LEMONADE STAND
Visit Petco in Yulee Aug. 1 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. for
- the kickoff of Cats
"// Angels' "Alter
Nassauville" program
and PETCO's
S"Operation Alteration"
spay and neuter proj-
ect.
_ ~ ' , Teens from Disney
Friends for Change, a
group dedicated to helping the environment, will
sell lemonade to help raise funds for the pro-
grams.
Cats Angels will have cats and kittens, and even
a few dogs, available for adoption, and will sell
tickets for its Super Raffle.
The drawing is Aug. 15.

'NOUVEAU ART'
The Island Art Association's next Nouveau
Art show, "Vibrant Colors," will run from Aug. 3-


Sept. 30. .' -, - F-
An opening reception .- .
will be held Aug. 8 from
5-8 p.m. at the gallery, 18
N. Second St.,
Fernandina Beach. For
information call 261-7020.

SHAKESPEARE AT ACT
Tickets are on sale at Amelia Community
Theatre for a touring production of the energetic
comedy, "The Complete
CO.j-w. j Works of William
1a-'a Shakespeare, Abridged."
Se ba Performances are at 8 p.m.
. Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Aug. 8 at the theater, 209
Cedar St. Adult tickets are
- $15; student tickets are $10.
- s The show is a mix of
"pratfalls, puns, clunky
female impersonations, clean-cut ribaldry and
broad burlesque. The gung-ho vitality is impossi-
ble to resist," says the New York Times.
Call 261-6749 for tickets and information, or
come by the box office between 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Submit items to Sidn Perry, sperry@fbnewsleader.com




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 31, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

Kinderstudios will hold
registration from 3:30-6:30
p.m. today for ages 2 to adult
in musical theater, classical
ballet, hip hop, drama,
ballet/tap/jazz combination
classes and tumbling. Call
415-0954 or visit www.kinder-
studios.com.

A radio controlled model
boat fun sail and exhibition
will be held Aug. 1 from 10
a.m. to noon at Amelia
Island Plantation. All model
boats are welcome, working
or not, finished or not, except
gas powered. Spectators,
including supervised children,
especially welcome.
Call Hal Mather at 261-
6420 for details and to
arrange for a pass at the
security gate.

Ballroom dance lessons
with Felix Solis start Aug. 4
at 7:30 p.m. at Club 14
Fitness on 14th Street and
meet each Tuesday in August.
Cost is $60 per couple/$30
individuals for members and
$100 and $50 respectively for
non-members. Contact
Kristen M. DeRoo at 206-
4414 to reserve your spot.

"The Second Chances,"
a documentary television-
like magazine show about
those challenged by adversity,
will be screened at 6:45 p.m.
Aug. 4 at Long Point
Clubhouse, 2 Long Point
Drive, Amelia Island
Plantation.
Refreshments and hours
d'oeuvres will be served
beginning at 6 p.m.
The short program fea-
tures Fernandina Beach resi-
dent KCJ Szwedzinski, a for-
mer drug addict who with her
mother BJ created Project
Chance, which specializes in
raising and training service
dogs for children with autism.
For information, call 261-6161
or visit thesecondchances.
com.

The Association for
Retarded Citizens will hold
an open house at 6 p.m. on
Aug. 6 at ARC/Nassau,
86051 Hamilton St. in Yulee.


VIDEO GAME
CLASSICS
ACROSS
1. *Invaders' home
6. Right-angle
building exten-
sion
9. Absent in the
army
13. Revealed to
the prophet
Muhammad
14. Hula dancer's
necklace
15. Fill with high
spirits
16. Not active
17. " Lobos"
18. Gymnast
Comaneci
19. *Its predeces-
sor is Galaxian
21. *It features
falling puzzle
pieces
23. It doesn't mix
well with water
24. Substance
abuser
25. *Do it to alien
invaders before
they do to you
28. Right to a prop-
erty
30. Immature, as in
an insect in
wormlike stage
35. It's usually on
the main menu
37. Podium
39. Southern
chicken stew
40. Lake in
Scotland
41. Sound of "s,"
pl.
43. Solo
44. Hang loosely
46. Civil wrong
47. Ore smelting


Tickets are on sale for
"Seven Days of Fine
Dining," a drawing to win
seven dinner-for-two gift
certificates to local restau-
rants. A tax-deductible dona-
tion of $50 enters you in the
drawing, with proceeds bene-
fiting the TLC Pregnancy
Center, 410 S. Ninth St., dedi-
cated to empowering women
and men to make informed
decisions about pregnancy
and sexual integrity. Call the
center at 321-2008 to make a
donation and enter the draw-
ing, which will be held Aug. 7.
Only 100 tickets will be sold.
* * *
The Baptist Medical
Center Nassau Auxiliary will
host a Fuzzy Bean Candle
and Health Fair from 7 a.m.-
4 p.m. Aug. 14 in the confer-
ence room of the hospital,
featuring unique candles and
interesting health products. All
visitors will be treated to a free
mini-massage.

Celebrate the 40th
Anniversary of Woodstock
with Woofstock at the
Nassau Humane Society
Dog Park on Aug. 15 from
5-10 p.m. Enjoy mellow music
by Hupp and Ray. Admission
is $15 for adults and $10 for
kids and includes catfish and
hotdogs, coleslaw, fries and
dessert. Beer and wine will be
available for purchase. Best-
dressed wins a prize. Bring
your lawn chairs - but not
your dogs - and be ready to
party!
Tickets are available at the
Nassau Humane Society Dog
Park (across from the
Fernandina Beach airport)
and Redbones Dog Bakery on
South Eighth Street in the
Pelican Palms Plaza.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
will hold its annual Walk and
Candlelight Vigil commemo-
rating International
Homeless Animals Day on
Aug. 15 at Central Park on
Atlantic Avenue in Fernandina
Beach.
The two-mile walk starts at
6:30 p.m. and is followed by a
candlelight vigil. Contact Cats
Angels at 321-2267, e-mail
catsangels@bellsouth.net or


by-product
48. Bone cavity
50. Less than aver-
age tide
52. Tropical
American cuck-
oo
53. Across from
win column
55. Author Fleming
57. Eat a
Joe
60. *Game venue
63. *Video game
pioneer
64. Psychedelic
drug
66. Multiple war-
heads on a bal-
listic missile
68. Chemistry
class measur-
ing instrument
69. It lives in a pod
70. "To no
71. Cocoyam
72. Bottom of
pants
73. Recently
DOWN
1. Mogul rider
2. *Invented by
#63 Across
3. Equals pi times
square of the
radius
4. Pinocchio cre-
ator Collodi
5. Have as logical
consequence
6. Children's book

Enchanted"
7. Author Tolstoy
8. To-do_ , pl.
9. Having wings
10. Dry riverbed
11. Redding
12. Unit of length
of yarn


15. Ensnare
20. Move smoothly
22. Unagi
24. Simultaneous
occurrences
25. *Famous
princess in
need of rescu-
ing
26. Decorate
27. Lace stitch
29. Sunrise point
31. A Supreme
singer
32. Violin-like
instrument
33. Edgar
Poe
34. *Mario's
younger brother
36. God of thunder
38. Dried-up, as in
vegetation
42. Step, as on a
porch
45. Preacher's
post
49. Janitor's chore
51. *It features
Blinky, Pinky
and Inky
54. Airy spirit
56. Lacking guile
or worldly expe-
rience
57. Part of house
frame
58. Hog fat
59. Dunking treat
60. Abel and
Cain's father
61. Popular attrac-
tion
62. *The villains in
video games?
63. An honest
President?
65. What we do to
Spot
67. Stallone


MUSIC(

WhitbyQuinn
Robert Sanders and
Michael J. Howerton will per-
form as Whitby Quinn on
Aug. 1 from 7-10 p.m. at
Indigo Alley, located at 316
Centre St.
As Whitby Quinn, the
Fernandina Beach songwrit-
ers, Sanders (lead
vocal/acoustic guitar) and
Howerton (vocals/acoustic
and electric guitar) combine
their performance and song-
writing talents in an acoustic
eclectic sound that is remi-
niscent of America, Eagles
and James Taylor.
Whitby Quinn's show
comprises mainly original
music with blend of familiar
cover tunes. The duo's CD
"She's Gone" will be avail-
able at a special show price.
Surflineup
The Surf Restaurant and
Bar, 3199 S. FletcherAve.,
Reggie Lee 6-10 p.m. tonight
and 1-5 p.m. Aug. 1; Gary
Keniston 6-10 p.m. Aug. 1
and noon-4 p.m. Aug. 2;
Reggie Lee 5-9 p.m. Aug. 2;
Andy Haney 5-9 p.m. Aug. 3;
Stevie "Fingers" 5-9 p.m.
Aug. 4; and DJ Roc 5 p.m. till
late Aug. 5. Call 261-5711.
Emery inconcert
Post-hardcore band,
Emery, will perform at the
Murray Hill Theatre in
Jacksonville on Aug. 4. Their
newest album, "In Shallow
Seas We Sail," released
June 2, debuted at number
50 on Billboard's Top 200
chart. For more information
visit www.emerymusic.com.
Sounds on Centre
The next "Sounds on


visit the Thrift Store and
Adoption Center at 709 S.
Eighth St.
The International Society
forAnimal Rights, or ISAR,
sponsored the first National
Homeless Animals Day in
1992 by launching a crusade
to enlighten society, elected
officials and the media
about the urgent need to spay
and neuter companion ani-
mals in an effort to halt the
killing of millions of unwanted
dogs and cats each year in
the nation's shelters. It has
since grown into an interna-
tional event. For more infor-
mation, visit
www.isaronline.org.


JAZZ Continued from 1B
event.
Saxophonist David San-
born will headline the 2009
festival, which will run from


SOLUTION 07.29


:NOTES
Centre" concert and street
dance, hosted by the Historic
Fernandina Business
Association, is from 6-8 p.m.
Aug. 7 with music by Face
For Radio.
Bring your lawn chairs
and dancing shoes. Snacks
and beverages will be avail-
able and there will be draw-
ings for prizes.
Gene Knaga
Gene Knaga plays from
8-10 p.m. Wednesday at
the Kofe Hous, 822 Sadler
Road, with acoustic rendi-
tions of today's (and yester-
day's) popular contemporary
Christian songs. Call 277-
7663.
InstantGroove
The Instant Groove plays
from 8 p.m. to midnight each
Thursday at The Ritz-
Carlton, Amelia Island.
tEvolution'
Evolution, with acoustic
rock and ballads, plays every
Friday and Saturday from 6-
9 p.m. at Sandy Bottoms,
2910 Atlantic Ave., Fernan-
dina Beach. Call 310-6904.
DJfun
Enjoy Karaoke at the 11th
Frame Lounge in Yulee
Bowling Center Saturdays 9
p.m.-close and at the Palace
Saloon Sundays 10 p.m.-1
a.m. with DJ Lamar & DJ
Rock Candy. Ladies Night
Out (Party with Rock Candy)
is at the 11th Frame Lounge
in the Yulee Bowling Center
on Tuesday 8 p.m.-close.
For information, contact
DJ Lamar at (904) 349-1405,
djlamarmail@yahoo.com or
myspace.com/djlamarspace.


The Intergalactic Bead &
Jewelry Show will be held
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 15-
16 at the Morocco Shrine
Auditorium, 3800 Saint
Johns Bluff Road S., Jackson-
ville. For information and a
discount admission coupon
visit www.beadshows.com.
Admission is $5 Saturday, $4
Sunday and children 12 and
under, free.

Tickets are on sale for
Cats Angels annual Super
Raffle to support its
spay/neuter/education pro-
grams. More than 50 prizes
are donated by area mer-


Oct. 2-11. Additional players
and a full schedule of shows
and programs will be announ-
ced at the Palace concert.
Advance tickets to "Jazz At
The Palace" can be purchased
for $25 at the UPS Store in
the Island Walk Shopping
Center, 1417 Sadler Road,
277-0820, at the UPS Store


I


46368 State Road 2000, Suite
1,Yulee, 225-8840, online at
www.ameliaislandjazzfesti-
val.com, or at the door if not
sold out. From 6-7 p.m. before
the show, Amelia Island
Carriages will offer compli-
mentary rides around the
downtown area to all ticket
holders.


chants, restaurants and indi-
viduals, including jewelry, art-
work, a 3-night stay for two at
Amelia Island Plantation, a
one-night stay at Elizabeth
Pointe Lodge, salon services,
golf packages and more.
Tickets are $1 each, $5 for
seven, $10 for 15 or $30 for
50 and available at the Thrift
Store and Adoption Center,
709 S. Eighth St., and by mail
to Cats Angels, P.O. Box
16072, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035. Include your name,
phone number, number of
tickets and check. Call 321-
2267. The drawing will be
held Aug. 15. You need not
be present to win.

The next WIN WIN meet-
ing is Aug 17 at 6:30 p.m.,
hosted by Karen Lee of
Heron's Swim & Sport and
Judy Richardson of Divine
Finds, 4924 First Coast Hwy.,
Amelia Island.
Women in Nassau helping
Women in Need is a women's
networking group established
to benefit women dealing with
cancer, through Gerri's
Corner.
Bring a $35 check payable
to WIN WIN, which includes
dinner and a beverage. Get a
$5 discount if you bring a door
prize to be raffled at the
Fashion Show on Sept. 20.
Donations are tax deductible.
To RSVP contact Connie at
759-0745 or e-mail
connie@winwinnassau.com.
Visit winwinnassau.com.
* * *
Rescuing Animals in
Nassau, or RAIN, will hold its
annual spaghetti dinner
fundraiser from 4-8 p.m.
Aug. 22 at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center in
Fernandina Beach.
Tickets are $10 and
include spaghetti with sauce
of choice, salad, bread, drink
and dessert. There will also
be a silent auction and enter-
tainment.
Tickets go on sale starting
Aug. 1 at Fernandina Beach
Animal Clinic, Lofton Creek
Animal Clinic, Nassau
Veterinary Clinic, BarkAvenue
Pet Boutique and Bucky's
Best Friends Card and Gift.
For information call RAIN at
(904) 879-5861 or e-mail rain-
humane@yahoo.com.

Ever wonder what
Facebook, Twitter and blog-
ging are? The Amelia Island
Museum of History, 233 S.
Third St., is offering "Facing
Facebook," an introductory
seminar on using today's
online social networking tools,


All proceeds benefit the
Amelia Island Jazz Festival, a
not-for-profit 501(c) 3 corpora-
tion, and its newly established
jazz scholarship program.
For information, call (904)
504-4772, visit www.ameliais-
landjazzfestival.com or e-mail
info@ameliaislandjazzfesti-
val.com.


Four-Way Scramble


GULLAH Continued from 1B
support evening activities
in the area.
On Aug. 23 at 11 a.m. the
participants will depart
Georgia together in a historic
procession into Florida. Many
Gullah/Geechees on the
southern coast of Georgia
used to cross into Florida for
trade, worship and to connect
with family. This will be the
largest family reconnection as
the group proceeds to Yulee,


SUDOKU


1 2 3

S 3 _ 4

5 367 8

941 52

4 3
72 689


1 2 7 5 4

3 9

6 4 3


Fill in the squares so
that each row, column
and 3-by-3box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Sudoku Difficult
Puzzle #1520D


81 9725436
367481 529
24569371 8
7861 54392
1 23978645
9 5 4 2 3 6 8 7 1
954236871
6725491 83
59831 7264
431 862957


Nassauville and Amelia Island
to conclude with a tribute to
MaVynee "The Beach Lady"
Betsch at historic American
Beach.
The celebration will con-
clude with a traditional wor-
ship service at Little Mt.
Olive, drumming, ancestral
tributes and tributes through
the spirituals. "The Beach
Lady" is one of the sacred
ancestors of the Gullah/
Geechee Nation and was one
of the first to be placed in the
Gullah/Geechee Nation Hall
of Fame. Additional Hall of
Fame inductees will be
announced on Saturday at the
events in Brunswick, Ga.
The craft artisans are also
natives of the area and people
learn from them the tradi-



TLC Continued from 1B
to use a second building
on the property, which will be
outfitted with restaurant
equipment for cooking class-
es at no extra cost in
exchange for fixing it up. And
Griffin's wife, a photographer,
is going to teach a photogra-
phy class.
Rossiter said though the
startup of classes has been
going smoothly, with an out-
pouring of interest from a
variety of experts looking to
share their skills with stu-
dents, she has run into some
minor issues with the city.
After going through the steps
to obtain a local business
license, Rossiter was awaiting
word to make it official and in
the meantime hung up signs
outside the buildings to
advertise The Learning
Community.
"We put up a sign Sunday
afternoon and I get a call
Monday, and they said they
were ready to issue the busi-
ness license, but said since


tions behind the crafts before
purchasing the items.
Books, CDs, and
Gullah/Geechee cuisine are
also a part of the "Living
Marketplace" that will be in
Brunswick and American
Beach.
Founders of the event,
Queen Quet, Chieftess
of the Gullah/Geechee
Nation and Kwame Sha of All
Mobile Productions (AMP)
invite you to come out and
share the culture of your com-
munity or reconnect with
your culture if you are
Gullah/Geechee.
For more details including
group discounts call (843)
838-1171 or e-mail
GullGeeCo@aol.com or
AMPTurnItUp@aol.com.



we put up signs, they couldn't
issue it," she said. "Because
we needed the license, we
had to take the signs down in
order to get it and pay $103
for a sign permit - even
though they were the exact
same signs that had previous-
ly hung outside, just repaint-
ed."
Despite that slight set-
back, Rossiter said after
months of planning, things
are starting to come
together.
"Our goals are to pay our
bills first - as with most start-
ups," she said. "We need to
get through the first stage,
which is the survival stage.
Our investors are looking to
maybe open a few other facili-
ties in North Florida and the
possibility of franchising has
also come up. Our primary
goal is to find out what people
want as far as classes and
offer those classes in an
affordable and community
setting, then just go from
there."
jyurgartis@fbnewsleadercom


at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 27. For
more information, contact the
museum at 261-7378.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with any
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event.
All 1970-75 FBHS stu-
dents and faculty/staff are
invited. No invitations are
being mailed.

FILM/THEATER

Amelia Community
Theatre presents "Six Dance
Lessons in Six Weeks,"
directed by Toni D'Amico and
starring Carey Dresser and
Arlene Filkoff.
Lilly Harrison, retired and
living in a condo in Florida,
hires Michael, a cynical dance
instructor, to give her lessons
in the privacy of her own
home. If these two people
can't settle their many differ-
ences, the first dance may be
the last.
Remaining performances
are at 8 p.m. tonight and
Aug. 1. Admission is $16
adults and $10 students.
Amelia Community Theatre is
located at 209 Cedar St. Call:
261-6749.

The world premiere of
the feature film
"Chiaroscuro, Baby" will be
held at the Florida Theatre
Nov. 4, black tie required.
Tickets go on sale Aug. 7 at
the Florida Theatre box office
as well as Ticketmaster.
Christopher Bolla, Chris-
tianna L. White and Milan
Alley star in the film, produced
entirely in Jacksonville. The
story follows an aspiring
painter who compromises his
ambition for his seductive girl-
friend, only to be torn when
his new muse reignites his
passion.
See the trailer at
www.youtube.com/killacozzy.
Visit http://www.chiaroscurob-
aby.com for information about
the premiere.


+


I


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


CLASSIFIED


3B

NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, JULY 31,2009


To Place An Ad. Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday


100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment &Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 902 Trucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms &Acreage 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercial/Retail 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial


THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 3B


102 Lost & Found
LOST "TOM-TOM" - Big gray tabby
cat, white toes, neutered, no collar.
Lost on Barnwell Rd. in early June.
(904)674-4163 or 261-6074.
FOUND 4G MEMORY CARD
w/photos taken March-May 2009.
Contains movie of Okefenokee Swamp
Park - lots of children/family photos.
(912) 294-4778
LOST DOG - Male, part Collie/
Shepherd. Name is "Shema". Please
call (904)556-1291.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
LOST BASSETT HOUND PUPPY -
Male, 4 mos. old, black & tan, lost
vicinity of Edwards Rd., Yulee. Call
225-8586 or 225-5516.

104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF
TAX MATTERS - and then-some.
Thomas Avery Blair (Tom "the
TAXMAN") - federally-licensed Enrolled
Agent providing services in tax
preparation/ taxpayer representation.
29 years experience in taxation
matters. Call toll-free 1-888-250-5687
or visit httD://www.TomBlairEA.com

105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.






201 Help Wanted
HAIRSTYLIST AND NAIL TECH
NEEDED - Commission or booth rent-
al. Call (904)321-2826 for interview.

EXPERIENCED MEDICAL FRONT
OFFICE - Part-time. Busy dermatology
practice. Fax resume to Summer
(904)261-2166.


201 Help Wanted


APARTMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN
We have an exciting career
opportunity for a Service Technician at
Nassau Club in Fernandina Beach.
The ideal team member will have prior
general maintenance and repair
experience. Apply online today at
www.concordrents.com. Excellent
Benefits!

Earn $1000-$3200 a Month
to drive new cars with ads.
www.YouDriveJobs.com
LAWN MAINTENANCE TECH NEED-
ED - Experience preferred. Driver's
license required. Drug free workplace.
(904)261-0728 or 583-1946

A JANET LYNNE SALON & SPA - is
accepting applications for a stylist/
colorist for a booth rental position.
Discover the difference in our relaxing,
non-competitive environment. Call
Janet at 556-1687 for a confidential
interview. Serious inquiries only.
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
RN - with MDS experience needed.
Competitive pay with benefits. EOE/
Drug Free Workplace. Apply in person,
1625 Lime St.
AMELIA ISLAND YACHT BASIN
251 Creekside Drive
Weekends & Holidays Mandatory
Store Clerk & Dock Hand/Mechanic
Part-Time Position
Ships Store Clerk: answer
telephones, book reservations, store
sales, inventory, cleaning store, and
general office duties.
Mechanic/Dock Hand: Service Yard
-bottom painting and mechanical
experience helpful. Other duties:
upkeep of grounds, cleaning restroom
facilities, fueling and docking boats.
Excellent customer service skills
required.
Apply in person.
No telephone calls please.
ADMINISTRATIVE/CUSTOMER SER-
VICE ASSISTANT - needed ASAP!
Olympic Steel has an immediate
opening for an administrative /
customer service job in Fernandina.
Position Qualifications *Excellent
computer, phone, and time
management skills and ability to multi-
task in a fast paced environment.
Position Requirement *Bilingual-
Spanish/English Interested candidates
please fax/email resumes to 904-491-
8688 olvsteeltradinq.iobs@
olysteel.com. EOE m/f/d/v
TIMES UNION MOTOR ROUTE -
available in Yulee. Excellent part-time
income. Covers Chester Rd. &
Blackrock area. Approximately 4 hours
a day. You must have dependable
transportation & current insurance. To
apply, please contact Jason Green at
225-9170 ext. 3.
OTR DRIVERS - for PTL. Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced NE. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262 www.ptl-inc.com. ANF
ROOM FOR RENT - in salon/spa. Call
(904)491-0991, ask for Jessica or
Summer.
RV Delivery Drivers Needed
Deliver RVs, boats & trucks for PAY!
Deliver to all 48 states & CN. For
details log on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF
HELP WANTED - Join Wil-Trans Lease
or Company Driver Program. Enjoy our
strong freight network. Must be 23.
(866)906-2982. ANF


I 201 Help Wanted I


NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.
Office Assistant/Customer Service
- Part-time 25-30 hrs/week assisting
customer, processing jobs. Detail
oriented, multi-taked. Call Emily (904)
261-0740, Amelia Island Graphics.
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need employ-
ees to assemble products at home. No
selling, any hours. $500 wkly potential.
Info 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-1380.

LAMB CHRISTIAN DAY CARE - now
hiring (2) part-time positions. Apply in
person at 601 Centre St.
$140,000
$89,000
That is the '08 income of the top
23% and top 55% of our agents
respectively at Reserve National Ins.
Co. Our agents enjoy: free direct mail
leads fantastic contest and exotic
trips among the top commissions
and renewels in the industry.
Alan Thomas (904)891-9787
athomas@unitrin.com
LMT Position Available - in
expanding Chiropractic & Wellness
Center. 2 years minimum experience
required. Please call (912)882-8888.

S 204 Work Wanted
PART-TIME EXPERIENCED HOUSE-
KEEPER - Energetic, detail-oriented,
team player. Must be flexible on hours,
occasional weekends. Condos, offices,
residential. Must have transportation!
Great pay! Serious inquiries only!
References required. (904)261-2747
HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
LIVE IN CAREGIVER/NANNY JOB
WANTED Spanish lady (Hablo
Espanol). Have good experience &
references. Call (912)674-6781.
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


207 Business
Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF



301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF

305 Tutoring
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.



503 Pets/Supplies
SIAMESE/PERSIAN MIX KITTENS -
Free to good home. (904)225-9940
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES - 9 weeks old.
$100/each. Mother & father on site.


601 Garage Sales
SAT. 8/1 - 96007 Hidden Marsh Ln.,
in Fiddlers Walk Subd. off Barnwell Rd.
Household items, clothes, VHS tapes
(.50) most items $1.00. 8am until
noon.
MOVING SALE - Everything must go.
Lots of furniture, home decor, & kid's
items. 18 N. 18th St. Sat. 8/1, 8am-?
YARD SALE - 95350 Karen Walk. Fri.
7/31, Sat. 8/1, & Sun. 8/2, all day.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE - Sat.
& Sun., 8am-4pm. 76237 Long Pond
Loop (off William Burgess Rd. in Yulee -
follow signs). Baby items, laptop, TV's,
clothes, & more.
HUGE SALE - Sat. 8/1, 8am-? 87509
Creekside Dr., Yulee (off Roses Bluff).
Furniture, fridge, youth baseball equip.,
PS2, (2)DS lite, gamecube & games for
all, boys clothes sz 12-16, and too
much more to mention!
EGANS BLUFF - Sat & Sun, 7am-3pm.
MULTI-FAMILY. South side of Simmons,
1921 Lakeside Dr. North. See list on
Craigslist - search 'Fernandina'

YARD SALE - Sat., 8am-12pm. 877
Diane Dr., off S. 14th St. Women's &
men's clothes 1-2-3X, some furniture,
lamps, household misc., electric hand
tools.
YARD SALE - Fri. 8/1, Sat. 8/2, &
Sun. 8/3, 8am-? Lots of good stuff.
85250 Theresa Rd., off of Miner Rd.
KID GOING TO COLLEGE? - Yard sale
with bedding, lamps, flatware, lots of
clothes including summer dresses, &
much more. Sat. 8/1, 8:30am. 96074
Ridgewood Cir. (Lofton Point subdiv.,
across from North Hampton).


601 Garage Sales
OTTER RUN HOMEOWNERS
COMMUNITY YARD SALE
Sat. 8/1, 8am-lpm.
YARD SALE - 1605 Highland St. Fri.
7/31 & Sat. 8/1. Furniture,
housewares, toys, men's & children's
clothes, electronics, books, much
more.
YARD SALE - Sat. 8/1, 8am-? Girls 9
yrs & under toys & clothes, boys 6 yrs
& under toys & clothes. Home
furnishings, yard stuff, etc.
4160/96190 Rivermarsh Bend, off of
Barnwell Rd. in Riverside subdivision.
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/1, 8am-lpm.
97340 Castle Ridge Dr. in Arnold Ridge
Subdivision off Chester Rd. Tools, lawn
mower, clothes, household items.
GARAGE SALE - Toys, furniture, lots
more. 1636 Ocean Forest Dr. (Ocean
Forest Subdivision). Sat. 8/1, 8am-?
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8/1 & Sun. 8/2,
8am-3pm. 95024 Greenberry Rd.
SR107, right on Hendricks, right on
Greenberry. Back to school sale.
FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS - 7/17 &
7/18; 7/24 & 7/25; 7/31 & 8/1. 9am -
? Off A1A to Harts Rd W. to 86204
Hayley Pl., follow signs. Jerri's This-N-
That Antiques and Collectibles + yard
sale items. Shoes, clothes, dolls,
furniture, fishing, books, China,
vintage fashion jewelry. If the price
isn't right, make a fair offer. Let's make
a deal. Everyone welcome.

602 Articles for Sale
GOLF CART - 2007 Precedent 48 volt.
Like new. (904)631-5822


(904)61-7504 or (904)206-3449 F HONDA FOREMAN 500 4-WHEELER
(904)4)FLORA PARKE NEIGHBORHOOD - garage kept, very clean, less than 15
YORKIE - Female, registered, 1 year YARD SALE - Saturday, Aug. 1st. hrs., $4000. TRACKING UNIT - $500.
old. Needs loving home, prefer fenced 8AM-NOON. (904)548-2232 or (904)553-7982
yard. $400 firm. Call (904)491-5644.


FREE TO GOOD HOME - Cairn Terrier/
Shitzu Mix female dog. Approx. 1&1/2
yrs. old. All shots/wormed. Spayed.
Contact Carl or Jen at (904)310-6016.




601 Garage Sales
PATIO SALE FOR CHARITY - 7/29
thru 8/5, 8am-7pm. 1636 Highland
St., Fernandina. Porcelain dolls, yarn,
clothing, lots more. Low prices!


Nassau County
(Temporary Position)

Applicant must possess college credits in pursuit of
Sociology or Psychology degree, or related fields
with a minimum of three years experience in social
service or an acceptable combination of education
and experience; must have knowledge of various
computer software packages and their operation.

Apps/resumes may be mailed or faxed to NFCAA
Attn. HR Dept., PO. Box 52025,
Jacksonville, FL 32201
or FAX- (904) 398-7480.
Phone: (904) 398-7472
Closing date of application is 8/4/09


MOVING SALE - 1440 Scott Rd behind
the Healing Dome. Large furniture
including; a couch, love seat, twin bed
frame, 2 wood chests, 2 wood china
cabinets, Bistro table with 4 bar stools,
Antique library wood card file. Also
have misc. home decor and antiques
like; 2 area rugs, a toy wood rocker
train, accent pillows and much more.
Everything must Go! 8am-3pm Sat 8/1
GARAGE SALE - Flora Parke Subd.,
31083 Grassy Parke Dr. Sat. 8/1,
8am-lpm. Electronics, piano, clothing,
& much more.


603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF
NEW DIRT BIKE - Suzuki DR-Z125/L.
Asking $2500/OBO. Goggles, boots,
and helmet included. (904)261-0936


antiques & Collectibles Auction
Sunday, August 2, 2009
Preview 10 AM - Auction 11 AM
jfranek, Rntiqued & uctionm
U.S. HWY. 1 Hilliard, FL.
Art including: Fitch, Macmillan,Yale, McDougan &
Spencer. Oak Telephones, Telephone Stocks &
Signs. Furniture. Sculptured Birds. Fossils.
Gold Coins, Coins, & Currency.
Many more Quality items.
PUBLIC WELCOME
To View On-Line www.auctionzip.com
ID #4730. Credit Cards accepted 13%
Buyers Premium Discounted to 10 % for Cash or Check
Sale by: Barbara Speal Bus. Lic. #366
For information call: (904) 845-2870
... Auctioneer: Don Elliott Lic. #1487.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREATPRICE

277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available


CLEANING SERVICE



PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES


Xelley CCeaning &-Mgt.
Services Inc.
Bonded Insured
-We offer "green cleaning"
Won-rentaCproperty mgmt.
CalfXelCey (904)335-1370
EmailXKefCeyCMS@yahoo.com




dNA TIME

Window & House

Cleaning

(904) 583-6331


CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
L LICENSE #694

AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duste
(904) 261-1940

CONSTRUCTION


BRANNAN


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


GARAGE DOORS


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, Inc.
"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much! I
SOperator or door replacements Transmitter replacement
* Broken springs Stripped gears
*Cables Sercefor all m es & models
904-277-2086

HOME IMPROVEMENT


"* /'- i f 11,< 1"
Repair* Rebuild Remodel
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work* Hardwood Floors* Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 *557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003



wOTTO CUITOM
WOODWORKING, INC.
CUSTOM CABINET ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
BOOKCAIEI o TRIM CARPENTRY
HOME REPARI REMODEUNG
HANDYMAN SERVICE
LICENSED & INSURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 904-157-3100






The N(- ,/- A -, ac81
Service 1 Di e c/ ltc- ily!


LAWN MAINTENANCE



Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc.
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
*Plants &flowers, trees, sod
*Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation R E
* Sprinkler Installation ES1,ES
*Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354



H WELBORN
IRRIGATION
- 3 Do it right the first time.
*Complete system designs
* Repairs & modifications
* System tune ups *10 years experience
Licensed/insured
Warranty on new installs
Free estimates * 904-277-8231


LOCKSMITH


NEW & USED CARS


PRESSURE WASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES

261-4353


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* ' ... .. " ... 'iRe.Roofing Is Our Specialty"
"11 "�I 1 . Nassau County's Largest
S.11 ..1 JIJ1 Roofing & Siding Contractor �
Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
AMELIA ISLAND Since 1993
QUALITY PAINTING, INC., Re-Roofing * New Roofing
"Call the Professionals" Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia

(904) 753-1689 261-2233
* RESIDENTIAL Free Estimate
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904-321-LOCK [56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
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Owner: Steve Brookbank


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*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
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Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


I


I




CYAN MAGENTA


4B FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


--f TI0Slorlda-cliioria - - ni


TiersfIlreiM


PLANTATIONS-ACREAGE-FARMS-COMMERCIAL
u IIlFIT mnIBH g IwmR aI rIeEInu lluIM, IIo b M Miue iut
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802 Mobile Homes
FERNANDINA BEACH - 1987 Omni
doublewide, 1.05 acre. New paint, tile,
carpet, textured walls, flower beds,
fruit trees, two out buildings, carport,
12x28 concrete pad w/50 amp power.
Make offer. Appraised at $96,000. Call
(904)491-4367, (904)753-0360.


1804 Amelia Island Homes I


OCEANFRONT - Log Cabin R-3
income. Property remodeled $975K.
Oceanview - Homes needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. Summer
Beach - 2028sf. Short distance to
beach. $415K. Amelia Coastal Realty
261-2770
HIGHEST POINT ON THE ISLAND -
4BR/3BA. 2500sf home with extra
family room & screened in porch. Call
(904)491-4290.
FERNANDINA BEACH
Open Sunday, 1-4pm
534 Tarpon Ave, Unit A. $319,900.
3BR/2BA townhome, near water's
edge, ocean view and breezes. Betty
Carter (904)945-3376. ZipRealty
805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled porch-
es, hot tub. $344,900. (904)556-4500


806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.
607 Antiques
& Collectibles
BASEBALL CARDS - collected from
last 25-30 years. 6 baseball albums
plus 1 carton full of cards, some
unopened. Call Pam (904)849-3662.


609 Appliances


APPLIANCES FOR SALE - Washer,
dryer, stove. $100/each. Call cell #
(828)550-4202. (Appliances are in
Fernandina Beach).
610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.
615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupplv.com. ANF
624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628


It's your right to know.

NOTICE what's going on in your community.


School District Budgets Local Tox Changes


Property Auctions

Adoptions


ro


Public Hearings


NEWSAD
LEADER


Find out aboul public notices in:
News-Leader

Or search online at:

www.floridapublicnotices.com


Woman To Start Professional

. Tug-Of-War League
BEXAR COUNTY - Mary Ann W. applied Thera-Gesic' pain
creme to her sore shoulder and hands and felt so great she
o decided to start a professional tug-of-war league. When asked
who would be the target audience for the new TOW league, she painlessly
replied. "None of your dang business!"
SGo Painlessly-
Endorsedby: 1 11ERAlGESC�


+


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


808 Off Island/Yulee
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
house semi-secluded 1 acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095


809 Lots
MAKE AN OFFER!
Was $97,000. Now make an offer on a
building lot in Old Town and buy it at
your price. Must be sold. Owner
financing. Call 753-3219 for details.
LOWEST PRICED FULL SIZE LOT - in
Amelia Island Plantation. Cul-de-sac.
On marshside. Approved house plans
available. $199,900. Claudia, RE/MAX
Professional Group. (904)556-4000
1 ACRE DRY LOT with SWMH (of little
value) - Raintree Lane, F.B. $78,000.
Call (904)321-1159.

814 West Nassau County
FSBO - 55030 Deer Run Rd. 1.02 ac.,
3BR/2.5BA, fireplace, nice neighbor-
hood, Callahan. $333,000. (904)631-
5822 after 5pm.

817 Other Areas
LAKEFRONT - Grand opening sale!
8/15/09 only. 10 acre dockable lake-
front only $49,900. Wooded park-like
setting on one of Alabama's top recre-
ational lakes. All amenities complete.
Boat to Gulf of Mexico! Exc. financing.
(866)952-5302 ext. 1514. ANF
Absolute Auction - 214+/- acre farm,
house. Pike County near Troy, AL.
Offered in parcels, combinations &/or
entirely. 8/13, 1pm. www.gtauctions.
com (800)996-2877. Granger, Thagard
& Assoc., Inc. Jack F. Granger #873.
ANF
Lakefront Steal - 1.2 acres $49,892.
(In lieu of foreclosure on builder.)
Gently sloping lakefront estate on
private bass lake. Gorgeous unspoiled
setting. No crowds, no noise. Abutting
lakefronts sold for $69,900 & $64,900
- not 1/2 as nice as this one! Exc.
financing. (888)792-5253 ext. 2341.
ANF


817 Other Areas
NC Mountains Closeout Sale - Cabin
shell, 2+ acres with great view, very
private, big trees, waterfalls & large
public lake nearby. $99,500. Bank
financing. (866)275-0442. ANF





851 Roommate Wanted
ROOM FOR RENT - at beach for
stable, mature person. $500/mo. +
$500 dep. Utilities included. (904)310-
6392

S 852 Mobile Homes
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on 1/2
acre lot in Yulee. $700/mo. + $700
dep. Available now. Call (904) 491-
4383 or 237-7324.
SMALL MOBILE HOME - 2BR remod-
eled on 1 acre lot. Hardwood floors, on
pond, great fishing. $625. And one for
$650. Call (904)491-8768 or (904)
321-7062.
3BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE - on one
acre. $750/mo + $750 dep. 3/2
Doublewide - on one acre $850 +
$800 deposit. (904)753-2156
3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on quiet
private property, Roses Bluff area.
Great location. Call for details. $750/
mo. + dep. 261-0728 or 583-1946
YULEE 2BR SINGLEWIDES
Teakwood Mobile Home Park. $500-
$550. Call Marie (904)225-5378.
2 to 3BR - Nice new decor. $600-
$675/mo. Includes water, lawn.
Possible RTO. (904)315-1757 or 613-
8401
3BR/2BA - on 25 acres on Little St.
Marys River. Great hunting/fishing.
Tidal water. Near White Oaks Planta-
tion in Yulee. Fully furnished, all new
appliances, new paint. $900/mo. +
dep. ALSO - 3BR/2BA fixer upper on 4
acres, w/fireplace. Great hunting/fish-
ing. $700/mo. + dep. (904)845-3885
3BR/2BA DWMH - Private lot on
Blackrock Rd. Washer/dryer, dishwash-
er. $825/mo. + dep. (904)206-3423


852 Mobile Homes I " Find The News-Leader on the World Wide Web
852_______Mobile s i .fbnewsleader.com
On Island/In Park- Long term. 1,2& Read the news, e-mail the staff, check the
3BR starting $150/wk. $600/mo.+dep. classified, or subscribe to
Utils avail. Off Island- 2/2 MH, $175/ Florida's Oldest Weekly Newspaper!
wk. or $695/mo + dep. 261-5034.


2BR/1BA SW - in Nassauville.
Remodeled. Rent $550/mo + $550
dep. Service animals only. (904)583-
2009.
3BR/2BA DWMH - Lina Rd.,
Fernandina. 1 acre, fenced backyard.
$800/ mo. (904)557-1253
NICE 2BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE
MOBILE HOME - in Yulee. CH&A,
carport. $750/mo. + deposit &
references. (904)335-7276
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
FOR RENT - (3) 2BR trailers in mobile
home park. $500/mo. + $250 deposit.
Call Debi (904)759-3897.








2 Br, 2 Ba Condo with
view of #2 West Nine
Golf Course, Sawgrass
Country Club. 2 car
garage.

Owner interested in
either sale or trade for
comparable property
on Amelia Island.


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE




PUBLIC INVITED



Saturday * August 1st * 1 till 4 pm



ON ISLAND


1738 Leslie Ct. - 3BR/2BA - 1617 asf.- $499,500





NORTH HAMPTON

85121 Bostick Wood Dr - 4BR/3BA - 2145 asf. - $308,000

86181 Eastport Dr - 4BR/3BA - 2271 asf. - $340,000

Reduced

861384 Hampton Club Way W - 3BR/2.5BA - 2521 asf. $329,000

85259 Nageaque Dr - 4BR/4BA - 4527 asf. $709,900


7 Mariann

o -Dahl
mariann@uniqueameliaisland.com * www.uniqueameliaisland.com
3955 Amelia Island Pkwy * Amelia Island, FL
91-14, 261-3900 * (800) 940-3955

AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION

,






BEST VIEW IN SYPGLASS! SPECTACULAR SUNSETS
6546 Spyglass Offered at$1,595,000 3418 Fiddlers Bend Offered at $475,000
Oceanfront 3 bedroom/3 bath and over 2,400 square feet, Decorator quality on Amelia Island Plantation. Furniture
garage, large balcony Fully remodeled included 3bedroom/3 bath. Manyupgradesandinexcellent
Condition.








FINE EXECUTIVE DEEP WATER ON AIP
LIVING ON THE MARSH 50 Marsh Creek Offered at$1,550,000* Virtual Tour
98 Sea Marsh* Offered at $2,495,000* Virtual Tour A rare opportunity on Amelia Island Plantation. Private home
Serene marshfront & Intracoastal views in this executive home on marsh with a dock. Featured in the Home Garden Tour.
boasting 5,177 square feet of living space. Luxury features Large deck runs length of home High ceilings and light oak
abound. Gourmet kitchen, large master suite, spa like master floors to let in the view!
- bath and surround sound stereo system.
b ss^'^ G ON TS^^^ IdASs 0Mas Cek�Ofe atSitSS^^^^gitS^^S^^^s^^^


O- WM I1925 S. 14- St., Suite

z WIWI I Amelia Island, FL
Sales (904)277-9700

l, Broe Property Managemenl
Surfside Properties, Inc. ThadSmith (904)277-0907


PROPERTIES FOR SALE
I ____________


HILLIARD 3/2 great home with 4BR/1.5BA block home on an acre. Corner lot and fenced.
vaulted ceilings, eat-in kitchen and island, needs TLC. $137,500 Great setting. $89,900 MLS
2 car garage. Motivate seller. MLS# 47266 #48333
$105,900 MLS #49226


4


Angel VanZant
Realtor'


Gialphin


REAL EST VTE SERVICES, INC.
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company


Visit us at www.galphinre.com

(904) 277-6597 Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
(904) 277-4081 Fax

1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32034


NATURES GATE AMELIA SOUTH FLORIDAAVENUE
Custom 3/3 concrete block Furnished 2/2 "end unit" Perfect starter or retirement
home built in 2003 has w/Southern exposure. home in Yulee. Remodeled
inground pool, double lot. Oceanfront pool and great kitchen & bath, tile & laminate,
Home has oversized MBR SS vacation rental possibilities newHVAC.
appliances & granite tops.
#49900 $370,000 #50009 $460.000 #49929 $122.900


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
*2403 Los Robles 1 1 -I I ... r golf clubs and walk the
golf course. Single ...I I .. Ii I. ... with 2 car garage. Living
room and dining room at front of house. Fireplace in family room
which exits to large screened porch. Master bedroom has entry to
screened porch for early morning coffee and bird watching in a natu-
ral setting. Conveniently located to shopping, schools and dining just
off Amelia Island Parkway $1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered patio
and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and fireplace in
living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in pres-
tigious gated community where amenities include a community swim-
ming pool and easy access to the . i i , ,i . .... I I
Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking distance
to the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage. $1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home located in Ocean
Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in back patio
and 2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming countryliv-
i ; i . i ..i;,, i, .i r Point Plantation on three acres ofland
SI . i . II .... Sit back and relax warm evenings in
the florida room or cozy up by the fireplace on the cold winter nights.
Either way this one is a charmer. $1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA - 2795 sq. ft., granite count-
er tops, maple cabinets, stainless steel appliances, washer/dryer
included, centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green in
the NorthHampton Golf( . ....
basketball/tennis court, o ..... i i .. i i
lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television, High Speed
Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400
* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced lot, satellite
dish, tool house. Ten minutes from Amelia Island and convenient to
Jacksonville International Airport. $1150


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS


* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include
swimming pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools
and shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with community
pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Great
south end location. Large 2 car garage. This unit is in excellent condi-
tion. Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the ocean, golf
and shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking a leisurely
drive on A1A through State Parks along the ocean and intracoastal
waterway. $925
* 2012A West Natures Lane-3BR/2.5BA-Lovely townhome centrally
located on the island. Minutes to shopping, schools and the
beach.$1100
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town home
located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal water-
way. Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service. $2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as well
as golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful brick
paver walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front
and rear yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family
room. Home is only one block from the ocean. $900

FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A - 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnished.1 block
from the beach. $750
* 2770 Mizell 102B- 2BR/2BA in Amelia Woods. Fully furnished unit
with community pool and tennis court. One block from the beach.
Avail Sept 1st. $900


S.FLETCHERAVENUE
Spectacular 3-year old ocean
view home sits on a double lot
and has every imaginable
upgrade Call for details
#48550 $1.550,000


Amelia Island
Avery Rd $45,000 Long Point $575,000
Barrington $119,900 Opal Ave $395,000
Blackbeard's Way $1,065,000 Pinedale Road $69,000
Calhoun St. $99,500 Someruelus $99,000
First Ave $295,000 S. Fletcher $995,000
Gaines Ln. $110,000 10th Street $48,000
lan Drive $45,000


Amberwood Ln $67,500
Bennett Ave $225,500/$3
Brady Point Rd $480,000
Cayman Circle $69,000/$
Edwards Road $59,000
Gravel Creek $69,900
High Pointe $119,900
Lafitte's Way $89,900
Lina Road $417,900
Little Piney Island $300,


OCEANVIEW HOME
Great price on this light &
bright beach cottage on S
FletcherAve Steps to the beach
access Zoned for duplex and
easily expanded
#50061 $350,000


Off-Island
Marc Anthony $46,800
150,000 Napeague Dr $165,000
0 Plum Loop $49,900/$66,000
$134,900 Redbud Lane $199,000
Reserve at Deer Run
$55,000-$75,000
Roses Bluff $29,900
Southern Heritage $155,000
US Highway 17 $350,000
000 Wesley Rd 13 61 acres
$899,900
HIGH POINTE
1.2 acre wooded lots in
gated subdivision off
Barnwell Road. Bring
your own builder with
no time limit to build.

$119.900


GRANDE OAKES
Spectacular riverfront living
in this brand new 5/4 beauty.
Gourmet kitchen, 3-car
garage & more.

#44921 $689.000








LOFTON POINTE
Pride of ownership shows in this
well-appointed 4/3 home Bonus
room with full bath over garage
home warranty
#48773 $239900








RIVER GLEN
Nearly new 4/2 home on nicely
landscaped lot with sprinkler
system in new family neighbor
hood close to 195 Built in 2008
and in perfect shape
#48541 $177,000


--I'Sls ae Sls ae


$799,000 - Sandpiper Loop
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$340,000 - Reserve Court $425,000 - S. Fletcher Lot 50'x100'
4BR/2BA in Reserve at Old Bluff Ready to build - Plans Available 2700 s.f.
Nip Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166


-Z




$725,000 - Fernandina Cay - MLS# 43544 $595,000 - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lot - MLS# 45255 $142,000 - The Palms - MLS# 45243
3BR/3BA - Great Ocean View Buy now, Build later, use of existing home 2BR/2BA - Many Upgrades
Nip Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166 Brad Goble - 261-6166







375,000 MLS#49508 $510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365 $150,000 -1311 Broome- MLS# 47106
0 SFacrossfrom te Bel Rer 4BR/3BA - 2578sf - In Seaside Subdivision 1375 s.f. Open Floor Plan
Call me or your agent quickly!
Bra Goble - 904-261-6166 Nip Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


I


I Rentals Rntals Rentas Rentals 1


CLUBVILLA BLACKROCK HAMMOCK NORTH HAMPTON
Serene marsh view condo in 5454 SF of luxury living in this Beautiful 4/3 two-story over-
Amelia Island Plantation. 6/6.5 executive home looks the 4th fairway. Three
Steps to pool and close to Screened & heated pool. sum bedrooms upstairs & guest
Amelia Links Golf Club. mer kitchen, guest suite and suitedown.
RV/boat garage.
#47011$345,000 #50073 $659,000 #49533 $315.000

.Lots & Acreage


m I I


t








6B FRIDAY, JULY 31, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


853 Mobile Home Lots
CAMPER/RV SPACE AVAIL - 50/30
AMP elec. incl., $360/mo. Stationary
camper for one person, $100/wk. Elec
& gas incl. Sandpiper Court 261-6957

854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - $500/mo. Utilities
included. Washer & dryer. (904)415-
5712

855 Apartments
Furnished
AT BEACH - Effic., 1 & 2BR starting
$145/wk. + dep., utils incl. ON
ISLAND - 2-3BR MH's in park $150/
wk. up or $600/mo. + dep. 261-5034
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2/2 flat,
next to tennis courts/pool. Long term.
$900. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)
277-0006.


855 Apartments
Furnished

2BR/1BA APT. - on S. Fletcher.
Completely furnished. $750/mo. +
$250 deposit. Background check req'd.
(904)321-4366 or (904)557-8220
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262



856 Apartments
Unfurnished
SMALL UPSTAIRS 2/1 DUPLEX - on
Clinch Dr. CH&A, new carpet. Quiet
marsh view. $650/mo. + $300 dep.
Lease required. References. (904)583-
0803 after 4pm.
1BR/1BA DOWNTOWN - All utilities
included. $650/mo. (904)468-0411
1BR/1BA DOWNTOWN - Private bal-
cony overlooking Fairbanks House. S.
6th & Cedar. W/D, water, garbage incl.
Svc dogs only. $675 + dep. 556-3002
2BR/1BA - Near beach. $795/mo. +
$795 dep. Call (904)583-3811.


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

A 4BR/3BA - $217/mo. HUD home.
3BR only $199/mo. Stop renting. 5%
dn, 15 yrs @ 8% apr. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext. 5669. ANF
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
ISLAND STUDIO APT. - 422 Pinedale
Rd., Fernandina Beach, 800 sq ft.
$600/mo, 1 month deposit. Incl.
garbage. No Smoking. Available Aug.
1, call M-F 9am to 5pm 904-277-5606
leave message after 5pm.
BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N.
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D.
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
included. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
OCEAN VIEW 2BR - No lease. Service
animals only. $750/mo. + security
deposit. Call (904)261-7750 after 6pm.
SMALL 1BR - at the beach. Quiet. No
smoking. Service animals only. Utilities
included. References, $500 deposit
required. $650/mo. (904)335-1665


lnin I lmice - Hrignl visauimuy smlau j7/ rlrst oastrnwy.- various oInice oaJ1 reroamano-lNew DD./iZDi noume
office suites. Located near A1A and suites to choose from. Located in the in Isle De Mai with screenedin lanai
Highway 17. Wireless internet and resort district and close to AIP. Visit facing pond. Community Pool.Lawn
security system provided. From ParkPlaceofAmelia.com for details and care. Pets allowed. Half off 1 month rent
$200.00 .. 4 ': " i .., pricing. Restaurant space available. with full lease. On Island. $1,650/mo
Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists
5209 Village Way - 3BR/2BA located in Ocean Village. 86059 Remsenburg- 3BR/2BA North Hampton 1,500 sq.
Furnished or unfurnished. Community Pool with beach ft. home. Huge backyard. Wireless access. Pets allowed.
access and Summer Beach membership available for small Half of one month rent with full lease. Off Island.
fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,950/mo $1,300/mo

1913 Perimeter Park - 3BR/2.5BAwith formal living and 96928 Buccaneer - 3BR/2BA home with Italian tile floors
dining. Master with garden tub & granite counter tops. Pets and cedar wood throughout. 3 car garage. W/D and lawn
allowed. On Island. $1,995/mo care. On Island. $1,300/mo

95118 Sandpiper - 2BR/2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck 1994 Amelia Green - Brand new 2BR/2.5BA townhome
over looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities with loft and one car garage. Close to shopping and beach.
included. No Pets. On Island. $1,895/mo Pets allowed. On Island. $1,200/mo

95208 Woodberry- 4BR/3.5BA Summer Beach home with 1969 Amelia Green - 2BR/2.5BA townhome with tile floors
tile floor throughout and large bonus room. Screened in throughout main living. Granite countertops, stainless steel
lanai, 2 car garage and community pool. Lawn care and appliances. Close to shopping and beach. Pets Allowed.
washer/dryer. On Island. $1,750/mo Lawn care. On Island. $1,200/mo

2851 Ferdinand - Brand new 3BR/2BA home in Isle De Mai 2651 Delorean - 3BR/2BA located off Will Hardee - dose to
with screened in lanai. Overlooking pond. Community Pool. schools, shopping and beach, lawn care incd. Pets
Lawn care. Pets allowed. Half off rent one month rent with allowed. On Island. $1,175/mo
12 month lease. On Island. $1,650/mo
96679 Arrigo - 3BR/2BA home located in Beechway. 1600
95015 Sea Walk - Beautiful 3BR/2BA home located in Sea sq ft, split foor plan, covered lanai. Off Island. $1,150/mo
Walk off Scott Road. Split floor plan with large oversized back
yard and short walk to beach. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On 823 N. Fletcher- 2BR/1BA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean
Island. $1,550/mo view with sunroom. Water/sewer included. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,100/mo
96153 Ridgewood - 4BR/3BA home located in Lofton Point
with screened patio and wraparound deck, 2373 sq ft, 86184 Augustus - 3BR/2BA house located in Cartesian
master down and bonus/BR up with full bath, fenced Pointe with fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2
backyard, laminate flooring, upgrades throughout house, car garage. Off Island. $1,100/mo
pets allowed, lawn care included. OffIsland. $1,475/mo
5437 Leonard - 2BR/2BA home located in American Beach.
95141 Amalfi - 3BR/2.5BA town home located in the Villas of Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Summer Beach with community pool. Short walk to beach. Oversized yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $950/mo
Lawn care and washer/dryer. Screened lanai. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,450/mo 314 S. 14th - 2BR/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in
backyard and deck. Pets allowed. Half month free with
96816 Arrigo - 3BR/2BAhome located in Beachway with 12/mo lease. Half month off with 12 month lease. On
oversized fenced backyard. Many upgrades with lawn care. Island. $850/mo
Pets allowed. Off Island. $1,325/mo

Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most From Your Investment Property.
Give Us A Call Today!


H5472 First Coast Highway #1

B~f~|R^AmeliaH Is^fland, loid

Chapin Willams (04) 21-060
Rentals 9am to 5pm/MON-SATC~l0^


857 Condos-Furnished 11858 Condos-Unfurnishedl


Beautiful Oceanfront - fully furnish-
ed 3BR/3BA. Ocean Place @ Summer
Beach. $3000/mo., incl. all utils. Avail.
10/1. Call Marcy, (904)753-6500.
AMELIA LANDINGS - Furnished 2BR/
2BA, water/sewer & garbage included.
Pool. Non-smoking. Service animals
only. $995/mo. + $995 deposit. Call
(904)759-1105 or (904)838-1969.
FOR RENT - Fernandina. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. Utils incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
AMELIA WOODS - 1BR/1BA. Beauti-
fully furnished with vaulted ceilings.
Close to beach access. $840/mo. Call
for details (770)789-2965.

858 Condos-Unfurnished
NOW LEASING AMELIA LAKES
CONDOS - Private & gated luxury
community featuring resort style
swimming pool, tennis court, fitness
center, beach volleyball, & more.
Overlooking a spring fed lake. 1 & 2BR
homes starting at $799/mo. Call today
for a showing (904)415-6969.
www.amelialakes.com
2BR/2BA COLONY UNIT - 2-car gar.,
newly remodeled, pool & tennis court.
No smoking. $975/mo. + dep. & utils.
(904)548-0774, (904)556-5457.
NICE 1BR/1BA CONDO - Newly
painted, garden tub, screened porch, Ig
rooms. Gated community w/ amenities.
$750/mo. Call (904)432-8359
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $950/mo. (904)206-
2313
THE PALMS AT AMELIA - 2BR/2BA
starting at $800/mo. Call about our
early move-in special. (904)277-1983
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated! Ameni-
ties incl. $900/mo + sec dep. Call
912-269-3960.


P Club
Apartments
BestAddress inFernandinaBeach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.
D I I


LONG TERM
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side)., 3-4
BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots of park-
ing. Unfurnished $1,500.00.
* 19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo.+ util., securi-
ty deposit $1,000.Avail.August 2009.
* 4BR/2.5BA Very nice 2500 sq.ft. home at
Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
* 3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island with
beautiful view of Egans Creek. $1,850/mo.
+ Util. Avail Sept. I"
* 3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood PI.,
close to beach and golf course $1350/mo
+ util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit in
Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of ameni-
ties. $950/mo.
*514 S. 14th St.- 3BR/IBA $875/mo.+ util.
security deposit $1,000. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo.+ util.
Security deposit of $1,000.
*2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt. Great
Deck - Oceanview $l,000/mo.+ util.
* 3BR/2BA on First Ave.w/one car garage.
Like new with a partial ocean view
$1,150/mo + util.

VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/IBA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher. Call
for more information

hzIo "A[bzm d OI-[


2003 ChevroletT" W
Monte Carlo SS


.^^rr* ^^P ^r -


3BR/2BA BEACH CONDO - All new.
$800/mo. Annual unfurnished rental.
(904)415-1313
AMELIA LAKES - 1BA/1BA condo.
Personally owned, well kept, very clean
unit, nice amenities. Best value on
property. Great landlord. $725/mo.
Call Tim (386) 846-2951.

860 Homes-Unfurnished

MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
2BR/1BA DUPLEX IN YULEE - Newly
remodeled. $750/mo. + deposit. Avail-
able now. (912)467-3654 or (904)237-
0692.
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1425/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177
NORTH HAMPTON UNFURNISHED
HOME - 3BR/2BA, large backyard.
$1300/mo. One month free with year
lease. Call (912)270-3239.
2BR/1BA/1-CAR GARAGE BEACH
BUNGALOW - 2295 S. Fletcher Ave.
Ocean view, beach access. $1095/mo.
+ deposit. Call (904)759-1105.
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177
3BR/2BA - 1800 sq.ft. Tile floors,
gorgeous fenced yard, all appliances.
2046 Marlin CT. $1375/mo. + dep.
(858)354-8221
4BR/3BA Foreclosure! - $11,500.
Only $217/mo. 5% down 15 years @
8% apr. Buy 3BR $199/mo. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5798. ANF
TIMBERCREEK PLANTATION - 3BR/
2BA, 2-car garage. New home. Avail-
able 9/1. $1100/mo. Call (904) 553-
3445.
NICE 2BR/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE - on
island. 10x12 storage, fenced yard.
$825/mo. (904)556-1663


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.



* 850785 US 17Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq.ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & util.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$19.00 PSF + 3.5 CAM + Sales tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
* Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses.$2,500/mo + tax + util
* DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St. OldWest
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $12 per sf + tax.

6r. 10 71





Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810







Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 bedro, Ini t, i\\ ni ,,-,ll.- It. I..-
3 bedroom garden units * Iih rN \L r .\\
Swimming pool Dishwasher* Laun.1ri tacLiliti.,
Washer/dryer connections* * Washer .1r ..r unillt- \ iiIbi..
Water, garbage & pest control included in r..-nt
Prices starting at $675.�0 per month
*Some features not available in all units
Sio c34 tX*ouN4s-4 A� A44A Ou" 0 eu.4 !
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you i.i , -, .ilk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gateway to Anici., center!

CMA taU! (904) 261-0791
WWvNA .ZItllcdCL\ CI llc1nlt.cLcmi




MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free LimitedTime

* W/D Connections
* Large Closets
- * Pirvate Pations
S�* Sparkling Pool
* Tennis Courts
S^* Exercise Room
, * Close to Shopping
* Twenty Minutes to
6 Jacksonville & Fernandina
City Apartments with Country Charm

(904) 845-2922
37149 Cody Circle
Eastwoo Haks Hilliard, Florida
APARTM ENTS Mon.- Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


MAGENTA


BLACK


860 Homes-Unfurnished
YULEE - Rent, rent to own. 3BR/2BA,
2-car gar., 2 workshops, lots of
storage, studio, on marsh, 2-story
stucco, no deed restrictions, 1 ac
private. Avail now. $1300/mo. Yearly
or short term. 1(865)429-0287
3BR/2BA - like new home with huge
yard. 2 car garage, W/D and garden
tub. Page Hill subdivision in Yulee.
$1100/mo. (904)536-6379.
ROBINHOOD - 1538sf, 3BR/2BA. 2-
car garage, fenced rear yard.
$1200/mo. Amelia Coastal Realty 261-
2770.
3BR/2BA BLOCK HOUSE - Low utili-
ties, W/D, garage, fenced back yard,
on island, open floor plan. $1050/mo.
Please call Angela (904)753-3639
BRAND NEW HOME - 5BR/4BA, 4000
sf, custom made kitchen, bathrooms,
granite, SS appl's, vaulted ceilings, sits
on 1 acre of land, w/option to buy.
$1975/mo. OBO. (904)509-6167
2BR/2BA - with extra room. Pirates
Wood subdivision. Fenced in yard. Pool
access. $975/mo. Security deposit
required. (904)335-0116

861 Vacation Rentals
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.

863 Office
SADLER RD. - Office/retail space
avail. $900/mo. 8th & Gum - 1200sf
+ loft at $1200/mo. 1105 S. 8th -
1065sf $1000/mo. 6400sf $4500/mo.
Beech Street - Former Restaurant
Lease. $1700/mo. Buy $195K. Down-
town - 1900sf at $2000/mo. 1280-
3200sf - Tyler Plaza, Yulee. $14psf.
Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
TURNKEY CLASS A OFFICE SPACE -
in Gateway To Amelia complex avail-
able for professional service firm on an
office sharing basis. If interested con-
tact Sue Armstrong at (904)277-2788.
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
3 ROOM SUITE - utilities furnished.
$625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd. behind
Amelia Insurance. Call George, (904)
557-5644.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597


864 Commercial/Retail
RESTAURANT FOR LEASE - 3800 sq.
ft. 463179 A1A, Yulee. Permits
available for alcoholic beverages. (904)
557-5004
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.




901 Automobiles
Acura Integra - '95 $500. Honda
Civic '99 $400. Ford Taurus '01 $750.
Toyota Camry '98 $850. Police
Impounds. For listings call (800)366-
9813 ext 9275. ANF
BUY POLICE IMPOUNDS - '97 Honda
Civic $400. '97 Honda Accord $500. For
listings call (800)366-9813 ext 9271.
ANF
CLASSIC 1984 CHRYSLER NEW
YORKER - AC, PS, PB, PW. 73,000
actual miles. Call (904)261-3811.

S903 Vans
SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034


+


Nasu o ntysLaresSlctono
Long.T erm Rentals.



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