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FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


TV Continued from 1A
to government," said Bach.
"The city manager said that
in other communities, they had
the distinction (between reli-
gious groups and non-profits),"
Bach said after the meeting.
"That's stupid and danger-
ous, to put in a non-religious
policy."
Czymbor recommended a
citizen advisory committee be
formed to advise the city on
programming the channel. It
was not clear, however, how
programming would be man-
aged in the interim, or whether
SearchAmelia, which has taken
over a large chunk of air time,
would continue its program-
ming.
SA subsidiary of Pirate Com-
munications, SearchAmelia.TV
began broadcasting four hours
a day June 29 and has said it
would increase to six hours a
day beginning Aug 1. Vice
Mayor Eric Childers' brother-
in-law, Lawrence Mackie, who
is involved in Pirate Commu-
nications, approached the city
in April about programming.
Bach said the city did not
have a contract with Search
Amelia.TV,'and added she did
not know if it would continue
broadcasting. She said it would
be up to the city manager and
Mike Rooney, the city infor-
mation technology director, to
decide which programs to air.
Czymbor said at the
Tuesday meeting that Search
Amelia.TV had provided qual-
ity broadcasting, and told com-
missioners that Childers had
no involvement in the city's
relationship with SearchAme
lia.TV.
"It seems to me we need a
board established first," said
Mayor Susan Steger at the
meeting. "We don't have staff
time to look at all the pro-
gramming." Steger became a


PARK Continued from 1A
tionship is very important,"
"If it weren't for Grandpa, I
don't think this ever would
have happened," Doris Mellion
told the crowd. "He saw this
land and loved it, and tried to
build a little community. Many
offers were presented to me
to sell this land, but it wasn't
until the Trust for Public Land
approached me that I said to
one of my sisters, This is what
we need to do.'
"I know our grandpa is look-
ing down- on usjust absolute-.
ly thrilled and delighted with.
.... .- . 1: : .� .. .. . . q


FLU Continued from 1A
health conditions play a role in
how individuals react to the flu.
People experiencing cough,
fever and fatigue, possibly along
with diarrhea and vomiting,
should contact their physician.
Six patients were seen in the
Baptist Medical Center Nassau
Emergency Department with
flu-like symptoms between July
7-13. All patients were treated
and allowed to go home. None
were confirmed swine flu cases.
As a precaution, everyone


CityTVguidelines
All programming must comply with all applicable feder-
al, state and local laws and regulations and meet commu-
nity standards for decency. Live or taped broadcasts will
be considered unacceptable and wll not be broadcast by
the city if in the opinion ,of the city manager they contain
any of the following:
* Any advertising material designed to promote the sale
of commercial products or services, including advertising
by or on behalf of candidates seeking public office;
* Any obscene or indecent material, including but not
limited to sexual content;
* Any advertisement of or information concerning any
lottery, gift enterprise or similar offering prizes dependent
in whole or in pan on chance;
* Use of unauthorized copyrighted maternal:
* Any solicitation of funds;
* Material that defames any racial, ethnic, sexual, age
or religious group;
* Material primarily designed to promote, proselytize, or
otherwise recruit members to religious organizations or
causes or to promote membership in political, racial, eth-
nic, age or sexual advocacy groups;
* Any avocation of violence or fighting words which are
designed to invoke violence;
* Any slanderous, defamatory or libelous materials;
* Any deliberate misinformation, unfair competition,
Invasion of privacy or publicity rights which may result in
harm to any individuals or organizations.


bit of a watchdog herself a few
hours after the meeting, when
she e-mailed Czymbor after
seeing programming on the
city channel.
"It is 9:22 p.m. and our
channel is showing something
about starting your own busi-
ness," Steger wrote to
Czymbor after the commission
meeting. "At the end, they are
selling a book. Let's get that
off the air." The program is one
of those produced by Search
Amelia.TV that has been aired
repeatedly.
Resident Tony McAdoo,
founder of the Amelia Island
Film Festival, said at the meet-
ing that it was "a great oppor-
tunity for the city to have
diverse use of the channel,"
including tourism and educa-
tion. McAdoo noted that, with


everything that's happened,"
she added.
Construction of the park
was funded in the county's cap-
ital improvement plan, and uti-
lized grants and more than
$748,000 in impact fees.
'This is a big deal -and you
know the best part? There's
no debt on it. It's paid for,"
Crawford said after the cere-
mony. "I'm thrilled that every
successive commission
thought the park worthy to be
funded and built"
County Commissioner
Mike Boyle. an advocate of
increasing Nassau County's.
, 1 1i :


who enters the hospital with flu-
like symptoms is masked imme-
diately and, if admitted to the
hospital, cared for in isolation,
according to the hospital. All
staff that work with these
patients wear masks. Every
patient has a private-room in
the hospital's new wing, which
helps prevent the spread of
infection. The hospital's infec-
tion control team is working
with local physicians and the
county health department to
monitor the situation.
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


more than 1,000 local hotel
rooms with televisions, visitors
could be exposed to city
events. He also suggested the
city "look at the possibility of
establishing a public advisory
council for the TV station."
Commissioner Jeffrey
Bunch asked if the city could
request another channel from
cable franchiser Comcast, and
was told the city could possibly
have up to two channels. But
Bunch's motion to table the
PEG policy in order to find out
about a second channel was
not supported by any other
commissioners.
'This resolution is not set in
stone," said Commissioner
Ken Walker. "I'm certainly
open to discussion of chang-
ing or prohibiting anything we
need to address."


parkland, said he thought the
park would be a boon to the
county.
"It's spectacular," he said.
"And it appeals to people from
all age groups - from retirees
who just want to stand on the
fishing pier with a line in the
water, to young adults who
wish to launch a boat, to young
children who can use the beau-
tiful play area."
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


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BEAR Continued from 1A
"It either crossed the bridge
or swam here," Shelton said,
and she expects it to swim or
cross back. 'They have a very
strong homing instinct, and
they will head for home."
State wildlife officials are
monitoring the bear's move-
ment and expect it to leave the
island. To report a sighting, call
the wildlife alert hotline at 1-
888404-3922.
This is the black bear's nat-
ural habitat, Shelton reminded.
"It's a rare opportunity to see
wildlife in their natural habitat."
It is unlawful to shoot a bear.
"Black bears are protected,"
Shelton said. She also noted,
"We've never had a document-
ed human attack by a bear in
the state of Florida." "
According to FWC officials,
the bear has been reported in
the North Florida area for sev-
eral weeks. They believe it is a
bear relocated from Palm Beach
County on June 24. He was
released in Pinhook Swamp, in
the northern section of Osceola
Wildlife Management Area in
Baker and Columbia counties,
on June 25. He has been aver-
aging between three and five
miles a day.
This is mating season and
Florida black bears are more
active, looking for mates. "In
addition to looking for a mate,
the bears are also searching for
food sources within their home
range," Shelton said.
"Problems arise when bears
have access to food sources
such as pet foods, garbage, bar-
becue grills, bird seed or live-
stock feed. Bears learn very
quickly to associate people with
food," Shelton said. "Black
bears normally are too shy to
risk contact with humans, but
their strong food drive can over-
whelm these instincts."
Residents can help this bear
"move on" so it does not


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Humans and bears
If you see a bear, remain calm.
"Don't run away Walk calmly toward a building or vehicle
and gel inside." said Rebecca Shelion of the Florida Wildlife
Service. "If you have children or pets, bring them inside, too.
You also can encourage the bear to leave. Bang pots and
pans, or blow an air horn or whistle. The more stressful a
bear's encounter with you. the less likely it is to come back."
If a bear is in a tree, leave II alone. Remove people and
dogs from the area. The bear usually will come down and
leave after dark when it feels sate.
Properly scoring or securing garbage discourages bears.
Birdfeeders and grills should be stored in a secure place,
such as a garage or a sturdy shed. Garbage should be
placed outside on morning of pickup rather than the night
before.
"Another way people can help is to feed pets indoors or
bring in dishes after feeding," Shellon said. "Keep barbecue
grills clean, and store them in a secure place. Picking ripe
fruit from trees and picking up fallen fruit removes another
food source."
For more information, visit www.myfwc.com.


become a problem by properly
storing or securing garbage,
barbecue grills and pet dishes.
Relocating the bear is not a
good option, because there are
few places to relocate bears
where they will not encounter
people.
"Many people wonder why
we 'simply' don't move the bear
to another area," Shelton said.
'"he problem with that is bears
have a rather strong homing
instinct, and moving bears
exposes them to increased


potential for vehicle collisions
and often puts them in another
bear's home range."
Another important reason
for not relocating bears is that it
requires chemically immobiliz-
ing the animal.
'This subjects the bear to
additional stress with no guar-
antees of how it will react
around people before it goes to
sleep or how it will handle the
administered drug," Shelton
said.
mparnell@fbnewsleader.com


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FRIDAY, July 24.2009 NEWS News-Leader


'Forgotten War' remembered


Do the dates June 25, 1950,
through July 27. 1953, trigger
any significant memories? What
about the Battles of Inchon,
Bloody Ridge, Heartbreak
Ridge, ITwin Tunnels, White
Horse, Old Baldy or Pork Chop
Hill?
They should. This period of
American history and the spe-
cial. details of these events,
where lives were forever
changed, are still freshly
embedded in the minds of many
Korean War veterans and their
families.
In the U.S. in 1950, the
Korean War was officially
termed a police action. It was
known as the Korean Conflict
rather than a war largely to
avoid the necessity for
Congress to officially declare
war. To some Americans it's
also referred to as "The
Forgotten War" or "The
Unknown" War" because it
receives far less attention than
other wars of the 20th century.
For Americans the Korean
War was an escalation of bor-
der clashes between two rival'
Korean regimes that began on
June 25, 1950, when the North
Korean Army assaulted south-
ern Korea. Hostilities contin-
ued until the armistice, a cease-


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signed on
R aJuly 27,
1953.
At the
end of
World War
II, the Uni-
ted Nations
VETERAN S developed
CORNER administra-
tive plans
for a trust-
Debbie eeship for
Walsh the nation
known as
Korea. The Soviet Union was
trustee for the territory north of
the 38th parallel, the Military
Demarcation Line (Korea),
while the U.S. administered
affairs for the south. Historians
surmise the intention of both
major powers was to establish a
stable and unified Korea, how-
ever before withdrawing forces
from the area they wanted to
leave behind a nation favorable
to their ideology. The Soviets
desired a communist Korea,
whereas the U.S. strove for a
democratic nation. The 38th
Parallel, then and now, still sep-
arates the two disputing coun-
tries.
On July 30, 1950, southern

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NA' IONALAR
The Korean War Memorial, Washington, D.C., above
honors the veterans of that conflict. Bloody Ridge, a
right, was one of the difficult battles of the war. A se
ice medal, below right, is available for veterans of ti
.war.


Korea, already under trustee-
ship of the United States,
received a full commitment of
military assistance from the U.S.
when it became apparent diplo-
macy could not repress contin-
ued fighting between the north
and south. Additional American
forces were commanded under
the leadership of Gen. Douglas
MacArthur and soon after other
countries of the United Nations
gained entrance to military
aggression efforts.
North Korea was initially
backed only by the Soviet Union


until China felt threaten
the U.N. offensive. It wi
that forces would not stop
border between northern
and China. The Chinese
ernment argued that by
ing Japan its main war b
the Far East, launching an
sion against northern i
and the Chinese provir
Taiwan, and carrying out
intervention in other
counties, the United State
building up a military
clement of China. China w
American leaders it would
vene to protect its national
rity. The day after Ame
troops crossed the 38th p;
Chairman Mao Zedong i
orders to assemble the Cl
People's Volunteer Army
Finally, on July 27, 1'
Korean armistice was e
lished. The ceasefire agree
ended the fighting, but a f
peace treaty has never
completed, still leaving th
Koreas separate to this d
U.S. veterans of the K
War are now eligible to
the Republic of Korea (


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CHIVES Korean War Service Medal. In
e 1951, the medal was originally
above offered by the ROK to United
erv- Nations forces serving in Korea
he and adjacent waters, but U.S.
law prohibited the military from
wearing any medals issued by
foreign governments. In 1954
ed by the law changed, however most
worried members eligible for the medal
at the had already exited the military.
Korea In 1998, commemorating the
e gov- 50th anniversary of the Korean
mak- War Armistice, the ROK
ase in renewed its original offer of
n inva- awarding Korean War veterans
Korea this service medal. Veterans of
ice of any branch of service or family
active members of deceased veterans
Asian may get more information for
es was issue of the medal by calling
encir- the AFPC at 800-525-0102.
earned The U.S. Department of
inter- Veterans Affairs states actual
I secu- hostilities occurred from June
erican 27, 1950 to July 27, 1953.
arallel However, Congress extended
ssued the war eligibility benefit period
linese to January 31,1955, and records
indicate 6.8 million Americans
953, a served the Korean War effort
estab- between June 27, 1950 and
ement January 31, 1955. It records
normal 54,200 American deaths, 33,700
been of which were actual battle
ie two deaths; 7,140 members wdre
ay. POWs, 4,418 of those returned
orean to the U.S., 2,701 died and 21
wear refused assistance for return-
ROK) ing to American soil. A not-so-
surprising statistic is that there
S are 131 recipients of the
S Congressional Medal of Honor
among Korean War veterans.
Floridians have a Korean
War Memorial in Tallahassee.
The tribute contains the "Circle
of Life," an upright, open-ended
S .circular display. Next to this
structure lies a broken fragment
engraved '.*.idi rthe..nam g;of
' loridians killed in action: Cad
the circle been completed it
would represent the purity of
life. The memorial personifies
the fallen, showing how the
Korean War interrupted the
lives of so many.
Many Hollywood movies
like "Battle Circus" with
Humphrey Bogart, "'The Bridge
at Toko-Ri" starring William
Holden and "Battle Hymn" fea-
turing Rock Hudson used the
Korean War as their theme.


C


Those movies are rarely viewed
nowadays, but.that doesn't
mean we'll ever put the Korean
War out of our minds. I know
my family won't; my dad was a
Purple Heart recipient during
the Korean War.
To the Korean War veterans,
I say thank you.-Your support to
our country during this time
will never be forgotten. I
emphatically believe it is not a
"Forgotten War" and it never
will be. To families who lost
service members while sup-
porting this devastating conflict,
I salute your loved one. They
fought courageously and with
dignity in the name of the
United States of America. For
the youth of today, remember
this war and all others. Always
strive for peace and democra-
cy, and foremost, never forget
the sacrifices made or the lives
lost.
So on Monday, July 27, 56
years after"the("Korea' War
Armistice, lets 's~led 'l'ew.
moments anid rememiber'all'
Americans, particularly those
of the Korean War era that
served in the military, were
killed or wounded in action,
held as POWs and those still
listed as MIA. \
Debbie Walsh is a 22-year vet-
eran, retired Senior Master
Sergeant in the Air Force and a
Life Member ofAmerican Legion
Post 54, Fernandina Beach.
whitelabaron'@yahoo.com


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public meeting
will be held on Thursday, July 30, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. in
the Commission'Chambers, located at the James S.
Page Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau Place,
Yulee, Florida for the purpose of providing the residents
of the Nassau Lakes Subdivision the opportunity to
meet with Building Maintenance Department staff and
the County Commissioner representing District 2 to
review the proposed conceptual plan for recreational
amenities for the Nassau Lakes Subdivision.

The public is invited to be present and be heard.

Individuals with disabilities requiring a reasonable
accommodation in order to participate should contact
the office of the Ex-Officio Clerk at (904) 548-4660 or
Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8770 (v) or
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) at least seventy-two hours in
advance to request such accommodation.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA

Barry V. Holloway, Chairman

Attest:
John A. Crawford
Ex-Officio Clerk


A,


'- "~ " '''







FRIDAY, July 24,2009 NEWS News-Leader


A new man in my life


I have been keeping a
secret from you, Gentle
Readers. There is a new man in
my life I have neglected to tell
you about.
Late one February after-
noon, the Curtins were driv-
ing by the Nassau Humane
Society on Airport Road when
we spotted several dog walkers
out with their charges. "I want
to meet that dog," I said, and
pointed to a small black and
white dog with large ears.
Our beloved Demonic Duo
was long-gone, and our dog-
less house had grown larger
and emptier every day. We had
visited Lynda Mixson at RAIN
and the litter she'd named after
Greek and Roman gods. Apollo
was a cute pup, but he was
going to grow 50 pounds too
large. We went to every Yappy
Hour at Falcon's Nest that's
hosted by Bark Avenue Pet
Boutique, and met several vol-
unteers from STARS and
their foster dogs. They were
cute too (the dogs, I mean),
but the whistles and bells still
did not sound off. I had also
become a frequent visitor at
the Humane Society; I would
pet and hold as many dogs as
I could lay my hands on, but I'd
always come home empty-
handed.
Until I saw Ace, that
February afternoon. He was
18 pounds of attitude, giving
his walker a good workout. He
greeted me like a long-lost
friend, and I was a goner. We
were leaving soon for one of
our famous flyabouts, so I pre-
sented myself and my check-
book at the Humane Society
before we left town to put a
deposit on the dog. We spent
the entire trip trying to come
up with a perfect name for him,
but by the time we returned
to Paradise, we knew that he
already had one.
Ace was waiting for us
when we returned, and we
now faced the medical chal-
lenge the society had warned
us about. Ace had a serious
case of heartworms. We could
foster him during the treat-
ment; if it was successful, we
could then adopt him.
Dr. Gilbert at Nassau
Veterinary Clinic in Yulee
made sure that Ace, never real-
ized that he was at the vet's.
Instead of placing him on the
exam table, she and her tech
got down on the floor with him,
Lots of treats and one quick
shot later, the play date was


CITY
SIDEBAR

Cara Curtin


over. And so
it went for
se v e r a
months. We
watched hin
carefully and
thought we
saw improve-
ment after
every date
with Dr
Gilbert. Part
of his recov-
ery required
us to keep


him as quiet as possible, but he
always went a little crazy at the
clinic when he saw Ashley, his
fav-o-rite tech in the whole,
wide world.
Ace was declared heart-
worm-free this April, and the
Curtins promptly adopted him
into his forever home. He has
grown stronger, healthier, and
happier each day.
It didn't take us long to real-
ize that this is a very gregari-,
ous dog. He demands to meet
and greet everyone we see on
our walk. He bestows puppy
kisses on the humans within
tongue range, and strains at
the leash to exchange sniffs
with the dogs. Since he is an
only dog, at least for now, we
grew concerned that he might
grow lonely, so it was off to the
Nassau Humane Society's Dog
Park. We have become fre-
quent visitors, and it is round-
ing out his social life quite nice-
ly. There are separate exercise
areas for both large and small
dogs; the small dogs can visit
the pond and its waterfall,
while the larger ones can play
in a Milk Bone-shaped pool.
Neat, huh? Ace isn't too inter-
ested in the water, but he does
enjoy a good romp.

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Ace Curtin

I have always been an advo-
cate of animal rescue groups,
and this latest adventure has
only cemented my high regard
for both these organizations
and the people who rescue the
animals. These tough eco-
nomic times are proving to be
equally tough for these groups.
Pets have become luxuries
some families can no longer
afford, so the number of turn-
ins has surged.
This surge means that this
is an excellent time to find that
four-legged friend you've been
searching for; everyone I have
talked to has an overabun-
dance of critters. This over-
abundance also means that
now is a great time for you to
throw a little extra support at
your favorite group. Towels,
food, toys, treats, and of course
money, are always welcome.
Time is always the most
valuable commodity that you
can volunteer, the one that is
always in the shortest supply.
And who knows, becoming a
foster parent or a dog walker
niay benefit you just as much
as it does the four-legger! I'm
sure your own dog would enjoy
a play date at the Dog Park -
just be sure to look for me and
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RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
A Nassau County School
Board member missed nearly
half of the board's scheduled
meetings in the past 12 months,
citing conflicts with his job.
Three-term school board
member Jim Adams missed 10
out of 23 meetings between July
1, 2008, and June 30 this year.
However, Superintendent John
Ruis said Adams still brings
valuable experience to the
board.
Adams, who is CEO of
Family Support Services, which
runs the foster care systems in
Jacksonville and Nassau
County, said his job requires
travel that often conflicts with
the board meetings.
"I've been out of town a lot of
those times," he said. "...
Unfortunately there's been a
conflict with my other job as
we've taken on new business.
But we're going to make an
effort to send other people."
Adams added that he had
considered stepping down from
the board.
"I actually talked to the attor-
ney and the superintendent
about resigning at one point,"
he said. "The attorney was
actually in the process of draft-
ing a letter, but I was actually
asked to stay on by the super-
intendent."
Ruis confirmed that he
asked Adams to stay. "Jim's
been a very integral part of our
success as a school district," he
said. "He's very knowledgeable.
He's been on the board for


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JimAdams
apologizes 6A

about 12 years now, and I think
has been very successful in that
role."
Ruis also said that he and
Adams had discussed strategies
to ease the scheduling conflicts
caused by Adams' position at
Family Support Services.
"I think that certainly hell
get back on track with regard to
his attendance, and be able to
participate a lot more than he
has in the past," Ruis said.
"He was certainly concerned
about his inability to attend
more regularly for that
period of time, and I would
expect that to improve. ... He's
indicated to me that he's trying
to coordinate some of the


activities he's been involved
in and to delegate those to oth-
ers. I'm sure he'll be able to do
that."
Ruis added that in his opin-
ion, Adams' position in the fos-
ter care system was a boon to
the school board.
"I think because of that, it
gives him an insight into a lot of
issues with children," he said.
"It provides us with some input
and feedback in that regard. I've
known him for the past 12 years
or so to be very conscientious
and diligent in trying to help
children in all regards."
Adams said he felt he felt he
was still a relevant member of
the board.
"I do take it seriously and
after careful consideration, I do
think that I can continue to be
effective," he said.
rsmith@fbnewsleader.com


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FRIDAY, July 24. 2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER\


I ORI I\ 1'S OlI EST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
EST\L\BISHE IN '1854
The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
For R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIM PE. CIRCULATIONDIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


TT Community
Newspapers,
Incorporated

The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their owh
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper. its owners or employees


SWhat a long, strange trip it's been


Michael Parnell and I sat down over
iced tea - I don't drink the good stuff
and I'm too cheap to buy it for others
- and talked about a concept for a guest col-
umn that would run every couple of weeks.
Years ago, I was a newspaper reporter.
Someone told Parnell that I might be a good
person to tap for an occasional guest column.
He should've put on his hip waders at that
point, or at the very least turned tail and run.
But he didn't and so, over numerous rounds of
the house wine of the South and a bunch of tall
tales, Cup of Joe was born.
Parnell didn't place any restrictions on me
and told me to write about whatever I wished.
I tossed out some ideas and told him that what
I'd really like to do with the column once it got
up and running was to mix creative writing
with traditional column writing. One of my
first columns was a first-person piece about an
elderly lady I met on the street in St.
Augustine one day. Using her as a device, I
told a story about how people drift unseen in
and out of our lives, and yet these minor char-
acters are as much an integral part of life's big
play as each of us are. Looking back on three
years of columns, that one remains one of my
personal favorites.
At some point, I decided to take a crack at
doing the column once a week. I discussed it
with Mike, who's always been most agreeable
with me, and so here we are. After three years,
I've been pouring out a Cup of Joe pretty much


week in and week out. Today,
I pour the last cup.
SI've been increasingly rest-
S. less in a literary sense for the
past few months and perhaps
S'if it's been this column which
Shas gotten my dormant cre-
ative juices flowing again. I've
been experimenting some
with different kinds of writing
CUP OF but what I'd really like to do
JOE is write a book.
I know. Everyone wants to
have written a book. Few
Joe Palmer have the self-discipline to
actually sit down and churn
one out. And for good reason. It's really hard
work. Just like writing a weekly column is
hard work, especially when trying to balance it
with family life, job and other outside interests.
Like fishing and a local civic organization I
recently joined.
Several weeks ago, I reached the sore deci-
sion to take a sabbatical from my column. I
know I have the skills, tools and education to
write but I want to see if I can press myself
into actually writing a novel. I've actually got-
ten a start on it and figure I have about as
much chance at getting it successfully
published, if and when I finish it, as I do of
winning the lottery. But someone has to hit
the lucky numbers once a week, so who
knows?
This column and the people it connected


me with has been one of the most gratifying
experiences I've ever had. I'm deeply grateful
to Mike Parnell and News-Leader Publisher
Foy Maloy for giving me 750 words of space -
and the most butt-ugly photo of me they could
find - week in and week out. No, they never
paid me a nickel. Yes, some fools will actually
work for free, especially if they love what
they're doing.
It's a columnist's mission to not necessarily
inform readers, but to touch their lives in
some way and make them think. Humor,
satire, sarcasm and just plain old story telling
are all literary devices all coluinnists employ
to challenge their readers to think and to read
between the lines. I wrote about my heart
attack three years ago. Between the lines was
a story that translates in all languages: No one
gets out alive. As John Donne wrote, "Never
send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls
for thee."
I was particularly touched earlier this year
by a letter from a'state inmate who took com-
fort in something I wrote. His words were elo-
quent. I was moved by his obvious sincerity
and his stoic acceptance of his fate. The tough-
est enemy with which to make peace is self.
Trust me. I know.
An old Deadhead, I've often quoted Jerry
Garcia and will do so one last time: "What a
long, strange trip it's been."
From a lounge chair on a beach sonie-
where south of reality, hasta luego, amigos.
treysurf@comcast.net


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Paid parking
I am very upset that the city of
Fernandina Beach wants to follow in
the footsteps of Jacksonville Beach
paying for parking. The economy is
crazy, needless to say, so are our light
bills and taxes on our property that is
not lined in gold, and the only thing for
our kids to do is go to the beach. I
may not be a resident of Fernandina
Beach but I do live in this county and
I am outraged that the city would even
consider charging for parking. This
is a tourist attraction and you are going
to drive our business down. They are
struggling as well as the residents of
this county. I say no to the city of
Fernandina Beach for charging the
only thing that keeps our kids out of
trouble.
Dina McCormick
Yulee

Howluckyweare
I want to take this opportunity to
express my heartfelt gratitude for the
great leadership provided our fair com-
munity by City Manager Michael
Czv mbir ai-d City Attornev Taimiif"
B id:h i , their efforts to -enierate .
income by establishing parking meters
and assessing fines.
The projected $1.5 million in fees
and $700,000 in fines will be a boon for
our government and their foresight
should be rewarded accordingly. I pro-
pose our commissioners immediately
enact an ordinance doing away with
their meager salaries and benefits and,
in lieu thereof, give them each 20 per-
cent of the profit realized by the city
from the parking-generated dollars.
With the $2.2 million projected they
will each be able to project an income
in excess of $400,000. How lucky we
are to have such gifted individuals and
they should share in our luck.
Charles Corbett
Fernandina Beach

Aid appreciated
I would like to express a heartfelt
"thank you" to the sheriff's officer
who assisted my three children week-
end before last while boating.
My son, a safe, cautious and avid
boat owner, needed assistance after a
mechanical problem caused engine
failure. My children, ages 19, 17 and
12, were left sitting in the ocean liter-
ally baking in the mid-90s sun.
After several hours and running
out of drinking water, being ignored by
the Coast Guard and calling and being
told a tow company would have to
come from Jacksonville and cost
approximately $300 (which they didn't
have), a sheriff's officer came to their
aid and rescue. He towed them into
the boat ramp and made sure they
successfully got the boat out of the
water and onto the trailer safely.
To the officer - you know who you.
are - thank you so much for going
above and beyond in a situation that
protected my children!
Terri Christopher
Fernandina Beach

Builders Care
There's a group of people on the
island that does repair work for those
who cannot do it for themselves. They
are called Builders Care.
Builders Care is a group of men,
women and even young people from
Memorial United Methodist Church
(and the Northeast Florida Builders
Association). I know of this group first-


hand because this group built a ramp
for my sister, Betty Ann Gandy, who
has MS. I could not have done this
job. In the end, they built a ramp so my
sister can get in and out of her house
without any problem. They also built
a landing area so she can sit outside.
There are no words to express our
appreciation and gratitude. Thank you,
Mac Morriss for heading up this proj-
ect, and to everyone else, including
Mac, may God bless each and every
one of you deeply.
Sandi Lane and family
Nassauville

Easing the passage
Fifteen years ago I wrote a letter to
the News-Leader thanking all those
who were instrumental in saving my
husband's life. His name was Fred
Purvis. He suffered a heart attack and
was unconscious for some length of
time. The paramedics who came to
our home stabilized him and trans-
ported him to Fernandina where the
hospital emergency team continued
the efforts. He was then transported
to Jacksonville's Baptist Hospital
where he r,:mained in a coma for two
weeks. ',
After 10 years of caring for him
with the help of hired sitters and fam-
ily, I found a wonderful place for him
to spend time each day. It was the
Council on Aging Adult Day Care
Facility. He was picked up each day by
caring caravan drivers. At the center,
he was involved in activities and
received a nourishing meal before
returning home in the afternoon. The.
staff members were so wonderful and
understanding and I couldn't have
asked for better care. With his health
and mobility declining, I placed him in
the Quality Health Nursing Facility
where he was cared for by dedicated
doctors and staff members. The nurs-
es and nursing assistants were won-
derful and Fred actually seemed to be
content. Living nearby made it con-
venient for me to check on him each
day.
On April 16, Fred passed away due
to heart failure. I want to thank Quality
Health for their quickness in getting
him transported to the emergency
room and for alerting me. Thanks to
all the doctors and emergency crew
who worked on him at Fernandina,
and for the crew aboard Life Flight
who transported him to Jacksonville.
Thanks to Dr. Dillahunt, his heart cath
staff and for all the nurses who cared
for him around the clock for-the eight
days he was alive. They made our fam-
ily feel at home, which made his pass-
ing easier for all of us.
Karen Purvis
Yulee

Unbelievable
Do you understand how our
beloved homeland could become vic-
tim of a huge and devastating depres-
sion to our economy, which will affect
every one of us, and we had little or no
warning from any or few of our many
"Brains" in our syndicated ranks in
the print media or the TV media.
Makes you wonder if they might be
part of the problem?
Unfortunately those who caused
the problem are not the ones who suf-
fer. "Their cup runneth over" at the
expense of the working class. Our
Constitution provides protection
against bad decisions by the execu-
tive branch of our Government, head-
ed by the president. That is supposed
to be the function of Congress.


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words. Letters must include writer's
name (printed and signature), address and telephone number for
verification. Writers are normally limited to one letter in a 30-day
period. No political endorsements or poems will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed. Not all letters are published.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina
Beach, FL., 32035
E-mail: mparnell@fbnewsleader. com.
visit us on-line atfbnewsleadercom


When Congress gave Bush and
Cheney permission to declare war on
Iraq, it was the beginning of the mess
we are now confronted with. You can't
throw away trillions of borrowed
money on a mission and come away
with only the end of Saddam. It does-
n't take much imagination to call
Halliburton the big winner.
The power to control Congress by
the president comes from' the use by
him of campaign contributions he uses
to get them elected.
So much for "legal crooks."
W.H. Burney
Fernandina Beach

Universal health care
I have heard and seen lots of infor-
mation about the idea of universal
health care. I have some issues that
don't seem to be being addressed:
1. Forcing everyone into a health
program takes away liberty to choose
how you want to run your life. If I was
a healthy, unmarried, 20-year-old with
good auto insurance, why would I want
to pay into a health system I don't want
or need? And to be forced to by the
power of the law is unconscionable,
. 2. No one is talking about the
impact of 43 million uninsured people
suddenly having access to the coun-
try's medical system. Many of those
currently uninsured are not in the best
of health, many because they have
abused their bodies. What will be the
impact on the 253 million of us, cur-
rently insured, after the 43 million
compete for doctors, hospitals, expen-
sive medical treatment and the like.
Talk to the Canadians about their wait
for just about every medical proce-
dure since they implemented univer-
sal health care. Personally, I am not
willing to see a degradation of my fam-
ily's health support, regardless of the
humanitarian issues involved. This
will probably sound selfish to many,
and I agree it is. But where my fami-
ly's health is concerned I am very self-
ish.
3. Universal medical health care is
the last part of the "we will take care
of you" ethos of socialism. It will
remove the last incentive for many to
go to work and remove the drive to
succeed. Go to Europe to see this fact
in operation.
America's motto is, "Life, liberty
and the pursuit of happiness." Don't let
the middle word, liberty, be erased
by another ill-conceived government
program.
Hal Mather
Amelia Island


OCanadal
Having recently returned from
Canada, I read with interest the weeks
of health care dialogue. The issue was
also prominent in The Globe and Mail,
Canada's national newspaper.
British Colombia has reported a
$360 million gap between budget and
demand. Belt tightening apparently
goes down to one of their health care
providers which reports that it can do
2,000 more MRIs than last year, but
will be held to the 2008 level.
In 2005, the Supreme Court of
Canada issuedia landmark judgment
allowing Quebeckers to purchase pri-
vate insurance for three surgical pro-
cedures to be done in private clinics,
thus avoiding the long wait, and by
this September it will be 56. This
firmly establishes a two-tier health
care system. British Colombia and
Alberta are considering the same.
Page 16 of our current health care
proposal prohibits us from purchas-
ing supplemental private health care
insurance.
A Manitoba native community is
caught in a jurisdictional dispute
between provincial and national gov-
ernments over dispensing flu supplies;
44 new cases of H1N1 (swine flu) were
reported, bringing the provincial cases
to 831 and national cases over 10,000.
In Ontario, 227 children were sent
home from three overnight camps
with mild cases of H1N1. The editori-
al page addresses triaging the vaccine
when/if available, prioritizing (physi-
cians, government officials and
important others) versus a general
lottery.
Finally, there is an apparent short-
age of medical isotopes, meaning a
longer wait for heart tests or cancer
treatments.
While our health care system is
not perfect, it has the best quality and
access in the world, according to
WHO. We do have some uninsured,
many who choose not to spend their
money on health insurance. This is
frequently the category that pays noth-
ing but clogs up the emergency rooms
with non-emergencies. For the truly
indigent there is public aid, which pays
for routine and emergency care giving
the hospital and physician some nom-
inal reimbursement.
If one looks at page 11 of the cur-
rent proposal, we see that we are
allowed to keep our current insurer,
but if we change employers or loose
insurance, we only can have the nation-
al health insurance policy. We are
never permitted to apply to another


company, which as intended, will run
the private insurance companies out of
business, leaving only insurance from
the bloated government. At this
point, we would be just like our north-
ern neighbors getting authorized
health care via government officials,
lowering our current standard of care
and degrading the status of MD to
that of a robot. How long would it be
before elder care is limited as cost cut-
ting? What happened to our
Constitution and Bill of Rights? How
did they become irrelevant? And I
have not even addressed the cost of
health care expanding current enti-
tlements.
Beverly Stormoen,
R.N., MS, CNS
Amelia Island

Our country'sfuture
Mr. President, please stop, Stop
trying to undo what my parents,
grandparents and their grandparents
fought and worked so hardfor to give
me the opportunity to pursue my
dream unfettered with government
intervention into all aspects of living in
our great country. Stop the redistrib-
ution of wealth, for as wealth goes to
the public sector, so goes the liber-
ties earned over two millennia. Stop
thinking intrusion into corporate suc-
cess allowsme to succeed. Stop the
forced health care scheme proven to
be yet afather anchor to our leader-
ship role in the world. Stop the apolo-
gies to countries that send their stu-
dents to America for education and
their workers fbr dreanl fulfillment.
Stop the'hanagement by poll and
begin substantive policy design based
on (a) principled foundation poured
by our forefathers.
Please stop, Mr. President Allow
the discussion. Welcome dissent.
Value the opinions of those you do not
agree with, for they have merit and
bring insight, experience and per-
spective.
If what you are so earnest in trying
to achieve is the right answer, it will
happen. Americans will rally. But, for
now, at this moment in the history of
our country a unilateral approach to
the significant 'challenges we face is
not the way.
We stand on those broad shoul-
ders of our ancestors; we feel their
calluses, remember their sacrifices
and most of all. (to this day) mourn
the loss of uniformed heroes.
It's time to stop and pause. Please.
Gary Fierro
Fernandina Beach











COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, JULY 24,2009 / NEWS-LEADER


A love that left too soon


Lord, open my eyes and show me the
areas of my life that do not please you and
give me the strength, grace and wisdom to
remove any sin or weight that would prevent
our close fellowship. Felicia Holmes-Way was
happy, loving, giving and free-spirited. Even
during her failing health, she never stopped
showing her love.
A love that no one else can duplicate has
been removed from our presence, only by
her maker himself. There was nothing any-
one needed help with that she herself did not
go to them, even if she heard it through
someone else. She had one very large family,
which included all people. It didn't matter if
you were black or white, her heart surely was
full of love for you.
No one was obligated to return that love.
It was very plain she did it all from her heart.
She gave of her time, money and self because
people around her were more important than
she was. Helping others was when she was
most happy.
In order to help others, she bowed in wor-
ship and praise before the heavenly father,
covered herself with the blood of Jesus Christ
and claimed the protection of his blood for
others. She surrendered herself completely
in all areas of her life, took a stand against the
working of the devil that would hinder her
from serving him.
Even during her illness, Felicia continued
to be a blessing to others. She encouraged
them to tear down the strongholds of the
devil against their minds, surrendered her
mind to his blessed Holy Spirit, knowing he
had not given her the spirit of fear, but of
power, of love and of a sound mind. She said,
"I resist the spirit of fear in the name of Jesus,,
the son of the living God, and I refuse to fear,
refuse to doubt, refuse to worry, because I
have authority. I claim complete and absolute
victory over the forces of darkness in the
name of Jesus, and I bind the devil and com-
mand him to loose my peace, joy, prosperity
and every member of my family for the glory
of God, and, by faith, I call it done."
We visited Felicia wherever she was, but


, f when we got there, she took
over, giving God praise for
her life, family and friends.
She knew who God was and
that he knew where she was
and what she needed, refus-
. I iing to fear, worry or be dis-
couraged. She did not hate,
envy or show any type of bit-
terness toward her broth-
NOW AND ers, sisters or even her ene-
THEN mies, but loved them with
the love God shed abroad in
her heart.
Maybelle What a love that left too
Kirkland soon. But she will live on
through her family, whom
she loves oh, so much. For all of the work
she had done, her rewards were out of this
world, so she has gone to receive them. Her
love will also live on through the many other
people whose lives she touched. She gave her
name to Felicia Green. They, too, shared that
special love for each other.
All of the free samples of medicine given
to us by her through her doctor showed how
she put herself on the line for the health and
her love for others. If you put yourself on that
same line for others, her love surely will con-
tinue to live.
Rest on, Felicia. God answered your
prayer. He has taken you from labor to
reward.
The families of the late Felicia Holmes-
Way, Mother Lucy Bell Turner, Jackie
Williams, Mr. Ted Alston and Dea. Allen
Melton Sr.'wish to express their sincere
appreciation for your thoughtful acts of kind-
ness during their hours of bereavement. May
God bless each of your.
Birthday wishes to Christian Benson,
Rebecca Washington, Marcus Williams,
Alyssia Benson, Israel Melton, Michelle
Williams, Blake Jones, Kendaris Chatman,
JaSean Washington, Carminique Blue, Darryl
Williams, Darlene Albertie, Jeannette
Johnson, LuLu Shell, Clarice Jones, Carlesa
Kirkland and Mother Blanche Williams.


* The Fernandina Senior Squadron, Civil
Air Patrol meets the first Saturday of the
month at 9 a.m. at the CAP Trailer at the
Fernandina Beach Airport The third
Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. is the
squadron safety meeting. For information call
Nick Feakes 415-0131.
* Fernandina Beach Lions Club meets at
noon the first and third Tuesdays at the
Florida House Inn, 22 S. Third St. Call Paul
Booton at 491-1814.
* Fernandina Beach Shrine Club meets at
7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month
(except July and August) at the Yulee Lions
Club, 894 US 17 North. Call president Mike
Taylor at 753-4669.
* Fernandina Beach Shrine Ladies
Auxiliary is a service organization that meets
at 7 p.m. the second Thursday. Call Suzi
,Taylor at 753-4671 for location.
* First Coast Koi Club meets third Sunday
to share news of the pond, koi and water gar-
den hobby. Contact Teresa Lawrence at (904)
287-0059 or visit firstcoastkoiclub.com.
* Florida A&M University Alumni
Association meets at 6 p.m. the third Monday
at the Peck Center. Call 261-7906.
* Friends of the Library, Fernandina


Beach welcomes all to support the value and
joy of literacy and advocate for the public
library in our community. Membership forms
are available at the library at 25 N. Fourth St
Call 277-7365 or visit Read.nassau.lib.fl.us.
* GFWC Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach is a volunteer service organization that
meets at 10:30 a.m. the first Wednesday of
each month at 201 Jean Lafitte Blvd. (behind
the Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center). Call
Kathy Shipman at 277-3668.
* The Historical Recovery Association of
North Florida is an independent metal detect-
ing club that meets at 7 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of each month at the Piccadilly
Restaurant on Monument Road near Regency
Square Mall in Jacksonville. Everyone is wel-
come, particularly children. Contact Shelly
Simpson at 261-4655 or e-mail shelly.simpson
@bayercropscience.com.
* Just Friends, for singles over age 55,
meets once a month for dinner. For more
information call Helene Scott at 321-1116.
* Kiwanis "Serving the Children of the
World" meetings are held at 6:30 p.m. the
first three Mondays of each month at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Clubhouse on Bill
Melton Road. Call Jeff Shipman at 277-3668.


Welcome to


Qod's House


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC
464054 SR 200, Yulee
(904) 261-6821


802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
Femandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291


FAMILY DENTISTRY Bo
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN Ba cock
Most Insurances Accepted HOM FURNITURE
Call For Appointment
261-6826
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
AlA at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL "


FREEMAN
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installations & Repair
606 S. 6th Street
Femandina Beach, FL 32034


Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Conriunity


VEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS


W

Miranda-Bray
Lindsay Bray and Thiago
Miranda were united in mar-
riage during an oceanside
ceremony on Saturday
evening, June 6, 2009. The
ceremony was officiated by
the Rev. Barbara Ryan of St.
Marys, Ga.
Lindsay is the daughter of
Mike and Jan Bray of
Fernandina Beach. Maternal
grandparents are the late Dr.
Bailey Dickens Jr. and
Barbara Dickens. Paternal
grandparents are the late
John and Grace Bray. Thiago
is the son of Paulo and Silvia
Miranda of Sao Luis, Brazil.
Maternal grandparents are
the late Antonio and Ilva
Saldanha. Paternal grandpar-
ents are the late Hamilton
and Helena Miranda.
The bride's sister, Christin
Bray, of Fernandina Beach,
served as maid of honor. The
groom's sister, Ana Miranda,
of Memphis, Term., served as
a bridesmaid. David Alfin of
Weston served as the best
man. The bride's brother,
Justin Bray of Orlando,
served as a groomsman.
The two families were
honored with a dinner at the
home of Drs. Tod and Suellen
Garner on Thursday evening.
The rehearsal dinner was
held on Friday evening for
the families and out-of-town
guests at Horizon's
Restaurant of Amelia Island.
The wedding reception
was held at the Fernandina
Beach Golf Course club-
house. Out-of-town guests
included Tom and Ann Bray
of Winter Park; Brenda Bray
Farmer and son Kevin of
Atlanta, Ga.; John and Patsy
Bray Jones of College Park;
Donna Bray, son Patrick Bray
and daughter Kristen Bray of
Griffin, Ga.; Erica Ledford of
Gainesville; Ryan and
Jennifer Lee Donegan of
Atlanta, Ga.; Danny and
Crystal Watt of Provo, Utah;
Bill and Caroline Dickens
Kent of Jacksonville; George
and Svetlana Strain of Canton,
Ga.; Thomas and Jesse
Hatton of Clovis, N.M.; Kelly
Williams of College Park.
Guests from Sao Luis, Brazil,.
included Lidia Nicolau, aunt
of the groom; Sanira and
Sylvino Goulart; Manuel and
Maria Oliveira.
The groom is currently
employed as a research coor-
dination specialist with phar-
maceutical product develop-
ment in Research Triangle
Park, N.C. The bride is cur-
rently employed as a certified
athletic trainer and sports
medicine department head at
The Carolina Family Practice


i:fTUrnrR~~5fi1wFu


inaley brethren, whatever is tru,
whiaever Is honorable, whalevr s
lust, whatever Is pure, whatever is
lovely, whatever Is gracious,
If other Is any excellenc, If the Is
anything worthy of praisa think
about these lelngs.


Reading and writing are to the
mind what diet and exercise are
to the body. Just as food nourish-
es the body, so too does reading
nourish the mind. And, just as
exercise strengthens the body, so
too does writing strengthen our
mind. When we write, we are
forced to make our ideas clear,
and this mental exercise
improves our mind. Of course, we
should pay careful attention to the
particular quality of what we are
reading and writing since much of
today's popular reading material
is of questionable value, and not
all writing is equally strenuous
exercise for the mind. We should
" seek out books which will teach
us something or that will inspire
usto become a better person,
and then we should try our hand
at writing things which will like-
wise teach or inspire others. So,
we should consider turning off the
television and instead read a
good book, and then tell some-
one about
it In writing.


F~r pY



650 IIc~


I-


Mr. and Mrs. Miranda


/ii


;.
*^


Mr. and Mrs.'Vail


and Sports Medicine in
Raleigh, N.C.
Following a honeymoon
on Amelia Island, the couple
will reside in Cary, N.C.

VallOlin
Lindsey B. Olin and Adam
C. Vail, both of Kauai, Hawaii,
were married May 25, 2009,
on Anini Beach in Kauai.
The bride is the daughter
-of Mark and Janet Olin of , .,,
Amelia Island. The groom is
the son of Carla and Kent Vail
of Mapleton, N.D.

Rhoden-Wingate
Chelsea Nicole Rhoden of
Callahan and Adam Cecil
Wingate of Yulee will be mar-
ried at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 18,
2009, at Amelia Island
Plantation with Pastor Steve
Robertson officiating. The
'reception follows the ceremo-
ny.


The bride-elect is the
daughter of Garland and
Kelly Rhoden of Callahan.
The groom-elect is the son of
Allen and Ann Wingate of
Yulee.


* Jermaine and Lethesia
Williams of Fernandina
Beach announce the birth of
a daughter, Jer'Myla
Williams, born at 3:35 p.m.
July 10, 2009, at Baptist
Medical Center Nassau. The
baby weighed 5.1 pounds and
measured 16 inches in length.
She joins siblings
Jah'Maine, 3, and Ja'Khia


Miss Rhoden, Mr. Wingate


Haslip-Stevens
Melanie Maria Haslip of
Fernandina Beach and John
Calvin Stevens III of Portland,
Maine, will be married Aug.
1, 2009, at The Ribault Club
on Fort George Island. The
reception will follow the cere-
mony.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Gary Haslip of Fernandina
Beach. The groom-elect is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Stevens of Portland, Maine.


BIRTH


Williams, 2.
Paternal grandparents are
Janice Bayles and Ronald
Haley of Jacksonville.
Maternal grandparents are
Chythina Moore and Aaron
Williams of Fernandina
Beach.
Great-grandparents are
Carolyn and Ron Bayles of
Jacksonville.


CAMPUS NOTES

* Matthew Muhlenkamp, the university's commence-
a resident of Fernandina ment exercises held May 23,
Beach, was among the more 2009.
than 1,000 students from . Muhlenkamp received a
Roger Williams University to bachelor of science degree in
receive their degree during engineering.

Deadline for wedding information and photos
Is 3 p.m. Tuesday prior to publication on Friday.


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


Advertise your business &
to support your local cnufcn
Call/ he ,ewsleader - 26 1-3696

*

* / /


BUSINESS CARD BILLBOARD


*-4, "Az


-- - I_ - -


-------..1IIUl""~g"""R~~ I


I


-aPPSBb~at~�s~plBP18~~


I


"r


I


I


BIRTH








FRIDAY. July 24.2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Tunnels, water and working toward each other


A s soon as ottr feet hit the
cold water, I knew we were
in for an adventure. With
my mom clinging to my
belt from behind and unknown voic-
es echoing through the dark tunnel
in front of us, history had called and
we had answered.
I love exploring - always have
and, I suppose, always will. This par-
ticular excursion had taken a small
group of pilgrims and myself to one
of the most fascinating sites in all of
Israel - Hezekiah's Tunnel. As we
waded through knee-deep water
with only a small flashlight and each
other to lean on, we couldn't help
but wonder how they had built it
some 2,700 years ago.
Created during a season of trou-
ble, the tunnel is one of the great
wonders of the ancient world. Its


story is a fascinat-
iqg one. At a time
when Jerusalem
was facing an
S impending siege
S from the Assyrian
army, IMng
Hezekiah moved to
protect the city's
only water source -
PULPIT the Gihon Spring.
NOTES The problem was
no easy one to fix.
With the spring on
Pastor the outside of the
Rob Goyette city wall, and the
prospect of his peo-
ple being trapped inside, King
Hezekiah knew there was only one
thing to do - build a tunnel, cover
the spring and bring the water
inside the city walls.


Unlike most ancient sites, the
people who built this one actually
chiseled the record of how they built
it on the tunnel's walls. I suppose
they wanted future generations to
marvel at their success just like they
had.
Starting at two opposite ends,
they dug through solid bedrock for a
distance of 1,750 feet. Think about it.
With no modern tools to chart their
course, they simply chiseled and lis-
tened for those who were working
fromnthe opposite end. According to
their own.account, when they finally
reached each other, they were off
course by several feet. So, they both
made sharp 90-degree turns and
kept on working. They chiseled a lit-
tle more, listened a little more and
finally broke through! What a cele-
bration that must have been. When


the group I was with finally reached
that part of the tunnel, you could
almost hear the ancient shouts of
victory still bouncing off the stone
walls.
To me, the story carries a great
message for the churches of our
community. Let's face it, though we
may come at things from different
angles, at the end of the day we're
all working toward the same thing -
to bring God's gracious provision to
our city. That said, I rejoice to see
mpre and more congregations work-
ing together for the cause of Christ.
I'm confident that if we'll keep at it,
and do a good job of listening to
each other, it's only a matter of time
before we'll see some real break-
throughs.
Yes, I kndw, the closer we get
we'll all have to acknowledge that


we've missed the mark a little bit,
but so what. I'd rather humble
myself, make the adjustment and get
on with the business of letting God's
provision flow.
Anyway, as is the case with many
of my articles, I end in places I don't
expect. I just want to encourage
those of you out there who are faith-
fully chiseling away. Your labors are
not in vain. As for me, and the con-
gregation that I pastor, we want to
say thanks for all your hard work.
We hear you out there hammering
away at your part of the tunnel and
appreciate your service for the King.
Future generations are sure to
rejoice because of your diligent
labors.
Robert L. Goyette is pastor of
Living Waters World Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


'aith at the Movies'
Memorial United Methodist Church
is hosting a film series titled Faith at the
Movies. This is a brand new series
designed to explore issues of faith
through popular movies. There will be a
simultaneous movie and program for
children, as well as nursery. All are wel-
come. Movies start at 6:30 p.m. in
Maxwell Hall.
The lineup includes: "Romero"
tonight and 'The Ultimate Gift" Aug. 7.
Agree 33 in concert
First Assembly of God, 302 South
14th St., will host Agree 33 live'in con-
cert on July 25 at 7 p.m.
Agree 33 has been a featured favorite
at the Rock and Sharathon and also
Friday Nigh Live with Rick Lowry. This
is part of a ministry to reach the youth of
the community. Call 261-6448.
Anniversary celebration
The Miracle Faith Church of God
Family, 85688 Roses Bluff Road in Yulee,
will celebrate the 11th anniversary of
their pastor, Bishop W. J. Franklin, on
July 26.
The service times are 11 a.m. and 5
p.m. The public is invited to come and
enjoy a time of fellowship. Call 261-7374
or 548-0046.
Impact Your World Church
Join Pastor Kalvin R. Thomp.;son on.-
luly 26 at 11 a.fi' as he treache .-..n tie
healing mercies of God. Thompson will
also pray for the sick during this special
church service. Services are held every
Sunday in the Full Service School, 86207
Felmor Road, Yulee. Call 261-9072.
Gage at First Baptist
On July 26, First Baptist Church will
welcome one of today's most sought-


after gospel communicators, Rick Gage.
In 1986, Gage walked away from a prom-
ising career coaching football and sur-
rendered his life to full-time evangelistic
ministry. Later he founded GO TELL
Crusades. He has been conducting evan-
gelistic events around the world and
seen tens of thousands make commit-
ments to the Lord Jesus Christ. Gage
will speak at the 10:15 a.n. service.
Friends &Family Day
Mount Horeb Missionary Baptist
Church will celebrate its annual Family
& Friends Day July 26. Services will
begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday School and
morning worship will be at 11 a.m.
The community is invited to attend.
Program Committee Chair is Sis. LaTara
Alderman. Mount Horeb is located in
the Lessie community at 58552 Coopers
Neck Road, Hilliard. Pastor is the Rev.
Williams Jones. Call (904) 845-3948.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope House
each Tuesday at noon for its Weekly
Worship Service and Fellowship Lunch.
On July 28, Bishop Dr. Van Gayton, of
Providence Christian School in
Jacksonville and former pastor of Christ
the Redeemer Church, will share the
Gospel message. For more information,
call 321-0435 or stop by the Hope House,
410 South Date St.
SGplftourmanrment .
: ' rt~st Batist Church is'libstih' a bGolf
Tournament/Clinic Aug. 1 featuring
renowned golf pro Wally Armstrong,
who will be guest speaker as well as
offer a clinic before the tournament.
While he has played professionally and
taught golf since 1968, Armstrong's true
passion is sharing his faith with others
through the game of golf.
Cost is $75 per person and includes


dinner. Everyone is invited that evening
as Armstrong shares stories about His
career in golf and his faith journey in
life. For more information or to sign up,
call 261-3617 or contact Scott Womble at
the Fernandina Beach Golf Club.
Bible marathon
Living Waters World Outreach
Center is hosting the seventh annual
Genesis to Revelation Non-Stop-Around-
The-Clock-Bible Reading beginning at 6
am. Aug. 3 and ending late Thursday
afternoon, Aug. 6. The Bible is read in
15-minute increments, and you can sign
up in the church sanctuary or by calling
the church office at 321-2117. All are
welcome to read or just come and listen.
Summer Bible study
On Aug. 14 Providence Presbyterian
Church will host summer Bible studies,
using sermons from renowned preach-
ers Fred Craddock, Barbara Brown
Taylor and Tom Long as the basis for
conversation about the scripture. Call
the church at 432-8118 for information.
Everyone's welcome. The church is
located at 96537 Parliament Drive, just
off Old Nassauville Road.
Summer reading
All are welcome to join the members
and friends of Providence Presbyterian
Church in reading and discussing
Barbara Brown Taylor's newest book,
An Altar in the World, on Aug. 19..
" ' 'Call the church at 432-8118 for infor-
mation or to order the books. The
church is located at 96537 Parliament
Drive, just off Old Nassauville Road.
MlnistryFair'
First Presbyterian Church will host a
Ministry Fair on Aug. 23 in Jim Thomas

RELIGION Continued on 11A


Grace Community Church

to ordain new pastor


David Wayne Bradsher will
be ordained as the new pastor
for Grace Community Church
at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 2
at Yulee Middle School's caf6-
torium, 85439 Miner Road.
Bradsher graduated from
Orlando's Reformed
Theological Seminary and
served numerous community
congregations.
He was previously the assis-
tant pastor at DaySpring
Presbyterian Church in
Linthicum, Md.
His new' role at Grace
Community will allow him to
serve the church and its
community further through
prayer, preaching, teaching and


evangelism.
Bradsher, wife Jennifer and
four children ages one to nine
years old recently moved to
Yulee.
The church draws its
members from St Marys, Ga.,
Yulee and Fernandina Beach/
Amelia Island and worships
Sunday at 10:30 a.m., with
small group meetings and
social activities throughout the
week.
For more information visit
http://gracenassau.com or call
491-0363.
Online reservations accept-
ed on Facebook at http://face-
book.com/eventphp?eid=1162
71698400.


'Rite of Christian Initiation' class


St. Michael Catholic Church
is sponsoring an inquiry class
for those who wish to know
more about the Roman.Catholic
faith and what Catholics believe.
The program, called R.C.IA,
will start on Sept. 1 and contin-
ue each week through_ Easter
2010. *: . . ., .r.
The first few sessions are
devoted to basics of the faith. At
the end of the "inquiry" phase,
participants can decide if they
want to continue on and become
regular members of the
Catholic Church, culminating
in a special ceremony at Easter
time.


The sessions are open to
those who have never been bap-
tized, oi have been baptized in
another faith or to Catholics
who have not received the
Sacraments of First Eucharist or
Confirmation. There is no cost
and the first session will meet in
.:the St 'iMicel-Academy library
at 6:45 p.m. on Sept. 1.
So that organizers have
enough materials and in case
they need to change the meet-
ing place, call the church office
at 261-3472 and leave your name
and telephone number. You can
also call the office if you would
like more information.


"Worship this week at the pace of your choice"


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
A4n InterdenominationafCommunity Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
July 26, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.


MESSAGE: "Waiting Eagerly.& Patiently"
MUSIC: "Lift High the Cross"

(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-

WHAT IS YOUR OPINION?
Read Amelia Plantation Chapel Pastor Ted Schroder's new Blog
....9:30 am at ameliachapel.com and state your feelings! Log on, go to Pastor's Corner,
..10:45 am and Ted's Blog. Simply input your name and e-mail at the bottom of the blog
.....6:15 pm content and begin. We want to hear from YOU!
....6:30 pm
d-107 South The Chapel is located behind
34 The Spa & Shops at Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
r (904) 277- 4414 * www.ameliachapel.com


ANCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday 1 1:00
515 Centre Street


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor

-- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
--- Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17
0:1l I lWM ll.h! [ll! IiIir! 1
Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.poplcamella.org


./1


t,, l, ,,,,)',
Anglican Cimrcli

I y o t'Wil t ',omtitiy


Everyone Welcome


A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


, -i l; 2 . :..' . . .

Everyone is welcome

,e ,R , . ... ., I I ,
R i ,i, r , i- i . r
i ,I , . i ,


SYULEE UNITED
- METHODIST
CHURCH
Please oin us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


T �I U


I�_E4 �


In the heart of
Fernahdino
9 N. 6 Street
'r He -.IIn l e jli.
Sen 'i.' Pa-t 7 I
Worship 8.30 & I la
Sunday School 9:50a
n C ' illrll:-.
Adults
261-3837
www. Ostpites-f.coim


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided ,
www, blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30amlu
' ible Study - 9ntn1
Nursery provided fotr all services
Small group studies-Adulhs 6pin
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30)pr
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAII
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Femandiun Bcl
For More Information Call: 261-9527


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH. WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... 9:45A.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:55A.M.
Discipleship Training ........... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship.:. .......... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service .......7:00P.M.
736 Bonnlevlew Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spplntsbaptlstchurch.org


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
Innovative Sy ConteaooiayMW CasualAmosp a here
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday mom. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
S Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 630pm
Connecling isth ChMs..Conneaing ,vith People


AIAPTIST
BfHURCHLj
�n . : C.ll,, '5-
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning.Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Pr.yer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1,79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904'225'5128
Yulee, FL 32097 . Fax 225-0809


Living Waters oCURC
cFIRSTuMISSIONAlYBAPTIST

world outreach osoth Ni Street 2614907
Contemporary Worship o R. D wr R. Bolden Sr., Pastor
SUN 9:30am The Churc tinthe
S WED 7:00pm ,e 'tof thec~
Wi-th thet*Deas to kin tbe
. Youth, Nursery & HeatsofAUPeople
C ' ChildrenMinistries SnmrllNweabrsClam 9am.
321-2117 - Sa$Sclioo 9:.30.
L Rob&ChrlatleGOoyoet321-2117 M W p.s,
II. SenlorPastors On AfA1mile Westo0fA me Ia lslandS w . . s d -' eW9p.M.
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org nidoks iiIBsl& Vu a Couplessfex Strowth


.1. 1=


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
In Amelia Park
1830 Lake Park Drive
(across from the YMCA)
Sunday worship times
8:00 am.n.
10:00 a.m. (with music)
904-430-0274
www.holytrinityanglican.org


AMFLIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
C,-n-e W':rship wllh us where-
Iho BiL. lIis our o:nly Auith ritly
Clhr.heli Se'. e, i. larri
,',t A onr Citr.'ia3 2,lH-56 5f.
... I...ll-.I'FIlar,,y.Fr...l.'.r, "r.rlil .-.i.r.


Fir-i B.I1i I l I'l I r L



Sunday
9 am
LIFE Groups
10:15 am & 6:30 pm
Worship Service

Wednesday
6:30 pm
LIFE in 3-D
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-261-3617
www.FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton, Sr Pastor


Rev. Brian Eburn Pastor
Saturday Vigil Mass - 4 pm& 5:30 pm
Saturday 4 pmro Mass at Yulea United Methodist Church
Sunday Masses 8:00 & 10.00 am & 12 Nooon
Daily Mass - 8:30 am Mon., Wed,, Thuts & Fd.
6 pm - Tuesday
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6:00 pr Holy Day 8:30 am
Confessions: Saturday 3:15pm -3:45 pm or by appt
Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number 904-277-6566,
also call 904-277-0550


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10A RIHS AY, July 24, 2009/NEws -Li':A i)li

HOMES


Coffee at market
Blair Davison of Montego
Bay Coffee has joined the
Fernandina Farmers Market
as a vendor. Montego Bay has
made-to-order smoothies with
a variety of tropical fruits
including strawberry, mango,
banana, pineapple and more -
the perfect refreshing drink
for summer at the market.
Also enjoy custom-made
espresso based drinks made
at the market and served
either hot or iced and out-
standing frozen blended cof-
fee drinks.
Davison roasts his own
high-grade coffee for use in
his beverages and will have
freshly roasted coffee by the
bag in either bean or ground.
Having been infatuated with
coffee since he was 9 years
old, Davison became the
owner seven years ago of his
first roaster and began roast-
ing beans for himself, family
and friends. This love of cof-
fee culminated in the opening
of Montego Bay Coffee in
Yulee in December 2007.


Montego Bay Co
fresh smoothies
assorted coffees
Fernandina Far
Market

The market, op
days from 9 a.m.-1
Seventh and Centi
Call 491-4872 or vi
nandinafarmersm
Sierra Club o
The Nassau Sii
planning a weekel
with manatees and
fauna and flora of
River and Homosa


BUILD OUR PL

ON YOUR LA,


k Aug. 14-16. The event is open
S, to the public. Deadline to reg-
S ister is today.
Club members will travel
to Crystal River on Friday and
meet Saturday at Manatee
Tours USA for a morning
manatee tour and an after-
noon of kayaking at Crystal
River/Kings Bay. Group
- rates include $39 for the man-
atee tour and $25 for kayak
rental.
SUiBMlTED Sunday optional'activities
ffee offers include a visit to Homosassa
and Springs Wildlife Park that
Sat the showcases native Florida
mers wildlife.
Recreational opportunities
include picnicking, nature
study and bird watching. A
pen Satur- children's education center
p.m. at provides hands-on experi-
re streets. endes. Group admission rates
visit www.fere of $9 for adults and $6 for chil-
arket.com. dren are available for 10 or
Muting more people.
Participants arrange their
erra Club is own lodging and pay the con-
nd outing cessionaire fees directly. For
d the other information and to register
Crystal contact Len Kreger at
assa Springs l.kreger@comcast.net or
(904) 432-8389.
A ImI Talbotcrltters


A -

4DD


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I SAVINGS up to OFFSITEDIVISION
I $2 5 www.sedaconstruction.com
I 25,000, 571-3865


I incldes. 20 000 in nree upgiaacl s plus I
$5.000 toward closing cosis'
call now- this offer expires July 31, 2009
Lmii .mmal


493-6922


Join a park ranger to learn
about the many common
species that inhabit the natu-
ral communities of the unde-


OrthoGel'
) Solutions


veloped barrier islands of
Northeast Florida at 2 p.m.
July 25 at pavilion five on
Little Talbot Island. No reser-
vations are necessary and the
program is free with regular
park admission.
For information call the
Talbot Islands Ranger Station
at (904) 251-2320.
Florida sea turtles
Join a park ranger and
learn about the lifecycle of
the sea turtle and the impor-
tande of these creatures on
Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. at pavilion
one on Little Talbot Island.
No reservations are neces-
sary and the program is free
with regular park admission.
For additional information
call the Talbot Islands Ranger
Station at (904) 251-2320.
Animal signs
Join a park ranger for a
presentation and leisurely
guided hike through different
Florida ecosystems on a quest
to characterize tracks left by
an assortment of critters on
Aug. 8 at 10 a.m. at the
Ribault Club on Fort George
Island Cultural State Park. No
reservations are necessary
and the program is free. For
additional information call the
Talbot Islands Ranger Station
at (904) 251-2320.


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40-FOOTBLOOM


PHOTO BY JOHN POWERS/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER
This American Agave plant, aka Century Plant,
reached 40 feet as it bloomed in front of the Powers'
family home on South Fletcher Avenue over the July
4th weekend. "It has been planted 15-plus years and
never bloomed," said John Powers. The plant's name
is derived from its habit of blooming infrequently.
After it dies it re-grows itself from shoots formed at its
base. The plant is indigenous to Mexico and is consid-
ered rare in North Florida.


NEWS, a4LEADER BESTOF JEBEST "
,- -,- -.., - ------ -I



just take a moment and fill out our Reader's Survey of your favorite places and become eligible for a $250 cash drawing on August 8.2009. All survey forms
must be received at the News Leader no later than August 7.2009. All entries must include name, address, and phone number. Mail Entries to:
The News-Leader, 511 Ash Street. Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. NO PHOTO COPIES, PLEASE.
All survey forms must be mailed (only one per envelope), and no entries will be accepted over the counter.

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HOME AND GARDEN BRIEFS








FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


RELIGION
Continued from 9A
Hall from 9:30 a.m.-12:45
)p.1. Booths represe-nting
the missions, ministries,
studies, events and olpportu-
nities available at First
Presbyterian will fill the hall.
There will be gaunes, door
prizes, lots of food, an Ugly
Tie Contest and fellowship.
Nursery and preschool will
be available.
living Proof
simulcast
On Aug. 28-29 Beth
Moore is bringing Living
Proof Live to her hometown
of Green Bay, Wis. Thanks
to simulcast satellite tech-
nology, she'll spend that
weekend at First Baptist
Church, too. Tickets are $10
and may be purchased at
the church. For more infor-
mation, call 261-3617.
'Rally Day'
Rally Day for children
and youth will be Aug. 30 at
First Presbyterian, begin-
ning at 9:50 a.m. Nursery,
toddlers, preschool and


kindergarten will meet in
their classrooms in Noah's
Place. First and second
graders will meet in the
Power Lab and third
through fifth graders will
meet in the Kidmo theater.
Middle school students will
meet in the Skate Room in
the Youth Center. Senior
high youth will meet in
Faith Cafe at 12:15 p.m. for
lunch and Bible study.
Parents of all children,
nursery through senior
high, are invited to
Breakfast & Conversation in
Jim Thomas Hall at 10 a.m.,
hosted by the Christian
Education Committee.
Parents, call the church
office to confirm your atten-
dance no later than Aug. 27.
Women's study
The Amelia Island
Women's Evening
Community Bible Study
invites you to join an in-
depth, non-denominational
study of the Book of Acts.
Meetings will be Monday
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church,
961167 Buccaneer Trail near
Harris Teeter. The study


'U2charist'at St Peter's
St. Peter's Episcopal church, 801 Atlantic Ave., will
host U2charist and Potluck on Aug. 9, a celebration of
the Eucharist that features the music of band U2 and a
message about God's call to rally around the Millennium
Development Goals.
Several people will share personal stories and experi-
ences related to Millennium Development Goals ser vice
and action, including John and Alice THlliday, Mark
Kaufman and Donla Paz and Brenda clomnandeur.
The music in the service is replete with the message
of global reconciliation, justice fur the poor and the
oppressed and the importance of caring for your neigh-
bor. Led by global MDG ambassador, Bono. LU2 is calling
people worldwide to deeper faith and engagement with
God's inlssion. The U2charist seeks to be an extension
of this ministry
Potluck and information begins at 5 p.m. and
U2chanst at 6 p.m For information call 261-4293.


begins Sept. 14 and contin-
ues through May 3.
For more information
and to register, call Michal
Polese at 548-9971 or Linda
Bell at 261-0569. Visit
www.communitybiblestudy.o
rg and www.ameliaislande-
vecbs.org.
Playgroup
MOM,ME meets every
Wednesday from 9:30-11


a.m. in Noah's Place, First
Presbyterian's nursery and
preschool classrooms.
Everyone is welcome to par-
ticipate in the mom and
baby/toddler playgroup that
has evolved into an interest-
ing group of moms and chil-
dren growing and nurturing,
networking and socializing,
sharing and caring with all
who come. This group
meets year round. This min-


istry is open to the public.
No reservations are needed,
just drop in. Park your
stroller out front. You never
know who might stop by
with a guitar and a song.
'Stuffthe Bus'
The Salvation Army
Hope House is accepting
applications to help income
qualifying families obtain
school supplies for their
children as part of its Stuff
the Bus School Supply
Drive. If you wish to volun-
teer to take applications or
have questions, call 321-
0435. Applications accepted
on Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays from 1-4 p.m.,
through July 31.
Food program
Yulee Baptist Weekday
Ministry, 85967 Harts Road,
is now participating in the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture's Child Care Food
Program. Meals will be
available at no charge to eli-
gible children enrolled in
the ministry's day care.
Parents or guardians must
complete an application. For
information, call 225-9196.


VACATION BIBLE
SCHOOLS
Faith Christian Academy presents
Kids Choice Camp 2009 from 7 a.m.-
6p.m. through Aug. 12 at 96282
Brady Point Road, Fernandina
Beach. Camp is for ages 3-12 years.
Call 321-2137.
�* A'
Mighty Men of Valor, an original
vacation Bible school written by Dr.
John Van Delinder, will be held from
6:30-8:30 p.m. nightly, July 26-30, at
Bible Baptist Church, 820 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach.
Students in kindergarten and up
are welcome. Some transportation is
available by calling 261-5457. Each
evening will feature skits, games,
dramatized Bible stories about
Joshua, refreshments and many
exciting events - including the
largest water pistol fight.
* * *
Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ presents "A Veggie Tales
VBS!" July 28-Aug. 1 for kids age 4 to
entering fifth grade.
School is 6:30-8:30 p.m. each
night at the church, 1005 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach (corner of
14th and Jasmine streets).
Call 261-9760.


"We really try to listen to the customer to help meet their jewelry
S needs," says Amelia's Fine Jewelry owner, Gigi Grubner.
Precious Gems and treasures at
Amelia's Fine Jewelry
Gigi Grubner has been involved in the jewelry industry since
1991, working in her family's jewelry store in upstate New York.
Armed with a college degree in Fine Arts with courses in business
management, marketing and advertising, Grubner began Amelia's
--finc .Jau Iry i2007 u ith "'$50-a ni . JI'i.'-'- ,-C�. ^
A full service jeweler, Grubner and employees Caroline Sosnoski
and Gianinna Cooper offer custom designed jewelry, redesign of
existing pieces, and repairs and remounts. They also buy gold and
do selective consignment jewelry.
"We carry newv and estate jewelry," said Grubner. "Estate jew-
elry pieces have fascinating histories."
Amelia's Fine Jewelry also carries pieces by renowned jewel-
ry artists such as Simon G and Denny Wong, as well as pieces hand-
crafted by local and regional artists.
Anew offering for coin collectors is America's first silver dol-
lar used and accepted as legal tender in the American colonies.
Treasure hunters might be interested in authentic sunken treas-
ure from the I10-loot Spanish galleon, the Nuestra Sefiora De
Atocha. a Mel Fikher find which sank off the Flonda Keys in 1622.
Another oceanic treasure Grubner stocks is jewelry made with
the rare and beauuful Larnmar stone. This one source gemstone
from the Dominican Republic re-min-
eralizes from volcanic rock to a
unique aqua blue color.
The star of the
show is a specially
commissioned charm m
the shape of Amelia
Island, with a diamond
denoting the historic district.
Grubner runs her shop in a
relaxed atmosphere, free of high
pressure tacucs. With 19 years in the
jewelry industry, she finds her career ,
rewarding and %ants to continue to offei
unique, fine quality jewelry and excepuonal &.
customer service.

Amelia's Fine Jewelry is located at
317 Centre Street. Phone 277-0665


Call Us Today


261-3696


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FRIDAY, JULY24.2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


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.PHOTOS BY ED HADEE/SPEIAL

PHOTOS BY ED HARDEE/SPECIAI.


Bradley Dunham, left, and Eric Hatton compete in the Eastern Surfing Association contest held July 12 at the beach accesson Sadler Road.



ESA holds surf contest, plans another one for Aug. 8


ED HARDEE
News-Leader


The first in a series of local
surfing competitions organized
by the Eastern Surfing Associ-
ation First Coast District was
held July 12 on the beach at
Sadler. Road. The ESA, an
organization dedicated to ama-
teur surfing, plans another
competition on the morning of
Aug. 8 at the same location,
near Slider's.
The contests are open to
surfers of all ages and abilities,
said Robert Ruy, co-owner of
Pipeline Surf Shop on Sadler
Road.
The events "create a sense
of community and help develop
some out-of-this-world ath-
letes," he said. - -
Winners accumulate points
that allow them to advance to
regional competition.
"A lot of the surfers enter
the competitions to get noticed
by surfing companies and to
get their name out in the surf-
ing world," said Bradley
Dunham, winner of the boys
junior division.
Surfing conditions July 12
"weren't the best, but every-
one made the most of it," he
said. "Surfers riding smaller



Lifeguards


compete,


advance


to national

The city of Fernandina
Beach Ocean Rescue sent a
team of competitors to the
USLA South Atlantic Regional
Lifeguard Championships in
Myrtle Beach, S.C., July 15-16.
Lifeguards, 250 strong, from
Virginia Beach to St. Augustine
competed in a variety of races
showcasing their lifeguard
skills.
Travis Hargrove and Lance
Croft placed second overall in
the rescue board race. Angela
Ray placed first in the 2K run,
board race, surf swim, run
swim run and beach flags in
the 35-39 women's division.
Jenn Stelmach placed sixth in
both the beach flag event and
the 4x100 relay in the open
women's division.
These four competitors will
now go on to compete at the
USLA National Lifeguard


Nick Isabella, left, and Chance Bennett hit the water for a heat in the July 12 surf contest Another contest is
planned for Aug. 8 at the beach access on Sadler Road, near Slider's.


boards had a harder time than
,surfers with longer, wider and
thicker boards. Larger boards
will provide more flotation,
making an easier ride."
Surfers who'd like to enter


the next event can call Brad
Long at 415-6033 or Richie
Obszarski at (904) 891-3032 or
visit the Pipeline Surf Shop for
information.
Long said he was especially


SUBMITTElD PHOTOS
Lance Croft, left, and Travis Hargrove teamed up to take
second in the rescue board race of a lifeguarding compe-
tition in South Carolina earlier"this month.


Championships in Fort Lauder-
dale Aug. 6-8.
The Amelia Island Lifesav-
ing Association raised the
money to pay for the competi-
tors to go to competition,
through donations and
fundraising events. The city life-
guards, businesses, individuals
and community organizations


came together to help raise
money to send these competi-
tors to Myrtle Beach.
The Amelia Island Lifesav-
ing Association is still accepting
donations for competitors to
participate at the national cham-
pionships. '
For more information, con-
tact Ray at 415-5223.


The city Ocean Rescue team competed in regional lifeguard championships.


pleased with the participation
among young people and is
hoping for more in the upcom-
ing events.
"I got into surfing when I
was 13 years old, 22 years ago,"


he said. "Surfing helps keep
kids healthy, happy, focused -
and it goes hand-in-hand with
swimming and other cardio-
vascular training activities, such
as bicycling. Also, once you pur-


return to cycling after coming out of
retirement. Armstrong had won the
Tour de France, the 23-day, 2,125-
mile journey through Switzerland, Germany
and France seven straight times from 1999-
2005 before retiring. He then returned after 3
1/2 years and, at 37, began cycling again in
hopes of another victorious ride through
Paris July 26. At present, he is in fourth place,
and the fact that Armstrong remains at the
top of his game after his time away is remark-
able. He also has had to deal with a crash in
March, at which time he fractured his clavicle
and required surgery.
Armstrong's story continues to amaze
both the sporting and the medical world
because he was given less than a 40 percent
chance of survival years ago when it was dis-
covered he had advanced testicular cancer.
In 1996, Armstrong first mentioned to his
doctor a few things that seemed somewhat
embarrassing to him at the time. He reported
sore nipples, a swollen testicle and blood in
his mouth when he coughed. Testing
revealed he had a very advanced form of tes-
ticular cancer, which has spread through his
body and into his brain and lungs.
Armstrong thought his life was over and.
he underwent brain surgery, chemotherapy
and had a testicle removed. But he has beat-
en cancer and his story has informed millions
around the world and likely saved thousands
of lives.
Testicular cancer is the most common can-
cer in American men between the ages of 15
and 35, but can strike any male at any time.
The most common sign is a painless mass on
the testicle. Unfortunately, denial and embar-
rassment surrounding the disease contribute
to making it one of the least talked about can-
cers, but it is highly treatable. Well-lmown
testicular cancer survivors include skater
Scott Hamilton, Philadelphia Philly John
Kruk, comedian Tom Green and actor
Richard Belzer.
During my residency I took care of a 25-
year-old man whose testicle had become the
size of a grapefruit before he came in.
Because of his denial, his cancer was too


chase the equipment, there's
not much else you need to buy
except sunscreen - the beach
is free every day."
Results of the July 12 con-
test:
.Menehune (age 11 and
under) short board: 1. Sutton
Kerlin; 2. Gage Kropff 3. Gavin
Johnson; 4. Scotty Rivenbank
Boys/juniors: 1. Bradley
Dunham; 2. Jesse Chapman
Junior men's: 1. Walter
Obszarski
Men's final shortboard: 1.
Nick Isabella; 2. Chance
Bennett; 3. Chris Igou; 4. Jake
Combs
Women's: 1. Leslie Baker
Senior women's: 1. Shellie
Kropff
Men's longboard final: 1.
NickItsabertllr.ofeltg;"jE
3. Eric Hatton; 4. Todd Burwell
Senior men's longboard: 1.
Kevin Leary; 2. Brad Long; 3.
Scott Riven; 4. Frank Blake
Men's open final: 1. Eric
Hatton; 2. Nick Isabella; 3.
Chris Igou; 4. Walter Obszarski
Women's longboard: 1.
Leslie Baker
Senior women's longboard:
1. Joy Anderson; 2. Shellie
Kropff
Grand masters shortboard:
1. Kevin Leary; 2. Frank Blake


advanced and he died. Had
he presented earlier, his life
likely would have been
saved.
w No one knows what may
cause testicular cancer.
S . Caucasian males have an
increased incidence coin-
pared to black and Hispanic
men. Children born with an
undescended testicle are
SPORTS also at increased risk for the
development of this cancer,
MEDICINE even if surgery is performed
GREGORY to correct the problem.
Warning signs for testicu-
SMITH, M.D. lar cancer include a painless
- ... _- lump on the scrotum. The
lump may be very small,
even the size of a pea. Other signs of concern
would include change in the size of the testi-
cle, a chronic dull ache in the lower
abdomen, swelling in the scrotum and
enlargement or tenderness of the breast or
nipple.
If you find a mass, a bump or a lump on
your testicle, get it checked out. The
American Cancer Society estimates about
7,500 new cases of testicular cancer are diag-
nosed each year in the United States.
Unfortunately, an estimated 400 men die of
testicular cancer annually, but when detected
early, testicular cancer is highly treatable and
more than 90 percent of cases are curable.
Early diagnosis and treatment are important.
The sooner the cancer is detected and treat-
ed, the better a man's chance for a complete
recovery. Don't be embarrassed. If you find a
lump, get it checked out.
This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacement for treat-
ment by your regular doctor It is only designed
to offer guidelines on the prevention, recogni-
tion and care of injuries and illness. Specific
concerns should be discussed with your physi-
cian. Mail your questions to Gregory Smith,
M.D., Sports Medicine, 1250 S. 18th St., Suite
204, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Call 261-
8787 or visit www.gsmithmd.com.


12A


SPORTS


Armstrong continues



his cycling comeback


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FRIDAY. JULY 24.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


Babe Ruth regional
Fernandina Beach Babe
Ruth is hosting the 14-and-
under southeast regional tour-
nament, starting next week.
Opening ceremonies will be
held at 4:30 p.m. July 29 and
will include game booths and
a home run derby for all
youths until 8:30 p.m.
Games start July 30 at 10
a.m. and Fernandina takes on
East North Carolina at 5:30
p.m. that night.
For information, visit
www.leaguelineup.com/fer-
nandina.

Sign up for soccer
Amelia Island Youth
Soccer online registration is
still open through Aug. 2. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com.

Elm Street banquet
Elm Street Little League
will hold its award banquet at
2 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Martin
Luther King Jr. Center. For
information, contact Wayne
Peterson at 753-1663.

Tennis tourney atAlP
To raise additional funds -
for the Interfaith Dinner
Network, which benefits Hope
House clients, Amelia Island
Plantation will be sponsoring
a round robin tennis tourna-
ment Aug. 8. The tournament
is open to players of all levels,
men and women, for $30 per
person, including lunch. The
tournament will be divided into
social and competitive players
with a grand prize of a new
Head tennis racquet plus a 20
percent discount for partici-
pants at Amelia Island
Plantation's tennis pro shop.
Courts open for warm-up
at 9 a.m. and play begins at
9:30 a.m. Lunch with overview
of IDN is at noon. After lunch,
courts open to all participants
at no extra charge for addi-
tional play
Call the Pro Shop 277-
5145 to register. Payment
may be made upon arrival
With all profitsdonated directly
to the IDN.
IDN is a non-profit organi-
zation as a part of the
Homeless Coalition of Nassau
County, which works with the
Ministerial Association to offer
winners to the homeless and
I ...t-. .I .... . P, I
* �yi - A d-'t ' P >eed
temporary. help within the
community. This pilot project
involves 12 churches on
Amelia Island with dinners
prepared and served at the
Salvation Army's Hope House
at Ninth and Date streets. The
teams from these churches
have served more than 3,000
plates in 2009. They are
expanding the program to
include Yulee and Callahan.

Beach run
The second annual Back
to School Beach Fun
Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K
(one mile) will be held Oct. 17
at Peters Point on A1A. The
event starts at low tide, 4 p.m.
Registration information will
be available in August. The
day includes music, food and
awards. Begin training now.
Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit
Communities in Schools of
Nassau County.

YMCAflagfootball
The McArthur Family
YMCA teams up with the
Jacksonville Jaguars and NFL
Flag Football for its fall youth
flag football program. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices
begin the week of Aug. 24.
The season kicks off Sept. 5
and the last game will be held
Oct. 24. All games will be
played Saturday mornings.
Games and practices will be
held at the fields behind
Kmart in Fernandina Beach.
The league is open to any-
one ages 4-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-
bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a NFL Flag Football jersey
and an end-of-the-season
award.
Call 261-1080 or visit
http://www.firstcoastymca.
org/mcarthur-branch for infor-
mation.

YMCA fallvolleyball


The McArthur Family
YMCA is introducing a new
fall volleyball league. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices start
the week of Aug. 24. The sea-
son runs Sept. 10 through
Oct. 29. All games and prac-
tices will be held in the
McArthur YMCA gymnasium
with games on Thursday
nights.
The league is open to any-
one ages 8-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-


bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a volleyball jersey and an
award at the end of the sea-
son. Call 261-1080 or visit
http://www.firstcoastymca.org/
mcarthur-branch.

YMCA skills camps
The McArthur Family
YMCA is offering skills camps
for ages of 6-15 with special
interests for the summer time.
Camps include basketball,
soccer, golf, volleyball and
football. All ages, dates, loca-
tions, times and fees vary
between camps. r
Registration ends the
Wednesday before the camp
begins. Visit the YMCA on
Citrona Drive or call 261-1080
for more information.

Soccer referee courses
The following soccer clubs
are hosting the Grade 8 (entry
level) referee course1 Visit
http://fsr-inc.com/Welcome.
aspx to register. Contact Mike
Goodman, director of coach-
ing of Amelia Island Youth
Soccer, at aiydoc@aiysoc-
cer.com with questions.
* Greater Arlington Soccer
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July
25, from 1-4 p.m. July 26 and
from 6-8 p.m. Aug. 3 (test
night) at Grace Lutheran
Church, 12200 McCormick
Road, Jacksonville.
* First Coast Soccer Club
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 1,
from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 2 (test
day) at Kumon Math &
Reading Center, 13947 Beach
Blvd. Ste. 109, Jacksonville.
* Westside Soccer Club
from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug.
8 and from 1-4:30 p.m. Aug. 9
at Venetia Terrace Baptist
Church (by Westside Soccer
fields), 5284 118 St.,
Jacksonville.
* Creeks Soccer Club from
10 a.n. to 3 p.m. Aug. 15 and
from noon to 5 p.m. Aug. 16
(test day) at Veterans Park
(Creeks Soccer complex),
1332 Veterans Parkway,
Jacksonville.
* Jacksonville Soccer Club
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.Aug. 22
and from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 23
(test night) at Chuck Rogers
soccer park behind First
Christian Church of
Jacksonville, 11924 San Jose
Road, Jacksonville.

Yulee Pop Warer
Yulee Pop Wamer will hold
sign-ups July 25 for football
and cheerleading for ages 5-
15 at the Yulee Sports
Complex from 9 a.m. to noon.
All participants need a birth
certificate, walletrsize photo,
final report card of 2009
school year and a Pop
Warner physical. Fees are
$125 for first child, $100 for
each additional sibling. Call
277-8136.
Yulee Pop Warner board
meets at 7 p.m.July 30 at the
Yulee Sports Complex.

Femandina Pop Wamer
Fernandina Beach Pop
Warner is holding registration
for.football and cheerleading
Saturday in July from 10
a.m. to noon at the field house
on South 11th Street..
Registration fees are $125
and $100 for each additional
sibling. Copy of birth certifi-
cate and 50 percent of fees
are required at registration.
Visit www.leaguelineup.com/
fbpwa or contact Chrisie
Oliver at 277-9660.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing
Club meets the first Tuesday
at the Kraft Athletic Club.
Social hour is at 6:30 p.m;
meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Stein-
kamp at 261-5213 or visit
www.ameliaislandsailing.org
for information.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports
Association meets at 7 p.m.
the first Tuesday:of the mrionth .
at the county building, Yulee.
Call 261-1075 or 277-1609 for
information.

Basketball camp
Applications are being
evaluated for the Ten Star All
Star Summer Basketball


Camp, which is held by invita-
tion only for boys and girls
ages 10-19. Past participants
include Michael Jordan, Tim
Duncan, Jerry Stackhouse
and Antawn Jamison. College
scholarships are possible for
players selected to the All-
American Team.
Camp locations include
Babson Park and Gainesville,
Ga. There is also a summer
camp for boys and girls ages
9-18. Call (704) 373-0873 or
visit www.tenstarcamp.com
for information.


LeSage's 37.4-pound kingfish wins


Spencer LeSage and Steve
Pickett's 4/0 Fishing team for
winning the Jacksonville junior
angler tournament. Young Spencer
fought his 37.4-pound kingfish for 20
minutes before the big king mackerel
was boated. First-place prize in the jun-
ior angler tournament was a brand new
15-foot Carolina Skiff and Mercury out-
board motor.
A variety of saltwater species are run-
ning offshore in water depths from 50-
70 feet, including the ever-popular king
mackerel, cobia, grouper and red snap-
per. FA and the Nassau bottom are both
loaded with game fish and a good bet for
this weekend's offshore fishing scene.
There are plenty of mefihaden
schools holding at the north end of
Cumberland Island and holding just
south of Amelia
Island's Main Beach
and all the way along
the shallow beaches to
Amelia Island
Plantation. Be sure to
tune in your VHF
marine radio to chan-
nel 18 for the latest
reports on where men-
ON THE haden schools are hold-
ing.
WATER David Lacoss fished
in the Jacksonville jun-
TERRY ior angler tournament
LACOSS and celebrated his 17th
birthday by hooking
into a six-foot sailfish.
However, after some 60 seconds of fran-
tic jumps, the sailfish managed to throw
the small kingfish hooks.
Redfish are holding in the backwa-
ters, particularly during the mid falling
and incoming tides. Schooling redfish
weighing to 10 pounds are ambushing
forage foods as the running tides move
baits over flooding oysterbars. Drift a
live shrimp under a popping cork for
reds weighing to 10 pounds.
Flounder action continues to show-
case Amelia Island's backcountry fish-
ing scene during the falling tide. There
are lots of finger mullet schooling on
shallow bars that continue to be prime
fl6under:baits. Barb the live finger mul-
let right through the bottom of the
mouth and out through the top of the
mouth with a 1/4-ounce led head jig.
Retrieve the live finger mullet slowly
along a rough bottom for flounder
weighing to five pounds.
With a flood tide arriving at 12:21
p.m. at the entrance of the Amelia River,
inlet fishing should be excellent this
weekend for red drum, tarpon, sharks
and cobia at the tip of the St Marys
south jetty rocks. Fish dead on the bot-


PHOTOS BY TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
Jim Wormhoudt, above, is pictured with a big king mackerel that was
caught with a rigged ribbonfish. Amberjack are running at many of the
deep-water structures. Pictured below with an Amelia Island amberjack are
Roland and Judy Martin.


tom with live menhaden, cut whiting or /bnewsleadercom, mail them to PO. Box
large fresh shrimp. 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035, or
The News-Leader encourages local drop them by the office qt 511 Ash St. in
anglers to submit photographs of their Fernandina Beach. Call Beth Jones at
catches. E-mail photos to bjones@ 261-3696for information.


Display Advertising deadline for Wednesday is 3 p.m. Friday
Classified Advertising deadline is 5:00 p.m. IMondaye -
Display Advertising deadline for Friday Is 3 p.m. Tuesday
Classified Advertising deadline s 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.
Please call 261-3696 to place your advertisement.


I U


PERFORMANCE FIRST"


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example: 36 monthly payments of $28.20 for each $1,000 financed. Offer good on new and unregistered 2009 model year MUV700, 2008 & prior GL1800 and 2009 & prior AquaTrax models. Not all buyers may qualify. Higher
rates apply for buyers with lower credit ratings. Check parnicipaling Honda dealers for complete details, Offer ends 7/31/09. "Dealer retains all rebates. See dealer for more details, honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET EYE
PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ YOUR OWNER'S MAN-
UAL THOROUGHLY. For riding training information or to locate a rider-trainlng course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-800-446-9227. Rearview mirrors are standard equipment, VTX and Performance First
are trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (06/09)


SPORTS SHORTS


---i


NEWS
LEADE


I





14A FRIDAY, JULY24.2009 SPORTS News-Leader


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CROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
SUMMER CAMPS
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY. JULY24.2009
NEwS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


This is not your college


ub crawl


Enjoy history

with your drinks

on museum tour
SIAN PERRY
News-Leader

"spirited" than this, a group
of 12 ticket holders to '
Fernandina's newest walk-
ing tour learned Tuesday night.
Standing outside the old train
depot downtown, they pulled out
their IDs to show Amelia Island
Museum of History docent Charlie
Corbett they were indeed old enough
to embark on the "Original Historic
Fernandina Beach Pub Crawl" - open
to anyone age 21 and older.
The tour, created by Corbett and
fellow docents Steve Sansbury and
Chris Rasch, is a crawl in the truest
sense, ambling through downtown
Fernandina with frequent stops to
admire the architecture, ask ques-
tions arid learn about the history
behind the storefronts. Just when
your mind is wandering to thoughts
of something cold on a hot summer
night, you've arrived at one of four
watering holes on the tour - The
Palace Saloon, O'Kane's Irish Pub &
Eatery, the new KariBrew Brewpub
& Grub and Pablo's Grill & Cantina.
Corbett, a native Fernandinan,
starts where the city itself did - at the
foot of Centre Street, home to the
Amelia River with its deep harbor
and "sweet water" that attracted
sailors the world over. Add to the mix
David Yulee, founder of the Florida
Rail Road Co., who relocated
Fernandina a few blocks from Old
Town to accommodate his ambitious
plans, and you have the birth of
industry in what had been a sleepy
marsh-side town.
By the turn of the 20th century
Fernandina boasted 11 hotels, more
than 20 bars and three steamers a
day chock a block with passengers,
Corbett.noted. -
"With all the ships in the harbor,
they needed a cold beer when they
arrived," he said. And along came the
Palace Saloon, created by Louis G.
Hirth in 1903 as an upscale "captain's
bar" replete with mustache towels so
gentlemen could wipe the froth from
their beards. Inside, visitors today
can enjoy a drink and ogle over the
mosaic tile floors, tin ceilings and
massive gas lamp that still hangs
over the 40-foot bar. Murals, commis-
sioned by Hirth "to class the place
up," still grace the walls, as do carved
mahogany caryatids. Unlike other
establishments that served popcorn
or peanuts, Hirth preferred peel and
eat shrimp, which was set out in
large bowls on the bar.
Back on Centre Street, Corbett
stands in the pocket park beside
what istoday Seattle's Best coffee
shop and tells how it used to hold the
liquor store with the infamous "Cat
Crack" - the alley down which black


SIAN IERRY/NEWS-LEADER


FIl- PHOTO


Top, Amelia Island Museum
of History docent Charlie Corbett
shows Arlene Rice of Edison,
NJ., old photos of the Palace
Saloon during an Original
Historical Fernandina Beach
Pub Crawl.
Above, Charles Homage and
Robert B. Lockwood man the
"bar" of the saloon during
Prohibition, when it was an ice
cream parlor.
Right, Corbett (holding a soda
- the guides do not drink on the
tour) explains the importance of
the house that was also known as
"the scourge of Fourth Street."
Take the tour to find out why.


people could buy their liquor during
segregation. At a small window on
the side of the building they could
ask for their drink of choice, a "bull"
if they wanted a Schlitz beer, or a
"hog" if they preferred Gordon's gin,
for example, since many were not
afforded the opportunity to learn to
read and knew only the logo on the
label. An oil drum stove kept them
warm in winter, and an old car seat
provided a place to sit.


At O'Kane's, a short lesson on the
history of bootlegging and Prohibi-
tion seems appropriate, since Irish
monks were the first to develop
whiskey in the sixth century by dis-
tilling grains. As the Irish.immigrat-
ed, so did their "pot liquor," as it.
came to be called in America.
'This was an economical measure
- they knew how to make liquor and


SIAN PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
it was cheap. They were not flouting
the law - it was liquor by poor people
for poor people," said Sansbury of
the local folk who set up stills.
"Locally, our moonshine was done
in the west part of the county," said
Corbett. "In North Florida alcohol
making was very popular and corn
..f. lVWL Continued on 2B


TheBard

likeyou've

neverseen

-atACT
Amelia Community
Theatre will host three per-
formances of "The Complete
Works of William
Shakespeare, Abridged" in
August, presented by Skrank
Tank Productions.
Playwrights Adam Long.
Jess Winfield and Daniel
Singer appeared in the origi-
nal California production in
1987. The show was devel-
oped through improvisation,
and the use of current events
and audience participation
keeps that spontaneity intact
This touring show stars
Erik DeCicco, Tyler Ross and
Dustin Whitehead. All have
been involved in Jacksonville
area theater, plus academic
and professional theater else-
where.
The energetic comedy will
be presented at 8 p.m. on
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Aug. 8 at 209 Cedar St. Adult
tickets are $15; student tick-
ets are $10. Although plays
don't come with a rating sys-
tem like the movies, this
show could be considered
PG-13, as a guide to parents.
The New York Times said
of a past production, "It is a
mix of pratfalls, puns, willful
misreadings of names-and
dialogue, clunky female
impersonations, clean-cut rib-
aldry and broad burlesque.
The gung-ho vitality is impos-
sible to resist.... At its giddi-
est, its tone recalls the fabled
Bullwinkle cartoon shows."
And The New York Daily
News said, "A fantasia of zany
energy that throws together
Monty Python-ish drag and
Mel Brook-ish anything-for-a-
laugh gags."
"If you like Shakespeare,
you'll like this show. If you
hate Shakespeare, you'll love
this show," touted The Today
Show.
The ACT box office is
open 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on
Tuesday, Thursdays and
Saturday, or call 261-6749.


SONIHETSLANJ


ACT PLAY
Amelia Community Theatre presents "Six
Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," directed by Toni
DAmico and starring Carey Dresser and Arlene
Filkoff.
Lilly Harrison, retired and
living in a condo in Florida,
hires Michael, a cynical dance
instructor, to give her lessons
in the privacy of her own
S home. If these two people
- can't settle their many differ-
ences, the first dance may be
:J the last. This touching come-
dy proves that friendship can develop, even
between vastly different people. This play con-
tains adult language.
Performances are at 8 p.m. tonight and July 25.
July 29-31 and Aug. 1 and at 2 p.m. July 26.
Admission is $16 adults and $10 students. Amelia
Community Theatre is located at 209 Cedar St.
Call: 261-6749. Box office hours are Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday from 11 a.m.-l p.m. and two
hours before curtain.

SUMMER JAZZ
The Historic American Beach "Summer Jazz
Series" presents its second free concert featuring


The Instant Groove Band on July 25 from 5-8 p.m.
at Burney Park (corner of Gregg and Burney) in
S_________ _, American Beach. Bring


your chairs to enjoy
food, fun, music and
tasty treats by Gourmet
Gourmet. The concert


.. ... -..' series is sponsored by
the American Beach Property Owners
Association. Donations to the association for out-
standing projects are appreciated. For informa-
tion call 277-7960.

ART IN THE PARK
The Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State
Park hosts 'Art in the Park" the first Saturday of
each month. The park is located on US 41, three
:;miles from 1-75 and -~-itr d---
nine miles from 1-10 IMG 1" Me )P"ARW
in White Springs. I A hph1P
Crafters will ,n A^L4di.. C., V� oI <-�,-nO , -- . -k-i.
demonstrate pot- -
tery, fabric arts, stained glass, quilting, jewelry
making and many other crafts. Workshops are
available for a small fee and on a first come, first
served basis.
The event is free with regular park admission
of $4 per vehicle with up to eight people. Call
(386) 397-1920 or visit www.stephenfostercso.org.


'POPEYE' IN THE PARK
The next free movie in Central
Park, sponsored by Prosperity
Bank, is a screening of"Popeye,
the adventures of the spinach-
munching sailor directed by
Robert Altman and starring
Robin Williams and Shelley
Duvall, on July 25 at 8:30 p.m.
Bring your blankets and lawn chairs. Concessions
will be available for purchase.

'WOOFSTOCK'
Celebrate the 40th anniver-
sary of Woodstock with
Woofstock at the Nassau
Humane Society Dog Park on
Aug. 15 from 5-10 p.m. Enjoy
mellow music by Hupp and
Ray. Chow down on catfish and....
hotdogs. coleslaw, fries and dessert. Beer and
wine will be available for purchase. Best-dressed
wins a prize. Bring your lawn chairs.
Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for kids.
Tickets are available at the NHS Dog Park,(across
from the Fernandina Beach airport) and at;
Redbones Dog Bakery and Boutique on South
Eighth Street in the Pelican Palms plaza.


Ticketlinformation ,
SOrigibal Historic Fernandln~
Beach.Pub Crawl tickets are $20 :.'
and include: a guided walking - 'I
tour through four taverns, a d"ri
beer, glass of house wine, well' .
Drink or soda at each stop apd ,
colorful and interesting stories' :I
about the city and pub's hst6ry.
Drink tickets do not have to be
used the night of the tour and are
good up to the day lief6re the' .
:ntttour., ,
'* The tours take pla6e .
Tursda yat 5:30 p.m. ; ',,:
Reseriadohs ire required. .
SContact Thea at ?61-7378,,ext .
105, or thea@amieliamuseum.org.
You must be 21 or'older and .,:
feryone will.be asked to sho* ,..
)..:L "itie touis take aboutto.: ,
hoursr, so dress comfortably and:'
* wair walking shoes. . ., .
" ___ -- .


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FRIDAY, July 24.2009 LEISURE News-Leader


SPECIAL EVENTS

Young Professionals
Council (YPC) will meet at
Woody's BBQ (near Lowes)
on July 30 at 7 p.m. for
Trivia Night. Trivia starts at
7:30 p.m. for ages 21-40. The
goals of YPC include network-
ing, professional develop-
ment, community service and
advocacy.

"The Biggest July
Birthday Party Ever" sched-
uled for 6:30-11 p.m. July 31
at the Femandina Beach
Women's Club, 201 Jean
Lafitte Blvd., is sold out. For
more information contact
Joyce A. Jones at 583-1949.

Tickets are on sale for
"Seven Days of Fine
Dining," a drawing to win
seven dinner-for-two gift
certificates to local restau-
rants. A tax-deductible dona-
tion of $50 enters you in the
drawing, with proceeds bene-
fiting the TLC Pregnancy
Center, 410 S. Ninth St., dedi-
cated to empowering women
and men to make informed
decisions about pregnancy
arid sexual integrity. Call the
center at 321-2008 to make a
donation and enter the draw-
ing, which will be held Aug. 7.
Only 100 tickets will be sold.
Participating restaurants are
Baxter's, Brett's Waterway
Cafe, Joe's 2nd Street Bistro,
PLAE, The Verandah, 29
South and The Ritz Cafe.
* * *
Fifi's Fine Resale of
Amelia Island is holding a
canned food drive for the
Bamabas food pantry each
Sunday in August, beginning
Aug. 2. Bring in a canned
good and receive an ice
cream sundae treat for free.
Fifi's, 1853 S. Eighth St., will
be open noon-4 p.m. each
Sunday in August. Call 277-
4430. Visit
www.myspace.com/fifis_ameli
a.
* * *
The Baptist Medical
Center Nassau Auxiliary will
host a Fuzzy Bean Candle
and Health Fair from 7 a.m.-
4 p.m. Aug. 14 in the confer-
ence room of the hospital,
.featuring unique candles and


s *
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*l -


interesting health products. All
visitors will be treated to a free
mini-massage.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
will hold its annual Walk and
Candlelight Vigil commemo-
rating International Homeless
Animals Day on Aug. 15 at
Central Park on Atlantic
Avenue in Fernandina Beach.
The two-mile walk starts at
6:30 p.m. and is followed by a
candlelight vigil. Contact Cats
Angels at 321-2267, e-mail
catsangels@ bellsouth.net or
visit the Thrift Store and
Adoption Center at 709 S.
Eighth St.
The International Society
for Animal Rights, or ISAR,
sponsored the first National
Homeless Animals Day in
1992 by launching a crusade
to enlighten society, elected
officials and the media about
the urgent need to spay and
neuter companion animals in
an effort to halt the killing of
millions of unwanted dogs
and cats each year in the
nation's shelters. It has since '
grown into an international
event. For more information,
visit www.isaronline.org.

-The Intergalactic Bead &
Jewelry Show will be held
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 15-
16 at the Morocco Shrine
Auditorium, 3800 Saint Johns
Bluff Road S., Jacksonville.
For more information and a
discount admission coupon
visit www.beadshows.com.
Admission is $5 Saturday, $4
Sunday and children 12 and
under, free.

Tickets are on sale for
Cats Angels annual Super
Raffle to support its
spay/neuter/education pro-
grams. More than 50 prizes
are donated by area mer-
chants, restaurants and indi-
viduals, including jewelry, art-
work, a 3-night stay for two at
Amelia Island Plantation, a
one-night stay at Elizabeth
Pointe Lodge, salon services,
golf packages and more.
Tickets are $1 each, $5 for
seven, $10 for 15 or $30 for
50 and available at the Thrift
Store and Adoption Center,
709 S. Eighth St., and by mail
to Cats Angels, P.O. Box


* *

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SUMMER CAMPS


OUT AND ABOUT


16072, Femandina Beach, FL
32035. Include your name,
phone number, number of,
tickets and check. Call 321-
2267. The drawing will be
held Aug. 15. You need not be
present to win.

Ever wonder what
Facebook, Twitter and blog-
ging are? The Amelia Island
Museum of History, 233 S.
Third St., is offering "Facing
Facebook," an introductory
seminar on using today's
online social networking tools,
at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 27. The
museum utilizes Facebook,
Twitter and a blog to promote
its activities and educate the


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The McArthur Family
YMCA will hold its Eco-
Adventure Summer Day
Camp through Aug. 21.
Episcopal Children's
Services accepted. Fee is
$105 membersi$110 non-
members and a $50 registra-
tion lee (waived for mem-
bers). Daily rate is $40.
Camp locations are Atlantic
Elementary, Callahan
Elementary and the Yulee
Kids' Campus. Call 261-
1080.

Boys and Girls Clubs of
Nassau County Summer
Camps run until Aug. 21.
Participants will experience
fun and learning in a struc-
tured environment. Hours
are 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Weekly fee
is $50. Various free and
reduced enrollment plans
are available, as are pay-
ment plans. For inform nation
at the Miller Club (942259
Old Nassauville Road), call
Carla Wilson at 261-1075:
for information at the
Femandina Beach Club
(11th and Indigo), call
Reggie Williams at 491-
9102.

Kayak Amelia is offenng
one-day Kid's Kayak Day
Camps July 28 for children
ages nine through 14.
Campers will learn the
basics of kayaking (paddle
strokes, rescues), water
safety, survival skills and
navigation.
The instructor is an
American Canoe Association
Level 3 Kayak Instructor, cer-
tified in Wildemess First Aid
and CPR.
Class is limited to seven
paddlers. Cost is $75 per
person. Call (904) 251-0016
for reservations.
* * *
The Yulee High School
Hornet Marching Band will
hold summer band camps
In the Yulee High School
band hall on the following
dates: Color Guard and
Percussion Mini-Camp, July


community and wants to
make sure all are able to take
advantage of these tools. For
more information, contact the
museum at 261-7378.

Rescuing Animals in
Nassau, or RAIN, will hold its
annual spaghetti dinner
fundraiser from 4-8 p.m.
Aug. 22 at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center in
Femandina Beach.
Tickets are $10 and
include spaghetti with sauce
of choice, salad, bread, drink
and dessert. There will also
be a silent auction and enter-
tainment.
Tickets go on sale starting
Aug. 1 at Femandina Beach
Animal Clinic, Lofton Creek
Animal Clinic, Nassau
Veterinary Clinic, Bark Avenue
Pet Boutique and Bucky's
Best Friends Card and Gift.
For information call RAIN at
(904) 879-5861 or e-mail rain-
humane@yahoo.com.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept,
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell rnst is $20 nar nDrsnn


A meal will be serve
Reservations and
must be made by
First Coast Commi
in Yulee or mailed
Attn: Susan Murray
1739, Femandina I


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27-31, 8 a.m.-3 pm. All band
instrumentalists, percussion
and color guard members,
Aug. 10-14, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m
* * *
The Amelia Island
Parent Co-Op Preschool is
enrolling now for fall 2009
preschool classes for ages 2
and 3. The Co-Op also offers
summer camps in two-
week sessions for ages 3-5.
Call 261-1161 or visit
www.aipcp.org. The Co-Op
is located at 5040 First Coast
Hwy., next to The Dome
Healing Center.

The Cummer Museum
of Art & Gardens, 829
Riverside Ave., Jacksonville,
is hosting a Middle School
Art Camp for children enter-
ing sixth through eighth
grades, where children are
immersed in art for a week of
learning and can establish a
strong portfolio. Camp is 9
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 27-31.
Cost is $200 per child for
members and $225 for non-
members. For information or
to register, call Art
Connections at (904) 355-
0630.

The Epilepsy
Foundation of Florida is
offenng full scholarships to
Camp Boggy Creek Aug. 6-
11 which provides children
with epilepsy, ages 7-16, an
opportunity to escape the
stress of dealing with their
medical conditions. Campers
participate in a variety of
activities and on-staff med-
ical teams and volunteers
ensure the environment is
physically safe and medically
sound.
Located in Eustis, Camp
Boggy Creek is a permanent
facility on 232 acres of tall
pines, majestic oaks and
nature trails.
Contact the Jacksonville
EFOF office at (904) 731-
3752 or visit www.Boggy
Creek.org or www.epilep-
syfla.org as soon as possi-
ble.


ed at noon. Tickets are on sale at
payment Amelia Community Theatre
Sept. 1 at for a touring production of the
unity Bank energetic comedy, "The
to FCCB - Complete Works of William
y, P.O. Box Shakespeare, Abridged."
Beach, FL Performances are at 8 p.m.
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8
S p.m. Aug. 8 at the theater,
209 Cedar St. Adult tickets
are $15; student tickets are
$10.
The show is a mix of "prat-
S falls, puns, clunky female
impersonations, clean-cut rib-
Saldry and broad burlesque:
The gung-ho vitality is impos-
sible to restt" says The New



CRAWL Continuedfrom 1B
S was the grain of choice
because it fermented in hot
humid climates the best."
A common question
among farmers might be
3 "How is your corn?" said
Sansbury, but the reply
around these parts would be,
"Oh, I'm getting 10 to 12 gal-
lons to the acre."
But before O'Kane's was a
pub, it was the second Ford
dealership in town, opening
in 1924, said Corbett. It wasn't
necessary to have a huge
* showroom, customers would
simply order from a catalogue
and the car would be deliv-
* 0* erpd to their door.
The next stop, KariBrew
on Third Street, was home to
* the first Ford dealership in
1910. Armed with this knowl-
Sedge, it seemed appropriate
* * to pause aong the way at the
site of the first car accident in
Fernandina, when Flossie


32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yuleefbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with any
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event.

Ghost tours on "Polly
the Trolley" are offered on
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday evenings from 7:30-
8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 for
adults and $5 for children 3
and under. Call 753-4486 for
more information or reserva-
tions.

Enjoy "Trivia with
Maggie" on Wednesdays at
7:30 p.m. at the Crab Trap in
downtown Femandina Beach.
Enjoy a special trivia menu,
drink, win prizes and listen to
music while you improve your
memory and get smarter.
Free and open to the public.

FILM/THEATER

Tickets for romantic soul
artist Smokey Robinson are
on sale now at the Florida
Theatre. Robinson will per-
form Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. With
the Miracles in the 1960s, he
recorded dozens of tuneful
Motown hits with his high
tenor. As a solo performer
from the 1970s onward, he
was one of the staples of
urban contemporary music.
His work contributed to the
success of Motown Records
and helped advance the pop-
ularity of soul music.
The Florida Theatre is
located at 128 E. Forsyth St.
in Jacksonville. For ticket
information call the box office
at (904) 355-2287.
* 9*
The Amelia Island Film
Festival announces a special
festival award in honor of
Don Davis (1931-2008) to be
presented to a filmmaker for a
film made in Florida. Davis
was instrumental in creating
Florida's Film Production
Incentive Program.
The Second Annual AIFF
will be held in Femandina
Beach for four days in
February, beginning Feb. 25.
Visit
www.AmelialslandFilmFestiva
l.org for information about fes-
tival events and film submis-
sion applications.

Memorial United
Methodist Church is hosting
a film series titled Faith at the
Movies. This is a brand-new
series designed to explore
issues of faith through popular
movies. There will be a simul-
taneous movie and program
for children, as well as a nurs-
ery. All are welcome. Movies
start at 6:30 p.m. in Maxwell
Hall.
The lineup includes:
"Romero" tonight and "The
Ultimate Gift" Aug. 7.

"Dora the Explorer Live!
Search for the City of Lost
Toys" will be at the Times
Union Center's Moran
Theater on Aug. 4 and 5 for
three performances. "Dora the
:Explorer Live!" is a culturally
rich, interactive theatrical
show for preschoolers and
their families. Call the FCCJ
Artist Series Box Office at 1-
888-860-BWAY.
*ee


KariBrew, it's on to Pablo's '
and the end of the tour, but
not before learning about the
"Silk Stocking District" and
how Yulee dreamed that
"Fernandina was going to be
the next Manhattan, the
Broadway of the South," said
Corbett.
With roughly 22 bars and
12 bordellos by the turn of
the century - many situated
on Second Street - it "didn't
quite pan out that way," said
Corbett. Still, the small island
the size of Manhattan doesn't
lack for history.
sperry@fbnewsleadercom


York Times.
Call 261-6749 for tickets
and information, or come by
the box office between 11
a.m.-1 p.m. on Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays.

ART/GALLERIES

The Haskell Gallery & Art
Kiosks at the Jacksonville
International Airport Main
Terminal.present "A
Women's Point of View:
Paintings, Photography,
and Sculpture" by Lara
Summers, Elisa Olderman
Johnson and Cookie Davis.
For information visit
www.JIAarts.org.

The Art House, 11 S.
Seventh St., offers art class-
es for all ages, abilities and
interests as well as portfolio
and professional develop-
ment. Individual and group
classes are forming. The Art
House offers a classic photog-
raphy studio, photography,
portraits, restoration, wed-
dings, events, computers and
software, digital and film. For
Information or to register, call
Robin at 261-0116 or 705-
6178.

Island Art Association
member Paul N. Massing is
exhibiting his recent works at
The Intercoastal Wine
Company, 10 N. Second St.,
through July.
"Portraits, Pirates and
Other Local Notables" fea-
tures poses of pirates in full
costume and others in historic
garb made from live sittings
by local people.
* * *
The Cummer Museum of
Art & Gardens, 829
Riverside Ave., Jacksonville,
is hosting a one-day painting
workshop with local artist
Christina Foard on July 25
from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Move
toward abstract expression-
ism in a workshop that will
push your work beyond the
ordinary. Foard will demon-
strate some of her techniques
on paper and canvas and
teach elements of design,
process, detachment from fin-
ished product, color theory
and symbolism. Participants
can also tour the exhibition.
that inspired the workshop.
Paul Jenkins: Works from
Jacksonville Collections, on
view through Aug. 9, features
18 paintings by Paul Jenkins.
Cost is $70 for members,
$90 for non-members and
$55 for active docents, lunch
included. For more informa-
tion or to register, call Art
Connections at (904) 355-
0630.

Celebrate the Dog Days
of Summer at The Cummer
as part of The Artist in The
Store series from 7-9 p.m.
Aug. 25 featuring James
Lehosit's The'Dogs of
Riverside andAvondale.
Enjoy viewing unpublished
photographs of the featured
dogs from the book. Book
signing is at 7 p.m. and is
open to the public.
Lehosit, who was raised in
the Riverside-Avondale com-
munity, was the photographer
for the 251-page book..
For more information
about the book and event, call
The Cummer Store at (904)
899-6035.

Paul Jenkins: Works
from Jacksonville
Collections is on exhibit at
The Cummer Museum of Art
& Gardens, 829 Riverside
Ave., Jacksonville, through
Aug. 9.
Jenkins is an important fig-
ure in post-World War II
American Abstraction. Now in
his 80s, he continues to
exhibit in America and
Europe. His works can be �
found in the collections of
major museums.
Admission is $10 for non-
members. Call (904) 356-
6857.



Borden pulled-out of her
driveway at Yilla Las Palkias
and into the path of Dr. Waas,
the first person in town to
own a car. (Flossie was the
second.)
'"There were only two cars
on the island and they had a
wreck," said Corbett, shaking
his head.
After a welcome break at


0 p o b S* * * 0 0 0


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CLASSIFIED


To PLACE AN AD. CALL, (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR TIHE FRIDAY ISSUE


3B
'NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, JULY 24.2009


WEDNESDAY A"T' 5 P.M.


100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property r cI,:..:.r, . ..nrfurn,,hed
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County l9 Hrrm,E-Furnisrej
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 50b FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys . H..)n---t.muurn,.red
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County I,-1 ' . .': e,.,r, Finta
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817,Other Areas E"2 a, Er-a,.ra;r
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS . : - ,,r:,e , ,
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Srr.ices *1i hlu-ciall Instruments 625 Fr.I- I.ra' 56806 Wcrii..r-,rr. 851 ;..r,',rr,3i.- tied _ ,: ,--,mr--,r,,u 'R
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 61. T,:l,.il.-r,-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 8," C, o-.,T,,-, n,u- 852 "'L. 1..rrn- 901 TRANSPORTATION
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garag. sales c.14 J.,, ir, iWatches 701 Ebi. i L Tr,i.llr. Uilb lin ilUOd .ul.e 853 Mobile H Lots 01 TRANSPORTA
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Art,:les for Sale 615 B.JI3li,.j rlaterials 702 e.-.r .0.uppi1ie, C.:.:tl ,9 L,-[ 854 c...: .. ,.i Tru,- i
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 r-,sccllaneCous o616 SL[,:. .agie srer,.use - -,-..,.rr , EQu.,.l, 'ir Sil.: -ll FarmT , .. . .:r.,-.,. 855 ,.j5rr,..,r,,, .,jrr,,-I,.. , 1 _ n
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 b61cles . 17 rl ,n er, -T,:,,, Equip ' -4 , ,.r.r-a,.7..-, ,l.'cli *'al C.'. m.rr,eroi ...i ,1 856 "-'1 r.,-r,-, I rir, ,-, Hru,4 ..,:tr,:,,:le-
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Suppni.es 618 A .r.,-,r, -n_ :.,-,pu[� . =uppi'-l- a ' Fro.,Ert E.:r.ar-..- 857 ,-'-r.J. -F..F -,n,;I .,, -,mm.Trra

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW


102 Lost & Found
FOUND PARROT - by one of the pools
at Amelia Island Plantation, Please call
the nature center to identify (904)
321-5082.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.

104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF
TAX MATTERS - and then-some.
Thomas Avery Blair (Tom "the
TAXMAN") = federally-licensed Enrolled
Agent providing services in tax
preparation/ taxpayer representation.
29 years experience in taxation
matters. Call toll-free 1-888-250-5687
or visit htto://www.TomBlairEA.com

105 Public Notice
THERE TS A LIEN - . r ,.:- r .:.H.:...,,-,,
vehicles for towing and storage and will
be auctioned off on the listed dates
below: on August 3, 2009 a 1962 Ford
Pickup VIN# F10JH309800 at 12 noon
at 1683B S. 8th St., Fernandina Beach,
FL 32034. (904)321-3422
THERE IS A LIEN - on the following
vehicles for towing and storage and will
be auctioned off on the listed dates
below: on August 8, 2009 a 1989
Acura 4DR VIN#JH4KA3179KC015423,
a 1994 Ford Escort VIN#
1FARP15J9RW205424, a 1985 Chevy
Caprice VIN# 1G1BN69H2FY138941,
and a 1960's Chevy Pickup VIN#
6Z123962 at 12 noon at 1683B S. 8th
St., Femandina Beach, FL 32034.
(904)321-3422


I 105 Public Notice


All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
Informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.



LJM~~~un


Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
CASTING CALL - We are seeking
personable bartenders, cocktail wait-
resses and dances for a new ultra
lounge located in downtown Fernip-
dina. Please come with resume &
personality July 19th or 20th @ 2pm to
The Palace Saloon. Email castln call
thenalacesaloonicom for ?'s
TIMES UNION MOTOR ROUTE -
available in Yulee. Excellent part-time
income. Covers Chester Rd. &
Blackrock area. Approximately 4 hours
a day. You must have dependable
transportation & current insurance, To
apply, please contact Jason Green at
225-9170 ext. 3.
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.
ROOM FOR RENT - in salon/spa. Call
(904)491-0991, ask for Jessica or
Summer.


201 Help Wanted I LAMB CHRISTIAN DAY CARE - now
Sharing (2) part-time positions. Apply in
nerson at 601 Centre St.


PATIENT COORDINATOR/
SECRETARY
Life Line Home Care needs a full-time
patient coordinator/secretary. Excellent
hours and benefits. Computer experi-
ence and good customer service skills
required. Fax resume Attn: Admini-
strative Assistant to (229) 382-1350.

Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.


Price Comparison
2001 Chevrolet Silverado Motor Mount
Parts Store Part Brand Price


RockAuto

Advance

Autozone

NAPA

O'Reilly


Anchor

Anchor

Anchor

NAPA

Anchor


$30.79

$49.99

- ' � $49.99.-

$56.99

$56.99


IMMEDIATE OPENING - 5 Days per
week Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm.
Data Entry-A/R Billing Clerk-Office
Assistant $9.00/hr to start. Position
requirements: Data entry experience,
ability to work in a fast paced, detail
oriented environment, Flexibility, Multi-
tasking, Computer experience to
include Microsoft Word & Excel,
Excellent Customer Service, Accounts
Receivable experience a plus.
Applications can be picked up at: 511
Ash Street Fernandina Beach, FL. NO
PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


PART-TIME HELP WANTED - Basic
computer skills and retail experience.
Apply in person only. The UPS Store,
1417 Sadler Rd.
ADMINISTRATIVE/CUSTOMER SER-
VICE ASSISTANT - needed ASAP!
Olympic Steel has an Immediate
opening for an administrative/ custom-
er service job In Fernandina. Position
Qualifications *Excellent computer,
phone, and time management skills
and ability to multi-task in a fast paced
environment. Position Requirement
*Bilingual-Spanish/English Interested
candidates please fax/email resumes to
904-491-8688 olvsteeltradina.iobs@(
olvsteel.com. EOE m/f/d/v
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA
has a Teller position available at our
new Yulee Branch in Nassau County.
Must possess good interpersonal skills,
organizational & computer skills, ability
to operate standard office equipment
and above average math skills.
Previous teller or other cash handling
experience is required. Fax resume to
386-754-7163 attn: Jan Turbeville or
email to Turbevillel@ffsb.com. A
quality Equal Housing Lender and EEO
Employer.
A JANET LYNNE SALON & SPA - is
accepting applications for a stylist/
colorist for a booth rental position.
Discover the difference in our relaxing,
non-competitive environment. Call
Janet at 556-1687 for a confidential
interview. Serious inquiries only.
AWESOME CAREER OPPORTUNITY -
$20/hr. Avg $57K/yr. Postal jobs. Pd
training. Vac., OT, full benefits, pension
plan. Call M-F, 8-5 CST. (888)361-6551
ext 1040. ANF
NOW HIRING
Companies desperatelyneed employ-
ees to assemble products at home. No
selling, any hours. $500 wkly potential.
Info 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-1380.

BARISTAS, SERVERS, & PREP CHEF
- Espressos Cafe in Amelia Island.
Described in Amelia Islander magazine.
Fax resume to (904)491-9810


The Tribune & Georgian is looking for a creative,
ambitious, result-oriented, advertising sales pro-
fessional. Responsible for selling to established
accounts, prospecting and cold calling..Must be
able to work with deadlines. To apply for this po-
sition, send cover letter, resume including pro-
fessional references to:
Tribune & Georgian, Attention Tom Latos
P.O. Box 470, St. Marys, Ga. 31558
or e-mail: tomlatos@tribune-georgian.com

DEADLINE: July 10, 2009


Tribune & Georgian
48906 T&G 6/5


EXPERIENCED PARTS/WAREHOUSE
PERSON - Need experienced person
for our busy parts counter. Duties
include inbound calls from customers,
handling requests from- both walk-in
customers and our service department.
Knowledge of parts a plus. Must be
dependable and able to work
independently. Fax resume to (904)
924-9335, Attn: Porter.
APARTMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN
- We have an exciting career
opportunity for a Service Technician at
Nassau Club in Fernandina Beach.
The ideal team member will have prior
general maintenance and repair
experience. Apply online today at
www.concordrents.com. Excellent
Benefits! -


201 Help Wanted
MERRY MAIDS
is now accepting applications for
permanent part-time/on call position.
No nights or weekends. Background
check. Drug free workplace. Must be
21 or older. (904)261-6262. Must have
own vehicle.
FRONT DESK CLERK NEEDED -
Experience preferred. Apply at Holiday
Inn Express, 76071 Sidney PI., Yulee or
call (904)849-0200.

204 Work Wanted
HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - Houpe cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.


Nassau County
(Temporary Position)

Applicant must possess college credits in pursuit of
Sociology or Psychology degree, or related fields
with a'minimum of three years experience in social
service or an acceptable combination of education
and experience; must have knowledge of various
computer software packages and their operation.


Apps/resumes may be mailed or faxed to NFCAA
Attn.- HR Dept., PO. Box 52025,
Jacksonville, FL 32201
or FAX (904) 398-7480.
Closing date of application is 8/4/09













a b~omerang


LOCALSPENDING WORKS


www.BackyardEconomics.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY.


BALED STR._


JOHNS PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over'18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installaion Available

CL EA NING SERVICE_]


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.
* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At
753-3067 -'-

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES




9LEAN[UGSERVICE
Rcsidcntial/Commercial
Licensed Bonded Insurance
Member AIEB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904491-1971 Cell: 904742-8430
E-mail: justforyouscrv@iaol.com












The11* .w * l . l
Series Directory!


.CLEANING SERVICE |

CLEAN by Genine Inc.
Attention to Detaill
.1
Genuine Harter
Ho-Iuscekeeping

904-415-1186
gennehahorer@gmal corn


CONCRETE ]


NICK ISABELLA, INC
Color and Stamped Patios.
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Nojn doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete


GARAGE DOORS - LAWN MAINTENANCE & _ NE\V &1 USED CARS .


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In
"The local guy" since 198'- ,
Quit Paying Too Much! .
Operator or door replacements Transmitter replacement
* Broken springs Stripped gears
*Cables .Service for all makes & models
904-277-2086

HOlME INPROVENIENT _
..... , I


261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES .
LICENSE 1#6941 "R'gt l1ie
Repair* Rebuild * Remodel
AMELIA ISLAND Specialzng in Hardle Board Siding
Tile Work i Hardwood Floors * Doors
GUTTERS Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
When It Rains Be Prepared. Crowd Moulding
6" Seamless MA0iR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Aluminum Gutters Licensed & Insured
L ^iCE SteaR i 321-0540 � 557-8257
LicENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Dustes n2-04 * 5 2
(904)261-194

CONSTRUCTION O 's 11O TNm


B ANNAN CuSTroN CABINETS ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
ON TRCD O i N oOOICASES TRIM CARPENTRY
HOME REPAIRS IEHODELING
State Reg. Building Contractor HANDYMAN SERVICES
40 Years Experience LICENSED A INIISED
Licensed - Insured
State Licensed RB0055959 SCOTT IUDOLPH 9 " -57-310
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES


QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages
16,495 |
2024 Wood Fram Only I
Addlition o i t or
ioncala Tck
m9


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc.
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement *
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants & flowers, trees, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation fpE
* Sprinkler Installatlon EsrIIE
*Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354


r^ WELBORN
IRRIGATION
Do It right the tirsnt time.
* Complete system designs
Repairs & modifications
* System tune ups *10 years experience
Licensed/Insured
Warranty on new Installs
Free estimates * 904-277-8231





The Lock Doctor
904-321-LOCK (56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


] .(e0 , - ROOFING J-

CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC GMC AkMELIA
464054 SR 200 * Yulee .ROOFING, NC.

(904) 261-6821 333-6496
00% FINANCING
UPTO130MPH M'-i
METAL / SHINGLE Cejeg
| P IN. ... . FREE EST.
PA INIIN(; I CCC-055600


Quality Work at

& t1ill , fki 041lt, r .) Llel 1C'
Rct'..n"il ,, " ' h " ,


FREi 1i 225-9292



AMELIA ISLAND
QUALITY PAINTING, INC.,
"Ctall lthi P'rofi'ssionals"
S(904) 753-1689
*RFESIiENTIAlN llA
*COMMrICIAI, 'X
*INT'lRIORlEiIOXTli'UOI
SPECIALIZEDD FINISH IES
�*PIuESSlitU WASlSING(
( WATER R1'tOOFINGI;

LICENSED) * BONDEli)* INSURED
PROFESSIONALL CIRAFrSMANSII lP A
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALI.lTODAY FOilYOUR
FREE ESTIMAI'TE
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


U/I/lll fflllll/flll/llll

COASTAL BUILDING
SYSTEMS


"Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia
261-2233
Free Estimate
CCC-o07020
R . HE CCEPr MC1 'ISA "cii
;//;l////1//////////////ff


S201 Help Wanted 201 Help Wanted I I 201 Help Wanted


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353


_ __


1- .













4B FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


Find Th e Nwss.L dor on Ihe WorID. IICdWl Wb
mwHnw.mnsnwtlan�drs.Eo
clrasuleds. or subrrlbr o s
Florida' C 1dess weleuy Nesrpapepr s'


HOMELESS


ANIMALS ..


THEY'RE DYING FOR

A 2ND CHANCE,
ADOPT A COMPANION TODAY,


S '. "'.

'A ^


I wlAuctons *


APUIC SwcE niCaMM n iiliEttel | I | &6irsO �c IS1W .... . -1jI
S- - 4 - . ..- .- - - .- .





Saturday-Sunday, July 25 - 26


PRESENTED BY REALTY CORP.


3321 S. Fletcher Ave. * Fernandina Beach, FL 32034


(904) 261-3986




, ,

'"rs all th


RICHARD ROUX - MLS #49191
SATURDAY $449,900
3889S FLETCHER AVENUE,
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034


MIKE MATTHEWS - MLS# 48411.
SATURDAY - 463049 SR 200, YULEE,FL 32097
$249,900 - 1-95 TO SR 200 EAST. PROPERTY IS
NEXT TO THE YULEE POST OFFICE


SUSAN MCEWEN - MLS# 49170
SATURDAY OPEN HOUSE $299,000
422 S. 5TH STREET TAKE 8TH STREET TO DATE
GO WEST TO 5TH STREET MAKE LEFT


MARY BUNK - MLS# 48914
SUNDAY - 97119 PIRATES WAY, YULEE, FL
32097 - $179,900 - A1A TO NORTH ON
BLACKROCK ROAD APPROX. 4 MILES ON YOUR
RIGHT. TURN AT 1ST ENTRANCE PIRATES WAY
AND PROPERTY WILL BE ON YOUR LEFT.


TOM O'CONNELL - MLS# 49933
SATURDAY - 96475 CAYMAN CIRCLE,
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034 - $269,900 -
FROM A1A SOUTH ON NASSAUVILLE RD. TO
1ST RIGHT ON PARLIAMENT DR. TO 1ST LEFT
ON CAYMAN TO HOME ON RIGHT.


SUSAN MCEWEN - MLS# 49569
SUNDAY $157,000 COTTAGES AT STONEY
CREEK SR200/A1A TO ARRIGO THE RIGHT IN
TO STONEY CREEK BEHIND SUPER WAL-MART


DON CANTIN - MLS# 41539 DON CANTIN MLS# 43795
SATURDAY - $850,000 - 4709 GENOA DRIVE, SUNDAY - 4701 RINGING DRIVE, FERNANDINA
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034 - GOLFSIDE BEACH, FL 32034 - $649,000 - OFF AMELIA
SOUTH IS DIRECTLY ACROSS FROM RITZ PARKWAY ACROSS FROM THE ENTRANCE TO
CARLTON. FIRST STREET ON RIGHT IS GENOA THE RITZ CARLTON
DRIVE. HOUSE IS 5TH ON CORNER FROM LEFT.


204 Work Wanted
HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Grcat
references and estimates. Please call
(90,1)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
HOME REPAIRS - Painting, roofing,
rotted wood, electrical, ceiling fans,
decks, tile, chimney repairs, gutter
cleaning and pressure washing. Call
Marc (904)583-4900. Lic. & Ins.
HOME REPAIRS - All types of home
repair & improvements, mobile homes
also. Dependable service. Licensed,
bonded, & insured. Call Mark Bullington
at(904)277-8780.


206 Child Care
FIRST GRADE TEACHER - will nanny/
teach your home-schooler reading &
math. Excellent references. Call Alice
(904)261-6599.
Weekend Child Care Available - I
have an, opening in my home for
weekend child care. Mornings or
evenings. References available. (904)
225-8778


207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF


Motor graders, Excavators, Backhoe, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks,
Flatbed & Winch Trucks, Farm Tractors. Riding Mowers,
Batwing Mowers, Gators, Generator, Welders, Tag & Enclosed Trailers, Late
Model Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge Pickups, Explorers, Suburbans, Vans,
Workstations, Computers, Laptops, Printers, Fax Machines,
Calculators, Office Furniture, Phones, Radios and Much More.
J. M. Wood Auction Co, Inc.
(334) 264-3265
BryantWood AL LIC#1137







Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Ferandina ieach "'. ...
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810 -- I


Saturday - August 8 10:00 .m.
* Crop L ,I.* : ""I .. , ' , * I . I.. .. I ' i . 7 ,)pprlnull
* ('o .. I Divided and im its Entiia y * Beautiful Potential HOImesites
* Excellent Timber Inmvstment * Zoned RA
* Prime Groutwt Area of Lowlndes County * Hardee Road Froantage

f7 Rowell Auctions, Inc. 800-323-8388
S,,s 10% Buyrs u emium GALAU iC002529


Ths roery asreenl

ra




Pore


A GUIDE TO NEWLY LISTED REAL ESTATE PROPERTIES


AMAZINGIII
NEW crown In ever room. NEW bamboo
floors throughout NEW paint In every room,
loser, exterlorl NEW granite fireplace, shelving,
corian counters, custom Ilghting, remote control
fans, surround sound in & out. PREMIUM lot size
backs to preserve, extends beyond fence plus
garden & fruit trees (orange, tangerine, lemon),
koi pond, outdoor lighting & outlets, 2nd water
meter saves $$$. Room for everyone - bring
your extended/growing family to this SIX be
room, FOUR bath home with 2nd story bonus
room PLUS mother-in-law suite. FREE pool table
and bar included. Seller owned for quick closing!
MLS#49965 $491,000

Chad &Sandy Neumann
904-219-7539
www.houses-that-rock.comrn


ERA
ERA


Fernanlinal Bea Hnu3jll
l' jh i lllll ] " l.r:li 1,


Home lociald -'ln 09i7 3ire in
neighborhood cC)rnvenernl i island
beach, school a il iho0[ppin
Hump lihjiureS iclrnplr IlPeplaie Iiled
ll:nrs neIw :irpel nrew Ferii l
doors opening lo deck and pool
mrj Him wirr inrr ML',49t-)


Cheryl Holt

904-742-4649


85198 Trinity Circle, Yulee 'i Beautiful Wooded Lot
Nicie lerincd hll V, re h, ,i - Backsaup to a pond in desirable Harrison
.,islirii 1j:iJublP ' ,i: "ili lile h i riml Cove at Summier Beach on Amelia Island.
Hom0 rej wi but d,:,i. 3l., . Small galtedl neighborhood, short walk to
polriil ;a rIiri:IInf1 rJ n IIi Ihe beach, membership to Golf Club of
pl:a, d 2i)n Hnnmi [,li :,,i] Amelia Island available.
"AS I nir i ,'I lriA 31 $65 .000. $160,000 MLS#:48207
MLS 49852
The Home Store Amelia Island Properties, Inc
Cheryl iolt Ron Thornberry
(904) 415-0615
319 Centre Street,
904-742-4649 . Fernnandina Beach, FL 32034 2


*US :g


'n~sruJ~a~t'j*.s~~s.-


Neumann
P E A L T I ' 1:' P


301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. C all Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF

305 Tutoring
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing: (904)432-8212.

'& A A


503 Pets/Supplies
GREAT PUPS - free to good loving
homes. Brother & sister lab mix
w/beagle must go together. Also boxer
mix. Must have a fenced yard. Fixed.
Love walks. Housebroken. (904)556-
9512.
FREE BEAGLE - doesn't like cats. 4
years old. Housebroken. Needs chain
link fence. (904)491-4970.
PERSIAN/MANX MIX KITTENS -
Free to good home. Also have Siamese
/Persian mix. (904)225-9940




601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - Sat. & Sun. 86016
Cherry Laurel Way, Yulee (Sand
Hickory Subdivision). Furniture,
clothes, tools, laminated wood flooring,
GE W/D and much more.
FAMILY YARD SALE - Sat. 7/25,
8am-12pm. 1912 Atlantic Ave.
Furniture items,. household Items,
children's clothes & toys. Everything
must go. (904)321-1468


I


i


ts


601 Garage Sales
HUGE GARAGE SALE - Fri. 7/24, Sat.
7/25, & Sun. 7/26, 10am-4pm. Oak
dresser, diaper cakes, plus sized
clothes, etc. 86012 John St. in Yulee
off Felmor. Follow the signs.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE -
Corner of Simmons & 1st Ave. Sat.
7/25, 7:30am-noon. No early birds.
ESTATE/DOWNSIZING SALE - We
are moving contents from Osprey
Village to 528 S 8th St, here in
Fernandina, to hold the sale. Estate
and yard sales are not permitted in
Osprey Village. Thurs 7/23, Fri 7/24,
Sat 7/25, 9:00am-4:00pm. Rain or
shine. Corner shelf, room divider,
vintage oak curio, rattan shelf, 2
vintage clocks, hanging curio,
Cuisenart Griddle and coffee maker,
Williams Sonoma items, utensils,
pyrex, corning, fish poacher, bake-
ware, Italy kitchenwares and dishes,
Chitarra pasta maker, ravioli maker,
Ginori China, 23 pcs Royal Copehhagen
China, chopsticks, Pipka Santa, vintage
purses, perfume bottles, costume
jewelry, compacts, lipstick holders,
Japanese lanterns, asparagus dishes,
vintage molds, gourds, 66 pcs sterling
Manchester Southern Rose silverware,
Shelley Dainty Blue Snack Set for 6,
antique sewing box with contents and
key, Tiffany & Co Sterling children's
pcs, Gorham Sterling Tea Set, 120+
pcs Sheffield Silver Plate flatware, lots
of vintage lamp prisms, Pewter dishes,
48 pcs flatware, large bronze vase, egg
cups, 2 rabbits on nest, marble/onyx
eggs, toaster oven, trunk, treadmill,
cook books and recipes, old lace, lots
of beads and ribbons, clothing. This is
a smaller size sale, but nice clean sale
of interesting and fun items, so don't
miss out! For more info, photos and
map go to
www.MovingAndEstateSales.Net. Sale
is being done by Mary Ann Pihlblad dba
Finders Keepers. Licensed bonded and
insured.
YARD SALE - Fri. & Sat., 9am-?
Household items, toys, kids stuff,
motorcycle (Suzuki Boulevard 2006
650cc) only 900 miles, lots of extras.
New diamond rib tool box & ladder rack
fits extended cab or crew cab General
motors, truck.
ALSO FOR SALE at' 2999B 1st Ave.
garage sale - refrigerator, dishwasher,
stove, washer & dryer.

BACKSTAGE BARGAINS - Furnish-
ings, glassware, paintings, picture
frames, record albums, books, kid
stuff, decorations; TV. 1014 Beech St.,
Femandina Little Theatre. Sat. 7/25,
8am-noon.
MOVING OUT! - Sat. 7/25, 10am-
4pm. Everything must go. Furniture,
couches, art, 'etc. Make us an offer.
809 S. 8th St., Pelican Palms Shops
next to Redbones.
HUGE GARAGE SALE - 87509
Creekside Dr., Yulee (off Roses Bluff)
Sat. 7/25, 8am-? Furniture, fridge,
multiple gaming systems w/games,
baseball stuff, LEGOS, boys clothes sz.
12-16, and way too much more to
mention.
2-FAMILY YARD SALE - Sat. 7/25
only, 8am-? US 17 South at Crady
Lake. Furniture, remodeling materials,
baby items - Lots of stuff.
95292 ARBOR LN. (Nassauville) -
Fri. 7/24 & Sat. 7/25, 8am-12pm.
Household items, furniture, TV,
appliances, dishes (great for college
bound), & misc.
ESTATE SALE - Saturday, July 25th,
9:00-12:00, 2318 Inverness Rd
(Lakewood). Designer purses, clothing
(sizes 0-4), furniture, boating items,
etc. Everything must go! Early Bird
Sale, Friday 1:00-3:00.
BIG SALE - Sat. 7/25, 8am-12 noon.
96417 Otter Run Dr.
FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS - 7/17 &
7/18; 7/24 & 7/25; 7/31 & 8/1. 9am -
? Off A1A to Harts Rd W. to 86204
m.a, I. fi r-.:llow signs. Jorri's This N-
-Tr.jt M.r,..j.;; and Collectibles + yard
'sale items. Shoes, clothes, dolls,
furniture, fishing, books, China,
vintage fashion jewelry. If the price
isn't right, make a fair offer. Let's make
a deal. Everyone welcome.
COMMUNITY WIDE GARAGE SALE -
Timber Creek Plantation. 2 miles west
of 1-95, exit 373. Sat., 7/25, 8am-
1pm. Visit the KB model home for a
chance to win prizes.
FLORA PARKE - SAT. 7/25, 8-12.
Furniture, dishware, rugs, novels,
children's books, games, decorative
items, misc. 31179 Grassy Parke Dr.











FRI\A, . JuLY 24.2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader 5B


602 Articles for Sale
MOVING SALE - Sat., 7/25. 96205
River Marsh Bend. Riverside subdi-
vision off Barnwell Road. Furniture &
household items, leather sectional,
stainless steel firdge. Lawn mower,
tools, etc. Cash Only. 8am-??
CHURCH FURNITURE - Does your
church need pews, pulpit set, baptsitry,
steeple, windows? Big sale on new
cushioned pews & cushions for hard
pews. wwwv.pewsl.com. (800)231-
8360. ANF
GOLF CART - 2007 Piecedent 48 volt.
Like new. (90-1)631-5822
SAT., 8AM-2PM. DVDs, tie rims, lots
of good boys' clothes & household
items, 85383 Blackmon Rd.

603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF


4BR/3BA Foreclosure! - $11,500.
S *I Only $217/mo. 5% down 15 years @
615 Building Materials 8 apr. 3BR $199/mo. For listings
--... . .. ... .. .. ... (800)366-9783 ext 5760. ANF


METAL . ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupply.com. ANF

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628
DAWN PICTURE - Approx. 6am,
10/27/08 over ocean w/new moon &
star at 12 o'clock. Ca11,(404)725-8133.






802 Mobile Homes
4BR/2BA ON 1 ACRE - Ready to
move in. Low down and only $650/mo.
Call (904)424-7345.

804 Amelia Island Homesi
3BR/1BA ADORABLE HOME - on
Stanley Dr. Hardwood firs. Ready for
move-in. All appliances incl. $165,000
or $950/mo to rent. (904)335-0454
OCEANFRONT - Log Cabin R-3
income. Property remodeled $975K.
Oceanview - Homes needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. Summer
Beach - 2028sf. Short distance to
beach. $415K. Amelia Coastal Realty
261-2770

805 Beaches
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled-
porches, hot tub. $344,900. (904)556-'
4500
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.


S 806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.


808 Off Island/Yulee
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
rermrodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
lhorus semni-secluded I acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/cldeck. $180,000. 583-0095


809 Lots
Lake Lot Deal Fell Thru - 2.6 ac
$19,300. Free boat slips. Was $39,900.,
Secluded wooded lot w/deeded access
to pvt stocked bass lake in TN, Quiet rd
frontage, utilities, warranty deed. Exc
financing. Must see, call now (888)
792-5253 x3087. ANF
1 ACRE DRY LOT with SWMH (of little
value) - Raintree Lane, F.B. $78,000.
Call (904)321-1159.


NEW DIRT BIKE - Suzuki DR-Z125/L. VACANT LOT - on lake in Otter Run.
Asking $2500/OBO. Goggles, boots, Asking $51,900. Call (904)321-0684.
and helmet included. (904)261-0936

605 Computers-Supplies 1814 West Nassau County


GET A NEW COMPUTER - Brand
name. Bad or no credit - No problem.
Smallest weekly pymts avail. Call now
(800)81609189. ANF

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating

HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.


FSBO - 55030 Deer Run Rd. 1.02 ac.,
3BR/2.5BA, fireplace, nice neighbor
hood, Callahan. $333,000. (904)631-
5822 after 5pm.


S 817 Other Areas
LAKE BARGAIN - 3+ ac just $49,900
(was $89,900). Nicely wooded, private
lake access. Ready to build. Owner will
finance. Only one - save big. (866)
352-2249. ANF


COASTAL GEORGIA - Bank Ordered
Sale. 1+ acre ocean access $29,900.
http://www.oceanaccess299.com/888-
982-8952 x5192. ANF


* A



851 Roommate Wanted
HOUSEMATES - off island, Private
home. No pets. Responsible, pro-
fcssional, clean. $ 500/mo. I deposit.
Utilities Included. Call (904)557-1659.


852 Mobile Homes
2BR/1BA SW - in Nassauville.
Remodeled. Rent $550/mo + $550
dep. Service animals only. (904)583-
2009.
2 & 3 BR Units - available in trailer
park. Call (904)335-6121.
3BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE - on one
acre. $750/mo + $750 dep. 3/2
Doublewide - on one acre $850 +
$800 deposit. (904)753-2156
3BR/1BA - CH&A. Singlewide In
Nassauville area. Call (904)261-6703.
FOR RENT - (3) 2BR trailers in mobile
home park. $500/mo. + $250 deposit.
Call Debi (904)759-3897.
UNFURNISHED 2 to 3BR - Beautiful
new decor. $600-$700/mo. Includes
water, lawn, poss. RTO. (904)315-1757
or 613-8401
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on 1/2
acre lot in Yulee. $700,mo. + $700
dep. Available now. Call (904) 491-
4383 or 237-7324.
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
YULEE 2BR SINGLEWIDES
Teakwood Mobile Home Park. $500-
$550. Call Marie (904)225-5378.
On Island/In Park - Long term. 1,2&
3BR starting $150/wk. $600/mo.+dep.
Utils avail. Off Island - 2/2 MH, $175/
wk. or $695/mo + dep. 261-5034.
YULEE 3BR/2BA DW - Newly
remodeled on 1 acre. $800/mo + $800
sec. dep. References, lease. Service
animals only. (904)225-5214


-Exit 3







Iatidj Eigi'u rom 3 toj112'aes Cities of&. MaU1s&R n Kigsd, Geogia
* Ne r e.\tiJ (Og llcoimrli dree]lelk l 4 Conveliet I-9Sacces- Exit 3

INSPECTION DATES:
Wednesday, July 8 and:22 from 3:001- 6:00 PM and
Wednesday, July 29 from 3 00 - 5.00 PM
Action S Irspaaors held attheWe~'terrMotel Confererne Roomn 1215iEast KingA've * Kngdand. GA
PL Contact Jim oll tz AUtt'."=0v .. Rex Schrader lAuNmooase)

WOLTZ:a: &


855 Apartments -; DO T LITTER
Furnished :SPAY- ~NEUTER
AT RFArCH - rffir 1 R& 2R startilnn I ' "'


$145/wk. + dep., utils incl. ON
ISLAND - 2-3BR MI-'s In park $150/
wk. up or $600/mo. + dep. 261-5034
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking, $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262
2BR/1BA APT. - on S. Fletcher.
Completely furnished. $750/mo. +
$250 deposit. Background check req'd.
(904)321-4366 or (904)557-8220


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
SMALL 1BR - at the'beach. Quiet. No
smoking. Service animals only. Utilities
included. References, $500 deposit
required. $650/mo. (904)335-1665
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
included. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
ISLAND STUDIO APT. - 422 Pinedale
Rd., Fernandina Beach, 800 sq ft.
$600/mo, 1 month deposit. Incl.
garbage. No Smoking. Available Aug.
1, call M-F 9am to 5pm 904-277-5606
leave message after 5pm.
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY - PRIVATE
ENTRANCE. Must be clean. No
smoking, Dock for sunning or fishing.
Utilities & cable included. $700/mo. +
dep. & refs. (904)556-1401
1BR ON ISLAND - Secluded, quiet,
good view, W/D. $650 + dep., lease
utilities included, restrictions. (904)
753-1116
2BR/1BA - Near, beach. $795/mo. +
$795 dep. Call (904)583-3811.
BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N.
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D.
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005
HISTORIC DISTRICT - 2BR/1BA,
approx. 1000sf, above Cafe Karibo.
$1000/mo. Utilities included. (904)
415-6533


GovDeals is Hosting at Online Auction the Surplus
Assets of Florida County, City, Law Enforcement and
Educational Agencies
Police/Sheriff Vehicles a Confiscated Property - Heavy
Equipment - Pickup Trucks - Cars - Buses - Computers
Furniture - Specialty Assets - Scrap Metal
New Items Adde Dally - Register Online to Bid Nowl
htItp:/FL.govdeals.com
Register online to bid Call 800-6130156 or
e-mail lnfo@govdeals.com f.om0re Information GovDeot JS '







Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * : bedroom townhouse style
L 3 bedroom garden units * Marsh views
Swimming pool * Dishwasher * Laundry facilities
Washer, drier connections'" \\'asher,dnrer units available'
'Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675."" per month
*Some features not available in all rn ts
5^Ct4-V e1 NIUC4Ml$1 � O uXA 040.4 Sci!i
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you can wdlk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gateway to .Nmella center!


m.e oa! (904) 261-0791
v'mv. .atcdevelopment.com


R EA L TR OPENHO UEjiI


PUBLIC INVITED



Saturday, Jly 18th


114PM





ON ISLAND

727 Tarpon - Green Home

3BR/3BA - $459,900





MAINLAND

96232 Dowling Dr. - Lanceford

3BR/3BA - $599,000........


l Visit us at www.galphinre.com

C I a ln (904) 277-659t Business
(800) 699-6597 Toll Free
S~* , ,',"ATE . '", � (904) 277-4081 Fax
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company 1880 S.'14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32034
R t al


DEALOF THE DAY1 NATURES GATE AMELIA SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE
Fenced 1/2 acre lot in Yulee Custom 3/3 concrete block Furnished 2/2 "end unit" Perfect starter or retirement
w/AS-ISDWMH.New roof& home built in 2003 has w/Southern exposure. home in Yulee. Remodeled
new siding in 2007. Home inground pool. double lot Oceanfront pool and great kitchen & bath. tile & laminate.
needs workbut has great Home has oversized MBR. SS Oeanfron p0t kitchen . e ne.
potential. appliancesgranitetops. vacation rental possibilities. newHVAC

#49852 $65.000 #49900 $370.000 #50009 $460.000 #49929 $122.900


Lots&Acreage


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles- 3BR/2.5BA Bringyour golf clubs and walk the
golf course. Single family traditional home with 2 car garage.
Living room and dining room at front of house. Fireplace in fami-
ly room which exits to large screened porch. Master bedroom has
entry to screened porch for early morning coffee and bird watch-
ing in a natural setting. Conveniently located to shopping, schools
and dining just off Amelia Island Parkway. $1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered
patio and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and
fireplace in living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in
prestigious gated community where amenities include a codmiuni-
ty swimming pool'and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and
Golf Club of Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking dis-
tance to the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage.
$1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home located in
Ocean Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in
back patio and 2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country
living at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres
of land with beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm
evenings in the flrida room or cozy up by the fireplace-on tihe
cold winter nights. Either way this one is a charmer. $1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA - 2795 sq. ft., granite
counter tops, maple cabinets, stainless steel appliances,
washer/dryer included, centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES , OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green
in the Nottlh Hampton Golf Community with club house/aquatic
center, basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with
canoe/kayak lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television,
High Speed Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400


* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced lot, satellite-
dish, tool house. Ten minutes from Amelia Island and convenient
to Jacksonville International Airport. $1150

CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include
swimming pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools
and shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with communi-
ty pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Great
south end location. Large 2 car garage. This unit is in excellent con-
dition. Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the
ocean, golf and shopping.Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking
a leisurely drive on AIA through State Parks along the ocean and
intracoastal waterway. $925
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town
home located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal
waterway. Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service.
$2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as
well as golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful
brick paver walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/lBA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus roonl, fenced
front and rear yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family
room. Home is only one block from the ocean. $900
* 2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1BA Located only 2 blocks from the
beach. Home has new carpet! Community features include swim-
ming pool, tennis court, play ground and Bar-B-Q area. $750

FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A - 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnisled.1
block from the beach. $750


SalesSalesSalesSalesSale


I


i












6B FRIDAY. Ju i.Y 24. 2009 CLASSIFIEDS Ncws-Lcadcr


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc. CURTISS H.

-i LASSERRE


S850785 US 17 Yulee - 150x300 lot with
.I 1-18 sq. it bUilding & large paved piark-
Ing lot. $2,500/mo1. tax & utl
* 1200 sf. a l Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Sterm Mart and At Home
Amelia, Great fi oltage Long term lease.
$19.00 PSF f 3.5 CAM + Sales tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + t ax
SApprox 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure oni
AIA Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities. .
*Approx 1.800 s.f. Retail Bldg � 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2.250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses.$2,500/mo + tax + until
*DEER WALK - 1.250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water;
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St. Old West
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $12 per sf + tax.


- I aM -:-A S o1 -


SI Keal Lstate, Inc. I


LONG TERM
*2519 S. FletcherAve (West Side),, 3-4
BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots of
parking. Unfurnished $1,400.00.
S19 S. 14th St., 2/1. $900/mo. + until. secu-
rity deposit $1.250.Avail.August 2009.
*4BR/2.5BA Very nice 2500 sq.ft. home
at Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
*3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island with
beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,850/mo. + Util. Avail Sept. I"
*3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood
PI., close to beach and golf course
$1350/mo + util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit in
Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of
amenities. $950/mo.
*514 S. 14th St. - 3BR/IBA $875/mo. +
until. security deposit $1,250. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. +
util. Security deposit of $1,250.
*2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt,
Great Deck - Oceanview $1,000/mo. +
util.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/IBA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher.
Call for more information
904-261340S 6


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

BEACHES CHOICE - 2BR lownhom e
with oceranvlew covered porches.
CII&A. C(hrlng fans. W/D connection.
Sirvilc adnimell , only, No smnkinq, 737
N. Fletcher. $ '10/U/m . I dep. (904))
2 1 -4127.
OCEAN VIEW 2BR Nil lese. SiLvice
animal-s only. :|,i75L/nli. *+- security
deposit. Call (90( 1)2 l - 7750 alter 6pm.













sNsassau


Club
Apartments
Brcst.AIddrtlssil / il-liandina Beachr

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool


/ Fitness Center
/ Business Cener
/ Gatedi Communliiiiiyx

FREE RENT
Call for Details
(904)277-2500


r


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

SPACIOUS STUDIO APT - w/ocean
view, 619 S. Fletcher. Private beach
access, freshly painted. No smoking.
$650/mo I+ $650 cdp. (904)261-7658.

857 Condos-Furnished

AMELIA LANDINGS - Furnished 2BR/
2BA, walter/sewer & garbage included.
Pool. Non-smoking. Service animals
only. $1050/mo. + deposit. Call (904)
759-1105.
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2/2 flat,
next to tennis courts/pool. Long r-i-,
$900. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. , i-l,
277-0006.
TOWNHOUSE - Furnished 2BR/2.5BA,
North Pointe. Pool, beach. Can be
unfurnished. Hm: (912)921-8976, Cell:
(912)414-2556
BEAUTIFUL Oceanfront fully furnished
3BR/3BA. Ocean Place @ Summer
Beach. $3000/mo., incl. all utils. Avail.
10/1. Call Marcy, (904)753-6500.
FOR RENT - Fernandina. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
-court, pool. Svc animals only. Utils incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
AMELIA LAKES - 2nd floor, 2BR/2BA,
1181 sq. ft., W/D, fully furnished and
equipped in immaculate conditions.
$1300/mo. Real wood- fireplace.,
Screened porch. Short Term leases
available. Call Janina (904) 261-2169


858 Condos-Unfurnished

3 STORY - new, 2800 sq ft Amelia
townhome close to beach - 3BR's + 2
study areas, sitting area in MBR, 3.5
bath with 2 car attached garage,
patios, inside home elevator. Upgrades
galore with wood floors in main area,
.all appliances, pool & gym. Rent on a
lease; will consider a lease purchase.
Non-smoking please. $1,500 monthly
- first, last and deposit upfront 904
962-7477 or 904-827-9900
NOW LEASING AMELIA LAKES
CONDOS - Private & gated luxury
community featuring resort style
swimming pool, tennis court, fitness
center, beach volleyball, & more.
Overlooking a spring fed lake. 1 & 2BR
homes starting at $799/mo. Call today
for a showing, (904)415-6969.
www.amelialakes.com

FERNANDINA SHORES - 2BR, pool,
tennis, 2 blocks to beach, W/D, lower
unit. Service animals only. $875/mo.
Available now. Call (847)867-3163.
NICE 1BR/1BA CONDO - Newly
painted, garden tub, screened 3orch, Ig
rooms. Gated community w/ amenities.
$750/mo. Call (904)432-8359
3BR/2BA BEACH CONDO - Al new.
$800/mo. Annual. unfurnished rental.
(904)415-1313


858 Condos-Unfurnished

2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
bbach. Completely renovated! Ameni-
ties incl. $900/mo + sec dep. Call
912-269-3960.
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA Lownhouse. $895. Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
CLOSE TO THE OCEAN
Overlooking pool. 2BR/2.5BA w/
carport. Year's lease. $875 + dep.
(904)430-2605 I
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $950/mo. (904)206-
2313
2BR/2BA TOWNHOME - 2-car
garage. $895/mo. Call (904)415-8256.
THE PALMS AT AMELIA - 2BR/2BA
starting at $800/mo. Call about our
early move in special. (904)277-1983


859 Homes-Furnished
3BR/2.5BA Fully Furnished Home -
just 1" m ile from beach or historic
downtown.-l mo. dep. req'd. $1350/
mo. Includes basic cable, water, sewer,
& yard maint. Short or long term lease.
Available now. (757)639-5453
3BR/2BA - plus bonus room, garage.
Fully furnished. In Lofton Pointe.
$1300/mo. For information call Anna
S(904)403-1982..

860 Homes-Unfurnished

2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
NORTH HAMPTON UNFURNISHED
HOME - 3BR/2BA, large backyard.
$1300/mo. One month free with year
lease. Call (912)270-3239.
3BR/2BA - 1800 sq.ft. Tile floors,
gorgeous fenced yard, all appliances.
2046 Marlin CT. $1375/mo. + dep.
(858)354-8221
4BR/3BA. Foreclosure! - $11,500.
Only $217/0(b. 5% down 15 years @
8% apr. Buy 3BR $199/mo. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5798. ANF
$200 OFF 1ST MO. - 3BR/2BA home
in Heron Isles, 96017 Tidal Bay Ct.
Lake view. CH&A. FREE CABLE.
$995/mo. (916)300-3039
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. '$1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177
ROBINHOOD - 1538sf, 3BR/2BA. 2-
car garage, fenced rear yard. $1200/
mo. Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770.
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1425/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177


'92 CADILLAC 60 SERIES - 4 door
fleetWood, 4.9L V8. Nice. 174,000
miles. $2500/OBO. (904)225-5418
FOR SALE - 2004 VW Passat. GLS TDI
sedan. Diesel. Pristine condition. Very
low mileage. Loaded. Must see!
$15,40o0. (904)277-6946.
BUY POLICE IMPOUNDS - '97 Honda
Civic $400. '97 Honda Accord $500. For
listings call (800)366-9813 ext 9271.
ANF
Acura Integra - '95 $500. Honda
Civic '97 $400. Toyota Camry '98 $850.
Ford Taurus '00 $900. Police Impounds.
For listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9275. ANF
1994 CHEVROLET STEPSIDE P/U -
350 V8, 154K mi., all power, runs
great, no oil leaks, clean interior, black.
Has A/C leak. $2900. 277-2075

[-- 903-Vans --
SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034


LongTermRn

EasyAppicatiooES
. ... ....


I 1 n .. ... I , lh1 , . .1 I. ....IIl , I-I I -,I i _ ,,.I I-I , - ' .nr ., . ,n , ., ,, , i,. in _- , ,I 'I I 1 .. 1i,, I.,, ,r. ,[
office srtes. ]Located near A1A and suites to choose from. Located in the in Beachway irh ovcrsizced fi.ced back
Highway 17, WiSreless internet and resort district aud close to AIP. Visit yard. Mlany i upgrades with lawn cam
security systmin provided. From ParklPlalceof\Amelia.corn for details and included. lPes allowed. (fft Island.
S250.00 to $5i(00(,/mo pricing. 51,325imo
Nassau Countlm's Premier Property Management Specialists


5209 Village Way - 3RIl2BA located in Ocean Village.
Furnishef or unfurnished. Community Pool with beach
access and Summer Beach membership available for'small
fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. S1,950/mo

1913 Perimeter Park - 3BR/2.5BAwith formal living and
dining. Master with garden tub & granite counter tops. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,995nmo

95118 Sandpiper - 2BR/2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck
over looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities
included. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,895/mo

1886 Cape Sound- 3BR3.513A condo lully furnished with
community pool and work out room. Granite counter tops.
Stainlcss steel appliances. Utilities included. No pets. On
Island. $1,850/nmo

,,:, ti \\,.,,,It, . 1, 1 . J -, I. i' % L, t 11n 1,.. l , I t, ,il..i th
",h_1 ~11 ,,...I r u h .u 1111, l ,. ,L ,II u . 11 , - ,II,_1 I1UI h
Sl , II' ll . II. I I II ,n l I In 11 ll I, .,,,1 ,I I i .. n I I . iiil
washer/dryer. O Island. $1,750/mo

2851 Ferdinand - Brand new 3BR/2BA home in Isle De Mai
with screened in lanai. Overlooking pond. Community Pool.
lawn care. No pets. 'a offrent with 12 month' lease. On
Island. SJ,650/mo

95015 Sea Walk - Beautiful 3B/v2BA home located in Sea
Walk off Scott Road. Split floor plan with large oversized back
yard and short walk to beach. Lawn care. Pels allowed. On
Island. $1,550/imo

95141 Amalff- 3BR/2.5BA towfi home located in the Villas of
Summer Beach with community pool. Short walk to beach.
Iawn care and washer/dryer, Screened lanai. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,450/tmo

,i.M i., \i,,..', , I 1 Ii.,\ l iv ime located in Heachway
SillI.,, I I, II. I I1., I m l,l Many upgrades with lawn
care included. Pels allowed' (ill 1ii-1.1 .'i 25/mo

86059 ltemseilburg-31B8/12lA North ilaml)ton 1,500 sq. ft.
home. I luge hack yard. Wireless ,ri e I', ll, 'ii, l Iill'of
one month rent with full lease. Off Island, 1,300/mn


95152 Elderberry - 311i2.5BA town home located in the
Preserve with community pt)l. Short walk to beach. Lawn
care and washeridryer. Summer Beach membership
available for small tee. Pets allowed. ()n Island. $1,300/mo

1994 Amelia Green - Brand new 21BR2.5BA townhome
with loft and one car garage. Close to shopping and beach.
Pets allowed. On Island. , 1,200/mo

1969 Amelia Green - 213R/2.5IA townhome with tile floors
throughout main living. Granite countmrtops, stainless
steel appliances. Close to shopping and beach. awn care.
On Island. $1,200mno

2651 Delorean Street- 3BVR/21\A located off WillI l lrdee -
close to schools, shlppliing and beach, lawn care incld. On
Island. $1,175/mo

96679 Arri o- l. , - .' \ III..i' I- iit.l i n Is., liway. 1600
|li, | ' li lii , , l. C., 1 t , . l, l. l ii, , ill l i.,i1l $J,150/m o

823 N. Fletcher- 2BII BA furnished u stairs unit. Ocean
view with sunroonl. Water/sewer included. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,100/mo

86184 Augustus - 3BR/2BA house located in airtesian
Pointe with fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2
car ga-age. Off Island. $1,100/mo

5437 Leonard - 2BR/2BA home located In American leach.
Great outdoor area for , . l.... wii i .11..il i g1.1i rllrii .
Oversized yard. Petsall n-. i n il.n'J ,l m ,n .,, ,

314 S. 4Lth - 21111.5B1A home with oversi cd fkneed in
back yard and deck. Pets allowed. Ilall' onilh treC with
12 r" i . I. is, i11il'montrh uofwitlli 1j month ls-,. On
.'l. nlh , I , I i , ii.

765 Kenneth Coult - 2Blli/2l A Icn'cdi will oversized back
yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $7501/mo


Owncrs: \IV, Can flhelp You (Get uThe Most From Your It'tlMInenCs IIt prt-Y.
Givc I s A (Cll 'Ioday!


MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free mitedTime

* W/D Connections
* Large Closets
* � 1 Pirvate Pations
1. * iSparkling Pool
* i q Tennis Courts
" - , '* Exercise Room
S7* Close to Shopping
* Twenty Minutes to
Jacksonville & Fernandina
City Apartments with Country Charm

S(904) 845-2922
, 37.149-Cody. Circle
Eastwoo Oaks Hilliard;, Florida
APARTMENTS Mon.- Fri 8:30-5:30
SSat./Sun by Appt.


860 Homes-Unfurnished
3BR/2BA - like new home with huge
yard. 2 car garage, W/D and garden
tub. Page Hill subdivision in Yulee.
$1100/mo. (904)536-6379.

861 Vacation Rentals
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
.Realtor, for special rates.
SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - Furnised
house. 3BR/2BA, 2-car gar, 'gated
comm/pool, 5 min/beach. Rent by day,
;wk, mth, yr. 261-6204, 206-0035


863 Office
OFFICE OR RETAIL SPACE - for rent,
'14 North 4th St. 400sf with bathroom.
Just renovated. Behind Post Office.
$750/mo. (904)415-1053
TURNKEY CLASS A OFFICE SPACE -
in Gateway /To Amelia complex.
available for professional service firm
on an office sharing basis. If interested
contact Sue Armstrong at (904)277-
2788.
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
Office Space - Includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack.
(904)583-0058.
SADLER RD. - Office/retail space
avail. $900/mo. 8th & Gum - 1200sf
+ loft at $1200/mo. 1105 S. 8th -
1065sf $1000/mo. 6400sf $4500/mo.
Beech Street - Former Restaurant
Lease. $1700/mo. Buy $195K. Down-
town - 1900sf at $2000/mo. 1280-
3200sf - Tyler Plaza, Yulee. $14psf.
Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770
3 ROOM SUITE - utilities furnished.
$625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd. behind
Amelia Insurance. Call George,
(904)557-5644.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to.
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.:


864 Commercial/Retail
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtist Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.





901 Automobiles


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815 PAGE 4A
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F LO R I DA S


OLDEST


Historic
pub crawl
PAGEIB


WE E KLY


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FRIDAY July 24. 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS fbnewsleadercom


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Count

RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
A ceremony Wednesday celebrated
the opening of the Goffinsville/Nassau
River Regional Park. The park features
a boat ramp, a fishing pier, nature walk
and a children's play area.
Construction on the park began in
September, on acreage purchased by
the county with the help of the Trust
for Public Land. However, the park
had been on.the drawing board much
longer than that, Nassau County
Commission Chairman Barry
Holloway told ceremony attendees.
"This is something we can be proud
of in our county," he said. "This has
been the work of many, many years. I
know the first grant was applied for
way back in 1993."
The park was built on the site of
the East Coast's first oyster canning
plant, built some time after the Civil'
War. In 1893, a Russian immigrant
named Saul Goffin purchased the plant
The land remained in his family until
his granddaughters, Doris Mellion,
Kiki Umla and Barbee Baron, decided-
to sell it to the county.
"Ms. Mellion and her family - they
sold us the land," Clerk of Court John
Crawford told the crowd. "And let me
tell you, they could have gotten multi-
ples of what we could offer, but they
wanted to contribute to the county....
We should be proud in Nassauville,
because we're now in 'high cotton'."
Former Fernandina Beach mayor
Charles Albert said the area was spe-
cial to him because he spent his child-
hood nearby.
'This is the greatest of pleasures
to me because it brings back so many
fond memories. If you look to your left,
I was born on that creek," he said.
"(The park) is something we can use,
each of us. We don't have to have a
boat - we can throw out a line and
catch a fish. ... When we talk about
ecology, we talk about our relationship
to the environment - and that rela-
PARK Continued on 3A


now a reality


i-A . I 11 K M R', .LN 1 H1 I % -" - -A-mL
Noah Wilder, 4, above, tests the slide at the opening of the Goffinsville/Nassau River Regional Park
on Wednesday. Below right, Jennifer Phijps of Girl Scout Troop 400 leads a color guard of Boy
-S~outs from Troop 152 and Cub Scouts from Pack 549 during a ceremoai-el.ebrading ihe. open.iig of
the park. Below left, Doris Mellion, who sold family property to the county for construction of the
park, and former Fernandina Beach Mayor Charles Albert, who grew up nearby, share a moment.


Swine flu case at county


RYAN SMITH
Nezus-Leader
A possible case of swine flu at the
Nassau County Judicial Annex in
Yulee prompted county officials to
contact the local health department
and inform employees. An employee
at the annex went home this week
with flu-like symptoms, but has not
been confirmed to have swine flu, also
known as H1N1.
"We have called the health depart-
ment about it. They're aware of it and
they've indicated that there's no need
to panic, especially just in light of one
case," said Shannon Crow, research
and communications coordinator for
the clerk of court. "If anyone had any
symptoms, we would send them home
and ask them to stay home for seven
days."
Crow said Judge Robert Foster,
who administers the courts at the
annex, was aware of the case, and all
employees received an e-mail inform-
ing them. The courthouse would not
be closing, Crow said. The sick
employee is not in a position of wide-
spread contact with the public, offi-
cials said.
Kim Geib, director of the health
department's Disease Control and


1 4" I4 6 ' " ...i I I I ... ... . . . .... '..... . .


Swine flu in the workplace
Preventing the spread of swine flu and other influenza viruses in the
workplace is basically a matter of common sense and good hygiene.
Here are some tips from the Nassau County Health Department and the
federal Centers for Disease Control:
* Cover your cough. Cough into your sleeve or a tissue, not into your
hand.
* Disinfect common surfaces like keyboards, telephones, countertops,
doorknobs and bathroom fixtures. Use a disinfectant that is labeled as
effective against influenza viruses.
* Wash hands often, especially after coughing or sneezing. Alcohol-
based hand saniuzers can be used if soap and water are not available.
* Stay home if you're sick. The CDC recommends employees with flu-
like illnesses stay home for seven days after symptoms begin or until 24
hours after symptoms end, whichever is longer.
For more information on preventing the transmission of swine flu, visit
vww.cdc.gov/hl niflu.


Prevention Service, confirmed that
the courthouse had contacted the
department, but said one unconfirmed
case of swine flu was no cause for
alarm.
"We have a suspected case of swine
flu, but it's a single case and not an out-
break," she said. "We know we're hav-
ing sporadic cases of swine flu
throughout the United States, and it's
going to continue to happen. We've
given them information about swine
flu and how to protect themselves."


Geib said the precautions taken to
keep H1N1 from spreading in an office
environment are the same as those
to prevent the spread of traditional
influenza.
"If you have a case of flu in your.
office, what you want to do is clean
common keyboards, telephones. You
can go ahead and wipe it down with
any disinfectant that says it's good
against influenza," she said. "Anyone
who's coughing needs to cover their
cough - coughing into your sleeve or


building?

coughing into a Kleenex and then
washing your hands. Using hand san-
itizer as well - that's effective against
this virus.
"Every year, most offices have
somebody who's had the flu.... So this
is really no different," Geib added. "If
they have a lot of people who are ill,
the health department will help guide
them through it, just so they can
implement better infection control
measures."
* Swine flu has been declared a pan-
demic because it is worldwide. The
Florida Department of Health con-
firmed 10 more swine flu deaths on
Wednesday, bringing the total.to 22
thus far.
The most recent deaths included
two22-year-old males, one in Broward
and one in Sarasota County, two 31-
year-old males, one in Dade and anoth-
er in Polk County, a 42-year-old Palm
Beach County man, 44-year-old man in
Broward, 47-year-old male in Sarasota,
a 49-year-old Monroe County female,
51-year-old Lee County man and 55-
year-old male in Dade.
Florida currently has listed 2,915
confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu.
Most cases are mild, and pre-existing


FLU Continued on 3A


LEISURE ............................................... B
........................ 3B OBITUARIES ....................................... 2A
........................ 2B OUT AND ABOUT ................. 2B
......................... 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ................... 3B
.................... 13A SPORTS ..... ........................................ 12A
................. . ...... 10A SUDOKU .................................. . 2B


I~_ __^__~j__l__U__~____~


SEATURTE NESTING SEASON
2009Nests73 Hatched: 203
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Bear




roams



island
MICHAEL PARNELL
News-Leader
A bear crossed the parking lot of
Comfort Suites, 2801 Atlantic Ave.,
Thursday morning. Dean Finney of
Kingsport, Tenn., said two women
were loading luggage into their car
when they came into the hotel lobby
screaming, "Bear! Bear!"
Finney took a photograph (above
left), and off the bear lumbered.
The black bear was sighted numer-
ous times this week on Amelia Island.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission urged the
public to avoid contact, and said oth-
erwise the bear posed no threat.
The bear was seen at Fort Clinch,
Amelia City, Osprey Village, Burney
Park, Summer Beach, Ocean Village
and Fort Clinch again. It was at
Summer Beach 7:30 p.m. Wednesday,
near the Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center at 7:30 a.m. Thursday.
"We put public safety first and the
bear second," said state wildlife biol-'
ogist Rebecca Shelton. "(But) It has
shown no signs of nuisance or aggres-
sion. ... We have a very gentle, curious,
tender black bear here."
BEAR Continued on 3A




City OKs


new TV


policy

ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
A new broadcasting policy has been
approved for the city-controlled public-
access television channel.
Four city commissioners approved
Tuesday a Public, Educational and
Government (PEG) policy, which is
meant to give the city more control
over programming of its public-access
channel 29. Commissioner Tim
Poynter was absent.
Starting immediately, there will be
no advertising allowed on the chan-
nel, including candidates running for
public office. Solicitation of funds will
not be allowed. However, religious
groups will be permitted to broadcast
as long as they do not promote mem-
bership.
The new policy gives priority to
broadcast of "municipal business of
the city of Fernandina Beach," which
includes event information, public
meetings, job postings, emergency
information and city-related statistics
and data. Other "policy-compliant" pro-
gramming has second priority.
In spite of City Manager Michael
Czymbor advising against it, commis-
sioners also approved the allowance
of religious programming.
Calling religious programming "a
slippery slope," Czymbor said the city
should have a "tighter policy that we
can loosen up."
"I would suggest we try to be more
narrow in scope," said Czymbo r."That
would be my recommendation."
City Attorney Tammi Bach, who
wrote the new policy, said she allowed
religious programming because she
could not disallow non-profit religious
.groups while allowing other non-prof-
it groups.
'The city commission does have
the opportunity to say, we limit it only
TV Continued on 3A









FRIDAY, July 24,2009 NEWS News-Leader


LOOKING BACK


50 YEARS AGO

The Fernandina Beach
airport was proposed as the
focal point for industrial
development by realtors
from Miami.
July 23, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

A mobile home and a car,
owned by ITT Rayonier


union employees who
crossed the picket line, were
fired on with a shotgun.
July 25, 1984

10 YEARS AGO

Target officials were
quietly inquiring about
available utilities for a site on
the west side of Amelia
Island.
July 21, 1999


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


- -Available from Commercial News Providers
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mG m


* *
40 AN


-elr -"-- -

- -


p b a


Playground board expanding


The First Coast Freedom
project is currently expanding
its board' and is accepting
applicants that have an interest
in having a universally acces-
sible playground in the city of
Fernandina Beach.
It is the organization's
dream to have a place to play
in Northeast Florida for people'
of all abilities and ages. This
park is unique and has taken
local history, art and nature
into consideration in the
design. The project has been
granted use of land by the city
of Fernandina next to the


Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center, and designs have been
produced by a- landscape
architect with experience
designing accessible play-
grounds. Supporters are cur-
rently in the fundraising
stages of this project.
Anyone interested in serv-
ing on the board is encour-
aged to apply. The only quali-
fication is that you must share
the dream to have a place to
play for people of all abilities.
Contact Aaron Morgan at 335-
7253 or e-mail him at aaron-
morgan4@gmail.com.


WEEKLY UPDATE


Booksigning
1 Ben Walker will hold a
S book signing for his new
S * novel, Winds of the South, at
Books Plus, 107 Centre St.,
� Fernandina Beach, on Aug. 1
S from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Healthcare
'con ver on'


0


@004



A *-!
O ** Q






a_ * * *


am- .


511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach. FL 3
(904) 261-3696 Fax261
Webslte for email addre
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to5:00p.m. Monday through Frida
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fen
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Femandina Beach, F
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Femandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-9
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication In wh
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Femandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by pe
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no finance
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified prompt
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-L
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wo
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publ
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to th
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ........... . .. .$
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NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Placed:
Thursday, 3 p.m.

CNI co"",
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.n
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.n
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:0
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5'P
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 f
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5


A "Federal Healthcare
S Reform Conversation" will be
S hosted by State Rep. Janet
Adkins, R-District 12, the
Health Planning Council of
Northeast Florida, Inc. and
S Florida CHAIN, in coopera-
tion with Florida Community
College at Jacksonville, on
Aug. 4 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Betty P Cook Nassau Center
in the "Red" Bean Technical
Career Center, Room T126,
76346 William Burgess
Blvd., Yulee.
Congress and the White'
House are debating several
major health care insurance
reform ideas that will ulti-
niately affect every United
States citizen. Elected offi-
cials want your input as deci-
sions are made about how
health care services will be
received in-the future. The
public is invited to attend this
event For more information,
contact Amanda Young, com-
munications director, at 491-
3664.

Home school
orientation
2034 Are you considering
home schooling your chil-
-3698 dren and want information
sse about how to get started?
Are you a home schooling
family new to the area and
'ay want information about a
home school support group?
andina Nassau County Home
900) Educators will hold its annu-
hole or In al Orientation Night on Aug.
6 at 7 p.m. at Springhill
Baptist Church on Old
Nassauville Road. For infor-
rsons or nation, directions and to
RSVP, call 225-9160 or e-mail
lal Debbie at ddhopper@bell-
ptly, the south.net.
reprint-
eader Free screenings
icaion orf Free total cholesterol and
he gen- diabetes screenings will be
held from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug.
8 and from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Aug. 13 at the Winn-Dixie
36.00 Pharmacy, 947 Amelia Plaza.
63.00 No appointment is neces-
sary. For information call
800-713-3301.
Consumer dinics
m.* Free consumer clinics


mn.



p.m.
p.m.


presented by Jacksonville
Area Legal Aid for Nassau
County residents will be held
Aug. 10, Sept. 14 and Oct. 5
at 5:30 p.m. in the jury selec-
tion room of the Nassau
County Judicial Annex in
Yulee.
Topics include debt slea--;
lecticn. -mall -laims..ba k:,.
ruptcy, foreclosure and ID
theft. For more information
call (904) 356-8371, ext. 2509.
AARP meetings
The local chapter
#4608 of the AARP will
resume its regular meetings
at 1 p.m. Aug: 11 at the'
Council on Aging building
across from Baptist Medical
Center Nassau.
The AARP driving course
at First Presbyterian Church
will begin in late summer or
early fall.
Call the church at 261-
3837 to register.
Diabetes education
The Nassau County
Health Department is offer-
ing a series of four, two-hour
diabetes classes on
Wednesday Aug. 19, 26,
Sept 2 and 9 from 5:30-7:30
p.m. at the Callahan Tax
Collector's office, 45401
Mickler St., Callahan.
Registration fee is $20 and
$10 for NCSD employees.
For questions-or to register
contact Jen Nicholson, RD,
LD/N, Healthy Communities
Healthy People program
manager at 548-1853 or e-
mail Jennifer_Nicholson@
doh.state.fl.us.
Recovery event
A Keep Kids Drug Free
event will be held at Metro
Park in Jacksonville from
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 19 in
observance of SAMHSA's
national alcohol and drug
addiction, recovery month
initiative (www.recovery-
month,org).
'There will be live enter-
tainment by XODUS, Celinda
Pink's Blues Band, Billie
Holiday and more, a chil-
dren's zone with bouncy
house, face painting and
more, a youth art exhibit,
vendors, mentors and con-
cessions. For information
about the Ride for Recovery
motorcycle ride, contact
Freda Colley at (904) 485-
3512.
For more information
contact Mike Wheeler at
(904) 655-5785 or e-mail
Mwheeler6555785@com-
cast.net or Colley at fcolley@
gatewaycommunity.com.


OBITUARIES

Charles F "Chuck" Farnsworth Jr.


Mr. Charles E "Chuck"
Farnsworth, Jr., age 83, for-
merly of Fernandina Beach,
passed away on Tuesday, July
21, 2009 at St. Mary's Hospice
in Knoxville, TN.
Born in Montclair, NJ, he
was the son of the late Charles
F. and Mabel Stephens
Farnsworth, Sr.
Mr. Farnsworth was a grad-
uate of the University of
Virginia where he earned his
Bachelors Degree in Hospital
Administration. He had worked
as the Hospital Administrator
for Humphries Memorial
Hospital in Fernandina Beach
.before working in S. Florida
and eventually moving to the
Knoxville, TN area. While living
and working in Knoxville, he
worked at Bedford County
Hospital in Shelbyville as
Administrator before joining
the State of TN as an Inspector
for the State Survey Board of
Nursing Homes and Hospital
Quality Assurance.
-Mr. Farnsworth was a U.S.,
Army Veteran serving during,
WW II.
His family recalls his love of
computers, Tennessee


Volunteer foot-
ball and old
Western
Movies.
He is pre-
ceded in death
by. his wife,
Kathleen
Brauda "Kitty" Farnsworth,
who passed away on September
7,1992.
He leaves behind, two
daughters, Lori Cooper, Karen
Jones (Tom), Knoxville, TN,
grandchildren, Chris Cooper,
Amy Cooper, Jennifer Wyrick,
Krystal Poje, great-grandchil-
dren, Jhace, Chryslynne,
Chelsea, Sherry, Lily, Gracie,
Judah, Shane and Abigail.
Funeral services will be at
2:00 pm, today from the grave-
side in Bosque Bello Cemetery,
Fernandina Beach, FL with
Reverend Alan Brown, officiat-
ing.
Mr. Farnsworth will be laid
to rest beside his wife.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed, tovisit from-l2:304-10 pm,
today at the funeral home.,:
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


Ronald "Ron" E Nalley Sr.


Mr. Ronald "Ron" E Nalley,
Sr., age 61 of Yulee, FL passed
away on Sunday, July 5, 2009
at Shands Medical Center -
Jacksonville.
Born in Tucker, Georgia, he
was the son of -the late
Benjamin Franklin and Vivian
L Nelms Nalley. A resident of
Yulee for the past 13 years, Mr.
Nalley had been an over the
road truck driver, for many
years, working locally for Scott
Trucking. He worked for a
short time at White Oak
Plantation where he enjoyed
his time out of doors. He was a
U.S. Naval Veteran.
He is preceded in death by
a grandson, Corporal Benjamin
Frederick Blair.
He leaves behind, his wife,
Cam Nalley, children, SFC


Ronald F. Nalley, Jr., Ft.
Leonardwood, MO, Donna
Blair (Donald W. Blair, IV),
Goose Creek, SC, Rhonda
Phelps (Charles Phelps, IV),
New London, CT, Jason Gerard,
Independence, MO, Joseph
Gerard, Jr., Palatka, FL, sisters,
Jane Triplet, Leesville, SC,
Frances Jackson,
Lawrenceville, GA, Kathy
Langston, Lithonia, GA, grand-
children, Debra and Donald
Blair, Brandon and Shea
Phelps, a great-grandchild,
Addison Blair, several nieces
and nephews.
Services will be held at a
later date as Mr. Nalley is laid to
-rest.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-Heard Funeral Directors


VOLUNTEERS


Truck needed
Micah's Place needs a box
truck to pick up donated fur-
niture and other items to be
used by survivors of domestic
violence or at its resale center.
SAs a 501(c) (3) organization,
the donation of a truck is tax
deductible. Please call 491-
6364, ext. 102.
Clowns needed
Savannah Grand Assisted
Living, 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Fernandina Beach, will
be hosting a "Come Clown
Around With Us!" event and
needs help from anyone that


would like to be a clown or
has clown suits and games
like those used at school car-
nivals. For information or to
volunteer, contact Renee
Stoffel at 321-0898.
Van washer
The Council on Aging
Transportation Department
needs someone to wash the
vans on a weekly basis. This
could be a project for a teen
group or Scout troop.
All cleaning supplies will
be provided. Contact Greg
Frick, COA transportation
manager, at 261-0701, ext.
114.


PAID OBITUARY POLICY


Our policy: The News-
Leader strives to make this
list a complete record of
deaths involving Nassau
County residents and their
families. Please ask your
funeral home or cremation
society to fax us or e-mail us
with all death notices. Death
notice listings are free and


Olj9?G/I i 5eJrmert2/ g�irecta,'w

The Nassau CountV Tradtion since 1931
Visit Our Life Stories at www.OxleyHeard.com


include the deceased's name,
place of residence, age, date
of death, service date and
name of the funeral home or
cremation society handing
the arrangements. For a paid
detailed family-placed obitu-
ary, have your funeral home
fax (261-3698) or e-mail the
information to
sperry@fbnewsleader.com.
Deadlines are noon Tuesday
for the Wednesday newspaper
and noon Thursday for the
Friday newspaper. Any billing
questions can be directed to
the business office at 261-
S3696.


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NEWS E
LEADER








F RI:,w. July 24.2009/NEWS-LEADER


OPINION


VIEWPOINT/JIM ADAMS/NASSAU COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

An apology, and pledge


'to meet the


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sibilities of an elected
official include serv-
ing as "trustee" to
the people and (' In'I it'fl.ii;-
as a whole. It is incumbent
upon every elected official to
meet the demands of the
office, which include attend-
ing all meetings, as well as
balancing their career and
their family life.
I take extreme pride in the
fact that during my tenure as
iy I tpl r t-. rnt I it. ii n the
Nassau County School Board
in District 4 1 inili.ii, the first
town hall meetings. I started a
"breakfast listening" to hear
from students. I was also
instrumental in raising close
to $5,000 for the high school
foundation in Hilliard. During
my tenure as chairman for the
school board, we initiated the
mission statement of the
school district and we imple-
mented a review of the poli-
cies and procedures.
Additionally, for the first time
we set goals and objectives for
the year which included leg-
islative changes and advocacy
for those changes. listening


Adams

apologize to the
County resident
absences from
School Board n
past year, it has
my most challe
during my tenu
school board re
from District 4.
My full-time
Chief Executive
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I would like Superintendent John Ruis,
at this time to Chairman Muriel Creamer
e Nassau and the School Board attor-
ts for my ner I reconsidered my resig-
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meetings this have the opportunity to meet
been one of the challenges of the Nassau
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The news-leader
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00455
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach, Fla
Creation Date: July 24, 2009
Publication Date: 1980-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04377055
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00455
 Related Items
Preceded by: Fernandina Beach news-leader

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Full Text
MAGENTA BLACK


Fri
7/24


Sat
7/25

t"


92/75 89/75


'Forgotten
war'
PAGE 4A


door


F LORIDA'S


OLDEST


WEEKLY N


EWSPAP ER


NEWS


LEADER


FRIDAY July 24, 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleader.com


DEAN FINNEY/FOR THE NEWS-LEADER


County park now a reality

RYAN SMITH
News Leader . .


A ceremony Wednesday celebrated
the opening of the Goffinsville/Nassau
River Regional Park. The park features
a boat ramp, a fishing pier, nature walk
and a children's play area.
Construction on the park began in
September, on acreage purchased by
the county with the help of the Trust
for Public Land. However, the park
had been on the drawing board much
longer than that, Nassau County
Commission Chairman Barry
Holloway told ceremony attendees.
"This is something we can be proud
of in our county," he said. "This has
been the work of many, many years. I
know the first grant was applied for
way back in 1993."
The park was built on the site of
the East Coast's first oyster canning
plant, built some time after the Civil
War. In 1893, a Russian immigrant
named Saul Goffin purchased the plant.
The land remained in his family until
his granddaughters, Doris Mellion,
Kiki Umla and Barbee Baron, decided
to sell it to the county.
"Ms. Mellion and her family - they
sold us the land," Clerk of Court John
Crawford told the crowd. "And let me
tell you, they could have gotten multi-
ples of what we could offer, but they
wanted to contribute to the county...
We should be proud in Nassauville,
because we're now in 'high cotton'."
Former Fernandina Beach mayor
Charles Albert said the area was spe-
cial to him because he spent his child-
hood nearby.
"This is the greatest of pleasures
to me because it brings back so many
fond memories. If you look to your left,
I was born on that creek," he said.
"(The park) is something we can use,
each of us. We don't have to have a
boat - we can throw out a line and
catch a fish. ... When we talk about
ecology, we talk about our relationship
to the environment - and that rela-
PARK Continued on 3A


PHOTOS BY RYAN SMITH/NEWS-LEADER
Noah Wilder, 4, above, tests the slide at the opening of the Goffinsville/Nassau River Regional Park
on Wednesday. Below right, Jennifer Phipps of Girl Scout Troop 400 leads a color guard of Boy
Scouts from Troop 152 and Cub Scouts from Pack 549 during a ceremony celebrating the opening of
the park. Below left, Doris Mellion, who sold family property to the county for construction of the
park, and former Fernandina Beach Mayor Charles Albert, who grew up nearby, share a moment.


Swine flu case at county building?


RYAN SMITH
News Leader
A possible case of swine flu at the
Nassau County Judicial Annex in
Yulee prompted county officials to
contact the local health department
and inform employees. An employee
at the annex went home this week
with flu-like symptoms, but has not
been confirmed to have swine flu, also
known as H1N1.
"We have called the health depart-
ment about it. They're aware of it and
they've indicated that there's no need
to panic, especially just in light of one
case," said Shannon Crow, research
and communications coordinator for
the clerk of court. "If anyone had any
symptoms, we would send them home
and ask them to stay home for seven
days."
Crow said Judge Robert Foster,
who administers the courts at the
annex, was aware of the case, and all
employees received an e-mail inform-
ing them. The courthouse would not
be closing, Crow said. The sick
employee is not in a position of wide-
spread contact with the public, offi-
cials said.
Kim Geib, director of the health
department's Disease Control and


Swine flu in the workplace
Preventing the spread of swine flu and other influenza viruses in the
workplace is basically a matter of common sense and good hygiene.
Here are some tips from the Nassau County Health Department and the
federal Centers for Disease Control:
* Cover your cough. Cough into your sleeve or a tissue, not into your
hand.
* Disinfect common surfaces like keyboards, telephones, countertops,
doorknobs and bathroom fixtures. Use a disinfectant that is labeled as
effective against influenza viruses.
* Wash hands often, especially after coughing or sneezing. Alcohol-
based hand sanitizers can be used if soap and water are not available.
* Stay home if you're sick. The CDC recommends employees with flu-
like illnesses stay home for seven days after symptoms begin or until 24
hours after symptoms end, whichever is longer.
For more information on preventing the transmission of swine flu, visit
www.cdc.gov/hl nlflu.


Prevention Service, confirmed that
the courthouse had contacted the
department, but said one unconfirmed
case of swine flu was no cause for
alarm.
"We have a suspected case of swine
flu, but it's a single case and not an out-
break," she said. "We know we're hav-
ing sporadic cases of swine flu
throughout the United States, and it's
going to continue to happen. We've
given them information about swine
flu and how to protect themselves."


Geib said the precautions taken to
keep H1Nlfrom spreading in an office
environment are the same as those
to prevent the spread of traditional
influenza.
"If you have a case of flu in your
office, what you want to do is clean
common keyboards, telephones. You
can go ahead and wipe it down with
any disinfectant that says it's good
against influenza," she said. "Anyone
who's coughing needs to cover their
cough - coughing into your sleeve or


coughing into a Kleenex and then
washing your hands. Using hand san-
itizer as well - that's effective against
this virus.
"Every year, most offices have
somebody who's had the flu.... So this
is really no different," Geib added. "If
they have a lot of people who are ill,
the health department will help guide
them through it, just so they can
implement better infection control
measures."
Swine flu has been declared a pan-
demic because it is worldwide. The
Florida Department of Health con-
firmed 10 more swine flu deaths on
Wednesday, bringing the total to 22
thus far.
The most recent deaths included
two 22-year-old males, one in Broward
and one in Sarasota County, two 31-
year-old males, one in Dade and anoth-
er in Polk County, a 42-year-old Palm
Beach County man, 44-year-old man in
Broward, 47-year-old male in Sarasota,
a 49-year-old Monroe County female,
51-year-old Lee County man and 55-
year-old male in Dade.
Florida currently has listed 2,915
confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu.
Most cases are mild, and pre-existing
FLU Continued on 3A


I e~ EI


News-Leader INDEX LEISURE ........................................... . IB SEA TURTLE NESTING SEASON
155th year No 57 CLASSIFIEDS .............................. 3 B OBITUARIES ........................................... 2A 2009Nests:73 Hatched: 203
Copyright 2009 < CROSSWORD ........................... 2B OUT AND ABOUT ................. 2B 2 lost due to recent storms
The News Leader EDITORIAL .................................. 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B Pleaseturn offorredirectlighsshining
Fernandina Beach, FL FISHING ..................................... 13A SPORTS .................................................... 12A direct on the beach Fora detailedcount
1 84264 00013 3 nwspntwithsoy basednk HOMES ..................................................... 10A SUDOKU .................................................... 2B see wwv .ameliaislandseaturtlewatchcom.


Bear




roams




island
MICHAEL PARNELL
News Leader
A bear crossed the parking lot of
Comfort Suites, 2801 Atlantic Ave.,
Thursday morning. Dean Finney of
Kingsport, Tenn., said two women
were loading luggage into their car
when they came into the hotel lobby
screaming, "Bear! Bear!"
Finney took a photograph (above
left), and off the bear lumbered.
The black bear was sighted numer-
ous times this week on Amelia Island.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission urged the
public to avoid contact, and said oth-
erwise the bear posed no threat.
The bear was seen at Fort Clinch,
Amelia City, Osprey Village, Burney
Park, Summer Beach, Ocean Village
and Fort Clinch again. It was at
Summer Beach 7:30 p.m. Wednesday,
near the Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center at 7:30 a.m. Thursday.
"We put public safety first and the
bear second," said state wildlife biol-
ogist Rebecca Shelton. "(But) It has
shown no signs of nuisance or aggres-
sion. ... We have a very gentle, curious,
tender black bear here."
BEAR Continued on 3A





City OKs



new TV



policy
ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
A new broadcasting policy has been
approved for the city-controlled public-
access television channel.
Four city commissioners approved
Tuesday a Public, Educational and
Government (PEG) policy, which is
meant to give the city more control
over programming of its public-access
channel 29. Commissioner Tim
Poynter was absent.
Starting immediately, there will be
no advertising allowed on the chan-
nel, including candidates running for
public office. Solicitation of funds will
not be allowed. However, religious
groups will be permitted to broadcast
as long as they do not promote mem-
bership.
The new policy gives priority to
broadcast of "municipal business of
the city of Fernandina Beach," which
includes event information, public
meetings, job postings, emergency
information and city-related statistics
and data. Other "policy-compliant" pro-
gramming has second priority.
In spite of City Manager Michael
Czymbor advising against it, commis-
sioners also approved the allowance
of religious programming.
Calling religious programming "a
slippery slope," Czymbor said the city
should have a "tighter policy that we
can loosen up."
"I would suggestwe try to be more
narrow in scope," said Czymbor. "That
would be my recommendation."
City Attorney Tammi Bach, who
wrote the new policy, said she allowed
religious programming because she
could not disallow non-profit religious
groups while allowing other non-prof-
it groups.
"The city commission does have
the opportunity to say, we limit it only
TV Continued on 3A


Historic
pub crawl
PA GEB I


ow l T OI ? 1 , - 'f- : �I I .




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


50 YEARS AGO

The Fernandina Beach
airport was proposed as the
focal point for industrial
development by realtors
from Miami.
July 23, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

A mobile home and a car,
owned by ITT Rayonier


union employees who
crossed the picket line, were
fired on with a shotgun.
July 25, 1984


10 YEARS AGO

Target officials were
quietly inquiring about
available utilities for a site on
the west side of Amelia
Island.
July 21, 1999


Today's Weather
* o i . - .-
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
7/24 7/25 7/26 7/27 7/28


92/75
Sunshine
and clouds
mixed. High
92F. Winds
WSW at 5 to
10 mph.


Sunrise:
6:39 AM
Sunset:
8:26 PM


89/75
Slight
chance of a
thunder-
storm.



Sunrise:
6:40 AM
Sunset:
8:25 PM


89/76
Partly cloudy
with a stray
thunder-
storm.



Sunrise:
6:41 AM
Sunset:
8:25 PM


88/76
A few thun-
derstorms
possible.




Sunrise:
6:41 AM
Sunset:
8:24 PM


Florida At A Glance


-' -- O Tallahassee
Pensaola-", ' ' -



SOrla
' 9


(


Area Cities
Clearwater 91 77 pt sunny
Crestview 90 68 t-storm
Daytona Beach 91 74 mst sunny
Fort Lauderdale 93 80 t-storm
Fort Myers 94 77 mst sunny
Gainesville 92 73 pt sunny
Hollywood 93 79 t-storm
Jacksonville 95 77 pt sunny
Key West 89 83 t-storm
Lady Lake 93 74 t-storm
Lake City 91 73 pt sunny
Madison 90 73 t-storm
Melbourne 92 75 t-storm
Miami 92 79 t-storm
N Smyrna Beach 92 76 mst sunny
National Cities
Atlanta 89 65 sunny
Boston 66 59 rain
Chicago 83 67 t-storm
Dallas 99 76 mst sunny
Denver 90 62 mst sunny
Houston 97 74 t-storm
Los Angeles 84 65 sunny
Miami 92 79 t-storm
Moon Phases


89/76
Partly
cloudy,
chance of a
thunder-
storm.


Sunrise:
6:42 AM
Sunset:
8:23 PM


Fernandina Beach
\ 92/75


ndo -
4/77

'N


Tampa i._

"1 Miami

*,'




Ocala 93 73 t-storm
Orlando 94 77 t-storm
Panama City 88 76 t-storm
Pensacola 87 75 t-storm
Plant City 94 75 t-storm
Pompano Beach 92 78 t-storm
Port Charlotte 94 76 t-storm
Saint Augustine 91 75 pt sunny
Saint Petersburg 90 81 pt sunny
Sarasota 91 78 pt sunny
Tallahassee 89 72 t-storm
Tampa 92 77 t-storm
Titusville 93 75 mst sunny
Venice 93 77 t-storm
W Palm Beach 94 77 t-storm


Minneapolis 83 63 t-storm
New York 73 65 t-storm
Phoenix 101 83 t-storm
San Francisco 75 54 pt sunny
Seattle 82 61 pt sunny
St. Louis 88 72 mst sunny
Washington, DC 84 68 pt sunny


New First Full Last
Jul22 Jul 28 Aug 6 Aug 13
UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
7/24 7/25 7/26 7/27 7/28

Extreme Very High Extreme Very High Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 0 l 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
�2009American Profile Hometown Content Service


NEWS

LEADER


511 Ash Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax261-3698
Website for e-mail addresses
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830 a.m. to5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............... $36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ............ $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
CNI ommuity
Newspapers,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


Getting a boat loan in a tough economy


ALEXANDRIA, Va. - For boat buyers,
getting a loan to finance a new or used
boat is much tougher these days as many
banks have dropped out of the market.
However, that doesn't mean money is not
available, says the nation's largest recre-
ational boat owners group, BoatU.S.
'The real news is that today's shrink-
ing pool of lenders are simply returning
to the lending standards they had prior to
the sub-prime loan debacle," said Vice
President of BoatU.S. Finance Charm
Addington. "As for lenders like BoatU.S.,
who never focused on riskier loans, there
is still money available for qualified boat
buyers."
BoatU.S. has these tips on how to get
a boat loan in a tough lending market:
1. Before you start window-shopping,
ensure that all three major credit-report-
ing bureaus - Equifax, Experian and
TransUnion - have your most current
information. By law, these consumer
credit reporting companies must provide
you with a free copy of your credit report,
at your request, once every 12 months.
(For more:
www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/c
redit/cre34.shtm)
2. Banks now generally require down
payments in the range of 10-15 percent -
more for boats older than 20 years.
3. Keep an eye on your liquid assets.


Banks today want bor-
rowers to have
enough cash for the
down payment and
sales tax as well as a
safety net or cushion
in case your financial
picture changes.
4. When you find your dreamboat,
know its book value (with all of its
options and accessories). The free Boat
U.S. Value Check service at www.BoatUS.
com/buyer/valueform can help.
5. Gone are the days of "relaxed
guidelines" and "no documentation"
loans. Today's lenders generally look for
two years of banking and income (W-2)
statements, as well as other assets.
6. Don't let "Pre-qualifying" and "Pre-
approval" confuse you. Going to a lender
to pre-qualify simply means a borrower
has their income and assets verified by a
lender first, before a specific boat model
has been chosen. A pre-approval does the
same but also includes the specific boat
model the borrower wishes to purchase.
BoatU.S. recommends getting a pre-
approval as it can help negotiations with a
dealer or seller. However, if you still
aren't quite sure on what boat you'd like
to buy, tell your lender that you'd like to
substitute a similarly priced boat in order
to complete the pre-approval process.


Playground board expanding


The First Coast Freedom
project is currently expanding
its board and is accepting
applicants that have an interest
in having a universally acces-
sible playground in the city of
Fernandina Beach.
It is the organization's
dream to have a place to play
in Northeast Florida for people
of all abilities and ages. This
park is unique and has taken
local history, art and nature
into consideration in the
design. The project has been
granted use of land by the city
of Fernandina next to the


Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center, and designs have been
produced by a landscape
architect with experience
designing accessible play-
grounds. Supporters are cur-
rently in the fundraising
stages of this project.
Anyone interested in serv-
ing on the board is encour-
aged to apply. The only quali-
fication is that you must share
the dream to have a place to
play for people of all abilities.
Contact Aaron Morgan at 335-
7253 or e-mail him at aaron-
morgan4@gmail.com.


WEEKLY UPDATE


Booksigning
Ben Walker will hold a
book signing for his new
novel, Winds of the South, at
Books Plus, 107 Centre St.,
Fernandina Beach, on Aug. 1
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Healthcare
'conversation'
A "Federal Healthcare
Reform Conversation" will be
hosted by State Rep. Janet
Adkins, R-District 12, the
Health Planning Council of
Northeast Florida, Inc. and
Florida CHAIN, in coopera-
tion with Florida Community
College at Jacksonville, on
Aug. 4 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Betty P Cook Nassau Center
in the "Red" Bean Technical
Career Center, Room T126,
76346 William Burgess
Blvd., Yulee.
Congress and the White
House are debating several
major health care insurance
reform ideas that will ulti-
mately affect every United
States citizen. Elected offi-
cials want your input as deci-
sions are made about how
health care services will be
received in the future. The
public is invited to attend this
event. For more information,
contact Amanda Young, com-
munications director, at 491-
3664.

Home school
orientation
Are you considering
home schooling your chil-
dren and want information
about how to get started?
Are you a home schooling
family new to the area and
want information about a
home school support group?
Nassau County Home
Educators will hold its annu-
al Orientation Night on Aug.
6 at 7 p.m. at Springhill
Baptist Church on Old
Nassauville Road. For infor-
mation, directions and to
RSVP, call 225-9160 or e-mail
Debbie at ddhopper@bell-
south.net.
Free screenings
Free total cholesterol and
diabetes screenings will be
held from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug.
8 and from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Aug. 13 at the Winn-Dixie
Pharmacy, 947 Amelia Plaza.
No appointment is neces-
sary. For information call
800-713-3301.
Consumer clinics
Free consumer clinics


presented by Jacksonville
Area Legal Aid for Nassau
County residents will be held
Aug. 10, Sept. 14 and Oct. 5
at 5:30 p.m. in the jury selec-
tion room of the Nassau
County Judicial Annex in
Yulee.
Topics include debt col-
lection, small claims, bank-
ruptcy, foreclosure and ID
theft. For more information
call (904) 356-8371, ext. 2509.
AARP meetings
The local chapter
#4608 of the AARP will
resume its regular meetings
at 1 p.m. Aug. 11 at the
Council on Aging building
across from Baptist Medical
Center Nassau.
The AARP driving course
at First Presbyterian Church
will begin in late summer or
early fall.
Call the church at 261-
3837 to register.
Diabetes education
The Nassau County
Health Department is offer-
ing a series of four, two-hour
diabetes classes on
Wednesday Aug. 19, 26,
Sept. 2 and 9 from 5:30-7:30
p.m. at the Callahan Tax
Collector's office, 45401
Mickler St., Callahan.
Registration fee is $20 and
$10 for NCSD employees.
For questions or to register
contactJen Nicholson, RD,
LD/N, Healthy Communities
Healthy People program
manager at 548-1853 or e-
mail Jennifer_Nicholson@
doh.state.fl.us.
Recovery event
A Keep Kids Drug Free
event will be held at Metro
Park in Jacksonville from
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 19 in
observance of SAMHSA's
national alcohol and drug
addiction recovery month
initiative (www.recovery-
I , , l l.,1 ,, ' "
There will be live enter-
tainment by XODUS, Celinda
Pink's Blues Band, Billie
Holiday and more, a chil-
dren's zone with bouncy
house, face painting and
more, a youth art exhibit,
vendors, mentors and con-
cessions. For information
about the Ride for Recovery
motorcycle ride, contact
Freda Colley at (904) 485-
3512.
For more information
contact Mike Wheeler at
(904) 655-5785 or e-mail
Mwheeler6555785@com-
cast.net or Colley at fcolley@
gatewaycommunity.com.


This gives you flexibility and the upper
hand in boat purchase negotiations.
7. In a hurry? For a speedier boat loan
approval on a new or used boat, ensure
that the loan application is completely
filled out. An empty line significantly
slows the loan process, so have the
boat/engine information readily available
when applying for a loan. Sending in
proof of income up front with the com-
pleted application will also speed loan
processing, as does submitting a pur-
chase agreement. Just ensure the pur-
chase agreement allows you to back out
of the purchase if financing is unavailable.
8. Also, for used boats, most banks
require a survey so you may want to have
a surveyor lined up before you apply for a
loan. However, it's not recommended to
have the survey done before the loan is
approved - wait until your lender asks
you to do so. You'll find a roster of sur-
veyors at www.BoatUS.com/surveyors.
To learn more about BoatU.S. boat
loans or to complete an online applica-
tion, go to www.BoatUS.com/boatloans.
BoatU.S. - Boat Owners Association of
The United States - is the nation's leading
advocate for recreational boaters providing
its 600,000 members with government rep-
resentation, programs and money saving
services. For membership information visit
www.BoatUS.com or call 800-395-2628.


OBITUARIES

Charles E"Chuck" Farnsworth Jr.


Mr. Charles E "Chuck"
Farnsworth, Jr., age 83, for-
merly of Fernandina Beach,
passed away on Tuesday, July
21, 2009 at St. Mary's Hospice
in Knoxville, TN.
Born in Montclair, NJ, he
was the son of the late Charles
E and Mabel Stephens
Farnsworth, Sr.
Mr. Farnsworth was a grad-
uate of the University of
Virginia where he earned his
Bachelors Degree in Hospital
Administration. He had worked
as the Hospital Administrator
for Humphries Memorial
Hospital in Fernandina Beach
before working in S. Florida
and eventually moving to the
Knoxville, TN area. While living
and working in Knoxville, he
worked at Bedford County
Hospital in Shelbyville as
Administrator before joining
the State of TN as an Inspector
for the State Survey Board of
Nursing Homes and Hospital
Quality Assurance.
Mr. Farnsworth was a U.S.
Army Veteran serving during
WW II.
His family recalls his love of
computers, Tennessee


Volunteer foot-
ball and old
Western
Movies.
He is pre-
ceded in death
by his wife,
Kathleen
Brauda "Kitty" Farnsworth,
who passed away on September
7, 1992.
He leaves behind, two
daughters, Lori Cooper, Karen
Jones (Tom), Knoxville, TN,
grandchildren, Chris Cooper,
Amy Cooper, Jennifer Wyrick,
Krystal Poje, great-grandchil-
dren, Jhace, Chryslynne,
Chelsea, Sherry, Lily, Gracie,
Judah, Shane and Abigail.
Funeral services will be at
2:00 pm, today from the grave-
side in Bosque Bello Cemetery,
Fernandina Beach, FL with
Reverend Alan Brown, officiat-
ing.
Mr. Farnsworth will be laid
to rest beside his wife.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit from 12:30-1:30 pm
today at the funeral home.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


Mr. Ronald "Ron" E Nalley,
Sr., age 61 of Yulee, FL passed
away on Sunday, July 5, 2009
at Shands Medical Center -
Jacksonville.
Born in Tucker, Georgia, he
was the son of the late
Benjamin Franklin and Vivian
L. Nelms Nalley. A resident of
Yulee for the past 13 years, Mr.
Nalley had been an over the
road truck driver for many
years, working locally for Scott
Trucking. He worked for a
short time at White Oak
Plantation where he enjoyed
his time out of doors. He was a
U.S. Naval Veteran.
He is preceded in death by
a grandson, Corporal Benjamin
Frederick Blair.
He leaves behind, his wife,
Cam Nalley, children, SFC


Ronald F Nalley, Jr., Ft.
Leonardwood, MO, Donna
Blair (Donald W. Blair, IV),
Goose Creek, SC, Rhonda
Phelps (Charles Phelps, IV),
New London, CT, Jason Gerard,
Independence, MO, Joseph
Gerard, Jr., Palatka, FL, sisters,
Jane Triplet, Leesville, SC,
Frances Jackson,
Lawrenceville, GA, Kathy
Langston, Lithonia, GA, grand-
children, Debra and Donald
Blair, Brandon and Shea
Phelps, a great-grandchild,
Addison Blair, several nieces
and nephews.
Services will be held at a
later date as Mr. Nalley is laid to
rest.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


VOLUNTEERS


Truck needed
Micah's Place needs a box
truck to pick up donated fur-
niture and other items to be
used by survivors of domestic
violence or at its resale center.
As a 501(c) (3) organization,
the donation of a truck is tax
deductible. Please call 491-
6364, ext. 102.
Clowns needed
Savannah Grand Assisted
Living, 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Fernandina Beach, will
be hosting a "Come Clown
Around With Us!" event and
needs help from anyone that


would like to be a clown or
has clown suits and games
like those used at school car-
nivals. For information or to
volunteer, contact Renee
Stoffel at 321-0898.
Van washer
The Council on Aging
Transportation Department
needs someone to wash the
vans on a weekly basis. This
could be a project for a teen
group or Scout troop.
All cleaning supplies will
be provided. Contact Greg
Frick, COA transportation
manager, at 261-0701, ext.
114.


PAID OBITUARY POLICY


Our policy: The News-
Leader strives to make this
list a complete record of
deaths involving Nassau
County residents and their
families. Please ask your
funeral home or cremation
society to fax us or e-mail us
with all death notices. Death
notice listings are free and


,19 tar1 WtiAwner1- �Z4ectorw

The Nassau County Tradtion since 1931
Visit Our Life Stories at www.OxlevHeard.com


include the deceased's name,
place of residence, age, date
of death, service date and
name of the funeral home or
cremation society handing
the arrangements. For a paid
detailed family-placed obitu-
ary, have your funeral home
fax (261-3698) or e-mail the
information to


sperry@fbnewsleader.com.
Deadlines are noon Tuesday
for the Wednesday newspaper
and noon Thursday for the
Friday newspaper. Any billing
questions can be directed to
the business office at 261-
S3696.


LOOKING BACK


Ronald "Ron" F Nalley Sr.


+


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


TV Continued from 1A
to government," said Bach.
'The city manager said that
in other communities, they had
the distinction (between reli-
gious groups and non-profits),"
Bach said after the meeting.
'That's stupid and danger-
ous, to put in a non-religious
policy."
Czymbor recommended a
citizen advisory committee be
formed to advise the city on
programming the channel. It
was not clear, however, how
programming would be man-
aged in the interim, or whether
SearchAmelia, which has taken
over a large chunk of air time,
would continue its program-
ming.
A subsidiary of Pirate Com-
munications, SearchAmelia.TV
began broadcasting four hours
a day June 29 and has said it
would increase to six hours a
day beginning Aug 1. Vice
Mayor Eric Childers' brother-
in-law, Lawrence Mackie, who
is involved in Pirate Commu-
nications, approached the city
in April about programming.
Bach said the city did not
have a contract with Search
Amelia.TV, and added she did
not know if it would continue
broadcasting. She said it would
be up to the city manager and
Mike Rooney, the city infor-
mation technology director, to
decide which programs to air.
Czymbor said at the
Tuesday meeting that Search
Amelia.TV had provided qual-
ity broadcasting, and told com-
missioners that Childers had
no involvement in the city's
relationship with SearchAme
lia.TV.
"It seems to me we need a
board established first," said
Mayor Susan Steger at the
meeting. "We don't have staff
time to look at all the pro-
gramming." Steger became a


PARK Continued from 1A
tionship is very important."
"If it weren't for Grandpa, I
don't think this ever would
have happened," Doris Mellion
told the crowd. "He saw this
land and loved it, and tried to
build a little community. Many
offers were presented to me
to sell this land, but it wasn't
until the Trust for Public Land
approached me that I said to
one of my sisters, 'This is what
we need to do.'
"I know our grandpa is look-
ing down on us, just absolute-
ly thrilled and delighted with


FLU Continued from 1A
health conditions play a role in
how individuals react to the flu.
People experiencing cough,
fever and fatigue, possibly along
with diarrhea and vomiting,
should contact their physician.
Six patients were seen in the
Baptist Medical Center Nassau
Emergency Department with
flu-like symptoms between July
7-13. All patients were treated
and allowed to go home. None
were confirmed swine flu cases.
As a precaution, everyone


City TV guidelines
All programming must comply with all applicable feder-
al, state and local laws and regulations and meet commu-
nity standards for decency. Live or taped broadcasts will
be considered unacceptable and will not be broadcast by
the city if in the opinion of the city manager they contain
any of the following:
*Any advertising material designed to promote the sale
of commercial products or services, including advertising
by or on behalf of candidates seeking public office;
*Any obscene or indecent material, including but not
limited to sexual content;
*Any advertisement of or information concerning any
lottery, gift enterprise or similar offering prizes dependent
in whole or in part on chance;
* Use of unauthorized copyrighted material;
*Any solicitation of funds;
* Material that defames any racial, ethnic, sexual, age
or religious group;
* Material primarily designed to promote, proselytize, or
otherwise recruit members to religious organizations or
causes or to promote membership in political, racial, eth-
nic, age or sexual advocacy groups;
*Any avocation of violence or fighting words which are
designed to invoke violence;
*Any slanderous, defamatory or libelous materials;
*Any deliberate misinformation, unfair competition,
invasion of privacy or publicity rights which may result in
harm to any individuals or organizations.


bit of a watchdog herself a few
hours after the meeting, when
she e-mailed Czymbor after
seeing programming on the
city channel.
"It is 9:22 p.m. and our
channel is showing something
about starting your own busi-
ness," Steger wrote to
Czymbor after the commission
meeting. "At the end, they are
selling a book. Let's get that
off the air." The program is one
of those produced by Search
Amelia.TV that has been aired
repeatedly.
Resident Tony McAdoo,
founder of the Amelia Island
Film Festival, said at the meet-
ing that it was "a great oppor-
tunity for the city to have
diverse use of the channel,"
including tourism and educa-
tion. McAdoo noted that, with


everything that's happened,"
she added.
Construction of the park
was funded in the county's cap-
ital improvement plan, and uti-
lized grants and more than
$748,000 in impact fees.
'This is a big deal - and you
know the best part? There's
no debt on it. It's paid for,"
Crawford said after the cere-
mony. "I'm thrilled that every
successive commission
thought the park worthy to be
funded and built."
County Commissioner
Mike Boyle, an advocate of
increasing Nassau County's


who enters the hospital with flu-
like symptoms is masked imme-
diately and, if admitted to the
hospital, cared for in isolation,
according to the hospital. All
staff that work with these
patients wear masks. Every
patient has a private room in
the hospital's new wing, which
helps prevent the spread of
infection. The hospital's infec-
tion control team is working
with local physicians and the
county health department to
monitor the situation.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


more than 1,000 local hotel
rooms with televisions, visitors
could be exposed to city
events. He also suggested the
city "look at the possibility of
establishing a public advisory
council for the TV station."
Commissioner Jeffrey
Bunch asked if the city could
request another channel from
cable franchiser Comcast, and
was told the city could possibly
have up to two channels. But
Bunch's motion to table the
PEG policy in order to find out
about a second channel was
not supported by any other
commissioners.
'This resolution is not set in
stone," said Commissioner
Ken Walker. "I'm certainly
open to discussion of chang-
ing or prohibiting anything we
need to address."


parkland, said he thought the
park would be a boon to the
county.
"It's spectacular," he said.
"And it appeals to people from
all age groups - from retirees
who just want to stand on the
fishing pier with a line in the
water, to young adults who
wish to launch a boat, to young
children who can use the beau-
tiful play area."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom






ICE AGE 3 PG
12:40, 2:50, *5:00, 7:10, 9:30
PUBLIC ENEMIES R
9:45 ONLY
THE PROPOSAL PG13
1:00,*4:00, 7:00
TRANSFORMERS 2 PG-13
12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:10
G-FORCE IN 3D PG
12:20, 2:35,*4:50, 7:05, 9:20
HARRY POTTER 6 PG
12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15
THE ORPHAN R
1:30, *4:20, 7:10, 10:00
THE UGLYTRUTH R
12:25, 2:40, *4:55, 7:10, 9:25
S TuesdaStimulus Deal n
.......o ' . .... ...0


N. LD-CN1 1x


BEAR Continued from 1A
"It either crossed the bridge
or swam here," Shelton said,
and she expects it to swim or
cross back. "They have a very
strong homing instinct, and
they will head for home."
State wildlife officials are
monitoring the bear's move-
ment and expect it to leave the
island. To report a sighting, call
the wildlife alert hotline at 1-
888-404-3922.
This is the black bear's nat-
ural habitat, Shelton reminded.
"It's a rare opportunity to see
wildlife in their natural habitat."
It is unlawful to shoot a bear.
"Black bears are protected,"
Shelton said. She also noted,
"We've never had a document-
ed human attack by a bear in
the state of Florida."
According to FWC officials,
the bear has been reported in
the North Florida area for sev-
eral weeks. They believe it is a
bear relocated from Palm Beach
County on June 24. He was
released in Pinhook Swamp, in
the northern section of Osceola
Wildlife Management Area in
Baker and Columbia counties,
on June 25. He has been aver-
aging between three and five
miles a day.
This is mating season and
Florida black bears are more
active, looking for mates. "In
addition to looking for a mate,
the bears are also searching for
food sources within their home
range," Shelton said.
"Problems arise when bears
have access to food sources
such as pet foods, garbage, bar-
becue grills, bird seed or live-
stock feed. Bears learn very
quickly to associate people with
food," Shelton said. "Black
bears normally are too shy to
risk contact with humans, but
their strong food drive can over-
whelm these instincts."
Residents can help this bear
"move on" so it does not


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Humans and bears
If you see a bear, remain calm.
"Don't run away. Walk calmly toward a building or vehicle
and get inside," said Rebecca Shelton of the Florida Wildlife
Service. "If you have children or pets, bring them inside, too.
You also can encourage the bear to leave. Bang pots and
pans, or blow an air horn or whistle. The more stressful a
bear's encounter with you, the less likely it is to come back."
If a bear is in a tree, leave it alone. Remove people and
dogs from the area. The bear usually will come down and
leave after dark when it feels safe.
Properly storing or securing garbage discourages bears.
Birdfeeders and grills should be stored in a secure place,
such as a garage or a sturdy shed. Garbage should be
placed outside on morning of pickup rather than the night
before.
"Another way people can help is to feed pets indoors or
bring in dishes after feeding," Shelton said. "Keep barbecue
grills clean, and store them in a secure place. Picking ripe
fruit from trees and picking up fallen fruit removes another
food source."
For more information, visit www.myfwc.com.


become a problem by properly
storing or securing garbage,
barbecue grills and pet dishes.
Relocating the bear is not a
good option, because there are
few places to relocate bears
where they will not encounter
people.
"Many people wonder why
we 'simply' don't move the bear
to another area," Shelton said.
"The problem with that is bears
have a rather strong homing
instinct, and moving bears
exposes them to increased


potential for vehicle collisions
and often puts them in another
bear's home range."
Another important reason
for not relocating bears is that it
requires chemically immobiliz-
ing the animal.
"This subjects the bear to
additional stress with no guar-
antees of how it will react
around people before it goes to
sleep or how it will handle the
administered drug," Shelton
said.
mparell@fbnewsleadercom


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Friday Night, 4PM to 10PM,

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Bar-B-Q Buffet
* A special buffet of Bar-B-Q Chicken, Ribs, Beef and Pork with
Bar-B-Q Beans, salad bar, cornbread, and soft drink or iced tea
. All you can eat for only $12.95 (kids under 10 only $6.95)
* Plus a special group of our celebrity friends will be working
for your tips, which they will be donating to Toys For Tots!

Saturday, 10AM to 2PM,

Come Meet

Santa
Even though he's
on vacation, Santa
.'.ill be greeting all kids
Iat Sonny's from
1 O10AM 'til 2PM.
Come by,
have your
picture taken
..ith Santa / rJD
meal.i - ..Lire to give him
I . ,.:i.u h,-liday wish list!


Open Daily 11AM 'til 9PM
And This Friday Only'til 1 OPM
2742 South 8th Street * Fernani.:ilr,.5 a.-, FlIri l r.: l i-
Still taking donations of new toys or books
for Toys For Tots!


A 12-MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT
WITH A SURE, STEADY RATE OF RETURN!


AN 18-MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT WITH A ONE-TIME OPTION
TO INCREASE YOUR RATE OF RETURN IF RATES GO UP!**


To learn more about these two great Certificate of Deposit options, available for a limited
time only, visit First National Bank of Nassau County. Or call (904) 321-0400.







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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


'Forgotten War' remembered


Do the dates June 25, 1950,
through July 27, 1953, trigger
any significant memories? What
about the Battles of Inchon,
Bloody Ridge, Heartbreak
Ridge, Twin Tunnels, White
Horse, Old Baldy or Pork Chop
Hill?
They should. This period of
American history and the spe-
cial details of these events,
where lives were forever
changed, are still freshly
embedded in the minds of many
Korean War veterans and their
families.
In the U.S. in 1950, the
Korean War was officially
termed a police action. It was
known as the Korean Conflict
rather than a war largely to
avoid the necessity for
Congress to officially declare
war. To some Americans it's
also referred to as "The
Forgotten War" or "The
Unknown War" because it
receives far less attention than
other wars of the 20th century.
For Americans the Korean
War was an escalation of bor-
der clashes between two rival
Korean regimes that began on
June 25, 1950, when the North
Korean Army assaulted south-
ern Korea. Hostilities contin-
ued until the armistice, a cease-


fire agree-
ment, was
signed on
July 27,
1953.
At the
end of
World War
II, the Uni-
ted Nations
VETERAN'S developed
CORNER administra-
tive plans
for a trust-
Debbie eeship for
Walsh the nation
known as
Korea. The Soviet Union was
trustee for the territory north of
the 38th parallel, the Military
Demarcation Line (Korea),
while the U.S. administered
affairs for the south. Historians
surmise the intention of both
major powers was to establish a
stable and unified Korea, how-
ever before withdrawing forces
from the area they wanted to
leave behind a nation favorable
to their ideology. The Soviets
desired a communist Korea,
whereas the U.S. strove for a
democratic nation. The 38th
Parallel, then and now, still sep-
arates the two disputing coun-
tries.
On July 30, 1950, southern


ciS L to R Back: Jordyn Mooney, Hayley Cheek, Emily Chandler, Sonia Santiago.
Center: Sherri Collier, Nancy Byrd, Jaclyn Cannistraro,
om v Mary Rose Cannistraro, Elizabeth Nelson, Tina Hood, Hali Clark.
T an s a . w . Melbye.
Come visit The Green Team and see all we have to offer!


PHOTOS COURTESY OFTHE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
The Korean War Memorial, Washington, D.C., above
honors the veterans of that conflict. Bloody Ridge, above
right, was one of the difficult battles of the war. A serv-
ice medal, below right, is available for veterans of the
war.


Korea, already under trustee-
ship of the United States,
received a full commitment of
military assistance from the U.S.
when it became apparent diplo-
macy could not repress contin-
ued fighting between the north
and south. Additional American
forces were commanded under
the leadership of Gen. Douglas
MacArthur and soon after other
countries of the United Nations
gained entrance to military
aggression efforts.
North Korea was initially
backed only by the Soviet Union


until China felt threatened by
the U.N. offensive. It worried
that forces would not stop at the
border between northern Korea
and China. The Chinese gov-
ernment argued that by mak-
ing Japan its main war base in
the Far East, launching an inva-
sion against northern Korea
and the Chinese province of
Taiwan, and carrying out active
intervention in other Asian
countries, the United States was
building up a military encir-
clement of China. China warned
American leaders it would inter-
vene to protect its national secu-
rity. The day after American
troops crossed the 38th parallel
Chairman Mao Zedong issued
orders to assemble the Chinese
People's Volunteer Army.
Finally, on July 27, 1953, a
Korean armistice was estab-
lished. The ceasefire agreement
ended the fighting, but a formal
peace treaty has never been
completed, still leaving the two
Koreas separate to this day.
U.S. veterans of the Korean
War are now eligible to wear
the Republic of Korea (ROK)


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Korean War Service Medal. In
1951, the medal was originally
offered by the ROK to United
Nations forces serving in Korea
and adjacent waters, but U.S.
law prohibited the military from
wearing any medals issued by
foreign governments. In 1954
the law changed, however most
members eligible for the medal
had already exited the military.
In 1998, commemorating the
50th anniversary of the Korean
War Armistice, the ROK
renewed its original offer of
awarding Korean War veterans
this service medal. Veterans of
any branch of service or family
members of deceased veterans
may get more information for
issue of the medal by calling
the AFPC at 800-525-0102.
The U.S. Department of
Veterans Affairs states actual
hostilities occurred from June
27, 1950 to July 27, 1953.
However, Congress extended
the war eligibility benefit period
to January 31, 1955, and records
indicate 6.8 million Americans
served the Korean War effort
between June 27, 1950 and
January 31, 1955. It records
54,200 American deaths, 33,700
of which were actual battle
deaths; 7,140 members were
POWs, 4,418 of those returned
to the U.S., 2,701 died and 21
refused assistance for return-
ing to American soil. A not-so-
surprising statistic is that there
are 131 recipients of the
Congressional Medal of Honor
among Korean War veterans.
Floridians have a Korean
War Memorial in Tallahassee.
The tribute contains the "Circle
of Life," an upright, open-ended
circular display. Next to this
structure lies a broken fragment
engraved with the names of
Floridians killed in action. Had
the circle been completed it
would represent the purity of
life. The memorial personifies
the fallen, showing how the
Korean War interrupted the
lives of so many.
Many Hollywood movies
like "Battle Circus" with
Humphrey Bogart, "The Bridge
at Toko-Ri" starring William
Holden and "Battle Hymn" fea-
turing Rock Hudson used the
Korean War as their theme.


Those movies are rarely viewed
nowadays, but that doesn't
mean we'll ever put the Korean
War out of our minds. I know
my family won't; my dad was a
Purple Heart recipient during
the Korean War.
To the Korean War veterans,
I say thank you. Your support to
our country during this time
will never be forgotten. I
emphatically believe it is not a
"Forgotten War" and it never
will be. To families who lost
service members while sup-
porting this devastating conflict,
I salute your loved one. They
fought courageously and with
dignity in the name of the
United States of America. For
the youth of today, remember
this war and all others. Always
strive for peace and democra-
cy, and foremost, never forget
the sacrifices made or the lives
lost.
So on Monday, July 27, 56
years after the Korean War
Armistice, let's spend a few
moments and remember all
Americans, particularly those
of the Korean War era that
served in the military, were
killed or wounded in action,
held as POWs and those still
listed as MIA.
Debbie Walsh is a 22-year vet-
eran, retired Senior Master
Sergeant in the Air Force and a
Life Member ofAmerican Legion
Post 54, Fernandina Beach.
whitelabaron@yahoo.com


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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public meeting
will be held on Thursday, July 30, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. in
the Commission Chambers, located at the James S.
Page Governmental Complex, 96135 Nassau Place,
Yulee, Florida for the purpose of providing the residents
of the Nassau Lakes Subdivision the opportunity to
meet with Building Maintenance Department staff and
the County Commissioner representing District 2 to
review the proposed conceptual plan for recreational
amenities for the Nassau Lakes Subdivision.

The public is invited to be present and be heard.

Individuals with disabilities requiring a reasonable
accommodation in order to participate should contact
the office of the Ex-Officio Clerk at (904) 548-4660 or
Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8770 (v) or
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) at least seventy-two hours in
advance to request such accommodation.

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NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA

Barry V. Holloway, Chairman

Attest:
John A. Crawford
Ex-Officio Clerk


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FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


A new man in my life


I have been keeping a
secret from you, Gentle
Readers. There is a new man in
my life I have neglected to tell
you about.
Late one February after-
noon, the Curtins were driv-
ing by the Nassau Humane
Society on Airport Road when
we spotted several dog walkers
out with their charges. "I want
to meet that dog," I said, and
pointed to a small black and
white dog with large ears.
Our beloved Demonic Duo
was long-gone, and our dog-
less house had grown larger
and emptier every day. We had
visited Lynda Mixson at RAIN
and the litter she'd named after
Greek and Roman gods. Apollo
was a cute pup, but he was
going to grow 50 pounds too
large. We went to every Yappy
Hour at Falcon's Nest that's
hosted by Bark Avenue Pet
Boutique, and met several vol-
unteers from STARS and
their foster dogs. They were
cute too (the dogs, I mean),
but the whistles and bells still
did not sound off. I had also
become a frequent visitor at
the Humane Society; I would
pet and hold as many dogs as
I could lay my hands on, but I'd
always come home empty-
handed.
Until I saw Ace that
February afternoon. He was
18 pounds of attitude, giving
his walker a good workout. He
greeted me like a long-lost
friend, and I was a goner. We
were leaving soon for one of
our famous flyabouts, so I pre-
sented myself and my check-
book at the Humane Society
before we left town to put a
deposit on the dog. We spent
the entire trip trying to come
up with a perfect name for him,
but by the time we returned
to Paradise, we knew that he
already had one.
Ace was waiting for us
when we returned, and we
now faced the medical chal-
lenge the society had warned
us about. Ace had a serious
case of heartworms. We could
foster him during the treat-
ment; if it was successful, we
could then adopt him.
Dr. Gilbert at Nassau
Veterinary Clinic in Yulee
made sure that Ace never real-
ized that he was at the vet's.
Instead of placing him on the
exam table, she and her tech
got down on the floor with him.
Lots of treats and one quick
shot later, the play date was


CITY
SIDEBAR

Cara Curtin


over. And so
it went for
several
months. We
watched him
carefully and
thought we
saw improve-
ment after
every date
with Dr
Gilbert. Part
of his recov-
ery required
us to keep


him as quiet as possible, but he
always went a little crazy at the
clinic when he saw Ashley, his
fav-o-rite tech in the whole
wide world.
Ace was declared heart-
worm-free this April, and the
Curtins promptly adopted him
into his forever home. He has
grown stronger, healthier, and
happier each day.
It didn't take us long to real-
ize that this is a very gregari-
ous dog. He demands to meet
and greet everyone we see on
our walk. He bestows puppy
kisses on the humans within
tongue range, and strains at
the leash to exchange sniffs
with the dogs. Since he is an
only dog, at least for now, we
grew concerned that he might
grow lonely, so it was off to the
Nassau Humane Society's Dog
Park. We have become fre-
quent visitors, and it is round-
ing out his social life quite nice-
ly. There are separate exercise
areas for both large and small
dogs; the small dogs can visit
the pond and its waterfall,
while the larger ones can play
in a Milk Bone-shaped pool.
Neat, huh? Ace isn't too inter-
ested in the water, but he does
enjoy a good romp.

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I have always been an advo-
cate of animal rescue groups,
and this latest adventure has
only cemented my high regard
for both these organizations
and the people who rescue the
animals. These tough eco-
nomic times are proving to be
equally tough for these groups.
Pets have become luxuries
some families can no longer
afford, so the number of turn-
ins has surged.
This surge means that this
is an excellent time to find that
four-legged friend you've been
searching for; everyone I have
talked to has an overabun-
dance of critters. This over-
abundance also means that
now is a great time for you to
throw a little extra support at
your favorite group. Towels,
food, toys, treats, and of course
money, are always welcome.
Time is always the most
valuable commodity that you
can volunteer, the one that is
always in the shortest supply.
And who knows, becoming a
foster parent or a dog walker
may benefit you just as much
as it does the four-legger! I'm
sure your own dog would enjoy
a play date at the Dog Park -
just be sure to look for me and
Ace. WOOF!



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misses 10 of 23 meetings


RYAN SMITH
News Leader
A Nassau County School
Board member missed nearly
half of the board's scheduled
meetings in the past 12 months,
citing conflicts with his job.
Three-term school board
member Jim Adams missed 10
out of 23 meetings between July
1, 2008, and June 30 this year.
However, Superintendent John
Ruis said Adams still brings
valuable experience to the
board.
Adams, who is CEO of
Family Support Services, which
runs the foster care systems in
Jacksonville and Nassau
County, said his job requires
travel that often conflicts with
the board meetings.
"I've been out of town a lot of
those times," he said. "...
Unfortunately there's been a
conflict with my other job as
we've taken on new business.
But we're going to make an
effort to send other people."
Adams added that he had
considered stepping down from
the board.
"I actually talked to the attor-
ney and the superintendent
about resigning at one point,"
he said. "The attorney was
actually in the process of draft-
ing a letter, but I was actually
asked to stay on by the super-
intendent."
Ruis confirmed that he
asked Adams to stay. "Jim's
been a very integral part of our
success as a school district," he
said. "He's very knowledgeable.
He's been on the board for


Jim Adams
apologizes 6A

about 12 years now, and I think
has been very successful in that
role."
Ruis also said that he and
Adams had discussed strategies
to ease the scheduling conflicts
caused by Adams' position at
Family Support Services.
"I think that certainly he'll
get back on track with regard to
his attendance, and be able to
participate a lot more than he
has in the past," Ruis said.
"He was certainly concerned
about his inability to attend
more regularly for that
period of time, and I would
expect that to improve. ... He's
indicated to me that he's trying
to coordinate some of the


activities he's been involved
in and to delegate those to oth-
ers. I'm sure he'll be able to do
that."
Ruis added that in his opin-
ion, Adams' position in the fos-
ter care system was a boon to
the school board.
"I think because of that, it
gives him an insight into a lot of
issues with children," he said.
"It provides us with some input
and feedback in that regard. I've
known him for the past 12 years
or so to be very conscientious
and diligent in trying to help
children in all regards."
Adams said he felt he felt he
was still a relevant member of
the board.
"I do take it seriously and
after careful consideration, I do
think that I can continue to be
effective," he said.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


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the staff of First National Bank of Nassau County invites our
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Please join us any time during the day on
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CYAN MAGENTA


OPINION


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


VIEWPOINT/JIM ADAMS/NASSAU COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD


An apology, and pledge


to meet the


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The roles and respon-
sibilities of an elected
official include serv-
ing as "trustee" to
the people and communities
as a whole. It is incumbent
upon every elected official to
meet the demands of the
office, which include attend-
ing all meetings, as well as
balancing their career and
their family life.
I take extreme pride in the
fact that during my tenure as
your representative on the
Nassau County School Board
in District 4 I initiated the first
town hall meetings. I started a
"breakfast listening" to hear
from students. I was also
instrumental in raising close
to $5,000 for the high school
foundation in Hilliard. During
my tenure as chairman for the
school board, we initiated the
mission statement of the
school district and we imple-
mented a review of the poli-
cies and procedures.
Additionally, for the first time
we set goals and objectives for
the year which included leg-
islative changes and advocacy
for those changes. Listening


Adams

apologize to the
County resident
absences from
School Board r
past year, it has
my most challe
during my tenu
school board r
from District 4.
My full-time
Chief Executivi
Family Support
North Florida 1
very busy and 1
Duval and Nass
are participation
gram to redesign
care system by
number of child
homes.
Also early in
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as an advo- after a brave and painful battle
cate for the with cancer. Earlier this year I
teachers, par- welcomed my first grandchild
ents and stu- into our home.
dents was Over the course of the last
(and is) one several weeks I have contem-
of my most plated resigning from the
important pri- Nassau County School Board
orities. and after consultation with
I would like Superintendent John Ruis,
at this time to Chairman Muriel Creamer
e Nassau and the School Board attor-
its for my ney I reconsidered my resig-
Nassau County nation. I realized that I still
meetings this have the opportunity to meet
Been one of the challenges of the Nassau
nging years County School District and
ire as your impact the lives of the chil-
epresentative dren.
I plan to give the School
Position as Board 100 percent. Although
e Officer of if I find that my work schedule
t Services of through the rest of 2009 will
has kept me not permit me the necessary
traveling as time to serve as a School
sau counties Board member I will resign
g in a pilot pro- my school board seat.
gn the foster Thank you in advance for
reducing the your patience and understand-
dren in foster ing and feel confident that my
commitment remains strong
S2008, I was to all children, but particularly
he death of my those in Nassau County.


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854
The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR., PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL, EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE, PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIMPE, CIRCULATIONDIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


S CNI^ Community
I |Newspapers,
Incorporated

The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
Sand do not necessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees.


What a long, strange trip it's been


Michael Parnell and I sat down over
iced tea - I don't drink the good stuff
and I'm too cheap to buy it for others
- and talked about a concept for a guest col-
umn that would run every couple of weeks.
Years ago, I was a newspaper reporter.
Someone told Parnell that I might be a good
person to tap for an occasional guest column.
He should've put on his hip waders at that
point, or at the very least turned tail and run.
But he didn't and so, over numerous rounds of
the house wine of the South and a bunch of tall
tales, Cup of Joe was born.
Parnell didn't place any restrictions on me
and told me to write about whatever I wished.
I tossed out some ideas and told him that what
I'd really like to do with the column once it got
up and running was to mix creative writing
with traditional column writing. One of my
first columns was a first-person piece about an
elderly lady I met on the street in St.
Augustine one day. Using her as a device, I
told a story about how people drift unseen in
and out of our lives, and yet these minor char-
acters are as much an integral part of life's big
play as each of us are. Looking back on three
years of columns, that one remains one of my
personal favorites.
At some point, I decided to take a crack at
doing the column once a week. I discussed it
with Mike, who's always been most agreeable
with me, and so here we are. After three years,
I've been pouring out a Cup of Joe pretty much


CUPOF
JOE

Joe Palmer


week in and week out. Today,
I pour the last cup.
I've been increasingly rest-
less in a literary sense for the
past few months and perhaps
it's been this column which
has gotten my dormant cre-
ative juices flowing again. I've
been experimenting some
with different kinds of writing
but what I'd really like to do
is write a book.
I know. Everyone wants to
have written a book. Few
have the self-discipline to
actually sit down and churn


one out. And for good reason. It's really hard
work. Just like writing a weekly column is
hard work, especially when trying to balance it
with family life, job and other outside interests.
Like fishing and a local civic organization I
recently joined.
Several weeks ago, I reached the sore deci-
sion to take a sabbatical from my column. I
know I have the skills, tools and education to
write but I want to see if I can press myself
into actually writing a novel. I've actually got-
ten a start on it and figure I have about as
much chance at getting it successfully
published, if and when I finish it, as I do of
winning the lottery. But someone has to hit
the lucky numbers once a week, so who
knows?
This column and the people it connected


me with has been one of the most gratifying
experiences I've ever had. I'm deeply grateful
to Mike Parnell and News-Leader Publisher
Foy Maloy for giving me 750 words of space -
and the most butt-ugly photo of me they could
find - week in and week out. No, they never
paid me a nickel. Yes, some fools will actually
work for free, especially if they love what
they're doing.
It's a columnist's mission to not necessarily
inform readers, but to touch their lives in
some way and make them think. Humor,
satire, sarcasm and just plain old story telling
are all literary devices all columnists employ
to challenge their readers to think and to read
between the lines. I wrote about my heart
attack three years ago. Between the lines was
a story that translates in all languages: No one
gets out alive. As John Donne wrote, "Never
send to know for whom the bell tolls, it tolls
for thee."
I was particularly touched earlier this year
by a letter from a state inmate who took com-
fort in something I wrote. His words were elo-
quent. I was moved by his obvious sincerity
and his stoic acceptance of his fate. The tough-
est enemy with which to make peace is self.
Trust me. I know.
An old Deadhead, I've often quoted Jerry
Garcia and will do so one last time: "What a
long, strange trip it's been."
From a lounge chair on a beach some-
where south of reality, hasta luego, amigos.
" L. � t .. ,, , ;. ,,;'.


VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Paid parking
I am very upset that the city of
Fernandina Beach wants to follow in
the footsteps of Jacksonville Beach
paying for parking. The economy is
crazy, needless to say, so are our light
bills and taxes on our property that is
not lined in gold, and the only thing for
our kids to do is go to the beach. I
may not be a resident of Fernandina
Beach but I do live in this county and
I am outraged that the city would even
consider charging for parking. This
is a tourist attraction and you are going
to drive our business down. They are
struggling as well as the residents of
this county. I say no to the city of
Fernandina Beach for charging the
only thing that keeps our kids out of
trouble.
Dina McCormick
Yulee

Howluckyweare
I want to take this opportunity to
express my heartfelt gratitude for the
great leadership provided our fair com-
munity by City Manager Michael
Czymbor and City Attorney Tammi
Bach in their efforts to generate
income by establishing parking meters
and assessing fines.
The projected $1.5 million in fees
and $700,000 in fines will be a boon for
our government and their foresight
should be rewarded accordingly. I pro-
pose our commissioners immediately
enact an ordinance doing away with
their meager salaries and benefits and,
in lieu thereof, give them each 20 per-
cent of the profit realized by the city
from the parking-generated dollars.
With the $2.2 million projected they
will each be able to project an income
in excess of $400,000. How lucky we
are to have such gifted individuals and
they should share in our luck.
Charles Corbett
Fernandina Beach

Aid appreciated
I would like to express a heartfelt
"thank you" to the sheriff's officer
who assisted my three children week-
end before last while boating.
My son, a safe, cautious and avid
boat owner, needed assistance after a
mechanical problem caused engine
failure. My children, ages 19, 17 and
12, were left sitting in the ocean liter-
ally baking in the mid-90s sun.
After several hours and running
out of drinking water, being ignored by
the Coast Guard and calling and being
told a tow company would have to
come from Jacksonville and cost
approximately $300 (which they didn't
have), a sheriff's officer came to their
aid and rescue. He towed them into
the boat ramp and made sure they
successfully got the boat out of the
water and onto the trailer safely.
To the officer -you know who you
are - thank you so much for going
above and beyond in a situation that
protected my children!
Terri Christopher
Fernandina Beach

Builders Care
There's a group of people on the
island that does repair work for those
who cannot do it for themselves. They
are called Builders Care.
Builders Care is a group of men,
women and even young people from
Memorial United Methodist Church
(and the Northeast Florida Builders
Association). I know of this group first-


hand because this group built a ramp
for my sister, Betty Ann Gandy, who
has MS. I could not have done this
job. In the end, they built a ramp so my
sister can get in and out of her house
without any problem. They also built
a landing area so she can sit outside.
There are no words to express our
appreciation and gratitude. Thank you,
Mac Morriss for heading up this proj-
ect, and to everyone else, including
Mac, may God bless each and every
one of you deeply.
Sandi Lane and family
Nassauville

Easing the passage
Fifteen years ago I wrote a letter to
the News-Leader thanking all those
who were instrumental in saving my
husband's life. His name was Fred
Purvis. He suffered a heart attack and
was unconscious for some length of
time. The paramedics who came to
our home stabilized him and trans-
ported him to Fernandina where the
hospital emergency team continued
the efforts. He was then transported
to Jacksonville's Baptist Hospital
where he remained in a coma for two
weeks.
After 10 years of caring for him
with the help of hired sitters and fam-
ily, I found a wonderful place for him
to spend time each day. It was the
Council on Aging Adult Day Care
Facility. He was picked up each day by
caring caravan drivers. At the center,
he was involved in activities and
received a nourishing meal before
returning home in the afternoon. The
staff members were so wonderful and
understanding and I couldn't have
asked for better care. With his health
and mobility declining, I placed him in
the Quality Health Nursing Facility
where he was cared for by dedicated
doctors and staff members. The nurs-
es and nursing assistants were won-
derful and Fred actually seemed to be
content. Living nearby made it con-
venient for me to check on him each
day.
On April 16, Fred passed away due
to heart failure. I want to thank Quality
Health for their quickness in getting
him transported to the emergency
room and for alerting me. Thanks to
all the doctors and emergency crew
who worked on him at Fernandina,
and for the crew aboard Life Flight
who transported him to Jacksonville.
Thanks to Dr. Dillahunt, his heart cath
staff and for all the nurses who cared
for him around the clock for the eight
days he was alive. They made our fam-
ily feel at home, which made his pass-
ing easier for all of us.
Karen Purvis
Yulee

Unbelievable
Do you understand how our
beloved homeland could become vic-
tim of a huge and devastating depres-
sion to our economy, which will affect
every one of us, and we had little or no
warning from any or few of our many
"Brains" in our syndicated ranks in
the print media or the TV media.
Makes you wonder if they might be
part of the problem?
Unfortunately those who caused
the problem are not the ones who suf-
fer. 'Their cup runneth over" at the
expense of the working class. Our
Constitution provides protection
against bad decisions by the execu-
tive branch of our Government, head-
ed by the president. That is supposed
to be the function of Congress.


JEFF PARKER/FLORIDA TODAY


When Congress gave Bush and
Cheney permission to declare war on
Iraq, it was the beginning of the mess
we are now confronted with. You can't
throw away trillions of borrowed
money on a mission and come away
with only the end of Saddam. It does-
n't take much imagination to call
Halliburton the big winner.
The power to control Congress by
the president comes from the use by
him of campaign contributions he uses
to get them elected.
So much for "legal crooks."
W.H. Burney
Fernandina Beach

Universal health care
I have heard and seen lots of infor-
mation about the idea of universal
health care. I have some issues that
don't seem to be being addressed:
1. Forcing everyone into a health
program takes away liberty to choose
how you want to run your life. If I was
a healthy, unmarried, 20-year-old with
good auto insurance, why would I want
to pay into a health system I don't want
or need? And to be forced to by the
power of the law is unconscionable.
2. No one is talking about the
impact of 43 million uninsured people
suddenly having access to the coun-
try's medical system. Many of those
currently uninsured are not in the best
of health, many because they have
abused their bodies. What will be the
impact on the 253 million of us, cur-
rently insured, after the 43 million
compete for doctors, hospitals, expen-
sive medical treatment and the like.
Talk to the Canadians about their wait
for just about every medical proce-
dure since they implemented univer-
sal health care. Personally, I am not
willing to see a degradation of my fam-
ily's health support, regardless of the
humanitarian issues involved. This
will probably sound selfish to many,
and I agree it is. But where my fami-
ly's health is concerned I am very self-
ish.
3. Universal medical health care is
the last part of the "we will take care
of you" ethos of socialism. It will
remove the last incentive for many to
go to work and remove the drive to
succeed. Go to Europe to see this fact
in operation.
America's motto is, "Life, liberty
and the pursuit of happiness." Don't let
the middle word, liberty, be erased
by another ill-conceived government
program.
Hal Mather
Amelia Island


O Canada!
Having recently returned from
Canada, I read with interest the weeks
of health care dialogue. The issue was
also prominent in The Globe and Mail,
Canada's national newspaper.
British Colombia has reported a
$360 million gap between budget and
demand. Belt tightening apparently
goes down to one of their health care
providers which reports that it can do
2,000 more MRIs than last year, but
will be held to the 2008 level.
In 2005, the Supreme Court of
Canada issued a landmark judgment
allowing Quebeckers to purchase pri-
vate insurance for three surgical pro-
cedures to be done in private clinics,
thus avoiding the long wait, and by
this September it will be 56. This
firmly establishes a two-tier health
care system. British Colombia and
Alberta are considering the same.
Page 16 of our current health care
proposal prohibits us from purchas-
ing supplemental private health care
insurance.
A Manitoba native community is
caught in a jurisdictional dispute
between provincial and national gov-
ernments over dispensing flu supplies;
44 new cases of H1N1 (swine flu) were
reported, bringing the provincial cases
to 831 and national cases over 10,000.
In Ontario, 227 children were sent
home from three overnight camps
with mild cases of H1N1. The editori-
al page addresses triaging the vaccine
when/if available, prioritizing (physi-
cians, government officials and
important others) versus a general
lottery.
Finally, there is an apparent short-
age of medical isotopes, meaning a
longer wait for heart tests or cancer
treatments.
While our health care system is
not perfect, it has the best quality and
access in the world, according to
WHO. We do have some uninsured,
many who choose not to spend their
money on health insurance. This is
frequently the category that pays noth-
ing but clogs up the emergency rooms
with non-emergencies. For the truly
indigent there is public aid, which pays
for routine and emergency care giving
the hospital and physician some nom-
inal reimbursement.
If one looks at page 11 of the cur-
rent proposal, we see that we are
allowed to keep our current insurer,
but if we change employers or loose
insurance, we only can have the nation-
al health insurance policy. We are
never permitted to apply to another


company, which as intended, will run
the private insurance companies out of
business, leaving only insurance from
the bloated government. At this
point, we would be just like our north-
ern neighbors getting authorized
health care via government officials,
lowering our current standard of care
and degrading the status of MD to
that of a robot. How long would it be
before elder care is limited as cost cut-
ting? What happened to our
Constitution and Bill of Rights? How
did they become irrelevant? And I
have not even addressed the cost of
health care expanding current enti-
tlements.
Beverly Stormoen,
R.N., MS, CNS
Amelia Island

Our country's future
Mr. President, please stop. Stop
trying to undo what my parents,
grandparents and their grandparents
fought and worked so hard for to give
me the opportunity to pursue my
dream unfettered with government
intervention into all aspects of living in
our great country. Stop the redistrib-
ution of wealth, for as wealth goes to
the public sector, so goes the liber-
ties earned over two millennia. Stop
thinking intrusion into corporate suc-
cess allows me to succeed. Stop the
forced health care scheme proven to
be yet another anchor to our leader-
ship role in the world. Stop the apolo-
gies to countries that send their stu-
dents to America for education and
their workers for dream fulfillment.
Stop the management by poll and
begin substantive policy design based
on (a) principled foundation poured
by our forefathers.
Please stop, Mr. President. Allow
the discussion. Welcome dissent.
Value the opinions of those you do not
agree with, for they have merit and
bring insight, experience and per-
spective.
If what you are so earnest in trying
to achieve is the right answer, it will
happen. Americans will rally. But, for
now, at this moment in the history of
our country a unilateral approach to
the significant challenges we face is
not the way.
We stand on those broad shoul-
ders of our ancestors; we feel their
calluses, remember their sacrifices
and most of all (to this day) mourn
the loss of uniformed heroes.
It's time to stop and pause. Please.
Gary Fierro
Fernandina Beach


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words. Letters must include writer's
name (printed and signature), address and telephone number for
verification. Writers are normally limited to one letter in a 30-day
period. No political endorsements or poems will be published.
Letters should be typed or printed. Not all letters are published.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina
Beach, FL., 32035
E-mail: mparnell@fbnewsleader. com.
visit us on-line atfbnewsleadercom


I


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


8 COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, JULY 24,2009 / NEWS-LEADER


A love that left too soon


Lord, open my eyes and show me the
areas of my life that do not please you and
give me the strength, grace and wisdom to
remove any sin or weight that would prevent
our close fellowship. Felicia Holmes-Way was
happy, loving, giving and free-spirited. Even
during her failing health, she never stopped
showing her love.
A love that no one else can duplicate has
been removed from our presence, only by
her maker himself. There was nothing any-
one needed help with that she herself did not
go to them, even if she heard it through
someone else. She had one very large family,
which included all people. It didn't matter if
you were black or white, her heart surely was
full of love for you.
No one was obligated to return that love.
It was very plain she did it all from her heart.
She gave of her time, money and self because
people around her were more important than
she was. Helping others was when she was
most happy.
In order to help others, she bowed in wor-
ship and praise before the heavenly father,
covered herself with the blood of Jesus Christ
and claimed the protection of his blood for
others. She surrendered herself completely
in all areas of her life, took a stand against the
working of the devil that would hinder her
from serving him.
Even during her illness, Felicia continued
to be a blessing to others. She encouraged
them to tear down the strongholds of the
devil against their minds, surrendered her
mind to his blessed Holy Spirit, knowing he
had not given her the spirit of fear, but of
power, of love and of a sound mind. She said,
"I resist the spirit of fear in the name of Jesus,
the son of the living God, and I refuse to fear,
refuse to doubt, refuse to worry, because I
have authority. I claim complete and absolute
victory over the forces of darkness in the
name of Jesus, and I bind the devil and com-
mand him to loose my peace, joy, prosperity
and every member of my family for the glory
of God, and, by faith, I call it done."
We visited Felicia wherever she was, but


when we got there, she took
over, giving God praise for
her life, family and friends.
She knew who God was and
| *^ that he knew where she was
S and what she needed, refus-
ing to fear, worry or be dis-
couraged. She did not hate,
envy or show any type of bit-
terness toward her broth-
NOWAND ers, sisters or even her ene-
THEN mies, but loved them with
the love God shed abroad in
her heart.
Maybelle What a love that left too
Kirkland soon. But she will live on
through her family, whom
she loves oh, so much. For all of the work
she had done, her rewards were out of this
world, so she has gone to receive them. Her
love will also live on through the many other
people whose lives she touched. She gave her
name to Felicia Green. They, too, shared that
special love for each other.
All of the free samples of medicine given
to us by her through her doctor showed how
she put herself on the line for the health and
her love for others. If you put yourself on that
same line for others, her love surely will con-
tinue to live.
Rest on, Felicia. God answered your
prayer. He has taken you from labor to
reward.
The families of the late Felicia Holmes-
Way, Mother Lucy Bell Turner, Jackie
Williams, Mr. Ted Alston and Dea. Allen
Melton Sr. wish to express their sincere
appreciation for your thoughtful acts of kind-
ness during their hours of bereavement. May
God bless each of your.
Birthday wishes to Christian Benson,
Rebecca Washington, Marcus Williams,
Alyssia Benson, Israel Melton, Michelle
Williams, Blake Jones, Kendaris Chatman,
JaSean Washington, Carminique Blue, Darryl
Williams, Darlene Albertie, Jeannette
Johnson, LuLu Shell, Clarice Jones, Carlesa
Kirkland and Mother Blanche Williams.


* The Fernandina Senior Squadron, Civil
Air Patrol meets the first Saturday of the
month at 9 a.m. at the CAP Trailer at the
Fernandina Beach Airport. The third
Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. is the
squadron safety meeting. For information call
Nick Feakes 415-0131.
* Fernandina Beach Lions Club meets at
noon the first and third Tuesdays at the
Florida House Inn, 22 S. Third St. Call Paul
Booton at 491-1814.
* Fernandina Beach Shrine Club meets at
7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month
(except July and August) at the Yulee Lions
Club, 894 US 17 North. Call president Mike
Taylor at 753-4669.
* Fernandina Beach Shrine Ladies
Auxiliary is a service organization that meets
at 7 p.m. the second Thursday. Call Suzi
Taylor at 753-4671 for location.
* First Coast Koi Club meets third Sunday
to share news of the pond, koi and water gar-
den hobby. Contact Teresa Lawrence at (904)
287-0059 or visit firstcoastkoiclub.com.
* Florida A&M University Alumni
Association meets at 6 p.m. the third Monday
at the Peck Center. Call 261-7906.
* Friends of the Library, Fernandina


FREEIVIAN
WELL DRILLERS, INC.
261-5216
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installations & Repair
606 S. 6th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


Beach welcomes all to support the value and
joy of literacy and advocate for the public
library in our community. Membership forms
are available at the library at 25 N. Fourth St.
Call 277-7365 or visit Read.nassau.lib.fl.us.
* GFWC Woman's Club of Fernandina
Beach is a volunteer service organization that
meets at 10:30 a.m. the first Wednesday of
each month at 201 Jean Lafitte Blvd. (behind
the Atlantic Avenue Recreation Center). Call
Kathy Shipman at 277-3668.
* The Historical Recovery Association of
North Florida is an independent metal detect-
ing club that meets at 7 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of each month at the Piccadilly
Restaurant on Monument Road near Regency
Square Mall in Jacksonville. Everyone is wel-
come, particularly children. Contact Shelly
Simpson at 261-4655 or e-mail shelly.simpson
@bayercropscience.com.
* Just Friends, for singles over age 55,
meets once a month for dinner. For more
information call Helene Scott at 321-1116.
* Kiwanis "Serving the Children of the
World" meetings are held at 6:30 p.m. the
first three Mondays of each month at the
Fernandina Beach Golf Clubhouse on Bill
Melton Road. Call Jeff Shipman at 277-3668.


WEDDINGS/ENGAGEMENTS


Miranda-Bray
Lindsay Bray and Thiago
Miranda were united in mar-
riage during an oceanside
ceremony on Saturday
evening, June 6, 2009. The
ceremony was officiated by
the Rev. Barbara Ryan of St.
Marys, Ga.
Lindsay is the daughter of
Mike and Jan Bray of
Fernandina Beach. Maternal
grandparents are the late Dr.
Bailey Dickens Jr. and
Barbara Dickens. Paternal
grandparents are the late
John and Grace Bray. Thiago
is the son of Paulo and Silvia
Miranda of Sao Luis, Brazil.
Maternal grandparents are
the late Antonio and Ilva
Saldanha. Paternal grandpar-
ents are the late Hamilton
and Helena Miranda.
The bride's sister, Christin
Bray, of Fernandina Beach,
served as maid of honor. The
groom's sister, Ana Miranda,
of Memphis, Tenn., served as
a bridesmaid. David Alfin of
Weston served as the best
man. The bride's brother,
Justin Bray of Orlando,
served as a groomsman.
The two families were
honored with a dinner at the
home of Drs. Tod and Suellen
Garner on Thursday evening.
The rehearsal dinner was
held on Friday evening for
the families and out-of-town
guests at Horizon's
Restaurant of Amelia Island.
The wedding reception
was held at the Fernandina
Beach Golf Course club-
house. Out-of-town guests
included Tom and Ann Bray
of Winter Park; Brenda Bray
Farmer and son Kevin of
Atlanta, Ga.; John and Patsy
Bray Jones of College Park;
Donna Bray, son Patrick Bray
and daughter Kristen Bray of
Griffin, Ga.; Erica Ledford of
Gainesville; Ryan and
Jennifer Lee Donegan of
Atlanta, Ga.; Danny and
Crystal Watt of Provo, Utah;
Bill and Caroline Dickens
Kent of Jacksonville; George
and Svetlana Strain of Canton,
Ga.; Thomas and Jesse
Hatton of Clovis, N.M.; Kelly
Williams of College Park.
Guests from Sao Luis, Brazil,
included Lidia Nicolau, aunt
of the groom; Samira and
Sylvino Goulart; Manuel and
Maria Oliveira.
The groom is currently
employed as a research coor-
dination specialist with phar-
maceutical product develop-
ment in Research Triangle
Park, N.C. The bride is cur-
rently employed as a certified
athletic trainer and sports
medicine department head at
The Carolina Family Practice


peaing&Writin
A re oodfor Y ouI


Reading and writing are to the
mind what diet and exercise are
to the body Just as food nourish-
es the body, so too does reading
nourish the mind And, just as
exercise strengthens the body so
too does writing strengthen our
mind When we write, we are
forced to make our ideas clear,
and this mental exercise
improves our mind Of course, we
should pay careful attention to the
particular quality of what we are
reading and writing since much of
today's popular reading material
is of questionable value, and not
all writing is equally strenuous
Exercise for the mind We should
seek out books which will teach
us something or that will inspire
us to become a better person,
and then we should try our hand
at writing things which will like-
wise teach or inspire others So,
we should consider turning off the
television and instead read a
good book, and then tell some-
one about
it in writing " .


Mr. and Mrs. Miranda


Mr. and Mrs. Vail


and Sports Medicine in
Raleigh, N.C.
Following a honeymoon
on Amelia Island, the couple
will reside in Cary, N.C.

VallOlin
Lindsey B. Olin and Adam
C. Vail, both of Kauai, Hawaii,
were married May 25, 2009,
on Anini Beach in Kauai.
The bride is the daughter
of Mark and Janet Olin of
Amelia Island. The groom is
the son of Carla and Kent Vail
of Mapleton, N.D.

Rhoden-Wingate
Chelsea Nicole Rhoden of
Callahan and Adam Cecil
Wingate of Yulee will be mar-
ried at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 18,
2009, at Amelia Island
Plantation with Pastor Steve
Robertson officiating. The
reception follows the ceremo-
ny.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Garland and
Kelly Rhoden of Callahan.
The groom-elect is the son of
Allen and Ann Wingate of
Yulee.


* Jermaine and Lethesia
Williams of Fernandina
Beach announce the birth of
a daughter, Jer'Myla
Williams, born at 3:35 p.m.
July 10, 2009, at Baptist
Medical Center Nassau. The
baby weighed 5.1 pounds and
measured 16 inches in length.
She joins siblings
Jah'Maine, 3, and Ja'Khia


Miss Rhoden, Mr. Wingate


Mr. Stevens, Miss Haslip


Haslip-Stevens
Melanie Maria Haslip of
Fernandina Beach and John
Calvin Stevens III of Portland,
Maine, will be married Aug.
1, 2009, at The Ribault Club
on Fort George Island. The
reception will follow the cere-
mony.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Gary Haslip of Fernandina
Beach. The groom-elect is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Stevens of Portland, Maine.


BIRTH


Williams, 2.
Paternal grandparents are
Janice Bayles and Ronald
Haley of Jacksonville.
Maternal grandparents are
Chythina Moore and Aaron
Williams of Fernandina
Beach.
Great-grandparents are
Carolyn and Ron Bayles of
Jacksonville.


CAMPUS NOTES

* Matthew Muhlenkamp, the university's commence-
a resident of Fernandina ment exercises held May 23,
Beach, was among the more 2009.
than 1,000 students from Muhlenkamp received a
Roger Williams University to bachelor of science degree in
receive their degree during engineering.

Deadline for wedding information and photos
is 3 p.m. Tuesday prior to publication on Friday.


BLACK


CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS


Welcome to


Qod's House

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261-68260
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ahootthese iee6ngs




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Tunnels, water and working toward each other


cold water, I knew we were
in for an adventure. With
my mom clinging to my
belt from behind and unknown voic-
es echoing through the dark tunnel
in front of us, history had called and
we had answered.
I love exploring - always have
and, I suppose, always will. This par-
ticular excursion had taken a small
group of pilgrims and myself to one
of the most fascinating sites in all of
Israel - Hezekiah's Tunnel. As we
waded through knee-deep water
with only a small flashlight and each
other to lean on, we couldn't help
but wonder how they had built it
some 2,700 years ago.
Created during a season of trou-
ble, the tunnel is one of the great
wonders of the ancient world. Its


story is a fascinat-
ing one. At a time
when Jerusalem
was facing an
impending siege
S from the Assyrian
army, King
Hezekiah moved to
protect the city's
only water source -
PULPIT the Gihon Spring.
NOTES The problem was
no easy one to fix.
With the spring on
Pastor the outside of the
Rob Goyette city wall, and the
prospect of his peo-
ple being trapped inside, King
Hezekiah knew there was only one
thing to do - build a tunnel, cover
the spring and bring the water
inside the city walls.


Unlike most ancient sites, the
people who built this one actually
chiseled the record of how they built
it on the tunnel's walls. I suppose
they wanted future generations to
marvel at their success just like they
had.
Starting at two opposite ends,
they dug through solid bedrock for a
distance of 1,750 feet. Think about it.
With no modern tools to chart their
course, they simply chiseled and lis-
tened for those who were working
from the opposite end. According to
their own account, when they finally
reached each other, they were off
course by several feet. So, they both
made sharp 90-degree turns and
kept on working. They chiseled a lit-
tle more, listened a little more and
finally broke through! What a cele-
bration that must have been. When


the group I was with finally reached
that part of the tunnel, you could
almost hear the ancient shouts of
victory still bouncing off the stone
walls.
To me, the story carries a great
message for the churches of our
community. Let's face it, though we
may come at things from different
angles, at the end of the day we're
all working toward the same thing -
to bring God's gracious provision to
our city. That said, I rejoice to see
more and more congregations work-
ing together for the cause of Christ.
I'm confident that if we'll keep at it,
and do a good job of listening to
each other, it's only a matter of time
before we'll see some real break-
throughs.
Yes, I know, the closer we get
we'll all have to acknowledge that


we've missed the mark a little bit,
but so what. I'd rather humble
myself, make the adjustment and get
on with the business of letting God's
provision flow.
Anyway, as is the case with many
of my articles, I end in places I don't
expect. I just want to encourage
those of you out there who are faith-
fully chiseling away. Your labors are
not in vain. As for me, and the con-
gregation that I pastor, we want to
say thanks for all your hard work.
We hear you out there hammering
away at your part of the tunnel and
appreciate your service for the King.
Future generations are sure to
rejoice because of your diligent
labors.
Robert L. Goyette is pastor of
Living Waters World Outreach Center
rgoy@livingwatersoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


'Faith at the Movies'
Memorial United Methodist Church
is hosting a film series titled Faith at the
Movies. This is a brand new series
designed to explore issues of faith
through popular movies. There will be a
simultaneous movie and program for
children, as well as nursery. All are wel-
come. Movies start at 6:30 p.m. in
Maxwell Hall.
The lineup includes: "Romero"
tonight and "The Ultimate Gift" Aug. 7.
Agree 33 in concert
First Assembly of God, 302 South
14th St., will host Agree 33 live in con-
cert on July 25 at 7 p.m.
Agree 33 has been a featured favorite
at the Rock and Sharathon and also
Friday Nigh Live with Rick Lowry. This
is part of a ministry to reach the youth of
the community. Call 261-6448.
Anniversary celebration
The Miracle Faith Church of God
Family, 85688 Roses Bluff Road in Yulee,
will celebrate the 1lth anniversary of
their pastor, Bishop W. J. Franklin, on
July 26.
The service times are 11 a.m. and 5
p.m. The public is invited to come and
enjoy a time of fellowship. Call 261-7374
or 548-0046.
Impact Your World Church
Join Pastor Kalvin R Thompson on
July 26 at 11 a.m. as he teaches on the
healing mercies of God. Thompson will
also pray for the sick during this special
church service. Services are held every
Sunday in the Full Service School, 86207
Felmor Road, Yulee. Call 261-9072.
Gage at First Baptist
On July 26, First Baptist Church will
welcome one of today's most sought-


after gospel communicators, Rick Gage.
In 1986, Gage walked away from a prom-
ising career coaching football and sur-
rendered his life to full-time evangelistic
ministry. Later he founded GO TELL
Crusades. He has been conducting evan-
gelistic events around the world and
seen tens of thousands make commit-
ments to the Lord Jesus Christ. Gage
will speak at the 10:15 a.m. service.
Friends & Family Day
Mount Horeb Missionary Baptist
Church will celebrate its annual Family
& Friends Day July 26. Services will
begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday School and
morning worship will be at 11 a.m.
The community is invited to attend.
Program Committee Chair is Sis. LaTara
Alderman. Mount Horeb is located in
the Lessie community at 58552 Coopers
Neck Road, Hilliard. Pastor is the Rev.
Williams Jones. Call (904) 845-3948.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope House
each Tuesday at noon for its Weekly
Worship Service and Fellowship Lunch.
On July 28, Bishop Dr. Van Gayton, of
Providence Christian School in
Jacksonville and former pastor of Christ
the Redeemer Church, will share the
Gospel message. For more information,
call 321-0435 or stop by the Hope House,
410 South Date St.
Golf tournament
First Baptist Church is hosting a Golf
Tournament/Clinic Aug. 1 featuring
renowned golf pro Wally Armstrong,
who will be guest speaker as well as
offer a clinic before the tournament.
While he has played professionally and
taught golf since 1968, Armstrong's true
passion is sharing his faith with others
through the game of golf.
Cost is $75 per person and includes


dinner. Everyone is invited that evening
as Armstrong shares stories about his
career in golf and his faith journey in
life. For more information or to sign up,
call 261-3617 or contact Scott Womble at
the Fernandina Beach Golf Club.
Bible marathon
Living Waters World Outreach
Center is hosting the seventh annual
Genesis to Revelation Non-Stop-Around-
The-Clock-Bible Reading beginning at 6
am. Aug. 3 and ending late Thursday
afternoon, Aug. 6. The Bible is read in
15-minute increments, and you can sign
up in the church sanctuary or by calling
the church office at 321-2117. All are
welcome to read or just come and listen.
Summer Bible study
On Aug. 14 Providence Presbyterian
Church will host summer Bible studies,
using sermons from renowned preach-
ers Fred Craddock, Barbara Brown
Taylor and Tom Long as the basis for
conversation about the scripture. Call
the church at 432-8118 for information.
Everyone's welcome. The church is
located at 96537 Parliament Drive, just
off Old Nassauville Road.
Summerreading
All are welcome to join the members
and friends of Providence Presbyterian
Church in reading and discussing
Barbara Brown Taylor's newest book,
An Altar in the World, on Aug. 19.
Call the church at 432-8118 for infor-
mation or to order the books. The
church is located at 96537 Parliament
Drive, just off Old Nassauville Road.
'Ministry Fair
First Presbyterian Church will host a
Ministry Fair on Aug. 23 in Jim Thomas

RELIGION Continued on 11A


Grace Community Church

to ordain new pastor


David Wayne Bradsher will
be ordained as the new pastor
for Grace Community Church
at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 2
at Yulee Middle School's caf&-
torium, 85439 Miner Road.
Bradsher graduated from
Orlando's Reformed
Theological Seminary and
served numerous community
congregations.
He was previously the assis-
tant pastor at DaySpring
Presbyterian Church in
Linthicum, Md.
His new role at Grace
Community will allow him to
serve the church and its
community further through
prayer, preaching, teaching and


evangelism.
Bradsher, wife Jennifer and
four children ages one to nine
years old recently moved to
Yulee.
The church draws its
members from St. Marys, Ga.,
Yulee and Fernandina Beach/
Amelia Island and worships
Sunday at 10:30 a.m., with
small group meetings and
social activities throughout the
week.
For more information visit
http://gracenassau.com or call
491-0363.
Online reservations accept-
ed on Facebook at http://face-
book.com/event.php?eid=1162
71698400.


'Rite of Christian Initiation class


St. Michael Catholic Church
is sponsoring an inquiry class
for those who wish to know
more about the Roman Catholic
faith and what Catholics believe.
The program, called R.C.I.A.,
will start on Sept. 1 and contin-
ue each week through Easter
2010.
The first few sessions are
devoted to basics of the faith. At
the end of the "inquiry" phase,
participants can decide if they
want to continue on and become
regular members of the
Catholic Church, culminating
in a special ceremony at Easter
time.


The sessions are open to
those who have never been bap-
tized, or have been baptized in
another faith or to Catholics
who have not received the
Sacraments of First Eucharist or
Confirmation. There is no cost
and the first session will meet in
the St. Michael Academy library
at 6:45 p.m. on Sept. 1.
So that organizers have
enough materials and in case
they need to change the meet-
ing place, call the church office
at 261-3472 and leave your name
and telephone number. You can
also call the office if you would
like more information.


"Worship this week at the pace of your choice"


" l" ':' Church
Sunday School.......................................... 9:30 am
Sunday W orship .................................... 10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA ..............................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study ........................6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road - County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.ora


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor

--- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
--- Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17
911 -iil
Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.poplcamelia.org


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
An InterdenominationaflCommunity Churchl
SUNDAY WORSHIP
July 26, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.


MESSAGE: "Waiting Eagerly & Patiently"
MUSIC: "Lift High the Cross"

(Nursery Provided)
-ALL ARE WELCOME-

WHAT IS YOUR OPINION?
Read Amelia Plantation Chapel Pastor Ted Schroder's new Blog
at ameliachapel.com and state your feelings! Log on, go to Pastor's Comer,
and Ted's Blog. Simply input your name and e-mail at the bottom of the blog
content and begin. We want to hear from YOU!
The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
-w4i 277- 4414 * www.ameliachapel.com


SYULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
In Amelia Park
1830 Lake Park Drive
(across from the YMCA)
Sunday worship times
8:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. (with music)

904-430-0274
www.holytrinityanglican.org


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship with us where
the Bible is our only Authority.
Church Services: 11am
YMCA on Citrona / 225-5368
www.ameliaislandchurchofchrist.com


S KHoly Trinity
fngfican Church
A Triationaf
I 'toskp Comummty


Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


providencee
(Cres6yterian 4 f
hurch FORIOA '� s r 1
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corner Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.providenceyulee.com
providenceyulee@comcast.net


I - U .vn w l~ Lrnuu.C..In~i uwy. .


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6*' Street
Dr. Holton Slegling
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:s0a
Nursery
Children
Youth
Adults
261-3837
www. 1 stpres-fb.com


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www.blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service 10:30am
Bible Study 9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Ferandina Bch
For More Information Call: 261-9527


t


First Baptisr Church



Sunday
9 am
LIFE Groups
10:15 am & 6:30 pm
Worship Service

Wednesday
6:30 pm
LIFE in 3-D
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-261-3617
www.FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton, Sr Pastor


11i ILIr i nini ii I i. iiirl
Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor


, ', II, II, , , h ,I 'I 'I Ih-


Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566,
also call 904-277-0550


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
innovative e, Contemporay Music, Casua/Atmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday morn. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10'30am Sunday
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ..Connecting with People


SlO -- -M i=NFO:l* (m I2- r77


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... 9:4SA.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training ...........6:00P.M.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ....... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnieview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptistchurch.org


yITLEE

_JPH'IIS!RCH

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225*0809


Living W waters FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST
Living Waters CHURCH
world outreach 20 South Ninth Street 2614907
. Contemporary Worship Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
SUN 9:30am The Church in the
WED 7:00pm Heart of the City
With the Desire to be in the
Youth, Nursery & Hearts ofAllPeople
Children's Ministries Sunday New Members Class 9 a.m.
10-117 SundaySchool 9:30a.m.
Senior Pastors OnAIA milewest of Amelialsland WednesdayMmd-weekSPraer p.m.
a d esday Mid-WeekSeric 7-9 .m.
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org Minitgies:Bus& Van, Couples, Singles, Yo&th



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Musi prgra s ad s allgrops vaiabl


S4'NCHOR

Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
515 Centre Street


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CYAN MAGENTA


10 HOMES


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009/NEWS-LEADER


Coffee at market
Blair Davison of Montego
Bay Coffee has joined the
Fernandina Farmers Market
as a vendor. Montego Bay has
made-to-order smoothies with
a variety of tropical fruits
including strawberry, mango,
banana, pineapple and more -
the perfect refreshing drink
for summer at the market.
Also enjoy custom-made
espresso based drinks made
at the market and served
either hot or iced and out-
standing frozen blended cof-
fee drinks.
Davison roasts his own
high-grade coffee for use in
his beverages and will have
freshly roasted coffee by the
bag in either bean or ground.
Having been infatuated with
coffee since he was 9 years
old, Davison became the
owner seven years ago of his
first roaster and began roast-
ing beans for himself, family
and friends. This love of cof-
fee culminated in the opening
of Montego Bay Coffee in
Yulee in December 2007.


Montego Bay Coffee offers
fresh smoothies and
assorted coffees at the
Fernandina Farmers
Market

The market, open Satur-
days from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at
Seventh and Centre streets.
Call 491-4872 or visit www.fer-
nandinafarmersmarket.com.
Sierra Club outing
The Nassau Sierra Club is
planning a weekend outing
with manatees and the other
fauna and flora of Crystal
River and Homosassa Springs


*BU.LD OUR PLAN-

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I ' I 571-3865


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493-6922
, ,, ,, I,' , ,


Aug. 14-16. The event is open
to the public. Deadline to reg-
ister is today.
Club members will travel
to Crystal River on Friday and
meet Saturday at Manatee
Tours USA for a morning
manatee tour and an after-
noon of kayaking at Crystal
River/Kings Bay. Group
rates include $39 for the man-
atee tour and $25 for kayak
rental.
Sunday optional activities
include a visit to Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park that
showcases native Florida
wildlife.
Recreational opportunities
include picnicking, nature
study and bird watching. A
children's education center
provides hands-on experi-
ences. Group admission rates
of $9 for adults and $6 for chil-
dren are available for 10 or
more people.
Participants arrange their
own lodging and pay the con-
cessionaire fees directly. For
information and to register
contact Len Kreger at
l.kreger@comcast.net or
(904) 432-8389.
Talbot critters
Join a park ranger to learn
about the many common
species that inhabit the natu-
ral communities of the unde-


veloped barrier islands of
Northeast Florida at 2 p.m.
July 25 at pavilion five on
Little Talbot Island. No reser-
vations are necessary and the
program is free with regular
park admission.
For information call the
Talbot Islands Ranger Station
at (904) 251-2320.
Florida sea turtles
Join a park ranger and
learn about the lifecycle of
the sea turtle and the impor-
tance of these creatures on
Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. at pavilion
one on Little Talbot Island.
No reservations are neces-
sary and the program is free
with regular park admission.
For additional information
call the Talbot Islands Ranger
Station at (904) 251-2320.
Animal signs
Join a park ranger for a
presentation and leisurely
guided hike through different
Florida ecosystems on a quest
to characterize tracks left by
an assortment of critters on
Aug. 8 at 10 a.m. at the
Ribault Club on Fort George
Island Cultural State Park. No
reservations are necessary
and the program is free. For
additional information call the
Talbot Islands Ranger Station
at (904) 251-2320.


40-FOOTBLOOM


PHOTO BY JOHN POWERS/FORTHE NEWS-LEADER
This American Agave plant, aka Century Plant,
reached 40 feet as it bloomed in front of the Powers'
family home on South Fletcher Avenue over the July
4th weekend. "It has been planted 15-plus years and
never bloomed," said John Powers. The plant's name
is derived from its habit of blooming infrequently.
After it dies it re-grows itself from shoots formed at its
base. The plant is indigenous to Mexico and is consid-
ered rare in North Florida.


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER


NEWS LEADER BEST OF THE BEST

Just take a moment and fill out our Reader's Survey of your favorite places and become eligible for a $250 cash drawing on August 8,2009. All survey forms
must be received at the News-Leader no later than August 7, 2009. All entries must include name, address, and phone number. Mail Entries to:
The News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. NO PHOTO COPIES, PLEASE.
All survey forms must be mailed (only one per envelope), and no entries will be accepted over the counter.
-- -------------------------------- Elm
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IBest Art Gallery Best Lawn Service


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Best Bait & Tackle Shop_
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Best Bar-B-Q


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Best Breakfast


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Best Liquor Store
Best Massage Therapist
Best Nail Salon


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Best Pastor/Priest


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


RELIGION
Continued from 9A
Hall from 9:30 a.m.-12:45
p.m. Booths representing
the missions, ministries,
studies, events and opportu-
nities available at First
Presbyterian will fill the hall.
There will be games, door
prizes, lots of food, an Ugly
Tie Contest and fellowship.
Nursery and preschool will
be available.
'Living Proof
simulcast
On Aug. 28-29 Beth
Moore is bringing Living
Proof Live to her hometown
of Green Bay, Wis. Thanks
to simulcast satellite tech-
nology, she'll spend that
weekend at First Baptist
Church, too. Tickets are $10
and may be purchased at
the church. For more infor-
mation, call 261-3617.
'Rally Day
Rally Day for children
and youth will be Aug. 30 at
First Presbyterian, begin-
ning at 9:50 a.m. Nursery,
toddlers, preschool and


kindergarten will meet in
their classrooms in Noah's
Place. First and second
graders will meet in the
Power Lab and third
through fifth graders will
meet in the Kidmo theater.
Middle school students will
meet in the Skate Room in
the Youth Center. Senior
high youth will meet in
Faith Cafe at 12:15 p.m. for
lunch and Bible study.
Parents of all children,
nursery through senior
high, are invited to
Breakfast & Conversation in
Jim Thomas Hall at 10 a.m.,
hosted by the Christian
Education Committee.
Parents, call the church
office to confirm your atten-
dance no later than Aug. 27.
Women's study
The Amelia Island
Women's Evening
Community Bible Study
invites you to join an in-
depth, non-denominational
study of the Book of Acts.
Meetings will be Monday
evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. at
Amelia Baptist Church,
961167 Buccaneer Trail near
Harris Teeter. The study


'U2charist' at St Peter's
St. Peter's Episcopal church, 801 Atlantic Ave., will
host U2charist and Potluck on Aug. 9, a celebration of
the Eucharist that features the music of band U2 and a
message about God's call to rally around the Millennium
Development Goals.
Several people will share personal stories and experi-
ences related to Millennium Development Goals service
and action, including John and Alice Holliday, Mark
Kaufman and Donna Paz and Brenda Commandeur.
The music in the service is replete with the message
of global reconciliation, justice for the poor and the
oppressed and the importance of caring for your neigh-
bor. Led by global MDG ambassador, Bono, U2 is calling
people worldwide to deeper faith and engagement with
God's mission. The U2charist seeks to be an extension
of this ministry.
Potluck and information begins at 5 p.m. and
U2charist at 6 p.m. For information call 261-4293.


begins Sept. 14 and contin-
ues through May 3.
For more information
and to register, call Michal
Polese at 548-9971 or Linda
Bell at 261-0569. Visit
www.communitybiblestudy. o
rg and www.ameliaislande-
vecbs.org.
Playgroup
MOM,ME meets every
Wednesday from 9:30-11


a.m. in Noah's Place, First
Presbyterian's nursery and
preschool classrooms.
Everyone is welcome to par-
ticipate in the mom and
baby/toddler playgroup that
has evolved into an interest-
ing group of moms and chil-
dren growing and nurturing,
networking and socializing,
sharing and caring with all
who come. This group
meets year round. This min-


istry is open to the public.
No reservations are needed,
just drop in. Park your
stroller out front. You never
know who might stop by
with a guitar and a song.
'Stuff the Bus
The Salvation Army
Hope House is accepting
applications to help income
qualifying families obtain
school supplies for their
children as part of its Stuff
the Bus School Supply
Drive. If you wish to volun-
teer to take applications or
have questions, call 321-
0435. Applications accepted
on Monday, Wednesdays
and Fridays from 1-4 p.m.,
through July 31.
Food program
Yulee Baptist Weekday
Ministry, 85967 Harts Road,
is now participating in the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture's Child Care Food
Program. Meals will be
available at no charge to eli-
gible children enrolled in
the ministry's day care.
Parents or guardians must
complete an application. For
information, call 225-9196.


VACATION BIBLE
SCHOOLS
Faith Christian Academy presents
Kids Choice Camp 2009 from 7 a.m.-
6p.m. through Aug. 12 at 96282
Brady Point Road, Fernandina
Beach. Camp is for ages 3-12 years.
Call 321-2137.
* * *
Mighty Men of Valor, an original
vacation Bible school written by Dr.
John Van Delinder, will be held from
6:30-8:30 p.m. nightly, July 26-30, at
Bible Baptist Church, 820 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach.
Students in kindergarten and up
are welcome. Some transportation is
available by calling 261-5457. Each
evening will feature skits, games,
dramatized Bible stories about
Joshua, refreshments and many
exciting events - including the
largest water pistol fight.
* * *
Fernandina Beach Church of
Christ presents "A Veggie Tales
VBS!" July 28-Aug. 1 for kids age 4 to
entering fifth grade.
School is 6:30-8:30 p.m. each
night at the church, 1005 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach (corner of
14th and Jasmine streets).
Call 261-9760.


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"We really try to listen to the customer to help meet theirjewelry
needs," says Amelia's Fine Jewelry owner Gigi Grubner
Precious Gems and treasures at
Amelia's Fine Jewelry
Gigi Grubner has been involved in the jewelry industry since
1991, working in her family's jewelry store in upstate New York.
Armed with a college degree in Fine Arts with courses in business
management, marketing and advertising, Grubner began Amelia's
Fine Jewelry in 2007 with "$50 and a dream."
A full service jeweler, Grubner and employees Caroline Sosnoski
and Gianinna Cooper offer custom designed jewelry, redesign of
existing pieces, and repairs and remounts. They also buy gold and
do selective consignment jewelry.
"We carry new and estate jewelry," said Grubner. "Estate jew-
elry pieces have fascinating histories."
Amelia's Fine Jewelry also carries pieces by renowned jewel-
ry artists such as Simon G and Denny Wong, as well as pieces hand-
crafted by local and regional artists.
A new offering for coin collectors is America's first silver dol-
lar used and accepted as legal tender in the American colonies.
Treasure hunters might be interested in authentic sunken treas-
ure from the 110-foot Spanish galleon, the Nuestra Sefiora De
Atocha, a Mel Fisher find which sank off the Florida Keys in 1622.
Another oceanic treasure Grubner stocks is jewelry made with
the rare and beautiful Larimar stone. This one source gemstone
from the Dominican Republic re-min-
eralizes from volcanic rock to a
unique aqua blue color.
The star of the
show is a specially
commissioned charm in
the shape of Amelia
Island, with a diamond
denoting the historic district.
Grubner runs her shop in a
relaxed atmosphere, free of high
pressure tactics. With 19 years in the
jewelry industry, she finds her career
rewarding and wants to continue to offer
unique, fine quality jewelry and exceptional
customer service.

Amelia's Fine Jewelry is located at
317 Centre Street. Phone 277-0665


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SPORTS


12A


FRIDAY, JULY24,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


PHOTOS BY ED HARDEE/SPECIAL


Bradley Dunham, left, and Eric Hatton compete in the Eastern Surfing Association contest held July 12 at the beach access on Sadler Road.



ESA holds surf contest, plans another one for Aug. 8


ED HARDEE
News Leader

The first in a series of local
surfing competitions organized
by the Eastern Surfing Associ-
ation First Coast District was
held July 12 on the beach at
Sadler Road. The ESA, an
organization dedicated to ama-
teur surfing, plans another
competition on the morning of
Aug. 8 at the same location,
near Slider's.
The contests are open to
surfers of all ages and abilities,
said Robert Ruy, co-owner of
Pipeline Surf Shop on Sadler
Road.
The events "create a sense
of community and help develop
some out-of-this-world ath-
letes," he said.
Winners accumulate points
that allow them to advance to
regional competition.
"A lot of the surfers enter
the competitions to get noticed
by surfing companies and to
get their name out in the surf-
ing world," said Bradley
Dunham, winner of the boys
junior division.
Surfing conditions July 12
"weren't the best, but every-
one made the most of it," he
said. "Surfers riding smaller



Lifeguards


compete,


advance


to national

The city of Fernandina
Beach Ocean Rescue sent a
team of competitors to the
USLA South Atlantic Regional
Lifeguard Championships in
Myrtle Beach, S.C., July 15-16.
Lifeguards, 250 strong, from
Virginia Beach to St. Augustine
competed in a variety of races
showcasing their lifeguard
skills.
Travis Hargrove and Lance
Croft placed second overall in
the rescue board race. Angela
Ray placed first in the 2K run,
board race, surf swim, run
swim run and beach flags in
the 35-39 women's division.
Jenn Stelmach placed sixth in
both the beach flag event and
the 4x100 relay in the open
women's division.
These four competitors will
now go on to compete at the
USLA National Lifeguard


Nick Isabella, left, and Chance Bennett hit the water for a heat in the July 12 surf contest. Another contest is
planned for Aug. 8 at the beach access on Sadler Road, near Slider's.


boards had a harder time than
surfers with longer, wider and
thicker boards. Larger boards
will provide more flotation,
making an easier ride."
Surfers who'd like to enter


the next event can call Brad
Long at 415-6033 or Richie
Obszarski at (904) 891-3032 or
visit the Pipeline Surf Shop for
information.
Long said he was especially


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Lance Croft, left, and Travis Hargrove teamed up to take
second in the rescue board race of a lifeguarding compe-
tition in South Carolina earlier this month.


Championships in Fort Lauder-
dale Aug. 6-8.
The Amelia Island Lifesav-
ing Association raised the
money to pay for the competi-
tors to go to competition
through donations and
fundraising events. The city life-
guards, businesses, individuals
and community organizations


came together to help raise
money to send these competi-
tors to Myrtle Beach.
The Amelia Island Lifesav-
ing Association is still accepting
donations for competitors to
participate at the national cham-
pionships.
For more information, con-
tact Ray at 415-5223.


The city Ocean Rescue team competed in regional lifeguard championships.


pleased with the participation
among young people and is
hoping for more in the upcom-
ing events.
"I got into surfing when I
was 13 years old, 22 years ago,"


he said. "Surfing helps keep
kids healthy, happy, focused -
and it goes hand-in-hand with
swimming and other cardio-
vascular training activities, such
as bicycling. Also, once you pur-


N


S


chase the equipment, there's
not much else you need to buy
except sunscreen - the beach
is free every day."
Results of the July 12 con-
test:
Menehune (age 11 and
under) short board: 1. Sutton
Kerlin; 2. Gage Kropff; 3. Gavin
Johnson; 4. Scotty Rivenbank
Boys/juniors: 1. Bradley
Dunham; 2. Jesse Chapman
Junior men's: 1. Walter
Obszarski
Men's final shortboard: 1.
Nick Isabella; 2. Chance
Bennett; 3. Chris Igou; 4. Jake
Combs
Women's: 1. Leslie Baker
Senior women's: 1. Shellie
Kropff
Men's longboard final: 1.
Nick Isabella; 2. Scott Kellogg;
3. Eric Hatton; 4. Todd Burwell
Senior men's longboard: 1.
Kevin Leary; 2. Brad Long; 3.
Scott Riven; 4. Frank Blake
Men's open final: 1. Eric
Hatton; 2. Nick Isabella; 3.
Chris Igou; 4. Walter Obszarski
Women's longboard: 1.
Leslie Baker
Senior women's longboard:
1. Joy Anderson; 2. Shellie
Kropff
Grand masters shortboard:
1. Kevin Leary; 2. Frank Blake


Armstrong continues



his cycling comeback


return to cycling after coming out of
retirement. Armstrong had won the
Tour de France, the 23-day, 2,125-
mile journey through Switzerland, Germany
and France seven straight times from 1999-
2005 before retiring. He then returned after 3
1/2 years and, at 37, began cycling again in
hopes of another victorious ride through
Paris July 26. At present, he is in fourth place,
and the fact that Armstrong remains at the
top of his game after his time away is remark-
able. He also has had to deal with a crash in
March, at which time he fractured his clavicle
and required surgery.
Armstrong's story continues to amaze
both the sporting and the medical world
because he was given less than a 40 percent
chance of survival years ago when it was dis-
covered he had advanced testicular cancer.
In 1996, Armstrong first mentioned to his
doctor a few things that seemed somewhat
embarrassing to him at the time. He reported
sore nipples, a swollen testicle and blood in
his mouth when he coughed. Testing
revealed he had a very advanced form of tes-
ticular cancer, which has spread through his
body and into his brain and lungs.
Armstrong thought his life was over and
he underwent brain surgery, chemotherapy
and had a testicle removed. But he has beat-
en cancer and his story has informed millions
around the world and likely saved thousands
of lives.
Testicular cancer is the most common can-
cer in American men between the ages of 15
and 35, but can strike any male at any time.
The most common sign is a painless mass on
the testicle. Unfortunately, denial and embar-
rassment surrounding the disease contribute
to making it one of the least talked about can-
cers, but it is highly treatable. Well-known
testicular cancer survivors include skater
Scott Hamilton, Philadelphia Philly John
Kruk, comedian Tom Green and actor
Richard Belzer.
During my residency I took care of a 25-
year-old man whose testicle had become the
size of a grapefruit before he came in.
Because of his denial, his cancer was too


advanced and he died. Had
he presented earlier, his life
likely would have been
saved.
es . No one knows what may
cause testicular cancer.
S- r Caucasian males have an
increased incidence com-
pared to black and Hispanic
men. Children born with an
undescended testicle are
SPORTS also at increased risk for the
development of this cancer,
IEDICINE even if surgery is performed
GREGORY to correct the problem.
Warning signs for testicu-
;MITH, M.D. lar cancer include a painless
- lump on the scrotum. The
lump may be very small,


even the size of a pea. Other signs of concern
would include change in the size of the testi-
cle, a chronic dull ache in the lower
abdomen, swelling in the scrotum and
enlargement or tenderness of the breast or
nipple.
If you find a mass, a bump or a lump on
your testicle, get it checked out. The
American Cancer Society estimates about
7,500 new cases of testicular cancer are diag-
nosed each year in the United States.
Unfortunately, an estimated 400 men die of
testicular cancer annually, but when detected
early, testicular cancer is highly treatable and
more than 90 percent of cases are curable.
Early diagnosis and treatment are important.
The sooner the cancer is detected and treat-
ed, the better a man's chance for a complete
recovery. Don't be embarrassed. If you find a
lump, get it checked out.
This column is written to discuss issues
regarding sports, medicine and safety. It is not
intended to serve as a replacementfor treat-
ment by your regular doctor It is only designed
to offer guidelines on the prevention, recogni-
tion and care of injuries and illness. Specific
concerns should be discussed with your physi-
cian. Mail your questions to Gregory Smith,
M.D., Sports Medicine, 1250 S. 18th St., Suite
204, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Call 261-
8787 or visit www.gsmithmd.com.


4


1


BLACK


' -'


;�




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


Babe Ruth regional
Fernandina Beach Babe
Ruth is hosting the 14-and-
under southeast regional tour-
nament, starting next week.
Opening ceremonies will be
held at 4:30 p.m. July 29 and
will include game booths and
a home run derby for all
youths until 8:30 p.m.
Games start July 30 at 10
a.m. and Fernandina takes on
East North Carolina at 5:30
p.m. that night.
For information, visit
www.leaguelineup.com/fer-
nandina.

Sign up forsoccer
Amelia Island Youth
Soccer online registration is
still open through Aug. 2. Visit
www.aiysoccer.com.

Elm Streetbanquet
Elm Street Little League
will hold its award banquet at
2 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Martin
Luther King Jr. Center. For
information, contact Wayne
Peterson at 753-1663.

TennistourneyatAIP
To raise additional funds
for the Interfaith Dinner
Network, which benefits Hope
House clients, Amelia Island
Plantation will be sponsoring
a round robin tennis tourna-
ment Aug. 8. The tournament
is open to players of all levels,
men and women, for $30 per
person, including lunch. The
tournament will be divided into
social and competitive players
with a grand prize of a new
Head tennis racquet plus a 20
percent discount for partici-
pants at Amelia Island
Plantation's tennis pro shop.
Courts open for warm-up
at 9 a.m. and play begins at
9:30 a.m. Lunch with overview
of IDN is at noon. After lunch,
courts open to all participants
at no extra charge for addi-
tional play
Call the Pro Shop 277-
5145 to register. Payment
may be made upon arrival
with all profits donated directly
to the IDN.
IDN is a non-profit organi-
zation as a part of the
Homeless Coalition of Nassau
County, which works with the
Ministerial Association to offer
dinners to the homeless and
hungry and those in need of
temporary help within the
community. This pilot project
involves 12 churches on
Amelia Island with dinners
prepared and served at the
Salvation Army's Hope House
at Ninth and Date streets. The
teams from these churches
have served more than 3,000
plates in 2009. They are
expanding the program to
include Yulee and Callahan.

Beach run
The second annual Back
to School Beach Fun
Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K
(one mile) will be held Oct. 17
at Peters Point on Al A. The
event starts at low tide, 4 p.m.
Registration information will
be available in August. The
day includes music, food and
awards. Begin training now.
Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit
Communities in Schools of
Nassau County.

YMCAfag football
The McArthur Family
YMCA teams up with the
Jacksonville Jaguars and NFL
Flag Football for its fall youth
flag football program. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices
begin the week of Aug. 24.
The season kicks off Sept. 5
and the last game will be held
Oct. 24. All games will be
played Saturday mornings.
Games and practices will be
held at the fields behind
Kmart in Fernandina Beach.
The league is open to any-
one ages 4-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-
bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a NFL Flag Football jersey
and an end-of-the-season
award.
Call 261-1080 or visit
http://www.firstcoastymca.
org/mcarthur-branch for infor-
mation.

YMCAfallvolleyball
The McArthur Family


YMCA is introducing a new
fall volleyball league. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices start
the week of Aug. 24. The sea-
son runs Sept. 10 through
Oct. 29. All games and prac-
tices will be held in the
McArthur YMCA gymnasium
with games on Thursday
nights.
The league is open to any-
one ages 8-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-


bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a volleyball jersey and an
award at the end of the sea-
son. Call 261-1080 or visit
http://www.firstcoastymca.org/
mcarthur-branch.

YMCAsldlls camps
The McArthur Family
YMCA is offering skills camps
for ages of 6-15 with special
interests for the summer time.
Camps include basketball,
soccer, golf, volleyball and
football. All ages, dates, loca-
tions, times and fees vary
between camps.
Registration ends the
Wednesday before the camp
begins. Visit the YMCA on
Citrona Drive or call 261-1080
for more information.

Soccer referee courses
The following soccer clubs
are hosting the Grade 8 (entry
level) referee course. Visit
http://fsr-inc.com/Welcome.
aspx to register. Contact Mike
Goodman, director of coach-
ing of Amelia Island Youth
Soccer, at aiydoc@aiysoc-
cer.com with questions.
* Greater Arlington Soccer
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July
25, from 1-4 p.m. July 26 and
from 6-8 p.m. Aug. 3 (test
night) at Grace Lutheran
Church, 12200 McCormick
Road, Jacksonville.
* First Coast Soccer Club
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 1,
from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 2 (test
day) at Kumon Math &
Reading Center, 13947 Beach
Blvd. Ste. 109, Jacksonville.
* Westside Soccer Club
from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug.
8 and from 1-4:30 p.m. Aug. 9
at Venetia Terrace Baptist
Church (by Westside Soccer
fields), 5284 118 St.,
Jacksonville.
* Creeks Soccer Club from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 15 and
from noon to 5 p.m. Aug. 16
(test day) at Veterans Park
(Creeks Soccer complex),
1332 Veterans Parkway,
Jacksonville.
* Jacksonville Soccer Club
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 22
and from 1-6 p.m. Aug. 23
(test night) at Chuck Rogers
soccer park behind First
Christian Church of
Jacksonville, 11924 San Jose
Road, Jacksonville.

Yulee PopWarner
Yulee Pop Warner will hold
sign-ups July 25 for football
and cheerleading for ages 5-
15 at the Yulee Sports
Complex from 9 a.m. to noon.
All participants need a birth
certificate, wallet-size photo,
final report card of 2009
school year and a Pop
Warner physical. Fees are
$125 for first child, $100 for
each additional sibling. Call
277-8136.
Yulee Pop Warner board
meets at 7 p.m. July 30 at the
Yulee Sports Complex.

FemandinaPop Warner
Fernandina Beach Pop
Warner is holding registration
for football and cheerleading
Saturday in July from 10
a.m. to noon at the field house
on South 11th Street.
Registration fees are $125
and $100 for each additional
sibling. Copy of birth certifi-
cate and 50 percent of fees
are required at registration.
Visit www.leaguelineup.com/
fbpwa or contact Chrisie
Oliver at 277-9660.

SallingCubmeets
The Amelia Island Sailing
Club meets the first Tuesday
at the Kraft Athletic Club.
Social hour is at 6:30 p.m;
meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Stein-
kamp at 261-5213 or visit
www.ameliaislandsailing.org
for information.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports
Association meets at 7 p.m.
the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee.
Call 261-1075 or 277-1609 for
information.

Basketball camp
Applications are being
evaluated for the Ten Star All
Star Summer Basketball
Camp, which is held by invita-
tion only for boys and girls


ages 10-19. Past participants
include Michael Jordan, Tim
Duncan, Jerry Stackhouse
and Antawn Jamison. College
scholarships are possible for
players selected to the All-
American Team.
Camp locations include
Babson Park and Gainesville,
Ga. There is also a summer
camp for boys and girls ages
9-18. Call (704) 373-0873 or
visit www.tenstarcamp.com
for information.


SPORTS SHORTS


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LeSages 37.4-pound kingfish wins

C congratulations to eight-year-old
Spencer LeSage and Steve
Pickett's 4/0 Fishing team for
winning the Jacksonville junior
angler tournament. Young Spencer
fought his 37.4-pound kingfish for 20
minutes before the big king mackerel
was boated. First-place prize in the jun-
ior angler tournament was a brand new
15-foot Carolina Skiff and Mercury out-
board motor.
A variety of saltwater species are run-
ning offshore in water depths from 50- :
70 feet, including the ever-popular king
mackerel, cobia, grouper and red snap-
per. FA and the Nassau bottom are both
loaded with game fish and a good bet for
this weekend's offshore fishing scene.
There are plenty of menhaden
schools holding at the north end of " ".
Cumberland Island and holding just
south of Amelia
Island's Main Beach
and all the way along
the shallow beaches to
Amelia Island
Plantation. Be sure to
tune in your VHF
marine radio to chan-
nel 18 for the latest
reports on where men- PHOTOS BY TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
ON THE haden schools are hold- Jim Wormhoudt, above, is pictured with a big king mackerel that was
ing. caught with a rigged ribbonfish. Amberjack are running at many of the
WATER David Lacoss fished deep-water structures. Pictured below with an Amelia Island amberjack are
in the Jacksonville jun- Roland and Judy Martin.
TERRY ior angler tournament
LACOSS and celebrated his 17th
birthday by hooking
into a six-foot sailfish.
However, after some 60 seconds of fran-
tic jumps, the sailfish managed to throw
the small kingfish hooks.
Redfish are holding in the backwa-
ters, particularly during the mid falling
and incoming tides. Schooling redfish
weighing to 10 pounds are ambushing
forage foods as the running tides move
baits over flooding oysterbars. Drift a .
live shrimp under a popping cork for
reds weighing to 10 pounds.
Flounder action continues to show-
case Amelia Island's backcountry fish-
ing scene during the falling tide. There
are lots of finger mullet schooling on
shallow bars that continue to be prime
flounder baits. Barb the live finger mul-
let right through the bottom of the
mouth and out through the top of the
mouth with a 1/4-ounce led head jig.
Retrieve the live finger mullet slowly I
along a rough bottom for flounder
weighing to five pounds.
With a flood tide arriving at 12:21
p.m. at the entrance of the Amelia River, tom with live menhaden, cut whiting or fbnewsleadercom, mail them to PO. Box
inlet fishing should be excellent this large fresh shrimp. 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035, or
weekend for red drum, tarpon, sharks The News-Leader encourages local drop them by the office at 511 Ash St. in
and cobia at the tip of the St. Marys anglers to submit photographs of their Fernandina Beach. Call Beth Jones at
south jetty rocks. Fish dead on the bot- catches. E-mail photos to bones@ 261-3696for information.

Display Advertising deadline for Wednesday is 3 p.m. Friday
Classified Advertisinrig deadline is 5:00 p.m. Monday.
NEWS Display Advertising deadline for Friday is 3 p.m. Tuesday
LEJA DER Cassfnidc Adveortising deadline is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.
Please call 261-3696 to place your advertisernenrt

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B SECTION NEWS-LEADER /


ROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
SUMMER CAMPS
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, JULY24,2009
FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


This is not your college


ib crawl


Enjoy history

with your drinks

on museum tour
SIAN PERRY
News Leader

"spirited" than this, a group
of 12 ticket holders to
Fernandina's newest walk-
ing tour learned Tuesday night.
Standing outside the old train
depot downtown, they pulled out
their IDs to show Amelia Island
Museum of History docent Charlie
Corbett they were indeed old enough
to embark on the "Original Historic
Fernandina Beach Pub Crawl" - open
to anyone age 21 and older.
The tour, created by Corbett and
fellow docents Steve Sansbury and
Chris Rasch, is a crawl in the truest
sense, ambling through downtown
Fernandina with frequent stops to
admire the architecture, ask ques-
tions and learn about the history
behind the storefronts. Just when
your mind is wandering to thoughts
of something cold on a hot summer
night, you've arrived at one of four
watering holes on the tour - The
Palace Saloon, O'Kane's Irish Pub &
Eatery, the new KariBrew Brewpub
& Grub and Pablo's Grill & Cantina.
Corbett, a native Fernandinan,
starts where the city itself did - at the
foot of Centre Street, home to the
Amelia River with its deep harbor
and "sweet water" that attracted
sailors the world over. Add to the mix
David Yulee, founder of the Florida
Rail Road Co., who relocated
Fernandina a few blocks from Old
Town to accommodate his ambitious
plans, and you have the birth of
industry in what had been a sleepy
marsh-side town.
By the turn of the 20th century
Fernandina boasted 11 hotels, more
than 20 bars and three steamers a
day chock a block with passengers,
Corbett noted.
"With all the ships in the harbor,
they needed a cold beer when they
arrived," he said. And along came the
Palace Saloon, created by Louis G.
Hirth in 1903 as an upscale "captain's
bar" replete with mustache towels so
gentlemen could wipe the froth from
their beards. Inside, visitors today
can enjoy a drink and ogle over the
mosaic tile floors, tin ceilings and
massive gas lamp that still hangs
over the 40-foot bar. Murals, commis-
sioned by Hirth "to class the place
up," still grace the walls, as do carved
mahogany caryatids. Unlike other
establishments that served popcorn
or peanuts, Hirth preferred peel and
eat shrimp, which was set out in
large bowls on the bar.
Back on Centre Street, Corbett
stands in the pocket park beside
what is today Seattle's Best coffee
shop and tells how it used to hold the
liquor store with the infamous "Cat
Crack" - the alley down which black


1*



S "

. /


Top, Amelia Island Museum
of History docent Charlie Corbett
shows Arlene Rice of Edison,
NJ., old photos of the Palace
Saloon during an Original
Historical Fernandina Beach
Pub Crawl.
Above, Charles Homage and
Robert B. Lockwood man the
"bar" of the saloon during
Prohibition, when it was an ice
cream parlor.
Right, Corbett (holding a soda
- the guides do not drink on the
tour) explains the importance of
the house that was also known as
"the scourge of Fourth Street."
Take the tour to find out why.


people could buy their liquor during
segregation. At a small window on
the side of the building they could
ask for their drink of choice, a "bull"
if they wanted a Schlitz beer, or a
"hog" if they preferred Gordon's gin,
for example, since many were not
afforded the opportunity to learn to
read and knew only the logo on the
label. An oil drum stove kept them
warm in winter, and an old car seat
provided a place to sit.


FILE PHOTO


II


U.1! II
SVFT r *I '

pi 1



SIAN PERRY/NEWS-LEADER


At O'Kane's, a short lesson on the
history of bootlegging and Prohibi-
tion seems appropriate, since Irish
monks were the first to develop
whiskey in the sixth century by dis-
tilling grains. As the Irish immigrat-
ed, so did their "pot liquor," as it
came to be called in America.
"This was an economical measure
- they knew how to make liquor and


it was cheap. They were not flouting
the law - it was liquor by poor people
for poor people," said Sansbury of
the local folk who set up stills.
"Locally, our moonshine was done
in the west part of the county," said
Corbett. "In North Florida alcohol
making was very popular and corn
CRAWL Continued on 2B


The Bard

likeyou've

neverseen

-atACT
Amelia Community
Theatre will host three per-
formances of "The Complete
Works of William
Shakespeare, Abridged" in
August, presented by Skrank
Tank Productions.
Playwrights Adam Long,
Jess Winfield and Daniel
Singer appeared in the origi-
nal California production in
1987. The show was devel-
oped through improvisation,
and the use of current events
and audience participation
keeps that spontaneity intact.
This touring show stars
Erik DeCicco, Tyler Ross and
Dustin Whitehead. All have
been involved in Jacksonville
area theater, plus academic
and professional theater else-
where.
The energetic comedy will
be presented at 8 p.m. on
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Aug. 8 at 209 Cedar St. Adult
tickets are $15; student tick-
ets are $10. Although plays
don't come with a rating sys-
tem like the movies, this
show could be considered
PG-13, as a guide to parents.
The New York Times said
of a past production, "It is a
mix of pratfalls, puns, willful
misreadings of names and
dialogue, clunky female
impersonations, clean-cut rib-
aldry and broad burlesque.
The gung-ho vitality is impos-
sible to resist. ... At its giddi-
est, its tone recalls the fabled
Bullwinkle cartoon shows."
And The New York Daily
News said, "A fantasia of zany
energy that throws together
Monty Python-ish drag and
Mel Brook-ish anything-for-a-
laugh gags."
"If you like Shakespeare,
you'll like this show. If you
hate Shakespeare, you'll love
this show," touted The Today
Show.
The ACT box office is
open 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on
Tuesday, Thursdays and
Saturday, or call 261-6749.


OFFONTHE ISLAND


ACT PLAY
Amelia Community Theatre presents "Six
Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," directed by Toni
DAmico and starring Carey Dresser and Arlene
Filkoff.
Lilly Harrison, retired and
living in a condo in Florida,
hires Michael, a cynical dance
instructor, to give her lessons
in the privacy of her own
home. If these two people
' -,, can't settle their many differ-
. ences, the first dance may be
-the last. This touching come-
dy proves that friendship can develop, even
between vastly different people. This play con-
tains adult language.
Performances are at 8 p.m. tonight and July 25,
July 29-31 and Aug. 1 and at 2 p.m. July 26.
Admission is $16 adults and $10 students. Amelia
Community Theatre is located at 209 Cedar St.
Call: 261-6749. Box office hours are Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and two
hours before curtain.

SUMMER JAZZ
The Historic American Beach "Summer Jazz
Series" presents its second free concert featuring


The Instant Groove Band on July 25 from 5-8 p.m.
at Burney Park (corner of Gregg and Burney) in


I


American Beach. Bring
your chairs to enjoy
food, fun, music and
tasty treats by Gourmet
Gourmet. The concert


LM - -- series is sponsored by
the American Beach Property Owners
Association. Donations to the association for out-
standing projects are appreciated. For informa-
tion call 277-7960.

ART IN THE PARK
The Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State
Park hosts 'Art in the Park" the first Saturday of
each month. The park is located on US 41, three
miles from 1-75 and a -
nine miles from 1-10 ".i l _lh PA R-d
in White Springs. A~ 9s..ne.. P.a.,SA i
Crafters will ,, , E, -k=iW,,,


demonstrate pot


h woc1


tery, fabric arts, stained glass, quilting, jewelry
making and many other crafts. Workshops are
available for a small fee and on a first come, first
served basis.
The event is free with regular park admission
of $4 per vehicle with up to eight people. Call
(386) 397-1920 or visit www.stephenfostercso.org.


'POPEYE' IN THE PARK
The next free movie in Central
Park, sponsored by Prosperity '
Bank, is a screening of "Popeye,
the adventures of the spinach-
munching sailor directed by
Robert Altman and starring
Robin Williams and Shelley
Duvall, on July 25 at 8:30 p.m.
Bring your blankets and lawn chairs. Concessions
will be available for purchase.

'WOOFSTOCK'
Celebrate the 40th anniver-
sary of Woodstock with
Woofstock at the Nassau
Humane Society Dog Park on
Aug. 15 from 5-10 p.m. Enjoy
mellow music by Hupp and .
Ray. Chow down on catfish and
hotdogs, coleslaw, fries and dessert. Beer and
wine will be available for purchase. Best-dressed
wins a prize. Bring your lawn chairs.
Admission is $15 for adults and $10 for kids.
Tickets are available at the NHS Dog Park (across
from the Fernandina Beach airport) and at
Redbones Dog Bakery and Boutique on South
Eighth Street in the Pelican Palms plaza.


Ticket information


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 24, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

Young Professionals
Council (YPC) will meet at
Woody's BBQ (near Lowes)
on July 30 at 7 p.m. for
Trivia Night. Trivia starts at
7:30 p.m. for ages 21-40. The
goals of YPC include network-
ing, professional develop-
ment, community service and
advocacy.

"The Biggest July
Birthday Party Ever" sched-
uled for 6:30-11 p.m. July 31
at the Fernandina Beach
Women's Club, 201 Jean
Lafitte Blvd., is sold out. For
more information contact
Joyce A. Jones at 583-1949.

Tickets are on sale for
"Seven Days of Fine
Dining," a drawing to win
seven dinner-for-two gift
certificates to local restau-
rants. A tax-deductible dona-
tion of $50 enters you in the
drawing, with proceeds bene-
fiting the TLC Pregnancy
Center, 410 S. Ninth St., dedi-
cated to empowering women
and men to make informed
decisions about pregnancy
and sexual integrity. Call the
center at 321-2008 to make a
donation and enter the draw-
ing, which will be held Aug. 7.
Only 100 tickets will be sold.
Participating restaurants are
Baxter's, Brett's Waterway
Cafe, Joe's 2nd Street Bistro,
PLAE, The Verandah, 29
South and The Ritz Caf&.

Fifi's Fine Resale of
Amelia Island is holding a
canned food drive for the
Barnabas food pantry each
Sunday in August, beginning
Aug. 2. Bring in a canned
good and receive an ice
cream sundae treat for free.
Fifi's, 1853 S. Eighth St., will
be open noon-4 p.m. each
Sunday in August. Call 277-
4430. Visit
www.myspace.com/fif is_ameli
a.
* * *
The Baptist Medical
Center Nassau Auxiliary will
host a Fuzzy Bean Candle
and Health Fair from 7 a.m.-
4 p.m. Aug. 14 in the confer-
ence room of the hospital,
featuring unique candles and


UNDER THE SEA

ACROSS
1. Fraudulent busi-
nesses
6. President
Roosevelt, e.g.
9. Swear
13. Administer
14. British rule over
India prior to
1947
15. *Usually done
with a buddy
16. Gossiper's news
17. Is this Geller a
psychic or magi-
cian?
18. Block of gold,
e.g.
19. *Diver's edible
treat
21. Rivals who can-
not be beaten
23. Santa , CA
24. To a place or
position on
25. Subdivision of
theatrical play
28. Chow
30. *Reef structures
35. What buffaloes
do?
37. Classic movie
"The Man Who
Too Much"
39. Gymnast
Comaneci
40. Cuzco valley
empire
41. "The Da Vinci
Code" monk
43. "Buddenbrooks"
author
44. What editor
does
46. Cash strongbox
47. Accelerated
48. Legal gambling
game in many


interesting health products. All
visitors will be treated to a free
mini-massage.

Cats Angels, Inc. SPCA
will hold its annual Walk and
Candlelight Vigil commemo-
rating International Homeless
Animals Day on Aug. 15 at
Central Park on Atlantic
Avenue in Fernandina Beach.
The two-mile walk starts at
6:30 p.m. and is followed by a
candlelight vigil. Contact Cats
Angels at 321-2267, e-mail
catsangels@bellsouth.net or
visit the Thrift Store and
Adoption Center at 709 S.
Eighth St.
The International Society
for Animal Rights, or ISAR,
sponsored the first National
Homeless Animals Day in
1992 by launching a crusade
to enlighten society, elected
officials and the media about
the urgent need to spay and
neuter companion animals in
an effort to halt the killing of
millions of unwanted dogs
and cats each year in the
nation's shelters. It has since
grown into an international
event. For more information,
visit www.isaronline.org.

The Intergalactic Bead &
Jewelry Show will be held
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 15-
16 at the Morocco Shrine
Auditorium, 3800 Saint Johns
Bluff Road S., Jacksonville.
For more information and a
discount admission coupon
visit www.beadshows.com.
Admission is $5 Saturday, $4
Sunday and children 12 and
under, free.

Tickets are on sale for
Cats Angels annual Super
Raffle to support its
spay/neuter/education pro-
grams. More than 50 prizes
are donated by area mer-
chants, restaurants and indi-
viduals, including jewelry, art-
work, a 3-night stay for two at
Amelia Island Plantation, a
one-night stay at Elizabeth
Pointe Lodge, salon services,
golf packages and more.
Tickets are $1 each, $5 for
seven, $10 for 15 or $30 for
50 and available at the Thrift
Store and Adoption Center,
709 S. Eighth St., and by mail
to Cats Angels, P.O. Box


states, pl.
50. Pig feed
52. Common warn-
ing not to do this
at home
53. It's often used in
potato soup
55. Fairytale
princess test
57. Situation sur-
rounding South
Carolina gover-
nor, e.g.
61. *Table mineral
65. It's often con-
fused with a
kayak
66. *Arctic cover
68. To consult, as in
notes
69. Late New York
socialite Brooke
70. Digital audio-
tape
71. One of Florida
Keys
72. Smell badly
73. Major division
of geological time
74. Honker

DOWN
1. Lee, know
for its treats
2. "The Breakfast

3. mater
4. Loot
5. Often associated
with a bull
6. "Tried and
7. A corncob
8. Arabic genie
9. Skin problem
10. Rock cavities
11. Double reed
woodwind
12. Wide Area
Telephone
Service


15. Saharan wind
20. Police informers
22. And so on
24. The Washington
Monument, e.g.
25. *Aka Little
Mermaid
26. Popular form of
urban living
27. Silent or implied
29. It's used in
measuring
31. Those born
under Aries
32. Conform
33. Inside of a jack-
et
34. *Bikini Bottom's
Texan
36. Dillon or Damon
38. *Sea_, built
to reduce effect
of strong waves
42. It lies on an
angle
45. Fuse together
49. *Siren's domain
51. *They're found
in oysters
54. Omit
56. Southeastern
Asian organiza-
tion
57. Harry Potter's
mark
58. Sherlock
Holmes' assign-
ment
59. " up," as in
poker
60. Breakfast corner
61. Stiff hair
62. 1970s hairdo
63. Kids' building
block
64. Ragtime turkey
dance
67. Lightning
McQueen, e.g.


SUMMER CAMPS
The McArthur Family 27-31, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. All band
YMCA will hold its Eco- instrumentalists, percussion
Adventure Summer Day and color guard members,
Camp through Aug. 21. Aug. 10-14, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Episcopal Children's * *
Services accepted. Fee is The Amelia Island
$105 members/$110 non- Parent Co-Op Preschool is
members and a $50 registra- enrolling now for fall 2009
tion fee (waived for mem- preschool classes for ages 2
bers). Daily rate is $40. and 3. The Co-Op also offers
Camp locations are Atlantic summer camps in two-
Elementary, Callahan week sessions for ages 3-5.
Elementary and the Yulee Call 261-1161 or visit
Kids' Campus. Call 261- www.aipcp.org. The Co-Op
1080. is located at 5040 First Coast
S* * Hwy., next to The Dome
Boys and Girls Clubs of Healing Center.
Nassau County Summer * *
Camps run until Aug. 21. The Cummer Museum
Participants will experience of Art & Gardens, 829
fun and learning in a struc- Riverside Ave., Jacksonville,
tured environment. Hours is hosting a Middle School
are 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Weekly fee Art Camp for children enter-
is $50. Various free and ing sixth through eighth
reduced enrollment plans grades, where children are
are available, as are pay- immersed in art for a week of
ment plans. For information learning and can establish a
at the Miller Club (942259 strong portfolio. Camp is 9
Old Nassauville Road), call a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 27-31.
Carla Wilson at 261-1075; Cost is $200 per child for
for information at the members and $225 for non-
Fernandina Beach Club members. For information or
(11th and Indigo), call to register, call Art
Reggie Williams at 491- Connections at (904) 355-
9102. 0630.


Kayak Amelia is offering
one-day Kid's Kayak Day
Camps July 28 for children
ages nine through 14.
Campers will learn the
basics of kayaking (paddle
strokes, rescues), water
safety, survival skills and
navigation.
The instructor is an
American Canoe Association
Level 3 Kayak Instructor, cer-
tified in Wilderness First Aid
and CPR.
Class is limited to seven
paddlers. Cost is $75 per
person. Call (904) 251-0016
for reservations.

The Yulee High School
Hornet Marching Band will
hold summer band camps
in the Yulee High School
band hall on the following
dates: Color Guard and
Percussion Mini-Camp, July


16072, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035. Include your name,
phone number, number of
tickets and check. Call 321-
2267. The drawing will be
held Aug. 15. You need not be
present to win.

Ever wonder what
Facebook, Twitter and blog-
ging are? The Amelia Island
Museum of History, 233 S.
Third St., is offering "Facing
Facebook," an introductory
seminar on using today's
online social networking tools,
at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 27. The
museum utilizes Facebook,
Twitter and a blog to promote
its activities and educate the


SOLUTION 07.22
Exit to the Rear


The Epilepsy
Foundation of Florida is
offering full scholarships to
Camp Boggy Creek Aug. 6-
11 which provides children
with epilepsy, ages 7-16, an
opportunity to escape the
stress of dealing with their
medical conditions. Campers
participate in a variety of
activities and on-staff med-
ical teams and volunteers
ensure the environment is
physically safe and medically
sound.
Located in Eustis, Camp
Boggy Creek is a permanent
facility on 232 acres of tall
pines, majestic oaks and
nature trails.
Contact the Jacksonville
EFOF office at (904) 731-
3752 or visit www.Boggy
Creek.org or www.epilep-
syfla.org as soon as possi-
ble.


community and wants to
make sure all are able to take
advantage of these tools. For
more information, contact the
museum at 261-7378.

Rescuing Animals in
Nassau, or RAIN, will hold its
annual spaghetti dinner
fundraiser from 4-8 p.m.
Aug. 22 at the Atlantic
Avenue Recreation Center in
Fernandina Beach.
Tickets are $10 and
include spaghetti with sauce
of choice, salad, bread, drink
and dessert. There will also
be a silent auction and enter-
tainment.
Tickets go on sale starting
Aug. 1 at Fernandina Beach
Animal Clinic, Lofton Creek
Animal Clinic, Nassau
Veterinary Clinic, BarkAvenue
Pet Boutique and Bucky's
Best Friends Card and Gift.
For information call RAIN at
(904) 879-5861 or e-mail rain-
humane@yahoo.com.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 FBHS students
from Yulee will be held Sept.
7, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem
Cell. Cost is $20 per person.
A meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Fernandina Beach, FL


SUDOKU


1 2 3 4

2 5 6 1

7 8 1 5 2

6 8

5 9

1 2

4 9 7 6 2

8 2 1 5


S1 6 3 8


Fill in the squares so
that each row, column
and 3-by3 box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009
Sudoku Difficult
Puzzle #1513D


571 829463
9384651 72
246371 589
41 7986235
35921 7846
6 8 2 5 3 4 7 9 1
1 93758624
864192357
725643918


32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with any
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event.

Ghost tours on "Polly
the Trolley" are offered on
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday evenings from 7:30-
8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 for
adults and $5 for children 3
and under. Call 753-4486 for
more information or reserva-
tions.

Enjoy "Trivia with
Maggie" on Wednesdays at
7:30 p.m. at the Crab Trap in
downtown Fernandina Beach.
Enjoy a special trivia menu,
drink, win prizes and listen to
music while you improve your
memory and get smarter.
Free and open to the public.

FILM/THEATER

Tickets for romantic soul
artist Smokey Robinson are
on sale now at the Florida
Theatre. Robinson will per-
form Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. With
the Miracles in the 1960s, he
recorded dozens of tuneful
Motown hits with his high
tenor. As a solo performer
from the 1970s onward, he
was one of the staples of
urban contemporary music.
His work contributed to the
success of Motown Records
and helped advance the pop-
ularity of soul music.
The Florida Theatre is
located at 128 E. Forsyth St.
in Jacksonville. For ticket
information call the box office
at (904) 355-2287.

The Amelia Island Film
Festival announces a special
festival award in honor of
Don Davis (1931-2008) to be
presented to a filmmaker for a
film made in Florida. Davis
was instrumental in creating
Florida's Film Production
Incentive Program.
The Second Annual AIFF
will be held in Fernandina
Beach for four days in
February, beginning Feb. 25.
Visit
www.AmelialslandFilmFestiva
I.org for information about fes-
tival events and film submis-
sion applications.

Memorial United
Methodist Church is hosting
a film series titled Faith at the
Movies. This is a brand-new
series designed to explore
issues of faith through popular
movies. There will be a simul-
taneous movie and program
for children, as well as a nurs-
ery. All are welcome. Movies
start at 6:30 p.m. in Maxwell
Hall.
The lineup includes:
"Romero" tonight and "The
Ultimate Gift" Aug. 7.

"Dora the Explorer Live!
Search for the City of Lost
Toys" will be at the Times
Union Center's Moran
Theater on Aug. 4 and 5 for
three performances. "Dora the
Explorer Live!" is a culturally
rich, interactive theatrical
show for preschoolers and
their families. Call the FCCJ
Artist Series Box Office at 1-
888-860-BWAY.

Tickets are on sale at
Amelia Community Theatre
for a touring production of the
energetic comedy, "The
Complete Works of William
Shakespeare, Abridged."
Performances are at 8 p.m.
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8
p.m. Aug. 8 at the theater,
209 Cedar St. Adult tickets
are $15; student tickets are
$10.
The show is a mix of "prat-
falls, puns, clunky female
impersonations, clean-cut rib-
aldry and broad burlesque.
The gung-ho vitality is impos-
sible to resist," says The New


CRAWL Continued from 1B
was the grain of choice
because it fermented in hot
humid climates the best."
A common question
among farmers might be
"How is your corn?" said
Sansbury, but the reply
around these parts would be,
"Oh, I'm getting 10 to 12 gal-
lons to the acre."
But before O'Kane's was a
pub, it was the second Ford
dealership in town, opening
in 1924, said Corbett. It wasn't
necessary to have a huge
showroom, customers would
simply order from a catalogue
and the car would be deliv-
ered to their door.
The next stop, KariBrew
on Third Street, was home to
the first Ford dealership in
1910. Armed with this knowl-
edge, it seemed appropriate
to pause aong the way at the
site of the first car accident in
Fernandina, when Flossie


York Tines.
Call 261-6749 for tickets
and information, or come by
the box office between 11
a.m.-1 p.m. on Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays.

ART/GALLERIES

The Haskell Gallery & Art
Kiosks at the Jacksonville
International Airport Main
Terminal present "A
Women's Point of View:
Paintings, Photography,
and Sculpture" by Lara
Summers, Elisa Olderman
Johnson and Cookie Davis.
For information visit
www.JIAarts.org.

The Art House, 11 S.
Seventh St., offers art class-
es for all ages, abilities and
interests as well as portfolio
and professional develop-
ment. Individual and group
classes are forming. The Art
House offers a classic photog-
raphy studio, photography,
portraits, restoration, wed-
dings, events, computers and
software, digital and film. For
information or to register, call
Robin at 261-0116 or 705-
6178.

Island Art Association
member Paul N. Massing is
exhibiting his recent works at
The Intercoastal Wine
Company, 10 N. Second St.,
through July.
"Portraits, Pirates and
Other Local Notables" fea-
tures poses of pirates in full
costume and others in historic
garb made from live sittings
by local people.

The Cummer Museum of
Art & Gardens, 829
Riverside Ave., Jacksonville,
is hosting a one-day painting
workshop with local artist
Christina Foard on July 25
from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Move
toward abstract expression-
ism in a workshop that will
push your work beyond the
ordinary. Foard will demon-
strate some of her techniques
on paper and canvas and
teach elements of design,
process, detachment from fin-
ished product, color theory
and symbolism. Participants
can also tour the exhibition
that inspired the workshop.
Paul Jenkins: Works from
Jacksonville Collections, on
view through Aug. 9, features
18 paintings by Paul Jenkins.
Cost is $70 for members,
$90 for non-members and
$55 for active docents, lunch
included. For more informa-
tion or to register, call Art
Connections at (904) 355-
0630.

Celebrate the Dog Days
of Summer at The Cummer
as part of The Artist in The
Store series from 7-9 p.m.
Aug. 25 featuring James
Lehosit's The Dogs of
Riverside andAvondale.
Enjoy viewing unpublished
photographs of the featured
dogs from the book. Book
signing is at 7 p.m. and is
open to the public.
Lehosit, who was raised in
the Riverside-Avondale com-
munity, was the photographer
for the 251-page book.
For more information
about the book and event, call
The Cummer Store at (904)
899-6035.

Paul Jenkins: Works
from Jacksonville
Collections is on exhibit at
The Cummer Museum of Art
& Gardens, 829 Riverside
Ave., Jacksonville, through
Aug. 9.
Jenkins is an important fig-
ure in post-World War II
American Abstraction. Now in
his 80s, he continues to
exhibit in America and
Europe. His works can be
found in the collections of
major museums.
Admission is $10 for non-
members. Call (904) 356-
6857.


Borden pulled out of her
driveway at Villa Las Palmas
and into the path of Dr. Waas,
the first person in town to
own a car. (Flossie was the
second.)
"There were only two cars
on the island and they had a
wreck," said Corbett, shaking
his head.
After a welcome break at
KariBrew, it's on to Pablo's
and the end of the tour, but
not before learning about the
"Silk Stocking District" and
how Yulee dreamed that
"Fernandina was going to be
the next Manhattan, the
Broadway of the South," said
Corbett.
With roughly 22 bars and
12 bordellos by the turn of
the century - many situated
on Second Street - it "didn't
quite pan out that way," said
Corbett. Still, the small island
the size of Manhattan doesn't
lack for history.
sperry@fbnewsleadercor


+


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


CLASSIFIED


3B
NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, JULY 24,2009


To PLACE AN AD, CALL (904) 261-3696. CLASSIED DEADLINE FOR THE FRIDAY ISSUE - WEDNESDAY AT 5 P.M.

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment &Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 902 Trucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms &Acreage 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercial/Retail 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED BELOW


S 102 Lost & Found
FOUND PARROT - by one of the pools
at Amelia Island Plantation. Please call
the nature center to identify (904)
321-5082.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.

104 Personals
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF
TAX MATTERS - and then-some.
Thomas Avery Blair (Tom "the
TAXMAN") - federally-licensed Enrolled
Agent providing services in tax
preparation/ taxpayer representation.
29 years experience in taxation
matters. Call toll-free 1-888-250-5687
or visit http://www.TomBlairEA.com

105 Public Notice
THERE IS A LIEN - on the following
vehicles for towing and storage and will
be auctioned off on the listed dates
below: on August 3, 2009 a 1962 Ford
Pickup VIN# F10JH309800 at 12 noon
at 1683B S. 8th St., Fernandina Beach,
FL 32034. (904)321-3422
THERE IS A LIEN - on the following
vehicles for towing and storage and will
be auctioned off on the listed dates
below: on August 8, 2009 a 1989
Acura 4DR VIN#JH4KA3179KC015423,
a 1994 Ford Escort VIN#
1FARP15J9RW205424, a 1985 Chevy
Caprice VIN# 1G1BN69H2FY138941,
and a 1960's Chevy Pickup VIN#
6Z123962 at 12 noon at 1683B S. 8th
St., Fernandina Beach, FL 32034.
(904)321-3422


105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
-HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.



EMPLOME


201 Help Wanted


1


PATIENT COORDINATOR/
SECRETARY
Life Line Home Care needs a full-time
patient coordinator/secretary. Excellent
hours and benefits. Computer experi-
ence and good customer service skills
required. Fax resume Attn: Admini-
strative Assistant to (229) 382-1350.

Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.


Price Comparison
2001 Chevrolet Silverado'Motor Mount
Parts Store - Part Brand Price


RockAuto

Advance

Autozone

NAPA

O'Reilly


Anchor

Anchor

Anchor

NAPA

Anchor


$30.79

$49.99

$49.99

$56.99

$56.99


201 Help Wanted 201 Help Wanted


Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
CASTING CALL - We are seeking
personable bartenders, cocktail wait-
resses and dances for a new ultra
lounge located in downtown Fernan-
dina. Please come with resume &
personality July 19th or 20th @ 2pm to
The Palace Saloon. Email castinacall)
thepalacesaloon.com for ?'s
TIMES UNION MOTOR ROUTE -
available in Yulee. Excellent part-time
income. Covers Chester Rd. &
Blackrock area. Approximately 4 hours
a day. You must have dependable
transportation & current insurance. To
apply, please contact Jason Green at
225-9170 ext. 3.
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.
ROOM FOR RENT - in salon/spa. Call
(904)491-0991, ask for Jessica or
Summer.
LAMB CHRISTIAN DAY CARE - now
hiring (2) part-time positions. Apply in
person at 601 Centre St.
IMMEDIATE OPENING - 5 Days per
week Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm.
Data Entry-A/R Billing Clerk-Office
Assistant $9.00/hr to start. Position
requirements: Data entry experience,
ability to work in a fast paced, detail
oriented environment, Flexibility, Multi-
tasking, Computer experience to
include Microsoft Word & Excel,
Excellent Customer Service, Accounts
Receivable experience a plus.
Applications can be picked up at: 511
Ash Street Fernandina Beach, FL. NO
PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


PART-TIME HELP WANTED - Basic
computer skills and retail experience.
Apply in person only. The UPS Store,
1417 Sadler Rd.
ADMINISTRATIVE/CUSTOMER SER-
VICE ASSISTANT - needed ASAP!
Olympic Steel has an immediate
opening for an administrative/ custom-
er service job in Fernandina. Position
Qualifications *Excellent computer,
phone, and time management skills
and ability to multi-task in a fast paced
environment. Position Requirement
*Bilingual-Spanish/English Interested
candidates please fax/email resumes to
904-491-8688 olvsteeltradina.iobs()
olvsteel.com. EOE m/f/d/v
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA
has a Teller position available at our
new Yulee Branch in Nassau County.
Must possess good interpersonal skills,
organizational & computer skills, ability
to operate standard office equipment
and above average math skills.
Previous teller or other cash handling
experience is required. Fax resume to
386-754-7163 attn: Jan Turbeville or
email to TurbevilleJ@ffsb.com. A
quality Equal Housing Lender and EEO
Employer.
A JANET LYNNE SALON & SPA - is
accepting applications for a stylist/
colorist for a booth rental position.
Discover the difference in our relaxing,
non-competitive environment. Call
Janet at 556-1687 for a confidential
interview. Serious inquiries only.
AWESOME CAREER OPPORTUNITY -
$20/hr. Avg $57K/yr. Postal jobs. Pd
training. Vac., OT, full benefits, pension
plan. Call M-F, 8-5 CST. (888)361-6551
ext 1040. ANF
NOW HIRING
Companies desperately need employ-
ees to assemble products at home. No
selling, any hours. $500 wkly potential.
Info 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-1380.

BARISTAS, SERVERS, & PREP CHEF
- Espressos Cafe in Amelia Island.
Described in Amelia Islander magazine.
Fax resume to (904)491-9810


The Tribune & Georgian is looking for a creative,
ambitious, result-oriented, advertising sales pro-
fessional. Responsible for selling to established
accounts, prospecting and cold calling. Must be
able to work with deadlines. To apply for this po-
sition, send cover letter, resume including pro-
fessional references to:
Tribune & Georgian, Attention Tom Latos
P.O. Box 470, St. Marys, Ga. 31558
or email: tomlatos@tribune-georgian.com

DEADLINE: July 10, 2009


Tribune & Georgian
48906 T&G 6/5


S 201 Help Wanted


EXPERIENCED PARTS/WAREHOUSE
PERSON - Need experienced person
for our busy parts counter. Duties
include inbound calls from customers,
handling requests from both walk-in
customers and our service department.
Knowledge of parts a plus. Must be
dependable and able to work
independently. Fax resume to (904)
924-9335, Attn: Porter.
APARTMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN
We have an exciting career
opportunity for a Service Technician at
Nassau Club in Fernandina Beach.
The ideal team member will have prior
general maintenance and repair
experience. Apply online today at
www.concordrents.com. Excellent
Benefits!


201 Help Wanted
MERRY MAIDS
is now accepting applications for
permanent part-time/on call position.
No nights or weekends. Background
check. Drug free workplace. Must be
21 or older. (904)261-6262. Must have
own vehicle.
FRONT DESK CLERK NEEDED
Experience preferred. Apply at Holiday
Inn Express, 76071 Sidney PI., Yulee or
call (904)849-0200.

204 Work Wanted
HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.


Nassau County
(Temporary Position)

Applicant must possess college credits in pursuit of
Sociology or Psychology degree, or related fields
with a minimum of three years experience in social
service or an acceptable combination of education
and experience; must have knowledge of various
computer software packages and their operation.


Apps/resumes maybe mailed or faxed to NFCAA
Attn. HR Dept, PRO. Box 52025,
Jacksonville, FL 32201
or FAX- (904) 398-7480.
Closing date of application is 8/4/09




























BACNKARD www.BackyardEconomics.com
OEONOMI S
LOCAL SPENDING WORKS


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At ,
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES




LEANIRICE
Residential/Commerci a
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Member AIFB Chamber
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E mail: justforyouserv@aol.com


CLEANING SERVICE

CLEAN by Genine Inc.
Attention to betaill

Genine Harter /
Housekeeping ''^ 1^
-- 7
904-415-1186 .....
genineharter@giail.com


CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694

AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duste
(904) 261-1940

CONSTRUCTION


BRANNAN

CONSTRUCTION
State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GOROGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages

16,49500
24x2Wood iiFame On


GARAGE DOORS

GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, Inc.
"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much!
SOperator or door replacements Transmitter replacement
* Broken springs Stripped gears
* Cables Service forall makes &models
904-277-2086

HOME IMPROVEMENT


S-"" Il , 1 I"
Repair* Rebuild Remodel
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 * 557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003


OTTOS CUSTOM
WOODWORKING, INC.
CUSTOM ABINETI ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
0BOKCAE1 ' TRIM CARPENTRY
HONE REPAIR REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICES
LICENSED IIIIURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 90-557-3100



THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for you!


LAWN MAINTENANCE



Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc.
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
*Plants & flowers, trees, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation fVIEE
SSprinkler Installation EST ME
* Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354


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* Complete system designs
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* System tune ups * 10 years experience
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NEW & USED CARS


PRESSURE WASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
WoodDecks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353


I"C#& | i- .ROOFING

CHEVROLET * BUICK
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(904) 261-6821 333-6496
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' U ' , \\ ,,l II








UALITY PAINTING, INC.,
CQUall the PrsII INC.,
"Call the Professionals"


Warranty on new installs (904) 753-1689
Free estimates * 904-277-8231 REDENTIAL
*RESIDENTIAL
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*SPECIALIZED FINISHES
PRESSURE WASHING

The Lock Doctor &WATERPROOFING
904-321-LOCK (56251 LICENSED BONDED INSURED
* Lock Out Service -PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIPAT
* New Locks Installation & Service AFFORDABLE PRICES
* Automobile Keys -SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
SCar Remotes -CALL TODAYFORYOUR
* Free Security Survey FREE ESTIMATE
Owner: Steve Brookbank
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


A COASTAL BUILDING

SYSTEMS

"Re.Roofing Is Our Specialty"
Nassau County's Largest
Roofing & Siding Contractor
Serving Satisfied
Homebuilders & Homeowners
Since 1993
Re-Roofing * New Roofing
Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia
261-2233
Free Estimate
CCC-057020
4// ',-17 ".' I,-. " -44 visa








Stc///^//////f/f/r/"/uLI


I


BLACK








4B FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


SUSAN MCEWEN - MLS# 49170
SATURDAY OPEN HOUSE $299,000
422 S. 5TH STREET TAKE 8TH STREET TO DATE
GO WEST TO 5TH STREET MAKE LEFT


DON CANTIN - MLS# 41539
SATURDAY - $850,000 - 4709 GENOA DRIVE,
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034 - GOLFSIDE
SOUTH IS DIRECTLY ACROSS FROM RITZ
CARLTON. FIRST STREET ON RIGHT IS GENOA
DRIVE. HOUSE IS 5TH ON CORNER FROM LEFT.


HOMELESS


ANIMALS...


THEY'RE DYING FOR

A 2ND CHANCE,
ADOPT A COMPANION TODAY.


..! -


SUSAN MCEWEN - MLS# 49569
SUNDAY $157,000 COTTAGES AT STONEY
CREEK SR200/A1A TO ARRIGO THE RIGHT IN
TO STONEY CREEK BEHIND SUPER WAL-MART


DON CANTIN MLS# 43795
SUNDAY - 4701 RIGING DRIVE, FERNANDINA
BEACH, FL 32034 - $649,000 - OFF AMELIA
PARKWAY ACROSS FROM THE ENTRANCE TO
THE RITZ CARLTON


"" ".fbmewsleader.com
Read the news, e-mail the staff, check the
classified, or subscribe to
Florida's Oldest Weekly Newspaper!







Saturday -:- August 8 -:-10:00 a.m.
* Crop Land & Timber Land * Excellent Real Estate Investment Opportunity
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204 Work Wanted
HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
HOME REPAIRS - Painting, roofing,
rotted wood, electrical, ceiling fans,
decks, tile, chimney repairs, gutter
cleaning and pressure washing. Call
Marc (904)583-4900. Lic. & Ins.
HOME REPAIRS - All types of home
repair & improvements, mobile homes
also. Dependable service. Licensed,
bonded, & insured. Call Mark Bullington
at (904)277-8780.


S 206 Child Care
FIRST GRADE TEACHER - will nanny/
teach your home-schooler reading &
math. Excellent references. Call Alice
(904)261-6599.
Weekend Child Care Available - I
have an opening in my home for
weekend child care. Mornings or
evenings. References available. (904)
225-8778


207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF





Iarnabas
CENTER, INC

The New to You Resale Store is an
excellent place to recycle your household
goods. For info, call: 904.321.2334


Motor graders, Excavators, Backhoe, Service & Bucket/Sign Trucks,
Flatbed & Winch Trucks, Farm Tractors, Riding Mowers,
Batwing Mowers, Gators, Generator, Welders, Tag & Enclosed Trailers, Late
Model Chevrolet, Ford and Dodge Pickups, Explorers, Suburbans, Vans,
Workstations, Computers, Laptops, Printers, Fax Machines,
Calculators, Office Furniture, Phones, Radios and Much More.
J. M.Wood Auction Co, Inc.
(334) 264-3265
BryantWood ALLIC #1137







Countryside Apartments

1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810


301 Schools &
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888) 349-5387. ANF
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer available.
Financial aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF

305 Tutoring
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.




503 Pets/Supplies
GREAT PUPS - free to good loving
homes. Brother & sister lab mix
w/beagle must go together. Also boxer
mix. Must have a fenced yard. Fixed.
Love walks. Housebroken. (904)556-
9512.
FREE BEAGLE - doesn't like cats. 4
years old. Housebroken. Needs chain
link fence. (904)491-4970.
PERSIAN/MANX MIX KITTENS -
Free to good home. Also have Siamese
/Persian mix. (904)225-9940




601 Garage Sales
YARD SALE - Sat. & Sun. 86016
Cherry Laurel Way, Yulee (Sand
Hickory Subdivision). Furniture,
clothes, tools, laminated wood flooring,
GE W/D and much more.
FAMILY YARD SALE - Sat. 7/25,
8am-12pm. 1912 Atlantic Ave.
Furniture items, household items,
children's clothes & toys. Everything
must go. (904)321-1468


A GUIDE TO NEWLY LISTED REAL ESTATE PROPERTIES
........... .......... ....


AMAZING!!!
NEW crown in every room. NEW bamboo
floors throughout NEW paint in every room,
closet, exterior! NEW granite fireplace, shelving,
corian counters, custom lightinp, remote control
fans, surround sound in & out. PREMIUM lot size
backs to preserve, extends beyond fence plus
arden & fruit tree (orange, tangerine,lemon),
koi pond, outdoor lighting & outlets, 2nd water
meter saves $$$. Room for everyone - bring
your extended/growing family to this SIX bed-
room, FOUR bath home with 2nd story bonus
room PLUS mother-in-law suite. FREE pool table
and bar included. Seller owned for quick closing!
MLS#49965 $491,000

. . Chad &Sandy Neumann
NeumaII nn II1 904-219-7539
REALTY CO RP www.houses-that-rock.com


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Cheryl Holt

904-742-4649


Fernandina Beach Realty
474262 SR 200
Fernandina Beach, FL


85198 Trinity Circle, Yulee


85198 Trinity Circle, Yulee
Nice fenced half acre lot with
I1.hi l J .in1, l . 1, .ri ruh i,,r. h: Iil
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'A'. 1. i 1111 i. i .r... ,1 I S65 .000.
MLS 49852


Cheryl Holt

904-742-4649


Beautiful Wooded Lot
Backs up to a pond in desirable Harrison
Cove at Summer Beach on Amelia Island.
Small gated neighborhood, short walk to
the beach, membership to Golf Club of
Amelia Island available.
$160,000 MLS#:48207

The Home Store Amelia Island Properties, Inc
Ron Thornberry
(904) 415-0615
319 Centre Street,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034


601 Garage Sales
HUGE GARAGE SALE - Fri. 7/24, Sat.
7/25, & Sun. 7/26, 10am-4pm. Oak
dresser, diaper cakes, plus sized
clothes, etc. 86012 John St. in Yulee
off Felmor. Follow the signs.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Corner of Simmons & 1st Ave. Sat.
7/25, 7:30am-noon. No early birds.
ESTATE/DOWNSIZING SALE - We
are moving contents from Osprey
Village to 528 S 8th St, here in
Fernandina, to hold the sale. Estate
and yard sales are not permitted in
Osprey Village. Thurs 7/23, Fri 7/24,
Sat 7/25, 9:00am-4:00pm. Rain or
shine. Corner shelf, room divider,
vintage oak curio, rattan shelf, 2
vintage clocks, hanging curio,
Cuisenart Griddle and coffee maker,
Williams Sonoma items, utensils,
pyrex, corning, fish poacher, bake-
ware, Italy kitchenwares and dishes,
Chitarra pasta maker, ravioli maker,
Ginori China, 23 pcs Royal Copehhagen
China, chopsticks, Pipka Santa, vintage
purses, perfume bottles, costume
jewelry, compacts, lipstick holders,
Japanese lanterns, asparagus dishes,
vintage molds, gourds, 66 pcs sterling
Manchester Southern Rose silverware,
Shelley Dainty Blue Snack Set for 6,
antique sewing box with contents and
key, Tiffany & Co Sterling children's
pcs, Gorham Sterling Tea Set, 120+
pcs Sheffield Silver Plate flatware, lots
of vintage lamp prisms, Pewter dishes,
48 pcs flatware, large bronze vase, egg
cups, 2 rabbits on nest, marble/onyx
eggs, toaster oven, trunk, treadmill,
cook books and recipes, old lace, lots
of beads and ribbons, clothing. This is
a smaller size sale, but nice clean sale
of interesting and fun items, so don't
miss out! For more info, photos and
map go to
www.MovingAndEstateSales.Net. Sale
is being done by Mary Ann Pihlblad dba
Finders Keepers. Licensed bonded and
insured.
YARD SALE - Fri. & Sat., 9am-?
Household items, toys, kids stuff,
motorcycle (Suzuki Boulevard 2006
650cc) only 900 miles, lots of extras.
New diamond rib tool box & ladder rack
fits extended cab or crew cab General
motors truck.
ALSO FOR SALE at 2999B 1st Ave.
garage sale - refrigerator, dishwasher,
stove, washer & dryer.
BACKSTAGE BARGAINS - Furnish-
ings, glassware, paintings, picture
frames, record albums, books, kid
stuff, decorations, TV. 1014 Beech St.,
Fernandina Little Theatre. Sat. 7/25,
8am-noon.
MOVING OUT! - Sat. 7/25, 10am-
4pm. Everything must go. Furniture,
couches, art, etc. Make us an offer.
809 S. 8th St., Pelican Palms Shops
next to Redbones.
HUGE GARAGE SALE - 87509
Creekside Dr., Yulee (off Roses Bluff)
Sat. 7/25, 8am-? Furniture, fridge,
multiple gaming systems w/games,
baseball stuff, LEGOS, boys clothes sz.
12-16, and way too much more to
mention.
2-FAMILY YARD SALE - Sat. 7/25
only, 8am-? US 17 South at Crady
Lake. Furniture, remodeling materials,
baby items - Lots of stuff.
95292 ARBOR LN. (Nassauville) -
Fri. 7/24 & Sat. 7/25, 8am-12pm.
Household items, furniture, TV,
appliances, dishes (great for college
bound), & misc.
ESTATE SALE - Saturday, July 25th,
9:00-12:00, 2318 Inverness Rd
(Lakewood). Designer purses, clothing
(sizes 0-4), furniture, boating items,
etc. Everything must go! Early Bird
Sale, Friday 1:00-3:00.
BIG SALE - Sat. 7/25, 8am-12 noon.
96417 Otter Run Dr.
FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS - 7/17 &
7/18; 7/24 & 7/25; 7/31 & 8/1. 9am -
? Off A1A to Harts Rd W. to 86204
Hayley PI., follow signs. Jerri's This-N-
That Antiques and Collectibles + yard
sale items. Shoes, clothes, dolls,
furniture, fishing, books, China,
vintage fashion jewelry. If the price
isn't right, make a fair offer. Let's make
a deal. Everyone welcome.
COMMUNITY WIDE GARAGE SALE -
Timber Creek Plantation. 2 miles west
of 1-95, exit 373. Sat. 7/25, 8am-
1pm. Visit the KB model home for a
chance to win prizes.
FLORA PARKE - SAT. 7/25, 8-12.
Furniture, dishware, rugs, novels,
children's books, games, decorative
items, misc. 31179 Grassy Parke Dr.


A PuBuIC SicE ANNOUNCEMENT rBYTH Nwi.-LEADE


Saturday-Sunday, July 25 - 26


PRESENTED BY (AW N REALTY CORP.


3321 S. Fletcher Ave. * Fernandina Beach, FL 32034


(904) 261-3986










RICHARD ROUX - MLS #49191 MARY BUNK - MLS# 48914
SATURDAY $449,900 SUNDAY - 97119 PIRATES WAY, YULEE, FL
3889S FLETCHER AVENUE, 32097 - $179,900 - A1A TO NORTH ON
FERNANDINA BEACH, FL 32034 BLACKROCK ROAD APPROX. 4 MILES ON YOUR
RIGHT. TURN AT 1ST ENTRANCE PIRATES WAY
AND PROPERTY WILL BE ON YOUR LEFT.


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CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


602 Articles for Sale]
MOVING SALE - Sat., 7/25. 96205
River Marsh Bend. Riverside subdi-
vision off Barnwell Road. Furniture &
household items, leather sectional,
stainless steel fridge. Lawn mower,
tools, etc. Cash Only. 8am-??
CHURCH FURNITURE - Does your
church need pews, pulpit set, baptsitry,
steeple, windows? Big sale on new
cushioned pews & cushions for hard
pews. www.pewsl.com. (800)231-
8360. ANF
GOLF CART - 2007 Precedent 48 volt.
Like new. (904)631-5822
SAT., 8AM-2PM. DVDs, tire rims, lots
of good boys' clothes & household
items. 85383 Blackmon Rd.

603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF


806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904) 261-4066 for information. C.H.
Lasserre, Realtor.


808 Off Island/Yulee

BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
house semi-secluded 1 acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095


809 Lots
Lake Lot Deal Fell Thru - 2.6 ac
$19,300. Free boat slips. Was $39,900.
Secluded wooded lot w/deeded access
to pvt stocked bass lake in TN. Quiet rd
frontage, utilities, warranty deed. Exc
financing. Must see, call now (888)
792-5253 x3087. ANF
1 ACRE DRY LOT with SWMH (of little
value) - Raintree Lane, F.B. $78,000.
Call (904)321-1159.


NEW DIRT BIKE - Suzuki DR-Z125/L. VACANT LOT - on lake in Otter Run.
Asking $2500/010. Goggles, boots, Asking $51,900. Call (904)321-0684.
and helmet included. (904)261-0936

1605 Computers-Supplies 814 West Nassau County


GET A NEW COMPUTER - Brand
name. Bad or no credit - No problem.
Smallest weekly pymts avail. Call now
(800)81609189. ANF

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.


FSBO - 55030 Deer Run Rd. 1.02 ac.,
3BR/2.5BA, fireplace, nice neighbor
hood, Callahan. $333,000. (904)631-
5822 after 5pm.


817 Other Areas
LAKE BARGAIN - 3+ ac just $49,900
(was $89,900). Nicely wooded, private
lake access. Ready to build. Owner will
finance. Only one - save big. (866)
352-2249. ANF


4BR/3BA Foreclosure! - $11,500.
615 __ uildig Materials Only $217/mo. 5% down 15 years @
615 Building Materials 8% apr. 3BR $199/mo. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5760. ANF


METAL ROOKU FI - 4U yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupply.com. ANF

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628
DAWN PICTURE - Approx. 6am,
10/27/08 over ocean w/new moon &
star at 12 o'clock. Call (404)725-8133.






802 Mobile Homes
4BR/2BA ON 1 ACRE - Ready to
move in. Low down and only $650/mo.
Call (904)424-7345.

804 Amelia Island Homes
3BR/1BA ADORABLE HOME - on
Stanley Dr. Hardwood firs. Ready for
move-in. All appliances incl. $165,000
or $950/mo to rent. (904)335-0454
OCEANFRONT - Log Cabin R-3
income. Property remodeled $975K.
Oceanview - Homes needs TLC. Rear
unit leases at $750/mo. Summer
Beach - 2028sf. Short distance to
beach. $415K. Amelia Coastal Realty
261-2770

805 Beaches

FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled
porches, hot tub. $344,900. (904)556-
4500
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.


COASTAL GEORGIA - Bank Ordered
Sale. 1+ acre ocean access $29,900.
http://www.oceanaccess299.com/888-
982-8952 x5192. ANF


851 Roommate Wanted
HOUSEMATES - off island. Private
home. No pets. Responsible, pro-
fessional, clean. $500/mo. + deposit.
Utilities included. Call (904)557-1659.


852 Mobile Homes
2BR/1BA SW - in Nassauville.
Remodeled. Rent $550/mo + $550
dep. Service animals only. (904)583-
2009.
2 & 3 BR Units - available in trailer
park. Call (904)335-6121.
3BR/2BA SINGLEWIDE - on one
acre. $750/mo + $750 dep. 3/2
Doublewide - on one acre $850 +
$800 deposit. (904)753-2156
3BR/1BA - CH&A. Singlewide in
Nassauville area. Call (904)261-6703.
FOR RENT - (3) 2BR trailers in mobile
home park. $500/mo. + $250 deposit.
Call Debi (904)759-3897.
UNFURNISHED 2 to 3BR - Beautiful
new decor. $600-$700/mo. Includes
water, lawn, poss. RTO. (904)315-1757
or 613-8401
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME - on 1/2
acre lot in Yulee. $700/mo. + $700
dep. Available now. Call (904) 491-
4383 or 237-7324.
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
YULEE 2BR SINGLEWIDES
Teakwood Mobile Home Park. $500-
$550. Call Marie (904)225-5378.
On Island/In Park - Long term. 1,2&
3BR starting $150/wk. $600/mo.+dep.
Utils avail. Off Island - 2/2 MH, $175/
wk. or $695/mo + dep. 261-5034.
YULEE 3BR/2BA DW - Newly
remodeled on 1 acre. $800/mo + $800
sec. dep. References, lease. Service
animals only. (904)225-5214


855 Apartments
Furnished

AT BEACH - Effic., 1 & 2BR starting
$145/wk. + dep., utils incl. ON
ISLAND - 2-3BR MH's in park $150/
wk. up or $600/mo. + dep. 261-5034
1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262
2BR/1BA APT. - on S. Fletcher.
Completely furnished. $750/mo. +
$250 deposit. Background check req'd.
(904)321-4366 or (904)557-8220


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
SMALL 1BR - at the beach. Quiet. No
smoking. Service animals only. Utilities
included. References, $500 deposit
required. $650/mo. (904)335-1665
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
included. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
ISLAND STUDIO APT. - 422 Pinedale
Rd., Fernandina Beach, 800 sq ft.
$600/mo, 1 month deposit. Incl.
garbage. No Smoking. Available Aug.
1, call M-F 9am to 5pm 904-277-5606
leave message after 5pm.
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY - PRIVATE
ENTRANCE. Must be clean. No
smoking. Dock for sunning or fishing.
Utilities & cable included. $700/mo. +
dep. refss. (904)556-1401
1BR ON ISLAND - Secluded, quiet,
good view, W/D. $650 + dep., lease
utilities included, restrictions. (904)
753-1116
2BR/1BA - Near beach. $795/mo. +
$795 dep. Call (904)583-3811.
BEACH LUXURY DUPLEX - 927 N.
Fletcher Ave. 3BR/1BA, CH&A, W/D.
Flexible terms. (904)386-1005
HISTORIC DISTRICT - 2BR/1BA,
approx. 1000sf, above Cafe Karibo.
$1000/mo. Utilities included. (904)
415-6533


DON'T LITTER

SSPAY ~ NEUTER


agi oerm Seroebe anntunremen o ttepr/Leagder s



GovDeals is Hosting at Online Auction the Surplus
Assets of Florida County, City, Law Enforcement and
Educational Agencies
Police/Sheriff Vehicles & Confiscated Property - Heavy
Equipment - Pickup Trucks - Cars - Buses - Computers
Furniture - Specialty Assets - Scrap Metal
New Items Added Daily - Register Online to Bid Now!

Register nlineto bid. Call 800-613-0156or A htp: .g deals. m
e-mail info@govdeals.com for more information - :GovDeals m







Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 bl,.*.l., 11 ,Iln t 1111 nh, i.. 't\ I...
3 bedroom garden unit, * MIirlrh i\ %.,
Swimming pool * Dishwash..-r * L,,uIn.1r\i talilitt-.
Washer/dryer connections* * W-lh..-r .]rI ..-r unit ,IiIiiN..�
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675.�0 per month
*Some features not available in all units

ev Cii nSc DicouW s * A " Aout Our Secia s!
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you I.ii \ .ilk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gateway to Anch., center!


M C uky! (904) 261-0791
www.atcdevel IpmLcnt.coml


I R MLTORJ OENHOISE]


Tr icts rL'ua ftro 3 to 12 I.Ks *s (. it i of ,. MI.s % . kisL-u Id. (.royii
a Nlrr el\tiil corfieriird deteloprneiit * Convenient 1- ,ciiss Exit 3


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I.. , r Jirn W oltzii'j ..:. r : . iri RexSchrader. i r.. j l:l-



I IN


PUBLIC INVITED



Saturday, j ly 18th


la i4PM





ON ISLAND

727 Tarpon - Green Home

3BR/3BA- $459,900





MAINLAND

96232 Dowling Dr. - Lanceford

3BR/3BA - $599,000


l Visit us at www.galphinre.com

n Iih (904) 277-6597 Business

S______ (800) 699-6597 Toll Free
EAL , ESTATE S iVrLF'C , INC. (904) 277-4081 Fax
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company 1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32034
RiF; a h rei7fals Rei:'7fa!' [ls rei7fals'


NATURES GATE AMELIA SOUTH FLORIDAAVENUE
Custom 3/3 concrete block Furnished 2/2 "end unit" Perfect starter or retirement
home built in 2003 has w/Southern exposure, home in Yulee. Remodeled
inground pool, double lot. Oceanfront pool and great kitchen & bath, tile & laminate.
Home has oversized MBR SS vacation rental possibilities. new HVAC.
appliances & granite tops.

#49900 $370.000 #50009 $460,000 #49929 $122,900


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles- 3BR/2.5BA Bring your golf clubs and walk the
golf course. Single family traditional home with 2 car garage.
Living room and dining room at front of house. Fireplace in fami-
ly room which exits to large screened porch. Master bedroom has
entry to screened porch for early morning coffee and bird watch-
ing in a natural setting. Conveniently located to shopping, schools
and dining Just off Amelia Island Parkway. $1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered
patio and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and
fireplace in living room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in
prestigious gated community where amenities include a communi-
ty swimming pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and
Golf Club of Amelia just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking dis-
tance to the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage.
$1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home located in
Ocean Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in
back patio and 2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country
living at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres
of land with beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm
evenings in the florida room or cozy up by the fireplace on the
cold winter nights. Either way this one is a charmer. $1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA - 2795 sq. ft., granite
counter tops, maple cabinets, stainless steel appliances,
washer/dryer included, centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND
* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green
in the North Hampton Golf Community with club house/aquatic
center, basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with
canoe/kayak lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television,
High Speed Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400


* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced lot, satellite-
dish, tool house. Ten minutes from Amelia Island and convenient
to Jacksonville International Airport. $1150

CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include
swimming pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools
and shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with communi-
ty pool at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Great
south end location. Large 2 car garage. This units in excellent con-
dition. Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the
ocean, golf and shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking
a leisurely drive on A1A through State Parks along the ocean and
intracoastal waterway $925
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is a beautiful town
home located in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal
waterway Rent includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service.
$2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as
well as golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful
brick paver walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs.
$1100 Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced
front and rear yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family
room. Home is only one block from the ocean. $900
* 2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1BA Located only 2 blocks from the
beach. Home has new carpet! Community features include swim-
ming pool, tennis court, play ground and Bar-B-Q area. $750

FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A - 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnished.1
block from the beach. $750


$799,000 - Sandpiper Loop
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphin - 277-6597







$725,000 - Fernandina Cay - MLS# 43544
3BR/3BA - Great Ocean View
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


2600 S.F. - across from the Bells River
Call me or your agent quickly!
Brad Goble - 904-261-6166


$340,000 - Reserve Court
4BR/2BA in Reserve at Old Bluff
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$595,000 - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lot - MLS# 45255
Buy now, Build later, use of existing home
Brad Goble - 261-6166







$510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365
4BR/3BA - 2578sf - In Seaside Subdivision
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


$425,000 - S. Fletcher Lot 50'x100'
Ready to build - Plans Available 2700 s.f.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$142,000 - The Palms - MLS# 45243
2BR/2BA - Many Upgrades
Brad Goble - 261-6166







$150,000 -1311 Broome- MLS# 47106
1375 s.f. Open Floor Plan
Brad Goble - 261-6166


* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


Lots & Acreage


W3


Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales









6B FRIDAY, JULY 24, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


I F AI - qA i i


CURTISS H. *RTENiL

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc. CURTISS H.

-. LASSERRE
^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^r^^ 1 lr �t T T-I -


*850785 US 17Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq.ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & until.
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$19.00 PSF + 3.5 CAM +Sales tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
*Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses.$2,500/mo + tax + util
*DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St.OldWest
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $12 per sf + tax.


I I Keal state. Inc.


LONG TERM
*2519 S. Fletcher Ave (West Side)., 3-4
BR/2.5BA 2800 sq. ft. Home. Lots of
parking. Unfurnished $1,400.00.
*19 S. 14th St.,2/1,$900/mo.+ util.,secu-
rity deposit $1,250.Avail.August 2009.
*4BR/2.5BA Very nice 2500 sq.ft. home
at Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
*3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island with
beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,850/mo. + Util. Avail Sept. Ist
*3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood
PI., close to beach and golf course
$1350/mo + util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit in
Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of
amenities. $950/mo.
*514 S. 14th St - 3BR/IBA $875/mo. +
util. security deposit $1,250. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. +
util. Security deposit of $1,250.
*2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt.
Great Deck - Oceanview $1,000/mo. +
util.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/IBA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher.
Call for more information
EI I r]'.=11,14 ."i k I1I.TI


I�


km *um mmai


1925 S. 14T St., Suite 4

Amelia Island, FL

SSales (904)277-9700
X wz U Property Management
Surfside Properties, Inc. Doroth Trent (904)2770907 Angel VanZant
Realtor (904)277-0907 Realtor


HILLIARD 3/2 great home with island, North 14th, needs TLC. an acre. Corner lot and fenced.
vaulted ceilings, eat-in kitchen and $137,500 MLS# 47266 $89,900 MLS #48333
2 car garage. Motivate seller.
$105,900 MLS #49226


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

BEACHES CHOICE - 2BR townhome
with oceanview covered porches.
CH&A. Ceiling fans. W/D connection.
Service animals only. No smoking. 737
N. Fletcher. $850/mo. + dep. (904)
261-4127.
OCEAN VIEW 2BR - No lease. Service
animals only. $750/mo. + security
deposit. Call (904)261-7750 after 6pm.
















Club
Apartments
BestAddress inFernandinaBeach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details

(904)277-2500


I


MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free LimitedTime

S* W/D Connections
\ in ^ * Large Closets


"*'. ..... City Apartments with


ON ISLAND custom built
3BR+Office/2.5BA, 2,250 sq. ft.
on .62 ac. lot. Upgrades galore. EastR
$349,900 MLS #48981 APARTMENTS


JacKsonville & Fernandina
Country Charm

(904) 845-2922
37149 Cody Circle
Hilliard, Florida
Mon. - Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

SPACIOUS STUDIO APT - w/ocean
view, 619 S. Fletcher. Private beach
access, freshly painted. No smoking.
$650/mo + $650 dep. (904)261-7658.

857 Condos-Furnished

AMELIA LANDINGS - Furnished 2BR/
2BA, water/sewer & garbage included.
Pool. Non-smoking. Service animals
only. $1050/mo. + deposit. Call (904)
759-1105.
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2/2 flat,
next to tennis courts/pool. Long term.
$900. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)
277-0006.
TOWNHOUSE - Furnished 2BR/2.5BA,
North Pointe. Pool, beach. Can be
unfurnished. Hm: (912)921-8976, Cell:
(912)414-2556
BEAUTIFUL Oceanfront fully furnished
3BR/3BA. Ocean Place @ Summer
Beach. $3000/mo., incl. all utils. Avail.
10/1. Call Marcy, (904)753-6500.
FOR RENT - Fernandina. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. Utils incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
AMELIA LAKES - 2nd floor, 2BR/2BA,
1181 sq. ft., W/D, fully furnished and
equipped in immaculate conditions.
$1300/mo. Real wood fireplace.
Screened porch. Short Term leases
available. Call Janina (904) 261-2169


858 Condos-Unfurnished

3 STORY - new, 2800 sq ft Amelia
townhome close to beach - 3BR's + 2
study areas, sitting area in MBR, 3.5
bath with 2 car attached garage,
patios, inside home elevator. Upgrades
galore with wood floors in main area,
all appliances, pool & gym. Rent on a
lease; will consider a lease purchase.
Non-smoking please. $1,500 monthly
- first, last and deposit upfront 904
962-7477 or 904-827-9900
NOW LEASING AMELIA LAKES
CONDOS - Private & gated luxury
community featuring resort style
swimming pool, tennis court, fitness
center, beach volleyball, & more.
Overlooking a spring fed lake. 1 & 2BR
homes starting at $799/mo. Call today
for a showing, (904)415-6969.
www.amelialakes.com

FERNANDINA SHORES - 2BR, pool,
tennis, 2 blocks to beach, W/D, lower
unit. Service animals only. $875/mo.
Available now. Call (847)867-3163.
NICE 1BR/1BA CONDO - Newly
painted, garden tub, screened porch, Ig
rooms. Gated community w/ amenities.
$750/mo. Call (904)432-8359
3BR/2BA BEACH CONDO - All new.
$800/mo. Annual unfurnished rental.
(904)415-1313


AIA In iulee - rign visaointy small 34/z First Loast lHwy. - Vanous office Yt510 Arrgo - JiK/2iAnnome located
office suites. Located near A1A and suites to choose from. Located in the in Beachway with oversized fenced back
Highway 17. Wireless internet and resort district and dose to AIP. Visit yard. Many upgrades with lawn care
security system provided. From ParkPlaceofAmelia.com for details and included. Pets allowed. Off Island.
� - n,,... -.1 ., , ,i/mo pricing. $1,325/mo

Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists


5209 Village Way - 3BR/2BA located in Ocean Village.
Furnished or unfurnished. Community Pool with beach
access and Summer Beach membership available for small
fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,950/mo

1913 Perimeter Park - 3BR/2.5BAwith formal living and
dining. Master with garden tub & granite counter tops. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,995/mo

95118 Sandpiper - 2BR/2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck
over looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities
included. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,895/mo

1886 Cape Sound - 3BR/3.5BA condo fully furnished with
community pool and work out room. Granite counter tops.
Stainless steel appliances. Utilities included. No pets. On
Island. $1,850/mo

95208 Woodberry - 4BR/3.5BA Summer Beach home with
tile floor throughout and large bonus room. Screened in
lanai, 2 car garage and community pool. Lawn care and
washer/dryer. On Island. $1,750/mo

2851 Ferdinand - Brand new 3BR/2BA home in Isle De Mai
with screened in lanai. Overlooking pond. Community Pool.
Lawn care. No pets. V2 off rent with 12 month lease. On
Island. $1,650/mo

95015 Sea Walk - Beautiful 3BR/2BA home located in Sea
Walk off Scott Road. Split floor plan with large oversized back
yard and short walk to beach. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On
Island. $1,550/mo

95141 Amalfi - 3BR/2.5BA town home located in the Villas of
Summer Beach with community pool. Short walk to beach.
Lawn care and washer/dryer. Screened lanai. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,450/mo

96816 Arrigo Blvd. - 3BR/2BA home located in Beachway
with oversized fenced back yard. Many upgrades with lawn
care included. Pets allowed. OffIsland. $1,325/mo


95152 Elderberry - 3BR/2.5BA town home located in the
Preserve with community pool. Short walk to beach. Lawn
care and washer/dryer. Summer Beach membership
available for small fee. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,300/mo

1994 Amelia Green - Brand new 2BR/2.5BA townhome
with loft and one car garage. Close to shopping and beach.
Pets allowed. On Island. $1,200/mo

1969 Amelia Green - 2BR/2.5BA townhome with tile floors
throughout main living. Granite countertops, stainless
steel appliances. Close to shopping and beach. Lawn care.
On Island. $1,200/mo

2651 Delorean Street - 3BR/2BA located off Will Hardee -
close to schools, shopping and beach, lawn care incld. On
Island. $1,175/mo

96679 Arrigo - 3BR/2BA home located in Beechway. 1600
sq ft, split floor plan, covered lanai. Off Island. $1,150/mo

823 N. Fletcher - 2BR/1BA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean
view with sunroom. Water/sewer included. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,100/mo

86184 Augustus - 3BR/2BA house located in Cartesian
Pointe with fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2
car garage. Off Island. $1,100/mo

5437 Leonard - 2BR/2BA home located in American Beach.
Great outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings.
Oversized yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $950/mo

314 S. 14th - 2BR/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in
backyard and deck. Pets allowed. Half month free with
12/mo lease. Half month off with 12 month lease. On
Island. $850/mo

765 Kenneth Court - 2BR2BA fenced with oversized back
yard. Pets allowed. On Island. $750/mo


86059 Remsenburg - 3BR/2BA North Hampton 1,500 sq. ft.
home. Huge backyard. Wireless access. Pets allowed. Half of
one month rent with full lease. Off Island. $1,300/mo

Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most From Your Investment Property.
Give Us A Call Today!








Renal 9am t0 S/ONS0


2003 Dodge Neon I 2005 Che
Warranty Wa


Nassa Couty'sLargst Slecton o


SPirvate Pations
7 �- Sparkling Pool
* � Tennis Courts
" Exercise Room
* Close to Shopping
* Twenty Minutes to


858 Condos-Unfurnished
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated! Ameni-
ties incl. $900/mo + sec dep. Call
912-269-3960.
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006
CLOSE TO THE OCEAN -
Overlooking pool. 2BR/2.5BA w/
carport. Year's lease. $875 + dep.
(904)430-2605 J
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $950/mo. (904)206-
2313
2BR/2BA TOWNHOME - 2-car
garage. $895/mo. Call (904)415-8256.
THE PALMS AT AMELIA - 2BR/2BA
starting at $800/mo. Call about our
early move-in special. (904)277-1983


859 Homes-Furnished
3BR/2.5BA Fully Furnished Home -
just 1 mile from beach or historic
downtown. 1 mo. dep. req'd. $1350/
mo. Includes basic cable, water, sewer,
& yard maint. Short or long term lease.
Available now. (757)639-5453
3BR/2BA - plus bonus room, garage.
Fully furnished. In Lofton Pointe.
$1300/mo. For information call Anna
(904)403-1982.

860 Homes-Unfurnished

2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island.
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105.
MARSH LAKES - 3/2.5 T.H. 1860sf.
4572 Village Dr. $1300/mo. Call Don
Brown Realty 225-5510 or 571-
7177
NORTH HAMPTON UNFURNISHED
HOME - 3BR/2BA, large backyard.
$1300/mo. One month free with year
lease. Call (912)270-3239.
3BR/2BA - 1800 sq.ft. Tile floors,
gorgeous fenced yard, all appliances.
2046 Marlin CT. $1375/mo. + dep.
(858)354-8221
4BR/3BA Foreclosure! - $11,500.
Only $217/mo. 5% down 15 years @
8% apr. Buy 3BR $199/mo. For listings
(800)366-9783 ext 5798. ANF
$200 OFF 1ST MO. - 3BR/2BA home
in Heron Isles, 96017 Tidal Bay Ct.
Lake view. CH&A. FREE CABLE.
$995/mo. (916)300-3039
NORTH HAMPTON - 3/2.5, 1950sf.
85001 Wainscott Ct. $1625/mo. Call
Don Brown Realty 225-5510 or
571-7177
ROBINHOOD - 1538sf, 3BR/2BA. 2-
car garage, fenced rear yard. $1200/
mo. Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770.
BEACH - 4/2, 1452sf. 3454 First
Avenue. $1425/mo. Call Don Brown
Realty 225-5510 or 571-7177


860 Homes-Unfurnished
3BR/2BA - like new home with huge
yard. 2 car garage, W/D and garden
tub. Page Hill subdivision in Yulee.
$1100/mo. (904)536-6379.

861 Vacation Rentals
VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.
SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - Furnised
house. 3BR/2BA, 2-car gar, gated
comm/pool, 5 min/beach. Rent by day,
wk, mth, yr. 261-6204, 206-0035


863 Office
OFFICE OR RETAIL SPACE - for rent,
14 North 4th St. 400sf with bathroom.
Just renovated. Behind Post Office.
$750/mo. (904)415-1053
TURNKEY CLASS A OFFICE SPACE-
in Gateway To Amelia complex
available for professional service firm
on an office sharing basis. If interested
contact Sue Armstrong at (904)277-
2788.
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
SADLER RD. - Office/retail space
avail. $900/mo. 8th & Gum - 1200sf
+ loft at $1200/mo. 1105 S. 8th -
1065sf $1000/mo. 6400sf $4500/mo.
Beech Street - Former Restaurant
Lease. $1700/mo. Buy $195K. Down-
town - 1900sf at $2000/mo. 1280-
3200sf - Tyler Plaza, Yulee. $14psf.
Amelia Coastal Realty 261-2770
3 ROOM SUITE - utilities furnished.
$625/mo. 2382 Sadler Rd. behind
Amelia Insurance. Call George,
(904)557-5644.
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.


864 Commercial/Retail
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.





901 Automobiles
'92 CADILLAC 60 SERIES - 4 door
fleetwood, 4.9L V8. Nice. 174,000
miles. $2500/OBO. (904)225-5418
FOR SALE - 2004 VW Passat. GLS TDI
sedan. Diesel. Pristine condition. Very
low mileage. Loaded. Must see!
$15,000. (904)277-6946.
BUY POLICE IMPOUNDS - '97 Honda
Civic $400. '97 Honda Accord $500. For
listings call (800)366-9813 ext 9271.
ANF
Acura Integra - '95 $500. Honda
Civic '97 $400. Toyota Camry '98 $850.
Ford Taurus '00 $900. Police Impounds.
For listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9275. ANF
1994 CHEVROLET STEPSIDE P/U -
350 V8, 154K mi., all power, runs
great, no oil leaks, clean interior, black.
Has A/C leak. $2900. 277-2075

903 Vans
SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034


+


I