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FRIIlAY, July 17,2009 NEWS News-Leader


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SLAN PERRY/NEWS-LEADIER
As a special gift, Chef William Castleberry bought the students in his culinary arts
class chef coats and hats embroidered with their names. From left with their new gear
are Alexa Doyle, Alexis Turner, Kate Lowmaster, Henry Hess, Chris Pallan, Danny
Ritchie, Gabriel Smith and Castleberry.


SCHOOL Continued from 1A
Burns. The Living Resource
Center, based in Jacksonville,
conducts "employability skills"
training at no cost.
From 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
the students do classroom and
hands-on work and also spend
time in real workplaces.
For Vanessa Montes, work-
ing towards her childcare cer-
tification is a dream come true.
"When I was five years old I had
a dream and this is my dream -
to be a teacher," she said. The
students will continue the pro-
gram and complete seven
exams in the upcoming school
year to earn their credentials.
"It's helping me with the dif-
ferent stages - how children
grow, what to feed them and
how to keep them safe and
avoid abuse and neglect," said
Allesia Floyd.
Led by instructor Katrina
Millan Flannery, the young
women and their five class-
mates eagerly jump up to sing
"Good Morning to You," a nurs-
ery song that has become their
anthem, a way to start their day.
The summer school may last
just three weeks, but for.many
of the students it has opened


for them and for us. ... Most of
the teachers will tell you, 'I just
love it. I love these kids so
much."'
That's the case for
Castleberry, who used his own
funds to buy chef's hats and
coats for his class, embroidered
with their names. The students
wore them when they prepared
and served dinner to 50 guests
in the last week of the program.
They also have a cookbook in
the works, to raise funds for
equipment for next summer's
class - the grant program will
be offered again next year -
based on recipes they devel-
oped while cooking each day
for their fellow students and
teachers.
"It's been an awesome pro-
gram," said Castleberry. "Ill tell
you, I teach college and these
kids are every bit as attentive as
my college kids - and they work
harder."
sperry@fbnewsleader.com


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up a world of possibilities they
never knew existed - or could
otherwise afford - and intro-
duced them to the many pro-
grams at the Lewis "Red" Bean
Technical Career Center, a facil-
ity Castleberry calls "the best
kept secret in Nassau County."
'"The kids get to see the
products of their labor, whether
it's cooking a meal or fixing a
car. They get an opportunity to
see what success is," said
Burns, and a taste of the real
work world. "This is your job
and if you did that, you'd be
fired - they learn that," said
Burns. The students also face
payroll deductions for infrac-
tions such as absenteeism or
poor behavior.
"It's about working together
and respect - rIot just the
authority, but respecting each
other. That's my biggest issue -
being tolerant of each other and
respecting each other," said
Burns. "It's a great opportunity


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FRIDAY, July 17. 2009 NEWS News-Leader


County board may


expand law on


conflict of interest


RYAN SMITH
News-Leader

The Nassau County Com-
mission plans to hold a public
hearing on crafting an ordi-
nance that would bar com-
missioners from attempting
to influence debate on sub-
jects in which they have a con-
flict of interest.
Commissioners already
are required to recuse them-
selves from voting on an issue
if they have a conflict of inter-
est. However, Commissioner
Mike Boyle has suggested
enacting an ordinance that
would bar commissioners
from participating in discus-
sion on those subjects during
meetings.
"It's not as though it hap-
pens every day, but I think it
sends a message to the
electorate that we're trying to
be fair and impartial," he said
at a commission meeting July
8.
Boyle said he talked to
Broward County commis-
sioners about the issue at
the recent Florida Association
of Counties meeting. In
Broward, he said, a commis-
sioner with a conflict of
interest must leave the.
Room while the subject is
debated.
Commissioner Stacy
Johnson said since recusal
was already a requirement,
she didn't see the need for a
new law.
"If we haven't had a prob-
lem with it in the past, why
make another ordinance?" she
said. "... If we'd.had a prob-
lem with people recusing
themselves and then trying
to influence debate - but I
don't think we've ever had a
problem with that."
Johnson also questioned
whether the ordinance would
apply only to commissioners,
or also to the various appoint-
ed boards under them. "I just
see this going way out of con-
trol," she said.
Johnson, who recused her-
self from debate earlier in the
year during a discussion about
land development in which
she had a concern, said the
public could help police gov-
ernment ethics.
"When I had to recuse


Myself once,
I didn't par-
ticipate. I
., * conducted
myself pro-
; fessionally,
" and I think if
I hadn't I
would have
Boyle heard about
it," she said.
Boyle
Agreed that
citizens could and would act as
ethics watchdogs - but felt the
public would keep a sharper
lookout if they knew an ordi-
nance was in force.
"As far as sanctions, I think
in the court of public opinion,
people would know, 'This
commissioner decided to go
against the ordinance,'" he
said.
Commissioner Danny
Leeper said the idea was
worth considering.
"If you have a voting con-
flict and you don't leave the
room - and it doesn't happen
here, but I guess it happens in
other places - even if you
don't talk, you try to stare
someone down or some-
thing," he said. "... I think
the idea has merit. I know it's
not a problem with this
board, but I think we could
set an example for future
boards."
"If one of us could actually
be stared down, I think the
public would want to know
about it," Johnson said.
"This five-member com-
mission will not always be
here, and I don't think it's any
secret that the previous com-
mission wasn't nearly as cohe-
sive and collegial as this one,"
Boyle said.
Commission Chairman
Barry Holloway agreed with
Johnson that an ordinance
was probably unnecessary. "I
think we should be civilized
enough, if that's the word,
that if we need to recuse our-
selves we leave the room," he
said.
However, neither Holloway
nor Johnson was against
bringing the idea before the
-publie. The commission decid-
,- d. tL , .t a .public hearing on.
the matter at a date t be
decided later.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Humans fight over animal control


RYAN SMITH
News-Leader

The ongoing debate over the
county's efforts to revitalize the
Animal Control Department
turned personal last week as
citizens questioned County
Coordinator Ed Sealover's abil-
ity to oversee the hiring of new
Animal Control staff. Sealover -
who was unable to attend that
meeting - fired back in a July 9
memo to the county commis-
sion, calling the allegation that
he isn't qualified "nonsense."
The issue was raised at the
commission's July 8 meeting,
when a group of citizens argued
against Sealover's suggestion
that the board consider con-
tracting out the shelter opera-
tions of the Animal Control
department. The contracted
organization would handle spay-
ing and neutering, adoptions
and the like, while the county
would retain responsibility for
the animal control aspect -
things like removing danger-
ous animals and picking up
untagged dogs or cats.
"This is a $1.2 million depart-
ment. Please note that our
neighbor, Waycross, Ga., went
private - and they failed," said
Mimi Vitale. "I've asked, 'How
do I help?' Instead I was asked
to stay away and leave the shel-
ter alone."
Vitale served as interim ani-
mal control director under
Sheriff Tommy Seagraves, who
handed the department back to
the county on June 1 after over-
seeing the operation for a year.
Seagraves removed Vitale from
her position in April, saying he
did not want to taint the process
of hiring anew director by leav-
ing an interim director in place
that had expressed interest in


Sealover Vitale


the permanent position.
However, he said his decision
was not meant to reflect nega-
tively on Vitale's job perform-
ance.
Other citizens demanded the
board create an "advisory com-
mittee" to make hiring recom-
mendations in the search for an
Animal Control director.
Currently, the hiring decision
rests with Sealover.
However, Mark Childs of
Amelia Island said Sealover was-
n't qualified to make that call.
"If you don't take a leader-
ship role in this, we're going to
be right back where we were
with the old-boy system," he
told the commission. "If you
leave this decision to Mr.
Sealover, we think you're going
to see some serious, ongoing
problems.... We don't trust Mr.
Sealover to do this on his own
without help from you folks."
"I'm not'sure any of us have
any more qualifications to pick
a shelter tech than he does,"
Commissioner Mike Boyle said.
'Tell me how we do this."
"What we'd do is form an
oversight committee with one of
you as the head of it," Childs
said. "... Why not use volun-
teers? They're here, they're in
the community, and they keep
getting pushed aside."
"The only concern I have is
... if an advisory board is


appointed, if the final selection
is not to their liking we're going
to hear back from them again,"
Boyle said. "What I don't want to
do is set a precedent of adviso-
ry boards hiring the depart-
ment heads in this county."
Sealover expressed similar
concerns in his July 9 memo to
the board.
"My major concern is that
the advisory/oversight com-
mittee in a short time would
morph into the 'management'
committee, with individual
members going into the shel-
ter and directing employees,"
he wrote.
In fact, it has been alleged
that is precisely what happened
during Seagrave's tenure, when
an oversight committee that
included Vitale and Childs
became involved in hirings, fir-
ings and the day-to-day opera-
tions of the shelter.
Sealover dismissed Childs'
contention that he was unqual-
ified to make the hiring deci-
sion for the Animal Control
director.
"In a word, that's nonsense,"
he wrote. "I've been in positions
of responsibility at the state,
county'and municipal levels for
32 years. Just about 23 of those
years have been in service to
county governments. As a chief
administrative officer of sorts,
I've done a considerable amount
of hiring and firing."
Sealover also listed his expe-
rience with animal control
departments in other counties.
He was in charge of creating or
upgrading six different animal
control programs prior to com-
ing to Nassau County, according
to the memo.
"I've also done amendments
to animal control ordinances,
as well as developing and rewrit-


ing policies and procedures for
operations," he wrote. "Lastly,
I've hired and fired several
directors and (animal control
officers)."
Sealover reiterated his con-
cerns at Monday's commission
meeting.
"(If a committee is formed),
you're going to have to have a
purpose, a clearly stated objec-
tive and an understanding of
whose committee it is," he said.
"I believe it's a committee of the
Board of County Commission-
ers. It's an advisory committee,
not a decision-making commit-
tee."
The commissioners assured
Sealover that if a committee was
formed, it would have no deci-
sion-making power.
"You put out that there are
some issues with an advisory
board, and I think they're legit-
imate issues," Boyle said.
"I think that every one of us
said it would be an advisory
board - just that, an advisory
board. So take comfort in that,
if we decide to go in that direc-
tion," said Commissioner
Danny Leeper.
In the meantime, Sealover
said he planned to keep the hir-
ing process going.
"I believe it's now time to
move forward with the direc-
tor's position," he said. "I have
five or six good candidates, and
I want to proceed with the inter-
views."
Sealover and the commis-
sioners also agreed to hold off
on a final decision on the sepa-
ration of functions at the depart-
ment until a director is hired
and can provide input
Sealover said he would begin
interviewing candidates within
two weeks.
rsmithCfbnewsleadercom


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Only at Sonny's...Sunday, July 19th to Saturday, July 25th



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Who says you have to wait until uecemoer
for the Christmas spirit" Just for the fun of
it, we'll have our decorations up and the
holiday music will be playing for a full week
so come join in the spirit and enjoy
Christmas in July!

Contribute To Toys For Tots
Bring us anew kids toy or book (not
wrapped, please) to give to Toys For Tots
and we'll give you a dollar off the regular
price of any meal


* * *
Turkey & Dressing...Only $7.99
Enjoy a special Smoked Turke/, meal evith
dressing, cranbcrr., sauce, sveet potato,
green bear s and cornbread anytime
all '.'.eek for a special low price

Kids' Holiday Coloring Contest
It .viouldn't be Christmas withoutt our 'Color
The Tree" contest all week Santa will help
elect prize winnerss romn kids in three age
groups Enter as manyr times as ,ou likely
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Friday Night, July 24th,

All-You-Can-Eat in9

Bar-B-Q Buffet IA
Just like we serve on Christmas Eve, from
4PM 'til 10PM, a special buffet of Bar-B-Q Chicken,
Ribs, Beef and Pork, with Bar-B-Q Beans, Salad Bar,
Cornbread, Soft Drinks and Iced Tea. It's all the
barbecue you can eat for only $12,95 (kids under 10
years old eat for $6.95). Plus a special group of our
celebrity friends will be'working hard for your tips,
which they will be donating to Toys For Tots!


Saturday, July 25th,

All Kids Are Invited

To Come Meet Santa
Even though he's on vacation, Santa will be
greeting all kids at Sonnys from 10AM 'til 2PM.
Come by, have your picture taken with Santa AND
make sure to give him you holiday wish list!


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Hayley Cheek, MAelody 5hel!e, ijclyri Cannatraro, Heather Crane,
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FRIDAY. July 17.2009 NEWS News Leader


LEAD ER\


F' ORI .\'.S l DI' S I' \ E'F1KI N :\\A SI'AI'1 R
I s \i \ IisrI ) IN 1 1 S54

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
For R. MALOY JR.. PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL. EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIME. CIRCULATION DIRECTOR


TOM WOOD
I CHAIRMAN


DINK NESM'ITI-
PRESIDENT


CNI Community
INewspapers,
Incorporated
The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
the newspaper, its owners or employees



COMMUNITY THANKS

Fighting stigma
The National Alliance on Mental Illness
(NAMI) of Nassau County would like to
express its deepest appreciation to everyone
who helped us recognize May as Mental
Health Awareness month by participating in
our first-ever "Make Stigma Walk the Plank"
Walk-a-Thon.
We are deeply indebted to our partner, the
Fernandina Pirates Club, which gave life to
our theme and provided us with outstanding
support.
The following donors and sponsors were
also instrumental in helping us create a suc-
cessful event: Amelia Island Graphics,
Anchors Aweigh Charters Inc., Karen
Antworth, Books Plus, Cafe Karibo, Christmas
Shop on the River, Curves, Andera Dickens,
First National Bank of Nassau County, Five
Star Auto Care, Dr. Robert Friedman, Harris
Teeter, Susan Henderson, Barbara Kelmers,
Ms. Carolyn's Breakfast and Desserts, Nassau
Health Foods, The New U Salon, Tom and
Anita Oliver, P5 Productions, Putt-Putt Golf,
Quality Life Center, Sherry and Ken
Quattlebaum, River Point Behavioral Health,
Dorothy Robb, Seaside Amelia Inn, Sutton
Place Behavioral Health, Tiger Palms, Trish
Titon of Sliht Off Centre, the Ann Dickens
rcle and the United Methodist Women from
tile Memorial United Metbhdipt Church, Ye,
Ole Pirate and the YMCA
We would also like to take this opportuni-
ty to thank the Fernandina Farmers Market
for allowing us to be part of their "Booths
with a Cause" program and the Rayonier
Foundation for a very generous grant, which
will support our Consumer Emergency
Services program.
Nassau NAMI is a non-profit support, edu-
cation and advocacy organization. The funds
we receive allow us to provide a variety of
services such as sponsoring support groups
for consumers and families dealing with men-
tal illness as well as other consumer support
programs, distribution of resource materials
on mental illness and a telephone help/refer-
ral line. During the holidays, we donate shoes,
toiletries and underclothing to the residents
of a local assisted living facility and give gifts
to the clients of a local crisis respite center and
a local day treatment program. Anyone wish-
ing to help us in our efforts to create a com-
munity that fosters hope, help and recovery
for all those affected by mental illness can
send a donation to NAMI, Nassau County,
P.O. Box 15816, Fernandina Beach FL 32035.
Bonnie Dickens
Walk-a-Thon Chairman
Fernandina Beach

Testing Day
The director and officers of the Coalition
for the Reduction/Elimination of Ethnic
Disparities in Health (CREED) sends a sincere
thanks to everyone for all their hard work
June 27 during the National HIVTesting Day
Event held at the Martin Luther King Center.
I am so proud to be a part of a community that
feels that volunteerism and the health of oth-
ers is important. Just witnessing the hard
work and dedication everyone gave during the
event was extremely gratifying.
Screenings provided during this event:
Baptist Medical Center, 44 cholesterol and
glucose tests; Sickle cell foundation, 10 sick-
le tests; Nassau County Health Department,
9 HIV tests; Wal-Mart Vision Center, 22 vision
screenings.
Special thanks to Taylor Rental, Winn
Dixie, city of Fernandina and local churches
for their support during this event.
We hope to see all of you at this event next
year, during our monthly health seminars at
the Peck Center and on Dec. 1 at the World
AIDS Day Program at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church.
Jennett Wilson-Baker, RN, BSN
Executive Director, CREED


'-I


Dying minutes of Independence Day


buried my Uncle Paul in the sandy .much shorter Korean War. tell my little sisters and cousins that the squig-
loam of High Bluff Cemetery up in One by one, old Korean War gly scraps of rubber he layered into his drive-
Brantley County, Ga. At age 80, he'd vets like Uncle Paul are slip- way to prevent erosion were snakes and that
been ill for a long time. And though his pass- ping away, their stories large- they came alive at night. One of my aunt's cats
ing saddens my family, especially my Aunt ly unfold. They're a dying once got beneath the hood of Uncle Paul's
Pauline and cousins Paula and Pam, we're '' breed. Literally. truck while he was getting ready for work.
relieved that this particular old soldier's long Uncle Paul was in a U.S. When someone asked him what happened to
battle is finally over. Now he's on R&R some . Army unit that serviced the the cat, he quipped, "I suspect he's dead." He
place where the bass always bite and the deer big artillery guns. Big was kidding, of course, but he let the suspense
are fat and easy to take. CUP r artillery guns make big tar- play out awhile.
It is perhaps fitting that Uncle Paul slipped JOE gets. Uncle Paul and several Once on a fishing trip he and I took when I
away in the dying minutes of Independence ... other members of his unit was in high school, he let me drink a beer and
Day. Uncle Paul was a wounded and decorated were servicing one of them smoke a cigarette and then squinted at me and
Korean War veteran. Not that you'd ever know Joe Palmer one day when a North asked slyly, "You ain't gonna run home and tell
it from talking with him. He'd keep you laugh- Korean mortar scored a lucky hit. As bad luck your daddy on me, are you?" - knowing darn
ing with his rapid-fire jokes and his sometimes- would have it, the round landed right in the well that we were equal partners in crime and
strange sense of humor, but he didn't talk middle of the trench they dug to shield them as that my lips were sealed.
about what happened on that frigid peninsula they worked on the gun. There was always a fishing hole out there
so many years ago. Even my cousin Barry, who The blast killed Uncle Paul's buddies and somewhere that he'd discovered where trophy-
flew several hundred combat missions in blew him out of the trench. He came to his sized bass were just waiting to hook them-
Vietnam and who was wounded in battle, didn't senses some time later, staggering around , selves. But what can you expect from a man
know much about Uncle Paul and his part in nearby, his nose bloodied from the concussion with a trophy-sized sense of humor and love of
the Forgotten War. he received and a face full of shrapnel. Over life?
But that's not surprising. The old ones don't the ensuing years, he had to visit the doctor His casket was draped with the American
talk much about their ordeals in those long-ago from time to time to get a piece of metal dug flag. It's been years since I wore a uniform, but
places like Okinawa, Normandy and Pusan. out of his face. I felt it appropriate to stand at attention and
They did their stint and came home and went One piece, lodged near his optic nerve, was salute when they folded the flag and presented
on with their lives and reared sons and daugh- deemed too risky to touch and so it remained it to my aunt.
ters who went off to fight another war in there. There's an old soldier's song that goes in
Vietnam. We talk about our war. There's a cot- Years ago, he began to lose his hearing and part like this: "Sergeants they love to drill.
tage industry of Vietnam movies out there. But the Veterans Administration provided him with Guess the bastards always will. So we drill and
the bloody three-year conflict in Korea receives hearing aids. But he wasn't the complaining drill till we fade away."
little popular attention. The Vietnam War raged sort. No sir. At ease, Uncle Paul. At ease.
for nearly 10 years, but over half as many The Uncle Paul who won't fade away is my treysurf@comcast.net



VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Journalism ethics
We must applaud the News-
Leader for relentless pursuit of the
truth. As we all know by now,
Florida has some of the most strict
Sunshine laws in the nation. And
Sas the city clerk experiences every
day, municipalities are required to
respond quickly to public informa-
tion requests, especially those from
the media. So you would think that,
following the spirit of full and fair
disclosure and the right of the pub-
lic to know,that the News-Leader
would be equally open and honest
with its readers. Sadly, you would be
wrong.
Politics of personalities is alive
and well in the News-Leader offices.
How's that, you say? Well, just look
at the stories they are covering and
the people involved. Over the past
few weeks, we have had a story crit-
ical of the city attorney's failure to
stop a meeting that might have been
a Sunshine Law violation. Lots of
attention was given to naming cer-
tain commissioners who partici-
pated; no space was given to allow
comments Ij,:om ij c i3 attorney.
.JThen there was the article about
the firm Search Amelia's broad-
casting on the city's public access
channel'and its connection with
Commissioner Eric Childers. Not
to mention all the articles that
appear regularly pointing out all the
problems the News-Leader has with
the city manager.
I wonder. Are these problems of
the News-Leader or a recently
"retired" city commissioner who
found himself on the losing end of
4-1 votes, and who unsuccessfully
tried to fire both the city manager
and the city attorney? And is it a
coincidence that early on in his
tenure Commissioner Childers pub-
licly accused this same commis-
sioner of being the worst thing that
ever happened to the city commis-
sion? And of course, this very same
commissioner is a regular columnist
for the News-Leader. Some coinci-
dence!
If the News-Leader had made
even a small attempt to inject some
balance into the piece on Search
Amelia it would have reported that
when the city manager proposed a
public-access policy to the com-
mission last year, their now ace
columnist was vociferously opposed
to it, stating that there was no need
for such a policy. The city manager
warned at the time that the air
waves were open to anyone with
any agenda. Certainly didn't bother
the News-Leaders pal, who maybe
declined to run for another term
because he himself had memory
problems.
Shame on the News-Leader if it is
allowing itself to be led by the mean-
spirited agenda of a former com-
missioner who could not get his
way when he had some power.
There used to be something called
ethics in journalism. I guess that
now that Bob Spiegal has passed
from the scene here on Amelia
Island, the last of the ethical jour-
nalism went with him.
Jim Jenkins
Fernandina Beach

Vicious dogs
I am writing because I am
appalled at the careless and lenient
nature of the animal leash laws and
the lack of action taken when ani-
mals attack. My dog was brutally
attacked twice by the same vicious
pit bull and the only punishment
that was given was a $100 fine to the
dogs' owner. A mere slap on the
wrist. In my opinion, not enough of
a penalty to prevent this incident
from happening again.
My dog, Veal Chop, is large but
kind-hearted and, more important-
ly, over 10 years old and has had a
stroke and a broken leg. He doesn't
exactly have an aggressive "attack"
mentality. He certainly is no match


SCopyrighted Material

I Syndicated Content Jr

Available from Commercial News Providers
br. ," '1



H A


heftier fine than a measly $100.
Apparently, it is nearly impossible to
permanently remove a dog from an
unfit owner. A dog can attack mul-
tiple times and be returned to its
owner time and time again. This
process seems unsafe and nonsen-
sical.
These laws need to change soon,
especially with this new craze that
is happening that it is cool to own a
pit bull. I think that if you get a pit
bull you should be required by law
to take a class on how to properly
care for the dog. What if my chil-
dren had been injured? I should be
able to walk down the sidewalk with
my kids in their stroller and dog on
a leash without having to carry a
gun for fear that one of us will be
attacked. There need to be stiffer
penalties for owners with this type,
of negligent behavior.
Jessica Bruland
Yulee

County Building
Department
Well, I know our county com-
missioners have been receiving
their share of criticism lately for a
number of recent decisions; far be
it from me to add to their growing
list of detractors, but there is an
issue going on that I feel ethically
cannot be ignored.
A year ago the commissioners,
in their usual whimsical style, and
with the stated motive being to stim-
ulate the local economy, decided to
do away with impact fees for new
buildings and cut all permitting fees
in half. Theoretically, this would
lead to increased building and
greater jobs. The plan did not
work, but the success of their plan
is not in question here. The problem
lies in what has happened after-
ward.
Now, at the time the no-impact
fee measure was enacted, presum-
ably, every voting member under-
stood that doing this would mean
that the Building Department would
not be generating its own revenue
(which it had always done before)
and would instead be drawing on its
several millions of reserve funds.
At the end of the year, they were
scheduled to review the issue and
decide if the no-fee policy was work-
ing or not.
So, here we are, with June being
the end of the proposed year, and
somebody seems to have noticed
that - gasp - the Building
Department isn't making any
money and is working in the red. So
the county sprang into action with
another capricious move. In order to
save money and continue to sup-
port a non-functional building incen-
tive, the county has decided to cut
the Building Department staff in


half.. I
OK, it's a recession; this hap-
pens. But the crux of the issue is
this: while the commissioners sit
secure in their financial future, over
30 people in the Building
Department - people with families
- have been waiting for a month to
know who is getting the proverbial
ax. They, like the rest of the News-
Leader readership, saw the
announcement that the department
would be cut in half- and that is all
they have been told. They have
been told that their jobs and their
families are in jeopardy so the coun-
ty can continue a failing program.
It is one thing to make a difficult
and destructive decision, but it is
another to leave people to wonder
what is happening while the coun-
ty decision-makers continue on like
their policies aren't affecting lives
and families.
To the county commissioners, I
say show some compassion. Let
these employees know what their
future holds. Tell them who is being
terminated. As for me, I - and 'm
sure many other voters - are watch-
ing you right now. You have a lot of
decisions to make in these
tumultuous times, and I pray that,
you make them not only to please
your wealthy constituents. In a
recession, you might just find that
the poorer majority will sway the
vote.
Uisa M. Kugler
Fernandina Beach

Government health care
In response to the (July 10)letter
about health care being such a no-
brainer, I submit that (the writer)
along with others that feel as he
does are not very well educated on
just what this all entails.
First I have yet, in my 62 years,
seen the government handle any
social program with efficiency or
fiscal restraint. I do not want them
in my health decisions.
I am a disabled vet and it takes
me anywhere from 6-9 months to
have a medical problem dealt with.
This is what the government will
do for us.
Second, our neighbor to the
north has national health care and
if it were not for the American
health system many of them would
die due to the wait forced on them
by their socialist system. They cross
the border for medical treatment
that they can't get in their country.
I ask that you not take my word
for this but to do a wee bit of look-
ing via search engines and verify it
yourself.
Government health care is far
from what out politicians, read roy-
alty, are telling us.
Ray Wager
Yulee


for the young, enormous and
vicious pit bull that violently
attacked him while I was pushing
my two small children in a stroller
and holding Veal Chop on a leash.
The pit bull had no collar or leash
on. I have multiple witnesses that
say that the owner put the leash on
the dog after the attack.
.We walk every day, and every
day I have carried Mace with me
because of my fear of this particular
dog and its negligent owner's behav-
ior. When I saw the dog coming, I
pulled out my Mace and emptied
the container in its eyes. The dog
didn't even blink - it went straight
for Veal Chop's face. I let go of the
stroller and began trying to separate
the two dogs. It is a scary thing to
have to get your dog out of the
mouth of a ferocious pit bull while
your small children are screaming
and watching their pet get attacked
(for the second time).
Luckily, I have wonderful neigh-
bors that saw it happen and came
running to help break up the fight
and calm my kids (and myself). I
don't know where Veal Chop would
be if they hadn't been around. After
the first attack, I made the mistake
of not calling the police or animal
control because the owner was so
apologetic and I believed her
when she said that it would not hap-
pen again. She also did not
hesitate to pay his medical bills
when I presented them to her. I was
also under the impression that it
didn't take much in our county to
have a dog euthanized. I was com-
pletely wrong. I should not have
been so naive.
I don't want to be misunder-
stood; I love animals and believe
that all animals have the potential to
be well-mannered, great pets if
brought up in a loving environment
with the correct owners. Not all
people are a good match for pit
bulls. They are potentially danger-
ous weapons and if under the wrong
ownership can get out of control
and injure or even kill. They can be
loving and wonderful pets, but your
have to take special care and pre-
caution, like always having a leash
and a collar on - especially in Heron
Isles, where the houses are so close
together and there are so many chil-
dren. They need the proper disci-
pline and attention so that these
attacks don't happen.
Both the police officer and the
animal control officer were polite
and professional, however they
work within the confines of the law.
I think these laws need to change.
I realize that I didn't report the first
attack, and that is my mistake.
However, when an owner shows
multiple acts of negligence I think
the pet should be placed in a better
environment with someone who is
more responsible or charged with a


HOW TO WRITE US
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Letters must include writer's name
(printed and signature), address and
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Writers are normally limited to one let-
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ed. Not all letters are published. Send
letters to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box
766, Fernandina Beach, FL., 32035
E-mail: mparnell@fbnewsleader. com.












COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009 / NEWS-LEADER


WEDDING ENGAGEMENTS

GallagherMarvel
Tim and Sherry Gallagher
of Amelia Island are happy to
announce the engagement of
their daughter. Bonnie Marie
Gallagher, to Johnathon Rex
Marvel, son of Mark Marvel
of Yulee and Charlotte
Castillo of Wichita, Kan.
The bride-to-be graduated
from Fernandina Beach High
School and is a 2008 graduate
of Florida State University,
where she earned a bachelor " ' "
of science degree in market-
ing and communications. She
is also an alumna of Delta
Delta Delta women's fraterni-
ty. Mr. Marvel, Miss Gallagher
The groom-elect graduat-
ed from FBHS and is a 2009
graduate of Florida State
University, where he earned a
bachelor of science degree in .
political science and religion,
accompanied by a certificate
in human rights.
Bonnie and John are mov-
ing to Ohio, where she will
pursue her career in market-
ing and John will be attending ',: /
the University of Cincinnati ..:
Law School. i
The couple met at Florida
State University, where both
were members of the FSU
crew team. The pair share a Mr. Lamar, Miss Wilcox
passion for the outdoors and
were engaged on a December
kayaking trip. Michael Lamar of Callahan
The wedding and recep- will be married Oct. 3, 2009,
tion will take place at the at the home of the bride with
Ribault Club on Fort George the Rev. Bruce Lamar officiat-
Island, across from the sandy ing. The.reception will be
beach where they were en- held at Amelia Island
gaged. The date of the occa- Plantation.
sion is set for May 22, 2010. The bride-elect is the
daughter of Dale and Anita
Wilcox of Fernandina Beach.
Wilcox-Lamar The groom-elect is the son of
Whitney Leigh Wilcox of Bruce and Jean Lamar of
Fernandina Beach and Jared Callahan.


SUMMER CAMPS


* The McArthur Family
YMCA will hold its Eco-
Adventure Summer Day
Camp through Aug. 21.
Episcopal Children's Services
accepted. Fee is $105 mem-
bers/$110 non-members and
a $50 registration fee (waived
for members). Daily rate is
$40. Camp locations are
Atlantic Elementary, Callahan
Elementary and the Yulee
Kids' Campus. Call 261-1080.
* Boys and Girls Clubs of
Nassau County Summer
Camps run until Aug. 21.
Participants will experience
fun and learning in a struc-
tured environment. Hours are
8 a.m.-6 p.m. Weekly fee is
$50. Various free and reduced
enrollment plans are avail-
able, as are payment plans.
For information at the Miller
Club (942259 Old Nassauville
Road), call Carla Wilson at
261-1075; for information at
the Fernandina Beach Club
(11th and Indigo), call Reggie
Williams at 491-9102.
* Kayak Amelia is offering
one-day Kid's Kayak Day
Camps July 21 and 28 for chil-
dren ages 9-14. Campers will
learn the basics of kayaking
(paddle strokes, rescues),
water safety, survival skills
and navigation. The instruc-
tor is an American Canoe
Association Level 3 kayak
instructor, certified in
Wilderness First Aid and
CPR Classes are limited to
seven paddlers. Cost is $75
per person. Call (904) 251-
0016 for reservations.
* The Yulee High School
Hornet Marching Band will
hold summer band camps in
the school band hall on the
following dates: Color Guard


and Percussion Mini-Camp,
July 27-31, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; all
band instrumentalists, per-
cussion and color guard, Aug.
10-14, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
* The Amelia Island
Parent Co-Op Preschool is
enrolling now for fall 2009
preschool classes for ages 2
and 3. The Co-Op also offers
summer camps in two-week
sessions for ages 3-5. Call
261-1161 or visit www.aipcp.
org. The Co-Op is located at
5040 First Coast Hwy., next to
The Dome Healing Center.
* The Cummer Museum
of Art & Gardens, 829 River-
side Ave., Jacksonville, is
hosting a Middle School Art
Camp for children entering
sixth through eighth grades,
where children are immersed
in art for a week of learning
and can establish a strong,
portfolio. Camp is 9 am. to
3:30 p.m. July 27-31. Cost is
$200 per child (members)
and $225 (non-members).
Call (904) 355-0630.
* The Epilepsy Founda-
tion of Florida is offering full
scholarships to Camp Boggy
Creek Aug. 6-11, which pro-
vides children with epilepsy,
ages 7-16, an opportunity to
escape the stress of dealing
with their medical conditions.
Campers participate in a vari-
ety of activities and on-staff
medical teams and volunteers
ensure the environment is
physically safe and medically
sound. Located in Eustis, the
permanent facility is on 232
acres of tall pines, majestic
oaks and nature trails.
Call the Jacksonville
EFOF office at (904) 731-3752
or visit www.BoggyCreek.org
or www.epilepsyfla.org.


W Welcome to


Qod's House

SA Classic Carpets
e& Interiors, Inc.
CHEVROLET * BUICK - BUDDY KELLUM
PONTIAC * GMC Abby Carpet" PresidentL
464054 SR 200, Yulee 802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
(904) 261-6821 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291 /


FAMILY DENTISTRY a
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN adcock
Most Insurances Accepted H o M F I
Call For Appointment
261-6826
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
AlA at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL
FREEIIAN
WELL DRILLERS, INC. -/i._ c-
261-5216 Advertise our business &
Rock & Aesian Wellrch
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606 S. 6th Street I ca'/71 Nei.sleaaer - 261-3696
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034


Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community


Callahan hosts senior adult lunch


Willie Brunette, education and out-
reach minister at Amelia Baptist
Church, writes: "Risk Management, a
strange subject, but this was the title of
my first class at New Orleans. From the
beginning, the professor said this would
'be a very scary course; and it was. The
entire class focused on the vulnerability
of churches for litigation.
"Churches are no longer thought to
be'off limits' to lawsuits. Churches are
seen as 'easy' targets because we are
friendly and assume the best in people.
We reviewed several books and multiple
Internet sites of the subject of church
risk management. Most of them had a
single theme: Churches are doing a
poor job of protecting themselves, peo-
ple and its property from risk.
"The largest assumption of most
churches is 'it won't happen. here' and
the second was 'we have insurance to
cover that.' At the end of the class, the
conclusion was that it can happen here
and insurance is not prevention. .
"My assignment from the class was
to develop a risk management strategy
of Amelia. At this same time, the
trustees and I were reviewing our
church insurance liability and property
coverage. With some help from an
Internet site and a checklist of insurance
coverage available, we were able to
negotiate more coverage for less cost.
We came in almost $5,000 under budget
with more coverage.
"Our children's policies and the use
of background checks place us ahead of
the power curve in that ministry. For the
most part, we are in good shape, but
some of our policies need to be written
down. I will continue to create a risk
strategy for the church and, if you have
any interest in being on the team, please
give me a call."
Thanks to First Baptist Church,
Callahan, for hosting our senior adult
associational luncheon May 21. Dr.
Lynn Hyatt brought an inspirational
message. The meal was delicious and a
big "thank you" to those who prepared
it. There were approximately 142 in
attendance. Our attendance was down
due to the bad weather we were having.
Looking forward to seeing all you
"Senior Saints" at Springhill Baptist
Church Aug. 20. In his service, Bro.
Jimmy Flanagan.
From the Shepherd's Staff: "Watch
the impossible take place. God has truly
blessed us over the past few weeks.
What an awesome time we had with
Tony Nolan as God used him in our
'Mission Possible.' It was great to see
over 20 come to the Lord and 27 more
through the prison ministry. God contin-'
ues to challenge me as your pastor to
lead us to new ministries to reach more
for Christ I know that the same God
that brought the great results during
'Mission Possible' is the same God that
wants to do even more through all of
our ministries.
"With that said, I am excited to
announce a new ministry at First Baptist
Church. I believe the church should
look for all means we have to reach
someone. This is not always through the
spoken word in a Sunday morning serv-
ice. There are many ways to tough a
heart One is by meeting a need some-
one might have and, in the process,
sharing with them the love of Jesus.
"As humans, we need to grow and
strengthen spiritually and physically.
Because of this, we are announcing the
beginning of our Health'and Fitness
ministry. Kim Gose, a certified personal
trainer, will be leading three different
types of exercise class.


"For times and
types, please not the
article in the newslet-
ter. All classes will be
in the Family Life
S Center. They are free
of charge - some will
I require certain items
S for you to bring - and
they are open to any-
HILDAS one.
HEAR- "Make sure to tell
ABOUTS your friends and come
be a part of this great
Sway to introduce an
Hilda unchurched friend to
Higginbotham the wonderful family of
God here at First


Baptist. More new ministries in the
works. We need people to participate
and to lead. Pray about what your role
will be."
Student ministry by the Rev. Charlie
McDonough of First Baptist Church,
Fernandina Beach: "Let me start by say-
ing welcome to the incoming fifth
graders. I think I speak for everyone in
the student ministry when I say that we
are excited about this new crop of stu-
dents coming up. I can't wait to see what
God is going to do in them and through
them this year."
Ride through the Australian outback.
The train ride will show us an Aussie
view of God's love for us, filled with awe-
some Bible stories, games, crafts and
don't forget the snacks on the barbie.
Kidz Camp 2009 is Aug. 3-6. Registration
packs are available now. Curtis Crider is
minister of children, Angie McClellan is
interim minister of music, ministry
assistants are Michelle Springer and
Wendy Kidd, Yulee Baptist Church.
Hi, Mike, Rhonda, Caroline, Stephen
and Daniel Reed up in Folly Beach, S.C.
We really miss this lovely family and, on
Mike's first Saturday, June 7, preaching
there, they had a nice number attend-
ing. We heard that from a phone call.
They were remembered in prayer at
First Baptist here at the time he was
having church service up there.
Mike, I have a cousin who lives in
Beaufort, S.C., which I hear isn't far
from Folly. Her name is Geraldine
(Gerry) Brewton. She goes to a large
church there near her. I write her and
she calls me after that for a lorig cell
phone chat. I'm going to ask her some
questions. Please try to meet her.
Wally Armstrong comes to First
Baptist Aug. 1. Armstrong will be.our
guest speaker as well as offer a clinic
before our tournament He has played
professionally and taught golf since 1968
after gridatiting from the University of;"
Florida with a bachelor's and master's
degree in education. Armstrong was a
member of the Gator golf team and
earned All-American recognition in
1966.
A PGA member since 1974,
Armstrong has competed in more than
300 PGA tournaments. In his first
Masters, he finished fifth, setting a rook-
ie record score of eight under par.
During his career, he competed in
numerous majors, including the British-
Open, Masters, U.S. Open, PGA
Championship and The Players
Championship and was a solid front-run-
ner on the PGA Tour, finishing second
four times and one year finishing seven
times in the top 10.
In the last 20 years, Armstrong has
concentrated on golf instruction, pro-
ducing 22 golf instructional videotapes,
selling more than 500,000 copies. His
best-selling Golffor Kids ofAll Ages was
the first tape for kids and dads. In 1995,


I


HELPERS


* Sponsored by the Amer-
ican Cancer Society and sup-
ported by product donations
from various cosmetic com-
panies, Look Good, Feel
Better is a program designed
for female cancer patients
going through chemotherapy
and/or radiation therapy.
Group sessions help patients
restore their appearance and
self-image through a


makeover and style tips from
professionally trained beauti-
cians. Call the American
Cancer Society at 1-800-227-
9954 to register.
* Medals4Mettle.org, a
non-profit, is collecting
earned half-marathon,
marathon, triathlon and
Ironman medals to donate to
local people battling illness-
es. If you have a medal to


S The principal danger of arguing with fools is that we are more
^ < likely to sink to their leial than to raise the up to ours. Likewise
Il can be extneret' difficult t o deal with those who hate us without
ending up in a seething cauldron ot hatred ourselves. Can you be
honest with those who lie to you? Can you trust those who don't
trust you? Rudyard Kipllng's edifying poem "I' inspires us to
balleve that, "if you can keep your head when all about you ore
losing thalrs and blaming It on you; If you can trust yourself when
all men doubt you... Or, being lied about, don't deal In lies, or
being hailed. don't give way to haling... Your Is th Earth and
everything that's In it.' Surely this may be a bit of an
overstlatment, but the man or woman who can resist hating those
who hate thom and losing thelr head when others are doing just
that has surely gained a monsur of self-masltry worth emulating.
So, the next time fool or a scoundrel tries to pull you down to
their level, consider It best to hold your tongun and safeguard your
heart. When asked where we come front, most of us think of our
preonas or n ographic local rlhor Ithn the ullimato source of
our being, which las Spirit. Wu come (n ll Obd, and Iho only mr0on
Answer not a fool ,tht most of n onm't ,conlran zhia Ithl our, bodo doludo us
according to his folly, into thinkng that we are a o purto fromn everything also.
lest you be like him Ulirmahly. we are oll coinnloed itrogih0fi is oninocioneil wh t h
Sono Splri, bill oi00 our Indlvliunl gon Trlny nor otllw us to see
yourself. thi. Our bodies convince uu int eil nrou nlque, soporot beings.
R.S. V. Proverbs 26: 4 As physical brings, we are Indeed unique and soparto Ioln ill
nlse, but aos plrltull bolngs, w oare port of a giotlor wlholo An
physlcal beings, we undergo consltln chlantie and will ownlidally
die, but os spirilual balngs, we am
oomrnal W should remember then. that
we are connected to God, and ore indood
part of God, an omanaioon from
holy source.
a--


donate to a courageous child
or adult, place it in the collec-
tion box at T&A Sports, Red
Otter Outfitters or any 1st
Place Sports store. For infor-
mation, contact Rose Bennett
at 491-3758.
* Micah's Place is a
501(c) (3) non-profit and the
only certified domestic vio-
lence center serving Nassau
County. It provides emer-
gency shelter, outreach, pre-
vention programs and com-
munity education. Visit
www.micahsplace.org.
If you or someone you
know is being abused, call
the 24-hour crisis hotline at 1-
800-500-1119, and emergency
shelter at 225-9979. For infor-
mation or to make donations,
call 491-6364, ext. 102, or e-
mail development@micah-
splace.org. Support groups
for victims and survivors of
domestic violence meet
weekly. For location informa-
tion, please call Micah's
Place at 548-5656. For out-
reach call 548-4646.
Volunteers call 491-6364, ext.
106.
* East Nassau County
Military AP-3 Honor Guard
provides military honors on
the death of a serviceman.
Eligible recipients include
military members on active,
duty or in the Selected
Reserve, former military
members who served on
active duty and department
under conditions other than
dishonorable, former military
members who completed at
least one term of enlistment
or period of initial obligated
service in the Selected
Reserve and departed under


conditions other than dishon-
orable, former military mem-
bers discharged from the
Selected Reserve due to a
disability incurred or aggra-
vated in the line of duty, and
members of the Commission-
ed Officer Corps of the
Public Health Service and
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration,
as members of a uniformed
service. To prove eligibility
documentation, such as the
DD Form 214 discharge cer-
tificate, is required.
For information contact
Commander/Coordinator
Ted Davis at 225-9212.
* A project to fabricate
metal parts used in the manu-
facture of three-wheeled,
hand-cranked carts is ongo-
ing at a workshop sponsored
by Memorial United
Methodist Church. The vehi-
cles, called Personal Energy
Transportation or PETs, are
assembled at Penney Farms
and shipped throughout the
world to victims of polio, land
mines and other injuries.
Opportunities exist for those
interested in cutting, grind-
ing, drilling and welding
metal parts, delivering parts
and procuring materials. Call
Jack at 261-5691 or James at
261-5863.
* The Nassau Alcohol,
Crime and Drug Abatement
Coalition (NACDAC) is a
non-profit coalition created to
support and encourage drug-
free lifestyles for the youth of
Nassau County. It meets the
third Tuesday of every
month at 4 p.m. at the County
Building at 86026 Pages
Dairy Road in Yulee.


_ L~


I -j


I


a


Armstrong and his then 10-year-old son,
Blake, produced, the first golf instruc-
tional kids video taught by a kid, Power
Drives for Kids.
Armstrong is recognized by his
peers as one of the most creative teach-
ers of the game. He is best noted for
teaching the game with the use of fami-
lies objects, such as brooms, mops,
'hula-hoops, hangers, etc.
But, Armstrong's true passion is
sharing his faith with others and he
does this through the game of golf.
Armstrong helps players use golf as a
tool for sharing his faith with others.
And he does this through the game of
golf. Armstrong helps players use golf
as a tool for sharing Christ both on and
off the golf course.
This is an event you do not want to
miss. Mark your calendars now for Aug.
1. Bring a friend who does not know
Jesus. It could be the best day of their
life.
Grace Groups of Springhill Baptist
Church. Grace: A disposition to kind-
ness and compassion, the attitude of
God toward men. Ministry: A person or
thing through which something is
accomplished. We desire to grow into
ladies who minister grace.
Betty Shook says, "I have been part
of a Grace Group since 2002. It has
helped me in retaining the sermon mes-
sages presented by Bro. Jackie Hayes.
When we go over the message, it is a
deeper learning experience and it helps
me feel closer to God. We pray for each
other's needs, our church needs and our
nation."
"Our praises are lifted to God as we
thank Him for His countless blessings.
This group has become a very special
group of friends.
"In February, Betty challenged us to
make about 40 Easter bonnets out of
paper plates and artificial flowers for the
ladies at Savannah Grande. Betty Ann
accompanied us on the piano and we
sang Easter songs. We tied the bonnets
on their heads. We didn't leave out the
men. They were the proud recipients of
bow ties. Ours, however, was the
greater blessing. Nothing can compare
to seeing the joy on others' faces when
they are shown a little kindness and
compassion. Our ladies got such a bless-
ing out of this that we went back before
Mother's Day with tissue paper flower
arrangements.
"Another ministry that has given us
pleasure is our sponsoring of an 11-year-
old boy from Ethiopia. One of our ladies
introduced us to a ministry group called
'Compassion,' a child advocacy ministry
:,tBat releases children fromspiritual., i
economic, social and physical poverty
and enables them to become responsi-
ble, fulfilled Christian adults.
"Matthew 18:15 states, 'And whoever
welcomes a little child like this in My
name welcomes Me.' We are helping to
provide ongoing Christian training and
educational opportunities for him that
couldn't be possible otherwise. Letters
from him (translated, of course) detail-
ing his daily life, his hopes and his
dreams are an encouragement to us and
we pray that God will enable him to
become a Godly Christian man, whose
life will be a blessing to others. Please
pay with us for Henok."
May we all grow in God's Grace, the
"Grace Gals" (Patty Peacock).
Grace Group leaders: Dave
Blanchette, Mike Darby, Josh Dunton,
Ben Guest, Dick Hopper, Louie
Johnson, Chris McKinney, Jake
Mottayaw, Patty Peacock, Wayne Peters,
Bill Sullenger, Lamar Underwood.









FRIDAY. July 17. 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Friends, faith and


"Al, excuse me. Aren't you the
guy who writes articles for the news-
paper?"
"Yes I am," I replied, surprised by
his sudden appearance. "My name is
Rob," I said as I rolled the car win-
dow all the way down in order to
properly meet him.
"I was just wondering," he said
abruptly, "what kind of formal educa-
tion do you have?"
"Well, to be honest," I replied,
"not a whole lot."
"I can tell," he said. "Your articles
are the dumbest articles I've ever
read."
Shocked, yet amused by my new
friend's approach, I had to chuckle.
This guy was serious.
"I am so sorry you feel that way,"


I replied. "You
know you don't
have to read them,"
I said.
"Oh I know," he
answered, a bit off
balance. '"They're
just so dumb, I find
them funny." And,
with that, my new
PUPIT friend began edu-
NOTES casting me on why
.. having faith in God
was the most illogi-
Pastor cal, nescient thing a
Rob Goyette person could do.
The thought of me
spending time each week writing and
spreading such lies was more than
he could bear.


opposing
Thankfully, for me, the whole
encounter happened at a moment
when I was on a spiritual high.
Having just finished my time of
prayer and Bible reading, to try to
convince me that God didn't exist
and that what I really needed was
more education was a bit in vain.
As I listened and did my best to
understand where my faithful reader
was coming from, I realized I was
late for an appointment. "I've got to
go," I said, "Perhaps we can talk
again some other time."
"OK," he replied, "but the bottom
line is, you just need to get an educa-
tion."
To which I lovingly replied, "And
you just need Jesus."
As we both smiled at each other,


'points ofview

and I began to drive away, I realized For them, and for me,
that I indeed had a new friend, influence of the most wid
Since that time, we've run into lished, widely read book
each other here and there and have world - the Bible - and tl
been able to share our opposing changing message that it
views with a little more gracility. (I to miss out on the great
put that word in there just for you my edge available to man: th
friend in the event that you're still edge of God Himself.
reading.) . So what's the point of
Though most of the people who I don't know, perhaps I ju
take the time to comment on the arti- it appropriate to acknowl
cles I write are very appreciative, I of you who read but don'
must say I'm thankful for the oppos- Just so you know, I count
ing points of view. I'm honored to to share the often simple
know that people, whether highly ful message of Jesus Chr
educated or not, are taking the time Though you may not
to read. Actually, some of my dearest thanks for your friendshi
friends are extremely educated and, Robert L. Goyette is pa
interestingly enough, have a strong Living Waters World Outr
faith in God. rgoy@livingwate,


to deny the
tely pub-
in the entire
he life
: carries, is
st knowl-
e knowl-

this article?
ust thought
edge those
t believe.
Sit an honor
, yet power-
ist with you.
agree,
p anyway.
stor of
'each Center
rsoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


Save the
Children Day
O'Neal Memorial Baptist
Church, 474257 SR 200 East
in O'Neil, will present the 15th
annual Save the Children Day
at 3 p.m. July 19.
The youth department and
male mentors, program spon-
sors, will honor retired educa-
tors during
the worship
service.
Clinical psy-
chologist
Iathleen
Watkins,
Ph.D., of Los
Angeles, r
Calif., will Watkins
speak for the
service.
Watkins has served as a child
therapist for Miller Children's
Abuse and Violence
Intervention Center in Long
Beach since 1999.
She has also directed the
center's Child and Adolescent
Trauma Program Consumer/
Family Advisory Council
since 2005. Watkins is the
daughter of Gwendolyn
Morrison Watkins, formerly
of Fernandina Beach, and the
late Tommie Watkins.
... Save the Children Day ..
anniually.recognizes the out-, **
standing service and conitribu-
tions of local citizens. For
information, call 261-4186.

What Can We
KnowAbout esus'
Saving Jesus is a revolu-
tionary DVD-based small
group exploration of Jesus


Christ featuring modern reli-
gious voices of our day. This
10-week program utilizes
guided discussion and a 20-
minute video segment featur-
ing Marcus Borg, John
Dominic Crossan, Matthew
Fox, Amy-Jill Levine, James
Forbes and a host of others.
The topic for July 19 is,
"What Can We Know About
Jesus?" The series continues
weekly through Sunday, Sept.
8 from 10-11 a.m. New Vision
Congregational Church meets
at 96074 Chester Road in
Yulee. Contact the Rev. Mary
Kendrick Moore at 238-1822.
Folk theologian
Returning to Memorial
Church for his second visit,
nationally known singer, sto-
ryteller and folk theologian
Ed Kilbourne will be featured
during Sunday morning in
worship on July 19 and for
three evenings July 19-21.
Sunday worship is at 8:30
a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. and
at 6:30 p.m.
Kilbourne has 23 record-
ings on the Fly-By-Night label
and a collection of his stories
and essays will soon be avail-
able online (www.edkilbour
ne. com) in the e-book, The
. Gospel According To You.
-a ..Call 261,5769 or visit . .
www.mumc6nline.cdm. The'
church is located at 601
Centre St, Fernandina Beach.
Exploring faith
During July, worship at
Providence Presbyterian
Church, 96537 Parliament
Drive, just off Old Nassauville
Road, will be in response to


questions members and
friends of the church submit-
ted for consideration. Worship
is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope
House each Tuesday at noon
for its Weekly Worship
Service and Fellowship
Lunch. On July 21, Gene
Knaga of Amelia Island
Ministries will lead worship
and the congregation will
share testimonies. Lunch fol-
lows at approximately 1 p.m.
For more information, call
321-0435 or stop by the Hope
House, 410 South Date St.

Worship on
the beach
Join Memorial United
Methodist Church for its wor-
ship on the beach July 22 at 7
p.m. Participants gather just
to the right off Public Beach
Entrance #22, or at 2252
South Fletcher Avenue. Bring
your beach chairs, towels or
blankets and join in a great
time of music and worship.

Friends &
FamilyDay
Mount Horeb Missionary
. Baptist Church.will celebrate
its annual Family & Friends
Day July 26. Services will
begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday
School and morning worship
will be at 11 a.m.
The community is invited.
located in the Lessie commu-
nity at 58552 Coopers Neck
Road, Hilliard. Call (904) 845-
3948.


NEWPASTOR

The Rev. Michael S. Bowen, with his
family, left, is the new senior pastor
of Blackrock Baptist Church, 96362
Blackrock Road, Yulee. "It is a great
joy to be the pastor of such a won-
derful fellowship," he said in a
* press release. "God has great things
in store for Blackrock Baptist
Church. Our mission as a church is
to win the lost, disciple the saved
and make an impact upon the entire
world. There are many ways that one
*". can be involved in the ministry of
Blackrock Baptist Church. We have
a lot to offer for all ages and we
value everyone that walks through
our doors." Visit the church or e-
S . mail him at GodSavs@yahoo.com.
SUBMnITED


VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS


Wacky Wednesdays for
children in kindergarten
through fifth grade are held
at Memorial United
Methodist Church, 601
Centre St., in July.
The classes are taught by
elementary school teacher
Linda Seng, assisted by
Carol Olson, director of
Christian Education, and
Deena Wolfe. Registration
forms are available in the
Partin.Center,, 601.,Center $t.,
Memorial United Methodist
Church, Maxwell Hall and
the sanctuary. Children will
learn scripture through
crafts and trips to area muse-
ums. Call Olson at 261-5769.
* * *
Faith Christian
Academy presents Kids
Choice Camp 2009 from 7


a.m.-6p.m. through Aug. 12
at 96282 Brady Point Road,
Fernandina Beach. Camp is
for ages 3-12 years. To regis-
ter call 321-2137.

Yulee' Baptist Church,
85971 Harts Road, Yulee, will
host "Boomerang Express"
vacation Bible school July 19-
23 from 6-9 p.m. Kids will
wind their way across
Australia to discover the vast-

no matter what they do in
life, it all comes back to
Jesus. Call 225-5128.

Mighty Men of Valor, an
original vacation Bible school
written by Dr. John Van
Delinder, will be held from
6:30-8:30 p.m. nightly, July
26-30, at Pible Baptist


Church, 820 South 14th St.,
Fernandina Beach.
Students in kindergarten
and up are welcome. Some
transportation is available by
calling 261-5457.
Each evening will feature
skits, games, dramatized
Bible stories about Joshua,
refreshments and many
exciting events - including
the largest water pistol
fight.
, ., . . , .-,,- ,*- . ' *. ,, .,; ,
Fernandina Beach
Church of Christ presents
"A Veggie Tales VBS!" July
28-Aug. 1 for kids age 4 to
entering fifth grade. School
is 6:30-8:30 p.m. each night at
the church, 1005 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach (cor-
ner of 14th and Jasmine
,streets). Call 261-9760.


"Worship this week at the place of your choice


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor

--- Every Sunday --
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
-- Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park'
261-6306
www.poplcamelia.org


j~' 11/I / 6Af1f C%1/V/~


II " .... . ... U I.


( 9 '-.st Church
Sunday School........................ .......... 9:30 am
Sunday Worship .................................... 10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA .............................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study........................6:30 pm
941017 Old Nossauville Road - County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillboptistfb.org


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
ln Interdenominationa Community Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
July 19, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.


MESSAGE: The Suffering of Creation"
MUSIC: "On Eagles Wings"
(Nursery Provided)
Adult Sunday School Class at 10:30 am
"Our Obligation to Love"
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .


WHAT IS YOUR OPINION?
Read Amelia Plantation Chapel Pastor Ted Schroder's new Blog
at ameliachapel.com and state your feelings! Log on, go to Pastor's Comer,
and Ted's Blog. Simply input your name and e-mail at the bottom of the blog
content and begin. We want to hear from YOU!I
-ALL ARE WELCOME-


The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
(904) 277- 4414 www.ameliachapel.com


YULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join/ Us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev..Mark Stiles


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
In Amelia Park
1830 Lake Park Drive
(across from the YMCA)
Sunday worship times
8:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. (with music)
904-430-0274
www.holytrinityanglican.org


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship with us where
the Bible is our only Autllority
Church Services. I am
YMCA onon na 225-5368
www.amollatblandchurch0othrls.Oom


*}o fy Tr inity
lnqIcan Cfurcli
)1 ,lkadltilndt
i 't.anriiftio, nmtity


Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


S- .. .


( ,'iit/ 'i .'.r ' ' i'
Everyone..is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corncr Odi N;ass;u,ville Rd.)
W'Ir.ship Service ;i 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.pllrovilLnceryilLcc. .cii
prtrv Ile yiilltc et,@cOinllci st.nii leI


9


fn tiR hosrt Of
Femrondcrna
9 N., 6-fStRfrf
Dr. Hotton Stegling
SSeor Pastor
S Worship 8:30 & 1) a
Nursery
Chiclren
Youth
Adults
261-3837
www. Istpres-fb corn

BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Chlldrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www.blackrockbaptlst.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service - 10:30am
Bible Study - 9ans
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pmr
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children'Activities
961167 BUCCANEER TRAIL
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Femandimn Bch
For More Information Call: 261-9527


First ;iptspt t ( lin h
..... ,. h ' . ,


Sunday
9 am
LIFE Groups
10:15 am & 6:30 pm
Worship Service

Wednesday
6:30 pm
LIFE in 3-D
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandira Beach, FL
904-261-3617
www.FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton, Sr Pastor


Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor
is aturday Vigil Mass - 4 pFm &5:90 pm4-
Saturday 4 pm Mass at Yule UnitledMethodist Church
Sunday Masses 8&00 & 10.00 am & 12 Nooon
Daily Mass - 8:30am Mon.. Wed., Thurs & Fri.
6tum-Tuesday
Holy Day Masses Vigil 6:00 pm; Holy Day 8:30 am
Confessions: Saturday 3:15pm -3:45 pm or by appt
Telephone Numbers: K
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number 904-277-6566,
also call 904-277-0550


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH. WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor: Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............ .. 9:4SA.M.
Worship Service ............ 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training ........... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship.............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service......... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnlevlew Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spolntsbaptlstchurch.org


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
xarle S o, Cauemyrfu siec Casu alA0nospWe
Pastor Mike Kwlatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10230
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday morn. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10:30am Sunday
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm


%. asVAe lms WaxmT""'
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


ANCHOR

' Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
H 515 Centre Street


Living Waters mSTMSIO
world o outreach 2 OSouth athS t2sm.61.490
Contemporary Worship Rev. D i a K. Bold enSr., Paut
SUN 9:30am .c0urcliheo
- WED 7:00pm BrtofthLeCty
Wlth Dtosiw to being the
Youth, Nursefry& reatsofA People
Children's Ministries suNerseLUCls9.
S321-2117 .SschwI o. ...
Rob I ChristleGoette 3
Senlorpas'ate^rOn1Almil lowest of Ame lslaid W *.� '`2 .!. s t-gi>.
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org M1itrisnBm Vur Coupes, slgu, roat







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----












FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


To Camden


Discov

St. Mar

Cumberland Island
National Seashore
Visitors Center
and artifact museum
(912) 882-4335,
877-860-6787,
www.nps.gov/cuis

Cumberland Sound
Passenger ferry betv
downtown St. Marys
Femandina Beach, F
877-264-9972,www.i
rivercruises.com

Orange Hall
House Museum
Open 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Monday - Saturday,
1 - 4 p.m. Sunday.
311 Osborne Street
(912) 576-3644
St. Marys
Welcome Center
Maps, shopping, dini
lodging information,
tram rides.
406 Osborne Street
(912) 882-4000, wwv
maryswelcome.com

St. Marys
Submarine Museur
102 W. St. Marys Str
Hours: Closed Mond
open 10 a.m. to 4 p.r
Tuesday-Saturday ai
p.m. Sunday. (912)-8
iaa)-wwwatmnIaryss

Up the Creek Xpedi
Outfitter, guided
kayak trips.
111 Osborne Street
912-882-0911,
www.upthecreektrips


There's some


, The sleepy seaport city

By SUSAN RESPESS
Tribune' & eorgian Staff

For a slow-down, friendly
?r folks kind of place, take a stroll
around the seaport settlement
of St. Marys, Ga.
Once a thriving river town
of timbermen, fishermen and
boat builders, the waterfront
along the St: Marys River is
quieter today. You're more
likely to see kayakers on guid-
m ed tours, recreational boats
headed out for a day of fishing
and ferries that take visitors
back and forth to Fernandina
Beach, Fla., and to
I ferry Cumberland Island National
veen Seashore.
and Shrimp boats share the
Fla. waterway, too, pulling in to the
amelia pier at Lang's Marina with a
fresh catch that will end up on
the menu at Lang's Marina
Restaurant.
The coastal Georgia city's -
history goes back about 5,000
years as part of the lands of
the Timucua Indians. You'll
see that history told in arti-
facts and displays at the
Cumberland Island National
Seashore Museum along with park are perfect for a closer
a timeline of events from look, a fishing pole or a crab
ng, Spanish and British occupation trap fed over the side with a
to the gilded age of Thomas hand line.
Carnegie's family on In the park, bring a blanket
Cumberland in the early or a lawn chair to the city's
w.st 1900s. Starry Nights summer series
St. Marys' downtown is a. of free concerts from 7 to 9
National Register Historic p.m. July 11, Aug. 15 and Sept.
District and walking and tram 19.
Tours will lead you to clap- The Cumberland Island
reet board churches and homes Visitors Center and gift shop
ay, and shops that date to the on the waterfront is the ferry
.- 1800s. site for day trips and camping
nd 1-5 A pleasant starting point is trips to the island. Nearby is
182- the riverside Howard Gilman the city pavilion and dock
ukBi..I' 1.fiAFahWMihFlaiye d ford& Q08 I v il. lI : Ctimberland Sound
-- - pulp and pape-Ltdatiuftuactuig I . r %ie: ,it-' x*ii, ,. '", ,, I -.
'owner and benefactor whose from Fernandina Beach. The
tions grandfather built a mill in St. ferry is part of the East Coast
Marys. The park is oh St. Greenway also ferries bicy-
Marys Street, and wooden clists between St. Marys and
bench-style swings offer a Fernandina Beach.
prized view of the river and its Across the street is a reflec-
3.com sunrises and sunsets. A broad tion of the area's recent histo-
Dier and a floating dock at the ry, the St. Marys Submarine


thing about St. Marys


comes alive with history


and charm


The Howard Gilman Memorial Park, with its
swinging benches, fountain and fishing pier, is
a favorite gathering place for St. Marys resi-
dents and visitors to the area.


Museum and its gift shop. It's
managed and staffed by Navy
veterans, many of them retired
from Kings Bay Naval
Submarine Base. The base,
home to two submarine
squadrons that head to sea
past Cumberland Island, ush-
ered in a new era of develop-
ment and activity.
John Crouse, museum man-
ager, said several thousand vis-
itors a year look at the compo-
nents of the submarine James
K. Polk - ship- and ballast-con-
trol panels - and admire a real
leril.uI,' that extends
ing. There are artifacts, ships'
models and previously classi-
fied documents about the.sub-
marine force.
"We are working on World
War II submarine patrol
reports," Crouse said. "We are
getting them typed - 1800 of


them - in a Word format so
that people can read them.
Some of these are 40- to 50-
year-old reports and the paper
is old, the ink bleeds through.
They have to be done by
hand."
Close by are a hotel and
two B&Bs and restaurants on
St. Marys Street and along
Osborne Street that beckon
with seafood and other menu
items. Shops tempt with local
wares and books to purchase.
Volunteers lead tram tours
and tell the history of the
Orange Hall House Museum,
"a three-story Greek Revival
home built in the 1800s for
the Presbyterian minister's
family.
Four 19th century church-
es are on the walking tour as is
the walled Oak Grove
Cemetery, laid out in the
1780s.


"Our guests think the
downtown area is charming
and they love the history," said
Mary Neff, who owns Spencer
House Inn with her husband.
Neff also is chairman of the
board of the St. Marys
Convention and Visitors
Bureau Authority. "People like
to walk, and they can park and
not have to get back in their
cars."
Visitors walk through
the neighborhoods, to the
museums and stores and out
to eat, then sit in the park after
dinner and meet residents who
are enjoying a sea breeze
'They like the old houses
and the porches, the rockers
and thefeeling of being very
unrushed," Neff said. 'They
are always envious that we live
here and most everybody who
comes thinks they would like
to live here."


See America's MOST Beautliul Wilderness Beach!

,.A"" i*-' .1, ,.


Regular Fares - Round Trip (St. Marys to Cumberland Island)
Adult - $17.00 Senior - $15:00,* Children 12 yrs & under - $12.00
(Including sales tax) Rates & Schedule subject to change.
National Park Service has additional user & camping fees. 4927 La 7.17


St. Marys Submarine Museum
102 St. Marys Street * Downtown Historic District
Hours of Operation: Monday & Selected Holidays: Closed
Tue-Sat 1000-1600 (10am-4pm)* Sunday: 1300-1700 (1-5pm)
Phone: 912-882-2782

ORANGE HALL MUSEUM
311 Osborne St. * Downtown St. Marys
The "Grand Dame of St. Marys," Orange
Hall is an extraordinary example of ante-
| bellum life in Greek Revival style dating
back to ,circa 1820s-1830s. She reigns in
grandeur as you make your entrance into
the historic district of Downtown St. Marys
and serves as a house museum with tours
912.576,364 seven days a week. 4,288 SMS717


Did we capture that
special moment?
You can capture it too with
Photo Reprints.


Did we have a great photo of your
daughter scoring the winning goal? Was your
mom featured in an article?
The News-Leader offers color and
black and white reprints of, photos taken by
our staff and that have appeared in our paper
or on our website. Prices are $10 for 5x7s and
$15 for 8xl0s.
Call 261-3696 to order your reprint or
stop by our office at 511 Ash Street.
Fernandina Beach.
Photo orders music be paid in advian:c.


coe eeou oci 1ueus
















SPORTS


12A


FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


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SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Lizzie Leipau places sixth in the girls 11-12 100-yard individual medley with a strong butterfly beginning.


YMCA Sailfish soar past White Sharks, Riverfins for regional title


The air at the McArthur
Family YMCA pool Saturday
morning was thick with antici-
pation, determination and
chlorine.
As the National Anthem
played, jets zoomed overhead,
setting a high-flying tone for
the day.
Inspired, the undefeated
McArthur Sailfish swam to
victory, overpowering rivals
Williams Family YMCA
White Sharks and Arlington
Riverfins at home in the
YMCA of Florida's First Coast
Region AAA meet.
The Sailfish took the meet
in decisive fashion, besting
their closest opponent by
more than 1,500 points.
McArthur started strong with
a commanding lead in the
individual medley events,
never looked back and won
each stroke category easily.
Once again, they ransacked
the record book, as nine
swimmers'set 13 new team
records.
SSofia Dupee dominated


the six-and-under girls,
adding two records to her col-
lection (25-yard freestyle, 25-
yard backstroke).
Eight-year-old Taylor
Radcliffe and 10-year-old
Maisie Gooch each bested
her own backstroke mark and
claimed their respective
freestyle records.
Juan Cardenas added the
13-14 boys' 200-yard individ-
ual medley to his list and
rewrote his own 13-14 boys'
100-yard backstroke record.
Ciera Wilcox (girls' 25-
yard breaststroke), Evan
Crayton (boys' 25-yard
freestyle) and Jonah Braeger
(boys' 100-yard IM) each gar-
nered one record in the eight-
and-under categories.
Katy Weaver (100-yard
backstroke) and Gabi Nobles
(100-yard butterfly) each
grabbed a new 13-14 girls'
record.
Blasting the team's-overall
performance record, 51
Sailfish earned 98 National
Time Standards, including 13


First-year swimmer Evan Crayton breaks a team and pool record with a 17.07 in the 25-yard freestyle.


A times, 33 BB times and 52
B times.
This is the first year the
YFFC has elected to hold
regional qualifying meets


)n !
M _E '


prior to the championships,
sending each region's top
eight swimmers in each event
(10-and-under, 11-12, 13-14
and senior age groups) to the


finals. All swimmers in the
six-and-urider and eight-and-
under agie6gtbupwwho partici
pated in the regional meet are,
eligible to swim in the chanm-


pionships. There will be 122
Sailfish swimmers, defending.,
McA-thur's-titiejl Ty-24-2512(t.
the Barco-Newton Family
YMCA in Orange Park.


Brigette DeLille and Ceira Wilcox, left, high five each other after the 100-yard individual medley after the Sailfish took first, second and third in the event. Right, Blake Cox
strokes strong in the 50-yard freestyle.


Ella Johns, left, breaks her personal record "flying" down the pool for a second-place finish. Jake Smith, right, finishes wiih a sixth in the six-and-under boys 25-yard freestyle.


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Jared Smith, left, proves hard work in practice pays off with a first-
place finish in the 10-and-under boys' 100-yard freestyle. Jonah
Breager, above, breaks the eight-and-under team record in the 100-
yard IM as he takes off doing the fly portion of the event.


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FRIDAY. JUiY 17.2009 SPORTS News Lcadcr


NATIONAL QUALIFIERS


p . ..






SUBMITIIED
The U-13 Amelia Island Arsenal placed second at the Jekyll Island 3v3 tournament
July 11-12. The team qualified for the national 3v3 tournament in Orlando. Arsenal's
record for the tournament was 3-2. Pictured, back row from left, are Coach Will, Matt
Golan, Dustin Moore, Austin Meadows, Riley Hall; front row, Tyler and Tanner
Callaway. Arsenal will hold a car wash and bake sale Saturday at the Baptist church
across from the Wal-Mart Supercenter in Yulee.



SPORTS SHORTS


Elm Street banquet
Elm Street Little League
will hold its award banquet at
2 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Martin
Luther King Jr. Center. For
information, contact Wayne
Peterson at 753-1663.

Beach run
The second annual Back
to School Beach Fun
Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K
(one mile) will be held Oct. 17
at Peters Point on A1A. The
event starts at low tide, 4 p.m.
Registration information will
be available in August. The
day includes music, food and
awards. Begin training now.
Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit Communi-
ties in Schools of Nassau
County.

YMCA flag football
The McArthur Family
YMCA teams up with the
Jacksonville Jaguars and NFL
Flag Football for its fall youth
flag football program. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices
begin the week of Aug. 24.
The season kicks off Sept. 5
and the last game will be held
Oct. 24. All games will be
played Saturday mornings.
Gamesand practices will.be,,:.
held.at-tthefeld! tb ehindiL'-iA->".
Kmart in Fernandina Beach.
The league is open to any-
one ages 4-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-
bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a NFL Flag Football jersey
and an end-of-the-season
award. Call 261-1080 or visit
http:// www.firstcoastymca.
org/mcarthur-branch.

YMCAfavlllleyball
The McArthur Family
YMCA is introducing a new
fall volleyball league. Register
Through Aug. 8. Practices-start
the week of Aug: 24. The sea-
son runs Sept. 10 through
Oct. 29. All games and prac-
tices will be held in the McAr-
thur YMCA gymnasium with
games on Thursday nights.
The league is open to any-
one ages 8-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-
bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a volleyball jersey and an
award at the end of the sea-
son. Call 261-1080 or visit
http://www.firstcoastymca.org/
mcarthur-branch.

Baseball softball lessons
Baseball and softball les-
sons are being offered by
Coach Shelly Hall for ages
five to high school. Call 583-
0377 for information.

Junior lifeguard program
Nassau County Ocean
Rescue is offering a junior life-
guard program through July
29 on Mondays, Tuesdays
and Wednesdays from 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. at Peters Point.
Call (904) 316-7929 for infor-
mation.

ProwrestlingJuly18
Continental Championship
Wrestling returns to the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center July 18 with a 7:30


p.m. bell time. In the main
event, CCW champion "Rock
'n' Roll" Chris Turner puts the
title on the line against John
Douglas of the Wranglers.
The Marcs Brothers are in sin-
gles action as Julian Marcs
goes one-on-one with the
"Six-Foot Walking Attitude"
Kevin Toole and Ethan Marcs
steps into the ring with Blane
Rage. Mad Dog Miller is in
action against Scotty Biggs.
Women's champion
Samantha Steele takes on
Nikki Knight in a non-title
match. Don't miss the debut
of the sensational lady
wrestler Riot. Also appearing
on this card are Jarrod
Michaels, Chyene Miles,
Logan Stevens, Oblivion, J.D.
Holla and many more.
Tickets are $7 at the door.
Partial proceeds to benefit the
Shiny Badges Ball. Visit
http://www.ccwrestling.org.

YMCA skills camps
The McArthur Family-
YMCA is offering skills camps
for ages of 6-15 with special
interests for the summer time.
Camps include basketball,,
soccer, golf, volleyball and
football. All ages, dates, loca-
tions, times and fees vary
betwep carmps. Rgstration
the camp begins. Visit the
YMCA on Citrona Drive br call
261-1080.

Yulee Pop Warner
Yulee Pop Warner will hold
sign-ups July 25 for football
and cheerleading for ages 5-
15 at the Yulee Sports
Complex from 9 a.m. to noon.
All participants need a birth
certificate, wallet-size photo,
final report card of 2009
school year and a Pop
Warner physical. Fees are
$125 for first child, $100 for
each additional sibling. Call
277-8136.
Yulee Pop Warner board
meets at 7 p.m. July 30 at the
Yulee Sports Complex.

FBPopWamer
Fernandina Beach Pop
Warner is holding registration
for football and cheerleading
Saturday in July from 10
a.m. to noon at the field house
on South 11th Street.
Registration fees are $125
and $100 for each additional
sibling. Copy of birth certifi-
cate and 50 percent of fees
are required at registration.
Visit www.leaguelineup.com/
fbpwa or contact Chrisie
Oliver at 277-9660.


Stimulus Help

Refinance with

No Equity

* If you thought you could not refinance
due to equity issues, we may be able
to lower your rate drastically without
an appraisal
* We only care that you don't have any
late mortgage payments in the last 12
months
* Convert your Arm's or Interest Only
loans into fixed rates
Call Now For Detailsl
I iversiedi MrTaim e Ansaoclates
0o North Foirlda, Inc
Fran Holland 904.753-1862
FAMB Member


5KBridgesRun
The Vestcor Companies is
hosting its 14th annual 5K
Bridges Run to benefit local
non-profit organizations July
18 in downtown Jacksonville.
Beginning at 7:30 p.m., the
course will take runners
across the Main Street and
Aoosta bridges. Following the
race, a block party and
awards ceremony will be held
at Hemming Plaza. Prize
money will be awarded to the
top three men and women,
overall. Participants can also
enjoy free food and drinks,
free beer, T-shirts and live
music.
Race registration though
today is $25 and $30 on event
day. Visit any 1st Place Sports
location or www.1 stplaces-
ports.com.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing
Club meets the first Tuesday
at the Kraft Athletic Club.
Social hour is at 6:30 p.m;
meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Stein-
kamp at 261-5213 or visit
www.ameliaislandsailing.org.

Sports association
Thp.Nassau County Sports
AsPociation meets at '7"p:mn:
the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee.
Call 261-1075 or 277-1609.


Gaw Open Water Challenge is set for Saturday


The 2009 Ed (;aw Amelia Island Open
SWater Challenge, originally scheduled for
May but postponed by the weather, will take
place July 18 at 8:30 amn. The event, sanc-
tioned by U.S. Masters Swimming, offers a
5K and a one-mile open water swim. Both
events are open to USMS and USA
Swimming registrants. All swimmers must be
registered with USMS or USA Swimming
($17 on-deck registration).
Entry fee is $40. All pre-registrants receive
an event T-shirt, swim cap and other items.
Deck entries will receive a T-shirt on an as-
available basis. Participation is limited to 300.


Race finish area and check-in are at Main
Beach at the intersection of Fletcher and
Atlantic avenues. Check-in begins and 7 a.m.
Transportation will be provided to the
starting points at the Jasmine Street (one-
mile) and Simmons Road (5K) beach access-
es. Coast Guard Auxiliary boats and life-
guards will be on the water. EMTs and
lifeguards will also be on the beach.
Awards and breakfast after the race. Non-
swimmers must pay $6 for the breakfast.
Entry forms are at www. fbfl.us. Contact Scott
Mikelson at 277-7350 or smikelson@fbfl.org
or Chris Gaw at cgaw@cfl.rr.com.


Beautiful hardbound collectors' edition will be printing on acid-free paper.
This pictorial history will contain up to 96 pages, over 100 years in words and
pictures, utilizing more than 250 photographs.SAVE BY ADVANCE ORDER.
Your cost is only $24.95 plus $1.75 tax per copy. Only those who order in
advance are assured of obtaining a copy. After publication, remaining copies
will sell for $34.95 plus $2.45 tax per copy. Delivery is scheduled for Fall 2009.
A gift you know will be appreciated and cherished. This history in words and
pictures will analyze Fernandina Beach and outline the many urban changes.
rI -5g1 IM=EP


We need to borrow your old pictures for the publication of this book!

RETURN ORDER BLANK TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
Please enter my order for: A Pictorial History of Fernandina Beach, Florida

_ copies) STANDARD EDITION @ $24.95 + $1.75 tax

copiese) LIMITED EDITION @ $75.00 + $5.25 tax
O I am enclosing payment in full.
O Please ship my books) to the address below. I have enclosed an additional $7.00 for each book shipped.

NAME

ADDRESS


CITY


STATE ZIP_


PHONE
MAIL TO: The News-Leader. 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 261-3696


ROMANCEE FIRST"

912-729-8686 "We Sell Fun!"


M-F: 9-6* SAT: 9-4 Closed Sunday


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FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009 SPORTS News-Leader


OUTDOOR BRIEF


Saltwater fishermen need license
byAug 1 to fish from shorein Florida
Florida's resident saltwater anglers who
fish from shore or a structure affixed to
shore will need to buy a $7.50 (plus adminis-
trative and handling fees) shoreline fishing
license by Aug. 1, unless they have a regular
resident saltwater fishing license.
The new license applies only to Florida
resident saltwater anglers who fish from
shore. Resident anglers may prefer to pur-
chase the regular recreational saltwater
license that covers them, no matter where
they fish for saltwater species in Florida.
Florida has always required non-residents
to have a license when fishing from shore,
and they will still need to purchase a regular
non-resident saltwater fishing license.
The new shoreline saltwater fishing
license for residents goes on sale today.
It provides all of the same exemptions as a
regular license, including senior citizens, chil-
dren, disabled people who meet certain quali-
fications, active-duty military personnel while
home on leave and anglers who fish from a
licensed pier.
In addition, the shoreline license require-
ment includes two new exemptions: anglers
drawing food stamps, temporary cash assis-
tance or Medicaid; and anglers fishing in
their home counties who use cane poles or
- other gear that does not depend on mechani-
cal retrieval.
At the request of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission, the


Florida Legislature passed the new license
requirement to head off a federal license
requirement that will go into effect Jan. 1,
2010, and will have a $15-$25 fee beginning in
2011. Florida's new shoreline license exempts
this state's anglers from the federal license
requirement.
Several hunting, fishing and conservation
organizations requested other permit fee
changes, which do not take effect until July
2010. They include increases in the state
waterfowl stamp from the current $3 to $5; in
the resident turkey permit from $5 to $10; the
non-resident turkey permit from $100 to
$125; the wildlife management area permit
for hunting, fishing and other recreational
uses from $25 to $30; the limited-entry or spe-
cial-opportunity hunt fee from $100 per day to
$150 per day and $250 per week to $300 per
week, as determined by FWC Commission-
ers; the snook permit from $2 to $10 and the
lobster permit from $2 to $5.
Also, new laws create a $5 annual deer
permit (in addition to the current hunting
license requirement for deer hunters) and
allow the agency to charge up to $5 per day
for non-hunting and non-fishing recreation on
certain wildlife management areas.
The FWC will evaluate areas where it is
the lead manager to determine where to
charge the fees and how much to charge.
In addition, the state will use up to 10 per-
cent of the hunting and sport-fishing fees to
promote those sports, with emphasis on
youth participation.
For information visit MyFWC.com.


I1 _ .I . . I-I


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TERRY IACOSS/SPECIAL
A variety of saltwater species are running in the surf, including red drum, flounder
and sea trout.



Kings along the beaches


: ;' !, enny Crawford reports a big king-
S fish run along the beaches of
Northeast Florida, which is excel-
lent news for next week's BellSouth
Greater Jacksonville Kingfish Tournament.
Yulee's Kenny Crawford and his "AT&T Real
Yellow Pages" kingfish team placed second in
last week's Ancient City Kingfish Challenge in
St. Augustine with a 40.95-pound king macker-
el. Also fishing aboard Crawford's kingfish
- boat were Cindy Farlow, Bill
Walsh and Al Morris.
"In the Moment," skip-
pered by BJ. Pearson,
weighed in the largest king
mackerel, which tipped the
scales at 46.10 pounds. A total
of 150 kingfish teams partici-
S pated in the tournament
Warm water temperatures
ON THE have returned along the
beaches of Northeast Florida
WATER with temperatures ranging in
the low 80s along Florida's
TERRY "Gold Coast" Menhaden and
LACOSS silver mullet are schooling
__... just off the surf, where a vari-
ety of saltwater game fish is
present
Capt. Allen Mills, captain of.the "Wahoo II"
charter boat, reports good numbers of tarpon
at the southern end of Amelia Island, where
"silver kings" are weighing over the 100-pound
mark.
Beach fishermen are cast netting a cooler
full of menhaden and then setting up a chum
slick from either an anchored or drifting boat.
Large baits are set out in the chum slick with
30- to 50-pound saltwater fishing tackle.
At the business end of the fishing gear, a
five-foot section of 100-pound fluorocarbon
shock leader and a 7/0 circle hook are tied to
the tag end of the leader. Small floats are
attached to the leader to keep the bait close to
the surface. Prime tarpon baits include live
menhaden, whiting, croaker and yellow-mouth
trout.
Flounder fishing continues to highlight
Amelia Islanid's bacicoiitiiry fisHiiig with ii
excellent tide arriving on Saturday for flatfish
weighing just over the five-pound mark.
Flounder fishermen will find a high falling tide


I. SPECIAL:
Jay Price is pictured with his Amelia' :=
Island tarpon before releasing his big ;
"silver king."

at daylight with low tide arriving at 11:31 am.
at the mouth of the Amelia River.
Barb a live bullhead minnow or finger mul-
let to a 1/4-ounce jig head and retrieve this
deadly combo slowly along the bottom from
the Fernandina port to the footsteps of histori- :
cal Fort Clinch.
Flounder must measure at least 12 inches
in length with a bag limit of 10 per day, per
angler.
For the latest red snapper and grouper reg-_
ulations, be sure to visit www.keepoceanfish-
ing.com. With a recent approval of amend-
ment 16, saltwater fishermen may see a
complete red snapper closure with a closed
season for grouper beginning in January and
running through April.
The News-Leader encourages local anglers to
submit photographs of their catches. E-mail pho-
tos to bjones@fbnewsleader com,.mail. them to.
EO. Box 766, Fernandrna Beac'B EL 32035. Or
drop them by the office at 511 Ash St. in Fern-
andina Beach. Call Beth Jones at 261-3696for
information.


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Dancing, fun


and drama

'Heartwarming'comedy atACT


RYAN SMITH
News-Leader

beat in Amelia
Community Theatre's
latest show, Richard
Alfieri's "Six Dance Lessons in
Six Weeks." The show opens
tonight at ACT, 209 Cedar St.
"It's about a woman who
lives in St. Petersburg,
Florida," said director Toni
D'Amico. "She calls a dance
company to get dance lessons,
and they send over a man
named Michael Manetti. It's
about how these two people,
who are extremely different,
come to find out that they're
not so different after all.
"She's from South Carolina,
he's from New York. What the
author is trying to say is that
you shouldn't rely on stereo-
types."
The two forge an unlikely
friendship despite their differ-
ences, D'Amico said.
"She's in her 60's, he's 45 -
so it's not'a romantic comedy
at all," she said. "It's about how
two different people can
become friends and find a
common ground. Its very
funny, very heartwarming...
It's saying generational gaps
can be broken. They can be
bridged."
D'Amico does caution that
the play contains some adult
language, which parents might
want to consider when bring-


Ticket information
"Six Danc, Lessonw in
Six Weeks" opens at 1 p.n.
tonight at Amelia
Community\ Theatre, 209
Cedar St. Additional pefor-
mances are Saturday and
July 23-25 and Jul\ 29-Aug. 1
at . p.m., with a matinee
July 20 at 2 p.m. Tickets are
81' lor adults. S10 for stu-
dents and available at the
box office or by phone. Box
office hours are 11 a.m -1
p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday. The box office
also opens two hours before
showtime. Call 261-6749.
This play contains adult lan-
guage.

ing a child.
D'Amico said the dance
theme attracted her to the
material - but it also meant a
lot of hard work.
"There's a lot of dancing in
it, and I love the dancing. It
has six ballroom dances," she
said. "...We've been working
on the dances for six months.
They're not that elaborate -
the reason we did that is so
we'd be ahead of the curve."
The play has a cast of two,
ACT veterans Arlene Filkoff
and Cary Dresser. D'Amico
said the intimacy of a small
cast reduced the stress of
directing.
"It's great. It's actually real-


SUBMrrTED
Cary Dresser and Arlene Filkoff in a scene from "Six
Dance Lessons in Six Weeks." The comedy opens tonight
at Amelia Community Theatre, 209 Cedar St.


ly cool because you've got two
people. You don't have this
huge cast where some people
may get lost in the crowd," she
said. "You really get to work
on the nuance.... Cary and
Arlene have great chemistry.
They blend well."
But the stars aren't the only
ones who make the show pos-
sible, she added.
"There's a lot of people
behind the scenes, and it takes
everybody. If anybody has
ever had the inkling to volun-


teer -.if they sew, if they paint,
if they construct - I really
encourage them to come on
down."
Particularly important to
this show, D'Amico said, was
the set design by ACT vet Liz
Dion, and lighting effects by
Johnny Petegrew of Florida
Community College at
Jacksonville's theater tech pro-
gram.
D'Amico said she was also
ACT Continued on 2B


JASON YURGARTIS
- ----News Le-ader *
Ordinarily, creating graffiti
inside a room at a police sta-
tion would be a simultaneous-
ly gutsy and unintelligent act
that would likely land the
artist in jail.
However, recently in the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department community room,
more than 20 local teens were
hard at work on their very
own graffiti tags. But instead
of facing a jail sentence or pro-
bation, they're earning com-
munity service hours.
Its just another evening of
activities for the members of
Teen B.LAS.T - which
stands for Becoming Leaders
and Successful Teens. The
group of sixth through:12th


graders meets each Thursday
to plan and implement pro-
grams for teens, by teens,
through the Fernandina
Beach branch library. They
also aid in Young Adult
Collection development at the
library and earn volunteer
service hours toward Florida
Bright Futures scholarships in
the process. And the student
who earns the most communi-
ty service hours receives a
$500 scholarship.
On this particular evening,
members of B.L.A.S.T. were
asked to create their own graf-
fiti masterpieces and tell their
story through writing their
names using expressive letter-
ing designs. Teens practiced
on scrap paper with colored
TEEN Continued on 2B


James Leigh and Katelyn Parker work on tags - graffiti rep-
resentations of their names - during a Teen B.LA.S.T.
event run by the Fernandina Beach branch library.


Chardonnay


surprises await


the adventurous

ROBERT M. WEINTRAUB
For the News-Leader
Two wine truths:
* Tastes and preferences change over time, so it wise
to constantly challenge our assumptions;
* Price and hype don't make the wine - an $8 bottle
can be as satisfying as'a $100 bottle.
These oenophilic maxims-were reinforced at a recent
chardonnay tasting on Woodstork Lane with six mem-
bers of the Nassau wine club, "The Cellar Dwellers,"
hunkered around eight chards'and a smorgAsbord of
seafood dishes from the Sicilian Contessa's cucina.
Chardonnay was once the
white wine of choice inf '
America, as California reformu- - N I
lated its offerings to make ''
them "oaky" to appeal to the
sweet taste of the "Pepsi
Generation."'Some vintners
added oak chips, sawdust and oak syrup to the wine. As
with any fad, the boom was followed by a big bust; true
oenophiles avoided the stuff, calling American chardon-
nay "sugar water" and the faddists jumped to the next
wine "craze," merlot. As a result, chardonnay went into a
long eclipse.
But good chardonnay (also known as white
Burgundy) has its place in the wine cooler both as a
summer aperitif and a partner for seafood, especially
shellfish. So we decided to revisit chards in a voyage of
discovery and to challenge personal assumptions.
First we researched chards recommended by
"experts" priced under $20; then checked local availabili-
ty. Our list was culled to six ranging in price from $8 to
$17. To these one of our tasters, Ross, threw in two
ringers, chards that retail for $55 and $100 "to provide a
benchmark for the tasting." The eight bottles were
wrapped to the neck and numbered to create a blind
test.
Food served included deviled oysters, coquille St
Jacques, fruita del mare picata (Ciao Bistro's recipe),
shrimp putenesca (a la Joe's 2nd St. Bistro), buffalo scal-
lops and Matthew Martindale's "Seafood Royale" (scal-
lops and shrimp in a tomato wine sauce served over lin-
guini).
It was no surprise that the $100 Sonoma Peter
Michael (a 2005 from the high-elevation Ma Belle-Fille
vineyard) received top honors, but barely. The surprise
was that the six tasters were virtually unanimous that a
very close second was the Argentine Alamos, available
at Harris Teeter for $8 (also at Costco). Lagging in third
-place was a-French chard, the $55 Chassagne- "- ,
Montrachet from the Vincent Girardin estate (which
borders the Montrachet grand cru region). But the $17
South African Dombeya (Riverside Liquors in
Jacksonville's Five Points) was judged to be on a par
with the French first tru.
Next came what had been my two standard chards:
the French Louis Jadot's Macon-Villages ($12 to $15 at
several local stores) and the Chilean Cassillero del
Diablo ($10 to $12 locally). Two Sonoma wines rounded
out the tasting. These four wines, although pleasant and
drinkable, were considered to have serious flaws when
compared with the higher-rated quartet- "no match for
food," "no finish," "weak nose," "unbalanced," "bad oak."
While the Peter Michael was the star of the evening -
chardonnay made in the highest traditions of French
winemaking - the moral of the tasting is that the
Alamos, and to a lesser degree the Dombeya, compare
favorably to a more expensive wine: high quality and an
excellent match with food at a much lower cost. A case
of the Alamos costs the same as one bottle of Peter
WINE Continued on 2B


UTTFON THE ISLAND
.i i'l.


'TlREE CVIL WAR WOUNDS'
The Amelia Island Museum of History invites
you to its next 3rd Friday on 3rd Street presenta-
tion at 5:30 p.m. tonight. This month's speaker is
S Dr. Bill Birdsong, presenting
9 Three Civil War Wounds: A
hero, an Irony and a Love Story.
Birdsong will give a brief histo-
ry of the treatment of gunshot
wounds in the Civil War.
Afterwards, he will tell the sto-
ries of three famous people and
their injuries: Joshua
Chamberlain, who was left for dead; Albert
Sydney Johnston, who died but could have been
saved by a device he carried: Jenny Wade, a love
story about the only civilian to die at Gettysburg.
Come hear true stories of both valor and love as
you learn more about the bloodiest chapter in
American history. Admission is free for museum
members and $5 for non-members. For more
information contact the museum at 261-7378.



The Island Art Association presents the 14th
annual 'Art Off the Wall" exhibit, featuring artists
that do figure and portrait art from clothed mod-
els, with an opening reception from 5-8 p.m. July


18 in the gallery studios, 18 N. Second St.,
Fernandina Beach. . _,.-- . ---
Drawings and paint-
ings that were produced -Ol
during the past year will
be displayed in an "off
the wall" manner. Some ,,
works will be framed or ".
matted. Most will be " , 1
pinned to the studio "A1 I I
walls. All work will be for " '
sale at studio prices.
Refreshments will be served. Meet the artists and
models - personalities from various "walks-of-life"
in the community. The workshops are held on
Tuesday nights, with one Saturday session per
month.
For information call 261-7020 or visit
www.islandart.org.

FOl. THEOLOGIAN
Returning to Memorial United Methodist
Church for his second visit, nationally known
singer, storyteller and folk theologian Ed
Kilbourne will be the featured guest Sunday
morning in worship and for three evenings,
Sunday through Tuesday, July 19-21.
Sunday morning worship services are at 8:30
a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. and the evening perform-


ances are at 6:30 p.m.
Kilbourne has 23 recordings on
the Fly-By-Night label, including
the new release. A World Of
Good." "The Grateful Ed Live." a.4-
CD collection of his songs and sto-
ries, is a favorite of those who attended his previ-
ous appearances at Memorial. A collection of his
stories and essays will soon be available online
(www.edkilbourne.com) in the e-book, The Gospel
According To You.
Memorial United Methodist Church is located
at 601 Centre'St., Fernandina Beach. Visit
www.mumconline.com or call 261-5769.

'POPEYE' IN THE PARK
The-next free movie in
Central Park, sponsored by
Prosperity Bank, is a screening
of"Popeye" the adventures of |
Sthe spinach-munching sailor
directed by Robert Altman and
starring Robin Williams and
Shelley Duvall. on July 25 at
8:30 p.m. Bring your blankets
and lawn chairs. Concessions will be available for
,purchase.
Submit items to Sin Perry.
sperry@fbnewsleader.com


FRIDAY, JULY 17.2009
NEWS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


B SECTION


Library's teen program a BLAST'


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FRIDAY. July 17,2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

"The Biggest July
Birthday Party Ever" will be
held at 6:30-11 p.m. July 31
at the Femandina Beach
Women's Club, 201 Jean
Lafitte Blvd. Today is the
deadline to purchase "all
access" passes.
Enjoy an evening of cele-
bration and dancing featuring
live entertainment by nation-
al recording artist Miles
Jaye, a classically trained vio-
linist and R&B and contempo-
rary jazz composer. Also per-
forming will be saxophone
sensation Allana Southerland
and The Fusion Band of
Jacksonville.
Included are a food buffet,
fruit, cheese and veggie sta-
tion, dessert bar, beer, wine
and a "Claws and Paws" mar-
tini bar. Passes are $30 and
can be purchased at
www.TheBiggestJulyBirthday
PartyEver.myevent.com. No
passes will be sold at the .
door. Contact Joyce A. Jones
at 583-1949.

Tickets are on sale for
"Seven Days of Fine
Dining," a drawing to win
seven dinner-for-two gift
certificates to local restau-
rants. A tax-deductible dona-
tion of $50 enters you in the
drawing, with proceeds bene-
fiting the TLC Pregnancy
Center, 410 S. Ninth St. Call
the center at 321-2008 to
make a donation and enter
the drawing, which will be
held Aug.'7. Only 100 tickets
will be sold. Participating
restaurants are Baxter's,
Brett's Waterway Cafe, Joe's
2nd Street Bistro, PLAE, The
Verandah, 29 South and The
Ritz Caf6.

On July 20 the SCV and
the Order of the
Confederate Rose will learn
about self-defense from inter-
national karate expert and
grand master Jack Hogan,
who directs schools in
England, Ireland, Scotland,
Finland and the U.S.
The program will also fea-
ture Southern music, songs
and poetry. The camps meet
at 7 p.m. the third Monday of
each month at the Pig BBQ


in Callahan and the public is
always welcome. For informa-
tion call (904) 571-1177 or
(904) 806-0624.
* * *
The Amelia Island
Genealogical Society will
meet July 21 at 7 p.m. at the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department Community
Room, 1525 Lime St. Guest
speaker Anne Hawn Smith
will speak about "Getting the
most out of Ancestry.com" and
will touch on using Heritage
Quest as well.
The meetings are free and
open to the public.

The Nassau County
Commission presents the
grand opening of the
Goffinsville-Nassau River
Park, 95001 Goffinsville Road
in Nassauville, on July 22 at
10 a.m. The community is
invited.

The Young Professionals
Council will celebrate its one-
year anniversary at 6 p.m.
July 23 at the Half Time
Sports Bar, with refresh-
ments, happy hour drink spe-
cials, door prizes, and net-
working for professionals
ages 21-40. RSVPs are
appreciated but not required.
E-mail youngprofession-
alscouncil @gmail.cqm or
check out YPC on Facebook.

The American Business
Women's Association -
Eight Flags Charter Chapter
will meet July 23 at the
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club. Social time begins at 6
p.m., with the dinner meeting
being called to order at 6:30
p.m. This month's speaker will
be Melba Whitaker of
Robison's Jewelry. She is also
a retired teacher, a local histo-
rian and an active member of
the community. Dinner is $13
a person and is payable that
evening. Call Esther Schindler
at 491-5790 for information'
and to RSVP.

The Historic American
Beach "Summer Jazz
Series" presents its second
free concert featuring The
Instant Groove Band on
July 25 from 5-8 p.m. at
Burney Park (comer of


r.
* 8


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Gregg and Burney) in
American Beach. Bring your
chairs to enjoy food, fun,
music and tasty treats by
Gourmet Gourmet. The con-
cert series is sponsored by
the American Beach Property
Owners Association.
Donations to the association
for outstanding projects are
appreciated. For information
call 277-7960.

Fifl's Fine Resale of
Amelia Island is holding a
canned food drive for the
Barnabas food pantry each
Sunday in August, beginning
Aug. 2. Bring in a canned
good and receive an ice
cream sundae treat for free.
Fifi's, 1853 S. Eighth St., will
be open noon-4 p.m. each
Sunday in August. Call 277-
4430.

Celebrate the 40th
anniversary of Woodstock
with Woofstock at the
Nassau Humane Society
Dog Park on Aug. 15 from 5-
10 p.m. Enjoy mellow music
by Hupp and Ray. Chow
down on catfish and hotdogs,
coleslaw, fries and dessert.
Beer and wine will be avail-
able for purchase. Best-
dressed wins a prize. Bring
your lawn chairs.
Admission is $15 for adults
and $10 for kids.Tickets are
available at the NHS Dog
Park (across from the
Femandina Beach airport)
and at Redbones Dog Bakery
and Boutique on South Eighth
Street in the Pelican Palms
plaza.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 students from
Yulee will be held Sept. 7, 11
a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem Cell.
Cost is $20 per person. A
meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Femandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with any
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event.

FILM/THEATER

The Amelia Island Film
Festival announces a special
festival award In honor of
Don Davis (1931-2008) to be
presented to a filmmaker for a
film made in Florida. Davis
was instrumental in creating
Florida's Film Production
Incentive Program.
The Second Annual AIFF
will be held in Femandina
Beach for four days beginning
Feb. 25. Visit www.Amelialsl
andFilmFestival.org for infor-


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mation about festival events
and film submission applica-
tions.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold its annual
meeting from 4-6 p.m. July
19 at 209 Cedar St. All mem-
bers and prospective mem-
bers are invited to hear about
the upcoming 29th season,
tour the new theater under
construction and enjoy
refreshments. For information
call 261-6749.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold auditions
for "The Dixie Swim Club"
at 7 p.m. July 20 and 21 at
209 Cedar St. Five women
are needed for the cast of this
comedy about a group of
women who were teammates
on their college swim team
and now get together every
summer for a long weekend to
catch up, laugh and meddle in
each other's lives. During the
course of the play, they age
from their 40s to their 70s.
This extremely funny play is a
celebration of friendship and
will be directed by Barry
Ralston. Rehearsals begin in
early August and performanc-
es are between Sept.10-26.
For information contact the
theater at 261-6749.

Memorial United
Methodist Church is hosting
a film series titled Faith at the
Movies, designed to explore
issues of faith through popular
movies. There will be a simul-
taneous movie and program
for children, as well as a nurs-
ery. All are welcome. Movies
start at 6:30 p.m. in Maxwell
Hall. The lineup includes:
"Romero" July 24 and 'The
Ultimate Gift" Aug. 7.
* * *
Tickets are on sale at
Amelia Community Theatre
for a touring production of
the energetic comedy, "The
Complete Works of William
Shakespeare, Abridged."
Performances are at 8 p.m.
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8
p.m. Aug. 8 at the theater,
209 Cedar St. Adult tickets
are $15; student tickets are
$10.
The show is a mix of "prat-
falls, puns, clunky female
impersonations, clean-cut rib-
aldry and broad burlesque.
The gung-ho vitality is impos-
sible to resist," says the New
York Times.
Call 261-6749 for tickets
and information, or come by
the box office between'11 "
a.m.-1 p.m. on Tuesdays, ;
Thursday and Saturdays.

IRT/GAERIES

The Hpskell Gallery & Art
Kiosks at the Jacksonville
International Airport Main
Terminal present "A
Women's Point of View:
Paintings, Photography,
and Sculpture" by Lara
Summers, Elisa Olderman
Johnson and Cookie Davis.
For information visit
www.JIAarts.org.

The Art House, 11 S.
Seventh St., offers art
classes for all ages, abilities
and interests as well as
portfolio and professional
development. Individual and
group classes are forming.
The Art House offers a
classic photography studio,
photography, portraits,
restoration, weddings,
events, computers and soft-
ware, digital and film. For
information or to register, call
Robin at 261-0116 or 705-
6178.


a.t


Available from Commercial News Providers
Available from Commercial News Providers
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- - . .'. . �- *. .-. _

JASON YURGARTIS/NEWS-LEADER
Fernandina Beach youth librarian and leader of Teen
B.LAS.T. Michelle Forde works with Jack Chapman
on a graffiti art project at the Fernandina Beach
Police Department community room.


TEEN Continuedfrom 1B
pencils to flesh out their
ideas, then used colored
permanent markers to cre-
ate graffiti tag designs that
showed off their personality.
They then cut out their art-
work and glued it to a large
paper banner that was later
hung up for display in the
library.
Atlanta's Sherry
Norfolk, normally a story-
teller who goes to schools
and libraries to teach vari-
ous curriculums, led the
group by fueling their artis-
tic visions.
"In Atlanta gang mem-
bers spray their tags all over
buildings," Norfolk said.
"It's destructive. But when
they get really good at it, it
becomes art and then they
start doing murals of it and
they enter competitions and
get paid for it. We're going
to do the good kind, the art
kind."
Fernandina Beach
Youth Librarian Michelle
Forde, who heads up
Teen B.LAS.T, said this is
just one of many weekly
events designed to engage
teens and give them a voice
in the library while they
learn leadership skills and
make a difference in the
community.
"My goal is to build it up
and to have more teens, but
they're not aware," Forde
said. "There are just so
many people that are not
aware we exist. The more
we get the word out, the
more they show interest. I
Think the biggest thing is
they hear library and they .
think if they go, they'll be
labeled by their friends. My
job is to change that mind-


WINE Continued from 1B
Michael, providing a dozen
very satisfying dinners.
Alamos chardonnay is a
product of Bodega Catena
Zapata, which climbs the
Andes foothills. Nicolas and
Laura Catena have devel-
oped an understanding of
microclimates in the high
altitude, wine country of
Mendoza. A blend of grapes
from three vineyards pro-
duced the 2008 Alamos we
tasted. This wine has bal-
ance, concentration and a
strong varietal identity. Our
tasters said it has well bal-
anced fruit with a hint of
oak. While it doesn't have
the complexity of the Peter
Michael it was considered
elegant, a bit of jasmine in
the floral nose, a full mouth
feel, a touch of grass, good
acidity and a long finish.
Named after the
Dombeya tree, which is
native to South Africa,
Dombeya wines are created
in the heart of Stellenbosch,
South Africa's prime wine
region, Winemaker Rianie
Strydom has gained acclaim
as one of the world's most
promising new vintners. In
just three years her wines -
especially her pinot noir -
have won numerous awards
and gold medals. The 2006
chardonnay we tasted has a
light green color that goes
with the herbaceous charac-
ter of the wine. The subdued
nose has fresh citric aromas
with a bit of smokiness. The
soft palate has the character-
istic velvety butter flavor


set. It's not just about books
anymore, it's about pro-
grams and ways to make
them use their imagination,
it's about ways to spark cre-
ativity while stressing the
importance of leadership
and community."
Forde said she tries to
work with what limited,
budget she has, but said
they desperately need fund-
ing to grow the program.
'The graffiti art program
is free other than supplies,"
she said. "It's something
that we can do with very lit-
tle money. But when your
budget is $500 a year, that
goes out the window -we
need corporate sponsors.
There's no limit to what we
can do if we had the fund-
ing."
Forde said the group
gets by with funds from
Friends of the Nassau
County Library fundraisers
like book sales and a haunt-
ed house B.LAS.T. creates
at the library in the last
week of October.
"Right now I'm working
on a yearly calendar of
events, so that well have a
whole year of programs
planned out," she said.
"We're going to have a
weeklong haunted house in
the library. This is the third
year we've done it and it's
going to take place Oct. 23-
30. Its going to be a
fundraiser for the teens by
charging a small admission
fee. It's a good program to
get teens in and we literally
transform the library into a
haunted house."
: For information contact
: Forde at 277-7365-or 548-
4858. E-mail mforde@nas-
saucountyfl.com.
jyurgartisfbnewsleader cor


with a touch of spicy oak
and green herbs. Nicely bal-
anced, it has the acidity to
go well with food. It has
good length, although our
tasters disagreed on this,
one reason it didn't rank
higher.
Interestingly, at the end
of the evening when the
tasters were asked how
chardonnay ranks as their
favorite seafood wine, four
said.they prefer Chablis,
which is also made from the
chardonnay grape and has
its historic home in the
Rhone Valley just north of
Macon-Villages.
Once my favorite white
wine, Chablis got a bad rap
from California meddling
(vapid, overly fruity white
jug wines made from any
combination of grapes and
spelled with a lower-case
"c"). True Chablis is now
hard to find. Unable to find
one under $20, it was not
considered for this tasting.
But I miss the crisp, steely
and dry wine with its miner-,
ality.
Challenging one's
assumptions can often lead
to a better experience.
Good, low-cost wines may
not be as good as you think.
It is worthwhile to keep try-
ing new wines; to truly
appreciate the chardonnay,
grape one needs to drink
many chardonnays to see
what is good or not.
Robert Weintraub writes
about wine monthly. He wel-
comes your comments at
rmw. weintraub@mind-
spring.com.


. 0


0


0 --
0


O

- - --


- .--


ACT Continued from 1B


excited about ACTs upcom-
ing season, which begins
* ' * * * Sept. 10 with "The Dixie
* * . * g Swim Club." ACT is also
building a new theater,
* * * * * which D'Amico said should
* . e * * * be open in time for the April
show, "The Pirates of
S' * * * * Penzance." ACT's annual
* * . * * meeting, Sunday at 4 p.m., is
open to the public and will
S* * * include a tour of the new
. * * o * building.
For now, however,
S* * * D'Amico is concentrating on


"Six Dance Lessons." She
said it's a far cry from ACTs
last show - the tense court-
room drama "Nuts" - but
still a great evening of the-
ater.
'We're going from one
end of the spectrum to the
other. Everybody loved
'Nuts' but I think we're
ready to go in a different
direction," she said. 'There
is dancing, fun, a little
drama, with a nice heart-
warming ending. It's going
to be fun."
rsmith@jbnewsleadercom


a - -


-- -



- - 0.

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-uS,,m=


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- -


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CLASSIFIED


3B

NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009


To ;'.I.: An Ad, Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Finjr,.:ial-tion,ie Properrv 606 Photo Equipment & Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE rI i.,-;r,TrPr,.o:,prt,, 858 Cr.nd.os-.JnfurnrsEd
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 rMone-, To L.an 607 Antiques-Collectible's 6- ....'..-...:l -Fu1 ,':jnr :d . , i .i .. i.r .i al- .., . riasr , Ju .:unr, 659 Homrr.e-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 6: ,-, .,-, L, .', Eipm,~',-t Hi ' oI1,.- H., -:: 6n g.lad Sr lar i 860 Home-LUnfurn,shed
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 5C EOuipment 609 AppCiainces 6- h.Iljr: ,17. i- F ,'l .f; 8r 71 l.tle if,. L. r. ..r ,n.r,-, C.unr, 6 Ja:a ir, Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 5C2 LI.et,:ck & SupPliei,, .1.i ir C,,nd i,e5 ni M i ,:.r H - r:.21 TT,3, ',]J4 ATEli3 i'l:arn.j HO,,rn'. tI- [h,~, Ar.33 862 Bed & Br earkasr
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 FPetsiSuppnes 611 Home F,,-nisr,,r,,. 6. -4i ,nt,:d ro Bu, ,'j Eea,:rW 850 RENTALS 10.1 omierice a
106 Happy Card 302 DiL 'C,.:l.e 0I044 Services 612 Irluscl Ilshirumri :- Frd., Ire.- lr',,-. 3,6 : eriri.lr -,I1 Pw.n-. 'nd Cormmer.al.'Reta
107 Special Occasion 303 h..t, Cr.ts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 T.lil,.-n 7R,.,.. rr'. 00 RECREATION r C6,-,nl*oirnl, l H,,i 9o1 5 arerseTATION
108 Gift Shops 305 iLl.orin. n )1 Garae Sales 614 jwe Ir, I,: E:,-,at 'T Tr2,i.r: _-m 'i lin.3 ',- ,'. -3 l ,: . ,ll -,,,, LrOt 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 LEs.an;'Clas s 602 Arrtcls for Sale 615 Bu.l3'.ng I 1rer.nl i e.-.r z.'ui, .:.. i . L,4s t-4 ,.. n, -02 Trul..'.s
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 60u3 r.lisceianeous 616 Storayie - penuo ? ip.:.rnC Euu.p.-r,r'ni ' r:l . Fir Ar, e. 5, pa3rTrmnrurrise, 03 ,an:
202 Sales-Business 4011 l.orrTgage Bouor,,Soila c0 B.,cles 61-' Irachinrr, -Tr.o-i:Equp -04 i -.:r.qr st ,-,l, :nil.-l 11 ,l:.me-,_i e raill l h3, t' arments-lrfur,-, 90, 1 ltorcyclde
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Srocks c. Bonds 605 Computers-Suppiles 6168 ucti:.rs -0c :,,-pu.er- , E.uppl.ie 012 rp- r . r E..r:.anr,,. _5 .r,I,:..-Furr,;ni ed 9155 commercal

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 3B1


102 Lost & Found
LOST WHITE FERRET - 7/11/09 on N.
Tarpon Ave. Very gentle. Part of
bonded pair. (904)321-4372
LOST MALE CAT - part Siamese, blue
eyes, toffee color w/blk markings. No
collar. Lost north end, Fletcher/Ocean
Ave. on Fri. 7/10/09. Reward. Pis call
261-9994.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
LOST DOG - Small female black/tan
Min Pin/Dachschund rix. Name "Little
Girl". Missing from Blackrock Rd. area
since 7/9/090. Pis call (904)583-0986.
Reward for return.

104 Personals
TAX MATTERS - and then-some.
Thomas Avery Blair (Tom "the
TAXMAN') = federally-licensed Enrolled
Agent providing services in tax
preparation/ taxpayer representation.
29 years experience in taxation
matters. Call toll-free 1-888-250-5687
or visit htto://www.TomBlairEA.com
$$LAWSUIT ADVANCE$$ - No credit
check, money when you need it fast,
Car accidents, clip & fall. If you don't
win, you keep the cash. Need a lawyer,
doctor or cash today? Call (813)270-
9874, (877)275-8299 x 4 or (813)699-
2157. ANF
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks 'of Florida -
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF

105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you' :..i . ri.r you may:haie
been- tliscilrmin'ated against it'
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
- HUD - 1(800)669-9777, or for
the hearing impaired 1(800)927-
9275.






201 Help Wanted
FRONT DESK CLERK NEEDED -
Experience preferred. Apply at Holiday
Inn Express, 76071 Sidney PI., Ydlee or
call (904)849-0200.


201 Help Wanted
A JANET LYNNE SALON & SPA - is
accepting applications for a stylist/
colorist for a booth rental position.
Discover the difference in our relaxing,
non-competitive environment.' Call
Janet at 556-1687 for a confidential
interview. Serious inquiries only.
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply In
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.
$600/WK. POTENTIAL$$$ - helping
the government PT. No exp. No selling.
Call (888)213-5225. Ad Code: M. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
MERRY MAIDS
is now accepting applications for
permanent part-time/on call position.
No nights or weekends. Background
check. Drug free workplace. Must be
21 or older. (904)261-6262. Must have
own vehicle.
TIMES UNION MOTOR ROUTE -
available in Yulee. Excellent part-time
income. Covers Chester Rd. &
Blackrock area. Approximately 4 hours
a day. You must have dependable
transportation & current insurance. To
apply, please contact Jason Green at
225-9170 ext. 3.
CASTING CALL - We are seeking
personable bartenders, cocktail wait-
resses and dances for a new ultra
lounge located in downtown Fernan-
dina. Please come with resume &
personality July 19th or 20th @ 2pm to
The Palace Saloon. Email castinacall9 (
theoalacesaloon.com for ?'s
OTR DRIVERS - for PTL. Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced NE. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262 www.ptl-inc.com. ANF
DRIVER/MAINTENANCE POSITION
- at ARC/Nassau off HWY 17 in Yulee.
30-35 hrs.per week, full-time position
w/PTO. Van driver mornings and after-
noons plus maintenance other part of
day. Must have excellent driving record
plus handyman skills. Call 225-9355
HELP WANTED - No truck driver
experience - No problem. Wil-Trans will
teach you how to drive. Company
sponsored CDL training. Must be 23.
(888)368-1205. ANF
Office Manager/Billing and Collect-
ions Clerk (must have experience with
both insurance and patient A/Rs
required) and Receptionist (medical
office experience, -rquired) for. St.
Marys surgical practice. Both .positions
are fulltime With 'behefits. Fax re'dmne
to (912)729-8133.
BARISTAS, SERVERS, & PREP CHEF
- Espressos Cafe in Amelia Island.
Described in Amelia Islander magazine.
Fax resume to (904)491-9810"
RV Delivery Drivers Needed - Deliv-
er RVs, boats & trucks for PAY! Deliver
to all 48 states & CN. For details log on
to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF


To olrfIrJ

Cas crpIron

23-593 87-13


PART-TIME
ADOPTION COORDINATOR
Nassau County has an opening for a
part-time Adoption Coordinator in
Animal Care and Control at $15.24/hr.
with no benefits. Requires high school
diploma or GED equivalent supple-
mented by 3 years of hands on
experience In animal care In a shelter
center environment and 2 years direct
public customer service. Must have
valid drivers license. Applications will
be accepted thru July 28, 2009 and can
be obtained In the Human Resources
Department located at 96161 Nassau
Place, Yulee, FL 32097. Phone
(904)491-7332 or fax (904)321-5926.
EOE/M/F/D/V Drug Free Workplace.
ROOM FOR RENT - in salon/spa. Call
(904)491-0991, ask for Jessica or
Summer.
ADMINISTRATIVE/CUSTOMER SER-
VICE ASSISTANT - needed ASAP!
Olympic Steel has an immediate
opening for an administrative/customer
service job In Fernandina. Position
Qualifications *Excellent computer,
phone, and time management skills
and ability to multi-task in a fast paced
environment. Position Preferences
*Bilingual-Spanish/Engllsh Interested
candidates please fax/email resumes to
904-491-8688 olvsteeltrading.iobs(i
olvsteel.com. EOE:m/f/d/v

EXPERIENCED PARTS/WAREHOUSE
PERSON - Need experienced person
for our busy parts counter. Duties
include inbound calls from customers,
handling requests from both walk-in
customers and our service department.
Knowledge of parts a plus. Must be
dependable and able to work
independently. Fax resume to (904)
924-9335, Attrp Porter.

204 Work Wanted
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to . yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
HOME REPAIRS - Painting, roofing,
rotted wood, electrical, ceiling fans,
decks, tile, chimney repairs, gutter
cleaning and pressure washing. Call
Marc (904)583-4900. Lie. & Ins.
Landlords, Property Mgrs, Home
Owners - We Can Save You $$$$.
Refresh/For Sales/Move Outs
Maintenance/Repairs/PaintIng
Call PoPs (904)742-1352
Professionals of Property Services LLC
HOME REPAIRS - All types of home
repair & improvements, mobile homes
also. Dependable service. Licensed,
bonded, & insured. Call Mark Bullington
at(904)277-8780.
SHOVEL TO SHINGLE - Home
Improvement, Maintenance and Repair.
583-3866 or 277-7850

206 Child Care
STATE LICENSED & INSPECTED
HOME DAYCARE - has Immediate
opening for any age child newborn-4
years. Lots of activities, hot meals,
oodles of love & attention! Please call
321-6757 for interview. Hours 7:30-
5:30. All meals, snacks & juice
provided. Rate $125/wk. over 20 yrs
licensed experience & references!

207 Business
Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - in the
Christian market. Concessions avail for
only 1 person per city. Keep 100% of
the revenue. Go to www.Christian
LeadersWanted.com. ANF


The Tribune & Georgian is looking for a creative,
ambitious, result-oriented, advertising sales pro-
fessional. Responsible for selling to established
accounts, prospecting and cold calling. Must be
able to work with deadlines. To apply for this po-
sition,, send cover letter, resume including pro-
fessional references to:
Tribune & Georgian, Attention Tom Latos
P.O. Box 470, St. Marys, Ga. 31558
or email: tomlatos@tribune-georgian.com

DEADLINE: July 10, 2009


Tribune & Georgian
48906 T&G 6/5


301 Schools &
Instruction

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial aid if qualified. Call
(866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance Car-
eer. FAA approved program. Financial
aid if qualified - Housing available. Call
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888)
349-5387. ANF


305 Tutoring
ACADEMIC ASSOCIATES
Free Reading Evaluation. Pay as you
go. Tutoring in math and science.
www.PhonicsReadingGuide.com
(904)277-0911
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.


306 Lessons/Classes
The Guitar Studio - Private guitar
instruction. Acoustic, electric,
fingerstyle, flatpicking. Terry Thrift
(904)704-2011.


503 Pets/Supplies
OLD ENGLISH BULLDOGS - with
papers, $500. (904)624-5068.
SHELTIE PUPS - AKC. All shots. (2)
females, 10 wks old. $500. Call 225-
8634 or 629-0260.
GREAT PUPS - free to good loving
homes. Brother & sister lab mix
w/beagle must go together. Also boxer
mix. Must have a fenced yard. Fixed.
Love walks. Housebroken. (904)556-
9512.




S 601 GarageSales
MISS RUBY'S BIGGEST ESTATE
SALE - with furnishings, inside & out.
Fri. 7/17, afternoon till 7p5m. All day
Sat. 7/18. 1120B Natures Walk Dr.
FRIDAY & SATURDAYS - 7/17 &
7/18; 7/24 & 7/25; 7/31 & 8/1. 9am -
? Off A1A to Harts Rd W. to 86204
Hayley PI., follow signs. Jerri's This-N-
That Antiques and Collectibles + yard
sale items. Shoes, clothes, dolls,
furniture, fishing,. books, China,
vintage fashion jewelry.'If the price
isn't right, make a fair offer. Let's make
a deal. Everyone welcome.


1 Exit 3







Tao rangs ig rim Jlo I2a.rus Cites of. Madys & Kglaid, Gergia
*Naire\istin amunerti developer a Convenient 1-95 access t 3

INSPECTION DATES:
Wednesday, July 8 and 22 from 3:00 - 6:00 PM and
Wednesday, July 29 from 3:00 - 5:00 PM
a iJcri, irsPtorL:a lte 'a~ t .T fLe ersne? , t' Ia i15 aing re , .k'e.pian i
Pa~ C.,nract Jin WoItz ,a~orNw or Rex Sdhrader ase


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


CLEANING SERVICE I


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a ime through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


'PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

* BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At a
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES


XelfCy CCeanirng & Mgt
Services Inc.
Bonded & Insured
We offer "green cleaning"
Non-rentalproperty mgmt.

cafrrKelfey (go4) 335-1370
Ema iC: KeleyCYMSryaahoo.conm





LEANING SERVICES
Residential/Commcrcial
Licensed Bonded * Insurance
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904 491-1971 Cell: 904-742-8430
E-mail: justioryouserv@aol.com


CLEAN by Genine Inc.
Attention to betaill

Genine Harter
Housekeeping
. 8:---
904-415-1186
genineharter@gmail com


S CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC,
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Noiw doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE f694


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duste
(904)261-1940

CONSTRUCTION _




CONSTRUCTION
" i jlr H ,?,: 1 .jildi.-,, ," ,:.ril( 3,:l,:,,
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GARAGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES
QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages
$16,49500
Adiiona l C l or
Conrrao Block
c 9


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance, In.. .
"The local guy" since 198 .
Quit Paying Too Much!
S Operator or door replacements *Transmiler replacorn nt
Broken sprlns * Sripped gears
Cables .Service for all makes & models
904-277-2086

HOME IMPROVEMENT I


-'(/?//ht/,t " I t""
Repair* Rebuild * Remodel
Specializing in Hardle Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows *Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Clown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 * 557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003



OTTOI CITOM
WOWORKIG, INW.
CITOM CABINETI ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
BOOKCAIEI < TRIM CARPENTRY
IOME IEPAIRI REMODELING
HANDYMAHN IERVICEI
LICENIED A INSURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 90--57-3100



THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise In
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to vvork for you!


Florida Gardener
Landscape Management, Inc.
Residential, Commercial, Associations
LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
LiCensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
*Plants & flowers, treas, sod
* Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation fl EE
* Sprinkler Installation , ESTI E
* Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354


RK W WELBORN
IRRIGATION
SDo It right the first time.
* Complete system designs
* Repairs & modllcatlons
* System tune ups * 10 years experience
Licensed/insured
Warranty on new Installs
Free estimates * 904-277-8231

LocKs 1T ii ---


The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK (56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Servale
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC MELIA i,
464054 SR 200 * Yulee L ROOFING C
(904) 261-6821 333-6496
100% FINANCING
UPT0O130MPH ' _ ..1'"
METAL / SHINGLE
FREE-EST.
PAINTING CCC-055600


WV rSPI1MA G COASTAL BUILDING

QuIlk rics. SYSTEMS A
'Nil kl0 ?1 it r ail i a Tr L*q - Wye
I . ..,r',i-. rii.,i . iI F1 ."Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty"
FREE ESTIMATES 2Nassau County's Largest
AVAILABLE Roofing & Siding Contractor
- ( Serving Satisfied
SHomebuilders & Homeownerse
AMELIA ISLAND Since 1993
QUALITY PAINTING, INC., Re-Roofing * New Roofing
"(all the Prqfi>sionats" Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascla

(904) 753-1689 261-2233
PRESIDENTIAL Free Estimate
SCOMMERCIAAI, WE ACCEPT MC VISAiV7.
SiNTliITOlt/EXo'r'itol IO / WA EMJ"/A ]


201 Help Wanted I 204 Work Wanted I


GARAGE DOORS


] _ AH'NilAINTENANCE


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
261-4353


1SIPECIALIZEDI) INISHES
1I'REISSIIUREWAS1lING
& WATER PR001FING ;

LICEiNSED * BONDED INSURED
*I'IPROFESSIONAI. CRA1I'SMANSHI1P AT
AFFORDABLE I'PRICES
*SlERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FOR YOUR
FREE ESTIMATE

Marc Lawlng - Ownlcr/Operator


I I


r-


--I-------~1~


. 'WISMAIRP-Mol OWNIMMIN


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II i [I'(It IIII

Ca~llII ().)I 11I'l ll [I , 1I
,I II w ll k , � tit""mti
Id v l (i IIt [ i 1i t,[


I










4B ...... FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009 CLASSIFIEDS News-Leader


Go Painlessly









Compare and Save! Buy THERA-GESIC"




B......i5,019 I%,,



- 4C!; 1� kk


Commercial Condo

1430 Park Ave., Fernandina Beach, FL

Formerly KP's Bar & Grille

Equipment Offered Separately

Callfor Details 800-323-8388

Rowell Realty

& Auction Co., Inc.
10% Buyers Premium AU479, AB296
In Cooperation with: Richard L. Vairo, CCIM SIOR, RCV Properties, Inc.

,oelAucin~


.nne Friend ., . L. L .;. 'L.; Ron Palmquist

irW., 4 I "i .'.1 $ 1'.041206-1945
. ',c' ,ll;..uLh fir, ,', .lJu" ,, b 'u W , L.. fI


601 Garage Sales
MULTI-FAMILY SALE - Sat, 7/18,
8am-2pm. 86123 Meadowfield Bluffs,
Yulee. Household & craft items, ribbon,
cards, clothing, bar stools, mini-fridge.
Hundreds of Items.
HUGE MULTI-FAMILY SALE -
Bunkbed w/attached desk, coffee &
end tables, lamps, exercise equipment,
glass top dining table w/chairs,
clothing & shoes for men, women, &
children and much morel Two days
only Fri. & Sat. 17 & 18 July 8am-3pmn.
85102 Windy Oaks Lane off Harts Rd.
East. Look for the Orange Balloonsi
HUGE YARD SALE - Thurs. 7/16, Fri.
7/17 & Sat. 7/18, 8am-5pm. 95343
Clearwater Rd., Nassauville. Many
items, color TVs, 55 gal aquarium,
furniture. Too much to mention.
MOVING SALE - Lofton Pointe, 96213
Ridgewood Cir. Furniture, misc. items.
Sat. 7/1,8, 8am-11am.


601 Garage Sales
SAT. & SUN. - 7am-4pm. Isle Of
Palms Ln. Camera equip, housewares,
lawn tools, bedding, stuffed toys -
plenty of misc. All must go. COME To
SHOP!
GOING BACK TO SCHOOL SALEII -
Young Grad-Student trying to lighten
his load before heading back to school!
ComputersI TVsl Furniturel AND
MUCH MUCH MOREIII! Everything
Must Gol Games, Raffles and Morel
Come And Make an Offerl 2191 High
Rigger Place, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM (or later),
Sat., 7/18.
GARAGE SALE - First Presbyterian
Church. Sat. 7/28, 9am-lpm. Many
Items, household goods. 9 North 6th
St.


807 White Street - $495,00
T LL. J. rAl I3 & P A . c ., B % -r, r, l r h, -1o .. ,I .'J r.,..-i. N ii l. I i L4 l1J li J
Je. ,Iil IL o. , L [,; ir lr . . L ,I j , .1 ( -r., i o v�l t |'UlN ilo, ' -l [I4 0- i1 . m, ' h'l .
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it the'.. lJ ']L. Adr r.-K l,- r. ., *iJ,, n, the .--it. E'l.ir [Ie iA ida e Fi . r trhe'
rt u ..hijl t u k, r' . |i rrn . i ar . , ... L r 'i. irl I'.. red i ,i j u j. rr li hs . r ir
r .lbl 'l e h i . lIgJ .l r 'j T.ler r, 1I 1 .t-, IdU l"ir. f "l l t fJ re U lt'nrlnJ *.. J dl
r ,:- \rlnr, >.,e0 --id f L a '.'.:


B SEA

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S '4' S Jler RJ
it.ne3liland rL ;Z^M
,, t-l0,l I,-'O.,'l


601 Garage Sales
1424 S. FLETCHER - Sat. 7/18, 9am-
1pm. Couch, toys, clothes, rugs,
tables, TVs, wall TV mount, books,
luggage, morel
BIG YARD SALE - Baby stuff,
furnituFe, clothes, housewares, etc.
801 San Fernando St. Sat. 7/18, 8am-
noon.
JULY 18 &19 - 2840 1st Ave.
Assortment of stuff from tools to knick-
knacks.
96165 ABACO ISLAND DR. (Nassau
Lakes) - Furniture, antiques,
something for everyone. Fri. & Sat.,
8am-?
FORREST DR. NEIGHBORHOOD
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8-4. (Road
across from Harris Teeter extending
towards Intercoastal). Misc. household
goods incl. furniture, clothes, sporting
goods, etc.
95292 ARBOR LN. (Nassauville) -
Sat. 7/18 & Sun. 7/19, 8am-4pm.
Household items, furniture, TV,
appliances, dishes (great for college
bound), & misc.
ESTATE SALE - 2525 Robert Oliver
Ave., Thurs, Fri, Sat, 9:00am-4:00pm.
Rain or shine. Smaller size sale of nice
furnishings. Armoire entertainment
center, Queen bed set, twin day bed &
trundle, rattan dresser, Drexel serving
cart, China Cabinet, dining table w/2
chairs, 3 televisions, Sony boom box,
upholstered chair, vintage cane back
chair, glass top dinette set, 3 misc. side
chairs,, sm tables, end table, Ig
planters, wicker & rattan chairs,
nesting tables, large area rugs & sm
rugs, lamps, wall pictures, mirrors,
LLadro figure, Limoges Pot De Cr6me
set, 5 pcs Aynsley Pembroke, 4 pcs
Schumann Empress, 31 pcs Limoges
UNC24 China, 5 Lenox Boehm plates,
vintage Lenox vase, Limoges Coronet
plate, silver plate pitcher, 37 pcs
Mikasa Marseilles China, 35 pcs Mikasa
Renaissance China, mantel urns,
decorative pillows, misc kitchen items,
Eureka sweeper, lawn chairs, cement
bird bath, and other misc Items. For
more info, map and photos go to
www.MovingAndEstateSales.Net
Sale done by Mary Ann Pihlblad dba
Finders Keepers.
LARGE GARAGE SALE - Sat. 7/18,
8am-noon. Books, household,
antiques, & old stuff. 523 N. Fletcher
Ave.

602 Articles for Sale
FOR SALE - New & old appliances &
misc. Call (904)277-1233.


603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.

615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSuoplv.com. ANF

621 Garden/
Lawn Equipment
CUB CADET.- Model 1045 Rid;ng
Lawn Mower, 20HP Kohler engine, 46"
mulching deck, optional twin bagger.
Used 2 summers, low hours, just
serviced, new belts &. blades. $1200.
Call (904)491-8985.

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628
DAWN PICTURE - Approx. 6am,
10/27/08 over ocean w/new moon &
star at 12 o'clock. Call (404)725-8133.





802 Mobile Homes
4BR/2BA, ON 1 ACRE - Ready to
move in. Low down and only $650/mo.
Call (904)424-7345.

804 Amelia Island Homes
GREAT INVESTMENT - 2 family plus
office/studio, near Centre St.'2BR each
with eat-in-kitchen & separate utilities.
Furnished or unfurnished. Under
$200K. (904)321-4191


The Southern Pine Beetle


Prevention Cost-Share Program 1

2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1St-Aug 12th s n

Apply for incentive payments or cost-share assistance with:
SThinning � Mechanical underbrush removal
SPrescribeud burning * Planting tongleaf pine


VENT

*Bpgg
3 aJm


For guidelines and application materials contact your
local Flonda Divisron of Forestry office or visit:
www.fi-dof.com
A message from the Florida Depairneiof Agrcuu#ture and Consumer Servics Diviston of
Fcastry. Charles K BonsOn. Coir-mssionr Funding suppiied by the USDA Forest. Ssve;
a,- i -"J3I ,=FEr.: ,u, T i, i .,i





























S ll1 www.BackyardEconomics.cbm

K A SPENDIP G W RK


608 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, Fl 32034
www.ACRFL.com


Phil Griffin
Bmroker
phllOacrfl.com


(904) 261-2770
COMMERCIAL * INVESTMENT * LEASING * SALES


BUSINESS CARD BILLBOARD


AIR N�


m-.l


PREV








FRIDAY, JuLY 17,2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled porch-
es, hot tub. $344,900. (904)556-4500


806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Call
(904)261-4066 for information. C.H,
Lasserre, Realtor


08 Off Island/Yulee
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
house semi-secluded 1 acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095

809 Lots
FSBO - 50 X100, 430 N Fletcher. Great
ocean view. DEP permit w/plans in
place. $299K. (904)261-9487
LOT FOR SALE - #10 Blackrock Rd,
between Pirates Wood entrances, .55
acre, cleared, filled, well already
drilled. $69,000. Call (912)506-1035.
VACANT LOT - on lake in Otter Run.
Asking $51,900. Call (904)321-0684.
Lake Lot Deal Fell Thru - 2.6 ac
$19,300. Free boat slips. Was $39,900.
Secluded wooded lot w/deeded access
to pvt stocked bass lake in TN. Quiet rd
frontage, utilities, warranty deed. Exc
financing. Must see, call now (888)
792-5253 x3087. ANF
MAKE AN OFFER!
Was $97,000. Now make an offer on a
building lot in Old Town and buy it at
your price. Must be sold. Call 753-
3219 for details.

815 Kingsland/
St. Mary's
AUCTION - Comm'[ & Dev. Real
Estate: 109. ac offered in 36 tracts,
located in Kingsland & St. Marys, GA
near 1-95, Exit 3. Auction on 7/30 at
,5pm at the Western Motel in Kingsland,
GA. Auction staff will be available 7/22
& 29 from 3-6pm at the Western
motel, Kingsland. Call (800)551-3588
,for info or go to www.woltz.com. Jim
Woltz #AUNR002906. Woltz &
Associates, Inc., Real Estate Brokers &
Auctioneers. Roanoke, VA. ANF

817 Other Areas
COASTAL GEORGIA - Bank Ordered
, Sale. 1+ acre ocean access $29,900.
http://www.oceanaccess299.com/888-
982-8952 x5192. ANF
LAKE BARGAIN - 3+ ac just $49,900
(was $89,900). Nicely wooded, private
lake access. Ready to build. Owner will
finance. Only one - save big. (866)
352-2249. ANF
RARE FIND! - Private Island and
cabin, St. Lawrence River, NYS.
Associate Broker Nancy Williams,
Christensen Realty, (315)528-2801.
Fabulous views and sounds. $370,000.
Alabama Waterfront Blow-Out - Es-
tate size lakefront now only #39,900. 1
day, Sat. 7/25 (adjoining lakefront
parce) sold for $92,300 on 4/12/09-
others avail at similar -savings).
Sensible owner & bank financing.
Owner on-site to ensure all lakefronts
sell! Best prices ever, guar-anteed! Call
now (866)952-5343 x106. ANF




851 Roommate Wanted
2 ROOMS FOR RENT - $500/each.
Utilities included. Quiet neighborhood,
beautiful home. Call (904)583-0037 for
details.
HOUSEMATES - ,off Island. Private c
home. No pets. Responsible, profess-
ional, clean. $500/mo. + deposit.
Utilities included. Call (904)557-1659.


852 Mobile Homes
On Island/In Park - Long term. 1,2&
3BR starting $150/wk. $600/mo.+dep.
Utils avail. Off Island - 2/2 MH, $175/
wk. or $695/mo + dep. 261-5034.
DWMH - on 1 acre, 3BR/2BA, good
condition, great location. $850/mo. I
deposit. CIIll (90')583-3,1 t.


3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME
Naissauiville. $800/,o. Call (901)206-
3111 i 1r.32-8688.


3BR/1BA - CH&A, singlewide in
Nassauville area. Call (904)261-6703.
2BR/1BA SW - in Nassauville.
Remodeled. Rent $550/mo + $550
dep. Service animals only. (904)583-
2009.
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-557,7
BLACKROCK AREA - 2BR/1BA in
small, very quiet trailer park. Water,
garbage, sewer & lawn service provid-
ed. $550/mo. + $500 dep. 261-6486
3BR/2BA - Roses Bluff and Lents.
New carpet, new paint, new flooring.
$675/mo. Call (904)415-1540.
2BR/1.5BA - Covered carport,
ceramic tile, large acre shaded lot, 1/2
mile from beach. References required.
(904)261-5148 or 557-3362
UNFURNISHED 2 to 3BR - BeaUtiful
new decor. $600-$700/mo. Includes
water, lawn, poss. RTO. (904)315-1757
or 613-8401
YULEE 2BR SINGLEWIDES -
Teakwood Mobile Home Park. $500-
$550. Call Marie (904)225-5378.


854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5 min-
utes from beach. Private bath, private
entrance. $100/wk. I $200 dcep. Call
10am-6pm, (904)335-2086 anytime.


855 Apartments
Furnished

AT BEACH - Effic., 1 & 2BR starting.
$145/wk. -I- dcp., utils incl. ON
ISLAND - 2-3BR MH's in park $:;150/
wk. up or $600/mo. + dep. 261-5034

1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262

856 Apartments
Unfurnished

SPACIOUS STUDIO APT - w/ocean
view, 619 S. Fletcher. Private beach
access, freshly painted. No smoking.
$650/mo + $650 dep. (904)261-7658.

HISTORIC DISTRICT - 2BR/1BA,
approx. 1000sf, above Cafe Karibo,
$1000/mo. Utilities included. (904)
415-6533

2BR/1BA UPSTAIRS DUPLEX - on
island. Quiet marsh view. New carpet.
$650/mo. + $300 dep., I year lease,
w/reference. (904)583-0803


Countryside Apartments
1&2 Bedroom Units
Rent starting at $630-$750
'Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units
Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810






Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 2 bedroom townhouse style
3 bedroom garden units * Marsh views
Swimming pool * Dishwasher. Laundn facilities
Washer/dryer connections* * Washer/drner units a\ailable-
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675.00 per month
*Some features not available in all units
54I,0 041L' 3 ]) eW.ht L A* A1d& 0i4,t 0 SpeC!
Less than .2 mils-. from the beach and you can \alk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gateway to Amelia center!

... t y! (904) 261-0791
\%%vwv.atcde\velpment.com


Find The News-Leader on the World Wide Web
vv www-fbrnewsleader.com
Read the news. e-mail the staff, check the
classifleds, or subscribe to
Florida's Oldest Weekly Newspaperl


T tUTM Mariann r

Dahl
mariann@uniqueameliaisland.com * www.uniqueameliaisland.com
3955 Amelia Island Pkwy * Amelia Island, FL
(904)261-3900 * (800)940-3955
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION





IBEST VIEW IN SP ! PE
BEST VIEW IN SYPGLASS! SPECTACULAR SUN


6546 Spyglass Offered at $1595.000
Oceanfront 3 hedroom/3 bath and over 2.400 square feel.
garage, large, balcony. Fully remodeled.


SETS


�N


3416 Fiddlers Bend * Offered at $45.000U
Decorator quality on Amelia Island Plantation. Furniture
Included. 3 bedroom / 3 bath. Many upgrades and in excellent


FINE EXECUTIVE DEEP WATER ON AIP
LIVING ON THE MARSH 50 Marsh Creek Offered at $1550,000 -Virtual Tout
98 Sea Marsh Offered at $2.495,000 Vrtual Tour - A rare opportunity on Amelia Island Plantation. Private home
Serene marshfront & Iniracoasial views in ihis executive home on marsh with a dock. Featured in the Home Garden Tour.
boasting 5.177 square le o al iing space Luxury feaures Large deck runs length of home. High ceilings and light oakl
aroundd Gourrmci kitc'hcn, large m1.i.,stl suite spa. like n.i.scr floors io Ilt in llc iclt
h.ilh anti si lllnouni sind siereu s)'Im-


Case No: 99-DEA-3553961 Case No: 00-CRS-200500; Case No: 99-FBI-001716
DRUG DEALERS SEIZED ASSETS UP FORAUCTION.
Jewelry & Fine Art SEIZED bypolice & federal agency auction, property from seized
& forfeited assets, abandoned safe deposit boxes, bankruptcies, and liquidation of
Rolex's, large diamonds, fine jewelry, art, and other major consignments.






7 i &iail fla ..J LOCATION:


DAYS INN

HOTEL

FERNANDINA

BEACH,

FLORIDA
2707 Sadler Road
1-95 to Exit 373 (Fer-
nandina Beach, A1A) 14
Miles East on A1A. Right
on Sadler Rd. Hotel on
Left after 1.5 miles.
Or call 904-277-2300
for directions.


Lots & Acreage


tgM a


I Il W Mb =I I - i' t
THIS WLL BEAN EVENTNOTTO BEMISSED!ACOMPLETE UUI NATION OFOVER
-2 MILLION DOLLARSWORTH OFMERGIANDISEINLUDING...
Lithographsfrm Dali, Chagall, Picasso and others, oil paintings, diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby rings, Rolex watches,
FLORIDAAVENUE bracelets and necklaces including a large selection of estate pieces. Merchandise shown is fr desiptive purposes only,
Adorable fhurnished Ameli Islind nvertiry (hjnges Wekly
hir e is is s blocks ni, Ml THIS IS A PRIVATELY HELD AUCTION AND IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH A GOVERNMENT AGENCY.
IeaCh. rI crfccI scCnad iir vici1.
tion home. FREE ADMlSS1Orl- . rTrirn Cash, Che:k Charge Itern, Subject to error or omission- 15% BuversPremium-
#48671 $169.000 Forc e n1or inf:ln3tion c i3l 404-254-5142. Licensed AB2673, Auctioneer# AUl623
F N E T & W E Y A T1


REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED


Saturday * June 18th * 1 till 4 pm



ON ISLAND

727 Tarpon - Green Home

3BR/3BA - $459,900




MAINLAND

96232 Dowling Dr. - Lanceford

3BR/3BA - $599,000


^h


- ,










6B FRIDAYIULY 17. 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.



S850785 US 17 Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq ft building & large paved park-
Ing lot. $2.500/mo. + tax & until,
* 1200 s.f. at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia Great frontage. Long term lease.
$19.00 PSF + 3.5 CAM + Sales tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath. pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
*Approx 850 s.f. by Fastcnal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350h/o + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg * 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail. Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses. $2,500/mo + tax + util
* DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water.
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St. OldWest
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $12 per sf + tax.

1n . - lB .- I.-


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

Need to sell your home?
Call 261-3696 and sell it fast!


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.




LONG TERM
*19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo. + until ,
security deposit $1,250.Avail. August
2009.
*4BR/2.5BAVery nice 2500 sq.ft. home
at Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
*3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island
with beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1.850/mo.+ Util. Avail Sept. I
*3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood
PI., close to beach and golf course
$1350/mo + util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit
in Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of
amenities. $950/mo.
*514 S. 14th St.- 3BR/IBA $875/mo.+
util. security deposit $1,250. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. +
until. Security deposit of $1,250.
�2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt.
Great Deck - Oceanview $1,000/mo.
+ util.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/I BA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher:
Call for more information
E&z' - . 1 -1-1


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
HISTORIC DISTRICT - il :ii .
screened porch. No smoking. Service
animals only. $675/mo. includes utili-
ties plus deposit. 277-6763, 583-0862
2BR/1BA DUPLEX - near American
Beach. CH&A, W/D, stove &
refrigerator, ceiling fans, mini blinds, &
tile floors. $795/mo. (404)661-2706
MODERN 2BR/2.5BA BEACH TOWN-
HOUSE - Ideally located. $900/mo.
Call (904)261-6450 to schedule an
appointment.
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
included. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
ISLAND STUDIO APT. - 422 Plnedale
Rd., Fernandina Beach, 800 sq ft.
$600/mo, 1 month deposit. Incl.
garbage. No Smoking. Available Aug.
1, call M-F 9am to 5pm 904-277-5606
leave message after 5pm.
OCEAN VIEW 2BR - No lease. Service
animals only. $750/mo. + security
deposit. Call (904)261-7750 after 6pm.
BREEZY OCEAN VIEW - 2BR/1.5BA,
freshly painted, ceiling fans, W/D
connection. Service animals only. 737
N. Fletcher. $850/mo. (904)261-4127
SMALL 1BR - at the beach. Quiet. No
smoking. Service animals only. Utilities
included. References, $500 deposit
required. $650/mo. (904)335-1665

S857 Condos-Furnished
AMELIA WOODS - 1BR/1BA.
Beautifully furnished with vaulted
ceilings. $840/mo. Call for details
(770)789-2965.
AMELIA LANDINGS - Furnished 2BR/
2BA, water/sewer & garbage included.
Pool. Non-smoking. Service animals
only. $1050/mo. + deposit. Call (904)
759-1105.
AMELIA LAKES - 2nd floor, 2BR/2BA,
1181 sq. ft., W/D, fully furnished and
equipped in immaculate conditions.
$1300/mo. Real wood flretplace.
Screened porch. Short Term leases
available. Call Janina (904) 261-2169


857 Condos-Furnished

FOR RENT - Fernandlna. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. ULlls incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2/2 flat,
next to tennis courts/pool. Long term.
$900. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)
277-0006.
TOWNHOUSE - Furnished 2BR/2.5BA,
North Pointe. Pool, beach. Can be
unfurnished. Hm: (912)921-8976, Cell:
(912)414-2556


858 Condos-Unfurnished

2BR/2BA TOWNHOME - 2-car
garage. $895/mo. Call (904)415-8256.
3 STORY - new," 2800 sq ft Cape
Sound Amelia townhome - 3 Bdrs + 2
study areas, sitting area in MBR, 3.5
bath with 2 car attached garage,
patios, inside home elevator. Upgrades
galore with wood floors in main area,
all appliances, pool & gym. Rent on a
lease; will consider a lease purchase.
No pets, non-smoking please. $1,500
monthly - first, last and deposit upfront
904 962-7477 or 904-827-9900
AMELIA LAKES CONDOS NOW
LEASING - Luxury 1 and 2 bedroom
homes. Starting at $799/mo. Private
and gated. Fitness center, pool and
many more amenities. Call today for
showing, (904)415-6969.
203A AMELIA WOODS - 1BR
completely renovated. Includes washer
& dryer. Very close to pool & beach.
$650/mo. (904)753-6500 (Marcy)
2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated
Amenities incl. $900/mo + sec dep.
Call 912-269-3960.
FOR RENT - 1B.R/1BA condo at Amelia
Lakes with porch. Nice Amenities.
$750/mo. Call Tim (386) 846-2951.
925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006

AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $950/mo. (904)206-
2313
3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE - 1700 sf.
3 yrs old. Upgrades galore. Fireplace, 1
car gar. Close to beach. $1200/mo.
negotiable. (904)294-1587.
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2BR, pool,
tennis, 2 blocks to beach, W/D, lower
unit. Service animals only. $875/mo.
Available now. Call (847)867-3163.
2BR/2BA COLONY UNIT - 2-car gar.,
newly remodeled, pool & tennis court.
No smoking. $1000/mo. + dep. & utils.
(904)548-0774, (904)556-5457.
AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA, 1200sf,
W/D. Immaculate. Lake view, 1st floor.
$875/mo. Call Don Brown Realty
(904)225-5510 or 571-7177.


859 Homes-Furnished

3BR/2BA - plus bonus room, garage.
Fully furnished. In Lofton Pointe.
$.1300/mo. From information call Anna
(904)403-1982.
3BR/2.5BA Fully Furnished Home -
just 1 mile from beach or historic
downtown. 1 mo. dep. req'd. $1350/
mo. Includes basic cable, water, sewer,

860 Homes-Unfurnished

NORTH HAMPTON UNFURNISHED
HOME - 3BR/2BA, large backyard.
$1300/mo. One month free with year
lease. Call (912)270-3239.
3BR/2 FULLBATHS - New tile, rec-
ently upgraded, Delorean St. $1500/
mo. Negotiable. (423)716-2148
AMERICAN BEACH - 5475 Ocean
Blvd., 3BR/2BA, 1100sf, $775mo. Don
Brown Realty at 225-5510 or 571-
7177.
YULEE - Nice 3/2 brick home on 1+
acres. 96686 Chester Rd. near Home
Depot & Target. Home has large den.
Updated kitchen & baths. $1,150/mo.+
dep. 904-491-6008 or 904-910-5913
$900/MO. - 3BR/2BA, large family
room, fenced backyard. Very nice.
$900 deposit. (904)277-8698 or 753-
8773
LEASE/OPT/BUY - 3BR/2BA home in
Heron Isles, 96017 Tidal Bay Ct. Lake
view. CH&A. FREE CABLE. $995/mo.
(916)300-3039


3BR/2BA - with in ground pool, in
Hickory Village. $1275/mo. Call (904)
553-7258.
YULEE 1BR/1BA GUEST HOME - on
lake. CH&A, W/D hookups, lawn care.
No smoking. $700/mo. + $700 deposit.
(904)225-5952 or (904)945-3405
FREE RENT - Small cottage down-
town. $595. 2/1, CH&A, wood floors,
laundry rm, nice area. Drive by and
look in, 506 Dade St. (904)607-3121
AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
HOME - for rent. 4BR/3BA, great
location. $1500/mo. + deposit. Call
(904) 545-3017.
3BR/2BA HOME - in town, new. For
rent with sales option and rent credit.
(904)753-0025

861 Vacation Rentals

VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - Furnish-
ed house. 3BR/2BA, 2-car gar, gated
comm/pool, 5 min/beach. Rent by day,
wk, mth, yr. 261-6204, 206-0035
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.


MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free LimiedTime
* W/D Connections
* Large Closets
* Pirvate Pations
* Sparkling Pool
* Tennis Courts
* Exercise Room
7 * Close to Shopping
- Twenty Minutes to
S Jacksonville & Fernandina
City Apartments with Country Charm

Odt (904) 845-2922
37149 Cody Circle
Eastwoo aks HilliairF, Flo rida...
APARTM EN TS Mon.I.- Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


863 Office
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
LARGE OFFICE - approximately 600sf
above the Palace Saloon. $900
monthly, including utilities. Call George
(904)557-5644.
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
OFFICE OR RETAIL SPACE - for rent,
14 North 4th St. 400sf with bathroom.
Just renovated. Behind Post Office.
$750/mo. (904)415-1053
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.

864 Commercial/Retail

2000SF BUILDING FOR LEASE -
1893 S. 8th St., Fernandina Beach.
$1500/mo. (904)349-2558
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on A1A in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.

865 Warehouse


901 Automobiles

Acura Integra -'95 $500. Honda
Civic '97 $400. Toyota Camry '98 $850.
Ford Taurus '00 $900. Police Impounds.
For listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9275. ANF

1994 CHEVROLET STEPSIDE P/U -
350 V8, 154K mi., all power, runs
great, no oil leaks, clean interior, black.
Has A/C leak. $2900. 277-2075
ESTATE SALE - Gator golf cart,
$2000. 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan
SE, full loaded, $3500. Excellent
condition. (904)225-2965
'96 CHRYSLER CONCORD LXI - 1
owner. New brakes, valves, radiator,
hoses, gaskets, 2 tires, battery, tune
up. Auto., A/C. $2,900. 717-487-6723

S903 Vans

1995 FORD VAN - Runs good. In line
6 cylinder. $1200. (904)321-1260
SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034





Nassau

SClub
Apartinents
Best Address in Fernandina Beach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
J Pool
/ Fitness Center
/ Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details
(904)277-2500 ,~


l Visit us at www.galphinre.com

a 1 I , (904) 277-6597 Business
______ (800) 699-6597 Toll Free
. . F.. . TI ....... *, " (904) 277-4081 Fax

Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company 1880 S. 14th'St., Suite 103 * Amelia Island, FL 32i


034


I RetalsRen al RetsRnasI


I I In 'I.... 1. i A iL.il, tr. ..ll 0 . .I I I iri (...[ Ln - . \ nio-.. ' ofic 86867 CCattesiantoi te-4B1K/2.i5BA
office suites. Located near A1A and suites to choose from, L...l.cJ in thl home loc-Atedin Cattesian Pointe on
Highway 17. Wireless internet and resort district and close i., iUP '.Lit cC.,rnr in ..i. I1,t ll.t i i b.tA yard. 2500
seityti' system provided. From Ptki'l.,:i'.io'naclntd nni ia riteddi and q PF. )lf lf unil $1 4- '1o
" f: , , r..: -.... i , i.... pricing.
Nassau (o)ung t Premier Property Management Specialists


i209 Village ryiv - BR/2BA located in Ocean Village. Furnished or
in ,ifr..[-!li i J .t . .n. in l ]i.1 widilvt h i jiic s . ind.d Sumnler
'< utJ i nemlr rsh ihp..lllr'lr l ii, 1 n.ll lILC Li. , .i. t l Ic 5 is llio rd.
On Island. $1,950/mo

1913 Perimeler Park - 3B2.5BA with formal living and dining.
Master with garden tub & granite counter tops. Pets allowed. On
Island. $1,995/mo
fr- 1 In I n..Jl" ,[ - 1 .' 't .\ ., ,.i Jltil ,,-i a i,, i,, '..' t , ilr-d . ,'"
i, i kI.L I v i. i r u ni . h..l, ,r uiul rmt ,,h J Ill.li i Iin ll .luj fItL
aJl.,' i.,>l 1. 11 . 1 i ll I b'1 i i ill..

1886 (Cape Sound- 3BI/3.5BA condo fully furnished with
community pool and work out room. Granite counter tops. Stainless
steel appliances. Utilities induded. No pels. On Island, .1,850/mo

95208 Woodhcrry - 4BIV3.5BA Summer Beach home with tile flxor
throughout and large bonus room. Screened inlanai, 2 car garage
and community pool. Lawn care and washer/dryer. On Island.
$1,750/mo

2851 Ferdinand - Brand new 31BR2BA home in Isle De Mal with
screened in lanai. Overlooking pond. Community Pool. lawn care.
No pets. On lIsland. S1,650/mo

87067 Kipling- 4 BR12.5 BA located in Bells River Estates. Screened
pool. 2818sq t.3 car .u ii.. I I ',idoel hil,ei lih pui Ic l.rIge
u,".t r ,.'" 'i idlitl.r ipl.n irt I Pets allowed. Includes pool caue.
hio l_ l ..I .i 1 <"r',,I,,,

95015 Sea Wailk. 1cautiful l3BIV2BA home localed in SeIa lk .7.,_if
S,. ,l ,.i . I i. li.I, ,,..r rla., i Ii r a, ,, .i roie I s, , Ik ,hi ui,] -I, nel

86867 Catesian Pointe - 4BR/2.5BA home located in Cartesian
Poinle on comer lot. Huge fenced back yard. 2500 Sq. Ft.. Off Island.
$1,475/'mo

'951 i nAmalfi - 3BR/2.5BA town home located In the villas of
Summer Beach with community pool. Short walk to beach. Lawn
care and washler/drycr Screened lanai. Pets allowed. On Island.
$ l,50/nmo

96816 Arrigo Blvd, - 3BIV/2BA home located in Beachwaywith
oversized enced backyard. Many upgrades ilt lawn care
included. Pets allowed. OfflIsland. $],325/mo


86i059 t -ienburg - 3BH/2BA North Hampton 1500 sq. It. home.
Huge back yard. Wireless access. lPes allowed. Halfof one month
rent with full lease. Offlsland. $1.300/no

95152 lildcrberry - 3BR/2.5BAtown home located in the Preserve
with community pool. Short walk to beach. lawn care and
washer/dryer. Summer Beach membership available for small fee.
Pets allowed. On Island. 1,300/mo

1994 Amelia Green - Brand new 2 R.-! ' inA lonnh. nie dit lifi
and one car garage; Close to shopping and beach. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,2(X)/nio

1969 Amelia Green - 2B1/2.5BA townhome widl tile floors
throughoultmain living Gr.utill c(iounenups s5.linll y.s-el
appliances. Close to shiippingt IndIrr ch lance OnLcm n ndl
$1,200/mo

1oa4,' Ampg:. - %BR2b,\ homire kl.-d in Ik.rul" r' . 1600 sqft,
s,.pli 1. ..r plhn, u., ,err I ln. OI f ly.ind 1I 151 ino

823 N. lletcher - 2BIVhA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean view
with sunroom. atiersewer Included, Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,100/mo

86184 Augueiu., - Bllt211,l it.ti Irt JId li (tanesljn PBiinle id,
IkInt .l li.ik.,rdl uiflt.q li n.icenil porch. 2 .Ir gr.tage IIUlf
IMl ai.d SlI, i . rn.

23(,2' fih- .sAl . IR I R l furmnshed condo nih communil) p...l
loc'jitl I in \1nlij lu 1 rind PinLiUon A.i>s Ire-rl lirem hea.h ,I11
UIllllit-u plums'.h.ibl inlrnlci Incllidel 81,l 111in

5437 Leonard 2B1/2BA home located inAmerican Beach. Great
outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings. Oversized yard.
Pets allowed. On Island. $950/mo
sI .S I ilh -"'lit I 5hIh h,,int tilh0,1t In] 'd fkIILLdt li a'.-k.,iil
jan lii..k l . ,l-..alll :,t 'l Il l ni.:.nilh iri t lih 12 ti.' ,lk.i.i on
'.1,,1 .J '. tin rd'. ..li .nl, I2 m.undij kI.e . i i lln..

' i.n i.II.i. h ' -...un - ::ii(-2 B\ Icn.l d nl h nti rt s d L'b.i.- it :l.
Pets allowed. On Island. $750/mo


Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most From Your Investment Property.
ive Ls A Call Today!


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles- 3BR/2.5BA Bring your golf clubs and walk the golf'
course. Single family traditional home with 2 car garage. Living mrom and
dining romn at front of house. Fireplace in family room which exits to
large screened porch. Master bedroom has entry to screened porch for
early morning coffee and bird watching in a natural setting. Conveniently
located to shopping, schools and dining just off Amelia Island Parkway.
$1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beauifhul home withi covered patio
and well mainitned lawn. Home has separate diinig and fireplace in liv-
ing room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in presti-
gious gated community where amenities include a community switmmipg
pool and easy access to the beach, Ritz Carlton and Golf Club of Amelia
just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking distance to
the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage. $1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA - Nice home located in Ocean
Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in back patio and
2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA - This home is charming country living
at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land with
beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm evenings in the flori-
da room or cozy up by the replace on the cold winter nights. Either way
this one is a charmer. $1500 (
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.SBA - 2795 sq. ft., granite counter
tops, maple cabiicts, stainless steel appliances, washer/dryer included,
centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND

* 95140 Hither Hills Way - 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green in
the North Halmpton Golf Community with rlub house/aquatic center,
basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with canoc/kayak
lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television, High Speed
Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400
* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA - Beautiful fenced lot, satellite dish,
tool house. Telln minutes from Almelia Island and convenient to
Jacksonville International Airport. $1150


$799,000 - Sandpiper Loop
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
NIn anlnhln - 277-6597


. . IIrr!I llr.. . . t------iI


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2633 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1.5BA Community features include swimming
pool. tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools and
shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo \ith community pool
at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BRi2BA \ith fireplace Great south
end location,. lnrge 2 car garage. This unit is in excellent condition.
Community Poo and tennis courts. Minutes from the ocean, golf and
shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking a leisurely drive on
AlA through State Parks along the ocean and intracoastal waterway.
$925
* 2012A West Natures Lane-3BR/2.5BA-Lovely townhome centrally
located on the island. Minutes to shopping, schools and the beach.$1100
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is beautiful town home locat-
ed in a gated community oFP AA off of the Intercoastal waterway. Rent
includes water, garbage, sewer and lasn service. $2475
*, 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as well as
golf course;views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful brick paver
walkways. Private elevator, $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs. $1100
Downstairs oceanfront 2 BI/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front and rear
yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family room.
lolime is only onie block from the ocean, $900
* 2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1BA Located only 2 blocks from the beach.
iHome hias new carpet! Coniunity features include swimming pool, ten-
nis court, play ground and Bar-B-Q area. $750
2999-B South Fletcher 3BR/3.5BA - Watch the dolphins feed from your
rooftop deck. Open floor plan has all the living on the second floor with
2 Car Garage. GriREK ocean views. First floor has two bedrooms and 2
baths. \asher/dryer hookups. Downstairs bathroom has sliders to
screened porch overlooking Egan's'Creek Imarsih. Walk to the beach.
$1695
FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A - 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnished.1 block frpm
the beach. $750


$425,000 - S. Fletcher Lot 5Ox10O0'
Ready to bulld - Plans Available 27010 .f.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


E LT -- U-


$725,000 - Fernandlna Cay - MLS# 43544 $595,0oo - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lot- MLS# 45255 $142,000 - Tile Palms - MLS* 45243
3BR/3BA - Great Ocean View ouy now, Build later, use ofxistieng home 2B/28A - Many Upgrades
NIp Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166 Brad Goble - 261-6166





.a.

375,000 - MLS#49508 $510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365 $150,000 -1311 Broome- MLS# 47108
2600 S.F. - across rom tlle Bells River 4BR/3BA - 2578sl - In Seaside Subdlvlslon 1375 s.f. Open Floor Plan
Call me or your agenl quickly Nip Galphin - 277-0507 Brad Goble - 261-6166
Brad Goble - 904-261-0166
* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


60X125 STORAGE YARD - Zoned
2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island. i $5/ (0432
industrial. Only $550/mo. (904)321-
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals n2st2a
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105. 2222


Sale Saes ale Sle Sle
___________ ______________________________


$340,000 - Reserve Court
4BR/2BA In Reserve at Old Bluff
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


Nassau County's Largest Selection of


Long Term Rentals.


Easy Application Process, Ext)ert Service & Grea t Prices

11 1 1 1


I


nip U illillill - 41 ---Uuut


i i h c�''' � ' ' C " L' ii







Fri Sat S
7/17 7/18 Baby

pictures

90/76 84/74 PAGE6A


F L 0 R I D A' S


OLDEST


WE E K L Y


N E W SPA P E R


will.
-- ,Cb. ,, *


NEWS LEADER


>,~' ~


FRIDAY July 17 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS .fbnewsleader.com


Husband



guilty of



murder

JASON YURGARTIS
News-Leader
A jury of nine men and three
women deliberated for four hours
Thursday before returning a verdict
of guilty in the capital murder trial of
Michael Ratley. The Bryceville man
could face the death penalty.
The case was put in the hands of the
jury a day after Michael Ratley took
the stand and denied
killing Effie Ratley.
Ratley, 25, admit-
ted he was nervous
when prompted by
defense attorney Lee
Hutton Wednesday
afternoon at the
Nassau County
Ratley Judicial Annex in
Yulee.
But he answered
questions for more than two hours
ranging from how he and Effie met to
the events that led to her death at age
29 on Jan. 27, 2007.
After revisiting at length the cou-
ple's life together and getting the defen-
dant's version of the crime, Hutton
asked Ratley if he murdered his wife.
"No sir, I did not," he replied.
The jury unanimously disagreed.
TRIAL Continued on 3A




Noise



law is



official
ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News-Leader
The city's new noise ordinance was
finally passed with little fanfare
Tuesday evening at its fifth public read-
ing in City Hall.'
The vote was 3-1, with
Commissioner Ken Walker voting
against. Vice Mayor Eric Childers was
absent.
There were still a few downtown
residents and business owners, how-
ever, who appeared to have serious
doubts about the ethical history or
effectiveness of the ordinance..
Anthony DeLucia, owner of the
Green Turtle Tavern, which has been
subject to repeated noise complaints
'by next-door Florida House Inn, said
the ordinance was "contrived and
brewed up behind closed doors." He
referred to a recent article in the News-
Leader that pointed ,to a possible
Sunshine Law violation by a former
city commission that may have given
the new ordinance a legal "leg up"
because the city wanted to avoid a law-
suit.
Because of that alleged Sunshine
Law violation, DeLucia said Joe and
Diane Warwick, owners of the Florida
House Inn, were "essentially black-
mailing the city to get their way."
"This senseless litigation has gone
on for five years," DeLucia said of the
noise complaints. "I do not run an
establishment that has affected anyone
else negatively."
City Attorney Tammi Bach said,
however, that any allegations of a
"back-door deal," as DeLucia called it,
were false.
"The only reason the city commis-
sion has addressed a noise ordinance
is because we had an unenforceable
noise ordinance," Bach said.
NOISE Continued on 3A


Students


prepare


foriobs


and life
SIAN PERRY
News-Leader
When Chef William Castleberry
agreed to teach high school kids in
a summer career education pro-
gram, he never dreamed he would
be the one doing the learning. But
the students in his culinary arts
class at the Lewis ."Red" Bean
Technical Career Center in Yulee
have taught him a thing or two.
"I served in Vietnam, and
they're as much of a team as you'd
find in Special Ops in the military,"
said Castleberry. "You don't even
find this in upscale hotel kitchens.
There's no ego here. The hardest
thing about this whole program is,
'Chef, what can do I do next? What
can I do next?' It's awesome. ... I
always blame myself when class-
es aren't as successful as they
should be, but these kids have
taught me I can only be as good as
they allow me to be."
Castleberry is one of five
instructors in the three-week pro-
gram funded through a $32,000
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act grant adminis-
tered by WorkSource and overseen
by Jim Burns, transition coordina-
tor for exceptional student educa-
tion at the Nassau County School
District.
Thirty-two local high school stu-
dents, all facing different social and
academic challenges, were chosen
on the recommendation of their
teachers to study one of five career
paths: culinary arts, medical skills,
child -care, automotive and con-
struction. The auto and construc-
tion courses are held at Yulee High
School and the others at the Bean
Center.
While the students are becom-
ing educated about career choic-
es, learning valuable job skills and
earning $10Q per week, the pro-
gram encompasses much more,
noted Burns.
"I think we're hitting a lot-of dif-
fefent things that will get students
better prepared for post-secondary
life - not just jobs, but life," he
said, referring in part to morning
rotations that focus on personal
and social skills.
"Group talk," led by Sutton
Place Behavioral Health, tackles
issues such as self-esteem, trust
and how to interact with other peo-
ple, and coaching in team building
by FCCJ staff "gets people to learn
how to work with each other," said
SCHOOL Continued on 4A


Inside the automotive lab at Yulee High School, instructor Ron
Kennison teaches the workings of a drill to Nassau County high
school students taking part in a career education summer pro-
gram, top. Alexa Doyle, above, stirs a pot of spaghetti sauce in the
culinary arts class held at the Lewis "Red" Bean Technical
Career Center in Yulee. Cody Lyons, below, and Aaron
Highsmith, bottom, work on a construction project as part of the
program funded through a federal American Recovery and.
Reinvestment Act grant.


Swine



flu in



Nassau
RYAN SMITH
News-Leader
There have been three cases of
H1N1 swine flu in Nassau County. All
of those who fell ill have recovered.
The Nassau County Health
Department confirmed Thursday that
the three cases occurred in May and
June. Two were members of the same
family, and in all three cases the ill-
ness originated out of state. The health-
department declined to say where in
the county the sick lived.
The health department did not
report the cases to the public although
the cases were reported to the Florida
Department of Health. Local officials
chose not to inform the public because
there was already sufficient awareness
of the virus, according to county
Disease Control Director Kim Geib.
"From an (epidemiology) stand-
point we weren't that concerned. ...
These were mild cases. Never went to
the hospital or anything," Geib said.
Geib said the victims were treated
and monitored until the danger of trans-
mitting the illness had passed. "Usually
you're considered contagious for seven
days after your first symptoms. One
day before and seven days after ... so
we had people stay home," she said.
"They didn't go anywhere for seven
days."
Geib said state privacy regulations
prohibit her from releasing where in
the county the victims were from.
"They're small cities, and people could
figure out (who contracted the virus)."
The mildness of the cases was one
reason the health department chose
not to release the information, she said.
"We felt like people had sufficient
awareness to protect themselves - and
(the illness) had been acquired out of
FLU Continued on 3A



Callahan

boy's death

led to alert
KATHIE COLGROVE
Community Newspapers
Although health officials would not
confirm it, a 13-year-old Callahan boy
died July 10, possibly of fatal menin-
gitis. Autopsy results are pending and
the cause of death will not be known for
several weeks.
The Nassau County Health
Department issued
an alert after the
death because it : ,
could be fatal menin-
gitis, but it declined
to reveal where the
child lived.
SDalton Nettles, a
Callahan Middle
School seventh- Dalton
grade student, was
treated for an ear
infection July 2, after swimming in a
pond. Dalton returned to the emer-
gency room July 8, As his health began
to worsen, he was put on life support,
family friend Judy Cooper wrote in an
e-mail July 9.
"There are no words to express the
sadness and sorrow we feel in the loss
of Dalton. I have cried a river since
seeing him on (July 9)," Cooper wrote
in an e-mail Saturday.
On Monday, family members
shared their memories of the boy who
loved the outdoors and had a zest for
life. "Bubble is loving and caring and I


DEATH Continued on 3A


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SID ............................ 2B OUTANDABOUT ................ 2B 2 lostduetorecentstonns
, ......................... 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B e t orghss g
, .................o.............. 14A SPORTS ......... ........................................... 12A diecdyonthebeachForadeta ledo nt
S: ' i.. - ' .................................. A SUDOKU .................................................... 2B sB ee ,w am elalnd seatur a ta t com .


Comedy
night
PAGE IB


*-*aw-"'









FRIDAY, July 17.2009 NEWS News-Lcader


A new street was under
construction to link Franklin
Street and Stanley Drive,
saving drivers 10 miiuutes on
trips to Container Corp. or
the Amelia River waterfront.
July 16, 1959

25 YEAS .

The Northeast Florida
Regional Planning Council


unanimously approved plans
for Summer Beach, a 2,414-
unit development on south
Amelia Island.
July 18, 1984
10 YEARS AGO

City commissioners voted
to create a Wal-Mart
Defense Fund to pay experts.
in the ongoing battle to pre-
vent construction of a super-
center on the island.
July 14, 1999


, e. -0


Suic irks Ircc (n SuntLi


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


- 9


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WEEKLY UPDATE


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NEWS.
LEADER\


511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904) 261-3696 Fax 261-3698
Website for email addresses:
fbnewsleader.com


Office hours are 830 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Femandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Femandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Femandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subjectto the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............. . $36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ...... .... .. $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.

CNI nc orporA.,
~ Incorporat d


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


YuleeHigh
registration
Yulee High School will
accept registration for new
students from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
on Tuesday and Wednes-
days through Aug. 19. Call
the Guidance Department at
225-8641.
Carwash
A car wash fundraiser and
raffle to help supplement the
fees for children attending
local summer camps will be
held July 18 starting at 9 a.m.
at the Wal-Mart Supercenter
in Yulee. Raffle tickets are $5
and include a chance to win
$100, a one-night stay at the
Hampton Inn & Suites and a
boat charter to Cumberland
Island donated by Capt. Bill
Supplee.
The drawing will be held
Aug. 8. For information con-
tact Brenda Manson at 261-
.7488 (day) or 321-2486 (after
6 p.m.).
Micah's orientation
Micah's Place invites the
public to its monthly orienta-
tion on July 23 at 5:30 p.m.
Learn more about the
agency's services, family vio-
lence issues and volunteer-
ing. Call 491-6364, ext. 102 to
RSVP and for location.
Orientations are held the
fourth Thursday each month.


VOLUNTEERS

Van needed
Micah's Place needs a van
to transport emergency shel-
ter residents and their chil-
dren to medical appointments,
child-care, employment and
other necessary activities. As
a 501(c) (3) organization, your
donation of a van is. tax
deductible. Call 491-6364, ext.
102 to make arrangements.
Cowns needed
Savannah Grand Assisted
Living, 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Fernandina Beach, will
be hosting a "Come Clown
Around With Us!" event and
needs help from anyone that
would like to be a clown or
has clown suits and games
like those used at school car-
nivals. Contact Renee Stoffel
at 321-0898.


'.-* ' z z r i : 7 ,


Dr. and Mrs.
Carlos
Salmon
wish to express
their heartfelt
gratitude to
family and t-
friends for their
love and
Sup lpot' in the
lo.s of their son,

Rolando
Salmon


Consumer clinics


register contact Jen Nich-
olson, RD, LD/N, Healthy


Free consumer clinics Communities Healthy People
presented by Jacksonville program manager at 548-I853
Area Legal Aid for Nassau or e-mail Jennifer_Nichol
County residents will be held son@doh.state.fl.us.
Aug. 10, Sept. 14 and Oct. 5 Recoveryevent
at 5:30 p.m. in the jury selec-
tion room of the Nassau A Keep Kids Drug Free
County Judicial Annex in event will be held at Metro
Yulee. Park in Jacksonville from 10
Topics include debt collec- a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 19 in obser-
tion, small claims, bankrupt- vance of SAMHSA's national
cy, foreclosure and ID theft. alcohol and drug addiction
For more information call recovery month initiative
(904) 356-8371, ext. 2509. (www.recoverymonth.org).
AARPmeeting" There will be live enter-
tainment by XODUS, Celinda
The local chapter #4608 of Pink's Blues Band, Billie
the AARP will resume its reg- Holiday and more, a chil-
ular meetings at 1 p.m. Aug. dren's zone with bouncy
11 at the Council on Aging house, face painting and
building across from Baptist more, a youth art exhibit,
Medical Center Nassau. vendors, mentors and con-
The AARP driving course cessions. For information
at First Presbyterian Church about the ride, contact Freda
will begin in late summer or Colley at (904) 485-3512.
early fall. Call the church at For more information con-
261-3837 to register, tact Mike Wheeler at (904)
Diabetes education 655-5785 or e-mail
Mwheeler6555785@com-
The Nassau County cast.net or Colley at fcol-
Health Department i ioffew1~." ley@gatewaycommunity.com. '
ing a series. 4,, ilwr. Lwoha. . Centre'dWotntn'
diabetes classes un Wedne'is.
days Aug. 19, 26, Sept. 2 and Centre'd Women, a social
9 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the and informational group,
Callahan Tax Collector's meets at 6:30 p.m. on the
office, 45401 Mickler St., third Monday of each month
Callahan. Registration fee is at Eileen's Arts and Antiques,
$20 and $10 for NCSD em- 702 Centre St. For more
ployees. For questions or to information, call 548-9770.


LITERARY LEANINGS


Summer book dub
The Book Loft is hosting
a 2009 Summer Book Club.
For more information con-
tact the store, 214 Centre
St., Fernandina Beach, at
261-8991.
Books needed
Nassau Humane Society
will hold its annual Paw
Prints Book and Plant Sale
on Friday, Aug. 7 from 9
a.m.-5 pm. and Saturday,
Aug. 8 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at
the Fernandina Beach air-
port. Please drop off your
unwanted books, CDs,
DVDs, artwork or other
items at the shelter located
at 671 Airport Road. All
donations are tax
deductible. Contact Gail
206-4092 or Sandra 321-
2319 with questions.
Writers and poets
The Nassau County
Writers and Poets Society
will meet at 9:30 a.m. July
18 at the Fernandina Beach
Municipal Airport. All writ-
ers and poets in the county
are invited; bring two dou-
ble-spaced pages of your
original prose or two to
three of your poems. Be
prepared to read and dis-
cuss your work. For infor-
mation contact Cara at
www.wordsmythe@net-
magic.net.
Florida writers
The Florida Writers
Association will meet July
21 at 6 p.m. at the Florida
House Inn, 22 S. Third St.
Guest speaker will be
Harold P Voyles, author of
Appalachian Sketches, who
will read excerpts from his
book, provide a historical
background and a photo


display of a 1920's mining.
camp. This is a dinner meet-
ing and members and the
public are invited. For infor-
mation and reservations,
call Maggie de Vries at 321-
6180.
Summer reading
All are welcome to join
the members and friends of
Providence Presbyterian
Church who will be reading
and discussing two special
books this summer. On July
22 they will discuss Sinning
Like a Christian by William
Willimon, and on Aug. 19,
they will discuss Barbara
Brown Taylor's newest
book, An Altar in the World.
Call the church at 432-
8118 for more information
about these discussions or
to order the books.
Writers' conference
The Division of Continu-
ing Education and the.
Department of English at
the University of North
Florida along with the
Florida Writers Association
is sponsoring the 2009
Writers Conference Aug. 7-
9 at the University Center
on campus.
The conference is for
writers of fiction, iton-fiction
and screenplays.
The three-day confer-
Sence kicks off Aug. 7 at 8
a.m., featuring keynote
speaker Steve Berry, New
York Times best-selling
author of The Charlemagne
Pursuit, The Alexandria
Link, The Venetian Betrayal
and many more.
Registration through
July 31 is $299. For more
information and to register
online visit www.unfwriter-
sconference.com or call
(904) 620-4200.


O(9arffCeardJiuerai Otredow,

Serving All of Nassau County for almost Eighty Years
Visit Our Life Stories At www. OxleyHeard.com


.


LOOKING BACK


-
- -


0


OBITUARY

David Ray Anderson
Mr. David Ray Anderson,
age 49, passed away suddenly
on, Tuesday, July 7, 2009 in
Fernandina Beach, FL.
Born in Gardner, Kansas, he
had been a former resident of
Orange Park, FL. For many
years Mr. Anderson had
worked in the Construction
Industry as a Roofer.
He leaves behind his 3 chil-
dren; Jaymes
Anderson, Sarai
Anderson, both
of Emporia, KS,
Arielle Serrano,
Glendora, CA, 1
brother, Robert
Anderson; 3 sis-
ters, Misty Anderson, Marilyn
Anderson, Christine Traw, his 3
nieces and 1 nephew.
He will be greatly missed by
all his family and many friends.
Funeral services will be on
Saturday, July 18, 2009 at 2:00
pm at the Fernandina Beach
Seaside Park, Gazebos No. 3 &
4, Fernandina Beach, Florida.
(Intersection of Sadler Road &
Flethier Ave.) ," - ' . �r-
M-. Anderson wilLbe laid to
rest at a later date.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit prior to and following
the services, on Saturday, at
the Seaside Park.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley-HeardFuneral Directors




Helpwith


Medicare


choices

The Medicare supplemen-
tal policy reform bill that comes
into effect Oct. 1 has a huge
impact on the disabled who
have Medicare Part A and B.
Before they could not get a sup-
plemental policy if there were
under age 65.
A supplemental policy pays
for all co-pays and deductibles
Medicare does not cover.
Guaranteed Issued Policy
means the individual has six
months from the time they get
their Medicare A and B to join
a Supplemental Policy and they *
will not be charged higher pol-
icy rates or denied a policy due
to past or current health prob-
lems.
House Bill 675-Medicare
Supplement reform is effective
Oct. 1, requiring an open enroll-
ment period for individuals that
become eligible for Medicare
Part A and B due to disability,
including end stage renal dis-
ease.
The time periods are the
same as for Medicare eligible
individuals when they turn age
65. Once a person becomes eli-
gible for and enrolled in
Medicare Part Aand B, regard-
less of age, they have six
months to obtain a guaranteed
issue Medicare Supplement pol-
icy.
Individuals that became eli-
gible for and enrolled in
Medicare Part A and B due to
disability prior to Oct. 1 will have
a six-nronth period starting Oct
1 to obtain a guaranteed issue
policy.
All companies that sell
Medicare Supplement policies
in Florida will have to offer the
S. policies to those under age 65.
If you need assistance under-
standing and selecting a
Supplemental/Medicap Policy
contact your local University of
Florida Extension Agent Meg
McAlpine at 548-1116.


- q









FRIDAY', July 17.2009 NEWS Ncws-Lcadcr


MATERNITY WARD


Baptist
Medical
Center
Nassau
nurses
Paula Platt,
Christina
Richards and
Agnes
Bayacal enjoy
baby pictures
donated by
Pam Bell
Photography
recently to
the hospital
maternity
ward. Bell
selected the
photos from
among thou-
sands she's
taken over
the years.
SUBMrITED)


St.


0
0
-0
(5
0.


i.


Aneurysms


July 22, 2006 was a day like
any other until suddenly I
found myself with a painful
headache and uncontrollable
vomiting; it felt like a rubber
band had snapped in my head.
I knew immediately that some-
thing was terribly wrong and
dialed 911.
At the hospital I was
informed that my brain was
bleeding and I had to have
emergency
brain sur-
gery. (I was
given a 5
percent
chance of
survival).
Three
weeks in the
hospital and
WELLNESS six months
CORNER of rehab
later, I was
able to see
Elsa M. the light at
Cintron the end of
the tunnel.
Thanks to God I was able to
recover my "cognition" skills
that I need to use in my daily
living.
* What is an aneurysm?
An aneurysm, "brain
attack," is a localized, blood-
filled dilation (balloon-like
bulge) of a blood vessel caused
by disease or weakening of the
vessel wall. Aneurysms most
commonly occur in arteries at
the base of the brain. As the
size of an aneurysm increases,
there is an increased risk of
rupture, which can result in
severe hemorrhage, compli-
cations and sudden death.
* Risk factors
Rupture and blood clotting
are the risks involved with
aneurysms. Rupture leads to
drop in blood pressure, rapid
heart rate, high cholesterol
and lightheadedness. The risk
of death is high except for rup-
ture in the extremities. Risk
factors for aneurysms are obe-
sity, diabetes, hypertension,
alcoholism, tobacco use and
copper deficiency.
* Symptoms
A sudden, severe headache
is one of the first sign of a rup-
tured aneurysm (hemorrhag-
ic stroke). A patient will typi-
cally describe it as the worst


Suddenly Ifound
myself with a painful
headache and
uncontrollable
vomiting; it felt like a
rubber band had
snapped in my head.

headache of their lives. The
headache may be accompa-
nied by nausea and vomiting.
Other symptoms are weak-
ness or numbness; confusion
and lethargy; and seizures.
Aneurysms that haven't
ruptured usually don't cause
symptoms; sometimes the
bulging vessel announces itself
by pressing against surround-
ing brain tissue. This can
cause symptoms very similar
to those of a rupture, including
severe headaches, gait imbal-
ance, weakness or numbness
on one side of the body. If you
notice these symptoms, get
medical help immediately.
* Treatment
Currently there are two
treatment options for brain
aneurysms: surgical clipping
or endovascular coiling. In my
case surgical clipping was the
option.
Surgical clipping was intro-
duced by Walter Dandy of the
Johns Hopkins Hospital in
1937. It consists of perform-
ing a craniotomy, exposing the
aneurysm and closing the
base of the aneurysm with a
clip. This surgical technique
has been modified and
improved over the years and
remains the best method to
permanently, eliminate
aneurysms.
This column should be
used as a useful adjunct to
other available medical and
educational resources related
to brain aneurysms and other
future topics described herein;
it should not be used as an
alternative to personal con-
sultation with a physician.
Elsa Cintron is a physical
therapist and owner of Cintron
Rehab and Wellness Center
elsacin@gmaiLcom


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Tuesday, July 21, 2009
9:00 am - 11:0.0 am
Hampton Inn & Suites
19 South Second Street


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Wednesday, July 22, 2009
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Hilton Garden Inn
9745 Gate Parkway Dr. N


WESTSIDE/NORTHSIDE
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Holiday Inn
1-295 & Commonwealth


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Wednesday, July 22, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Hilton Garden Inn'
1-295 & US 17


JAX BEACH/PONTE VEDRA
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Hampton Inn
1220 Marsh Landing Pkwy


PALM COAST
Thursday, July 23, 2009
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Hampton Inn & Suites
1-95 & SR 100


ST. AUGUSTINE
Wednesday, July 22, 2009
10:00 am -Noon
San Marco Theater
28 San Marco Avenue


MANDARIN
Thursday, July 23, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Ramada Inn
1-295 & San Jose Blvd.


Refreshments will be served. Plenty of free parking.



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Please arrive early, seating may be limited.


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Practice Primarily Devoted to Estate Planning
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f 303 Centre Street. Suite 102
N Located in Historic Downtown Fernandina Beach
On Amelia Island
904-321-1999 OFrFIE oR 904-556-4000 :CELL'LPRIBLACKBEPRY
E-MAIL: claudiacw@iremax net
WCla a ebsiWae wwtt psrop f, l iot.:lll l ,lan,-ffl v.'I i ".n%
Claudia Watts


' iI ' r


941d








FRIDAY. July 17.2009/NEWS-LEADER


HOMES


Farmers market
Mike and Brenda Cooper of Annie Clyde's
have returned to the Fernandina Farmers
Market as a vendor. Annie Clyde's homemade
pound cakes honor Brenda's mother, Annie
Clyde, a Georgia native who spent hours teach-
ing Brenda her .-
recipes and
techniques for *, ,
baking a good-
looking and, mot .1 all, girel-
tasting cake. Brenda developed miniature ver-
sions of those pound cakes that her mother
baked until her death in 1987. These gourmet
mini cakes are made with fresh and natural
ingredients and topped with handmade glazes
include Loving Lemon, Shonuff Strawberry,
Plezant Pineapple, Chocolate Chocolate,
Comely Coconut and Off the Tree Orange.
There's even a mini Sweet Potato Pie.
The market, open Saturdays from 9 a.m.-1
p.m. at Seventh and Centre streets, features
fresh produce as well as organic products, spe-
cialty foods and plants. Call 491-4872 or visit
www.fernandinafarmersmarket.conm.
Birdingwalk
Join Our Greenway on July 18 at 8 a.m. for a
birding walk on the Egans Creek Greenway.
You can expect to see a variety of wading and
songbirds as well as birds of prey. Go to the
Our Greenway website at www.ourgreenway.
org to download a Greenway specific bird list.
Participants are encouraged to bring binocu-
lars, water, sun protection, bug juice, comfort-
able walking shoes and optionally field guides
and spotting scopes.
SMeet in the parking lot at the entrance to
the Greenway behind the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center, 2500 Atlantic Ave. It is free
and open to the public. For information call
277-7350 or visit www.ourgreenway.org.
Beach walk
Join a park ranger for a walk on the beach
as they explain the importance of undeveloped
beach habitat, including many interesting facts
about sea creatures and common shells found
in the area, July 19 at 2 p.m. at pavilion one on
Little Talbot Island State Park. No reservations
are necessary and the program is free with reg-


ular park admission. For information call (904)
251-2320.
Sierra Club outing
A weekend outing with manatees and the
other fauna and flora of Crystal River and
Homosassa Springs is planned for Aug. 14-16
by the Nassau Sierra Club. The event is open
to the public. Deadline to register is July 24.
Club members will travel to Crystal River
on Friday and meet Saturday at Manatee Tours
USA for a morning manatee tour and an after-
noon of kayaking at Crystal River/Kings Bay.
Group rates include $39 for the manatee tour
and $25 for kayak rental.
Sunday optional activities include a visit to
Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park that show-
cases native Florida wildlife. Recreational
opportunities include picnicking, nature study
and bird watching. A children's education cen-
ter provides hands-on experiences. Group
admission rates of $9 for adults and $6 for chil-
dren are available for 10 or more people.
Participants arrange their own lodging and
pay the concessionaire fees directly. For infor-
mation and to register for the event and be eli-
gible for group rates, contact Len Kreger at
1.kreger@comcast.net or (904) 432-8389.
Talbot critters
Join a park ranger to learn about the many
common species that inhabit the natural com-
munities of the undeveloped barrier islands of
Northeast Florida at 2 p.m. July 25 at pavilion
five on Little Talbot Island. No reservations are
necessary. For information call the Talbot
Islands Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320.
Bird dub
The Nassau County Bird Club will hold a
field trip to Huguenot Memorial Park on Aug.
15 and Sept. 5 at 8 a.m., rain or shine. Park
entry is $1 per car. The park is located off
Heckscher Drive about 8 miles south of the
Nassau Sound bridge. Meet in the parking lot
of the general store. Target birds include the
Piping Plover, Oystercatcher, Whimbrel,
Reddish Egret, gulls and terns. Bring your
binoculars, field guide, bug juice, sunscreen,
rain gear, sunglasses and water.
For information call Carol Wyatt at 262-9272
or e-mail carolinewy@aol.com.


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The news-leader
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028319/00453
 Material Information
Title: The news-leader
Uniform Title: News-leader (Fernandina Beach, Fla.)
Portion of title: News leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Fernandina Beach News-Leader
Place of Publication: Fernandina Beach, Fla
Creation Date: July 17, 2009
Publication Date: 1980-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Fernandina Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Nassau County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Nassau -- Fernandina Beach
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 124, no. 9 (Feb. 27, 1980)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04377055
lccn - sn 78002171
issn - 0163-4011
System ID: UF00028319:00453
 Related Items
Preceded by: Fernandina Beach news-leader

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Full Text
MAGENTA BLACK


Fri
7/17



90/76


Sat
7/18 Baby

pictures
PAGE 6A
84/74 L

F LO RI DAY'S


Comedy

night
PAGE B

OLDEST


NEWS


LEADER


FRIDAY July 17 2009/20 PAGES 2 SECTIONS *fbnewsleadercom


Husband



guilty of



murder

JASON YURGARTIS
News Leader
A jury of nine men and three
women deliberated for four hours
Thursday before returning a verdict
of guilty in the capital murder trial of
Michael Ratley. The Bryceville man
could face the death penalty.
The case was put in the hands of the
jury a day after Michael Ratley took
the stand and denied
killing Effie Ratley.
Ratley, 25, admit-
ted he was nervous
when prompted by
defense attorney Lee
Hutton Wednesday
afternoon at the
Nassau County
Ratley Judicial Annex in
Yulee.
But he answered
questions for more than two hours
ranging from how he and Effie met to
the events that led to her death at age
29 on Jan. 27, 2007.
After revisiting at length the cou-
ple's life together and getting the defen-
dant's version of the crime, Hutton
asked Ratley if he murdered his wife.
"No sir, I did not," he replied.
The jury unanimously disagreed.
TRIAL Continued on 3A




Noise



law is



official
ANGELA DAUGHTRY
News Leader
The city's new noise ordinance was
finally passed with little fanfare
Tuesday evening at its fifth public read-
ing in City Hall.
The vote was 3-1, with
Commissioner Ken Walker voting
against. Vice Mayor Eric Childers was
absent.
There were still a few downtown
residents and business owners, how-
ever, who appeared to have serious
doubts about the ethical history or
effectiveness of the ordinance.
Anthony DeLucia, owner of the
Green Turtle Tavern, which has been
subject to repeated noise complaints
by next-door Florida House Inn, said
the ordinance was "contrived and
brewed up behind closed doors." He
referred to a recent article in the News-
Leader that pointed to a possible
Sunshine Law violation by a former
city commission that may have given
the new ordinance a legal "leg up"
because the city wanted to avoid a law-
suit.
Because of that alleged Sunshine
Law violation, DeLucia said Joe and
Diane Warwick, owners of the Florida
House Inn, were "essentially black-
mailing the city to get their way."
'This senseless litigation has gone
on for five years," DeLucia said of the
noise complaints. "I do not run an
establishment that has affected anyone
else negatively."
City Attorney Tammi Bach said,
however, that any allegations of a
I,,n,. Il.;Il .r deal," as DeLucia called it,
were false.
'"The only reason the city commis-
sion has addressed a noise ordinance
is because we had an unenforceable
noise ordinance," Bach said.
NOISE Continued on 3A


Students


prepare


forjobs,


andlife
SIAN PERRY
News Leader
When Chef William Castleberry
agreed to teach high school kids in
a summer career education pro-
gram, he never dreamed he would
be the one doing the learning. But
the students in his culinary arts
class at the Lewis "Red" Bean
Technical Career Center in Yulee
have taught him a thing or two.
"I served in Vietnam, and
they're as much of a team as you'd
find in Special Ops in the military,"
said Castleberry. "You don't even
find this in upscale hotel kitchens.
There's no ego here. The hardest
thing about this whole program is,
'Chef, what can do I do next? What
can I do next?' It's awesome. ... I
always blame myself when class-
es aren't as successful as they
should be, but these kids have
taught me I can only be as good as
they allow me to be."
Castleberry is one of five
instructors in the three-week pro-
gram funded through a $32,000
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act grant adminis-
tered by WorkSource and overseen
by Jim Burns, transition coordina-
tor for exceptional student educa-
tion at the Nassau County School
District.
Thirty-two local high school stu-
dents, all facing different social and
academic challenges, were chosen
on the recommendation of their
teachers to study one of five career
paths: culinary arts, medical skills,
child care, automotive and con-
struction. The auto and construc-
tion courses are held at Yulee High
School and the others at the Bean
Center.
While the students are becom-
ing educated about career choic-
es, learning valuable job skills and
earning $100 per week, the pro-
gram encompasses much more,
noted Burns.
"I think we're hitting a lot of dif-
ferent things that will get students
better prepared for post-secondary
life -- not just jobs, but life," he
said, referring in part to morning
rotations that focus on personal
and social skills.
"Group talk," led by Sutton
Place Behavioral Health, tackles
issues such as self-esteem, trust
and how to interact with other peo-
ple, and coaching in team building
by FCCJ staff "gets people to learn
how to work with each other," said
SCHOOL Continued on 4A


PHOTOS BY SIAN PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
Inside the automotive lab at Yulee High School, instructor Ron
Kennison teaches the workings of a drill to Nassau County high
school students taking part in a career education summer pro-
gram, top. Alexa Doyle, above, stirs a pot of spaghetti sauce in the
culinary arts class held at the Lewis "Red" Bean Technical
Career Center in Yulee. Cody Lyons, below, and Aaron
Highsmith, bottom, work on a construction project as part of the
program funded through a federal American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act grant.


Swine



flu in



Nassau
RYAN SMITH
News Leader
There have been three cases of
H1N1 swine flu in Nassau County. All
of those who fell ill have recovered.
The Nassau County Health
Department confirmed Thursday that
the three cases occurred in May and
June. Two were members of the same
family, and in all three cases the ill-
ness originated out of state. The health
department declined to say where in
the county the sick lived.
The health department did not
report the cases to the public although
the cases were reported to the Florida
Department of Health. Local officials
chose not to inform the public because
there was already sufficient awareness
of the virus, according to county
Disease Control Director Kim Geib.
"From an (epidemiology) stand-
point we weren't that concerned. ..
These were mild cases. Never went to
the hospital or anything," Geib said.
Geib said the victims were treated
and monitored until the danger of trans-
mitting the illness had passed. "Usually
you're considered contagious for seven
days after your first symptoms. One
day before and seven days after ... so
we had people stay home," she said.
"They didn't go anywhere for seven
days."
Geib said state privacy regulations
prohibit her from releasing where in
the county the victims were from.
'They're small cities, and people could
figure out (who contracted the virus)."
The mildness of the cases was one
reason the health department chose
not to release the information, she said.
"We felt like people had sufficient
awareness to protect themselves - and
(the illness) had been acquired out of
FLU Continued on 3A



Callahan

boy's death

led to alert
KATHIE COLGROVE
Community Newspapers
Although health officials would not
confirm it, a 13-year-old Callahan boy
died July 10, possibly of fatal menin-
gitis. Autopsy results are pending and
the cause of death will not be known for
several weeks.
The Nassau County Health
Department issued
an alert after the
death because it
could be fatal menin-
gitis, but it declined
to reveal where the
child lived.
Dalton Nettles, a
Callahan Middle
School seventh- Dalton
grade student, was
treated for an ear
infection July 2, after swimming in a
pond. Dalton returned to the emer-
gency room July 8. As his health began
to worsen, he was put on life support,
family friend Judy Cooper wrote in an
e-mail July 9.
"There are no words to express the
sadness and sorrow we feel in the loss
of Dalton. I have cried a river since
seeing him on (uly 9)," Cooper wrote
in an e-mail Saturday.
On Monday, family members
shared their memories of the boy who
loved the outdoors and had a zest for
life. "Bubbie is loving and caring and I
DEATH Continued on 3A


News-Leader INDEX LEISURE ........................................................ B SEATURTLE NESING SEASON
155th year No 57 CLASSIFIEDS .............................. 3 B OBITUARIES ........................................... 2A 2009 Nests:69 2008 Nests: 128
Copyright 2009 CROSSWORD ........................... 2B OUT AND ABOUT ................. 2B 2 lost due to recent storms
The News Leader EDITORIAL .................................. 7A SERVICE DIRECTORY ...................... 3B Pleaseturn offorredirectlighsshining
Fernandina Beach, FL FISHING ..................................... 14A SPORTS .................................................... 12A directly on the beach Fora detailedcount
S 4264 0001 3 3 n printwithsoy based nk HOMES ..................................................... 10A SUDOKU .................................................... 2B seerwr.ameliaislan&deaturtlewe atchcom.


WEEKLY N EWS PAPER







FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


50 YEARS AGO

A new street was under
construction to link Franklin
Street and Stanley Drive,
saving drivers 10 minutes on
trips to Container Corp. or
the Amelia River waterfront.
July 16, 1959

25 YEARS AGO

The Northeast Florida
Regional Planning Council


unanimously approved plans
for Summer Beach, a 2,414-
unit development on south
Amelia Island.
July 18, 1984
10 YEARS AGO

City commissioners voted
to create a Wal-Mart
Defense Fund to pay experts
in the ongoing battle to pre-
vent construction of a super-
center on the island.
July 14, 1999


Today's Weather
* I s - .
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
7/17 7/18 7/19 7/20 7/21




90/76 84/74 87/73 86/73 86/75
Scattered A few thun- Partly Partly A few thun-
clouds with derstorms cloudy, cloudy, derstorms
the possibil- possible. chance of a chance of a possible.
ity of an iso- Highs in the thunder- thunder- Highs in the
lated thun- mid 80s and storm, storm, mid 80s and
derstorm de- lows in the lows in the
velopin. mid 70s. mid 70s.

Sunrise: Sunrise: Sunrise: Sunrise: Sunrise:
6:35 AM 6:36 AM 6:36 AM 6:37 AM 6:38 AM
Sunset: Sunset: Sunset: Sunset: Sunset:
8:29 PM 8:29 PM 8:28 PM 8:28 PM 8:27 PM

Florida At A Glance


P


SFernandina Beach
. - 90/76
. . - JTallahassee ) Jacksonville
Pensacola "', t -i 94/78
--I

1-, - "
Orlando >

j 92/76



Tampa . ...i -_ -

a 1 Miami
2.-----
S 2y


Area Cities
Clearwater 89 78 t-storm
Crestview 84 72 t-storm
Daytona Beach 90 75 t-storm
Fort Lauderdale 92 80 t-storm
Fort Myers 91 78 t-storm
Gainesville 91 74 t-storm
Hollywood 93 79 t-storm
Jacksonville 94 78 t-storm
Key West 90 83 ptsunny
Lady Lake 92 74 t-storm
Lake City 90 74 t-storm
Madison 90 74 t-storm
Melbourne 90 76 t-storm
Miami 92 80 t-storm
N Smyrna Beach 90 76 t-storm
National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


86 67 t-storm
85 65 ptsunny
70 55 mst sunny
98 76 ptsunny
84 59 mst sunny
97 76 ptsunny
86 65 sunny
92 80 t-storm


Ocala 92 74 t-storm
Orlando 92 76 t-storm
Panama City 86 77 t-storm
Pensacola 84 77 t-storm
Plant City 92 76 t-storm
Pompano Beach 92 79 t-storm
Port Charlotte 93 77 t-storm
Saint Augustine 89 76 t-storm
Saint Petersburg 88 80 t-storm
Sarasota 90 80 t-storm


Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Venice
W Palm Beach


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


89 74 t-storm
90 78 t-storm
92 75 t-storm
90 79 t-storm
92 78 t-storm


63 55 rain
88 68 mst sunny
109 86 ptsunny
82 59 pt sunny
84 59 mst sunny
75 61 mstsunny
89 71 t-storm


Moon Phases





Last New First Full
Jul 15 Jul 22 Jul 28 Aug 6
UV Index
Frl Sat Sun Mon Tue
7/17 7/18 7/19 7/20 7/21

Extreme High Extreme Extreme Extreme
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection
�2009American Profile Hometown Content Service


A

NEWS

LEADER


511 Ash Street
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
(904)261-3696 Fax261-3698
Website for email addresses
fbnewsleader.com


Officehours are 830 a.m. to5:00p.m. Monday through Friday
The News-Leader is published every Wednesday and Friday by The Fernandina
Beach News-Leader, 511 Ash Street, P.O. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034. Periodicals postage paid at Fernandina Beach, Fla. (USPS 189-900)
ISSN# 0163-4011. Reproductions of the contents of this publication in whole or in
part without written permission from the publisher are prohibited.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: News-Leader, P.O. Box 766,
Fernandina Beach, FL 32035. The News-Leader may only be sold by persons or
businesses authorized by the publisher or circulation director.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS: The News-Leader assumes no financial
responsibility for typographical errors in advertising. When notified promptly, the
part of the advertisement in which the typographical error appears will be reprint-
ed. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher. The News-Leader
reserves the right to correctly classify, edit or delete any objectionable wording or
reject the advertisement in its entirety at any time prior to scheduled publication if
it is determined that the advertisement or any part thereof is contrary to the gen-
eral standard of advertising acceptance.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Mail in Nassau County ............... $36.00
Mail out of Nassau County ............ $63.00


NEWS DEADLINES
Community News:
Monday, 5 p.m.
Letters to the editor:
Monday, 12 p.m.
Church Notes:
Monday, 5 p.m.
People and Places:
Thursday, 3 p.m.
TY Community
CNI cp .
INewspaper,
Incorporated


ADVERTISING DEADLINES
WEDNESDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Monday, 5:00 p.m.*
Classified Display: Friday, 3 p.m.
Legal Notices: Friday, noon
Retail Advertising: Friday, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY NEWS-LEADER
Classified Ads: Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Classified Display: Tuesday, 5 p.m.
Retail Advertising: Tuesday, 3 p.m.
* Monday holidays will move the
Classified deadline to Friday at 5 p.m.


State parks free on Sunday


TALLAHASSEE - The Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection's (DEP) Florida Park Service
will waive entrance fees at all state parks
on Sunday - recognizing National Parks
and Recreation Month.
"Florida's award-winning state park
system is one of the best in the country,
providing high quality recreation at an
unmatched value," said DEP Secretary
Michael W. Sole. "By offering free
entrance to state parks on July 19, and
encouraging state park visitation
throughout National Parks and
Recreation Month, we hope to foster a
deeper appreciation of our state's natural
resources and the recreational, historical
and cultural value parks contribute to our
great state."
In addition to offering free entrance
on Sunday, the Florida Park Service will
also offer free entrance to visitors with a
library card or with the donation of a
new or gently used family friendly book
Sept. 11-13, for State Park Literacy
Month and on Nov. 11 for Veteran's Day.
"We are pleased to offer free admis-
sion into Florida's state parks on these
three occasions to encourage tourism
and outdoor activity," said DEP Florida
Park Service Director Mike Bullock.


'"The value of state
parks is much greater
than often realized,
- impacting healthy
lifestyles, educating
visitors about natural
and cultural
resources, as well as
making an economic impact of more
than $1 billion to Florida's communities."
Since 1985, the National Recreation
and Park Association has designated July
as National Parks and Recreation Month.
This year, the Florida Park Service is
offering a free entrance day and continu-
ing its Family. Friends. Fun. campaign by
encouraging children and families to
engage in outdoor activity at one of 160
Florida state parks throughout July.
Visitors can learn about ways to cele-
brate National Parks and Recreation
Month by viewing the 100 activities fea-
tured as part of DEP's Rediscover
Florida - 100 Ways in 100 Days cam-
paign. The initiative encourages
Floridians to explore the many exciting
and affordable recreation opportunities
in their own backyards. From the tradi-
tional activities - hiking, biking, fishing,
picnicking or camping, to the unique -
festivals, museums and education cen-


WEEKLY UPDATE


YuleeHigh
registration
Yulee High School will
accept registration for new
students from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
on Tuesday and Wednes-
days through Aug. 19. Call
the Guidance Department at
225-8641.
Carwash
A car wash fundraiser and
raffle to help supplement the
fees for children attending
local summer camps will be
held July 18 starting at 9 a.m.
at the Wal-Mart Supercenter
in Yulee. Raffle tickets are $5
and include a chance to win
$100, a one-night stay at the
Hampton Inn & Suites and a
boat charter to Cumberland
Island donated by Capt. Bill
Supplee.
The drawing will be held
Aug. 8. For information con-
tact Brenda Manson at 261-
7488 (day) or 321-2486 (after
6 p.m.).
Micah's orientation
Micah's Place invites the
public to its monthly orienta-
tion on July 23 at 5:30 p.m.
Learn more about the
agency's services, family vio-
lence issues and volunteer-
ing. Call 491-6364, ext. 102 to
RSVP and for location.
Orientations are held the
fourth Thursday each month.


VOLUNTEERS

Van needed
Micah's Place needs a van
to transport emergency shel-
ter residents and their chil-
dren to medical appointments,
child-care, employment and
other necessary activities. As
a 501(c) (3) organization, your
donation of a van is tax
deductible. Call 491-6364, ext.
102 to make arrangements.
Clowns needed
Savannah Grand Assisted
Living, 1900 Amelia Trace
Court, Fernandina Beach, will
be hosting a "Come Clown
Around With Us!" event and
needs help from anyone that
would like to be a clown or
has clown suits and games
like those used at school car-
nivals. Contact Renee Stoffel
at 321-0898.


S-



SDr. and Mrs.
Carlos
Salmon
wish to express
( their heartfelt )
gratitude to
family and
friends for their
love and
support in the
loss of their son,


Rolando
Salmon


Consumer clinics
Free consumer clinics
presented by Jacksonville
Area Legal Aid for Nassau
County residents will be held
Aug. 10, Sept. 14 and Oct. 5
at 5:30 p.m. in the jury selec-
tion room of the Nassau
County Judicial Annex in
Yulee.
Topics include debt collec-
tion, small claims, bankrupt-
cy, foreclosure and ID theft.
For more information call
(904) 356-8371, ext. 2509.
AARP meetings
The local chapter #4608 of
the AARP will resume its reg-
ular meetings at 1 p.m. Aug.
11 at the Council on Aging
building across from Baptist
Medical Center Nassau.
The AARP driving course
at First Presbyterian Church
will begin in late summer or
early fall. Call the church at
261-3837 to register.
Diabetes education
The Nassau County
Health Department is offer-
ing a series of four, two-hour
diabetes classes on Wednes-
days Aug. 19, 26, Sept. 2 and
9 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the
Callahan Tax Collector's
office, 45401 Mickler St.,
Callahan. Registration fee is
$20 and $10 for NCSD em-
ployees. For questions or to


register contact Jen Nich-
olson, RD, LD/N, Healthy
Communities Healthy People
program manager at 548-1853
or e-mail Jennifer_Nichol
son@doh.state.fl.us.
Recovery event
A Keep Kids Drug Free
event will be held at Metro
Park in Jacksonville from 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 19 in obser-
vance of SAMHSA's national
alcohol and drug addiction
recovery month initiative
(www.recoverymonth.org).
There will be live enter-
tainment by XODUS, Celinda
Pink's Blues Band, Billie
Holiday and more, a chil-
dren's zone with bouncy
house, face painting and
more, a youth art exhibit,
vendors, mentors and con-
cessions. For information
about the ride, contact Freda
Colley at (904) 485-3512.
For more information con-
tact Mike Wheeler at (904)
655-5785 or e-mail
Mwheeler6555785@com-
cast.net or Colley at fcol-
ley@gatewaycommunity.com.
Centre'dWomen
Centre'd Women, a social
and informational group,
meets at 6:30 p.m. on the
third Monday of each month
at Eileen's Arts and Antiques,
702 Centre St. For more
information, call 548-9770.


ters, there are countless activities to
experience and enjoy. Visitors to the
Rediscover Florida website can explore
an interactive list of 100 activities and
track how many of the activities they can
complete. To view the list, visit
www.dep.state.fl.us and click Rediscover
Florida.
Joining in the National Parks and
Recreation Month celebration is The Get
Outdoors Florida! Coalition, a partner-
ship of land managers, government
agencies, children's advocates, health
care professionals, public interest groups
and other individuals formed in 2008.
The coalition is the product of a wide
array of partners coming together to
address societal needs including public
well-being, health issues and natural
resource conservation.
Tips for outdoor activities, as well as a
calendar featuring a variety of planned
outdoor events for youth, families and
mentors can be found at www.getout-
doorsflorida.org.
To learn more about Florida's state
parks, visit www.floridastateparks.org.
Free day-use entrance does not apply
at Skyway Fishing Pier State Park in
Tampa Bay. Other state park usage fees
still apply.


OBITUARY


David Ray Anderson
Mr. David Ray Anderson,
age 49, passed away suddenly
on, Tuesday, July 7, 2009 in
Fernandina Beach, FL.
Born in Gardner, Kansas, he
had been a former resident of
Orange Park, FL. For many
years Mr. Anderson had
worked in the Construction
Industry as a Roofer.
He leaves behind his 3 chil-
dren; Jaymes
Anderson, Sarai
Anderson, both
of Emporia, KS,
Arielle Serrano,
Glendora, CA, 1
brother, Robert
Anderson; 3 sis-
ters, Misty Anderson, Marilyn
Anderson, Christine Traw, his 3
nieces and 1 nephew.
He will be greatly missed by
all his family and many friends.
Funeral services will be on
Saturday, July 18, 2009 at 2:00
pm at the Fernandina Beach
Seaside Park, Gazebos No. 3 &
4, Fernandina Beach, Florida.
(Intersection of Sadler Road &
Fletcher Ave.)
Mr. Anderson will be laid to
rest at a later date.
Guests and friends are invit-
ed to visit prior to and following
the services, on Saturday, at
the Seaside Park.
Please share his life story
at www.oxleyheard.com.
Oxley Heard Funeral Directors


Help with


Medicare


choices

The Medicare supplemen-
tal policy reform bill that comes
into effect Oct. 1 has a huge
impact on the disabled who
have Medicare Part A and B.
Before they could not get a sup-
plemental policy if there were
under age 65.
A supplemental policy pays
for all co-pays and deductibles
Medicare does not cover.
Guaranteed Issued Policy
means the individual has six
months from the time they get
their Medicare A and B to join
a Supplemental Policy and they
will not be charged higher pol-
icy rates or denied a policy due
to past or current health prob-
lems.
House Bill 675-Medicare
Supplement reform is effective
Oct. 1, requiring an open enroll-
ment period for individuals that
become eligible for Medicare
Part A and B due to disability,
including end stage renal dis-
ease.
The time periods are the
same as for Medicare eligible
individuals when they turn age
65. Once a person becomes eli-
gible for and enrolled in
Medicare Part A and B, regard-
less of age, they have six
months to obtain a guaranteed
issue Medicare Supplement pol-
icy.
Individuals that became eli-
gible for and enrolled in
Medicare Part A and B due to
disability prior to Oct. 1 will have
a six-month period starting Oct.
1 to obtain a guaranteed issue
policy.
All companies that sell
Medicare Supplement policies
in Florida will have to offer the
policies to those under age 65.
If you need assistance under-
standing and selecting a
Supplemental/Medicap Policy
contact your local University of
Florida Extension Agent Meg
McAlpine at 548-1116.


Summer book club
The Book Loft is hosting
a 2009 Summer Book Club.
For more information con-
tact the store, 214 Centre
St., Fernandina Beach, at
261-8991.
Books needed
Nassau Humane Society
will hold its annual Paw
Prints Book and Plant Sale
on Friday, Aug. 7 from 9
a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday,
Aug. 8 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at
the Fernandina Beach air-
port. Please drop off your
unwanted books, CDs,
DVDs, artwork or other
items at the shelter located
at 671 Airport Road. All
donations are tax
deductible. Contact Gail
206-4092 or Sandra 321-
2319 with questions.
Writers and poets
The Nassau County
Writers and Poets Society
will meet at 9:30 a.m. July
18 at the Fernandina Beach
Municipal Airport. All writ-
ers and poets in the county
are invited; bring two dou-
ble-spaced pages of your
original prose or two to
three of your poems. Be
prepared to read and dis-
cuss your work. For infor-
mation contact Cara at
www.wordsmythe@net-
magic.net.
Florida writers
The Florida Writers
Association will meet July
21 at 6 p.m. at the Florida
House Inn, 22 S. Third St.
Guest speaker will be
Harold P Voyles, author of
Appalachian Sketches, who
will read excerpts from his
book, provide a historical
background and a photo


display of a 1920's mining
camp. This is a dinner meet-
ing and members and the
public are invited. For infor-
mation and reservations,
call Maggie de Vries at 321-
6180.
Summer reading
All are welcome to join
the members and friends of
Providence Presbyterian
Church who will be reading
and discussing two special
books this summer. On July
22 they will discuss Sinning
Like a CO, ,r,..... by William
Willimon, and on Aug. 19,
they will discuss Barbara
Brown Taylor's newest
book, An Altar in the World.
Call the church at 432-
8118 for more information
about these discussions or
to order the books.
Writers' conference
The Division of Continu-
ing Education and the
Department of English at
the University of North
Florida along with the
Florida Writers Association
is sponsoring the 2009
Writers Conference Aug. 7-
9 at the University Center
on campus.
The conference is for
writers of fiction, non-fiction
and screenplays.
The three-day confer-
ence kicks off Aug. 7 at 8
a.m., featuring keynote
speaker Steve Berry, New
York Times best-selling
author of The Charlemagne
Pursuit, The Alexandria
Link, The Venetian Betrayal
and many more.
Registration through
July 31 is $299. For more
information and to register
online visit www.unfwriter-
sconference.com or call
(904) 620-4200.


LOOKING BACK


CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


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LITERARY LEANINGS


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


NOISE Continued from 1A
"You can investigate (the
Sunshine Law violation) all you
want," said Bach. "Verbal com-
munications (at a closed meet-
ing) had nothing to do with the
noise ordinance ... it was just
some venting. I would have
been forced to do the ordi-
nance anyway."
Resident Patrick Higgins
also criticized the new ordi-
nance, saying "the way it's writ-
ten is vague and unconstitu-
tional" - which was the major
complaint about the former
noise ordinance.
Another resident, John
Gould, said the ordinance
should use scientific measure-
ments rather than being based
on a police officer's opinion of
excessive noise.
Jason Rowe, owner of
Wicked Davey's Fancy Saloon
on North Second Street, which
is in an industrial zone, said he
was afraid the ordinance as
written could "open the oppor-
tunity to people who don't like
what business you're running."
Rowe, whose business has
also been subject to noise com-
plaints, also asked what would
stop nearby residents from call-
ing "15 or 20 times a day?"
'The city will ticket (noise


TRIAL Continued from 1A
The defense emphasized
throughout Ratley's testimony
the voluntary cooperation with
law enforcement on the part
of Ratley and his family as well
as the couple's amicable nature
and lack of violence.
Ratley was asked about evi-
dence found in his truck,
including the alleged murder
weapon - a hammer, latex
gloves with his DNA on them,
another set of gloves, a wire
removed from his mobile
home that burned down weeks
earlier, drugs stolen from St.
Vincent's Medical Center, wire
cutters, a boxcutter and paper
towels with blood on them.
Ratley said he always kept
his truck unlocked with the
keys in the ignition, including
the night of the murder, despite
the prosecution's opinion that
he would likely have locked
the truck after an alleged bur-
glary on the property the night
before. Ratley said he did not
know how this evidence ended
up in the storage compart-
ments of his truck, with the
exception of the latex gloves
and the drugs, which he admit-
ted stealing while his wife was
in the hospital to give birth to
their son the month before her
death.
"I took that medication from
St. Vincent's when Effie was
in there," Ratley said. "It
embarrasses my family. ... I
took it and there's nothing else
to say about it."
Ratley maintained he was
sleeping in the living room of
his parents' home when his
wife was bludgeoned to death
a few feet down the hall and
awoke only after hearing a loud
noise - possibly a small shelf
falling in the hallway bathroom.
"I didn't hear a single
scream from Effie," Ratley said,
adding that he didn't hear the
bedroom screen being cut or


Noise in a nutshell
According to the new noise ordinance passed by the city
commission Tuesday:
* Musical instruments, amplification and other sound
devices that can be heard at a distance of 25 feet from the
premises or vehicle are illegal from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
Sunday through Thursday and 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Friday and
Saturday.
* Twelve exemptions are written into the ordinance,
including an exemption for "a forest-products processing
plant," which provides for Fernandina Beach's two paper
mills. There are also exemptions for emergency sirens,
parades and fireworks, locomotives, relief valves, vessels
and other "authorized activities."
* Operators of tools and landscaping equipment may
begin their work at 7 a.m., seven days a week. Those tools
include "noise-producing lawn mowers, lawn edgers, weed
trimmers, leaf blowers, chippers, chainsaws, power tools,
hammers, air compressors and other noise-producing
tools."


violators), and you'll eventual-
ly be put out of business,"
Rowe said.
Rowe also said that
Commissioner Tim Poynter
should recuse himself from the
vote because he owns a restau-
rant and bar downtown.
Bach, however, said
Poynter's owning a business
was not a conflict of interest,
and also noted that many elect-
ed officials had been business
owners.
"He is required to vote,"


anyone entering or leaving the
home. "I wish I had heard
something and then Effie
might still be here," he said.
After hearing the noise,
Ratley said he went to investi-
gate, noticed a shelf had fallen,
then looked in on his wife and
noticed a chill in the room as
he found her covered in blood
and unconscious. He then
screamed for his parents.
The defendant's father,
Steven Ratley, testified earlier
Wednesday that his son was
panicked and screamed,
"Somebody beat Effie." He was
so hysterical, they had to send
him out of the room, the father
testified.
"He was crying, screaming,
praying to God," the elder
Ratley said.
Both Steven Ratley and
Cindy Ratley testified they
were covered in blood from
trying to help Effie, but the
prosecution questioned why
their son did not.
"It is human instinct (to
assist the injured)," Assistant
State Attorney John Guy said
during his closing argument.
'That is common sense."
Common sense was the
overriding theme the prose-
cution attempted to drive home
in its closing argument. Guy
cited "overwhelming" circum-
stantial evidence while explain-
ing that a motive wasn't nec-
essary to prove first-degree
murder, only what was done.
"What matters is what you
know in your head, heart,
stomach about who did this,"
Guy told the jury.
Defense attorney Robert
Stuart Willis began his closing
argument by questioning the
investigation that ultimately
had only one suspect, Michael
Ratley. He eschewed the pros-
ecution's notion that Ratley was
a "criminal genius." Willis said
if the crime was premeditated,
Ratley wouldn't have put the


said Bach. "He cannot abstain
from voting."
Walker said he "appreciated
all the hard work" that went
into creating the ordinance, but
that he was not going to sup-
port it.
"I don't think it solves our
problems," said Walker.
"Hopefully it does what it's sup-
posed to do."
Bach said training on the
new ordinance would begin
Tuesday for the city police
department.


items in a place he knew law
enforcement would check. He
cited several places on the 20-
acre Bryceville property - the
woods, overgrown grass, a
pond out back - that would be
more conducive to disposing
of evidence.
Willis said Ratley had no
motive, did not have a history
of violence and that he was in
the midst of the happiest days
of his life. But the crux of the
argument focused on exami-
nation of the evidence itself.
Willis reiterated that the major
contributor to DNA on the
hammer was Effie Ratley, while
the second largest contributor
was a male that is conclusively
not Michael Ratley or any other
person living on the Ratley's
property.
After a rebuttal by Assistant
State Attorney Bernie de la
Rionda, followed by instruc-
tions read by Judge Robert
Foster, the jury was excused
for deliberations just after 1
p.m. Thursday.

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FLU Continued from 1A
state," she said. "When the state
has already had multiple (state-
ments) saying swine flu is
everywhere in Florida, the
assumption is it's in Nassau
County."
"Remember, we're con-
stantly monitoring for out-
breaks," Geib said. '"There were
no additional cases outside the
families. We tightly monitored
the case, and we were con-
vinced there was no real risk to
the public. There's always a bal-
ance between too much infor-
mation and not enough infor-
mation."
Geib also said the health
department is continuing to
investigate a mass illness that
shut down the Bank of America
branch on Eighth Street in
Fernandina Beach Tuesday.
The branch was closed all day
after eight of the 10 employees
became ill with flu-like symp-
toms.


DEATH Continued from 1A
love him," said Dalton's sister,
Heather, 11.
His grandmother, Linda
"Grannie" Willard, recalled, "He
was ... caring and would do any-
thing for anybody. He had such
a beautiful smile."
Caitlin Beasley, 14, shared
a tight bond with her younger
cousin. "We were really close
and I told him all my secrets,"
Caitlin said. Tiffany McCall, 20,
said Dalton was kind. "If you
were having a bad day, he knew
it and he would give you a hug
and make you feel better."
His aunt, Anita Willard,
described him as "the best kid
in the world.... He was loving
and kind," she said. "He lived
life to the (fullest). I love him so
much."
Another aunt, Cyndi
Beasley, said, "He was the


So far the health department
hasn't confirmed that the
employees had any strain of
influenza, let alone swine flu,
Geib said.
"We've talked to some of the
managers and all they're telling
us is that people are sick," she
said. "We don't have any con-
firmed cases of swine flu with
this."
The health department also
is investigating whether the
employees contracted a food-
borne illness, the symptoms of
which are often similar to flu,
Geib said.
And it will continue to mon-
itor the progress of H1N1 and
help distribute the vaccine due
out later this year, she said.
"We're looking at various
ways to offer the vaccine to the
public. It will be free and it will
probably come out in October,"
she said. "This story isn't over.
We'll be continuing to watch
swine flu."
There have been at least 12


sweetest, kindest person you
ever met. He always wanted to
give hugs." She recalled how
he enjoyed the outdoors.
"He loved hunting. He killed
his first deer, an 8-point buck,
last year," Beasley said. "He
loved fishing and four-wheel
driving, anything outdoors."
CMS Principal Ellen Ryan
was saddened at the loss of one
of her students. "We're just dev-
astated. He was very well-liked
by everyone," she said Monday.
"We're just shocked. It's very,
very hard when it's a young
child. It's a testimony and a
reminder that life is fragile and
brief."
Active in Pop Warner foot-
ball and Little League baseball,
Dalton loved sports.
His former Little League
coach, Scott Delano, offered
these memories of the young
man who played for the


confirmed deaths from swine
flu in Florida since mid-June.
Most of those who have died
were in their fifties, including a
55-year-old Duval County man.
But the deaths include a 41-year-
old Orange County woman, a
25-year-old Palm Beach County
woman, a 30-year-old Seminole
County woman and a 9-year-old
Miami-Dade County child.
Most, but not all, of those who
died had pre-existing health
conditions.
Florida currently has listed
2,188 confirmed cases of swine
flu. The World Health
Organization (WHO) alert level
is at phase 6 "pandemic"
because the disease is now cir-
culating worldwide.
People are encouraged to
take the usual precautions
against transmitting diseases,
particularly washing their
hands frequently and refrain-
ing from touching your eyes,
nose or mouth.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Callahan Little League Major
Braves baseball team: "Dalton
was the kind of kid that was
always smiling and brightened
up every day," he wrote in an e-
mail. "He had a great sense of
humor and exemplified 'team
spirit.' Words cannot express
the sense of loss felt by his fam-
ily, friends and our community.
We love you, Buddy."
His football coach, who
worked with Dalton for five
years, will miss the young cor-
nerback. "He was a great kid. A
good ball player," Anthony
Carter said. "He was the first
one at practice and the last one
to leave. Always full of energy -
a good energy booster."
A fund has been established
for Dalton's medical expenses
under the name of Dalton Ed
Nettles, at Southeastern Bank.
For more information, call the
bank at (904) 879-2613.


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


SIAN PERRY/NEWS-LEADER
As a special gift, Chef William Castleberry bought the students in his culinary arts
class chef coats and hats embroidered with their names. From left with their new gear
are Alexa Doyle, Alexis Turner, Kate Lowmaster, Henry Hess, Chris Pallan, Danny
Ritchie, Gabriel Smith and Castleberry.


SCHOOL Continued from 1A
Burns. The Living Resource
Center, based in Jacksonville,
conducts "employability skills"
training at no cost.
From 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
the students do classroom and
hands-on work and also spend
time in real workplaces.
For Vanessa Montes, work-
ing towards her childcare cer-
tification is a dream come true.
"When I was five years old I had
a dream and this is my dream -
to be a teacher," she said. The
students will continue the pro-
gram and complete seven
exams in the upcoming school
year to earn their credentials.
"It's helping me with the dif-
ferent stages - how children
grow, what to feed them and
how to keep them safe and
avoid abuse and neglect," said
Allesia Floyd.
Led by instructor Katrina
Millan Flannery, the young
women and their five class-
mates eagerly jump up to sing
"Good Morning to You," a nurs-
ery song that has become their
anthem, a way to start their day.
The summer school may last
just three weeks, but for many
of the students it has opened


up a world of possibilities they
never knew existed - or could
otherwise afford - and intro-
duced them to the many pro-
grams at the Lewis "Red" Bean
Technical Career Center, a facil-
ity Castleberry calls "the best
kept secret in Nassau County."
"The kids get to see the
products of their labor, whether
it's cooking a meal or fixing a
car. They get an opportunity to
see what success is," said
Burns, and a taste of the real
work world. "This is your job
and if you did that, you'd be
fired - they learn that," said
Burns. The students also face
payroll deductions for infrac-
tions such as absenteeism or
poor behavior.
"It's about working together
and respect - not just the
authority, but respecting each
other. That's my biggest issue -
being tolerant of each other and
respecting each other," said
Burns. "It's a great opportunity


for them and for us. ... Most of
the teachers will tell you, 'I just
love it. I love these kids so
much."'
That's the case for
Castleberry, who used his own
funds to buy chef's hats and
coats for his class, embroidered
with their names. The students
wore them when they prepared
and served dinner to 50 guests
in the last week of the program.
They also have a cookbook in
the works, to raise funds for
equipment for next summer's
class - the grant program will
be offered again next year -
based on recipes they devel-
oped while cooking each day
for their fellow students and
teachers.
"It's been an awesome pro-
gram," said Castleberry. "I'll tell
you, I teach college and these
kids are every bit as attentive as
my college kids - and they work
harder."
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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


County board may


expand law on


conflict of interest


RYAN SMITH
News Leader

The Nassau County Com-
mission plans to hold a public
hearing on crafting an ordi-
nance that would bar com-
missioners from attempting
to influence debate on sub-
jects in which they have a con-
flict of interest.
Commissioners already
are required to recuse them-
selves from voting on an issue
if they have a conflict of inter-
est. However, Commissioner
Mike Boyle has suggested
enacting an ordinance that
would bar commissioners
from participating in discus-
sion on those subjects during
meetings.
"It's not as though it hap-
pens every day, but I think it
sends a message to the
electorate that we're trying to
be fair and impartial," he said
at a commission meeting July
8.
Boyle said he talked to
Broward County commis-
sioners about the issue at
the recent Florida Association
of Counties meeting. In
Broward, he said, a commis-
sioner with a conflict of
interest must leave the
room while the subject is
debated.
Commissioner Stacy
Johnson said since recusal
was already a requirement,
she didn't see the need for a
new law.
"If we haven't had a prob-
lem with it in the past, why
make another ordinance?" she
said. "... If we'd had a prob-
lem with people recusing
themselves and then trying
to influence debate - but I
don't think we've ever had a
problem with that."
Johnson also questioned
whether the ordinance would
apply only to commissioners,
or also to the various appoint-
ed boards under them. "I just
see this going way out of con-
trol," she said.
Johnson, who recused her-
self from debate earlier in the
year during a discussion about
land development in which
she had a concern, said the
public could help police gov-
ernment ethics.
"When I had to recuse


myself once,
I didn't par-
ticipate. I
---, conducted
myself pro-
fessionally,
and I think if
I hadn't I
would have
Boyle heard about
it," she said.
Boyle
agreed that
citizens could and would act as
ethics watchdogs - but felt the
public would keep a sharper
lookout if they knew an ordi-
nance was in force.
"As far as sanctions, I think
in the court of public opinion,
people would know, This
commissioner decided to go
against the ordinance,"' he
said.
Commissioner Danny
Leeper said the idea was
worth considering.
"If you have a voting con-
flict and you don't leave the
room - and it doesn't happen
here, but I guess it happens in
other places - even if you
don't talk, you try to stare
someone down or some-
thing," he said. "... I think
the idea has merit. I know it's
not a problem with this
board, but I think we could
set an example for future
boards."
"If one of us could actually
be stared down, I think the
public would want to know
about it," Johnson said.
"This five-member com-
mission will not always be
here, and I don't think it's any
secret that the previous com-
mission wasn't nearly as cohe-
sive and collegial as this one,"
Boyle said.
Commission Chairman
Barry Holloway agreed with
Johnson that an ordinance
was probably unnecessary. "I
think we should be civilized
enough, if that's the word,
that if we need to recuse our-
selves we leave the room," he
said.
However, neither Holloway
nor Johnson was against
bringing the idea before the
public. The commission decid-
ed to set a public hearing on
the matter at a date to be
decided later.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Humans fight over animal control


RYAN SMITH
News Leader

The ongoing debate over the
county's efforts to revitalize the
Animal Control Department
turned personal last week as
citizens questioned County
Coordinator Ed Sealover's abil-
ity to oversee the hiring of new
Animal Control staff. Sealover -
who was unable to attend that
meeting - fired back in a July 9
memo to the county commis-
sion, calling the allegation that
he isn't qualified "nonsense."
The issue was raised at the
commission's July 8 meeting,
when a group of citizens argued
against Sealover's suggestion
that the board consider con-
tracting out the shelter opera-
tions of the Animal Control
department. The contracted
organization would handle spay-
ing and neutering, adoptions
and the like, while the county
would retain responsibility for
the animal control aspect -
things like removing danger-
ous animals and picking up
untagged dogs or cats.
"This is a $1.2 million depart-
ment. Please note that our
neighbor, Waycross, Ga., went
private - and they failed," said
Mimi Vitale. "I've asked, 'How
do I help?' Instead I was asked
to stay away and leave the shel-
ter alone."
Vitale served as interim ani-
mal control director under
Sheriff Tommy Seagraves, who
handed the department back to
the county on June 1 after over-
seeing the operation for a year.
Seagraves removed Vitale from
her position in April, saying he
did not want to taint the process
of hiring a new director by leav-
ing an interim director in place
that had expressed interest in


Sealover Vitale


the permanent position.
However, he said his decision
was not meant to reflect nega-
tively on Vitale's job perform-
ance.
Other citizens demanded the
board create an "advisory com-
mittee" to make hiring recom-
mendations in the search for an
Animal Control director.
Currently, the hiring decision
rests with Sealover.
However, Mark Childs of
Amelia Island said Sealover was-
n't qualified to make that call.
"If you don't take a leader-
ship role in this, we're going to
be right back where we were
with the old-boy system," he
told the commission. "If you
leave this decision to Mr.
Sealover, we think you're going
to see some serious, ongoing
problems. ... We don't trust Mr.
Sealover to do this on his own
without help from you folks."
"I'm not sure any of us have
any more qualifications to pick
a shelter tech than he does,"
Commissioner Mike Boyle said.
"Tell me how we do this."
"What we'd do is form an
oversight committee with one of
you as the head of it," Childs
said. "... Why not use volun-
teers? They're here, they're in
the community, and they keep
getting pushed aside."
"The only concern I have is
... if an advisory board is


. 1





Customi L to R Front Emily Chandler, Sonia Santiago, Mary Rose Cannistraro,
Hy Tina Hood, Elizabeth Nelson, Hali Clark. Back: Sherri Collier,
GIn Hayley Cheek, Melody Shelley, Jacyn Cannistraro, Heather Crane,
"'fl Jordyn Mooney, Nancy Byrd Notpictured: Michelle Jones,
Yolanda Lane and Randii o Melbye.
Come visit The Green Team and see all we have to offer!


appointed, if the final selection
is not to their liking we're going
to hear back from them again,"
Boyle said. "What I don't want to
do is set a precedent of adviso-
ry boards hiring the depart-
ment heads in this county."
Sealover expressed similar
concerns in his July 9 memo to
the board.
"My major concern is that
the advisory/oversight com-
mittee in a short time would
morph into the 'management'
committee, with individual
members going into the shel-
ter and directing employees,"
he wrote.
In fact, it has been alleged
that is precisely what happened
during Seagrave's tenure, when
an oversight committee that
included Vitale and Childs
became involved in hirings, fir-
ings and the day-to-day opera-
tions of the shelter.
Sealover dismissed Childs'
contention that he was unqual-
ified to make the hiring deci-
sion for the Animal Control
director.
"In a word, that's nonsense,"
he wrote. "I've been in positions
of responsibility at the state,
county and municipal levels for
32 years. Just about 23 of those
years have been in service to
county governments. As a chief
administrative officer of sorts,
I've done a considerable amount
of hiring and firing."
Sealover also listed his expe-
rience with animal control
departments in other counties.
He was in charge of creating or
upgrading six different animal
control programs prior to com-
ing to Nassau County, according
to the memo.
"I've also done amendments
to animal control ordinances,
as well as developing and rewrit-


ing policies and procedures for
operations," he wrote. "Lastly,
I've hired and fired several
directors and (animal control
officers)."
Sealover reiterated his con-
cerns at Monday's commission
meeting.
"(If a committee is formed),
you're going to have to have a
purpose, a clearly stated objec-
tive and an understanding of
whose committee it is," he said.
"I believe it's a committee of the
Board of County Commission-
ers. It's an advisory committee,
not a decision-making commit-
tee."
The commissioners assured
Sealover that if a committee was
formed, it would have no deci-
sion-making power.
"You put out that there are
some issues with an advisory
board, and I think they're legit-
imate issues," Boyle said.
"I think that every one of us
said it would be an advisory
board - just that, an advisory
board. So take comfort in that,
if we decide to go in that direc-
tion," said Commissioner
Danny Leeper.
In the meantime, Sealover
said he planned to keep the hir-
ing process going.
"I believe it's now time to
move forward with the direc-
tor's position," he said. "I have
five or six good candidates, and
I want to proceed with the inter-
views."
Sealover and the commis-
sioners also agreed to hold off
on a final decision on the sepa-
ration of functions at the depart-
ment until a director is hired
and can provide input.
Sealover said he would begin
interviewing candidates within
two weeks.
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


Only at Sonny's...Sunday, July 19th to Saturday, July 25th











"il 7)0lOmko


Wi u says yUu I lave LU waIL l UIIi JecemI I IU
for the Christmas spirit? Just for the fun of
it, we'll have our decorations up and the
holiday music will be playing for a full week
... so come join in the spirit and enjoy
Christmas in July!

Contribute To Toys For Tots
Bring us a new kids toy or book (not
wrapped, please) to give to Toys For Tots
and we'll give you a dollar off the regular
price of any meal.


*
Turkey & Dressing...Only $7.99
Enjo, a special Smoked Turke, meal i. tr�h
dressing crarnblCrr, sauce, :,.'-.ect Cotato.
.reeri beans ard corr- nb.read arn, tine
all .-.eek for a special lo.. price

Kids' Holiday Coloring Contest
It .'.Oultrl: be hr sr.ina. *.. irthOult ur Color
The Tree contest all .. cek Sarta . .ill help
selec r r ie .. inner ri orn kids in, three age
S rupS Er-nter as rnan, time: aS ,oa u lke.'


Friday Night, July 24th,

All-You-Can-Eat 4195

Bar-B-Q Buffet I1
Just like we serve on Christmas Eve, from
4PM 'til 10PM, a special buffet of Bar-B-Q Chicken,
Ribs, Beef and Pork, with Bar-B-Q Beans, Salad Bar,
Cornbread, Soft Drinks and Iced Tea. It's all the
barbecue you can eat for only $12.95 (kids under 10
years old eat for $6.95). Plus a special group of our
celebrity friends will be working hard for your tips,
which they will be donating to Toys For Tots!


Saturday, July 25th,

All Kids Are Invited

To Come Meet Santa
Even though he's on vacation, Santa will be
greeting all kids at Sonny's from 10AM 'til 2PM.
Come by, have your picture taken with Santa AND
make sure to give him you holiday wish list!


2742 S Sth Street * Ferranrdina Beach, FL
(3/4-mile east of the bridge)
Open Daily 11AM 'til 9PM and Friday'til 10PM
Phone 261-6632


.e iLaae, C qett )(uicewY &Wx
Is Now Registering for Dance Classes!
Classes begin August 3rd

St. Marys Studio Registration .
Returning students July 20th
New Students July 21st

Fernandina Studio Registration
Returning students July 22nd
New Students July 23rd

St. Marys Studio Fernandina Studio
10880 Colerain Road 96537 Parliament Drive
St. Marys, GA 31558 Fernandina, FL 32024
(912) 673-9161 (904) 277-7040
www.lisaallensdance.net


SOUTHEASTERN
BANK
SFOR 120 YEARS*
























PROUD TO BE AMERICAN



L.id . Libt,-rt', % a fo, r ,-. h-: r, .,. pe-, " ' ,
i..r ,l....r. .I :,ir . I ';:-"-' Southeastern Bank Ih
Ir-ru ll-ll. l 1 -ht . 'll.sl ,al. I--li h ll.t.ll- . kin. _
Ir[ '.t l iil r[i '.. i j !! ,' ., rr i ulrrm --n t 1-t :, > i t.,t. in, hr','
it ]:.t _'-,riii " � it ..i, 'nl r'i, . . j . i n. J ir i 0 ' .n .


Trust Built Through Generations



SEVENTEEN LOCATIONS. Daricn. Br-r.- .i.:lk ).ur.hport. Dou,.l;.
Eulonia. Folk'iton. H lenhurst. Hoboken. Kngilajnd NM hunt. Ni.:holI.I
R.:hmond HII '.[. M rv i.. 5codbin - C j1halhn. Hillird. ind'r'ulc
LLOP. I 2:8-09

itsi it t i.southeasternbanA corm ? . I
FIMCi


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


MATERNITY WARD


Baptist
Medical
Center
Nassau
nurses
Paula Platt,
Christina
Richards and
Agnes
Bayacal enjoy
baby pictures
donated by
Pam Bell
Photography
recently to
the hospital
maternity
ward. Bell
selected the
photos from
among thou-
sands she's
taken over
the years.
SUBMITTED


Whether buying or selling, speak

with the realtor uho has md Jit happen

since 1995. Over re n. .
in closed sales year- .

View the b-,
A me io ,. .

Amelia ti" "

www.propertieso(fapi i. rida.com




Claudia Watts of
RE/MAX Professional Group a
303 Centre Street, Suite 102 A
Located in Historic Downtown Fernandina
On Amelia Island * N.. -
904-321-1999 OFFICE OR 904-556-4000 CELLULARIB1ACKERRY
E-MAIL: claudiacw@remax.net
. 4 Website: www.propertiesofameliaislandflorida.com
Claudia Watts


Help for elders
TALLAHASSEE - The state
Department of Elder Affairs has
received a federal grant of
almost $1.5 million to help eld-
ers, individuals with disabilities
and their caregivers learn about
and receive special assistance
available through Medicare.
Elder Affairs will use a por-
tion of the grant for outreach
and assistance activities by its
SHINE (Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders) program,
and the rest will be distributed
to the Area Agencies on Aging,
Aging Resource Centers and
Aging and Disability Resource
Centers throughout the state.
The funds, from the federal
Medicare Improvements for
Patients and Providers Act of
2008, will provide support to
reach Floridians who are likely
to be eligible for three pro-
grams: the Low-Income Subsi-
dy, Medicare Savings Programs
and the Medicare Part D
Prescription Drug Program.
Call the helpline toll-free at
1-800-963-5337 or visit www.
FloridaSHINE.org or elderaf-
fairs.state.fl.us.


Aneurysms


July 22, 2006 was a day like
any other until suddenly I
found myself with a painful
headache and uncontrollable
vomiting; it felt like a rubber
band had snapped in my head.
I knew immediately that some-
thing was terribly wrong and
dialed 911.
At the hospital I was
informed that my brain was
bleeding and I had to have
emergency
brain sur-
gery. (I was
, given a 5
percent
chance of
survival).
Three
weeks in the
hospital and
WELLNESS six months
CORNER of rehab
later, I was
able to see
Elsa M the light at
Cintron the end of
the tunnel.
Thanks to God I was able to
recover my "cognition" skills
that I need to use in my daily
living.
* What is an aneurysm?
An aneurysm, "brain
attack," is a localized, blood-
filled dilation (balloon-like
bulge) of a blood vessel caused
by disease or weakening of the
vessel wall. Aneurysms most
commonly occur in arteries at
the base of the brain. As the
size of an aneurysm increases,
there is an increased risk of
rupture, which can result in
severe hemorrhage, compli-
cations and sudden death.
* Risk factors
Rupture and blood clotting
are the risks involved with
aneurysms. Rupture leads to
drop in blood pressure, rapid
heart rate, high cholesterol
and lightheadedness. The risk
of death is high except for rup-
ture in the extremities. Risk
factors for aneurysms are obe-
sity, diabetes, hypertension,
alcoholism, tobacco use and
copper deficiency.
* Symptoms
A sudden, severe headache
is one of the first sign of a rup-
tured aneurysm (hemorrhag-
ic stroke). A patient will typi-
cally describe it as the worst


Suddenly Ifound
myself with a painful
headache and
uncontrollable
vomiting; it felt like a
rubber band had
snapped in my head.

headache of their lives. The
headache may be accompa-
nied by nausea and vomiting.
Other symptoms are weak-
ness or numbness; confusion
and lethargy; and seizures.
Aneurysms that haven't
ruptured usually don't cause
symptoms; sometimes the
bulging vessel announces itself
by pressing against surround-
ing brain tissue. This can
cause symptoms very similar
to those of a rupture, including
severe headaches, gait imbal-
ance, weakness or numbness
on one side of the body. If you
notice these symptoms, get
medical help immediately.
* Treatment
Currently there are two
treatment options for brain
aneurysms: surgical clipping
or endovascular coiling. In my
case surgical clipping was the
option.
Surgical clipping was intro-
duced by Walter Dandy of the
Johns Hopkins Hospital in
1937. It consists of perform-
ing a craniotomy, exposing the
aneurysm and closing the
base of the aneurysm with a
clip. This surgical technique
has been modified and
improved over the years and
remains the best method to
permanently eliminate
aneurysms.
This column should be
used as a useful adjunct to
other available medical and
educational resources related
to brain aneurysms and other
future topics described herein;
it should not be used as an
alternative to personal con-
sultation with a physician.
Elsa Cintron is a physical
therapist and owner of Cintron
Rehab and Wellness Center
elsacin@gmail.com


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plans, is over $1,000,000 in 2011, your family may owe estate taxes which


could amount to 41-55% of the value of your estate. This means that your
family may have to sell some assets just to pay the estate taxes!

A living trust can eliminate probate and minimize estate taxes. Plus, a liv-
ing trust may protect your estate if you become incapacitated during your
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aged as you see fit, not as a court-appointed guardian sees fit. To find out
more about the benefits of living trusts attend one of these free seminars.


FERNANDINA BEACH
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
9:00 am - 11:00 am
Hampton Inn & Suites
19 South Second Street


SOUTHSIDE/TINSELTOWN
Wednesday, July 22, 2009
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Hilton Garden Inn
9745 Gate Parkway Dr. N


WESTSIDE/NORTHSIDE
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Holiday Inn
1-295 & Commonwealth


ORANGE PARK
Wednesday, July 22, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Hilton Garden Inn
1-295 & US 17


JAX BEACH/PONTE VEDRA
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Hampton Inn
1220 Marsh Landing Pkwy


PALM COAST
Thursday, July 23, 2009
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Hampton Inn & Suites
1-95 & SR 100


ST. AUGUSTINE
Wednesday, July 22, 2009
10:00 am - Noon
San Marco Theater
28 San Marco Avenue


MANDARIN
Thursday, July 23, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Ramada Inn
1-295 & San Jose Blvd.


Refreshments will be served. Plenty of free parking. Please arrive early, seating may be limited.


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(877) 631-6170


The Edwards Law Firm
A Professional Association
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Main Offices: Orange Park and St. Augustine
Satellite Office: Fernandina Beach

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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision which should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free, written information regarding our qualifications and experience.


+


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


TOM WOOD
CHAIRMAN


DINK NESMITH
PRESIDENT


NEWS

LEADER


FLORIDA'S OLDEST WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
ESTABLISHED IN 1854

The News-Leader is published with pride weekly
for the people of Nassau County by Community
Newspapers, Inc., Athens, Georgia. We believe
that strong newspapers build strong communi-
ties - "Newspapers get things done!" Our primary
goal is to publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. This mission
will be accomplished through the teamwork of
professionals dedicated to the truth, integrity, qual-
ity and hard work.
FoY R. MALOY JR., PUBLISHER
MICHAEL PARNELL, EDITOR
MIKE HANKINS, ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
ROBERT FIEGE, PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
BOB TIMPE. CIRCULATIONDIRECTOR


C N I TITCommunity
Newspapers,
SIncorporated

The views expressed by the columnists and
letter writers on this page are their own
and do not necessarily reflect the views of
Sthe newspaper, its owners or employees.



COMMUNITY THANKS

Fighting stigma
The National Alliance on Mental Illness
(NAMI) of Nassau County would like to
express its deepest appreciation to everyone
who helped us recognize May as Mental
Health Awareness month by participating in
our first-ever "Make Stigma Walk the Plank"
Walk-a-Thon.
We are deeply indebted to our partner, the
Fernandina Pirates Club, which gave life to
our theme and provided us with outstanding
support.
The following donors and sponsors were
also instrumental in helping us create a suc-
cessful event: Amelia Island Graphics,
Anchors Aweigh Charters Inc., Karen
Antworth, Books Plus, Cafe Karibo, Christmas
Shop on the River, Curves, Andera Dickens,
First National Bank of Nassau County, Five
Star Auto Care, Dr. Robert Friedman, Harris
Teeter, Susan Henderson, Barbara Kelmers,
Ms. Carolyn's Breakfast and Desserts, Nassau
Health Foods, The New U Salon, Tom and
Anita Oliver, P5 Productions, Putt-Putt Golf,
Quality Life Center, Sherry and Ken
Quattlebaum, River Point Behavioral Health,
Dorothy Robb, Seaside Amelia Inn, Sutton
Place Behavioral Health, Tiger Palms, Trish
Tipton of Slightly Off Centre, the Ann Dickens
Circle and the United Methodist Women from
the Memorial United Methodist Church, Ye
Ole Pirate and the YMCA.
We would also like to take this opportuni-
ty to thank the Fernandina Farmers Market
for allowing us to be part of their "Booths
with a Cause" program and the Rayonier
Foundation for a very generous grant, which
will support our Consumer Emergency
Services program.
Nassau NAMI is a non-profit support, edu-
cation and advocacy organization. The funds
we receive allow us to provide a variety of
services such as sponsoring support groups
for consumers and families dealing with men-
tal illness as well as other consumer support
programs, distribution of resource materials
on mental illness and a telephone help/refer-
ral line. During the holidays, we donate shoes,
toiletries and underclothing to the residents
of a local assisted living facility and give gifts
to the clients of a local crisis respite center and
a local day treatment program. Anyone wish-
ing to help us in our efforts to create a com-
munity that fosters hope, help and recovery
for all those affected by mental illness can
send a donation to NAMI, Nassau County,
PO. Box 15816, Fernandina Beach FL 32035.
Bonnie Dickens
Walk-a-Thon Chairman
Fernandina Beach

Testing Day
The director and officers of the Coalition
for the Reduction/Elimination of Ethnic
Disparities in Health (CREED) sends a sincere
thanks to everyone for all their hard work
June 27 during the National HIVTesting Day
Event held at the Martin Luther King Center.
I am so proud to be a part of a community that
feels that volunteerism and the health of oth-
ers is important. Just witnessing the hard
work and dedication everyone gave during the
event was extremely gratifying.
Screenings provided during this event:
Baptist Medical Center, 44 cholesterol and
glucose tests; Sickle cell foundation, 10 sick-
le tests; Nassau County Health Department,
9 HIV tests; Wal-Mart Vision Center, 22 vision
screenings.
Special thanks to Taylor Rental, Winn
Dixie, city of Fernandina and local churches
for their support during this event.
We hope to see all of you at this event next
year, during our monthly health seminars at
the Peck Center and on Dec. 1 at the World
AIDS Day Program at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church.
Jennett Wilson-Baker, RN, BSN
Executive Director, CREED


HOW TO WRITE US
Maximum length is 500 words.
Letters must include writer's name
(printed and signature), address and
telephone number for verification.
Writers are normally limited to one let-
ter in a 30-day period. No political
endorsements or poems will be pub-
lished. Letters should be typed or print-
ed. Not all letters are published. Send
letters to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box
766, Fernandina Beach, FL., 32035
E-mail: mparnell@fbnewsleader. com.


Dying minutes of Independence Day

O n a hot, hazy afternoon last week, we troops lost their lives in the memory of the boisterous jokester who used to
buried my Uncle Paul in the sandy much shorter Korean War. tell my little sisters and cousins that the squig-
loam of High Bluff Cemetery up in One by one, old Korean War gly scraps of rubber he layered into his drive-
Brantley County, Ga. At age 80, he'd vets like Uncle Paul are slip- way to prevent erosion were snakes and that
been ill for a long time. And though his pass- ping away, their stories large- they came alive at night. One of my aunt's cats
ing saddens my family, especially my Aunt ly untold. They're a dying once got beneath the hood of Uncle Paul's
Pauline and cousins Paula and Pam, we're breed. Literally. truck while he was getting ready for work.
relieved that this particular old soldier's long Uncle Paul was in a U.S. When someone asked him what happened to
battle is finally over. Now he's on R&R some Army unit that serviced the the cat, he quipped, "I suspect he's dead." He
place where the bass always bite and the deer big artillery guns. Big was kidding, of course, but he let the suspense
are fat and easy to take. CUPOF artillery guns make big tar- play out awhile.
It is perhaps fitting that Uncle Paul slipped JOE gets. Uncle Paul and several Once on a fishing trip he and I took when I
away in the dying minutes of Independence ... other members of his unit was in high school, he let me drink a beer and
Day. Uncle Paul was a wounded and decorated were servicing one of them smoke a cigarette and then squinted at me and
Korean War veteran. Not that you'd ever know Joe Palmer one day when a North asked slyly, "You ain't gonna run home and tell
it from talking with him. He'd keep you laugh- Korean mortar scored a lucky hit. As bad luck your daddy on me, are you?" - knowing darn
ing with his rapid-fire jokes and his sometimes- would have it, the round landed right in the well that we were equal partners in crime and
strange sense of humor, but he didn't talk middle of the trench they dug to shield them as that my lips were sealed.
about what happened on that frigid peninsula they worked on the gun. There was always a fishing hole out there
so many years ago. Even my cousin Barry, who The blast killed Uncle Paul's buddies and somewhere that he'd discovered where trophy-
flew several hundred combat missions in blew him out of the trench. He came to his sized bass were just waiting to hook them-
Vietnam and who was wounded in battle, didn't senses some time later, staggering around selves. But what can you expect from a man
know much about Uncle Paul and his part in nearby, his nose bloodied from the concussion with a trophy-sized sense of humor and love of
the Forgotten War. he received and a face full of shrapnel. Over life?
But that's not surprising. The old ones don't the ensuing years, he had to visit the doctor His casket was draped with the American
talk much about their ordeals in those long-ago from time to time to get a piece of metal dug flag. It's been years since I wore a uniform, but
places like Okinawa, Normandy and Pusan. out of his face. I felt it appropriate to stand at attention and
They did their stint and came home and went One piece, lodged near his optic nerve, was salute when they folded the flag and presented
on with their lives and reared sons and daugh- deemed too risky to touch and so it remained it to my aunt.
ters who went off to fight another war in there. There's an old soldier's song that goes in
Vietnam. We talk about our war. There's a cot- Years ago, he began to lose his hearing and part like this: "Sergeants they love to drill.
tage industry of Vietnam movies out there. But the Veterans Administration provided him with Guess the bastards always will. So we drill and
the bloody three-year conflict in Korea receives hearing aids. But he wasn't the complaining drill till we fade away."
little popular attention. The Vietnam War raged sort. No sir. At ease, Uncle Paul. At ease.
for nearly 10 years, but over half as many The Uncle Paul who won't fade away is my .....



VOICE OF THE PEOPLE


Journalism ethics
We must applaud the News-
Leader for relentless pursuit of the
truth. As we all know by now,
Florida has some of the most strict
Sunshine laws in the nation. And
as the city clerk experiences every
day, municipalities are required to
respond quickly to public informa-
tion requests, especially those from
the media. So you would think that,
following the spirit of full and fair
disclosure and the right of the pub-
lic to know, that the News-Leader
would be equally open and honest
with its readers. Sadly, you would be
wrong.
Politics of personalities is alive
and well in the News-Leader offices.
How's that, you say? Well, just look
at the stories they are covering and
the people involved. Over the past
few weeks, we have had a story crit-
ical of the city attorney's failure to
stop a meeting that might have been
a Sunshine Law violation. Lots of
attention was given to naming cer-
tain commissioners who partici-
pated; no space was given to allow
comments from the city attorney.
Then there was the article about
the firm Search Amelia's broad-
casting on the city's public access
channel and its connection with
Commissioner Eric Childers. Not
to mention all the articles that
appear regularly pointing out all the
problems the News-Leader has with
the city manager.
I wonder. Are these problems of
the News-Leader or a recently
"retired" city commissioner who
found himself on the losing end of
4-1 votes, and who unsuccessfully
tried to fire both the city manager
and the city attorney? And is it a
coincidence that early on in his
tenure Commissioner Childers pub-
licly accused this same commis-
sioner of being the worst thing that
ever happened to the city commis-
sion? And of course, this very same
commissioner is a regular columnist
for the News-Leader. Some coinci-
dence!
If the News-Leader had made
even a small attempt to inject some
balance into the piece on Search
Amelia it would have reported that
when the city manager proposed a
public-access policy to the com-
mission last year, their now ace
columnist was vociferously opposed
to it, stating that there was no need
for such a policy. The city manager
warned at the time that the air
waves were open to anyone with
any agenda. Certainly didn't bother
the News-Leaders pal, who maybe
declined to run for another term
because he himself had memory
problems.
Shame on the News-Leader if it is
allowing itself to be led by the mean-
spirited agenda of a former com-
missioner who could not get his
way when he had some power.
There used to be something called
ethics in journalism. I guess that
now that Bob Spiegal has passed
from the scene here on Amelia
Island, the last of the ethical jour-
nalism went with him.
Jim Jenkins
Fernandina Beach

Vicious dogs
I am writing because I am
appalled at the careless and lenient
nature of the animal leash laws and
the lack of action taken when ani-
mals attack. My dog was brutally
attacked twice by the same vicious
pit bull and the only punishment
that was given was a $100 fine to the
dogs' owner. A mere slap on the
wrist. In my opinion, not enough of
a penalty to prevent this incident
from happening again.
My dog, Veal Chop, is large but
kind-hearted and, more important-
ly, over 10 years old and has had a
stroke and a broken leg. He doesn't
exactly have an aggressive "attack"
mentality. He certainly is no match


for the young, enormous and
vicious pit bull that violently
attacked him while I was pushing
my two small children in a stroller
and holding Veal Chop on a leash.
The pit bull had no collar or leash
on. I have multiple witnesses that
say that the owner put the leash on
the dog after the attack.
We walk every day, and every
day I have carried Mace with me
because of my fear of this particular
dog and its negligent owner's behav-
ior. When I saw the dog coming, I
pulled out my Mace and emptied
the container in its eyes. The dog
didn't even blink - it went straight
for Veal Chop's face. I let go of the
stroller and began trying to separate
the two dogs. It is a scary thing to
have to get your dog out of the
mouth of a ferocious pit bull while
your small children are screaming
and watching their pet get attacked
(for the second time).
Luckily, I have wonderful neigh-
bors that saw it happen and came
running to help break up the fight
and calm my kids (and myself). I
don't know where Veal Chop would
be if they hadn't been around. After
the first attack, I made the mistake
of not calling the police or animal
control because the owner was so
apologetic and I believed her
when she said that it would not hap-
pen again. She also did not
hesitate to pay his medical bills
when I presented them to her. I was
also under the impression that it
didn't take much in our county to
have a dog euthanized. I was com-
pletely wrong. I should not have
been so naive.
I don't want to be misunder-
stood; I love animals and believe
that all animals have the potential to
be well-mannered, great pets if
brought up in a loving environment
with the correct owners. Not all
people are a good match for pit
bulls. They are potentially danger-
ous weapons and if under the wrong
ownership can get out of control
and injure or even kill. They can be
loving and wonderful pets, but your
have to take special care and pre-
caution, like always having a leash
and a collar on - especially in Heron
Isles, where the houses are so close
together and there are so many chil-
dren. They need the proper disci-
pline and attention so that these
attacks don't happen.
Both the police officer and the
animal control officer were polite
and professional, however they
work within the confines of the law.
I think these laws need to change.
I realize that I didn't report the first
attack, and that is my mistake.
However, when an owner shows
multiple acts of negligence I think
the pet should be placed in a better
environment with someone who is
more responsible or charged with a


heftier fine than a measly $100.
Apparently, it is nearly impossible to
permanently remove a dog from an
unfit owner. A dog can attack mul-
tiple times and be returned to its
owner time and time again. This
process seems unsafe and nonsen-
sical.
These laws need to change soon,
especially with this new craze that
is happening that it is cool to own a
pit bull. I think that if you get a pit
bull you should be required by law
to take a class on how to properly
care for the dog. What if my chil-
dren had been injured? I should be
able to walk down the sidewalk with
my kids in their stroller and dog on
a leash without having to carry a
gun for fear that one of us will be
attacked. There need to be stiffer
penalties for owners with this type
of negligent behavior.
Jessica Bruland
Yulee


County Building
Department
Well, I know our county com-
missioners have been receiving
their share of criticism lately for a
number of recent decisions; far be
it from me to add to their growing
list of detractors, but there is an
issue going on that I feel ethically
cannot be ignored.
A year ago the commissioners,
in their usual whimsical style, and
with the stated motive being to stim-
ulate the local economy, decided to
do away with impact fees for new
buildings and cut all permitting fees
in half. Theoretically, this would
lead to increased building and
greater jobs. The plan did not
work, but the success of their plan
is not in question here. The problem
lies in what has happened after-
ward.
Now, at the time the no-impact
fee measure was enacted, presum-
ably, every voting member under-
stood that doing this would mean
that the Building Department would
not be generating its own revenue
(which it had always done before)
and would instead be drawing on its
several millions of reserve funds.
At the end of the year, they were
scheduled to review the issue and
decide if the no-fee policy was work-
ing or not.
So, here we are, with June being
the end of the proposed year, and
somebody seems to have noticed
that - gasp - the Building
Department isn't making any
money and is working in the red. So
the county sprang into action with
another capricious move. In order to
save money and continue to sup-
port a non-functional building incen-
tive, the county has decided to cut
the Building Department staff in


DAVID FITZSIMMONS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR

half.
OK, it's a recession; this hap-
pens. But the crux of the issue is
this: while the commissioners sit
secure in their financial future, over
30 people in the Building
Department - people with families
- have been waiting for a month to
know who is getting the proverbial
ax. They, like the rest of the News-
Leader readership, saw the
announcement that the department
would be cut in half - and that is all
they have been told. They have
been told that their jobs and their
families are in jeopardy so the coun-
ty can continue a failing program.
It is one thing to make a difficult
and destructive decision, but it is
another to leave people to wonder
what is happening while the coun-
ty decision-makers continue on like
their policies aren't affecting lives
and families.
To the county commissioners, I
say show some compassion. Let
these employees know what their
future holds. Tell them who is being
terminated. As for me, I - and I'm
sure many other voters - are watch-
ing you right now. You have a lot of
decisions to make in these
tumultuous times, and I pray that
you make them not only to please
your wealthy constituents. In a
recession, you might just find that
the poorer majority will sway the
vote.
Lisa M. Kugler
Fernandina Beach

Government health care
In response to the (uly 10)letter
about health care being such a no-
brainer, I submit that (the writer)
along with others that feel as he
does are not very well educated on
just what this all entails.
First I have yet, in my 62 years,
seen the government handle any
social program with efficiency or
fiscal restraint. I do not want them
in my health decisions.
I am a disabled vet and it takes
me anywhere from 6-9 months to
have a medical problem dealt with.
This is what the government will
do for us.
Second, our neighbor to the
north has national health care and
if it were not for the American
health system many of them would
die due to the wait forced on them
by their socialist system. They cross
the border for medical treatment
that they can't get in their country.
I ask that you not take my word
for this but to do a wee bit of look-
ing via search engines and verify it
yourself.
Government health care is far
from what out politicians, read roy-
alty, are telling us.
Ray Wager
Yulee


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


8 COMMUNITY


FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009 / NEWS-LEADER


Gallagher-Marvel
Tim and Sherry Gallagher
of Amelia Island are happy to
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Bonnie Marie
Gallagher, to Johnathon Rex
Marvel, son of Mark Marvel
of Yulee and Charlotte
Castillo of Wichita, Kan.
The bride-to-be graduated
from Fernandina Beach High
School and is a 2008 graduate
of Florida State University,
where she earned a bachelor
of science degree in market-
ing and communications. She
is also an alumna of Delta
Delta Delta women's fraterni-
ty.
The groom-elect graduat-
ed from FBHS and is a 2009
graduate of Florida State
University, where he earned a
bachelor of science degree in
political science and religion,
accompanied by a certificate
in human rights.
Bonnie and John are mov-
ing to Ohio, where she will
pursue her career in market-
ing and John will be attending
the University of Cincinnati
Law School.
The couple met at Florida
State University, where both
were members of the FSU
crew team. The pair share a
passion for the outdoors and
were engaged on a December
kayaking trip.
The wedding and recep-
tion will take place at the
Ribault Club on Fort George
Island, across from the sandy
beach where they were en-
gaged. The date of the occa-
sion is set for May 22, 2010.

Wilcox-Lamar
Whitney Leigh Wilcox of
Fernandina Beach and Jared


* The McArthur Family
YMCA will hold its Eco-
Adventure Summer Day
Camp through Aug. 21.
Episcopal Children's Services
accepted. Fee is $105 mem-
bers/$110 non-members and
a $50 registration fee (waived
for members). Daily rate is
$40. Camp locations are
Atlantic Elementary, Callahan
Elementary and the Yulee
Kids' Campus. Call 261-1080.
* Boys and Girls Clubs of
Nassau County Summer
Camps run until Aug. 21.
Participants will experience
fun and learning in a struc-
tured environment. Hours are
8 a.m.-6 p.m. Weekly fee is
$50. Various free and reduced
enrollment plans are avail-
able, as are payment plans.
For information at the Miller
Club (942259 Old Nassauville
Road), call Carla Wilson at
261-1075; for information at
the Fernandina Beach Club
(11th and Indigo), call Reggie
Williams at 491-9102.
* Kayak Amelia is offering
one-day Kid's Kayak Day
Camps July 21 and 28 for chil-
dren ages 9-14. Campers will
learn the basics of kayaking
(paddle strokes, rescues),
water safety, survival skills
and navigation. The instruc-
tor is an American Canoe
Association Level 3 kayak
instructor, certified in
Wilderness First Aid and
CPR Classes are limited to
seven paddlers. Cost is $75
per person. Call (904) 251-
0016 for reservations.
* The Yulee High School
Hornet Marching Band will
hold summer band camps in
the school band hall on the
following dates: Color Guard


Mr. Marvel, Miss Gallagher


Mr. Lamar, Miss Wilcox


Michael Lamar of Callahan
will be married Oct. 3, 2009,
at the home of the bride with
the Rev. Bruce Lamar officiat-
ing. The reception will be
held at Amelia Island
Plantation.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Dale and Anita
Wilcox of Fernandina Beach.
The groom-elect is the son of
Bruce and Jean Lamar of
Callahan.


and Percussion Mini-Camp,
July 27-31, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; all
band instrumentalists, per-
cussion and color guard, Aug.
10-14,8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
* The Amelia Island
Parent Co-Op Preschool is
enrolling now for fall 2009
preschool classes for ages 2
and 3. The Co-Op also offers
summer camps in two-week
sessions for ages 3-5. Call
261-1161 or visit www.aipcp.
org. The Co-Op is located at
5040 First Coast Hwy., next to
The Dome Healing Center.
* The Cummer Museum
of Art & Gardens, 829 River-
side Ave., Jacksonville, is
hosting a Middle School Art
Camp for children entering
sixth through eighth grades,
where children are immersed
in art for a week of learning
and can establish a strong
portfolio. Camp is 9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. July 27-31. Cost is
$200 per child (members)
and $225 (non-members).
Call (904) 355-0630.
* The Epilepsy Founda-
tion of Florida is offering full
scholarships to Camp Boggy
Creek Aug. 6-11, which pro-
vides children with epilepsy,
ages 7-16, an opportunity to
escape the stress of dealing
with their medical conditions.
Campers participate in a vari-
ety of activities and on-staff
medical teams and volunteers
ensure the environment is
physically safe and medically
sound. Located in Eustis, the
permanent facility is on 232
acres of tall pines, majestic
oaks and nature trails.
Call the Jacksonville
EFOF office at (904) 731-3752
or visit www.BoggyCreek.org
or www.epilepsyfla.org.


Callahan hosts senior adult lunch


Willie Brunette, education and out-
reach minister at Amelia Baptist
Church, writes: "Risk Management, a
strange subject, but this was the title of
my first class at New Orleans. From the
beginning, the professor said this would
be a very scary course; and it was. The
entire class focused on the vulnerability
of churches for litigation.
"Churches are no longer thought to
be 'off limits' to lawsuits. Churches are
seen as 'easy' targets because we are
friendly and assume the best in people.
We reviewed several books and multiple
Internet sites of the subject of church
risk management. Most of them had a
single theme: Churches are doing a
poor job of protecting themselves, peo-
ple and its property from risk.
'The largest assumption of most
churches is 'it won't happen here' and
the second was 'we have insurance to
cover that.' At the end of the class, the
conclusion was that it can happen here
and insurance is not prevention.
"My assignment from the class was
to develop a risk management strategy
of Amelia. At this same time, the
trustees and I were reviewing our
church insurance liability and property
coverage. With some help from an
Internet site and a checklist of insurance
coverage available, we were able to
negotiate more coverage for less cost.
We came in almost $5,000 under budget
with more coverage.
"Our children's policies and the use
of background checks place us ahead of
the power curve in that ministry. For the
most part, we are in good shape, but
some of our policies need to be written
down. I will continue to create a risk
strategy for the church and, if you have
any interest in being on the team, please
give me a call."
Thanks to First Baptist Church,
Callahan, for hosting our senior adult
associational luncheon May 21. Dr.
Lynn Hyatt brought an inspirational
message. The meal was delicious and a
big "thank you" to those who prepared
it. There were approximately 142 in
attendance. Our attendance was down
due to the bad weather we were having.
Looking forward to seeing all you
"Senior Saints" at Springhill Baptist
Church Aug. 20. In his service, Bro.
Jimmy Flanagan.
From the Shepherd's Staff: "Watch
the impossible take place. God has truly
blessed us over the past few weeks.
What an awesome time we had with
Tony Nolan as God used him in our
'Mission Possible.' It was great to see
over 20 come to the Lord and 27 more
through the prison ministry. God contin-
ues to challenge me as your pastor to
lead us to new ministries to reach more
for Christ. I know that the same God
that brought the great results during
'Mission Possible' is the same God that
wants to do even more through all of
our ministries.
"With that said, I am excited to
announce a new ministry at First Baptist
Church. I believe the church should
look for all means we have to reach
someone. This is not always through the
spoken word in a Sunday morning serv-
ice. There are many ways to tough a
heart. One is by meeting a need some-
one might have and, in the process,
sharing with them the love of Jesus.
"As humans, we need to grow and
strengthen spiritually and physically.
Because of this, we are announcing the
beginning of our Health and Fitness
ministry. Kim Gose, a certified personal
trainer, will be leading three different
types of exercise class.


"For times and
types, please not the
article in the newslet-
ter. All classes will be
in the Family Life
a Center. They are free
of charge - some will
Require certain items
for you to bring - and
they are open to any-
HILDA'S one.
HEAR- "Make sure to tell
ABOUTS your friends and come
be a part of this great
way to introduce an
Hilda unchurched friend to
Higginbotham the wonderful family of
God here at First
Baptist. More new ministries in the
works. We need people to participate
and to lead. Pray about what your role
will be."
Student ministry by the Rev. Charlie
McDonough of First Baptist Church,
Fernandina Beach: "Let me start by say-
ing welcome to the incoming fifth
graders. I think I speak for everyone in
the student ministry when I say that we
are excited about this new crop of stu-
dents coming up. I can't wait to see what
God is going to do in them and through
them this year."
Ride through the Australian outback.
The train ride will show us an Aussie
view of God's love for us, filled with awe-
some Bible stories, games, crafts and
don't forget the snacks on the barbie.
Kidz Camp 2009 is Aug. 3-6. Registration
packs are available now. Curtis Crider is
minister of children, Angie McClellan is
interim minister of music, ministry
assistants are Michelle Springer and
Wendy Kidd, Yulee Baptist Church.
Hi, Mike, Rhonda, Caroline, Stephen
and Daniel Reed up in Folly Beach, S.C.
We really miss this lovely family and, on
Mike's first Saturday, June 7, preaching
there, they had a nice number attend-
ing. We heard that from a phone call.
They were remembered in prayer at
First Baptist here at the time he was
having church service up there.
Mike, I have a cousin who lives in
Beaufort, S.C., which I hear isn't far
from Folly. Her name is Geraldine
(Gerry) Brewton. She goes to a large
church there near her. I write her and
she calls me after that for a long cell
phone chat. I'm going to ask her some
questions. Please try to meet her.
Wally Armstrong comes to First
Baptist Aug. 1. Armstrong will be our
guest speaker as well as offer a clinic
before our tournament. He has played
professionally and taught golf since 1968
after graduating from the University of
Florida with a bachelor's and master's
degree in education. Armstrong was a
member of the Gator golf team and
earned All-American recognition in
1966.
A PGA member since 1974,
Armstrong has competed in more than
300 PGA tournaments. In his first
Masters, he finished fifth, setting a rook-
ie record score of eight under par.
During his career, he competed in
numerous majors, including the British
Open, Masters, U.S. Open, PGA
Championship and The Players
Championship and was a solid front-run-
ner on the PGATour, finishing second
four times and one year finishing seven
times in the top 10.
In the last 20 years, Armstrong has
concentrated on golf instruction, pro-
ducing 22 golf instructional videotapes,
selling more than 500,000 copies. His
best-selling Golffor Kids ofAll Ages was
the first tape for kids and dads. In 1995,


Armstrong and his then 10-year-old son,
Blake, produced the first golf instruc-
tional kids video taught by a kid, Power
Drives for Kids.
Armstrong is recognized by his
peers as one of the most creative teach-
ers of the game. He is best noted for
teaching the game with the use of fami-
lies objects, such as brooms, mops,
hula-hoops, hangers, etc.
But, Armstrong's true passion is
sharing his faith with others and he
does this through the game of golf.
Armstrong helps players use golf as a
tool for sharing his faith with others.
And he does this through the game of
golf. Armstrong helps players use golf
as a tool for sharing Christ both on and
off the golf course.
This is an event you do not want to
miss. Mark your calendars now for Aug.
1. Bring a friend who does not know
Jesus. It could be the best day of their
life.
Grace Groups of Springhill Baptist
Church. Grace: A disposition to kind-
ness and compassion, the attitude of
God toward men. Ministry: A person or
thing through which something is
accomplished. We desire to grow into
ladies who minister grace.
Betty Shook says, "I have been part
of a Grace Group since 2002. It has
helped me in retaining the sermon mes-
sages presented by Bro. Jackie Hayes.
When we go over the message, it is a
deeper learning experience and it helps
me feel closer to God. We pray for each
other's needs, our church needs and our
nation."
"Our praises are lifted to God as we
thank Him for His countless blessings.
This group has become a very special
group of friends.
"In February, Betty challenged us to
make about 40 Easter bonnets out of
paper plates and artificial flowers for the
ladies at Savannah Grande. Betty Ann
accompanied us on the piano and we
sang Easter songs. We tied the bonnets
on their heads. We didn't leave out the
men. They were the proud recipients of
bow ties. Ours, however, was the
greater blessing. Nothing can compare
to seeing the joy on others' faces when
they are shown a little kindness and
compassion. Our ladies got such a bless-
ing out of this that we went back before
Mother's Day with tissue paper flower
arrangements.
"Another ministry that has given us
pleasure is our sponsoring of an 11-year-
old boy from Ethiopia. One of our ladies
introduced us to a ministry group called
'Compassion,' a child advocacy ministry
that releases children from spiritual,
economic, social and physical poverty
and enables them to become responsi-
ble, fulfilled Christian adults.
M\I:II I. . 18:15 states, 'And whoever
welcomes a little child like this in My
name welcomes Me.' We are helping to
provide ongoing Christian training and
educational opportunities for him that
couldn't be possible otherwise. Letters
from him (translated, of course) detail-
ing his daily life, his hopes and his
dreams are an encouragement to us and
we pray that God will enable him to
become a Godly Christian man, whose
life will be a blessing to others. Please
pay with us for Henok."
May we all grow in God's Grace, the
"Grace Gals" (Patty Peacock).
Grace Group leaders: Dave
Blanchette, Mike Darby, Josh Dunton,
Ben Guest, Dick Hopper, Louie
Johnson, Chris McKinney, Jake
Mottayaw, Patty Peacock, Wayne Peters,
Bill Sullenger, Lamar Underwood.


HELPERS


* Sponsored by the Amer-
ican Cancer Society and sup-
ported by product donations
from various cosmetic com-
panies, Look Good, Feel
Better is a program designed
for female cancer patients
going through chemotherapy
and/or radiation therapy.
Group sessions help patients
restore their appearance and
self-image through a


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464054 SR 200, Yulee 802 S. 8th Street (904) 261-0242
(904) 261-6821 Fernandina Beach, FL 32034 Fax (904) 261-0291
FAMILY DENTISTRY /
FOR ADULTS & CHILDREN Badcock


Most Insurances Accepted HOM URNITUR
Call For Appointment l O Tre
e261-6ea82
Dr. Robert Friedman 904-261-6956
A1A at Bailey Rd. 542057 Us Hwy 1, Callahan, FL Answer not a
according to his
FREEIVAN lestyoube like
WELL DRILLERS, INC. ace able yourself.
261-5216 Advertie yourbusiness & R.S. . Proverbs
Rock & Artesian Wells
Pump Installations& Repair to support your local church
606 S. 6th Street Call tfhe NewsLeader - 261-3696
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
Steve Johnson Automotive
1505 S 14t Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-277-9719
Proudly Supporting Our Community J '


I


fool
folly,
Shim

26:4


makeover and style tips from
professionally trained beauti-
cians. Call the American
Cancer Society at 1-800-227-
9954 to register.
* Afrdal,4lM ttl.urig. a
non-profit, is collecting
earned half-marathon,
marathon, triathlon and
Ironman medals to donate to
local people battling illness-
es. If you have a medal to


The principal danger of arguing with fools is that we are more
likely to sink their level than to raise them up to ours Likewise,
it can be extremely difficult to deal with those who hate us without
ending up in a seething cauldron of hatred ourselves Can you be
honest with those who lie to you? Can you trust those who don't
trust you? Rudyard Kipling's edifying poem If" inspires us to
believe that, If you can keep your head when all about you are
losing theirs and blaming it on you If you can trustyourself when
all men doubt you Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies, or
being hated, don't give way to hating Yours isthe Earth and
everything that's in it Surely this may be a bit of an
overstatement, but the man orwoman who can resist hating those
who hate them and losing their head when others are doing just
that has surely gained a measure of self mastery worth emulating
So, the next time a fool or a scoundrel tries to pull you down to
their level, consider it best to hold your tongue and safeguard your
heart When asked where we come from most of us think of our
parents or a geographic locale rather than the ultimate source of
our being, which is Spirit We come from God, and the only reason
that most of us don't recognize this is that our bodies delude us
into thinking that we are separate from everything else
Ultimately, we are all connected through this connection with the
one Spirit but often our individual egos may not allow us to see
this Our bodies convince us that we are unique, separate beings
As physical beings, we are indeed unique and separate from all
else, but as spiritual beings, we are part of a greater whole As
physical beings, we undergo constant change, and will eventually
die, but as spiritual beings, we are
eternal We should remember then, that
we are connected to God and are indeed
partof God, an emanation from a
holy source

Q


donate to a courageous child
or adult, place it in the collec-
tion box at T&A Sports, Red
Otter Outfitters or any 1st
Place Sports store. For infor-
mation, contact Rose Bennett
at 491-3758.
* Micah's Place is a
501(c) (3) non-profit and the
only certified domestic vio-
lence center serving Nassau
County. It provides emer-
gency shelter, outreach, pre-
vention programs and com-
munity education. Visit
www.micahsplace.org.
If you or someone you
know is being abused, call
the 24-hour crisis hotline at 1-
800-500-1119, and emergency
shelter at 225-9979. For infor-
mation or to make donations,
call 491-6364, ext. 102, or e-
mail development@micah-
splace.org. Support groups
for victims and survivors of
domestic violence meet
weekly. For location informa-
tion, please call Micah's
Place at 548-5656. For out-
reach call 548-4646.
Volunteers call 491-6364, ext.
106.
* East Nassau County
Military AP-3 Honor Guard
provides military honors on
the death of a serviceman.
Eligible recipients include
military members on active
duty or in the Selected
Reserve, former military
members who served on
active duty and department
under conditions other than
dishonorable, former military
members who completed at
least one term of enlistment
or period of initial obligated
service in the Selected
Reserve and departed under


conditions other than dishon-
orable, former military mem-
bers discharged from the
Selected Reserve due to a
disability incurred or aggra-
vated in the line of duty, and
members of the Commission-
ed Officer Corps of the
Public Health Service and
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration,
as members of a uniformed
service. To prove eligibility
documentation, such as the
DD Form 214 discharge cer-
tificate, is required.
For information contact
Commander/Coordinator
Ted Davis at 225-9212.
* A project to fabricate
metal parts used in the manu-
facture of three-wheeled,
hand-cranked carts is ongo-
ing at a workshop sponsored
by Memorial United
Methodist Church. The vehi-
cles, called Personal Energy
Transportation or PETs, are
assembled at Penney Farms
and shipped throughout the
world to victims of polio, land
mines and other injuries.
Opportunities exist for those
interested in cutting, grind-
ing, drilling and welding
metal parts, delivering parts
and procuring materials. Call
Jack at 261-5691 or James at
261-5863.
* The Nassau Alcohol,
Crime and Drug Abatement
Coalition (NACDAC) is a
non-profit coalition created to
support and encourage drug-
free lifestyles for the youth of
Nassau County. It meets the
third Tuesday of every
month at 4 p.m. at the County
Building at 86026 Pages
Dairy Road in Yulee.


WEDDING ENGAGEMENTS


SUMMER CAMPS


mm�


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009/News-Leader


RELIGION


Friends, faith and


"Ah, excuse me. Aren't you the
guy who writes articles for the news-
paper?"
"Yes I am," I replied, surprised by
his sudden appearance. "My name is
Rob," I said as I rolled the car win-
dow all the way down in order to
properly meet him.
"I was just wondering," he said
abruptly, "what kind of formal educa-
tion do you have?"
"Well, to be honest," I replied,
"not a whole lot."
"I can tell," he said. "Your articles
are the dumbest articles I've ever
read."
Shocked, yet amused by my new
friend's approach, I had to chuckle.
This guy was serious.
"I am so sorry you feel that way,"


I replied. "You
know you don't
have to read them,"
I said.
S "Oh I know," he
answered, a bit off
balance. "They're
just so dumb, I find
them funny." And,
with that, my new
PULPIT friend began edu-
NOTES rating me on why
. having faith in God
was the most illogi-
Pastor cal, nescient thing a
Rob Goyette person could do.
The thought of me
spending time each week writing and
spreading such lies was more than
he could bear.


opposing
Thankfully, for me, the whole
encounter happened at a moment
when I was on a spiritual high.
Having just finished my time of
prayer and Bible reading, to try to
convince me that God didn't exist
and that what I really needed was
more education was a bit in vain.
As I listened and did my best to
understand where my faithful reader
was coming from, I realized I was
late for an appointment. "I've got to
go," I said, "Perhaps we can talk
again some other time."
"OK," he replied, "but the bottom
line is, you just need to get an educa-
tion."
To which I lovingly replied, "And
you just need Jesus."
As we both smiled at each other,


points ofview

and I began to drive away, I realized For them, and for me,
that I indeed had a new friend, influence of the most wid
Since that time, we've run into lished, widely read book
each other here and there and have world - the Bible - and tl
been able to share our opposing changing message that it
views with a little more gracility. (I to miss out on the great
put that word in there just for you my edge available to man: th
friend in the event that you're still edge of God Himself.
reading.) So what's the point of
Though most of the people who I don't know, perhaps I ju
take the time to comment on the arti- it appropriate to acknowl
cles I write are very appreciative, I of you who read but don'
must say I'm thankful for the oppos- Just so you know, I count
ing points of view. I'm honored to to share the often simple
know that people, whether highly ful message of Jesus Chr
educated or not, are taking the time Though you may not
to read. Actually, some of my dearest thanks for your friendshi
friends are extremely educated and, Robert L. Goyette is pa
interestingly enough, have a strong Living Waters World Outr
faith in God. raov@livinawate,


to deny the
ely pub-
in the entire
he life
carries, is
st knowl-
e knowl-

this article?
.st thought
edge those
t believe.
Sit an honor
, yet power-
ist with you.
agree,
p anyway.
stor of
'each Center
rsoutreach.org


RELIGION NOTES


'Save the
Children Day
O'Neal Memorial Baptist
Church, 474257 SR 200 East
in O'Neil, will present the 15th
annual Save the Children Day
at 3 p.m. July 19.
The youth department and
male mentors, program spon-
sors, will honor retired educa-
tors during
the worship
service.
Clinical psy-
chologist
Kathleen
Watkins,
Ph.D., of Los
Angeles,
Calif., will Watkins
speak for the
service.
Watkins has served as a child
therapist for Miller Children's
Abuse and Violence
Intervention Center in Long
Beach since 1999.
She has also directed the
center's Child and Adolescent
Trauma Program Consumer/
Family Advisory Council
since 2005. Watkins is the
daughter of Gwendolyn
Morrison Watkins, formerly
of Fernandina Beach, and the
late Tommie Watkins.
Save the Children Day
annually recognizes the out-
standing service and contribu-
tions of local citizens. For
information, call 261-4186.

What Can We
Know About Jesus'
Saving Jesus is a revolu-
tionary DVD-based small
group exploration of Jesus


Christ featuring modern reli-
gious voices of our day. This
10-week program utilizes
guided discussion and a 20-
minute video segment featur-
ing Marcus Borg, John
Dominic Crossan, Matthew
Fox, Amy-Jill Levine, James
Forbes and a host of others.
The topic for July 19 is,
"What Can We Know About
Jesus?" The series continues
weekly through Sunday, Sept.
8 from 10-11 a.m. New Vision
Congregational Church meets
at 96074 Chester Road in
Yulee. Contact the Rev. Mary
Kendrick Moore at 238-1822.
Folk theologian
Returning to Memorial
Church for his second visit,
nationally known singer, sto-
ryteller and folk theologian
Ed Kilbourne will be featured
during Sunday morning in
worship on July 19 and for
three evenings July 19-21.
Sunday worship is at 8:30
a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. and
at 6:30 p.m.
Kilbourne has 23 record-
ings on the Fly-By-Night label
and a collection of his stories
and essays will soon be avail-
able online (www.edkilbour
ne. com) in the e-book, The
Gospel According To You.
Call 261-5769 or visit
www.mumconline.com. The
church is located at 601
Centre St., Fernandina Beach.
Exploring faith
During July, worship at
Providence Presbyterian
Church, 96537 Parliament
Drive, just off Old Nassauville
Road, will be in response to


questions members and
friends of the church submit-
ted for consideration. Worship
is at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Worship and lunch
Join Salvation Army Hope
House each Tuesday at noon
for its Weekly Worship
Service and Fellowship
Lunch. On July 21, Gene
Knaga of Amelia Island
Ministries will lead worship
and the congregation will
share testimonies. Lunch fol-
lows at approximately 1 p.m.
For more information, call
321-0435 or stop by the Hope
House, 410 South Date St.

Worship on
the beach
Join Memorial United
Methodist Church for its wor-
ship on the beach July 22 at 7
p.m. Participants gather just
to the right off Public Beach
Entrance #22, or at 2252
South Fletcher Avenue. Bring
your beach chairs, towels or
blankets and join in a great
time of music and worship.

Friends &
Family Day
Mount Horeb Missionary
Baptist Church will celebrate
its annual Family & Friends
Day July 26. Services will
begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday
School and morning worship
will be at 11 a.m.
The community is invited.
located in the Lessie commu-
nity at 58552 Coopers Neck
Road, Hilliard. Call (904) 845-
3948.


NEWPASTOR

The Rev. Michael S. Bowen, with his
family, left, is the new senior pastor
Li. .of Blackrock Baptist Church, 96362
Blackrock Road, Yulee. "It is a great
joy to be the pastor of such a won-
derful fellowship," he said in a
press release. "God has great things
in store for Blackrock Baptist
Church. Our mission as a church is
to win the lost, disciple the saved
and make an impact upon the entire
world. There are many ways that one
can be involved in the ministry of
Blackrock Baptist Church. We have
* a lot to offer for all ages and we
value everyone that walks through
our doors." Visit the church or e-
mail him at GodSavs@yahoo.com.
SUBMITTED


VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS


Wacky Wednesdays for
children in kindergarten
through fifth grade are held
at Memorial United
Methodist Church, 601
Centre St., in July.
The classes are taught by
elementary school teacher
Linda Seng, assisted by
Carol Olson, director of
Christian Education, and
Deena Wolfe. Registration
forms are available in the
Partin Center, 601 Center St.,
Memorial United Methodist
Church, Maxwell Hall and
the sanctuary. Children will
learn scripture through
crafts and trips to area muse-
ums. Call Olson at 261-5769.
* * *
Faith Christian
Academy presents Kids
Choice Camp 2009 from 7


a.m.-6p.m. through Aug. 12
at 96282 Brady Point Road,
Fernandina Beach. Camp is
for ages 3-12 years. To regis-
ter call 321-2137.
* * *
Yulee Baptist Church,
85971 Harts Road, Yulee, will
host "Boomerang Express"
vacation Bible school July 19-
23 from 6-9 p.m. Kids will
wind their way across
Australia to discover the vast-
ness of God's love and that
no matter what they do in
life, it all comes back to
Jesus. Call 225-5128.
* * *
Mighty Men of Valor, an
original vacation Bible school
written by Dr. John Van
Delinder, will be held from
6:30-8:30 p.m. nightly, July
26-30, at Bible Baptist


Church, 820 South 14th St.,
Fernandina Beach.
Students in kindergarten
and up are welcome. Some
transportation is available by
calling 261-5457.
Each evening will feature
skits, games, dramatized
Bible stories about Joshua,
refreshments and many
exciting events - including
the largest water pistol
fight.
* * *
Fernandina Beach
Church of Christ presents
"A Veggie Tales VBS!" July
28-Aug. 1 for kids age 4 to
entering fifth grade. School
is 6:30-8:30 p.m. each night at
the church, 1005 South 14th
St., Fernandina Beach (cor-
ner of 14th and Jasmine
streets). Call 261-9760.


"WVorship this week at the ylace of your choice"


f. r :t Church
Sunday School ..........................................9:30 am
Sunday Worship .......................... 10:45 am
Wednesday AWANA ..............................6:15 pm
Wednesday Bible Study........................6:30 pm
941017 Old Nassauville Road * County Rd-107 South
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
261-4741
www.springhillbaptistfb.org


I Um- rv &rn~~u i-mj


AMELIA PLANTATION CHAPEL
An InterdenominationalCommunity Church
SUNDAY WORSHIP
July 19, 2009 * 9:15 a.m.


MESSAGE: "The Suffering of Creation"
MUSIC: "On Eagles Wings"
(Nursery Provided)
Adult Sunday School Class at 10:30 am
"Our Obligation to Love"
WHAT IS YOUR OPINION?
Read Amelia Plantation Chapel Pastor Ted Schroder's new Blog
at ameliachapel.com and state your feelings! Log on, go to Pastor's Comer,
and Ted's Blog. Simply input your name and e-mail at the bottom of the blog
content and begin. We want to hear from YOU!
-ALL ARE WELCOME-
The Chapel is located behind
The Spa & Shops at Amelia Island Plantation
36 Bowman Road
-* i- 277- 4414 * www.ameliachapel.com


4, ANCHOR


Contemporary
Worship
Sunday @11:00
515 Centre Street


I .- i R


Rev. Ray Ramsburg, Pastor

--- Every Sunday ---
Traditional Worship: 8AM & 11AM
Praise Worship: 9:30AM
Nursery provided at all services
--- Vacation Bible School ---
July 12 thru 17

Across from Fort Clinch State Park
261-6306
www.poplcamelia.org


lmrct/vrL


Holy tinity
Anglican Church
j Arat onal
weirsHp Comnunuty


Everyone Welcome
A 1928 Prayer Book Parish
The Rev. J. Michael Bowhay, Rector
Come Grow With Us


1*�


Providence ,,.
(resbyterian Z
Church YIM s *
Everyone is welcome
Rev. Robert Phelps
96537 Parliament Drive, Yulee
(Corer Old Nassauville Rd.)
Worship Service at 9:30 a.m.
(904) 432-8118
www.providenceyulee.com
providenceyulee@comcast.net


.7I


SYULEE UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Please join us for
SUNDAY SERVICES:
Church School 9:30AM Worship 11AM
Wednesday Study 6:30PM
A1A & Christian Way, Yulee
225-5381 * Rev. Mark Stiles


Holy Trinity Anglican Church
In Amelia Park
1830 Lake Park Drive
(across from the YMCA)
Sunday worship times
8:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. (with music)

904-430-0274
www.holytrinityanglican.org


AMELIA ISLAND
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Come Worship with us where
the Bible is our only Authority.
Church Services: 11am
YMCA on Citrona / 225-5368
www.ameliaislandchurchofchrist.com


In the heart of
Fernandina
9 N. 6'" Street
Dr. Holton Slegling
Senior Pastor
Worship 8:30 & 11 a
Sunday School 9:50a
Nursery
Children
Youth
Adults
261-3837
www. I stpres-fb.com
L.L ^ ^ _ ^


BLACKROCK BAPTIST
CHURCH
96362 Blackrock Rd., Yulee
261-6220
Senior Pastor: Rev. Michael S. Bowen
Sunday Morning Worship Services
10:30am
Sunday School 9:15am
Friday 6:45 - 9:00 Awana
Worship Service 10:30 (Childrens Church)
Sunday p.m. Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Nursery Provided
www.blackrockbaptist.com


"Discover the Difference" at
Amelia Baptist
Church
Pastor: Dr. H. Neil Helton
Sunday Worship Service 10:30am
Bible Study -9am
Nursery provided for all services
Small group studies-Adults 6pm
Wednesday - Prayer Service 6:30pm
Preschool and Children Activiles
961167 BUCCANEER TRAII
Comer of Buccaneer Tr. & Gerbing Road, Ferandina Bce
For More Information Call: 261-9527


First B.ipr.-r Church
I, m . ,J,,, .1. I.. I.


Sunday
9 am
LIFE Groups
10:15 am & 6:30 pm
Worship Service

Wednesday
6:30 pm
LIFE in 3-D
First Baptist Church
1600 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, FL
904-261-3617
www.FBFirst.net
Rev. Jeff Overton. Sr Pastor


Rev. Brian Eburn, Pastor
, ', , . h , , ,




Telephone Numbers:
Parish Office: 904-261-3472; Fax 904-321-1901
Emergency Number: 904-277-6566,
alsn call Qnf4-77-fn5f


CELEBRATION BAPTIST
CHURCH
innovative Stye, ContemporaiyMusic, Casua/Atmosphere
Pastor Mike Kwiatkowski
85520 Miner Rd
Yulee, FL 32097
Sunday Worship 10:30
Nursery Provided
Small group bible study Sunday morn. @ 9:15am
KidKredible Children Ministries Meeting @ 10'30am Sunday
Youth "Body Shop" Wed. @ 6:30pm
Connecting with Christ..Connecting with People.


FORaMOE IF ( 4 7ii. U


FIVE POINTS BAPTIST
"MORE THAN A CHURCH, WE'RE FAMILY"
Pastor : Dr. Alan Brown
Sunday School ............... 9:4SA.M.
Worship Service ............. 10:SSA.M.
Discipleship Training .......... 6:00P.M.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Fellowship Supper .... 6:00P.M.
Wednesday Prayer Service ....... 7:00P.M.
736 Bonnieview Road (across from Sadler Rd.)
904-261-4615 (church office)
EVERYONE WELCOME
Nursery provided
Spointsbaptistchurch.org


ITULEE
\PTIST
ABCHlIRC'H

Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Worship 8:15am and 11:00 am
Sunday Evening 6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 pm
Wednesday Team Kid 6:15 pm
Wednesday 1-79 Youth 6:30 pm
Classes For All Age Groups Including Youth
Nursery Provided For All Services
www.Yuleebaptistchurch.com
85971 Harts Rd., West 904-225-5128
Yulee, FL 32097 Fax 225-0809


Livin W aters FISTMISSIONARY BAPTIST
world outreach 20 South Ninth Street 261-4907
Contemporary Worship Rev. Darien K. Bolden Sr., Pastor
SUN 9:30am The Church in the
S WED 7:00pm Heartof the City
SE. 7 With the Desire to be in the
- Youth, Nursey & Hearts ofAll People
Children's Ministries SundayNew Members Class 9a.m.
Sunday Schooll9:30a.m.
RobChr,,Ooyt 321-2117 MorrngWorsplla.m.
L Rob & Christe Goyette Noodayayer
h. SeniorPastors OnAA ImilewestofAmela Island WednesdayMid-weekSece p.m.
www.LivingWatersOutreach.org Ministries: Bs& Vayn Coples, Singles, Yont






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BLACK


" "




CYAN MAGENTA


101 HOMES


FRIDAY, July 17,2009/NEWS-LEADER


Farmers market
Mike and Brenda Cooper of Annie Clyde's
have returned to the Fernandina Farmers
Market as a vendor. Annie Clyde's homemade
pound cakes honor Brenda's mother, Annie
Clyde, a Georgia native who spent hours teach-
ing Brenda her
recipes and
techniques for
baking a good-
looking and, most of all, great-
tasting cake. Brenda developed miniature ver-
sions of those pound cakes that her mother
baked until her death in 1987. These gourmet
mini cakes are made with fresh and natural
ingredients and topped with handmade glazes
include Loving Lemon, Shonuff Strawberry,
Plezant Pineapple, Chocolate Chocolate,
Comely Coconut and Off the Tree Orange.
There's even a mini Sweet Potato Pie.
The market, open Saturdays from 9 a.m.-1
p.m. at Seventh and Centre streets, features
fresh produce as well as organic products, spe-
cialty foods and plants. Call 491-4872 or visit
www.fernandinafarmersmarket.com.
Birdingwalk
Join Our Greenway on July 18 at 8 a.m. for a
birding walk on the Egans Creek Greenway.
You can expect to see a variety of wading and
songbirds as well as birds of prey. Go to the
Our Greenway website at www.ourgreenway.
org to download a Greenway specific bird list.
Participants are encouraged to bring binocu-
lars, water, sun protection, bug juice, comfort-
able walking shoes and optionally field guides
and spotting scopes.
Meet in the parking lot at the entrance to
the Greenway behind the Atlantic Avenue
Recreation Center, 2500 Atlantic Ave. It is free
and open to the public. For information call
277-7350 or visit www.ourgreenway.org.
Beach walk
Join a park ranger for a walk on the beach
as they explain the importance of undeveloped
beach habitat, including many interesting facts
about sea creatures and common shells found
in the area, July 19 at 2 p.m. at pavilion one on
Little Talbot Island State Park. No reservations
are necessary and the program is free with reg-


ular park admission. For information call (904)
251-2320.
Sierra Club outing
A weekend outing with manatees and the
other fauna and flora of Crystal River and
Homosassa Springs is planned for Aug. 14-16
by the Nassau Sierra Club. The event is open
to the public. Deadline to register is July 24.
Club members will travel to Crystal River
on Friday and meet Saturday at Manatee Tours
USA for a morning manatee tour and an after-
noon of kayaking at Crystal River/Kings Bay.
Group rates include $39 for the manatee tour
and $25 for kayak rental.
Sunday optional activities include a visit to
Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park that show-
cases native Florida wildlife. Recreational
opportunities include picnicking, nature study
and bird watching. A children's education cen-
ter provides hands-on experiences. Group
admission rates of $9 for adults and $6 for chil-
dren are available for 10 or more people.
Participants arrange their own lodging and
pay the concessionaire fees directly. For infor-
mation and to register for the event and be eli-
gible for group rates, contact Len Kreger at
l.kreger@comcast.net or (904) 432-8389.
Talbot critters
Join a park ranger to learn about the many
common species that inhabit the natural com-
munities of the undeveloped barrier islands of
Northeast Florida at 2 p.m. July 25 at pavilion
five on Little Talbot Island. No reservations are
necessary. For information call the Talbot
Islands Ranger Station at (904) 251-2320.
Bird club
The Nassau County Bird Club will hold a
field trip to Huguenot Memorial Park on Aug.
15 and Sept. 5 at 8 a.m., rain or shine. Park
entry is $1 per car. The park is located off
Heckscher Drive about 8 miles south of the
Nassau Sound bridge. Meet in the parking lot
of the general store. Target birds include the
Piping Plover, Oystercatcher, Whimbrel,
Reddish Egret, gulls and terns. Bring your
binoculars, field guide, bug juice, sunscreen,
rain gear, sunglasses and water.
For information call Carol Wyatt at 262-9272
or e-mail carolinewy@aol.com.


* Rolling Shutters *
* Accordion Shutters Offie 321-1988
* Storm Panels
* Screen Rooms Cellular 206-1334
* Pool Enclosures
* Vinyl Siding Painting Serving Femandina Beach Amelia Island And South East Georgia
* Replacement Windows
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BLACK


Top 10 lawn care mistakes
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - During a summer - a slow steady water once a week is a good
when "staycations" encourage homeowners to rule of thumb. Lawns require a minimum of 1
get the most enjoyment from their lawns, inch per week of water - or as much as local
keeping lawn care as care-free as possible is a water restrictions allow- which is achieved in
number-one priority. A survey of lawn care about 30 minutes of watering. Be mindful of
experts from lawn care company TruGreen the weather and time of day when watering as
reveals the top 10 mistakes homeowners well. Watering in the heat of the day actually
across the country make when it comes to wastes water to evaporation; instead, water
lawn care and how to avoid them. early in the morning to maximize the mois-
No. 10. Removing the lawn clippings after ture on your lawn.
mowing. Lawn clippings are a great source of No. 2. Mowing mishaps. Some homeown-
nutrients for your soil. Rather than bagging ers try to reduce the number of times they
grass clippings when you mow, recycle the mow by mowing too low, essentially "scalp-
clippings back into the soil. ing" the grass. This can put the lawn into
No. 9. Wrong plant, wrong place. shock and allow weeds and insects to take
Planting unsuitable grass or plant types for over. Additionally, mowing with a dull blade
the agronomic region is an easily avoidable increases water loss from plants and requires
mistake. Ask a lawn care expert in your area more gasoline to power the mower.
for a list of the plants and grass types that will And the number one-lawn care mistake to
thrive with your average temperature and soil avoid this summer is:
type. No, 1. Failure to follow. All lawn care
No. 8. Fertilizing faux pas. Fertilizing at products come with instructions for proper
the incorrect rate or the incorrect time of year use. Be sure to read and follow the instruc-
for your type of grass can seriously damage tions and you will avoid some potentially seri-
your lawn. Research the best time and rate to ous mistakes that could damage your lawn
fertilize your grass to get maximum results. and the environment.
No. 7. Off target application. Fertilizer is a 'There's a lot more to proper lawn care
great source of nutrients for your lawn but it than simply pushing a mower," said Kirk
doesn't do much for your sidewalk, driveway Hurto, vice president, technical services for
or street. It's important to keep fertilizer appli- TruGreen. "If you really want a winning lawn
cations on target to avoid potential nutrient this summer, you need to be aware of some
run-off. basic lawn care principles. Knowing the mis-
No. 6. Misdiagnosis. Well-meaning do-it- takes to watch for is the first step to a gor-
yourselfers often inadvertently cause more geous green lawn that can be an outdoor liv-
harm than good by misdiagnosing a lawn ing room and playspace for family and
problem. Unless you're positive of the prob- friends."
lem, consult a lawn care specialist who can Hurto recommends that do-it-your-
provide you with the correct solution for your selfers seek lawn care advice from a quali-
lawn care challenges. fled lawn care professional or the local
No, 5. Seasonal seeding. Eager to get extension service. They can help direct you to
their lawn looking great, homeowners often the appropriate products, set a healthy water-
grow anxious to seed new grass to thicken up ing schedule, and identify any problems you
their lawn. Seeding is typically best in the fall have.
when grass is going into dormancy for the Additionally, TruGreen recently launched
winter, a new website for homeowners who want to
No. 4. Trimming trouble. Using a string discover even more ways to enjoy their well-
trimmer too close to the base of a tree may cared-for lawns: www.FunByTheYard.com.
actually kill the tree over time. It's important The easy-to-navigate website features lawn
to be mindful of trees and shrubs when caring and landscaping tips, outdoor grilling recipes,
for your lawn. games to play in the back yard, and even con-
No. 3. Watering woes. Watering is a tricky tests where people can submit videos and
task. Avoid over or under watering your lawn photos describing "Why I Love My Yard."


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CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 NEWS News-Leader


To Camden Coui


There's something about St. Marys


The sleepy seaport city comes alive with history


and charm


BY SUSAN RESPESS
Tribune d Georgian Staff

For a slow-down, friendly
folks kind of place, take a stroll
around the seaport settlement
of St. Marys, Ga.
Once a thriving river town
of timbermen, fishermen and
boat builders, the waterfront
along the St. Marys River is
quieter today. You're more
likely to see kayakers on guid-
ed tours, recreational boats
headed out for a day of fishing
and ferries that take visitors
back and forth to Fernandina
Beach, Fla., and to
Cumberland Island National
Seashore.
Shrimp boats share the
waterway, too, pulling in to the
pier at Lang's Marina with a
fresh catch that will end up on
the menu at Lang's Marina
Restaurant.
The coastal Georgia city's
history goes back about 5,000
years as part of the lands of
the Timucua Indians. You'll
see that history told in arti-
facts and displays at the
Cumberland Island National
Seashore Museum along with
a timeline of events from
Spanish and British occupation
to the gilded age of Thomas
Carnegie's family on
Cumberland in the early
1900s.
St. Marys' downtown is a
National Register Historic
District and walking and tram
tours will lead you to clap-
board churches and homes
and shops that date to the
1800s.
A pleasant starting point is
the riverside Howard Gilman
Memorial Park, named for a
pulp and paper-manufacturing
owner and benefactor whose
grandfather built a mill in St.
Marys. The park is on St.
Marys Street, and wooden
bench-style swings offer a
prized view of the river and its
sunrises and sunsets. A broad
pier and a floating dock at the


The Howard Gilman Memorial Park, with its
swinging benches, fountain and fishing pier, is
a favorite gathering place for St. Marys resi-
dents and visitors to the area.


Discover


St. Marys

Cumberland Island
National Seashore
Visitors Center
and artifact museum
(912) 882-4335,
877-860-6787,
www.nps.gov/cuis

Cumberland Sound ferry
Passenger ferry between
downtown St. Marys and
Fernandina Beach, Fla.
877-264-9972,www.amelia
rivercruises.com

Orange Hall
House Museum
Open 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.,
Monday - Saturday,
1 - 4 p.m. Sunday.
311 Osborne Street
(912) 576-3644

St. Marys
Welcome Center
Maps, shopping, dining,
lodging information,
tram rides.
406 Osborne Street
(912) 882-4000, www.st
maryswelcome.com

St. Marys
Submarine Museum
102 W. St. Marys Street
Hours: Closed Monday,
open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesday-Saturday and 1-5
p.m. Sunday. (912)-882-
2782, www.stmaryssub-
museum.com

Up the Creek Xpeditions
Outfitter, guided
kayak trips.
111 Osborne Street
912-882-0911,
www.upthecreektrips.com


Museum and its gift shop. It's
managed and staffed by Navy
veterans, many of them retired
from Kings Bay Naval
Submarine Base. The base,
home to two submarine
squadrons that head to sea
past Cumberland Island, ush-
ered in a new era of develop-
ment and activity.
John Crouse, museum man-
ager, said several thousand vis-
itors a year look at the compo-
nents of the submarine James
K Polk - ship- and ballast-con-
trol panels - and admire a real
periscope that extends
through the roof of the build-
ing. There are artifacts, ships'
models and previously classi-
fied documents about the sub-
marine force.
"We are working on World
War II submarine patrol
reports," Crouse said. "We are
getting them typed - 1800 of


them - in a Word format so
that people can read them.
Some of these are 40- to 50-
year-old reports and the paper
is old, the ink bleeds through.
They have to be done by
hand."
Close by are a hotel and
two B&Bs and restaurants on
St. Marys Street and along
Osborne Street that beckon
with seafood and other menu
items. Shops tempt with local
wares and books to purchase.
Volunteers lead tram tours
and tell the history of the
Orange Hall House Museum,
a three-story Greek Revival
home built in the 1800s for
the Presbyterian minister's
family.
Four 19th century church-
es are on the walking tour as is
the walled Oak Grove
Cemetery, laid out in the
1780s.


"Our guests think the
downtown area is charming
and they love the history," said
Mary Neff, who owns Spencer
House Inn with her husband.
Neff also is chairman of the
board of the St. Marys
Convention and Visitors
Bureau Authority. "People like
to walk, and they can park and
not have to get back in their
cars."
Visitors walk through
the neighborhoods, to the
museums and stores and out
to eat, then sit in the park after
dinner and meet residents who
are enjoying a sea breeze.
"They like the old houses
and the porches, the rockers
and the feeling of being very
unrushed," Neff said. 'They
are always envious that we live
here and most everybody who
comes thinks they would like
to live here."


Regular Fares - Round Trip (st. Marys to Cumberland Island)
Adult - $17.00 Senior - $15.00 * Children 12 yrs & under - $12.00
(including sales tax) Rates & Schedule subject to change.
National Park Service has additional user & camping fees. 49287 LB 717
I I I I I I
Fa:01-637779 ol*re:87-6-68


St. Marys Submarine Museum
102 St. Marys Street * Downtown Historic District
Hours of Operation: Monday & Selected Holidays: Closed
Tue-Sat: 1000-1600 (10am-4pm) * Sunday: 1300-1700 (1-5pm)
Phone: 912-882-2782

ORANGE HALL MUSEUM
S 311 Osborne St. * Downtown St. Marys
S The "Grand Dame of St. Marys." Orange
Hall is an extraordinary example of ante-
S bellum life in Greek Revival style dating
S back to circa 1820s-1830s. She reigns in
grandeur as you make your entrance into
Sthe historic district of Downtown St. Marys
and serves as a house museum with tours
912.576,3644 seven days a week.
49288 SMS 7-17


park are perfect for a closer
look, a fishing pole or a crab
trap fed over the side with a
hand line.
In the park, bring a blanket
or a lawn chair to the city's
Starry Nights summer series
of free concerts from 7 to 9
p.m. July 11, Aug. 15 and Sept.
19.
The Cumberland Island
Visitors Center and gift shop
on the waterfront is the ferry
site for day trips and camping
trips to the island. Nearby is
the city pavilion and dock
where the Cumberland Sound
Ferry ties up with passengers
from Fernandina Beach. The
ferry is part of the East Coast
Greenway also ferries bicy-
clists between St. Marys and
Fernandina Beach.
Across the street is a reflec-
tion of the area's recent histo-
ry, the St. Marys Submarine


Did we capture that
special moment?
You can capture it too with
Photo Reprints.


Did we have a great photo of your
daughter scoring the winning goal? Was your
mom featured in an article?
The News-Leader offers color and
black and white reprints of photos taken by
our staff and that have appeared in our paper
or on our website. Prices are $10 for 5x7s and
$15 for 8xl0s.
Call 261-3696 to order your reprint or
stop by our office at 511 Ash Street,
Fernandina Beach.
Photo orders must be paid in advance.


I


See America's MOST Beautiful Wilderness Beacli!

E^^ S 'jg , . �-*^ i*:^^-~L*j~ h ^^^


I, Come See Ou local Museums, IIV


BLACK


% w




CYAN MAGENTA


SPORTS


12A


FRIDAY, JULY17,2009
NEWS-LEADER/FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA


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Lizzie Leipau places sixth in the girls 11-12 100-yard individual medley with a strong butterfly beginning.


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SUBMITTED PHOTOS


YMCA Sailfish soar past White Sharks, Riverfins for regional title


The air at the McArthur
Family YMCA pool Saturday
morning was thick with antici-
pation, determination and
chlorine.
As the National Anthem
played, jets zoomed overhead,
setting a high-flying tone for
the day.
Inspired, the undefeated
McArthur Sailfish swam to
victory, overpowering rivals
Williams Family YMCA
White Sharks and Arlington
Riverfins at home in the
YMCA of Florida's First Coast
Region AAA meet.
The Sailfish took the meet
in decisive fashion, besting
their closest opponent by
more than 1,500 points.
McArthur started strong with
a commanding lead in the
individual medley events,
never looked back and won
each stroke category easily.
Once again, they ransacked
the record book, as nine
swimmers set 13 new team
records.
Sofia Dupee dominated


the six-and-under girls,
adding two records to her col-
lection (25-yard freestyle, 25-
yard backstroke).
Eight-year-old Taylor
Radcliffe and 10-year-old
Maisie Gooch each bested
her own backstroke mark and
claimed their respective
freestyle records.
Juan Cardenas added the
13-14 boys' 200-yard individ-
ual medley to his list and
rewrote his own 13-14 boys'
100-yard backstroke record.
Ciera Wilcox (girls' 25-
yard breaststroke), Evan
Crayton (boys' 25-yard
freestyle) and Jonah Braeger
(boys' 100-yard IM) each gar-
nered one record in the eight-
and-under categories.
Katy Weaver (100-yard
backstroke) and Gabi Nobles
(100-yard butterfly) each
grabbed a new 13-14 girls'
record.
Blasting the team's overall
performance record, 51
Sailfish earned 98 National
Time Standards, including 13


a e a -e - i- -


First-year swimmer Evan Crayton breaks a team and pool record with a 17.07 in the 25-yard freestyle.


A times, 33 BB times and 52
B times.
This is the first year the
YFFC has elected to hold
regional qualifying meets


prior to the championships,
sending each region's top
eight swimmers in each event
(10-and-under, 11-12, 13-14
and senior age groups) to the


finals. All swimmers in the
six-and-under and eight-and-
under age groups who partici-
pated in the regional meet are
eligible to swim in the cham-


pionships. There will be 122
Sailfish swimmers defending
McArthur's title July 24-25 at
the Barco-Newton Family
YMCA in Orange Park.


Brigette DeLille and Ceira Wilcox, left, high five each other after the 100-yard individual medley after the Sailfish took first, second and third in the event. Right, Blake Cox
strokes strong in the 50-yard freestyle.


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Ella Johns, left, breaks her personal record "flying" down the pool for a second-place finish. Jake Smith, right, finishes with a sixth in the six-and-under boys 25-yard freestyle.


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Jared Smith, left, proves hard work in practice pays off with a first-
place finish in the 10-and-under boys' 100-yard freestyle. Jonah
Breager, above, breaks the eight-and-under team record in the 100-
yard IM as he takes off doing the fly portion of the event.


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BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


NATIONAL QUALIFIERS


SUBMITTED
The U-13 Amelia Island Arsenal placed second at the Jekyll Island 3v3 tournament
July 11-12. The team qualified for the national 3v3 tournament in Orlando. Arsenal's
record for the tournament was 3-2. Pictured, back row from left, are Coach Will, Matt
Golan, Dustin Moore, Austin Meadows, Riley Hall; front row, Tyler and Tanner
Callaway. Arsenal will hold a car wash and bake sale Saturday at the Baptist church
across from the Wal-Mart Supercenter in Yulee.



SPORTS SHORTS


Elm Street banquet
Elm Street Little League
will hold its award banquet at
2 p.m. Aug. 1 at the Martin
Luther King Jr. Center. For
information, contact Wayne
Peterson at 753-1663.

Beach run
The second annual Back
to School Beach Fun
Run/Walk 5K (3.1 miles) or 2K
(one mile) will be held Oct. 17
at Peters Point on A1A. The
event starts at low tide, 4 p.m.
Registration information will
be available in August. The
day includes music, food and
awards. Begin training now.
Students participate for free.
Proceeds benefit Communi-
ties in Schools of Nassau
County.

YMCAflagfootball
The McArthur Family
YMCA teams up with the
Jacksonville Jaguars and NFL
Flag Football for its fall youth
flag football program. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices
begin the week of Aug. 24.
The season kicks off Sept. 5
and the last game will be held
Oct. 24. All games will be
played Saturday mornings.
Games and practices will be
held at the fields behind
Kmart in Fernandina Beach.
The league is open to any-
one ages 4-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-
bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a NFL Flag Football jersey
and an end-of-the-season
award. Call 261-1080 or visit
http:// www.firstcoastymca.
org/mcarthur-branch.

YMCAfallvolleyball
The McArthur Family
YMCA is introducing a new
fall volleyball league. Register
through Aug. 8. Practices start
the week of Aug. 24. The sea-
son runs Sept. 10 through
Oct. 29. All games and prac-
tices will be held in the McAr-
thur YMCA gymnasium with
games on Thursday nights.
The league is open to any-
one ages 8-14 as of Aug. 1.
Cost is $50 for YMCA mem-
bers and $100 for non-mem-
bers (financial assistance is
available). All players receive
a volleyball jersey and an
award at the end of the sea-
son. Call 261-1080 or visit
http://www.firstcoastymca.org/
mcarthur-branch.

Baseball softball lessons
Baseball and softball les-
sons are being offered by
Coach Shelly Hall for ages
five to high school. Call 583-
0377 for information.

Junior lifeguard program
Nassau County Ocean
Rescue is offering a junior life-
guard program through July
29 on Mondays, Tuesdays
and Wednesdays from 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. at Peters Point.
Call (904) 316-7929 for infor-
mation.

ProwrestdngJuly18
Continental Championship
Wrestling returns to the
Atlantic Avenue Recreation
Center July 18 with a 7:30


p.m. bell time. In the main
event, CCW champion "Rock
'n' Roll" Chris Turner puts the
title on the line against John
Douglas of the Wranglers.
The Marcs Brothers are in sin-
gles action as Julian Marcs
goes one-on-one with the
"Six-Foot Walking Attitude"
Kevin Toole and Ethan Marcs
steps into the ring with Blane
Rage. Mad Dog Miller is in
action against Scotty Biggs.
Women's champion
Samantha Steele takes on
Nikki Knight in a non-title
match. Don't miss the debut
of the sensational lady
wrestler Riot. Also appearing
on this card are Jarrod
Michaels, Chyene Miles,
Logan Stevens, Oblivion, J.D.
Holla and many more.
Tickets are $7 at the door.
Partial proceeds to benefit the
Shiny Badges Ball. Visit
http://www.ccwrestling.org.

YMCAsklls camps
The McArthur Family
YMCA is offering skills camps
for ages of 6-15 with special
interests for the summer time.
Camps include basketball,
soccer, golf, volleyball and
football. All ages, dates, loca-
tions, times and fees vary
between camps. Registration
ends the Wednesday before
the camp begins. Visit the
YMCA on Citrona Drive or call
261-1080.

YuleePopWarer
Yulee Pop Warner will hold
sign-ups July 25 for football
and cheerleading for ages 5-
15 at the Yulee Sports
Complex from 9 a.m. to noon.
All participants need a birth
certificate, wallet-size photo,
final report card of 2009
school year and a Pop
Warner physical. Fees are
$125 for first child, $100 for
each additional sibling. Call
277-8136.
Yulee Pop Warner board
meets at 7 p.m. July 30 at the
Yulee Sports Complex.

FBPopWamer
Fernandina Beach Pop
Warner is holding registration
for football and cheerleading
Saturday in July from 10
a.m. to noon at the field house
on South 11th Street.
Registration fees are $125
and $100 for each additional
sibling. Copy of birth certifi-
cate and 50 percent of fees
are required at registration.
Visit www.leaguelineup.com/
fbpwa or contact Chrisie
Oliver at 277-9660.


Stimulus Help

Refinance with

No Equity

* If you thought you could not refinance
due to equity issues, we may be able
to lower your rate drastically without
an appraisal
* We only care that you don't have any
late mortgage payments in the last 12
months
* Convert your Arm's or Interest Only
loans into fixed rates
Call Now For Details!
* Diversified Mortuane Associates
Fran Holland 904.753-1862
FAMB Member


5KBridgesRun
The Vestcor Companies is
hosting its 14th annual 5K
Bridges Run to benefit local
non-profit organizations July
18 in downtown Jacksonville.
Beginning at 7:30 p.m., the
course will take runners
across the Main Street and
Acosta bridges. Following the
race, a block party and
awards ceremony will be held
at Hemming Plaza. Prize
money will be awarded to the
top three men and women,
overall. Participants can also
enjoy free food and drinks,
free beer, T-shirts and live
music.
Race registration though
today is $25 and $30 on event
day. Visit any 1st Place Sports
location or www. 1 stplaces-
ports.com.

Sailing Club meets
The Amelia Island Sailing
Club meets the first Tuesday
at the Kraft Athletic Club.
Social hour is at 6:30 p.m;
meeting is at 7:30 p.m. Call
Commodore Charlie Stein-
kamp at 261-5213 or visit
www.ameliaislandsailing.org.

Sports association
The Nassau County Sports
Association meets at 7 p.m.
the first Tuesday of the month
at the county building, Yulee.
Call 261-1075 or 277-1609.


PEI


Gaw Open Water Challenge is set for Saturday


The 2009 Ed Gaw Amelia Island Open
Water Challenge, originally scheduled for
May but postponed by the weather, will take
place July 18 at 8:30 a.m. The event, sanc-
tioned by U.S. Masters Swimming, offers a
5K and a one-mile open water swim. Both
events are open to USMS and USA
Swimming registrants. All swimmers must be
registered with USMS or USA Swimming
($17 on-deck registration).
Entry fee is $40. All pre-registrants receive
an event T-shirt, swim cap and other items.
Deck entries will receive a T-shirt on an as-
available basis. Participation is limited to 300.


Race finish area and check-in are at Main
Beach at the intersection of Fletcher and
Atlantic avenues. Check-in begins and 7 a.m.
Transportation will be provided to the
starting points at the Jasmine Street (one-
mile) and Simmons Road (5K) beach access-
es. Coast Guard Auxiliary boats and life-
guards will be on the water. EMTs and
lifeguards will also be on the beach.
Awards and breakfast after the race. Non-
swimmers must pay $6 for the breakfast.
Entry forms are at www. fbfl.us. Contact Scott
Mikelson at 277-7350 or smikelson@fbfl.org
or Chris Gaw at cgaw@cfl.rr.com.


Beautiful hardbound collectors' edition will be printing on acid-tree paper.
This pictorial history will contain up to 96 pages, over 100 years in words and
pictures, utilizing more than 250 photographs.SAVE BY ADVANCE ORDER.
Your cost is only $24.95 plus $1.75 tax per copy. Only those who order in
advance are assured of obtaining a copy. After publication, remaining copies
will sell for $34.95 plus $2.45 tax per copy. Delivery is scheduled for Fall 2009.
A gift you know will be appreciated and cherished. This history in words and
pictures will analyze Fernandina Beach and outline the many urban changes.


We need to borrow your old pictures for the publication of this book!

RETURN ORDER BLANK TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
Please enter my order for: A Pictorial History of Fernandina Beach, Florida

_ copies) STANDARD EDITION @ $24.95 + $1.75 tax

_ copies) LIMITED EDITION @ $75.00 + $5.25 tax
O I am enclosing payment in full.
O Please ship my books) to the address below. I have enclosed an additional $7.00 for each book shipped.

NAME

ADDRESS


CITY


STATE


PHONE

MAIL TO: The News-Leader, 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
Phone: (904) 261-3696


m


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MAGENTA


FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 SPORTS News-Leader


OUTDOOR BRIEF


Saltwater fishermen need license
byAug to fish from shore in Florida
Florida's resident saltwater anglers who
fish from shore or a structure affixed to
shore will need to buy a $7.50 (plus adminis-
trative and handling fees) shoreline fishing
license by Aug. 1, unless they have a regular
resident saltwater fishing license.
The new license applies only to Florida
resident saltwater anglers who fish from
shore. Resident anglers may prefer to pur-
chase the regular recreational saltwater
license that covers them, no matter where
they fish for saltwater species in Florida.
Florida has always required non-residents
to have a license when fishing from shore,
and they will still need to purchase a regular
non-resident saltwater fishing license.
The new shoreline saltwater fishing
license for residents goes on sale today.
It provides all of the same exemptions as a
regular license, including senior citizens, chil-
dren, disabled people who meet certain quali-
fications, active-duty military personnel while
home on leave and anglers who fish from a
licensed pier.
In addition, the shoreline license require-
ment includes two new exemptions: anglers
drawing food stamps, temporary cash assis-
tance or Medicaid; and anglers fishing in
their home counties who use cane poles or
other gear that does not depend on mechani-
cal retrieval.
At the request of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission, the


Florida Legislature passed the new license
requirement to head off a federal license
requirement that will go into effect Jan. 1,
2010, and will have a $15-$25 fee beginning in
2011. Florida's new shoreline license exempts
this state's anglers from the federal license
requirement.
Several hunting, fishing and conservation
organizations requested other permit fee
changes, which do not take effect until July
2010. They include increases in the state
waterfowl stamp from the current $3 to $5; in
the resident turkey permit from $5 to $10; the
non-resident turkey permit from $100 to
$125; the wildlife management area permit
for hunting, fishing and other recreational
uses from $25 to $30; the limited-entry or spe-
cial-opportunity hunt fee from $100 per day to
$150 per day and $250 per week to $300 per
week, as determined by FWC Commission-
ers; the snook permit from $2 to $10 and the
lobster permit from $2 to $5.
Also, new laws create a $5 annual deer
permit (in addition to the current hunting
license requirement for deer hunters) and
allow the agency to charge up to $5 per day
for non-hunting and non-fishing recreation on
certain wildlife management areas.
The FWC will evaluate areas where it is
the lead manager to determine where to
charge the fees and how much to charge.
In addition, the state will use up to 10 per-
cent of the hunting and sport-fishing fees to
promote those sports, with emphasis on
youth participation.
For information visit MyFWC.com.


* a -


Bob Gedeon
Island resident since 1962
Real Estate Broker since 1972


4CEN_ RO NrT&l'J
www. oceanfrontamelia.com
"'The Ocecanfront Expert"
Reduced Commission, 3 %- 4.5 %, Call for details.
When You Call, I Will Personally Answer The Phone
No Menus, Voicemail or Phone Tag.


Local 904.261.8870


Toll Free 877.261.8870


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Buy a Whirlpool� water softener and save.


TERRY LACOSS/SPECIAL
A variety of saltwater species are running in the surf, including red drum, flounder
and sea trout.


Kings along


fish run along the beaches of
Northeast Florida, which is excel-
lent news for next week's BellSouth
Greater Jacksonville Kingfish Tournament.
Yulee's Kenny Crawford and his "AT&T Real
Yellow Pages" kingfish team placed second in
last week's Ancient City Kingfish Challenge in
St. Augustine with a 40.95-pound king macker-
el. Also fishing aboard Crawford's kingfish
boat were Cindy Farlow, Bill
Walsh and Al Morris.
"In the Moment," skip-
pered by B.J. Pearson,
weighed in the largest king
mackerel, which tipped the
scales at 46.10 pounds. A total
of 150 kingfish teams partici-
pated in the tournament.
Warm water temperatures
ON THE have returned along the
beaches of Northeast Florida
WATER with temperatures ranging in
the low 80s along Florida's
TERRY "Gold Coast." Menhaden and
LACOSS silver mullet are schooling
just off the surf, where a vari-
ety of saltwater game fish is
present.
Capt. Allen Mills, captain of the "Wahoo II"
charter boat, reports good numbers of tarpon
at the southern end of Amelia Island, where
"silver kings" are weighing over the 100-pound
mark.
Beach fishermen are cast netting a cooler
full of menhaden and then setting up a chum
slick from either an anchored or drifting boat.
Large baits are set out in the chum slick with
30- to 50-pound saltwater fishing tackle.
At the business end of the fishing gear, a
five-foot section of 100-pound fluorocarbon
shock leader and a 7/0 circle hook are tied to
the tag end of the leader. Small floats are
attached to the leader to keep the bait close to
the surface. Prime tarpon baits include live
menhaden, whiting, croaker and yellow-mouth
trout.
Flounder fishing continues to highlight
Amelia Island's backcountry fishing with an
excellent tide arriving on Saturday for flatfish
weighing just over the five-pound mark.
Flounder fishermen will find a high falling tide


the beaches


SPECIAL
Jay Price is pictured with his Amelia
Island tarpon before releasing his big
"silver king."

at daylight with low tide arriving at 11:31 a.m.
at the mouth of the Amelia River.
Barb a live bullhead minnow or finger mul-
let to a 1/4-ounce jig head and retrieve this
deadly combo slowly along the bottom from
the Fernandina port to the footsteps of histori-
cal Fort Clinch.
Flounder must measure at least 12 inches
in length with a bag limit of 10 per day, per
angler.
For the latest red snapper and grouper reg-
ulations, be sure to visit www.keepoceanfish-
ing.com. With a recent approval of amend-
ment 16, saltwater fishermen may see a
complete red snapper closure with a closed
season for grouper beginning in January and
running through April.
The News-Leader encourages local anglers to
submit photographs of their catches. E-mail pho-
tos to bjones@fbnewsleadercom, mail them to
PO. Box 766, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035, or
drop them by the office at 511 Ash St. in Fern-
andina Beach. Call BethJones at 261-3696for
information.


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^*eisure
_ 'lUr


B SECTION


Dancing, fun


and drama

'Heartwarming'comedy atACT


RYAN SMITH
News Leader

beat in Amelia
Community Theatre's
latest show, Richard
Alfieri's "Six Dance Lessons in
Six Weeks." The show opens
tonight at ACT, 209 Cedar St.
"It's about a woman who
lives in St. Petersburg,
Florida," said director Toni
D'Amico. "She calls a dance
company to get dance lessons,
and they send over a man
named Michael Manetti. It's
about how these two people,
who are extremely different,
come to find out that they're
not so different after all.
"She's from South Carolina,
he's from New York. What the
author is trying to say is that
you shouldn't rely on stereo-
types."
The two forge an unlikely
friendship despite their differ-
ences, D'Amico said.
"She's in her 60's, he's 45 -
so it's not a romantic comedy
at all," she said. "It's about how
two different people can
become friends and find a
common ground. It's very
funny, very heartwarming...
It's saying generational gaps
can be broken. They can be
bridged."
D'Amico does caution that
the play contains some adult
language, which parents might
want to consider when bring-


Ticket information
"Six Dance Lessons in
Six Weeks" opens at 8 p.m.
tonight at Amelia
Community Theatre, 209
Cedar St. Additional pefor-
mances are Saturday and
July 23-25 and July 29-Aug. 1
at 8 p.m., with a matinee
July 26 at 2 p.m. Tickets are
$16 for adults, $10 for stu-
dents and available at the
box office or by phone. Box
office hours are 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday. The box office
also opens two hours before
showtime. Call 261-6749.
This play contains adult lan-
guage.

ing a child.
D'Amico said the dance
theme attracted her to the
material - but it also meant a
lot of hard work.
"There's a lot of dancing in
it, and I love the dancing. It
has six ballroom dances," she
said. "...We've been working
on the dances for six months.
They're not that elaborate -
the reason we did that is so
we'd be ahead of the curve."
The play has a cast of two,
ACT veterans Arlene Filkoff
and Cary Dresser. D'Amico
said the intimacy of a small
cast reduced the stress of
directing.
"It's great. It's actually real-


SUBMITTED
Cary Dresser and Arlene Filkoff in a scene from "Six
Dance Lessons in Six Weeks." The comedy opens tonight
at Amelia Community Theatre, 209 Cedar St.


ly cool because you've got two
people. You don't have this
huge cast where some people
may get lost in the crowd," she
said. "You really get to work
on the nuance. ... Cary and
Arlene have great chemistry.
They blend well."
But the stars aren't the only
ones who make the show pos-
sible, she added.
'There's a lot of people
behind the scenes, and it takes
everybody. If anybody has
ever had the inkling to volun-


teer - if they sew, if they paint,
if they construct - I really
encourage them to come on
down."
Particularly important to
this show, D'Amico said, was
the set design by ACT vet Liz
Dion, and lighting effects by
Johnny Petegrew of Florida
Community College at
Jacksonville's theater tech pro-
gram.
D'Amico said she was also
ACT Continued on 2B


Library teen program a BLAST'


JASON YURGARTIS
News Leader
Ordinarily, creating graffiti
inside a room at a police sta-
tion would be a simultaneous-
ly gutsy and unintelligent act
that would likely land the
artist in jail.
However, recently in the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department community room,
more than 20 local teens were
hard at work on their very
own graffiti tags. But instead
of facing a jail sentence or pro-
bation, they're earning com-
munity service hours.
It's just another evening of
activities for the members of
Teen B.L.A.S.T. - which
stands for Becoming Leaders
and Successful Teens. The
group of sixth through 12th


graders meets each Thursday
to plan and implement pro-
grams for teens, by teens,
through the Fernandina
Beach branch library. They
also aid in Young Adult
Collection development at the
library and earn volunteer
service hours toward Florida
Bright Futures scholarships in
the process. And the student
who earns the most communi-
ty service hours receives a
$500 scholarship.
On this particular evening,
members of B.LA.S.T were
asked to create their own graf-
fiti masterpieces and tell their
story through writing their
names using expressive letter-
ing designs. Teens practiced
on scrap paper with colored
TEEN Continued on 2B


JASON YURGARTIS/NEWS-LEADER
James Leigh and Katelyn Parker work on tags - graffiti rep-
resentations of their names - during a Teen B.L.A.S.T.
event run by the Fernandina Beach branch library.


CROSSWORD, SUDOKU
OUT AND ABOUT
CLASSIFIED


FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009
NEWS-LEADER / FERNANDINA BEACH, FLORIDA



Chardonnay


surprises await


the adventurous

ROBERT M. WEINTRAUB
For theNews-Leader
Two wine truths:
* Tastes and preferences change over time, so it wise
to constantly challenge our assumptions;
* Price and hype don't make the wine - an $8 bottle
can be as satisfying as a $100 bottle.
These oenophilic maxims were reinforced at a recent
chardonnay tasting on Woodstork Lane with six mem-
bers of the Nassau wine club, "The Cellar Dwellers,"
hunkered around eight chards and a smorgasbord of
seafood dishes from the Sicilian Contessa's cucina.


Chardonnay was once the
white wine of choice in
America, as California reformu-
lated its offerings to make
them "oaky" to appeal to the
sweet taste of the "Pepsi
Generation." Some vintners


WINE &

Pa rNERS


added oak chips, sawdust and oak syrup to the wine. As
with any fad, the boom was followed by a big bust; true
oenophiles avoided the stuff, calling American chardon-
nay "sugar water" and the faddists jumped to the next
wine "craze," merlot. As a result, chardonnay went into a
long eclipse.
But good chardonnay (also known as white
Burgundy) has its place in the wine cooler both as a
summer aperitif and a partner for seafood, especially
shellfish. So we decided to revisit chards in a voyage of
discovery and to challenge personal assumptions.
First we researched chards recommended by
"experts" priced under $20; then checked local availabili-
ty. Our list was culled to six ranging in price from $8 to
$17. To these one of our tasters, Ross, threw in two
ringers, chards that retail for $55 and $100 "to provide a
benchmark for the tasting." The eight bottles were
wrapped to the neck and numbered to create a blind
test.
Food served included deviled oysters, coquille St.
Jacques, fruita del mare picata (Ciao Bistro's recipe),
shrimp putenesca (a la Joe's 2nd St. Bistro), buffalo scal-
lops and Matthew Martindale's "Seafood Royale" (scal-
lops and shrimp in a tomato wine sauce served over lin-
guini).
It was no surprise that the $100 Sonoma Peter
Michael (a 2005 from the high-elevation Ma Belle-Fille
vineyard) received top honors, but barely. The surprise
was that the six tasters were virtually unanimous that a
very close second was the Argentine Alamos, available
at Harris Teeter for $8 (also at Costco). Lagging in third
place was a French chard, the $55 Chassagne-
Montrachet from the Vincent Girardin estate (which
borders the Montrachet grand cru region). But the $17
South African Dombeya (Riverside Liquors in
Jacksonville's Five Points) was judged to be on a par
with the French first cru.
Next came what had been my two standard chards:
the French Louis Jadot's Macon-Villages ($12 to $15 at
several local stores) and the Chilean Cassillero del
Diablo ($10 to $12 locally). Two Sonoma wines rounded
out the tasting. These four wines, although pleasant and
drinkable, were considered to have serious flaws when
compared with the higher-rated quartet - "no match for
food," "no finish," "weak nose," "unbalanced," "bad oak."
While the Peter Michael was the star of the evening -
chardonnay made in the highest traditions of French
winemaking - the moral of the tasting is that the
Alamos, and to a lesser degree the Dombeya, compare
favorably to a more expensive wine: high quality and an
excellent match with food at a much lower cost. A case
of the Alamos costs the same as one bottle of Peter
WINE Continued on 2B


OFfONTHE ISLAND


'THREE CIVIL WAR WOUNDS'
The Amelia Island Museum of History invites
you to its next 3rd Friday on 3rd Street presenta-
tion at 5:30 p.m. tonight. This month's speaker is
Dr. Bill Birdsong, presenting
Three Civil War Wounds: A
hero, an Irony and a Love Story.
Birdsong will give a brief histo-
ry of the treatment of gunshot
wounds in the Civil War.
Afterwards, he will tell the sto-
ries of three famous people and
their injuries: Joshua
Chamberlain, who was left for dead; Albert
Sydney Johnston, who died but could have been
saved by a device he carried; Jenny Wade, a love
story about the only civilian to die at Gettysburg.
Come hear true stories of both valor and love as
you learn more about the bloodiest chapter in
American history. Admission is free for museum
members and $5 for non-members. For more
information contact the museum at 261-7378.

'ART OFF THE WALL'
The Island Art Association presents the 14th
annual 'Art Off the Wall" exhibit, featuring artists
that do figure and portrait art from clothed mod-
els, with an opening reception from 5-8 p.m. July


18 in the gallery studios, 18 N. Second St.,
Fernandina Beach. - . .- ..


Drawings and paint-
ings that were produced
during the past year will
be displayed in an "off
the wall" manner. Some
works will be framed or
matted. Most will be
pinned to the studio
walls. All work will be for
sale at studio prices.


JULAYI tEIOK Jl



" ^'^ /J f


Refreshments will be served. Meet the artists and
models - personalities from various "walks-of-life"
in the community. The workshops are held on
Tuesday nights, with one Saturday session per
month.
For information call 261-7020 or visit
www.islandart.org.

FOLK THEOLOGIAN
Returning to Memorial United Methodist
Church for his second visit, nationally known
singer, storyteller and folk theologian Ed
Kilbourne will be the featured guest Sunday
morning in worship and for three evenings,
Sunday through Tuesday, July 19-21.
Sunday morning worship services are at 8:30
a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. and the evening perform-


ances are at 6:30 p.m.
Kilbourne has 23 recordings on
the Fly-By-Night label, including
the new release, "A World Of
Good." "The Grateful Ed Live," a 4-
CD collection of his songs and sto-
ries, is a favorite of those who attended his previ-
ous appearances at Memorial. A collection of his
stories and essays will soon be available online
(www.edkilbourne.com) in the e-book, The Gospel
According To You.
Memorial United Methodist Church is located
at 601 Centre St., Fernandina Beach. Visit
www.mumconline.com or call 261-5769.

'POPEYE' IN THE PARK
The next free movie in
Central Park, sponsored by
Prosperity Bank, is a screening
of "Popeye," the adventures of
the spinach-munching sailor
directed by Robert Altman and
starring Robin Williams and
Shelley Duvall, on July 25 at
8:30 p.m. Bring your blankets
and lawn chairs. Concessions will be available for
purchase.
Submit items to Sidn Perry,
sperry@fbnewsleader.com




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, July 17, 2009 LEISURE News-Leader


OUT AND ABOUT


SPECIAL EVENTS

"The Biggest July
Birthday Party Ever" will be
held at 6:30-11 p.m. July 31
at the Fernandina Beach
Women's Club, 201 Jean
Lafitte Blvd. Today is the
deadline to purchase "all
access" passes.
Enjoy an evening of cele-
bration and dancing featuring
live entertainment by nation-
al recording artist Miles
Jaye, a classically trained vio-
linist and R&B and contempo-
rary jazz composer. Also per-
forming will be saxophone
sensation Allana Southerland
and The Fusion Band of
Jacksonville.
Included are a food buffet,
fruit, cheese and veggie sta-
tion, dessert bar, beer, wine
and a "Claws and Paws" mar-
tini bar. Passes are $30 and
can be purchased at
www.TheBiggestJulyBirthday
PartyEver.myevent.com. No
passes will be sold at the
door. Contact Joyce A. Jones
at 583-1949.

Tickets are on sale for
"Seven Days of Fine
Dining," a drawing to win
seven dinner-for-two gift
certificates to local restau-
rants. A tax-deductible dona-
tion of $50 enters you in the
drawing, with proceeds bene-
fiting the TLC Pregnancy
Center, 410 S. Ninth St. Call
the center at 321-2008 to
make a donation and enter
the drawing, which will be
held Aug. 7. Only 100 tickets
will be sold. Participating
restaurants are Baxter's,
Brett's Waterway Caf6, Joe's
2nd Street Bistro, PLAE, The
Verandah, 29 South and The
Ritz Caf6.

On July 20 the SCV and
the Order of the
Confederate Rose will learn
about self-defense from inter-
national karate expert and
grand master Jack Hogan,
who directs schools in
England, Ireland, Scotland,
Finland and the U.S.
The program will also fea-
ture Southern music, songs
and poetry. The camps meet
at 7 p.m. the third Monday of
each month at the Pig BBQ


SUMMER
BLOCKBUSTERS
ACROSS
1. Reduced
Instruction Set
Computer
5. *Elliott to E.T.
8. *The original
summer block-
buster?
12. Margarine
13. Charlie "Bird"
Parker's sax
14. British story
writer H.H.
15. Bound
16. *She starred
with Willis in
1997's "The
Fifth Element"
17. St. , U.S.
Virgin Islands
18. *Sparrow's turf
in '03 block-
buster
20. Can not
21. Bitter quarrels
22. Cosine
23. Bacchus' atten-
dants, e.g.
26. Very deep
30. Big head
31. They're free in
basketball
34. *Where
Costner farmed
in "Field of
Dreams"
35. Sound of water
splashing
37. *It took E.T.
home
38. Enthusiastic
approval
39. SAT, e.g.
40. Automatic
reaction
42. Wrath
43. Achieves
45. *What bit Peter


in Callahan and the public is
always welcome. For informa-
tion call (904) 571-1177 or
(904) 806-0624.

The Amelia Island
Genealogical Society will
meet July 21 at 7 p.m. at the
Fernandina Beach Police
Department Community
Room, 1525 Lime St. Guest
speaker Anne Hawn Smith
will speak about "Getting the
most out of Ancestry.com" and
will touch on using Heritage
Quest as well.
The meetings are free and
open to the public.
* * *
The Nassau County
Commission presents the
grand opening of the
Goffinsville-Nassau River
Park, 95001 Goffinsville Road
in Nassauville, on July 22 at
10 a.m. The community is
invited.

The Young Professionals
Council will celebrate its one-
year anniversary at 6 p.m.
July 23 at the Half Time
Sports Bar, with refresh-
ments, happy hour drink spe-
cials, door prizes, and net-
working for professionals
ages 21-40. RSVPs are
appreciated but not required.
E-mail youngprofession-
alscouncil@gmail.com or
check out YPC on Facebook.

The American Business
Women's Association -
Eight Flags Charter Chapter
will meet July 23 at the
Fernandina Beach Golf
Club. Social time begins at 6
p.m., with the dinner meeting
being called to order at 6:30
p.m. This month's speaker will
be Melba Whitaker of
Robison's Jewelry. She is also
a retired teacher, a local histo-
rian and an active member of
the community. Dinner is $13
a person and is payable that
evening. Call Esther Schindler
at 491-5790 for information
and to RSVP.

The Historic American
Beach "Summer Jazz
Series" presents its second
free concert featuring The
Instant Groove Band on
July 25 from 5-8 p.m. at
Burney Park (corner of


Parker?
47. Formerly Radio
Corporation of
America
48. Frequently
50. New Zealand
fruit
52. *E.T. and
Indiana Jones
director
56. Gold, silver or
bronze
57.
Counterbalanc
e used to get
net weight
58. Iranian money
59. Mimicry
60. Big bang theo-
ry's original
matter
61. Therefore or
consequently
62. Buenos
63. Denotes
female
64. " Purple,"
rock band
DOWN
1. Military training
in college
2. One of the hip-
bones, pl.
3. Tiresias in
"Oedipus Rex"
4. Organize into
code
5. Applied oneself
diligently
6. Bears the sky on
his shoulders
7. shark
8. *No ordinary
walk in this
park
9. In a little while,
old-fashioned
10. Judicial docu-
ment
11. Chicago's


White
13. Lie in wait
14. *This doctor
joined Kirk and
Spock on big
screen
19. Ship or train
bed
22. Moonves' com-
pany
23. Dividing parti-
tion in anatomy
24. End of
shoelace
25. Raised glasses
26. Absent in mili-
tary
27. Water below 0
Celsius
28. Fully informed
29. "See you
_ alligator"
32. Streets in
France
33. Bug spray
36. *Latest 3 are
prequels to
original 3
38. Force to leave
40. DNA transmit-
ter
41. Regard highly
44. In a cold man-
ner
46. Produced by
inbreeding
48. October stones
49. Many blazes
50. Yachting cap
51. "What's the big
!?"
52. Eye infection
53. Republic of
Ireland
54. Extreme anger
55. Unappealing
lump of stuff
56. Humor maga-
zine launched
in '50s


Gregg and Burney) in
American Beach. Bring your
chairs to enjoy food, fun,
music and tasty treats by
Gourmet Gourmet. The con-
cert series is sponsored by
the American Beach Property
Owners Association.
Donations to the association
for outstanding projects are
appreciated. For information
call 277-7960.

Fifi's Fine Resale of
Amelia Island is holding a
canned food drive for the
Barnabas food pantry each
Sunday in August, beginning
Aug. 2. Bring in a canned
good and receive an ice
cream sundae treat for free.
Fifi's, 1853 S. Eighth St., will
be open noon-4 p.m. each
Sunday in August. Call 277-
4430.

Celebrate the 40th
anniversary of Woodstock
with Woofstock at the
Nassau Humane Society
Dog Park on Aug. 15 from 5-
10 p.m. Enjoy mellow music
by Hupp and Ray. Chow
down on catfish and hotdogs,
coleslaw, fries and dessert.
Beer and wine will be avail-
able for purchase. Best-
dressed wins a prize. Bring
your lawn chairs.
Admission is $15 for adults
and $10 for kids. Tickets are
available at the NHS Dog
Park (across from the
Fernandina Beach airport)
and at Redbones Dog Bakery
and Boutique on South Eighth
Street in the Pelican Palms
plaza.

A Labor Day get-together
for 1970-75 students from
Yulee will be held Sept. 7, 11
a.m.-3 p.m., at Chem Cell.
Cost is $20 per person. A
meal will be served at noon.
Reservations and payment
must be made by Sept. 1 at
First Coast Community Bank
in Yulee or mailed to FCCB -
Attn: Susan Murray, P.O. Box
1739, Fernandina Beach, FL
32035. Make checks payable
to Yulee/FBHS Classes of
1970-1975.
E-mail Starr Davis at
yulee_fbhs.gettogether@yaho
o.com or call Kathy Gillis
Spivey at 225-9560 with any
questions. This is an alcohol-
free event.

FILM/THEATER

The Amelia Island Film
Festival announces a special
festival award in honor of
Don Davis (1931-2008) to be
presented to a filmmaker for a
film made in Florida. Davis
was instrumental in creating
Florida's Film Production
Incentive Program.
The Second Annual AIFF
will be held in Fernandina
Beach for four days beginning
Feb. 25. Visit www.Amelialsl
andFilmFestival.org for infor-


SOLUTION 07.15

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TAN AR GTUHE SOELARS


Fill in the squares so
that each row, column
and 3-by-3box
contain the numbers
1 through 9. Solution
will appear in the
Friday B-section.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009
Sudoku Difficult
Puzzle #1506D


mation about festival events
and film submission applica-
tions.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold its annual
meeting from 4-6 p.m. July
19 at 209 Cedar St. All mem-
bers and prospective mem-
bers are invited to hear about
the upcoming 29th season,
tour the new theater under
construction and enjoy
refreshments. For information
call 261-6749.

Amelia Community
Theatre will hold auditions
for "The Dixie Swim Club"
at 7 p.m. July 20 and 21 at
209 Cedar St. Five women
are needed for the cast of this
comedy about a group of
women who were teammates
on their college swim team
and now get together every
summer for a long weekend to
catch up, laugh and meddle in
each other's lives. During the
course of the play, they age
from their 40s to their 70s.
This extremely funny play is a
celebration of friendship and
will be directed by Barry
Ralston. Rehearsals begin in
early August and performanc-
es are between Sept.10-26.
For information contact the
theater at 261-6749.

Memorial United
Methodist Church is hosting
a film series titled Faith at the
Movies, designed to explore
issues of faith through popular
movies. There will be a simul-
taneous movie and program
for children, as well as a nurs-
ery. All are welcome. Movies
start at 6:30 p.m. in Maxwell
Hall. The lineup includes:
"Romero" July 24 and "The
Ultimate Gift" Aug. 7.

Tickets are on sale at
Amelia Community Theatre
for a touring production of
the energetic comedy, "The
Complete Works of William
Shakespeare, Abridged."
Performances are at 8 p.m.
Aug. 7 and 2 p.m. and 8
p.m. Aug. 8 at the theater,
209 Cedar St. Adult tickets
are $15; student tickets are
$10.
The show is a mix of "prat-
falls, puns, clunky female
impersonations, clean-cut rib-
aldry and broad burlesque.
The gung-ho vitality is impos-
sible to resist," says the New
York Times.
Call 261-6749 for tickets
and information, or come by
the box office between 11
a.m.-1 p.m. on Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays.

ART/GALLERIES

The Haskell Gallery & Art
Kiosks at the Jacksonville
International Airport Main
Terminal present "A
Women's Point of View:
Paintings, Photography,
and Sculpture" by Lara
Summers, Elisa Olderman
Johnson and Cookie Davis.
For information visit
www.JIAarts.org.

The Art House, 11 S.
Seventh St., offers art
classes for all ages, abilities
and interests as well as
portfolio and professional
development. Individual and
group classes are forming.
The Art House offers a
classic photography studio,
photography, portraits,
restoration, weddings,
events, computers and soft-
ware, digital and film. For
information or to register, call
Robin at 261-0116 or 705-
6178.


781 523964
32649781 5
459 1 68327
61 8739452
974251 638
2 3 5 8 4 6 1 79
843672591
1 62985743
59731 4286


Fernandina Beach youth librarian and leader of Teen
B.LA.S.T. Michelle Forde works with Jack Chapman
on a graffiti art project at the Fernandina Beach
Police Department community room.


TEEN Continued from 1B
pencils to flesh out their
ideas, then used colored
permanent markers to cre-
ate graffiti tag designs that
showed off their personality.
They then cut out their art-
work and glued it to a large
paper banner that was later
hung up for display in the
library.
Atlanta's Sherry
Norfolk, normally a story-
teller who goes to schools
and libraries to teach vari-
ous curriculums, led the
group by fueling their artis-
tic visions.
"In Atlanta gang mem-
bers spray their tags all over
buildings," Norfolk said.
"It's destructive. But when
they get really good at it, it
becomes art and then they
start doing murals of it and
they enter competitions and
get paid for it. We're going
to do the good kind, the art
kind."
Fernandina Beach
Youth Librarian Michelle
Forde, who heads up
Teen B.LAS.T, said this is
just one of many weekly
events designed to engage
teens and give them a voice
in the library while they
learn leadership skills and
make a difference in the
community.
"My goal is to build it up
and to have more teens, but
they're not aware," Forde
said. "There are just so
many people that are not
aware we exist. The more
we get the word out, the
more they show interest. I
think the biggest thing is
they hear library and they
think if they go, they'll be
labeled by their friends. My
job is to change that mind-


WINE Continued from 1B
Michael, providing a dozen
very satisfying dinners.
Alamos chardonnay is a
product of Bodega Catena
Zapata, which climbs the
Andes foothills. Nicolas and
Laura Catena have devel-
oped an understanding of
microclimates in the high
altitude wine country of
Mendoza. A blend of grapes
from three vineyards pro-
duced the 2008 Alamos we
tasted. This wine has bal-
ance, concentration and a
strong varietal identity. Our
tasters said it has well bal-
anced fruit with a hint of
oak. While it doesn't have
the complexity of the Peter
Michael it was considered
elegant, a bit of jasmine in
the floral nose, a full mouth
feel, a touch of grass, good
acidity and a long finish.
Named after the
Dombeya tree, which is
native to South Africa,
Dombeya wines are created
in the heart of Stellenbosch,
South Africa's prime wine
region. Winemaker Rianie
Strydom has gained acclaim
as one of the world's most
promising new vintners. In
just three years her wines -
especially her pinot noir -
have won numerous awards
and gold medals. The 2006
chardonnay we tasted has a
light green color that goes
with the herbaceous charac-
ter of the wine. The subdued
nose has fresh citric aromas
with a bit of smokiness. The
soft palate has the character-
istic velvety butter flavor


ACT Continued from 1B
excited about ACT's upcom-
ing season, which begins
Sept. 10 with "The Dixie
Swim Club." ACT is also
building a new theater,
which D'Amico said should
be open in time for the April
show, "The Pirates of
Penzance." ACT's annual
meeting, Sunday at 4 p.m., is
open to the public and will
include a tour of the new
building.
For now, however,
D'Amico is concentrating on


set. It's not just about books
anymore, it's about pro-
grams and ways to make
them use their imagination,
it's about ways to spark cre-
ativity while stressing the
importance of leadership
and community."
Forde said she tries to
work with what limited
budget she has, but said
they desperately need fund-
ing to grow the program.
'The graffiti art program
is free other than supplies,"
she said. "It's something
that we can do with very lit-
tle money. But when your
budget is $500 a year, that
goes out the window - we
need corporate sponsors.
There's no limit to what we
can do if we had the fund-
ing."
Forde said the group
gets by with funds from
Friends of the Nassau
County Library fundraisers
like book sales and a haunt-
ed house B.LA.S.T creates
at the library in the last
week of October.
"Right now I'm working
on a yearly calendar of
events, so ti: ll ._. II have a
whole year of programs
planned out," she said.
"We're going to have a
weeklong haunted house in
the library. This is the third
year we've done it and it's
going to take place Oct. 23-
30. It's going to be a
fundraiser for the teens by
charging a small admission
fee. It's a good program to
get teens in and we literally
transform the library into a
haunted house."
For information contact
Forde at 277-7365 or 548-
4858. E-mail mforde@nas-
saucountyfl.com.
z. � , ,- , . . . ,,


with a touch of spicy oak
and green herbs. Nicely bal-
anced, it has the acidity to
go well with food. It has
good length, although our
tasters disagreed on this,
one reason it didn't rank
higher.
Interestingly, at the end
of the evening when the
tasters were asked how
chardonnay ranks as their
favorite seafood wine, four
said they prefer Chablis,
which is also made from the
chardonnay grape and has
its historic home in the
Rhone Valley just north of
Macon-Villages.
Once my favorite white
wine, Chablis got a bad rap
from California meddling
(vapid, overly fruity white
jug wines made from any
combination of grapes and
spelled with a lower-case
"c"). True Chablis is now
hard to find. Unable to find
one under $20, it was not
considered for this tasting.
But I miss the crisp, steely
and dry wine with its miner-
ality.
Challenging one's
assumptions can often lead
to a better experience.
Good, low-cost wines may
not be as good as you think.
It is worthwhile to keep try-
ing new wines; to truly
appreciate the chardonnay
grape one needs to drink
many chardonnays to see
what is good or not.
Robert Weintraub writes
about wine monthly. He wel-
comes your comments at
rmw.weintraub@mind-
spring.com.


"Six Dance Lessons." She
said it's a far cry from ACT's
last show - the tense court-
room drama "Nuts" - but
still a great evening of the-
ater.
"We're going from one
end of the spectrum to the
other. Everybody loved
'Nuts' but I think we're
ready to go in a different
direction," she said. "There
is dancing, fun, a little
drama, with a nice heart-
warming ending. It's going
to be fun."
rsmith@fbnewsleadercom


+


SUDOKU


1 2 34

5 4 6 7

5 3
. ---- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---


7 5 6 8

3 8 4 5

6 1 2 9

6 8

S21 5 9
46 8 1__
4 6 8 1


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


CLASSIFIED


3B
NEWS-LEADER
FRIDAY, JULY 17,2009


To Place An Ad. Call (904) 261-3696. The Classified Ad Deadline for Wednesdays is 5:00 p.m. Monday and for Fridays is 5:00 p.m. Wednesday

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 204 Work Wanted 403 Financial-Home/Property 606 Photo Equipment &Sales 619 Business Equipment 800 REAL ESTATE 813 Investment Property 858 Condos-Unfurnished
101 Card of Thanks 205 Live-in Help 404 Money To Loan 607 Antiques-Collectibles 620 Coal-Wood-Fuel 801 Wanted to Buy or Rent 814 West Nassau County 859 Homes-Furnished
102 Lost & Found 206 Child Care 500 FARM & ANIMAL 608 Produce 621 Garden/Lawn Equipment 802 Mobile Homes 815 Kingsland/St. Marys 860 Homes-Unfurnished
103 In Memoriam 207 Business Opportunity 501 Equipment 609 Appliances 622 Plants/Seeds/Fertilizer 803 Mobile Home Lots 816 Camden County 861 Vacation Rentals
104 Personals 300 EDUCATION 502 Livestock & Supplies 610 Air Conditioners/Heaters 623 Swap/Trade 804 Amelia Island Homes 817 Other Areas 862 Bed & Breakfast
105 Public Notice 301 Schools & Instruction 503 Pets/Supplies 611 Home Furnishings 624 Wanted to Buy 805 Beaches 850 RENTALS 863 Office
106 Happy Card 302 Diet/Exercise 504 Services 612 Muscial Instruments 625 Free Items 806 Waterfront 851 Roommate Wanted 864 Commercial/Retail
107 Special Occasion 303 Hobbies/Crafts 600 MERCHANDISE 613 Television-Radio-Stereo 700 RECREATION 807 Condominimus 852 Mobile Homes 865 Warehouse
108 Gift Shops 305 Tutoring 601 Garage Sales 614 Jewelry/Watches 701 Boats & Trailers 808 Off Island/Yulee 853 Mobile Home Lots 901 TRANSPORTATION
200 EMPLOYMENT 306 Lessons/Classes 602 Articles for Sale 615 Building Materials 702 Boat Supplies/Dockage 809 Lots 854 Room 902 Trucks
201 Help Wanted 400 FINANCIAL 603 Miscellaneous 616 Storage/Warehouses 703 Sports Equipment Sales 810 Farms &Acreage 855 Apartments-Furnished 903 Vans
202 Sales-Business 401 Mortgage Bought/Sold 604 Bicycles 617 Machinery-Tools-Equip. 704 Recreation Vehicles 811 Commercial/Retail 856 Apartments-Unfurn. 904 Motorcycles
203 Hotel/Restaurant 402 Stocks & Bonds 605 Computers-Supplies 618 Auctions 705 Computers & Supplies 812 Property Exchange 857 Condos-Furnished 905 Commercial

THE NEWS-LEADER SERVICE DIRECTORY Is LOCATED ON PAGE 3B


LOST WHITE FERRET - 7/11/09 on N.
Tarpon Ave. Very gentle. Part of
bonded pair. (904)321-4372
LOST MALE CAT - part Siamese, blue
eyes, toffee color w/blk markings. No
collar. Lost north end, Fletcher/Ocean
Ave. on Fri. 7/10/09. Reward. PIs call
261-9994.
If You Have Lost Your Pet - please
check the Nassau Humane Society
facility located at 671 Airport Rd. next
to the airport (904)321-1647 & the
Nassau County Animal Shelter, 86078
License Rd. in Yulee next to the drivers
license building (904)491-7440.
LOST DOG - Small female black/tan
Min Pin/Dachschund mix. Name "Little
Girl". Missing from Blackrock Rd. area
since 7/9/090. PIs call (904)583-0986.
Reward for return.

104 Personals
TAX MATTERS - and then-some.
Thomas Avery Blair (Tom "the
TAXMAN") - federally-licensed Enrolled
Agent providing services in tax
preparation/ taxpayer representation.
29 years experience in taxation
matters. Call toll-free 1-888-250-5687
or visit http://www.TomBlairEA.com
$$LAWSUIT ADVANCE$$ - No credit
check, money when you need it fast.
Car accidents, clip & fall. If you don't
win, you keep the cash. Need a lawyer,
doctoror cash today? Call (813)270-
9874, (877)275-8299 x 4 or (813)699-
2157. ANF
Advertise in Over 100 Papers! -
One Call - One Order - One Payment
The Advertising Networks of Florida
Put Us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com. ANF

105 Public Notice

All Real Estate Advertised
Herein - is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal to advertise any prefer-
ence, limitation, or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make any such preference,
limitation or discrimination.
The News-Leader will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
If you believe that you may have
been discriminated against in
connection with the sale, rental or
financing of housing, call the
United States Department of
Housing and Urban Development
the hearing impaired 1(800)927
9275.






201 Help Wanted
FRONT DESK CLERK NEEDED -
Experience preferred. Apply at Holiday
Inn Express, 76071 Sidney PI., Yulee or
call (904)849-0200.


A JANET LYNNE SALON & SPA - is
accepting applications for a stylist/
colorist for a booth rental position.
Discover the difference in our relaxing,
non-competitive environment. Call
Janet at 556-1687 for a confidential
interview. Serious inquiries only.
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY - Great part-
time opportunity. Three days a week,
early morning. Good driving record and
car insurance required. Apply in
person Mon-Fri between 8:30am-5pm
at 511 Ash St., Fernandina Beach.
Interviews will be scheduled.
$600/WK. POTENTIAL$$$ - helping
the government PT. No exp. No selling.
Call (888)213-5225. Ad Code: M. ANF
Earn $$$ Helping MDs! Process
medical claims from home. Call the
Federal Trade Commission to find out
how to spot medical billing scams.
1(877)FTC-HELP. A message from the
News-Leader and the FTC.
MERRY MAIDS
is now accepting applications for
No nights or weekends. Background
check. Drug free workplace. Must be
21 or older. (904)261-6262. Must have
own vehicle.
TIMES UNION MOTOR ROUTE -
available in Yulee. Excellent part-time
income. Covers Chester Rd. &
Blackrock area. Approximately 4 hours
a day. You must have dependable
transportation & current insurance. To
apply, please contact Jason Green at
225-9170 ext. 3.
CASTING CALL - We are seeking
personable bartenders, cocktail wait-
resses and dances for a new ultra
lounge located in downtown Fernan-


thepalacesaloon.com for ?'s
OTR DRIVERS - for PTL. Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced NE. 12 mos exp
req'd. No felony or DUI past 5 yrs.
(877)740-6262 www.ptl-inc.com. ANF
DRIVER/MAINTENANCE POSITION
- at ARC/Nassau off HWY 17 in Yulee.
30-35 hrs.per week, full-time position
w/PTO. Van driver mornings and after-
noons plus maintenance other part of
day. Must have excellent driving record
plus handyman skills. Call 225-9355
HELP WANTED - No truck driver
experience - No problem. Wil-Trans will
teach you how to drive. Company
sponsored CDL training. Must be 23.
(888)368-1205. ANF
Office Manager/Billing and Collect-
ions Clerk (must have experience with
both insurance and patient A/Rs
required) and Receptionist (medical
office experience required) for St.
Marys surgical practice. Both positions
are full-time with benefits. Fax resume
to (912)729-8133.
BARISTAS, SERVERS, & PREP CHEF
- Espressos Cafe in Amelia Island.
Described in Amelia Islander magazine.
Fax resume to (904)491-9810
RV Delivery Drivers Needed - Deliv-
er RVs, boats & trucks for PAY! Deliver
to all 48 states & CN. For details log on
to www.RVdeliveryjobs.com. ANF
a 5 A S. enni Bah


PART-TIME
ADOPTION COORDINATOR
Nassau County has an opening for a
part-time Adoption Coordinator in
Animal Care and Control at $15.24/hr.
with no benefits. Requires high school
diploma or GED equivalent supple-
mented by 3 years of hands on
experience in animal care in a shelter
center environment and 2 years direct
public customer service. Must have
valid drivers license. Applications will
be accepted thru July 28, 2009 and can
be obtained in the Human Resources
Department located at 96161 Nassau
Place, Yulee, FL 32097. Phone
(904)491-7332 or fax (904)321-5926.
EOE/M/F/D/V Drug Free Workplace.
ROOM FOR RENT - in salon/spa. Call
(904)491-0991, ask for Jessica or
Summer.
ADMINISTRATIVE/CUSTOMER SER-
VICE ASSISTANT - needed ASAP!
Olympic Steel has an immediate
opening for an administrative/customer
service job in Fernandina. Position
Qualifications *Excellent computer,
phone, and time management skills
and ability to multi-task in a fast paced
environment. Position Preferences
*Bilingual-Spanish/English Interested
candidates please fax/email resumes to
904-491-8688 olvsteeltradinq.tobsa
olysteel.com. EOE m/f/d/v

EXPERIENCED PARTS/WAREHOUSE
PERSON - Need experienced person
for our busy parts counter. Duties
include inbound calls from customers,
handling requests from both walk-in
customers and our service department.
Knowledge of parts a plus. Must be
dependable and able to work
independently. Fax resume to (904)
924-9335, Attn: Porter.

S204 Work Wanted
MASTER ELECTRICIAN - 45 yrs exp-
erience. Low prices, work guaranteed.
Small jobs welcomed. 10% discount
with ad. Call Tom (904)491-9992.


HARD WORKERS SAVE YOU TIME
AND MONEY - House cleaning and
painting. Garages to yards. Great
references and estimates. Please call
(904)335-1226 or (904)206-1059.
HOME REPAIRS - Painting, roofing,
rotted wood, electrical, ceiling fans,
decks, tile, chimney repairs, gutter
cleaning and pressure washing. Call
Marc (904)583-4900. Lic. & Ins.
Landlords, Property Mgrs, Home
Owners - We Can Save You $$$$.
Refresh/For Sales/Move Outs
Maintenance/Repairs/Painting
Call PoPs (904)742-1352
Professionals of Property Services LLC
HOME REPAIRS - All types of home
repair & improvements, mobile homes
also. Dependable service. Licensed,
bonded, & insured. Call Mark Bullington
at (904)277-8780.
SHOVEL TO SHINGLE - Home
Improvement, Maintenance and Repair.
583-3866 or 277-7850

S 206 Child Care
STATE LICENSED & INSPECTED
HOME DAYCARE - has immediate
opening for any age child newborn-4
years. Lots of activities, hot meals,
oodles of love & attention! Please call
321-6757 for interview. Hours 7:30-
5:30. All meals, snacks & juice
provided. Rate $125/wk. over 20 yrs
licensed experience & references!

207 Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING - Do you earn
$800/day? 25 local machines & candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
Call us: We will not be undersold! ANF
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - in the
Christian market. Concessions avail for
only 1 person per city. Keep 100% of
the revenue. Go to www.Christian
LeadersWanted.com. ANF


The Tribune & Georgian is looking for a creative,
ambitious, result-oriented, advertising sales pro-
fessional. Responsible for selling to established
accounts, prospecting and cold calling. Must be
able to work with deadlines. To apply for this po-
sition, send cover letter, resume including pro-
fessional references to:
Tribune & Georgian, Attention Tom Latos
P.O. Box 470, St. Marys, Ga. 31558
or email: tomlatos@tribune-georgian.com

DEADLINE: July 10, 2009


Tribune & Georgian
48906 T&G 6/5


301 Schools &
Instruction
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE - from
home. Medical, business, paralegal,
computers, criminal justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer
available. Financial aid if qualified. Call
(866)858-2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com. ANF
AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance Car-
eer. FAA approved program. Financial
aid if qualified - Housing available. Call
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888)
349-5387. ANF


305 Tutoring
ACADEMIC ASSOCIATES
Free Reading Evaluation. Pay as you
go. Tutoring in math and science.
www.PhonicsReadingGuide.com
(904)277-0911
www.abclearningresourcecenter.com
Tutoring, behavior, summer programs,
Spanish, home school support,
educational testing. (904)432-8212.


306 Lessons/Classes
The Guitar Studio - Private guitar
instruction. Acoustic, electric,
fingerstyle, flatpicking. Terry Thrift
(904)704-2011.


503 Pets/Supplies
OLD ENGLISH BULLDOGS - with
papers, $500. (904)624-5068.
SHELTIE PUPS - AKC. All shots. (2)
females, 10 wks old. $500. Call 225-
8634 or 629-0260.
GREAT PUPS - free to good loving
homes. Brother & sister lab mix
w/beagle must go together. Also boxer
mix. Must have a fenced yard. Fixed.
Love walks. Housebroken. (904)556-
9512.




601 Garage Sales
MISS RUBY'S BIGGEST ESTATE
SALE - with furnishings, inside & out.
Fri. 7/17, afternoon till 7pm. All day
Sat. 7/18. 1120B Natures Walk Dr.
FRIDAY & SATURDAYS - 7/17 &
7/18; 7/24 & 7/25; 7/31 & 8/1. 9am -
? Off A1A to Harts Rd W. to 86204
Hayley PI., follow signs. Jerri's This-N-
That Antiques and Collectibles + yard
sale items. Shoes, clothes, dolls,
furniture, fishing, books, China,
vintage fashion jewelry. If the price
isn't right, make a fair offer. Let's make
a deal. Everyone welcome.


SERVICE DIRECTORY


BALED STRAW


JOHN'S PINE STRAW
QUALITY GA STRAW - GREAT PRICE
277-0738
Locally Owned & Operated
"A company built one bale at a time through
hard work and integrity over 18 years."
Fast, Friendly Service-Installation Available

CLEANING SERVICE


PERFECT CLEAN, INC.

*BONDED, INSURED

Please Call Us At M
753-3067

HOMES * CONDOS * OFFICES


XKeley Cleaning & Mgt
Services Inc.
Bonded & Insured
-We offer "green cleaning"
Non-rentaCproperty nmgmt.

callXeCfey (904) 335-1370
Emai: XeiCCeyCMS@yahoo.com





LEANI SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
Licensed Bonded -Insurance
Member AIFB Chamber
FREE ESTIMATES
904 4911971* Cell: 904 742 8430
E-mail: justforyouserv@aol.com








c[ut1h1i\1,/ tc) put yllu


CLEANING SERVICE


CLEAN by Genine Inc.
Attention to betaill

Genuine Harter /
Housekeeping

904-415-1186. :
genineharter@gmail.com


CONCRETE


NICK ISABELLA, INC.
Color and Stamped Patios,
Driveways, Sidewalks, Slabs
Now doing Regular Concrete
and Stamped Concrete
261-3565 REASONABLE ESTIMATES
LICENSE #694 -


AMELIA ISLAND
GUTTERS
When It Rains Be Prepared.
6" Seamless
Aluminum Gutters
LICENSED & INSURED Lowell & Renee Duster
(904) 261-1940

CONSTRUCTION


BRANNAN


State Reg. Building Contractor
40 Years Experience
Licensed * Insured
State Licensed RB0055959
GORGES * ROOM ADDITIONS
NEW HOMES

QUALITY GUARANTEED

2-Car Garages --1

1, 0 001 .-
24x24 Wood Frame Only /
Additional Costfor l F ^


GARAGE DOORS


GARAGE DOOR &
OPERATOR SYSTEMS
Steven Hair Maintenance Inc.
"The local guy" since 1984
Quit Paying Too Much! I
SOperator ordoor replacements *Transmitter replacement
* Broken springs * Stripped gears
Cables Service forall makes & models
904-277-2086

HOME IMPROVEMENT

oPRO







(zPKT ght TEe

Repair* Rebuild* Remodel
Specializing in Hardie Board Siding
Tile Work * Hardwood Floors * Doors
Windows * Custom Decks * Custom Trim
Crown Moulding
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
Licensed & Insured
321-0540 557-8257
Serving Nassau County Since 2003



OTT0'S CUSTOM
WOODWORKING, INC.
CUSTOM CABINET S ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
BOOKCAIEI TRIM CARPENTRY
HONE REPAIR REMODELING
HANDYMAN SERVICES
LICENSED t, INSURED
SCOTT RUDOLPH 904557 -3100



THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
Advertise in
The News-Leader
Service Directory!
Call 261-3696 and find
out how to put your
advertising dollars
to work for youl


LAWN MAINTENANCE



Florida fiardener
Landscape Management, Inc.

LAWN MAINTENANCE
* Mowing, trimming, edging, blowing
* Pruning & weeding
LANDSCAPING
* Mulch and pinestraw
* Flower beds and plantings
* Sod installs and replacement
SPRINKLER SYSTEM EXPERTS
* Installations
* Tune-ups and maintenance plans
* Repairs and valve locating
Call today for your free estimate
(904) 753-1537
Licensed & Insured


Emerald Green
Landscapes
Lawncare & Landscaping
* Plants &flowers, trees, sod
Mowing, edging, blowing, trimming
* Mulch, decorative stones, fountains
Irrigation fVil
* Sprinkler Installation Ea
*Sprinkler Inspection and repair
(904) 556-2354


B WELBORN
IRRIGATION
Do it right the first time.
*Complete system designs
* Repairs & modifications
* System tune ups * 10 years experience
Licensed/insured
Warranty on new installs
Free estimates * 904-277-8231


LOCKSMITH


NEW & USED CARS


PRESSURE WASHING


PRESSURE WASHING
RAY O'ROURKE
Houses - Trailers - Patios
Driveways - etc.
Roofs
Wood Decks Cleaned& Resealed
FREE ESTIMATES
Scott Lawson Chris Lowe 261-4353
Sales Consultant Sales Consultant


R"A 4 ROOFING

CHEVROLET * BUICK
PONTIAC * GMC J-MELIA
464054 SR 200 * Yulee i ROOFING NC.

(904) 261-6821 333-6496
100% FINANCING
UP TO 130 MPH
METALISHINGLE Certified
FREE EST.
PAINTING CCc-055600


WIDDrsPIIW G I COASTAL BUILDING
P'u,,,1 I' SYSTEMS


SI . I' I i * "Re-Roofing Is Our Specialty"
111 .11 2 22 Nassau County's Largest
,. l.II .1 I 1_ _ JJ Roofing & Siding Contractor
S Serving Satisfied
MHomebuilders & Homeowners
AMELIA ISLAND Since 1993
QUALITYPAINTING, INC., Re-Roofing * New Roofing
"Call the Professionals" Vinyl Siding * Soffit & Fascia �
(904) 753-1689 261-2233
Src TTFree Estimate �
*RESIDENTIAL Free Estcma
COMMERCIAL . -.
SINTERIORIEXTERIOR ///////////////////lll


BLACK


201 Help Wanted 201 Help Wanted 204 Work Wanted


The Lock Doctor

904-321-LOCK [56251
* Lock Out Service
* New Locks Installation & Service
* Automobile Keys
* Car Remotes
* Free Security Survey
Owner: Steve Brookbank


L SPECIALIZED FINISHES
*PRESSURE WASHING
& WATER PROOFING

LICENSED * BONDED * INSURED
*PROFESSIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP AT
AFFORDABLE PRICES
*SERVING NASSAU COUNTY SINCE 1997
*CALL TODAY FORYOUR
FREE ESTIMATE
Marc Lawing - Owner/Operator


i


I I


Ill


IAMllA11 LAB1 LEtJil
A 1111i 8 i se In I
The N(-J\ ,s-i(- ac 11


adcts ranging from 3 to 112 acres * Cities of &. Marys & Clngsland, Georgia
SNearexistingcommerdal development * Convenient 1-95 access- Exit 3

INSPECTION DATES:
Wednesday, July 8 and 22 from 3:00 - 6:00 PM and
Wednesday, July 29 from 3:00 - 5:00 PM
,12 l,n I ~irpa ol.lrr "Eld -E e'mrr fr.l-l l l.r g EgrI-r.* I il �a se * 6 qjr,. 1,d Ij A
Please Contact Jim WoLtz iAUNROO2900 or Rex Schrader (#AUNR002895)

WOLTZ &




CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


4B FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


[p Go Painlessly


Mary Ann W. T W T






Compare and Save! Buy THERA-GESICO





BiI:g



qEEirm nci


Commercial Condo

1430 Park Ave., Fernandina Beach, FL

Formerly KP's Bar & Grille

Equipment Offered Separately

Cal for Details 800-323-8388

Rowell Realty

& Auction Co., Inc.
10% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB296
In Cooperation with: Richard L Vairo, CCIM SIOR, RCV Properties, Inc.

P Au


SEA
HO IE


, joki- i- -- In 1

- -,. - Jon -.rtrih-

, I.- :,-', -- . ,. A - :,_.
1''' - L lc .I '-,l.,-d [-L '- 2;,'
" 3"- - L. - ,3'zi


Phil Griffin
Broker
phil@acrfl.com


(904) 261-2770
COMMERCIAL * INVESTMENT * LEASING * SALES


608 S. 8th Street
Fernandina Beach, Fl 32034
www.ACRFL.com


Anne Friend
Realtor�
(904) 415-1558
affriend@bellsouth.net


Kon raimquist
Realtor@
(904) 206-1945
rpalmquistl@bellsouth.net


601 Garage Sales
MULTI-FAMILY SALE - Sat. 7/18,
8am-2pm. 86123 Meadowfield Bluffs,
Yulee. Household & craft items, ribbon,
cards, clothing, bar stools, mini-fridge.
Hundreds of items.
HUGE MULTI-FAMILY SALE!
Bunkbed w/attached desk, coffee &
end tables, lamps, exercise equipment,
glass top dining table w/chairs,
clothing & shoes for men, women, &
children and much more! Two days
only Fri. & Sat. 17 & 18 July 8am-3pm.
85102 Windy Oaks Lane off Harts Rd.
East. Look for the Orange Balloons!
HUGE YARD SALE - Thurs. 7/16, Fri.
7/17 & Sat. 7/18, 8am-5pm. 95343
Clearwater Rd., Nassauville. Many
items, color TVs, 55 gal aquarium,
furniture. Too much to mention.
MOVING SALE - Lofton Pointe, 96213
Ridgewood Cir. Furniture, misc. items.
Sat. 7/18, 8am-11am.
TOTAL ESTATE SALE - Sat., 8am-
4pm & Sun., 8am-3pm. 85067 St.
Thomas St., back of Lofton Oaks Subd.
on A1A, Yulee. NEW ITEMS. PRICES
SLASHED. Antiques, collectibles, &
much more.
YULEE 3-FAMILY YARD SALE - Sat.
7/18, 9am-?, across from Yulee Post
Office. Ladies clothes Small-XL, boys 2-
4 & 10-12, gas smoker, gas patio
heater, pictures, sets of dishes, lots of
good stuff. See you there!


601 Garage Sales
SAT. & SUN. - 7am-4pm. Isle Of
Palms Ln. Camera equip, housewares,
lawn tools, bedding, stuffed toys -
plenty of misc. All must go. COME To
SHOP!!
GOING BACK TO SCHOOL SALE!! -
Young Grad-Student trying to lighten
his load before heading back to school!
Computers! TVs! Furniture! AND
MUCH MUCH MORE!!!! Everything
Must Go! Games, Raffles and More!
Come And Make an Offer! 2191 High
Rigger Place, Fernandina Beach, FL
32034 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM (or later),
Sat., 7/18.
GARAGE SALE - First Presbyterian
Church. Sat. 7/28, 9am-lpm. Many
items, household goods. 9 North 6th
St.
GARAGE SALE - Fri. & Sat., 8am-lpm.
Baker's rack, vacuum cleaner, shade
trees, plants, large chair. 96014 Sea
Winds Dr., south end of Clinch.
YARD SALE - Jet ski trailer, swing set,
12" boys & girls bikes, baby thru 8 yrs
old boys & girl clothes & toys. Stained
glass lamps, used kitchen cabinets,
Port-a-brake, drywall primer, (3) 3X7
windows, other misc. Sat., 9am-?
96681 Chester Rd.
YARD SALE - Sat. 7/18, 8am-12 noon
at FLT, 1014 Beech St., Fernandina.
Costumes, clothes, books, furniture,
and much more.


pROPERTY


PKOPER



~-6O


,; l' - IillulHI
807 White Street - $495,00
This adorable 3 BR / 3 BA Key West style home in Old Town on Amela Island has
wonderfulviews ofthe intra coast ... . ., ..
,,' ,,. ....... . ... .... ,.......II ,... '. rt
... . ... io . . . '. ' . ........ . .. .. .... , loca ted in a quaint historic
neighborhood near-: i, :,,' I ,, . .... I ; ....... .CumberlandSoindand


SEA





. . .... - --I.. owner r

-+ F.A.I-.


601 Garage Sales
1424 S. FLETCHER - Sat. 7/18, 9am-
1pm. Couch, toys, clothes, rugs,
tables, TVs, wall TV mount, books,
luggage, more!
BIG YARD SALE - Baby stuff,
furniture, clothes, housewares, etc.
801 San Fernando St. Sat. 7/18, 8am-
noon.
JULY 18 &19 - 2840 1st Ave.
Assortment of stuff from tools to knick-
knacks.
96165 ABACO ISLAND DR. (Nassau
Lakes) Furniture, antiques,
something for everyone. Fri. & Sat.,
8am-?
FORREST DR. NEIGHBORHOOD
GARAGE SALE - Sat. 8-4. (Road
across from Harris Teeter extending
towards Intercoastal). Misc. household
goods incl. furniture, clothes, sporting
goods, etc.
95292 ARBOR LN. (Nassauville) -
Sat. 7/18 & Sun. 7/19, 8am-4pm.
Household items, furniture, TV,
appliances, dishes (great for college
bound), & misc.
ESTATE SALE - 2525 Robert Oliver
Ave., Thurs, Fri, Sat, 9:00am-4:00pm.
Rain or shine. Smaller size sale of nice
furnishings. Armoire entertainment
center, Queen bed set, twin day bed &
trundle, rattan dresser, Drexel serving
cart, China Cabinet, dining table w/2
chairs, 3 televisions, Sony boom box,
upholstered chair, vintage cane back
chair, glass top dinette set, 3 misc. side
chairs, sm tables, end table, Ig
planters, wicker & rattan chairs,
nesting tables, large area rugs & sm
rugs, lamps, wall pictures, mirrors,
LLadro figure, Limoges Pot De Creme
set, 5 pcs Aynsley Pembroke, 4 pcs
Schumann Empress, 31 pcs Limoges
UNC24 China, 5 Lenox Boehm plates,
vintage Lenox vase, Limoges Coronet
plate, silver plate pitcher, 37 pcs
Mikasa Marseilles China, 35 pcs Mikasa
Renaissance China, mantel urns,
decorative pillows, misc kitchen items,
Eureka sweeper, lawn chairs, cement
bird bath, and other misc items. For
more info, map and photos go to
www.MovingAnd EstateSales.Net
Sale done by Mary Ann Pihlblad dba
Finders Keepers.
LARGE GARAGE SALE - Sat. 7/18,
8am-noon. Books, household,
antiques, & old stuff. 523 N. Fletcher
Ave.

602 Articles for Sale
FOR SALE - New & old appliances &
misc. Call (904)277-1233.


E ON OI
LOCAL SPENDING WORKS


603 Miscellaneous
Donate Your Vehicle - Receive $1000
grocery coupon. United Breast Cancer
Foundation. Free mammograms, breast
cancer info www.ubcf.info. Free towing,
tax deductible, non-runners accepted.
(888)468-5964. ANF

610 Air Conditioners
/Heating
HEAT/COOL - Window units & ice
machines, used all sizes w/warr.
Repairs to central & window AC's,
refrigerators & freezers. Kish's (904)
225-9717.

615 Building Materials
METAL ROOFING - 40 yr warranty.
Buy direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock, wall accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mgf. (888)393-0335.
www.GulfCoastSupplv.com. ANF

621 Garden/
Lawn Equipment
CUB CADET - Model 1045 Riding
Lawn Mower, 20HP Kohler engine, 46"
mulching deck, optional twin bagger.
Used 2 summers, low hours, just
serviced, new belts & blades. $1200.
Call (904)491-8985.

624 Wanted To Buy
I BUY JUNK CARS & HEAVY
EQUIPMENT FOR SCRAP - CASH
PAID. (904)879-1190 / 705-8628
DAWN PICTURE - Approx. 6am,
10/27/08 over ocean w/new moon &
star at 12 o'clock. Call (404)725-8133.





802 Mobile Homes
4BR/2BA ON 1 ACRE - Ready to
move in. Low down and only $650/mo.
Call (904)424-7345.

804 Amelia Island Homes
GREAT INVESTMENT - 2 family plus
office/studio, near Centre St. 2BR each
with eat-in-kitchen & separate utilities.
Furnished or unfurnished. Under
$200K. (904)321-4191


www.BackyardEconomics.com


The Southern Pine Beetle .
PREVENT
Prevention Cost-Share Program

2009 Sign-Up Period: July 1st -Aug 12th im

Apply for incentive payments or cost-share assistance with:
* Thinning * Mechanical underbrush removal
* Prescribed burning * Planting longleaf pine

For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:
www.fl-dof.com '5
A message from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of
Forestry, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner. Funding supplied by the USDA Forest Service;
an equal opportunity provider












a boomera nI


+


BUSINESS CARD BILLBOARD


3976S . t
GreatInvesmentOpporunit


FO nDwtw S.Mrs a


Thi poprt wa rcetl
SA rezoned frm C-2 to C-1


I




CYAN MAGENTA


FRIDAY, JULY 17, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader 5B


Ill
H.


808 Off Island/Yulee
BLACKROCK AREA - Completely
remodeled roof to floors. 4BR/2BA
house semi-secluded 1 acre. FP, new
A/C, cabinets, appliances, tile, Ig
pool/deck. $180,000. 583-0095

809 Lots
FSBO - 50 X100, 430 N Fletcher. Great
ocean view. DEP permit w/plans in
place. $299K. (904)261-9487
LOT FOR SALE - #10 Blackrock Rd,
between Pirates Wood entrances, .55
acre, cleared, filled, well already
drilled. $69,000. Call (912)506-1035.
VACANT LOT - on lake in Otter Run.
Asking $51,900. Call (904)321-0684.
Lake Lot Deal Fell Thru - 2.6 ac
$19,300. Free boat slips. Was $39,900.
Secluded wooded lot w/deeded access
to pvt stocked bass lake in TN. Quiet rd
frontage, utilities, warranty deed. Exc
financing. Must see, call now (888)
792-5253 x3087. ANF
MAKE AN OFFER!
Was $97,000. Now make an offer on a
building lot in Old Town and buy it at
your price. Must be sold. Call 753-
3219 for details.

815 Kingsland/
St. Mary's
AUCTION - Comm'l & Dev. Real
Estate: 1091 ac offered in 36 tracts,
located in Kingsland & St. Marys, GA
near 1-95, Exit 3. Auction on 7/30 at
5pm at the Western Motel in Kingsland,
GA. Auction staff will be available 7/22
& 29 from 3-6pm at the Western
motel, Kingsland. Call (800)551-3588
for info or go to www.woltz.com. Jim
Woltz #AUNR002906. Woltz &
Associates, Inc., Real Estate Brokers &
Auctioneers. Roanoke, VA. ANF

817 Other Areas
COASTAL GEORGIA - Bank Ordered
Sale. 1+ acre ocean access $29,900.
http://www.oceanaccess299.com/888-
982-8952 x5192. ANF
LAKE BARGAIN - 3+ ac just $49,900
(was $89,900). Nicely wooded, private
lake access. Ready to build. Owner will
finance. Only one - save big. (866)
352-2249. ANF
RARE FIND! - Private Island and
cabin, St. Lawrence River, NYS.
Associate Broker Nancy Williams,
Christensen Realty, (315)528-2801.
Fabulous views and sounds. $370,000.
Alabama Waterfront Blow-Out - Es-
tate size lakefront now only #39,900. 1
day, Sat. 7/25 (adjoining lakefront
parcel sold for $92,300 on 4/12/09-
others avail at similar savings).
Sensible owner & bank financing.
Owner on-site to ensure all lakefronts
sell! Best prices ever, guar-anteed! Call
now (866)952-5343 x106. ANF





851 Roommate Wanted
2 ROOMS FOR RENT - $500/each.
Utilities included. Quiet neighborhood,
beautiful home. Call (904)583-0037 for
details.
HOUSEMATES - off island. Private
home. No pets. Responsible, profess-
ional, clean. $500/mo. + deposit.
Utilities included. Call (904)557-1659.


S 852 Mobile Homes
On Island/In Park - Long term. 1,2&
3BR starting $150/wk. $600/mo.+dep.
Utils avail. Off Island - 2/2 MH, $175/
wk. or $695/mo + dep. 261-5034.
DWMH - on 1 acre, 3BR/2BA, good
condition, great location. $850/mo. +
deposit. Call (904)583-3411.


3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME
Nassauville. $800/mo. Call (904)206-
S3111 or 432-8688.


3BR/1BA - CH&A, singlewide in
Nassauville area. Call (904)261-6703.
2BR/1BA SW - in Nassauville.
Remodeled. Rent $550/mo + $550
dep. Service animals only. (904)583-
2009.
STATIONERY RV FOR RENT - Weekly
& monthly rates. (904)225-5577
BLACKROCK AREA - 2BR/1BA in
small, very quiet trailer park. Water,
garbage, sewer & lawn service provid-
ed. $550/mo. + $500 dep. 261-6486
3BR/2BA - Roses Bluff and Lents.
New carpet, new paint, new flooring.
$675/mo. Call (904)415-1540.
2BR/1.5BA - Covered carport,
ceramic tile, large acre shaded lot, 1/2
mile from beach. References required.
(904)261-5148 or 557-3362
UNFURNISHED 2 to 3BR - Beautiful
new decor. $600-$700/mo. Includes
water, lawn, poss. RTO. (904)315-1757
or 613-8401
YULEE 2BR SINGLEWIDES
Teakwood Mobile Home Park. $500-
$550. Call Marie (904)225-5378.


805 Beaches
OCEANFRONT PROPERTY
Visit www.OceanfrontAmelia.com for a
complete list, or call Bob Gedeon at
Oceanfront Realty (904)261-8870.
FSBO-Reduced. 3/2, 1.5 blocks to
beach. New roof/kitchen/siding. Across
from comm. pool, 2 scrn'd tiled porch-
es, hot tub. $344,900. (904)556-4500
1


Countryside Apartments
1&2 Bedroom Units

Rent starting at $630-$750
Mon & Wed 8am - 5pm, Fri 1pm - 5pm
1105 S. 13th Street, Fernandina Beach
(904) 277-2103

Yulee Villas
1,2&3 Bedroom Units
Rent starting at $585-$705
Tues & Thurs 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 12pm
850766 US Hwy 17 South, Yulee
(904) 225-5810 T







Features include:
2 bedroom garden units * 29 b...-.l] Hr In t, nM1111iui.* .t\ u ..
3 bedroom garden unit, * MlIiish i '..ir s
Swimming pool * Dishwash.-r * Laurn'.i1r t-a.iliti..-
Washer/dryer connections* * W'h1..-r .l�'...r unit-i di a ld,..- "
Water, garbage & pest control included in rent
Prices starting at $675.�0 per month
*Some features not available in all units
~ c D 1v c3 * A- Alc44 Ol S 4 5tc
Less than 2 miles from the beach and you c.lli I .ilk to the
shops and restaurants at The Gateway to Anl i..,i center!

CM .! (904) 261-0791
www.atcdevel(| mllllcnt.co Im


SPANISH OAKS LAKEWOOD AMELIA SOUTH NORTH HAMPTON
Plenty of room in this nice 4/2 Lovely 3/2 ready to move in Lovely updated fully furnished Absolutely gorgeous 4/3 home
stucco home surrounded by Amelia Island home has nice 7th floor "Penthouse" unit is a with all amenities on 86acreover
nature Great room opens to Florida room and great yard greatvacation rental C ........... I - "'- lake and golf fairways
huge tiled Florida room Across Close to everything room & large pool I .. garage, culde sac loca
from the marsh tion
#49696 $239,000 #49708 $269,000 #49722 $419,900 #49644 $437,500







OCEAN PARK OCEANFRONT COTTAGE AMELIA BY THE SEA FLORA PARKE
Corner unit with sweeping Fully furnished twostory cottage Completely remodeled 2/2 Former model home has lots of
views of the ocean from the on the beach has 5 bedrooms and a oceanfront condo has SS appli upgrades 4/2 lakefront beauty
wraparound balcony Tastefully vacation rentalpermit Great rental ances, custom cabinets, granite has full irrigation, fenced yard,
furnished 3/2 villa has private with room for two families inkitchen & baths, 18in tile, new screened porch, water softener,
garage & storage rom furniture & more plantation shutters
#49595 $525,000 #49597 $950,000 #49674 $549,000 #46578 $211,000


I - I I { It-- .. --11 m l
RIVER GLEN NORTH 18TH STREET AMELIA CIRCLE
Nearly new 4/2 home on nicely Charming Amelia Island home Custom built by builder/owner
landscaped lot with sprinkler one block off Atlantic Avenue in 2007, this 3/2 home on wood
system in new family neighbor Inground pool, pool house, ed corner lot is fabulous! SS
hood close to 195 Built in 2008 concrete block construction appliances, island kitchen
and in perfect shape #48541
$192,000
#48541 $177,00 #47377 $229,000 #48542 $359,000


I S.FLETCHERAVENUE
Spectacular 3 year old ocean
view home sits on a double lot
and has every imaginable
upgrade Call for details
#48550 $1,550,000


Amelia Island
Avery Rd $45,000 lan Drive $45,000
Barrington $119,900 Opal Ave $395,000
Calhoun St. $99,500 Offshore Drive $184,900
First Ave $325,000 Pinedale Road $69,000
Blackbeards Place $275,000 10th Street $48,000
Gaines Ln. $110,000
Off-Island


Amberwood Ln $67,500
Bennett Ave
$225,500/$350,000
Brady Point Rd. $480,000
Cayman Circle $69,000
Christopher Creek $299,000
Edwards Road $59,000
Gravel Creek $89,500
Lafitte's Way $89,900
Lina Road $417,900


UNIQUE OCEANFRONT
PROPERTY
Home with adjoining "lighthouse"
on 300 ft deep lot Both havevaca
tion rental permits Private board
walk to beach
#47864 $940.000


Little Piney Island $95,000
Little Piney Island $300,000
Marc Anthony $47,800
Napeague Dr $165,000
Plum Loop $49,900/$66,000
Redbud Lane $199,000
Southern Heritage $155,000
US Highway 17 $350,000

RESERVE AT
DEER RUN
5 miles West of 195
l acre +lots
$55,000 $75,000
Lot/home packages
start at $250,000


PELICANS CONDO
Fabulous buy on this 2/2 third
floor furnished condo heated
pool, covered parking great
rental history

#46355 $392.000







LOFTON POINTE
Pride of ownership shows in this
well appointed 4/3 home Bonus
room with full bath over garage
home warranty
#48773 $249,900







FLORIDAAVENUE
Adorable furnished Amelia Island
home is lust blocks from Main
beach Perfect second or vaca
tion home
#48671 $169,000


S 854 Rooms
ROOM FOR RENT - for single. 5 min-
utes from beach. Private bath, private
entrance. $100/wk. + $200 dep. Call
10am-6pm, (904)335-2086 anytime.



855 Apartments
Furnished

AT BEACH - Effic., 1 & 2BR starting
$145/wk. + dep., utils incl. ON
ISLAND - 2-3BR MH's in park $150/
wk. up or $600/mo. + dep. 261-5034

1BR APT. - Fully furnished. A.I.,
gated, all utilities, beach access. Short
term rental. No smoking. $1050/mo.
(904)206-1071 or 321-4262


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

SPACIOUS STUDIO APT - w/ocean
view, 619 S. Fletcher. Private beach
access, freshly painted. No smoking.
$650/mo + $650 dep. (904)261-7658.

HISTORIC DISTRICT - 2BR/1BA,
approx. 1000sf, above Cafe Karibo.
$1000/mo. Utilities included. (904)
415-6533

2BR/1BA UPSTAIRS DUPLEX - on
island. Quiet marsh view. New carpet.
$650/mo. + $300 dep., 1 year lease,
w/reference. (904)583-0803


MAINLAND

96232 Dowling Dr. - Lanceford

3BR/3BA - $599,000


OU Jj GU r~ Mariann 7 A

Dahl V11
mariann@uniqueameliaisland.com * www.uniqueameliaisland.com
3955 Amelia Island Pkwy * Amelia Island, FL
S9114, 261-3900 * (800) 940-3955

AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
. , . _ j






BEST VIEW IN SYPGLASS! SPECTACULAR SUNSETS
6546 Spyglass * Offered at $1,595,000 3418 Fiddlers Bend * Offered atS475000 i
Oceanfront 3 bedroom/3 bath and over 2,400 square feet, Decorator quality on Amelia Island Plantation. Furniture
garage, large balcony Fully remodeled. included. 3 bedroom/3 bath. Many upgrades and in excellent
condition.


FINE EXECUTIVE
LIVING ON THE MARSH
98 Sea Marsh � Offered at S2,495,000 . Virtual Tour
Serene marshfront & Intracoastal views in this executive home
boasting 5,177 square feet of living space. Luxury features
abound. Gourmet kitchen, large master suite, spa like master
bath and surround sound stereo system.


DEEP WATER ON AIP
50 Marsh Creek Offered at$1550,000* Virtual Tour
Arareopportunity onAmelia Island Plantation. Privatehome
on marsh with a dock. Featured in the Home Garden Tour.
Large deck runs length of home. High ceilings and light oak
floors to let in the view!
21'


-A




Case No: 99-DEA-355396; Case No: OO-CRS-200500; Case No: 99-FBI-001716

DRUG DEALERS SEIZEDASSETS UP FOR AUCTION.
Jewelry & Fine Art SEIZED by police & federal agency auction, property from seized
& forfeited assets, abandoned safe deposit boxes, bankruptcies, and liquidation of
Rolex's, large diamonds, fine jewelry, art, and other major consignments.

"JUL I"I





4"7W LOCATION:

DAYS INN

HOTEL

FERNANDINA

BEACH,

FLORIDA
2707 Sadler Road
S1-95 to Exit 373 (Fer-
nandina Beach, A1A) 14
Miles East on A1A. Right
Son Sadler Rd. Hotel on
Left after 1.5 miles.
Or call 904-277-2300
S-- for directions.


THISWILL BEAN EVENT NOTTO BE MISSED! COMPLETE UQUIDATION OFOVER
2 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF MERCHANDISE INCLUDING....
Lithographsfrom Dali, Chagall, Picasso and others, oil paintings, diamond, emerald, sapphire and ruby rings, Rolex watches,
bracelets and necklaces including a large selection of estate pieces. Merchandise shown isfordescriptive purposes only,
inventory changes weekly.
THIS IS A PRIVATELY HELD AUCTION AND IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH A GOVERNMENT AGENCY.
FREE ADMISSION .Terms: Cash, Check, Charge. Items Subject to error or omission* 15% Buyers Premium.
For more information call 404-254-5142. License# AB2673, Auctioneer# AU 623
FA I " I E E R AI1


Find The News--Leader on the World Wide Web
S&vvvv wwwv.fbnewsleader.com
Read the news, e-mail the staff, check the
(9 classified, or subscribe to
Florida's Oldest Weekly Newspaper!




REALTOR OPEN HOUSE



PUBLIC INVITED



Saturday * June 18th * 1 till 4 pm



ON ISLAND

727 Tarpon - Green Home

3BR/3BA - $459,900


I 806 Waterfront
Waterfront Homes & Lots - Ca
(904)261-4066 for information. C.H
Lasserre, Realtor.


V4


BLACK




CYAN MAGENTA


BLACK


6B FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 2009 CLASSIFIED News-Leader


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.



* 850785 US 17Yulee - 150x300 lot with
a 1458 sq.ft. building & large paved park-
ing lot. $2,500/mo. + tax & util.
S1200 s.f.at Five Points Plaza, 816 Sadler
Rd. Between Stein Mart and At Home
Amelia. Great frontage. Long term lease.
$19.00 PSF + 3.5 CAM + Sales tax.
* 1539 S. 8th St. I room office & bath, pri-
vate ent. $300/mo. + tax.
*Approx 850 s.f. by Fastenal and Peacock
Electric in O'Neil, good exposure on
AIA. Great for show room or office
space $1350/mo + tax +utilities.
*Approx 1,800 s.f. Retail Bldg � 1839 S.
8th St Lease by Huddle House
$2,250/mo + tax or may purchase.
*2385 JAMESTOWN ROAD Approx
2400 SF Great for Retail, Office,
Industrial or light manufacturing located
at Industrial Park by airport. Roll up
doors and easy access. Rare zoning
allows many uses.$2,500/mo + tax + util
*DEER WALK - 1,250 s.f. retail/office
space. Units range from $1,750 to
$2,000 /mo includes CAM, tax, water,
sewer, garbage. First months rent FREE
with one year signed lease.
*Amelia Park Office Suites 900 s.f.+/-
Fronting 14th Street $1,685.mo includes
all other fees/costs except utilities. One
mo. FREE rent w/ signed lease.
* Five PointVillage 2250 S 8th St.OldWest
Marine space. 2,900 HSF, ample parking,
AIA exposure. Great for retail or large
office space. $12 per sf + tax.

6 Lr. 10S7


856 Apartments
Unfurnished

Need to sell your home?
Call 261-3696 and sell it fast!


CURTISS H.

LASSERRE
Real Estate, Inc.




LONG TERM
* 19 S. 14th St., 2/1, $900/mo. + util.,
security deposit $1,250.Avail.August
2009.
*4BR/2.5BAVery nice 2500 sq.ft. home
at Florence Point $1,450/mo. + Util.
*3BR/2BA Home on Amelia Island
with beautiful view of Egans Creek.
$1,850/mo. + Util. Avail Sept. I st
*3BR/2BA Home w/ pool, Dunewood
PI., close to beach and golf course
$1350/mo + util
*2BR/2BA upstairs condo, unfurn, unit
in Amelia Lakes, smoke free, lots of
amenities. $950/mo.
*514 S. 14th St. - 3BR/IBA $875/mo. +
util. security deposit $1,250. Avail.
*619 S. 14th St. 3BR/IBA $975/mo. +
util. Security deposit of $1,250.
*2801 Elizabeth St - 3/2 upstairs Apt.
Great Deck - Oceanview $1,000/mo.
+ util.
VACATION RENTAL
*AFFORDABLE WEEKLY/MONTHLY
2BR/IBA Oceanview. 487 S. Fletcher.
Call for more information

bzzzrz b~ ~ ma


856 Apartments
Unfurnished
HISTORIC DISTRICT - 1BR apt w/
screened porch. No smoking. Service
animals only. $675/mo. includes utili-
ties plus deposit. 277-6763, 583-0862
2BR/1BA DUPLEX - near American
Beach. CH&A, W/D, stove &
refrigerator, ceiling fans, mini blinds, &
tile floors. $795/mo. (404)661-2706
MODERN 2BR/2.5BA BEACH TOWN-
HOUSE - Ideally located. $900/mo.
Call (904)261-6450 to schedule an
appointment.
2BR/2.5BA 2-STORY LOFT - w/
bonus room, 2-car garage, W/D
included. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available
8/1. (904)662-2360
ISLAND STUDIO APT. - 422 Pinedale
Rd., Fernandina Beach, 800 sq ft.
$600/mo, 1 month deposit. Incl.
garbage. No Smoking. Available Aug.
1, call M-F 9am to 5pm 904-277-5606
leave message after 5pm.
OCEAN VIEW 2BR - No lease. Service
animals only. $750/mo. + security
deposit. Call (904)261-7750 after 6pm.
BREEZY OCEAN VIEW - 2BR/1.5BA,
freshly painted, ceiling fans, W/D
connection. Service animals only. 737
N. Fletcher. $850/mo. (904)261-4127
SMALL 1BR - at the beach. Quiet. No
smoking. Service animals only. Utilities
included. References, $500 deposit
required. $650/mo. (904)335-1665

857 Condos-Furnished

AMELIA WOODS - 1BR/1BA.
Beautifully furnished with vaulted
ceilings. $840/mo. Call for details
(770)789-2965.

AMELIA LANDINGS - Furnished 2BR/
2BA, water/sewer & garbage included.
Pool. Non-smoking. Service animals
only. $1050/mo. + deposit. Call (904)
759-1105.
AMELIA LAKES - 2nd floor, 2BR/2BA,
1181 sq. ft., W/D, fully furnished and
equipped in immaculate conditions.
$1300/mo. Real wood fireplace.
Screened porch. Short Term leases
available. Call Janina (904) 261-2169


.. 1925 S. 14T St., Suite 4

Amelia Island, FL

SSales (904)277-9700

Property Management
Surfside Properties, Inc. Thai Smith (904)277-0907 Larr Coleman
Broker ^ ^- Realtor'


............... .... . 5K.. . . . .... . . . . .e on I..........LL .........ML on oV
HILLIARD 3/2 great home with island, North 14th, needs TLC. an acre. Corner lot and fenced.
vaulted ceilings, eat-in kitchen and $137,500 MLS# 47266 $89,900 MLS #48333
2 car garage. Motivate seller.
$105,900 MLS #49226

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS
I ON ISLAND I COMMERCIAL
* 536-A N. Fletcher, 2BR/2BA, 2
blocks from beach. $1,050/mo.


* 2124 Ciera Ln, 4/2, eat in
kitchen, 2 car garage Avail NOW
$1,200/mo.

OFF ISLAND
* 85399 Brooke St., 3BR/2BA
mobile home. Now Available
$800/mo.


* Corner of 8th & Beech, office
space available. 1,200 sq. ft.


4k.. \. . *. w


ON ISLAND custom built
3BR+Office/2.5BA, 2,250 sq. ft.
on .62 ac. lot. Upgrades galore.
$349,900 MLS #48981


Nasa ConysLretSlcino


857 Condos-Furnished 1859 Homes-Furnished I


FOR RENT - Fernandina. Furnished
2BR/2BA condo. Close to beach, tennis
court, pool. Svc animals only. Utils incl.
$600/wk., $1100/mo. (904)310-6493
FERNANDINA SHORES - 2/2 flat,
next to tennis courts/pool. Long term.
$900. Nick Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)
277-0006.
TOWNHOUSE - Furnished 2BR/2.5BA,
North Pointe. Pool, beach. Can be
unfurnished. Hm: (912)921-8976, Cell:
(912)414-2556


858 Condos-Unfurnishedl


3BR/2BA - plus bonus room, garage.
Fully furnished. In Lofton Pointe.
$1300/mo. From information call Anna
(904)403-1982.
3BR/2.5BA Fully Furnished Home -
just 1 mile from beach or historic
downtown. 1 mo. dep. req'd. $1350/
mo. Includes basic cable, water, sewer,

860 Homes-Unfurnished

NORTH HAMPTON UNFURNISHED
HOME - 3BR/2BA, large backyard.
$1300/mo. One month free with year
lease. Call (912)270-3239.


3BR/2 FULL BATHS - New tile, rec-
2BR/2BA TOWNHOME - 2-car ently upgraded, Delorean St. $1500/
garage. $895/mo. Call (904)415-8256. mo. Negotiable. (423)716-2148


3 STORY - new, 2800 sq ft Cape
Sound Amelia townhome - 3 Bdrs + 2
study areas, sitting area in MBR, 3.5
bath with 2 car attached garage,
patios, inside home elevator. Upgrades
galore with wood floors in main area,
all appliances, pool & gym. Rent on a
lease; will consider a lease purchase.
No pets, non-smoking please. $1,500
monthly - first, last and deposit upfront
904 962-7477 or 904-827-9900
AMELIA LAKES CONDOS NOW
LEASING - Luxury 1 and 2 bedroom
homes. Starting at $799/mo. Private
and gated. Fitness center, pool and
many more amenities. Call today for
showing, (904)415-6969.
203A AMELIA WOODS - 1BR
completely renovated. Includes washer
& dryer. Very close to pool & beach.
$650/mo. (904)753-6500 (Marcy)

2BR/1.5BA CONDO - 1.5 blocks from
beach. Completely renovated!
Amenities incl. $900/mo + sec dep.
Call 912-269-3960.
FOR RENT - 1BR/1BA condo at Amelia
Lakes with porch. Nice Amenities.
$750/mo. Call Tim (386) 846-2951.


AMERICAN BEACH - 5475 Ocean
Blvd., 3BR/2BA, 1100sf, $775mo. Don
Brown Realty at 225-5510 or 571-
7177.
YULEE - Nice 3/2 brick home on 1+
acres. 96686 Chester Rd. near Home
Depot & Target. Home has large den.
Updated kitchen & baths. $1,150/mo.+
dep. 904-491-6008 or 904-910-5913
$900/MO. - 3BR/2BA, large family
room, fenced backyard. Very nice.
$900 deposit. (904)277-8698 or 753-
8773
LEASE/OPT/BUY - 3BR/2BA home in
Heron Isles, 96017 Tidal Bay Ct. Lake
view. CH&A. FREE CABLE. $995/mo.
(916)300-3039


II I


2BR/1BA HOUSE - on the Island 60X125 STORAGE YARD - Zoned
$700/mo. plus deposit. Service animals industrial. Only $550/mo. (904)321-
only. No smoking. Call (904)759-1105. 2222


3BR/2BA - with in ground pool, in
Hickory Village. $1275/mo. Call (904)
553-7258.
YULEE 1BR/1BA GUEST HOME - on
lake. CH&A, W/D hookups, lawn care.
No smoking. $700/mo. + $700 deposit.
(904)225-5952 or (904)945-3405


925 TARPON AVE. - North Pointe FREE RENT - Small cottage down-
2BR/2.5BA townhouse. $895. Nick town. $595. 2/1, CH&A, wood floors,
Deonas Realty, Inc. (904)277-0006 laundry rm, nice area. Drive by and
look in, 506 Dade St. (904)607-3121


AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA split floor
plan. Fireplace, screened porch. Water
& W/D included. $950/mo. (904)206-
2313
3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE - 1700 sf.
3 yrs old. Upgrades galore. Fireplace, 1
car gar. Close to beach. $1200/mo.
negotiable. (904)294-1587.

FERNANDINA SHORES - 2BR, pool,
tennis, 2 blocks to beach, W/D, lower
unit. Service animals only. $875/mo.
Available now. Call (847)867-3163.
2BR/2BA COLONY UNIT - 2-car gar.,
newly remodeled, pool & tennis court.
No smoking. $1000/mo. + dep. & utils.
(904)548-0774, (904)556-5457.

AMELIA LAKES - 2BR/2BA, 1200sf,
W/D. Immaculate. Lake view, 1st floor.
$875/mo. Call Don Brown Realty
(904)225-5510 or 571-7177.


AMELIA ISLAND PLANTATION
HOME - for rent. 4BR/3BA, great
location. $1500/mo. + deposit. Call
(904) 545-3017.


* A . A .


901 Automobiles

Acura Integra - '95 $500. Honda
Civic '97 $400. Toyota Camry '98 $850.
Ford Taurus '00 $900. Police Impounds.
For listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9275. ANF

1994 CHEVROLET STEPSIDE P/U -
350 V8, 154K mi., all power, runs
great, no oil leaks, clean interior, black.
Has A/C leak. $2900. 277-2075


3BR/2BA HOME - in town, new. For ESTATE SALE - Gator golf cart,
rent with sales option and rent credit. $2000. 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan
(904)753-0025 SE, full loaded, $3500. Excellent
condition. (904)225-2965


861 Vacation Rentals

VACATION CHALET - in N. Carolina
Mtns. River overlook, cozy, well
furnished, majestic views. Peaceful.
$495/wk. or $95/day. (904)757-5416
SUMMER BEACH VILLAGE - Furnish-
ed house. 3BR/2BA, 2-car gar, gated
comm/pool, 5 min/beach. Rent by day,
wk, mth, yr. 261-6204, 206-0035
OCEANVIEW 3BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA.
Call (904)261-4066, C.H. Lasserre,
Realtor, for special rates.


'96 CHRYSLER CONCORD LXI - 1
owner. New brakes, valves, radiator,
hoses, gaskets, 2 tires, battery, tune
up. Auto., A/C. $2,900. 717-487-6723

903 Vans

1995 FORD VAN - Runs good. In line
6 cylinder. $1200. (904)321-1260
SALE - '95 Plym Van $1800, '94 Dodg
V6 PU $700, '01 Tracker $2500. '91
Dodg PU $3000, nu eng/paint. All run-
ning. Cash/OBO/pymts. 904-261-5034







Club
Apartments
BestAddress inFernandinaBeach

1, 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms
/ Pool
V Fitness Center
V Business Center
/ Gated Community

FREE RENT
Call for Details (


SVisit us at www.galphinre.com

n Iin (904) 277-6597 Business

______ (800) 699-6597 Toll Free

: E..AL, EST"TE SFrRVICFS, INC. (904) 277-4081 Fax
Over 24 Years As Amelia Island's #1 Property Management Company 1880 S. 14th St., Suite 103 Amelia Island, FL 32034


I .. .
A1A In Yulee - High visibility small 5472 First Coast Hwy. - Various office 86867 Cartesian Pointe - 4BR/2.5BA
office suites. Located near A1A and suites to choose from. Located in the home located in Cartesian Pointe on
Highway 17. Wireless internet and resort district and close to AIP. Visit cornerlot. Huge fenced back yard. 2500
security system provided. From ParkPlaceofAmelia.com for details and Sq. Ft. Off Island. $1,475/mo
S '1111 r.. '.1 " ' i,,. pricing.

Nassau County's Premier Property Management Specialists


5209 Village Way - 3BR/2BA located in Ocean Village. Furnished or
unfurnished. Community Pool with beach access and Summer
Beach membership available for small fee. Lawn care. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,950/mo

1913 Perimeter Park - 3BR/2.5BAwith formal living and dining.
Master with garden tub & granite counter tops. Pets allowed. On
Island. $1,995/mo

95118 Sandpiper- 2BR/2.5BA oceanfront condo with deck over
looking ocean. Furnished or unfurnished. Utilities included. Pets
allowed. On Island. $1,895/mo

1886 Cape Sound - 3BS/3.5BA condo fully furnished with
community pool and work out room. Granite counter tops. Stainless
steel appliances. Utilities included. No pets. On Island. $1,850/mo

95208 Woodberry- 4BR/3.5BA Summer Beach home with tile floor
throughout and large bonus room. Screened inlanai, 2 car garage
and community pool. Lawn care and washer/dryer. On Island.
$1,750/mo

2851 Ferdinand - Brand new 3BR/2BA home in Isle De Mai with
screened in lanai. Overlooking pond. Community Pool. Lawn care.
No pets. On Island. $1,650/mo

87067 Kipling- 4 BR/2.5 BAlocated in Bells River Estates. Screened
pool. 2818 sq ft. 3 car garage. Upgraded kitchen with granite. large
guest rooms with den/play area. Pets allowed. Includes pool care.
Off Island. $1,595/mo

95015 Sea Walk - Beautiful 3BR/2BA home located in Sea Walk off
Scott Road. Split floor plan with large oversized backyard and short
walkto beach. Lawn care. Pets allowed. On Island. $1,550/mo

86867 Cartesian Pointe- 4BR/2.5BA home located in Cartesian
Pointe on comer lot. Huge fenced back yard. 2500 Sq. Ft.. Off Island.
$1,475/mo

95141 Amalfi - 3BRv2.5BA town home located in the Villas of
Summer Beach with community pool. Short walk to beach. Lawn
care and washer/dryer. Screened lanai. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,450/mo


86059 Remsenburg- 3BR/2BA North Hampton 1,500 sq. ft. home.
Huge backyard. Wireless access. Pets allowed. Half of one month
rent with fulllease. Off Island. $1,300/mo

95152 Elderberry - 3BR/2.5BA town home located in the Preserve
with community pool. Short walk to beach. lawn care and
washer/dryer. Summer Beach membership available for small fee.
Pets allowed. On Island. $1,300/mo

1994 Amelia Green - Brand new 2BR/2.5BA townhome with loft
and one car garage. Close to shopping and beach. Pets allowed.
On Island. $1,200/mo

1969 Amelia Green - 2BRV2.5BA townhome with tile floors
throughout main living. Granite countertops, stainless steel
appliances. Close to shopping and beach. Lawn care. On Island.
$1,200/mo

96679 Arrigo - 3BR/2BA home located in Beachway. 1600 sq ft,
split floor plan, covered lanai. Off Island. $1,150/mo

823 N. Fletcher - 2BR/1BA furnished upstairs unit. Ocean view
with sunroom. Water/sewer included. Pets allowed. On Island.
$1,100/mo

86184 Augustus - 3BR/2BA house located in Cartesian Pointe with
fenced backyard. 1500 sq ft; screened porch. 2 car garage. Off
Island. $1,100/mo

2362 Boxwood - 1BR/1BA furnished condo with community pool
located inAmelia Island Plantation. Across street from beach. All
utilities plus cable & internet included. $1,100/mo

5437 Leonard - 2BR/2BA home located in American Beach. Great
outdoor area for cookouts and family gatherings. Oversized yard.
Pets allowed. On Island. $950/mo

314 S. 14th - 2BR/1.5BA home with oversized fenced in back yard
and deck Pets allowed. Half month free with 12/mo lease. On
Island. /2 month off with 12 month lease $850/mo

765 Kenneth Court - 2BR/2BA fenced with oversized back yard.
Pets allowed. On Island. $750/mo


96816 Arrigo Blvd. - 3BR/2BA home located in Beachway with
oversized fenced back yard. Many upgrades with lawn care
included. Pets allowed. Off Island. $1,325/mo

Owners: We Can Help You Get The Most From Your Investment Property
Give Us A Call Today!


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - ON ISLAND
* 2403 Los Robles 3BR/2.5BA Bring your golf clubs and walk the golf
course Single family traditional home with 2 car garage. Living room and
dining room at front of house. Fireplace in family room which exits to
large screened porch. Master bedroom has entry to screened porch for
early morning coffee and bird watching in a natural setting. Conveniently
located to shopping, schools and dining just off Amelia Island Parkway.
$1195.
* 95069 Reserve Court - 4BR/2BA Beautiful home with covered patio
and well maintained lawn. Home has separate dining and fireplace in liv
ing room. $1595
* 4701 Rigging Drive (Golf Side South) - 3BR/2BA Located in presti
gious gated community where amenities include a community swimming
pool and easy access the beach, Ritz Carlton and Golf Club of Amelia
just across the street. $1800
* 2614 McGregor (Pirates Cove)- 3BR/2BA Home Walking distance to
the ocean, hard wood floors, fenced rear yard and garage $1100
* 2806 Ocean Sound Drive 3BR/2BA- Nice home located in Ocean
Sound subdivision. Fireplace in family room, screened in back patio and
2 Car garage. $1450
* 1933 Sycamore Lane 3BR/2BA This home is charming country living
at its best. Located in Shady Point Plantation on three acres of land with
beautiful trees all around. Sit back and relax warm evenings in the flori
da room or cozy up by the fireplace on the cold winter nights. Either way
this one is a charmer $1500
* 1913 Perimeter Park Rd. - 3BR/2.5BA- 2795 sq. ft., granite counter
tops, maple cabinets, stainless steel appliances, washer/dryer included,
centrally located in Amelia Park. $1995

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - OFF ISLAND

* 95140 Hither Hills Way 3BR/2BA Great home on the #2 Green in
the North Hampton Golf Community with club house/aquatic center,
basketball/tennis court, outpost on Lofton Creek with canoe/kayak
lunch and pavilion. Washer/dryer, Cable television, High Speed
Internet, Monitored Security System included. $1400
* 86004 Cathedral Lane 3BR/2BA Beautiful fenced lot, satellite dish,
tool house. Ten minutes from Amelia Island and convenient to
Jacksonville International Airport. $1150


$799,000 - Sandpiper Loop
4BR/4BA, 2,693 s.f.Townhome
Nip Galphin - 277-6597

t(!!!!ItuIn ***"r:rt'r1!i -'





$725,000 - Fernandina Cay- MLS# 43544
3BR/3BA - Great Ocean View
Nip Galphin - 277-6597


CONDO/TOWNHOME/APARTMENTS
* 2633 Forest Ridge- 2BR/1.5BA Community features include swimming
pool, tennis court, and park. $850
* 988 Chad Street - 3BR/2BA conveniently located close to schools and
shopping. $1050
* 3165 Unit 12 South Fletcher - 3BR/2.5 Condo with community pool
at rear of condo. $1100
* 4750 Westwind Court (Colony)- 2BR/2BA with fireplace Great south
end location. Large 2 car garage This unit is in excellent condition.
Community Pool and tennis courts. Minutes from the ocean, golf and
shopping. Just 30 minutes from Jacksonville taking a leisurely drive on
AIA through State Parks along the ocean and intracoastal waterway.
$925
* 2012A West Natures Lane-3BR/2.5BA-Lovely townhome centrally
located on the island. Minutes to shopping, schools and the beach.$1100
* 95046 Springtide Lane - 3BR/4BA. This is beautiful town home locat
ed in a gated community off A1A off of the Intercoastal waterway Rent
includes water, garbage, sewer and lawn service $2475
* 95024 Sandpiper Loop - 3BR/3.5BA Wonderful ocean views as well as
golf course views. Covered patios front and rear. Beautiful brick paver
walkways. Private elevator. $1895
* 2850 South Fletcher - 3BR/1BA beautiful ocean views upstairs. $1100
Downstairs oceanfront 2 BR/1 BA w/bonus room, fenced front and rear
yard. $1395
* 2443B First Ave. - 3BR/2BA townhome with fireplace in family room.
Home is only one block from the ocean. $900
* 2778 Forest Ridge - 2BR/1BA Located only 2 blocks from the beach.
Home has new carpet' Community features include swimming pool, ten
nis court, play ground and Bar-B-Q area. $750
* 2999-B South Fletcher 3BR/3.5BA- Watch the dolphins feed from your
rooftop deck. Open floor plan has all the living on the second floor with
2 Car Garage GREAT ocean views. First floor has two bedrooms and 2
baths. Washer/dryer hookups. Downstairs bathroom has sliders to
screened porch overlooking Egan's Creek marsh. Walk to the beach.
$1695

FURNISHED - ON ISLAND
* 2483 First Ave Unit A- 2BR/2BA Duplex fully furnished.1 block from
the beach. $750


$340,000 - Reserve Court
4BR/2BA in Reserve at Old Bluff
Niu Galuhin - 277-6597


$595,000 - S. Fletcher, 50' Beach Lot - MLS# 45255
Buy now, Build later, use of existing home
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$425,000 - S. Fletcher Lot 50'x100'
Ready to build - Plans Available 2700 s.f.
Brad Goble - 261-6166


$142,000 - The Palms - MLS# 45243
2BR/2BA - Many Upgrades
Brad Goble - 261-6166


TF"






375,000 MLS#49508 $510,000 - Starboard Landing- MLS# 43365 $150,000 -1311 Broome- MLS# 47106
2600 cross from e Beiye 4BR/3BA - 2578sf - In Seaside Subdivision 1375 s.f. Open Floor Plan
Call me or your agent quickly!
Brad Goble - 904-261-6166 Nip Galphin - 277-6597 Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Lanceford Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #45603 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Barrington Lot * $122,000 Package $321,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* Beech Street * Commercial Lot $159,000 #46502 * Brad Goble - 261-6166
* 1735 Clinch Dr. 3.2 acres $599,000 #49568 * Nip Galphin - 277-6597

SALES * RENTALS * PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


MOVE-IN SPECIAL


2 Months Rent Free LimitedTime

* W/D Connections
SLarge Closets
* Pirvate Pations
, * Sparkling Pool
I PO * Tennis Courts
1 Exercise Room
S* Close to Shopping
* Twenty Minutes to
Sacksonville & Fernandina
City Apartments with Country Charm


37149 Cody Circle
(904) 845-2922

Eastwoo aks Hilliard, Florida
APARTMENTS Mon.-Fri 8:30-5:30
Sat./Sun by Appt.


+


863 Office
Office Space - includes utilities &
janitor. Small $125, medium $225,
large $350, & office suites avail.
Jasmine Office Center. Call Mack
(904)583-0058.
LARGE OFFICE - approximately 600sf
above the Palace Saloon. $900
monthly, including utilities. Call George
(904)557-5644.
AMELIA CONCOURSE AREA - 2000
sq. ft. available. Call 753-2018 for
more information.
OFFICE OR RETAIL SPACE - for rent,
14 North 4th St. 400sf with bathroom.
Just renovated. Behind Post Office.
$750/mo. (904)415-1053
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE - Down-
town & 14th Street. 150sf to 1500sf.
Galphin R/E Svc. (904)277-6597
DOWNTOWN "CHANDLERY BUILD-
ING" - (Centre & 2nd). Single office to
3500sf. Call Manager, (770)444-9800.


864 Commercial/Retail
2000SF BUILDING FOR LEASE -
1893 S. 8th St., Fernandina Beach.
$1500/mo. (904)349-2558
DEERWALK - Prime high visibility
location on AIA in O'Neal. 1250sf
units. Curtiss Lasserre Real Estate
(904)261-4066.

865 Warehouse


Sale Saes ale Saes ale