<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00377
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Publication Date: 3/31/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
sobekcm - UF00028316_00377
System ID: UF00028316:00377
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Full Text





The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888




H HERALD
L- ib- COMBINED WITH THE BREEZE
-. ac- .; -zistor.
AM _.. --4-

-- ^ ",.,,,r,,,I,. _--


TALK LIKE AN
EGYPTIAN...
First Christian
Academy studies
Egypt from 'way
back. 1-B


I VOLUME 122


I


NUMBER 13


3 SECTIONS THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011


_ I I I


75 PER COPY


INSIDE 1


SPECIAL
OLYMPICS
ATHLETES
GET SEND-OFF
Cake, gifts and
best wishes for local
competitors. 2-A



BOWDEN SPEAKS
AT BOYS & GIRLS
CLUB-
Steak & Burger
Dinner raises funds.
8-A



BCC ROLL CALL
MARCH 22
Main agenda and
measures taken.
2-C



WALTON MIDDLE
WINS COUNTY
TITLE
Second in a row
for softball champs.
12-B



WHS BEATS
PAXTON 8-2
Bobcats' first loss
of season. 10-B


ARTS &
ENTERTAINMENT
5-C
CLASSIFIED 7-C
OUTDOORS 2-C
ARRESTS 10-A

www.defuniakherald.com





0 94922 73172 2


DFS City


Council has


eyes on the sky:


AWOS and air pollutants


By ASHLEYAMASON
The DeFuniak Springs
City Council, Wayne Gra-
ham absent, unanimously
approved a fee waiver for
the Chautauqua Hall of
Brotherhood for the mili-
tary council spouses tour.
Mayor Pro-Tempore James
Huffman said, "This is a
wonderful thing...it's the
best advertising we can pos-
sibly get." Council members
echoed their support for all
the military council's activi-
ties.
Planning Director Greg
Scoville sought direction
on whether to prepare an
amendment to add cremato-
riums as a use exception al-
lowed upon special approval
at Evans Funeral Home lo-
cated on Walton Road. Ac-
cording to Scoville's memo,
"The C-1 restricted com-
mercial district in which the
funeral home is located does
not allow the crematorium
use combined with a funeral
home...One item of concern
has been that the exhaust
systems of cremation ovens
may contribute to air pol-
lution." Crematories' major
emissions include nitrogen
oxides, carbon monoxide,


Bob Campbell
seeks City
Council Seat 2
SHello, my name is Bob
Campbell. I was born here
in DeFuniak Springs in
1950. I've continue to reside
here 58 of the past 60 years.
I'm married to my wonder-
ful wife Janet, since 1971,
with whom we have three
children and one grand-
daughter so far. My family
heritage goes back to the
1800s settling in this com-
munity. My grandfather
Olin Campbell Sr. held the
position of city mayor when
I was a young boy about 50
years ago. He was the "mean
ole mayor" that stopped us
from riding horses down in
the lakeyard. LOL
I bring to this race a very
diversified background in
the workplace. From an


sulfur dioxide and other pol-
lutants.
Joel Glenn of Clary-Glenn
Funeral Home addressed the
Council on the basis that his
request to install a crema-
torium a few years ago was
denied due to possible air
pollution to the surrounding
residential district. Glenn
reminded the Council that
Evans Funeral Home sits
across from Walton High
School, the Wee Care Park,
and near Maude Saunders
Elementary School and
asked that the same con-
sideration given to Clary-
Glenn's request be given to
Evans Funeral Home. "I un-
derstand your consideration,
but our industry has done a
lot of things to protect [sur-
rounding residents] from
pollution," he said. Glenn
added crematorium controls
regulate exhaust systems to
emit less than .015 percent
air pollution, and should an
amendment be provided for
Evans, Clary-Glenn would
return with a crematorium
as use exception request.
Former planning board
member and. Seat 2 candi-
See COUNCIL 3-A


BOB CAMPBELL


electrician's helper, to a sur-
vey party chief, to a sawmill
superintendent, to a certi-
fied welder, to full time min-
istry for five years, to start-
ing a telecommunications

See CAMPBELL 11-A


PAXTON MAYOR HAYWARD THOMAS and Walton County Sheriff Michael Adkinson
presided over the dedication ceremony and invited those in attendance to an open house
tour of the new facility. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


WCSO's Paxton Substation to

service north Walton community


By REID TUCKER
After only a few short
months, the Walton County
Sheriffs Office's (WCSO)
new Paxton Substation is
Open for business.
Walton County Sheriff
Michael Adkinson presided
over a dedication ceremony
announcing the completion
of the new substation on
Tuesday, March 29. Repre-
sentatives of local govern-
mental agencies and the
community at large were
invited to attend anl open


Jimmy Macon
running for
City Marshal
Campaign announcement
submitted by Jimmy Macon
I, Jimmy Macon, can-
didate for City Marshal,
have been a resident of De-
Funiak Springs for the past
31 years. After retiring from
the Army in May 1996, I
began working for the Wal-
ton County Sheriffs Office
as a deputy sheriff for nine
years. Currently and for the
past six years, I have been
employed for the Walton
County School District as
the truant officer and safe
schools liaison and for the
Niceville Police Department
as a patrolman and gang in-
vestigator. I hold a Bachelor
of Arts Degree in Criminal
Justice.


house tour of the new multi-
use facility immediately
following brief opening re-
marks.
Adkinson said part of the
substation's mission was to
provide a link back to the
agency's, information main-
frame, enabling the build-
ing to be used as a field com-
mand center, if necessary.
However, the main purpose
of the substation was to give
the sheriffs office a more
visible presence in Paxton
and the larger north Walton


JIMMY MACON


As your City Marshal, I
will be committed to making
our community a much bet-
ter place to live, work and
play for everyone. This will
include making daily physi-
cal checks on the elderly,
See MACON 11-A


community.
"It's an anchor to the com-
munity," he said. "It conveys
a sense that [the WCSO] is
a local establishment and
that we provide these ser-
vices to the community. The
idea is to push the services
out to the citizens, not make
the citizens come to the ser-
vices. We very much want to
convey that sense of commu-
nity-oriented policing."
The 1,500 ,square-foot

See SUBSTATION 13-A


State to


Freeport:


start work


on project

By BEN GRAFTON
A short meeting of the
Freeport City Council on
March 24 opened with the
presentation of a proclama-
tion by Mayor Mickey Marse
that April 8 and 9 were des-
ignated as Relay for Life
days. On those two days the
Cancer Society's Relay for
Life will hold a fund-raiser
at Freeport's Sports Com-
plex.
Parks Director Shane

See FREEPORT 9-A


Ron Kelley
announces
candidacy
Campaign announcement
submitted by Ron Kelley
Long-time radio broad-
caster and newspaper editor
Ron Kelley has announced
his candidacy for DeFuniak
Springs City Council Seat
3, currently held by James
Coffield, who is not seeking
re-election.
Kelley is running on a
platform of economic de-
velopment and revitaliza-
tion. "As goes the business
community, so goes the
town," said Kelley, "and the
business community is suf-
fering. Over a period of sev-
eral years, the City Council
has inadvertently burdened
local businesses with strin-
gent ordinances, impact
fees and other requirements
that are excessive and un-


RONKELLEY


necessary in a town of only
6,000 people. This needs to
change."
Kelley, who has owned
and operated businesses and
worked in retail sales, said
anyone who has not worked
See KELLEY 11-A


Huffman
qualifies for
Council Seat 2
Campaign announcement
submitted by
James A. Huffman
James Huffman has
qualified for re-election .to
the DeFuniak Springs City
Council, Seat 2. He has
been a member of this com-
munity, which he has long
called home, for almost 50
years. Born in Courtland,
Alabama, he moved here, at-
tended and graduated from
Tivoli High School. Huff-
man then went on to Florida
A&M University earning
a Masters Degree in Guid-
ance and Counseling with
certification in Educational
Leadership.
All of his work experi-
ence has been in public ser-
vice. He worked 22 years


JAMES A. HUFFMAN


at Walton High School as a
classroom teacher, guidance
counselor and assistant
principal where he retired
for medical reasons. For the
last eight years he has con-
tinued to serve this commu-

See HUFFMAN 11-A


Kermit Wright
seeks City
Council Seat 2
Campaign announcement
submitted by Kermit Wright
Greetings, I am Kermit
Wright, candidate for De-
Funiak Springs City Coun-
cil seat 2. Please mark your
calendars for Tuesday April
12, 2011 and vote. Natu-
rally, my prayer is that you
and your family will choose
to support my effort.
I am a native of De-
Funiak Springs; graduated
from Walton High School;
son of Lyman and Margaret
Wright; married to Brenda
Anderson Wright, daughter
of John Homer and Dadie
Anderson; have three chil-
dren and five grandchil-
dren.
I served four years in the
U.S. Air Force (Red Horse).
I worked a total of 32 1/2


KERMIT WRIGHT


years for the Postal Service,
serving as Postmaster of
Sneads, Fla., Postmaster of
Freeport, Fla., Postmaster
of Chipley, Fla., and finally
retiring as Postmaster of
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. I
See WRIGHT 10-A


I


I .







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011
sip-LU--HH


KAREN BUTTS (1), Patty Douglass, Greg Floyd and Bruce Butts pose for a photo during
their recent send-off party. The Butts presented Douglass and Floyd with Gideon Bibles for
their upcoming trips to California and Greece.



Special Olympians


get send-off party


By JEFFREY POWELL
On March 27, local Spe-
cial Olympians Patty Doug-
lass and Greg Floyd will
embark upon a trip of a
lifetime. First the duo will
be going to California to
compete on a national level
and to prepare for the inter-


national games to be held in
Athens, Greece, later in the
year.
Recently DeFuniak
Springs residents, and Spe-
cial Olympic supporters,
Karen and Bruce Butts held
a going away party for the
olympians and their friends


from Resources for Human
Development.
The send-off celebration
included cake and drinks
for everyone. The Butts also
presented the athletes with
.Bibles for their trip.
Douglass will participate
in several long-distance
running events and Floyd
will be participating in bocci
ball.
"We held this party to
honor Patty and Greg for
their past and future ac-
complishments," said Karen
Butts. "We are very proud
they are representing our
area."


RESOURCES FOR HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CLIENTS gather for a Special Olym-
pics send off party at the home of Karen and Bruce Butts.
I I


Sm As your Cil' Marshal,
I pledge to continue
improving public safety
with well-trained officers,
professional standards and
procedures, and the highest level
of sen'ice and dedication."


On Api il 2. Please ",'v L


Mark Weeks


Poliit'.l.31 J. rli-Z Mtl F. .1 l.:.r a no gppr.- J I.=1
M 'rl. ,,eei -, r..',npr n iar." ,; .n] c,3' ll rc.ai


PATTY DOUGLASS (1) and Greg Floyd proudly pose
with their cake prior to the party.


County animal

shelter to vie for

prize money


The community has the
opportunity to support the
Walton County Animal
Shelter in a competition
that could bring substantial
funding to the shelter in the
form of prize money. The
shelter is among more than
100 such organizations that
have applied to compete
in the ASPCA 100K Chal-
lenge.
Bill Bard, president of
the Friends of the Walton
County Animal Shelter, an-
nounced the county animal
shelter's entry into the con-
test at the March 22 Walton
County Board of County
Commissioners (BCC) meet-
ing.
The animal shelter has
been open for approximately
a year and recently report-
ed great strides in animal
adoptions.
Bard asked for the sup-
port of the commissioners
and that of the community
with the contest, including
with getting the word out to
friends and acquaintances.


- ~'1
>1


It


He noted that last year Tal-
lahassee's animal shelter
won $25,000 in the compe-
tition. Prizes range from
$1,000 to a $100,000 grand
prize, Bard said.
The grand prize honors
the shelter with the largest
increase in animals' lives
saved.
Competition will be
among the 50 shelters get-
ting the most on-line votes
in a qualifying "heat." Vot-
ing in the heat begins on
April 4 and concludes on
April 15. It is possible to en-
ter a vote once a day.
Community members
are encouraged to support
the Walton County Animal
Shelter by going to the Web
site www.VoteToSaveLives.
org and casting their vote
for the shelter.
Additional information
is available at the follow-
ing email contacts: mar-
lois@co.walton.fl.us or
Bill@FriendsOfTheWalton-
CountyAnimalShelter.org


LTCO M E TAXP R EPARATION


-: .


85083217 9-0 62 8


COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

AMVETS Post 178 is host-
ing a poker run for raising
funds for our DeFuniak
Springs "Special Olympics."
If anyone would like to par-
ticipate registration is at
10:30 a.m. at the AMVETS
Post 178, April 2. Costs are:
riders-$5 passengers-$2.50.
Come out and help our
"Special Olympics." The
Ladies Auxiliary will host
a chicken and meatloaf din-
ner with sides and a dessert
for $6. They will also be sell-
ing some cakes and sweets.
Come out and eat and sup-
port the cause.


PAGE 2-A


A New Voice For The Citizens Of DeFuniak Springs

* New Ideas to Support Growth in the
Business Community
* Proven Experience in : "
Public Administration
* A Vision for the Future of
DeFuniak Springs

On April 12th, Please Vote for and Elect


JIM HARMAN

DeFuniak Springs City Council Seat 3
PAID POLITICALADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY JIM HARMAN, CANDIDATE FOR CITY COUNCIL SEAT 3


Chautauqua Rehabilitation

Outpatient Services:


Has your doctor ordered....

Physical, Occupational or Speech Therapy?




Mike .o~~ Let Our


Qualified
STherapists

Help You Return
SToDoing What
You Love



We Accept:
BCBS of Florida
Medicare
Mike Richards "After2 shoulder Workman's Comp Deb Goodwin,
surgeries, Ican nowfish again Tri-Care Physical Therapist 22years
surgeriet Aetna
without pain, thanks to United Health Care Orthopedic Specialist
Chautauqua Rehab." And Many More

785 South 2nd Street DeFuniak Springs, FL (850) 892-1089
I I I I li


Jan Davidson
21 Years Experience

OFFICE LOCATED AT
6455 County Hwy. 0605
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433

You can drop off paperwork or
sit while it is prepared whichever
is more convenient for you


-;-- ,.,, ;...


m








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


COUNCIL FROM PAGE 1-A


date Kermit Wright recalled
an incident while director
of the Association for Re-
tarded Citizens in which a
black cloud surrounded the
entire area from the Davis-
Watkins crematorium on
U.S. 83. "Crematoriums are
fine...but they're kind of
like nuclear reactors, when
everything works, it's great,
but one snafu and it's bad,"
he said.
"I don't see where we
shouldn't pursue an amend-
ment," Huffman said. The
Council authorized Scoville
to move forward subject to
additional study and return
with a draft amendment.
Likewise, Scoville will
move forward with an
amendment to section 17.09
of the code regarding store-
front signs. The amendment
will clarify all storefronts
have a 64-square feet base
for signs.
Regarding "consterna-
tion" from the county and
team sponsors at the Little
League field and Harbeson
Field, Scoville sought the
Council's wishes on permit-
ting business/sports team
sponsors to advertise with
signs or banners along the
fence line or scoreboard.
Councilman Don Harrison
stated, "I'm opposed to ad-
vertising. It can get out of
hand...kids are out there
to play, they don't need to
be bombarded .with adver-
tisements." Councilman
James Coffield mentioned
the disadvantage to the el-
derly or disabled,, "The ban-
ners [along the fence] would
block people's view] who
sit in their cars and watch
games." Huffman coun-
tered, "...It's getting more
expensive to outfit these
kids," and sponsors may
not be as forthcoming with
funds if they don't receive
advertisement in return.
The Council reached a
consensus to permit signs
identifying only the busi-
ness name of a sponsor dur-
ing season.


A code amendment will
be brought forth clarifying
the timing for removal and
definition of a real estate
sign, particularly in mul-
tiple tenant buildings where
all units are occupied. The
amendment will dictate
regulations for a permanent
sign on such premises, stat-
ing, "For leasing and man-
agement information, please
contact [number]."
The city approved the ad-
vertisement of the abandon-
ment of N. 18th Street The
matter will be considered at
the April 11 meeting. The

I lU-. P


abandonment of N. 18th
Street to Vista Properties
would be contingent upon
the following conditions:
"the recording of an access
easement across the 24-feet
wide paved drive in perpe-
tuity; the 24-feet wide paved
access to be constructed and
completed within 24 months
of the abandonment or the
right of way would revert
back to the city."
Timothy Crenshaw,
whose mother uses N. 18th
Street to access her resi-
dence spoke against aban-
donment. "I am very much
opposed to giving away city
property," he said. "The land
developer will benefit, not
the city or city residents."


John Johnson of Land
Engineering Services spoke
on behalf of Vista Proper-
ties, stating, "The 24-month
thing might be a problem,
,but we're not sure yet."
Assistant City Manager
Bill Holloway's request to
purchase an $11,950 obser-
vation camera system from
I Fix Computers for Pat
Covell Park in light of re-
cent vandalism resulted in
a special meeting. Because
the system would be covered
by grant funds for the park,
purchase and final paper-
work must be completed by
April 1. As the system costs
more than the $9,999 pur-
chase order limit, the city is
required to get three docu-


COUNCILMEN JAMES COFFIELD (left), Don Harrison and Mayor Harold Carpenter'
discuss the pros and cons of advertising banners at the Little League field and Harbeson
Field.


. Experienced in projecting and maintaining budgets

. Self employed for over 20 years with hands on experience j

SPut my Experience and Knowledge to work for you, the
citizens of DeFuniak Springs





Political advertisement paid for and approved by Billy Deisler, nonpartisan candidate, for city council seat 1


mented quotes. City Man-
ager Kim Kirby resolved to
bring two more quotes to the
Council in a special meeting
before April 1.
The second reading of
the referendum regarding
property tax exemptions oc-
curred. The exemption al-
lows any business within
city limits ad valorem ex-
emption up to 100 percent
of the assessed value of all
improvement to the existing
property, and/or personal
property of a new business
for up to 10 years. This is
according to Florida statute
196.1995 and will be on the
April 12 ballot.
Election managers Kir-
by, Holloway, Sara Bow-
ers, and Kelly Schultz were
approved, as was the can-
vassing board, comprised
of Councilmen Wayne Gra-
ham and Henry Ennis, and
Mayor Harold Carpenter.
The amendment to the
service area of the natural
gas franchise agreement
to exclude portions of ar-
eas previously identified
within Rock Hill Road and


PAGE 3-A
north approximately to In-
dian Creek Road which are
served by the Okaloosa gas
district was approved, as
well as the request not to
decrease the maximum dai-
ly transportation quantity
(in the pipeline) of natural
gas the city could receive in
a one-day period.
Approval was granted for
a supplemental task autho-
rizing URS to "prepare con-
struction plans, specifica-
tions, contract documents,
bid, and award phase sup-
port for the installation of an
automated weather obser-
vation system and beacon at
the DeFuniak Springs Mu-
nicipal Airport." Local pilot
Terry Dawkins thanked and
commended the Council for
approving the system.
Financial Director Sara
Bowers requested to move
$500,000 from the city's re-
serves. "Cash flow is not the
best in the world right now,
and I need some monies to
make sure we meet our ob-
ligations," she said. The
Council unanimously ap-
proved the request.


Child Abuse Prevention Awareness




Family Fun Day



April 2, 2011



10:00-2:00


Wee Care Park


552 Walton Road

DeFuniak Springs


tFace pain


ainig


'Gaes


reefood
ood


Ri bbo0s

fo KIDS
prevent child abuse
and neglect


Bring your family out to enjoy a fun-filled day

with the ones you love most.


I ,., i. I


Sponsored by:

FamiliesFirst Network
of Lakeview
1 ,~B ISI III A 1 II .\RI-


Ribborns

fo KIDS
prevent child abuse
and neglect


W. Flemming Ward
Attorney at Law







Over 40 Years
Experience


Free Initial Consultation

General Practice
Marital & Family Law Real Estate Business
Wills & Probate Personal Injury

770 Baldwin Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
Phone (850) 892-3822 Fax 850-892-2169


)es


r I a


a








PAGE 4-A

Editorial Comment

*PERSONAL

COMMENTS

*LETTERS TO

THE EDITOR


Editorial comment

Three


Seats


Up for

Grabs


By BRUCE COLLIER

Three seats on the DeFuniak Springs City
Council are in contention Seats 1, 2, and 3. On a
five-seat council, that adds up to a majority, which
could spell changes. Some of the candidates have
submitted campaign biographies and statements
to this newspaper, and you can read them in this
week's edition. Unfortunately, the planned De-
Funiak Business and Professional Association
(DBPA) forum on April 5 (next Tuesday) for City
Council candidates will be too late for this paper
to report on it in time for the election (April 12).
The forum will be held at the DeFuniak Springs
Civic Center, from 6 8 p.m.
The PSA announcing the forum invites voters
to email questions to defuniakdbpa@aol.com, pri-
or to the forum. I have some.
1. Have you read the Municipal Code? (If that
sounds flippant it isn't)
2. Would you agree to a series of public work-
shops on the Municipal Code?
3. Are you prepared to consider going over the
Municipal Code, line by line, chapter by chapter,
and take a serious look at what needs to be recon-
sidered and revised? And before you offer the "if it
ain't broke, don't fix it" argument, remember that
just because no one has complained doesn't mean
everything is working well.
4. Not everyone understands legal language,
and that's not because they're stupid. How would
you help all citizens not just special interests to
understand the laws they are obliged to follow?
5. Some people think complaining about city
government is a waste of time. How would you
go about convincing them otherwise?
6. Would you consider taking unscheduled, un-
publicized walks though the community, listen-
ing informally to citizens, business owners and
tourists about what concerns them?
7. What would you describe as being the job of
a City Council member? Is it active or passive?
8. What do you think is the public's perception
of the city of DeFuniak Springs?
9. What kind of businesses would you like to at-
tract to DeFuniak Springs? Give reasons for your
answers.
10. What kind of businesses would you oppose
opening in DeFuniak Springs? Give reasons for
your answers.
11. Do you think there are actually two cities -
"old" DeFuniak and "new" DeFuniak?
12. Assume you are elected to the seat you're
seeking. Describe, in 100 words, what DeFuniak
Springs will be like at the end of your first term.
That's a dozen questions, probably more than
my share. If everyone wrote and sent just one of
their own, that ought to make a lively forum, far
more entertaining than what we've been accus-
tomed to in the past. Don't forget to vote.










rmmii~T~tiT


P 0Z. Bx 54
9- 19 0




The e -uia -prigs eral/BeeeIn




I- prngs5F 343


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 31, 2011


FLORIDAJ!C1APITIALNEW


Hundreds of green-clad government em-
ployees converged on the Capitol today for a
"death match" lobbying effort to protect their pen-
sions, maintain payroll deduction of union dues
and fight privatization of state services. Members
of the American Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees filled 21 big chartered bus-
es for the overnight trek to the Tallahassee-Leon
County Civic Center, where they had breakfast
and got organized for an uphill three-block march
that marked the union's largest annual lobbying
day. Organizers said more than 1,000 public em-
ployees, most of them wearing the union's green
T-shirts enscribed "The Public is Our Special In-
terest," would fan out through the House and Sen-
ate office buildings to talk with lawmakers about
pending issues. AFSCME lobbyist Doug Martin
told members the focus is on a House-passed
"paycheck protection" bill that would forbid gov-
ernment employers to deduct union dues, pend-
ing bills that would require employees to con-
tribute at least 3 percent of their salaries to the
Florida Retirement System and plans to privatize
Department of Juvenile Justice jobs, state hospi-
tal positions and other government services. Mar-
tin and Patrick Bell, another labor lobbyist, said
the dues-checkoff proposal strikes at the core of
unions themselves. "All of these fights are death
matches," said Martin. "They want to kill us."
The House last week voted 73-40 for the bill (HB
1021) by Rep. Chris Dorworth, R-Lake Mary, that
ends deduction of union dues from government
paychecks. AFSCME and other labor organiza-
tions would have to separately bill members for
monthly dues. The Senate has a companion bill
(SB 830) by Sen. John Thrasher, R-Jacksonville,
who fought a tough re-election campaign last year
against a Democrat backed by teacher unions.
"We've got to kill this in the Senate," said Martin.
"John Thrasher is mad at teacher unions so he's
trying to do this as payback." He said this year's
AFSCME lobbying day is the biggest in at least
10 years. But if unions lose dues deduction, he
said, there may not be another show of strength
by public employees. "If this thing passes, guess
what? There's not going to be a lobby day next
year," he said. "It's union dues that pay for those
budgets." Leon County Commissioner Bill Proc-
tor welcomed the AFSCME members, along with
some representatives of teacher unions and oth-
er labor groups, to Tallahassee. He said the new
Republican administration, backed by two-thirds
GOP majorities in the House and Senate, has
caused "a tsunami" among state employees. Re-
peatedly pouring water from one glass to another,
like a chemist, Proctor said Gov. Rick Scott and
conservative Republican lawmakers are brewing
a bitter potion for public employees in the legisla-
tive session. "People are nervous, they're fright-
ened, they're downright scared of the public policy
that's being concocted," Proctor told the breakfast
group. "We have a strange mix of public policy
that's being brewed up." By Bill Cotterell, Florida
Capital Bureau
Gov. Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam
Bondi announced formation of a statewide strike
force Monday to help local police agencies combat
pill mills that have made Florida the nation's top
source of illegal trafficking in pain killers. Scott
said he has not relaxed his opposition to the pre-
scription drug monitoring database, which Bondi
and many police officials across the state support.
Scott said he wants statewide investigation, anal-
ysis and intelligence capabilities shared so cities
and counties can put the illegal dealers behind
bars. "We are known as the Oxy Express," said
Bondi. "It is an epidemic." Scott also said he will
work with the Legislature on laws providing that
"you can't be prescribing drugs and then dispens-
ing them at the same time. If you're prescribing
drugs, should you be in the position that you own
the pharmacy?" Scott gathered sheriffs and police
chiefs from across the state to announce he has


committed $800,000 in unused grant money to
form the strike force and provide help with over-
time and other expenses for local governments
attacking the clinics that have sprung up mostly
in South Florida. He said 98 of the top 100 doc-
tors dispensing oxycodone are in Florida and that
126 million of the pills are sold in the state. "The
numbers plainly show that Florida has a serious
problem that demands a serious, coordinated law-
enforcement response," said Scott. "Florida's fu-
ture is threatened by crimes involving drugs and
our local sheriffs and chiefs simply cannot contin-
ue to tackle this mounting issue alone." Scott and
Bondi said their strike force would include the
Florida Highway Patrol, Agency for Health Care
Administration, Department of Business and Pro-
fessional Regulation, Department of Health, and
insurance investigators from Chief Financial Of-
ficer Jeff Atwater's department. Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement Commissioner Gerald
Bailey, who heads the team, said FDLE will have
a meeting of drug-unit commanders from many
police agencies in Orlando today. "This $800,000
will allow us to ramp up very quickly," said Bai-
ley.
The Legislature voted two years ago to create the
prescription monitoring data base but bid pro-
tests now resolved delayed its implemen-
tation. House Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter
Park, sides with Scott. But Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, has said the Sen-
ate will not kill the prescription drug-monitoring
database. Wakulla County Sheriff David Harvey
said his wife is a pharmacist at a CVS pharmacy.
"It's not just in South Florida," he said. "She sees
an individual come into her pharmacy, pays cash
for OxyContin they don't use insurance be-
cause they can take it out on the street and sell it
at a huge profit. I have incarcerated individuals
who have been hooked on these same drugs." Tal-
lahassee Police Chief Dennis Jones said the capi-
tal hasn't had a pill mill problem but pain killers
are making their way up from South Florida, and
some young people are stealing their parents' le-
gal pills. "With OxyContin and some of the high-
potency pain killers, we're finding that they're
raiding Grandma's medicine cabinet, and it's
something that's being sold illegally," said Jones.
By Bill Cotterell, Florida Capital Bureau
The Florida Legislature is in session
through May 6. The key issues Monday [March
28] and what's coming up:
PSC: What's happening: A Senate committee,
with some questioning, approved Gov. Rick Scott's
nominees to the powerful utility regulatory board,
the Public Service Commission. What's next: Art
Graham, Julie Brown, Ronald Brise and Eduardo
Balbis seem primed for full-Senate confirmation.
GUNS: What's happening: A Senate commit-
tee passed, after lengthy debate, a compromise
amendment to a bill that originally prohibited
doctors from asking patients if they owned a gun.
It takes out civil and criminal penalties and limits
the recordkeeping allowed. What's next: Ongoing
concerns, including from insurance companies,
are still to be worked out.
GROWTH MANAGEMENT: What's happening:
A Senate committee passed that chamber's ma-
jor overhaul of growth-management regulation
by pushing much oversight of development to the
local level. The proposal continues a ban on most
impact fees through 2013. What's next: A similar
version is moving through House committees.
COURTS: What's happening: The Senate Judi-
ciary Committee had a handful of court-reform
proposals on its agenda Tuesday and passed a
proposed constitutional amendment to require
Senate confirmation of gubernatorial judicial ap-
pointments. What's next: The full Senate must
approve the resolution by a super majority, and
60 percent of voters in 2012 would have to vote
yes.


Keep informed order a subscription by calling 892-3232 or 892-7991
Subcription are $39.00 a year for in-state. $45 a year for out-of-state
*VISA *MASTERCARD*DISCOVER accepted


,iLkck-







THE~~~~ DeU KSRNSHRL REE TUSAMRH3,01PG -


Thrift-Way Supermarket

yif March 31-April 6, 2011 DeFuniak Springs, FL

Big 3 Savings Plus One Weekly Specials Best Buys Everyday Low Prices Super Bonus Buys


Fresh Fryer
Boneless
Breasts

fn. lb.


I.


Whole

Pork Loin


Chuck
Roast
lb.


Fresh Fryer
Thighs


frn lh


U-


Zeigler Roll

Sausage..........6 oz.$199
Zeigler

Bacon ...............12 oz. 2
Zeigler Jumbo

Franks.........6 oz. $199

SUPERH BONUiS


Register Smoked

Sausage..........4o oz.
Swaggerty Sausage

Patties..................#3
Kelley Turkey or

Ham..............10 oz.


$729


$759


Kelley
Smoked
Sausage

$2990


Assorted
Pork
Chops

$1990


Chuck
Steak

$3590


Fresh
Ground
Beef

$2390


Fryer
Leg
Quarters
Thurs.-Sat.
$590


__I___I _ __ II__ _ _


Each Additional $10 Food Order,
Super Bonus Buys excluded, entitles you
to your choice of One Super Bonus Buy!
Shur Fresh White
Bread........................ oz.119
Flavorite
Milk .................. ...... a$299
Flavorite
Sugar.....................4 lbs. $159


Oranges................4 lb. $199
Crisco Vegetable
Oil...............................48 oz $249
Shawnee Best
Flour....................... 5 lb. $169
Duncan Hines
Cake Mix.........18 o. $169
Flavorite
Mayonaise......30 oz. $169
Flavorite Medium
E ggs.................................... doz.99




Totino's
Pizza Rolls.......9.8soz. $199
Shoppers value
Crinkles...................5 lb. $299
Fresh Frozen
Cut Okra...................2lb. $249
Banquet
Pot Pies......................... oz. 3/$2

OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY
6 A.M. 8 P.M.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
SALE STARTS THURSDAY 8 A.M.
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOS


Betty Crocker
Frost1ing.......... asset.
Flavorite Quick
Oats.......................8 oz.

Bama Jelly
G rap e....................32 oz.


Kelloggs
Pop Tarts..............as... $249
Homelife Aluminum
F o il.......................................... 7.5 f. 4 9
Flavorite Flake
Coconut............................14 o. $199


$199 Rice-A
Flavorite Flavorit
$149 Veget
J1 Mayonnaise
SHomelife
30 oz. Chare
$149 $19Char

Flavorite
Marshmellow .............1o o. 990
Jif Peanut
Butter................. .....28oz. $349
Flavorite

Syrup...................... .... o 199


-Roni...asst. $149
e asst.
ables...4-15 oz. 591


ioal.. b. $699
coal .......16.6 1b. $6


I ~1:FRESH PRODUCE


Sweet
Potatoes..........................lb. 3 9

Oranges..........................4 b. 2/$5
Snap
Beans.................................b. $129


Mangoes.............................each 99
Gala
Apples................................lb. $119


Cantaloupe S


.e $169
hcae I


Flavorite Medium
E ggs ................................. doz. $1 29
Bordens Chunk
Cheese..........................oz $199
Favorite
Biscuits...................4 pack $199
Flavorite
Spread................1 b. qtrs. 3/$2


I


=="i


I


$279


A...........


PAGE 5-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


1T


-i










PAE -ATE eFNIKSPINSHEAL BEZE TUSDYMAC 3,21


BLACK CREEK GENERAL STORE
* Open early till late 7 days a week *
SFishing tackle and licenses *
Bait


SQuality Exxon gas, off-road and
on-road diesel *
MINOR .7 ,


II II


hunters SPRING IS RIGHT
AROUND THE
CORNER...
e Payments begin at $751
(p&i for qualified buyers)
Located behind Walton High School


MOVE IN READY!
Very Popular Split Floor Plan, 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage
Builder will pay closing,
100% Financing Available
to qualified buyers.


F IVR educed Sd
u.st.R e,-
.......


Call Judy McAnnally with Centurion Properties
850-830-3237
www.huntersridgeflorida.com


NOW IS THE TIME


FOR A
SEASONAL
CHECK-UP
on your
Heating & Cooling
System!


I .


j


TAYLOR MIR CONDONING & ElIMCTI ,L INC.
pjrn, SALES, SERVICE & INSTALLATION
ER-o095o5 684 N. 9th St., DeFuniak springs, FL
RG-0048207
RF-0066780 50-9-3955
RM-0048225 -3955www.carrier.com




-FGUARDIAN
--PEST CONTROL,

SCIENTIFIC PEST AND TERMITE CONTROL

NO NEED To empty cabinets
with our Specializedapplication equipment andtechniques

NO ODOR To upset your allergies

-ED I
BUDDY INFINGER


Greg Majors
Representative

Majors Financial Group, Inc.

1299 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 4
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Office 850-892-9922 Toll Free 866-892-9922
Fax 850-892-4088
Email: GregMajors @planmembersec.com
Representative is registered with and ffers only securities and advisory services through
PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor, and
member, FINRAISIPC., 6187 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013, Phone (850) 874-6910.
Majors Financial Group, Inc. and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently owned
and operated. PlanMember is not responsible or liable for ancillary products or services offered
by Majors Financial Group, Inc. and complete disclaimer.


Don't Get

Left In The

Dark....

Advertise Your


Business Here!
GREAT DEALS!

Call For Details 892-3232



e nolia Terrace
.Assisted Living Facility
A GREAT PLACETO CALL HOME
ALF #10903
SERVICES/AMENITIES:
24 Hr. Personal Care Staff
3 Scrumptious Meals Daily
Recreational Activities
*Weekly Housekeeping &
Laundry Services Available
Fire Sprinkler System
Intercom System .
Many More Accommodations .
5209 Hwy. 331 South DeFuniak Springs, FL 850-892-8348


Conserving energy today
means saving tomorrow.


GOT A/C TROUBLES?

ONE CALL, NO WORRIES.


Located at 2243 State Highway 83N, DFS. FL Lic. #CA1814381
Serving North Walton County since 1991.

892-2804


435 SR 90 DeFuniak Springs


NOW OPEN
24 Hours A Day
7 Days A Week


OFFERING:
Premium Fuels Including Diesel
We Also Have Your Favorite
Beverages, Snacks & More!


'/ Lunch Special
#1-9 On Menu
$3.99
Mon.-Fri.
includes tea
11 am 2 pm


Hours: Mon.-Thurs.
11 am- 9pm
Fri. & Sat. 11 am i pm
Sun. 11 am 9 pm
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


AUTHENTIC
MEXICAN
RESTAURANT
Daily Specials
MON. 990 Margaritas
99 Tacos
TUES. 2 for 1 Margaritas
WED. $3.00 Off Fajita Dinner
THURS. $5.00 Athru Lon
Menus
$1.99 Beer Mexican
& Domestic
FRI. & SAT. 2 for 1 Margaritas
SUN. $2.00 Off Taco Salad
FULL BAR


W SPECIALTY DRINKS
1317 Hwy 331 South
DeFuniak Springs, Florida
(850) 951-2175
DAILY HAPPY HOUR 4-7


1350 West Baldwin Ave.
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
Phone: 850-892-2111
Outages: 1-800-342-0990
www.chelco.com


C W i


I


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


PAGE 6-A


. I ,







STHE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011
wI w1 'mfflwpq mmolow wpl, p.


MORE THAN 30 VENDORS participated in the arts and crafts sale.
Freeport Town Planters hold arts and crafts sale
Story and photos by City Hall and was well at- lenge early in the morning," Relay for Life."
JEFFREYPOWELL tended. More than 30 crafts said Town Planter Eleanor The day went so well for
The Freeport Town Plant- vendors and six food conces- Turner. "The Town Plant- the food vendors that some
ers held their second annual sions were involved. ers are within 10 percent of of them ran out of food, ac-
Arts and Crafts show on Sat- "We had a wonderful day reaching their goal of $1,500. cording to Turner. Plans
urday, March 26. The event although the wind and rain Nearly all the money raised are already in the works for
took place at the Freeport did present a bit of a chal- today will go straight to the next year's event, which is
expected to be even larger
S777 than this year.


FREEPORT TOWN PLANTER Eleanor Turner (1) calls out a raffle number.


Backyard poultry workshop:
raising chickens for food and fun


Walton County Extension
Service will host the last of
its four-part workshop on
proper methods of backyard
or urban poultry production.
The final workshop will be:
April 4, at 6:30 p.m. at the


Walton County Extension
office on Hwy 83. Families
are encouraged to attend
pre-registration is required
and space is limited. Regis-
tration fee is $25 per fam-
ily or individual for all four


workshops. Topics covered
will include: poultry selec-
tion; housing; nutrition; and
health. To register contact
the Extension Office at (850)
892-8172.


A LARGE VARIETY of arts and crafts could be pur-
chased at the event. The right person could have taken home
a dragon.


On behalf of the patients,


caregivers and employees of


Regency Hospice of


Northwest Florida, we would H-- S P I


like to extend our utmost -H 0 S PI E


gratitude and appreciation to










JZr. ames owei M, (.



Your dedication, hard work and


expertise are invaluable to us.



Happy Doctor's Appreciation Day!

FL License No. 50370972
IL -_ --
i


PAGE 7-A


Shock your mom, go to Church.

St. Agatha's Episcopal Church
144 Circle Dr, Defuniak Springs, FL
Sunday Service 10:15am


I


--lw -lw


"Mi


wmr


lw


-Mi


qw-


qw-












B&G Club celebrates third annual


Steak and Burger Dinner with a Bowden


Story and photos by
ALICIA LEONARD
Former Clemson
versity and Tulane
ball coach, and soon


Uni-
foot-
to be


resident of Walton County
T6mmy Bowden packed the
DeFuniak Springs Com-
munity Center's main room
with supporters for the Boys


& Girls Club of the Emerald
Coast's Steak and Burger
fundraiser this past week.
Volunteers, civic lead-
ers, businesses, citizens and
kids enjoyed the best din-
ner around for one of the
best causes in town. Affinity


Circle Chairman Rev. Davis
King and Chief Volunteer
Officer Cory Godwin re-
minded attendees that the
Boys & Girls Club makes a
difference in a child's life in
more ways than one. King
told the crowd, "Some come


LEVICO THOMPSON, AARON GLENN and Brad Bald-
win (l-r) got a chance to sit and enjoy the fruits or steaks of
their efforts after serving a wonderful dinner to supporters
of their club.


FORMER COLLEGE FOOTBALL coach Tommy Bowden
told parents to stand their ground, know where their kids
' are and ask 1,001 questions before letting them out the door
-as one of the keys of good parenting. Bowden told the kids to
draw their strength from God when times got tough.




Rob Garver, MD
Now seeing patients in DeFuniak Springs & Andalusia
Qualficatia-ons:
Board Certified in Pulmonary Disease,
and Critical Care Medicine
Professor Emeritus, UAB School Of Medicine
Expertise in:
Shoraness of breath Asthma, COPD
Coughs Lung cancer
Wheeling Lung fibrosis


Now Accepting
Appointments

Call toll free
888-681-5864
More info at,
www.seclung.com


O'Donnell

Cosmetic Dentistry & Orthodontics

A A SO F I E "


- PAINLESS DENTISTRY

- Cosmetic/Smile Make-Overs

- Root Canals

- Implants & Dentures

- Orthodontics
- ,.r' ,,JI;]F I-L ir.:3 a i ie i: e rj I.rl-r J I', v 1 ,-, 1 .)1, ', i .


Michael 1. O'Donnell
D.M.D., PA


Santa Rosa Beach
S % 1r.3c tH .* i-,l-I it -
i itr. lr it -ii 'Fi jirt H ', 4 -pit-
llI u r F. 'ri ri rin


to us hungry and we feed
them. Some come to us with
no shoes and we find them
shoes. Some come to us with
no direction and we guide
them. We turn no child
away." King also told the
crowd that with a gradua-
tion rate of only 70 percent
in the state, attendees of the
B & G Club have had a 100
percent graduation rate for
the last two years.
Godwin reminded the
crowd that every dollar
raised in DeFuniak for the
club stays local, "Every dol-
lar raised here stays here,"
he said. The club is also one of
the few that does not receive
extra funding from state or
federal sources through the
parent group, relying on do-
nations and fundraisers to
keep the doors open.
Unit Director for the De-
Funiak center Bobby Smith
presented the teen center
awards to the following
kids: Youth of the Year-Ger-
ald Gladney. Most Improved


Behavior- Dazia Young.
Most Improved Female Bas-
ketball Player- Krista Mc-
Queen. Most Improved Male
Basketball Player- LeVico
Thompson. Volunteer of the
Year- Jade Earnest.
Attendees perused auc-
tion items donated to raise
funds for the group from va-
cations to a signed plaque by
Brett Favre. They then en-
joyed a steak or burger din-
ner with all the trimmings,
served with care by the kids
that use the center. When
Bowden arrived, tables bid
on the honor of having him
sit with them.
Bowden spoke to the
crowd after eating and re-
minded parents and kids
that life is not always easy,
"It's tough out there. You
often go from one problem
to the next, but you have
to be strong and find that.
strength in God. Parents,
I urge you to know where
See DINNER 9-A


BOWDENAND THE CAUSE FOR THE KIDS PACKED THE main room at the DeFuniak Springs Community 'Center
last Thursday night.


Gladly Welcoming New Patients


K ..Gvnecolo


DeFuniak Springs
.'". ,, L ,,,-**''l-


* Routine Obstetrics
* High Risk Obstetrics
* 3D/4D Ultrasound
in Office


*Infertility
* Preferred Provider for
BCBS of Florida and
Most Insurances


Jennifer Esses, MD
Board Certified OB/GYN
As the mother of two boys, I understand the needs you have,
whether you're pregnant now or planning to be in the future.

Women & Children First
< 870 Mack Bayou Rd *Suite D *729-7344


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER


() CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY


Dr. James Howell, D.O. Carolyn Lawrence, PAC Robert Knox, PAC
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Mon., Wed, Thurs. Mon., Tues., Thurs.
7:30 am 4 pm 7 am 5:30 pm 7 am 5:30 pm


$21
on.-Fri. 7:30-11:3
L .No apoinment neede
1 4 a,._


Dr. Stacey Temkin, D.O.
Tues., Wed., Thurs.
7:30 am 4:30 pm
Fri. 7:30 am 2 p.m.


located
WEST MAIN STREET, DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL


ADVANCED

PRACTICE

CLINIC, LLC

HaveTm onur friends aTr


-S S
Weight Los
iv~1~
Soltins


J"UVW jrVUj JjjV.Ijj^j vjj I
neighbors been losing weight?
Maybe they have discovered
our proven weight loss system!
Come by our office or call for more information.

Office Hours
Every Wednesday 8 am 4 pm
Every other Tuesday 10 am 7 pm

CaU (850) 892-4441 for more information

New Location:
1299 Hwy. 90 W., Suite 1
DeFuniak Springs
(near Prescription Place)


- I
a "


55


.TI.
^, 1


I


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


PAGE 8-A









PAGE 9-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


DINNER

FROM PAGE 8-A


your kids are and who they
are hanging out with. Ask
1,001 questions before they
go out that door. Don't fold
to pressure, just because
they tell you all the other
kids are doing it. Kids, be
careful who you spend your
time with, it makes a differ-
ence in the direction of your
life, and always remember
your relationship with God
is where you will find your
strength."
According to Walton
County Affinity Member
Kara Stallings, "the Steak
and Burger Event this year
raised a little over $21,600.
Last year's profit was
$10,400. The Walton Coun-
ty Affinity Circle would like
to especially thank all of the
sponsors for their support
as well as our community
members who purchased
tickets. Our Teen Center re-
lies upon the support of our
community and DeFuniak
Springs continues to get
behind our programs and
show our teens that they
care about them and want
to see them succeed. Thank
you DeFuniak Springs."
The center still has open-


DINERS BID ON GETTING THE CHANCE TO share a meal with Coach Bowden be-
fore he spoke.


ings for middle school and
high school aged teens and
always has room for dona-
tions and mentors to help a
local child find a good path
in life and succeed. Find out
more about the Boys & Girls
Club of the Emerald Coast
at www.BGCEC.Com, look
for them on Facebook, or
call them at (850) 892-3752.


FREEPORT

FROM PAGE 1-A


Supple reported that the
county crews were at work
clearing the area where two
new ball fields will be built
as soon as grant funding is
available. Supple also re-
ported that electric meters
have been installed at dif-
ferent ball field locations in
the Sports Complex for the
purpose of measuring the
electric load on individual
fields when they are in use.
Angle Jay of Preble-Rish
Engineering reported that
the plans for extending the
water main from Portland
to Choctaw Beach have been
approved at last by USDA's
Rural Development branch.
A request for bids on the
work has been published.
Marion Cook, a planner
with Eglin Air Force Bay
asked the Council to approve
a resolution concerning a
joint land use study (JLUS)
between the Air Base and
Freeport. The request was
approved.
Marse presented the
rankings of the bidders for
the FRSC Clean Energy
Grant, which covers the in-
stallation of solar powered
lights and equipment at the
Sports Complex. Preble-
Rish was number 1 in the
rankings.
City Clerk Robin Haynes
reported that April Groover
of the Florida Governor's
Energy Office called and
asked that the city move
ahead with work on the
FRSC Grant even though
the required federal approv-
al has not yet been received.
The state feels the grant
will be approved. Accord-
ing to Groover, if the city
does go ahead with the work
and then the grant does not
get the expected federal ap-
proval, the city would have
to cover any project expen-
ditures as unbudgeted ex-
pense items without outside
financial help. This is the
same grant the city applied
for over a year ago, received
notice that the grant had
been awarded and then,
about three weeks later,
found itself in the position of
losing the grant to another
city due to an administra-
tive error at the state office.
After this happened, the city
that had been awarded the
grant withdrew its project
and Freeport, once again,
was awarded the grant for
its project.
In view of the history of
this grant, Marse and Coun-
cil members were hesitant
about going ahead with proj-
ect expenditures without
having the grant approval in
hand. The Council approved


a proposal to go ahead with
administrative work on
project bids but to withhold
other work pending a review
of federal approval status at
a later Council meeting.









DBPA

sponsors

candidate

forum

The DeFuniak Springs
Business and Professional
Association (DBPA) is spon-
soring a candidate forum
for those running for De-
Funiak Springs City Coun-
cil on Tuesday, April 5 from
6 8 p.m. at the DeFuniak
Springs Civic Center.
The public is invited to
attend and meet the candi-
dates. To ask questions of
the candidates send your
questions to defuniakdbpa@
aol.com


r ,

\,4 *'
\iiJ


TEENS WERE ALL SMILES as they served a delicious
dinner to supporters of the Boys & Girls Club of the Emer-
ald Coast.


ITEMS LIKE THIS SIGNED plaque by Brett Favre
helped raise funds for the local teen center, where every dol-
lar raised here, stays here.









Jane Henderson, M.D.
GY'necologi'

lane Henderson, M.D provide. care for '.\omen from adolescence
to post-menopause at Northi'.es Flonda Women's Sences in
Nice\ille. Dr. Henderson earned her medical, deuiee from the
University of Florida College of Medicine and completed her
four-year residency training at the Lruverslr, of South ,Aabama.
She pranced obsterncs and gnecoloy' for
tventy years and has fociLsed solely on
gynecology for the past ten ears
Dr. Henderson understands the
many different stages of a 's '
woman's life

Annual wellness exams
Contraception
STD resting and counsehng
Pre- menopause care
Post-menopause care
Breast evaluations
Nutrition and exercise
counseling
Bone maintenance
and loss prevention
Hormone replacement
therapy




11thwest lorida

c/4rom-m 9 wtce
1001 West College Blvd, SuiteB-1 Niceville
(850) 678-1244


www .nwfoidawomns-co


Healthmark Hospital & Clinic

WIY WAIT?
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS
WALK-INS WELCOME
* ACCEPTING ADULT & PEDIATRIC PATIENTS


Rob Garver, M.D. John Thomas, M.D. Larry Rafey, PA.-C
Pulmonology & Surgery & Pediatrics &
Critical Care Family Practice Family Practice


F. Edward Tenewitz, M.D.
General Surgeon


Shyla D. Scott, LPT
Licensed Physical Therapist


You're Invited To Contact Our Healthcare Professionals
At (850) 951-4556 Or Visit
Healthmark Rural Health Clinic, 4415 Hwy. 331 South, DeFuniak Springs, FL
Monday Friday 8:00 am 4:30 pm


MEDICARE & MEDICAID patients welcomed and most insurances accepted.


"It's Not a Spider Bite"
Private Medical Practice for Individuals with
Chronic Wounds, Abscess or Diabetes

Advanced Practice Clinic, LLC
Dr. James Howell DO, Medical Director
1299 Highway 90 West, Suite 1, DeFuniak Springs, FL

Appointment & Fax

(850) 892-2138

Accepting New Patients for
Medical Wound Management
&
Prevention of Wounds with
Diabetic Foot Evaluation & Management of Numbness &
Tingling to Prevent Wounds/Amputation

Jill M. Allen ARNP, CWS, FACCWS
Diplomat of American Academy of Wound Management,
Fellow of College of Certified Wound Specialist

Private Clinic By Appointment.
On-Site ALF, Nursing Home & Hospital Consult
Out-Patient Surgical Debridement with Topical Anesthetic,
Wound Matrix & Bio-Synthetic Grafts, Tissue Biopsy for
Definitive Antiobiotic Management,
Diabetic Neuropathic Foot & Chronic Abscess Management
Rx for Home Health and/or Facilities as indicated by exam.








PAGE 10-A


WRIGHT FROM PAGE 1-A


served as a Trainer of Post-
masters, and taught the
Postal Management Degree
Program at both Wallace Jr.
College in Dothan, Ala. and
Chipola Jr. College in Mari-
anna, Fla. After retirement,
I served as the Executive
Director of Walton County
Association for Retarded
Citizens (ARC) for approx.
2 1/2 years. Since 2002,
you have seen me working
harder than ever on either
my John Deere or Kubota
tractors. My wife and I have
owned and operated two
restaurants, a large eight
operator beauty salon, and
a race track. Over the years,
I have supervised employ-
ees belonging to three dif-
ferent unions without hav-
ing a grievance filed against
me. This reflects my ability
to remain on the adult level


and display an attitude of
genuine understanding and
concern to employees and
customers alike.
Now is the time in my life
when I should be laid back
and taking it easy, however,
I just can't do it. The citi-
zens of DeFuniak Springs
deserve far better from their
City Council than they are
getting. I resigned from
the planning board in total
disgust and vowed to run
for City Council and make
many necessary changes.
Why is my son; and many
of your sons and daughters,
unemployed? The answer
is "Impact Fees." Potential
businesses looking at com-
ing here have been hit with
"Impact Fees" so large they
turned and ran.-I want the
Council to look beyond to-
day, think outside of the


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


box, and realize that regu-
lar monthly revenue com-
ing in over so many years is
far better than any up-front
"Impact Fee." I want to seek
out businesses that No. 1
will employ our residents,
No. 2 will complement
our business community,
and No. 3 serve commu-
nity needs. These potential
businesses will receive the
"Welcome Mat" not "Impact
Fees." Together, we can turn
this negative into a positive.
I am not taking this job on
to win a popularity contest,
I am giving up this time in
my life to make a difference.
My wife reminds me that
I will be one of five, and it
takes three. If you, the citi-
zens of DeFuniak Springs,
truly desire changes in ar-
eas like Magnolia Cemetery,
our sign ordinances, and the
"Impact Fees" I mentioned,
select a candidate from each
of the three seats who will
work together toward this


DeFUNIAK SPRINGS POLICE REPORT


DeFuniak Springs Police
arrested the following peo-
ple during the week ending
March 27, 2011:

Dominic Lee, 23, DFS,
Obstruction w/o violence,
John Wesley Beaver,
39, Freeport, Worthless
checks x2,


James Ray Dillon, 61,
Operating motor vehicle w/o
valid DL, dealing in stolen
property,
Shelby Daniel Free-
man, 19, DFS, Possession
of cannabis, poss. of para-
phernalia, grand theft $300
- 5,000,
Jennny Marie Harri-


son, 32, DFS, Driving with
DL expired,
Clifton Cedric Good-
man, 52, Address not given,
Obstruction w/o violence,
indecent exposure,
Sidney Lee Bishop, 40,
PDL, Disorderly intoxica-
tion in a public place caus-
ing disturbance.


WALTON COUNTY SHERIFF'S REPORT


Walton County Sheriffs
Deputies arrested the fol-
lowing people during the
week ending March 27,
2011:

SJoseph Francis Bren-
nan, 56, PDL, DUI,-
Janna Johnston Car-
roll, 52, Valparaiso, DUI,
Adrian Kenyotta Flow-
ers, 29, SRB, Child support,
Cleveland Hanks, 35,
Holly Hill, DWLSR,
Tamar Rashad Robin-
son, 28, DFS, FVOP,
Anderson Berner Sut-
ton, 32, SRB, DWLSR, ex-
pired motor vehicle registra-
tion,
Brandy Nichole Wag-
goner, 23, DFS, Worthless
check,
Chris Ryan Johnson,
48, Niceville, MVOP,
Gary Ralph Bishop, 43,
Destin, Battery domestic,


Mickie Richard Brazile,
26, PDL, MVOP,
Melissa Ann Clifton,
37, DFS, MVOP,
Rex Dewayne Gainey,
48, DFS, Domestic violence
injunction,
Michael Wayne Hand,
41, SRB, Aggravated assault
w/intent to commit felony,
Jonathan Earl Hartley,
53, Prattville, Ala., Fugitive
(Ala.),
Delfino Hernandez, 21,
FWB, MVOP,
Jose Martin Maldona-
do-Ortiz, 24, DFS, Battery,
Mike Eron Mandel, 34,
Niceville, FTA,
Raymond Olivarez, 27,
Address not given, MVOP,
SRobert Earl Richard-
son, 63, DFS, DUI,
Juan Lorenzo Rivera,
30, Santa Rosa, Workers
comp fraud, false ID,
Jacob Zachery Smith,


30, DFS, Possession of fire-
arm or.ammo by convicted
Fla. felon, carrying con-
cealed weapon,
Glendale Sullivan, 45,
Middleburg, Fla., DUI,
Joshua Daniel Aycock,
24, DFS, DWLSR,
Brett Kyle Furr, 34,
Bonifay, Warrants (Okaloo-
sa and Holmes counties),
SRobert Gregory God-
win, 54, DFS, Warrant (Gulf
Co.),
Komatsu Olaf Leante,
36, Panama City, MVOP,
Daniel James Stoffel,
22, Longmont, Colo., Pos-
session of marijuana +20
grams, poss. of controlled
substance w/o prescription,
trafficking in 1 gram or
more of LSD, poss. or use of
narcotic equipment,
Jessica Emily Thomp-
son, 26, Jacksonville,
FVOP.


QuALITY EYE CARE

RIGHT HERE

IN DEFUNIAK SPRINGS





"Darren Payne, M.D. and I would be
privileged to provide all of your
eye care needs in our new
DeFuniak Springs Office.-"

LEE MULLIS, MD
LEE MULLIS, MD
BOARD CERTIRIE IN HISTORIC DISTRICT
EYE PHYSICIAN & CATARACT
SURGEON DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

746 BALDWIN A VENUE
(850) 892-6100

r --------------------------------------1
FREE COMPREHENSIVE

FRJ2 EYE EXAM


Call Today! 892-6100
I I
DeFuniak Springs Office. New Patients 59 Years & Older.
I Limited Time Offer. Expires 4/30/2011
L-------------------------------------- _
NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to
pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement of the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.


end. There are so many ar-
eas that need to be seen by
new eyes. I am a Christian
and love the Lord with all my
heart. I solicit your prayers
and input as I go forward.
I am very emotional about
the areas noted and many





Ribs for

Relay for

Life

benefit

The Walton County De-
partment of Corrections Re-
lay for Life Team is now tak-
ing orders for a slab of ribs
cooked by 4c's barbeque. Or-
der now until April 6, 2011.
The cost is $20. A portion of
the proceeds will be donated
to the Relay for Life cam-
paign for the American Can-
cer Society. The ribs will be
ready for pick-up or delivery
by Friday, April 8, 2011. To
place an order, call Alicia at
419-3275 or Kevin at 419-
3274.


more. I will stand strong for
the citizens and businesses
of DeFuniak Springs. If be-
ing nice can get the job done,
nice I will be. However, we
all know, sometimes being
nice simply does not get the
job done. Lets turn this City
Council into one that truly
represents and answers to
you, not special interests.
Vote Kermit M. Wright


City Council Seat 2.
I look forward to hear-
ing your concerns by phone,
but please consider written
format and in either case, I
would appreciate your solu-
tion being included. I will
listen to you.
Address: 615 Lakeview
Drive, Defuniak Springs FL.
32433-4053, phone: home:
892-4532 Cell: 892-1509.


MONTHLY SPECIALS!
* Decks Aluminum Awnings New Home
* Completely Remodeling Or
* We Will Fix As Little As You Can Afford!


Industrial /




Estate Residential : SI





EglinAFB /

OF


Windows & doors installed correctly,
in most cases, will not alter your interior.
* FREE ESTIMATES! * *


TOTAL HOMEScc.
| A| lic.#RR282811542


Commercial







Estate Residential


Small Scale
Amendment
11-01


#404-11 2tc: 3-31;4-7


"Christ in the Passover"
Jesus' last supper was actually
a Jewish Passover.
Greg Savitt, of Jews for Jesus, will
re-create the traditional Passover service ;. ".'
and explain how it foreshadowed Jesus'
death and resurrection in a presentation .
called "Christ in the Passover" at
New Harmony Baptist Church
located 9 miles north of Mossy Head on 1087
at 2281 County Hwy. 2A
Sunday, April 3, 2011 11 a.m.
Mr. Savitt will set a table with items traditionally used at the
Passover meal and detail their spiritual significance. He will explain
the connection between the events of the first Passover in Egypt
and the redemption that Jesus accomplished. Come and bring a
friend with you to see this exciting presentation.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL (850) 834-2871


4647 Hwy. 90 East, DeFuniak Springs 1-800-526-8185


Have you had estimates for
new windows, new doors or vinyl siding
for your home and you thought
the estimate was way too high?!!

LET TOTAL.HOMES INC. GIVE YOU AN. T-
THAT WONT MAKE YU CRnt ::. .


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

PROPOSED SMALL SCALE AMENDMENT
to the

WALTON COUNTY

FUTURE LAND USE MAP

The Walton County Planning Commission on Thursday. April
14. 2011, at the South Walton Courthouse Annex, 31 Coastal
Center Boulevard, Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, beginning at 5:00 p.m.,
or as soon thereafter as may be heard, will consider a proposal to
amend the Future Land Map within the area shown on the map in this
advertisement by the following Small Scale Amendment:

SSA 11-01 Walton County is requesting a Small Scale Amendment
to change 4.897 +/-acres in Walton County north of the Choctawhatchee
Bay on parcel(s) identified as 35-2N-19-18000-001-0100 from
Commercial to Industrial. The property is located in the northeast corner
of Edgewood Circle and Highway 331, approximately 2.6 miles south of
DeFuniak Springs, Florida.

The proposed amendment will be available for public review at the
office of Planning and Development Services, South Walton Annex, 31
Coastal Centre Boulevard, Suite 100, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459.

If any interested person should, decide to appeal the decision of the
Board or the Planning Commission with regard to these proceedings, he
or she will need a record of the proceedings and may need to ensure
that a verbatim record is made. Such record should include evidence
and testimony upon which the appeal is to be based.
Please be governed accordingly,









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


HUFFMAN
nity on the City Council.
As for his platform, he
had none, he has a VISION.
Huffman feels that with a
platform you stand still,
with a vision you move for-
ward. Part of that vision in-
cludes:
1. Be Fiscally Respon-
sible: We should always be
good stewards of our financ-
es.
2. Taking care of our se-
niors and our youth. Our
seniors are of present, our
youth are our future.
3. Maintaining a quality
of life: our history is our No. 1
industry- attracting tourists
from all over the world, we


FROM PAGE 1-A
must protect it as we grow.
4. Improving our Down-
town: We are the county
seat. We must take care of
our backyard before we can
expect businesses to come.
We should be the city that
sits on a hill.
5. Economic Develop-
ment: We must work to
retain present businesses
while
creating an atmosphere for
others to come; our children
are our most valuable
resource. The school system
does a great job educating
them and they leave to
find work. We must reverse
this trend and keep some of


CAMPBELL FROM PAGE 1-A


contracting business and
electrical contracting busi-
ness in 1989, to which I still
own and operate today. .
I'm not running against
anyone, but I am running
for the citizens of DeFuniak
Springs, your children, your
grandchildren, business-


es here, and the potential
businesses and industry to
come.
My motto is "Preserva-
tion and Progress shaking
hands."

Bob Campbell, City Coun-
cil Seat 2


KELLEY FROM PAGE 1-A


these young people
home. This is how you save
and grow a community.
6. Work Together: We run
as non-partisan. Council
members should find solu-
tions to make this city grow
and prosper.
Huffman is married to
Patricia G. Huffman and
are the parents of four chil-


850-835-4221
244 E. Main St, Freeport


dren: Victor, Erica, Jami
and Candice and have two
granddaughters, Mallory
and Makenzie.
It would be an Honor to
serve you as your Council
Member.
Vote James A. Huffman
on April 12, 2011.
Thank you in advance for
your support.


MACON FROM PAGE 1-A


schools, businesses, and
traffic control throughout
the city. I will be available
to all citizens of DeFuniak
Springs, if elected as your
City Marshal, I promise you
the following: leadership.


Loyalty, commitment, hon-
esty, integrity, trustworthi-
ness, and one that will work
very hard to make our com-
munity one of the safest cit-
ies in America.


bi |dll OO --..--.
Pressure Treated Pine
---- -- 850-231-0500
FranksCC.com 113 Logan Lane, Grayton Beach


in the private sector cannot
truly understand the multi-
tude of challenges that local
businesses face, especially
in the current economic cli-
mate, the worst since the
Great Depression.
"To hobble local industry
during these difficult times
is simply unacceptable,"
said Kelley. "We should in-
stead be doing everything
we can to help our local busi-
nesses. Take a tour of Hwy.
90., U.S. 331 and downtown
and you'll see empty build-
ings and storefronts where
thriving businesses once
stood," said Kelley. "The
chicken plant is gone, Food
World is gone, Lewis Bear
is gone, MicroSpine is gone.
Marvin's, Hodges Cash &
Carry, Peebles and a host of
smaller operations have left
or gone out of business. If we
allow this trend to continue,
our local economy will even-
tually grind to a halt. When
that happens, City Coun-
cil will have to cut back on
services and raise taxes and
fees to pay for whatever re-
mains and none of us can af-
ford that."
Kelley said he sees a need
to overhaul of the city's sign
ordinance, which he feels
was already too restric-
tive even before the last
set of changes were pushed
through, over the impas-
sioned protests of local busi-
ness leaders. "When the
Council was accepting com-
ment on the ordinances, I
spoke out, as did many oth-
ers. Afterwards, with a cou-
ple of exceptions to benefit
one or two businesses, the
Council simply passed the
ordinance they intended to
pass in the first place. That's
not the kind of representa-
tion we need at City Hall."
Impact fees are another
idea recently adopted by
the city, he said. "The Coun-
cil's impacts fees have had
an impact, all right to
discourage new businesses
from locating here," said
Kelley. "On top of the enor-
mous expense of launching
a hew business, we also de-
mand that people pay tens of
thousands of dollars just for
the pleasure of doing busi-
ness here? Clearly, that's a
business-killer. No wonder
many prospective compa-
nies simply go somewhere
else. We've missed so many
opportunities. How many
more can we afford to miss
before opportunity quits
knocking on our door?"
Kelley is on the board of
directors of the DeFuniak
Business and Professional
Association and said he
hears the frustrated com-
plaints of local business
leaders who say their con-
cerns are routinely ignored
by city officials. Kelley also
said there are many ordi-
nances and regulations that


need a fresh look, includ-
ing building codes, park-
ing lot and retention pond
requirements and the city's
cemetery policies. "Because
the size and population of
DeFuniak Springs has gone
virtually unchanged for de-
cades, many of our current
ordinances are over-zealous,
over-reaching and simply
unnecessary," he said.
Kelley, a two-term presi-
dent of the Walton County
Heritage Association, said,
"No one appreciates the his-
torical character of this town
more than I and no one will
work harder to protect it.
Loosening these restrictions
will not disturb the unique
charm of our beautiful town.
DeFuniak Springs was just
as lovely 20 years ago before
we had all these new ordi-
nances and our economy
was more robust."
When it comes to media
relations, there is simply
no one who comes close to
matching his experience.
"I started in radio in 1974
and for most of the last 18
years, I served as news di-
rector for WZEP, co-owner
of WGTX, then as editor of
the Herald-Breeze. I have
closely watched and care-
fully reported back to listen-
ers and readers the actions
and decisions of local gov-
ernment. A good reporter
or editor must understand
the issues and the players
to. be able to successfully
share that information," he
said. "Understanding the
benefits of good media re-
lations, I have maintained
close contact with reporters
and news agencies through-
out the area, which will be a
great benefit to the Council
and the people."
In closing, Kelley said
that he shares the tradi-
tional values of people of
DeFuniak Springs. "I am a
Christian and have been a
member of the First Baptist
Church for over 40 years. I
attended Maude Saunders
Elementary School when
it was located on what is
now Walton Middle School
and I graduated from Wal-
ton High School. This is my
home and I am enormously
proud of the people of this
community. Like them, I
believe in helping others in
need. I believe we ought to
spend the public's money as
carefully as we spend our
own. I believe in hard work
and taking responsibility
for one's own actions and I
believe that freedom, liberty
and justice are the corner-
stones of our democracy,"
said Kelley.
"Please join me as we set
a new course and a new di-
rection, so that DeFuniak
Springs can again claim its
rightful place as the Jewel
of the Panhandle."


Hospice team you know and trust
Hometown service Proven care in the community


End-of-life care





Not-for-profit charitable organization

Our family of caregivers is ready to work together with yours.
Take the time now.


I


DeFuniak Springs Community Support Center: 951-0127
Niceville Branch Office: 729-1800 Crestview Branch Office: 682-3628
covenanthospice.org


Covenant
HOSPICE
Licensed in Florida in 1983


OFFICIAL MUNICIPAL BALLOT
CITY OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS ELECTION A T
SAMPLE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FLORIDA SAMPLE
APRIL 12, 2011

* INSTRUCTIONS: TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE.
* Use only the marking device provided or a blue or black pen.
* If you make a mistake, do not hesitate to ask for a new ballot. If you erase or make other marks, your
vote may not count.

CITY MARSHAL
(Vote for One )

0 Jimmy (Jay) Macon
CO Mark A. Weeks

CITY COUNCIL
SEAT 1
(Vote for One )
0 Billy Deisler
0 Janie Griffith
CD Mac Work

CITY COUNCIL
SEAT 2
(Vote for One )
0 Bob Campbell
O James A. Huffman
O Kermit M. Wright

CITY COUNCIL
SEAT 3
(Vote for One )
0 Jim Harman
C Ron M. Kelley

REFERENDUM
(Vote for One )

A referendum for selection of "Property Tax Exemptions"

Should the City Council be allowed to renew certain property tax exemptions previously granted to new
businesses and for expansions of existing businesses?

O YES
C NO


Your hometown hardware provider

proudly carries YellaWood" brand products.


[]


Thir. ppeerbenmreimort

TIMETIRNGoTHE]FAMLYTiOGETHER.


PAGE 11-A;


--I








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011
- 4 -. -f -Z i#- JV v. '-


DEFUNIAK SPRINGS MAYOR C. Harold Carpenter was the special guest of honor at
this year's Countyside Festival. Carpenter took a minute for a photo, alongside some of De-
Funiak Springs and Walton County's finest public servants in blue.


THE LIBERTY FIRE DEPARTMENT came out to support the cause of the Friendship
House. Every year fire departments from around the county give young visitors a thrill by
providing them with an up-close experience with the big, red trucks.


Countryside Festival draws community's support


By ALICIA LEONARD
The Friendship House
put together another great
event this past Saturday
with their annual Country-
side Festival in support of
those families who have a
person diagnosed with Al-
zheimer's Disease that can't
afford the cost of respite
care.
Area police and fire
groups, arts and crafts ven-
dors, musicians, civic lead-
ers and a slew of volunteers
of all ages took part in sup-
porting the donation only
respite care group home in
the area.
The theme this year
was "Celebrate Walton,"
in honor of the community
that has rallied around the
home and its mission to pro-
viding caretakers a way to
continue some normalcy in
life while caring for a loved
one with any type of brain
damage or head trauma as
well. Whether it be running
errands or providing time
for a much needed break,
Friendship House provides
a unique opportunity for a
caretaker to take a break
and anyone who has ever
been a caretaker knows it
is very much needed when
providing undivided at-
tention to a sick or injured
loved one.
DeFuniak Springs Mayor
C. Harold Carpenter was
the special guest this year
and an entire line up of mu-
sical guests took to the stage
later in the day.
Since the Friendship
House is community driven,
they can still use volunteers,
donations and clients. If
someone is a caretaker who
needs a break, needs to run
errands, take care of busi-
ness or would like to help
the only community driven
respite care service in the
area, contact the Friendship
House at 353 Juniper Lake
Road in DeFuniak Springs
or call (850) 892-0565 to find
out how you can help or be
helped.














Gone But

Not

Forgotten

project

Anyone who is a descen-
dent of a family that lived in
the New Home, Alice Creek
or surrounding area prior to
1945 (it's now the Eglin AFB
reservation) is invited to the
second reunion on April 9, at
11 a.m. at Southwide Baptist
Church, Coy Burgess Road,
DeFuniak Springs. Bring
a covered dish and bever-
ages. Share old memories,
make new ones by renewing
friends from long ago. For
more information call (850)
548-5353 or (850) 897-2145.


FAMILY IS WHAT IT is
THE FRIENDSHIP HOUSE IS there for neighbors help- all about and m s ad
ing neighbors to care for themselves and their loved ones. a o nd o nd
bies enjoyed getting to play
and letting older brothers
S. and sisters play at the many
S- games available for them.


VOLUNTEERS LIKE Kermit Wright, helping to set up
the grills, are what helps keep the doors open for the Friend-
ship House and the community that needs it.


TEEN VOLUNTEERS, like this group, man the games
for the kids and provide amazing support for the Friendship
House every year for the festival.



LEGAL NOTICE


YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
pursuant to Florida Statute 193.122 and
197.323 Patrick P. Pilcher, Property
Appraiser for Walton County, Florida
hereby gives notice that the final
certification for the 2010 Walton County
Tax Roll was submitted to the Tax
Collector on March 28, 2011.


PLEASE
ACCORDINGLY.


BE


GUIDED


Patrick P. Pilcher, CFA, CCF
Property Appraiser
Walton County, Florida
#406-11 Itc: 3-31


THE OLD FAVORITE OF finding the "needle in a hay-
stack"game kept kids entertained without the use of a video
game or television.


FHS to host MADD speaker
On Friday, April 1, the in a drunk driving accident is invited to attend the pre-
day before Freeport High when he was 16. She now sentation which will begin
School's Prom, FHS will host speaks to groups about the at 9:20 a.m. in the gymna-
Amy Jamieson, a speak- consequences of drinking sium.
er from Mothers Against and driving and how choices For more information, con-
Drunk Driving (MADD). can have a ripple effect on tact Carla Hunt at (850)
Ms. Jamieson lost her son many lives. The community 892-1201, ext. 4120 or at
HuntC@walton.kl2.fl.us.


PUBLIC HEARING TO ADOPT

OVERLAY DISTRICT


The Walton County Board of County Commissioners will
hold a public hearing on Tuesday, April 12, 2011, at the
South Walton Courthouse Annex, 31 Coastal Center
Boulevard, Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, beginning at 5:00
p.m. or as soon thereafter as may be heard, for the adoption of
the Point Washington Neighborhood Plan as an overlay district,
more particularly described as follows:


An ordinance adding Section 2.03.07 to the Walton County
Land Development Code to adopt the Point Washington
Neighborhood Plan as an overlay district; establishing a
defined boundary; establishing that the intent of the plan is to
preserve the unique heritage of the Point Washington
neighborhood and to ensure compatibility for future
development; establishing development standards; establishing
provisions for permitted uses, maximum density and intensity,
setbacks, build-to-lines, lot coverage, allowable accessory
structures, tree protection, short-term rentals, signage, parking
requirements for new construction, and an off-street parking
requirements chart; providing for the incorporation of the Point
Washington Neighborhood Plan as Appendix NP-5 to the
Walton County Land Development Code; providing for
severability; and providing for an effective date.


PAGE 12-A


Point Washington
Neighborhood Plan Area
Stretls
[ Pt Washgton NPA iPropos-)
i Parcels

ost. '938
Po"t Omco
ca 1940'0
S-cMlnn-d Hou.s
Eien SIlo Gnrdwi
ca 1890
WH 6B0. HO
a 1920
Bulllrd & Dutlor S10O
S1920"s
Bert brille ous
M 1920
Board & Batten Lean-lo
Honey Coh-p

n 1935
Bullard HouSB
ca 1888's
Hil'rt House

c 190o,0
Schood Wli
Buildson Houlo
Wise House
ral 1880s
Uolhofisl Chuirch
co 1894
Ok] Post Office
nb0ndon0 1040's

ca 1 3


#405-11 2tc: 3-31;4-7


"-







PAGE 13-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


Last week, when I read
and wrote about an article
titled, "Are whites racially
oppressed," I thought I had
discovered and debunked
the pinnacle of all outra-
geous claims. Turns out, I
was mistaken.
More upsetting than any
racial debate are the indi-
viduals and groups claiming
the earthquake, tsunami
and ensuing nuclear reactor
disaster in Japan is God's
punishment for a select
group of people.
As a matter of fact, Fa-
cebook groups have formed
to promote the idea that the
tsunami and nuclear disas-
ter was a kind of supernatu-
ral payback for Pearl Har-
bor, and television hosts like
Glenn Beck are making their
own asinine claims: "I'm
not saying God is, you know,
causing earthquakes-well,
I'm not not saying that ei-
ther. But I'll tell you this
...There's a message being
sent. And that is, 'Hey you
know that stuff we're doing?
Not really working out real
well. Maybe we should stop
doing some of it.' I'm just
saying..."
My mind swirled over
the cretinous, downright
monstrous accusation. God
is now murdering people
en masse via natural di-
sasters to convey some sort
of cosmic message that hu-
mans are displeasing? No,
I didn't forget the flood, but
I also haven't seen anyone
swallowed by a whale for
three days or coming down
a mountain with stone tab-
lets, or walking by burning
Bushes, so I think we've
passed that phase.
But let's say Beck in all
his semi-coherent wisdom
is right, God is sending
messages through natural
disasters. I suppose Hur-
ricane Katrina was pay-
back for all that voodoo and
Mardi Gras flashing in New
Orleans (talk about overkill,
though). Hurricane Ivan
was a lesson learned for
those quaint little drinking
towns with a fishing problem
to our west. As for the dust
bowl in the 1930s which left
half-a-million people home-


less, thank the flappers and
bootleggers.
Is that what you mean,
Glenn? What goes around
comes around, and for that
matter fun isn't free? I had
no idea you were so versed in
the principles of karma. Per-
haps Beck is at one with the
universe and God is sending
a message, although it got
lost in translation (that hap-
pens a lot with television
media). Maybe the message
is "Pay attention to your sci-
entists, I created them for a
reason, gave them a gifted
intelligence to caution you
how to respect and preserve
this one and only beautiful
mother Earth I gave you, so
when they talk about global
warming and tectonic plates
shifting and the dangers of
mass annihilation at your
fingertips, listen."
As syndicated columnist
Mark Morford realized,
Beck and others who share
his belief of "you've got mail
via Richter Scale 9" must
be in tune with ancient
wisdom, otherwise no one
would dare make such a far-
reaching claim. "Certainly
no one can be so ridiculous
as to suggest that some sort
of...bearded Christian de-
ity was just sitting around,
bored out of his mind and a
bit pissed off, and suddenly
decided, on a frustrated
whim, to flick his middle fin-
ger against the Pacific plate
and touch off a temblor that
killed thousands and sent
a nation into a vicious tail-
spin to 'send a message,'
like a petulant toddler act-
ing out against quiet time.
Certainly no one could be
so childishly heartless, so
spiritually inept to suggest
some sort of cosmic vendetta
is at play. Beck cannot pos-
sibly be that dumbly cruel,"
Morford argued.
Moreford's column boasts
the same sardonic wit I
adore in the likes of Mark
Twain and Kurt Vonnegut,
but at the core is a simple
message: how dare anyone
turn a tragedy of lives lost
into his political step-stool.
Be careful over-reaching, or
God might just thump that
stool out from under you.


Traffic stop leads to illicit drug seizure


n mason s



' BA.4SHLEY.4MASON


21 "hits" of LSD, and two
grams of MDMA and drug
paraphernalia.
Stoffel was charged with
one count of trafficking in
LSD, a first-degree felony;
possession of more than 20
grams of marijuana, a third-
degree felony; possession
of ecstasy, a third-degree
felony; and possession of
drug paraphernalia, a first-
degree misdemeanor.
He was booked into the


Walton County Jail.
The WCSO canine unit
consists of four teams who
assist in the apprehension
of suspects and the seizure
of illegal narcotics. In 2010,
the team recovered two
stolen vehicles and seized
$40,000 in cash and five ve-
hicles. The unit also seized
10 pounds of marijuana,
160 ecstasy pills, 45 pounds
of cocaine and two ounces of
methamphetamine.


On March 23,'the Wal-
ton County Sheriffs Office
(WCSO) arrested Daniel
James Stoffel, 22, of Long-
mount, Colo., for the traf-
ficking of LSD, and posses-
sion of ecstasy (MDMA) and
other illegal drugs.
The investigation began
March 23 after Deputies
Steve Key and Mark Wen-
del and Ella, a certified
narcotics detection canine,
conducted a traffic stop on
Stoffel's vehicle for a seat-
belt violation near mile
marker 88 on Interstate 10.
A probable cause search
of Stoffel's vehicle was con-
ducted after Ella alerted
the deputies of the possible
presence of illegal narcot-
ics in the vehicle. During
the search, the canine unit
seized what appeared to
be one ounce of marijuana,


DRUGS AND PARAPHERNALIA seized in a March 23 traffic stop/drug bust.


U.S.A.F. Col. Paul Calta-
girone


Caltagirone
assigned to the
American
Embassy in
New Delhi
U.S.A.F. Col. Paul Calta-
girone has been assigned to
the American Embassy in
New Delhi, India.
He will be the senior mili-
tary advisor to the Federal
Republic of India.
He is there with his fam-
ily, wife, Angela, and daugh-
ters Carmella and Eliza-
beth.

He is the son of John (JC)
Caltagirone of Freeport and
mother Linda Valentine of
Fort Walton Beach, Fla.


MEMBERS OF
THE LAW EN-
FORCEMENT
community, north
Walton County res-
idents and repre-
sentatives of local
government were
in attendance at a
ceremony dedicat-
ing the new Wal-
ton County Sher-
iff's Office Paxton
Substation. (Photo
by Reid Tucker)


SUBSTATION FROM PAGE 1-A


building contains space for
two offices, an interview
room and a conference room
used for law enforcement op-
erations. Adkinson elaborat-
ed on the multi-use nature
of the facility, saying that it
could be used by any num-
ber of civic organizations
and constitutional offices,
including the Walton Coun-
ty Property Appraiser's Of-
fice and Tax Collector's Of-
fice as well as whatever uses
required of it by the Paxton
Town Council. Addition-
ally, special safety features
included in the substation's
construction enable it to
be used as a shelter in the
event of inclement weather
such as tornados and up to
Category 3 hurricanes.
Even with these capabili-
ties, the $117,500 building
came in significantly under
the $160,000 amount bud-
geted for construction and
was completed ahead of
time as well. Furthermore,
Adkinson said "zero taxpay-
er dollars" were used in the
project, as the total funds
needed came from assets
seized by the WCSO during
criminal investigations.
"I look at it as a return on


an investment and as mak-
ing good on a promise," Ad-
kinson said. "We said that
we would seize assets and
go after criminals. This was
a great opportunity to take
money generated from crim-
inal activity and give it back
to the community. I looked
at this as a long term invest-
ment. This is something that
will be here past my tenure
in office and is something
the people will get continual
use out of."
The WCSO initially dis-
cussed whether it was bet-
ter to remodel the old Pax-
ton Substation, which had
been in operation in various
capacities since the early
1960s, or to construct a new
building entirely. It was
eventually decided that it
was more cost-effective to
build a new facility from
the ground up as that would
allow it to more easily ad-
here to modern regulations
regarding handicap ac-
cess, security and building
codes while providing a full
range of services to Paxton
residents. The Paxton Town
Council unanimously ap-
proved the WCSO's plan late
last year and a few months


later construction was com-
pleted.
While funds are current-
ly unavailable for staffing
a full-time receptionist or
clerk at the substation, net-
working back to the WCSO
main office will give resi-
dents access to the full range
of services provided. The
substation will eventually'
be used as the home base of
a property investigator and
deputies on patrol will be
able to use it as a waypoint
while working in the north
end of the county.
Paxton Mayor Hayward
Thomas, who also spoke at
the dedication ceremony, ex-
pressed his satisfaction with
the new substation, saying
it met a longstanding need
in the community. In fact,
he liked the substation so
much that he jokingly sug-
gested a trade between the
city of Paxton and Walton
County.
"It's a great building and
a great asset to the city of
Paxton," Thomas said. "I
told the sheriff we're proba-
bly going to try to move City
Hall up here and move [the
WCSO] down there to the
City Hall building because
this place is so nice."


Pursuant to 101.5612 F.S., the public testing of the voting equipment
to be used in the DeFuniak Springs City Election to be held April 12,
2011 will be conducted on Thursday, April 7, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. This
testing will be held at the Supervisor of Elections Office at 571 US
Highway 90 E, DeFuniak Springs, Florida. The public is encouraged
to attend. For more information, you may call 850-892-8112.
#408-11 1tc: 3-31



NOTICE OF ABANDONMENT


Notice is hereby given that the City Council

of the City of DeFuniak Springs, Florida, intends

to abandon that portion of 18th Street North of

U.S. Highway 90 which is located in the City of

DeFuniak Springs, Florida.


The City Council shall vote on such

abandonment at its regular meeting on April 11,

2011, at 6:00 P.M. at City Hall, DeFuniak

Springs, Florida.


Note: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Council with respect to any matter considered at such
meeting or
hearing, such .i.


need a record -
of the
proceeding ,, 1
and that, for
Such purpose, City-of DeFunlak Sprinw.
such person
may need to
ensure that a
verbatim la4
record of the / 27-
proceeding is /
made, which
r e c o r d I 1 \
includes the
testimony and
e v i d e n c e 2010ABANDON-02S
N 18th St
upon which A
NORTH
the appeal is inch = 250 fee
to be based. 1o0/21o2010
#407-11 ltc: 3-31


DANIEL JAMES
STOFFEL


DEFUNIAK SPRINGS CITY ELECTION PUBLIC


LOGIC AND ACCURACY TESTING








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



ANTICIPATION HIGH AS OHIO VALLEY GOLD &


SILVER REFINERY OPENS FOR BUSINESS


NEXT WEEK IN DEFUNIAK SPRINGS & NICEVILLE!


By David Morgan
STAFF WRITER

Been following the gold and silver
market lately? Well if you have a
jewelry box, a lock box full of gold or a
coffee can full of old coins, you should
be, according to Ohio Valley Refinery
spokesperson John Miller. "The gold
and silver markets have not been this
strong for over 30 years" said Miller.
Typically when the U.S. dollar is weak
and the economy is flat, gold and silver
markets soar. "That's good news if you
are sitting on a few gold necklaces or
an old class ring" says Miller.
Next week, starting Monday at
9am and every day next week through
Friday, the Ohio Valley Refinery is
setting up a satellite refinery right here
in DeFuniak Springs at the Comfort
Inn & Suites and in Niceville at the
Quality Inn. During their 5 day stay,
anyone can bring gold, silver or platinum
items and turn them in for immediate
payment, explains John Miller. "Just about
everybody has some amount of gbld or
silver just lying around collecting dust and
this week anybody can sell theirs direct to
our refinery. Typically selling direct to a
refinery.is reserved for larger wholesale
customers like jewelry stores, pawn shops
and laboratories" says Miller. "We are
changing how business is done," he
explains "we want to do business with
everybody so we took our business to
the streets". "Our teams visit various
cities around the country hosting 5 day
events and allowing the general public
to take advantage of our services. "The
turnout has been overwhelming" says
Miller. "Usually each day is busier than
the previous day. It seems once people
come to us and sell something, they are
so amazed what an old ring or gold coin
is worth, they go home and start digging
around for more and telling relatives,
friends and neighbors. It's like a feeding
frenzy by the third day. People line up with
everything from gold jewelry to sterling
silver flatware sets to old coins. I think


to 1 hour, so bring something to read.
If you are the owner of a jewelry store,
pawn shop, dentist office or a dealer you
are encouraged to call ahead to make
an appointment with the smelt master to
discuss their special dealer programs.
They can be reached during Refinery
hours at (217) 787-7767.
Ohio Valley Refinery will open for
business Monday from 9am-6pm. The
event continues every day through next
Friday. No appointment is needed for the
general public.



Chek t ut


Above: Refinery representatives will be on hand next week starting Monday through
Friday to purchase all gold, silver and platinum items, as well as coins. Public welcome!


during this bad economy everybody can
use extra money, but most people say they
are taking advantage of selling direct to
our refinery because of the higher prices
we pay".
During this special event, anyone is
welcome to bring all types of gold, silver
and platinum to the refinery and turn it
in for instant payment. The types of items
they will accept include all gold jewelry,
gold coins, gold ounces, dental gold,
old coins made before 1965 including
silver dollars, halves, quarters and dimes,
anything marked "sterling" including
flatware sets, tea pots, silver bars, silver
ounces and all industrial precious metals.
What should you expect if you go
to the event to sell your gold and/or
silver? Just gather up all gold, silver and
platinum in any form. If you are not sure
if it's gold or silver, bring it in and they
will test it for free. When you arrive at
the event you will be asked to fill out a
simple registration card and will be issued
a number. Seating will be available.
When your number is called you will be


escorted to a table where your items will
be examined, tested and sorted. This only
takes a few minutes, using their expertise
and specialized equipment. Items will be
counted and/or weighed. The value of
the items will be determined based on
up to the minute market prices. Live feeds
will be available at the event displaying
current market prices of all precious
metals. If you choose to sell your items,
they will be bagged and tagged and you
will be escorted to the cashier to collect
your payment. Waiting time to sell your
items may range from just a few minutes



"MOMMM" ON


FO MREINORATON CL
2 1 7 8 7 .7 6 70


SILVER AND GOLD COIN PRICES

UP DURING POOR ECONOMY.


Collect rs and Enthusiasts
in DeFuniak Springs and
Nkievlle with $200,000 to
Purchase Yourts

By Ken Mclntosh
STAFF WRITER

Got Coin? It might be just the time to
cash in. Next week, starting Monday
and continuing through Friday, the
International Collectors Association in
conjunction with the Ohio Valley Gold
& Silver Refinery will be purchasing all
types of silver and gold coins direct from
the public. All types are welcome and the
event is free.
Collectors will be on hand to identify
and sort your coins. Then the quality or
grade will be determined. The better the
grade the more they are worth, according
to collectors I talked to. With the silver
and gold markets high, prices of older
coins are too. Any coins minted before
1965 in the U.S. are 90% silver, except
nickels and pennies.
The coin's worth is determined by the
rarity and the grade. Old silver dollars
are worth a great premium right now,
even well worn heavily circulated ones
are bringing good premiums. Franklin
and Kennedy half dollars, Washington
quarters, Mercury and Roosevelt dimes
are all worth many times the face value.
While older types like Seated Liberty,
Standing Liberties, and Barber coins are
worth even more.
Gold coins are really worth a lot
right now, according to Brian Eades of
the International Collectors Association.
"This country didn't start minting coins
until 1792" says Eades. He explained,
"Before that, people would trade goods
using gold dust and nuggets. Some
shop keepers would take more gold
than needed to pay for items purchased.
There was no uniform system of making
change."
The government opened the first
mints and began distributing the coins
in 1792. By the beginning of the 19th


ITEMS WE WILL
ACCEPT INCLUDE:


i , i 3. '















century, coins and paper currency were
wide spread and our monetary system

required all banking institutions to turn
in all gold coins. Once all-banks turned
in this gold, the president raised the
gold standard from $20.00 per ounce to
$33.00 per ounce. This was his way of
stimulating the economy during the great
depression. However, gold coins were
never redistributed after the recall. But not
all gold coins were turned in. "Many folks
during that time didn't completely trust the
governm nt and chose to keep their gold"
said Eades.
These gold coins are sought after by
collectors today and bring many times
the face value. Any gold coins with the
mint marks of CC, D or O will bring nice
premiums. Collectors at the event will be
glad to show you where to look. Other
types of coins will also be purchased
including foreign coins, Indian cents, two
cent pieces, half dimes, three cent pieces
and buffalo nickels to name a few.
Collectors warn people against
trying to clean their coins, as significant
damage can be done and the coin's
value lessened.


COINS: All coins made before 1965:
silver and gold coins, dollars, halves,
quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All
conditions wanted!
VINTAGE GUITARS: Martin, Gibson,
Fender, National, Rickenbacker,
Gretsch, Mandolins, Banjos & others
WRIST & POCKET WATCHES: Rolex,
Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard,
Cartier, Philippe, Waltham, Swatch,
Elgin, Bunn Special, Railroad, Ebel,
Illinois, Hamilton & all others
JEWELRY: Gold, silver, platinum,
diamonds, rubies, sapphires, all types
of stones and metals, rings, bracelets,
necklaces, etc. (including broken and
early costume jewelry)


ANTIQUE TOYS: All makers and types
of toys made before 1965: Hot Wheels,
Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint,
Robots, Battery Toys, Mickey Mouse,
Train Sets (all gauges, accessories,
individual cars), Barbie, GI Joe, German
& others
WAR MEMORABILIA: Revolutionary War,
Civil War, WWI, WWII, etc: swords,
badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives,
gear, letters.

Local records reveal to our research
department that recent vintage guitar
sold for $2400.00 and another for
$12,000.00 to a collector that will be
tied into the event this week via live
database feed.


LOCAL RESIDENTS ARE READY TO CASH IN!
: ., 4 '-



By David Morgan
STAFF WRITER

Hundreds of phone calls from local residents poured in to the corporate office of the
Ohio Valley Gold and Silver Refinery this week-inquiring about items to be purchased
by the team of antique buyers that is on site with OVGSR.
The team of buyers next week are purchasing a vast array of vintage items, along
with the coins, gold jewelry and sterling silver items the refinery deals in. It is a local
shot in the arm for our economy-the spokesperson for the event expects to spend in
excess of $200,000.00 next week in DeFuniak Springs and Niceville, paying
local residents on the spot. The spokesperson for the company has explained that these
collectors are paying collector prices for the vintage items and it is great way for people
to get a great value for their items.

X J 6amavo0n" 4


Above: Refinery representatives will be on hand next week starting Monday through
Friday to purchase all gold, silver and platinum items, as well as coins. Public welcome!


PAGE 14-A








PAGE 1-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011


PL, '


First Christian Academy students




study ancient Egypt to better




understand modern world


TANNER ABBOTT, as the King of Upper Egypt, might
be the most powerful 10-year-old since Tutankhamun's sec-
ond year on the job. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


By REID TUCKER
Most fifth-graders don't
have adoring servants for
friends but 10-year-old Tan-
ner Abbott wouldn't know
what that's like, what with
being recently named King
of Upper Egypt and all.
Abbott, the oldest of 26
students at the First Bap-
tist Church of DeFuniak
Springs' First Christian
Academy, pointed with
pride to the ancient Egyp-
tian hieroglyphics spelling
his name. Flanked by sev-
eral of the school's under-
classman (his loyal and stal-
wart vassals), he said it took
him about 30 minutes to in-
scribe his name in a royal
cartouche using the nearly
5,000-year-old writing sys-
tem.
"It was a lot of fun," Ab-
bott said. "It took a while be-
cause it's so different (from
writing in English) but it's
cool. This whole week is go-
ing to be really cool."
The young pharaoh was
referring to the First Chris-
tian Academy's annual
"mini-mester," a simulated
weeklong educational trip to
exotic locales like the rain-
forests and ancient ruins of
South America or the high-
walled fortresses and for-
bidden cities of China. This


year's mini-mester deals
with the whole of the Afri-
can continent with a special
emphasis on Egypt.
From March 20 25, stu-
dents were immersed in ev-
erything from the language,
history and culture of the
ancient Egyptians to the
geography and animal life
of the rest of the continent.
In addition to these more
bookish activities, students
designed their own phara-
onic head-dresses, inscribed
their signatures in royal
cartouches, ate African
food like baba ganoush and
couscous at mealtimes and
experienced the barter sys-
tem in a simulated open-air
market built in the church's
fellowship hall.
In addition to the aca-
demic side of exploring a
foreign culture in a school
setting, the mini-mester
also emphasizes the ways
in which students can share
their faith and help others,
said First Christian Acad-
emy Director Jennifer Wilk-
erson. To that end, students
learn about missionaries
that have served and cur-
rently work in Africa. Wilk-
erson said they also engage
in comparative studies of
Islam and ancient Egyptian
pantheistic religion and


SEVEN YEAR-OLD GAINES MARSHALL wanted des-
perately to purchase this tribal mask in the "Memphis Mar-
ket" constructed by academy staff in the church's fellowship
hall. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


THE ACADEMY'S students peruse the Memphis Market and learn about the barter system as part of the experiential
learning emphasized by the annual mini-mester. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


modern Christianity.
"In addition to learning
the academics it helps teach
children about missionaries
and how they can be a mis-
sionary at home or abroad,"
Wilkerson said. "It shows
them they can help someone
wherever they are, overseas
or just here at home."
Pastor Bobby Tucker said
another of the purposes of
the mini-mesters is to give
the students an increased
global perspective in both
an academic and spiritual
sense. Tucker said these
efforts are reinforced by
the subject matter itself,
as Egypt, site of one of the
longest-lasting early civili-
zations, is featured just as
heavily in. the Bible as it is
in today's news media. This
double-exposure increases
the chances that students
will take to heart what they
learn about in school, Tuck-
er said.
"We live in a global society
and for the kids to be able


to experience another cul-
ture, especially an ancient
culture that they can read
about in the Bible and also
read about today, is hugely
advantageous," Tucker said.
"In their Bible lessons they
read about Egypt but then
they can go home and turn
on CNN or Fox News and
there Egypt is again. They
get to see and feel and touch
it and also have their minds
expanded so it's a really cool
thing we're involved in."
The First Christian Acad-
emy is just one of several
ministries offered by the
First Baptist Church: Oth-
ers include a prison min-
istry, a pregnancy support
center, the WAKJ 91.3 FM
radio station and preschool
and afterschool programs.
The academy is open to all
students from kindergar-
ten through fifth grade but
Wilkerson said the curricu-
lum will be expanded to ac-
commodate sixth-grade stu-
dents beginning next year.












THE STUDENTS of the
First Baptist Church of De-
Funiak Springs' Christian
Academy pose in their an-
cient Egyptian-themed re-
galia at the start of the 2011
"mini-mester." (Photo by
Reid Tucker)


~
;'
j,-
1








PAGE 2-B

St. Agatha's Concert

Series April 3


Could it be Spring al-
ready, was that a songbird,
or was that a flute? On
Sunday, April 3 at 3 p.m.,
the answer will definitely be
"flute." Actually the entire
flute family, including pic-
colo, concert flute, alto flute,
and bass flute. The Lake-
side Concert Series at St.
Agatha's Episcopal Church
presents "Flutes Furioso"
of Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC).
The flute ensemble
"Flutes Furioso" was found-
ed in January of 1995 by di-
rector Robin Home, a well-
known Fort Walton Beach
flutist, performer, teacher
and faculty member of
NWFSC. The group is made
up of local flutists, includ-
ing both advanced students
and professional musicians.
They enjoy performing both
popular arrangements and
original works for flute


choir. They also play several
pieces composed specifically
for this group. The concert
features many members of
the flute family, including
piccolo, concert flute, alto
flute and bass flute. Flutes
Furioso is the only regularly
established flute choir in the
Panhandle.
Admission to the concert
is free, though a collection
is taken to be used only for
the support of the series. A
reception will be held imme-
diately following the perfor-
mance to provide the audi-
ence an opportunity to meet
the artists. The program, in-
cluding a brief intermission,
will run about one hour. All
are invited to enjoy the mu-
sic and the reception.

St. Agatha's Episcopal
Church is located at 144
Circle Drive in DeFuniak
Springs.


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


-
FINLEY REESE with big sister Laney Grace Kelley.


Finley Reese


joins Kelley family


Laney Grace Kelley is su-
per excited to announce the
birth of her baby sister, Fin-
ley Reese Kelley who was
born Aug. 27, 2010, at 8:29


a.m. She weighed 7 pounds
and was 19 1/2 inches long.
Proud parents are Charlie
and Sam Kelley.


Camden Brantley


arrives March 7


Justin Butts and Stepha-
nie Crawford announces
the birth of their son Cam-
den Brantley. Camden was
welcomed (by the Grace
of God) on March 7, 2011
by his grandparents Con-
nie Hludzik of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla., and Todd and
Nita Crawford of DeFuniak


Springs, Fred and Jennie
Butts of West Virginia and
great-grandparents, Pastor
Robert and Donna Glass of
DeFuniak Springs and Fred-
die and Sarah Butts of West
Virginia, and Shirley Craw-
ford of Georgia, and many,
many aunts and uncles and
cousins who love him.


CAMDEN BRANTLEY


Chautauqua Theatre presents


"Murder can be Habit-forming"


Connect With Us On Facebook
The DeFuniak Herald Beach Breeze


When a busload of pas-
sengers is stranded by a
blizzard in upstate New
York, they find their way
to an old mansion in the
woods, now St. Mary's Con-
vent, where the Rev. Mother
Mary Cecilia provides them
lodging for the night. Un-
fortunately, she soon real-


Dear Auntie Em,


It seems to be time to
cast a vote again in my area
and I have grown somewhat
perplexed as to whom to
choose. In the past I have
not been too thrilled with
my choices. Everyone keeps
saying they want to cut my
taxes, but for the last eight
years, with self-proclaimed
conservatives at the helm in
many branches of local gov-
ernment, my taxes just keep
going up.
Part of me doesn't
think going out to cast a
vote is worth it anymore.
Politicians are going to tell
me what I want to hear to
get my vote and then help
their buddies and business
partners, and not an aver-
age citizen like me. I see the
top management locally get-
ting big raises and the work-
ing class get hardly nothing
but saddled with more taxes
and longer hours and job
cutbacks.
Do you think it is worth
it to vote? How can anyone
choose or know who is really
right for the positions? I just
don't know what to think
anymore. Your thoughts
would be appreciated.

Vexed voter

Dear Vexed,


I know what you mean.
Sometimes I believe that one
must vote for the one that
can cause the least damage.
I try not to think about poli-
tics any more than I have to
these days, and only glean
what I do know of incum-
bents' policy by attending
meetings. There is no way.to
understand that when you
have a new person running
for office.
Like you, I have noticed
every tax I pay creeping up
while I hear the continual
drumbeat of cutting busi-
ness taxes around every
corner, and not those of the
mom and pops' businesses
either. I think that your vote
does count though, even if
sometime we may feel that
it doesn't. I think it is our
duty as Americans to vote
in every election and to ask
every question we can of our
elected and soon to be elect-
ed officials. One way of doing
that is to become much more
involved with your local civ-
ics. Go to all the meetings
you can. Ask questions, and
really listen to what those in
office have to say. Ask your-
self if they have made good
decisions, and if they have
never held office, but owned
a business, look to see how
they have handled that.


Most of all, we know when
someone says something
that resonates with our core
values, or when we feel they
are spouting a party line.
Also pay attention to what
they have to gain by running
for office. Politics is a dirty
business, and many enter
into it because they want to
see a change and see things
handled differently, while
some enter to gain access
to even a limited amount of
power. Which candidate is
which will have to be your
decision, but don't shy away
from meeting them, asking
tough questions and keep-
ing your BS meter running
while doing so. God bless,
good luck and get out and
vote.

Auntie Em

Send your letters and
emails to Auntie Em to df-
sherald@gmail.com or to
P.O. Box 1546, DeFuniak
Springs, FL.32435


izes that among her guests
is likely to be a serial killer
known as "the Mary Mur-
derer" whose victims are all
named Mary.
Though most of the sis-
ters have been stranded in
Buffalo, the four nuns re-
maining with her all have
the first name Mary, as do




Happy
12th

Birthday


two of the women on the
bus. To add to the list of
potential victims, one pas-
senger is a flamboyant ac-
tress whose TV character is
named Mary and another is
a retired school teacher who
was formerly... you guessed
it, a nun named Mary. Be-
fore the night is over, the
killer strikes.
Which person from the
bus could be the Mary Mu-
derer? The college professor?
The newspaper columnist?
The bus driver? Luckily,
police detective Patrick Mc-
Dougal was also on the bus
and takes charge of solving
the case. Providing as many


laughs as chills, Murder
Can Be Habit-Forming is a
light-hearted mystery com-
edy that reveals the very
human side of the nuns as
they attempt to stay one
step ahead of the killer.
Show Dates: Saturday,
April 16 at 7 p.m.; Sunday,
April 17 at 2:30 p.m;. Fri-
day, April 15 at 7 p.m.
Ticket Prices: Adults $12.
Students 22 and under,
$10.
For more information
call (850)892-9494, or email
info@fcweb.org .
The Florida Chautauqua
Inc. is a 501C3'non profit or-
ganization.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR

The Paxton Ruritan Club would like to thank the following people for their support in the
recent Ruritan Annual Equipment Auction: Rockin' S Auction, Henry Alford, Auctioneer;
Dale Anderson, Suzie Thomas, the City of Paxton, the Walton County Sheriffs Depart-
ment, the local community and all the buyers and sellers.


The City of DeFuniak
Springs and airport staff
are excited to announce that
wireless internet access is
now available at the De-
Funiak Springs Municipal
Airport. This is a service
that many customers have ngra .
requested, and it will be a
great asset to the airport H
and community.


Avery

Norman


March 25, 2011


We love you,


Mom & Dad,
Maddie, Mason,
Granny Sandra,
and Papa Mercer


El


Barbara is back!


mERLE nORmFRn Studio
Winn Dixie Shopping Center
DeFuniak Springs, FL 892-3011
j- -


J








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


OFFICERS: ROW 1: Phyllis Lake, Betty Crain, Kim May, Thelma Camara, Mildred Roach, JoAnn Burdick, Mary
Emond, Janet Brown, Floried White, Row 2: LaJuana Hooks, Michelle Jackson, Protem, Rosanna McCurry, Judy Rush-
ing, Protem, Marilyn White, Lucy White, Susan Haney, Row 3: Martha Wilbanks, Marian Godwin, John White, Izaias
Camara.


Eastern Star installs officers


DeFuniak Chapter Num-
ber 115, Order of the Eastern
Star, held an open Installa-
tion on February 26, 2011.
The Installing Officers for
the evening were Installing
Officer: Charlene Williams,
Past Grand Matron of the
Grand Chapter of Florida,
Assisting Installing Officer:
Billy Williams, Chaplain:
Heather Earnhardt, Past
Grand Chaplain, Marshal:
Theresa Mouer, Past Grand
Marshal and Organist: Sha-
ron Wykle, Past Matron.
Officers installed for the
year 2011-2012 were: Wor-
thy Matron: Marian Godwin,
Worthy Patron: John White,
Associate Matron: Martha
Wilbanks, Associate Patron:
Izaias Camara, Secretary:
Floried White, Treasurer:
Phyllis Lake, Conductress:
Kim May, Associate Con-
ductress: Thelma Camara,
Chaplain: Mary Emond,
Marshal: Marilyn White,
Organist: Rosanna McCur-
ry, Adah: Mildred Roach,
Ruth: Susan Haney, Es-
ther: LaJuana Hooks, Mar-
tha: Betty Crain, Electa:
Lucy White, Warder: JoAnn
Burdick, Sentinel: Janet
Brown.
The Presentation of the
Flags were given by the De-
Funiak High School Honor
Guard: Right Guard: Jus-
tin Siefert, American Flag:
Jessica Lindsey, Christian
Flag: Shaun Banks, Eastern
Star Flag: Alyssa Dominick
and Left Guard; Cody Ad-
ams.
The Addenda was nar-
rated by: Mary Emond. The
Emblem Bearers were: Bi-
ble: Joan Desruisseaux, The
Magnolia: Sophia Elizabeth
Parker, Cross Pens and Mu-
sical Notes Plaques: Marilyn


KIWANIS CLUB OF TRI-
CITY'S FLORALA is looking
for food and craft vendors for
the April 9, first annual Old
Timers Day in Paxton, Fla.
from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. They
have ample space for craft
booths and food vendors.
There is a $25 charge for
vendor space and 20 percent
commission for food ven-
dors. They also have some
space left for demonstrators
of old time crafts and arts.
For more information call
Glen Powell at (334) 858-
3800 or Pam Thompson at
(858) 834-2803.


White. The Emblem Bear-
ers: Adah: Wanda Mitchell,
Ruth: Ruth Wilson, Esther:
Olive Watson, Martha: Mil-
dred Johnson, Electa: Lucy
White.
The Worthy Matron chose
for her Theme: Friendship,
Her Emblem: The Cardinal,
Her Guide: The Holy Bible,
Scripture: John 15:12 "This
is my Commandment, that
ye love one another as I have
loved you."
In closing, the Mizpah,
was given and the officers
retired to the Fellowship
Hall which was beautifully
decorated with an arrange-
ments of the Magnolia and
Red Cardinal on each table
as well as in the windows
using her colors of red, gold
and green.
Everyone was invited to
stay and share food and fel-
lowship.


MARY EDMOND Past Matron, DeFuniak Chapter No.
115presents a check to Joe Simmons, representing the Shri-
ners Children Hospital. Mary's project for the past year re-
.ceived donations from the members of the chapter, in the
amount of $502.31.


INSTALLING OFFICERS: Sharon Wykle, Installing Grand Organist: Theresa Mouer,
Installing Grand Marshal, Heather Earnhardt, Installing Grand Chaplain, Charleen Wil-
liams, Installing Grand Officer, Marian Godwin, Worthy Matron, John White, Worthy Pa-
tron, Billy Williams, Assisting Installing Grand Officer.



BEADS AND SUCH BOUTIQUE
1614 West Highway 90


European Beads & Jewelry
Purses

Bags


Bows
& Much More!


No Cash to Shop?
No PROBLEM!
Bring your
old gold and silver jewelry


or coins and get cash in hand!
Highest Prices GUARANTEED!

Call 850.892.0211


COMMUNITY CALENDAR

THE WALTON HIGH SCHOOL classes of 1965-1967
are planning a combined reunion for June 10-11, 2011. We
plan to do some charity work in the community on June 10
followed by a picnic at Glendale Nature Reserve. On the
Junell, they hope to have a school tour followed by a golf
outing (format and type yet to be decided) with an evening
meal/social at the Country Club. Those interested in play-
ing golf please email your preference for a 9 hole scramble
or 18 holes of individual play to Don White at afdtwhite@


aol.com or Karen Baker at
mathprof51148@aol.com.
The cost will be $30 with
$1 being donated to two lo-
cal young athletes to attend
the Special Olympics in
Greece. Request classmates
send their $30 payment
to Sara Keith at 720 Keith
Drive, DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433. No refunds af-
ter May 5, since the Country
Club will need to know final
numbers for food prepara-
tion. The menu sounds awe-
some. Contact Sara Keith
at (850)859-2963 sara720@
hughes.net or Lynda Melson
at (850)974-1651 kookin-
kayte@yahoo.com or Don
White at (210)884-9303 or
email afdtwhite@aol.com
with any questions.
Theywill also be selling
Reunion T-Shirts for $6each
and a directory for $5 or
$10 for both. Send pay-
ment for T-shirt and direc-
tory to Patti Broach at 1602
Rocky Brook Road Opelika,
AL 36801 or contact her by
email at pabroacJh@charter.
net, or Don White at 9706
Mid Walk Dr., San Anto-
nio, TX 78230, or.email at
afdtwhite@aol.com. Bring
a list of medications to see
who is most doped up and
bring yearbook to give them
a chance to update/edit com-
ments they made years ago.
A lot has changed in 44-46
years.


Drivers
Beware!




*F




Jacob
turns
16!













We love you!

Mom, Tommy
Grandma Dial
and
your crazy fam


ne

ily


Now you have a choice!


STELLA'S
Florist and Boutique
850-520-4623

Downtown ,
DeFuniak ,
Springs

Find us on Facebook
and visit our website
www.stellasfloristand
boutique.com
.. ,
!n- It's lime to order corsages and tuxedos



























PLAYS FAVORITES
A Blend of Country's Best & Oldies

ENDLESS ENTERTAINMENT

ENDLESS INFORMATION


24/7

ALWAYS ON FOR YOU
www.wzep 460.com
Click on News
PLAYS FVORITE


COMMUNITY
CALENDAR


PAGE 3-B


Mention Ad &
Receive

10% off!













PAGE ^^^^^^^^^^^^^A^Come and TorshEDUiASISELREH32

SFind the church of yourchoice


ALAQUA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. The pastor and
congregation invite you to come join us for services at 9 a.m. every
Sunday. Church school for children and coffee fellowship follow the
morning service. Serving the faithful at 4189 Coy Burgess Loope
since 1837. Come to the country for worship. Call Pastor Henry
Martin at (850)892-4860 for more information.

ARGYLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 252 Argyle Church Road, Argyle,
FL invites everyone to attend their services. Sunday School 9:45
a.m. all ages, Church Service 11 a.m., Sunday night 6 p.m. all
ages, Wednesday night 6 p.m.
Pastor James Burnham. Call (850)892-2327, or (850)259-2173.
All are welcome.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH invites you to attend
Sunday School 9:45, Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Train-
ing 5 p.m., Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m., Wednesday Prayer
Service 6:30 p.m. Come and be a part of an awesome ministry
here in your community.

BEECHGROVE CHURCH OF GOD and Pastor D. Wayne
Rickards extend a warm welcome to everyone to attend their regular
services. Sunday School begins .at 10 a.m.; morning worship at 11
a.m.; Sunday night services begin at 5 p.m. and Wednesday night
services begin at 6 p.m. The church is located six miles south of
Ponce de Leon on CR 183. For information (850)836-4484.

BIBLE BELIEVERS BAPTIST CHURCH, The congregation and
Pastor Dan Hershey, would like to invite you to come and be a part of
our continuing church growth. If you are looking for a fundamental,
KJV Bible-believing, independent Baptist Church, then we are just
what you are looking for. The preaching is not compromised, it is
straight out of God's Word. The preaching is known to be "old-
fashioned," like it used to be. So, please come join us in worship.
330 North Davis Lane, DFS. Sunday School at 10 a.m. services 11
and 6 p.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study 6:30
p.m. "Teaching the Bible as it is for men as they are."

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W.
Live Oak Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and
congregation welcomes you to join Spirit filled worship services
where we'll treat you in so many different ways, you will have to
like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7 p.m. All are cordially invited
and welcome. For a ride to church contact (850)892-0706 or (850)
892-4704.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come meet and fellowship with
other real people who genuinely love the Lord. Sit under practical
bible teaching and preaching relevant to today's issues. Come let
Jesus Christ heal your body, save your marriage, touch your kids,
and give hope to the broken hearted. Come dressed casual or
Sunday best. All are welcome and will fit in. No ties required. Seekers
welcome. Come see for yourself that we are sound, practical, God
loving people who center our lives around the person of Jesus
Christ and a solid approach to the Holy Scriptures. We do pray for
the sick and needy, and believe in the bible gospel of power to meet
the human need. Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. and Wednesday night
classes begin at 6:30 p.m., Teens: Wednesday nights, Children's
Church: Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights. Cornerstone
Church is located at 2044 Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak
Springs. Ph.(850) 892-2240.

EUCHEE VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is located in
the Euchee Valley community at the intersection of County Hwys.
183 S. and 280 E. Reverend John Erthein and the congregation
warmly invite you to come and worship with us and make us your
church home. Sunday school for all ages begins at 9:45 a.m. and is
followed by Morning Worship at 11:00 a.m. A nursery is provided.
Adult Bible Study is held at 6:00 p.m. on Sunday evenings. Choir
rehearsal is held at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights. If you have
questions or need assistance, please call (850)892-3180.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church
attendance doesn't have to be dull, mundane or feel like just an
added burden to your life! You can attend a church service in which
you feel both welcomed and loved, as well as be challenged by
the powerful preaching of God's Word. The church family of the
First Apostolic Church embraces the doctrine of the early Apostles
and their preaching as recorded in the Book of Acts and other
New Testament teachings. Sunday Services begin at 10 a.m. with
Sunday school for the children and a spirt-filled worship for adults.
Sunday evening service begins at 5:30 with prayer, with worship
and preaching beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday night bible study
begins at 7 p.m. and we offer family prayer on Thursday from 6 p.m
to 7 p.m. each week. Not able to physically attend? Hear sermons
posted on our website at www.defuniakapostolic.com. Come and
experience church the way God started it all in the New Testament!
If you have any questions or need ministry assistance, please feel
free to call the church office at (850) 892-7882. Rev. David W. King,
Pastor.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located
at 461 Van Buren Avenue, Pastor Michael F. Tadlock, his wife,
Amy and Son, Hayden would like to extend an invitation for all
to come join us as we celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus
Christ through Spirit filled worship & annointed preaching!! Sunday
School begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by Morning Worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evening
service begins at 6:30 p.m. Youth Ministry Services are held every
Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Please come and worship with us.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East
Live Oak Avenue. We cordially invite you to join our "Fellowship
of Encouragement" and come for Worship and Bible Study at the
following times: Sunday Bible Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship
(10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5 p.m.) and evening worship
(6:00 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us for prayer meeting
at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship dinners.
Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details. Visit our webpage
at www.fbcdfs.org.

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite
you to worship with us this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Then stay for
refreshments and adult Bible Study and children's Sunday School.
Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz, speaks from the Gospel each
Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We are known throughout
our community as a friendly and serving Church that welcomes
newcomers. We are located on U.S. 331, very near the Florida line
[245121bd 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at
(334) 858-3515 for more specific directions.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS,
1063 Circle Drive, invites the public to join them throughout the
week for worship, fellowship, study and service. A men's fellow-
ship group and Presbyterian women meet monthly for fellowship
and Bible study. Children's and youth activities are announced. Call
for information. Sunday (nursery provided from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.)
9:30 a.m. Songfest for everyone 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for all
ages. 11 a.m. morning worship. Wednesday 3:30 p.m. Presbyterian
youth fellowship. 6:30 p.m. Chancel choir rehearsal.
First and third Wednesday, 9 a.m. 12 p.m. KID'S CLOSET to
provide basic necessities to children of Walton County families in
need.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who


are committed to being an inclusive faith community, where per-
sons from all walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working
together. If you're looking for a church home, we invite you to come
visit us. Church office phone number 892-5832. email:fpcdfs@em-
barqmail.com Website: fpcdfs.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS, located at 88 Circle Drive, Rev. Robert West, staff
and congregation wish to invite you to join our family for activities
on Sunday beginning with Contemporary Worship Service in the
sanctuary at 8:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship Service at 11 a.m. with


Children's Church (Pre-K to third grade) provided for both services;
Vesper service at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. Communion is observed
at both morning services on first Sunday and Sunday School for all
ages at 9:45 a.m. Children's Sunday school (k-6th) is "JAM" (Jesus
and Me) is the Multi-Dimensional Learning program with children
rotating to different workshops (art, computer, cooking/science,
games, storytelling/movie) each Sunday "learning by doing". Other
opportunities on Sunday include: Sr. High Youth Fellowship at 4
p.m..; Jr. High Youth Fellowship and Children (HIS Kids Club) at
3:30 p.m.; Food pantry every 3rd Sat. 7-9 a.m. For more information,
call (850) 892-5332, 892-5128 e-mail fumcdfs@embarqmail.com
website www.fumcdefuniaksprings.org.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF WESTVILLE,
2100 Highway 90 West, Westville. Pastor Jason Campbell and
the Westville church family invite you to come to a place where
Pentecost is an experience, not a thing of the past. We offer a
friendly environment with annointed preaching and singing, Our
Sunday morning services begin at 10 a.m. and our Sunday evening
service begins at 5 p.m. Our Wednesday evening service begins
at 7 p.m. We also offer children's church on Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Come experience the power of the Holy Ghost just like early church
did in the Book of Acts. For more information call, (850) 548-5898
or(850) 892-7499.

FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP INTERNATIONAL is a non-
denominational church filled with excitement about what the future
holds and a sincere hunger for the outpouring of the Spirit of God.
We are a church where God's presence is never taken for granted
and neither are you. Freedom Fellowship is a church looking for a
people "who will humble themselves before God and seek His ways."
2Chr. 7:14, Pastor Dennis Grey II invites your family to be a part of
our family each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Casual dress / Contemporary
Worship. We are now meeting at the Continental Worship Center
located at 2132 U.S. 90 across from the DeFuniak Springs Airport.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FREEPORT 430 Kylea Laird
Drive, Freeport, Fla. Pastor Ken Coots would like to extend an
invitation to one and all to come and "Worship"the Lord Jesus
Christ with us, as we seek His perfect will. Bible Study for all ages
commences at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday. Sunday a.m. worship
service begins at 10 a.m., and Sunday p.m. service at 5 p.m.. The
Wednesday p.m. prayer service begins at 6.p.m.. Both the Sunday
p.m. and Wednesday p.m. prayer services are being held in the
Fellowship Hall. Explicit Bible doctrine is the continuous thread
during both evenings. We at FBC Freeport are strong advocates of
Romans 10:17, "Faith cometh by hearing and hearing by the Word
of God." Hope and pray to see all there! (850) 835-2742 (850) 774-
8327.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (formerly the Concerned Christian
Church) desires to reproduce in doctrine, in life and practice, the
Church founded by Christ. Our position may be summarized as
"where the Bible speaks, we speak" and "where the Bible is silent,
we are silent," we invite you to join us and help spread the message
of Christ in our community. Sunday School (all ages) at 10 a.m.
and worship (including Childrens' Church) starts at 11 a.m. Nursery
available. Our minister is John Dixon and the church is located on
U.S. 90, 2.4 miles west of the intersection of U.S. 90 and U.S. 331
North.

FREEPORT ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 17457 US 331S. Sunday
services: Learning Center 9:45 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:50 a.m.
Do you need joy in your life? Then come hear the sermon series
from the Book of Philippians call "Disturbed by Joy!" Wednesday,
7 p.m. Hear the teaching series. "Traveling through the Psalms."
Nursery available. Phone 865-4068 for more information.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 174 Harrison
Street, (corner of Bayloop & Harrison St.) Freeport, Fl. 32439 Office
- 850-880-6633, Parsonage 850-835-2261, Pastor's Cell Phone -
850-225-4914 Dr. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor. Please come worship
with us. Rev. Dr. G Charles Sattewhite, Pastor announces that we
are having blended services which include both Contemporary and
Traditional services, these services are geared to reach both t he
seeker, and the growing church member, as well as the established
member. WE are excited about what God is doing at the Freeport
UMC. Our service times are 9:00 a.m. for Bible Study, and children's
hour, our Worship time is 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship in
Song 4:00 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wednesday 6:00 p.m., Our Ladies
meet every other Tuesday Night 6:00 p.m., We have a Gospel Singing
Jubilee on the 1st Saturday of every month 6:00 p.m. (Open Mic).
Come be with us. "a short drive for a life changing experience."

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, 2415 County Hwy. 1883,
DeFuniak Springs is a friendly little country church that welcomes
all visitors. Everyone is invited to worship with the congregation.
Sunday school starts at 9:15 a.m. Sunday morning worship is at
10:30 a.m. and Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday
we have prayer meeting starting at 6:30 p.m. and children's mission
program and Bible drill program. Every fifth Sunday, we have special
music followed by "Dinner on the Grounds." We have a nursery for
0-3 and Children's Church for ages 3 through the first grade.
Missions are very important to Friendship. We have Men's, Wom-
en's and children's mission program. Our pastor is Johnmark Brown.
We extend a heartfelt welcome for you to come and join with us
in worship and fellowship. For any questions please call (850)859-
2287.

GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (GPC) Pastor Keith An-
drews and the congregation of GPC invite you to come and worship
with them. At GPC, you'll find teaching that's biblical, practical, and
encouraging; worship that's exciting, joyous, and Christ-honoring;
and fellowship that's warm and personal. Sunday: Sunday School
(all ages) at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Kidz Klub at 11 a.m. Ignitel
(Youth) at various locations from 5 7 p.m. Wednesday: Trans-
formation (Bible study for men and women) at 6:30 p.m. GPC is lo-
cated about 10 minutes north of DeFuniak Springs on SR-83N. Find
out more on the web at www.glendalechurch.org or call (850)859-
0080.

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of
Highway 90 on Laird Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just
before the Okaloosa County line. Grace Community is a church
committed to historical Southern Baptist principles and believes that
the Church is called, not to reflect its culture, but to shape it. We
believe that faith must be lived as well as affirmed, therefore, right
living derives from right believing. We hold to a high view of Scrip-
ture believing the Bible as our final authority and that it "stands
in judgement of us, never do we stand in judgement of it." Sunday
morning worship begins at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday School at 11 a.m.
and evening bible study at 6 p.m. Friday night home Bible study at
6:30 p.m. If you are tired of playing church, come help us shape the
culture where we are "learning God's will one verse at a time."

HARMONY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH and Pastor Donel David-
son together with his family welcome all to worship God in spirit and
in truth, at 974 Adams Road, DeFuniak Springs.
Church services will begin with Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Sun-
day morning worship at 11 a.m.; Sunday evening at 5 p.m., and
Wednesday evening 6:30 p.m. Directions: U.S. 331 N turn on to
Williams Road, go about 3.3 miles to Adams Road, turn right onto
Adams go about 9/10 of a mile to church. U.S. 90, turn onto CR-


1087 in the Mossy Head area, go to Williams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to Adams Road, turn left onto Adams, go
9/10 of a mile to church. From CR-1087 out of New Harmony, turn
left onto Adams Road and go 9/10 of a mile to church. For more
information, call the pastorium phone number at (850) 834-2017.

INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles
south of DeFuniak Springs, cordially invites you to come and
worship with us in Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship
services, at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is
at 6 p.m. Pastor Scot Keppel and the congregation extends a very
special welcome to come visit or make us your church home. We
practice "Love one another". A nursery is provided.


NEW HARMONY BAPTIST CHURCH is located at 2281 County
Hwy. 2A, DeFuniak Springs, FL. only nine miles north of Hwy. 90 on
Rt. 1087 from Mossy Head. Pastor Todd Camp would like to invite
you to worship with us during any of our exciting weekly services.
We are a family church that loves Jesus! Our Sunday School hour
is from 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. followed by our morning worship
service at 11 a.m. Nursery and children's church are provided. Our
Sunday evening service begins at 6 p.m., as we "study to show
ourselves approved unto God." On Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. we have a dynamic children's program, youth meeting, ladies
ministry, and adult prayer and Bible study service. The church also
offers affordable daycare services. Monday-Friday. We are a Bible
church committed to seeing God change lives in the power of the
Holy Spirit. Come and be a part of "what the Lord is doing at New
Harmony Baptist Church. Call for more information at (850) 834-
2871.

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH 6753 State Hwy 2 East,
Darlington, Fla. We are reaching out to the lost, hurting, hungry,
and naked. Pastor Rev. Curtis Manning and his congregation would
like to invite you to attend services with them. Sunday School for
all ages is at 10 a.m., and Sunday Morning worship is at 11 a.m.;
Sunday evening services will be at 5 p.m.; Wednesday night prayer
and teaching is at 6 p.m.; Come enjoy our anointed praise and
worship and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and
teaching of God's Word. For more information call ( 850 ) 892-
2048.

PASTOR BILL HUNTER AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE
BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, "the Church in
the Wildwood," invites you to come and worship with us just as you
are. Black Creek UMC is located five miles east of Freeport at 278
Memorial Lane. (If you need directions, please call (850)859-2366
or (850)830-1497. We are a church body who loves people and
who also loves to hear the word of God preached. If you sing and/
or play a musical instrument and would like to share your talents)
please come and join us. Make plans now to attend Sunday school
at 10 a.m., Morning Worship at 11 a,m., and Evening Worship at
6 p.m. Rev. Bill may be reached at (850)859-2366 or (850)830-
1497.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs.
Located one mile south of Bob Sikes Road at 1015 Pleasant Ridge
Rd. extends a special invitation for you to join us to worship the
Lord and study His Word at the following times: Sunday Breakfast/
Fellowship (8:45); age appropriate Sunday Bible Study (9:15);
Morning Worship (10:30); Discipleship training (5 p.m.) and Evening
Worship (6 p.m.); Wednesday (6 p.m.) adult Bible study and youth
activities. Participate in meaningful worship with family and friends.
Call (850) 892-3500 for more information.

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at the
intersection of Hwy. 1883 & 183 invites you to Sunday School 9:45
a.m., Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Training at 5 p.m.,
Evening Service 6 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 p.m. Please come
worship God with us.

PORTLAND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH welcomes you!
We are here for you and hope you will bless us with y our presence
as we worship God and live in the community together. We're
different, and seeking new ways to be the church God call us to
be. We focus on prayer, fellowship, study, missions and worship. A
variety of activities are going on weekly. We have Sunday school
for adults and youth. Worship at 11 a.m. and a new contemplative
prayer service beginning in September at 8:30 a.m., nursery
provided. Youth meet on Wednesday along with dinner and adult
Bible studies at 6 p.m. For more information call (850)-307-2009.

SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1307 County Hwy 278,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Morning Worship
10 a.m.; Puppets, Children's and Adult Choir 4 p.m.; Evening Adult
Bible Study, Youth Bible Study, and Children's Mission Classes 5
p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday mid-week
worship service and AWANA 6:30 p.m. Sign language interpretation
for the deaf provided at all services. Southwide Baptist Church has
classes and activities for all ages: Youth Group, Royal Ambassadors,
Girls in Action, Acteens, Adult Choir, Women on Mission, Paintball
(ages 10+ everythird Saturday of the month), AWANA (3yrs-
12th Grade), and sign language classes for all ages. Pastor William
Whaley invites everyone to come and hear the saving word of God.
Directions: from DeFuniak take U.S. 331 S. turn right on first road
(Coy Burgess Loop) past 1-10. Southwide Baptist Church is located
1.5 miles on the left at intersection of Coy Burgess Loop and Millard
Gainey Road. Call (850) 892-3835 for more information or for
directions.

ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is a historic mission
located at 144 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday schedule:
9 a.m. Bible study in the vicarage and 10:15 a.m. Eucharist in the
church. A COMMUNITY "CENTERING PRAYER GROUP" meets
each Saturday morning at 10 a.m. in the church. All are invited.
From December through May COMMUNITY FIRST SATURDAY
BREAKFASTS are served in the parish hall from 7 am. till 11 a.m.
St. Agatha's is the home of the Lakeside Concert series. For more
information call (850) 892-9754

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331
N., P.O. Box 590, DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 32435, Phone: (850)
892-9247. Mass Schedule: Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday,
6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of
Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard Dawson, pastor.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congrega-
tion cordially invite you to attend services with us. Sunday School
is at 10 a.m. Sunday Evening Services are at 6:00 pm. Wednes-
day Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 26 Joe Ander-
son Road (Hwy 83 North). Our pastor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please
come ready to worship and expecting a blessing!

VICTORY LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD, Highway 90
at the Mossy Head Community Center across from the Mossy
Head General Store. We would like to extend to all an invitation to
come and join us and be blessed. We are a church dedicated to
serving Jesus and spreading His wonderful word. Let us share the
light of God's word with you. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.,
followed by Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Each Sunday we have a
fellowship lunch on the grounds, all are invited. Sunday afternoon
service begins about 1:30 p.m. Friday evening service 7 p.m. -
prayer, Royal Rangers, Missionettes and Adult Bible Study followed
by prayer time. Pastor is Thomas Adamson, Children's Ministries
Kevin Chilcutt. For more information call 892-3817 or 652-4610.
Website www.victorylighthouse church.org.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner
of Live Oak and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Open Hearts,
Open Minds, Open Doors," Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School
9 a.m., Morning Worship 10 a.m. The small church by the side of
the road with a cross over the entrance, longing to extend the love
and peace of God to any wayfarer or pilgrim seeking a rest from
this world of strife and despair. A place where common people can
assemble for simple worship and experience the Presence of God
in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered together in my
name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V. "The


devil wins a skirmish with a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the
war."

WESTSIDE CHURCH OF CHRIST Do you truly know what
it means to be saved? Are you worshipping according to God's
divine instructions? If you're even contemplating that answer, then
please come visit us this coming Sunday at 9 a.m. Bible study, 10
a.m.worship, and/or during 7 p.m. Wednesday night Bible class.
The address is 121 East Larkspur Avenue, DeFuniak Springs FL,
32435. If you have any questions please call us at (850)892.3391.


II I -


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 31, 2011


PAGE 4B









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011

Paxton student wins CHELCO Youth Tour competition


David Hodges of Paxton
High School is one of four
high school students who
will represent CHELCO
during Youth Tour week in
Washington, D.C. in June.
The remaining winners of
the March 1 competition
include Kenna Rogers and
Austin Walthall, both of
Crestview High School; and
Sara Schulmeister, Laurel
Hill High School. Rebecca
Davis and Nathaniel Holley,
both of Baker High School,
were chosen as alternates.
When in Washington,
CHELCO's four winners will
travel with approximately
25 other students, repre-
senting co-ops throughout
Florida. Florida's group will
be part of a delegation that
numbers about 1,500 high
school juniors, representing
46 states.
In CHELCO's competi-
tion, winners were chosen
from a field of 16 repre-
sentatives from 10 schools.


A panel of three judges
quizzed the students on
CHELCO facts and the his-
tory of rural electrification.
The judges selected the win-
ners based on knowledge of
subject, poise and appear-
ance, speaking ability and
personality.
Prior to the competition,
the students traveled to Tal-
lahassee Feb. 9-10 as part
of
Florida's Youth Tour in
the capital. While in Tal-
lahassee, the Youth Tour
participants took part in a
mock session in the Senate
and viewed a court case in
the Florida Supreme Court.
They also visited the Chal-
lenger Learning Center to
participate in a demonstra-
tion on electricity and the
IMAX theater to see a movie
on the Hubble telescope.
In Washington, the stu-
dents will visit all the capi-
tal's historic monuments,
as well as the Smithsonian
Institution and Mount Ver-


non. They will also visit leg-
islators on Capitol Hill and
cruise on the Potomac.
Through 28 years of
CHELCO's Youth Tour,
about 600 students have
visited Tallahassee and 86
have made the trip to Wash-
ington during Youth Tour
week.
Youth Tour gives pub-
lic recognition to deserving
young people who live with-
in the cooperative's service
territory. Through the pro-
gram, high school juniors
become acquainted with the
cooperative way of business
and learn about their gov-
ernment.
Additional students par-
ticipating in the 2011 Youth
Tour competition and their
schools included: Kaydee
Willcox, Walton High
School; Madison Spence and
Hunter Bailey, Freeport
High School; Jacob Leuze
and Allison Stroop, South
Walton High' School; Jacob
Wolak and Katherine Sims,


The Collegiate High School;
John Stevenson, Rocky
Bayou Christian School; Re-
bekah Pruett and Nathan
Ritterband, Niceville High
School.
In addition to the stu-
dents who represented area
schools, three students
participated in Youth Tour
through a separate compe-
tition hosted by the Florida
Electric Cooperatives As-
sociation. This competition
is for students who are the
children or grandchildren of
cooperative employees, re-
tirees or board members.
The three participants
were Alex Brack, Walton
High School, grandson of
CHELCO retiree Evelyn
Jones; Brandon Head, Free-
port High School, son of
Customer Care Representa-
tive Mary Head; and Emily
McKinion, Crestview High
School, daughter of Execu-
tive Assistant Denise McKi-
nion.


DAVID HODGES


Boys & Girls Club attempt Guinness world record


PARENTS, STUDENTS AND STAFF MEMBERS participated in the world record attempt. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


By JEFFREY POWELL

On. Tuesday, March 22,
thousands of Boys & Girls
Clubs of America (BGCA)
participants attempted to
break a Guinness simulta-
neous jumping jack world
record. The attempt was
an effort to bring attention
to the importance of young
people living a healthy life-
style. The attempt coincided
with National Boys & Girls
Club week and is part of
their Triple Play Program.
"The kids have been prac-
ticing and looking forward
to this event all week," said
south Walton BGCA Unit
Director Stephanie Rhoden,..
"We had five parents, three
staff members and a club
alumni involved in today's
attempt. We appreciate ev-


eryone that was involved."
Each club that partici-
pated was required to have
at least 25 people involved
and every club began at
6:30 p.m. EST. The partici-
pants were to complete two
minutes of jumping jacks
without stopping. After the
event, witness statements
from each location was sent
to BCGA national who was
responsible for collating all
the information and sub-
mission to Guinness World
Records.
"This was fun and tir-
ing at the same time," said
BGCA student Rose Stran-
sky. "I hope we broke the,
record.
BGCA expects to receive
official word concerning the
results from Guinness in ap-
proximately two weeks.


Walton C t


BIKINI
SETS

$20 EA.
OR 2/$30


4i'e


NEW ARRIVAL... BIKER BOUTIQUE


BA

$1


SHORTS
& TOPS
As Low As

$9


QUALITY APPAREL & ACCESSORIES



.GS CR/ZYCAR

15


AAETL A piit


'I
. .. .


850-951-2525
0 !I a OEMlaII.JlL lB


ft~l 21vl zODuJ


For The Finest In Seafood
Enjoy the sunsets while dining overlooking the
beautiful~ Cfoctawhatchee 'Bay!!
7585 State Hwy 20West Tuesday Sunday
850-835-2222 IIAM-8:30 PM



CRAZY CARL I'


Benjamin Moore


m CAS(Njt RY)

Hardware and Building Supplies
Franks_cc@yahoo.com
FREEPORT LOCATION GRAYTON BEACH LOCATION
244 Highway 20 East 113 Logan Lane
FREEPORT, FL Grayton Beach, FL 32459
(850) 835-4221 (850) 231-0500.


PAGE 5-B


- ,""' .. .. . ...


850-835-4153
18374 U.S. Hwy. 331 S. Freeport, FL 32439

To view our local listings visit our website at
www.freeportwaterfront.com r


SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
HANDLED APPEALS EXPERT
By: Dr. Anna Pat Krupkin, Ph.D
DISABILITY CONSULTANTS
(850) 835-2163
P.O. Box # 539, Freeport, Florida 32439
NO FEE UNLESS YOU COLLECT Since 1970
CALL PAT FOR DETAILS


850-951-2525
1 1:111M^..ll..^.!.L Il~a l" !^*l


'
~F ..


I ,












PAG OB-BUTHEDeNAKSPRNSHRL REZTUSAIAC121


Ward


Bonnie Jean Ward, 74,
of Bruce, Fla. passed away
Tuesday, March 22, 2011 at
her residence. She was born
May 16, 1936 in Niceville,
Fla. Bonnie was Baptist by
faith and a member of Ebro
Baptist Church.
She is preceded in death
by her husband of 52 years,
Hubert Earl Ward.
Bonnie is survived by her
daughter, Sandra L. Os-
born and husband Buddy;
one son, Randall Ward and
wife Kathy; nine grandchil-
dren, Stephen Jones and
wife Carol, Stacy Wilkerson,
Seth Fuller, Maggie Con-
ner, Cody Osborn, Jacob Os-
born, Auston Osborn, Dawn
Gundrum, Justin Spires;
17 great-grandchildren,
Courtney Roberts, Pres-
ton Brown, Kaytlyn Jones,
Hunter Jones, Jonathan
Bonilla, Brandon Bonilla,
Emilee Osborn, Abigail Os-
born, Isabella Osborn, Ivy


Osborn, Zackary Conner,
Skylar Conner, Hayden
Waggoner, Lashuan Gun-
drum, Rashawn Gundrum,
Karma Gundrum, and Con-
ner Spires; one sister, Mary
Madden; one brother, Louie
Willingham; arn. nephew,
Buddy Andrews and wife
Maria.
Funeral services were
held Friday, March 25, 2011
in the chapel of Davis-Wat-
kins Funeral Home, begin-
ning at 11 a.m. with Rever-
end Jack Bailey officiating.
A time of visitation was held
one hour prior to the service.
Committal services followed
at Hatcher Cemetery.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.

Arrangements and ser-
vices were under the direc-
tion of Davis-Watkins Fu-
neral Home.


Laird


Mrs. Donna "Dianne"
Laird, 74, passed away
March 23, 2011. She was
born March 20, 1937 in Wal-
ton County, Florida to Dan-
iel Floyd and Emma Ealum
Slay.
Mrs. Laird was a life long
resident of Walton County
and worked many years for
the Walton County School
District. Dianne enjoyed the
outdoors, but lived for her
children, grandchildren, and
great-grandchildren.
She was an amazing gar-
dener who loved making
things grow. She also en-
joyed quilting, crocheting,
sewing and taking care of
her dog "Sparky".
Mrs. Laird is preceded in
death by her parents; her
husband, Dilbert D. Laird;
one daughter, Lorna Laird,
and five siblings.
Mrs. Laird is survived by
her four sons, Larry Laird
and wife, Catherine Laird of
Houston, Texas, Lennie
Laird and wife, Owene Laird
of Glendale, Fla., Lance
Laird and wife, Gayl Broth-
erton Laird of DeFuniak
Springs, Lonnie Laird and
wife, Laurie Loman Laird of
Morganton, N.C.; one daugh-
ter Lottie Laird Mixson and
husband, Breck Mixson
of Choctaw Beach,Fla.,14
grandchildren, David Laird
and wife, Heidi, Amy Laird,
Allison Toone and husband,
Nathan, Valerie Houston,


Dana Laird, Robyn Laird,
Skylar Laird, Ethan Laird,
Thomas Reese, Jeffrey
Mixson and wife, Bethany,
Lindsay Post and husband,
Jonathan, Samuel Laird,
Lindsey Laird and Jeremi-
ah Laird, and eight great-
grandchildren, Carrie Ann,
Jacob, Sarah, Susan, Kate-
lyn, Chase, Kelsey and Mat-
thew; also survived by sib-
lings Cludie Faulk of Plant
City, Fla., Bill Wilkerson of
Jacksonville, Fla., Roberta
Frazier of Chattanooga,
Tenn., Lynvol Wilkerson of
Graceville, Fla. and Wav-
ine Turner of Panama City,
Fla.

Memorial services were
held, Saturday, March 26,
2011 at Clary-Glenn Funer-
al Home Chapel, 230 Park
Avenue, DeFuniak Springs,
Fla. 32435 with Rev. Joel
Glenn officiating.
Burial of cremains will be
held at a later date at Gum
Creek Cemetery.
Donations may be made
to the American Cancer So-
ciety 339 Race Track Road,
Suite 24, Ft. Walton Beach,
FL 32547, or Covenant Hos-
pice at 370 West Redstone
Drive, Crestview, FL 32536.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign a
guest book, and view video
tribute at www.clary-glenn.
com


Santos
Mr. Luzimar Julio dos
Santos, 41, of Destin, Fla.,
passed away March 21,
2011. He was born Jan. 31,


Adams


Mrs. Ida Louise Harbuck
Adams, 87, passed away
Wednesday, March 23, 2011.
She was born Oct. 6, 1923
in Walton County, Florida
to John and Nancy Ann Hi-
note.
Mrs. Adams had lived
most of her life in Walton
County. She was Baptsit by
faith and a member of New
Harmony Baptist Church.
She was a devoted wife
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother. She was
a talented seamstress and
enjoyed artist crafts and
cooking for her family.
Mrs. Adams is preceded


1969 in Fidelandia, MG
Brazil to Antonio and Dazil-
da Santos.
Mr. Santos is survived by
his wife, Maria Rosilene dos
Santos; one son, Maxwell
Broxson Santos, 17 years-
old, and two daughters,
Bryanna Ingrid Santos, 14
years of age, Winifren Rey-
na Santos, 11 years-old.
Funeral services were
held at 11 a.m., Thursday,
March 24, 201,1 at Village
Baptist Church with Pastor
Eliel Carvalho officiating.
Burial followed in.the Gulf
Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences and sign
a guest book at www.clary-
glenn.com.
Clary-Glenn Freeport
Chapel Funeral Home was
entrusted with the arrange-
ments.


and welcoming her to heav-
en are her husband, Obie
Harbuck; parents, John and
Annie Richardson; sisters,
Grace Poole, Elsie Gorden,
Faye Smith, Dorothy Kaiser
and second husband, Elgert
Adams.
Mrs. Adams is survived by
her daughter, Martha and
Chester Wilkerson; grand-
children, Toma and Jason
Wilkerson; great-grandchil-
dren, Madeline Sewell and
Delilah Wilkerson, John
Sewell and Sedesh Boodram;
sisters, Iris Casteele, Ila
Chandler, Teen Sadler and
Mavis Belle. Also survived
by special friend, Betty Rob-
erts.
Funeral services were
held Friday, March 25, 2011
at New Harmony Baptist
Church with Revs. Larry
Quattlebaum and Todd
Camp officiating.
Burial followed in the
Crowder Chapel Cemetery
in Mossy Head.
Friends and family may go
online to view obituaries, of-
fer condolences, and sign a
guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com

Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home is entrusted with the
arrangements.


Mrs. Ruth Mitcheom
Hutcheson passed away
suddenly, Friday, March 25,
2011 after battling conges-
tive heart and kidney fail-
ure for the past five years.
Although she was a life-
long resident of DeFuniak
Springs, she had resided for
the past five years in Ala-
chua, Fla. with her daugh-
ter, Rebecca ard husband,
Mike Jacobs. Ruth was a
homemaker, cakemaker and
decorator. She also worked
at The Breeze, Fisher Phar-
macy and Walton County
Lunchroom. Ruth was an
avid fisherwomen and en-
joyed many days of fishing
with her husband Adrian
and sister Artie, and Bood
McBroom. During Ruth's
last years, she enjoyed rock-
ing in her rocker, watching
people and T.V. and going
out to eat shrimp. Ruth was
loved and will be missed by
all.
Mrs. Hutcheson is preced-
ed in death by her parents,
and her husband Adrian M.


In lieu of regular meet-
ings in the Fort Walton
Beach Stake consisting
of Olive Branch, Paxton
Branch, De Funiak Springs
Ward, Crestview Wards
I and II, Niceville Ward,
Sandestin Branch and Fort
Walton Beach Wards I and
II, the following schedule
will be observed for general
conference Saturday, April


Hutcheson.
Mrs. Hutcheson is sur-
vived by her son, Randall
and Del Hutcheson of Chat-
tahoochee Hill, Ga.; two
daughters, Rebecca and
Mike Jacobs ofAlachua, and
Debra Tate; four grandchil-
dren, Marc and wife, Lori,
Roth and wife, Michelle,
Christopher and wife, Kelly
and Michelle Jacobs, and
seven great- grandchildren.
Funeral services were
held, Monday, March 28,
2011 at Clary-Glenn Funer-
al Home Chapel with Rev.
Wayne White officiating.
Burial followed in the Mag-
nolia Cemetery.
Donations may be made
to Haven Hospice, 4200 NW
90th Blvd, Gainesville, FL
32606.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com
Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home was entrusted with
the arrangements.


2, broadcast times will be
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3
to 5 p.m.

Priesthood Broadcast will
be Sunday, April 3, from 7 to
9 p.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Potluck Lunch between ses-
sions in Fort Walton Beach.

The final broadcast will
be from 3 to 5 p.m.


SMarble & Granite

.rraJ I? y dcnen at mmar -





(800) 892-3213
Fax (850) 892-2534



Ward Memorial

Granite Marble Bronze
'lnonu iittlls a rkcr BN,-t1 ic's
Coprrlng & Ci1pA Dwih Dawi;
a Viagit Our SboIM Wr
892-3332

a'r ~.-id 3131 Hwy, 83 Ny .,.N.,



tyr' JMCO 'V^

MEMORIALS. INC.

EA.IIL YO)I ONEDe OPERATED


(850) 834-4345
1979) Staie Hwy 2 West
fFunriak S pring-, FR. 12.i11, ,

Snr in~i the Fhofrida Panhandlek And Soulhicni Alahbamia ith:
Monuments
Vaults
Bronze
And all Cemetry Nccd.!

W*sprciflhzt' mustm mwnAblultws i7' \ f&bus.' 'fi.u /


CLARYGLENN FUNERAL HOMES CELEBRATES




80 YEARS

OF COMMTMENT TO SERVICE


Jon us in cebng dedes Cory and ses.


-- eA'p
W7-
W..~llg


*. jnl
mm-


a


EbHkbedfa 193 bdirza1n =PbprPia pT & fimgw rnl
n N I 0dJo hpd -Mn1d&Pu ijedy al Hdkoiifka 15B I ad

=arphA ilodwiKBduhCAY Chd aldhmo Inale alMad Ka
dam mima ~makzhL dla$JcbMii mImalBh Ir amd



w- ..Padki&.2J mad Ai an..k ImpufiL.atr


h ayCbei yu iuuallmebiagp wn4 iP sassful p o the ma
whmodRtti~b *Kltiarylerm^hdt upCad t





0007Mc -s ml -l ya0'md d 6&


IIFr RWEHAL HMEMS
P ~Ir' ~ *a~ Lie~ia~jrid~b


-'


CUwamENNUFmALEmE
2mIBUBLNM* CERANUICKEDl11.w* Pq IS11

M1ABuNSrCY vHFarEB* NlK. e* ABSL


Hutcheson


Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter-day Saints to observe

General Conference April 2


First Lutheran Church

in Florala to host

2011 Spring yard sale

April 9, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Your Station For Life!

Christian Music, Teaching and Talk
The Land and the Book
Dr. Charlie Dyer examines the events and issues of Israel and
the Middle East from a biblical worldview. The Land and the
Book helps listeners understand how these topics fit into a
broader context as Dr. Dyer visits with scholars and authors
that will assist us in comprehending what God says about this
vital part of the world.
Saturday Mornings at 11am


rrsp-irae~~3~~~N1~-';gsr:r~ma~PP~a~ar


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011


PAGE 6-B


MAWL


BraarsalaaBB^ssfi~it J~a8P-sig-'s'aB^iiBgia










THE DeCFUJNIA/*XK1X 31X1 fJ l"---L \mln Il-' -'I IV-I, -l -)I






McLain's Family Steak House and Pizza Hut team up with First United Methodist Church


First United Methodist Church



announces "Restaurant Night"


McLain's Family Steak
House and Pizza Hut will
team up with DeFuniak
Springs First United Meth-
odist Women (UMW) to
raise funds for school sup-
plies and tennis shoes for all
school age children in the
community.
First United Methodist


Women invites the com-
munity to participate in
"Restaurant Night." To
participate in "Restuaurant
Night," pick up tickets and
present them at designated
DeFuniak Springs restau-
rants and a percentage of
the sales come back to the
church for its community-


based services. Just pick up
free fundraiser tickets at the
church office or just print
from the church's website at
www.fumcdefuniaksprings.
org. Take the designated
ticket (one for each paid re-
ciept) to Pizza Hut (includes
eat in, carry out and deliv-
ery) on the first Tuesday of


April, May or June from 5
-8 p.m. and McLain's Fam-
ily Steak House on the first
Thursday of April, May, and
June from 5-8 p.m.
The local UMW fulfills
needs in our own backyard
by providing school sup-
plies for 379 children and


new shoes for 190 kids from
kindergarten to 12th grade
in DeFuniak Springs this
past fall. In addition, they
support the "Children's Vol-
untere Health Network"
(a donation-only organiza-
tion) which provides a mo-
bile dental clinic for pre-k
through 3rd grade children


who would never have the
opportunity or resources to
receive any dental care.
For more information
contact Pat Ernst at 951-
8882. First United Method-
ist Church is located at 88
Circle Drive in DeFuniak
Springs.


Mt. Pleasant A.M.E. Church to hold

Family and Friends Day Program


Mt. Pleasant A.M.E.
Church in the Flowersville
community cordially invite
the community to their an-
nual Family and Friends
Day Program on Saturday,
April 16 at 6 p.m.
Sis. Haja Radder from


Great Saint Mark Primi-
tive Baptist Church from
Tallahassee, Fla. and Pas-
tor Gregory Washington
from Jesus Can Help Min-
istries in Pensacola, Fla.
will be the speaker for this
program. This year's theme


will be 'Youth and Adults
Walking with God in the
Past, Present, and Future.
Mt. Pleasant A.M.E. is lo-
cated at 1233 Flowersville
Blvd. For more information
or direction call the church
at (850) 834-4108.


Carpenter's Helper Donel Davidson. Ike Gilmore

Harmony Fellowship Church hosts gospel sing


Gospel Sing at Harmon
Fellowship Church April 2,
6:30 p.m. Featuring Car-
penter's Helper Donel Da-
vidson, Ike Gilmore and


other local talent.
Harmony Fellowship is
located at 974 Adams Road,
DeFuniak Springs.
Pastor Donel Davidson


and congregation cordially
invite the public to come out
and join them.
Contact Jan Davidson at
978-0628 for information.


Greater Saint Joseph A.M.E. announces

annual Women's Conference, May 13-15


Greater Saint Joseph
AME Church. announces its
Annual Women's Confer-
ence on May 13-15, 2011.

The official kick-off for the
annual women's conference
begins with Sunday din-


ners with an opportunity to.
fellowship. Dinners will be
offered with a $6 donation.
Meals will include dessert
and tea. Eat in or carry out
will be offered. All proceeds
will help to defray the cost
of their much anticipated


women's conference.
The schedule follows with
dinners on Sunday, April 3,
April 10, and April 17. Din-
ners will be served 1-3 p.m.
Those who cannot drive may
call 892-2009 for delivery of
dinner.


Indian Creek Baptist Church to

present "Christ in the Passover"


Christ in the Passover.
What do the Jewish Pass-
over and Jesus' last sup-
per have in common? Greg
Savit, with Jews for Jesus,
will answer that question as
he presents, "Christ in the
Passover" at Indian Creek
Baptist Church on Sunday,


April 3, 2011 at 5 p.m. The
public is invited to come and
gain wonderful insights on
how the pieces of God's plan
of salvation fit together, and
you will remember this vi-
sual display of the Passover
pageantry for years to come.
Come and join us for Christ


in the Passover from Egypt
to Calvary to what it means
for us today.
Indian Creek Baptist
Church is located at 3946
CR-280A (S. 2nd Street)
DeFuniak Springs, FL. For
more information, call the
church at (850)892-2220.


Steak dinner fundraiser planned at Thriftway
for Pleasant Valley Baptist Church, April 1


Pleasant Valley Baptist
Church to host a steak din-
ner fundraiser on April 1
from 11 a.m. 5:30 p.m. at
Thriftway Supermarket.


Steak dinner will be $8 a
plate. Dinners will consist
of steak, potato salad, green
beans, dessert and roll. For
free delivery and to place


an order call (850)830-0079,
(850)830-5311 or (850)836-
9919.
Place order by Thursday,
March 31 p.m.


Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church

to host fish dinner fundraiser, April 2


Union Springs Mission-
ary Baptist Church will be
having a fish dinner fund
raiser on April 2, from 10


a.m. until.
The fundraiser will take
place at Anthony's Stylist
and Barber Shop located at


1261 U.S. 90 East in De-
Funiak Springs.
Everyone is encouraged
to come and support them.


Mt. Pis-Gah A.M.E. Church to

host Spring Revival April 17


On Sunday April 17 at 4
p.m., Mt. Pis-Gah A.M.E.
Church will be having a
Spring Revival. The speak-
er will be Elder Willie E.
Brown, pastor of Macedonia
Baptist Church of Argyle.


Elder Brown always brings
a powerful message, so don't
miss out! The revival will
continue on Monday night
the 18 at 7 p.m. The speak-
er will be Rev. Malcolm Nel-
son of New York City who


Beechgrove Church of


now resides in Chipley, Fla.
Come one, come all. Let's
save souls before the devil
take control.
The church is located at
330 Joe Campbell Road in
Freeport, Fla.

God host


benefit dinner and sing April 2


The Beechgrove Church of
God will have a benefit din-
ner and sing on April 2, be-
ginning at 4 p.m.
The dinner will consist of
chicken plates served buf-

Breakfast


fet style and the cost is $6 church.
each.
The church is located six
The proceeds will go into miles south of Ponce de
the general fund to help Leon, on CR-183 approxi-
with financial needs of the mately one mile.

cooked to order" at


St. Agatha's Episcopal Church


Breakfast "cooked to or-
der" will be available April
2 in the Parish Hall at St.
Agatha's Episcopal Church
(150 Circle Drive). Pan-
cakes, eggs, grits or home
fries, sausage or bacon,
sausage gravy on toast or
biscuit, juice, milk, or cof-


fee will be offered from 7-11
a.m. Cost for the break-
fast is $4.50 for adults and
$2.50 for children under 10.
Any profits will benefit the
building and grounds fund.
Their goal for this month is
to serve 115 meals and earn
lots of tips. Join them for the


best bargain and best kept
secret in the county. Plan
to come and bring friends.
Next breakfast is planned
for May 7, 2011.
The historic church will
be open for tours from 7-9:30
a.m.


FUMC Ecuador Mission's

Team hosting yard sale
The First United Method- The fundraiser will take United Methodist Church at
ist Church's (FUMC) Ecua- place Saturday, April 2 from 88 Circle Drive in DeFuniak
e, n A M..Q\ln n ., T m nnd t, 7 n m imunil nnrn o astthe Fiirt Springs.


Friendship Baptist Church


to celebrate
Friendship Baptist Rev.
Church located at 2415 CR- be the
1883 will celebrate its 61st special
anniversary, April 10 start- Robert
ing at 10 a.m. will fol:


Homecoming
Richard Martin will John Mark Brown, pastor
guest speaker with and the homecoming com-
music provided by mittee extend a special in-
and James. Dinner vitation to everyone, old and
ow on the grounds. new friends.


Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church of Holmes

County announces Homecoming April 3


Pleasant Ridge Baptist
Church in Holmes County to
host homecoming on Sunday
April 3 beginning with Sun-
day school at 10 a.m. and
morning worship at 11 a.m.


with guest speaker, Mitchell
Davis, a former pastor from
the 1950's. Lunch will be in


th


stone Bluegrass will begin
after lunch.


e fellowship hall at noon. Everyone is inivted to
come and join with Pastor
Guest singers the Corner- Dale Paul and congregation


The public is invited to a revival
at the DeFuniak Springs
Civic Center on March 31 April 2 starting at 7p.m.
The Evangelist is Duncan Burkett and wife Shiela.
The public is invited.


PAGE 7-B


PS RINGS HERALD BREE 1


l<










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


*Growing Wrth Amerca'

NATIONAL

V BROKERS
CORP.

Kely i
Michelin
Goodyear
Passenger
Truck
OTR


NATIONAL
TIRE
BROKERS
CORP
829 Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Tires, Brakes,
Alignments & Auto Service
850-892-5191
1-800-252-2888


TAYLOR Pu*


Air Conditioning & Electrical Incorporated

Sales, Service & Installation
(850) 892-3955


684 North 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433


DANNY TAYLOR
President


The DeFuniak Springs

Herald-Breeze

your source for local news!

Published Weekly On Thursdays


850-892-3232


r~rnv7


h Airnn Conditioning CmgIunsEecr


TAYLORS A/C & ELECTRIC, INC.
LIC'S RM0048225
RG00048207-ER00015 892-3955
--------..-.--..--..-----.--.-..--.-.--.-..--.-.--.-
AMERICAN AIR SYSTEMS LLC
Reliability, Comfort & Performance.
LIC. RA0064836 892-2804
.....................................................-
POLAR CAPS AIR CONDITIONING
AND HEATING SERVICES
LIC# RA0066940 850-834-5075


PLATES APPLIANCE REPAIR
4410 US HWY 90 W
892-4670

RON'S APPLIANCE
REPAIR AND PARTS
CALL 850-689-1007 OR 850-305-8515


MAGNOLIA TERRACE ASSIST. LIVING
5209 HWY 331 S, DeFUNIAK
850-892-8348 ALF#10903


REV. P.A. EVANS ASTROLOGER
Spiritual Consultations, Astrological
Charts, Readin s. Call 850-892-3217
* -
BRYANS USED CARS*
1133 HWY 90 W. DFS
DEWITT BRYAN* 892-7148


SLAY'S SALVAGE PAYS CASH FOR
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & SCRAP
METAL. 850-956-2870
(pd thru 5/11/10


NATIONAL TIRE BROKERS
829 HWY. 90 WEST, DFS
892-5191
.....................................................
ROCKMAN'S AUTO CENTER
WRECKER SERVICE
BEHIND SUBWAY 892-5015


RANDEL'S BARBER SHOP
US HWY 83 DFS
892-1011 (tfn)
Boo 0or


RV SITE,
WATER, ELECTRIC, SEWER, CABLE
892-7229


HICKS' CARPET CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
892-2623


OKALOOSA WALTON CHILD CARE
HRS & UNITED WAY
892-8560

QUALITY WORK
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
850-956-2213
(pd hn 2/19/11)
-----------------------------------------------------
ABLE CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS
Replacement Patios, Stamp Concrete,
Different Types Of Pavers, Bobcat,
Military/Senior Discounts, LICENSED
AND INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA 461-6733


Construction WE SPECIALIZE IN
SMALLER JOBS. HAULING, BACKHOE
WORK, DRIVES. ETC. LAWRENCE & SON
892-3873
......................................................
ADDITIONS, REMODELING &
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, PAINTING,
DRYWALL, SIDING & WOOD ROT
850-685-7008
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
(PDTHRU 1/2111)
BEST RATES!
Need New Roof, Home Remodel, or
New Construction. Call Paul Rushing.
We do the work, you reap the rewards.
Licensed & Insured in Florida
Call (850) 401-1537 or (850) 892-3334
------------------------------------------------------
PALM CONSTRUCTION CO. OF
WEST FL. NEW CONSTRUCTION,
ADDITIONS, REMODELS, DOOR &
WINDOW REPLACEMENTS, POLE
BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, No Job
Too Small. 850-259-0398 CGC1508332


HARPER DAY CARE
OPENING FOR INFANT- PRESCHOOL
CALL 892-3985
(Pd thru 4/10/11)
DisabilityServic


NEW & USED BOOKS TRADE-INS SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
DOWNTOWN ON BALDWIN & 6TH HANDLED APPEALS EXPERTS
TUES.-SAT. 10-5, 892-3119 DISABILITY CONSULT. (850) 835-2163


BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299
(PD THRU 3/11


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326


FIREWOOD FOR SALE U PICK UP
OR WE DELIVER. 850-401-4478
OR 850-685-0916


WOOD, CARPET, TILE.
REPAIR, INSTALLATION 30YEARS
EXPERIENCE. 865-2524 (12-18-itp)


D.S. HANDYMAN SERVICE
CALL 419-4519
ANYTIME (Oc)
---------------------------------------------------...
35 YEARS
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE
850-956-2213. HURRICANE REPAIRS.
(PD THRU 2/19/11)
JOE'S HANDYMAN AND YARD
SERVICE: Call me first, "I do it all!"
Home: 850-401-3695 Cell: 850-419-1869


VANN CARPENTRY & HOME REPAIR:
BIG & SMALL JOBS, MOBILE HOME
REPAIR, ADD ONS, PATIOS/
PORHCES. LIC. & INS.
892-9467


HOUSEKEEPING DAILY, WEEKLY, AND
DEEP CLEANING. CALL
SUSIE WILLIAMS 850-259-0404
------------------------------------------------------
GRAM'S HOME SERVICES: Free Est.,
Basic Cleaning & Extended Cleaning,
Deep Cleans, Move Outs.
Avail. Mon.-Sun. (850) 225-2826
(pd thru 5/31/11)



C&C LANDSCAPING LLC
Irrigation, Bobcat Work, Pressure
Washing. 850-585-0403 Lic. & Ins.


RODNEY'S LAWN SERVICE.Total lawn
maintenance. Serving Walton Co. over
10 years. 850-974-6972, 850-834-3925


JOHNSON'S LAWN SERVICE
GENERAL CLEAN UP/REASONABLE
CELL: 259-6318 PH: (850) 834-2200
M&M LAWN CARE. Free Quotes &
Reasonable Rates For Residential
850-401-4477/850-419-0014
BEAR CREEK CREATIVE SERVICES
Landscaping, Lawn Maint., Tractor Work,
Land Clearing, Fencing, Lic. & Ins.
892-4423 OR 865-2848
-----------------------------------------------------
D.S. LAWN CARE
FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE &
PRESSURE WASHING. 850-419-4519.
(VC)
-----------------------------------------------------
REASONABLE RATES LAWN CARE
YEAR AFTER YEAR FOR ALL
YOUR LAWN CARE NEEDS.
FREE ESTIMATES CALL RUSTY
(CELL) 850-546-0011
(HOME) 850-834-3141
(PDTHRU6A10/11)



SUNBELT CREDIT
LOANS FOR ANY REASON
850-892-9504 (CTFN)



MOBILE/RV LOTS FOR RENT
WATER, GARBAGE PICK-UP
892-2157 (205) 441-0464 (ttc)


BEST RATES!
STOR-RITE MINI STORAGE
1599 83 N, DFS, FL
Behind Roehm Pre-School
Free lock with rental
Call (850) 892-3334 or (850) 830-8868
(CTFN)
........................-!. .------------------------
THARP & SONS MINI STORAGE
HWY.90 & NORWOOD
892-6035 24 HOUR SERVICE (CTFN)
-.---.-.-----------.--.--.-....-.--...-------.-.-..--
A-1 MINI STORAGE
1154 US HWY 90 W
DFS (850) 892-4677 (CTFN)
......----...........................................



SUNDOWN INN
NEWLY RENOVATED ACROSS FROM
WAL-MART (850) 892-9647 DFS


JEMCO PLASTERING INC.
892-5524
QUALITY IS OUR GOAL


FANCY NAILS 10YRS EXPERIENCE
NAIL & TOE GET A FREE EYEBROW
WAX. FRENCH TIP WITH GEL $35'-
NOW $25. EYEBROW WAXING/
PEDICURE CHAIR 931 US HWY 331
(850) 892-0466 M-SAT. 9-7


LANGLEY'S OFFICE SUPPLY
1027 S. 19TH STREET
892-9776


BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299
(PDTHRU3 /1)


PRESSURE WASHING, HOUSES,
CONCRETE, ROOFS, NO JOB TOO
SMALL. EXP., LICENSED & INSURED
CELL 585-8412


JOHN DANILOW, BROKER
http://www.johndanilow.com
(850) 217-8104 (tic)


SOUTHERN ROOFING
ALL TYPES RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
LIC. #CCC058016 956-4325
ROOFING: NEW ROOF, REROOF &
REPAIRS. SHINGLES AND METAL.
CCC1327250 CALL 850-685-7008


AA AUTO SALVAGE
442 CTY HWY 1087
MOSSY HEAD 850-892-3256


WINDHAM SEPTIC SERVICE, INC.
67 JOE CAMPBELL RD.
835-3356

ARNETT SEPTIC
LOCATED AT 1101 HWY 90 W
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS (ti)


BONDS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
(850) 951-1118
Hot Water Hydro Jetting, Drain Snaking,
Video Pipe Inspection, Plumbing Repair
FL State Cert. Plumbing Contractors
Lic.# CFC1427405/CFC026554
(pd lhru 529/10 c)


ALL'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
REPAIRS-TUNE-UPS*OVERHAULS
FREE Pickup & Delivery 850-892-7887


MAKE YOUR EVENT SPECIAL
HIRE 'THE LIL' TROLLEY"
CALL (850) 865-7050 FOR PRICES


STUCCO, PLASTERING, STONE,
DRYWALL REPAIRS.
850-956-2213
(PD TRU 2/19/11)


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326
------------------------------------------ r------------
VOELKER SURVEYING, LLC
Santa Rosa Beach 622-1610
DeFuniak Springs 892-2410
(CTFN)
......................................................
FULL SCOPE SURVEYING, LLC
DOUG MEEKER, PSM
FREEPORT 850-880-6215
(PDTHRU 7/20/11)


DeFUNIAK TAX: 24 HOUR SERVICE
SMOKE-FREE TAXI FAIR PRICE
PROMPT SERVICE 419-0773
(pd thru 4-10-11)


McDONALD TREE SERVICE
BUCKETTRUCK & STUMP GRINDING
LIC. & INS. (850) 892-7380
------------------------------------------------------
BARBER'S TREE SERVICE: FREE
ESTIMATES, LIC. WILL BEAT ANY
REASONABLE PRICE. 850-956-2676
TOLL-FREE 1-866-848-6651
(CTFN)


THOMAS JOHNSON TRAPPING LLC
WILDLIFE ANIMAL CONTROL
850-585-5486
(PDTHRU 4/27/11)


ADVERTISE

HERE!
3 Lines
$10 per month

892-3232


(CQwer Waliranm Cuwmnty


'he DeFuniak Springs Herald


& The Beach*Breeze




with offices located in both


North & South Walton


The DeFuniak Springs Herald

740 Baldwin Avenue

DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435

(850) 892-3232


The Beach Breeze


4401 Hwy. 98 East

Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459

(850) 231-0918


Fax: 892-2270 1 Fax: 231-0928
E-mail: dfsherald@email.com


PAGE 8-B


OBIBB










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE. THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


Sports


Walton Defeats Paxton

Baseball 8-2

10B


I~~~ ~~ I'-.- _-


PAGE 9-B

WMS Wins

County Title

12B


Walton's program shows signs of



turnaround after working Vernon 10-5


By REID TUCKER
After a convincing 10-5
victory over Vernon, it's
clear a change in thinking is
underway within Walton's
baseball team.
The Braves, who histori-
cally struggled in a district
stacked with tough oppo-
nents like Chipley, Pensa-
cola Catholic and Marian-
na, have won two district
games this season, going 6-3
against Bay and beating Ar-
nold 3-1. That may not seem
like much, but a lone district
victory last season broke a
nearly five-year streak in
which the Braves went win-
less in district play and had
losing seasons besides.
Walton Coach Rick Dixon
said the win against Ver-
non did not come as a sur-
prise. After enduring a 17-6
pounding from Catholic
a few weeks prior left the
team with no choice but to
pick up the pieces, Dixon
said he's seen his players go
through a complete change


in the way they think about
ballgames.
"Slowly but surely we're
getting better," Dixon said.
"Each individual kid has
more confidence and when
one does well it becomes
contagious. When a program
has lost for a long time, what
happens is you get into tight
games and then you expect
to lose. Now they're think-
ing about winning instead of
thinking about losing."
That paradigm shift in
thinking apparently paid
off, as Walton came back
down one run in the first to
dominate the Yellowjack-
ets through the next six in-
nings on Monday, March 21.
Brennon Orcutt threw nine
strikeouts and went 2-for-3
at the plate, which was fol-
lowed up by Angus Ander-
son, who also went 2-for-3
and Chris Murphy who
went 2-for-4. Nine differ-
ent Braves put a run on the
board and Brendan Leach
notched two.


Vernon jumped ahead
to an early one-run lead in
the first inning but Wal-
ton's first three batters
scored on walks before Dy-
lan Kirk relieved Dylan
Lee (who walked seven and
was hit once in the first in-
ning alone) on the 'Jackets'
mound. The Braves batted
11 that inning, driving in a
further three runs to close
out the inning 6-1.
Walton sat on the lead de-
spite some good looks until
the bottom of the fifth, when
Leach reached for single,
only to score three batters
and two outs later. Warren
Redd, Vernon's third pitcher
of the day, walked Kyle Clark
and then threw one straight
down the pipe to Murphy,
who crushed an RBI double,
bringing around Clark and
Orcutt. The Braves looked
to end the game in five, but
the Yellowjackets put down
the final Walton batter to
make it a mandatory seven-
inning ballgame.


AFTER JUMPING to an early one-run lead, Vernon struggled to get on base and score
until the top of the seventh inning, when pitcher Warren Red touched for a triple and drove
in three runs before scoring himself. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


The batters of both sides
were retired early through
the sixth inning, but with
Zach Burgess relieving
Orcutt on the mound, the
Braves loaded the bases as
Redd came up to bat. The
Vernon pitcher's luck was
better from the plate and he
touched on Burgess' change-
up for a triple, which drove
in three runs. Redd himself
scored on the next at back
before Vernon's original
pitcher, Lee, came up to
bat.
That's when things got
interesting.
Lee crushed a fly ball
deep into left field, right in
the middle of three converg-
ing Walton fielders. With
the bases unloaded, the best
Lee could have done would
be to reach on a double, but
Murphy had other plans. He
called the ball and caught
it, ending the game 10-5 in
favor of an ecstatic Braves
team.
Dixon said a scenario like
this never would have hap-
pened at the beginning of
the season, to say nothing
of the past three years he's
coached at Walton. He said
the "old Braves" wouldn't
have had the confidence to
make the call on a big fly
ball, but now things are dif-
ferent. For Dixon, the win
and the spectacular winning
play by Murphy is proof that
times are changing for Wal-
ton's program.
"I think we're well on our
way to developing a winning
program here," Dixon said.
"I think they're buying in.
You don't see kids ready to
give up. What I'm the most
proud of as a coach is that
we had a guy calling the ball
and going for it. To me, that
speaks volumes as to where
we are as a team. Now I feel
like we've got a bunch of
guys who are going to go out
and make the play."


BRENNON OCUTT pitched through the first six innings
and most of the seventh against Vernon, getting nine strike-
outs and just three walks in the process. He also scored a
run in the bottom of the fifth. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


WALTON'S KYLE CLARK(1 Q) keeps a close eye on a wild,
throw during the Braves game with Vernon on March 21.
The Braves got revenge for a 3-2 loss at Vernon to start the
season with a 10-5 win. (Photo by Cindy Clark)


South Walton Avenges Loss to Freeport 7-3


By PATRICK CASEY
Caitlin Holliday had three
hits and scored three runs
as South Walton picked up a
7-3 victory over the Freeport
Bulldogs in a non-district
game played on March 21 at
Freeport High School.
The Seahawks got even
for a 13-7 loss on March 4
by scoring two runs in the
top of the first inning as
Holliday and Mackenzie
Watson singled to start the
game and later scored with
the help of a Freeport error
for a 2-0 lead. The Bulldogs
scratched back with a run
of their own in the bottom
of the first inning as Megan
Seibert scored on a Reba


Blythe force play at second
base to cut the lead to 2-1.
South Walton scored one
run in both the third and
fourth innings to push the
lead to 4-1 as Holliday scored
on a Sam-Snider groundout
in the third inning with
Lacy Littlefield scoring on a
Mackenzie Watson single in
the fourth.
The Seahawks broke
the game open in the sixth
inning as Kristy Potter
reached base after a wild
pitch got away on her strike-
out to star the inning.
Courtney Wright followed
with a single and Holliday
provided an RBI double af-
ter a force play at third to


increase the lead to 5-1. Me-
gan MacLeod followed with
a single and another run


scored on a throwing error
for a 7-1 advantage.
Freeport did not go qui-


etly as they rallied for two
runs in their final at-bat af-
ter two outs were recorded.
Seibert reached base on a
single and Taylor Taunton
followed up with a double.
Amanda Bates then drove
in the two runners with a
sharp single to cut the lead
to 7-3. Seahawks pitcher
Meagan Ellison was able
to get Rani Simmons on a
ground ball to second to end
the contest.
Four errors hurt the Bull-
dogs chances at a win and
the team stranded nine run-
ners on base in the contest.


"We just can't seem to get
the big hit with people on
base," coach Charles Trot-
man said after the game.
"Errors and clutch hitting
have been a problem."
The Bulldogs did pick up
a win on Thursday as they
dispatched Paxton 15-8 to
improve to 2-14 on the year.
South Walton improved
to 7-5 overall and 6-3 in
district play after edging
Sneads 3-2 on Friday night.
The Seahawks scored three
runs in the top of the first
inning and held on for the
key district victory.


FREEPORT'S AMANDA BATES drove in two of the Bull-
dogs three runs in their loss to South Walton last week. The
Bulldogs defeated Paxton on Thursday 15-8 to earn their
second win of the year. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


SOUTH WALTON'S CAITLIN HOLLIDAY helped the
Seahawks pick up wins over Freeport and Sneads last week
with timely hitting. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


DANNICA MOSHER'S SWING is a little high during
the Bulldogs final at-bat in a 7-3 loss to South Walton on
March 21. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


THIRD BASEMAN MEGAN MACLEOD had two hits
and drove in a run in South Walton's 7-3 win over Freeport
last week. The Seahawks are 7-5 overall and 6-3 in district
play as of March 28. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


L- ~;"ar~F:
~jLT~~' .2ps"
1$

'J









PAGE 10-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


Walton Defeats Paxton Baseball 8-2


By PATRICK CASEY
The Walton Braves got
an outstanding performance
from junior pitcher Angus
Anderson as he tossed a
complete game while strik-
ing out 13 Paxton Bobcats
as the host team picked up
an 8-2 win on Thursday
night.
Walton fell behind 2-0 im-
mediately as a pair of field-
ing errors around an RBI
double from Zach Forehand
put the Bobcats ahead in
the top of the first inning.
The Braves scratched
to within 2-1 in the bottom
of the third inning as Kyle
Clark singled and scored on
an Anderson single to cut
the lead in half. Then the
Braves took the lead at 4-2
in the bottom of the fourth
inning as starting pitcher
Josh McLaney saw Brendan
Leach double, followed by an
RBI single by Zach Burgess
to tie the game. McLaney
knocked down a line drive
by Liam Miller but threw
the ball past his first base-
man as one of three errors


in the frame. Brennan Or-
cutt provided an RBI single
before the Bobcats retried
the next three batters to end
the inning.
The Braves added a run
in the fifth inning before
adding breathing room with
three runs in the bottom of
the sixth to pad the lead to
8-2. Brandon Hollingsworth
had a key double in the in-
ning as he had three of Wal-
ton's 10 hits in the contest
while driving in two runs.
Zach Forehand had two
hits with Ryan Gilbert pro-
viding a double in the sixth
inning for the Bobcats' three
hits. Gilbert recorded the fi-
nal two outs in the sixth as
McLaney was pulled from
the contest.
Anderson allowed only
one walk in the game and
tossed 100 pitches in pick-
ing up the victory. Two of
the Bobcats baserunners
were caught stealing with
only two men left on base in
the contest.
Series Notes: Walton
holds a 2-1 record against


Paxton in baseball since
1998. The Braves lost at
Paxton in 2010 by a 5-0
score after posting a 7-2 win
in 2005. The Bobcats suf-
fered their first loss of the


season and are 8-1 on the
year. Walton improved to
8-6 and has a chance to post
a winning record for the
first time since at least 1997
if they can finish strong.


WALTON'S ANG US ANDERSON(15) pitched the Braves
to an 8-2 win over Paxton on Thursday night. Anderson
stuck out 13 Bobcats and reached base four times at the
plate as Walton improved to 8-6 on the year. (Photo by Pat-
rick Casey)


WALTON'S BRANDON HOLLINGSWORTH(8) had
three hits and had a key double in the sixth inning to help
Walton pull away in their victory over Paxton. (Photo by
Patrick Casey)


2011 High School Baseball Standings
SThrough March 27
District 1, Class A District- Overall


Paxton
Bethlehem
Laurel Hill .
Central
Poplar Springs
SRocky Bayou ...


District 1, Class 2A Di

Baker
Jay
Northview
Freeport --
Pensacola Christian


Ponce de Leon

District 2. Class

P.C. Bozeman
Holmes Co.
South Walton
Vernon
Sneads
Graceville
Blountstown
Cottondale

District 1. Class


Pensacola
Marianna
P.C. Bay


Cathi


W L W
5 0 8
3 : 1 5
2 1 5
3 2 4
15 i
0 _5 1 0
---- .... ...... -.............. ---........

istnct Overall
W L iW
4 1 8
3 : . 1 ... .
I 6

0 3 3
0 6 1


2A District
W L
7 1


7
4


--- ----- --- ... --------- -
4
4
4
2
1

3A District
W
olic 7
4... ....
S 4


2
3
4
4
4
8
7


L
0
2
3


I ChipIey 2 3
[Walton 5 2 5
IP.-C Anold I 1 -_-- 5 -


Over
SW
8
10
8
6
4
5
6

ver
Over


W-
13
10
7

8


2011 High School Softball Stand
SThrough March 27


District 1, Class A District,


Poplar Springs
Central
Laurel Hill
Rocky Bayou
Paxton
Bethlehem


W L
5 1
4 2
, 2 -. 3
1 4
1 4


District 1. Class 2A District
SW
Northview 6
Jav 5


Baker
Ponce de Leon


5
2


Over
W
4
7
3
3
2
4

Over
W
10
9
10
6


Freeport I 0 7 2

District 2, Class 2A District' Over@
W I L W
Holmes Co. 10 3 i 13
P-C. Bozeman J 8 1 3 10-
Vernon 7 3 8
South Walton 6 3 7
SSneads 7 1 4 10
Blountstown 2 7 2
Graceville 2 10 4
Cottondale 1 10 2

District 1, Class 3A District Over
w L W
Mi;arianna 7 ---...7 0 ... 7 15
P.C. Arnold 5. 2 12
Chipey 3 2 8
P.ay j 3 2 3 43
IPensacola Catholic 2_ .5 .3
.w a! ton ............................_.............. ..... O . .....7 4


SL
1
4
2
9
5
10


L
6
5
7
6

11


PAXTON'S ZACH FOREHAND(2) had a single and a
double while driving in one of Paxton's two runs against
Walton. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


- PIM, T: I



PAXTON'S RYAN GILBERT(4) had one of the Bobcats
three hits in an 8-2 loss to Walton. Gilbert closed out the
game on the mound as Paxton lost for the first time this sea-
son to fall to 8-1. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


Freeport royally defeats Jay for the


first time since 2001 in 9-1 rout


all By REID TUCKER
L Freeport's baseball team
S broke a decade-long losing
streak to district frontrun-
4 ner Jay in grand fashion
5 with a crushing 9-1 win.
8 Prior to claiming the 13-
Shit, nine-strikeout shutout
victory on Thursday, March
9 24, the Bulldogs lost in
9 16 straight meetings with
9 Jay since the 2001 season.
Though the two schools
were not district opponents
all from 2002 to 2004, it still ef-
L fectively means eight whole
0 classes' worth of Freeport
5 baseball teams had fallen to
S the Royals twice a year for
- the better part of a decade.
7 That trend looked to contin-
S 6 ue this year as well, as the
S Royals once again beat the
Bulldogs, this time 13-4, in
their March 4 meeting.
Freeport head coach
ings Shaun Arntz said his team
T- was not willing to let the
cycle continue any further.
al What the senior players
L didn't realize was that they
0 weren't the only team to
3 have struggled against Jay,
and Arntz wasn't going to
5 tell them.
5 "Our stubborn seniors
7 seemed to think they were
6 only team that hadn't beat
Jay in four years but they
didn't know about the class-
all es before them that didn't
L do the same thing," he said.
7 "They were determined
since we cranked the bus up
to leave from Jay last time.
4 They had the mindset that
7 this had to be done. It was
-1--.1...1 certainly a team effort but
our seniors were really hun-
gry for this tonight. The kids
all played their butts off. That's
S L what got it done."
4 As expected, the seniors
came out in force, with Mi-
chael Graziani striking out
3 nine batters from the mound
5 and walking just one. Cous-
7 ins J.R. and Jake Fannin
11. made big contributions from
1 the plate, as both went 2-4
14 and both scored a run.
14 Other Freeport standouts
were Austin Woodard, who
all1 went 2-3, Brandon Head,
who scored two runs for the
L Bulldogs on two hits, and
S 4 Caleb McCormick, who got
4 hits on three out of four ap-
8 pearances at the plate.
Jay's numbers were less
favorable. Hunter Brown
I13 had just one strikeout and
8 I walked one batter but gave


up eight hits. The Royals
looked better on offense, as
the team ;accounted for sev-
en hits but dduld not convert
them into runs despite good
looks throughout the game.
Two strikeouts breezed
Freeport through Jay's first
at-bat but Graziani was left
on third when the Bulldogs
got their turn at the plate.
The Royals didn't waste
time in the top of the second
inning, as a Freeport error
enabled them to easily score
what turned out to their sol-
itary run of the game on a
hit from Connor Weeks.
The Bulldogs quickly rallied
back and found the measure
of Brown, with Jake Fannin
earning a double and two
RBIs to put Freeport up 2-1
before the Royals turned a
trick double play to halt a
further advance.
The score held steady
through the next two in-
nings, as both sides retired
the other's batters almost
in order but Freeport came
out big in the bottom of the
fourth and Woodard nailed
an RBI double to load the
bases. Collin Myrick got a
double two bats later, bring-
ing three more runners
around. Freeport contin-
ued to score even after Jay
switched in Payden Roberts
at the mound, as Myrick
and McCormick made their
way home thanks to an er-
ror from the Royals right
fielder.
Freeport kept the 8-1 lead
until the bottom of the sixth
inning, when Caleb Bowden
finally made it home after
struggling at the plate all
evening. Jay looked to rally
in the top of the seventh,
putting runners on second
and third with two outs.
However, Graziani and the
Bulldog infield made short
work of the Royals batters,
retiring the last three in or-
der to end the game half an
inning early.
While the win improved
Freeport's record to .500 all
around (6-6, 3-3) it meant a
lot more for Arntz and his
players. The big win brought
with it a realization that
the Bulldogs have a shot at
a decent midlevel district
standing, something critical
if the team wishes to avoid a
repeat of last year's upset to
Ponce De Leon. While Jay's
club did not play its best


game, Arntz is confident the
Royals will be seeded first
in the district, which means
Freeport's placement in the
tournament will be more
important than ever.
"We are all super pumped
because this means we can
come out and here and sure
enough stroke it against a
good pitcher," Arntz said of
Brown, who led Jay to the
state Final Four last year.


"I've known all along that we
have a team that can accom-
plish anything they strive
for. I think right now we
have to strive for the third
seed and have a shot at the
six-seed and then if we win
that we'll get a shot at the
number-two team. Jay did
not play their best ballgame
tonight. There's no doubt in
my mind that they will be
the number-one seed."


.
~ ~t,---

FREEPORT SENIOR J.R. FANNIN got two singles in
four appearances at the plate against Jay. He and his cousin
Jake Fannin each scored a run for the Bulldogs, along with
six of their team mates on the way to a 9-1 victory. (Photo by
Reid Tucker)


MICHAEL GRAZIANIpitched what Freeport head coach
Shaun Arntz said was his best game of the season. The se-
nior struck out nine Jay's batters and walked just one. (Pho-
to by Reid Tucker)


--------- ---1-


.


i










South Walton Falls to Holmes County 4-1


By PATRICK CASEY
The South Walton Sea-
hawks could not hold on to a
1-0 lead as Holmes County
rallied with two runs in the
bottom of both the fifth and
sixth innings to pick up a
4-1 win in a District 2, Class
2A baseball contest played
in Bonifay on March 22.
The Seahawks held a 1-0
lead after three innings as
starting pitcher Mitchell


Peterson tripled with one
out in the top of the third
inning and later scored on a
wild pitch to give the visit-
ing team the lead.
Peterson made it hold up
through four innings of play
as he retired 12 consecutive
batters to start the game
while needing only 43 pitch-
es to do so.
Jordan Worthing broke
up the no-hit bid to lead off


WaltonOutdoors.com


Your source for the outdoors
in Walton County
and the surrounding area.


the bottom of the fifth in-
ning as he singled. Two outs
later another single put run-
ners on first and second for
the Bluedevils before Travis
Scorza delivered the big hit
of the night as he doubled
in two runs to give Holmes
County a 2-1 lead.
Bluedevils left-handed
starter Will Thompson kept
the Seahawks off the score-
board the rest of the way as
he struck out 13 batters in
the contest while allowing
South Walton only four hits
while walking none.
Holmes County added
two more runs in the bot-
tom of the sixth inning as a
triple to start the inning set
up Cole Long's RBI single


for a 3-1 lead. Will Thomp-
son added a pop-up single
that the wind pushed into
fair territory for the 4-1 fi-
nal margin.
The Seahawks put a run-
ner on base in both the top
of the sixth and seventh in-
nings but could not put the
ball in play as Thompson
closed out the contest for the
win.
Peterson deserved a bet-
ter fate in the contest but
got a couple of pitches up
in the strike zone that the
Bluedevils jumped on to get
key hits. Peterson finished
with eight strikeouts and no
walks while allowing seven
hits and four runs.
The Seahawks did get a


DID YOU KNOW?
5 Sports Facts
1. The Rose Bowl continued the longest sellout streak in
college football, which dates back to 1947, selling 94,118
tickets for the TCU and Wisconsin match-up.
2. National leaders in current consecutive college foot-
ball bowl games are Florida State 29, Florida 20, Virginia
Tech 18, Georgia 14, Georgia Tech 14, Boston College 12,
and Oklahoma 12. Nebraska still holds the all-time record
with 35 straight trips from 1969-2003.
3. Through the 2010-11 bowl season, Alabama (58 bowl
appearances), Tennessee (49),Texas (49), Southern Califor-
nia (48), and Nebraska (47) remain the top five all-time for
bowl appearances with Georgia just behind with 46 post-
season visits.
4. Tim Cooney led Wake Forest to its first shutout of
Florida State in baseball since the third day of the 1999
ACC Championship at Durham, N.C. It marked the first
time that the Demon Deacons had shut out FSU in Talla-
hassee since April 1, 1967.
5. City College of New York captured both the NIT and
NCAA college basketball tournament titles in 1950, beating
Bradley University in both events in the final contest. They
are the only team to claim both titles in the same year.


win on Friday night as Tan-
ner Degafferelly pitched the
home team to a 6-3 victory
against Vernon, avenging a
3-2 loss to the Yellowjackets
on March 11. South Wal-


ton is 8-5 overall and 4-3 in-
district play while Holmes
County posted their sixth
consecutive win in moving.
to 10-4 overall and 7-2 in
district competition.


SOUTH WALTON'S MITCHELL PETERSON stands at
third base after hitting a triple in the top of the, third in--.
ning in a contest against Holmes County. Peterson scored,"
moments later on a wild pitch to give the Seahawks a 1-0
lead. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


HOLMES COUNTY'S WILL THOMPSON pitched the
Bluedevils to a 4-1 win over South Walton in Bonifay on
March 22. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


Come See Us


At


GENESIS


AUTOMOTIVE

And Find Your

Next Vehicle!

For Work Or Play We've Got
What You're Looking For!


2008 JEEP WRANGLER 4x4
Only 19,000 Miles!!


GENESIS


AUTOMOTIVE
850-892-9145
20 Shoemaker Drive DeFuniak Springs


Va


---


I


PAGE 11-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


1999 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4
Automatic, Very Good Condition!!


81#',*lLZ-7


go1 (D








PAGE 12-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011


WMS Wins County Title


From Coach Charles Sexton
The Walton Middle School
(WMS) softball team de-
feated Emerald Coast 19-7
:on Saturday to win their
second consecutive Walton
County middle school soft-
ball championship.
The Lady Warriors bested
Paxton and Emerald Coast
in the three-team tourney
as Kayla Jackson pitched
the squad to victory in the
championship contest, al-
lowing no hits after a tough
first inning.
Jackson contributed three
hits in the contest while
Mara Morse had a pair of
hits and scored three runs.
Jamie Lamb, Laura Hydle,
Jackson and Morse scored


12 of the 19 runs for the host
squad.
Hydle pitched the War-
riors to a 16-0 win over Pax-
ton in the opening game of
the tourney as she allowed
only two hits while striking
out 10. Jackson and Hydle
led the way with two hits
apiece.
The squad also picked up
a win on Thursday with an
11-0 victory at home against
Emerald Coast. Hydle
tossed a one-hitter in that
contest while tallying eight
strikeouts. Shyy Walker
had a pair of singles to help
the offense post a shutout.
The Warriors(8-7-2) are
scheduled to host Shoal Riv-
er on Thursday at 3:30 p.m.


THE WALTON LADY WARRIORS took first place in a three-team middle school tourney played on Saturday for the
county championship. Pictured are:(Front Row) Kelee Mosley, Jasmin Hester, Shelby Peeples, Jamie Lamb, Mara Morse,
Shelbie Busbee, Jamison Minniefield and Taylor Butler. (Back Row) Coach Michelle Seay, Bethany Gavins, Shyy Walker,
Ashley Manuel, Laura Hydle, Kiki Bogart, Hannah Phillips, Kayla Jackson, Haley Hurley, Coach Charles Sexton, Coach
Ellen McLean. (Not Pictured) Chambleigh Webster, Kayla Atchley, Krystal Schipper and Kassandra Carpenter..




Sports News and Notes


High School PDL GRADWILL SCOTT
holds a 3-2 record at Peru.
Baseball Scores State College so far this
season as the right-handed
Monday- March 21 pitcher plays for the Nebras-
Walton' 10 ka NAIA school.(Photo cour-
Vernon 5 tesy Peru State website)


Tuesday- March 22
Holmes Co. 4
South Walton 1


Jay
PDL


P.C. Arnold
Freeport

Paxton
Bethlehem


Thursday- March 24
Freeport 9
Jay 1


Malone
PDL

Walton
Paxton


FMS Softball

Wins

By Joe Padgett
The Freeport Middle
School softball team defeat-
ed the Surfside Sharks 2-0
and 5-4 on Thursday. Kate
Duross pitched a shutout in
leading the Lady Bulldogs
(8-3-1) to the win in the first
game. Mary Kate Myrick
pitched seven innings in the
second game without giving
up an earned run. FMS fell
behind 4-0 after two innings
in the second game. hut ral-
lied for the win. Duross hit
two doubles and finished
with three RBIs in the come-
back.


By PATRICK CASEY
Former Ponce de Leon
baseball players Will Scott
and Brandon Howell are
playing for Peru State Col-
lege in Nebraska, a NAIA
school. The Bobcats are 10-
14-1 through March 28 with
Scott picking up the win
over the weekend in the first
game of two with Oklahoma
Wesleyan University on
Saturday. Scott, a junior, is
a 2005 graduate of PDL, and
holds a 3-2 record so far this
season. Scott allowed only
one hit and one run to score
while striking out 10 batters
in a 3-1 victory. Scott has
started five games, pitching
just over 30 innings- while
holding a 2.67 ERA. Howell,
a freshman, has appeared in
three games this season in
relief, pitching 3 2/3 innings
with a 9.82 ERA.
Former Paxton boys bas-
ketball player Demetrius
Moore played in 21 of North-
west Florida State College's
28 basketball games as a
freshman as the Raiders fin-
ished the year with a 22-6
mark in 2010-11. The Raid-
ers lost four of their five Pan-
handle Conference games
by one point, knocking them
out of the state playoff hunt
while dealing with the ill-
ness of coach Bruce Stewart.
Moore averaged 4.8 points
per game while hitting 41-
of-76 shots from the floor.
He also pulled down 3.4 re-
bounds per contest.
Former Pensacola Catho-


lic baseball player Austen
Smith led the Alabama
Crimson Tide with a .500
average for the week last
week, going 10-for-20 in
five starts at first base. The
freshman collected seven
RBI with two runs scored
during the week and had
hits in all five games to ex-
tend his career-long hitting
streak to six games. He was
3-for-4 with two RBI in a
6-3 win over UAB on March
22. He was 2-for-4 in the se-
ries finale against Kentucky
on Sunday with three RBI,
helping the Tide to a sweep
of the Wildcats, and improve
to 5-1 to open SEC play this
season.

The University of Florida
men's track and field team
is rated No. 1 in the 2011
U.S. Track and Field and
Cross Country Coaches As-
sociation Division I Men's
Preseason Outdoor Com-
puter Rankings, the New
Orleans-based organization
announced on March 23.
The Gators, who are two-
time defending NCAA In-
door Championships, have
finished second at the NCAA
Outdoor Championships in
each of the last two seasons.
The Gators are No. 1 in the
USTFCCCA Outdoor Pre-
season Rankings, followed
by No. 2 Texas A&M and
No. 3 Texas Tech. Florida
State (No. 4) and LSU (No.
5) round out the USTFC-
CCA's top-five.


Friday- March 25
Northview 10
PDL 4


South Walton 6
Vernon 3

Saturday March 26
Freeport 11
Pens. Christian 8


High School
Softball Scores

Monday- March 21
South Walton 7
Freeport 3

Tuesday- March 22
Jay 8 0
PDL 1 1


BR.NDON HOWIELL is
a freshman at Peru State
College and plays for the
Bobcats baseball team af-
ter a solid playing career at
PDL. (Photo courtesy of Peru
State iu,'bsite


:P.C. Arnold
Walton


Wednesday- March 23
:PDL 12
:P.C. Bozeman 5

:Thursday March 24
'Freeport 15
'Paxton 8

'Pens. Catholic 10
'Walton 4

:Friday- March 25
Northview 6
PDL 0

South Walton 3
Sneads 2


DEMETRIUS MOORE,
a 2010 Paxton graduate,
helped Northwuest Florida
State College men's basket-
ball tean to a 22-6 record
in his first season u'ith the
tanm. (Photo courtesy North.-
west Florida State College
u'ebih te)


The Orlando Magic's
Dwight Howard was named
the Eastern Conference
Player of the Week for games
played Monday, March 21,
through Sunday, March 27.
It marks the sixth time this
season, which is an NBA-
high (LeBron James-5; Rus-
sell Westbrook, Dwyane
Wade-4), and the 17th time
of his career that Howard
has earned the league's top
weekly honor. Howard led
the Magic to a 3-0 week and
helped push the team to its
fifth consecutive victory,
which is Orlando's third
longest winning streak of
the season and is tied for
the longest active winning
streak in the Eastern Confer-
ence. Howard averaged 27.3
points (third in the East),
an NBA-high 14.3 rebounds
per game and shot .717 (27-
of-38) from the field, which
was also tops in the league.
He also ranked first in the
East in blocks (3.3 blkpg.)
and second in steals per con-
test (2.3 stlpg.). Howard tal-
lied double-doubles in each
of the Magic's three contests,
extending his franchise re-
cord double-double streak to
30 games (Jan. 21-present)
and led the team in scoring
and rebounding in all three
games.
For the fourth time in five
years, college football set a
record for the number of


people attending games at
the 639 NCAA schools with
49,670,895 fans turning out
to watch an NCAA football
game this past season. The
total figure represents an
increase of 1,386,222 (or
nearly 3 percent) from last
year and an increase of 26
percent or more than 12.8
million fans since 1997. The
35 bowl games this season
attracted 1,813,215 specta-
tors to the stands, eclipsing
the 1.8 million mark for the
first time in history. The
previous bowl game record
stood 1,773,882, which was
set during the 2008-09 bowl
season. This year's new
mark represents a 0.8 per-
cent increase for the games
played in the same venues
as the previous year, and
the two new bowl games, the
New Era Pinstripe and the
TicketyCity, each launched
with a crowd in the top 15
for bowls making their de-
buts. College football bowl
games across all networks
remained robust, attract-
ing 134 million viewers (71
million households) to tele-
vision screens to watch, the
35 games and complement-
ing the more than 200 mil-
lion fans who tuned into the
regular season.
Contact Patrick Casey at
The DeFuniak Herald with
your local sports notes at:
heraldsports@aol.com.


Walton vs. Bozeman tennis -

results for Tuesday, March 22

Boys
Walton 7, Bozeman 0
Singles: 1. Tray Virgin, Walton, def. Swade Potter, Boze-
man, 9-7, 2. Jeremiah Johnson, Walton, def. Jake Hadey,
Bozeman, 8-5, 3. Hunter Gainey, Walton, def. Cody Lee,
Bozeman, 8-6, 4. Thomas Brannon, Walton, def. Will
Oberst, Bozeman, 8-7, 5. Kyle Doggett, Walton, def. Tren-
ton Oberst, Bozeman, 8-1
Doubles: 1. Virgin/Gainey, Walton, def. Potter/Lee, Boze-
man, 8-2, 2. Johnson/Brannon, Walton, def. Hadey/W.
Oberst, Bozeman, 8-5

Girls
Bozeman 7, Walton 0
Singles: 1. Kyle O'Rorke, Bozeman, def. Elizabeth Evans,
Walton, 8-2, 2. Kirstie Cannon, Bozeman, def. Andrea Picon,
Walton, 8-4, 3. Kristen Benjamin, Bozeman, def. Karmel
Teves, Walton, 8-5, 4. Samantha Gardner, Bozeman, def.
Peia Fields, Walton, 8-1, 5. Rebecca Hatchell, Bozeman,
def. Caroline Manning, Walton, 8-6
Doubles: 1. O'Rorke/Cannon, Bozeman, def. Evans/Teves,
Walton, 8-2, 2. Benjamin/Gardner, Bozeman, def. Pincon/
Fields, Walton, 8-8 (16-4)

Walton vs. Rutherford tennis results for Thursday, March
24
Boys
Rutherford 5, Walton 2
Singles: 1. Tray Virgin, Walton, def. Nathan Allen, Ruther-
ford, 8-1, 2. Dev Nanji, Rutherford, def. Jeremiah Johnson,
Walton, 9-7, 3. Troy Nguyen (Rutherford) def. Hunter Gain-
ey, Walton, 8-5, 4. Patrick Bates, Rutherford, def. Thomas
Brannon, Walton, 8-2, 5. TC Chestnut, Walton, def. Michael
Pham, Rutherford, 8-5.
Doubles: 1. Allen/Nanji, Rutherford, def. Brannon/Belle,
Walton, 8-2, 2. Nguyen/Bates, Rutherford, def. Doggette/
Chestnut, Walton, 8-2

Girls
Rutherford 7, Walton 0
Singles: 1. Sarah Waranker, Rutherford, def. Andrea Picon,
Walton, 8-3, 2. Nhi.Luong, Rutherford, def. Karmel Teves,
Walton, 8-6, 3. Mariam Aboulela, Rutherford, def. Teia
Fields, Walton, 8-2, 4. Bridgett Bacon, Rutherford, def.
Caroline Manning, Walton, 8-3, 5. Hanna Williams, Ru-
therford, def. Abbie Williamson, Walton, 8-2
Doubles: 1. Waranker/Bacon, Rutherford, def. Picon/Teves,
Walton, 8-6, 2. Aboulela-Luong, Rutherford, def. Fields/
Manning, Walton, 8-2








THE DeFUNIAK SPR HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31,2011 PAGE 13-B


WHS band students receive honors


On Jan. 20, students from
the Walton High School band
(WHS) traveled to Marian-
na High School, Marianna,
Fla., to audition for chair
placements in the District II
Small Schools Honor Bands,
sponsored by the Florida
Bandmaster's Association.
District II includes the coun-
ties of Bay, Calhoun, Frank-
lin, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson,
Liberty, Walton, and Wash-
ington. Students were re-
hearsed and conducted by
Lamar Weathermon from
Playground Music in Pana-
ma City, Fla., (Junior High
Band) and Raymond H.
Smith, Associate professor
of Music at Troy University
in Troy, Ala., (Senior High
Band.) The performance
took place at Marianna High
School, Marianna, Fla., on
Jan. 29, at 2 p.m.
Students also were nomi-
nated by their director and
selected by the Music De-
partment at Troy State Uni-
versity, in Troy, Ala., to par-
ticipate in the 38th Annual
Southeastern United States
Concert Band Clinic and


Honor Bands. Students au-
ditioned for band and chair
placement on Thursday,
Feb. 3.
Rehearsals culminated in
performances by the Gold,
Silver, and Cardinal Honor
Bands on Saturday night,
Feb. 5, at 5 p.m., in the Cros-
by Theatre. Two seniors,
Nathan Frymire, (clarinet),
and Andrew Patzig, (percus-
sion), also auditioned and
received scholarships to at-
tend Troy State University.

In addition to honor band
participation, band students
in District II selected solo
material to rehearse and
perform for judging at the
Florida Bandmaster's As-
sociation's District II Solo
and Ensemble Festival held
at the Baptist College of
Florida in Graceville, Fla.,
on Feb. 11. Eight students
from Walton High School
chose to participate.
Students were judged
individually on technical
execution, tone, musicality,
and other aspects related to
their particular instrument.


WHS HONOR BAND STUDENTS: Andrew Patzig: District II Honors Band-First Chair, Percussion. Seus Honor Band-
Cardinal Band. District H Solo and Ensemble- Superior Snare Drum Solo. Nathan Frymire: District H Honors Band-
Second Chair, Clarinet. Seus Honor Band- Fourth Chair, Cardinal Band. District H Solo and Ensemble- Superior Clari-
net Solo. Laura Gillis: District II Honors Band-Eighth Chair, Clarinet. Seus Honor Band- Silver Band. Crystal Guerra:
District II Honors Band-Third Chair, Flute. Seus Honor Band- Silver Band. Karmel Teves: District II Solo and Ensemble-
Excellent Alto Saxophone Solo. Alex Rich: District II Honors Band-Sixth Chair, Alto Saxophone. Seus Honor Band- Fifth
Chair, Cardinal Band. Bryanna Muscella: District II Junior High Honors Band- First Chair, Baritone. Seus Honor Band-
Gold Band. Chris Rodier: District H Honors Band-First Chair, Flute. Seus Honor Band- Silver Band. District H Solo and
Ensemble- Superior Flute Solo. Caroline Gillis: District II Honors Band-Sixth Chair, Flute. District II Solo and Ensemble-
Superior Flute Solo. Dillion Clifton: District II Honors Band-Tenth Chair, Clarinet. Seus Honor Band- Cardinal Band.
Megan Downing: District II Solo and Ensemble-Superior Snare Drum Solo. Kelyan Hurley: District H Honors Band-Third
Chair, Trumpet. District H Solo and Ensemble-Excellent Trumpet Solo. Ashlyn Hadden: District II Honors Band- First
Chair, Bass Clarinet. David Riggs: District H Honors Band-First Chair, Mallets. Seus Honor Band- Second Chair, Gold
Band. District HI Solo and Ensemble- Superior Xylophone Solo. Joseph Cogswell: District II Honors Band-Second Chair,
Tenor Saxophone. Seus Honor Band- Silver Band.


MHS K-Kids complete

beautification project


Mossy Head School K-
Kids completed their first
service project on March 15.
The students planted a
Bradford pear tree as part of
a continuing beautification
project for their school.
Each student had the op-
portunity to give a helping
hand in the planting process
and parents were present to
give support. For support
the parents have given all


year to the students of MHS,
the tree was dedicated to
them in great appreciation.
The members of the K-
Kids enjoyed the opportu-
nity to begin their service
projects and look forward to
working on their upcoming
project in May.
Congratulations to the
K-Kids and our deepest
gratitude to the Mossy Head
School parents.


School Sports

Calendar

Wednesday- March 30
Northmont, Ohio vs Paxton Baseball in Crestview 3 p.m.

Thursday- March 31
Freeport and Walton Track at Chipley 3:30 p.m.
Paxton Baseball at Rocky Bayou 3:30 p.m.
Paxton Softball at Rocky Bayou 3:30 p.m.
Shoal River at Walton Middle School Softball 3:30 p.m.
PDL Softball at Bethlehem 4 p.m.
Shoal River at Walton Middle School Baseball 4 p.m.
Chipley at Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
South Walton Softball at Vernon 4/6 p.m.
South Walton at Walton Baseball 4/6 p.m.
Freeport Middle School Softball at.Surfside 5 p.m.
Rocky Bayou at Emerald Coast Middle School Baseball 5
p.m.
Freeport Softball at P.C. Bay 6 p.m.

Friday- April 1
Jax Trinity Christian at Freeport Softball 4 p.m.
Seaside at Freeport Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Walton Baseball at Pensacola Catholic 4/6:30 p.m.
Paxton JV Baseball at Central 4:30 p.m.
Paxton Softball at Central 4:30/6:30 p.m.
Graceville at South Walton Baseball 5 p.m.
South Walton Softball at Blountstown 5 p.m.
Paxton Baseball at Central 6:30 p.m.

Saturday- April 2
Freeport and South Walton Track at P.C. Bay Track Invi-
tational 10 a.m.
Pensacola Christian at PDL Baseball 12/2 p.m.

Monday- April 4
Freeport and South Walton at Walton Tennis for District
Tourney 8 a.m.
Donelson Christian at South Walton Softball 4 p.m.
Walton Middle School Volleyball at Grand Ridge 4/5 p.m.
Donelson Christian at South Walton Baseball 4/6 p.m.
Paxton at PDL Softball 4/6 p.m.
Freeport at Walton Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Florala, Ala. at Paxton JV Baseball 5 p.m.
Baker at Paxton Baseball 6 p.m.

Tuesday- April 5
Freeport and South Walton at Walton Tennis for District
Tourney 8 a.m.
Paxton Track at Central 3 p.m.
Holmes Co. at Walton JV Baseball 4 p.m.
Paxton at Freeport Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Paxton JV Baseball at Laurel Hill 4 p.m.
Marianna at Walton Middle School Volleyball 4/5 p.m.
P.C. Bozeman at South Walton Baseball 5 p.m.
PDL at Freeport Baseball 5 p.m.
PDL at Freeport Softball 5 p.m.
Marianna at Walton Softball 5:30 p.m.
Chipley at Walton Baseball 6 p.m.
P.C. Bozeman at South Walton Softball 6 p.m.
Paxton Softball at Bethlehem 6 p.m.


THE MEMBERS OF THE Mossey Head School K-Kids enjoyed the opportunity to begin their beautification projects by
planting the Bradford pear tree and look forward to working on their upcoming project in May.


SOUTH WALTON HIGH SCHOOL participated in the 24th Annual Northwest Florida State College/BAE Math Bowl
last Friday. The team, consisting of Raquel Bradley, Jacob Leuze, Cassidy Whitson, Luke Cyr, Wade Howard, Reed Coker,
Kristy Potter and Shawn Howard, won third place in their division. Reed Coker also won ninth place in the individual
competition. Congratulations to these wonderful math students and their teacher, Dr. Cheryl Mixson.


KIWANIS STUDENT of
the Month for March Ale-
jandra Santamaria, sixth-
grade.


WMS STUDENTS OF THE MONTH for March are: Amanda Hessler, sixth-grade; Is-
abelle Jones, seventh-grade; Thane Walters, eighth-grade; Mack Metz, sixth-grade; from
front row (l-r); Brittany Perdue, eighth-grade; Tripp Hope, principal; Azende Rey, seventh-
grade from back row (l-r).







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011


Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From the beginning,
we have taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our commitment to the Gulf remains unchanged, as
does our responsibility to keep'you informed.


No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100% of the waters
are open and the beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety, Gulf seafood has been more
rigorously tested by independent researchers and experts than any other seafood in the world.
To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion in clean-up costs.


An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife rescue and
restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed $500 million to the
Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund scientific studies on the potential impact of the spill.


$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an independent fund
to pay for environmental restoration and all legitimate claims, including lost incomes. More than
$200 million in grants have been made to the Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.


This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn from it and share
with competitors, partners, governments and regulators to help ensure that it never happens again.

We know we haven't always been perfect but we are working to live up to our commitments, both
now and in the future.

For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.


facebook.com/BPAmerica
twitter.com/BP_America
youtube.com/bp



C 2011 BP, E&P


PAGE 14-B


v .ra,
~- ~P~:5 BWS~