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The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00376
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Publication Date: 3/24/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
sobekcm - UF00028316_00376
System ID: UF00028316:00376
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Full Text







The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888




HERALD
A. a COMBINED WITH THE BREEZE


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Library of Florida History
pn. Bo 117007
20n Sna Universit of Fiorida
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NUMBER 12 3 SL .esviiit -.CH 24, 2011
NUMBER.12 3 SL....- .... -rvUroA Y MARCH 24,2011


BE010
81 65/20! 1


DeFuniak Springs Little League
holds opening day ceremonies 1-B


I VOLUME 122


750 PER COPY


S INSIDE


SCHOOL
DISTRICT, UNIONS
REACH TENTATIVE
AGREEMENT
Unions vote to rat-
ify or reject March
28-29. 13-A



SCHOOL BOARD
WORKSHOP
Considers over-
crowding problem.
13-A



OIL SPILL
DAMAGE
ASSESSMENT
MEETING IN
PANAMAA CITY
Area residents
participate to "make
the public whole."
1-C



PLEASANT
VALLEY WOMAN
LOOKS AT PAST
Reminisces on
"lost" town. 7-A


RURAL RELIEF
GETTING RELIEF
Food, volunteer
help making a dif-
ference. 11-A


Census figures


provided, county to


consider redistricting


By DOTTY NIST

The 2010 Census figures
for Walton County show a
population of 55,043, an in-
crease of 14,443 residents as
compared with the figures
for 2000, the last time a fed-
eral census was taken.
Walton County Citizen
Services Director Ken Little
provided information on the
new census figures at the
March 22 Walton County
Board of County Commis-
sioners (BCC) meeting at
the Walton County Court-
house in DeFuniak
Springs.
In anticipation of the ar-


rival of this new informa-
tion, in November Walton
County had appointed a Re-
districting Committee com-
posed-of five citizens chosen
by the BCC and five com-
mittee members selected by
the Walton County School
District. The committee
has held an organizational
session and plans to begin
meetings to develop recom-
mendations for the future
delineation of districts in
the county, based on the
newly-obtained census in-
formation.
The Florida Constitu-
tion requires the members
of each of the state's boards


of county commissioners
to divide their county into
districts as nearly- equal in
population as practical after
each 10-year census.
For Walton County,
with a perfect split of the
newly-reported population
into districts, each district
would contain approximate-
ly 11,000 residents. District
3 comes closest to this num-
ber, with a population of
10,662. Districts 1, 2, and
4 currently fall below the
ideal split number at 9,817,
8,867, and 9,751 residents,
respectively.
Meanwhile, the county's
largest district, District 5 in


the southwest, now shows a
population of 15,946, which
exceeds the ideal split num-
ber -by more than 40 per-
cent.
The Redistricting Com-
mittee has scheduled its first
meeting to address the task
of post-census redistrict-
ing for 2 p.m. on April 6 at


the Walton County Health
Department building in De-
Funiak Springs. The public
is encouraged to attend.
Little noted that the com-
mittee plans to hold several
other public meetings in
other areas of the county.
Information on those meet-
ings will be forthcoming.


Natural gas deal between Paxton and DFS a no-go for now


By REID TUCKER
As it now stands, the
proposed interlocal natural
gas franchise agreement be-
tween. the cities of Paxton
and DeFuniak Springs, first
proposed last August, is off.
The Paxton Town Coun-
cil, advised by City Attorney
Lori Bytell at the regularly
scheduled monthly meeting
on Tuesday, March 15, chose
not to pursue the contract,
which would include Pax-
ton in DeFuniak Springs'
expanded natural gas fran-
chise. The proposal would
effectively offer Paxtonians
an alternative to electric-
ity for heating and cooking.
Bytell, appointed in August
as a liaison between the two
cities, told the Council that
the proposed agreement


would require a consider-
able (though unspecified)
amount of the expense of in-
stalling infrastructure nec-
essary for the natural gas
system to be shouldered by
Paxton.
She said this is neither
what the Council indicated
it was interested in when
the agreement was first pro-
posed nor is it within the
city's means, both monetary
and in terms of manpower,
to undertake at this time.
"It's unthinkable that
we were going to have to
meet that burden," Bytell
said. "We shouldn't have to
pay for natural gas to come
here because we don't have
the revenue to do it. I can't
see us binding ourselves to
pay for pipelines and other


things that would make it
feasible for us to do this.".
Bytell said rejecting the
agreement does not pre-
vents an outside company
from bringing natural gas
service to Paxton in the fu-
ture, but instead asserts the
city's position that it should
not have to incur the costs
of updating infrastructure.
Utilities companies, such as
CHELCO and Gulf Power,
do not usually charge cities
for installation of new in-
frastructure as they assume
this to be part of the cost of
doing business in that com-
munity, Bytell explained.
The results of a straw
poll study conducted by Bill-
ing Clerk Judy Williams
shows that the majority of
Paxton's residents are in


favor bringing in a natural
gas service. Williams was
not present at the meeting
to explain the full results of
the survey, which was in-
cluded on customers' water
bills last month, but City.
Clerk Susan Imfeld said the
data collected could be pre-
sented at the next meeting
if the council wished.
Returning to the topic
of water bills, the Council
unanimously approved a
format change of the hard
copy invoices, bringing them
in line with privacy laws.
Water and sewer bills were
mailed printed on postcards
and mailed without a cover-
ing, whereas the new for-
mat will involve a change in
their overall dimensions so
the invoices can be mailed


in envelopes. The move,
which Imfeld said had to be
made in order to protect the
confidential information of
customers on the city's-wa-
ter system, will lighten Pax-
ton's coffers by $500, due
mostly to software changes.
The Council also voted
unanimou'y to waive rent-
al fees of 't, city's agricul-
tural complex for Kimberly
Cook, whose son has a bone
condition that requires a
trip out of state for surgery.
Cook said she plans to have
a benefit barbecue dinner on
April 2 to pay for the cost of
the trip and the procedure.
However, the Council in-
formed her that both a live-
stock sale and Dixie Youth

See DEAL 10-A


WALTON MIDDLE
DRAMA CLUB
WINS VIDEO
CONTEST
Statewide compe-
tition brings cash
award with "Cover
Your Mouth." 13-A



HIRING FAIR
DRAWS
GOOD-SIZED
CROWD IN DFS
More than 180 job
seekers turn out.
3-A


ARTS &
ENTERTAINMENT
5-C

CLASSIFIED 7-C

OUTDOORS 2-C

ARRESTS 10-A

www.defuniakherald.com






0 94922 73172 2


Bearden appointed


as county Support


Services Director


Brady Bearden was re-
cently appointed as Sup-
port Services Director for
the Walton County Board
of County Commissioners
(BCC). He had been serving
as Interim Human Resourc-
es Director since October
2009. In February 2011, Hu-
man Resources, Fire Rescue
Services, Animal Control,
Recreation, and Geographi-
cal Information Services
(GIS) were combined under
the Support Services Divi-
sion for more efficient over-
sight and management.
Bearden .is a retired Na-
val Officer with 24 years of
active service, enlisting in
1971 and retiring in 1995.
His career started as an
aviation electrician where
he worked on several types
of aircraft. He promoted up
through the enlisted ranks
to senior chief petty officer
and was commissioned as
a naval officer in 1984. He
served in progressively re-
sponsible positions as shop
electrician, shop supervisor,
quality assurance represen-
tative and later as quality
assurance officer. He served
as maintenance and mate-
rial control officer for over
200 enlisted personnel man-
aging day to day flight oper-
ations and maintenance. He
served two tours of instruc-


tor duty teaching young
first tour officers the intrica-*
cies of becoming an aviation
maintenance officer. He
also served as placement
officer at theeEnlisted per-
sonnel management center
for 114 major aviation com-
mands comprising 37,800
positions for the East and
West coast. While in service
he earned a bachelor's de-
gree in business administra-
tion and management from
Northwood University.
Upon his retirement from
the Navy in 1995, he went to
work in the home health in-
dustry as human resources
and briefly as administra-
tor. He started at Choctaw-
hatchee Electric Cooperative
(CHELCO) in 1997 where he
served as job training and
safety specialist and later as
director of loss control. This
included responsibilities of
safety, training, environ-
mental and liability insur-
ance for CHELCO. In 2005
he was hired by the Walton
County BCC as training
coordinator in the human
resources division. He was
promoted to production
manager for public works,
the largest division under
the BCC in 2006. Later that
year he took on responsibili-
ties as public works safety
and personnel manager and


Lk '---. -_ I
BRADYBEARDEN

served in that capacity until
October 2009 when he was
promoted to interim human
resources director.
He and all other division
directors are looking to con-
tinue to do more with less
and still provide adequate
and professional services to
the citizens of Walton Coun-
ty. They are looking at cost
reductions and ensuring
proper manpower levels are
met. His goals for the Sup-
port Services Division are to
continue to provide strong
Human Resources and GIS
departments for the employ-
ees and citizens; to assist in
providing a strong Fire Res-
cue Department for protec-
tion of the citizens of Wal-
ton County. In addition, he
intends to continue to help
build an Animal Control
facility the county will be
proud of and continue to add
to the recreation program
for the adults and youth of
Walton County.


Billy Deisler qualifies

for City Council seat 1


Campaign announcement
submitted by Billy Deisler
Hi, my name is Billy
Deisler. I have been a resi-
dent in Walton County for
the past 26 years. I am an
active member of Destiny
Worship Center Church,
where I have been serving
faithfully for the past sev-
eral years. I am a father to
one daughter, and the proud
grandfather of two beautiful
granddaughters.
My qualifications for DFS
City Council:
I am a local businessman
and state certified general
contractor, with an extensive
background in the building
industry. My background
brings to the council knowl-
edge of infrastructure and
understanding of utilities,
as well as land use. I have
vast experience in build-
ing and maintaining high
end budgets. My knowledge
comes from hands-on expe-
rience and dedication to the
industry. I remain current
on continued education in
multiple areas as a General
Contractor.
I feel the city of De-
Funiak Springs has come
a long way in the past few
years, with addressing the
city's needs. The city is in
need of qualified candidates
with experience and desire
to move the city forward, for
current affairs and future
growth. When I look at De-
Funiak as a whole, I see so


BILLY DEISLER


much potential within this
city for amazing things to
happen for our children and
the children to come. Put
my experience, my back-
ground and knowledge to
work for you the citizens of
DeFuniak Springs. Only to-
gether as a unity will we see
such changes.
I am thankful to have this
opportunity to serve the citi-
zens of DeFuniak Springs
and would be honored with
your support on April 12,
2011.
Billy Deisler for DFS City
Council, Seat 1.
For further questions or
concerns, I may be contact-
ed at billy@deislerinc.com
or (850) 978-7703.


I '












Annual Countryside Festival at the Friendship House March 26


It's time again for the an-
nual Countryside Festival at
the Friendship House, 353
Juniper Lake Road in De-
Funiak Springs. The theme
this year is "Celebrate Wal-
ton" accentuating the posi-
tive of the community. The
festival begins this Satur-
day at 10 a.m. with free ad-
mission and a full schedule


of fun for the whole family.
Special guest this year will
be Mayor C. Harold Carpen-
ter and there'll be a full line
up of local talent on the stage
during the day including:
Lee Touchton and friends,
The Headliners from Mossy
Head Elementary, the Bee
Bops from West DeFuniak
Elementary and a showcase


of local performers during
the Walton Music talent
contest. There'll be several
door prizes given away by
area sponsors and a chance
to win a Pine Mountain
getaway that includes two
nights at the Valley Inn and
gift certificates for the Bull-
ock House and Especially
You Boutique near Callaway


Gardens. Local fire and res-
cue teams will be on hand as
well as city and county law
enforcement to provide an
interesting and fun way for
kids to learn about safety.
During the festival, a dove
release is scheduled to dedi-
cate the Memory Garden
and the Saturday evening
sing starts at 4 p.m. with


4-Ever His quartet, Robert
and James, John Hattaway
and the Staffords.
Several area crafters will
be set up along the midway
and a wide variety of food
and snacks will be available
as well.
This year the Friend-
ship House began a penny


drive to provide funds for
families who have a person
diagnosed with Alzheimer's
Disease that can't afford the
cost of respite care. Hilda
Coursey will present the fi-
nal count of pennies during
the festival, so those that
have been collecting pen-
nies are encouraged to bring
them to the festival.


Dog Walk around Lake DeFuniak for fitness and fun March 26


The fourth annual Dog
Walk around Lake De-
Funiak is sponsored by
the Walton County Health
Department on Saturday,
March 26.
This opportunity for out-
door activity and recreation
is free and open to the public
of all ages, with or without a
canine companion.
Doggie bags at registra-
tion include a free leash
and Frisbee; information
on canine concerns such as


rabies, dog bite prevention,
pet hurricane preparation,
and animal shelters and ref-
uges.
Registration begins at 10
a.m. on Circle Drive near
the Amphitheater at Lake
DeFuniak. Dogs are encour-
aged to dress for the occa-
sion.
Prizes of grooming items,
tasty dog treats and/or chew
toys will be awarded to the
"Best Dressed" dogs at 11:30
a.m. at the registration area.


Halfway around this 1-1/4
mile route, a water station
will be available for both
hounds and humans, cour-
tesy of the Walton County
Prevention Coalition. Dogs
are rewarded at the end of
their exercise with a compli-
mentary doggy delicacy.
Over 50 dogs of every
size, breed and disposition
attended last year's event
without dispute, demon-
strating, admirable social-
ization skills.


This community activity
is being held in conjunction
with "Healthy Floridians
Month." Everyone can gain
the health benefits of physi-
cal activity. Regular physi-


cal activity helps improve
overall health and fitness
and reduces the risk for
many chronic diseases. I
In recognition of Tobacco
Free Florida week, and in


consideration of residents of
Circle Drive, this is a tobac-
co-free event. All dogs must
be leashed.
For more information,
contact Kat Tanza at (850)
892-8040, extension 1159.


DFS Planning Board


passes two variances


DeFuniak Springs Police


respond to 911 call on


possible suicide attempt


On March 16 in the late
night hours the DeFuniak
Springs Police responded
to the area of Highway 83
North in reference to a 911
call from a cellular phone.
The communication offi-
cer overheard a person ask
for help and heavy breath-
ing during an open line,
however when trying to ob-
tain further information the
line remained open without
any further response.
Officers arrived in the
area quickly and began their


search for the caller. Shortly
after they began their search
officers spotted a vehicle off
of Highway 83 North in the
area that is known as the
"clay pit."
As the officers approached
the vehicle they observed
some type of hose connected
to the vehicle's exhaust pipe
and the other end stuck
through a window leading
into the interior portion of
the vehicle. Officers also ob-
served a subject sitting in
the driver seat of said vehi-


cle and were able to remove
him safely from the carbon
monoxide fumes.
The subject was assessed
by Walton County Emergen-
cy Medical Services (E.M.S.)
on scene and was listed alert
but uncooperative when an-
swering questions. Subject
was transported to Health-
Mart for further evaluation.
The investigation is being
reported as information only
at this point and there is no
further information avail-
able at this time.


WCHD warns of high bacteria

count at Morrison Springs


Due to high levels of bac-
teria found in routine moni-
toring of Morrison Springs,
the Walton County Health
Department has closed the
following Public Bathing
Place: Morrison Springs


The health department
advises against any water-
related activities at the
above location due to the
high bacteria levels. The
health department will ad-
vise the public when water


samples confirm that there
is no longer a threat to the
public.
For more information,
contact the Walton County
Health Department at (850)
892-8021.


The DeFuniak Springs
Planning Board met on
March 7 to discuss two re-
quests for variances by citi-
zens.
The first request was
made by Richard D. Black
for property located at 676
2nd Street. After discussion,
Jim Harman made the mo-
tion to approve the follow-
ing, "recommend approval
of the variance request to
the front yard setback from
30 ft. to 13 ft., the distance
between the proposed addi-
tion and carport from 10 ft.
to 0 ft, the distance between


the existing house and car-
port,from 10 ft. to 3 ft. and
the distance between the
carport and wood shed from
10 ft. to 8 ft. Motion second
by Ryan Douglass, motion
carried 4-0."
The second request was
made by William J. Deisler
for a front yard setback lo-
cated at 433 Twin Lakes
Drive, so the building could
conform to residential use.
After discussion, a motion
was made by Harman, "to
recommend approval of the
request for a variance from
a 30 ft. front yard setback to


a 19.24 ft. front yard setback
based upon staff recommen-
dation, second by Tyron
King, motion carried 4-0."
According to minutes of
the meeting provided by
staff, "City Attorney Clay
Adkinson updated the Plan-
ning Board of the [First
Judicial Circuit] Court's
order denying petition for
Writ of Certiorari regard-
ing the Jack Bell and Frede
Lopez court case." The case
concerned the application
to build an establishment
called El Charo in DeFuniak
Springs.


Jan Davidson 4
21 Years Experience

OFFICE LOCATED AT
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S DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433

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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011


PAGE 2-A










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT of Children and Families Community Partner Liaison Phil-
lip Waltrip was on hand at the Resource and Hiring Fair to explain the various services
offered by the FDCF, including food and temporary cash assistance, Medicaid applications
and the Florida Healthy Kids Programs. Waltrip also announced an expansion of the Auto-
mated Community Connection to Economic Self-Sufficiency (ACCESS) program compiling
lists of locations with public Internet access. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


SHERONMCLANEY, Northwest Florida State College Transitional Specialist, informed
Bethany Drake and Charlotte Smith of the adult education programs offered at NWFSC's
Chautauqua Center in DeFuniak Springs. (Photo by Reid Tucker)




Resources and Hiring

Fair held in DFS March 18


More than 180 job seek-
ers turned out for the 2011
Walton County Resource
and Hiring Fair, held Fri-
day, March 18, at the De-
Funiak Springs Community
Center. The event, hosted by
Okaloosa-Walton JobsPlus,
was the first of its kind since
2008, and attracted 30 em-


players in the private and
public sectors. Though the
state's economy is starting
to pick up, Florida has the
second-highest unemploy-
ment rate among the most
populous states at 11.9 per-
cent (100,000 jobless out of
a labor force of 9,276,000)
in January 2011. Accord-


ing to figures provided by
JobsPlus Communications
Coordinator Trisha King,
Walton County had the 10th
lowest unemployment in the
state at 9.2 percent, though
that number is up 0.3 per-
cent from December of last
year.


MORE THAN 180job seekers visited the Resource and Hiring Fair in DeFuniak Springs.
(Photo by Reid Tucker)


Laurel Hill motorist killed on CR-2


Third annual fundraising event

benefiting the Boys & Girls Club


Limited tickets are on
sale now for the Boys & Girls
Clubs of the Emerald Coast
DeFuniak Springs Teen
Center's third annual Steak
and Burger fundraising
event. Individual tickets are
$45 and can be purchased at
the Walton County Tax Col-
lector's Office or teen center.
Proceeds from the event will
support the annual operat-
ing costs of the teen center.
The Steak and Burger event
will take place on Thursday,
March 24, at 6 p.m. at the
DeFuniak Springs Commu-
nity Center.
The event will feature a
presentation on the accom-
plishments of the teen cen-
ter, a presentation by the
"Youth of the Year," as well
as what the future holds for
the club. Collegiate football
coach, Tommy Bowden, is
the keynote speaker for the
evening and will share an in-
spiring story of his own life
experiences and the quali-
ties he learned during the
32 years of college coaching.
The event coincides with
National Boys & Girls Club
Week, and they encourage
the community to come and
support our youth.
The goal of the event is to
raise funds to help the teen
center become self-sustain-
ing. One of the successful
attributes of Boys & Girls
Clubs models across the
country is their ability to
operate through community
donations and fundraisers.


Each center is responsible
for raising funds to pay for
the operating expenses of
the club, which currently at
the teen center consists of
staff salaries.
The teen center currently
has over 100 members on its
roll with approximately 40
teens attending daily after
school.
Programs at the teen cen-


ter are focused on developing
academic skills, character,
and healthy lifestyles. The
teen center serves middle
and high school aged youth:
Anyone interested in
purchasing tickets, contact
Fundraising Chair Mike
Morris at (850) (850)585-
1718, or mmorris@chelco.
com.


D rf s k l $ dI be o nslc


* More officers, better training /

* Increased patrols, security checks

* Conservative management A
of taxpayer dollars

C AApril 12. Pl' .'<',, Mark A Weeks
M ae DeFuniak Springs
SCity Marshal

Mark WeekCsIr


F.:.liI.-nl aj.j ., .hJ I.r g r.1 i p .-j .~J .,: i t
i i t r id


A Laurel Hill man was
killed in a vehicle crash that
took place March 18 on CR-2
in Walton County.
Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP) investigator Cpl. Eric
R. Diaz reported that a ve-
hicle was traveling west on
CR-2. "For unknown rea-
sons" it crossed the double
solid yellow painted lines on
the road, into the eastbound


lane and into the path of an
eastbound vehicle. The driv-
er and sole occupant, Edwin
Floyd Thurston Jr., 50, of
Laurel Hill, steered to avoid
the eastbound vehicle and
crossed into the westbound
lane, then onto the north
shoulder where it struck
a wooden trash can holder
in front of the vehicle. The
driver apparently tried to
steer back onto the road,


obsPlus
Veteran Services


but lost control. The vehicle
then crossed both lanes and
entered the south shoulder,
rotating clockwise. The ve-
hicle came to rest on its
right side.
Thurston was fatally in-
jured. The FHP report states
that Thurston was not using
a seatbelt. An investigation
is pending into whether al-
cohol had been a factor.


Swvjobspuisonestop com



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--Open to the Public--


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March 30, 2011 from 9:00am to 1:00pm

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Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548
(across from the Gulfarium)

*Meet with employers seeking seasonal and permanent employees.


*No cost to attend and plenty of parking
*Dress for success and bring resumes


WALTON ACADEMY o
Technology Night
for Parents
Monday, March 28. 2011
5:00-6:00
Please join us for presentations by our computer lab
teachers, Mrs Ireton and Mrs. Pitts. You will visit the
computer lab where teachers will discuss and
demonstrate the computer programs available at
WAC for students to use for middle and high-school
credits, credit retrieval and in preparation for FCAT
Assessments. Many of these programs are available
for home computer use. Topics will include:
ED Options
Middle and High-School Credits, Credit Retrieval
FCAT Explorer
Review and tutoring on Florida's State Standards
Test Preparations
*"$5.00 gas card will be provided to those in attendance.
Please complete this form if you plan to attend.

Parent/Guardian:
Students:
Grades:
Yes, I plan to attend Technology Night for Parents.
No, I will not be able to attend.


PAGE 3-A


i










PAGE 4-A

Editorial Comment

*PERSONAL

COMMENTS

*LETTERS TO

THE EDITOR


Editorial comment


War



No.



3

By BRUCE COLLIER

Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, the rule of threes is
now embedded in our foreign policy, at least re-
garding intransigent Muslim nations. The U.S.
has begun air strikes to enforce a "no-fly" zone
over Libya. An American F-15 had to ditch over
Libya on March 21, apparently because of me-
chanical failure. Both crewmen are reportedly
safe, one having been rescued by Libyan rebels
("good Libyans" as opposed to "bad Libyans," this
being a civil war), the other picked up by a Ma-
rine search and rescue plane. So far, so good.
Despite the administration's, assurances that
ours will be a limited role, and that this is not a
full-fledged commitment to send troops, President
Obama has stated that Muammar al-Qaddafi has
to go. Ideally, that means we (and the French,
and the Italians) just need to stand aside and let
the home team do the heavy lifting, right?
Weekly Standard Editor Bill Kristol happily
calls this "America's fifth war of Muslim libera-
tion." He counts Kuwait, the Balkans, Afghani-
stan and Iraq as the other four. I am sticking
just to three. Kuwait (The First Gulf War) was
a traditional military operation, large armies in
the field, formal battles, and the clear objective of
getting Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. And, like
the the Balkans, it was pre-September 11. Things
have changed, big time.
A U.S. military spokesman has stated the very
real possibility of Qaddafi launching "surrogate"
terrorist strikes in Europe and elsewhere to bloody
the waters while he struggles to maintain his sul-
tanate in Libya. Any doubters of his willingness
should remember Pan Am Flight 103, exploded
over Lockerbie, Scotland on Dec. 21, 1988. Last
month the former Libyan minister of justice fin-
gered Qaddafi as the man who ordered the Lock-
erbie bombing, chiming in with what the world
already knew decades ago. Granted, Osama bin
Laden eclipsed him on September 11, but Qaddafi
hasn't hung onto power for 42 years by being easy
to kill. Or short on ideas.
If our objective really is to ensure that Qaddafi
is stripped of power, then we either have to force
him to leave permanently, or kill him. It would
be nice to think his own people will take care of
that on their own, but now, why should they? The
Americans have come, with planes, trained fight-
ing men, and supplies. Financed God knows how,
but that's not the Libyans' problem, is it?
A lot of wars start out easy. Iraq did, and we
are still there, more or less. By the way, the code
name of this operation is Odyssey Dawn. Some
humorist has remarked that it sounds like a Car-
nival Lines cruise ship. Still, remember that the
hero of The Odyssey is a soldier who spends 20
years of his life away from home the first 10 in
a stupid war over a woman, the next 10 fighting
the gods to get back to his wife. As for the "Dawn"
part, well, dawn begins the day. We've just begun
War No. 3.


PeioialPstgePida
P.O. Box 154

DeunakSpinsFL323
Telephone (850)892-3232 Fax 892-2270


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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 24, 2011


ARGUMENTS AAIsT-

H- S^S9


F i ,i94
o B il\ ~ %wel Sf" t.46


FLORIIDJA.YCAPITALUNEWS


Defense attorneys told jurors Monday
that former House Speaker Ray Sansom not only
didn't steal taxpayer money to build a $6-million
airplane hangar for Destin developer Jay Odom,
the men couldn't have illegally hidden the item in
a state budget if they had tried. But State Attor-
ney Willie Meggs, prosecuting the men on felony
charges of grand theft and conspiracy, said San-
som and Odom conspired with former Northwest.
Florida State College President Bob Richburg
to reward Odom for nearly $1 million in politi-
cal contributions. Meggs said he will call ex-Gov.
Charlie Crist to the witness stand on Wednesday
to testify that, when he learned how the hangar
got into the budget, he recalled unspent money
from the college and canceled the Destin airport
project.Richburg, who cut a plea deal to escape
an indictment on the same charges, is also on
the prosecution witness list. "The college never
asked for this building, the city never asked for
this building," said Meggs. "The only people who
wanted this project was Jay Odom. He wanted the
people of Florida to pay for it." Sansom was ap-
propriations chairman in the House, and speak-
er-designate, in the 2007-08 term. He steered
about $31 million in new or accelerated funding
to the former Okaloosa-Walton Community Col-
lege, including a "multi-use educational facility"
at the Gulf Coast airport. Attorneys Steve Dob-
son, representing Sansom, and Jimmy Judkins,
representing Odom, said in their opening state-
ments that there was nothing wrong with Odom
asking the state to help provide a hurricane-proof
hangar, or with Sansom using his clout to grease
the appropriation. They said the building would
have had classroom space for the college and stag-
ing facilities for emergency equipment to "hunker
down" and ride out a hurricane.
The airport project was never completed and
Sansom resigned from the Legislature as the con-
troversy spread. He also resigned a $110,000-a-
year job at the college. "Ray Sansom didn't break
any rule of the Legislature in doing this; in fact,
it was his responsibility to do this," Dobson told
the six jurors and two alternates. "There's no way
Ray Sansom is guilty of these charges. This case
involves an appropriation made by the Florida
Legislature in 2007. This court has ruled that
you cannot steal an appropriation made by the
Florida Legislature." Meggs said the appropria-
tion was a reward for Odom; unable to get the
building funded by the state initially as an emer-
gency operations center, Sansom and Odom in-
volved Richburg to disguise it as a college project.
Richburg, who was fired by the college trustees,
was initially charged in the case but made a plea
agreement with Meggs on March 11.
Meggs said he will produce emails and tes-
timony indicating the men conspired to get the
money into the budget and to deceive the gov-
ernor's office. He said House budget staff aides
would testify that Sansom told them to keep the
money in the budget, despite a tight-money ban
that year on member projects. In his opening
statement, Judkins said all Odom did was try to
get state and local involvement in a badly needed
project to provide recovery assistance for Destin
residents in a hurricane or other emergency. If he
had leased the facility for his jets the rest of the
time, Judkins said, that was a fair transaction.
"He is absolutely innocent of those charges. He
is not guilty," Judkins said. "He spoke to his pity
council, to his county commissioners, to his legis-
lators and anybody else who would listen to him
about the need for emergency services in the Des-
tin area. That's his right as an American citizen,
as a Floridian." By Bill Cotterell, Florida Capital
Bureau
The Florida Legislature is in session
through May 6. The key issues yesterday and
what's coming up:
UNION DUES
What's happening: A House committee passed
a proposal to ban automatic paycheck deduction
of union dues from public employees and require
specific authorization from every member to use
those dues for political purposes. What's next:
The bill now goes to the full House. A similar bill


is moving through the Senate.
CAMPAIGN FINANCE
What's happening: A Senate committee passed
a bill that would allow political contributions to
soar to $10,000 for candidates for governor, $5,000
for other statewide races, $2,500 for legislative
campaigns and $1,000 for county candidates.
Contributions are now capped at $500 across the
board. What's next: The proposal looks to be on
the fast track for approval in the Senate.
GUNS
What's happening: A Senate committee unani-
mously passed a bill that prohibits local govern-
ments from regulating guns more strictly than the
state. It's one of several bills sought by the gun
lobby, including other proposals to allow weapons
to be openly carried and to prohibit doctors from
asking their patients if they own a gun. What's
next: The Senate bill, and an identical House ver-
sion, are moving steadily through committees.
ABORTION
What's happening: A House committee passed
a bill that makes parental-notice requirements
more strict for minor girls who seek an abortion.
What's next: An identical Senate version is also
moving through committees.

A divided Florida Innocence Commis-
sion voted Monday to endorse a controversial
bill that would set minimum standards for police
lineups. The bill by Sen. Joe Negron, a commis-
sion member and powerful Republican from Port
St. Lucie, would require police to use a third par-
ty unfamiliar with the case to administer photo
lineups. The proposal would also require police
to tell a witness that the lineup may or may not
include a photo of the actual suspect. The idea
is to reach a "double blind" standard that would
prevent police from coaching the witness, subtly
or not. "I think it's our job to boldly transform
how we do eyewitness identifications in the state
of Florida." Negron said. The commission voted
8-12 to endorse Negron's bill. Among those voting
in favor were Leon Public Defender Nancy Dan-
iels, Brevard Circuit Judge J. Preston Silvernail
and Orange Chief Circuit Judge Belvin Perry, the
commission chairman. The panel only has the
power to recommend legislation, but its endorse-
ment carries considerable weight.
Charlotte County Sheriff Bill Cameron and
Rod Smith, a former state senator from Gaines-
ville who once served as Alachua state attorney
and is now chairman of the Florida Democratic
Party, were among the no votes.
Law-enforcement groups prefer new guidelines
recently adopted by the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement. They require new training
and more rigorous procedures but don't mandate
the use of a third party. Cameron warned after
the vote that the legislation will backfire. Small-
er agencies will stop doing photo lineups because
they can't afford to hire additional staff, Cam-
eron said. "Nobody wants to address the costs,"
Cameron said. "Once again, they'll pass a law
with no funding and then take credit." The panel
of prominent judges, prosecutors, defense attor-
neys and academics was created last year by the
Florida Supreme Court to study wrongful con-
victions 12 have been documented in Florida,
many of them discovered through DNA testing.
Of the 12 documented cases, experts found that
nine involved witness misidentification. "That
is the central problem that leads to false convic-
tions," Silvernail said. The cases include Wilton
Dedge, who was convicted in Brevard County of
rape, aggravated battery and burglary in 1982.
The victim's identification and the testimony of a
dog handler who was later discredited and an in-
famous jailhouse informant, all helped get Dedge
convicted. Dedge was released in 2004 after he
was cleared by DNA evidence. "Something has to
be done," Daniels said. "Every once in a while, you
have a perfect storm like the Dedge case." Smith
argued that Negron's bill would not have made
any difference in the Dedge case. The victim, who
never knew Dedge, was steadfast about her iden-
tification through two trials.
"It won't cure the problem," Smith said. By Jim
Ash, Florida Capital Bureau Chief








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


Thrift-Way Supermarket


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March 24- March 30, 2011


* DeFuniak Springs, FL


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PAGE 5-A


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-- ------ ---


1350 West Baldwin Ave.
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
Phone: 850-892-2111
Outages: 1-800-342-0990
www.chelco.com


Conserving energy today
means saving tomorrow.



Greg Majors
Representative

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1299 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 4
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Office 850-892-9922 Toll Free 866-892-9922
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Representative is registered with and offers only securities and advisory services through
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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011


PAGE 6-A


11J ^ *









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011


BONNIE (THARP) SUTTON'S 1942 Walton High School graduating class.


Reminiscing; Pleasant Valley


woman looks back at the past


Story and Photos by
JEFFREYPOWELL
A few weeks back, the
DeFuniak Herald Beach
Breeze published a story
concerning the "lost towns"
of Walton County. In the
article, an archeologist sug-
gested locating and record-
ing the sites of communities
that could be forgotten to
time. Local longtime resi-
dent Bonnie Suttton saw the
article and wanted to share
her memories of a childhood
in the Pleasant Valley, Knox
Hill areas of eastern Walton
County.
Bonnie Tharp (Suttton)
was born at home on what is
now Pusley Hill Rd. in east-
ern Walton County in 1923.
In a home near that site
she grew up and spent the
next 22 years until she mar-
ried. As a young girl Sutton
can remember going to first
grade on Crooked Creek Rd.
at Knox Hill west of where


the first Knox Hill Acad-
emy was built. She only at-
tended one year there and
the school was closed. This
site, according to Sutton, is
largely forgotten by Walton
County historians. For the
next two years she attended
a brand new school east of
the intersection of Pusley
Hill Rd. and Knox Hill Rd.
For fourth grade her
friend Edna Elmer Richard-
son talked her into walking
with her to Pleasant Val-
ley school and her previ-
ous school burned the same
year. The school was rebuilt
and Sutton attended fifth
through 10th grade there be-
fore going to the old Walton
High School on Bruce Ave.
graduating in 1942. The
sites of her first two schools
are now on private property
and little remains to mark
their existence. Sutton lat-
ter attended church at the
Pleasant Valley Church of


EARLY 1940s PHOTOS of Sutton and family members.


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Christ in the same build-
ing she had spent the fourth
grade. That building still
stands and the chalkboards
still hang in place. As a
9-year-old she was walking
with her mother and she
saw several men building a
home out of wood salvaged
from the second Knox Hill
Academy, which was north
of her early schools.
"There are not a whole lot
of people left alive that know
about these sites," said Sut-
ton while touring the area.
"I would like the things I re-
member recorded for histo-
ry. Some of the names I re-
member at the early schools
were the Infingers, Cannons


and Weimorts. It was also a
lot easier to walk to places
back then before everyone
fenced in their property."
Another area Sutton re-
members people talking
about is a stop on the Choc-
tawhatchee River named
Yellow Bluff. She recalls
that the spot had at one
time been a stopping point
for steam powered vessels
traveling to and from Chip-
ley and beyond. She also
feels this area has been for-
gotten to time.
In 1946 Malery Sutton re-
turned home from the army
after serving in Europe.
Malery and Bonnie had
known each other through-


SUTTON HOLDS PHOTOS of her Pleasant Valley class-
mates. She attended one year of elementary school in the
building and went to church there for many years.


out their childhood but had
never dated before he "came
courting" after being hon-
orably discharged from the
service. They soon married
and had two daughters Jan-
ice and Doloris. The Suttons
set up house in the Moore's
community near Morrison
Springs and, but for a brief
time living in Monticello,
Fla., stayed in the home
they built.
Sutton has strong feel-
ings about recording her
past in part due to gaps in
her own life story.
"There are things I would
have liked to have known
about my parents' past that
I do not know. Enough time
has passed now that I will
never know." she comment-
ed. "I have told my family a


lot of the old stories so they
will have the chance to know
their past."


A TEENAGED Bonnie
Tharp.


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PAGE 7-A


-"








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011

Alaqua Animal Refuge's 4th Annual

Canine Carnival is coming to town


BOARD CERTIFIED IN INTERNAL MEDICINE

New Location:
800 Hwy 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL
(next to Haircrafters)


OFFICE
HOURS:
Monday Wednesday
8 AM -4 PM
Thursday
8AM 5 PM
Friday
8 am 12 Noon


IN-OFFICE
LAB FACILITY
(Adult
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892-0997


Diseases of Heart & Lungs Diabetes
Stomach Problems Hypertension
Cancer Screening Cholesterol Screenings
Pap Smears Kidney Trouble
Adult Vaccinations For:
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ACCEPTING MEDICARE & MEDICAID
AS WELL AS MOST HEALTH INSURANCE


Laissez bon temps roll-
over with Rover at Alaqua
Animal Refuge's 4th An-
nual Canine Carnival, to
be held on Saturday, March
26 at Gulf Place in Santa
Rosa Beach. The date is re-
scheduled from an earlier
date that was canceled due
to weather concerns.
The Mardi Gras-themed,
pet-centric outdoor party
will feature a parade of ac-
tivities for pups and the peo-
ple who love them, including
games for kids and canines,
live music, local vendor
booths, food, a raffle, silent
auction, agility demonstra-
tions and the ever-popular
dachshund races.
"Our focus at Alaqua Ani-
mal Refuge is to save the
lives of abused, homeless
and neglected animals, and
while this is a serious mis-
sion, we still find time every
year to celebrate the joy of
pet companionship with
our Canine Carnival," said
Laurie Hood, president and
founder of Alaqua Animal


Refuge. "This special day,
with its Mardi Gras theme
and more activities then
ever, is about fun for the en-
tire family, including dogs!"
Sponsors for the 2011 Ca-
nine Carnival include Bent-
ley's on the Bay, Coastal
Builders of Northwest Flor-
ida, Gigi's Fabulous Kids
Fashions and Toys, Gulf
Place, Kappy the Clown and
Qantum Communications
with guest emcee Aimee
Shaffer. A $5 donation is
suggested at entry. To learn
more about Alaqua Animal
Refuge's 4th Annual Canine
Carnival, including vendor


Argyle Post

informative

There will be a public
meeting at the DeFuniak
Springs Civic Center on
March 30 from 6:30 -8:30


booth qualifications, please
call (850) 880-6399.
About Alaqua Animal
Refuge: Alaqua Animal Ref-
uge, an independent, non-
profit organization located
on Florida's Emerald Coast,
advocates the general wel-
fare and humane treatment
of animals by providing
shelter, prevention of pet
overpopulation and adop-
tion services. Currently, up
to 100 animals are adopted
per month from this unique
rescue facility, which serves
as a true refuge for more
than 250 animals at any
given time.


Office

session set

p.m. to answer questions,
discuss alternatives, and
provide information for the
public on the Argyle Post
Office.


Rob Garver, MD
Now seeing patients in DeFuniak Springs & Andalusia
SQualifications:
Board Certified in Pulmonary Disease,
and Critical Care Medicine
Professor Emeritus, UAB School Of Medicine
--- ertise in:
* shortness ofbreath Aathma, COPD
* Coughs Lung cancer
* WheeMsln Lung fibroasi

Now Aaoepting
Appointments
Cal toll free
888-681-8864
More info at
www.seclung.com


O'Donnell

Cosmetic Dentistry & Orthodontics

ALLAP CSO -MLD ENTIST"


- PAINLESS DENTISTRY

- Cosmetic/Smile Make-Overs

- Root Canals

- Implants & Dentures

- Orthodontics
"Odilndo nrtc rieslri-nI completed by gni al lne, nri


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D.M.D., PA


Santa Rosa Beach
8"O Mack, Baou Rd St A
irMr. Si.:red Heart Hc,.'.ptdll
5r.0 62: ~s88
I hurs & Fri ;'n2-?npm


DeFuniak Springs
5' Bruice /,,. rn e
850 89.-1 .SL,
riie'. A i/i',"il K,. r-r-" ,,pm


* Routine Obstetrics
* High Risk Obstetrics
* 3D/4D Ultrasound
in Office


* Gynecology
* Infertility
* Preferred Provider for
BCBS of Florida and
Most Insurances


Jennifer Esses, MD
Board Certified OB/GYN
As the mother of two boys, I understand the needs you have,
whether you're pregnant now or planning to be in the future.

Women & Children First
<:X 870 Mack Bayou Rd *Suite D *729-7344


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER


) CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY


Dr. James Howell, D.O. Carolyn Lawrence, PAC
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Mon., Wed, Thurs.
7:30 am 4 pm 7 am 5:30 pm


Robert Knox, PAC
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
7 am 5:30 pm


Dr. Stacey Temkin, D.O.
Tues., Wed., Thurs.
7:30 am 4:30 pm
Fri. 7:30 am 2 p.m.


located
VEST MAIN STREET, DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL


ADVANCED

PRACTICE
*

CLINIC, LLC

Have your friends and
neighbors been losing weight?
Maybe they have discovered
our proven weight loss system!
Come by our office or call for more information.

Office Hours
Every Wednesday 8 am 4 pm
Every other Tuesday 10 am 7 pm

call (850) 892-4441 for more information
New Location:
1299 Hwy. 90 W., Suite 1
DeFuniak Springs
(near Prescription Place)


PAGE 8-A


d EXPERIENCE

ST.AGATHA'S

EPISCOPAL CHURCH!

WHERE EVERYONE
IS WELCOME,
11H OLE IS PERFECT
AnD AIYTHI-IG IS
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I 144 Circle Drive
SI DeFuniak Springs FL 32435
Surndair 10:15 ant, Wed. 6 pm
Waq. of he CIoss Fli. 6pma


Gladly Welcoming New Patients


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L j p oinmentneedd a








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


FamiliesFirst Network


prepares for Family Fun Day


During the month ofApril,
Child Abuse Awareness Pre-
vention month, Families-
First Network and friends
aspire to bring awareness
to the often overlooked issue
of child abuse and neglect.
They seek to do this through
education and partnerships
in their community.
FamiliesFirst Network
of Lakeview (FFN) oper-
ates six service centers in
District One to provide pro-
tective services: Escambia,
Milton, Navarre, Crestview,
Fort Walton Beach, and De-
Funiak Springs. FFN repre-


sents a partnership with the
Department of Children and
Families to provide an array
of foster care and protective
services in coordination with
the network partners.
"We feel that the best way
to educate our community is
to gain their trust and the
best way to gain trust is to
build a relationship with
them" said Coordinator Ra-
chel Jones.

In an effort to build the
trust and relationships from
the community, the organi-
zation will host the second


annual Family Fun Day on
April 2, from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the Wee Care Park
on Walton Road. There will
be free food, games, and lo-
cal entertainment for those
who attend.
During the process of co-
ordinating this event, Fami-
liesFirst partnered with
C.O.P.E representatives,
Michelle Rule and Natasha
Heckinger, who assisted
in the organization and re-
cruitment of community re-
sources. This year's event
has brought organizations
from the north and south


end of the county together,
all with the same purpose in
mind: to build strong fami-
lies and keep kids safe.
"By holding this event, it
not only allows our strug-
gling families a chance to see
what the community has to
offer, but it also gives indi-
viduals who want to help an
opportunity to do so," said
Family Services Counselor
Arie Dykes.

FamiliesFirst Network
thanks the sponsors who
have made Family Fun Day
a reality.


Relay for Life event

scheduled April 8-9


There will be an event for
the entire family. The fun
begins Friday, April 8 at 6
p.m. and continues through
Saturday, April 9 at 12 p.m.
at the Freeport Regional
Sports Complex. The Relay
for Life event will be to re-
member and fight back for
the survivors and remember


loved ones who have been
diagnosed and lost to can-
cer.
There will be live enter-
tainment, children activi-
ties, games and food.

For more information con-
tact Erin Arnett at (850)880-
6406.


PAGE 9-A


FAMILIES FIRST is working with the community to end
child abuse. Photos by MollyAnn Photography.


DR. JACKL. BLACKWOOD


Blackwood elected to

Emergency Veterinary

Clinic Board of Directors


At its annual meeting,
held on March 15, the mem-
bers of the Emergency Vet-
erinary Clinic of Okaloosa-
Walton County elected Dr.
Jack L. Blackwood of Wal-
ton County Animal Clinic
to serve on the Board of Di-
rectors. Dr. Blackwood will
serve with Dr. Jim Brechin
of Destin, Dr. Phil Blum-
er, Dr. Laurel Tovrea, Dr.
Carter Zorn of Fort Walton
Beach.


The Emergency Veteri-
nary Clinic was started in
September of 1995 to pro-
vide pet owners with after-
hours emergency care for
their pets. The clinic also
provides overnight care and
weekend care for pets need-
ing additional care that a
private clinic cannot pro-
vide. The Emergency Veter-
inary Clinic is located at 212
Government Ave., Niceville,
FL.


Win a $250 Bass


Pro-Shop gift card


A $250 Bass Pro-Shop gift
card is the prize in a draw-
ing being sponsored by the
United Methodist Women of
the First United Methodist
Church. The drawing will
be held on Monday, May 2,
at the church. Tickets for
the drawing are $3 each or
four for $10. They can be
purchased from UMW mem-
bers on Saturday, March 26
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
Walmart Store in DeFuniak
Springs.



CVHN

birthday

bash

April 16

Save the Date: The Chil-
dren's Volunteer Health
Network (CVHN) Birthday
Bash and Volunteer Appre-
ciation Party will be on Sat-
urday, April 16. They turn
six this year. Join them for
food and fun April 16 from
11 a.m. 2 p.m. at their of-
fices located at 82 Lynn
Drive in Santa Rosa Beach
to show their appreciation
for the providers and volun-
teers who make CVHN pos-
sible!
Children's Volunteer
Health Network, Inc., PO
Box 2142, Santa Rosa
Beach, Florida 32459, (850)
622-3200.


All money raised goes
to the United Methodist
Women's School supply and
Shoe ministries which help
children in need in Walton
County. Last year, these
ministries helped 379 chil-
dren locally.


Disabled American Veterans

extends invitation


Your presence is needed
at our meetings. This is your
club, too. Attend and help us
keep it open.
They would also welcome
any disabled vet to join


them.
Their meetings are on
the first Thursday of each
month at 19:00 hours.
Euchee Valley DAV chap-
ter 98 phone (850)892-7818.


Rob Garver, M.D. John Thomas, M.D. Larry Rafey, PA.-C F. Edward Tenewitz, M.D.
Pulmonology & Surgery & Pediatrics & General Surgeon
Critical Care Family Practice Family Practice


Jane Henderson, M.D.
Gynecology


Jane Henderson. M D provides care for omenn from adolescence
to post-menopause at Northwest Flonda Women's Services in
Niceulle. Dr. Henderson earned her medical decree from the
University of Florida College of Medicine and completed her
four-year residency training at the L.ru'ersitry of South Alabama
She pranced obstetrics and g-necologv for
twenty years and has focused solely, on
g'necolog for the past ten ears.
Dr. Henderson understands the
many different stages of a
woman's life

* Annual wellness exams
*Conaacepuon -
* STD resting and counseling
* Pre-menopause care
* Post-menopause care
* Breast evaluations
* Nutrition and exercise
counseling
* Bone maintenance
and loss prevention
* Hormone replacement
therapy


I5rthwest lorida


1001 West College Blvd, SuiteB-I Niceville
(850) 678-1244

f i s.


, .. .
Shyla D. Scott, LPT
Licensed Physical Therapist


You're Invited To Contact Our Healthcare Professionals
At (850) 951-4556 Or Visit
Healthmark Rural Health Clinic, 4415 Hwy. 331 South, DeFuniak Springs, FL
Monday Friday 8:00 am 4:30 pm

MEDICARE & MEDICAID patients welcomed and most insurances accepted.


"It's Not a Spider Bite"
Private Medical Practice for Individuals with
Chronic Wounds, Abscess or Diabetes

Advanced Practice Clinic, LLC
Dr. James Howell DO, Medical Director
1299 Highway 90 West, Suite 1, DeFuniak Springs, FL

Appointment & Fax

(850) 892-2138

Accepting New Patients for
Medical Wound Management
&
Prevention of Wounds with
Diabetic Foot Evaluation & Management of Numbness &
Tingling to Prevent Wounds/Amputation

Jill M. Allen ARNP, CWS, FACCWS
Diplomat of American Academy of Wound Management,
Fellow of College of Certified Wound Specialist

Private Clinic By Appointment.
On-Site ALF, Nursing Home & Hospital Consult
Out-Patient Surgical Debridement with Topical Anesthetic,
Wound Matrix & Bio-Synthetic Grafts, Tissue Biopsy for
Definitive Antiobiotic Management,
Diabetic Neuropathic Foot & Chronic Abscess Management
Rx for Home Health and/or Facilities as indicated by exam.
==1


Healthmark Hospital & Clinic

WHY WAIT?
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS
WALK-INS WELCOME
* ACCEPTING ADULT & PEDIATRIC PATIENTS


II


'Xi








PAGE 10-A

Waste Management to locate

in the Walton County

Industrial Park at Freeport


Following the recent
transfer of Dayco's franchise
agreement to Waste Man-
agement for garbage collec-
tion in unincorporated Wal-
ton County and the city of
Freeport, the company will
establish a location in the
Walton County Industrial
Park at Freeport.
After a 30-day transition
period, which began on Feb.
28 when Waste Manage-
Sment commenced pick up
services in north Walton
and Freeport, the company
plans to lease an existing
building in Phase I and an
adjacent lot for parking, for


a term of 12 months. The lo-
cation will serve as the main
site for all local routes, and
approximately 25 employees
will be reporting to work in
Freeport. During this time
they will assess their needs,
and establish a permanent
facility to better serve the
citizens county-wide.
"The decision of a corpo-
ration such as Waste Man-
agement to locate in the
Walton County Industrial
Park is very positive not
only for the park, but for
the entire Freeport commu-
nity," commented Scarlett
Phaneuf, managing direc-
tor of the Walton County


Economic Development Al-
liance (WCEDA). "We are
also pleased that, through
the franchise agreement
many local residents, which
were previously employed
by Dayco, were able to re-
tain their jobs," added Pha-
neuf.
This move is in result of
a mutually agreed upon and
approved letter of under-
standing that was a part of
Waste Management's re-
cent franchise acquisition
and transfer. Commissioner
Scott Brannon, as Chairman
of the Walton County Board
of County Commissioners,
negotiated the letter of un-


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


WASTE MANAGEMENT will locate in Walton County
Industrial Park in Freeport.


derstanding working co-
operatively with Freeport
Mayor Mickey Marse. Bran-
non added, "The provisions
and benchmarks that are in-
cluded in the new agreement
provide the foundation for a


comprehensive county-wide
recycling initiative. Waste
Management will be a valu-
able addition to the WCEDA
Industrial Park, as the orga-
nization progresses with the
development of Phase II."


DEAL

CONTINUED FROM
PAGE 1-A

baseball games will be going
on on that same weekend,
which means finding suffi-
cient parking may be an is-
sue.
Before the meeting came
to a close, Mayor Hayward
Thomas informed the Coun-
cil of an invitation from the
Walton County Sheriffs Of-
fice to attend the dedication
ceremony of its new Paxton
substation on March 29. The
mayor, city attorney, Coun-
cil members, all Paxton res-
idents and members of the
public are invited to attend.
The ceremony is slated to
begin at 10 a.m.


Alaqua Animal Refuge Pet of the Week


By M. VREELAND
It's obvious from the pho-
to that Banzai is a dog who
really knows how to enjoy
life! This extremely hand-
some Basenji/Fox Terrier
mix is as happy as the day
is long, and a pup who re-
ally loves to hang out with
all his canine companions




Parents

Night Out

planned

Discovery Time Play-
school in Freeport will be
hosting a Parents Night Out
on Saturday, April 2 from 4
p.m. until midnight. Dinner,
a movie and planned activi-
ties will be provided. The
cost is $25 for the first child
and $10 for each additional
child. Limited spots. Call
(850)835-2331. All proceeds
go to Relay for Life- Free-
port.


DeFUNIAK


DeFuniak Springs Police
arrested the following peo-
ple during the week ending
March 20, 2011:

Kelli Michelle Peak, 19,
DFS, Possession of w/intent
to distribute Schedule I, III,
or IV substance, child ne-
glect w/o great harm,
Robert Glenn Garri-
son, 25, DFS, Possession
of Schedule I, II or IV con-
trolled substance w/intent


at Alaqua Animal Refuge.
The epitome of sociability,
he is a jovial character who
never fails to elicit a smile
from everyone he meets. In


other words, Banzai is the
perfect partner for anyone
who shares his zest for life
and wants to nurture a joy-
ful spirit. He would gladly


BANZAI! is waiting to hear from you at Alaqua Animal
Refuge.


SPRINGS POLICE REPORT I


to distribute,
Shadona Denise Hucka-
ba, 45, DFS, Tampering with
or fabricating evidence,
Allan Ray Day, 48, DFS,
Trafficking in hydrocodone,
Brittney Michelle Mims,
22, DFS, Possession of mari-
juana -20 grams,
Jeffrey Sly Allen, 28,
Edinburgh, Ind., Possession
of controlled substance 20
grams,
Marcos Antonio Duque-


Alcudia, 20, DFS, Operating
motor vehicle w/o valid DL,
Charles Ryan Edler, 22,
DFS, Battery domestic,
Mitchell Sharod Reed,
27, DFS, Worthless check
- $150, criminal mischief
$200 1,000,
S Stephen Bernard
Whisenhunt, 27, DFS,
MVOP,
Marvin Nelson, 30, Ad-
dress not given, DWLSR.


WALTON COUNTY SHERIFF'S REPORT


Walton County Sheriffs
Deputies arrested the fol-
lowing people during the
week ending March 20,
2011:

John Russell Cunning-
ham, 27, SRB, DUI,
Rhonda Kaye Harris,
37, SRB, DUI,
Nolan Ray White, 32,
Boaz, Ala., DWLSR,
Calvin Tyrell Blackmon,
21, Pensacola, Warrant,
Brittany Michelle Both,
22, Columbus, Miss., Grand
theft,
Stephen Anthony Burn-
ham, 51, Freeport, Civil com-
mitment (child support),
Marshall David Carroll,
65, DFS, Battery domestic,
Jerry Lee Clifton, 67,
DFS, Infliction of physical
or mental injury,
Joyce Marie Clifton, 66,
DFS, Child neglect without
great harm,
SRyan William Dun-
away, 20, Gulf Breeze, DUI,
Shawn Daniel Freese,
28, Milton, DWLSR, DUI,
Jose Garcia Gomez, 33,
Bonifay, Warrants (Holmes
and Washington counties),
Jackie Hutchins, 63,
DFS, DUI,
Richard Okley Rife, 31,


MVOP,
Michael Ray Turner, 40,
Freeport, Battery by stran-
gulation, inflicting bodily
harm or terrorizing victim
or other, burglary w/assault
or battery,
Justin Benjamin Asher,
24, DFS, Battery on officer,
firefighter, etc., obstruction
w/o violence, FVOP,
Larry W. Blane, 20,
PDL, Grand theft third de-
gree, unarmed burglary of
unoccupied dwelling,
Cary Lee Brooks, 38,
Freeport, VOP,
James Joel Catalan, 44,
Lake Worth, FVOP,
Travis William Knaub-
er, 24, DFS, Affray, battery
domestic,
Igmar R. Lopez, 29, Or-
lando, DUI,
Daryl Wade Mayatte,
34, SRB, Battery, premedi-
tated murder,
George Nye Osburn, 46,
DFS, Affray, causing bodi-
ly harm, assault w/deadly
weapon w/o intent to kill,
Jessica Leigh Rast,
33, Panama City, DUI,
DWLSR,
Danny Lee Skelton, 32,
SRB, MVOP,
Claude Lee Smith Jr.,
36, Jackson, FVOP,


Stacey Wade Ward, 36,
Freeport, Domestic violence
causing bodily harm,
Mario Jose Castellon
Espinoza, 23, DFS, Operat-
ing motor vehicle w/o valid
DL,
William Brandon Glass,
26, DFS, Possession of con-
trolled substance w/o pre-
scription, theft $100 300,
SChanelle Monique
Graham, 22, Panama City,
FVOP,
Katrina Stephanie Gra-
ham, 23, Crestview, MVOP,
Michael Lee Hall, 43,
DFS, FVOP,
Felipe Perez Hernan-
dez, 38, Freeport, FTA,
Roger Dale Kiper, 45,
PDL, Battery domestic,
Jay Anthony Middle-
ton, 23, Jacksonville, War-
rant (Duval Co.),
Johnathan Ross Pres-
ton, 23, Birmingham, DUI,
Hector Javier Ramos,
24, DFS, Operating motor
vehicle w/o valid DL,
Lodonta Demont Ran-
dolph, 28, DFS, FTA,
Conrad Barton Taylor,
21, Birmingham, DUI,
Kyle David Turner, 20,
PDL, FVOP.


trade romping around our
beautiful 10-acre sanctu-
ary with his pals for that
special someone who wants
to give him a loving forever
home. If you'd like to make
Banzai a part of your fam-
ily, he's waiting anxiously to
meet you.He promises to be
the very best dog he can be
and not to take up too much
room except in your heart.
Alaqua Animal Refuge


is a non-profit, no-kill shel-
ter, located at 914 Whitfield
Road, Freeport. They wel-
come everyone to visit all
the adoptable animals at
their beautiful 10-acre sanc-
tuary any Tuesday through
Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m.

For more information con-
tact them at (850) 880-6399
or check out their website at
www.aarflorida.com


DEFUNIAK SPRINGS CITY ELECTION PUBLIC
LOGIC AND ACCURACY TESTING


Pursuant to 101.5612 F.S., the public testing of the voting equipment to
be used in the DeFuniak Springs City Election to be held April 12, 2011
will be conducted on Friday, April 7, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. This testing
will be held at the Supervisor of Elections Office at 571 US Highway 90
E, DeFuniak Springs, Florida. The public is encouraged to attend. For
more information, you may call 850-892-8112.
#403-11 ltc: 3-24




Walton County 2011


Small Scale Land Use


Amendments


The Walton County Board of County Commissioners
has authorized the advertisement of the annual 80
acre Small Scale Amendment application process
afforded by Florida Statute, for which 40 acres of the
80 acres may be offered to owners of parcels
requesting a change in the Future Land Use Map
designation on their property. Therefore, the
timeline and application procedures for the 40 acres
of small scale amendments (parcels of less than 10
acres) that have been reserved for private property
owners are as follows:
One page summary applications will be

accepted from March 17, 2011through noon
on Mareh 31 2011.
Drawing to be held at 1'0.0 a.m. on
lMonda. April 4. 20I, in the South Walton

Courthouse Annex.
Those drawn will have until May 9, 2011, to

submit complete application.
Any applications not complete by May 9.
2011, will be replaced with applications in the
order in which they were drawn.


The one page application and additional information
will be available on the

a/tlon Counoty website (www.co.walton.fl.us)


Please be advised accordingly.
#402-11 Itc: 3-24


I -- --- I










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011 PAGE 11-A


Good things happening with Rural Relief


By LEAH STRATMANN

The advent of spring and
spring break has put some
seasonal workers back to
work leading to a lessening
demand at the last food pan-
try on March 12. "The beach
is open and people are get-
ting jobs and we had enough
food for the 94 families seek-
ing assistance," said Chuck
Tucker, pantry manager.
"We have been so fortu-
nate as to have been adopted
by the nice people at Village
Baptist Church in Destin.
They do a three-week gath-
ering of specific foods and
they brought us 1,000 cans
of canned fruit. By the first
of next month, I will have a
lot more canned goods and
USDA brought a lot of fro-
zen foods. The pantry will
be open again on March 26
and on that same day we


will be offering a free eye
clinic," Tucker said.
In addition to the food
collection, Village Baptist
has also donated appliances
for Fuller House, which is to
be built soon.
"Things are starting to
happen," Tucker said. "We
have had AmeriCorps kids
here for the past couple of
weeks and we will have them
until the end of March. They
are working on painting the
thrift store and making the
whole area look like a real
village compound. The other
thing happening is Village
Baptist has put together a
rural relief coalition. At the
first meeting there were 12
other organizations there
and at the second one we
had 32 organizations rep-
resented. The next one is
April 8 at 10 a.m. at the
Bruce Methodist Church.


The public is invited. This
coming together of lots of
organizations for a common
goal is going to move things
forward rapidly."
Tucker said some mon-
ey has been donated for
the foundation for Fuller
House, which was originally
planned as an emergency
house or a tribal guest-
house. "However, the Rural
Relief Coalition has decided
to try and make the house
big enough to serve as a cold
weather shelter which is
why we are trying to get as
many appliances as possible.
It would be large enough
to house several people for
immediate care with emer-
gency cots and emergency


food. It may also be used as
a rehab center and for some
office space.
"Another new thing is
pre-testing 16 individuals
for the GED next week and
the class will start the fol-
lowing week. Classes will
start March 28 from 6 to
9 p.m. at the church. The
classes will run through the
end of April. New applicants
will be accepted and we are
seeking donations of work
clothing for graduates,"
Tucker said.
"We don't know the actual
percentage of those without
at least a high school educa-
tion, but most have only gone
through the eighth grade. It
is a very high percentage


and those individuals have
a tough time getting a job,"
he said.
Plans continue going for-
ward toward getting a clinic
on tribal land. Tucker said
grant money has been filed
to open the clinic. "Either
this month or next month a
group of men from Georgia
are coming down to build a
playground within the con-
fines of the trees. No trees
will be taken down and it
will give the kids a safe
place to go and play on pan-
try days. We have used the
money collected for us by
the Emerald Coast Associa-
tion of Realtors for the raw
materials," he noted.
Another non-profit orga-


nization called Begenerous
has decided to concentrate
on providing adult and chil-
dren's diapers to the pan-
try.
"Our major needs now are
operational funding support
to pay for fuel, utility bills
and the supplemental food
that sometimes must be
purchased. Funds are dwin-
dling and even though other
things are happening, cash
is always in short supply,"
Tucker said.
Donations may be made
by sending, checks to Rural
Relief Fund, 278 Church
Road, Bruce, Fla. 32455.
Leah Stratmann may
be reached via leahwrites@
gmail.com


TWO VOLUNTEERS from AmeriCorps paint the shelves
in the Rural Relief pantry. The entire area is getting a face-
lift given the influx of various groups dedicated to helping
coming through almost every week. (Photo by Chuck Tuck-
er)


THE WHOLE CREW strikes a pose in front of the sign at the entrance to the tribal compound which is undergoing a
facelift and expansion week by week. (Photo by Chuck Tucker)


Dear Auntie Em,


Dear Auntie Em,
I feel foolish writing you
about this, but it is bugging
me and I don't know what to
do. You see, I am a retired
woman, who is part of a
large, social-church organi-
zation with many widows
in attendance. Every time
someone has become a wid-
ower in our group, the other
single ladies swarm him
and one usually ends up
dating him after an appro-


private amount of time has
passed. I am lonely some-
times as well, but I have
always felt strange about
this on one hand, but on the
other, I think if I did it too,
maybe I'd have a male com-
panion as well. I have lots
of friends, but I don't think
we ever get over our need to
have an adult relationship
with a member of the oppo-
site sex that makes us feel
special and maybe even in


/
', --


love.
The women often become
very competitive with each
other, and sometimes it
ends their friendships. I love
my friends and can't decide


if I should change my ways
and compete as a part of the
casserole Casanova patrol,
or should I just be myself
and offer support if needed?
Your advice is appreciated.

Sincerely,
Not Betty Crocker

Dear NBC,
I've seen what you speak
of for many years in the
South and I've seen the need
for a relationship wipe out a
friendship of many, many
years before. It is not pretty.
I also think you are very hu-


man for questioning your
feelings about joining in a
behavior and wondering if it
would be worth it to change
for the chance of love. I say
no. It's not worth changing
yourself, or your behavior
that you feel comfortable
with in order to "find" a re-
lationship. Any relationship
worth having will not be
found in pursuit of some-
one when you are not being
yourself.
My advice is to be your-
self. Enjoy your friendships.
Love the people around you
and love yourself. Be a part


of your community. Let oth-
ers see that you are happy
with yourself, and with
your life and if a man comes
along that is right for you
and Heaven sent, he will
take you out to eat, and not
be expecting a casserole any
time soon. Good luck and
God bless.

Auntie Em

Send your letters and
emails for Auntie Em to
dfsherald@gmail.com or to
P.O. Box 1546, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435


"We went from being a
privileged group to all of a
sudden becoming whites,
the new victims."

This is a statement from
Charles Gallagher, a soci-
ologist at a Pennsylvania
university, and excerpt from
the CNN article "Are whites
racially oppressed."
It's a fact. Yes, with the
current rate of immigration
and contributing factors
white people are predicted
to no longer be the major-
ity in America by 2050. But
let's look at the ironic hilar-
ity that whites are march-
ing on Washington as the
face of the new minority, are
calling for whiteness studies
and white history month,
and are suffering anxiety
and displacement in a world
of being White Like Me.
Let's take these one by
one, shall we?
Whites marched on Capi-
tol Hill to express anxiety
over the possibility of being
ousted as the face of Ameri-
ca, with majority-losing pre-


dictions looming in the next
few decades. Really? An
attitude and mindset still
exists in which whites are
concerned they won't be the
face of America? Relax, boys,
the face of America is green,
you weren't in the running
anyway. But if it makes you
feel any better, the faces
on all those greenbacks are
white males (don't hold your
breath though, some of those
were immigrants, maybe
even had Jewish or African
ancestry, probably mingled
and reproduced with slaves,
and I bet in coming decades
the treasury will release an
Obama bill...but only the
most disreputable establish-
ments will accept it).
Perhaps by the release of
the first federal reserve note
with a black face, there will
be a white history month in
America-oh, wait, that's
all history isn't it? Like
when the Europeans came
over and wiped out the
real face of America, then
the Englishmen picked up
where they left off, colonized


and civilized this land, and
wrote a declaration that all
men were created equal all
while they imported more
slaves.
James Edwards, a white
radio host of Political Cess-
pool, argued in reference
to slavery, "Whatever mis-
takes might have been made
in our pasts, they have not
only been corrected, but
they've been overcompen-
sated for." Still, it's pretty
good to be white, eh James?
Even when minority enroll-
ment in college rose by 50
percent to 4.7 million in the
decade between 1993-2003,
it still didn't equal even half
of the white student enroll-
ment. Among minority stu-
dents (black/Hispanic) in
college and white students,
barely one-third of the for-
mer graduate whereas al-
most two-thirds of the lat-
ter graduate. As for income
in this millennium, a white
person with some college ed-
ucation was three-and-half
times more likely to earn
$50,000/year than a black
person with some college
education (which has more
to do with fewer minorities
attending and graduating
high school/college than it
does. with overt discrimina-
tion in pay-grades). Subse-
quently, or one could argue,
previously, 39 percent of all


black families live below the
poverty line compared to
about 13 percent of all white
families. When looking at
a single black mother, that
number jumps to about 58
percent, whereas the num-
ber for a single white moth-
er is still less, at 38 percent,
than the lowest percentage
for all black families.
And in the face of statis-
tics like that and jokes about
immigrants living 13 to a
room and working for $20 a
day, a select group of whites
feel that "white interests
have been compromised
by what [Edwards] sees as
the 'preferential treatment'
blacks have received in the
job market to compensate
for slavery."
Tim Wise, author of White
Like Me, explains this in
terms of the recession. "For
the first time since the Great
Depression, white Ameri-
cans have been confronted
with a level of economic in-
security that we're not used
to," he says. "It's not so new
for black and brown folks,
but for white folks, this is
something we haven't seen
since the Depression." Kind
of like the back of the bus,
that was something we
hadn't once seen, but now
it's where all the cool kids
sit.
It's not only the job mar-


ket of which some whites
fear losing control, it's ce-
lebrity too. "The very defini-
tion of being an American
is going through a profound
change," Wise says. "We can
no longer take it for grant-
ed that we (whites) are the
dictionary definition of an
American." Especially with
names like Longoria, Men-
des, and Kardashian ruling
entertainment, for which we
white Americans sit glued
to the television almost 30
hours per week. Next thing
you know they'll have black
players in the NBA and gay
theater directors. Oh, wait...
that too?
How about instead of wor-
rying what color someone's
skin is, worry what mindset
they have, what intelligence
they possess. Then maybe
instead of ranking 25/27
in math and science out of
29 developed countries, we
could get some brains into
office to restrict immigra-
tion laws like that of New
Zealand, which require im-
migrants to obtain a skilled
worker visa (meaning one
has to have skills/degree
to enter) or a study visa
(meaning one has to obtain
an education upon arriving
and gets no free ride while
obtaining said education).
No wonder New Zealand is
the most literate country


(don't fret, American stu-
dents rank number one in
self-confidence despite their
abysmal scores).
This isn't a lynch-mob on
white attitudes. After all,
the majority of the country
doesn't feel as this select
group does, for it elected the
first black president. How-
ever, enough feel this way
to create national headlines
and groups like the For-
mer Majority Association
for Equality, which claims,
"There was no one for
white males until we came
around." Sure...like there
was no one for air until the
Dyson bladeless fan.

The bottom line is every
person in this country has
the exact same opportunity
to make of himself what he
will. Regardless of class or
wealth, an education is pos-
sible. Loans are available,
and fortunately, if one se-
lects a career with a promis-
ing salary, and in turn sky-
high loans, the government
often waives those loans
because they know they'll
get most of that income
once you're in the highest
tax bracket. So dream big,
Uncle Sam is counting on
it, and white people, relax,
your Prozac is coming (but
that's another discussion).









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE. THURSDAY. MARCH 24.2011


THIS 1932 FORD has an interesting history accord to its owner, Ann and Glen Freeman
from Brewton Ala. "Built in the North Georgia woods by little elves at Timeless Rods and
Customs in downtown Lula, Ga."


Wearin' O the




Green Car Show


OLD, NEW OR REBUILT, all the engines were shined up like new for visitors and car
lovers to eyeball the shine.'


On March 13, some of
the coolest car enthusiasts
and community minded in-
dividuals came together for
the Chautauqua Cruisers
Wearin' O the Green Car
Show.
SThe group was estab-
lished in 1988 in order to
'preserve their automotive
past while helping their
community in the present."
The group has donated
over $20,000 back to the
community since its start.
They describe themselves
on their web site as: "a ga-
rage get-together of old car
enthusiasts that soon de-
veloped into a club serv-
ing the community. The
organization has presented


car shows in the DeFuniak
Springs area for over 20
years and now holds three
events each year. The first
one is the 'Wearin' O' The
Green' car show in March,
the second is the cruise-in to
Panhandle Opry in August
and the third event the 'End
of Summer Blowout' in No-
vember."
The web site continues:
"The Chautauqua Cruisers
are seeking any individuals
who have an interest in au-
tomobiles as well as actively
helping the community.
Meetings are held the sec-
ond Tuesday evening of each
month at the Walton Coun-
ty Shrine Club on U.S.90
West, DeFuniak Springs.


THIS GREEN CAR COULD HAVE had the luck of the
Irish behind it as everyone admired its deep emerald paint
job on a beautiful Saturday morning.


The meetings begin at 7
p.m. You do not need to own
an antique or classic car,
but just have an interest in
vehicles or motorcycles, old
or new. Membership dues
are only $5 per person, per
year."

Results are: Glen Freen-
man, Best of Show, 1932
Ford 3-Window (Modified)

Roger McLaney, Presi-
dent's Choice Award, 1964
Chevy C-10 (Modified)

Bob Harris, Best St. Pat-
rick's Day Car Theme, 1973
Ford Pinto Coupe (Original)

Other cars with high
points included:

Mike Justice, DeFuniak
Springs, Fla., 1967 Buick
Riviera (Original)

Richard Vain, DeFuniak
Springs, Fla., 1953 Kaiser
Manhattan (Original)

Bruce Arnold, Valparaiso,
Fla., 1929 Ford Model A
(Original)

Lester Highsmith, De-
Funiak Springs, Fla, 1927
Ford Model T (Modified)

Marvin Christianson, De-
Funiak Springs, Fla., 2003
Ford Mustang GT (Origi-
nal)


THIS SWEET RIDE was a blast from the past and had it made in the shade as visitors
enjoyed its historic beauty.


Judy Christianson, De-
Funiak Springs, Fla., 2010
Ford Mustang GT (Orgini-
al)

Jenn Urbach and Cliff
Hodge, Fort. Walton Beach,
Fla., 1926 Ford Model T
(Original)

To find out more about
this community minded
group go to www.chautau-
quacruisers.com or call Joe
at (850) 892-2042 or Jerry
at (850) 892-0392.


SMART CARS, LITTLE CARS AND BIG cars drew ad-
miring glances.


Walton Guards commemorate

150th anniversary


Enter a time machine
on the weekend of April 8 -
10, 2011, when the Walton
Guards Inc., a local authen-
tically minded living history
and reenactor organization,
will lead community cel-
ebrations of the 150th Anni-
versary of tle unit's found-
ing at Fort Walton Landing
(139 Brooks Street), in Fort
Walton Beach, Florida. The
event will feature a live
Civil War militia camp, his-
torical exhibits and presen-
tations, as well as vendors
and performances. Friday
afternoon (April 8) will be
reserved as "School Day" for
local children to learn more
about the area's Civil War
history.
Oni Friday, historical re-
enactors will set up and
operate a period 1861 mili-
tary camp, sleeping over
the weekend in tents, with
campfires, military drills,
soldiers on guard duty, and
work details. On Saturday,
the men will be joined by
families of the soldiers who
will be re-enacting the fre-
quent family visits to Camp
Walton. The ladies will also
present an 1860s 'fashion
and household items show
The weekend will hold
several highlights, includ-
ing a "skirmish" between
the Confederate defenders
of Camp Walton and in-
vading Union scouts or re-
connaissance forces at the
Landing the original site of
Camp Walton in 1861. The


skirmish will take place on
at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday
and Sunday. It will demon-
strate typical skirmish tac-
tics and weapons used dur-
ing the war between small
opposing forces groups.
Another unique feature
of the weekend will be inter-
active presentations by re-
enactors who portray Gen-
erals Ulysses S. Grant and
Jefferson Davis. They will
hold a staged dialogue on
Saturday and Sunday, and
will wander and chat with
visitors throughout the day,
speaking in character with
all attendees.
And yes there will be
music! Civil War music, of
course performed by the
Olde Towne Brass, a musi-
cal group that performs in
the manner of Early Ameri-
can and Civil War bands,
playing original Civil War
Music on actual Civil War
over-the-shoulder (OTS)
Brass Horns. Olde Towne
Brass presents programs
that provide their listeners
with history and informa-
tion about the composer and
the song. Their renditions of
these timeless and compel-
ling tunes are played just
as they were more than 150
years ago.
Living History Stations
will be in continuous ses-
sion throughout each day:
1) blacksmith; 2) basket
weaving; 3) weavers and
spinners; 4) soap making; 5)
laundress; 6) small arms; 7)


Confederate Signal Corps; 8)
1st Fla. U.S. Cavalry; 9) CS
Postal Service; 10) Indian
museum; and 11) Surgeon.

This event is sponsored
by the Greater Fort Walton
Beach Chamber of Com-
merce, the city of Fort Wal-
ton Beach, and the North-
west Florida Daily News.
For more information, con-
tact the FWB Chamber at
244-8191 or go to www.
fwbchamber.org/guards.


THE OLDE TOWNE BRASS musical group will perform Civil War music on their period instruments.


THE CIVIL WAR ERA rifles are always a big hit with visiting students.


PAGE 12-A










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011 PAGE 13-A



WMS drama club wins state-wide


video contest and $1,500


By ASHLEYAMASON
Peggy Alexander, Walton
Middle School (WMS) drama
sponsor, first heard of the
"You Call the Shots" video
contest from WMS nurse
Connie King. Sponsored by
the Florida Bureau of Im-


munizations, the contest
asked kids 11-18 to create
a 30-second public service
announcement on prevent-
ing the spread of meningitis
and HPV. When Alexander
presented the idea to the
drama club, "they were all


eager to be a part of the
project" she said.
Alexander's son, John, a
professional videographer,
filmed the video based on
club member Devin Black's
idea. "She had seen an in-
surance commercial where a


man was just walking down
the street talking to you (the
camera) and she thought
that came across well. We
agreed, so we used Devin's
idea for the format," Alex-
ander said.
The video's primary ac-


tors, Black, Meredith Ricks,
and Taylor Martin take you
along during their school
day-to the classroom, the
cafeteria, and the infamous
student exchange in be-
tween classes-all with a bit
of humorous information on
the easy spread and preven-
tion of diseases.
"When we first did this
it was a little dream...but
after we got started we re-
alized we had a pretty good
shot," Alexander said.
Once it was submitted,
viewers couldn't get enough
of WMS's "Cover your
mouth" video. With almost
20,000 votes (52 percent), it
left the other seven finalists


in the dust and easily worn
the statewide video contest..
Alexander received offi-
cial word that "Cover your
mouth" won Mar. 11. The
drama club received a $1,500
cash award, for which Alex-
ander has big plans. "I want
to take them to a play," she
said. The remaining money
will be used for costuming
and planning events next
year, possibly including the
rights to do a play and take
it to county schools.
"Cover your mouth" will
soon be on the Florida De-
partment of Health's web-
site and can still be viewed
on www.youcalltheshots-
florida.com.


WALTON MIDDLE SCHOOL DRAMA: back row (l-r), Kiarra Chamberlain, Jasmine Lara, Caitlyn Irlbeck, Laura
Allison, Sierra Platt, Aleacia Ingram, Laura Hydle, Morgan Ingram, Sarah Evans, Victorria Sandlin, Brianna Adki-
son, Sarah Nunley, Kaycee Herndon, Emma Kuykendall, Chambleigh Webster; Front row (l-r): John Alexander, Taeyah
Banks, Kaylyn Massey, Madeline Allred, Cierra Prater, Taylor Martin, Devin Black, Meredith Ricks, Katelyn Robinson,
Savannah Woodham, Anthony King, Peggy Alexander, (not pictured Angela Sexton).


WCSB workshop: Fifth graders

may move to middle school

campuses to ease overcrowding


By ASHLEYAMASON
Fifth-grade students may
move to middle school cam-
puses in the coming school
year in light of elementary
school overcrowding. Super-
intendent Carlene Ander-
son discussed restructuring
schools at a workshop with
the Walton County School
Board, Tuesday, March 15.
Freeport Elementary
School is at capacity, result-
ing in regular classes being
held in resource rooms, ex-
ceptional student education
services housed in storage
areas, and multiple co-
teaching situations.
Anderson recommended
relocating FES fifth-grade
students to building 800
at Freeport Middle School,
which at only $35,000 for
minor renovations and tech-
nology improvements is the
least expensive and most
effective way to solve FES
overcrowding versus build-
ing new classrooms or por-
table buildings.
Additionally, building
800 is isolated from sixth
through eighth grade stu-
dents.
Likewise, Van R. Butler
Elementary (VRB) and Bay
Elementary School (BES)
are overcrowded, with But-
ler averaging 75-100 new


students per year and both
schools requiring multiple
portable and co-teaching
classrooms. Even with VRB
students retaining current
facilities and expanding to
the current Emerald Coast
Middle School, three porta-
bles will still be needed on
campus. Again, Anderson
recommended moving VRB
and BES fifth-grade stu-
dents to the new Emerald
Coast Middle School. Fu-
ture considerations include
building an addition to the
new Emerald Coast Middle
School, which has yet to
open, for a fourth and fifth-
grade wing, making VRB
and BES primary centers for
Pre-K through third grade.
Anderson made note
of consolidating Freeport
Middle School and Free-
port High School, but rec-
ommended against it. The
estimated $325,000 in ad-
ministrative cost savings
from consolidation would be
nearly offset by the cost to
consolidate, including leas-
ing 17 portable buildings.
Furthermore, FHS would
immediately become over-
crowded and classroom and
cafeteria expansion is esti-
mated at $4.5 million.
An informational meet-
ing will be held in Freeport


and the VRB/BES area prior
to the April 5 WCSB meet-
ing, at which the board will
decide on the above restruc-
turing recommendations. A
date has not yet been set.

At the regular WCSB
meeting, March 15, Ander-
son reminded the board and
voting public the half-mill
will be on the May 17 ballot.
This half-mill is tax-neutral
(offset in the capital outlay
budget) and is dedicated to
employees' salaries. Failure
to approve the half-mill will
result in salary and program
cuts, and layoffs.
Freeport High School
football team will travel to
Stetson University June 16-
20 for the Bishop/Dullaghan
passing football camp, and
again from June 27-July 1
for the down and dirty foot-
ball camp. Paxton School's
track schedule was unani-
mously approved.
A new Walton Education
Foundation board of direc-
tors was appointed: Amy
Coleman, Christy Scally,
Lynn Chesser and Ashley
Vannoy.
The next WCSB meeting
will be April 5 at 5 p.m. at
the Walton County School
District Tivoli Complex in
DeFuniak Springs.


Walton County School


District and unions reach


tentative agreement


By ASHLEYAMASON

Last week, The Defuniak
Herald reported on the is-
sues leading to mediation
between the Walton County
School district and instruc-
tional and educational sup-
port professionals unions.
Below is the outcome of that
mediation.
Regarding the instruc-
tional union's request for a
step-increase in salary and
the ESP union's request for
30 cents per hour increase,
a compromise was made
with the following tenta-
tive agreement language.
"If the ending balance for
the 2010-11 fiscal year ex-
ceeds $4,588,000, the school
board agrees to distribute
such funds to the employees
of the Walton County School
District in increments not to
exceed $200 per employee.
Eligibility to receive this
payment requires active


employment as of March 16,
2011. Final checks will be
distributed on/by July 31,
2011."
Also in the tentative
agreement is a guaranteed
30-minute duty free lunch
for instructional personnel.
No changes were made
in the district's policy on
employee health insurance,
therefore it will continue to
offer three plans, paying 100
percent of the employee pre-
mium for the least expen-
sive option, plan 328, but
will not pay full premiums
for either of the remaining
options.
The Walton County Edu-
cation Association will hold
an informational meeting for
ESP and instructional em-
ployees at Maude Saunders
Elementary School Wednes-
day, March 23 at 4 p.m. in
the cafeteria. For those who
cannot attend March 23 and
for south Walton employees,


an informational meeting
will be held at Freeport El-
ementary School on Friday,
March 25 at 3:30 p.m.
The unions will vote
to ratify or reject the ten-
tative agreement March
28-29. Should the unions
reject the agreement, they
will again declare impasse
and continue with a special
magistrate.
"The school district does
not anticipate a fund bal-
ance above $4,588,000, but
this is a good faith offer to
the employees to promote
trust. The school district
has also committed to a col-
laborative, transparent re-
lationship next year," Trish
Hutchison, president of the
instructional union said.

The agreement will go
before the Walton County
School Board for adoption
or rejection at the April 5
meeting at 5 p.m.


FHS students

receive Microsoft

Office Specialist

certification


One of the main focuses in
education today is preparing
students to enter the work-
force. In order to accomplish
this, Career Technical Edu-
cation programs throughout
the United States are being
tasked with providing stu-
dents with the certifications
and credentials that poten-
tial employers are seeking.
One of those certifications
is the Microsoft Office Spe-
cialist (MOS) certification.
It is recognized and val-
ued by businesses through-
out the nation. Freeport


High School is proud to an-
nounce that 27 of their stu-
dents took the challenge to
try their hand at becoming
MOS and all 27 succeeded.
These students had to take
and pass three exams cover-
ing Microsoft Word, Power-
Point, and Excel.

Freeport High School is
extremely proud of them
and would like to take this
opportunity to publicly con-
gratulate them on their
hard work and commitment
to their future.


BACK ROW: DAVID GIRALDO, Zeke Wolf, Noah Campbell, Jacob Sherman, James Morgan, Hunter Wilson, Eli Bur-
gess, Hayden Grant, Kareem Mitry, Lee Brackins, J.R. Fannin, Nick DeChristopher, Dalton Bohning. Middle Row: Becky
Jenkins, Trisha McCormick, Amy Smith, Shadia Mitry, Molly Cuchens, Brittany Thomas, Holly Uquhart, Alyssa Duross,
Brianna Ross. Front Row: Makayla Clark, Morgan Autrey, Shelby McCormick, Michael Hoobler, and Daniel Lechner.


THE PRINCIPAL ACTORS (l-r) in "Cover your
mouth," Devin Black eighth- grade, Taylor Martin sixth-
grade, Meredith Ricks sixth-grade.








PAGE 14-A THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011

CITY OF FREEPORT

2010 ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT
We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the
quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable sup-
ply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.
We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from six wells. The wells draw from the Floridan Aquifer. Our
water is chlorinated for disinfection purposes.
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Gregory M. Yancey, Water Operator @ 850-835-2822. We
encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings.
They are held on the 2nd Tuesday & the 4th Thursday of each month @ 7:00 P.M.
City of Freeport routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where
indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2010. Data obtained before January
1, 2010, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.. The presence of
contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be
obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
In-the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms, we've provided the following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as
feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.
MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study
conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs).
Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring
locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that
addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to
health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
"ND" : not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/I): one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L): measure of the radioactivity in
water.2010 CONTAMINANTS TABLE
water.
Microbiological Contaminants
The State of Florida Department of Environmental Dates of MCL Highest
Protection (FDEP) sets drinking water standard for secondary ContaminantandUnitof sampling Violation Prthy MCLG MCL iSo
Measurement sampling Violaion Perc Contamination
contaminants and has determined that Odor is an aesthetic (mo./yr.) Y/N /Number___
concern at certain levels of exposure. Odor, as a secondary For systems colcting fwrthanprent in
Jan -Dec samples per month: presence ofcolifortn Naturally present in
drinking water contaminant, does not pose a health risk. Total Coliform Bacteria No 0 0 bacteria in sample collected during a the environment
The City of Freeport constantly monitors for various _____month.
contaminantsin the water supply to meet all rgulatoryContaminant andUnitof Datesof sampling MCL Violation Level Rangeof MCLG MCL LikelynSourenof
requirements. Due to operator oversight during a busy part of Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
the year, our office failed to collect sufficient monthly Radioactive Contaminants
microbiological contaminants coliformss) samples in the erosion of natural
month of April. Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally Alpha emitters (pCiL) Jun08-Oct-10 N 3.7 ND-3.7 deposits
present in the environment and are used as an indicator that Radium 226 N 228. 0.1-08 Erosion of natural
combined radium (pCi/L) Jun-08-Oct 10 N 0.8 0.1-0.8 0 5 d osits
other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present.
Technically, the presence or absence of coliforms for the Inorganic Contaminants
Discharge of drilling
missed sample cannot be verified since no sample was taken wastes; discharge
thus the health effects are also unknown. However, all other Barium (ppm) Jun-08 & Mar-09 N 0.026 0.008-0.026 2 2 from metal refineries;
erosion ofnatural
microbiological samples taken in the year 2010 were negative deposits
(none present). We have reviewed and updated our sampling Erosionofnatural
procedure to insure this violation does not happen again. rom feter and
,In, 2009 the Florida Department of Environmental aluminum factories.
Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our luoride (ppm) Jun-08 & Mar-09 N 0.09 ND-0.09 4 4.0 Water additive which
promotes strong teeth
system. The assessment was conducted to provide when at optimum
information about any potential sources of contamination in levels between 0.7
and 1.3 ppmn
the vicinity of our wells. There are 5 potential sources of R-sidue frm man-
contamination identified for this system with low to moderate made pollution such
susceptibility levels. The assessment results are available on Lead (point ofentry) (ppb) Jun-08 & Mar -09 N 2 ND-2 15 as auto emissions nd
the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program _casing, and solder
website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp or they can be obtained Erosion ofnatural
deposits; discharge
from the City of Freeport. rom refineries and
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health Mercu norganic)(ppb) un-08Mar-09 N 0.2 ND-2 2 factoriesrunofffrom
,landfills; runofft from
problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. opland; ruof ro
Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and Sodium(ppm) Ju-08&Mar-09 N ND-3 NA 160 Salt water intrusion,
components associated with service lines and home leaching fromsoil
plumbing. City of Freeport is responsible for providing high Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products
quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of Disinfectantor o MCLor
materials used' in plumbing components. When your water Contaminant and ato MRDL Level a CLG orr Lkely SourceofContamination
Unit of amoli Violation Detected MRDLG MRDI,
has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the Measurement (movyr.) Y/NResults
potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 chlorine (ppimi) Jai-De- N 0.6 0.54- MRDLG MRDL=4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or HaloaceticAcids 0 0.68 =4
cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you fi) (HA(ppb) ug-08 N 0.78 0.6-0.9 NA MCL60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in TTHM [Total ND- NA MCL80 By-productofdrinkingwaterdisinfetio
drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to b)ril ] Aug- N 8.8 19.2 NA 80 By-pr
minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Contaminant nd )atcs f AL 90th No. of sampling AL
Unit of sampling Exceeded Perccntile sites exceeding MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled Measurement (mo./yr.) (Y/N) Result the AL Level)
water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the pp corrosion ofhousehod plumbing systems;
land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring pp) war) N 0.1 0o0fO 1.3 1.3 erosionofnaturaldeposits eachingfrom
minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can Lead (tap water) Jun-Sept N 3 0fl 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems,
pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or (pb)s erosion of naturaldeosits
from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include: SECONDARY CONTAMINANTS TABLE
.(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, Containant and Un of g MCL Violation Highest Range of Likely Source of Contmitio
l sa ling MCL. Violation Highest Range ofi MCLG MrCI. Likely Source ofsColttRmiutlots
which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic Mearreet (moivr.) 's/N Result Results
systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. Secondary Contaminants
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, Odor Jun 08& y 4 ND4 NA 3 Naturally occurring organic
which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban thresholdodornumber) Mar09
stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater
discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum
production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.


(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by
public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same
protection for public health.
Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply,
we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are sometimes reflected as rate structure
adjustments. Thank you for understanding.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons
such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other
immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about
drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

"We at City of Freeport work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap," said Gregory M. Yancey Water Operator. We ask that all our
customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children's future.








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011 PAGE 15-A


NORTH BAY

2010 ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

We're very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the
excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable
supply of drinking water. Our water sources is ground water from one well. The well draws from the Floridan Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of
our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfection purposes.
In 2009 the Florida Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a search of the data sources
indicated no potential sources of contamination near our wells. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and
Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Gregory M. Yancey Water Operator at 850-835-2822. We
encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings.
They are held on the 2nd Tuesday & the 4th Thursday of each month @ 7:00 P.M.
North Bay water system routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except
where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2010. Data obtained before
January 1, 2010, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.
In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following
definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as
feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to
health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study
conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs).
Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring
locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that
addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to
health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (0'83g/1): one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/I): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L): measure of the radioactivity in water.

In October of 2010, a Total coliform water 2010 CONTAMINANTS TABLE
sample taken in North Bay water system was Microbiological Contaminants


determined to be present with coliform bacteria.
Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present
in the environment and are used as an indicator
that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be
present. When coliforms are found in more
samples than allowed there is a warning of
potential problems. Subsequent samples proved
that coliform bacteria were absent in repeat
samples. However, FDEP requires a water
system that routinely takes fewer than 5 samples
a month to take at least 5 routine samples in the
month following. We failed to take the 5 routine
samples for November of 2010. In response to
this violation, we issued a public notice in
December and have since established a report-
tracking file to ensure that all reporting and
sampling requirements are met in the future.
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause
serious health problems, especially for pregnant
women and young children. Lead in drinking
water is primarily from materials and
components associated with service lines and
home plumbing. North Bay Water System is
responsible for providing high quality drinking
water, but cannot control the variety of materials
used in plumbing components. When your water
has been sitting for several hours, you can
minimize the potential for lead exposure by
flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes
before using water for drinking or cooking. If you
are concerned about lead in your water, you
may wish to have your water tested. Information
on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and
steps you can take to minimize exposure is
available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline
or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking water (both tap
water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,


Dates of MCL Highest
Contaminant and Unit of sampling Violation Monthly MCLG MCL LikelySourceof
Measurement Percentage Contamination
(mo. /yr.) Y/N /Number
For systems collecting fewer than 40
samples per month: presence of coliform Naturally present in
Total Coliform Bacteria Jan-DeclO N 1 0 bacteria in 1 sample collected during a the environment
month.
Contaminant and Unit Dates of sampling MCL Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Sourceof
of Measurement (mo.yr.) Violation Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Radioactive Contaminants
Radium 226 +228 or Jun-08 N 0.2 N/A 0 5 Erosion of natural deposits
combined radium (pCi/L)
Inorganic Contaminants
Discharge of drilling wastes;
Barium (ppm) Jun-08 N 0.007 N/A 2 2 discharge from metal refineries:
erosion of natural deposits
Erosion of natural deposits;
discharge from fertilizer and
aluminum factories. Water
Fluoride (ppm) Jun-08 N 0.17 N/A 4 4.0 amin factories. Wter
additive which promotes strong
teeth when at optimum levels
between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Salt water intrusion, leaching
Sodium (ppm) June-08 N 8 N/A NA 160 Salt water intrusion, leaching
from soil

Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products
Disinfectant or MCL or Range
Contaminant and Datesof MRDL Level MCLG or MCL or
Unit of sampling Violation Detected of MRDLG MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (mnoyr.) Y/N Results
Chlorine (ppm) JanDec N 0.62 0.46-0.7 MRDLG MRDL = 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
to =4
Haloacetic Acids
(five) HAA5 (ppb) Aug-09 N 5.75 N/A NA MCL =60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
TTHM [Total
trihalomethanes] Aug-09 N 8.2 N/A NA MCL =80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)
Contaminant and Dates of AL 90th No. of sampling AL
Unit of sampling Exceeded Percentile sites exceeding MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (mo./yr.) (Y/N) Result the AL Level)
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)


Copper (tap water) Jun- Sept
(ppm) 08
Lead (tap water) Jun-Sept-
(ppb) 08


Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
erosion of natural deposits; leaching from
wood preservatives
Corrosion of household plumbing systems,
erosion of natural deposits


streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals
and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic
wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum
production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by
public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same
protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of
contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be
obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency' s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons
such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other
immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about
drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by
Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
We at North Bay Water System would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our
water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel
free to call any of the numbers listed.








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


PAGE 16-A
Lm-


DEMONSTRATING THE PROPER FORM, a Story
Time in the Sky attendee prepares to go fly a kite. (Photo by
Bruce Collier)


THESE KIDS RAN up and down the flight line by the lake, trying hard to send homemade kites into the sunny skies at
Story Time in the Sky last Thursday. (Photo by Bruce Collier)


Story Time in the Sky at the Lakeyard


A near absence of a ers who congregated at the
breeze last Thursday did Lakeyard for "Story Time in
not deter would-be kite fly- the Sky." parents and chil-


dren worked together on
homemade kites, which the
kids tried to send aloft, with
varying degrees of success.


Bus driver suspended


By ASHLEYAMASON
In an emergency meeting,
the Walton County School
Board, minus Chairperson
Sharon Roberts, unani-
mously voted to suspend
bus driver Hattie M. Thorn-
ton for five days without pay
March 22. Superintendent
Carlene Anderson explained
Thornton "used the bus for
personal reasons" which led
to a "safety issue and viola-
tion."
While en route trans-
porting high school stu-


dents, Thornton was noti-
fied her 19-month-old was
ill at daycare and used the
bus to pick up her child. She
then transported the infant
on her lap with no safety re-
straint.
Anderson noted Thorn-
ton has "been very reason-
able" throughout the dis-
ciplinary action process
and said, "[We] want to be
understanding, yet that's a
violation." Board member
Faye Leddon added, "...As a
mother I understand [your


position]...but you have to
understand where we are
coming from."
Subsequent to the safety
violation, transporting a
rion-Walton County student,
and using the bus for per-
sonal reasons, Anderson's
said a five-day suspension
beginning March 23. was a
"very lenient consequence"
compared to termination.
District Human Resourc-
es Director Sonya Alford
thanked Thornton for her
co-operation throughout the
process.


Kindergarten registration notice


FIERCE CONCENTRATION was on this kid's face as he listens to advice from a fellow
kite-maker, at last week's Story Time in the Sky at the Lakeyard. (Photo by Bruce Collier)


All Walton County el-
ementary schools started
registration on March 21
and will go through April 1,
from 8 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
Any child who will be five
on or before Sept. 1, 2011
qualifies.
An official birth certifi-
cate for any child born in
Florida can be obtained at
the Walton County Public
Health Unit for $12.
Before entering school
in August, each child must
have a physical examina-


tion and up-to date immuni-
zations. DOH 680 Florida
Certification of Immuniza-
tion (blue card).
South Walton
Bay Elementary, 118
Gilmore Street. call (850)
622-5050, or Van R. Butler
Elementary, 6694 West Co
CR-30A. Call (850) 622-
5040.


Freeport
Freeport
15381 U.S.


Elementary,
331. Call (850)


892-1211.
Paxton
Paxton
21893 U.S.
892-1230.'


Elementary,
331. Call (850)


Mossy Head
Mossy Head
133270 U.S. 90 W.


School,


DeFuniak Springs
Maude Saunders Elem.,
416 John Baldwin Rd. Call
(850)892-1260, or West De-
Funiak Elem., 815 Lincoln
Ave. Call (850)892-1250.


Ist Annual Sacred Heart


leIa h


ar


Saturday, April 2 9 am. 12 p.m.
Hospital Main Entrance


Free Pediatric Health Screenings
Health & Community
Information Booths
" Healthy Start
" Walton County Health Department
" Community Health Center
" South Walton Fire Department
Children's Volunteer Health Network
" Mantie Kelly Arts Foundation
" Early Steps
" Diabetes & Nutrition
" Pediatric Rehabilitation Services -
" Emerald Coast Autism Center
" Healthy Bones
C Children's Advocacy Center
" And More


Also Featuring...
* Crafts with Abrakadoodle
* Bicycle Safety and Helmet Fittings
* AIRHeart Regional Air Ambulance
* Child ID Kits
* Car Seat Fittings
* Face Painting




bill.


"Working together as
one, to improve a
community for alt"


2011 TOBACCO FPBB
PLO IDA WBBK.
March 28 April 2, 2011





EwFnm Win WlThnm IllidanKms
09~ Y~ha@@ 0:-1;.


I
--ir
~-? ~~~
,4


2.


.M.


Ch.


e~
i.
re
:r r






PAGE I-B


THE DeFU NI 4K SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


People


Places


DeFuniak Springs Little League holds opening day ceremonies
J.. M ., -Irl A-I f T ,, 1_I


The DeFuniak Springs held opening day ceremonies March 19 with 41 teams participat-
ing.


Elected officials and other guests welcome coaches and players onto the field.


"' Brian McBroom, presi-
dent of the DeFuniak Springs
The Kiwanis Club of DeFuniak Springs was recognized as being a charter team sponsor Little League, presented the
of DeFuniak Springs Little League. 2011 teams.








PAGE 2-B

The annual Miss Freeport


pageant held March 19


The annual Miss Free-
port pageant was held Sat-
urday evening, March 19 at
the Freeport High School
auditorium. The pageants
cover young ladies from
kindergarten through high
school in six different com-
petitions.
There were numerous
awards given during the
pageant, the largest of which
was a $1,000 scholarship to
the college of choice which

"- fll".


was awarded to the winner
of the Miss Freeport divi-
sion. The pageant is spon-
sored yearly by The Town
Planters Society of Freeport
and is chaired by Russ Bar-
ley. The Town Planters Soci-
ety wishes to thank all who
participated in and attend-
ed this wonderful evening,
the area businesses who
bought ads for the program
book, Don Keen of Five Star
Productions for his gracious


support with the sound and
lighting, Emerald Coast
Flowers & Gifts for their do-
nation of the flowers, stage
decorations and the Miss
Freeport crown, and The
Prissy Hen of Freeport for
their donation of the crowns
for all of the other divisions.

Congratulations to all of
the young ladies pictured
here.....they are all truly
winners.


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE. THURSDAY.


MISS FREEPORT- 1st runner-up Ebone' Newkirk, Morgan Goodwin Miss Freeport
2011, 2nd runner-up Kaitlyn White, and 3rd runner-up Mallory Simmons (l-r).


YOUNG MISS FREEPORT- 2nd runner-up Wendy McCormick, Lila Budzinsky Young
Miss Freeport 2011, 1st runner-up Galexie Braswell (l-r).


TEEN MISS FREEPORT 2nd runner-up Deanna Sadler, 2nd runner-up, Ashley Ar-
cher Teen Miss Freeport 2011; 1st runner-up Courtney Nelson (l-r).


See Additional Photos Page 3-B


- -- -l --.


JUNIOR TEEN MISS FREEPORT 1st runner-up Taylor Thomas, Nikole Dier Jr. Teen
Miss Freeport 2011, 2nd runner-up Savanna Dailey, 3rd runner-up Lillian Rodgers (l-r).

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PAGE 3-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


orkeski/Okkema to wed
















'Mr. anc'Mrs. 'Michae(lKorleski
Of
Paxton, Tlorida
announce the engagement
of
their son, Christopher Xorleski
to
Jessica Okkema,
daughter of'Mr. andcMrs. James Okkema
of
Crestview, Tlorida.
Christopher is currently
attenrin northwestt 'University
in Vicevile, TFlorida and
willsoon be in the U.S. Air Torce.
Jessica is currently attending
forthwest 'University in
Vficeville, Tlorida.
Jessicayplans to
pursue a career in the medical( C cC
hT'e wedding is lannecd or
2p.m., April 2, 2011
S iat
SQuiet Lake, Paxton, 'Florida.


Pilot Club

hears

nursing,

therapy

program
Renee Phillippi, Sales
and Marketing for Okaloosa
Regional Home Health Ser-
vices, recently spoke to Pilot
Club members about their
nursing and therapy servic-
es provided to home bound
patients in Okaloosa and
Walton counties.
One of the main points
Phillippi shared with those
in attendance was the pa-
tient's right to choose their
home health care provider.
Her presentation was fol-
lowed by a question and
answer session with a great
exchange of information.
Pilot Club meets the first
and third Wednesdays of ev-
ery month from 12- 1 p.m.
at the Best Western Cross-
roads Inn.
For more information,
contact Sondra Frizzell at
(850) 892-7283/978-3757, or
Melissa Ortiz at (850) 951-
9849/543-3529.


4'j

~c N


We iw ."!
vltun, 'Bg. 3'Brater,
'Big Siter and 'Family,
rf ,v nr ';.t


SDYO S
YOUR TowN. YOUR STORe.


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Defuniak Springs, Don't Miss It!


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JUNIOR MISS FREEPORT 1st runner-up Victoria
Ward, Riley Herrington Jr. Miss Freeport 2011 and not pic-
tured, 2nd runner-up Tara Reynolds (l-r).


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REGISTER TO WIN
A '250 GIFT CARD!


* Register in store thru March 28.
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.
See store for details. *
00 00000 9


Celebration Continues

thru Monday, March 28

1030 Freeport Hwy. S.


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with Every 50 Purchase
March 23-28
* Redeem March 30 April 4.
See register receipt for details. .
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LITTLE MISS FREEPORT-Alainna Ward Little Miss
Freeport 2011, 2nd runner-up Bella Antone and not pic-
tured, 1st runner-up Koryn Keen (l-r).


Your Favorite Brands Your Storewide Savings
1030 HWY 331 SOUTH, STE 1, DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL MON.-SAT. 10-8 FRI. SUN. 1-6


MELISSA ORTIZ, PRES-
IDENT-ELECT; Renee Phil-
lippi, Sales and Marketing,
Okaloosa Regional Home
Health Services (l-r).









7ir1 / -Fi
7"rentan AC2 e
cAndrew&
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j "f


Now you have a choice!-


STELLA'S
Florist and Boutique
850-520-4623

Downtown
DeFuniak
Springs

Find us on Facebook
and visit our website
www.stellasfloristand -
boutique.com


.:i It's time to order corsages and tuxedos


Miss Freeport Pageant
continued from page 2-B


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PAGE -B TE DeIA SPRNGSandHERLDhipBREZE THRSDYARH


^^^^^^B^^^^ Find the church of your choice^^^^^


ALAQUA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. The pastor and
congregation invite you to come join us for services at 9 a.m. every
Sunday. Church school for children and coffee fellowship follow the
morning service. Serving the faithful at 4189 Coy Burgess Loope
since 1837. Come to the country for worship. Call Pastor Henry
Martin at (850)892-4860 for more information.

ARGYLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 252 Argyle Church Road, Argyle,
FL invites everyone to attend their services. Sunday School 9:45
a.m. all ages, Church Service 11 a.m., Sunday night 6 p.m. all
ages, Wednesday night 6 p.m.
Pastor James Burnham. Call (850)892-2327, or (850)259-2173.
All are welcome.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH invites you to attend
Sunday School 9:45, Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Train-
ing 5 p.m., Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m., Wednesday Prayer
Service 6:30 p.m. Come and'be a part of an awesome ministry
here in your community.

BEECHGROVE CHURCH OF GOD and Pastor D. Wayne
Rickards extend a warm welcome to everyone to attend their regular
services. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m.; morning worship at 11
a.m.; Sunday night services begin at 5 p.m. and Wednesday night
services begin at 6 p.m. The church is located six miles south of
Ponce de Leon on CR 183. For information (850)836-4484.

BIBLE BELIEVERS BAPTIST CHURCH, The congregation and
Pastor Dan Hershey, would like to invite you to come and be a part of
our continuing church growth. If you are looking for a fundamental,
KJV Bible-believing, independent Baptist Church, then we are just
what you are looking for. The preaching is not compromised, it is
straight out of God's Word. The preaching is known to be "old-
fashioned," like it used to be. So, please come join us in worship.
330 North Davis Lane, DFS. Sunday School at 10 a.m. services 11
and 6 p.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study 6:30
p.m. "Teaching the Bible as it is for men as they are."

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W.
Live Oak Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and
congregation welcomes you to join Spirit filled worship services
where we'll treat you in so many different ways, you will have to
like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7 p.m. All are cordially invited
and welcome. For a ride to church contact (850)892-0706 or (850)
892-4704.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come meet and fellowship with
other real people who genuinely love the Lord. Sit under practical
bible teaching and preaching relevant to today's issues. Come let
Jesus Christ heal your body, save your marriage, touch your kids,
and give hope to the broken hearted. Come dressed casual or
Sunday best. All are welcome and will fit in. No ties required. Seekers
welcome. Come see for yourself that we are sound, practical, God
loving people who center our lives around the person of Jesus
Christ and a solid approach to the Holy Scriptures. We do pray for
the sick and needy, and believe in the bible gospel of power to meet
the human need. Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. and Wednesday night
classes begin at 6:30 p.m., Teens: Wednesday nights, Children's
Church: Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights. Cornerstone
Church is located at 2044 Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak
Springs. Ph.(850) 892-2240.

EUCHEE VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is located in
the Euchee Valley community at the intersection of County Hwys.
183 S. and 280 E. Reverend John Erthein and the congregation
warmly invite you to come and worship with us and make us your
church home. Sunday school for all ages begins at 9:45 a.m. and is
followed by Morning Worship at 11:00 a.m. A nursery is provided.
Adult Bible Study is held at 6:00 p.m. on Sunday evenings. Choir
rehearsal is held at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights. If you have
questions or need assistance, please call (850)892-3180.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church
attendance doesn't have to be dull, mundane or feel like just an
added burden to your life! You can attend a church service in which
you feel both welcomed and loved, as well as be challenged by
the powerful preaching of God's Word. The church family of the
First Apostolic Church embraces the doctrine of the early Apostles
and their preaching as recorded in the Book of Acts and other
New Testament teachings. Sunday Services begin at 10 a.m. with
Sunday school for the children and a.spirt-filled worship for adults.
Sunday evening service begins at 5:30 with prayer, with worship
and preaching beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday night bible study
begins at 7 p.m. and we offer family prayer on Thursday from 6 p.m
to 7 p.m. each week. Not able to physically attend? Hear sermons
posted on our website at www.defuniakapostolic.com. Come and
experience church the way God started it all in the New Testament!
If you have any questions or need ministry assistance, please feel
free to call the church office at (850) 892-7882. Rev. David W. King,
Pastor.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located
at 461 Van Buren Avenue, Pastor Michael F. Tadlock, his wife,
Amy and Son, Hayden would like to extend an invitation for all
to come join us as we celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus
Christ through Spirit filled worship & annointed preaching!l Sunday
School begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by Morning Worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evening
service begins at 6:30 p.m. Youth Ministry Services are held every
Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Please come and worship with us.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East
Live Oak Avenue. We cordially invite you to join our "Fellowship
of Encouragement" and come for Worship and Bible Study at the
following times: Sunday Bible Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship
(10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5 p.m.) and evening worship
(6:00 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us for prayer meeting
at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship dinners.
Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details. Visit our webpage
at www.fbcdfs.org.

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite
you to worship with us this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Then stay for
refreshments and adult Bible Study and children's Sunday School.
Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz, speaks from the Gospel each
Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We are known throughout
our community as a friendly and serving Church that welcomes
newcomers. We are located on U.S. 331, very near the Florida line
[245121bd 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at
(334) 858-3515 for more specific directions.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS,
1063 Circle Drive, invites the public to join them throughout the
week for worship, fellowship, study and service. A men's fellow-
ship group and Presbyterian women meet monthly for fellowship
and Bible study. Children's and youth activities are announced. Call
for information. Sunday (nursery provided from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.)
9:30 a.m. Songfest for everyone 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for all
ages. 11 a.m. morning worship. Wednesday 3:30 p.m. Presbyterian
youth fellowship. 6:30 p.m. Chancel choir rehearsal.
First and third Wednesday, 9 a.m. 12 p.m. KID'S CLOSET to
provide basic necessities to children of Walton County families in
need.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who


are committed to being an inclusive faith community, where per-
sons from all walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working
together. If you're looking for a church home, we invite you to come
visit us. Church office phone number 892-5832. email:fpcdfs@em-
barqmail.com Website: fpcdfs.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS, located at 88 Circle Drive, Rev. Robert West, staff
and congregation wish to invite you to join our family for activities
on Sunday beginning with Contemporary Worship Service in the
sanctuary at 8:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship Service at 11 a.m. with


Children's Church (Pre-K to third grade) provided for both services;
Vesper service at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. Communion is observed
at both morning services on first Sunday and Sunday School for all
ages at 9:45 a.m. Children's Sunday school (k-6th) is "JAM" (Jesus
and Me) is the Multi-Dimensional Learning program with children
rotating to different workshops (art, computer, cooking/science,
games, storytelling/movie) each Sunday "learning by doing". Other
opportunities on Sunday include: Sr. High Youth Fellowship at 4
p.m..; Jr. High Youth Fellowship and Children (HIS Kids Club) at
3:30 p.m.; Food pantry every 3rd Sat. 7-9 a.m. For more information,
call (850) 892-5332, 892-5128 e-mail fumcdfs@embarqmail.com
website www.fumcdefuniaksprings.org.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF WESTVILLE,
2100 Highway 90 West, Westville. Pastor Jason Campbell and
the Westville church family invite you to come to a place where
Pentecost is an experience, not a thing of the past. We offer a
friendly environment with annointed preaching and singing, Our
Sunday morning services begin at 10 a.m. and our Sunday evening
service begins at 5 p.m. Our Wednesday evening service begins
at 7 p.m. We also offer children's church on Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Come experience the power of the Holy Ghost just like early church
did in the Book of Acts. For more information call, (850) 548-5898
or(850) 892-7499.

FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP INTERNATIONAL is a non-
denominational church filled with excitement about what the future
holds and a sincere hunger for the outpouring of the Spirit of God.
We are a church where God's presence is never taken for granted
and neither are you. Freedom Fellowship is a church looking for a
people "who will humble themselves before God and seek His ways."
2Chr. 7:14, Pastor Dennis Grey II invites your family to be a part of
our family each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Casual dress / Contemporary
Worship. We are now meeting at the Continental Worship Center
located at 2132 U.S. 90 across from the DeFuniak Springs Airport.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FREEPORT 430 Kylea Laird
Drive, Freeport, Fla. Pastor Ken Coots would like to extend an
invitation to one and all to come and "Worship"the Lord Jesus
Christ with us, as we seek His perfect will. Bible Study for all ages
commences at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday. Sunday a.m. worship
service begins at 10 a.m., and Sunday p.m. service at 5 p.m.. The
Wednesday p.m. prayer service begins at 6 p.m.. Both the Sunday
p.m. and Wednesday p.m. prayer services are being held in the
Fellowship Hall. Explicit Bible doctrine is the continuous thread
during both evenings. We at FBC Freeport are strong advocates of
Romans 10:17, "Faith cometh by hearing and hearing by the Word
of God." Hope and pray to see all there! (850) 835-2742 (850) 774-
8327.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (formerly the Concerned Christian
Church) desires to reproduce in doctrine, in life and practice, the
Church founded by Christ. Our position may be summarized as
"where the Bible speaks, we speak" and "where the Bible is silent,
we are silent," we invite you.to join us and help spread the message
of Christ in our community. Sunday School (all ages) at 10 a.m.
and worship (including Childrens' Church) starts at 11 a.m. Nursery
available. Our minister is John Dixon and the church is located on
U.S. 90, 2.4 miles west of the intersection of U.S. 90 and U.S. 331
North.

FREEPORT ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 17457 US 331S. Sunday
services: Learning Center 9:45 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:50 a.m.
Do you need joy in your life? Then come hear the sermon series
from the Book of Philippians call "Disturbed by Joy!" Wednesday,
7 p.m. Hear the teaching series. "Traveling through the Psalms."
Nursery available. Phone 865-4068 for more information.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 174 Harrison
Street, (corner of Bayloop & Harrison St.) Freeport, Fl. 32439 Office
- 850-880-6633, Parsonage 850-835-2261, Pastor's Cell Phone -
850-225-4914 Dr. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor. Please come worship
with us. Rev. Dr. G Charles Sattewhite, Pastor announces that we
are having blended services which include both Contemporary and
Traditional services, these services are geared to reach both t he
seeker, and the growing church member, as well as the established
member. WE are excited about what God is doing at the Freeport
UMC. Our service times are 9:00 a.m. for Bible Study, and children's
hour, our Worship time is 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship in
Song 4:00 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wednesday 6:00 p.m., Our Ladies
meet every other Tuesday Night 6:00 p.m., We have a Gospel Singing
Jubilee on the 1st Saturday of every month 6:00 p.m. (Open Mic).
Come be with us. "a short drive for a life changing experience."

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, 2415 County Hwy. 1883,
DeFuniak Springs is a friendly little country church that welcomes
all visitors. Everyone is invited to worship with the congregation.
Sunday school starts at 9:15 a.m. Sunday morning worship is at
10:30 a.m. and Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday
we have prayer meeting starting at 6:30 p.m. and children's mission
program and Bible drill program. Every fifth Sunday, we have special
music followed by "Dinner on the Grounds." We have a nursery for
0-3 and Children's Church for ages 3 through the first grade.
Missions are very important to Friendship. We have Men's, Wom-
en's and children's mission program. Our pastor is Johnmark Brown.
We extend a heartfelt welcome for you to come and join with us
in worship and fellowship. For any questions please call (850)859-
2287.

GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (GPC) Pastor Keith An-
drews and the congregation of GPC invite you to come and worship
with them. At GPC, you'll find teaching that's biblical, practical, and
encouraging; worship that's exciting, joyous, and Christ-honoring;
and fellowship that's warm and personal. Sunday: Sunday School
(all ages!) at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Kidz Klub at 11 a.m. Ignite!
(Youth) at various locations from 5 7 p.m. Wednesday: Trans-
formation (Bible study for men and women) at 6:30 p.m. GPC is lo-
cated about 10 minutes north of DeFuniak Springs on SR-83N. Find
out more on the web at www.glendalechurch.org or call (850)859-
0080.

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of
Highway 90 on Laird Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just
before the Okaloosa County line. Grace Community is a church
committed to historical Southern Baptist principles and believes that
the Church is called, not to reflect its culture, but to shape it. We
believe that faith must be lived as well as affirmed, therefore, right
living derives from right believing. We hold to a high view of Scrip-
ture believing the Bible as our final authority and that it "stands
in judgement of us, never do we stand in judgement of it." Sunday
morning worship begins at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday School at 11 a.m.
and evening bible study at 6 p.m. Friday night home Bible study at
6:30 p.m. If you are tired of playing church, come help us shape the
culture where we are "learning God's will one verse at a time."

HARMONY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH and Pastor Donel David-
son together with his family welcome all to worship God in spirit and
in truth, at 974 Adams Road, DeFuniak Springs.
Church services will begin with Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Sun-
day morning worship at 11 a.m.; Sunday evening at 5 p.m., and
Wednesday evening 6:30 p.m. Directions: U.S. 331 N turn on to
Williams Road, go about 3.3 miles to Adams Road, turn right onto
Adams go about 9/10 of a mile to church. U.S. 90, turn onto CR-
1087 in the Mossy Head area, go to Williams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to Adams Road, turn left onto Adams, go


9/10 of a mile to church. From CR-1087 out of New Harmony, turn
left onto Adams Road and go 9/10 of a mile to church. For more
information, call the pastorium phone number at (850) 834-2017.

INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles
south of DeFuniak Springs, cordially invites you to come and
worship with us in Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship
services, at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is
at 6 p.m. Pastor Scot Keppel and the congregation extends a very
special welcome to come visit or make us your church home. We
practice "Love one another". A nursery is provided.


NEW HARMONY BAPTIST CHURCH is located at 2281 County
Hwy. 2A, DeFuniak Springs, FL. only nine miles north of Hwy. 90 on
Rt. 1087 from Mossy Head. Pastor Todd Camp would like to invite
you to worship with us during any of our exciting weekly services.
We are a family church that loves Jesus! Our Sunday School hour
is from 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. followed by our morning worship
service at 11 a.m. Nursery and children's church are provided. Our
Sunday evening service begins at 6 p.m., as we "study to show
ourselves approved unto God." On Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. we have a dynamic children's program, youth meeting, ladies
ministry, and adult prayer and Bible study service. The church also
offers affordable daycare services. Monday-Friday. We are a Bible
church committed to seeing God change lives in the power of the
Holy Spirit. Come and be a part of what the Lord is doing at New
Harmony Baptist Church. Call for more information at (850) 834-
2871.

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH 6753 State Hwy 2 East,
Darlington, Fla. We are reaching out to the lost, hurting, hungry,
and naked. Pastor Rev. Curtis Manning and his congregation would
like to invite you to attend services with them. Sunday School for
all ages is at 10 a.m., and Sunday Morning worship is at 11 a.m.;
Sunday evening services will be at 5 p.m.; Wednesday night prayer
and teaching is at 6 p.m.; Come enjoy our anointed praise and
worship and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and
teaching of God's Word. For more information call ( 850 ) 892-
2048.

PASTOR BILL HUNTER AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE
BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, "the Church in
the Wildwood," invites you to come and worship with us just as you
are. Black Creek UMC is located five miles east of Freeport at 278
Memorial Lane. (If you need directions, please call (850)859-2366
or (850)830-1497. We are a church body who loves people and
who also loves to hear the word of God preached. If you sing and/
or play a musical instrument and would like to share your talents)
please come and join us. Make plans now to attend Sunday school
at 10 a.m., Morning Worship at 11 a,m., and Evening Worship.at
6 p.m. Rev. Bill may be reached at (850)859-2366 or (850)830-
1497.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs.
Located one mile south of Bob Sikes Road at 1015 Pleasant Ridge
Rd. extends a special invitation for you to join us to worship the
Lord and study His Word at the following times: Sunday Breakfast/
Fellowship (8:45); age appropriate Sunday Bible Study (9:15);
Morning Worship (10:30); Discipleship training (5 p.m.) and Evening
Worship (6 p.m.); Wednesday (6 p.m.) adult Bible study and youth
activities. Participate in meaningful worship with family and friends.
Call (850) 892-3500 for more information.

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at the
intersection of Hwy. 1883 & 183 invites you to Sunday School 9:45
a.m., Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Training at 5 p.m.,
Evening Service 6 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 p.m. Please come
worship God with us.

PORTLAND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH welcomes you!
We are here for you and hope you will bless us with y our presence
as we worship God and live in the community together. We're
different, and seeking new ways to be the church God call us to
be. We focus on prayer, fellowship, study, missions and worship. A
variety of activities are going on weekly. We have Sunday school
for adults and youth. Worship at 11 a.m. and a new contemplative
prayer service beginning in September at 8:30 a.m., nursery
provided. Youth meet on Wednesday along with dinner and adult
Bible studies at 6 p.m. For more information call (850)-307-2009.


SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1307 County Hwy 278,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Morning Worship
10 a.m.; Puppets, Children's and Adult Choir 4 p.m.; Evening Adult
Bible Study, Youth Bible Study, and Children's Mission Classes 5
p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship at 6 p.m. 'Wednesday mid-week
worship service and AWANA 6:30 p.m. Sign language interpretation
for the deaf provided at all services. Southwide Baptist Church has
classes and activities for all ages: Youth Group, Royal Ambassadors,
Girls in Action, Acteens, Adult Choir, Women on Mission, Paintball
(ages 10+ every third Saturday of the month), AWANA (3yrs-
12th Grade), and sign language classes for all ages. Pastor William
Whaley invites everyone to come and hear the saving word of God.
Directions: from DeFuniak take U.S. 331 S. turn right on first road
(Coy Burgess Loop) past 1-10. Southwide Baptist Church is located
1.5 miles on the left at intersection of Coy Burgess Loop and Millard
Gainey Road. Call (850) 892-3835 for more information or for
directions.

ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is a historic mission
located at 144 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday schedule:
9 a.m. Bible study in the vicarage and 10:15 a.m. Eucharist in the
church. A COMMUNITY "CENTERING PRAYER GROUP" meets
each Saturday morning at 10 a.m. in the church. All are invited.
From December through May COMMUNITY FIRST SATURDAY
BREAKFASTS are served in the parish hall from 7 am. till 11 a.m.
St. Agatha's is the home of the Lakeside Concert series. For more
information call (850) 892-9754

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331
N., P.O. Box 590, DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 32435, Phone: (850)
892-9247. Mass Schedule: Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday,
6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of
Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard Dawson, pastor.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congrega-
tion cordially invite you to attend services with us. Sunday School
is at 10 a.m. Sunday Evening Services are at 6:00 pm. Wednes-
day Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 26 Joe Ander-
son Road (Hwy 83 North). Our pastor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please
come ready to worship and expecting a blessing!

VICTORY LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD, Highway 90
at the Mossy Head Community Center across from the Mossy
Head General Store. We would like to extend to all an invitation to
come and join us and be blessed. We are a church dedicated to
serving Jesus and spreading His wonderful word. Let us share the
light of God's word with you. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.,
followed by Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Each Sunday we have a
fellowship lunch on the grounds, all are invited. Sunday afternoon
service begins about 1:30 p.m. Friday evening service 7 p.m. -
prayer, Royal Rangers, Missionettes and Adult Bible Study followed
by prayer time. Pastor is Thomas Adamson, Children's Ministries
Kevin Chilcutt. For more information call 892-3817 or 652-4610.
Website www.victorylighthouse church.org.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner
of Live Oak and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Open Hearts,
Open Minds, Open Doors," Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School
9 a.m., Morning Worship 10 a.m. The small church by the side of
the road with a cross over the entrance, longing to extend the love
and peace of God to any wayfarer or pilgrim seeking a rest from
this world of strife and despair. A place where common people can
assemble for simple worship and experience the Presence of God
in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered together in my
name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V. "The
devil wins a skirmish with a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the
war."


WESTSIDE CHURCH OF CHRIST Do you truly know what
it means to be saved? Are you worshipping according to God's
divine instructions? If you're even contemplating that answer, then
please come visit us this coming Sunday at 9 a.m. Bible study, 10
a.m.worship, and/or during 7 p.m. Wednesday night Bible class.
The address is 121 East Larkspur Avenue, DeFuniak Springs FL,
32435. If you have any questions please call us at (850)892.3391.


- I II II


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


PAGE 4-B








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


;1 /


I 1






.















LITTLE MISS DEFUNK SPRINGS 2010, Harmony





Heitger.



Wornanless beauty
pageant set
LITTLE MISS DEFUNIAK SPRINGS 2010, Harmony
Heitger.



Womanless beauty

pageant set


A fundraiser for Ponce
De Leon Pee Wee Football
Association will be held Fri-
day, April 1 at 7 p.m. at the
Ponce De Leon old gym. Ad-
mission is $1 for school age
and up.
Age Groups: Little Miss-
Elementary School, Young
Miss- Middle School, Junior
Miss- High School, Miss-
Adults.
There is no entry fee. The
winner will be determined


by amount of donations for
each contestant.
Fish fry and smoked
chicken dinner plates will
be available beginning at 5
p.m. for $5 each. Meal will
consist of fish or chicken,
choice of two: cole slaw,
baked beans, or potato sal-
ad, plus desert and tea.
For more information con-
tact Mike Findley (850)260-
6312 or Kristy Farmer(
904)373-4445.


2011 Miss DFS Pageant March


Miss DeFuniak Springs
2010, Shani Thrower and


Little Miss
Springs 2010,


MISS DEFUNIAK SPRINGS 2010, Shani Thrower.


"Christ in the Passover"
Jesus' last supper was actually
a Jewish Passover.
Greg Savitt, of Jews for Jesus, will
re-create the traditional Passover service
and explain how it foreshadowed Jesus'
death and resurrection in a presentation
called "Christ in the Passover" at
New Harmony Baptist Church
located 9 miles north of Mossy Head on 1087
at 2281 County Hwy. 2A
Sunday, April 3, 2011 11 a.m.
Mr. Savitt will set a table with items traditionally used at the
Passover meal and-detail their spiritual significance. He will explain
the connection between the events of the first Passover in Egypt
and the redemption that Jesus accomplished. Come and bring a
friend with you to see this exciting presentation.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL (850) 834-2871


DeFuniak Heitger invite you to attend
Harmony the 2011 Miss DeFuniak
Springs Pageant being held
in the Walton High School
Auditorium on Saturday,
March 26, 2011. Afternoon
session for Tiny Miss, Fu-
ture Little Miss, Young Miss
and Junior Miss competition
will begin at 1 p.m. followed
by the evening session for
Little Miss, Teen Miss and
Miss competition at 7 p.m.
Ticket prices are $7 for
age 12 and above and $6 be-
low age 12. Advanced seat-
ing will be on sale at Walton
High School for $10.
Pageant staff would like.
S to thank Shani and Harmo-
ny as they represented De-


26


Funiak Springs in the 2010
National Peanut Festival
Pageants. Shani placed in
Top 5 of the Peanut Knowl-
edge Test in the Miss Na-
tional Peanut Festival Pag-
eant that was held this past
November. Both Shani and
Harmony, as well as the oth-
er queens were an excellent
representation of DeFuniak
Springs for 2010. Miss De-
Funiak Springs Pageant is
sponsored by the Walton
High School Anchor Club.
Everyone is invited to join
them on Saturday, March 26
as we present "Denim and
Diamonds" and crown the
new Miss DeFuniak Springs
2011.


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PAGE 5-B









PAGE 6-B


Miss Walton County


2011 crowning ceremonies


Walton High School Dra-
ma Club is proud to present
the 2011 winners of the Miss
Walton County pageants
that were held on Feb.19.
Drama Club members


congratulate all of the win-
ners and thank all of local
businesses for their support
of the Miss Walton County
pageants. Little Miss Wal-
ton County, Cayley Willcox,


and Miss Walton County,
Caitlin Marrow, will repre-
sent Walton County in Octo-
ber at the National Peanut
Festival Pageants.


/j/


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011


.. I.







MISS WALTON COUNTY- Miss Congeniality and Miss Viewers' Choice Kayla Moore;
1st runner-up Devero Bogart; Miss Walton County 2011 Caitlin Marrow; 2nd runner-up
Emily Davis and Miss Photogenic Catherine Trotman.


...g. ......... . -- ;..,. .;... .. ... ... "-.-.".....l
JUNIOR MISS WALTON COUNTY 1st runher-up Isabella Ekstrom; Junior Miss Wal-
ton County 2011 and Junior Miss Viewer's Choice Miranda Matthews; 2nd runner-up Na-
rissa Riley, and Junior Miss Photogenic Lillian Bruce.


TEEN MISS WALTON COUNTY--Teen Miss Congeniality Christina Graves; 1st run-
ner- up and Teen Miss Photogenic Layce Miller; Teen Miss Walton County 2011 Kayla
Chancey; 2nd runner-up, and Teen Miss Viewers' Choice Megan Matthews.


YOUNG MISS WALTON COUNTY- Young Miss Photogenic, Annabelle Adkinson; 1st
runner-up Kaylee McBroom; Young Miss Walton County 2011 Briona Keys; 2nd Runner Up
Chloe Alford, and Young Miss Viewers' Choice Gina Hernandez.


LITTLE MISS WALTON COUNTY 3rd runner-up Delta May; 2nd runner-up and
Little Miss Photogenic Kyleigh Carroll; Little Miss Walton County 2011 and Little Miss
Viewers' Choice Cayley Willcox, and 1st runner-up Sierra Carroll.


TINY MISS WALTON COUNTY- 1st runner-up Chelsea Robertson; Tiny Miss Walton
County 2011 Jasmyn Gomez; 2nd runner-up and Tiny Miss Photogenic Olivia Ritter; 3rd
runner-up and Tiny Miss Viewers' Choice Savanna Boettge.


It is no surprise to her
family and friends that Ni-
cole Yeakos was recognized
for her outstanding academ-
ic work for her first semes-
ter at the University of West
Florida by membership on
the Deans Honor List. Just
as she was active at Paxton
High School, Nicole keeps
busy as a member of the
sorority, Alpha Delta Pi,
which raises money for the
Ronald McDonald House in
Pensacola. She also contin-
ues with her excellent writ-
ing and has already had an
article published in the col-
lege's newspaper.


Bock graduates basic


combat training


Army Pfc. David A. Bock
has graduated from basic
combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness, and re-


ceived instruction and prac-
tice in basic combat skills,
military weapons, chemical
warfare, bayonet training,
drill, ceremony, marching,
rifle marksmanship, armed
and unarmed combat, map
reading, field tactics, mili-
tary courtesy, military


justice system, basic first
aid, foot marches, and field
training exercises.
Bock graduated in 2007
from Freeport High School,
Fla., and received an asso-
ciate degree in 2009 from
Northwest Florida State
College, Niceville, Fla.


FUTURE LITTLE MISS WALTON COUNTY Future Little Miss Photogenic Jala Thorne;
1st runner-up Emma Wilkerson; Future Little Miss Walton County 2011 Ava Hayden; 2nd
runner-up Raleigh Reed, and Future Little Miss Viewers' Choice Haylee Howell.



COMMUNITY CALENDAR


THE 45TH REUNION FOR THE WALTON HIGH CLASS OF 1966 -now planned for
June 10-11, has been expanded to include the 1965 and 1967 classes. They plan to do some
charity work in the community on June 10, followed by a picnic at the Glendale Memorial
Nature Preserve. On the June 11, we hope to have a school tour followed by a golf out-
ing (format and type yet to be decided) with an evening meal/social at the Country Club.
Request the classes of 1965 and 1967 identify a point of contact to work with Don White
at (210)884-9303 or email afdtwhite@aol.com to make sure the announcement of the com-
bined reunion reaches as many classmates as possible. Hope to see all of the survivors at
the reunion. A lot has changed in 44-46 years.

WALTON SENIOR HIGH CLASS OF 1986 is looking for classmates for their 25th class
reunion. Call Melissa Webster at (850)974-1478; email mwebster@chautauquawinery.com
or mail to 600 Paradise Island Drive, DeFuniak Springs, FL., 32433. Join them on Face-
book "Walton Senior High Class of 1986."

THE AREA HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER is offering free smoking cessation classes
at the Walton County Health Department in DeFuniak Springs at 362 SR-83. Participants
receive free nicotine replacement therapy such as nicotine patches, gum and/or lozenges
along with professional consultation, resources and support. Small group sessions start
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 3, with additional one-hour sessions each Thursday evening
through April 7. For more information, call Lynne Weldon at (850) 685-8814 to join others
who want help to quit smoking.

LAKE DEFUNIAK TOASTMASTERS -Dedicated to building better communicator.
Meetings are every second and fourth Thursday from 12-1 p.m. at Northwest Florida State
College, Room 213. For more information contact person is Tina Rushing at (850)598-4636,
or trushing@chelco.com

LOOKING FOR CLASSMATES from Walton Senior High School, Class of 1985. Call
Terinda Wilkerson at (850)274-2776, Patti Coffield at (850)509-6868, Tommy Andrews
at (850)333-0720 or search Facebook Walton Senior High School Class of 1985 25th re-
union.







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011
Daniel Todd Keeton II of
DeFuniak Springs earns degree
from Wayland Baptist University


Daniel Todd Keeton II
of DeFuniar Springs, FL
recently completed require-
ments for a degree from
Wayland Baptist Univer-
sity's Fairbanks campus.
Keeton II earned a Mas-
ter of Arts in Management
degree in HR Mgmt. from
Wayland.
Founded in 1908 in Plain-
view, Texas, Wayland Bap-
tist University has 14 cam-
puses around the country,
providing private Christian
education for students of all
ages and backgrounds. The


Plainview headquarters
campus serves a primary
traditional population with
residence halls, athlet-
ics and student activities.
The 13 external campuses
-- located in Arizona, New
Mexico, Alaska, Hawaii,
Texas, Oklahoma and Ke-
nya -- cater primarily to
adult students and military
personnel completing their
degrees.
For more information on
Wayland Baptist Univer-
sity, visit the web site at
www.wbu.edu


CAITLIN BRAMBLE
5th grade, is Freeport El-
ementary School Kiwanis
Citizen of the Month for
March.


Paxton High School hosts


Monet traveling exhibit


Paxton High School will
be displaying a Teacher's
Discovery Traveling Exhibit
featuring the paintings of
french artist Claude Monet.
The students and staff will
enjoy the giant reproduc-
tions during the weeks of
March 21- April 1. The ex-
hibit includes one of the fa-
mous paintings in the Water
Lillies series and celebrates
art, culture, and history.
Paxton High School Art


teacher Melanie Griep has
coordinated the exhibit to
celebrate the record-break-
ing Monet retrospective
earlier this year in Paris.
Students in all art classes
also created artworks in
response to Monet's im-
pressionist style. Selections
from each grade will be on
display, in tandem with the
Monet reproductions, in-
cluding a version of Monet's
Water Lillies made entirely


out of recycled plastic bot-
tles and scrap wood.

The Claude Monet ex-
hibit was made possible by
a generous grant from the
Cultural Arts Association
of Walton County. The com-
munity is invited -to attend
on Wednesday, March 30,
from 3 6 p.m. The exhibit
will be displayed in the atri-
um in the main building of
Paxton High School.


Pennies for Caring


How much is a penny worth to
you? Would you be willing to share
those stray pennies that are scat-
tered around your house or car if
you knew they would make a differ-
ence in someone's life here in Walton
County?
The Friendship House, Brain Dis-
order Support Foundation is begin-
ning a campaign to collect enough
pennies to "Cover Walton County"
- all 669.440 acres of it. (WOW!
That's a lot of pennies.) We des-
perately need your help. There are
many families in Walton County
who are affected by Alzheimer's Dis-
ease, and many 24/7 Caregivers who
desperately need a few hours relief
from the stress. Every penny collect-
ed will go directly to provide respite
time for an overburdened caregiver.
Collection jugs will be placed in
businesses throughout the county, or


PAGE 7-B




-1


if you cannot find one easily. just call
the Friendship House at (850) 892-
0565 and we will gladly help you. Ifa
group or an organization would hke
to designate an Alzheimer's patient
to be the recipient of their donation.
that is quite acceptable.
Families who have a person diag-
nosed with Alzheimer's Disease, at
whatever stage, and who cannot af-
ford to pay the cost for Respite Care
($45 per day) are invited to apply
for this assistance. The Friendship
House will provide one day per week
for each qualifying family as long as
pennies are available.
Penny collection will continue
through the Countryside Festival /
Spring Fling on March 26. so please
bring those extra pennies with you!

Please search around and share
your pennies for caring.


4,


THESE VOLUNTEERS HELP honor the memory of Margaret Wooten, a founding mem-
ber of the Choctawhatchee Hemerocallis Society.


Choctawhatchee Hemerocallis

Society assist with garden


PAXTON SCHOOL announced the winners from the Tropicana Public Speaking Compe-
tition held on March 17. Congratulations to all these students for a job well done! Pictured
above are: (back row) Sixth grade 1st place: Cortni McKee, 2nd place: Summer Padgett,
3rd place: Frankie Pate. (middle row) Fifth grade 1st place: Cheslee Mathis, 2nd place:
Michaela Cain, 3rd place: Garet Tate. (front row) Fourth Grade 1st place: Emily Ran-
dall, 2nd place: Camryn Brazile, 3rd place: Savannah Ard.


St. Agatha's Concert Series


Could it be Spring al-
ready, was that a songbird,
or was that a flute? On
Sunday, April 3 at 3 p.m.,
the answer will definitely be
"flute." Actually the entire
flute family, including pic-
colo, concert flute, alto flute,
and bass flute. The Lake-
side Concert Series at St.
Agatha's Episcopal Church
presents "Flutes Furioso"
of Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC).
The flute ensemble
"Flutes Furioso" was found-


ed in January of 1995 by di-
rector Robin Home, a well-
known Fort Walton Beach
flutist, performer, teacher
and faculty member of
NWFSC. The group is made
op of local flutists, includ-
ing both advanced students
and professional musicians.
They enjoy performing both
popular arrangements and
original works for flute
choir. They also play several
pieces composed specifically
for this group.
Admission to the concert


is free, though a collection
is taken to be used only for
the support of the series. A
reception will be held imme-
diately following the perfor-
mance to provide the audi-
ence an opportunity to meet
the artists. The program, in-
cluding a brief intermission,
will run about one hour. All
are invited to enjoy the mu-
sic and the reception.
St. Agatha's Episcopal
Church is located at 144
Circle Drive in DeFuniak
Springs.


Earlier this month, sev-
en members of the Choc-
tawhatchee Hemerocallis
Society met in front of the
caboose on Circle Drive in
DeFuniak Springs to work
on the Margaret Wooten
Daylily garden. This daylily
flowerbed was established
in 2004 in memory of Mar-
garet Wooten who helped
establish this club back in
1965.
Due to a problem of in-
vasive weeds, the daylily
plants were all removed
from the garden and planted
in pots. These potted lilies
will be replanted in the fall
after the garden area has
been treated and the weeds
have been eliminated.
The seven members
worked tirelessly to beauti-
fy the spot, that community
members enjoy during their
rides and walks around the
lake. DeFuniak Springs
residents and visitors ap-
preciate all of the work the


Choctawhatchee Hemero-
callis Society does to keep


this little corner of the world
more beautiful.


HATS AND GLOVES ARE standard attire for those
helping out with with transplanting day lily bulbs until fall
when they can be returned to their garden.


May Day Festival is coming


Mark that calendar for the
5th Annual May Day Festi-
val, to be held the weekend
of May 20,. at the Walton


County Fairgrounds. There
will be food, games and fun
for the entire family. Inter-
ested vendors and sponsors


of the 5th Annual May Day
Festival are asked to call
520-4290 or 333-3871.


Understanding the Almanac and Hay Bale
Gardening programs at Gladys Milton Library


On March 29 at 10
a.m. a two part program
-"An Introduction to Using
the Almanac" and "Intro-
ducing Hay Bale Garden-
ing" will be given at the
Gladys. Milton Library in
Paxton. The library is lo-
cated on Flowersview Blvd.


off CR-147 between Harri-
son Curve and the Paxton
Emergency Station on U.S.
331.

This program is for those
who feel intimidated by the
almanac but would like to
have a basic understanding


of how to use it, particularly
for gardening. Hay bale gar-
dening will help those with
limited space, poor soil, and
little time to spend weed-
ing. This program is free to
the public. Call 834-5383 for
more information.


. ..-. - 1

IT TAKES A LOT OF ELBOW grease to keep these flowers blooming, but the club has
been doing it since 1965.


I


la~I~








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


IeJ0WJTUAI*


Dorriety
Sarah "Sally" Scoggins-
Dorriety 90, Ft. Myers, Fla.,
passed away on Monday,
March 21, 2011. She was
born on April 25, 1920 in
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
Sarah was born in De-
Funiak Springs, Fla. She
relocated to Orlando, Fla.
where she was active in the
Salvation Army, especially
Sthe youth program. Children
. always held a warm spot in
her heart. She enjoyed fish-
ing, camping and being with
her family.
She was preceded in
death by her parents, John
and Mary McLendon; one


Wooten
Mrs. Julia Jeanette Woo-
ten, 91, passed away Sun-
day, March 20, 2011. She
was born Feb. 27, 1920 in
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. to
Perry and Maude Emmett
Henderson.
Mrs.Wooten was Baptist
by faith. She worked helping
her husband in the trucking
industry for many years. She
enjoyed quilting, crocheting
and was an avid reader.
Mrs. Wooten is preceded
in death by her parents; her
husband, Stan Wooten; four
sisters, Eva Lodge, Hattie
Cawthon, Annie Lou Born
and Irene Langford; three
brothers, Gordan Hender-





QU
-? q'


daughter, Linda Petrea;
one brother, Buck McLen-
don, four sisters, Georgia,
Nell, Aida, Iva Ruth,; two
husbands, first Eulice "Pee
Wee" Scogggins 52 years,
and second, Dewey Dorri-
ety.
She was survived by one
son, Paul Scoggins (Brenda);
one daughter, Judi Weber
(Dave), eight grandchildren,
and 13 great-grandchil-
dren.
Graveside service will
be held at 11 a.m., Satur-
day, March 26, at Magnolia
Cemetery 71 U.S.90 W -
DeFuniak Springs, FL.
Fellowship will follow
immediately after service
at the First Presbyterian
Church of DeFuniak Springs
located at 1063 Circle Drive,
DeFuniak Springs, FL.
Burial will follow in the
Magnolia Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com.Clary-Glenn Fu-
neral Home is entrusted
with the arrangements.


son, Hilton Henderson and
Buck Henderson.
Mrs. Wooten is survived
by three special nieces, Betty
Spiegelhalter, Cheryl Paul
and Teresa Carol Hawkins
and one special great-niece,
Debbie Dubus; one brother,
Robert Henderson and wife,
Peggy of Pensacola, Fla. and
one sister, Mary Mason.
A time of visitation will
be held 10-11 a.m., Wednes-
day, March 23, 2011 at
Clary-Glenn Funeral Home,
230 Park Avenue, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435.
Funeral services will be
held 11 a.m., Wednesday,
March 23, 2011 at Clary-
Glenn Funeral Home with
Rev. Lindsey Martin offici-
ating.
Burial will follow in the
Magnolia Cemetery.
Floral arrangements are
being accepted, or dona-
tions may be made to Emer-
ald Coast Hospice, 1555 N.
Palafox Street, Pensacola,
FL 32501.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com.
Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home is entrusted with the
arrangements.



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Thompson

Homer J. Thompson, 96
of Darlington passed away
Wednesday, March 16,
2011 in Healthmark Re-
gional Medical Center. He
was born Feb. 24, 1915 in
Milton, Fla. the son of Wil-
liam Benjamin and Pearlie
Mathais Thompson. He is
predeceased by his wife,
Eunice Mae Thompson and
his son, Richard Thompson.
Homer's family wishes to
thank his, daughter-in-law,
Sherry for the love and care
and companionship she has
given him over the past
twenty or so years.


Accardo
Mr. Daniel "Dino" Ac-
cardo, 60, ofMiramar Beach,
Fla. passed away March 18.
He was born Feb. 23, 1951
in Palermo, Italy to Angelo
and Lillian Celano Accardo.
Mr. Accardo worked as a
developer in the Real Estate
Industry for many years in
Chicago, Ill. His residen-
tial developments in Lake
County on Chicago's North
Shore, won numerous Gold
Key Awards from his peers.
He was a very accomplished
artist, he enjoyed bicycling,
swimming, hiking, traveling
and music.
Mr. Accardo was preceded


Among survivors are his
children, Geraldine and hus-
band Lamar, Homer William
and wife Patricia, Christine
and husband Ronald, Jessie
James and wife Ingrid, Lor-
raine and husband David,
Billy Ray and wife Frances,
Janice Marie and husband
Philip, Benjamin and wife
Linda, Ronald Edward and
wife Sherry, Huey and wife
Kay and Dewey. Forty one
grandchildren and numer-
ous great and great great
grandchildren also survive.
Pallbearers were Adam
Thompson, Aaron Thomp-
son, Tommy Thompson,
Davey Davis, Tad Davis,
Larry Bell and David Wayne
Dubose. A time of visitation
was held Sunday, March 20,
2011 in Jerry Evans Chapel.
Funeral services were held
Monday, March 21, 2011 at
11 a.m. in Leonia Baptist
Church with Reverend Jeff
Cain officiating. Eulogies
by Janice Marie and Ronnie
Bell. Burial followed in Leo-
nia Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences and sign
the guest register at jerrye-
vansfuneralhome.com


in death by his parents and
one uncle Rosario Celano.
Mr. Accardo is survived
by his best friend and busi-
ness partner for 24 years
Hamilton D. Harper III of
Miramar Beach; special
cousins Benny and Vita
RaVenna, and his God Par-
ents Carmello and Rose Na-
poli.
Memorial services were
held Tuesday, March 22,
2011 at Christ the King
Episcopal Church in Santa
Rosa Beach 480 North CR-
393, Santa Rosa Beach, Fla.
32459, with Father Frank
Cooper IV officiating.
Flowers are being ac-
cepted or donations may
be made to the Children of
the Muskogee Indian Tribe
in care of Christ The King
Episcopal Church.
Memorialization will be
,by cremation.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book at www.clary-
glenn.com.
Clary-Glenn Freeport
Chapel Funeral Home was
entrusted with the arrange-
ments.


narry


Matthew Robert Barry,
44, of DeFuniak Springs,
Fla. passed away Wednes-
day, March 16, 2011 at his
residence. He was born
June 4, 1966 in Manchester,
N.H. Matthew was a li-
censed pilot and a member
of both the NRA and AOPA.
He was a septic system de-
signer and contractor and a
home developer. He was a
loving father and avid hunt-
er.
Matthew is preceded in
death by his wife, Julie M.
Barry; father, William J.
Barry; and step-father, Rob-
ert L. Lovering.
He is survived by one
son, Matthew R. Barry II
of DeFuniak Springs, Fla.;
two daughters, Amanda M.
Norris of DeFuniak Springs,
and Amy Lyn Barry of Man-
chester, N.H.; two grand-


sons, Landon J. Moore of
Manchester, and Grady J.
Norris of DeFuniak Springs;
mother, Beverly W. Lover-
ing of DeFuniak Springs;
two brothers, Donald Paul
Wilson of Texas and Danny
Ronald Wilson of Penna-
cook, N.H.; one sister, Dar-
lene Victoria Wilson of Man-
chester; loving companion,
Christie C. Howell, and sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to Em-
brey Riddle Aeronautics in
Fort Walton Beach, Fla.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.

Local arrangements are
under the direction of Da-
vis-Watkins Funeral Home
and Crematory.


CLARY-GLENN FUNERAL HOMES CELEBRATES




80 YEARS

OF COMMITMENT TO SERVICE


Join us in celebrating eight decades of history and services.

Vt14 Esrablished in 1931 by John Page, Randolph Clary purchased the tuneral home
in 1952 and joined parmtnership with Jerry and Sheila Godwin in 1982 and
I ."' the funeral home became Clary-Godwin Funeral Home. In 1952 Mercer
and Ada Comander established Comander Funeral Home, in 1975
"-' """ Robert and Sara Comander obtained ownership of Comander Funeral
Home. In 2002 Clary-Godwin and Comander Funeral Homes merged
Sand became Clary-Godwin-Comander Funeral Homes. In 2000
Clary-Godwin Freeport Chapel Funeral Home was establihhed in
SFreeport, Florida. in 2004 Joel and Paula Glenn purchased Clarv-
i- --.' GodwmiComander Funeral Home and Clar\-Godwin Freeport
Chapel Funeral Home and today are Clary-Glenn Funeral
Homes. Clary-Glenn Funeral Homes, Inc. Is proud of their
ll eghty years of funeral heritage and is grateful to the families
whom they have served for eight decades.


... 2


j*' ~u .-Fj
c I~ I 't"


SClary-Glenn

'q FUNERAL HOMES
Locall h 'it o lw a nit d hl nt tpt'ili\eated


I'. -


clary-glenn.com
CLAR'-GLEN-N FiNERAL HOME
230 PARK AVENIIE DEFUNNAK SPRINGS FL (850i 2-l511
CL.ARY'-GLENN FREEPORT CFL\PEL FUNERAL HOME
150 EAST -HIGFVAH 20 FREEP-ORT. FL 1ik850i S3-211
I,\I r C I,.,, L O :'. e,,, F-,.,fi,, .. ... ... ,


a~a rr p~ -r lla l~r ~ -"I-~


Mlattheu. Barry Jr. (left) and Matthew Barry (right)
Matthew Barry
June 4, 1966- March 16, 2011
Letter to My Son

Matthew Barry

Son, ue knew you were tired,
and needed your rest.
Now God has called you home
to live with His best.
With your construction skills
and love for some fun,
you'll be building for God
homes in the sun.
When our days seem darkest
and nights seem long,
we'll hold on to your memory
trying to be strong.
Words could never express
the sadness we feel.
But having your spirit with us
brings a joy that's real.
All those wonderful times
we've enjoyed with you,
will remain in our thoughts
till ue gel there too.
In that bright sapphire sky
with visions of gold
build us a large mansion,
our family will behold!

Love from your Mom
Beverly Lovering
by
Mary Ann Whiddon


I .


PAGE 8-B


)C1









er, ,NiA N 3rF A M 4 1G


Ch h ews ve 9
a


Saint Agatha's moves


forward in faith


The tiny white frame
church on Circle Drive in
DeFuniak Springs has a
five- year plan that includes
a goal for preservation and
improvement of its historic
structures and grounds.
This goal is certainly in
keeping with their 2000-
2007 success in restoring
both the church (1892) and
the vicarage (1887) with
the help of The Florida De-
partment of State, Bureau
of Historic Preservation
matching grants program.
In examining this and
other goals the vestry de-
termined that there was
barely enough space to meet
current educational and fel-
lowship programming needs
much less future ones. In
fact, Adult Sunday School
met in. the vicar's parlor
and Children's Sunday
School met in the vicar's
dining room. Functions in
the parish hall were very
crowded. When four wheel-
chair bound members were
present on the same day it
was difficult to move about.
Members wanted to resolve
these issues but lack of
building space and the poor
economy seemed to be over-


whelming considerations.
Nevertheless, preliminary
investigations about new
construction crept forward.
Then God presented an-
other opportunity. A query
letter about purchasing the
adjoining property was an-
swered positively five years
after it was originally sent.
This property includes a
dwelling (circa 1885), that
might be used to provide
the priest with a private
vicarage which the church
has never before been able
to offer. The home, like
the church and vicarage, is
a contributing site to the
DeFuniak Springs Historic
District (on The National
Register of Historic Places)
and can be an attractive
portion of a priest's compen-
sation package. The current
vicarage can now be used for
Sunday School rooms and
as fellowship space. In ad-
dition, a small lot suitable
for future building was part
of the package. The deci-
sion was to move forward
in times'of economic uncer-
tainty or to remain crowded,
stable and risk free? After
careful fact finding and long
deliberations the decision


was to move forward, in
faith.

Positive things began to
occur. Philip M. Duncan, II,
Bishop of the Diocese of the
Central Gulf Coast granted
the mission church $50,000
from the Noel Turner Fund
and also a loan for a similar
amount from the Congre-
gational Loan Fund. Saint
Agatha's Endowment Trust
will supply some of the re-
quired funds. A Capital*
Campaign, chaired by John
Miller, started this month
to raise additional money
for the final purchase of
the property and to restore
funds to the Trust.

Members are excited
about the future of St. Ag-
atha's and they see the need
to plan for generations yet to
come. Their reputation for
restoration and preservation
make them good stewards
for these historic properties.
They are moving forward
in faith. For more informa-
tion, contact John Miller at
(850) 892-5441 or St. Ag-
atha's Episcopal Church,
150 Circle Drive, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435.


Mt. Pleasant A.M.E. Church to hold

Family and Friends Day Program
Mt. Pleasant A.M.E. Great Saint Mark Primitive be "Youth and Adults Walk-
Church in the Flowersville, Baptist Church from Tal- ing with God in the Past,
community cordially invited lahassee, Fla. and Pastor Present, and Future.
the community to their an- Gregory Washington from Mt. Pleasant A.M.E. is
nual Family and Friends Jesus Can Help Ministries located at 1233 Flowersville
Day Program on Saturday, from Pensacola, Fla. will Blvd. For more information
April 16 at 6 p.m. be the speaker for this pro- or direction call the church
Sis. Haja Radder from gram. This years theme will at (850)834-4108.

FUMC Ecuador Mission's


Team hosting yard sale


The First United Method-
ist Church's (FUMC) Ecua-
dor Missions Team and the
UMW are hosting a yard
sale. This time it is sure to
be huge again as the church
members do their Spring
cleaning. The community is
asked to come and support
the 2011 Ecuador mission
trip and.UMW's school sup-
ply mission. Their goals is


to help children locally and
internationally. The major-
ity of items will be sold by
donation only with a few
having minimum price do-
nations. There will be baby
clothes and items, furniture,
and much more. The Teens
for Christ group will also be
holding a bake sale during
this event to raise money for
SmileTrain. Tables may be


rented for the sale of your
own goods. Table rentals
are $10. Contact the church
office at 892-5128 for more
information.
The fundraiser will take
place Saturday, April 2 from
7 a.m. until noon at the First
United Methodist Church at
88 Circle Drive in DeFuniak
Springs.


Walk, Run, Ride, event


to benefit missionaries


The WMU of Southwide
Baptist Church will be spon-
soring a fundraiser. Walk,
Run, Ride, will be held on
Sunday, March 27, at noon
at Harbeson Park in De-


Funiak Springs.
This event is to raise mon-
ey for the mission program
Annie Armstrong, Easter
Offering and benefits mis-
sionaries living and work-


ing in the United States. All
children, grades 1-5 are wel-
come to participate.
For more information
contact Southwide Baptist
Church at (850) 892-3835.


Harmony Fellowship Kitchen invites First Lutheran Church in Florala


everyone to join them in a supper


Harmony Fellowship
Kitchen invites everyone to
share a supper with them
on Tuesday, March 29 from
5:30 7:30 p.m.
Harmony Fellowship is
located at 974 Adams Rd.
in DeFuniak Springs (the
New Harmony area) Direc-


turn on to Williams Road,
go about 3.3 miles to Adams
Road, turn right onto Adams
go about 9/10 of a mile to
church. U.S. 90, turn onto
CR-1087 in the Mossy Head
area, go to Williams Road,
turn right onto Williams
about 2.8 miles to Adams


go 9/10 of a mile to church.
From CR-1087 out of New
Harmony, turn left onto Ad-
ams Road and go 9/10 of a
mile to church.
For more information,
call the pastorium phone
number at (850) 834-2017
or contact Jan Davidson at


In Western Christianity,
Easter is always celebrated
on the Sunday immediately
following the Paschal Full
Moon date of the year.

There are many mis-
understandings about the
calculation of Easter dates.
What follows is an attempt
to clear up at least some of
the confusion.
In actuality, the date of
the- Paschal Full Moon is
determined from historical
tables, and has no corre-
spondence to lunar events.
In the year 325 AD, astron-
omers approximated the
dates of all the full moons
in the year for the Western
Christian churches. These
were called the Ecclesias-
tical Full Moon dates, and
they have been used ever
since 326 AD to determine
the date of Easter. So, the
Paschal Full Moon is always
the first Ecclesiastical Full
Moon date after March 20
(which happened to be the
vernal equinox date in 325
AD).
The Paschal Full Moon
can vary by two days from
the date of the actual full
moon, with dates ranging
from March 21 to April 18.
As a result, Easter dates
can range from March 22
through April 25 in Western
Christianity.
Western churches use the
Gregorian Calendar to cal-
culate the date of Easter and
Eastern Orthodox churches
use the Julian Calendar.
This is partly why the dates
are rarely the same.
Easter and its related hol-
idays do not fall on a fixed
date in either the Gregorian
or Julian calendars, making
them moveable holidays.


The dates are based on a lu-
nar calendar very similar to
the Hebrew Calendar.
The Eastern Orthodox
Church not only maintains
the date of Easter based on
the Julian Calendar which
was in use during the First
Ecumenical Council of Nicea
in 325 AD, but also accord-
ing to the actual, astronomi-
cal full moon and the actual
vernal equinox as observed
along the meridian of Jeru-
salem.
This complicates the mat-
ter, due to the inaccuracy of
the Julian calendar, and the
13 days that have accrued
since 325 AD. This means,
in order to stay in line with
the originally established
(325 AD) vernal equinox,
Orthodox Easter cannot be
celebrated before April 3
(present day Gregorian cal-
endar), which was March 21


in 325 AD.
Additionally, in keeping
with the rule established by
the First Ecumenical Coun-
cil of Nicea, the Eastern
Orthodox Church adhered
to the tradition that Easter
must always fall after the
Jewish Passover, since the
death, burial and Resurrec-
tion of Christ happened after
the celebration of Passover.
Eventually the Orthodox
Church came up with an al-
ternative to calculating Eas-
ter based on Passover, and
developed a 19-year cycle,
as opposed to the Western
Church 84-year cycle.


to host 2011
The First Lutheran
Church invites everyone to
their indoor yard sale/bake
goods/craft items.
It will be held rain or
shine on Saturday, April 9,
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Yard
sale items will include


spring yard sale
household items, electron- good Christian fellowship.
ics, clothing, books, plants First Lutheran is locat-
and treasures for everyone. ed at 24512 Fifth Avenue
There will be a large selec- in Florala, AL, close to the
tion of baked goods and some Flordia and Alabama line
handmade crafts for Easter on U.S. Hwy 331. For more
and birthdays, etc. Come to Information, call (850)859-
shop for bargains or for just 1046.


tions are go to U.S. 331 N Road, turn left onto Adams, 978-0628. Beechgrove Church of God host
The Bibletones to perform March 25 .B ,. ..C. h. r .f AGo


at First Baptist Church of Freeport


The Bibletones, a nation-
ally renowned southern Gos-
pel group will be in concert
at the First Baptist Church


of Freeport on March 25 at 7
p.m.
The public is cordially in-
vited to attend. Admission


is free, however a love offer-
ing will be taken. For infor-
mation call (850)835-2742.


benefit dinner and stag Aprel 2


The Beechgrove Church of
God will have a benefit din-
ner and sing on April 2, be-
ginning at 4 p.m.
The dinner will consist of
chicken plates served buf-
Gospel Sing
at Harmony
Fellowship
Church
April 2, 6:30
p.m.
Featuring
Carpenter's
Helper Donel
Davidson and
other local
talent.
Harmony Fellowship is
located at 974 Adams Road,
DeFuniak Springs. Contact
Jan Davidson at 978-0628,


fet style and the cost is $6
each.
The proceeds will go into
the general fund to help
with financial needs of the
church.


The church is located six
miles south of Ponce de
Leon, on CR-183 approxi-
mately one mile.


Your Station For Life!

Join Us for the Countryside Festival
This Saturday at The Friendship House
From 1 am to 6pm you can enjoy a full day offun for the
whole family! There'll be live music throughout the day,
great food and wonderful door prizes.

This Saturday Morning beginning at 1 Oam
353 Juniper Lake Road


Why Easter Sunday Falls

On Different Dates
Rev. Dr. G. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor


"Christ In the Passover"
JBIB'lad wapp adLmly



ad WiinH ha it MeWed Je
dBali td reiemAM in a pamrtai

camld ChBist in t PafsaO aI
New Harmony Baptist Church
Iocd 9 mkes mr&i nf Ib Ia- m011G7
at2281 cum iH. 2A
Sunday, April 3, 2011 11 a.m.
Ik Siwt a ti U Iwih bi caiB Mld is tL
Re asalim bd nd I l em Hofam IF in P m Epn mji
a.d tle mai~pb oa s asm p Lmr aed @Maiq a

F MMW SFWUMN1 MCL |MG) 0W257


PAGE 9-B


THE DFUNIAK SPRINGS 2011


I









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


'Growing Wrth America'

4 NATIONAL
TIRE
S BROKERS
CORP.

Kelly
Michelin
Goodyear
Passenger
Truck
OTR


NATIONAL
TIRE
BROKERS
CORP
829 Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Tires, Brakes,
Alignments & Auto Service
850-892-5191
1-800-252-2888


TAYLOR Pun


Air Conditioning & Electrical Incorporated

Sales, Service & Installation
(850) 892-3955


684 North 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433


DANNY TAYLOR
President


The DeFuniak Springs

Herald-Breeze

your source for local news!

Published Weekly On Thursdays


850-892-3232


I- a


TAYLORS A/C & ELECTRIC, INC.
LIC'S RM0048225
RG00048207-ER00015 892-3955
-----------------------------------------------------
AMERICAN AIR SYSTEMS LLC
Reliability, Comfort & Performance.
LIC. RA0064836 892-2804

POLAR CAPS AIR CONDITIONING
AND HEATING SERVICES
LIC# RA0066940 850-834-5075


PLATTS APPLIANCE REPAIR
4410 US HWY 90 W
892-4670

RON'S APPLIANCE
REPAIR AND PARTS
CALL 850-689-1007 OR 850-305-8515


MAGNOLIA TERRACE ASSIST. LIVING
5209 HWY 331 S, DeFUNIAK
850-892-8348 ALF#10903


REV. PA. EVANS ASTROLOGER
Spiritual Consultations, Astrological
Charts, Readings. Call 850-892-3217


BRYANS USED CARS
1133 HWY 90W DFS
DEWITT BRYAN 892-7148


SLAY'S SALVAGE PAYS CASH FOR
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & SCRAP
METAL. 850-956-2870
(pdthru 5/11/10


NATIONAL TIRE BROKERS
829 HWY. 90 WEST, DFS
892-5191
.....................................................
ROCKMAN'S AUTO CENTER
WRECKER SERVICE
BEHIND SUBWAY 892-5015


RANDEL'S BARBER SHOP
US HWY 83 DFS
892-1011 (fn)


RV SITE,
WATER, ELECTRIC, SEWER, CABLE
892-7229


HICKS' CARPET CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
892-2623


OKALOOSA WALTON CHILD CARE
HRS & UNITED WAY
892-8560


QUALITY WORK
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
850-956-2213
(pdlhu 2/19/11)
-----------------------------------------------------
ABLE CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS
Replacement Patios, Stamp Concrete,
Different Types Of Pavers, Bobcat,
Military/Senior Discounts, LICENSED
AND INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA 461-6733

mCu
Construction WE SPECIALIZE IN
SMALLER JOBS. HAULING, BACKHOE
WORK, DRIVES. ETC. LAWRENCE & SON
892-3873
......................................................
ADDITIONS, REMODELING &
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, PAINTING,
DRYWALL, SIDING & WOOD ROT
850-685-7008
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
(PD THRU 1/2/11)
--------......--------------...........--------------
BEST RATES!
Need New Roof, Home Remodel, or
New Construction. Call Paul Rushing.
We do the work, you reap the rewards.
Licensed & Insured in Florida
Call (850) 401-1537 or (850) 892-3334
------------------------..............................
PALM CONSTRUCTION CO. OF
WEST FL. NEW CONSTRUCTION,
ADDITIONS, REMODELS, DOOR &
WINDOW REPLACEMENTS, POLE
BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, No Job
Too Small. 850-259-0398 CGC1508332


HARPER DAY CARE
OPENING FOR INFANT- PRESCHOOL
CALL 892-3985
(Pd thru 4/10/11)
DisabilityServic


BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299
PDTHRU 3/11)


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326


FIREWOOD FOR SALE U PICK UP
OR WE DELIVER. 850-401-4478
OR 850-685-0916


WOOD, CARPET, TILE.
REPAIR, INSTALLATION 30YEARS
EXPERIENCE. 865-2524 (12.18.-1p)


D.S. HANDYMAN SERVICE
CALL 419-4519
ANYTIME (ic,
..............................-------------...........
35 YEARS
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE
850-956-2213. HURRICANE REPAIRS.
(PD THRU 2/19/11)
---------------------------------------------------
JOE'S HANDYMAN AND YARD
SERVICE: Call me first, "I do it all!"
Home: 850-401-3695 Cell: 850-419-1869


VANN CARPENTRY & HOME REPAIR:
BIG & SMALL JOBS, MOBILE HOME
REPAIR, ADD ONS, PATIOS/
PORHCES. LIC. & INS.
892-9467


HOUSEKEEPING DAILY, WEEKLY, AND
DEEP CLEANING. CALL
SUSIE WILLIAMS 850-259-0404


C&C LANDSCAPING LLC
Irrigation, Bobcat Work, Pressure
Washing. 850-585-0403 Lic. & Ins.


RODNEY'S LAWN SERVICE.Total lawn
maintenance. Serving Walton Co. over
10 years. 850-974-6972, 850-834-3925
JOHNSON'S LAWN SERVICE
GENERAL CLEAN UP/REASONABLE
CELL: 259-6318 PH: (850) 834-2200


NEW & USED BOOKS -TRADE-INS SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS M&M LAWN CARE. Free Quotes &
DOWNTOWN ON BALDWIN & 6TH HANDLED APPEALS EXPERTS Reasonable Rates For Residential
TUES.-SAT. 10-5, 892-3119 DISABILITY CONSULT. (850) 835-2163 850-401-4477/850-419-0014
*_ f ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----


BEAR CREEK CREATIVE SERVICES
Landscaping, Lawn Maint., Tractor Work,
Land Clearing, Fencing, Lic. & Ins.
892-4423 OR 865-2848
-----------------------------------------------------
D.S. LAWN CARE
FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE &
PRESSURE WASHING. 850-419-4519.
(ntc)
-----------------------------------------------------
REASONABLE RATES LAWN CARE
YEAR AFTER YEAR FOR ALL
YOUR LAWN CARE NEEDS.
FREE ESTIMATES CALL RUSTY
(CELL) 850-546-0011
(HOME) 850-834-3141
(PDTHRU 6/10/11)


SUNBELT CREDIT
LOANS FOR ANY REASON
850-892-9504 (CTFN)


MOBILE/RV LOTS FOR RENT
WATER, GARBAGE PICK-UP
892-2157 (205) 441-0464 ("c)


BEST RATES!
STOR-RITE MINI STORAGE
1599 83 N, DFS, FL
Behind Roehm Pre-School
Free lock with rental
Call (850) 892-3334 or (850) 830-8868
(CTFN)
......................................................
THARP & SONS MINI STORAGE
HWY. 90 & NORWOOD
892-6035 24 HOUR SERVICE (CTFN)
-----------------.--.---..-.-------.-..-------.-.-..-
A-1 MINI STORAGE
1154 US HWY 90 W
DFS (850) 892-4677 (CTFN)



SUNDOWN INN
NEWLY RENOVATED ACROSS FROM
WAL-MART (850) 892-9647 DFS



JEMCO PLASTERING INC.
892-5524
QUALITY IS OUR GOAL



FANCY NAILS 10YRS EXPERIENCE
NAIL & TOE GET A FREE EYEBROW
WAX. FRENCH TIP WITH GEL $35 -
NOW $25. EYEBROW WAXING/
PEDICURE CHAIR 931 US HWY 331
(850) 892-0466 M-SAT. 9-7


LANGLEY'S OFFICE SUPPLY
1027 S. 19TH STREET
892-9776



BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299
(PDTHRU 3/11)



JOHN DANILOW, BROKER
http://www.johndanilow.com
(850) 217-8104 (c



SOUTHERN ROOFING
ALL TYPES RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
LIC. #CCC058016 956-4325
...........................................................................
ROOFING: NEW ROOF, REROOF &
REPAIRS. SHINGLES AND METAL.
CCC1327250 CALL 850-685-7008



AA AUTO SALVAGE
442 CTY HWY 1087
MOSSY HEAD 850-892-3256



WINDHAM SEPTIC SERVICE, INC.
67 JOE CAMPBELL RD.
835-3356
.....................................................
ARNETT SEPTIC
LOCATED AT 1101 HWY 90 W
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS (ic)


BONDS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
(850) 951-1118
Hot Water Hydro Jetting, Drain Snaking,
Video Pipe Inspection, Plumbing Repair
FL State Cert. Plumbing Contractors
Lic.# CFC1427405/CFC026554
(pd thru 529110 -tc)


AL'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
REPAIRS'TUNE-UPS'OVERHAULS
FREE Pickup & Delivery 850-892-7887


MAKE YOUR EVENT SPECIAL
HIRE "THE LIL' TROLLEY"
CALL (850) 865-7050 FOR PRICES


STUCCO, PLASTERING, STONE,
DRYWALL REPAIRS.
850-956-2213
(PD THRU 2119/11)


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326
-----------------------------------------------------.
VOELKER SURVEYING, LLC
Santa Rosa Beach 622-1610
DeFuniak Springs 892-2410
(CTFN)
-.----.-.--..---..-.-.----------------.---------------
FULL SCOPE SURVEYING, LLC
DOUG MEEKER, PSM
FREEPORT 850-880-6215
(PD THRU 720/11)


DeFUNIAK TAX: 24 HOUR SERVICE
SMOKE-FREE TAXI FAIR PRICE
PROMPT SERVICE 419-0773
(pd thru 4-10-11)


McDONALD TREE SERVICE
BUCKETTRUCK & STUMP GRINDING
LIC. & INS. (850) 892-7380

BARBER'S TREE SERVICE: FREE
ESTIMATES, LIC. WILL BEAT ANY
REASONABLE PRICE. 850-956-2676
TOLL-FREE 1-866-848-6651
(CTFN)
Wdf A n a l
THOMAS JOHNSON TRAPPING LLC
WILDLIFE ANIMAL CONTROL
850-585-5486
(PO THRU 4/27/11)


ADVERTISE HERE!


892-3232

* 3 Lines $10 per month 892-3232


(CQuer W/allitm (Goumity


The DeFuniak Springs Herald


& The Beach*Breeze




with offices located in both


North & South Walton


The DeFuniak Springs Herald

740 Baldwin Avenue

DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435

(850) 892-3232


Fax: 892-2270


The Beach Breeze


4401 Hwy. 98 East

Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459

(850) 231-0918

Fax: 231-0928


E-mail: dfsherald@email.com


PAGE 10-B


4OF









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011


Sports


Tennis and Track

results

12B


PAGE 11-B

Sports News and Notes: WMS
Baseball Wins Tourney
13B


Lady Braves score six in the third to beat Paxton 9-8


Lady Braves score six in the third to beat Paxton 9-8


By REID TUCKER
Though Walton and
Paxton's softball teams are
strictly county rivals and
not district opponents, every
game between the two sides
is a big game, especially
considering both clubs have
struggled in district match-
ups early this season.
When Walton (4-6, 0-5)
pulled out a 9-8 win against
Paxton (2-5, 1-4) on Friday,
March 18, it may not have
improved the team's district
standings, but it did pro-
vide a psychological boost.
The Lady Braves could
have stood a solid win af-
ter a tough last-inning loss
to Pensacola Catholic days
earlier, said Walton coach
Stan Bosenberg.
"We needed this win big
time," he said. "We were
ahead at Catholic 3-2 Tues-
day night but we made an
error and they ended up
beating us by one run after
they got ahead of us in the
bottom of seven. This win
today was a good job of re-
bounding."
Paxton coach Laurie Gil-
bert's appraisal of the game
was a little different in light

High School
Baseball Scores

Monday- March 14
South Walton 13
University High, Tenn. 3


of her team's four-game los-
ing streak in district con-
tests, though she saw silver
lining in the Lady Cats' will-
ingness to scrap for seven
innings.
"[A game against Walton]
was for bragging rights at
Walmart," she said. "I com-
mend my girls for not laying
their heads down and giv-
ing up. They are a team of
battlers. These are going to
be the types of experiences
that are going to help us be
successful when it comes to
[district play]."
The back-and-forth tone
of the game was set early, as
Walton's Shelbie Standland
scored on her first at-bat
only to have Paxton pile on
three runs in the bottom of
the first inning. Both sides
fell silent at the plate dur-
ing their next at-bats but it
proved to be only a lull in
the storm as Walton capi-
talized on three errors from
the Lady Cats to cross home
plate on six occasions in
the third inning. An inning
later, Paxton made it a 7-7
ballgame.
The Lady Braves broke
the deadlock on a line drive
two-out double by pitcher
Camille Cosson, which
brought in Kaitlyn Green.
Cosson herself came around
on the next hit and Walton
took the go-ahead run on


Paxton's fifth error of the
day, eventually sealing the
deal in the visiting team's
favor.
Paxton looked to be mak-
ing some headway in the
fifth, as Bethany Neale
made it to first on a Walton
error but Standland, play-
ing shortstop, turned a criti-
cal double play to halt any
meaningful advance from
then on. The Lady Cats
managed one more run on
an RBI double before Cos-
son and the Walton infield
retired them in order in the
bottom of seven.
Bosenberg said Stand-
land's double play was cru-
cial if the Lady Braves were
to keep Paxton from gaining
momentum and was, in his
view, the defining moment
of the game, paving the way
for a Walton victory.
"I thought that dou-
ble play Shelbie made kind
of stopped their momentum
and flattened them out a lit-
tle bit and pumped us up," he
said. "When we came in the
dugout you could tell there
was a lot more excitement
than there had been, espe-
cially than when we were
down at the beginning."
The Walton/Paxton
game was a numbers game,
and not all of them were
good: though Cosson had
six strikeouts, Paxton's hit-


ters touched on her 13 times
while Paxton's pitcher, Kap-
pi Stewart, had four strike-
outs and four walks but
gave up 14 hits. The batting
department was obviously
much better for both teams,
as Treasa Herndon went
3-for-3 at the plate, followed
by Cosson, who was 2-for-
4. Paxton's Brianna Owens
had two hits, Stewart had
three and Chrissy Currid
turned in four.
Individual scoring was
also good, as Walton's Green
and Cosson accounted for
two runs apiece and Paxton
got three runs out of Katie
Sebastian and two apiece
from Leighanna Miller and
Infinger.
However, the big
numbers of the game were
errors. Though Walton's
four errors trailed the Lady
Cats' by just one jot, the ma-
jority of Paxton's came in the
six-run third inning. Gilbert
said avoiding those kind of
defensive miscues are what
her club will have improve
upon if Paxton hopes to im-
prove its chances to follow
up on the success of past
seasons.
"If we cut down our errors
we win ballgames," Gilbert
said. "We've got to put seven
innings together and we will
before the district tourna-
ment."


Ili .- .4.


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1 rFt .; -. ....



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KAPPI STEWART did her best to hold off Walton's bat-
ters, striking out four, but infield errors ended up costing
Paxton six runs in the third inning. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


Tuesday- March 15
Freeport
PDL


Walton 13
University High, Tenn. 1

Thursday- March 17
Marianna 1
Walton 0

Paxton 15
Kingswood Chr., Ala. 3


South Walton
Cottondale


Friday- March 18
Freeport 2
Northview 0


Paxton
Laurel Hill


Samson, Ala. 12
PDL 2

South Walton 5
Sneads 4

Walton 6
P.C. Bay 3

Saturday- March 19
Kinston, Ala. 7
PDL 2


High School
Softball Scores

Monday- March 14
PDL 7
Paxton 5

Tuesday- March 15
Laurel Hill 10
Paxton 8

Pens. Catholic 4
Walton 3


PDL Softball Defeats Paxton


By PATRICK CASEY
The Ponce de Leon Pi-
rates rallied from a 5-0 defi-
cit after two innings of play
to defeat the Paxton Bobcats
on March 14 by a 7-5 score.
Paxton took a 4-0 lead in
the bottom of the first inning
as the host squad put to-
gether five hits in their first
at-bat with Jessie Oglesby
providing the key hit with
a single that drove in two of
the runs.

The Bobcats added anoth-
er run in the bottom of the
second inning when Leah
Infinger drove in Bethany
Neale with a single for a 5-0
advantage.
Paxton got out of trouble
in the top of the third inning
as a single and a pair of er-


rors loaded the bases for the
Pirates before Bobcats pitch-
er Kappi Stewart coaxed a
ground ball to Neale at third
base to get out of the inning
without any damage.
Fortunes began to turn in
favor of the visiting Pirates
in the top of the fourth in-
ning as the Holmes County
squad sent nine batters to
the plate, scoring four runs
off of three hits and three
errors by the Bobcats in the
field. Sha-Lea Yates stroked
a single that drove in a pair
of runs as she led PDL with
three of their seven hits in
the contest.
Trailing 5-4 heading into
the top of the fifth inning,
the Pirates struck for three
runs to take the lead. Maris-
sa Powell tripled and scored


to tie the game and another
Paxton error combined with
a Yates single gave the Pi-
rates a 7-5 lead.

Powell, who took over on
the mound for Allie Rushing
to start, the fourth inning,
was able to keep the Bobcats
off the scoreboard in four in-
nings of work.
Brianna Owens started
the bottom of the seventh
inning with a single but the
Bobcats could not put any-
thing else together as Pow-
ell retired the next three
batters in order to claim the
victory.
PDL tallied two more
wins during the week as
they defeated Freeport 7-6
and Bethlehem 15-5 to im-
prove to 4-5 on the year.


PONCE DE LEON'S HIL-
LARY HARPER(12) eyes
second base after drawing a
walk in the sixth inning of
the Pirates game with Pax-
ton on March 14. The Pirates
rallied from a 5-0 deficit to
take a 7-5 victory. (Photo by
Patrick Casey)


PDL
Freeport


Thursday- March 17
Baker 8 inn 8
Freeport 4


Holmes Co.
South Walton

Marianna
Walton

PDL
Bethlehem


Friday- March 18
Northview 7
Freeport 0

South Walton 14
Cottondale 4

Walton 9
Paxton 8


PDL PITCHER tAL-RIS
S. POI'ELL(14) picked up
the win in relief o teammate
Allie Rushing as she pitched
the final four Innintgs with-
out giving up a run. (Photo
by Patrick Casey)


PAXTON'S KATIE SEBASTIAN led the field in scoring,
chalking up three runs over the course of the Lady Bobcats'
non-district game against Walton. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


WALTON'S BATTERS spread 14 hits over seven innings
to outlast Paxton 9-8. (Photo by Reid Tucker)

r ~~-~~`""~~~f~ : ... L''' .... -


WaltonOutdoors.com



Your source for the outdoors

in Walton County

and the surrounding area.
.... ... ... . .. .... ... .


^^fc^"
moor_


-MEM



































SOUTH WALTON'S JAY VICE took out Walton's Hunter
Gainey in convincing fashion, claiming the win by an 8-3
margin. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


HUNTER GAINEY and doubles team mate Tray Virgin
turned the tables on South Walton's top-seed team of Tyler
Goodson and Jay Vice by winning the match 8-6. Gainey
lost 8-3 to Vice in singles play. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


THE DeFUNI!
Walton vs. South Walton

tennis results for Tuesday,

March 15

Boys South Walton 5, Walton 2
Singles
1. Tyler Goodson, South Walton, def. Tray Virgin, Wal-
ton, 8-4
2. Jay Vice, South Walton, def. Hunter Gainey, Walton,
8-3
3. Bret Nesbit, South Walton, def. Thomas Brannon,
Walton, 8-4
4. Cole Weinstein, South Walton, def. Hunter Bell, Wal-
ton, 8-2
5. Ravi Abuvala, South Walton, def. Kyle Doggett, Wal-
ton, 8-1

Doubles
1. Virgin/Gainey, Walton, def. Goodson/Vice, South Wal-
ton, 8-6
2. Brannon/Belle, Walton, def. Nesbit/Weinstein, South
Walton, 8-6


2011 track meet results

Freeport track meet results for Thursday, March 17

Girls
Team scores: Graceville 155, 2. Freeport 130, 3. Paxton 59,
4. South Walton 57, 5. Chipley 23, 6. Walton 22, 7. Ponce
De Leon 4
4x800: 1. Graceville, 2. Freeport; 100 hurdles: 1. Brittany
Crittenden (SW), 2. Jessie Harris (SW), 3. Devin (F); 1600:
2. Laura Hayhurst (F); 4x100: 2. Freeport; 400: 1. Brittany
Crittenden (SW), 3. Emily Key (F); 300 hurdles: 1. Court-
ney Job (F), 2. Kelly Evans (P), 3. Prophecy Spaid (F); 800:
3. Holly Urghart (F); 200: 3. Emily Key (F);
3200: 1. Laura Hayhurst (F); 4x400: 1. Freeport; Long
jump: 3. Jessie Harris (SW); Triple jump: 2. Emily Key (F),
3. Prophecy Spaid (F); High jump: 1. Brooklynn (P), 2. Brit-
tany Crittenden (SW), 3. Missy Colins (P); Discus: 1. Bri-
anna Ross (F), 2. Deardre (P)

Boys
Team scores: Graceville 133, 2. Freeport 128, 3. Walton
124, 4. South Walton 38, 5. Paxton 31, 6. Chipley 28, 7.
Bonifay 22
4x800: 2. Freeport; 110 hurdles: 1. Chris Sanders (SW), 2.
Levi Key (F), 3. Bryce Sefo (F); 100: 1. Tray Williams (W);
1600: 2. Terrell Campbell (W); 4x100: 1. Walton;
400: 2. Chris Sanders (SW), 3. Gabe Moore (F); 300 hurdles:
1. Alan Bralotte (F); 800: 2. Terrell Campbell (W); 200: 1.
Corliss Stone (W), 2. Nick Ellington (F), 3. Conona Tarrant
(W); 4x400: 1. Freeport; Long jump: 1. Nick Ellington (F), 3.
Corey Peak (P); Triple jump: 1. Bryce Sefo (F); High jump:
1. Terrell Campbell (W), 2. Conona Tarrant (W), 3. Bryce
Sefo (F); Shot put: 1. Chris Sanders (SW), 2. Nick Ellington
(F); Discus: 1. Chris Sanders (SW)


PAXTON PLACED THIRD as a team with 59 at the meet.
Missy Colins finished third in the girls' high jump. (Photo
by Reid Tucker)


DeFuniak Springs Little

League Teams

2011 Season

Tee-Ball
Ed's Restaurant
Edward Jones
Farm Bureau
First United Methodist
Fisher Pharmacy
Herald Breeze
Prescription Place
SunTrust Bank
Triangle Chevrolet
Walton County Teacher's Federal Credit Union

Pitching Machine
Army Aviation Credit Union
Coastal Palms
Dixie Trucking
Firestone
Florida Transformer
GLMCO
Kiwanis
Rockman's

Minors
AA Auto Salvage
Beef O'Brady's
Brighthouse
JEMCO
Mark Harris Bail Bonds
Smokey J Caf6

Majors
Ace Hardware
National Tire Brokers
Southern Concrete
Stubbs Orthodontics

Softball Pitching Machine
Collins Fire Extinguisher
Colortyme
Genesis
Walton Credit

Softball Minors
Clary Glenn
Doctors Medical
Powerade
Taylor A/C

Softball Majors
Absolute Dance Center
Afterglow
Chautaqua Rehab
Coke
Ramey & Bytell


TRAY VIRGIN came up short against his Seahawk coun-
terpart, Tyler Goodson. The tind played a big role in Vir-
gin's match against Goodsoon and did neither player any
favors in service, but the South Walton player took the win
8-4. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


SEVEN TEAMS participated in the Freeport track meet,
but Graceville swept the competition, scoring 155 points on
the girls' side and 133 points on the boys' side. (Photo by
Reid Tucker)


2011 BASEBALL

STANDINGS


(Through March 20)
CLASS A, DISTRICT 1
District
W L
Paxton 4 0
Bethlehem 3 0
Laurel Hill 2 1
Central 1 2
Poplar Springs 1 3
Rocky Bayou 0 5

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 1
District
W L
Jay 2 0
Baker 4 1
Northview 3 2
Freeport 2 3
Pens. ChristianO 1
PDL 0 4

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 2


P.C. Bozeman
Holmes Co.
South Walton
Vernon
Sneads
Blountstown
Graceville
Cottondale


Overall
W L
7 0
5 3
5 2
2 7


Overall
W L
4 3
8 6
4 6
5 5
2 4
1 7


District Overall
WL WL
6 0 7 7
6 2 8 4
3 2 7 4
4 3 6 6
3 3 3 8
2 5 6 6
1 4 1 9
1 7 5 9


CLASS 3A, DISTRICT 1


School Sports

Calendar

Wednesday- March 23
PDL at P.C. Bozeman Softball 3 p.m.

Thursday- March 24
P.C. Rutherford at Walton Tennis 2:30 p.m.
P.C. Bozeman at Freeport Tennis 3 p.m.
Emerald Coast at Walton Middle School Softball 3:30 p.m.
Emerald Coast at Walton Middle School Baseball 4 p.m.
Freeport at Paxton Softball 4/6 p.m.
PDL Baseball at Malone 4/6 p.m.
Jay at Freeport Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Surfside at Freeport Middle School Softball 5 p.m.
Pensacola Catholic at Walton Softball 5:30 p.m.
Paxton at Walton Baseball 6 p.m.

Friday- March 25
East Hill at Paxton Baseball 4 p.m.
East Hill at Paxton Softball 4 p.m.
South Walton Softball at Sneads 4/6 p.m.
Northview at PDL Baseball 5 p.m.
Northview at PDL Softball 5 p.m.
Vernon at South Walton Baseball 5 p.m.

Saturday- March 26
Walton Middle School Softball Tourney 10 a.m.
Pensacola Christian at Freeport Baseball 12/2 p.m.

Monday- March 28
Cottondale at South Walton Baseball 4 p.m.
Freeport at Paxton Middle School Softball (DH) 4 p.m.
Freeport at Walton JV Baseball 4 p.m.
Holmes County at PDL Softball 4/6 p.m.
PDL Baseball at Bethlehem 6 p.m.

Tuesday- March 29
South Walton Tennis at P.C. Bozeman 3 p.m.
Baker at Paxton Middle School Baseball(DH) 4 p.m.
Freeport at Walton Middle School Baseball 4 p.m.
Freeport at Walton Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Blountstown at South Walton Baseball 4/6 p.m.
Blountstown at South Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
P.C. Bozeman at Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
PDL Softball at Vernon 4/6 p.m.
Bethlehem at Paxton Softball 4:30 p.m.


Pens. Catholic
P.C. Bay
Marianna
Chipley
Walton
P.C. Arnold


District
W L
4 0
4 2
2 2
2 2
2 5
1 4


CLASS A, DISTRICT 1
District
W L
Poplar Springs 4 0
Central 2 1
Laurel Hill 3 2
Rocky Bayou 2 3
Bethlehem 1 3
Paxton 1 4


CLASS 2A,


Jay
Baker
Northview
PDL
Freeport


DISTRICT 1
District
W L
4 0
5 2
4 2
1 3
0 7


CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 2


P.C. Bozeman
Holmes Co.
Vernon
Sneads
South Walton
Blountstown
Graceville
Cottondale

CLASS 3A, DIS


Marianna
P.C. Arnold
Chipley
P.C. Bay
Pen. Catholic
Walton


District
W L
8 1
8 3
6 2
6 3
5 3
2 6
1 8
1 10

STRICT 1


Overall
W L
10 0.
6 4
8 4
5 6
6 6
3 8


Overall
W L
4 0
5 2
3 5
3 5
1 5
2 6


Overall
W L
8 3
10 4
7 7
4 5
1 13


Overall
W L
9 3
11 4
7 2
8 6
5 5
2 9
3 12
1 14


District Overall
W L W L
5 0 13 4
4 1 11 2
3 2 8 6
2 2 3 6
1 5 2 11
0 5 4 6


2010 SOFTBALL

STANDINGS








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011 PAGE 13-B

Sports News and Notes: WMS Baseball Wins Tourney


By PATRICK CASEY
Walton Middle School
(WMS) captured a four-
team baseball tournament
played at Walton High
School on Saturday as they
defeated Chipley Roulhac in
the championship game 7-4
after beating Seaside 13-0
in the opening round. Roul-
hac defeated Emerald Coast
Middle School 15-3 with
ECMS taking the third place
contest with a 12-4 win over
Seaside. Jordan Watkins
was the winning pitcher
against Seaside, throwing
three innings while striking
out four batters. Rasheen
Blackmon had two hits and
six stolen bases in the game.
In the Roulhac contest, Ty-
ler Wood pitched six innings
while striking out six and
allowed only two hits. Tyler
Lawnizack walked once, hit
a triple and had two stolen


bases with two runs scored.
The Warriors hold an 8-3
record and will host Em-
erald Coast Middle School
on Friday at the Wee Care
Park before Freeport Middle
School comes in for a 4 p.m.
game on March 29.
Freeport and Walton bat-
tled to a 3-3 tie after eight
innings of play in middle
school softball competition
last week in Freeport. The
Warriors beat Rocky Bayou
the next day 15-8 to improve
to 5-5-1 on the season. Free-
port is 6-3-1 and will host
Surfside at 5 p.m. on March
24 while WMS will return
to action on the same day
when they host Emerald
Coast Middle School at 3:30
p.m.
The FHSAA has released
their academic team cham-
pions in the winter sports
that concluded last month.


South Walton High School
had their boys basketball
team finish with the fifth
highest GPA in the state
in Class 2A with a 3.3 GPA
while the girls basketball
team was sixth with a 3.6
GPA and the wrestling
squad finished 10th with
a 3.1 GPA. Paxton's boys
basketball team had the top
GPA in Class A with a cu-
mulative 3.6 while the girls
squad finished third with a
3.7 GPA.

Kyler Hall,28, is the new
football coach at Tallahassee
Maclay. The former Florida
State defensive back and
Leon defensive coordina-
tor accepted the position on
Friday to take over for Kez
McCorvey. The school had
more than 60 applicants
and wanted to have some-
one in place by the end of


the week as spring practice
is less than six weeks away
for all Florida schools.
Tallahassee Maclay girls
basketball coach Rapheal
Harris was named the 2A


Coach of the Year by the
Florida Association of Bas-
ketball Coaches in his sec-
ond season at the school.
The Marauders were 25-4
this season as they doubled


their win total from the 2010
season.
Contact Patrick Casey at
The DeFuniak Herald with
your local sports notes at:
heraldsports@aol.com.


THE WALTON MIDDLE SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM swept a pair of games on Satur-
day to capture the four-team tournament they hosted at Walton High School by posting wins
of 13-0 over Seaside and 7-4 ober Chipley Roulhac. (Photo by Cindy Clark)

C ~-: ...$.# / 1 ,


THE IIMS PITCHING
STAFF had a good day
while the offense scored 20
runs in tiro games on Satur-
day. (Photo by Cindy Clark)


WALTON'S ZACH CARTER was nipped at the plate despite a sliding attempt to sneak
around the Panama City Bay catcher in a junior varsity contest played at Walton High
School on Friday afternoon. (Photo by Gary Woodham)


WALTON JV FIRST BASEMAN NATHAN COBB(19)
works to hold a runner on first base during the Braves con-
test with district foe Bay High. (Photo by Gary Woodham)


FREEPORT'S COLLIN MYRICK PICKED up a win last week as the Bulldogs defeated
PDL 11-1 in a district contest. Freeport is 5-5 overall and 2-3 in district play so far this
season. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


FISHER PHARMACY
TEE-BALL PLAYER Aidan
Koons pursues a baseball
during Saturday's Opening
Day game against SunTrust
Bank in the top of the second
inning from the pitcher's
mound. (Photo by Jeremy D.
Smith)


FHS students receive Microsoft


Office Specialist certification


FREEPORT'S CALEB BOWDEN(15) is guarded by
Ponce de Leon first baseman Ethan Merchant(7) during the
Bulldogs 11-1 victory over the Pirates on March 15. (Photo
by Patrick Casey)



Brown graduated


basic training


Air Force Reserve Airman
1st Class Vinson D. Brown
graduated from basic mili-
tary training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San Anto-
nio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week pro-
gram that included train-
ing in military discipline
and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness, and
basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete ba-
sic training earn four credits
toward an associate in ap-
plied science degree through
the Community College of
the Air Force.
He is the son of Vince and
Connie Brown of Clyde


Brown Road, Ponce de Leon,
Fla.
Brown graduated in 2009
from Walton High School,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.


/~L :4


One of the main focuses in
education today is preparing
students to enter the work-
force. In order to accomplish
this, Career Technical Edu-
cation programs throughout
the United States are being
tasked with providing stu-
dents with the certifications


and credentials that poten-
tial employers are seeking.

One of those certifications
is the Microsoft Office Spe-
cialist (MOS) certification.

It is recognized and val-
ued by businesses through-


out the nation. Freeport
High School is proud to an-
nounce that 27 of their stu-
dents took the challenge to
try their hand at becoming
MOS and all 27 succeeded.
These students had to take
and pass three exams cover-
ing Microsoft Word, Power-


Point, and Excel.

Freeport High School is
extremely proud of them
and would like to take this
opportunity to publicly con-
gratulate them on their
hard work and commitment
to their future.


BACK ROW: DAVID GIRALDO, Zeke Wolf, Noah Campbell, Jacob Sherman, James Morgan, Hunter Wilson, Eli Bur-
gess, Hayden Grant, Kareem Mitry, Lee Brackins, J.R. Fannin, Nick DeChristopher, Dalton Bohning. Middle Row: Becky
Jenkins, Trisha McCormick, Amy Smith, Shadia Mitry, Molly Cuchens, Brittany Thomas, Holly Uquhart, Alyssa Duross,
Brianna Ross. Front Row: Makayla Clark, Morgan Autrey, Shelby McCormick, Michael Hoobler, and Daniel Lechner.


VINSOND. BROWN








PAGE 14-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 24,2011

Boys & Girls Club of DFS "Youth of the Year"


Gerald Gladney, a senior
at Walton High School, was
named the 2011 "Youth of the
Year" for the Boys & Girls
Club of DeFuniak Springs.
Gladney was selected from
several outstanding young
people in the local commu-
nity. He is a true example
of an extraordinary young
man who understands the
meaning of having leader-
ship skills, sound character,
and the willingness to give


back to the community.
Being named Youth of the
Year is the highest honor a
Boys & Girls Club member
can receive.

The title recognizes out-
standing contributions to
a member's family, school,
community and Boys &
Girls Club, as well as per-
sonal challenges and obsta-
cles overcome.
"Being recognized as the


Youth of the Year means I
am a valued member of the
club and that I'm working
to achieve my goals. I really
like helping others, espe-
cially the younger kids. I try
to be a positive role model
for them," said Gladney.

Gladney enjoys playing
basketball and attending
programs at the Boys &
Girls Club. He goes to the
Teen Center, because he


loves the positive and fun
atmosphere.
"The club has helped me
go from average grades to
excellent grades in school,
and I have learned that I
can achieve anything in life
if I have the right mindset
and set goals for myself,"
said Gladney. Gladney plans
to attend Northwest Florida
State College (NWFSC) af-
ter graduating this spring
and pursue a degree in Po-


litical Science.
Gladney will share an in-
spiring story about his expe-
rience at The Boys & Girls
Club Steak and Burger din-
ner this Thursday, March 24
at 6 p.m. at the DeFuniak
Springs Community Cen-
ter.

The Boys & Girls Clubs
of the Emerald Coast De-
Funiak Springs Teen Cen-
ter is impacting our local


youth, helping them develop
positive relationships and
discover hidden talents. The
Boys & Girls Clubs of the
Emerald Coast DeFuniak
Springs Teen Center is open
to middle and high school
aged teens.

For membership informa-
tion or to make a donation
to the Teen Center, contact
Unit Director Bobbie Smith
at (850) 892-3752.


Let's Build Something Together'

Prices valid 3/20/11 3/28/11 unless
otherwise noted. While supplies last.


HITACHI


now
*$89 was
89 $97
7-1/4" 15-Amp Circular
Saw with Case #200152


GERALD GLADNEY


$2550
$25s per bundle
Oakridge8 Limited Lifetime Shingles
*slura, iam inrel3 consruction
3 ? so q. n per tunrdle


$4998
*was 5848n
Step2 MailMaster
S Plus Mail Box
#68112


VIA MAIL-IN REBATE
with purchase of $499 or more of in-stock
or Special Order Owens Coming shingles.
US delivenes only and must be within 20
miles of store. Offer valid through 5/9/11.


Snow
$550
was s647
10' Aluminum
Gutter #11551

now was
$7.60 58.94
2" x 3" Aluminum
Downspout #11557


Florida Trail Association

49I events around the South for
1 perpicket March and April 2011:
5/8" x 5-1/2" x 6'
SDog-Ear Pine


SFence Picket
#202922


now

$168
was $188
32" or 36"
Concord
Storm Door
*ScreenAway
retractable screen
included


Saturday, March 26, at 8 a.m. Join the Florida
Trail Association for a 3, 6, or 8 mile hike on Eglin
in the Cimarron section. Eglin recreation permit
required. Details: (850) 682-6098 or http://choc-
taw.floridatrail.org

Saturday, March 26, at 9 a.m. Join the Florida
Trail Association for a 3 to 4- mile hike in Black-
water Forest. Details: (850) 484-0528 or http://
choctaw.floridatrail.org

Friday, April 1, 2011 at 6 p.m. Join the Flor-
ida Trail Association for a dinner hike in Gulf
Breeze. Details: (850) 932-0125 or http://choctaw.
floridatrail.org

Saturday, April 2 Sunday, April 3, 2011 at 1
p.m. Join the Florida Trail Association for a Be-
ginners Backpacking trip near DeFuniak Springs.
Hike three miles Saturday and camp. Hike two
miles on Sunday. Details: (850) 729-0344 or http://
tiny.cc/o01q3

Saturday, April 2 Sunday, April 3, 2011 at
9 a.m. Join the Florida Trail Association for an
easy backpack trip near Navarre. Eglin recreation
permit required. Details: (850) 623-1646 or http://
choctaw.floridatrail.org


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supplies last. 2011 Lowe's Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Lowe's, the gable design and Let's Build Something Together are registered trademarks of LF, LLC.(R
001/7002/016


Sunday, April 3, 2011 at 7 a.m. Join the Florida
Trail Association for an early morning hike near
Milton. Details: (850) 776-5147 or (850) 434-8861
or http://choctaw.floridatrail.org

Saturday, April 9 Sunday, April 10, 2011 at 9
a.m. Join the Florida Trail Association for an 11-
mile lake-to-lake hike between Karick Lake and
Hurricane Lake. Can be done in one day or you
can backpack/camp and do it in two days. Details:
(850) 982-4544 or http://choctaw.floridatrail.org

Sunday, April 10, 2011 at 7 a.m. Join the Flor7
ida Trail Association for an early morning hike
near Milton. Details: (850) 776-5147 or (850) 434-
8861 or http://choctaw.floridatrail.org

Friday, April 15, 2011 Saturday, April 23,
2011 at 7 a.m. Join the Florida Trail Association
for the Panhandle Trace, a series of nine day hikes
from Fort Pickens to the Alabama line north of
Blackwater River State Forest. Do all nine days
or part. Details: (850) 776-5147 or http://choctaw.
floridatrail.org

Sunday, April 17, 2011 at 7 a.m. Join the Flor-
ida Trail Association for an early morning hike
near Navarre. Details: (850) 776-5147 or (850)
434-8861 or http://choctaw.floridatrail.org

Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:30 a.m. Join the
Florida Trail Association for a 10-mile hike near
DeFuniak Springs. Eglin recreation permit re-
quired. Details: (850) 682-6098 or http://tiny.cc/
o01q3

Sunday, April 24, 2011 at 7 a.m. Join the Flor-
ida Trail Association for an early morning hike
near Milton. Details: (850) 776-5147 or (850) 434-
ke 8861 or http://choctaw.floridatrail.org

Tuesday, April 26, 2011 at 6 p.m. Monthly
meeting of the Florida Trail Association at Ed's
Hometown Seafood & Steaks in Niceville. Visi-
tors welcome. Details: (850) 546-1172 or http://
tiny.cc/o01q3

Saturday, April 30, 2011 at 8:30 a.m. Bring
15/11 your canoe or kayak and join the Florida Trail As-
ewhile sociation for a paddle on Juniper Creek in Santa
7002) Rosa County. Details: (850) 484-9111 or http://
choctaw.floridatrail.org


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