<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00375
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Publication Date: 3/17/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
sobekcm - UF00028316_00375
System ID: UF00028316:00375
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Full Text

o010
Library of Florida History 8/1620
. Box 1-17007
201 Sma ,University of Florida
il- FL 326.1!-7007
FL All.\11\111111(1111)(1111111


The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888




HERALD
S* COMBINED WITH THE BREEZE


.-.. .m!9 ,, I
... F" -7r 77


HISTORY
AND
ANTIQUE
CAR
SHOW
Walton
County's
past on
display.
1-B


NUMBERR 11 3 SECTIONS THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2011 75 PER COPY
I ^ d u--, .. NUb 1 3S C IN


INSIDE

TO CLOSE OR
NOT TO CLOSE?
Argyle post office
under study. 11-A




COFFIELD WILL
NOT SEEK
RE-ELECTION
DFS City Council
March 14 meeting.
9-A




"WEDDING
HOUSE"
ORDINANCE
HEARING
RE-SCHEDULED
Will be heard
April 12. 1-C




OPENING DAY FOR
PAXTON DIXIE
YOUTH LEAGUE
Photos of event.
12-B




BRAVES
VICTORIOUS
OVER JAY 7 -1
WHS baseball
improves to 3-4 for
year. 9-B


Over fire department funding


Freeport and


Walton County


at odds


By BEN GRAFTON

At the Freeport Council
meeting of March 8 Mayor
Mickey Marse opened a
discussion about the cost of
fire protection. He said that
Walton County does not pro-
vide its fair share of funding
for Freeport's Fire Depart-
ment which provides pro-
tection to county residents
and businesses outside of
Freeport's city limits. Marse
said that the city's officials
were elected to look after its
money and that they would
not be doing their jobs un-
less the city received a fair
contribution from the coun-
ty. He said that if the county
did not provide a fair share
of the funding, then the city
should draw its Fire Depart-
ment response zone back to
the city limits.
In the general discus-
sion that followed it was
said that of the 125 square
miles,io the. Freeport Fire,.
District, 107 and 1/2 square
miles are outside of the city
limits and although more
than 50 percent of the' calls
answered are to the areas
outside of the city limits the
county's contribution is only
about 35 percent of the cost.
Individual Council mem-
bers said they had tried to
discuss the funding issue
with members of the Board
of County Commissioners
but, they report, the county
is turning a deaf ear to the
problem.
Fire Chief Ben Greenslait
said that he has done a lot
of work on this problem.


He said, "We are growing
and the county is not help-
ing us grow." He also said
that Freeport is the only
city that protects county
property; that Freeport has
invested substantially in
fire hydrants, a feature that
other areas covered by coun-
ty equipment do not have;
and that fire insurance rates
will go up in the previously
covered county areas if the
city draws its area of cover-
age back to the city limits.
Greenslait reported using
electric power meters to
judge the number of custom-
ers that are covered by the
Freeport Fire Department.
Within Freeport there are
some 1,418 power meters
representing customers for
which he says Freeport's
cost is $265 each. Measured
by power meters outside of
Freeport's city limits there
are 3,149 customers for
which he says the 'county
contributes approximately
$65 each.
The Council approved a
motion to notify the county
that if additional funding is
not provided by Sept. 30, the
end of the fiscal year, then
the city will draw its cov-
erage area back to the city
limits.
In other business: Marse
reported that the county
has started work to clear an
area to accommodate two
additional ball fields at the
Sports Complex and that
bids for making the improve-
ments will be reviewed and

See FUNDING 8-A


Juliet Sorensen, Director Aaron S. Williams, Carolyn Kennedy and Kathryn Davies
Clark (RPCV) at the John F. Kennedy Service Awards



Local resident presented with


John F. Kennedy Service Award


On March 5, a DeFuniak
Spring's resident received
one of the most prestigious
awards given for volunteer
service in America. Kathryn
Davies Clark was awarded
the John F. Kennedy Ser-
vice Award. It is only pre-
sented every five years to
six Americans who have
given outstanding service to
the Peace Corps, both home
and abroad. The Herald/
Breeze has been in touch
with Clark for the last few
months, attempting to get
her to speak about her ca-
reer. Clark always directed
the attention back towards
the Special Olympics ath-
letes, and volunteers other
than herself.
The following is an ex-
cerpt from the award's site
and more information on all
the winners can be found at
www.peacecorps.gov/index.
cfm?shell=about.fiftieth.jfk_
awards


Clark served as a Peace
Corps volunteer twice in
Sierra Leone from 1968
to 1969 and in Jamaica
from 1984 to 1987. She has
spent much of her career
with Special Olympics, pro-
moting self-esteem, social
skills, physical fitness, and
increased independence for
people with intellectual dis-
abilities.
After returning from vol-
unteer service in Sierra Le-
one, Clark initially became
an area coordinator for Spe-
cial Olympics in North Car-
olina. When she returned
to the Peace Corps in the
1980s, and at the request
of founding Peace Corps Di-
rector Sargent Shriver, she
became the first volunteer
to launch a Special Olym-
pics-based .service project.
Clark led efforts to establish
Special Olympics programs
in Jamaica, even recruiting
and training the volunteers


who work with athletes.
Noting Clark's success in
Jamaica, Special Olympics
hired her to establish new
programs across the Carib-
bean and Africa.
As director of Caribbean
programs, director of Africa
programs and, currently, di-
rector of athlete leadership,
she laid the groundwork for
43 new programs that serve
more than 100,000 athletes.
Those who are familiar with
her efforts note that she is
still fondly referred to as
"Mother Kathryn" in Africa.
Clark earned degrees in spe-
cial education and a Master
of Social Science from
Syracuse University. Ac-
cording to Clark, "Peace
Corps and Special Olympics
are very similar both work
with volunteers in countries
throughout the world, pro-
moting hope, change, and
fulfillment to everyone they
touch."


WHS BEATS P.C.
ARNOLD 3 -1
Angus Anderson
has "stellar" night
on the mound. 10-B


FLOWER POWER
IN PONCE
PDL woman is
growing variety of
tulips. 12-A



ARTS &
ENTERTAINMENT
5-C

CLASSIFIED 7-C

OUTDOORS 2-C

ARRESTS 10-A


www.defuniakherald.com







o 9 49 22 73172 2


School district/union impasse goes to mediation


By ASHLEYAMASON
The Walton County
School District and teach-
ers' unions, both instruc-
tional and education support
professionals (ESP), have
reached an impasse in ne-
gotiating the 2010-11 collec-
tive bargaining agreement.
Union presidents Trish
Hutchison and Dixie Burge
note three non-negotiable
items for which the unions
are requesting a retroactive
application to July 1, 2010:
a step increase in salary
based on years of experience
for instructors and 30 cents
per hour wage increase for
ESP, paid employee health
insurance for Blue Cross
and Blue Shield plan 5360,
and a guaranteed planning


time. Other contract lan-
guage amendments have
been requested, including a
30-minute duty free lunch
and 15-minute break during
the school day.
When negotiations first
began in 2010, the district
proposed a 3-percent salary
cut while Hutchison pro-
posed a two-step increase
for instructional personnel,
rolling in the previous year's
unpaid step during which
time employees received a
bonus check for half of their
step, and Burge proposed
a 40 cents hourly wage in-
crease for ESP.
The district and unions
compromised; the district
agreed to no salary cuts,
whereas the union reduced


their request to one step in-
crease in salary for instruc-
tors and 30 cents increase
for ESP.
"We want to be paid for
our years of experience,"
Hutchison stated, "which
they haven't done in two
years, for instructional or
ESP."
Vice president of the in-
structional union Jennifer
Nick echoed, "We're not ask-
ing for a raise, we just want
our years of'experience."
Step increases are not
guaranteed contractual-
ly., The district maintains
that it cannot afford to give
employees a salary increase
in light of a possible $3.1 mil-
lion in cuts according to the
governor's proposed budget,


decreased funding in 2011-
12 due to declining prop-
erty values, the end of fed-
eral stimulus dollars which
amounted to $2 million, as
well as the consideration
that the Federal Education
Jobs Funding (EJF) bill will
be part of the district's rev-
enue allocation next year.
The EJF bill, a two-year
grant awarded in 2010 pro-
vided the district just over
$1.3 million, is the basis
upon which Hutchison and
Nick are fighting for a step
increase and Burge is fight-
ing for 30 cents per hour
wage increase. Step increas-
es are approximately $660
per year, except every fifth
year when employees re-
ceive a "bump." From year


UNIONAND DISTRICTREPRESENTATIVES met with mediator Tom Young Tuesday, March 15 in attempt to resolve
the 2010-11 collective bargaining agreement.


5-6, a $1,500 bump in sal-
ary is received. Year 10-11
is a $2,250 bump, and year
15-16 is a $3,000 bump. Ac-
cording to the step schedule,
Hutchison should've been
bumped from a 9 to a 10
and Nick from a 14 to a 15
in the 2010-11 school year
(when bonuses rather than
step increases were given),
entering the 2011-12 year
as steps 11 and 16.
In an interview, Hutchi-
son, Nick and Burge agreed,
"We got [almost] $1.4 mil-
lion of Jobs money that is
supposed to go to salaries,
only salaries, for bringing
back employees who were
laid off or giving raises."
"The bottom line with
this year is that Jobs bill
money...that was given for
salaries. [If the Jobs bill was
not on the table] I would not
feel as strongly about the
[step increase]" Hutchison
said. "[On] the pay scale....
teachers retire at the top
step... [so it] should be fairly
cost neutral to give a step
for your years of experience
because you have people re-
tiring and you have people
shifting on that pay scale."
Regarding the statement
that the EJF funds could
be used only for re-hiring
laid-off employees or giving


See MEDIATION 8-A


'rA.

I-. A


-- -








PAGE 2-A

Tommy Bowden


guest speaker at


Steak & Burger


dinner benefit


Tommy Bowden, former
head football coach of the
Clemson Tigers, and son
of legendary coach Bobby
Bowden, will share his per-
sonal story on what it takes
to be a champion at The Boys
& Girls Club of the Emerald
Coast (BGCEC) DeFuniak
Springs Teen Center's third
annual Steak & Burger Din-
ner on Thursday, March 24
at 6 p.m. at the DeFuniak
Springs Community Center.
Proceeds will support the
annual operating costs of
the Teen Center and corpo-
rate and community spon-
sors are being sought for the
event.

Bowden will share an in-
spiring story of his own life
experiences and the quali-
ties he learned during the
32 years of college coach-
ing. Bowden will also dis-
cuss; the current state of
the family unit, having a
positive attitude and strong
work ethics, and the need
of support systems like The
Boys & Girls Clubs.
The goal of the event is to
raise funds to help the Teen
Center become self-sustain-
ing with the long-term goal
of raising enough capital to


build a facility in DeFuniak
Springs. The current facility
has been graciously provid-
ed by the city of DeFuniak
Springs and the Walton
County Board of County
Commissioners.
One of the successful at-
tributes of Boys & Girls
Clubs models across the
country is their ability to
operate through community
donations and fundraisers.
Each center is responsible
for raising funds to pay for
the operating expenses of
the club, which currently at
the Teen Center consists of
staff salaries.
"This event is an oppor-
tunity to hear the incredible
and inspiring story of Tom-
my Bowden as well as learn
about the inspiring events
taking place daily at the
Teen Center," said David
King, Chairman of the Wal-
ton County Advisory Board
for the DeFuniak Springs
Teen Center and Member
of the Board of Directors for
the Boys & Girls Clubs of the
Emerald Coast. "The event
also coincides with National
Boys & Girls Club Week, we
encourage the community to
come and support our youth
on this evening."


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


*McKee trial


ends in mistrial


The trial of Teresa McKee
for the August 2009 shotgun
killing of Stephanie Lock-
wood ended in a mistrial on
March 11, with the 12-per-
son jury unable to break a
7 5 deadlock, seven vot-
ing for acquittal and five for
conviction on the charge 'of
first-degree murder. Judge
Kelvin Wells declared a mis-
trial after a five-day proceed-
ing. The defense had argued
that someone other than Te-


resa McKee may have com-
mitted the murder, focusing
on McKee's husband Piper,
originally a suspect but nev-
er charged.

The state intends to try
McKee again. The case is
on the March 17 docket, but
the State Attorney's Office
expressed the opinion that
there will likely be some de-
lays before the case is tried
again.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR

AMVETS YARD SALE/FLEA MARKET first Saturday
of each month, vendors wanted. Located at 4776 U.S. 90 W.
For more information, call Lee Owens at (850)419-2455 or
(850)859-2029.


TOMMY BOWDEN


The Teen Center current-
ly has over 100 members on
its roll with approximately
40 kids attending daily af-
ter school. Programs at the
Teen Center are focused on
developing academic skills,
character, and healthy
lifestyles. The Teen Cen-
ter serves middle and high
school aged youth.
Sponsorship opportuni-


ties for the event range from
$2,500 to $500. In-kind
sponsorships and donations
to help pull off a successful
event are also being sought.
If interested in sponsoring
the Steak & Burger Event,
contact Fundraising Chair
Mike Morris at 850)585.1718
or mmorris@chelco.com,
or visit www.bgcec.com for
sponsorship opportunities.


Jane Henderson, M.D.
Gynecology


lane Henderson. M.D. provides care for women from adolescence
to post-menopause at Northwest Florida Women's Senices in
Niceville. Dr. Henderson earned her medical degree from the
Uniersity of Florida College of Medicine and completed her
four-year residency training at the Universiry of South Alabama.
She practiced obstetrics and gynecology for
twenty years and has focused solely on
gynecology for the past ten ears.


JobsPlus announces upcoming Job Fairs


The Workforce Board of
Okaloosa and Walton Coun-
ties and its JobsPlus One-
Stop Career Centers are
pleased to announce two
upcoming job fairs. The first
of the job fairs, the Walton
County Resource & Hiring
Fair, will be held on March
18 at the DeFuniak Springs
Community Center from 9
a.m. 1 p.m. The second job
fair, the 2011 Seasonal Hir-
ing Fair, will be on March
30 at the Emerald Coast
Convention Center (on Oka-


loosa Island) from 9 a.m. 1
p.m.
Both job fairs are free to
the public and individuals
from students to seniors
are invited to attend and
meet with employers hiring
for permanent, part-time
and seasonal openings. Job
seekers are encouraged to
bring resumes and dress
for success to increase their
chances of being hired.
"It is our goal to get as
many people employed as
soon possible," stated Mary


Lou Reed, executive direc-
tor for the Workforce Devel-
opment Board of Okaloosa
and Walton Counties. "By
offering these free job fairs
to job seekers and employ-
ers alike, we are confident
that there will be success-
ful hires resulting from the
event. Job seekers can also
learn about some special
training opportunities that
are currently available."
Space is still available
for additional employers.
If you would like to secure


a table, please call Vincent
Kendrick at 892-8668 ext
236. For more information
on the Hiring Fairs or on the
services JobsPlus One-Stop
Career Centers offer, visit
our website at www.jobsplu-
sonestop.com.
About JobsPlus The
JobsPlus mission is to en-
sure that every citizen has
the opportunity and skills
necessary to engage in
meaningful employment
throughout Okaloosa and
Walton counties, and that
every business has access to
educated, trained, and pre-
pared employees that meet
their needs.


Dr. Henderson understands the
many different stages of a
woman's life.

* Annual wellness exams
* Contraception
* STD tesung and counseling
* Pre-menopause care
* Post-menopause care
* Breast evaluations
* Nutrition and exercise
counseling
* Bone maintenance
and loss prevention
* Hormone replacement
therapy


mm-


thwest lorida


100l 11i st College Bld., SuiteB-1 ANicn ille
(850) 678-1244

www.nwflriawmes0o


JobsPlus BUILD program


graduates first class


On Friday, Feb. 25, the
JobsPlus BUILD program
graduated its first class.
During the five-day inten-
sive seminar the partici-
pants worked with many lo-
cal agencies and companies
to provide pertinent life and
career skills training to the
group.
"This program would not
have been as impactful to
the participants if it were
not for the phenomenal
partnerships with our lo-
cal business and agencies,"
said Mary Lou Reed, Execu-
tive Director of the Work-
force Development Board
of Okaloosa and Walton
counties. "It was because of
these partnerships we were
awarded this opportunity."
During the seminar, the
participants learned about
work ethics, team building,
goal setting, decision mak-
ing, money and financial
management, importance of
health and nutrition, value
of self-worth, how to start
a business and appropriate
work attire. On the final
day, the participants were
able to utilize their training
and completed Mock Inter-
views with local profession-
als.
JobsPlus thanked the fol-
lowing companies that do-
nated their services to make
this seminar a tremendous
success: Walton Career De-
velopment Center's Cosme-
tology Program, Northwest
Florida State College, Op-


portunity Inc., Bank Trust,
Walton County Health De-
partment, University of
Florida Extension Office,
Walton County Support
Services, Small Business
Development Council, Rep-
resentative Brad Drake's
Office and Susan Kiefer.
The Workforce Board
of Okaloosa and Walton
counties and its DeFuniak
Springs JobsPlus One-Stop
Career Center continue to
seek non-custodial parents
to participate in the Job-
sPlus BUILD Program. In-
formation sessions about
the JobsPlus BUILD pro-
gram, as well as many other
training opportunities, will
be held in the JobsPlus of-
fice at 171 N 9th Street, De-
Funiak Springs on Tuesdays
at 10:30 a.m.
To qualify for the pro-
gram, individuals must pass
the following eligibility re-
quirements:
Be able to verify the
right to work in the United
States;
Must be a non-custodial
parent of a child under 18
years of age;
Willing to complete a five
day life skills/work readi-
ness workshop;
Willing to work with a
dedicated Case Manager for
at least six months;
Willing to receive job
support services and follow-
up services for six months
after completion of program
activities.


Bring an identification
card, Social Security card
and if a Veteran, bring your
the DD214 Form. For any
additional information, con-
tact Rebecca Pazik at (850)
892-8668 ext 215.
About JobsPlus The
JobsPlus mission is to en-
sure that every citizen has
the opportunity and skills
necessary to engage in
meaningful employment
throughout Okaloosa and
Walton counties, and that
every business has access to
educated, trained, and pre-
pared employees that meet
their needs.


SDeFuniak Springs City Marshal, elected in 2009
X Formerly served as Assistant City Marshal and
Supervisor in Charge of DeFuniak Springs Police
* 17 years experience in Law Enforcement i
f Master's Degree in Criminal Justice
" Third generation native of DeFuniak Springs B
On April 12, Please Vol Mark A. Weeks
DeFunlak Springs


Mark Weeks


Polwical averisemerI p.3,rj r and appro' ed by
MaIl-. eek nonprbr sa, c n le Ih:,r Cry i1 ,rshal


Your hometown hardware provider

proudly carries YellaWood" brand products.

.... .... ........... .rI.. ....- . ...aW o o d .
Pressure Treated Pine
850-835-4221 e T 850-231-0500
244 E. Main St, Freeport FranksCC.com 113 Logan Lane, Grayton Beach


I I


.e _-

",...'-') =.,
ZPy J








PAGE 3-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


Commissioners lobby


for U.S. 331 expansion


During a trip in March
to Washington D.C. for a
National Association of
Counties Conference, Wal-
ton County Commissioners
Scott Brannon and Sara Co-
mander took the opportunity
to meet with former Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion Secretary Stephanie
Kopelousos on Capitol Hill
to discuss funding options
for the expansion of U.S.
331.
They reviewed current
funding obligations for two
sections north of Highway
20 and stressed the impor-
tance of getting the road
four laned to the state line.
A major topic of discussion
was securing funding for
an additional bridge over
Choctawhatchee Bay to im-
prove hurricane evacuation
times and provide a safer
passage for County citizens
and tourists. Kopelousos
explained several avenues
to stress the importance of
getting the bridge section
four-laned to help Walton
County's objective, and she
added that frequent contact
with local officials is imper-
ative as decisions are being
made in Washington.
According to Comander,
"having the benefit of for-
mer Secretary Kopelousos'
insight and knowledge of
our road issues as she works


with Congressman Mica on
the federal Transportation
Authorization Bill should
put Walton County in a good
position." Mica chairs the
U.S. House Transportation
and Infrastructure Commit-
tee.
While in Washington,
Brannon and Comander at-
tended several seminars on
Workforce and Economic


Development issues; and
heard Attorney General Eric
Holder, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Chairman Admiral Mike
Mullen, Housing and Ur-
ban Development Secretary
Shaun Donovan, and Rep.
John Mica (FL-7) speak to
the conference. They were
also able to meet with Rep.
Jeff Miller to discuss Wal-
ton County issues.


LYLE SEIGLER, SCOTT BRANNON AND SARA CO-
MANDER of Walton County government visited Washing-
ton, D.C. to lobby for expansion of U.S. 331.


DeFuniak Springs Police

awarded new equipment


The DeFuniak Springs
Police received new equip-
ment after attending aLocal
Area Network (LAN) meet-
ing at the Niceville Police
Department on Thursday,
March 3. Local agencies
meet bi-monthly at Local
Area Network (LAN) meet-
ings to discuss local traffic
safety issues which include
implementation of the Flor-
ida Department of Trans-
portation and the National
Highway Traffic Safety Ad-
ministration's traffic safety
initiatives such as "Click it
or Ticket" or Drunk Driv-
ing.
Panhandle Region Law
Enforcement Liaison An-
drew Johnson was conduct-
ing training about the up-
coming "Click it or Ticket"
and Drunk Driving .cam-
paigns for 2011 and covering
law enforcement seatbelt
usage, and the increasing
number of law enforcement
officers killed in crashes. At
the end of the meeting dif-
ferent items that pertained
to 'traffic enforcement were
raffled off to the attending
agencies. The DeFuniak
Springs Police& was awarded
a Pro-Lite+ from Kustom
Signals, Inc.


Pro-Lite+ is a binocular
style, handheld device that
measures both the range
and velocity of selected tar-
gets by laser. It allows an of-
ficer to isolate a single viola-
tor from a group of vehicles,
regardless of size. The Kus-
tom Signals' Pro-Lite+ pro-
vides 1:1 viewing, without


magnification, for precise
targeting and less eyestrain,
and provides' quik' target-
ing and viewing capabilities
for range applications up to
2,000 feet.
This new equipment will
greatly aid the agency in the
future to encourage individ-
uals to drive safely.


COMMISSIONERS COMMANDER AND BRANNON meet with Secretary Kopelousos in
Congressman Mica's office.




Walton's certificate of land use

ordinance hearing continued


Due to an inadvertent er-
ror in publication of the full
legal notice required by state
statutes, the Certificate of
Land Use Compliance Ordi-
nance Public Hearing, origi-
nally scheduled for March
22 will be continued to April
12 by the Walton County
Board of Commissioners.
The purpose, of the hear-
ing is to receive public
input on a proposed ordi-
nance known by many as
the "Wedding House Ordi-
nance" or the "Short Term
Rental Ordinance." It is
actually entitled "An Ordi-
nance Of Walton County,
Florida, Establishing Regu-
lations And Permitting Re-
quirements For Businesses
Located Within The County;
Setting Forth Maximum Oc-
cupancy Rates; Regulating
Parking; Providing Regula-
tions For Short Term Rent-
als; Requiring Posting Of
The Certificate And Fee;
And Providing For Inspec-
tion, Enforcement, Penal-
ties, Severability, And An
Effective Date." This ordi-


nance in various forms and
drafts has been under con-
sideration for some time.
This public hearing will
be held at the Walton County


Courthouse Annex located
at 31 Coastal Centre Blvd.,
Santa Rosa Beach, FL on
Tuesday, April 12, 2011 at
4 p.m. or soon thereafter.


Al j ;
avHUBaUSM"


The Proven Professionals



Naylor

faI REALTY
& Associates Inc.


Bruce Naylor
Owner-Broker


NAYLOR REALTY

Specializes In

Creative Internet Advertising

Strategic Internet Marketing

State of The Art Web Page Platform

At

www.BruceNaylor.com

www.NaylorRealtyUSA.com

Ask about our Personalized
Internet Marketing Plan for your property

850-951-2488


We Can Sell Your Property


NEW


INDOOR



MA


DOWNTOWN DeFUNIAK SPRINGS
Grand Ofaenig rcidac, Apri1 I

Table space for rent to vendors of fresh fruits,
vegetables, plants, flowers & eggs. Organic
welcome! Makers of preserves, relishes,
candles, soaps & specialty foods.
Bakers of breads, cakes & pastries.
Reservations in person at Southebys Antiques
or call 850-892-6292 or 850-419-9286


Kindergarten PREP Night i O
Will Be Held at
First Christian Academy .. .-

First Christian Academy, a division of First Community Schools,
will hold an informative Kindergarten PREP Night at 6:00 PM on
March 31.
The Academy offers a combined four- and five-year-old academic
and biblical program, as well as a sound educational program for
grades 1-6.
Children born on or before September 1, 2006, are eligible for K5,
and children born on or before September 1, 2007, are eligible for
consideration in the K4 academy program for the upcoming school
year.
Parents of future four-year-old and five-year-old kindergarteners
are invited to observe our state-certified and ACSI-certified teachers
during academic instruction. Classroom observations allow parents to
learn more about the Academy and to see teacher-student interaction.
Please call the Academy at 892-2722 to participate in the
Kindergarten PREP Night or to schedule a special visitation time. We
look forward to you sharing with you how we build spiritual strength
and academic excellence in children.


776 Baldwin Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, FL


I, II


--.r

o
o








PAGE 4-A


Editorial Comment

*PERSONAL

COMMENTS

*LETTERS TO

THE EDITOR


Editorial comment



Hey, let's



get



involved



in Libya!

By BRUCE COLLIER

Are two bloody, expensive and drawn-out wars not
enough for you? Well, say no more, we can always get in on
the fight in Libya. Never mind the American lives it would
cost, the billions it would suck out of the economy, and
the new opportunities to sow bad will among people who
couldn't possibly hate us any more. It's a revolution, and
this country was born in revolution.
Direct involvement too much of a strain? Not to worry,
let's just declare Libya a no-fly zone. Some see it as the mili-
tary equivalent of a bartender telling a couple of belliger-
ent drunks to take it outside. However, Defense Secretary
Robert Gates, the guy just below the guy who makes such
decisions, observed that it takes more than shutting a door
or putting up a velvet rope to create a no-fly zone.
Gates said that setting up such a zone (theoretically giv-
ing the Libyans opposing Muammar al-Qaddafi a fighting
chance to complete their task) would first involve destroy-
ing Libyan air defenses. And as your mom might say, those
air defenses aren't going to destroy themselves. So, that
means direct American military (i.e. Air Force) action. Do I
detect the sound of falling dominos?
President Obama is getting advice from every quarter,
including those media sources that are generally uncriti-
cally on his side. The Washington Post, of all papers, sug-
gested that creating a no-fly zone in Libya should be "man-
ageable." No doubt it would be for The Washington Post.
The same newspaper also offered the president the helpful
suggestion that we send arms, trainers and intelligence to
the Libyan rebels. After all, we did that in Vietnam, and
things never got out of hand there, did they? Ben Bradlee
isn't dead, but he must be spinning in his lounge chair at
that. A San Francisco newspaper simply advised we just
kill Qaddafi. This, no doubt, after a heady round of Call of
Duty: Black Ops. Do they want fries' with that order?
Even if we do create (and maintain) a no-fly zone, it will
surely cost American lives, and Qaddafi is not going to stop.
He will keep fighting until killed in battle (not likely) or until
he runs out of supporters and scampers into exile (France,
most likely maybe he can have Baby Doc's old place). The
more we get involved, the less likely it is that whatever
Libyan revolution is underway is going to be anything other
than Afghanistan all over again. Also, just because they're
having a revolution doesn't mean that Thomas Jefferson
and John Adams are waiting in the wings, Bill of Rights in
hand, to make Libya into America-on-the-Mediterranean.
How about a little non-intervention? It would be cer-
tainly be a change of pace. How likely is it to turn out any
worse, with or without us?

QUOTE

"It is easier to run a revolution than a gotv-
ernmen. "

-- Ferdinand Marcos (1917-1989) President
of the Philippines


00 &A.:/


PO. Bx:54

PublisheId weekly evef Thursday




I- S 149-900)

POSTMASTER:Send Form 3579 toTT~T~T
Th D~uia prng HradBrez, n
RO Bo 154


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 17, 2011


74


Editor:
On Feb. 23, President Obama directed attorney general
Eric Holder to stop defending the Defense of Marriage Act
(DOMA), signed into law in 1996 by then-president Bill
Clinton. DOMA defines marriage under federal law as the-
union of one man and one woman. In the wake of President.
Obama's decision, American Family Association president
Tim Wildmon issued the following statement:
"As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama said he was
against homosexual marriage. Many people at the time
suspected he was intentionally being dishonest for political
expediency, because he thought it would hurt his chances to
beat John McCain if he said he was in favor of homosexual
marriage. Now the truth is out. He was lying.
"This sets a dangerous precedent when a president decides
which federal laws his administration will defend and which


Editor:
As a member of the Episcopal Church, I was chagrined-
indeed, somewhat embarrassed- by the large ad in the
lower right corner of [the March 3 Herald's] Church News
and Events page. Why anyone would think this ad would
appeal to any demographic, I don't know, because its su-
perior, smarty-pants tone is an instant turnoff to any dis-
cerning reader. The intellectual elitism implied by this ad
is certainly not a tenet of the Church I have grown to love
over the past 32 years.
St. Agatha's Church has always been humbly grateful
for its many friends of all persuasions and denominations
in DeFuniak Springs. Without them, the first of the month
breakfasts and Lakeside Concert Series would not have


Editor:
I want to express my "thanks" to Chautauqua Rehab
& Nursing Center, all their therapists, medical staff, PA
Trang, Dawn Dries and especially Debbie Manning for the
treatment and kindness shown to my husband Chuck and
myself.


they will not. In essence, this changes our government from
the rule of law to the rule of one man who decides himself
which laws he will enforce and which he will not.
"The Constitution explicitly directs the president, in Ar-
ticle II, Section 3, to 'take Care that the Laws be faithfully
executed.' President Obama took a sacred oath to preserve,
protect and defend the Constitution, and he's not doing it.
He's subverting the Constitution rather than upholding it.
He is in clear violation of his oath of office."
In the book of Genesis, we read that God created Adam
and Eve, not Adam and Steve. I guess if this president
cares not to read the Constitution and abide by it, he surely
would not have taken time to read the Bible.
God Bless America
Sandra McHenry
Ponce de Leon


become the successful and respected outreach events that
they are.
Inquirers who have an interest in what kind of people
most of us Episcopalians strive to be are invited to read
An Outline of the Faith in our Book of Common Prayer.
Among many other things, this Catechism tells us "that all
people are worthy of respect and honor, because all are cre-
ated in the image of God, and all can respond to the love of
God." It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that respect
and honor and love are of more value to our Christian faith
than anything our "intellect" can provide.
Virginia Johnson Woolweaver
DeFuniak Springs


A "thank you" note also to the wonderful medical staff
at Healthmark Regional Medical Center ER unit and ICU
unit and a "God bless you" and thanks to Dr. James Howell
for the kindness and compassion shown to us.


Ellin A. Osborn
DeFuniak Springs


Editor:
I and a few friends attended the Antique Farm show Sat-
urday at the Fair grounds.
We did not know what to expect but we ended up having
a great time. We were looking at the exhibits. The Sheriffs
Department had a display of pictures of all the Sheriffs of
Walton County. Did you know two of them were shot and
killed in the line of duty? Awesome pictures. We met a man
dressed in his Scottish kilt. He shared his history and the
history of the tartan and the kilt. He even told us what was
worn under the kilt. I will let him reveal that secret. He and
his wife.reside in Walton County and she also had on her
tartan colors. They are from two different warring clans but
have found how to live in harmony.
We stopped at the display, to honor the veterans of our
country, that is done by the supervisor of elections office.
They display pictures of our veterans on the walls of the
courthouse. I think he said they now have 700 and are hop-


Dear Citizens,
I want to express my heartfelt thanks for your sup-
port of the Children's Miracle Network and Sacred Heart
Children's Hospital. I am often asked to help with different
types of fundraisers through the year, many of which are
tremendously worthwhile endeavors that need our support.
However few can rise to the level of importance and imme-
diate impact as the work being done at the Sacred Heart
Children's Hospital.
I am so impressed at how many of you answered the
call for assistance [that day]. While Walton County is the
smallest and farthest away of the four county Sheriffs Of-

President/Publisher....Gary Benjamin
Woodham
Editor.....Bruce Collier
Assistant Editor.........Alicia Leonard.
Advertising Sales Manager....... Gary Wood-
ham
Advertising Sales......Jeffrey Powell
Herald Breeze News Staff..Patrick Casey,
Ben Grafton, Chuck Hinson, Dotty Nist, Jef-


ing more people will come forward and honor their heroes.
Check it out.
Some people live history, others make history. We met
the first black man to, serve on the Arlington Honor Guard.
He was there when John F. Kennedy was laid to rest. He
escorted Mrs. Kennedy when John F. Kennedy's body was
moved. He also participated in more moments of history,
it was an honor to shake his hand. He is now a pastor in
Flowersview, Florida.
An old pick up and old car on display...The gentleman
showed us where he rode as a kid cause it was a two seater.
No seatbelts back then.
Lots of tractors....old and new...
We got to share some history Saturday. I hope that more
people will get the chance to share their county's history as
we did.
Barbara Porter
DeFuniak Springs


fices participating [that day], the people of this county out-
raised other county Sheriffs Offices that have three times
the population. The greatest amount previously raised dur-
ing the telethon on a Wednesday was $5,000. [That day] in
a little over 2 hours we helped raise about $20,000.
I am truly touched and honored to play some small
part in assisting. Thank you for helping bail me out and
more importantly thank you for opening hearts. May God
bless you for your kindness.
Sincerely
Michael A. Adkinson Jr.
Sheriff
frey Powell, Leah Stratmann, Reid Tucker,
Ashley Amason.

Herald-Breeze Office Staff....Alisha Brown,
Sandra McHenry, Norma Rediker, Lisa
Windham, Quinton Woodham.
Printing Planit Foreman.....Benjamin Wood-
ham
Pressman.... Nick Harrison


Keep Informed order a subscription by calling 892-3232 or 892-7991
Subcription are $39.00 a year for in-state. $45 a year for out-of-state
*VISA -MASTERCARD-DISCOVER accepted


LETT- ES TO 3 TiE EDITO


ILETTERSn I TO THEDTOR I


eOp&


LETESTOTH DIO


LETTERB^ 3STOsEDiTOR1]nS]^^^


V^^^^S^^^LETTESRS TO HE DITRR'^ W^


I l;O&mzd'o-


&iWfI|pWn






PAGE 5-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


Thrift-Way Supermarket

Thrift-Way Supermarket


March 17- March 23, 2011


* DeFuniak Springs, FL


New York
Strip
Steak
fp. lb. (small 6.49 lb)


Fresh
Fryer
Split Breasts
fp. lb.


Sirloin
Tip Roast


Fresh
Fryer
Drumsticks
lb. fp.


El Monterry
Burritos.........32 oz.399


Zeigler


Bologna..........12 oz.
Zeigler Party Pack
Weiners.........2 lb.


Flanders Beef


P atties................5 lb.


Registers Smoked


Sausage..........40 oz.


$729


Bars Deli Style


$399


Ham..............6 oz.


Kelley
Smoked
Sausage

$2990


Assorted
Pork
Chops

$1990


Bottom
Round
Steak

$2990


Fresh
Ground
Beef

$2390


Fryer
Leg
Quarters
Thurs.-Sat.
$590


$375


Each Additional $10 Food Order,
Super Bonus Buys excluded, entitles you
to your choice of One Super Bonus Buy!
Shur Fresh White
Bread.......................2 oz. $119
Flavorite
M ilk ......................... 299
Flavorite '
Sugar.........................4 bs. $209
Jiff Peanut
Butter.....................8s oz. $169
Super Chill
Soda.......................12 pack299
Shawnee Best
Flour ........................5 lb. $179


Shoppers Value
Ice Creamr ....14ooz.
Flavorite Vegetable
O il ................................. 48 oz.


$499

$169


Flavorite Medium
Eggs ................................. z.89




Shoppers Value
Ice Creama...........140 oz. $549
Totinos


Fresh Frozen
Cut Okra.................32 oz.$229
Totinos
Pizza..,,,,,,................... 9-10 oz.2/$3

OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY
6 A.M. 8 P.M.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
SALE STARTS THURSDAY 8 A.M.
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOS


Palmolive


Liquid.,................20 oz.
Super Chill
Soda..................12 pack
Kelloggs Frosted
Flakes...................14 oz.


Flavorite Tomato
Juice..................................46oz


Homelife Foam
Plates...................................50 ct.
Betty Crocker
H elp ers. ..................................asst


$299
Angel Soft

$349 Tissue

24 roll
$399 $599

Homelife
Charcoal.......................16.6 lb.
Jiff Peanut
B u tte r ................................18oz.
Flavorite
SSyrup.....................................24 oz.


Mclib's
Dumplings......s oz.


Shawnee Best


Flavorite
Vegetables ...14-15 oz. 5 9


Eggs........................ doz.
Bordens Chunk
C h eese. ..........................8oz.
Axelrod
Yogurt........................6-8 oz.
Philadelphia Cream
Cheese.......................... 8oz.


FRS POU


White Seedless
Grapes ..............................b. $

Broccoli.................. bunch
Red


$179

2/$3

2/$5


Poaoe....51. Cabge....b.9


Big 3 Savings Plus One Weekly Specials


* Best Buys Everyday Low Prices Super Bonus Buys


Baby Back
Ribs


VD. lb.


ILI


$329


Flour...................5 lb.


$209


2/$3


Pizza Rolls..........7.5 oz.


Flavorite Medium


$129


$199


699

$199


Pears................................. b.$119


Granny Smith
A pples................................lb.


$129


I


---j


LB, MEAT PACKAGE


DAlIRYDEATMENTW


$899


Cabbage............................ lb. 49


Potatoes........................5 lb.


VISA


$159


$149


$179


$199


$199


c














Greg Majors

Representative






Majors Financial Group, Inc.



1299 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 4


DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433




Office 850-892-9922 Toll Free 866-892-9922


Fax 850-892-4088

Email: GregMajors @planmembersec.com


Representative is registered with and offers only securities and advisory services through PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor, and
member, FINRA/SIPC., 6187 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013, Phone (850) 874-6910. Majors Financial Group, Inc. and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently
owned and operated. PlanMember is not responsible or liable for ancillary products or services offered by Majors Financial Group, Inc. and complete disclaimer.


ii L I


S 1350 West Baldwin Ave.
SDeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
Phone: 850-892-2111
SOutages: 1-800-342-099
www.chelco.com

Conserving energy today
means saving tomorrow.



Greg Majors
Representative

Majors Financial Group, Inc.

1299 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 4
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Office 850-892-9922 Toll Free 866-892-9922
Fax 850-892-4088
Email: GregMajors@planmembersec.com
Representative is registered with and offers only securities and advisory services through
PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor, and
member, FINRA/SIPC., 6187 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013, Phone (850) 874-6910.
Majors Financial Group, Inc. and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently owned
and operated. PlanMember is not responsible or liable for ancillary products or services offered
by Majors Financial Group, Inc. and complete disclaimer.




435 SR 90DeFuniakSprings
435 SR 90 DeFuniak Springs


OFFERING:
Premium Fuels Including Diesel
We Also Have Your Favorite
Beverages, Snacks & More!
I


GOT A/C TROUBLES?
ONE CALL, NO WORRIES.


g hunters

Bge


SPRING IS RIGHT
AROUND THE
CORNER...
Payments begin at $751
(p&i for qualified buyers)


Located behind Walton High School
MOVE IN READY! ~i tR educed $1 39 90
Very Popular Split Floor Plan, 3 '
Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage .
Builder will pay closing, ijt .... --
100% Financing Available V J
to qualified buyers, ""
Call Judy McAnnally with Centurionl Properties
850-830-3237
www.huntersridgeflorida.com


NOW IS THE TIME


1-a' .'


Located at 2243 State Highway 83N, DFS. FL Lic. #CA1814381
Serving North Walton County since 1991.
892-2804


Don't Get

Left In The

Dark....
Advertise Your

Business Here!
GREAT DEALS!
Call For Details 892-3232


Lunch S
#1-9 On
$3.!
Mon.-
includel


i' 11 am-



Hours: Mon.-Thurs.
11 am 9 pm
Fri. & Sat. 11 am 11 pm
Sun. 11 am 9 pm
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


AUTHENTIC
MEXICAN
RESTAURANT
special Daily Specials
Menu MON. 99 Margaritas
99 Tacos
S TUES. 2 for 1 Margaritas
99 WED. $3.00 Off Fajita Dinner
Fri. THURS. $5.00 Athru Lon
Menus
s tea $1.99 Beer Mexican
2 pm & Domestic
FRI. & SAT. 2 for 1 Margaritas
SUN. $2.00 Off Taco Salad
FULL BAR
SPECIALTY DRINKS
1317 Hwy 331 South
DeFuniak Springs, Florida
(850) 951-2175
DAILY HAPPY HOUR 4-7


-UK A
SEASONAL
CHECK-UP
on your
Heating & Cooling
System!


STAYLO R AR ONDmONINiG ELECTI1CAL INC.
p o SALES, SERVICE & INSTALLATION
684 N. 9th St., DeFuniak springs, FL |
S850-892-3955 r rm



rFGUARDIAN
OLNC PEST CONTROL

SCIENTIFIC PEST AND TERMITE CONTROL
NO NEED To empty cabinets
with our Specialized application equipment and techniques

NO ODOR To upset your allergies

BUDDY INFINGER


BLACK CREEK GENERAL STORE
Open early till late 7 days a week *
Fishing tackle and licenses *
Bait-


SQuality Exxon gas, off-road and
on-road diesel *
BKM- ^P


Wknolia Terrace
Assisted Living Facility
A GREAT PLACETO CALL HOME
ALF #10903
SERVICES/AMENITIES:
* 24 Hr. Personal Care Staff
* 3 Scrumptious Meals Daily
* Recreational Activities
*Weekly Housekeeping &
Laundry Services Available
" Fire Sprinkler System
* Intercom System
* Many More Accommodations
5209 Hwy. 331 South DeFuniak Springs, FL 850-892-8348


NOW OPEN
24 Hours A Day
7 Days A Week


Fl .~


mmm


PAGE 6-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2011


4? -, 6


I


yrrr
~spp
I,








PAGE 7-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011

DFSPD investigates city park arson


By REID TUCKER
DeFuniak Springs Police
Department (DFSPD) inves-
tigators have interviewed
one suspect in connection
to last week's vandalism/
arson at Pat Covell Park #2
but are otherwise short on
leads.
The newly refurbished
park, located near Beach-
wood Place on Van Street
in the northeast part of
the city, suffered extensive
damage to both the men's
and women's restroom fa-
cilities on the afternoon of
Tuesday, March 8. Officers
arrived on the scene at ap-
proximately 4:53 p.m. and
soon discovered in the men's
room remnants of a fire that
charred a large spot on one
wall and melted plastic ceil-
ing panels. The vandals also
destroyed the fluorescent
light bulbs and their ceiling
fixtures in the men's room
and tore two wash basins
from the wall of the women's
room.
The ongoing criminal in-
vestigation is headed up by
DFSPD, but the state Fire
Marshal's office was also
called upon to assist with
analyzing evidence recov-
ered from the scene. DFSPD
Lt. David Krika said there
is a 10-day waiting period
before lab-test data on the
evidence will be made avail-
able. Test data should show
whether or not an accelerant
like lighter fluid or gasoline
was used to start the fire as
part of a planned arson or if
the conflagration was start-
ed unintentionally.
Krika said either case is
equally likely but the na-
ture of the vandalism sug-
gests juvenile culprits and
the sole suspect interviewed
was underage, therefore the


Walton Career develop-
ment Center (WCDC) will
host its first annual WCDC
SkillsUSA golf tournament
on March 19, at Blackstone
Golf Course, 108 Blackstone
Lane, Mossy Head. Time
is 8 a.m. for shotgun start.
Cost for entry is $60 per
person, $240 per four-man
team. Cost includes lunch,
goodie bags, soft drinks and
prizes. Range balls will be
provided. Come join the fun
and help raise backing for
SkillsUSA teams to compete
for scholarships at the state
level. All proceeds benefit
this organization.
To register, contact
Tommy Martin, martin@
walton.kl2.fl.us, or call 892-


COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

BINGO EVERY SUN-
DAY at the VFW: Quarter
games at noon; early birds
at 1 p.m. Regular session at
2 p.m. For more information
call (850) 892-3539.


Lr
'^ 7


suspect's name has not been
released. Krika said assis-
tance from the community
is both' vital to solving the
case but is likely to be hard
to come by if it turns out the
vandals are juveniles. For
that reason, Krika, a coor-
dinator with Walton County
Crime Stoppers, said a re-
ward (of up to $1,000) for
information leading to an
arrest has already been is-
sued.
"The unfortunate thing is
that we don't have any solid
leads to work with yet," Kri-
ka said. "We really need the
public to help us because
vandalism like this is a big
concern for us."
Krika added that there
will be an increased police
presence in the area and
investigators "will be knock-
ing on doors" until more
leads surface.
The number-two Park
Covell Park was only this
month opened to the public
after an eight-month reno-
vation project made pos-
sible by a $135,611 Florida
Recreational Development
Assistance Program grant
through the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Pro-
tection. The park includes
a basketball court, baseball
field, playground equipment,
picnic tables and the afore-
mentioned restroom facili-
ties. The near-future plan is
to lay the entire park in sod
as part of the city's continu-
ing commitment to provid-
ing the best possible public
recreation facilities for local
kids and their families, said
Assistant City Manager Bill
Holloway.
"[The park] is all about
the kids," Holloway, who
was visibly upset, said.
"We're just trying to have


1241. Registration forms are
available.


[ Mrc 26 211^
Ell


something nice out here
for the kids. We are under-
standably proud of the work
we do in and for the commu-
nity and when something
like this happens it's really
frustrating. It's like, 'Don't
burn the place down before
we finish building it.'"
Holloway said a spe-
cific figure could not yet be
placed on the damages done
to the restroom facilities but
costs are expected to be in
the multiple thousands of
dollars. Repairs will involve
repainting the burnt wall,


ARSONISTS LIKELY
scorched the wall and melt-
ed the light fixtures and ceil-
ing panels of the men's room
at Pat Covell Park #2 in De-
Funiak Springs on. Tuesday,
March 8. (Photo by Reid
Tucker)


SPONSORED BY
PAXTON
RURITAN CLUB


CHECK-IN TIMES WILL BE MARCH 23, 24, 25
FROM 2-5 PM & DAY OF AUCTION FROM 7-9 AM -
HELP FOR LOADING YOUR PURCHASES
WILL BE THE DAY OF AUCTION ONLY.


AUCTIONEERS: DALE ANDERSON & HENRYALFORD
FEES ARE:
10% Commission / $10 Minimum -
Maximum 'No Sale Fees'
1-4 Items.....$10
5-10 Items...$15
11+ Items......$20
FOR INFORMATION CALL:
BILL McRAE 850-834-3031 or 850-221-6802
BILL PERKINS 850-834-2205
SDATE: Saturday, March 26, 2011
TIME: 10:00 AM Until
PLACE: Paxton, Florida
Sheriffs Substation
on Hwy. 331
ai~-


E 1Univ.imrl I


The Walton Board of County Commissioners is sponsoring a project to collect, recycle, treat, and
properly dispose of these and other household hazardous wastes:
PESTICIDES -.USED OIL STALE GASOLINE -,SOLVENTS FERTILIZERS PAINT -
PAINT THINNERS PAINT STRIPPERS BATTERIES FURNITURE POLISH -
BRAKE FLUID ENGINE DEGREASERS ANTI-FREEZE -
POOL CHEMICALS INSECTICIDES SPOT REMOVERS
Waste tire amnesty will also be held on the same date, during the same hours and locations. Walton
County residents may bring up to 12 tires per residence.
Collection Date: Saturday, March 5, from 8 AM to 12 PM
Locations: Walton County Fairgrounds, Highway 83 North (9th Avenue), DeFuniak Springs
South Walton Mosquito Control Office, County Road 393, Santa Rosa Beach
* No gas cylinders or explosives, please.
* Due to hazardous nature of certain components in home computers, we will be accepting old
computer hardware including processors, monitors, keyboards, printers, scanners, etc.


Conditionall3
acci


y Exempt Small Quantity Generators (small businesses, schools, growers, etc.) will be
apted at a reduced rate. For more information or to schedule a drop off time,
contact the Landfill Department at 892-8180


Soulh 'Jaljn '.lrouno Con lt,.. .


Th
5tc: 2-3,10,17,24:3-3


is service is free and available to residents of Walton County


replacing the melted ceiling
and installing new lights
and plumbing.
Both Krika and Hol-
loway urged the people of
the community to contact
the DeFuniak Springs Po-
lice Department's Criminal
Investigations Division at
(850) 892-8513 with any in-
formation regarding the in-
vestigation. For those who
prefer to submit informa-
tion anonymously, Walton
County Crime Stoppers can
be reached at (877) 718-
TIPS (8477).


THE WOMEN'S RESTROOM was also the victim of ap-
parent vandalism, as two sinks were nearly ripped from the
wall and left to hang by their plumbing. Investigators think
the wash basins may have been jumped on or stomped re-
peatedly. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


THE WIDESPREAD DAMAGE to the ceiling can be eas-
ily seen. Assistant City Manager Bill Holloway said this en-
tire section of the ceiling will have to be replaced at consider-
able cost to the city. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


GEORGE RALPH MILLER
- ATTORNEYS AT LAW -

RUSTON R. SANDERS


24706 Hwy. 331 South
Santa Rosa Beach, FL
(just north of
South Walton Courthouse Annex)
850.267.1764


562 Hwy. 90 East
DeFuniak Springs, FL
(across from
Walton County Courthouse)
850.892.5153


DUI, Criminal, Civil, Personal Injury and allyour legal needs








QUALITY EYE CARE

RIGHT HERE

IN DEFUNIAK SPRINGS





"Darren Payne, M.D. and I would be
privileged to provide all of your
eye care needs in our new
DeFuniak Springs Office."

LEE MULLIS, MD
LEE MULLIS, MD
BOARD CERTIFIED IN HISTORIC DISTRICT
EYE PHYSICIAN & CATARACT
SURGEON DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

746 BALDWIN A VENUE
(850) 892-6100
r ---------------------=====-------ma--------- I
IFREE COMPREHENSIVE

IJ2 EYE EXAM


Call Today! 892-6100
DeFuniak Springs Office. New Patients 59 Years & Older.
I Limited Time Offer. Expires 4/30/2011
L---------------------------------------------J
NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to
pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement of the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.


WCDC SkillsUsa Golf

Tournament March 19


PAXTON
HOME & FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION


I


-i








PAGE 8-A


MEDIATION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-A


salary increases, district
Chief Financial Officer Jim
McCall stated, "That is not
correct." The bill was a
one-time federal provision
to prevent further education
position layoffs and could be
used only for employment
costs such as salaries and
benefits.
McCall explained upon
reception of the EJF funds,
"[The Department of Educa-
tion] strongly indicated to us
from day one, spend these
funds by June 30, [2011],
and the reason they say that
is the federal government is
in such bad shape financially
there is some fear that if you
still have funds left at June
30, 2011 that they can revert
to the federal government...
But at the same time, you
have those words from the
Senator saying this is going
to be considered your next
year money. If you spend it
now you're not going to have
any money next year."
McCall refers to a state-
ment from Senator Alex-
ander on Sept. 14, 2010
at the Legislative Budget
Commission Meeting, in
which he said, "The federal
government has dictated
the terms of this award to
require that these funds be
spent and not held in re-
serve, even though we face
an incredibly challenging
budget outlook in our next
fiscal year, 2011-12. There-


fore, I would like to strongly
suggest that all school dis-
tricts spend these funds as
required, but reserve or set
aside a like amount from
other state or local funds to
be available for the district
in 2011-12...We will take
into account that the school
districts have received this
additional funding."
"In other words," McCall
said, "next year the state
will consider [the $1.3 mil-
lion] as part of our revenue
allocation."
Therefore, the district
used the Jobs bill money to
pay salaries and benefits
this year. Because those sal-
aries and benefits were al-
ready budgeted, it frees up
$1.3 million in the general
operating fund to be rolled
over as part of next year's
fund balance.
"We're going to have a
good number going into this
year, about $4.7 million
fund balance," said McCall,
"but remember next year
your state revenue is go-
ing down, and not only are
local revenues going down
[because of the] tax base,
but we lose the federal pro-
grams...the federal stimulus
money and it's well over $2
million, so that's why you've
got to stockpile all the funds
that you can just to keep as
many employees working
as you can...If you were to
use this money for raises


or to hire new employees or
something like that...then
whatever [the] budget prob-
lem is going to be next year,
and our budget problem is
going to be severe next year,
then it would be $1.3 million
worse than that."
As for employee insur-
ance, the district offers three
plans which escalate in cost.
Plan 328 is the base plan,
plan 5360 the middle grade
option, and plan 3559 the
most expensive option. Pre-
viously, the district offered
only plans 5360 and 3559
and paid 100 percent of the
employee premium on plan
5360. Beginning the 2010-
11 school year, the district
adopted option 328 and pays
100 percent of that plan pre-
mium, $453 per month. The
unions are requesting the
district revert to its past
practice of paying the em-
ployee premium for option
5360, but the district says it
is not financially feasible.
McCall explained, "Our
premiums did not adequate-
ly cover the cost of the insur-
ance and when that happens,
you pay for it the next year.
They just raise your rates
[because] the first thing
they have to do is pay all the
hospital and doctor bills for
anything that comes to them
and those amounts have in-
creased astronomically, not
only in Walton County but
everywhere." As a result,


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


even with the less expensive
option, the district is paying
half-a-million dollars more
for health insurance than it
did the previous year.
A mediation was held
Tuesday, March 15 at the
Walton County School Dis-
trict during which each
party presented its position,
then divided into individual
caucuses. Tom Young, an
attorney who was formerly
the chief negotiator for the
Miami-Dade school district
as well as a school board
member in Leon County
served as mediator. Since
retiring in 2005, Young has
served as special magistrate
in 18 hearings in the past
two years. "There really
isn't a side of this I don't un-
derstand," he said.
During the public portion
of the meeting, at which both
parties shared a table with
Young, the district declared
its position. Chief negotiator
for the district Jerry Cope-
land explained over the past
seven years the district lev-
ied a half-mill and dedicated
that revenue to increasing
employees' salaries. "It was
the intent of the board to
give employees as much as
they could as often as they
could from that revenue," he
said.
From the half-mill, sala-
ries increased an unprec-
edented amount, 30-56 per-
cent. The cumulative cost
of those raises is approxi-
mately $13 million. When
the half-mill was originally


levied before the recession,
it brought in $8 million in
revenue. It currently pro-
vides only $5.6 million, less
than half of the district's an-
nual cost to maintain sala-
ries. "What we've already
put in salaries from the half-
mill is a cumulative cost
more than double what the
half-mill yields" Copeland
said. He added the Walton
County Tax Appraiser has
submitted a report predict-
ing the tax roll will decrease
another 6-10 percent in
the coming year. Copeland
said to maintain the dis-
tirct's current workforce,
programs, and salaries and
benefits with the expected
budget' cuts will leave the
district with a. fund balance
of $445,000 at the end of the
2011-12 school year-far be-
low the 3-percent fund bal-
ance required by the state.
"We're in a position where
giving any increase this year
jeopardizes the fiscal sound-
ness of this school district
and contributes to massive
cuts and/or drastic salary
cuts, or [leaves the district]
where it cannot operate next
year" Copeland closed.
Sandra Butler, execu-
tive director of the Miracle
Strip service unit of the
Florida Education Asso-
ciation, spoke on behalf of
the unions. She noted the
unions' two primary con-
cerns: salary increases and
insurance. There is "distrust
from the unions' perspec-
tive," she said. "We think


the district has money to
pay what we've requested.
It's just that simple."
The parties divided into
individual caucuses to pres-
ent further evidence to
Young. Should the parties
reach agreement, no further
action will be necessary for
the collective bargaining
agreement for the 2010-11
school year. Should the two
parties remain at impasse,
they will go before chosen
magistrate Dr. James W.
Mastriani.
Mastriani will hold an ad-
ministrative hearing known
as a special master hear-
ing. Both sides will pres-
ent evidence to support its
position. After the hearing
is transcribed, each party
will have 30 days to write
a recommended final order,
called a post-hearing brief to
the magistrate. He then has
30 days to issue his decision.
His decision goes to the Wal-
ton County School Board
(WCSB) for adoption or re-
jection. Should the WCSB
reject the magistrate's rec-
ommendation, they impose
their final decision.
Young noted if a date for
the special master hearing
were set immediately, both
parties would be at least 3-4
months from a final deci-
sion.

The DeFuniak-Herald
went to press before media-
tion ended. The outcome will
be reported in next week's
edition.


FUNDING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-A


an award made at the next
regular Council meeting.
Also, it was announced
that the Sports Complex
won the bid to have the Dis-
trict 1 South women's rugby
championships played there
on April 9 and 10. Teams
are expected to come from
all over the South.'
Angie Jay of Preble-Rish
,paid that an e-mail has been


received saying that the
plans and specifications for
the North Bay water main
extension project have fi-
nally been reviewed by the
state level U.S.D.A. Rural
Development office. Jay said
a few comments about the
project were made, but none
of them were of major con-
cern. A reply to the e-mail
will be sent out before the


close of business on March
9.
Jody Solomon of Peters
Municipal Associates re-
ported a meeting to iden-
tify where the Department
of Transportation wants
the city's utility lines to
be moved to accommodate
work to widen U.S. 331. The
information received will be
used to identify any prob-


lems. The main problem is
expected to be wetland is-
sues.
Solomon said the work on
relocating the Bay Loop lift
station is nearing comple-
tion. A punch list of items
to be corrected will go out
to the contractor on March
9. About 5 percent of the
project funds funds will be
withheld until work on the
punch list is complete. Proj-
ect managers will make sure
all systems including radios
are working before releasing


the final payment. Manual
overrides will be put in.
Solomon said the bids
for up-grading the treating
plant are due on March 17.
Presently he is dealing with
minor questions from con-
tractors about the job.
Next week an electrical en-
gineer from Peters Munici-
pal Associates will come to.
check the circuits at the ball
field behind City Hall to see
why the breakers keep trip-
ping.
Marse said that as a part


of the Sheriffs Department
substation work they will
begin tearing down the old
city hall building. The con-
trols located there for the
well need to be moved. Solo-
mon said the plans for the
new control room (a 15 by
18 foot building) are com-
plete and the estimated cost
will be in the neighborhood
of $125,000. Given the es-
timated cost, the project
will be put out for bids. The
Council approved a motion
to proceed with the work.


O'Donnell

Cosmetic Dentistry & Orthodontics

A A TO A M -


- PAINLESS DENTISTRY


- Cosmetic/Smile Make-Overs

- Root Canals

- Implants & Dentures

- Orthodontics
-" 'u r jun-ir iLflri i -,l iel,'ta .i n, 'ijl .Jn.:!


Michael T. O'Donnell
D.M.D., PA


Santa Rosa Beach


T oir. rFr i


DeFuniak Springs
'-:,' I- ri l.-, "... -,


* Routine Obstetrics

* High Risk Obstetrics
* 3D/4D Ultrasound
in Office





As the mother
whether you'

Worn

Ox 870 Ma


* Gynecology
* Infertility

* Preferred Provider for
BCBS of Florida and
Most Insurances


Jennifer Esses, MD
Board Certified OB/GYN
er of two boys, I understand the needs you have,
re pregnant now or planning to be in the future.

ien & Children First
ck Bayou Rd Suite D 729-7344


ADVANCED

PRACTICE

CLINIC, LLC


Have your friends and
neighbors been losing weight?
Maybe they have discovered
our proven weight loss system!
Come by our office or call for more information.

Office Hours
Every Wednesday 8 am 4 pm
Every other Tuesday 10 am 7 pm

cal (850) 892-4441 for more information

New Location:
1299 Hwy. 90 W., Suite 1
DeFuniak Springs
(near Prescription Place)


S I ti(
W i t
Effctv

Safe


ZL I/








/34


Gladly Welcoming New Patients


.. 54


55


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER


* CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY














Dr. James Howell, D.O. Carolyn Lawrence, PAC Robert Knox, PAC Dr. Stacey Temkin, D.O.
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Mon., Wed, Thurs. Mon., Tues., Thurs. Tues., Wed., Thurs.
7:30 am 4 pm 7 am 5:30 pm 7 am- 5:30 pm 7:30 am 4:30 pm
Fri. 7:30 am 2 p.m.





located
21 WEST MAIN STREET, DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL


_


__


M---









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011 PAGE 9-A

DFS City Council: Coffield announces he won't seek re-election


By ASHLEYAMASON
In a brief meeting of the
DeFuniak Springs City
Council on March 14, Curtis
Chastain of Tipton, Marler,
Garner and Chastain CPA
Group presented the an-
nual audit. Chastain noted
the City has $131,000 of
net assets and deemed their
findings an "overall good re-
port." Councilman Wayne
Graham echoed Chastain's
comment and applauded Fi-
nancial Director Sara Bow-
ers.
An additional line tech-
nician was hired, at a cost
of $21,000, to service the
DeFuniak Springs Munici-
pal Airport. The additional
technician provides support


to open the airport seven
days per week, 10 hours
per day, whereas it has
been open only six days per
week, eight hours per day.
Local pilot Terry Dawkins
thanked the Council and
noted an incident in which
he needed to fuel his plane
on a recent Sunday and no
one was available at the air-
port. Fortunately, City Man-
ager Kim Kirby happened to
stop by the airport and was
able to provide Dawkins
fuel. "Had I been in transit,"
he said, "I wouldn't have
been as happy and wouldn't
have left with a very good
impression of our airport."
Huffman added, "Activity
is there, it's picking up...the


airport is the hub of what-
ever happens to us economi-
cally in the future."
The Council renewed a
fire services agreement with
the Florida Department of
Corrections, under which
the DeFuniak Springs Fire
Department agrees to re-
spond with fire suppression
and fire equipment and res-
cue inmates or persons who
may have become entrapped
in Walton Correctional In-
stitution.
The ordinance permitting
property tax exemptions for
new businesses unanimous-
ly passed. Mayor Pro-Tem-
pore James Huffman said
of the 10-year referendum,
"We need to do everything


we can to attract business-
es."
The city approved the
employee of the quarter pro-
gram, which will provide
four employees per year one
day off with pay.
A request to place purple
ribbons on poles throughout
the city, as well as a Relay
for Life banner on U.S. 90
for its yard sale and rodeo
at the Walton County Fair-
grounds the weekend of
April 2 was approved.
Gerald Lang of Pensa-
cola requested permission
to host a dance at the com-
munity center and charge
entrance fees, donating a
portion of such proceeds to
Walton High School. The


COMMUNITY CALENDAR

THE WALTON HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES of 1965-1967
are planning a combined reunion for June 10-11. They plan
to do some charity work in the community on the June 10,
followed by a picnic at the Glendale Memorial Nature Pre-
serve. On the June 11, they hope to have a school tour fol-
lowed by a golf outing (format and type yet to be decided)
with an evening meal/social at a location yet to be deter-
mined. Request the classes of 1965 and 1967 identify a
point of contact to work with Don White at (210)884-9303,
or email afdtwhite@aol.com to make sure the announce-
ment of the combined reunion reaches as many classmates
as possible. Hope you at the reunion. A lot has changed
in 44-46 years.




Rob Garver, MD
Now seeing patients in DeFuniak Springs & Andalusia
Qualincations:
Board Certified in Pulmonary Disease,
and Critical Care Medicine
Professor Wmeritus, VAB School Of Moedine
expertise in:
SShaortness of breath Asthma, COPL
aounas ung aI uunr
Wheeling Lung fibrosis

Now Accepting
Appointments

Call toll free
888-681-8864
More info at
www.seclung.com




"It's Not a Spider Bite"
Private Medical Practice for Individuals with
Chronic Wounds, Abscess or Diabetes

Advanced Practice Clinic, LLC
S Dr. James Howell DO, Medical Director
1299 Highway 90 West, Suite 1, DeFuniak Springs, FL

Appointment & Fax

(850) 892-2138

Accepting New Patients for
Medical Wound Management
&
Prevention of Wounds with
Diabetic Foot Evaluation & Management of Numbness &
Tingling to Prevent Wounds/Amputation

Jill M. Allen ARNP, CWS, FACCWS
Diplomat of American Academy of Wound Management,
Fellow of College of Certified Wound Specialist

Private Clinic By Appointment.
On-Site ALF, Nursing Home & Hospital Consult
Out-Patient Surgical Debridement with Topical Anesthetic,
Wound Matrix & Bio-Synthetic Grafts, Tissue Biopsy for
Definitive Antiobiotic Management,
Diabetic Neuropathic Foot & Chronic Abscess Management
Rx for Home Health and/or Facilities as indicated by exam.


FREEPORT ELEMENTARY WAS awarded as a Bronze Status Model School and' West DeFuniak Elementary was
awarded as a Gold Status Model School.



WC schools awarded as Model Schools


for Positive Behavior Support


Freeport Elementary and
West DeFuniak Elementary
Schools were recognized at
the Walton County School


"No man is an island."
Likely, we've all heard this
famous line from John Don-
ne. At times it, like the bell,
rings more true than others.
As such, a man I've never
known with an. entirely dif-
ferent set of values, ethics,
experiences, and philoso-
phies who sits 14,000 miles
from where I sit has the
power to cancel my summer
vacation.
It may seem a provincial
correlation that a leader in
Libya can affect the global
oil market, therefore in-
creasing the price of gaso-
line, cost of food, airfare-
hence international flights
have increased $200-$500
in cost in recent weeks.
Yet it is that simple.
What happens around the
world is registered right
here in hometown U.S.A.
-a fact history and its ob-
servers have tried to teach
us for centuries. Ralph Wal-
do Emerson made famous
the line "shot heard 'round
the world" in the poem
Concord Hymn referencing
the American Revolution-
ary War. Almost 100 years
later, the same phrase was
coined in Europe in regard
to the assassination of Arch-
duke Franz Ferdinand-
one bullet which eventu-
ally drew nations into the
First World War. Many
of our great-grandfathers
lost their lives because one
man, Gavrilo Princip, who
suffered tuberculosis, saw
membership in the Black
Hand society a useful pur-
pose to his quickly degrad-
ing life. Could those two
mothers ever have known,


District's School Board
meeting on Tuesday, March
1 for being selected by. the
Florida Department of Ed-


Princip's and Ferdinand's,
as they held their babies
in their arms and watched
them grow, that upon their
children's meeting, coun-
tries would collide?
Cause-and-effect is the
physics of our existence,
but just like in high school,
most fail to understand this
principle. (By the way, ever
been called a knuckle-head


,,: ,
lt !,.-/


ucation as 2009-10 Model
Schools for the Positive Be-
havior Support program.
Freeport Elementary was


for bringing home that F in
physics? Note this bit of triv-
ia: the word comes from the
Islamic term naql. mean-
ing without intellect, hence
naql-head.)
Our interconnectedness
is manifest in our language,
our traditions, our economy,
our bloodlines. Donne un-
derstood what some world
leaders still do not -that
a people, a nation, a world
divided against itself can-
not stand. The world carries
on wars over resources and
religious differences and
lines drawn in the sand. As
a result, future generations
will inherit impotent lands,
inadequate policy, and an


awarded as a Bronze Sta-
tus Model School and West
DeFuniak Elementary was
awarded as a Gold Status
Model School.


inane view of global con-
sciousness, assuming there
is anything left to inherit
Despite party affihations.
religious denominations, or
caste associations, we rely
on one another as we are
one other.

Author Isaac Asimov em-
phasized,. "There are no na-
tions! There is only human-
ity. And if we don't come
to understand that right
soon, there will be no na-
tions because there will be
no humanity"-a lesson I
indeed hope Muammar al-
Gaddafi is soon taught, be-
fore he ends more than sum-
mer vacations.


Council denied the request
upon the basis there was no
sponsoring organization.
The Council granted fee
waivers for use of the com-
munity center for a gospel
sing June 11 sponsored by
the tax collector's office to
raise money for the Emerald
Coast Children's Advocacy
Center.
Public hearings were
set for April 25 for Richard
Black and William Deisler,


both pertaining to variance
requests to front yard set-
back requirements.
Closing the meeting,
Councilman James Coffield
announced he will not seek
re-election in April. "It has
been a privilege to serve
the people of DeFuniak
Springs," he said.

The next City Coun-
cil meeting is Mar. 28 at 6
p.m.


Healthmark Hospital & Clinic

WHY WAIT?
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS
WALK-INS WELCOME
* ACCEPTING ADULT & PEDIATRIC PATIENTS


Rob Garver, M.D. John Thomas, M.D. Larry Rafey, PA.-C F. Edward Tenewitz, M.D.
Pulmonology & Surgery & Pediatrics & General Surgeon
Critical Care Family Practice Family Practice


Shyla D. Scott, LPT
Licensed Physical Therapist


You're Invited To Contact Our Healthcare Professionals
At (850) 951-4556 Or Visit
Healthmark Rural Health Clinic, 4415 Hwy. 331 South, DeFuniak Springs, FL
Monday Friday 8:00 am 4:30 pm

MEDICARE & MEDICAID patients welcomed and most insurances accepted.








PAGE 10-A


WALTON COUNTY SHERIFFS REPORT
II I WALTON ll


Walton County Sheriffs
Deputies arrested the fol-
lowing people during the
week ending March 13,
2011:

Nellie Christine Sei-
gler, 38, PDL, FVOP,
John Mark Capobianco,
38, Winter Haven, DUI,
Russell David Fowler,
52, Freeport, Battery do-
mestic,
Donald Charles Hanish,
40, DFS, Burglary of prop-
erty not structure or con-
veyance, theft $300 5,000,
possession of controlled sub-
stance w/o prescription,
Jason Lee Hitchcock,
25, Pensacola, Fugitive,
Merenda Lynd Ma-
gelitz, 45, Crestview, Bat-
tery,
Megan Elizabeth Ma-
haffey, 20, Auburn, Ala.,
Possession of controlled
substance w/o prescription,
poss. of paraphernalia,
Aaron Shane McCull-
ers, 24, Freeport, Theft $300
- 5,000, trespass on property
not structure or conveyance,
property damage $200 -
1,000,
John Daniel Pierce, 20,
Indian Springs, Ala., Giving
false I.D. to LEO,
Niles Roulhac, 21, DFS,
VOP,
Barbara Susan Russell,
54, Andalusia, DUI,
Mason Bradley Scud-
der, 24, Seagrove Beach,
Trespass property not struc-
ture or conveyance,
James David Ward, 41,


Westville, DUI,
Lonnie L. Weeks, 73,
Westville, DUI
Allan Lee Nabors, 37,
DFS, FTA,
SChristopher James
Richard, 25, Crestview, Un-
armed burglary of unoccu-
pied conveyance, petit theft
property $100 300,
S Michelle Charrice
Ward, 42, Freeport, MVOP,
Joseph Roland Thomas,
48, Destin, Worthless checks
x2,
Robert Emery Bartlett,
25, DFS, MVOP,
Mickie Richard Brazile,
26, PDL, Battery by stran-
gulation,
Robert Gage Caden-
head, 20, Crestview, FVOP,
Archie Maurice Chap-
man, 29, Semmes, Ala., Fu-
gitive (out of state),
Casey Daniel Dunn, 28,
Panama City Beach, DUI,
Douglas Alfred Dunni-
gan, 30, SRB, MVOP,
Robert Lee Durham,
30, Violation of domestic
violence injunction,
Bradley Justin Gaio,
42, Springfield, Ill., Disor-
derly intoxication in public
place causing disturbance,
Jason Allen Hamilton,
31, PDL, Possession, manu-
facture, sale of still or liquor,
unlawful possession/sale/
transfer of alcohol beverage
container, poss. of illegal li-
quor under one gallon, poss.
of raw materials,
William Austin Izqui-
erdo, 18, DFS, Possession of
liquor by person under 21,


Tiffany Joleen Jones,
22, Laurel Hill, Possession
of controlled substance w/o
prescription, poss. of mari-
juana 20 grams, poss. of
drug equipment,
Willard Jonathan Lew-
is, 63, DFS, DUI, possession
of illegal substance under
20 grams,
Jessica Donielle Par-
amore, 27, Troy, Ala., FTA,
Robby James Rowles,
19, Samson, MVOP,
Eric Dewayne Russell,
25, DFS, Battery,
Vernon Smith, 27, DFS,
Possession of cocaine, poss.
of controlled substance w/o
prescription,
Austin Godfrey Stucki,
22, DWLSR,
Sara Lynn King, 37,
Panama City, Municipal or-
dinance violation,
Margaret Ann Buckel,
45, Panama City, Worthless
check,
Quinton Lee Chambers,
25, Tallahassee, Sentenced
misdemeanor,
Robert Gregory Ford,
47, Molino, Fla., DWLSR,,
Jansen Holland Infin-
ger, 18, SRB, Criminal mis-
chief, $1,000 or more,
James Richard Mulroy,
31, SRB, Possession and/or
use of drug paraphernalia,
Bonnie Sue Pittman,
51, Navarre, FTA,
Sean Anson Russell, 23,
FWB, Simple battery,
John Damon Williams,
18, SRB, Criminal mischief,
$1,000 or more.


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011

Walton County man arrested


for running illegal still


The Florida Department
of Business and Profession-
al Regulation last week an-
nounced that the Division of
Alcoholic Beverages and To-
bacco (ABT) arrested a Wal-
ton County man for running
an illegal moonshine still.
Jason Allen Hamilton was
operating the moonshine
distillery in his front yard
in Ponce de Leon. Hamil-
ton was arrested after ABT
agents conducted an under-
cover investigation which
led them to discover the ille-
gal still. The Walton County
Sheriffs Office assisted with
the investigation.
Based on their investi-
gation, ABT agents believe


Hamilton, 31, was running
the still over the course of
several months. Hamilton
was also allegedly selling
the homemade moonshine
to other individuals. Agents
executed a search warrant
at Hamilton's home ear-
lier this week and seized
the materials being used to
make the moonshine and to
run the still. Hamilton sur-
rendered to authorities this
morning after learning a
warrant had been issued for
his arrest.
Hamilton is being held at
the Walton County Jail and
faces one count of posses-
sion of moonshine, a second-
degree misdemeanor; and


one count of possession of a
moonshine still, one count of
possession of raw materials,
and one count possession of
containers for moonshine,
all third-degree felonies. If
convicted, he could face up
to 15 years in prison and
$15,000 in fines. The case
will be prosecuted by the
State Attorney's Office in
Walton County.


HAMILTON


DeFUNIA SPRINGS POLICE REPORT


DeFuniak Springs Police
arrested the following peo-
ple during the week ending
March 13, 2011:

Luis Alfredo Hernan-
dez, 21, DFS, Operating mo-
tor vehicle w/o valid DL,
Tim Lafferty, 29, Ad-


dress not given, DWLSR,
STeodulfo Martinez
Nava, 33, DFS, Operating
motor vehicle w/o valid DL,
Andrez Gomez Orozco,
38, Kenner, La., Violation of
non-resident DL exemption,
Thomas Earl Roper, 36,
Mossy Head, DWLSR,


* Mark Matthew Thomp-
son, 22, DFS, MVOP, FVOP,
fleeing and eluding LEO, ob-
struction w/o violence,
Jia Cachafa Holmes,
20, DFS, Child neglect w/o
great bodily harm,
Blaze Celeste Mitchem,
25, PDL, DWLSR.


WALTON COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL CENTER in
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Pet adoption fees are $55., which
includes spay/neuter, heartworm screen, first de worming;
first booster, and rabies. Call (850) 892-8682 or stop in at
365 Triple G Road, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433. Triple G
Road is approximately five miles north of town. Follow SR
- 83N. to CR -1883; then follow the signs to Triple G Road.
Shelter Hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 9
a.m. 5p.m. Wednesday & Saturday: 9 a.m. 12p.m.


I, SAMATHA BROWN,
am on probation for petit
theft.


Crime Stoppers seeks fugitive suspects


Crime Stoppers of Wal-
ton County, Inc. is seeking
information on the
following three suspects
who are wanted as of March
14, 2011.
Jeronimo Bailon is want-
ed for failure to appear in
court on the original charg-
es of felony DUI and felony
driving while license sus-
pended or revoked. Bailon,
41, is a Hispanic male who
is 5 feet 6 inches tall, 170
pounds with black hair and
brown eyes. His last known
address is 206 W. Orange
Ave, DeFuniak Springs.
Raymundo Rexavier Her-
rera is wanted for felony
violation of probation on
the original charge of resist-
ing an officer with violence.
Herrera, 24, is a Hispanic


male who is 5 feet 7 inches
tall, 165 pounds with brown
hair and brown eyes. His
last known address is 5202
Heatherbrook, Harris, Tex-
as.
Christopher Donald
Lundy is wanted for felony
probable cause on the origi-
nal charges of possession of
hallucinogens with intent to
sell/mfg/deliver, possession
of marijuana with intent to
sell/mfg/deliver, producing/
possession of controlled sub-
stance without prescription,
possession of narcotic equip-
ment. Lundy, 26, is a white
male who is 5 feet 11 inches


BAILON


tall, 130 pounds with brown
hair and blue eyes. His
last known address is 43
Cypress Pond Road, Santa
Rosa Beach.
Anyone with any infor-
matioi regarding these fu-
gitives or any other crime, is
asked to call Crime Stoppers
at 1-866-718-TIPS (8477) or
their local law enforcement
office. Callers do not have to
give their name or appear
in court and could be eligi-
ble for a cash reward of up
to $1,000., The information
must be reported through
the tip line and callers must
remember the code num-
ber to be eligible for the re-
ward.


HERRERA


LUNDY


Larry Wayne Cain
P.O. Box 63
Westville, FL 32464

George Paul
1206 Knox Hill Rd
Ponce de Leon, FL 32455


Jason Albert Diblasio
9950 US Hwy98 W Lot98
Miramar Beach, FL 32550

Chad G. Lippoldt
129 McCewen St
Ponce de Leon, FL 32455


Jason Matthew Reynolds
681 Chat Holly Rd
Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459


Pursuant to 98.075 (7) F.S., you are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required
to contact the Supervisor of Elections in Walton County, FL. no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this
publishing to receive information regarding the basis for the potential ineligibility and the procedure to resolve
the matter. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name
will be removed from the statewide voter registration system.
Bobby Beasley, Supervisor of Elections
Walton County, Florida
571 US Highway 90 East
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
#401-11 ltc: 3-17


Walton County 2011

Small Scale Land Use

Amendments


The Walton County Board of County
Commissioners has authorized the advertisement
of the annual 80 acre Small Scale Amendment
application process afforded by Florida Statute,
for which 40 acres of the 80 acres may be offered
to owners of parcels requesting a change in the
Future Land Use Map designation on their
property. Therefore, the timeline and application


procedures


for the


40 acres of


small scale


amendments (parcels of less than 10 acres) that
have been reserved for private property owners
are as follows:


* One page summary applications will be
accepted from March 17. 2011 through noon on
March 31. 2011.
* Drawing to be held at 10:00 a.m. on Monday.
April 4. 2011, in the South Walton Courthouse
Annex.


* Those drawn will
complete application.


have 60 days to


submit


* Any applications not complete at the end of 60
day period will be replaced with applications in the
order in which they were drawn.


The one page application and additional
information will be available on the
Walton County website (www.co. walton.fl.us)


Please be advised accordingly.
#400-11 2tc: 3-17,24


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:


I -








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


Postal Service reps, community members


discuss possible Argyle post office closure


By REID TUCKER
A packed house of con-
cerned Argyle residents
attended a special public
meeting to have their voices
heard in opposition to the
possible shutdown of their
community's post office.
A panel made up of region-
al and local representatives
of the U.S. Postal Service
hosted a two-hour town-hall
style meeting on Tuesday,
March 8, at the DeFuniak
Springs Community Center.
The purpose of the meeting
was to get public input for a
study that could ultimate-
ly influence postal service
headquarters' decision to ei-
ther keep the Argyle post of-
S fice open or close it. To that
end, Post Office Operations
Manager Todd Williams,
who oversees the day-today
workings of post offices from
Pensacola to Jacksonville in
the North Florida District,
asked those in the crowd
to tell the panel what the
Argyle post office means to
their community and to dis-
cuss the effects of closing it
and the advantages of keep-
ing it in operation.
Post Office Review Coor-
dinator Carolyn Kirce, who
kept the notes used to create
the official record to be sub-
mitted to her Postal Service
superiors, said the purpose
of the night's meeting was
not to debate but rather to
compile a list of concerns as
part of the first phase of the
study. In addition to com-
ments made at the meeting,
the study will include de-
tails gleaned from a Postal
Service questionnaire dis-
tributed to Argyle boxhold-
ers. Before opening the floor
to the public, Williams reas-
sured those in attendance
that no decision would be
made at the conclusion of
the meeting and that the re-
sults of the study and the of-
ficial record would be made
available at the Argyle post
office fpr pub4cgresponse fol-
lowing the meeting.
"The approval is not
made at our level, it's made
at the headquarters level
and nothing is being decid-
ed tonight," Williams said.
"This is only a study at this
phase. It takes time. It's not


an overnight process."
The first question asked
of the panel was for an ex-
planation of the reasoning
behind the proposed closure
of the Argyle post office,
which Smith explained came
down to an overall lack of
work to be done. Smith said
the Argyle post office branch
averages only 1.8 hours of
work, which includes retail
transactions, boxing mail
and customer assistance,
per eight-hour day, a fact
he said was "a problem." In
fact, only 93 of the 240 mail
boxes at the Argyle post of-
fice are rented out at this
time. For comparison, the
DeFuniak Springs post of-
fice, where the customer ac-
counts of the Argyle branch
would be transferred if it
closes, handles approxi-
mately 120 hours of work
per week, with 24-33 hours
per day coming from clerks
alone and a combined 16
hours per day between the
postmaster and supervisor.
Smith said 10 other sur-
veys similar to the one con-
cerning Argyle are under-
way throughout the North
Florida District, which is
a reflection of the fact that
the Postal Service has lost
27 billion pieces of mail as
an organization since 2009,
with more than 11 billion
losses expected this year.
With business down across
the country, local post of-
fices in Mossy Head and
Red Bay were both closed
within the last two years,
and those customers have
been absorbed into the De-
Funiak Springs and Argyle
branches, respectively. Even
the influx of the Mossy Head
P.O. boxes accounts for only
15 minutes of the post of-
fice's total daily workload.
Overall lack of mail secu-
rity and the inconvenience
(and increased cost) of trav-
eling to DeFuniak Springs
to collect their mail was the
primary concern of Argyle
residents. Teresa Nelson,
a longtime customer of the
Argyle postal branch, said
her rural box is far enough
away from her home that
large packages such as the
medical supplies she re-
ceives every three months


NORTH FLORIDA DISTRICT POST OFFICE Operations Manager Todd Smith, North Florida District Retail Spe-
cialist Marlena Hopkins, DeFuniak Springs Postmaster Kelly Lanning and Post Office Review Coordinator Carolyn Kirce
made up a panel of U.S. Postal Service representatives who answered questions and took comments from Argyle residents
about a possible closure of the community's post office. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


and regular mail alike were
liable to be stolen or dam-
aged if left by the road.
Furthermore, because she
is unable to drive for long
distances, she would have to
depend on others to get her
mail should it be sent to De-
Funiak Springs.
"I don't feel comfortable
with a rural box," Nelson
said. "I've had the same
P.O. box for 23 years and I
feel very comfortable with
my mail going there. I don't
want the hassle of having to
come all the way into town
because I don't drive that
much. I could drive there
but I could not drive back
home."
Another Argyle resi-
dent, Blythe Gottlieb, said
she personally knows of 10
elderly people in the com-
munity who depend on the
personal assistance they get
from workers at their local
post office in order to send
and receive mail. Gottlieb
said these seniors would
have great difficulty main-
taining a rural box, have no
means of getting to the De-
Funiak Springs post office
or would not be 41, to wait
long in line, something they
almost never have to do at
the Argyle branch.
DeFuniak Springs Post-
master Kelly Lanning said
mail and parcels can-be de-
livered to a customer's door
rather than to a rural box


if hardship delivery crite-
ria are met. Furthermore,
Marlena Hopkins, a retail
specialist in Smith's North
Florida District and herself
a former rural carrier, said
today's rural carriers act
as "post offices on wheels,"
and are more than willing
to give people personal at-
tention just like a post office
clerk would.
"I'm not taking anything
away from rural carriers,
but I still think this popu-
lation will suffer," Gottlieb
said. "I don't think [rural
carriers] have the time to
mail a package, seal a pack-
age, fill out an address or
various clerical things. I
think, in spite of your best
efforts, they will suffer...I
know times are hard right
now, but I think closing [the
Argyle post office] prema-
turely would be a mistake."
Other recommenda-
tions as to ways the Postal
Service could improve the
situation on the ground in-
cluded installing a cluster
mailbox (a "neighborhood
delivery collection box unit"
in Postal Service parlance)
and greater reliance on e-
mail. However, Smith said
it is primarily e-mail that
has put the Postal Service in
the dire straits it is in today.
Along with a generally slow
economic outlook due to the
financial crisis, the Service
lost $7.5 billion in revenues


last year alone and is down
to 532,000 employees com-
pared to more than a million
12 years ago.
As the meeting drew to a
close, Smith said the deci-
sion to close or continue op-
erating the Argyle post of-
fice will ultimately be based
on the amount of work being
done at the site and not spe-
cifically on how much mon-
ey it costs to keep it running
versus how much it could
save to close it.
"People do so many things
online today that in the past
they had to use the post of-
fice for," Smith said. "They
pay their bills over e-mail,
they communicate over e-
mail, they even vote over
e-mail. Not too many people
write letters anymore."
However, one person in
the crowd who most certain-


ly remembers writing let-
ters on a regular basis was
.95-year-old Mace Campbell,
who said he had rented a
P.O. box in Argyle since the
'30s. Campbell had the last
comment of the evening be-
fore the meeting was closed.
"I've had a post office box
in Argyle since 1939 which
was, I imagine, before most
everyone here was born," he
said. "Today I can drive to
the post office but if it's done
away with I couldn't drive
the long distance."
A second meeting allow-
ing the public to comment
on the findings of the study
will be announced within
the next 30 days. After the
official record is compiled it
will be posted at the Argyle
post office for review until
the second meeting con-
venes.


Relay For Life

Fundraiser, March 18


There will be a Relay
For Life Fundraiser at
the Greater Saint Joseph
AME Church located on 117
Graham Ave., DeFuniak
Springs.
GSJ Soul Stirrers in
conjunction with Covenant
Hospice Butterflies are
sponsoring a Spaghetti Din-
ner Friday March 18, from
11 a.m.- 1 p.m.


The plates consist of
spaghetti with meat sauce,
tossed salad, garlic bread,
and pound cake for a $6 do-
nation.
Dine in or carry out
(church fellowship hall) 117
Graham Ave. Delivery of
five or more available.
For more information call
Carolyn Williams at (850)
598-1057.


Alaqua Animal

Refuge's 4th Annual

Canine Carnival is


TRAFFIC WAS STOPPED ON SR-83 on March 4 to clear a two-vehicle accident that left three people injured. (Photo by
Reid Tucker)




Three injured in SR-83 accident


An accident on SR-83 on
March 4 left three DeFuniak
Springs residents injured,
one seriously. Florida High-
way Patrol (FHP) investi-
gating Tpr. E.J. Roberts III
reported that a vehicle was
stopped on the east shoul-
der of SR-83, facing north.
The driver and sole occu-
pant was Lanell C. Brake,
75, of DeFuniak Springs. A
second vehicle was traveling
north on SR-83, occupied by
driver Tina H. Martin, 39,
and passenger Brittany N.
Robertson, 13, both of De-
Funiak Springs.

The FHP report states
that Brake pulled out onto
the roadway in front of Mar-
tin's vehicle. Martin struck
Brake's vehicle on the left
side. Brake was transported
by Air One to Sacred Heart
of Pensacola with serious
injuries. Martin and Rob-
ertson were taken to North
Okaloosa Medical Center


with.minor injuries.
The FHP report says that


all persons were using seat-
belts and .that alcohol was


not a factor. Charges are
listed as pending.


ALL THREE MOTORISTS were treated as a result of an accident on SR-83 on March 4.
(Photo by Reid Tucker)


coming to town


Laissez bon temps roll-
over with Rover at Alaqua
Animal Refuge's 4th An-
nual Canine Carnival, to
be held on Saturday, March
26 at Gulf Place in Santa
Rosa Beach. The date is re-
scheduled from an earlier
date that was canceled due
to weather concerns.
The Mardi Gras-themed,
pet-centric outdoor party
will feature a parade of ac-
tivities for pups and the peo-
ple who love them, including
games for kids and canines,
live music, local vendor
booths, food, a raffle, silent
auction, agility demonstra-
tions and the ever-popular
dachshund races.
"Our focus at Alaqua Ani-
mal Refuge is to save the
lives of abused, homeless
and neglected animals, and
while this is a serious mis-
sion, we still find time every
year to celebrate the joy of
pet companionship with
our Canine Carnival," said
Laurie Hood, president and
founder of Alaqua Animal
Refuge. "This special day,
with its Mardi Gras theme
and more activities then


ever, is about fun for the en-
tire family, including dogs!"
Sponsors for the 2011 Ca-
nine Carnival include Bent-
ley's on the Bay, Coastal
Builders of Northwest Flor-
ida, Gigi's Fabulous Kids
Fashions and Toys, Gulf
Place, Kappy the Clown and
Qantum Communications
with guest emcee Aimee
Shaffer. A $5 donation is
suggested at entry. To learn
more about Alaqua Animal
Refuge's 4th Annual Canine
Carnival, including vendor
booth qualifications, please
call (850) 880-6399.
About Alaqua Animal
Refuge: Alaqua Animal Ref-
uge, an independent, non-
profit organization located
on Florida's Emerald Coast,
advocates the general wel-
fare and humane treatment
of animals by providing
shelter, prevention of pet
overpopulation and adop-
tion services. Currently, up
to 100 animals are adopted
per month from this unique
rescue facility, which serves
as a true refuge for more
than 250 animals at any
given time.


PAGE 11-A







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


A field of dreams


By JEFFREY POWELL
Since she was a little
girl, Ponce De Leon resi-
dent Wanda Grant has
loved everything about the
Netherlands. As a child she
was fascinated with its art,
architecture and especially
the flowers. She has also
longed to visit the country
that seems to be covered in
tulips. Although she has not
been able to make the trip
she has been able to bring a
little of the Netherlands to
northwest Florida.
"My best friend Jan Ver-
haert is from the Nether-
lands and a couple of years
ago he sent me 105 tulip
bulbs from Keukenhof Gar-
dens," said Grant. "Those
did so well he sent me 500


more last year. The tulips
are so beautiful, I love the
way they change through-
out the day. They are truly
amazing."
Planting so many bulbs
has been a learning pro-
cess and a labor of love. In
fact it is so much work she
has depended on her friend
Royce Montgomery to help
her with the planting. Also,
she is getting so much input
from the community that
she decided to start a tulip
photo contest. The photos
will be accepted until April
15, and will hang in her
business, Wanda's Style
Shop. Her customers will
decide upon the winning
image. Each photographer
may enter three photos.
"People have thanked me


for planting the tulips out by
the road," said Grant. "They
have told me they enjoy see-
ing the flowers on the way to
work."
In the future Grant would
like to have her entire back-
yard planted with tulips.
She realizes, of course, that
such an endeavor would be
both labor and cost prohibi-
tive but she can still dream.
"I would love to have my
whole back yard look like
a tulip field in the Nether-
lands," she said. "Perhaps
my dreams will come true.
I may never get to travel to
the Netherlands but I am
going to do my best to see it
here."
Wanda's Style Shop can
be reached by calling (850)
836-5299.


GRANT HAS AT LEAST 10 different varieties of tulips planted outside her home. (Photo
by Jeffrey Powell)


Relay for Life dinner at

Panhandle Opry Mossy Head


A Relay for Life spaghet-
ti dinner will be offered on
Saturday, March 19 at the
Panhandle Opry in Mossy
Head. Included in the $6 do-
nation is a salad, roll, bev-
erage and dessert. Serving
begins at 6:30 p.m. so that
guests may elect to attend
the live country music show
which follows at 7:30 p.m.


for an additional $7.
The Panhandle Opry
which is located at 657 De-
Shazo Road in Mossy Head,
Fla. is known for its clean
family entertainment, with
no alcohol, smoking or pro-
fanity allowed. Located be-
tween DeFuniak Springs
and Crestview, take U.S.


90 to Hinote Road, then
go three miles to DeShazo
Road on the left.
For details on the Relay
for Life spaghetti dinner,
call Tina Potts at (850) 333-
7408. For more information
on the Panhandle Opry, call
Corrine or Gordon Porter at
(850) 892-4050.


SERVED ALL DAY, MARCH 17 Locally owned & Operated!
eas. m 20111!


Supporting our Community,
Always! See Ya at Beef's!


I


PONCE DE LEON RESIDENT Wanda Grant poses next to her tulip garden. (Photo by
Jeffrey Powell)



Pennies for Caring


How much is a penny worth to
you? Would you be willing to share
those stray pennies that are scat-
tered around your house or car if
you knew they would make a differ-
ence in someone's life here in Walton
County?
The Friendship House, Brain Dis-
order Support Foundation is begin-
ning a campaign to collect enough
pennies to "Cover Walton County"
- all 669,440 acres of it. (WOW!
That's a lot of pennies.) We des-
perately need your help. There are
many families in Walton County
who are affected by Alzheimer's Dis-
ease, and many 24/7 Caregivers who
desperately need a few hours relief
from the stress. Every penny collect-
ed will go directly to provide respite
time for an overburdened caregiver.
Collection jugs will be placed in
businesses throughout the county, or


if you cannot find one easily, just call
the Friendship House at (850) 892-
0565 and we will gladly help you. If a
group or an organization would like
to designate an Alzheimer's patient
to be the recipient of their donation.
that is quite acceptable.
Families who have a person diag-
nosed with Alzheimer's Disease, at
whatever stage, and who cannot af-
ford to pay the cost for Respite Care
($45 per day) are invited to apply
for this assistance. The Friendship
House will provide one day per week
for each qualifying family as long as
pennies are available.
Penny collection will continue
through the Countryside Festival /
Spring Fling on March 26, so please
bring those extra pennies with you!

Please search around and share
your pennies for caring.


At Beltone, we don't just talk

about patient care,


From the moment you walk through our doors, Beltone is committed to providing the
finest service. With a 95% patient satisfaction rating and over 70 years of experience,
Beltone is proud to be the most trusted name in Hearing care.

Financial Dangers of Unaddressed Hearing Loss
According to a study published by the Better Hearing Institute, people
with untreated hearing loss lose as much as $30,000 in income annually,
depending on their degree of hearing loss.
Treating hearing loss early is critical for optimal job
performance and career success.
Identifying and addressing your hearing loss can have a positive impact
on your economic circumstances and quality of life.



All 15% OFF
All Beltone Hearing Aid Systems
Call Today! Expires March 30, 2011


SFREE In-office Trial
Hurry! Space is Limited. Expires March 30, 2011.
All participants will receive a FREE comprehensive
hearing analysis. Don't miss this exclusive trial.
Call today! Offer valid on Beltone TrueTM only.



Special Offer

SFREE Hearing Screenings
Call Today! Expires March 30, 2011


-it0
I Beltone
t Iir the world hear better


. Beltone True'" -
Winner of the Prestigious
International CES
Innovations 2011 Design
& Engineering Award**


Crestview 1332 N. Ferdon Blvd. (850) 398-4563
Chipley 1611 Main St. (850) 387-4931
De Funiak Springs 1756 US Hwy. 90 West (850) 307-5183


Benefits of hearing Instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper fit.
Some restrictions may apply. Not to be combined with other offers or previous purchases. Limited time ofer.


PAGE 12-A








PAGE 1-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011



People


BETTIE AND MARIANNE HUSSEY (l-r) display a family collection of Coca-Cola
memorabilia that has deep family ties. Their father, Bert Hussey, started working for the
company in Pensacola in 1939 and then moved the family to DeFuniak Springs in 1941 to
continue working at the bottling plant located here at the time.


IT RUNS LIKE A DEER(E) and still looks pretty snazzy to have been made in 1937.


History, Antiques, and Tractors


CLAY AND BRADEN BAXLEY, father and son, from
Panama City, enjoy a Saturday of sunshine, tractors and
history. Braden has a bird's eye view from his seat.


Story and photos by
ALICIA LEONARD
Young or old, male or fe-
male, resident or visitor, the
2011 Walton County Histo-
ry Fair, Antique Farm Day
and Tractor Pull had a little
something for everyone to
enjoy. Whether getting in-
formed about what and who
shaped this great county,
visiting with vendors, show-
ing off your tractor-pulling
skills or seeing a blast from
the engineering past, the
Walton County Fairgrounds
was ground zero for family


fun this past Saturday.
Story-tellers, amateur
archeologists and residents
recalled though demonstra-
.tion and artifacts the his-
tory of Walton. Machinery,
built to last, demonstrated
craftsmanship from years
past, that can no longer
be found. Artists with the
Walton County Art League
(WCAL) showed off their
talents and encouraged oth-
ers to join their ranks and
learn to express themselves
through many different
mediums. The DeFuniak


''' t:'TL:":1
1.
r;
?


r r!9~


di:'"" 11

a. ~
r


Garden Club encouraged
everyone to give their green
thumb a try. Collectors ex-
hibited treasures carefully
cultivated and stored for fu-
ture generations.
The fun and educational
event was organized by The
Walton County Heritage
Association, Inc., in part-


%VK r


nership with the Walton
County Fair Association,
Inc. To learn more about the
heritage of Walton County
and to help keep it alive, go
to www. WaltonCountyHer-
itage.org

See additional photos and
Tractor pull results 5-B


4;


EDDIE FARRIS AND ANNA LaCour represented the
WCSO with the history of sheriffs in Walton County.


LOCAL HISTORIAN BRENDA REES discusses her display
interested in how Florida was shaped.


..~.~...~~.....
r
" . . .. .... ... .. ... :
( ~ ^ i - - 1 '"'" .^ -I^it- w P --^i--- --,.. ." . .


TOM AVERILL FROM GASKIN, Fla., shows off his historic engine collection. Averill
said his favorite is the 1922 Economy Engine, just because it runs so good.


JAN HANNON AND BARBARA McLellan (l-r) with the Walton County Art League,
encouraged visitors to express themselves in whatever artistic medium they chose.


LADIES DOWN ON THE FARM know how to put it in gear and take care of business as
this one tractor pull contestant showed. She won first place in her class.


?-
"-`
-s


..s
5.: 1.:~..j
. : '"
~~I
'-
~~f ~N.


,P ~

La
i








PAGE 2-B
J .- -I


Douglas andDixie Bur e of DeTuniak Syrin8
are ypeasedto announce the engagement of their
daughter, Mliss Jessica Lynn 'urge to vMr. Mar-
cus Boyd 'Keene qV, son of 'Mir. Mark Keene
of Santa Rosa Beach and Mrs. Lyn Owens of
licevilCe. Jessica is a graduate of Walton q gh
class of2oo004, University of Torida in 2007 an
University of eorgia in 2009 with a Masters in
nutrition, she ispresently employedby Sodexo in
Okaloosa County.

Jessica is the granddaughter of 'Dot and the
late Wilmon Burge of Carrier, Mississippi. Marc
is a 2004 graduate of South Walton qFgh anda
2009 graduate from University of West Florida
with a $B.A in Liberal Arts. qMarc is currently
serving in the U.S. 'Jiavy SpecialCWarfare Com-
batant Crewmen Training, based in Coronado,
Caif. Marc is thegrandson of Mr. anduMrs. ifar-
oldCarpenter of 'DeTunia kSprings and the late
Marcus andAnn 'Keene of DeFuniak Springs.

Jessica and'Marc areplanning afallwedding.




The Winds Of Spring




The winds of spring are a melody
that whispers in the breeze.
Songs of Ireland come to mind
from out across the seas.

The woodlands sing out loud and long
when trees start turning green.
I'm carried back to emerald hills
where Irish hearts are seen.

I can see those eyes a smiling
and hear their laughter too.
With shamrocks and shenanigans
they call to me and you.

Enchanted by the winds of spring
with greening of the land,
a rainbow with a pot of gold
would make my life grand!
By Mary Ann Whiddon


St.


Agatha's


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011
V-: ~~f


Concert Series


Could it be Spring al-
ready, was that a songbird,
or was that a flute? On
Sunday, April 3 at 3 p.m.,
the answer will definitely be
"flute." Actually the entire
flute family, including pic-
colo, concert flute, alto flute,
and bass flute. The Lake-
side, Concert Series at St.
Agatha's Episcopal Church
presents "Flutes Furioso"
of Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC).
The flute ensemble
"Flutes Furioso" was found-
ed in January of 1995 by di-
rector Robin Home, a well-
known Fort Walton Beach
flutist, performer, teacher
and faculty member of
NWFSC. The group is made
op of local flutists, includ-
ing both advanced students


and professional musicians.
They enjoy performing both
popular arrangements and
original works for flute
choir. They also play several
pieces composed specifically
for this group.
Admission to the concert
is free, though a collection
is taken to be used only for
the support of the series. A
reception will be held imme-
diately following the perfor-
mance to provide the audi-
ence an opportunity to meet
the artists. The program, in-
cluding a brief intermission,
will run about one hour. All
are invited to enjoy the mu-
sic and the reception.
St. Agatha's Episcopal
Church is located at 144
Circle Drive in DeFuniak
Springs.


Dear Auntie Em,


A dear friend of mine
is a wonderful person. He
would give you the shirt off
his back if you asked. But,
he seems to have a social
problems that often leaves a
bad impression of him with
others; he interrupts people
when they are speaking. I
don't think he means to do
it. He simply gets excited
and jumps into the conver-
sation.
I understand why he does
it, and I don't let it affect our
friendship. I am concerned
though, that it might hurt
his chances in other social
circles. I don't quite know
what to say to him, or even
if I need to say something.
Any advice?
Wondering in Walton

Dear Wondering,
I can sympathize with you
and your friend, because I
am an interrupter as well. I
thought it best to confess, to
help you maybe understand
your friend's state of mind
and to help you talk with
him.
Often during exciting
mental stimulation, I will
jump in and out of conversa-
tions. My dear friends, who
know and love me, simply
give me a knowing look, and
I pipe down. But you see,
I, as you understand about
your friend, don't mean to
be rude and often think I am
just adding to the conversa-
tion. Others don't see it that
way and I understand that
side as well.
As usual per my advice,
sitting your friend down
and gently explaining your
thoughts on the issue might
be enough to help him be-
come more socially able.
When you attend events
with him and give him the
"look" as my friends do, he
can push his reset button
and wait his turn in the con-
versation. Soon he will be
more self aware and be able
to do it when he is alone in
these situations.
I often remind myself of


970Zirn d


Monday, March 21st 10 am 6pm


BEADS AND SUCH BOUTIQUE
1614 West Highway 90


European Beads & Jewelr
Purses ,
Bags \
Bows /
& Much More!


^,e No Cash to Shop? No PROBLEM!
Bring your old gold and silver jewelry
or coins and get cash in hand!
Highest Prices GUARANTEED!
Call 850.333.7497


Cd




C






k.


4-.


the saying "God gave us two
ears and one mouth, so we
should listen twice as much
as we talk." I think deliv-
ered in the proper way your
friend will understand you
are only trying to help him.
Good luck and God bless.
Auntie Em
Send your letters and
emails to Auntie Em to df-
sherald@gmail.com. or to
P.O. Box 1546, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435


H-appy 3rd

Birthday


B1lake/AUenv
D)ay
From: Daddy, Haieigh,
Bradley, Grandparents,
Corbin, Aunt Amy and
Uncle Danny
^____' -


Bruce and Kim, Collier
announce the birth of their
daughter, Grace Christi-
ana. Grace was born Jan.
24, 2011. Grace was wel-
comed home by her maternal
grandparents Ernest and
Faye Cockcroft of DeFuniak
Springs, aunts and uncles
John and Sheila Hudson of
DeFuniak Springs and Deb-


bie and Donald Coppock
of Bellbrook, Ohio. Grace
was also welcomed home by
her cousins Emma and An-
drew Hudson of DeFuniak
Springs and Drew Coppock
of Bellbrook, Ohio. Paternal
grandparents are the late
Ellis and Dorothy Collier of
Englewood, Ohio.


Miss Freeport 2011


The public is invited to
come and support Miss
Freeport 2011 contestants in
building self-confidence, ed-
ucational and career goals.
A scholarship is awarded to
the crowned contestant.
The event is sponsored by
The Town Planters Society


Now


D


of Freeport since 1996.
Thanks to everyone for
their support in promoting
community spirit, pride and
service.
For additional informa-
tion contact Russ Barley,
chairman at (850) 835-
5200.


you have a choice!










STELLA'S
Florist and Boutique
850-520-4623
downtown DeFuniak Springs
Find us on Facebook and visit our website
wvv~.stellasflorisiandboutique.com

Now Renting Tuxedos For Prom


-- .---. '-


SS:.OFFEE \
oo Ae' ( SHOP
s2 (IS BAC



a ooleHot Chocolate

S$2 o 00


GRACE CHRISTIANA COLLIER


Grace joins


Collier family


5 FREE BEADS
for first
25 Customers!


i


mmm







PAGE 3-B

\ iiiiriM ii Ml


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011
I r,:=


It's not too late to
come find your
perfect Prom Dress!!
If you have missed the fittings, call
Michelle Schack at (850)892-8500 and
they will set up an individual fitting.
There is no cost to participate. Prom is
right around the corner and they still
have a large inventory of around 200
beautiful gowns.


.1'


Connect with us on Facebook
DeFuniak Herald Beach Breeze


Youth ambassadors


visit


Head Start


Recently, Devero Bogart,
Teen Miss DeFuniak Springs
2010, and Alexa Wilkinson,
Junior Miss Walton County
2010, enjoyed sharing time
with the students at the
Walton County Head Start.
Devero and Alexa shared
their love of reading by pre-
senting several children's
books about the uncondi-
tional love of parents and
what friendship means to
children.
The enjoyable visit ended
with a quick photo session
and a healthy snack for the
children. Devero, who has
made an annual visit to
Head Start for the last few
years, said that the experi-
ence is one of her favorites


The Choctaw
Beach
Community
Center
spaghetti
dinner
March 19

The Choctaw Beach Com-
munity Center will have a
spaghetti dinner on March
19, from 4-7 p.m. at the com-
munity center which is lo-
cated on Wateroak Street in
Choctaw Beach. Dinners are
$6 and for more information
call (850) 897-5590.


COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

The 2011 Old Spanish
Trail Beauty Pageant will
be held at 2 p.m. on March
26 at Crestview High School
for girls ages 0-21 years and
boys 0-3 years. Deadline for
entry is March 19. For infor-
mation call (850) 682-6129
or 682-2175 or 974-0220.


as a.youth ambassador be-
cause the Head Start stu-


dents always make her feel doesn't want to be royalty
like a true princess and who for a day?


DEVERO BOGART, the reigning 2010 Teen Miss DeFuniak Springs, and Alexa Wilkin-
son, the former Junior Miss Walton County 2010, pose for a picture with students at the
Tri-County Head Start on Davis Lane.




I Barbara is back! I


WHILE ALEXA WILKINSON LOOKS ON, Devero Bog-
art shares illustrations from a favorite children's book with
the attentive audience at Head Start.




to all

ATTEnDEES

SPONSORS

SUPPLIER

WAITOn HIGH1 and

SCHOOL DISTRICT

CITYOr

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

EXTEnSIOn OFFICE



Staff andc amiies


I VuWYE T-M
AM 3A pm )


Does anyone know this

"Mail" Man?

Years come ...
Years go...
"Wish I could ... !

Room service!
Corn cobs please!

Happy Birthday!
David


TIERLE nORmI n Studio
Winn Dixie Shopping Center
DeFuniak Springs, FL 892-3011
1i __ -


*a ) *
O000000









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


*Growing Wrth America'


OTR


NATIONAL
TIRE
BROKERS
CORP
829 Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Tires, Brakes,
Alignments & Auto Service
850-892-5191
1-800-252-2888


TAYLOR PAn


Air Conditioning & Electrical Incorporated

Sales, Service & Installation
(850) 892-3955


684 North 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433


DANNY TAYLOR
President


The DeFuniak Springs

Herald-Breeze

your source for local news!

Published Weekly On Thursdays


850-892-3232


1A


I MO EN* 556 S


TAYLORS A/C & ELECTRIC, INC.
LIC'S RM0048225
RG00048207-ER00015 892-3955
AMERICAN AIR SYSTEMS LLC
Reliability, Comfort & Performance.
LIC. RA0064836 892-2804
....................................-------------------
POLAR CAPS AIR CONDITIONING
AND HEATING SERVICES
LIC# RA0066940 850-834-5075


PLATES APPLIANCE REPAIR
4410 US HWY 90W
892-4670
....................................................--
RON'S APPLIANCE
REPAIR AND PARTS
CALL 850-689-1007 OR 850-305-8515


MAGNOLIA TERRACE ASSIST. LIVING
5209 HWY 331 S, DeFUNIAK
850-892-8348 ALF#10903


REV. PA. EVANS ASTROLOGER
Spiritual Consultations, Astrological
Charts, Readings. Call 850-892-3217


BRYANS USED CARS
1133 HWY 90W DFS
DEWITT BRYAN 892-7148


SLAY'S SALVAGE PAYS CASH FOR
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & SCRAP
METAL. 850-956-2870
(pd thru 5/11/10


NATIONAL TIRE BROKERS
829 HWY. 90 WEST, DFS
892-5191
.....................................................
ROCKMAN'S AUTO CENTER
WRECKER SERVICE
BEHIND SUBWAY 892-5015


RANDELS BARBER SHOP
US HWY 83 DFS
892-1011 (tn)


RV SITE,
WATER, ELECTRIC, SEWER, CABLE
892-7229


HICKS' CARPET CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
892-2623


OKALOOSA WALTON CHILD CARE
HRS & UNITED WAY
892-8560


QUALITY WORK
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
850-956-2213
(pd thru 2/19111)
ABLE CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS
Replacement Patios, Stamp Concrete,
Different Types Of Pavers, Bobcat,
* Military/Senior Discounts, LICENSED
AND INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA 461-6733

U S
Construction WE SPECIALIZE IN
SMALLER JOBS. HAULING, BACKHOE
WORK, DRIVES. ETC. LAWRENCE & SON
892-3873
ADDITIONS, REMODELING &
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, PAINTING,
DRYWALL, SIDING & WOOD ROT
850-685-7008
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
(PD THRU 1/2/11)
-------------------.----------.----.------------------
BEST RATES!
Need New Roof, Home Remodel, or
New Construction. Call Paul Rushing.
We do the work, you reap the rewards.
Licensed & Insured in Florida
Call (850) 401-1537 or (850) 892-3334
......................................................
PALM CONSTRUCTION CO. OF
WEST FL. NEW CONSTRUCTION,
ADDITIONS, REMODELS, DOOR &
WINDOW REPLACEMENTS, POLE
BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, No Job
Too Small. 850-259-0398 CGC1508332


HARPER DAY CARE
OPENING FOR INFANT PRESCHOOL
CALL 892-3985
(Pd thru 4/10/11)
Disb-lt-er


BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326


FIREWOOD FOR SALE U PICK UP
OR WE DELIVER. 850-401-4478
OR 850-685-0916


WOOD, CARPET, TILE.
REPAIR, INSTALLATION 30YEARS
EXPERIENCE. 865-2524 (12-8-ip)


D.S. HANDYMAN SERVICE
CALL 419-4519
ANYTIME (ic)
......................-------------------------------.
35YEARS
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE
850-956-2213. HURRICANE REPAIRS.
(PD THRU 2'19/11)
.....................--------------------------------.
JOE'S HANDYMAN AND YARD
SERVICE: Call me first, "I do it all!"
Home: 850-401-3695 Cell: 850-419-1869


VANN CARPENTRY & HOME REPAIR:
BIG & SMALL JOBS, MOBILE HOME
REPAIR, ADD ONS, PATIOS/
PORHCES. LIC. & INS.
892-9467
H useke*e Sn
HOUSEKEEPING DAILY, WEEKLY, AND
DEEP CLEANING. CALL
SUSIE WILLIAMS 850-259-0404


C&C LANDSCAPING LLC




RODNEY'S LAWN SERVICE.Total lawn
maintenance. Serving Walton Co. over
10 years. 850-974-6972, 850-834-3925
JOHNSON'S LAWN SERVICE
GENERAL CLEAN UP/REASONABLE
CELL: 259-6318 PH: (850) 834-2200
.....................................................


NEW & USED BOOKS TRADE-INS SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS M&M LAWN CARE. Free Quotes &
DOWNTOWN ON BALDWIN & 6TH HANDLED APPEALS EXPERTS Reasonable Rates For Residential
850-401-4482/850-419-0014
TUES.-SAT. 10-5, 892-3119 DISABILITY CONSULT. (850) 835-2163 .......................


BEAR CREEK CREATIVE SERVICES
Landscaping, Lawn Maint., Tractor Work,
Land Clearing, Fencing, Lic. & Ins.
892-4423 QR 865-2848
----------------------------------------
D.S. LAWN CARE
FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE &
PRESSURE WASHING. 850-419-4519.
(Vc)
-----------------------------------------------------
REASONABLE RATES LAWN CARE
YEAR AFTER YEAR FOR ALL
YOUR LAWN CARE NEEDS.
FREE ESTIMATES CALL RUSTY
(CELL) 850-546-0011
(HOME) 850-834-3141
(PDTHRU 6/10/11)


SUNBELT CREDIT
LOANS FOR ANY REASON
850-892-9504 (CTFN)


MOBILE/RV LOTS FOR RENT
WATER, GARBAGE PICK-UP
892-2157 (205) 441-0464 (t#c)


BEST RATES!
STOR-RITE MINI STORAGE
1599 83 N, DFS, FL
Behind Roehm Pre-School
Free lock with rental
Call (850) 892-3334 or (850) 830-8868
(CTFN)
THARP & SONS MINI STORAGE
HWY. 90 & NORWOOD
892-6035 4 HOUR SERVICE (CTFN)
A-1i MINI STORAGE
1154 US HWY 90 W
DFS (850) 892-4677 (CTFN)
..................--.................................



SUNDOWN INN
NEWLY RENOVATED ACROSS FROM
WAL-MART (850) 892-9647 DFS


JEMCO PLASTERING INC.
892-5524
QUALITY IS OUR GOAL



FANCY NAILS 10YRS EXPERIENCE
NAIL & TOE GET A FREE EYEBROW
WAX. FRENCH TIP WITH GEL $35 -
NOW $25. EYEBROW WAXING/
PEDICURE CHAIR 931 US HWY 331
(850) 892-0466 M-SAT. 9-7


LANGLEY'S OFFICE SUPPLY
1027 S. 19TH STREET
892-9776


BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299
(PDTHRUa 11)



JOHN DANILOW, BROKER
http://www.johndanilow.com
(850) 217-8104 (ie)



SOUTHERN ROOFING
ALL TYPES RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
LIC.#CCC058016 956-4325
ROOFING: NEW ROOF, REROOF &
REPAIRS. SHINGLES AND METAL.
CCC1327250 CALL 850-685-7008



AA AUTO SALVAGE
442 CTY HWY 1087
MOSSY HEAD 850-892-3256


WINDHAM SEPTIC SERVICE, INC.
67 JOE CAMPBELL'RD;
835-3356
-----------------'"------------ ----------
ARNETT SEPTIC
LOCATED AT 1101 HWY 90 W
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS (noc


BONDS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
(850) 951-1118
Hot Water Hydro Jetting, Drain Snaking,
Video Pipe Inspection, Plumbing Repair
FL State Cert. Plumbing Contractors
Lic.# CFC1427405/CFC026554
(pdthru 5/2910-dc )


ALL'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
REPAIRS-TUNE-UPS.OVERHAULS
FREE Pickup & Delivery 850-892-7887


MAKE YOUR EVENT SPECIAL
HIRE THE LIL'TROLLEY"
CALL (850) 865-7050 FOR PRICES


STUCCO, PLASTERING, STONE,
DRYWALL REPAIRS.
850-956-2213
(PDTHRU 2/19/11)


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326
......................................................
VOELKER SURVEYING, LLC
Santa Rosa Beach 622-1610
DeFuniak Springs 892-2410
(CTFN)
FULL SCOPE SURVEYING, LLC
DOUG MEEKER, PSM
FREEPORT 850-880-6215
(PDTHRU 7/20/11)


DeFUNIAK TAX: 24 HOUR SERVICE
SMOKE-FREE TAXI FAIR PRICE
PROMPT SERVICE 419-0773
(pd thru 4-10-11)


McDONALD TREE SERVICE
BUCKET TRUCK & STUMP GRINDING
LIC. & INS. (850) 892-7380
..--..................................................
BARBER'S TREE SERVICE: FREE
ESTIMATES, LIC. WILL BEAT ANY
REASONABLE PRICE. 850-956-2676
TOLL-FREE 1-866-848-6651
(CTFN)


THOMAS JOHNSON TRAPPING LLC
WILDLIFE ANIMAL CONTROL
850-585-5486
(PDTHRU4/27/11)


ADVERTISE HERE!

892-3232


* 3 Lines $10 per month 892-3232


Walamn (CQunty


e DeFuniak Springs Herald



& The Beach*Breeze




with offices located in both


North & South Walton


The DeFuniak Springs Herald

740 Baldwin Avenue

DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435

(850) 892-3232

Fax: 892-2270
E-mail: dfsherald


The Beach Breeze


4401 Hwy. 98 East

Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459

(850) 231-0918

Fax: 231-0928


,com


PAGE 8-B


~9~6~











THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


Sports


S.W. Baseball Nips
Port St. Joe 5-4
10B


*1


PAGE 9-B

.-Jie Yeuth League
bpoto s

;. :. .
............................: ...:......- "


Walton Baseball Defeats Jay 7-1


By PATRICK CASEY
The Walton Braves de-
feated the Jay Royals on
March 7 by a 7-1 score as the
Braves hit three home runs
in the contest to improve to
3-4 on the year.
Jay took the lead in the
top of the first inning as an
error led to an early run for
the Royals as Kevin Stanton


scored on a single by team-
mate Tyler Prescott. The
Braves got out of the inning
without further damage as
Payden Roberts was gunned
down trying to go to third
base on Prescott's hit.
Walton responded imme-
diately as an error allowed
Chris Murphy to reach first
on a strikeout. Brendan


Leach drew a walk after
Angus Anderson hit into a
force play at second base.
Rightfielder Brandon Hol-
lingsworth then deposited
a 2-2 pitch onto the tennis
courts behind the leftfield
fence for a three-run homer
to give the Braves the lead.
That was all the run sup-
port Walton would need as


sophomore starter Brennan
Orcutt pitched seven in-
nings, striking out 11 bat-
ters while allowing no walks.
Orcutt allowed only five hits
while throwing 83 pitches in
capturing the varsity win.
The Braves put four more
runs on the scoreboard in the
bottom of the third inning
as Angus Anderson started


the frame with a solo shot
to left-center for a 4-1 lead.
An error and a walk brought
Orcutt to the plate with a
chance to help himself as he
unloaded on a 1-0 pitch for
a three-run homer off of Jay
starter Zack Gavin for the
final runs of the contest.
Walton managed only
four hits on the night as An-


gus Anderson provided half
of them with a single and a
home run.
The Braves lost to Pensa-
cola Catholic 17-6 on March
8 as the Crusaders put up 10
runs in the third inning to
earn a district win against
Walton and drop the club to
3-5 overall.


WALTON'S BRENNAN ORCUTT struck out 11 batters OUTFIELDER BRANDON HOLLINGSWORTH hit
in helping the Braves pick up a 7-1 win over Jay on March a three-run homer in the first inning as Walton used the
7. (Photo by Patrick Casey) long-ball to account for all seven runs in a victory over Jay.
(Photo by Patrick Casey)


WALTON SHORTSTOP CHRIS MURPHY keeps a close
eye on a Jay runner while his brother, leftfielder Stephen
Murphy(2), provides back-up in the sixth inning of the
Braves home opener.


South Walton Edges Holmes County in Softball


By PATRICK CASEY
Megan MacLeod hit a
sacrifice fly scoring Macken-
zie Watson from third base
in the bottom of the sixth in-
ning as South Walton scored
the only run of the game in a
1-, win over district foe :Hol-
V~~i~~:-~ ~ ' '' -


mes County on March 8.
The Seahawks and
Bluedevils battled to a score-
less tie through five innings
of play before South Walton
scratched across their lone
run of the game in their fi-
nal at-bat. The Seahawks


got a single from Watson to
start the inning, then an in-
field hit by Caitlin Holliday
as she beat a bad throw to
the first base bag. The throw
skipped away from Holmes
County's first baseman, al-
lowing both runners to move
up a base on theerror. Ma-
cLeod promptly stroked a fly


ball to center field, allowing
Watson to tag up and race
home for the go-ahead run.
Holmes County had one
last chance to rally in the
top of the seventh inning as
a single and a walk with two
outs put runners on base
only to see freshman pitch-
er Meagan Ellison coax a


popout from the Bluedevils'
Danielle Payne to end the
game.

Holmes County stranded
eight runners on base dur-
ing the game as they could
not get a key hit to drive in a
run. The Bluedevils had five
hits in the game as.Shelby
Clark provided a single and
a double for the visiting
team.
The Seahawks got two of
their four hits from Macken-
zie Watson as Sarah Pippin


was the hard-luck loser for
Holmes County.
"We played the kind of de-
fense we needed to win this
game. Ellison walked only
one batter and we got a cou-
ple of key hits in the sixth
to take the lead,": coach Phil
Tisa said after the contest.
South Walton improved
to 4-4 overall with the win
and 4-2 in district play. The
Seahawks are off until a re-
match with Holmes County
on March 17 in Bonifay at 6
p.m.


SOUTH WALTON THIRD BASEMAN Megan MacLeod
drove in the only run of the game with a sacrifice fly to center
in the bottom of the sixth inning for a 1-0 win over the visit- SOUTH WALTON'S SOFTBALL TEAM was all smiles
ing team from Bonifay. (Photo by Patrick Casey) after a 1-0 win over Holmes.County improved their overall
record to 4-4 with a 4-2 mark in the district. (Photo by Pat-
.-- ....... rick Casey)


SOUTH WALTON PITCHER MEAGAN ELLISON
pitched the Seahawks to an important 1-0 win over Holmes
County in a District 2, Class 2A contest played on March 8.
(Photo by Patrick Casey)


DID YOU KNOW?

5 Sports Facts

1. American swimmer Michael Phelps holds the record
for the most gold medals won in a single Olympics, with
eight at the 2008 Beijing Games.

2. Vin Scully will begin his 62nd season broadcasting the
Dodgers baseball games on March 31 when the squad opens
the regular season by hosting the San Francisco Giants.
Scully joined the broadcast crew in 1950, eight years before
the team moved to Los Angeles from Brooklyn.

3. Andre Reed is the Buffalo Bills all-time leader with 36
career 100-yard receiving games.

4. Deion Sanders holds the FSU record for most punt re-
turn yards in a career and in a single season for the Semi-
noles.

5. The Toronto Blue Jays' George Bell won the 1987
American League MVP Award as he hit 47 home runs and
drove in 134 runs that season.


School Sports

Calendar

Wednesday- March 16
Cottondale at PDL JV Baseball 1 p.m.
Cottondale at PDL Middle School Baseball 3 p.m.

Thursday- March 17
Walton at Freeport Tennis 3 p.m.
Paxton and Walton Track at Freeport 3 p.m.
Paxton at PDL Middle School Baseball 3:30 p.m.
Walton Middle School at Freeport Softball 4 p.m.
Baker at Freeport Softball 4/6 p.m.
South Walton Softball at Holmes Co. 4/6 p.m.
Walton Softball at Marianna 4/6 p.m.
Walton Baseball at Marianna 4/6:30 p.m.
Bethlehem at PDL Softball 5 p.m.
South Walton Baseball at Cottondale 5 p.m.
Paxton at PDL JV Baseball 5:30 p.m.

Friday- March 18
Walton at Paxton Softball 3/5 p.m.
Laurel Hill at Paxton JV Baseball 4 p.m.
Walton Middle School Softball at Rocky Bayou 4 p.m.
Cottondale at South Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
Freeport Softball at Northview 4/6 p.m.
P.C. Bay at Walton Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Freeport Baseball at Northview 5 p.m.
Laurel Hill at Paxton Baseball 6 p.m.
South Walton Baseball at Sneads 6 p.m.
PDL at Samson, Ala. Baseball 7 p.m.

Saturday- March 19
Chipley vs Emerald Coast Middle School Baseball at WMS
11 a.m.
PDL Baseball vs Bethlehem in Samson, Ala. Noon
Seaside at Walton Middle School Baseball 1 p.m.
PDL Baseball vs Kinston, Ala. in Samson, Ala. 2 p.m.

Monday- March 21
Freeport Tennis at P.C. Rutherford 3 p.m.
Walton JV Baseball at Freeport (DH) 4 p.m.
South Walton at Freeport Softball 4/6 p.m.
Vernon at Walton Baseball 6 p.m.

Tuesday- March 22
South Walton at Freeport Tennis 3 p.m.
Walton Tennis at P.C. Bozeman 3 p.m.
Bethlehem at Paxton JV Baseball 3:30 p.m.
Freeport and South Walton Track at P.C. Arnold 3:30
p.m.
P.C. Arnold at Walton Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
PDL Baseball at Jay 4 p.m.
PDL Softball at Jay (DH) 4 p.m.
Poplar Springs at Paxton JV Softball (DH) 4 p.m.
South Walton Baseball at Holmes Co. 4/6 p.m.
Walton Softball at P.C. Arnold 4:30/6 p.m.
Bethlehem at Paxton Baseball 5:30 p.m.
Freeport Baseball at P.C. Arnold 6 p.m.
North Bay Middle School at Emerald Coast Softball 6
p.m.


WaltonOutdoors.comr



Your source for the outdoors

in Walton County

and the surrounding area
l l^ l..-.l.l- l~


. .
















P-om and ThEi
Fid hechrcDo yurchic


ALAQUA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. The pastor and
congregation invite you to come join us for services at 9 a.m. every
Sunday. Church school for children and coffee fellowship follow the
morning service. Serving the faithful at 4189 Coy Burgess Loope
since 1837. Come to the country for worship. Call Pastor Henry
Martin at (850)892-4860 for more information.

ARGYLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 252 Argyle Church Road, Argyle,
FL invites everyone to attend their services. Sunday School 9:45
a.m. all ages, Church Service 11 a.m., Sunday night 3 p.m. all
ages, Wednesday night 6 p.m.
Pastor James Burnham. Call (850)892-2,27, or (850)259-2173.
All are welcome.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAFTIST CHURCH invites you to attend
Sunday School 9:45, Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Train-
ing 5 p.m., Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m., Wednesday Prayer
Service 6:30 p.m. Come and be a part of an awesome ministry
here in your community.

BEECHGROVE CHURCH OF GOD and Pastor D. Wayne
Rickards extend a warm welcome to everyone to attend their regular
services. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m.; morning worship at 11
a.m.; Sunday night services begin at 5 p.m. and Wednesday night
services begin at 6 p.m. The church is located six rr."es south of
Ponce de Leon on CR 183. For information (850)836-4484.

BIBLE BELIEVERS BAPTIST CHURCH, The congregation and
Pastor Dan Hershey, would like to invite you to come and be a part of
our continuing church growth. If you are looking for a fundamental,
KJV Bible-believing, independent Baptist Church, then we are just
what you are looking for. The preaching is not compromised, it is
straight out of God's Word. The preaching is known to be "old-
fashioned," like it used to be. So, please come join us in worship.
330 North Davis Lane, DFS. Sunday School at 10 a.m. services 11
and 6 p.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study 6:30
p.m. "Teaching the Bible as it is for men as they are."

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W.
Live Oak Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and
congregation welcomes you to join Spirit filled worship services
where we'll treat you in so many different ways, you will have to
like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7 p.m. All are cordially invited
and welcome. For a ride to church contact (850)892-0706 or (850)
892-4704.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come meet and fellowship with
other real people who genuinely love the Lord. Sit under practical
bible teaching and preaching relevant to today's issues. Come let
Jesus Christ heal your body, save your marriage, touch your kids,
and give hope to the broken hearted. Come dressed casual or
Sunday best. All are welcome and will fit in. No ties required. Seekers
welcome. Come see for yourself that we are sound, practical, God
loving people who center our lives around the person of Jesus
Christ and a solid approach to the Holy Scriptures. We do pray for
the sick and needy, and believe in the bible gospel of power to meet
the human need. Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. and Wednesday night
classes begin at 6:30 p.m., Teens: Wednesday nights, Children's
Church: Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights. Cornerstone
Church is located at 2044 Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak
Springs. Ph.(850) 892-2240.

EUCHEE VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is located in the
Euchee Valley Community at the intersection of County Hwys. 183
South and 280 East.
We cordially invite you to come and worship with us and make
us your church home. Sunday School begins for all ages at 9:45
a.m. followed by morning worship at 11 a.m. Nursery provided.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church
attendance doesn't have to be dull, mundane or feel like just an
added burden to your life! You can attend a church service in which
you feel both welcomed and loved, as well as be challenged by
the powerful preaching of God's Word. The church family of the
First Apostolic Church embraces the doctrine of the early Apostles
and their preaching as recorded in the Book of Acts and other
New Testament teachings. Sunday Services begin at 10 a.m. with
Sunday school for the children and a spirt-filled worship for adults.
Sunday evening service begins at 5:30 with prayer, with worship
and preaching beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday night bible study
begins at 7 p.m. and we offer family prayer on Thursday from 6 p.m
to 7 p.m. each week. Not able to physically attend? Hear sermons
posted on our website at www.defuniakapostolic.com. Come and
experience church the way God started it all in the New Testament!
If you have any questions or need ministry assistance, please feel
free to call the church office at (850) 892-7882. Rev. David W. King,
Pastor.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located
at 461 Van Buren Avenue, Pastor Michael F. Tadlock, his wife,
Amy and Son, Hayden would like to extend an invitation for all
to come join us as we celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus
Christ through Spirit filled worship & annointed preachingll Sunday
School begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by Morning Worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evening
service begins at 6:30 p.m. Youth Ministry Services are held every
Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Please come and worship with us.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East
Live Oak Avenue. We cordially invite-you to join our "Fellowship
of Encouragement" and come for Worship and Bible Study at the
following times: Sunday Bible Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship
(10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5 p.m.) and evening worship
(6:00 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us for prayer meeting
at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship dinners.
Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details. Visit our webpage
at www.fbcdfs.org.

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite
you to worship with us this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Then stay for
refreshments and adult Bible Study and children's Sunday School.
Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz, speaks from the Gospel each
Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We are known throughout
our community as a friendly and serving Church that welcomes
newcomers. We are located on U.S. 331, very near the Florida line
[245121bd 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at
(334) 858-3515 for more specific directions.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS,
1063 Circle Drive, invites the public to join them throughout the
week for worship, fellowship, study and service. A men's fellow-
ship group and Presbyterian women meet monthly for fellowship
and Bible study. Children's and youth activities are announced. Call
for information. Sunday (nursery provided from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.)
9:30 a.m. Songfest for everyone 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for all
ages. 11 a.m. morning worship. Wednesday 3:30 p.m. Presbyterian
youth fellowship. 6:30 p.m. Chancel choir rehearsal.
First and third Wednesday, 9 a.m. 12 p.m. KID'S CLOSET to
provide basic necessities to children of Walton County families in
need.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who
are committed to being an inclusive faith community, where per-
sons from all walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working
together. If you're looking for a church home, we invite you to come


visit us. Church office phone number 892-5832. email:fpcdfs@em-
barqmail.com Website: fpcdfs.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS, located at 88 Circle Drive, Rev. Robert West, staff
and congregation wish to invite you to join our family for activities
on Sunday beginning with Contemporary Worship Service in the
sanctuary at 8:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship Service at 11 a.m. with
Children's Church (Pre-K to third grade) provided for both services;
Vesper service at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. Communion is observed


at both morning services on first Sunday and Sunday School for all
ages at 9:45 a.m. Children's Sunday school (k-6th) is "JAM" (Jesus
and Me) is the Multi-Dimensional Learning program with children
rotating to different workshops (art, computer, cooking/science,
games, storytelling/movie) each Sunday "learning by doing". Other
opportunities on Sunday include: Sr. High Youth Fellowship at 4
p.m..; Jr. High Youth Fellowship and Children (HIS Kids Club) at
3:30 p.m.; F-od pantry every 3rd Sat. 7-9 a.m. For more information,
call (850) 892-5332, 892-5128 e-mail fumcdfs@embarqmail.com
website www.fumcdefuniaksprings.org.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF WESTVILLE,
2100 Highway 90 West, Westville. Pastor Jason Campbell and
the Westville church family invite you to come to a place where
Pentecost is an experience, not a thing of the past. We offer a
friendly environment with annointed preaching and singing, Our
Sunday morning services begin at 10 a.m. and our Sunday evening
service begins at 5 p.m. Our Wednesday evening service begins
at 7 p.m. We also offer children's church on Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Come experience the power of the Holy Ghost just like early church
did in the Book of Acts. For more information call, (850) 548-5898
or(850) 892-7499.

FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP INTERNATIONAL is a non-
denominational church filled with excitement about what the future
holds and a sincere hunger for the outpouring of the Spirit of God.
We are a church where God's presence is never taken for granted
and neither are you. Freedom Fellowship is a church looking for a
people "who will humble themselves before God and seek His ways."
2Chr. 7:14, Pastor Dennis Grey II invites your family to be a part of
our family each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Casual dress / Contemporary
Worship. We are now meeting at the Continental Worship Center
located at 2132 U.S. 90 across from the DeFuniak Springs Airport.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FREEPORT 430 Kylea Laird
Drive, Freeport, Fla. Pastor Ken Coots would like to extend an
invitation to one and all to come and "Worship"the Lord Jesus
Christ with us, as we seek His perfect will. Bible Study for all ages
commences at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday. Sunday a.m. worship
service begins at 10 a.m., and Sunday p.m. service at 5 p.m.. The
Wednesday p.m. prayer service begins at 6 p.m.. Both the Sunday
p.m. and Wednesday p.m. prayer services are being held in the
Fellowship Hall. Explicit Bible doctrine is the continuous thread
during both evenings. We at FBC Freeport are strong advocates of
Romans 10:17, "Faith cometh by hearing and hearing by the Word
of God." Hope and pray to see all there! (850) 835-2742 (850) 774-
8327.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (formerly the Concerned Christian
Church) desires to reproduce in doctrine, in life and practice, the
Church founded by Christ. Our position may be summarized as
"where the Bible speaks, we speak" and "where the Bible is silent,
we are silent," we invite you to join us and help spread the message
of Christ in our community. Sunday School (all ages) at 10 a.m.
and worship (including Childrens' Church) starts at 11 a.m. Nursery
available. Our minister is John Dixon and the church is located on
U.S. 90, 2.4 miles west of the intersection of U.S. 90 and U.S. 331
North.

FREEPORT ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 17457 US 331S. Sunday
services: Learning Center 9:45 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:50 a.m.
Do you need joy in your life? Then come hear the sermon series
from the Book of Philippians call "Disturbed by Joy!" Wednesday,
7 p.m. Hear the teaching series. "Traveling through the Psalms."
Nursery available. Phone 865-4068 for more information.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 174 Harrison
Street, (corner of Bayloop & Harrison St.) Freeport, Fl. 32439 Office
- 850-880-6633, Parsonage 850-835-2261, Pastor's Cell Phone -
850-225-4914 Dr. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor. Please come worship
with us. Rev. Dr. G Charles Sattewhite, Pastor announces that we
are having blended services which include both Contemporary and
Traditional services, these services are geared to reach both t he
seeker, and the growing church member, as well as the established
member. WE are excited about what God is doing at the Freeport
UMC. Our service times are 9:00 a.m. for Bible Study, and children's
hour, our Worship time is 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship in
Song 4:00 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wednesday 6:00 p.m., Our Ladies
meet every other Tuesday Night 6:00 p.m., We have a Gospel Singing
Jubilee on the 1st Saturday of every month 6:00 p.m. (Open Mic).
Come be with us. "a short drive for a life changing experience."

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, 2415 County Hwy. 1883,
DeFuniak Springs is a friendly little country church that welcomes
all visitors. Everyone is invited to worship with the congregation.
Sunday school starts at 9:15 a.m. Sunday morning worship is at
10:30 a.m. and Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday
we have prayer meeting starting at 6:30 p.m. and children's mission
program and Bible drill program. Every fifth Sunday, we have special
music followed by "Dinner on the Grounds." We have a nursery for
0-3 and Children's Church for ages 3 through the first grade.
Missions are very important to Friendship. We have Men's, Wom-
en's and children's mission program. Our pastor is Johnmark Brown.
We extend a heartfelt welcome for you to come and join with us
in worship and fellowship. For any questions please call (850)859-
2287.

GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (GPC) Pastor Keith An-
drews and the congregation of GPC invite you to come and worship
with them. At GPC, you'll find teaching that's biblical, practical, and
encouraging; worship that's exciting, joyous, and Christ-honoring;
and fellowship that's warm and personal. Sundays:- Sunday School
(all ages!) at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Kidz Klub at 11 a.m. Ignitel
(Youth) at various locations from 5 -7 p.m. Wednesday: Trans-
formation (Bible study for men and women) at 6:30 p.m. GPC is lo-
cated about 10 minutes north of DeFuniak Springs on SR-83N. Find
out more on the web at www.glendalechurch.org or call (850)859-
0080.

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of
Highway 90 on Laird Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just
before the Okaloosa County line. Grace Community is a church
committed to historical Southern Baptist principles and believes that
the Church is called, not to reflect its culture, but to shape it. We
believe that faith must be lived as well as affirmed, therefore, right
living derives from right believing. We hold to a high view of Scrip-
ture believing the Bible as our final authority and that it "stands
in judgement of us, never do we stand in judgement of it." Sunday
morning worship begins at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday School at 11 a.m.
and evening bible study at 6 p.m. Friday night home Bible study at
6:30 p.m. If you are tired of playing church, come help us shape the
culture where we are "learning God's will one verse at a time."

HARMONY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH and Pastor Donel David-
son together with his family welcome all to worship God in spirit and
in truth, at 974 Adams Road, DeFuniak Springs.
Church services will begin with Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Sun-
day morning worship at 11 a.m.; Sunday evening at 5 p.m., and
Wednesday evening 6:30 p.m. Directions: U.S. 331 N turn on to
Williams Road, go about 3.3 miles to Adams Road, turn right onto
Adams go about 9/10 of a mile to church. U.S. 90, turn onto CR-
1087 in the Mossy Head area, go to Williams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to Adams Road, turn left onto Adams, go
9/10 of a mile to church. From CR-1087 out of New Harmony, turn
left onto Adams Road and go 9/10 of a mile to church. For more
information, call the pastorium phone number at (850) 834-2017.


INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles
south of DeFuniak Springs, cordially invites you to come and
worship with us in Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship
services, at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is
at 6 p.m. Pastor Scot Keppel and the congregation extends a very
special welcome to come visit or make us your church home. We
practice "Love one another". A nursery is provided.


NEW HARMONY BAPTIST CHURCH is located at 2281 County
Hwy. 2A, DeFuniak Springs, FL. only nine miles north of Hwy. 90 on
Rt. 1087 from Mossy Head. Pastor Todd Camp would like to invite
you to worship with us during any of our exciting weekly services.
We are a family church that loves Jesus! Our Sunday School hour
is from 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. followed by our morning worship
service at 11 a.m. Nursery and children's church are provided. Our
Sunday evening service begins at 6 p.m., as we "study to show
ourselves approved unto God." On Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. we have a dynamic children's program, youth meeting, ladies
ministry, and adult prayer and Bible study service. The church also
offers affordable daycare services. Monday-Friday. We are a Bible
church committed to seeing God change lives in the power of the
Holy Spirit. Come and be a part of what the Lord is doing at New
Harmony Baptist Church. Call for more information at (850) 834-
2871.

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH 6753 State Hwy 2 East,
Darlington, Fla. We are reaching out to the lost, hurting, hungry,
and naked. Pastor Rev. Curtis Manning and his congregation would
like to invite you to attend services with them. Sunday School for
all ages is at 10 a.m., and Sunday Morning worship is at 11 a.m.;
Sunday evening services will be at 5 p.m.; Wednesday night prayer
and teaching is at 6 p.m.; Come enjoy our anointed praise and
worship and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and
teaching of God's Word. For more information call ( 850 ) 892-
2048.

PASTOR BILL HUNTER AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE
BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, "the Church in
the Wildwood," invites you to come and worship with us just as you
are. Black Creek UMC is located five miles east of Freeport at 278
Memorial Lane. (If you need directions, please call (850)859-2366
or (850)830-1497. We are a church body who loves people and
who also loves to hear the word of God preached. If you sing and/
or play a musical instrument and would like to share your talents)
please come and join us. Make plans now to attend Sunday school
at 10 a.m., Morning Worship at 11 a,m., and Evening Worship at
6 p.m. Rev. Bill may be reached at (850)859-2366 or (850)830-
1497.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs.
Located one mile south of Bob Sikes Road at 1015 Pleasant Ridge
Rd. extends a special invitation for you to join us to worship the
Lord and study His Word at the following times: Sunday Breakfast/
Fellowship (8:45); age appropriate Sunday Bible Study (9:15);
Morning Worship (10:30); Discipleship training (5 p.m.) and Evening
Worship (6 p.m.); Wednesday (6 p.m.) adult Bible study and youth
activities. Participate in meaningful worship with family and friends.
Call (850) 892-3500 for more information.

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at the
intersection of Hwy. 1883 & 183 invites you to Sunday School 9:45
a.m., Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Training at 5 p.m.,
Evening Service 6 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 p.m. Please come
worship God with us.

PORTLAND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH welcomes you!
We are here for you and hope you will bless us with y our presence
as we worship God and live in the community together. We're
different, and seeking new ways to be the church God call us to
be. We focus on prayer, fellowship, study, missions and worship. A
variety of activities are going on weekly. We have Sunday school
for adults and youth. Worship at 11 a.m. and a new contemplative
prayer service beginning in September at 8:30 a.m., nursery
provided. Youth meet on Wednesday along with dinner and adult
Bible studies at 6 p.m. For more information call (850)-307-2009.


SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1307 County Hwy 278,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Morning Worship
10 a.m.; Puppets, Children's and Adult Choir 4 p.m.; Evening Adult
Bible Study, Youth Bible Study, and Children's Mission Classes 5
p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday mid-week
worship service and AWANA 6:30 p.m. Sign language interpretation
for the deaf provided at all services. Southwide Baptist Church has
classes and activities for all ages: Youth Group, Royal Ambassadors,
Girls in Action, Acteens, Adult Choir, Women on Mission, Paintball
(ages 10+ every third Saturday of the month), AWANA (3yrs-
12th Grade), and sign language classes for all ages. Pastor William
Whaley invites everyone to come and hear the saving word of God.
Directions: from DeFuniak take U.S. 331 S. turn right on first road
(Coy Burgess Loop) past 1-10. Southwide Baptist Church is located
1.5 miles on the left at intersection of Coy Burgess Loop and Millard
Gainey Road. Call (850) 892-3835 for more information or for
directions.

ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is a historic mission
located at 144 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday schedule:
9 a.m. Bible study in the vicarage and 10:15 a.m. Eucharist in the
church. A COMMUNITY "CENTERING PRAYER GROUP" meets
each Saturday morning at 10 a.m. in the church. All are invited.
From December through May COMMUNITY FIRST SATURDAY
BREAKFASTS are served in the parish hall from 7 am. till 11 a.m.
St. Agatha's is the home of the Lakeside Concert series. For more
information call (850) 892-9754

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331
N., P.O. Box 590, DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 32435, Phone: (850)
892-9247. Mass Schedule: Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday,
6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of
Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard Dawson, pastor.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congrega-
tion cordially invite you to attend services with us. Sunday School
is at 10 a.m. Sunday Evening Services are at 6:00 pm. Wednes-
day Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 26 Joe Ander-
son Road (Hwy 83 North). Our pastor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please
come ready to worship and expecting a blessing!

VICTORY LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD, Highway 90
at the Mossy Head Community Center across from the Mossy
Head General Store. We would like to extend to all an invitation to
come and join us and be blessed. We are a church dedicated to
serving Jesus and spreading His wonderful word. Let us share the
light of God's word with you. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.,
followed by Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Each Sunday we have a
fellowship lunch on the grounds, all are invited. Sunday afternoon
service begins about 1:30 p.m. Friday evening service 7 p.m. -
prayer, Royal Rangers, Missionettes and Adult Bible Study followed
by prayer time. Pastor is Thomas Adamson, Children's Ministries
Kevin Chilcutt. For more information call 892-3817 or 652-4610.
Website www.victorylighthouse church.org.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner
of Live Oak and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Open Hearts,
Open Minds, Open Doors," Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School
9 a.m., Morning Worship 10 a.m. The small church by the side of
the road with a cross over the entrance, longing to extend the love
and peace of God to any wayfarer or pilgrim seeking a rest from
this world of strife and despair. A place where common people can
assemble for simple worship and experience the Presence of God
in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered together in my
name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V. "The
devil wins a skirmish With a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the
war."


WESTSIDE CHURCH OF CHRIST Do you truly know what
it means to be saved? Are you worshipping according to God's
divine instructions? If you're even contemplating that answer, then
please come visit us this coming Sunday at 9 a.m. Bible study, 10
a.m.worship, and/or during 7 p.m. Wednesday night Bible class.
The address is 121 East Larkspur Avenue, DeFuniak Springs FL,
32435. If you have any questions please call us at (850)892.3391.


L I r.


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 17, 2011


PAGE 6f-R



















5 Harmony Fellowship Kitchen invites

.;I 3 i ,a _, everyone to join them in a supper


Harmony Fellowship
Kitchen invites everyone to
share a supper with them
on Tuesday, March 29 from
5:30 7:30 p.m.
Harmony Fellowship is
located at 974 Adams Rd.
in DeFuniak Springs (the
New Harmony area) Direc-
tions are go to U.S. 331 N


turn on to Williams Road,
go about 3.3 miles to Adams
Road, turn right onto Adams
go about 9/10 of a mile to
church. U.S. 90, turn onto
CR-1087 in the Mossy Head
area, go to Williams Road,
turn right onto Williams
about 2.8 miles to Adams
Road, turn left onto Adams,


go 9/10 of a mile to church.
From CR-1087 out of New
Harmony, turn left onto Ad-
ams Road and go 9/10 of a
mile to church.
For more information,
call the pastorium phone
number at (850) 834-2017
or contact Jan Davidson at
978-0628.


First United Methodist to serve country breakfast


Everyone is invited to devotional every Wednes-
come and enjoy a "coun- day until Easter beginning
try" breakfast and a short on March 16 at 6:30 a.m.


at First United Methodist
Church Fellowship Hall.
Everyone welcome.


Bruce Methodist Church to celebrate

homecoming March 20, on the grounds


WALK, RUN, RIDE, will be held on Sunday, March 27, at noon at Harbeson Park in
DeFuniak Springs.


Sunday, March 20 Bruce
Methodist Church will
be celebrating homecom-
ing from 10:30 a.m. 2:30
p.m. There will be singing,


visiting and dinner on the
grounds.
Bruce Methodist Church
is located 10 miles east of
Freeport on CR-20. The con-


gregation of Bruce Meth-
odist Church encourages
everyone, old and new mem-
bers, friends and family to
join them for homecoming.


Annie Armstrong Easter offering


Walk, Run, Ride, event


to benefit missionaries


The WMU of Southwide
Baptist Church will be spon-
soring a fundraiser. Walk,
Run, Ride, will be held on
Sunday, March 27, at noon
at Harbeson Park in De-
March 20 at 6 p.m.


Funiak Springs.
This event is to raise mon-
ey for the mission program
Annie Armstrong, Easter
Offering and benefits mis-
sionaries living and work-


ing in the United States. All
children, grades 1-5 are wel-
come to participate.
For more information
contact Southwide Baptist
Church at (850) 892-3835.


Southwide Baptist Church to


Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church to
celebrate Evangelical Gospel Choir's anniversary
Union Springs Mission- ning at 3 p.m. in DeFuniak Springs.
ary Baptist Church will be Pastor Johnson and con-
celebrating the anniversary Union Springs Mission- gregation cordially invite
of the Evangelical Gospel ary Baptist Church is locat- everyone to come celebrate
Choir on March 20 begin- ed at 416 Rail Road Street with them.

The Bibletones to perform March 25

at First Baptist Church of Freeport
The Bibletones, a nation- of Freeport on March 25 at 7 vited to attend. Admission
ally renowned Southern Gos- p.m. is free, however a love offer-
pel Group will be in concert ing will be taken. For infor-
at the First Baptist Church The public is cordially in- mation call (850)835-2742.

Gospel concert to be held at


host Trevor Thomas "Mr. Drama" Walton County Fairground
SWlo County iFaidground


out w ile DBaptist
Church will be hosting Trev-
or Thomas "Mr. Drama" on
March 20, 2011 at 6 p.m.
In 1991, at the age of 18,
he began traveling and per-
forming at churches and
events. A year later, after
much prayer and counsel-
ing, Trevor surrendered to
the call of full-time minis-
try.


INow nown tnrougnout-tne
cQuntry as "Mr. Drama,"
Trevor makes approxi-
mately 180 appearances a
year. At each appearance
Trevor cleverly combines
music, monologues, poems,
sketches, and mime with
humor and sincerity, which
makes for an unforgettable
worship experience for the
believer and a picture of sal-


vation for the lost.
Come and see Trev-
or Thomas appearing at
Southwide Baptist Church
Sunday, March 20, 2011 at
6 p.m. Southwide Baptist
Church is located at 1307
Coy Burgess Loop in De-
Funiak Springs. For more
information call the church
office (850)892-3835.


Gary Winstead holding revival services at
New Harmony Baptist Church, March 20-23


New Harmony Baptist Sundayserviceswillbegin
Church will have revival at 6 p.m. with the Stafford's
services beginning Sunday, singing in concert. Winstead
March 20 through Wednes- will be preaching Monday
day, March 23. Gary Win- through Wednesday servic-
stead will be bring the Word es will begin each evening
of God as he brings us the at 7 p.m.
messages that God has laid
on his heart. The congregation encour-

Edsol and Judy Jenkins
to be performing March 19

Otter Creek United Methodist
Church to host gospel sing


Edsol and Judy Jenkins
will be singing at Otter
Creek Methodist Church
Saturday, March 19, at 7





















I' I-a


I Iahral, coi


p.m.
The church is located
four miles north of Ponce de
Leon, off of CR-81.


age everyone to join them in
revival.


Gospel concert to be held
Saturday, March 19 at 6
p.m. at the Walton County
Fairgrounds on SR-83 in
DeFuniak Springs. A jam
session will begin at 5:30
p.m.
Those performing in the
concert will be The Dye-
ss Family from Opp, Ala.
The Cains' from DeFuniak
Springs Fla.; The Harrel-
son's from Florala, Ala.;
Smooth Gospel from Pax-
ton, Fla.; Gospel Echoes
from DeFuniak Springs;
Called Out from Andalusia,
Ala.; Lorene McCart from
Andalusia; Janet Matthews


from DeFuniak Springs;
Destination Heaveri' from
Crestview, Fla. and The
Good News Quartet from
Andalusia.


The concert is free but
a love offering will b' tak-
en. For more information
contact (334)222-2281 or
(850)892-7607.


"Christ in the Passover"
Jesus' last supper was actually
a Jewish Passover.
Greg Savitt, of Jews for Jesus, will
re-create the traditional Passover service
and explain how it foreshadowed Jesus'
death and resurrection in a presentation
called "Christ in the Passover" at
New Harmony Baptist Church
located 9 miles north of Mossy Head on 1087
at 2281 County Hwy. 2A
Sunday, April 3, 2011 11 a.m.
Mr. Savitt will set a table with items traditionally used at the
Passover meal and detail their spiritual significance. He will explain
the connection between the events of the first Passover in Egypt
and the redemption that Jesus accomplished. Come and bring a
friend with you to see this exciting presentation.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL (850) 834-2871


J-


Your Station For Life!

QueIaMI a1mdl tMveEasti

The Land and the Book

I UL..rIhds& &i ..rAdr finf.M.. ....Iwr

LJAe .- i-lm TYMurian t It 1 Hm


--- :-I-- =-- p_ -

First Baptist Church
216 East Live Oak Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435
Phone: 850-892-2722 Fax: 850-892-2381
e-mail: fbcdfs@embarqmail.com
Website: www.fbcdfs.org


Sunday School 9:15 AM
Morning Worship Service 10:30 AM
Discipleship Training 4:30 PM
Evening Worship Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM

Dr. Bobby Tucker Pastor
Cordell Harrison Supply Music Minister
Richard Murray Jr. Associate Pastor of Education,
Discipleship & Missions
Ryan Stinson Youth Intern

WOMEN'S BIBLE STUDY
Ladies of all ages are invited to join us each Monday in
March (6:30-7:30 PM).
This is a four-week series from Beth Moore entitled
"He Is"...based on the book of Hebrews.
et


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2011


I


PAGE 7-B














OBITTEDAS
0; 4


Harper
Mrs. Edna unt Harper,
87, passed away Tuesday,
March 8, 2011. She was
born Jan. 26, 1924 in Wal-
ton County, Florida to Wil-
lie and Ehren Adams Hunt.
Mrs. Harper was a life long
resident of Walton County.
She was Baptist by faith
and a member of the First


Sims
Mr. Ronald "Ronnie" Stu-
art Sims, 68, passed away
March 9, 2011. He was born
Oct. 8, 1942 in Savanna,
Okla. to John and Ola Mae
Sims.
Mr. Sims was a resident


Baptist Church in DeFuniak
Springs. She was very ac-
tive at the church serving in
the food pantry, Women on
Missions, Pregnancy Sup-
port System and the Inter-
sory Prayer Group. She was
an avid sports fan, loving
to fish, and being with her
family. She also loved grow-
ing African Violets.
Mrs. Harper is preceded
in death by her parents; her
husband, John L. Harper;
three brothers, Fred Hunt,
Joel Hunt and Clifford
Hunt; one sister Ella Mae
Hunt; one great-grandson
William Ryan, and one son-
in-law Bill Bishop.
Mrs. Harper is sur-
vived by three daughters,
Paula Bishop of DeFuniak
Springs, Ruth Barrett and
husband, Jean of Melbourne
and Florence Provost and
husband, Wilbur, of De-
Funiak Springs; two sister-
in-laws, Callie Hunt of New
Harmony and Myrtle Trusty
of Longview, Washington,
seven grandchildren, Fred


of Walton County, Florida.
He was Baptist by faith.
He was a veteran of the
U.S.Navy. He worked as a
welder in the pipe line in-
dustry and he also worked in
the telephone cable industry
for many years. He enjoyed
going to yard sales, also col-
lecting various items. He
also enjoyed drawing and
taking care of his late wife.
Mr. Sims is preceded
in death by his father and
mother; and his wife, Jane
Sims.
Mr. Sims is survived by
one son, Daniel Richard of
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.;
one daughter, Brandi Sims
Walker and her husband
Shawn of Tecumseh, Okla.;
one brother, Kenny Sims.


Provost and wife, Heather,
Stephanie Alford and hus-
band, Mark, Eddie Provost,
Robyn Peters and husband,
David, Kim Best and hus-
band, Greg, William Bishop
III and Christa Hickingbot-
tom and husband, Nathan
and six great-grandchildren,
Ian, Garrett, Kelly, Sierra,
Nolan and Austen.
Funeral services were
held Thursday, March 10,
2011 at New Harmony Bap-
tist Church with Dr. Bobby
Tucker officiating.
Donations may be made
to the First Baptist Church
at 216 East Liveoak Ave-
nue, DeFuniak Springs, FL
32435.
Burial followed in the
New Harmony Cemetery.
Friends and family may go
online to view obituaries, of-
fer condolences, and sign a
guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com

Clary-Glenn Funeral Home
was entrusted with the ar-
rangements.


He is also survived by five
grandchildren, Autumn
Walker, Lang Walker both
of Tecumshe, Okla.; Cory
Hammond of Santa Rosa
Beach, Fla.; Danny Richard
of Huntsville, Ala. and Deb-
ra Richard of Mobile, Ala.
Graveside services were
held Saturday, March 12,
2011 at Hatcher Cemetery
with Rev. Louis Taunton of-
ficiating.

Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com.

Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home was entrusted with
the arrangements.


Cook


Ms. Nancy J. Cook, 75,
passed away Monday, March
14, 2011. She was born Oct.
5, 1935 in Darlington, Fla.
Ms. Cook was a life long
resident of Walton County.
She was Baptist by faith.
She was a very devoted
wife, mother, grandmother
and great grandmother. She
loved growing flowers, fish-
ing and she also loved ani-
mals.
Ms. Cook is preceded in
death by her parents, and
her second husband Oliver
Cook.
Ms. Cook is survived by
her four daughters, Dorothy
Jean Altman and Brenda
Lee Holt, both of DeFuniak


Springs, Fla., Glenda Kath-
leen Gainey ofBaconton, Ga.
and Alisa Francine Osburn
of Mary Esther, Fla.; five
grandchildren, Viola Davis
Rodgers and husband John,
James Alfred Cordle, Scot-
tie Shane Mann, Holly Lynn
Osburn, Sara Marie Cay-
lor and husband, Scott; 11
great-grandchildren, Bryan,
Dustin, Sandra, Ansley, Isa-
iah, Allysa, Holden, Heaven,
Ella, Allyson and Cameron
and one great-great-grand-
son.
A time of visitation will
be held 1-2 p.m., Thursday,
March 17, 2011 at Clary-
Glenn Funeral Home, 230
Park Avenue, DeFuniak


Springs, FL 32435.
Funeral services will be
held at 2 p.m., Thursday,
March 17, 2011, at Clary-
Glenn Funeral Home with
Rev. Howard Taylor offici-
ating and Eulogy by Scott
Caylor.

Burial will follow in the
Concerned Christian Church
Cemetery.
Friends and family may go
online to view obituaries, of-
fer condolences, sign guest
book, and view tribute at
www.clary-glenn.com.

Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home is entrusted with the
arrangements.


Get Out of the House!

By Ronnie McBrayer


Last week we had a fire
in our home. Our aged heat
pump flashed out, blow-
ing smoke throughout the
house, tripping alarms and
setting off smoke detectors.
Thankfully, it turned out to
be more of a minor inconve-
nience than a major disas-
ter.
But at first, we didn't
know this. We had smoke in
the house, could not find the
source more than a little
disconcerting so I called
911 and calmly explained
our situation: "Everything
looks okay now, but could
you send someone just to
take a look?" The dispatcher
sent someone all right. In
five minutes we had a dozen
fire-fighters, six fire trucks,
and a battalion chief stand-
ing in the front yard.
Everyone involved was
consummately thorough, es-
pecially the dispatcher. She
did not care that everything
"looked okay." She did not
respect our schedules or our
busy lives. Minor event or
four alarm fire, her instruc-
tions were direct and clear:
"Get out of the house!" I pro-
tested several times stating
that it was cold outside and
we were safe.
She continued to answer:
"Get out of the house," grow-
ing more forceful each time
until finally it sounded as if
my mother was on the line.
I relented and did as I was
told.
That dispatcher would
make a wonderful preacher.
See, the best sermons are
not necessarily the ones
that reinforce our comfort or
our long-held beliefs, caus-
ing us to rest well in pews.
The best sermons are those
that cause us to get up and


run from the sanctuary. The
best sermons say directly
and clearly: "Get out of the
house!"
I cut my theological teeth
in a tradition fixated with
defending the Bible. We
were "people of the Book"
who worked hard to pro-
tect the always-under-siege
Scriptures. Thus, I heard
much high oratory and deep
exegesis on the inspiration,
infallibility, incorrigibility,
and inerrancy of the Bible
- this was an almost weekly
subject.
In short, I heard a whole
lot about the Bible, but didn't
get much help in how to live
the Bible. This seemed out
of joint because the people
that gathered week after
week to hear these theologi-
cal treatises were not doubt-
ing, suspicious skeptics.
They already believed in the
Bible, passionately. Truly, it
was "the Word of God for the
people of God." Case closed.
So no, I don't think Mrs.
Casey who taught the pri-
mary Sunday School class
was about to go off the theo-
logical reservation. How
could she? She knew more
good theology than most
preachers. I'm certain that
sweet, old Deacon Cooper
didn't know what the word
inerrantt" meant, though he
shouted "Amen" whenever
the preacher used the term
in a sermon.

And contrary to the fears
of some visiting evange-
lists, there was never a
conspiracy in our church
by the Women's Missionary
Union to tear out the writ-
ings of the Apostle Paul and
replace him with Oprah
(though some truly loved


-~
Ronnie McBrayer
Oprah more than Paul).
These good people needed
less information about the
Bible coming from inside the
church house, and needed
more real-world, life-giving
ways to put the Bible into
practice outside the church
house. They needed we
all need to practice some
of the oldest words from the
New Testament: "Don't just
listen to the Word. Do what
it says."
After all, one can shout
"Amen" when a theological
axe is ground or when be-
ing comforted by the famil-
iar words of custom and still
be a blazing hypocrite. And
in matters of faith there is
little worse than one who
seems to have all the right
beliefs, who can correctly
quote Scripture, canon, and
verse, who has a superior
sense of orthodoxy, but then
lives arrogantly and treats
others wrongly. Such living
is a betrayal of the truth one
claims to defend.
No, the proof of truth is
not how often we use the cor-
rect theological buzzwords
or how long we sit and listen
inside our houses of wor-
ship. The proof of truth is
the practice of God's grace
and burning love out in the
communities around us. Get
out of the house.

Ronnie McBrayer is the
author of "Leaving Religion,
Following Jesus." He writes
and speaks about life, faith,
and Christ-centered spiri-
tuality. Visit his website at
www.ronniemcbrayer.net.


St. Agatha's Concert Series


Could it be Spring al-
ready, was that a songbird,
or was that a flute? On
Sunday, April 3 at 3 p.m.,
the answer will definitely be
"flute." Actually, the entire
flute family, including pic-
colo, concert flute, alto flute,
and bass flute. The Lake-
side Concert Series at St.
Agatha's Episcopal Church
presents "Flutes Furioso"
of Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC).
The flute ensemble
"Flutes Furioso" was found-


CLARY-GLENN FUNERAL HOMES CELEBRATES


80


YEARS


OF COMMITMENT TO SERVICE


Join us in celebrating eight decades of history and services.

Established in 1931 by John Page, Randolph Clary purchased the fueral home
SJ I in 1952 and joined partnership with Jerry and Sheila Godwin in 1982 and
the funeral home became Clary-Godwin Funeral Home. In 1952 Mercer
and Ada Comander established Comander Funeral Home, in 1975
Robert and Sara Comander obtained ownership of Comander Funeral
Home. In 2002 Clary-Godwin and Comander Funeral Homes merged
and became Clary-Godwm-Comander Funeral Homes. In 2000
Clary-Godwin Freeport Chapel Funeral Home was established in
Freeport, Florida. In 2004 Joel and Paula Glenn purchased Clary-
'- Godwmn-Comander Funeral Home and Clary-Godwmn Freeport
Chapel Funeral Home and today are Clary-Glenn Funeral
"Homes. Clary-Glenn Funeral Homes, Inc. is proud of their
eighty years of funeral heritage and is grateful to the families
whom they have served for eight decades.


\si u.J


clary-glenn.com
CLARI-GLENN FUNEtRAL HOME
S 30l PRK AVENUE DEFUN-LAK SPRINGS. FL (80) 892-2511
S, CLARY-GLENN FREEPORT C-LAPEL FUNERAL HOME
150 EAST H]GI-f\AY 20 FREEPORT, FL i850l 835-2511

.__ ,, , h ,I t ." im y


ed in January of 1995 by di-
rector Robin Home, a well-
known Fort Walton Beach
flutist, performer, teacher
and faculty member of
NWFSC. The group is made
up of local flutists, includ-
ing both advanced students
and professional musicians.
They enjoy performing both
popular arrangements and
original works for flute
choir. They also play several
pieces composed specifically
for this group.
Admission to the concert


is free, though a collection
is taken to be used only for
the support of the series. A
reception will be held imme-
diately following the perfor-
mance to provide the audi-
ence an opportunity to meet
the artists. The program, in-
cluding a brief intermission,
will run about one hour. All
are invited to enjoy the mu-
sic and the reception.
St. Agatha's Episcopal
Church is located at 144
Circle Drive in DeFuniak
Springs.


Marble &

Y''Q^**t3 Pdoav1tn'


Granite

Smonaa
more


Ah'?Wt1c2.t ewFra :4Mu/wcums
.* (utrw' nt-eri'rs I;omI.y a ori Custm if'
(800) 892-3213
Fax (850) 892.2534






MEMORIALS, INC.

FAMILY OH N'ED &O OPERATED


(850) 834-4345
3979 Slaic Hwy 2.Wcst
DeFuniak Springs, FL 12431

Semring the Flwida Panhandle And Southern Alahbama with:
Monuments
Vaults
.. Bronze
And all Cemetery Needs!

We.sp'iafizr Custom .a.,Imumnts v& Afzdeumcts


Ward Memorial

Granite Marble Bronze
Mommemls Markersb* fthches
Coping & 'Chif~ Death Datie


8c4curds 8 wy 92 N33" 32 I
AmTWtyei 3131 Hwy. 83 N.


.:;AA< ., H ^sso
Clary-Glenn

oAl = FUNERAL HOMES
... Locally ouned aindt fmliy operated


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2011


PA GE 4-B








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011

Bill Nail retires from CHELCO


Bill Nail and his wife,
Linda, show off his retire-
ment cake during an event
honoring him at CHELCO
on March 8.


Nail retired from CHEL-
CO after 39 years of service
to the cooperative.
He began work in Janu-
ary 1972 as an administra-


tive assistant to the manag-
er of purchasing, stores and
accounts for $700 a month.
Upon retirement, his job
title was manager of plant
accounting.


BILL NALL SHOWN
WITH his retirement cake
from CHELCO after 39years
along with his wife Linda.


Covenant Hospice hosts annual Boston butt sale March 29


Covenant Hospice will be
having their annual Boston
butt sale Saturday, March
26 at Triple B Bar B Que,


downtown Crestview.
The cost is $30 each.
They will deliver them on
Friday night to those that


want them straight off the
grill.
For more information


contact Carolyn Williams,
Covenant Hospice Commu-
nityEducator, (850) 598-
1057.


THIS TRACTOR WAS displayed inside and drew many
an eye to its simplicity and beauty after all these years.


Tractor Pull
Results

2500 Stock
1. Joann Hirschkorn- 73'
2. Jim Wasson- 63' 3"
3. Ethan Tatman- 61' 6"
4. Roger Nehus- 57' 7"

3500 Stock
1. Joey Kent- 93' 2"
2. Chandley Gilbert- 89' 3.84"


3500 Modified.
1. Joey Kknt- 96' 3"
2. Chandley Gilbert- 95'
3. Roger Nehus- 57' 7"


11"


4500 Stock
1. Larry Hirschkorn- 161' 7"
2. Chandley Gilbert- 134' 11"
3. Sam Mathews- 132' 10"
4. Roger Nehus- 128' 2"
5. Dewayne Bunge- 124' 8"
6. Steve Hurst- 111' 11"
7. Joey Kent- 99' 8"
8. Clay Baxley- 84' 6"

'4500 Modified
1. Chandley Gilbert- 135' 9"
2. Clay Baxley- 129'
3. Roger Nehus- 127' 9"
4. Sam Mathews-:121' 5"
'': Steve Hurst- 117' 9"


5500 Stock
1. Terry Pittenger- 163' 9"
2. Kenny Barfield- 156' 3"

5500 Modified
1. Terry Pittenger- 162' 8"
2. Kenny Barfield- 156' 6"

6500 Stock
1. Terry Pittenger- 190' 1"
2. Robert Wilkerson- 189' 9"
3. Kenny Barfield- 186' 1"
4. Roger Nehus- 158' 4"
5. Jim Wasson- 153' 3"

6500 Modified
1. Kenny Barfield 190' 4"
2. Terry Pittenger- 184' 9"


YOU ARE NEVER TOO young to get in on the tractor
pull and show your farming skills. (Photo by Lori Ceier and
Walton Outdoors)


7500 Stock
1. Dewayne Bunge- 241'4"
2. Jonathan Harris- 239' 8"
3. Dennis Gainer- 233' 1"
4. Frank Hall- 221'2"
5. Joey Kent- 219' 6"
6. Miles Ericson- 208' 1"

7500 Modified
1. Frank Hall- 224' 5"
2. Miles Ericson- 220' 4"
3. Dennis Gainer- 217' 9"
4. Joey Kent- 213' 1"


9500 Stock
1. Jim Wasson- 246'
2. Sam Mathews- 239' 5"
3. Clif Gilbert- 216' 1"

9500 Modified
1. Roger Nehus- 245' 8"
2. Chandley Gilbert- 239' 3"
3. Dennis Gainer- 238' 6"
4. Jim Wasson- 224' 3"


Walto 1 Count m = lan I I1igl P oges sve Growing!


SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIM


S


HANDLED


- APPEALS EXPERT


By: Dr. Anna Pat Krupkin, Ph.D


DISABILITY CONSULTANTS


(850) 835-2163

P.O. Box # 539, Freeport, Florida 32439
NO FEE UNLESS YOU COLLECT
Since 1970


SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
HANDLED APPEALS EXPERT
By: Dr. Anna Pat Krupkin, Ph.D
DISABILITY CONSULTANTS
(850) 835-2163
P.O. Box # 539, Freeport, Florida 32439
NO FEE UNLESS YOU COLLECT Since 1970
CALL PAT FOR DETAILS


Benjamin Moore-
Paint.s


EST. 1970 .
Hardware and Building Supplies
Franks_cc@yahoo.com
FREEPORT LOCATION GRAYTON BEACH LOCATION
244 Highway 20 East 113 Logan Lane
FREEPORT, FL Grayton Beach, FL 32459
(850) 835-4221 (850) 231-0500


CRAZY CARL '.


For The Finest In Seafood
Enjoy the sunsets while dining overCooking the
beautrifuChoctawhatchee 'rBay!!
7585 State Hwy 20 West Tuesday Sunday
850-835-2222 1IAM-8:30PM


PAGE 5-B


L*


EVENTS LIKE THIS ARE ABOUT NEIGHBORS, en-
gines, history and fun.


S ATLM '
?(rvz T V
*ypPE TJ' S **l T*.iirr

850-835-4153
18374 U.S. Hwy. 331 S. Freeport, FL 32439
To view our local listings visit our website at
www.freeportwaterfront.com mI
nutron.









PAGE 10-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011


S.W. Baseball Nips Port St. Joe 5-4


SBy PATRICK CASEY
South Walton pitcher
Mitchell Peterson threw a
complete game in picking
up a 5-4 win over Port St.
Joe in a non-district contest
played on Saturday after-
noon as South Walton High
School.

It wasn't easy for Peter-
son as he got out of jams in
both the sixth and seventh
innings to help the Sea-
hawks even their record at
4-4 on the year.
South Walton put two
runs on the scoreboard in the
bottom of the first inning as
Peterson reached on an er-


ror and eventually scored on
a wild pitch for the first run
of the game. First baseman
Alex Astin followed up with
a solo home run to push the
lead to 2-0.
Peterson kept the Sharks
from plating any runs
through the first three in-
nings but ran into trouble
in the fourth. Rock Quinn
and Austin Howze reached
on singles with a walk load-
ing up the bases with just
one out. After a strikeout,
Trevor Lang singled in a run
followed by an error that
cut the lead to 3-2 before a
strikeout of Tucker Smith
ended the inning.


Astin, who had three hits
in the game, provided an
RBI single in the third and
doubled with one out in the
fifth inning. Shortstop Tan-
ner DeGafferelly followed
with an RBI single for a 4-2
lead after five innings of
play.
The Seahawks added an
important insurance run in
the bottom of the fifth in-
ning as Johnny Harrison
drew a walk and eventually
scored on a pinch-hit single
for a 5-2 lead.
Peterson struggled to fin-
ish the game as an error and
a double by Sharks starting
pitcher JMason Ray got the


final inning off to a rough
start. Peterson settled down
to post a strikeout against
Chase Watford before a
Rock Quinn sacrifice fly cut
the lead to 5-3. Austin How-
ze was hit by a pitch to load
the bases before an infield
single cut the lead to 5-4.
Peterson then got a ground
ball to second to earn a force
and bring the game to a
close.

South Walton will travel
to Cottondale for a district
contest on March 17, then
make a trip to Sneads for
another district game on
March 18.


'*---- -- -- .- -.

SOUTH WALTON SHORTSTOP Tanner DeGafferelly
prepares to throw out a runner, at first base during the Sea-
hawks game with Port St. Joe on Saturday. The Seahawks
improved to 5-4 on the year with the win. (Photo by Patrick
Casey)


-. w-f '^^l ^ '^
4. '..,.


A PORT ST. JOE BATTER POPS up a pitch during the
second inning of the Sharks game at South Walton. The
Seahawks won both games with the Sharks this season and
face three consecutive district games on the road beginning
Thursday. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


THE SOUTH WALTON COACHES and reserve players
enjoyed the weather on Saturday afternoon as well as a win
over Port St. Joe. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


SOUTH WALTON'S MITCHELL PETERSON threw a
complete game on Saturday as the Seahawks eked out a 5-4
win over Port St. Joe. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


Anderson strikes out 11 to pave the way



for 3-1 Walton victory over P.C. Arnold


By REID TUCKER
Angus Anderson's stel-
lar performance from the
mound and solid contribu-
tion at the plate prevented
Walton's second game this
season against Panama City
Arnold .from being decided
by pure, blind chance.
Walton coach Rick Dixon
was in no hurry to have his
team grind out 12 innings
again as the two sides had
done in the first meeting of
the season on March 1, a
game that ended in an 8-7
loss for the Braves. So, as
a precaution, he struck an
unorthodox deal with his
Arnold counterpart prior


to the start of the game,
played Friday, March 11, at
Walton.
"I had gone over before the
game and told their coach
that if it looked anything
like we were going to go to-
ward 12 innings again that
we would play rock-paper-
scissors," Dixon said, laugh-
ing. "I was hoping it wasn't
going to go in that direction.
Fortunately it didn't."
In spite of the clandes-
tine preparation to prevent
a drawn-out game, Dixon
needn't have worried. The
Braves (4-5) came back
from one-run deficit going
into their third at-bat to lay


claim to and hang on to a
3-1 victory over Arnold (3-6),
this time around sans five
innings of free baseball. The
win marks the first time in
five games that Walton has
beaten the Marlins.
Integral to that effort
was Anderson, who struck
out 11 batters and walked
just three, compared to the
Marlins' Hank Hobby, who
tallied three strikeouts and
two walks. Walton also out-
hit Arnold, with Anderson
and Liam Miller account-
ing for four of five total hits,
while Hunter Hart had two
hits and James McKenzie
had one for the Marlins.


Miller, Chris Kelly and
Chris Murphy scored Wal-
ton's three runs and Bron-
son Hill scored Arnold's lone
run in the top of the second
inning.
Though Anderson would
make a good account of him-
self in the game, he started
out slow, with an initial
strikeout tempered by back-
to-back walks, though no Ar-
nold batter got on base. This
trend continued through
the bottom of the inning,
but Arnold capitalized on a
walk at the top of the second
to send Hill stealing around
the bases to home. Ander-
son gave up two hits in that


~*.I -.4-


LIAM MILLER CRUSHED a home run over the center
fielder's head to start the Braves on a 3-1 scoring run. Wal-
ton's batters had six hits on the evening compared to Ar-
nold's three. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


WALTON JV CATCHER MICHEAL STANLEY throws.
an Arnold runner out at second base during their 12-3 vic-
tory.


ANGUS ANDERSON TERRORIZED Arnold's batters in
the March 11 game, striking out 11. He pitched what Wal-
ton coach Rick Dixon said was "the best game he's had this
year." (Photo by Reid Tucker)


ISAAC MORRISON RAPS a single past third base dur-
ing the Walton JVgame against Arnold.


at-bat but Walton's defense
turned in a good play at first
to prevent the Marlins from
scoring further, despite hav-
ing two runners on.
Neither club scored again
until the bottom of the
third, when Miller took just
one strike before crushing a
homer over the center field
wall to tie the game. Walton
got two more hits that in-
ning and drove in runs from
Kelly and Murphy before
the Braves were retired.
The Braves held on to the
two-run advantage for the
rest of the game though they
tried to lengthen the lead
several times. Hobby threw
nothing but fastballs and the
occasional changeup at the
onset, but knuckled down
on a wicked 12 o'clock-6
o'clock curveball in the mid-
dle innings, which gave the
Braves some pause as the
ball came from well above
shoulder height to drop
into the strike zone. While
Hobby may not have gotten
as many strikeouts, he nev-
ertheless held up Walton's
batters long enough to keep
the Marlins in the game.
Anderson retired three
batters in quick succession
in the top of the sixth, but
Walton was unable to con-
vert a run despite holding
two bases in the bottom of
the inning. Then, at the top
of the seventh, Anderson
gave up two hits in a row to
put Arnold runners on first
and second. Fortunately for
the Braves, Ean Phillips
popped out to the infield and
Walton took the early win
with a score of 3-1.
Dixon commended An-
derson's performance at the
plate and at the pitcher's
mound, calling this his best
game of the year. Despite
struggling with his pitch-
ing in some earlier games,
Anderson is primed to finish
out the season stronger than
ever, Dixon said. Anderson's
combination of solid hitting
(as of this writing he hovers
around the .500 mark) and a
real presence on the mound
means his individual suc-
cess and the Braves' success
as a whole will be one and
the same.
"[Anderson]'s been just
on fire at the plate and I told
him yesterday after hitting
that he needs to bring the
confidence he has when bat-
ting to the pitcher's mound.
"He's a quality pitcher but
he just hasn't gone out and
put together a great outing


on the mound but he did to-
night. I think getting him
on track is going to go along
way as far as our whole sea-
son is concerned."

High School
Baseball Scores

Monday- March 7
Freeport 9
Laurel Hill 8


Walton
Jay


Tuesday- March 8
Baker 4
PDL 2

Paxton 16
Rocky Bayou 0

Pens. Catholic 17
Walton 6

Thursday- March 10
Baker 2
Freeport 1

Friday- March 11
Paxton 16
Poplar Springs 3


Vernon
South Walton

Walton
P.C. Arnold


Saturday- March 12
South Walton 5
Port St. Joe 4


High School
Softball Scores

Monday- March 7
Vernon 13
PDL 0

Tuesday- March 8
Baker 6
PDL 1


P.C. Arnold
Walton


Paxton 8 inn 8
Rocky Bayou 7


Port St. Joe
Freeport


South Walton 1
Holmes Co. 0

Friday- March 11
Northview 7
PDL 4

Poplar Springs 6
Paxton 3 3


--; -. ,
-- L~
~.








PAGE 11-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011



Sports News and Notes


By PATRICK CASEY
Eight girls basketball
players from the Area 5 as
well as two boys basketball
players will help to make
up squads in the East-West
Freedom All-Star Classic in
Panama City on Saturday,
April 16. South Walton's
Sam Snider and Alex Lovell
will join Paxton's Magen Ad-
ams and Krysten Cuchens
along with Walton's Lynn


Paulk and Freeport's Dan-
nica Mosher in representing
the West squad while Ponce
de Leon's Sha-Lea Yates
and Hillary Harper will play
for the East team. Paxton's
Shaq Jackson and Free-
port's Michael Graziani will
both play for the West boys
basketball team. Freeport
boys basketball coach Da-
vid Burke will help Choctaw
boys basketball coach Marc


Tisza coach the West boys
squad while Paxton coach
Steve Williams will help
Fort Walton Beach coach
Holly McDaniel with the
West girls team. The games
will take place at Gulf Coast
Community College with
the girls game tipping at 11
a.m and the boys contest at
1 p.m.
The DeFuniak Springs
Red Sox defeated Campbell-


ton 10-9 on March 6 to grab
a road victory against the
defending champions. The
DeFuniak squad scored four
runs in the second inning
with the help of a pair of
doubles and an error by the
Wildcats. Former Walton
High athlete Xavier Jack-
son hit a grand slam home
run in the fifth inning to
push the lead to 10-1 before
Campbellton rallied for six


NWFSC High School Math Bowl winners announced


Teams from 29 northwest
Florida high schools recent-
ly competed in the 24th an-
nual Math Bowl at North-
west Florida State College
(NWFSC) at the college's
Niceville campus. More than
200 students participated in
the day-long competition.
The NWFSC Math Bowl
featured events in solving
mathematics problems on
a written test and cipher-
ing matches in which teams
were pitted against each
other in a race against time
to correctly solve various
algebra, trigonometry, ana-
lytic geometry, plane geom-
etry, calculus and miscella-
neous problems.
Competing schools were
divided into three divisions,
based .on school size. In the
small school division, Ma-
Clay placed first, followed
by Rocky Bayou Christian
School in second place, third
place was South Walton
High School, Freeport in
fourth place, and Port St.
Joe in fifth place.
In individual awards
in this division, first place
went to So Hyun Park from
MaClay, followed by Yang
Liu from Maclay, Haley
Lee of Rocky Bayou, Jona-
than Allen of Rocky Bayou,
Tim Sung of Rocky Bayou,
William Hudson of Rocky
Bayou, Cameron Ridgewell
of Maclay, Seungbyn Beak
of Maclay, .Reed Coker of
south Walton and AJ Neale
of Paxton.
In the medium school cat-
egory, Choctawhatchee High
School took top honors, fol-
lowed by NWFSC Collegiate
High School in second place,
Marianna High School in
third place, Gulf Breeze
High School in fourth place,
and Rutherford High School
in fifth place.
In individual awards in
this division, Brandon Jow-
ers of Choctawhatchee High
placed first, followed by Al-
len Wang of Gulf Breeze,
Ryan Smith of Chipley,
Mark Boutwell of NWFSC
Collegiate, Kai Billings of
Choctawhatchee, Wesley
Olson of NWFSC Colle-
giate, Sarah Warkander of
Rutherford, Malcolm Foley
of Choctawhatchee, Jude


Han of Marianna and John
Crowell of Choctawhatchee.
In the large school cat-
egory, Rickards High School
placed first, followed by
Chiles High School in second
place, Lincoln High School
of Tallahassee in third, and


Leon High School of Talla-
hassee in fourth and Fort
Walton Beach High School
in fifth place.
In individual awards in
this category, first place
went to Andrew Chico of
Rickards followed by Pratik


Sachdeva from Rickards,
Chase Belcher of Chiles,
Chris Kim of Rickards, Kev-
en Huang of Chiles, Alex Yu
of Rickards, Shawn Best of
Lincoln, Ziyan Song of Lin-
coln, Jimmy Zhang of Chiles
and Wayne Zhao of Chiles.


ROCKY BAYOU CHRISTIAN took second place in the small school category.


CHOCTAW HIGH SCHOOL took first place in the medium school division at the 24th An-
nual NWFSC Math Bowl.


NWFSC Jazz Ensemble upcoming performances


The Jazz Ensemble of
Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC) will be
performing at the following
community events around
the Panhandle area during
March and April. The Jazz
Ensemble is comprised of
NWFSC students and com-
munity members and is led
by Fred Domulot and Tom
Latenser. For information
contact the NWFSC Fine


Arts Office at (850) 729-
5382.
March 17, two NWFSC
Jazz Ensemble students,
Michael Malone and Tito
Rodgers, will be performing
at the Jazz Society of Pensa-
cola Jazz Competition in the
Ashmore Auditorium on the
campus of Pensacola State
College.
April 3, performing from
12 12:30 p.m. on the main-


stage of the Pensacola Jazz
Festival being held in Seville
Square.

April 8, performing at
the NWFSC Middle School/
High School Jazz Clinic &
Festival being held in the
NWF State College Amphi-
theater.

April 18, performing with
Pensacola State College and


University of West Florida
at the Jazz Society of Pensa-
cola Jazz Gumbo at 7:30 pm
April 27, Jazz Ensemble
Spring Concert at NWFSC
on the Mainstage at Mattie
Kelly Arts Center.

The free concert is a non-
ticketed event and. seating is
on a first come basis. Doors
open at 7 p.m. and the con-
cert begins at 7:30 p.m.


runs in the seventh inning
with the help of three Red
Sox errors. Red Sox coach
Booketee Hartfield closed
the game in the bottom of
the ninth inning by striking
out the side to preserve the
win.
The No. 2-ranked Ala-
bama (24-1) softball team
claimed the Easton SEC/
ACC Challenge by earn-
ing four more,wins over the
weekend. The Crimson Tide
downed 2010 NCAA tour-
nament participants North
Carolina and Florida State,
twice each. Alabama opened
the tourney with a 3-0 win
on Friday over the Tar Heels
and then downed Florida
State, 8-0 and UNC, 10-1 on
Saturday. On Sunday the
Tide completed the sweep
with a 9-2 victory over the
Seminoles.
The University of Florida
will unveil three statues
outside of Ben Hill Griffin
Stadium at halftime of the
team's spring game on April
9, featuring the school's
three Heisman winners:
Steve Spurrier (1966), Dan-
ny Wuerffel (1996) and Tim


Through March 13
CLASS A, DISTRICT 1
District
W L
Paxton 3 0
Bethlehem 2 0
Laurel Hill 1 0
Central 1 2
Poplar Springs 0 2
Rocky Bayou 0 3

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 1
District
W L
Jay 2 0
Baker 4 1
Northview 2 1
Pens. Christian 0 1
PDL 0 3
Freeport 0 3

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 2
District
W L
P.C. Bozeman 5 0
Sneads 3 1
Holmes Co. 3 2
Vernon 3 2
Blountstown 2 4
So. Walton 1 2
Graceville 1 3
Cottondale 0 5

CLASS 3A, DISTRICT 1
District
W L
Pens. Catholic 4 0
P.C. Bay 3 1
Chipley 2 1
Marianna 1 2
Walton 1 4
P.C. Arnold 1 4


Tebow (2007).
Lindsey Hansen, who
played softball at Niceville
High School, was named
the Big Ten Player of the
Week for her contributions
at Michigan State for play
during the week of Feb. 28 -
March 6. The senior earned
conference Player of the
Week status after hitting
at a .750 clip and knocking
in 11 runs to help Michigan
State to a 3-1 record that
week. The senior shortstop
had three multi-hit and
multi-RBI games in finish-
ing 9-for-12 from the plate,
including a 4-for-4 perfor-
mance against Seton Hall
in which she hit her 31st
career homerun. Hansen
drove in four against the Pi-
rates after driving in three
each against Providence and
South Carolina, also steal-
ing two bases that week.
She scored seven runs and
finished the week with an
OPS of 2.369 in earning her
second career weekly honor.
Contact Patrick Casey at
The DeFuniak Herald with
your local sports notes at:
heraldsports@aol.com.


Overall
W L
5 0
3 2
2 2
2, 6
2 2
0 6


Overall
W L
4 3
7 4
2 4
2 4
1 4
3 5


Overall
W L
7 3
3 6
5 4
4 5
5 5
4 4
1 8
4 7


Overall
W L
8 0
4 3
5 4
7 3
4 5
3 6


2010 SOFTBALL

STANDINGS

CLASS A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
W L W L
Poplar Springs 2 0 2 0
Laurel Hill 2 1 2 3
Central 2 1 5 2
Bethlehem 1 1 1 2
Paxton 1 3 2 3
Rocky Bayou 0 2 1 4

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
W L W L
Jay 4 0 8 3
Baker 4 1 8 3
Northview 2 2 5 7
PDL 0 3 1 5
Freeport 0 4 1 10


N'FSC JAZZ ENSEM-
BLE-lead vocalists, (bot-
tom rowu)Mary Ann Gleason
(Crestlieu') Cara Ratliff
(Fort Walton Beach) Kris
Kuss ('1al-P) Carrie Rogers
(Navarre) (1-r).


CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 2
District
W L


P.C. Bozeman
Holmes Co.
Sneads
Vernon
South Walton
Cottondale
Graceville
Blountstown

CLASS 3A, DI
I

Marianna
P.C. Arnold
P.C. Bay
Chipley
Walton
Pens. Catholic


Overall
W L
9 3
10 3
7 4
5 2
4 4
1 10
1 10
0 8


STRICT 1
districtt Overall
W L W L
4 0 10 4
4 1 7 2
2 2 3 5
2 2 7 5
0 3 3 4
0 4 1 9


2011 BASEBALL

STANDINGS


I


1








PAGE 12-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 17,2011

Paxton Dixie Youth League opening day photos


THE WAREHOUSE MARKET MALL-sponsored softball
JOSHUA HOLMES of the Buddy's Fireworks t-ball team BRYANPURSLEYpitched a solid game against the T&D team had a tough game against the Florida Transformers,
didn't need much help to get a base hit on his first-ever at- Trucking-sponsored team in the Paxton Dixie Youth Major Inc.-sponsored team, but pitcher Grace Cox anchored her
bat. (Photo by Reid Tucker) League game for 11-and-12-year-old competitors. (Photo by team mates from the mound. (Photo by Reid Tucker)
Reid Tucker)


S B o t p a f d it t b r r GARRETT BRODY slid safely to third base, narrowly missing the out by Austin Cosby
LOGAN BAIEY outran the play at first base despite the best efforts of The Florala in the Major League game. (Photo by Reid Tucker)
News'pitching machine team's infield players. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


..... -...........^... ... .-_ ^-. ,
THE ONLY THING that automatically makes anything
THE WARM-UP AREA was abuzz with activity as the better is good barbecue this fact was not missed by the Di-
teams awaited their games on opening day. (Photo by Reid xie Youth League. Lines stayed long at the concession stand
Tucker) accordingly. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


THE ALLURE OF A CLAY INFIELD proved too much
for Trevor Schottroff. However, the young player wasn't neg-
ligent in his duties, as he did at least wait until a change in
batters before getting his hands dirty. (Photo by Reid Tuck-
er)


COOL SPRING WEATHER. a beautifully blue sky, a
packed parking lot, energetic young ball players and lots of
supportive fans: the ingredients fr a perfect opr'ning day of
Dixie Youth League baseball. (Photo by Reid Ti,,:ler)