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The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00373
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Publication Date: 3/3/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
sobekcm - UF00028316_00373
System ID: UF00028316:00373
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Full Text






The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888




HERALD
COMBINED WITH THE BREEZE

Library of Florida History a101
P.O. Box 117007
200 Sma University of Florida
Gainesville FL 32611-7007 ,,,"
, .., h,,,,,,14. .'--. re


ART AT
BOGEY'S
Walton
County Art
League cel-
ebrates at
Hotel De-
Funiak.
I-B


VOLUME 122 NUMBER 9 3 SECTIONS THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2011 75 PER COPY


I INSIDE


DEMERS NOW
ACTING COUNTY
ADMINISTRATOR
Seigler to be pub-
lic works director.
1-C




MEET WCEDA
An interview with
Scarlett Phaneuf.
12-A




NEW FOOTBALL
COACH AT WHS
Robert Bennett of
Fayetteville, N.C.
starts March 21.
3-A




CDLAB WANTS
TO BE CLEAR
Unique lakes need
special designation.
1-C




ATHLETIC
EXCELLENCE
IN FREEPORT
An interview with
Michael Graziani.
10-B


Vrl _

CONGRESSMAN JEFF MILLER (1) asked guests for their input into ways to allevi-
ate the nation's financial crisis at a barbecue luncheon just outside DeFuniak Springs on
Thursday, Feb. 24. (Photo by Reid Tucker)



U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller discusses


national deficit and debt at


"meat-and-greet" lunch


By REID TUCKER
Good barbecue makes ev-
erything taste better, even
the sometimes unpalatable
realities associated with
cutting the pork out of fed-
eral spending.
At least that was the
hope of the District 5 State
Representative Brad Drake,
whose staff organized a bar-
becue luncheon for the pur-
pose of hosting U.S. Rep.
Jeff Miller. The Republican
congressman of District 1
met with a crowd of about
30 individuals representing
various local government


agencies as well as private
citizens at a residence just
outside I)eFuniak Spriings
on Thursday, Feb. 2.1. While
Miller fielded questions on
myriad topics from national
health care to local infra-
structure enhancements.
the main topic of discussion
was the state of the ongoing
battle against the nation's
fiscal woes.
Miller, between sips of
iced tea, told the crowds of
the continuing resolution
passed a couple of weeks ago
in the GOP-controlled House
to cut the federal budget by


$60 billion for the remainder
of the year, or roughly .'s''
million per day (an overall
deficit reduction of 6.9 per-
cent). Miller said this reso-
lution, which would be good
through the first part of
September, amounts to the
biggest spending cut in the
history of the federal gov-
ernment. However, he said
people shouldn't expect that
to come without some bad
aftertastes, as Florida will
feel the crunch too, seeing as
the state's budget has a $3.5
See MILLER 10-A


DFS City Council

approves 30-year

gas contract


By ASHLEYAMASON
The Defuniak Springs
City Council approved a let-
ter of intent to participate
in a 30-year contract with
Florida Gas Utility (FGU)
to receive 20 percent of
its natural gas supply at a
$.50 discount below market
price. The city has been a
member of FGU, the fourth
largest buyer of natural gas
in Florida, since May 2010.
FGU General Manager Ka-
trina Warren explained the
city would assume no risk
or debt by committing a let-
ter of intent and obligatory
$1,100 for attorney fees,
listed as continuing develop-
ment costs, FGU incurred in
procuring the contract. FGU
will issue the bonds for the
pre-paid natural gas sup-
ply, with Goldman Sachs as
guarantor.
Councilman Don Har-
rison questioned why FGU
would commit to a fixed dis-
count rather than a percent-
age, considering the market
price for natural gas over a
30-year span could increase
drastically.
Warren answered Gold-
man Sachs is willing to
discount the amount that
is prepaid, which locks in
a number of units of natu-
ral gas and a finite dollar
amount discount.
City Manager Kim Kirby
interjected, "It eliminates
any and all risk for the
city...we would always get
$.50 .-.\ i ng. on 20 percent of
our gas supply [for the next
30 years and that savings
would be directly passed to
our customers]."
Harrison noted based
on the city's daily usage,


it would equate to $900 in
monthly savings for natural
gas customers.
Mayor Pro-Tempore
James Huffman added, "To
risk $1,100 for a savings
as long as 30 years is mini-
mal."
The Council agreed draw-
ing a letter of intent to par-
ticipate in the contract was
a means of direct savings
for customers. When the
vote came to call, the motion
passed 4-1, Wayne Graham
objecting.
In light of a request to
reconsider survey require-
ments for all new construc-
tion, Planning Director Greg
Scoville brought three sug-
gestions for the appropriate
requirement of a new survey
or use of existing one. The
recommended amendments
to the land development
regulations regarding sur-
vey requirements include:
new construction requires
an initial boundary survey
with complete legal descrip-
tion, total acreage, flood
zone certification, survey-
or's certification, and must
be prepared within the last
two years by a surveyor reg-
istered in the state of Flori-
da; in the case of additions
and location of accessory
structures, an existing sur-
vey may be used if no other
permanent construction has
been added since the origi-
nal survey was prepared:
a foundation survey is re-
quired at the time a founda-
tion inspection is requested
and an "as-built" survey is
required at the time a final
inspection is requested.

See COUNCIL 8-A


Waste Management to replace Dayco in Freeport


WALTON SHUTS
OUT FREEPORT
7-0
Walton pitcher
tosses one-hit game.
9-B




WALTON DEFEATS
ROCKY BAYOU
13-9 IN SOFTBALL
"Offense-driven"
home game. 9-B






ARTS &
ENTERTAINMENT
5-C

CLASSIFIED 7-C

OUTDOORS 2-C

ARRESTS 10-A


www.defuniakherald.com







0 94922 73172 2


By BEN GRAFTON
At the Freeport City
Council meeting of Feb. 24,
representatives of Waste
Management and Dayco ap-
peared before the Council
and asked for approval of a
contract that would transfer
the municipal waste pickup
franchise held by Dayco to
Waste Management. The
term of the franchise ex-


Scarlett Phaneuf, Man-
aging Director, Elizabeth
Brannon, Vice Chair, Wal-
ton County Economic Devel-
opment Alliance and Free-
port City Council Member,
and Walton County Com-
missioner, District 3 Larry
Jones attended the 2011
Florida Rural Summit re-
cently held in St. Augus-
tine. The conference was
hosted by the North Flori-
da Economic Development
Partnership (NFEDP), a
14-county regional economic
development organization.
"Florida's Rural Econom-
ic Development Future in
the New Economy" was the
theme of this year's confer-
ence and was focused on the
economic development chal-
lenges and opportunities
facing rural Florida com-
munities in today's tech-
nology driven, knowledge-


pires in 2015. Under this
agreement, trash pickup by
Waste Management would
begin on Monday, Feb.
28. Dayco employees
and equipment would con-
tinue be used for at least
30 days following approval
of the franchise transfer. A
Waste Management official
acknowledged that a 3-per-
cent franchise fee would be


based economy. Executive
Director, Jeff Hendry and
Chairman, Rick Breer of the
NFEDP were gracious hosts
and prepared an agenda that
covered topics pertinent to
rural communities includ-
ing community stakeholder
visioning, planning, eco-
nomic gardening, the power
of regional partnerships,
innovative capital project
investment and financing,
and many other informative
breakout sessions.
Pat Lien of Government
Services Group also spoke
about the broadband grant
application process for Op-
portunity Florida, the re-
gional economic develop-
ment group representing
the Eight-County Rural
Areas of Critical Econom-
ic Concern in Northwest
Florida, and the plans for
the new broadband network


paid to the city. The Council
approved the transfer of the
franchise.
In other business, City
Planner Latilda Henninger
reported that between 75
and 80 Freeport businesses
and non-profit organiza-
tions have completed the
registration now required
of these entities. Henninger
said registrations have not


within the region. Further,
the grant award and de-
velopment of the network
will present new opportu-
nities for broadband access
for additional communities
outside of the eight-county
service area such as Walton
County.
On the last day of the con-
ference, the attendees were
treated with an unexpected
visit from Gov. Rick Scott.
Scott took the time to meet
attendees and also to speak
about his plans for economic
development in the state. "I
want Florida to be the num-
ber state for economic de-
velopment, and the number
one place to do business,"
was Scott's proclamation
to the audience filled with
economic development pro-
fessionals, elected officials,
county/city managers, and
other professionals.


yet been received from a
number of organizations.
Even so. the registrations
received report there are
329 employees working for
these employers in the city
of Freeport.
Henninger said that the
mayor and Council have
received a letter from Free-
port Youth Sports inviting
them to attend the opening


day ceremonies on Feb. 26
for the youth baseball sea-
son. Marse has been invited
to throw out the first pitch.
City Attorney Clayton Ad-
kinson presented a required
resolution setting forth the
conditions of the bond agree-
ment for the North Bay wa-
ter main project. The Coun-

See FREEPORT 11-A


Walton County leadership attends

Florida 2011 Rural Summit


SCARLETT PHANEUF, Managing Director, WIalton
County lEconoImic Development Alliance, meeting (lGo. Rick
Scott at the 2011 Florida Rural Sum mit.








PAGE 2-A

Best friends plan to open Bullets

and Bones Sportsman's Club


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


In this winter of our re-
cession, it is encouraging
to see new developments
springing up. The old Grey-
hound racing training facil-
ity located on U.S. 90 E.,
approximately two miles
east of DeFuniak Springs is
being eyed for development
into a gun/archery shooting
range.
Two hunting friends have
partnered to develop a new
gun and archery range.
Scott McKinney and Bran-
don Keene are looking for
their slice of the American
dream as they pursue their
long-held desire to own their
own business. What they en-
vision is a modern shooting
range where hunters, ar-
chers, and gun enthusiasts
can practice their skills. The
potential Bullets and Bones
.Sportsman's Club develop-
ment will feature a 10-stall
archery range with 3-D mul-
tiple fauna targets (deer,
hogs, birds, rabbits, etc.) at
ranges from 10 to 60 yards.
The rifle range will have 30
stalls with targets at 100 to
300 yards. There will also


be a pistol range with tar-
gets at 5 to 25 yards. Hours
of operation will be Tuesday
through Sunday from dawn
to dusk.
McKinney and Keene
dreamed this dream during
the many hours they spend
together hunting. "We both
talked about ways we can
start a business where we
do something we love and
are passionate about," said
McKinney. "Guns and hunt-
ing are what we love and
there seems to be a real
need for this type of facility
in Walton County." Their
friendship hosts a fair share
of rivalry as McKinney, 39,
quips, "Brandon may be a
better shot, but I get the big-
ger bucks." Keene, 27, fires
back, "That's just been luck,
you're the blind squirrel old
man."
The often arduous devel-
opment process has been a
big surprise to the partners
as they learn of the myriad
of regulations and restric-
tions involved when open-
ing a new business. "Fortu-
nately the county employees


have been extremely helpful
by exploring ways we can
get this done right and not
totally break the bank," not-
ed Keene.
Their first step was to hire
a development consultant
and engineer. "[John] John-
son with Land Engineering
Services has been helping
us through the development
process and even made pay-
ment arrangements to help
make this project afford-
able," said McKinney. "We
have saved all our lives to
make this possible and we
are not going to let a few
hurdles stop us...We can
do most of the construction
ourselves and our families
are very supportive and
helpful."
They hope to have the
range open in approximately
six to nine months. One can
only wish these entrepre-
neurs well as they pursue
their slice of the American
dream.

For more information
contact Land Engineering
Services at (850) 892-3639.


MAGNOLIA CEMETERY


"Legends from the Graves"

sponsored by Walton

County Heritage Museum


DeFuniak motorist injured

in Okaloosa County crash


An Feb. 23 accident on
SR-285, one mile south of
CR-280, left a DeFuniak
Springs motorcyclist seri-
ously injured. Two other
motorists were involved, but
hot injured.

Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP) investigating Tpr.
Christopher A. Robinson
reported that a motorcyclist
was traveling south on SR-
'285, its driver Louis Claudio,
54, of DeFuniak Sp[rings. A
second vehicle was traveling


north, occupied by driver
Johnathan J. James, 30, of
Crestview, and passenger
John M. Howze, 44, of De-
Funiak Springs.
The FHP report states
that James attempted to
make a left turn onto a dirt
road on Eglin AFB property.
James told investigators
that he did not see Claudio's
motorcycle traveling south
until it was too late. James
accelerated in his left turn to
avoid hitting Claudio,while
Claudio swerved to avoid


hitting James. Claudio ap-
parently lost control of his
motorcycle, which rolled
onto its right side and eject-
ed Claudio.
Claudio was life-flighted
to Sacred heart Pensacola
with serious injures. Nei-
ther James not Howze were
injured.

The FHP report states
that alcohol was not a factor,
and that all motorists were
using seatbelts. Charges are
listed as pending.


Walton County Heri-
tage Museum is proud to
announce their premier of
"Legends from the Graves."
This special event will in-
clude a 'Lil Trolley' ride from
the Walton County Heritage
Museum to Magnolia Cem-
etery.
While at the cemetery,
Walton County's very own
local actors will step from
behind their perspective
headstones, board the trol-
ley and tell their story.
Learn a brief history of
Governor Catts, the Stinson
family, Wallace Bruce, Van
Ness Butler, Judge Clyde
Wells, and Judge Tom Bea-
sley. It should prove to be
an exciting time to discover
Walton County's history
from beyond the grave.
The "Legends from the
Graves" tour is scheduled
for March 11. and tickets


may be purchased prior
to the event by contacting
(850)892-9578, (850)859-
2207 or the Museum at
(850)951-2127. Tickets will
also be on sale the evening
of the event at the Heritage
Museum Depot, 1140 Circle
Drive, DeFuniak Springs.
There are three tours at 6
p.m., 7 p.m., and 8 p.m.
Seating is limited so arrive
at least 15 minutes early


before departure time. The
price of the ticket is $10 per
person and this includes
travel to and from the Mag-
nolia Cemetery on DeFuniak
Springs' own 'Lil Trolley.'
Light refreshments will
be served inside the muse-
um and donations are wel-
comed.
For additional information,
email hinsonharmony@ya-
hoo.com.


Backyard poultry workshops scheduled:



Raising chickens



for food and fun


Walton County Extension
Service will host a four-part
workshop on proper methods
of backyard or urban poultry
production. The first work-
shop will be held on March
7, at 6:30 p.m. at the Wal-
ton County Extension office
on Hwy 83. Dates for addi-
tional workshops are: March
21, March 28, and April 4.
families are encouraged to
attend pre-registration is
required and space is lim-
ited. Registration fee is $25
per family or individual for
all four workshops. Topics
covered will include: poultry


selection; housing; nutri-
tion; and health. To register
contact the Extension Office
at (850) 892-8172.

Persons with disabilities
needing special accommo-
dations should contact the
Extension Office at least 10
working days prior to the
event so that special con-
sideration can be given to
the request. The Institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal
Opportunity Institution au-
thorized to provide research,
educational information,


and other services only to
individuals and institutions
that function with non-dis-
crimination with respect to
race, creed, color, religion,
age, disability, sex, sexual
orientation, marital status,
national origin, political
opinions, or affiliations. U.S.
Department of Agriculture,
Cooperative Extension Ser-
vice, University of Florida,
IFAS, Florida A&M Uni-
versity Cooperative Exten-
sion Program, and Boards
of County Commissioners
Cooperating.


This service Is free and available to residents of Walton County
5tc: 2-3,10,17,24;3-3


'1 t


j*1
9..PI


Bruce Naylor
Owner-Broker


. The Proven Professionals



avlor


- W uj,/

REALTY
& Associates Inc.

L 776 Baldwin Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, FL


NAYLOR REALTY

Specializes In

Creative Internet Advertising

Strategic Internet Marketing

State of The Art Web Page Platform

At

www. BruceNaylor.com

www. NaylorRealtyUSA. com


Ask about our Personalized

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850-951-2488

We Can Sell Your Property


DeFuniak Lodge 170


& F&AM

1 st and 3rd Thursday 7:30 PM

; 220 Park Ave.
4 3


The Walton Board of County Commissioners Is sponsoring a project to collect, recycle, treat, and
properly dispose of these and other household hazardous wastes:
PESTICIDES USED OIL STALE GASOLINE SOLVENTS FERTILIZERS PAINT -
PAINT THINNERS PAINT STRIPPERS BATTERIES FURNITURE POLISH *
BRAKE FLUID ENGINE DEGREASERS ANTI-FREEZE -
POOL CHEMICALS INSECTICIDES SPOT REMOVERS
Waste tire amnesty will also be held on the same date, during the same hours and locations. Walton
County residents may bring up to 12 tires per residence.
Collection Date: Saturday, March 5, from 8 AM to 12 PM
Locations: Walton County Fairgrounds, Highway 83 North (9th Avenue), DeFunlak Springs
South Walton Mosquito Control Office, County Road 393, Santa Rosa Beach
* No gas cylinders or explosives, please.
* Due to hazardous nature of certain components In home computers, we will be accepting old
computer hardware including processors, monitors, keyboards, printers, scanners, etc.
Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators (small businesses, schools, growers, etc.) will be
accepted at a reduced rate. For more information or to schedule a drop off time,
contact the Landfill Department at 892-8180


I ... :
n. r ,,t~,I, 1 r
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S- -o
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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


A DeFuniak Springs
woman was seriously in-
jured on Feb. 25 when her
own vehicle ran over her.
Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP) investigating Tpr.
Mark Kemp reported that
Bobbie Jean Burkett, 80,
of DeFuniak Springs, was
found lying under her own
vehicle on Penn Williams
Road at Punch Bowl Road,
with chest injuries and lac-.
erations to her face and
head. Burkett told investi-
gators that she had stopped


Bennett named


DFS POLICE, FIRE DEPARTMENT, AND MASCOT EDDIE THE EAGLE pose with children of His Kids daycare at
a recent combined visit by the two departments to talk about safety.


DeFuniak Springs Police and Fire


Department visit "His Kids" day care


On Feb. 24, the DeFuniak
Springs Police and Fire De-
partments visited the "His
Kids" daycare to talk with
them about safety.
Members from the De-
Funiak Springs Police also
surprised the youngsters
with Eddie the Eagle, who
is their mascot for gun safe-
ty. Officers then explained
and demonstrated, through
class participation, what to
do when they come in con-
tact with a stranger.
Members of the Fire De-
partment talked to them on
procedures to follow if there
is a fire and when to call 911
and when not to. After the
kids received goodie bags,
the demonstration moved
from the classroom to the
outside where the young-
sters were able to enter a
police car as well as a fire
truck. Members from both
agencies answered many
questions from the young-


sters during this time.
The visit ended with all
the youngsters' high giving,


hugging and telling the en-
tire group goodbye, but not
before they made their way


to Eddie the Eagle to give
him a hug and say their
goodbyes to him as well.


KIDS PILE INTO POLICE vehicle, part of a tour when DFSPI) and the DFS Fire De-
partment visited His Kids daycare.


Walton County Master


Gardeners offer scholarship


The Walton County Mas-
ter Gardeners are offer-
ing scholarships to Walton
County Florida high school
seniors or Walton County
Florida residents currently
attending college or tech-
nical school interested in
furthering their education
in floriculture/horticulture.
Specific areas of interest


may include landscaping,
nursery/ garden center
management, floriculture,
forestry, grounds and turf
management, parks and
natural resources and/or
other agriculturally related
fields.
One to two scholarships,
ranging from $500 to $2,000,
are available and will be paid


jointly to the student and the
school. A good scholastic re-
cord, special interests, and
commitment to a floricul-
ture/horticulture career are
considerations when award-
ing the scholarshipss.
Applications are available
for the 2011-2012 school
year in the Guidance Coun-
selors' Offices at all Walton


High Schools, on-line at
http://walton.ifas.ufl.edu/,
and at the University of
Florida/Walton Extension
Office located at 732 N 9th
Street in DeFuniak Springs
(850) 892-8172).
For more information call
Paula Tutwiler at (850) 892-
2522. The deadline to apply
is April 1.


her vehicle to catch a dog
that was in the road. She
thought she had left the ve-
hicle's gear shift in Park po-
sition, but Kemp determined
that the vehicle had been
left in Drive. Consequently,
when Burkett exited to get
the dog, her vehicle began to
travel forward, striking and
running over her.
,Burkett was transported
to Sacred Heart of Pensaco-
la with serious injuries. Al-
cohol was not a factor, and
no charges are pending.


Walton football coach


By PATRICK CASEY
Robert "Bobby" Bennett,
who served as head coach
at Cape Fear High School
in Fayetteville, N.C., for
the past four seasons, was
named the head football
coach at Walton High School
by the Walton County
School Board at their March
1 meeting.
Bennett, 47, will take
over the football program on
March 21 after head coach-
ing stops at Live Oak Su-
wanee (2005-07), Ozark Car-
roll High School(2001-05),
Arcadia Desoto County High
School (1995-2001), and Val-
rico Bloomingdale Senior
High School (1989-92). Ben-
nett also served as defensive
coordinator and linebackers
coach at Lakeland Senior
High School from 1992-95.
In four years at Cape


Fear, Bennett led the squad
to two playoff appearances
and the school's first playoff
victory in its 41-year his-
tory.
The Braves will open
spring practice under Ben-
nett on Monday, May 2, and
will play at Chipley in the
spring game on Thursday,
May 19.
Bennett will become the
26th head football coach
in the history of the Wal-
ton High School football
program this fall when the
Braves open the regular sea-
son on SepT. 2 with a home
game against Gulf Breeze.
Coach Bennett is also
an ordained deacon in the
Southern Baptist Church.
He and his wife, Amy, have
four daughters, Taylor,
twins Brooke and Brittany,
and Abby.


Alaqua Animal Refuge's

Fourth Annual Canine

Carnival is coming to town


Laissez bon temps roll-
over with Rover at Alaqua
Animal Refuge's Fourth An-
nual Canine Carnival, to be
held on Saturday, March 5
at Gulf Place in Santa Rosa
Beach.
The Mardi Gras-themed,
pet-centric outdoor party
will feature a parade of ac-
tivities for pups and the peo-
ple who love them, including
games for kids and canines,
live music, local vendor
booths, food, a raffle, silent
auction, agility demonstra-
tions and the ever-popular
dachshund races.
"Our focus at Alaqua Ani-
mal Refuge is to save the
lives of abused, homeless
and neglected animals, and
while this is a serious mis-
sion, we still find time every
year to celebrate the joy of
pet companionship with
our Canine Carnival," said
Laurie Hood, president and
founder of Alaqua Animal
Refuge. "This special day,
with its Mardi Gras theme
and more activities then
ever, is about fun for the en-
tire family, including dogs!"
Sponsors for the 2011 Ca-


nine Carnival include Bent-
ley's on the Bay, Coastal
Builders of Northwest Flor-
ida, Gigi's Fabulous Kids
Fashions and Toys, Gulf
Place, Kappy the Clown and
Qantum Communications
with guest emcee Aimee
Shaffer. A $5 donation is
suggested at entry. To learn
more about Alaqua Animal
Refuge's Third Annual Ca-
nine Carnival, including
vendor booth qualifications,
please call (850) 880-6399.
Alaqua Animal Refuge, an
independent, nonprofit orga-
nization located on Florida's
Emerald Coast, advocates
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PAGE 3-A


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---









PAGE 4-A


Editorial Comment


*PERSONAL

COMMENTS

*LETTERS TO

THE EDITOR



Editorial comment



Muammar


el-Qaddafi


and


Charlie


Sheen


By BRUCE COLLIER
This past week the world has been witnessing the strug-
gle of two erratic megalomaniacs to hold on to their king-
doms. In the East is Muammar el-Qaddafi, Lord of Libya
and formerly the worst-hated Islamist in America, if you
can recall, pre-9/11. In the West is Charlie Sheen, self-de-
scribed "Vatican warlock assassin" (I don't know what that
means either) and reportedly TVs highest-paid comedy ac-
tor.
Qaddafi-watching used to be pretty entertaining, and he
could always be counted on to furnish something insanely
quotable for the press. Whether he actually said some of the
things he said, or whether it was just inept translation, I
don't know. Qaddafi eventually eased up on the anti-West-
ern rhetoric maybe it was President Reagan's bombing
raid on his residence and after 9/11, no one in America re-
ally cared. Now, as rebel forces are hacking away at Qadd-
afi's power, Libya appears to be following Egypt's "throw
the b out" program of regime change. Qaddafi has
said he intends to die a martyr (that's the Muammar I re-
member). Last time I checked, martyrdom entailed dying
as a witness to something: Does brutal tyranny merit a wit-
ness? Yes and a prosecutor, jury, judge, and hangman,
too.
Which brings us to Charlie Sheen. Charlie's dad Martin
(a fellow native of Dayton, Ohio) is a terrific actor. While
politically too extreme for my taste, he is willing to get him-
self arrested for his anti-nuke, anti-war beliefs. Son Char-
le is willing to do the same, and has several times sur-
rendered his freedom in the cause of intoxication, whoring,
battery and destruction of private property. For now, he's
chased both the Oscars and the Libyan revolution right off
the page (at least in America) with his campaign to free the
cast and crew of Two and a Half Men from the bondage of
continued gainful employment.
Both Qaddafi and Charlie Sheen are convinced that
they are not only valuable and productive members of so-
ciety, but that they actually deserve the grotesquely rich
lifestyles that are in danger of being taken from them. If
you scrub away all his video game/samurai/anti-Semitic
rhetorical hogwash, what Charlie is actually bawling about
is that someone in authority had the nerve to say, "OK,
Charlie, we know none of this matters to you, but TV is a
business and you're a liability." Film star Michael Caine
once observed that any given TV or movie set has people
whose job it is to calculate how much money is being lost by
some star's self-indulgent antics. Once the cost exceeds the
benefit, that star becomes a liability. And just as Nature
abhors a vacuum, Hollywood abhors losing money. Charlie
tipped his hand, in an interview. Claiming his case was so
strong he couldn't possibly lose if his contract dispute went
to court, he advised an out of court settlement. As the old
joke goes, he's established what he is, now he's just negoti-
ating price.
As for Qaddafi, think of him as Charlie Sheen with less
money but more firearms. They do differ in one respect,
though. There's not much of a chance for an out of court
settlement with Qaddafi's opponents. They seem to want
the same retirement plan for him that Saddam Hussein is
now enjoying. We'll see how things work out. One thing is
certain. Charlie Sheen will get a lot more coverage. What's
happening in Libya is, after all, only history in the making.
Charlie Sheen is must-see TV.
As for me, I miss Jane Russell.


-O. BxZ54
SnF3
Teehoe(5082-22Fa 9227
- ed gm co



The e -e SrigsHeal/BeeeIn
Bx14


De iak -* Springs,0FL 32435
~ I-T 0 -


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 3, 2011

^______ "^- l^F^.'


Editor:
Mr Larry Martin has served our community for 22 years
by his active participation in the DeFuniak Springs Lit-
tle League; he has served as a coach and board member
throughout his years of service. When not coaching, Coach
Martin stays actively involved when not coaching by: um-
piring, operating the press box, operating the concession
stand, and even picking up trash. His true passion is this
community and the ability to serve the community by
coaching little league, and mentoring the youth in this com-
munity. Coach Martin teaches our children life skills, that I
believe are unparalleled to any other, he continually instills


values including; self discipline, leadership skills, respect,
integrity, and dedication. These skills remain with our
children on and off of the ball field, lasting a lifetime. The
purpose of this letter is to publicly comment. Mr. Martin
and inform the members of our community that the current
Little League Board of Directors has denied Coach Martin
the opportunity to coach in this 23rd year. I believe his ac-
tion by the Board of Directors is unwarranted and serves as
an injustice to the youth of our community.
Thank you
Kevin Harper, DFS.


L T S TE I T "


Editor:
During the early years of this Country, it took months for
a letter to be delivered from the east to the West Coast. In
1860, the Pony Express was established by a relay of horses
and riders. It took 10 to 12 days to make a 2,000-mile trip.
Approximately a year later, Western Union established a
transcontinental telegraph line. The line followed railroad
tracks and was considered the ultimate in nation-wide com-
munications. Alexander Graham Bell developed the first
telephone in 1876. The distance from one phone to another
was very limited and required the users to shout. Eventu-
ally, one could talk around the world with perfect clarity.
The first mobile phones did not seem practical to most
people. The usable range was short and few people had one.
Now it seems like everyone has his or her own phone and
personal phone number. In recent years, cell phones became
capable of receiving and transmitting pictures, emails, and


access all types of information sources.
I find the cell phone irritating and dangerous. When an au-
tomobile continues to sit at a stop light after it turns green,
the operator is busy talking on the phone or text messag-
ing. Twice in recent months, I have had a driver nearly hit
me head-on because of cell phone distraction.
I don't know how to text message. I don't want to know
how to text message. In my opinion, text messaging should
be banned from cell phone use. Several months ago, my
28-year old grandson was text messaging while driving his
F-150 truck. He drove off the road and had a terrible one-
vehicle accident. His back was broken in addition to other
serious wounds. He is now confined to a wheel chair for the
rest of his life.

Lou Barber
Ruston, La.


I LETTERS TO THEDITSO


Editor:
I heard a rumor the other day that the United Way
stopped giving to the Boy Scouts, here in the Panhandle. So
I did a bit of research, and this is rather old news in other
parts of the country. When I hear that this near perfect
organization is under attack, I thought you all needed to
know. The reason some chapters of the United Way, Knight
Ridder newspapers, Steven Spielberg, Merrill Lynch,
and others no longer donate their big money is for political
reasons. They have no concern for the boys. They only seem
to want to push their Hollywood agenda.
Boy Scouts is not a political organization, but is being at-
tacked by those groups that do not hold to our country's her-
itage. Thus the reason for this letter. To defend Boy Scouts
and what is right. I was an Eagle Scout and will be all my
life, and proud of it. Boy Scouts of America is the best orga-
nization, for boys and young men, to be involved in, and for
adults also, as leaders. A scout is Trustworthy, Loyal, Help-


ful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty,
Brave, Clean, and Reverent are only taught in Scouting. If
only our leaders today lived up to those 12 words of charac-
ter. That is what Scouting is about, character, that prepares
boys as they grow to be young men, to be knowledgeable in
over hundred different life skills called merit badges, and to
be good citizens, proud of their country.
So, I recommend that if you do want to help the Scouts
in these tough times that you donate directly, so that you
make sure your local Cub Scout Pack and Boy Scout Troop
will get the donation. I do not want to deride the United
Way or these other groups, for they do support good causes,
and Spielberg makes nice movies, but we need to be in-
formed. Just let your feet and wallet do your voting for you.
You know I do.

Randy Henning
Mossy Head


ILTES T HE I TOR I


Editor:
Subject: Proposed Land use ordinance.

So we don't need more rules, eh?
Maybe we didn't in years past; back when neighbors re-
spected one another and honorable people accepted a hand-
shake as a bond. But today some people operate by simply
trying to game the system to their favor.
My wife and I worked hard throughout our careers and
when it was time to smell the roses, 15 years ago, we chose
Seagrove Beach in Walton County to live out the rest of
our blessed lives. We followed the rules and as experienced
re-locators seven moves with our past employer, we pur-
chased a residence ensuring the property was in a Residen-
tial Zoned area with protective covenants. This is not a time
of life to gamble with our entire savings in real estate.
A few years ago our next door neighbor purchased a va-
cant landlocked parcel behind their triplex condominium
rental building. They cleared the land and created a wed-
ding and event venue with a Gulf access. These remote
owners reside several miles from this property. In short
order the brides from afar flocked to use the property as
advertised for their romantic weddings on the beach, and
in order to save expense, they conduct their receptions on
the lawn, typically erecting large tents, 20 by 40 feet, hire
disc jockeys and bands, and invited 100 -150 of their closest
relatives and friends to share their happy moments.
The problem is that the treasured venue property is
square in the middle of a normally quiet county residential
designated neighborhood. Weekend after weekend, with a
number during the week, a total of 49 of these events took
place on the property in 2009 with more numbers continu-
ing in 2010. These large obnoxiously loud disruptive groups
converged on this neighborhood parcel to party, drink, and
frolic bringing an influx of a parking congestion and intoler-
able amplified music.
The myriad of exasperated neighbors, tired of constantly
calling the sheriff for "breach of peace" relief, petitioned
Code Enforcement in order to exercise their right to a peace-
ful life. Code Enforcement issued property owners a cita-
tion and a date of Code Enforcement's Board hearing. After


a number of hearing postponement tactics, with the wed-
dings continuing, the case was finally heard, and as a result
the board issued a cease and desist order to the owners for
misuse of residential property. Note: the property owner's
defense was that the code was too vague for interpretation.
The board also presented a deferred effective date so as to
permit any wedding backlog to make other arrangements.
The owners appealed the Code Enforcement Board's de-
cision, then sought and were granted a stay until the ap-
peal was determined. This action produced five more large
affairs with sheriff calls to quell the noise and partying.
The wheels of Justice still grind slowly and five months lat-
er the appeal judge upheld the Code Enforcement Board's
action.
The property owners filed another appeal for a rehear-
ing, I suspect to seek another stay order getting ready for
their spring wedding season and continuing to impact the
neighborhood. This appeal was denied fairly quickly by the
judge, and the stays from code enforcement were lifted.
However, There is a significant moral issue at play....
How can the benefit of two individuals making a few dollars
at the expense and well being of the entire neighborhood
of approximately 125-plus neighbors' right to a peaceful
existence be justified? It's been disguised as contributing
to the local economy, but, these affairs would take place
anyway, somewhere more appropriate, in a legitimate busi-
ness on the beach or a commercially designated area. Then
the argument of local employment arises. With the events
in more appropriate locations the employment would still
transpire. There are many local establishments/locations
that are in business to provide event services. With the
numbers of restaurants in our area closing, perhaps we
should help support them instead of bootlegging wedding/
events into residential neighborhoods, driving neighbor's
property values down, chasing away family renters, and
making it impossible to sell.


Joe Stanko
Santa Rosa Beach


I LETTERS TO THE EDITOR










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PAGE 5-A


THE DeFULNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


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PAGE 6-A


lirn to thi e .x'fi per
B ca U.










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


PAGE 7-A

DFS Police attend CSX Railroad

emergency response training


On Feb. 23, officers from
the DeFuniak Springs Police
attended a one -day Railroad
Emergency Response Train-
ing in Pensacola. The train-
ing event was presented by
CSX Railroad and covered
a variety of emergency re-


sponse and situational man-
agement techniques; includ-
ing hazardous materials and
train derailment.
The class took place in
a freight train box car that
CSX has converted-into a
fully functional classroom.


The box car, along with two
other training tanker cars,
travels the country on rail
providing training oppor-
tunities to first responders.
CSX operates the rail line
that runs through the city of
DeFuniak Springs.


IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Cory Godwin presented the check to Florida Agriculture
Extension Agent Mike Goodchild. Kiwanian Don Harrison (son of Oscar) was on hand for
the presentation (l-r).


DFS Kiwanis Club honors Harrison


At its Feb. 22, 2011 reg-
ular meeting the Kiwanis
Club of DeFuniak Springs
presented its first of an an-
nual gift in the amount of
$250 in support of the 4-H
Youth Livestock Program.
The donation is a result of
the Club's creation of the
annual Oscar Harrison Me-
morial Fund.


Long time Kiwanian Hen-
ry Oscar Harrison passed
away on Jan. 4 of this year
and one of DeFuniak's few
centenarians. As a member
of the DeFuniak Springs Ki-
wanis Club, Harrison held a
58-year perfect attendance
record. In addition in 1951
Harrison was named as the
Walton County Extension


mAm p ,-, 5
~'m m:maso 's



B y ASHLEY A.M4SON'


While some mistake the
increase in gas prices for
spring break inflation, oth-
ers watching Libya and the
middle East know that spike
is still to come.
Last week I pulled up
to the gas pumps at Tom
Thumb on U.S. 331 South in
DeFuniak Springs. Where
gas had been $3.11 the day
before, it was now $3.29.
Further south, it was $3.35
at Murphy Oil and $3.59 at
stations directly off the in-
terstate.
As I began my internal
ravings over how gas could
jump more than a quarter
in one day and mentally
cancelled summer road
trips, I listened as an NPR
news anchors told of the
violence in the unofficial
civil war in Libya. Current
leader Muammar el-Qaddafi
(Shi'ite) has called for rebel
protesters (Sunni) who seek
to overthrow his regime
to be dealt with like "cock-
roaches," taken up arms
against and squashed.
According to Yahoo news


Agent and was instrumental
in the establishment of the
Walton County Fair Build-
ing. He was a strong sup-
porter of 4-H and its youth
livestock program.
The Kiwanis Club desired
to honor Harrison by creat-
ing this fund to provide an-
nual financial support for
the youth served by 4-H.


q


reports "Qaddafi, the coun-
try's embattled leader, is
said to have ordered the
destruction of his country's
oil facilities in an effort
to dramatize how regime
change could wreak havoc.
both within Libya's borders,
and in the broader global oil
economy. And Gaddafi's son
Seif has warned that con-
tinuing violence could drive
foreign oil companies out of
Libya."
As Libya is the world's
12th largest exporter of
crude oil, we're already feel-
ing the pinch on our wallets.
But Libya being the 12th
largest producer may not
sound critical, unless one
considers the United States
is the'number one consumer
and importer of oil in the
world, using more than 20
million barrels per day. No
other country comes close,
with China straggling in
second place at only 7 mil-
lion barrels per day.
As a result of Qaddafi's
actions, not only did prices
at the pump jump, the price


of oil reached i100 per 'ibar-
re-l for the first time in three
\ears and the national av-
erage \\as the highest it
has been since 1990 Some
things did drop, however.
including the stock market
which took a hit due to po-
tential inflation triggered by
higher oil and gas prices.
Relief does not seem
likely, as the world calls for
Qaddafi's resignation. Secre-
tary of State Hillary Clinton
demanded Qaddafi surren-
der power, echoed by France
and Britain. Meanwhile,
the European Union is said
to be establishing contacts
with the opposition. As of
Feb. 28, the United States
and its allies weighed Libya
as a no-fly zone.
Even more than the con-
tinued violence and uncer-
tainty in Libya is the pos-
sibility that unrest could
reach Saudi Arabia, the
world's top oil producer,
should the Shi'ite minority
there follow Libya's exam-
ple and rise against Sunni
rulers. If that happens, gas
prices will soar far higher
than the already predicted
$5/gallon by summertime.
About those summer road
trips, looks like I'll be enjoy-
ing good old Lake DeFuniak
this year.
Contact Ashley Amason
at aeamason@gmail.com


Alaqua Animal Refuge


gets grant to vaccinate


dogs for influenza


Alaqua Animal Refuge,
Freeport, now has help in
protecting dogs against ca-
nine influenza virus (CIV),
a highly contagious disease
that spreads easily from dog
to dog, especially those in
close proximity. The shelter
received a grant for the vac-
cines as part of a Petfinder.
com Foundation program
to build community immu-
nity against this respiratory
infection. The foundation
partnered with Intervet/
Schering-Plough Animal
Health, a global animal
health company and makers
of the NOBIVAC(r) Canine
Flu H3N8 vaccine, to fund
the grant.

Because CIV is relatively
new, most dogs have not
built up immunity to the
disease. Dogs can get the
disease by being exposed to
those that have it, as well as
playing with toys or drink-
ing from bowls used by oth-
er dogs. People can also un-
wittingly spread the germ
if they come in contact with
infected dogs.
"Shelters and rescue or-
gainizations are often the
first places that new diseas-
es already in the community


become evident. Dogs come
in from the community
and are released back into
it, and often move to and
from states with confirmed
cases," said Liz Neuschatz,
director of the Petfinder.
com Foundation. "Canine
flu can be a real problem
for shelters, where one sick
dog can cause an outbreak
through an entire facility.
We are pleased to be part
of this effort to help protect
the community by providing
canine flu vaccine to Alaqua
Animal Refuge."
Dog flu is a growing prob-
lem throughout the U.S. It
has been confirmed in 34
states so far, but tracking
the disease is hard because
it is so difficult to diagnose.
Dogs are contagious before
they show any symptoms.
By the time the dog starts
coughing, it's too late. Virtu-
ally all dogs exposed to the
virus will become infected,
and some will get more se-
rious infections, such as
pneumonia, which can be
fatal. Dogs that go to doggie
daycare, boarding facilities,
groomers and shows and are
vaccinated for canine cough
(Bordetella) are also at risk
for canine flu. Information


about canine flu is available
at www.doginfluenza.com.
The grant for Build-
ing Community Immunity
seeks to protect all at-risk
dogs in the community, in-
cluding those in close prox-
imity with other dogs, as is
the case with shelters and
rescue facilities. It also pro-
vides greater assurance to
adopting families that their
new pets will be healthier
and much less likely to be
sick or get more serious, and
sometimes fatal, infections.
The grant further links Pet-
Finder.com member shelter
and rescue grant recipients
with local veterinarians to
protect all adoptable dogs in
their care. The program pro-
motes veterinary visits for
wellness exams and, when
appropriate, the second dose
administration of Nobivac
Canine Flu vaccine.

The Petfinder.com Foun-
dation was created in 2003
to respond to needs of its
Petfinder member shelters
and rescue groups and to as-
sist them in ensuring that
no pet is euthanized for lack
of a home. The vaccine grant
will help keep dogs.healthy
and adoptable.


850.880.6800




GRAIMtlrOPENING


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Corporate and community sponsors are sought for fundraiser


Former head football
coach of the Clemson Tigers,
and son of legendary coach,
Bobby Bowden, Tommy
Bowden, will share his per-
sonal story on what it takes
to be a champion at The Boys
& Girls Club of the Emerald
Coast (BGCEC) DeFuniak
Springs Teen Center's third
annual Steak & Burger Din-
ner on Thursday, March 24
at .6 p.m. at the DeFuniak
Springs Community Center.
Proceeds will support the
annual operating costs of
the Teen Center and corpo-
rate and community spon-
sors are being sought for the
event.
"Tommy Bowden will
share an inspiring story of
hi$ own life experiences and
the qualities he learned dur-
ing the 32 years of college
couching. Bowden will also
discuss; the current state
of the family unit, having a
positive attitude and strong
work ethics, and the need
of support systems like The
B(ys & Girls Clubs.


Vital
and Simila
Proper Usage, Corn



Presei
Dr. Jose
Family i
Sacred Heart.

Wednesday
10C


The goal of the event is to
raise funds to help the Teen
Center become self-sustain-
ing with the long-term goal
of raising enough capital to
build a facility in DeFuniak
Springs. The current facility
has been graciously provid-
ed by the City of DeFuniak
Springs and the Walton
County Board of County
Commissioners.
One of the successful at-
tributes of Boys & Girls
Clubs models across the
country is their ability to
operate through community
donations and fundraisers.
Each center is responsible
for raising funds to pay for
the operating expenses of
the Club, which currently at
the Teen Center consists of
staff salaries.
"This event is an oppor-
tunity to hear the incredible
and inspiring story of Tom-
my Bowden as well as learn
about the inspiring events
taking place daily at the
Teen Center," said David
King, Chairman of the Wal-


in D
ar Vitamins
mon Misconceptions



nted by
Jimenez
Medicine,
Medical Group

Ly, March 9
a.m.


Suite 3 Resource Center Conference Room
Sacred Heart Hospital on the Emerald Coast


0l


Call to register or receive more
information: 850-278-3600


g


S d r 3


ton County Advisory Board
for the DeFuniak Springs
Teen Center and Member
of the Board of Directors for
the Boys & Girls Clubs of the
Emerald Coast. "The event
also coincides with National
Boys & Girls Club Week, we
encourage the community to


come and support our youth
on this evening."
The Teen Center current-
ly has over 100 members on
its roll with approximately
40 kids attending daily af-
ter school. Programs at the
.Teen Center are focused on
developing academic skills,


character, and healthy
lifestyles. The Teen Cen-
ter serves middle and high
school aged youth.
Sponsorship opportu-
nities for the event range
from $2500 to $500. In-kind
sponsorships and donations
to help pull off a successful


event are also being sought.
If interested -in sponsoring
the Steak and Burger Event,
contact Fundraising Chair
Mike Morris at (850)585-
1718, or mmorris@chelco.
com, or visit www.bgcec.com
for sponsorship opportuni-
ties.


Covenant Hospice celebrates


National Social Work Month


Covenant Hospice proud-
ly celebrates National So-
cial Work Month. The 2011
theme promotes the role of
social workers as positive
change agents. There are
640,000 professional so-
cial workers in the United
States who have dedicated
their careers to either help-
ing people transform their
lives, or improving environ-
ments that make such prog-
ress possible.


For example, throughout
34 counties in South Ala-
bama and Northwest Flori-
da Covenant Hospice social
workers help patients and
families to live with dignity
and the highest degree of
physical, emotional, social
and spiritual comfort. They
provide emotional support
to the patients and loved
ones assist in dealing with
closure issues, help in un-
derstanding and completing


COUNCIL FROM PAGE 1-A

The Council, excepting tract to determine wheth-
Harrison, approved a con- er the city is eligible for a




Rob Garver, MD
Now seeing patients in DeFuniak Springs & Andalusia
I Qnalfoationa:
Board Crtifid in Pulmonary DaseM e,
ana cdratoa oare Maaione
Proftsa r merritus, VAB Sohool Of Medlo'tl
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Now Aa~eptg
Appointments

Call tol tree
888-681-5864
More info at
www.seolung.oom


advanced directives, and
help in understanding and
utilizing Medicare, Medic-
aid or other insurance ben-
efits. Covenant Hospice so-
cial workers may also help
patients and families who
need financial assistance by
identifying and accessing
community resources.
"Social workers are essen-
tial to our organization, pro-
viding services across a wide
range of needs," says Pam


settlement from the BP oil
spill. City Attorney Clayton
Adkinson explained, "[The
city doesn't] pay a dime for
experts...fees come out of
the settlement." Should the
city receive a settlement, 20
percent will be paid to legal
fees.
The Council unanimous-
ly authorized staff to move
forward with negotiations
with URS Corp. for general
airport consulting services,
as well as a professional ser-
vices agreement with Pre-
ble-Rish, Inc.
Kitty Whitney addressed
the Council on behalf of
the Walton Area Cham-
ber of Commerce, noting
a record number of new
members and retention of
members this January and
February. Likewise, last


Edwards, VP of Clinical Ser-
vices for Covenant Hospice.
"They are individuals with
passion and an inherent
sense of purpose, who truly
inspire."
Covenant Hospice is a
not-for-profit organization
dedicated to providing com-
prehensive, compassion-
ate services to patients and
loved ones during times of
life-limiting illnesses.


year's chamber-sponsored
Taste of the Beach, which
donates proceeds to chil-
dren's charities, netted a
record breaking $125,000.
Whitney announced the
chamber has released a
new smart phone applica-
tion for military residents,
"My military discounts,"
detailing which businesses
in Walton County provide
military discounts on prod-
ucts and services. Whitney
along with Scarlett Phaneuf
of the Walton County Eco-
nomic Development Council
both offered their assistance
to the Council and request-
ed questions and input on
how to keep Walton County
thriving.
The next DFS City Coun-
cil meeting will be March 14
at 6 p.m. at City Hall.


O'Donnell

Cosmetic Dentistry & Orthodontics

- -- -- - - -- - -- -


Michael T. O'Donnell
D.M.D., PA


- PAINLESS DENTISTRY

- Cosmetic/Smile Make-Overs

- Root Canals

- Implants & Dentures

- Orthodontics
'Orthodontic treatment completed by general dentist


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870 Mack Bayou Rd., St. A
(near Sacred Heart Hospital)
850.622.5888
Thurs. & Fri. 7am-3pm


DeFuniak Springs
57 Bruce Avenue
850.892.2500
Tues. & Wed. 8am-3pm


Gladly Welcoming New Patients


* Routine Obstetrics
* High Risk Obstetrics
* 3D/4D Ultrasound
in Office


* Gynecology
SInfertility
* Preferred Provider for
BCBS of Florida and
Most Insurances


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Board Certified OB/GYN
As the mother of two boys, I understand the needs you have,
whether you're pregnant now or planning to be in the future.

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C < 870 Mack Bayou Rd Suite D *729-7344


DOCTOR'S


CARING






1





Dr. James Howell, D.O. Carolyr
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Mon
7:30 am 4 pm 7 a


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Mon.-Fri.7:30-11:3
o app o ~ int m en ne d e


MEDICAL CENTER


FOR THE COMMUNITY


1 Lawrence, PAC
., Wed, Thurs.
m 5:30 pm


Robert Knox, PAC
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
7 am 5:30 pm


Dr. Stacey Temkin, D.O.
Tues., Wed., Thurs.
7:30 am 4:30 pm
Fri. 7:30 am 2 p.m.


located
WEST MAIN STREET, DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL


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afe &
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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


PAGE 8-A


T, 29
VIN
o~

$r .+









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


PAGE 9-A

WMS Drama Club invited by the Florida

Bureau of Immunization regarding HPV

and Meningitis vaccination PSAs


FREEPORT HIGH SCHOOL delegates for this years conference Hunter Bailey, Megan
Salzlein, Madison Spence and Collin Myrick with Albert and Alberta (l-r) at the University
of Florida Young Leaders Conference.



FHS Young Leaders conference


The University of Florida
Student Government held
its fourth annual Young
Leaders Conference Jan.
28-30. Regarded as one-
of-a-kind, the YLC is the
only high school leadership
conference run entirely by
college students. The Uni-
versity of Florida Student
Government is the second
largest student government
in the United States and
has a rich history of foster-


WCEDA
business owner who was in-
terested in expanding opera-
tions to provide the business
to support the grant. The
total cost of improvements
will approach $360,000 and
WCEDA will provide a part
of the capital to complete
this work.
There are a number of
empty buildings in the Wal-
ton County Industrial Park
in Freeport. The property
on which these buildings
are located was sold to a
private entity which owns
the buildings. WCEDA does
not have control over these
buildings.
A few times each month,
the State Economic Develop-
ment group will send out a
Request for Proposal (RFP)
for a company that may be
in Florida and is looking to
expand or a company that is
outside of Florida and look-
ing to relocate. When these
RFPs are received WCEDA
will check to see if there are
any publicly owned prop-
erties that meet specifica-


ing the nation's finest lead-
ers.
Freeport High School
chose four outstanding del-
egates for this year's confer-
ence. Madison Spence, Me-
gan Salzlein, Hunter Bailey
and Collin Myrick spent
time on the campus of the
University of Florida as they
attended interactive work-
shops and seminars that
will allow these students to
improve on their leadership


theory and experiences.
The closing ceremony
was held in the J. Wayne
Reitz Union Ballroom where
brunch was provided for the
students and their parents.
These students feel that
the experiences and hands-
on activities they had the
privilege of participating in
at this conference was valu-
able in their leadership roles
at FHS and preparation for
college.


Chautauqua Rehabilita-
tion and Nursing Center
(CRNC) proudly announce
the recent achievement of
its second consecutive state
gold survey.
State surveys are conduct-
ed annually by the Florida
Agency for Healthcare Ad-
ministration (ACHA), which
oversees the state licensure
and Medicare and Medic-
aid certification of nursing
homes. ACHA is respon-
sible for the administration
of Medicaid programs and
licensure and regulation of
health facilities. Annual
survey results are based on
health inspection results,
nursing home staffing data,
quality measures and fire
safety inspection results.
"Our staff continues to
excel in their clinical compe-
tencies achieving excellent
outcomes for our residents,"
said Facility Administra-
tor Dawne Dries. "I am
honored to work with such
compassionate, dedicated
stakeholders in every de-
partment."
The CRNC is a 144-bed
skilled nursing facility
owned by Signature Health-
care of Louisville, Ky. The
facility is located on South
2nd St. in DeFuniak Springs
and offers inpatient and
outpatient physical, occupa-
tional, and speech therapy
as well as long term care.
"Signature Healthcare's
dedication to education,
spirituality, process im-
provement, and resident


centered healthcare services
combined with a dedicated
team has helped us accom-
plish this honorable achieve-
ment," said Gina Johnson,
Director of Marketing for
CRNC.


Rob Garver, M.I
Pulmonology &
Critical Care


The Florida Bureau of
Immunization invited kids
and teens (ages 11 to 18) to
create a 30-second public
service announcement about
why HPV or Meningitis vac-
cinations are important to
teens. Individual or group
entries were allowed.

The challenge: Shoot a
PSA that informs and mo-
tivates teens to take steps
that will help prevent the
spread of meningitis or
HPV. Include three to five
facts from a toolkit about
the causes, symptoms, treat-
ments or prevention of these
diseases.
The Walton Middle
School Drama Club has
made it in to the top eight.
Their video is called "Cover
Your Mouth!" with the name
Devin under the title.
Each vote is entered in
a drawing to win one of 25
$20 iTunes gift certificates,
and winners will be notified
by the email address with
which they vote.
The winning PSAs will
be posted on the Immunize
Florida website and a mon-
etary award of $500, $1,000
or $1,500 will be. given to


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12-A


tions in the RFP. If there
are none, then WCEDA will
canvass privately owned
properties to see if there is a
fit anywhere in the County.
If a match is found, WCEDA
will submit the property to
Enterprise Development for
consideration.
What WCEDA does not
do is consider businesses
that would discharge tox-
ic chemicals or otherwise
harm the environment. This
position would reject locat-
ing a company that would
want to drill for oil or gas on
publically owned property.
However if such a proposal
was the result of work in the
private sector, then county
and city officials would have
to determine whether or not
such a business could be lo-
cated in their areas.
In other recent develop-
ments: a six-acre parcel of
land has been effectively
deeded as a land grant to
Southern Wines and Spir-
its for the construction of a
20,000-square-foot redistri-


bution facility that could, at
its full development, bring
as many as 60 jobs to Free-
port. For this to become a
reality, the company must
begin development on site
within three years. The
project is currently on hold
due to economic conditions.
There is also some inter-
est from a company that
proposes to provide Internet
advertising. This company
has made an application to
Enterprise Florida for in-
centives to go forward. The
Board of County Commis-


sioners has passed a resolu-
tion to support this project.
The current target is to have
an operation that would em-
ploy about 30 people up and
running within three years.
There has been some dis-
cussion about a project that
proposes to generate solar
power or to produce equip-
ment used for the produc-
tion of solar power. How-
ever, proposals of this type
must satisfy state and fed-
eral requirements for incen-
tives before they can be con-
sidered at the local level.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR I

THE AREA HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER is offering
free smoking cessation classes at the Walton County Health
Department in DeFuniak Springs at 362 SR-83. Partici-
pants receive free nicotine replacement therapy such as
nicotine patches, gum and/or lozenges along with profes-
sional consultation, resources and support. Small group
sessions start at 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 3, with ad-
ditional one-hour sessions each Thursday evening through
April 7. For more information, call Lynne Weldon at (850)
685-8814 to join others who want help to quit smoking.

MICROSPINE MEDICAL PLAZA
CLOSING INFORMATION EFFECTIVE 02/04/2011
Dr. Anthony Mork has relocated his practice effective 02/04/2011
to California. To contact Dr. Mork's new office please call 855-
378-6675.
Dr. Scott Haufe has relocated his practice effective 02/14/2011 to
Destin. To contact Dr. Haufe's new office please call 850-424-
3769 or 800-489-3277.
For information about Medical Records please contact the
custodian of the medical records:
Medical Records Custodian: Medical Legal Experts, LLC,
1180 Eglin Parkway, Shalimar, FL 32579, 850-613-6448


the top three individuals or
teams.
The polls close on March
4, so get those votes in daily,
and feel free to share this
page with friends and fam-
ily. It's all for a great cause.

Go online using the link
provided and vote for "Cover
Your Mouth" and help Wal-
ton Middle School Drama
Club shine state wide.


After clicking on the link.,.
provided below:
www.youcalltheshotsflori-.
da.com
(1) find and click on the,
video, "Cover Your Mouth"
(2) click on vote (lower
right corner of video pop-
up),
(a) enter an email ad-
dress, and
(b) click finish in order to
vote.


S"It's Not a Spider Bite"
Private Medical Practice for Individuals with
Chronic Wounds, Abscess or Diabetes

Advanced Practice Clinic, LLC
Dr. James Howell DO, Medical Director
1299 Highway 90 West, Suite 1, DeFuniak Springs, FL

Appointment & Fax

(850) 892-2138

Accepting New Patients for
Medical Wound Management
&
Prevention of Wounds with
Diabetic Foot Evaluation & Management of Numbness &
Tingling to Prevent Wounds/Amputation

Jill M. Allen ARNP, CWS, FACCWS
Diplomat of American Academy of Wound Management,
Fellow of College of Certified Wound Specialist

Private Clinic By Appointment.
On-Site ALF, Nursing Home & Hospital Consult
Out-Patient Surgical Debridement with Topical Anesthetic,
Wound Matrix & Bio-Synthetic Grafts, Tissue Biopsy for
Definitive Antiobiotic Management,
Diabetic Neuropathic Foot & Chronic Abscess Management
Rx for Home Health and/or Facilities as indicated by exam.




/ 8th Anniversary


Sa ed Heart

IHealth Fair

Saturday, March 5th
8 a.m. ~ 11 a.m.
Hospital Main Entrance


Free Health Screenings
Fasting Glucose* Pulse Oxygen
Fasting Cholesterol' Skin Cancer Spot Checks
Blood Pressure Hearing Test
Body/Fat Analysis Vision Screening
Osteoporosis Heel Scan
Health Information Booths:
Ask the Doctors & Pharmacist

s .Children's Health Fair
Sat, April 2 9 am. 12 pLm.
Sacred Heart Hospial on the Emerald Coast
*Fasthng, Scrt'enmi ;For be.a rt mrsl rlea e
do not eat or rannk atdtimng beafod. water
8 hour ;nr Ar ar dre re1ir



a g ,


Healthmark Hospital & Clinic

WHY WAIT?
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS
WALK-INS WELCOME
ACCEPTING ADULT & PEDIATRIC PATIENTS















D. John Thomas, M.D. Larry Rafey, PA.-C F. Edward Tenewitz, M.D. Shyl
Surgery & Pediatrics & General Surgeon Licens
Family Practice Family Practice

You're Invited To Contact Our Healthcare Professionals
At (850) 951-4556 Or Visit
Healthmark Rural Health Clinic, 4415 Hwy. 331 South, DeFuniak Springs, FL
Monday Friday 8:00 am 4:30 pm


I
p


a D. Scott, LPT
ed Physical Therapist


MEDICARE & MEDICAID patients welcomed and most insurances accepted.


Another Gold Survey

for Chautauqua Rehab









PAGE 10-A


WALTON COUNTY SHERIFF'S REPORT


Walton County Sheriffs
Deputies arrested the fol-
lowing people during the
week ending Feb. 27, 2011:

T.A.B., 14, DFS, False
report of bomb, arson, etc.,
interfering with school ad-
ministrative functions,
John Foster Yearwood,
49, DFS, Possession of mar-
ijuana -20 grams, poss. of
drug paraphernalia,
Jeanette Lee Holley, 34,
Westville, MVOP, worthless
checks x2,
Elizabeth Arlene Short,
32, Gulf Breeze, FVOP,
John Hawkins Bech-
stein, 38, Mexico Beach,
DUI,
James Ernest Thomp-
son, 37, Freeport, Assault
with deadly weapon w/o in-
tent to kill, battery, posses-
sion of firearm,
April Melissa Siples,
33, PDL, FVOP,
.* Christopher Allen
Lynch, 31, Pensacola,
DWLSR,
Zachary David Floyd,
24, PDL, Possession of con-
trolled substance, poss. of
listed chemical w/intent to


manufacture controlled sub-
stance,
Debra Lynn Curry, 55,
PDL, Possession of listed
chemical for manufacture of
controlled substance,
Ander Carlose Suggs,
36, DFS, VOP,
Kenneth Scott Borges,
45, SRB, DUI,
John Frederick Gess,
23, DFS, FVOP,
Michael Walter Brat-
ton, 30, Niceville, MVOP,
Kenneth Wayne White,
48, FWB, Unarmed bur-
glary of unoccupied dwell-
ing, trespass on structure or
conveyance,
John Nathan Young-
beck, 30, SRB, MVOP,
Jose Manuel Camocho-
Hipolito, 42, SRB, Operat-
ing motor vehicle w/o valid
DL,
Ryan Anthony Rous-
se, 45, Mandeville, La.,
DWLSR,
Casie Lynn Whitfield,
22, SRB, Petit theft from
merchant,
Nancy Louise Russell,
46, DFS, Obstruction w/o
violence,
Marvin Junior Wil-


COMMUNITY CALENDAR

The Chautauqua Amateur Radio Club of DeFuniak
Springs / Walton County, Florida meets the last Tuesday of
every month at 6:30 p.m. at McLean's Restaurant near 1-10
and U.S. 331 south. This club welcomes new and old ham
radio operators to the get together. There are no business
meetings on these Tuesdays. Attendees have classes and
a great time together. Business meetings are on different
dates and at different locations.
Come out and join them. For more information contact
Rodney Ryals at (850) 892-2562 or e-mail at kj4jah@arrl.
net


MILLER

billion $4 billion shortfall
with no government stimu-
lus dollars coming to take
up the slack.
"We've got to make
some decisions that are
not going to be very nice,"
Miller said. "They're going
to be painful for everybody
when it's all said and done.
We're all going to feel the
squeeze."
That said, Miller
told the crowd the best way
to stimulate the economy,
which would in turn boost
revenues, is to loosen the
economic constraints on the
private sector. He criticized
the government's insistence
on issuing regulations in-
stead of proposing legisla-
tion as a primary culprit,
and used the numerical wa-
ter quality standards pro-
posed by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) on
Florida's waters as an exam-
ple. Miller said these stan-
dards will not only harm the
state's industry and agricul-
ture but will cost the state
billions.
."[The EPA] would like
Florida to go back to pre-di-
posaur times and have our
Waters be cleaner than they
have been since God made
the earth," Miller said. "You
just can't do it. To get where
they want us to go the finan-
cial cost is astronomical."
In addition to deficit
woes, Miller made mention
of the perhaps greater prob-
lem posed by the national
debt. He said that, even
if the gap on the $1.4 tril-
lion deficit was closed there
would still be the issue of $14
trillion in debt. That's a gap
that can't be closed through
discretionary spending
alone, as only 17 percent of
the federal budget is discre-
tionary, Miller said.
Social Security and
Medicare are of course the
elephants in the room, and
Miller didn't shy away from
addressing the dire straits
the healthcare system finds
itself in.
"If we don't talk about it
now, [Social Security] will
not be here in a few years,"
he said. "For the Obama
administration to make the
statement that Social Secu-
rity is just fine the way it is
not totally truthful. You can
use smoke and mirrors any
way to make your numbers
look like they're going to be
OK. Social Security is going


FROM PAGE 1-A

to run out of money and it's
going to run out of money
sooner rather than later."
Miller took suggestions,
comments and questions
from several members of
the crowd, but the biggest
item was expansion of U.S.
331 into a four-lane high-
way from DeFuniak Springs
in the north to Santa Rosa
Beach in the south. County
Commissioner Sarah Co-
mander told the congress-
man about the importance
of making sure Walton
County's concerns were "at
the top of the list" when it
came time for the U.S. De-
partment of Transportation
six-year transportation bill
come before the U.S. legis-
lators. The fiscal year 2012
budget recently proposed by
President Barack Obama
provides for a 48-percent
increase to funding ($336
billion over the next six
years) for road and bridge
construction and improve-
ments, and Comander said
Walton County deserves to
be in the fore when it comes
to receiving some of those
funds.
"I don't think there's a
person sitting here that
won't tell you that [U.S. 331]
is a major concern of almost
everyone in Walton County,"
she said. "We want to be in
that bill. That's probably go-
ing to be the last big chance
in a while to get money for
roads here in Walton Coun-
ty."
Miller said a congressio-
nal ban on earmarks would
preclude Walton County
from getting in special treat-
ment, indicating the best
way to see results would be
for the county to place its ef-
forts on the state DOT rath-
er than on its counterpart
in Washington. He cited
Escambia County's success
in getting major highways
four-laned all the way south
from its border with Ala-
bama as proof of what can
happen when local govern-
ments work together with
the DOTs of Florida and
neighboring states.
"What your group has
done has continued to keep
that issue on the front burn-
er, and that's what's impor-
tant," Miller said. "It's going
to be difficult to steer with-
out earmarking it, but I still
feel like we can do it. The fo-
cus needs to be on Tallahas-
see."


liams, 47, Theft $300 5,000,
dealing in stolen property,
Arthur Franklin Hol-
lingsworth, 42, DFS, FTA,
James Francis Lyons,
40, DFS, Possession of fire-
arm or ammo by convicted
felon, armed burglary of
dwelling, structure or con-
veyance,
Ernest Michael Scott,
34, Laurel Hill, Hold (Cov-
ington Co., Ala.),
Andre Henderson, 32,
FWB, FTA,
Edward Ojeda, 30,
Niceville, MVOP,
M.M.W., 15, DFS, Pos-
session of marijuana -20
grams,
Antonio Demarcus Da-
vis, 35, Tallahassee, FTA,
damage to property, grand
theft $10,000 20,000, crim-
inal mischief, bond revoca-
tion.



DeFUNIAK
SPRINGS
POLICE
REPORT


DeFuniak Springs Police
arrested the following peo-
ple during the week ending
Feb. 27, 2011:

B.Q.A., 15, DFS, Breach
of peace.


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011

Two charged with

methamphetaminepossession


Walton County Sheriff
(WCSO) Mike Adkinson an-
nounced the arrest of two
suspects who have been
charged with possessing il-
legal substances.
Sheriffs investigators
have booked Zachary Da-
vid Floyd, 24, of Ponce De
Leon, with one count of a
violation of F.S. 893.149
(1) (a) possession of listed
chemicals with the intent
to manufacture, a 2nd de-
gree felony, and one court
with a violation of 893.135
(1) possession of controlled
substances over 14 grams
to wit: methamphetamine.
Debra Lynn Curry, 55, of
Ponce De Leon, was also
charged with a violation of
F.S. 893.149 (1) (a) posses-
sion of listed chemicals with
the intent to manufacture.
The subjects were charged
after investigators, conduct-
ing a follow-up burglary in-
vestigation at the residence
of the suspects, smelled an


odor consistent with the
production of methamphet-
amine onsite. After consent
to search the premises was
agreed to by the suspects,
meth oil product was seized,
and admissions concerning
the purchase of base sub-
stances from the drug store
and methamphetamine pro-
duction process used by the


defendants were obtained.
If convicted, Floyd could
face up to 30 years and Cur-
ry up to 15 years in state
prison.
Both Floyd and Curry
were transported to the
county jail. Bond was set
by the judge for $25,000 for
Floyd and $10,000 for Cur-
ry.








^f


FLOYD


CURRY


The Walton County Sher-
iffs Office (WCSO) last
week arrested Eric Dwayne


Russell, 25, of DeFuniak
Springs, for domestic bat-
tery.

The WCSO investiga-
tion began after deputies
responded to a domestic vio-
lence call at approximately
4:45 p.m. on Feb. 23, at 320
E. Tedder Rd. in DeFuniak
Springs. Russell, who was
suspected of felony battery
of his sister, fled the scene.
WCSO deputies and the
Walton County Correctional
Institution canine team im-
mediately began a pursuit
to apprehend Russell. Dur-
ing the pursuit, the WCSO
received a report regarding
a golf cart that was stolen
from a residence on State
Line Rd. Deputies recov-
ered the abandoned golf cart
less than a mile from where
it was stolen.
The investigation led in-


vestigators to Florala, Ala.
where Russell was arrested
by the Florala Police De-
partment and transported
to the Covington County
Jail. He was charged with
domestic battery by stran-
gulation and grand theft,
both third-degree felonies.
At the time of his arrest,
Russell was wearing shoes
with a tread design similar
to those found at both crime
scenes.

The investigation re-
vealed that Russell's moth-
er, Nancy Russell, know-
ingly transported a criminal
suspect to a residence in
Florala, Ala. She was ar-
rested by the WCSO at her
residence and charged with
obstruction of justice, a first-
degree misdemeanor. She
was booked into the Walton
County Jail.


CITY OF DeFUNIAK SPRINGS
2011 CITY ELECTION

Listed below is the schedule for the April 12, 2011 City Election:

VOTER REGISTRATION BOOKS CLOSE: Monday, March 14, 2011 5:00 p.m.

QUALIFYING: Tuesday, March 15th Thursday, March 17th 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;
and Friday, March 18th 8:00 am to 1:00 p.m.

ABSENTEE: Monday, March 21st, through Monday, April 11th during office hours
(8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday Friday)
and 7:00 a.m. through 7:00 p.m. on election day, Tuesday, April 12, 2011

ELECTION DAY: 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 12, 2011

QUALIFYING FEES ARE AS FOLLOWS FOR THE CORRESPONDING POSITIONS
BASED ON 2010 CALENDAR YEAR SALARY:


City Council Seat #1
City Council Seat #2
City Council Seat #3
City Marshal


Qualifying Fee = $ 240.00
Qualifying Fee = $ 240.00
Qualifying Fee = $ 240.00
Qualifying Fee = $2,978.32


All persons eligible to vote in the City elections will vote at the DeFuniak Springs
Community Center: 361 North 10th Street, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433.


Qualifying and absentee Voting will be held at the Supervisor of Elections Office,
Walton County: 571 US Highway 90 East, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433. Please
contact the Supervisor of Elections Office at 892-8112 for more information.


No one may qualify for a position before the qualifying period. However, this
does not prevent anyone from announcing they intend to seek public office,
opening an account, and receiving and expending funds after they pre-file.

Reporting Schedule


Due March llth
Due March 25th
Due April 8th
After Election


1/01/11 through
3/11/11 through
3/25/11 through
due before July 12, 201


3/10/11 [Due 32 days out]
3/24/11 [Due 18 days out]
4/07/11 [Due 4 days out]
1 5 pm (90 days following)


Domestic violence suspect


arrested in Alabama


I, CHRISTOPHER L. I, SUSAN ARNOLD, am
ILONG, am on probation for on probation for petit theft.
petit theft.


4 Year Term
4 Year Term
4 Year Term
4 Year Term


Note: Contributions received on the day the election or less than five days prior must be
returned to the contributor.


#396-11 2tc: Feb. 17, Mar. 3









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011 PAGE 11-A

Fourth annual Chautauqua 5K Fun Run/Walk successful


Feb. 26 dawned clear and
sunny, a perfect day for the
DeFuniak Springs Woman's
Club's fourth annual Chau-
tauqua 5K Fun Run/Walk
sponsored by Pizza Hut and
Dr. Michael O'Donnell. Al-
though most of the partici-
pants were from the local
area, some came from as far
away as Indiana.
When the last of the 80
participants were clocked,
Stan Standland of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla. was the fastest
male runner with a time of
19 minutes 47 seconds. The
overall fastest female run-
ner was Sandy Ebanks of
Pace, whose time was 20
minutes two seconds.
This year prizes were also
awarded to walkers. The
fastest male walker was
Dave Deruiter of Shalimar
with a time of 40 minutes
and seven seconds. Teresa
Bankston of Niceville was
the fastest female walker.
Her time was 42 minutes 19
seconds.
All were presented with a
trophy and cash prize. Gold,
Silver and Bronze medals
were awarded to first, second
and third place winners for
males and female runners
and walkers in seven age
groups. A total of 51 medals
were presented. In addition,.
all participants received a
brightly colored commemo-
rative T-shirt. Competitors
also received a pedometer,
pen, band aids and other
goodies donated by the Wal-
ton County Health Depart-
ment. Pizza Hut provided
pizzas. Fruit and other
snacks were available to the
runners and walkers upon
completion of the course.
For the first time there
was a wheelchair division in
the race. Mackey Tyndall of
Panama City won gold with
his time of 14 minutes and
53 seconds. A medal was
presented to the youngest
participant, Jennifer Thom-


as of DeFuniak Springs, who
was six years old on race
day. She also won gold for
her age group as a walker.
The most senior competitor
received a medal was John
Jackson of Wing, Ala. who
competed as a runner at 76
years young.
The successful event
would not have been pos-
sible without the help of
many volunteers.
Johnnie Kay Elum
brought Anchor and Key
Club students from Walton
Senior High School to help
time the event. The Junior
Army ROTC cadets kept
runners on the correct race
course. Mr. Paulk from the
high school loaned timing
equipment. Lt. Mears of the
DeFuniak Police Depart-
ment insured safety through
traffic control. An Emer-
gency Medical Service team
was on site in case of medi-
cal emergencies. The city of
DeFuniak Springs donated
the use of the Amphitheater
and allowed their.beautiful


town to be used as the venue
for the run. John Murphy
took wonderful photos of the
event.
Friends, spouses and chil-
dren of the Woman's Club


offered much needed help.
The DeFuniak Springs
Woman's Club would like to
thank Dr Michael O'Donnell
and Pizza Hut who were our
main sponsors. Thanks also


to Samantha Garner of the
local Pizza Hut, who for the
second year rose early to
make the delicious pizzas
for the participants.
They could not have had
such a successful event
without contributions from
other local businesses. They
are grateful to those men-


tioned above plus WZEP,
Brighthouse Networks, Wal
Mart, The Bookstore, War-
ren, Sasser and Associates,
the Nook and Cranny, The
DeFuniak Springs Her-
ald/Breeze, Naylor Realty,
Stanley House and Express
Health and Fitness for their
support.


Fastest walkers Dave Deruiter and Teresa Bankston.










Fastest runners Sandy Ebanks and Stan Standland.


And they're off!


FREEPORT


cil approved the resolution.
Adkinson reported he
has been contacted by Bea-
sley-Allen, a law firm out of
Montgomery, Ala., seeking
to represent interests of mu-
nicipalities in claims against
British Petroleum arising
from the oil spill. They offer
a contract that would not re-
sult in any attorney fees or
expert witness fees unless
the municipality actually
collects money as the result
of a claim. Claims could be
based on lost revenues from
sales taxes, reduction in ap-
praised value of real estate,
gasoline taxes and similar
items. A motion to autho-
rize the city to enter into a
contract with Beasley-Allen
was approved.
Marse noted that the City
still has not yet received
funding for the North Bay
water main extension proj-
ect from the USDA Rural
Development office. Marse
thinks that they will delay
finalization of the loan as
long as they can.



COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

BINGO EVERY SUN-
DAY at the VFW: Quarter
games at noon; early birds
at 1 p.m. Regular session at
2 p.m. For more information
call (850) 892-3539.

LAKE DEFUNIAK
TOASTMASTERS- "Dedi-
cated to Building Better
Communicators." The meet-
ings are every second and
fourth Thursday at North-
west Florida State College
(NWFSC) from 12-1 p.m. in
Room 213. Happy fifth an-
niversary Lake DeFuniak
Toastmasters!
Everyone is invited to join
the celebration featuring
a 'Speechathon.' Light re-
freshments will be served.
For more information please
contact: Tina Rushing, Pres-
ident Lake DeFuniak Toast-
masters at (850) 598-4636,
or trushing@chelco.com


FROM PAGE 1-A


Eleanor Turner repre-
senting the Freeport Town
Planters Society presented
a plan to revise the land-
scaping of the "Triangle" at
the intersection of SR-20
and Business U.S. 331. The
new plan will be low main-
tenance, perhaps bi-annual.
The Planters propose plant-
ing Asiatic Jasmine, a low
growing ground cover which
can be walked on and will
totally cover the ground.
It will be cut with a lawn
mower perhaps twice per
year. Marse said there is a
lot of trash that blows into
that intersection and he
asked what could be done to
control the problem. Turner
said that the Planters will
continue its practice of stop-
ping to pick up trash all the
time. A dwarf Loropetalum
and dwarf Yaupon will also
be used. The Planters also
propose painting the inside
of the Triangle and the an-
chor. The water fountain
nozzles will be relocated
around the inside of the


wall and will spray toward
the anchor. The Planters
asked the city to prepare the
ground, clean and pressure-
wash the inside of the foun-
tain, install a new pump and
fix the lights. The Council
approved a motion to move
forward with the plan.
Turner announced that
the Miss Freeport Pageant
would be held in the Free-
port High School auditorium
on March 19 at 6 p.m..
City Clerk Robin Haynes
asked the Council to approve
writing off utility accounts
which have had no activity
for at least two years. The
auditors approve this action.
Records have been flagged
so that if attempts are made
to reopen these accounts the
applicants will be billed for
the account balance written
off. Haynes will report back
to the Council with informa-
tion on the amount of the
write off.
Haynes also asked for ap-
proval to engage a collection
agency to pursue outstand-


ing balances on accounts.
She said agencies charge a
fee of 30 to 35 percent of any
monies collected. Haynes
proposes turning over ac-
counts with higher outstand-
ing balances to an agency.
The Council approved the
request.


Mackey Tyndall, winner of wheelchair division and Chris
Guzowski.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Board of County Commissioners, Walton County, Florida, will hold a Public Hearing on the following proposed
amendment to the Capital Projects Fund and Automation Fund for the Fiscal year 2010-2011 on March 8, 2011, at 4:00 P.M. or
soon thereafter. The Public Hearing will be held at the Walton County Courthouse Annex, 31 Coastal Centre Blvd, Santa Rosa
Beach, FL 32439. No millage rate is required to be levied or raised by reason of the proposed budget amendment.

AMENDMENTS #4


Automation Fund


Adopted Proposed Amended Adopted Proposed Amended
Budget Change Budget Budget Change Budget

Total Revenues 2,250,000 0 2,250,000 Total Revenues 0 0 0

Cash Balance Forward 0 1,457,758 1,457,758 Cash Balance Forward 0 41,250 41,250

Total Resources 2,250,000 1,457,758 3,707,758 Total Resources 0 41,250 41,250
Total Appropriations 2,250,000 1,457,758 3,707,758 Total Appropriations 0 41,250 41,250

William R. Imfeld
Finance Director
Board of County Commissioners
Walton County, Florida
#399-11 1tc: 3-3


Attention all voters registered in Walton County:

You are reminded of the following election in 2011:

City of DeFuniak Springs on April 12

Requests for absentee ballots may be submitted to the Supervisor of Elections
beginning
immediately. Simply contact contact Bill Vorwald or Patty Nelson
via e-mail, fax, or phone at vorbill@co.walton.fl.us or nelpatty@co.walton.fl.us
FX: (850) 892-8113 or PH: (850) 892-8112
or, you may prefer to use the online form on our website www.votewalton.com

Don't forget about the 'Free Access System'. This website allows voters to file or
update their registration, request and track absentee ballots, and obtain
information about upcoming elections and polling places. The 'Free Access
System' can be found at the following address:
www.votewalton.com/Lookup
Thank you.
#397-11 ltc: 3-3


Capital Projects Fund








PAGE 12-A


Meet

WCEDA

By BEN GRAFTON
On Feb. 25 at the Wal-
ton Area County Chamber
of Commerce office in De-
Funiak Springs, Scarlett
Phaneuf, Executive Direc-
tor of the Walton County
Economic Development Al-
liance (WCEDA) spoke with
the Herald Breeze about the
structure and operation of
this organization.
WCEDA is an alliance
whose members come from
government (Walton Coun-
ty, DeFuniak Springs, Free-
port and Paxton) and the
private sector with the goal
of attracting high quality
businesses to Walton Coun-
ty and supporting current
businesses who can help the
local economy and provide
workers with improved wag-
es. It was founded in 2008
and about 90 percent of its
$242,000 budget for 2011 is
funded by the government
members under the provi-
sions of an inter-local agree-
ment. Grant funds are not
included in the budget and
these are managed under
terms of the agreement un-
der which each is acquired.
At the present time there
are some 40 members (a
list of these can be found at
www.wcedafl.com) in the al-
liance.
The organization takes
its direction from a 24-mem-
ber Board of Directors hav-
ing 21 voting members and
a five-person Executive
Committee. The Executive
Committee meets on the
first Thursday and the full
Board meets on the third
Thursday of each month at
8 a.m. in the Best Western
Motel on U.S. 331 near In-


SCARLETT PHANEUF, Executive Director of the Wal-
ton County Economic Development Alliance.


terstate 10 in DeFuniak
Springs. WCEDA oper-
ates under the provisions
of Florida's Sunshine law
so all meetings are open to
the public. Phaneuf reports
to the Executive Committee
and she is also accountable
to the Board of County Com-
missioners and the Councils
of the three cities as a result
of the funding agreement.
The Walton Area Cham-
ber of Commerce was in-
strumental in the forma-
tion of WCEDA and under
the terms of a three year
management agreement it
provided planning, techni-
cal and administrative as-
sistance. The Executive
Committee and the Board
of WCEDA recently deter-
mined that this was no lon-
ger needed and the manage-
ment agreement will come
to an end on March 31.
In its search for new
businesses WCEDA re-
lies heavily on information
gathered from Florida's
Targeted Industry List and
from Florida's Great North-
west Regional Council. The
Targeted List is quite broad


Walton County
Economic DCvlDo;: r't IIiance


and WCEDA tends to seek
companies that qualify for
incentives that are fur-
nished by the state through
Enterprise Florida. The in-
centives are available on a
competitive basis. In Walton
County there is a need to at-
tract in businesses that that
pay higher wages and bring
in dollars from other regions
of the country. This means
businesses that pay average
wages of at least $28,000 but
those that pay an average of
$32,000 are preferred. The
businesses that fall into this
category can include health
care, transportation, distri-
bution, logistics and light
manufacturing.
Locally, the Board of
County Commissioners has
an ordinance on the books
that allows them to grant an
abatement of real and per-
sonal property taxes as an
incentive to attract a worth-
while business. The city of
DeFuniak Springs has a
similar ordinance as well.
The number-one barrier
to business growth in rural
communities is the lack of
infrastructure. In one ef-
fort to address this problem
WCEDA helped Freeport
submit a grant application
for $260,000 to provide road
improvements to the In-
dustrial Park in Freeport .
WCEDA sought out a local
See WCEDA 9-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011

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PAGE I-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


People


Place


ASPIRING ARTIST LUKE PENN looks on as WCAL
painter John Murphy demonstrates his talents.


LUKE PENN picked out his favorite piece.


Story and photos by
JEFFREY POWELL

For just over a year
now the Walton County
Art League (WCAL) has
been displaying its mem-
bers' artwork in the Ho-
tel DeFuniak art gallery.
On Thursday, Feb. 24,
the group gathered to cel-
ebrate the milestone with
an anniversary celebra-
tion. The gallery is a coop-
erative effort between Bo-
gey's Restaurant owners
Brad and Michelle Hard-
ing and the WCAL.
The WCAL was found-
ed in 1965 by Mary Vin-
son and fellow artists and
is the oldest art organiza-
tion in Walton County.
Thursday's gathering was
well attended and gave at-
tendees a chance to view
and purchase the mem-
bers works.
"This has been a suc-
cessful venture," said
WCAL President Jan
Hannon. "We are very
very happy with the sales
and visitors' input. The
gallery contains a great
variety of artwork and we
suggest everyone come
and visit the gallery and
have dinner. We are very


happy with the way our
organization has grown
and hope it continues to
succeed."
Since its humble be-
ginnings the WCAL has
grown from under 10
members to close to 80
presently. In 1998 they
incorporated in Florida as
a non-profit entity.
Throughout the eve-
ning, visitors were enter-
tained musically by saxo-
phonist Randy Sherwood.
Attendees were also able
to see local artist John
Murphy work on one of


his paintings. A wine tast-
ing station was set up in
one of the gallery's rooms
and local author Brenton
Udor was on hand to sign
his latest book. Also pres-
ent were several young
artists from the Boys
& Girls Club. They had
many pieces for sale and
the proceeds went direct-
ly to their organization.
A portion of the night's
sales were also donated to
the Boys & Girls Clubs by
Bogey's.
"Not only are we here
to showcase the kids'


artwork but also to help
them enjoy art for the rest
of their lives," said Boys
& Girls Clubs Director of
Resource Development
Patricia Butler. "We are
very appreciative of Bo-
gey's and Michelle Hard-
ing for giving us the op-
portunity to be involved in
this event. We are hoping
this experience will so-
lidify the kids' love of art
when they see the com-
munity's appreciation."
For more information
concerning the WCAL call
(850) 835-4929.


DEE SOUTH (1) AND ROSEMARIE SIMONS look on as
local author Brenton Udor signs his latest work.


SEVERAL OF THE WCAL ARTISTS pose for a photo as the event came to a close.


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB
were on hand for the celebration.


SAXOPHONIST RANDY SHERWOOD provided the eve-
ning's musical entertainment.


MUCH CONVERSATION WAS HELD around the wine tasting station.









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011
li UM


PAGE 2-B


J Ja m es and Ma u reen
(Nee O'Malley) Gilreath
to Celebrate 40th Anniverst


James and Maureen '(ee O'Malley) Gilreath of
Red Bay will celebrate their 40th wedding anniver.
sary on Sunday. They were married on March 6.
1971 in Woodbridge, England. Mr. Gilreath was
stationed at RAF Bentwaters/Woodbridge with the
U.S. Air Force and Mrs. Gilreath worked on the
base. After their marriage, they traveled to many
countries and states during Mr. Gilreath's over
26years with the USAF, retiring to their land in
Florida. Mr. Gilreath then went to work with the
20th Space Control Squadron (USAF Civil Service)
at Eglin AFB, Site C-6. After over ten years at
Site C-6 in March 1998 Mr. Gilreath was trans-
ferred to serve on the communications staff with
Headquarters USAFE at Ramstein AB, Germans
for three years before returning to Site C-6. Mr.
Gilreath then retired on December 31, 2004 with
over 17 years with USAF Civil Service. The couple
have two sons, Paul (deceased) and Travis and
wife Tisha of Red Bay who have two sons, Dylan
and Sean. Paul has one son, lan who lives with
his mother in Jackson, MS. Mr. and Mrs. Gilreath
will celebrate their anniversary with a short trip to,-
Biloxi, Miss. A long trip to an undisclosed loca- '
ion will be taken later this year. Their hobbies ar
gardening, crocheting and cooking. .


Florida

Florida


1


SThe New World School
:of the Arts (NWSA), in
:downtown Miami, Fla., will
launch the Florida Water-
:ways Dance Project, a col-
laborative initiative which
Celebrates Arts in Education
:by uniting Florida's arts in-
stitutions in simultaneous
performances inspired by
iFlorida's unique waterways.
:From Miami to the Pan-
:handle and from Tampa to
:Jacksonville dancers, musi-
ccians and visual artists from
*23 participating arts schools
and dance companies at
eight different locations will
join together to bring atten-
tion to the power and fragil-
ity of Florida's waterways.
Allperformances through-
out the state of Florida are
scheduled to begin at 4 p.m.
EST (3 p.m. local CST), Sat-
urday, March 5. In addition,
all performances will be live
streamed on floridawater-
.waysdanceproject.com.
Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC) will have
:20 dance students partici-
pating in the local event tak-
ing place at Lake DeFuniak
at 3 p.m. (CST) on Satur-
day, March 5. The NWFSC
yMadrigal Singers will also
Je performing at the event,
singing "Earth Song" by
Frank Ticheli, "Dirait-On"
by Morten Lauridsen and
Amon- Pays composed by
Jeremy Ribando. The free
performance is expected
to last 45 minutes and will
take place near the Chau-
tauqua Building.
Local students partici-
pating in the event are
Nate Beechum, Shalimar;
Nick Beechum, Fort Wal-
ton Beach; Jenna Cordeiro,
Shalimar; Roxy Curtis,
Fort Walton Beach; Natalie
Fowler, Fort Walton Beach;
Ashley Gaston, Crestview;
Allyson Johnson, Shalimar;
Natalie Lirette, Fort Walton
'Beach; Patty Perez-Borroto,
rF.,' .


S* tIChautauqua Quilters

try return to their roots
Chautauqua Quilters re- ily Consumer Science Agen
'i cently found their roots and Kendra Zamojski, and 4-I
returned "home" to where Youth Development Agent
S the group was first formed Suzanne Wilson.
in 1975. When Virginia Together, they plan t
Clark was Walton County's promote the art of sewin


Home Demonstration Agent
for the Extension service,
-she organized a group of
quilters to meet on a regu-
lar basis at the extension
office in DeFuniak Springs,
Fla. Now, 36 years later,
the group known as Chau-
tauqua Quilters has come
back to the extension office
on North 9th Street in De-
Funiak Springs.

Until recently, the group
had been meeting at The
Crazy Patch Quilt Shop on
Baldwin Avenue. With the
shop's closing, the group de-
cided to make arrangements
with the Walton County Ex-
tension to return to their
"roots" and begin working
in coordination with Fam-


it
H
t,

o
g


and quilting with both chil-
dren and adults alike.
The Chautauqua Quilters
Guild will hold regular meet-
ings from 9 until 11 a.m.
on the second and fourth
Monday for the months of
January-October. Novem-
ber and December meetings
will be held only on the sec-
ond Monday. Starting on
March 14, the new meeting
place will be at the Walton
County Extension Building
at 732 N. 9th Street in De-
Funiak Springs.
Individuals interested in
joining this group are invit-
ed to attend.
Beginners are welcome!
For more information call
Lesa Harrison at (850)892-
7249 or (850)585-2796.


Ruritan Club


hosts concert


The Paxton Ruritan Club
is hosting "Straight Arrow,"
a Southern Bluegrass Gos-
pel group on March 12 from
12-2 p.m. at the Paxton Ag
Center.


Barbecue plates and Bos-
ton butt tickets will be pre-
sold for Paxton High School
scholarships.
Contact a Ruritan member
for tickets.


Waterways Dance Project


Fort Walton Beach; Gillian
Poole, DeFuniak Springs;
Shelia Postlewate, Shali-
mar; Cara Ratliff, Niceville;
Bailey Snell, DeFuniak
Springs; Amy Toole, Fort
Walton Beach; Bronwyn
Toombs, Niceville; Melissa
Wade, Fort Walton Beach:
Lizzie Wilson, Niceville;
Angela Yale, Fort Walton
Beach; Karla Zaldivar, Fort
Walton Beach.
"The goal of this proj-
ect is to unite the state of
Florida through its unique
and extensive arts in educa-
tion programs," explained
Dale Andree, dance faculty
at New World School of the
Arts in downtown Miami,
who conceived the collabora-
tion earlier this year. "These
young artists represent the
best of our K-12 and college
and university arts pro-
grams. By bringing their
talents together they hope
to bring to the attention of
the public the essential need
of a healthy society for clean
water and inspired art."
NWFSC Dance Coordina-
tor and Professor of Dance
Joesph Taylor told the Her-
ald/Breeze, "I feel people al-
ways seem to forget how im-
portant the inclusion of arts
in education is to the well-
rounded educated mind. As
we witness more and more
funding cuts for our arts
programs, we are watching
our children being cut and
slighted in these areas and
also the subsequent death
of fine arts as we know it. If
our children are not taught
to appreciate it how can we
expect it to continue? This
project has opened my eyes
to the ever growing problem
of our arts programs disap-
pearing from our schools.
We are reaching out in one
dance voice to show why it's
important to support Arts in
Education."
Taylor spoke about the


difference and the common-
alities of each performance
locally as well as state wide,
"The performances state-
wide will happen simultane-
ously. The choreography is a
collaborative effort as well.
There are motif phrases of
movement that everyone
across the state has learned
and will perform and then
each of the site coordinators
and their assistants have
choreographed the rest of
the piece. Each site will
begin and end in the same
way. My collaborative team
is Wendy Justice, Kelly
Murdock and myself. The
students have also added
their own flare to the piece
as well with short solos they
have created that we have
manipulated and rounded
together for the coherence of
the piece."
Taylor and the students
are hopeful for a great turn-
out to see the effort the group
has put in together, "The
performance is scheduled
for Saturday, March 5, 2011
at 3 p.m. We will be behind
the Chautauqua Building by
the swings, merry-go-round,
and slide. Bring a blanket
and enjoy the spring air and
a free 20 30 minute per-
formance that will hopefully
help you see why it's impor-
tant to keep arts in educa-
tion for the advancement of
our children. The dancers
will be accompanied by the
NWFSC Madrigal Singers
under the direction of Al-
lison Everitt. There are 19
dancers and 26 singers from
both Okaloosa and Walton
counties."
Dance performances
from all participating in-
stitutions will be linked by
common movement themes;
however, each choreogra-
pher will be creating a work
specific to their geographic
location, with music ranging
from choral music to drum


ensembles.
Participating schools
from the state of Florida in-
clude:
1. Miami: New World
School of the Arts, Miami
Dade College. South Miami
Middle Community School.
Conchita Espinosa Acad-
emyIN
2. Fort Lauderdale:
Nova Southeastern Univer-
sity, Jubilee Dance Theatre
3. Boca Raton: Florida
Atlantic University
-1. Daytona Beach:
l)aytona State College
5. Tampa: University
of South Florida, Univer-
sity of Tampa, Blake High
School. Revolution Dance
Company, Moving Current
Dance Collective, Shoes at
Door Dance Company, All
Out Rep. Company
6. Gainesville: Uni-
versity of Florida, Santa Fe
College. College of Central
Florida, Duval Elementary
7. Jacksonville: Jack-
sonville University, Florida
State College. Douglas An-
derson School of the Arts
8. Niceville: Northwest
Florida State College
More information about
Florida Waterways Dance
Project can be found at flor-
idawaterwaysdanceproject.
coin.


Bettye f' 'Dawson


Copeland


Tef. 17, 1951


.'
.-,r-:
I
g";-


Dawson and Bettye Copeland celebrated their 60th
Wedding Anniversary with family in Tallahassee on
the 22nd of February. They are parents and in-laws
of: Cathy & Eliot Rosenberg of Tallahassee, Carol &
Kyle Eidahl of Tallahassee, Carla & Michael Burns of
Greensboro, NC and Mike & Lisa Copeland of Craw-
fordville, Fla. They have nine grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
Bettye and Dawson met in her hometown of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla. Dawson, a civil and structural engineer,
was working in the vicinity with the U.S. Geological
Survey while completing his degree from the University
of Cincinnati They were married at the First Method-
ist Church on Feb. 17, 1951. After living in Ohio, Indi-
ana and Tennessee for a -few years Bettye and Dawson,
along with their two girls, Cathy and Carol, moved to
DeFuniak Springs where they enjoyed family close by
while building Dawson's career and expanding their
family to include Carla. In the late 60's Dawson went
to work for a large company in Baton Rouge, La. Mike
was born while the family lived in Louisiana. The fam-
ily returned to Florida via Pensacola and finally moved
to Tallahassee in 1969.
Over the last 40 years, Dawson has worked on over
500 major projects in the area. He established Copeland
Consulting Engineers, Inc. in 1980. His projects range
over the Tallahassee hills from FSU, FAMU and TCC,
as well as many private jobs. During this past decade
Dawson has done extensive structural engineering on
Coastal development in the Florida Panhandle. He liter-
ally has helped shape the face of Panama City Beach as
we see it today having worked on approximately half of
the condominium complexes developed during this time
period. As a consultant called upon in the aftermath of
some of the worst coastal hurricanes, Dawson's knowl-
edge and experience has helped to ensure the safety of
these buildings when they need to withstand nature's
fury in the future.
Bettye, a natural born artist, earned her degree in Vi-
sual Design from FSU while raising four children. She
has studied with numerous famous artists, including
Ed Gordon locally, and became a very accomplished
commission portrait artist. Besides the beautiful life-
like portraits she has painted of family members, they
especially enjoy her landscapes fun pictures to use up
paints on her pallet that depict many favorite places
she and Dawson have traveled throughout their lives
together. Her paintings always won first place in shows.
Bettye also has won local, state and national awards in
floral arranging and has been a member of Iris Garden
Circle of the Tallahassee Garden Club since 1969.
It is truly a great accomplishment in this day and age
to have been married to the same person for 60 years.
All the Copeland family four kids, sons and daughters
in-law; seven grandchildren, plus spouses and signifi-
cant others, and now two great-grandchildren are very
happy to celebrate.


S-'] ~Bettye & Dawson 60th Anniversay


'I /


N .. -i r.,.-....... .c
.. . . .. .. .. . .. . . . .. . ;. ...6 7. . . .. .. 0


a'
--- '
r--


i








PAGE 3-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


Dear Auntie Em,


Dear Auntie Em,
I am a young woman and
I just have to express it's
really tough out here, be-
ing a teen and not being a
size two in today's world.
Everywhere I look I am be-
ing told I am less than per-
fect because I don't look like
the girls in the magazine. It
makes me depressed and I
just want to eat more junk,
since junk is easier to get
than a healthy meal that's
not laden with salt and fat.
It's a vicious circle, getting
depressed over my size and
then eating to console my-
self.
I know I should be think-
ing about my future and my
grades and not that I'll nev-
er have a boyfriend if I don't
lose weight, but it's awful
hard. A few of my friends
are in the same boat as
me, although I don't think
it bothers them as much as
it bothers me. I just don't
know how to handle it any-
more. Can you give me any
advice that will make me
feel better or help me to lose
some weight?
Feelin' like a loser in north
Walton
Dear Feelin',
No, I can't give you any


advice to lose weight. You
are a young woman, a teen
as you have described your-
self and your body is going
through many changes right
now, changes that make it
difficult to lose weight some-
times. I can give you some
advice and if you take it to
heart, it will make you feel
better. You are perfect just
as you are. Not what you
expected to hear, is it? Well,
it's true.
My second piece of advice
is to stop buying your misery.
Stop looking at and reading
magazines or watching TV
shows that make you feel
bad about your body. Those
people don't care about you,
they care about selling a
perfect image, one that is
photo-shopped beyond be-
lief to you and your friends
so you will buy stuff in the
hopes you too can look a way
that is not achievable by
most. That's right, they are
selling you your own misery
and you pay them for it.
Now, think instead about
getting healthy inside and
out. Get your friends togeth-
er for a walk or hike, do the
dance revolution or kinetic
games on Xbox to move
and have fun. Your body is
a tool given to you to carry
you through this life and


The Jazz Ensemble of
Northwest Florida State
College (NWFSC) will be
performing at the following
community events around
the Panhandle area during
March and April. The Jazz
Ensemble is comprised of
NWFSC students and com-
munity members and is led
by Fred Domulot and Tom
Latenser. For information
contact the NWFSC Fine
Arts Office at (850)729-
5382.
March 17, two NWFSC-
Jazz Ensemble students,
Michael Malone and Tito
Rodgers, will be performing
at the Jazz Society of Pensa-
cola Jazz Competition in the
Ashmore Auditorium on the
campus of Pensacola State
College.
April 3, performing from


12 12:30 p.m. on the main-
stage of the Pensacola Jazz
Festival being held in Seville
Square.
April 8, performing at the
NWFSC Middle School/
High School Jazz Clinic &
Festival being held in the
NWF State College Amphi-
theater.
April 18, performing with
Pensacola State College and
University of West Florida
at the Jazz Society of Pen-'
sacola-Jazz Gumbo at 7:30
p.m.
April 27, Jazz Ensemble
Spring Concert at NWFSC
on the Mainstage at Mattie
Kelly Arts Center.
The free concert is a non-
ticketed event and seating is
on a first come basis. Doors
open at 7 p.m. and the con-
cert begins at 7:30 p.m.


A,,', '
(


it is much more important
than who you date or what
someone else thinks about
you. Focus on the good you
can do for yourself and nev-
er punish yourself for being
different. Your entire life is
in front of you, so wise up
and stop buying the lies the
outside world is selling you,
so you will buy more of their
products. Dr. Seuss actu-
ally said it very well when
he wrote, "Those that mind
don't matter and those that
matter don't mind." In oth-
er words, live for yourself,
move your body every day,
give it clean fuel to carry
you on your important mis-
sion through this world and
don't worry about the guy.
If you follow this advice, he
will show up when every-
thing else has been put into
place. I promise you if you do
these things, in six months
you will feel very different
about yourself and it will be
a positive change. Good luck
and God bless.
Auntie Em
Send your letters and
emails to Auntie Em to df-
sherald@gmail.com or to
P.O. Box 1546, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435


WZEP to hold annual radiothon


By JEFFREY POWELL
For nearly 30 years now
Art and Marty Dees of
WZEP radio have been hold-
ing an annual radiothon to
benefit Walton County Spe-
cial Olympians. This year's
event is to be held this Satur-
day, March 5. Hours for the
radiothon are from 6 a.m.
to noon with the exception
of 9 a.m. to 10 a.m: for the
country store. All proceeds
received from the event are
to allow Special Olympians
to travel to their respective


competitions.
"We hold this event every
year to help these special
people have a little quality
of life," said Art Dees. "This
event really has become a
total community effort. Over
the years there have been
some folks that have come
through with both large
and small donations, both of
which are greatly appreci-
ated. It is heartwarming to
see everyone's devotion."
Walton County Sheriff
Michael Adkinson and De-
Funiak Springs City Mar-


shal Mark Weeks are both
scheduled to appear on the
morning's program. Listen-
ers can pledge donations by
calling in or by coming by
the WZEP AM 1460 studio
which is located at 449 N.
12th Street. WZEP can be
reached by calling 892-3158.
Several Special Olympians
are also scheduled to be in
the studio during the broad-
cast.
"It is such a joy to see
their smiling faces when
the phone rings," Dees com-
mented.


Northwest Florida State

College presents As You Like It


A cast of 14 Northwest
Florida State College (NWF-
SC) students and commu-
nity members will present
Shakespeare's comedy As
You Like It in the Sprint
Theater of the Mattie Kelly
Arts Center in Niceville,
Fla., from March 16 through
19 at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are $15 for adults
and $10 for youth 18 and
under. NWFSC students
and employees with Raider-
Card ID may obtain one free
ticket per ID, in person from
the box office space permit-
ting. Purchase tickets by
phone, in-person or online
from the Mattie Kelly Arts
Center box office at (850)
729-6000, or the website at
wwvw.mattiekellyartscenter.
org. The box office is open
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to


Friday. The online box office
is open around the clock. If
available, seats purchased
at the door are the same
price as advance tickets.
As You Like It subverts
the traditional rules of ro-
mance. Gender roles, na-
ture, and politics are con-
fused in a play that reflects
on how bewildering yet ut-
terly pleasurable life can be.
The idyllic Forest of Arden
provides the backdrop for
Shakespeare's glorious ro-
mantic comedy of courtiers,
clowns, philosophers and


provincials-all bewitched
by the trials and triumphs
of love. As You Like It tells
the story of power hungry
women exiling their sisters,
girls playing guys, and ev-
eryone finding love in unex-
pected places.
A firm favorite among
Shakespeare's comedies, As
You Like It runs the glorious
gamut of pastoral romance
- with cross-dressing and
love-notes to poetry and
brilliant conversation, gen-
tle satire, slapstick, and
passion!


SOCIAL


S


HANDLED


SECURITY CLAIMS


- APPEALS EXPERT


By: Dr. Anna Pat Krupkin, Ph.D


DISABILITY CON


(850) 835


S


-2


ULTANTS


163


P.O. Box # 539, Freeport, Florida 32439

NO FEE UNLESS YOU COLLECT

Since 1970


SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
HANDLED APPEALS EXPERT
By: Dr. Anna Pat Krupkin, Ph.D
DISABILITY CONSULTANTS
(850) 835-2163
P.O. Box # 539, Freeport, Florida 32439
NO FEE UNLESS YOU COLLECT Since 1970
CALL PAT FOR DETAILS


Benjamin Moore,
Paintsr
fvyANks

CASHICABRY
EST. 1970
Hardware and Building Supplies
Franks_cc@yahoo.com
FREEPORT LOCATION GRAYTON BEACH LOCATION
244 Highway 20 East 113 Logan Lane
FREEPORT, FL Grayton Beach, FL 32459
(850) 835-4221 (850) 231-0500


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NWFSC Jazz Ensemble

upcoming performances


Now you have a choice!











STELLA'S,
Florist and Boutique
850-520-4623
Downtown DeFuniak Springs

. WFresh Flowers Lingerie Handbags


-;^^ ,,..' .. T T


850-835-4153
18374 U.S. Hwy. 331 S. Freeport, FL 32439

To view our local listings visit our website at
www.freeportwaterfront.com
> I-


MARH! 1,211


Walto C Pan P


bh,LijBLAI Mi
--B^tl zr~OMLi~i y














OAIITUREDNS


Harrison


Talmadge "Pee Wee"
Harrison, 72, of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla. passed away
Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011 at
his residence. He was born
March 21, 1938 to the late
Lethon and Anna Lee Har-
rison in the Knox Hill Com-
munity in Walton County.
He enjoyed talking on the
phone, fishing, watching
wrestling and old westerns.
He also enjoyed telling jokes
with everyone, and was
known by his neighborhood
as the "Mayor of Paradise Is-
land." Pee Wee retired from
WCSB in 2000, as Bus Shop
Foreman after 34 years and
8 months of service.
He is preceded in death by
two brother-in-laws, Jimmy
Kemp and Marvin Blizzard.
Pee Wee is survived by
his loving wife, Millie B.


i.r
I '

Aiii-.a


*I
I-~C


Warren

Mrs. Beverley Warren
of DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
passed away in her home
on Friday, Feb. 25, 2011 at
the age of 83, surrounded
by her family. Mrs. Warren
was born June 12, 1927 to
Pete and Evelina Mae Mil-
ner of Newport Beach, Calif.
She met her husband "Bud-
dy" Warren of DeFuniak
Springs while he was sta-
tioned with the Navy in Cal-
ifornia. They married Au-
gust 20, 1946 and moved to
DeFuniak Springs in 1950.
Mrs. Warren worked
alongside her husband at
both Service Drug Store and
Warren's Pharmacy. She
was a very active member of
the First United Methodist
Church. She was a member
of the church choir, chair-
person of the PPR, and was
actively involved with vaca-
tion Bible school.
Mrs. Warren also was
very involved with the com-
munity. She was Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer of Walton
Cares, a division of Angel
Food Ministries dedicated
to providing food and other
essentials to needy families
in Walton County. She also
donated funds and her time
to Breast Cancer Research
and Relay for Life.
Perhaps Mrs. Warren's
greatest accomplishment
was that of being a Mother.


Harrison; children, Ronnie
Cook, Donnie Cook, Loretta
Laird and husband Kevin all
of DeFuniak Springs, Fla.,
Donna Cook of Freeport,
Fla., Tammy Thomas and
husband Wesley of Ponce de
Leon, Fla., and Vickie Jack-
son of Cambridge, Ohio;
three sisters, Shirley Kemp
of Paxton, Fla., Carolyn
Blizzard of Madison, Wis.,
and Winona McLendon of
Eucheanna; two brothers,
Benjamin (Bunk) and wife
Elaine of Eucheanna and
Clayton and wife Nell of
Wewahitchka, Fla.; eleven
grandchildren and 10 great-
grandchildren.

A celebration of Pee Wee's
life was held Saturday, Feb.
26, 2011 at Davis-Watkins
Funeral Home, with Pastor
Walter Ales and Reverend
John Hatcher officiating.
Flowers were being ac-
cepted, or in lieu of flowers
donations may be made at
Army Aviation Center FCU
in memory of Pee Wee, or
Covenant Hospice, 370 Red-
stone Avenue, Crestview,
Florida 32536.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.

Arrangements and ser-
vices were under the direc-
tion of Davis-Watkins Fu-
neral Home and Crematory.


She was the backbone of her
family, always offering sup-
port, advice, and most of all
love to her children, grand-
children and great-grand-
children. She was often
seen carrying around her
grandchildren to school and
activities in her cars aptly
named "Gee's Taxi" and lat-
er "Gee's Taxi the Sequel."
Mrs. Warren is survived
by her children, Karen
Baker, Carolyn Clear. Carl
Warren, and Sara Bowers of
DeFuniak Springs, as well
as Curtis Warren of Talla-
hassee, Fla.
She is survived by ten
grandchildren, Beverley
Lastinger, Libby Warren,
Curtis Warren, Daniel War-
ren, Kristen Privette, Jacob
Clear, Lora Harrison, Jo-
seph Warren, Megan War-
ren, and Kala Wilson. She
is survived by seven great-
grandchildren, Jade Horner,
Kaylei Harrison, Cody War-
ren, Cole Warren, Jackson
Lastinger, Mason Lasting-
er, and Jeremiah Warren.
She is also survived by her
beloved dog Maggie, who
never left her side.
She is preceded in death
by her husband Buddy War-
ren, Mother Evelina Milner,
and Father Pete Milner.
Visitation services were-
held Saturday, Feb. 26, at
Davis-Watkins Funeral
Home. Funeral services
were held Sunday, Feb. 27,
at 3 p.m at the First United
Methodist Church of De-
Funiak Springs with Rever-
ends Jesse Evans and Rob
West officiating. Committal
services followed at Magno-
lia Cemetery.

Flowers were accepted, or
donations may be made to
the First United Methodist
Church Youth Group in the
name of Mrs. Beverley War-
ren.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.

Arrangements and ser-
vices were under the direc-
tion of Davis-Watkins Fu-
neral Home.


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Paul Ray Leddon, 71,
of DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
passed away Tuesday, Feb.
22, 2011 at Fort Walton
Beach Medical Center. He
was born May 27, 1939 in
Holmes County, Florida.
Paul loved the dulcimer,
and enjoyed participating
in Dulcimer festivals and
gardening. He was a mem-
ber of the Dulcimer Club in
Opp, Ala. Paul also served
as a deacon of Calvary Bap-
tist Church where he was a
charter member.
Paul is preceded in death
by his parents, Tommy and
Julia Leddon; special broth-
er-in-law, J.D. Holiday; and
brother-in-law, Charlie Gil-
lis.
Paul is survived by his
loving wife, Edna Leddon;
one daughter, Merita Led-
don of DeFuniak Springs,
Fla; aunt, Oleane King of


Rushing
Mrs. Eloise Brackin
Rushing, 90, passed away
Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011.
She was born Oct. 1, 1920 in
Geneva, Ala. to Arthur and
Eliza Power Brackin.
Mrs. Rushing was a lifelong
resident of Walton County.
She was Baptist by faith
and had been a member of
Baldwin Baptist Church for
541 years.
Mrs. Rushing is preceded
in death by her parents;
her loving husband of 65
years, Louie Rushing; one
son, Ronald L. Rushing; one


Mrs. Deborah Taunton
McKinney, 54, passed away
Friday, Feb. 2011. She was
born Jan. 21, 1957 in Pica-
yune, Miss. to Leon and
Christine Taunton.
Mrs. McKinney was a
resident of Walton County.
She was Baptist by faith.
She worked as a file clerk
at the Walton County Clerk
of Court's Office. She loved
fishing, animals, gardening
and canning vegetables. She
was a devoted wife, mother
and grandmother.
Mrs. McKinney is preced-
ed in death by her parents;
three brothers, Charles
Tilden (Boss), Leon Fraul-
din (Buck) and Ricky Leon
Taunton, and one sister,
Kathy Denise Taunton.
Mrs. McKinney is sur-
vived by her husband, Den-
nis L. McKinney of Liberty;
two sons, Gary Clark and
wife, Christy of Freeport and
Nicholas Clark of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla.; one step-'
daughter, Linda L. McKin-


Ponce de Leon, Fla; two
sister-in-laws, Elzie Gillis
of Geneva, Ala. and Laveda
Holiday of Leonia, Fla.; and
numerous nieces, nephews,
and cousins.
Funeral services were-
held Friday, Feb. 25, 2011
in the chapel of Davis-Wat-
kins Funeral Home, with
Brother Tim Barrow and
Brother Bill Stevens officiat-
ing. A time of visitation was
held one hour prior to the
service. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
the Calvary Baptist Church
Building Fund or a charity
of your choice.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.
Arrangements and ser-
vices were under the direc-
tion of Davis-Watkins Fu-
neral Home.


brother, Charles Brackin
and granddaughter, Vicky
Turner.
Mrs. Rushing is survived
by her daughter, Linda
Sue Ellis and husband, Ju-
nior; daughter-in-law, Terri
Rushing; sisters, Susan
Shell and Mary Vorpagel
and husband, Ross; grand-
children, Richard Cotton
and wife, Jane, Tim Cotton
and wife, Robin, Stephanie
Bowin and husband, John,
and Kevin Roddenberry and
wife, Lori; great-grandchil-
dren, Kody, Michael and
Turner Cotton, Andrew and
Brian Bowin, Kassie and
Madison Rodenberry, Peryn
and Blake Schmitt and Sa-
die and Bailey Murphy.
Funeral services were held
Friday, Feb. 25, 2011 at
Clary-Glenn Funeral Home
with Rev. Richard Murray
officiating.
Burial followed in the
Magnolia Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituar-
ies. offer condolences, sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com.

Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home was entrusted with
the arrangements.


ney of DeFuniak Springs;
two step- sons Patrick Scott
and McKinney and wife,
Teresa and Terry Eugene
McKinney, all of DeFuniak
Springs; two sisters, Tena
Yarborough and husband,
Richard, of New Hope and
Dolly Taylor and husband,
Cecil, of Mobile, Ala.; six
grandchildren, Makayla
Clark, Mackenzie Clark,
Heather Clark, Zack Clark,
Derek Jones and Preston
Lee McKinney.
Funeral services were
held Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011
at Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home with Dr. James John-
son officiating.
Burial followed in the
Pleasant Ridge Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com

Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home was entrusted with
the arrangements.


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SYour Sttin Fwa Lif z

Quesdirun sbut hMhid34cEastI

The Land and the Book



SUi.L f fI---w"L *mam a- r r t it 1 J


Gann
Mrs. Stella Louise Gann,
64, of Miramar Beach,
passed away Wednesday,
Feb. 23, 2011. She was
born Jan. 3, 1947 in Walker
County, Alabama.
Mrs. Gann was Baptist
by faith. She worked as an
engraver in the printing in-
dustry for many years. She
enjoyed archery and being


Andrews
Mrs. Iris Elaine Williams
Andrews, 94, passed away
Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011.
She was born Aug. 21, 1916
in Covington County, Ala-
bama to Mack Clayton and
Hannah Harriet Britt Wil-
liams.
Mrs. Andrews was a resi-
dent of DeFuniak Springs,
Fla. She was Baptist by faith
and a member of The First
Baptist Church of DeFuniak
Springs since 1924, where
she was active especially
with the children's minis-
tries for many years. She
was involved in Women's
Club and Choctawhatchee
Hemerocallis Society. She
worked in sales in several
different stores in DeFuniak


outdoors.
Mrs. Gann was preceded
in death by her parents, and
one brother, Troy Douglas
Wingo.
Mrs. Gann is survived by
her four brothers, David
Wingo and wife, Linda,
Freddy McClure, Billy Mc-
Clure and wife, Valarie,
and Edward Wingo; four
sisters, Gail Pulkowski and
husband, Jeff Daily, Helen
Wingo, Jackie Wingo and
Johnnie Wingo.
Graveside services were
held Saturday, Feb. 26,
2011 at Littlevine Cemetery
in Empire, Ala.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com

Clary-Glenn Freeport
Chapel Funeral Home was
entrusted with the arrange-
ments.


Springs and in the Walton
High School Library until
her retirement in 1999 at
83.
Mrs. Andrews is preceded
in death by her parents; her
husband, Thomas Linzie
Andrews; daughter, Martha
Sue Wilkinson; son, Thomas
Hugh Andrews and nine
siblings.
Mrs. Andrews is survived
by her daughter, Harriet
Parish and husband, Jeff of
Andalusia, Ala., son, Ralph
Andrews and wife, Marian
Andrews of Palm Harbor,
Florida; eight grandchildren
and 19 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011 at
First Baptist Church with
Dr. Bobby Tucker officiat-
ing.
Donations may be made
to the First Baptist Church
building fund, or to a favor-
ite charity.
Those asked to serve as
pallbearers were the deacons
of First Baptist Church.
Burial followed in the Mag-
nolia Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, and sign
a guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com.

Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home was entrusted with
the arrangements.


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ElAI." f)i \' ,EfL &D PERATED


(850) 834-4345
3979 Si.i n Hwy 2 W\si1
I1- Funiik Springs, FL 2 133

Serv-ing the F trida Pu iiiJid~" And Souihemrn Alabama r ill:
Monuments
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And all Ccenctcry Needs!

M y S i.' ,.M ( ... f, ',,,,,* ,,,,..,I ; -i ,. t ,\ f ,,,l '.,, ,f,'t..<


Leddon


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I


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2011


PAGE 4-B


a

;.




~Sl~t~








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MA


RHEA BRISCOE, native of Pennsylvania, enjoys sharing
the love of Christ and watching women become transformed
by the power Holy Spirit.


. . .
JUDY ROGERS has performed in numerous venues
ranging from churches and music conferences centers to
cruise ships. Each concert is seen as a unique opportunity to
share the gospel and draw families closer to God and each
other.


Florida Panhandle Women's Retreat

to be held at Southwide Baptist Church


Florida Panhandle Wom-
en's Retreat to host fourth
annual retreat, Streams in
the Desert, at Southwide
Baptist Church on Satur-
day, March 12, 2011. The
retreat will begin at 8 a.m.
and last till 2:30 p.m. There
will be a continental break-
fast and hot lunch.
This years retreat will


feature Rhea Briscoe as key-
note speaker form Wauke-
sha, Wi., and Judy Rogers
as worship leader from Or-
eido, Fla.
Rhea Briscoe has a pas-
sion to see women experi-
ence the freedom and power
found only in Jesus Christ.
Rhea draws from experienc-
es of God's faithfulness in


painful times and uses His
Word to minister the love of
Christ to others. God uses
her words to remind us of
His "treasures in darkness."
For more information'about
Briscoe, visit her website at
snowdropministries.com
Judy Rogers uses her mu-
sic ministry to communicate
with humor and inspiration


to all ages. Rodgers longs
for others to draw closer to
Jesus. To learn more about
Rogers visit her website at
judyandtrenarogers.com.
To register for the retreat
contact (850)892-9578. Tick-
ets are $25 before March 1,
and $30 at the door.


PGE 5-B

My Mother a
July 26,1931-March 6, 2008
Willie Jean
(Redmon) Hada


My memory of my mother is
she was my rock.
I leaned on her from the time I was
born here in DeFuniak on 1-23-48.
My dad was M.T. Gainey.
He passed Oct. 12, 2006.
I was taken out-of-state when I was five.
I just moved back to my home town
on 12-19-10 and bought a house.
I wish I could have my mother with me.
Everyday, every minute, that's how
much her memory is with me all the time.
I love her very much and miss her, but I
know she's smiling down at me,
knowing I came back to our home.
Jenny Roberta (Gainey) Silcott.
| School DaS i


1946.47










CLARY-GLENN FUNERAL HOMES CELEBRATES


80


YEARS


OF COMMITMENT TO SERVICE


Join us in celebrating eight decades of history and services.


Established in 1931 by John Page, Randolph Clary purchased the funeral home
in 1952 and joined partnership with Jerry and Sheila Godwin in 1982 and
the funeral home became Clary-Godwin Funeral Home. In 1952 Mercer
and Ada Comander established Comander Funeral Home, in 1975
Robert and Sara Comander obtained ownership of Comander Funeral
Home. In 2002 Clary-Godwin and Comander Funeral Homes merged
and became Clary-Godwin-Comander Funeral Homes. In 2000
Clary-Godwin Freeport Chapel Funeral Home was established in
Freeport, Florida. In 2004 Joel and Paula Glenn purchased Clary-
Godwin-Comander Funeral Home and Clary-Godwin Freeport
Chapel Funeral Home and today are Clary-Glenn Funeral
Homes. Clary-Glenn Funeral Homes, Inc. is proud of their
"aL eighty years of funeral heritage and is grateful to the families
i whom they have served for eight decades.


'*



',3


.,


Clary-Glenn
FUNERAL HOMES
Locill.f oWi't'd M lfiimilih operated


clary-glenn.com
CLARY-GLENN FUNERAL HOME
230 PARK AVENLIE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL (850>) ,82-2511
CL.AR\-GLENN FREEPORT CHAPEL FUNERAL HOME
150 EAST HIGHWAY 20 FREEPORT, FL (850) 835-2511
IIi I !,, i D ';l',, -',ilH Fl',i O il',l


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PAGE ~~ ~Cm andBWo ThEipUIKSRNS EADBEZTURDYMRH32


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I


barqmail.com Website: fpcdfs.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS, located at 88 Circle Drive, Rev. Robert West, staff
and congregation wish to invite you to join our family for activities
on Sunday beginning with Contemporary Worship Service in the
sanctuary at 8:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship Service at 11 a.m. with
Children's Church (Pre-K to third grade) provided for both services;
Vesper service at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. Communion is observed


ALAQUA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. The pastor and
congregation invite you to come join us for services at 9 a.m. every
Sunday. Church school for children and coffee fellowship follow the
morning service. Serving the faithful at 4189 Coy Burgess Loope
since 1837. Come to.the country for worship. Call Pastor Henry
Martin at (850)892-4860 for more information.

ARGYLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 252 Argyle Church Road, Argyle,
FL invites everyone to attend their services. Sunday School 9:45
a.m. all ages, Church Service 11 a.m., Sunday night" j p.m. all
ages, Wednesday night 6 p.m.
Pastor James Burnham. Call (850)892-2327, or (850)259-2173.
All are welcome.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH invites you to attend
Sunday School 9:45, Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Train-
ing 5 p.m., Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m., Wednesday Prayer
Service 6:30 p.m. Come and be a part of an awesome ministry
here in your community.

BEECHGROVE CHURCH OF GOD and Pastor D. Wayne
Rickards extend a warm welcome to everyone to attend their regular
services. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m.; morning worship at 11
a.m.; Sunday night services begin at 5 p.m. and Wednesday night
services begin at 6 p.m. The church is located six miles south of
Ponce de Leon on CR 183. For information (850)836-4484.

BIBLE BELIEVERS BAPTIST CHURCH, The congregation and
Pastor Dan Hershey, would like to invite you to come and be a part of
our continuing church growth. If you are looking for a fundamental,
KJV Bible-believing, independent Baptist Church, then we are just
what you are looking for. The preaching is not compromised, it is
straight out of God's Word. The preaching is known to be "old-
fashioned," like it used to be. So, please come join us in worship.
330 North Davis Lane, DFS. Sunday School at 10 a.m. services 11
and 6 p.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study 6:30
p.m. "Teaching the Bible as it is for men as they are."

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W.
Live Oak Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and
congregation welcomes you to join Spirit filled worship services
where we'll treat you in so many different ways, you will have to
like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7 p.m. All are cordially invited
and welcome. For a ride to church contact (850)892-0706 or (850)
892-4704.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come meet and fellowship with
other real people who genuinely love the Lord. Sit under practical
bible teaching and preaching relevant to today's issues. Come let
Jesus Christ heal your body, save your marriage, touch your kids,
and give hope to the broken hearted. Come dressed casual or
Sunday best. All are welcome and will fit in. No ties required. Seekers
welcome. Come see for yourself that we are sound, practical, God
loving people who center our lives around the person of Jesus
Christ and a solid approach to the Holy Scriptures. We do pray for
the sick and needy, and believe in the bible gospel of power to meet
the human need. Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. and Wednesday night
classes begin at 6:30 p.m., Teens: Wednesday nights, Children's
Church: Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights. Cornerstone
Church is located at 2044 Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak
Springs. Ph.(850) 892-2240.

EUCHEE VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is located in the
Euchee Valley Community at the intersection of County Hwys. 183
South and 280 East.
We cordially invite you to come and worship with us and make
us your church home. Sunday School begins for all ages at 9:45
a.m. followed by morning worship at 11 a.m. Nursery provided.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church
attendance doesn't have to be dull, mundane or feel like just an
added burden to your life! You can attend a church service in which
you. feel both welcomed and loved, as well as be challenged by
the powerful preaching of God's Word. The church family of the
First Apostolic Church embraces the doctrine of the early Apostles
and their preaching as recorded in the Book of Acts and other
New Testament teachings. Sunday Services begin at 10 a.m. with
Sunday school for the children and a spirt-filled worship for adults.
Sunday evening service begins at 5:30 with prayer, with worship
and preaching beginning'at 6 p.m. Wednesday night bible study
begins at 7 p.m. and we offer family prayer on Thursday from 6 p.m
to 7 p.m. each week. Not able to physically attend? Hear sermons
posted on our website at www.defuniakapostolic.com. Come and
experience church the way God started it all in the New Testament!
If you have any questions or need ministry assistance, please feel
free to call the church office at (850) 892-7882. Rev. David W. King,
Pastor.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located
at 461 Van Buren Avenue, Pastor Michael F. Tadlock, his wife,
Amy and Son, Hayden would like to extend an invitation for all
to come join us as we celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus
Christ through Spirit filled worship & annointed preaching!! Sunday
School begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by Morning Worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evening
service begins at 6:30 p.m. Youth Ministry Services are held every
Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Please come and worship with us.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East
Live Oak Avenue. We cordially invite you to join our "Fellowship
of Encouragement" and come for Worship and Bible Study at the
following times: Sunday Bible Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship
(10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5 p.m.) and evening worship
(6:00 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us for prayer meeting
at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship dinners.
Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details. Visit our webpage
at www.fbcdfs.org.

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite
you to worship with us this Sunday at 9.30 a.m. Then stay for
refreshments and adult Bible Study and children's Sunday School.
Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz, speaks from the Gospel each
Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We are known throughout
our community as a friendly and serving Church that welcomes
newcomers. We are located on U.S. 331, very near the Florida line
[245121bd 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at
(334) 858-3515 for more specific directions.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS,
1063 Circle Drive, invites the public to join them throughout the
week for worship, fellowship, study and service. A men's fellow-
ship group and Presbyterian women meet monthly for fellowship
and Bible study. Children's and youth activities are announced. Call
for information. Sunday (nursery provided from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.)
9:30 a.m. Songfest for everyone 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for all
ages. 11 a.m. morning worship. Wednesday 3:30 p.m. Presbyterian
youth fellowship. 6:30 p.m. Chancel choir rehearsal.
First and third Wednesday, 9 a.m. 12 p.m. KID'S CLOSET to
provide basic necessities to children of Walton County families in
need.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who
are committed to being an inclusive faith community, where per-
sons from all walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working
together. If you're looking for a church home, we invite you to come
visit us. Church office phone number 892-5832. email:fpcdfs@em-


INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles
south of DeFuniak Springs, cordially invites you to come and
worship with us in Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship
services, at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is
at 6 p.m. Pastor Scot Keppel and the congregation extends a very
special welcome to come visit or make us your church home. We
practice "Love one another". A nursery is provided.


Y


WESTSIDE CHURCH OF CHRIST Do you truly know what
it means to be saved? Are you worshipping according to God's
divine instructions? If you're even contemplating that answer, then
please come visit us this coming Sunday at 9 a.m. Bible study, 10
a.m.worship, and/or during 7 p.m. Wednesday night Bible class.
The address is 121 East Larkspur Avenue, DeFuniak Springs FL,
32435. If you have any questions please call us at (850)892.3391.


I


at both morning services on first Sunday and Sunday School for all
ages at 9:45 a.m. Children's Sunday school (k-6th) is "JAM" (Jesus
and Me) is the Multi-Dimensional Learning program with children
rotating to different workshops (art, computer, cooking/science,
games, storytelling/movie) each Sunday "learning by doing". Other
opportunities on Sunday include: Sr. High Youth Fellowship at 4
p.m..; Jr. High Youth Fellowship and Children (HIS Kids Club) at
3:30 p.m.; Food pantry every 3rd Sat. 7-9 a.m. For more information,
call (850) 892-5332, 892-5128 e-mail fumcdfs@embarqmail.com
website www.fumcdefuniaksprings.org.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF WESTVILLE,
2100 Highway 90 West, Westville. Pastor Jason Campbell and
the Westville church family invite you to come to a place where
Pentecost is an experience, not a thing of the past. We offer a
friendly environment with annointed preaching and singing, Our
Sunday morning services begin at 10 a.m. and our Sunday evening
service begins at 5 p.m. Our Wednesday evening service begins
at 7 p.m. We also offer children's church on Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Come experience the power of the Holy Ghost just like early church
did in the Book of Acts. For more information call, (850) 548-5898
or(850) 892-7499.

FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP INTERNATIONAL is a non-
denominational church filled with excitement about what the future
holds and a sincere hunger for the outpouring of the Spirit of God.
We are a church where God's presence is never taken for granted
and neither are you. Freedom Fellowship is a church looking for a
people "who will humble themselves before God and seek His ways."
2Chr. 7:14, Pastor Dennis Grey II invites your family to be a part of
our farrily each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Casual dress / Contemporary
Worship. We are now meeting at the Continental Worship Center
located at 2132 U.S. 90 across from the DeFuniak Springs Airport.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FREEPORT 430 Kylea Laird
Drive, Freeport, Fla. Pastor Ken Coots would like to extend an
invitation to one and all to come and "Worship"the Lord Jesus
Christ with us, as we seek His perfect will. Bible Study for all ages
commences at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday. Sunday a.m. worship
service begins at 10 a.m., and Sunday p.m. service at 5 p.m.. The
Wednesday p.m. prayer service begins at 6 p.m.. Both the Sunday
p.m. and Wednesday p.m. prayer services are being held in the
Fellowship Hall. Explicit Bible doctrine is the continuous thread
during both evenings. We at FBC Freeport are strong advocates of
Romans 10:17, "Faith cometh by hearing and hearing by the Word
of God." Hope and pray to see all there! (850) 835-2742 (850) 774-
8327.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (formerly the Concerned Christian
Church) desires to reproduce in doctrine, in life and practice, the
Church founded by Christ. Our position may be summarized as
"where the Bible speaks, we speak" and "where the Bible is silent,
we are silent," we invite you to join us and help spread the message
of Christ in our community. Sunday School (all ages) at 10 a.m.
and worship (including Childrens' Church) starts at 11 a.m. Nursery
available. Our minister is John Dixon and the church is located on
U.S. 90, 2.4 miles west of the intersection of U.S. 90 and U.S. 331
North.

FREEPORT ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 17457 US 331S. Sunday
services: Learning Center 9:45 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:50 a.m.
Do you need joy in your life? Then come hear the sermon series
from the Book of Philippians call "Disturbed by Joy!" Wednesday,
7 p.m. Hear the teaching series. "Traveling through the Psalms."
Nursery available. Phone 865-4068 for more information.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 174 Harrison
Street, (corner of Bayloop & Harrison St.) Freeport, Fl. 32439 Office
- 850-880-6633, Parsonage 850-835-2261, Pastor's Cell Phone -
850-225-4914 Dr. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor. Please come worship
with us. Rev. Dr. G Charles Sattewhite, Pastor announces that we
are having blended services which include both Contemporary and
Traditional services, these services are geared to reach both t he
seeker, and the growing church member, as well as the established
member. WE are excited about what God is doing at the Freeport
UMC. Our service times are 9:00 a.m. for Bible Study, and children's
hour, our Worship time is 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship in
Song 4:00 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wednesday 6:00 p.m., Our Ladies
meet every otherTuesday Night 6:00 p.m., We have a Gospel Singing
Jubilee on the 1st Saturday of every month 6:00 p.m. (Open Mic).
Come be with us. "a short drive for a life changing experience."

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, 2415 County Hwy. 1883,
DeFuniak Springs is a friendly little country church that welcomes
all visitors. Everyone is invited to worship with the congregation.
Sunday school starts at 9:15 a.m. Sunday morning worship is at
10:30 a.m. and Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday
we have prayer meeting starting at 6:30 p.m. and children's mission
program and Bible drill program. Every fifth Sunday, we have special
music followed by "Dinner on the Grounds." We have a nursery for
0-3 and Children's Church for ages 3 through the first grade.
Missions are very important to Friendship. We have Men's, Wom-
en's and children's mission program. Our pastor is Johnmark Brown.
We extend a heartfelt welcome for you to come and join with us
in worship and fellowship. For any questions please call (850)859-
2287.

GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (GPC) Pastor Keith An-
drews and the congregation of GPC invite you to come and worship
with them. At GPC, you'll find teaching that's biblical, practical, and
encouraging; worship that's exciting, joyous, and Christ-honoring;
and fellowship that's warm and personal. Sunday: Sunday School
(all ages!) at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Kidz Klub at 11 a.m. Ignite!
(Youth) at various locations from 5 7 p.m. Wednesday: Trans-
formation (Bible study for men and women) at 6:30 p.m. GPC is lo-
cated about 10 minutes north of DeFuniak Springs on SR-83N. Find
out more on the web at www.glendalechurch.org or call (850)859-
0080.

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of
Highway 90 on Laird.Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just
before the Okaloosa County line. Grace Community is a church
committed to historical Southern Baptist principles and believes that
the Church is called, not to reflect its culture, but to shape it. We
believe that faith must be lived as well as affirmed, therefore, right
living derives from right believing. We hold to a high view of Scrip-
ture believing the Bible as our final authority and that it "stands
in judgement of us, never do we stand in judgement of it." Sunday
morning worship begins at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday School at 11 a.m.
and evening bible study at 6 p.m. Friday night home Bible study at
6:30 p.m. If you are tired of playing church, come help us shape the
culture where we are "learning God's will one verse at a time."

HARMONY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH and Pastor Donel David-
son together with his family welcome all to worship God in spirit and
in truth, at 974 Adams Road, DeFuniak Springs.
Church services will begin with Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Sun-
day morning worship at 11 a.m.; Sunday evening at 5 p.m., and
Wednesday evening 6:30 p.m. Directions: U.S.331 N turn on to
Williams Road go about 3.3 miles to Adams Road, turn right onto
Adams go about 9/10 of a mile to church. U.S. 90 turn onto CR-
1087 in the Mossy Head area go to Williams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to Adams Road, turn left onto Adams go
9/10 of a mile to church. From CR-1087 out of New Harmony turn
left onto Adams Road and go 9/10 of a mile to church. For more
information, call the pastorium phone number at (850) 834-2017.


NEW HARMONY BAPTIST CHURCH is located at 2281 County
Hwy. 2A, DeFuniak Springs, FL. only nine miles north of Hwy. 90 on
Rt. 1087 from Mossy Head. Pastor Todd Camp would like to invite
you to worship with us during any of our exciting weekly services.
We are a family church that loves Jesus! Our Sunday School hour
is from 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. followed by our morning worship
service at 11 a.m. Nursery and children's church are provided. Our
Sunday evening service begins at 6 p.m., as we "study to show
ourselves approved unto God." On Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. we have a dynamic children's program, youth meeting, ladies
ministry, and adult prayer and Bible study service. The church also
offers affordable daycare services. Monday-Friday. We are a Bible
church committed to seeing God change lives in the power of the
Holy Spirit. Come and be a part of what the Lord is doing at New
Harmony Baptist Church. Call for more information at (850) 834-
2871.

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH 6753 State Hwy 2 East,
Darlington, Fla. We are reaching out to the lost, hurting, hungry,
and naked. Pastor Rev. Curtis Manning and his congregation would
like to invite you to attend services with them. Sunday School for
all ages is at 10 a.m., and Sunday Morning worship is at 11 a.m.;
Sunday evening services will be at 5 p.m.; Wednesday night prayer
and teaching is at 6 p.m.; Come enjoy our anointed praise and
worship and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and
teaching of God's Word. For more information call ( 850 ) 892-
2048.

PASTOR BILL HUNTER AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE
BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, "the Church in
the Wildwood," invites you to come and worship with us just as you
are. Black Creek UMC is located five miles east of Freeport at 278
Memorial Lane. (If you need directions, please call (850)859-2366
or (850)830-1497. We are a church body who loves people and
who also loves to hear the word of God preached. If you sing and/
or play a musical instrument and would like to share your talents)
please come and join us. Make plans now to attend Sunday school
at 10 a.m., Morning Worship at 11 a,m., and Evening Worship at
6 p.m. Rev. Bill may be reached at (850)859-2366 or (850)830-
1497.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs.
Located one mile south of Bob Sikes Road at 1015 Pleasant Ridge
Rd. extends a special invitation for you to join us to worship the
Lord and study His Word at the following times: Sunday Breakfast/
Fellowship (8:45); age appropriate Sunday Bible Study (9:15);
Morning Worship (10:30); Discipleship training (5 p.m.) and Evening
Worship (6 p.m.); Wednesday (6 p.m.) adult Bible study and youth
activities. Participate in meaningful worship with family and friends.
Call (850) 892-3500 for more information.

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at the
intersection of Hwy. 1883 & 183 invites you to Sunday School 9:45
a.m., Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Training at 5 p.m.,
Evening Service 6 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 p.m. Please come
worship God with us.

PORTLAND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH welcomes you!
We are here for you and hope you will bless us with y our presence
as we worship God and live in the community together. We're
different, and seeking new ways to be the church God call us to
be. We focus on prayer, fellowship, study, missions and worship. A
variety of activities are going on weekly. We have Sunday school
for adults and youth. Worship at 11 a.m. and a new contemplative
prayer service beginning in September at 8:30 a.m., nursery
provided. Youth meet on Wednesday along with dinner and adult
Bible studies at 6 p.m. For more information call (850)-307-2009.


SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1307 County Hwy 278,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Morning Worship
10 a.m.; Puppets, Children's and Adult Choir 4 p.m.; Evening Adult
Bible Study, Youth Bible Study, and Children's Mission Classes 5
p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday mid-week
worship service and AWANA 6:30 p.m. Sign language interpretation
for the deaf provided at all services. Southwide Baptist Church has
classes and activities for all ages: Youth Group, Royal Ambassadors,
Girls in Action, Acteens, Adult Choir, Women on Mission, Paintball
(ages 10+ every third Saturday of the month), AWANA (3yrs-
12th Grade), and sign language classes for all ages. Pastor William
Whaley invites everyone to come and hear the saving word of God.
Directions: from DeFuniak take U.S. 331 S. turn right on first road
(Coy Burgess Loop) past 1-10. Southwide Baptist Church is located
1.5 miles on the left at intersection of Coy Burgess Loop and Millard
Gainey Road. Call (850) 892-3835 for more information or for
directions.

ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is a historic mission
located at 144 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday schedule:
9 a.m. Bible study in the vicarage and 10:15 a.m. Eucharist in the
church. A COMMUNITY "CENTERING PRAYER GROUP" meets
each Saturday morning at 10 a.m. in the church. All are invited.
From December through May COMMUNITY FIRST SATURDAY
BREAKFASTS are served in the parish hall from 7 am. till 11 a.m.
St. Agatha's is the home of the Lakeside Concert series. For more
information call (850) 892-9754

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331
N., P.O. Box 590, DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 32435, Phone: (850)
892-9247. Mass Schedule: Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday,
6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of
Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard Dawson, pastor.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congrega-
tion cordially invite you to attend services with us. Sunday School
is at 10 a.m. Sunday Evening Services are at 6:00 pm. Wednes-
day Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 26 Joe Ander-
son Road (Hwy 83 North). Our pastor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please
come ready to worship and expecting a blessing!

VICTORY LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD, Highway 90
at the Mossy Head Community Center across from the Mossy
Head General Store. We would like to extend to all an invitation to
come and join us and be blessed. We are a church dedicated to
serving Jesus and spreading His wonderful word. Let us share the
light of God's word with you. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.,
followed by Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Each Sunday we have a
fellowship lunch on the grounds, all are invited. Sunday afternoon
service begins about 1:30 p.m. Friday evening service 7 p.m. -
prayer, Royal Rangers, Missionettes and Adult Bible Study followed
by prayer time. Pastor is Thomas Adamson, Children's Ministries
Kevin Chilcutt. For more information call 892-3817 or 652-4610.
Website www.victorylighthouse church.org.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner
of Live Oak and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Open Hearts,
Open Minds, Open Doors," Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School
9 a.m., Morning Worship 10 a.m. The small church by the side of
the road with a cross over the entrance, longing to extend the love
and peace of God to any wayfarer or pilgrim seeking a rest from
this world of strife and despair. A place where common people can
assemble for simple worship and experience the Presence of God
in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered together in my
name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V. "The
devil wins a skirmish with a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the
war."


PAGE 6-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY MARCH 3, 2011










ChurchNews&ERs T M


Cricket Lee to be performing at

Harmony Fellowship Church
Harmony Fellowship -.:
Church will be hosting a
gospel sing featuring Crick- 4 ,
et Lee from Dothan, Ala. on .
March 5 at 6:30 p.m.
Directions to the church,
take U.S. 331 N, turn on to
Williams Road go about 3.3
miles to Adams Road, turn
right onto Adams, go about
9/10 of a mile to church. U.S.
90 turn onto CR-1087 in the
Mossy Head area go to Wil-
liams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to
Adams Road, turn left onto
Adams go 9/10 of a mile to
church. From CR-1087 out
of New Harmony turn left
onto Adams Road and go '
9/10 of a mile to church. For
more information, call (850) CR T
834-2017. CRICKET LEE

Greater Saint Joseph AME Church

to host Relay for Life fundraiser


Greater Saint Joseph
AME Church will host a Re-
lay for Life Fundraiser on
Friday, March 4 at 6 p.m.

GSJ Soul Stirrers and
Covenant Hospice Butter-
flies are sponsoring a spa-


ghetti dinner consisting of
spaghetti with meat sauce,
tossed salad, garlic bread
and pound cake for a dona-
tion of $6. Dine in or carry
out at the church fellowship
hall at 117 Graham Avenue,
DeFuniak Springs. Delivery


of 5 or more dinners avail-
able.

For information call Car-
olyn Williams at (850)-598-
1057. All proceeds will ben-
efit the American Cancer
Society.


Breakfast to order at St. Agatha's

Episocopal Church planned for March 5


Breakfast "cooked to or-
der" will be available March
5 in the Parish Hall at St.
Agatha's Episcopal Church
(150 Circle Drive). Pan-
cakes, eggs, grits or home
fries, sausage or bacon,
sausage gravy on toast or


biscuit, juice, milk, or coffee
will be offered from 7 9:30
a.m. Cost for the break-
fast is $4.50 for adults and
$2.50 for children under 10.
Any profits will benefit the
building and grounds fund.
Their goal for this month is


to serve 115 meals and earn
lots of tips. Join them for the
best bargain and best kept
secret in the county. Plan to
come and bring friends.
More breakfasts are
planned for April 2 and May


Nothing Less Than My Total Trust
Rev. Dr. G. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor


Surely God is my salva-
tion; I will trust and not be
afraid. The Lord, the Lord,
is my strength and my song;
he has become my salvation.
With joy you will draw wa-
ter from the wells of salva-
tion, Isaiah 12:2-3
Total trust in God means
total confidence in Christ's
character
Total trust in Christ
means we give up total
control of our lives. It is a
wise trade that reaps radi-
cal results. Having Christ
in control replaces fear with
peace.
We do not have to figure
it all out-instead we trust
God for the ultimate results.
We are.incapable of knowing
everything, but we can to-
tally trust Him. Do I utterly
trust Him with everything?
"Trust in the LORD with all
your heart and lean not on
your own understanding,"
(Proverbs 3:5).
Christ can be trusted
Jesus said, "Anyone who
has seen me has seen the
Father" (John 14:9b). If we
can trust Him with eternal
salvation, we can trust Him
with the temporal control of
our life. If we can trust Him
to energize our faith, we can


trust Him heal us from the
fear of man.
He will give you the wis-
dom, finances and relation-
ships to be successful. The
Holy Spirit will build bridg-
es across cultural barriers
that allow you to serve and
love people. God will pro-
vide the needed resources to
be successful parents.
Where God leads-He
provides.
What God initiates-He
completes.
His part is provision and
our part is trust.
Don't fall into the trap
of trusting Him with some
things and not trusting Him
with others. Distrust in God
is sinful. It is an insult to
His integrity.
God is big enough to han-
dle any situation? Health
issues, wars, teenagers,
money issues, conflict, pros-
perity, relationships and un-
certainty can all be placed
into God's hands-not to be
taken back.
God can be trusted be-
cause He is trustworthy.
The waters of His salvation
bubble up from an infinitely
deep well. Your thirsty heart
can always drink and be sat-
isfied. Without the sunnort


of a sympathetic Jesus you
will be immobilized-even
crushed-under the weight
of worry, but Jesus is there
to outsource your anxiety.
He with Him.
"Come to me, all you who
are weary and burdened,
and I will give you rest. Take
my yoke upon you and learn
from me, for 1 am gentle and
humble in heart, and you
will find rest for your souls.
For my yoke is easy and my
burden is light" (Matthew
11:28-30).
Trust in Christ means
prayerfully walking with
Him in all choices. Slow
down, look up, trust Him
and watch Him create ex-
traordinary results. Partial
trust breeds frustration and
worry; total trust leads to
contentment and calm. Joy
flows from the Lord.
Jesus said, "Peace I leave
with you; my peace I give
you. I do not give to you
as the world gives. Do not
let your hearts be troubled
and do not be afraid" (John
14:27).
Io I trust Christ only
when it, is convenient, or
do I totally trust Him at all
times?


Friendship Baptist


schedules revival M


Friendship Baptist
Church invites everyone to
join them in revival March
6-9.
Guest Speaker is the Rev.
John W. Brown, Jr., father
of the church's pastor, Rev.
Johnmark Brown.


Revival services are
scheduled for Sunday,
March 6 at 10:30 a.m. and 5
p.m., and then at 6:30 p.m.
Monday through Wednes-
day.
Dinner -on the grounds
will be held after Sunday


Church


arch 6-9
morning's service. Special"
music is also planned for.
each service.
The church is located at
2415 CR-1883 (off SR-83
North), DeFuniak Springs,>
.and can be reached by call-:
ing (850) 859-2287.


Union Springs Missionary Baptist

Church youth to host car wash

The Union Springs Mis- from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 331-S.
sionary Baptist Church Advance Auto Parts in De- Donations will be accept-
youth ministry will have a Funiak Springs at the inter- ed. All donations will go to:
carwash on March 5, 2011, sectionof U.S. 90 and U.S. the youth ministry.

First United Methodist Church Youth

to host spaghetti supper March 4
First United Methodist supper on Saturday, March p.m. in the fellowship hall.
Church Youth of DeFuniak 5. Spaghetti suppers will
Springs will host a spaghetti be $5 per plate from 5:30 8 Everyone welcome!

St. Agatha's to sponsor pancake supper


Mardi Gras came to the
U.S. in 1699. Long before
the customs associated with
the New Orleans carnival
and reveling, the religious
connotation for Mardi Gras
(Fat Tuesday) from the Eu-
ropean countries was to rid
the home of fats and sweets
prior to beginning the forty
day of Lent on Ash Wednes-
day.
Saint Agatha's Episcopal
Church will sponsor a Mardi
Gras Pancake Supper as a
culinary indulgence prior to
beginning Lent. Pancakes,
sausage, drinks, butter and
syrup (sugar free is also
available) will be served. Do-
Pleasant Valley
Baptist Church
to host steak
dinner, March 4
The Pleasant Valley Bap-
tist Church will be having
a steak dinner at Thriftway
Supermarket on Friday.
March -1, from 11 a.m. to
5:30 p.m.
The cost is $8 per plate
and consist of steak, potato
salad, green beans, dessert
and roll.
There will be free delivery
for five or more plates.
Call to order and leave a
time for drop off at (850)
830-5311 or (850) 836-9919.
Proceeds go toward the
church building fund.


Fear


Not!


nations will be $6 for adults
and $3 for children under
ten. Tickets are available
at the doors, from members
of the church, at Southbys
Antiques, Nook and Cranny
Consignments, Sanford and
Sisters Antiques, and oth-
ers.
Plan to come and bring


friends Tuesday evening on:.
March 8 from 5-8 p.m. Par-:
ticipants may eat in or take:
out some pancakes and help:
us symbolically rid their.:
homes of fats and sweets..
Some sedate reveling may:
take place and the custom-.
ary Mardi Gas colors and:
masks will be in evidence


First Baptist Church
216 East Live Oak Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435
Phone: 850-892-2722 Fax: 850-892-2381
e-mail: fbcdfs@embarqmail.com
Website: www.fbcdfs.org


Sunday School 9:15 AM
Morning Worship Service 10:30 AM
Discipleship Training 4:30 PM
Evening Worship Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM

Dr. Bobby Tucker Pastor
Cordell Harrison Supply Music Minister
Richard Murray Jr. Associate Pastor for Missions
& Community Ministries
Ryan Stinson Youth Intern


WOMEN'S BIBLE STUDY


Ladies of all ages are invited to join us each Monday in
March (March 7, 14, 21, 28 6:30-7:30 PM).
This will be a four-week series from Beth Moore entitled
lHe is ...based on the book of Hebrews.


PAGE 7-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRING 1









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


"Growing With America"

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CORP.

Kelly ,
Michelin
Goodyear
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829 Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Tires, Brakes,
Alignments & Auto Service
850-892-5191
1-800-252-2888


V-.TAYLOR Pron
Air Conditioning & Electrical Incorporated

Sales, Service & Installation
(850) 892-3955


684 North 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433


DANNY TAYLOR
President


I I


The DeFuniak Springs

Herald-Breeze

your source for local news!

Published Weekly On Thursdays


850-892-3232


[F-kw hn
h o i V ys^"^* n


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S PLATTS APPLIANCE REPAIR
4410 US HWY 90 W
892-4670
......................................................
RON'S APPLIANCE
REPAIR AND PARTS
SCALL 850-689-1007 OR 850-305-8515


MAGNOLIA TERRACE ASSIST. LIVING
5209 HWY 331 S, DeFUNIAK
850-892-8348 ALF#10903


REV. P.A. EVANS ASTROLOGER
SSpiritual Consultations, Astrological
Charts, Readings. Call 850-892-3217


BRYANS USED CARS
1133 HWY 90 W DFS
DEWITT BRYAN* 892-7148


SLAY'S SALVAGE PAYS CASH FOR
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & SCRAP
METAL. 850-956-2870
(pd thru 5111/10


NATIONAL TIRE BROKERS
829 HWY. 90 WEST, DFS
892-5191
-- - -- -- -- - -- - -- -- ---- - -- -
ROCKMAN'S AUTO CENTER
WRECKER SERVICE
BEHIND SUBWAY 892-5015


RANDEL'S BARBER SHOP
US HWY 83 DFS
892-1011 (tn)

.ee S -Z


RV SITE,
WATER, ELECTRIC, SEWER, CABLE
892-7229


HICKS' CARPET CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
892-2623


OKALOOSA WALTON CHILD CARE
HRS & UNITED WAY
892-8560


QUALITY WORK
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
850-956-2213
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ABLE CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS
Replacement Patios, Stamp Concrete,
Different Types Of Pavers, Bobcat,
Military/Senior Discounts, LICENSED
AND INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA 461-6733


Construction WE SPECIALIZE IN
SMALLER JOBS. HAULING, BACKHOE
WORK, DRIVES. ETC. LAWRENCE & SON
892-3873
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850-685-7008
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
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Need New Roof, Home Remodel, or
New Construction. Call Paul Rushing.
We do the work, you reap the rewards.
Licensed & Insured in Florida
Call (850) 401-1537 or (850) 892-3334
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ADDITIONS, REMODELS, DOOR &
WINDOW REPLACEMENTS, POLE
BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, No Job
Too Small. 850-259-0398 CGC1508332


SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
HANDLED APPEALS EXPERTS
DISABILITY CONSULT. (850) 835-2163

Eetia


NEW & USED BOOKS TRADE-INS BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
DOWNTOWN ON BALDWIN & 6TH 1943 U.S. 90 E
TUES.-SAT. 10-5, 892-3119 850-892-3299
(PDITHRU VII)


Engine-- rn

LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326


FIREWOOD FOR SALE U PICK UP
OR WE DELIVER. 850-401-4478
OR 850-685-0916


WOOD, CARPET, TILE.
REPAIR, INSTALLATION 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE. 865-2524 (1218-l p)


D.S. HANDYMAN SERVICE
CALL 419-4519
ANYTIME [Ic)
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35 YEARS
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE
850-956-2213. HURRICANE REPAIRS.
IPD THRU 219 11)


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e DeFuniak Springs Herald



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PAGE 8-B


f~:~









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


Sports


PAGE 9-B


Lady Seahawks gut district rival Sneads
11-8 in first softball meeting of 2011
11B


Leach


Tosses One-Hitter


By PATRICK CASEY
Walton junior pitcher
Brendan Leach tossed a one-
hitter as the Braves posted a
7-0 shutout win at Freeport
on Thursday right.
Leach struck out 15 bat-
ters on the night as he
tossed a complete game as
the visiting team picked up
their first win of the year.
Walton struck for three
runs in the top of the third
inning as Brandon Hollings-
worth provided a key double
after a Liam Miller single to
plate the Braves first run.
Zach Burgess drove in a run
with one of his three singles
on the night while a wild
pitch helped plate another
run in the inning.


The Braves put another
run on the board in the
fourth inning with the help
of a Freeport error, then
pushed the lead to 7-0 with
three more runs in the fifth
inning. Leach, Hollings-
worth and Burgess all pro-
vided singles after Angus
Anderson drew a walk to
lead off the inning.
Freeport used four pitch-
ers on the night with Kevin
Caudill taking the loss while
recording eight outs in the
contest. Michael Graziani
pitched the final two in-
nings and had the most suc-
cess as he allowed only two
hits while striking out four.
Freeport could not solve
Leach's pitching as the


Braves junior needed ap-
proximately 110 pitches to
finish up the seven inning
affair. Caudill provided
the only hit of the night for
Freeport with a fifth inning
single.
Leach had both of Wal-
ton's errors on the night as a
pair of pick-off attempts got
away from Walton but the
Braves got Jake Fannin try-
ing to go from first to third
on the relay in the second
inning to end that scoring
threat. Leach never had to
face more than four batters
in any inning and struck out
the side in both the first and
last inning of the contest.
Walton evened their re-
cord at 2-2 with a 13-8 win


at Baker on Friday night
while Freeport rode a strong
performance by Graziani to
edge South Walton 4-3 in a
tight win at home to also im-
prove to 2-2.
Team Notes: Walton will
not play their first home
baseball game until a March
7 date with Jay. The Braves
have their first six varsity
games of the season on the
road. Leach pitched a no-
hitter in a five inning win
over Rocky Bayou last sea-
son. The Braves had 10 hits
in the win over Freeport.
The Bulldogs varsity will be
on the road until a March 24
date with Jay. Walton won
the junior varsity game over
Freeport 6-2.


.. .-- - . ..:

.^ -, .- .....
.* '-A^^ K


WALTON JUNIOR BRENDANLEACH(13) tossed a one-
hitter while striking out 15 Freeport batters in a 7-0 victory
on Thursday night. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


FREEPORT'S MICHAEL GRAZL4NI(2) pitched the fi- WALTON ('AT'('HI' LL1M 311LLER(.) had two of the
nal two innings of the Walton game on Thursday, then came Braves 10 hits on the night as the squad earned their first
back to earn a win against South Walton on Friday night in win of the year with a victory at Freeport. (Photo by Patrick
a 4-3 thriller for the Bulldogs. (Photo by Patrick Casey) Casey)


WII4LTON HAD PLENTY OF BASERUNNERS in back-
to-back games last week as they beat Freeport 7-0 and Bak-
er 13-8 to even the team's record at 2-2. (Photo by Patrick
Casey)


Walton


overcomes


Rocky


Bayou


13-9 in offense-driven home game


By REID TUCKER
With an overwhelming
defeat to Bozeman in the
softball season opener still
ringing in their ears, the
Walton Lady Braves poured
on the runs to beat Rocky
Bayou 13-9.
Walton (1-1, with one
reschedule from Paxton)
met Rocky Bayou (0-1) on
Tuesday, Feb. 22, in a home
contest that saw both sides
do well on offense while
struggling when it came to
fielding the ball. The Lady
Braves had 14 hits but in-
curred four errors in the
process, while the Knights
turned in 11 hits. The pitch-
ing of both sides was also a
mixed bag, though Walton's
Comille Cosson had only
four strikeouts but just two
walks, compared to Rocky
Bayou's Samantha Holcomb
(a seventh-grader), who had
three strikeouts but twice
that number of walks.
Rocky Bayou head coach
Lynn Holcomb said the
Knights' performance on of-
fense was to be commended
and said the game, while a
loss for the team, represent-
ed a good showing consid-
ering the young age of her
players in their first game of
the season.
"A lot of good things
happened and a lot of bad
things happened," Holcomb
said. "Offensively I'm very
pleased...defensively it was
not as good, but I'll take nine
runs any day. I don't think
too many of our runs were
unearned and I think most
of theirs were. I have a lot
of new players this year and
every game I'm expecting
them to grow and get better.
For some girls on my team,
this was their first-ever fast
pitch game."


Walton jumped to a 2-0
lead in the bottom of the
second inning, after Shelbie
Standland popped on over
the head of Rocky's first
and second basemen, driv-
ing in Kristian Ealum in the
process. It took two outs to
do it, but the Lady Braves
loaded the bases two batters
later but they were stopped
when Rocky Bayou's short-
stop picked off a line drive
to close the inning.
The Knights scored four
runs in the third inning de-
spite having their first bat-
ter struck out by Cosson. On
the next at-bat, Raven Mot-
ley committed the first of the
Lady Braves' four errors by
letting the hit from Rocky's
Katie Kaim shoot past her.
Brittany Tiller was hit
in the helmet, loading up
the bases, and then Rachel
Mosely crushed a shot over
Walton's infielders' heads
to tie it up. Hannah Peters
found the same gap to bring
in two more runs, giving
Rocky Bayou a 4-2 lead, but
a further attempt to score
was cut short (even as Mari-
ah Colvin hit the same spot)
as Hannah Barber struck
out to close the inning.
Each team made short
work of the other's bat-
ters in a scoreless third in-
ning but Walton tied it up
in the bottom of the fourth
as Cosson made a double of
a smash to the center field
fence, getting an RBI. Gil-
lian Infinger, next up to bat,
was thrown out at first but
enabled Motley to make it
home, putting the Braves
up 5-4. Theresa Herndon
got another RBI and Ealum
sailed a hit to the left field
wall to bring in two more
runs, allowing Walton to
run the score up 8-4 before


Standland was struck out to
close the inning.
Rocky Bayou added an-
other three runs in the next
inning to come within one of
the Lady Braves, but they
scored four more times in
their next at-bat when Hern-
don hit deep center to bring
herself home, accompanied
by three other runners to
make it 12-9. Rocky's last
real shot to reclaim the lead
came in the top of the sixth
and the Knights made a
good go of it, pulling in base
hit after base hit to load the
bases and allowing Kaim
and Brittany Tiller to add
a pair of runs to the total.
However, Walton's Kaylyn
Douglass made an easy out
at first to halt the Knights'
comeback run.
Walton scored just one
more run in the final inning


when Cosson stole home
while Infinger went down
swinging. The Lady Braves
did a routine three-up-three-
down on Rocky Bayou's bat-
ters in the top of the seventh
by turning a quick double
play at first and second and
catching a pop up in foul ter-
ritory to end the game 13-9
in favor the home team.
In spite of a few some-
what sketchy moments with
simple mistakes, Walton
coach Stan Bosenberg said
the Lady Braves played
much better than they did
against Bozeman, when they
suffered a bitter 14-4 loss in
the season opener. Bosen-
berg said the need to smooth
out some rough spots wasn't
entirely unexpected consid-
ering he, like Holcomb, has
a young team to work with:
Walton's starting lineup

..4


consists of five freshmen
and just one senior.

"We've got some young
talent coming but we've
got to eliminate errors and
we've just got to work on
hitting the ball," Bosenberg
said. "The main thing is to
get more mentally focused. I
think a lot of our girls turn
into spectators out there in-
stead of players. It's easy to


get caught up in that mess if
you're not on your toes."
Walton visited Bay High
School on Thursday, Feb. 24,
and was defeated 5-0. Be-
fore this most recent win,
Bay had never beaten Wal-
ton until last year, and that
"victory" was actually one
of the two times when the
Lady Braves were forced to
forfeit due to not being able
to field a full team.


i


KAYLA CHANCEY helped Walton jump to an early 2-0
lead against Rocky Bayou. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


COMILLE C(SSON pitched a full seven innings for the
Lady Braves and notched four strikeouts from the mound as
well as getting two RBls and two hits from the plate. (Photo
by Reid Tu'cker)


Freeport's Michael Graziani leaves
the legacy of a true competitor
10B


I I I I L~C L ---I ~ L ~------"- -- -- I~
r I I


;~:
...
t ,.


S 1 : 1 :


k









PAGE 10-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


Port St. Joe Defeats Freeport Softball 10-5


By PATRICK CASEY
The Port St. Joe Sharks
scored eight runs over the
final three innings of play to
rally for a 10-5 win at Free-
:iport on Feb. 22.
SThe Sharks pounded out
'15 hits off of Freeport pitch-
,:er Rani Simmons as they
:::plated five runs in the top of
::the fifth inning to rally from
:a 5-2 deficit to take, a 7-5
lead.
Junior Katie Gardner led
:the Sharks with three hits
,in the game while driving in
two runs while Kristi Davis


had a pair of hits and drove
in three runs in the contest.':
Freeport took a 2-1 lead
in the bottom of the first in-
ning as a Dannica Mosher
single coupled with an error,'
by Port St. Joe and a double
by Amanda Bates allowed;
the Bulldogs to rally from a
1-0 deficit early.
After the Sharks tied the
game at 2-2 in the third:
inning, Freeport's offense
went back to work by scor-
ing three runs in the bottorh
of the fourth inning. Bates
led off the inning with an-.


other double with Simmons
and second baseman Aman-
da Dawkins adding a pair of
singles. Senior Alyssa Du-
ross added a key double to
help the Bulldogs surge to a
5-2 lead.
'Simmons kept the Sharks
in check for the first four in-
nings but the visiting team
found their hitting stroke in
the top of the fifth inning as
the first six batters to the
plate reached safely. The
Sharks sent nine batters to
the plate in the inning as
five hits and a pair of walks


allowed them to take a 7-5
lead.

Port St. Joe added two
more runs in the sixth in-
ning as a single and a pair
of doubles stretched the lead
to 9-5.
Freeport threatened to
cut the lead in the bottom
of the sixth inning as they
loaded the bases with the
help of a pair of fielding
errors but Megan Seibert
flew out to center to end the
threat.
The loss dropped Free-


port to 0-4 on the year and
did not get the week off to a
good start as the Bulldogs
dropped a 4-3 decision to
Baker and a 10-1 outcome
to Northview to finish the


week at 0-6.
The Bulldogs will travel
to South Walton for an in-
tra-county battle with the
Seahawks on Friday, March
4, at 6 p.m.


SFREEPORT SENIOR ALYSSA DUROSS(10) had a pair.
:of hits and an RBI in Freeport's 10-5 loss to Port St. Joe.
:(Photo by Patrick Casey)


FREEPORT CATCHER TAYLOR TAUNTON(7) works
to frame a pitch in the sixth inning of the Bulldogs game
with Port St. Joe. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


FREEPORT SOPHOMORE PITCHER RANI SIM-
MONS(18) worked hard on the mound to try and keep the
Sharks off balance. The Bulldogs are off to a slow start this
season but have plenty of time to rally from an 0-6 start.
(Photo by Patrick Casey)


Freeport's Michael Graziani leaves the legacy of a true competitor


:By REID TUCKER
Here's the bottom line: if
.you're in need of one Free-
port athlete that can run
really fast for a long time,
shoot the lights out on the
basketball court and get
critical strikeouts from the
'pitcher's mound, Michael
Graziani is pretty much the
go-to guy.
Case(s) in point: his fast-
'est 5k time of 16 minutes,
39 seconds is the quickest
cross country time recorded
by a Walton County runner
"last season though he said
he runs cross country "just
to stay in shape for other
sports." The 19 points he av-
eraged per game, along with
60-percent accuracy from
the free-throw line and 1,049
career points make him the
best shooter on the Bulldogs'
basketball team in 2010-
2011. Finally, four years of


game-winning pitching has:
made him top dog on the
mound when baseball sea-.
son rolls around.
In spite of the overwhelm-
ing empirical evidence, Gra-
ziani, one of the school's best
all-around athletes, will.-
likely be the last one to let
on he's aware of it. In fact,.
he frequently reiterates how
important is for him to do
his best, not for himself, but
for the sake of his team.
"I don't take failure too
well," Graziani said. "I get,
down on myself. No matter
how good I do it feels like.
I could always do better. If*
we lose, I always feel like.
I could have done better to
change the outcome. I don't
ever want to let my school'
and my coaches and my"
team mates down."
The standout moment"
of Graziani's career, was


School Sports

Calendar

Wednesday- March 2
Walton at PDL Softball 3 p.m.

Thursday- March 3
Freeport JV Softball at Walton (DH) 3 p.m.
Walton Tennis at Pensacola Catholic 3 p.m.
Walton Track at Crestview 3 p.m.
Freeport Track at Baker 3:30 p.m.
PDL Middle School Baseball at Paxton 3:30 p.m.
Paxton Softball at East Hill 3 p.m.
Paxton Baseball at East Hill 4 p.m.
Ruckel at Freeport Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Walton Middle School Baseball at Baker 4 p.m.
Walton Middle School Sofball at Shoal River 4 p.m.
PDL Softball at Laurel Hill 4/6 p.m.
South Walton Softball at Cottondale 4/6 p.m.
PDL JV Baseball at Paxton 5:30 p.m.

Friday- March 4
Chipley at Walton Middle School Softball 3:30 p.m.
Freeport at South Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
South Walton Baseball at Blountstown 4/6 p.m.
Freeport Baseball at Jay 4/6:30 p.m.
Pensacola Christian at Paxton Baseball 5:30 p.m.
Walton Baseball at Chipley 6 p.m.

Saturday- March 5
South Walton Track in Fort Walton Beach 10 a.m.
Walton JV Baseball at Chipley (DH) 11 a.m.
PDL Baseball at Pensacola Christian 12/2 p.m.

Monday- March 7
Freeport at Walton Tennis 3 p.m.
Paxton JV Baseball at Rocky Bayou 3 p.m.
Walton Middle School Softball at Paxton 3:30/5 p.m.
Freeport Middle School Softball at Ruckel 4 p.m.
Vernon at PDL Softball 4/6 p.m.
Freeport Baseball at Laurel Hill 5 p.m.
Jay at Walton Baseball 5 p.m.

Tuesday- March 8
Freeport at P.C. Bozeman Tennis 3 p.m.
South Walton Tennis at Rocky Bayou 3 p.m.
Freeport Track at Jay 3:30 p.m.
Rocky Bayou at Paxton Baseball 3:30 p.m.
Baker at Walton Middle School Baseball 4 p.m.
P.C. Arnold at Walton Softball 4 p.m.
Holmes Co. at South Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
PDL Softball at Baker 4/6 p.m.
Pensacola Catholic at Walton Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
PDL Baseball at Baker 4/6:30 p.m.
Rocky Bayou at Paxton Softball 4:30 p.m.
Freeport Softball at Port St. Joe 5 p.m.


when, as a freshman in
2007, he pitched the closing
innings of Freeport's district
championship game against
Jay, which the Bulldogs lost
3-2. What makes that game
so important for him is that
he threw the pitch that al-
lowed Jay to get a hit, score
a run, break the tie and win
the game. Instead of letting
that loss cripple his drive to
succeed, Graziani instead
took away a strong desire
to always play to the limit
of his abilities, a mindset
that has taken him through
a sterling tenure as8 a muIilti-
sport athlete at his school.
"That taught me that
you can't win every game,"
Graziani said. "I played my
best, so that's all I could do.
I approach anything in life
with the goal of doing my
very best."
It's that hard-working
attitude that has endeared
Graziani to everyone he
comes into contact with,
said David Burke, Free-
port's head basketball coach.
Burke coached the distance


runner/shooting guard/
pitcher over the course of
his whole high school ca-
reer. Burke said it is Gra-
ziani's desire to always do
the very best job possible
in everything and a willing-
ness to put his team mates
before himself that makes
the senior stand out among
his peers as a great athlete.
He said Graziani is the kind
of player some coaches wait
their entire career to have.
"He's the type of kid who
gives you everything they've
got from the time they step
out on the floor or on the
field," Burke said. "Wheth-
er it's cross country, base-
ball or basketball, he's going
to give you 100 percent and
that's as much as you can
ask for. Once he puts his
mind to something he's go-
ing to do it."
Graziani first got involved
in sports when, at age six,
he played third base and
short stop in the Freeport
Little League. Though base-
ball has always been his fa-
vorite sport (in part because


MICHAEL GRAZIANI has, for the past four years, played
a key role in Freeport's success in several athletic arenas.
Graziani has competed at the state level in cross country
and has contested several district titles in basketball and
baseball. (Photo by Reid Tucker)




WCDC SkillsUsa Golf

Tournament March 19


Walton Career develop-
ment Center (WCDC) will
host its first annual WCDC
SkillsUSA golf tournament
on March 19, at Blackstone
Golf Course, 108 Blackstone
Lane, Mossy Head. Time
is 8 a.m. for shotgun start.
Cost for entry is $60 per
person, $240 per four-man
team. Cost includes lunch,
Sgoodie bags, soft drinks and


prizes. Range balls will be
provided. Come join the fun
and help raise backing for
SkillsUSA teams to compete
for scholarships at the state
level. All proceeds benefit
this organization.
To register, contact
Tommy Martin, martin@
walton.kl2.fl.us, or call 892-
1241. Registration forms are
available.


of the special place it holds
for him, being the favorite
sport of his father, Joseph
Graziani), he said he never
neglected the others, partic-
ularly basketball. However,
being a dedicated athlete
never created conflict with
his educational pursuits, as
Graziani said "schoolwork
comes first, and the sports
will come later."
In addition to school ath-
letics, participation in the
National Honor Society and
leadership development
classes at Freeport High,
Graziani is an avid fisher-
man who enjoys spending
time on the Choctawhatchee
Bay. Though he doesn't have
plans to play sports at the
collegiate level, Graziani's
love for the outdoors and for
the water led him to apply
to Chipola College, in Mari-
anna, where he intends to
study marine science.
Graziani said he learned
a lot about being "a true
competitor" from his coach-
es and team mates over the
course of his career at Free-
port. Though it seems sports-
centric at first glance, he
said learning to work hard
will pay dividends whether


on the field or in day-to-day
life. Graziani hopes to leave
a legacy of commitment,
dedication and a positive
work ethic at Freeport when
he graduates.
"I want to be remembered
as a competitor," Graziani
said. "I might not have the
kind of talent a college or
NBA player has, but I try
to make up for it with hard
work."
When it comes to the fu-
ture of the school's sports
programs, Burke said Gra-
ziani will undoubtedly cast
a big shadow, especially
considering his success in
multiple sports, though like
so much else about him, he
won't be the one to play up
his importance in the grand
scheme. Burke said the hu-
mility that characterizes
Graziani, to say nothing of
his skills on court or field, is
what will be most missed.
"He's 'very humble,"
Burke said. "He lets his ac-
tions do the talking. He's
a great kid, a real student
athlete. He's going to be a
hard player to replace. A kid
like him doesn't come along
very often. He's going to be
missed around here."


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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011 PAGE 11-B


Lady Seahawks gut district rival Sneads



11-8 in first softball meeting of 2011


By REID TUCKER
South Walton stepped up
in a big way from the play
and in the field to hold off
Sneads for an 11-8 softball
victory while the Seahawks'
new pitcher, freshman
Meagan Ellison, found her
rhythm.
Ellison, in her fourth
game as starting pitcher,
walked three Sneads bat-
ters in the top of the second
inning, first putting two
runners on, then loading the
bases and finally walking
in a run. The Pirates, now
trailing by just one run after
South Walton (2-2) jumped
to an early two-aught lead,
were halted in an attempt to
tie the ballgame by Caitlin
Holliday a stellar cross-field
pop out in deep center field.
Holliday's out seemed to
supercharge the Seahawks'
defense, which held Sneads
(3-2) at bay while the offense
raked Pirates' pitchers Kar-
issa Childs and Ashlen Wil-
son over the coals.
The Seahawks went on a
14-hit tear by the time the
final inning rolled around
but Sneads' offense wasn't
exactly asleep either, as the
Pirates' batters racked up
13 hits of their own. South
Walton head coach Phil
Tisa said batting was off the
charts for a contest between


the two teams, which last
season met in four tightly
contested games. However,
Tisa said those meetings
were largely battles between
South Walton's ace pitcher
Shelby Watson (who led the
Seahawks to a 20-6 season
and a third-straight District
2-2A title) and her Sneads
counterpart,'which kept the
score out of double digits in
most cases.
Tisa said he didn't know
how things would turn out
without Watson in the first
2011 game against the Pi-
rates but he was shocked to
see the score climb so high.
"I don't really know what I
expected coming in," Tisa
said. "Whatever happened,
I knew it was going to be a
battle. We played four times
last year and all of them
were close games. This is by
far the highest scoring game
we've had between the two
of us."
The score held steady at
2-1 through the third inning
but, after the Seahawks
laid a pair of slap bunts and
a sacrifice down the third
base line to move runners
to second and third, Sam
Snider smashed a triple into
left field to drive in both
runners. Errors by Sneads'
infielders enabled South
Walton to get four more hits


and two more runs before
the end of the inning.
Sneads scored twice in
their next at-bat and gave
South Walton the three-up-
three-down treatment to
close the fourth inning be-
fore climbing to a 7-6 lead
at the top of the fifth. Childs
couldn't sustain the Sea-
hawk hitters renewed pace,
though, and she gave up five
runs before being spelled
by Wilson. The change did
little good, however, as she
walked two batters after
striking out her first oppo-
nent, causing Childs to be
switched back in.
The Seahawks kept the
11-7 advantage until the top
of the sixth when an infield
error and a walk earned the
Pirates loaded bases. Wil-
son, seemingly in remedia-
tion for her brief stint at the
pitcher's mound, struck the
ball like a meteor deep into
the outfield, which brought
in a runner for the Pirates.
It was ultimately too little
too late for Sneads, how-
ever, as even another error
from the Seahawk infielders
couldn't prevent them from
catching an easy pop out in
left field to close the game at
the top of the sixth.
Though the Seahawks
capitalized on an off night
from Sneads' pitchers to run


the score up, the real deter-
mining factor was the eight
errors the Pirates commit-
ted. Sneads head coach Kel-
vin Johnson commended the
efforts of his team from the
plate but he was candidly
unhappy about the Pirates'
uncharacteristically poor
play.
"Any game where you al-
most score nine runs, you've
got to win it," Johnson said.
"If we can't get our pitching
and defense up, we won't be
going anywhere."
For Tisa, the game's out-
come was proof that the Se-
ahawks still stand a chance,
even without Watson's pres-
ence on the mound and a
young pitcher in tow. He
said playing against Childs
in last season's four match-
ups gave him a good idea of
her capabilities and how to
instruct his batters to best
exploit her weaknesses.
"I was actually comforted
in knowing who their pitch-
er was because I knew what
she was going to do, whereas
[Sneads] had no idea what
they were coming in to face,"
Tisa said. "I knew [Childs]
was good but we knew what
she going to do and we made
adjustments and definitely
put the bat on the ball bet-
ter than we ever have before
against Sneads."


Sports News and Notes


1 ...- - .. - -.t3 'Ait- f 7i . .-'
SOUTH WALTON'S FRESHMAN PITCHER MEAGAN
ELLISON did her best to hold off Sneads' batters, but both
sides went on hitting frenzies in the Friday, Feb. 25, game,
and she needed all the help she could get from her team
mates on defense. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


MACKENZIE WATSON started a trend of successful
slap bunts in the bottom of the third inning. It proved to be
a trick stratagem, as the Seahawks loaded the bases before
getting two RBIs to end the third. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


By PATRICK CASEY
Pensacola High was the
only school from the area to
make a state championship
game in .girls basketball,
losing to Lakewood 53-44 in
the Class 4A championship
game. Tallahassee Rick-
ards made the state semi-
final in Class 3A but lost to
North Broward Prep 53-49
while Tallahassee FAMU
got bombed back to the Big
Bend region by eventual
state champion Hollywood
Christian Academy 63-27.

The Florida High School


Athletic Association (FH-
SAA) has decided to keep
the football state finals at
the Citrus Bowl in Orlando
for the next three years. The
Central Florida Sports Com-
mission will serve as host
for the event. For Classes
1A, 2A, 3A and 4A the dates
will be Dec. 9-10, 2011, Dec.
7-8, 2012, and Dec. 13-14,
2013. For Classes 5A, 6A,
7A and 8A the dates will be
Dec. 16-17, 2011, Dec. 14-15,
2012, and Dec. 20-21, 2013.
"Orlando has proven to be a
great venue for our member
schools to play football," said


FHSAA Executive Director
Dr. Roger Dearing. "We're
excited to announce a re-
newed agreement between
the Florida High School
Athletic Association and
the Central Florida Sports
Commission for the state
finals in Orlando with the
new football classifications
in place. It was rewarding
to word directly with Mayor
Buddy Dyer in reaching this
three-year agreement." The
football finals have been
held at the Citrus Bowl for
the past four years.
The 36th-ranked Ala-
bama women's tennis team
collected a 4-0 win Sunday
in the consolation finals of
the 2011 Blue Gray Nation-
al Tennis Classic with a win
over No. 48 DePaul. The vic-
tory lifts the Crimson Tide
to 7-2 on the season, while
the loss puts. the Blue De-


mons at 6-6 overall.

Former South Walton
tennis player Alexa Guara-
chi would clinch the match
at No. 2 with a 6-2, 6-0 deci-
sion against junior Gia McK-
night. "Alexa was our MVP,"
Alabama Head Coach Jenny
Mainz said. "She played
great tennis all weekend.
She gave us quite a bit of a
boost and helped to lift the
team this weekend."
Off to the second-best
start in program history,
the No. 4/5 UF softball team
wrapped up its stint at the
Cathedral City Classic with
a 7-3 victory over Utah Sat-
urday to improve to 14-0 on
the season. The Gators were
5-0 on the weekend, de-
feating Indiana, No. 11/12
Texas, San Diego State, No.
2/2 UCLA and Utah in the
three-day tournament at the


Big League Dreams Com-
plex in Palm Springs. The
Gators will be idle through
the next week before host-
ing their home tournament,
the Lipton Invitational,
March 4-6. UF will welcome
Valparaiso, Syracuse, North
Dakota State, Pacific and
Gardner-Webb for the three-
day tournament at Katie
Seashole Pressly Stadium.
The Southeastern Confer-
ence and the Georgia Dome
have agreed to keep the SEC
Football Championship in
Atlanta through the 2017
season. The new agreement
adds two additional years
to a five-year contract that
was agreed upon in July
of 2009, keeping the game
in the Georgia Dome for at
least another seven years.
The game has sold out in
16 of the 17 championships
held in the Dome, packing


nearly 1.2 million people in
the Georgia Dome to watch
past SEC Championships.
The annual event has gen-
erated over 702 million
dollars of economic impact
to the city of Atlanta since
2000, an average of nearly
64 million dollars per year,
and approximately 30.7 mil-
lion dollars in sales taxes
over the same time span.

Don Graham Enterprises
baseball is merging with the
Gulf Coast Baseball Associa-
tion. The DeFuniak Springs
Red Sox will take on the de-
fending Gulf Coast champi-
on Campbellton Wildcats at
3 p.m. in Campbellton. For
more information, call 218-
0134.
Contact Patrick Casey at
The DeFuniak Herald with
your local sports notes at:
heraldsports@aol.com.


FMS Softball 5-0


LOCAL DISTANCE RUNNER PATTY DOUGLASS fin-
ished with top marks in her age group at the Chautauqua
5K. Douglass will represent Walton County at the 2011
Special Olympics World Summer Games in Athens, Greece.
She will compete in the 1,500, 3,000 and 5,000-meter races.
(Photo by Beth Tucker)


THOUGH ATTENDANCE NUMBERS and finishing
times are not in yet, the 2011 running of the DeFuniak
Springs Women's Club -sponsored Chatauqua 5k Fun Run/
Walk, held in and around the Lakeyard on Saturday, Feb.
26, was a great success thanks to enthusiastic participation
from area runners out to enjoy the great weather. (Photo by
Beth Tucker)


Submitted by Joe Padgett
Freeport Middle School's
softball team improved to
5-0 for the regular season
with wins last week against
Seaside, Emerald Coast and
Chipley Roulhac.
The Lady Bulldogs won
18-5 at Seaside on Feb.
22, with Kate Duross go-
ing 4-for-4 at the plate and
knocking in three runs.
The Lady Bulldogs scored
a dramatic 8-7 win Thurs-
day at home against Em-
erald Coast. Trailing 7-6 in
the bottom of the seventh
inning, Mary Kate Myrick
led off the inning with her
fourth intentional walk of
the game. Laura Ham then
belted a two-run homer to


give the Lady Bulldogs the
win.
Myrick's four intentional
walks followed a first-in-
ning home run that cleared
the fence in left-center field.
Myrick also came on to pitch
in relief for the Lady Bull-
dogs, striking out 10 batters
in five innings without giv-
ing up a hit.
FMS hit the road again
Friday and left Chipley with
a 5-1 victory over Roulhac.
Laura Ham hit a two-run
triple, which was all the
offense Myrick needed to
secure her fifth victory of
the season. FMS returns to
action Thursday at home
against Ruckel Middle
School at 4 p.m.


DID YOU KNOW?

5 Sports Facts

1. Ollie Matson, who died Feb. 19 at 80 years of age, won
a silver medal in the 1,600-meter relay and a bronze medal
in the 400-meter race as a sprinter for the United States in
the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki.

2. The NBA added the three-point shot for the 1979-80
season.

3. Houston's Rick Barry was the first player to make
eight shots from behind the three-point shot in league his-
tory in a 117-95 win over Utah on Feb. 9, 1980.

4. The NFL held its first draft in February of 1936 with
the Philadelphia Eagles choosing University of Chicago
halfback and Heisman Trophy winner Jay Berwanger with
the first pick.

5. The only two of the eight original National League
clubs to play continually since 1876 are the Braves and the
Cubs.


2010-11 FINAL BOYS

BASKETBALL STANDINGS


CLASS A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
W L W L
!Paxton 13 1 23 5
*Laurel Hill 11 4 18 8
Poplar Springs 9 5 16 8
Central 7 7 13 11
Escambia Ch. 6 7 8 13
Rocky Bayou 1 12 2 20
Bethlehem 1 12 7 19

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
W L W L
!Freeport 10 2 18 10
*Baker 10 2 17 10
Pens. Christian 7 5 14 7
Northview 6 6 9 9
Jay 2 9 4 19
PDL 0 11 2 22

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 2


District
W L
*Holmes Co. 17 1
Blountstown 11 5
!Cottondale 12 6
Sneads 9 7
Graceville 7 8
Vernon 4 11
So. Walton 3 12
P.C. Bozeman 1 14


CLASS 3A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall


W L
12
8
6
4 7
4 1
1 1


*- District Tournament Champion
!- District Tournament Runner-Up


*Chipley
!Marianna
Pens. Catholic
P.C. Bay
Walton
P.C. Arnold


Overall
W L
23 5
13 10
15 14
12 14
9 16
8 11
10 16
2 24


W L
27 1
17 8
12 15
11 14
11 15
8 18









PAGE 12-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, MARCH 3,2011


Sacred Heart Guild host Golf Expo



and clinic at Kelly Plantation


Looking for a fun out-
door event and an oppor-
tunity to improve that golf
game? Men, women and
senior golf enthusiasts are
invited to join the Sacred
Heart Hospital Volunteer
Guild for the sixth annual


Golf Expo and Clinic at
Kelly Plantation on Sat-
urday, March 5 from 2 to
6 p.m. The event includes
equipment demonstrations
by leading golf club makers
and the opportunity to par-
ticipate in presentations to


improve your golf swing.
Always a great event for
golf enthusiasts and nov-
ices alike, this year's Golf
Expo features special pre-
sentations by Rob Strano,
Director of Golf Instruc-
tion at Kelly Plantation


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Plants sold separately.


Golf Club, and Chip Hol-
combe of Cleveland Golf,
on the short game, wedge
play and proper gapping of
clubs. The 2011 Golf Expo
will feature Cleveland
Golf/Srixon's Launcher Ul-
tra Light Driver powered


by Milazaki shaft. The
Golf Expo has become rec-
ognized as a terrific event
to receive tips and free tar-
geted "mini lessons" help-
ing golfers improve their
game. Golfers are encour-
aged to check swing speed


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$348 Assorted Vegetables
1.5 pint .Tomato shown #197502
Mature plants shown. Actual plant material at store may vary.
Herbs also available: basil, oregano and thyme. Vegetables also
available: peppers and squash. Varieties may vary by market.


on a launch monitor, test
drive the newest clubs and
get a swing fundamentals
check up.
Participants will have
an opportunity to partici-
pate in skill contests and
drawings featuring several
thousand dollars worth of
golf, dining and equipment
prizes. Skill contests in-
clude long drive, featuring
categories for men, senior
men, women and senior
women; closest to the pin;
pitching; and putting. Par-
ticipants will also have an
opportunity to bid on silent
auction items, including
sports memorabilia, golf
merchandise and more.
The Sacred Heart Hospi-
tal Guild is a group of more
than 300 area residents
who volunteer in many de-
partments of Sacred Heart
Hospital on the Emerald
Coast. The Guild also oper-
ates the hospital gift shops
and conducts fund-raising
activities throughout the
year. Funds raised pur-
chase special capital equip-
ment, assist underserved
residents with mammo-
gram fees, and provide
scholarships to students
seeking degrees in health
care. Since the Guild was
established in 2002, 65
scholarships have been
awarded to area students.
Tickets are $30 in ad-
vance or $35 at the door
and are available for pur-
chase at Edwin Watts in
Destin, the gift shop at Sa-
cred Heart and Kelly Plan-
tation Golf Club. For more
information, contact Ly-
man Guidry at 837-7119.







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Thursday- Feb. 24
Walton
Freeport

Friday- Feb. 25
Freeport
South Walton

Walton
Baker


High School

Softball

Scores


Tuesday- Feb. 22
Walton
Rocky Bayou


Baker
South Walton

Port St. Joe
Freeport


Thursday- Feb. 24
Baker
Freeport

P.C. Bay
Walton

Friday- Feb. 25
Northview
Freeport

South Walton
Sneads

Walton
Laurel Hill


Speed





L TriAction


My!