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The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00372
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Publication Date: February 24, 2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
sobekcm - UF00028316_00372
System ID: UF00028316:00372
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Full Text





The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888



HERALD
SA COMBINED WITH THE BREEZE



,_ _ _ -
,, ..u .. -


& *
J*'xI


FAMILY
FUN
ON A
BUDGET
Near-
by park
and zoo.
14-C


VOLUME 122 NUMBER 8 3 SECTIONS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011 750 PER COPY


INSIDE
I INSIDE I

SEAWALL BILL
TO BE FILED IN
LEGISLATURE
Local bill address-
es controversial ar-
moring issue. 1-C



"LOST" WALTON
COUNTY?
Proposal to ex-
plore buried histori-
cal communities.
2-A



OKALOOSA-
WALTON TPO
HEARS REPORT
Assessment of fu-
ture transportation
needs. 7-A



PAXTON GIRLS
FALL AT FAMU
Lady Bobcats fin-
ish season with 58-
48 loss. 9-B



PAXTON BOYS
END SEASON AT
FAMU, TOO


Strong
ends with


season
49-28


loss. 10-B



PAXTON GIRLS
FALL AT FAMU
Lady Bobcats fin-
ish season with 58-
48 loss. 9-B


A LARGER THANEXPECTED CROWD made for standing room only at last Saturday's
official dedication of the First National Bank Clock. Members of the Walton County Com-
mission, DFS City Council, and community leaders were present. Photo by Bruce Collier


Waste Management

to collect waste

countywide


By DOTTY NIST
The transfer of Dayco,
Inc.'s franchise agreement
for household garbage col-
lection north of the bay in
Walton County to Waste
Management, Inc., of Flor-
ida has been approved by
the Walton County Board
of County Commissioners
(BCC).
The decision took place
at the Feb. 22 BCC regu-
lar meeting. The franchise
transfer is to take effect on
Feb. 28.
Currently Waste Man-
agement is collector for
household garbage only for
the area south of the bay
and along the bay near Villa
Tasso. The decision gives
the company an exclusive
franchise in the county's


unincorporated areas, both
north and south, with cer-
tain exceptions.
At the meeting, the com-
missioners were provided
with a Dec. 8, 2010, letter
from Leroy D. Day of Dayco
indicating that Waste Man-
agement was planning to ac-
quire "certain assets" of the
company in the near future,
and that it was Dayco's in-
tent to assign its franchise
with the county to Waste
Management "in connection
with the Acquisition."
The commissioners ap-
proved a new 26-page fran-
chise agreement with Waste
Management, which pro-
vides for the company to
furnish, not only residential
See WASTE 9-A


New owner of track property found in violation


By DOTTY NIST
The new owner of prop-
erty near Gaskin containing
a motorcross track has been
directed to correct violations
there within 10 days.
This was by decision of
the Walton County Code


Enforcement Board at the
board's Feb. 17meeting.
Code Enforcement Of-
ficer J.C. Alford presented
evidence that the track on
the property was being run
as a business, contrary to
allowable uses in the Gen-


eral Agriculture land use
area where it is located.
Evidence included recent
postings, one dated January
2011, about the track, Uto-
pia Motorcross, on a website
and elsewhere on the Inter-
net indicating that the track


Paxton Town Council


hears presentation on


Gladys Milton Library


The Paxton Town Coun-
cil opened their regularly
.scheduled meeting on Feb.
15 with the unanimous ap-
proval of the prior meeting's
minutes and a unanimous
approval to pay bills owed.
Pam Thompson brought
a well thought-out presen-
tation to the Council on the
Gladys Milton Library and
the ability of the library to
help save local residents


money, provide entertain-
ment and help with job
searches.
"We can request any in-
formation, anything you
need from any other library
in Walton County and have
it delivered here for your
convenience," said Thomp-
son. "I believe that if we
here, local residents, begin
to utilize and publicize the
fact that we have a local li-


brary, we might be able to
grow in the future. During
tough times, government of-
ten puts items like libraries
on the chopping block when
the people of the community
need it the most. I'd like to
implore our locals to use
their library and let others
know it is there. We need to
support the library by using
See LIBRARY 9-A


was open for business and
listing prices to ride there.
The postings were identified
as being by Chris Miller, the
previous owner.
The property is close to
residences, and neighbors of
the track had complained of


noise disturbance from mo-
torcycles.
A previous case involving
the same issues on the prop-
erty had come before the
board several years ago. Ac-
See VIOLATION 12-A


PAM THOMPSON implored Paxton Town Council mem-
bers and the public to keep the public library also know as
the Gladys Milton Library in Paxton in use by reminding
each other that it. is there and holds a wealth of free infor-
mation for all to use.


ONE HOUR WITH A
BUDDHIST PRIEST
Interview with
Joen Snyder O'Neal.
4-C




ARTS &
ENTERTAINMENT
5-C
CLASSIFIED 7-C
OUTDOORS 2-C
ARRESTS 10-A


www.defuniakherald.com






0 94 9 22 7 3 172 22


Freeport Community Health Center offering

basic health, dental care to uninsured


By BEN GRAFTON
In a telephone interview
on Feb. 17 Chris Mitchell
of the PanCare Community
Health Center staff offered
information about the clinic
which has recently moved
from offices in the Walton
County Health Department
building (now closed) on
U.S. 331 South, to offices on


SR-20 in Freeport.
Mitchell said the Freeport
Center is one of three clinics
that are funded and man-
aged by PanCare of Florida,
Inc., a 501C non-profit or-
ganization with offices in
Panama City. PanCare does
not have any religious af-
filiation. Two of its 'centers,
one a dental clinic and the


other a health clinic are also
located in Panama City.
The objective of PanCare
is to offer basic health and
dental care to low income
individuals and families
who are uninsured or who
are covered by Medicare or
Medicaid. PanCare does not
See HEALTH 12-A


THE FREEPORT CENTER OF PANCARE houses both a health and dental clinic. Pho-
to by Ben Grafton.


PANCARE COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER on SR-20
in Freeport. Photo by Ben Grafton.








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011


In search of lost towns


By JEFFREY P'OWELL
Since the dawn of man-
kind transportation routes
have led to the rise and fall
of communities and cultural
:centers. Very early humans
followed game trails in
'search of sustenance. These
:game trails led to areas ear-
:ly man later settled. As riv-
:er and sea travel advanced
.many communities devel-
oped on natural harbors or
important river landings,
usually founded by indig-
enous residents. In Walton
County the early communi-
ties of Alaqua and Euchee-
anna were founded, in large
part, due to the terminus
of Alaqua Creek and Bruce
:Creek respectively.
Native Americans had
been using these routes for
many years before Scot-


tish settlers came to the
area. From the 1820s to the
1870s these towns were the
cultural centers of Walton
County. Small courthouses,
churches, businesses and
residences were built and
life flourished for over 50
years in these areas until
one day in the early 1880s.
It is said that Col. W.D.
Chipley, Maj. W.J. Van Kirk
and Thomas Wright, while
surveying for Pensacola
and Atlantic Railroad, came
across a body of water they
called Open Pond and sat
down on a small rise. The
trio felt the site was a good
place for a railway stop. It
could be argued that that
moment was the death knell
to many small communities
in rural Walton County as
the railroad stop created a


new town.
DeFuniak Springs soon
turned into the county seat
and much of the county's
commerce was relocated
there before 1890. In the
following years many of
the outlying communities
dwindled, becoming but a
memory. Recently, a Pensa-
cola based archaeologist ap-
proached the Walton County
Board of County Commis-
sioners with a proposal
to locate and record these
settlements before they are
completely lost to time.
In his proposal, Pana-
merican Consultants, Inc.
Senior Archaeologist Greg
Mikell states he is seeking
support and funding to doc-
ument several settlements
in the area through "assimi-
lation of historic documents
and records, recorded folk-
lore, informant interviews
and archaeological investi-
.gation."
Among those communi-
ties on the list are Euch-
eeanna, Knox Hill, Mossy
Bend, Alaqua, LaGrange
City, Alaqua Blockhouse and
several stagecoach lines and


lumber mills. Mikell hopes
to fund the project through
a Special Category Grant
or as a grant from Walton
County and other benefac-
tors. He would also like to
team up with the Northwest
Florida Water Management
District and the E. O. Wison
Biophilia Center.
"My main interest is in
the period before 1870 which
means the period before the
railroad," Mikell said while
examining the Eucheeanna
area. "Searching for the lost
towns of Walton County
would be meaningful and
significant archeology. Eu-
cheeanna and several of the
other settlements are, for
the most part, lost. Through
this endeavor it could be
found and recorded for edu-
cational purposes, our chil-
dren will be able to know
these areas."
Some of the property
Mikell would examine, if
given permissiorf, is pri-
vate and he wants people to
know whether, in the event
something is found the arti-
facts, it would belong to.the
property owner.


MIKELL POINTS OUT an undetermined topical anom-
aly while standiAg next to what he believes could be the old
Eucheeanna well. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


Trial updates


Todd Ball, charged with
the 1999 murder of his ex-
wife, has a pretrial date
March 17, but according to
the Walton County Clerk of
Courts case progress docket,


no trial date has been set.
Jimmy Donald Suttles
Jr., charged with lewd and
lascivious molestation of a
victim under 12 years old,
has a trial date on March 7.


Hello my name is Scout


*-
*

***.

*~
**

**o


SPANAMERICAN CONSULTANTS SENIOR ARCHAE-
OLOGIST Greg Mikell examines a piece of broken glass
found near the Eucheeanna community. (Photo by Jeffrey
Powell)


WCDC SkillsUsa Golf

Tournament March 19


; Walton Career develop-
$hent Center (WCDC) will
host its first annual WCDC
SkillsUSA golf tournament
bn March 19, at Blackstone
Golf Course, 108 Blackstone
Lane, Mossy Head. Time
fs 8 a.m. for shotgun start.
Cost for entry is $60 per
person, $240 per four-man
team. Cost includes lunch,
goodie bags, soft drinks and



Fire ha,

i: .
warning

SWalton Fire Rescue re-
Sponded to six calls for forest
fires in the latter part of last
'veek in various parts of the
county. According to Chief
Brian Coley, "conditions are
terrible for anyone trying to
do any burning right now."
Walton County residents


prizes. Range balls will be
provided. Come join the fun
and help raise backing for
SkillsUSA teams to compete
for scholarships at the state
level. All proceeds benefit
this organization.
To register, contact
Tommy Martin, martin@
walton.kl2.fl.us, or call 892-
1241. Registration forms are
available.



zard



g
are urged to exercise ex-
treme caution with fire -at
all times. Anyone needing
to burn any outdoor fires
should contact the Florida
Division of Forestry at (850)
547-7083 before starting
any fires.


The Holmes County Ama-
teur Radio Club will be hav-
ing the yearly get together
call the Chicken Pick-in
at the Falling Water State
Park just south of Chipley.
The state park charges a
small fee for getting into
the parks, The club does not
charge anything. Date is
March 5, and starting time
is 9 a.m. Tail gate for used
ham equipment starts at 9
a.m. There is no charge, but
bring your own tables and
set up in the parking lot for
free. Lunch will start about
noon.
: All level of ham testing
starts 1:30 2 p.m. Bring a
copy of your drivers license
or state ID card to take a


test. If you are updating also
bring a copy of your ham li-
cense also to test. There will
be a CW code contest using
only one of your big toes.
There will be certificates
for the winner of the CW big
toe contest, one for the ham
that travels the furthest to
the event, one for the old-
est ham, one for youngest
ham, and maybe more. This
is open to all hams and non-
hams. Talk in 145.110 with
no tone.

Bring a covered dish to
the event. The club will
furnish the chicken. For
more information call Ewan
Moore at (850)547-2141 or
Dee (850) 547-6690.


Addendum to Special

Olympics story


Last week the Herald
Breeze ran a story by report-
er Jeffrey Powell on the ac-
tivities of two local athletes,
Patty Douglass and Greg
Floyd, who are bound for
the Special Olympics 2011
Summer Games in Athens,
Greece.
Assistant Walton County


Special Olympics Coordina-
tor Louise Guice-Conner
called the Herald last week
and asked that we also in-
clude a mention of Romona
Satterwhite, Walton County
Special Olympics Coordina-
tor for her fine work and
leadership in this area's
Special Olympics.


I want to thank everyone at W.C.A.R.
for taking care of me.
Nearly a year ago someone came and
looked into my big sad brown eyes and
took me home with her.
I have a big fenced in yard, a doghouse
full of hay, and a side-kick named Heidi.
My new mama is old so I walk her
and Heidi, every day around the field.


At.






A.t







A.4
-ft-
.s.










-;.


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I I I e

- UICHSE-AHOM


PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION
FILING DEADLINE MARCH 1, 2011

Patrick P. Pilcher, Walton County Property Appraiser, reminds property owners who
intend to make application for Homestead Exemption, Veteran's Exemption,
Additional Senior Exemption, Agricultural Classification, Disability Exemption, or
Widow's and Widower's Exemption, MARCH 1, 2011 is the absolute filing deadline.

If you plan to file your exemption for the first time, please bring with you a copy of
your recorded deed or tax receipt, the social numbers) of all owners of property,
Florida driver's license number, Florida auto tag number, and voter's registration
number. If you are entitled to disability exemption, please bring proof of disability
(two doctors' statements). If you are filing Homestead Exemption on a mobile home,
please bring the title or registration certificate.

If you are filing for the "Additional Exemption for Persons 65 and Older" your
annual household income cannot exceed $26,203 (adjusted annually) (proof will be
required). Application must be made each year.

If you would like information to determine your eligibility for exemptions, please
call 850-892-8123 or 850-267-4500, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.

You may file for exemptions at the following office locations of
the Property Appraiser Monday thru Friday, 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.


Santa Rosa Beach
31 Coastal Centre Blvd Suite 600


THE ABSOLUTE FILING DEADLINE FOR 2011 EXEMPTIONS IS
MARCH 1, 2011.


0


Chicken Pick-in for

Holmes County

Amateur Radio Club


DeFuniak Springs Courthouse
571 Hwy 90 East


I


PAGE 2-A


1


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PAGE 3-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011

Alaqua Animal Refuge's

Fourth Annual Canine

Carnival is coming to town


Laissez bon temps roll-
over with Rover at Alaqua
Animal Refuge's Fourth An-
nual Canine Carnival, to be
held on Saturday, March 5
at Gulf Place in Santa Rosa
Beach.
The Mardi Gras-themed,
pet-centric outdoor party
will feature a parade of ac-
tivities for pups and the peo-
ple who love them, including
games for kids and canines,
live music, local vendor
booths, food, a raffle, silent
auction, agility demonstra-
tions and the ever-popular
dachshund races.
"Our focus at Alaqua Ani-
mal Refuge is to save the
lives of abused, homeless
and neglected animals, and
while this is a serious mis-
sion, we still find time every
year to celebrate the joy of
pet companionship with
our Canine Carnival," said
Laurie Hood, president and
founder of Alaqua Animal
Refuge. "This special day,
with its Mardi Gras theme
and more activities then
ever, is about fun for the en-
tire family, including dogs!"
Sponsors for the 2011 Ca-
nine Carnival include Bent-
ley's on the Bay, Coastal
Builders of Northwest Flor-
ida, Gigi's Fabulous Kids


Fashions and Toys, Gulf
Place, Kappy the Clown and
Qantum Communications
with guest emcee Aimee
Shaffer. A $5 donation is
suggested at entry. To learn
more about Alaqua Animal
Refuge's Third Annual Ca-
nine Carnival, including
vendor booth qualifications,
please call (850) 880-6399.
Alaqua Animal Refuge, an
independent, nonprofit orga-
nization located on Florida's
Emerald Coast, advocates
the general welfare and hu-
mane treatment of animals
by providing shelter, pre-
vention of pet overpopula-
tion and adoption services.
Alaqua, located on 10 acres
in the town of Freeport, was
formed by Walton County,
Fla.-resident Laurie Hood
in 2007 when she discov-
ered that countless animals
were being euthanized due
to a lack of a no-kill shelter/
adoption organization in
the area. Since that time,
Alaqua Animal Refuge has
helped find homes for more
than 6,000 animals. Cur-
rently, up to 100 animals
are adopted per month from
this unique rescue facility,
which serves as a true ref-
uge for more than 250 ani-
mals at any given time.


Neighborhood

Watch meet


A Neighborhood Watch
program will be held at
Glendale Fire Department
(old School house) on Thurs-


day March 3, at 6 p.m. Or-
ganizers ask that everyone
come and get involved in
their community.


Grit & Grace holds

final storytelling

evening


After a month of storytell-
ing evenings taking place in
Paxton, Red Bay and Free-
port the stories are almost
compiled and the script is
just about to go into produc-
tion. But there is still one
more chance to get your fa-
vorite story'written down.
The final Grit & Grace
storytelling session will take
place in DeFuniak Springs,
Feb. 24, from 6 8 p.m. at
the Chautauqua Hall of
Brotherhood.


The public is invited to
come and tell stories of their
family history and memo-
ries, to possibly be used
in the 2011 Grit & Grace
production. Dinner will be
served beginning at 6 p.m.,
so bring your appetite and
your favorite stash of memo-
ries.
For more information,
or more details about the
scheduled storytelling
events, call 892-9578.


THE KIWANIS CLUB of DeFuniak Springs, with help from the Walton High Scool Anchor and Key Clubs, held its anj
nual pancake breakfast at First Methodist Church Friday, Feb. 18. (Photo by Ashley Amason)


WCSO provides free se


checks for businesses


The Walton County Sher-
iffs Office (WCSO) Citizens
Services Division encour-
ages Walton County busi-
nesses to sign up for Busi-
ness Watch, a free service
designed help local busi-
nesses protect their assets
from criminal activity.
"Every Walton County
business can benefit from
the Business Watch pro-
gram," said Sheriff Michael
A. Adkinson Jr. "Business
Watch helps prevent and
reduce crime by directly
connecting law :e'nforce-



www.(ISRPA.com
Craig S Robinson, CPA
38 S 8th Street DeFuniak
850-892-0888
New Fangled Technology
Old Fashioned.Service
Tax Accountants
Web-based Bookkeeping &
Payroll
Financial Consultants


850.880.6800




GRAND OPENING

Saturday March 5th
Come celebrate with the Emerald Coast's new ECHO, Scag, and Billy
Goat dealer. Join Southern PowerWorks at their Grand Opening next
Saturday from 10AM to 2PM. Free equipment, great finance offers,
and factory representatives on hand to answer your questions.


YOURS FREE!

...you Choose!
Buy a Scag V-Ride, Tiger Cat, WildCat or Turf Tiger
and receive your choice of 2 ECHO units FREE!!
Up to a $1,000.00 value. FREE with your purchase!

Buy a Scag Hydro Drive walk-behind or a Freedom Z
mower and receive your choice of 1 ECHO unit FREEII
Up to a $500.00 value. FREE with your purchase!


SSRM265T


R ;


PE265


PB620T
I


Your choice of ECHO's SRM265T; SRM280T; PE265; PB620ST; OR PB770T 2
A PB770T. You may not select two of the same products. This promotion
is valid only on Saturday, March 5t, during Grand Opening.


ment with businesses rang-
ing from clothing stores to
banking institutions."
In 2010, there were 267
crimes against Walton
County businesses, includ-
ing two armed robberies, 67
commercial burglaries, 109
grand thefts and 89 petit
thefts. The Business Watch
program promotes crime
prevention by providing free
and confidential security as-
sessments to local business-
es. WCSO personnel are
available to educate busi-


4-


Bruce Naylor
Owner-Broker


nesses regarding possible
threats, suspicious activity,
and specific preparedness
and prevention techniques.
Business Watch is avail-
able to businesses of all
types and sizes and is avail-
able at no charge to Walton
County businesses.
The WCSO Citizen Ser-
vices Division's mission is
to empower citizens to help
improve and maintain their
safety and quality of life, and
to provide resources to the
public to prevent crime. The


curity




division provides neighbors
hood watch programs, home
safety and business inspec-:
tions, self-defense training
and identity theft prevent:
tion and awareness training:
In addition, the team assists
school resource officers with
educating students about
safety and crime awareness
issues at area schools.
Contact the WCSO Citi-
zen Services Division at
(850) 892-8186 to receive a
free business security as-
sessment.


The Proven Professionals



Naylor

mfl iaM REALTY
& Associates Inc.

776 Baldwin Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, FL


NAYLOR REALTY

Specializes in
Creative Internet Advertising

Strategic Internet Marketing

State of The Art Web Page Platform
At

www.BruceNaylor.com

www. NaylorRealtyUSA.com

Ask about our Personalized
Internet Marketing Plan for your property

850-951-2488

We Can Sell Your Property


I









PAGE 4-A


Editorial Comment

*PERSONAL

COMMENTS

*LETTERS TO

THE EDITOR



Editorial comment


National


Institute


for


Civil


Discourse?

By BRUCE COLLIER

There's an Orwellian aura about any entity formed for
:the task, put simply, of studying and curing public rude-
:ness. Fred DuVal, a member of the Arizona Board of Re-
gents ("out of Arizona, always something new") and a friend
of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, has plans in the works to estab-
lish a National Institute for Civil Discourse, in order, as
he told The New York Times, to "define best practices and
corrosive practices" in the area of political debate.
SThe Christian Science Monitor's Patrik Jonsson pub-
lished a thoughtful but pessimistic article about whether
attempts to institute civility in political discourse won't run
afoul of"America's unique social contract." A nation born in
one rebellion and nearly torn apart in a second one has
an ingrained anti-government, anti-authority streak in its
character, it said. A good but debatable point, considering
how large a part the government plays in everyone's life,
leading me to wonder whether the real debate isn't just over
"good" big government (i.e., the parts we like) and "bad" big
government (i.e. the parts we don't like).
SAnyway, much as I love the image of every political ques-
tion being conducted like a cross between the Federalist Pa-
pers (geniuses in white wigs sagely pondering how to craft
:a constitution) and the Lincoln-Douglas debates (the two
foremost legal minds of the time fencing vigorously over
slavery), I am inclined to the observation of Hank Hill (car-
toon hero of Mike Judge's King of the Hill). Hank is ordered
to attend anger management classes following a public dis-
play of temper. Hank tries, but finally comes to self-realiza-
tion: "I don't have an anger problem," he says. "I have an
idiot problem."
: Let's admit it. Politically, the noisy idiots get all the
press. The dumber the idea, the more extreme the opinion,
the more coverage it will attract, if only the kind that mocks
it. And attention, any attention, is seen as good, because it
keeps the speaker in the public's mind, like a well-known
brand of cereal.
SThe Internet has enabled anyone with basic typing skills
and a competent website designer to pose as someone ac-
tually worthy of attention. In any other time, such people
would have to stand on a street corner soapbox, screaming
themselves hoarse and more often than not getting mugged.
Social networks make it possible to be in someone's face
24/7, all in the comfort (and safety) of one's home.
:The reason we're not politically civil is that it has been
made abundantly plain to anyone, from child to elder, that
there's no percentage in it, in any walk of life. Did any-
body ever get a reality series by being kind to their fam-
ily, polite to strangers, diligent at work, or faithful to their
spouse? No, and it's become plain that politics follows the
same path. If ideal politics is about an exchange of ideas
and viewpoints in a good-faith effort to achieve what's best
for the most people, it follows that at least one or two of
those ideas have to pass the jackass test. Do we need an
Institute for Civil Discourse (I thought your parents were
n charge of that) as much as we need an Institute of Think'
Before You Run Your Stupid Mouth in Public?
Columnist George Will has written of "renewed serious-
hess" in pondering the nation's "core skepticism about gov-
ernment," but Will has the kind of optimism that a man
turning 70 this year might as well have, since he's closer to
the end than the beginning. Me, all I can think of is why do
the good ideas only show up at the party after the bad ideas
have already trashed the place? Or, specifically, after some
shave-headed creep earns his 15 minutes of fame with a
gun?





i A~~T~


P0. Bx*54


Pubishd wekl evry hurda

(U-P 149900
E:S Fom359t






TheSrinserald/BeezeInc
*e Box 1546


S gs3


R\GT | WAT

"Yo0I CoffEEDTo BE A SUPR COMPtTn-R To BEAT TARES TWO,,
ToHE oNVY Ags ER TRY KNEN WA/'NRT IS GRILOcKAL.(x?'


^^^LEaiTTERS-TO THE EIiTOR^


Editor:
Wanted a little justice from a liar in Walton. I read
the article about employee retirement from the taxpayers
group. The gentleman, your Human Resource man said
retirement is non-negotiable. He promised me a job from
two open. Then you the taxpayers paid for my drug test
for nothing, wasted money. After me being installed in the
welfare rolls, this man is promoted to Human Resource and


talks about non-negotiable. Perhaps if you'll make me ad-
ministrator from welfare I'll silently remove him too, back
to his old job, safety man or mosquito leader. That way
at least the other employees will be assured that such a
important position is not associated THE LIAR. No more
"I'm sorry." My application has already been submitted,
ask him.
Louis H. Roberts


Editor:
I am so thankful to our newly elected Senator Marco Ru-
bio for standing up to Obama and his administration. I just
hope he continues to hold their feet to the fire.
Here is Rubio's statement this week on the president's
so-called budget proposal, which was laughable, because
it only added more debt onto our children and grandchil-
dren.
Marco released this statement, noting his disappoint-
ment in the president's failure to provide leadership in
these tough economic times:
"Sadly, the president has missed a golden opportunity to
have an adult conversation with the American people about
the seriousness and urgency of our debt crisis: The presi-
dent's budget falls far short of tackling our national debt
in a serious way. Although we face a $1.6 trillion deficit
and a staggering national debt that exceeds $14 trillion,


Editor,
Please help us to extend our most gracious apprecia-
tion for all the kindnesses and acts of respect and honor
shown to us in this most horrific time of the loss of our
most beloved son and brother, Col. Greg Malloy. We have
been overwhelmed with the outpouring of love and support
shown through the kind actions of so many. Thank you to
all the wonderful people who stood by the roadway as our
dear loved one was transported. Thank you to all the law
enforcement personnel who stood by and held us up in
these most devastating days. Thank you to all of you who
sent food and flowers or just gave a kind word or a hug.


Critics of Gov. Rick Scott's proposed budget reduc-
tions and tax cuts plan protests across Florida as legisla-
tors convene two weeks from [Feb. 22]. The backlash won't
be as big as Wisconsin's mobilization of public employees,
but the political implications are just as great. President
Obama carried both states in 2008 and needs their com-
bined 39 electoral votes next year, but both states last
November elected tea party-backed Republican governors
who promised to cut spending and both have U.S. Sen-
ate races brewing. Organizers of some labor, civil rights
and Democratic Party groups said Monday that, because
of Florida's geography and the difficulty of working people
getting to the Capitol, they opted for rallies at government
office complexes and parks in major cities on March 8. Tal-
lahassee will have some protests, but the main thrust will
be lobbying by representatives of state employees, teachers,
police and firefighters and advocates for programs affected
by Scott's plans for $5 billion in spending cuts and $1.7 bil-
lion in tax reductions. "There are a lot of angry people be-
cause of this," Tim Heberlein, an organizer for the Florida
Consumer Action Network in Tampa, said Monday. In ad-
dition to fiscal policy, he said, lodal officials in the Tampa
Bay area were motivated by Scott's rejection of federal
funding of a high-speed rail project. Susannah Randolph,
executive director of Florida Watch Action in Orlando, said
her group is organizing rallies in major cities to focus atten-
tion on the Legislature. "It's sort of an organic movement
started on Facebook," she said. "There's a big movement
afoot to oppose what's going on in Tallahassee right now."
Damien Filer of Progress Florida in Tallahassee said a Fa-
cebook page called "Awake the State" was "liked" by 2,665
people in a few days. "Draconian budget cuts proposed by
Gov. Scott along with equally destructive proposals from
the Legislature are threatening Floridians from every walk
of life," he said. "Our goal with Awake the State is to give a
platform to Floridians who want to speak out on the open-
ing day of session and make sure their voices are heard,
in addition to the message put forth by Gov. Scott in his
State of the State address." Senate President Mike Hari-
dopolos, R-Merritt Island, supports Scott in cutting spend-
President/Publisher....Gary Benjamin Wood-
ham
Editor.....Bruce Collier
Assistant Editor.........Alicia Leonard.
Advertising Sales Manager....... Gary Wood-
ham
Advertising Sales......Jeffrey Powell
Herald Breeze News Staff..Patrick Casey,


the president's proposal would add $7.2 trillion of new debt
over the next ten years."
Rubio states, "The stimulus.didn't fail because of bad in-
tentions. The stimulus failed because government doesn't
create private sector jobs. Jobs are created by everyday
people from all walks of life that start a new business or
expand an existing business. The job of government is to
make it easier for them to do that not harder."
It's a shame that our other Florida Senator Bill Nelson is
still bent on BIG Government takeover. I think he will get
to kiss his political career goodby along with the rest of his
liberal buddies when this term is up unless he has a change
of heart and begins to listen to "We the People."
God Bless America
Sandra McHenry
Ponce de Leon, FL


Without all these we would never have been able to survive
these dark days. Our hope is that Greg will never be forgot-
ten and will live on in the memories so many of you have.
Our love for Greg will never fade but please pray for us that
the pain of this loss will. May God bless each of you, may he
be gracious to you, and may he give you peace.

With most sincere gratitude,
Sue Griner
(mother) DFS,
Deidra Pettis
(sister) DFS.


ing to meet a $3.6-billion revenue shortfall without rais-
ing taxes. A GOP candidate for the U.S. Senate next year,
Haridopolos also backs Scott's decision to turn down the
high-speed rail money, He said, "We don't want to penal-
ize people," but state spending must be cut. Haridopolos
declined to speculate on political ramifications for 2012 but
said the last election showed the public likes conservatives.
"I don't know the political answer, but the policy answer is
that we're going to lead by example and the voters clearly
sided with us last November," he said. "The policies that
we're talking about, tightening our own belts first, are very
much in sync with public opinion." But Senate minority
leader Nan Rich, D-Weston, said the public will eventually
turn on Republicans for an average $703-per-student re-
duction in school funding, among other budget cuts. She
also said the state can't afford to cut the corporate income
tax from 5.5 to 3 percent, as Scott proposes, and that voters
will turn to Democrats if teachers are laid off and emer-
gency services are cut. "It's a little early to make predic-
tions, but some organized demonstrations will benefit the
Democrats," she said. "People will start to see the impact of
what the tea party would like the Republicans who run the
state to do with public services." Stephanie Porta, director
of Organize Now, said her group plans a march and rally in
downtown Orlando. She said organizations in several cities
will lobby at the Capitol. "It's too expensive and out of the
way to get everyone to Tallahassee, so we are organizing
where we live," she said. "And if-we are loud enough, the
people in power in Tallahassee will hear us." Joseph Phel-
an, organizer of a "Just Work Campaign" for Florida New
Majority in Miami, said unemployed people will be bused
to Tallahassee on March 9 for a rally against restrictions
on unemployment compensation. He said New Majority is
a coalition of labor and civil rights activists. With the GOP
holding two-thirds majorities in both legislative chambers,
he said, Scott may get most of what he wants "but we have
to speak out." Like Rich, Phelan predicted voters will feel
the impact of taxation and budgeting practices in time for
next year's elections. By Bill Cotterell, Florida Capital Bu-
reau
Ben Grafton, Chuck Hinson, Dotty Nist, Jef-
frey Powell, Leah Stratmann, Reid Tucker,
Ashley Amason.
Herald-Breeze Office Staff....Alisha Brown,
Sandra McHenry, Norma Rediker, Lisa
Windham, Quinton Woodham.
Printing Plant Foreman.....Benjamin Wood-
ham
Pressman.... Nick Harrison


LET TE S I THE0EDITOR


I L E S TO HE EITOR*I


FLORIDA STATE NEWS I










Thrift-Way Supermarket


VISA


Feb. 24- March 2, 2011


* DeFuniak Springs, FL


Big 3 Savings Plus One Weekly Specials Best Buys Everyday Low Prices Super Bonus Buys


Rib-Eye
Steaks
fp. lb.


Fresh Fryer
Tenders


lb.


Bottom Round or
Rump Roast


lb.


Fresh Fryer
Drumsticks


fp. lb.


Cubed

Pork Steak


wl IIwfl


Register Smoked
Sausage.......40 o.$699


Zeigler


Weiners...........12 oz.
Zeigler
Bologna 2......12 oz.


Carolina Pride Roll
Sausage............16 oz.$1 5


Bar S Deli Style


Ham...................16 oz.
Farm Fresh Cooked


Bacon..............2.1 oz.


$375


2/$5


Kelley
Smoked
Sausage

$2990


Assorted
Pork
Chops
$1990


Chuck
Steak

$3190


Fresh
Ground
Beef

$2390


Fryer
Leg
Quarters
Thurs.-Sat.
$490


______________ I I


Each Additional $10 Food Order,
Super Bonus Buys excluded, entitles you
to your choice of One Super Bonus Buy!
Shur Fresh White
Bread........................2oz.11
Flavorite
M ilk ............................gal... 2 9


Flavorite
Sugar..........................4 lbs.


Viva
Towels.....................6 roll$649
Flavorite Apple
Juice..........................64oz. $119


Shawnee Best
Flour ......5.............. b.


$189


Nabisco
Saltines ................. b. $249
Peter Pan Peanut
Butter ................... .16 oz. $149
Flavorite Medium
E ggs.............................. dozen 99



Banquet
Pot Pies................. ......7 oz.3/$2
Banquet
Dinners ...........................asst 99
Fresh Frozen
Broccoli......................2 lb. $299
Fresh Frozen
Cut Okra........................2 lb.$229

OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY
6 A.M. 8 P.M.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
SALE STARTS THURSDAY 8 A.M.
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOS


Nabisco
Saltines................................ b. 2 79


Favorite Instant
Oatmeal............................ 1 o.
Hunts
Ketchup...........................24 oz.


Welch Jelly :'
A $ 1 9$99
Grape ..................32 oz.
Shoppers Value
Tea Bags........100t. 99


Peter Pan Peanut
Butter..................16 oz.


Texas Pete


Hot Sauce ......................9 oz.
Hunts
Manwich.............. 15 o,.
Hunts Spaghetti


Sauce...................


$2 99 i
48 oz.
$149 $2'99

Hunts Tomato
2/$1
-S auce........................8 oz. 2 1
Kelloggs Frosted
Flakes................ 14 oz.3
Super Chill
Soda....................12 pack $29
^^^J^iE~


2/$1


2/$3


$149


.................26 oz.


Yellow 3/$1


O n ion s..............................3 lb.


2/$3


Cole
Slaw ..................................6 oz. 2/$3
Cantaloupes.........each $199


V rangeSt .........................each

Pears.................................... b. 9 9 0
Rutabagas......................lb. 690


Flavorite Medium
Eggs..............................doz.


Axelrod
Yogurt .........................6-8 oz.69
Flavorite
Spread.....................1 lb. qtrs 795


Flavorite Shred
Cheese..........................8oz.


Im


JL-


B>I:DAIRYDEPARTMEN


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011


PAGE 5-A


LB, MA PACKAGES


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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 24,2011


PAGE 6-A


TAYIOR IR CONDmONING I ELECTIICAL INC.
S SALES, SERVICE & INSTALLATION
ER-oo0s'is 684 N. 9th St., DeFuniak springs, FL
RG-0048207
RF-0066780
RM-0048225 85 U0 2395 www.carrier.com



krnolia Terrace
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A GREAT PLACETO CALL HOME
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SERVICES/AMENITIES:
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3 Scrumptious Meals Daily
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Intercom System
Many More Accommodations -
5209 Hwy. 331 South DeFuniak Springs, FL 850-892-8348

BLACK CREEK GENERAL STORE
Open early till late 7 days a week *
Fishing tackle and licenses *
SBait
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Quality Exxon gas, off-road and
on-road diesel *


Greg Majors
Representative

Majors Financial Group, Inc.

1299 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 4
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Office 850-892-9922 Toll Free 866-892-9922
Fax 850-892-4088
Email: GregMajors @planmembersec.com
RepreSentative is registered with and offers only securities and advisory services through
PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor, and
member, FINRA/SIPC., 6187 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013, Phone (850) 874-6910.
Majors Financial Group, Inc. and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently owned
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by Majors Financial Group, Inc. and complete disclaimer.


435- .r 0 u -


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We Also Have Your Favorite
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i 8




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Located at 2243 State Highway 83N, DFS. FL Lic. #CA1814381
Serving North Walton County since 1991.
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11 am 2 pm


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MON. 99 Margaritas
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718 Walton Road
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433 yA
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"Legends from the Graves" sponsored by the


Walton County Heritage Museum


On March 11, the Wal-
ton County Heritage Muse-
um will be providing trolley
tours to Magnolia Cemetery.
While at the cemetery, Wal-
ton County's very own local
actors will step from behind
their perspective head-
stones, board the trolley and
tell their story.
Learn a brief history
of Governor Catts, Judge
Clyde Wells, Wallace Bruce,


Judge Tom Beasley, Van
Ness Butler and others.
Mark your calendar to be a
part of the premier of "Leg-
ends from the Graves."
The "Legends from the
Graves" tour is scheduled
for March 11 and tickets
may be purchased prior
to the event by contacting
the museum at (850) 951-
2127 or (850) 892-9578 and
(850)859-2207. Tickets are


also available at "The Book
Store" located at 640 Bald-
win Avenue, DeFuniak
Springs.
Tickets will also be on sale
the evening of the event at
the Heritage Museum De-
pot, 1140 Circle Drive, De-
Funiak Springs, FL. There
are three tours 6, 7, and
8 p.m. Seating is limited
to only 26 people per tour
so arrive at least 15 min-


utes before departure time.
The price of the ticket is
S10 per person and this in-
cludes travel to and from
the Magnolia Cemetery on
DeFuniak Springs' own 'Lil
Trolley.' Light refreshments
will be served inside the
museum and donations are
welcomed.
For additional informa-
tion, email at hinsonharmo-
ny@yahoo.com


TPO members hear


of transportation


visioning effort


By DOTTY NIST
Local planners, together
with representatives of Eg-
lin Air Force Base, have
been meeting since Septem-
ber to develop data to plan
for transportation needs as
far forward as 2035.
Members of the Okaloo-
sa-Walton Transportation
Organization (TPO) heard a
report on these efforts from
Wiley Page of PBS&J at
their Feb. 17 meeting.
The group, known as the
Land Use Subcommittee, is
looking at "people and jobs
and where they're located,"
Page explained, along with
trend analyses, to arrive at
data for the area that will be
the basis for a needs plans
for the TPO's Long-Range
Transportation Plan.
Page said the committee
looked at projected popula-


tion and employment growth
figures for Walton and Oka-
loosa counties, areas where
building permits have been
issued, vacant areas and ar-
eas with potential for rede-
velopment.
Using 2006 as a basis,
Walton County is expected
to grow by .90,000 people
by 2035. and employment
in the county is expected to
grow by 43,000 jobs in that
period, Page explained: The
corresponding figures re-
ported for Okaloosa County
were 250,000 in population
growth and 140,000 growth
in jobs,
All data, Page explained,
was loaded into a transpor-
tation model. called the Ur-
ban Land Use Allocation
Model (ULAM), providing
for areas where there will be
too much traffic to be identi-


fled.
Page said the commit-
tee will be gathering ideas
to plan transportation so-
lutions for these areas. He
told the members that, for
the first time, there has
been talk by the military of
sharing costs on projects.
The TPO members ap-
proved the use of the data
set in connection with the
Long-Range Transportation
Plan.
Composed of representa-
tives of local government in
Okaloosa and Walton coun-
ties, the TPO identifies pri-
orities for the use of state
and federal transportation
dollars within the urban-
ized areas of the two-county
area. The next meeting of
the TPO is scheduled for
3 p.m. on March 17 at the
Destin City Hall Annex.


FAMILY OWNED. FAMILY OPERATED.

FAMILY INVESTED.

There is a difference.
:' ./' Clary-Glenn Funeral Homes is honored to


Clary-Glenn "-
FUNERAL HOMES
Locally owned and family operated


S 'be family owned and operated by Joel
... and Paula Glenn. But we want you to
._ . know that we are also family invested.
-- We are not part of an out-ot-town
investment group where our properties,
buildings and business are backed and
ou ned by our-of-town investors. We are your
local funeral home. When you do business~ at Clary-
Glenn Funeral Homes in DeFuniak Springs and Freeporr
Nour mone does not go into the pockets of out-otftown
in esters orCorporate oned or investor backed, we don't see
the difference Ift\ou like family\ owned and operated and family
invested, rhjt's whar you % ill find at Clary-Glenn Funeral Homes.
clary-glenn.com
Clary-Glenn Funeral Home
230 Park Avenue DeFuniak Springs, FL (850) 892-2511


Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home
150 East Highway 20 Freeport, FL (850) 835-2511
Joel Glenn, LFD, Owner Paula Glenn, Owner


.i: L.-L ,i.















Ashley

Three Piece

Living Room Set












'Wall Hugger

Recliners

variety of colors







Sale Ends February 28th
'A "II-

I ,"I. I .:. -,,-
qi, Wal Hugge


Cadfinty


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 2011


PAGE 7-A









PAGE 8-A

Head Start/Early

Head Start now

taking applications


: Head Start/Early Head
Start is a child and family
development program.
Head Start/Early Head
Start offers education,
fiealth, nutrition, family
support, transportation as-
sistance, and disability
services. Children with dis-


abilities are encouraged to
apply.
For more information call
www.tricountyheadstart.
com, or call administration:
(850) 548-9900. Walton:
(850) 892-7635. Early Head
Start (850) 548-9900. Chau-
tauqua (850) 892-6144.


Michael T. O'Donnell
D.M.D., PA


,- ;'


I'm sort of an over-an-
alyzer. I make lists on top
of lists, and couldn't stop
multi-tasking if I put it on
my to-do list, my Blackber-
ry, or my Google reminder.
I have read so many how to
be a better you tips, articles,
and books, I could write a
self-improvement book, or
at the very least a motiva-
tional pamphlet.
However, all of this list-
ing and tasking and self-
improving resulted in an
over-analyzer's meltdown
during which I declared five
minutes of my day was to
be phone/internet/TV/lists/
book/people/complaint-free.
For five minutes each day
I would sit quietly in med-
itation-not thinking of the
laundry or tomorrows to-


- PAINLESS DENTISTRY

- Cosmetic/Smile Make-Overs

- Root Canals

- Implants & Dentures

- Orthodontics
-o0rlmoonltc reaTmnent lWrmlele atb' eneail dienst


Santa Rosa Beach
870 Mack Bayou Rd St A
(near Ssared Heart Hospital
85.0 622 5S89
1 lu i. z -r 'n i .3prr,


DeFuniak Springs
57 Bruce Avenue
850.892 2500
Tues & Wed Sam-3pm


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011


S. AEEiMA SON


UCi' rdwe~bsr


dos, but simply being aware
of myself.
I didn't have a clue how to
meditate and didn't expect
anything from my feeble at-
tempt, other than to save my
sanity. I didn't think I would
magically wake up the next
day and feel refreshed and
energized, better than I had
in years...but I did.
So last week, I attended
a regular meeting of the
Emerald Coast Meditation
Society where Buddhist
priest Joen Snyder O'Neal
spoke, and later in the week
had a one-on-one conversa-
tion with her. Let me say,
I have a-diversified circle
of friends and family, and
within the circle is an even
more varied host of beliefs
and philosophies. Of my
best friends, one is devoutly
Christian, one is agnostic,
and one studies Eastern
philosophies. My parents
are Christian, my husband
is Mormon, and I myself am
fascinated by it all.
The secret in this melting
pot stew of religious ideas is
that each person in the circle


is a wonderful, fascinating
person who has furnished
me with thrilling new ways
to see the world and my ex-
istence.
In speaking to O'Neal, her
wisdom became the salt and
pepper of my stew, opening
the mind's palate. By giving
me instructions on how to
meditate, she gave instruc-
tions on how to live.
Create a stable base-
turn inward for strength
and don't get tossed around.
When you are tossed around
and when you find yourself
straying, take a second to
return to that stable base.
Sit up straight so that you
may stand up straight in
the middle of your life. Don't
lean, physically or psycho-
logically. Don't move, so that
in the eye of the storm, you
can remain grounded. Fol-
low your breath; follow the
stream of your life so that
when you are breathing, you
know you are breathing. Be
in the moment.
For a multi-tasking, over-
analyzer like myself to be in
the moment and focus on one
thing, I would need a switch
to flip off my thoughts. Con-
veniently, O'Neal gave me
one. She shared her experi-
ence in Plum Village, France
where she studied under
Thich Nhat Hahn. There,
whenever a bell rang-a
phone bell, a church bell-


I ', II ',

Rob Garver, MD
Now seeing patients in DeFuniak Springs & Andalusia
.. qinatlions:
uoaa wtieea in Pulmonary Diaemase,
anm OdtaOan oae Mediecne
Prosawr wmaritus, VAB Sahool Of Medtiine
S mzpertlse in:
*.' ,oiu! M 9f rbreathI Asthma, COPD


Wow Accepting
Appointment


all toll free
888-681-8864
More info at
wyww.seclung.com


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER


( CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY


Dr. James Howell, D.O. Carolyn Lawrence, PAC Robert Knox, PAC Dr. Stacey Temkin, D.O.
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Mon., Wed, Thurs. Mon., Tues., Thurs. Tues., Wed., Thurs.
7:30 am 4 pm 7 am 5:30 pm 7 am 5:30 pm 7:30 am 4:30 pm
A Fri. 7:30 am 2 p.m.


located
21 WEST MAIN STREET, DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL





BOARD CERTIFIED IN INTERNAL MEDICINE

New Location:
800 Hwy 90 West
1 .... DeFuniak Springs, FL
(next to Haircrafters)


OFFICE
HOURS:
Monday Wednesday
8 AM 4 PM
Thursday
8AM 5 PM
Friday
8 am -12 Noon


IN-OFFICE
LAB FACILITY
(Adult
practice only)


CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT

892-0997


Diseases of Heart & Lungs Diabetes
Stomach Problems Hypertension
Cancer Screening Cholesterol Screenings
Pap Smears Kidney Trouble
Adult Vaccinations For:
SFlu Pneumonia Tetanus

ACCEPTING MEDICARE & MEDICAID
AS WELL AS MOST HEALTH INSURANCE


* Routine Obstetrics
* High Risk Obstetrics
* 3D/4D Ultrasound
in Office


cx


* Gynecology
* Infertility
* Preferred Provider for
BCBS of Florida and
Most Insurances


Jennifer Esses, MD
Board Certified OB/GYN
As the mother of two boys, I understand the needs you have,
whether you're pregnant now or planning to be in the future.

Women & Children First
870 Mack Bayou Rd Suite D 729-7344


ADVANCED

PRACTICE

CLINIC, LLC

Have your friends a


nd


neighbors been losing weight? ',l .j
Maybe they have discovered
our proven weight loss system!
Come by our office or call for more information.

Office Hours
Every Wednesday 8 am 4 pm
Every other Tuesday 10 am 7 pm

Cal (850) 892-4441 for more information

New Location:
1299 Hwy. 90 W., Suite 1
DeFuniak Springs
(near Prescription Place)


everyone would stop and
take three deep breaths.
"Make something your
mindfulness bell," she said,
"to stop the monkey mind,
where thoughts leap from
branch to branch or the
picky mind where we grab
onto a thought and judge
and analyze it."
The lessons she shared
were passed down from her
spiritual teacher, who at the
end of his life said, "Thank
you, I have no complaints
whatsoever."
Isn't that a pepper in the
stew?
Contact Ashley Amason
at aeamason@gmail.com.








Emerald

Coast

Wildlife

Refuge host

annual

Wine and

Cheese

reception
"Everyone is invited to
join the Emerald Coast Wild-
life Refuge for their annual
Wine and Cheese Reception,
Sunday, March 6 2011, 2-4
p.m. at the Magnolia Grill,
157 Brooks St SE, Ft Wal-
ton Beach; FL.
Enjoy a relaxing after-
noon mingling and learning
about the mission to rescue,
rehabilitate and release na-
tive wildlife. Meet and greet
their live animal ambassa-
dors and participate in the
silent auction.
Tickets are only $15. and
can be purchased by calling
the refuge at (850) 650-1880
or through their Facebook
page.


MICROSPINE MEDICAL PLAZA
CLOSING INFORMATION EFFECTIVE 02/04/2011
Dr. Anthony Mork has relocated his practice effective 02/04/2011
to California. To contact Dr. Mork's new office please call 855-
378-6675.
Dr. Scott Haufe has relocated his practice effective 02/14/2011 to
Destin. To contact Dr. Haufe's new office please call 850-424-
3769 or 800-489-3277.
For information about Medical Records please contact the
custodian of the medical records:
Medical Records Custodian: Medical Legal Experts, LLC,
1180 Eglin Parkway, Shalimar, FL 32579, 850-613-6448


O'Donnell

Cosmetic Dentistry & Orthodontics

ALLASPCT O AMIY ENISR


Gladly Welcoming New Patients








PAGE 9-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24.2011


Home school student to join People to People delegation to Australia


Christopher Adams, a
sixth grade honor roll stu-
dent of Abeka Academy
has been accepted into the
People to People Student
Ambassador program. This
is an educational travel pro-
gram founded by President
Dwight D. Eisenhower over
five decades ago. Christo-
pher will explore Australia
for 15 days in summer 2011
as a member of the North-
west Florida Area Delega-
tion.
By participating in the
Exploring Australia itiner-
ary, Christopher can earn
academic credit while get-
ting to know the people,
culture and history of the
places visited. He will take
part in a variety of activities
such as live a slice of Aus-
tralian life during a farm


WASTE

collection services, but curb-
side yard trash collection
services and commercial
collection services. The new
agreement takes effect on
Feb. 28 and is set up to run
through the end of 2016. It
is set up to renew automati-
cally every five years unless
terminated by one of the
parties.
Walton County pays for
the collection of household
garbage through a local op-
tion sales tax.
At one point there had
been bad feelings between
Dayco and the county when
in 2010 billing discrepan-
cies and a billing overcharge
had been identified by the
county, resulting in a dis-
agreement and Dayco fil-




COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

TURTLE WATCH ORGA-
NIZATION in conjunction
with the -South Walton
Comniunity Council and the
Merchants of Gulf Place are
currently seeking to select
a diversified group of turtle
or ocean inspired artists for
the second annual Turtle
Fest. Turtle Fest launches
turtle nesting season and
aims to celebrate as well
as educate the public about
our precious sea turtles. The
celebration will be held Sat-
urday, April 30, on the Gulf
Place amphitheater from 1
to 6:30 p.m. The cost is $50
per table and a tent is re-
quired. Submit photos of art
or web site links to gulfpla-
ceeventscoord@gmail.com

TWO HOUR BOATING
SEMINARS OFFERED-
Four Thursday evening
boating seminars starting
at 5:30pm will be presented
at the West Marine store
in Uptown Station in Fort
Walton Beach.
The two hour seminars,
which are geared toward
local boaters, are being pre-
sented to educate boaters
in matters of safety, navi-
gation, security, anchoring,
rules of the road, hurricane
preparation, and more.
Seminars are open to the
public, and are offered at no
charge.
The schedule for the Thurs-
day evening seminars is:
March 3- Coastal Boat Secu-
rity; March 31- Navigation;
April 14- Anchoring; May 5-
Hurricanes and Boats.
The Seminars are con-
ducted by experienced local
boaters, and cover the prac-
tical aspects of boating. The
seminars will be especially
valuable to boaters who are
new to Gulf Coast boating,
are interested in improving
their boating skills, or have
recently acquired a new
boat.
The seminars are spon-
sored by West Marine and
the Fort Walton Sail and
Power Squadron, a unit of
the United States Power
Squadrons.
For further information,
please telephone 850-315-.
0686 or visit the website
www.fwsps.com


stay in Queensland; spend a
day at an Australian School
and learn the similarities
and differences between
educational systems; learn
to throw a boomerang or
play a didgeridoo from the
experts Australian
Aboriginals; and participate
in a significant local service
project in cooperation with
the hosting community.
Acceptance into the Stu-
dent Ambassador Program
is an honor. After being in-
vited to enroll, Christopher
submitted letters of recom-
mendation and successfully
completed an interview pro-
cess. Before departing he
will attend several orienta-
tion meetings with program
leaders and fellow delegates
to learn about the destina-
tion and prepare for the


journey. Christopher will
travel under the leadership
of Barbie Nail, a teacher-
leader from West Florida
High School in Pensacola.
Fla. The group will be met
upon arrival by a local del-
egation manager who coor-
dinates the cultural and rec-
reational excursions and is
familiar with local customs.
President Eisenhower
founded People to People
during his presidency in
1956 with citizen leaders
including entertainer Bob
Hope, Olympic champion
Jesse Owens, amusement
entrepreneur Walt Disney
and Hallmark Cards found-
er Joyce Hall.
Having served as a mili-
tary commander, Eisenhow-
er believed that ordinary
citizens of different nations


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-A


ing suit against the county.
Dayco dropped the lawsuit
in August 2010. The matter
led the county to closely ex-
amine billing in connection
with all its waste collection
companies, who cooperat-
ed to resolve issues of this
kind.
The franchise agree-
ment with Waste Manage-
ment states the number of
residences agreed on by the
company and the county to
be served for garbage collec-
tion---and provides a meth-
odology for the county to
adjust that count on a quar-
terly basis through, among
other means, accounting for
new certificates of occupan-
cy (COs) and verifying that
the address of the new CO
is not among those already


4,


being served..
Also at the Feb. 22 meet-
ing, the commissioners ap-
proved a parallel agreement
with Waste Management
for disposal of solid waste
and its transport a regional
landfill.
All agreements were ap-
proved in a 3-1 vote, with
County Commissioner Lar-
ry Jones not present for the
meeting and District 4 Com-
missioner Sara Comander
voting no. Comander com-
mented that her vote was
not a reflection on the com-
panies, both of which which
she believes to be good ones.
She said the reason was her
feeling that the public had
not been made sufficiently
aware of what the county
was doing in this matter.


could make a difference
where governments could
not. People to People Stu-
dent Ambassador Programs
is based in Spokane. Wash..
and has been coordinating
educational travel for over
50 years.
Perseverance and in-
tegrity helped Christopher
earn his first and second
degree Black Belts in Tae-
kwando by the early age of
nine. His compassion and
understanding have been
shared through his many
visits with the residents at
the Chautauqua Rehabilita-
tion Nursing Center since
he was 5 years old. His true
characteristics as a leader
speak for themselves and


the opportunity to reach
out as an Ambassador is an
awesome privilege.
Christopher will be found
speaking to business own-
ers. individuals, community
leaders, and many more,
over the next several weeks
seeking contributions which
will enable him to raise the
program tuition which is his
first responsibility.
Before traveling, he must
have a total of $6,339 for the
educational program. He is
also applying for a scholar-
ship and will be offering the
2011 Spring Edition of the
Fundrays Coupon book (ex-
pires 10-2011) at local busi-
nesses as his major fund-
raiser. Any help is greatly


Dr. Shayla D. Scott, PT

Dr. Shayla D. Scott, LPT


appreciated.
Christopher is the son of
Vanessa and Larry Adams
of DeFuniak Springs.


CHRISTOPHER ADAMS.


Shayla received her Bachelor
of Science degree in
Neuroscience from the
University of Pittsburgh in
2001 and her Doctorate of
Physical Therapy.degree from
the University of St.
Augustine (FL), for Health
Sciences, in 2005. She has
experience working in acute
hospital settings, as well as
outpatient rehabilitation. In
addition, she started a thera-
peutic intervention program
for men and women suffering
from bowel and bladder
incontinence, as well as pelvic
pain. Shayla is an active
member of the American
Physical Therapy Association.


Healthmark Regional Medical Center is now a provider of
specialized treatments for muscles, joints, and movement problems.
Healthmark is committed to providing you the highest quality of
care. Healthmark's Home Health Agency is able to assist
home-bound residents in the transition to independent living
following discharge from the hospital. Healthmark believes it is
important to maintain the continuity of care for those requiring
ongoing rehabilitative needs. Our dedicated staff will work with
patients to help them quickly return to a life free from pain and
physical limitations.


Appointments may be scheduled by calling
Healthmark Home Health at
850-951-4550


Healthmark Hospital & Clinic

WHY WAIT?
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS
WALK-INS WELCOME
* ACCEPTING ADULT & PEDIATRIC PATIENTS


F. Edward Tenewitz, M.D.
General Surgeon


You're Invited To Contact Our Healthcare Professionals
At (850) 951-4556 Or Visit
Healthmark Rural Health Clinic, 4415 Hwy. 331 South, DeFuniak Springs, FL
Monday Friday 8:00 am 4:30 pm


MEDICARE & MEDICAID patients welcomed and most insurances accepted.


Healthmark Regional


Medical Center


Join us in welcoming the newest member of our
healthcare family, Dr. Shayla D. Scott, a certified,
licensed physical therapist, who is the new director of
Healthmark's Physical Therapy Department.


"It's Not a Spider Bite"
Private Medical Practice for Individuals with
Chronic Wounds, Abscess or Diabetes

Advanced Practice Clinic, LLC.
Dr. James Howell DO, Medical Director
1299 Highway 90 West, Suite 1, DeFuniak Springs, FL

Appointment & Fax

(850) 892-2138

Accepting New Patients for
Medical Wound Management
&
Prevention of Wounds with
Diabetic Foot Evaluation & Management of Numbness &
Tingling to Prevent Wounds/Amputation

Jill M. Allen ARNP, CWS, FACCWS
Diplomat of American Academy of Wound Management,
Fellow of College of Certified Wound Specialist

Private Clinic By Appointment.
On-Site ALF, Nursing Home & Hospital Consult
Out-Patient Surgical Debridement with Topical Anesthetic,
Wound Matrix & Bio-Synthetic Grafts, Tissue Biopsy for
Definitive Antiobiotic Management,
Diabetic Neuropathic Foot & Chronic Abscess Management
Rx for Home Health and/or Facilities as indicated by exam.


Rob Garver, M.D.
Pulmonology &
Critical Care


Larry Rafey, PA.-C
Pediatrics &
Family Practice


John Thomas, M.D.
Surgery &
Family Practice


~S~R







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24.2011

Walton County Animal Control

Center Pets of the Week


Labs are front and center
this week. The dogs of this
breed are very loving, kind,
loyal and compassionate
to their master.You'll find
these lovelies at the Walton
County Animal Control Cen-
ter in DeFuniak Springs.


Pet adoption fees are $55
which includes spay/neuter,
heartworm screen, first de-
worming, first booster, and
rabies. Call (850) 892-8682
or stop in at 365 Triple G
Road, DeFuniak Springs,
FL 32433. Triple G Road


is approximately five miles
north of town. Follow SR-
83N. to CR-1883; then follow
the signs to Triple G Road.
Shelter Hours are: Monday.
Tuesday, Thursday. Friday:
9 a.m. 5 p.m. Wednesday &
Saturday: 9 a.m. 12 p.m.


WALTON COUNTY SHERIFF'S REPORT


LABS AND LABS are up for grabs at Animal Control Center.


(ASTD) March Professional

Development Program Training


The American Society
of Training & Develop-
ment (ASTD) welcomes the
public to its March Profes-
sional Development Pro-
gram Training Effectively
On-The-Job: The Four Step
Method by Susan Neumans
Van Buren, Ph.D. at North-
west Florida State College,
100 College Blvd-Building
K Gallery, Niceville, FL
32578 on Tuesday, March 8,


from 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m.
This presentation will re-
view the basic elements of
training your Subject Mat-
ter Experts (SME) who
act as on-the-job trainers
to train more effectively.
Studies have shown that
between 80-90 percent of
what employees learn about
their jobs is learned on-the-
job from peers, supervisors,
and others in their respec-


tive workplaces and not in
formal class- room settings.
Van Buren will introduce
participants to the tried and
proven four-step method of
structured on-the-job train-
ing.
The cost is $17 for non-
members, $12 for chapter
members.
To sign up, email response
to:astd.ec.hospitality@
gmail.com


The Walton County Sher-
iffs Office (WCSO) an-
nounced the arrest of Ran-
dall Irwin Henderson, 56, of
Bethlehem, Ga., for larceny.
The WCSO investigation
began Jan. 19 after Hender-
son allegedly stole a utility
trailer valued at $1,200 from
a Walton County recreation-
al vehicle park and sold it to
an Alabama man who was
unaware of the theft.
The WCSO conducted a
Jan. 24 traffic stop in Free-


port and recovered the al-
legedly stolen item from the
individual who purchased it
from Henderson. Deputies
arrested Henderson Jan. 25
and charged him with larce-
ny, a third-degree felony. He
was booked into the Walton
County Jail.
Henderson's wife was re-
cently arrested by the Opp
Police Department in Opp,
Ala. for dealing in stolen
property after investiga-
tors recovered stolen license


plates in her vehicle after a
traffic stop.
As a result of these ar-
rests, a subsequent inves-
tigation revealed that Hen-
derson has similar charges
pending from Florida law
enforcement agencies in
Holmes, Madison, Hamil-
ton and St. Johns counties.
Henderson has also been
linked to a series of thefts in
the southern United States.
The investigation is ac-
tive and ongoing.


Walton County Sheriffs
Deputies arrested the fol-
lowing people during the
week ending Feb. 20, 2011:
Larry Keith Mynott,
34, Bay St. Louis, Miss.,
DWLSR,
Stephen Trae Antinoro,
34, Freeport, DWLSR,
Michael Wayne Alford,
26, DFS, DWLSR,
Amos Weddington, 55,
DFS, DUI, DWLSR,
Louis Albert Petit, 69,
SRB, DUI,
William Anthony Lane,
52, DFS, DUI, battery on of-
ficer, firefighter, EMT, etc.,
Bradford Keith Darr,
42, SRB, Battery domestic,
F.T.J., 11, DFS, Ag-
gravated assault w/deadly
weapon w/o intent to kill,
battery domestic,
Aarron Daniel Meiss-
ner, 29, Miramar Beach,
Battery domestic, resisting
officer, obstruction w/o vio-
lence,
Jason Brandie Seay, 35,
Panama City Beach, DUI,
Michael David Knicley,
31, Freeport, MVOP, civil
commitment (child sup-
port),
Linda Gayle Cooper, 59,
SRB, MVOP,
Mistee Renee Bridger,
44, Bethalto, Ill., FVOP,
Yimi Inmer Cruz Gre-
gorio, 23, SRB, Operating
motor vehicle w/o valid DL,
John Phillip Blizzard,
44, DFS, MVOP, child sup-
port,
Thomas Henry Linden,
23, Freeport, Warrant (Mar-
ion Co.) child support,
Justin Ryan Tankers-
ley, 25, DFS, FVOP,
Stacey Wade Ward, 36,
Freeport, MVOP,


Catherine Rosa Clau-
dio, 26, DFS, Battery do-
mestic,
Roy Richard McGraw,
27, DFS, Possession of listed
chemical for manufacture of
controlled substance,
Ronnie Dwayne Cole-
man, 38, Freeport, Posses-
sion of listed chemical for
manufacture of controlled
substance,
Dara Lael Smith, 37,
Freeport, Possession of list-
ed chemical for manufacture
of controlled substance,
Jeanette Nicole Pen-
nington, 22, DFS, VOP,
Brandy Nacole Mancill,
28, Bonifay, DWLSR,
Michael Arthur Wooley,
45, Pensacola, MVOP,
Bobby Joe Cotton, 53,
DFS, Child support,
Mitchell Edward Wil-
liams, 24, SRB, Sale of mar-
ijuana,
T.M.J., 17, Freeport,
Battery,
S James Thomas
Birdwell, 25, Panama City
Beach, MVOP,
Rosario Augusto Ber-
nado-Vasquez, 28, FWB,
Coerce employee to obtain
certificate of workers comp
exemption, misrepresent
self,
Darren Timothy Leahy,
45, Miramar Beach, DUI,
Lonnie Dion Peterson,
34, Freeport, Unarmed bur-
glary of unoccupied convey-
ance,
S Michael Timothy
Burke, 45, Miramar Beach,
DWLSR, failure to regis-
ter motor vehicle, warrant
(Okaloosa Co.),
Chama Ed Humphries,
23, PDL, Possession ofmeth-
amphetamine,
William O'Neal McKen-


zie, 27, Pace, DUI, DWLSR,
refusal to surrender sus-
pended DL,
Christy Lane Awad, 28,
Dothan, VOP,
Ignacio Bernal, 21,
DFS, VOP,
Jesse Leroy McQueen,
21, PDL, Battery,
Stephanie Corrine
Quinton, 23, PDL, Warrant
(Holmes Co.),
Melissa Ann Scott, 45,
DFS, Possession of listed
chemical for manufacture of
controlled substance,
S Milous Humphery
Keith, 53, DFS, Trespass of
structure or conveyance,
Derek Joshua Lovell,
22, Freeport, DUI,
Jerome Cochran, 51,
DFS, DWLSR,
Hector Javier-Segundo,
25, SRB, Operating motor
vehicle w/o valid DL.


I, DENNIS TERHAAR,
am on probation for petit
theft.


Take


medicaid!


Dental & Health Care







479 East Highway 20


Freeport, Florida 32439


(850) 880-6568






Si EALTHCENTER


WALT T


C OU-P Y


A Federally Qualified Health Center/ 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization




Now taking patients!
Download a patient intake form at www.PanCareFL.org, fill it out and fax it to (850) 880-6583 or send it to:
Community Health Center, 479 East Highway 20, Freeport, Florida 3243,9. We will then call you to schedule an
appointment. Printed forms may be available at select locations near your community. Call us to find out where.
Questions? Call 850-880-6568.


PAGE 10-A


Georgia man arrested in


Walton County for larceny


e








PAGE 11-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24.2011


Free Tax help now available in DeFuniak Springs


Courtesy tax return prep-
aration services are now
available with free tax help
sites opening in DeFuniak
Springs as of Feb. 14, by the
Walton Tax & Savings Co-
alition. JobsPlus and North-
west Florida State College
in partnership with the
Internal Revenue Service,
will kick-off the tax season
at JobsPlus in DeFuniak


Springs with available ap-
pointments from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. on Monday and
Tuesday. Currently free tax
preparation will be available
at Northwest Florida State
College Chautauqua Center
on Thursday evenings from
5:30 8:30 p.m. As demand
for services increases, addi-
tional days will be added to
the schedule.


"We'll help people whose
incomes are S50.000 or less
to prepare and electronically
file their federal income tax
returns," said Site and Vol-
unteer Coordinator Rebec-
ca Pazik for the free sites.
"This year we are excited
to offer debit cards to those
households who do not have
a bank account. By offering
the debit card, we believe it


will help our residents be
able to keep more of their
money.

Visitors to the site seek-
ing tax assistance must have
valid photo identification
and Social Security Cards
(or Individual Taxpayer
Identification Numbers) for
themselves, spouses and
dependents. They should


also bring their 2009 tax re-
turn (if available), wage and
earnings statements (forms
W-2), interest and dividend
statements (forms 1099),
and any other information
concerning their income and
expenses for 2010.

E-Filing provides the
highest degree of speed, ac-
curacy and security in filing


tax returns. This is one of
the most popular innova-
tions ever introduced by the
IRS and continues to grow
in popularity each year. To
schedule an appointment at
either JobsPlus or North,
west Florida State College;
call Pazik at (850) 892-8668
ext. 215 or email: walton-
freetaxprep@gmail.com


Bright House Networks announces 2010 Bright Futures Campaign


Bright House Networks
recently announced the
implementation of its 2010
Bright Futures Campaign.
The Bright Futures Cam-
paign is a two part educa-
tional initiative that rec-
ognizes Educators and
Students that teach and
attend schools in Bright
House Networks service
areas. The Laptop Scholar-
ship Program recognizes
high school seniors matricu-


lating to college with a new
laptop, related software,
and carrying case for their
leadership skills, academic
achievements and commu-
nity service activities. The
Classroom Grant Program
is available to area educa-
tors in K-12 programs who
demonstrate creative learn-
ing experiences utilizing
advanced technology, web
based instruction, and/or
cable programming to en-


BBB urges


caution with refund


anticipation loans


The Better Business Bu-
reau (BBB) warns that two
conditions in the market-
place may make getting a
refund anticipation loan
(RAL) a short-term, high-
interest advance against
a tax refund even riskier
this year. The IRS is no lon-
ger providingthe Debt Indi-
cator "credit check" service
to tax preparers. And the
BP oil spill may complicate
tax time for taxpayers along
the Gulf Coast who aren't
prepared to pay taxes on
checks for lost wages.
"Just like payday loans,
Refund Anticipation Loans
are, expensive, short-term
loans in which consum-
ers pay to borrow their
own money," said Norman
Wright, president and CEO
of the BBB I Northwest
Florida. "But if the tax pre-
parer makes a mistake in
calculating their refund or if
a refund is delayed for any
reason, taxpayers could be
required to pay additional
fines and fees, too. And giv-
en that many taxpayers may
not be expecting to receive a
1099 form from BP oil spill
funds, it's possible that
some taxpayers could be in
for a surprise this year."
While they may seem
like quick cash, the Nation-
al Consumer Law Center
found that the effective an-
nualized rate for RALs can
range from about 50 percent
to nearly 500 percent. The
loans usually only last 7-14
days, until the taxpayer's
IRS refund repays the loan.
The IRS recently changed
its policy and no longer pro-
vides the Debt Indicator to
tax preparers, which re-
vealed whether a taxpayer's
refund might be intercepted
for government debts. With-
out this Debt Indicator,
RAL lending is expected to
decline and become much
riskier and thus even more
expensive for taxpayers as
well.
Gulf Coast taxpayers who
received funds from BP for
lost wages may find them-
selves in unfamiliar terri-
tory when they receive an
IRS Form 1099 if they are
accustomed to only receiv-
ing a W-2. And taxpayers
accustomed to receiving a
refund may be shocked to
learn that taxes are not
withheld on BP lost wages
checks and instead of receiv-
ing a refund, they now owe
taxes.
The BBB offers the fol-
lowing advice for taxpayers


considering a refund antici-
pation loan:
SConsider e-File and direct
deposit: It's the fastest and
most secure way- for con-
sumers to receive refunds;
taxpayers can have their
money in as little as eight to
15 days.
Don't fall for the "con-
venient" debit card: These
cards are another way for
tax preparers to make mon-
ey. The debit card often in-
cludes hidden fees and some
have limits on how much
money you can access at one
time.
Finance purchases oth-
er ways: If consumers are
looking to purchase specific
high-priced items with their
refunds, BBB encourages fi-
nancing options other than
RALs, such as store credit
promotions and offers.
Shop around: If necessary
to have a refund immediate-
ly, BBB suggests consumers
shop around and look for
good deals. Fees and RALs
vary by tax preparer. Con-
sumers can check out tax
preparer's record of integri-
ty and performance free-of-
charge with BBB Reliability -
Reports, available online at
www.bbb.org.
For additional informa-
tion and trustworthy advice
this tax season, start with
bbb.org or call (850) 429-
0002 or (800) 729-9226.


hance the quality of educa-
tion in our communities.
"The Bright Futures Lap-
top Scholarship program is
designed to recognize young
people in the Elmore County
service area for their contri-
butions to their schools and
communities," said Karen
Broach, Regional Vice Pres-
ident of Operations Bright
House Networks. "Our deci-
sion to present this oppor-
tunity again to local high
school seniors allows us to
continue our commitment to
the communities where our
customers and employees
live and work."
All 2011 applicants must
meet the following criteria:
Be a fulltime senior at-
tending a high school within
a Bright House Networks
Service area.
Demonstrate leadership
abilities in school activities
or through work experienc-


es.
Demonstrate a strong
commitment to community
service involvement.
In addition to the com-
pleted application form, ap-
plicants must include a one-
page essay describing the
importance of leadership
and community service.
All applications for the
2011 Student Scholarship
Program must be complete
and postmarked by March
11, 2011. Application forms
have been mailed to guid-
ance counselors at every
high school in the Bright
House Networks service
community. Applications
are also available at http://
www.brighthouse.com/fl-al/
about/community Appli-
cants may also contact Jy-
lon Jones (205) 290-2264.
Bright House Networks
is proud to announce the
continuation of the Bight


The Walton Board of County Commissioners is sponsoring a project to collect, recycle, treat, and
properly dispose of these and other household hazardous wastes:
PESTICIDES USED OIL STALE GASOLINE SOLVENTS FERTILIZERS PAINT -
PAINT THINNERS PAINT STRIPPERS BATTERIES FURNITURE POLISH *
BRAKE FLUID ENGINE DEGREASERS ANTI-FREEZE *
POOL CHEMICALS INSECTICIDES SPOT REMOVERS
Waste tire amnesty will also be held on the same date, during the same hours and locations. Walton
County residents may bring up to 12 tires per residence.
Collection Date: Saturday, March 5, from 8 AM to 12 PM
Locations: Walton County Fairgrounds, Highway 83 North (9th Avenue), DeFunlak Springs
South Walton Mosquito Control Office, County Road 393, Santa Rosa Beach
* No gas cylinders or explosives, please.
* Due to hazardous nature of certain components in home computers, we will be accepting old
computer hardware including processors, monitors, keyboards, printers, scanners, etc.
Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generators (small businesses, schools, growers, etc.) will be
accepted at a reduced rate. For more information or to schedule a drop off time,
contact the Landfill Department at 892-8180

'/ ^ **'i --------- __
Soott Waen M o CWTER 2 Gr
DeFuniak,Sir;,,i


This service is free and available to residents of Walton County
5tc: 2-3,10,17,24;3-3


Futures Classroom Grant
Program, which is designed
to be an on-going program
to assist educators with new
and innovative projects.
Teachers must demonstrate
their creative use of cable
programming, web sites,
streaming video and broad-
band tools in developing
creative learning opportuni-
ties for students. Teachers
are asked to submit an ap-
plication including a Project
Summary and Evaluation
Form including support ma-
terial for the project. There
is no deadline associated
with the Educator Grant


Program as Educators will
be recognized and grants
will be awarded year-round.
"It is an exciting opportu-
nity to recognize the efforts
of our area Educators who
are using creativity to move
schools and students for-
ward", said Karen Broach.
Bright House Networks is
the sixth largest owner and
operator of cable systems
in the U.S. and the second
largest in Florida with tech-
nologically advanced sys-
tems located in five states
including Florida, Alabama,
Indiana, Michigan and Cali-
fornia.


il L


With over 950 independently owned stores operating
throughout America, our Hometown Store program
is an exceptional opportunity for entrepreneurs to
leverage their resources and talents. If you possess
the sales and leadership skills we are seeking
you can own and operate your own retail store in
DeFuniak Springs/Freeport, FL selling the kind of
brands and products that make life more enjoyable.
Kenmore, Craftsman, Whirlpool, Maytag, GE and
Sony are just some of the brands we sell. And, the
best part is if you qualify we make an investment in
you and place these top national branded products
in your store for you to sell.
Our business model offers you:

* Low up-front investment no cost for inventory
* Extensive advertising and marketing support
* No franchise fees or royalties
* Training and on-going support


Visit us on-line at www.searshometownstores.com
for additional information and an application.
L ---1^^ -- ^ *


Bright House Networks Customer Notice

From time to time our agreements with cable channels and
television stations come up for renegotiation. While we do not
anticipate any loss or disruption of service, regulations require us
to notify you of the possibility of losing programming. Our
agreements with Encore, Encore Action, Encore Drama, Encore
Love, Encore Mystery, Encore WAM, Lifetime, Encore Westerns, E!,
Style, Starz, Starz Cinema, Starz Comedy, Starz Edge, Starz in
Black, Starz Kids & Family, TruTV, Weather Channel, BBC America,
EWTN, and American Life remain in effect on a month to month
basis, but we may have to cease carriage in alt.formpts if our
authority to continue is withheld. Our agreements with Current TV,
FUSE, GOLF Channel, and Sprout have expired. We are working
diligently at this time to try to come to acceptable and fair terms
with all of these channels.

For more Information on Bright House Networks programming,
please call 866-876-1872 or visit our website at brighthouse.com.


bright house Z
NETWORKS akSpngs Defuia Spngs ald
DeFunlak Springs Defuniak Springs Herald


Phone Discounts Available to CenturyLink customers


The Florida Public Service Commission designated CenturyLink
as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier or ETC within its service
area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service.is
to provide all Florida citizens access to essential telecommunica-
tions services.


CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services
for rates from $16.40 to $17.00 per month for residential custom-
ers and $24.00 to $31.00 per month for business customers. This
includes access to long distance carriers, Emergency Services,
Operator Services, Directory Assistance and Toll Blocking. Use of
these services may result in added charges. Specific rates for your
areas will be provided upon request.


CenturyLink offers qualified customers Lifeline and Link-Up
Service if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements.
Lifeline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic
phone charges (including a waiver of the Federal Subscriber
Line Charge), as well as toll blocking at no charge and a waiver
of the deposit if toll blocking'is selected by qualifying customers.
Link-Up Service provides a discount on installation charges and
charges to move service.

If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call CenturyLink at
1-800-201-4099 or visit www.centurylink.com/lifeline with questions
or to request an application for the Lifeline/Link-Up programs.






CenturyLink"

lifeline NON-SAU www.centurylink.com


Come meet us in person at our

Open House Event

Tuesday, March ist

Between 10:oo am to 4:00 pm

R.S.V.P. to
Jeff McDowell
Sears District Sales Manager
(224) 805-2306
Location
Sears Hometown Store
726 US Hwy 331 S.
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433


I _








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011


A sign from above


By ALICIA LEONARD

Florida sunshine has
been known to bring many
things: health, vitality,
growth and now, hope and
love.
Mary and Al Messer have
enjoyed 53 years of mar-
riage, three sons and four
grandchildren in their life
together. They found their
way to Walton County 13
years ago during a motor-
home trip, ending up at Sun-
set King RV Resort. Three
years ago, they moved into a
permanent park model and
never looked back. "I love
this park and the people we
share our lives with here.
I wouldn't take anything
for it, and I'm here for the
long run or as long as I can
be, God willing." God's will
plays an important part in
Mary's life. "I'm a believer.
I'm a Christian and I believe
in miracles," she said.
A little over six
years ago, Mary developed a
cough that progressively got
worse over time. A gauntlet
of different doctors and tests
followed, yet no one had an
answer. Bouts of steroids
and oxygen supplementa-
tion helped Mary continue
on as her ability to breath
lessened and then a neigh-
bor recommended a new


doctor a little less than year
ago. Two biopsies later,
Mary was diagnosed with
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fi-
brosis, a scarring of the lung
tissue that has no known
cause and no known cure.
Life expectancy for the dis-
ease is around five years.
Mary has already reached
six since her symptoms ap-
peared, and she gives the
credit for that, and for many
more things, to God.
Since the first of this
year, something beautiful
and inspiring has been tak-
ing place on certain days
when the sun is just right at
the clubhouse where Mary
spends a great deal of her
time. A form, that many
believe to be an angel of
light, reflects through the
windshield of her easy-go
cart and onto the wall of the
clubhouse. "We were clean-
ing in here one Monday. A
couple of friends were in
here with me, and one went
outside and came back in-
side and said, 'I want you to
come outside,' so, I did, and
that image was on the wall.
He said if that's not a sign,
I don't know what is...."
said Mary before a series of
coughs and a few tears in-
terrupt her voice.
Mary was hesitant to be
interviewed for this piece


when pictures of the image
were brought to the atten-
tion of the Herald/Breeze
by others in the resort, but
with encouragement that
this article could bring hope
to others, she agreed. Right
before the image appeared,
Mary had just returned
from a holiday trip to visit
her kids and grandkids. "I
told them what I wanted for
my arrangements, and to
just try to get my affairs in
order."
When asked what per-
sonal message she wanted
to accompany the article,
she responded, "God never
leaves us, we leave him.
He's always watching over
us. We shouldn't ask him to
send us a signs, but it's hu-
man nature to need reassur-
ance. We all do. We always
pray to be healed, but may-
be we should pray for God's
will instead. Sometimes,
maybe he doesn't heal us so
we can be examples of his
message, or he has different
plans for us. The angel for
me is a great reminder that
we are never alone, no mat-
ter what hardships or chal-
lenges we face. I hope when
people see the pictures, they
will be reminded of that;
his love for us and that all
things are possible through
him if we believe."


AN ANGEL OF LIGHT
has graced a local commu-
nity after a terminal diag-
nosis was delivered to one
of the residents, lifting the
spirits of many in the com-
munity that are suffering
with health related issues.


VIOLATION


cording to testimony at the
meeting, the property was
brought into compliance and
all issues with fines were re-
solved. Due to a change in
ownership on the property,
code enforcement opted to
treat the current alleged
violation as a new one, not a
repeat violation.
Alford testified that, af-
ter receiving a Nov. 16 com-
plaint on the property, his
research had indicated that
it now belonged to Allan
Shane Miller.
Board member Robert
Nelson questioned why the
quitclaim deed transferring
ownership of the property
had been recorded in Bay
County, while the property
is located in Walton Coun,
ty.
Gilbert Ray, a neighbor
of the property, told the
board members that he had
been dealing with excessive
noise from motorcycles on
the track every weekend for
four to five years. "The mo-
torcycles have not stopped,"


LIBRARY

it, and by implementing a
'Friends of the Library' pro-
gram like the other three li-
braries in Walton have. We
can implement a volunteer
program, extend the chil-
dren's program and even
put together some programs
for special classes for adults
to get them in the the door
so they can see what the li-
brary has to offer. Work on
it, please, I'm begging you to
help us get a group together
to help keep our library. If
we don't speak up and out,
that library may not be
there for you in the future."
Councilman Tommy Ma-
this told Thompson that al-
though he understood she


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-A


he said.
Allan Miller testified that
Chris Miller, his father, had
given him the property last
SApril, and that he uses it
only as a weekend getaway
for himself and his friends,
not to make money. "I use it
to ride," he said.
Chris Miller was not pres-
ent for the hearing.
When board members
brought up the matter of the
Bay County quitclaim deed,
Allan Miller at first seemed
unfamiliar with what they
were referring to. Upon be-
ing shown a copy of the
document, he thought that
it must have been part of
the paperwork that he had
seen when the property was
transferred to him.
The quitclaim deed indi-
cated that $85,000 had been
paid for the property. The
board members asked Miller
if he remembered writing an
$85,000 check for the prop-
erty, and he said he did not.
Regarding the Internet
postings, Miller said, "I don't


take any part of that what-
soever." He said he had been
unaware of the postings and
did not know who could be
advertising the property
as a business. He said he
would not expect his father
to be doing this, since he is
not very computer literate.
He speculated that it might
be a friend of his father.
Miller indicated willing-
ness to remedy the situation
quickly.
Board member Tom Stein
asked if there was a way to
remedy the disturbance if
the noise was indeed coming
from Miller and his friends
riding on the track and not
from it being used as a busi-
ness. Alford responded that
this would not be a code vio-
lation and that there is no
noise ordinance applying to
the area north of the Bay in
Walton County.
Board member Charlotte
Flynt speculated that Miller
might indeed be unaware of
business activity going on
on the property but noted


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-A


was only requesting volun-
teers at that time, she knew
that budgets were tight in
Paxton and she or someone
like her would need to make
a formal request in the fu-
ture if any issues with the
library needed help in fund-
ing from the Council, so it
could be considered when
budget time rolled around.
The Council agreed that the
library was a very important
part of the community and
they could make more use
of or remember to remind
others that the library was
there for the residents.
Councilman Charles
Cook made a motion to bring
the city mileage rate up, af-


ter much discussion by the
Council, to the same as that
of the county at .51 cent per
mile. Council members are
the only employees that use
mileage and then only if
they have travel associated
official business. The motion
passed unanimously.

The Council then dis-
cussed getting some depart-
ment repairs made on a fire
hydrant that had a back
flow preventer problem, but
no formal motion was made
or needed.

The Paxton Town Council
meets on the third Tuesday
on every month.


that, nevertheless, as owner
he is responsible.
Miller was found in vio-
lation and directed to bring
the property into compliance
within 10 days. He was also
charged a prorated share for
costs of the hearing.



A N
,,'


SA NC

?


* North Ok.laud Medj.:J Center
* Dr %% -da BaLr.n Dr AmnyRiggs
SDr Lea Speiari. OptrImerists
* D a.d A. Hertr MD C-erral Surgeon
* Ca,-npa.al H Ba
* C .cori Ho&pice


HEALTH


CENTER

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-A


offer service to those people
who have regular medical in-
surance policies. Any person
treated at one of these clin-
ics is charged a fee based on
a sliding scale depending on
annual income. Regardless
of income, a minimum fee of
at least $25 is charged.
The Freeport Center
houses both a health clinic
and a dental clinic. The
health clinic is open from 8
a.m. until 8 p.m. on Monday
and Wednesday; from 8 a.m.
until noon on Tuesday and
Thursday; and from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. on Friday. This


clinic is staffed by a Reg-
istered Nurse Practitioner
who primarily treats mat-
ters of women's health, but'
who also can treat minor ill-
nesses and wounds, includ-
ing those that may require
stitches. More serious com-
plaints are referred to doc-
tors at one of the local hos-
pitals.

The dental clinic which is
just opening is staffed by a
dentist and offers primary
dental care. Its hours will
be from 7 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Monday through Thursday.


HEALTHY '' WOMAN
)RTH OKALOOSA MEDICAL CENTER RESOURCE
". r


EVERYTHING YQU-NEED TO KNOW ABOUT RAISING A CHILD


A tlree ,,i'niiiarpre,'etntc' by
Health \\man


Tuesday March 1st

6:00PM
Walton County Health Department
362 Hwy%, 83
DeFuniak Springs


Thursday March 17th

6:00PM
First Baptist Church
798 N Pearl St.
Crestview

Light dinner &
door prizes provided

RSVP online at
www.healthywomanonline.com
or call Amy Linares at
850-689-8446


Featuring
Valery Niedermeyer, M.D.
Pediarician
-and -


START
IAmcf*-Wrkab


* Glenn M. Bankert, D.O. OB/GYN
* Okaloosa Heart & Vascular
* Lee Buick GMC
* State Farm Insurance
Ann Teel Hatcher
* Crestview News Bulletin


* Certified Constructors
Services, Inc.
* LPL Financial- Joe Faulk
* 21st Century Oncology
* CCB Community Bank
* Canr Riggs & Ingram, LLC


FREEPORT FIRE AND RESCUE responded to a grass fire near the Freeport High School on Wednesday, Feb. 16.
They received the call around 1 p.m. and had arrived and extinguished the blaze by 1: 15p.m. The fire was acciden-
tally started when a riding lawnmower's exhaust came in contact with a pile of dry grass. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


Than/k to our Gold Partners:


,- -- --


PAGE 12-A









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011


People


Place


First National Bank historical clock dedicated


KEEPING TIME ONCE MORE IS THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK CLOCK at the cor-
ner of Baldwin Avenue and 7th Street in DeFuniak Springs.


WALTON COUNTY HERITAGE ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT DIANE MERKEL ex-
presses her joy at hearing the chimes of the First National Bank Clock.


Story and photos by
BRUCE COLLIER
Beautiful warm weather
and a larger-than-expect-
ed crowd made last Sat-
urday's dedication of the
First National Bank Clock
an historical occasion for
all concerned. The restored
timepiece, located on the
corner of Baldwin Avenue
and 7th Street in DeFuniak
Springs, was formally dedi-
cated and a commemora-
tive plaque unveiled at a
brief ceremony that began
promptly at the stroke of
10 a.m., a sound heard -
and cheered by attendees.
In the crowd were Walton
County commissioners, De-
Funiak Springs City Coun-
cil members, City Manager
Kim Kirby, DFSPD City
Marshal Mark Weeks, edu-
cators and community lead-
ers.
Walton County Heritage
Association President Diane
Merkel opened the proceed-
ings, welcoming guests and
introducing Walton County
Heritage Association Board
of Directors member Rev.


Tyrone Broadus. Broadus
gave the invocation and
asked a special blessing on
the contributors: "those who
thought it not robbery to
take stock in the clock."
DeFuniak Springs Mayor
Harold Carpenter spoke
next, thanking those who
contributed, worked on or
otherwise supported the ef-
forts to restore the histori-
cal clock to its rightful state.
"The word is 'accomplished,"'
he said. A list of names,
printed on a program giv-
en out to attendees, listed
contributors and those who
worked on the clock project.
The program flyer also list-
ed the names of those who
had contributed funds to the
Take Stock in the Clock sub-
scription drive, which raised
a total of $3,715.
County Commissioner
Larry Jones briefly remi-
nisced about seeing the
clock in his younger days,
remarking that "the clock is
cool again." Following Jones,
Walton County Heritage
Association Vice President
Terry Dawkins presented


Carpenter with a check for
"leftover" funds that had
been collected for the clock
but not spent.
"Timing is everything,"
quipped Walton County Cit-
izens Services Director Ken
Little, as the clock chimed
10:15 a.m. Little and vari-
ous officials and supporters
of the project stood by as the
nearby bronze plaque was
unveiled. The plaque, set
into the wall of the build-
ing now housing the Pub-
lic Defender's office, reads:
"First National Bank Clock,
Placed in service at this lo-
cation 1924, Restoration in
2010, A partnership of The
City of DeFuniak Springs,
Walton County Board of
County Commissioners, The
Walton County Heritage As-
sociation, Inc. and Florida
White Sands Chapter 96,
the National Association of
Watch and Clock Collectors
of Pensacola, Florida."
A punch and cake recep-
tion was held immediately
after the dedication, at the
Walton County Heritage
Museum on Circle Drive.


-KWI tA I I


PLAQUE honors the groups that worked together to restore the First National Bank
Clock.


TAKE
STOCK IN
THE CLOCK
fundraising
effort is com-
memorated
in display
near the First
National
Bank Clock
in DeFuniak
Springs.
(Photo by
Gary Wood-
ham)


& I
















KEN LITTLE (r) AND GUESTS unveil a commemorative bronze plaque near the First National Bank Clock,
which was formally dedicated on Feb. 19.


PAGE 1-B








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011
...;AIN


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/ytar eobal at Are nmarenam~ ai Aeir a/iaq/ter
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at'Boo/iM4ty m t/9eaflWn. cpdw!4ef: U
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C0. S~ ,#i ,,i,/ w.,' /. .ie ,l/,.. , ,,,,,i


A BARBERSHOP QUARTET entertained Stanley House residents for Valentine's Day. Shown (top row l-r) are quartet
members Bob Hixson, Keith Tallent, Harvey Fleming, and David Holcomb. Seated are (l-r) Gena Hixson (Pat's daughter),
and Stanley House residents Pat Heacock and Marion Hixson.



Love is in the air at Stanley House


ley House Assisted Living the rich harmonies of a very
with an ice cream social and special barbershop quartet.



Toastmasters celebrate 5 years


in a comfortable, support-
ive environment is invited
to attend the meeting and
anniversary celebration at
noon on Thursday, Feb. 24.
Meetings are held in room
213 of the NWFSC campus
in DeFuniak Springs.
Attendees will hear able
speakers participate in the


club's monthly speechathon
and enjoy light refresh-
ments.
For more information
about the meeting, contact
Tina Rushing at 598-4636/
trushing@chelco.com or
Kathy Morrow at 865-6993/
kmorrow@chelco.com.


Dear Auntie Em,


Dear Auntie Em,
SI am an older, (past 50)
female who has recently
been laid off from the job I
thought I would retire from
one day. Silly me, I feel like
I never planned or even
thought I would have to look
for work again.
I have found another job,
and although it does not
pay as well and I will be re-
quired to be on my feet all
day or night, I do thank God
that I have an option.
I write to you though, for
another purpose. During the
time after my layoff, I was
approached about an oppor-
tunity to return to school
and to learn a new trade. I
seem to find myself leaning
towards the new job more
than going back to school,
because deep down I fear I
am too old to learn a new
trade. I have never been
praised for my intellect, but
I am disciplined and a pro-
ductive worker:
I am very curious to know


what you think of my situ-
ation and any advice you
can give me. Thank you so
much.
Sincerely,
Never too old to learn?
Dear Never,
I sense from your name
you may hold out a glimmer
of hope to go in a different
direction during this phase
of your life, and I, I honestly
think you should go for it, if
it's in your heart.
I once attended classes
with many ladies quite a bit
older than I at the time and
they ran circles around me
as a student. Their focus,
discipline and work ethic
were a great blueprint for
me as a student.
I found the relationships
between the younger and
older students to be quite
symbiotic as well. We leaned
on them for their life expe-
rience and values and they
leaned on us for our youth


and vigor, although some of
them were hard to keep up
with too.
I don't think you are ever
too old to do what is in your
heart.. If you can pay the
bills and go back to school,
then by all means, do so.
We're given second and
third chances in this world
so we can take them. Don't
waste yours now that it has
appeared if that's really
what is in your heart. Good
luck and God bless.
Auntie Em
Send your letters and
emails to Auntie Em to df-
sherald@gmail.com or to
P.O. Box 1546, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435


1~r nWA


Tenor Bob Hixson, who is
the son of Stanley House
resident Marion Hixson, and
the son-in-law of resident
Pat Heacock, accompanied
the other members of the
group, lead Keith Tallent,
bass Harvey Fleming, and
baritone David Holcomb in
"Let Me Call You Sweet-
heart," as well as several
other traditional favorites.
Almost every resident was
on hand to hear the love
songs and enjoy ice cream
sundaes, heart-shaped box-
es of chocolates, and beauti-
ful Valentine's cards hand-
crafted by the residents in
their arts and crafts class-
es.
"We would also like to
thank two local church
groups who brought Valen-
tine's goodies to our resi-
dents," said Stanley House
Community Relations Di-
rector Alex Alexander, "The
Euchee Valley Presbyte-
rian Church Youth Group
baked cookies and brownies
for us, and New Harmony
Baptist Church delivered
roses, small gifts and baked
goods. The love, prayers,
and special attention the
community shares with our
residents is phenomenal,
and we appreciate it very
much!"


TICKETS ON SALE N(


tasteofhome
COOKING SCHOOL
March 15, 2011
Walton High School
Doors open at 4:30pm
Show starts at 6:30pm

FREE GOODY BAG TO
ALL TICKET HOLDERS -
Contains Special Taste
of Home Cookbook, '
Counons & More -

RECIPES BOO
ia LOTS OF
.GIVEAW

View pictures on-line at
wzepl460.com & click Cooking

Since 1.931
Clary-Glenn ; -.
SNERNA HOE fCh\FunOkr he rl- Bi
SHighway s 90 ,l
DFunaik Springs




1-v3^


I
iTHS
FUN
AYS






i vX


QUALITY EYE CARE

RIGHT HERE

IN DEFUNIAK SPRINGS




"Darren Payne, M.D. and I would be
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eye care needs in our new
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LEE MULLIS, MD
LEE MULLIS, MD
EY D CERT CE IN HISTORIC DISTRICT
EYE PHYSICIAN & CATARACTS
SURGEON DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

746 BALDWIN A VENUE
(850) 892-6100


FREE COMPREHENSIVE I


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Call Today! 892-6100
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within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement of the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.


SValentine's Day was cel-
ebrated this month at Stan-



Lake DeFuniak
*The Lake DeFuniak
Toastmasters club is offi-
cially celebrating its fifth
year. The club organized in
October 2005 and received
its charter from Toastmas-
ters International in Febru-
ary 2006.
SAnyone interested in
learning public speaking


PAGE 2-B


~p~ if' C.

:.3









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24.2011


MHE school hosts charter


night for 32 K-Kids


Mossy Head School is
proud to announce they are
a K-Kids Club school. They
hosted their Charter Night
on Feb. 15, where they in-
ducted 32 student members
to the K-Kids.
Kiwanis Club officers at-


tended the function and
were very excited about
the upcoming community
service projects that the
K-Kids are planning. Mrs.
Wassman anxiously looks
forward to helping the K-
Kids members begin their


service to their school, to
their community, and the
success that this wonderful
groups of students will see
this year. Congratulations
to all of Mossy Head School's
K-Kids members.


NWFSC Foundation



annual meeting


The Northwest Florida
State College (NWFSC)
Foundation recently hosted
more than 250 college sup-
porters at its annual meet-
ing to acknowledge the
foundation's benefactors
and induct its 2011 officers
and board members. At-
tendees of the Feb. 11 event
included trustees, donors,
friends of the college, fac-
ulty and staff. Foundation
net assets were reported at
$35,532,043 for the fiscal
year ending Sept. 30, 2010,
up from $33,914,830 in 2009
and the Foundation provid-
ed more than $1.4 million in
resource support to the col-
lege during the year.

College president Dr. Ty
Handy recognized donors
for their support of stu-
dent scholarships, endowed
teaching chairs, campus
enhancements and named
facilities. Handy noted that
NWFSC Foundation schol-
arship awards totaled more
than $375,000 in the last
academic year providing
needed financial assistance
for more than 400 students
to attend NWFSC. "The
college succeeded finan-
cially in spite of continued
pressure on state funding,"
noted Handy, who credited
the NWFSC Foundation's
achievements to "a generous
community of Norwest Flor-
ida State College support-
ers" as he asked for contin-


ued support of the college to
"help us continue to prepare
the next generation of com-
munity leaders for success."
Donors who contributed
gifts to the endowed teach-
ing chair program were com-
mended for their vital sup-
port of academic programs,
instruction and technology.
Handy also thanked those
donors who provided gifts
that support a broad range
of college interests, from
campus enhancements such
as the new interactive sun-
dial on the Niceville cam-
pus, to cultural endeavors
such as symphony concerts
made possible through cor-
porate underwriters.
"In addition to the NWF-
SC Foundation's traditional
support of academics, the
foundation also serves as
an umbrella organization
for a broad spectrum of pro-
grams that not only provide
educational enrichment to
students, but also to the
community at large arts
patrons, environmental con-
servationists, college ath-
letic enthusiasts and more,"
noted outgoing NWFSC
Foundation president, Glo-
ria Frazier of Shalimar, who
commended all those who
had donated to the college
or any college sponsored
program or service.
Following the confirma-
tion of the 2011 NWFSC
Foundation directors and
officers, Gloria Frazier in-


produced Wayne Campbell,
retired Fort Walton Beach
Medical Center CEO as the
foundation's in-coming pres-
ident for 2011-2012. Lamar
Conerly of Conerly, Bowman
and Dykes, will serve as the
vice-president and Fred
Thomas of ThomCo Enter-
prises will serve as treasur-
er. Frazier also introduced
Robin Wilson of CHELCO
and Dewayne Youngblood of
Regions Bank as new direc-
tors on the NWFSC Founda-
tion board of directors.
Wayne Campbell thanked
Frazier for hei more than
nine years of vital service to
the college's foundation, as
both a member of the board
and the foundation's execu-
tive committee, and for her
tireless contributions to the
foundation, college and com-
munity. Campbell also noted
the NWFSC Foundation's
success, reflected by growth
in net assets and support for
college, endeavors, and chal-
lenged attendees to continue
to support the foundation in
its mission to provide educa-
tional aid to the college.

The NWFSC Founda-
tion provides charitable and
educational aid in the form
of money and other prop-
erty and services to and/or
for the benefit of NWFSC.
A copy of the annual report
is available on the NWFSC
Foundation website at www.
nwfscfoundation.org


2011 FOUNDATION PRESIDENT, Wayne Campbell, presents 2010 Foundation Presi-
dent, Gloria Frazier with a framed Holzhauer print in appreciation for her service on the
NWFSC Foundation Board.


NWFS trustees approve new college mission and values


The governing Board of
Trustees of Northwest Flor-
ida State College (NWFSC)
have approved a new mis-
sion statement and guiding
values for the college as part
of a new Vision 2020 outline
that will focus the work of
the college over the coming
years. A 15-member college
committee, led by NWFSC
President Ty Handy, com-
pleted the Vision 2020 plan
following several months of
discussion and work within
various standing commit-
tees of the college.
"The college mission is
what we do the essence of
why we exist," noted Handy.
"The committee completely
rewrote the college's mis-
sion statement to better re-
flect our core work and also
identified seven core values
that are central to all our
programs and services."
"We plan to fully incorpo-
rate this Vision 2020 into all
aspects of college life, from
our branding and student
recruitment to our planning
processes and how we evalu-
ate our success and that of
our students," said Handy.
As approved by NWFSC
trustees at their Feb.15
meeting, new mission state-
ment of the college is:
"NWFSC improves lives.
We deliver outstanding edu-
cational programs that are
relevant, accessible, and


engaging for students of
all ages and provide excep-
tional cultural, athletic, and
economic development ac-
tivities for the communities
served. We commit to excel-
lence, creativity, integrity,
and service."
The new college values
endorsed by NWFSC Trust-
ees are:
Northwest Florida
State College values:
Opportunity meeting
each student's educational
need at his or her level of
ability.
Excellence achieving
the highest standards.
Learning acquiring new
skills, insights, and ideas.
Success preparing stu-
dents for the future.
Creativity finding in-
novative ways to accomplish
our objectives.
Community listening
and responding to commu-
nity needs.
Teamwork supporting
and respecting each other
and those we serve.
Accompanying the new
permanent mission and val-
ues statements of the college
are Vision 2020 principles
that the college may update
on an annual basis.
The college's new vision
principles are:

Vision One: A Learn-
ing-Centered Communi-


ty
NWFSC will be a college
that places the teaching-
learning process at the core
of our existence and seeks to
improve student success.
We will assess student
learning, hold ourselves
accountable for learning
outcomes, and invest in re-
sources to improve student
learning outcomes.
We will use learning-fo-
cused methods that actively
engage students and will
seek to help students under-
stand that they are an in-
tegral part of the teaching-
learning process.
We will provide learning
environments, both in and
out of the classroom, that
meet student learning needs
and encourage student suc-
cess.

Vision Two: Access to
Opportunity
NWFSC will be the gate-
way to higher education op-
portunity for students in ar-
eas we serve.
We will provide edu-
cational opportunities at
multiple sites and varying
times and through alterna-
tive delivery methods that
maximize the opportunity
to earn an education.
We will seek efficiency
and quality while maintain-
ing an affordable tuition
level.


Vision Three: Commu-
nity Engagement
NWFSC will be recog-
nized as a critical commu-
nity resource and a valuable
partner in advancing cul-
tural, economic, and educa-
tional aspirations.
We will develop partner-
ships with community orga-
nizations to promote educa-
tional opportunity.
We will provide a rich in-
ventory of cultural, athletic,
life-long learning, and aca-
demic experiences that en-
gage community members
in the life of the college.
We will offer cultural and
educational opportunities to
the many constituencies we
serve in a deliberate effort
to broaden and enrich the
lives we touch.

Vision Four: Institu-
tional Growth
NWFSC will seek to grow
strategically in areas that
increase our impact on the
communities we serve.
We will increase program
offerings and enrollments in
baccalaureate and career/
technical programs.
We will increase the pro-
portion of students we en-
roll from the communities
we serve.

Vision Five: Financial
Stewardship
NWFSC will be financial-


ly secure and will practice
wise financial stewardship.
We will grow the college
Foundation's asset base and
increase its annual impact
on the college.
We will maintain suffi-
cient financial reserves to
provide security, flexibility,
and institutional innovation
and development.

Vision Six: A Great
Place to Work
NWFSC will be one of
the leading employers in
our service area by offering
competitive compensation
packages and investments
in personal and professional
development programs and
will place an emphasis on
job security.
We will offer a combina-
tion of salary and benefits
that allows us to recruit and
retain the best possible em-
ployees.
We will invest in the per-
sonal and professional de-
velopment of our workforce
and provide employees with
the tools they need to do
their jobs well and prepare
them for future career op-
portunities.
In other action at the
board's Feb. 15 regular busi-
ness meeting, college trust-
ees also approved:
Changes to the admis-
sions process for the col-
lege's EMT (Emergency


Medical Technician) Cer-
tificate program to improve
the weighted point system
by which students are se,
elected for admission to the
program and to change the
process of selection when a
tie exists among applicants.
The competitive admission
program currently receives
over 100 applicants for ad-
mission each semester for
24 available slots.
The board's next regular
business meeting is sched-
uled for March 15, at 6 p.m.,
preceded at 5 p.m. by a din-
ner. For the March meeting,
trustees will begin a previ-
ously approved schedule to
rotate board meetings twice
a year to NWFSC centers
located in other communi-
ties served by the college.
Thus, the March 15 meeting
will be held at the college's
Chautauqua Center in De-
Funiak Springs, located at
908 U.S. 90 West. Plans call
for the next scheduled time
the trustees meet at an al-
ternate campus location to
be Fall 2011,,when the board
will hold one of its meetings
at the college's Fort Walton
Beach campus. Board of
Trustee business meetings
are open to the public.
For information on the
college's Board of Trustees,
see the college website at
www.nwfsc.edu/boardof-
trustees.


PAGE 3-B


A TOTAl of 32 Mossy Head Elementary students were inducted as K-Kids members.













PCom 4-d TorhipR
Fid hecurch of yurcoe


I


sons from all walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working
together. If you're looking for a church home, we invite you to come
visit us. Church office phone number 892-5832. email:fpcdfs@em-
barqmail.com Website: fpcdfs.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS, located at 88 Circle Drive, Rev. Robert West, staff
and congregation wish to invite you to join our family for activities
on Sunday beginning with Contemporary Worship Service in the
sanctuary at 8:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship Service at 11 a.m. with
Children's Church (Pre-K to third grade) provided for both services;
Vesper service at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. Communion is observed


ALAQUA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. The pastor and
congregation invite you to come join us for services at 9 a.m. every
Sunday. Church school for children and coffee fellowship follow the
morning service. Serving the faithful at 4189 Coy Burgess Loope
since 1837. Come to the country for worship. Call Pastor Henry
Martin at (850)892-4860 for more information.

ARGYLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 252 Argyle Church Road, Argyle,
FL invites everyone to attend their services. Sunday School 9:45
a.m. all ages, Church Service 11 a.m., Sunday night 6 p.m. all
ages, Wednesday night 6 p.m.
Pastor James Burnham. Call (850)892-2327, or (850)259-2173.
All are welcome.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH invites you to attend
Sunday School 9:45, Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Train-
ing 5 p.m., Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m., Wednesday Prayer
Service 6:30 p.m. Come and be a part of an awesome ministry
here in your community.

BEECHGROVE CHURCH OF GOD and Pastor D. Wayne
Rickards extend a warm welcome to everyone to attend their regular
services. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m.; morning worship at 11
a.m.; Sunday night services begin at 5 p.m. and Wednesday night
services begin at 6 p.m. The church is located six miles south of
Ponce de Leon on CR 183. For information (850)836-4484.

BIBLE BELIEVERS BAPTIST CHURCH, The congregation and
Pastor Dan Hershey, would like to invite you to come and be a part of
our continuing church growth. If you are looking for a fundamental,
KJV Bible-believing, independent Baptist Church, then we are just
what you are looking for. The preaching is not compromised, it is
straight out of God's Word. The preaching is known to be "old-
fashioned," like it used to be. So, please come join us in worship.
330 North Davis Lane, DFS. Sunday School at 10 a.m. services 11
and 6 p.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study 6:30
p.m. "Teaching the Bible as it is for men as they are."

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W.
Live Oak Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and
congregation welcomes you to join Spirit filled worship services
where we'll treat you in so many different ways, you will have to
like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7 p.m. All are cordially invited
and welcome. For a ride to church contact (850)892-0706 or (850)
892-4704.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come meet and fellowship with
other real people who genuinely love the Lord. Sit under practical
bible teaching and preaching relevant to today's issues. Come let
Jesus Christ heal your body, save your marriage, touch your kids,
and give hope to the broken hearted. Come dressed casual or
Sunday best. All are welcome and will fit in. No ties required. Seekers
welcome. Come see for yourself that we are sound, practical, God
loving people who center our lives around the person of Jesus
Christ and a solid approach to the Holy Scriptures. We do pray for
the sick and needy, and believe in the bible gospel of power to meet
the human need. Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. and Wednesday night
classes begin at 6:30 p.m., Teens: Wednesday nights, Children's
Church: Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights. Cornerstone
Church is located at 2044 Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak
Springs. Ph.(850) 892-2240.

EUCHEE VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is located in the
Euchee Valley Community at the intersection of County Hwys. 183
South and 280 East.
We cordially invite you to come and worship with us and make
us your church home. Sunday School begins for all ages at 9:45
a.m. followed by morning worship at 11 a.m. Nursery provided.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church
attendance doesn't have to be dull, mundane or feel like just an
added burden to your life! You can attend a church service in which
you feel both welcomed and loved, as well as be challenged by
the powerful preaching of God's Word. The church family of the
First Apostolic Church embraces the doctrine of the early Apostles
and their preaching as recorded in the Book of Acts and other
New Testament teachings. Sunday Services begin at 10 a.m. with
Sunday school for the children and a spirt-filled worship for adults.
Sunday evening service begins at 5:30 with prayer, with worship
and preaching beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday night bible study
begins at 7 p.m. and we offer family prayer on Thursday from 6 p.m
to 7 p.m. each week. Not able to physically attend? Hear sermons
posted on our website at www.defuniakapostolic.com. Come and
experience church the way God started it all in the New Testament!
If you have any questions or need ministry assistance, please feel
free to call the church office at (850) 892-7882. Rev. David W. King,
Pastor.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located
at 461 Van Buren Avenue, Pastor Michael F. Tadlock, his wife,
Amy and Son, Hayden would like to extend an invitation for all
to come join us as we celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus
Christ through Spirit filled worship & annointed preaching!! Sunday
School begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by Morning Worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evening
service begins at 6:30 p.m. Youth Ministry Services are held every
Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Please come and worship with us.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East
Live Oak Avenue. We cordially invite you to join our "Fellowship
of Encouragement" and come for Worship and Bible Study at the
following times: Sunday Bible Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship
(10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5 p.m.) and evening worship
(6:00 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us for prayer meeting
at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship dinners.
Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details. Visit our webpage
at www.fbcdfs.org.

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite
you to worship with us this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Then stay for
refreshments and adult Bible Study and children's Sunday School.
Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz, speaks from the Gospel each
Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We are known throughout
our community as a friendly and serving Church that welcomes
newcomers. We are located on U.S. 331, very near the Florida line
[245121bd 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at
(334) 858-3515 for more specific directions.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS,
1063 Circle Drive, invites the public to join them throughout the
week for worship, fellowship, study and service. A men's fellow-
ship group and Presbyterian women meet monthly for fellowship
and Bible study. Children's and youth activities are announced. Call
for information. Sunday (nursery provided from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.)
9:30 a.m. Songfest for everyone 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for all
ages. 11 a.m. morning worship. Wednesday 3:30 p.m. Presbyterian
youth fellowship. 6:30 p.m. Chancel choir rehearsal.
First and third Wednesday, 9 a.m. 12 p.m. KID'S CLOSET to
provide basic necessities to children of Walton County families in
need.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who
are committed to being an inclusive faith community, where per-


information, call the pastorium phone number at (850) 834-2017.

INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles
south of DeFuniak Springs, cordially invites you to come and
worship with us in Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship
services, at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is
at 6 p.m. Pastor Scot Keppel and the congregation extends a very
special welcome to come visit or make us your church home. We
practice "Love one another". A nursery is provided.


I


war."

WESTSIDE CHURCH OF CHRIST Do you truly know what
it means to be saved? Are you worshipping according to God's
divine instructions? If you're even contemplating that answer, then
please come visit us this coming Sunday at 9 a.m. Bible study, 10
a.m.worship, and/or during 7 p.m. Wednesday night Bible class.
The address is 121 East Larkspur Avenue, DeFuniak Springs FL,
32435. If you have any questions please call us at (850)892.3391.


I


I


at both morning services on first Sunday and Sunday School for all
ages at 9:45 a.m. Children's Sunday school (k-6th) is "JAM" (Jesus
and Me) is the Multi-Dimensional Learning program with children
rotating to different workshops (art. computer, cooking/science,
games, storytelling/movie) each Sunday "learning by doing". Other
opportunities on Sunday include: Sr. High Youth Fellowship at 4
p.m..; Jr. High Youth Fellowship and Children (HIS Kids Club) at
3:30 p.m.; Food pantry every 3rd Sat. 7-9 a.m. For more information,
call (850) 892-5332, 892-5128 e-mail fumcdfs@embarqmail.com
website www.fumcdefuniaksprings.org.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF WESTVILLE,
2100 Highway 90 West, Westville. Pastor Jason Campbell and
the Westville church family invite you to come to a place where
Pentecost is an experience, not a thing of the past. We offer a
friendly environment with annointed preaching and singing, Our
Sunday morning services begin at 10 a.m. and our Sunday evening
service begins at 5 p.m. Our Wednesday evening service begins
at 7 p.m. We also offer children's church on Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Come experience the power of the Holy Ghost just like early church
did in the Book of Acts. For more information call, (850) 548-5898
or(850) 892-7499.

FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP INTERNATIONAL is a non-
denominational church filled with excitement about what the future
holds and a sincere hunger for the outpouring of the Spirit of God.
We are a church where God's presence is never taken for granted
and neither are you. Freedom Fellowship is a church looking for a
people "who will humble themselves before God and seek His ways."
2Chr. 7:14, Pastor Dennis Grey II invites your family to be a part of
our family each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Casual dress / Contemporary
Worship. We are now meeting at the Continental Worship Center
located at 2132 U.S. 90 across from the DeFuniak Springs Airport.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FREEPORT 430 Kylea Laird
Drive, Freeport, Fla. Pastor Ken Coots would like to extend an
invitation to one and all to come and "Worship"the Lord Jesus
Christ with us, as we seek His perfect will. Bible Study for all ages
commences at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday. Sunday a.m. worship
service begins at 10 a.m., and Sunday p.m. service at 5 p.m.. The
Wednesday p.m. prayer service begins at 6 p.m.. Both the Sunday
p.m. and Wednesday p.m. prayer services are being held in the
Fellowship Hall. Explicit Bible doctrine is the continuous thread
during both evenings. We at FBC Freeport are strong advocates of
Romans 10:17, "Faith cometh by hearing and hearing by the Word
of God." Hope and pray to see all there! (850) 835-2742 (850) 774-
8327.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (formerly the Concerned Christian
Church) desires to reproduce in doctrine, in life and practice, the
Church founded by Christ. Our position may be summarized as
"where the Bible speaks, we speak" and "where the Bible is silent,
we are silent," we invite you to join us and help spread the message
of Christ in our community. Sunday School (all ages) at 10 a.m.
and worship (including Childrens' Church) starts at 11 a.m. Nursery
available. Our minister is John Dixon and the church is located on
U.S. 90, 2.4 miles west of the intersection of U.S. 90 and U.S. 331
North.

FREEPORT ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 17457 US 331S. Sunday
services: Learning Center 9:45 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:50 a.m.
Do you need joy in your life? Then come hear the sermon series
from the Book of Philippians call "Disturbed by Joy!" Wednesday,
7 p.m. Hear the teaching series. "Traveling through the Psalms."
Nursery available. Phone 865-4068 for more information.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 174 Harrison
Street, (corner of Bayloop & Harrison St.) Freeport, Fl. 32439 Office
- 850-880-6633, Parsonage 850-835-2261, Pastor's Cell Phone -
850-225-4914 Dr. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor. Please come worship
with us. Rev. Dr. G Charles Sattewhite, Pastor announces that we
are having blended services which include both Contemporary and
Traditional services, these services are geared to reach both t he
seeker, and the growing church member, as well as the established
member. WE are excited about what God is doing at the Freeport
UMC. Our service times are 9:00 a.m. for Bible Study, and children's
hour, our Worship time is 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship in
Song 4:00 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wednesday 6:00 p.m., Our Ladies
meet every other Tuesday Night 6:00 p.m., We have a Gospel Singing
Jubilee on the 1st Saturday of every month 6:00 p.m. (Open Mic).
Come be with us. "a short drive for a life changing experience."

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, 2415 County Hwy. 1883,
DeFuniak Springs is a friendly little country church that welcomes
all visitors. Everyone is invited to worship with the congregation.
Sunday school starts at 9:15 a.m. Sunday morning worship is at
10:30 a.m. and Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday
we have prayer meeting starting at 6:30 p.m. and children's mission
program and Bible drill program. Every fifth Sunday, we have special
music followed by "Dinner on the Grounds." We have a nursery for
0-3 and Children's Church for ages 3 through the first grade.
Missions are very important to Friendship. We have Men's, Wom-
en's and children's mission program. Our pastor is Johnmark Brown.
We extend a heartfelt welcome for you to come and join with us
in worship and fellowship. For any questions please call (850)859-
2287.

GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (GPC) Pastor Keith An-
drews and the congregation of GPC invite you to come and worship
with them. At GPC, you'll find teaching that's biblical, practical, and
encouraging; worship that's exciting, joyous, and Christ-honoring;
and fellowship that's warm and personal. Sunday: Sunday School
(all ages!) at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Kidz Klub at 11 a.m. Ignite!
(Youth) at various locations from 5 7 p.m. Wednesday: Trans-
formation (Bible study for men and women) at 6:30 p.m. GPC is lo-
cated about 10 minutes north of DeFuniak Springs on SR-83N. Find
out more on the web at www.glendalechurch.org or call (850)859-
0080.

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of
Highway 90 on Laird Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just
before the Okaloosa County line. Grace Community is a church
committed to historical Southern Baptist principles and believes that
the Church is called, not to reflect its culture, but to shape it. We
believe that faith must be lived as well as affirmed, therefore, right
living derives from right believing. We hold to a high view of Scrip-
ture believing the Bible as our final authority and that it "stands
in judgement of us, never do we stand in judgement of it." Sunday
morning worship begins at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday School at 11 a.m.
and evening bible study at 6 p.m. Friday night home Bible study at
6:30 p.m. If you are tired of playing church, come help us shape the
culture where we are "learning God's will one verse at a time."

HARMONY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH and Pastor Donel David-
son together with his family welcome all to worship God in spirit and
in truth, at 974 Adams Road, DeFuniak Springs.
Church services will begin with Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Sun-
day morning worship at 11 a.m.; Sunday evening at 5 p.m., and
Wednesday evening 6:30 p.m. Directions: U.S.331 N turn on to
Williams Road go about 3.3 miles to Adams Road, turn right onto
Adams go about 9/10 of a mile to church. U.S. 90 turn onto CR-
1087 in the Mossy Head area go to Williams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to Adams Road, turn left onto Adams go
9/10 of a mile to church. From CR-1087 out of New Harmony turn
left onto Adams Road and go 9/10 of a mile to church. For more


NEW HARMONY BAPTIST CHURCH is located at 2281 County
Hwy. 2A, DeFuniak Springs, FL. only nine miles north of Hwy. 90 on
Rt. 1087 from Mossy Head. Pastor Todd Camp would like to invite
you to worship with us during any of our exciting weekly services.
We are a family church that loves Jesus! Our Sunday School hour
is from 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. followed by our morning worship
service at 11 a.m. Nursery and children's church are provided. Our
Sunday evening service begins at 6 p.m., as we "study to show
ourselves approved unto God." On Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. we have a dynamic children's program, youth meeting, ladies
ministry, and adult prayer and Bible study service. The church also
offers affordable daycare services. Monday-Friday. We are a Bible
church committed to seeing God change lives in the power of the
Holy Spirit. Come and be a part of what the Lord is doing at New
Harmony Baptist Church. Call for more information at (850) 834-
2871.

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH 6753 State Hwy 2 East,
Darlington, Fla. We are reaching out-to the lost, hurting, hungry,
and naked. Pastor Rev. Curtis Manning and his congregation would
like to invite you to attend services with them. Sunday School for
all ages is at 10 a.m., and Sunday Morning worship is at 11 a.m.;
Sunday evening services will be at 5 p.m.; Wednesday night prayer
and teaching is at 6 p.m.; Come enjoy our anointed praise and
worship and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and
teaching of God's Word. For more information call ( 850 ) 892-
2048.

PASTOR BILL HUNTER AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE
BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, "the'Church in
the Wildwood," invites you to come and worship with us just as you
are. Black Creek UMC is located five miles east of Freeport at 278
Memorial Lane. (If you need directions, please call (850)859-2366
or (850)830-1497. We are a church body who loves people and
who also loves to hear the word of God preached. If you sing and/
or play a musical instrument and would like to share your talents)
please come and join us. Make plans now to attend Sunday school
at 10 a.m., Morning Worship at 11 a,m., and Evening Worship at
6 p.m. Rev. Bill may be reached at (850)859-2366 or (850)830-
1497.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs.
Located one mile south of Bob Sikes Road at 1015 Pleasant Ridge
Rd. extends a special invitation for you to join us to worship the
Lord and study His Word at the following times: Sunday Breakfast/
Fellowship (8:45); age appropriate Sunday Bible Study (9:15);
Morning Worship (10:30); Discipleship training (5 p.m.) and Evening
Worship (6 p.m.); Wednesday (6 p.m.) adult Bible study and youth
activities. Participate in meaningful worship with family and friends.
Call (850) 892-3500 for more information.

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at the
intersection of Hwy. 1883 & 183 invites you to Sunday School 9:45
a.m., Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Training at 5 p.m.,.
Evening Service 6 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 p.m. Please come
worship God with us.

PORTLAND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH welcomes you!
We are here for you and hope,you will bless us with y our presence
as we worship God and live in the community together. We're
different, and seeking new ways to be the church God call us to
be. We focus on prayer, fellowship, study, missions and worship. A
variety of activities are going on weekly. We have Sunday school
for adults and youth. Worship at 11 a.m. and a new contemplative
prayer service beginning in September at 8:30 a.m., nursery
provided. Youth meet on Wednesday along with dinner and adult
Bible studies at 6 p.m. For more information call (850)-307-2009.


SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1307 County Hwy 278,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Sunday School 8:45 a.rh.; Morning Worship
10 a.m.; Puppets, Children's and Adult Choir 4 p.m.; Evening Adult
Bible Study, Youth Bible Study, and Children's Mission Classes 5
p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday mid-week
worship service and AWANA 6:30 p.m. Sign language interpretation
for the deaf provided at all services. Southwide Baptist Church has
classes and activities for all ages: Youth Group, Royal Ambassadors,
Girls in Action, Acteens, Adult Choir, Women on Mission, Paintball
(ages 10+ everythird Saturday of the month), AWANA (3yrs-
12th Grade), and sign language classes for all ages. Pastor William
Whaley invites everyone to come and hear the saving word of God.
Directions: from DeFuniak take U.S. 331 S. turn right on first road
(Coy Burgess Loop) past 1-10. Southwide Baptist Church is located
1.5 miles on the left at intersection of Coy Burgess Loop and Millard
Gainey Road. Call (850) 892-3835 for more information or for
directions.

ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is a historic mission
located at 144 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday schedule:
9 a.m. Bible study in the vicarage and 10:15 a.m. Eucharist in the
church. A COMMUNITY "CENTERING PRAYER GROUP" meets
each Saturday morning at 10 a.m. in the church. All are invited.
From December through May COMMUNITY FIRST SATURDAY
BREAKFASTS are served in the parish hall from 7 am. till 11 a.m.
St. Agatha's is the home of the Lakeside Concert series. For more
information call (850) 892-9754

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331
N., P.O. Box 590, DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 32435, Phone: (850)
892-9247. Mass Schedule: Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday,
6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of
Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard Dawson, pastor.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congrega-
tion cordially invite you to attend services with us. Sunday School
is at 10 a.m. Sunday Evening Services are at 6:00 pm. Wednes-
day Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 26 Joe Ander-
son Road (Hwy 83 North). Our pastor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please
come ready to worship and expecting a blessing!

VICTORY LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD, Highway 90
at the Mossy Head Community Center across from the Mossy
Head General Store. We would like to extend to all an invitation to
come and join us and be blessed. We are a church dedicated to
serving Jesus and spreading His wonderful word. Let us share the
light of God's word with you. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.,
followed by Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Each Sunday we have a
fellowship lunch on the grounds, all are invited. Sunday afternoon
service begins about 1:30 p.m. Friday evening service 7 p.m. -
prayer, Royal Rangers, Missionettes and Adult Bible Study followed
by prayer time. Pastor is Thomas Adamson, Children's Ministries
Kevin Chilcutt. For more information call 892-3817 or 652-4610.
Website www.victorylighthouse church.org.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner
of Live Oak and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Open Hearts,
Open Minds, Open Doors," Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School
9 a.m., Mornihg Worship 10 a.m. The small church by the side of
the road with a cross over the entrance, longing to extend the love
and peace of God to any wayfarer or pilgrim seeking a rest from
this world of strife and despair. A place where common people can
assemble for simple worship and experience the Presence of God
in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered together in my
name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V. "The
devil wins a skirmish with a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the


PAGE 4-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 24, 2011













WCDC graduates nursing students


At Walton Career Devel-
opment'Center (WCDC), 12
practical nursing graduates
from the Fall 2010 class and
17 practical nursing gradu-
ates from the Spring 2010
class received their nursing
pins and certificates of com-
pletion during the tradition-
al evening service for the
nursing graduates that in-
cluded lighting of the Night-
ingale lamps and reciting of
the Nightingale pledge. The
practical nursing students
wore traditional white uni-
forms and caps for the cer-
emony.
Trecia Meadows, Pro-
gram Director presented


the following awards to the
Fall 2010 graduates. The
Outstanding Scholastic
Achievement Award and
Gail Cole Leadership Award
were presented to Liudmila
Andrew. Lynn Johnson, In-
structor presented the Out-
standing Bedside Nurse
Award to Liudmila An-
drew. For the Spring 2010
graduates Trecia Meadows
presented the Outstand-
ing Scholastic Achievement
Award to Donna Free and
Heather Coultas and the
Gail Cole Leadership Award
to Heather Coultas. Lynn
Johnson presented the Out-
standing Bedside Nurse


I COMMUNITY
CALENDAR


THE 45TH REUNION FOR THE WALTON HIGH
CLASS OF 1966 -now planned for June 10-11, has been
expanded to include the 1965 and 1967 classes. They plan
to do some charity work in the community on June 10, fol-
lowed by a picnic at the Glendale Memorial Nature Pre-
serve. On the June 11, we hope to have a school tour fol-
lowed by a golf outing (format and type yet to be decided)
with an evening meal/social at the Country Club. Request
the classes of 1965 and 1967 identify a point of contact to
work with Don White at (210)884-9303 or email afdtwhite@
aol.com to make sure the announcement of the combined
reunion reaches as many classmates as possible. Hope to
see all of the survivors at the reunion. A lot has changed
in 44-46 years.

SHELTER HOUSE, ON BEHALF OF THE ALLSTATE
FOUNDATION- is presenting a Day of WAM! (Women
and Money) at the Laurel Hill City Hall located on 8209
SR- 85 N., Laurel Hill, FL 32567, on Saturday, March 5.
from 10 a.m. 5 pm.
This free workshop will include breakfast, lunch and
childcare, in addition to transportation assistance.
The workshop will cover: financial abuse; income-and
assets; budgeting and couponing; banking and savings; in-
vesting; credit; loans; bankruptcy; taxes, and insurance.

THE AREA HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER is offer-
ing free smoking cessation classes at the Walton County
Health Department in DeFuniak Springs at 362 SR-83.
Participants receive free nicotine replacement therapy such
as nicotine patches, gum and/or lozenges along with profes-
sional consultation, resources and support. Small group
sessions start at 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 3, with ad-
ditional one-hour sessions each Thursday evening through
April 7. For more information, call Lynne Weldon at (850)
6,85-8814 to join others who want help to quit smoking.


Award to Adrienne Brock.
One additional award. The
Ryan Richardson Scholar-
ship Award. was presented
during the Spring 2010
graduation ceremony. Sher-
ry Richardson. LPN and
graduate of WCDC's Nurs-
ing program presented Kel-
ly Yeakel with a plaque and
$500 scholarship in memory
of her son Ryan Richardson
who died at age 5 from Nie-
mann-Pick disease.
Mike Davis, WCDC Prin-
cipal, presented the stu-
dents with their Certificate
of Completion and school
board members Sharon Rob-
erts and Faye Leddon were
present to congratulate the
students on their achieve-
ment. Following the presen-
tation of certificates the stu-
dents were pinned by family
members and received their
nursing lamps from instruc-
tors Twynette Earley, Lynn
Johnson, and Barbara Tay-
lor. A candlelight recita-
tion of the practical nursing
pledge concluded the cer-
emony.
The practical nursing
program includes 1,350
clock hours of classroom,
lab, and clinical instruction.


Upon successful completion
of the program and national
licensure exam the gradu-
ates will be able to pursue
a career as a License practi-


cal nurse. WCDC is now ac-
cepting applications for the
new Fall class which will
begin in August. To attend
an orientation session for


more information about the
practical nursing program
call (850) 892-1240. Applica-
tion deadline for the August
2011 class is May 31, 2011.


THE 2010 FALL CLASS: front row (l-r) Amber.Hunter, Samantha Hastings, Carmen
Castro, Diadema Bruno, Liudmila Andrew, Samantha Mattingly. Back row (l-r): Sigrid
Wasden, Jennifer Fair Byrd, Gregory Spires, Linsey Norman Missildine, Catherine West-
moreland, Amanda Mc Waters.


THE 2010 SPRING CLASS: front row (I r) Karen Pulver, Adrienne Brock, Beatrice Lajiness,.Rikki Garrett, Melisa
Mayzik, Muriay Brown, Hester Hollington, Noele Hagen. Back row (l-r) Donna Free, Kathleen Gallagher, Randi Lightner,
Tiffany Garrett, Tracy Ory, Jenna McElyea, Destiny Richardson, Heather Coultas, Regina Robbins.


F aIt I en C un y= i Plai e Proesive I I In


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Black Creek boat launch &
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BAY HARBOUR
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This unbelievable deal is not a short sale!
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Loatd 18045rii US Hwy 331S, Freepot, FL 3249 850-8354153 wwwfreeporutw RnV1'1~ II iLaterf[ront1111 ~comI


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FREEPORT LOCATION GRAYTON BEACH LOCATION
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SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
HANDLED APPEALS EXPERT
By: Dr. Anna Pat Krupkin, Ph.D
DISABILITY CONSULTANTS

(850) 835-2163
P.O. Box # 539, Freeport, Florida 32439
NO FEE UNLESS YOU COLLECT Since 1970
CALL PAT FOR DETAILS


__j


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 2011


PAGE 5-B


flfllw-









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


__BIT0; I3E


-:I


I-
.1


Paul


Robert "William" Paul
Sr., 94, formerly of 130 West
Chaffin Avenue in DeFuniak
Springs, Fla. passed away
Friday. Feb. 18, 2011 at the
Stanley House where he was
currently residing. He was
born Aug. 27, 1916 in Wal-
ton County, Fla. to the late
Alexander and Lucy Paul.
William worked as an or-
derly at both Lakeside and
Florala Memorial Hospital,
and became self-employed
as owner of Walton County
Janitorial Service. Formerly
a member of Greater St. Jo-
seph A.M.E. Church, he last
served his Lord and Savior
at Park Street Church of
God in Christ.
William is preceded in
death by his wife, Ruby
Lee Page Paul; son, Robert
William Paul Jr.; daugh-
ter, Vernell Page Paul; four
brothers, Morris Paul, Ray-


Eichorn


Tammy Michelle Price-
-Eichorn, 49, of DeFuniak
.Springs, Fla. passed away
.Friday, Feb. 18, 2011 at
SWest Florida Hospital. She
-was born February 9, 1962
Sin Jonesboro, Ark.
STammy is preceded in
death by her mother, Naomi
Shelton.
Tammy is survived by


4d


White
-: William "Mike" White, 52,
'passed away Thursday, Feb.
-17, 2011 at Sacred Heart
:Hospital on the Emerald
:Coast. He was born Sept.
122, 1958 in Chipley, Fla. In
:his spare time he enjoyed
'playing cards. Mike had a
:special love for his family
::and loved to make people
::smile.
: Mike is preceded in death
'by his father, Cecil White
:and father-in-law, Randall
:Shelley.
'' Mike is survived by his
loving wife, Renita White;
:one son, Brandon White of
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. and
*dog "P.D."; mother, Faye
:White of DeFuniak Springs;
two sisters, Cecilia Jones and
:husband Jerry and Marsha


mond Paul, Hiawatha Paul,
and James Paul; and four
sisters, Jeanette Paul Har-
ris, Vera Paul Perry, Mary
Louise Austin, and Ruth
Lee Carson.
William is survived by
three daughters, Lucy
Paul Toombs and husband
James, Glenda Paul Ales
and husband Wa1-_,, and
Sylvania Paul; two sisters,
Hellon Paul Barker and
Pinkie Vann Williams; one
brother, James L. Williams;
two grandchildren, Lacond-
uas Paul Freeman and hus-
band Christopher and Che'
valier K. Paul; one great-
grandchild, Kali Freeman;
and numerous nieces, neph-
ews, cousins, and friends.
A time of visitation was
held Monday, Feb. 21, 2011
at Davis-Watkins Funeral
Home, DeFuniak Springs,
Fla., from 6 until 7 p.m.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011 in
the chapel of Davis-Watkins
Funeral Home beginning at
10 a.m. with Pastor Walter
F. Ales officiating. Commit-
tal services followed at Mag-
nolia Cemetery.

Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.
Arrangements and ser-
vices are under the direction
of Davis-Watkins Funeral
Home.


her husband, Russ Eichorn;
two sons, Travis Pollock of
Little Rock, Ark. and Rusty
Eichorn of Knoxville, Tenn.;
one daughter, Jamie King-
sley of DeFuniak Springs,
Fla.; three sisters, Patsy
Raney and husband Earl of
Hoxie, Ark., Robin Smith of
Alabama, and Nancy Pol-
lock of DeFuniak Springs;
one brother, Eddie Price of
Hoxie; and five grandchil-
dren.
A celebration of Tammy's
life will be held Wednesday,
Feb. 23, 2011 at Davis-Wat-
kins Funeral Home, 1474
SR-83 North, DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32433, begin-
ning at 5 p.m. with Chap-
lain Jim Vail officiating.
Flowers are being accepted.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.

Arrangements and ser-
vices are under the direction
of Davis-Watkins Funeral
Home and Crematory.


Burgess and husband Ron
both of DeFuniak Springs;
one brother, Pete White and
wife Ann of Dothan, Ala.;
mother-in-law, Ruth Shel-
ley of DeFuniak Springs;
three sisters-in-law, Cindy
Anderson and husband Sam
of Samson, Ala., Laura Pe-
terson and husband Steven
of DeFuniak Springs, and
Bonnie Ard and husband
Ronnie of Samson; 12 nieces
and nephews; and numer-
ous great nieces, nephews,
and friends.
A time of visitation was
held Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011
at Davis-Watkins Funeral
Home. Funeral services
were held Sunday, Feb. 20,
2011 at Cornerstone Church
in DeFaniak Springs begin-
ning at 3 p.m. with Brother
Ronnie Ard and Pastor Doyle
Redwine officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Magnolia
Cemetery. Flowers were
being accepted, or in lieu
of flowers, donations may
be made to St. Jude's Chil-
dren Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38101-
2151, or the Alaqua Animal
Refuge, 914 Whitfield Road,
Freeport, FL 32439.

Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.
Arrangements and ser-
vices were under the direc-
tion of Davis-Watkins Fu-
neral Home.


George H. Beardsley. 92.
passed away peacefully Feb.
16, 2011 at his residence in
Fort Walton Beach, Fla.
George was born Feb. 22,
1918 to Claud Adelbert and-
Cardella Hardin Beardsely
in DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
George was a retired Chief
Warrant Officer serving in
the United States Air Force.
Serving in World War II, he
was shot down over Belguim
and escaped. He was also in
the Korean War and worked
for NASA as a communica-
tion and electrical engineer.
He was a life member of
the Retired Officer Asso-
ciation, Gulf Coast Seagulls
RV Club and a member of
Wright Baptist Church.
He is survived by his lov-
ing and devoted wife of 47
years, Bertha A. Beards-
ley, of Fort Walton Beach;
daughters, Frances A. Curry
and husband Logan of Lake
Helen, Fla., Connie B. Mal-
lard of Longwood, Fla., Phyl-
lis E. Seymour and husband
Rev. Douglas of Santa Rosa


Ramey
Mrs. Mary Allen Ramey,
96, passed away Friday,
Feb. 18, 2011. She was born
March 30, 1914 in Mount
Airy, Ga. to John and Min-
nie Edwards Allen.
Mrs. Ramey was a resi-
dent of DeFuniak Springs.
She attended Pleasant Ridge
Baptist Church. She was a
devoted wife, mother, grand-
mother and great grand-
mother. She was a very tal-
ented homemaker and cook.
Mrs. Ramey is preceded


Mr. Earl Burkett, 76,
passed away Thursday,
Feb.17, 2011. He was born
Feb. 25, 1934 in Samson,
Ala. to Burt and Alice Spann
Burkett.
Mr. Burkett was a resi-
dent of Darlington, Fla. He
was Holiness by faith and a
member of the Outreach for
Christ Church in Darlington.
He worked in the logging in-
dustry for many years. He
enjoyed hunting, fishing
and playing the guitar. He
dearly loved spending time
with his grandchildren and
his great grandson.
Mr. Burkett is preceded
in death by his parents; one
son, Jackie Wayne Brannon;
three sisters, Sybil Webster,
Vivian Dukes, and Hilda
Dillard; and two brothers,
Morris Burkett and I.D.
Burkett.
Mr. Burkett is survived by
his loving wife of 55 years,
Minnie Louise Burkett of
Darlington; one son, Ronald
Burkett and wife, Rose, of
Sunny Hills; two daughters,
Teresa Cook and husband,
Owen and Joe Ann Murphy
and husband, Winston, all
of Darlington; four brothers,
H.T. Burkett of Pensacola,
Fla., Billy Burkett and wife,
Carol Sue of Darlington,
Duncan Burkett and wife,
Sheila, of Paxton, Fla., and
Carl Burkett of Frostproof,
Fla.; two sisters, Thelma
Alford and Lavelle Spires,
both of Darlington; seven
grandchildren, Kimberly
Cook, Melissa Cook, Brandi
Murphy, Aron Murphy, Ron-
ald Burkett, Shawn Burkett


Beach, Fla.: son. Franklin
G. Beardsley and wife Su-
sie of McCalla. Ala.; sister's;
Altha L. Paschal of Sanford,
N.C., Gracie Ruth Skipper
and husband Courtland of
Summer Field, Fla.: sister-
in-law; Gladys Beardsley of
Greer, S.C.; grandchildren,
Douglas R. Seymour Jr.,
Simone Archer, Robert Sey-
mour, Valerie Beardsley,
Angela Carpenter, Jeffery
Breadsley, Jessica Pranch-
er, Steven Carpenter, Brian
Mallard, Scott Mallard and
Robin Beardsley, as well as
18 great-grandchildren. Mr.
Beardsley was predeceased
by his first wife, Jessie.
A time of visitation was
held Friday, Feb. 18, 2011
and a funeral service Satur-
day, Feb. 19, 2011 at 2 p.m.
at Emerald Coast Funeral
Home. Rev. Danny Adkin-
son officiated.
Expressions of sympathy
may be viewed or submit-
ted online at www.emerald-
coastfuneralhome.com


in death by her parents, her
loving husband of 67 years,
Roy Ramey; one son, Al-
lan Ramey; four brothers,
Charles Hubert Allen, J.
Lee Allen, Edgar Allen and
Sherman Allen, and three
sisters, Belle Ayers, Lois
Meritt and Iola'Warren.
Mrs. Ramey is survived
by her daughter, Andrea
R. Steelman of DeFuniak
Springs; one daughter-in-
law Dianne Ramey; three
grandchildren, Jennifer
Benghuzzi and husband,
Dean, Stephen Steelman
and wife, Stephanie and
Ron Steelman and wife,
Stacy and four great-grand-
children, .Joshua, Jordan,
Stephen and Samantha.
Graveside services were
held Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011
at Leonia Cemetery with
Dr. James Johnson and Rev.
Owen Smith officiating.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, sign guest
book, and view video tribute
at www.clary-glenn.com.
Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home was entrusted with
the arrangements.


and A.J. Bradley and one
great-grandson, Trey Mc-
Dougald.
Funeral services were
held Monday, Feb. 21, 2011
at Outreach for Christ
Church with Revs. Curtis
Manning and Franklin Pen-
ny officiating.
Pallbearers were Corey
Webster, Kevin McDougald,
Teddy Parker, Teddy Wil-
cowski, Toby Burkett and
Jody Burkett.
Burial followed in the
Darlington Methodist
Church Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, sign guest
book, at www.clary-glenn.
com.
Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home is entrusted with the
arrangements.


Sims
Mrs. Ruby Jane Sims, 67,
passed away Monday, Feb.
21, 2011. She was born-
Nov. 19, 1943 in DeFuniak
Springs, Fla.
Mrs. Sims was a resident
of DeFuniak Springs. She
was Methodist by faith. She
enjoyed going to yard sales
and collecting photos of her
grandchildren and great
grandchildren.
Mrs. Sims is preceded
in death by her parents;
one daughter, Jenny Lynn
Hammond, and one brother,
Charles Wesley.


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Mrs. Sims is survived by
her loving husband, Ronald
Sims of DeFuniak Springs;
two sons, Stephen Richard
and wife, Donna, of Vidor,
Texas and Daniel Richard
and Tina Odom of DeFuniak
Springs; five grandchildren,
Danny Richard, Debra
Richard, Stephen Richard,
Jr. and wife, Alexis, Kevin
Richard and wife, Melanie,
and Cory Hammond, and
four great-grandchildren
Layla, Kallie Rae, Kristeona
and Braylnn.
A time of visitation will be
held 6-8 p.m., Wednesday,
Feb. 23,2011 at Clary-Glenn
Funeral Home, 230 Park
Avenue, DeFuniak Springs,
FL 32435.
Funeral services will be
held 10 a.m., Thursday, Feb.
24, 2011 at Clary-Glenn Fu-
neral Home Chapel with
Rev. Louis Taunton officiat-
ing.
Burial will follow in the
Hatcher Cemetery.
Friends and family may go
online to view obituaries, of-
fer condolences, and sign a
guest book, at www.clary-
glenn.com
Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home is entrusted with the
arrangements.


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THE DeFUNIAK SPRING FEBRUARY 24. 2011


March 5

Cricket Lee to be performing at

Harmony Fellowship Church


Harmony Fellowship
Church will be hosting a
gospel sing featuring Crick-
et Leelfrom Dothan, Ala. on
March 5 at 6:30 p.m.
Directions to the church,
take U.S. 331 N, turn on to
Williams Road go about 3.3
miles to Adams Road, turn
right onto Adams, go about
9/10 of a mile to church. U.S.
90 turn onto CR-1087 in the
Mossy Head area go to Wil-
liams Road, turn right onto
Williams about 2.8 miles to
Adams Road, turn left onto
Adams go 9/10 of a mile to
church. From CR-1087 out
of New Harmony turn left
onto Adams Road and go
9/10 of a mile to church. For
more information, call (850)
834-2017.


Black History Celebration at


Macedonia Missionary BC


The Macedonia Mis-
sionary Baptist Church of
Argyle, Fla. will celebrate
their annual Black History


program on Saturday, Feb.
26 at 6 p.m. Their speaker
for this occasion will be the
Rev. Terrence Bulger of


Panama City, Fla.
Rev. Willie E.Brown Sr.
and congregation cordially
invites everyone.


Union Springs Missionary Baptist

Church youth to host car wash


The Union Springs Mis-
sionary Baptist Church
youth ministry will have a
carwash on March 5, 2011,


from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at
Advance Auto Parts in De-
Funiak Springs at the inter-
sectionof U.S. 90 and U.S.


331-S.
Donations will be accept-
ed. All donations will go to
the youth ministry.


Union Springs Missionary Baptist Church

youth ministry announces car wash fundraiser


'Union Springs Mission-
ary Baptist Church youth
ministry will have a Krispy
Kreme Doughtnut fund rais-


a.m. to 11 a.m. Items can be
pickup at that time in the
church's kitchen area.
Union Springs Mission-


ed at 416 Rail Road Street
in DeFuniak Springs.
All donations will be used
to send youth to different


Sing event on Feb. 26 from 9 ary Baptist Church is locat- Christian events.'

Homecoming at Solid Rock Community


CRICKET LEE
CRICKET LEE


Riverside Gospel Church to Church scheduled for February 27


host sing and dinner


A sing and dinner will
be held on the grounds at
Riverside Gospel Church on
Feb. 26 beginning at 4 p.m.
There will be special
entertainment featuring


Wayen Carroll and Family,
Rayond Spencer and Fam-
ily, and others. Dinner will
be served after the sing.
Riverside Gospel Church
in located in Darlington on


the corner of 181E and Cook
Road behind the fire sta-
tion.
For more information call
(850)491-1500.


Solid Rock Community
Church will be having Home-
coming on Sunday, Feb. 27.
Sunday School starts at 10
a.m. with Bro. Carl Redmon


bringing the message at the
11 a.m. service.

Fresh Anointing from An-
dalusia, Ala., will be singing


in the afternoon, starting
about 1:30 p.m.
Pastor Larry Murphy and
congregation invites every-
one to attend.


Habits In Holy Living
BY REV. DR. G. CHARLES SATTERWHITE,


"You talk a whole lot
about Jesus," an interview-
:-er said to me. I was glad to
hear this remark, for talking
"a whole lot about Jesus" is
my intention. He continued,
"But when are you going to
talk about the gospel?" That
is when my face fell like
ice-cream sliding off a cone.
I couldn't give him an an-
swer, because for me, Jesus
himself is the good news of
the Christian gospel.
Just what was it that my
interviewer wanted to hear
that he considered "the gos-
pel"? I think (this is my best
guess) that he wanted me to
use my pen and platform to
give some type of revivalistic
altar-call. I think he wanted
me to talk exclusively about
how we get to go to heaven
when we die. That wvas his
definition of "the gospel."
I'm guilty of serious over-
simplification here I know,
but for many believers, the
gospel is a "get-out-of-jail-
free" card. It is a heavenly
bus that carries the beloved
over the horizon of death
into glory-land, and Jesus
is reduced to being the bus
driver or the ticket agent.
Now, hold your fire (and
your fiery emails); I'm not
saying there are no pearly
gates or that there is no
heavenly dimension to the
gospel. I'm just saying there
is more to it than that. The
gospel is more than an in-
surance policy whereby one
has to die to enjoy its ben-
efits. The gospel is for today
as well.
The good news that Jesus


SPAGHETTI
SUPPER

First United Meth-
odist Church Youth
of DeFuniak Springs
will host a spaghetti
supper on Saturday,
March 5. Spaghetti
suppers will be $5 per
plate from 5:30 8 p.m.
in the fellowship hall.
Everyone welcome!


proclaimed in the deserts
of Palestine was not one
that simply got people into
heaven; it was one that got
heaven into people. "Do you
want to go to heaven when
you die" was not his invita-
tion. His invitation was "The
kingdom of God is at hand.
Follow me."
It is awfully easy for we
who are Christians to get
distracted from this, but
Jesus did not say "Follow a
particular church denomi-
nation, pastor, or preacher."
He did not say, "Read the
Romans-Roads, walk the re-
vival aisle, and pray the pre-
printed, scripted prayer."
He did not say, "Memorize
the Creeds and go to Sun-
day School or attend Cat-
echism." He said, "Follow
me."
The essence of Christi-
anity is not the baking of
our pies-in-the-sky or some
hoped-for rescue lest we are
Left Behind.Its core is not
the Ten Commandments,
the New Testament, or the
interpretations of today's
Christian leaders. The crux
of Christianity is Christ. All
these others things well-
intended as they may be -
should point us to him, not
distract us from truly fol-
lowing him.
Think of it like this: When
I was young I had a little
Brittany Spaniel named
Max. Max was loving, ener-
getic, smart, and apparently
suffered from Attention-Def-
icit-Hyperactivity-Disorder.
He was so excitable and ea-
ger he couldn't stay focused


on anything. He probably
would have benefited from
some doggie-Adderall.
What I remember most
about Max (and your dog
may do this too) is what
happened whenever I tried
to teach him a new trick.
Say I threw a ball for Max to
retrieve. What was he doing
at the time? Not paying at-
tention; no, Max was chas-
ing a butterfly or eyeballing
the neighbor's cat, or in the
split second it took to throw
the ball he had gnawed the
tires off my dad's car. He
was always distracted.
I would go over to him
and point at the ball, know-
ing, that if he would just see
it just once he would go
get it. "Max, get the ball!" I
would say, and then I would
wildly shake and point in
that general direction. But
where would Max look? Ex-
asperatingly, he would al-
ways look at the, end of my
finger, and never get an eye
on the ball.
Let's not lose sight of
what is most important. If
we are focused on anything
except Christ, then we are
focused on the end of the
finger. Look beyond these
pointers to the One who is
the beginning and end of
our faith. Look to the One
who is the very definition of
the gospel.
Ronnie McBrayer is the
author of "Leaving Religion,
Following Jesus." He writes
and speaks about life, faith,
and Christ-centered spiri-
tuality. Visit his website at
www.ronniemcbrayer.net.


Ybur StUtirr Far Life!

QucdiFi 4&abdftUfiumiCMAEst

The Land and the Book

L.l -J6I Ih iftilj *iM d it.,ibJ .i H I
J~, &wip %mt ,. ffi1 -iy j, m ,-, ,,ll i, ,,


Spiritual leaders do not
have an easier path to holi-
ness than anyone else. Spir-
itual growth doesn't come
more easily just because I'm
a pastor.
Like all believers, spiritu-
al leaders are responsible to
obey the command to grow:
"But grow in the grace
and knowledge of our Lord
and Savior Jesus Christ. To
him be the glory both now
and to the day of eternity.
Amen" (2 Peter 3:18).
The word grow is in the
present tense with an in-
dicative mood. That simply
means that we are com-
manded to be continually
growing in the grace and
knowledge of our Lord. Spir-
itual growth is not an option
or a suggestion; it's a God-
given duty.
The Means of Grace
We all know that we
should be growing in Christ,
but sometimes we forget
that God holds us respon-
sible to use the tools He has
provided for our growth.
Christians of another gen-
eration described these tools
as "means of grace."
They include reading and
meditating on Scripture,
praying,, fasting, attending
corporate worship, and cel-
ebrating the Lord's Table.
Today we usually call
them "spiritual disciplines."
We might also consider
them "habits of holiness,"
but whatever description we
prefer, our regular partici-
pation in them is essential
to our spiritual growth.
For example, Peter com-
manded us to long for the
milk of the Word:
"So put away all malice


and all deceit and hypocrisy
and envy and all slander.
Like newborn infants, long
for the pure spiritual milk,
that by it you may grow up
to salvation" (1 Peter 2:1-2).
Let's be" clear: Spiritual
disciplines are not given as
a means of achieving some-
thing for God. They are,
rather, the means of receiv-
ing something from God.
We do not read our Bi-
bles and pray to meet God's
needs, any more than a
child eats three meals a day
to meet his parents' needs.
Children eat because they
are hungry and will die if
they don't.
But a child is dependent
on parents' provision and
preparation of the food.
A wise mom knows how
to make nutritious meals
tasty, and a wise dad turns
mealtimes into celebrations.
Food then becomes not only
a means for growth but also
a source of gladness.
The same is true of spiri-
tual disciplines. They make
.us grow, but they also bring
us pleasure, because our
wise Father seasons our
spiritual food with the spic-
es of joy and delight.
Let's focus on our rela-
tionship to Scripture. As you
read the following passages,
ask yourself if you find the
same measure of delight in
God's Word as these writers
did.
The precepts of the Lord
are right, rejoicing the
heart.... More to be desired
are they than gold, even
much fine gold; sweeter
also than honey and drip-
pings of the honeycomb.
Moreover, by them is your


servant warned; in keeping
them there is great reward
(Psalm 19:8-11).
In the way of your testi-
monies I delight as much as
in all riches. I will delight
in your statutes; I will not
forget your word. The law of
your mouth is better to me
than thousands of gold and
silver pieces (Psalm 119:14,
16, 72).
Your words were found,
and I ate them, and your
words became to me a joy
and the delight of my heart,
for I am called by your
name, O LORD, God of hosts
(Jeremiah15:16).
But what if we do not
have this joy? The problem
is not with the Bible; it's
with us. If we have lost our
delight in God's Word, it's
because we have spoiled our
appetite by feasting too long
on the world's junk food.
Habits of Holiness
The goal of spiritual dis-
ciplines is to help you form
new habits that will keep
you oriented to the Lord
Jesus and His Word. Ev-
ery Christian who has ever
grown to great stature spiri-
tually had to develop habits
of holiness.
The particular forms
they take vary from person
to person. One person may
have his quiet time in the
morning, another in the eve-
ning. One may meditate on
one verse in the Bible daily
while another may read ten
chapters. Some may use a
prayer list; others may not.

What matters most is that
we each build daily prac-
tices to help us bask in the
light of God's presence.


Keep Your Eye


on the Ball


By Ronnie McBrayer


ChrhNws&Eet


PAGE 7-B


i


o
J -rjh~L









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,2011


*Growing WMrt Amenria'


NATIONAL
TIRE
BROKERS
CORP
829 Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
Tires, Brakes,
Alignments & Auto Service
850-892-5191
1-800-252-2888


TAYLOR Pu-


Air Conditioning & Electrical Incorporated

Sales, Service & Installation
(850) 892-3955


684 North 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433


DANNY TAYLOR
President


The DeFuniak Springs

Herald-Breeze

your source for local news!

Published Weekly On Thursdays


850-892-3232


II i


.. .* ,.

I *H SL^ 1 .


TAYLORS A/C & ELECTRIC, INC.
LIC'S RM0048225
RG00048207-ER00015 892-3955
---------------------- I~-----------------------------
AMERICAN AIR SYSTEMS LLC
Reliability, Comfort & Performance.
LIC. RA0064836 892-2804
POLAR CAPS AIR CONDITIONING
AND HEATING SERVICES
LIC# RA0066940 850-834-5075


PLATTS APPLIANCE REPAIR
4410 US HWY 90 W
892-4670
:,: RON'S APPLIANCE
REPAIR AND PARTS
i:CALL 850-689-1007 OR 850-305-8515


:MAGNOLIA TERRACE ASSIST. LIVING
5209 HWY 331 S, DeFUNIAK
' 850-892-8348 ALF#10903


SREV. PA. EVANS ASTROLOGER
h Spiritual Consultations, Astrological
Charts, Readings. Call 850-892-3217


BRYANS USED CARS
1133 HWY 90 W DFS
DEWITT BRYAN 892-7148


SLAY'S SALVAGE PAYS CASH FOR
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & SCRAP
METAL. 850-956-2870
(pdl thru 5/11/10


NATIONAL TIRE BROKERS
829 HWY. 90 WEST, DFS
892-5191
.....................................................
ROCKMAN'S AUTO CENTER
WRECKER SERVICE
BEHIND SUBWAY 892-5015


RANDEL'S BARBER SHOP
US HWY 83 DFS
892-1011 (fn)


RV SITE,
WATER, ELECTRIC, SEWER, CABLE
892-7229

HICKS' CARPET CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
892-2623


OKALOOSA WALTON CHILD CARE
HRS & UNITED WAY
892-8560

0 --
QUALITY WORK
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
850-956-2213
(pd lthu 2/19/11)
-----.-..-.-..-....--....-..-....----.---------------
ABLE CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS
Replacement Patios, Stamp Concrete,
Different Types Of Pavers, Bobcat,
Military/Senior Discounts, LICENSED
AND INSURED. FREE ESTIMATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA 461-6733


Construction WE SPECIALIZE IN
SMALLER JOBS. HAULING, BACKHOE
WORK, DRIVES. ETC. LAWRENCE & SON
892-3873
ADDITIONS, REMODELING &
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, PAINTING,
DRYWALL, SIDING & WOOD ROT
850-685-7008
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES
(PDTHRU 1/2/11)
......................................................
BEST RATES!
Need New Roof, Home Remodel, or
New Construction. Call Paul Rushing.
We do the work, you reap the rewards.
Licensed & Insured in Florida
Call (850) 401-1537 or (850) 892-3334
PALM CONSTRUCTION CO. OF
WEST FL. NEW CONSTRUCTION,
ADDITIONS, REMODELS, DOOR &
WINDOW REPLACEMENTS, POLE
BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, No Job
Too Small. 850-259-0398 CGC1508332


SOCIAL SECURITY CLAIMS
HANDLED APPEALS EXPERTS
DISABILITY CONSULT. (850) 835-2163


; NEW & USED BOOKS TRApE-INS BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
DOWNTOWN ON BALDWIN & 6TH 1943 U.S. 90 E
TUES.-SAT. 10-5, 892-3119 850-892-3299
(PD THRU 3/11)


LAND ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL
PH. 850-892-3639 FAX. 850-892-6326


FIREWOOD FOR SALE U PICK UP
OR WE DELIVER. 850-401-4478
OR 850-685-0916


WOOD, CARPET, TILE.
REPAIR, INSTALLATION 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE. 865-2524 (12-18-lp)


D.S. HANDYMAN SERVICE
CALL 419-4519
ANYTIME (ic)
35YEARS
CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE
850-956-2213. HURRICANE REPAIRS.
(PD THRU 2/19/11)


VANN CARPENTRY & HOME REPAIR:
BIG & SMALL JOBS, MOBILE HOME
'REPAIR, ADD ONS, PATIOS/
PORHCES. LIC. & INS.
892-9467
Huke Sping
HOUSEKEEPING DAILY, WEEKLY, AND
DEEP CLEANING. CALL
SUSIE WILLIAMS 850-259-0404


HEALTH INSURANCE
BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD
Mac McClenahan 850-231-6225
(Pd thru 12/25/10)


C&C LANDSCAPING LLC
Irrigation, Bobcat Work, Pressure
Washing. 850-585-0403 Lic. & Ins.


RODNEY'S LAWN SERVICE.Total lawn
maintenance. Serving Walton Co. over
10 years. 850-974-6972, 850-834-3925
JOHNSON'S LAWN SERVICE
GENERAL CLEAN UP/REASONABLE
CELL: 259-6318 PH: (850) 834-2200
.........--------------------------------------------
M&M LAWN CARE. Free Quotes &
Reasonable Rates For Residential
850-401-4482/850-419-0014
-----------------------------------------------------


BEAR CREEK CREATIVE SERVICES
Landscaping, Lawn Maint., Tractor Work,
Land Clearing, Fencing, Lic. & Ins.
892-4423 OR 865-2848
------.----------.-.---..--.----------....-..-------
D.S. LAWN CARE
FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE &
PRESSURE WASHING. 850-419-4519.
------------------------- -------------------
ADVERTISE HERE!
3 Lines
$10 per month
892-3232


SUNBELT CREDIT
LOANS FOR ANY REASON
850-892-9504 (CTFN)


MOBILE/RV LOTS FOR RENT
WATER, GARBAGE PICK-UP
892-2157 (205) 441-0464 (tc)


BEST RATES!
STOR-RITE MINI STORAGE
1599 83 N, DFS, FL
Behind Roehm Pre-School
Free lock with rental
Call (850) 892-3334 or (850) 830-8868
(CrFN)
----------------------------- ---------------------
THARP & SONS MINI STORAGE
HWY.90 & NORWOOD
892-6035 24 HOUR SERVICE (CTFN)
A-1 MINI STORAGE
1154 US HWY 90W
DFS (850) 892-4677 (CTFN)



SUNDOWN INN
NEWLY RENOVATED ACROSS FROM
WAL-MART (850) 892-9647 DFS


JEMCO PLASTERING INC.
892-5524
QUALITY IS OUR GOAL



FANCY NAILS 10YRS EXPERIENCE
NAIL & TOE GET A FREE EYEBROW
WAX. FRENCH TIP WITH GEL $35 -
NOW $25. EYEBROW WAXING/
PEDICURE CHAIR 931 US HWY 331
(850) 892-0466 M-SAT. 9-7


LANGLEY'S OFFICE SUPPLY
1027 S.19TH STREET
892-9776


BARLEYS UTILITY SERVICE
1943 U.S. 90 E
850-892-3299
(PD THRI 3/H1)


JOHN DANILOW, BROKER
httpJ//www.johndanilow.com
(850) 217-8104 (c)


SOUTHERN ROOFING
ALL TYPES RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
LIC. #CCC058016 956-4325
ROOFING: NEW ROOF, REROOF &
REPAIRS. SHINGLES AND METAL.
CCC1327250 CALL 850-685-7008


AA AUTO SALVAGE
442 CTY HWY 1087
MOSSY HEAD 850-892-3256


WINDHAM SEPTIC SERVICE, INC.
67 JOE CAMPBELL RD.
835-3356
----------------- ------------- 7---------------
ARNETT SEPTIC
LOCATED AT 1101 HWY 90 W
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS &c()


BONDS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
(850) 951-1118
Hot Water Hydro Jetting, Drain Snaking,
Video Pipe Inspection, Plumbing Repair
FL State Cert. Plumbing Contractors
Lic.# CFC1427405/CFC026554
(pd thru 5/29/10- c)


AL'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
REPAIRS*TUNE-UPS*OVERHAULS
FREE Pickup & Delivery 850-892-7887


MAKE YOUR EVENT SPECIAL
HIRE "THE LIL' TROLLEY"
CALL (850) 865-7050 FOR PRICES


STUCCO, PLASTERING, STONE,
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PAGE 8-B


lv-


9 .









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 2011





SSports


Paxton Boys

Eliminated

10B


PAGE 9-B

Sports News and Notes:

Dunwald Takes Second

12B


F


Graceville edges out PDL in girls' basketball regional semifinal


By REID TUCKER
Ponce de Leon's girls'
hoops team, local power-
house squad that it is, found
its match in the Graceville
Tigers, who edged out the
Lady Pirates with a 52-
48 win in the Region 1-2A
semifinals.
Despite felling Graceville
in the playoffs last year
49-45 in their only previ-
ous postseason contest, two
of the losses in PDL other-
wise sterling 2010-2011 re-
cord, which stands at 25-4,
came in contests against
Graceville, including one
just a month ago. The semi-
final matchup, which played
out on Tuesday, Feb. 15, in
Graceville, showed signs
from the get-go of being a
similarly close call as Ponce
de Leon's shooters struggled
at the outset.
Only sisters Hillary and
Ashley Harper and Kait-


lynn Carroll put points
on the board in the first
quarter for the Lady Pi-
rates. Graceville's Jessica
McClendon scored on two
buckets and sophomore Zay
Henderson netted a pair of
threes, one with 50 seconds
showing on the clock. The
combination of McClendon's
daunting presence under the
rim and Henderson's accu-
rate 3-point sniping proved
troublesome for PDL for the
duration of the game, espe-
cially with Jasmine Flock
running into foul trouble by
the end of the period.
PDL rallied back despite
going into the second quar-
ter down 12-8, with Hillary
Harper leading the way with
a trio of field goals and a
free-throw. McClendon was
fouled toward the end of the
period but whiffed on both
shots from the free-throw
line and Hillary Harper got


the rebound, ran back and
scored on fade-awaV hook-
shot to tie the game at 23-all
at halftime. Shalea Yates,
Jaicee Mayo and Carroll
added to the tally to help
Ponce outscore Graceville
15-11 in the quarter.
The third quarter was
Graceville's turn to stage a
comeback, though the team
had to do it without much
help from McClendon, who
got in foul trouble after scor-
ing just once from the char-
ity stripe. The Tigers trailed
by five points during most of
the quarter as Harper and
Carroll pounded out a string
of 2s with four minutes to
go and a 3-pointer less than
a minute later, putting
the Lady Pirates up 35-30.
Graceville closed within two
points by the end of the pe-
riod, going five-for-six from
the floor.
The Tigers tied it up at
35 within the first 20 sec-
onds of the fourth quarter
and went up by four points
with a little more than six
minutes to play as McClen-
don again took to the floor
and promptly put up a pair
of field goals. Her biggest
competitor on PDL's side
was Flock, also back in the


game after sitting out most
of the first half. Flock scored
six points from the floor
but only went four-for-10
from the free-throw line, a
troubling fact considering
Graceville was not only the
more active (and accurate)
team from the floor but also
from the line.
The Tigers were forced
to bench their post players
when they fouled out in the
fourth quarter, but Ponce
de Leon would get no closer
than 47-43 with two min-
utes to go. Five critical free
throws later, Graceville ran
out the clock on a 52-48 win
and a berth to the state final
four.

Very hoarse after the
tense contest, Graceville
head coach Jon Habali said
it was anybody's game right
down to the closing mo-
ments, especially after the
close second and third quar-
ters showed Ponce de Leon
came to win just as much as
the Tigers. He said it was a
team effort that allowed his
squad to reclaim the lead late
in the game and to hang on
until the end. Furthermore,
he said it's that kind of de-
termination that the Tigers


will need if they're commit-
ted to winning a state title.
"No individual did it by
themselves," Habali said.
"I'm proud of every single
one of them. I didn't know it
was ours until we had a four:
point lead with two seconds
to go. [Ponce de Leon is] the
best team we've beaten all
year. They don't quit and
it shows. But we had a goal
all along to make it down to
Lakeland. We want to go for
a title."
The Tigers will travel to
Mayo to contest for an entry
into the state final four.
As for the Lady Pirates,
head coach Tim Alford said
he was proud of the team
but conceded that the pres-
sure got to the team. He said
the symptoms of that pres-
sure, giving up some big free
throws and failing to pounce
on Graceville's offense when
it ran into foul trouble, is
what ultimately cost Ponce
the win. Nevertheless, the
effort on the part of the
whole team was apparent
and Alford said that counts
for a lot.


"I love those kids," Alford
said. "They just came up a
little short tonight. The ef-
fort was there, we just lost
our composure. We had op-
portunities but we just got
kind of overcome by the
moment. I thought we'd be
ready but it didn't work out
for us tonight."
Hillary Harper led all
scorers with 20 points and
Flock was right behind her
with 12 points. Top scor-
ers for the Tigers were Mc-
Clendon, with 17 points,
and Henderson, who scored
10. The Lady Pirates will
lose two seniors next sea-
son: Shalea Yates and Hil-
lary Harper, who finished
her high school career with
1,169 points.
PDL is now 32-17 in the
state playoffs in 19 appear-
ances. Alford ends his 16th
season as head coach with
a record of 350-136 at PDL.
The Pirates have won 20
games in 12 of his 16 sea-
sons as coach. PDL won the
state championship in 1988-
89 and 1999-2000 in Class
A.


--'-.-




JASMINE FLOCK scored the majority of her 12 points
from the free-throw line after running into foul trouble early
on. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


PDL'S ASHLEY HARPER went head-to-head with
Graceville's Zay Henderson throughout the Region 1-2A
semifinal matchup, played Tuesday, Feb. 15, in Graceville.
(Photo by Reid Tucker)


HILLARY HARPER took the ball to the basket on sev-
eral occasions during the regional semifinal contest against
Graceville. Harper wrapped up her high school career with
1,169 points scored. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


Paxton Girls Fall at FAMU


By PATRICK CASEY
A slow start coupled with
a late FAMU charge allowed
the Baby Rattlers to defeat
the Paxton Lady Bobcats on
Feb. 15 by a 58-48 margin in
a second round Class A bas-
ketball playoff contest.
The Bobcats fell behind
12-5 after one quarter of play
as the visiting team could
hit only 1-of-9 shots in the
opening period while suffer-
ing seven turnovers. FAMU
took advantage as freshman
center Lakaris Salter scored
half of the Rattlers points
in the opening frame as the
home team used their size
advantage to grab several
offensive rebounds in build-
ing the lead.
FAMU held the advan-
tage for most of the first half
as they took a 26-18 lead
into the locker room despite
committing 14 fouls in the
first half of play. Paxton's
woeful 4-of-19 shooting from
the floor in the first half was
helped by making 8-of-14
free throws to stay within
reach of a second-half come-
back.
The Bobcats made their
move in the third quarter as
they hit 7-of-12 shots with
senior Krysten Cuchens
providing 11 of her 20 points
in the period to take a 38-36
lead into the fourth quar-
ter.
FAMU, battling foul trou-
ble, spread the floor in the
third period to run the clock
while trying to avoid pick-
ing up fouls on defense. The


strategy worked in shorten-
ing the game, but cost the
Rattlers the lead as Paxton
began to make shots from
the field.

The fourth quarter turned
FAMU's way early as back-
to-back steals were convert-
ed for lay-ups to give the
home team the lead back.
The Rattlers forced eight
turnovers in the final period
while Paxton could man-
age only 4-of-11 shooting to
close out the contest.
Salter led the way in the
contest for FAMU's offense
as she scored 29 of the Rat-
tlers' 58 points, dominating
inside while canning three
shots from behind the arc to
mix in a perimeter game.
Paxton's Alyssa Dupree
scored six of her 13 points in
the final quarter but 21 turn-
overs on the night proved
too much for the Bobcats
to overcome as their season
came to an end at the Rat-
tlers' hands for the fourth
time in the last seven years.
FAMU (19-9) was able to
hit 22-of-52 shots from the
field on the night as they
were able to grab several of-
fensive rebounds to extend
possessions. Jazmine Jones
added 13 points as the only
other Rattlers player in dou-
ble figures.
Paxton (25-3) got six
points from Rebecca Fer-
reira and five from senior
Magen Adams in the loss.
Game Notes: Paxton
holds a 33-15 record in the


state playoffs in 19 appear-
ances with four state cham-
pionships (1986, 1994, 1996,
1997). The game marked
the final contest for seniors
Magen Adams, L.A. Ander-


son and Krysten Cuchens.
FAMU advanced to the Fi-
nal Four in Lakeland with
a 61-40 victory over Gaines-
ville Oak Hall on Saturday
night.


PAXTON'S ALYSSA DUPREE(24) converted this shot
for two of her 13 points against the Rattlers. (Photo by Pat-
rick Casey)


FAMUPULLED OUTA CLOSE CONTEST with a fourth
quarter rally that got 29 points from center Lakaris Salter
to help the host squad advance to the next round. (Photo by
Patrick Casey)


PAXTON SENIOR KRYSTEN CUCHENS(25) led the
Bobcats with 20 points as their season came to an end with
a 25-3 mark. (Photo by Patrick Casey)









PAGE 10-B THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE. THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 24.2011


Paxton Boys Eliminated


By PATRICK CASEY
The Paxton Bobcats could
not overcome a poor second
half as the FAMU High Baby
Rattlers ended the visiting
team's season with a 49-28
win in the opening round of
the Class A boys basketball
playoffs on Thursday (Feb.
17) night in Tallahassee.
Paxton stayed even with
the District 2 champions for
a half of play as the score
was tied at 9-9 after one
quarter and 18-18 after 24
minutes of the contest.
Paxton was able to stay
with the host squad despite
committing 18 turnovers as
FAMU could hit only 6-of-26
shots in the first half in a
very defensive contest.
The Rattlers, who had a
significant height advan-
tage in the post, chose to
double-team Paxton guard
Shaq Jackson for most of
the game, limiting his op-
portunities to drive to the


basket as he had to settle
for long jumpers for most
of the night. Jackson, who
in his final game scored 17
points, was able to connect
from long range in the first
half but saw his shooting
fall off in the second half as
the Rattlers worked to push
him further away from the
basket for more difficult
shots.
The Bobcats hit 7-of-15
shots from the field in the
first half to help overcome
the poor ball-handling that
cost them several shots at
the lead in the opening 16
minutes of play.
FAMU senior center Jor-
dan Warner scored eight
of his 14 points in the first
half as the Rattlers used a
deliberate, half court style
of offense to slow down the
game and keep Paxton from
getting many second-chance
opportunities on offense.
The game got away from


Paxton in the third quarter
as FAMU took a 30-23 lead
after 24 minutes of play. The
Bobcats went ice-cold from
the floor, making only three
field goals the entire second
half while FAM1U hit shots
from the interior while mak-
ing 13-of-20 from the free
throw line to pull away for
the win.

Paxton center Chad Zes-
sin got in foul trouble in the
second half and had only
two points in the game while
Josh McLaney could not find
his shot in scoring only two
points. Jackson was double
and triple-teamed when
he approached the basket,
leaving the Bobcats with
few options to put points on
the board. Mason McCor-
mick scored five points on
the night and was the only
other Bobcats player to hit
a shot from the floor in the
second half other than Jack-


son.
Jackson did all he could
to keep the Bobcats in the
game but could not over-
come a solid game plan by
the Rattlers to keep him out
of the lane.
The loss ended the Bob-
cats' season with a 23-5 re-
cord while Jackson finished
his senior year with 715
points scored, one of the
highest single season scor-
ing outputs in Walton Coun-
ty basketball history. Jack-
son's 1,944 points scored in
104 games averages out to
18.7 points per game and a
98-18 record for the Bobcats
during his four years of play
at the school.
Team Notes: Had Shaq
Jackson not been injured
during his sophomore year,
he would have likely chal-
lenged former Walton bas-
ketball player Davonn
Fields' 2,209 points scored
for what is believed to be
the county record. The
FAMU contest was the fi-
nal game for seniors Shaq
Jackson and Josh McLaney.
Jeff Bradley ended his 13th


season as head coach and is
believed to hold a 262-125
record at the school. Paxton
made its 16th appearance in
the state playoffs and holds
a 16-14 record in 30 games.
Paxton will not have to face


FAMU High next season as
the Bobcats move into the
rural Class A as member of
District 1 along with Beth-
lehem. Poplar Springs, Cen-
tral. Laurel Hill and Ma-
lone.


PAXTON SENIOR GUARD SHAQ JACKSON(3) scored
17points in the 49-28 loss to FAMU High on Thursday night
but the Bobcats could manage only 10 points in the second
half of play. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


PAXTON STAYED EVEN WITH FAMU High on Thursday night in the first half of play
as the Bobcats defense forced poor shooting by the home team. (Photo by Patrick Casey)


........... lIA I R 11 | il if l *-:
FAMU MADE 13-of-20 free throws down the stretch to pull away from Paxton in the
opening round of the Class A boys basketball playoffs. (Photo by Patrick Casey) .


Freeport gets burned by Holmes County in Region 1-2A quarterfinals


By REID TUCKER
' Holmes County turned
up the heat on Freeport's
boys' basketball team, de-
feating the visiting Bulldogs
by a blistering 79-53 in the
Region 1-2A quarterfinals
: Freeport, still seething
over a close 60-54 loss to
Baker for the district title,
had to contend with the Blue
Devils' 6-foot-8 sophomore
weapon, Chris Walker, who
literally bounded over the
Bulldog defenders. Walker
scored 21 points by half-
time, accounting for roughly
half of all points scored by
the Devils in the first two
quarters before going on to
tally 27 total points on the
evening. Freeport (18-10)
hung with Holmes Coun-
ty (23-4) through the first
quarter of the game, played
Thursday, Feb. 17,in Boni-
fgy, but quickly fell behind
in ensuing periods and nev-
er threatened thereafter.
Freeport coach David
Burke said the plan going


into the game was to neu-
tralize Walker, who Burke
said "was just about guaran-
teed to get 20 points." How-
ever, the Bulldogs' defensive
presence visibly diminished
when senior point guard
Dalton Morrison got in foul
trouble early on, which all
but unraveled Freeport's
plans at containing Holmes
County's heavy hitter.
"We were going to front
Walker and put a lot of
pressure on him," Burke
said. "Our game plan was to
limit him to 15 or 20 points
and make the other guys
beat us but when Dalton got
in trouble we never really
recovered.from that."

The situation looked grim
for Freeport at the onset, as
the Bulldogs sprang to an
early 5-0 lead only to have
the Blue Devils go on the
rampage, scoring 10 unan-
swered points and running
up the score to 16-5. Mi-
chael Graziani accounted


for a 3-pointer and a pair of
layups, though his only help
came from a smattering of
goals from Colin Myrick and
Morrison. Walker's size ad-
vantage helped him score
eight points under the goal
(despite missing on three at-
tempts to dunk).
Things got even worse for
the Dogs in the second quar-
ter, as Holmes County went
on a 22-14 scoring binge,
running up the deficit to
43-28 at the intermission.
Walker scored three more
2-pointers and he also nailed
seven shots from the charity
stripe for a total of 13 points
in the period, again around
half of the points scored by
his team in the period. The
best Freeport could manage
was a 3 and a perfect four-
for-four from the free-throw
line by Graziani, though
Gabe Moore did tally a
brace of 2-pointers in his
only score of the game.
The Bulldogs' woes should
have been, in theory, allevi-
ated by limited appearances
by Walker in the third and
fourth quarters, but the re-
ality of the situation was
that they had their worst
scoring period yet, dropping
to 58-39 by the end of the


third. Despite Morrison's
return, Graziani scored only
seven points in the second
half and Myrick just eight.
Walker slammed home two
dunks within three minutes
in the fourth quarter to so-
lidify Holmes County's claim
to the eventual 26-point
margin of victory.
In spite of Holmes Coun-
ty's convincing win, Burke
said a Freeport victory had
not been out of the question
had the team shot the ball
better.
"Our last two or three
games we haven't shot the
ball very well," Burke said.
"I don't know if the kids are
tired or worn out or sick or
whatever but we just haven't
played very well. I thought
we might have had a chance
to win but we would have
had to shoot extremely well
and played good defense.
We would have had to play
a very good game to beat
Bonifay because they are a
very good team."
The numbers tell the sto-
ry: Graziani, with 22 points,
was top scorer for Freeport
but otherwise only Myrick
among the rest of the team
got out of digits with 11
points. Holmes County's


situation was similar, as
the bulk of the load was car-
ried by Walker's 27 points,
but only two members of
the Blue Devils' roster did
not score and three players
scored nine points or better.
Historically, Holmes
County has beaten Freeport
in eight out of the squads'
last 12 meetings. Further-
more, the Bulldogs are 5-6
in seven appearances in the
state playoffs. Freeport has
also not won a boys' bas-
ketball playoff game on the
road since the 1967-68 sea-
son in which the team won a
state title.
However, changes are on
the way for the Bulldogs, as
the team will graduate se-
nior point guards Morrison
and Graziani, who finished
his high school basketball


career with 1,046 points,
but nine players will return.
Statewide district restruc-
turing will also bring with it
two new competitors, Chip-
ley and Bonifay.
Burke, undeterred by the
loss to the Blue Devils and
encouraged by the Bulldogs'
prospects for the future, said
the rearrangement could be
a great opportunity for a
team comprised of experi-
enced players.
"I have a good group of
kids coming back next year,"
Burke said. "Hopefully we
can make another run, but
who knows with the new dis-
trict lineups they're coming
out? With that, everything
will be new. We'll have a lot
of seniors coming back and
they'll have a lot of experi-
ence to draw on."


HOLMES COUNTY'S high-flying Chris Walker gave
Freeport a devil of a time, scoring 27 of his team's 79 points,
the majority of which he got in the first half. (Photo by Reid
Tucker)


SENIOR POINT GUARD DALTON MORRISON, an in-
MICHAEL GRAZIANI was Freeport's top scorer in the tegral part of Freeport's defense, got in serious foul trouble
contest against Holmes County. He accounted for 22 points early in the game and saw limited action throughout the Re-
of the Bulldogs' 53. He averaged 19 points per game during gion 1-2A quarterfinal matchup. He nevertheless had an im-
his final season on Freeport's varsity hoops team. (Photo by pact, as the Blue Devils had difficulties converting on layups
Reid Tucker) when he was in the game. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


I
---








PAGE 11-B


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24.2011


Area tennis recap


South Walton's girls
claimed a 7-0 win over Wal-
ton on Feb. 15 as Brooke
Durden, Jessie Taylor,
Teryn Akridge and Elaine
Khoo each won their re-
spective matches 8-0. The
Seahawks' doubles teams of
Taylor-Coker and Akridge-
Khoo also claimed 8-0 wins.
The Seahawks boys de-
feated Walton by a 6-1 mar-
gin. Riley Colton, Jay Vice,
Cole Weinstein and Bret
Nesbitt each notched wins
in singles play for the Sea-


Scoring
Name
Shaq Jackson
Collin Myrick
Michael Graziani
Dalton Morrison
Shane Seeger
Shafer Martin
Tanner Degafferelly
Josh McLaney
Chad Zessin
Deshun Tucker
Eddie Pomante


School
PAX
FRE
FRE
FRE
SW
SW
SW
PAX
PAX
WAL
WAL


hawks while South Walton's
doubles teams of Colton and
Taylor Goodson and Vice-
Nesbitt also won.
Walton's No. 2 singles
player, Jeremiah Johnson,
registered the Braves lone
win.

Girls: South Walton defeat-
ed Walton 7-0.
Singles: 1. Brooke Durden
(SW) defeated Elizabeth
Evans 8-0; 2. Jessie Taylor
(SW) defeated Andrea Pin-
con 8-0; 3. Caroline Coker


GP
28
18
28
28
16
26
26
28
28
26
25


PTS
715
347
532
474
202
320
318
329
301
277
255


Free Throw Shooting (Min. 48 Att.)
Name School FT/FTA
Marcus Bradley PAX 41/56
Josh McLaney PAX 73/101
Shaq Jackson PAX 109/158
Henry Griffin PDL 41/64
Shafer Martin SW 36/57


Team Free Throw Shooting
FT/FTA
Paxton 347/559
South Walton 227/410
Walton 188/339
Freeport 312/571
PDL 238/455


Team Records
Paxton
Freeport
Walton
South Walton
PDL


AVG
25.5
19.3
19.0
16.9
12.6
12.3
12.2
11.8
10.8
10.7
10.2


AVG
73
72
69
64
63


AVG
62 percent
56
55
55
52


23-5
18-10
11-15
10-16
2-22


(SW) defeated Karmel Teves
8-1; 4. Teryn Akridge (SW)
defeated Caroline Manning
8-0; 5. Elaine Khoo (SW)
defeated Abbv Williamson
8-0.


Doubles: 1. Taylor/Coker
(SW) defeated Evans/Pincon
8-0: 2. Akridge/Khoo (SW)
defeated Teves/Manning
8-0.


School Sports

Calendar

Thursday- Feb. 24
Freeport at South Walton Tennis 3 p.m.
Emerald Coastat Freeport Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Paxton Middle School Baseball at Bethlehem 4 p.m.
Seaside at Walton Middle School Baseball 4 p.m.
Seaside at Walton Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Freeport Softball at Baker 4/6 p.m.
Walton at Freeport Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Paxton JV Baseball at Bethlehem 6 p.m.
Walton Softball at P.C. Bay 6 p.m.

Friday- Feb. 25
Freeport Middle School Softball at Chipley 4 p.m.
Paxton at PDL JV Baseball 4 p.m.
Paxton at PDL Middle School Softball (DH) 4 p.m.
Northview at Freeport Softball 4/6 p.m.
Sneads at South Walton Softball 4/6 p.m.
Walton at Laurel Hill Softball 4/6 p.m.
South Walton at Freeport Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Walton Baseball at Baker 4/6:30 p.m.
Walton Middle School Softball at Marianna 4:30 p.m.

Saturday- Feb. 26
Freeport and South Walton Track in P.C. Bay 10 a.m.
Paxton Middle School Softball in Poplar Springs Tourney

Monday- Feb 28
Walton Middle School Baseball at Davidson 3:30 p.m.
Chipley at Freeport Middle School Softball 4 p.m.
Holmes Co. at Freeport Softball 4/6 p.m.
Walton at Chipley Softball 4/6 p.m.
Baker at South Walton Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Altha at PDL Baseball 5 p.m.

Tuesday- March 1
Freeport Tennis at Rocky Bayou 3 p.m.
Pensacola Catholic at South Walton Tennis 3 p.m.
Marianna at Walton Middle School Softball 3:30 p.m.
Central at Paxton Softball 3:30/ 5 p.m.
Freeport Softball at Jay (DH) 4 p.m.
Walton Middle School Baseball at Chipley 4 p.m.
Baker at PDL Softball 4/6 p.m.
South Walton Baseball at P.C. Bozeman 4/6 p.m.
South Walton Softball at P.C. Bozeman 4/6 p.m.
Baker at PDL Baseball 4/6:30 p.m.
Walton Baseball at P.C. Arnold 4/6:30 p.m.
Vernon at Freeport Middle School Softball 5 p.m.


Boys: South Walton defeat-
ed Walton 6-1.

Singles: 1. Riley Colton (SW)
defeated Tray Virgin 8-0: 2.
Jeremiah Johnson (W) de-
feated Tyler Goodson 8-4;
3. Jay Vice (SW) defeated
Hunter Gainey 8-0; 4. Cole


Weinstein (SW) defeated
Thomas Brannon 8-1; 5.
Bret Nesbitt (SW) defeated
Brady Davis 8-1.
Doubles: 1. Colton/Goodson
(SW) defeated Virgin/Gain-
ey 8-1; 2. Vice/Nesbitt (SW)
defeated Johnson/Brannon
8-2.


AREA 5 GIRLS

BASKETBALL FINAL STATS

2010-11 Season


Scoring
Name
Dannica Mosher
Samantha Snider
Taliah Moore
Alyssa Dupree
Krysteri Cuchens
Hillary Harper
Jasmine Flock


School
FRE
SW
WAL
PAX
PAX
PDL
PDL


GP
23
26
23
28
28
30
26


Free Throw Shooting (Min. 46 Att.)
Name School FT/FTA
Dannica Mosher FRE 96/137
Sam Snider SW 105/150
Hillary Harper PDL 49/72
Alyssa Dupree PAX 70/105
Krysten Cuchens PAX 45/68
Sha-Lea Yates PDL 60/95
Jasmine Flock PDL 48/77
Taliah Moore WAL 50/81


Team Free Throw Shooting
FT/FTA
Paxton 209/334
Freeport 189/335
South Walton 309/563
PDL 264/482
Walton 160/314


Team Records
Paxton
PDL
South Walton
Walton
Freeport


PTS AVG
418 18.2
443 17.0
359 15.6
392 14.0
374 13.4
399 13.3
292 11.2


AVG
70
70
68
67
66
63
62
62


AVG
63 percent
56
55
55
51


25-3
26-4
17-9
14-9
11-13


Team Offense: Points Per Game
South Walton 60.4
PDL 51.9
Paxton 50.5
Walton 50.0
Freeport 41.0


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AREA 5 BOYS

BASKETBALL FINAL STATS

2010-11 Season


I


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Sports News and Notes: Dunwald Takes Second


By PTI'RICK CASEY
South Walton senior Jus-
tin Dunwald finished second
in the 160-pound division in
the Class A wrestling tour-
nament in Lakeland this
past weekend, posting a 3-1


record in the event. Dun-
wald ended his career with
164 victories for South Wal-
ton, the most wins in school
history, while improving on
a third place finish in 2010.
He ended his senior year


with a 45-4 record as he
lost to Clay High School's
Casey Soileau in the final by
a 15-9 decision. Soileau had
finished as the runner-up in
2010. Teammate Jay Gatto
won his opening match but


dropped his next two as
he was eliminated in the
152-pound weight class.
The 2011 University of
Alabama football team will
return to the practice fields
March 21 and conclude


spring drills with the an-
nual A-Day Game on Sat-
urday. April 16, at Bryant-
Denny Stadium at 2 p.m.
Admission will again be free
to the public and further de-
tails on television coverage


WALTON SWEPTA PAIR of junior varsity baseball games from South Walton on Sat-
urday, picking up 13-0 and 4-2 victories. (Photo by Gary Woodham)


WALTON PUT THE BALL IN PLAY on Saturday as the
Braves junior varsity scored 17 runs in two games. Wal-
ton travels to Freeport on Thursday with the junior varsity
starting at 4 p.m. followed by a varsity contest at 6:30 p.m.
(Photo by Gary Woodham)


__Sacred Heart Guild to host

Golf Expo and clinic at Kelly
Plantation March 5


THE SOUTH WALTON BASEBALL TEAM will play at Freeport on Friday afternoon
with the junior varsity playing at 4p.m. followed by the varsity contest at 6:30 p.m. (Photo
by Gary Woodham)


NWFSC Brain Bowl Team qualifies

for state tourney competes Feb. 25, 26


NWFSC BRAIN BOWL TEAM. Andrew Dovin, Ryan
Adams, coach, back row (l-r); Jesse Schober, captain, Bob
Burkart, coach, Sarah Hooper and Shannon Mosley, front
row, (l-r).

2010-11 FINAL GIRLS

BASKETBALL STANDINGS


*Paxton
!Bethlehem
Laurel Hill
Central
Poplar Springs
Rocky Bayou



*PDL
Freeport
!Baker
Jay
Northview
Pens. Christian



*Graceville
!Holmes Co.
South Walton
Cottondale
Blountstown
Sneads
Vernon
P.C. Bozeman



P.C. Bay
Walton
*Pens. Catholic
!P.C. Arnold
Marianna
Chipley


CLASS A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
W L W L
12 0 25 3
8 4 8 14
6 6 10 15
6 6 12 11
4 7 8 9
0 11 0 19

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
W L W L
12 0 26 4
6 5 11 13
7 6 11 10
6 6 13 10
4 7 6 13
0 11 0 18

CLASS 2A, DISTRICT 2
District Overall
W L W L
16 1 23 6
13 4 22 7
11 5 17 9
11 5 16 6
6 9 9 12
4 11 4 16
2 13 2 13
0 15 0 18

CLASS 3A, DISTRICT 1
District Overall
WL WL
8 3 13 8
8 3 14 9
8 5 12 16
6 7 6 19
4 7 7 13
1 10 2 18


*- District Tournament Champion
!- District Tournament Runner-Up


The Northwest Florida
State College Brain Bowl
Team recently placed third
at the National Academic
Quiz Tournament's (NAQT)
Florida Two Year Section-
al Championship held at
Chipola College in Marian-
na, Fla. The team competed
against 22 college teams
from Florida and quali-
fied to compete in the 2011
NAQT Community College
Championship Tournament,
which will be held on Feb.
25-26 in Panama City, Fla.
At the NAQT Two Year Sec-
tional Tourney, the NWFSC
team finished with a 5-1 re-
cord during the preliminary
round, which placed them
into the Championship
round robin.
During this round, the
team was pitted against two
teams from the host school,
Chipola College, two teams
from Valencia Community
College in Orlando and one
team from Pasco-Hernando
Community College.
The NWFSC team fin-
ished the round with a 4-1
record. Their combined re-
cord placed the team third
overall. Team members
include: Andrew Dovin of
Shalimar; Sarah Hooper of
Destin; Shannon Mosley of
Fort Walton Beach and Jes-
se Schober, tear captain, of
Freeport.
The NWFSC Brain Bowl
competes on college-level
questions in the areas of nat-
ural science, social science,
humanities, and mathemat-
ics. Openings are available
for new team members who
are enrolled for at least six
credit hours at NWFSC and
scholarships are available.
For information, contact
Ryan Adams at adams5@
nwfsc.edu or by phone at
(850) 729-5348.


Men, women and senior
golf enthusiasts are invited
to join the Sacred Heart Hos-
pital Volunteer Guild for the
sixth annual Golf Expo and
clinic at Kelly Plantation on
Saturday, March 5 from 2
to 6 p.m. The event includes
equipment demonstrations
by leading golf club mak-
ers and the opportunity to
participate in presentations
to improve a person's golf
swing.
Always a great event for
golf enthusiasts and novices
alike, this year's Golf Expo
features special presenta-
tions by Rob Strano, director
of Golf Instruction at Kelly
Plantation Golf Club, and
Chip Holcombe of Cleveland
Golf, on the short game,
wedge play and proper gap-
ping of clubs. The 2011 Golf
Expo will feature Cleveland
Golf/Srixon's Launcher Ul-
tra Light Driver powered
by Milazaki shaft. The Golf
Expo has become recognized
as a terrific event to receive
tips and free targeted "mini
lessons" helping golfers im-
prove their game. Golfers
are encouraged to check
swing speed on a launch
monitor, test drive the new-
est clubs and get a swing
fundamentals check up.
Participants will have an
opportunity to participate in
skill contests and drawings
featuring several thousand
dollars worth of golf, din-
ing and equipment prizes.
Skill contests include long
drive, featuring categories
for men, senior men, women
and senior women; closest to
the pin; pitching; and put-
ting. Participants will also
have an opportunity to bid
on silent auction items, in-
cluding sports memorabilia,
golf merchandise and more.
The Sacred Heart Hospi-
tal Guild is a group of more
than 300 area residents who
volunteer in many depart-
ments of Sacred Heart Hos-
pital on the Emerald Coast.
The Guild also operates the
hospital gift shops and con-
ducts fund-raising activities
throughout the year.
Funds raised purchase
special capital equipment,
assist underserved residents


with mammogram tees, and
provide scholarships to stu-


dents seeking degrees in
health care. Since the Guild
was established in 2002,
65 scholarships have been
awarded to area students.





High School

Basketball

Scores


Tuesday- Feb. 15
FAMU High
Paxton Girls


Graceville
PDL Girls


Thursday- Feb. 17
FAMU High
Paxton Boys

Holmes Co.
Freeport Boys


along with events surround-
ing A-Day will be released
at a later date. The Crimson
Tide football team is sched-
uled to begin spring prac-
tice on the Monday follow-
ing spring break. UA will
practice a total of 15 times
culminating with the spring
game. Other than A-Day,
practices are closed to the
public. Alabama's Pro Day
is set for March 9.
The University of Flori-
da football team will open
spring practice on Wednes-
day, March 16, and hold the
annual Orange & Blue De-
but on Saturday, April 9 at
12 p.m. The Orange & Blue
Debut will be streamed on
GatorVision and carried on
the Gator Radio Network.
Sun Sports broadcast de-
tails will be announced at a
later time.
Contact Patrick Casey at
The DeFuniak Herald with
your local sports notes at:
heraldsports@aol.com.


High School

Baseball

Scores


Tuesday- Feb. 15
South Walton
Rocky Bayou

Thursday- Feb. 17
P.C. Arnold
South Walton

Friday- Feb. 18
Holmes Co.
Freeport

Vernon
Walton


High School

Softball

Scores


Tuesday- Feb. 8
P.C. Bay
Freeport

Friday- Feb. 11
Holmes Co.
Freeport

Tuesday- Feb. 15
P.C. Bozeman
Walton

Thursday- Feb. 17
P.C. Arnold
Freeport

Vernon
South Walton

Friday- Feb. 18
South Walton
Graceville


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THE DeFLNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011


t