The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00364
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Publication Date: December 30, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
System ID: UF00028316:00364
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Full Text





The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888




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VOLUME 121 NUMBER 52 3 SECTIONS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010 750 PER COPY


JANUARY


SEARCH AND RESCUE was part of the New Year's
morning routine when Walton County Sheriff Office dep-
uties and South Walton Fire Department paramedics re-
trieved a Georgia man from chilly waters after his boat cap-
sized. James Henson of Marietta, Ga., was duck hunting in
his 14-foot john boat in choppy seas on the east side of the
Clyde B. Wells bridge on U.S. 331 when his boat began to
sink and then overturned. A WCSO boat as used to get to
Henson, who was found floating motionless in his lifejacket.
Henson was transported the the emergency room of Sacred
Heart on the Emerald Coast and later released.

COURT RULES against Jolly Bay PUD appeal. Florida's
First District Court of Appeal affirmed a lower court deci-
sion that had stated that Walton County's denial of the Jol-
ly Bay planned unit development (PUD) project had been
in accordance with due process of law, met essential legal
requirements, and was supported by competent substantial
evidence.

LEIGH GRANTHAM stepped in as the new CEO of
CHELCO. Grantham took over as the chief executive office
and general manager on Jan. 1 following the retirement
of Gene Smith. During the 18 years Grantham has served


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THE BUDGET approval process was a particularly tense
one in 2010, with the economic downturn putting the pinch
on both county government and citizens'pocketbooks. (Photo
by Dotty Nist)


with CHELCO, she help positions in human resources, and
as director of corporate services, general manager, vice
president of marketing and administration, and chief oper-
ating officer.

A 24-HOUR MANHUNT ended with an arrest on Jan.
2 after deputies from the WCSO located Willie Foreman
Jr. in the Woodlawn community following the arson of his
ex-wife's vehicle and her home. Mary Foreman said her ex-
husband had just set her pickup truck on fire; which was
only a few feet from the house. Oxygen tanks inside the
vehicle reportedly then exploded. The flames spread to the
home and within a short time the entire structure was ful-
ly involved. No one was injured, but the home and vehicle
were both a total loss.

WEATHER DID little to deter 75 individuals from tak-
ing the plunge in the Gulf of Mexico on Jan. 1. The fourth
annual Polar Bear Plunge was held behind the Watercolor
Inn and has become a unique way for citizens to start off
their new year. This number of this year's participants was
larger than the last and entire families participated in the
swim. Hot chocolate was served after the swim and partici-
pants were able to purchase a T-shirt commemorating their


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chilly experience.


WALTON COUNTY Animal Shelter opened for busi-
ness. The Walton County Board of County Commissioners
(BCC) announced that the Walton County Animal Shelter
as opened for use on Jan. 4 2010. Construction of the build-
ing was begun in October 2008 after a long site selection
process.The shelter can be reached at (850) 892-8758.

A 12-YEAR-OLD CHILD was taken into custody shortly


after pointing what turned out to be a toy gun at a conve-
nience store clerk in north Walton County. The store clerk
said the young man pointed a wood barreled, long gun at
her and demanded money from the cash register. After
handing the man the money, the clerk said, "he then said
thank you before leaving the business." A Walton County
Sheriffs deputy patrolling in the area saw the suspect
walking north on U.S. 331. The young man attempted to
run before being stopped and handcuffed by the deputy.

See REVIEW 2-A


MILITARY MEMBERS from each branch of the service unveiled the Veteran"s memo-
rial, at a Veterans Day ceremony for the new monument in Freeport. (Photo by Jeffrey Pow- NORTHWEST FLORIDA State College and the community celebrated the opening of a
ell) new location in early 2010 for the college in south Walton County. (Photo by Dotty Nist)


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PAGE 2-A '


REVIEW


Authorities found the stolen
money and toy gun just off
U.S. 331. The Department
of Children and Families as
contacted and assisted the
WCSO in the investigation.

OPERATION VALLEY
VIEW meth bust yielded
multiple suspects for Wal-
ton County law enforce-
ment. The nine month oper-
ation culminated in a series
of pre-dawn raids across
the Florida Panhandle and
southeast Alabama. The
main portion of the investi-
gation took part in the Val-
ley View community of east-
ern Walton County. Walton
County Sheriff Mike Adkin-
son said 'hundreds and hun-
dreds" of hours of work went
into the investigation.

RED CROSS opened a
shelter in DFS. With re-
cord breaking temperatures
in the Panhandle, the Red
Cross opened a cold weath-
er shelter at the DeFuniak
Springs Community Center.
The shelter opened at 5 p.m..
in the afternoons and closed
at 8 a.m. in the mornings.


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


FROM PAGE 1-A


The shelter was scheduled
to be open for less than a
week and only to cover the
record lows, "We opened the
shelter for one of two rea-
sons...either because other
shelters are full or people
can't get the distance to the
other shelters, the latter be-
ing the reason we open this
one in DeFuniak," said Jer-
ry Kindle, CEO of the Red
Cross of Northwest Florida.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL
approved a controversial
apartment complex to be lo-
cated on Shoemaker Drive in
DeFuniak Springs. The Ar-
bours at Shoemaker brought
our scores of residents in
protest against the three
year in the making complex.
Residents complained that
traffic through the area was
already congested and the
original plan was not for
low-income housing but for
luxury town-home units.
The residents also expressed
concerns about the possible
rise of crime in the area and
of their property values be-
ing lowered by lower-income


housing in their area. Some
of the confusion came from
the property changing hands
from multiple owners and
through at least one land-
use change before a new de-
veloper started working on
the property. The Council
approved the construction
in a narrow 3-2 vote with
conditions.

REPRESENTATIVES
FROM VARIOUS state
agencies and organizations
met in DeFuniak Springs
last week for a panel discus-
sion of the issues related to
the new federally mandated
water standards for the
state. The meeting was held
one day prior to the official
announcement of the so-
call "nutrient runoff pollu-
tion" standards established
by the Environment Protec-
tion Agency (EPA).The new
standards are more rigid
than those previously put
into place by the Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Protection. According to the
study, none of northwest
Florida's three main rivers
currently meet the new fed-
eral standards.

NWFSC SOUTH WAL-
TON center opened its doors


to residents and students
this month. More than 150
community leaders gathered
Jan. 14 to formally open the


newest location of the college
at the new center located off
U.S. 331 South. The college
also dedicated the Allyn C.


Donaldson Entrepreneurial
Institute, which is housed

See REVIEW 2-A


Paxton Town Council and Dixie



Youth League agree to play ball again


By REID TUCKER
The Paxton Town Council
wrapped up a year's worth
of city business by voting
unanimously to approve the
renewal of the interlocal
agreement with the Paxton
Dixie Youth League.
The Council members
have on several occasions
voiced concern over some
practices of the league's
management, which alleg-
edly included leaving lights
on at the park after game
times and running air con-
ditioning temperatures
lower than necessary. Since
the city pays for water and
lights at the park (though it
reserves the right to termi-
nate payment at any time
with a 30 days' notice), it
was of utmost concern to
councilman Charles Cook,
the newly appointed head
of the city's parks and rec-
reation, that newly elected
Dixie Youth President Matt
Mitchell address these is-
sues at the Town Council's


regular monthly meeting on
Dec. 21.
Upon signing the inter-
local agreement, Mitchell
told the Council members
that initiatives have been
taken to ensure that more
discipline is taken with the
facilities at the ballpark.
He said a lock box had been
installed over the thermo-
stat, to which Dixie Youth
possesses only two keys,
and the Town Council. Also,
Mitchell assured the Coun-
cil that no one, not even
league officers, will be at the
park if there is not a game
or some other league func-
tion underway.
"All I can do is the best I
can do," Mitchell said. "We
appreciate everything the
city does for us. If we didn't
have [the Council] paying
the light bill we wouldn't
be able to survive up there.
Then the communities of
Lockhart, Florala, Paxton
and Laurel Hill wouldn't
have the great facility that


we have right now."
As per the agreement, the
Dixie Youth League is re-
sponsible for cleaning up af-
ter games and paying for all
maintenance and any dam-
ages incurred to the city's
property at the complex and
must provide proof of insur-
ance to the Council.
The Council blazed
through the rest of its agen-
da, approving plans to sell
two of its older service pick-
up trucks and purchase a
trailer to haul two 150-gal-
lon tanks, one for water
and the other for fuel. The
board also voted to accept
Kelson Electric Co.'s bid for
improvements to the city's
well. The project carries a
lump sum of $15,400, but
the city will only be liable
for $3,400 of that amount
as it received a grant from
the Northwest Florida Wa-
ter Management District to
the tune of $12,000 that has
already been applied to the
cost of the renovation.


Mayor Hayward Thomas
reported to the Council that
the interior remodeling proj-
ect of the Agricultural Cen-
ter, in the works for the bet-
ter part of half a year, has
finally been completed. All
new nonslip tile has been
laid inside the building and
the mayor commended the
work done by the inmate
labor secured via the city's
partnership with the Wal-
ton County Correctional In-
stitution.
The Council concluded the
meeting following a motion
made by 'Thomas to waive


rental fees to non-profit or-
ganizations or churches for
the use of Town Hall and
the Agricultural Center.
The Council was very much
behind the proposal and the
motion was swiftly seconded
and approved when put to
the vote.
"I'm really in favor of
that," Councilman Bobby
Kemp said. "If [organiza-
tions] are not using the
buildings for no profit what-
soever and doing things for
the community, I say let
them have it as far as I'm
concerned."


SPREAD SOME

HOLIDAY CHEER WITH
GREAT DEA LS.


Eventful day for


DeFuniak Springs Police


On Dec. 17 the members
of the DeFuniak Springs
Police had an eventful day.
It started with each one of
them have their agency-is-
sued vehicles recalibrated,
and the in car radars recer-
tified. This is to satisfy the
state requirements and to
re-ensure that they are op-
erating properly.

They then gathered at
the City Marshal's Office,
at which time City Marshal
Chief Mark A. Weeks open
the scheduled semiannual
staff meeting, by welcom-
ing each one and wishing
them a happy and safe holi-
day. He went on to applaud
them on their hard work in
the 2010 year and what the
goals were for the upcoming
2011 year as he provided
each one with gifts of appre-
ciation.
Chief Weeks wasn't fin-
ished, as he handed out cer-
tificates to the recent promot-
ed members. He started out
by recognizing Lt. Tilman F.
Mears (Special Operations
Division Commander) for
his achievements over the
past few months, Sgt. Detec-
tive John D. Powers (Crimi-
nal Investigation Division)
for his dedication and hard
work, Detective Marshal J.
Dees for his enthusiastic to-


wards his new promotion to
detective. Last but not least
were the new patrol ser-
geants. The new sergeants
are: Sgt. Philip J. Austin
and Sgt. Chuwan Boros.
Chief Weeks kept the
floor a little longer as he rec-
ognized the members of the
agency and a citizen from
the community, Mrs. Ellern
Mayfield, for the food and
desserts they provided for


this event.
In closing Weeks an-
nounced once again the re-
cent retirement of Officer
Carol Skelton earlier this
year and Capt. Greg K.
Gandy's dedication to this
agency and his announce-
ment of retirement the last
'day of December 2010, which
both were in attendance and
received awards of apprecia-
tion as well.


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Ig -I


Bright House Networks Customer Notice

From time to time our agreements with cable channels and
television stations come up for renegotiation. While we do not
anticipate any loss or disruption of service, regulations require us
to notify you of the possibility of losing programming. Our
agreements with Encore, Encore Action, Encore Drama, Encore
Love, Encore Mystery, Encore WAM, Lifetime, Ehcore Westerns, El,
Style, Starz, Starz Cinema, Starz Comedy, Starz Edge, Starz in
Black, Starz Kids & Family, TruTV, Weather Channel, BBC America,
EWTN, and American Life remain in effect on a month to month
basis, but we may have to cease carriage in all formats if our
authority to continue is withheld. Current TV, FUSE, GOLF Channel,
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For more Information on Bright House Networks programming,
please call 866-876-1872 or visit our website at brlghthouse.com.

bright house IS
NETWORKS Srns Dfnl SprngHer
DeFunlak Springs Definlak Springs HerlR l


VET TECH SILVER MERCER and Commissioner Kenneth Pridgen at newly opened
Walton County Animal Shelter. A grand opening for the public was held Jan. 26.









PAGE 3-A


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW


at the center and named
in honor of Donaldson, a
Santa Rosa Beach resident
and long-time supporter of
the college's educational
and cultural programs. The
South Walton Center be-
comes the seventh instruc-
tional location in the two-
county region and its second
center in Walton County.
The south Walton devel-
opment had been almost
15 years from planning to
completion. NWFSC Board
Chair Wesley Wilkerson
told attendees, "Reaching
out and making educational
opportunities accessible has
been a key part of our col-
lege's master plan for many
years- now, it is a reality."

I WRITE THE SONGS -
30A Songwriters Festival
was a big hit with music lov-
ers along the Walton Coast-
lines. Restaurants, bars and
open-air venues were packed


FROM PAGE 2-A


of halting construction of
the city's new storage build-
ing because. without water
and with the ground already
bogged by recent rains, the
work crews could not pour
the concrete flooring ac-
cording to the council. "It's
just been so cold, the work
crews couldn't get much of
anything done on the stor-
age buildings. It's like they
lost a month of work," said
Councilman Mark Warren.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
ROTARY Club purchased a
$1,000 ShelterBox for Haiti.
In response to the cries for
help from the devastated
Haitians who were left with
massive earthquakes, local
Rotarians came together
and purchased a ShelterBox
to send to Haiti. The Shel-
terBox provided a temporary
home and needed supplies
for people who had lost ev-
erything due to the disaster.


-


lite in.te_- ..



THE CROWD GATHERED for Memorial Day services at the Gum Creek Cemetery was
one of the largest on record in the event's 15-year history. Those in attendance are seen here
listening the haunting bugle strain of "Taps, "first composed as a "lights out"call during the
Civil War. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


with high-season crowds
as local and regional music
lovers headed to CR-30A in
search of a face-to-face with
their favorite songwriters
and signers. Headliners in-
cluded the Indigo Girls duo,
Shawn Mullins, Susanna
Hoffs, Rodney Crowell and
Chely Wright. Volunteers
from the area worked over-
time to maintain the tight
schedules, dispensing tick-
ets, wristbands, and driving
directions to make the event
go smoothly. Workshops and
other educational events
were offered throughout the
weekend.

COLD WEATHER put a
stop to some public works
projects in Paxton in late
December and early Janu-
ary. Temperatures in the
teens caused breakages of
several of the city's water
lines and broken the sewage
backflow valves, resulting
in multiple instances of wa-
ter outages among Paxton
residents. The record set-
ting lows also had the effect


Instead of going to a group
facility, families can setup a
home in a safe location and
feel like they have some-
thing of their own when all
seemed lost. The temporary
homes can last for up to two
years. Each box also con-
tained food, tools and medi-
cal supplies for the family.

LOCAL KIWANIS CLUB
members organized "buckets
of blessings" for the disaster
in Haiti. They partnered
with Compassion Services
International (CSI) to pro-
vide the surviving people
of Haiti with basic food and
hygiene items and medical
relief supplies. The Kiwanis
secured 100 of the five-gallon
buckets with lids for adop-
tion. Those who adopted the
buckets were asked to fill it
with designated items for
either the family or medical
team. Item included food,
basic hygiene items, can-
dles, non-perishable snacks,
and medical items. The es-
timated cost of the buckets
were $30 for a family bucket


a local hospital before being
booked for armed burgerly
of a structure, criminal mis-
chief, and resisting arrest.

STRANDED HIKERS
FOUND safe on Eglin Air
Force Base. Two Crestview
men survived rapidly rising
floodwaters from heavy rain-
fall by climbing a tree on the
Eglin reservation. Justin
Hansen, 32, and Ray Coles
Jr., 26, were leaving their
campsite when they found
flash flood waters breaching
the banks of several tribu-
taries. Within minutes, the
water was up to their necks.
The two began climbing
trees to avoid being swept
downstream. The pair used
a cell phone to call 911 and
the Walton County Sheriffs
Office (WCSO) was able to
determine their location
using the phones GPS and
mapping feature. Due to ris-
ing waters it was difficult for
rescuers to get to the scene.
Freeport Fire Rescue, Wal-
ton County Fire and Eglin
Air Force personnel assisted


and $50 for a medical buck-
et. Once filled, the buckets
were transported to Miami
and flown to Haiti by mis-
sionaries.

SUSPECT JUMPS IN
lake to avoid DeFuniak
police. Brian Kirk Eckert
was a suspect in a reported
burglary of the DeFuniak
Springs library. A con-
cerned citizen called police
and reported hearing glass
breaking near the library.
Upon arrival, .officers with
the DeFuniak Springs Po-
lice Department saw some-
one leaving the library and
flee, on foot into the lake.
Walton County Sheriff Of-
fice deputies and Walton
County Emergency Opera-
tions workers surrounded
the lake and persuaded the
suspect to come ashore and
surrender. Officers then had
to proceed by boat onto the
lake and retrieve the suspect
from the water. Eckert was
suffering from the effects of
the cold water and was tak-
en for medical treatment to


in the rescue.

JENNA BUSH HAGER
opened the 2010 Florida
Chautauqua Assembly in a
lively, animated and educa-
tional presentation as the
featured keynote speaker.
The former president's
daughter spoke to the audi-
ence on topics such as hun-
ger, starvation, HIV Aids
and education. Hager is the
chair of UNICEF'S Next
Generation and a contribut-
ing correspondent for NBC's
Today show. Hager said she
first learned of the hunger
and starvation issues facing
many in the Latin America
and the Caribbean when
she worked as an intern for
UNICEF in 2006.



FEBRUARY

THE MUSCOGEE
CREEK Indian Nation relief
project was brought to the
public's attention through a
series of articles in The Her-
ald. The American Indian
tribe has had an ongoing
problem that reached crisis
proportions over the winter
with more than 35 children
in the Bruce community not
getting adequate nutrition
or health care according to
spokeswoman Ann Tucker.
Several local agencies lined
up to help the tribe includ-
ing the Walton County
Health Department, Angel
Food Pantry. Tri-County
Services, COPE, Children
and Family services. A food
bank and a small building
was set up to help the tribe.
The Florida Extension office
also planned on helping the
community set up a commu-
nity garden to help with nu-
trition needs.

AMORNINGMANHUNT
IN south Walton brought
out the bloodhounds and
helicopters. A homeowner
on Garden Bay Circle in
Miramar Beach observed a
person attempting to break
into vehicles. The WCSO set
up a perimeter of the area
and soon arrested Payton
Fitgerald, 19. on charges of
loitering and or prowling. A
few hours later deputies ar-
rested an accomplice. Dane
Patrick Hanlon Kemper was
arrested while driving along
an intersection of Shore
Drive and Hidden Lakes
Drive. Sheriffs investiga-
tors found tools inside the
car that are commonly used
in vehicle break-ins.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY SCHOOL District and
the Walton Area Chamber


of Commerce celebrated
the graduation of 19 future
leaders from the Youth
Leadership Walton class at
South Walton High School.
"This is not an end, but a
beginning for you to use
your knowledge, skills, and
confidence gained from this
class to become future lead-
ers in Walton County," said
Superintendent of Schools
Carlene Anderson. "I wish
I would have had the op-
portunity to take a class like
this when I was your age be-
cause I learned much later
in life how to empower my-
self through effective leader-
ship."

THE WALTON COUN-
TY DEPARTMENT of Cor-
rections (Walton County
Jail),Director Danny Glide-
well announced'the Walton
County DOC had met 100
percent of the requirements
of a highly regarded and
broadly recognized body of
corrections standards and
was accredited through
the Florida Corrections Ac-
creditation Commission on
Feb. 2. 2010. The Correc-
tions Department was the
first local Criminal Justice
agency in Walton County to
ever be accredited. Follow-
ing the presentation of the
Accreditation award. Glide-
well said, "The accreditation
assessors found our opera-
tions to be virtually flaw-
less, which is a credit to the
hard work and dedication of
the jail staff and the leader-
ship of the Board of County
Commissioners."

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS Post Office wel-
comed its newest postmas-


ter, Kelly A. Lanning on
Feb. 9. Lanning has served
at both the Fort Walton
and Crestview Post Offices
and as an officer in charge
at several other facilities.
Manager of Post Office Op-
erations Todd Smith induct-
ed Lanning into her new
position, saying, "She'll do
a great job." With friends,
family and fellow postal
workers in attendance, Lan-
ning thanked everyone in
the DeFuniak Springs Post
Office for encouraging her to
seek the position and said,
"I'm excited to be here, and
glad to work with such good
people."

TWO PEOPLE WERE
killed on Shoemaker Drive
in a traffic crash that oc-
curred at 2:37 a.m. on Feb.
7. A DFSPD officer noticed a
car traveling without head-
lights on U.S. 90 west, then
turned onto Shoemaker,
driving "at a high rate of
speed." The officer followed,
the noticed the vehicle
failed to make a curve, left
the road and struck a tree.
There were three occupants
in the crashed vehicle. The
driver was identified as Jer-
emy Leon Reed: the two pas-
sengers were Tarris Rynell
Johnson and Beronica Dawn
Thrash. All were from De-
Funiak Springs. Thrash died
at the scene. Johnson later
died at HealthMark Region-
al Medical Center. Reed was
transported to Sacred Heart
Hospital in Pensacola. Later
investigations revealed that
Reed was driving with a
suspended license and that
a warrant was out for his ar-

See REVIEW 7-A


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I ,Li rin I-tmuL-r., iI I. mes in DeFuniak Springs and Freeport
',I ,,r rn. i I... n,. .t go into the pockets of out-of-town
ir., r. ,i .r .ir I.- owned or investor backed, we don't see
rli,. .litth r,. int. t ,I. .i like family owned and operated and family
in \-r:' d tI' I', l.r ',ou will find at Clary-Glenn Funeral Homes.
clary-glenn.com
Clary-Glenn Funeral Home
230 Park Avenue DeFuniak Springs, FL (850) 892-2511
Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home
150 East Highway 20 Freeport, FL (850) 835-2511
Ifoel Glenr, LFD, Owner Paula Glenn, Owneer
adlinily


---
Army Aviation Center
=- Federal Credit Union

200 MacI Bayou Rd., Santa Rosa Beach (850) 267-2163
1421 US Hwy. 331 South, DeFuniah Springs (850) 951-2099
www.aacfcu.comI
*APR means annual percentage rate. "Autos (current and 1 year old): 3.99% APR for 48 or 60 months; 4.49% for 72 months
($20,000 or more);'5.29% APR for 84 months ($30,000 or more). Used autos: 4.99% APR for 48 months; 5.29% APR for 60 months.
Used Autos are considered 2 and 3 years old. Army Aviation Center Federal Credit Union will finance paQ. 100% of MSRP
(new) or NADA retail (used) plus tax and title on all vehicles. Offer good for a limited time and with approved credit. Certain
restrictions may apply. Offer good for new loans only to AACFCU. Contact any of our branch locations for more information.


Our low auto loan


rates lust got even


LOWER4 ,90, A Pp
for

L36 months
Longer financing
erns avol' ble. -.


ON HIS 90th BIRTHDAY, Ralph Rushing recalls time
stationed at Fort McClellan, Ala. At Rushing's 90th birth-
day party, a small group of friends and family gathered to
celebrate his life and many occupations -clerk, insurance
salesman, police officer- and a part of the Civilian Conser-
vation Corps.


I


.r,
'!;' in


--- I I









PAGE 4-A


Editorial Comment

*PERSONAL

COMMENTS

*LETTERS TO

THE EDITOR



Editorial comment



So this was



Christmas

By Assistant Editor ALICIA LEONARD


Growing up, I always heard the phrase, "slow as Christ-
mas" referring to how long it seems to take for the holiday
to roll around for the kids. Thinking back, it did seem to
take forever for Christmas to come every year. That is, un-
til I got older. Mom always said that time speeds up as we
grow older and although I'm relatively sure there is no sci-
ence experiment that will confirm it, it sure does seem to
fly by faster every year. Maybe that fleeting sense of time
is what helped this Christmas to be the best one I've had in
recent memory.
This year, there were no expensive presents exchanged,
no faraway balmy vacations on a tropical beach, no new
wheels or fancy gadgets. In their place, I mended some
fences, wiped some tears away, held some hands, hugged
some necks and surprised some friends when they were
least expecting it.
This Christmas, I visited more with family. I ate less,
thinking of those who have less. I smiled more and spoke
more often to strangers and when things got overwhelming
with traffic and shoppers, I breathed more and deeper than
before. I reminded myself, often, of my many blessings, es-
pecially while spending time with the people I love and that
love me.
I think between the 24-hour news cycle that many Amer-
icans find themselves glued to everyday telling us how out-
raged we are supposed to be, the pressure we feel from ad-
vertisers to buy more than we need and the basic struggles
we all face everyday, that we have lost what really makes
us happy or even the drive or ability to find it. The con-
stant buzz around us has separated us from the things we
love most, and in its place, the buzz tells us we have to
have more to fill up.that empty place where happiness and
contentment through our deeds to others used to dwell.
Reminds me of another phrase used often in my family, "I
never saw a hearse pulling a U-haul."
S This New Year, my resolution is simple, I'm going to take
::this gift I received this year, the gift of giving, the gift of
time, and try to keep it all year long if possible. I'm going to
:make the effort to remember that everyone has a struggle
inside of them, and they may not be at their best when we
meet. So, I will be the best I can to them, and the gift will
be twofold. We will both benefit no matter the circumstance
'of our meeting.
Give yourself a gift that will continue much longer than
your fasciation with your newest gadget, give yourself a new
lease to happiness. Treat others with respect and kindness.
Be happy and live every day as if it might be your last and
remember "no one is promised another day," as my mom
has often opined.
Kindness, love and understanding are never wasted and
are New Year's resolutions worthy of keeping in the uncer-
tain and stressful times in which we live, and during any
Other time for that matter.
Happy New Year and may you find peace, happiness and
:love in your heart in 2011.


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

HERALDIBREEZE, INC.
(USPS 149-900)
POSTMASTER:Send Form 3579 to
The DeFuniak Springs Herald/Breeze, Inc
P.O Box 1546
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
Periodical Postage Paid at
P.O. Box 1546
DoFuniak Springs, FL 32435
Telephone (850)892-3232 Fax 892-2270
email:dfsherald@gmail.com
Published weekly every Thursday
President/Publisher....Gary Benjamin Woodham

Editor.....Bruce Collier

Assistant Editor.........Alicia Leonard.

Advertising Sales Manager....... Gary Woodham

Advertising Sales......Jeffrey Powell


Herald Breeze News Staff..Patrick Casey. Ben

Grafton, Chuck Hinson. Dotty Nist. Jeffrey Powell.

Leah Stratmann, Reid Tucker, Ashley Amason.

Herald-Breeze Office Staff....Alisha Brown, Sandra

McHenry, Norma Rediker, Lisa Windham. Quinton

Woodham.

Printing Plant Foreman.....Benjamin Woodham

Pressman.... Nick Harrison


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY DECEMBER 30, 2010
^-*- ~ ~ ~~- lllll---:i


Dear Editor:


Building a sports stadium where one did not exist is a
welcome improvement during good times, but upgrading a
stadium that already exists, during hard economic times, is
irresponsible. I know, I know, money for operating schools
and money for building schools does come from different
pots. That is why America does not maintain their schools,
but lets them decay, and then tears them down and replac-
es them with brand new buildings.*Walton County School
District is no different.
WCSD board voted to spend $6.5 million, for a new Wal-
ton High School stadium, to make the stadium disability
accessible and to add some lanes to the track so we can have
track meets here at WHS. It seems, wow, what a lucrative
contract, to put in a ramp or two here and there, and tear
up some grass, and put down a couple more lanes of track.
This is what happens when it is OPM, other peoples mon-
ey, that is being spent. So, will our property taxes go up?
[The] $6.5 million could have purchased a trade school or
the necessary equipment to teach valuable needed trades.
The only downside to that argument is that making our
perfectly fine septic field ditches even bigger, and cleaning
our already clean septic tanks is what our Florida leaders
think is valuable. Life is high school, it only gets bigger.
The lessons we learn in our schools today will be the
policies of our government in the next generation. Again,
please refresh my thinking on why we even have a school


board and superintendent? It seems parents, teachers, and
the children are the only necessary participants. Children
are told what to do. Parents are not even asked, or if they
are, they have no real say, and teachers, if they do what
they know is right for the child and the parents' wishes,
they would get in trouble, with the bureaucracy, i.e. super
and board.
This brings me to my wrap up solution. Governor elect
Rick Scott is asking for solutions to cut government spend-
ing and help get government out of the way, so that 700,000
jobs can be created in the commercial world. Remember the
private sector? That is the one where you get a paycheck
that has a private business name on it, and it does not say
State of, or County of, or school district or City of. You can
give him your suggestions at http://www.scotttransition.
com/send-your-ideas/.
My all encompassing idea was to start from scratch.
Have every statute and code re-justify itself when stacked
against how it robs us of our life, liberty, property and pur-
suit of happiness. If it harms any of those four UNalienable
rights found in the Declaration of Independence, without
taking away another citizen's UNalienable rights, then re-
peal it. If Rick gets the legislature to repeal one each day,
then he will need special sessions lasting 15 years. Oh, well,
it's a start.


Randy Henning
Mossy Head


I LE TTS TOT3HEDIWTORI


Open letter from City Marshal Weeks:

Dear Businesses and Citizens of DeFuniak Springs:
Please accept my sincere appreciation and gratitude for
all of your support over the past year (2010) for the De-
Funiak Springs Police. I would like to commend everyone
for your continuing devotion to public safety in our historic
community.
I have received many comments from the businesses and
citizens of DeFuniak Springs concerning the quality of ser-
vice that we provide to each and every one of you. It has


been my pleasure, along with the men and women of the
DeFuniak Springs Police, to partner with our community in
making DeFuniak Springs, Florida a safer place to live and
work.
Again, thank you for your continued support and dedica-
tion to the Office of the City Marshal and to the DeFuniak
Springs Police.

Sincerely,
Chief Mark A. Weeks, MS
City Marshal, DeFuniak Springs


I orsN


Gov.-elect Rick Scott began his inauguration fes-
tivities Monday [Dec. 27] with an "appreciation tour" to
emphasize campaign themes to repeal job-killing regulation
and hold state agencies accountable for revving up Florida's
economic engine.Scott and his running-mate, Lt.Gov.-elect
Jennifer Carroll, were mobbed by supporters at the start
of their seven-city trek, which will fill two days this week.
They said they wanted to bring their new administration's
message to voters who wouldn't be able to get to Tallahassee
next Monday and Tuesday when they formally take office.
"Who's ready to hold this state accountable again? Who's
ready to use accountability budgeting to look at every state
agency and say, 'Why are we spending that money? Are
we getting a return for that money?"' Scott shouted into
a chilly breeze in the courtyard of the Food & Thought or-
ganic market and restaurant. About 200 southwest Florida
voters roared their approval. "We cannot continue down the
path we're going we cannot continue down the path that
Barack Obama is taking us," he said. "We're going to make
sure we change how we run the state." Scott transition ad-
visory teams last week gave him a long list of suggestions
for reorganizing and shrinking state government. They in-
cluded merging the Department of Transportation with the
Department of Environmental Protection and Department
of Community Affairs, privatizing state hospitals and con-
solidating functions of health agencies. As he has since win-
ning the Nov. 2 election in a close race with Chief Financial
Officer Alex Sink, Scott remained non-committal on specific
recommendations. In an interview aboard his jet, Scott said
he had not had time to study all of the proposals. "All I did
was to ask them to think outside the box, and a lot of people
have given us a lot of good advice," he said. The purpose of
his and Carroll's trips to Orlando and Clewiston followed
by similar stops Wednesday in the Panhandle, Jacksonville
and Miami is to thank supporters and promote the Scott
team's "Let's get to work" campaign theme. "What we're
starting here today is the broadest, most diverse inaugura-
tion put on anywhere," said Francis Rooney, co-chairman
of the Scott-Carroll inaugural committee. "We're going to
forge a path to prosperity, which is the theme of this in-
auguration." The team has raised more than $2.5 million
for the two-day bash, which features concerts and ticketed
luncheons in addition to the big parade and inaugural ball.
Scott said he looks forward to living in Tallahassee. He said
his wife, Ann, has already begun preparations for their
move. [ ] Scott and Carrroll scheduled a series of events
across the state this week to thank voters who can't make
it to Tallahassee next week for the big inauguration bash.
Scott and Carrroll will be sworn in next Tuesday, along with
the three new Cabinet officers. Scott's tour began in his
home town and continues today in Orlando and Clewiston.
He'll be in Jacksonville and Tallahassee on official business
Tuesday, then continue their tour in Fort Walton Beach,
Panama City and Miami on Wednesday. By Bill Cotterell,


Florida Capital Bureau


Florida legislators got the official go-ahead Tues-
day [Dec. 21] to start a two-year argument over redrawing
the state's congressional and legislative districts. Details
on how Florida's population has shifted internally remain
months away. Because of national population shifts, the
state gains two seats in the U.S. House. But it also means
that state lawmakers will have to draw the district bound-
aries for themselves 40 in the Senate and 120 in the
House as well as the now-27 congressional tracts. "We'll
take the show on the road and have at least 20 public hear-
ings," Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, who chairs the Senate
committee on redistricting, said Tuesday. "Also, we're going
to light up a website allowing every citizen in Florida to
have access to the same data that we're using." While Flor-
ida gets more seats in Congress, the state Legislature does
not grow. "We know we'll all be representing more people,"
Gaetz said, "but there won't be any more of us."
Gaetz said the "block by block" breakdown of population
shifts will be sent to Tallahassee in April. The 2011 session
will then be in its second half, so the data will be fed into
computers. It will all be cross-matched with voter registra-
tion and election results, so members will know who is af-
fected when they bunch counties together or split them two
or three ways. Eventually, the Florida Supreme Court and
federal courts will decide whether legislators get too self-
interested in drawing the lines. Hundreds of maps will be
haggled over by legislators and lawyers, for review by the
U.S. Department of Justice, with judges probably moving a
few lines. The 2011-12 task is complicated by a pair of state
constitutional amendments, adopted Nov. 2, requiring dis-
tricts to be as compact and contiguous as possible while not
favoring or handicapping incumbents, political parties or
potential candidates. The 1965 Voting Rights Act, protect-
ing the electoral interests of black and Hispanic voters, also
applies to Florida. Scott Arceneaux, executive director of
the state Democratic Party, said the Electoral College gain
that comes with additional congressional seats makes Flor-
ida more critical in the presidential election. Democrats are
outnumbered 2-1 in both legislative chambers, but Arce-
neaux said the GOP majority has to be mindful of the two
"Fair District Florida" constitutional amendments voters
approved last month.
"Floridians of all parties can look forward to districts that
truly reflect their communities and representation that
reflects the diversity of our great state," said Arceneaux,
"rather than the partisan gerrymandering that best de-
scribes the current districts." Senate President Mike Hari-
dopolos, R-Merritt Island, expressed confidence that Gaetz
will run "an efficient, transparent process to maximize Flo-
ridians' voice in Tallahassee and Washington, D.C." By Bill
Cotterell, Florida Capital Bureau


I LETTERS TOiTHEEDITORB^










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PAGE 6-A


.ji,
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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW


rest.

A FATHER AND SON
were arrested for aggravat-
ed battery. An Air Heart he-
licopter transported a Wal-
ton County man after being
savagely beaten outside of
a residence in the Laurel
Hill area. On Feb. 7 WCSO
deputies met with William
Gautney, 40, and his son
Joshua Gautney, 19. The
Gautneys went to a resi-
dence on U.S. 331 belonging
to Warren Simpson. Simp-
son said he and his friends,


harm.


FROM PAGE 3-A


John Matthew Mount, 36
and Tammy Poston, 41 were
watching television when
someone started beating on
the door so hard it knocked
the window out of the frame.
Simpson said a short time
later he and Mount walked
outside when they were at-
tacked by the two suspects.
Due to severe bleeding from
his head, Mount was air-
lifted for medical treatment
and evaluation. Both, father
and son were charged with
one count of aggravated bat-
tery causing great bodily


THE 4-H CLUB SPENT a day at the state capital in late
spring. They took the motorcycle and several 4-Hs from the
county and spent the day learning about the capital. It was
also Earth Day so Governor Crist came out an talked with
them about the motorcycle. In this photo, are Zachary Bes-
settee, Marvin Tweedy, Govenor Charlie Crist, Elizabeth
Evens, Donnel Goeffrion.


HANDS ACROSS THE
SAND gained nationwide
traction this month in 2010.
The demonstration of in-
dividuals linking hands on
beaches across the state
was to show opposition to
near shore oil drilling on
Florida beaches. "I just nev-
er imagined it could get this
big. The mission statement
on the Web site concerning
awareness is coming true
beyond my wildest dreams,"
said "Hands" founder Dave
Rauschkolb. CNN, NPR,
and a host of national media
covered the extremely well
attended event. More than
400 people assembled at
the beach at Seaside for the
event.

A RASH OF BURGLAR-
IES was solved over the Feb
13 weekend. WCSO depu-
ties tracked down separate
leads to burglary rings op-
erating from the beaches to
the central and north part of
the county. Paton Fitzger-
ald was arrested after he
climbed over a homeowner's
privacy fence. A few hours
later his accomplice Dane
Patrick Hanlon Kemper was
also 'arrested. The two men
were persons of interest in a
rash of vehicle break-ins in
the southern part of Walton
County. A few days later, two
Niceville men were caught
by WCSO deputies in the act
of burglarizing a home on
Bayshore Drive in Miramar
Beach. Brandon Corbitt and
Christopher Sylvester were
trying to remove a televi-
sion from the home when
approached by the deputy.
Later in the week, deputies
located a treasure trove of
stolen goods during an ongo-
ing investigation into a key
figure in the Walton area for
crystal-methamphetamine.
Deputies found everything
from stolen lawn equipment
to electronic items including
laptop computer at suspect
Billy Ray Blane's home.

LET IT SNOW. Snow
flurries excited kids of all
ages as snow fell on Walton


County on Feb. 12, 2010. The
rare sight stopped residents
and visitors in their tracks
as kids and parents went
outside to make the most
of the unusual occasion and
to try and scavenge enough
snow for a snowman. The
snow didn't last for long, but
readers of the Herald/Breeze
sent in their best snow-day
pictures to memorialize the
rare weather occurrence for
posterity.

THE FLORIDA CHAU-
TAUQUA ASSEMBLY cele-
brated 125 years of learning
with the 2010 assembly in
DeFuniak Springs. "Chau-
tauqua Still Matters After
125 Years" was the theme
for the assembly. Mayor
Harold Carpenter welcomed
guests to the assembly. Af-
ternoons with Southern Au-
thors, afternoon teas, can-
dleligh't tours, yoga on the
porch, and a series of key
note speakers rounded out
the two weekend event.

THE WEDDING INDUS-


TRY and residents agreed
to meet in a series of round-
table discussions. The dis-
cussions were organized in
response to the concerns of
representives of the indus-
try and other businesses
over a nuisance ordinance
that had been proposed by
Walton County. The ordi-
nance was in part aimed at
addressing complaints from
neighborhoods about al-
leged disturbances associat-
ed with homes in residential
areas that are rented out for
weddings and other events.
The meeting was facilitated
by Dawn Moliterno of the
Walton Area Chamber of
Commerce. The meeting was
closed to the media. Moliter-
no said that press coverage
might have hindered round
table participants from
speaking freely in order to
resolve differences between
the parties and find a com-
mon ground. The media was
invited to speak with those
that participated once the
discussion was over.


THE BOMB SQUAD RE-
SPONDED to a call in Mossy
Head on Feb. 20. The WCSO
received a report of a man
reportedly screaming at the
top of his lungs, threatening
to kill a woman and chil-
dren, or anyone who came
on his property. The caller
who lived more than a block
away, told dispatchers that
the individual had also been
shooting a gun during his
ranting. Deputies responded
to 234 East Jonquil Avenue
in Mossy Head. Deputies ar-
rested Chris Bronaugh, 52,
inside a pickup truck parked
outside the home. Deputies
found a homemade firearm,
known as a zip gun, and a
box of .410 shotgun shells.
During this time, deputies
noticed a long silver pipe
with wire hanging from
the raised hood of the Nis-
san truck. Inside the engine
compartment was an an-
swering machine with wires
going into the firewall and

See REVIEW 8-A


Mattie Kelly Arts Center Galleries New Exhibitions


For the new year, the
Mattie Kelly Arts Center
Galleries at Northwest Flor-
ida State College (NWFSC)
in Niceville will host two
new exhibitions: Beau-
vias Lyons, Association for
Creative Zoology and die
Wunderkammer-Selections
from the College's Perma-
nent Collection. Though
each exhibition is distinct in
presentation and message,
these complimenting art
shows present a well-round-
ed assortment of fascinat-
ing works and objects that
whimsically celebrate natu-
ral and creative diversity.
The McIlroy Gallery will
showcase the featured ex-
hibition, Beauvias Lyons,
Association for Creative
Zoology. Lyons is the cura-
tor of the Hokes Archives
at the University of Tennes-
see and one of the country's
leading originators of in-
tellectual satire and artis-
tic ruses. This kiosk-style
display showcases striking
prints and two- and three-
dimensional works such as


zoological prints, fabricated
'artifacts', and other unique
works that evoke scientific
specimens from the 19th
century, including works
that visually describe "zoo-
morphic juncture."
In addition to thrilling the
eye, this imaginative ex-
hibition gently encourages
viewers to consider the cre-
ation vs. evolution debate.
According to Lyons' exhibit,
the "Association for Cre-
ative Zoology was founded
in 1908 and is devoted to
appreciating the beauty of
the complex natural world
through the theory of zoo-
morphic juncture."
Running concurrently, die
Wunderkammer will trans-
form the Holzhauer Gallery'
into a cabinet of wonders
filled with exciting and var-
ied art and items from the
college's Permanent Collec-
tion, as well as works on
loan from members of the
NWFSC community.
The Mattie Kelly Arts Cen-
ter Galleries exhibitions are
free of charge and open to


the public. Gallery hours for
the exhibits are Monday to
Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m.
and 90 minutes prior to most
performances in the main


stage theater of the Mattie
Kelly Arts Center.
Please note that the Galler-
ies will be closed on Jan.14,
15 and 17 in observance of
Martin Luther King Jr. Day,


Beauvais Lyons, Coluberjeremi, lithograph.


but open for open normal 1
to 4 p.m. hours on Sunday,
Jan. 16.
For more information, con-
tact the Galleries office at
(850) 729-6044. The center


is located at 100 College
Boulevard on the Niceville
Campus of NWFSC and is
easily accessible from I-10,
U.S. 285 and SR-85, and the
Mid-Bay Bridge.


Beauvais Lyons, Trichopiscidae, lithograph.


LANDSCAPE FROM FOUR PERSPECTIVES-promises to be a superb visual experiencewith vibrant realistic images,
impressionistic imagery on venetian plaster, luminous pastels, and vivid acrylic nature scenes.


JOHN WILKERSON usually only sells cuts of the bamboo growing on his property for
use as stout fishing poles. Wilkerson has owned and operated the Glendale Memorial Na-
ture Preserve since 2002. In June, he sold nearly $4,500 worth of 15-foot bamboo poles, or
culms, to a Louisiana company that wanted to use them to push oil containment booms in
the Gulf of Mexico. (Photo by Reid Tucker)


P. ;ml ". J), I 16,j t ;. ", . . .


PAGE 7-A


. I .


..^|~ ,|
74ft^sBEBt




% sT11^ s








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30,2010


REVIEW


going to a circuit board and
fuse box. There were mul-
tiple wires coming from the
circuit board going to what
appeared to be fuel lines
and a radio transmitter. It
appeared that the suspect
had rigged the truck to be
a bomb. The suspect stated
that he rigged the truck be-
cause he was tired of people
stealing his gas. The Region
One Domestic Task Force
Bomb Squad was alerted
and arrived on the scene for
the next six hours. With the
use of a device, the suspi-
cious object inside the en-
gine unit was neutralized.
Bronaugh was booked with
manufacturing a hoax weap-
on of mass destruction and
making an explosive device.
Officers had met Bronaugh
before in 2006 when they
responded to gunfire at the
residence to discover the
suspect had shot himself in


FROM PAGE 7-A


the leg while trying to make
a zip gun.

LARGE CROWDS en-
joyed Eden's Camellia Fes-
tival and Heritage. Day.
Parking sports were at a
premium when hundreds
of visitors enjoyed getting
back to basics and learn-
ing how life was before the
luxuries of modern conve-
niences. Volunteers dressed
in period costumes as they
demonstrated candle-mak-
ing, basket weaving, but-
ter churning, soap making,
moonshining, black-smith-
ing and period games for the
kids.


MARCH

LOCAL RELIEF and
community service-based
organizations came togeth-


__ I


proved a request to apply for
infrastructure improvement
grants on 43 at the Freeport
Industrial Park in order to
avoid up-front costs to the
city. The grant covered the
construction of new roads
within the complex which
would, in time, become city
streets. The Council also ap-
proved a second reading of


the updated Comprehensive
Plan.

THE ENVIRONMEN-
TAL PROTECTION Agen-
cy's proposed numeric
water quality standards,
announced Jan. 15 but not
released until March, super-
sede and exceed the proposed
standards of the Florida De-


er to assist Walton County's
homeless population, esti-
mated to be between 500
and 750 individuals. Utili-
ties and running water are
requisite to be designated
as homeless according to
federal standards. As such,
the actual number of home-
less people who are actually
without a roof over their
heads most likely does not
exceed 50 individuals, said
Lenore Wilson, executive di-
rector of Opportunity, Inc.,
an organization that pro-
vides services for the home-
less in Okaloosa and Walton
Counties. The majority of
the aid thus far distrib-
uted has been directed at
the Muscdgee Tribe in the
northern part of the county.
The services provided in-
clude donations of sheets,
clothing, shoes, toys and
personal care products as
well as the creation of over-
night shelters, job counsel-
ing and parenting classes.

TOM COFFEE, a U.S.
Census recruiter for Walton
County, visited the Freeport
City Council in an attempt
to get help drumming up
census workers. He pre-
sented the particulars of
working for the Census on
a temporary basis, which
would cover the period from
mid-March until the end
of August. The Council ap-


apartment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP). These
standards, which regulate
excess nutrient runoff pol-
lution of the state's water-
ways, are the first of their
kind for any state in the na-
tion, which makes Florida a
kind of "testing ground" for
across-the-board federal wa-
ter quality standards, said
FDEP's Division of Envi-
ronmental Assessments and
Restoration Director Jerry
Brooks. FDEP missed the
Jan. 14 deadline to establish
standards of its own, though
he said the state's proposed
standards better fit the real-
ity of Florida's water system
than the EPA's set of regu-
lations. Brooks said the full
economic effect of the new
regulations could not be


guessed at until they came
up for approval in October.

THE WALTON COUNTY
BRANCH of Habitat for Hu-
manity's Women Build pro-
gram attracted women from
across the county to partici-
pate in the final stages of
construction of a home in
Mossy Head. Women Build
is a Habitat for Humanity
International program that
encourages women to make
a difference by building
homes in their communities.
It also provides an atmo-
sphere that allows women
to learn construction skills
they might not otherwise
have a chance to practice.

SEASIDE REPERTORY
THEATRE'S board of gov-
ernors executive committee
voted to remove Executive
Director Craige Hoover from
his position. Hoover initially
decided against signing the
letter of resignation but
later consented upon "ad-
vice of counsel." The board
declined to give an explana-
tion for their action but said
it was a "business decision."
The 2010 Rep season would
remain unchanged despite
Hoover's resignation, with
the exception of the the-
atre's production of A Tuna
Christmas, a two-man show
he produced several years
ago.

THE WALTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS approved
plans to develop a 6.36-acre
property at Lupin Beach in
the county's extreme south-
east corner. The project had
been in the works for two
years before it was finally
approved by the commission-
ers at their Feb. 23 meeting.
The development of Lupin
Beach was also to include a
dune enhancement project
costing between $500,000
and $600,000 and features
neighborhood access. The
board did not approve de-
tailed plans, instead del-
egating final approval to the
Walton County Technical
Review Committee. Con-
struction was set to begin

See REVIEW 9-A


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MORE THAN 150 people attended the 10th annual Nick's
Speckled Trout Shoot Out awards ceremony at Nick's sea-
food restaurant on Monday, June 7. The gathering was the
culmination of a nine-day tournament dedicated to Nick's
founder Frank A. Nick (old man Nick). This years Shoot
Out attracted 118 anglers from throughout the area. Jason
Taylor (1) and Haleigh Sallee entered four fish in the shoot


I


PAGE 8-A


<)C









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


BROTHERHOOD RIDE PARTICIPANTS arrive at the Ten-8 facility in DeFuniak
Springs. The Brotherhood Ride annually honors firefighters killed in the line of duty. Funds
raised are donated to families of the fallen. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


REVIEW


Nov. 1.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUN-
CIL heard the first read-
ing of a proposed ordinance
changing the position of
City Clerk to an appointed,
rather than an elected posi-
tion. The Council set March
22 as a public hearing date
for the possible change and
authorized advertising for
the position, with a special
election scheduled to take
place on April 13. If voters
decided to make the position
an appointed one, a new
clerk will not be appointed
until the newly-elected clerk
fulfills his year of service on
the job. The Council also
unanimously approved an
interlocal agreement with
Walton County to provide
sewer services to the Wal-
ton County Jail. Finally, Or-
dinance 783, which amends
the city's land development
regulations, met with the
Council's approval when put
the vote.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY SCHOOL DISTRICT'S
2010-2011 master calendar
was approved by the school
board at its regularly sched-
uled March 3 meeting. The
new calendar concedes a few
compromises, chiefly a short
nine-week summer (June 9
Aug. 12) allowing the first
semester of school to wrap
up before Christmas break.
Superintendent of Schools
Carlene Anderson said this
is crucial to avoid losing
critical FCAT prep time.
The bbard also attempted
to resolve a back-and-forth
land purchase encroach-
ment issue with local prop-
erty owner Bruce Butts,
who rejected the board's of-
fer of $16,500 per acre for
his 9.3-acre property. Butts'
counter offer of $17,400 per
acre was not approved by
the school board members.
Anderson said the only op-
tions remaining open were
mediation or litigation,
though the latter was not
her preference.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
became one of the first law
enforcement agencies in
northwest Florida to make
automatic patrol rifles stan-
dard equipment. All sworn
WCSO personnel were is-
sued AR-15 patrol rifles,
160 of which were procured
through a federal grant se-
cured by the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement.
WCSO personnel had to
complete a 20-hour training
class including daylight and
nighttime shooting before
being issued their rifles.

PAULA HAMILTON, of
Freeport, participated in an
experimental adult stem cell
procedure in 2006 that re-
built the areas of her heart
damaged by a massive heart
attack suffered in 1999. On
the fourth anniversary of
the procedure, Hamilton
told The Herald that the
procedure was a "resounding
success." Hamilton's then-
relatively unprecedented
procedure was performed at
St. Luke's Episcopal Hospi-
tal in Houston, Texas.

FREEPORT CELE-
BRATED.the opening of its
inaugural baseball season
in the Dixie Youth League.


FROM PAGE 8-A


The league is geared to-
ward providing a level play-
ing field for young athletes
from rural communities.
The opening day ceremo-
nies included a parade and
appearances by local digni-
taries, Walton County Com-
missioners Sara Comander,
Cecilia Jones and Kenneth
Pridgen, and Mayor Mickey
Marse among them. The Di-
xie Youth state-level tour-
nament for 11-and-12-year
olds was set to be held at the
Freeport Sports Complex in
July.

AN ARTICLE appearing
in the March 11 edition of
The Beach Breeze informed
readers of bills related to
exploratory oil drilling off
Florida's coastline that
had recently come before
the state Legislature. It is
worth noting that the BP oil
spill in the Gulf of Mexico
occurred a month after this
article was printed. Senate
Bill 2622 and House Bill
2019 (which was passed in
the 2009 legislative session)
basically deal with current
prohibitions applying to


state waters and whether
they should be repealed to
allow construction, instal-
lation and maintenance of
structures for oil and natu-
ral gas production.

THE WALTON COUNTY
TAXPAYERS ASSOCIA-
TION set several goals for
.2010 at its annual meeting
on March 4. These goals
included an expansion of
WCTA membership within
homeowners' associations
and condominium associa-
tions as well as plan to work
more closely with local tax-
ing authorities to reduce
their budgets, saving tax-
payers' m6ney. Additional-
ly, commitment to remain-
ing involved in the Walton
County Board of County
Commissioners' budget was
renewed and attention was
brought to bear on spending
by the South Walton Tourist
Development Council.

A WORLD WAR II-ERA
AT6 Texan single-engine
trainer aircraft crashed in
the Gulf of Mexico on March
7, much to the consterna-
tion of the Federal Aviation
Administration and Nation-
al Transportation Safety
Board. The airplane went


I_


3 /


CITY MARSHAL MARK A. WEEKS temporarily at rest
behind his desk at DFSPD headquarters. In April, Weeks
observed his first year in office as the city's chief law enforce-
ment officer.


\ L.._. j


down about a mile offshore
form Topsail hill Preserve
State Park, located between
Miramar Beach and Gray-
ton Beach. Four other air-
craft were reportedly flying
in the same area when the
accident occurred.The pilot,
Dr. Herman Evan Zeiger,
60, of Birmingham, Ala,
and an unconfirmed female
passenger, reported to be
his wife, Peggy, were killed
in the crasH. Agencies in-
volved in the recovery and
investigation were the Wal-
ton County Sheriffs Office,
the Okaloosa County Sher-
iffs' Office, the U.S. Coast
Guard, the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, the South Walton
Fire District and the Florida
Department of Environmen-
tal Protection.

VISITORS to the 2010
Florida Chautauqua Assem-
bly were offered the oppor-
tunity to walk a labyrinth
based on the one located in
the Chartres Cathedral in
France. A state Parks and
Recreation Grant could
help fund the placement of
a labyrinth permanently at
the Lakeyard in DeFuniak
Springs.

THE FREEPORT CITY
COUNCIL approved the
purchase of upgrades to the
city's fire hydrants. The to-
tal cost for new nozzles and
hoses came in at $19,000.
Additionally, the council
approved the purchase of a
new fire engine capable of
supporting a 3000-gallon
compressed air foam unit,
which allowed the Freeport
Fire Department to get rid of
a non-functioning 1000-gal-
lon pumper previously on
hand. Finally, the Council
was updated on the status of
the completed management
package for the North Bay
water project. The expanded
system may still exceed ca-
pacity by 2014 if population
growth continues as expect-


ed. Job costs associated with
the project were reported to
be $1.9 million for construc-
tion and a further $580,000
for engineering and admin-
istration.

THE NORTHWEST
FLORIDA STATE COL-
LEGE Board of Trustees
named three finalists for
the open presidential posi-
tion. The three finalists,
William Edward Coppola,
William L. Kiebler and Ty
Julian Hardy, were chosen
from a pool of 76 candidates
following a nationwide
search process coordinated
by Academic Search, Inc., of
Washington, D.C.

FORMERPROFESSION-
AL FOOTBALL PLAYER
and Alabama Crimson Tide
defensive back Jermiah Cas-
tille spoke at a steak dinner
sponsored by the Boys &
Girls Club of the Emerald


PAGE 9-A
Coast's DeFuniak Springs
Teen Center. Castille played
professionally for the Tam-
pa Bay Buccaneers and the
Denver Broncos and played
on the last University of
Alabama football team to
be coached by the legendary
Paul "Bear" Bryant. After
college, Castille, a Christian
since age 13, dedicated his
life to reaching out to youth
with "the gospel of Jesus
Christ through sports."

WALTON COUNTY
CHAMBER OF COM-
MERCE President Dawn
Moliterno reported the Wal-
.ton County Board of County
Commissioners that a con-
sensus was never reached
at round table discussions
regarding disturbances in
south Walton neighborhoods
due to wedding parties. The
board considered a county-

See REVIEW 10-A


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PAGE 10-A


REVIEW


wide noise ordinance in
2009, but halted those plans
in the face of opposition from
the wedding industry, which
led to the roundtable discus-
sions on the subject. One
recommendation was to cre-
ate an occupational license
for commercial operations,
which would, in theory, re-
solve confusion as to which
residential properties were
being used as short-term
rentals.

STATE REPRESENTA-
TIVE MARTI COLEY spon-
sored a bill that changed
the composition of the board
for the Panama City-Bay
County International Air-
port. The airport relocated
to a facility near West Bay,


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


FROM PAGE 9-A


just a few miles from the
Bay-Walton County bor-
der and changed its name
to the Northwest Florida
Beaches International Air-
port. The board's composi-
tion was expanded to seven
voting members, with two
members representing Bay
County, two from Panama
City, two from Panama City
Beach and one from Walton
County. Pending approval
in the 2010 legislative ses-
sion, the bill would take ef-
fect July 1.

THE PAXTON TOWN
COUNCIL defused a dicey
situation related to prob-
lems with dogs that had
reportedly escaped their
owner's yard and harassed


DeFUNIAK SPRINGS POLICE REPORT

DeFuniak Springs Police John Thomas Watson, terprise, Battery on officer,
arrested the following peo- 33, DFS, VOP, firefighter, EMT, etc., out-
ple during the week ending Robert Jay McIntire, 54, of-state fugitive,
Dec. 26, 2010: DFS, Disorderly conduct, Jeffery Thomas
Shannon Michael Caldwell, 50, DFS, Trespass
SAshton Renee Nichols, Smith, 27, DFS, DWLSR, .after warning,
19, DFS, Grand theft auto, Vernell Smith, 42, En- Susan Todd, 38, Ad-
dress not given, Warrants.



WALTON COUNTY SHERIFF'S REPORT


Walton County Sheriffs
Deputies arrested the fol-
lowing people during the
week ending Dec. 26, 2010:

Nathan Ryan Fox, 19,
Vincennes, Ind., Possession
of marijuana +20 grams,
Christopher Paul Ber-
ry, 27, Niceville, Warrant
(Okaloosa Co.),
Susan Diane Arnold,
38, DFS, MVOP,
Luis Guillermo En-
riquez-Olivas, 55, Mary Es-
ther, DUI,
S Sara Lynn King, 37,
Panama City, DUI,


James Robert Sumner,
19, Middleburg, Fla., Un-
armed burglary of unoccu-
pied dwelling,
Richard Kelly Har-
rison, 29, Hammock Bay,
Unarmed burglary of unoc-
cupied dwelling x2,
Sarah Lee Chason, 29,
SRB, Battery domestic,
Richard Lee Bever, 49,
Freeport, DUI,
Steven James Under-
wood, 28, Freeport, Battery
domestic,
Cornelle Donte News-
ome, 21, DFS, MVOP, pos-
session of controlled sub-


stance w/o prescription,
Shane Lynn O'Roark,
34, DFS, Unarmed burglary
of unoccupied dwelling,
Thayer Van Evans, 43,
Tampa, DWLSR,
James Alan Fuller, 56,
SRB, Battery domestic,
Nicole Marie Jakiela.
26, Freeport, DUI,
Thomas Lee Gray, 55,
DFS, DUI,
Breana Louise Kopko,
20, Panama City, FTA,
Justin Andrew Butts,
20, DFS, FTA.


runners and cyclists on
Turner Street. The city
charter delegates all animal
control authority to Walton
County's Animal Control of-
ficials, a representative of
which attended the meet-
ing. It was suggested that
affected citizens either sign
sworn affidavits that the
dogs were being a nuisance
and produce photographic
evidence thereof. Otherwise,
she said residents could file
a civil suit against the ani-
mals' owner, but she said
this would not likely stand
up in court. The Council also
authorized the purchase
of new GPS equipment for
the city's water department
as well as agreeing to use a
$10,000 grant to shore up
Paxton's water system. At-
tached to the grant was a
stipulation that part of the
money go toward educating


the public about the water
system.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL
learned from City Manager
Kim Kirby that the city had
been chosen as the recipient
of a $100,000 donation from
the estate of Thomas Smart.
The donation was to be used
to erect a monument me-
morializing Smart's wife
Mary B. Smart. Kirby said
discussion was underway to
see if any remaining funds
might be used by the city
to improve recreation areas
in DeFuniak Springs. The
Council also voted 4-1 to stop
allowing permits for groups
requesting donations along
state roadways and right-
of-ways. State statute al-
lows municipalities to grant
permits for the use of state
right-of-ways to solicit dona-
tions or for fund raising if it
is determined that this will
not interfere with safe and
efficient movement to traffic
and not otherwise harm the
public. Finally, the Council
approved the second read-
ing of the ordinance chang-
ing the position of city clerk
to an elected to an appointed
position.

LARGE NUMBERS of
motorcycle enthusiasts
turned out at Freeport's Dis-
tinctive Cycles, which host-
ed the Victory Demo Team.
Attendees at the March 19
event were given the chance
to test-ride new Victory
models without making a
commitment to purchase
the bikes.

THE DEFUNIAK
LITTLE LEAGUE AND
PAXTON DIXIE YOUTH
LEAGUE hosted opening
day ceremonies on March
20 in their respective cities.
Both events were attended
by local government offi-
cials.

THE WALTON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD voted for
the termination of employee
Mark Cozzie, former boys
basketball coach at South
Walton High School. Cozzie


was suspended from his po-
sition in 2007 while under
investigation on charges of
sexual misconduct with 11
former students with ages
ranging from nine to 18
years. The board approved
a recommendation from Su-
perintendent Carlene An-
derson to fire Cozzie and not
award him back pay. The
board also decided to imple-
ment all three phases of the
Walton High School Athletic
Complex at one time, which
carried an estimated cost
of $5.9 million. The board
sought a loan of $16 mil-
lion for the completion of
that project as well as the
finalization of construction
at Emerald Coast Middle
School.

DISTRICT 2 FLORIDA
SENATE candidate Mike
Hill visited the Walton Re-
publican Women Federated
group on March 17. In his
address. Hill emphasized
his vision for expanding and
diversifying northwest Flor-
ida's economy so that young


people would be able to find
good jobs upon entering the
workforce without having to
leave their home area.


APRIL

LYLE SEIGLER WAS
NAMED as the new Walton
County administrator by the
Board of County Commis-
sioners on March 23. Seigler
had previously served as in-
terim county administrator
for eight months following
the resignation of former
administrator Ronnie Bell
announced his retirement
in July of 2009. Before Sei-
gler's nomination to admin-
istrator was confirmed by
the BCC, other key county
departments had interim
directors, including public
works, planning and the le-
gal department.

IN YEARS PRIOR, the
city of DeFuniak Springs

See REVIEW 11-A


Request for Proposals
City of DeFuniak Springs
Professional Planning and Design
Services
To Assist in the Creation of a
Community Redevelopment Agency


The City of DeFuniak Springs will be accepting sealed
proposals for a consultant to conduct the Findings of
Necessity, preparation of a Resolution establishing the
Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), and to prepare a
Community Redevelopment Plan, all consistent with Florida
Statutes, Chapter 163, et al. The City will accept sealed
proposals until January 11, 2011, at 2:00 p.m. CST.
Proposals will be opened in the Council Chambers located at
71 US Hwy 90 West, DeFuniak Springs, Florida, on January
11, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. CST. The proposals shall be marked
on the outside of the envelope "Community Redevelopment
Agency". Any proposal received after 2:00 p.m. on the
above-mentioned date will not be accepted and will be
returned unopened to the supplier.

The City of DeFuniak Springs reserves the right to reject any
and all proposals, waive any formalities, and award in the
best interest of the City of DeFuniak Springs. The City of
DeFuniak Springs reserves the right to negotiate with the
successful respondent for the necessary services. Responses
will be evaluated with the following criteria:

Qualifications of firm, staff, and consultants
Reputation of client references
Previous work with the City of DeFuniak Springs
within the last five years
Previous work experience with Comprehensive
Planning, Land Development Regulations and
Community Redevelopment Agency Findings of
Necessityand Plans
Previous experience
Claims and litigation history


The City of DeFuniak Springs is
Affirmative Action/ADA Employer
Place.

THE CITY OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

Kim Kirby
City Manager


an
and


Equal Opportunity/
a Drug Free Work


#383-10 3TC: 12-23,30;1-6


NOTICE OF A FINDING OF
NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The USDA, Rural Utilities Service has received an application for financial assistance
from the City of Freeport. The proposed project consists of the new construction of
approximately 73,000 linear feet of water mains in the water system's franchise area.
All distribution lines will be located within state and county road rights-of-way and
designated easements.

The following mitigation measures will be implemented:
Project plans and specifications will be submitted to the FL Department of
Environmental Protection and other required regulatory agencies to insure that
construction meets all current regulatory standards and all required permits are
issued;
The City of Freeport will scrutinize all service connection applications where
wetlands exist to verify that all potential users have obtained proper USACE
Section 404 Permits;
Best Management Practices will be utilized in order to prevent storm water runoff
and erosion along the project route during construction, including but are not
limited to minimize' soil disturbance and the installation of storm water controls
such as hay bales and silt fencing and grassing stabilizing construction site
entrances using FDOT-approved stone and geotextile;
Best Management Practices will be utilized to maintain air quality and lessen
emissions, including spraying the construction area with water, replacing or
repairing the ground cover and limiting vehicle equipment idling time where
practical;
Best Management Practices will be utilized to lessen impacts to biological resources,
including the use of directional boring near confirmed flatwoods salamander
habitat. This is not necessary in the Basin Bayou or Trout Brach areas of the
project. If threatened or endangered species such as gopher tortoise or black
bear is sited, construction personnel will cease all activities, allowing the animal
sufficient time to move away from the site;
In order to mitigate any impact the proposed project may have on historical site
8WL2445, the pipeline will be placed between the north edge of the existing road
and the south edge of the drainage ditch so that significant portions on the site
will be avoided. In addition, a professional archaeologist will monitor ground
disturbance in this area
to prevent unidentified
intact deposits from
being disturbed;
Coordination with Eglin Air
Force Base will be U AI
implemented to insure
the buried fiber optic
cables located near the .
construction route are- ,-
not disturbed; and
Normal and required traffic
control and safety
measures as required by
Walton County and the
Florida Department of /
Transportation will be
implemented during .... /
construction. /

As required by the National Environmental Policy Act, the Rural Utilities Service has
assessed the potential environmental effects of the proposed project and has determined
that the proposal will not have a significant effect on the human environment and
therefore an Environmental Impact Statement will not be prepared.
Copies of the Environmental Assessment are available for review at:


USDA, Rural Development
Diane B. Collar, Area Director
932 N Ferdon Blvd.
Crestview, FL 32536
Telephone: 850-682-2416


City of Freeport
112 Hwy. 20 W
Freeport, FL 32439
Telephone: 850-835-2822


A general location map of the proposal is shown.
#384-10 2lc: 12-23.30


GABRIEL PANNELL of DeFuniak Springs shows off
beads collected from the parade participants. Local politi-
cians, classic cars, motorcycle riders, Freeport Fire Depart-
ment personnel and beauty queens along SR-20 for an Inde-
pendence Day parade in Freeport on Saturday, July 3.


I _









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW


and private benefactors have
provided some funding that
added enough to the city's
budget to allow the annual
Fourth of July fireworks
show at the Lakeyard to
take place. However, dwin-
dling financial support due
to the economic downturn
threatened to put an end to
the 20-year tradition. The
DeFYuniak Springs Business
Professionals Association
needed to raise $8,000 to
$9,000 in order to put on the
fireworks show. To that end,
donation jars were places in
area businesses and fund-
raisers including a barbecue
dinner were organized.

THE MARCH 25 MEET-
ING of the Freeport City
Council focused on a debrief-
ing about the so-called "2060
FTP," or the Florida Trans-
portation Plan designed to
project statewide needs of
all transportation issues for
the next 50 years. The plan
must meet all federal as well
as state requirements for all
forms of highway, rail, air,
public transit and seaport
transportation. The Council
was informed that 25 agen-
cies, associations, commis-
sions and councils, including
two citizen representative
groups, will have seats on
the 2060 FTP Steering Com-
mittee.

APPROXIMATELY 450
entrants from seven states
turned out at Hammock Bay
in Freeport for the Mark for


FROM PAGE 10-A


in a spring arts program.
Set to be held May 21 at the
Walton High School audito-
rium, the event, called "Full
Score," is designed to show-
case the talents of the city's
students and school's arts
programs. The program was
described as a "synergetic
concert" featuring elemen-
tary, middle and high school
students and all proceeds
'raised from admissions and
concessions went to support-
ing the music programs at
DeFuniak's public schools.

A PUBLIC OPEN
HOUSE was held March
27 at the E.O. Wilson Bio-
philia Center at Nokuse
Plantation. The private 10-
acre conservatory functions
as an educational facility
and, as such, hosts students
from area middle schools on
weekdays with the objective
of introducing youngsters
to nature. The public was
invited to attend the center
and view dioramas, videos
and displays all pertaining
to local flora and fauna.

WALTON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE DEP-
UTIES and guards from
Walton County Correc-
tions competed in a charity
benefit basketball game on
March 26. The event, called
"Battle of the Badges" was
held at the Emerald Coast
Boys & Girls Club's De-
Funiak Springs Teen Cen-
ter and attracted a crowd
of more than 100 onlookers.


THE CAST OF "Seussical the Musical" at SWHS, directed by Don Goodrum, music di-
rection by Latilda Hettinger, choreographed by Valerie Theobald. The show ran at South
Walton High School on, April 22, 23 and 24. Photo by Elysia Griffin


The corrections squad beat
the deputies 64-50, but were
themselves beaten 41-37 by
the Boys and Girls Club's
team. Plans are in place to
expand next year's even by
'inviting other local public
safety agencies to partici-
pate in the tournament.

THE FRIENDS OF SCE-
NIC 30A celebrated the
second anniversary of CR-
30A's addition to Florida's
Scenic Highway Program on
March 27. Prominent mem-
bers of the community and
local dignitaries were pres-
ent at the festivities, which


included speeches, games,
films and much socializing.
Proposing that CR-30A be
designated as a scenic high-
way by the Friends as, in
there, view, such a designa-
tion would have the effect of
stimulates tourism and eco-
nomic development in the
area.

WALTON COUNTY
SHERIFF Mike Adkinson
hosted a town hall meeting
on March 23 at the South
Walton Substation in Santa
Rosa beach. The meeting
was attended by about 75
people. Adkinson fielded
questions from the audience,
including those directed at
the sheriffs office's $16.7
million budget cuts. He said
it was necessary to take a
hard look at what nonessen-
tial functions could be re-
duces, consolidated or elimi-
nated outright. The sheriff
also addressed rumors that
his office would take over
control of the Walton County
Jail from the Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners. Three
more meetings were sched-
uled for April 1, April 8 and


April 15 in Paxton, Freeport
and DeFuniak Springs, re-
spectively.

A PORTION OF SR-83
north of DeFuniak Springs
was closed to all traffic on
the afternoon of April 6 due
to a reported bomb threat at
Florida Transformer Inc.,
located at the intersection
of Sunrise Road and SR-83.
The Walton County Sheriffs
Office and emergency re-
sponders at the scene evac-
uated 140 Florida Trans-
former employees while
waiting for assistance from
a bomb-detection unit from
the Okaloosa County Sher-
iffs Office.

FOUND GUILTY OF
DUI with serious bodily in-
jury and manslaughter af-
ter the Jan. 4 2009 death of
a passenger in her vehicle,
Elyse Tirico and was sen-
tenced under youthful of-
fender guidelines to three
years in prison followed by
three years of community
control. She was also liable
for fine, court costs of $5,000
and lifetime driver's license


_


.4 ~ t
jq.~


2* .'


THE TIVOLI HISTORICAL SOCIETY has located the site of 14 all-black schools found-
ed in Walton County. This was part of the March 13 Walton County History Fair's array of
exhibits. (Photo by Ashley Amason)


Misty 5k and 10k race -on SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
March 27. The event was TRAINING COURSE
organized to raise money
in support of the family of interested applicants please note the following:
local resident Misty Wil-
liams, who suffered from Dates for the CDL Class have been set as
rectal cancer that eventu- February 14th-25th, 2011.
ally spread to her lungs and .15 students will be accepted, ALL paperwork
lymph nodes. All proceeds must be turned in prior to class start date.
raised by the run went to-
ward Williams' meeting You MUST complete all 50 hours of training.
treatment and transporta- Please note: Fingerprint fees will increase to
tion costs. $75.00 as of Jan. 1,2011.
Please pick up (SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVER/BUS
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS AIDE PACKET) at Transportation Dept.,
of DeFuniak Springs an- "
nounced their cooperation 735 Walton Rd., DeFuniak Springs, FL.
Questions: please call (850) 892-1141



WALTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT
145 Park Street DeFuniak Springs, FL

LISTED BELOW MUST BE COMPLETED BEFORE ENTERING THE CLASS:

1. Fingerprinting is taken by appointment only. There is a fee required, $57.25,
payable with Master Card, VISA, money order or cash. Money orders should be
made out to: Fingerprinting Services, LLC. Please visit www.flprints.com to pay
for the fee or pay at time of your appointment. Please call (850) 892-1100 to
schedule an appointment or for further information.
2. Pre-employment drug screening. No appointment is needed. There is a fee
required, $38.50. This screening will take place at Healthmark Regional Hospital.
Please complete the drug test form before testing.
3. Complete application, demographic form, Form W-4 and Form 1-9 (Employment
Eligibility Verification). For Form 1-9, complete Section I, sign and date. For section II,
furnish correct document from List A or correct documents from List B and List C.
4. Physical, please call the Transportation Department at (850) 892-1141 for more
information.
5. Study the Florida CDL handbook and pass the related test. Please call the
Transportation Department for more information.

LISTED BELOW WILL BE COMPLETED DURING/AFTER THE CLASS:

1. Attend and pass the 50 hour class at the Transportation Department.
2. Acquire a Class-B driver's license from the Department of Motor Vehicles after
completing the class. After receiving license, you must bring the license by the
Transportation Department.
3. Attend bus driver orientation at the Transportation Department.


BCC MEETING DATES FOR 2011
DATES, TIMES, AND PLACES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE


JANUARY
January 11, 2011
January 25, 2011

FEBRUARY
February 08, 2011
February 22, 2011

MARCH
March 08, 2011
March 22, 2011

APRIL
April 12, 2011
April 26, 2011

MAY
May 10, 2011
May 24, 2011

JUNE
June 14, 2011
June 28, 2011

JULY
July 12, 2011
July 26, 2011

AUGUST
August 09, 2011
August 23, 2011

SEPTEMBER
September 13, 2011
September 27, 2011

OCTOBER
October 11, 2011
October 25, 2011

NOVEMBER
November 08, 2011
November 22, 2011

DECEMBER
December 13, 2011
December 20, 2011


S.W.
DFS


S.W.
DFS


S.W.
DFS


S.W.
DFS


S.W.
DFS


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


4:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.


Annex
Courthouse


Annex
Courthouse


Annex
Courthouse


Annex
Courthouse


Annex
Courthouse


S.W. Annex
DFS Courthouse


S.W. Annex
DFS Courthouse


S.W. Annex
DFS Courthouse


S.W.
DFS


S.W.
DFS


Annex
Courthouse


Annex
Courthouse


S.W. Annex
DFS Courthouse


S.W.
DFS


Annex
Courthouse


Approved this 23rd day of November 2010.
APPROVED: : Scott Brannon, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners, Walton County, Florida
#385-10 12-22, 29


PAGE 11-A
revocation .and must visit
the grave of her passenger,
Meghan Burkhart-Smith,
once per year. Tirico failed
to negotiate a stop sign at
the intersection of Easy
Bay Loop Road and SR-20
in Freeport and the result-
ing crash was determined to
have caused the death of her
passenger. Tirico's blood-al-
cohol level was reported to
have been .102 the night of
the accident.

WALTON COUNTY
COMMISSION CHAIR-
MAN Scott Brannon, Com-
missioner Kenneth Pridgen,
SCounty Administrator Lyle
Seigler, County Attorney
Lynn Hoshihara and Dawn
Moliterno, then CEO of the
Walton County Chamber
of Commerce, traveled to
Washington D.C. to meet
with a federal delegation
to discuss Walton County's
adopted federal agenda.
The agenda addresses the
county's priorities, such as
widening U.S.-331 and the
Choctawhatchee Bridge as
well as an environmental
assessment of the county's
coastal dune lakes. The
group met with Represen-
tatives Allen Boyd and Jeff
Miller and Senator Bill Nel-
son to discuss funding for
these projects. In spite of
a one-year moratorium on
earmarks for funding, the
legislators said they would
continue to seek money for
the aforementioned proj-
ects.

WILBERT BRINSON
JR. of DeFuniak Springs,
was removed from Florida's
sex offender registry thanks
to the "Romeo and Juliet
Law." The law allows cer-
tain individuals who either
have or had engaged in con-
sensual sex with a minor
no younger than 14, while
being themselves no more
than four years older than
their partner, to petition for
their removal from the sex
offender registry so long as
the defendant has no other
sex-related convictions prior
See REVIEW 12-A









PAGE 12-A


REVIEW


or since.

THE WALTON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD approved
,the conceptual implementa-
:tion of the Institute of Medi-
cal Sciences at South Wal-
ton High School through
:the Northwest Florida State
College South Walton cam-
pus. The services were to be
provided at no cost to the
school district via a partner-
ship with Sacred Heart Hos-
pital, which will fully fund
one its employees to teach
courses directed toward pre-
medicine, nursing, radiol-
ogy and others. In financial
news, the school board unan-
imously approved a resolu-
tion to borrow $6 million to
complete the construction
at Emerald Coast Middle
,School. Also, the board re-
ceived a Federal Temporary
Assistance for Needy Fami-
lies grant, which provides
sufficient funds for the dis-
trict to employ 20 people for
25 weeks if necessary. At
the end of that period, the
district would be solely re-
sponsible for the employees'
salaries.

NEW PLANS for the con-
struction of three domed-
shaped buildings at the
Emerald Coast Boys & Girls
Club's south Walton county
location were approved by
the county's Design Review
Board. The three .buildings
will house the facilities of
the new Boys & Girls Club
site, located adjacent to the
Coastal Branch Library.
The domed shape of the
buildings was chosen be-
cause they are capable of
withstanding winds of 350
miles per hour, as opposed
to the 150 mph winds of the
previously planned conven-
tionally shaped buildings.

THE DETAILS OF the
March 17 letter sent to Wal-
ton County Sheriff Mike
Adkinson by Walton County
District 1 Commissioner
Scott Brannon regarding a
potential transfer of super-
vision of the Walton County
Jail back to the WCSO were
finally revealed. Brannon
wrote that the reason for his
request was "primarily bud-
getary in nature," but that
he was also concerned with
ways the jail could be poten-
tially run more efficiently
under sheriffs office super-
vision. At the time of the
article, no decision had been
reached by either the Board
of County Commissioners or
the WCSO. Former Sheriff
Ralph Johnson relinquished
control of the jail, which re-
quired the BCC to operate
and fund it, but declining
revenues forced Brannon's
hand.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUN-
CIL discussed plans for the
possible installation of a
skateboarding park at the
DeFuniak Springs Com-
munity Center. Funding for
the park was available in
the form of $10,000 donat-
ed to the city by last year's
Christmas Reflections. The
new park would likely be
located in the current loca-
tion of the tennis courts at


FROM PAGE 11-A


the community center, as
they have been observed to
have little use much of the
year. The Council agreed to
contact the director of the
city of Niceville's skate park
in order to see how Niceville
manages to abide by Fl6rida
statutes and also how the
operators of the park avoid
liability should a person us-
ing the proposed park be in-
jured.

A BILL PUT BEFORE
the Florida legislature in its
spring session would sup-
port the state's citizens to
keep and bear certain fire-
arms, accessories and am-
munition free from federal
regulation, including reg-
istration. The main qualifi-
ers are that the firearm be
manufactured within the
state without any "signifi-
cant parts" imported from
another state and that these
weapons be labeled "made in
Florida" on metallic surface
of the gun. The bill requires


CITY MARSHAL MARK WEEKS assorted local queens
paid a visit at DFSPD headquarters. In this photo with
Weeks are Teen Miss Walton County, Haley Biddle; Little
Miss Walton County, Auburn Frymire; Young Miss Walton
County, MaKayla Hightower; Junior Miss Walton County,
Alexa Wilkinson; and Teen Miss DeFuniak Springs, Devero
Bogart, visiting DFSPD headquarters.


that all firearms produced
within the state be marked
this way, effective Oct. 1.
By designating Florida-de-
veloped and manufactured
weapons as an "intrastate"
activity, rather than an "in-
terstate" one, which there-
fore places them beyond the
federal government's power
to regulate.

STATE CHIEF FINAN-
CIAL OFFICER and Demo-
cratic gubernatorial candi-
date Alex Sink held a public
fundraiser at Seaside eatery
Bud & Alley's on April 8 to
drum up support in her bid
for the governor's seat. Sink,
an opponent of offshore oil
drilling in state waters, told
the crowd she would veto
the near-shore drilling bill
before the state legislature.
She also emphasized her
commitment to improving
the state's public education
system and to eliminate
wasteful spending in gov-
ernment.

THE MUSCOGEE NA-
TION of Florida's Rural
Relief Fund's USDA-certi-
fled food pantry, located in


eignty and gun ownership.

WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL junior Craig Dar-
ity, 17, a receiver on the
school's football team, was
killed in an automobile
crash on April 17 when the
driver, Marie Ellis, 17, of
Crestview, lost control of the
car, slamming its right side
into a tree. The accident oc-
curred two miles south of In-
terstate 10 on SR-81 at 3:40
p.m. Darity was pronounced
dead of his injuries. Ellis was
hospitalized at Bay Medical
Center with serious injuries
but was listed the following
Monday as being in stable
condition. Also in the ve-
hicle with Darity and Ellis
was Cody Ryan Butcher, 17,
of Ponce de Leon, who sus-
tained minor injuries. A re-
port from the Florida High-
way Patrol unit assigned to
investigate the crash stated
that none of vehicle's occu-
pants were wearing seat-
belts and that alcohol was
not a factor. Charges were
listed as pending.

THE WALTON COUNTY
BOARD of County Commis-


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30,2010
%h~Wl~le3~i"""rc rr~l~ti~~r~~II


Bruce, had a ribbon-cutting
ceremony on Earth Day. An
estimated 76 heads of house-
hold were served on the
pantry's opening day, which
means that food was pro-
vided for approximately 500
people in one day. The pan-
try's operating times were
set for Wednesdays twice
a month, from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. on both days. Seasonal
workers make up much the
rural needy, so the number
of people seeking assistance
was estimated to be less in
the summer months, but
donations for utilities were
called for by Rural Relief
Fund management.

THE WALTON TEA
PARTY Patriots promoted
and organized a tea party
rally, held Saturday, April
17 in DeFuniak Springs, the
first such rally in the city's
history. The keynote speak-
er at the tea party was Sen-
ate candidate Mike Hill (R)
of Pensacola. Hill addressed
the hot button conservative
issues of the day, including
Constitutional enforcement,
less taxation, state sover-
I


sioners approved the tempo-
rary use of a vacant parcel
at Grand Boulevard by Le
Grand Cirque, an acrobatic
and theatrical circus-style
production similar to the
well-known "Cirque du So-
leil." The 640 Grand Blvd.
location is the same site
for which 'Walton County
had issued a development
order for a 14-story, 225-
room hotel in June 2008,
but construction never took
place. The BCC approved Le
Grand Cirque's use of the
land at its April 13 meet-
ing.

THE WALTON COUNTY
BOARD of County Commis-
sioners unanimously ap-
proved the drafting of an
agreement for an interim
oversight of the South Wal-
ton Tourist Development
Council (TDC) by the Cham-
ber of Commerce. Though a
motion to merge the TDC
and chamber was approved
at the Board of County Com-
missioner's meeting on April
13, lack of public comment
prior to the vote caused the
motion to be withdrawn.
Much discussion was had
by the commissioners upon
entertaining public input at
the meeting, and the they
addressed the dichotomy
between the TDC, a public
entity established prior to
Walton County's implemen-
tation of the tourist develop-
ment tax, and the Chamber
of Commerce, a private or-
ganization funded primar-
ily through memberships.
Chamber President/CEO
Dawn Moliterno was named
as the most likely candidate


for the position of executive
director of the TDC under
the proposed chamber over-
sight. The full plan was set
for a final vote at the BCC's
April 27 meeting.

THE U.S. MARSHAL'S
Task Force arrested the
Walton County Sheriffs Of-
fice's No. 1 fugitive, Donald
Suttles, Jr., in Marietta,
Ga., after an arrest warrant
was first issues in April of
2006. Suttles faced several
charges of lewd and lascivi-
ous molestation. His extra-
dition back to Florida was
requested by the WCSO, as
Suttles had to face charges
of both molestation of a child
under 12 and battery. Since
taking office in January
2009, Sheriff Mike Adlin-
son placed a high priority on
arresting sexual predators
that prey on children.

THE FREEPORT CITY
COUNCIL approved the ap-
plications for the creation of
an industrial planned devel-
opment. The first permits a
wide range of businesses to
set up'shop within the city
limits. The development is
capable of carrying ware-
houses, offices and manu-
facturing facilities on 43.8
acres south of Bulldog Road
in Freeport. The second ap-
plication was for approval
of the Walton County In-
dustrial Park at Freeport
phase two development,
which would allow the city
to make modifications to the
development code that are
tailored to a particular ap-
plication. The basic concept
was to provide a pre-devel-


oped industrial park that
has infrastructure already
installed. The Council also
scheduled a workshop for
April 27 to review progress
on the North Bay water
line project, underway since
March.

JONATHON KING WAS
SWORN IN to the position
of DeFuniak Springs City
Clerk at the April 26 meet-
ing of the DeFuniak Springs
City Council. Once King
serves the remainder of the
term of previous clerk, Suzie
Campbell-Work, the posi-
tion will be appointed by the
council. The Council also ap-
proved the Okaloosa Walton
Transportation Planning
Organization's Updated In-
tergovernmental Coordina-
tion and Review as well as
public transportation coor-
dination joint participation
agreement. These are stan-
dard agreements required
by the Florida Department
of Transportation to be re-
newed ever five years that
describe the process for co-
ordinating between govern-
mental entities in the re-
gion.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY COMMUNITY COALI-
TION decided at its April
20 meeting to support a
Walton County-centric 2-1-
1 community service call-
in system exclusive of any
partnership with Okaloosa
County. Around 19 Florida
counties are currently not
served by the 2-1-1 system,
which catalogues various

See REVIEW 13-A


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ST. MARKS LIGHTHOUSE IS SOMEWHAT UNIQUE in that the keeper's house is
connected to the lighthouse. The Forgotten Coast (an area roughly from Port St. Joe to St.
Marks) Lighthouse Challenge was held in spring to commemorate Florida Lighthouse Day
and to expose citizens to maritime history. Four lighthouses were involved in the celebration
and the public was invited to tour the structures. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


WALTON



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HIGH WATERS caused attendees to keep a safe distance when gathering in a circle of
prayer at Lake DeFuniak, at the May 6 National Day of Prayer service.










THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW


services including non-
emergency medical care and
affordable housing contacts.
The process of getting on-
board with the 2-1-1 system
is expected to take up to 18
months to complete. In or-
der to expedite the process,
a clearinghouse identifying
and cataloging all sources
of community service in the
Walton County area.

THE PAXTON TOWN
COUNCIL approved plans
to pursue two grants, one
each from Lowe's and the
Home Depot, at its regularly
scheduled April 20 meeting.
Both corporations stipulate
that grant funds awarded
be used for to purchase tools
and materials for projects
relating to community facil-
ity improvements, among
other possible construc-
tion projects. The Lowe's
grant comes in at a range
of $5,000 to $25,000 and the
Home Depot offered a,grant
of $2,500. The grant pack-
age was set to be presented
to Council for approval at
its next meeting in order to
meet the June 1 deadline
for completion of the appli-
cation process. The Council
unanimously agreed to pro-
ceed with plans to pursue a
partnership with the Walton
County Corrections Insti-
tute to obtain inmate labor
for assistance in the Paxton
Agricultural Complex reno-
vation.

THE SOUTH WALTON
COUNTY Mosquito Control
District reported finding
two traps testing positive for
Eastern Equine Encephali-
tis and the West Nile Virus.
Sites in the northern part of
the county were also identi-
fied as carrying the viruses,
but a pattern was not impli-
cated.



MAY

WALTON COUNTY OF-
FICIALS held a public fo-
rum concerning
fears related to the BP
Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
Representatives from the
tourism industry, Health
Department and Walton
County Sheriffs Office
(WCSO) used the forum,
held Friday, April 30, at the
Hilton Sandestin Beach/
Golf Resort and Spa, to re-
assure the public that they
were working closely with
state and federal agencies to
monitor the situation. Sher-
iff Mike Adkinson, whose
office is heading up the co-
ordination of relief efforts,
told the standing- room-
only crowd that the WCSO
had begun environmental
studies designed to provide
a standard against which to
measure any future nega-
tive impacts caused by the
leak.

A ONE-YEAR CON-
TRACT for a new South Wal-
ton Tourist Development
Council Executive Director
was in the works following
an April 27 decision by Wal-
ton County commissioners.
In a 3-1 vote, the commis-
siohers approved the negoti-
ation of a one-year contract
with Dawn Moliterno to fill
the vacancy caused by the
resignation of Sonny Mares.
At the time Moliterno was
the president and CEO of


FROM PAGE 12-A


the Walton County Cham-
ber of Commerce.

A PENSACOLA MAN
was killed in an accident
that took place on May 4 at
the 94 mile post on Inter-
state 10 at around 7 a.m.
in Walton County. Florida
Highway Patrol investiga-
tor Cpl. Eric R. Diaz report-
ed that a truck was travel-
ing east in the outside lane
of I-10 when the right side
wheels drove onto the south
shoulder. The driver, Tuan
Cong Mai, 57, of Pensaco-
la, apparently lost control
when he tried to steer back
onto the roadway. Mai was
dead on scene.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
MAYOR HAROLD CAR-
PENTER presented prior
planning board member
Don Truitt with a certifi-
cate of appreciation for his
almost three years of work
on the board. The presenta-
tion occurred at a regularly
scheduled Planning Board
meeting. Truitt resigned his
position earlier in the year
in protest over the Arbours
at Shoemaker development.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS POLICE DE-
PARTMENT organized a
training seminar to educate
local law enforcement per-
sonnel on the northward
migration of south Florida
"pill mills" and other forms
of pharmaceutical abuse.
The day-long event was
sponsored by Purdue Phar-
ma L.P., a NewYork-based
pharmaceutical company,
and attracted more than
40 individuals representing
law enforcement and other
government agencies from
throughout the Panhandle.

ABNORMALLY HIGH
OXYGEN LEVELS were
apparently the cause of
the deaths of several fish
in Lake DeFuniak. City of-
ficials determined this af-
ter performing a battery of
tests. The tests were con-
ducted by an environmental
agency which checked for
the presence of pesticides
and other contaminants
that could have potentially
caused the deaths. More
than 100 fish were collected
from the lakeyard. The city
vowed to continue the moni-
toring of the situation.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY TAXPAYERS ASSO-
CIATION and citizens alike
raised a number of questions
concerning outgoing South
Walton Tourist 'Develop-
ment Director Sonny Mares'
retirement package. The
agreement would pay him
his full salary and benefits
through the end of Septem-
ber 2010. Questions were
raised as to why Mares' re-
tirement letter was written
on county human resources
letterhead. Former head
of the county's human re-
sources department Gary
Mattison responded that
"Sonny and I collaborated
on the letter. As far as let-
ters, I see all kinds and I
never thought about the
letterhead. We collaborated
on the letter's content and I
wanted to make sure all the
bases were covered."

MAY 6 SAW A CIRCLE
OF PRAYING PEOPLE
gathered, as best they


could, around the swollen
waters of Lake DeFuniak.
The National Day of Prayer,
observed all over the state
and country, began at 6 p.m.
with the tolling of church
bells, followed by the blow-
ing of a shofar, an ancient
trumpet traditionally used
to call people to prayer. At-
tendees joined hands as
prayers were led by pastors
and community spiritual
leaders. The service ended
with the singing of God
Bless America and Amazing
Grace.


A LOCAL MAN WAS
FOUND NOT GUILTY in re-
trial of two DUI manslaugh-
ter charges after the initial
conviction was overturned
on appeal. Nicholas Chesser
had served about 18 months
of a 20-year sentence after
being convicted in 2008 of
killing Ernest and Roberta
Mahaffey in an automobile
accident. Chesser who was
19 at the time, drove his
Jeep Wrangler across the
center turn lane on U.S. 98
in Sandestin, where he col-
lided head first with the Ma-
haffeys' mini-van. The First
District Court of Appeals
ruled Judge Kelvin Wells
should not have admitted
the testimony of two wit-
nesses in the first proceed-
ing.


THE ANNUAL MAY
DAY FESTIVAL was held
on May 15, at the Gene
Hurley Recreational Park
in DeFuniak Springs. The


PARROTS OF THE CARIBBEAN: Bird fancier and steel
drummer John Bussert and a few exotic friends greeted visi-
tors to the Florida Chautauqua Assembly's 2010 "Journey
into the Caribbean." (Photo by Bruce Collier)


event celebrates the historic
signing of the Emancipation
Proclamation. Attendees to
the festival enjoyed a day in
the sun eating and watching
several youth group enter-
tainers. A focal point of the
day was the yearly softball
tournament. A number of lo-
cal dignitaries were on hand
for the ceremony.

A FIREEPORT MAN WAS
CHARGED with shooting
his roommate following an
altercation on May 13. Wal-
ton County Sheriffs depu-
ties responded to a U.S. 331
business in Freeport where
they made contact with the
alleged victim, Brandon
Houser. Houser said his girl-
friend was taking a shower


THOUSANDS attended the two day Eglin Airshow, held in April at EGlin Air Force
Base. Base officials invited the public to celebrate its 75th anniversary with an open house
and air show. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


G. Blount, Sheriff Daniel
Clayton Adkinson, Sheriff
Robert E. Gatlin, Wildlife
Officer Ray Lynn Barnes
and Deputy Harold Michael
Altman.

A SMALL GROUP of
dedicated Freeport citizens
met to discuss and finalize
plans for a veterans memo-
rial to be erected adjacent
to the Freeport City Hall.
The meeting took place at
T.J.'s Table in Freeport. The
monument was originally
inspired by local resident
Trudy Boudreaux whose
husband was a member of
the elite naval flying team
the Blue Angels and Free-
port historian Beckie Bux-
ton. The memorial was to be
unveiled on Veterans day.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
POLICE investigated a mo-
torcycle crash that occurred
on May 20, in the parking
lot of Lowe's. The driver
of the motorcycle, Harold
Parker of DeFuniak Springs
was reportedly passing a
car on the right side. The
driver of the car Diane Hall
was trying to park when the
two collided. The traffic re-
port listed Parker as being
at fault. Parker was taken
to the Fort Walton Beach
Medical Center.

THE NORTHWEST
FLORIDA BEACHES IN-
TERNATIONAL AIRPORT
opened to great fanfare in
West Bay north of Panama
City. "This is truly a mo-
mentous occasion," said
Florida Governor Charlie


when Richard Milton Best
made continuous efforts to
enter the bathroom. An ar-
gument ensued which re-
sulted in the altercation.
Houser was shot in the arm
with a .410 shotgun. Best
was booked on aggravated
battery with a deadly weap-
on, possession of a destruc-
tive device and for being a
felon in possession of a fire-
arm.

JIMMY DONALD SUT-
TLES JR. made his first
appearance in a Walton
County courtroom on May
13, following an extended
manhunt. U.S. Marshals
arrested the 43-year-old fu-
gitive without incident at a
garage apartment in Cobb
County, Ga. He was charged
with one count of lewd or
lascivious molestation on a
child under 12 and a second
charge of battery. Walton
County Sheriff Michael A.
Adkinson Jr. had placed a
high priority on seeking out
and arresting sexual preda-
tors. Suttles had been want-
ed for approximately four
years.


LOCAL CIVIC AND
COMMUNITY leaders gath-
ered on May 20, to dedicate a
street and foot trail to honor
local fallen law enforcement
officers who died in the line
of duty. Walton County Citi-
zen Services Director Ken
Little opened the ceremony,
held at the Wee Care Park,
and welcomed attendees to
the event. The fallen officers
honored are Deputy Thomas


Crist. "It's all about jobs..
thank God, thank you, and
God bless Florida tourism."
The occasion was open to
the public but a ticket was
required for admission. Air-
port representatives said
approximately 8,000 tickets
had been issued. Crist was
joined by a number of local
and Panhandle dignitaries
at the event.



JUNE

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
RESIDENTS RALLIED to
save the historic St. Marga-
ret's Catholic Church located
across from the court house
on U.S. 90. The owner of
the building, George Ralph
Miller, bought the property
in the 1970s and was under
contract to sell to attorneys
Clayton and Clay Adkin-
son. The Adkinsons offered
the building to anyone that
would pay for the removal.
"It deserves to be saved,"
saved local mortician Jerry
Evans. Evans had a per-
sonal interest as his grand-
father built the church in
the 1930's. Evan's hoped to
move the building next to
his funeral home business.

A WALTON COUNTY
RESIDENT was arrested
after calling in a false bomb
threat to the Walton County
Sheriffs Office. The caller
stated that a bomb would
go off at 9:30 p.m. inside St.
Margaret's Catholic Church
on U.S. 331. While on the
scene, the Sheriffs Office
Command Center received a
call from the man that made
the threat. Michael Oparka.
27, of DeFuniak Springs,
said there was no bomb
and that he wanted to turn
himself into authorities. A
search of the building re-
vealed no explosive device.
Oparka was arrested.

MEMORIAL DAY SER-
VICES were held in both
the Gum Creek Cemetery
in Glendale and Gulf Cem-
etery in Santa Rosa Beach
on May 30. Both events
were well attended and fo-
cused on the "Decoration
Day" theme originated dur-
ing the American Civil War.
"Memorial Day is a time for
us to rededicate ourselves to
serving our God, our coun-
try and above all our fel-
low man," said Gum Creek
event keynote speaker Gen.
Maney. "Many of us today
are not taking the time to
prepare the next generation
to carry the torch of freedom
and liberty."

TO COUNTER MISIN-
FORMATION and negativi-
ty in connection with the BP
oil spill, the South Walton
Tourist D)evelopment Coun-
cil (SWTDC) took $500,000
from its reserve funds for a
marketing and public rela-
tions campaign. SWTDC
Executive Director Dawn
Moliterno said the plan was
based on research by the
organization and that the


move was the unanimous
recommendation of SWTDC
members, who are of the
opinion that Walton County
should "step up our efforts"
at this time.

DEPARTMENT OF COR-
RECTIONS DIRECTOR
Danny Glidewell announced
his retirement on June 3
with an effective date of
June 4. "I.have been think-
ing of going in a different
direction for awhile and this
seemed like the time to ex-
plore other options for public
service." he said. Prior to be-
coming corrections director,
Glidewell had served the
public in positions of pro-
gressive responsibility with
the Walton County Sheriffs
Office since 1984.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
RESIDENT Ana D. Ellison
was arrested and booked
on drug charges on June 5.
Upon her arrests Ellison
was found to be in posses-
sion of a large quantity of
prescription medication.
She was transported to the
Walton County Department
of Corrections and booked
on felony charges of traffick-
ing hydrpcodone in excess of
28 grams. She was believed
to be headed for the Domini-
can Republic the next day.
Ellison received a $25,000
bond and a stipulation that
should she post bond, she
would surrender her pass-
port.

WALTON MIDDLE
SCHOOL TEACHER Mi-
chelle Voelker received the
2009 Presidential Award
in Mathematics. On June
7, President Obama named
103 mathematics and sci-
ence teachers as recipients
of the prestigious Presiden-
tial Award for excellence in
those fields. The educators
received their awards in
Washington, D.C. later in
the year. "We are proud to
have her teaching in Walton
County," said Superinten-
dent of Schools Carlene An-
derson. "Her instructional
approach is exemplary."

THE STATE ATTOR-
NEY for the First Judicial
Circuit has declined to bring
criminal charges in relation
to a lawsuit filed by citizen
Suzanne Harris against the
Walton County Board of
County Commissioners and
the Walton County Clerk of
Court. The case, which gen-
erated a great deal of pub-
licity, arose out of a public
records request made by
Harris. Harris requested e-
mails containing a reported
29 specified words or phras-
es and covered a 22-month
period. Following correspon-
dence and additional re-
quests it came to light that
the county clerk's informa-
tion technology department
did not have software to car-
ry out the requested search.

WALTON COUNTY OF-
FICIALS came together

See REVIEW l14-A


HAMMOCK BAY RESIDENTS Candi and Vincent
Palazzo anxiously await the parade's arrival. The Dixie
Youth Organization baseball and softball players paraded
to the Freeport Regional Sports Complex for their opening
day ceremonies in March. (Photo by Jeffrey Powell)


PAGE 13-A









THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


TOM MELVILLE (r) demonstrates what is and is not cricket, in the Lakeyard at De-
Funiak Springs. Melville offered explanations and participatory games of cricket for at-
tendees to Florida Chautauqua Assembly 2010. (Photo by Bruce Collier)


REVIEW


with engineers and contrac-
tors to complete the closure
of the last coastal dune lake
that would be at risk if BP oil
reaches the beaches. "Public
Works really'stepped up and
led the charge to implement
the dune lake protection
plan," said County Com-
missioner Kenneth Pridgen.
"Due largely to their efforts,
we were able to move this
project forward from per-
mitting to completion in
just a few days." The county
received the necessary per-
mits from the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers and the
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection to
initiate the plan earlier in
the week.

WALTON COUNTY
established, standards to
regulate commercial min-
ing operations, also some-
times referred to as borrow
pits, with the approval of
a mining ordinance. The
approval took place at the
June 8 meeting of the Wal-
ton County Board of County
Commissioners. Many min-
ing businesses exist in Wal-
ton County, most of which
have been in operation for
many years. Many of these
pits provide fill dirt or sand
for the construction busi-
ness. Mines in existence at
the time of the adoption of
the ordinance which have
a county development or-
der will be governed by the
terms of that development
order rather than by those
of the ordinance.

ON JUNE 13, Walton
County Sheriffs deputies
responded to an attempted
suicide and fire at 625 Carol
Lane. Upon arrival a female
reported that her 22 year-
old son had wrapped an
electrical cord around his
neck and tied it to a tree.
The cord broke when the
man jumped and he was not
seriously injured. During
this same time the woman
stated that her father, Mi-
chael Devlin, had physically
attacked her hitting her sev-
eral times in the head. Dev-
lin then reportedly started a
fire around the front porch
of the home. Initial attempts
to arrest Devlin were unsuc-
cessful and a SWAT team
was called in. Approximately
an hour later Devlin exited
the home and was taken
into custody without further
incident.

OFFICERS FROM THE
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS PO-
LICE DEPARTMENT re-
sponded to 685 West Orange
Avenue in reference to a call
of domestic abuse involving
a firearm. Upon arrival of-
ficers secured the residence,
along with the two individu-
als involved. They were iden-
tified as Sandra L. Kerpsack
and William F. Lyons. Ac-
cording to the report Lyons
had brandished a firearm
and told her to get out of his
face and if she tried to leave
he would kill her family. Ly-
ons was arrested and trans-
ported to the Walton County
Department of Corrections
where he was booked on one
felony charge of domestic
aggravated assault with a
fire rm


FROM PAGE 13-A


WALTON COUNTY
JUDGE David Green and
Walton County Commis-
sioner Kenneth Pridgen
continued in their elected
posts as they both went
unopposed by challengers
at the end of the qualifying
deadline for upcoming elec-
tions. Contested elections
included County Commis-
sioner District 4 incumbent
Sara Comander, who faced
Rosier Cuchens and David
Kramer, Supervisor of elec-
tion incumbent Bobby Bea-
sley faced Shelia Grimes.
Several of the area school
board seats were also up for
grabs.

A TRAFFIC STOP by
Walton County deputies
along Interstate 10 led to
the confiscation of 10 ki-
los of powdered cocaine
on June 14. Deputy Steve
Kay conducted the stop on
a 2006 Nissan SUV in the
eastbound lanes near the
U.S. 331 exit. The driver,
Christina Calderon, and her
passengers Rogelio Munoz,
Yolanda Herrera all listed
El Paso, Texas addresses.
There was also a one year
old child in the vehicle. Key
deployed his K-9 LElla after
Calderon could not produce
a valid drivers license. The
drugs had a street value of
$330,000. All three adults
were arrested and the child
was handed over to the Flor-
ida Department of Children
and Family.

THE CITY OF DE-
FUNIAK SPRINGS chose
its top three objectives for
the upcoming year in a stra-
tegic objectives workshop
on June 21. "The priority to-
night is to look ahead," City
Manager Kim Kirby said. In
a brainstorming session the
Council stated priorities for
the next year ranging from
new signage to additional
staffing. Ranking its top
three objectives, the Council
chose staffing as its highest
priority, followed by new
signs for business parks and
the downtown area, and
holding the line on taxes
and fees. "I think we should
bite the bullet and say we
are not going to increase
taxes or fees." said Council-
man Don Harrison.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
was making daily helicopter
flights to obtain real time
reports of the location and
status of the BP oil spill.
Areas of oil had been spot-
ted three to five miles south
of Destin. The plan was to
keep as much oil off of the
beach as possible through
collection prior to landfall.
Walton County agencies and
organizations continued to
have a unified approach in
planning for and responding
to the situation.



JULY

AT A JUNE 22 meeting
of the Walton County School
Board, members discussed
the proposed annual bud-
get. The final action of the
budget would be be taken in


August. Estimated taxable
value showed that it had
dropped from $14 billion to
$11.7 billion. Also discussed
in detail were employee
health insurance rate in-
creases, supplemental de-
ductions, capital outlay
reductions, and a proposed
raise in the millage rate.

FREEPORT CITY COUN-
CIL members met June 24
and discussed a proposed
"no wake" zone for Four Mile
Creek, fire hydrant service,
street paving, vandalized
playground equipment, the
Dixie Youth Minor League
baseball tournament, the
Freeport T-ball team's in-
vitation to state play-offs,
and historical/archaeologi-


ground), cost ($3,000 was
a tentative figure) the wa-
ter expense for a proposed
"splash-pad," and various
fundraising or grant-pro-
curement efforts. The Ki-
wanis and the Paxton Town
Council agreed to discuss
the subject further.

MARGARET HICKS
SAVAGE, reportedly the
last living member of St.
Margaret's Catholic Church
in DeFuniak Springs, spoke
with the Herald on hear-
ing mass at the church as a
child. Savage expressed in-
terest in efforts to relocate
the church.

DR. TY HANDY assumed
office as the new president of
the Northwest Florida State
College on June 21. Handy
is a Florida native who most
recently served as president
of Vermont Technical Col-
lege.

TWO MEN were arrested
by DeFuniak Springs Police
in the act of stealing a fire
hydrant and metal pipe.
Adrian Buck Sconiers and
Randall Eugene Key were
booked with theft of prop-
erty between $500 5,000 in
value.

HANDS ACROSS THE
SAND. took place June 26.
The state-wide grass-roots
protest against offshore
drilling took'on additional
meaning thanks to the BP
Deepwater Horizon oil spill
that threatened water qual-
ity, wildlife and the tourist
industry all along the gulf
coast. About 1,000 people
reportedly joined hands at
Seaside.

WALTON COUNTY
BEACHES remained open to


A MUSCOGEE CREEK DIGNITARY, keeping out the
cold at an outdoor Muscogee camp at Lakeyard. The camp
was one of the educational and entertaining events of Flor-
ida Chautauqua Assembly 2010's "Journey into the Carib-
bean." (Photo by Bruce Collier)


cal concerns with the North
Bay Water project.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY BOARD OF COUNTY"
COMMISSIONERS (ICC)
approved the Jolly Bay
planned united development
(PUD) when the developers
agreed to reduce the height
of a bayfront condo. Jolly
Bay earned unanimous ap-
proval by the BCC at a June
22 meeting by agreeing to
reduce the height to no more
than 50 feet, down from the
original proposed height of
more than 147 feet. Prior
BCC denial of the develop-
ment led to a lawsuit against
the county, which this agree-
ment effectively settled.
Also agreed was a reduction
in the number of condo units
and in parking space. Area
residents and property own-
ers appeared at the meet-
ing, some to express support
and others to raise concerns
about increased traffic.

KIWANIS CLUB OF THE
TRI-CITIES PROPOSED
constructing a water-park
style play area for Paxton.
Mayor Hayward Thomas
projected that, barring any
unforeseen problems, the
park could be open to the
public by summer of 2011.
Discussed were concerns
such as location (a parcel of
land adjacent to the play-


the public despite reports of
tar ball washing ashore and
complications from high tide
levels.

THE JUNE 22 MEETING
of the Walton County Board
of County Commission-
ers saw a presentation by
a group called Reclaim our
America, that called for wa-
ter testing and management
change at BP regarding the
oil spill. A Department of


Environmental Protection
(DEP) representative said
fhat water testing labs were
"overwhelmed" but that test
results on oil and dispersant
would be forthcoming.

CHUCK HINSON re-
ported and photographed
his travels along the coasts
of Mississippi, Alabama
and the Florida Panhandle,
offering area fishermen's,
retailers', restaurant own-
ers' and others' opinions on
the impact of the oil spill
on fishing, restaurants, and
various aspects of the tourist
industry. Comments ranged
from resigned to deeply pes-
simistic to optimistic for
quick recovery.

THE LAST CLASS TO
ATTEND Tivoli Elementary
and High School held its
40th reunion in June. The
segregated school closed as
a public high school in 1969
and mandatory integration
began in 1970.

AT A SPECIAL MEET-
ING of the Walton County
School Board June 29 it was
announced that no further
reductions would be made
to the proposed budget. CFA
Jim McCall announced that
the board had a fund balance
of $4.5 million, "much better
than we had anticipated."
This put the board past the
required 3-percent fund bal-
ance. The revised budget
stood at $62.8 million, and
the board voted 4-0 to make
no further reductions.

THE DFS CITY COUN-
CIL voted for a new skate
park, to be located at the
current location of the ten-
nis courts at the DFS Com-
munity Center. At the same
meeting the Council received
an update on the municipal
airport master plan.

TWO TRAFFIC STOP-
LIGHTS, one at Coy Bur-
gess Loop and U.S. 331 and
the other at U.S. 90 and
Shoemaker Drive, got un-
derway, starting with the
one at Coy Burgess. The to-
tal cost was estimated to be
$160,000, of which the city
could probably have to pay
$60,00, the rest being cov-
ered by a traffic concurrency
fee from the developer of Ar-
bours at Shoemaker Drive,
and available proportionate
fair funds. Mayor Harold
Carpenter called it an "es-
pecially good deal" for the
city.

THE FOURTH OF JULY
was observed and celebrated
all over Walton County, with
patriotic events, parades,
beauty queens, barbecues
and, of course, fireworks.

A TOWN HALL MEET-
ING was held to update the
public on efforts to contain
the clean up the oil spill.
DEP representative Dar-
ryl Boudreau and Walton
County Sheriff Mike Adkin-
son spoke, along with offi-
cials from SWFD, the Coast
Guard, Tourist Development
Council, and other entities.
Attendees were told that
reimbursement funds from
BP would be coming soon,
though had not yet arrived.
The oil boom containment
plan was discussed, as were
the results of daily flyovers
and air and water quality
reports.

THE DFS CITY COUN-


CIL voted to give two lots
to Habitat for Humanity. At
the same July 12 meeting,
the Council was introduced
to Kitty Whitney, new presi-
dent and CEO of the Walton
Area Chamber of Commerce.
The city's millage rate was
discussed, as well as the lo-
cal mitigation strategy on
use of federal funds in the
event of a natural disaster.

THE MOVIE GALLERY,
a longtime DeFuniak
Springs business, closed
following the corporation's
seeking Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy protection.

THE SOUTH WALTON
TOURISTDEVELOPMENT
COUNCIL (TDC) voted to'
turn down a proposal to
spend $600,000 on three
concert events in south Wal-
ton County. The intent of the
concerts was to stimulate
tourist business, which was
jeopardized by the impact of
the gulf oil spill. A motion to
decide drew no support, and
proposal failed.

OIL SPILL IMPACT
NOTICES posted along
66 south Walton County
beach public accesses by the
county health department,
drew' complaints from tour-
ist industry leaders, who
said the wording of the no-
tices "effectively closed" the
beaches. The notices includ-
ed detailed information on
what to do or not to do in the
event of "oil product" on the
beach, along with advisories
for children, pregnant wom-
en, and people with compro-
mised immune systems to
avoid the area.

THE WALTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS (BCC) voted
4-1 on a tentative 2010-2011
budget, one that undercuts
the current by somewhat
less than $2.4 million. The
total proposed budget was
$98,591,654. The lower
figures were affected by
"substantially lower" tax-
able property values for FY
2011. Assessed property
values dropped 17 percent.
Acicrdiiigly, 'the BCC voted
4-1 to tentatively raise the
millage rate .74 mills. Com-
missioner Sara Comander
cast the sole opposing vote
to raising the millage rate,
suggesting the commission
seek to find needed funds by
pulling back on expensive
projects and streamlining
operations. Two more pub-
lic hearings were set on the
budget in September.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL
held a budget workshop to
consider possibly setting
a higher tentative millage
rate for the coming fiscal
year and budget. After dis-
cussion, the Council agreed
not to raise the millage rate,
and to set another workshop
for August 5.

THE JULY MEETING
OF THE FREEPORT CITY
COUNCIL on July 13 re-
cessed to count votes in a
race for a seat on the Coun-
cil. Challenger Harold Taun-
ton was declared the winner,
defeating incumbent Mark
Martin. The business of the
regular meeting included
a reading of Local Mitiga-
tion Strategy Ordinance, a
draft resolution to expand

See REVIEW 15-A


KREWE DE YAK'S VIKING SAIL unfurled at Mardi Gras, conveying the Delhniak
Springs krewe through the crowded streets in the St. Andrews Mardi Gras celebration. The
Yakkers collect food and supplies for the needy throughout the year. (Photo by B'ruce Col-
lier)


PAGE 14-A








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW FROM PAGE 14-A


the Freeport Rural Enter-
prise Zone to take in all
land within the city limits,
and other ordinances. Also
discussed fire department
business, sewer-line work,
and the Sports Complex.

THE HERALD BREEZE
INTERVIEWED Dr. Ty
Handy, newly installed pres-
ident of Northwest Florida
State College (NWFSC). A
Florida native, Handy also
has family in the Dothan-
Alabama area.

AIRCRAFT MODELERS
put on a spectacular show
of remote-control aircraft to
raise funds and awareness of
the Wounded Warrior Proj-
ect, a Jacksonville-based or-
ganization offering support,
counseling and assistance
through rehabilitative ser-
vices for wounded members
of the military. Among the
aircraft featured was a fly-
ing lawnmower.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS (BCC)
reviewed several proposed
EAR (Evaluation and Ap-
praisal Report)-based
amendments to the coun-
ty's comprehensive plan, as
part of a special meeting on
Future Land Use Element
(FLUE). Owing to the num-
ber of classification catego-
ries and the controversial
nature of some of them, the
meeting was continued to a
later date to complete the
discussion and review.

THE ALAQUA ANIMAL
REFUGE was profiled. The
no-kill animal shelter had
grown to house some 200
animals of all kids on its
10-acre property. Founder
Laurie Hood said that the
shelter costs some $38,000
per month (about $1,200 per
day) to operate, and that
difficult economic times for
human had affected the wel-
fare of animals as well.

IRA ALEXANDER RAN-
DALL was arrested and
booked for murder after an
alleged confession, which he
followed by leading lawmen
to the buried body of the vic-
tim, Robert James Dickens,
in Holmes County. Investi-
gators supposed that "drugs
or money" was the motive
behind the killing.

THE WALTON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD recog-
nized school district math
coach and teacher Michelle
Voelker's achievement in
winning the Florida Presi-
dential Award for excellence
in mathematics teaching. At
the same meeting the board
discussed class size amend-
ment compliance, budget re-
ductions, and heard a report
from the Walton County
Property Appraiser that the
county's gross taxable value
is $11.7 billion, down from
last year's $14 billion.

THE PAXTON TOWN
COUNCIL handled a mixed
agenda at its July meeting,
covering theft of American
flags from city poles, attract-
ing a doctor to set up a prac-
tice in the city, tearing down
a outlying building near the
town hall, first readings of
several proposed ordinances
(dealing with signage and
with disaster management
response), and set a date for
a budget workshop.

THE FREEPORT CITY
COUNCIL welcomed newly-
elected council member Har-
old Taunton and unopposed
incumbent Ray Jackson to
their new terms of office.
The same meeting saw the
Council vote to terminate its
contract with Dayco, Inc. of
Freeport for garbage collec-
tion services, due to alleged
over-billing. The Council
also addressed fire depart-


ment and budget issues, in-
cluding setting a tentative
millage rate and a budget
workshop.

KITTY WHITNEY was
welcomes by area officials
and business leaders as the
new President/CEO of the
Walton Area Chamber of
Commerce.


HERALD BREEZE RE-
PORTER Jeffrey Powell vis-
ited and photographed the
International Motorsports
Hall of Fame in Talladega,
Ala. The 35-acre facility
opened in 1983, and houses
14,000 books and periodi-
cals as well as 10,000 pho-
tographs on the subject of
racing.

A GROUP OF LOCAL
RESIDENTS joined in with
fellow citizens in a rally in
Tallahassee protesting off-
shore drilling in Florida,
and asking to vote on a state
constitutional amendment
banning such activity in
state waters. Participants
gathered on the steps on the
state capitol building. The
Legislature was meeting in
special session at the order
of Gov. Charlie Crist in con-
nection with his proposed
amendment on drilling. The
brief session was adjourned
without action on the pro-
posal.

AT A MEETING OF THE
SOUTH WALTON TOUR-
IST DEVELOPMENT
COUNCIL (TDC) there was
revealed a slight (3.8 per-
cent) increase in bed tax
numbers in May due to col-
lection of past due bed taxes,
accompanied by a 3-percent
decrease in occupancy rent-
als. TDC Executive Director
Dawn Moliterno commented
that the "true effects" of the
oil spill would not be seen
until June and July figures
are known. Moliterno said
the TDC had prepared a
plan to rebuild brand image
using funds from the state
for tourist marketing. The
TDC also heard a report
that work can continue on
the county's beach restora-
tion plans following a favor-
able Supreme Court ruling.



AUGUST

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUN-
CIL heard a presentation
July 26 evaluating water
rate structure, classifying
amount used by different
entities. The presentation
was part of deliberations on


THE CUTTING of a ribbon marked the official opening of the new Camp Helen multi-use
path on March 30. The trail opens up a previously-inaccessible 50-acre portion of the state
park, located on the north side of U.S. 98, to the public. (Photo by Dotty Nist)


"tight" budget.

WALTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS approved a
new job description for an
assistant county adminis-
trator that would focus on
performance and efficiency
to meet the upcoming bud-
get reduction challenges.
The commission voted to ap-
point a search committee to
review applications.

WALTON ACADEMY'S
new administrator Steven
Ruder was profiled in the
Herald Breeze. Ruder's
background includes train-
ing and certification as a
first-degree black belt in
kenpo karate- and cross-
training in ninjitsu.

ASHLEY AMASON RE-
PORTED on a trip to Wash-
ington State, including
Olympic National Park and
the town of Forks, made fa-
mous by the Twilight Saga


District 5 Commissioner
Cecilia Jones reported good
results with the amended
program. It was agreed to
discuss and develop recom-
mendations regarding ex-
pansion of the program.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CITY COUN-
CIL approved changes to
the American Federation of
State, County and Munici-
pal Employees (AFSCME)
union collective bargaining
agreement. Changes on-call
employment policies, a regu-
lar wage increase, and addi-
tional increases for quality
performance. Other busi-
ness included fee waivers
for city facility use, repairs
for the water tower (struck
by lightning) and field trip
opportunities.

FREEPORT'S SWIM-
MING POOL was closed.
The pool, operated by Wal-
ton County and the YMCA,
was shut down following the


THE 22ND ANNUAL ARTSQUEST fine arts festival found a new home over Mother's
Day weekend at Seaside. Photo courtesy Kurt Lischka, SoWal.comn


contemplated rate increas-
es. Though the Council was
not voting at that time on a
progressive rate structure,
City manager Kim Kirby ad-
vised the Council that such
a structure may be coming
in future, as part of state-
mandated conservation in-
centive plans. The city also
set a tentative millage rate
as part of the proposed new
budget, and increased the
police department's budget.

THE FREEPORT CITY
COUNCIL held its first
budget workshop for the
coming year on July 28. As
with the rest of the county,
the decline in property val-
ues and the;slowdown in de-
velopment means less rev-
enue from ad valorem taxes
under the current millage
rate. Also discussed was the
proposed swimming pool to
operated by the city. Mayor
Mickey Marse predicted a


films.

A PUBLIC HEARING
WAS HELD ON THE HAB-
ITAT CONSERVATION
PLAN (HCP). The county
has been working on devel-
oping the HCP following a
series of legal wrangles over
beach armoring and alleged
governmental "taking" in
the wake of the devastating
2005 hurricane season. The
plan calls for procedures for
take authorizations, mea-
sures to safeguard protected
species, and vehicle beach
impact.

WALTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS considered
raising the eligibility num-
ber for beach driving per-
mits. An amendment had
been approved six months
prior that imposed permit
limits and allowed review
of issued permits numbers.


Healthy Department's de-
termination that the pump
was not operating properly
and that there were leaks
in the circulation system.
Water was determined to
be cloudy and required chlo-
rine was not present. Free-
port mayor Mickey Marse
decided to terminate YMCA
oversight on the pool. Mea-
sures were taken to repair
the problems.

ON AUG. 6, INVES-
TIGATORS with Walton
County Sheriffs Office Vice-
Narcotics Unit along with
investigators from Crest-
view Police Department un-
covered an elaborate indoor
marijuana grow located at
44 Carol Lane in DeFuniak
Springs, the residence of Mi-
kael Benjjamin L Andre and
Jeanyn Louise L Andre. A
search of the main residence
yielded three handguns,
eight long guns, marijuana,


and drug paraphernalia. A
search of the barn located
approximately 100 yards off
the main residence yielded
an indoor marijuana grow
operation divided into three
separate rooms for the dif-
ferent stages of growth.
A total of 245 marijuana
plants were seized.

MOTION AFTER MO-
TION was either denied or
died for lack of a second re-
garding the Walton County
School Board's budget and
millage rate at the Aug. 3
meeting. Chairman Mark
Davis said, "we have got to
have a millage rate tonight,"
and eventually moved to re-
duce the capital outlay mill-
age rate by .150 mills, a cut
of $1,687,500. The motion
passed three-to-two, Laird
and Roberts opposing. The
district's new budget for
2010-11 is $105,830,015
with a village rate of 5.07
mills.

CONSTRUCTION OF
DeFuniak Springs' new
public skate park was slat-
ed to begin at the beginning
of August, though as of an
Aug. 3 workshop, the actual
layout of the park remained
undecided. Grounds Mainte-
nance Supervisor Ed Joyner
(along with some other city
officials, including City
Manager Kim Kirby and
Mayor Harold Carpenter)
held the workshop with the
intent of getting input from
local skateboarders as to the
design of the half-pipes, rails
and ramps that will make up
the park, which is projected
to be completed by October.
However, since none of the
youths the skate park is
meant to serve turned out
for the workshop, discussion
was relegated to the logis-
tics of implementing safety
and security measures as
well as the park's proposed
operating hours.

THE FONTANA DAM
of North Carolina was the
subject of an article with
photos. Fontana Lake pro-
vides endless opportunities
for recreational boaters and
sportsman. Also several
waterfront communities
have sprung up along the
lake's shore. Additionally,
the dam is a destination for
those who want to admire
the beauty of the surround-
ing Smoky Mountains and
enjoy vistas from the tallest
dam east of the Mississippi
River.

TRANSCRIPTS from ex-
ecutive sessions on lawsuits
filed against Walton County
by the Edgewater Beach
Owners Association (EBOA)
and an offshoot case filed
against the county by Su-
zanne Harris became avail-
able in electronic form dur-
ing the week of Aug. 2. The
transcripts provide insight
into matters related to these
legal challenges. Walton
County was criticized dur-
ing the litigation because


PAGE 15-A
Harris did not receive public
records that she requested
from the county. What has
not been common knowl-
edge was that throughout
the litigation period, a se-
ries of offers and attempts,
albeit unsuccessful, were
made by the county to ful-
fill Davis' records request.
While continuing to deny
any liability to Harris in
connection with the public
record requests, the county
agreed to resolve the pub-
lic records case through an
agreement with Harris in
which she received $148,500
from the county and $6,500
from the Clerk of Courts in
reiinbursement of her legal
fees.

FAMILIES, FRIENDS
civic leaders all gathered at
the Flowersview Communi-
ty Library on Aug. 8 to cele-
brate 34 years of the Milton
Memorial Birthing Center
helping families to be "fruit-
ful and multiply," as the
Rev. Tyrone Broadus said
during a part of the prayer
he shared with the crowd
before starting the celebra-
tion with music by the P and
P Gospel Singers. Founder
Gladys Milton's daughter
Maria Milton spoke to the
crowd, after greeting many
of the children, (who ranged
from nearly newborn to
teens) she delivered and
their families outside as
they made their way into
the celebration.

WALTON COUNTY
CHIEF OF EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT and Pub-
lic Safety Communications
Capt. Michael Barker re-
signed from his position as
head of the Emergency Op-
erations Center for Walton
County as of Aug. 6. Barker
cited in the letter that he
was resigning to pursue
"other opportunities." Bark-
er was placed on administra-
tive leave with pay on Aug.
5.In the notice, Barker was
also ordered to make him-
self available for interviews
with investigators with the
Walton County Sheriffs Of-
fice (WCSO). Earlier in the
week, WCSO Public Infor-
mation Officer Camille Cox
verified to Herald/ Breeze
editor Bruce Collier that
Barker was a part of an on-
going investigation, but per
WCSO policy, she would not
comment on specifics of an
ongoing investigation and
could not divulge any more
information.

AN ELECTION was held
in Tallahassee in which offi-
cers of the DeFuniak Springs
Police Department voted on
the question of whether to
accept representation by the
Police Benevolent Associa-
tion (PBA). An unconfirmed
report put the vote at 13 out
of 14 voting officers in favor
of representation.

WITHSTANDING BUD-
GET CUTS, the Walton
County School District re-
vamped several of its non-
instructional positions be-
ginning the 2010-11 school
year. Students this year
would notice not every
school has a nurse or titled
assistant principal; how-
ever, rumors regarding a
reduced number of school
resource officers as well
employees' paying a por-
tion of their insurance were
unfounded. All elementary
and middle schools retained
full-time nurses, whereas
high schools have trained
personnel to perform nurse
functions.
Superintendent Carlene
Anderson explained, "In
light of budget reductions,
principals had to make
decisions on non-instruc-
tional employees...Walton
High School, Freeport High


School, and South Walton
High School chose to reduce
school nurses because they
felt that was a position they
could give up. At the same
time, we have [registered
nurse]-trained personnel
within the schools to dis-
pense medication, [perform]
CPR, and first aid. Health
Services Manager Nancy
Smith [will] serve in a ro-
tating capacity to monitor
trainees as well as serving
one day per week in each
[high] school."

See REVIEW 16-A








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


RELAY FOR LIFE cancer survivors take the first lap of the evening. This relay was held
in Freeport, to honor those survivors and to educate the public about the dreaded disease.
Communities all over America hold Relay for Life events every year. (Photo by Jeffrey Pow-


ell)




REVIEW


AT A 7 P.M. BUD-
GET WORKSHOP meeting
on Aug. 12, City Clerk Rob-
in Haynes gave each council
member a draft 2010/2011
budget package containing
line item revenue and ex-
pense. data for each of the
city's revenue sources and
operating departments. In
its present form, projected
revenue from all sources is
about $388,000, or 10 per-
cent less than the amount
budgeted for the current fis-
cal year. Haynes had also
reviewed the proposed fire
department budget with
Fire Chief Ben Greenslait.
This proposal reflects an
increase in spending. The
Council agreed to review
the draft and provide ideas
for changes.

A TOURIST DEVELOP-
MENT COUNCIL (TDC)
meeting released the news
that beach signs warning of
possible oil or oil waste from
the oil spill, posted at all 66
Walton County beach access
points, would be removed.
TDC executive director
Dawn Moliterno, at the reg-
ular monthly meeting of the
council, said: "There is not a
health reason to keep them
up and that has been con-
firmed by the state, but the
state is still giving the ulti-
mate authority to the coun-
ty health director." Visitors
were reportedly confused
and angered by the sight of
the signs on otherwise clean
and safe-looking beaches.

A FIRST PUBLIC
HEARING ON the county's
Habitat Conservation Plan
(HCP) was held. Regulatory
authorities had recommend-
ed the county adopt such
a plan in conjunction with
its Incidental Take Permit
(ITP) application. The pur-
pose of the ITP is to protect
the county from lawsuits
resulting from issuance of
future emergency permits
for temporary seawalls and
other coastal protection
measures in the event of
beachfront impacts similar
to those of Hurricane Den-
nis in 2005. The proposed
ITP and HCP would re-
main in effect for 25 years.
At the public hearing, Billy
McKee, Walton County en-
vironmental manager, and
Bob Ernest, environmental
consultant for the county,
provided presentations on
the plan and took comment
from the Walton County
Board of County Commis-
sioners (BCC) and from the
public. There was criticism
from beachfront property
owners, and comments from
various environmental and
local interest groups.

FLORIDA DEPART-
MENT OF TRANSPORTA-
TION Secretary Stephanie
Kopelousos was joined in
south Walton County on
Aug. 17 by a crowd composed
of state and local officials,
dignitaries, and citizens to
celebrate the completion of
the four-laning of the seg-
ment of U.S. 331 between
the Clyde B. Wells Bridge,
which spans the Choctaw-


FROM PAGE 15-A


hatchee Bay, and U.S. 98.
U.S 331 is not only one of
the county's major travel
routes but the sole route for
evacuation of the area south
of the bay. The segment was
completed several months
before the ceremony and
had been in use. County of-
ficials has intended to hold
the ceremony earlier, but it
had been necessary to delay
it for a number of reasons,
one of those being the BP oil
spill.

DEPUTIES WITH WAL-
TON COUNTY SHERIFF'S
OFFICE (WCSO) had been
investigating a series of auto
burglaries in the Freeport.
Choctaw Beach and south
Walton areas. Information
gathered during the inves-
tigation lead deputies to a
group of three white male
juveniles and one white fe-
male juvenile who were par-
ticipating in what was de-
scribed as "car hopping." in
which they would walk up
to parked cars in a neighbor-
hood and check for unlocked
doors. As a result of the in-
vestigation all were charged
with burglary of an unoccu-
pied conveyance and grand
theft. During questioning
the suspects admitted to
committing (as a group and
individually) approximate-
ly 100 burglaries during a
three-month period in the
Choctaw Beach, Indian Bay,
Waterview Cove, East Bay
Loop, Lagrange Bayou, Bay
Grove Road, Blue Water
Bay and the Mack Bayou
area. Some of the property
taken was being used by the
suspects and other property
was being stored. One of the
individuals sold an item on
Craigslist.

THE PAXTON TOWN
COUNCIL voted unani-
mously at its Aug. 17 meet-
ing to pursue preliminary
discussions with the city
of DeFuniak Springs over
a proposition on the part
of the latter to redefine its
natural gas franchise area
with Florida Gas Transmis-
sion Company, LLC, which
could potentially enable
Paxton to supply customers
with an alternative to its
electrical grid. If approved,
the natural gas franchise
area, which extends five
miles outside city limits (but
all the way west to the bor-
der with Okaloosa County),
would likely extend north to
the Alabama state line. The
city of DeFuniak Springs
already made similar geo-
graphic changes to the cov-
erage area of its water and
sewer system. "Right now
we're at a purely conceptual
level, but if this is something
we want to explore in more
detail we will be more than
happy to do that," DeFuniak
Springs City Manager Kim
Kirby said.

THE WOMANLESS
BEAUTY PAGEANT (WBP)
featured some extraordinary
men, who strapped on their
high-heels for an extraor-
dinary cause. Sponsored
by the Walton County Tax
Collector's Employee Fund,


the pageant benefitted the
Boys & Girls Clubs of the
Emerald Coast DeFuniak
Springs Teen Center. Con-
testants competed in three
areas: catwalk, talent, and
questions.

ON AUG. 12, the Wal-
ton County Sheriffs Office
appointed Capt. Joe Pres-
ton as the Division Chief
and Director of Emergency
Management and Public
Safety Communications.
Preston had over nine years
experience with the Walton
County Sheriffs Office and
prior to that served with the
Clay County Sheriffs Office


water and sewer and con-
necting the sewer plants for
the school and business to
provide a capacity of 40,000
gallons per day (gpd), en-
abling future industrial park
tenants to "tap in" to sewer.
Knauer discussed that lack
of sewer service had been a
major impediment to obtain-
ing park tenants. A 250,000
gpd sewer plant had been
designed for the park and
permitted, but county staff
had been concerned about
issues with operating such a
plant with the small amount
of flow currently anticipated.
Knauer recommended that,
in four or five years, once
flow from the new park ten-
ants was close to the 40,000
gpd capacity, it would be
time to start construction
on the larger plant. Part of
the approved strategy was
support of the RV business'
application for a $750,000
grant, which would fund
connection of the two small
plants via a force main and
also a needed turn land at
the SR-285 intersection.
Another was rescinding a
previous county commis-
sion directive to take the RV
business' sewer plant out of
the county's name.

COASTAL DUNE Lake
Advisory Board members
learned at their Aug. 26
meeting that rebuilt berms
constructed at the coastal
dune lakes in response to
news of the BP oil spill would
remain in place through the
end of the hurricane season,
when both pipes installed at
the dune lakes and berms
would be removed. The dune
lakes were reported to be
free of oil. Board members
decided to renew efforts to
pursue a special designa-


OLD SAINT NICK made his appearance on the The
Lil' Trolley. The jolly old fat man spread Christmas cheer
around Circle Drive during this year's DeFuniak Springs
Christmas Parade. (Photo by Gary Woodham)


in Kansas City, Mo. Russell
Beaty was also named Man-
ager of Emergency Manage-
ment. Beaty began his ca-
reer with the Pensacola Fire
Department in 1983 as a fire-
fighter/EMT. He progressed
through the ranks working
in the fire suppression, res-
cue, and ARFF Branches
as well as the fleet/facility
management and communi-
cations divisions.

STORMS IGNITED
TWO HOUSE FIRE'S in
south Walton County over
the weekend of Aug. 21 -
22. Firefighters managed to
save both homes and keep
damages to a minimum,
with only a minor injury to
a firefighter.


NINE SCHOOL RE-
SOURCE OFFICERS (SRO)
were profiled in the Herald
Breeze. These WCSO of-
ficers dedicate their days
and nights to providing a
positive, stable and safe
influence for children, par-
ents and teachers in Walton
County schools.


COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS agreed to pursue
a plan to get Mossy Head
Industrial Park "off the
ground and running." The
decision came at the Aug.
24 Walton County Board
of County Commissioners
regular meeting. County
engineering consultant Cliff
Knauer suggested connect-
ing the Mossy Head Middle
School and the new RV deal-
ership on the former Lucky
13 Truck Stop property with


tion with the state and ul-
timately the federal govern-
ment for these globally rare
and imperiled lakes. Board
member Richard Bryan rec-
ommended asking the coun-
ty to approve such a desig-
nation to further the effort.
Board Chair Marsha Ander-
son suggested approaching
the Northwest Florida Wa-
ter Management District for
assistance. Bryan agreed to
do fact-finding to see what
other agencies might help


with the initiative.

THE FREEPORT City
Council agreed to submit for
a $200,000 grant for expan-
sion of the Freeport Sports
Complex. It was discussed
that the grant, if approved,
could be used for additional
balls fields or to fund other
facilities at the complex such
as batting and pitching cag-
es. The Council members
voted to schedule a public
meeting, a requirement for
the grant application.

PROPOSED COUNTY-
SPONSORED large-scale
amendments that could
have resulted in 25-room
hotels adjacent to neighbor-
hoods at intersections along
CR-30A triggered a deluge
of calls to county commis-
sioners by citizens. These
were part of a group of more
than 40 county-sponsored
large-scale map amend-
ments applying to parcels
all over the county. The first
Walton County Board of
County Commissioners pub-
lic hearing on the amend-
ments took place on Aug.
30. Most public comment
at the meeting involved
Neighborhood Commercial
(NC), a proposed new land
use category for small areas
close to residential neigh-
borhoods providing for "a
limited group of commercial
uses to serve the needs of
residential areas." Among
a variety of other uses, an
allowable use in NC would
have been "limited lodging
not to exceed 25 rooms." Dis-
trict 3 Commissioner Larry
Jones said that he believed
everyone was in agreement
that NC "needed some ad-
justment." Gerry Demers,
county planning and devel-
opment director, offered to
meet with interested parties
and bring back options for
revision of the NC category
that would alleviate citizen
concern. There was a favor-
able vote to move forward on
each of the proposed amend-
ments, with a final decision
on the amendments to come
at the second public hearing
on Sept. 28.



SEPTEMBER

PLANS FOR El Charo,
a bar/tavern proposed for
a C-1 district in DeFuniak
Springs, were sidetracked
by the DeFuniak Springs
City Council's denial of
Frede Lopez's request for a
use exception. The city plan-
ning board had recommend-
ed denial, based on testi-
mony that "El Charo will
compromise the safety and
welfare of the public." Lo-
pez's attorney argued that
it was unfair to speculate on
the future of the proposed
business. Councilman Don
Harrison's motion to deny
the use exception carried in
a 3-1 vote, with Wayne Gra-
ham opposing and James
Huffman absent.

THE WALTON COUN-
TY School Board set a final
millage rate (5.07 mills)
and budget ($107.3 mil-
lion) at its Sept. 7 meeting,


in two 3-2 votes, with Bill
Laird and Sharon Roberts
opposing. Prior to the suc-
cessful motion, Laird had
moved to stay at the cur-
rent year's millage rate,
4.654 mills, and reduce the
general operating budget
and capital outlay. Roberts
seconded that motion, then
later withdrew her second,
and the motion died. Still,
the approved millage rate
was predicted to produce
$5 million less as compared
with the previous year's rev-
enues, as a result of lowered
property values. Anderson
and the board members
expressed concern regard-
irg class-size requirements
and a possible $115,000 net
penalty for noncompliance.
In order to comply, several
teachers had elected to teach
a sixth-period class in lieu
of their planning period, a
more cost-effective solution
than hiring new teachers,
a yearly expense of $44,500
for each teacher added.

A SMALL BUT enthusi-
astic and committed group
of animal lovers gathered
at the Freeport Community
Center for the inaugural
meeting of the Friends of
the Walton County Animal
Shelter. Nonprofit group
president Bill Bard stated
that its purpose was to be
part of the shelter and help
animals in any way pos-
sible. "We want the shelter
to grow to be an important
part of the community," he
said. Bard expressed hope
that the group would also
grow. Membership is avail-
able for a $10-per-year fee
that is tax deductible, and
donations of any size are
welcomed as well.
MOSSY HEAD WATER
WORKS' (MHWW) water
system Josh Hayes was
named Operator of the Year
by the Florida Rural Water
Association. Hayes received
the honor only one year af-
ter becoming a certified wa-
ter systems operator. Hayes
came to work for the water
system fresh out of high
school in 2003. "The kid is
just phenomenal at what he
does," said MHWW Presi-
dent Tom Terrell. "I abso-
lutely could not do this job
without him. period. All of
us [at Mossy Head Water
Works] are super proud of
his," Terrell said.

SANTA ROSA BEACH
turned 100 years old, and
the community's birthday
was observed in a two-day
celebration on Sept. 11 and
12 at Gulf Place. A wealth
of material about the his-
tory of Santa Rosa Beach
was on display, and attend-
ees enjoyed, music, food and
drink. Historians were the
people of the day, and art-
ists and crafters were pres-
ent in force during both very
warm days. A musical per-
formance excerpt from the
Walton County folk life play
Grit & Grace was present-
ed on Sept. 11. There were
demonstrations of wood-
crafting and jewelry making
and plenty of soaking up the
sun and sundry beverages.

See REVIEW 1-B


A I-IAIJNT''ID) MANSION and empty coffin couldn't scare away trick-or-treaters. For the
19th year, the DeFuniak Springs Business anld Professional Association (D1)PA) hosted a
fun filled and safe alternative for trick-or-treaters with Halloween Happenings. The cute
and the sometimes scary looking treat seekers spilled onto Circle Drive alnd enjoyed trick-
or-treating around the lake yard at homes as well as tables set up by 'he IDeFuniak Springs
Woman's Club.


PAGE 16-A








PAGE I-B
---


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010





2oSo S


CONYEAD R PAGE


REVIEW
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16-A


GRIT & GRACE ended an-
other season as the curtain
closed on "A Box of Grace."
From what started out as a
small group of board mem-
bers, under the leadership
of Marie Hinson, the board
puled the script together
and put plans into action
for another production that
combined stories of home-
town heroes, fables and folk-
lore with local talent, both
in front of and behind the
stage. Bruce Collier served
as director and Renae Ward
was stage manager. Herald/
Breeze columnist Chuck
Hinson also took an active
role in the production. With
the season ending, plans for
the 2011 Grit & Grace went
immediately into the works,
with several audience mem-
bers expressing an interest
in having their time on the
stage in a future produc-
tion.

STATE REPRESENTA-
TIVE Brad Drake (R-Euch-
eeanna) addressed county
commissioners on Sept. 14
about the new state regu-
lations applying to septic
systems, which call for a
statewide program that
would, among other things,
mandate inspection of sep-
tic tanks every five years at
a cost of $150 to $450 per
tank. Drake said he would
favor either a repeal of the
regulations or a provision
for local areas to opt out. He
was hopeful that the Florida
Legislature would take up
the matter in the session be-
ginning in March 2011 and
take action in line with one
of the aforementioned op-
tions. The commissioners
had previously adopted a
resolution against the new
regulations. They urged
Drake to continue to oppose
the regulations.

NEW ASSISTANT State
Attorney Clifton Alan Drake
was sworn in on Sept. 21
by Circuit Judge William
F. Stone. From Crestview,
Drake graduated from
Georgetown University
Law Center after receiv-
ing graduate degrees from
the University of Florida.
State Attorney William Ed-
dins administered Drake's
appointment. The new as-
sistant state attorney was
assigned to cases in the
misdemeanor division of the
DeFuniak Springs State At-
torney's Office.

THE PAXTON TOWN
Council adopted fiscal year
2010-2011 budgets on Sept.
21, with an increase in valu-
ation of the upcoming fiscal
year's expected revenues
in the general fund budget,
which saw a projected hike
of $13,000, or 3.5 percent,
from $367,954 to $380,954).
The water and sewer fund
budget, on the other hand,


maintained their 5-percent
jumps over fiscal year 2010
to $235,000 and $109,977,
respectively.

JAMES SUMPTER and
Shelton S. Stone, co-found-
ers of Energy Farm, Inc.,
discussed plans to bring in-
dustry in the form of clean
energy production to the
local area and other areas
in Florida, including a pos-
sible energy co-op for people
wanting to use solar power,
but not having the space or
means to put solar panels on
their homes. The partners
spoke of starting out with
a 74-megawatt solar plant
in the Freeport area, along
with a separate utility com-
pany. They were hopeful of
creating 150 jobs to produce
solar modules, along with
research and development
jobs for fusion and fuel cell
technology.

TODD MCQUILLAN, a
Walton County Sheriffs Of-
fice (WCSO)' deputy since
2004, was found deceased at
his home on Sept. 26, with
the cause of death unknown
but no apparent signs of foul
play. Medical Examiner Jeff
Martin ruled that McQuillan
had died of natural causes.
McQuillan had worked both
as a school resource office
and uniformed deputy while
with the WCSO. Sgt. Artie
Rodriguez, school resource
deputy supervisor, said,
"Todd was a such a mentor
to the students at Freeport
Middle School, and he will
be greatly missed by the
students, faculty, and par-
ents." "We are all very sad-
dened by the loss of Deputy
McQuillan. Todd was such a
fine man and served his pro-
fession well," said Walton
County Sheriff Mike Adkin-
son.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS City Council
heard recommendations on
Sept. 27 for future public
facilities space. Consultants
recommended as a commu-
nity center and city hall site
the former Piggly Wiggly
store at the intersection of
Baldwin Avenue and 10th
Street. The cost to purchase
the 15,873-square-footbuild-
ing was estimated at $6.1
million. Other recommenda-
tions included the construc-
tion of a $2 million new fire
station at the public works
yard just west of the exist-
ing fire station. Demolition
of the former health depart-
ment building on U.S. 83
N. and the construction of a
new 15,988-square-foot po-
lice department there was
recommended, as well, at
a cost of approximately $4
million. Consultants recom-
mended as funding sources
a FEMA grant, low-inter-
est loans from USDA, and
bonds. The council members


I ,--.
'; .
: ". '... .


A METAL TANK, APPARENTLY FROM Deepwater Ho-
rizon, washed up on Miramar Beach last weekend.


directed City Manager Kim
Kirby to move forward with
seeking funding, research-
ing acquisition of the rec-
ommended new city hall/
community center site, and
contacting underwriters to
determine what amount the
city could afford.

WALTON COUNTY ap-
proved a fiscal year 2010-
2011 budget of slightly over
$98 million and set a millage
rate of 3.5563 mills for coun-
ty government operations.
Approval of the lbiid.t and
village rate came on Sept.
27 at the county's final bud-
get hearing. The proposed
budget amount represented
a 2.9 percent reduction from
that of the previous year,
but the proposed millage
rate represented just under
a 4.5-percent increase. Citi-
zens continued to ask for
additional reduction of the
budget---and for keeping
the millage rate the same
or lowering it. The budget
and millage rate were ap-
proved with little discussion
by commissioners in a 4-1
vote, with District 4 Com-
missioner Sara Comander
voting no.

THE CITY OF Freeport
set its ad valorem tax rate
at 3.93 mills for the 2010-
2011 fiscal year and adopt-
ed proposed total budget of
$3.67 million, approximate-
ly $362,000 less than the
previous year's budget. The
city of DeFuniak Springs set
a village rate of 4.5 mills
and approved a $24.36 mil-
lion budget for the new fis-
cal year.

A LAWSUIT involv-
ing Oyster Lake, a Walton
County coastal dune lake,
was settled by a Sept. 28 de-
cision of the Walton County
Board of County Commis-
sioners. The litigation had
begun approximately eight
years ago when Willam R.
and Patricia Hemby, own-
ers of a CR-30A beachfront
home and adjacent vacant
lots sued the county in circuit
court for trespass. The claim
involved occasions when the
county had removed sand
and debris from a culvert
under CR-30A to lower the
level of Oyster Lake, which
lies immediately north of
CR-30A in the vicinity of the
Hemby property. Conditions
of the agreement included a
payment of $525,000 by the
county to the Hembys' suc-
cessors in exchange for a
permanent easement to an
area where the county is to
be responsible for construct-
ing and maintaining a stabi-
lization channel for the dune
lake outfall. The agreement
was conditioned on Walton


County being able to obtain
a state permit for the chan-
nel. The county also agreed
other conditions, including
assistance to the property
owners in obtaining a state
permit for construction of a
single-family home on their
vacant property.

A CONVICTION WAS
announced on four counts
of confinement of animals
without sufficient food and
water. Aldo 1M. I)onald, own-
er of four horses, was con-
victed on Sept. 28 by a Wal-
ton County jury. One of the
horses died, and the three
others were reported to be
severely malnourished. Tes-
timony in the case revealed
that Alaqua Animal Refuge
had maintained the three
surviving horses and sta-
bilized their health with
proper feeding. Cooperat-
ing with the investigation
and arrest were the Walton
County Sheriffs Office, Wal-
ton County Animal Control,
and the Florida Department
of Agriculture Law Enforce-
ment Division.

THE OWNER of a min-
iature horse known as
"Champ" was arrested on
Sept. 30 by Walton County
Sheriffs Office (WCSO) dep-
uties. Nicholas William Sco-
niers was charged with vio-
lating Florida law related to
cruelty of animals. WCSO
investigators and Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services of-
ficials had investigated and
documented the circum-
stances which were reported
to have led to serious health
conditions with the animal.
Champ was reported to have
been placed under the care
of Alaqua Animal Refuge
and to be recovering well.



OCTOBER

WAYFINDING SIGNS
were brainstormed in a
meeting between city of
DeFuniak Springs officials,
business owners and con-
cerned citizens. The officials'
motivation for pursuing the
initiative was to direct traf-
fic to the downtown area
and thus help stimulate
business. Greg Scoville,
city planner, told attendees
that their ideas for signage
would be submitted to the
state Department of Trans-
poration "because it's your
business that these signs
are meant to help." The city
had put in a request for five
s1t r'. i ..llh 11 l.i., .I 1 signs,
with their cost already ap-
proved in the budget. Four
to five panels were planned
for each sign, and plans were


for them to go in state right-
of-ways. Attendees made
suggestions as to areas for
placement for the signs and
descriptions to appear on
them. Officials said they
would continue to welcome
signage ideas from the com-
munity and that additional
signs would possibly be ap-
proved in the future.

THE BOLEN FAMILY of
New Harmony was selected
as the 2010 Farm Fam-
ily of the Year by the North


Animal Refuge founder Lau-
rie Hood and her volunteers.
Hood told the Herald that
support was still needed for
Champ, along with a perma-
nent home.

COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS approved a set
of large-scale amendments
to be included with pro-
posed revisions to the Wal-
ton County Comprehensive
Plan. The approval took
place on Oct. 4. The amend-
ments were based on the


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PREPARATIONS WERE made by Walton County upon
learning of threats to the beaches and dune lakes posed by
the BP oil spill. The actions included the placement protec-
tihe sand berms across the dune lake outfall areas. (Photo by
Dotty Nist)


Florida Fair Association.
The Bolens, a family of five
boys and parents Bill and
Melissa, live at the 25-acre
Welcome Home Farm, dedi-
cated to self-sufficiency and
raising a variety of types of
farm animals. "This life is a
dream come true," said Bill
Bolen.

A FIRE CLAIMED the
Barefoot Beachside Bar
and Grill at the Sandestin
Beach Hilton on Oct. 3. The
fire was reported shortly af-
ter midnight and began on a
beachside deck. South Wal-
ton Fire District crews were
able to prevent, the fire from
spreading and igniting the
Hilton structure itself. Fire-
fighting units from Destin,
Freeport, and North Bay as-
sisted in the response. The
State Fire Marshal's office
initiated an investigation
into the cause of the fire.

CHAMP, THE MINIA-
TUl E horse, rescued from
an owner charged with ani-
mal cruelty, was reported to
be gaining weight and thriv-
ing under the care of Alaqua


county's Evaluation and
Appraisal Report (EAR),
which the state requires on
a regular basis as a mea-
sure of the comp plan's suc-
cess at meeting community
goals. In connection with
the approval, 15 requests
for large scale amendments,
affecting property in various
areas of the county, got a fa-
vorable vote, while two re-
quests were denied. As part
of a package of EAR-based
amendments, the large-scale
amendments were conveyed
to the state Department of
Community Affairs (DCA),
with the expectation for the
amendments to be sent back
to Walton County with at-
tached comments and rec-
ommendations by DCA. to
receive final consideration
by county commissioners.

THE WALTON COUNTY
School Board on Oct 5 ap-
proved a motion to put school
district bus driver Kath-
leene Flowers Merrell on
administrative leave with-
out, pay, pending the out-

See REVIEW ;3-B


ICE IS NICE, at least for a day or two. This photo was taken Dec. 27 at the site of the historical caboose near the
Heritage Museum in DeFuniak Springs. A mantle of crystalline ice covered the ground and plants, until the sun
melted it away.


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On dec. 20, 2010, the Ladies Auxiliary to VFW Post 4437
in DeFuniak Springs presented Christmas food baskets to
15 needy families in the area. Community service is one of
the many programs (civil welfare, Americanism, Veterans
Affairs and Veteran Services, Nursing Homes, Scholar-
ships, etc.) that the Auxiliary participates in each year. Pic-
tured from l-r are auxiliary members, Dea Nelson, Maureen
Brown, Patricia King and Cathy Davis. Not shown, Deb.
Bishop. (Photo by Del Carr, Aux. member.)


Happy 1st Birthday
December 30, 2010
Kaleb Tae' Shawn McDonald














We love you,
Mama, Granny,
Pa-pa
and Khalil


yiLj Mj f f


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


Ask

Auntie Em "


Dear Auntie Em,
It's almost that time
again. I haven't even cleared
out all the ripped-up wrap-
ping paper and I'm already
S getting depressed. I tried to
get dressed this morning, to
S go meet friends and I can't
get my big butt into any of
S my pre-holiday pants.
My entire family are
great cooks and we really
S pile it on during the season.
That combined with way too
many Christmas treats has
left me feeling fat, dumpy
. and depressed. I don't want
to buy another exercise
system, just to use it as a
clothes rack. I've done low
;- carb, low calorie, low fat,
Sand.I just don't know if I can
S do it again, but I don't want
04' to gain either. Nothing fits
i- me as it is. I'd really appre-
ciate any advice about how
S to shed these extra pounds
that showed up this year.


Fluffy in Freeport

Dear Fluffy,
Don't feel alone. Many of
us are in the can't-hardly-
get-it-zipped-up crowd. The
holidays only add insult to
injury for those who already
struggle with their weight.
Struggle is a very accu-
rate word, as those disposed
to low metabolisms seem
to look at food and gain
weight.
Most experts say that
one must perform a task or
stick with a commitment for
21 days before it becomes
habit. I always advise baby
steps, so take it slow and
pick one thing every 21 days
you want to change. Like, no
soda, diet or regular, for 21
days. Keep a diary or calen-
dar so you can visually see
your progress and lose the
all-or-nothing attitude while
you are at it. If you have a
smart phone, there's an app


for that. Scientists believe
we have a set amount of will
power and if we attempt to
use it in too many areas, we
end up failing and feeling
worse than when we start-
ed.
Another problem with
people who want to change
their eating habits is they go
on ridiculous diets, instead
of slowly cutting away bad
habits and starting to move
more.
Don't worry about your
pants, unless they are
stretchy pants and if they
are, toss them and get some
with a set waist band. Re-
ward yourself with items
other than food when you
succeed, make small chang-
es, trend toward eliminat-
ing processed food as much
as possible and move a lit-
tle every day. Make it fun.
Dance around the house,
play video games with the
kids that make you get up
and move, walk the dog.
If you still have problems
with weight gain and you
are implementing better
habits, schedule an appoint-
ment with your physician
and get a checkup, including
a checkup on your thyroid,
to see if there is a medical
reason you can't lose. Many
are walking around with a
sub-par thyroid and have
chalked it up to just getting
older.
Taking care of yourself,
eating fresh, unprocessed
foods and increasing your
movement will soon cause
you to be fabulous and not
frumpy in Freeport. Good
luck, God bless and Happy
New Year to you and yours.

Auntie Em

Send your letters to Aun-
tie Em to dfsherald@gmail.
corn or to P.O. Box 1546, De-
Funiak Springs, FL. 32435


Community Calendar

THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS GARDEN CLUB guest
speaker for January will be Mike Goodchild, with the Wal-
ton County Extension Office. Goodchild will discuss what
trees grow best in this area and how to plant them.
The garden club meets at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday,
Jan. 5, in the Life Enrichment Center at 312 College Ave..
DeFuniak Springs, FL. The program will begin at noon.

BE A PART OF Northwest Florida's most exciting mu-
sic event, featuring over 100 international songwriters. See
the line-up, sponsors, venues and more at 30ASongwriters-
Festival.com. Volunteers are needed in many capacities,
including box office, merchandise sales, front of house, lo-
gistics and more.
Volunteers will receive a weekend pass ($85 value) and
a 30A Songwriters Festival shirt! Complete the online vol-
unteer application by Friday, Dec. 31 to ensure your place
as a volunteer.


KEN HAIR, CIC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR and Sam
Smith, President of the Harley Owners Group (l-r).


The President of the Har-
ley Owners Group, (HOG)
Sam Smith presented Chil-
dren in Crisis, Inc. toys, gift
cards and a $7,500 donation
to help feed, clothe and care
for the children living at the
CIC Children's Neighbor-
hood.
The donation came from
the recent Toy Drive that
originated at the Fort Wal-
ton Beach Sam's Club and
ended at the Niceville Mul-
let Festival grounds. Heri-
tage Cycles and Sam's Club
was also major sponsors of
the charity event.
Ken Hair, CIC executive
director commented, "We
have been blessed with great
support from the commu-


unds to C3C

nity to build the Children's
Neighborhood. However, it's
a struggle to find the nec-
essary funding to feed and
clothe the kids and sustain
operations into the future.
Support from the "HOG" is
a tremendous help in our
efforts to provide a safe ha-
ven to the abused, neglected
and abandoned children
that don't have a home. This
is the fourth year they've
played Santa to the-children
and they've made a differ-
ence in so many children's
lives!"

To learn more about Chil-
dren in Crisis call (850)864-
4242, or visit www.children-
incrisisfl.org.


gbi



t'


Community


Calendar


LOOKING FOR CLASSMATES from Walton Senior High
School, Class of 1985. Call Terinda Wilkerson-(850)274-
2776, Patti Coffield-(850)509-6868, Tommy Andrews-
(850)333-0720, Facebook Walton Senior High School Class
of 1985 25th reunion.

WALTON SENIOR HIGH CLASS OF 1986 is looking for
classmates for their 25th class reunion. Call Melissa Web-
ster at (850)974-1478; email mwebster@chautauquawin-
ery.com or mail to 600 Paradise Island Drive, DeFuniak
Springs, FL., 32433. Join them on Facebook "Walton Senior
High Class of 1986."

THE PAXTON HIGH School Alumni Association meets
the second Monday of the month in Mrs. Anderson's fourth
grade classroom, room 802, at 6 p.m. For information on the
alumni association, visit the website at paxtonalumnias-
sociation.com or call Phil Anderson at (850) 419-1951.



Send your

community calendars,

family reunions and

social events to

dfsherald@gmail.com

Happy New Year!


A Touch Of Heaven
The light of the world has come
to brighten our new year!
He sends His love to everyone,
and holds His children dear.

If neighbor reached out to neighbor;
in the coming twenty eleven,
the joy that lives in every heart,
would be a touch of heaven!

When you give of yourself to others.
they will then give back to you.
Pray that all of us may
keep His spirit the whole year through.

Wake up on Saturday morning
to a little touch of heaven.
Vow to bring some happiness
in the year twenty eleven!

By Manr Ann I 7iddon


I..ia--







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW


come of her prosecution for
charges of allegedly striking
a nine-year old boy for being
too loud. In other action, the
board members unanimous-
ly approved a charter school
application for the Chautau-
qua Learn and Serve Char-
ter School submitted by the
Walton County Association
for Retarded Citizens. Plans
were for the school to open
in 2011 with 12-15 students
in its first year. The school's
target population was to be
students 18-21, for whom
a special diploma would be
appropriate due to their dis-
ability.

AFTER OPERATING
for three years, the Florida
Chautauqua Assembly, Inc.,
led by Ann Robinson, presi-
dent, discontinued opera-
tion, with no program to be
presented in 2011. Robin-
son thanked everyone who
has assisted and worked
diligently in support of the
organization. Florida Chau-
tauqua Assembly, Inc., had
been one of two organiza-
tions presenting education-
al and thought-stimulating
yearly lecture series for the
public in DeFuniak Springs.
The other, the Florida Chau-
tauqua Center, traces its
roots to the original Florida
Chautauqua Association, es-
tablished in the city in 1884.
Citing confusion among the
public over which Chautau-
qua "is which," Robinson
commented, "I dearly love
DeFuniak Springs and I
think it deserves better than
two organizations fighting
publicly or otherwise."

THE COMPLETION of
improvements to a portion
of Scenic Gulf Drive was cel-
ebrated on Oct. 13. County
-commissioners and staff
were joined by other mem-
bers of the community for
a ribbon cutting just east
of the Whale's Tail eatery.
Among the improvements
were a wood boardwalk
along the county highway,
101 brick-enhanced parallel
parking spaces, four dune
walkovers, a decorative met-
al emergency access gate to
the beach, and landscaping
featuring newly-planted
palm trees.

SOUTH WALTON Tur-
tle Watch Director Sharon
Maxwell reported two prob-
lems during the 2010 sea
turtle nesting season: activ-
ity on beaches following re-
ports of the BP oil spill and
predators, both pet dogs and
foxes, attacking nests. Max-
well said 31 nests were ob-
served, one laid by a Kemps-
Ridley turtle and the others
by Loggerheads. Thirteen of
the nests, including hatch-
lings captured from four
nests, were transferred to
the East Coast. Maxwell
.added that 21 false crawls
were observed.

THE PAXTON Town
Council voted unanimously
to demolish the old dilapi-
dated sheriffs substation
due to the construction of a
new substation in the com-
munity, with funding com-
ing exclusively from forfei-
ture moneys awarded to the
Walton County Sheriffs Of-
fice based on assets seized in
.drug raids. The city provid-
ed property for the building
through a lease agreement.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS City Council
on Oct. 19 scheduled an
executive session to dis-
cuss possible settlement
options in litigation with
Aero FX regarding the De-
Funiak Springs Municipal
Airport. Aero FX had filed
suit against the city over a
contract dispute regarding
leased premises.

WALTON COUNTY
:SHERIFF Mike Adkinson


was honored by being ap-
pointed to the Commission
for Florida Law Enforce-
:ment. "Accredition enhances
law enforcement's ability to
provide professional servic-
es to its citizens," Adkinson
'commented.

IT WAS ANNOUNCED
at the Oct. 19 Walton Coun-
ty School Board meeting


FROM PAGE 1-B


that Teresa Tripp, teacher
at Freeport Elementary
School, had won the Golden
Apple Award from WJHG.
The board members ap-
proved in a 4-1 vote Phase
I of the Walton High School
Athletic Complex, encom-
passing ADA accessibility
to the stadium seating, new
restrooms and concession
stands, drainage features,
and underground piping for
sewer, water, and electric-
ity, with the possibility of
additional items to be added
to the scope of work.


NOVEMBER

POLL RESULTS WERE
FINALIZED with Rick Scott
winning the gubernatorial
race, Marco Rubio taking
the Senate, and locals Jeff
Miller and Steve Souther-
land earning seats in Con-
gress.

DATES FOR FOUR MUR-
DER trials were set, includ-
ing Teresa McKee, Thomas
Ford McCoy, Todd Ball, and
Dannie Roy Baker, the lat-
ter being the most notable
case when Baker shot and
killed two Chilean students
and wounded three others
who were visiting Miramar
Beach.

LYNN HOSHIHARA
WAS THE FIRST WOMAN
named county attorney for
Walton County. Hoshihara
is a graduate of Florida
State University College of
Law and has worked with
the county since 2005.


SEVEN DEAD GREY-
HOUNDS found near the
Walton/Washington County
line are likely linked animal
abuse case at the Ebro Grey-
hound Park where Ronnie
Williams, 36, of Ponce de
Leon was charged with 37
counts of animal cruelty
when 32 dead greyhounds
were found emaciated.

MARSHA WINEGAR-
NER WAS NAMED PRESI-
DENT of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Science Teachers.
Winegarner was the 1988
Walton County teacher of
the year and former science
teacher at Walton High
School.

KATHLEEN FLOWERS
MERRELL, a bus driver for
the Walton County School
District, entered a not guilty
plea to misdemeanor charg-
es after allegedly striking
a nine-year old boy on her
route for being too loud.


BOX OFFICE VIDEO
opened at the former Movie
Gallery location under local
owner Kelly Shelton. Shel-
ton introduced name-your-
nights pricing and $5/5 days
hot new releases, as well as
$.99 rentals for older DVDs.
Box Office Video gets new
releases 28 days sooner than
Netflix or Redbox.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
POLICE DEPARTMENT
warned citizens of scams.
Several residents reported


Cleveland, both of SanDes-
tin Golf and Beach Resort,
an Marie Nasri of Courtyard
by Marriott.


NORTHWEST FLORIDA
STATE COLLEGE broke
ground on a $25 million
student services building in
Niceville. It will be a three-
story, 75,000 square-feet
building to serve its more
than 17,000 annual student
enrollment.


THE FIRST Southwest Airlines Flight received a water
salute on arriving at the new Northwest Florida Beaches
International Airport in conjunction with the grand opening
of the airport in spring 2010. (Photo by Dotty Nist)


receiving official looking ca-
shier's checks asking them
to deposit it then send taxes
due to another address. A
separate scam involved no-
tification that a relative had
been arrested and needed
immediate bail funds wired.
DFSP advises notifying your
bank, credit card companies
and police if you believe you
are involved in a scam.

OVER 1,500 TRICK-OR-
TREATERS made their
rounds along Circle Drive
and the downtown profes-
sionals and business associ-
ation on Halloween. Record
hot weather couldn't scare
away the masses from set-
ting a record number.

BARK PARK SUPPORT-
ERS MADE SOME NOISE
and Alaqua Animal Ref-
uge founder Laurie Hood
succeeded in keeping the
funding-sparse park open
through an agreement to
run it as part of her non-
profit no-kill shelter. Hood
sought community input.
and envisioned dog training
and agility courses taking
place at the 10-acre park.


ABOVE AND' BEYOND
WINNERS were announced
by the Tourist Development
Council for outstanding cus-
tomer service in the hotel/
resort, restaurant and retail
industries. Winners were
Gina Jackson, and Heather


CAMP HELEN IN-
STALLED SOLAR PANEL
DISPLAYS to teach visi-
tors about its history. The
sun-powered signs bring the
camp's history to visitor's
fingertips and provide audio
commentary on each build-
ing.

VAN NESS BUTLER JR.
HOSPITALITY AWARD
went to Keith Howard, CEO
of Howard Group, for his vi-
sion in making the beaches
of south Walton a premier
tourist destination. The
Tourist Development Coun-
cil (TDC) said Howard's
focus on responsible land
development and sustain-
able growth warranted the
award.

A THREE-CAR COLLI-
SION on U.S. 331 resulted
in the death of DeFuniak
Springs resident Deborah
Slay Smith. -16. Occupants of
one of the vehicles, Sandra
and Palmer Adkins were se-
riously injured, and Brooks
Lee Chouinard, whose car
initially crossed the center
line, suffered only minor in-
juries.

NEW STANDARDS AND
TEACHER EVALUATIONS
will be phased into the Wal-
ton County School District.


JAMES DAVID


BAR-


Under the Race to the Top
grant, school curriculum
standards will be aligned
with national standards and
teacher evaluations will be
based, at least partially on
student learning gains and
FCAT scores.

ZAMBIA CAMPBELL
AND LUKE ANDREWS
were named Walton High
School's Homecoming king
and queen.

EDDIE FARRIS TOOK
OATH OF OFFICE to serve
as the newest member of the
Freeport Planning Board.

NOVEMBER IS NA-
TIONAL HOSPICE
MONTH. Mayor Harold
Carpenter signed a procla-
mation into effect to increase
awareness of the services
hospice offers. Covenant
Hospice has served the area
for over 25 years and cares
for 1,300 patients daily.

THE K-KIDS CLUB
WAS CHARTERED at West
DeFuniak Elementary, the
first Kiwanis service orga-
nization for elementary stu-
dents in Walton County.

BRAVES PEE WEE
FOOTBALL team was Su-
per Bowl bound. After an
undefeated season and 12-0
South Walton blowout, the
young Braves squared off
against Niceville for the
Super Bowl Championship
Nov. 16.


SThe Pregnancy Support
Center is pleased to


If you need
grief of a past


offer a powerful class which
helps hurting women find
the path to healing in a
CONFIDENTIAL and
caring atmosphere.

help with the pain, guilt and
abortion, call today to sign up:
892-7400.


Class begins:
Tuesday, January 11, 2011


892-7400
295 Hwy 90 W
The Pr
Next to Regions Bank First B


4


et C
egnancy Support Center is a ministry of
aptist Church, DeFuniak Springs


QUALITY EYE CARE

RIGHT HERE

IN DEFUNIAK SPRINGS





"Darren Payne, M.D. and I would be
privileged to provide all of your
eye care needs in our new
DeFuniak Springs Office."

LiE MULLIS, MD
LEE MULULIS, MD
BSoARD CHATrrAo IN HISTORIC DISTRICT
FYE PHYSICIAN & CATARACT
SUR,.ON DEFUNIAK SPRINGS

746 BALDWIN AVENUE
(850) 892-6100



FREE COMPREHENSIVE

EYE EXAM


Call Today! 892-6100
DcFuniak Springs Office. New Patients 59 Years & Older.
Limited Time Offer. Expires 1/31/2011
L--------------------------------------j
NO IlIIl)I)l'N ( AI I ''AR IS: It is out pIoliicv that tll II paliciit and alliiy othel r trsoIIn rcsponsihlI lior pIyt nLi it has llh Il iiiight to itlus o
pay, ca ncl paymI) tII or he ilmbursl d for pIaym, nt tfor any serv'ic, t'xIaIinanI ton or t'.i attniiwnt l which is per-ori nlC d as a result o t nl
within 72 hours of rspotII lg i It t io tI dveiLClc lllInt I oi thI frIeet lsC oiitil t Ice i t rdfi eldi f e sC iv c. xamlilan llon or 1 tt'm1cL nt.


-VM1' I6
LAM!MU4S


PAGE 3-B
RON WAS ARRESTED af-
ter allegations that he in-
tentionally struck a football
player in the throat during
practice. The South Walton
High School football coach
allegedly used medical neck
braces during practices to
demonstrate a throat thrust
to injure opposing players.
He was booked into the Wal-
ton County Jail.

SEASIDE NEIGHBOR-
HOOD SCHOOL WON
FIVE AWARDS in the
BEST Robotics Competi-
tion. They won the 3rd place
BEST (Boosting engineer-
ing, science, and technology)
award, founders award for
-creative design, web page
design award, 3rd place best
project engineering note-
book award, and 2nd place
best spirit and sportsman-
ship award.

FIRST SOUTH WALTON
WAL-MART was approved
for signage variances, al-
lowing four-feet-six-inch let-
ters on its building, far sur-
passing the normal 36-inch
height limit.

THE 20TH ANNUAL
SEEING RED WINE FES-
TIVAL took place in Seaside,
drawing huge' crowds with
hundreds of notable wines,
cheeses, and chef special-
ties to sample. The four day
festival included a vintners
dinner, grand tasting, and a
celebration of bubbles.


See REVIEW 5-B









PAGE4 TH DeUNA SPING HEADBEZTUSAEEBR3,21


SKEDnEH~3 EAEJ


ALAQUA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH. The pastor and
congregation invite you to come join us for services at 9 a.m. every
Sunday. Church school for children and coffe fellowship follow the
morning service. Serving the faithful at 4189 Coy Burgess Loope
since 1837. Come to the country for worship. Call Pastor Henry
Martin at (850)892-4860 for more information.

ARGYLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 252 Argyle Church Road, Argyle,
FL invites everyone to attend their services. Sunday School 9:45
a.m. all ages, Church Service 11 a.m., Sunday night 6 p.m. all
ages, Wednesday night 6 p.m.
Pastor James Burnham. Call (850)892-2327, or (850)259-2173.
All are welcome.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH invites you to attend
Sunday School 9:45, Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Train-
ing 5 p.m., Sunday Evening Service 6 p.m., Wednesday Prayer
Service 6:30 p.m. Come and be a part of an awesome ministry
here in your community.

BEECHGROVE CHURCH OF GOD and Pastor D. Wayne
Rickards extend a warm welcome to everyone to attend their regular
services. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m.; morning worship at 11
a.m.; Sunday night services begin at 5 p.m. and Wednesday night
services begin at 6 p.m. The church is located six miles south of
Ponce de Leon on CR 183. For information (850)836-4484.

BIBLE BELIEVERS BAPTIST CHURCH, The congregation and
Pastor Dan Hershey, would like to invite you to come and be a part of
our continuing church growth. If you are looking for a fundamental,
KJV Bible-believing, independent Baptist Church, then we are just
what you are looking for. The preaching is not compromised, it is
straight out of God's Word. The preaching is known to be "old-
fashioned," like it used to be. So, please come join us in worship.
330 North Davis Lane, DFS. Sunday School at 10 a.m. services 11
and 6 p.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study 6:30
p.m. "Teaching the Bible as it is for men as they are."

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W.
Live Oak Ave. in DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and
congregation welcomes you to join Spirit filled worship services
where we'll treat you in so many different ways, you will have to
like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7 p.m. All are cordially invited
and welcome. For a ride to church contact (850)892-0706 or (850)
892-4704.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come meet and fellowship with
other real people who genuinely love the Lord. Sit under practical
bible teaching and preaching relevant to today's issues. Come let
Jesus Christ heal your body, save your marriage, touch your kids,
and give hope to the broken hearted. Come dressed casual or
Sunday best. All are welcome and will fit in. No ties required. Seekers
welcome. Come see for yourself that we are sound, practical, God
loving people who center our lives around the person of Jesus
Christ and a solid approach to the Holy Scriptures. We do pray for
the sick and needy, and believe in the bible gospel of power to meet
the human need. Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. and Wednesday night
classes begin at 6:30 p.m., Teens: Wednesday nights, Children's
Church: Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights. Cornerstone
Church is located at 2044 Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak
Springs. Ph.(850) 892-2240.

EUCHEE VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is located in the
Euchee Valley Community at the intersection of County Hwys. 183
South and 280 East.
We cordially invite you to come and worship with us and make
us your church home. Sunday School begins for all ages at 9:45
a.m. followed by morning worship at 11 a.m. Nursery provided.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church
attendance doesn't have to be dull, mundane or feel like just an
added burden to your life! You can attend a church service in which
you feel both welcomed and loved, as well as be challenged by
the powerful preaching of God's Word. The church family of the
First Apostolic Church embraces the doctrine of the early Apostles
and their preaching as recorded in the Book of Acts and other
New Testament teachings. Sunday Services begin at 10 a.m. with
Sunday school for the children and a spirt-filled worship for adults.
Sunday evening service begins at 5:30 with prayer, with worship
and preaching beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday night bible study
begins at 7 p.m. and we offer family prayer on Thursday from 6 p.m
to 7 p.m. each week. Not able to physically attend? Hear sermons
posted on our website at www.defuniakapostolic.com. Come and
experience church the way God started it all in the New Testament!
If you have any questions or need ministry assistance, please feel
free to call the church office at (850) 892-7882. Rev. David W. King,
Pastor.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located
at 461 Van Buren Avenue, Pastor Michael F. Tadlock, his wife,
Amy and Son, Hayden would like to extend an invitation for all
to come join us as we celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus
Christ through Spirit filled worship & annointed preaching!! Sunday
School begins at 9:30 a.m., followed by Morning Worship at 10:30
a.m. Sunday evening service is at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evening
service begins at 6:30 p.m. Youth Ministry Services are held every
Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Please come and worship with us.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East
Live Oak Avenue. We cordially invite you to join our "Fellowship
of Encouragement" and come for Worship and Bible Study at the
following times: Sunday Bible Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship
(10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5 p.m.) and evening worship
(6:00 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us for prayer meeting
at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship dinners.
Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details. Visit our webpage
at www.fbcdfs.org.

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite
you to worship with us this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Then stay for
refreshments and adult Bible Study and children's Sunday School.
Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz, speaks from the Gospel each
Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We are known throughout
our community as a friendly and serving Church that welcomes
newcomers. We are located on U.S. 331, very near the Florida line
[245121bd 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at
(334) 858-3515 for more specific directions.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS,
1063 Circle Drive, invites the public to join them throughout the
week for worship, fellowship, study and service. A men's fellow-
ship group and Presbyterian women meet monthly for fellowship
and Bible study. Children's and youth activities are announced. Call
for information. Sunday (nursery provided from 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.)
9:30 a.m. Songfest for everyone 9:45 a.m. Sunday school for all
ages. 11 a.m. morning worship. Wednesday 3:30 p.m. Presbyterian
youth fellowship. 6:30 p.m. Chancel choir rehearsal.
First and third Wednesday, 9 a.m. 12 p.m. KID'S CLOSET to
provide basic necessities to children of Walton County families in
need.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who
are committed to being an inclusive faith community, where per-
sons from all walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working
together. If you're looking for a church home, we invite you to come
visit us. Church office phone number 892-5832. email:fpcdfs@em-
barqmail.com Website: fpcdfs.com

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS, located at 88 Circle Drive, Rev. Robert West, staff
and congregation wish to invite you to join our family for activities
on Sunday beginning with Contemporary Worship Service in the
sanctuary at 8:45 a.m.; Traditional Worship Service at 11 a.m. with


Children's Church (Pre-K to third grade) provided for both services;
Vesper service at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. Communion is observed
at both morning services on first Sunday and Sunday School for all
ages at 9:45 a.m. Children's Sunday school (k-6th) is "JAM" (Jesus
and Me) is the Multi-Dimensional Learning program with children
rotating to different workshops (art, computer, cooking/science,
games, storytelling/movie) each Sunday "learning by doing". Other
opportunities on Sunday include: Sr. High Youth Fellowship at 4 p.m..;
Jr. High Youth Fellowship and Children (HIS Kids Club) at 3:30 p.m.;
Food pantry every 3rd Sat. 7-9 a.m. For more information, call (850)
892-5332, 892-5128 e-mail fumcdfs@embarqmail.com website www.
fumcdefuniaksprings.org.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF WESTVILLE, 2100
Highway 90 West, Westville. Pastor Jason Campbell and the Westville
church family invite you to come to a place where Pentecost is an
experience, not a thing of the past. We offer a friendly environment
with annointed preaching and singing, Our Sunday morning services
begin at 10 a.m. and our Sunday evening service begins at 5 p.m. Our
Wednesday evening service begins at 7 p.m. We also offer children's
church on Wednesday at 7 p.m. Come experience the power of the
Holy Ghost just like early church did in the Book of Acts. For more
information call, (850) 548-5898 or(850) 892-7499.

FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP INTERNATIONAL is a non-
denominational church filled with excitement about what the future
holds and a sincere hunger for the outpouring of the Spirit of God. We
are a church where God's presence is never taken for granted and
neither are you. Freedom Fellowship is a church looking for a people
"who will humble themselves before God and seek His ways." 2Chr.
7:14, Pastor Dennis Grey II invites your family to be a part of our family
each Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Casual dress / Contemporary Worship. We
are now meeting at the Continental Worship Center located at 2132
U.S. 90 across from the DeFuniak Springs Airport.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FREEPORT 430 Kylea Laird Dr.,
Freeport, Fl. Pastor Ken Coots would like to extend an invitation to one
and all to come and "Worship"the Lord Jesus Christ with us, as we
seek His perfect will. Bible Study for all ages commences at 8:45 a.m.
each Sunday. Sunday a.m. worship service begins at 10 a.m., and
Sunday p.m. service at 5 p.m.. The Wednesday p.m. prayer service
begins at 6 p.m.. Both the Sunday p.m. and Wednesday p.m. prayer
services are being held in the Fellowship Hall. Explicit Bible doctrine
is the continuous thread during both evenings. We at FBC Freeport
are strong advocates of Romans 10:17, "Faith cometh by hearing and
hearing by the Word of God." Hope and pray to see all there! (850)
835-2742 (850) 774-8327.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (formerly the Concerned Chris-
tian Church) desires to reproduce in doctrine, in life and practice,
the Church founded by Christ. Our position may be summarized as
"where the Bible speaks, we speak" and "where the Bible is silent, we
are silent," we invite you to join us and help spread the message of
Christ in our community. Sunday School (all ages) at 10 a.m. and wor-
ship (including Childrens' Church) starts at 11 a.m. Nursery available.
Our minister is John Dixon and the church is located on U.S. 90, 2.4
miles west of the intersection of U.S. 90 and U.S. 331 North.

FREEPORT ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 17457 U.S. 331 S. Sunday
services: Learning Center 9:45 a.m. Morning worship 10:45 a.m. Hear
the series "Galatians-Christ in You;" Wednesday 7 p.m.-Hear the series
"Preaching through the Psalms." Nursery available. Phone 865-4068
for more information.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 174 Harrison Street,
(corner of Bayloop & Harrison St.) Freeport, Fl. 32439 Office 850-
880-6633, Parsonage 850-835-2261, Pastor's Cell Phone 850-225-
4914 Dr. Charles Satterwhite, Pastor. Please come worship with us.
Rev. Dr. G Charles Sattewhite, Pastor announces that we are having
blended services which include both Contemporary and Traditional
services, these services are geared to reach both t he seeker, and
the growing church member, as well as the established member. WE
are excited about what God is doing at the Freeport UMC. Our service
times are 9:00 a.m. for Bible Study, and children's hour, our Worship
time is 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship in Song 4:00 p.m., Prayer
Meeting Wednesday 6:00 p.m., Our Ladies meet every other Tuesday
Night 6:00 p.m., We have a Gospel Singing Jubilee on the 1st Saturday
of every month 6:00 p.m. (Open Mic). Come be with us. "a short drive
for a life changing experience."

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, 2415 County Hwy. 1883, De-
Funiak Springs is a friendly little country church that welcomes all
visitors. Everyone is invited to worship with the congregation. Sun-
day school starts at 9:15 a.m. Sunday morning worship is at 10:30
a.m. and Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday we have
prayer meeting starting at 6:30 p.m. and children's mission program
and Bible drill program. Every fifth Sunday, we have special music
followed by "Dinner on the Grounds." We have a nursery for 0-3 and
Children's Church for ages 3 through the first grade.
Missions are very important to Friendship. We have Men's, Wom-
en's and children's mission program. Our pastor is Johnmark Brown.
We extend a heartfelt welcome for you to come and join with us in wor-
ship and fellowship. For any questions please call (850)859-2287.

GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (GPC) Pastor Keith An-
drews and the congregation of GPC invite you to come and worship
with them. At GPC, you'll find teaching that's biblical, practical, and
encouraging; worship that's exciting, joyous, and Christ-honoring; and
fellowship that's warm and personal. Sunday: Sunday School (all
ages!) at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Kidz Klub at 11 a.m. Ignite! (Youth)
at various locations from 5 7 p.m. Wednesday: Transformation
(Bible study for men and women) at 6:30 p.m. GPC is located about
10 minutes north of DeFuniak Springs on SR-83N. Find out more on
the web at www.glendalechurch.org or call (850)859-0080.

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of High-
way 90 on Laird Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just before
the Okaloosa County line. Grace Community is a church committed to
historical Southern Baptist principles and believes that the Church is
called, not to reflect its culture, but to shape it. We believe that faith
must be lived as well as affirmed, therefore, right living derives from
right believing. We hold to a high view of Scripture believing the Bible
as our final authority and that it "stands in judgement of us, never do
we stand in judgement of it." Sunday morning worship begins at 9:45
a.m. with Sunday School at 11 a.m. and evening bible study at 6 p:m.
Friday night home Bible study at 6:30 p.m. If you are tired of playing
church, come help us shape the culture where we are "learning God's
will one verse at a time."

HARMONY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH and Pastor Donel Davidson
together with his family welcome all to worship God in spirit and in
truth, at 974 Adams Road, DeFuniak Springs.
Church services will begin with Sunday School at 10 a.m.; Sunday
morning worship at 11 a.m.; Sunday evening at 5 p.m.,, and Wednes-
day evening 6:30 p.m. Directions: U.S.331 N turn on to Williams Road
go about 3.3 miles to Adams Road, turn right onto Adams go about
9/10 of a mile to church. U.S. 90 turn onto CR-1087 in the Mossy
Head area go to Williams Road, turn right onto Williams about 2.8
miles to Adams Road, turn left onto Adams go 9/10 of a mile to church.
From CR-1087 out of New Harmony turn left onto Adams Road and
go 9/10 of a mile to church. For more information, call the pastorium
phone number at (850) 834-2017.

INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles
south of DeFuniak Springs, cordially invites you to come and worship
with us in Sunday School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship services,
at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is at 6 p.m.
Pastor Scot Keppel and the congregation extends a very special
welcome to come visit or make us your church home. We practice
"Love one another". A nursery is provided.

NEW HARMONY BAPTIST CHURCH is located at 2281 County
Hwy. 2A, DeFuniak Springs, FL. only nine miles north of Hwy. 90 on


Rt. 1087 from Mossy Head. Pastor Todd Camp would like to invite
you to worship with us during any of our exciting weekly services.
We are a family church that loves Jesus! Our Sunday School hour
is from 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. followed by our morning worship
service at 11 a.m. Nursery and children's church are provided. Our
Sunday evening service begins at 6 p.m., as we "study to show
ourselves approved unto God." On Wednesday evenings at 7
p.m. we have a dynamic children's program, youth meeting, ladies
ministry, and adult prayer and Bible study service. The church also
offers affordable daycare services. Monday-Friday. We are a Bible
church committed to seeing God change lives in the power of the
Holy Spirit. Come and be a part of what the Lord is doing at New
Harmony Baptist Church. Call for more information at (850) 834-
2871.

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH 6753 State Hwy 2 East,
Darlington, FL.. We are reaching out to the lost, hurting, hungry,
and naked. Pastor Rev. Curtis Manning and his congregation would
like to invite you to attend services with them. Sunday School for
all ages is at 10 a.m., and Sunday Morning worship is at 11 a.m.;
Sunday evening services will be at 5 p.m.; Wednesday night prayer
and teaching is at 6 p.m.; Come enjoy our anointed praise and
worship and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and
teaching of God's Word. For more information call ( 850 ) 892-
2048.

PASTOR BILL HUNTER AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE
BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, "the Church in
the Wildwood," invites you to come and worship with us just as you
are. Black Creek UMC is located five miles east of Freeport at 278
Memorial Lane. (If you need directions, please call (850)859-2366
or (850)830-1497. We are a church body who loves people and
who also loves to hear the word of God preached. If you sing and/
or play a musical instrument and would like to share your talents)
please come and join us. Make plans now to attend Sunday school
at 10 a.m., Morning Worship at 11 a,m., and Evening Worship at
6 p.m. Rev. Bill may be reached at (850)859-2366 or (850)830-
1497.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs.
Located one mile south of Bob Sikes Road at 1015 Pleasant Ridge
Rd. extends a special invitation for you to join us to worship the
Lord and study His Word at the following times: Sunday Breakfast/
Fellowship (8:45); age appropriate Sunday Bible Study (9:15);
Morning Worship (10:30); Discipleship training (5 p.m.) and Evening
Worship (6 p.m.); Wednesday (6 p.m.) adult Bible study and youth
activities. Participate in meaningful worship with family and friends.
Call (850) 892-3500 for more information.

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at the
intersection of Hwy. 1883 & 183 invites you to Sunday School 9:45
a.m., Worship Service 11 a.m., Discipleship Training at 5 p.m.,
Evening Service 6 p.m., Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 p.m. Please come
worship God with us.

PORTLAND UNITED METHODIST CHURCH welcomes you!
We are here for you and hope you will bless us with y our presence
as we worship God and live in the community together. We're
different, and seeking new ways to be the church God call us to
be. We focus on prayer, fellowship, study, missions and worship. A
variety of activities are going on weekly. We have Sunday school
for adults and youth. Worship at 11 a.m. and a new contemplative
prayer service beginning in September at 8:30 a.m., nursery
provided. Youth meet on Wednesday along with dinner and adult
Bible studies at 6 p.m. For more information call (850)-307-2009.

SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1307 County Hwy 278,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Morning Worship
10 a.m.; Puppets, Children's and Adult Choir 4 p.m.; Evening Adult
Bible Study, Youth Bible Study, and Children's Mission Classes 5
p.m.; Sunday Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday mid-week
worship service and AWANA 6:30 p.m. Sign language interpretation
for the deaf provided at all services. Southwide Baptist Church has
classes and activities for all ages: Youth Group, Royal Ambassadors,
Girls in Action, Acteens, Adult Choir, Women on Mission, Paintball
(ages 10+ every third Saturday of the month), AWANA (3yrs-
12th Grade), and sign language classes for all ages. Pastor William
Whaley invites everyone to come and hear the saving word of God.
Directions: from DeFuniak take U.S. 331 S. turn right on first road
(Coy Burgess Loop) past 1-10. Southwide Baptist Church is located
1.5 miles on the left at intersection of Coy Burgess Loop and Millard
Gainey Road. Call (850) 892-3835 for more information or for
directions.

ST. AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is a historic mission
located at 144 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday schedule:
9 a.m. Bible study in the vicarage and 10:15 a.m. Eucharist in the
church. A COMMUNITY "CENTERING PRAYER GROUP" meets
each Saturday morning at 10 a.m. in the church. All are invited.
From December through May COMMUNITY FIRST SATURDAY
BREAKFASTS are served in the parish hall from 7 am. till 11 a.m.
St. Agatha's is the home of the Lakeside Concert series. The Vicar
is The Rev. John C. Scott, Mdiv. For more information call (850)
892-9754

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331
N., P.O. Box 590, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435, Phone: (850)
892-9247. Mass Schedule: Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday,
6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of
Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard Dawson, pastor.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congrega-
tion cordially invite you to attend services with us. Sunday School
is at 10 a.m. Sunday Evening Services are at 6:00 pm. Wednes-
day Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 26 Joe Ander-
son Road (Hwy 83 North). Our pastor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please
come ready to worship and expecting a blessing!

VICTORY LIGHTHOUSE ASSEMBLY OF GOD, Highway 90
at the Mossy Head Community Center across from the Mossy
Head General Store. We would like to extend to all an invitation to
come and join us and be blessed. We are a church dedicated to
serving Jesus and spreading His wonderful word. Let us share the
light of God's word with you. Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m.,
followed by'Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Each Sunday we have a
fellowship lunch on the grounds, all are invited. Sunday afternoon
service begins about 1:30 p.m. Friday evening service 7 p.m. -
prayer, Royal Rangers, Missionettes and Adult Bible Study followed
by prayer time. Pastor is Thomas Adamson, Children's Ministries
Kevin Chilcutt. For more information call 892-3817 or 652-4610.
Website www.victorylighthouse church.org.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner
of Live Oak and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Open Hearts,
Open Minds, Open Doors," Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School
9 a.m., Morning Worship 10 a.m. The small church by the side of
the road with a cross over the entrance, longing to extend the love
and peace of God to any wayfarer or pilgrim seeking a rest from
this world of strife and despair. A place where common people can
assemble for simple worship and experience the Presence of God
in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered together in my
name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V. "The
devil wins a skirmish with a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the
war."


AD BU~~ F~ ar


I I I -


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY DECEMBER 30, 2010


PAGE 4B


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THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


REVIEW


THE FREEPORT VET-
ERANS MEMORIAL WAS
UNVEILED in time for Vet-
eran's Day. Honor guards
from each branch of the
military revealed an eagle-
topped monument on Free-
port City Hall grounds. The
memorial was inspired by
the idea of Trudy Boudreaux
and Beckie Buxton.

SCHOOL BOARD MEM-
BERS WERE SWORN IN
by Judge Wells. Incumbent
Sharon Roberts pledged the
oath of office with newcom-
ers Faye Leddon and Den-
nis Wallace on Nov. 16.

RE-ELECTED COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS Sara
Comander and Kenneth
Pridgen took the oath of of-
fice for their new term on
Nov. 16.

GERRY DEMERS WAS
APPOINTED assistant
county administrator under
current administrator Lyle
Seigler. Demers has been
a resident of Florida for
19 years, and is a certified
building official, plans ex-
aminer, inspector and main-
tains certification as a code
enforcement officer.

THE TOUR OF HOMES
was gearing up in both Free-
port and DeFuniak Springs
for the holiday season, show-
casing homes such as the
Burruss Cawthon house on
Circle Drive and the Castle
horse ranch on SR-20.

CHAUTAUQUA REHAB
AND NURSING CENTER,
held its first learning con-
gress--an educational forum
to provide employees con-


FROM PAGE 3-B


tinued education on demen-
tia awareness and customer
service. The congress is in-
tended to show employees
what dementia patients face
on a day to day basis and is
a time for reflection, intro-
spection, and rededication.

THE 38TH ANNUAL
VETERANS DAY PRO-
GRAM was held at Walton
Middle School, where local
heroes were honored by stu-
dents, staff, and the com-
munity. In addition to the
playing of Taps, a moment
of silence, and the posting of
the colors, students present-
ed a drama skit and song for
veterans.

THE CITY OF DE-
FUNIAK SPRINGS hosted
its fifth annual Veterans
Day program at Magnolia
Cemetery. Guest speaker
retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen
Patt Maney spoke on honor-
ing those who fight for free-
dom and demanding proper
care for soldiers returning
from battle.

FREEPORT, ELEMEN-
TARY, MIDDLE AND
HIGH SCHOOLS came to-
gether on Nov. 10 for a joint
Veterans Day service. Guest
speaker Air Force Lt. Col.
George Trumba spoke on
the value of students and
teachers, and how his his-
tory teacher, a Vietnam vet-
eran, influenced his decision
to enter the military.

A TOWN HALL MEET-
ING FOR BP OIL SPILL
concerns was hosted by the
Walton County Sheriffs
Office. Sheriff Mike Adkin-
son told attendees his office


is a facilitator and can be
contacted with any linger-
ing questions on the Gulf
Coast's recovery. Speakers
announced water samples
and seafood are being tested
for oil and dispersant and
have met quality water stan-
dards and FDA standards.

HERALD BREEZE EDI-
TOR BRUCE COLLIER re-
ceived an honorary member-
ship to the Seagrove Garden
Club at its holiday meeting
Nov. 10. Russ Barley gave
a motivational and instruc-
tional presentation on holi-
day decor.


THE FLUTTERBY FES-
TIVAL highlighted local
children's art in Rosemary
Beach's town square Nov.,
13 and 14. Kids enjoyed
puppet shows, storytelling,
and other games to cele-
brate the 20th edition of the
festival which honors the
Monarch butterfly's migra-
tion through the area.

THE CITY OF DE-
FUNIAK SPRINGS ap-
proved the budget amend-
ment in the amount of
$253,251 for Defuniak
Springs Municipal Airport
operations, including two
full-time employees. As of
Dec. 1, the city took control
of the airport and began ad-
vertisement for an airport
manager and administra-
tive support.

A VETERANS MEMORI-
AL WALKWAY was planned
for Magnolia Cemetery, to
be installed by Veterans
Day 2011. Brick pavers are
for sale and can be inscribed
with a message in honor of a
local hero.

FREEPORTRESIDENTS


VOICED SEWAGE RELAT-
ED HEALTH CONCERNS
after learning approximate-
ly 10 percent of the popu-
lation was using canister
lift stations rather than a
gravity collection system
to feed sewage to the treat-
ment plant. Residents wor-
ried in the event of a power
outage, the canister lift sta-
tions would shut down, re-
sulting in sewage back-up
into homes. Mayor Mickey
Marse assuaged these fears
by pointing out the one-
half horse power pumps on
the canister system can be
wired to and powered by a
geneator in the event of a
significant power outage.

ORDINANCE CHANG-
ES IN PAXTON'S sewer
and water rates led to disso-
nance at a city council meet-
ing. The ordinance results
in a 5-percent hike across
the board for sewer and wa-
ter rates and a late payment
penalty of 15 percent of the
total utility bill.

THE DFS WOMAN'S
CLUB CHRISTMAS PA-
RADE was planned for Dec.
11 at 1 p.m. beginning at
Walton Middle School and
inviting all to participate.

PATTY WINSTEAD FIN-
ISHED THE PENSACOLA
MARATHON, a remarkable
26 miles. Winstead is an em-
ployee of the Walton County
Tax Collector's Office and
trained for six months for
the marathon.


THE WALTON COUNTY
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION
held a free Thanksgiving
meal for the community
Nov. 25. Along with other
churches, the association
provided a full turkey din-


ner at the Walton County
Fairgrounds, and offered
delivery, setting a record
breaking number of those
served.

MICHAEL SMITH, 19,
WAS NAMED CO-AN-
GLER OF THE YEAR at the
Florida B.A.S.S. Federation
State Championship. Smith
won against 44 co-anglers
and will advance to repre-
sent Florida in the Southern
Region Divisional. This is
the second consecutive year
Smith qualified for the state
team.

THE SHIDER FAMILY
RECIEVED KEYS to their
new home, built by Habi-


A SINGLE VEHICLE CRASH left a man injured on
Christmas Day.


Driver injured in


crash on


Shoemaker Drive


Former DFS man detained in Haitian prison


Paul Waggoner, 32,
whose sister Randi Lightner
lives in DeFuniak Springs,
is being held in the Haitian
national penitentiary in
Port-au-Prince, a detainee
facing accusations that he
kidnapped a baby who sub-
sequently died in a hospital
where he was volunteering.
Waggoner was doing vol-
unteer work for Materials


Management Relief Corps,
a group he helped found.

Waggoner was born and
raised in DeFuniak Springs.
Following the Haitian earth-
quake in January, he sold
his construction company
and helped found Materials
Management, which pro-
vides medical supplies and
transportation for aid mis-


sions.
Lightner has contacted
Rep. Brad Drake, who prom-
ised to help her make con-
tact with people who could
help. A Haitian judge is
reportedly looking into the
case. While it, appears that
Waggoner has yet to be for-
mally charged, Haitian law
allows him to be jailed with-
out charges. Lightner is also


speaking with other state
and federal authorities.

Lightner has expressed
'concern over substandard
conditions in the prison,
which is overcTrowded and
disease-ridden. Her brother
is reportedly being given
food and water by an outside
source, and has been moved
to a private cell.


On Dec. 25, late in the
evening, DeFuniak Springs
Police responded to a single
vehicle crash on Shoemaker
Drive north of Lakeview
Drive.
Upon arrival Cecilo Es-
cobedo Quintero was found
pinned inside the vehicle.
First responders worked
diligently in freeing and ad-
ministering first aid. Upon
extraction, he was trans-
ported to Fort Walton Beach
Medical Center for non-life
threatening injuries.


Investigation at the scene
revealed the vehicle was
traveling north on Shoe-
maker Drive at a high rate
of speed and failed to main-
tain a single lane, traveling
off the roadway onto the
right shoulder while enter-
ing a citrve. The vehicle
proceeded off the roadway
striking a tree, overturning
and coming to final rest on
its left side.
Alcohol is believed to be a
factor and charges are pend-
ing further investigation.


at 1( Cu It P l nin gP o grs iv G rIw I ng I


m I *


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Quiet neighborhood near the Freeport
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in place. Home site is cleared. New
seawall. Good fishing! Call for details!
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LaGRANGE BAYOU HOME SITE
Postcard setting & adjoins 7 acre nature
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To view our local listings visit our website at
www.freeportwaterfront.com [1


PAGE 5-B
tat for Humanity. In time
to be home for Christmas,
the Shider home is the 21st
home built by Habitat in
Walton County.

NATIONAL BIBLE
WEEK PROCLAMATION
was signed by Mayor Harold
Carpenter. The week is des-
ignated to inspire people to
read the Bible as a source of
inspiration, hope and guid-
ance.

THE RATE PROGRAM
WAS TAKEN to the commu-
nity on Nov. 18. The remote
area tax express payment
program gives citizens an

.See REVIEW 6-B







PAGE 6-B


REVIEW


accessible way to pay their
taxes as it is convenient, as
well as an opportunity to
speak with someone from
the tax collector's office on
their property taxes. The
RATE program was institut-
Sed by Tax Collector Rhonda
Skipper when she took office
five years ago.

DECORATIONS FOR
CHRISTMAS REFLEC-
TIONS began popping up
around the Lakeyard in
preparation for its glowing
debut on Nov. 26. The lights
can be viewed from 5p.m. -
9p.m. throughout the holi-
day season.




DECEMBER


THE WALTON COUNTY
BOARD OF COMMISSION-
ERS adjusted their regular
meeting times from 4 p.m.
on the second and fourth
Tuesday of the month to
include a 9 a.m. meeting on
the fourth Tuesday of the
month in hopes elderly citi-
zens of the community will
be able to attend.

S ELIZABETH BRAN-
NON, FREEPORT CITY
SCOUNCIL member was ap-
pointed to Northwest Flori-
da League of Cities board of
directors. Brannon proudly
accepted the appointment to
the largest regional munici-
pal government organiza-
tion in Florida and said she
hopes to "make a positive
Impact in the community in
which [she] lives."

A HISTORICAL RE-
SEARCH GRANT was ap-
plied for by the Walton
County Board of Commis-
sioners to find information
on Mossy Bend, LaGrange
City, New Home, Alaqua
Fort, and the Bell and North
Turpentine Still-pre 1880
Walton County communi-
ties.

THE THANKSGIVING
MEAL BROKE RECORDS,
serving a total of 528 people
a free turkey dinner. The
church-organized meal saw
a huge increase from the 200
people it served last year.

JOHN QUITMAN CLEN-
:NEY WAS ARRESTED for
Felony grand theft and orga-
nized fraud. The contractor
Allegedly conspired with lo-
cal Lowe's employee Chris-
Stopher Michael Weaver to
steal merchandise from the
DeFuniak Springs Lowe's.

HABITAT FOR HUMAN-
ITY BROKE GROUND on
its 21st house in Walton
County. Along with stu-
dents from the Walton Ca-
reer Development Center,
volunteers held a barn rais-
ing for Roberta Palmer and
help family on Nov. 12.

MELANIE AND JIM
NIPPER OPERATE SKY-
DIVE! LIVE, Walton Coun-
ty's only skydiving drop
zone. The pair, Melanie an
Army Chief Warrant Of-
ficer, and Jim, a veteran of
the Army Parachute Team
with 8,000 jumps under his
belt, have the only landing
zone from Tallahassee to
Elberta. Tandem jumps run
$250 each and once one has
a solo license are $20 per
jump.

SANTA ARRIVED BY
HELICOPTER to Silver
Sands Factory Stores on
Dec. 4, thanks to the AIR-
Heart helicopter from Sacred
Heart Hospital. After climb-
ing out of the helicopter,
,-. Santa took a red Mustang
convertible to the center's
42-foot-tree in front of Saks
Fifth Avenue and listened to


Small the good boys' and girls'
Christmas wishes.

RILEY CLEVELAND
AND NYSSA WILLIAMS
were both crowned in the
Northwest Florida pageant,
Cleveland taking Little Miss
and Williams taking Miss
for the 2011 year.

ELIZABETH NETTLES,
RYAN HINES AND MADY


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


The DeFunlak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1888


FROM PAGE 5-B


BRAMMEL took first, sec-
ond, and third place in the
second annual Walton Mid-
dle School talent show "Wal-
ton's Got Talent."

A ONE-TIME FEE OF
$100 PER FOOT of seawall
was proposed for the Habi-
tat Conservation Plan. The
fee would be paid by proper-
ty owners who constructedd
coastal armoring permitted
on a temporary basis by the
county in the emergency
period following 2005 Hur-
rican Dennis. The fee would
not be mandatory.

THE WALTON REPUB-
LICAN WOMEN FEDER-
ATED members chose Com-
pany B of the 101st Infantry
to send Christmas goodies
to this holiday season. Items
sent include food, toiletries,
and clothing. The decision
was made after learning the
unit was home to local sol-
dier PFC Tommy Keeter.

YOU COULD SAVE JOR-
DAN JEMSEK'S LIFE. The
six-year-old North Carolina
resident is fighting leuke-
mia for a second time. Three
days before Jordan was di-
agnosed her mother Kay
was diagnosed with breast
cancer. Just a month before
their diagnoses, Kay lost her
mother to ovarian cancer.
On Jan. 15, a booth will be
set up at the Seaside Farm-
er's Market for potential do-
nors to have a cheek swab to
see if they are a match for
Jordan. If you are unable
to attend, donor kits can be
mailed. To learn more visit,
www.caringbridge.org/visit/
jordanjemsek. --

COMMUNITY WAL-
TON ELECTED ITS 2011
OFFICERS. They are
Jan Stevens,chair; Kevin
Crystal,vice-chair; Shonda
Trantina, treasurer; Jamie
Huggins, Johndra Culp and
Bruce Buchanan, board
members.

THE BAYTOWNE
WHARF ICE SKATING
RINK had locals on the ice
for a rare treat in Florida.
Until Valentine's Day, Flo-
ridians will get to lace up
their skates for $10 (plus $2
for skate rentals) and glide
around the ice for 90 min-
utes.

CHAD AND KYLE
LINDAAS WERE REUNIT-
ED thanks to Regency Hos-
pice Second Wind Dreams
organization. Kyle Lindaas,
who is critically ill with Lou
Gehrig's Disease, had not
seen his brother, a truck
driver in Illinois, for 10
years. Second Wind Dreams
raised and donated funds
to pay for a car rental and
fuel for Chad to spend three
days with his brother Kyle.

THE RURAL RELIEF
PANTRY was feeling the
strains of a tough economy
as its food request doubled
in November. It fed over 92
families, totaling 266 people.
The pantry handed out over
4,000 pounds of produce at
its Thanksgiving opening,
and held another pantry
day Dec. 18.

AUSTIN CARTER, 15,
WAS -STRUCK BY A CAR
mirror as he was crossing
Walton Road. The driver of
the truck that struck him,
61-year-old Charles Lin-
ton said he tried to avoid
Carter. Carter was treated
at the scene and reported as
stable.

TRISHA KING WAS
NAMED THE COMMUNI-
CATIONS COORDINATOR
for Jobs Plus. King will be
responsible for marketing
and communications, com-
munity outreach and event
promotion. King will aid
residents of Walton and


Okaloosa Counties get back
to work.

ANDRUS BOYD GRAY-
SON READ The Night
Before Christmas to local
school and churches in the
month of December. The
son of Laura O. Grayson, he
received the key to the City
of Miami for founding the
Queen of the United States


scholarship pageant.

KIM KIRBY WAS CHO-
SEN AS GRAND MAR-
SHAL of the Defuniak
Springs Woman's Club an-
nual Christmas parade.
Kirby, city manager, said
serving the public was "an
honor and a privilege."

THE ADOPT-A-CLASS-
ROOM program helps teach-
ers with purchases to edu-
cate children, and the North
Okaloosa Medical Center
donated $100 to Mrs. Hay-
les' first grade class at West
Defuniak Elementary.

WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL'S ATHLETIC
COMPLEX got one-phase
approval at the Dec. 7
school board meeting. The
$6.5 million complex will
renovate the bleachers,
lighting, landscaping, press
box, bathrooms, concession
stands, and meet AI)A re-
quirements.

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
IS A TREE CITY. The idea
was brought forward by lo-
cal Michael Jenkins, and
pursued by City Manager
Kim Kirby and City Planner
Greg Scoville after the city
council gave their approval.
The designation, awarded
by the Arbor Day Founda-
tion, is an elite honor for
environmentally conscious
communities.

THE COLLEGIATE
HIGH SCHOOL WAS
NAMED NUMBER ONE
for the second time in its, 10-
year history. The Northwest
State College school placed
first in Florida among 470
schools. It has consistently
scored in the top one-half of
one percent in the Florida
Accountability System.

THE WALTON EDUCA-
TION FOUNDATION pre-
sented a $2,000 grant to
the E.O. Wilson Biophilia
Center to support Science,
Technology, Engineering
and Mathematics education


for local students. The grant
will be used to purchase
GPS systems.

THE COMMUNITY
SERVICES COMPLEX lo-
cated at Northwest Florida
State College will hold its
grand opening Jan. 5, 2011.
Tours will be available, and
the open house begins at
3:30 p.m., followed by free
admission to a men's and
women's conference basket-
ball game against Pensacola
State College.

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS CHRISTMAS
PARADE rolled through
downtown Dec. 11. Local of-
ficials, beauty queens, and
of course Santa waved to
the crowds and threw out
candy-no one was injured
by dancing sugar plums.

HALEY BIDDLE, TEEN
MISS WALTON COUNTY
was crowned Teen Miss
Northwest Florida.

THE BENNET HOUSE
IN SEAGROVE BEACH,
known as the wedding
house, was ordered to cease
nonresidential use by Aug.
31. After appeal review by
Judge Howard LaPorte, he
confirmed the decision to
end all commercial use.

THE SOUTH WALTON
FIRE DEPARTMENT ad-
opted an ordinance which
requires a permit for beach
bonfires for non-beachfront
owners. The permit must
come to the South Walton
Fire Department and re-
quires a $50 fee payable by
check or cash only.

THE MOTION TO AP-
PROVE 723 WHISKEY
BRAVO at the old Wheel-
house Restaurant in Sea-
grove Beach passed the
planning commission. The
development seeks to re-
open the restaurant and
renovate the commercial
cottages located on 1.16
acres, which may be used as
offices.


VOLUME 121 NUMBER 51 3 SECTIONS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010 74B PER ctW V-


HUNDREDS CAME TO
THE ALAQUA HOLIDAY
OPEN HOUSE looking for
a new furry member of the
family. The animal refuge is
seeking generous, responsi-
ble animal lovers to provide
homes for any of its 5,000
animals. For information
visit www.aarflorida.com.

THE JOHN SALTSMAN
FAMILY was chosen as
the 2010 DeFuniak Herald
Christmas Family. With
children and grandchildren
home for the holidays, John
and Becky Saltsman shared
what the holidays mean to
them, a love of Christ, music
and togetherness. The Salts-
man family has been inte-
gral to the advancement of
the DeFuniak Springs com-
munity, founding ARC and
the Maude Saunders PTO,
as well as serving on several
community representative
boards.


SCHOOL


GRADES


MOSSY HEAD SCHOOL
is proud to announce Jarred
Coffman as the December
Student of the Month. Jarred
is a fifth-grade student in
Mrs. Amy Wilson's class-
room. Great job, Jarred!


FREEPORT MIDDLE SCHOOL Kiwanis Students of the
Month: Back -'owu (1-r): Eli Sell, eighth grade; Megan Sell,
seventh grade, and Jada Brown sixth grade. Front row: Kel-
lie Rushing, eighth grade.


WERE RELEASED for Wal-
ton County high schools this
month. Both South Walton
High School and Paxton
School earned As. However,
Freeport High School scored
a C and Walton High School
a D. Superintendent Car-
lene Anderson said she is
working with "the low scor-
ing schools" and cautioned
against thinking that grade
is a reflection of the whole
school body's performance,
when it in fact often reflects
the lowest scoring 25 per-
cent of students.

FREEPORT CITY COUN-
CIL received an insurance
premium refund from the
Northwest Florida League
of Cities in the amount of
$19,200 at its December
meeting.

SENATOR DON GAETZ
RECEIVED AN AWARD
from the E.O. Wilson Bio-
philia Center for his support
of its educational offerings.
Gaetz praised the Center as
"natural science in its natu-
ral state," and said "an hour
or day here is worth a week
or a month in a classroom."

DUANE AND SHERRY
HICKS OPENED STELLA'S
FLORIST Dec. 8 in down-
town Defuniak Springs. Lo-
cated at 766 Baldwin Ave.,
the florist offers fresh and
silk arrangements, as well
as handbags, pashminas,
jewelry, and pajamas fea-
tured on Oprah's favorite
things. Stella's hopes to of-
fer formal wear in the near
future.

THE FIRST NATIONAL
BANK CLOCK was restored
to service on Dec. 19. The
two-year project funded by
donation from Take Stock
in the Clock was restored by
Jim Gramlich of Pensacola,
free of charge. Gramlich's
generous offer to restore the
clock saved $8,000.

THE SANTA PATROL
gave Christmas to 208 kids
this year, having received
1,950 toy donations. Over
100 business and residents
participated in the toy drive
sponsored by the Walton
County Sheriffs Office.

A LOCAL BILL PRE-
SENTED BY Emmet Hil-
dreth could result in leg-
islation filed that will not
require Gulf Coast residents
to obtain a state DEP permit
to keep permanent seawall
armoring.

THE FORT WALTON
BEACH BOEING Employ-
ee Foundation awarded a
$3,400 grant to Children
in Crisis, Inc. to purchase
computers and educational
equipment for at-risk chil-
dren. This is Boeing's third
grant to CIC and hopes these
funds will aid with tutoring
and educational programs.

THE CHILDREN'S VOL-
UNTEER HEALTH NET-
WORK Christmas party
was a great success. A silent
auction for lunch with Mike
arid Janet Huckabee raised
almost $4,000. Britt Walk-
er, coordinator of events and
marketing, said it was an
evening to express thanks
for donors' generosity.







THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010
I m-ibililil l I OI


THE CHILDREN OF CHAUTAUQUA HEAD START had some very special guests. McGruff and Smokey Bear visited
with them at the center.



Chautauqua Head Start had some


special guests visit them at the center


THE SECOND GUESTS that came out to visit the Chau-
tauqua Head Start class were the forest rangers from the
Walton County Forestry Division and they brought Smokey
Bear with them.


The children of Chautau-
qua Head Start had some
very special guests visit
with them at the center.

The first guests were Sgt.
Garner, Anna Lacour and


McGruff the Crime fighting
dog. Sgt. Garner and Lacour
spoke to the children about
not talking to strangers, and
to not ever touch a gun.
The next guests that came
out were the forest rangers


from the Walton County
Forestry Division and they
brought Smokey Bear with
them. The rangers spoke
to the children about never
playing with lighters or
matches.


The children loved visit-
ing with both McGruff and
Smokey Bear. We thank ev-
eryone for taking the time
to come out and speak to the
children about the impor-
tance of being safe.


MS. LACOUR SPOKE TO THE CHILDREN at Chau-
tauqua Head Start about not talking to strangers, and to
not ever touch a gun.


THE FIRST GUESTS that came out and visited the Chautauqua Head Start class were Sgt. Garner, Anna Lacour and
McGruff the Crime fighting dog.


THE WALTON COUNTY FORESTRY DIVISION rang-
ers, along with Smokey the Bear spoke to the Chautauqua
Head Start children about never playing with lighters or
matches.


WCHD offers New Year's resolution help


Two of the most common
New Year's resolutions are
to lose weight or quit smok-
ing. Now a person can get
local help with either or


both. Walton County public
services are poised to help
those interested to succeed.
The Walton County Health
Department, University of


COPE Center


Inc. partners


with Pizza Hut in


honoring


grandparents


The Relatives As Par-
ents Program is honoring
families where relatives are
the primary caregivers for
their related children. This
is often grandparents, but
can also be aunts, uncles,
great-grandparents or other
relatives. COPE is partner-
ing with Pizza Hut to honor
primary caregivers for their
commitment to raising re-
lated family members.
The whole family can en-
joy a "Pizza Party" at home
for the holidays. This com-


munity effort is sponsored
by COPE and the Brookdale
Foundation Group.

The DeFuniak Springs
Woman's Club, along with
the DeFuniak Springs Pizza
Hut will supply free pizza
tickets. Each ticket is good
for one large 3 topping pizza
valued at $10. Pizza Hut will
accept tickets for dining in
or picking up. This Holiday
Season get your extended
family together for a "Pizza
Party" on us!


Florida/Walton County Ex-
tension Service, and Wal-
ton County Parks and Rec-
reation have partnered to
sponsor fitness classes at
the DeFuniak Recreation
Center, 435 North Ninth
Street on SR-83. Held on
Wednesday and Thurs-
days from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.,
this dance-inspired, easy-
to-follow program sways to
the beat of Latin rhythms.
Certified Zumba Fitness in-
structor Melissa Rodrigues
leads the diverse group of all
ages and fitness levels. Cost
is $5 for each class or a five-
class punch card for $20.


For information, contact
Melissa Rodrigues at (850)
259-3189, or email Kaiwa2@
cox.net. According to the
Centers for Disease Control
(CDC), regular physical ac-
tivity is one of the most im-
portant things a person can
do for their health. More
information on how physi-
cal activity improves a per-
sons health can be found at
http://www.cdc.gov/physica-
lactivity/everyone/health/.
If smoking has become a
strain on a persons health
and on the budget, smok-
ers can become ex-smokers
with the help of free "Quit


Smoking Now" classes. The
Area Health Education
Center offers free nicotine
patches, lozenges or gum in
conjunction with free coun-
seling and tips for success
during the quitting process.
Beginning Jan. 6, sessions
will be held at the Walton
County Health Department,
362 SR-83 North, from 5 to
6:15 p.m. for six consecutive
Thursday.
For questions, or to join
the class, call Lynne Wel-
don at (850) 685 -8814, or
(850) 398-6965, email lwel-
don@wfachec.org. A list of
resources to help the pub-


Volunteers needed for tax preparation


The Walton County Tax
and Saving Coalition is look-
ing for volunteers for its free
tax preparation program for
low income families in the
DeFuniak Springs Area. The


coalition needs to secure vol-
unteers to serve as tax pre-
parers, quality assurance
personnel and greeters. The
IRS will be providing free
training so there is no expe-


rience necessary. To volun-
teer, contact Rebecca Pazik
at (850) 892-8668 ext. 215 or
email: waltonfreetaxprep@
gmail.com The tentative
dates for training will be
Jan. 20- 22, 2011.


Shelter House offers free WAM!


Just in time for New
Years resolutions Shel-
ter House, local domestic
violence shelter, offers free
WAM! (Women and Money!)
Economic Empowerment
classes. Participants will


learn about credit, how to
deal with creditors, loans,
basic savings and checking
accounts, and much more.
Classes will begin Jan.6
in Niceville, Fla. Classes are


once a week for six weeks.
All classes are open to the
public and free of charge.
Call (850)243-1201, or e-mail
info@shelterhousenwfl.org
to register.


lic learn about the health
consequences of smoking,
secondhand smoke, and
smokeless tobacco use, plus
suggestions to help them
quit smoking can be found
at http://cdc.gov/tobacco/
resources_foryou/individu-
als/index.htm .





Mosley

graduates

special

training
Army Pvt. Timothy J.
Mosley has graduated from
the H-8 Tracked Vehicle Re-
covery Specialist Course at
Fort Knox, Ky.
The course is designed to
train students in the skills
and knowledge needed to
perform recovery operations
using the M88A1/A2 tracked
recovery vehicle.
Mosley is the son of Thom-
as L. and Maria A. Mosley of
I.D. Martin Drive, Freeport,
Fla.
He is a 2008 graduate of
the Rocky Bayou Christian
School, Niceville, Fla.


PAGE 7-B







D1 A I r 0Tf


B VAX" GAPIM
Church Wew


THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010


Reboot and Reload;



A New Year Is Upon Us

By Ronnie McBrayer


Maybe faith is a lot like
your personal computer. Is
that a stretch? Well, think
about it. No one really
thinks about his or her com-
puter until it stops working.
Faith isn't much different.
For example, I spent some
time once.with a young lady
who was convinced God was
going to heal her of a seri-
ous sickness. She spoke of
her faith with conviction,
over and over like a magical
niantra. But I felt she was
trying to talk herself into
a. hoped-for outcome, more
than giving testimony to
genuine faith. Then, it hap-
ppned. Not healing, but sur-
gory.
SShe was devastated; and
not in the garden variety
way of being disillusioned.
No, this was a bona fide
spiritual crisis. What she
hhd believed was reduced to
ashes, consumed in the fires


of disappointment.
As instructed by her spir-
itual leaders, she had, as it
were, dutifully shoved coins
into the Jesus-shaped vend-
ing machine that informed
her understanding of God.
She got nothing in return.
No amount of smashing but-
tons, shaking heaven, or
demanding a refund would
change that.
I spoke to her after sur-
gery and did my best to ex-
plain that faith isn't always
an escape hatch. Having
faith doesn't mean we always
avoid trouble, like a cosmic
"Get out of Jail Free" card.
Instead, as disturbing as it
is, faith sometimes leads to
troubles. But in the process,
faith is the only thing to get
us through it. I was met with
a cold, empty stare and nary
a spoken word. Her faith, at
least faith as she had known
it, was no longer functional.


Leaving her, I immedi-
ately met a friend for lunch
at a local Chinese buffet.
He arrived red-faced and
breathing fire even before
we got around to the Hunan
chicken. It seems the com-
puter system at his office
was on the blink.

Heaven knows I can com-
miserate. Can't we all? I
have never seen anything
make otherwise normal
people (including myself)
go absolutely banshee-bon-
kers than a malfunctioning
computer. Let the computer
system crash at the com-
pany office, deprive people
of their precious e-mail, let
everyone know that all hard
drives are fried along with
everything on them and
there will be weeping and
gnashing of teeth.

Formerly mild-mannered


corporate cogs will be trans-
formed into bloodthirsty
hooligans with torches and
pitchforks lying in wait out-
side the IT engineer's office
until they have had the op-
portunity to tear him or her
to pieces.

So, computer crashes and
crises of faith have more
in common than you may
have realized. When faith
and computers work, life is
grand. When either of these
fails, well, it hits the fan.
But maybe they also have a
similar recovery. Maybe the
problem isn't faulty faith or
crashing computers at all.
Maybe it's a virus.
I'm no computer-geek but
I know that a computer vi-
rus is a nasty piece of work.
It so screws up the operat-
ing system and the other
software on the computer,
that actions as simple as


RONNIE MCBRAYER
sending an e-mail become
impossible.
Likewise, many of us have
viruses in our faith. Sure we
have faith, but there are bits
of contamination that have
wormed their way deep into
our operating system. We
may not even know these
invaders are there until we
call upon our. faith to actu-
ally work.

Like in times of sickness,
or when we have marital
problems, or in rearing chil-
dren, or faced with financial
crisis, or when we can't ac-
cess our e-mail; then, with
the pressures of life bearing
down upon us, we will find
out if our faith is function-
al.


So what do you do if your
faith seems a bit virus weak-
ened? Well, don't throw it all
away. That would be akin to
chunking your new laptop
just because your spread-
sheets won't load.

Instead, take the time to
do a little maintenance. Scan
your files. Fix the firewall.
Delete the corrupted files.
Protect your faith from the
glut of enemies it naturally
has. Then, reboot, power up,
and get to work. You've got
mail waiting in your inbox.
Ronnie McBrayer is the
author of "Leaving Religion,
Following Jesus." He writes
and speaks about life, faith,
and Christ-centered spiritu-
ality.


Watch Night Services


planned at Union Springs


Missionary Baptist Church


Union Springs Mission-
ary Baptist Church will be
hosting a Watch Meeting
Fellowship service on Dec.


31 at 10 p.m.
Union Springs Mission-
ary Baptist Church is locat-
ed at 416 Rail Road Street


in DeFuniak Springs.

Everyone is cordially in-
vited.


December 31. starting 8 p.m.

Harmony Fellowship Church

hosting Watch Night Services


Harmony Fellowship
Church will be hosting
Watch Night service on
New Years Eve starting at
8 p.m. until. There will be
preaching, singing with lo-
cal talent. There will be re-
freshments served after the
service.
Harmony Fellowship is


located at 974 Adams Road.
Directions U.S.331 N turn
on to Williams Road go
about 3.3 miles to Adams
Road, turn right onto Ad-
ams go about 9/10 of a mile
to church. U.S. 90 turn onto
CR-1087 in the Mossy Head
area go to Williams Road,
turn right onto Williams


about 2.8 miles to Adams
Road, turn left onto Adams
go 9/10 of a mile to church.
From CR-1087 out of New
Harmony turn left onto Ad-
ams Road and go 9/10 of a
mile to church. For more
information, call the pasto-
rium phone number at (850)
834-2017.


Kevin Spencer to be

in concert January 5
Kevin Spencer will be in Springs. Pastor Howard
concert Wednesday. Jan. 5. Taylor and congregation
at 7 p.m. at Communith Ho- cordialkl invit. everyone to
lines Church. Joln thmni


Comtunilty Holiness
Church is located at 971
W. Live Oak in DeFuniak


Fo.Ir monr:, information call
-._si1 S92-470 1


Be Still and Know that I am God
King James Bible Psalm 46:10
Be still, and know that I [am] God: I will be exalted among the heathen,
I will be exalted


Barnes' Notes
on the Bible
Be still The word used
here from raphih means
properly to cast down; to let
fall; to let hang down; then,
to be relaxed, slackened,
especially the hands: It is
also employed in the sense
of not making an effort; not
putting forth exertion; and
then would express the idea
of leaving matters with God,
or of being without anxiety
about the issue. Compare
Exodus 14:13, "Stand still,
and see the salvation of
God." In this place the word
seems to be used as mean-
ing that there was to be no
anxiety; that there was to be
a calm, confiding, trustful
state of mind in view of the
displays of the divine pres-
ence and power. The mind
was to be calm, in view of
the fact that God had inter-
posed, and had shown that
he was able to defend his
people when surrounded by
dangers. If this the divine
interposition when Jerusa-
lem was threatened by the
armies of the Assyrians un-
der Sennacherib, the force
and beauty of the expression
will be most clearly seen.


Even with all of the modern conveniences
available, many of us still run ourselves
ragged. We cram our days full, and while that
can be fruitful, it can also lead to fatigue and
frustration. Even Jesus recognized the value of
rest and encouraged His followers to be still
from time to time and honor Him.


Kwanzaa 2010 to be celebrated at

DeFuniak Springs Community Center


The Walton CountyKwan-
zaa Committee presents the
16th annual Walton County
Kwanzaa feast/celebration.
"At the time of Kwanzaa


we come together and com-
mit ourselves to work and
study." The celebration will
take place at 6 p.m. Dec.
31, 2010 at the DeFuniak


Springs Community Cen-
ter.
Join them in the celebra-
tion of this joyful cultural
event.


Held in His Hand
Devotional thought from the messages of Adrian Rogers
BIBLE MEDITATION:
1 John 3:1 "Behold. what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we
should be called the- sons of God: therefore the world knoweth us not, because it knew
Him not."

DEVOTIONAL THOUGHT:
You are rich! .Jesus became the Son of Man that we might become sons of God. We
are saved because of the grace of Christmas. That is not rhetoric that is reality! A
little boy was talking about eternal security and said, "I am held in His hand." A cynic
responded, "What. if you slip through His hands?" "Oh, I forgot to tell you," the boy
replied, "I'm one of His fingers." You are rich, my friend.

ACTION POINT:
Amidst all the materialism that sometimes chokes out the true meaning of Christmas,
take some time to share this Good News with someone today.











B,, 0 TU I
TII l~F NA PR~l E ADREZ T-IRDY.DCME 30 00PG9


~up~B"PI


Risher


Song Cha Risher, 72, of
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.,
passed away Sunday, Dec.
19, 2010 at Sacred Heart
Hospital in Pensacola. She
was born April 10, 1938 in
Korea. At the age of 31, she
came to the United States
and resided in DeFuniak
Springs for the last 15 years
of her life.
Survived by people who
came to her aid knowing she
was helpless without a mode
of transportation or driver's
license, are close friends
Cary, Jamie and Bonnie Ye-
rdon of DeFuniak Springs,
Fla.; caring church friends,
Cathy Howell of Ponce de
Leon, Fla.; Rachel Thomas,
Genny Crocker, and Ann
Barnes all of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla.
She would often share her
sincere wish with others, to
be with Jesus. Always de-


lighted to have visitors stop
by her home, she would
stand at the door and wave
bye as they drove out of
sight. In April of this year,
the DeFuniak Springs Her-
ald featured Song, complete
with color pictures, being
towed in a little customized
trailer resembling a rick-
shaw. Local residents will
recall seeing her along the
roadways being pulled by a
bicycle with Cary Yerdon at
the pedal as they made their
leisurely trips around the
Lake yard and businesses
around town.

Graveside services were
held Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2010
at Gulf Cemetery. Visita-
tion services were private.
.Arrangements and ser-
vices are under the direction
of Davis-Watkins Funeral
Home.


Linke


December 9, 1920 -
December 24, 2010

Dr. Charles Eugene
"Gene" "Doc" Linke, 90 of
Santa Rosa Beach, Fla.,
passed away Friday, Dec.
24, 2010 in a Crestview
healthcare facility. He was
born Dec. 9, 1920 in Sioux
City, Iowa, the son of Paul
Alfred and Muriel Hattie
Remington Linke.
Dr. Linke was a veteran,
having served his country in
the United States Navy dur-
ing World War II. Dr. Linke
received his undergraduate
degree, masters degree and
PhD from the University of
Iowa. He was chair of the
speech pathology depart-
ment at Tulane University
in New Orleans. After his re-
tirement in 1993, he moved


Gillis


On Monday, Dec. 27,
2010, Jesus came and took
Mrs. Annie Ruth Gillis to be
with Him. She was 86.
Funeral services will be
1 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 29,
2010, in the chapel of Sor-
rells Funeral Home in Gene-
va, Ala., with Rev. Kenneth
Harrison officiating. Burial
will follow in the Gillis Fam-
ily cemetery at the home
place, 1556 Spears Road,
Westville, Fla. with Sorrells
Funeral Home of Geneva di-
recting. The family received
friends at the funeral home
Tuesday, Dec. 28, from 6 un-
til 8 p.m.
The family asked that
flowers be omitted and me-
morial contributions be
made to your favorite char-
ity.
Mrs. Gillis was born Aug.
5, 1924, in Walton County,
Florida, to the late J.A.
and Mahalia Padgett Ar-
rant. She was a member of
Northside Baptist Church
in Ponce de Leon, Fla., for a
number of years and will be


remembered for her strong
faith she had in Jesus.
In addition to her parents,
her husband of 67 years, Ray
Gillis, an infant son, John
Angus Gillis, and a brother,
Angus Gay Arrant, all pre-
ceded her in death.

Survivors include one son
and daughter-in-law, Mur-
dock Leroy and Audrey Kay
Andrews Gillis, Westville,
Fla.; three grandchildren,
Sherry Ann Barney and hus-
band Timothy, Westville,
Murdock Ray Gillis and wife
Emily, Blountstown, Fla.,
Jolie Lynn Gillis, Westville;
five great-grandchildren,
Melody Faith Barney, Jor-
dan Wyatt Barney, Anna
Catherine Gillis, Cheyenne
Aislinn Skipper and Sam-
ual Ryan Gillis; two sisters,
Jessie Mae Simmons, Pen-
sacola, Fla., Wynell Paul,
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.;
sister-in-law, Joan Arrant,
Pensacola, Fla.; other ex-
tended family and a host of
friends.


Armstrong


Mrs. Patricia Jean Arm-
strong, 73, passed away
Monday, Dec. 20, 2010. She
was born Nov. 23, 1937 in
West Paris, Maine to Ray-
mond and Maude Rose Wil-
son.
Mrs. Armstrong was a
resident of Walton County.
She was Seven Day Adven-
tist by faith. She was a very
devoted wife, mother, and
grandmother. She enjoyed
reading, working puzzles,
and fishing. She was known
as the neighborhood mom.
She was also an avid bird
watcher.
Mrs. Armstrong is preced-
ed in death by her parents;
one brother, Leslie Wilson
and her husband, Howard
Hugh Armstrong.
Mrs. Armstrong is sur-
vived by her daughter, Mar-
garet D. Bogue and husband,
Dennis; one son, Patrick E.
Armstrong and wife, Can-


dace; brother, and sisters,
Emily Brown and husband,
Danny ofAngwin, Calif., Da-
vid Wilson and wife, Kathy,
of Palmdale,Calif., Lorena
Wilson of Bryant Pond, ME.,
Priscilla Staley and hus-
band, John of Bryant Pond,
ME; grandchildren, Dinie-
ka R. Armstrong, Mandi J.
Armstrong, Sierra D. Stairs,
Sean P. Stairs, and Kaila S.
Armstrong.
Funeral services were
held, Thursday, Dec. 23,
2010 at Clary-Glenn Funer-
al Home. Rev. Joel Glenn
officiated.
Burial followed in the Eu-
chee Valley Cemetery.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences, sign guest
book, at www.clary-glenn.
com.
Clary-Glenn Funeral
Home is entrusted with the
arrangements.


Johnson


Lucille Howell Johnson,
85, of DeFuniak Springs,
Fla., passed away Tuesday,
Dec. 21, 2010 at North Oka-
loosa Medical Center. She
was born April 1, 1925 in
Walton County, Florida.
Lucille loved flowers, gar-
dening, fishing, cooking, and
children of all ages.
She is preceded in death
by her parents, Wesley and
Florence Howell; two broth-
ers, Ernest and Cecil Howell;
three sisters, Ruth Garrett,
Luverne Opry, and Maebell
Infinger; son-in-law, Lewie













Another fresh new year
is here ...
Another year to live!
To banish worry,
doubt, and fear,
To love and laugh and give!

This bright new year
is given me
To live each day with zest

To daily grow and try to be
My highest and my best!

I have the opportunity
Once more to right
some wrongs,
To pray for peace,
to plant a tree,
And sing more joyful
songs!"
William Arthur Ward
quote


SUSRIBE TDAY(


*MA A *DISCOVER

I ACC EPTD I9


to Santa Rosa Beach, where
he made his home. Aside
from being one of Iowa's avid
Hawkeye fans, he was a Civ-
il War buff, his library full
of books and commentary
on the war. He had a pas-
sion for trains and is noted
for knowing all of the sched-
ules by heart. The sound of
a train whistle in his later
years would put a spark in
his eye and he would come
to life at just the sound of a
freighter going by. Gene's
family wishes to thank the
staff and employees of Car-
ington Manor in Crestview,
Fla. for the love and care
given Gene during the past
years he lived there.
Among survivors are his
brother, Wayne Linke and
wife Jo Ann of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla.; his sisters,
Anita Eyestone of Santa
Rosa Beach and Judy Grei-
man and husband Eldon of
LeClaire, Iowa; his foster
son, Joseph Edge of Boca
Raton and numerous nieces
and nephews also survive.
Memorials may be made
in Dr. Linke's memory to
The American Cancer Soci-
ety. Funeral services will be
held in Davenport, Iowa and
information will be available
through Runge Mortuary in
Davenport at(800)457-8643.
Friends and family may
go online to view obituaries,
offer condolences and sign
the guest register at jerrye-
vansfuneralhome.com


King; and one grandson,
Christopher Wayne Brown.
Lucille is survived by two
sons, Ray Johnson and wife
Angie and David M. John-
son and wife Lottie both of
DeFuniak Springs, Fla.; six
daughters, Carolyn King,
Faye Brown and husband
Kenneth, Janice Brackins
and husband Donnie, Sue
Taylor, Wanda Carroll all
of DeFuniak Springs, and
Bernice Drake and husband
David of Freeport, Fla.; one
sister, Martha Joyce Price;
16 grandchildren, 29 great-
grandchildren, and three
great great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were
held Thursday. Dec. 23,
2010 in the chapel of Davis-
Watkins Funeral Home,
DeFuniak Springs, Florida
beginning at 2:30 p.m. with
Reverend Scott Keppel of-
ficiating. A time of visita-
tion was held one hour prior
to the service. Interment
followed at Pleasant Ridge
Baptist Church Cemetery.
Memories and condolenc-
es may be shared with the
family at www.daviswat-
kins.com.

Arrangements and ser-
vices were under the direc-
tion of Davis-Watkins Fu-
neral Home.


"We will open the book.
Its pages are blank.
We are going to put words
on them ourselves.
The book is called
Opportunity and its first
chapter is
New Year's Day."


Edith Lovejoy Pierce


It is during a time like
this that you realize how
much family and friends
mean to you.
We so much appreciate
the many kindnesses evi-
dent in thought, and deed,
in the beautiful floral ar-
rangements, in the delicious
food and your prayers.
We ask for your prayers
in the coming weeks and


months.
A special thank you to
Vanessa, Amanda and Dr.
Donchey from Emerald
coast Hospice, Dr. Mann
Jane, Pat, Hilda and all the
staff at 21st Century Oncol-
ogy. Also to Jerry Evans and
Earnest Price for a wonder-
ful job.

The John Pryor family


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THE DeFUNIAK SPRING 0


PAGE 9B







GS HFR 1 1 HRFF7F TH l


2010 Sports


Year in Review


By PATRICK CASEY and
REID TUCKER

January

THREE LOCAL HIGH
,SCHOOL basketball play-
ers joined Walton's James
.Towery in the 1,000-career-
-points-scored category as
:.Freeport's Alex Newkirk
,along with Paxton's Deme-
trius Moore and Shaq Jack-
son all achieved the mile-
,stone at the start of 2010.
SOUTH WALTON'S
GIRLS AND BOYS SOC-
:CER teams each snatched
.district titles for the school
from the jaws of the Port St.
Joe Sharks. The girls squad
beat Port St. Joe 1-0 for the
.title with the boys capturing
the championship with a
,3-2 victory over the Sharks
squad.
STHE AREA 5 TEAMS
.wrapped up the girls bas-
ketball regular season with
three squads winning regu-
,lar season district titles.
.South Walton claimed the
top seed in District 2 of
Class 2A with a 22-3 regular
,season record while Paxton
,-brought home the District
1, Class A regular season
title with a 16-9 record un-
der first-year head coach
.Steve Williams. Ponce de
Leon's veteran coach Tim
.Alford saw his squad cap-
ture the regular season Dis-
.trict 1 title in Class 2A with
;a 21-3 record. Walton fin-
.ished the year in third place
-in their district with a 14-7
record while Freeport drew
a fourth place finish with a
,410-14 record in District 1 of
.,Class 2A. I (i

jFebruary

STHE PAXTONBOBCATS
and Ponce de Leo .Pirates
-both won girls basketball
'district championships for
,the sixth consecutive sea-


sons.
THE SOUTH WALTON
GIRLS SOCCER team, after
receiving a first round bye,
lost to Rocky Bayou 3-1 in
the first round of the Class
2A playoffs.
SOUTH WALTON'S
GIRLS BASKETBALL team
was stunned by a 43-36 loss
to Cottondale in the District
2, Class 2A semi-final on
the Hornets' home floor. The
loss kept South Walton, 23-
4, out of the playoffs after a
spectacular regular season.
SOUTH WALTON'S
BOYS SOCCER team de-
feated Freeport in the first
round of the Class 2A play-
offs with a 4-1 victory be-
hind the significant contri-
butions of Jose Flores and
Gerardo Gordillo. The Sea-
hawks dropped their second
round contest to Port St. Joe
by a 2-1 score in overtime to
end the year with a 14-2-2
record.
THE PAXTON BOYS
BASKETBALL team won
their district tournament
to capture their third con-
secutive district champion-
ship. The Bobcats were the
only Area 5 boys basketball
team to qualify for the state
playoffs as Freeport finished
9-14. Walton ended the year
at 10-15, while South Wal-
ton posted a 10-13 mark.
PDL won a game over Pop-
lar Springs to finish up a
rough season at 1-23.
THE PAXTON GIRLS
BASKETBALL team fell
48-31 in the second round
of the Class A playoffs to
FAMU High to end the sea-
son with a 19-10 mark. Pax-
ton drubbed Malone in the
opening round 67-44 before
falling to the Rattlers, with
turnovers proving to be the
Bobcats weakness on the
night of the game.
THE PONCE DE LEON
GIRLS BASKETBALL team
was the only girls squad to


make it to the Region Final
as they fell 48-37 in Mayo to
Lafayette County in Class
2A. The Pirates had de-
feated Graceville 49-45 and
Cottondale 47-37 at home
before having to hit the road
for the Elite 8 contest. The
Pirates ended the season
with a 25-4 record with only
one senior on their roster.
THE WALTON LADY
BRAVES BASKETBALL
team finished as the run-
ner-up in District 1 of Class
3A and had to travel to Tal-
lahassee Rickards in the
opening round of the play-
offs. The Braves fell to the
Raiders 81-46 to end the
year with a 16-9 mark.
SOUTH WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL had three wres-
tlers, place in the Class A
state tournament as Jus-
tin Dunwald (145) finished
third in his weight class
while Jay Gatto (152) and
Dan Dunwald (140) each
placed fifth. The Seahawks
squad earned a 10th place
finish, the highest ever for
a Seahawks wrestling team
as the squad broke 19 school
records during the 2009-10
season.
THE PAXTON BOBCATS


BBS--HM~~~~- JfJT'' --

PAXTON SENIOR ERIN
WALKER received a hug
from a young friend during
the Bobcats final regular
season home game. The Bob-
cats went 16-9 on the regular
season and won their sixth
consecutive district title.


BOYS basketball team de-
feated Malone 61-57 in the
first round of the Class A
playoffs and FAMU High
69-52 in the second round
before falling to Jackson-
ville Arlington Country Day
81-53 in the Region 1 final.
The loss ended Paxton's sea-
son at 24-5 as the Bobcats
closed out their 12th season
under coach Jeff Bradley.
FORMER WALTON
HIGH SCHOOL- golfer
Chase Blaich earned his sec-
ond career individual cham-
pionship on the second hole
of a sudden-death playoff to
lead No.2-ranked Hunting-
don to a 14-stroke victory
at the Wynlakes Wynter-
nationals at Wynlakes Golf
and Country Club in Mont-
gomery, Ala.


March

FREEPORT opened Dixie
Youth baseball and softball
play early in the month with
a parade and a Saturday full
of games at the Freeport Re-
gional Sports Complex.
SOUTH WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL SENIOR Bryant
Adams signed a scholarship
to play football at Middle-
bury College in Vermont in
the fall of 2010. Bryant, who
played three seasons on the
varsity under coach David
Barron, led the Seahawks
with 3.5 quarterback sacks
in 2009. Bryant had 1,908
rushing yards in three sea-
sons with 11 rushing touch-
downs. Bryant ran for 1,089
yards on the ground as a ju-
nior to become the school's
first 1,000-yard running
back while helping the Sea-
hawks to a 9-3 record and a
second round state playoff
game. On defense, Bryant
finished his career with 4.5
sacks with 11 tackles for loss
while forcing two fumbles as
a constant force on defense
for the Seahawks.
THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS LITTLE LEAGUE
opened their 59th season of
play on March 20 with a pa-
rade, cookout and full slate


of games on the third Satur-
day of the month. Paxton's
Dixie Youth also began play
on March 20.
WALTON SOPHOMORE
BASEBALL player Kahler
Lang drove in two runs in
the bottom of the 10th in-
ning to hand the Braves an
8-7 win over Chipley for the
team's first district win in
several seasons.
WALTON TENNIS play-
er Curtis Miller wrapped up
the district slate for his ca-
reer undefeated with an 8-0
win over Pensacola Catho-
lic's Casey Lowery.
THE WALTON MIDDLE
SCHOOL Warriors softball
team won the Walton Coun-
ty Middle School Champion-
ship Tournament with a 5-2
victory over Seaside after
defeating Emerald Coast
Middle School 13-7 in the
opening round of the tour-
nament.


April

PAXTONHIGH SCHOOL
senior Demetrius Moore
inked a deal to play junior
college basketball at North-
west Florida State College
on April 8. Moore, who
played four seasons for the
Bobcats, scored 1,287 points
in 99 games at the school. He
averaged 13 points per game
in his career but was more
of a force as a rebounder and
shot-blocker for the Bobcats.
Paxton posted a 90-25 re-
cord during Moore's career
and has won three consecu-
tive District 1, Class A titles.
The Bobcats advanced to the
Elite 8 round of competition
during Moore's sophomore
and senior years.
THE FHSAA's winter
sports Academic Team
Champion standings saw
Paxton's boys basketball
team post a 3.245 combined
grade point average to fin-
ish fifth in Class A. The
Freeport girls basketball
team was fourth in Class 2A
with a 3.660 grade point av-
erage with Ponce de Leon's
girls squad coming in eighth


U


. THE SOUTH WALTON BOYS AND GIRLS soccer teams
.,both won their district tournament by defeating Port St.
:Joe.


S/ I L A\ 1
i i i
THE SOUTH WALTON SENIORS on the girls basketball
team were honored before their final home game in January
as the Seahawks posted a 22-3 regular season mark before
.being upset by Cottondale in the semi-finals of the district
-tournament.


, WALTON'S JAMES TOWERY finished his basketball
career with 1,288 points scored and beat Pensacola Catholic
with a shot at the buzzer.


PDL'S HILLARY HARP-
ER (12) directs the Pirates
offense during a playoff win
over Graceville. The Pirates
finished the year with a 25-4
record and a tough road loss
to Mayo Lafayette in the
Class 2A Region Final.


THE PAXTON GIRLS softball team won the District 1,
Class A title in late April with a 6-3 win over Central.


DEFUNL4K SPRINGS LITTLE LEAGUE season opened
its 59th year on March 20.


g.

S-' .



WALTON BASEBALL
player Kahler Lang(20)
came through in the clutch
of an 8-7 district win over
Chipley with a two-run sin-
gle in the bottom of the tenth
inning for the Braves in this
March contest.


PAXTON'S SHAQ JACKSON (left) and Demetrius
Moore(right) both went over the 1,000 points scored mark
while leading the Bobcats to the Class A Region Fi nal and a
24-5 record.


at 3.518. The Paxton girls
basketball team was fourth
in Class A at 3.561.
WALTON TENNIS play-
ers Curtis Miller and Luke
Andrews earned a berth to
the state tennis tournament
with a solid performance in
the district tournament at
Sandestin's Seascape Re-
sort on April 13-15. The pair
won the district doubles title
with Miller also capturing
the district title at the No. 1
singles position. South Wal-
ton's Alexandra Alford won
the No. 1 singles title on the
girls side in the district com-
petition.
WALTON JUNIOR
FOOTBALL player Craig
Darity was killed in a trag-
ic car accident on April 17.
Darity finished third on the
Braves football team in re-
ceptions with 34 catches for
602 yards in 2009. He also
played on the boys soccer
team.

THE PAXTON SOFT-
BALL TEAM captured their
first district crown since
2006, defeating the Central
Jaguars 6-3 in the District
1-A title game. Paxton(17-6)
put together four hits and
a walk in the bottom of the
fourth inning to take a 3-1
lead as senior Kristyn Gei-
selman's double that was
laced over the third base
bag put them ahead to
stay. Starting pitcher Kap-
pi Stewart followed with a
single to give the Bobcats a
3-1 lead. Three errors and
a double by Brianna Ow-
ens allowed Paxton to add
three more runs in the fifth
inning. Geiselman provided
her third RBI of the night
with a groundout for a 6-1
advantage. Central scored
two runs in the top of the
seventh inning with the
help of three hits but the
rally ended as the final out
was recorded with a flyout
to Bobcats leftfielder Ch-
antel McCormick. Stewart
pitched a complete game, al-
lowing nine hits in picking
up the win.
SOUTH WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL JUNIOR Sam
Snider hit a two-out solo
home run in the bottom of
the tenth inning to give the
Seahawks a 1-0 win over the
Sneads Pirates to claim the
District 2, Class 2A softball
crown. South Walton (19-5)
senior pitcher Shelby Wat-
son pitched all 10 innings
while recording 17 strike-
outs for the win. Seahawks
coach Phil Tisa became the
first softball coach to win
three consecutive district ti-
tles in high school fast-pitch
softball in Walton County
history.
WALTON'S CURTIS
MILLER and Luke Andrews
lost their doubles match at
the Class A tennis state
tournament in Sanford 6-0,
6-4 with Miller falling in his
opening singles match 6-1,
6-1.
SOUTH WALTON'S AL-
EXANDRA ALFORD lost
her opening match at the
Class A girls state tourna-
ment to Calvary Christian's
Emily Groenevelde 7-6, 6-3.
PAXTON'S ERIN WALK-
ER won her third Class A
discus state championship
of her career with a throw of
133 feet, 4 inches in Winter
Park.
THE PAXTON BASE-
BALL .TEAM won their
fourth consecutive District
1, Class A title with a 7-2
victory over Laurel Hill. The
Bobcats scored four runs in
the sixth inning as Jesse
Crawford cleared the bases
for Paxton with a double to
ice the game.


Continued to page 11B


\ti l -- THF ...... S. ... .. .. .




SPORTS


Lt~~._


l


_








THE DeFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2010

Sports Year in review continued


SOUTH WALTON
PITCHER SHELBY WAT-
SON led the Seahawks to
their third consecutive dis-
trict title and a 20-6 record
that ended with a 3-1 loss to
Sneads in the second round
of the state playoffs.

May

THREE ERRORS in the
top of the third inning al-
lowed Sneads to plate three
runs that would stand up for
a 3-1 victory over the South
Walton Seahawks in a sec-
ond round Class 2A softball
game. The Seahawks, who
split four games with the
Pirates on the season, saw
Shelby Watson strike out
10 batters in the final game
of her career for South Wal-
ton. South Walton (20-6)
failed to get past the second
round for the third consecu-
tive year as they could not
capitalize on a bases loaded
situation in their final at-
bat.
FIELDING ERRORS
doomed the Paxton Bobcats
softball team as the visiting
Aucilla Christian Warriors
earned a 5-2 victory over
Paxton in the first round of
the Class A playoffs.
TALLAHASSEE JOHN
PAUL II plated three runs
in the first inning on their
way to a 5-3 victory over the
Paxton Bobcats in a first
round Class A playoff game.
Jeff Bradley wrapped up his
15th season as the Bobcats
head coach with a 16-8 re-
cord.
FREEPORT QUARTER-
BACK COLE WEEKS signed
a scholarship to continue
his playing career at Bre-
vard College. Weeks leaves
the school after passing for
3,217 yards in his career
with 31 touchdown passes
as he led the Bulldogs to an
11-2 mark in 2009.
WALTON MIDDLE
SCHOOL took home the ju-
nior varsity girls volleyball
title by defeating Freeport
in the championship game
of the Walton County girls
volleyball tournament with
Freeport Middle School cap-
turing the varsity event.
SOUTH WALTON'S
SHELBY WATSON pitched
the West to a 3-1 victory
over the East squad in the
Panhandle Softball Classic
held at the Vera Champlain
Sports Complex on the cam-
pus of Panama City Ruther-
ford High School.
PAXTON'SDANGEOGH-
AGAN took home MVP hon-
ors as the West rallied to
defeat the East 13-12 in the
Panhandle Baseball Classic.
Geoghagan went 4-for-6 at
the plate as he scored three
runs and drove in two while
recording the final nine outs
on the mound to get the
win.


WALTON TENNIS PLAYERS Luke Andrews and Curtis
Miller each earned a berth to the state tennis tournament in
April.


June

JACKIE HERRING RE-
TIRED from Walton Middle
School after 34 years at the
school and 36 years in coach-
ing and physical education.
WALTON GIRLS BAS-
KETBALL COACH Terry
McClure was let go after
four seasons as head coach.
McClure compiled a 69-40
record with four consecutive
playoff appearances and a
district championship in
2009.
THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS #1 softball team
captured the 7-9 Machine.
Pitch title in Chumuckla
with a 5-1 record.
THE PAXTON DIXIE
YOUTH 'SQUAD defeated
Freeport 20-8 to earn the
Northwest Florida Regional
Tournament title at High-
land Park in Panama City.
Paxton posted a perfect 4-0
record to claim the title.
SOUTH WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL SOFTBALL pitch-
er Shelby Watson signed her
letter of commitment to play
at Gulf Coast Community
College in 2011.
PONCE DE LEON
BASEBALL player Brandon
Howell will play at Bishop
State Community College in
Mobile in 2011.
THE PAXTON 11-12
YEAR-OLD Dixie Youth
squad won the district title
after sweeping a pair of
games from Freeport.


July

THE DEFUNIAK
SPRINGS 9 10 YEAR-OLD
softball team captured the
Little League District 1 title
with a convincing 17-3 vic-
tory over Niceville. The girls
team posted a 3-0 record in
the four-team event to ad-
vance to Tallahassee for the
next round.
FORMER SOUTH WAL-
TON High School tennis
player Alexa Guarachi fin-
ishes her freshman sea-
son at the University of
Alabama ranked No.56 in
singles after making an ap-
pearance in the 2010 NCAA
Singles Championship.


PDL BOYS BASKET-
BALL COACH Brad Grant
accepted a job at Pine For-
est High School after two
seasons with the Pirates.
WALTON HIGH
SCHOOL GRADUATE and
baseball player James Tow-
ery will play baseball for
Northwest Florida State
College in Niceville in the
spring of 2011 after a stel-
lar four-year career in bas-
ketball and baseball for the
Walton Braves.
THE FREEPORT MA-
JORS DIXIE YOUTH
BASEBALL SQUAD fin-
ished in fifth place at the
2010 Dixie Youth Majors
State Tournament that was
held at Hammock Bay. The
Freeport squad posted a 2-2
record in the event.
FORMER WALTON
GOLFER CHASE BLAICH
qualified for the 2010 U.S.
Amateur Golf Champion-
ship as he shot a two-round
total of 144 at a qualifying
event at the 7,149-yard par
72 Camp Creek Golf Club.


August

FORMER CENTURY
RESIDENT Buck Showalter
was named the new manag-
er of the Baltimore Orioles
on Aug. 2.
FORMER WALTON
GOLFER Chase Blaich shot
a 74 in the opening round
of the 2010 U.S. Amateur
Golf Championship on the
Chambers Bay Golf Course
in Washington state but
could not duplicate the feat
the next day as his 85 left
him ten strokes behind the
cut line for match play.


September

FORMER RAGIN' CA-
JUNS head women's bas-
ketball coach J. Kelley Hall,
51, suddenly passed away
on Sept. 2 after suffering
a heart attack at his home
in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Hall
moved from Niceville to
Freeport High School and
played on the first varsity
football team under coach
Aubrey Rentz for the Bull-
dogs in 1976, graduating


with the Class of 1977.
THE WALTON BRAVES
got a 102-yard interception
return from senior defensive
back John Querisma as they
built a 21-0 lead, then held
on in the second half for a 28-
14 win over University High
in a game played at Deltona
High School. Walton made
one of their longest trips in
school history to play a foot-
ball game and came back
winners as senior quarter-
back Liam Miller threw for
238 yards while four differ-
ent Braves players scored to
help Walton improve to 2-1
on the 2010 season.
THE SOUTH WALTON
DEFENSE turned in the
play of the night as they
stopped Bozeman quarter-
back Zach Martinez on a
two-point conversion run


with 27 seconds left in the
contest to preserve a 17-16
victory at Seahawks Stadi-
um as the team improved to
2-1 on the year.
WALTON BROKE a four-
game losing streak to Mari-
anna and captured a district
win as they scored on their
first six possessions on the
night to pick up a 43-8 win
over the Bulldogs on Craig
Darity night.
SOUTH WALTON
PICKED UP a 21-14 vic-
tory over Baker to win their
2010 Homecoming game.
Jay Gatto led the way with
77 rushing yards and a pair
of touchdowns. Tristan La-
Nasa was chosen as the
Homecoming King with
Caitlin Holliday chosen as
the Homecoming Queen for
the Seahawks.


COACHES AND PLAYERS from the 1985 Walton state
championship football team came back to be honored on Oc-
tober 1 at Walton High School for the 25-year anniversary of
that accomplishment.


THE PAXTON BOBCATS won, their fourth consecutive
baseball district title with a 7-2 win over Laurel Hill. Dan
Geoghagan helped to pitch the Bobcats into the playoffs
though the squad lost their first round game to Tallahassee
John Paul II 5-3.


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS #1 softball team capt
the 7-9 Machine Pitch title in Chumuckla with a 5-
cord.


AUGUST SIGNALED the return of football season c
three Walton County teams began fall practice.

q- -. .


FREEPORT WON the "Battle of the Bay" in high school
football with a 15-0 road win in October.


FORMER WALTON
GOLFER CHASE BLAICH
qualified for the 2010 U.S.
Amateur Golf Champion-
ship at the Chambers Bay
Golf Course in Washington
state.


WALTON FANS made one of the longest treks in school
history as the Braves defeated University High at Deltona
High School 28-14 in September.


r -- .. -

WALTON STUDENTS HONORED the memory of f
teammate Craig Darity with a pep rally in September a
Braves went out and defeated the Marianna Hulldogs
key district game 43-8.


PAGE Il-B
October

THE WALTON MIDDLE
SCHOOL girls basketball
team won the Northwest
Florida Girls Basketball
Tournament in Laurel Hill
with a 48-38 victory over
the host. The Lady War-
riors won three consecutive
games to capture the crown.
FREEPORT DEFEATED
South Walton 15-0 to take
the "Battle of the Bay" in
high school football.
THE WALTON FOOT-
BALL TEAM defeated Chip-
ley 28-14 on Oct. 8 to im-
prove to 2-0 in district play.
Lenny Jankowski, in his
fifth season as head coach,
became the first Braves
leader to post five consecu-
tive wins against the Tigers
since the early 1940's.
SOUTH WALTON
FOOTBALL COACH Da-
vid Barron was reassigned
after an investigation into
misconduct was alleged at
one of his practices. Barron
would be later charged in
early November with third-
degree child abuse for teach-
ing some of his players to hit
the opposition in the throat
during football contests.
Assistant principal Char-
lie Marello took over as the
head coach for the remain-
der of the season.
THE SOUTH WALTON
SEAHAWKS won the Dis-
trict 2, Class A golf tourney
held at the Hombre Golf
Course in Panama City
Beach while Walton saw
three of their boys place as
individuals to earn a berth
into the Regional tourna-
ment in Pensacola. South
Walton also saw their girls
team qualify as they earned
a second place finish to Pan-
ama City Arnold in the dis-
trict match. South Walton
claimed their second con-
secutive boys district title as
Jordin Corchis shot a 74 to
take the Low Medalist hon-
or in the competition. Team-
mate Alex Odegaard added
a 79 with Nathan Corchis
turning in an 85 and Shawn
Howard an 87 to post a team
total of 325.
JESSICA MOULTON
AND DAVID GIRALDO
were crowned Homecoming
Queen and King as Freeport
defeated Panama City Boze-
man 39-19 on Oct. 22 to im-
prove to 6-1 on the year.
FREEPORT WON their
second consecutive football
district title with a 42-34
victory in Baker on Oct. 29.


November

SOUTH WALTON'S
FOOTBALL TEAM ended
a tumultuous season with a
5-5 record after a 41-0 loss
to Walton on Nov. 5. Liam
Miller tossed five touch-
down passes in his final
home game for Walton as
ured the Braves rolled up 495
1 re- yards of total offense. Zam-
bia Campbell is chosen as
the Homecoming Queen
with Luke Andrews named
the Homecoming King.
THE WALTON BRAVES
WRAPPED up the regular
season with a 39-23 victory
over the Vernon Yellowjack-
ets to enter the playoffs in
Class 2B with a 7-3 record.
FREEPORT'S FOOT-
SBALL TEAM saw the regu-
Slar season come to a close
with a 34-20 win against
Rocky Bayou. The Bulldogs
posted an 8-2 record during
the regular season.
S WALTON'S FOOTBALL
S SEASON came to an end
with a 7-4 record as Taylor
rs all County picked off four Liam
Miller passes, returning
three for touchdowns in the
second quarter of play on
the way to a 41-13 victory in
a Class 2B football playoff
game.
FREEPORT WON their
first-round playoff game as
they defeatedLiberty County
27-14. Nick Ellington threw
a touchdown pass to Jordan
Varner for an early 7-0 lead
but it took two touchdowns
in the fourth quarter for the
Bulldogs to pull away for
the win. Caleb McCormick
and Nick Ellington each
hauled in touchdown passes
over the final seven minutes
of the game for the Bulldogs
to take the win.
allen
s the Continued to page 12B
in a








PAGE 12-B

Sports Year in review co., ,i


FORMER WALTON
RUNNING BACK Issac THE FREEPORT BULLDOGS lbol ll /li. ps.
Jackson combined for 590 9-3 record in 2010 while winning lthir second cot.0(''c
total yards and 11 touch- district championship. The Bulldogs w(', d,,rilt'id b
downs in his sophomore Northview Chiefs in a second round playo// :'I'71. f'
campaign at Bethune Cook- late November.
man in 2010. c ..l.d,1" LlUI


THE DcFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD BREEZE, THURSDAY, DlI)('IlMBI3R 2010


on Dec. .1.

1. -' NE] FLOCK scored
d20 points as the Ponce de
Leon Lady Pirates won their
eighth consecutive Holmes
County Christmas Tour-
noitaieint with a 64-45 win
ill I oloifay. Ashley Harper
scored 17 points to help the
Pirates improve to 10-0 on
thie year.

'I' THE PAXTON BOYS
.BASKETBALL team fin-
ished third in the eight-team
SStraughn Christmas Shoot-
out. Shaq Jackson scored 19
points to help the Bobcats
' edge the host team 40-39.

THE FREEPORT BULL-
(d 1) DOGS boys basketball team
1uti1v is 7-1 after picking up key
v 1/,,'' wins on the road at Baker
' i m aind Northview. The Bull-
(ogs' Iup-t elmpo style has
(betI difficult. for district foes
ito haIndle and has Freeport
,Imsitioied for a top seed in
t he district tournament in
SlFebruary.


HILLARY HARPER
scored 19 points as the
PDL girls hit the Christmas
break with a 13-0 record af-
ter gaining a 59-47 victory
and some revenge against
Mayo Lafayette on Dec. 18.

THE PAXTON BOYS
BASKETBALL team earned
their ninth consecutive win
over Laurel Hill with a 78-
58 victory at home on Dec.
17. The Bobcats (8-1, 3-0)
won a knockout 78-58 vic-
tory over their heated rivals
in a game that saw Shaq
Jackson score a game-high
31 points. Jackson's team-
mates Chad Zessin and Josh
McLaney scored 19 points
and 16 points, respectively.
Laurel Hill's Seth Strick-
land was forced to pick up
the slack of the Hoboes'
leading scorer Issaic Wil-
liams, who got in foul trou.,
ble in the first quarter. Both
teams were undefeated in
district standings going into
the game and Paxton had
played seven games in the


10 days prior to Ithe mit.clh-
up against, 1,h l lobo.s. 'The
Bobcats holl Ithe IJcl ircco'rd
in the district, with l Iii 8-
mark.



PONCE DE LEON'S
GIRLS basketball team
came up against their
toughest opponent yet on
Saturday, Dec. 18. The Lady
Pirates (11-0) nevertheless
triumphed over the Hornets
of Mayo, Florida's Lafayette
High with a close 59-47 win.
The first three quarters of
the play were hotly contest-
ed by both teams and the
score was separated by only
five points in Ponce's favor
going into the final period,
but the Pirates pulled away
thanks to a combination of
more accurate free throw
.shooting. Hillary Harper
,Scored 19 points for Ponce
de Leon, while team mates
Jasmine Flock and Ashley
Harper scored 12 points and
11 points, respectively.


This Week in College Football


UHistory: Dec. 28 Jan 2


SHAQ JACKSON'S performance was characterized by a
one-two combination of outside shooting prowess and on at-
tack on the backboard which earned him a game-h i/i'r ''
points.


FREEPORT'S MICHAEL
GRAZIANI finished in 27th
place at the Class A cross
country meet in Dade City
on Nov. 20. Graziani posted
a time of 17:04.16 which
was a little over 94 seconds
behind the winner's time
of 15:29.79. In 2009, Gra-
ziani finished 18th at the
state meet with a time of
16:51.08.
SOUTH WALTON'S JA-
COB LEUZE finished in
38th place at the Class 2A
state meet in Dade City with
a time of 16:51.54. Leuze
finished 52nd as a freshman


in the Class A meet in 2008
with a time of 17:36.
NORTHVIEW I E-
TURNED an interception
35 yards for a touchdownN on
Freeport's opening )osse's-
sion of the game aid used
a running game that c(on-
trolled the football fi(or over0(
29 minutes of the contest 'to
eliminate the Bulldogs 21-
12 in a second roundl ('lass
A playoff game. F1reeport
saw their season co(n'I to
an end with a 9-:3 r'ccord :Ia
two interceptions aind two
missed conversion tries al-
lowed Northview to avenge


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Forida
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Tennessee
Kentucky
Vanderbilt


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Arkansas 6-2 .750 291 225 10.2 .8 i44 2i ',1 1
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Alabama 5-3 .625 218 143 9-3 ,7s0 415 i'l Ii -0 6-I Ii 0
Mississippi Stale 44 .500 151 17i 8.4 .667 125 214 '/ i i 2 t i
OleMiss 1-7 .125 194 301 4-8 .3]3 36t 422 a I 14 il I I) 0
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(ouortesy The National Foot-
ball Foundation & College
tlall of' Fame.

Dec. ;1, 1973 In a duel of
College FootballHallofFame
coaches Ara Parseghian and
Paul "Bear" Bryant, No. 3
Notre Dame clinched the
national championship with
a 2-1-23 win over No. 1 Ala-
bama in the Sugar Bowl in
New Orleans. Trailing 17-14
In ihe third quarter, Fight-
ing Irish defender Drew
Mahalic returned a Crim-
isn Tide fumble nine yards
toi il' 12-yard line, which
'rw 1'cniiick capitalized and
sie\ if t( Irish a 21-17 lead.
\lilha;nii responded with a
km1uchdldlown but missed the
ensuing extra point, open-
n ii he i t Il'door for a game, and
:ilm iion l title, clinching 19-
\,id 1 i,(t l Th'iomas field goal.

I), 27. 199'1 In the final
'I'oom ionwll in A\nahein,
(':lit No. I Utah defeated
N. 1 A\rizonma 16-13. Tilhe
l'i( s w\\'er alle to earn the
\\ili dtrspite being limited
l J lust T \'Valrdos iof total of-
'i ts' : id tix'e first downs
i Ariz'oiIaI's Desert Swarmn
Iti iinse'. Ultah ,lgot a six-
IrdtI sc'lng 1roip by Char-
It' tBrtwn, a safety, and
:Wli 'vi'td te winning score
iin 1; five-'Vard heave on
totiurth-ad-goal from Mike
NMcCov to Kevin Dyson. The
LUtes' win clinched the first
t O-win season in school his-
i oIV.

l)c. 28. 1989 No. 25 Texas
T'ch topped No. 20 Duke,
19-21, in the All-Ameri-
ciln kBowl in Birmingham,
\l;i. The Blue Devils were
(o('ched( by College Foot-
hilll all of' Famer Steve
Spurrier and featured Col-
hl'e Football Hall of Fame
inlductee Clarkston Hines
iat wideout, but Red Raider
t1iii)1:l'k almoies (Gray stole
ili' show. h'ay set. All-
Iintroiicn owl records with
281) rushing yards and four
I1tocdowils il what was at
(I ti line tle largest bowl
win in I ed Raider history.

Dec. 29., 1998 Formner NFF
Nat itml Scholar-Athlete
I)Dw t Ilrees and Purdue
uipset No. 41 Kansas State,
:1-:3 I, in the Alamo Bowl in
S ln Aint onion, Tex. The Boil-
('riinaklrs engineered the
win by forcing the Wildcats
into seven turnovers. Trail-
ing! ;30-20( midway through
tlIe final frame,. Kansas
State, quarterback Michael
Iishop connected with Dar-
nell Mc)Donlald for an 88-
v \a scoring strike. Bishop
pitt lihe Wildcats on top with
I toLiuchdown Ipass to Justin
Swift with 1:24 to play, but
li('es coolly led Purdue on a
gi:iiiN'winning six play, 80-
Y:il'd drive culminating in
2 21l-ynrd touchdown pass
\\ithi just 30 seconds re-
mianiing.

Iec. ;30, 19.18 I Iardin-Sil-
Ionis (lTex.) topped Wich-
ili Stl .' t49-12 in the first
;mii only Calellia Bowl ill
ILl aet Ite, I:. The game was
Iplayd It(, McNNaspy Stladiu
bet [foi'e ,.5({00 spectators.


Jan. 1, 1902 Michigan
downed Stanford 49-0 in
the inaugural Rose Bowl in
Pasadena, Calif. Played at
Tournament Park in Pasa-
dena, it was the first college
bowl game, and to this day
the Rose Bowl Game carries
the moniker the "Grand-
daddy of Them All." College
Football Hall of Fame coach
Fielding Yost led the 11-0
Wolverines to their first na-
tional championship that
season.

Jan. 2, 1971 No. 10 Auburn
out-dueled Ole Miss 35-28
in the Gator Bowl in Jack-
sonville, Fla., in a matchup


of eventual College Football
Hall of Fame quarterbacks
Pat Sullivan and Archie
Manning. Sullivan, who
accumulated 351 passing
yards, guided the Tigers to
an early 21-0 edge by throw-
ing for two touchdowns and
galloping 37 yards for an-
other score. Manning, who
played with a cast on his
left arm, scored by air and
ground, throwing for 180
yards while also leading
the Rebels with 95 rushing
yards on 11 carries, but a
55-yard punt return touch-
down by Larry Willingham
sealed the Auburn win.
Manning presently serves
as the NFF's Chairman.


DID YOU KNOW?

5 Sports Facts

1. Kansas City center Casey Wiegmann has taken
10,069 consecutive snaps at center dating back to Sept. 23
of 2001.

2. The 1942 Chicago Bears defense allowed only 17.2
rushing yards per game. the best rush defense in NFL his-
tory.

3. New England quarterback Tom Bradyi has thlrowNn 319
passes without an interception as he surpassed Bernie Ko-
sar's mark of 308 on Sunday in the Patriots game against
Buffalo.

4. Utah made history in 1944 as the first college basket-
ball team to play in both the NIT and NCAA tournaments
at the end of the season. Utah won the NCAA tourney with
a 42-40 victory over Dartmouth in overtime.

5. Grand Ridge (1996) and Malone (1999) are the only
two teams from Florida to win the boys side of the Freeport
Basketball Blowout, now in its 16th year in 2010.


Your source for the outdoc, '

in Walton County

and the surrounding area.


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The Atlantic Coast Conferetce

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