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 Section A: Main: Editorial
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 Section A: Main: Walton County...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Business Information...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Features
 Section B: Features: Social...
 Section B: Features continued
 Section B: Features: Religion
 Section B: Features: Obituarie...
 Section B: Features: Sports
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The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028316/00027
 Material Information
Title: The DeFuniak herald combined with the breeze
Portion of title: De Funiak herald combined with the breeze
DeFuniak herald
Alternate title: Beach breeze
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Larry and Merle Woodham
Place of Publication: DeFuniak Springs Fla
Creation Date: July 7, 2005
Publication Date: 1993-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- De Funiak Springs (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Walton County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Walton -- DeFuniak Springs
Coordinates: 30.721389 x -86.119444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 106, no. 20 (May 20, 1993)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002059593
oclc - 33857908
notis - AKP7659
lccn - sn 95047382
System ID: UF00028316:00027
 Related Items
Preceded by: DeFuniak herald (De Funiak Springs, Fla. : 1992)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Editorial
        page A 4
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 5
        page A 6
    Section A: Main: Walton County Business Directory
        page A 7
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
    Section A: Main: Business Information Directory
        page A 12
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 13
        page A 14
    Section B: Features
        page B 1
    Section B: Features: Social News
        page B 2
    Section B: Features continued
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
    Section B: Features: Religion
        page B 6
    Section B: Features: Obituaries
        page B 7
    Section B: Features: Sports
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
    Section B: Features continued
        page B 11
        page B 12
Full Text






















DFS

Council

selects

city

manager
By RON KELLEY
The DeFuniak Springs
City Council met and dis-
cussed their leading candi-
dates for the position of city
manager, following the resig-
nation of Mike Standley, who
held the post for 21 years.
After several hours of de-
liberation and discussion, the
council chose a woman for its
second city manager. Kim
Presnell is a public works di-
rector for the city of
Chattahoochee.
With no prior experience as
a city manager, she was ac-
tually ranked third behind
two other candidates. Vari-
ous candidates scored points
with individual city council-
men, but, because a unani-
mous vote was required,
council members James
Coffield changed his vote, as
did Roy McLeod, to make it
a 5-0 vote.
McLeod had expressed se-
rious reservations about sev-
eral of the candidates and
also expressed concerns
about Presnell's lack,of expe-
rience. He asked his fellow
council members why they
had ranked an amateur over
professionals and wondered
about the need to have staff
train Presnell for her-first job
as a city manager.
Council members Mark

See CITY 13A


Independence

celebrated in

DeFuniak
By RON KELLEY
From the fife and drummer
who led the parade to the fi-
nal explosions of fireworks
across Lake DeFuniak, the
Fourth of July celebration
was a resounding success.
Despite the heat of a July
day, spectators lined Circle
Drive to enjoy the parade,
which included Uncle Sam,
beauty queens, antique cars,
clowns, horses, floats and fire
trucks. Children rushed to
pick up the candy that was
tossed to the crowds and
more than one adult joined
in the candy grab.
Dr. Lynn and Ellen
Mayfield served as parade
grand marshals and'were
honored during the opening
ceremonies for their tireless
contributions and
volunteerism for the city.
Sara Comander, president
of the DeFuniak Springs
Business and Professional
Association, which sponsors
the annual event, welcomed
the crowd and the partici-
pants while children played

See CELEBRATION 13A


: ^. K


,,










UNCLE SAM. WANTS
YOU to'hie a wonderful 4th
of July!


fHER IALL) i
Combined With The Breeze




S- _, -"
44"=PII


THE BEECHCRAFT V35 PLANE crashed slightly west of Old Landfill Road.


Single-engine plane crashes

in north Walton County


By BRUCE COLLIER
A single-engine Beechcraft
V35 plane crashed in a
swampy area of north Wal-
ton County on July 3. The
pilot of the plane was killed.
The other occupant of the
plane survived.
According to a report re-
leased by Walton County
Sheriff's Office spokesman
Lt. Frank Owens, the pilot
was identified as Dale Allen,
51, of Friendswood, Texas.
The other passenger was


Alien's 14-year-old son,
whose name has not been re-
leased.
The crash was reported at
12:12 p.m. on Sunday. The
location of the crash was
slightly west of Old Landfill
Road.
The precise reason for the
crash is under investigation,
but witnesses told investiga-
tors that the plane's engine
was "putt-putting like it was
running out of fuel."
The pilot was dead on the


scene. The son was con-
scious, and apparently was
able to give some information
to rescue workers. Swampy
conditions, including "waist-
deep mud," made rescue ef-
forts difficult.
The son was taken via
AirHeart to Sacred Heart
Hospital in Pensacqla, where
he is listed in guarded but
stable condition.
The Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration will conduct an
investigation of the crash.


i. l .
HOMETOWN HEROES, the group Dakota performed a big variety of songs, including
their hit single, "Linda Lou."


By BARBARA ALLEN
According to local resi-
dents, a half a century ago
the Lakeyard (as the park
around DeFuniak Lake is
called by locals) had many
natural areas of native
shrubs and wildflowers that
bloomed spring and summer.
DeFuniak Springs City
Council member Don
Harrison reinembered
masses of pink native phlox
and Black-eyed Susan
blooming around the lake
when he was a youngster.
Barbara Allen, the de-
signer and coordinator of the
Library Native Plant Read-
ing Garden, says that over
time, for a variety of reasons,
the bushes were removed
and the wildflowers mowed.
The vegetation that was left
was kept mowed close to the
ground and so over time
many plants that couldn't
survive this treatment disap-
peared. Areas of bare soil be-
gan to appear and the topsoil
has been slowly washing
down the slope and filling up
the edges of the lake and
changing its ecology.
To add to the erosion prob-
lem, pine needles and leaves
are raked up from under the
trees, removing material
that protects the. soil and
adds nutrients that the trees
use. Trees have died over
time, from lightening, hurri-
canes, disease or old age, and
have not been replaced.
Without enough young trees
coming on to replace those
that die, over time a serious
change has occurred in the
whole ecosystem of the
Lakeyard,
On June 27, Allen went be-
fore the DoFuniak Springs
City Council and proposed a
solution to those problems.


0j


council


The DeFuniak Springs PUBLISHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE
I Won mA


I


ME 116 o NUMBER 27 o3 SECTIONS' JULY 7' 2005 500 PER COP


She proposed that native
trees, shrubs and wildflowers
be planted again in the areas
of erosion around the Lake-
yard and the amphitheater,
playground, picnic and ga-
zebo areas, to hold the soil as
well as to beautify the park.
"These plants will work to
hold and replace lost topsoil
and slow the loss of trees.
They will add color and life
and attract a wider variety
of birds and butterflies,
which would add to the plea-
sure of the Lakeyard for visi-
tors.
"It would cut down on
maintenance, as the wild-
flower areas would only be
mowed once or twice a year,"
she said.
"With plants and habitats
labeled it would create an
educational opportunity for
area school children,
Elderhostel groups, out of
town visitors as well as local
residents, and would greatly
enhance the experience of all
those who visit the Lake-
yard."
Alien went before the
Council because she recently
became aware of a grant that
is funded by the sale of the
Florida Native Wildflowers
license plate. The Lakeyard
restoration is just the sort of
project the funding is in-
tended for, and the deadline
for the grant application is
July 31. Alien needed the
city's approval and support
for the project before she
could send in the application
to the Florida Wildflower
Advisory Council and the
Florida Wildflower Federa-
tion, Inc., the organizations
that oversee the use of these
funds.

-( PROJECT 13A


approves Lakeyard


landscaping


A


By RON KELLEY
Barbara Allen of the na-
tionally-recognized DeFu-
niak Springs Garden Club
brought a detailed proposal
for landscaping the Lakeyard
to the DeFuniak Springs City
Council.
Allen asked the Council for
permission to apply for a
grant to pay for native trees,
flowers and shrubs that
would be planted in the
Lakeyard to help stop ero-
sion. She said the club would
do the beautification work at
no charge to the city, for the
benefit of all citizens and
visitors.
After questioning Allen at
some length, the Council de-
cided to agree to the proposal
and asked that she obtain a
map from city staff showing
water and electrical lines in
the Lakeyard before begin-
ning.
DeFuniak Business and
Professional Association
President Sara Comander
sought permission by the city
to close Circle Drive around
the Lakeyard for the Fourth
of July celebration, which
was, granted and to close
Baldwin Avenue downtown
for Hometown Christmas, to
be held the Friday and Sat-
urday after Thanksgiving,
and to close the street again
for the DBPA's Halloween
Happening. Comander's re-
quest was granted.
After the enormous success
of last year's event, Home-
town Christmas will expand
to a two-day event this year
that will include staging
crafters downtown and at the
fairgrounds.
Councilman Roy McLeod
stepped from behind the
council table and asked his
fellow council members for a
resolution supporting the ef-
forts of the Chautauqua Hall
of Brotherhood Foundation
to build an audi[tiorium be.-
hind the Chautauqua Hall of
Brotherhood similar in style
and size to the original.
McLeod explained that in
order to seek the necessary
grant funds for the major


Lakeyard restoration and

beautification project


construction project, the plan
had to have the official en-
dorsement of the building's
owner in this case, the city
of DeFuniak Springs.
After a round of detailed
questioning by some council
members regarding the city's
potential liability with re-
gard to the resolution of sup-
port. McLeod's request was
approved.
City Attorney Clayton
Adkinson explained that the
city was no more liable for
this resolution than for the
numerous other resolutions
sought be various' groups.
which have been routinely
endorsed by this city council.
McLeod also asked his fel-
low councilmen to consider
adding a motto on the city's
business cards that refer to
two of the town's unique
claims to fame.
McLeod suggested the card
include "Florida's First City
of Education" and "Home of
the Florida Chautauqua As-
sembly."
Councilman Don Harrison
said he'd rather open it up to
the public and let citizens
submit suggestions. Council-
man James Huffman dis-
agreed and said that such a
move would unnecessarily
complicate a simple,
straightforward idea.
Ultimately, no decision was
made. The councilmen
agreed to delay a decision.
In other news, the Council
voted to approve a supple-
mental agreement with URS
Engineering regarding a
stormwater permit for taxi-
way A at the city airport.
They also approved the
planned project development
at Springs East Apartment
by developer Gerald
McCormick and awarded a
bid for street resurfacing to
Gum Creek Construction for
$99,750. Additional work will
be added in because the win-
ning bid was $50,000 under
budget.
The Council also approved
a $2B,.831 bid from Gulf
Coast Traffic, Inc. for street
traffic control improvements.






PAGE 2-A THE DEFINI \K SI'RINUS HERALD. THIRSI)DA. i.Y 7. no,'


Notice of meeting

There will be a quarterly public meeting of the board of
commissioners for the Liberty Fire District, Inc. at 7 p.m.
on July 12, 2005, in the training room at the fire station,
located at 3910 Kings Lake Road, DeFuniak Springs.
The meeting is open to all who reside in Liberty Fire
District and other interested parties.

Walton County

School District offers

discounted meals
The Walton County School District announced its policy
for free and reduced price meals. for children unable to pay
the full price of meals served under thed National School
Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. The district's/
sponsor's administrative office'has a copy of the policy, which
may be reviewed by any interested party.
The following household size and income criteria will be
used for determining eligibility:
Effective from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006
Free Meal Scale


Household
Size
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
For each
Additional
.Family
member
add
Household
Size
1
2
3


Annual
12,441
16,679
20,917
25,155
29,393
33,631
37,869
42,107
4,238


'`'Twice Per Every Two
.Monthly Month Weeks
1,037 ; 519 ,"'.i3 479
1,390 695 i 642
1,744 872 805
2,097 1,049 968
2,450 1,225 1,131
2,803 1,402 1,294
3,156 1,578 1,457
3,509 1,755 1,620
354 177 163


Weekly
240
321
403
484
566
647
729
810
82


Reduced Price Meal Scale


Annual
17,705
23,736
29,767


Monthly
1,476
1,978
2,481


Twice Per
Month
738
989
1,241


Every Two
Weeks
681
913
1,145


Weekly
341
457
573


The


DBPA


wants


YOU!
Business owners and staff
are invited to join the board
of directors of the DeFuniak
Business and Professional
Association on Thursday,
July 7, 2005, at 7 a.m. at
Hotel DeFuniak for coffee
and 'brainstorming' on how,
together, downtown can be
improved and revitalized.
Everyone is encouraged to
share their ideas and com-
ments as the DBPA looks to-
ward the growth and expan-
sion of DeFuniak Springs.
Additionally, a summit
meeting will be held with all
business owners and any in-
terested people to discuss
signage, lighting, DBPA fes-
tivals and the role of the
DBPA in the future.
The summitmeeting will
be held on Thursday, July 14,
2005 at 5:30 p.m. at the
Chautauqua Hall of Brother-
hood in the Lakeyard.


Eucheeanna
Community
Center hosts


4 35,798 2,984 1,492 1,377 689 special meetin
5 41,829 3,486 1,743 1,6Q9 805 meeting
6 47,860 3,989 1,995 1,841 921 The historic Eucheeanna
7 53,891 4,491 2,246 2,073 1,037 Community Center "old
8 59,922 4,994 2,497 2,305 1,153 school house" will hold a spe-
For each 6,031 503 252 232 116 cial meeting on Monday, July
Additional 11, at 7 p.m. to discuss the
Family future of the Center.
member, Volunteers are needed to
serve on the board of direc-
Children from families whose income is at or below the tors and various committees,
levels shown are eligible for free or reduced price meals, and to help with several
Applications forms are being sent to all homes with a let- maintenance projects on the
ter to parents og aardians to apply.for free or reduced price building. The new pavilion
meals, households should fill out the application and return is almost finished, and it's a
T ...Col, Additional copies are- available at the great place to hold commu-
offoe -in eaeScbhool:' O.. '. m ty W an fa ly events....
-The information provided on the application will be Aued' 'All' ifimb'rsG 'neiglhbo'is
"Tor 'thfe purpose of determining eligibility and mayj e veri- and friends of the center are
fled at any time during the school year by school or other invited to attend this very
program officials. important meeting.


*


KEEPD


.Mickey I
? "MAYOR OF FI

"Steady Leadership

For Freeport's

Future"
I have worked for aggressive infra-
structure expansion to surrounding
areas to keep citizen 's rates low.


Marse

REPORT


Ca a;
Si~






*


Mayor Marse

SWith the growth of the PRESENT and the
SLagFUTURE my VISIONS are:
Large family recreation facility to include ball fields.
To further expand both water and sewer systems to
,, keep our Bay and all of our waterways clean and pure.
To see "Water Side" Park a reality with monies from
the revenue the property has made.

oDting my watch over the City ofFreeport, I have played
a majorpart in the following accomplishments:
BUILT WITH GRANT MONIES
New Fire Station Public Library
Community Center *Laird Park
.* 1st Public Swimming Pool in Walton County
Casey Park
Old Post Office Building [Boughtand Preserved]
S* New Fire Equipment (No interest loan from Walton County]
Expansion of Water System [From 500 to 4,000 customers)
5 Expansion of Sewer System


"Together we can continue the work that we've already
begun and ensure the Freeport never loses that small town
community feel." 'i,\ J "\/, ...


'1 r


I0-YUI]NIGHBOR O0 A HARDWARE


Wells attends seminar


Judge Kelvin C. Wells of
the First Judicial Circuit,
Walton County, FL, recently
successfully completed the
criminal trial skills course at
the American Academy of
Judicial Education in Jack-
son Hole, WY on June 4-10.
Judge Wells attended this
seminar with judges from all
over the United States. The
seminar covered all areas of
criminal trial procedures.
Judge Wells' attendance
was supported by a scholar-
ship awarded by the State
Justice Institute (SJI), a non-
profit organization estab-
lished by federal law to
award grants to improve the
quality of justice in state
courts nationwide, facilitate
better coordination between
state and federal courts, and
foster innovative, efficient
solutions to common prob-


lems faced by all courts. More
information about the Insti-
tute is available on the SJI
web site (http://
www.statejustice.org).


Craig S, Robinson, CPA

Tax
Bookkeeping &
Accounting
Financial Planning
Business Consultant



892-0888

The CPA. NverUnderestimateThe Value .
]


The helpful place.


.. .... ".l' ,' .. .

ROLLOVER YOUR 401(K)
,,,; with someone who's
always been there or you. *"




S...





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for your home-

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While Supplies Last During July!








IDe lo phiyscal slie nerclianidising polices and manulaclurer s shortages, sone stores iiiav Ia' Ina le to suckai r1els show However, mosl Htems -
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'PEIASE Vbf'JlE2~ iDL 12th '
Nta*Pe',r a n CrirEl ,,z te Pn .,ur s bey iar Cj r xi
Mo :ma ip6


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THE DEFLU'IAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


4IA~ :
41 %


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS FIRE DEIl\rI MeN.VT re-
cently tested sprayer equipment and conducted training at
the firehouse. Fire department personnel said they needed
to test the equipment before they had to use it on a fire and
figured the best way was to help water the ball field,


Old Spanish Trail sale set


Now is the time to make
plans to participate in the
second annual Old Spanish
Trail Rummage Sale to take
place Sept. 30. and Oct. 1,
2005 on Hwy. 90 from
Pensacola to Marianna, FL.
Businesses and individuals
located on and near Hwy. 90
are encouraged to set up side-
walk sales, yard sales, flea
markets, auctions, carnivals,
and other special events to
take place on the first week-
end of October.
This will be an opportunity
for folks from across the


Covenant

Hospice

cablethon

scheduled
Tune in to local Cox Chan-
nel 6 on July 8 through July
9 from 8 to 8 p.m. for the 33rd
annual Cox Communications
Cablethon benefiting Cov-
enant Hospice.
The live 24-lj-our br:oilcr it
:..-i fI nature r_-.,i:4..: Lall-i.
i-ti-'ir-5 .-:ith items such as
roundt.rip tickets from Air
Tran, vacation getaways, golf
packages, autographed
sports memorabilia, beauti-
ful artwork, jewelry, furni-
ture and much more. Auction
items and times can be
viewed online at www.
covenanthospice.org.
All the proceeds will ben-
efit Covenant Hospice's non-
funded and under-funded
programs in Okaloosa and
Walton counties. For more
information, please contact
Lill Jennings at 729-1800.


Southeastern United States
to get off the interstate and
discover the unique charm
and character of historic Old
Spanish Trail. It will be a fun
and relaxing day for partici-
pants and attendees alike.
Events already scheduled
for that weekend include:
In Walton County, B & B
auctions .will take place at
the Shriners building.
Florida Antique Mall will
have vendors set up in their
parking lot on Hwy. 90 near
downtown DeFuniak
Springs.
The 'Wunw'n's Club will be
having a yard sale on Satur-
day at their building across
from the Walton County
Courthouse, and several
other sales are scheduled
throughout town.
In Holmes County area
vendors will be set up beside
the Ponce de Leon City Hall
parking lot. Jack Palmer at
the Caryville Fire Depart-
ment will be renting out
space on the banks of the
beautiful Choctahatchee
River.
More events are constantly
be added to the event. This
event is sponsored by Fred
and Sharon Willharm. owners
rof Fiornda LAntique Malt 'ih
DeFuniak Springs. Florida,
and was inspired by similar
events that take place in
other states. All businesses
and individuals wishing to
participate should contact
Fred Wilharm at 850-892-
7282 or e-mail mainstreet
prod@earthlink.net.
All events will be listed
free on Old Spanish Trail
Rummage Sale website and
will be included free in press
releases and other publicity.
For more information, visit
the website at www.trailsale.
com.


TOP TEN THINGS TO DO
WHEN SELLING YOUR HOME
1. CALL BRUCE NA YLOR
(He will take care of the other 9!)

The Proven Professionals

9 Naylor
: 1ftie _l REALTY
776 BALDWIN AVENUE

Bruce Naylor 951-2488
Owner-Broker www.brucenaylor.com


FFlexsteeL
America's Seating Specialist




100

Recliners

Sell Cheap & Tell The Truth!
Sleep Tight Furniture Inc.
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TkMietliR-~pFirr1


Democrats
meet
A Sunny Saturday After-
noon provided a perfect back-
drop for a gathering of Wal-
ton County Democrats on the
lawn at the home of Willa
Hertwig on Coy Burgess
Loop.
Sixty local democrats and
guests enjoyed music pro-
vided by Thorn Brooks
and the Dixie Dads.
A delicious Spaghetti din-
ner was prepared by chefs
Kermit and Brenda Wright
leaving the air filled with the
aroma of Italian Spices and
Garlic Bread warmed on the
grill.
Rev. James Williams gave
an inspirational speech and
blessing with additional com-
ments offered by local party
officers. Youth and
adults enjoyed an afternoon
of music, food, fellowship
and ideas.
The event was organized
by the Walton County Demo-
cratic Party as a forum to dis-
cuss goals, growth, and de-
velopment of the local party.
Anyone seeking informa-
tion about the local party or
wishing to participate in
party activities should call
O-50-892-5030, write the Wal-
ton County Democratic Party
at P.O. Box 526 DeFuniak
Springs, FL 32435 or email
us atWaltonDemocrats
@earthlink.net.
For more information, visit
the website atWaltonDemo
crats.org.


MIMI BROOKS (left) shares a smile with host 'Widla
Hertwiig and Walton County School Board Member Mildred,
Wilkerson. Although the school board is non-partisan,
Wilkerson is a Democrat at heart.


A better way for the future.



On Tuesday, vote Janice McLean


for Mayor of Freeport


Janice McLean will be a full-time mayor
Freeport is no longer the sleepy little town it once was. With the rapid
growth we are experiencing, Freeport needs a full-time mayor to serve
the community. Janice McLean will be Freeport's first full-time mayor,
dedicating all of her time and energy to the job and its important duties.

Involving the public: Open door policy
One of the keys in making our community a better place to live is to
better inform and involve the public in the decision-making process at
City Hall. As mayor, Janice McLean will implement an open door policy
that will improve communications and encourage public participation.

A "Shared Direction for the Future"
When Janice McLean is elected Mayor of Freeport, she will establish a
Shared Direction for the Future, a unified vision statement with the City
Council identifying issues to be targeted for action during Janice's term
as mayor. A cooperative attitude, together with a cohesive and unified
plan, are key when dealing with water, sewer and road demands, and
the other growth challenges that Freeport is facing.

Building a strong economy
We must ensure Freeport has well paying jobs for our residents so they
can live and thrive here. As your mayor, Janice McLean will work with
local businesses, our county and state governments, and the Economic
Development Council to develop and implement specific plans to ensure
new economic opportunities exist in Freeport.

Focusing on children and families
As we meet the demands of growth, we must focus on children and
families. Janice McLean will make our children one of her highest
priorities. Janice will work closely with school officials to bring new and
better facilities to Freeport, and continue her efforts to improve parks
and recreational opportunities here.


Janice McLean


will be a

full-time

Mayor

who works

overtime

for you!


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Janice McLean for Mayio
- - -


189 N.Main St.
Crt.vkcvJ,1 FL.


Two" I /4.0 wIl8


8 50-682-8872 iavia


WALTON COUNTY DEMOCRATS prepared early for the Fourth of July by celebrating
democracy recently with an afternoon of good food and fellowship at the home of Willa
Hertwig in DeFuniak Springs. There was plant of lively discussion about next year's po-
litical races in Walton County and at the state level.
Local Democrats are hoping to break what they see as a complete strantglehlold on local
politics due to the fact that every partisan elected government office int Walton Count'y is
currently held by Republicans.


"' '~''''''" ~


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THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


PERSONAL COMMENTS



Editor's Comment By Ron Kelley




Taking the day off creatively


Walton County residents know how to enjoy their Fourth
of July. From 'Bama to the Beaches, there were celebrations,
fireworks and parades'for kids of all ages.
In DeFuniak Springs, the celebration was a smashing
success for the sponsors, participants and the residents. It
was'the genuine article, a magnificent small town Fourth
of July and fun truly was had by all.
Most people had the day off, making it a long weekend for
lots of folks. Beach house rentals were off the charts and
restaurants and clubs were packed. Traffic was...well, traf-
fic was incredibly bad, even by our standards. It's my opin-
ion that Florida DOT officials and every member of our leg-
islative delegation should be forced to drive U.S. 331 from
the state line to U.S. 98 and back twice. Then they can tell
me that four-laning U.S. 331 is 10 years away...again.
But I digress.
We were talking about getting a day off. This editorial is
dedicated to those faithful workers who toiled and labored
while the rest of us played.
A friend of mine e-mailed a list of potential excuses sure
to convince the boss that you absolutely do not need to go
in. Some of them were so clever that I had to share them.
This'one is great if you work at the post office: "If it's all
the same, toyou, I won't be coming in to work. The voices
told 'me' to clean all my guns today."
Ifyoor bf-eling a little irregular, here's a good one: "When
I gotu 'u is morning, I took two Ex-Lax, in addition to my
Prozai I can't get out of the bathroom, but it's okay, I feel
good about it."
If you're a Star Trek or Star Wars fan, try this: "I set half
the clocks in my ho4s'e ahead an hour and the other half
back an hour Saturday and spent 18 hours in some kind of
space-time continuum loop, reliving Sunday (right up until
the explosion). I was able to exit the loop only by reversing
the polarity of the power source exactly e*log(pi) clocks in
the house while simultaneously rapping my dog on the snout


CORRECTION:
In a June 23, 2005 letter to the editor, Lynda Morse wrote
regarding animal control services, "The other $193,000 is
spent on salaries of the two animal control officers with ap-
proximately $10,000 per year (if that) spent for transporta-
tion of animals to and from the Chipley facility." According
to Morse, the statement should have read: "The other
$193,000 is spent on salaries of the two animal control of-
ficers with approximately $10,000 per year (if that.i spent
fof transportation of animals t''and from the Chipljey facil-
ity. and ALL other county related-expenses."




Editor:
Eminent domain. There are groups to join like the Castle
Coalition on the Internet to help make this wrong right. I
have news for the state of Florida, they will. Anyone can
now take our parks, wetlands, beach front properties, any-
thing now, for more revenue. We're in a very corrupt area.
All of our politicians in this area in my opinion are for sale.
We all know that maybe one or two are not.
All of Destin, there's a need for new roads, highways, con-
dos, is your property safe? I know I am just like most other
people, try to steal my property and I plan to protect it with
all I got, so I am looking to see people killed over this and
plan to see people defending their property with bloodshed.
All of you that plan to scheme and get rich over night,
better think again. Is it worth it? I know I speak for many.
You're not stealing our lands! Remember, in the state of
Florida they passed a new law, you can kill if you fill threat-
ened.
Mike Judkins
DeFuniak Springs

The DeFuniakD CONUOUSY MNCZ 41


HS&. *

-.-- -,.-- I ~- -i-
The DeFuniak Springs Herald-Breeze, Inc.
676 Baldwin Ave., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
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The DeFuniak Springs Herald
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Fax: 231-0928
E-mail: breeze@dfsi.net


with a rolled up Times. Accordingly, I will be in late, or early."
If you're a religious zealot, use this one: "My stigmata's
acting up."
If you want your boss to tiptoe around you, try this one: "I
can't come in to work today because I'll be stalking my pre-
vious boss, who fired me for not showing up for work. Okay?"
If you work in a hospital, this one's perfect: "I have a rare
case of 48-hour projectile leprosy, but I know we have that
deadline to meet. What do you want me to do?"
If you spend too much time in discount stores, use this
one: "I am stuck in the blood pressure machine down at
Wal-Mart."
If you are normally considered ditzy, or happen to be blond,
here's one for you: "Yes, I seem to have contracted some at-
tention-deficit disorder and, hey, how about them Hoyas,
huh? So I won't be able to, yes, could I help you? No, no, I'll
be sticking with Sprint, but thank you for calling."
If you need the whole week off, try this one: "Constipation
has made me a walking time bomb."
If you work at the courthouse or in a law office, try this: "I
just found out that I was switched at birth. Legally, I
shouldn't come to work knowing my employee records may
now contain false information."
If you've seen Silence of the Lambs 17 times or more, use
this one: "The psychiatrist said it was an excellent session.
He even gave me this jaw restraint so I won't bite things
when I am startled."
If you're a pet owner, try this one: "The dog ate my car
keys. We're going to hitchhike to the vet."
If you are sure your wife will never find out, try using this
one: "My mother-in-law has come back as one of the undead
and we must track her to her coffin to drive a stake through
her heart and give her eternal peace. One day should do it."
If you want to confuse everyone and display your superior
intellect, use this: "I am converting my personal work cal-
endar from Julian to Gregorian.",
Finally, if you live anywhere in Walton County, this one's
for you! "I can't come to work today because the DEP has
determined that my house is completely surrounded by wet-
lands and I have to arrange for helicopter transportation."
Have a wonderful day off!


Editor,
All over the world, smart companies are finding ways to
make products, earn profits, and reduce pollution at the
same time. It makes both financial and social sense, since
everyone depends on clean water, soil, and air.; '.., 'i
Sadly, the state of Florida and the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency aren't getting with the clean industry
program even though smart technology and innovation
are American traditions. Some of Florida's worst polluters
are about to get a free pass to use our public waters as their
private sewers. Citizens shouldn't stand for it.
Three belching north Florida paper mills are going to be
allowed to pipe their wastes to larger water bodies where
we all fish and swim, just because the companies claim that
they can't meet water quality standards on the smaller riv-
ers and creeks that they have already polluted and killed.
For years, the EPA has opposed the absurd idea that "di-
lution is the solution to pollution." The whole purpose of the
Clean Water Act, after all, is to clean public waters not
allow industry to ignore new technology and keep adding
more toxins to our rivers and oceans. But under the indus-
try-beholden administrations of President George Bush and
Gov. Jeb Bush, the.state DEP and the EPA are now sup-
porting all three paper-mill pipelines. These pipelines will
benefit fat corporations: Georgia Pacific in Palatka, Inter-
national Paper in Pensacola, and Buckeye in Perry.
And what does the public get? A polluted Gulf of Mexico,
with black waste pouring all over the Big Bend National
Seagrass Sanctuary not far from Tallahassee; a polluted
Perdido Bay in Pensacola, where last summer Hurricane
Ivan carried arsenic and dioxin-laced mud from Interna-
tional Paper's mill into people's homes and gardens; and a
ruined St. John's River near Jacksonville, where Georgia
Pacific's pollution is making fish change sex.
In fact, fish have been found changing sex near all these
paper mill they call them "bearded lady fish" because the
females are developing male genitalia. State and federal
regulators are now with straight faces allowing these
companies to move that gender-bending poison further into
our marine nursery grounds. There is already a 15-square
mile "dead zone" where the Fenholloway River empties into
our Gulf, thanks to Buckeye and its biggest customer, Procter
& Gamble. P&G built the mill and ran it for years. This
giant company made bundles of money by ruining our pub-
lic fishing grounds.
We Floridians got.tired of being accused of wanting to take
away jobs and stop progress in the name of clean water. So,
we raised and spent private money to bring in some of the
best paper mill technology experts in the world. From 2002
to 2004, these experts toured these mills, and concluded that
the mills could switch to cleaner technology, save money,
and stop wrecking public waters. The world is full of paper
mills that no longer pollute like ours do.
Too bad that state and federal regulators didn't listen.
Instead, they want to apply 1950s technology to a 2005 prob-
lem. The saddest part of this story is that it would cost about
the same amount of money to fix these problems with new
technology as it does to build the pipelines. What does it
take to get sane water policy in the state of Florida today?
The only thing left to do to protect public waters from these
lax regulators and private profiteers is to go to court. Shame
on our elected leaders!
If you care about clean Florida water, boycott.these pol-
luters who refuse to get with 21st century technology: In-
ternational Paper, Georgia Pacific, and Buckeye. The least
we can do is stop buying their products until they clean up
their acts and the public waters they polluted for profit.
The Clean Water Network is a coalition of 155 grassroots
organizations working to protect Florida's waters. Linda
Young can be reached at lly6ung2@earthlink.net.

Linda Young
Director Clean Water Network
Tallahassee


Editor,
Since Tropical Storm Arlene, I've been receiving a lot of
questions about our beaches and wanted to share what I
learned during a recent TDC board meeting.
After Hurricane Ivan, the South Walton Tourist Develop-
ment Council used visitor dollars to replace approximately
450,000 cubic yards of sand, push sand back onto the dunes
and purchase 900,000 sea oats to be planted this summer.
These emergency measures served their purpose, provid-
ing a reservoir of sand to be eroded instead of our natural
dune system.
Fortunately, Arlene, unlike Ivan, spared most of our dunes.
However, serious erosion occurred to our beaches. We lost
several feet of sand exposing the black peat, which lies un-
der our white sand beaches. The peat is the result of the
cypress swamp that existed thousands of years ago where
our beaches are located today. The county cannot bring in
sand to cover the peat at this time due to state and federal
permitting that is difficult to obtain during turtle nesting
season. In addition, another storm would quickly wash the
new sand out to into the gulf and thousands of dollars later,
we'd be in the same predicament. Since much of our sand is'
just offshore and large amount of beach recovery should
occur in the following weeks, the county is looking to de-
velop more long-term options.
Long-term success is most often found through large-scale
beach restoration projects. In order for beaches to receive
large-scale restoration they must be classified as "critically
eroded" by the Florida Department of Environmental Pro-
tection. Critical erosion is determined on a yearly basis and
only 6.5 miles of beaches were deemed "critically eroded"
prior to Ivan. After Ivan, the Florida DEP critical erosion
draft report included approximately 11 miles of critically
eroded beaches in Walton County. This allows more beaches
in Walton County to be considered for a large-scale beach
restoration. Of the original 6.5 miles, a 4.8 mile. stretch of
"critically eroded" beach in western Walton County is await-
ing final permitting and we expect that restoration will be-
gin this fall.
The Walton County Commission and the TDC are sched-
uling workshops to discuss additional areas that could ben-
efit from large-scale restoration and to gauge the
community's interest in various options. Once the date is
set, property owners, association managers and everyone
with an interest in our beaches is encouraged to attend. In
the meantime, the TDC will move forward on plans to en-
hance the dune system by planting more than 900,000 sea
oats this summer.
Ultimately, Mother Nature is the only one who can pre-
dict how quickly our beaches will begin to show improve-
ment, but the TDC is working diligently to provide her a
helping hand.

Maurice Gilbert
chairman, South Walton Tourist Development Council



Dear Editor,
The fireworks have long dissolved into the night sky; the
tiny flags plucked off the front of the amphitheater from
whence they have so proudly waved.
The celebration is over and those who participated in the
dg.ys' festivities sit in quiet reflection: laughter, good food. y
&geatentertainment and the pop of fireworks fill ourl'
thoughts. July 4th in DeFuniak Springs is truly a joyous 4l' i-
casion. That's the day that Walton County families gather
together to share in the expression of small town values:
pride in our community, pride in ourselves and pride in our
country. By coming together, we strengthen our common
bonds and seek out the answers in a brightly-lit night sky.
Innocence and hope filled our. hearts that warm summer
evening.
I am happy to have been a part of this annual journey of
spirits people and families spending time together is the
stuff of which memories are made. As for me, I have mine.
Memories of the first 4th of July celebration after Desert
storm in 1991, and those that have followed; memories of
planning meetings; of rainy and humid weather, of F-15's
coming out of an afternoon sky ard the sound of children's
laughter. But more than that, I have memories of special
moments shared with family and friends in the town I love.
Congratulations to Dr. Lynn and Ellen Mayfield, Grand
Marshals of the 2005 Fourth of July Parade. Lynn and Ellen
were honored for their many contributions to DeFuniak
Springs. They have accomplished many things for our com-
munity with their generous sprit and "can do attitude." They
are a shining example of what serving your community is
all about!
Thanks go to those who helped make this year's event
possible. Roy and Voncille McLeod, DeFuniak Springs Fire
Chief Brian Coley and his department, the DeFuniak
Springs Police Department, Eglin Air Force Base, the Civil
Air Patrol, and all those who came to be a part of the pa-
rade. Others who gave of their time include Gary Hulion,
Shala Cuchens, Ron Kelley and Rev. Tony Dixon. The band
Dakota gathered from all over the southeast to entertain
the "home folks."
Now I must thank the people who placed the guidance of
this year's festivities into my hands. Special thanks go to
the members of the DeFuniak Springs Business and Pro-
fessional Association Board of Directors who gave countless
hours to make the day possible. They showed up for 7 a.m.
meetings, and sweated in the summer heat putting up deco-
rations, lining up the parade, cooking and cleaning up after
dark when everyone else had long left for the comfort of
home. This band of dedicated volunteers are Mary Helen
Connell, Gillis Douglass, Carla Hulion, Eric Joiner, Carolyn
Mora, Bruce Rhodes, Liz Sinclair and Julie Smith.
The generous spirit of our community was shown by those
individuals, organizations and churches that sponsored the
free children's activities. They include: Southwide Baptist
Church, First Presbyterian Church, East Baptist Church,
Martha Ingle, Rhonda Skipper, Rainbow Florist, Dave's
Music, the Argyle Fire Department, CHELCO, WZEP, and
WGTX.


The fireworks were brighter this year because of the gen-
erous donations of John and Lora Beebe, J.C. and Mary
Helen Connell at Badcock Home Furnishings and More,
Regions Bank, CHELCO and Gillis and' Gene Douglass.
By working (long and hard) together, we coordinated an
event the citizens of this community have come to look for-
ward to each year. I now look toward planning next year's
event. Before too long, we will need to start raising the
needed funds and begin making more memories amidst com-
mittee meetings, making decorations and, of course, order-
ing the fireworks.
But for now, I am content to sit back and reminisce.
Sara Comander. president
DeFuniak Springs Business
and Professional Association

see ADDITIONAL LETTERS page f1B


PAGE 4-A









Thrift-
SQuest as
Food StampsV


Way Supermarket.....


July 7 -13


Hwy. 90 DeFuniak Springs, FL


Boneless Chuck
Roast
lb.

$199


e eeky 5.
-1 L
T-Bone
Steak
lb.

$549
"1 r


Round
Steak

lb.

$229


I L
Rib Eye
Steak

lb. (family pack)

$599
5F


Sliced Pork 1/4
Loin

lb.(Ribend)


Bar-S


Bologna ...... lb. $129


Country Style


Rump
Roast lb.$219


Bar-S


Back Ribs ... lb. $139 Franks ........ 12 oz. 89'


Cube (family package)
Steak lb.$299


Sunset Farm Smoked (fam. pkg.)


Sausage


........ b. $189


10 POUND. MEAT PACKAGES


Fresh
Ground
Chuck

$1990


Assorted
Pork


Chops-

$1590


SFresh
Ground
Beef

$1490


Fire'sh
Chuck
Steak
$1 090


Each additional $10 food order, SUPER
BONUS BUYS excluded, entitles you to your
choice of one SUPER BONUS BUY!
Shur Fresh White

Bread .20 oz.89

Shawnee Best

lour- .. .' 51b. 99

Flavorite

Milk gallon$249

Flavorite

Sugar 4 lb.$129

Flavorite Medium

Eggs dozen 29A
Kraft

Mayonnaise............... quart 269

2 Liter

Coke 99'
L r

Shoppers' Value
Ice Cream 4 quart $2
Cole's
Texas Toast ........ 16 oz.2/$00
Fresh Frozen
Italian Beans ........... 32 oz.$219
McKenzie
Corn 20 oz. roll 2/$300
OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY
6 A.M. 8 P.M.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
SALE STARTS THURSDAY, 8 A.M.
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOS


Brawny
Towels 8 roll pack $649
Shawnee Best
Flour 5lb.$129
Old Orchard
Apple Juice .............. 64 oz. $109
Flavorite
Rice .5 lb. $149
Kraft
BBQ Sauce 18oz.99'
Kraft
Mayonnaise ................. quart$299
Original Scent
Clorox 96 oz.$39
Kellogg's Princess
Cereal ........................ 10.4 oz. 2/$500
Shoppers' Value
Tea Bags 100 count99'


Super Chill
Sodas 12 pack


2/$ 500


Flavorite
Pork-n-Beans .... 16oz. 3/$100


China Doll
Blackeye Peas ... 12 oz


3/$100


-J IL

Music City
Drink .............................. gallon $ 00
Flavorite Medium
Eggs ............................... dozen 2/$
Florida Natural Orange
Juice ................................. 64 oz.2/400
Favorite
Oleo ....................... 8 oz. patty 3/$100
r


F REaS.- P RO. D U.C E


Baking


Seedless Green


Potatoes ................................... lb. 49' Grapes ................................... lb. $149
Red


Plum s ............... .149
B ananas ............................. b.3/$ 00


Friday & Saturday
Peaches ..................... lb. 69'


Look for local produce!!


- U -


I' I I


I -- .~


I L


I I






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


PAGE 6-,,,.

oewo tre teo


Capitol

"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Additional circuit

judge sought

for Walton County


WCBC makes

changes in

meeting schedule


In an effort to better serve
the citizens of Walton
County, the board of county
commissioners recently
voted to make a change in
their meeting schedule.
In the past, the commis-
sioners met the second and
fourth Tuesday of each
month for their regular meet-
ings and land use issues were
discussed at a meeting held
on the first Tuesday of each
month.
The land use issues will
now be heard following the
regularly scheduled board
meetings. The change in the


meeting schedule will give
more time for land use issues
and help streamline the de-
velopment and permitting
process. The time for the
meeting will be at 4:00 p.m.
and will alternate between
the Walton County Court-
house in DeFuniak and the
South Walton Courthouse
Annex in Santa Rosa Beach.
In July the first regular
board meeting will be July 12
at 4 p.m. in DeFuniak
Springs at the Courthouse.
The July 26 meeting will be
held at 4 p.m. at the South
Walton Courthouse Annex.


The First Circuit Judicial
Nominating Commission is
now accepting applications
for the circuit judge position
in Walton County. Applicants
must be a registered voter
and a member of The Florida
Bar for the past five (5)
years.
Applications are available
from the Florida Bar web
site:
http://www.floridabar.org/
tfb/TFBComm.nsf or from
the chair of the Commission,
Drew S. Pinkerton, by pick-
up from his law office at 25
Walter Martin Road, Fort
Walton Beach, FL, between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday
through Thursday, and 8
a.m. to noon on Fridays.
An original plus nine cop-
ies of the completed applica-
tion must be received by
Pinkerton no later than 5
p.m., Monday, July 25,2005.
The Judicial Nominating


Commission has tentatively
scheduled applicant inter-
views beginning at 9 a.m. on
Thursday, August 4, 2005,
and all day Friday, August 5,
2005, at the Okaloosa
County Courthouse in
Crestview, FL. Applicants
will be advised of the inter-
view schedule and meeting
room.
A list of the members of the
1st Circuit JNC is available
on the Bar's web site.


-


All


Dan Sullitan
Agency


Nationwid["
et


Insurance &
Financial Services 8 2 2 6


Nationwide Is On Your Sde: -
Lfe insurance underwritten by Nationwide Life Insurance Company.
Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Home Offce. Columbus. OH 43215-2220 L2 11/00


Community Calendar

THE EMERALIDTOAST WOODTURNING GUILD will
hold their monthly meeting on July 9, at the Freeport Com-
munity Center in Freeport. They will meet at 8 a.m. till
noon to tour Jim Stokes' saw mill in Chipley.
Call Ron Ferreira for details 850-622-0942. Open to any-
one interested in wood turning.
THE DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS Chapter 98
of DeFuniak Springs invites everyone to Friday Night Bingo.
The chapter is located at 131 Royal Drive which is two blocks
east of Twin Lakes Superette off of Hwy. 90 W in DeFuniak
Springs. Phone 892-7818 or contact Douglas Godwin at 892-
9737 for information.
The Early Bird games start at 6 p.m. sharp which consist
. of 12 games and a winner take all game.' Early bird games
.,are $5.00 for all 3 packets for the 12 games.
Regular game packets are $10 per packet.
No alcoholic-beverages allowed. The Disabled American
Veterans is a,non-profit organization that gives back to lo-
cal charities, the community and veterans.






LI 5
r- / / / .1



Anniversary

1955-2005



Celebrating

YEAR-LONO

LISTEN.

ENJOY.

WIN PRIZES

r www.w zepl 460.com i


CITY OF FREEPORT
2005 CITY ELECTIONS
Please be advised the City of Freeport will have an election for Mayor and
Council seat #4 on Tuesday. July 12, 2005 in the Meeting Room at Freeport City
Hall. The polls will be open from 7:00 am until 7:00 pm. Absentee voting will be
held at the City Clerk's office at City Hall from Monday, June 20, 2005 through
Monday, July 11,2005.
Anyone who has questions or comments may stop by the City Clerk's Office at
Freeport City Hall, 112 Highway 20 West, Freeport, or call 850-835-2822. The
Clerk's Office is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. .
3tc: 6-23,30;7-7


SPeoples Neational Bank

'our nsiendlylomineown Bank"



Welcomes

,, Johanna Castrillo


To









Stop in today to meet Johanna, and

sign-up for your Free Checking Account

with direct deposit*, which also includes:



Free Internet Banking

Free Online Bill Pay

Free Telephone Banking

*Free ATM Card

Free Check Card*

*$500.00 reoccurring direct deposit monthly. *Check card subject to credit approval.
-I) MEMBER FDIC
LMNOC


* ~ -






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005

I~O ~;F7- Zrjj im4


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER


Available

In House



* Labs

* X-rays

* Ultrasoun

* Allergy

Testing


CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY




FAMILY

S- PRACTICE

BOARD
CERTIFIED


d


A ed-
ccept nW I^


ROBERT KNOX, P.A-C. CAROLINE LAWRENCE, P.A-C. JAMES W. HOWELL, D.O.


892-2888


Monday


- Friday 7:30


- 500


21 WEST MAIN ST. DeFuniak Springs


CI


Your Tolucltone Energy' It
Cooperative
(850) 892-2111
www.chelco.com
1350 W. Baldwin Ave., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435



MWWmMrv Coea
Old School pride in our work +
the latest New School tools =
Central Heat & Air Conditioning
'at its best.


Providing quality service since
1991
American Air Systems, LLC
2243 State Hwy 83, DFS
FL. Lic. CAC1814381


892-2804


Nice mobile home on ,
4.99 ACRES in Ponce
de Leon. This is
beautiful property and
mobile home is in
excellent condition!, l
$150,000.00..
MLS# 394142
SIRON i 1147 HWY.90W.
HORSE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
REALTY 850-951-2703
www.ironhorserealty.net


AUTHENTIC
MEXICAN
RESTAURANT


$3 99 Include
S III drink
11 am 2 pm
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. it am 9 pm
Fri. & Sal. 11 am 1o pm
V-l I m- n


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


Sun. 11 am 9 pm
1317 Hwy 331 South
DeFuniak Spnngs. Florida
(850) 951-2175
Judy Torres, Mgr.


SJIedicrne
Shopper

Ross A. Centanni, R.Ph.
674 Freeport Hwy. S.
DeFuniak Spgs, FL
'".......- 32433-3349 -
across from
Po Boys Gun & Pawn
y (850) 951-0859

The Pharmacy That's All About Your Health.'


Southern Homes, Inc.
"UPSCALE MANUFACTURED HOMES &
MODULARS"

COMPLETE LAND/HOME PACKAGES
Electric, well, septic, eta:ihcluded
FHA VA Conventional +
Home Orly Loans Available.
5.i K


aV


Janei Hurst, Michuel Lil .na Jcnliltre C ral .tpani u
Brok-r/,sRetr Hunt Y.un Hu RE tal Epperol Carroll Lawrncae
10 ACRES Tripple G Rd $95,000
OAKWOOD LAKES ESTATES waterfront lot $89,900
RENOIR ST. waterfront 3 bedroom/2 bath mobile home .........$140,000
MARTIN RD waterfront, 3 bedroom/2.5 bath.:.......................... $244,900
OAKWOOD HILLS LOTS .............$18,000 -$25,000 each
FREEPORT 2 BR/2 BA mobile home...........................................$95,500
BLUE POND 1 acre waterfront lot ..$175,000
PONCE DE LEON 3 BR/1.5 BA brick house $89,900
PONCE DE LEON 27.3 acres w/small pond ...........................$135,000
WATERFRONT LOTS .........................$104,900 each

THE WEATHER IS
,^ I,.. P E R FE C T
FOR
S. SAVINGS.

S"',.-. No%\ is the perfect time
t.or a new Carrier air
conditioning sy stem.

TAYLOR AIR CONDITIONING & ELECTRICAL INC.
r -p L SALES, SERVICE & INSTALLATION
I ER *,F15 684 N. 9th St., DeFuniak springs, FL
RG-0048207
RF-0066 780850-892-3955
RM-00E48225 mwww.carrier.com





PAIN MANAGEMENT CENTER

Micr( Spine
PHsLEADER L M IMAUM.INVASIVEA NIALSURGE RY

1 1-888-642-7677
Scott Haufe, M.D.
We accept most Major Ins. Board Certified
including Medicare Anesthologist.
& Workets Comp. Board Certified
Pain Management


Southern
S qmps, Inc.
O -----
Hw. 90 Mossy DeFuniak
Head Springs


Services available include:
* 24 hour staffing/security
* 3 delicious meals daily
* Emergency call system
* Calendar of activities
* Weekly housekeeping
* Personal care assistance
* Much more!


GUARDIAN
PES T CONTROL

SCIENTIFIC PEST AND TERMITE CONTROL
NO NEED To empty cabinets
with our Specialized application equipment and techniques
NO ODOR To upset your allergies

BUDDY INFINGER


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER
CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY


Available
In House
* Labs
* X-rays
* Ultrasound


SAll
Te


ergy CROBERTKNOX, P.A-C.
CAROLINE LAWRENCE. P.A-C.
sting JAMES W. HOWELL DO.
892-2888
Monday Friday 7:30 5:00
21 WEST MAIN ST. DeFuniak Springs


Located
42 Laird Rd.
Mossy Head, FL
(850) 892-2232


Affordable Assisted Living


*.S Stanley House Assisted Living


718 Walton Road, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
850-951-1880 Phone 850-951-2846 Fax
www.allianceseniorservices.com
Assisted Living FTacil


if" #9616


FAMILY
PRACTICE
BOARD
CERTIFIED


V


PAGE 7-A
't not",


i


vvKARAOKE
[Every Thursday
6-9 PM MA







THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7. 2005
PAGE 8-A


2004 QUALITY WATER REPORT

CITY OF DeFUNIAK SPRINGS


We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our con-
stant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and
protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from 4 wells. The wells draw from the Floridan Aquifer. Because of
the excellent quality of our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfecting purposes.

The Department of Environmental Protection is in the process of conducing Source Water Assessments (SWA) for all public water systems in Florida. These assessments will identify
and assess any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of your water supply. A SWA report for this system is available or will be by July 1, 2005 at the DEP SWAPP website:
www.dep.state.fl.us.swapp.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility please contact Mr. Michael G. Standley, City Manager at (850) 892-8500. We encourage our valued custom-
ers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the second and fourth Monday of every
month at 7:00 PM at the DeFunTak Springs Council Chambers located at 71 Hwy. 90 W., DeFuniak Springs, Florida.

-The City of DeFuniak Springs routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise,
this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2004. Data obtained before January 1, 2004, and presented in this report are from the
most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.

In the table below you find terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:

Maximum Contarmipant evel or MCi: ,The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available
treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level 9oal o( MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of
safety. ..

Action level (A): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

Picocurie der liter (pCi/) measure of the radioactivity in water.

"N." means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.

Parts per million (pp1n) pr Mglligramp oer ite9 rmg/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.

Ports per billion (ppI) or Microgrania oer liter (pg/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.

Maximum residual ipsinf9itpat Igyel or MlDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfection is necessary for
control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum residupl disinfectant level goal or MRD..G: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the
benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.



2004, TEST RESULTS TABLE
Total colifonn bacteria: Iighest Monihly Percetitge/Number is the highest monthly number of positive samples for 4systerm
enlurmin fLe C ihi 41 t)ain I phlc. per nvm11oh High-.-l Mimlhlt) PlnCrntIagNoumihti rr thighest monthly pircntlagc of'To itive
rsmples for systems collecting at least 40 samples per month.
Microbiological Contaminants
tt uf MCL likheirt
Comtumt and Unit ,of ,tpling o Viflit Monthly Me .Ctal.elly lr atiof
Mesurfem t (mo.1yr.) Y/N Number
or sytacmr s collcning fewer than N i t
'roltClrl tlm -a lI Jiiii.Jlu D Y 10 0 40 slo pls per m ouitnh: pruene of N.'h"mly prcw'nn
Wleilcmrn bictri, ill I sanill r
collected during a month.
*' R i tlls it Ilte l.ecvl Decictled t li,irt lin nodiulogiol fuilltiinIuls, inrgeinurte nlc ninil ni, >yllillr'i organic ronlttmmnants indluhnd peicidit
and hthicides, and volatile oganicnl contninantr are the hiithet ave'r" e l ally ,trl.e] qsii|lig p(l.i>.imt llr tie hisha denhst -' tel l t tay A nr plig
point, depending on Ihe sampling frcqucncy
(:ostminnat and Init of Iates of sampltitg 4MCI.VitatioU RnI WAX MCL likely Sourr oft
Measurement (moJ/yr.) YN I Result sj (;ltmintattk
Radiological Contaminants
Alplh cmitllt (pdCi) Aug-0l N 1.1 1-1.1 0 15 E wo
Rndirmn 226 or crt incd AtA-2- N I .5141.6 0 minr of n
rna (p1radium ) ,(DUosL
a. I "* j I .. .
C smuinld U o Dates ofra"pint MCL Vilatili Level Rae of Uk S#ly Seer.o
Measurementl IN. Deteet en, t r CRont mlamlion

Inorganic Contaminants -. ",:"-

pollllino l lb I I t l nt
Leild (puint ofcnty)(pph) Alg-02 N 6.00 2.00.6.00 na 15 cm ssiao nd painl;
O lm pip%, asing. and
solder
Pollution from mining
Nickel (pp) Aut-02 N 10( ND-1I N/A 100) a d"leliingl'eremi ons
Natural occurrence it,
i w il.
Ruinoff frin feniiler
use: Itching from
Nitrale (as Nitrmen) (lJpnm) Neq-(0 N 0.61 ND-0.61 10 to0 eptic if~nki snwS
crsion of narnml
deposits
n, ittlrm fIrtilirci
Susic Icaching limom
Nitrite (n Nitrogen)(p(pm) Scp-04 0,05 ND4 0.05 I 1 sepliv l~nks sewage,
rnosion Oal'itnttl
deposits
STTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfetarit/Disinfection By-Producti(P/DBP) Parameters

or he follr iinig iiripn iitue ilorir' undcr Siage I I /llI Fiegulation. the level dtl ctld is lhe annual average oif theqaterly
Sverges: Bromatc. Chloramilne. (Chlrine. Ii loceic Acids. imdl/or TTHM (MCI. O0 pph). RKang eoRanslt is the f rtanT ofrota~
Slowest Ihighesi) at the individual sampling sit.
Catmmminan ld Dates of M(CL L Itvel lC rIge WOr
UVit f mpli violin,,t of t tey.TOr(or 1 erCwlmiatlh1
Measurement (oyr'.) Y/N Reults L M 'I
Chvnac (pm) nn m) N 0.85 163- MRDLG MKI). 4.11 Wlter lditive IlaU t control microhe
Ha4llo ic Atidt 1n- c9 4
,(livse) (HAAi) (pb) a-04 N 1.39 N)-5.4 NA MCI. 60 By-product of drinking water disiinfecrin
riM [P la r t -Dec N
.r*m" ,h, ,omethii) tl D 2 00 N %t ( IPI Ill t i'r"mr-il ril nu1n ei. i Jhoqnrlnn


No.aof
Co.nnnptb ndViblmtu Prah ir lltldP 1. ft MCt.C tcIt.M, (Atrikely snolre. of1 C.iltllloti ttntu
.I litie ,1.
Lead and Copper (Tap Waterr)
Cower (tap waler) Jun-Sp N Corroston of household pnlunbing .'nstetnjs; estitiin
p ) 04 19 0 1.3 1.3 f ini posit ue hing tOlom oo
eld (it wlfer) .lm-Sop 2 30 0 15 C'um't iut'huashnold puming system, em nn
S(pph) 114 N .t, il30 0n mlml drlcitsl



Total Coliform. Coliforms are.bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other; portentially-harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were
found in more samples than allowed and this was a warming of potential problems.

On June 10th, 2004 monthly samples were collected throughout the city. The. next day our lab notified us that all samples came back positive for Coliform. We immediately raised our
chlorine residual in the water. On June 12th 2004 we sampled the same sites plus one site upstream and downstream from the original sites. These repeat samples came back clear of
coliform: There have been no positive samples since.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or
through the ground, it dissolve's .naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas
production, mining or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from


ga.s stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonable be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indi-
cate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe
Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, we sometimes need to make
improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are sometimes reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for being understanding.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergo-
ing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly
at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk
of infection by Cryptosporidlum and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

We at the City of DeFuniak Springs would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are com-
mitted to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call the numbers listed. ltc: July 7






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7,2005 PAGE 9-A


WALTON COUNTY THIS MONTH



Walton County is fortunate to have so many dedicated volunteer and professional firefighters serv-
ing the citizens. There are about 120 fire fighters in the 12 volunteer fire departments. The South
Walton Fire Department has 75 employees and the City of DeFuniak Springs has 6 professional
firemen.
These fire departments not only offer aid during a home fire, but can be the first responders on a
medical emergency as well.
Local departments conduct routine training session that improve their proficiency and enable them
to give better service to the citizens of Walton County. Often these volunteers pay for their own
training and equipment.
In addition to the DeFuniak Springs fire station and the South Walton Fire Department, three fire.
stations in the county are manned 24 hours a day by a full time paramedic/firefighter. They include
Tri-Village, Red Bay and Darlington/Gaskin. As the county's population grows, the demand.for
more stations to be manned 24 hours a day will increase.
On June 11, 2005 the Walton County Emergency Response Division held an "Appreciation Din-
ner" for all the fire departments and fire fighters in the county. This gave the commissioners a
chance to say "thank you" for a job well done.


Eddie Rivers is the new Fire
Manager for Walton County. Rivers will oversee the
new'Walton County Fire Rescue Department. As a
unit, the departments can save money on costs, such
as insurance. Three departments have already
merged, Mossy Head, Red Bay and Darlington-
Gaskin


1f -,


'r
v-p.

i-


Repre.seftatives from eachof.thei fireedepartments received a
"Certificate of Appreciation" from the Board of County Commissioners.


Roger Roy and others from the Liberty Fire De-
partment enjoyed a great dinner!

On June 20 and 21, the Public Information Office,
Emergency Response Division and the Walton
County Extension Service held free seminars on
"Self-Reliance Through Preparation," how to pre-
pare for hurricane season. Topics included home-
owner's insurance, food safety, valuable papers,
evacuation routes, and how to safeguard your home
and property. A free hog dog dinner was served to
those who attended and door prizes were donated by
the DeFuniak Springs Wal-Mart store.
-- j- f ~
w as.~~ |


I t.lfort ii..* 1I, moldtaki c.,b,
3.-

Maggie Owens and Betty Hunt vol-
unteered their time to help serve.

Displays and handouts included
information on mold, taking care
of pets. ho\\ to protect your home
against \\ ind damage and flood-

The American Red Cross also had
informational material on hand.


Emergency Response Director Ed Baltzley
and Commission Chairman Kenneth Prid-
gen thanked those in attendance for the job
they do for all of us.


"p-c^ 1.' ?ffiCN; '- 'I:

Speakers for the seminars included Representative Don Brown;, Geolrge L
P-.:, UF/IFAS, Windstorm Damage Mitigation Center; Connie La:\\ '
(I.':,n County, UF/IFAS Extension Facility; Captain Stan Sunday.
7 County Sheriff's Office; Ty Leath, Farm Bureau Insurance;
Ed -.. ;/kcy, Christine Bell and Jeff McVay, Emergency Operations Center,
S.,ni, COrnjiidcr, Walton County Public Information Coordinator and Lt. Frank Owens,
Walton County Sheriff's Office PIO


A free "hurricane supper" of hot dogs, chips
and cookies was served to all who attended

ISara Comander, Public Information June 2005


r41 ~C r I I I II 1 ~-- 1(1 -- r I I 7 I I I 'II

--e IL I Illr I II I I II

---~1 I II I II I I


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


PAGE 9-A


i


::
;t


~'
:"~T*~'
i`i ,
"d'"-~e~llld
~.; ---- -r






PAGE 10-A

DOH officials emphasize precautionary

measures to help prevent West Nile Virus
Florida Department of the Floiida Department of There were a total of 42
Health (DOH) officials today Agriculture and Consumer confirmed human WN virus
emphasized the importance Services, the Florida Fish cases resulting in two deaths
of Florida's residents and and Wildlife Commission, in Florida in 2004, compared
visitors protecting them- mosquito control agencies to 94 cases with six deaths in
selves against mosquito- and state universities, to 2003. In 2002, there were 35
borne diseases. Throughout monitor for the presence of cases with two deaths. Ad-
the year, DOH w6ioks with mosquitoes carrying ill- ditionally, nohumanEEE or
partner' agencies, including nesses. SLE cases were reported in
Symptoms of West Nile 2004 to the Florida State
(WN) virus, St. Louis En- Health Office.
:. cephalitis (SLE), and East- Avoid being outdoors when
Department ern Equine Encephalitis mosquitoes are seeking
: (EEE) may include head- blood. For many species, this
of Health ache, fever, fatigue, dizzi- is during the dusk and dawn
ness,-weakness and confu- hours.
announces new sion. Physicians should con- Wear clothing that covers
adminisr tact their county health de- most of your skin.
administrator apartment if they suspect an When the potential exists
Florida Department of individual may have a mos- for exposure to mosquitoes,
Health (DOH) Deputy State quito-borne illness. DOH repellents containing DEET
Hekith Officer Bonita laboratories provide testing (N, N dieth y 1- meta-
* .S.rensen, M.D., M.B.A.,'has services for physicians treat- toluamide, or N,N-diethyl-3-
-.ajnoupced the selection of ing patients with clinical methylbenzamide) are rec-
..Jim A. Jones, M.P.H., as signs of mosquito-borne dis- ommended. Picaridin and oil
health administrator of the ease. of lemon -ucalvptus are other


" Walton Cotnty Health De-
'.-" apartment (CHD), effective
July 3.
Jim will make a fine addi-
tion to the Walton County
Health Department," said
Sorensen. "I am confident
that his knowledge and ex-.
Spertise in public health will
serve the residents in Walton
County well.
Jones has worked in the
field of public health for 33
years. Most recently, he
served as the health director
for Stanly County Health
Department in Albermarle,
N.C., where he was respon-
sible for assuring that fed-
eral, state and local public
health laws and regulations
were properly interpreted
and followed under the direc-
tion of the Board of Health.
During his tenure, Jones
organized, financed and de-
livered various health de-
partment programs. He
worked closely with staff,
boards and advisory commit-
tees to develop well inspec-
tion rules, animal control and
solid waste ordinances.
"It is an honor to have the
opportunity to work in this
capacity at the 'local county
health level," said Jones. "I
am passionate about public
health and excited to work
with Walton CHD officials to
ensure that county residents
remain safe and healthy."
Jones earned a master's
degree in public health from
the University of North Caro-
lina in 1977. He received his
A.B. in history and political
science in 1966 from High
Point College in High Point,
N.C.
For more information
about the Walton CHD, visit
the DOH Web site at http://
www.doh.state.fl.us/ and se-
lect county health depart-
ments from the drop box.


FREEPORT
FOOT CLINIC
479 Highway 20 East
i Located in Freeport Medical Clinic
wmm,& URICL RETMN
heFOT AKE LG


uW PHONE (850) 650-6492
John T. Saeva, D.P.M., PA.
Board certified, American Board of Podiatric Surgery


Sa'itaiJsa Beach



Dr. A er Wibe, MD
Cosmetic and Family Dentistry
S267-0777
) optingg New Patients


iAkde1Makewen


Coame&t kmee
Cawuw & &idge
xRvt CARALF
c wild sde4 b
Exbadtldl


Santa Rosa Beach Village 4942 Highway 98 INet in Guglhelmo'i
Early Morning Appts. Available We Love Children
Z Member ADA PFDA, NWOA






Specialty Programs
Women's Programs Incontinence
Fall Prevention Ergonomic Assessments
*Arthritis *Living with COPD Fibromyalgia
Orthopedic Conditions Sports Medicine
Pain Management Neurological
SBack & Athletic Injuries Wound Care

* *Aquatic Therapy 14 x 40 Indoor Heated Pool
*Crestview Location Only


Freeport Location:
15199 US Hwy 331 S.
Ph: 850-835-4766 Fax: 850-835-5567


Crestview Location:
577 Brookmeade Drive
Ph: 850-682-7466 Fax: 850-682-6591


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY. JULY 7, 2005


repellent options.
Check around your home to
rid the area of standing wa-
ter, which is where mosqui-
toes can lay their eggs.
Clean out eaves, troughs
and gutters.
Remove old tires or drill
holes in those used in play-
grounds to drain.
Turn over or remove empty
plastic pots.
Pick up all beverage con-
tainers and cups.
Check tarps on boats or
other equipment that may
collect water.
Pump out bilges on


boats.
Replace water in birdbaths
and pet or other animal feed-
ing dishes at least once a
week.
Change water in plant
trays, including hanging
plants, at least once a week.
Remove vegetation or ob-
structions in drainage
ditches that prevent the flow
of water.

Additionally, officials en-
courage anyone who discov-
ers a dead bird to report it via
the Internet. The bird mor-
tality reporting system is lo-


cated on the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission's website at:
www.wildflorida.org/bird/. If
people do not have access to
the Internet, they may report
dead birds to their county
health department or local
FWCC office.
For more information on
mosquito borne illnesses,
visit the DOH website at:
www.doh.state.fl.us, the
CDC website at:
www.cdc.gov, or call your lo-
cal county health depart-
ment.


* HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
* DIABETES
k MINOR PROCEDURES
* VACCINATIONS
* PHYSICAL EXAMS
* ALLERGIES
* HEART DISEASE
* ARTHRITIS

892-2888
MON.-FRI. 7:30-5:00
21 West Main Street
DeFuniak Springs, FL


Gateway


(Left right)
Robert Knox, PA-C
Board Certified Phy. Assistant

Caroline Lawrence, PA-C
Board Certified Phy. Assistant
Jamnes W. Howell, D.O.
Family Medicine
Board Certified
Insurance Accepted
We file most major insurance


Medical
Family PracLice Clinics
Affiliated with
North Okaloosa Medical Center


Providing Quality Healthcare For
Your Entire Family!



At Gateway Medical Clinics we are
committed to providing your family
dependable healthcare. We recognize
that you have many choices when
deciding upon healthcare, and we are
especially grateful that you have placed
your confidence in us.


Gateway Medical Clinics


Where Your Family
Comes First!


We accept all major medical insurance!


Healthmark

Medical Arts Building

With

Physician Clinics

Okaloosa/Walton Pediatrics
Joseph Philip Peter, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Ronald Victoriano, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Jaqannadha Rao, M.D., F.A.A.P.
Carrie Lehman, PA-C
892-1302

James Sheppard, M.D.
Cardiology/Internal Medicine 951-4565
G. Sherman Johnson, D.C., Joe W. Johnson, D.C.
Joseph Morris, D.C.
Chiropractic/Acupuncture 951-4556
Scott Beals, D.O.
Dermatology 897-7546
Fawzi Fawaz, M.D.
Family Medicine/Surgery 951-4556
Clyde Pence, M.D.
Nephrology 951-4556
Healthmark Clinic
Robert L. Teitelbaum, M.D.,
Laura Gerhard, A.R.N.P.
Family Medicine/Occupational Medicine 951-4556
4415 US Highway 331 South, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435
441 -J iha 3 23


CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY


DOCTOR'S MEDICAL CENTER
AVAILABLE IN HOUSE '
* LABS
* X-RAYS
" ULTRASOUND
" ALLERGY TESTING


*:
e






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


Florida Highway Patrol

promises "Strict Enforcement"

of new seat belt law


By BRUCE COLLIER
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol has vowed that there
will be "mtri:t it forcement" of
Florida's new Primary Seat
Belt Law, which went into ef-
fect on the first of July.
The new law requires that
all occupants of a motor ve-
hicle under the age of 18
buckle their seat belts.
Under the law, the driver
of the vehicle can be held re-
sponsible for the failure of
any occupants under 18
years to be buckled up.
According to FHP figures,
"traffic crash fatalities re-
main the leading cause of
death for Florida's teenag-
ers."


FHP reports that in 2004,
there were 35 fatal crashes
and 42 fatalities during the
period from 12:01 a.m. on
July 2 to midnight of July 5.
Of those figures, 12 of the
crashes and 14 of the fatali-
ties were alcohol-related.
Of the 42 fatalities, 28
were drivers of the vehicles,
12 were passengers, and 2
were pedestrians.
Saturday and Sunday
were the heaviest days for ac-
cidents. Careless driving and
failure to yield were the most
common causes.
At press time, FHP fig-
ures for the 2005 Indepen-
dence Day holiday were not
yet available.


SWALTON COUNTY

SHERIFF'S REPORT
99lh uuiuiihuue:iuuuhiml


Walton County Sheriff's Deputies
arrested the following people during
the week ending July 3, 2005:
Jose Ramon Dominguez-Coulter,
20, DFS, No valid DL, DUI refused
test, fleeing/eluding, grand theft auto,
criminal mischief,
Kevin Joseph Cotton, 22, DFS,
VOP, worthless checks x2,
Cornell Burnette, 51, DFS,
DWLSR,
Bryan Eric Kilhefner, 28,
Woodlawn, MVOP,
Richard Plate, 35, Freeport, Affray,
criminal mischief,
Anthony Dean Knutson, 42, Free-
port, Affray,
Heath Matthew Waldo, 32, DFS,
FTA,
James Howard Davis, 46, DFS,
DUI refused test, refused to sign cita-
tion,
Jason Lee Fowler, 28, Freeport,
Worthless checks,
Michael Roughton, 41, DFS,
DWLSR,
Todd Beeler, 24, DFS, VOP x2,
Charles Blumin, 44, SRB, MVOP,
Kenneth Young, 43, Crestview,
Battery, armed robbery,
Maximillian Hornsby, 32, Miramar
Beach, DUI, leaving scene of accident,
Travis James Johnson, 18,
Panama City, Possession of mari-
juara.-2a-grams wlintent.todistribute,
poss. of drug paraphernalia, .
SElem Mvann, 50, DFS, MVOP,
Becky Jo Brown, 36, Laurel Hill,
Worthless checks,
Tyler Bink Cloud, 20, Eglin AFB,
FVOP,
Christopher Shawn Wilson, 32,
Riverview, MVOP,
*Samuel Otto Chambless, 41, DFS,
FVOP,
Justin Allred, 18, Charlotte, N.C.,
Theft,
Christopher A. Grant, 28, DFS,
Trespass after warning,
D.M., 13, SRB, Trespassing,
Dawn Renee Colmer, 35, Milton,
Battery domestic,
Robert Charles Porter, 41, No
address given, Battery domestic,
Robert John Cox, 23, SRB, Worth-
less check,
Coralie Moncrieff, 40, Cerra
Gorda, Fla., FVOP,
Holly Densmore, 37, DFS, Obtain
ing credit card through fraudulent
means, fraudulent use of credit card,
forgery, grand theft, exploitation of eld-
erly person,
Christopher Timm, 26, Destin,
FTA,
Cesar Gomez, 21, SRB, DWLSR,
Charles Long, 41, Dothan, FTA,
Gabriel Rodriques, 30, No ad-
dress given, FTA,
David Gene Lewis, 34, DFS, Vio-
lation of restraining order,
Jesse Anthony Tyson, 26, DFS,
MVOP,
*Tommy Parsky, 39, Valdosta, Pos-
session of marijuana -20 grams,
Roy Earl Nicholson, 21, DFS,
MVOP,
Tripp Redrick McTier, 25,
Thomson, Ga., DUI,
Clifton E. Anderson, 41, Address
unknown, Violation of conditional re-
lease,
Bairett Boyd Scott, 45, DFS,
Worthless checks x5,
Jonathan Lee Odom, 22, FWB,
Theft,
Andre Sorrell, 25, Dothan, Child
support,
Santiago Gabriel Mendez, 25, 01-
ive Branch, Miss., No DL,
Steven Todd Bullard, 37, Freeport,
Battery domestic,
Carlos Borromeo Perez Vasquez,
26, DFS, No DL, DUI,
Nicholas Wesley Clark, 24,
Pensacola, MVOP (Santa Rosa Co.),
Joseph Snell, 26, Greenbrier,
Tenn., Possession of cannabis -20
grams,
Julie Rhea Thompson, 44, Free-
port, Battery domestic,
Willie Dean Drake, 46, DFS, Con-
Scealed weapon,
Christopher Eugene Potter, 34,
DFS, FTA,
Dustin Lee Cole, 18, Paxton, FTA,
Hector Mauricio Villegas, 38, DFS,
No DL,
Roxanna Marie Towery, 19, DFS,
Resisting LEO w/violence, failure to
obey lawful command,
Mariana Michelle Bolding, 43,
SBlue Mountain Beach, Aggravated
battery w/deadly weapon (domestic
violence),
Jeffrey Lee Watson, 28, DFS,
Burglary/criminal mischief, possession
of drug paraphernalia,
Donna Leah Edwards, 49, Free-


port, Battery domestic,
Michael C. Lane, 25, LaGrange,
Ga., DUI refused test,
D.G.M., 13, SRB, Aggravated
stalking, battery,
S.W.G., 16, DFS, Possession of
methamphetamine, poss. of cocaine
w/intent, MVOP (Etowah Co., Ala.),
Donald Johnson Jr., 29, SRB,
FTA, -
Daniel Monroe Clark III, 30, Gulf
Shores, Obstruction by disguise,
Curtis James Hobbs, No age
given, Loxley, DWLSR,
Phillip H. Hendrixon, 59,
Bainbridge, Ga., MVOP x2, DUI,
DWLSR,
Mary Kathleen Elam, 38, DFS,
Forged check (Miss. warrant),
Deborah Morrissey Cooper, 39,
DFS, DUI refused test,
Brian Luther Grant, 33, New Port
Richey, Possession of marijuana -20
grams,
Lisa F. Woods, 45, Jackson, Tenn.,
Battery, disorderly intoxication,
Shelley Walters, 18, Stapleton,
Ala., DUI,
James Scott Edge, 21, Jackson,
Tenn., Disorderly intoxication, resist-
ing w/o violence,
Joseph Alan Kuykendall, 18, SRB,
Battery,
Jeffrey Hall, 24, Pensacola, VOP
on felony burglary,
.- *-Steven McConnell; 36, Destin,
DUI,
Erik Smith, 30, SRB, DWLSR
(felony),
Belinda Lane, 30, DFS, Retail
theft,
Douglas Clay Harwell, 20, DFS,
Possession of cocaine w/intent, poss.
of marijuana -20 grams, poss. of
paraphernalia, intro. of contraband,
*Aubrey Edward Campbell Sr., 48,
DFS, Resisting w/violence, battery on
LEO x2, battery domestic x2,
*Angie Welch Bradshaw, 48, FWB,
Possession of marijuana +20 grams,
poss. of paraphernalia, DUI,
Shane White, 38, Milton, DUI w/
serious bodily injury to another,
James Morris Cooper, 25, Free-
port, Violation of trespass warning,
FTA, battery domestic.


For the Week ended June 30,
2005
At the Florida Livestock Auc-
tions, receipts totaled 9,173 com-
pared to last week 9,125 and
11,103 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Live-
stock Market News Service,
slaughter cows and bulls were
steady, feeder steers and heifers
steady to weak.
Feeder Steers:
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 150.00-215.00
300-400 lbs 130.00-185.00
400-500 lbs 112.00-138.00
Feeder Heifers:
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 140.00-196.00
300-400 lbs 124.00-159.00
400-500 lbs 110.00-130.00
Slaughter Cows: Lean:
750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent-
52.00 59.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade
No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs -65.00-
76.00


JUNE SALESMAN OF

THE MONTH

GRAHAM

CAMPBELL- WORK

See Graham for all your

vehicle purchases.


CHEVROLET BUICK
* 475 US Hwy. 90 East Nelson Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, FL
850-892-2151
web page: www.trianglechevybuick.com
Email: sales@trianglecbo.coin


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PAGE 11-A


Triangle Chevrolet Buick

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111 1m ll 11






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


PAGE 12-A


"Growing With America'

NATIONAL
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BROKERS
CORP.

Kelly
Michelin
Goodyear
Passenger
Truck
OTR


NATIONAL
TIRE
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CORP
829 Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, eL 32433
Tires, Brakes,
Alignments & Auto Service
850-892-5191
1-800-252-2888


Asird HANDYMAN S SERVICES
Azssciat'v, c5n7.
DRIVEWAYSIROADS TREEIDEBRIS
Gravel Removal
PAINTING PRESSURE
INT& EXT Washing
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Trey rd, 5 7 8 One Call,
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DECKS DOCKS *-WHIE.CLtAIR RAMPS PORCHES
FENCES FRONTEND LOADER & BACKHOE WORK


U U l II IIII


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WE PUMP YOUR GAS

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435 US HWY 90 WEST, DFS 892-3034
U-HAUL RENTALS 892-5215


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(850) 892-3955


684 North 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs
FL 32433


DANNY TAYLOR
President


UI U I


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SHOP
TIRES CUSTOM WHEELS
AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR
CAR & TRUCK ACCESSORIES
AUTO ELECTRONICS


951-1137


ADVERTISE YOUR


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BUSINESS & PERSONAL TAXES
NEXTELAUTH. REP.
16784 HWY. 331 S., FREEPORT,
3047 MAIN ST., VERNON
835-2747 535-5000



TAYLORS A/C & ELECTRIC, INC.
LIC'S RM0048225
RG00048207-ER00015 892-3955

AIR CONDITIONING & ELECTRICAL
SERVICE INC. ALL MAKES & MODELS
LIC. RA0066795 1-877-642-4078/231-9150

AMERICAN AIR SYSTEMS LLC
Reliability, Comfort & Performance.
LIC. RA0064836 892-2804



PLATTS APPLIANCE REPAIR
4410 US HWY 90 W
892-4670


DAVID R. THOMAS
OFFICE 892-0700
FAX 892-0996
CRIMINAL LAW
FAMILY LAW
PERSONAL INJURY

KATHE KOZLOWSKI, ESQ.
179 N. 9TH STREET, STE. 1
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
850-951-1997
BANKRUPTCY FAMILY
CIVIL MATTERS PROBATE
"The hiring of a lawyers an important
decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you
decide, ask me to send you free written
information about my qualifications
and experience."



BRYANS USED CARS
1133 HWY 90 W DFS
DEWITT BRYAN* 892-7148

T.P. MOTOR COMPANY
HWY. 90, 892-7444
YOUR HEADQUARTERS FOR LIKE
NEW SUV'S, TRUCKS & CARS
tpmotor.com
Check Out Our Backlot Vehicles
100% APPROVALS, GUARANTEE
SECONDARY FINANCING


AA AUTO SALVAGE
442 CTY HWY 1087
MOSSY HEAD 850-892-3256


TONY'S PAINT & BODY
LIFETIME GUARANTEE ON
BODY WORK 892-0313

NATIONAL TIRE BROKERS
829 HWY. 90 WEST, DFS
892-5191

ROCKMAN'S AUTO CENTER
WRECKER SERVICE
BEHIND SUBWAY 892-5015


RANDEL'S BARBER SHOP
US HWY 83 DFS
892-1011 (PDI 1-os)

ADVERTISE HERE!


KEN'S CUSTOM BUILT
OUTSIDE STRUCTURES
Cell 978-2109 Ph. (850) 892-3290


CARROLL'S HAIR CARE
3841 HWY. 83 N., DFS
892-9431 892-3972 CTFN

EXPERT COLOR/WEAVE HILIGHTS
TO LOOK YOUR BEST
CALL, MYRNAAT
SANDRA'S HAIR SALON
104 N. 9TH ST, DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
892-3207


NEW & USED BOOKS TRADE-INS
_JiOW.[ITC[OWIl1 EBALDWI4 & 6TH-..
M-SAT. 10-5, 892-3119


Keith's Backhoe & Bushhogging Service,
Land Clearing, Stump Removal, Spread
Dirt, Reasonable Rates 892-4302


RV SITE,
WATER, ELECTRIC, SEWER, CABLE
892-7229


HICK'S CARPET CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
892-2623

NEW LOOK CLEANING COMPANY
JOHN & TOBY STONE, OWNERS
LIC. FREE EST. 892-4573 OR 259-5856

RAY'S CARPET SERVICE
892-1309
OR CELL 203-0851 (pd 7-7)

--C"'S --
OKALOOSA WALTON CHILD CARE
HRS & UNITED WAY
892-8560


COMPUTER REPAIR
I FIX COMPUTERS, INC.
CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
892-0977


CROSSFIRE CONSTRUCTION
NEW CONST., ADDITIONS, REMODEL,
ELEC., PAINTING, DECKS, DOCKS, VINYL
LIC #RG0066812* INS. (850) 748-1697

Construction WE SPECIALIZE IN
SMALLER JOBS. HAULING, BACKHOE
WORK, DRIVES. ETC. LAWRENCE & SON
892-3873

DONEL DAVIDSON CONSTRUCTION
CUSTOM HOMES* REMODEL* ELEC.
& PLUMBING. LIC. INS. RD0048939
(850) 834-2017 (ctfn)


B&B EQUIPMENT RENTALS
HWY. 331 S.* FREEPORT
835-4500


ODD JOBS, NONE TOO SMALL,
INSIDE & OUT. LICENSED & INSURED
850-836-4426 (ctfn)



NATURE'S HEALTH FOOD STORE
756-C BALDWIN AVENUE
892-2356


STAN'S HOME REPAIR
REPAIRS A-Z NO JOBS TOO SMALL
REASONABLE RATES FREE EST.
INSURED. CELL: 850-496-8181
HOME: 9580-892-9357 (TFN)



JOHN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC
LIC. & INS. FREE ESTIMATES
865-0924


DIAL UP & BROADBAND
I FIX COMPUTERS
892-0977


RODE' 'S LAWIJ SERVICE
PRESSI.IRE W\SH FREE ESTIMATE
REASONABLE RATES 974-6972

JOHNSON LAWN SERVICE
GENERAL CLEAN UP/REASONABLE
RATES. (850)'834-2200

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
I GUARANTEE IT
DICK 892-9139


SUNBELT CREDIT
LOANS FOR ANY REASON
850-892-9504 (CTFN)


SOUTHERN HOMES INC.
MOSSY HEAD, FL
(850) 892-2232



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NORTH OF TOM THUMB HWY. 83
892-3334 OR 7100
SURE-LOCK STORAGE
OPEN STORAGE FOR RV & BOAT
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
3734 US HWY 331 S (850) 892-6170
THARP & SONS MINI STORAGE
HWY. 90 & NORWOOD
892-6035 24 HOUR SERVICE (CTFN)
GANDY'S STORAGE
331 S. WOODLAWN
892-0528
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1154 US HWY 90 W
DFS (850) 892-4677 (CTFN)


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ACCESSORIES. 892-7073 (CTFN)


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931 US HWY 331
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1027 S. 19TH STREET
892-9776


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SERVING SOUTH WALTON COUNTY
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850-974-1963


FREEPORT PHYSICAL THERAPY
HWY. 331 S., FREEPORT
835-4766

NORTH WALTON
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Jessica Monteleone, RPT 951-2244


HUNGRY HOWIE'S PIZZA & SUBS
WALTON PLAZA
WE DELIVER 951-0484


JEMCO PLASTERING INC.
892-5524
QUALITY IS OUR GOAL


PRATT PLUMBING CO.
SERVICE, REPAIR &
NEW CONSTRUCTION
RF0067071 836-5444


HALLMARK PORTABLE BUILDINGS
HWY 90 PONCE DE LEON
(850)836-4545/4455


PRESSURE WASHING, HOUSES,
CONCRETE, ROOFS, NO JOB TOO
SMALL. EXP., LICENSED & INSURED
Free Est. (850) 892-9620/cell 585-8412


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ALL TYPES RE-ROOFS & REPAIRS
LIC. #RC0056527 956-4325


LYLE'S SALVAGE
BUYING CANS, COPPER & ALUMINUM
HWY. 90 W.* 892-0123



WINDHAM SEPTIC SERVICE, INC.
67 JOE CAMPBELL RD.
835-3356



AL'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
REPAIRS-TUNE-UPS*OVERHAULS
FREE Pickup & Delivery 850-892-7887



R&M TREE SERVICE
BUCKET TRUCK & INSURED,
FIREWOOD FOR SALE 850-892-6440

McDONALD TREE SERVICE
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CCO'UrTR COMMUNICATIONS -
NEXTEL SERVICE CENTER- 1031 US
HWY 90 W. DFS (850) 951-0664 (ctfn)

--------


~I~Ef~i~p






T' II,: I)I.'FUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


ARC CLIENTS and Director Kermit Wright toss out candy
from their red, white and blue float.


GENERATIONS OF ASSORTED BEAUTY QUEENS at
July 4th ceremonies.


COLOR GUARD MARCHES TO FRONT at July 4th cer-
emonies.


PLEDGING ALLEGIANCE at July 4th ceremonies.


SARA COMMANDER PRESENTS PLAQUE TO PARADE
GRAND MARSHALS LYNN AND ELLEN MAYFIELD


THE MINUTE MAN BOYS are (oldest to youngest larg-
est to smallest) Ryan Chicai 12 .2 Travis Chilcutt (10) and
Alexander Chilcutt (7).

p2-.


FACE PAINTING AT 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION.


MASTER OF CEREMO-
NIES RON KELLEY starts
the party at July 4th ceremo-
nies.


CLOWNINGAROUND came naturally to these fellows and
delighted the throngs of children.


CELTEBRATIO

-And laughed in the
'moonwalk' and 'slip and
slide,' two of many children's
events sponsored by local
businesses and individuals.
There was a fly-over by four
Eglin Air Force jets, too.
The country rock band, Da-
kota, thrilled the crowd with
a huge variety of music, in-
cluding their own hit single,
Linda Lou, which hit number
17 on Billboard's worldwide
charts. The crowd sang and
clapped along with the band,
some even got up and danced.
After the Dakota closed
z-eir show with Elvis
Presley's anthem to Dixie,
i:--w,:.rks began to burst


CITY

Anderson, Don Harrison and
James Huffman defended
Pre--rell'a .-a:-ingthat, after 17
years in city government, she
was v .rkir.g herself up
through the ranks and has
good -peoplje : I I," while the
other two would actually be
making a step down to this
position and neither are cur-
rently working. She also
agreed to start at the lowest
salary range otfftred, $65,000
per year.
Presnell indicated that she
started as a utility billing


PROJECT

The Council approved the
I.,-',.. i. Allen will seek addi-
tional funding from the St.
Joe Foundation and Wal-
Mart, The funds will be used
to buy native plants, wild-
flower and gras seed, per-
manint plant labels, educa-
tional i,' 1'". benches
and Materials for the cre-
atin ofnew t,. ., State pris-
oner, i be used, fr most of
the llabot ,'i i.-.f'i i ii- i/.'n iii,

days for a lcal. u., bIr, elub
Aenbetrs, master '1, ii
vo=teh students and any in-
-,:,- .;, area res~id nt who
a ,,,.;oaf like to r' .' (ti i' t
Ti- DeFumnik t i" ;II.
Garden club J fendforses t
;/, i and club "' ;i1,. M
Master n ardmvxi?' 1:t it Dob
000 1 i''i m.m~..' 00 ani orivifor


From Front


above the calm waters 6f'
Lake DeFuniak. The crowd
ooohed and aaahed over the
colorful display and left the
Lakeyard happy and tired.
Comander later said that
this had been among the very
best 4th of July celebrations
ever and that after expenses,
the DBPA had still raised
over a thousand dollars,
which will be used on next
year's event.
Comander credited her
board members for volun-
teering their hard work and
pulling everything together
for a successful celebration
that all Walton County fami-
lies could enjoy.


From Front

clerk. She said she's worked
with other department
heads, put together budgets
and helped with
Chattahoochee's comprehen-
sive plan, among other du-
ties. Presnell said that after
seeing how beautiful DeFu-
niak Springs is, she's seeking
a long term commitment.

Presnell is expected to be-
gin her duties after the July
11 city council meeting when
she will likely be officially
hired.


From Front

and helping in the grant pro-
cess. Jeff Norcini, native
wildflower and grass special-'
ist at the University of
Florida in Quincy, has agreed
to act as an adviser, as has
the US Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice.
If the project is awarded
the grant in October, work
will begin in November with
the seeding of a number of
badly eroded areas around
the lake with special native
ecotype i ll ll'vl.'. r and grass
seed, The planting of trees
and shrubs would begin in
January.
Allen invites community
input and comments on the
,,,,b ,i. For more informa-
Lion, contact her at ballell
@panhandile(r'.eonmc or call
her at "',"- ,'..


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I~- .~..~ ~.~ ... I ~,,, i~i 1 ... ". I 1. .. ... I.H. 'fln .. I '..".. Inc


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Code


PAGE 13-A


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THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


THE ONCE-NUMEROUS GOPHER TORTOISE is an animalfound in the Pt. Washington Forest. Now
protected by law and a species of special concern in Florida, the gopher tortoise is a "keystone" spe-
cies, because if it goes extinct, it will cause many other species to become extinct as well. The tortoise's
burrow provides protection from predators, fire, and the weather The burrow has a fairly constant
environment that is not too hot, too cold, too humid, or too dry. The burrows, which are why the tortoise
is an important part of the ecosystem, are used by many other species, including some declining species
such as the burrowing owl.
Much of the story of the acquisition of the Point Washington State Forest has been forgotten or
altered in the telling during the 13 years since the state purchased the land.
Virtually unknown to new residents of south Walton, the history of the acquisition of the 18,000-
plus acres is a fascinating saga with elements of high drama, shady characters, foreign investors, and
political intrigue. The story crosses the country from Texas banks to Washington D.C. to the steps of
the Walton County Courthouse and to hearing rooms in Tallahassee.
History of the Purchase:
Most of the land, including pristine beachfront now included in Topsail Hill State Preserve, was
owned by St. Joe, which was then known as the St. Joe Paper Company.
In 1986, a development company, Emerald Coast Joint Venture, bought most of the land from St.
Joe and announced plans for hotels, homes, golf courses, and even an airport. Before anything was
built, however, the company's finances collapsed, leaving behind a morass of documents, related
corporations, side deals, and complicated loans. In September of 1991, a grand jury empanelled by the
U.S. District Court for the Northern Division of Florida returned a 115-page, 15-count indictment
against 14 defendants involved with Emerald Coast Joint Venture.
Charges included conspiracy, bank fraud, mail fraud, and money laundering. A five-month trial
resulted in a number of convictions and jail terms.
Two savings and loans in Pennsylvania and Texas allegedly lost $102 million on the deal, and when
they bankrupted, the land ended up in the hands of the Resolution Trust Corporation (RTC). The RTC
was the organization set up in 1989 by the federal government to dispose of assets of failed thrift
institutions.
In May of 1992, the RTC auctioned off its entire south Walton holdings, in an all-or-nothing pack-
age. The State of Florida, which had long been interested in acquiring the Topsail property, bought it
all, through the Nature Conservancy, literally at the eleventh hour, at an auction on the Walton County
Courthouse steps. A little-known fact about the purchase is that of the 18,320 acres, 17,672 acres were
on the state's wish list of properties to purchase for conservation, the Conservation and Recreation
Lands (CARL) list. Although the Topsail Hill property was the state's top priority, the Pt. Washington
forest acreage had also been added to the list, in 1990.
Florida Fish & Game (now the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission) sponsored the
original Pt. Washington forest project, which went through a number of state studies before being
added to the CARL list. OnA'TTrwrTTEn PAI. 17-R


THE WHITE-TOPPED pitcher plant, found in some wet areas of the Pt. Washington
Forest, is one of the prettiest and most rare of these carnivorous plants.


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..,-.
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.i- :..;


,]mollnak~9





THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


iCsdn cucq


Square dancing


schedule changed


The Chautauqua Squares
have changed their night of
dancing to Tuesdays instead
of Monday nights. The time
will stay the same. The sum-
mer month schedule is 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. The regular time
during the year is 7 to, 9:30
p.m. The club will be danc-
ing August 16, at 7:30 p.m.
at DeFuniak Springs Middle
School Cafeteria.
The club voted to not dance
during the month of July and
the first week of August.
Many take vacations-and
help with Bible School at


their churches, and the
school is preparing the
middle school floor for the
upcoming year.
September is Square
Dance Month and the
Chautauqua Squares are
looking for some couples,
families and singles who
want something fun in their
life besides sitting around
bored. The Squares will hold
open house September 6 and
13 and then start classes
September 20, at the middle
school cafeteria.


Lowery/tBaker

to wed

qMr. and rs. Tred -aroldlowery
request the fhonour four presence
at the marriage ofhe.ir daughter
Kiplyn E za6jet Lowery
to
qMr. Adam Zachary Taker
Saturday, the sixteenth o fJuC
Two thousandand ive
at three o'clock in the a ernoon
'irst Baptist Church
DeTFunia Springs, Elorida
fNursery willbf provided
'Reception w'il( foClow
ill the kftowiA I a([.


HANNAH SHOAF


HJannah,


THE 2005 YOUTH AMBASSADORS OF WALTON
COUNTY are (l-r) Miss Walton County Ashley Nance, Teen
Miss DeFuniak Springs Allie Alford, Young Miss DeFuniak
Springs Savannah Nowling, Junior Miss Walton County
Devero. Bogart and Little Miss Walton County Melodiann
Nicole Dier.


Reunion to be held


The Carroll family reunion
will be held Saturday, July 9,
'" UT tfi ,, lll l I JL i I I i I., i ,.
,' E\,e, good and
Perfect gift is from
above.
"f Thank you Lord for
another birthday.


Shemya LeAngel
Edwards
Happy 5th Birthday
July 6th
Lots of Love.
Mommy, Daddy. and ,
all your family


2005, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at the DeFuniak Springs
Community Center in DeFu-
niak Springs, FL.
For'more information, call
(850) 956-2965 or (850) 892-
1011.


VONNIE PETERS
Peters named ilot president
"A better tomorrow start- Club members are always
ing today" was the theme as "busy as bees!" For more in-
Vonnie Peters was recently formation about Pilot Club
installed"as presidenirof-:the. abi4.e .~' the community,
:'D'' i D fi k 'Sp-t'n 'P1 t' 'c"iftrt'Vbffnie Peters at 892-
Club. Other officers fbr the 8123.
2005-2006 year include:
Martha Ingle, president-
elect; Rhonda Skipper, vice-
president; Brenda Earl, cor-
responding secretary;
LaJuana Rinker, recording
secretary; Sandy Weimorts,
treasurer; PIF representa-
tive, Annette Senn; chaplain,
Pam Odom; parliamentar-
ian, Becky Young. Directors '
are MaryLind Devlin,
Sandra Golden, Debbie
Cantrell, Judy Everett and
Annette Senn. Division co-
ordinators are as follows:
club operations, Marylene
Rhodes; Anchor, Debbie
Cantrell; fund raising, Tess
Lowery; projects Marty
Dees and Hilda Coursey.


Ka yden

Shoaf born

Hannah Kayden Shoafwas
born May 22, 2005 at Oka-
loosa Medical Center, in
Crestview, FL. She was born
at 10 a.m. and weighed 7
pounds and was 20 inches
long.
Hannah's parents are
Alison and Austin Shoaf of
DeFuniak Springs, FL.
Maternal grandparents are
Cynthia and Mark Anderson,
of DeFuniak Springs, and
Chuck and Debi Roehm of;
Wagoner, OK.
Paternal grandparents are
Terry and Paula Shoaf of
DeFuniak Springs, FL.


Walton County Art League




Adult Workshop
Ink and Oil Rouging
by Lois Kennedy
Saturday, July 23rd
10 am 2 pm
Registration Fee $10.00
Reservations: Margene 892-6921
..... >


GSILMORE
JEWELRY Co.


Bill and Susie Houck
S*Jewelry & Watch Repair We Buy Old Gold
Mon.-Fri. 9:00-5:30 Sat. 9:00-4:00
(850) 678-1411
1023 John Sims Pkwy. Niceville, FL (next to Kelleys)
Si NOBODY SELLS BETTER FOR LESS


PAGE 2-B






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


THE JOHNSON, GIPSON, GOODMAN REUNION will
be held Friday, July 8, 2005. Registration and a fish fry will
be held at 6:30. On Saturday, July 9, 2005, a luau begins at
4 p.m. On Sunday, July 10, 2005, a church service at
Macedonia Baptist begins at 11 a.m.
For further information, contact Barbara Gipson at P.O.
Box 40, Argyle, FL, 32433 or call (850) 892-5681 or Miriam
Sheppard at (850) 892-3960.

GASKIN SCHOOL REUNION, July 9, 2005 will be held
at the Civic Center from 9 a.m. to approximately 4 p.m. This
is the seventh year at the Civic Center and they are looking
forward to seeing the "Old Timers" and hope to see some
"First Timers", too.
Call classmates and give someone a ride, if needed. There
will be door prizes and lots of sharing of memories and pic-
tures. Don't forget to bring a covered dish. For more infor-
mation, call Lucille Lawrence at (850) 834-2245.

THE WALTON HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1956 is pre-
paring for their 50th year class reunion in 2006. They still
need.contact information for the following persons: Helen
Campbell, Mary Collinsworth, Sarah Radney, Mary Eliza-
beth Robinson, Allen Johnson, Frank McCook, James
McGowin, Bobby Joe Monk, Bobby McMillon, and Frank
Whidden.
All class members and anyone with information on these
individuals, contact Gene (Cain) Spencer at (334) 691-2007;
Joe Baker (850) 892-2042, Faye (Brinson) Craig (850) 835-
7780 or Sarah (Ward) Fetner (850) 678-7018.

THE WSHS CLASS OF 1985 is in the process of planning
their 20-year class reunion. If anyone knows the address of
a classmate, call 892-1308, 892-0108 or 836-4951.

THE WALTON HIGH SENIOR CLASS OF 1965 is plan-
ning their 40th class reunion, to be held at the Chautauqua
building on Saturday, November 26. They are updating the
class list with names, phone numbers, addresses and e-mail
addresses.
Contact Eugene Ray at (850) 995-8339, e-mail-
eray866@aol.com, Brenda (Rowe) Paul at (850) 682-0619, e-
mail-bpaulhsd@earthlink.net, or Glenda (Butts) Geoghagan
at (850) 859-2471.





Renton receives degree


Kelley Alford Renton re-
ceived her doctor of chiro-
practic medicine degree in
June, 2005 from Life Univer-
sity in'Atlanta. She has conrr
pleted' four national boards
and will be-taking hei
Florida board exam in No-
vember 2005.
Renton is also a 1997
graduate of Florida State
University where she re-
ceived a Bachelor of Science
degree in psychology.
In 1999. she graduated
from Core Institute of Talla-
hassee. FL. specializing in
massage therapy.
Renton is the daughter of
Lamar and Faye Alford of De-
Funiak Springs, FL.

M r


Kelley and her husband,
Ian, reside in Atlanta.


AI


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH PRESCHOOL held gradua- Front row, Thomas Feitsma, Taylor Seigler, Kelsea Rob-
tion ceremonies for its fourth graduating class, which is head- erts, Logan Burgess, Jordan Campbell, Paige Howell, Dane
ing off to kindergarten in the fall. The graduation ceremony Phillips, Meredith Bodie, Tucker Coffield, Taylor Coffield;
was held Thursday, May 19, at the First Baptist Church of middle row, Mason Norris, Tori Gratez, Miranda Matthews,
DeFuniak Springs. Ellie Johnson, Calan Ates, Tyler Craufbrd, Zachary Fox,
Tammy Godwin led the class, assisted by Shella Harman Emilee Morrison, BrieAnna Arke; back row, Logan Betts,
and Mona Peacock. The 29 graduates, as well as, the three- Tori Manning, Joshua Baur, Andy Pinson, Tanner
year-old class led by Dana Kay Evans, and the two-year-old Cruikshank, Tanner VanEycken, Christian Mosley, Emma
class led by Faith Joyner, participated in the program. Pilcher, Chase Edwards, and not pictured manner Abbott.
The children recited Bible verses and sang christian songs,
as well as, thematic songs. The evening concluded with a
reception honoring the graduates.


Congratulations to Mr. Justin McHenry
on your sterling academic performance at Gulf
Coast Community College during the spring
2005 term. Indeed, your grade point average of
4.0 has placed your name on the President's
List, a recognition of excellence reserved for only
the most outstanding of scholars at this insti-
tution.
Robert L. McSpadden
President

Justin is congratulated and encouraged in his
accomplishments by his wife, Angelia Harrison-
McHenry, Robert and Mary Harrison, James
and Rosemary McHenry and Joe and Rosella
Sanders.


THE FREEPORT TOWN PLANTER'S Society will be
having their monthly meetings on the first Tuesday of each
month at 7 p.m. at the Freeport Community Center.
Everyone's welcome to stop by and see what good things are
being done for the "Gateway To The Emerald Coast." New
members are always welcome.
THE "OVER FIFTY CLUB" meets the second Friday of
each month at the Freeport Community Center.
For information about the club, call 835-4352 or 835-4601.
Anyone age 50 or older is invited to join.

-
Shampood(les

S PET GROOMING
For Appointment
850-892-0544
9 W. Orange Ave., DeFuniak Springs, FL
ATTENTION HUNTERS: Offering Flea-Dip For Dogs
BASIC OR DELUXE BATHS TO FULL GROOMS


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ACCREDITED CONVENIENT AFFORDABLE

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Enroll July 18


-Aug. 21


By web: July 18 Aug. 21 In-person: Aug. 1 21


IS M


ALFORD


Harman

awarded

child care

credential
Shella Jo Harman of First
Baptist Church Preschool
has been awarded a Child
Development Associate
(CDA) Credential in recogni-
tion of outstanding work with
young children. The creden-
tial was awarded by the
Council for Professional Rec-
ognition in Washington, D.C.,
which represents the early
childhood profession.
CDA is the only major na-
tional effort to improve
childcare by evaluation and
recognizing the skills of indi-
viduals providing care. The
First: Credential was
awarded 25 years ago, and
now 46 states plus the Dis-.
trict of Columbia include
CDA in their childcare licens-
ing regulations.


ACG2001/41486
ACG2011/42772
BUL2241/41603
GEB1011/42773
ECO2013/41717
OST1107/42165
OST2117/42168
CGS1100/41620
OST1355/42898
MTB1103-42110


Accounting I
Accounting II,
Business Law I
Introduction to Business
Economics I
Typing & Word Processing I
Typing & Word Processing II
Micro-computer Applications
Records Management
Business Math


6:30 9:15 pm
6:00 pm 8:30 pm
5:00 6:15 pm
6:00 8:30 pm
4:00 6:50 pm
5:00 6:15 pm
5:00 6:15 pm
6:30 pm 9:10 pm
6:30 pm -9:00 pm
5:00 6:20 prn


Wed.
Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Tues.
Fri.
Tues,/Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Wed.
Tues.
Mon,/Wed.


I COMMUNICATIONS I


SLS1101/42300
REA0001/42254
REA0002/42269
ENC0020/41743

ENC0080/42860
ENC1101/41758
ENC1101/41759
ENC1102/42864
ENC1102/41803
LIN1670/41954
SPC1600/42875
SPN1121/42882


College Success
College Prep Reading I
College Prep Reading II
College Prep English Level A


College Prep English B
English Composition I
English Composition I
English Composition II
English Composition II
Writing and Grammar
Speech
Spanish II


3:30 6:00 pm Thurs.
Class for College Prep pilot students only
1:00 2:15 pm Tues./Thurs.
11:15 am- 1:00 pm Mon./Wed.
Class for College Prep pilot students only
9:00- 10:45 am Mon./Wed.
11:00 am- 12:20 pm Mon./Wed.
5:00 6:20 pm Mon./Wed.
12:30 1:50 pm Mon./Wed.
6:30 pm 9:10'pm Mon.
3:00 4-20 pm Mon:/Wed.
6:30 pm 9:15 pm Wed.
5:30 pm 7:10 pm Tues./Thurs.


I EARLY CH ~IDODEUATIN


ICHD2322/42434


Programs for Young Children


6:30 9:00 pm


IAI O


I EDF1005/42852


Introduction to Education


HLP1081/42842
ARH1000/42806
HUM1020/41923
PHI 2010/42193

REL2300/42818


I U ANIIE, IN &PEFOMIGARTSI


Wellness: Practice & Theory 3:00 4:20 pm Mon./Wed.
Humanities Art 3:30 6:00 pm Thurs.
Humanities Introduction 3:30- 6:15 pm Mon.
Introduction to Philosophy 6:30 9:15 pm Wed.
Weekend Class
Introduction to World Religions 8:00 am -12 pm & 1:00-5:00 pm Sat. & Sun
Class meets October 8, 9,15,16, 22


MATH MAT


STA2023/42353
MAT0002A/42030
MAT0024/42039
MAT0024/42040
MAC1105/41976
MAT1033A/42066
MAC2233/42850


BSC1005/41572
ESC1000/41831
PHY1020/42476


Statistics
College Prep Mathematics
College Prep Algebra 1
College Prep Algebra 1
College Algebra
Intermediate Algebra
Calculus for Business


General Biology
Earth Science
Physical Science


3:30 4:45 pm
8:00 8:50 am
9:00 11:05 am
6:30 8:30 pm
5:00 6:15 pm
5:00 6:45 pm
2:00 3:15 pm


4:30- 6:15 pm
6:30 8:15 pm
8:00 9:40 am


Mon./Wed
Mon./Wed.
Mon./Wed.
Tues./Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
Tues,/Thurs.


Mon./Wed.
Mon,/Wed,
Tues./Thurs.


S AL C E


POS1041/42854
AMH2010/42900
WOH1012/42974
PSY2012/42477


American Government
American History I
World Civilization I
Psychology


Thurs,


DEP2004/41707


5:00 6:15 pm


Tues./Thurs.


SYG2000/42901


HLP1081/42841


Wellness: Practice & Theory


1:30 2:50 pm


Mon./Wed.


3:30 6:00 pm
6:30 9:00 pm
6:30 9:00 pm
6:30 9:00 pm


Tues.
Thurs.
Tues.
Thurs.


I a t T a k T r : A ug st 2 -O c o e r 11


Human Growth and Development 6:30 9:15 pm


Tues./Thurs.


I Fc3 *r I e em e


Sociology


6:30 9:00 pm


Tues./Thurs.


New Students Call Now for

Academic Advising 892-8100
OWC Chautauqua Center 908 U.S. Highway 90 West

www.owc.edu
Tuition & Fees $55.45 per credit hour EANEO


Classes begin August 22


Plceen Tsin

MW -9:0 ,. -Ee ing bI p.1


PAGE 3-B


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THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005
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THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


Walton County

Art League holds

summer workshops


The Walton County Art
League will host a workshop
in ink and oil rouging tech-
nique with artist Lois
Kennedy. The workshop will
be held Saturday, July 23,
from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in
the Mary Vinson Room at the
Walton County Fairgrounds.
Another workshop on pas-
tels will be offered on Satur-
day, August 13, with artist
Jerri Whitehead.
All interested persons are
welcome. Materials will be
provided and charge is $10.
Reservations are required as
space is limited. Call
Margene at 892-6921.
The Walton County Art


League meets at 6 p.m. on
the second Thursday of every
month in The Art Center at
The Farmer's Market on
Highway 331. The league's
mission is to promote the
education and appreciation
of fine arts in this area and
to become better artists, con-
noisseurs and patrons of the
fine arts.
During the month of June,
the Art League offered a se-
ries of classes free to stu-
dents. The league also spon-
sors the display of art at the
Walton County Fair and at
the Chautauqua Assembly.
For information, call Jerri
Whitehead at 892-0478, or
Barb Kellogg, at 892-0890.


BOY SCOUTS OF
AMERICA Spanish Trail Res-
ervation "Summer Camp",
DeFuniak Springs, FL Troop
751, Freeport, FL took first
place in the staff hunt compe-
tition. The troop was also rec-
ognized and awarded a rib-
bon for Honor Troop.
Pictured left to right are
Mikiel. Block, Zachary
Waldrip, Adam Reddick, -.
Kevin Castro, Dakota Crotbsy,
Douglas Cavender, and Scout .
Master, Michael Crotean.



Overstreet joins US Army


Cody J. Overstreet has
joined the United States
Army under the Delayed En-
try Program. The program
gives young men and women
the opportunity to delay en-
tering active duty for up to
one year.
The recruit qualifies for a


$16,000 enlistment bonus.
Overstreet will report to
Fort Benning, Columbus,
GA, for basic training on
June 6, 2006.
He is the son of Selena
M. Wilson of Perdue Drive,
DeFuniak Springs, FL.


CHAUTAUQUA EARLY EDUCATION CENTER (Head
Start) is now accepting applications for the program year
2005-06. Child must be agethree or four by September 1st.
Pick up an application at the Chautauqua Head Start lo-
cated at the OWC campus in DeFuniak Springs. Any ques-
tions, call 892-6144.


WaRtonn Couwty- PblniP P rgiressive Growiig!'


32 years



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Corner of Bluebee & Hwy 331S 835-5NUG5684,
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in Freeport


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ross Creekales CASH AND
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on "LG range B ayaL LJ>S
Lots & New Homes Available SUPER RES FREEPORT LOCATION GRAYTON BEACH LOCATION
boardwalk & Dock to LaGrange Bayou K O~ u Rh 36054 Hwy. 98, Destin 269-0505 Highway 20 East 113 Logan Lane
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Tnall for ore Details! ed 722 N.W. Ft. Walton Beach. 862-1222 FREEPORT, FL (beside Regional Utilities)
in Sausites4 2 Locations in Pensacola!
.. ** 835-4221 231-0500


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FDIC www.pnbon.com _


Ekahi Business Services


2 Locations To Serve You
16784 Hwy 331 S., Freeport
850-835-2747
3029 Main St., Nkrnon
850-535-5000


Lw:I Iute


j RHODES JEWELERS, INC.

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42 South 9th St
DeFuniak Spgs, FL


(850) 892-3621


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THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT
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i 15787 Hwy. 331 South
Freeport, FL 32439


ri
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Open Every Evening
S 910M 't- CLnlil
3S A40se 't3 aoa CR4(On USAu9. g8)
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TReservations: (850) 622-3022
Jax: (850) 267-3976
vww.rcafeprovcncel t.a..m


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To Advertise On This Page Call Janice Or Marlena At 892-3232
C(2 Mossy Head


To DeFuniak Springs


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PAGE 5-B


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PAGE 6-B

Marching order


for the Church
By Dr. Robert M. Jaye
Many descriptions can be found to describe the Church
and its functions. One is found in Matthew 28:19-20: "Go ye
therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name
of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: teach-
ing them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded
you: and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the
world." This definition of the duties of the Church sets it
apart from any earthly organization. It makes the Church
more than a club or social gathering or fraternal organiza-
tion.
The last phrase of Jesus' command contains a ringing note
of victory with which Matthew concludes his Gospel. It is
the victory promised those who accept and implement the
marching orders of the Church: "Lo, I am with you always,
even unto the end of the world." "Lo" means "surely." Jesus
erased all doubt that we would be called upon to carry out
this task apart from His being present with us in the flesh,
though He is spiritually present.
How long is the interval of time between the commission
and the end of the world? We do not know. The disciples
wanted desperately to know. Jesus would say, "Watch...for
ye know not what hour your Lord doth come" (Matthew
24:42). But in the interim, during this period of grace, we
are to be strong, diligent, constant in making disciples for
Christ, and preparing them for life.
We do not know how much time we have left to carry out
our Lord's marching orders. It only stands to reason that
some of us will have less time than others. There is now, nor
has there ever been time for "playing church" or considering
it a club or social gathering. We are in spiritual warfare.
Use every opportunity to gladly and properly represent our
Lord.


NEW BEGINNINGS CHURCH, A Trauma Center for the hurting. 1564 State
Hwy. 20 West., P.O. Box 1022, Freeport FL 32439, Office 835-5111, Fax 835-
0123. Our services and activities are as follows: SUNDAY SERVICES: Adult
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.' Morning Worship and Children's Church 10:30
a.m.; Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m. MIDWEEK SERVICES: Bible Study & Prayer
and Youth Services, Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Midweek Prayer Service, Tues-
day 7:00 p.m./Daily Prayer, Mon.-Fri. 5:30 a.m. We provide a nursery for our
Sunday Worship Services. Pastor Louis Taunton and congregation would like
to invite anyone wishing to experience the love of God to come join us for
any of our services.

HISTORIC SAINT AGATHA'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH is located at 144 Circle
Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Sunday Eucharist, Rite II, is celebrated at 10:15
a.m. The Eucharist is also celebrated on Wednesdays at 6 p.m., followed by
a "bring your own supper" and a teaching on the Bible or some other source
of Christian learning. All are welcome. The Church belongs to the diocese
of the Central Gulf Coast, the Rt. Rev. Philip Duncan II is the Bishop. The Vicar
(Priest-in-Charge) is The Rev. Ashmun Brown, D. Min. St. Agatha's is the home
of the Lakeside Concert Series. For information,.call (850) 892-9754.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, located at
88 Circle Drive, Rev. Ken Autrey, staff and congregation invite you to join our
family throughout the week's activities including: Contemporary Worship
Service in Fellowship Hall at 8:30 a.m., Sunday Morning Traditional Worship
Service (and Children's church) at 11 a.m. with Communion observed at
both services the first Sunday of each month, Sunday School for all ages at
9:45 a.m., and Sunday evening Vespers Service in the Chapel at 5:30 p.m.
OGt',gr c.p:..nrunl. tel or fe.i.L.'.-., ip. in.2.IIudj Youth fell.'.. i-rlp ison Suriday
afternoon at 3,p.m. for theteens'and at 4 pm. for children In grades K-4 and
for the teens in transition. Please consider making our church home your
home too. For more information please call 892-5332 or 892-5640.

PLEASANT RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH, DeFuniak Springs "Celebrating the
Love and Glory of Christ." You are invited to experience a personal relation-
ship with God and join in worship to the Almighty God. Sunday services
include age-graded small group Bible studies at 9:00 a.m. and Morning
Worship time beginning at 10:30. Encouragement continues Sunday eve-
nings with Discipleship Training classes at 5:00 p.m. and Worship at 6:00.
Wednesday evening activities begin at 6:00 with choir practice, followed at
7:00 with G-Force for children, activities for youth and a Bible study and
prayer time for adults. The church is located 2-1/2 miles west of US Hwy.
331, and 1 mile south of Bob Sikes Road on Pleasant Ridge Road. Call the
church office (850) 892-3500 for more information.

BALDWIN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH invites you to attend Sunday School
9:45, Worship Service 11:00, Discipleship Training 5 p.m., Sunday Evening
Service 6 p:m., Wednesday Prayer Service 6:30 p.m. Come and be a part of
an awesome ministry here in your community..

BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 331 N., Freeport, Fl. Independent, Fun-
damental Standing for the Blood, The Book and the Blessed Hope. Services:
Sunday at 10 and 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Thursday at 7 p.m., WZEP Radio
-Sunday, at 8:05 a.m., 1460 AM on your dial. Pastor James Roesch phone
892-6252.

CORNERSTONE CHURCH Come as you are! Hear old-fashioned Gospel
preaching! Experience the presence of God first-hand. Sunday Worship 10
a.m. and Wednesdays, 7 p.m. CORNERSTONE CHURCH is an equipping
ministry designed to demonstrate, teach, train, impart and activate follow-
ers of Jesus Christ in the Gifts of the Holy Spirit. Sunday services include:
CHILDREN'S Church from Nursery through 12 years of age. TEENS meet on
Wednesday evenings and Friday nights. We also offer Bible based K 12th
grade, coupled with a Christian Academy / Preschool. Cornerstone Church
is located on Hwy. 83, two miles north of DeFuniak Springs.

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD of DeFuniak Springs, located on 461 Van Buren
Avenue, would like to extend an invitation for all to come join us as we
celebrate the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ through Spirit filled worship
& annointed preaching!! Sunday School begins at 9:45 a.m., followed by
Morning Worship at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday evening service is at 7 p.m. Youth
Ministry Services are held every Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. Pastor is
Adam Peterson, Associate Pastor, Joel Davis. Please come and worship with
us. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Donna Lorenz
between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. at 892-8045 or after 3:30 p.m. at 892-6859.

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH at 440 Orange Ave. Church attendance
doesn't have to be dull, mundane and a burden to your life! When was the
last time you attended a church where there was a spirit of excitement and
an abundance of the Spirit of God? This church family at the First Apostolic
Church would love for you to come and experience the kind of worship
and relationship that the Apostles enjoyed having when the Christian church
'was first birthed! Our Sunday services start at 10 a.m. for Sunday School for
the children and worship and preaching service for the adults. Sunday
Evening begins with prayer at 5:30 p.m., dnd then worship service follows


at 6 p.m. Our Wednesday night Bible Study begins at 7 p.m. We have prayer
meetings on Thursday Evenings beginning at 6 p.m. Come and experience
the Holy Ghost power the.way God intended church to really be!. If you
have any questions or need ministry assistance, feel free to call the church at
892-7882. Rev. David W. King, Pastor.

ST MARGARET CATHOLIC CHURCH, 247 U.S. Highway 331 N., P.O. Box
590, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435, Phone: (850) 892-9247. Mass Schedule:
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.; Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Vigil Saturday at 5 p.m.;
Sunday, 11 a.m.; Holy Days of Obligation 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Rev. Richard
Dawson, pastor.

SOUTHWIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 1307 Hwy. 278 (Coy Burgess Loop) De-
Funiak Springs, FL. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m.; Worship Service: 11:00 a.m.;
Sunday Evening Service: 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
EVERYONE IS WELCOME!


JESUS LOVES YOU JUST THE WAY YOU ARE ... SO DO WE at WESTSIDE
BAPTIST CHURCH, 295 Hwy. 331 N., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433. 850-892-
7112, PASTOR: Randy Nelson 892-2721. Sunday School 9:45 AM, Church
11:00 AM, Sunday Evening 6:00 PM, Wednesday Evening 6:00 PM.


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


THE RELIGION NEWSWRITERS ASSOCIATION invites
applicants to its Lilly Scholarships in Religion program,
which provides full-time journalists with up to $5,000 to cover
the cost of college tuition, books, registration fees, parking
and other costs. The scholarships can be used at any accred-
ited college, university, seminary or similar institution. Jour-
nalists can take any course they choose as long as it is in the
field of religion.
July 1, is the next deadline for scholarship applications,
which are reviewed quarterly by a committee of award-win-
ning journalists. Additional scholarship application deadlines
are Oct. 1 and Jan. 1.
Scholarships must be used within three academic quar-
ters of their award date and only fulltime journalists work-
ing in the general circulation news media are eligible. A to-
tal of $100,000 is available for distribution this year.
Complete information about the Lilly Scholarships in Re-
ligion is available at www.religionwriters.com. For ques-
tions, call Amy Schiska at 614-891-9001, ext. 3.

Send Your Church News :-
and events to.
POB 1546 DFS, FL 32435 -
herald@dfsi.net


Church Events

Gospel sings, revivals,


CENTER RIDGE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH wel-
comes Rev. Si Mathison as guest speaker on Sunday, July
17 at the 11 a.m. morning worship service. A covered dish
dinner will follow the service. The church is located on Hwy.
83 on CR-1883. For more informaiton call Rev. Nancy Snyder
at 859-2464.

CENTER RIDGE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH is
having a revival starting Sunday night, July 10, continu-
ing through July 13 at 7 p.m. Rev. Ray Kelly will be pre-
senting the messages. Music for Sunday night provided by
'Grace Notes' of First UMC of DeFuniak Springs. Monday
night music will be provided by 'New Direction'. Tuesday
night will be the Center Ridge Choir and Wednesday night
music provided by Louis Kathman. The church is located
east of Hwy. 83 on CR-1883. For more information, contact
Rev. Nancy Snyder at 859-2464.

CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH invites the public to travel
back to Biblical times during Vacation Bible School from
July 11-July 15 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Walk where Jesus
walked, without leaving the community. Pre-K to 5th grad-
ers will join together to form tribal families and share expe-
riences to make God's Word come alive. Call Bill or Beverly
Stephens at 859-0388, for more information. The church is
located at 75 Church Street in DeFuniak Springs.


CHURCH SERVICES DIRECTORY


NEW LIFE WORSHIP CENTER SBC at 1113 Hwy. 90 West, Suite 3. Sunday
School at 9:45, Morning Worship at 10:45, Wednesday Bible study at 6:00
p.m. Call 892-2327 for information.

EAST BAPTIST CHURCH Real answers for life's tough questions. Come
join a small church with a loving heart.for God's word. Sunday School be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., with our worship service beginning at 10:30 a.m. Wednes-
day Evening Services begin with a meal at 6:00 p.m.; Prayer and bible study
begin at 6:30 p.m. Pastor Dean Whitaker and congregation welcome you to
join us at 910 Bay Avenue in DeFuniak Springs. For more information, call
892-2324.

FREEPORT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 340 St. Hwy. 20 E., POB 287, Free-
port, FL 32439, phone and fax 835-2447. Bible Study is at 9 a.m. and Mom-
ing Worship is at 10 a.m. with Communion being served the first Sunday of
each month. The Rev. Gene Harris will deliver the morning message. Fellow-
ship immediately follows the worship service. All are cordially invited and
welcomed. The following events are held in the church Fellowship Hall -
Women of the church meet the second Tuesday of each month at 10:30
a.m. Boy Scout Troop 751 and Cub Scout Pack 751 meets every Tuesday at
6 p.m. Small Group Activities are held each Wednesday at 6 p.m.

FREEPORT CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday's, Bible study school at 9 a.m.,
morning worship at 10 a.m. and evening worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday
Bible School at 7 p.m. Free Bible correspondence courses. Everyone is in-
vited. Location: just past the city limits on U.S. Hwy. 331 South .

WAY OF LIFE UNITY CENTER, 1797 Hurlburt Road, Ft. Walton Beach, FL.
Office: 864-1232, Hours: By appointment. Metaphysical Bookstore: 864-5945,
Open Sundays 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Dial-A-Thought: 864-9139. Minister is
Rev. George A. Schmidt, Ph.D. Time for Sunday Services: 9:30 a.m. and 11
a.m. Celebration Services. All are welcome. Special Events: A Course in
Miracles Study Group meets Mondays at 7 p.m. An AA group for women
only meets each Friday at 7 p.m. The "Sparkle" AA group meets on Sunday
evenings at 7 p.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH We are a mission church dedicated to teach-
ing the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We invite you to join us for Sunday services at
1200 Circle Drive, DeFuniak Springs. Worship service only at 9:00 a.m. with
Pastor Delvin Bender. Pastor Bender can be reached at 537-4120 or call Ruby
Pfahlert at 892-3265. We welcome visitors and new members.

DAMASCUS PENTECOSTAL MINISTRIES, 922 W. Bayloop Road, Freeport,
FL. Executive Pastor Charles Carlton Sr. Senior Pastor T.C. Moon. Sunday
School 9:45 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.; Sunday evening 6 p.m.
Wednesday night service 7 p.m., Kids Power Hour 7 p.m., Youth 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, 216 East Live Oak Av-
enue. We cordially invite you to join our "Fellowship of Encouragement"
and come for Worship and Bible Study at the following times: Sunday Bible
Study (9:15 a.m.), Morning worship (10:30 a.m.), discipleship studies (5
p.m.) and evening worship (6:30 p.m.) You are also encouraged to join us
for prayer meeting at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and come early for fellowship
dinners. Call the church office, (850) 892-2722, for details.

FREEPORT UNITED METHODIST, 174 Harrison Street, corerr of Bayloop
& Harrison St.) Freeport, FL, 850-835-2261. Dr. Charles Satterwhite, pastor.
Sunday school 8:45 a.m., Sunday Morning Worship Service 10 a.m. Singing
5:15 p.m. Sunday Evening Worship Service 6 p.m. Prayer Meeting Wednes-
day 6 p.m. Please come worship with us.

THE SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY CHURCH and its congregation cordially
invite you toattend services with us. Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Sunday
Evening Services are at 6 p.m. Wednesday Services are at.7 p.m. The church
is located at 4592 Hwy. 83, (old Baker's Sporting Goods.Building).Our Pas-
tor is Rev. Larry Murphy. Please come ready to worship and expecting a
blessing!

INDIAN CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, Highway 280-A, 4.5 miles south of De-
Funiak Springs, cordially invites you to come and worship with us in Sun-
day School at 9:45 a.m. and Sunday Worship services, at 10:45 a.m. and 6
p.m. Choir Practice is Sunday afternoon at 4 p.m. and church training study
at 5 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. Interim Pastor David
Amason and the congregation extend a very special welcome to all to
come visit or make us your church home. Bro. Amason is preaching dy-
namic sermons from the Bible. We practice "Love one another". A nursery is
provided.

COMMUNITY HOLINESS CHURCH is located at 971 W. Live Oak Ave. in
DeFuniak Springs. Pastor Howard Taylor and congregation welcomes you to
join Spirit filled worship services where we'll treat you in so many different
ways, you will have to like some of them. Service each Sunday at 10:00 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m., Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7:00 p.m. All are cor-
dially invited and welcome. For a ride to church contact 892-0706 or 892-
4704.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH of DeFuniak Springs, 1063 Circle Drive,
invites you to join us throughout the week for worship, fellowship, study
and service. A Men's Fellowship group and Presbyterian Women meet
monthly for fellowship and Bible study. Sunday (nursery is provided from
9:30 a.m. to 12:00). 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages, 11:00 a.m. Morn-
ing Worship. Tuesday Tuesday Kidz Club (1st-5th) 3:00 p.m. Wednesday
Puppet Ministry 3:00 p.m., POWER HOUR! 4:00 p.m. (6'h-1 2th grade), Chan-
cel Choir rehearsal 6:30 p.m. First Sunday Churchwide covered-dish lun-
cheon after church. Second Friday 'Pairs and Spares Dinner' 6:00 p.m.
First Presbyterian is a community of disciples of Jesus Christ who are
committed to being an inclusive faith community where persons from all
walks of life feel comfortable worshiping and working together. If you're
looking for a church home, we invite you to come visit us. Church office
phone number 892-5832.


Send Your Churlch Ne... and E.enL- ,1
P 0 Boi. 1546. DeFiuniak Sprinn. FL 3_'435


GLENDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Pastor Keith Andrews and the con-
gregation of Glendale Presbyterian Church invite you to worship each Sun-
day morning at 11:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:30 fol-
lowed by a time of fellowship at 10:30. A Community Men's Bible Fellow-
ship meets in the church Fellowship Hall on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 p.m.
All men are invited. GPC is located on Hwy,. 83 about 9.5 miles north of
DeFuniak Springs. We are a church for today with historic roots. Find out
more on the web at www.glendalechurch.org. Call 859.0080 for more in-
formation.

NEW BIRTH FELLOWSHIP CHURCH, located 1045 E. Hwy. 90. Pastor.Henry
T. Beach welcomes all to Sunday School at 10:00 a.m. and Sunday Morning
worship at 11:00 a.m. Bible study, Wednesday at 7:00 p.m.

GREATER ST. JOSEPH AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 117
Graham Avenue, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433 invites you to come worship
with our church family each Sunday. Church school begins at 9:30 a.m.
Worship service begins at 11 a.m. We are located at 117 Graham Ave. Adult
Breakfast & the Bible at 8:30 a.m. every Sunday morning. Rev. Cecil Williams
and the entire congregation extends an open and warm welcome to each
and everyone to come and worship with us. You are encouraged to come
join us at any of our services. You may call for more information at 892-
2009.

SPIRIT AND THE BRIDE WORSHIP CENTER Are you one of so many
people that are tired of going to church and leaving the same way you
came in (hungr, and hurting' Do. ,ou feel ikie. ,..u.are sc:. far away from *
G6d,..r a. time that s ou need Him t he most?JThat -na, ba iF., ou cc.uld 1 j4 -
get to Him, so many things in ) our li, f .1-...ul' lange? '.: .:u been.Ut,. [,
by so called Christians, and now you won't even go into the house of God i
Do you have so many questions and no answers? There is a church you can
come to and not be judged by what you're wearing or what mistakes you're
made. Jesus says to come as you are, not come when you're perfect. If any
of these things apply to you, we invite you to come and get the answers
you need, come and get to Jesus. After all, you are hungry, aren't you? Take
Hwy. 90 E. to Ponce de Leon, turn right onto 181A, the church is right
across from Ponce de Leon Springs. Sunday: 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Thursday:
7 p.m. Call 548-9425.

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, corner of Live Oak
and 21st Street, DeFuniak Springs, FL. "Opern Hearts, Open Minds, Open
Doors". Pastor David Wilson. Sunday School 9:00 a.m., Morning Worship
10:00 a.m. The small church by the side of the road with a Cross over the
entrance, longing to extend the love and peace of God to any wayfarer or
pilgrim seeking a rest from this world of strife and despair. A place where
common people can assemble for simple worship and experience the
Presence of God in their midst. "For where two or three are gathered to-
gether in my name, there am I in the midst of them." Matthew 18:20 K.J.V.
"The devil wins a skirmish with a roar, but we belong to HIM who wins the
war."

The members of FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH warmly invite you to wor-
ship with us this Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Then stay for refreshments and Adult
Bible Study and children's Sunday School. Our Pastor, Reverend Jack Betz,
speaks from the Gospel each Sunday of Jesus' love for each of us. We-are
known throughout our community as a friendly and serving Church that
welcomes newcomers. We are located on Route 331 very near the Florida
line [24213 5th Avenue] in Florala, Alabama. If you wish, call us at 334-858-
3515 for more specific directions.

BLACK CREEK UNITED METHODIST "The church in the wildwood" -
invites you to come worship and fellowship with us on Sundays and
Wednesday. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m., followed by Worship Ser-
vice at 11 a.m. Children's church begins at 11:30 a.m. Choir practice is on
Sunday afternoon at 5:30 p.m. followed by the evening Worship Service at
6:00 p.m. A covered dish fellowship dinner is enjoyed on each first Sun-
day following the worship service. Wednesday Bible Study begins at 6!30
p.m. Black Creek UMC is located 5 miles east of Freeport, FL at 278 Memo-
rial Lane. Please call 835-1881 or 835-2521 for directions. Pastor Lavelle
Enterkin, (850-871-4142) and the congregation invite you to "come as you
are" with an expectant heart to receive a blessing.

EUCHEEANNA APOSTOLIC CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, 6068 CR 280E,
6.5 miles east of DeFuniak Springs, would love for you to come and expe-
rience true Pentecostal worship and anointed preaching! Sunday begins
with prayer at 9:30 a.m., Sunday School, 10 a.m. Sunday evening begins
with prayer at 5:30 p.m. and then worship service at 6 p.m. Our Wednes-
day Midweek service begins with prayer at 6:30 p.m. and service at 7 p.m.
Pastor Gary Jones and the congregation extend a very warm welcome to
all. Come visit or make us your church home. For more information, prayer,
Bible studies, please call church 892-9338. We hope to see you soon!!
Come expecting a Holy ghost move!

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH is located one mile north of Highway
90 on Laird Road. Laird Road is west of Mossy Head just before the Okaloosa
County line. Grace Community is a church committed to historical South-
ern Baptist principles and believes that the Church is called, not to reflect
its culture, but to shape it. We believe that faith must be lived as well as
affirmed, therefore, right living derives from right believing. We hold to a
high view of Scripture believing the Bible as our final authority and that it
"stands in judgement of us, never do we stand in judgement of it." Sunday
morning worship begins at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday School at 11:00 and
evening bible study at 6:00. Wednesday night prayer meeting at 6:30. If
you are tired of playing church, come help us shape the culture where
we are leadingg God's will one verse at a time."

OUTREACH FOR CHRIST CHURCH, 6753 State Hwy. 2 East, Darlington,
FL. We are reaching out to the lost, hurting, hungry, and naked. Pastor Rev.
Curtis Manning and his congregation would like to invite you to attend ser-
vices with them. Sunday School for all ages is at 10 a.m. Children's Church
and Sunday morning worship, is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer and
teaching is at 7 p.m. Nursery is provided for all services if needed. Gospel
Sing every first Saturday. Come enjoy our anointed praise and worship,
and be encouraged with Holy Ghost filled preaching and teaching of God's
Word. For more information call: (850) 892-2048.


I







PAGE 7-B


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


Obituaries


Casey
Willis Lloyd "Sonny" Casey
III, 62. a DeFuniak Springs
businessman, and civic
leader, passed away Tuesday,
June 28, 2005, at
Healthmark Regional Medi-
cal Center. He was born Feb-
ruary 13, 194;3, the son of
Lloyd Casey and Lois Rabon.
i.' r l the survivors are
his \ift.-, .Beitt S, Casey, of
D,:Funiak SprmL.s. his sons,
Patrick C.Ias and 'wi. i. Jen-
nifer, of DeFuniak Springs,
and Matthew Casey, of
Crestview; his .rainddalulh-
ter, Emily Case; his mother,
Lois Rabon and husband,
Bil. ofM3lcMhin., illt. TN; his
sisters, Mary Maloy and
husband, Pete, of Ocala,
Linda Turvin and husband,
Thomas, of Ashford, and his
brother, Dennis Casey and
wife, Lois Ann, of Viola, TN.
Funeral services were held
Friday, July 1, 2005 in Jerry
Evans Chapel. There was a
private family burial.
Arrangements and services
were under the direction of
Jerry Evans.


Brisson
Paul Louis Brisson, 61, of
DeFuniak Springs, passed
away Tuesday, June 28,2005,
in Healthmark Regional
Medical Center. He was born
August 28, 1943 in New Ha-
ven, CT, the son of Oswald
Brisson and Mignonne
Binette Brisson.
Among survivors are his
wife, Alesid Brisson; his sons,.
Bob Brisson and wife, Alex-
andria, Paul Brisson Jr. and
wife, Robin; his daughters,
Sandra Tideman and
husband, Greg, McKenzie
James, Shirley Collins and
husband, Owen; his mother-
in-law, Sally Bennett and
husband, Jamtes, an dhis fa-"
therinalaw, Richard' J'ames '
Thiteen grandchildren'aiid"
one great-grandchild also
survive.
Memorials may be made to
International Myeloma
Foundation, 12650 Riverside
Drive, Suite 206 North Hol-
lywood, CA, 91607. Funeral
services were held Friday,
July 1, 2005, at 6 p.m. in
Jerry Evans Chapel, with
Reverend Tom Fleetwood of-
ficiating.
Arrangements and services
were under the direction of
Jerry Evans.


Criddle
James A. Criddle, 72, of
Nashville, TN, died Tuesday,
June 28, 2005, at his resi-
dence at Thornapple Lake.
Criddle was born Novem-
ber 20, 1932 in Houston, MS,
the son of Levy and Katie
(Rambo) Criddle. He at-
tended Mason High School
with the class of 1952, where
he was a lineman on the high
school football team.
Criddle served in the
United States Navy from
1951 to 1954, during the Ko-
rean War. He was a member
of the VFW Post 7309 in Ma-
son, MI, and the AmVets in
Florida.
Criddle married Bonnie
Lynn Swan onApril 18, 1959.
They enjoyed spending win-
ters in DeFuniak Springs,
FL.
Criddle worked as an elec-
trician with IBEW Local 665
from 1957 until he retired in
1990. He was an avid big


game hunter and fisherman.
Criddle was preceded in
death by a brother, James
Rambo, and sister, Millie
Dohm.
Criddle is survived by his
wife of 46 years, Bonnie
Criddle, of Nashville; daugh-
ter, Laura (Dave) Gilbert;
son, Wayne (Christine)
Criddle; grandchildren,
Elizabeth Erin Criddle, Joel
(Kim) Crawford, David
(Kristine) Crawford, Jodi
'i rI. i rd; great-grandson,
Noah Crawford; sisters,
Katie Lou Rambo and
Maxine Henry.
Memorial services were
held in Michigan. Memorials
can be made to Heartland
Hospice or St. Jude's Chil-
dren Hospital.
Arrangements were by the
Girrbach Funeral Home in
Hastings, MI.


Davis
Robert Davis, 95, of
Freeport, FL, passed away
Sunday, July 3, 2005 in
Niceville, FL. He was born
Nov. 22, 1909 in Freeport to
Henry and Sara McCaskill
Davis.
Davis had lived in
Freeport for the past 30 years
after retiring, moving from
Nashville, TN. He was Pres-
byterian by faith and a mem-
ber of the Freeport Presbyte-
rian Church where he was
very active. He graduated
from the citadel with a bach-
elors degree. He was a vet-
eran of WWII serving his
country in the United States
Army. He was known as the
"Blueberry Man", having
taken great pride in growing
his blueberries.
Davis was preceded in
death by his father and
mother, and wife, Gladys
Shepard Davis, and four sis-
ters, and five brothers.


Cook
Ebbin Lee Oliver Cook Jr., DID YOU KNi
80, of DeFuniak Springs dren has a netwi
passed away Wednesday, calcaretochildr
June 29, 2005. He was born nal cord injuries
March 26, 1925 in DeFuniak sponsored by Shl
Springs, FL., to Alonzo Slay ton County Shri
and Sarah Cook Slay.
Oliver Cook was a life long
resident of DeFuniak
Springs. He worked for over
20 years at the Walton
County Courthouse before f-
retiring. He owned and oper- j
ated his own business, Cook's
Septic Tank Service. He also. Individuals i
maintained the Agriculture communities liv
Building and the Division of paced society w:
Driver Licenses for several
years.
Oliver Cook was preceded
in death by his father and Black (
mother. l c
Cook is survived by the m
mother of his children, Nancy M emorl
Cook, of DeFuniak Springs;
daughter, Lisa Osburn and Cemete
husband, George; three step-
daughtlr-,, Brend-la Holt aind"f t m eet
%Glrerda-GaineY all, of DeFui-
niak Springs, and Dorothy :There will be
Altman and husband, Mike, scheduled meet
of Freeport, FL.; four grand- Black Creek Mei
children, Sara Caylor and etery on Mond,
husband, Scott, of Lake City, beginning at
FL., Holly Osburn, of DeFu- meeting will be
niak Springs, Scotty Mann Black Creek Uni
and wife, Dale, of Bonifay, ist Church in th
FL., and Viola, of Freeport, hall. All individi
and also survived by one interested in tl
great-grandchild, Holden ment of the
Scott Mann. grounds are in
Funeral services were con- tend.
ducted Friday, July 1, 2005 For more inform
at the Clary-Glenn Funeral reactions, call 8
Home, with Rev. James A.-5-1881.
Campbell officiating. -
Burial followed in Con-
cerned Christian Church
Cemetery.
The Cook family placed MEMOR]
their confidence in Clary-
Glenn Funeral Home to 1
handle the arrangements: R/


Card of

Thanks

Thank You
The family of Mother Alline
Christian express our sincere
thanks for the many kind
deeds shown during the ill-
ness and demise of our lov-
ing mother.
A special thanks to
Chautauqua Rehab and
staff, Dr. Howell and staff,
City Wide Choir and City
Wide Usher's.
May God continue to bless
and keep you in our prayer.

The Christian family


ALL WORK
GUARANTEED


Davis is survived by his
two sons, Robert B. Davis Jr.
and wife, Pat, of Nashville,
TN and Doug S. Davis and
wife, Penny, of Atlanta, GA;
daughter, G. Patricia Davis,
of San Antonio, TX; three
grandchildren Chris Davis,
Wendy Lee and husband,
Jere, all of Nashville, TN and
Danielle Brooks and hus-
band, Bret, of Atlanta, GA;
and also survived by two
great-grandchildren Jackson
Lee and Taylor Brooks.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, July 5, 2005 at the
Freeport Presbyterian
Church in Freeport, FL, with
Rev. Gene Harris officiating.
Donations may be made to
the Freeport Presbyerian
Church, 340 SR 20 East,
Freeport, FL 32439.
The Davis family placed
their confidence in Clary-
Glenn Freeport Chapel Fu-
neral Home to handle the
arrangements.


OW THAT SHRINE HOSPITALS for chil-
ork of 22 hospitals to provide expert medi-
n with orthopaedic problems including spi-
and youngsters with burn injuries, all free,
miners. For information, call 892-9996, Wal-
.ne Club.


THE LONG-TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN COUNCIL is
a group of concerned citizens whose goal is to improve the
quality of life for people who live in long-term care facilities
such as nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult fam-
ily care homes and skilled nursing units in area hospitals.
An Ombudsman is a specially trained and certified volun-
teer who has been appointed by the governor and given au-
thority under Florida law to investigate and resolve com-
plaints made by, or on behalf of, long term care facility resi-
dents.
The Northwest Florida Long-Term Care Ombudsman
Council serves residents in four counties: Escambia, Santa
Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton. The ombudsman's job is to pro-
tect the rights of residents, assure that each complaint is
investigated by visiting each facility to evaluate conditions
and conduct annual inspections.
Qualified and caring volunteers are needed to serve all
four counties. For additional information regarding the
Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program or information on
the council, contact the coordinator at (850) 595-8013 or 1-
888-831-0404.

THE SENIOR MOBILITY PROGRAM makes available
to senior citizens and the permanently disabled electric
wheelchairs at no cost to the recipient, if they qualify. The
power wheelchairs are provided to those who cannot walk
and cannot self-propel a manual wheelchair in their home,
and who meet the additional guidelines of the program. No
deposit is required. For more information, call 1-800-451-
0971.

RSVP NEEDS VOLUNTEERS in Walton County. RSVP
program recruits volunteers of all ages to serve in many
and varied capacities. One doesn't have to be retired or a
senior to join us. RSVP offers a bonus to registered volun-
teers age 55 and better. For those volunteers, free accident
and liability insurance coverage when enroute to, serving
at and returning home from a registered station where hours
are being reported. One hour a week is all we are asking as
a commitment. To become a volunteer is free. Volunteers
can set their own schedules in cooperation with the needs
of the agency. To become a volunteer through the RSVP Pro-
gram, call Gina Smith at (850) 547-2511 or (850) 893-7030
Tuesday-Friday 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.


iect Help Forum planned


n the local
'e in a fast-
ith progress



reek

ial

ry


a regularly
;ing for the
norial Cem-
ay, July 11,
7 p.m. The
held at the
ted Method-
e fellowship
lals who are
he improve-
cemetery
vited to at-

mation or di-
192-0366 or


all around, but there is a prob-
lem facing many families in
the communities that often go
unnoticed. This problem is
poverty. According to the
2004 report form the Federal
Interagency Forum on child
and family statistics, child
poverty has risen for the first
time in a decade.

The Walton County Baptist
Association WMU wants to do
something about this through
the ministry of Project Help
on Poverty. Walton County
has an estimated population
of 48,477. Walton County was
recently cited as the 11th fast-
est growing county in the
state and the 61st in the na-
tion. The 2005 Florida trend
reported that the average
family income is $20,077
while the state average is
$32,622. This community is
way below the state average.


gLMCO
IALS & MAUSOLEUMS, INC.
1-888-834-4345
ANITE & MARBLE MONUMENTS
BRONZE MEMORIALS
PRE-NEED VAULTS


3979 STATE HWY 2 WEST ALL CEMETERY
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433 NEEDS


WOE


Many people are living with
challenges daily that are as-.
sociated with poverty, such as
food, clothing and miscella-
neous needs.
The Walton County Baptist
Association Women's Leader-
ship Team would like to help
with this need. There will be
a forum held to address the
different aspects of poverty.
This forum will consist of
various representatives in the
community that have come
face-to'face with. issues sur-
rounding poverty, including
Russell Hughes, principal of
Walton Middle School;


Barrett Glover, chaplain;
Kathy Butts, Walton County
Health Department nurse;
Pam Stuckey, community
support manager, and Rever-
end. Cliff Matthews, interim
director of missions.
Everyone is invited to join
this educational and informa-
tive forum. The forum will be
held on July 21 at 6:30 p.m.
at Baldwin Avenue Baptist
Church.
For more information, con-
tactLynda iWalton C6un ty"
Association WMT.director) at
951-4514 or Lessie at 892'-
2793. -


I Clary-Glenn
FUNERAL HOMES
Now locally owned and family operated.
Joel Glenn, LFD, Owner Randolph Clary. LFD

Two locations to serve you better
Clary-Glenn Funeral Home
230 Park Avenue DeFuniak Springs, FL 850-892-2511
S Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home
S I 150 East Highway 20 Freeport, FL 850-835-2511


Eyes Upon Us

By Dr. Charles Satterwhite
Pastor, Freeport UMC
Sponsored by T.P. Motors


Lead me in the right path, O LORD, or my enemies
will conquer me. Tell me clearly what to do, and show
me which way to turn. My enemies cannot speak one
truthful word. Their deepest desire is to destroy others.
Their talk is foul, like the stench from an open grave.
Their speech is filled with flattery, Psalms 5:8-9 (NLT).
Christian, do you realize that there are people around
you just waiting for you to stumble?
While it might make us uncomfortable, there are
those who would enjoy nothing more than seeing us fall
away from the walk of righteousness that is ours in
Christ.
The Psalmist prays that the Lord will keep him go-
ing in the right direction because he knows that his en-
emies will use any missteps he makes against him.
When we walk a path other than the one the Lord
has set before us, the enemy uses it as ammunition to
make us question our own Christian walk, as well as to
sway others away from becoming believers.
What we do, say, and how we live speaks volumes to
the world around us.
If we want the unchurched to become fully devoted
followers of Christ we will do everything we can to live
our lives by the example He has set for us.
An important way to avoid stumbling is to have a
high self accountability check-valve. When you are
tempted to stray, call a friend that is a strong Christian
to help you come to a deeper spiritual reality check.
Reflection Questions:
1) Do you ever pray that the Lord will lead you in the
right direction? Why not make it a daily practice?
2) Satan is always in the background just waiting for
you to mess up (1 Pet. 5:8). Take the time to ask God to
give you the power to not be overcome by him.
3) What enemies want you to fall? Pray for them.
A great covering of accountability, and outlet for min-
istry is through regular, systematic church attendance.
What better time to begin than this Sunday. Sunday
school 8:45 a.m.; worship 10 a.m.; 5 p.m. Bible Study;
Wednesday prayer meeting 6 p.m.


91.3 i iJ
Vbur Station Far Life!

WAKJ plays "Christian Classics"
throughout the day, mixed with
inspirational ministry short features,
designed especially to encourage
you throughout the day.


First Baptist Church
216 East Live Oak Avenue
DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435
Phone: 850-892-2722 Fax: 850-892-2381
e-mail: fbcdfs@earthlink.net
Jerry R. Chumley, Pastor
Greg Hollis, Minister of Music/Education
Lonnie Cook, Minister of Youth
Jacob Williams, Youth Intern
Mary Hollis, Director of Children's Ministries

Sunday School 9:15 AM
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM
Discipleship Training 5:30 PM
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 PM
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM

Join us for Youth Revival with David Rathel
Friday, July 31 Wednesday, August 3
at 6:30 each night.
David is a graduate of The Baptist College of Florida.
He is the son of Dr. & Mrs. Mark Rathel.


W-1.







PAGE 8-B


SP


THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


RTS


'PEE WEE FOOTBALL SIGN-UP for ages 6-12 must be
in by August 1.
Registration is taking place at Harbeson Field, on Hwy.
83N on July 16 and 30, from 9 a.m.-noon.
Football is $50 per child, and cheerleading is $45 per child
with a $5 discount for more than one child, and scholar-
ships are available.
For more information call 259-9354.


Little League Scores
11-12 Year Old Softball
At DeFuniak Springs
Double Elimination


Tri-County 18
Tri-County 6
DeFuniak Springs def
Tri-County 4


9-10 Year Old Softball
At Destin
Double Elimination

Tri-County 28
Tri-County 5
DeFuniak Springs 7
Tri- County 16


Destin 6
DeFuniak Springs 2
Destin
DeFuniak Springs 3


Sports news in review


By CHUCK HINSON
SWHS to host Nike Camp:
South Walton High School
and Lee Miller, director of
Elite Hoops Basketball, will
hold a coed camp at the South
Walton High School gym,
July 18-22. The cost is $225
and is open to students be-
tween the ages of 8-14.
For more information, call
(800) NIKE CAMPS.


Armstrong dressing to
impress: Lance Armstrong's
retirement bash is less that a
month away, but plans for
his next career have already
begun. The six-time Tour of
France champion is making
sure that people won't forget
him and is teaming with
Nike on the new 10/2 collec-
tion.
The clothing collection


DeFuniak Springs 0
Destin 1
Destin 1
DeFuniak Springs 14


11-Year Old Baseball
At Niceville-Valparaiso
Double Elimination


Tri-County
Niceville(A)
Tri-County
Destin
Tri-County
Niceville(N)
Niceville(A)
Niceville(A)
Tri-County


Destin 0
DeFuniak Springs 2
Niceville(N) 3
DeFuniak Springs 9
Niceville(A) 1
Destin 1
Niceville(N) 3
Tri-County 1
Niceville(A) 0


THIS PITCHER FOR THE DeFuniak Springs 11 and 12
year-old team, wound it up and threw a perfect strike. The
DFS team was eliminated last Tuesday after losing to Tri-
County, 6-2.


plays of the success of the
yellow wristbands and the
name commemorates the
day Armstrong was diag-
nosed with the cancer. Octo-
ber 2, 1996, doctors found the
cancer, but he has made a full
recovery from the disease.
The clothing line hit select
stores throughout the coun-
try on July 2.
Bogut drafted in first
round: It's not hard to get a
good NBA basketball job
when you are seven feet tall
and have an impressive rec-
ord like Australian Andrew
Bogut. He was selected in the
first round of the NBA draft
on June 29 by the Milwaukee
Bucks.
The 20-year-old Bogut,
who played two seasons at
Utah before transferring to
North Carolina and leading
them to a NCAA champion-
ship, was also player of the
year for the NCAA.
Bogut was one of four play-
ers from North Carolina cho-
sen among the first 14 picks
of the opening rounds of the
NBA draft.
Shula gets extension: Uni-
versity of Alabama head foot-
ball coach Mike Shula, re-
ceived a one-year contract
extension on June 29, but did
not get a raise to his $900,000
salary. Shula's record from
last season stands 10-15 rec-
ord for the two years he has
been head coach at Alabama.
His contract now extends
through 2010. Shula's con-
tract includes a $150,000
base salary and a $750,000
talent fee..
Auburn rejects appeal: An
Auburn University commit-
tee rejected gaurd Toney
Douglass' appeal to remove
restrictions nhis abilityuta
transfer to another SEC
school. The committee, com-
promised of university em-


ployees outside the athletic
department, sided with
coach JeffLebo in employing
a rule requiring him to pay
his own way through school
next year if he moves to an-
other SEC school.
Douglass, who led the Ti-
gers basketball team in scor-
ing as a freshman, must sit
out next season if he signs
with any Division I school,
but can accept scholarships
from any other schools that
are not in the same division
as the SEC.
Oh Thursday of last week,
Douglass transferred to Flor-
ida State University where
he will have to sit out for the
2005-2006 season, but will-
have three seasons of eligi-
bility remaining.
FIA rules against teams:
Formula One's governing
body ruled last Wednesday
that the seven teams that
boycotted. the United States
Grand Prix wer guilty of fail-
ing to provide suitable tires
and wrongfully refusing to
allow theirs cars to start. The
FIA. will announce their
punishment on the seven
teams on Sept. 14.
In a group response by
BMW-Williams, Mercedes-
McLaren, BAR-Honda, Toy-
ota, Sauber, Red Bull and
Renault declined to race on
June 19 after tire manufac-
turer Michelin, said its tires
were unsafe for the Indi-
anaoplis circuit. The seven
teams said they were very
disappointed by the decision
and will appeal.
FAMU cuts programs: The
Florida A & M University
BOard of Trustees voted to
eliminate its golf, tennis,
swimming and diving teams
to pare down spending on
sports and produce a bal-
anced budget for the entire
s.cooL The..state's only his-
.'tricaLiackjuawersi tb', j,
save an annual cost ,of
$639,000 by eliminating.
these sports.


j~ 3JE^-U ,^S^ ^ e


JOHN DEERE
NOTHING RUNS LIKE A DEERE"


PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT (back row) Darrell Tbwnsend, Brandon Head, John Spires;
middle row, Justin Spires, Matt Townsend, Christian Steadman, Cody Garrett, Christo-
pher Kelly; front row, Tyler Head, Hunter Bell, Jamey Stanley, and Levi Schofield.




All-Stars finish season


7 -


Like all of the DeFuniak
Little League All-Star teams,
the nine-year-old All-Stars
began their practices with
twelve players and three
coaches. At the end of the
first week of practice, this
team had nine players and
two coaches. As they contin-
ued with their second solid
week of practice, the team
was ready to give it all they
had, which included the
player who received nine
stitches above the eye earlier
that week during practice.
The tournament was to be
held in Flomaton, AL, and
was scheduled to begin June
11, 2005. Due to tropical
storm, Arlene, the first game
was postponed until Monday,
June 13 at 7:30 p.m. DeFu-
niak played Niceville-Ameri-
can, and was defeated. This
loss caused the team to drop
down into the losers bracket,
scheduling them to play
against Destin.
Due to double elimination,
the DeFuniak nine-year-old
All-Star team was then out
of thej tournament. Without
a single player to use as a
substitute, these nine-year-
old boys played baseball as a
team and with continues
pride. These boys did not give
up, and no matter what the
score was, they could always
hear cheers and support from
'the stands of the family and


friends that drove eighty-two
miles one-way to support
DeFuniak's home team.
What more could a coach or
parent ask for from these
nine exhausted baseball
players? Coaches and all of


the parents expressed appre-
ciation to everyone who be-
lieved in these players that
went all, the way to
Flomanton, AL to represent
DeFuniak Springs Little
League.


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WALTON COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS
DeFUNIAK SPRINGS
CARDS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 1-334-793-6705


TOP TEN THINGS TO DO
WHEN SELLING YOUR HOME
1. CALL BRUCE NA YLOR
(He will take care of the other 9!)

The Proven Professionals

Naylor


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.I'


~i~Sg~:.






THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005


2005

High School

football

schedules
(Home games denoted in all
caps)
Freeport High School
Aug. 19 Holmes County
(site TBA)
Aug. 26-SOUTH WALTON
Sept. 2 at Walton
Sept. 9 NORTHVIEW
Sept. 16 at Port St. Joe
Sept. 23 OPEN
Sept. 30- WEST GADSDEN
Oct. 7 at Jay
Oct. 14 at Wewahitchka
Oct. SNEADS
Nov. 4 at P.C. Arnold
South Walton
Aug. 19 BOZEMAN
Aug. 26 at Freeport
Sept. 2 WEWAHITCHKA
Sept. 9 at P. C. Arnold
Sept. 16 JOHN PAUL II
Sept. 23 at Cottondale
Sept. 30 BAKER
Oct. 7 BAKER
Oct. 14 at Northview
Oct. 21 at Quincy Monroe
Oct. 28 OPEN
Nov. 4 SNEADS

Walton High School
Aug. 19 ALABAMA CHR.
Aug. 26 at Baker
Sept. 2 FREEPORT
Sept. 9 CHILES
Sept. 16 OPEN
Sept. 23 at Chipley
Sept. 30 at Williston
Oct. 7 at South Walton
Oct. 14 CATHOLIC
Oct.21 -FAMU
Oct. 28 at Marianna


IOC gets close



to an Olympic host


By CHUCK HINSON
Of course we all know that
the next Olympic games
won't come around until
2008 when they are put on
and hosted by the city of Sin-
gapore, China, but plans and
designs are already heating
up among three major cities,
to host the 2012 games.
Last Tuesday, Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice was
in New York City and was
joined by New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg in
their praise of the city and
the potential of hosting the
games once again in the big
apple. Rice commented by
saying that the city is already
an Olympic Village and the
world has come to New York
for many years to live their
dreams.
New York is competing
with Paris, London, Moscow
and Madrid, with Paris re-
garded as the front runner.
But, the rumors of a decision
has not dampered the spirits
of the other cities.
Despite the odds leaning
towards France, London and
Madrid are pulling out their
big guns.
London's quest for the
games, is still a huge pile of
dirt that is sitting in the
heart of the city' rundown
outskirts. Amid all the
rubble and garbage in Strat-
ford, plans for a 500-acre
Olympic Village and stadium
have already begun.


The city is already banking
on the fact that they have
several venues that can be
used for the games including
the Wimbeldon Tennis Com-
plex, Wembley Stadium and
Regent's Park. Construction
has already been approved
for an aquatic center and
velodrome.
This is the biggest and
most impressive pitch the
city has made for the Olym-
pic Games in more than 20
years, many sources report.
The issues of transportation
and security are still con-
cerns from the International
Olympic Committee.
London has more than 7.3
million in population; has
hosted the Olympic Games in
1908 and 1948; has 33 of the
needed venues already in.
existence, needs 10 more
built. The biggest concern is
not all the land has yet been
purchased by the city to
complete construction and
there are great concerns that
the venues will not be com-
pleted in time for the 2012
games.
Overlooked Madrid,
Spain, is still fighting for the
games. King Juan Carlos is
reportedly using all his in-
fluences to get the games to
their neck of the wood.
In a June 6, IOC evalu-
ation report, the city was
praised for all the strides
they had made in the efforts
to host the games, but Lon-
don and front-runner Paris


still received higher marks.
Still, Madrid citizens and
the country feel they have
just as much of a chance to
get the bid as any other city.
A year ago the city was not
even considered to be in the
top 10 choices, now they are
in the top three.
One issue that has helped
and hurt Madrid is the fact
they have never hosted an
Olypmic Game. Some feel it
is unfair that a city of it's size
and culture should be given
the opportunity, while oth-
ers feel that since they have
had no experience with the
games and the fact that they
have so many hidden issues,
they would need to hold off
another four years before
reapplying for the 2016
games.
The city of Madrid has a
population of three million
in the city and 5.5 in the
greater area; have 22 of the
35 venues already built for
the games; have an "above
standard" rating and the
Olympic ring and village are
within walking distance of
each other.
Concerns that could influ-
ence the IOC are security
issues since the incident that
occurred last year on the
Madrid subway that killed
191 passengers.
The IOC will have their
decision over the weekend
and will announce their win-
ning city on July 6, live from
Singapore, China.


Titus Football Camp
Titus Sports Academy has created a football camp with
assistance from various NFL football players. The camp
was created to help youth players understand the impor-
tance of strength training, speed, conditioning, agility, and
the mental aspect of the sport.
The camp will be held at the Morgan Sports Center from
July 27 July 30, from 5- 8 p.m. The camp fee is $100, with
a 10 percent discount offered for early registration.
Deadline is July 15. For more information, call 650-1241.


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MORE THAN 300 chil-
dren participated in the
Family Fun Day at Rose-
mary Beach on Monday. The
events included a sack race, a
three-legged race, and a bal-
loon toss competition.


- --e r 1 I I I I I


PAGE 9-B


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THE DEFUNIAK SPRINGS HERALD, THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2005
&"-. mTr


UO JNI.


Frnm 1IR


At the time it was added, it
was low on the list for two rea-
sons, according to Ruark
Cleary, a state biologist who
worked on the project with the
state Conservation and Recre-
ation Lands Trust. It was a
larger project than the state
was used to working with, and
at the time, there was no rea-
son to think that the property
would be available for pur-
chase by the state.
Roark said that the agency's
vision at the time was to ob-
tain the Pt. Washington land
and the Topsail Hill land, and
combine them into an ecosys-
tem project that could tie into
Water Management District
land in the Choctawhatchee
River basin.
According to Cleary, "there
is nothing in the record to sup-
port the idea that the state only
wanted Topsail and never
wanted the Pt. Washington
tract," an idea that still surfaces
from time to time.
SAnother little known fact is
that there was once a "Point
Washington Phase II" project
that involved an additional
10,000 acres that would be
used to create a greenway all
the way from Georgia to the
Gulf in the eastern end of Wal-
ton County. Phase I, however,
never made it past the idea
stage, in part because of the
political climate in Walton
County, which was unfavor-
able for large state land pur-
chases.
The state bought the prop-
erty with $20 million in Pres-
ervation 2000 funds, the 10-
year program begun in 1990.


tem, creating greenways link-
ing preservation areas and
parks, providing for affordable
housing, and so forth. Part of
its mission was the creation of
an acquisition and disposition
plan for state-owned land. The
concept of this aspect of the
plan was to clean up conser-
vation borders using disposi-
tion of undesirable, isolated
parcels and to'acquire pri-
vately held parcels within the
conservation boundary. The
final Trust recommendation
was for the disposition of
nearly 3000 acres, and the ac-
quisition of about 500 acres.
Walton County, meanwhile,
was continuing to lobby for
more land to be sold offby the
state and made available for
commercial development. The
Ecosystem Management
Team, an implementation
panel set up with the county's
blessing to follow up on the
Trust's work, made a recom-
mendation that the state dis-
pose of land for the new town
center on Hwy. 331, now the
government and education
center. The original new town
proposal was for considerably
more acreage, and included
housing and commercial de-
velopment.
Also included in the team's
disposition recommendation
were three environmentally
sensitive parcels that were
contiguous with state land and
did not appear to meet the dis-
position criteria. These in-
cluded 245 acres in Seagrove
containing the Cassine Gar-
dens Cypress Swamp Nature
Trail, and an 80-acre parcel in


-. .

ONE OF THE MANY HIKING and biking trails available in
the Pt. Washington State Forest, the popular Cassine Trail was.
nearly sold o fior development inL he 'I o s. T.efo.res,.cd.alog.
with portions of what:is inow :Topsail Hill State Preserve,, was,,
bbjughtfrom the Resolution Trust Corporation at an eleventh
hour sale on the Walton County Courthouse steps.


the purchase ten years ago,
about 1.7 million longleaf pine
seedlings have been planted,
according to Tom Beitzel, of
the State Division of Forestry,
the managing agency for the
forest.
This replanting is the big-
gest accomplishment towards
restoration, Beitzel said. Most
of these have been planted on
about 1800 acres. The rest of
the forest is reseeding itself, or
consists of smaller parcels that
have not been cut. When the
state purchased the land, it was
pretty well cut over, Beitzel
noted.
The longleaf pine commu-
nity comprises a large part of
the Pt. Washington forest..
These forests once covered
over 70 million acres of the
Southern U.S. from Virginia to
Texas. In 1714 the water-pow-
ered sawmill was invented,
and by the 1760's there were
hundreds of these operating
along streams and rivers all
over the south. Timbering and
turpentining left much of the
forest weakened, and \ hat re-
mained was finished off b\ the
second wave of logging from
about 1870 to the 1920s. N hen
nearly all that remained %%as
logged with the help of steam
sawmills and railroads.
Many of the remnants of
longleaf that survived are in
areas where fire has been sup-
pressed. Lack of fire allows
hardwoods and other plants to
grow too tall and thick in the
under story of the pines. The
increased shade eliminates the
native wiregrass and other
plants normally found in the


of places. An effort to consoli-
date the forest holdings and
sell the surplus lands is still
ongoing, with land trade nego-
tiations underway.
Recently, a parcel on East
Hewitt where an eagle's nest
is located was added to the
forest. This parcel also pro-
vides a second area where the
forest touches the
Choctawhatchee Bay, with the
other being just west of Don
Bishop Road. When St. Joe
owned the land, it was in-
cluded, by agreement with St.
Joe, in the Pt. Washington
Wildlife Management Area.
However, during the period of
other private ownership after
St. Joe, there were private
hunting clubs that mostly
hunted the area out. Since
then, deer have returned to the
forest.
The Florida Wildlife Com-
mission co-manages the area
along with the Division of For-
estry, and manages hunting in
the forest, which is allowed on
about 12,000 acres.
Some rare species found in
the forest include the gopher
tortoise (gopher tortoise bur-
rows are used by many other
species), flatwoods sala-
mander, white-topped pitcher
plant, and the world's largest
population of Curtiss
sandgrass, a rare native grass.
Trails and Recreation
The forest is also used for
off-road bicycling and hiking.
The Eastern Lake Trail, dedi-
cated in 1996, is accessible
from a trailhead parking lot
located on CR-395, between
CR-30A and Hwy. 98. This


ANM 1JI'.iLE, DONBLt LOOP horse trail is under consiruc-
ti6n of/ Bay Drive in Pt. Washington State Forest. The parking
lot has been built, and the trail is still under construction. The
horse trail is the latest addition to numerous hiking.and biking
trails already available to visitors to the forest.


NOT EVERYONE RESPECTS the boundaries of the forest.
Currently, many boundary disputes and encroachment issues
must be handled by the Division of Forestry, which manages
the Pt. Washington State Forest. Other pressures on the forest
include adjacent, developments, trash dumping, and roadway
and right-of-way issues.


to purchase and preserve en-
vironmentally special land.
Another $90 million or so was
spent to acquire the portion of
Topsail Hill that was retained
by St. Joe and later purchased
through eminent domain pro-
ceedings.
The Walton County Com-
mission went on record at the
time as opposing the purchase
by the state, with the primary
objections being the removal
of land from the county's tax
rolls and the loss of future po-
tential private development.
The county's opposition and
other events taking place at the
same time set the stage for a
confrontation between the
county, development interests,
and citizens' conservation or-
ganizations that would not be
resolved until a Cabinet meet-
ing in Tallahassee four-and-
one-half years later.
In 1985, the state passed the
Growth Management Act,
which required all counties in
the state to adopt comprehen-
sive plans. In 1992, when the
state land purchase took place,
the county still did not have a
compliant plan. At this point,
the state stepped in with fund-
ing and a legislatively created
entity, the South Walton Con-
servation and Development
Trust.
The Trust was charged with
creating a comprehensive
plan, performing an environ-
mental analysis of the ecosys-


Blue Mountain Beach at the
headwaters of Redfish Lake.
In July of 1996, community
members learned that the
state's Land Acquisition and
Advisory Council was going
to approve redrawing the con-
servation map without public
hearings. All the land left out-
side the new boundaries, in-
cluding new town and the
Cassine Trail, would be "sur-
plus," and available for sale to
private interests or the county.
SThe conservation organiza-
tion Beach to Bay Cohnection
asked for a public hearing in
south Walton. Over 500 local
residents turned out at Bay
Elementary for a standing-
room-only meeting on a hot
summer night, and nearly
unanimously expressed a de-
sire to retain all the state lands
for conservation. After another
series of meetings in Tallahas-
see, the amount of the dispo-
sition acreage was reduced, as
was the size of the new town
site, which was modified to
limit its uses to civic services
such as government and edu-
cation, and the Cassine Trail
was saved from development.
The Forest Today
The Pt. Washington State
Forest today consists of
15,258 acres. The other 3000
acres from the original pur-
.chase were transferred into the
state park system and are in-
cluded in Deer Lake, Grayton,
and Topsail Hill parks. Since


PRESCRIBED FIRE IS AN IMPORTANT management tool in
conserving and protecting the longleaf pine forests. Without
fire, the natural plant communities are altered, and along with
them, the animals that depend on the habitat also disappear


longleaf forests, which would
naturally be quite open.
Beitzel is happy with the
return of fire to the forest. In
the old days, the coastal.plain
had large areas without any
natural firebreaks, such as a
large body of water or exten-
sive wetlands. A lightening
ignited fire in this area could
burn a significant part of the
forest, or, without firefighters
to suppress them, many small
fires burning at the same time
could do the same thing. With-
out fire, the natural plant com-
munities are altered, and along
with them, the animals that
depend on the habitat also dis-
appear. Beitzel has instituted
a prescribed burn program-on
about 10,000 acres of the for-
est. The western part of the
forest, which is still a mosaic
of smaller, unconnected par-
cels, is more difficult to burn
because of the proximity to
homes. The state has bought
some additional acres in this
mosaic and closed up a couple


trail consists of three double
loops of three-and-one-half,
five, or ten miles. The Cassine
trail and a view of the head-
waters of Eastern Lake are lo-
cated on the southern section
of the trail.
The Longleaf Greenway
Trail is the latest one to be
completed. This trail starts on
CR-395, on the opposite side
of the road from the Eastern
Lake trailhead parking lot, and
runs. west all the way to Satin-
wood Drive in Blue Mountain
Beach. It is eight miles long,
and crosses several county
roads that connect to the CR-
30A bike path. These can be
followed to provide a loop trail
to return bike riders to the
parking lot on CR-395. Maps
of the trails and forest infor-
mation can be found at the
trailhead parking lot.
Much of the work on the
trails has been done by volun-
teers from Beach to Bay Con-
nection, working with For-
estry staff. Chair Celeste


Cobena, who. had a vision of
trails linking the parks, the for-
est, the beach and the bay, re-
marked recently that those
trails are now a reality. "The
big worry now is that we will
see pressure for roads through
the forest. It is important we
don't lose the forest," Cobena
said.
An 11-mile, double-loop
trail for horses is under con-
struction off Bay Drive, north
of U.S. 98. The parking lot has
been completed, but the trail
itself, which requires two
bridges, has not been com-
pleted. Construction fell be-
hind in the wake of Hurricane
Ivan.
In the coming years, some
of the longleaf pines planted
will need thinning and will be
big enough to sell. Beitzel
hopes to be able to do some
timber marketing, with a high-
quality, high-demand product
that will generate some in-
come. So far, he, said,
$118,000 has been realized
from timber sales. In lieu of
property taxes, ten percent of
this income goes to the Wal-
ton County School Board.
Ten percent, or $75,000, of
another recent sale also went
to the school district. Sand
from the dredging of the Intra-
coastal Waterway onto banks
within the forest was sold for
$500,000, for fill used in the
widening of U.S. 98.
Beitzel hopes to complete
more trails and continue the
restoration of the forest ecol-
ogy for future generations to
enjoy.


SWHS final
Class2A overall
standings
South Walton High School
Athletic Director David
Barron has announced the
final Class 2A Public Overall
Standings in the 2004-2005
Dodge Sunshine Cup Florida
High School Athletic
Association's Floyd E. Lay
All-Sports Awards.
South Walton High
School's girls athletics were
ranked second in public over-
all 2A standings, and boys
athletics were ranked 24th
for a combined school rank-
ing of seventh in the state of
Florida.
"I am extremely pleased
with the efforts .of our
coaches and, student ath-
letes," said Barron. "We still
have work to do, but for a
school entering its fourth
year of competition, these
results provide a springboard
for even greater achieve-
ments."


Editor:
Did you know that you must now have a permit to hold a
yard sale and that there is a restriction to the number of
yard sales one can have per year (only two)? Furthermore,
did you realize that you can have only one sign for your
yard sale and it must be in your yard?
Since the city of DeFuniak Springs has failed to announce
this new rule to its citizens, I thought I would bring it to
everyone's attention. Oh, and as silly as it may sound you
better abide by these rules or you may be hit with a notice
by the "yard sale police." If you ask me, this seems like yet
another fine example of Big Brother stepping in and dictat-
ing to us the restrictions of what we gan do or place on our
own personal property. Only one sign can be placed in your
yard. Give me a break.
..... t is..also niceto know.,that 4we iave -a offiee ,..- t h l--
.make sure we fTllow th0ee rules !rules that,are made up on
the spot and never made available to the citizens until given
a notice by a code enforcement officer)r I feel much safer
already. Hey, this gives me an idea fbr anew series, Law &
Order: Yard Sale Violation Unit.
Although this seems like an extremely asinine rule, I say
we need to be particularly vigilant in what new rights are
slowly being taken away from us and without warning. Who
knows, they may soon tell us how many political signs one
can keep on their property (unless this is already a rule
that has not been brought to my, and I am sure several oth-
ers, attention)? I am sure if we continue down this path
this great town will no longer be referred to as Historical
DeFuniak Springs, but rather Hysterical DeFuniak Springs.
Sincerely,
Caleb Thomas
DeFuniak Springs



Editor:
Open letter to the U.S. Supreme Court. The recent rul-
ing by the court in the case of Kelo v. City of New London is
the worse decision the court has ever made. The possibili-
ties for unintended consequences are staggering. (Judge
Souter take note) Some have placed it on par with the Dred
Scott Decision. Although the Scott case legitimized an ab-
horrent institution, it also affirmed property rights.
The Kelo/New London decision is a direct assault on the
constitution. It is little wonder that Marxists have stated
that Communism will rise from the ashes and assume world
domination without firing a shot. Decisions such as the rul-
ing on property rights lend credence to this pronouncement.
When you have the guardians unlocking the castle gates,
why launch a frontal assault?
Gene Ryan
DeFuniak Springs



Editor,
The family of Mrs. Johnnie Mae Casey McDonald would
like to thank everyone who comforted us during the loss of
our loved one. Thank you for the cards, flowers, memorials,
phone calls, and especially your prayers.
A very special thank you to the Shoal Creak Rehabilita-
tion Center for taking special care of "Granny."
We would like to say thanks to the ladies of the Red Bay
churches and community for the food that was so nicely pre-
pared.
Once again, thank you for everything that youhave done.
Continue to pray for our family.
The McDonald family,
Norma, Wayne, John L. and Roger


Guidelines for submitting letters to
the editor
Letters to the editor should be mailed or delivered to Edi-
tor, DeFuniak Springs Herald, 676 Baldwin Avenue, DeFu-
niak Springs, FL 32435 or Editor, Beach Breeze, 440 U.S.
98E, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459. Letters may be sent
online to herald@dfsi.net or breeze@dfsi.net.
Letters may be typed or hand-written, approximately 500
words or less. Letters may not contain profanity, slander or
threats. Each letter must be signed and contain the author's
name, address and phone number. The DeFuniak Springs
Herald-Beach Breeze reserves the right to refuse publica-
tion at any time.


PAGE 11-B


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