Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
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Full Text

Gators mercy-rule Baylor in College World Serie B1

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TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
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MAY 30, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


L_ N___ws___www.chronicleonline.com
% Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 296


NEWS

CCSO searching
for Michigan
fugitive
On July 29,2013, sus-
pect Lee Patrick Saylor,
24, allegedly entered a
pet grooming store in
Genessee County, Michi-
gan, and is accused of
committing an armed rob-
bery with a pistol. While
there, he allegedly as-
saulted a female with the
intent to
commit
murder,
accord-
ing to a
press
release
from
the Cit-
Lee Saylor rus
wanted for County
armed robbery Sheriff's
in Michigan. Sheffs
Office.
He is wanted in Michigan
for charges related to the
incident.
On Wednesday
evening, Citrus County
sheriff's deputies re-
ceived information that
Saylor was in Room 7 of
the Three Rivers Motel in
Homosassa. The SWAT
team was called to re-
spond. Prior to making
contact, Saylor fled on
foot in a southbound di-
rection. K-9 units were
deployed along with the
aviation unit. A CodeRED
was sent to residents to
be on the lookout for Say-
lor. The search continued
through the night and
throughout Thursday.
Saylor is 6 feet tall, 180
pounds with brown hair,
green eyes and a goatee.
He may have a tattoo on
the back of his neck that
says "SAYLOR." As of
Thursday afternoon,
sheriff's officials believed
he was still in the
Homosassa area.
Residents are encour-
aged to be on the lookout
and to call 911 with any
information. Saylor may
be armed and is consid-
ered dangerous, so any-
one seeing him should
not approach, but call 911
immediately. To remain
anonymous and to be eli-
gible for a cash reward,
contact CrimeStoppers of
Citrus County at 888-
ANY-TIPS.
'Weed Fairy'
eases stress
SEATTLE-Awoman
known as 'The Weed Fairy"
distributed free nuggets of
marijuana to people in
Seattle over Memorial Day
weekend, taping the free
pot on flyers around a city
neighborhood.
The woman, 23-year-
old Yeni Sleidi, said she
does it to amuse people
and to give them a break
from everyday stress.
She said the idea
came to her during the
government shutdown
when many of her friends
were stressed.
Sleidi said she felt
comfortable attaching her
name to her deeds in
Seattle because recre-
ational marijuana has
been legalized in Wash-
ington state.
From staff and wire reports


Classifieds ........ C8
Com ics .......... 07
Community ...... C5
Crossword ........ 06
Editorial ........AIO
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies .......... C7
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C6


Hyacinth islands



keep manatees at bay


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Workers helping to build large PVC cages Wednesday morning include, from left, Bailey Stein, Todd Franks,
James Hush and Emily McDaniel. The cages will be used to corral aquatic plants in hopes the vegetation
will assist in filtering water in King's Bay.


Plants being studiedfor use

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Ten new PVC and chicken wire booms laden with hy-
acinths and water lettuce were deployed Wednesday at
an experimental station being used to figure out whether
the plant can be used to help clean King's Bay
The 8-foot by 16-foot PVC islands are designed to
keep manatees at bay and to allow for a thorough study
of the plant's benefits.
Dr Bob Knight of the Howard T Odum Florida Springs
Institute (FSI) and Helen Spivey of the King's Bay Springs
Alliance were on hand with about 10 volunteers assem-
bling the floating islands. Two booms that were previously
floated at the experimental station behind the Crystal
River National Wildlife Refuge Complex building are said
to be thriving.
Knight said manatees have so far been unable to
break through and consume the plants.
"We are adding these (new booms) to give us a better
idea about how effective the plants are," he said. "We
have been doing this for nearly three years now, and we
will see the results soon. We will then decide what to
do next whether to apply for a new permit or end it."
See Page A7


in King's Bay cleanup


Florida Springs Institute intern Emily Taylor uses
plastic ties to hold the mesh material to the
pipes.


Predicting

weather

brings

celebrity

status
Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG-
We see them on TV, brav-
ing tornadoes and hurri-
canes and flooding.
Delivering the weather
has put a whole new
group of celebrities on the
national radar: meteorol-
ogists. But what path did
they take to become so
well known? For some, it
was a childhood obses-
sion with storms; for oth-
ers, it was a fortuitous but
unpredictable turn of
events.
With the Atlantic hurri-
cane season opening Sun-
day, here are three of the
nation's most well-known
meteorologists and how
they reached the top of
their field:
JIM CANTORE
A self-described "Ver-
mont boy," Cantore grew
up shovel-
ing snow.
Today
he's just
as likely
to be cov-
ering a
m a j o r
major .H~~
blizzard
as a hurri- Jim
Cantore
cane or
tornado, as one of the
undisputed stars of The
Weather Channel.
When Cantore was a
senior in high school, his
father told him to "study
the weather" because the
teen would linger in the
barn, fascinated as he
watched the snow falling.
"When you wake up in the
morning, you'd better love
what you do," his father
advised him.
Cantore, who is now 50,
attended Lyndon State
See .Page A7


Hasten Davis: 'Tough and tender'


Hasten
Davis


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CHASSAHOWITZKA Tough on the
outside, tender on the inside.
That was Hasten Davis.
Lois Locke recalled her first meeting
with Hasten the time she and her hus-
band were clearing their property in
Chassahowitzka, readying it for their


TII

retirement.
Hasten, who famously rode his bicy-
cle all over the neighborhood, got off his
bike and started asking personal ques-
tions about their plans.


Finally, he said, "You Northerners
come down here and want to change
everything. Why don't you stay up
North!"
Locke said she thought Hasten was
nosy, contentious and mean until she
got to know him. Then she found him to
be generous, kind and giving, although a
little rough around the edges.
See Page A5


Spelling Bee surprise: A dual championship


Associated Press
OXON HILL, Md. For the first time in
52 years, two spellers were declared co-
champions of the Scripps National Spelling
Bee on Thursday
Sriram Hathwar of Painted Post, New
York, and Ansun Suj oe of Fort Worth, Texas,
shared the title after a riveting final-round
duel in which they nearly exhausted the 25
designated championship words. After they
spelled a dozen words correctly in a row,
they both were named champions.
Earlier, 14-year-old Sriram opened the
door to an upset by 13-year-old Ansun after


he misspelled "corpsbruder," a close com-
rade. But Ansun was unable to take the title
because he got "antegropelos," which
means waterproof leggings, wrong.
Sriram entered the final round as the fa-
vorite after finishing in third place last year
Ansun just missed the semifinals last year
See BEE/Page A8
Ansun Sujoe, 13, of Fort Worth, Texas, left,
and Sriram Hathwar, 14, of Painted Post,
New York, shake hands Thursday after
being named co-champions of the National
Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Md.
Associated Press


0-


State & Local:
Attorney Megan Fitzpatrick is set to graduate
from a leadership academy in June./A3


Nation & World: On the Scene:


Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki
continued to fight for his job on Thursday./A12


Weekend entertainment includes a showing of
the movie "Frozen" at Whispering Pines./Cl


vluony ciuuuy
with a 50 percent
chance of rain.
PAGE A4


I I N S I D E I




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TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County

Small-business
workshop offered
Citrus County's Cham-
ber of Commerce and Eco-
nomic Development
Council, with the support of
the Crystal River Area
Council (CRAC), have or-
ganized a resource devel-
opment workshop tailored
for small businesses lo-
cated in the Crystal River
area.
The event is from 5:30 to
7 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, at
Plantation on Crystal River,
Palm Room, 9301 W. Fort
Island Trail, Crystal River.
For information online, go
to www.citruscounty
chamber.com/events. To
RSVP, call 352-795-2000.
S.W. Citrus
Democrats to meet
The Southwest Citrus
Democratic Club will meet
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday,
June 7, at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club, 1 Douglas
St., Homosassa.
The guest speaker will be
Jon Brainard, education
chair for the SSJ Sierra
Club. He will give a presen-
tation that addresses seven
environmental issues com-
mon to this part of Florida.
Light refreshments will be
served.
For more information,
please contact swcdems
@gmail.com or call 352-
382-0032.
Program on living
shorelines June 3
At 6 p.m. Tuesday,
June 3, Sean King of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District will
present information to the
Crystal River Waterfronts
Board on living shorelines
and floating wetlands.
King is a staff engineer in
the district's Natural Sys-
tems and Restoration,
Springs and Environmental
Flows Section.
The program, to be at
Crystal River City Hall, is
open to the public.

Clermont
Police probe student
plot to kill teachers
Deputies in central
Florida are investigating a
possible plot by a middle
school student to harm
some of his teachers.
Officials said Thursday
that the student at East
Ridge Middle School in the
Orlando suburb of Clermont
is undergoing a mental
health evaluation. No
charges have been filed.
Deputies said the student
brought a knife to school
last week and had a black
book detailing a plot to kill
some of his teachers and
himself.
Deputies searched the
student's home but found
no other weapons.
Officials said the student
had recently been sus-
pended from school for
10 days.

Ocala
Teen wins car for
perfect attendance
An Ocala teen was hav-
ing a bad day as he stood
in the audience at a Honda
dealership, hoping to win a
new car for having perfect
attendance during his sen-
ior year in high school.
Marion Technical Institute
senior Ira Gilmore had just
dropped his iPhone and
cracked the screen
Wednesday when he heard
his name called as the win-


ner of a $22,616 2014
Honda Civic LX.
Officials said 104 teens
were eligible for Honda of
Ocala's "Perfect Car for
Perfect Attendance" event.
From staff and wire reports


Citizens braced for hurricane season


State-backed insurer has $7.3 billion surplus


The News Service
of Florida

TALLAHASSEE Citi-
zens Property Insurance
enters the 2014 hurricane
season believing its fi-
nances are on solid ground.
Of course, after a major
storm makes landfall, all
projections would start to
shift like the state's well-
known sand.
As the six-month hurri-
cane season starts Sunday,
Citizens has a $7.3 billion


surplus. Also, the state-
backed insurer has com-
pleted a $1.5 billion,
multi-year reinsurance
bond deal, and the state's
backup catastrophe fund
is at $13 billion.
Those figures should
allow Citizens to withstand
a 1-in-70-year storm event
without having to use an
"assessment"' process to
collect money from all ve-
hicle- and property-insur-
ance policyholders in
Florida to cover additional


hurricane costs.
An assessment of
$2.3 billion would be ex-
pected from the impact of
a 1-in-100-year storm event.
"We're the best prepared
for a hurricane since we
were created in 2002," Cit-
izens spokesman Michael
Peltier said Thursday
Advocates for con-
sumers and the insurance
industry tend to agree.
"I think Citizens has been
very conscientious to make
sure they have an


infrastructure, that they
have the ability to put ad-
justers out in the field after
a (catastrophic) event," said
Jay Neal, director of the ad-
vocacy group Florida Asso-
ciation for Insurance
Reform. "The (backup
Florida Hurricane Catas-
trophe Fund), according to
our numbers, is capable of
taking a first hit, and a sec-
ond hit, and really not hav-
ing to go to the bond market
for more than one or two
years to be able to pay the
freight"
Sam Miller, executive
vice president of the


Florida Insurance Coun-
cil, said the numbers for
Citizens could be better if
fraudulent water-loss
claims were reduced in
South Florida and the size
of the state-backed insurer
was further trimmed.
"Citizens is not nearly as
big as it was," Miller said.
"But there is still a lot of
exposure in Citizens that
doesn't need to be there."
The fiscal improvement
comes after Citizens
shifted nearly a quarter of
its policies into the private
market during the past
12 months.


Attorney: Leadership




academy a boon


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

One of the scions of an Inver-
ness family steeped in legal tra-
dition is raising her own profile
through networking and civic
involvement.
Megan Fitzpatrick, a third-
generation attorney in the
county, is set to graduate from
the Florida Bar's William
Reece Smith Jr Leadership
Academy in June.
Fitzpatrick, 31, is part of the
inaugural class of 60 attorneys
drawn from across the state.
According to the Florida Bar
website, the Academy Fellows'
program is "designed to assist a
diverse and inclusive group of
lawyers in becoming better
leaders within our profession,
in their chosen path, while en-
hancing their leadership
skills." The program runs for a
year
"It's a great program. I am
meeting and networking with a
lot of people who I usually
probably will not have met oth-
erwise," Fitzpatrick said.
"We also were divided into
several groups and we get to
work on projects," she added.
Some of the projects Fitz-
patrick and the other fellows
are working on include propos-
als for setting up an attorney ad
litem program, pro bono (free)
for those who can't afford to
hire an attorney and financial
literacy
"I don't know if any of these
things would ever become real-
ity, but it (the program) teaches
you a variety of things and im-
portant skills, which I could
definitely incorporate into
what I do a lot family and
probate law," Fitzpatrick said.
The Florida Bar has already
picked its next class of fellows
for the upcoming year and it in-
cludes another young attorney
from Citrus County, Tanya
Williams, of Haag Haag &
Friedrich, PA..
Williams is currently the
president of the Citrus County
Bar Association.
Fitzpatrick, who has been
practicing law now for four
years, also has been active with
the county bar group. She re-
cently cashed in her network
connections by inviting and


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle
The Fitzpatrick family name is synonymous with law in Citrus County, especially in the Inverness area.
Megan Fitzpatrick, 31, is carrying on the tradition.


having Gene Pettis, the presi-
dent of the Florida Bar, speak
at the Citrus County Bar's Law
Day luncheon. In June of 2013,
Pettis becomes the first
African-American to be se-
lected president in the organi-
zation's history
Fitzpatrick's father was
Richard "Spike" Fitzpatrick, a
well-known Inverness attorney
who died of cancer in May of
2006. He practiced law with his
father, Charles B. Fitzpatrick, at


the Fitzpatrick & Fitzpatrick
law office on South Apopka Av-
enue in Inverness. Charles Fitz-
patrick started the practice in
1951.
Megan Fitzpatrick joined the
family practice in 2010 along
with brother, Shawn, but in
2012 Shawn died at age 31 after
a long illness.
Fitzpatrick said she is com-
mitted to keeping the family
tradition going. Another sibling,
Molly, who also is an attorney,


lives in New York City.
Megan Fitzpatrick attended
Villanova University and the
Barry University of Law in Or-
lando, where she graduated
third in her class. She is mar-
ried to Mack DeBruyn, a local
chiropractor, and they are ex-
pecting their first child, Hattie,
this summer
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Secret proceeding held in redistricting trial


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
landmark trial over
whether Florida legislators
broke the law and used a
"shadow" process when
drawing up new political
maps for Congress was
held behind closed doors
for several hours Thursday
Circuit Judge Terry
Lewis removed members
of the public and the
media from the courtroom
during the eighth day of
the ongoing trial. They
were allowed to return
only after two witnesses
had finished testifying.
Lewis said before the
trial that he did not want to
close the courtroom during
the legal challenge to


Florida's congressional
districts being brought by a
coalition of groups includ-
ing the League of Women
Voters, Common Cause
and a group of voters.
But he was forced to do
so after the Florida
Supreme Court ruled this
week that up to 538 pages
of evidence which in-
cludes emails and maps -
must not be disclosed in
open court.
The Supreme Court took
that step after an appeals
court had previously
blocked the use of the evi-
dence entirely
Lawyers representing
Data Targeting, a
Gainesville-based political
consulting firm, and its
employees contend that


revealing the documents
violates their First Amend-
ment rights and also in-
clude trade secrets.
The attorneys, whose
fees are being paid by the
Republican Party of
Florida, tried to get U.S.
Supreme Court Justice
Clarence Thomas to block
the evidence. But Thomas
had not acted by the time
the courtroom was closed.
Several news organiza-
tions, including The Asso-
ciated Press, publicly
objected to the closing
which occurred during
the questioning of Repub-
lican consultant Rich
Heffley. The courtroom
also remained closed
when Pat Bainter, a top
employee at Data Target-


ing, took the stand.
The documents are con-
sidered key evidence of
whether legislators violated
the "Fair Districts" amend-
ments which said districts
cannot be drawn in a way to
favor incumbents or mem-
bers of a political party The
lawsuit marks the first time
those new standards
adopted by voters in 2010
are being used to challenge
the Legislature.
While legislators have
denied any wrongdoing, at-
torneys for the groups have
argued that legislators
used a "shadow" process
that relied on consultants
in an effort to bypass the
constitutional amendment.
Attorneys for some of those
suing are being paid by the


National Democratic Re-
districting Trust.
Evidence so far has
shown that one GOP con-
sultant received maps be-
fore they were made
public. A Republican Party
official testified Friday
that congressional maps
he drew and turned over
to a GOP consultant were
identical to those submit-
ted to the Legislature back
in 2012 byAlex Posada.
But in a new twist on
Thursday, attorneys re-
vealed that Posada, a for-
mer Florida State
University student and
member of that school's
College Republicans, had
denied in a new deposi-
tion that he ever submitted
a map to the Legislature.




Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday The coming year will be a
time of advancement. Your moneymak-
ing ideas are sound, but following the
proper channels will be necessary.
Stick to a strict budget, and your situa-
tion will continue to improve, allowing
you greater freedom to develop an idea
or interest that can add to your income.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Someone
will make you feel overly sensitive today
Don't waste time feeling sorry for your-
self, when you should be looking for
something to do that enriches your life
and leads to new acquaintances.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't fall
prey to a fast-talking stranger. Keep
your eye on your money and refuse
any offers that seem too good to be
true. Caution is the name of the game.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Offer your
time to a cause that you feel passion-
ate about. You can make life easier for
others with a little effort.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Delegate
your responsibilities. If you don't put in
an honest effort, you will not honor a
commitment.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -A romantic
encounter is in the stars. Don't question
what's being offered, just plan to enjoy the
moment and see where it leads.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Stick to
your own affairs today. You will have to
refrain from commenting on the way
others do things.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Someone close to you will show inter-
est in your personal life. This can lead
to an offer of help that will allow you
greater freedom to follow interesting
pursuits.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
take part in gossip. Protect your repu-
tation regardless of what others do.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
are probably in need of a little pamper-
ing. A relaxing day at the spa or an en-
ergetic session at the gym will prepare
you for a romantic evening.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You will
feel better about yourself if you get rid
of a bad habit. Self-improvement will
help you shed negativity, making way
for a confident, goal-oriented mindset.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Love and
laughter will surround you. Now is a good
time to spice up your romantic life.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -Your
schedule appears to be hectic, which will
lead to a costly error if you don't slow
down and think matters through carefully
Ask for help if you feel overwhelmed.


ENTERTAINMENT


'American Idol'
winner joins
runner-up for prom
DEARBORN, Mich. Big-
voiced rocker Caleb Johnson,
the winner of season 13 of
"American Idol," joined runner-
up Jena Irene at her high school
prom in suburban Detroit.
The Detroit Free Press and
The Detroit News reported they
were among hundreds attending
the North Farmington High
School prom Wednesday night
at Dearborn Inn.
The 17-year-old Irene is from
Farmington Hills. The pop singer
says Johnson is "awesome" and
the Fox show competitors are
"best friends."
The 23-year-old Johnson is
from Asheville, North Carolina.
His "American Idol" win came on
the strength of his renditions of
"Dream On," "Maybe I'm
Amazed" and "As Long as You
Love Me." Irene sang "Dog Days
Are Over," "Can't Help Falling in
Love" and "We Are One."


Associated Press
Caleb Johnson and Jena Irene talk about their American Idol
experience before attending her North Farmington High School
Prom Wednesday at the Dearborn Inn in Dearborn, Mich.


its iconic guitars, including the
Stratocaster and Telecaster.
More musidans are being
brought into the corporate world to
bolster brands. Apple acquired
Beats Electronics partly to add the
cachet of hip-hop mogul Dr. Dre.
Inhn I annnn art


Fver d o knmosu vf au cto
Fender adds Bono, poems up for auction
Tlia- &m.J -- ....IAI'


me Eage rrom u2
to its board
LOS ANGELES Its guitars
were played by rock legends
from Jimi Hendrix to Bruce
Springsteen. Now, Fender's
board of directors is looking like
the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,
too.
The guitar maker said it is
adding Bono and The Edge of
rock band U2 to its board.
The company said the two will
add to the board because of
their longtime experience in
music and entertainment. The
move also adds to the brand's
rock credibility.
Fender, majority owned by in-
vestment firm TPG Growth, was
formed in 1946. It is known for


NEW YORK -Whimsical
drawings, poems and prose cre-
ated by John Lennon for his ac-
claimed books "In His Own
Write" and "A Spaniard in the
Works" are coming to auction.
The books' British publisher,
Tom Maschler, has owned the
material for a half century and is
offering it for sale at Sotheby's
on Wednesday. It is the largest
private collection of Lennon's
work to come to the market, the
auction house said.
Among the 89-piece collec-
tion's highlights is a cartoon of a
boy with six birds that appeared
in "A Spaniard in the Works,"
published in 1965.
The drawing was used 30 years
later as the cover for the Beatles'
release "Free as a Bird," written by


Lennon in 1977. Twenty-five years
after the group's breakup and 15
years after Lennon's death, the
song was released as a single with
additional instrumentation and vo-
cals from the other three band
members. The cartoon has a pre-
sale estimate of $12,000 to
$15,000.
A nine-page manuscript, a
Sherlock Holmes parody titled
"The Singularge Experience of
Miss Anne Duffield," is estimated
to bring $50,000 to $70,000.
"The Fat Budgie," a beloved
nonsense poem, could fetch be-
tween $25,000 and $35,000.
Before becoming famous as a
musician, Lennon had trained as
an artist at the Liverpool School
of Art.
Maschler, who worked with
Lennon on the two books while
literary director at Jonathan
Cape publishers, called the late
singer a man of "extraordinary
talent and imagination." But he
said in a statement that
Lennon's art has been under-
rated and he hoped that the auc-
tion "will redress the balance."
-From wire reports


City


In/a f/a | |n/a n/a
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excve daily
7 ,1 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
" High: 88o Low: 68
Mostly cloudy with a 50% chance of mainly
\. .> .." afternoon and evening thunderstorms.
S' SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
illlj High:88 Low:68"
Mostly cloudy with a 50% chance of mainly
< ,' afternoon and evening thunderstorms
) T1 SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
| High: 90 Low: 67
. Partly suuny with a 40'0o chance of mainly
.'" *<" afternoon and evening thunderstorms.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 88/72
Record /64
Normal 89/73
Mean temp. 79
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.00
Total for the month 7.69"
Total for the year 18.48"
Normal for the year 11 .99"
"As o 7 p.m. a t Iwnverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2minimai,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. %
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 2.7/12
Saturday's count: 3.2
Sunday's count: 4.1
AIR QUALITY
Thursday observed: 24
Pollutant: Ozone


SOLUNAR TABLES Hun.m.
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
05/30 FRIDAY 8:10 2:40 10:05 3:05
05/31 SATURDAY 9:00 3:30 10:50 3:55
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUIiSET TOMHT 8....................... 8:21 p.m
SUMIST011110110101TO 1KO ..,...6:31 a.m.
SNn9 MIIiSE TODAY .-...........8.......... 10 a.m
Jun5 Jun13 Jun19 Jun27 M TP10:02 P.M.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: MOD. There Is no bum ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777, For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://Jframe.fi-dofcom1fire_ weather.Adidt
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m.. as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD aldrE-lsses may waler on We-onesday and'or Salurmay
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro inrigatbon of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any
time.
Citrus County Uilties' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may quality for additional
watering allowances.
To report violatons, please call: City of I wnvemrness @ 352-726-2,321. City of Crystal
River 0 352-7954216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-527-7669.

TIDES
*From mouths of rivers "At King's Bay ""At Masons Creek
FRIDAY
City High Low
Chassaiow4zka' 8:23am, 0.211. 8:39p.m 0.7fl1 4-05a.m. 0.1 It. l:0p.m0.1 fl,
Crystal River" 6:56am, 1.7ft 6:38p.m. 2.4fL 1:18a.m. -0.1t. 1O p.mO.7f1,.
WitNhlacoochee' 4:31 am, 3.1 It. 328pm., 3.7 f 10:28 a.m 1.3. 11:30p.n0.I ft,
Homosassa' 8:21 a.m. 0.6ft. 6:58p.m. 1.5ft. 3:48 a.m. -O. ft. 12:57 p.r&.3 ft.


city
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austln
Baltimore
BIings
Bimingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
BwuJington, VT
Charleston, S.C.
Charleston, W.V
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincnnati
Clevelarnd
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Molnes
Datroil
El Paso
Evansville. IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Ultie Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


H L F'cast City


Daytona Bch. 87 71 ts Miami
Fort Lauderdale 88 76 ts Ocala
Fort Myers 91 72 ts Oriand
Gainesville 89 68 ts Pensa
Homestead 88 75 ts Saras
Jacksonville 90 70 ts Tallahi
Key West 87 79 pc Tamp
Lakeland 89 71 ts Vero I
Melbourne 87 72 ts W. Pa

MARINE OUTL
Today: East winds around 5 knots.
Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and inland
waters smooth. Isolated
thunderstorms in the afternoon.
Tonight- East winds around 5 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
smooth.


H L FPcast
i 88 77 ts
89 69 ts
do 90 73 ts
icola 82 73 ts
ota 89 71 ts
lassee 87 67 ts
a 89 74 ts
each 88 71 ts
ilmBch. 87 76 ts

.OOK
Gulf water
temperature


83
Taken at Arl"tpM


THU FRI THU FRI
H L Pop. H LFct City H L Pap. H L FeCst
71 42 73 49 Is NewOrleans 86 71 04 05 72 Is
86 66 85 63 pc NewYorkCity 66 51 71 56 ts
81 59 .01 79 58 Is Norfolk 64 62 12768 60 r
86 68 86 67 Is Oklahoma City 88 64 83 66 ts
57 53 .02 71 53 sh Omaha 85 62 84 66 ts
89 66 90 69 Pc Palm Springs 104 73 101 73 pc
57 54 .32 73 56 1 Philadelphia 60 54 73 59 sh
71 59 76 51 pc Phoenix 99 84 105 78 pc
77 67 .47 84 68 Is Pittsburgh 77 63 .06 77 53 pc
70 43 79 51 pc Portland, ME 62 39 63 47 sh
58 43 67 53 sh Portland, OR 66 52 .01 79 52 pc
68 54 75 52 pc Providence. RI 67 41 66 52 sh
71 45 69 49 ts Raleigh 78 65 08 78 59 ts
94 69 89 68 ts RapidCity 91 59 72 57 Is
80 63 -02 82 56 pc FReno 76 45 78 46 pc
90 63 83 64 Is Rochester, NY 65 53 75 51 pc
76 54 78 56 s Sacramento 87 57 86 52 pc
83 68 82 60 pc Salt Lake City 75 57 86 60 pc
66 58 .05 74 53 s San Antonio 91 65 92 70 pc
83 64 84 66 tS San Diego 72 64 70 62 pc
85 67 79 56 s SanFrancisco 78 53 58 52 ?
70 39 70 48 ts Savannah 90 68 .27 91 68 ts
89 68 84 69 ts Seattle 64 51 73 52 pc
87 56 75 56 Is Spokane 62 43 .10 74 51 pc
85 65 84 67 Is St. Louis 86 70 86 69 Its
75 54 80 54 pc St. Ste. Marie 78 44 74 47 pc
95 72 94 72 pc Syracuse 68 54 73 50 tS
84 69 84 66 ts Topeka 90 66 .01 84 67 ts
57 54 15 74 54 pc Washington 62 58 .32 73 58 1
69 40 70 52 ts YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
88 68 87 72 ts NIGH 1O6.HNee .Calif,
81 65 02 83 61 pc LOW 21.Stardey.ldaho
9977 100 75 pc
79 691.968366tS WORLD CITIES
78 64 79 60 fFRI o 7 7C
86 69.16 8664pcIISKY L on o 6/53/r
77 69 65 82 69 ts Y London 66 r
66 47 69 51 s Acapulco 87178/ts Madnrid 73/57/s
83 57 84 64 pc Amsterdam 62/46/r Mexico CRy 73/571pc
76 66 2.6285 68 ts Athens 8Wf64/r MontreaJ 68/53/pc
79 68 .01 86 67 Is eBjing 102/69/S Moscow 73/55r
S2 64 85 65 IS Berlin 59/46/pc Paris 66/46/pc


uermuaa / //6/cd
KEY TO COmiONS c-cboudy; dr-m lej; Cairo 95/78/pc
fMfain h.hay, pcurty cloaudry; rain; Calgary 601371r
riraWonlow mix; sunrWmy; sh-shower; Havana 9371/pc
In=snow. tlhumdrstwns; wwkildy. Hong Kong 89/80/ta
WS C2 14 Jerusalem 87/69/pc


RiO 73U/r
Rome 75/51/s
Sydney 71/57/pc
Tokyo 78/64/pc
Toronto 62JSO/pc
Warsaw 60/441pc


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, May 30, the
150th day of 2014. There are 215
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 30, 1814, the first Treaty
of Paris was signed, ending war be-
tween France and the Sixth Coali-
tion (the United Kingdom, Russia,
Austria, Sweden, Portugal and
Prussia), with France retaining its
boundaries of 1792.
On this date:
In 1431, Joan of Arc, condemned
as a heretic, was burned at the
stake in Rouen, France.
In 1911, the first Indy 500 took
place at the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway; the winner was Ray
Harroun, who drove a Marmon
Wasp for more than 6 1/2 hours at
an average speed of 74.6 mph and
collected a prize of $10,000.
Ten years ago: Saudi commandos
drove al-Qaida militants from a hous-
ing complex in the kingdom's oil hub,
ending a shooting and hostage-taking
rampage that had left 22 dead, most of
them foreigners.
Five years ago: Prince Harry fol-
lowed in the footsteps of his late
mother, Princess Diana, as he
raised money for an AIDS charity
by playing in a polo match on Gov-
ernors Island in New York Harbor.
One year ago: Syria's President
BasharAssad said in an interview
with Lebanese television that he
was "confident of victory" in his
country's civil war, and he warned
Damascus would retaliate for any
future Israeli airstrike on his territory.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
Michael J. Pollard is 75. Pro and
College Football Hall of Famer Gale
Sayers is 71. Country singer
Wynonna Judd is 50. Rock musi-
cian Tom Morello (Audioslave;
Rage Against The Machine) is 50.
Rapper Cee Lo Green is 39.
Thought for Today: "There is a
Law that man should love his
neighbor as himself. In a few hun-
dred years it should be as natural to
mankind as breathing or the upright
gait; but if he does not learn it he
must perish." -Alfred Adler, Aus-
trian psychoanalyst (1870-1937).



LEGAL NOTICES

F IInToay's Citrus C hI c le


Fictitious Name Notices.......................C11
Lien Notices..........................................C11
Miscellaneous Notices.........................C11
Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices.........C11
Self Storage Notices............................C11
Surplus Property..................................C11


y^ C ITRUS COUNTY T Y


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
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and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
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Who's in charge:
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Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
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Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...................................................... Matt Pfiffner, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


LAKE LEVELS
Location THU WED Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.61 28,61 35.52
Tsata Apopka-Hernando 37.45 38.32 39.52
Tsata Apopka-lnvemess 38.58 39.44 40.60
Tsata Apopka-RFloral Cty 40.26 40.27 42.20
L-.Phemima i.wi-. Pfei an~ew sea i el Mc,-A %va~e 10 Wo&r taym tsw ac U, 2 3 vr-w Ii UK
"I" niBn ` nr.Jafl di ood v4rCnh has a 43 p- f c Cnance 01 being equaleda 1 e.ceeedm in
anZ e year Tns d1au is co ,mlaner h lin e SoulhPesi F '.,aa W ier Manl.pmii'l[ DiCiTr 1
ana1 is ubje).[ K re-.aii In n.r; r.ver. 1Ii iN' D, rci |11w Unred Slale-, Gtc.gicll Sur.",
be labtle lo any damage anismg out of the use ot tlis data. you have any questions you
should ontmaci Oe Hydroogia Data Section at (352) 796-7211
THE NATION
[, ,. [ 3c.. 14An hp, l :;











,- ",

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY


A4 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DAVIS
Continued from Page Al

"He became a good
friend," she said.
Hasten Davis died
May 17. He was 86.
Born the oldest of 14 sib-
lings in rural Alabama,
Hasten grew up poor and
struggling, working in the
cotton fields, helping to
take care of his six broth-
ers and seven sisters. In
1946 he joined the Army,
serving in occupied Japan
as a radar operator on a
gunship until 1949.
After that, he worked in
breweries in Tampa as a
forklift operator until re-
tiring to Chassahowitzka
in 1987.
But prior to that, he and
Frankie, his wife of 63
years, often brought their
family to the river commu-
nity, staying on a
houseboat
"Daddy fell in love with
the river and the people
here," said daughter An-
nette Phelps. "We'd go
crabbing at night and mul-


let would jump in the
boat"
One thing is for certain,
Hasten Davis loved to fish
and was partial to catching
stumpknockers, the small-
est fish in the river
One day he came in with
30-some stumpknockers,
all lined up, recalled War-
ren Hartway He took out
his electric knife and one
by one filleted them with
one stroke, then tossed
them to his fishing buddy
who took out the rib bones
- and then he gave them
all away
As gruff as he was, Has-
ten was always giving away
food fish, vegetables
from his garden, his fa-
mous pepper relish, plum
jelly or canned figs. If he
had it, he gave it to others.
And he loved to have fish
fries and invite everyone
to come.
"I think it was because
when he was growing up
he didn't have anything
and was himself the recip-
ient of generosity," Phelps
said.
Hartway called Hasten a
man of faith and a man of


prayer, although not until
later in his life. But when
he became a Christian, he
jumped into church life
wholeheartedly In 1991,
he was ordained as a dea-
con at First Baptist Church
of Homosassa and later
served as deacon at First
Baptist Church of Chassa-
howitzka until his death.
He and former pastor
John Fizer were insepara-
ble, working together at
the church, doing what-
ever needed doing.
One day, Hasten decided
the church needed clean-
ing up he hated disor-
der- and the two men set
out to clean, starting with
the refrigerator
"Hasten cleaned out
everything," Fizer said.
"He even threw out the
secretary's lunch! But he
jumped in his car and got
her another one."
Another time the two of
them were pressure wash-
ing the building and de-
cided the cross on top of
the steeple needed atten-
tion, which required being
up pretty high on a ladder
"Hasten volunteered to


hold the ladder while I
climbed it," Fizer said.
"Halfway up, he started
shaking it, laughing so
hard he almost fell. We
had a good time working
together, going on visita-
tion ministry together We
were like brothers."
As a deacon, Hasten al-
ways wanted two hymnals
and two bulletins each
week at the Sunday serv-
ice, one set for where he
sat with his wife and one
set in the back where he
greeted people coming
into the church.
"Heaven help anyone
who came in and took his
bulletin," said Barbara
Chandler, church greeter.
"If I would see someone
take his bulletin, I would
stop and tell them it be-
longed to Hasten. But if I
didn't see them, I would
try to replace it before he
found out. If ... for some


D SERVICE

NFIsTED ton


reason I missed greeting
someone, he would say,
'You could be replaced,
you know.' But his bark
was worse than his bite. I
really miss him."
Charles Chandler said
when he and his wife first
came to the church two
years ago, they noticed
right away the great affec-
tion everyone had for this
gruff, contentious man.
"Hasten seemed to be on
a first name basis with
everyone in Chassahow-
itzka and apparently
fished with most of them,"
Chandler said. "He shared
his love of the church and
his Savior with us. He gave
liberally from his produc-
tive garden, which de-
lighted both him and all of
us who shared in his
bounty"
Hasten Davis loved fish-
ing, when he wasn't falling
out of his boat. He loved


28 I .
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serving at church, singing
his favorite hymn, "Nail
Scarred Hands." He
watched the History Chan-
nel on TV, especially "How
It's Made."
He lived to help others,
served with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
Crime Watch program, was
recognized for his work in
storm clean up after the
1993 "no-name storm."
Once, he and Denver
Futch rescued two men
who had survived the sink-
ing of their boat in a
thunderstorm.
"Hasten Davis was a
friend to five generations
of my family," said Mary
Lee Woodly "He gardened
with my dad, showing him
the how's and what's of
growing vegetables ... he
impacted five generations
of my family, which says a
lot. He shared and cared,
and will be missed dearly"


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IN CRYSTAL RIVER 79
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AFN41741_0309 00010J


LOCAL


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 A5


PROPERLY INFLATED ,i.*




A6 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014


Survey sheds light o


dating expectations

Associated Press


WASHINGTON In
dating, money may be the
biggest taboo.
An Associated Press-
WE tv poll found two-
thirds of Americans think
it's tougher to talk money
with your romantic part-
ner than it is to talk sex.
Three in 10 said sex is the
harder conversation.
Seven in 10 of those sur-
veyed said it's unaccept-
able to expect a date to
pay for everything. But
most still said it's a man's
job to pay for the first date.
Most said it's OK to ask
someone out because he
or she seems successful.
But even more said it's
unacceptable to turn
down people because
they haven't had much
success.
One-third think it's OK
to search for online clues
about a potential first
date's success in life. But
very few said daters
should pay attention to
each other's finances be-
fore they are exclusive.
Men and women agree


Dating and money
Women are more likely than men to seek a potential mal
career ambitions and financial stability, an AP-WE tv poll
Q: When considering whether to go out on a first date with som
how important are each of the following traits? (Asked of those
identified as not married or in a committed relationship)
Percentage answering "extremely" or "very" important


F'- : : Ill 5 Ir


Caring


Sense of humor .4
Chemistry .:-


:3


Shared interests
Ambitious in WA
M
~ ill

L I 47
1. ~ ~ j j.


NOTE: Poll of 1,354 U.S. adults; conducted May 16-19, 2014; marg
error +3.0 percentage points.
SOURCE: GfK Public Affairs & Corporate Communications


that personality is the
most important trait to
consider when deciding
whether to go on a first
date with someone, and
very few said money is a
top consideration. Yet for


men, a sense of h
outweighs intellin
and they are mor
than women to price
looks. Most women
greater emphasis
suitor's financial situ


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration is
poised to unveil the first
rules limiting carbon
emissions from the thou-
sands of power plants
across the nation. The
pollution controls form
the cornerstone of Presi-
dent Barack Obama's
campaign to combat cli-
mate change and a key el-
ement of his legacy
Obama says the rules are
essential to curb the heat-
trapping greenhouse gases
blamed for global warming.
Critics contend the rules
will kill jobs, drive up elec-
tricity prices and shutter
plants across the country
Environmentalists and
industry advocates alike
are eagerly awaiting the
specifics, which the Envi-
ronmental Protection
Agency will make public for
the first time on Monday
Some questions and an-
swers about the proposal:
Q: How does the gov-
ernment plan to limit
emissions?
A: Unable to persuade
Congress to act on climate
change, Obama is turning
to the Clean Air Act. The
1970s-era law has long
been used to regulate pol-
lutants like soot, mercury
and lead but has only re-
cently been applied to
greenhouse gases.
Unlike with new power
plants, the government
can't regulate existing
plant emissions directly
Instead, the government


Waterbodv Plant
Inverness Pool Torpedograss / Willows /
Cabomba / S. Naiad /
Pondweed / Limnophilia


will issue guidelines for
cutting emissions, then
each state will develop its
own plan to meet those
guidelines. If a state re-
fuses, the EPA can create
its own plan.
Q: Why are these rules
necessary?
A: Power plants are the
single largest source of
greenhouse gas emissions
in the U.S. Environmental-
ists and the White House
say without bold action, cli-
mate change will intensify
and endanger the public's
well-being around the
world. In its National Cli-
mate Assessment, the ad-
ministration said weather
will become increasingly
disruptive unless curtailed.
Q: How steep will the
reductions be?
A: We don't know The
administration hasn't said
whether it will set one
universal standard or
apply different standards
in each state.
But the administration
has signaled it plans to
give states as much flexi-
bility as possible to meet
the standards. That could
include offsetting emis-
sions by increasing the use
of solar and nuclear
power, switching to
cleaner-burning fuels like
natural gas or creating ef-
ficiency programs that re-
duce energy demand.
States might also pursue
an emissions-trading plan
- also known as cap-and-
trade as several states
have already done.
Q: How will they affect


Herbicide Used
Glyphosate / 2,4D /
Clipper/Quest/
Element 3A/
Aquathol / Diquat


Hernando Pool Torpedograss / Willows/ Glyphosate,
Cabomba Element 3A
Floral City Pool Tussocks 2,4D
MECHANICAL HARVESTING


Crystal River Lyngbya / E. Milfoil
Inverness Pool Pondweed / Tussocks /
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Hernando Pool Tussocks
Homosassa River Filamentous Algae


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Mechanical Harvesting
Mechanical Harvesting
Mechanical Harvesting


Chassahowitzka Hydrilla / Cabomba Mechanical Harvesting
River
All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality Treated areas will
be identified with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water
use restrictions For further information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at
httD //www bocc citrus fl us/Dubworks/aauatics/aauatic services htm Citrus County Division
of Aquatic Services


my power bill?
about the economy?
A: It depends
you live. Different
have different mi
coal versus gas and
fuels, so the rules v
fect some states
than others. Doze
coal-burning plants
already announce
plan to close.
Still, it's a good b
rules will drive up
tricity prices. The U
lies on coal for 40 pa
of its electricity, ar
Energy Departmen
dicts retail power ]
will rise this year be
of environmental re
tions, economic
and other factors.
Environment
argue that some of
costs are offset b
creased health care
and other indirect
fits. They also sa
transition toward gr
fuels could create j(
Q: Doesn't Obam2
approval from Cong
A: Not for this. A
Supreme Court
gave the EPA the
light to regulate ca
dioxide under the
Air Act.


To Place Your
"InMemory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Obituaries


in


si


Nikolaos
Anastasiou, 66
BEVERLY HILLS


.-. nf., - -


-"YOUICOULD RECEM
K A REWARD UP TOH


i of Citrus County, Inc.


No Bullies Allowed!
If You See It... Stop It!
Visit us at
www.CrimeStoppersCitrus.com
or Call 1-888-ANY-TIPS (1-888-269-8477)
Funded by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund A


I


SServing Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

Fuea [ini Ce atr


j5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. S
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694|
S rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhone.c


Nikolaos G. Anastasiou,
66, of Beverly Hills,
Florida, passed away May
29, 2014.
He was
te with born to
1,finds. bon t
George
eone, and Evan- ',
gelia Anas-
tasiou in
Evvia,
Greece,
April 9 Nikolaos
1948. He Anastasiou
served as a seaman in the
Greek Merchant Marines
then moved to the United
States, where he operated
a restaurant for 10 years in
the Gallery Mall in Center
City, Pennsylvania. He
moved to Florida and in-
'omen vested in a six-unit apart-
en ment complex. Nickolaos
worked very hard all his
life and was a loving and
dedicated husband and fa-
in of their. He loved boating, an-
imals, fishing and working
AP on his truck, which he was
especially determined to
lumor make run to 300,000 miles.
gence, He worked at Seven
re apt Rivers Regional Medical
)ritize Center for more than
place seven years and was lov-
on a ingly referred to as the
nation "Mayor of Seven Rivers."
His dream was to retire to
Tennessee, where he loved
to vacation. There, he sin-
S gle-handedly built a cabin
s for himself and his sons.
Nikolaos visited his family
in Greece at least every
| two years and spoke often
Sof his homeland.
Born into the Orthodox
Greek faith, he attended
i'ces the Greek Orthodox
Church in Elkins Park,
What Pennsylvania, and in later
? years the Cornerstone
where Baptist Church in Beverly
states Hills.
xes of Nikolaos is survived by
other his loving wife, Susan
will af- Anastasiou; children,
more Nickolas (Stephanie)
ns of Anastasiou and Peter (Tri-
s have cia) Anastasiou; siblings,
I they Paginiota (Kosta) and
Lefftera Anastasiou; and
et the sister-in-law, Marina Anas-
elec- tasiou all of Greece; and
rS. re- nephews, Yannie and
percent Demetrie (Litza) also of
id the Greece.
t pre- A memorial service for
prices Nikolaos will be at 3 p.m.
*cause Sunday, June 1, 2014, at
egula- Brown Funeral Home &
forces Crematory in Lecanto. In
lieu of flowers, the family
Si s t s wishes donations be made
those to HPH Hospice, 3545
y de- N. Lecanto Hwy Beverly
Costs Hills, FL 34465. Brown FYu-
bene- neral Home and Crema-
y the tory, Lecanto, wwwbrown
reener funeralhome.com, www
obs. facebookcom/brownftmeral
Need homeandcrematory
,ress?
A 2007 j IN MEMORY OF Y
ruling BE
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Q&A: Obama's new rul


on power plant emission


Among likely impacts: Higher electricitypr


MARCH 20, 1938---MAY 30, 1989
"FOR OUR BELOVED MOTHER"
Dear Mother,
Hi Mom, it's hard to believe it's another year,
seems like yesterday we were talking and
laughing about life.
Our lives are never standing still, but it's the
memories of you always seeing the good in
people, giving from your heart and smiling
with good will.
From the momentyou held us in your arms you
made the most selfless choice of life.
Angels come in many forms and for me it is you
Mom; always shining like the sun and stars.
The longer we live, the more fully we become
aware of the loving Mother you were for us.
Our time on earth is brief; there are lessons to
be learned each precious day, Faith is what is
hoped for, things we cannot see; heaven is
promised to all of us if only we believe.
"We love you and miss you deeply Mom"
Love always your children,
Sandy, Randy, Sue, Kenny and Danny


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning June 2, 2014
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS


Joseph
Mooney Jr., 74
CITRUS SPRINGS
Joseph Anthony
Mooney Jr., 74, of Citrus
Springs, Florida, died
May 28, 2014. Visitation
from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday,
June 1, 2014, at Fero Fu-
neral Home. Funeral
Mass at 10 a.m. Monday,
June 2, 2014, at St. Eliza-
beth Ann Seton Catholic
Church. Interment will
follow at 3 p.m., at Calvary
Catholic Cemetery in
Clearwater

Brenda
Blair, 62
DUNNELLON
Brenda Fay Blair, 62, of
Dunnellon, Florida,
passed away May 23,2014.
She was born to Leonard
and Ruby Dillingham on
Dec. 21, 1952, in Camp-
bellsville, Kentucky
Brenda was a CNA for
most of her life and
moved to the area about
25 years ago from Ken-
tucky She attended Lake
Rousseau Baptist Church,
was a hair stylist for many
years and was a loving
mother and beautiful
sister
She was preceded in
death by her parents;
brothers, Tommy and
Michael Dillingham; and
her nephew, Raymond
Dillingham. Brenda is
survived by her daughter,
Krystle Blair; siblings,
Sharon (Eugene) Wheeler,
Barry (Debbie) Dilling-
ham, Linda (Mike) Ponter
and Thomas (Vickie) Ed-
ward Dillingham; and her
special friend, Perry
Blair.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home in Lecanto.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.
Brenda
Shetrone, 59
INVERNESS
Brenda C. Shetrone, 59,
of Inverness, died Monday,
May 26, 2014, at Citrus
Health & Rehabilitation
Center Private arrange-
ments are being handled
by Cremation Center of
The Nature Coast Crystal
River


Ceaion




S1-
e te
of the
Naur Cu
35*N 0t veu


Gracie
Lemon, 61
ST. PETERSBURG
Gracie Mae Lemon, 61,
of St. Petersburg, Florida,
passed away May 19, 2014,
in St. Pe-
tersburg.
Born and
reared in
Crystal
River, she
attended
the George
Washing-


Foer (Netie) iemn
ton Carver Gracie


Cavi (eogi)Lemon;
Elemen- e n
tary School and the Key
Training Center
Survivors include her
brothers, Johnny Lemon,
Robert (Nettie) Lemon,
Leon Lemon and Elder
Calvin (Georgia) Lemon;
sisters, Elder Betty Bryant,
Earlene (Leroy) Bellamy,
Delphine Brooks, Melo-
dine Lemon and Celestine
(Arthur) Hayes; and a host
of nieces and nephews.
Funeral service will be
1 p.m. Saturday, May 31,
2014, at Independent
House of God Church of
the Living God, 557 N.E.
Second Ave, Crystal River,
with Bishop Leonard
Smith, eulogist. Interment
will be at Crystal Memo-
rial Gardens, Crystal
River Professional serv-
ices are entrusted to New
Serenity Memorial Fu-
neral Home & Cremation
Svcs., Inc. 352-563-1394.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Sherrie
Pimental, 62
LAKE
PANASOFFKEE
Sherrie Ellen Pimental,
62, Lake Panasoffkee,
Florida, died May 26,2014,
at her residence. Sherrie
was born Feb. 17, 1952, in
Newport, Rhode Island, to
Lloyd and Agnes (Hudson)
Kenyon. She was a paper
carrier for the Citrus
County Chronicle and the
Tampa Bay Times. She
dearly loved her horses
and dogs, most of which
were rescue animals.
She is survived by her
mother and stepfather,
George and Agnes
Michaels, Hernando; her
brother, Lloyd D. Kenyon
Jr, Massachusetts; and her
companion, Gary
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.

9 &E!Nvsu
Funeral Home With Crematory
EUGENIA HIGH
Private Arrangements

JAMES & PATRICIA PANEK
Service:
Mon. 10:30 AM Chapel
Burial: Hills of Rest Cemetery
BETTY SHIPLEY
Private Arrangements
726-8323


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0001OU2


-7 "-I~ |1




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAGES
Continued from Page Al

Water hyacinths are
known to deprive phyto-
plankton a film of float-
ing microorganisms often
blamed for choking off
aquatic life of sunlight,
which, in turn, kills
phytoplankton.
Hyacinth is a floating
perennial plant with a fi-
brous root system that can
grow to a height of 3 feet.



STORMS
Continued from Page Al

College, a small school in
Vermont's Northeast King-
dom, studying in its
well-known meteorology
program.
After graduation, he
went home to White River
Junction to paint houses
for the summer and send
out demo tapes of his col-
lege weather forecasts. He
expected to land a job at a
TV station and never
dreamed he would one
day be deemed a "hurri-
cane hunk" by fans on the
Internet.
"I knew about snow, I
knew about coastal lows. I
didn't know anything
about tropical meteorol-
ogy," Cantore said.
One day that summer
his brother walked up to
him. "Hey Jim, the
Weather Channel called,"
his brother said. They
liked his tape and hired
him.
At that time 1986 -
The Weather Channel was
4 years old. It was in
22 million homes then, and
according to Cantore, in
about 101 million homes
now
Cantore's first hurricane
was Andrew, in 1992. He
reported live from
Louisiana.
In 1996, Cantore was in
Wilmington, North Car-
olina, reporting on Hurri-
cane Fran. During a live
shot, producers told him
that there were "too many
people" behind him -
hundreds in all.
'"Wow, this is pretty


Fully grown, it has dark
green leaf blades that can
be circular to egg-like in
shape. Its flowers are a
cross between periwinkle
and violet
Volunteers of the proj-
ect transfer the hy-
acinths and water lettuce
from a retention pond
along Cutler Spur Boule-
vard to behind the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Refuge
complex. Project organ-
izers are in the final
stage, putting enough
plants out in the bay to


cool,' I thought," Cantore
said. "I never thought as a
meteorologist I'd have
rock star status."
BRYAN NORCROSS
Norcross took a less tra-
ditional path into meteor-
ology, but he also made it
to The Weather Channel.
He began his career as a
radio DJ, then was a TV
news director and pro-
ducer. He was running a
news department for a TV
station in Louisville, Ken-
tucky, when he decided he
wanted to "try and do the
weather"
"Doing the weather was
the intersection of science
and broadcasting," Nor-
cross said.
It intrigued him so much
that he ended up going
back to school. He earned
his master's degree from
Florida State University in
meteorology, then took a
job as a forecaster in Tal-
lahassee. From there, he
was CNN's first weekend
weather forecaster and
took a job in Miami at
WPLG in 1983.
'At that time, hurricanes
weren't on people's
minds," he said, adding
the last big storm to hit
South Florida had been
Betsy in 1965.
Norcross became inter-
ested in South Florida his-
tory and its previous
storms. He wondered what
would happen if a big
storm hit the area. In 1990,
Norcross went to WTVJ
and he suggested that the
station raise the profile of
the weather during the
newscasts, and suggested
calling it "The Storm Cen-
ter" He broadcast specials


see how much nitrogen
they can slurp.
The first phase was
spent trying to figure out if
the plants could withstand
brackish water
To volunteer or for more
information about the
project, visit florida
springsinstitute.org.

A kayaker paddles past
a large area of hyacinths
near the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service office
in Crystal River.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


about past storms.
Then Andrew hit in
1992. The Category 5 storm
devastated Homestead, a
town south of Miami.
"That really was a conflu-
ence of a set of circum-
stances that happened to
come together that al-
lowed us to be prepared
like no TV station had ever
been," he recalled.
In 2010, Norcross went
to work for The Weather
Channel.
"I think of myself as
being in disaster commu-
nications," said the
63-year-old. "It's a bigger
thing than understanding
meteorology it's about
explaining what the mete-
orology means and how it
translates into a threat."
MAX MAYFIELD
Unlike Cantore and
Norcross, Mayfield didn't
have a dream of being on
NEW --__TV
quite the
opposite.
But then
came Hur-
ricane Ka-
trina in
2005, when
Mayfield
Max became a
Mayfield household
name as director of the
National Hurricane Cen-
ter in Miami. Today he's
one of the best in the busi-
ness at forecasting hurri-
canes, a specialist at
WPLG in Miami.
"When you take the
Myers Briggs test, I'm off
the scale on the introvert
side of things," the 65-year-
old Mayfield laughs. Now,
Mayfield is one of the an-
swers on the TV quiz show


'Jeopardy," and it's all be-
cause of hurricanes.
Born in Oklahoma, May-
field was always inter-
ested in tornadoes. As an
Air Force ROTC student at
the University of Okla-
homa, Mayfield wanted to
be a pilot, but his vision
was poor So he focused on
meteorology instead.
He landed a job in 1972
with the National Hurri-
cane Center in Miami and
stayed there for about
35 years. In 2000, he be-
came the center's director,
but it wasn't until the hur-
ricane seasons of 2004 and
2005 that Mayfield became
a household name.
For years, Mayfield had
constantly worried that
people weren't taking hur-
ricane forecasts or the


threats of storm surge -
seriously
He and his forecasters
predicted on Aug. 26 that
Hurricane Katrina would
hit the bayous of
Louisiana.
Mayfield was a constant
presence on national tele-
vision during Katrina, and
personally called the gov-
ernors of Mississippi and
Louisiana and the mayor
of New Orleans on Aug. 27.
The next day, he even
talked about the force of
Katrina during a video
conference call with Pres-
ident George W Bush at
his ranch in Crawford,
Texas.
"I just wanted to be able
to go to sleep that night
knowing that I did all I
could do," Mayfield said.


The storm hit on Aug. 29,
just 18 miles from where
Mayfield and his team had
forecast landfall three
days earlier
Mayfield retired from
the hurricane center in
2007 and then headed over
to WPLG.
He still worries about
how best to communicate
the dangers of hurricanes
to the public and spends
some of his free time giv-
ing talks to civic and
tourism groups about
storm surge.
'A major hurricane is
extremely unusual, and a
large, strong hurricane
with storm surge, it doesn't
happen that often," he
said. "But when it does, it
kills hundreds if not thou-
sands of people."


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This notice Is to Inform our Bright House Networks customers of upcoming changes to their cable programming lineup.
From ime to iOme our agreements with cable channels and television stations come up for renewal. While we do not anticipate any loss or disruption of service, regulations require us to notify you of the
possibility of losing programming. m Therefore, please be advised that our agreements with Caracol V, Gol V, NHL Center Ice, NHL Network, Outdoor Channel, and Youtoo remain in effect on a montrtomonth
basis, but we may have mto ceas carriage in all formats if our authority to continue is withheld. Also, our agreement with Jewelry TV expires on June 30,2014 and we may have to cease carnage in all formats
If our authority to continue is withheld.
We are worklng diligenty atthis time to come to acceptable and far terms with all these channels.
On after Jly 7, 2014, Bio wIl' rebrand to FYI Network and continue to appear on the following channels:
*FYI Netaork Channel 104
*FYI Network HD Channel 1240
On a after July 15, 2, WE will no longer be carried on analog channel 69. However, WE will remaina on channel 69 in digital format. Customers who do not have a digital device may contact Briht House
Networks to obtain this device.
On O after Ji y 1I, 2014, Jewelry TV will be removed from the following channels:
Pinellas, Manatee & Polk County channel 95
Hernando County channel 7
*Hillsbrnough County channel 97
Pasco County channel 6
Jewelry T will remain in digital format on channels 110 and 174 for Digital Tier subscribers.
On o after July 15, 2014 OWN will be removed from the basic tier of service on channel 20 in Pinellas, Hemrnando, Hillaborough, Manatee, & Pasco Counties. OWN will alse no longer be carded on the analog
lineup In all Counties. We will continue to carry OWN on the standard tier ofserviuce In digital format only on channel 20 In Hillsborough County; channel 24 In Pinellas, Hemando, Manatee,& Pasco Counties;
and channel 24 in Citrus and Polk Counties. Customers who doe not have a digital device may contact Bright House Networks to obtain this device.
On or armed Augat 1, 2014, MundoFox will be added to channels 94 and 909 to Standard and Nuesltros Cnales customers with a digblal device.
Bright House Networks utilizes a new digital video delivery technology known as Switched Digital Video (SDV). SDV is a robust bandwidth management system that makes it possible to offer more dital
video programming services than before including rnew HD channels. To be able to offer more new video services, Bright House Networbeks will be moving some eating programming services to the new SDV
system as well as adding new services on te SDV system.
On wr after Jim 12, 2014, the following services will be added to the SDV system:
The Arabic Channel (TAC) Intemaonal Premniumn Channel 994
STAR India PLUS Intomeatonal Premium Channel 978
Mediaset Italia International Premium Channel 961
TV 1000 Russian Kino Intemrnational Premium Channel 969
Tnse services will not be available on unidirectional retail devices as of the dates) noted above. If you want to subscribe to these services, you will need a diital set-top box or tuning adaptor from Bright
House Networks. Customers may continue to use their unidirectional retail device and CableCARD to receive video programming other than the programming delivered on the SDV system. Customers
who also utilioze a digital set-top box or tuning adaptor will be able to receive video programming delivered on the SDV system. Customers will be notified in advance of any other programming changes.
For more information please call 1-866-976-EASY or visit our website at brighthouse.com

bright house
NETWORKS
iQ O IG E X_________________________________________________________


LOCAL/STATE


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SFor the RECORD


Arrests
Crystal Marino, 25, of
West Jackson Lane, Ho-
mosassa, at 9:49 a.m. May 28
on an active warrant for felony
violation of probation stemming
from original charges dealing in
stolen property and providing
false information to a pawn
broker.
Timothy Neeld, 49, of
West Larchwood Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:17 a.m. May 28
on an active warrant for felony
violation of probation stemming
from an original charge of pos-
session of methamphetamine
and cocaine.
Kevin Kass, 49, of West
Edgehill Court, Crystal River, at
4:35 p.m. May 28 on a warrant
for felony grand theft. He was
also arrested on an active war-
rant for four counts of misde-
meanor petit theft. Bond
$4,000.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 6:09 a.m. Tuesday, May 27,
in the 5500 block of E. Tangelo
Lane, Inverness.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 10:01 a.m. May27
in the 5600 block of E. Granger
St., Inverness.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 10:35 a.m. May 27
in the 1800 block of W. Lorraine
Drive, Dunnellon.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 1:50 p.m. May 27 in
the 14000 block of W. River
Road, Inglis.
SA grand theft was reported
at 1:57 p.m. May27 in the 1300
block of S. Estate Point,
Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:36 p.m. May27 in the 1900


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County.

block of N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
SA grand theft was reported
at 5:02 p.m. May 27 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.


BEE
Continued from Page Al

They become the fourth
co-champions in the bee's
89-year history and the
first since 1962.
"The competition was
against the dictionary, not
against each other," Sri-
ram said after both were
showered with confetti
onstage. "I'm happy to
share this trophy with
him."
Sriram backed up his
status as the favorite by
rarely looking flustered
on stage, nodding confi-
dently as he outlasted 10
other spellers to set up
the one-on-one duel with
Ansun.
The younger boy was
more nervous and
demonstrative, no more


The competition was against
the dictionary, not against
each other.


Sriram Hathwar
National Spelling Bee Co-champion.


so than on the word that
gave him a share of the
title: "feulletion," the fea-
tures section of a Euro-
pean newspaper or
magazine.
"Ah, whatever!" Ansun
said before beginning to
spell the word as the stage
lights turned red, signal-
ing that he had 30 seconds
left
Although they hoisted a
single trophy together on-
stage, each will get one to
take home.
Each will also get the
champion's haul of more


than $33,000 in cash and
prizes.
Gokul Venkatachalam
of Chesterfield, Missouri,
finished third, and Ash-
win Veeramani of North
Royalton, Ohio, was
fourth.
Both champions are In-
dian-American. The past
eight winners and 13 of
the past 17 have been of
Indian descent, a run that
began in 1999 after
Nupur Lala's victory,
which was later featured
in the documentary
"Spellbound."


C I T R U S 0 U N T Y
H wQhoNICLE
Vwww.chronicleonline.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


1,960 ........................... ...... 1,S&P 50010 15720 .'s............................. .. Dow Jones industrials
- C.C Close: 1,920.03 ,-.y Close: 16,698.74
Change: 10.25 (0.5%) Change: 65.56 (0.4%)
1,840........ 10 DAYS ......... 16,320 ........10 DAYS .........
1,9501 519ai............................................. .............. ..... i.......... ................. .......... 16,8001616 .............. .................................7......
1 ,9 5 0 ............. ............. ......................... ............. ..........................





1,7 0 0 ...... .......... ......... .... ..... ......... .. ......... 1..... 5,2 00 .. ... .. ... .. . ....... .....
1,800 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .


1,700 ....b6 ... j ... F .... M ;k...A ... 15,200 .....y j ....I...F.......m .... A .... m...


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 2,653
Pvs. Volume 2,861
Advanced 2082
Declined 1024
New Highs 185
New Lows 17


NASD
1,652
1,715
1522
1061
80
26


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16698.74
8110.46
541.19
10752.16
4247.95
1920.03
1380.82
20333.04
1141.35


LOW
16620.43
8065.79
537.78
10699.49
4228.96
1909.82
1372.86
20228.68
1134.78


CLOSE
16698.74
8110.35
540.84
10752.11
4247.95
1920.03
1380.53
20332.99
1140.07


CHG.
+65.56
+34.47
+0.42
+49.38
+22.87
+10.25
+5.97
+103.08
+3.39


%CHG.
+0.39%
+0.43%
+0.08%
+0.46%
+0.54%
+0.54%
+0.43%
+0.51%
+0.30%


YTD
+0.74%
+9.59%
+10.25%
+3.38%
+1.71%
+3.88%
+2.83%
+3.18%
-2.03%


Interestrates


Em


The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury rose to 2.47
percent Thurs-
day. Yields af-
fect rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Gold and silver
prices ended
slightly lower
Thursday, ex-
tending their
losing streak to
four days. The
price of crude oil
rose above
$103 a barrel.
Crop prices
were mixed.




BIS

CE


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .04
6-month T-bill .05 0.04 +0.01 .07
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .13
2-year T-note .38 0.37 +0.01 .30
5-year T-note 1.53 1.48 +0.05 .99
10-year T-note 2.47 2.44 +0.03 2.12
30-year T-bond 3.33 3.30 +0.03 3.05


NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.10 3.09 +0.01 2.98
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.48 4.49 -0.01 4.21
Barclays USAggregate 2.15 2.21 -0.06 2.05
Barclays US High Yield 5.03 5.03 ... 5.42
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.13 4.21 -0.08 4.06
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.73 1.72 +0.01 1.26
Barclays US Corp 2.84 2.89 -0.05 2.86


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 103.58
Ethanol (gal) 2.38
Heating Oil (gal) 2.92
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.56
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.01
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1256.30
Silver (oz) 19.00
Platinum (oz) 1460.10
Copper (Ib) 3.15
Palladium (oz) 833.80
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.38
Coffee (Ib) 1.82
Corn (bu) 4.70
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 312.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.56
Soybeans (bu) 14.99
Wheat (bu) 6.33


PVS.
102.72
2.35
2.93
4.62
3.01
PVS.
1259.30
19.04
1462.70
3.19
839.75
PVS.
1.36
1.76
4.72
0.85
312.00
1.58
14.98
6.39


%CHG %YTD
+0.84 +5.2
-0.21 +24.5
-0.40 -5.1
-1.21 +7.8
+0.26 +8.2
%CHG %YTD
-0.24 +4.5
+0.06 -1.8
-0.18 +6.5
-0.88 -8.4
-0.72 +16.2
%CHG %YTD
+1.37 +2.6
+3.29 +64.4
-0.63 +11.3
+1.51 +1.8
+0.03 -13.3
-1.14 +14.4
+0.08 +14.2
-0.98 +4.5


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 25.15 +.08 +3.5 +12.7 +12.3 +14.5
CaplncBuA m 60.94 +.14 +5.7 +12.4 +9.6 +12.1
CpWIdGrIA m 47.53 +.11 +5.3 +18.0 +11.0 +13.8
EurPacGrA m 50.34 +.02 +2.6 +15.3 +6.8 +11.0
FnlnvA m 52.98 +.28 +3.2 +17.5 +13.5 +16.5
GrthAmA m 44.48 +.28 +3.4 +20.7 +14.7 +16.4
IncAmerA m 21.63 +.07 +5.6 +13.4 +11.4 +15.0
InvCoAmA m 38.87 +.20 +6.3 +21.8 +15.2 +16.4
NewPerspA m 38.38 +.13 +2.2 +15.9 +11.4 +15.1
WAMutlnvA m 41.04 +.22 +4.6 +18.2+15.6 +17.9
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 46.15 +.17 +7.2 +22.4 +9.9 +14.5
Stock 174.36 +.92 +3.9 +23.0 +16.6 +19.4
Fidelity Contra 97.01 +.56 +1.9 +19.6 +14.8 +17.8
ContraK 96.98 +.56 +2.0 +19.8 +14.9 +18.0
LowPriStk d 50.47 +.16 +2.0 +18.2 +14.4 +19.4
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 68.30 +38 +4.8 +18.9 +15.4 +18.3
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.56 ... +6.4 +12.7 +9.6 +14.2
IncomeA m 2.54 +.01 +7.1 +13.4 +10.2 +14.7
Harbor Intllnstl 73.94 +.31 +4.1 +14.5 +7.1 +12.9
Oakmark Intl 1 27.09 +.09 +2.9 +15.7 +12.2 +17.1
T Rowe Price Egtylnc 33.84 +.12 +3.7 +15.4 +14.0 +17.5
GrowStk 52.90 +.37 +0.6 +23.4 +16.0 +19.2
Vanguard 500Adml 177.65 +.97 +4.8 +18.9 +15.4 +18.3
5001lnv 177.61 +.97 +4.7 +18.8 +15.3 +18.2
500Sgnl 146.74 +.80 +4.8 +18.9 +15.4 +18.3
MulntAdml 14.19 +.01 +4.8 +3.1 +4.9 +5.0
STGradeAd 10.78 -.01 +1.6 +2.2 +2.5 +4.2
Tgtet2025 16.40 +.05 +4.1 +13.0 +9.7 +13.4
TotBdAdml 10.85 -.01 +3.9 +2.3 +3.5 +4.9
Totlntl 17.33 +.08 +4.2 +14.1 +5.3 +10.4
TotStlAdm 48.45 +.26 +4.2 +19.3 +15.2 +18.9
TotStldx 48.43 +.26 +4.2 +19.2 +15.0 +18.8
Welltn 39.52 +.12 +4.8 +12.9 +11.6 +13.7
WelltnAdm 68.26 +.20 +4.8 +13.0 +11.6 +13.8
WndsllAdm 68.75 +.38 +5.4 +17.5 +15.3 +18.1
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The stock market managed a
slight gain Thursday even as
economic reports gave investors
conflicting signals. Nine of the
10 industry groups in the S&P
500 index crept higher, led by
materials companies. The slight
gains pushed the S&P 500 in-
dex to a new high.

Hillshire Brands HSH
Close:S52.76A7.95 or 17.7%
Two days after Pilgrim's Pride made
a takeover offer for the food produc-
er, Tyson Foods makes a higher, $7
billion bid.

.10



52-week range
$30.35 $52.93
Vol.: 25.0m (8.3x avg.) PE: 28.5
Mkt. Cap: $6.47 b Yield: 1.3%
Abercrombie & Fitch ANF
Close:$37.14A2.02 or 5.8%
The teen retailer lost less money
than had been expected last quarter
and tightened spending offset thin-
ning gross margins.
$3,


52-week range
$31.14 $52.38
Vol.:6.5m (3.0x avg.) PE: 22.8
Mkt. Cap:$2.7 b Yield: 2.2%
Twitter TWTR
Close:$34.00AO0.23 or 0.7%
A second upgrade by financial ana-
lysts in as many days has pushed
shares of the social site up more
than 10 percent this week.
$80


C.~
[ I I- J r 1 r 1
52-week range
$29.51 $74.73
Vol.:53.9m (2.8x avg.) PE:
Mkt. Cap:$20.06 b Yield:...
Palo Alto Networks PANW
Close:S73.17A3.66 or 5.3%
A patent dispute between the net
work security company and rival Ju-
niper Networks has been settled at
a cost of $175 million.
$80




52-week range
$39.08 $80.84
Vol.:8.9m (4.5x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $5.42 b Yield:...
Tilly's TLYS
Close:$8.77V-1.81 or -17.1%
The teen retailer forecast a difficult
summer as revenue at stores open
at least a year fell 6.8 percent in the
first quarter.
$14

1,',
IM A M
52-week range
$7.95 $17.35
Vol.: 1.5m (13.4x avg.) PE: 10.7
Mkt. Cap: $100.32 m Yield:...


Economic news



pushes stocks higher


Associated Press

NEW YORK -Another
quiet day, another quiet
record.
Stocks rose modestly
Thursday, sending the
Standard & Poor's 500
index to another record
high. Investors rallied be-
hind a bidding war in the
food industry, as well as a
somewhat positive report
on the U.S. labor market
The S&P 500 rose 10.25
points, or 0.5 percent, to
1,920.03, closing above
Tuesday's record of
1,911.11. The Dow Jones in-
dustrial average rose 65.56
points, or 0.4 percent, to
16,698.74 and the Nasdaq
composite rose 22.87 points,
or 0.5 percent, to 4,247.95.
Among the biggest gain-
ers was deli meat and hot-
dog maker Hillshire
Brands, which jumped


$7.95, or 18 percent, to week, Apple said late
$52.76. Only two days after Wednesday it would buy
Pilgrim's Pride made a Beats Electronics for $3 bil-
$5.56 billion offer to buy lion, and now there's the bat-
the company, chicken com- tle over Hillshire Brands.
pany Tyson Foods stepped "It's an encouraging sign
in to offer $6.2 billion, because companies see
Investors expect that the economy improving,"
Tyson's offer will start a said Joe Tanious, a global
bidding war Hillshire's markets strategist with J.P
closing price of $52.76 was Morgan Asset Manage-
already above Tyson's ment. "Last thing you want
offer of $50 per share. The to do as a large company is
stock is up 43 percent this use your cash to buy a
week alone, company when you have
Tyson also rose on the an uncertain outlook on
news. The stock gained the economy"
$2.50, or 6 percent, to Other food companies
$43.25, making the com- also rose following the
pany the biggest gainer in Hillshire Brands news as
the S&P 500. traders anticipated more
The overall stock market deals and possibly more
has moved little this year, bidding wars. Jam and
but one theme that contin- jelly maker J.M. Smucker
ues to play out is the large rose $2.38, or 2.4 percent,
amount of corporate deals to $103. Hormel Foods,
being announced. Just dur- which makes Spam, rose
ing this holiday-shortened $1, or 2 percent, to $48.71.


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.92 --- 8.47 6.27 +.10 +1.6 V V V -23.5 +73.8 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 --- 37.15 35.39 +.05 +0.1 A V A +0.7 +2.7 11 1.84
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 --- 62.05 53.06 +.22 +0.4 A A A +0.7 +22.3 25 0.36f
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 0 111.38 110.03 +.10 +0.1 A A +3.4 +17.5 2.82e
Bank of America BAG 12.13 -0- 18.03 15.15 +.01 +0.1 A A V -2.7 +13.7 20 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 --- 14.71 13.06 -.09 -0.7 V V 7 +11.0 +10.0 25 0.08
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 0 38.21 37.68 -.12 -0.3 A A A +18.3 +7.8 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 45.06 --- 55.28 47.28 -.04 -0.1 7 V -9.3 -8.6 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 19.94 -- 28.10 26.36 +.37 +1.4 A A A +13.1 +32.2 dd 1.00
Disney DIS 60.41 0 83.98 84.03 +.43 +0.5 A A A +10.0 +26.6 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 --- 75.13 70.93 +.17 +0.2 A 7 7 +2.8 +9.0 17 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.69 --- 57.46 53.93 +.29 +0.5 A A A +9.7 +2.3 17 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 103.45 101.27 +.21 +0.2 7 A +0.1 +12.2 11 2.76f
Ford Motor F 14.30 --- 18.02 16.54 +.23 +1.4 A A A +7.2 +9.7 10 0.50
Gen Electric GE 22.76 28.09 26.74 +.08 +0.3 A 7 A -4.6 +16.4 20 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 35.20 0 54.00 53.39 +.02 ... A A +11.9 +39.3 15
Home Depot HD 72.21 --- 83.20 79.90 +.22 +0.3 A A A -3.0 +1.9 20 1.88
Intel Corp INTC 21.89 0 27.24 26.96 +.08 +0.3 A A A +3.9 +15.4 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0-- 211.98 183.76 +.68 +0.4 7 7 7 -2.0 -10.0 12 4.40f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 23.68 -0- 34.32 28.04 -.25 -0.9 V 7 A -14.8 +12.4 26
Lowes Cos LOW 38.87 --- 52.08 47.01 +.30 +0.6 A 7 -5.1 +10.7 21 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 -- 103.78 101.34 +.85 +0.8 A A A +4.4 +3.2 18 3.24
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 30.84 --0- 41.66 40.34 +.33 +0.8 A A V +7.8 +17.3 15 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.62 0 68.33 66.91 -.02 ... A A -0.9 +16.4 17 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 --0- 101.50 96.55 -.08 -0.1 A 7 A +12.8 +29.9 21 2.90
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 -0-- 19.39 9.03 +.25 +2.8 A A A -1.3 -53.1 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 -0- 20.36 18.52 -.02 -0.1 A A A +12.1 -1.9 39 0.80
Regions Fncil RF 8.82 -0- 11.54 10.10 ... A... +2.1 +10.7 13 0.20f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 26.62 -0- 54.69 41.15 +2.91 +7.6 A 7 A +3.6 -3.6 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -0- 114.72 103.00 +2.38 +2.4 A A A -0.6 -1.5 19 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 34.10 --0- 49.77 46.66 +.20 +0.4 A A V +6.3 +31.6 25 1.20
Time Warner TWX 55.71 0 71.40 70.31 -.36 -0.5 V A A +0.8 +19.7 15 1.27
UniFirst Corp UNF 87.68 -0-- 117.91 99.53 +.14 +0.1 A A 7 -7.0 ... 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 --- 51.98 49.72 -.02 ... A A +1.2 +2.0 11 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 27.49 -0- 42.14 35.04 +.08 +0.2 A 7 7 -12.4 +16.1 1.82e
WalMartStrs WMT 71.51 -- 81.37 75.98 +.45 +0.6 A 7 7 -3.4 +0.1 16 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 43.31 0 71.02 71.11 +1.30 +1.9 A A A +23.8 +41.5 25 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


In a 42-page report released Thursday, the
White House argues that significant increases
in the domestic production of natural gas and
reductions in oil consumption have better posi-
tioned the United States to advance its eco-
nomic and environmental goals.
Few of the report's conclusions are new, but
it includes a detailed analysis of how past re-
liance on petroleum imports made the U.S.
economy especially susceptible to oil price
shocks, a vulnerability that White House econ-
omists say has been diminished by a reduced
U.S. demand for foreign oil.

California city votes to end
hot sauce dispute
IRWINDALE, Calif. The fiery fight is ap-
parently over between the makers of a popu-
lar hot sauce and a small Southern California
city that said its factory's smells were
unbearable.
The Irwindale City Council voted Wednes-
day night to drop a public nuisance declaration
and lawsuit against Huy Fong Foods, makers
of Sriracha hot sauce. The dual moves
brought an effective end to the spicy-air dis-
pute that had Sriracha devotees worried about
future sauce shortages and had suitors includ-
ing the state of Texas offering Huy Fong a
friendlier home.
The closed-session council vote was unani-
mous with one councilman abstaining due to a
conflict of interest, the San Gabriel Valley
Tribune reported.

Applications for US jobless
aid near 7-year low
WASHINGTON The number of Ameri-
cans seeking unemployment benefits fell last
week to nearly the lowest level in seven years,
a sign hiring may be picking up.
Weekly applications for unemployment aid
dropped 27,000 to a seasonally adjusted
300,000, the Labor Department said Thurs-
day. That's just above a seven-year low
reached three weeks ago. The four-week av-
erage, a less volatile measure, fell to 311,500,
the fewest since August, 2007.
From wire reports


ICrstal River Othe locations ilude St Pete, Beleair Bluffs
30 S. US 19 Tampa, Bradento, prin Clearwater, ebing
352-799-7229 and Tarpon Sprinqg,


Money&Markets


Business B R I E FS


US economy set for
rebound after Q1 contraction
WASHINGTON The U.S. economy took
a beating from an especially harsh winter dur-
ing the January-March quarter, skidding into
reverse for the first time in three years. But
spring has arrived and along with it, signs that
the chill was just a temporary setback in the
long road to recovery.
Gross domestic product contracted at an
annual rate of 1 percent in the first quarter, the
Commerce Department said Thursday. That
was worse than the government's initial esti-
mate that GDP grew by a slight 0.1 percent.
The economy last posted a decline in the first
three months of 2011 when it dropped
1.3 percent.
Since then, the labor market has continued
to improve, consumer spending is solid and
manufacturers are benefiting from increased
spending. Economists expect a robust GDP
rebound in the April-June quarter as a result.
Tyson enters meat
brawl with Hillshire bid
NEW YORK Hillshire Brands is at the
center of a barnyard brawl.
Tyson Foods, the largest U.S. meat proces-
sor, on Thursday made a $6.2 billion offer for
the maker of Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball
Park hot dogs, topping a bid made two days
earlier by rival poultry producer Pilgrim's Pride.
Based in Greeley, Colorado, Pilgrim's Pride is
owned by Brazilian meat giant JBS.
The takeover bids for Hillshire by the two
major meat processors are being driven by the
desirability of brand-name processed products
like Jimmy Dean breakfast sandwiches.
White House touts energy
policies as rules loom
WASHINGTON Setting the stage for up-
coming restrictions on coal-fired power plants,
the Obama administration is making a con-
certed effort to cast its energy policy as an
economic success that is creating jobs, secur-
ing the nation against international upheavals
and shifting energy use to cleaner sources.


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 A9






IPage A10- FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014



OPINION
-CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


. .. "Show me a mall, and I'm happy."


Julia Roberts


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
a Mike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TURNING THINGS AROUND




CR Mall



finds success



in efforts



to rebuild


he sun has finally
parted the dark clouds
hanging above the
Crystal River Mall these past
few years.
Built in 1989 and opened in
1990, the Crystal River Mall
touted itself as the prototypi-
cal small community mall.
In 2006, a disconcerting
trend began where mall
tenants, including
the four anchor THE I|
stores at the time
- Belk, JCPen- Mall ad'
ney, Kmart and King
Sears began to
see a steady de- OUR 0O
dcline in sales at Mana
about the same tanag
time that Simon turning
Property LLC dec
purchased the shor
mall from Edward destir
J. DeBartolo arot
Corp.
In May 2011 the bank fore-
closed on Simon, who had
virtually stopped upkeep of
the facility and had stopped
making its mortgage pay-
ments. The bank appointed a
receiver to manage the mall.
In March 2012, Mike Kohen
of Crystal River Mall Realty
Management LLC purchased
the mall for $3 million from
Boxer Retail, the Dallas-
based receiver that took over
management of the mall.


Three months later, the
group hired Millie Bresna-
han to manage the mall.
While the past two years have
not been without drama for
the corporation and its man-
ager three of its anchor
stores have moved on some
of the moves Bresnahan has
been making are beginning to
pay off.


ISSUE:
ds Rural
store.

PINION:
cement
the once-
ining
)ping
nation
und.


Rural King is
moving in to the
old Sears location
and has begun
hiring employees
- 60 will be
needed in all for
the expected
mid-July opening.
Bresnahan has
already begun the
search for two
more anchors.
The mall now
has 41 businesses


and has taken advantage of
additional marketing meas-
ures offering space for free
weekly community dances;
opening space up for expo
and event opportunities; and
making use of the mall kiosk
locations.
It has not been easy, but the
mall management deserves
credit for putting in the hard
work to rebuild its clientele
and offer a viable location for
residents to shop local.


= Hot Corner: ANIMAL SHELTER =


Shelter yes, boat ramp no
Why is it so easy to slate fund-
ing for a $3 million boat ramp on
the barge canal but the commis-
sion cannot find the funds to
build a new animal shelter to re-
place the decrepit and bug-in-
fested current shelter? Perhaps
the citizens of Citrus County
should be asked for their opinion.
Why move it?
I acknowledge the RO


fact that the animal
shelter should be en-
larged and updated,
but my question is, why
do you have to move it
from where it is to
Lecanto? Could it possi-
bly be the Citrus
County commissioners
want to extend the air-


lire
i im
i lips
CAr
563-C


port road to Holden
Road for easier access to the
buildings they are erecting on
Holden Road?
Too many animals
Commissioner JJ Kenney's
out of his mind if he thinks all
taxpayers are going to support
this $4 million for an animal
shelter. And he wants to have
rocking chairs areas for little old
ladies to sit with a cat to see if
they want a cat because he
wants to create more cat ladies
that have five, 10 cats smelling
up the neighborhood? And get
all dogs adopted so we'll get
more dogs barking and get to
have more complaints about
barking dogs? These pet owners
don't care about other people ...
There's too many cats and dogs
in the world now.


Simple math problem
A new animal shelter. If Com-
missioner Kenney wants to build
a new animal shelter, all he
needs to do is do simple math.
Take the amount that it will cost
to build, and divide that number
by the number of pets in Citrus
County, then charge that much
for the license to keep a pet next
year. Problem solved.

JND Pay for your hobby
flEE I'm a gun owner and I
v rI want the county to raise
property taxes to pay
for a range so I can go
shoot. Now that I've got
your attention, I'm not
in favor of raising prop-
erty taxes to pay for an
) 579 animal shelter. I'll pay
) for the use of a gun
range for my hobby;
you pay for your pets.
Typical government
In the front page paper of the
Sunday Chronicle (May 25) re-
garding the Citrus Animal Shel-
ter, it appears we have 14
full-time employees working out
there, seven administrators and
seven workers.
That sounds like typical Citrus
County government.
New shelter needed
Three cheers to the Chronicle
and JJ Kenney for bringing to
our attention the horrible state
of affairs the animal shelter is
in. We need a new animal shel-
ter and we need it now. That
cramped, smelly, horrible
place.


Small men with ugly thoughts


onesome Racist of the shire and several state lawmak-
Week: Robert Copeland ers condemned Copeland's re-
of Wolfeboro, N.H. marks about Obama and said he
He's not as wealthy or promi- should resign immediately So
nent as Los Angeles Clippers did Mitt Romney, who owns a
owner Donald Ster- house in the state.
ling, but the 82- After a few days
year-old Copeland & Copeland gave up and
is no less quit. He's now free to
detestable. shamble around the
Until last week L house in his bathrobe
he served as one of R and boxers, spewing
three elected po- the N-word as much as
lice commissioners he wants.
in Wolfeboro, a He has little in com-
town of about 6,300 Carl Hiaasen mon with Sterling be-
people in central sides hateful
New Hampshire. A OTHER prejudice and ad-
resident had com- VOICES vanced age (the Clip-
plained to the town pers owner is 80). After
manager that, while dining at a Sterling's embarrassing man-
local restaurant, she overheard gled apology while being inter-
Copeland use the N-word to de- viewed by CNN's Anderson
scribe President Obama. Cooper, some began to wonder
Copeland didn't deny mak- if creeping senility is what
ing the slur, and brilliantly causes old white guys to drop
sent the following email to the their guard and blurt whatever
other commissioners: "I be- dumbass racist thought enters
lieve I did use the 'N' word in their brains.
reference to the current occu- They point to Cliven Bundy,
pant of the Whitehouse (sic). 67, the deadbeat Nevada
For this I do not apologize rancher who for two decades
he meets and exceeds my cri- hasn't paid grazing fees for the
teria for such." cattle he lets roam upon federal
Many people in Wolfeboro lands. When officers showed up
felt Copeland met and ex- last month to remove the live-
ceeded the criteria for being a stock, they were met by a defi-
bigoted gasbag, and a public ant Bundy and a band of armed
meeting was convened. The supporters.
crowd was virtually all white Bundy has claimed native
because fewer than two dozen rights to the lands, saying he
African-Americans live in the doesn't recognize the existence
town. of the U.S. government. For
Copeland sat there listening "standing up" to the feds (and
to all the outraged demands for stiffing American taxpayers for
his resignation, and never said more than $1 million), he was li-
a word. onized by conservative radio
Wolfeboro was in turmoil. It hosts, Sen. Rand Paul, Sean
wasn't as if Copeland could be Hannity and the other parrots
ignored or led away like some at Fox News.
demented old uncle. The po- If at that point he'd shut his
lice commission is in charge of mouth, Bundy would still be a
hiring, firing and disciplining media darling of the bug-eyed
officers, and also setting their right But while chatting with a
salaries. Copeland also New York Times reporter, he
worked as a dispatch decided out of nowhere to offer
supervisor some casual thoughts about
The governor of New Hamp- "the Negro."


He mused that black people
might be "better off as slaves"
rather than living "under gov-
ernment subsidy"
Whoops. Here we go again.
Instantly Bundy became po-
litically toxic. His cheering sec-
tion at Fox fell silent while Sen.
Paul, who has presidential am-
bitions, declared he didn't
agree with Bundy's view on
slavery and even unholstered
the 0-word ("offensive").
Like Sterling, Bundy's at-
tempts to clarify his feelings
about black Americans only
made things worse.
'"Are they slaves to charities
and government subsidized
homes?" he said two days later
"And are they slaves when their
daughters are having abortions
and their sons are in prisons?
This thought goes back a long
time."
On CNN Bundy labored to
stem the backlash with an inco-
herent reference to Martin
Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks,
while on his Facebook page he
stated more clearly that he
doesn't believe anyone should
be put back into slavery today
That's comforting to know,
but at this point Bundy's tres-
passing cows are his biggest
audience.
He, Copeland and Sterling
have blabbed themselves into
caricatures. It's not that they're
harmless (Sterling's discrimi-
natory practices as a landlord
were punitive to many black
families), but all the repudia-
tion and ridicule has reduced
them to their proper size.
They are just small men with
small, ugly thoughts, and every
so often it's useful to be re-
minded that they're still out
there.
Lots of'em.

Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for
the Miami Herald. Readers
may write to him at: 1 Herald
Plaza, Miami, 33132.


LETTER to the Editor


Who is listening?
Have you ever wondered
why more of our citizens do not
take a more active role in com-
municating with our elected of-
ficials? The answer may be as
simple as they do not listen.
I have written to my elected
officials in almost all levels of
government. Maybe it is to
voice my opinion on upcoming
legislation, maybe to suggest
change, or simply to say
thanks. With the exception of
my communication attempts
with our board of county com-
missioners, all other elected
officials or their staffs have re-
sponded to my written commu-
nications. Some may simply
acknowledge receipt, others
may respond in agreement,
and occasionally some will re-
spond with a position of oppo-
sition. The bottom line is they
all communicate.
In the past year, I have writ-
ten 11 emails to the full board
of commissioners and a few
others to specific commission-
ers. What is surprising and dis-
couraging is that three of the
commissioners have never


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


responded to a single email;
not even a simple acknowledge-
ment Although I am sure my
opinions have not always been
shared, not a single commis-
sioner has ever contacted me to
tell his or her opposing opinion.
I will say that I had one formal


meeting with one commis-
sioner, so I know they have it in
them to communicate.
I have also spoken a few
times during commission
meetings. After those meet-
ings, I was never contacted by
any commissioner; not even a
personal thanks for making my
opinion known. I do not expect
or need them to respond dur-
ing or after a public meeting.
Personally, I would respond
out of simple courtesy
I have to wonder if the com-
missioners, at least most of
them, make it a point of not re-
sponding in an attempt to dis-
courage future participation in
our democratic process. This
may also explain why they do
not hold town hall meetings or
other open meetings with their
constituents where they would
be expected to listen and re-
spond. In fairness to the com-
missioners, they have accepted
invitations to speak from some
civic organizations. Maybe
these organizations are good
with persuasion.
Gilbert Johnson
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Find a bridge
for tolerance
Forced acceptance? A
gay man, Alexander the
Great, a warrior and at
the time, the most power-
ful man on the planet,
said that "a man con-
vinced against his own
opinion is still of the
same opinion." He knew
all too well that forced ac-
ceptance does not work.
I am ashamed of the
persecution the gays of
our society have had to
endure. There are those
who would force them
into accepting what most
of us consider a normal
lifestyle.
I am ashamed that bel-
ligerent bullying led up to
the murder of Matthew
Wayne Shepard, a
22-year-old gay American
student at the University
of Wyoming who was
beaten, tortured and left
to die near Laramie,
Wyoming, on the night of
Oct. 6,1998. I am ashamed
that a fanatical fringe
group masquerading it-
self as a Christian Baptist
church had the audacity
and bad taste to show up
at this young man's fu-
neral and spew their hate.
I am ashamed of the
way gay social movements
such as the Lesbian, Gay
Bisexual, Transgender
movement has engaged in
the same type of bullying


tactics as they themselves
have suffered. One of the
most chilling and invasive
tactics unfolded recently
when Mozilla Firefox
CEO Brendan Eich re-
signed under pressure
after a gay group discov-
ered and publicized the
fact that Eich had made a
small donation to Califor-
nia's Proposition 8 cam-
paign which sought to
enshrine traditional mar-
riage as the standard for
marriage in that state.
This donation was made
in 2008.
Even more recently,
pressure generated by a
left-wing website led to
HGTV's dropping "Flip It
Forward," the show that
was to feature David and
Jason Benham. The un-
stated reason: One or
both twins expressed
what they consider Bible-
based views in support of
marriage as a man-
woman union and in op-
position to abortion on
demand.
The tolerance and ac-
ceptance that was so vig-
orously demanded by
those advocating for the
gay agenda are now being
strongly denied by this
same group to those who
may oppose same sex
marriage or any other
issue dealing with homo-
sexuality It seems anyone
who follows the dictates of
their conscience gets


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hammered. When any
group of like-minded peo-
ple engages in persecut-
ing and penalizing others
for what they believe or
do not believe, that is
called discrimination and
intolerance. It is the way
that all tyrants have be-
haved throughout history
These intolerant tactics
are the very thing that all
sensible people despise in
a free society. Even though
we may not agree, it ought
to be OK to believe in
same sex marriage and
say so. It ought to be OK to
believe that marriage is
between one man and one
woman and say so, without
fear of reprisal, without
fear of social media bul-
lies penalizing people for
what they believe or do
not believe.
These tactics of intimi-
dation and discrimina-
tion, pressuring networks,
corporations and busi-
ness to take action against
people of another point of
view, may not compare to
murder However, it is
nothing less than bullying.
Let us not force accept-
ance, or tolerate discrimi-
nation. Instead, let us find
a bridge of toleration. Let


r 4^ "" ob*ha1-g U-ip


us stay true to our free
way of life. Let us allow
each other to follow the
dictates of our con-
sciences, even when those
dictates clash. To do any
less is hypocritical.
The right-winger or gay
man is not the enemy The
lesbian or Christian is not
the enemy We are all in-
dividuals and should dia-
logue, build relationships
and treat one another
with tolerance, love and
respect.
Gerald Scott Antley
Homosassa


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Deaf dog learns
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CNN showed a film
clip of a very gentle
adult pit bull that had
been surrendered at an
animal shelter. However,
after being there for a
week or so, no one un-
derstood why this dog
was totally unresponsive
to commands. They fi-
nally discovered the rea-
son the dog was deaf
A volunteer taught it
some sign language so it
could understand what


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However, of the public
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dog to adopt, no one was
interested in a deaf dog.
Finally the answer to
everyone's prayers
walked in. It was a woman
who was deaf herself and
had been looking for a
deaf dog for a length of
time. She has since taught
the dog more sign lan-
guage and now they hold
conversations of sorts.
Margo Blum
Homosassa


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OPINION


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 All


F4










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Critics turn up heat on VA


Secretary Shinsekifaces mounting calls from lawmakers for his resignation


World BRIEFS

Ready


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sup-
port for embattled Veter-
ans Affairs Secretary Eric
Shinseki eroded quickly
Thursday, especially
among congressional De-
mocrats facing tough re-
election campaigns, even
as Shinseki continued to
fight for his job amid alle-
gations of delayed medical
care and misconduct atVA
facilities nationwide.
Shinseki spoke privately
with lawmakers and met
with nearly two dozen veter-
ans groups, assuring them
that he takes the reports se-
riously and is moving swiftly
to fix problems. On Friday,
he is to address the National
Coalition for Homeless Vet-
erans, outlining his plans for
corrections.
A federal investigation
of operations in the trou-
bled Phoenix VA Health
Care System found that
about 1,700 veterans in
need of care were "at risk


of being lost or forgotten"
after being kept off an offi-
cial waiting list. While ini-
tially focused on Phoenix,
the investigation described
Wednesday by the VA De-
partment's inspector gen-
eral found broad and
deep-seated problems in
the sprawling health care
system, which provides
medical care to about 6.5
million veterans annually
The interim report con-
firmed earlier allegations
of excessive waiting times
for care in Phoenix, with
an average 115-day wait
for a first appointment for
those on the waiting list -
nearly five times as long as
the 24-day average the hos-
pital had reported.
House Speaker John
Boehner and House Mi-
nority Leader Nancy
Pelosi said they were re-
serving judgment about
Shinseki. But with the sit-
uation threatening to af-
fect congressional
elections in November, the


Associated Press
Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., a member of the House
Committee on Veterans' Affairs, questions witnesses
from the Department of Veterans Affairs on Wednesday
as the panel investigates allegations of gross
mismanagement and misconduct at VA hospitals.


chorus of lawmakers call-
ing for his departure grew
by the hour
Democratic Sens. Mark
Warner and Tim Kaine of
Virginia, Mary Landrieu of
Louisiana, Jeff Merkley of
Oregon and New Mexico's
Tom Udall and Martin
Heinrich all urged Shin-
seki to step aside. Eleven


Senate Democrats have
called for Shinseki's resig-
nation since Wednesday,
when the VA inspector
general report came out.
All but Heinrich are on the
ballot this fall.
White House press sec-
retary Jay Carney declined
to say whether President
Barack Obama still has full


confidence in Shinseki,
who has led the VA since
the start of the Obama ad-
ministration. The presi-
dent is waiting for a full
investigation into the VA
before deciding who
should be held account-
able, Carney said.
Rep. Steve Israel, the
New York Democrat who
chairs the party's cam-
paign committee in the
House, called for a crimi-
nal investigation of the de-
partment by the Justice
Department and said of
Shinseki, "If his resigna-
tion is what it takes to fix
the problem, then yes, he
should resign."
And Sen. Dick Durbin of
Illinois, the No. 2 Democ-
rat in the Senate, said that
while he respects Shin-
seki, a former four-star
Army general who served
in Vietnam, the IG's report
"does really move us
closer to that point where
we have to question his
leadership."


Home at last


Associated Press
A rifle team stands at attention Thursday during burial services for Army Pfc. James Holmes of Warren, Ohio, from the Korean War, at
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Earlier this month, the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO)
announced that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, had been identified as Holmes and returned to his
family for burial with full military honors.


Extinctions speeding up


Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Species of plants and ani-
mals are becoming extinct
at least 1,000 times faster
than they did before hu-
mans arrived on the scene,
and the world is on the
brink of a sixth great ex-
tinction, a new study said.
The study looks at past
and present rates of ex-
tinction and finds a lower
rate in the past than scien-
tists had thought. Species
are now disappearing from
Earth about 10 times faster
than biologists had be-
lieved, said study lead au-
thor noted biologist Stuart
Pimm of Duke University
"We are on the verge of
the sixth extinction," Pimm
said from research at the
Dry Tortugas. "Whether we
avoid it or not will depend
on our actions."
The work, published
Thursday by the journal
Science, was hailed as a
landmark study by outside
experts.
Pimm's study focused on
the rate, not the number, of
species disappearing from
Earth. It calculated a "death


Associated Press
An undated photo provided by Terry Goss Photography
USA/Marine Photobank shows an oceanic whitetip
shark. The oceanic whitetip shark was once one of the
most plentiful predators on Earth and now is rarely seen.


rate" of how many species
become extinct each year
out of 1 million species.
In 1995, Pimm found
that the pre-human rate of
extinctions on Earth was
about 1. But taking into ac-
count new research, Pimm
and his colleagues refined
that background rate to
about 0.1.
Now, that death rate is
about 100 to 1,000, Pimm
said.
Numerous factors are
combining to make species


disappear much faster
than before, said Pimm
and co-author Clinton
Jenkins of the Institute of
Ecological Research in
Brazil. But the No. 1 issue
is habitat loss. Species are
finding no place to live as
more places are built up
and altered by humans.
Add to that invasive
species crowding out na-
tive species, climate
change affecting where
species can survive, and
overfishing, Pimm said.


Google pledges


greater efforts to


promote diversity


Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. -
Google has had more
trouble diversifying its
workforce than its com-
puter scientists have had
writing programs that re-
spond to search requests
in the blink of an eye or
designing cars that can
navigate traffic without a
human behind the wheel.
That seemed to be the
conclusion when the Sili-
con Valley giant this week
issued a gender and eth-
nic breakdown of its work-
force that showed that of
its 26,600 U.S. employees,
61 percent are white,
30 percent Asian, 3 per-
cent Hispanic and 2 per-
cent black. Thirty percent
of its employees are women.
"Google is miles from
where we want to be,"
said Laszlo Bock, head of
personnel at Google.
Why is one of the most


innovative, dynamic sec-
tors of the U.S. economy
looking like the corporate
world of the past?
The biggest factor is a
shortage of such students
majoring in computer sci-
ence or other technical
fields in college, Bock said.
One year, Google said,
there were just two black
people in the U.S. with
newly minted doctorates
in computer science.
Google hired one of them,
and Microsoft hired the
other, according to Bock.
Google's efforts come
amid a renewed bout of
advocacy from the Rev.
Jesse Jackson, who has
been leading delegations
to shareholder meetings at
such companies as Google,
Facebook, eBay and
Hewlett-Packard, decry-
ing "old patterns that ex-
clude people of color and
women from opportunity
and advancement."


Associated Press
A Ukrainian soldier
guards a checkpoint
Thursday near Slovyansk,
Ukraine.

Rebels down
Ukraine copter
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine-
In another devastating blow
to Ukraine's armed forces,
rebels shot down a troop
helicopter Thursday, killing
at least 12 soldiers, includ-
ing a general who had
served in the Soviet army
and was in charge of com-
bat training.
The loss underscored the
challenge Ukrainian forces
face in fighting a guerrilla-
style insurgency that has
proven to be an agile foe.
Ukraine, meanwhile, an-
nounced that President-
elect Petro Poroshenko will
be sworn in June 7, less
than two weeks after his
overwhelming victory in spe-
cial balloting that was hoped
would ease tensions in the
deeply divided country.
China loosens
'one child' policy
BEIJING China is
preparing for 2 million extra
babies a year as a result of
a loosening of its "one child"
birth limits that will allow
more couples to have two
children, health officials
said Thursday.
The ruling Communist
Party introduced birth limits
in 1980 to curb population
growth and demand for
water and other resources.
Most urban couples are al-
lowed one child and face
fines and other penalties for
additional births. Pressure
to enforce limits has led
local officials to force
women to abort fetuses or
to be sterilized, even
though such measures are
illegal.
The party announced in
November that couples in
which one parent was an
only child would be allowed
to have a second baby in
some areas. Previously,
both parents had to be an
only child to qualify for this
exemption.
Indians protest
rape, killings
LUCKNOW, India -Two
teenage sisters in rural
India were raped and killed
by attackers who hung their
bodies from a mango tree,
which became the scene of
a silent protest by villagers
angry about alleged police
inaction in the case. Two of
the four men arrested so far
are police officers.
Villagers found the girls'
bodies hanging from the
tree early Wednesday,
hours after they disap-
peared from fields near
their home in Katra village
in Uttar Pradesh state, po-
lice Superintendent Atul
Saxena said. The girls, who
were 14 and 15, had gone
into the fields because
there was no toilet in their
home.
Hundreds of angry vil-
lagers stayed next to the
tree Wednesday, silently
protesting the police re-
sponse. Indian TV footage
showed the villagers sitting
under the girls' bodies as
they swung in the wind,
and preventing authorities
from taking them down
until the suspects were
arrested.
Police arrested two po-
lice officers and two men
from the village later
Wednesday and were
searching for three more
suspects.
From wire reports









SPORTS


The Lady 'Noles,
back in the College
World Series after a
long drought, may
soon find themselves
back in the stands./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Baseball/B2
0 Basketball/B3
0 Hockey/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Auto racing/B4


Source:

Former

Microsoft

CEO wins

Clippers bid
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Shelly
Sterling reached an agree-
ment Thursday night to sell
the Los Angeles Clippers to
former Microsoft CEO Steve
Ballmer for $2 billion, ac-
cording to an individual with
knowledge
of the nego-
tiations.
The indi-
vidual, who
wasn't au-
thorized to
speak pub-
licly, told
Steve The Associ-
Ballmer ated Press
that Ballmer and the Ster-
ling Family Trust now have a
binding agreement The deal
now must be presented to
the NBA.
Shelly Sterling negotiated
the sale after her husband,
Donald Sterling, made racist
remarks that were made
public. Donald Sterling must
also approve the final agree-
ment as a 50 percent owner
Ballmer
beat out
bids by
Guggenheim
Partners
and a group
including
former NBA
All-Star
Donald Grant Hill.
Sterling It's un-
clear if the deal will go
through. The individual said
that though Donald Sterling
was not involved in the nego-
tiations, "at the end of the
day, he has to sign off on the
final process. They're not
going to sell his 50 percent
without him agreeing to it."
Donald Sterling's attorney
says that won't happen.
"Sterling is not selling the
team," his attorney Bobby
Samini said. "That's his posi-
tion. He's not going to sell."
That's despite a May 22 let-
ter obtained by The Associ-
ated Press and written by
another one of Sterling's at-
torneys that says that "Don-
ald T Sterling authorizes
Rochelle Sterling to negotiate
with the National Basketball
Association regarding all is-
sues in connection with a
sale of the Los Angeles Clip-
pers team." It includes the
line "read and approved" and
Donald Sterling's signature.
Samini said Sterling has
had a change of heart pri-
marily because of "the con-
duct of the NBA." He said
NBA Commissioner Adam
Silver's decision to ban Ster-
ling for life and fine him $2.5
million as well as try to oust
him as an owner was him
acting as "judge, jury and
executioner."
The person with knowl-
edge of the deal said that any
buyer would have to ensure
the team remains in Los An-
geles and be someone Shelly
Sterling could work with if
she decides to retain a small
stake. An attorney represent-
ing Shelly Sterling declined
to comment.


Associated Press
Spain's Rafael Nadal returns the ball to Austria's Dominic Thiem on Thursday during the second-round match of the
French Open tennis tournament at Roland Garros stadium in Paris. Nadal won 6-2, 6-2, 6-3.


NO


MORE


NADAL?


SPANISH ACE BECOMES COMTEMPLATIVE AFTER
DOMINATING DOMINIC THEM AT FRENCH OPEN


Associated Press
PARIS Shortly after winning
for the 61st time in his 62nd match
on the red clay at Roland Garros,
Rafael Nadal took a moment to
look at the future of tennis.
And the top-seeded Spaniard
doesn't see himself in the picture.
Or Roger Federer Or Novak
Djokovic. Or Andy Murray
True, Nadal advanced to the
third round of the French Open on
Thursday, beating a 20-year-old
Austrian in straight sets. But it's
that same 20-year-old Austrian,


Dominic Thiem, who is one of the
men who could start winning the
major titles that have been so elu-
sive to almost everyone outside
that famous quartet.
Together, they have won 34 of
the last 36 Grand Slam titles.
But, to drive home his point,
Nadal notes he's almost 28 while
Djokovic and Murray are 27 and
Federer is "I don't know, 32."
"(We're) not going to be here for
10 more years," he said.
The eight-time French Open
champion followed that last state-
ment with a chuckle, probably be-


cause he quickly realized how
ridiculous that kind of prognosti-
cation sounds after his 6-2, 6-2, 6-3
win over Thiem.
It was, however, quite a contest
on Court Philippe Chatrier, the
main stadium at Roland Garros
and Nadal's favorite place to play
Thiem broke Nadal's serve
twice, once in the first set and once
in the third. The first time, Nadal
was serving for the set at 5-1 and
leading 40-30, but Thiem hit three
straight thundering shots into the
See Page B3


Gators make short work of Baylor in OKC


Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY -
Florida senior Hannah
Rogers is a seasoned vet at
the Women's College
World Series (WCWS) and
pitched like one Thursday
Rogers, appearing in
her third WCWS, threw a
three-hitter and fifth-
seeded Florida rolled to
an 11-0, five-inning victory
over No. 13 seed Baylor on
Thursday in the NCAA soft-
ball championship tourna-
ment's opening round.
Rogers (27-8) threw her
fourth shutout of the post-
season for the Gators, who


have won six of their
seven NCAA tournament
games this season by
shutout. The run-rule win
over Baylor (47-15) was the
fifth of the tournament for
Florida (51-12).
Florida advanced to play
Friday against the top-
ranked Oregon, a 3-0 win-
ner over Florida State.
Baylor will face Florida
State in an elimination
game Saturday
Two errors and a passed
ball led to three unearned
runs for Florida in the first
off Whitney Canion (31-11),
who pitched the Bears into
the national semifinals in


2011. Bailey Castro had
the big hit for the Gators, a
double that scored Lauren
Haeger and Briana Little.
"For our team to come
out and get as many runs
as we were able to get
there early off of Whitney
Canion, I thought that was
pretty much the goal, to
get out there and score as
many runs as we can, be-
cause we know what their
offense can do and has
done," Florida coach Tim
Walton said.
Kirsti Merritt lined a
shot over the center field
See Page B4


Citrus County

Fairgrounds

Inverness, FL


Saturday, May 31
9am 5pm
&

Sunday, June 1
9am 4pm


With this coupon.
Valid May 31 & June 1, 2014
I. I


Florida's
Hannah
Rogers
pitches
against
Baylor on
Thursday in
the first
inning of
the NCAA
Women's
College
World Series
in Oklahoma
City. The
Gators
blanked the
Bears 11-0.
Associated
Press


IV !m! 71-0 07 M-T"4%

aim



sm'sy



lirlaymmIMEB











Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
20 .600 3
27 .509 4/2 1/2 7
28 .472 6/2 3/2 3
27 .471 6/2 3/2 3
30 .444 8 5 5


Str Home
W-1 14-11
W-3 16-12
W-1 13-14
L-2 13-14
L-4 15-11


Toronto
NewYork
Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay




Atlanta
Miami
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia


East Division
GB WC


West Division
L Pct GB WC
22 .593 -
23 .558 2 -
26 .519 4 1
26 .500 5 2
32 .407 10 7


Str Home Away
L-1 16-12 16-11
W-1 11-11 17-13
L-2 11-12 15-13
W-4 12-17 12-12
L-3 12-14 11-17



Str Home Away
L-4 18-12 10-13
W-2 20-8 8-17
L-2 14-14 11-13
W-3 13-17 12-11
L-1 11-16 12-12


W
Oakland 32
Los Angeles 29
Texas 28
Seattle 26
Houston 22



W
San Francisco 34
Los Angeles 29
Colorado 28
San Diego 24
Arizona 22


NL

Mets 4, Phillies 1
NewYork Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Lagarscf 5 0 2 0 Reverecf 4 0 1 0
DnMrp2b 4 00 0 Rollinsss 4 00 0
DWrght3b 5 0 1 0 Utley2b 4 00 0
Grndrsrf 2 1 0 1 Howardlb 4 00 0
Dudalb 3 1 1 0 Byrdrf 3 1 1 1
CYoungl If 4 1 2 2 DBrwnl If 3 00 0
Floresss 4 0 1 0 Ruizc 3 0 1 0
dArnadc 4 00 0 CHrndz3b 3 0 1 0
ZWhelrp 3 1 1 0 Buchnnp 2 00 0
Rice p 0 00 0 Hollndsp 0 00 0
Blackp 0 00 0 GwynJph 1 00 0
BAreuph 1 00 0 DeFrtsp 0 00 0
Mejiap 0 0 0 0 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Totals 35 48 3 Totals 31 1 4 1
NewYork 010 210 000 4
Philadelphia 000 000 100 1
E-C.Hernandez (2). DP-Philadelphia 2.
LOB-NewYork 8, Philadelphia 3.2B-Lagares
(11), Ruiz (11). HR-C.Young (4), Byrd (7). SB-


T-2:55. A-26,668 (43,651).

Rays schedule
May 30 at Boston
May 31 at Boston
June 1 at Boston
June 2 at Miami
June 3 at Miami
June 4 vs. Miami
June 5 vs. Miami
June 6 vs. Seattle
June 7 vs. Seattle
June 8 vs. Seattle
June 9 vs. Seattle
June 10 vs. St. Louis
June 11 vs. St. Louis
June 13 at Houston
June 14 at Houston
June 15 at Houston
June 16 vs. Baltimore
June 17 vs. Baltimore
June 18 vs. Baltimore
June 19 vs. Houston
June 20 vs. Houston
June 21 vs. Houston
June 22 vs. Houston
June 23 vs. Pittsburgh
June 24 vs. Pittsburgh
June 25 vs. Pittsburgh
June 27 at Baltimore
June 28 at Baltimore
June 29 at Baltimore
June 30 at NYYankees
July 1 at NYYankees
July 2 at NYYankees
July 3 at Detroit
July 4 at Detroit
July 5 at Detroit
July 6 at Detroit
July 7 vs. Kansas City
July 8 vs. Kansas City
July 9 vs. Kansas City
July 11 vs. Toronto
July 12 vs. Toronto
July 13 vs. Toronto
July 18 at Minnesota
July 19 at Minnesota
July 20 at Minnesota
July 22 at St. Louis
July 23 at St. Louis
July 25 vs. Boston
July 26 vs. Boston
July 27 vs. Boston
July 28 vs. Milwaukee
July 29 vs. Milwaukee
July 30 vs. Milwaukee
Aug. 1 vs. LA Angels
Aug. 2 vs. LA Angels
Aug. 3 vs. LA Angels
Aug. 4 at Oakland
Aug. 5 at Oakland
Aug. 6 at Oakland
Aug. 8 at Chicago Cubs
Aug. 9 at Chicago Cubs
Aug. 10 at Chicago Cubs
Aug.11 atTexas
Aug. 12 atTexas
Aug. 13 atTexas
Aug. 14 atTexas
Aug. 15 vs. NYYankees
Aug. 16 vs. NYYankees
Aug. 17 vs. NYYankees
Aug. 19 vs. Detroit
Aug. 20 vs. Detroit
Aug.21 vs. Detroit
Aug.22 atToronto
Aug.23 atToronto
Aug.24 atToronto
Aug.25 at Baltimore
Aug.26 at Baltimore
Aug.27 at Baltimore
Aug.28 at Baltimore
Aug. 29 vs. Boston
Aug. 30 vs. Boston
Aug.31 vs. Boston
Sept. 1 vs. Boston
Sept. 2 vs. Toronto
Sept. 3 vs. Toronto
Sept. 4 vs. Toronto
Sept. 5 vs. Baltimore
Sept. 6 vs. Baltimore
Sept. 7 vs. Baltimore
Sept. 9 at NYYankees
Sept. 10 at NYYankees
Sept. 11 at NYYankees
Sept. 12 atToronto
Sept. 13 atToronto
Sept. 14 atToronto
Sept. 15 vs. NYYankees
Sept. 16 vs. NYYankees
Sept. 17 vs. NYYankees
Sept. 19 vs. Chicago White Sox
Sept. 20 vs. Chicago White Sox
Sept. 21 vs. Chicago White Sox
Sept. 23 at Boston
Sept. 24 at Boston
Sept. 25 at Boston
Sept. 26 at Cleveland
Sept. 27 at Cleveland
Sept. 28 at Cleveland


.. ..


Associated Press
Toronto Blue Jays starting pitcher R.A Dickey walks back to the mound Thursday after he and third baseman
Juan Francisco, left, failed to field a bunt that stayed fair in the sixth inning of their game against the Kansas
City Royals in Toronto. Dickey was then taken out of the game.



Royals pluck win from Jays, end streak


Associated Press

TORONTO Omar Infante hit
a two-run single in the 10th inning
and the Kansas City Royals over-
came two home runs by Edwin
Encarnacion to beat the Blue Jays
8-6 on Thursday night, snapping
Toronto's winning streak at nine
games.
Facing Todd Redmond (0-4), Al-
cides Escobar singled to begin the
10th. Pedro Ciriaco was hit on the
front of the helmet while squaring
to bunt and Nori Aoki advanced
the runners with a sacrifice be-
fore Infante lined a single just
over the reach of leaping third
baseman Brett Lawrie.
Wade Davis (4-1) worked two in-
nings for the win and Greg Hol-
land closed it out for his 15th save
in 16 chances.
The Blue Jays were on the
verge of victory in the ninth be-
fore the Royals tied it with an un-
earned run off Casey Janssen,
who blew a save for the first time
in nine chances. After Jose
Bautista threw out Butler at first
base from right field for the sec-
ond out, Alex Gordon singled to
left and was replaced by pinch-
runner Jarrod Dyson, who stole
second and scored when Encar-
nacion couldn't handle an errant,
bouncing throw from shortstop
Jose Reyes on Salvador Perez's
grounder
Reyes batted with a runner on
in the 10th but couldn't atone for
his gaffe, striking out looking to
end it.
Perez hit a solo homer in the
second for the Royals who
snapped a four-game skid and
avoided matching their longest
losing streak of the season.
The Royals had 14 hits on the
same day they shook up their staff,
making Dale Sveum the hitting
coach and Mike Jirschele their
third base coach. Pedro Grifol,
who took over as hitting coach last
season, was reassigned as a catch-
ing instructor
Encarnacion matched a major
league record with his fifth multi-
homer game in a month. Albert
Belle did it in September 1995
and Harmon Killebrew in May
1959.
The blasts were Encarnacion's
15th and 16th in May, breaking
Bautista's team record for homers
in a month. Bautista hit 14 in
June, 2012.
The major league record for
home runs in May is 17, set by
Barry Bonds in 2001. Encarnacion
has two games remaining this
month.
Shields came in having won
four straight decisions and was
6-1 with a 1.13 ERA in his past
eight starts against Toronto, but
couldn't duplicate that success.
He allowed six runs and eight
hits in seven innings, including a
season-worst three homers.
Shields walked none and struck
out six.
Dickey allowed five runs and a
season-worst 10 hits in five in-
nings. He walked one and struck
out seven.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wednesday's Games
Houston 9, Kansas City 3
Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2
Boston 4, Atlanta 0
Milwaukee 8, Baltimore 3
Chicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 2
Texas 1, Minnesota 0
N.Y Yankees 7, St. Louis 4
Oakland 3, Detroit 1
Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 1
Thursday's Games
Texas 5, Minnesota 4
Detroit 5, Oakland 4
Kansas City 8, Toronto 6, 10 innings
Boston 4, Atlanta 3
Baltimore at Houston, late
L.A. Angels at Seattle, late
Friday's Games
Colorado (Nicasio 5-2) at Cleveland (Kluber 5-3), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Nolasco2-5) at Yankees (Nuno 1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 4-3) at Washington (Strasburg 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Vargas 4-2) at Toronto (Happ 4-1), 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay(Price 4-4) at Boston (Workman 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Gonzalez 3-3) at Houston (Oberhdtzer 1-6), 8:10 p.m.
San Diego (Kennedy 3-6) at White Sox (Danks 3-4), 8:10 p.m.
Angels (Richards 4-1) at Oakland (PoFmeranz 4-2), 10:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 5-4) at Seattle (Iwakuma 3-1), 10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wednesday's Games
N.Y Mets 5, Pittsburgh 0
San Francisco 5, Chicago Cubs 0
Philadelphia 6, Colorado 3
Miami 8, Washington 5, 10 innings
Boston 4, Atlanta 0
Milwaukee 8, Baltimore 3
N.Y Yankees 7, St. Louis 4
Arizona 12, San Diego 6
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Thursday's Games
N.Y Mets 4, Philadelphia 1
Boston 4, Atlanta 3
San Francisco at St. Louis, late
Cincinnati at Arizona, late
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, late
Friday's Games
Colorado (Nicasio 5-2) at Cleveland (Kluber 5-3), 7:05 p.m.
Mets (Mmntero 0-2) at Philadelphia (Burnett 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 4-3) at Washington (Strasburg 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 4-3) at Miami (Koehler 4-4), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Wood 5-4) at Milwaukee (Estrada 4-2), 8:10 p.m.
San Diego (Kennedy 3-6) at White Sox (Danks 3-4), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 6-3) at St. Louis (Wainwright
8-2), 8:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 2-4) at Arizona (Arroyo 4-3), 9:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-5) at Dodgers (Beckett 3-1), 10:10 p.m.


INTERLEAGUE

Red Sox 4, Braves 3
BOSTON Chris Johnson's throw-
ing error from third base allowed Jackie
Bradley Jr. to score from second with
none out in the ninth inning, giving the
Boston Red Sox a 4-3 win over the At-
lanta Braves for their fourth straight
win after a 10-game skid.
The Red Sox took advantage of two
more errors to score twice in the
eighth to tie it 3-all and set up closer
Koji Uehara (1-1) for the win.
Bradley and Brock Holt drew back-to-
back walks off closer Craig Kimbrel (0-1).
Xander Bogaerts followed with a hard
grounder to Johnson at third. Johnson
stopped it and picked it up, but his at-
tempt to force Holt at second base was
off and the Red Sox were rushing out
of the dugout as the ball trickled into
right and Bradley came around for the
winning run.
The Red Sox scored twice in the
eighth to tie it at 3-all and set up closer
Koji Uehara (1-1) for the win.
Boston completed a four-game
sweep in the home-and-home series.
Jason Heyward homered and Fred-
die Freeman drove in a run and scored
once for the Braves, who lost their
fourth straight and fifth in six games.
Mike Minor had a strong start for At-
lanta, holding Boston to one run on
seven hits in seven innings.


AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rangers 5, Twins 4
MINNEAPOLIS Leonys
Martin doubled twice and scored
three times, including the go-ahead
run in the eighth inning, and the
Texas Rangers beat Minnesota
Twins 5-4 on Thursday to win their
second straight four-game series
on the road.
Shin-Soo Choo hit a three-run dou-
ble in the second for the Rangers, but
the Twins took a 4-3 lead in the fifth in-
ning on Josh Willingham's first home
run of the season, a no-doubt drive to
the second deck above left-center
field.
Alexi Ogando (2-2) got four outs for
the victory, and Joakim Soria retired
the last two batters for his 10Oth save.
Casey Fien (3-2) got the loss.

Tigers 5, Athletics 4
OAKLAND, Calif. Miguel
Cabrera hit a go-ahead sacrifice fly
in the fifth to back Rick Porcello's
eighth victory, and the Detroit Tigers
beat the Oakland Athletics 5-4 on
Thursday for a split of the four-
game series between division
leaders.
Porcello (8-2) overcame a career-
high six walks, three shy of his season
total coming into Thursday's start. Joe
Nathan earned his 13th save after al-
lowing Josh Donaldson's leadoff dou-
ble, an RBI infield single by Yoenis
Cespedes and Josh Reddick's run-
scoring double.
Victor Martinez doubled home two
runs in the seventh and Cabrera also
had an RBI groundout for the Tigers,
who head to Seattle for the weekend
before returning home.
Nick Punto hit a two-run homer in
the fourth for Oakland, which wasted
chances all game to lose for only the
seventh time in 20 games.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Mets 4, Phillies 1
PHILADELPHIA- Chris Young hit
a two-run homer and Zack Wheeler
struck out nine in 6 1-3 innings to lead
the New York Mets to a 4-1 victory
over the Philadelphia Phillies on
Thursday night in the opener of a rare
five-game series.
The Mets, who opened an 11-game
road trip, matched a season best with
their third straight victory while beating
the Phillies for the sixth straight time at
Citizens Bank Park.
Marion Byrd homered for the
Phillies, who set a season high with
15 strikeouts against four Mets
pitchers.
The series originally was scheduled
for four games, but the teams will
make up their April 30 rainout on Mon-
day, which originally was a day off for
both teams.
Wheeler (2-5) looked nothing
like the pitcher who entered with a
4.63 ERA and one win in 10 starts
this season. Mixing a fastball that
hit the high 90s and a slow, knee-
buckling curveball, the right-hander
retired eight of the first 10 batters
via strikeout.


B2 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2013


Str Home
L-1 14-12
L-1 15-13
W-2 13-13
W-1 12-13
W-5 10-15



Str Home
W-2 19-9
L-1 11-14
L-1 16-7
L-1 14-15
W-1 8-19


Minnesota
r h bi
0 2 3 Dozier2b
0 1 0 Mauerlb
0 1 0 Plouffe3b
0 2 0 Arcia rf
1 1 0 A.Hicks pr
1 2 0 Wlnghdh
0 0 0 Kubel If
3 2 0 Pinto c
0 1 1 EEscorss
0 0 1 DSantn cf
5125 Totals
030 001 010
002 020 000


ab r h bi
4000
5110
5121
5030
0000
3123
3000
4000
4000
4130
5 37411 4
5 1 2 1
5 0 3 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 2 3
3 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
4 1 3 0
37411 4
5
4


DP-Texas 1. LOB Texas 9, Minnesota 10.
2B-Choo (9), L.Martin 2(4), Plouffe (19), Arcia
(3). HR-Willingham (1). SB-D.Santana (1).
S-Chirinos. SF-Odor.
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
N.Martinez 52-39 4
OgandoW,2-2 11-31 0
FrasorH,8 1 0 0
CottsH,7 1-3 0 0
SoriaS,10-11 2-3 1 0
Minnesota
Deduno 51-39 4
Duensing 1 0 0
Swarzak 2-3 1 0
FienL,3-2 1 1 1
Guerrier 1 1 0
HBP-by Duensing (Choo). WP-
T-3:34.A-28,170 (39,021).


4 1 2
0 0 1
0 0 1
1 0 0
0 0 2
00N.Martinez.
-N.Martinez.


Tigers 5, Athletics 4


Detroit


Oakland


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 5 22 1 Crisp cf 4 02 0
D.Kellyrf 4 1 2 0 Jasoc 3 02 0
MiCarrIb 3 1 1 2 DNorrsph-c 2 00 0
VMrtnzdh 4 02 2 Dnldsn3b 4 1 1 0
JMrtnzlf 4 0 1 0 Moss If 3 0 0 0
AJcksn cf 4 00 0 Cespdsdh 5 1 1 1
Avilac 4 00 0 Callasplb 4 1 1 0
Cstllns3b 4 02 0 Reddckrf 4 01 1
AnRmnss 4 1 1 0 Puntoss 2 1 1 2
Sogard2b 3 00 0
Lowrie ph 1 00 0
Totals 36 5115 Totals 35 4 9 4
Detroit 001 020 200 5
Oakland 000 200 002 4
DP-Detroit 1, Oakland 1. LOB-Detroit 7, Oak-
land 14. 2B-Kinsler 2 (19), V.Martinez (13),
Donaldson (12), Reddick (3). HR-Punto (1).
SF-Mi.Cabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
PorcelloW,8-2 52-35 2 2 6 4
Krol H,9 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Alburquerque H,8 1 0 0 0 2 1
Chamberlain H, 11 1 1 0 0 0 2
Nathan S,13-17 1 3 2 2 1 1
Oakland
J.Chavez L,4-3 6 8 3 3 2 3
Ji.Johnson 1 3 2 2 0 0
Abad 1 0 0 0 0 1
Fe.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Porcello (Sogard).
T-3:28.A-21,860 (35,067).

Royals 8,

Blue Jays 6

(10 innings)


Kansas City
ab
Aoki rf 3
Infante 2b 6
Hosmer lb 6
BButler dh 6
AGordn If 5
Dyson pr-lf 0
S.Perezc 4
L.Cain cf 4
AEscorss 5
Ciriaco 3b 4


Toronto
rhbi ab rhbi
1 1 0 Reyesss 5 00 0
0 2 3 MeCarrl If 4 12 0
1 1 0 Pillar If 0 0 0 0
0 2 1 Bautistrf 4 1 1 2
02 1 Linddh 4 22 0
1 0 0 Encrnclb 4 22 4
1 1 1 JFrncs3b 3 0 0 0
0 1 0 StTllsn2b 1 00 0
23 0 Lawrie2b-3b 4 00 0
2 1 1 Tholec 3 00 0


DNavrrph 1 00 0
Gose cf 4 02 0
Totals 43 8147 Totals 37 6 9 6
Kansas City01O 130 001 2 8
Toronto 200 202 000 0 6
E-Reyes (5). DP Toronto 1. LOB-Kansas
City 11, Toronto 1.2B-Hosmer (19), A.Gordon
(14), L.Cain (6), Ciriaco (2). HR-S.Perez (5),
Bautista (13), Encarnacion 2 (18). SB-Dyson
(10), A.Escobar(15). S-Aoki.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Shields 7 8 6 6 0 6
WDavisW,4-1 2 0 0 0 0 2
G.Holland S,15-16 1 1 0 0 0 2
Toronto
Dickey 5 10 5 5 1 7
Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 1
RasmussenH,2 2-3 1 0 0 1 1
LoupH,10 11-30 0 0 0 1
JanssenBS,1-9 1 1 1 0 0 1
RedmondL,0-4 1 2 2 2 0 0
Dickey pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Delabar (Aoki), by Redmond (Ciriaco),
by Rasmussen (S.Perez).WP-Rasmussen.
T-3:26.A-17,978 (49,282).


Interleague

Red Sox 4, Braves 3


Atlanta


Heywrd rf
BUpton cf
FFrmn 1 b
J.Upton If
Gattis c
CJhnsn 3b
Doumit dh


Boston
r h bi
1 2 1 Holt3b
1 1 0 Bogartsss
1 1 1 Pedroia2b
0 1 0 Przynsdh
0 1 1 JGoms lf
0 0 0 GSizmr rf
0 1 0 Lvrnwy lb


JSchafr pr-dhO 0 0 0 Nava ph-lb
LaStell 2b 3 0 0 0 D.Ortiz ph
Smmnsss 4 0 2 0 Carppr-lb
D.Ross c
BrdlyJr cf
Totals 35 39 3 Totals
Atlanta 001 100 010
Boston 000 010 021


ab r h bi
4131
5131
4010
4020
4010
4010
1000
2000
0000
0000
4110
3100
35412 2
4 1 3 1
5 1 3 1
4 0 1 0
4 0 2 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
4 1 1 0
3 1 0 0
35412 2
3
4


No outs when winning run scored.
E-B.Upton (3), J.Upton (5), La Stella (1).
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-Atlanta 7, Boston 10.
2B-F.Freeman (15), Holt (5), Bogaerts (13),
D.Ross (3). HR-Heyward (5). SB-Simmons
(1).S-La Stella.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Minor 7 7 1 1 0 3
D.Carpenter BS,2-4 1-3 4 2 2 0 1
Avilan 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
KimbrelL,0-1 1-3 1 1 0 2 0
Boston
Peavy 8 8 3 3 1 4
UeharaW,1l-1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
Balk-Peavy.
T-3:00. A-36,292 (37,499).


BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 32 22 .593 5-5 W-2 16-11 16-11
St. Louis 29 24 .547 2/2 6-4 L-1 15-9 14-15
Cincinnati 23 28 .451 7/2 4/2 4-6 W-1 12-12 11-16
Pittsburgh 23 29 .442 8 5 6-4 L-2 16-13 7-16
Chicago 19 32 .373 11/2 8/2 5-5 L-2 10-13 9-19


West Division
t GB WC


East Division
GB WC
8 3
8 1 /2
1 2/2 3
2 3 3/2
1 4 4/2


ab
Choo dh 4
Sardins ss 5
Morlnd lb 5
ABeltre 3b 5
Rios rf 5
Choice If 4
DRrtsn If 0
LMartn cf 3
Chirins c 3
Odor2b 3
Totals 37
Texas
Minnesota


IP H RERBBSO


Revere (14).

NewYork
Z.WheelerW,2-5
Rice H,6
Black H,1
Mejia S,5-5
Philadelphia
Buchanan L,1-1
Hollands
De Fratus
Bastardo


61-34 1
1-3 0 0
11-30 0
1 0 0

62-37 4
11-30 0
1-3 1 0
2-3 0 0


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rangers 5, Twins 4




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



French Open results
Thursday at Stade Roland Garros, Paris
Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Second Round
David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Simone Bolelli,
Italy, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Donald Young, United States, def. Feliciano
Lopez (26), Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3.
Kevin Anderson (19), South Africa, def. Axel
Michon, France, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Andreas Haider-
Maurer, Austria, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4.
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Dominic Thiem,
Austria, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Adrian
Mannarino, France, 6-4, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0.
Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, def. Jurgen Zopp, Es-
tonia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Teymuraz
Gabashvili, Russia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Andreas Seppi (32), Italy, def. Juan Monaco,
Argentina, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (28), Germany, def.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
Andy Murray (7), Britain, def. Marinko Mato-
sevic, Australia, 6-3, 6-1, 6-3.
Richard Gasquet (12), France, def. Carlos
Berlocq, Argentina, 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4.
Jack Sock, United States, def. Steve John-
son, United States, 7-5, 6-4, 6-2.
Fabio Fognini (14), Italy, def. Thomaz Bel-
lucci, Brazil, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (2).
Gael Monfils (23), France, def. Jan-Lennard
Struff, Germany, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-1.
Fernando Verdasco (24), Spain, def. Pablo
Cuevas, Uruguay, 4-6, 6-7 (6), 7-5, 6-4, 6-3.
Women
Second Round
Jelena Jankovic (6), Serbia, def. Kurumi
Nara, Japan, 7-5, 6-0.
Sloane Stephens (15), United States, def.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-1, 6-3.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (27), Russia, def.
Camila Giorgi, Italy, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, def. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova (24), Russia, 5-7, 6-4, 3-0, retired.
Julia Glushko, Israel, def. Kirsten Flipkens
(21), Belgium, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.
Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain, def. Yanina
Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-2, 6-4.
Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Mag-
dalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-2, 2-6, 6-2.
Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def. Monica
Niculescu, Romania, 2-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Lucie Safarova (23), Czech Republic, def.
Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 6-1, 5-7, 6-3.
Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Yaroslava
Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova (22), Russia, def. CoCo
Vandeweghe, United States, 6-4, 6-3.
Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Alison
Riske, United States, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-3.
Andrea Petkovic (28), Germany, def. Stefanie
Voegele, Switzerland, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2.
Sara Errani (10), Italy, def. Dinah Pfizenmaier,
Germany, 6-2, 6-4.
Sorana Cirstea (26), Romania, def. Teliana
Pereira, Brazil, 6-2, 7-5.
Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def. Ma-
rina Erakovic, New Zealand, 6-4, 6-4.
Simona Halep (4), Romania, def. Heather
Watson, Britain, 6-2, 6-4.
Ana Ivanovic (11), Serbia, def. Elina Svitolina,
Ukraine, 7-5, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Treat Huey, Philippines, and Dominic Inglot
(7), Britain, def. Santiago Giraldo and Alejandro
Gonzalez, Colombia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3.
Andre Begemann, Germany, and Robin
Haase, Netherlands, def. Fabrice Martin and
Hugo Nys, France, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3.
Feliciano Lopez, Spain, and Jurgen Melzer,
Austria, def. Pierre-Hugues Herbert and Albano
Olivetti, France, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Second Round
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Robert Lindstedt
(9), Sweden, def. Jeremy Chardy, France, and
Oliver Marach, Austria, 6-4, 6-1.
Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia
Tecau (13), Romania, def. Nicholas Monroe,
United States, and Simon Stadler, Germany, 6-3,
6-0.
Jonathan Erlich, Israel, and Marcelo Melo,
Brazil, def. Rohan Bopanna, India, and Aisam-
ul-Haq Qureshi (6), Pakistan, 6-3, 6-4.
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic
(3), Serbia, def. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain,
and Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-3.
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, def.
Jonathan Eysseric and Marc Gicquel, France,
6-3, 6-3.
Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (12),
Spain, def. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, and
Philipp Oswald, Austria, 4-6, 6-0, 6-3.
Women
First Round
Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (6),
United States, def. Sandra Klemenschits and
Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, 6-3, 6-3.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza (5),
India, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and
Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-3, 6-3.
Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada, and Alicja
Rosolska, Poland, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croa-
tia, and Zhang Shuai, China, 6-1, 6-3.
Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, and Karin
Knapp, Italy, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, and
Virginie Razzano, France, 6-4, 6-3.
Shuko Aoyama, Japan, and Renata Vora-
cova, Czech Republic, def. Amandine Hesse
and Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-1, 6-4.
Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (1),
China, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, and
Sam Stosur, Australia, 6-2, 6-4.
Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, and Barbora
Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, def. An-
abel Medina Garrigues, Spain, and Yaroslava
Shvedova (11), Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-2.
Garbine Muguruza and Carla Suarez
Navarro, Spain, def. Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia,
and Sloane Stephens, United States, 7-5, 6-4.
ChanYung-jan and Chan Hao-ching, Taiwan,
def. Kurumi Nara, Japan, and Anna
Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-0.
Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, and Kirsten
Flipkens, Belgium, def. Julia Goerges and Anna-
Lena Groenefeld (8), Germany, 7-5, 2-6, 7-5.
Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua (7),
Australia, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, and
Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, 6-2, 6-3.
Klara Koukalova, Czech Republic, and Mon-
ica Niculescu (14), Romania, def. Monica Puig,
Puerto Rico, and Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium,
6-7 (1), 6-0, 6-3.
Julie Coin and Pauline Parmentier, France,
def. Irina Buryachok, Ukraine, and Vladimira
Uhlirova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, and Magdalena
Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Claire Feuerstein and


Alize Lim, France, 6-1, 6-3.
Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Janette
Husarova, Slovakia, def. Karolina and Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina (3),
Russia, def. Alix Collombon and Chloe Paquet,
France, 6-2, 6-3.
Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (2), Italy, def.
Timea Babos, Hungary, and Varvara Lep-
chenko, United States, 6-1, 6-3.
Kristina Mladenovic, France, and Flavia Pen-
netta (12), Italy, def. Alize Cornet and Caroline
Garcia, France, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2.
Mixed
First Round
Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, and Santiago
Gonzalez, Mexico, def. Lisa Raymond, United
States, and John Peers, Australia, 7-6 (2), 6-2.
Liezel Huber, United States, and Juan Se-
bastian Cabal, Colombia, def. Stephanie Foretz
Gacon and Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 6-3,
6-2.
Raquel Kops-Jones, United States, and
Raven Klaasen, South Africa, def. Anastasia
Rodionova, Australia, and Colin Fleming,


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 B3


For the record


F== lorida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
7-2-7
S*CASH 3 (late)
08-4-3

SPLAY 4 (early)
7-7-6-7
PLAY 4 (late)
S 7-0-8-4

^ FANTASY 5
3-13-32-34-36


Wednesday's winningnumbers and payouts:


Powerball: 2 -24 -28 -32 -59
Powerball: 25
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 2 winners $1 million
No Florida winners
Fantasy 5:14 -17 -26 -29 -33
5-of-5 5 winners $45,278.53
4-of-5 314 $116
3-of-5 9,141 $11


Lotto: 13
6-of-6
5-of-6
4-of-6
3-of-6


-14 -18 -26 -37 -45
No winner
19 $5,866.50
994 $82
21,620 $5


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (FS1) NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: FedEx 400 Bene-
fiting Autism Speaks, practice. From Dover International
Speedway in Dover, Del.
12:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series:
Lucas Oil 200, qualifying. From Dover International Speedway
2 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Dover 200, practice
3:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Sprint Cup Series: FedEx 400 Ben-
efiting Autism Speaks, qualifying
5:30 p.m. (FS1) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series:
Lucas Oil 200
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Cal State Fullerton vs.
Nebraska. Regional, from Stillwater, Okla.
4 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Texas vs. Texas A&M.
Regional, from Houston
7 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAATournament: Arkansas vs. Liberty. Re-
gional, from Charlottesville, Va.
11 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: North Dakota State vs.
Oregon State. Regional, from Corvallis, Ore.
BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Atlanta Braves at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox
8 p.m. (MLB) Baltimore Orioles at Houston Astros or San
Francisco Giants at St. Louis Cardinals
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers
BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat. Eastern
Conference Final, Game 6
WNBA BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (NBA) Connecticut Sun at Chicago Sky
GOLF
5 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Nordea Masters, second
round. From Malmo, Sweden
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Nordea Masters, second
round
12 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: ShopRite Classic, first round.
From Galloway, N.J.
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Memorial Tournament, second
round. From Dublin, Ohio
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Principal Charity Clas-
sic, first round. From Des Moines, Iowa. (same-day tape)
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (NHL) Montreal Canadiens at New York Rangers. East-
ern Conference Final, Game 6 (taped)
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Los Angeles Kings.
Western Conference Final, Game 6
LACROSSE
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Boston Cannons at New York Lizards
(same-day tape)
SOFTBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA World Series, Game 5: Teams TBA.
From Oklahoma City
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA World Series, Game 6: Teams TBA
2 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA World Series, Game 5: Teams TBA
(same-day tape)
4 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA World Series, Game 6: Teams TBA
(same-day tape)
TENNIS
5 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open: third round
9 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open: third round
10 a.m. (TENNIS) French Open: third round
6 p.m. (TENNIS) French Open: third round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Britain, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Robert Farah,
Colombia, def. Alia Kudryavtseva, Russia, and
Treat Huey, Philippines, 6-4, 6-4.
Sania Mirza, India, and HoriaTecau, Roma-
nia, def. Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and
Marcin Matkowski (4), Poland, 4-6, 6-3, 10-7.
Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Jean-
Julien Rojer, Netherlands, def.Zheng Jie, China,
and Scott Lipsky, United States, 7-5, 6-3.

Thursday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Reassigned Dale
Sveum as hitting coach, Pedro Grifol as catching
instructor and Mike Jirschele as third base coach.
TEXAS RANGERS-Acquired INF Jason
Donald from Kansas City Royals for cash con-
siderations.
National League
NEWYORK METS-Named Wes Engram vice
president corporate partnerships sales and service.
Frontier League
LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS Released INF
Kevin Berard.
ROCKFORD AVIATORS- Sold the contract
of RHP Josh Slaatsto the Arizona Diamondbacks.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Fined Indiana G Lance Stephenson
$10,000 for his second violation and Indiana C
Roy Hibbert $5,000 for violating the league's
anti-flopping rules during last night's game.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS Signed OL Cyrus
Kouandjio. Released OL Randy Coiling.
CAROLINA PANTHERS Signed DE Kony
Ealy.
CHICAGO BEARS Claimed OL Michael
Ola off waivers from Miami.Terminated the con-
tract of CB Derrick Martin. Waived OL Rogers


Gaines.
CLEVELAND BROWNS -Agreed to terms
with DB Pierre Desir. Named Morocco Brown
vice president of player personnel.
DETROIT LIONS Promoted Rob Lohman
to assistant director of pro personnel. Named
Darren Anderson midwest region scouting su-
pervisor and Joe Kelleher midwestto the plains-
central region scout. Named Patrick Mularkey
pro personnel coordinator.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS Signed OL
Emmanuel McCray and CB Shaquille Richardson.
Claimed CB Deion Belue off waivers from Miami.
Released OLs Nik Embernate and Kaycee Ike.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Signed CB
Jason Verrett to a four-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS -Signed C Mar-
cus Martin to a four-year contract.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Agreed to terms
with WR Doug Baldwina on a contract exten-
sion through the 2016 season.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS- SignedT Mor-
gan Moses.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES Signed D Brady
Austin to a three-year contract.
DALLAS STARS Signed F Jason Dickin-
son to a three-year contract.
FLORIDA PANTHERS Agreed to terms
with D MacKenzie Weegar.
LOS ANGELES KINGS Signed F Valentin
Zykov and D Nick Ebertto three-year contracts.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS Issued official warnings to Vancou-
ver and Seattle for violating the league mass
confrontation policy in their game on May 24.
Fined Vancouver MF Pedro Morales and Seat-
tle F Chad Barrett undisclosed amounts for con-
tact to the head of an opponent and escalating
the incident. Fined Toronto FC coach Ryan
Nelsen an undisclosed amount for public criti-
cism after their May 23 game.


Il U
^- --l5- ^-

Associated Press
New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist reacts as time winds off the clock
Thursday to give the New York Rangers a 1-0 win over the Montreal Canadiens
in Game 6 of the NHL Eastern Conference finals in New York.



Rangers knock out Habs



in 6, reach Cup finals


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Dominic Moore
scored in the second period, Henrik
Lundqvist bounced back from his
worst performance in the playoffs and
the New York Rangers beat the Mon-
treal Canadiens 1-0 on Thursday night
to advance to the Stanley Cup finals.
The Rangers are in the champi-
onship round for the first time since
winning it all in 1994. To celebrate, the
Empire State Building was immedi-
ately lit up in Rangers colors.
Lundqvist and the Rangers shook off
a 7-4 road loss Tuesday night to take out
the Canadiens on home ice in Game 6.
Lundqvist needed to make only 18
saves to tie the team record for playoff
shutouts with nine. He was pulled
after allowing four goals in less than
two periods Tuesday
"It feels so unbelievable," Lundqvist
said. "The way we responded here, I
think we played one of our best peri-
ods of the whole playoffs in the third
period, when it mattered the most You
just have to get fired up and go out and


play The guys did such a great job. It
was not hard."
Lundqvist had been 0-5 since 2009 in
non-Game 7 clinching games. He
leaped several times in his crease with
his hands raised as streamers were
fired off from the rafters.
The Rangers don't have a captain, so
assistants Brad Richards, Dan Girardi
and Marc Staal were called to accept
the Prince of Wales Trophy The whole
team joined them and posed for a full
squad photo while the Garden rocked
with yells of"We Want The Cup!"
Montreal's Dustin Tokarski, who re-
placed injured No. 1 goalie Carey Price
after Game 1, made 31 saves.
The Stanley Cup finals will begin
Wednesday at either Chicago or Los
Angeles, which leads the Western fi-
nals 3-2.
NOTES: Lundqvist earned his team-
record 41st career playoff victory ...
The Rangers hadn't won a series in less
than seven games since the first round
in 2008 against New Jersey ... Montreal
hasn't been to the Stanley Cup finals
since winning the title in 1993.


OPEN
Continued from Pages B1

same corner, the first a backhand the
next two forehands, to make it 5-2.
"He has very powerful shots," said
Nadal, who can become the first man
in history to win five straight French
Open titles with another victory this
year "Very powerful forehand and
good backhand, too."
Good, for sure, but not yet good
enough to take down Nadal.
"It's really important to play against
these guys a lot, against these top guys
because it's more important than
every practice," said Thiem, playing in
only his second Grand Slam tourna-
ment. "I hope I can take a lot with me
from this match."
The three other old-timers have also
reached the third round, with Murray
beating Marinko Matosevic 6-3,6-1,6-3.
Despite the lopsided score, Murray
still had to work to keep himself sharp,
at times chastising himself out loud for
all to hear
"From a player's perspective ... the
beginning of sets are very important to
try and get ahead whilst the oppo-
nent's head is down a little bit," Mur-
ray said. "I was just trying to make
sure that my intensity was there every
moment, especially at the beginning of
the sets. I managed to get ahead early
in all of them, and that helped."
Murray has never won the French
Open, nor has anyone else in the men's
draw besides Nadal and Federer But
the Wimbledon champion reached the
semifinals at Roland Garros in 2011


and the quarterfinals in 2012. He
missed last year's tournament because
of a back injury
The women's tournament started
with six former champions in the main
draw, and three remain Maria
Sharapova, Svetlana Kuznetsova and
Ana Ivanovic.
Kuznetsova and Ivanovic won sec-
ond-round matches Thursday Shara-
pova advanced on Wednesday and will
play again Friday
But the one player just about every-
one expects to see holding the trophy
yet again at Roland Garros is Nadal,
the only man with eight major titles from
the same Grand Slam tournament.
Nadal's only loss at Roland Garros
came in the fourth round in 2009, a re-
sult that split his eight titles into two
neat groups of four And his start so far
this year is already a tad better than
the one last year, when he needed four
sets in the first round and four in the
second to advance.
"No one year is the same, no, no,
no," Nadal said. "No, no, no, doesn't
mean nothing, doesn't mean nothing
that last year I (started with) a very
hard week, but I played well when I
had to play well."
In the third round this year, Nadal
will face Leonardo Mayer, a 27-year-
old Argentine who has lost in his two
other attempts to reach the fourth
round at Roland Garros.
Should be another easy victory for
Nadal, but who knows how long those
will last.
"A generation is walking away and
others will replace us," Nadal said. "It
will not come overnight, but it will
come."


Spurs clobber Thunder,

take 3-2 series lead


Associated Press
San Antonio Spurs' Kawhi Leonard shoots over the Oklahoma City
Thunder's Kevin Durant on Thursday during the second half of Game 5
of the Western Conference finals in San Antonio. The Spurs won 117-89.


SCOREBOARD




B4 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 SPORTS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sprint Cup
SCHEDULE

x-non-points race
Feb. 15 x-Sprint Unlimited (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 20-x-Budweiser Duel 1 (Matt Kenseth)
Feb. 20 x-Budweiser Duel 2 (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 23 Daytona 500 (Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
March 2-The Profit on CNBC 500, Avondale,
Ariz. (Kevin Harvick)
March 9 Kobalt 400, Las Vegas (Brad Ke-
selowski)
March 16 -Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Carl
Edwards)
March 23 Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif.
(Kyle Busch)
March 30 STP 500, Ridgeway, Va. (Kurt Busch)
April 7 Duck Commander 500, Fort Worth,
Texas (Joey Lcgano)
April 12 Bojangles' Southern 500, Darling-
ton, S.C. (Kevin Harvick)
April 26 Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va.
(Joey Logano)
May 4 Aaron's 499, Talladega, AIa. (Denny
Hamlin)
May 10 Kansas 400, Kansas City Kan. (Jeff
Gordon)
May 16-x-Sprint Showdown, Concord, N.C.
(Clint Bowyer)
May 17 x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race,
Concord, N.C. (Jamie McMurray)
May 25 Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
(Jimmie Johnson)
June 1 Dover 400, Dover, Del.
June 8 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa.
June 15- Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 22 -Toyocta/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif.
June 28 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 5 Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach.
July 13 Camping World RV Sales 301,
Loudon, N.H.
July 27 -The Brickyard 400, Indianapolis.
Aug. 3- GoBowling.com 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug. 10 Cheez-lt 355 at the Glen, Watkins
Glen, N.Y
Aug. 17-Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 23- Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
Aug. 31 Atlanta 500, Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 6 Federated Auto Parts 400, Rich-
mond, Va.
Sept.14 -Chicagoland 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 21 -Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H.
Sept. 28-AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 5 Hdollywood Casino 400, Kansas City Kan.
Oct. 11 Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 19 GEICO 500, Talladega, AMa.
Oct. 26 Goody's Headache Relief Shot 500,
Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 2 -AAATexas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 9 Quicken Loans 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 16 Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead


For Hunter-Reay, replay




almost as exciting as a win


Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas
- Ryan Hunter-Reay was
on the edge of his seat
when he finally got a
chance to watch a replay
of the closing laps of his
Indianapolis 500 victory,
just like he was in the
cockpit when making a
bold, grass-clipping
inside move past Helio
Castroneves.
"It was ridiculously
close to watch it from TV,"
Hunter-Reay said
Wednesday "I felt more in
control of it in the car, so I
can see why everybody's
like, 'That's dodgy"'
Even though that wasn't
the winning pass, and
Hunter-Reay had to get
around Castroneves again
before taking the check-
ered flag, the daredevil
move provided quite a
highlight that has been
widely applauded.
"That's my personality,
that's my style," he said.
"It's my driving style. I al-
ways go for it, 100 percent"
When Hunter-Reay
made a similar move six
weeks earlier at Long
Beach, he triggered a
seven-car accident 24 laps
from the finish that also
took out his Andretti Au-


Associated Press
Ryan Hunter-Reay celebrates Sunday after crossing the
finish line to take the checkered flag in front of Helio
Castroneves to win the 98th running of the Indianapolis
500 IndyCar at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.


tosport teammate James
Hinchcliffe. Hunter-Reay
was the pole-sitter in that
race and led 51 laps be-
fore trying to pass a car
just out of the pits.
There was obviously a
much different result at
Indianapolis.
"It's the important race,
and think about if that had
gone wrong ... there's that
fine line right between
hero and zero, it would
have been the zero move,
but it ended up being the
hero move," Hunter-Reay
said. "It's cool to see it all
work out and the aggres-
sion was all paid off."


Hunter-Reay made the
last stop on his post-Indy
500 victory tour Wednes-
day in Texas, at a lunch
with Texas Motor Speedway
(TMS) sponsors and sea-
son ticket holders. He was
led to the patio at Joe T
Garcia's Mexican restau-
rant by a mariachi band.
At the conclusion of the
lunch program, TMS offi-
cials shared a milk toast
with Hunter-Reay And,
unlike in Victory Lane
after the race, his young
son Ryden took a sip of
milk this time.
His next stop was De-
troit, where the IndyCar


Series runs dual races
this weekend before
heading to Texas next
week. At the 1 1/2-mile
high-banked, high-speed
Texas track last summer,
Dallas-born Hunter-
Reay finished second to
Castroneves.
Hunter-Reay said he
"definitely, desperately"
wants to win at Texas and
take part in the victory
celebration that includes
firing six-shooters into the
air
"There's no victory cel-
ebration quite like that.
After finishing second to
Helio, climbing out of the
car and walking back to
the transporter a bit de-
jected, you hear those pis-
tols go off. It's like salt to
the wound," he said.
"That's the next most im-
portant on my list."
When TMS officials
presented him the victory
pistols for a trial run,
Hunter-Reay joked about
the perks of being the
Indy 500 champion. He
also had to be persuaded
to give them a try
"Is that like drinking
the milk before winning
the Indy 500, because I'd
never do that" he said. "I
hope I'm not jinxing
myself."


Points
STANDINGS

Sprint Cup
Through May 25
1. Jeff Gordon, 432.
2. Matt Kenseth, 421.
3. Kyle Busch, 408.
4. Carl Edwards, 408.
5. Dale EarnhardtJr., 394.
6. Jimmie Johnson, 388.
7. Joey Logano, 378.
8. BrianVickers, 365.
9. Brad Keselowski, 361.
10. Ryan Newman, 361.
Nationwide Series
Through May 24
1. Regan Smith, 414.
2. Elliott Sadler, 409.
3. Chase Elliott, 386.
4. Trevor Bayne, 379.
5.Ty Dillon, 378.
Camping World
Truck
Through May 16
1. MattCrafton, 162.
2. Timothy Peters, 151.
3. German Quiroga, 144.
NHRA
Through May 25
Top Fuel
1. Doug Kalitta, 704.
2. Antron Brown, 674.
3. Spencer Massey, 566.
Funny Car
1. Robert Hight, 770.
2. John Force, 566.
3. Alexis DeJoria, 509.
Pro Stock
1. Erica Enders-Stevens, 709.
2. Allen Johnson, 624.
3. Jason Line, 567.
Pro Stock Motorcycle
1. Andrew Hines, 286.
2. Eddie Krawiec, 276.
3. John Hall, 230.
IndyCar
Through May 25
1. Ryan Hunter-Reay 274.
2. Will Power, 234.
3. Helio Castroneves, 220.
Formula One
Through May 25
1. Nico Rosberg, 122.
2. Lewis Hamilton, 118.
3. Fernando Alonso, 61.


NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
FEDEX 400
Site: Dover, Delaware.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 11 a.m.-
12:30 p.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 3:30-5 p.m.); Sat-
urday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 9:30-10:30 a.m.,
12:30-1:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 1 p.m. (Fox, 12:30-4:30
pm.).
Track: Dover International Speedway (oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 400 laps.
Last year: Tony Stewart ended a 30-race victory
drought, racing to the last of his 48 Cup victories.
Last week: Jimmie Johnson won the Coca-Cola 600 at
Charlotte for his firstvictory of the season.The six-time
series champion won the race for the fourth time for
the most Cup victories at the track with seven.
Fast facts: Kevin Harvick and Joey Logano are the
only two-time winners in the first 12 races of the sea-
son. Dale Earnhardt Jr., Brad Keselowski, Carl Ed-
wards, Kyle Busch, Kurt Busch, Denny Hamlin and Jeff
Gordon also have won. Gordon leads the standings,
11 points ahead of Matt Kenseth.... Johnson won the
September race at the track for his record eighth Dover
victory. ... The race is Fox's final event of the season.
TNT will broadcast the next six races, and ESPN/ABC
will show the final 17.
Next race: Pocono 400, June 8, Pocono Raceway, Long
Pond, Pennsylvania.


NATIONWIDE
BUCKLE UP 200
Site: Dover, Delaware.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 2-3:30 p.m.);
Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2, 10:30 a.m.-noon), race, 2
p.m. (ESPN, 1:30-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway (oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
Last year: Joey Logano won the race and the Sep-
tember event at the track for Penske Racing after
sweeping the 2012 events for Joe Gibbs Racing.
Last week: Kyle Larson raced to his second Nation-
wide victory of the season, holding off Sprint Cup driv-
ers Brad Keselowski and Kyle Busch at Charlotte.
Fast facts: Busch won this year at Phoenix and Bris-
tol to push his series-record victory total to 65. He won
the Dover fall race in 2008 and swept the 2010 events.
...Regan Smith, the Daytona winner, leads the season
standings five points ahead of Talladega winner
Elliott Sadler.
Next race: Michigan 250, June 14, Michigan Interna-
tional Speedway, Brooklyn, Michigan.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
LUCAS OIL 200
Site: Dover, Delaware.
Schedule: Thursday, practice; Friday, qualifying (Fox
Sports 1, 12:30-2 p.m.), race, 5:30 p.m. (Fox Sports 1,
5-8 p.m.).
Track: Dover International Speedway (oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.


Around the TRACKS
Last year: Kyle Busch won the third of his five 2013
series victories.
Last race: Busch raced to his third victory in three
events this year, dominating at Charlotte on May 16.
He has six series victories at the North Carolina track.
Fast facts: Busch also won this year at Daytona and
Kansas. He has 38 series victories.
Next race: WinStar World Casino and Resort 400,
June 6, Texas Motor Speedway, Fort Worth, Texas.
VERIZON INDYCAR
CHEVROLET INDY DUAL IN DETROIT
Site: Detroit.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday, qualifying, race,
3:50 p.m. (ABC, 3:30-6 p.m.); Sunday, qualifying, race,
3:50 p.m. (ABC, 3:30-6 p.m.).
Track: The Raceway at Belle Isle Park (street course,
2.36 miles).
Race distances: 164.22 miles, 70 laps.
Last year: Mike Conway won the doubleheader opener
for Dale Coyne Racing, and Simon Pagenaud tookthe
crash-filled second race for Schmidt Hamilton Motor-
sports.
Last week: Andretti Autosport's Ryan Hunter-Reay
won the Indianapolis 500, holding off Team Penske's
Helio Castroneves by 0.060 seconds.
Fast facts: Hunter-Reay, also the Grand Prix of Ala-
bama winner in April, leads the season standings -
40 points ahead of Team Penske's Will Power. Hunter-
Reay won the 2012 season title.... Castroneves won


CART series races at the track in 2000 and 2001. ...
Doubleheaders also are set for Houston andToronto....
Conway and Pagenaud have victories this year. Con-
way won at Long Beach for Ed Carpenter Racing, and
Pagenaud took the Grand Prix of Indianapolis.
Next race: Firestone 600, June 7, Texas Motor Speed-
way, Fort Worth, Texas.
NHRA MELLO YELLO
DRAG RACING
NHRA SUMMERNATIONALS
Site: Englishtown, New Jersey.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday, qualifying
(ESPN, 4:30-6 p.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 4-7 p.m.).
Track: Old Bridge Township Raceway Park.
Last year: Shawn Langdon raced to the third of his
seven 2013 Top Fuel victories en route to the season
title. Matt Hagan topped the Funny Car field, Mike Ed-
wards won in Pro Stock, and Michael Ray in Pro Stock
Motorcycle.
Last week: Courtney Force won the Kansas Nationals
forthe 100th victory by a female driver in NHRA history,
beating Cruz Pedregon in the Funny Carfinal. Spencer
Massey won inTop Fuel, and Allen Johnson in Pro Stock.
Fast facts: Robert Hight, a four-time winner in the first
eight events, leads the Funny Car standings 204
points ahead of teammate and owner John Force....
Doug Kalitta has a 30-point lead over Antron Brown in


Top Fuel. Kalitta has one victory this season, and
Brown has three. In 2008 at Old Bridge, Kalitta's
cousin, Scott Kalitta, was killed after his Funny Car
burst into flames and crashed during qualifying. As a
safety measure, all Top Fuel and Funny Car races were
reduced from a quarter-mile to 1,000 feet.
Next event: Thunder Valley Nationals, June 13-15,
Bristol Dragway Bristol, Tennessee.
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Canadian Grand Prix, June 8, Circuit Gilles
Villeneuve, Montreal.
Last week: Nico Rosbergwonthe Monaco Grand Prix
to run Mercedes' season-opening winning streak to six
and its string of 1-2 finishes to five. Lewis Hamilton was
second after winning the previous four races. Rosberg,
also the winner in Australia, took the points lead

OTHER RACES
TUDOR UNITED SPORTSCAR CHAMPIONSHIP:
Chevrolet Sports Car Classic, Saturday (Fox Sports 1,
1:30-3:30 p.m.), Raceway at Belle Isle Park, Detroit.
ARCA RACING SERIES: Great Railing 150, Sunday,
New Jersey Motorsports Park, Millville, New Jersey.
WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car: Kistler Engines
Classic, Friday, Attica Raceway Park, Attica, Ohio; NAPA
Auto Parts Rumble, Saturday, 1-96 Speedway, Lake
Odessa, Michigan. Late Model: Fulton Bank 50, Thursday,
Delaware International Speedway, Delmar, Delaware.


Lady 'Noles fall in one-hitter


FSU toface Baylor in elimination game on Saturday


Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -
Making her debut in the
Women's College World
Series (WCWS), Oregon
sophomore left-hander
Cheridan Hawkins ac-
knowledged she was a bit
nervous, which led to a
shaky first inning.
She quickly recovered,
though, pitching a one-
hitter in top-seeded Ore-
gon's 3-0 victory over
Florida State on Thursday
in the opening round.
Alexa Peterson had a
pair of hits, including a
run-scoring double, to
help Oregon (55-7-1) break
the school record for vic-
tories in a season. The
Ducks advanced to play
Florida on Friday
Florida, which beat the
Ducks 2-1 in eight innings
on Feb. 28, downed Baylor
11-0 in five innings in an-
other first-round game on
Thursday
Hawkins (34-4) gave up
only a leadoff single to
Maddie O'Brien in the first
inning. Courtney Senas
drew a one-out walk two
batters later, but Hawkins
escaped the jam and the
left-hander eventually re-
tired 16 straight batters be-
fore a two-out error in the
sixth. She also gave up a
leadoff walk in the seventh
but that was it for Florida
State (55-8).


Associated Press
Oregon center fielder Koral Costa dives for and catches a ball hit by Florida State's
Tiffani Brown for the out Thursday in the third inning of a Women's College World Series


game in Oklahoma City.
"She was under (former
Oregon All-American) Jes-
sica Moore's wing last
year," Oregon coach Mike
White said about Hawkins.
"This year, she's stepped
up huge. Going back to our
very first game of the sea-
son, it didn't look that way
to start off, but she's shown
great composure and
worked very hard. ... She
loves to have the weight on
her shoulders and carries
it extremely well."
Florida State pitcher
Lacey Waldrop (38-6), the
Division I player of the


year, didn't make it out of
the sixth inning after giv-
ing up 10 hits. Alyssa Gille-
spie singled and scored on
a groundout by Janelle
Lindvall in the first for
Oregon and Peterson sin-
gled and scored on a single
by Nikki Udria the
Ducks' No. 9 hitter in
the second.
Koral Costa and Peter-
son had successive dou-
bles down the left-field
line in the fifth.
"The offense and de-
fense always pick me up
continuously," Hawkins


said. "When I get the op-
portunity to help out and
do my part, it's what I like
to do. They worked really
hard and scored some
runs, which is really
nice."
Florida State (55-8),
making its first WCWS ap-
pearance in 10 years, will
face Baylor on Saturday in
an elimination game. The
Seminoles recovered from
a 17-3 loss to Michigan in
the first game of their
super regional to win two
straight to qualify for the
WCWS.


Dover agrees to sell Superspeedway


Associated Press


DOVER, Del. Dover
Motorsports has agreed to
sell the Nashville Super-
speedway to NeXovation,
Inc., in a deal worth nearly
$46 million.
Denis McGlyn, Dover's
chief executive officer, an-


nounced the sale Thursday
NeXovation will pay $27
million and also put up a
letter of credit for the $18.8
million in bonds issued to
build the infrastructure
needed by the speedway
near Lebanon, Tennessee.
The Nashville-based com-
pany also was the highest


bidder for the Nfirburgring
motor sports facility.
The 1.33-mile, concrete
track opened in 2001, hosting
NASCAR trucks and Nation-
wide races along with an
Indy Racing League event
through 2008. Dover closed
the track, except for test-
ing, in 2011.


4-24 Players
I I
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GATORS
Continued from Page BI

wall to lead off the third
inning, putting Florida up
4-0. Aubree Munro's double
to center with one out in
the fourth chased Canion,
and Munro later scored on
a single by Kelsey Stewart
Baylor failed to record
an out in the bottom of the
fifth as Florida's first six
batters all reached base
and scored. Pinch-hitter
Chelsea Herndon ended
the game with a walk-off
grand slam to left-center
field while facingher former
high school teammate,
Heather Stearns. Both at-
tended Hebron High School
in Carrollton, Texas.
The loss was Baylor's
worst since falling 14-2 to
Georgia three years ago to
the day Baylor hadn't suf-
fered a run-rule loss since
losing 8-0 to Texas A&M
to end the 2013 season.


"I feel like we were
sucker-punched quick,"
Baylor coach Glenn Moore
said. "We didn't respond.
It was more of what we did
to ourselves than it was
Florida did to us. I thought
they played a great game
and we played maybe the
worst game that I have
been a part of coaching in
four or five years. You just
can't play that way at this
level and have a chance
to win. We made mistakes
all over our lineup."
Against Rogers, Baylor
managed only a third-in-
ning leadoff single by Jor-
dan Strickland and a pair
of infield singles by Ari
Hawkins and Linsey Hays
in the fourth.
"Just the way that I've
been pitching lately has
given me that confidence
to just go out there and shut
it down," Rogers said. 'Also,
howgood ouroffense is doing
right now, that just allows
you to go out and have fun
and do what you do."


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Section C- FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014

0Arts & Entertainment


NTHE


SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Saturday
Family, friends and all are welcome Saturday evening to take part in a frenzy that has gripped the nation. Whispering Pines Park will
show the movie "Frozen" with something new! It's a sing-a-long, with words to the movie's award-winning songs scrolling along the
bottom of the screen. Festival vendors and a free bungie trampoline will be available, along with facepainting.


Arts & Entertainment

Fred Brannen to speak at

the Florida Artists Gallery


Special to the Chronicle
Fred Brannen, noted for his
popular "Slice of Life" column in
the Citrus County Chronicle, will
be the featured speaker at the
Florida Artists Gallery & Caf6
Second Friday Dinner and
Lecture Series on June 13.
Not only has Brannen recently
published his first book, a capti-
vating courtroom drama titled 'At
the Bottom of Biscayne Bay," but
his paintings are currently on dis-
play in the Gallery Caf6 in his
one-man exhibit, "Both Sides of
Fred Brannen."
While Brannen's paintings are
not for sale, his book will be avail-
able at the Gallery, where he will


autograph copies.
Dinner will be served at the
Gallery Caf6 at
6 p.m. and Brannen's presentation
will follow at 7 p.m.
Admission for the evening is $25
per person, including dinner
Space is limited and reservations
should be made early
The Florida Artists Gallery and
Caf6 are in the historic Knight
House at 8219 Orange Ave. in Flo-
ral City Both are open 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. seven days a week.
For reservations for Fred Bran-
nen's presentation, call 352-344-
9300.
For more information, go to
wwwflartistsgallerycom or find it
on Facebook.


Hot night for cool blues
The Nature Coast Friends of the Blues presents ,
its final concert of the season at 1 p.m. Saturday at -
the Museum Caf6 in Homosassa. A duo, The Kings, om-
will be up first, followed by the local Cool Corporate Vol
Cats.
For $7, get some cool music to beat the summer
blues. The Museum Caf6 is at 10466 W Yulee Drive,
Homosassa. For information, call 352-628-1081.



Singers welcome at community choir


The Citrus Community Concert Choir is
in rehearsal for its summer series of con-
certs. This year's theme is the music of Burt
Bacharach.
Rehearsals begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday at
Faith Lutheran Church, 935 S. Crystal Glen
Drive, Lecanto, in the fellowship hall. New
singers are still welcome and should arrive
one-half hour early to audition. Contact the
choir's director, Jacki Scott, at 352-212-1746
for information.
The choir is also rehearsing for its June


appearances in Paris and Normandy
France, as part of the 70th anniversary re-
membrance of the Invasion of Normandy;
the D-Day landings of June 6,1944. It will
join a number of other singers from across
the country, under the direction of Ed Lo-
jeski, in this musical salute.
Since its inception, the choir has
also performed at the Hayden Festival
in Vienna, Austria, and at a memorial
aboard the USS Missouri in Pearl Harbor,
Hawaii.


Inside:

Comics ........C6
Community .... C5
Crossword .....C6
Movies ........C7
TV Listings .....C6


For questions or comments,
contact Features Editor Logan
Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext.
1141 or at mhnosby@dichronicle
online.com




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Disney's Maleficent' a beauty, but a sleeper


JOCELYN NOVECK
Associated Press
Maybe it's too soon to say the tide
has shifted definitively But it's cer-
tainly been a unique time for fairy-tale
villains.
After hundreds of years of moral
clarity, suddenly we're getting a new
look at these evil creatures, who are
actually turning out to be complex be-
ings, and not that bad at all. Really,
they've just been misunderstood. (And,
by the way, those charming princes?
Highly overrated.)
The most obvious recent example is
"Frozen," the animated Disney block-
buster that showed us how the Snow
Queen, long portrayed as an icy-
hearted villain, was actually a tragic
victim of circumstance, with a pure
and loving heart. And now we have
"Maleficent," which tells us that one of
the most evil characters in all of pop
culture is equally vulnerable and mis-
understood.
Plus, she's gorgeous. Duh. She's An-
gelina Jolie.
All this is a rather seismic develop-
ment in fairytale-dom. There are nu-
merous versions of "Sleeping Beauty,"
stemming back even before Charles


Perrault's from 1697, but the fairy who
casts an angry spell on the baby
princess, dooming her to prick her fin-
ger, has always been, well, just nasty
But now, 55 years after Disney intro-
duced the character named Maleficent
in its 1959 classic film- and colored
her skin an eerie green the studio is
back with a live-action (not to mention
3D) Maleficent who's more super-
heroine than evil fairy Think Malefi-
cent by way of Lara Croft.
And though Maleficent is no longer
green-skinned, it's hard not to think of
another green-skinned villainess who's
also been rehabilitated, by means of
the durable Broadway hit "Wicked":
the witch Elphaba from "The Wizard of
Oz," who, it turns out, we just didn't
know enough about.
And so it is in "Maleficent," in which
director Robert Stromberg and screen-
writer Linda Woolverton take us back
to the fairy's youth to better under-
stand her. She's a plucky young thing
with lovely wings and bright pink lip-
stick, which will turn blood-red when
she becomes an adult (the fairy world
clearly isn't lacking for cosmetics.)
One day she meets a young man from
that other, darker world, where hu-
mans live. The two form a strong bond.


But the ugliest human emotions -
jealousy and ambition will inter-
vene. Young Stefan will grow into the
power-hungry older Stefan (the wild-
eyed South African actor Sharlto Cop-
ley) And his stunning betrayal of
Maleficent will instantly harden her,
turning her into the villainess we
recognize.
Alas, the story's still all about a guy,
in the end. But we digress.
"Maleficent" is surely targeted to the
same audience young and female -
which has so lovingly embraced
"Frozen" and its appealing message of
female solidarity and empowerment.
But "Frozen" felt clever, charming, and
fresh. "Maleficent," less so.
Part of this is due, paradoxically, to
Jolie's star wattage. Don't get us wrong:
she's the best thing about the movie,
and always worth watching. But it
blunts the effectiveness of the narra-
tive if we can never quite believe
Maleficent is bad. That's because we
know she's essentially good, and she
seems to know that we know it; You
can see it in the upturned wrinkle of
her mouth.
And frankly, the other characters are
simply not that interesting Stefan,
but also Elle Fanning's Aurora, or


"Sleeping Beauty" The best scenes Au-
rora has, in fact, are when she's a gur-
gling baby and then, adorably, a toddler,
played by none other than 5-year-old
Vivienne Jolie-Pitt. (In the movie's one
laugh-out-loud moment, Maleficent
tells Aurora: "I don't like children.")
But Fanning as Aurora is too bor-
ingly sweet especially compared to
the fabulous-in-every-way Maleficent,
with her blazing lips, fashionable black
headgear and exaggerated cheekbones,
not to mention her way around a quip.
In the end, "Maleficent" is fun for its
appealing visuals especially in the
forest and for watching Jolie. But
that's not enough to make the whole
film interesting. As the minutes tick by,
you might even start feeling a bit like
Sleeping Beauty herself comes to feel:
Drowsy
"Maleficent," a Walt Disney Studios
release, is rated PG by the Motion Pic-
ture Association of America "for se-
quences of fantasy action and violence,
including frightening images." Run-
ning time: 97 minutes. Two and a half
stars out of four
MPAA rating definition for PG:
Parental guidance suggested. Some
material may not be suitable for
children.


OFood .ccln _n___rt___ _nt
irall L..


Chefs of

Napoli II

Originating in Spring Hill,
Florida, Chefs of Napoli II in
Inverness makes you feel as if you
have stepped right into Italy. If the I H
aromas don't convince you, the
tastes certainly will. Even first
generation Italians are exclaiming,
"Squisito!".
This welcome new addition to local dining is
open seven days a week and offers a classy ristorante
atmosphere with a Neapolitan cuisine. The foods of Naples range from recipes
that were influenced by the local aristocracy with very elaborate preparations
that included meat; to the more common offerings made from modest but
nutritionally healthy ingredients such as pasta and beans with local vegetables.
Based on the style of cooking famous in Naples, Chefs of Napoli II presents a
complete menu of exquisite specialties ranging from pasta dishes to seafood
and veal. Pizza was thought to have originated in Naples, and Chefs of Napoli II
makes pizza that rivals the homeland. There are lots of new entree dishes to
tempt your palate, and prices range from $12.00 to $16.00. A good selection of
beer and wine is also available to complement your meal. To top off your
experience, try to save room for authentic cannoli or tiramisu.
No reservations are required as yet, but you can call ahead to be sure:
352/419-6554.
Chefs of Napoli II is located at 1546 U.S. Highway 41 in Inverness, Florida.


. . . .... .m. m
DATE NIGNW- ~"Rft&Sxati 6pm |
M W ArnfalAWiWD B AB 9 .fa imSIM u.iWI


, Dillon's Restaurant & Bakery
I/ kf/)/i0 f 727 S. US Hwy. 41
419-7914
next to the Central Motel, Inverness
Tues.-Sun. 7am-3pm,
e lb ,-- Closed Mondays
y1 twww.cinnamonsticksrestaurant.com
... O' Thanks to everyone for
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j / Omelette in Citrus County.
t/ UDW Ron W Jennifer Dillon
.W inner .,, ., .


ES)bWshed 1981
You're invited to try us. Serving a good selection of Fo( ,l
Seafood ,,il Chicken Schnitzel Weekends: Salb.ii
SRoast Duck Parm & More Ossobuco (Pork Shank)
CLOSED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4
Wed & Thurs 3 PM-8'30 PM Fn & Sat 3 PM-9'00 PM SundaIy 11 AM-7 PM
Closed Monday & Tuesday
' SV70 S. Florida Ave. (ITS Hwv. 41T. Floral Cith. FT
,al; 1, 344-4443.


Mr. Wang's
CHINESE RESTAURANT
SAME CHEF FOR 18 YEARS


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IT'S ALL ABOUT WATERFRONT DINING


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Serving the Finest

& Freshest Seafood
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And Citrus County's Besl Open Flame Grilled
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Serving Breakfast & Lunch


IPressed Sandwiches
Soup, Salads, Quiche
S Burgers & Homemade Fries
Pasta Salads
Beer and Wine
S Homemade Pastries
LO Fresh Baked Goods Daily
CAPPUCCINO ESPRESSO
FRAPPES SMOOTHES & ITALIAN SODAS
Catering, Private Parties, Groups
(Welcomed with Reservations)
See our menu at
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2 LOCATIONS
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MONDAY 52795-7908-1n


C2 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014


ON THE SCENE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Seth MacFarlane, right, and Charlize Theron are shown in a scene from "A Million Ways to Die in the West."






In A Million Ways to Die in the West,'too few laughs meet too long a running time

In 'A Million Ways to Die in the West,) too few laughs meet too long a running time


JOHN BEFORE
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Seth MacFarlane
might've picked a safer place to make
his lead-acting debut than 'A Million
Ways to Die in the West," his directorial
follow-up to 2012's surprisingly success-
ful "Ted." The marketplace doesn't
seem to be crying out for Westerns, after
all be they earnest revivals, satires, or
genre hybrids involving extra-terrestri-
als and the undeniably of-his-moment
MacFarlane is, as the script indirectly
admits, a strange fit for the genre. Stock-
ing the supporting cast with top-drawer
talent, he gives most of his co-stars little
to do besides attract our attention on
movie posters.
A winking mid-film cameo prompts
viewers to wonder how MacFarlane
might have fared playing a time-trav-
eler from our era stranded in the Old
West. Instead, his 1880s sheep farmer
Albert Stark simply talks like someone
born in and transplanted from the 20th
century "We live in a terrible place
and time," Albert tells friends Edward
(Giovanni Ribisi) and Ruth (Sarah Sil-


verman), assessing his surroundings as
if seeing medical and social realities
through our eyes. There are too many
ways to die out here, he laments -
though most of the shock-violence gags
the movie employs demonstrate the
risks not of living in an age before mod-
em medicine but of inhabiting a world
whose authors aren't terribly gifted at
slapstick.
Dumped by his longtime sweetheart
Louise (Amanda Seyfried), Albert is
about ready to leave town when he
meets Anna (Charlize Theron), a new-
comer who appreciates his gentle per-
sonality in a way locals don't. Perhaps
that's because she's secretly betrothed
to the meanest cuss in these parts, a
bandit called Clinch (Liam Neeson),
who has sent her here to hide out while
he dodges the law for a spell.
(The preceding sentence contains
more Western-ese than the entire script
MacFarlane wrote with Alec Sulkin and
Wellesley Wild, which dates itself in-
stead with stuff like "oh, snap," "oh no I
did-uhnt," and "douche.")
While Albert frets about Louise's new
romance with fancy-pants shopkeeper


Foy (Neil Patrick Harris, whose vain
moustache-tonic merchant is a reliable
laugh-getter), Anna takes an inexplica-
ble interest in helping him stand up for
himself. Why? Though MacFarlane
eventually demonstrates a knack for
low-key flirty humor, Albert's appeal at
the start of their friendship is hard to
see. One assumes Anna knows how
much money Ted will make in 130 or so
years and wants to get in on the ground
floor
In a rare display of nerve, Albert
challenges Foy to a duel; as Anna of-
fers him the gunslinger lessons that
will inevitably lead to love, the film's
supporting cast all but vanishes from
the film. (Just as well, perhaps, as the
screenplay is about to run out of ways
to poke fun at the fact that Albert's
buddy Edward is a virgin in a chaste
relationship with Ruth, the town's
busiest whore.) The romance plot
could hardly be more familiar, but at
least it plays out against a landscape so
dramatic one almost suspects the film-
makers composite a few extra sand-
stone formations into Monument
Valley Theron carries almost all the


weight here, given her partner's unex-
pected blandness, which makes it
vaguely insulting when the third act
turns her into a helpless damsel in
need of his rescue.
Though the film is hardly laugh-free,
its uneven jokes appear to have breezed
through a very forgiving editing process.
"You really shouldn't drink and horse,"
Edward tells a soused Albert as he
heads out on horseback a bizarre
turn of phrase that presumably sounded
funnier to somebody than the more
sense-making "drink and ride." The
leave-it-all-in approach leads to a
nearly two-hour running time that looks
all the more indulgent given how much
invention Blazing Saddles packed into
an hour-and-a-half.
'A Million Ways to Die in the West," a
Universal Pictures release, is rated R by
the Motion Picture Association of Amer-
ica for "strong crude and sexual con-
tent, language throughout, some
violence and drug material." Running
time: 116 minutes.
MPAA rating definition for R: Re-
stricted. Under 17 requires accompany-
ing parent or adult guardian.


ONIRhAIINING NOIONI


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Slian Spec-ialt- isbes
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I .;^ ; .... 341-4555
d"", ""E *it II, "*"" ,I ,H l '





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Home ofathe Large Portions"

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Expires 6130114
I' IFT CERTIFICATES
Next to
ABC Liquor

Get Ready for Some
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DAILY SPECIALS -
Mon- Biscuit & Gravy ......Half 99( Full $1.99
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Thurs- 2-Egg Omelet (w/one item &one side). $2.99 :
Fri. French Toast ....................................... .99 ( '
Sat- Steak & One Side ................. $4.99 :
Sun- Breakfast for Two ............................$6.99
(One egg, I bacon or I sausage, one side, plus coffee per person
Coffee .......99t Coffee for Veterans.. .75 --T -

Open 7 Days AWeek 7am-2pm
6453 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 3.
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WE'RE NOT WHAT YOU MAY THINK!

COME SEE WHAT YOU'VE BEEN MISSING.
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( ,Ih ",,,\\ iand l- 'n. .h l- i.',
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...... N i I, 1i'i A .. "I . I1 :44:-1J3 4 1


ON THE SCENE


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 C3


I COUPN]




C4 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014


Theater
Central Florida Lyric
Opera's 2013-14 series. All
performances at Paul P.
Williams Fine Arts Auditorium,
9501 U.S. 441 and College
Drive, Leesburg. $15 and up.
352-753-3229 or centralflorida
lyricopera.org.
Art Center Theatre's
spring series. All perform-
ances at Art Center of Citrus
County, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave. off County Road 486,
Hernando. $19. 352-746-
7606 for tickets. Show times
are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Sat-
urday, 2 p.m. Sunday and an
extra matinee the second Sat-
urday of a play's run unless
otherwise indicated.
The Emperor's New
Clothes, a humorous fairy tale
musical. Show dates are today,
Saturday and Sunday. Adult
tickets are $8, youth are $5.
Doo-Wop Wed Widing
Hood, a 1950s style doo-wop
fairy tale. Show dates are
June 27-29. Adult tickets are
$8, youth are $5.

Arts & crafts
All Day Art Club, 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Old Ho-
mosassa Civic Center, 5530
S. Mason Creek Drive, behind
the fire station. $10. Bring
supplies. Intermediate and
advanced artists welcome.
352-795-8774.
Art Center Grafters
Group, noon to 3 p.m. Tues-
days, Art Center of Citrus
County, 2644 N. Annapolis
Ave., Hernando. 352-400-
4466. Members bring their
own crafts to work on each
week.
Floral City Grafters, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Flo-
ral City Community Hall next
to library. Come for a few
hours or for the day. 352-560-
7668.
Citrus Springs Fun Arts
& Crafts Group, first and
third Mondays each month.
352-489-2313.
Sandhill Crane Chapter
of the Embroiderers' Guild
of America, 10 a.m. to 2
p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200
Mount Fair Ave., Brooksville.
Bring lunch. 352-621-6680
(Citrus), 352-666-8350
(Hernando).
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly, Wild-
wood Public Library, 310 S.
Palmer Drive, Wildwood. 352-
748-1158. els34785@
yahoo.com.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. first Saturday
monthly at Weeki Wachee
Senior Center off U.S. 19 and
Toucan Trail, Spring Hill.
Short meeting, show-and-tell
and birthday raffle. 352-688-
4106 or 352-527-2778. nature
coastdecorativeartists.com.
Citrus Watercolor Club
meeting, noon second Friday
monthly, United Methodist
Church on County Road 581,
Inverness. Demonstrations by
well-know artists at each
meeting. $5. 352-382-8973 or
352-622-9352. citruswatercolor
club.com.
Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decorative
Painters, meets second Sat-
urday monthly at North Oak
Baptist Church, 9324 N. Elk-
cam Blvd., Citrus Springs.
352-270-3256 or dynamite71
@juno.com or manatee
havendecorativeartists.org.
Community Needle-
works Grafters meet at 10
a.m. first Wednesday. All quil-
ters, knitters and crochet
crafters are welcome. Call
Terri at 352-746-1973.
Florida Artists Gallery.
open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven
days a week.
Art Center of Citrus
County's regular gallery
hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday. The Art
Center of Citrus County is at
2644 N. Annapolis Ave., Her-
nando. 352-746-4089.


workshop through one of the
most beautiful rivers on the
Florida Nature Coast. For in-
formation and to register, call
Rebecca at 352-208-8711 or
Franklin Anderson Gallery at
352-697-2702
Watercolor classes with
instructor Pat Sistrand, 9 a.m.
Tuesday, Citrus Springs
Community Center. $10.
citruscountyfl.org, click on
Parks & Recreation to regis-
ter. 352-465-7007.
Pen and ink with oil
rouging and watercolor
batiks. Instructor Lois Owens.
$20 plus some materials. Be-
ginners welcome; completed
piece every week. Classes
every Saturday in Crystal
River Mall, 352-382-4911.
Art Quilt class, 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Tuesday at Whisper-
ing Pines Park community
building. Instructor Karol Kus-
maul. Complete landscapes,
portraits and still lifes. $80 for
eight weeks. 352-344-0779.
Lorna Jean Gallery art
classes:
Learn to Draw for ages 6
to adult. $15 for group les-
sons. Ages 6 to 11,4 p.m. to 5
p.m. Wednesday and 11 a.m.
to noon Saturday. Ages 12 to
18, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday.
Adult classes 11 a.m. to noon
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Watercolor Painting for
Beginners, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesdays.
$15 per session. Four students
per session. 352-564-2781.
Art & craft classes for
children ages 6 to 10, 11 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Saturday and 4
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days. Ages 11 to 16,4 p.m. to
5:30 p.m. Tuesday. $60 per
month. Materials included.
Classes limited to eight stu-
dents. 352-564-2781.
Learn to design and cre-
ate sterling silver jewelry, 1:30
p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in
four-week intervals. $140 for
four weeks. Materials and use
of tools included. 352-564-2781.
Voice lessons. Ages 10
to adult, by appointment. $15
per lesson. 352-564-2781.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. 352-564-2781.
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers art classes.
352-344-9300. Floridaartists


gallery.com.
Painting with Oils, 1 to 3
pm every Tuesday. Instructor,
Connie Townsend. Individual
instruction, beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-
400-9757 or Connietown68
@gmail.com.
Painting with Acrylics, 1 to
3 pm every Friday. Instructor,
Connie Townsend. Individual
instruction, beginners to ad-
vanced. $15 per session. 352-
400-9757 or Connietown68
@gmail.com.
Drawing classes to all
levels to with John Romaine,
instructor. Tuesday, 10 a.m.
to 12:00 noon. Prepay $20
per class. If not prepaid, $25.
Bring drawing materials and
draw from weekly still lifes or
your own photos, etc. Instruc-
tor specializes in color pen-
cils. Register through the
Florida Artists Gallery, 352-
344-9300. 3 people minimum.
Photography Critique
Session, 1 to 3 p.m. June 12
(second Thursday of every
month). Facilitator, Larry Jor-
dan. Critique of images. $10
per year. Contact Larry at
352-344-0518.
Gelatin Art Class for Be-
ginners, Bonnie Peterson, In-
structor. Monday, June 9,1:30
to 4 p.m. $47 all materials in-
cluded. Limited to six stu-
dents. Each student will learn
the basics of creating two
flower types within a cup of
pre-made clear gelatin. Bring
insulated lunch bag and an
ice pack for transport. To reg-
ister, contact the Florida Artists
Gallery at 352-344-9300.
Origami-Japanese Paper
Folding with Christine Randle,
instructor. June 16, 1:00-4:00
p.m. Class is $30. Learn to
fold a traditional crane shape,
and a box to keep it in. We
will use colorful handmade
paper, varnish and embellish
the finished piece with beads
and wire, to make a beautiful
and durable ornament for the
home or to give as a gift.
Class is limited to four partici-
pants. Instructor will provide
all materials and written in-
structions. To register, contact
the Florida Artists Gallery at
352-344-9300. Class size is
limited.
Adjustable Wire-sculp-
ture Ring Class by Lynda
Ryan on Saturday, June 14, 1
to 4 p.m. Class is $45. At the


end of the class student will
have an adjustable Sterling
Silver ring. Includes some of
the basics square wire skills
to instructions included. The
samples of the rings are in
Florida Artists Gallery. Stu-
dents will have choice of
semi-precious beads or
Swarovski Crystals to com-
plete their adjustable ring.
Tools needed are: flat-nose
and round -nose pliers, and
close/flush cutters. May use
instructor's tools. Call the
Florida Artists Gallery to regis-
ter for the class: 352-344-
9300, class size is limited.
Complete an oil painting
on a 16x20 canvas with Carol
Basso on June 22, noon until
4:30 p.m., all supplies in-
cluded for $55. Register
through the Florida Artists
Gallery, 352-344-9300.


Music
Music at the Museum
concert series in the Old
Courthouse in downtown In-
verness. Jazz concerts $25
each; acoustic concerts $10.
Social hour begins at 6 p.m.,
music at 7 p.m. 352-341-6427
or csociety@tampabay.rr.com.
The Country Sunshine
Band, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Friday, East Citrus Commu-
nity Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway (State Road 44
East), Inverness. Call Annie at
352-465-4860.
John Thomas traditional
country music show andjam. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday. Ox-
ford Community Center, 4027
C.R.106, Oxford (west end of
The Villages). Admission $5;
entertainers get in free. Cof-
fee, other drinks and finger
food available. 352-560-7946.
P.D. Smith, classical gui-
tar, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur-
days at the Museum Cafe,
10466 Yulee Ave., Ho-
mosassa. 352-628-1081.

Dance
Beginners' line dancing
classes. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday at Central Citrus
Community Center, 2804 W.
Mark Knighton Court,
Lecanto. $3. Instructor Cher
Mason. Closed-toe shoes
preferred, socdancer.org.
352-527-5993.


Social ballroom dance
classes with June Queripel,
Wednesday at the Central
Citrus Community Center,
2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. Dance basics
at 1:30 p.m. and advanced at
2:45 p.m. $5. 352-527-5993
or 352-795-3831.
Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance, 7:30
to 10:30 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at Lake
Panasoffkee Recreation Park
in blue building at 1582
County Road 459 off County
Road 470. Dances open to
married, couples, singles and
groups from churches and RV
parks. All ages welcome. No
alcohol. Finger foods or soda
welcome. 352-424-1688.
Sunday Night Dances
every week at Knights of
Columbus, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Lecanto. Doors
open at 6 p.m. Music starts at
7 p.m. Coffee, tea and soda
available.
Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East Cit-
rus Community Center, 9907
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness. $3 per class. 352-
344-9666.
Inverness Square Dance
Club's beginner square
dance lessons, 7:30 to 9:30
p.m. Tuesday, East Citrus
Community Center, 9907 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, east of
Inverness on State Road 44.
352-860-2090.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m. Thurs-
days, Beverly Hills Recreation
Center. $3 nonmembers. 352-
746-4882 or 352-527-3738.


ON THE SCENE


-NEW SUMMER HOURS-
Wednesday-Saturday 3pm-9pm Sunday 8am-7pm
Closed on Monday & Tuesday

EARLY EVENING SPECIALS
3pm-6pm Sun. Noon-6pm

Half Price Wine & Beers
Entrees served with choice offresh
homemade soup or crisp house salad
and yes, fresh baked Baklava for dessert!

1 11F


DownStairs Art Gallery
and Studio, at 611 N. Citrus
Ave., is open. Hours are 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Sunday. Pottery les-
sons available. 352-249-6170
or adellisster@gmail.com.

Art classes
Photo Safari On the
Homosassa River. June 21,
from 8 a.m. to noon, lunch in-
cluded. Cost is $75. Profes-
sional photographer Rebecca
Pujals-Jones will lead an


This Sunday's CH-ONIC
OOOIOL www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Let's Dance! 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. Thursday. Entertain-
ment by Bill Castner; instruc-
tion by Rita Hobbs. Crystal
River Mall, 1801 N.W. U.S.
19. Free.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, fellowship hall of
First United Methodist Church
of Dunnellon, 21501 W. State
Road 40, Dunnellon. 352-
489-1785 or 352-465-2142.
Spirit of Citrus Dances.
All dances 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
at Kellner Auditorium Jewish
Center, 92 Civic Circle, Bev-
erly Hills, unless otherwise in-
dicted. socdancer.org.
Ballroom and general
dancing on the second and
last Saturdays of each month
at Unity Church Lecanto,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Ballroom dancing
begins at 6 p.m. and general
dancing at 7 p.m. 352-746-
1270.

Special Interest
Upcoming events at
Dade Battlefield Historic
State Park include:
Pine Needle Basket
Class: June 3, Tuesday 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Cost is $5/person.
Pioneer Day Camp: June
9 to 13,9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost
is $75/child, ages 8 to 12.
Lunch and t-shirt provided.
Each day features a different
pioneer/Seminole theme from
food to games. Lots of hands-
on activities each day.
Patriotic Family Fun day:
July 5, from 4 to 8 p.m.
Nature Day Camp: July
14 to 18, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Cost is $75/child, ages 8 to 12.






CPage C5- FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

St. Paul's Soccer Camp
offers late registration
St. Paul's School in Beverly
Hills will host its third annual
Soccer Camp from Monday, June
2, through Friday, June 6, from
9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each day
All children ages 6 (entering
first grade and up) to 12 are in-
vited. The cost is $45, which in-
cludes the child's week at soccer
camp, a T-shirt, soccer ball and
water bottle. Daily water and
snacks will also be provided; all
parents and children will be in-
vited to take part in the family
picnic on June 6.
Late registration on Monday,
June 2, will be accepted on ar-
rival, no earlier than 8:30 am. To
register, go to www.stpauls.edu or
call 352-489-3027.

Howard's barbecue
contest to be Saturday
Bring your grill and smoker for
a real Barbecue Cook-off at
Howard's Flea Market from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday
There will be a prize for the
best barbecue. The cook-off will
be held in the courtyard next to
the office. Also, on Saturday and
Sunday, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.,
enjoy a "Taste of Howard's,"
where Howard's food vendors
will prepare all kinds of barbecue
dishes.
Call 352-628-3532 or come by
the office to register cook-off; no
entry fees and free parking.

Model railroaders
to gather Tuesday
The Citrus Model Railroad
Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day, June 3, in the Horticulture
building of the Citrus County
Fairgrounds.
The program will be on John
Giammasi's HO scale layout, the
Moosup Valley Railroad.
For information, call 352-527-
8706 or 352-341-2538; or visit
www. citrusmodelrrclub.org.

Quilters group to meet
June 5 in Inverness
The Citrus Friendship Quilters
Guild meets at 1 p.m. Thursday,
June 5, at Lakes Region Library,
1551 Druid Road, Inverness.
Meetings are on the first and
third Thursdays of the month.
The first meeting is business and
there is show and tell, workshops
and demonstrations. The work-
shop for this meeting will be mak-
ing a "Microwave Bowl Cozzie".
For information, call Denise at
352-344-90196 or Shirley Gorsuch
352-637-6838.

A Humane Society
OF CENTRAL FLA.

Little guys


Special to the Chronicle
Little Bit and Miles, are teacup-
size Chihuahuas, 3 to 4 pounds
each and about 6 and 7 years old.
They are sweet little dogs with
constantly wagging tails. Almost
like twins, father and son enjoy
being together, have always been
together and must be adopted and
kept together. They are obedient
and accustomed to going to the
potty in the yard. Because they are
so tiny and delicate, their adopter
must be willing to give them
considerable attention and
protection from their surroundings
and from children. A Humane
Society of Central Florida Pet
Rescue Inc. does home visits prior
to adoptions, so can only adopt to
the Citrus County and adjoining
county areas. Meet these two and
several other little dogs at our
Saturday adoption events from
10 a.m. noon at Pet Supermarket,
Inverness. If you must give up your
little dog, call 352-527-9050 and
leave your name and number. Visit
www.AHumaneSocietyPetRescue.
com and www.PetFinder.com ZIP
code 34465.


Women of Sugarmill Woods donations


ROCHELLE KAISER/Chronicle
At the end of each year, the Women of Sugarmill Woods are able to help many organizations with funds collected through their
charitable work all year long. Several organizations received hundreds of dollars in donations from the club. Representatives from the
local groups, standing, in back, are Linda Baker, Camp Good Hope; Paul Zukowski, Healthy Families of Citrus; Melissa Bowermaster,
Jessie's Place; Gayle Wire, Camp E-Ninee-Hassee; Diane Finnigan, CASA; Carol McKenzie, Citrus County Blessings and Kathrine
Sipper, The Path. In front are Bonnie McMullin, Nature Coast Ministries; Edna Pirmann, Sugarmill Manor; Debbie Lattin, Citrus
County Blessings and Diane Toto, We Care Food Pantry.




Jewish Center to host 'Taste of Israel'


All invited to special event Sunday


Special to the Chronicle

The Beverly Hills Jewish
Center will host a "Taste of Is-
rael" event from 3 to 5:30 p.m.
Sunday June 1, in Kellner Au-
ditorium, 102 Civic Circle in
Beverly Hills.
Everyone is invited to taste
several unique Israeli wines,
eat a sampling of light hors
d' oeuvres that one might ex-


pect to find in Israel and in-
dulge themselves by feasting
on Israeli desserts.
In addition, a special 55-
minute documentary movie,
"Israel Inside How a Small
Nation Makes a Big Differ-
ence," will be shown. Pro-
duced in 2011, it is narrated by
former Harvard lecturer Dr
Tal ben Shahar, who traveled
throughout Israel interviewing


leading entrepreneurs, aca-
demics, politicians, scientists
and others whose extraordi-
nary achievements have bene-
fited the entire world.
This documentary will pro-
vide a better understanding of
how Israel was able to become
the world's most technically
advanced nation with more
scientists and technicians in
its workforce than any other
nation, and with an astonish-
ing list of accomplishments
that impact every field of


human endeavor
In addition, there will be a
raffle of selected items from
and about Israel, including Is-
raeli chocolate liqueur, exotic
bath items, an award-winning
movie starring Topol in "Kaz-
ablan," gift certificates and
more. Raffle tickets will cost
$2 each, or 3 for $5, or 10 for
$10.
Admission at the door will
be $10 per person. For more
information, call Roberta
Kahn at 352-527-1213.


NEWS NOTES


Koch exhibit to
continue at bank
Due to outstanding response
from the community, the Den-
nis Koch art exhibit at Bran-
nen Bank, Dunnellon branch,
has extended the Art Retro-
spective during the month of
June.
This retrospective of 18 orig-
inal works of art includes


Koch's ongoing "Winged
Migration" series," American
Culture" series, "Lips" series
and limited edition Ireland
paintings.
Show hours are 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, and Fridays until
5p.m.
The branch is at 11472 N.
Williams St. (State Road 41),
just south of the Post Office.
Call 352-489-2466.


Jerseyans, friends
to meet June 2
The New Jersey and Friends
Club will meet at 1 p.m.
Monday, June 2, at VFW Post
4252 on State Road 200 in Her-
nando. The club meets the
first Monday of each month,
unless there is a holiday Then
it's the second Monday
It's Hoagy Time at the club;


other activities include lunch
on Wednesday, June 4, at
Red's, State Road 200, Her-
nando, at 1:30 p.m. and lunch
at Chefs of Napoli, U.S. 41, In-
verness on Wednesday, June
18, at 3 p.m.
For more information, call
Mary Anne at 352-746-3386.
There will be no meetings or
activities scheduled for July
and August For more informa-
tion, call 352-527-3568.


Kiwanis Club to celebrate 25-year anniversary


n June 12, the Kiwanis Club of Cen-
tral Ridge-Crystal River will cele-
brate its silver anniversary
In the past 25 years, several past and
present members have donated their
time and talent to benefit our local com-
munity They have made a difference!
To honor members, we are planning a
special luncheon on Thursday, June 12,
and are asking anyone who was a past
member of either club to join us for our
celebration. The luncheon will be infor-
mal and fun. Please call me at 352-527-
0039 for more information,
The anniversary luncheon will be at
noon at the Rose & Crown Restaurant,
505 E. Hartford St. in Citrus Hills.
Our club was formed by the Kiwanis
Club of Homosassa. With the rapid
growth of central Citrus County and new
construction in Citrus Hills, Black Dia-
mond, Pine Ridge and Beverly Hills, the
Homosassa members realized in 1989 the
need for a new Kiwanis chapter
It was chartered by Kiwanis Interna-
tional as the "Kiwanis Club of Beverly
Hills."
The pioneering members started the
annual Christmas parade, sponsored the
International Festival and started the an-
nual Not Home Alone Christmas Party
Former 1991 past president Bruce Ross
raised $20,000 and started a perpetual
Scholarship Foundation fund at the Col-
lege of Central Florida Citrus Campus


Pete
D'Elia

KIWANIS
CLUB


(formerly Central Florida Community
College). Each year, the scholarship is
awarded to a student attending CCF This
year, a $900 scholarship was presented to
a Crystal River High School student. The
fund has grown to $25,000.
In 2007, the Suncoast Kiwanis Club
serving Crystal River dissolved and its
members joined the Central Ridge chap-
ter to form the longest Kiwanis name in
the state: The Kiwanis Club of Central
Ridge-Crystal River
At that transition, a $4,000 balance in
Suncoast's treasury was used to purchase
defibrillators for Citrus County Sheriff's
Office deputies.
Kiwanis is about helping kids. One of
our major projects is Reading is Funda-
mental (RIF), which encourages
prekindergarten and kindergarten chil-
dren to read. Our members visit local ele-
mentary schools and read to the
youngsters. At the end of the session, the
children are given a book of their choice


to take home and keep. I'm sure this is a
rewarding and memorable experience.
The national popular A Child Reading
to a Dog program was a project started lo-
cally by a member's wife of our organiza-
tion. Additional children's projects
include: supplying diapers for needy
young families, supplying food for chil-
dren with the Citrus County Blessings
(formerly Blessings in a Backpack) proj-
ect college scholarships, a $10,000 dona-
tion to the Central Ridge Boys & Girls
Club, the annual Citrus Springs Elemen-
tary School Spring Festival and a weekly
collection for fighting maternal/neonatal
tetanus.
We are proud of our sponsorship of the
Crystal River Key Club and we are ac-
tively working on projects together Dana
Fields is a teacher at Crystal River High
School and a member of our Board of Di-
rectors. She is the counselor of the Key
Club and our link with our Kiwanis Club
and the high school students. They have
assisted us with a recent car show, clean-
ing the beach and the Not Home Alone at
Christmas party
You are welcome to join us, as we have
a lot to be proud of for the past 25 years.
It's amazing what we accomplish.
Like one member summed up recently,
"I feel like we are family"

Pete DElia is a member of the Kiwanis
Club of Central Ridge-Crystal River


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




C6 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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51 54 5 3 American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers (In American Pickers (In American Pickers (In
51 54 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' "Pinch Picker"'PG' Stereo)'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo)'PG'
r/ 2 2 Wife Swap "Meeks/ Wife Swap "Petersen/ Off Their Off Their Wife Swap (In Stereo) To Be Announced
24 38 24 31 Hoover"'PG' cc ,iiiii F'-, Rockers Rockers PG'c
1 "Teenage Bank Heist" (2012, Suspense) **Y2 "Class Warfare" (2001, Drama) Wade "Like Mother, Like Daughter"'(2007,
50 119 Maeve uinlan, Abbie Cobb. Carpenter, Lindsey J. McKeon. Suspense) Michelle Stafford.'NR'c
320 2 3 3 3 ** "House of Wax" (2005, Horror) Elisha **Y2 "Snitch" (2013, Crime Drama) Dwayne **Y2 "Now You See Me"(2013)Jesse
320 221 320 3 3 Cuthbert. (In Stereo) 'R' Johnson. (In Stereo)'PG-13'c Eisenberg. (In Stereo)'PG-13'c
MN.n 42 41 42 oiiticsNation (N) Hardball Witnh unris All in With unris Hayes I ne Hacnel Maddow LocKUp LocKUp: New Mexico
42 41 42 Matthews (N) N (N) Show (N)
S 109 65 109 44 5 Showdown of the Building Wild "Float My Dg9ers Diggers DiPqers Dg Ice Holes ce Holes Diers rDiers
109 65 109 44 53 Unbeatables'PG' Cabin" PG' 'P8_ (N)PG' g (N)'14' (N)'14' PG99 W __
Iii 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. ISponge. Sponge. Sam& Sam& Sam& FullH'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
103_62 103 Dr. Phil 'PG' c Dr Phil 'PG' c Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now?
fDQXD _44 123 *** "Freaky Friday" (2003) 'PG' w*** "13 Going on 30" (2004) 'PG-13' *** "13 Going on 30" (2004) 'PG-13'
O 34 2 3** 4 "Judqe Dredd" (1995, Action)Sylvester "ScaryMovie V" (2013) Ashley Penny Dreadful Nurse The 2014 AVN Awards
340 241 340 4 Stallone,Diane Lane. (In Stereo)'R'c Tisdale.'PG-13' "Resurrection"'MA' Jackie (N)'MA, L,S'
ii 37 4 37 2 3 Cops Cops'PG' Cops ** "Walking Tall" (2004, Action) The Rock, *Y2 "LawAbiding Citizen" (2009 Suspense) Jamie Foxx,
37 43 37 27 36 '14 cc c '14Nc Johnny Knoxville. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Gerard Butler, Colm Meaney (In Stereo)'NR
fSTAR7 37 27m^1 37** "The Call"(2013) *( Y"Mission to Mars"(2000, Science Fiction) "Grown Ups2"(2013) Adam ** "National Treasure" (2004)
370 271 370 Halle Berry. Gary Sinise. (In Stereo)'PG Sandier. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Nicolas Cage.'PG'
N Florida Rays Live! MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox. From Fenway Park Rays Live! Inside the Inside the P1 AquaX
S 36 31 36 Insider (N) in Boston. (N) (In Stereo Live (N) Rays Rays USA
S 31 5 31 2 2 ** "Lockout" (2012, Science Fiction) Guy WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) (In Stereo) Continuum "Minute of Wil Continuum
31 59 31 26 29 Pearce, Maggie Grace. PG-13' 'PG' Silence" (N) '14' Wheaton '14'
TR 49 23 49 16 19 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld *** "Wedding Crashers" (2005) Owen Wilson. 'R' I*** "Wedding Crashers"R'
n 1 1 3 *** "While the City Sleeps" (1956, Mystery) **)i "Newsfront" (1978, Drama) Bill Hunter, **)Y "Sunday Too FarAway" ".Chant of
169 53 169 30 35 Dana Andrews, Ida Lupino.'NR'c Chris Haywood. Premiere.'PG' (1975) Jack Thompson. Jim"
nn 5 Naked Castaway (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Chrome Underground Naked and Afraid (In
U 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) c Stereo)'14'c Stereo)'14'm c Stereo)'14'c "Road Rage" Stereo)'14'c
(TLJ 50 46 50 29 30 Say Yes:The Big Day Say Yes:The Big Day Say Yes:The Big Day Say Yes:The Big Day Gown IGown Say Yes:The Big Da
*** "Byzantium" (2012, Horror) Gemma ** "Diary of a Mad Black Woman" (2005) *** "The Best Man"(1999, Comedy-Drama)
ij 350 261 350 Arterton, Saoirse Ronan. (In Stereo) 'R' Kimberly Elise.'PG-13' c Taye Diggs. (In Stereo) R' c
T 48 3 4 31 3 Castle "A Death in the Castle "Deep in Death" *** "The Lincoln Lawyer" (2011, Suspense) Matthew *** "The Score"(2001) Robert
48 33 48 31 34 Family"'PG' 'PG' McConaughey MarisaVomei.'R' (DVS) De Niro.'R' c
TD4 38 58 38 33 Teen Gumball Adven Regular King/Hill |King/Hill Cleveland Cleveland American American Fam._Guy Fam. Gu
[TRA 9 106 9 44 Bizarre Foods Food Food Bizarre Foods Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum
Qjj 25 55 25 98 55 Most Shocking Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard Lizard
fWUD 32 49 32 34 24 Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland An AllII-Star Comedy Tribute to Don Rickles Kin Kin
S 47 NCIS"A Man Walks NCIS "Defiance" (In Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Playing
47 32 47 17 18 Into a Bar..."'14' Stereo)'PG' Family Family Family Family Family Family Family House
S117 Ma. Boot Marriage Boot Camp A full-scale Marriage Boot Camp: Marriage Boot Camp: Mystery Millionaire Marriage Boot Camp:
117 69 117 Camp brawl erupts. 14' TheAftermath '14' Reality Stars'14' (Series Premiere) (N) Reality Stars'14'
[WN-A 18 18 18 18 20 Funny Home Videos IFunny Home Videos MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers. (N) (Live) Mother |Mother


North 05-30-14
.) 8
SQ 9 4 2
J 7
QJ 9 5 4
West East
4 Q 9 5 2 K 1074
V A 8 3 5
AQ2 98643
tg863 10 7 2
South
A63
T K J 10 7 6
K105
AK
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 I Pass 2 V Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 2


= Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Michio Kaku, a professor of theoretical
physics, made this valid point: "It's pointless to
have a nice clean desk, because it means
you're not doing anything."
Who could disagree with that?
There are some plays that seem pointless,
but upon closer inspection prove that you are
doing something vital. In this deal, the "point-
less" play occurs at trick one.
South is in four hearts. West leads the spade
two. After declarer plays low from the dummy,
why does it make a difference whether East
plays his 10 or king?
Nowadays many Wests would have made a
takeout double over one heart. I am still not
convinced it is a good idea with a relatively
weak 4-3-3-3. South's jump to four hearts was a
slight overbid with such a balanced hand, but
whenever you smell a game, bid that game.
If East plays the spade king at trick one, it
does not cost the defense a spade trick, but de-
clarer can then make his contract. He wins
with his ace and drives out the heart ace. West
takes his ace and cashes the spade queen, but
even if he leads another spade, South ruffs in
the dummy, plays off his two top clubs, draws
trumps ending on the board, and runs the
clubs.
Now let East "finesse against his partner" by
putting in the spade 10 at trick one. Then West,
when he gets in with his heart ace, can lead
another low spade. East can take the trick and
shift to a diamond, giving the defenders one
spade, one heart and two diamonds.
The finesse against partner retains an entry
card for East.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I MESUA I


HLLRIT |



WELFAD


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
f -r, r yr vyji
.un.ng ii al l I
i~nrt ,I 1

III
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THEY WERI ENJOYING THE
ALL-YOU--AN-FAT STEAK
RF5TAURANT ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:W c Ll]
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: LUNCH HILLY FIBULA PUNDIT
I Answer: After their air conditioner broke down again, she
wished her husband could take a CHILL PILL


ACROSS
1 Rough shelter
4 The-
the limit!
8 Zilch
11 Dear, in Italy
12 Kind of wave
13 See -
glance
14 Jai -
15 Never
explored
17 Geologic
formation
19 Plank
20 Box-score fig.
21 Genre
22 Knight's
quest
25 Canine
categories
28 Goddess of
dawn
29 Hydrox rival
31 Face-off
33 Calendar abbr.
35 Bed and
breakfasts


37 Opposite of
post-
38 Aptitude
40 Piracy
42 Et, for Hans
43 Luau fare
44 Significant-
47 Descends a
cliff
51 Football field
53 Injection
54 Part of UCLA
55 Paint layer
56 Assns.
57 Publishing
execs
58 Has title to
59 Potpie veggie

DOWN
1 Luminous
ring
2 Europe-Asia
range
3 Chinese
exercises
(2 wds.)
4 Avoids


Answer to Previous Puzzle


CARRY POSY1
OXTA IL BUENOS
PEEWEEA RROYC
ELAINEW'OW
W|ORDLEEK

ADID 5 H U^ L E^ I \
dEIjL LlfM/M BN A.-RM
*R-Y -A N| I AiT'E[E
iiGIO^ N0 E 0 N-
|QT|S B L|EE ps|-
B IE T L E Can's| R|0
IST E R E|OB C E L0 T
*EM I R^ Asc|T


5 Lotto kin
6 Orange root
7 Even-
tempered
8 Wine valley
9 Route, for
Ben-Hur


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OuillDriverBooks.eom

^*1 -- -~^f~-- -- -~^~ -~^
11




S-1 -25 2,
3p


36


4 --5 49/ 4
2 2W 1,
bi S2 3

^ BB^ H^H56
444S4I-- ^se*p


10 "Shane" star
11 Mav's foe
16 Nudged
18 Guthrie of folk
music
21 Press
22 Figure out
23 Defeat handily
24 On a voyage
25 Stooped
26 Swindle
27 Feudal
underling
30 Marmalade
chunk
32 "- It Be"
34 Fishtailed
36 Whoa!
39 Physicist
Fermi
41 Rap music
(hyph.)
43 Slacks
44 Gawk at
45 Marched
along
46 Teakettle
sound
47 Reddish-
brown horse
48 Fictional
governess
49 Links letters
50 Brillo rival
52 Loud
argument


5-30 (jP 2014 UFS, Distl. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D ear Annie: When my
husband died, my
daughter, "Emma," in-
sisted that I move in with her
to take over the child care,
cooking, cleaning, etc. One of
my requirements was bring-
ing my dog. Emma knows
"Maisie" is a
barker, but prom-
ised it wouldn't be
a problem.
Emma began
seeing a fine
young man, who
moved in with us.
But Maisie barked
at him. When the
boyfriend's car
was repossessed, I
let him use mine.
It was a gas-guz- AN N
zler, so Emma in- MAIL
sisted I sell it,
even though I didn't want to.
She said I was selfish, so I
caved. She used the money to
buy another car, but the regis-
tration is in her name. She
said it was for the entire fam-
ily, but I think I was taken for
$5,000.
Last year, Emma told me to
give her the money from my
retirement fund to open a
new business. My financial
adviser agreed that it was a
good investment, so I let her
have the money with the un-
derstanding that I would con-
tinue living with her
But when Emma married
the boyfriend, they moved
into a new home, and I was
told that Maisie would not be
welcome. I was shocked that
they expected me to get rid of
my beloved companion.
When she again said I was
selfish, I lost my temper
Emma told me to move in
with a friend until I "see the
error of my ways."


I
L
Ll


Emma now won't let me see
my grandson and says I'm
choosing my dog over her
She says we can't have a rela-
tionship unless I apologize.
Even if I do, I realize that she
will use her son as a weapon
any time I do something she
doesn't like, and
by caving (again),
I'd be telling her
that it's OK to
break her prom-
ises. Any thoughts?
-Maisie's Mom,
Too
DearMom:
Emma sounds like
a bully and a ma-
nipulator She may
be right that you
IE'S are choosing
.BOX Maisie over her,
but the dog is part
of your family, and this was
the agreement she made. You
have given Emma free child
care and a new business,
while she has stolen your car
and made you homeless. Are
you willing to sue her for the
money? If not, you'll need to
grit your teeth and apologize,
but talk to your investment
counselor about ways to re-
coup some of your losses.
DearAnnie: Can I address
this to businesses, organiza-
tions and anyone with a busi-
ness card or website? Please
keep it simple!
So many of us have trouble
reading elaborate cards with
spider-silk-thin fonts with
long tails where a 6 looks like
an 8. Or where the print is a
light gray on a white back-
ground or a navy blue on a
black background, with
ridiculously fancy borders
and artwork. Please present
us with easy-to-read informa-
tion, especially addresses,


maps, phone numbers and
menus. Need To Decipher
Dear Need: A lot of busi-
ness cards are needlessly or-
nate, and websites can be too
confusing to navigate, even
for the savvy While you want
these things to look nice, you
also want your customers to
be able to make use of them.
Please save the fancy foot-
work for the wedding invita-
tions and keep the business
information clear
DearAnnie: I read the let-
ter from "Concerned Grand-
parents," whose daughter's
home is a mess. Thank you so
much for your supportive re-
sponse.
I was never taught to clean
as a child, because my
mother did everything. So
did my mother-in-law While
it was wonderful that our
mothers allowed us to be lit-
tle and simply cleaned up
after us, my kids don't have
that. My husband and I are
messy Our children are, too,
and we are working toward
change. Just as my sons are
getting better at baseball
each year, we are becoming
better housekeepers. Not
Quite a Grownup

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast. net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 Third
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.




CiTnus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


The Born Loser


AND THAT'S A
MEAITIFUL ULM...UH..


^^-i, FLOW T JACTUA,-LY, _
IT'S A COFFEE

TIr H ANDLE-


S -30


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


o60rTA PLY, MOM'
I'M ALSAOV LA'r
-. F0o SCHOOL.P





I C --'I .-. .-


I .~>cz 4



4, ~tiII.

~k' 4


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury Classic


Big Nate


TtiANKS BUT iO
TI-LANK, NLK i'M
GOING TO TrHE PFoO
WITH GORbLE.
OH. COME ONH r
YOU'RE CHOOSIN6G
HIM OvE& ME'= /





Arlo and Janis


WT III CAI'TA1N OF


WLT I'M CONTAIN OF
"HE HOCKEY 'TEA.M^'


P'm^4


... HiCH. W TRE
wAY, tM4ti A 1ECORIp
T-HI SEASON OF

TWO W1mJ, O.l. TEN
ro LSE _^t
^ V


TIS IT MY
FAULT WE.
HAD At'
LOUSY Y AKE
A0 LE? TH-AT
V r FIFTEEN


"PIP YOU GClTK14 NIC "SORRIy, pON,"
CARP I %ENT'oU g" OPEN &TifNK MAIL.I


Betty


Frank & Ernest


"Mommy, don't you think this dress
is too cute to just wear around
the house?"


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"A Million Ways to Die in the West" (R)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"Blended" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 1:35 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:35 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Maleficent" (PG) 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
"Maleficent" (PG) In 3D. 2 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,
10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG) 9:50 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 12:50 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:35 p.m.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) 12:45
p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No
passes.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"A Million Ways to Die in the West" (R)
12:50 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Blended" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Maleficent" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Maleficent" (PG) In 3D. 12:45 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
No passes.
"Neighbors" (R) 10:10 p.m.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) 4 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.

Visit www.chronicleonline. com for area
movie listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public L'Ocl RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: t sWfbe Oa


"FM VLPVI VEI IM SLP GDXMRRGCYP.


GS'R JMBSL SLP YMMA ME SLP NVOPR


MN SLMRP JLM RVGI TMK


OMKYIE'S."


JVYSPB CVFPLMS



Previous solution: "Bob Gibson is the luckiest pitcher in baseball. He is always
pitching when the other team doesn't score any runs." Tim McCarver
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-30


Peanuts


Pickles


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie


COMICS


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 C7




C8 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014




Chronicle


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


. -W MM Vk -= -: i
Fa:(5) S6-65 1 olFee@88 52-2401.E ai:.lasifed@chonclonin cmI0ebi0: w0croi .0olie 0


Cute & Fluffy
Free to good home
(352) 628-2178
FREE
Lab/Spaniel Mix
2 Females, 1 Male
2-3 yrs. old
(352) 422-6567
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
(352) 613-3205
Shepherd Mix
good watch dogs
5 yrs. old, 1 male,
1 neutered female,
Free to Good Home


inhnuanua eagle
Mix
black/tan w/white on
her chest, had on a
pink harness, lost in
the vicinity of Dunklin
and Citrus Springs Blvd
(352) 697-3466
Large Chow, Collie
Mix, reddish tan
w/black muzzle and
furry feet.Missing since
Wednesday
afternoon. Lost in the
vicinity of N. Fillmore
St. Beverly Hills
(352) 746-6063
LOST CAT
Small spayed female.
Brown, tan, orange tor-
toise shell. Citrus
Springs N Caressa
Way. Woods south of
Rutland, west of
Deltona, East of Elcam.
Her name is Lola and
she is very timid. If
seen, please call Donna
(352)613-6499.
Lost Fri, May 23rd
at Grumpy Gators,
Homosassa,
White Gold Bracelet
old filligree w/aqua
stone REWARD
352-601-5374



Chihuahua Mix
found in the vicinity
of Dunklin. between
495 and Citrus Springs
please call
(352) 563-0546








Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
www.preciouspaws
florida.com
Crystal River Mall
Wednesday-Sunday
12pm4pm
Floral City Adoption
Center 7358 S. Flor-
ida Ave Sat10-2pm
Pet Supermarket-lnv
(Cats & Kittens only)
low cost spay
/neuter and vaccine
vouchers are
available
726-4700 for Info.


Adopt a
igeocted Pet










dogs @ www.
adootarescuedoet
.com or call
352-795-9550
ADOPTIONS
Saturday. 10A-12P
PetSupermarket
Every 1st Saturday
Market Day
Dunnellon
We are in NEED
of Fosters to save
more dogs. To
foster or volunteer
please contact us
or visit PetSuper-
market, Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS


COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home style
environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kittens
are micro-chipped,
altered, & tested for
Feline Luk and Aids.
Up to date
on vaccines for age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw prints.


CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED"'I
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41

-B


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
I I I I I I I I




P/T CLERICAL
Help Needed
Real Estate Office
Computer Skills &
Real Estate Lic.
Preferred. Email
jcenturyltampabay.rr.co
m or Call
352-726-6668











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only_$28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
FOR ALL SHIFTS
Apply Online: home
Lnstead.com/671

CNA's/HHA's

Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com

Exp. Medical
Assistant

FT For Busy Medical
Office, EMR exp. a
plus. Email resume
hr@cmc-fi.com
or Fax Resume:
Fax (352) 564-4222

FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience
& experience with
Eaglesoft a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lynn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.com

MDS Nurse,
RN/LPN

Crystal River Health
and Rehab is seeking:
a FIT MDS NURSE
The ideal candidate
must be an Exp.
RegisteredNurse/
Licensed Practical
Nurse, have MDS
long-term care exp.
Come be a part of our
team. We offer com-
petitive salary, 401 K,
Health, Dental, and
Vision. Email:
chris.delgado@nortih-
portheath.com or
Call: 352-795-5044 to
come in for a tour....


Imy Noe^^


IIB


Office Manager
Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
to: 352-746-3838

Ophthalmic
Assistant

needed part time or
full time, ophthalmic
exp. preferred.
Apply in person
Monday Friday
8:00am-5:30pm to:
West Coast Eve
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246




Private Club with
Huge Tiki Hut
Needing
*Staff Supervisor,
*Bartender,.Servers,
*Hostess, *Food run-
ner, *Server's assis-
tant, *Bussers
and .Housekeeper
High volume
business. Must be
experienced & en-
ergetic with outgo-
ing personality. Must
have great cus-
tomer service skills.
Applyv in Person at
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando,
Mon-Fri., 2pm-5pm







Advertising Sales
Assistant
FT with Benefits

Seeking individual
with strong
customer service
and computer skills,
who can work in
a fast-pace team
environment with
co-workers and
outside customers.
Will be responsible
for generating
reports using MS
Excel and help to
coordinate special
events. At times,
must be able to
work independently
to prioritize tasks
assigned by many
different team
members.
Attention to detail
and accuracy are
key components to
this position.
Email resume to:
djkamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
Apply in person
at: 1624 N Meadow-
crest Blvd, Crystal
River, FL 34429
Drug Screen
required for final
candidate EOE


FiroiiumP
FULL TIME
Advertising Sales
Representative

Base Salary plus
Commission
Service existing
customers and
prospect for new
Meet monthly sales
goals. Sales experi-
ence a plus, but
will train. Need to
be organized and
have strong
computer skills
Excellent customer
service skills, always
with a genuine smile
Work in a fabulous
team environment
Must have valid FL
DL and reliable
vehicle
Email resume to:
dikamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
Apply in person
at: 1624 N Meadow-
crest Blvd, Crystal
River, FL 34429
Drug Screen
required for final
candidate EOE


CARIE




Fivatdfor / /r1 v








1 f~lBL*rfl';I






[#;TIT:1;1IP^TFJ


jTraes/
Bl^

Experienced
Service Plumber
Full-time, must have
own tools.
Billy the Sunshine
Plumber
16085 Commercial
Way, Brooksville, FL
34614
352-596-9191






Accounting Clerk
Announcement
#14-61

Responsible for per-
forming accounting
and clerical support
functions in Citrus
County Parks and
Recreation. Three
years financial ac-
counting experience
required. Must be pro-
ficient with Excel and
other Microsoft Office
Suite of Products.
$11.09 hourly to start.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us
you can also visit one
of the local Libraries
or the Human Re-
sources Department
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461 to
apply online by Fri-
day, June 6, 2014
EOE/ADA


APPT. SETTERS
Great Pay Weekly.
Daily Bonuses
APPLY IN PERSON
6421 W. Homossa Tr.
Homosassa Fl. 34448


CAREER
OPPORTUNITY
Full Benefits
General Laborer

F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED Required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM


SMW Landscaping
Co. Needs Qualified
Grounds
Maintenance
Worker

Valid Drivers Lic.,
with clean driving
record. References
Call (352) 382-7194


SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
**352-503-4930**


TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F






MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547















Day & Night School
Barber
Night School
Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School










Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM
CamIus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
NOW









ENROKSVLLNG










(727) 848-841,5
www.benes.edu

START CAREER
IN A YEAR


45972683 1
128543679

7 3 6 198 5 2 4
3 6-1 2 5 9 41 8 7
2 8 7 4 6 19153
594837 1162
945382716
813674295
672915348


GIFT SHOP/CAFE
seeks working
partner, or buyer
352-302-2194





2007 White Alum.
Shed. 10'X 20', $1500.
(352)601-6192,
(347)466-1506

ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com





1800S CHILDS TOY
FLAT IRON WITH HOT
PLATE 3.5"x2"x2" $40
OBO 352-270-3527

ANTIQUE IRON
SKILLET 1800S
CHILDS TOY Horse n
Buggy inside $40 OBO
352-2370-3527

CHEST OF DRAWERS.
1940's Waterfall front.
3 drawer. 36"T X 42"W.
Excellent cond. $25
527-6709






DUDLEY'S
AUCTrORW

TWO AUCTIONS
Thurs. 5/29- Walk-
About Auction 3pm
OUTSIDE Treasures
furniture, tools,
INSIDE antiques,
decorative Items,
furnishings & more!
Sun. 6/1- Antique &
Collectible Auction
1am-coins, jewelry,
art, vintage, fishing
Items, lots of
furniture, china,
porcelain and more!

call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.










DUDLEY'S


TWO AUCTIONS

Thurs. 5/29- Walk-
About Auction 3pm
OUTSIDE Treasures
furniture, tools,
INSIDE antiques,
decorative Items,
furnishings & more!
Sun. 6/1- Antique &
Collectible Auction
omrn-coins, jewelry,
art, vintage, fishing
Items, lots of
furniture, china,
porcelain and more!
call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.


ROCKWELL SCOUT-
ING "1979" -50 first day
covers-matching gov.
stamps $100.00-
352-527 9982




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
GE MINI REFRIGERA-
TOR Size: 19"x34"x18"
$35 Call 212-2961
Kenmore Elite Dryer
Electric, Ginger Color
good condition.
$200.
Free Matching HE
Washer (352) 489-3931
Kenmore Glass Top
Range Bisque $200
Microwave, Range
Hood Kenmore,
Bisque $100 good
cond. 352-476-7973
Sanyo Small
Refrigerator
excellent condition
$50. (352) 513-5368
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179

SOLD
Kitchenaid
Dishwasher,
all stainless interior,
black exterior, exc.
condition
Washer & Dryer
Front Load, GE with
Pedestals, 2008
units well cared for
indoors, $800. pr.
352-423-3107
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
(352)263-7398




DESKCHAIR Black
Swivel Armchair fully ad-
justable EXC $25.
Dunnellon
352-465-8495









DUDLEY'S
AUCTION

TWO AUCTIONS

Thurs. 5/29 Walk-
About Auction 3pm
OUTSIDE Treasures
furniture, tools,
INSIDE antiques,
decorative Items,
furnishings & more!
Sun. 6/1- Antique &
Collectible Auction
pmrn-coins, jewelry,
art, vintage, fishing
Items, lots of
furniture, china,
porcelain and more!
call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




4 Aluminum Ladders
two Extension,
one- 16 ft, one 12 ft.
$125.
Lawn Blower $20
352-382-3663
Black N Decker 71/2"
Hand Saw $25.
Craftsman 16 gal vac.
$25.Reciprocal Sander
& Saber Saw $8. ea.
(352) 382-5521
New Hedge Trimmer
$25., Electric tile saw,
$30.Heavy duty con-
crete saw $30., Electric
Sander and Polisher
$30. small grinder $10.
$120. for all
Jerry (352) 341-0959
TROY BILT 5500W
GENERATOR hardly
used at all great condi-
tion $350.00
352-527-1399




PLANAR COMPUTER
MONITOR Good con-
dition, black colored,
has speakers. $50
(352)465-1616
TV STAND for
LCD/LED TV w/Glass
Shelf for A/V equipment
$45. Call 212-2961


CLASSIFIED


To.da
.. fds]


FreeSerice


FreOfel




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DELL LAPTOP STAND
& PR01X DOCKING
STAT. set up for easy
desktop computing
$25 352-382-3650
PRINTER HP Printer,
wired, with extra black
cartridge. Works fine.
$25 352-476-8744
PRINTER Wireless HP
printer, copier, scanner.
Works fine. $25
352-476-8744



Parting Out Several
Antique Farm Tractors.
Some partially
restored. Make Offer.
563-1033/601-0819



PATIO DINING TABLE
Cir Glass top 3' 4 iron
legs
$35 352-270-3527



1 very gently used full
size Lazy Boy Sofa/
Hide a Bed, multi color
neutral pin stripes,
makes an excellent
sofa $125.
(352) 489-4649
Bed, Trundle, like old
brass bed 80W, 40D,
+ mattress, $300.
3 Bar Stools, 30"
Caned seats, Bent
wood style, New. $75.
ea. (352) 560-7526
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
*352-795-0121*

CRYSTAL RIVER
Nature Coast
Ministries
YARD Sale
Saturday 8a-1 p
*f /2 price sale *
On entire store!!
1590 Meadowcrest
Blvd. Volunteers
Needed
DESK LAMP BLACK
Adjustable,great for
close up, hobbies, Halo-
gen 50W bulb $25 Can
email pic 352-382-3650
DINING TABLE CIR 3'
Iron legs glass top good
cond. $35 OBO
352-270-3527
Dresser w/ Mirror,
& matching Bureau,
Rattan trim
$125. obo
(352) 527-7015
Entertainment Center
49" wide x 48" tall x
21" deep, dark wood
grain, $110.
Call Larry
(352) 344-1692
GE 5 Cycle Dryer
Excellent $100.
1 Lrg. & 1 Small Office
Chairs Excellent
$50. ea or 2 for $75
352- 503-6313
Homosassa

/THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
* SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
New, Restoration
Qn sz Pillowtop
Mattress set $200.
& frame $35.
(352) 423-4456
Oak Dining Room
Table w/ 4 chairs & 2
captain chairs $450.
Outdoor Tile Top
Cement Table w/ 3
curved cement
benches $400.
(352) 270-2495
Oak King Size
Headboard w/lighted
book cases &
matching mirror/
dresser $1500.
(352)270-2495
Queen Inner spring,
Mattress & Spring
Excel. Cond $225.
White ext or Int. wood
Rockers $35 or 2 for
$50. 352- 503-6313
Homosassa
Small Bedroom Chair,
$30
Entertainment center
28" W 27" Tall wooden
all in good cond. $50
(352) 419-8165


HERNANDO
leather chairs, Thurs., Fri. & Sat., 8a-4p
excel, cond. $250 4785 E. Dartmouth Ln.
Trundle Bed, rattan
trim, newer mattresses HOMOSASSA
$150 (352) 527-7015 Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
TRADE IN MATTRESS STORAGE UNIT
SETS FOR SALE ITEMS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.* Oak Ent. Cnt Furn.
King, Queen, Full, Twin jewlery, antique hum-
Very good condition mels, Much More!
352-621-4500 Crosby Sq. Storage
TWIN SIZE MATTRESS 6411 S. Tex Point.,
& BOX SPRING Across from
unmatched set, very Howards Flea Market
comfortable $50.00 Follow Pink Signs
3525271399 HOMOSASSA
Two Twin Beds Fri., Sat. Sun. 8a-?
comfortable mattress 6530 Pine Meadow Av
& boxsprings, includes
comforters & sheet set HOMOSASSA
$150. for all HUGE CHARITY
(352) 794-3963 YARD SALE
Two Twin Extra Large Sat, May 31, 9a to 1p
Medium Soft Mattress behind Mike's Pub
80" x 39", $900. obo coner of US 19 &
352-382-5183 Oaknridge Drive
All proceeds benefit
local needy children
absolutely no early
birds, rain date
AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Sun, June 1st
Rock, Driveways ___= I
Hauling & Tractor Work m s-
352-341-2019,201-5147 mIUSt sell.
CRAFTSMAN 42" ERNESS
Lawn Tractor, INVERNESS
17HP automatic, 9094 east china grove
H Rebuiltma, lane One day sale eve-
$400. rything must go. Entire
(352) 270-4087 house sale down to the
352) 27 "-48 walls.SATURDAY MAY
Cub Cadet Modle- 31 8.00 AM
Lt1050.50" mower
w/muncher attch. Kokler INVERNESS
23hp,140 hrs. New btry. ESTATE SALE
42"Sears Must sell it all!
sweeper/dump cart, Fri-Sun 8am to?
$1200 OBO. 6729 E. Falcon Rest
(352)503-6795 Ln. Inverness
John Deer Lawn INVERNESS
Tractor, Like New Fri. & Sat. 9a-2pm
23 hrs. includes 7092 E. Gospel Island
bagger, thatcher,
& spreader, $1,300. INVERNESS
(352) 513-5043 MOVING SALE!
Fri, Sat, 8a to 2p
Trimmer Mower, Sears, EVERYTHING MUST GO!
22" Cut, New 160 CM 10070 E Douglas Ct
Honda Engine, $150. (352) 464-1128
Snapper, Rear engine
Rider, w/Wisconsin INVERNESS
Robin Engine 33" Cut Saturday 31st, 9a-Sp
$300 (352) 507-1490 Gingerbread
Troy Built Pre School CLOSING
Rototiller EVERYTHING GOES!
Jr. Reartine 209 N. Citrus Ave.
5hp, manuals.
Forward/Rev. $275. LECANTO
(352)465-7506 Saturday 31st, 9a-2p
-* ESTATE SALE *
3290W Parkville St #18

YadSae YARDSALE

1^"" PINE RIDGE
r MOVING SALE
Fri, Sat. 8am to ?
bunk beds, matching
dresser, riding mower,
collectibleshswrs, etc
ADVERTISE 4749 N Mangrove Way
YOUR PINE RIDGE
GARAGE SALE Multi Family Yard Sale
IN THE Sat. May 31st, 9a-2p
N TE 4556 N. Capistrano Lp.
CHRON. ICLEj PINE RIDGE
Sat. & Sun. 8A.-12P.
CLASIFI S 2 Craftsman Lawn
CLASSIFIEDS Mowers 42" and MORE
5115 W. Bonanza Dr.
_1 .S


Homosassa
Fri, May 30, 8a to 6p
Sat. May31st, 8ato?
rooms full of furniture,
kitchen & household
items, collectibles, 2
sets English Bone
China dishes, elec-
tronics, exercise equip
5732 W Irving Court
off RockCrusher



EVAN PICONE SUIT
DBL BREASTED NAVY
Linen size 12-14 good
cond $20 OBO
352-270-3527
EVAN PICONE SUIT
DBL BREASTED White
Linen size 12-14 good
cond $20 OBO
352-270-3527



FAX MACHINE
Lexmark fax machine.
Fax, phone, copy. $25
352476-8744


4 Pekin Ducks $8. ea
Leghorn, New Hamp-
shire, Bantams, $5 ea
All are 5 months old,
(352) 422-5622
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
10 FT. RADIUS
CASTING NET-
20 ft. diameter,
1/2" mesh, Ex., $50.
(352)628-0033
Antique Cradle
& High Chair.
Baby blankets
& stroller
All for $200. obo
(352) 795-7254
Antique Horse Collar
Mirror $150.
Hepa Air Cleaners
$100. for both
(352) 628-5085
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
AQUARIUM ACRYLIC
curved front 12 gal
good shape incl fil-
ters, air pump, extras
$30. 352-621-0175
AQUARIUM ACRYLIC
Eclipse corner 5 gal
Good shape includes
many extras $30.
352-621-0175
BEANIE BABY-
BONGO THE MONKEY
Price: $10
(352)465-1616
BOAT OARS- pair,
Feather Brand, 60
inches long, black
with oar locks, $45.
(352)628-0033
CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with Case. $95.00
Excellent Condition
352-746-5421
END TABLE Glass Top
with Gold Edges.
Blonde End Table.
Excellent Condition
$25.00 352-746-5421
French Provincial Set
w/loveseat, couch & end
table, cherry, good cond
$325. Men's &
Ladies Golf Clubs
$150. for both sets
(352) 228-9145

V THIS OUT!



GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!!!



6 lines
-10 days
up to 2 items



$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50



GOLD FLATWARE 5
PC PLACE SET KINGS
INN ROSE never used
$20 352-270-3527
Golf Clubs, Bag
& Accessories
$100
Air Compressor
2.5 HP, $25.
(352) 527-8603
Homade quilt tops, 10
for $100. Cookie jars, 9
for $100. (352)795-7254
J B L CENTER
SPEAKER -100 watts-6
1/2"H-18 1/2"W-5
5/8"D-$25.00-more info
call- 352-527-9982
Pool Table 8ft 3/4
Italian Slate
All Equipment $1,200
Nikon Mount Sigma
Lens 300 mm 1: 4D
$250 (352) 422-3952
QUILTING TABLE
by Grace Company
for Long arm quilting
Twin to King size,
$500.
(352) 560-7526


CLASSIFIED



Rainbow Vacuum
Cleaner and
Shampooer
exc. cond. except power
head, all attachments
$300.(352) 628-5085
Red Lion
Concrete Mixer
$75.
Golf Dolly
$30.
(352) 697-1757
SHUTTERS 3 Complete
sets of Indoor or Out-
door Wooden Shutters.
$95.00 Excellent Condi-
tion 352-746-5421
Smithbilt Low Profile
Shed 10 x14 w/5ft
door, excel cond.
$1,400. obo
Located in Floral City
Duval Is 954-695-6721
SPEAKERS 2 Speakers
70 Watt.$35.00.Very
Good Condition
352-746-5421
TABLE 5' BROWN
FORMICA top Heavy
duty Legs fold. Yard
sales/banquet, etc.
$30. (352)270-3909
WOODEN GLASS GUN
CASE Wooden 8 gun
case with key lock ex-
cellent condition 6ft tall
$75. 352 302 5468



DISPLAY RACKS and
store fixtures,
retail store closing at
105W. Main St., Inver-
ness.



4 Step Acorn Chair Lift,
$1,000, (352)621-3987
Adult Wheelchair
$50.
Bedside Commode
$40
(352) 628-1029



First Act electric guitar
$35. 352-419-4464
Hohner acoustic guitar
$30 3524194464



DELTA SHOWER
HEAD New in box $20
Call 212-2961






BIKES Two 16 in. wheel
folding bikes, like new.
$100 each. call
352 794 3961
Ross Exercise Bike
$20
Tony Little
Circle Glide $75.
(352) 613-1674
TREADMILL
Multi-Modes,
A 1 Shape,
$125.
(352)746-4879
Treadmill, Proform
515 TX $400.
Sole E20 Elliptical
Machinine $600
Like New
(843) 469-3204



10' KAYAK
no paddles
good condition
$125. (352) 794-3963
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
King Cobra Irons,
3100i, 4-though
Sand wedge,
new graphite shafts,
$175.
352-422-0273
Schwinn AIR/DYNE
Excercise Bike
exc. cond. $125.00
(352) 513-5368
Yamaha
2000 Golf Cart
New battery Red with
roof and windshield
Fold down vinyl
enclosure $2,700. Call
today. 352-621-3678


FRIDAY, MAY 30,2014 C9


.1


utilt

Custom Utility Trailer
5'x1 0' w/extra welded
on tie-downs, spare
tire, drop-gate, stabi-
lizers, removeable
motorcycle chalk
& hitch lock, $750.obo
(352)628-1003
HEAVY DUTY
RIDER TRAILER
(car dolly)
all new tires, incl.
spare $800.
(352) 637-2829


Sell or Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





Smi Used Light Weight
RV Trailer, Mtr. Home
(352) 795-1590 or
(352)-563-7417
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted
Old Golf Cart
For Parts
(352) 564-2756
WANTED
Pillsbury Dough Boy
Collectibles
628-7765 leave mess.


Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
Holly Wolf
Stylist/Owner
Invites you to come
meet our Friendly
Knowledgeable
Staff!

JUNE SPECIAL
$60 COLOR
& CUT

826 US Hwy 41
Inverness, FL
352-637-0777


Robin Long
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.

"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.


HERMAN
LaughingStock Licensing Inc., Dist by Universal Uclick, 2014


5-30


"Two of these just fell out
of the car."


BELLA
Bella, 18-month-old
Chocolate lab mix,
spayed, housebrkn
& microchipped.
Sweet, kind, gentle
dog, good w/other
animals. UTD on
shots. Sits & waits
patiently for treats,
nice temperament.
Adoption fee $30.00
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821 or
rwmoak@att.net.


2 SHIH TZU PUPPIES
8 WEEKS
OLD,AKC,GEORGOUS
BRINDLES 726-9189


BRIT
Brit, Australian cattle
dog, 10y.o., quiet,
calm, housebroken.
Heartwonm-negative.
Loves cals, should
be only dog. Some
arthritis, but loves to
walk with you. Con-
sidered "Special
Needs" because of
arthritis.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363 or
email at: jamcbriar
@yahoo.com.









BUD
THIS BUD'S FOR
YOU! Bud, young ter-
rier mix, brown/white
in color, HW-neg, ap-
pears housebrkn, very
friendly & playful.
Loves people, wants
to be your lapdog.
All shots current.
Should be only dog
in the home.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
or 352-697-2682.


#1E tmploniclesourcecIs

www.chronicleonline.com


Birds for Sale
parakeets $10. ea.
cockatiels $35. ea.
lovebirds $30. ea.
Goffin cockatoo $400.
Mitred $100.
45 gal. aquarium
$75.352-287-1522









l '^




BUTTERBEAN
Butterbean, 2-y.o.
mixed breed
spayed female,
great size @ 41 Ibs.
Knows basic com-
mands, training on
leash work. Beautiful
sweet girl, playful,
loving & gentle,
plays w/cats. Chil-
dren in family should
be age 10 and up.
Call Michelle @
352-302-2664 or
352-726-5139.


CLARK
Clark, 1+ y.o. Boxer/
terrier mix, neu-
tered, wt 65 Ibs. UTD
shots, microchip-
ped, HW negative.
Gorgeous dog, very
affectionate, pro-
tective, housebrkn,
leash trained, knows
basiccommands,
good w/dogs.
Call Laci @
352-212-8936, email
Lacihendershot@
yahoo.com.


WY,


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625
Cinderella's Home
& OfficeCleaning &
Home Companions
Relax We'll Take Care
of you! 352-746-7760




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM Lic/Ins #2579
352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
K.S. LAND
SERVICES LLC
352-302-2849




A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *kk
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lie.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
* AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Cinderella's Home
& OfficeCleaning &
Home Companions
Relax We'll Take Care
of you! 352-746-7760


CLEANING BY PENNY
Residential Only
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-364-1773
HOME CLEANING
reliable & exp. lie/ins
needs based, ref's
Bonded- 352-613-8137




CREATURE COMFORTS


PET SITTING/WALKING
Exp., Reliable, Excel.
Ref. (352) 274-4138
Kat's Kritter Kare
PET SITTING


(352) 270-4672




Kitchen looking tired?
Re-Face not Replace!
KITCHEN SOLUTIONS
*(352) 794-3747"




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Emtt
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
K.S. LAND SERVICES.
LANDCLEARING, DIRT
WORK, DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE, AND MORE.
(352)302-2849




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Uc/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374

Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570




60ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397

A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746

Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998


Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352-476-4919




Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Clean View: Pressure
washingwindowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352-476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838





_, ,., 3


SComplete Tree Serv.
NATURE COAST RV TREE REMOVAL &
RV service. Darts, sales STUMP GRINDING
Mobile Repair/Maint. 55ft. Bucket Truck
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. 352-344-2696 Lic/ins.


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
Tree-services removal &
trimming cheapest
prices exp climber call
us today 352-364-2010



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


w Can your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966

BEVERLY HILLS
ESTATE SALE *
Everything for Sale
Thurs. Fri. & Sat. 8-5p
3224 N. Tallow Point
CITRUS SPRINGS
Friday & Sat. 9A-2P
7909 N. Triana Drive
CRYSTAL RIVER
Nature Coast
Ministries
YARD Sale
Saturday 8a-lp
*, /2 price sale *
On entire store!!
1590 Meadowcrest
Blvd. Volunteers
Needed

/THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
*SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491


I et


I Misc e




CIO FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014



WORDY GURDBY T
1. Cawing bird horizontal alignment (1) Every
pairof
and D
2. Char a ship's aft section (1) they
squar(
define
3. Pawn a wall timepiece (1) syllable
1 1 1 1@ 2014L

4. Say the word for "golf green club" (2)


5. Lummoxes' army greeting gestures (2)


6. Coffin 0-ring (2)


7. Missouri port's human-eating humans (3)


SrllNIWV3 S'IVaINNVH 'L IHNSVO asSVO '9
Ha$$1fld a111f I' xH010J IOH 'M NUMS N
5-29-14


Cockatoo
7 yrs old looking for
good home, includes
large cage. $500
(352) 489-4127
Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009
Energetic 12 week
Deerhead Chihuahua
Male, H/C, $50.
Sweet 1lwk, Mini
Daschund Male $150.
Registered/Puppy Kits
Janet (352) 628-7852
FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
MIN PIN PUPPIES
2 Blue, 2 Fawn,
1 Chocolate 15 inch
10-15 Ibs, Health Certs
CKC. $1,200-$ 1,400.
(352) 503-7919


PRINCE
Prince gorgeous
pit bull mix under 2
years old, dog &
cat friendly, gentle,
calm & sweet, good
on leash. Very af-
fectionate. $60 fee
for neuter, shots,
heartworm test,
microchip, 30 days
pet insurance,
obedience training
on request.
Call Laci @
352-212-8936.


REBEL
Rebel, 2-y.o. pit bull
mix, 40 Ibs, HW
negative, UTD on
shots. Loves to play
fetch, high energy,
friendly, exuberant,
learns basic
commands quickly,
loves to play in
water, best with
older children.
Call Sue @
352-270-9008.


SASHA
Sasha, 5-y.o. spayed
female Bulldog mix,
likes kids & other
dogs. Good on
leash, friendly &
playful, smart &
alert, would be a
good watchdog.
Takes treats in gen-
tle, respectful way,
would be good
family dog.
Adoption fee $30.
Call Wanda @
352-344-5737.
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
WESTINESE PUPPIES
All white, no shed,
m medical certicate,
9 weeks old, $500. ea
Call After 3pm.
(352) 586-0305




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


DUNNELLON/488
Extra Clean 2/2, Shed
$530 mo. 1st, last, Dep
(352) 795-6970
INVERNESS
1 Bd. Rm. $325. mo.
2 Bd. Rm. $360. mo.
Both $500. Dep. each
No Pets 352-726-7951



HUGE!! 4/3
$87,489 Land & Home
READY TO MOVE IN!
Owner Financed w/10k
to 20k down! MUST
SEE (352) 795-1272
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on '/2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
NEW NEW NEW
1460 Sq ft 3/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $60k
352-795-2377
NEW NEW NEW
MUST SEE
2036 Sq ft 4/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $70k
352-795-2377
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




3/2 WATERFRONT,
DOUBLEWIDE
$75.900.
10480 S. McClung Lp.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000



HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/1' BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds, must be
seen to appreciate
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330
OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807




must sell!
2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441
2 Bedroom, 17/Bath,
turn, Carport,
scrn rm good value,
In quiet 55+Park
$5,500. 386-234-0254
(352) 748-5325





-AUTION:
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY,INC.
352-795-7368
$1000 & UNDER
$1000-11770 W. Sunnybrook
3/2/2 on canal
$925-Beautiful Meadowcrest Villa
2/2/1, pool & tennis
$900-3290 S. Michigan Blvd.
2/2 nostalgic 2 story
$850-6698 S. Wold Pt.
4/2w/fencedyard!

$675 & UNDER
$675-6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2/2 home w/dock
$650-7096 N Dawson Dr.
2/2 mobile in Hernando
$575-8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SW onl.25acres
For More Listings Go To
www,.CitrusCountyHomeRentals. om


000 2132 11BB .M ml

RICKY RICKY KANE BEVERLY HILLS
3/2/2, Lg. Scrn. Porch,
y answer is a rhyming $800. 352-464-2514
)f words (like FAT CAT CRYSTAL RIVER
DOUBLE TROUBLE), and 2/2/2, $800. mo + sec.
will fit in the letter $500. 850-838-7289
res. The number after the CRYSTAL RIVER
ition tells you how many 3/2 Clean, $800. mo.
bles in each word. 352-795-6299,364-2073

4 UFS, Dist by Univ Ucick forUFS W tro


HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
F INVERNESS
LAKE FRONT HOME
spacious 3/2/2, c/h/a
$800. (908) 322-6529




SI 'I][vS s1OO'310 Homosassa
NIff MO[ Ai OB3 T private bedroom
w/tv/ & bathroom,
__ SH SKtV w/d, home privileges
$375. month
(352) 503-6412










h 5EST~ i.
B, EST ESS

fLhi3$i^(&-J DEB
l THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
Selling needs.
Realtor that you can
CRYSTAL RIVER refer to your
Fully Furnished family and friends.
Studio Efficiency Service with a smile
w/ equipped kit. All seven days
until cable, Internet, & a week.
cleaning provided.
$649.mo 352-586-1813 Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
FLORAL CITY 352-634-2656's
1/1, $375. Mo. $400/ resdeb _vahoo.com
Sec. Includes septic and
water, trash. No pets. debthomoson.com
(352) 344-5628 1
FLORAL CITY PUBLISHER'S
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. NOTICE:
AC, Clean, No Pets All real estate
(352) 344-1025 advertising in this
HOMOASA newspaper is subject
HOMOSASSA to Fair Housing Act
1BR, apple's & Util. Incl'd. which makes it illegal
$650. me + sec., to advertise "any
352-628-6537 preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
CRYSTAL RIVER national origin, or an
Quiet, 1/1, intention,
(352) 628-2815 to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
INVERNESS discrimination." Fa-
2/1 with patio in quiet milial status includes
area. $525/mo + $525 children under the age
Sec; 352-344-0238 of 18 living with
s parents or legal cus-
F ~IM\ rD F ~ todians, pregnant
INVERNESS women and people
CANDLEWOOD securing custody of
COURT APTS. children under 18.
This newspaper will
9 DrD 1 ATH ~not knowingly accept
2 BUDRM., I BATH any advertising for
Rental Assistance real estate which is in
Ava a violation of the law.
Security Dep $676. Our readers are
S/2 When Approved hereby informed that
1/2 as First Mo. Rent all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
CALL 252-344-1010 per are available on
M/W/TH., 8-12 & 1-5 an equal opportunity
307 Washington Av. basis. To complain of
Inverness Florida discrimination call
Equal Housing HUD toll-free at
Opportunity 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
I ^ hearing impaired is
EOUffi XU$ 1-800-927-9275.
W"ORTUNIT


-- '._ .Fr,_..,'



^^^^^^S PwSale ^ .
Lecanto
Lg 2/1, second floor SELL YOUR
pool access, sundeck HOME
$650. + elec. 628-7633 IN THE



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG CLASSIFIED
Large Paved Parking C IIE
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air SPECIAL!
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514 30 Days
u lx s$58.50

It's Easy
HOMOSASSA CaIl T'oa
2/1 Duplex $525 mo. CallToday
1st.& Sec, non smoker (352) 563-5966
Pets-? 352-21 2-4981 ___________

INVERNESS Specializing in
2/1 Brand New, Upscale Acreage,Farms
$599. (786) 405-3503 Ranches &
-Commercial


CRYSTAL RIVER u
Fully Furnished
Studio Efficiency
w/ equipped kit. All
util. cable Internet &
cleaning provided. ^B 1 ^B
$649.mo 352-586-1813
Richard (Rick)
HERNANDO Couch, Broker
Cottage for Rent, Incl. Cu Realt &
utilities, $450 mo. 1st Couch Relt &
+ dep. 352-341-0787 Investments, Inc.
HERNANDO (352) 212-3559
Watson's Fish Camp RCOUCH.com
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225 UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
INGLIS Waterfront & Land
Charming furn or unfurn "Small Town
effic./cottage, all utilities Country Lifestyle
incl'd. $650 no smoking OUR SPECIALTY
352-422-2994 SINCE 1989"
INVERNESS
1BR, IBA, Furnished 1 I
55+ Park $595. mo.
(352) 344-1380


Beverly Hills "LET US FIND
1 bdm, psbl 2, 1 bath YOU
$500. first/last A VIEW TO
352-220-2958 LOVE"
--WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Your World Crossland Realty Inc.




ATTN Homebuvers
100% financing avail.
Government Program.
You do not need perfect
credit. Call or email
C I ONn to get qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabfi@amail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
.. i .b,, ..-,,i ...,-, #267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 149709


CLASSIFIED
Real Esat

FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy486**
352-584-9496/464-2514









Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's,
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell!
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202

PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870




2 Bed 1 Bath CP. Tile
throughout. Updated
bath, roof '07. New paint
in/out. $45K. 527-1239
Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282




2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12 x 20 shed,
etc. $135,000.
(352) 419-6327
tj l l' tl I t

,tl V I' d ,ll I St.
Lii) LLI)


Classifieds


For Sale1
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084




2/1.5/2, City Water,
Sewer, New Metal
Roof & Carpet.
Lg. Kitchen & Garage
A Must See! $69,900.
(352) 860-2554

Inverness
2 bedroom I bath
house. Lot 100x150.
Zoned industrial.
Move-in condition.
$25,000 cash as is.
1309 Bruce Street.
Phone 352-726-7362.





Realty Connect
Buying or Selling?
Waterfront,
Acreage, Golf
Homes & Morel
FREE List of
Available Homes!
TheFLDream.com
Contact the
Premier Real
Estate Group
Realty Connect
(352) 341-2588 or
(352) 212-1446
T. Paduano, Broker




w" Sugarmill Woods
2900 sq. ft 3bd/2/2 ba
pool tile roof, 2 lots
234k (352) 382-8957


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exifttami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY !!!




4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods
$119.900.
1 Fig Court W.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000











Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.






"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company+
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!







DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL..
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email :debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
www.
citruscritters.com










Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscaDe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




M-


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email.
Cfatoneptamoabav.rr.
corn
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattd
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515











SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855













Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


#1 EmploymenourceIs



|www.chronicleonline.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHOOSE CAR SEAT: .
BYAGE & SIZE


THE NUMBER
OF PEOPLE

WHO THINK


THEY HAVE THEIR
CHILD IN THE RIGHT
SEAT


KNOW FOR SURE


IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.


NI'SA | Child Car
NKTM r safety


Citrus County
Homes .1
74


Citu Cont


M In




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor

(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com

"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"

ERA
American Realty
& Investments





$100,000. + Closing
Cost will get you this
2,100 Sq. Ft.,
3BR, 3'2BA, Fully Furn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268

Waerrontf^


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




* FLORAL CITY *
Waterfront. 6 adj.
Lots, 3/4 acre on chain
of lakes. Huge oaks,
good fishing. $110,000
OBO. (352)596-2921

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.corn
"To view
my properties"





Terra Vista Lot #9,
Hill Side Sub. 245 Red
Sox Path, Hernando.
Front on Skyview Golf
course, hole #6,
$56,500 352-322-6304




Gator Boat Trailer
good condition
call for information
$195. (352) 465-1892

Minn Kota Trolling
Motor with Interstate
Batter, 451b Bow
Mount Foot Control
$250. Trailer Dolly $30.,
(352) 697-1757

Yamaha
2013, Motor
90 HP 4 stroke
25hrs on motor $7,400
(352) 423-0289





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*

BOAT TRAILER
Aluminum, NEW 2014
18 -20 FT, w/tortion
axle, folding tonque,
LED lights, and disc
brakes all below cost
@ $2,195. Open Mon.
Wednesday & Friday
Only(352) 527-3555

GHEENOE
15' 2005 Boat, Motor &
Trailer, 15hp Evanrude,
asking, $2800. obo
352-613-8453

SEAARK
'06, 14 ft., '06, Yamaha
25 hp 4 stk, Trolling Mtr
GPS, Fish Find, Bimini
Top, TrIr., Garage kept
$3,600. (352) 527-8475










Wersell new, used, & I


Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



Newmar
96 Mountain Aire
great cond. clean,
newer Jasper engine
49,905 mi. Engine &
6.5 Kw Generator serv-
iced 3/14. Ready for
the road! Reduced
$23k, 352-586-8121
or 318-245-4565
WE BUY RV'S,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352)771-6191
CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!M
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS &SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41
KIA
2003, Rio,
Ice cold AC
$4,390.
352-341-0018

L4kf

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794, Call AJ
813-458-0584
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440




CHEVROLET
1999 Cavalier, runs
very well, looks good.
Asking $1,275.
352-637-2588
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala
$4,495.
352-341-0018
HONDA
1995 Civic, 4-dr, 63K
mi. you look, you'll
buy, like new $3,000
(352) 726-1500
HYUNDAI
'06, Sonata, V6, 97k mi.
new AC, young tires,
perfect maint.
$6,200 (352) 231-2265
KIA
'06, Spectra, EX,
4 door, auto, air,
One Owner. $4,795
obo (352) 621-0248
LINCOLN
'87, Town Car, good
cond., great tires,
Must See, $1,500
(352) 613-1674
r------^



HI


SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE



CLASSIFIED

"3 SPECIALS
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

if Call your
Classified
representative
for details.
352-563-5966

WE DO IT ALLL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JUNE 1st.
1-800-438-8559

CORVETTE
1979 350 Auto, Air,
70% Restored, 20,500
miles on motor. $8,500
(352) 422-3952
FORD
1955, Pickup, V8,
Frame off, very clean,
(352) 503-7865 or
(727) 422-4433
FORD
'64, Galaxy 500 2 door
hardtop, 352 modi-
fied, all original, needs
bodywork, runs excel.
$4,950 obo 476-3688


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




DODGE
'97, Dakota, SLT
Excellent Running
Truck $2,400.
(352) 419-5146
TOYOTA
'07. Tacoma, club cab
4cyl, auto, PW, PL, CD,
cruise, tow pkg. toolbx
looks like 2014, 59k mi
$12,800, 352-860-1106




CHEVROLET
1996, Blazer,
4 door, 89K miles
$2,900.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005,Equinox LS
power windows, locks,
AC, $3,990.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
Grandpa's 2000
Conversion Vanexc.
cond. new tires 104k
mi. $2995. Florida van
(352) 465-1892
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
GMC
1996, Safari
passenger Van
1 owner $3,450
352-341-0018




Harley Davidson
2006 Wide Glide, too
many extras to list in-
cluding a work station
9,000 miles, $11,500.
Call (352) 344-9176
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
HONDA
Red 2012 CBR 250
Exc cond, transfer-
able warr. 4700 miles,
$2700 (352) 220-6032
KAWASAKI
2003 1600 Vulcan
classic. Full dress,
senior owner, X-clean,
4980 ml, $5800 obo
(352) 860-1106
Kawasaki Ninja
2007 250 (motorcycle)
Great starter bike.
Fantastic fuel econ-
omy $2,788. Call
today. 352-621-3678
Polaris Magnum
2005 (atv) Get to the
woods today. Fully
serviced. Storage box.
And power to spare
$3100. Call today.
352-621-3678
SUZUKI
'08, Boulevard C90
Jackal Leyman Trike,
Black, blue shadow
pin striping, low miles,
Pristine Cond. $16,500.
obo (865) 386-8622
VESPA
2007, GTV250
(scooter/motorcycle)
Single piece unibody
construction. 250 cc.
Great around town
scooter Automatic.
With luggage box.
$4,850. Call today.
352-621-3678




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April
25, 2014-May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014






853-0530 FCRN
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PUBLIC NOTICE
ADVANCE TOWING gives
Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles) on June
14, 2014, 8:00 am at 4875
S. FLORIDA AVENUE, IN-
VERNESS, FL 34450, pursu-
ant to subsection 713.78
of the FL. Statutes.
ADVANCED TOWING
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and/or
all bids.
2008 MITSUBISHI
VIN#4A3AK24F88E038242
May 30, 2014

854-0530 FCRN
Lien Foreclosure Sale 6-11
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles


described below under
Florida Statutes 713.78.
The undersigned will sell
at public sale by compet-
itive bidding on Wednes-
day, June 11, 2014 at 9:00
am on the premises
where said vehicle has
been stored and which
are located at, Smitty's
Auto, Inc., 4631 W Cardi-
nal St, Homosassa, Citrus
County, Florida, the fol-
lowing:
1994 BUICK CENTURY
3G4AG55MXRS619909
2000 BUICK CENTURY
2G4WS52J3Y1251226
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of pur-
chase in cash only. Vehi-
cles sold as is and must
be removed at the time
of sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated
party.
Published May 30, 2014.


855-0530 FCRN
Fictitious Name Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, de-
siring to engage in busi-






850-0530 FCRN
Self Storage Lien Sale
Colonial Plaza LLC
2008 Highway 44 W.
Inverness, FL 34453
352-726-5430
SALE OF CONTENTS
Pursuant to FS 83.8055 the
entire contents of the fol-
lowing storage unit(s) will


CLASSIFIED




ness under the fictitious
name of:
DO IT ALL STROBAUGH
located at 6217 S. Can-
dice Path, Homosassa, FL,
34448, in the County of
CITRUS, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations
of the Florida


Sel~fStorage



be sold in order to pay for
past due rental, advertis-
ing and other charges
owed by these tenants.
The sale will take place
June 6, 2014 at 11:00 AM
a date which is 2 weeks
from the first publication.


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 C2.


I


Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Homosassa,
Florida, this 27th day of
May, 2014.
/S/ John Franklin
Strobaugh Owner.
Published one time in the
Citrus County Chronicle,
May 30, 2014.






Susa n Shipp
Unit 01
Miranda Riggins
Unit 49
Published twice in the
Citrus County Chronicle,
May 23 & 30, 2014.


852-0530 FCRN
6/6 Lien Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to FLA. STAT. 83.806 Notice is Hereby Given That on 6/6/14 at 11:00 a.m. at
PACK-N-STACK MINI STORAGE, 7208 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd, Homosassa, FL 34446,
The Miscellaneous Personal Property contents of your storage shall be sold for past
due rent and fees owed by tenant:
#87 JOHNNIE BEVERLY, 1824 E. WELCH RD, APOPKA, FL 32712
#30 ANDREW SERRA, P.O. BOX 2721, VALRICO, FL 33595
#21 ANN ELLIS, 7257 DANBURY WAY, CLEARWATER, FL 33764
#48 AMBER KELLY, 6280 S. BANYON DR, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448
#84 JOSEPH GUTH, 6499 W. PELICAN LN, HOMOSASSA, FL 34448

Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 23 & 30, 2014


844-0606 FCRN
Robinson, Marion 2014-CA-267A NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2014-CA-267A
Earl Stanley Moore, III a/k/a E.Stanley Moore and Stan Moore
Plaintiff,
vs.
Marion Robinson a/k/a Marion A. Robinson individually, if alive and if dead, the A.
Marion Robinson Living Trust, dated March 29, 1985Marion A. Robinson, Trustee
thereof; Betty J. Robinson, Marion A. Robinson, the Betty Robinson Living Trust, Dated
March 29, 1985.Betty J. Robinson as Trustee; Carole I. Martin successor trustee of Betty
J. Robinson Trust, the living children of Marion A. Robinson and Betty J. Robinson, are
Carole I. Martin, Beth Menges, Elaine Robinson, and Mary Robinson as heirs and suc-
cessor trustees; and Donald J. Heindel and Connie Heindel, his wife if alive or dead,
their unknown spouses, heirs, devises, legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or other parties claiming by and through, under or against the above
named Defendants, or any one of them who are not known to be dead or alive; and
all unknown natural persons if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or alive,
their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees,
assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, or other parties claiming by,
through, or under those unknown natural persons, and the several and respective un-
known directors, trustees, or other claimants, successor in interest, shareholders, as-
signs, and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against any cor-
poration under or against any corporation (existing or dissolved, domestic or foreign)
or other legal entity named as a Defendant; and all other claimants, persons, or par-
ties, natural or corporate, or other form of legal entity, or whose exact legal status is
unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or par-
ties or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands hereafter de-
scribed and involved in this lawsuit,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Defendant(s):
Marion Robinson a/k/a Marion A Robinson Individually if alive and if dead the Estate
of Marion A. Robinson or Trustee of Marion A.Robinson Living Trust, dated March 29,
1985.Whose last known address was 1820 Obrien Ave Clarion IA 50526.
Betty J. Robinson, individually and as Successor Trustee of Marion A. Robinson Trust,
dated March 29, 1985, if alive and if dead. Estate of Betty J. Robinson and/or the
Betty J. Robinson, Trust dated March 29, 1985. whose last known address was 1820
Obrien Ave. Clarion IA 50526.
Together with their
their unknown spouses, heirs, devises, legatees, grantees, assigns, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or other parties claiming by and through, under or against the above
named Defendants, or any one of them who are not known to be dead or alive;
and all unknown natural persons if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or
alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, legatees, grant-
ees, assigns, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants, or other parties claiming
by, through, or under those unknown natural persons, and the several and respec-
tive unknown directors, trustees, or other claimants, successor in interest, sharehold-
ers, assigns, and all other persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against
any corporation under or against any corporation (existing or dissolved, domestic or
foreign) or other legal entity named as a Defendant; and all other claimants, per-
sons, or parties, natural or corporate, or other form of legal entity, or whose exact le-
gal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described de-
fendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the lands
hereafter described and involved in this lawsuit.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to real property on the following
described property in Citrus County, Florida:
Beginning at a point that is East 1595.09 feet and North 1284.17 feet from the SW cor-
ner of Government Lot 6 of Section 20, Township 18 South, Range 17 East, the West
boundary of said Government Lot having a bearing of North, said Point of Beginning,
being the P.C. of a curve, concaved Northwesterly, having a central angle of 90 deg.
And a radius of 50 feet, said point also being the most Southerly corner of the lands
described in O.R. Book 194, page 325 of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida,
thence Southeasterly and Southwesterly along the arc of said curve to the P.T. of said
curve, said point also being the most westerly corner of lands described in O.R. Book
225, page 561, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida, a chord bearing and dis-
tance of S 34 deg. 38'13" W 70.71 feet, said point also being on the Easterly right of
way line of a road described in O.R. Book 273, Page 475, Public Records of Citrus
County, Florida, thence N 1 deg. 34'30" E along said Easterly right of way line a dis-
tance of 34.20 feet to the most southerly corner of the lands described in O.R. Book
205, page 44, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida, thence N 58 deg. 34' E along
the South line of said described lands a distance of 46 feet to the P.O.B.
AND
A portion of Government Lots 6 and 7 of Section 20, Township 18 South, Range 17
East, being Lot 8 of the unrecorded plat of Crystal Isle Subdivision more particularly
described as follows: Beginning at a point that is East 1595.09 feet and North 1284.17
feet from the SW corner of Government Lot 6, Section 20, Township 18 South, Range
17 East; the West boundary of said Government Lot having a bearing of North, said
point of beginning being the P.C. of said curve concaved Northwesterly, having a
central angle of 90 deg. 00' and a radius of 50 feet; thence Southeasterly and South-
westerly along the arc of said curve to the P.T. of said curve, a chord bearing and
distance of S 34 deg. 38'13" W 70.71 feet, thence N 79 deg. 38'13" E 188 feet, more or
less, to the waters of Crystal River, thence Northwesterly along and with said waters to
a point that is N 58 deg. 38' E from the Point of Beginning; thence S 58 deg. 34'W 151
feet, more or less, to the P.O.B.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff's attorney, Clark A. Stillwell, Esquire, LAW OFFICE of
CLARK A. STILLWELL, LLC, Post Office Box 250, Inverness, FL 34451-0250 within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this notice, to-wit: on or before the 16th day of
June, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
DATED this 22 day of April, 2014
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Court
(Court Seal)
By: /s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
Published 4 times in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 16, 23, 30 & June 6, 2014.



851-0523 FCRN
Grupo, Barbara Jean 09-2010-CA-000961 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 09-2010-CA-000961
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUS-
TEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, BARBARA
JEAN GRUPPO A/K/A BARBARA J. GRUPPO, DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
FRANK W. GRUPPO, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF BARBARA JEAN GRUPPO A/K/A BAR-
BARA J. GRUPPO, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 170 Fairlawn Avenue
West Hempstead, NY 11552

CURRENT ADDRESS: 170 Fairlawn Avenue
West Hempstead, NY 11552

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following prop-
erty in CITRUS County, Florida:
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND SITUATED IN CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 16,
TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE GO
NORTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 16 A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING, THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF
694.09 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 303.99 FEET, THENCE GO NORTH 06 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 637.34 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTH 1/2, OF THE
EAST 3/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 16; THENCE
GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF THE EAST 3/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4, A DIS-
TANCE OF 393.60 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 37 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OFTHE SOUTHWEST 1/4 A DIS-
TANCE OF 1,321.50 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE
ROAD NO. 488; THENCE GO SOUTH 55 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 11 SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIEN OF STATE ROAD NO. 488, A DISTANCE OF 11.85
FEET TO A POINT ON THE SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE GO NORTH
89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 20.21 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associ-
ates, P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 2nd day of May,


Foeloue-ae


2014.
Angela Vick, Clerk of Court and Comptroller
{COURT SEAL}
By: /s/ Sonia Prylepa, As Deputy Clerk
Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
**See Americans with Disabilities Act**
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact:Mr. John D. Sullivan, 110 N. Apopka Street, Inverness,
FL 34450-4231, Phone:352-341-6700 Fax: 352-341-7008
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 23 & 30, 2014. F10009340

857-0606 FCRN
Trombley, Kenneth 2014 CA 000369A NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2014 CA 000369 A
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH L. TROMBLEY, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO:
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH L. TROMBLEY
ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 8521 E GLASGOW PLACE,
INVERNESS, FL 34450
Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if
remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming
by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned
named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such
of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not
sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing described property to-wit:
LOT 34 OF REPLAT OF LOCHSHIRE PARK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE (S) 79, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
more commonly known as: 8521 E GLASGOW PLACE, INVERNESS, FL 34450
This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff's attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTOR-
NEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755,
on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by June 30, 2014,
and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 14th day of May 2014.
(SEAL) Clerk of the Court, CITRUS County, Florida
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 30 & June 6,2014. CA14-00848


858-0606 FCRN
McLaughlin, James 2013 CA 000936A NOS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUITIN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2013 CA 000936 A
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET SECURITIZATION
CORPORATION TRUST, 2007-HE2, MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES MCLAUGHLIN A/K/A JAMES EARL
MCLAUGHLIN A/K/A JAMES E. MCLAUGHLIN, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
JAMES MCLAUGHLIN A/K/A JAMES EARL MCLAUGHLIN A/K/A JAMES E. MCLAUGH-
LIN
Last Known Address: 10260 E ROO LN, FLORAL CITY, FL 34436
Also Attempted At: 345 NW 117TH CT, OCALA, FL 34482
PO BOX 894, FLORAL CITY, FL 34436
Current Residence Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES MCLAUGHLIN A/K/A JAMES EARL MCLAUGHLIN A/K/A
JAMES E. MCLAUGHLIN
Last Known Address: 10260 E ROO LN, FLORAL CITY, FL 34436
Also Attempted At: 345 NW 117TH CT, OCALA, FL 34482
Other: PO BOX 894, FLORAL CITY, FL 34436
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 5: COMMENCE A THE NW CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 20
SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST, THENCE SOUTH 8947'56" WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE
NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 13, A DISTANCE OF 369.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 5109'25"
EAST 414.02 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 408, PAGE 141, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, THENCE NORTH 2710'09" WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY 609.12 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 8354'10" WEST 427.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
NORTH 547.89 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LANDS DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 408, PAGE 141, THENCE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY WEST
370 FEET, THENCE NORTH 50 FEET, THENCE WEST 160 FEET TO THE WATERS OF LAKE TSALA
APOPKA, THENCE ALONG SAID WATERS THE FOLLOWING COURSES AND DISTANCES,
SOUTH 2148'35" WEST 173.84 FEET, SOUTH 1926'24" EAST 360.56 FEET AND SOUTH
633'56" WEST 150 FEET TO A POINT THAT BEARS SOUTH 0354'10" WEST FROM THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH 8354' 10" EAST 494.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.
TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER THE
LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 408 PAGE 139, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AND
OF THAT PART OF SW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE
20 EAST, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 20
SOUTH RANGE 20 EAST; THENCE SOUTH 8947'56" WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE
NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 13 A DISTANCE OF 369.88 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5109'25"
EAST 414.62 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN
OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 408, PAGE 141, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA; THENCE NORTH 2710'09" WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY 609.12 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 8354'10" WEST 427.42 FEET; THENCE NORTH 547.89 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 408,
PAGE 141; THENCE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY WEST 370.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 50.00
FEET; THENCE WEST 204.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 8945'21"
WEST 695.61 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS OF LAKE TSALA APOPKA; THENCE
SOUTH 2333'30" WEST ALONG SAID WATERS 847.31 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8354'10" EAST
1043.04 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SW
1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE 20 EAST; THENCE NORTH 0014'56"
WEST ALONG SAID EAST LINE 662.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address
is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before June 30,
2014, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in
the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR,
TELEPHONE (352) 341-6700, 110 N APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL, 34450, AT LEAST 7
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIV-
ING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
7 DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 11th day of April, 2014.
ANGELA VICK
As Clerk of the Court
{COURT SEAL}
By /S/ VIVIAN CANCEL
As Deputy Clerk
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 30 & June 6, 2014.
12-19188


845-0606 FRCRN
Bangs, James P. Case #36050 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
STATE OF FLORIDA, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT,
Petitioner,
vs.
JAMES P. BANGS, Case #36050
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JAMES P. BANGS,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you
seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section
943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant
to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism,
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P.O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before July 8, 2014. Failure to do so will result in a default being
entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuantto Section 120.60, F.S., and
Rule 11 B-27, F.A.C.
Dated: May 8, 2014
Dean Register, Professionalism Director
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
By: /s/ Clyde Lemon, Division Representative
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 16, 23, 30 & June 6, 2014.


856-0530 FCRN
6/5/14 CANVASSING BOARD MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Susan Gill, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections, announces an orientation meet-
ing of the canvassing board for the 2014 Elections to be held Thursday, June 5, 2014
at 12:00 PM in the Supervisor of Elections office located at 120 N. Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, FL. In accordance with the Sunshine Law of Florida this meeting is open to
the public, the press, and representatives of political parties. All candidates are in-
vited to attend.
Persons with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodation to participate
should contact the Elections office at (352) 341-6740. This notice is given pursuant to
Chapter 102.141(2), Florida Statutes.
Susan Gill, Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Avenue
Inverness, FL 34450
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 30, 2014.


Foreclosure Sal
Action Notices
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Action Notice 11
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^ag g'mm CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM (f Ij Vdl U lSO11
2OJEA CrystalAutos.com
2077 HIGHWAY 44 W. 14358 CORTEZ BLVD. 1005 S. SUNCOAST BLVD.
INVERNESS, FL BROOKSVILLE, FL HOMOSASSA, FL
'Pr: cencu% s all fnole-s and inc s no't r iiir 1 lua;E iaud5 al. I.. l e- c aea: x, 5N 0 &T a r,- d r cr"jtt. Lease a,mnenr3"es a? mcn 31 : e te fe of the Lease. S, ues i 8 due at 5ib andallEa11 as andIrFi:t c ene. not ev. ond
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C12 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CELEBRATE

IN A NEW CHEVROLET


A COMMITMENT TO SERVING ALL THAT HAVE SERVED
During Military Appreciation Month, now all Veterans along with
Active Duty, Reserves and Retirees are eligible for the Chevrolet Military Discount*.
The best Military Purchase Program in the industry.


2014 Chevy Silverado
Double Cab 4x4 All Star msRP$44,155.
$3,555Discountr
+ $3,250R9bate
+Ac
+ $500P8C
+ $750us
You Pay $35,100


S"


00-1


Low-Mileage Lease tor Qailitied Lessees.
Secuio posit
Down Payent
9W First Month Payment
4p.,r 36Mwmdl
er f Monmti 35MoPjmts.
No scury depose rquind. Tax, Iiie, l nse and deef IlS
extea iMHeagecharge HXM ni omls36,o00mles.


2014 Equinox
$1, GSf0 toniracah
+ $50aeor| Pu cte
*I wlyBonus Cash
+$0Rol ra/ spCm2fflfi~wn


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.

$1 for 3 WMOnths
<^0 O'f #Due at Signing
219A Afr Al
No Jurity d itqured Taxo Itellnptad efls
ei.Mlivea charge ot $2 ile over 36.000 rmles.


2014 Tramee .LSFWl
, 1" .f- May Puivtase
$1,5 0cWBnso Cash
$2,008013 css a mhsc
+wCmym


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
$259 Pter Month
vp^/!yfor 36 Month s
&J7 Due at Signing
66 After l Offers
%o s""Iity dePpohl eIJuirei Tax, litle, toiese a !p .4 faleo tes
eriaMlIP cge t ot$.25 O T le os 036.00 ni ,


OVER 90
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ki3~leipnihraniiinart(B~msh~pm3ttimii PRUlnanrilmii anrirI' hn rlwitT Mil iirt mntt~siK, Sl~flb \fwr


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*MiBBndatfi ~btelsii.Velttsm itfeeacBtain


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mw4Ws 35 1101


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MtlKnifat~ r Ts i lmdW Ktftfrd la ? Pauriwinttaaidifan lJfaiITir~iM3MB ~~s ll. .tnmeihn~ir im!lic~71) ftihi?


r S. I;
i arnei


S2014 Malibu LT

47+ 50 0 Y' C
m2 GWQU stomereCsh

+ oa Cas5f~llMayac


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealer for complete details.


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 C13




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HURRY


OPEN
SUNDAY!


A


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS


Hybrid Synergy Drive System, Electric Power Steering, Display Audio: 6.1" Touch-Screen, AM/FM/CD, 6 Speakers,
Bluetooth, Cruise Control, Driver Door Smart Key System, Push Button Start, Power Locks, Power Windows


51MPG


$25,060

$3,070


21,990


OR O0% FOR 72 MOS. OR 239* FOR 36 MOS.


2014 TOYOTA CAMRY
35MPG
2.5L 4-CYL DOHC 16V W/DI II-i
WT-I ENGINE, 6-Speed .. -J
ECT-I Transmission,
ruse Control, Power
Wrndows/Door,
AMr Condhtoning,
Bluetooth/USB/AUX/CD
Entune Audio: 6:1"..
Touch Screen 6/Speakers, Locks, Audio & Bluetooth Hands-Free
Controls, Color-Keyed Folding Power Outside Mirrors
MsRP $23,285 O %
VILLAGE OR 0%
SAVINGS $4,290 FOR 60 MOS.
$18F995 OR 199 FOR
0,36M9S.


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS V
hrid Svnprnv Nlrive vtpm Fhtri Pnwer Stpprinn (PACKAGE 2)


Display Audio: 6.1 Touch-Screer, -[I : i I
6 Speakers, Bluetooth, Cruise Coiir i
Driver Door Smart Key System,
Piih Riittnn tfrt Pnunr


I r U II UULLUII LUIL, I uVVui
Locks, Power Windows,
Back-up Camera


MSRP
VII I AI11


$28,009


SAVINGS 3,019 OR0%
$2490 0 FOR 60oMOS.
4OUUU OR290** Mo.


2014 ALL NEW REDESIGNED

TOYOTA COROLLA
8436 MPG
1.8L 4-CYLDOHC 16-VALVE I- I
4-Speed Automatic Transmission ""-
[lectrc Power Steering
Ahr Conditioning
USB Port w/iPod Conn.,
Hands-Free via Bluetooth
Power Door Locks, Power Windows
MsRP $18,260 oRO%
VILLAGEOR0
SAVINGS $1,265 FOR 36 MOS.
$1 ,-Q OR 169 FOR
1,6 FU -36MOS.


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS C


Hybrid Synergy Drive System, Electric Power Steering,
Display Audio: 6.1" Touch-Screen, AM/FM/rnD -
6 Speakers, Bluetooth, Cruise Control, T .
Driver Door Smart Key System,
Push Button Start,
Power Locks,
Power Windows ...___


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


119,940
$1,241


18,0699


#T140802


OR
$188**
MO.


2014 TOYOTA RAV4
31 MPG .
2.LDOHC O
16V4CYL %_
ENGINE Ws-.
6-Speed
Automatic VA
Electronic
Power Steeri ,ni f


$24,705


Stability Control, Traction Control,
Air Conditioning, Entune Audio
w/6Speakers Audio and
Bluetooth Controls, Backup
Camera, Remote Keyless Entry
System, Power Windows/Door
.O0%FOR36MOS.
. s249 FOR 36 MOS.


2014 TOYOTATUNDRA 4X2
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20 MPG/K


MSRP $27,810
VILLAGE 2 320
SAVINGS 2 0

125,490


4.6LV6DOHC24VWT-1270HP/
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Automatic Limited-Slip Differential
6.1" Touch Screen/Bluetooth/USB/
AUX/CD, Power Windows
Power Door Locks
.O0% FOR36MOS.
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2014 TOYOTA SIENNA

.- 9


MSRP $28,234


h -, 1,1i IN I ,,,,se
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O ToyotaCare
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ON ALL NEW CAR
PURCHASES


C14 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014


14


Ti Service Mor


SALE ENDS MONDAY, JUNE 2!


Ql




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE!


FROM HERE TO
MEMPHIS


IONWV1 IINGLiTNKl OF1 GIS(IEiJI


CRYSTAL
N I NISSAN


*
A


800-584-8755 EXTI0 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
*Must finance through NMAC and includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. +Lease
is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $3899 due at signing and all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer
fee $599.50. With approved credit. AEPA Estimated MPG highway, actual mileage may vary. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales may restrict stock.


2014 NISSAN PER MONTH
ALTIM A $ 3,89 9DUEASIGNING
IA $ VIN: 293676 MODEL: 13114


FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTALCHEVROLETONLINE.COM


Fh i,


I.


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*Must finance through Ally Finance Company. Includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. +
Payment is for 75 months at 2.39% APR, Includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. "Drive free
saving $10 per day on fuel. ++ Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $2688 due at signing and all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes
tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 With approved credit. ^^Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $3866 due at signing and all rebates and incentives, not
everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 With approved credit. **Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $2869 due at signing and
all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 With approved credit. With Approved Credit, Pictures are for illustration purposes only,
prior sales may restrict stock. Offers can not be combined.


$1


C16 FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2014


800=584=8755 EXT.10 I