Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
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Full Text

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M Y CITRUS COUNT Y

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Parity sunny; 30
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PAGE A4


MAY 27, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


UINILLJa
L www.chronicleonline.com
%- Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 119 ISSUE 293


Three Sisters roadmap on track


Limitedpublic access to springs

tentatively scheduledfor November


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Work
has begun in earnest for an
eventual access road inside the
Three Sisters Springs property,


which also will pave the way for
limited public access come next
tourist season.
A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serv-
ice worker was busy this past
week plowing swaths of land for
a planned limerock road to the


boardwalk area of the property
near the west bank of Lake
Lynda, which is to soon be re-
named Lake Ellie, in honor of
the late philanthropist Ellie
Schiller.
The county also is using the
57-acre parcel as a staging area
for wood chipping. County
crews have been chopping off
overhanging vegetation on the
canals at Three Sisters Springs.
The work is in line with a


commitment made by Andrew
Gude, the manager at Crystal
River National Wildlife Refuge,
about allowing limited public
access to the parcel by the end
of 2014. The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service manages the
property for the city of Crystal
River, which owns the land, and
the Southwest Florida Water
Management District.
"The former owner of the
property used to have furrows


on this property to make it seem
like it was agricultural, I guess.
So we have huge grooves all
over this property What George
(Pelt) is doing is discing those
furrows and making them flat,"
Gude said Wednesday
"Then we have engineering
and a design team coming in
(this) week to help us figure out
what to do next. Hopefully, in
See Page A2


Honoring those who sacrificed


Memorial Day remembers the men and women killed while serving in the armedforces


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
ABOVE: Ray Roby, commander of the American Legion Post 237 of Beverly Hills assists Monday in the traditional folding of the flag during a Memorial Day
service at Fero Memorial Gardens in Beverly Hills. TOP RIGHT: Army Air Corps veteran George Cavanaugh prays Monday during service. Cavanaugh flew B-24s in
World War II. BELOW RIGHT: Dennis Kocielko, honor guard with VFW Post 10087, carries the American flag in preparation for the laying of the wreath.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
M More than an acre of
graves flew American flags
in honor of Memorial Day
at Fero Memorial Gardens.
The flags had been placed two days
earlier by Boy Scouts from Troop 452.
On Monday morning a somber
crowd followed the flag-draped


walkway to the Garden of Honor for
the annual Memorial Day Service.
Similar services were repeated in
other parts of the county as people
took time out from their holiday to
honor those killed while serving in
the armed forces.
Many homes displayed their own
American flags, and some were deco-
rated, as well.
It was also a time to recall those


members of the military who remain
unaccounted.
The Nature Coast Young Marines
performed the Helmet Benediction,
honoring America's fallen heroes in
all the major conflicts of the past 100
years.
And it was an occasion for memo-
rable quotes, some traditional others
original.
"Because ofthem, our lives are free."


"Lincoln called them, 'the honored
dead."'
"Of all the missing, they truly are
not forgotten."
"They would mark the place where
their comrades had fallen, with their
rifle planted bayonet-first into the
ground, hung with dog tags and hel-
met to facilitate identification."


Page A7


Homosassa man remains


missing; foul play suspected


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

Authorities suspect foul play,
but as of Monday had no new in-
formation in the disappearance
of Homosassa resident Billy
Schuler
Schuler, 69, was reported
missing Thursday, after failing
to return home from a trip to
Holiday, in Pasco County, to
meet with an associate, who au-
thorities have been unable to
locate.
According to Pasco County
Sheriff Chris Nocco, Schuler
was supposed to be going to
meet with Anthony Maresca, 51.
"They had a relationship, they
worked together selling coins,"


Billy
Schuler
missing since
Thursday.
said Nocco at a Frii
ference. "On
evening, Billy was
Holiday to meet wi
On Thursday, S(
reported him miss
rus County She]
Tracking (pingin


Scellphone led to a remote stor-
age area in Pasco County where
Pasco County deputies found his
.j,.- 2010 Dodge truck
"There is evidence there is
[ ] foul play involved," said Nocco,
who would not elaborate, but
said they are still trying to figure
Anthony out what the truck was doing
Maresca there.
wanted for "We need to find where Tony
questioning. (Maresca) is," said Nocco.
"We're out there looking for him
day news con- right now
Wednesday "This is one of those cases
going down to where getting some answers
ith Anthony" from Tony will really help us
chuler's wife solve the case."
ing to the Cit- The sheriff said they did not


riff's Office.
g) Schuler's


See Page A2


Need help? Dial 211

United Way offers free resource line


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
When your life falls apart,
you need to know who to call
for help.
Whether it's help finding a
job, paying your electric bill,
getting affordable or emer-
gency housing, mental health
services or resources for an
aging parent, finding local
help is as easy as 2-1-1.
A community service of the
United Way, 2-1-1 is a free,
24/7, 365-day-a-year resource
help line that connects peo-
ple with local services.
"We get an average of 400
to 600 calls per month," said
Amy Meek, United Way of
Citrus County CEO. "That's a


lot of calls,
but still,
when you
S think about
the need out
there, a lot
more people
could be
Amy Meek using it.
AmyWa We're trying
United Way to get the in-
formation
out there so more people will
use it."
Meek said the help line is
staffed with trained, multi-
lingual professionals from
Heart of Florida United Way
in Orlando. When you call,
the person answering the
See Page A2


Classifieds ........ C8
Comics .......... C7
Crossword ........ C6


Community .......C5
Fditnrial Af.


Entertainment ..... A4 Horoscope


Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies ...........C7


Obituaries ........ A5
TV Listings ....... C6


M
TOE
& ne
morr


HIGH
92
LOW
65


I 1 IN DEX =11, I








Florida team builds running robot


WILL ISERN
The Pensacola
News Journal

PENSACOLA A six-
legged robot designed and
built in Pensacola is mak-
ing waves in the online
tech community.
OutRunner is the cre-
ation of Robotics Unlim-
ited, a spinoff of the
Florida Institute for
Human and Machine Cog-
nition headed by research
scientist Sebastien Cotton.
"The whole robotic world
is really closed off right
now," Cotton said. "If you're
not an engineer with a
Ph.D., well, you won't be
able to play with robots. I



SPRINGS
Continued from Page Al

the next few weeks we can
have something to take to
the county and city for our
permits to begin building
the road," Gude added.
The plan to build a tem-
porary road and restroom
facilities stems from re-
cent calls for public access
to the property, which was
purchased by public and
private partnerships to
stave off plans to build
housing on it.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service built a boardwalk
around the popular
springs area. Due to ex-
treme overcrowding in the
springs, some have sug-
gested that having land ac-
cess to view the springs
and the visiting manatees
would help alleviate the
overcrowding on the
water
Earlier this year, Gude
told a Crystal River City
Council audience his
agency is open to public
access to the facility by
the beginning of tourist
season in November. But
he said his agency
needed to build an alter-
nate route to the board-
walk and provide toilet
facilities before any



MISSING
Continued from Page Al

know what Schuler was
carrying with him but are
working under the as-
sumption that it was
valuable.
"There is a great con-
cern for Billy's welfare,"
he said. The department
has requested the public's
help in locating both men.
As of Monday afternoon,
there was no updates
available on Schuler's dis-
appearance or the search
for Maresca, according to
Pasco County spokesman
Eddie Daniels Jr



211
Continued from PageAl

help line will ask you
about your immediate
need, what kind of help
you're looking for and
where you live. That way,
the person can connect
you with the services near-
est you.
There are more than 100
local agencies that are a
part of the local 2-1-1
network.
'Another thing we want
to do is make sure our
agencies keep their infor-
mation up to date," Meek
said.
The $25,000 annual serv-
ice is well worth the cost,
Meek said.
"I couldn't hire a person
to work 24/7, 365 days a
year," she said.
She added, "One of the
best things about it, they
follow up with each caller
within three business
days. They'll ask, 'Did you
get what you need? Did
you go there? What hap-


opened Sometimes peo-
ple will call 2-1-1, but they
won't call the agency for
one reason or another We
want people to get the help
they need."
You can also text to TXT
211 (898-211). For the
Florida Relay Service,
dial 7-1-1.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


want to change that, so I
started my company to
commercialize robots."
Though not yet commer-
cially available, Out-
Runner has been featured
online by Stuff magazine,
Gizmag and the United
Kingdom's Daily Mail,
among other publications.
It's being touted as the
fastest-running robot in
the world.
The robot itself, which
its creators say can reach
speeds up to 20 mph and
run for two hours on a
single charge, is less than
2 feet tall, weighs about 3
pounds, and has three
legs on either side of a
central motor and

access can be allowed.
He reiterated his com-
mitment to the plan and
added that USFWS just
applied for another Fed-
eral Land Access Program
(FLAP) grant worth about
$340,000 for infrastructure
work at the facility Gude
said Fish and Wildlife will
have $146,000 in matching
funds if that grant is ap-
proved. He said despite re-
cent economic constraints
at the agency, an addi-
tional $700,000 has been
set aside for improve-
ments at Three Sisters
Springs. A similar FLAP
grant worth $384,232 was
recently OK'd and that
money is going to be used
to construct a new en-
trance to the property
from Cutler Spur Boule-
vard. The Southwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District also is set to
begin work on a wetland
area on the southeast cor-
ner of the property that
will make the current road
inside the property im-
passable.
That is the reason
Gude suggested a tempo-
rary road on the opposite
side of the lake. He also
said his office will soon
begin a process of select-
ing a concessionaire to
bring and pickup those
wishing to visit the


processing unit.
It's appearance comes
from necessity, Cotton
said.
"One of the hardest
things with bipedal loco-
motion is swinging the leg
forward," Cotton said.
"That's a very complicated
motion, so we took a dif-
ferent approach to sim-
plify the mechanics by
having the legs spinning."
OutRunner runs by ro-
tating both sets of legs in
time so that as a foot on
one side is lifted, the one
on the other is planted,
much like how humans
and many animals run.
Cotton said he and his
team have been working


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on OutRunner for about
the past year and that he
got the idea for the run-
ning robot after working
on a bipedal robot project
called FastRunner for the
IHMC.
"We see a lot of uses for
this," Cotton said. "First,
for people who love to
build and take apart
things, it's perfect because
OutRunner is completely
upgradable. It also can be
educational because it's
very fun for kids to play
with and easy to use. We
want people to be able to
play with real robots with-
out having to pay hun-
dreds of thousands of
dollars."


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A Kickstarter campaign
to bring OutRunner to the
public has already gar-
nered more than 70 back-
ers and $15,000 in support,
though that's far from the
campaign's June 7 goal of
$150,000.
And because Kickstarter
is an all-or-nothing affair,
Cotton and company won't
see a dime if the $150,000
goal isn't met.
A YouTube video of an
OutRunner prototype
shows the robot running
through the long-empty
Pensacola Technology
Park, perhaps making the
Robotics Unlimited team
the first to use the campus
for technological research.


Cotton said he and his
team have dubbed the
technology park road
"robot run."
OutRunner will come in
two models: core and per-
formance, Cotton said.
Both models will be oper-
ated by radio control,
though the performance
model will have an accom-
panying smartphone app
able to control it as well.
The performance model
also will be faster and
have a built-in camera,
along with other under-
the-hood perks. The core
model will start at $299,
with the performance
model running a cool $799,
Cotton said.


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A.B. SIDIBE/Chronicle
Andrew Gude, manager of the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, discusses plans for a road inside the Three
Sisters Springs property. Officials hope to have the property ready for limited public access by November.


property during next reporter AB. Sidibe at
cool-weather season. 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
Contact Chronicle chronicleonline.com.


tumn to the experts'


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epoH^^^P ^^^ ^^^l ^WH


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A2 TUESDAY, MAY 2 7, 2014


LOCAL/STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






Page A3 TUESDAY, MAY 27,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Republican club to
host forum June 12
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will host a
forum Thursday, June 12, at
the College of Central
Florida-Citrus Campus.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m.;
the forum begins at 6.
The forum will include a
panel debate of candidates
for the Citrus County Com-
mission. All candidates will
have the opportunity to
speak with the public.
Light refreshments will be
available.
All are encouraged to
come and meet the candi-
dates. For information,
email NCRC2014@aol.com
or call 352-746-7249.
Irrigation topic of
June 24 workshop
Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping is of-
fering a free gardening
workshop from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday,
June 24. Irrigation schedul-
ing and management are
essential to successful and
sustainable gardens. Pro-
viding the plants with the
water they require and effi-
cient application of this re-
source is the topic of the
day.
Evaluation and repair of
your irrigation system prior
to the summer heat is a
great idea. This evaluation
should include: planning
water-reducing retrofits,
regular monitoring and
catch-can testing to cali-
brate the system.
The class will be at the
Citrus County Extension
Service building, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Call Steven Davis at 352-
527-5708 to confirm
participation.
Basin plan focus of
Wednesday meeting
The second Crystal
River/King's Bay basin
management action plan
(BMAP) meeting will be at
10 a.m. Wednesday,
May 28, at Crystal River
City Hall, 123 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River. Planned top-
ics include an overview of
the hydrogeology of the
area and the draft nutrient
source inventory for King's
Bay area.
The kick-off meeting for
the Weeki Wachee Spring
BMAP will be at 1 p.m.
today in the Enchanted
Mermaid Banquet Hall,
Weeki Wachee Springs
State Park, 6131 Commer-
cial Way, Spring Hill.
Planned topics include an
overview of the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion's total maximum daily
load (TMDL) and an intro-
duction to the BMAP
process.
Presentations will be
posted at: http://publicfiles.
dep.state.fl.us/DEAR/BMAP
/Springs Coast/BMAPs/
under the appropriate basin
name (CR KB BMAP or
WW BMAP) and month of
meeting.

Lakewood Ranch
Veterans concerned
about VA turmoil
Concerns about long
waits and backlogs at Vet-
erans Affairs hospitals crept
into Memorial Day tributes
in the Tampa Bay area.
Gulf War veteran Dave
Daily and other veterans at
Sunday parade in Lake-
wood Ranch blamed bu-
reaucratic red tape for the
problems recently revealed
at VA hospitals nationwide.
Daily told the Sarasota
Herald-Tribune that middle
and upper managers are to
blame for holding up


claims, not the doctors and
nurses. Daily and other vet-
erans said working with
"service officers" associated
with veterans' organizations
sometimes sorts out some
problems with VA claims.
-From staff and wire reports


HONOR AND REMEMBRANCE


:-s




STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Dennis J. Cody, commander of VFW Post 8189, speaks Monday at the Memorial Day service in Old Homosassa.


VFW Post 8189 Commander Dennis J. Cody speaks Monday at the
Memorial Day service at the Veterans Monument in Old Homosassa.


The Nature Coast Young Marines stand at attention Monday as
they present the helmets during the Helmet Benediction at the
Memorial Day service at Fero Memorial Gardens.


New rules listed for child car seats


ANGELA MARIA DEJESUS
Staff writer

Last month in Citrus County,
84 percent of inspected child car
seats were incorrectly installed.
Sue Littnan, local expert on
child passenger safety, said that
the LowerAnchors and Tethers for
Children (LATCH) system was sup-
posed to reduce misuse, but four
out of five car seats nationwide are
inappropriately installed.
'A child car seat is a piece of
safety equipment that is manufac-
tured to save a child's life, but car
seats do expire ... and there are
new safety standards all the
time," Littnan said.
This reminder has never been
more important than right now
since a new federal ruling has
concluded it is unsafe to use a
car's lower anchor LATCH system
for child restraint systems when


CAR SEAT INFORMATION
* A brief list of lower anchor weight limits by car manufacturers
and of car seat weights, by brand, can be found at CSFTL.org.
* Free child car seat check-ups are available by appointment only.
Call Sue Littnan, child passenger safety coordinator, at
352-563-9939, ext. 235, to schedule an appointment in
Crystal River; or Michele Tewel, community resource officer, at
352-560-6024 in Inverness.


the weight of the car or booster
seat and the weight of the child,
combined, exceed 65 pounds.
This new rule, in effect since
Feb. 27, only affects the use of the
LATCH lower anchor Use of the
LATCH top tether anchor re-
mains unaffected, and child car
seats can be secured using either
a seat belt or the LATCH anchors.
Separately, both seatbelts and
LATCH are equally safe, but the
LATCH system is designed to be
easier to use.


Qualifying dates set for

local, state candidates


Chronicle

Citrus County Supervisor of
Elections Susan Gill has an-
nounced that candidate qualify-
ing for statewide, multicounty,
county, district and nonpartisan
candidates including write-in
candidates begins at noon
Monday, June 16, and ends at
noon Friday, June 20.
Candidates for statewide and
multicounty offices qualify with
the Division of Elections, which
is in the R.A. Gray Building,
Room 316, 500 S. Bronough St.,
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250. Call
850-245-6200, or visit its website
at http://election.dos.state.fl.us
for more information.


County candidate qualifying
will be in the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office, 120 N. Apopka Ave.,
Inverness.
County offices up for the 2014
election are property appraiser,
Board of County Commissioners
Districts 2 and 4, school board
Districts 1, 3, 4 and 5, Homosassa
Special Water District Seats 2
and 4, Mosquito Control Board
Seats 1, 2 and 3.
For information concerning the
elections for the cities of Crystal
River and Inverness, call their re-
spective city clerks.
For additional qualifying infor-
mation, call the elections office at
352-341-6751 or visit its website at
wwwvotecitrus.com.


Each car seat is different, as is
each car Littnan urges parents
and guardians to read the owner's
manual of their vehicles and to
find the child seat weight restric-
tions specific to their car Parents
should keep in mind child car
seats and booster seats are de-
signed to keep children safe, but
they will only work when they are
properly installed.
Parents and guardians can get a
free check-up of their child car
seat or booster seat by contacting


a local certified child-seat techni-
cian. A national listing is available
at SeatCheck.org. Additionally,
many child car seat check-up of-
fices provide new child car seats
at a reduced cost for low-income
families.
Manufacturers installed the
LATCH system in cars after 2002
in the U.S. and then tested car
seats weighing up to 40 pounds.
Car seats now, however, are heav-
ier than they were then with new
seats weighing up to 65 pounds.
According to experts, previous
testing and old weight-limit re-
quirements on child car seats did
not take this into consideration, so
in accordance with the new rule,
child-restraint systems are now
required to label a maximum rec-
ommended child weight limit ac-
cording to that seat's weight and
the car's lower anchor weight
limit of 65 pounds.


New MPO board to meet July 15


Special to the Chronicle
With the governor's approval of
the merger plan, the inaugural
meeting of the newly formed Her-
nando/Citrus MPO Board is sched-
uled at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 15,
in the Hernando County Commis-
sion chambers in Brooksville.
The new board will appoint a
new technical advisory commit-
tee (TAC), citizens' advisory com-
mittee CAC) and bicycle and
pedestrian advisory committee to
serve the combined urban areas
of Hernando and Citrus counties.
Anyone with questions should
contact Dennis Dix, AICP Her-
nando MPO coordinator, at 352-
754-4057, ext. 28014, or email at
dennisd@hernandocountyus.
Citrus County's Transportation
Planning Organization (TPO),
TAC and CAC will each meet one


last time.
The TPO will meet at 5:15 p.m.
Thursday, June 12, in the Inver-
ness Government Center, 212 W
Main St., Inverness. Its agenda
will include a transitional proj-
ects priorities list, discussion
about the inaugural meeting
agenda and other information
about transition activities.
The TAC will meet at 1 p.m. and
the CAC at 3 p.m. Wednesday,
June 4, at Citrus County Transit
Center, 1300 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
Meeting packets will be
emailed one week prior to the
CCTPO meetings and posted on
the TBARTA meetings calendar
Any questions should be di-
rected to Sheila Martin or
Christina Kopp at 800-998-7433 or
email sheila.martin@tbarta.com
and christina.kopp@tbarta.com.




A4 TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday: Believe in yourself. Giving in
to self-doubt will frustrate you and
delay your progress. Your goals may
seem unattainable at the moment, but
as the year unfolds, you will find a way
to accomplish them and more.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -You may
be missing some key information. Re-
frain from making an important decision
until you have all the relevant details.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Gain
some insight about who you and your
associates are. Start a dialogue about
your past, and urge others to share
theirs as well. You could learn some-
thing quite interesting.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Finding the
right balance can be difficult. Look for the
best way to manage your time effectively
so you don't fall behind. Being too proud
to ask for help will be your downfall.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Someone
you care deeply about needs attention.
Make an effort to show gratitude and
affection.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If some-
thing has been bothering you, take ac-
tion. Get professional advice or
consider taking a break from whatever
is causing you stress.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It's time
to move forward in your personal life.
Face up to emotional issues and de-
cide what is right for you.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)-
Check out an opportunity to advance
from your current position. Even if it of-
fers less in the initial stages, you'll
move ahead in the long run.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -A lot
of favorable attention will come your
way today. Your talent and charm are a
winning combination.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
will need to make an extra effort to get
along with others today Use tact and
show patience with someone who is
feeling sensitive and insecure.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Get to-
gether with someone you love for an
enjoyable outing. Be honest about the
way you feel.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Work
changes are imminent. This is a good
time to go for interviews, or pursue a
more lucrative position.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You may
be caught in an emotional whirlwind. If
you find matters too confusing at the
moment, back away from the situation
temporarily to give yourself time to sort
out your feelings.


ENTERTAINMENT


Station that


launched


legends


returns

Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -
Decades ago, unknown blues
musicians paid $15 to appear
on an east Arkansas radio
station, hoping a few minutes
of exposure would help them
become the legends they now
are: B.B. King, Howlin' Wolf,
Sonny Boy Williamson and
Ike Turner.
KWEM-AM fell silent in
1960 after more than a
decade in the Mississippi
River town of West Memphis,
which musician Rufus
Thomas then called "the Las
Vegas of the South." Fifty-
four years later, the station
will be revived online this
week by Mid-South Commu-
nity College and on 93.3 FM
by mid-August
"Those musicians that came
through KWEM were making
great music, but moreover,
they were making history"
said Diane Hampton, the col-
lege's vice president of institu-
tional advancement. 'And the
radio station preserves that
history better than anything
we could think of
"It's one thing to tell it. It's
another thing to hear it."
KWEM's original frequency
has survived as KWAM in
Memphis, Tennessee. Mem-
phis resident Dale Franklin
purchased KWEM in 2009,
briefly bringing it back on the
air via the Web. He later sold
it to Mid-South Community
College, choosing the West


Associated Press
Blues singer Howlin' Wolf holds a guitar near a banner for radio
station KWEM. The station that began broadcasting in West
Memphis in 1947 and lasted until 1960 is being re-launched
this week on the Internet. Plans are for a return to the air as
an FM broadcast in August 2014.


Memphis school because he
says he "wanted it in the right
hands."
On Thursday, the school
will host an event called
"Flip the Switch" to cele-
brate KWEM's return to
broadcasting online.
Mid-South wanted to "cap-
ture the story, before every-
body got so old that they
couldn't remember it," col-
lege president Dr Glen Fen-
ter said.
West Memphis used to be a
destination spot for musi-
cians, because, according to
station historian Franklin,
the city had "everything
you'd have on Bourbon
Street" in New Orleans.
KWEM began broadcast-
ing in 1947 and offered un-
known artists such as
Scotty Moore and Johnny
Cash to perform live as
long as they paid the fee or
found a sponsor
Resident Mary Toney, 67,
recalled listening to KWEM


as a child while her uncle
drove her around town in his
red GMC pickup. She also
serves on the college's board
of trustees.
"It was just what you did.
You turned it on with pride
because it was in your town,"
she said.
Toney remembers thinking
that B.B. King's voice was "im-
pressive" when it came on for
a commercial. She was famil-
iar with him already: His
voice used to ring through the
walls of her childhood home
on summer nights when he
played at Square Deal Cafe,
which was just a street over
from her home.
"You would hear him play-
ing on the weekend, because
it was hot and the windows
were open," she said. "There
was no air conditioning."
Station manager John
Bennett won't reveal what
will be KWEM's inaugural
song when it officially comes
on the Web this week.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, May 27, the
147th day of 2014. There are 218
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 27, 1937, the newly
completed Golden Gate Bridge
connecting San Francisco and
Marin County, California, was
opened to pedestrian traffic (vehi-
cles began crossing the next day).
On this date:
In 1941, the British Royal Navy
sank the German battleship Bis-
marck off France, with a loss of
some 2,000 lives, three days after
the Bismarck sank the HMS Hood.
In 1962, a dump fire in Centralia,
Pennsylvania, ignited a blaze in un-
derground coal deposits that contin-
ues to burn this day.
In 1994, Nobel Prize-winning au-
thorAlexander Solzhenitsyn re-
turned to Russia to the emotional
cheers of thousands after spending
two decades in exile.
Ten years ago: Mustafa Kamel
Mustafa, a Muslim cleric, was ar-
rested in London and accused of
trying to build a terrorist training
camp in Oregon. (Mustafa, also
known as Abu Hamza al-Masri, was
extradited to the United States in
the fall of 2012; his trial began in
New York in April 2014.)
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama announced more
spending for renewable energy
after touring a large field of solar
panels at Nellis Air Force Base,
near Las Vegas.
One year ago: U.S. Sen. John Mc-
Cain, a proponent of arming Syrian
rebels, quietly slipped into Syria for a
meeting with anti-government fighters.
Today's Birthdays: Pulitzer Prize-
winning novelist Herman Wouk is 99.
Actor Christopher Lee is 92. Former
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is
91. Musician Ramsey Lewis is 79.
Actor Louis Gossett Jr. is 78. Come-
dian Adam Carolla is 50.
Thought for Today: "Sixty years
ago I knew everything; now I know
nothing; education is a progressive
discovery of our own ignorance." -
Will Durant, American historian
(1885-1981).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


191169 0.50r a1i/D, u.40-
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y
p ... TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
_High. 92 Low: 651
~if .--. Partly sunny with a 30% chance of
S"-> i afternoon thunderstorms.
S WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
111 101100 .42High:90 Low:67-
Partly sunny with a 40% chance of
.\" i' \' afternoon thunderstorms.
I F'r THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
owo i-*. High: 92 Low. 68,
Partly sunny with a 50% chance of
,<' : ]," *..' afternoon thunderstorms.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 89f14
Record /60
Normal 89/72
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean 1
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00
Total for the month 4.81"
Total for the year 15.60"
Nnrmal fWr the vwar 1 171


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m.
HUMIDITY
Monday at3 p.m. %
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.5/12


*Asof 7 .m atImrs Wednesday's count: 4.3
UV INDEX. 12 Thursday's count: 3.7
O-2minimal, 3-4 low 5-6mooerale. AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday observed: 62
Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES ..=
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) IAFTERNOONi
05/27 TUESDAY 3:05 9:15 3:30 9:35
05/28 WEDNESDAY 3:45 10:05 4:30 10:25
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S e1 I UTO ...... 82.m................82 p-m.
e 111116 %@1 S M -..............-632 a.m.
S C MOO/>1M1NRISE TODAY 5 45 a rnm
May28 Jun5 Jun13 Jun19t MUS0M11 2.. -............7:27p.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There Is no bumr ban.
For mote Infooniahon call Florida Dlvreon of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
tnormalion on drought Mcondions, please vistt Ia O Ovsion of Forestry's Web site:
http:flarnme-tl-dol-conIncire weathef.4bc
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei ,n Wedrnesdaarm.or Sahurday
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or miro itigation of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, Ifowers anid shbs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus Courtly Utilities' customers shoum CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material l 352-527-7669. Sonue re-. pianlt i'j may Jaidy lo add l.n 1i
walering allowances
To report violations. please calli: C ol invemess @ 352-726-2321, Cty Co C vsial
River 3,52 795-421I ef 313 3unrncororwae' Cilrus County 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
TUESDAY
CRty High Low
Cha$ahowltzka" 6:30am 0.2 6:36p.m. 0.7t, 1:50a.m. 0.011ft 11:43a.ro.2,
CryslalRiver" 5:06am, .6,f, 4:37p.m. 24t,. M0:55a.m 0.7f, 11 57p.n.l fH.
Willacoochee* 243am, 3.2 It, 1:51p.m. 3.8ft, 8:38 a.m. 13I- 9:4B pmn0.4 .
Homosassa*" 6:27a.m. 0.7 It. 515p.m. t-4ft. 1:43a.m.-0.1 t. 11 :02a.rO.4ft.


H L Pcast City


Daytona Bch. 86 69 pc Miami
Fort Lauderdale 86 76 pc Ocata
Fort Myers 92 72 ts Orlanc
Gainesville 90 67 ts Pensa
Homestead 86 75 pc Saras<
Jacksonville 88 69 ts Tallah;
Key West 87 79 pc Tampa
Lakeland 91 71 ts VeroE
Melbourne 87 73 pc W. Pal

MARINE OUTL
Today: Southeast winds 5 to 10
knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay and
inland waters a light chop. Tonight:
North winds around 5 knots. Seas 2
feet or less. Bay and inland waters a
light chop. Isolated thunderstorms in
the evening.


H L Fcast
88 76 pc
90 69 ts
do 91 72 ts
cola 82 73 pc
ota 88 71 ts
assee 91 68 ts
G 90 74 ts
Beach 85 71 pc
ImBch. 87 76 pc

OOK
Gulf water
temperature


82
Taken at Ariptka


LAKE LEVELS
Location MON SUN Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.69 28.69 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.34 38.35 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.42 39.44 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.28 40.30 42,20
Levis reported in eet above sea level Flood stage lort laks are based on 233-year flood.
e mrean-annua.l Ioi xvhih ha. N 41 4 "nr chs- of. 1 tinq Rt, uaji 1 oa e,.:eede1 in
any one year T.5.s(,ila. >*'a.rw i..7. 11wn 5i .j .T lFiciad MdW a r r.a eni m UIL.u,
and is sutact o revison In no vent wa the Distrm or fe Unrted Stals Geoboa Survey
6? LabTe WEy a"V Q'rage, a- OJI .1 Ofl 1 ol ISfO M at. If yO u have ay questions you
sne-vo.,.rn[,K1 me 0,..;. 3L3 D ii v ii 0 i '7i6 7211

THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
AlaNl,,: Cilv
Auslin
Batibmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
BoIston
Buffalo
Buflngton, VT
Charleston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charofle
Chicago
Cincinnati
Clevelaindl
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concmd. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
ODalrot
El Paso
Evansvllle, IN
Harisburg
Hartlon!
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


MON TUE
H L Pcp. H LFcst
83 54 .02 80 54 Is
73 48 87 60 pc
81 58 .71 81 59 Is
85 66 .01 87 68 Is
86 62 88e 59 ts
75 64 1.5684 70 Is
86 57 87 65 Is
84 56 76 53 pc
89 70 B7 67 ts
67 S3 85 52 pc
79 55 .01 65 49 sh
72 55 76 57 Is
74 59 ,11 72 5 tIs
88 70 87 68 ts
86 51 83 63 Is
85 58 86 66 Is
87 61 81 56 Is
8556 86 65 Is
8354 79 62 Is
83 65 .02 83 64 Is
8656 83 66 s
79 48 .07 66 47 sti
80 71 17 80 66 ts
75 50 83 52 pc
79 66 .13 85 64 ts
86 59 83 63 ts
88 61 95 70 pc
88 63 88 67 Is
84 57 82 61 is
88 55 .01 83 52 sh
80 71 ,15 84 71 Is
8460 84 66 ts
102 75 104 79 s
88 67 84 67 Is
79 61 80 62 f
87 61 a8 68 ts
8970 87 69 ts
85 61 74 S3 is
8266 80 62 ts
87 63 86 69 pc
9068 90 67 ts
90 63 28 88 67 ts


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY

MON TUE
City L PCp. H L Fcst
NewOrleans 88 70 85 72 ts
New York City 86 66 86 56 ts
Nodolk 87 61 88 69 ts
Oklahoma Ciy 78 63 1.1177 63 is
Omaha 85 65 .22 85 63 ts
PalmSpfngs 105 74 104 76 s
PhiLadelpNhia 87 82 86 59 ts
Phoenix 104 76 107 81 s
Ptlsburgh 83 52 79 63 ts
Porltlalnd. ME 76 51 .01 59 45 sh
Porland. OR 71 56 .05 69 50 sh
Providence, lI 78 50 .01 77 50 sh
Rleigh 87 61 90 67 ts
Rapid Cily 78 53 82 56 pc
Reno 88 53 84 47 s
Rochester, NY 82 58 79 60 ts
Sactaimenlo 91 59 87 53 S
Sall Lake City 86 55 89 60 pc
SanAntoio 74 65 1,7388 72 ts
SanDiego 74 65 69 62 1
San Francisco 71 55 61 51 pc
Savannah 84 68 48 88 68 ts
Sealm 64 53 66 50 pc
Spokane 70 53 71 49 pc
St. Louis 88 69 86 68 ts
St.St9Mane 81 51 74 47 f
Syrammcuse 85 64 82 60 ts
Topeka 83 67 11 83 63 ts
Washington 88 64 87 68 ts
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HHGH & LOW
H 112, Demih Valley, Calif
LOW 26 WolD Creek Pass, oo.n
WORLD cmIS


TUE
CITY HL/SKY
Acaputco 87/80ts
Amsterdam 71157/cd
Athens 77/6/s
Belling 93W66s
Berlin 7857/s
Bermuda 7T/68/Ws


KEY TO CONDITIONS: cloudy; d. drdizde- Cairo 91/75/s
.oailn h-hmy pc.plrtly cloudy; rrfin; Calgawy 6W842fts
rl iVsnow mix; 'suumM hsh owiMi Havana 86/69fts
t-snow. tsa-undemtoyrw w-wlf* Hong Kong 89 S78/pc
WSi ,014 Jerusalem 82w66is


Lisbon 66531s
London 62/53I
MaOdrid 71/53/s
Mexico Cilly78W6pc
Montreal 75/534s
Moscow 82/57/pc
Paris 66511r
Rio 84m69/pc
Rome 77/51/s
Sydney 78/5Wpc
Tokyo 77/62vpc
Toronio 7/60/pc
Warsaw 80o6ws


LEGAL NOTICES





Meeting Notices................................. C12

Notice to

Creditors/Administration.............C12


Surplus Property...............................C12


j1- C I T R UL S C 0 U N T Y


CHRpNICLE
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Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
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Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries

Evva Fingar, 76
LECANTO
Evva Jeanne Lander
Hegedorn Fingar, 76, of
Lecanto, Fl. Passed away
May 23, 2014 at Life Care
Center of Citrus County,
Fl. Funeral services will
be held at Hooper Funeral
Home Beverly Hills
Chapel Wednesday May
28,2014 at Noon. The fam-
ily will receive friends at
11:00 am. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com. In lieu
of flowers donations may
be made to Humane Soci-
ety of Citrus Co. PO BOX
2283 Inverness, Fl. 34450
in memory of Evva.
A native of Lyons, N.Y
she came to the area in
2004. Mrs. Fingar was a
homemaker and Christian
by Faith. She was pro-
ceeded in death by her sis-
ter, Sheri Grant and
survived by her Husband,
Donald William Fingar
( married in 1988) of
Lecanto, Fl.; sister, Patri-
cia Lander of Old Town,
Fl.; Son, Hans (Peggy)
Hegedorn of Dickson, TN;
Son, Andie (Tammy) Hege-
dorn of Ontario, NY;
Grandson: Kyle (Jessica)
Hegedorn; Great Grand
Children, Brock & Brielle;
Grandson, Casey (Mau-
reen) Hegedorn; Great
Grand Child, Kylie; Step
Son, William Fingar of
Fairport, NY; Step Son,
James (Meredith) Fingar &
Families of Williamson,
NY
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Bev-
erly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Thurman
'Ted' Rich, 66
HOMOSASSA
Thurman (Ted) Rich, 66,
of Homosassa, Florida,
passed away at his resi-
dence Saturday, May 24,

was sur
rounded
by his fam-
ily and
loved ones
and died
peacefully
after a
long bout Thurman
of illness. "Ted" Rich
Ted was
a maintenance worker at
Withlacoochee River Elec-
tric company until he was
disabled with health prob-
lems. He was a member
of Homosassa Church of
God.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 31 years, Krista
Rich; his daughter
Tiffaney Ingram of Ho-
mosassa, Florida; and sons
Brian Rich of Florence,
Kentucky, and Chad Rich.
Other survivors include
Zella Matthews of Ho-
mosassa, Florida; Edna
Nelson of Fairfield, Ohio;
and Marge Gracie Taylor
of Ajo, Arizona. He is sur-
vived by four grandchil-
dren, Tyler and Alyssa
Sizemore of Homosassa,
Florida; and Austin and
Robbie Rich from Flo-
rence, Kentucky He was
preceded in death by
daughter Crystal Bare and
sister Viola Allen.
A memorial service is
scheduled for 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 29, 2014, at
Homosassa Church of God,
8323 W Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa, Florida, with a
celebration of life dinner
at the church following the
service.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Hos-
pice Center, Periwinkle
Drive, of Homosassa, or
the Homosassa Church of
God.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197

i '
adis uinesdy
p iort rndae


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 A5


Nuclear waste storage goes long-term


Associated Press

WATERFORD, Conn. Nu-
clear power plants across the
United States are building or ex-
panding storage facilities to hold
their spent fuel radioactive
waste that by now was supposed
to be on its way to a national
dump.
The steel and concrete con-
tainers used to store the waste
on-site were envisioned as only a
short-term solution when intro-
duced in the 1980s. Now they are
the subject of reviews by industry
and government to determine
how they might hold up if
needed for decades or longer
With nowhere else to put its nu-
clear waste, the Millstone Power
Station overlooking Long Island
Sound is sealing it up in massive
steel canisters on what used to be
a parking lot. The storage pad,
first built in 2005, was recently
expanded to make room for
seven times as many canisters
filled with spent fuel.
Dan Steward, the first select-
man in Waterford, which hosts
Millstone, said he raises the issue
every chance he can with
Connecticut's congressional
members.
"We do not want to become a
nuclear waste site as a commu-
nity," Steward said.
The government is pursuing a
new plan for nuclear waste stor-
age, hoping to break an impasse
left by the collapse of a proposal
for Nevada's Yucca Mountain.
The Energy Department says it
expects other states will compete
for a repository, and the accom-
panying economic benefits, and
it's already heard from potential
hosts in New Mexico, Texas and
Mississippi. But the plan faces
hurdles including a need for new
legislation that has stalled in
Congress.
So plants are preparing to keep
the high-level nuclear waste in
their backyards indefinitely Most
of it remains in pools, which cool
the spent fuel for several years
once it comes out of the reactors.
But with the pools at or nearing
capacity, the majority is expected
within a decade to be held in dry
casks, or canisters, which are


Associated Press
A trailer holding a spent fuel storage container is maneuvered into position Oct. 14, 2010, for offloading
into a horizontal storage module at the Millstone Power Station in Waterford, Conn. With the collapse of a
proposal for nuclear waste storage at Nevada's Yucca Mountain, Millstone and other plants across the
country are building or expanding on-site storage for waste.


used in 34 states. Only three of
the 62 commercial nuclear sites
in the U.S. have yet to announce
plans to build their own.
In the past few years since the
Yucca Mountain plan was aban-
doned, the government and in-
dustry have opened studies to
address unanswered questions
about the long-term performance
of dry cask storage. The Nuclear
Regulatory Commission in 2011
began offering 40-year license re-
newals for casks, up from 20-year
intervals. The tests are focusing
on how to monitor degradation
inside the canisters, environmen-
tal requirements for storage sites,
and how well the canisters hold
up with "high burnup," or longer-
burning fuels that are now widely
used by American plants.
"Now that we've shown that the
national policy is shifting, we're
having to relook at these systems
to make sure they still meet the
regulations for longer and longer
periods of time," said Eric Ben-
ner, an NRC official who has
served as the inspections branch
chief with its spent fuel storage
division.
At Millstone, 19 canisters
loaded with spent fuel are ar-


rayed on a concrete pad, which
was expanded in October to
make room for as many as
135 canisters by 2045. The canis-
ters, which are cooled by air cir-
culation, seal the waste with inert
gas inside an inner chamber and
are themselves loaded into con-
crete modules. Workers regularly
inspect temperature gauges and,
during the winter, shovel snow off
the vents.
Millstone's low-level nuclear
waste is shipped to a disposal fa-
cility in Barnwell, South
Carolina.
The spent fuel is piling up at a
rate of about 2,200 tons a year at
U.S. power-plant sites. The in-
dustry and government decline to
say how much waste is currently
stored at individual plants. The
U.S. nuclear industry had
69,720 tons of uranium waste as of
May 2013, with 49,620 tons in
pools and 20,100 in dry storage,
according to the Nuclear Energy
Institute industry group.
Spent nuclear fuel is about
95 percent uranium. About 1 per-
cent is other heavy elements such
as curium, americium and pluto-
nium-239. Each has an extremely
long half-life some take hun-


dreds of thousands of years to
lose all of their radioactive
potency
Watchdog groups say the dry
storage poses fewer safety con-
cerns than the reactors them-
selves, and many have pushed for
spent fuel to be transferred more
quickly from the pools. Heavy se-
curity is in place to deter sabo-
tage by terrorists.
The administration's strategy
calls for an interim storage facil-
ity by 2025 and a geologic reposi-
tory by 2048.
Peter Lyons, an assistant secre-
tary for nuclear energy at the U.S.
Energy Department, said it can-
not make plans for individual
sites until the passage of legisla-
tion creating a new framework
for waste policy But he said the
groups in southeastern New Mex-
ico, western Texas and Missis-
sippi are only the most public of
potential hosts to express inter-
est in taking in high-level waste.
The idea for the interim facil-
ity is to take spent fuel left behind
from reactors that have already
shut down, as is the case at sites
in California, Maine, Massachu-
setts, Michigan, Wisconsin, Con-
necticut, Colorado and Oregon.


Medicaid surge triggers cost concerns for states


Associated Press

WASHINGTON From
California to Rhode Is-
land, states are con-
fronting new concerns
that their Medicaid costs
will rise as a result of the
federal health care law
That's likely to revive
the debate about how fed-
eral decisions can saddle
states with unanticipated
expenses.
Before President
Barack Obama's law ex-
panded Medicaid eligibil-
ity, millions of people who
were already entitled to
its safety-net coverage
were not enrolled. Those
same people are now sign-
ing up in unexpectedly
high numbers, partly be-
cause of publicity about
getting insured under the
law
For states red or blue,
the catch is that they must
use more of their own
money to cover this par-
ticular group.
In California, Demo-
cratic Gov Jerry Brown's
recent budget projected
an additional $1.2 billion
spending on Medi-Cal, the
state's version of Medi-
caid, due in part to surg-
ing numbers. State
officials say about 300,000
more already-eligible Cal-
ifornians are expected to
enroll than was estimated
last fall.


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"Our policy goal is to get
people covered, so in that
sense it's a success," said
state legislator Richard
Pan, a Democrat who
heads the California State
Assembly's health com-
mittee. "We are going to
have to deal with how to
support the success."
Online exchanges that
offer subsidized private
insurance are just one
part of the health care
law's push to expand cov-
erage. The other part is
Medicaid, and it has two
components.
First, the law allows
states to expand Medicaid
eligibility to people with
incomes up to 138 percent
of the federal poverty line,
about $16,100 for an indi-
vidual. Washington pays
the entire cost for that
group through 2016, grad-
ually phasing down to a
90 percent share. About
half the states have ac-
cepted the offer to expand
coverage in this way
But whether or not a
state expands Medicaid,
all states are on the hook
for a significantly bigger
share of costs when it
comes to people who were
Medicaid-eligible under
previous law The federal
government's share for
this group averages about
60 percent nationally In
California, it's about a 50-
50 split, so for each previ-



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Associated Press
California Gov. Jerry Brown
responds May 13 to a
question about his revised
2014-15 state budget that
he unveiled at the Capitol
news conference in
Sacramento, Calif.

ously eligible resident
who signs up, the state has
to pony up half the cost.
There could be many
reasons why people didn't
sign up in the past
They may have simply
been unaware. Some may
not have needed coverage.
Others see a social stigma
attached to the program
for those with the lowest
incomes. But now virtu-
ally everyone in the coun-
try is required to have
coverage or risk fines.
That's more motivation to
come forward.
"It's not a bad thing that
we are opening a door
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open before," said Judy
Solomon of the Center for
Budget and Policy Priori-
ties, which advocates for
the poor
The budget conse-
quences are real.
"Clearly we are going to
need to do our best to
make sure we are working
within the budget we are
given," said Deidre Gif-
ford, Rhode Island's Med-
icaid director
States always expected
that some previously eligi-
ble people would sign up,
but Gifford said her state
enrolled 5,000 to 6,000
more than it had projected.
In Washington state,
people who were previ-
ously eligible represent
about one-third of new
Medicaid enrollments,
roughly 165,000 out of a
total of nearly 483,000. But
state officials say they are
treating that as a prelimi-
nary number, and the true
net increase may be lower
once they factor in people
who drop out of the pro-
gram for a host of reasons,
such as getting a job with
coverage.
Governors in California,
Rhode Island and Wash-
ington all strongly sup-
ported the health care
law Their outreach cam-
paigns to promote sign-
ups overall probably
contributed to drawing
out uninsured residents


who already were entitled
to Medicaid.
But researchers also
are seeing increased Med-
icaid enrollment in states
that have resisted the
health care law
A recent report from the
market research firm
Avalere Health found
Georgia enrollment in-
creased by nearly 6 per-
cent. Montana saw a
10 percent rise and South
Carolina 5 percent.
A big exception is
Texas, which has barely
seen any increase.
"Anyone who didn't
budget for this is going to
be behind the eight ball,"
said Avalere CEO Dan
Mendelson. "It's the kind
of thing governors will
want to discuss with the
White House."
When the health care
law was being debated in
Congress, many states rec-
ognized they might face a
problem if droves of al-
ready-eligible people
joined Medicaid. States
lobbied federal lawmak-
ers unsuccessfully to
get more money for that
group, said Ray Schep-
pach, the former top
staffer for the National
Governors Association.
"States are concerned
about this," he said. "It's
something they had been
worried about right
along."


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LOCAL/NATION






Page A6 TUESDAY, MAY 27,2014



PINION


"There is no success without hardship."
Sophocles, "Electra," C. 418-14 B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SV Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


MAKING THE GRADE




Student athletes


stand tall at


annual ceremony


itrus County's top stu-
dent athletes stepped
from the playing field
into the limelight recently
during the Citrus County
Chronicle's seventh annual
sports award show
What has remained consis-
tent through each and every
awards show is Citrus County


is blessed with an
abundance of stu-
dent athletes who
excel beyond any
imaginable realm.
Each year, the
Chronicle's selec-
tion committee
must decide on
the top athlete in
each sport and
overall. Whether


averages, practice every day
- sometimes year-round -
and burn the midnight oil
while catching up on home-
work once workouts are over
The grind takes commit-
ment- from parents and stu-
dents it saps resolve and
finances with equal vigor
Those who emerge on the


THE ISSUE:
Chronicle STARS
awards.

OUR OPINION:
Citrus County's
athletes shine
bright.


it's on the gridiron, hard
court, cinders or the well-
worn paths of a cross country
layout, the margin between
each athlete in every sport is
whisper thin.
Competing as a student ath-
lete takes hard work and ded-
ication. Students must
maintain solid grade-point


Double-crossed
I see Inverness is still fighting
the MSBU fire tax. I wish we all
had fought harder not to be dou-
ble taxed. They really pulled a
good one on us.
What's the pay?
I understand that the 0
new county attorney's
been approved. I didn't
see anything in the
newspaper about it or
what her salary will be.
Could the newspaper
please post what the
new county attorney CA
will be paid and her C
benefits? 563-
Editor's note: The
county will pay County At-
torney Kerry Parsons an annual
salary of $91,000, plus provide
free medical insurance.
Attention to detail
This is in response to the
"Show off your brain," to the
man who was nitpicking about
what someone was wearing: First
I will say that most of the real
estates offices have dress codes
and require agents to dress pro-
fessionally when meeting, show-
ing or on the floor. We don't
always know where we will be
showing and sometimes we may
not have that extra pair of shoes
or clothes in the car. Second,
these agents are putting some
pride in the way they look be-
cause this is really a job inter-
view when we do go out and
meet someone for the first time
and we would like to make a
good impression so that maybe
we get the listing or become the
buyer's agent. It is important to
remember that maybe we put
that kind of attention to detail
into ourselves, that you'll get the
same when we are given the
opportunity.
God bless the kids
Today is May 14 and I would
just really like to say thank you to
the Chronicle for publishing the
Class of 2014. It shows so many
wonderful, nice kids that we have
in this county. It doesn't have
anything to do with the bums
that are always in trouble with
drugs, but the kids that have


I

(


other end, though
battered, find
themselves a
more complete
person shaped by
accomplishment
and their naviga-
tion through suc-
cess and failure.
We applaud
each and every
student athlete


who makes this commitment,
whether they find themselves
on that College of Central
Florida stage in late May lis-
tening to their string of fine
accomplishments or success-
fully completed another year
as student and teammate.
Congratulations one and
all.


worked real hard to graduate
and some of their outstanding
achievements. Thank you, Chron-
icle. I really appreciate it. And
thank you, kids. May God bless
you all.
Well-written letter
S There was a (letter to
JND the editor) in yester-
flW day's (May 13) editorial
Urr section of the Chronicle
| written by a Mr. Andrew
j Hill. It was a wonderfully
S written and thought-out
Article about cats and
dogs and how many ex-
tras and the fact that
) 579 only 25 percent of them
) are adopted. Perhaps
people will be more re-
sponsible now that hopefully
they've read his article and per-
haps some people will even think
of adopting one.
No respect from teens
What kind of parents do these
teenagers have today in the
neighborhood? ... When they
walk through your property and
they're corrected, they tell you to
go "f" yourself. Where are the
parents? I would like to know
who's raising these kids to have
no respect for people's property
or the people themselves. I'm 77
years old and I think I deserve a
little bit more respect from these
teenagers. And the parents
ought to wise up and teach them
some respect. Maybe we ought
to bring back the draft and
maybe they would learn respect
and how to live with their fellow
man.
Call for 'do not call'
This is in regards to today's
paper, May 15, the "Solution to
sales calls." I have a number. If
you dial this number, it will stop
all soliciting calls. It has worked
for me for a couple of years and
here's the number: 1-888-382-
1222.
Wasting all that money
Our school system they do
a fine job, but they never have
enough money. Every year, it's
the same old thing. So I think
they spend a lot of money some-
where they shouldn't be spend-
ing it.


An address we'll never hear


WASHINGTON
All modem presidents of
both parties have been
too much
with us. Talking in-
cessantly, they have
put politics un-
healthily at the cen-
ter of America's 3
consciousness.
Promising promis- /
cuously, they have r
exaggerated govern-
ment's proper scope
and actual compe- Georg
tence, making the TH
public perpetually T
disappointed and VON
surly Inflating exec-
utive power, they have severed it
from constitutional constraints.
So, sensible voters might em-
brace someone who announced
his 2016 candidacy this way:
"I am ambling running sug-
gests unseemly ardor for pres-
ident It is axiomatic that anyone
who nowadays will do what is
necessary in order to become
president thereby reveals char-
acter traits, including delusions
of adequacy and obsessive com-
pulsive disorder, that should dis-
qualify him or her from
proximity to powers concen-
trated in the executive branch.
Therefore, my campaign will ini-
tially consist of driving around
the Obnoxiously Entitled Four-
Iowa, New Hampshire, South
Carolina and Nevada trying to
interest their 3.8 percent of
America's population in a mini-
malist president.
"Candidates are constantly
asked, 'Where will you take the
country?' My answer is:
'Nowhere.' The country is not a
parcel to be 'taken' anywhere. It
is the spontaneous order of 316
million people making billions
of daily decisions, cooperatively
contracting together, moving the
country in gloriously unplanned
directions.
"To another inane question,
'How will you create jobs?' my
answer will be: 'I won't.' Other


4


,e
I

II
U


than by doing whatever the chief
executive can to reduce the reg-
ulatory state's impediments to
industriousness. I will
S administer no major
economic regulations
those with $100 mil-
lion economic impacts
that Congress has
not voted on. Legisla-
tors' should be explic-
itly complicit in
burdens they mandate.
"Congress, defined
Will by the Constitution's
ER Article I, is properly
the first the initiating
ES branch of government
So, I will veto no bill
merely because I disagree with
the policy it implements. I will
wield the veto power only on
constitutional grounds when
Congress legislates beyond its
constitutionally enumerated
powers, correctly construed, as
they have not been since the
New Deal. So I expect to cast
more vetoes than the 2,564 cast
by all previous presidents.
"My judicial nominees will
seek to narrow Congress' use of
its power to regulate commerce
as an excuse for minutely regu-
latingAmericans' lives. My nom-
inees will broaden the judicial
recognition of Americans' 'privi-
leges or immunities,' the rights
of national citizenship men-
tioned in the 14th Amendment
and the unenumerated rights re-
ferred to by the Ninth.
"In a radio address to the na-
tion, President Franklin Roo-
sevelt urged Americans to tell
him their troubles. Please do
not tell me yours. Tell them to
your spouse, friends, clergy -
not to a politician who is far
away, who doesn't know you and
whose job description does not
include Empathizer in Chief 'I
feel your pain,' Bill Clinton
vowed. I won't insult your intel-
ligence by similarly pretending
to feel yours.
'A congenial society is one in
which most people most of the


LETTERS Z<


We need to protect
our children
Today's Chronicle (May 9) had
yet another story of a young cou-
ple abusing their children. It
seems that every day there is an-
other child having to suffer be-
cause of being neglected, abused
or even murdered by their
parents.
I can't help but wonder if the
generation now having children
is showing us the result of them
being brought up believing that
whatever they did was excellent
and got a trophy just for showing
up. Parents were told that if their
child experienced losing or fail-
ing it would hurt their "self-
esteem" and therefore sports
should have no losers, school
should have no student fail and
they should have everything they
want in life, regardless of how it
might impact other people or the
community
The poor children who are liv-
ing lives of pain and suffering at
the hands of people who are sup-
posed to love and cherish them
will pay a terrible price for the
rest of their lives.
I wish I knew a way to correct
what has become our national
shame, but I don't The various
agencies set up to protect chil-
dren fail time after time. They
keep saying "we can do better"


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

but somehow they never do. It
seems we, as a nation, have no
problem spending millions and
billions to finance wars to pro-
tect others, but won't do the same
to protect our precious children.
Evlyn Skurow
Crystal River

Admitting to
climate change
We now know what a "progres-
sive" Republican is. Senator
Mark Rubio has bravely stepped
forward and admitted the obvi-
ous: climate change is taking


time, and all politicians almost
all of the time, say when asked
about almost everything: 'This
is none of my business.' If as
president I am asked what I
think about the death of a rock
star, or the imbecilic opinions of
rich blowhards who own profes-
sional sports teams, I will say:
'Americans should have no in-
terest in my thoughts about such
things, if I had any' I will try not
to come to the attention of any
television camera more than
once a week, and only that often
if I am convinced that I can
speak without violating what
will be my administration's
motto: 'Don't speak unless you
can improve the silence.'
"I will not ruin any more
American evenings with tele-
vised State of the Union ad-
dresses. I will mail my thoughts
on that subject to Congress
'from time to time,' as the Con-
stitution directs. This was good
enough for Jefferson and every
subsequent president until
Woodrow Wilson, the first pres-
ident who believed, as progres-
sives do, that the nation cannot
function without constant pres-
idential tutoring and hectoring.
"This country has waged
many wars since it last actually
declared war, on June 5, 1942,
against Bulgaria, Romania and
Hungary If it is necessary to use
military force, I shall, if exigen-
cies permit, give Congress the
pleasure of collaboration.
"Finally, there have been 44
presidencies before the one I
moderately aspire to adminis-
ter, and there will be many more
than 44 after it. Mine will be a
success if, a century hence,
Americans remember me as
dimly as they remember Grover
Cleveland, the last Democratic
president with proper under-
standing of this office's place in
our constitutional order"


George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. corn.


place. But he hastens to explain
that the problem is not caused by
man. So God is punishing us for
something? Voting for Democ-
rats? Voting for Republicans? Al-
lowing gay marriage? But what
Rubio asserts is that it is not
caused by the oil-gas-coal indus-
tries. He has looked them in the
eye (presumably while receiving
campaign donations) and could,
like George Bush and Vladimir
Putin, see into their souls and he
saw only goodness.
But let's not talk about causes
- although the science on this is
pretty convincing. Let's talk about
Florida arguably the state most
threatened by global warming. Al-
ready Miami is feeling the brunt
of high ocean levels and it's only
going to get worse. Our state is ex-
tremely vulnerable up and down
our coasts. The state needs to ap-
point a committee of experts from
various fields charged with pro-
ducing a master plan to help save
Florida. What are the areas most
threatened in the short run? Can
we develop a program that helps
various areas with their prob-
lems? What factories are most
threatening our deteriorating air?
Unfortunately our current gov-
ernor refuses to take such an ob-
vious action
Michael J. Francis
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


to the Editor


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Experts: Mass murderers hard to predict


Associated Press
GOLETA, Calif. Colorado
movie theater shooter James
Holmes. Sandy Hook school at-
tacker Adam Lanza. And now El-
liot Rodger
All were young loners with no
criminal history who went on
shooting sprees, leaving devas-
tated families in their wake.
Mass murderers tend to have
a history of pent-up frustration
and failures, are socially iso-
lated and vengeful, blaming oth-
ers for their unhappiness,
experts say
"They all display deluded
thinking and a lot of rage about
feeling so marginalized," James
Garbarino, a professor of psy-
chology at Loyola University
Chicago, said in an email.
Since mass killings are ex-
tremely rare, scholars say
there's no way to predict who
has deadly intentions, let alone
who will reach a breaking point
and take action.
Past violence is a clue, but in
Rodger's case, police did not see
him as a threat to himself or oth-
ers during a welfare check
weeks before Friday night's ram-
page near the University of Cal-
ifornia, Santa Barbara that left
six victims dead and 13 injured.
Rodger died of an apparent
self-inflicted gunshot wound to
the head after a shootout with
deputies, ending a night of ter-
ror in this tight-knit seaside
campus community as the se-
mester drew to a close.
Pinpointing a mass killer "is not
an exact science. We don't have a
foolproof way of predicting" who
will turn violent, said Risdon
Slate, a professor of criminology
at Florida Southern College.
Before Rodger stabbed three
male UCSB students in his
apartment and cruised around
in his black BMW firing at soror-
ity girls and strangers, he left a
trail of YouTube videos and a
140-page manifesto ranting
against women and couples and
lamenting his lack of a sex life.
In his postings, Rodger, a 22-
year-old community college stu-
dent and son of a Hollywood
director, said he was a lonely
and frustrated virgin.
"I'm sexually attracted to girls.
But girls are not sexually at-
tracted to me. And there's a


Associated Press
Jose Cardoso pays his respects Sunday at a makeshift memorial in front of the IV Deli Mart, where part of Friday night's mass shooting took
place by a drive-by shooter near Goleta, Calif. Sheriff's officials said Elliot Rodger, 22, went on a rampage near the University of California,
Santa Barbara, stabbing three people to death at his apartment before shooting and killing three more in a crime spree through a nearby


neighborhood.
major problem with that a
major problem. That's a prob-
lem that I intend to rectify I in
all my magnificence and power,
I will not let this fly It's an injus-
tice that needs to be dealt with,"
Rodger said in one of the videos.
Recent mass shootings in-
volved young men described as
loners who had trouble fitting in.
In July 2012, 24-year-old
Holmes opened fire at a mid-
night screening of a Batman
film, killing a dozen moviegoers.
Five months later, 20-year-old
Lanza shot 20 first-graders and
six educators at Sandy Hook El-
ementary School in Connecticut.
Experts who study mass mur-
derers say the vast majority of
lonely and angry people don't
commit violence, which makes it
difficult to know who will snap.
"We can point to all the


warning signs we missed. But
they're yellow flags. They're not
red flags until blood is spilled,"
said James Alan Fox, a criminal
justice professor at Northeast-
ern University who has written
several books on mass murders.
Before the killings, Rodger's
mother became alarmed about
bizarre videos he posted and
alerted authorities in April. But
Rodger was able to convince
deputies that he was not a risk to
himself or others conditions
that would have allowed them to
take him into custody under Cal-
ifornia law
Family friend Simon Astaire
said Rodger was "very much a
boy of solitude" who spoke few
words.
"At a Christmas party, I went
out to get air and there he was
standing alone. I apologized for


disturbing his peace, and he said
it was all right I asked, 'How are
you doing?' He said, 'I find
things difficult.' I walked away
thinking that he was very sad
lonely boy," Astaire told The As-
sociated Press.
In his writings, Rodger said he
had seen several therapists
throughout his life, but it's unclear
what he was being treated for
Experts say people with men-
tal illness generally are not
more violent than the rest of the
population. A rare exception
was Jared Loughner, who fatally
shot six people in Arizona in
2011 in an attack that gravely in-
jured Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
After his arrest, Loughner was
diagnosed with schizophrenia.
On Sunday, several security
guards stood watch outside the
apartment building where


Rodger lived. Memorials sprung
up there, outside the sorority
house where two coeds were
shot nearby and at a deli where
a male student was shot.
The university planned a me-
morial Tuesday afternoon at
Harder Stadium on the 21,685-
student campus to mourn and
remember the six who were
killed. The day's classes were
canceled.
Garrett Schneider, a 22-year-
old student studying physical an-
thropology and linguistics, was
touched by the tragedy, but he
said he won't view fellow stu-
dents with more suspicion be-
cause of it.
"I figure people like this are
far and few between," he said.
"If you read his writing and look
at his videos, it's obvious that
he's far out there."


MEMORIAL
Continued from Page Al

"The white stripe tells us
of the peace they hoped to
bring to future generations."
"This was their flag, the
flag they loved, the flag
they served so well."
"The first Memorial Day
was in 1868, originally
called Decoration Day"
"Memorial Day is a cele-
bration of honor"
"Our land has been
blessed and honored."
"God bless those who
have given their lives."
There was a three-volley
rifle salute, followed by
"Taps" and the folding of
the flag.
"I wore my uniform with
pride and honor," recalled
Kat Powers, a detective
with the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office. She had
spent 23 years in the
Florida Army National
Guard, eventually becom-
ing an officer
"I truly know now that
the experiences, training
and knowledge that I
gained from my time in the
military saved my life as


I


Members of VFW post on---
10087 of Beverly Hills ,-f
stand at attention Monday S '
as taps is played during '
the Memorial Day service J Js
at Fero Memorial Gardens.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle --

well as my law enforce-
ment career"
"In each instance, when
called upon to defend the
rights of this nation, to
enjoy the liberty of free-
dom, the American soldier
has responded coura-
geously," she said.
"Whether it was World ',
War II and rallied by sup-
port around the world, or
in Vietnam, during a time
of disruption and confu-
sion among the people of -
our nation, or even today
when the wars over the
past few decades have pro-
voked similar confusion
and disagreement among
citizens.
"It is imperative that
each of us show our respect
for the soldiers who have
fought and remember the
sacrifices made by each." 9 I
Contact Chronicle
reporter Pat Faherty at
352-564-2924 or pfaherty@ *
chronicleonline. com.


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LOCAL/NATION


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 A7










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Judge: Man
threatened IRS
agent's life
PROVIDENCE, R.I.-A
Rhode Island man has
been convicted of threaten-
ing to kill an Internal Rev-
enue Service agent and
rape and kill the agent's
wife over a $330,000 tax
bill.
A federal judge on Friday
found Cranston resident
Andrew A. Calcione guilty of
threatening to assault and
murder an IRS revenue
agent and his family.
Prosecutors said Cal-
cione left voice mail mes-
sages in the Warwick IRS
office on July 15 threaten-
ing that if the agent called
him again, he would torture
the agent, rape and kill his
wife and injure his daughter
while the agent watched.
He said he would then kill
the agent.
Tax agents estimated
that Calcione owed
$330,000 for 2008, 2009
and 2010.
The 49-year-old Calcione
faces up to 20 years in
prison when he's sentenced
Sept. 11.
Prosecutors:
Hacker helped
thwart attacks
NEW YORK -A prolific
computer hacker who infil-
trated the servers of major
corporations later switched
sides and helped the gov-
ernment disrupt hundreds
of cyberattacks on Con-
gress, NASA and other sen-
sitive targets, according to
federal prosecutors.
New York prosecutors
detailed the cooperation of
Hector Xavier Monsegur for
the first time in court papers
while asking a judge to re-
ward him with leniency at
his sentencing Tuesday.
They credited Monsegur
with helping them cripple
Anonymous, the notorious
crew of hacktivists who
stole confidential informa-
tion, defaced websites and
temporarily put some vic-
tims out of business.
After his arrest and guilty
plea in 2011, Monsegur
faced more than two
decades behind bars. But
because of his cooperation,
the sentence could be two
years or less.
Reports that Monsegur
was cooperating made him
a pariah in the Anonymous
movement, prosecutors
said. Hackers began post-
ing personal information
about him, and he was even
approached on the street
and threatened, they said.
Buffett's older
sister works
to help needy
OMAHA, Neb. Billion-
aire Warren Buffett has re-
ceived scores of individual
requests for help since he
announced that he would
gradually
give away
his
Fudo. fortune.
So, he
turned to
his big
sister.
rrits a Doris
Buffett Buffett
Sunshine Lady and her
Foundation. Sunshine
Lady
Foundation review the let-
ters to find people strug-
gling through no fault of
their own and has given the
letter writers an undisclosed
amount.
She has also given away
more than $150 million of
her own money to help vic-
tims of domestic abuse,
people with mental ill-
nesses, prison inmates and
individuals in the communi-
ties where she lives.
Northeastern University
professor Rebecca Riccio


teaches about philanthropy.
She said the personal ap-
proach Doris Buffett uses
and her willingness to con-
sider individual requests set
her apart from others.
-From wire reports


Ukraine launches
airstrike on
pro-Moscow rebels
DONETSK, Ukraine-
Ukraine's president-elect said
Monday he wants to begin
talks with Moscow and end a
pro-Russia insurgency in the
east, but the rebels escalated
the conflict by occupying a
major airport, and the govern-
ment in Kiev responded with
an airstrike.
As darkness fell in Donetsk,
a city of about 1 million, it was
unclear who was in control of
the airport. Hundreds of fight-
ers of the separatist Donetsk
People's Republic had been
brought by trucks to a wooded
area on the fringes of the air-
port, many of them armed
with rocket-propelled grenade
launchers and automatic ri-
fles. At least one warplane
streaked over the city, firing
flares, and explosions were
heard from the direction of the
airport.
The rebels, who declared
independence for Donetsk
and the neighboring Luhansk
region after a hastily called
and dubious referendum two
weeks ago, regarded


Pope urges peace in Mideast












Associated Press
Pope Francis is seen though a window, third from left, aboard an El Al aircraft as the
Pontiff leaves Israel Monday following an official departure ceremony at Ben Gurion
airport near Tel Aviv, Israel. A day after he boosted Palestinian aspirations by praying
at Israel's security barrier surrounding Bethlehem, Francis honored Holocaust victims
by kissing the hands of several survivors and accepted Israel's last-minute request to
pray at a memorial to victims of suicide bombings and other attacks.


Sunday's election of candy ty-
coon Petro Poroshenko as
president to be illegitimate.
Pro-military fervor
at polls as
Egyptians vote
CAIRO Egypt's presi-
dential election on Monday
turned into a nationalist cele-
bration at many polls with vot-
ers singing and dancing for


the almost certain winner -
former military chief Abdel-
Fattah el-Sissi, who last year
ousted the first freely elected
president.
But the first day of voting in
the two-day election also illus-
trated the bitter divisions that
have riven Egypt since the
military's removal of Islamist
leader Mohammed Morsi. In
towns where Islamists domi-
nate, voting was often thin or


non-existent.
The 59-year-old retired
Field Marshal el-Sissi is look-
ing for more than a landslide
victory from the election. He's
hoping for a strong turnout to
show international critics that
his July 3 ouster of Morsi re-
flected the will of the people
- and to claim popular sup-
port as he tries to tackle
Egypt's daunting economic
woes.


Nigerian defense
chief says taken
girls located
ABUJA, Nigeria Nige-
ria's military has located
nearly 300 school girls ab-
ducted by Islamic extremists
but fears using force to try to
free them could get them
killed, the country's chief of
defense said Monday.
Air Marshal Alex Badeh told
demonstrators supporting the
much criticized military that
Nigerian troops can save the
girls. But he added, "we can't
go and kill our girls in the name
of trying to get them back."
He spoke to thousands of
demonstrators who marched
to Defense Ministry headquar-
ters in Abuja, the capital.
Many were brought in on
buses, indicating it was an or-
ganized event.
Asked by reporters where
they had found the girls,
Badeh refused to elaborate.
A source said a deal to
swap the girls for detained
Boko Haram members was
agreed last week and then
scuttled at the last minute by
President Goodluck Jonathan.
-From wire reports


Commemoration


Associated Press
A breeze billows the American flag above the head of Tommy Sammons of Richmond as he waits for a military band concert to begin
Monday at the Carillon, a memorial dedicated to Americans who died in World War I in Richmond, Va. Sammons, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is a fixture at patriotic festivities in Richmond, typically dressing as Uncle Sam and carrying a flag.


ABOVE: American Legion member Richard Clark, wearing his association
pins on his cover, participates in the annual Memorial Day observances
at the Vicksburg National Cemetery in Vicksburg, Miss. RIGHT: A rose
sits on a tombstone of a Civl War soldier at Marietta National Cemetery
on Memorial Day in Marietta, Ga.


Paulette Little visits the grave of her late husband, George Little, a Navy veteran, during Memorial Day observances Monday at the
Sacramento Valley National Cemetery in Dixon, Calif.


World BRIEFS









SPORTS


Red Sox
snap losing
streak with
come-from-
behind
victory in
Atlanta./B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


L...L .....


0 Baseball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Lottery, TV/B3
0 Auto racing/B4
0 College baseball/B4


Citrus' Cabanas
Sign t. committed to attend
m to wrestle for level school.
SAT S to wres t fo /He selected Life
NALA school in Georgia sons: "It was closet
has wrestled varsity
C.J. RISAK Wood is convinced 1
Correspondent mitment to succeed.
"Tarique is one o
The work necessary to transition from high worker, he listens, i:
school to collegiate athletics could possibly high,"' his prep coai
hinder Citrus High School graduate Tarique ing practice he'd gc
Cabanas only because he might spend too noon practice he'd g
much time working in the wrestling room.
"(His biggest challenge will be) balancing Citrus High Scho
his time between his wrestling and his aca- recently sig
demics," Citrus wrestling coach Jeff Wood Marietta, Ga.,
said of Cabanas. "He doesn't mind going into career. Pictur
the room and putting in the three-hour Delia Williams,
practice." Doran and Bo
Cabanas will get his opportunity on doing Assistant Princil
just that at Life University, located in Mari- head wrestling cc
etta, Georgia. The 145-pounder, who compiled Athk
a 35-15 record his senior year, has officially


ready
Sand wrestle at the NAIA-
for the most basic of rea-
Shome," he said. Cabanas
y for only two years, but
he has the skill and com-
of those kids, he's a hard
f I say jump he says 'how
ch said. "If I had a morn-
Sthere, if I had an after-
go there. He helped with
See Page B3
ol senior Tarique Cabanas
ned with Life University in
, to continue his wrestling
ed, front row, left to right,
Tarique Cabanas, Glorida
b Doran. Back row, Citrus
pal Deon Copeland, Citrus
coach Jeff Wood and Citrus
etic Director Larry Bishop.
Special to the Chronicle


to succeed at Life


Au revoir Wawrinka


Australian champ stunned in French opener; Nadal and Djokovic cruise


Associated Press
Stan Wawrinka throws his head back Monday after missing a return during a first-round match of the French Open against
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France. Wawrinka, the 2014 Australian Open champion and
No. 3 seed in Paris, lost in four sets.




Blue Jays rout Tampa Bay 10-5


Associated Press
PARIS The positive vibes and
big-deal victories began for Stan
Wawrinka at last year's U.S. Open,
back when he still went by "Stanis-
las," and picked up steam at this
year's Australian Open, where he
earned the right to forever be called
"major champion."
And yet all of that seemed so far
away late Monday at the French
Open as dusk approached and de-
feat became apparent in
Wawrinka's first Grand Slam match
since winning his first major title.
Surprisingly, Wawrinka looked
listless. More stunningly, he looked
very little like a guy who was seeded
No. 3 behind Rafael Nadal and
Novak Djokovic and proclaimed
himself "one of the favorites" just a
few days earlier In by far the biggest
development of the tournament's
first two days, Wawrinka lost in the
first round at Roland Garros with a
6-4, 5-7, 6-2, 6-0 defeat to 41st-ranked
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez of Spain.
"I was trying to find my game, try-
ing ... to be aggressive, trying to find
anything. And I didn't," said
Wawrinka, whose trademark one-
handed backhanded was off-target
throughout "I was completely flat."
He is the first Australian Open
champ to exit in the first round of
that year's French Open since Petr
Korda in 1998.
Garcia-Lopez has never been past
the third round at a major
During a pre-tournament news
conference Friday, Wawrinka spoke
about deriving confidence from his
recent spate of success.
Long in the shadow of Roger Fed-
erer, his Swiss Davis Cup and
Olympic teammate, not to mention
good friend, Wawrinka reached his
first major semifinal in New York
last September, beating defending
champion Andy Murray before los-
ing a five-setter to Djokovic. In Jan-
uary, Wawrinka topped Nadal in the
Australian Open final.
Boosting his clay-court bona tides
heading to Paris, Wawrinka de-
feated Federer in April's final at the
Monte Carlo Masters.
While he's never been beyond the
quarterfinals at the French Open,
Wawrinka seemed primed to do so.
Instead, he lost in the first round
in Paris for the first time since 2006,
when he was only 21.
"I need to put the puzzle back to-
gether, but differently than in the
past," Wawrinka said, "because now
- after winning a Grand Slam,
(Monte Carlo), being No. 3 in the
world everything is different."
See Page B3


Rays'four-game winning

streak snapped in Toronto

Associated Press
TORONTO Edwin Encarnacion hit his 13th
home run in May, Dioner Navarro and Steve
Tolleson added back-to-back shots and the
Toronto Blue Jays won their seventh straight
game Monday, beating the Tampa Bay Rays 10-5.
Melky Cabrera had three hits and three RBIs
as the AL East-leading Blue Jays won for the 12th
time in 14 games.
Toronto has hit at least one home run in nine
straight games and leads the majors with 73 this


season, including an ML-best 41 in May
David DeJesus, Desmond Jennings and James
Loney all hit solo homers for the Rays, whose
season-high four-game winning streak was
snapped.
Drew Hutchison wasn't at his best, but bene-
fited from strong run support to win his career-
best third straight start
Hutchison (4-3) allowed five runs and seven hits
in five innings, matched a season-worst with four
See Page B3
Toronto's Brett Lawrie, bottom, slides safe
into second base Monday past Tampa Bay
shortstop Yunel Escobar after Lawrie hit
a double during the fifth inning in Toronto.
Associated Press




B2 TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NL

Marlins 3,
Nationals 2
Miami Washington
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Yelichl If 4 0 0 0 Span cf 4 0 0 0
Dietrch2b 3 1 1 0 Rendon3b 3 00 0
Stantonrf 4 23 2 Werthrf 4 1 1 0
McGeh3b 4 02 1 LaRochlb 4 1 1 2
GJoneslb 4 00 0 WRamsc 4 0 1 0
Sltlmch c 3 00 0 Dsmndss 4 00 0
Ozuna cf 4 0 1 0 Espinos2b 2 00 0
Hchvrrss 3 00 0 Frndsnph 1 00 0
Eovaldip 2 00 0 McLothl If 2 00 0
MDunnp 0 00 0 Roarkp 1 00 0
RJhnsnph 1 00 0 Dobbsph 0 00 0
ARamsp 0 00 0 TMooreph 1 00 0
Cishekp 0 00 0 Clipprdp 0 00 0
Blevins p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 37 3 Totals 30 2 3 2
Miami 102 000 000 3
Washington 000 002 000 2
E-Dietrich (8). DP Washington 1. LOB-
Miami 4, Washington 5. 2B-Stanton (13),
McGehee (12), WRamos (3). HR-Stanton (15),
LaRoche (6). SB-McLouth (3). CS-Saltala-
macchia (1). S-Roark.
IP H RERBBSO


Pirates 5, Mets 3
Pittsburgh NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
JHrrsnrf 5 0 0 0 Lagars cf 3 1 1 0
NWalkr2b 4 1 2 0 DnMrp2b 4 0 1 1
AMcCtcf 3 1 2 0 DWrght3b 4 00 0
I.Davislb 2 00 0 Grndrsl If 3 00 0
GSnchzlb 2 22 2 BAreurf 4 02 0
RMartn c 5 0 1 1 CTorrsp 0 00 0
PAIvrz3b 4 0 2 0 Duda lb 4 1 2 1
SMartel If 4 1 1 0 Floresss 4 00 0
Mercerss 3 00 0 Centen c 4 00 0
Tabataph 1 0 1 1 deGrmp 2 1 2 0
Watsonp 1 0 1 0 Familip 0 00 0
Melncnp 0 00 0 CYoungph 1 00 0
Cumptnp 2 00 0 Ricep 0 00 0
Sniderph 0 00 0 Valvrdp 0 00 0
JHughsp 0 00 0 dnDkkrrf 1 00 0
Barmes ph-ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 5124 Totals 343 8 2
Pittsburgh 000 000 023 5
NewYork 000 020 001 3
E-RAIvarez (11), Mercer (3), J.Harrison (1),
Granderson (2). DP-Pittsburgh 2, New York 1.
LOB-Pittsburgh 13, NewYork 6.2B-R.Martin
(3), RAIvarez (3), S.Marte (9), B.Abreu (4). HR-
G.Sanchez (5), Duda (6). SB Tabata (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
Cumpton 6 7 2 1 1 1
J.Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 0
WatsonW,5-0 1 0 0 0 1 0
MelanconS,10-12 1 1 1 1 0 2
NewYork
deGrom 62/35 0 0 5 4
FamiliaH,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
RiceH,5 2/3 1 1 1 0 0
ValverdeL,1-1 2/3 4 4 4 1 0
C.Torres 2/3 2 0 0 1 1
Phillies 9, Rockies 0
Colorado Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Blckmn cf 4 02 0 Revere cf 5 03 1
Cuddyrrf 4 0 1 0 Rollinsss 4 1 0 0
Tlwtzkss 4 02 0 Brigncss 0 00 0
LeMahi2b 0 00 0 Utley2b 4 33 1
CGnzlzlf 2 0 0 0 Howard lb 4 23 5
Pachec lb 0 00 0 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Rosario c 4 00 0 DeFrtsp 0 00 0
Mornealb 3 0 1 0 Byrdrf 4 00 0
Ottavinp 0 00 0 DBrwnl If 2 1 1 0
Rutledg2b 4 0 0 0 MAdmsp 0 00 0
Culersn3b 4 0 1 0 Mayrryph-lb 1 1 1 2
Chacinp 0 00 0 Ruizc 4 0 1 0
Kahnlep 0 00 0 CHrndz3b 4 00 0
Barnesph 1 00 0 Kndrckp 2 00 0
Massetp 0 00 0 GwynJ If 1 1 0 0
Brothrsp 0 0 0 0
Dickrsn If 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 070 Totals 35912 9
Colorado 000 000 000 0
Philadelphia 000 112 50x 9
E Tulowitzki (1). DP-Colorado 1, Philadelphia
2. LOB-Colorado 9, Philadelphia 4. 2B-Utley
(21). HR-Howard (8), Mayberry (2). S-Chacin.
IP H RERBBSO


ab r h bi
5 2 2 0 Heywrd rf
S3 2 0 0 BUptoncf
S3 1 1 2 FFrmnlb
3 1 1 4 J.Upton lf
5 0 1 1 CJhnsn3b
2 00 0 Smmnsss
4 1 1 0 R.Pena2b
3 00 1 Laird c
1 0 1 0 ESantnp
0 0 0 0 Pstrnckph
0 1 0 0 A.Wood p
0 00 0 Thomsp
0 0 0 0 Avilan p
1 0 0 0 Doumitph
0 00 0 DCrpntp
1 0 0 0 Hale p
0000
0000
31 878 Totals
001 050 200
003 300 000


DP-Boston 2, Atlanta 1. LOB-Boston 6, At-
lanta 9.2B-Holt(4), B.Upton (9), J.Upton 2(11).
3B-G.Sizemore (2). HR-D.Ortiz (12). SF-
D.Ortiz, Bradley Jr..
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Buchholz 3 4 6 6 8 4
Badenhop 1 2 0 0 0 0
Capuano 1 0 0 0 0 1
MujicaW,2-1 1 0 0 0 1 0
TazawaH,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
A.MillerH,2 1 1 0 0 0 2
UeharaS,10-10 1 1 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
E.Santana 5 5 6 6 3 6
A.Wood 1 0 0 0 1 1
Thomas L,1-2 2/3 2 2 2 2 0
Avilan 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 0 2
Hale 1 0 0 0 1 0


East Division
GB WC


Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Minnesota
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
19 .596 3-7 L-3 14-11
27 .491 5 2/2 5-5 W-1 14-12
25 .490 5 2/2 4-6 L-1 13-11
25 .479 5/2 3 5-5 L-4 12-12
28 .462 61/ 4 5-5 L-2 15-11


Str Home Away
W-7 14-11 16-11
W-3 11-11 16-12
W-2 11-12 15-11
L-1 12-14 11-15
W-1 10-17 11-12



Str Home Away
L-1 18-11 10-11
W-1 20-8 7-17
L-1 14-13 11-13
W-1 10-14 12-12
L-1 11-17 11-11


W
Oakland 31
Los Angeles 28
Texas 26
Seattle 25
Houston 19


Toronto
NewYork
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Boston




Atlanta
Miami
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork


West Division
L Pct GB WC
20 .608 -
22 .560 2/2 -
25 .510 5 1/2
25 .500 5/ 2
32 .373 12 8%


West Division
t GB WC


Str Home
W-1 13-10
L-1 15-13
W-3 13-13
W-1 11-12
W-2 10-15



Str Home
L-1 17-9
L-2 16-7
W-1 9-13
L-1 14-15
W-1 7-18


.......- .


Associated Press
Boston's Dustin Pedroia flips over Atlanta's Justin Upton after throwing to first base for the double play
Monday during the sixth inning in Atlanta, Ga. The Red Sox snapped a 10-game losing streak with an 8-6 win.



Red Sox snap losing streak


Stanton hits NL-

leading 15th HR,

Marlins top Nats

Associated Press

ATLANTA David Ortiz home-
red and drove in four runs as the
Boston Red Sox ended their
10-game losing streak, rallying
from a five-run deficit to defeat
the Atlanta Braves 8-6 on Monday
The defending World Series
champions trailed 6-1 after the
fourth, with starter Clay Buchholz
walking a career-high eight in only
three-plus innings.
But Ortiz tied it by hitting a
three-run homer off Ervin San-
tana in the fifth. With Red Sox fans
at Turner Field chanting "Papi!
Papi!" the World Series MVP then
gave Boston the lead with a bases-
loaded sacrifice fly off Ian Thomas
(1-2) in the seventh.
The Red Sox came back to end
their worst skid since an 11-game
slide in 1994.
American League
Rangers 7, Twins 2
MINNEAPOLIS Nick Tepesch
won his second consecutive start,
Elvis Andrus and Chris Gimenez each
had two RBIs, and the Texas Rangers
beat the Minnesota Twins 7-2.
Tepesch (2-0) allowed two runs in
6 2/3 innings, striking out four to win
consecutive starts for the first time in
his career.
Alex Rios added two more hits and
now has six straight multi-hit games.
Trevor Plouffe homered and Ed-
uardo Escobar had two hits and an
RBI for the Twins.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Boston 8, Atlanta 6
Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2
Texas 7, Minnesota 2
Oakland 10, Detroit 0
Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 1
N.Y Yankees 6, St. Louis 4, 12 innings
Toronto 10, Tampa Bay 5
Houston at Kansas City, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-1) at Toronto (Buehrle 8-1), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Lester 4-6) atAtlanta (Harang 4-4), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (WChen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4),
8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 2-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 4-0), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (McHugh 2-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3),
8:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 4-2) at Minnesota (PHughes 5-1),
8:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2),
8:15 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 6-1) atOakland (Gray 5-1), 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-3) atSeattle (Elias 3-3), 10:10 p m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Boston 8, Atlanta 6
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Mets 3
Miami 3, Washington 2
Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings
Chicago Cubs 8, San Francisco 4
N.Y Yankees 6, St. Louis 4, 12 innings
Philadelphia 9, Colorado 0
Arizona 7, San Diego 5
Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels
1-2), 7:05 p.m.
Miami (H.Alvarez 2-3) at Washington (Treinen 0-2),
7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 4-6) atAtlanta (Harang 4-4), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Volquez 2-4) at N.Y Mets (Niese 3-3),
7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (WChen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4),
8:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2),
8:15 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 2-5) atArizona (Miley 3-5), 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (Simon 6-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 7-1),
10:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-0) at San Francisco (Hud-
son 4-2), 10:15 p.m.

career home run.


White Sox 6, Indians 2 National League
Marlin 3 Natinnals 2


CHICAGO Dayan Viciedo hit a
three-run homer, Conor Gillaspie col-
lected four more hits and the Chicago
White Sox beat the Cleveland Indians
6-2.
Gillaspie went 4 for 4, scored twice
and drove in a run. He became the first
White Sox player to hit three doubles in
a single game since Paul Konerko on
May 26, 2012, against the Indians.

Athletics 10, Tigers 0
OAKLAND, Calif. Kyle Blanks
homered in his home debut at the Col-
iseum and Derek Norris capped Oak-
land's five-homer day with a grand
slam and the Athletics snapped a
season-long four-game losing streak
with a 10-0 win over the Detroit Tigers.
Brandon Moss and Josh Donaldson
each hit their 12th home run and Yoe-
nis Cespedes also went deep for the
As.
That backed another strong start
from Tommy Milone (3-3), who allowed
four hits in 6 2/3 scoreless innings.
Mariners 5, Angels 1
SEATTLE Chris Young pitched
shutout ball until Albert Pujols home-
red in the seventh inning, Robinson
Cano had three hits and two RBIs to
raise his average to .332, and the
Seattle Mariners beat the Angels 5-1.
The Mariners scored five runs in the
first two innings off Tyler Skaggs (4-2).
Young (4-2) kept the Angels with-
out a hit until Kole Calhoun's single
with one out in the sixth inning. An
inning later, Pujols hit his 506th


II 1.ll %F I! R61U U1.V 0 KI .
WASHINGTON Giancarlo Stan-
ton hit his NL-leading 15th home run
and also doubled and singled in his
latest power performance at Nationals
Park, leading the Miami Marlins over
Washington 3-2.
Stanton doubled and scored in the
first inning, then launched a long two-
run homer in the third.
Stanton is hitting .333 (43 for 129)
with 14 home runs and 27 RBIs in
Washington since his career began in
2010.
Nathan Eovaldi (4-2) pitched 6 1/3
innings, giving up two runs and three
hits. Steve Cishek worked the ninth for
his 11th save.

Pirates 5, Mets 3
NEW YORK Gaby Sanchez
tagged the Mets again, delivering a
pinch-hit homer in the eighth inning and
a tiebreaking single in the ninth that
started the Pittsburgh Pirates' 5-3, come-
from-behind victory over New York.
Sanchez upped his average against
the Mets to .324 and has 34 RBIs vs.
New York, his best numbers against any
NL team. He homered off Scott Rice
while hitting for Ike Davis, who was mak-
ing his return to Citi Field after being
traded to the Pirates in mid-April.
Mets reliever Jose Valverde (1-1) was
booed off the field after allowing pinch-
hitter Jose Tabata's tying single in the
eighth. Valverde returned for the ninth
with the score 2-all and was even worse.
Tony Watson (5-0) pitched an inning for
the win. Mark Melancon got his 10Oth save.


Cubs 8, Giants 4
SAN FRANCISCO -Jeff
Samardzija struck out a season-high
10 for his first win since last August,
leading the Chicago Cubs past the
San Francisco Giants 8-4.
Samardzija (1-4) allowed six hits
and walked none in seven-plus in-
nings. He also had an RBI double dur-
ing a three-run fourth to help snap his
16-start winless streak.
Samardzija entered with six no-
decisions in his first 10 outings this
year despite leading the majors with a
1.46 ERA.

Phillies 9, Rockies 0
PHILADELPHIA- Ryan Howard
had five RBIs and Kyle Kendrick pitched
into the seventh inning to snap his 10-
game losing streak as the Philadelphia
Phillies beat the Colorado Rockies 9-0.
Kendrick (1-5) allowed six hits over
6 2/3 innings to earn his first win since
last Aug. 6, a span of 16 winless starts.
Jhoulys Chacin (0-4) gave up four
runs and seven hits in five-plus innings.

Diamondbacks 7,
Padres 5
PHOENIX-A.J. Pollock hit a two-
out, two-run homer on the first pitch he
saw in the ninth inning to give the Ari-
zona Diamondbacks a 7-5 victory over
the San Diego Padres.
It was the first game-ending homer of
Pollock's career.
Yonder Alonso hit a three-run homer
and Everth Cabrera launched a solo
shot off Arizona starter Brandon
McCarthy.
Martin Prado doubled in a run and
singled for the Diamondbacks.
Brad Ziegler (1-1) pitched two score-
less innings to get the win.
Interleague
Yankees 6,
Cardinals 4, 12 inn.
ST. LOUIS Brian Roberts hit a
tiebreaking single in a three-run 12th
inning after Brett Gardner's leaping
catch at the left-field fence helped
save the New York Yankees in a 6-4
victory over the St. Louis Cardinals.
Pinch-hitter Alfonso Soriano and
Brendan Ryan each added an RBI for
the Yankees, who took the opener of a
three-game interleague series for their
third straight win. Alfredo Aceves (1-2)
worked two scoreless innings and
David Robertson earned his 11th save
in 12 chances.
Jon Jay had an RBI double in the
12th for the Cardinals, who lost for the
third time in 12 games.

Orioles 7,
Brewers 6, 10 inn.
MILWAUKEE Jonathan Schoop hit
two home runs and newly acquired Nick
Hundley singled in the go-ahead run in
the 10th inning as the Baltimore Orioles
rallied past the Milwaukee Brewers 7-6.
Down 6-4 with two outs in the ninth,
the Orioles rallied off Milwaukee closer
Francisco Rodriguez. Schoop's second
homer cut it to one. After pinch-hitter Del-
mon Young singled, Nick Markakis hit a
game-tying double.
With two outs in the 10th, J.J. Hardy
doubled off Rob Wooten (1-2). He
scored on a single by Hundley. Darren
O'Day (2-0) pitched a scoreless inning of
relief to get the win. Zach Britton pitched
out of trouble in the 10Oth, to record his
third save in three opportunities.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 30 22 .577 3-7 L-1 14-11 16-11
St. Louis 28 23 .549 1/2 7-3 L-1 14-8 14-15
Pittsburgh 23 27 .460 6 3/2 6-4 W-1 16-13 7-14
Cincinnati 22 26 .458 6 3/2 4-6 L-2 12-12 10-14
Chicago 19 30 .388 9/2 7 6-4 W-1 10-13 9-17


Baltimore


Milwaukee


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Markksrf 5 1 2 1 Segurass 5 12 2
Machd3b 4 1 1 0 Braunrf 5 01 1
A.Jones cf 5 1 2 2 Lucroyc 4 1 1 0
N.Cruzl If 4 0 1 1 EHerrrpr 0 00 0
Pearcelb 5 0 0 0 Maldndc 0 00 0
Hardyss 5 1 3 0 CGomzcf 3 01 0
Hundlyc 5 0 1 1 MrRynl3b 4 00 1
Schoop2b 5 2 3 2 Gennett2b 5 0 1 0
Tillmanp 2 0 0 0 KDavisl If 4 24 1
R.Webbp 0 00 0 Overaylb 2 21 1
Clevngrph 1 00 0 Lohsep 3 00 0
Brach p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0
DYongph 1 0 1 0 RWeksph 1 00 0
Loughpr 0 1 0 0 FrRdrgp 0 00 0
O'Dayp 0 00 0 Wootenp 0 00 0
ZBrittn p 0 0 0 0 Faluph 1 0 0 0
Totals 42 7147 Totals 37611 6
Baltimore 003 000 102 1 7
Milwaukee 101 202 000 0 6
E-Hundley (1). DP-Baltimore 2, Milwaukee 2.
LOB-Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 9.2B-Markakis
(8), N.Cruz (11), Hardy 2 (11), Segura (7), Braun
(8), Gennett (9), K.Davis (14). 3B-A.Jones (2),
Segura (2). HR-Schoop 2 (5), K.Davis (7),
Overbay (2). CS-C.Gomez (2). S-C.Gomez.
SF-Mar.Reynolds.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
Tillman 52/37 6 6 4 7
R.Webb 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Brach 2 2 0 0 1 2
O'DayW,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Z.BrittonS,3-3 1 1 0 0 1 0
Milwaukee
Lohse 62/39 4 4 0 5
KintzlerH,3 11/30 0 0 1 0
Fr.Rodriguez 1 3 2 2 1 0
WootenL,1-2 1 2 1 1 0 1
T-3:42. A-42,889 (41,900).
Yankees 6,
Cardinals 4, 12 inn.
NewYork St. Louis


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Gardnrlf 4 1 1 1 MCrpnt3b-rf 6 1 1 0
Jeterss 5 0 1 0 Wong2b 6 02 1
Ellsurycf 4 1 1 1 Hollidyl If 4 1 1 0
McCnnc 4 1 0 0 MAdmslb 5 12 0
Solarte3b 4 00 0 YMolin c 4 00 0
ISuzukirf 3 2 0 0 Craigrf 5 0 1 1
BRorts2b 5 1 2 1 Mottep 0 00 0
KJhnsnlb 4 0 1 1 JhPerltss 4 1 1 1
Acevesp 0 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 00 0
ASorinph 0 00 1 Rosnthlp 0 00 0
DvRrtsp 0 00 0 Neshekp 0 00 0
Whitleyp 2 0 0 0 Choatep 0 00 0
Claiornp 0 0 0 0 Descals3b 1 00 0
Thrntnp 0 00 0 Wachap 2 00 0
ZAImntph 1 00 0 Roinsnph 1 00 0
Betncsp 0 00 0 CMrtnzp 0 00 0
Ryanlb 2 0 1 1 Jay cf 2 02 1
Totals 38 676 Totals 44410 4
NewYork 100 020 000 003 6
St. Louis 100 002 000 001 4
E-Jeter (4). DP-New York 1, St. Louis 1.
LOB-NewYork 4, St. Louis 7. 2B Wong (4),
Holliday (13), Jay (6). 3B-M.Carpenter (1).
SB-Ellsbury (12). CS-Gardner (1), Wong (1).
S-Solarte. SF-Gardner, A.Soriano, Jh.Peralta.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Whitley 5 8 3 3 0 2
ClaiborneBS,l-1 11/30 0 0 0 0
Thornton 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Betances 2 0 0 0 0 2
AcevesW,1-2 2 1 0 0 0 0
Dav.RobertsonS 1 1 1 0 0 2
St. Louis
Wacha 7 4 3 3 2 2
C.Martinez 2 1 0 0 0 2
Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 0 1
Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0
Choate L,0-2 1/3 1 3 3 2 0
Motte 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
Whitley pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
T-3:41.A-47,311 (45,399).


Rays schedule
May 27 atToronto
May 28 atToronto
May 30 at Boston
May 31 at Boston
June 1 at Boston
June 2 at Miami
June 3 at Miami
June 4 vs. Miami
June 5 vs. Miami


East Division
GB WC


San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


BASEBALL


Miami
Eovaldi W,4-2
M.Dunn H,7
A.Ramos H,7
Cishek S,11-12
Washington
Roark L,3-3
Clippard
Blevins


61/33 2
2/3 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 0


2 1 5
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 0 1


753314
120001
100002
7 5 3 3 1 4
1 2 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


Colorado
Chacin L,0-4
Kahnle
Masset
Brothers
Ottavino
Philadelphia
K.KendrickW,1-5
Mi.Adams
Bastardo
De Fratus


4 1 5
0 0 1
2 1 0
3 0 1
0 0 0


62/36 0
1/3 1 0
1 0 0
1 0 0


Interleague
Red Sox 8, Braves 6


Atlanta


Boston

Holt3b
Bogarts ss
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortiz 1lb
Przyns c
JGoms rf
GSizmr If
BrdlyJr cf
Bchhlz p
Badnhp p
Nava ph
Capuan p
Mujica p
Lvrnwy ph
Tazawa p
Carp ph
AMiller p
Uehara p
Totals
Boston
Atlanta


ab r h bi
2210
5111
2 2 1 0
2200
4123
5020
5 401 1

4000
2 2 0 0
4 1 2 3
5 0 2 0
4 301 1
24 000
1000
0000
0000
0000
1000
0000
3 0 1 1


2 0000
1 0 0 0



330 0608 6
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

336 8 6
8
6


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Blue Jays 10, Rays 5
Tampa Bay Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DeJessdh 4 1 2 1 Reyesss 4 1 1 1
Longori3b 4 1 1 0 MeCarr If 3 13 3
Joyce If 2 1 1 0 Bautistdh 5 0 1 1
Forsythph 1 00 0 Encrnclb 5 23 1
DJnngs cf 4 1 2 2 Lawrie3b-2b 5 1 2 1
Loneylb 4 1 1 2 DNavrrc 5 22 2
Myersrf 3 0 1 0 StTIIsn2b 2 1 1 1
CFigur 2b 4 0 1 0 JFrncs ph-3b 1 1 0 0
YEscorss 4 0 1 0 Pillarrf 4 1 1 0
Hanign c 2 0 0 0 Gose cf 3 0 1 0
JMolin ph-c 2 0 0 0
Totals 34 5105 Totals 37101510
Tampa Bay 002 030 000 5
Toronto 200 341 00x 10
E-C.Figueroa (1). LOB-Tampa Bay 9, Toronto
8.2B-Joyce (8), Me.Cabrera (13), Encarnacion
(14), Lawrie (8), Pillar (3). HR-DeJesus (5),
De.Jennings (5), Loney (2), Encarnacion (15),
D.Navarro (2), St.Tolleson (2). SB-Longoria (2).
S-Gose. SF-Loney, Me.Cabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
BedardL,2-3 4 12 8 7 0 2
Colome 4 3 2 2 3 0
Toronto
HutchisonW,4-3 5 7 5 5 4 0
Loup 2 2 0 0 1 2
Redmond 1 1 0 0 1 1
Rasmussen 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bedard pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
WP-Bedard.
T-2:58.A-15,616 (49,282).
White Sox 6,
Indians 2
Cleveland Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 Eaton cf 4 00 0
Aviles2b 4 02 0 Semien2b 4 21 0
Brantly If 3 1 2 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 2 4 1
ACarerdh 4 0 0 0 Viciedodh 4 22 3
Raburnrf-1b4 0 2 1 A.Dunnlb 3 00 0
Swisherib 3 0 1 0 AIRmrzss 4 0 1 1
DvMrpph-rfl 0 0 0 DeAzalf 4 0 1 1
YGomsc 4 00 0 Flowrs c 2 00 0
Chsnhll3b 3 1 0 0 Nietoc 2 00 0
Sellersss 3 0 1 0 Sierrarf 3 00 0
Totals 34 28 2 Totals 34 6 9 6
Cleveland 001 001 000 2
Chicago 003 002 10x 6
E-Chisenhall (8), Semien (8). DP-Chicago 1.
LOB-Cleveland 8, Chicago 5. 2B-Gillaspie 3
(12). HR-Viciedo (5). SB-Brantley (8), De Aza
(6).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
TomlinL,3-2 5 5 5 2 1 8
Outman 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Shaw 2/3 2 0 0 0 2
Rzepczynski 1/3 2 1 1 0 0
Carrasco 12/30 0 0 0 1
Chicago
QuintanaW,3-4 6 5 2 2 2 5
PetrickaH,4 1 0 0 0 0 0
Putnam 2/3 3 0 0 0 2
S.DownsS,1-1 11/30 0 0 1 1
Tomlin pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
T-3:22.A-17,075 (40,615).
Interleague
Orioles 7,
Brewers 6, 10 inn.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


French Open
Monday, At Stade Roland Garros, Paris,
Purse: $34.12 million (Grand Slam),
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men Here
First Round iere
Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Kei Nishikori (9), M On C
Japan, 7-6 (4), 6-1, 6-2.
Kenny de Schepper, France, def. Albert Mon-
tanes, Spain, 3-1, retired.
Benoit Paire, France, def. Alejandro Falla,
Colombia, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4). 0
JiriVesely, Czech Republic, def. Lukas Rosol,
Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 7-5.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Nikolay Davy-
denko, Russia, 7-5, 6-4, 6-2.
Marin Cilic (25), Croatia, def. Pablo Andujar,
Spain, 6-0, 6-3, 7-6 (6).
Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Ivan Dodig,
Croatia, 2-2, retired.
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Joao Sousa,
Portugal, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4.
Gilles Simon (29), France, def. Ante Pavic,
Croatia, 6-1, 6-1, 6-3.
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. David Goffin, Bel- S
gium, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4. Sun&
Tommy Robredo (17), Spain, def. James F
Ward, Britain, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4. Fantasy 5
Alejandro Gonzalez, Colombia, def. Michael 5-of-5
Russell, United States, 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 6-1. 4-of-5
Roberto Bautista Agut(27), Spain, def. Paolo 3-of-5
Lorenzi, Italy, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2.
Feliciano Lopez (26), Spain, def. Damir
Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-3, 7-6 (8), 6-3.
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Robby Ginepri,
United States, 6-0, 6-3, 6-0.
Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Vasek
Pospisil (30), Canada, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.
Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Benjamin
Becker, Germany, 6-2, 6-4, 3-6, 4-6, 6-2.
Fabio Fognini (14), Italy, def. Andreas Beck,
Germany, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. 7 p.m. (E
Adrian Mannarino, France, def.Yen-hsun Lu, 7 p.m. (F
Taiwan, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1. p
Tobias Kamke, Germany, def. Miloslav Mecir, 7 p.m. (S
Slovakia, 7-5, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (1). Blue Jay
Facundo Bagnis, Argentina, def. Julien Ben- 10 p.m. I
neteau, France, 6-1, 6-2, 1-6, 3-6, 18-16.
Ernests Gulbis (18), Latvia, def. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 4-6, 6-4, 7-5, 6-1. 9 p.m. (1
DominicThiem, Austria, def. Paul-Henri Math- Western
ieu, France, 6-4, 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Donald Young, United States, def. Dudi Sela,
Israel, 6-1, 2-6, 6-1, 6-0. 5 p.m. (G
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Nicolas Semifina
Mahut, France, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-4.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. James Duck- 8 p.m. (
worth, Australia, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (2).
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Stan Eastern
Wawrinka (3), Switzerland, 6-4, 5-7, 6-2, 6-0.
Women 7:45 p.rm
First Round Kansas (
Maria Sharapova (7), Russia, def. Ksenia Kansas
Pervak, Russia, 6-1, 6-2. 9:55 p.rm
Dominika Cibulkova (9), Slovakia, def. Vir- Azerbaijc
ginie Razzano, France, 7-5, 6-0.
Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Karin Knapp, 5 a.m. (E
Italy, 6-4, 6-0. am (
Sabine Lisicki (16), Germany, def. Fiona 9 a.m. (E
Ferro, France, 6-1, 7-5. 10 a.m. (
Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Alison Van Uyt- 6 p.m. (1
vanck, Belgium, 6-2, 7-6 (5).
Timea Bacsinszky, Switzerland, def. Maryna
Zanevska, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-4. Note: Til
Flavia Pennetta (12), Italy, def. Patricia Mayr- discretion
Achleitner, Austria, 6-2, 6-2.
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Lau-
ren Davis, United States, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4.
Eugenie Bouchard (18), Canada, def. Shahar
Peer, Israel, 6-0, 6-2. x-Chicago at
Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Roberta S
Vinci (17), Italy, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. x-NY Ranger
Sam Stosur(19), Australia, def. Monica Puig,
Puerto Rico, 6-1, 6-1. x-Los Angele
Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def. Romina
Oprandi, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-2.
Elena Vesnina (32), Russia, def. Christina
McHale, United States, 7-6 (0), 4-6, 6-3.
Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, def. Anna- Range
Lena Friedsam, Germany, 6-7 (3), Texas
Alize Cornet (20), France, def. Ashleigh Barty, ab
Australia, 6-2, 6-1. Choo dh 5
Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Andrusss 5
Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Morlnd lb 5
Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Michelle ABeltre3b 4
Larcher de Brito, Portugal, 6-2, 6-3. Rios rf 3
TaylorTownsend, United States, def. Vania Gimenzc 4
King, United States, 7-5, 6-1. LMartn cf 4
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def. Nadiya Choice If 4
Kichenok, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-1. Odor2b 4
Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Anna Tatishvili,
United States, 6-1,6-4. Totals 38
Andrea Petkovic (28), Germany, def. Misaki Texas
Doi, Japan, 6-3, 6-3. Minnesota
Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def. Za- E-Correia (3)
rina Diyas, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-2. 2B-Andrus (
Sharon Fichman, Canada, leads Jelena Choice (3), Ar
Jankovic (6), Serbia, 7-5, 1-5, susp., darkness. Plouffe (4). SB-


NBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE FINALS
Best-of-7
x-if necessary
Sunday, May 18
Indiana 107, Miami 96
Monday, May 19
San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105
Tuesday, May 20
Miami 87, Indiana 83
Wednesday, May 21
San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77
Saturday, May 24
Miami 99, Indiana 87
Sunday, May 25
Oklahoma City 106, San Antonio 97, San An-
tonio leads series 2-1
Monday, May 26
Miami 102, Indiana 90, Miami leads series 3-1
Today
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 28
Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 29
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Friday, May 30
x-lndiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 31
x-San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 1
x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, June 2
x-Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.



NHL Playoffs
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Saturday, May 17
N.Y Rangers 7, Montreal 2
Sunday, May 18
Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1
Monday, May 19
NY Rangers 3, Montreal 1
Wednesday, May 21
Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2
Thursday, May 22
Montreal 3, NY Rangers 2, OT
Saturday, May 24
Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3, Los Angeles leads
series 2-1
Sunday, May 25
NY Rangers 3, Montreal 2, OT, N.Y Rangers
lead series 3-1
Monday, May 26
Chicago at Los Angeles, late
Today
NY Rangers at Montreal, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, May 28
Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Thursday, May 29
x-Montreal at NY Rangers, 8 p.m.


Texas
Tepesch W,2-0
Frasor H,6
Cotts
Minnesota
Correia L,2-6
Burton
Duensing


Dr the


= Florid LOTTERY


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=On the AIRWAVES =


TODAY'S SPORTS
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
ESPN) Boston Red Sox atAtlanta Braves
:SNFL) Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals
SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto
s
(ESPN) Cincinnati Reds at Los Angeles Dodgers
NBA PLAYOFFS
*NT) San Antonio Spurs at Oklahoma City Thunder.
Conference Final, game 4
COLLEGE GOLF
3OLF) NCAA Men's Championship, Match Play
Is
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
IBCSPT) New York Rangers at Montreal Canadiens.
Conference Final, game 5
SOCCER
n. (ESPN2) MLS: New York Red Bulls at Sporting
city
n. (ESPN2) International Friendly: United States vs.
an
TENNIS
-SPN2) 2014 French Open First Round
-SPN2) 2014 French Open First Round
(TENNIS) 2014 French Open First Round
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Friday, May 30
Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Saturday, May 31
rs at Montreal, 8 p.m.
Sunday, June 1
ls at Chicago, 8 p.m.



rs 7, Twins 2


Minnesota
r h bi
1 1 0 Dozier2b
1 3 2 Mauerlb
0 0 0 Plouffe 3b
0 0 0 Arcia rf
22 0 Wlngh If
2 2 2 Kubeldh
01 1 Nunezph
0 1 1 KSuzukc
1 1 0 A.Hickscf
EEscor ss
7116 Totals
020 020 030
110 000 000


ab r h bi
4000
4010
4111
4010
3100
3000
1000
4020
4020
3021
4 0 1 09 2
4 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
3 1 0 0
3 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
4 0 2 0
4 0 2 0
3 0 2 1
342 9 2
7
2


. LOB-Texas 5, Minnesota 6.
13), Rios (12), Gimenez (2),
cia (1), E.Escobar (15). HR-
-Andrus (13), Rios (9).
IP H RERBBSO


62/37 2 2 0 4
1 1 0 0 0 1
11/31 0 0 0 1


7 7 4
1 3 3
1 1 0


HBP-by Tepesch (Willingham).
T-2:52. A-30,571 (39,021).
Athletics 10, Tigers 0


Detroit

RDavis If
AJcksn cf
MiCarr lb
VMrtnz dh
TrHntr rf
Cstllns 3b
Holady c
Worth 2b
AnRmn ss


Oakland
r h bi
0 1 0 Crispcf
0 0 0 DNorrsc
0 1 0 Dnldsn 3b
0 2 0 Cespds If
0 0 0 Lowrie ss
0 0 0 Moss dh
0 0 0 Callasp2b
0 0 0 Blanks lb
0 1 0 Gentryrf


Totals 33 050 Totals
10
Detroit 000 000 000
Oakland 022 200 04x


ab r h bi
4111
5114
5132
5111
4010
4111
4110
3321
2100
361011
4 1 1 1
5 11 4
5 13 2
5 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
4 1 1 1
4 11 0
3 3 2 1
2 1 0 0
361011


E-An.Romine (6), Holaday (3), Castellanos
(3), Lowrie (6). LOB-Detroit 8, Oakland 7.
2B-Mi.Cabrera (18), An.Romine (2). HR-
D.Norris (5), Donaldson (12), Cespedes (9),
Moss (12), Blanks (1). SF-Crisp.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Smyly L,2-3
Knebel
Coke
Oakland


586623
220002
114211
5 8 6 6 2 3
2 2 0 0 0 2
1 1 4 2 1 1


MiloneW,3-3 62/34 0 0 2 6
Otero 11/31 0 0 0 0
Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 1
T-2:53. A-35,067 (35,067).
Mariners 5, Angels I


Los Angeles
ab
HKndrc 2b 4
Trout cf 4
Pujolslb 4
Freese 3b 3
Ibanez If 2
Aybarss 3
Cron dh 3
Congerc 2
lannett ph-c 1


Seattle
r h bi
0 0 0 J.Jonescf
0 1 0 MSndrsrf
1 1 1 Cano2b
0 0 0 Smoaklb
0 0 0 Zunino c
00 0 Seager3b
00 0 Romerdh
0 0 0 Ackley If
0 0 0 Frnkln ss


ab r h bi
4210
3221
4 2 1 0
3 2 2 1
4032
2001
4000
3000
4000
3110
3000
2 0 0 1
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 1 0
3 0 0 0


Calhonrf 2 0 1 0
Totals 28 131 Totals 3057 4
Los Angeles 000 000 100 1
Seattle 230 000 00x 5
E-Aybar (4). DP-Los Angeles 1, Seattle 2.
LOB-Los Angeles 3, Seattle 5. 3B-M.Saun-
ders (3). HR-Pujols (14). SB-J.Jones (4),
Cano (4), Ackley (2).


Los Angeles
Skaggs L,4-2


IP H RERBBSO

7 7 5 2 2 8


Kohn 1 0 0 0 2 1
Seattle
C.YoungW,4-2 61/32 1 1 3 5
Furbush 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Farquhar 1 0 0 0 0 1
Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP-Kohn.
T-2:40.A-22,710 (47,476).
Cubs 8, Giants 4


Chicago


ab r h bi
Bonifaccf 4 02 1
Lakel If 5 1 1 0
Rizzolb 5 22 1
SCastross 4 0 0 0
Valuen3b 5 1 2 1
Castilloc 4 1 2 1
Schrhltrf 4 22 1
Barney2b 3 01 2
Smrdzjp 4 1 1 1
Grimmp 0 00 0
NRmrzp 0 00 0



Totals 38 8138
Chicago 001
San Francisco 100


San Francisco


Pagan cf
Pence rf
Posey 1b
Sandovl 3b
Morse If
HSnchz c
BCrwfr ss
B.Hicks 2b
Petit p
Huff ph-p
Kontos p
Blanco ph
J.Lopez p
JGutrrz p
Totals
032 200
200 100


ab r h bi
4110
4 1 1 0
4000
4110
4123
3110
4000
4011
4000
1000
1000
0000
1000
0000
0000
4 1 1 06 4
4 1 2 3
3 1 1 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 1
4 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
344 6 4
8
4


E-Samardzija (2), Huff (1), B.Crawford (5).
DP-San Francisco 1. LOB-Chicago 6, San
Francisco 4. 2B-Rizzo (5), Samardzija (2).
3B-Bonifacio (3), Morse (1). HR-Schierholtz
(1), Sandoval (7). SB-Pagan (10). CS-Boni-


facio (4). SF-Barney.

Chicago
Samardzija W, 1-4
Grimm
N.Ramirez
San Francisco
Petit L,3-2
Huff
Kontos
J.Lopez
J.Gutierrez


IP H RERBBSO


Samardzija pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
PB-H.Sanchez.
T-3:11.A-42,257 (41,915).
Diamondbacks 7,
Padres 5


San Diego

ECarer ss
S.Smith rf
Quentin If
Maybin cf
Headly 3b
Alonso lb
Gyorko 2b
Riverac
Amarst cf-lf
TRoss p
Vincent p
Medica ph
Thayer p
Benoit p
Grandl ph
Qcknsh p
Totals
San Diego
Arizona


ab r h bi
4124
4010
4010
0000
4010
4121
4010
4000
4120
2110
0000
1110
0000
0000
4 1 2 4






1 0 1 00
4 0 1 0





0000
36 5125 0
4 1 2 1
4 0 1 0




4 000





020
If4 1 2 0
2 1 1 0
0 0 0 0
1 1 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 00 0
36 5125
000
020


Arizona

Pollock cf
GParra rf
Gldsch 1 b
MMntr c
Prado 3b
C.Ross If
Owings ss
Pnngtn 2b
McCrth p
Thtchr p
Hill ph
Ziegler p
EChavz ph
Inciart pr


Totals
040 100
003 002


ab r h bi
5232
4110
4111
4011
3121
4110
4000
4 301 1 0



2000
0000
1000
0000
4 1 1 1
4 0 1 1
3 1 2 1
4 1 1 0


14 000
3 0 1 1
2 0 0 0

0100
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 1 0 0


35710 6
5
7


Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Amarista (2), Goldschmidt (5). DP-San
Diego 1, Arizona 2. LOB-San Diego 4, Ari-
zona 4.2B-E.Cabrera (10), S.Smith (13),
Alonso (12), Amarista (3), Medica (2), Prado
(8). HR-E.Cabrera (3), Alonso (3), Pollock
(6). SB-E.Cabrera (11).
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
TRoss 5 9 5 4 0 4
Vincent 1 0 0 0 0 1
Thayer 1 0 0 0 0 0
Benoit 1 0 0 0 1 2
Quackenbush L,0-1 2/3 1 2 2 0 1
Arizona
McCarthy 62/39 5 5 0 4
ThatcherBS,1l-1 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
ZieglerW,1l-1 2 2 0 0 0 3
T.Ross pitched to 5 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Quackenbush (Pennington). WP-
McCarthy.
T-2:59. A-35,580 (48,633).


I S P RTS B RI FS


Associated Press
Indiana guard George Hill, left, and Miami guard Dwyane Wade fight over a
loose ball Monday during the first half of Game 4 in the NBA Eastern
Conference finals in Miami. The Heat took a 3-1 series lead with a 102-90 win.


Heat take command of
East finals, 102-90
MIAMI LeBron James had 32
points and 10 rebounds, Chris Bosh
added 25 points and the Miami Heat
moved one win away from a return trip
to the NBA Finals with a 102-90 win over
the Indiana Pacers on Monday night.
Dwyane Wade scored 15 points for
the Heat, who have won three of the first
four games in the Eastern Conference fi-
nals. They can win the East for a fourth
straight season with a win at Indiana on
Wednesday night.
Miami led wire-to-wire, opening up as
much as a 23-point lead in the final
quarter.
Paul George scored 23 points and
David West added 20 points and 12 re-
bounds for the Pacers, who got 15




CABANAS
Continued from Page BI


the little kids club program.
"He did what he needed to do to be
a solid wrestler."
Others may dodge the feature that
attracts Cabanas to wrestling the
most: the individual responsibility at-
tached to it.
"You can't blame someone else if
you do something wrong, it's your
fault," he said. "You blame yourself
for your mistakes or your
successes."
He has no plans on accepting much
blame.
"Each year he would challenge
himself in the room, he would pick a
partner who would make him work
harder," Wood said. "He never backed
down from a kid he had to wrestle."
It's another trait Cabanas is proud
to attach to himself.
"My dedication, you have to be ded-
icated to it to succeed in wrestling,"
he said.
And that dedication begins with




WAWRINKA
Continued from Page BI


Wawrinka who recently told the
ATP he'd rather go by the shortened
version of his first name finished
with 62 unforced errors, 34 more than
Garcia-Lopez.
"I think what made him lose is he
was not very strong mentally and I
was," said Garcia-Lopez, who thought
the match would be suspended be-
cause of impending darkness; there are
no artificial lights on French Open
courts.
"I'm not as overwhelmed by emo-
tions as I used to be," Garcia-Lopez
said. "I played my game, on my terms."
Wawrinka's loss means yet another
season will pass without one man win-
ning the Australian Open and French
Open; Jim Courier was the last to ac-
complish that double, in 1992.
Another top-10 man lost Monday
when No. 9 Kei Nishikori of Japan was
eliminated by Martin Klizan of Slova-
kia. No. 17 Roberta Vinci of Italy was
the only seeded woman to exit Monday
when winners included 2012 champion
Maria Sharapova and 2011 Wimbledon




RAYS
Continued from Page BI


walks and struck out none.
Toronto jumped on Rays left-hander
Erik Bedard with five straight hits to
start the first. Jose Reyes had a bunt
single and scored on Cabrera's double.
Jose Bautista singled home Cabrera
but was caught in a rundown.
Encarnacion and Brett Lawrie both
singled, but Bedard got Navarro and
Tolleson to fly out
The Rays tied it in the third on a
homer by DeJesus and a sacrifice fly by
Loney, but the Blue Jays reclaimed the
lead with three in the third.
Navarro and Tolleson opened the in-
ning with home runs on consecutive
pitches from Bedard, who'd only al-
lowed one home run in 37 2/3 innings
coming into the game.
It was the third time this season the
Blue Jays have gone back-to-back.
Cabrera made it 5-2 with a two-out RBI
single.


points from George Hill. Lance Stephen-
son was held to nine.

Rays place OF Guyer on
DL, recall RH Colome
TORONTO The Tampa Bay Rays
have placed outfielder Brandon Guyer on
the 15-day disabled list with a broken left
thumb and recalled right-hander Alex
Colome from Single-A Charlotte.
Guyer was injured diving for a ball in
Sunday's victory over Boston. He's bat-
ting .262 with one homer and six RBIs in
28 games.
Colome has not pitched for the Rays
this season after being suspended 50
games in March for a drug violation.
Colome, who was reinstated Sunday,
made three starts for Tampa Bay in
2013, going 1-1 with a 2.25 ERA.
-From wire reports


workouts, which may seem long and
tedious but ultimately pay dividends
on the mat
"I wanted to get into something that
was challenging, more physical," Ca-
banas said. "It gets you mentally ready
for anything."
And he was always ready
"I think the biggest asset Tarique
has is he has a unique style of
wrestling," Wood said. "He's aggres-
sive, he could hit big moves when he
needed to, to win big matches. He def-
initely had the fundamental skills he
had to have to be a good wrestler
"He definitely liked that one-on-
one, let's get out there and see who
the better athlete is. He always en-
joyed that."
As for realizing his athletic goals,
Cabanas knows what path he must
travel and how to travel it.
"Just keep working, working hard, I
always have to have that strength," he
said. "I focus on that match, take it
one match at a time. I don't get ahead
of myself."
In other words, take it one step at a
time and Cabanas has already
taken the initial step.


winner Petra Kvitova.
Nadal and Djokovic, meanwhile,
looked very much like the top two
seeds.
When No. 2 Djokovic's victory was
interrupted by one of the passing show-
ers that made Monday a stop-and-start
affair, he pulled a white windbreaker
over his head, plopped down on his
changeover bench, and invited a ball
boy to sit, too. Djokovic exchanged a
racket for the kid's tournament um-
brella. Then Djokovic handed over a
Perrier, grabbed his own orange-
colored drink, and the pair clinked bot-
tles, sipped, then had a conversation.
"We had a nice chat. He's a tennis
player, so I asked him how long he's
(been) playing and how he's enjoying
his time as a ball kid," Djokovic related
with a smile. "Fun time."
Yes, all's fun and games when you're
on your way to a 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 victory
against 44th-ranked Joao Sousa of
Portugal.
Nadal improved to 60-1 at the French
Open by winning 6-0, 6-3, 6-0 over
Robby Ginepri, an American ranked
279th.
"It's probably one of the toughest
feats in sports," Ginepri said, "to play
Nadal at the French Open."


Tampa Bay battled back to tie it at 5
with a three-run fifth. Matt Joyce dou-
bled and scored when Jennings home-
red on the first pitch. Loney followed
with a blast to right, the first time this
season the Rays have hit consecutive
homers.
Toronto answered with a four-run,
bat-around inning in the bottom half
Lawrie hit an RBI double and scored
on Navarro's ground ball single, which
chased Bedard. Alex Colome came on
and issued a bases-loaded walk to
Reyes, then gave up a sacrifice fly to
Cabrera.
Bedard (2-3) lost his second straight
start, allowing eight runs, seven
earned, in four innings. He walked
none, struck out two and had his ERA
rise from 2.63 to 3.89.
Encarnacion led off the sixth with a
booming drive to left off Colome, his
15th homer of the season. The 13 home
runs this month is a Blue Jays record
for May, breaking the mark set by
Bautista in 2010. Toronto's team record
for home runs in a single month is 14,
set by Bautista in June 2012.


SCOREBOARD


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 B3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Johnson's


A seventh Sprint Cup

title would tie legends

Petty and Earnhardt

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. -Jimmie Johnson's
run at another Sprint Cup title is on and
could bring him a piece of NASCAR
history
Johnson's victory in the Coca-Cola 600
on Sunday night all but locked him into
the new, expanded championship Chase
format. If the 38-year-old Johnson pulls it
off, it'll be his seventh series crown to tie
the NASCAR mark shared by Richard
Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt.
NASCAR leaders changed the empha-
sis in qualifying, putting more of a pre-
mium on wins over the steadiness of
points racing. That's led to a flurry of
drivers taking the checkered flag- 10 of
them through 12 races all gleefully cel-
ebrating their near-assured spot in the
10-race championship run at the end.
Johnson had been on the outside of
that until his record-breaking seventh ca-
reer win at Charlotte Motor Speedway
He outlasted second-place Kevin Har-
vick and Matt Kenseth in third to pick up
his fourth victory all-time in NASCAR's
longest race.
"The first goal is to make the Chase,"
Johnson said. "You want to win races at
the end of the season."


title defense is on after victory

After Johnson finished s sixth in 2011 and
third in 2012, he was back on top last sea-
.. son and moved one step closer to the
record with two drivers who were part of
NASCAR's first Hall of Fame class five


Associated Press
From left are Richard Petty in a July 4, 1977, file photo, Jimmie Johnson in a May 24,
2014, file photo, and Dale Earnhardt in a Feb. 18, 2000, file photo. Johnson's run at
another Sprint Cup title is on and could bring him a piece of NASCAR history. If the
38-year-old Johnson pulls it off, it'll be his seventh series crown to tie the NASCAR
mark shared by Petty and Earnhardt.


Few have done that better when it
counts than Johnson. He's collected 14
Chase victories in his six title runs, in-
cluding a pair last season that led him to
title No. 6. It's a recipe, combined with
the No. 48's typically solid performance,
Johnson was certain would prevail no
matter how many outside the race shop
raised questions.
"Of course, we want to win early and
often," Johnson said. "But we were hold-
ing steady in championship points. In my
opinion, I don't believe there will be 16
different winners.
"I felt like a strong championship
points position would get us into the first


phase of the Chase," he added. "Granted,
tonight simplifies things."
And gives crew chief Chad Knaus the
ability to take a few chances to prepare
for the playoffs the rest of the season. Not
that he has to as the team approaches a
stretch of tracks where they know
success.
Next week comes Dover where John-
son owns a record eight victories, then
Pocono where Johnson's won three
times.
When Johnson broke through for his
first crown in 2006, he and Knaus used
the formula to add four more in one of
the series' most dominant stretches.


years ago.
Johnson, who had a Hall of Fame vote
as Sprint Cup champion, isn't thinking
much about that yet. The 38-year-old star
is eager to build on his dominant show-
ing in Charlotte.
Johnson took his first pole of the sea-
son Thursday and was strong in practice
Saturday He led 165 of the 400 laps, prov-
ing his strength at the start before settling
into the rhythm of NASCAR's long, long
night.
Johnson led 10 different times, includ-
ing a final time with nine laps left when
he swept past Kenseth in Turn 4 and was
never pressured on his way to the check-
ered flag.
With a race win finally checked off his
to-do list, Johnson can concentrate on
prepping for the 10-race playoffs later on.
Under the new format, the playoff field
will shrink by four drivers after every
three races so only four will have a shot
for the trophy come Homestead in
November
Johnson earned the llth career Coca-
Cola 600 victory for car owner Rick Hen-
drick, who's got no doubt Johnson and
Knaus are pointed to another big season.
"What they've been able to accomplish
together, it's been amazing," he said. "I al-
ways say I'm just glad I don't have to race
against them."


The road to Omaha begins



Oregon St. No. 1 seedfor

NCAA baseball tournament; ,

Florida, FSUalso seeded ,r-


Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. Oregon
State has proved itself as
the best in the West. The
NCAA Division I Baseball
Committee also thinks the
Beavers are best in the
nation.
The committee on Mon-
day made the Pac-12 cham-
pions the top seed for the
NCAA tournament over
SEC regular-season win-
ner Florida and a Virginia
team that's been one of the
most consistent in the na-
tion but failed to win an
ACC title.
"I thought if you took
Florida and Oregon State
and Virginia, you could
find a reason for any of
them to be the (No. 1)
seed," Beavers coach Pat
Casey said. "When it came
down to the fact neither
Florida or Virginia were
automatic qualifiers, I
thought that might swing it
our way"
The other five national
seeds, in order, are: Indi-
ana, Florida State,
Louisiana-Lafayette, TCU
and LSU.
Oregon State (42-12) is
the No. 1 seed for the first
time after being No. 3 a
year ago. The Beavers
have one of the nation's
best starting rotations in
Ben Wetzler, Jace Fry and
Andrew Moore and one of
the top offensive players in
the country in left fielder
Michael Conforto.
Florida (40-21) won the
SEC regular-season title
for the third time in five
years and reached the con-
ference tournament final.
The Gators' schedule
ranks as toughest in the
country, and they're 16-5 in
one-run games.
Virginia (44-13) has the
ACC's top pitching staff,

Baseball America
Top 25 poll
DURHAM, N.C.-The top 25 teams in
the Baseball America poll with records
through May 25 and previous ranking (vot-
ing by the staff of Baseball America):
Record Pvs
1. Louisiana-Lafayette 53-7 2
2. Oregon State 42-12 1
3. Florida 40-21 7
4. Florida State 43-15 4
5. Cal Poly 45-10 5
6. Indiana 42-13 9
7. Louisiana State 44-14 14
8.Virginia 44-13 3
9. Texas Christian 42-15 13
10. Oklahoma State 45-16 11
11. Miami 41-17 6
12. Mississippi 41-18 10
13. Louisville 45-15 12
14.Washington 39-15 8
15. Houston 44-15 16
16. Rice 41-18 17
17. Mississippi State 37-22 18
18. South Carolina 42-16 15
19. Nebraska 40-19 20
20.Vanderbilt 41-18 19
21.Texas 38-18 22
22. Kentucky 35-23 NR
23. Pepperdine 39-16 NR
24. Arkansas 38-23 NR
25. Georgia Tech 36-25 NR


headed by sophomore left-
hander Nathan Kirby, but
the Cavaliers lost four of
their last six games.
The tournament opens
Friday with 16 four-team,
double-elimination region-
als. Best-of-three super re-
gionals will be held next
week, with those winners
moving to the College
World Series in Omaha.
National seeds that win
their regionals play at
home in super regionals.
The Southeastern Con-
ference has 10 teams in the
tournament, the most ever
by a conference. The At-
lantic Coast Conference is
represented by seven
schools, the Big 12 and
Pac-12 by five apiece and
the Big West by four
Kennesaw State of the
Atlantic Sun Conference
and Sacramento State of
the Western Athletic Con-
ference are in the tourna-
ment for the first time.
Thirty-two of the 64
teams were in the field last
year
Miami is in the field for
the 42nd straight year, ex-
tending its own record.
Florida State is in for the
37th season in a row, sec-
ond all-time.
Three teams with losing
records are in after win-
ning conference tourna-
ment titles: Youngstown
State (16-36), Siena (25-31)
and Bethune-Cookman
(26-31).
UCLA (25-30-1) will not
get a chance to defend its
national title. The Bruins
didn't make the tourna-
ment for the first time
since 2009 after finishing
ninth in the Pac-12 in an
injury-plagued season.
Oregon State starts the
tournament against Sum-
mit League champion
North Dakota State. UC
Irvine and UNLV also are
in the Corvallis, Oregon,
regional.
Casey said his team's
No. 1 seeding didn't come
with an easy path to Omaha.
Barring an upset, the
Beavers would be matched
against Big 12 regular-
season champion Oklahoma
State in a super regional.
"I have no complaints,"
Casey said. "It's a tough
job, trying to balance it out
You could take every re-
gional, and everybody
would have something to
say"
Miami coach Jim Morris
isn't pleased with the
prospect of his ACC
regular-season champion
team having to play at
Florida in a super regional.
Though Farrell listed Rice
and Vanderbilt as teams
that were edged out for na-
tional seeds, Miami was in
the running for one before


Associated Press
Florida's Zack Powers, left, tags LSU's Alex Bregman out as he is picked off at first base during the eighth inning
of the Southeastern Conference Tournament championship game on Sunday in Hoover, Ala. Despite losing to the
Tigers, the Gators are seeded No. 2 in the NCAA Tournament and host North Carolina, Long Beach State and
College of Charleston in a regional tournament beginning Friday. No. 5 seed Florida State and Miami also host
first-round action.


it lost two of three in the
ACC tournament
"You never know the
rhyme or reason for where
you're going to go," Morris
said on the ESPNU selec-
tion show "It makes no


sense to me, if we're on the
borderline, to be going to
possibly the No. 2 seed."
Florida will be chal-
lenged this weekend. It
will be hosting the Big
West's second-place team


in Long Beach State, a
North Carolina squad with
lots of postseason experi-
ence, and a 41-win College
of Charleston that's
the bottom seed in the
regional.


"This is probably a re-
gional we need," Gators
coach Kevin O'Sullivan
said. "We tend to play up to
our competition or some-
times down to our
competition."


NCAA Division I Baseball Regionals


Opening Round
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
At Davenport Field
Charlottesville, Va.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 -Virginia (44-13) vs. Buck-
nell (30-19-1), 2 p.m.
Game 2 Liberty (41-16) vs.
Arkansas (38-23), 7 p.m.
At Carolina Stadium
Columbia, S.C.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Old Dominion (36-24) vs.
Maryland (36-21), 1 p.m.
Game 2 -South Carolina (42-16) vs.
Campbell (40-19), 7 p.m.
At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium
Gainesville
Friday, May 30
Game 1 North Carolina (34-25) vs.
Long Beach State (32-24), 1 p.m.
Game 2 Florida (40-21) vs. College
of Charleston (41-17), 7 p.m.
At A-Rod Park at Mark Light Field
Coral Gables
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Columbia (29-18) vs.
Texas Tech (40-18), 2 p.m.


Game 2 Miami (41-17) vs.
Bethune-Cookman (26-31), 7 p.m.
At Dick Howser Stadium
Tallahassee
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Kennesaw State (37-21)
vs. Alabama (34-22), Noon
Game 2 Florida State (43-15) vs.
Georgia Southern (39-21), 6 p.m.
At Jim Patterson Stadium
Louisville, Ky.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Kansas (34-24) vs. Ken-
tucky (35-23), 2 p.m.
Game 2 Louisville (45-15) vs. Kent
State (36-21), 6 p.m.
At Bart Kaufman Field
Bloomington, Ind.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Stanford (30-23) vs. Indi-
ana State (35-16), 2 p.m.
Game 2 Indiana (42-13) vs.
Youngstown State (16-36), 7 p.m.
At Hawkins Field
Nashville, Tenn.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Clemson (36-23) vs. Ore-
gon (42-18), 1 p.m.
Game 2 Vanderbilt (41-18) vs.


Xavier (29-27), 8 p.m.
At Swayze Field
Oxford, Miss.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Georgia Tech (36-25) vs.
Washington (39-15-1), 4 p.m.
Game 2 Mississippi (41-18) vs.
Jacksonville State (36-25), 8 p.m.
At Alex Box Stadium
Baton Rouge, La.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 LSU (44-14-1) vs. South-
eastern Louisiana (37-23), 3 p.m.
Game 2 Bryant (42-14) vs. Hous-
ton (44-15), 8 p.m.
At M.L. 'Tigue' Moore Field
Lafayette, La.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 San Diego State (42-19)
vs. Mississippi State (37-22), 2 p.m.
Game 2 Louisiana-Lafayette (53-7)
vs. Jackson State (31-23), 7 p.m.
At Allie P. Reynolds Stadium
Stillwater, Okla.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Cal State Fullerton (32-
22) vs. Nebraska (40-19), 1 p.m.
Game 2 Oklahoma State (45-16)
vs. Binghamton (25-25), 7 p.m.


At Charlie and Marie
Lupton Stadium
Fort Worth, Texas
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Sam Houston State (41-
17) vs. Dallas Baptist (40-19), 3:30 p.m.
Game 2 TCU (42-15) vs. Siena
(26-31), 8 p.m.
At Reckling Park
Houston
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Texas A&M (33-24) vs.
Texas (38-18), 4 p.m.
Game 2 Rice (41-18) vs. George
Mason (34-20), 8 p.m.
At Goss Stadium at Coleman Field
Corvallis, Ore.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 UC Irvine (35-22) vs.
UNLV (35-23), 5 p.m.
Game 2 Oregon State (42-12) vs.
North Dakota State (25-24), 11 p.m.
At Baggett Stadium
San Luis Obispo, Calif.
Friday, May 30
Game 1 Pepperdine (39-16) vs.
Arizona State (33-22), 4 p.m.
Game 2 Cal Poly (45-10) vs.
Sacramento State (39-22), 9 p.m.


B4 TUESDAY, MAY 2 7, 2014


SPORTS





Section C TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014


H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Celiac





Symptoms:


Digestive problems
(abdominal bloating,
pain, gas, diarrhea, pale
stools and weight loss)



A severe skin rash called
dermatitis herpetiformis



Iron deficiency anein ia
(low blood count)





Tingling
sensation in the
legs (caused by
nerve damage
and low calcium)




Seizures


Disease


Aphthous
ulcers (sores
in the mouth)


Missed menstrual
periods


Musculoskeletal problems
(muscle cramps, joint and
bone pain)



It

Growth problems and
failure to thrive (in
children)


.:-- Source: webmd.com


Dedicated diet keeps symptoms at bay


Katie Hendrick
For the Chronicle
Nausea. Bloating. Diarrhea.
Sounds like a call for Pepto-
Bismol, right?
If only
For the millions of people with
Celiac disease, usually discovered
after prolonged suffering of the
above symptoms, there is no mira-
cle drug to keep the digestive pain
away
"It's all about lifestyle," said Dr
Paul Hellstern Jr, a gastroenterolo-
gist with Gastroenterology Associ-
ates of Citrus County "To feel better,
you have to stay completely gluten
free."
Celiac disease is an autoimmune
disorder in which ingesting gluten
leads to damage in the small intes-
tine. For people with celiac dis-
ease, gluten a protein found in
wheat, rye and barley triggers an
immune response that damages the
villi, small fingerlike projections
that line the small intestine and
promote nutrient absorption.
As a result, the patient feels


malnourished and miserable.
Most people can identify bread
products as gluten culprits, but the
protein's more widespread that you
might expect.
"You even have to watch for prod-
ucts like lipstick and shampoo,"
Hellstern said. "These often contain
gluten and eating's not the only way
to ingest it."
Fortunately, Celiac patients can
find gluten-free versions of most
items in supermarkets and restau-
rant menus.
"There have been great strides in
the last 20 years," Hellstern said.
"You never used to see any refer-
ence to gluten. Now Publix stocks
gluten-free breads, cookies, beer,
etc., and even shares Celiac
recipes."
Dr Hellstern warns patients to
watch out for Internet promises for
a pill to treat the disease. "It doesn't
exist yet," he said, citing a recent
article in Medscape about a phar-
maceutical company working on a
drug Celiac patients could take be-
fore eating gluten, similar to how
Lactaid works for the lactose-


intolerant
"We're optimistic there are big
things coming in the future," Hell-
stern said.
He credits progress in improving
the daily lives of Celiac patients
with greater awareness.
Celebrities, such as Fox News
host Elizabeth Hasselbeck, have
been candid about their symptoms
and how they live, giving Celiac dis-
ease more prominence.
"Some people claim the disease is
on the rise, but I think people are
more cognizant of it," and come in
for a definitive diagnosis (a biopsy
of the upper small bowel while
eating a gluten diet), he said.
Celiac disease can occur at any
point of life.
"I had a patient diagnosed at 81,"
Hellstern said.
The Celiac Disease Foundation
estimates that the disease affects
1 in 100 people worldwide and that
2.5 million Americans are
undiagnosed.
For a comprehensive list of
symptoms and resources, visit
http://celiac.org.


Getting to know you


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Inside:
Health Notes.......................................C4
C om ics.................................................C 7
Community.........................................C5
Crossw ord...........................................C6
M ovies.................................................C 7
TV Listings.................................6......C6
Support Groups .................................C3
Fitness Groups....................................C2
Navigating Cancer.............................C4
Cancer & Blood Disease....................C2
Ear, Nose & Throat.............................C2
For questions or comments, contact Features Editor
Logan Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext. 1141, or at Imosby
@dichronicleonline.com


1.' 'i"- '




C2 TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014


I recently saw a patient,
who was obese. She de-
veloped breast cancer
When I asked her about the
cause of her cancer, she
thought it must be due to
chemicals in the environ-
ment. When we think about
causes of cancer, everyone
knows smoking or tobacco in
any form causes lots of
cancers.
Recently, the American
Society of Oncology, or
ASCO, released the latest
guidelines about obesity and
cancer Lots of facts are eye-
opening, and so I am going
to report them. Obesity is a
leading cause of cancer and
a factor that complicates pa-
tient care following a cancer
diagnosis.
More than one-third of
adults in the United States
and 17 percent of U.S. chil-
dren and adolescents are
categorized as obese.
The rates of obesity are
even higher in several sub-
groups. For example, 54 per-
cent of black women older
than 20 are categorized as
obese.
Therefore, this issue is be-
coming an increasingly criti-
cal consideration in the care
of patients with cancer
Obesity is quickly overtak-
ing tobacco as the leading
preventable cause of cancer,
the ASCO notes in the guide.
More than 40,000 cancer
cases attributed to obesity
are diagnosed every year,
while being overweight and
obese has been implicated
in 15 percent to 20 percent
of all cancer-related
mortality
Cancer Facts & Figures
also notes that in the United
States, "It has been esti-
mated that overweight and
obesity contribute to 14 per-
cent to 20 percent of all
cancer-related mortality"
Excess weight was


HEALTH & LIFE


Free yoga and reiki
sessions are offered
weekly
For schedules and in-
formation, call Aviva
(for yoga) at 352-419-7800
or Connie (for reiki) at
352-560-7686.

Chair yoga

available

Chair yoga classes are
offered free at 10 a.m.
Monday atAlesci's Cor-
ner Plaza, 1015 E.
Norvell Bryant High-
way, Hernando, across
from Dollar General.
This is an opportunity
for people who are not
able to practice regular
yoga on mats. Classes
are given by experi-
enced, certified yoga
teachers.
Call 352-419-7800.

Join group at

Y for exercise

The YMCA offers
group exercise classes
from cardio circuit to
yoga, and everything in
between.


FITNESS PROGRAMS


Zumba class in

Citrus Springs

Who doesn't like a
workout that doesn't
feel like one?
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a
Zumba class with certi-
fied instructor Christine
Mehlenbacher Let loose
and burn up to 650 calo-
ries per session while
having fun dancing to
easy-to-follow steps.
Classes run from
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tues-
days and Thursdays at
the Citrus Springs Com-
munity Center, 1570 W
Citrus Springs Blvd.
Register at the door
For cost and other in-
formation, call Parks &
Recreation at 352-465-
7007 or 352-527-7540.


Classes are conducted
at four locations: Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church
and First Presbyterian
Church in Inverness,
First United Methodist
Church in Homosassa
and Hope Evangelic
Lutheran Church in Cit-
rus Springs.
Classes are available
to anyone 18 and older,
and are offered in
the mornings and
afternoons.
Try the first class out
at a YMCA location of
choice for free.
All participants in the
YMCA programs are re-
quired to be program
members and pay fees
after the first class.
Call the YMCA 352-
637-0132, or visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
S r7 1 i


improved balance, coor-
dination, strength and
flexibility Yoga is also
helpful in counteract-
ing stress and anxiety
Call Sheila Abra-
hams at 352-270-8019 or
email divineyogas
@gmail.com.


Join Les Mills

for exercise

After numerous re-
quests, the Y has an-
swered the demand of
adding Les Mills classes
to the Group Exercise
schedule.
The Citrus County
YIVMCA will offer Les
Mills Body Pump at the
new Crystal River Fit-
ness Location, 780 S.E.
Fifth Terrace. The class
is taught by Cheryl Stef-
fer, certified and trained
Les Mills instructor
Les Mills Body Pump
will sculpt, strengthen
and tone the entire
body Through choreog-
raphy and lively music,
Body Pump can help
participants burn fat
quickly and focus on the
major muscle groups.
Body Pump will get
hearts racing with "The
Rep Effect," paired with
squats, presses, lifts and
curls.
Call 352-637-0132. To
download the Y's com-
plete group exercise
schedule, visit wwwym-
casuncoastorg. All par-
ticipants in the YMCA
programs are required
to be program members
and pay fees.


Zumba classes for be-
ginners are offered at
11:30 a.m. Monday,
Thursday and Saturday
at the Unity Church,
2628 W Woodview Lane,
Lecanto.
Email miss-donna@
tampabayrr.com or call
352-628-3253.

Club offers
weekly Zumba

Yankeetown/Inglis
Woman's Club offers
Zumba classes from 9 to
10 a.m. Tuesday and
Thursday
Everyone is welcome.
Call 352-447-2057.

Free yoga class

open to public

Unity Church of Cit-
rus County 2628 W
Woodview Lane,
Lecanto, is host site for
a community Divine
Yoga class beginning at
10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of
charge and is open to all
ages and physical abili-
ties. Some of the bene-
fits of yoga are


Got a news tip?
The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about
breaking news. Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660,
and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
To submit story ideas for feature sections,
call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby


The mysteries of ice



cream and brain freeze


ou scream, I
scream, we all
scream for ice
cream but nobody
asked for the headache
that you can get from eat-
ing ice cream too quickly
Many of us call this "brain
freeze," and I get asked
frequently what causes
certain problems in the
head and neck area. This
is a very common ques-
tion that I hear over and
over The cause of this
problem has three
theories.
The first theory is that a
nerve called the trigemi-
nal nerve, which inner-
vates and supplies
sensation to the inside of
the mouth, including the
hard palate, is stimulated
by the cold and there is a
retrograde (backward)
stimulation of the nerve
such that it causes the
headache. What likely
happens is that the cold
temperature change is an
abrupt from the internal
98.6 temperature change
and it causes the nerve to
constrict and the action is
very similar to pinching a
nerve.
There is pain that is
sent directly through the
branches of the trigemi-
nal nerve, including the
head area.
Other theories are that
the cold simply hurts the
bones of the palate and
the pain is transmitted
through the bones,


Dr.
Denis
Grillo
EAR,
NOSE&
THROAT


including the facial bones
and the skull and the si-
nuses to cause the brain
freeze.
The third theory is that
little arteries that travel
with the trigeminal nerve
become cold with the con-
tact and this sends a mes-
sage to the brain that
temperatures have
changed and so its re-
sponse is that it will di-
late, which means open
up the blood vessels to in-
crease blood flow to these
areas so that the warmth
from the blood carried
from the center of the
body to the head area will
compensate for the tem-
perature change and this
constriction and dilata-
tion is the mechanism
behind the pain.
Brain freeze occurs not
only with ice cream, but
also with cold liquids.
Also, there seems to be a
genetic trend; multiple


family members can suf-
fer with it. Thank good-
ness it is a very
short-duration, short-
lived type of problem and
usually goes away on its
own.
But, for more pro-
tracted problems, the sim-
ple thing to do is take
your tongue and place it
up against the hard palate
and the warmth of the
tongue will warm up the
palate and reverse and/or
stop the process, thus re-
lieving the brain freeze
headache.
Another way is that you
can drink some warm
water or warm liquid to
once again raise the tem-
perature and compensate
for the temperature drop
caused by the ice cream,
or you can put your ice
cream in the microwave
like I do for about 10 to 12
seconds and get it nice
and soft and warm and
you can eat to your heart's
content without getting
brain freeze.
Denis Grillo, D.O.,
FOCO0, is an ear, nose
and throat specialist in
Crystal River Call him at
352-795-0011 or visit
CrystalCommunityENT
corn.


Citrus County

Pediatrics, Inc.
Children aren't a business, they're our future


Dr. Marcy is an old fashion, rural pediatrician. American
Board Certified, she handles all aspects of General Pediatrics
and specializes in Developmental & Behavioral Issues.
A graduate from the University of Florida Pediatric
Program, Dr. Marcy has been in practice for ,1
19 years, the last 8 years here in Crystal River.
Her office accepts all Medicaid
HMOs/ MMAs as well as most
private insurances.

Marcy Lee Howard, MD
American Board Certified Pediatrician
547 SE Fort Island Trail Ste. C
0ooo02Y Crystal River, FL I 352.794.7391


rree ZumDa at
All welcome at Unity of Citrus
frpp vnca p


PAO)VER3NB


Accepting New Patients















"Caring is my Profession"r


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- Dr.
Sunil
Gandhi
CANCER
& BLOOD
DISEASE


implicated in deaths from
cancer of the uterus, esoph-
agus, kidney cancer, colon
cancer, pancreatic cancer
and postmenopausal breast
cancer Overweight and
obesity may also be associ-
ated with increased risk of
cancers of the liver, gallblad-
der, cervix and ovary; ag-
gressive prostate cancer;
and non-Hodgkin lymphoma
and multiple myeloma.
In addition, obesity is as-
sociated with many practi-
cal challenges in detecting
cancer, as well as affecting
local and systemic treatment
of the disease. As an exam-
ple, the ASCO points out
that obesity can influence
the accuracy of cancer diag-
nostics secondary to factors
such as lowering the quality
of imaging.
It can also pose problems
for administration of radia-
tion therapy and surgery,
and may be associated with
certain surgical complica-
tions. In addition,
chemotherapy doses may
need to be increased in
obese patients with cancer;
otherwise, they may receive
suboptimal doses, which can
affect the chance of cure.
Obese people, for the
above reasons, also have
poorer outcomes.
Managing obesity should
be one of the top priorities.
We all must realize that obe-
sity not only causes prob-
lems for diabetes or heart
diseases, it is also a major
problem as a cause and
management of cancer




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONTHLY SUPPORT GROUPS


SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
the Florida Cancer Institute-
New Hope's Spring Hill Cen-
ter, 10441 Quality Drive,
Suite 203 in the Medical Arts
Building next to Spring Hill
Hospital. Call Jeff Haight,
R.N., group facilitator, at 352-
688-7744.
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church's Caregivers' Sup-
port Group, 1 p.m. the fourth
Tuesday monthly.
Call Gail Sirak at 352-634-
2021 for information.
OCALA- Ocala Health
Stroke Support Group
meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the



WEEKLY
SUPPORT
GROUPS

AAA support group
meets at 7:30 p.m. Monday
for the purpose of resolving
underlying issues for healing.
Meetings are at Vision Temple
Ministries 705 Daniel Ave.,
Brooksville, across the street
from SunTrust bank on U.S.
41. Call 352-754-1009 for
information.
R.I. Discovery (Recov-
ery International) Abraham
Low, M.D., self-help systems
for mental health depres-
sion, obsession, stress, fears,
anger. Meetings are 2 to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Call Jackie, 352-563-5182.
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group,
6:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Room 204 in office building,
use right-side entrance across
from the Memorial Garden;
Nar-Anon is for family and
friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to
www.NARANONFL.org.
Recovery from Food
Addiction, 7 p.m. Thursday
at St. Anne's Church, 9870 W.
Fort Island Trail, Crystal River,
in the parish hall library. Call
Peg at 410-903-7740.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a
free 12-step recovery pro-
gram for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeat-
ing, undereating or bulimia.
For details or a list of meet-
ings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit www.foodaddicts.org.
7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the back hall, St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19 south of
Cardinal Street. Group is
composed of men and
women who are experiencing
grief and are convinced "Life
can be good again." Open to
all. Come or call Anne at 352-
220-1959.
AI-Anon groups meet
regularly in Citrus County.
Local website nfldistrict5.com
(Citrus, Hernando, Pasco).
Call 352-697-0497.
Homosassa: 6:30 p.m.
Monday, Nature Coast Com-
munity Church, 4980 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41.
6 p.m. Monday at Club
Recovery, corner of County
Road 486 and Anvil Terrace,
Hernando.
Crystal RiverAFG:
8 p.m. Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG:
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
YANA Club, 147 Seventh St.
(off Citrus Avenue), Crystal


River.
*Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave., Inver-
ness.
Alateen: 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.
(meets same time as AI-Anon,
in separate room).
Stepping Stones AFG:
10 a.m. Saturday atYana
Club, 147 Seventh St. (off


Senior Wellness Community
Center (9850 S.W. 84th
Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call
800-530-1188 to register.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group, 3 p.m. fourth
Tuesday monthly at Crystal
Gem Manor, 10845 W. Gem
St., Crystal River, facilitated
by Debbie O'Leary, a group
leader trained by the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion. Call 352-794-7601.
Respite care available.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group, 2 p.m. the
last Thursday monthly at
Highland Terrace ALF, 700
Medical Court E., Inverness,
facilitated by Debbie O'Leary,
a group leader trained by the
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-



Citrus Avenue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics


tion. Call 352-860-2525.
Respite care available.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group by
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, 2 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at Sug-
armill Manor, 8985 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
Call Bevin Brayton at 352-
302-9066.
The Citrus Memorial
Diabetes Support Group,
10:30 a.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly on the
campus of Citrus Memorial
Health System in the
auditorium.
Call Amy Freeman at 352-
341-6110. No reservation is
required.
The Leukemia & Lym-



Anonymous: If you drink,
and want to stop, call Alco-
holics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 352-621-
0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.


phoma Society Suncoast
Chapter, Cancer Support
Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner
Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is
no charge and light refresh-
ments are provided. Contact:
Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, pa-
tient services manager, at
813-963-6461 ext. 11,
Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or
visit The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society website at
www.lls.org.
0 PINELLAS PARK-
"Connections" fireside-dis-
cussion-style support group
for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the
last Thursday monthly, Well-
Spring Oncology, 6600 66th


10:30 a.m. Sunday,
10300 S. Riviera Drive, Chas-
sahowitzka Community Cen-
ter, 1 mile west of U.S. 19 on
Miss Maggie Drive, turn left,
two blocks. 813-423-1203.


St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-
343-0600; www.wellspring
oncology.org.
BROOKSVILLE "Man
to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Brooksville Center,
7154 Medical Center Drive.
Call Mary Capo at 352-596-
1926.
Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren Support
Group, 10 a.m. to noon the
first Monday monthly at the
Citrus County Resource Cen-
ter, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall
from Kids Central Inc. will fa-
cilitate the meeting. Call Pam
at 352-387-3540.


AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.


OCALA-The
Alzheimer's and Memory
Disorders support group of
Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Med-
ical Office Building at West
Marion Community Hospital,
4600 S.W. 46th Court, sec-
ond-floor Community Room.
Call 352-401-1453.
RBOI has begun a
monthly survivor group with
inspirational guests and
strength based topics. Any
cancer survivors and family
are welcome to attend. There
is no cost to attend.
For information, email
Tommie Brown at tbrown009
@tampabay.rr.com or call
Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-
527-0106.


A 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living
Waters Ministries, 12 N. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 352-527-2443.


-PAID ADVERTISING -






JifUE Dlili*


ASSISTED LIVING


CEDAR CREEK
AT KINGS BAY
231 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River......352-564-2446

SUGARMILL MANOR
8985 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-382-2531

SUNFLOWER SPRINGS
ASSISTED LIVING
COMMUNITY
8733 W. Yulee Drive,
Homosassa.......352-621-8017

SUNSHINE GARDENS
311 N.E. 4th Ave.,
Crystal River......352-563-0235

SUPERIOR RESIDENCES OF
LECANTO MEMORY CARE
4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Lecanto...............352-746-5483

CARDIOLOGY

ARRHYTHMIA CENTER
OF FLORIDA
14000 Fivay Road,
Hudson...............727-869-5565
Toll Free.............855-534-4325

DENTAL

CITRUS HILLS DENTAL
ASSOCIATES
2460 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernando...........352-527-1614

DENTOFACIAL INSTITUTE
Hashemian, Michael M. MD
DMD 591 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto...............352-527-8000

LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
3640 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-628-3443

CARL W. MAGYAR DDS PA
Magyar, Carl W. DDS
Lackey, MarkA. DMD
Paredes, Nina J. DMD
510 N. Dacie Point,
Lecanto...............352-527-8585
8415 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-382-1454

SMILES ON CITRUS AVE.
535 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River...... 352-795-1881

SWANSON, RICHARD C.
DMD PA
1815 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River...... 352-795-1223

TIMBERLANE FAMILY
DENTISTRY
Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
1972 N. Future Terrace,
Lecanto..........352-746-9111

DERMATOLOGY

BAY DERMATOLOGY &
COSMETIC SURGERY PA
Chavda, Krina DO FAOCD
Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD
Board Certified
Heckman, Lou Ann AARNP
Weston, Cynthia AARNP
Beck, Terri PA-C
Rosochowicz, Kerran PA-C
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-503-2002

SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY
CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point,
Lecanto...............352-746-2200


FAMILY/GENERAL
PRACTICE

BELLAM MEDICAL CLINIC
Bellam, Rajendra MD
20021 S.W. 111th Place,
Dunnellon..........352-465-1199

CHRIST MEDICAL CENTER
7562 Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River......352-564-0444

HEALTH &WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC.
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River......352-794-3872

HASAN, GHASSAN A. MD
700 S.E. Fifth Terrace, Ste. 6,
Crystal River.....352-794-6151

FAMILY/GENERAL
PRACTICE

HERNANDO MEDICAL
CENTER
Patel, Shirish MD
2669 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando...........352-637-2550

SHAH, GIRAS. MD
203 S. Seminole Ave.,
Inverness...........352-726-7800

SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE
SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs....352-489-2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-382-8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Inverness...........352-341-5520

GYMS AND EXERCISE
CLUBS

ANYTIME FITNESS
2010 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River......352-794-6161
5723 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-503-6856
345 E. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness...........352-400-4894
2668 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto............352-270-8868

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

CITRUS COUNTY HEALTH
Department GADCHC 2804
W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto...............352-249-9258
TOBACCO PREVENTION
.......................1-877-822-6669

HEARING EXAMS/
HEARING AIDS

AUDIBEL HEARING AID
CENTERS
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.......352-436-4393
2036 Hwy. 44 W,
Inverness...........352-419-0763
20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon..........352-502-4337

BELTONE HEARING CARE
CENTER
3350 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Unit 2
Inverness...........352-726-9545
2708 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto...............352-527-4327

HEARMORE SOLUTIONS
6441 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.,
Crystal River....352-795-EARS
..........................352-795-3277
13005 Spring Hill Drive,
Spring Hill..........352-556 5257

MIRACLE EAR
HEARING AID CENTER
Crystal River Mall
1801 N.W.U.S. 19,
Crystal River...... 352-795-1484


HEARING EXAMS/ OPTHALMOLOGY
HEARING AIDS CONTINUED CONTINUED


NUTECH HEARING
3161 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Inverness...........352-419-7911
1122 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River......352-794-6155

PROFESSIONAL HEARING
CENTERS
Dingier, Denny M. DIV. HAS
Audioprosthologist
211 S.Apopka Ave.,
Inverness..........352-726-4327

HOME HEALTH
SERVICES

AFFORDABLE HOMEMAKER &
COMPANION SERVICES
2615 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando...........352-637-4851

BRIDGING MOUNTAINS
2615 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando.............352-637-485

COMFORT KEEPERS
2244 State Road 44 West,
Inverness..........352-726-4547

FLORIDA CAREGIVERS, INC.
244 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River......352-735-7800

HOSPICE

HPH HOSPICE
2939 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Lecanto...............352-527-4600

HOSPITALS

CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH
SYSTEM
502 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness...........352-726-1551

MUNROE REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
1500 S.W. 1st Ave.,
Ocala..................352-351-7200

INDEPENDENT LIVING

BRENTWOOD RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY
1900 W. Alpha Court,
Lecanto...............352-746-6611

INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR
APARTMENTS
518 Ella Ave.,
Inverness...........352-344-8477

MEDICAL ALERTS

NATURE COAST EMS
3876 W. Country Hill Dr.,
Lecanto...............352-249-4730

MEDICAL SUPPLIES/
EQUIPMENT

B & W REXALL DRUGS
214 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness...........352-726-1021

G & R HEALTHMART
PHARMACY
3791 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills......352-527-3111

OBSTETRICS/
GYNECOLOGY

SUNCOAST OBSTETRICS &
GYNECOLOGY
Redrick, Scott MD FACOG
582 S.E. 7th Ave.,
Crystal River......352-564-8245

ONCOLOGY/HEMATOLOGY

ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Man-To-Man Prostate Cancer
Support and Education Program
522 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto...............352-527-0106

OPTHALMOLOGY

SUNCOAST EYE CENTER -
EYE SURGERY INSTITUTE
221 N.E.U.S. 19,
Crystal River...... 352-795-2526


VITREORETINAL SURGEONS
212 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
11373 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville...... 1-800-232-0455

ORTHOPAEDIC/SPORTS
MEDICINE

GULFCOAST SPINE
INSTITUTE
2300 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.,
Hernando..........855-485-3262
7101 Mariner Blvd.,
Spring Hill..........855-485-3262

NATURE COAST
ORTHOPAEDICS & SPORTS
MEDICINE CLINIC
2155 W. Mustang Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.......352-746-5707
2236 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Inverness...........352-344-2663

PHARMACY

B & W REXALL DRUGS
214 U.S. 41 South,
Inverness...........352-726-1021

G & R HEALTHMART
PHARMACY
3791 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills.......352-527-3111

PLASTIC/
RECONSTRUCTIVE
SURGERY

FARRIOR FACIAL PLASTIC
AND COSMETIC SURGERY
CENTER
Farrior, Edward H. MD FACS
2908 W. Azeele St.,
Tampa.................813-875-3223

PODIATRY

NATURE COAST FOOT &
ANKLE CENTER
Pritchyk, Kenneth P. DPM
6254 W. Corporate Oaks Dr.,
Crystal River......352-228-4975

SKILLED NURSING CARE

CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 S.E. 8th Ave.,
Crystal River......352-795-8832

DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH &
REHABILITATION CENTER
2730 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto...............352-746-9500

LIFE CARE CENTER OF
CITRUS COUNTY
3325 W. Jerwayne Lane,
Lecanto...............352-746-4434

THERAPY AND
REHABILITATION

CRYSTAL RIVER HEALTH
AND REHAB CENTER
136 N.E. 12th Ave.,
Crystal River......352-795-5044

HOMETOWN REHAB
944 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.,
Hernando...........352-341-1616

NATURE COAST PHYSICAL
THERAPY& REHAB
3777 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills.......352-527-3337
3787 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Inverness...........352-341-1101

WELLNESS

BOTOX SPA
1815 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River......352-795-1223

SKINOLOGY
Stephanie Roberts
3766 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Lecanto..........352-302-6908


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 C3


7------




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Benefits of red wine and blueberries


or many years, you have
heard about the potential
health benefit of a glass
of red wine and the consump-
tion of blueberries. Past re-
search has suggested that red
wine and blueberries may re-
duce inflammation, prevent
heart disease and even some
types of cancer The reason be-
hind such benefits? A com-
pound called resveratrol. And
now, researchers from The
Scripps Research Institute in
Florida say they have discov-
ered one way in which resvera-
trol has these beneficial effects
on health.
In this study, the research
team found that resveratrol
blocks interleukin 6 (IL-6), a
protein in the immune system
that can trigger inflammation
in our bodies. High levels of IL-
6 have been associated with a
poorer chance of survival in
breast cancer patients in previ-
ous studies, so any mechanism
we have to lower the level of
IL-6 could also improve sur-
vival.
Another mechanism to lower
the level of IL-6 is through exer-
cise; however, many people
would choose the glass of wine
over going to the gym. To take
the benefit of exercise even fur-
ther, earlier this year Medical
News Today reported on a
study suggesting that yoga may
reduce inflammation by 20 per-
cent in breast cancer survivors
by reducing levels of IL-6.
But enough about exercise,
let's get back to the red wine.
In this latest study, published
in the journal eLife, re-
searchers discovered that
resveratrol blocks IL-6 by work-
ing with the body's estrogen re-
ceptor Estrogen can increase


Dr. C.
Joseph
Bennett

NAVIGATING
CANCER


the growth of breast cancer tu-
mors through receptors that re-
side on the surface of cancer
cells. But in this study, the re-
searchers found that when
resveratrol blocks IL-6, estro-
genic cell proliferation -the
reproduction of cancer-causing
cells is not activated. Accord-
ing to the researchers, this
means that using resveratrol to
target the estrogen receptor
could lead to the development
of new drugs.
We also know estrogen has a
beneficial effect on conditions
such as diabetes and obesity,
but at the same time may in-
crease a woman's chance of de-
veloping breast cancer Now, it
appears you can achieve the
same benefits with resveratrol
that you can with estrogen, and
now that we have a better grasp
of the benefits of resveratrol,
we may be able to find similar
compounds out there with even
better results.
Luckily for those of you who
consume red wine, resveratrol
is a key ingredient in red
wine, which may explain why
the beverage has been associ-
ated with many health
benefits if consumed in
moderation.
Last year, Medical News
Today reported on a study sug-
gesting that red wine may pro-
tect against hearing loss and


cognitive decline, while an-
other study suggests red wine
may slow the aging process.
But, as with any chemical,
other research has indicated
that resveratrol may do more
harm than good. A 2013 study
from the University of Copen-
hagen in Denmark found that
the compounds may hinder the
benefits of cardiovascular exer-


l ,[ ; ; .. ..2A


cise, such as lowering blood day can also keep the doctor
pressure and cholesterol. But, away
as a friend of mine who is a car-
diologist might suggest, drink Dr. C Joseph Bennett is a
your wine, take your blood board-certified radiation oncol-
pressure and cholesterol med- ogist. Ifyou have any sugges-
ications, and enjoy life. tions for topics, or have any
So, if you consume red wine, questions, contact him at 522 N.
or are interested in doing so, Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL
discuss this with your doctor, 34461, or email cjbennett@
and see if a glass of red wine a rboi.com.


HEALTH NOTES


Train to become
county EMT

Nature Coast Emer-
gency Medical Institute
announces start date of
the next EMT and Hybrid
EMT classes: July 10. The
program course is 16
weeks long at Nature
Coast EMS Administra-
tion building, 3876 W
Country Hill Drive in
Lecanto, plus off-site clin-
ical work. The only class-
room time requirements
for the Hybrid EMT
classes are orientation,
testing and labs. There
are still opportunities to
attend traditional classes
while taking the Hybrid
class at no extra charge.
Those interested must
obtain an application
from the school or online
and have an interview
with the lead instructor
prior to entering into pro-
gram. Classes are open
for 12 to 18 classroom and
12 to 18 hybrid students.
Selection is on a first-
come, first-served basis.
Individuals interested
in registering should con-
tact student services and
complete an application.
The office is open 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday For information
and admission require-
ments, call Shannon Gip-
son at 352-249-4700 or
Lori Thompson at 352-
601-7330 or email
lori.thompson@nature
coastems.org.

Blood donors
asked for help
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers: To find a
donor center or a blood
drive near you, call 352-
527-3061. Donors must be
at least 17, or 16 with
parental permission,


weigh a minimum of 110
pounds and be in good
health to be eligible to do-
nate. A photo ID is re-
quired.
The Lecanto branch of-
fice is at 1241 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road
491), open from 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m.
Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday and
closed Sundays.
The Inverness branch is
at 2629 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, open from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. weekdays,
(6:30 p.m. Wednesday
and Fridays), 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Saturday and
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.
Visit www.lifesouth.org.
8 to 11:30 a.m. Tues-
day, May 27, Stoneridge
Landing Clubhouse, Inver-
ness.
12:30 to 4 p.m. Tues-
day, May 27, Walmart Su-
percenter, 2461 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, In-
verness.
11 a.m. to 4:55 p.m.
Wednesday, May 28, Cy-
press Creek Academy, 2855
W Woodland Ridge Drive,
Lecanto.
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 29, Big Lots, 146
S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fri-
day, May 30, Walmart Su-
percenter, 1936 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Noon to 3 p.m. Satur-
day, May 31, Inverness
Elks Lodge No. 2522, 3580
E. Lemmon Drive, Her-
nando. Free lunch.

Keep children


recalled, damaged or ex-
pired; is appropriate for
the child's age, height and
weight; is used correctly;
and installed securely
Contact Sue Littnan at
352-563-9939, ext. 235.

Seven Rivers
offers programs
CRYSTAL RIVER-
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center offers
health education pro-
grams facilitated by
board-certified physi-
cians and licensed med-
ical professionals.
Website: SevenRivers
Regionalcom. Call 352-
795-1234 to register for
the programs.
Healing Ways a se-
ries of education pro-
grams designed for
people concerned about
skin health and wound
care, especially individu-
als with diabetes. Pro-
grams are held at
10:30 a.m. the third
Wednesday monthly, fea-
ture a different topic each
month, and are presented
by Michelle Arevalo, pro-
gram director of wound
care and hyperbaric med-
icine at Seven Rivers
Wound Care Center On
May 21, the topic is
"Sneaky Skin Cancer"
Balance Screenings
- Seven Rivers Rehab &
Wound Center offers free
balance screenings at
11541 W Emerald Oaks
Drive, Crystal River (adja-
cent to the hospital). Call
352-795-0534 to schedule.


safe in car seatsHeth center
Health center
Free 20-minute child me
safety seat inspections board to meet


available by appointment
at the Early Learning
Coalition of the Nature
Coast, 1564 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River,
to be sure a seat is not


The George A. Dame
Community Health Cen-
ter Board meetings are at
3 p.m. the first Wednesday
monthly at the Citrus


[O, The United Way Women's Leadersh
i.0



.<.,.POWER
.......u 'r It ..i ,:.=- lr

SS .,!.,- jdip!' *" 7 "1^ i, ^ ,-
M. .. ..... L dis u ch on&,e


'k ... ...Saturday, June 7,
Black Diam
A..-. -.. To reserve your
=! : *:::: .. 1 ..,call for more inforr
7 " or visit www.citri
L :' iiMf j ": .L.. .. ..


County Health Depart-
ment, 3700 W Sovereign
Path, Lecanto, in the first-
floor conference room.

Group aims to
be substance-free
Partners for a Sub-
stance-Free Citrus Inc.
will meet the second
Thursday monthly in the
basement of the Citrus
County
School Board office in
Inverness, 1007 W Main
St. Use the elevator to go
to the basement.
8 to 9 a.m. board
meeting.
0 9:15 to 9:30 a.m.
coffee, doughnuts,
networking.
9:30 to 10:30 a.m.
membership meeting.
For information, call
the office at 352-389-0472
or email substancefree.
citrus@yahoo. com.

Seminar gives
knee facts

SPRING HILL -Oak
Hill Hospital offers its
For Your Health Commu-
nity Education Series
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tues-
day, May 27, when Fady D.
Zeidan, M.D., will present
"Considering Knee Re-
placement Surgery?
Know Your Surgical
Options: Replace or

MASTERPIECE

The art of optimum~quality dentistry.
A alwayss i
Willelcoming

ew Patient
FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDs_
4805 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34446 "
352-628-0012


Resurface" at the Palace
Grand, 275 Della Court,
Spring Hill.
Dr Zeidan is an or-
thopaedic surgeon at Oak
Hill Hospital and is
board-certified in or-
thopaedic surgery He
will discuss all available
surgical options for ad-
vanced knee arthritis. Dr
Zeidan has performed
over 2,500 cases of knee
replacements and resur-
facing and he will share
with you the benefits of
these procedures.
Admission is free and a
complimentary hot meal
will be served. Seating is
limited and reservations
are required. For infor-
mation and to register,
call 352-628-6060 in Citrus
or register online at
OakHillHospital.com/For
YourHealth.

Health fair
slated in June
The sixth annual Mind,
Body & Soul Health Fair,
from 9 a.m. to noon Thurs-
day, June 5, will feature
free door prizes, gifts and
promotional items; a car
show; and more than 50


local business and health
organizations providing
health screenings and
valuable information
about services available
in the community
The fair will be at First
United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W
Bradshaw St. Call 352-
628-4083 or visit lumc.org.

CASA in need
of donated
items
Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA) needs
donation of household
goods for its domestic vio-
lence shelter for women
and children: hair clips,
hair brushes, toilet paper,
paper towels, size 5 dia-
pers, hand soap, sham-
poo, conditioner, facial
tissues and liquid high-ef-
ficiency (HE) laundry
soap.
Drop off donations at
CASAs outreach center,
1100 Turner Camp Road,
Inverness, between 9 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday Donations
of grocery and gas cards
are always welcome. Call
352-344-8111.


lipCouncil LIVE UNITED

of the I






2014 at 11:30 a.m.

[ond Ranch
seat/table now,
nation at 795-5483
-usunitedway.org


--/ The Spanish American
Q l Club of Citrus County
B 7' 1 Installation/Anniversary
Pinner Pance
Saturday, June 7, 2014
Doors Open 6PM to Midnight Music by DJ Leo Roche
Catering by Cody's Roadhouse
DONATIONS:
$35.00 MEMBERS & SPONSOR OS
$45.00 NON-MEMBERS .,
Knights of Columbus Hall #6168
2389 N. Norvell Bryant, Hwy., Lecanto, FL
For Ticket Information Call Maria Coimbre 341-0979
Carlos Suarez 270-8077 or Ben Cruz 746-3599


I


C4 TUESDAY, MAY 2 7, 2014


HEALTH & LIFE


- -Ijmm





CPage C5 TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Doll club to gather
at member's home
The Central Florida Sugar
Babes Doll Club will meet at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the home
of one of its newest members. She
will show her vast collection of
dolls.
Sugar Babes Doll Club is a
member of the United Federation
of Doll Clubs. The club welcomes
visitors and all who share an in-
terest in the hobby
For information, call Laurie at
352-382-2299 or Barbara at 352-
344-1423.

Amateur radio group
meets Wednesdays
The Citrus County Amateur
Radio Emergency Service meets
at 7 p.m. Wednesday on the
146.775 mhz repeater with a PL
tone of 146.2 hz.
Meetings are once a month at
the Citrus County Emergency Op-
erations Center in Lecanto. For
more information and meeting
dates, contact Jerry Dixon,
WA6QFC at WA6QFC@ARRL.net
or on the Citrus County ARES
website at www.CitrusCounty
ARES.com.

Pearson to speak at
Town Hall Meeting
An update on country issues is
on the agenda as Assistant County
Administrator Cathy Pearson is
guest speaker at the next Town
Hall Meeting at the Central Ridge
Community Center, 77 Civic Cir-
cle, sponsored by the Beverly
Hills Civic Association.
The meeting will be at 7 p.m.
Thursday and will last about an
hour Complimentary coffee,
cookies and ice cream will be
served. Attendance is free and
open to all.
For more information, call
Bonnie Larsen at the Civic Office
at 352-746-2657 from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Monday through Friday

Hospice needs
volunteer courier
Hospice of Citrus and the Na-
ture Coast is offering a volunteer
courier opportunity
Volunteers are an integral part
of Hospice of Citrus and the Na-
ture Coast and getting started is
simple and specialized training is
provided. Hospice of Citrus and
the Nature Coast makes volun-
teering convenient easy and fun.
For more information on the
volunteer courier opportunity,
call 352-527-2020.

Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE


Rocky


Special to the Chronicle
Rocky is a senior adult Maltese
recovering from surgery to remove
a fatty tumor from his side. He is
up and around and playing with his
best friend, another adult Maltese.
Their owner passed away and a
new home is needed. They would
like to stay together, as they have
been housemates for years. They
are both friendly, well trained and
difficult to tell apart, they look so
much alike. They will make the
perfect addition to an adult home.
Donations to Rocky's medical fund
would be appreciated as well.
Kittens and cats are available for
adoption at the Pet Supermarket
on State Road 44 in Inverness
during regular store hours. The
Crystal River Mall adoption center
is open noon to 4 p.m. Wednesday
through Sunday and the Floral City
Adoption Center at 7360 S. Florida
Ave. is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday. Call 352-726-4700 or go
to www.preciouspawsflorida.com.


Volunteers show PRIDE


Pine Ridge seeks residents to help


Special to the Chronicle

One of this county's best means of
crime prevention is citizen attention.
Like many Citrus County communities,
Pine Ridge has a sheriff's crime watch
unit known as PRIDE. PRIDE has been a
recognized value with continuous com-
munity service since 1996.


community through crime prevention


Manned by volunteers, crime watch
units are a recognized line in defense of
communities. Every time a PRIDE volun-
teer checks a home or just patrols the
community, they discourage crime.
With continuing budget cuts, every vol-
unteer, allows dollars to be placed in
more critical crime prevention needs.
Volunteer participation is now more im-


portant than ever
The Pine Ridge Crime Watch Unit
needs more volunteers. New residents es-
pecially are asked to consider volunteer-
ing with PRIDE.
For information and an application,
call the Citrus County Sheriff's Volunteer
Office at 352-746-3484 or PRIDE Capt
Steve Wagner at 352-527-0723.


Supporting Hospice


Special to the Chronicle
Wells Fargo Bank was recently recognized recently at the Crystal River branch for its support of Hospice of Citrus and the Nature
Coast. Pictured, from left, are lead teller Zach Preston, Hospice Director of Children's Services Marylin Bloom, customer service
sales representative Kathryn Yarberry, Hospice Development Director Linda Baker, branch manager LeeAnne Rohrer, teller Sue
Fuller, service manager Tawnya Speedling and customer service sales representative Michelle McCracken. Visit Wells Fargo at
www.wellsfargo.com. Visit Hospice of Citrus and the Nature Coast on Facebook or on the Web at www.hospiceofcitrus.org.


NEWS NOTES


Spaghetti dinner
fundraiser on tap
The Chassahowitzka Com-
munity Association (CCA) will
hold a spaghetti dinner
fundraiser from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday at the Community Cen-


ter, 10300 S. Riviera Drive (old
firehouse), in Homosassa.
Cost is $5 in advance; $6 at
the door Takeouts will be
available. Proceeds will bene-
fit the Chassahowitzka Com-
munity Association.
Tickets are available at the
Chassahowitzka River Camp-


ground Store, 8600 W Miss
Maggie Drive. The association
also needs volunteers for the
event.
Contact Lizzie Blauer
lizzieblauer5@
gmail.com or 352-601-8612, or
email chassahowitzka@
outlook.com for tickets.


Barbershoppers
want more singers
"Chorus of the Highlands"
of the Barbershop Harmony
Society seeks men to join the
group. Call 352-382-0336 for
more information.


Show offers trip back to 1950s for fans


lIvis," starring Billy Lindsey,
M was presented at the Central
E Ridge Community Center in
Beverly Hills recently by the Citrus Parks
and Recreation Department. It was
standing room only as coordinator Jim
Smith welcomed the crowd of Elvis fans.
Dressed in black satin, Lindsey strode
onto the stage, encouraging the crowd to
clap to the beat of "I gotta woman way
cross town as mean as she can be." Imme-
diately, fans began to photograph Lind-
sey, as he demonstrated that he'd
perfected all of the familiar Elvis moves
and the distinctive vocal arrangements of
"the King."
Noting that he'd performed at a Lake-
land Theatre this month and was given
the same dressing room that Elvis had
used when he performed there in 1966,
brought memories of the last time I had
attended an Elvis concert at the Lake-
land Civic Center in 1976.
"Don't Say No" proved that Lindsey
had that special Elvis ballad sound.
Bringing out his black guitar for "When
My Blue Moon Turns to Gold Again,"
Lindsey received thunderous applause.
"Jailhouse Rock" from the movie, often
acclaimed as the best dramatic role given
to Elvis, and "You're So Square" ushered
in "Return to Sender," which brought sin-
gles and couples to the dance floor to
show off their special rock 'n' roll style.
"Lordy, Lordy, Lordy, Miss Claudie," an
early Elvis hit, provided smooth, rhyth-
mic sounds with clapping accompani-
ment from the audience.
From the Louisiana Hayride TV special
days, we enjoyed "Fame and Fortune My
Way" with Lindsey ending the applause
with "Thank you very much," an Elvis
trademark.
It wa off with the shoes as four female
dancers rocked to "Hound Dog," an early
classic Elvis hit that put him at the top of
the Hit Parade charts.
Lindsey then began yet another Elvis
tradition by meandering throughout the
audience with colorful leis (instead of the


Ruth
Levins

AROUND THE
COMMUNITY


scarves Elvis gave to the ladies), serenad-
ing and giving a bonus kiss, as well. By
the time the concert ended, nearly every
female had received both.
"It's Hard to Leave the One You Love"
with "I'm Comin' Home to Stay" and "If
That Isn't Love" struck a nostalgic chord
with most of us.
When he broke loose with 'All Shook
Up," I recognized and captured one of my
rockin' Woman's Club volunteers on my
camera.
"Blue Suede Shoes," a '50s standard
Elvis hit with the college crowd at Mar-
shall, in Huntington, West Virginia,
brought back fond memories of my col-
lege days and dancing in the student
Union around the jukebox, between
classes. "Teddy Bear" was another mem-
ory maker I still have my teddy bear col-
lection, began during those fabulous '50s.
Amazingly, one senior danced a com-
plete set of Lindsey's songs while holding
on to her quad cane.
"Won't You Wear My Ring Around Your
Neck" reminded me of that fad, a going-
steady signal, to any male looking for a
Saturday night date.
"She's Not You" was one of Lindsey's
best versions. The dance floor was
crowded for "Don't Be Cruel" with great
dancing styles. Lindsey fielded a request
for "Follow That Dream" from the movie
of the same name that brought Elvis to
film it here in 1962.
"My Way" brought romantic couples to
the dance floor, followed by the fast-
paced "Proud Mary" and "C.C. Rider" I
was lost in the 1950s as Lindsey sang "I'll


Remember You," my personal favorite.
It was quite a tribute to hear these all-
time hits once more: "Good Luck Charm,"
"Burnin' Love," "It's Now or Never,"
"Viva Las Vegas" and "Blueberry Hill," a
Fats Domino hit.
Bonding with the crowd, Lindsey gave
out more kisses and leis while singing "I
Can't Stop Loving You," 'Johnny Be
Good" and "Wooden Heart." Returning to
the stage area, he performed "Poke Salad
Annie" and the crowed went wild with
whistles and squeals, as he did the fa-
mous split, in his Elvis white pantsuit.
"The Wonder of You" made us swoon.
"If I Can Dream" was a tribute to the vet-
erans, ending with the crowd standing as
he sang "God Bless America." We heard
"Run, Run Runaway" and "Love Me Ten-
der" from his first movie, starring with
Debra Padgett.
Movin' and shakin' from head to toe
with "Suspicious Minds" and '"All Shook
Up" brought out more whistles and
squeals from the fans.
With an appealing silhouette in back of
the spotlight on Lindsey, we heard the
powerful voice of Lindsey singing
"Dixie," his best selection of the night,
with more of the true Elvis sound. At the
conclusion of this deeply moving song,
Lindsey asked us to continue to pray for
our service members and veterans as he
unfurled an American flag and wrapped
it around his shoulders and sang the im-
mortal line, "His truth is marching on,"
from "Battle Hymn of the Republic."
We just couldn't let him go until he sang
"I Can't Stop Loving You," an all-time
classic concert hit for Elvis.
The Nature Coast Volunteer Center
provided burger plates and soft drinks
for the concert. Memberships are still
available for the center

Ruth Levins participates in a variety of
projects around the community Let her
know about your group's upcoming
activities by writing to P.O. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




C6 TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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West
4 J 8 7 2
S 3
* Q 10 5 2
* A 9 63


North
4k 6
AY AQ985
* .1 83
4J 10 7 4


05-27-14


East
K Q 10 5 4
V K4
K96
S8 5 2
South
* A93
V J 10 7 6 2
* A74
* KQ


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North
1 V Pass 4 V


East
All pass


Opening lead: 2


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

We are looking at situations in which third
hand should or should not follow the "third-
hand high" mantra. Which is right here? South
is in four hearts. West leads a fourth-highest di-
amond two. After dummy plays low, should
East put in his nine or rise with the king?
North knew that his hand was a tad strong
for a four-heart "weak freak" raise, but he
knew that it was unlikely his side had a slam,
and he was worried that the opponents might
be able to do well in spades.
East should work out who has what in dia-
monds. He knows that South has the ace, be-
cause West would not have led a diamond
away from the ace. And South presumably has
three diamonds. West probably has the queen,
and might have the 10 as well. (If West had
started with 10-high diamonds, he likely would
have led from a stronger suit)
However, the key point is that if East plays
his king, declarer must get two diamond tricks:
his ace and, later, dummy's jack. But if East
puts in his nine, perhaps he can hold South to
one diamond winner
Yes, West will be momentarily misled about
the diamond position, but East will clarify
when in with his heart king, cashing the dia-
mond king and playing another round of the
suit.
You can see that in this layout, playing the
diamond nine is critical. It allows the defend-
ers to take one heart, two diamonds and one
club.
The usual rule is: When dummy has one
honor, third hand holds a higher honor, and
dummy plays low, third hand saves his honor
when he can insert a nine or higher


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SEEAC _

@2014Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved i-
SDAVPE



REVANT _



DERNTY


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


TANGO TOURNAMENT
Looks
like we're
all here
S' tonight .


t -VI


.






27


EVERYONE POING THE
TANGO AT THF CL-Ub
WAS IN --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: "
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: MADLY MOUND CASINO PUPPET
I Answer: To honor WWII's heroes, Fnriednrich St. Flonrian
came up with an idea that was MONUMENTAL


ACROSS
1 Where
monkeys
swing
4 Compete in a
slalom
7 Janitors' tools
11 Have supper
12 Dublin's land
14 Lendlof
tennis
15 Protected
17 LEM lander
18 Like
elephants
19 Clear, as a
drain
21 Bitter cold
22 Actor's
prompt
23 Unnerve
26 Barbarian
29 Freud
opponent
30 Cherry seeds
31 Fellow
33 Harden
34 Helm position
35 Reign


36 Sponges
38 Circus
performers
39 Bandleader
Kyser
40 Jabber
41 Jungle jaunt
44 borealis
48 Monsieur's
airport
49 Stranger
51 Ess molding
52 Fox show
53 Soccer goal
54 Garden
hopper
55 HMQ workers
56 Visa and
passport

DOWN
1 Lemon peel
2 Magnum
venue
3 Elevator man
4 Choose
5 Tot
6 Vexation


Answer to Previous Puzzle


JIIIM B TA PTA
AS|IFA MEN L A
EL|uN AM O T H
RSOARED I DlE S
HR SDEF
HUMI GOLFE D
WHO AUDI A I L
YOIN ARN NOEMA
HAIBIS LLE Y
DMYESLE
PIS R C AIL L
FE ASBLEmT HA I
REF SEAN S ASE
ORE D BTU


7 Chopped
finely
8 Zero-shaped
9 El -, Texas
10 Hitch in plans
13 Instruct
16 out a living


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at OuillDriverBooks.eom
2 3 M 4 6 89 10

"1- -|i |
12 16 14

a-31-9-^- ----


22 2~ 2b 26 2/ 2 8
29 30 -31 3p

3 6 3y 38



41 42 43 44 4b 4 /
mi -n_- .,
48 49 50
51 52
54 -A5


20 Sisters
23 LP spinners
24 "The
Mammoth
Hunters"
author
25 Golden rule
word
26 Competes for
27 Water, in
Tijuana
28 Calm
30 At the movies
32 Affirmative
34 From a
distance
35 Dupe
37 Approved
38 Tasty
toppings
40 Swung off-
course
41 Grime
42 Ben Affleck
film
43 Kind of collar
45 Former
science
magazine
46 Cattail
47 Poetry and
painting
50 Horror film
street


5-P27 (jP 2014 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: You've
printed letters about
grandchildren sleep-
ing with the grandparents.
What do you think about a 7-
year-old boy who sleeps with
his mother in her queen-
sized bed, displac-
ing his father? Dad
sleeps in his
daughter's room
(in twin beds).
This young boy is
very strong-willed,
as is his mother
She's quite proud
of this trait I know
my son, the father,
is not happy with
this arrangement,
but he says no one
will get any rest if AN I
they make the boy MAI
sleep in his own
room. This has
been going on since the child
was born.
I think my son is depressed
and unhappy, but lets the sit-
uation continue for many rea-
sons, one of which is that his
wife supports the family My
son works part time now be-
cause his wife demanded
that he be available to take
the kids to school and pick
them up in the middle of the
afternoon. So he hasn't
worked full time for three
years.
Their lives are dictated by
what the kids want or need,
and everybody else comes in
a distant second. The mother
is the dominant personality
in the family, and whatever
she says goes.
My son says this arrange-
ment must go on until both
kids are in middle school. By
then, my son will be 41 years
old, and I worry that he won't
be able to find full-time em-


mL
L


ployment I have suggested
counseling and offered to pay
for it, but he says he has al-
ready tried that and it didn't
do any good. Can you give me
some advice? -Worried
Grandmother
Dear Worried:
We know you are
concerned about
your son,but
which parent stays
home is between
him and his wife.
Nonetheless, if he
is unhappy, please
urge him to seek
counseling. He can
do it with or with-
out his wife. He
also should talk to
HE'S the children's pedi-
.BOX atrician about the
sleeping arrange-
ments and ask for
assistance in getting his wife
to recognize that she is doing
a great disservice to those
children.
DearAnnie: Quite fre-
quently during our Sunday
church services, the loud
noise of a crying baby or ba-
bies makes it difficult to hear
the sermon and other por-
tions of the worship service.
Instead of removing the child
from the service, these fami-
lies remain no matter how
long or loud the child
screams.
I do not know whether the
parents realize how disrup-
tive this is. I'd be glad to po-
litely speak with them after
church, but I cannot see who
they are from where I sit.
The church leadership
does nothing for fear of losing
members. I just want to hear
the word of God and not cry-
ing babies. Frustrated with
Noise


Dear Frustrated: We are
sure some parents would tell
you that a crying baby is also
a blessing. But there is a time
and place for everything. Par-
ents should take their
screaming children out of
places where they are disrup-
tive and disturbing to others.
Suggest to your church staff
that they set up a playroom
for young children, perhaps
supervised by responsible
teenage members or volun-
teers. Some toys and books
would go a long way toward
making church a pleasant ex-
perience for everyone.
DearAnnie: You were too
mild with "Upset Landlord,
Not Wicked Stepmother,"
whose husband's son moved
into his father's house and
isn't paying any rent.
There are compromises
that could start shaping the
son's behavior such as an-
nouncing the end of paying
utilities and cable. He'll pitch
a fit, but he'll survive. But you
are right that they should get
legal advice about who gets
the house when Dad dies. -
B.
Dear B.: Those compro-
mises are fine, but only if Dad
is willing to cut off payment
for cable and utilities. So far,
he isn't.
Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Email
your questions to anniesmail
box@comcastnet, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox, Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St., Her-
mosa Beach, CA 90254. To
find out more about Annie's
Mailbox and read features by
other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit
www creators. comn.




CiTus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


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WHAT? AREN'T WE
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Frank & Ernest


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m.,
3:50 p.m.,7 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Blended" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) In 3D. 4:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
No passes.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 12:45 p.m., 3:40 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG) 12:50 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:55 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:45 p.m.,8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) In 3D.


12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Blended" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 1 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) In 3D. 4:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG) 12:15 p.m., 3:20 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13)
3:45 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future Past" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to 70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenba N

"DWTHZS WG ST WZXVCEHZHTL CT


MWIH ... W ZSPH IWMZG LYSL W


BCKMJ MWPH LC YSEH GHHT BYHT W


BSG S NCKTR ZST." IVSTDCWG


LVKIISKL

Previous Solution: "Americans must honor the brave men and women who gave
their lives for the protection of this nation." Dan Lipinski
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-27


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


S' TRAW 1 1 iYEAH? I
0 Aag Y JeWON'T
ERO!UrL '10 D ME


COMICS


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 C7




C8 TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014


1 *Crnlef ] Ii 1b ^


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


*-..F1w I :^ IoP r .^i
Fa: 35) 6-565 1 ol.re: .88) 5-240 1*mal casifed 0hrni 0en n 0cm *bst: w0chonce0lie 0o


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
wit a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




K.S. LAND SERVICES.
LANDCLEARING, DIRT
WORK, DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE, AND MORE.
(352)302-2849




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Look

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


For SakA


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE




CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL!


30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966


Free
1 orange male tabby, 2
female, 1 black &
white, one tiger strip-
ped. 3 mo. old black
cats, males.
(352)447-0072
Leave Message
Free Cats
3- 4 yrs. old
spayed nuetered
Free to good home
(954) 214-4645
FREE KITTENS
7 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
FREE
Lab/Spaniel Mix
2 Females, 1 Male
2-3 yrs. old
(352) 422-6567
Free Pomeranian Mix,
Not neutered
(941) 447-1565



LOST CAT
Small spayed female.
Brown, tan, orange tor-
toise shell. Citrus
Springs N Caressa
Way. Woods south of
Rutland, west of
Deltona, East of Elcam.
Her name is Lola and
she is very timid. If
seen, please call Donna
(352)613-6499.
Lost Chihuahua
Tan, white markings
Near Diablo
Golf Course
(352) 835-6109




CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!I
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41


B-


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.


I ap oe3


P/T CLERICAL
Help Needed

Real Estate Office
Computer Skills &
Real Estate Lic.
Preferred. Email
jcenturytampabay.ir.co
m or Call
352-726-6668












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
FOR ALL SHIFTS
Apply Online: home
Lnstead.com/671


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com


F/T RECEPTIONIST

Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512


MDS Nurse,
RN/LPN

Crystal River Health
and Rehab is seeking:
a F/T MDS NURSE
The ideal candidate
must be an Exp.
RegisteredNurse/
Licensed Practical
Nurse, have MDS
long-term care exp.
Come be a part of our
team. We offer com-
petitive salary, 401 K,
Health, Dental, and
Vision. Email:
chris.delgado@north-
porthealth.com or
Call: 352-795-5044 to
come in for a tour.....


I '^
FRONT DESK

F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience &
experience with Ea
glesoft a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
lynn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.com

Office Manager

Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
to: 352-746-3838

Ophthalmic
Assistant

needed part time or
full time, ophthalmic
exp. preferred.
Apply in person
Monday Friday
8:00am-5:30pm to:
West Coast Eve
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246




Experienced
Plumbers, Pipe
Fitters, Welders
and Helpers

needed for large
commercial health-
care project in Wild-
wood. DFWP, EEO.
Apply via resume.
Fax 352-748-2990
or email
resume: jmoser
@nashincp-m.com




Private Club with
Huge Tiki Hut
Needing

*Staff Supervisor,
*Bartender,.Servers,
*Hostess, -Food run-
ner, *Server's assis-
tant, Bussers
and .Housekeeper
High volume
business. Must be
experienced & en-
ergetic with outgo-
ing personality. Must
have great cus-
tomer service skills.
Apply iDD n Person at
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando,
Mon-Fri., 2pm-5pm




DRIVERS
Medical Transport
Co. hiring. Clean DL.,
nights and wkends
Apply at: 204 W
Grace St. Inverness.
M-F 10a- 2p DFWP





































APPT. SETTERS
Great Pay Weekly.
Daily Bonuses
APPLY IN PERSON
6421 W. Homossa Tr.
352-503-6811

CAREER
OPPORTUNITY
Full Benefits
General Laborer

F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED Required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
*352-503-4930*

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547










NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School

Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM

Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE

(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu

START A CAREER
INA YEAR





GIFT SHOP/CAFE
seeks working
partner, or buyer
352-302-2194





2007 White Alum.
Shed. 10' X 20', $1500.
(352)601-6192,
(347)466-1506


Antiques

1800S CHILDS TOY
FLATIRON WITH HOT
PLATE 3.5"x2"x2" $40
OBO 352-270-3527

1800S CHILDS TOY
IRON SKILLET Horse n
Buggy pic imprint $40
OBO 352-270-3527

Antique Grinding
Wheel, early 1800's
heavy oak base
$120. (352) 341-2107


sqli_


DUDLEY'S
AUCTION

TWO AUCTIONS
Thurs. 5/29- Walk-
About Auction 3lm
OUTSIDE Treasures
furniture, tools,
INSIDE antiques,
decorative Items,
furnishings & more!
Sun. 6/1- Antique &
Collectible Auction
ipm-colns, jewelry,
art, vintage, fishing
Items, lots of
furniture, china,
porcelain and more!
......................
call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.















About Auction 3re
OUTSIDE Treasures
furniture, tools,
INSIDE antiques,
decorative Items,
furnishings & more!
Sun. 6/1- Antique &
Collectible Auction
iom-colns, jewelry,
art, vintage, fishing
Items, lots of
furniture, china,
porcelain and more!
call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.

GOLD FLATWARE 5
PC PLACE SET KINGS
INN ROSE never used
$20 352-270-3527


WEDGEWOOD CHINA
Lavender Grapes on
Cream 1950s new
never used $90
352-270-3527



2 Person Hot Spot
New, used 1 time
health forces sale
Pd. $4,200, Sell $3,500
(352) 621-5427



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SUNBEAM TOASTER
OVEN & COFFEE
MAKER WHITE $20
BOTH 746-5453









DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOW
TWO AUCTIONS
Thurs. 5/29- Walk-
About Auction 3Dm
OUTSIDE Treasures
furniture, tools,
INSIDE antiques,
decorative Items,
furnishings & morel
Sun. 6/1- Antique &
Collectible Auction
Ip.m-colns, jewelry,
art, vintage, fishing
Items, lots of
furniture, china,
porcelain and more!
......................
call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




4 Aluminum Ladders
two Extension,
one- 16ft, one- 12 ft.
$125.
Lawn Blower $20
352-382-3663
Sears 12" Wood Lathe
on a bench w/ 2
drawers on wheel,
incl. turning chisels
and 1/3hp grinder
$150. (352) 382-1814



Equalizer
$5.
(352)419-4464
Pair of speakers
$5.
(352)419-4464



Table & 6 chairs,
PVC,
excellent condition
$300.
(352) 302-9129



Bed, Trundle, like old
brass bed 8OW, 40D,
+ mattress, $300.
3 Bar Stools, 30"
Caned seats, Bent
wood style, New. $75.
ea. (352) 560-7526
CHINA CABINET
cherry wood, will hold
service for 12, original
wedding furn.,
exc. cond., $650.
(352) 419-6474
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
*352-795-0121*
DRESSER. Waterfall
Design 1940's. Great
condition. Asking only
$50. 527-6709
Entertainment Center
49" wide x 48" tall x
21" deep, dark wood
grain, $110.
Call Larry
(352) 344-1692
FIVE(5) OAK
CLAWFOOT DINING
CHAIRS, mid 1800's
upholstered seats one
with arms $125 set
(352)341-2107
GE 5 Cycle Dryer
Excellent $100.
1 Lrg. & 1 Small Office
Chairs Excellent
$50. ea or 2 for $75
352- 503-6313
Homosassa

V THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
Queen Inner spring,
Mattress & Spring
Excel. Cond $225.
White ext or Int. wood
Rockers $35 or 2 for
$50.352- 503-6313
Homosassa
Sofa & Love Seat
rattan trim, 2 match-
ing lamps, excel cond
non smoking no pets
$175 obo
Patio Furniture, white
Octagon Tbl., 4 chairs
& cushions, very nice
$80. 352-341-1015


Furniture
Serta King
Pillow-top Mattress
like new $150.
(352) 270-1366
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
Cub Cadet Modle-
Lt1050. 50" mower
w/muncher attch. Kokler
23hp,140 hrs. New btry.
42"Sears
sweeper/dump cart,
$1200 OBO.
(352)503-6795
Troy Built
Rototiller
Jr. Reartine
5hp, manuals.
Forward/Rev. $275.
(352)465-7506
WEED EATER GASO
LINE PUSH MOWER,
4.75 horsepower, excel-
lent condition, $80,
(352)465-1813



Garaae,,,







ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE

CH~pNCiJE

CLASSIFIED

w, Call your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966


*THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491

Clothing

DESIGNER EVAN
PICONE SUIT DBL
BRESTED White Linen
size 12-14 good cond
$20 OBO 352-270-3527
EVAN PICONE SUIT
NAVY DBL BRESTED
Linen size 12-14 good
cond $20 OBO
352-270-3527



3 Wheel Dog Stroller
holds up to 100 lbs
Cost $200.
Asking $100
Hardly used
(352) 382-7783
Antique Horse Collar
Mirror $150.
Hepa Air Cleaners
$100. for both
(352) 628-5085
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
French Provincial Set
w/loveseat, couch & end
table, cherry, good cond
$325. Men's &
Ladies Golf Clubs
$150. for both sets
(352) 228-9145

THIS OUT!



GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!!!



6 lines
-10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50



Golf Clubs, Bag
& Accessories
$100
Air Compressor
2.5 HP, $25.
(352) 527-8603
Homade quilt tops, 10
for $100. Cookie jars, 9
for $100. (352)795-7254
ORECK XL SIGNA-
TURE VACUUM UP-
RIGHT BAG Excel Cond
Works Great $90
352-270-3527
ORECK XL SIGNA-
TURE VACUUM UP-
RIGHT BAG Excel Cond
Works Great $100
352-270-3527


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted
Old Golf Cart
For Parts
(352) 564-2756


Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.
"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.




3 Wheel Dog Stroller
holds upto 100 lbs
Cost $200.
Asking $100
Hardly used
(352) 382-7783


Italian Slate
All Equipment $1,200
Nikon Mount Sigma
Lens 300 mm 1:4D
$250 (352) 422-3952
QUILTING TABLE
by Grace Company
for Long arm quilting
Twin to King size,
$500.
(352) 560-7526
Rainbow Vacuum
Cleaner and
Shampooer
exc. cond. except power
head, all attachments
$300.(352) 628-5085
Red Lion
Concrete Mixer
$75.
Golf Dolly
$30.
(352) 697-1757
Smithbilt Low Profile
Shed 10 x14 w/5ft
door, excel cond.
$1,400. obo
Located in Floral City
Duval Is 954-695-6721
Trailer Hookup
goes up or down $95.
Reeses Hitch
for Jeep has bolts &
hardware $95
(352) 489-3661



DISPLAY RACKS and
store fixtures,
retail store closing at
105 W. Main St., Inver-
ness.



4 Step Acorn Chair Lift,
$1,000, (352)621-3987
Adult Wheelchair
$50.
Bedside Commode
$40
(352) 628-1029
Small scooter, $350.
Large Scooter w/lift,
$1,000, (352)621-3987
TRANSPORT WHEEL
CHAIR new condition
$50. Call (352)746-2729



ACCORDION older ac-
cordion large size $50.
Call (352)746-2729



TREADMILL
Multi-Modes,
A 1 Shape,
$125.
(352)746-4879



3 WHEEL BIKE three
wheel bike $100. Call
(352)746-2729
4 Fishing Rods
3 of them custom
made, all with 10 reels
#704 and 712,
$25.00 to $65.00
(352) 382-1814
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Yamaha '00 GolfCart
Canvas Enclosure
New Batteries $2288.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678



Haulmark 6x12
'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand
New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678

Sell or Swa


BELLA
Bella, 18-month-old
Chocolate lab mix,
spayed, housebrkn
& microchipped.
Sweet, kind, gentle
dog, good w/other
animals. UTD on
shots. Sits & waits
patiently for treats,
nice temperament.
Adoption fee $30.00
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821 or
rwmoak@att.net.

Birds for Sale
parakeets $10. ea.
cockatiels $35. ea.
lovebirds $30. ea.
Goffin cockatoo $400.
Mitred $100.
45 gal. aquarium
$75. 352-287-1522


BUD
THIS BUD'S FOR
YOU! Bud, young ter-
rier mix, brown/white
in color, HW-neg, ap-
pears housebrkn, very
friendly & playful.
Loves people, wants
to be your lapdog. All
shots current. Should
be only dog in the
home. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
or 352-697- 2682

Cockatoo
7 yrs old looking for
good home, includes
large cage. $500
(352) 489-4127
Energetic 12 week
Deerhead Chihuahua
Male, H/C, $50.
Sweet IIwk, Mini
Daschund Male $150.
Registered/Puppy Kits
Janet (352) 628-7852
FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732

Husky Pups
12 wks old
1 male, 1 female
purebred, up to date
on shots, health cert.
$500. 352-246-3000


479 53

861
1235B


753469218
6 1. 2 8 7 3 9 4,5

94852167-3
194 28 5367
387946152
5263 117894


k M
ANDRE
Andre, beautiful
4-y.o. probable
Boxer mix, neutered,
HW negative, ap-
pears housebroken.
Very sweet boy,
good w/other dogs
& cats. Learning
new skills, interacts
well w/people.
Crate-trained,
eager to please.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I eat




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MIN PIN PUPPIES
2 Blue, 2 Fawn,
1 Chocolate 15 inch
10-15 Ibs, Health Certs
CKC. $1,200-$1,400.
(352) 503-7919










QUAID
Quaid, a beautiful
approx. 3-5 y.o. Bull-
dog mix, very quiet
& patient. Appears
housebrkn, is eager
to please. Knows
some basic com-
mands, responds
well to a prong
training collar.
Should be only
pet in the home.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
WESTINESE PUPPIES
All white, no shed,
m medical certicate,
9 weeks old, $500. ea
Call After 3pm.
(352) 586-0305




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

INVERNESS
1 Bd. Rm. $325. mo.
2 Bd. Rm. $360. mo.
Both $500. Dep. each
No Pets 352-726-7951
LECANTO
2BR DW Moble, $550.
mo. (352) 765-4135


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on '2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

NEW NEW NEW
1460 Sq ft 3/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $60k
352-795-2377
NEW NEW NEW
MUST SEE
2036 Sq ft 4/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $70k
352-795-2377

Palm Harbor Parade
of Homes!!
7 new models to
view, 3 models that
MUST, must be liqui-
dated. Save over
$26k, 4/2 in the 70's.
FREE factory tours!
plantcitv.
palmharbor.com or
800-622-2832

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$4 1,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




3/2 WATERFRONT,
DOUBLEWIDE
$75.900.
10480 S. McClung Lp.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000




OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


CLASSIFIED


HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/1' BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds, must be
seen to appreciate
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330




must sell!
* 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441
2 Bedroom, 1 2Bath,
turn, Carport,
scrn rm good value,
In quiet 55+Park
$5,500. 386-234-0254
(352) 748-5325




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640




FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375. Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
HOMOSASSA
1BR, appl's & Util. Incl'd.
$650. mo + sec.,
352-628-6537
INVERNESS
Sm place, S. Inverness,
for single person. Very
prv. UtI. incl. Prv prkg,
$500/mo. Call
(352)560-0370, Cell
(727)919-1119




INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio
in quiet area.
$525/mo + $525 Sec;
352-344-0238




Lecanto
2/1, $650. + elect.
(352) 628-7633


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




US 19 Office $550.
office/warehouse
1/b-lba$1200. util.
incl. 352-634-0129




HOMOSASSA
1/1, Duplex $435. mo.
2/1 Duplex $525 mo.
1st.& Sec, non smoker
Pets-? 352-212-4981




CRYSTAL RIVER
Remodeled Cottage
1/1, $460 mo 601-6314
HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
1BR, 1BA, Furnished
55+ Park $595. mo.
(352) 344-1380




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/B $850., sec. $450.
Fenced Yd.563-9857



Beverly Hills
1 bdm, psbl 2, 1 bath
$500. first/last
352-220-2958
BEVERLY HILLS
Lrg. Remodeled 2/2/2,
$750. mo. 1st/last/sec.
No Pets 352-726-2280



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
LAKE FRONT HOME
spectacular views,
spacious 3/2/2,
$750 (908) 322-6529



Homosassa
reliable, ref's, no pets
$350. mo.inc. until. w/d
access 352-228-3659


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebicvahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


EU4L .Q1.IK
OPPRTUrNT


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 C9


For Sale%^


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE
CH~p.NJCLE



CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL !


30 Days
$58.50

Its Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966




Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com




UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


HERMAN'
5-27 LanghingStonk Licnring Inc, Dist by Univorsal Unlick, 2014

"D'you get the feeling one of us
is getting ripped off?"


#1 Employment source is







C I'()NI C' 1





www. ch ron ici eonIi ne.cor


.JZak


Airport Transport
352-746-7595





SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019,201-5147

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


K.S. LAND
SERVICES LLC
352-302-2849



A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352-422-7279 *k*
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



*ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
sRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
P FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508*
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625



Kat's Kritter Kare
Pet Sitting


mji
Kitchen looking tired?
Re-Face not Replace!
KITCHEN SOLUTIONS
*(352) 794-3747"




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442

K.S. LAND SERVICES.
LANDCLEARING, DIRT
WORK, DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE, AND MORE.
(352)302-2849




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086




AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., LIc/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320

Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641


Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


MiscSe^rice


3' NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570




V ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746


Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Clean View: Pressure
washing windowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.






Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838












Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625







Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Tree-services removal &
trimming cheapest
prices exp climber call
us today 352-364-2010



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist
Summer Tune $S 95

Up Special 47 $
Guaranteeing lOx Cleaner Air
orf tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusve Laser Particle Scan to determine
the quality of the airyou breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires May 31, 2014
= Lh .[ AC1815891
... Back To New s99
Heating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz




WINDOW 0' ,"
GE7NIE. '
W, n 0 and a Whole Lot M
*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


YOUR INTERLOCKING i
BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST _|


LEEIIL I
















*Generators Ltghting Fixtures
*Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
P00L


















Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
LAND PAER LLC






352- 364-461088







%MR.
SELECTRICAL
SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost




6575 W. Gulf to L iake Hwy.
*Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
*Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
352-364-4610
.MR.

6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
24 lno---n-l- - --i a -V -ra -Week
I24 Hours a DaY 7 DaYS a Week


GENERAL j
Stand Alone .
Generator

Thomas Electric LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-61-124


'This Sat 6pm |

Preview 5pm
Antiques, Coins, Art, Jewelry,
Military and Estate Items

amBRed Barn Auctions
4535 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
Terms 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash Ft Sales Tax
AB 3172 AU4416
Sall 419 7 to
12 Consign Now
Rates as low as 2 % We Buy Estates









WATER HEATERS
SLAB LEAKS REPIPES
FAUCETS TOILETS
DRAIN CLEANING
WATER FILTRATION
ALL PLUMBING REPAIRS
LICENSED CFC1426865
www.modern-plumbing.com

i^^A^*


rIlalaRei Come visit our
III slall R r showroom for a
P|Inlps.ilIers, huge selection of
Healers tile, pavers, pool
& SaNl Svsleins finishes and pool
~equipment.





P 0roo .t ,Su .. ..... .
smwPos.COm 382-4421





SERVING CIITRS COUNTY lONGER THAN THE REST
CONSISTENTLY VOTED BEST OF THE EST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install
7 3 Time Winner
2011 -2012-2013

746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded S


J AF
Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
l All Home Repairs
t* Small Carpentry
Fencing
A Nu" S:eening
o i P O (lean Dryer Vents
ffl,, Joble & Dependable
Eh" fp.,ience lifelong
I 352-344-0905
Sell: 400-1722
9 ,J Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761




FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C
and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202
Lic.#CAC057482


T.Airport>^axi
anspr.ai.or


ogo% zIarza


^R I CL ANIN I 1LF^^




CIO TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014


* ATTN Homebuvers
100% financing avail.
Government Program.
You do not need perfect
credit. Call or email
to get qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickpbfigmail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854,FL#9096
NLMS ID 149709






FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514










Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+ Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's,
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202


PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870






2 Bed 1 Bath CP. Tile
throughout. Updated
bath, roof '07. New paint
in/out. $45K. 527-1239


Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282



2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12 x 20 shed,
etc. $135,000.
(352) 419-6327




ForSfle(u'.
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084



Inverness
2 bedroom 1 bath
house. Lot 100x150.
Zoned industrial.
Move-in condition.
$25,000 cash as is.
1309 Bruce Street.
Phone 352-726-7362.


^NN

Realty Connect
Buying or Selling?
Waterfront,
Acreage, Golf
Homes & More!
FREE List of
Available Homes!
TheFLDream.com
Contact the
Premier Real
Estate Group
Realty Connect
(352) 341-2588 or
(352) 212-1446
T. Paduano, Broker



2BR, 1BA, Singlewide,
Remodeled
Carport & Deck,
2 Storage sheds
55+Community $3,500
(440) 742-0559


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY !!


CLASSIFIED

,^q"n^^m^to


m, Sugarmill Woods
2900 sq. ft 3bd/2 /2ba
pool tile roof, 2 lots,
234k (352) 382-8957







4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282







3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods
$119.900.
1 Fig Court W.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.








"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
www.
citruscriffers.com


Citrs.Cunt
Homes .1*


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments





$100,000. + Closing
Cost will get you this
2,100 Sq. Ft.,
3BR, 3'/2BA, Fully Furn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


I Ah-


Desperately
Need Rentals


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Hoe




* FLORAL CITY *
Waterfront. 6 adj.
Lots, 3/4 acre on chain
of lakes. Huge oaks,
good fishing. $110,000
OBO. (352)596-2921


Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafu-eoast
Properlies.com
"To view
my properties"


Floral City, 1 acre cnr
lot Oak Forest, S Fern
Pt. nice oaks & pine
trees, pretty cleared
home site only $14,500
obo 352- 678-7145





Minn Kota Trolling
Motor with Interstate
Batter, 451b Bow
Mount Foot Control
$250. Trailer Dolly $30.,
(352) 697-1757


Yamaha
2013, Motor
90 HP, 4 stroke
25hrs on motor $7,400
(352) 423-0289





BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510*


BOAT TRAILER
Aluminum, NEW 2014
18 -20 FT w/tortion
axle, folding tonque,
LED lights, and disc
brakes all below cost
@ $2,195. Open Mon.
Wednesday & Friday
Only(352) 527-3555


HURRICANE
'99, Deck Boat, w/ trlr.
22ft 8 inch. 115 Yam.,
outboard, $2,900
(352) 228-1340
POLAR SKIFF
1995, 17ft, CC, 8ft Wide
75HP Yamaha, Trailer,
very good cond. $4,200
352-476-1113
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



Newmar
96 Mountain Aire
great cond. clean,
newer Jasper engine
49,905 mi. Engine &
6.5 Kw Generator serv-
iced 3/14. Ready for
the road! $29k,
352-586-8121
or 318-245-4565
WE BUY RVS,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



FLAGSTAFF
2006, 27 ft, Super Light
series, used 2 times,
due to illness must sell
excel, cond., 30" door
opening for wheelchair
access, one slide out
$11,400. 352-489-8637


CHOOSE CAR SEAT: -
BYAGE & SIZE


THE NUMBER
OF PEOPLE


WHOTHINK


THEY HAVE THEIR
CHILD IN THE RIGHT
SEAT.


KNOW FOR SURE



IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.


VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT


*** |e Child Car
NlTSA Vo Safety
ww.at sty


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ttWORDY GURDlIY) .......


WORlU I URU @BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Luxuriant scrub vegetation (1) EveTry answer is a rhyming
I- '- '- '-' ~ pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Adorable skydiving "para" device (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
Definition tells you how many
3. Ensure the ruin of a bride's man (1) syllables in each word.
1 1C2014 UFS,Dist. by Univ Jc ckfor UFS
4. Senate gofers' drama platforms (2)


5. Pullover raincoat bigwig (2)

I 1 I I 1 1 i -
6. Prejudiced person's navy warships (2)


7. Putting a stop to leaping with a pole (2)


ONIVflfVA 9NILVH-L S"I11VOIHA S091O "9 OHONHOH0MNOd 9
S-1 viS SaOVd S 0SW oIW K0oo '11 N flH3 1_TE HSf HSflA'i I
5-27-14 S1IMSNV








Tust Us To Do It RIGHT We're FILlY INSURED for
IBotl general Uabilit.1 li D Whote' Coeipl


fi3ST.-
)[ .f 't .T


("ol


Need a JOB?

#1 Employment source is


CI'] 16.\ Classifieds




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


6jlV- oil3 a-ll (eia3q olll dni.ffl





pim te (4 1jTTW O? t


TUESDAY, MAY 27, 2014 CII


/


Call For A
s% Free J
Estimatee./ A

Oer
40 Years of
Experience

^^ (~Maq toto*cfc
q % i t ,ie.'d
* Sod & Sod Sales j
All Varieties Available "
Removal & Installation
Available to Pick-up or Deliver
By the Plug, Piece, Pallet or Truckload
* Irrigation
Installation & Repair -
Service Plans Available


((!W(wd aaW wliyu
"^ li~k Pww&t


Ow Sod Is aiNwys f"sh from thFARM!
rallet----- --rv--------- ------- -------
Irrigation Service Call Pallet of Sod, Delivery

orePick/Up

With coupon. Expires 6/30/14 I I I
----------------------------I I With coupon. Expires 6/30/14
L / --


3 Time Winner
2011-2012- M13


Serving Citrus for over 40 years
www.cloverlawnsod.com


4


i


W10-criLl
SOD &
ol0
IRRIGATION


.




C12 TUESDAY, LMAY 27, 2014


NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts. sales CHEVROLET
Mobile Repair/Maint. 1996, Blazer,
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins. 4 door, 89K miles
$2,900.
c 352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
onn2 CI5in.v InL


Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41
KIA
2003, Rio,
Ice cold AC
$4,390.
352-341-0018


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794, Call AJ
813-458-0584
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


%l11t VKlVLC 1
2001, Impala
$4,495.
352-341-0018
FORD
'07, Fusion SEL, V6
34K mi., $10, 500.
Excel. Condition.
(352) 489-6996
HYUNDAI
'06, Sonata, V6, 97k mi.
new AC, young tires,
perfect maint.
$6,200 (352) 231-2265
KIA
'06, Spectra, EX,
4 door, auto, air,
excel, cond. $4,995
obo (352) 621-0248
lllllll






SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE

CHLRNiCLE

CLASSIFIED

.3 SPECIALS **
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

S Call your
Classified
representative
for details.
352-563-5966

SOLD
Chrysler
2005 PT Cruiser
touring edition, low
mil, new tires,1 owner
WE DO IT ALLL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440



AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. JUNE 1st.
1-800-438-8559
CORVETTE
1979 350 Auto, Air,
70% Restored, 20,500
miles on motor. $8,500
(352) 422-3952
FORD
'64, Galaxy 500 2 door
hardtop, 352 modi-
fied, all original, needs
body work, runs excel.
$4,950 obo 476-3688




IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII
MERCEDES
'84, Convertible, &
Hard top, New tires,
battery & lines. Runs
great, body excellent
10,500. 352-382-7022



DODGE
'97, Dakota, SLT
Excellent Running
Truck $2,400.
(352) 419-5146
TOYOTA
'07. Tacoma, club cab
4cyl, auto, PW, PL, CD,
cruise, tow pkg. toolbx
looks like 2014, 59k mi
$12,800, 352-860-1106


power windows, locks,
AC, $3,990.
352-341-0018
FORD
1997 Explorer, 6 cyl.,
auto., Class II hitch
installed, $2,100
(352) 233-3837


GMC
1996, Safari
passenger Van
1 owner $3,450
352-341-0018




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County


Noie oCeito,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONiCLE


Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055

HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678

HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678




Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at

koic s t rdtr


HONDA
Red 2012 CBR 250
Exc cond, transfer-
able warr. 4700 miles,
$2700 (352) 220-6032
KAWASAKI
2003 1600 Vulcan
classic. Full dress,
senior owner, X-clean,
4980 ml, $5800 obo
(352) 860-1106
SUZUKI
'05, Bergman,
400CC, Scooter
reconditioned $2,500
(352) 503-7583
Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678




aovdeals.com from April
25, 2014-May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014


592-0527 TUCRN
Goldstein, David 2014-CP-184 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2014-CP-184
IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID GOLDSTEIN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DAVID GOLDSTEIN, deceased, whose date of
death was December 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for CITRUS County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness,
F134450. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the person-
al
representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COpy OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is May 20, 2014.
Personal Representative:
By: /s/ ANDRE ERLANDSON
4088 S. Kindness Pt., Homosassa, Florida 34446
Attorney for the estate:
By: /s/ Robert S. Christensen
ROBERTS. CHRISTENSEN, ESQ.
P.O.Box 415, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447
Telephone: (352)382-7934, Fax: (352)382-7936, E-Mail: christensenlaweearthlink.net
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle: May 20 & 27, 2014

593-0527 TUCRN
McMullen, Mary M. 2014-CP-69 NTC
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEVY COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 2014-CP-69
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF:
MARY MARGUERITE McMULLEN A/K/A MARY M. McMULLEN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the Estate of MARY MARGUERITE McMULLEN A/K/A MARY M.
McMULLEN, deceased, whose date of death was November 15,2013, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Levy County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
355 S. Court Street, Bronson, Florida 32621. The names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Representative's Attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's Estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 20, 2014.
Personal Representative:
By: /s/ HELEN ADAIR DUKE
3910 SE 193rd Place, Yankeetown, FL 34498-2134
Attorney for Personal Representative:
By: /s/ KAREN 0. GAFFNEY, Esquire, Florida Bar No.: 500682
Karen 0. Gaffney, P.A.
205 West Dampier Street, Inverness, FL, 34450
Telephone: (352)726-9222, E-Mail Address: pleadings@karengaffney.com
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICE: May 20 & 27, 2014

596-0603 TUCRN
Gotch, Virginia 2014-CP-335 NTC-SA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2014-CP-335
IN RE: ESTATE OF VIRGINIA GOTCH,,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered
in the estate of VIRGINIA GOTCH, deceased, File Number: 2014-CP-335, by the Cir-
cuit Court for CITRUS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date of death was June 30,
2013; and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by
such order are:
Name Address
DAVID V. GOTCH 4310 Sheard Rd., Kansasville, WI 53139
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is May 27, 2014.
Personal Representative:
By: /s/ DAVID V. GOTCH
4310 Sheard Rd., Kansasville, WI 53139
Attorney for the estate:
By: /s/ Robert S. Christensen, Florida Bar Number 0075272
ROBERT S. CHRISTENSEN, ESQ., Attorney for the estate
P.O.Box 415, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447
Telephone: (352)382-7934, Fax: (352)382-7936, E-Mail: christensenlaweearthlink.net
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 27 & June 3, 2014


595-0527 TUCRN
NOTICE OF MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
HISTORICAL RESOURCES ADVISORY BOARD
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Historical Resources Advisory
Board will meet on Wednesday, June 4, 2014, at 4:00 PM at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida, to discuss busi-
ness of the Historical Resources Advisory Board which may properly come before
them.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Historical Resources
Advisory Board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Jim Faulkner, Director
Geographic Resources and Community Planning
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 27 ,2014.

596-0527 TUCRN
ENTERPRISE ZONE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY BOARD MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
ENTERPRISE ZONE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Enterprise Zone Development
Agency Board will meet on Friday, June 6, 2014, at 9:00 AM at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida, to discuss busi-
ness of the Enterprise Zone Development Agency Board which may properly come
before them.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two (2) days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD Telephone
(352) 341-6580.
f a person decides to apped any decision made by the Enterpnse Zone Devel-
opment Agency Board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting,
he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
BY: Jim Faulkner, Director
Geographic Resources and Community Planning
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 27, 2014.


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Featuring enS
o Assisted Living
o Dental -
o Dermatology
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Hearing
o Heart Health
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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Irregular Heartbeat?


Everyone knows that
an irregular heartbeat is
something you should
have checked out, but
not everyone knows
where to go. Your
general practitioner
probably has a good
idea of where to send
you.


Joyce Gruver of Floral City, Florida
asked her usual doctors just that when
she knew something was wrong-she'd
been feeling short of breath and
exhausted, and had a persistent cough.
She didn't know what the problem
might be.
"I just thought I was getting old," said
Joyce, but she asked her family doctor
anyway. He sent her to Citrus Memorial
Hospital for an EKG (an
electrocardiogram, which checks for
electrical problems in the heart).
Her cardiologist referred her to the
Arrhythmia Center of Florida at Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point in
Hudson. The medical center was
recognized in US News and World
Report, which named it one of the "Top
50 Hospitals in the Nation" for heart
procedures and it is known by
physicians in Florida and beyond for its
excellent programs, its nationally-
acclaimed Heart Institute, and the
Arrhythmia Center of Florida.
Joyce and her husband Jim, a veteran,
visited Regional Medical Center, where
Joyce underwent a procedure called the
Convergent Procedure. It is used to treat
patients with persistent atrial
fibrillation-irregular heartbeat.
Performed by Cardiothoracic Surgeon
Dr. Wahl and Electrophysiologist Dr.
Yamamura, the Convergent Procedure
took about seven hours to complete and
Joyce spent three days in intensive care.
But she now has no problems with
arrhythmia, and her shortness of
breath, exhaustion, and cough are gone.
"I feel fantastic now and I'm not just
bragging!" she said. "One week ago I


had an electrocardiogram and it came
back perfect."
The procedure involves a
Cardiothoracic Surgeon threading a
special catheter called a trochar through
a small incision made in the patient's
abdomen, which allows access to the
posterior of the atrium of the heart.
Then, using radiofrequency (focused
heat), Dr. Wahl produced complete
linear lesions (scar tissue) on the
outside of the heart. This blocks
abnormal electrical signals, effectively
interrupting them and stopping the
cause of the arrhythmia. The
Electrophysiologist then navigates a
different catheter, called an ablation
catheter, through the groin area to gain
access to the upper left chamber of the
heart, checking to ensure that the
lesions are completely connected. He
also treats the arrhythmia from the
inside of the left atrium.

Dr. Goyal, an
Electrophysiologist at The
Arrhythmia Center of Florida,
explained that the
Electrophysiologist is looking
for electrical activity.
"We look at how well the ablation
worked-it should be electrically silent-
if there are any gaps we find them and
close them off."
Dr. Yamamura explained that Mrs.
Gruver was a perfect candidate for the
procedure because drug therapies had
proved ineffective, as had a
Cardioversion procedure.
"Her left atrium was so enlarged
already," he explained. "I felt like the
only shot she had was the Convergent
Procedure. It is more invasive but the
success rate is much higher for patients
like Mrs. Gruver, who have failed other
options and continue to have persistent
atrial fibrillation."

An arrhythmia can be a small
problem, not affecting the
sufferer's life, or it can turn
dangerous.
It can be the result of any change or
complication in the electrical pathway
running from the upper to the lower
chambers of the heart, and can cause


the heart to beat either too fast, too
slow, or an unpredictable combination
of the two. Sufferers often feel a racing
heartbeat or a strange fluttering
sensation, which can be startling and
uncomfortable. Other symptoms
include some of those noticed by Mrs.
Gruver, such as fatigue or exhaustion,
weakness, dizziness or fainting,
difficulty breathing, and chest pain.
Physicians participating in the Atrial
Fibrillation Program at the Arrhythmia
Center of Florida include:
Electrophysiologists Luis R Annoni, MD;
Rajiva Goyal, MD; Raul Jimenez, MD;
Huang-Ta Lin, MD; Darshan V. Patel,
MD; and Kenneth H Yamamura, MD.
Cardiothoracic Surgeons include
Marshall DeSantis, MD, N.S. Rattehalli,
MD, and Michael Wahl, MD. They work
together, combining their skills in order
to provide treatment options for even
the hardest to treat arrhythmias.

"We don't want those patients
to give up," said Dr. Wahl. "We
are pushing for them and we
have an alternative."
The Arrhythmia Center of Florida at
Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point
has the most up-to-date technology,
which they use to diagnose and treat
their patients. Their state-of-the-art
equipment includes an advanced 3D
mapping system and CT imaging. They
also master new techniques, such as
Cardiac Cryoablation, in which the
ablation is completed with cold rather
than heat.
There are a variety of other treatment
options as well, and the experts at The
Arrhythmia Center of Florida are happy
to help you find the best one for treating
your atrial fibrillation and other
arrhythmias. Some are as simple as a
lifestyle change, or blood thinners or
other medications to control symptoms
and lower risk factors for high blood
pressure and heart disease, which can
lead to arrhythmia or worse. More
specialized treatment options include: a
pacemaker; Cardiac Resynchronization
Therapy (CRT); Implantable Cardioverter
Defibrillator (ICD); Atrioventricular
Nodal (AVN) Ablation; Inappropriate
Sinus Tachycardia (1ST) Ablation;


Premature Ventricular Contraction
(PVC) Ablation; Supraventricular
Tachycardia (SVT) Ablation; and
Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation.

"The treatment of atrial
fibrillation is very complex,"
explained Dr. Wahl. "We
carefully evaluate patients to
make sure there are no
underlying structural problems
that need to be repaired. If a
patient does well with medicine
or non-invasive procedures,
then we leave them alone."
Joyce Gruver is a living testament to
the possible results of the one-on-one
care and expert techniques used at the
Arrhythmia Center of Florida.
"She is a completely changed woman
now," said Dr. Yamamura. "When she
came in, she was desperate. She was
very symptomatic. Her heart rate was
very fast and difficult to control." Now,
she enjoys a steady heartbeat, thanks to
her Convergent Procedure and the
doctors at the Arrhythmia Center of
Florida at Regional Medical Center
Bayonet Point.

The Arrhythmia Center of
Florida works to promote
awareness of arrhythmia and
its dangers, as well as other
potentially life-threatening
cardiac conditions. Information
about their advanced
technologies, patient care and
education, and preparing for
procedures can be found on
their web site, at
www.yourheartbeat.com.


Regional Medical Center
Bayonet Pint
is located at 14000 Fivay Road in
Hudson, Florida.

For more information on
Regional Medical Center
Bayonet Point,
visit www.RMCHealth.com
or call (727) 819-2929
Toll Free: (855) 534-4325


G2 Tuesday, May 27, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Darshan V. Patel, MD


Huang-Ta Un, MD Raul Jimenez, MD Rajiva Goyal, MD Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD


Your Heart


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Luisol R. Annoni, MD
Medical Director


Tuesday, May 27, 2014 G3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Profiles


-Pr fi iesHealth-^


N"' N~te tion
" Dermatology
- Eyecare
r Foot Care
- Hearing
- Heart Helith
-Medical
Research
andmoe.
unique senior care
so.utons provided
by Carolyn, Melisa
and Amny of Superior
flowerr Spfinp
ALFlon pages


I a' I


Gerry Mulligan
Publisher

Trina Murphy
Advertising/Operations Director

Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager


Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429


We are excited to present
this special advertising
section providing you with a
better knowledge about a
variety of local health related
businesses. In these
advertisements, readers will
learn about the rich history
of these businesses and
about the products and
services they offer. These
businesses provide an
excellent choice for
customers to meet their
health needs. They make our


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



Affordable dental service


Our dentistry staff
offers high quality
dentistry in a friendly
atmosphere. From the
moment you enter our
office, our caring staff
welcomes you with a
smile. We strive to pro-
vide quality dentistry at
affordable prices.

Dr. Welch and associates take time
in reviewing the recommended treat-
ment that is within your financial
means and will answer any questions
or concerns that you may have. Our
friendly staff will ensure that your
visit is as pleasant as possible. Our
monthly specials are geared to help


people afford dental services, whether
you have insurance or not.
Value Dental offers several types of
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Our crown and bridge lab has more
than 30 years experience.
We offer three levels of dentures so
everyone can afford to have new
teeth. We also offer root canal ther-
apy in our office.
If you make an early appointment
we can reline and repair your den-
tures the same day.

Value Dental
6824 Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River
Phone: (352) 794-6139
7425 Spring Hill Dr.
Spring Hill
(352) 684-1274


Value Dental Care, Inc.


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WE ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO SERVING YOU AT ANY OF OUR LOCATIONS.
7425 Spring Hill Dr., Spring Hill 352-684-1274 6824 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 352-794-6139


Health


community a better place to
live with their choices of
products and services and
serve as an integral part of
the community through
participation in community
events and fundraisers.

We are confident you will
find this publication useful
and interesting and we
encourage your support of
these local businesses as
they help our community
grow and prosper.


G4 Tuesday, May 27, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


As an Audiologist and Mom, She



Conquers Hearing Loss 24 Hours a Day!


Dr. Angela SchIeY

Au.D.
Citrus County's
One and Only
Doctor of Audiology


Dr. Angela Schenk, of
Gardner Audiology in
Crystal River and
Inverness, is an
audiologist with the
highest degree in
hearing science and a
hearing aid expert. But
she's also a mom of
hearing impaired
Children and the wife of
a hearing aid user.

Originally from Greenwood,
Irn.:i.,lina, she joined Gardner
uLiIiology in 2013, after
.'.,:.rking in the field for 13
',-ars in both Florida and
f levada. Her husband Steve,
,i professor in the biology
department at CFC's Citrus
campus, has worn a
hearing aid since he was a
child, and their two
children are hearing-
impaired as well-the
result of a genetic
condition called
EBranchio-Oto-Renal
syndrome (BOR).
Her oldest son's
hearing appeared
S s normal when he
was born. "Our
son had one
ear that was
J smaller than
S J the other,"
said Schenk,
""but he passed his newborn
hearing screening so not much was
thought of it by us or his


pediatrician." He learned to speak
normally, but soon after the birth of
her youngest son a little more than
two years later, the Schenks noticed
that he wasn't responding as well to
their voices. He got a hearing aid at
the age of two and a half.
Her profession allows Dr. Schenk
to not only understand her
children's needs, but also the ever-
improving technologies available to
help them hear. When her youngest
son was born with barely-formed
ears and no apparent ear canals,
she was "devastated."
Her son had a CT scan soon after
his birth, and it was discovered that
his middle and inner ears were
intact-making him a candidate for
hearing aids. He was fit with his
first one at 3 weeks old, and started
speech-language therapy at 10
months.
Now, thanks to more than four
years of speech therapy, his hearing
aids, and his effort, she said her
younger son's speech is
understandable to most listeners.
At the age of five, he'll be eligible
for a bone-anchored hearing aid. Dr.
Schenk explained that this is an
implantable prosthetic device.
"Titanium screws are implanted in
the bone behind the ear." An
abutment allows a hearing aid to be






www.gardneraudiology.com


"His grandparents constantly tell
me how much his speech has
improved when they talk on the
phone or via Skype," she said.
"He LOVES his hearing aid
and will not go without it
unless he is playing in water.
He even sleeps in it!"

attached. "Because it is implanted,
we no longer have to go through
hair and skin -there is direct
stimulation to the bone and
therefore better hearing."
Dr. Schenk's experience as an
audiologist allows her to
understand how best to meet the
needs of her hearing-impaired
children and her adult patients in
Inverness and Crystal River.

Gardner Audiology
700 SE 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL at Ste. 11
352-795-5700

820 S. Bea Ave.
Inverness, FL
352-795-5700

www.gardneraudiologyv.com


Tuesday, May 27, 2014 G5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




6 Tuesday, May 27, 2014 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Suncoast Primary Care: Growing

In Tandem With Citrus County


Citrus County has grown
considerably over the past
decade, and in line with
this growth, the humble one
physician practice of
Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists in Citrus Springs
has danced in step with the
county through these years.

Because of the numerous patients calling
the office their primary healthcare provider of
choice, it wasn't long until word of mouth
inevitably gave birth to two more clinics in
Inverness and Homosassa. These two addi-
tions have been strategically helpful in provid-
ing patients with Suncoast Primary's distinc-
tive medical services by bringing the clinic
closer to the patients. This way, members of
the community will no longer have to drive too
far to enjoy Suncoast Primary Care's trade-
mark Modern Medicine, the Old Fashioned
Way.
In the leadership of the formidable Dr.
Alex T. Villacastin, Suncoast Primary
Care Specialists is embarking on a
new trajectory of calculated growth,
through the opening of a fourth clinic
in Hernando.
Located at the Publix Mall in the northeast
corner of Norvell Bryant (486) and Forest
Ridge, Suncoast Primary Care Specialists -
Citrus Hills is scheduled to begin serving the
community in the summer of 2014.
Established providers, as well as new ones
who will join the Suncoast family, will rotate in
the four facilities so each patient's provider
preference is catered to.
In the spirit of Suncoast's hospitality and
inclusiveness, Suncoast Primary Care
Specialists Citrus Hills will project a
compact, efficient and well-appointed, service
oriented system with available ancillary
services like EKG, Ultra-sound, Pulmonary
Function Test, PT-INR, and labs, among
others. Bone density tests and Xrays are
available in other Suncoast Primary clinic
locations. Four highly trained doctors, five
mid-level providers, and highly trained medical
assistants and support staff are ready to
welcome current and new patients needing
family medicine, general practice, and internal
medicine needs.


Navarro, Board Certified in Family Medicine;
Dr. Alistair Co, Board Certified in Family
Medicine; Maria Villacastin, ARNP-C;
Alexander Villacastin, ARNPC; Sheila
Villacastin, ARNP-C; and Lawrence
Stawkowski, PA-C. Two more providers are
joining the team, with the support of
physicians and providers from specific
medical specialties who rotate on a regular
basis at a Multi- Specialty Clinic located on-
site for further patient convenience.
Suncoast Primary providers maintain
hospital privileges at both Citrus Memorial
Hospital and Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center. Dr. Villacastin also keeps visiting
privileges in several nursing homes and
assisted living facilities in the county. This
puts him in a position to come up with a larger
picture and monitor the flow of care of any
given patient. He encourages his team to strive
within reason to get to know the patient,
beyond their physical condition, stating,"
When you understand the whole patient, they
will open up and work with their doctor, and
follow their treatment plan better."
Looking forward, Suncoast Primary
Care Specialists works proactively to
stay ahead of the ever-changing
healthcare and insurance landscape by
adapting and reinventing itself, always
putting the patient's well-being first.




.'L- C ..t


It is continuously studying ways in which
to better serve the Citrus County community.
Its involvement in the Nature Coast
Accountable Care Organization is
manifestation to this calculated development.
It affords the group better accountability and
healthcare quality and cost, and passes these
benefits on to the patients, providing a
significantly improved patient outcome.
Suncoast Primary Care Specialists gives
back to the local community through its
involvement in non-profit foundations, fund-
raisers, and other activities. It also extended
help during the Philippine devastation by
Hurricane Haiyan in 2013 by sending canned
food, old clothes and rice to the victims
through its office staff.
Suncoast Primary Care Specialists is
quickly becoming the Primary Care
Clinic of choice of residents in Citrus
County, and its growth is a reflection
of the exemplary and personalized
service it provides the community.
If it stands for Modern Medicine, the Old
Fashioned Way, everybody knows Suncoast
Primary is there to make their day.


PrimnarN Care Ser' ice,
\oIomen', Health,
Stress Tert ing,
Hpertension Control,
Minor Surgical Procedure%',,
Arthritis Care,
Adult Ph,-iical,
Dialher And
Cholesterol Control,
Infection Care,
Cardiovascular and Neurol
Dikeae Treatrment


-





,.'\ uneoast
SN tPrimary Care,

T Specialists



' ki al i , ,, ,


Affiliated with
Citrus Memorial Health System Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center West Florida Medical Associates

FOUR LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT CITRUS COUNTY
10489 N Florida Ave., Citrus Springs/Dunnellon, FL 34434 (352) 4 4

3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy. (SR 44), Inverness, FL 34453 (3 2) 3415620

7991 S uncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 (352) 382 2 2

Soon to Open: 2624 N. Forest Ridge, Hernando, FL 34442 (352) 513S O6


Dr. Alex Villacastin, Board Certified in
Internal Medicine, is joined by a team
comprised of Dr. Catherine Sembrano-




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paid Advertisement


Paid Advertisement


Renew yourself at Suncoast Dermatology


Dermatology is a medical specialty that deals
specifically with skin diseases and conditions.
Dermatologists are medical doctors who have
extensive training and experience, as well as a
passion for keeping skin, hair, and nails healthy
and vibrant, throughout all phases of life. A
dermatologist's medical education includes
training to treat medical/health and cosmetic
concerns. At Suncoast Dermatology, our four
board certified physicians not only treat a long
list of skin conditions, including the surgical
removal of potentially deadly skin cancers; but
they also use many techniques to reverse the
signs of aging and improve the skin's
appearance.
Suncoast Dermatology and Skin Surgery
Center offers the latest in the diagnosis and
treatment of skin cancer. Since 1989, the
physicians of Suncoast Dermatology have
continued to evolve their practice to ensure their
patients receive the best options available to
diagnose and treat your skin. Skin cancers effect
2 million people annually. They are the one type
of cancer that will increase in frequency as
people age and they receive more exposure to the
environment.
The most frequent types of skin cancer are
basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell
carcinomas, and melanomas. Any skin cancer
needs to be taken seriously and treated promptly;
but of these three types, melanomas can be
deadly if not treated early.
Anyone can get melanoma. It's important to
establish a regular routine for self examination
that encompasses a head to toe assessment.
This exam starts with your scalp and goes to the
bottom of your feet. Use a hand held mirror
where necessary, and take notes. A detailed list
of the existing moles and skin lesions will help
you decide if there is a change in size or shape


that needs to be seen by the doctors at Suncoast
Dermatology. This is a good habit to develop to
find melanoma early, when it is nearly 100%
curable.
When checking your skin, you should look for
the ABCDEs of melanoma:
Asymmetry. Do both halves look the same?
Border. Is there an irregular, scalloped, or
poorly defined border?
Color. Is the color varied from one area to
another, from tan to brown to black, or even
shades of white, red or blue?
Diameter. Melanomas are usually larger than
a pencil eraser (6mm) when diagnosed, but
can be smaller.


Evolving. A mole or skin lesion that looks
different from the rest or is changing size,
shape or color.
If you see a mole or new spot on your skin
that has any of the ABCDEs, immediately make
an appointment to see the doctors at Suncoast
Dermatology. In the early stages, melanoma may
not cause any symptoms, but sometimes
melanomas will itch, bleed, or be painful. Many
melanomas have these signs and symptoms, but
not all melanomas will display them. A common
misconception people have is that their mole or
skin lesion is normal and nothing to worry about.
Be proactive with your health and watch out for
the warning signs.


In addition to the diagnosis and treatment of
medical skin conditions, Suncoast Dermatology
offers an extensive array of Skin Renewal and Age
Management options. At Suncoast Dermatology it
really is possible to turn back and slow the clock,
help you defy age, gravity, and increase your
confidence. The Age Management Department at
Suncoast Dermatology specializes in normalizing
hormones, creating a healthier lifestyle through
dietary choices and routine exercise.
Additionally, they use the latest advances to
successfully treat wrinkles, sagging skin, frown
lines, age spots, spider veins, hair loss or hair
removal, and much more. Suncoast Dermatology
has licensed estheticians who can provide facials,
peels, and cosmetic counseling. Many blemishes
that occur on the skin, such as age or brown
spots, birthmarks, wrinkles, and scars, can be
eliminated or improved by an appropriate
dermatological procedure. The Laser Center at
Suncoast Dermatology can help reduce the
effects aging has on your skin as well as promote
a healthier overall look.
For any additional information you may have
regarding skin conditions or how to achieve a
healthier, more youthful appearance and
lifestyle, contact Suncoast Dermatology or visit
our website at www.dermatologyonline .com
There are two locations to serve you:
Allen Ridge Professional : .,
525 N. Dacie Point (CR491), Lecanto, Fl 34461
Phone: (352) 746-2200
Timber Ridge Medical Park at 9401 S. W.
Highway200, Ocala, FL 34481-7700
Phone: (352) 873-1500
Offices are open Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Closed from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. for lunch.


Incorporating science with skin care




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Tuesday, May 27, 2014 G7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


c




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Protect Your Vision


There are many things you
can do yourself to protect
your eyes and retain eye
health and function; but,
there are times you need
the services of a highly
trained professional.

Most people over the age of 60 expe-
rience some level of blurry vision due to
cataracts, and almost everyone over 50
loses their ability to read comfortably
without glasses.
The professionals at Suncoast Eye
Clinic offer the ability to care for your
eyes from the initial exam through sur-
gery, if required. The satellite office in
Crystal River makes it convenient to
schedule a comprehensive eye exam. If it
is necessary to schedule surgery to
remove cataracts or remove excess eyelid
folds to improve your vision, their surgery
center in Hudson, Florida, can complete
the job. Bus transportation is even pro-
vided for your convenience. Suncoast Eye
Clinic maintains total control of every
step of the process to ensure your protec-
tion and desired outcome.

What can I do for myself?
Incorporate healthy eye habits.
Many eye health and vision problems
occur naturally with age and with no obvi-
ous signs or symptoms. The most impor-
tant way to prevent eye health issues from
becoming unmanageable is by scheduling
an annual exam with Suncoast Eye Clinic.
More than 80 percent of all visual impair-
ment is treatable, preventable or curable,
so early diagnosis and proper care is
critical.
In addition to regular eye exams, the
following habits can help maintain healthy
eyes and vision:
D Obtain the right glasses or contact
lenses to correct visual impairment
and always disinfect and replace con-
tact lenses as recommended
D Wear sunglasses or hats to block
harmful UV rays and glare
D Avoid smoking
D Maintain a healthy weight to avoid sys-
temic conditions-such as diabetes-
that may lead to impaired vision
D Monitor chronic health conditions (dia-
betes and high blood pressure)
D Reduce computer-induced eye strain
by practicing the 20-20-20 rule: look
20 feet away for 20 seconds, every 20
minutes


D Eat a healthy diet for plenty of antioxi-
dant rich foods and omega-3 fatty
acids, and include dietary supple-
ments that boost your intake of
vitamins and minerals that support
eye health
Antioxidants are nutrients that protect
cells from damage caused by free radi-
cals-molecules caused by aging, poor
diet, stress and disease. Too many free
radicals can cause eye disease, including
advanced
age related "Truly words cannot
m a c u I a r for the cataract sur
degenera sight and my hop.
tion (AMD).
Common antioxidants include vitamin C,
vitamin E, vitamin A, selenium and zinc.
They are generally found in foods with
strong colors, particularly orange, yellow,
red, purple and dark green fruits and
vegetables.
Selenium is found in Brazil nuts,
whole grains, tuna, beef and dark meat
turkey. Zinc is abundant in oysters, nuts,
seafood, red meat, beans and dairy.
Eating dark green leafy vegetables also
provides lutein and zeaxanthin. These
nutrients are important to eye health
because they help protect against harm-
ful UV rays and lower the risk of devel-
oping age-related macular degeneration.
They also act as antioxidants.
Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty
acids that your body uses to support
healthy tear production and overall macu-
lar health. Several studies suggest that
omega-3 fatty acids may help protect
your eyes from age-related macular
degeneration (AMD) and dry eye syn-
drome. Your body cannot produce omega-
3 fatty acids, so you must get them from
your food or supplements.
The foods richest in omega-3 fatty
acids are cold-water fish such as sar-
dines, herring, salmon and tuna. Other
foods containing omega-3 fatty acids are
flaxseeds, walnuts and dark green leafy
vegetables. You also need to limit omega-
6 fatty acids, which interfere with your
body's ability to absorb and use the
"good" omega-3 fats. Foods high in
omega-6 fatty acids include fried and
highly processed foods such as those
made with most cooking oils and
transfats.

When is it time for a professional?
Are you experiencing signs of cataracts?
D Difficulty driving at night
D Difficulty reading, especially in low
light
D Difficulty viewing a computer screen
D Colors appear dim and faded


tex
ier)
? b


D The appearance of glare or starbursts
around lights
D Frequent change needed in prescrip-
tion glasses
Cataracts are a result of the natural
lens inside the eye becoming cloudy, even
brown or yellow, preventing light from
passing through and inhibiting images
from focusing on the retina. Cataracts
form naturally as we get older, but they
can develop at any age as the result of an
injury or a
press my gratitude disease, or
y. You gave me my from taking
ack. Thank you!" certain medi
cations.
When these symptoms are so severe
that they interfere with daily activities, the
doctor may recommend removing the
natural lens that has become cloudy and
replace it with an intraocular lens. The
good news is that cataracts are the lead-
ing cause of treatable vision loss in
adults and cataract surgery is one of the
safest and easiest procedures for patients
to undergo.
At the Suncoast Eye Center, home of
the premium lenses, cataracts are treated
with the most advanced surgical pro-
cedure available: a small incision,
no-stitch sur-
gery. The "I want to thank Dr.
clouded nat has done for me. Wi
teural lens of compassionate nat
the eye is
removed and ments to my vision
replaced with not have been accoi
an advanced,
artificial multifocal Lens. This unique
multifocal implantable lens is proven to
provide excellent vision at near, inter-
mediate and far distances without
glasses; under all lighting conditions day
and night.
The Multifocal Lens procedure is per-
formed over 15 million times per year
worldwide and is recognized for its safety
and predictability. The beauty of using
this type of lens is that is relies on the
eyes working together, as they are
designed to do. By having both eyes proc-
essing all visual information in the same
way, the multifocal lens gives people natu-
ral vision at all distances, much like they
had when they were young. Therefore, the
implants must be put in both eyes.
If cataracts are affecting your lifestyle,
now is the time to call the Suncoast Eye
Center and find out your best option.
"I just wanted to thank you so much
for the fantastic job done on my eyes.
You did everything that you said you
would do. It's so great to be able to see
clearly again. Thank you!"


Sei
itho
ire,
an
iplis


EYELID SURGERY You not only look
younger but you can see better!
Eyelid surgery produces very pleasing
results and has become a popular out-
patient procedure. Patients experience
improved peripheral vision, greater ocular
comfort and boast a more youthful
appearance after surgery.
Often a sign of aging, sagging eyelids
may impair vision, cause eye irritation,
and convey a tired, weary appearance.
Many patients report headaches are elimi-
nated because they had unconsciously
used brow muscles to lift the sagging skin
around their eyes in order to see.
It is important to discuss your expec-
tations and to discuss your expectations
and to ask any questions you may have
during an initial visit. The examination
will include a comprehensive vision analy-
sis and appropriate treatment will be rec-
ommended based on your results.
Insurance may cover your surgery if
vision is impaired.
Eyelid surgery involves tightening loose
muscles and removing sagging skin and
excess fat tissue from around the eyes.
Incisions are made along the natural lines
of the eyelids, and are hidden by natural
folds of the skin after surgery.
Surgery is
gel for everything he performed
ut his generous and on an out
the vast improve- patient basis
d well being would under local
d well being would anesthesia
shed. Thank you. and lasts
a p p r o x i
mately 40 minutes. As a patient of the
Suncoast Eye Center, your surgery is per-
formed in the privacy of their specialized
Eye Surgery Institute.
Following surgery, you will be
instructed to apply cold compresses
intermittently for 24-36 hours to ease dis-
comfort and to reduce swelling.
Excessive tearing and sensitivity to light
may occur for a few days and sunglasses
will protect your eyes from sunlight and
wind. You can resume your normal activi-
ties one week after surgery.
Call Suncoast Eye Center today and
find out how we can help you protect your
vision.
Suncoast Eye Center
14003 Lakeshore Blvd.
Hudson, FL 34667
Phone: (727) 868-9442
Toll Free: (800) 282-6341
Crystal River
221 NE Hwy 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-2526


G8 Tuesday, May 27, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The Superior Choice


For a superior


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Whether you just want more time to enjoy your
hobbies, socialize with friends, and spend less time
worrying about housekeeping and maintenance or you
are caring for a loved one with a memory illness that
needs more care than you can provide.

We have you covered with a range of solutions
for the LIFESTYLE you deserve.


A senior lifestyle in a wonderful location with exceptional amenities, striking
architecture & a full range of activities. Add in friendly neighbors, daily social
hour, personalized services, chauffeured transportation & restaurant quality
meals 3 time daily... all at affordable rates. Welcome to Sunflower Springs.


8733 W. Yulee Dr., Homosassa, FL 34448
Contact Amy for Your Tour and to Place Your
Priority Reservation Now
352*621*8017


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# 11566


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At Superior Residences in Lecanto, we want our residents to feel at home.
Our community welcomes those at all levels of Alzheimer's & other dementia-
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they need.


4865 W. Gulf to Lake Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461
Call Carolyn Reyes for a personal tour today and come see
how you can live the Superior Life too!
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G10 Tuesday, May 27, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Sunflower Springs & Superior Residences


Provide Superior Choices For a Superior Lifestyle!


Nestled on the sunny nature
coast in Central Florida,
Sunflower Springs Assisted
Living Community and
Superior Residences of
Lecanto are offering a new
standard of living for those
in their later years of life.


Whether you are looking forward
to not doing laundry and having
someone else do the cooking and
cleaning, or you need secure, memory-
care-focused assisted living with the
amenities of a resort and 24-hour
nursing care, these beautiful
communities have you covered.

Choosing an assisted living
facility can be a confusing and
daunting process, from knowing what
type of community your loved ones
need to trying to understand the
different licenses that exist. But it
doesn't have to be. At Sunflower
Springs and Superior Residences, you
will meet friendly, well-educated staff
members who not only truly enjoy
what they do, but sincerely love the
folks who live there.

A group of local doctors had a
vision: to create more resort-like and
upscale assisted living. Out of that
vision, Sunflower Springs was born.
Now in its fifth year in Homosassa,
Sunflower Springs has a sister
building: Superior Residences of
Lecanto, a secure memory-care
community, which has been open
about a year and half. It is owned by
Superior Residences, the company
that manages the day-to-day
operations of Sunflower Springs.
Superior Residences has been around
for over a decade and has seven other
communities throughout Florida.

With a beautiful, welcoming
environment that promotes
independence, both assisted living
communities offer so much. Both


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communities have an extended
congregate care license, the highest
that an assisted living facility can
have. This license allows a licensed
nurse to work in her scope, and
perform nursing services other
facilities cannot. The primary purpose
of extended congregate care services
is to allow residents, as they become
more impaired, the option of
remaining in a familiar setting, to age
with dignity, and to maintain the
quality of life that they deserve.

The daily care that each resident
receives is nothing short of exemplary.
From restaurant-style dining with
award-winning chefs Steve Holloway
and Ryan Long to
a 24-hour staff of
nurses and CNAs,
these facilities are
community-
oriented and
residents feel right
at home. They
offer personal
assistance with
daily tasks such
as bathing and
dressing, weekly
housekeeping, a 24-hour state- of-the-
art emergency response system, and
so much more. Each resident will
receive a custom service plan that is
tailored to their needs. There is an
abundance of amenities offered at
each community, including on -site
occupational, speech, and physical
therapies, a wellness center, a salon, a
movie theater, a library, billiards,
happy hour daily with live
entertainment on Fridays, and even an


ice cream parlor.
Jeopardy night,
trivia night, game
^ night, and pet
therapy are all
activities residents
can take part in.
Residents can even
oihop on the facility's
r van and go to the
t casino or grab
and some catfish from
a local restaurant.

"We want our residents to feel
they live at a resort," states Amy
Holaday, Director of Community
Relations at Sunflower Springs. "It is a
positive, fun, laugh-out-loud family
here." Amy, who spent twenty years in
the car business working for GMAC
and Hendrick Automotive Group, says,
"I love what I do. I checked out
Sunflower Springs during their grand
opening, heard there was a position
open and now I just love it." When
asked about the most rewarding thing
about being on staff, she responds,
"Walking in every morning and being
surrounded by such great people."


Amy's co-worker, Carolyn Reyes,
who is also a Director of Community
Relations at the Lecanto campus,
started out working as a teacher and
after 14 years in education, developed
a desire to go into the healthcare
system. She went back to school and
became EMS certified. "I always feel
like I need to be in a place to help
people and the best part of this job is
helping families in need," she


%


Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Gil


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


expresses. Carolyn loves that she can
help bring peace to the family and
says, "It's such a privilege that I get to
spend the last part of their life with
them." Carolyn leads the Alzheimer's
Support Group that meets the third
Thursday of each month at 2:30. It's a
place where folks can be assisted with
the grieving process.

Superior Residences of Lecanto
Assisted Living Community focuses on
memory care and specializes in
Alzheimer's and Dementia, trying their
best to help each individual maintain
his or her dignity. One out of five
people have or will encounter
someone who has the disease, and it
is the sixth leading cause of death in
the U.S.

That is actually what got Area
Executive Director Melissa Rogers,
who oversees and manages daily
operations for both buildings, involved
in healthcare in the first place. "My
grandma had Alzheimer's and was in
a facility 'till she passed, I saw the
horrible disease affect her and my
family. I was a CNA at the time and
saw it from both sides. I went on to
become an LPN and then an RN. I
wanted to go as far as I could to make
sure people were treated with dignity
and respect with this horribly
devastating disease," she states.
Melissa says, "Helping people through
their resistance to leave their homes
and then seeing them flourish, get
somewhat better, by making friends
and really enjoying themselves" is the
factor that is most gratifying to her.
"If I had a wish list, on it would be to
make seniors understand that now is
the time and to not wait, live the
Superior lifestyle now.

Sunflower Springs and Superior
Residences have core values
such as integrity, service,
efficiency, and fun, and I believe
that we all are part of this stool
and each core value is a leg that
we need to stand."




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Comfort Keepers

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Comfort Keepers of

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Since the business opened in
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provide every client the support
necessary to have the best
possible quality of life while living
in the comfort of their own home.
Comfort Keepers discovered over
the years that some clients
needed more care than they were
licensed to provide-to be able to
keep living in their home, they
needed skilled medical care.
To meet that need, Comfort
Keepers upgraded their state
licensing, hired experienced
nurses, and took classes at CK
Franchising, Inc. Now, they can
offer new services to people in
need of in-home care: Private Duty
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skilled medical services, such as
tube feedings, ostomy and catheter
hygiene, wound care, and
medication set-up and
administration.
For each client, Comfort
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activities that will enrich the lives
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socially, and emotionally. Comfort
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Whether it's for only a few
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the caregivers at Comfort Keepers
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continue to live in their own home
and enjoy a quality of life that they
may have lost otherwise.
Interactive CaregivingTM reinforces
seniors' sense of self-worth by
enabling them to continue their
daily activities with as much
independence as possible. The
focus is on providing solutions for
the normal transitions and changes
of aging.
In order to achieve the most
favorable outcome for each client,


Comfort Keepers carefully matches
caregivers and clients by
personality, interests, skills, and
needs. This extra consideration
forms the basis for strong,
healthful relationships. Comfort
Keepers Care Coordinators work as
partners with clients' families to
provide their loved one a complete
in-home care solution to promote
independent living and allow
seniors to maintain the lifestyle
they're accustomed to.
To work with Comfort Keepers,
caregivers must navigate a
stringent screening and
interviewing process, and must
show a strong devotion to caring
for others. Only a few special
people who complete this process
go on to complete the training
necessary to deliver this special
brand of care and become Comfort
Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass
extensive background checks and
participate in continuing
education.
All Comfort Keepers are
employees of the company. They
are trained, supervised, insured
with Worker's Compensation, and
liability insured and bonded.
Comfort Keepers is locally-
owned and family-operated by
Deborah and Gailen Spinka and
their daughter Lindsey Hailer.
Comfort Keepers is actively
involved in the community, and
participates in and sponsors local
organizations such as the Chamber
of Commerce, the Business
Women's Alliance, Leadership
Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters,
and various health expos.

For in-depth information about
Comfort Keepers,
visit their web site at
seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com
give them a call at
352-726-4547,
or stop by their local office at
2244 Highway 44 West, Inverness.


G12 Tuesday, May 27, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Physicians Join


Together


In the 1990s heath care
costs to the federal
government and to
insurance companies
were growing at
unsustainable rates.

To curb these costs, the government
aggressively ratcheted down payments
to physicians and other health care
providers. Insurance companies
developed "managed care" products and
began recruiting physicians who were
willing to focus on company profit more
than on patient needs and best medical
practices. Their patients experienced
delays and difficulties in obtaining
specialist care, diagnostic studies or
even hospital admission.

A few doctors, reacting to cuts in
payments, began providing more


services, more visits, more procedures
and tests than were needed to keep
their patients healthy. Their patients
were over treated at considerable
expense without measurable
improvements in their health.

Concerned that these poor medical
practices would soon show up in Citrus
County, nine senior physicians joined
together to form the Florida Wellcare
Alliance to support physicians in private
practice and to protect patients in the
County from aggressive practices. We
believed then, as we do now, that the
voluntary relationship between a patient
and a physician who promises to put
that patient's welfare ahead of the
physician's interests results in the
highest quality, cost-effective health
care. Our partnership has grown to
more than one hundred physicians who
share those beliefs.
We believe measures of physician


quality recently devised by the
government will have little value to
patients looking for the best medical
care. But, as practicing physicians, all
of us know which physicians in our
communities practice quality medicine,
which doctors put patient needs above
all else. These doctors we ask to join the
Florida Wellcare Alliance.

None of our physicians can be perfect in
all aspects of his medical practice, and
none can suit every patient, but each of
our physician partners is someone to
whom we would send our own family
members for treatment. There is no
better measure of quality.

Over time, people change; physician
practices may change as well. For that
reason, the FWA physicians review the
performances of each partner annually.
Every partner is required to review other
partner's quality of practice as
measured by his outcomes and his


relationships with patients and other
physicians. Partners falling below
standards are counseled the first year.
Poor performance the following year
results in expulsion from the FWA.

Despite the recent governmental
changes to the way health care is
delivered, the insurance disruptions,
and the pay cuts to us, Florida Wellcare
Alliance physicians will be there when
you need us. We remain committed to
putting the medical needs of our
patients first.


Florida Wellcare Alliance
1245 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, FL 34442
Phone: 352-419-4859
Fax: 352-419-4861

Office Hours: Monday to Thursday
9:00 AM to 3:00 PM


Is Your Doctor A Member Of The


FLORIDA WELLCARE ALLIANCE?
















DominickJ. Passalacqua, M.D., Executive Director Florida Wellcare Alliance, LC



YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO ASK


Tuesday, May 27, 2014 G13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT To CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



Meridien Research Is Making


A Difference In Brooksville


Have you ever been
curious about clinical
research studies?
Meridien Research in
Brooksville can answer
your questions.

They provide patients and families in
the Tampa Bay area an opportunity to
take part in clinical research trials for a
wide variety of conditions. Area
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in medical research without venturing
too far from home.
There is never a charge to the
participant, as the pharmaceutical
company that sponsors the research
program pays for the cost of medical
research, and compensation may be
available for the patient. No medical
insurance is necessary to participate in
any Meridien clinical studies.
The Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) has strict guidelines and
regulations that help ensure the safety
of clinical trials. According to the FDA,
"Carefully conducted clinical trials are
the safest and fastest way to find
treatments that work in people and new
ways to improve health."

People can benefit from
participating in a research study
or clinical trial in many ways,
including:
* Gaining access to new treatments not
yet available to the public
* Testing drugs and procedures at
no cost
* Obtaining improved medical care at a
leading health care facility
* Playing an active role in their own
health care
* Improving quality of life
* Helping others by contributing to
medical research
The medical community is constantly
seeking new treatment options for
diseases and conditions. To make sure
new medications and devices are safe
and effective, they are tested by
volunteers at facilities like Meridien
Research.


"Most adults are candidates for our
research studies," explained Katie
Leonard, site director for Meridien
Research in Brooksville. "Before anyone
can enroll in a clinical research study,
they must be screened to be sure they
are right for the study and that the
study is right for them."
Meridien Research has been
conducting clinical research trials and
studies for more than 10 years in the
Tampa Bay area.

All studies are administered by
board certified doctors and
highly trained medical
personnel.

New research studies begin almost
every month. "Our currently enrolling
studies are looking for people who have
high potassium, type II or type I
diabetes, high cholesterol with a cardiac
history, opioid-induced constipation,
memory loss, irritable bowel syndrome,
or are looking for weight loss," said
Leonard.

"We also have waiting lists
started for upcoming studies
including acne, weight loss,
diabetic peripheral neuropathy,
fibromyalgia, and constipation."

If you have any of these symptoms or
conditions, participating in a research
study or clinical trial with Meridien
Research of Brooksville may help you
alleviate your symptoms and improve
your quality of life.
If you're interested in participating in
a study, or for more information, contact
Meridien Research of Brooksville.


Meridien Research of Brooksville
16176 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville, FL 34601
Phone: (352) 597-8839D
www.newstudyinfo.com

Meridien Research also has offices in
St. Petersburg, Tampa, Bradenton,
and Lakeland.


Meridien
Research is
participating in an
exciting new study
of an
investigation l
medicine for
patients with mild
Alzheimer's
A .


t I -'


Qualified participants will receive at no cost
study-related:

Evaluations, physical exams, routine lab work
Investigational medication or placebo

Compensation may be available. No medical insurance
is necessary. Help us develop potential future
Alzheimer's medicines by participating in this free
clinical trial.


Kelli K. Maw,
352-597-8839 eMD MPH
di \Board Certified,

M e r i dien Family Medicine
eQe arch 16176 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville, FL
w Ie 34601


G14 Tuesday, May 27, 2014


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Tuesday, May 27, 2014 G15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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