Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text

Finally: Rays break Sox after 15-inning affair /B1
--- LJ I .1, r' .. : . .


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 291D6
VOL. 119 ISSUE 291


MILITARY MATTERS:


HeLter


SHeLter


Remember
Find a list of area
ceremonies and
services for Memorial
Day./Page A15
LOCAL NEWS:


U
Graduates
Seven Rivers Christian
School honors 11
seniors./Page A3
* The school also bids
farewell to a longtime
teacher./Page A3


9






Pet issue
Learn how to keep your
dog physically and
mentally fit, find expert
advice on choosing the
right cat food and get
homemade dog treat
recipes./Inside


BUSINESS:


Renovated
Get a peek inside Black
Diamond./Page Dl


HOMEFRONT:


Citrus County Commissioner John "JJ" Kenney explains the need for a new animal
through the existing shelter in Inverness. The building is more than 20 years old and h
for the animals and staff, according to Kenney.

Commissioner pulls for new, centralize


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS As a human
being whose passion is animals,
John "JJ" Kenney's No. 1 prior-
ity is getting a new animal shel-
ter for Citrus County.
As the chairman of the Citrus
County Commission, it's only
one of a long list of priorities for
the county.
Still, it's on his list.
Recently, the commissioner
led the Chronicle on a tour of
the county facility near the air-


port in Inverness, pointing out
all the reasons he believes the
current shelter is woefully
inadequate.
"First of all, the location is
terrible," he said. "It should be
more centrally located."
Kenney said he'd like to see a
facility near the government
center in Lecanto, closer to the
jail.
Jail trusties work at the shel-
ter during the week, and a shel-
ter that's closer may allow more
trusties to work with the
animals.


How neighbor


counties care


for stray pets
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Has any Florida county devised a better way to
offer animal services than Citrus?
The quick answer in no; nearby counties oper-
ate shelters similar to Citrus County's method.
The Chronicle asked surrounding counties six
questions about their shelters. Not all replied. But
all maintain websites that indicate procedural
similarities to citruscritters.com. What follows
are answers from Sumter, Pasco and Marion
counties.
Questions:
1. When was your county animal shelter built?
Sumter Tamra Belancin, animal services
manager: "Last year, we got a new office building,
See Page A8


"CCA (Co
tion of Am
programs v
help sociali2
them into E
have the do
them," Kent
As he w,
front buildii
comes for
where staff
where surge
Kenney poi
portable ke


Many animals, including these
at the Citrus County Anim
available for adoption.


County

-.. f grapples with

,, best way to

i,' || protect animals
Editor's note: The people
/ ....who are advocates for dogs
and cats in Citrus County say
it's not their job to run the
S' county animal shelter See
Monday's Chronicle.
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
iogs are loyal and
D kittens are cute,
but unless they
vote or pay
taxes, none of
that may matter in
deciding whether to re-
place the aged, cramped
Citrus County Animal
Shelter
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicie County Commission
shelter as he walks Chairman John "JJ" Ken-
as become too small ney, backed by a host of or-
ganizations that promote
healthy lives for dogs and
dfa iit cats, support construction
A facility of a new animal shelter
Other commissioners,
rrections Corpora- however, say the timing isn't
erica) already has right with the upcoming
where the inmates resignations or retirements
ze animals and turn of County Administrator
service dogs; even Brad Thorpe and two other
gs in the cells with top officials in county
ney said. government.
alked through the Plus, the August primary
ng where the public and November general
animal adoptions, election will bring one or
offices are located, two new members to the
*ries are performed, county commission and a
inted out dogs in majority vote that doesn't
nnels in hallways count the animal shelter
among its highest priorities.
See Page A8 "I just feel right now we
need to be living within our
means and not building
new animal shelters,"
Commissioner Scott Adams
said. "With Brad leaving,
we need to evaluate
everything."
Commissioner Dennis
Damato said he would like
to see a discussion on what
the community expects or
wants from a shelter That
discussion, he said, should
wait until after the new ad-
ministrator is in place.
"This is a complex issue
and I don't know what the
focus of Brad and adminis-
tration is going to be," Dam-
ato said.
The county's new five-
year capital plan includes a
$4 million animal shelter,
but no specifics on how to
build it.
In an April meeting with
pro-animal organizations,
Kenney suggested the non-
profits raise about $2.5 mil-
kittens, are housed lion toward construction of
al Shelter and are
See Page A5


Exhibit of daily life among troops draws military


Natural style
Designers turn to
natural inspiration for
homes. /HomeFront


Annie's Mailbox ......A14
Classifieds ................ D5
Crossword ...............A14
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A14
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A18
Veterans ........ A15


6 184578 2007511o


Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Ashley Danault had to
compose herself before
she entered the gallery
housing Steve Mumford's
"War Journals."
It was easy for the Iraq
veteran to imagine what
memories might be con-
jured up by the paintings
and drawings of daily life
among American troops
that Mumford created
during his eight trips to
Iraq and Afghanistan.
"I wanted to come and
by the same token I didn't
want to come, because ...
it's kind of difficult," she
said, her voice cracking
with emotion.
Yet once inside, it
wasn't the more dramatic
paintings such as one of
an amputated leg in a
Baghdad emergency
room, bones protruding
and foot grotesquely


swollen that struck
Danault as she strolled
through the exhibit at
Nashville's Frist Center
for the Visual Arts. In-
stead, it was a simple
black-and-white painting
Mumford had created of a
memorial service for a
fallen soldier
Danault immediately
engaged with the painting,
which portrays the dead
soldier's boots on top of a
stepped platform, the
point of his rifle stuck into
the boots and his helmet
placed on the rifle's butt.
It reminded Danault of a
similar service she wit-
nessed for a lost helicop-
ter crew chief named D.J.
It is that kind of connec-
tion with images as Associated Press
doorways into personal Veteran Aaron Voris and his wife, Stephanie, view the "Steve Mumford's War Journals:
memories that the vet- 2003-2013" exhibit April 10 at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville, Tenn.
erans support group Sol- Discussion of the exhibit was facilitated by counselors from Soldiers and Families
diers and Families Embraced. Some veterans say that seeing Mumford's drawings and paintings, which
depict scenes of war, both mundane and horrific, gives them a visual reference to tell
See Page A5 their own stories.




A2SUNDAY, MAY 2 5, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the


COUNTY

C.R. Democrats to
meet Tuesday
The Crystal River Demo-
cratic Club will meet at
7 p.m., Tuesday, May 27, at
Oysters Restaurant in Crys-
tal River. Anyone who
wishes to have dinner is
asked to arrive by 6 p.m.
A representative from
the National Association for
the Mentally Ill's Lighthouse
program will speak about
job training and socializa-
tion for those in need.
All Democrats are wel-
come. For information, call
352-795-5384.
Swimmer takes on
challenge for cause
Former Citrus County
sheriffs deputy Kurt Lynn in-
tends to complete a
2.4-mile swim in Tampa with
Swim Across America on
Saturday, May 31, to raise
funds for the fight against
cancer through Tampa's
Moffitt Cancer Center.
Readers can sponsor
Lynn's swim using the
Swim Across America web-
site at SwimAcrossAmerica.
org; or, by contacting Lynn
directly at klynn2009@
hotmail.com.
Program on living
shorelines June 3
At 6 p.m. Tuesday,
June 3, Sean King of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District will
present information to the
Crystal River Waterfronts
Board on living shorelines
and floating wetlands.
This program is open to
the public and will be at
Crystal River City Hall.
From staff reports

Campaign TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, can-
didate appearances and the
like for this year's political
campaign. Send informa-
tion to mwright@
chronicleonline. com.
Donna Fletcher, candi-
date for school board Dis-
trict 5, will have a fundraiser
golf tournament at 8:30
a.m. (7:30 a.m. registration)
Saturday, June 7, at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club.
Information: 352-400-0839.
Doug Dodd, candidate
for school board District 3,
will have a barbecue
fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, June 7, at the Re-
altors Association building
on State Road 44 and Scar-
boro Avenue, Lecanto. In-
formation: 352-637-3519.
Les Cook, Republican
for property appraiser, will
greet the public from 5 to
7 p.m. Friday, June 20, at
the Deco Cafe in downtown
Inverness. Information:
352-628-7426.
Winn Webb, Republican
for county commission Dis-
trict 4, will have a fundraiser
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
June 21, at Mama's Kuntry
Kafe on S.R. 44 in Inverness.
Information: 352-634-0983 or
352-419-5614.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission District 2,
will have a fundraiser from 4
to 7 p.m. Saturday, July 26, at
Mama's Kuntry Kafe across
from Whispering Pines Park,
Inverness. Information: 352-
257-5381.
The Citrus County
Chronicle will have its pri-
mary forum at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in Inver-
ness. The Chronicle's gen-
eral election forum is at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at
the College of Central
Florida in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will have a
forum for county commis-
sion candidates at 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 12, at the
College of Central Florida.


The Citrus Hills Civic
Association will have a can-
didates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club.


Success and failure,




challenge and change


Seven Rivers

graduates reflect

on what they've

learned thus far

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

LECANTO Teetering on
high heels, looking spiffy in
bow ties, the 11 members of
Seven Rivers Christian School
class of 2014 closed one chapter
of their lives and opened an-
other at their graduation cere-
mony Friday night.
After a welcome and invoca-
tion by school headmaster
Dana James, honor graduate
Holly Pafford gave the first of
the evening's three student
speeches.
"One of the best lessons I
have learned here... was about
failure. But through my failures
and all our failures, through all
those difficult times, we ... sur-
vived and we are better for it.
We have a strong foundation to
stand on ... our foundation and
support is God, our families or
guardians, our Christian
friends and our Seven Rivers
'family'
"To my fellow graduating
seniors: Don't be concerned
about what lies ahead, because
you are well prepared for what
the future holds for you."
Class salutatorian Jacqueline
Miller also spoke about failure
- and of not being afraid to
dream big and attempt success.
"Contrary to what the world
would have us believe, our
challenge is not to avoid failing,
but to avoid settling for
mediocre, living life watching
from the sidelines instead of
playing in the arena ... we do
not need to be afraid; we can-
not mess up God's plans for our
lives."
Class valedictorian Alexis
Zachar charged her class to
work hard, never give up, do
the right thing and not compro-
mise their beliefs and values.
"We are the images of


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Rachel Leeg and Jacqueline Miller take a quick selfie Friday prior to the Seven Rivers
Christian School graduation ceremony.


To my fellow graduating seniors:
Don't be concerned about
what lies ahead, because you are
well prepared for what the future
holds for you.

Holly Pafford
Seven Rivers Christian School honor graduate.


tomorrow," she said, "and our
actions must make a statement
and send a clear message, one
that says: Wherever we come
from, whoever we are, what-
ever background we have, we
are proclaimers of God's love to
the world, and his guidance
partnered with hard work is the
formula for greatness."
Also during the ceremony,
Adam Gage was named Senior
Swordsman, the student who


exemplifies consistent Chris-
tian character
Science teacher Chris Eckart
delivered the commencement
address, reading the words of
Ken Wackes, the school's his-
tory teacher who now has ALS.
Wackes charged the students
to concentrate on the word
"change," for it is inevitable.
Quoting screenwriter and di-
rector Joss Whedon, Wackes ad-
vised them: "Even if you see


them coming, you're not ready
for the big moments. No one
asks for their life to change, not
really, but it does. So what are
we? Helpless? Puppets?
"When the big moments
come, it's what you do after-
wards that counts. That's when
you find out who you really
are," Wackes wrote in his
speech, then added that how
they handle disappointment,
tragedy, difficulty, etc. will be
determined on how much
they've read and meditated on
the Word of God to the point
that it becomes their sole
source of wisdom, comfort and
guidance.
"You will be like a tree
planted by the water, yielding
fruit in its season," he wrote,
quoting Psalm 1, "whose leaf
does not whither Whatever he
does prospers. Will you lose
your leaves and whither, or will
you prosper?"


Beloved Seven Rivers teacher leaves legacy


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER Earlier
this year, Ken and Ruth Wackes
watched the movie "Tuesdays
with Morrie," about a man who
spends Tuesdays with his former
college sociology professor, Mor-
rie Schwartz, who is dying from
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
(ALS).
The name Morrie comes from a
Hebrew word that means "my
teacher"
Several weeks after the Wacke-
ses watched the movie, Ken
Wackes, himself a lifelong educa-
tor, was diagnosed with ALS.
"That's how God prepared us,"
Ruth Wackes said. "We didn't
know anything about ALS before
that"
Although the diagnosis was dev-
astating, the couple is facing the
next chapter of their lives with
grace and hope and a deep Chris-
tian faith.
Most recently, former 30-year
headmaster at Westminster Acad-
emy in Fort Lauderdale, Ken
Wackes taught history at Seven
Rivers Christian School for nine
years. He left earlier this school
year and was honored at the
school's end-of-year awards night
two weeks ago.
"In our world, we all know peo-
ple that are very good in what they
do, and we all know some people
that are great in what they do. But
there are a select few that are in-
fluential in what they do; whose
impact on their area changes
lives," said SRCS Headmaster
Dana James. "Dr Wackes has been
truly influential in the world of
Christian education, not just at
Seven Rivers, not just at Westmin-
ster Academy, but in the state of
Florida and across the nation."


''* *. ,

S*:** -

NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Longtime Christian school educator
Ken Wackes was recently honored
by Seven Rivers Christian School.
After serving as headmaster at
Westminster Academy in Fort
Lauderdale for 30 years, he taught
history for nine years at SRCS until
earlier this year when he was
diagnosed with ALS.
Wackes had started out as a
trumpet player. He met his wife in
college she was an organist -
and the two teamed up to play
music in church. They ended up
as missionaries to New Guinea.
"That was the end of my trum-
pet playing," Wackes said.
They spent four years on the
mission field, and when they re-
turned to the U.S., Wackes went
back to school and seminary and
worked in church music ministry
In 1971, Coral Ridge Presbyte-
rian Church in Fort Lauderdale
had started a Christian school and
Wackes was asked to teach Bible
classes there. In 1974, he was
named headmaster and remained


In our world, we all know people that
are very good in what they do, and we
all know some people that are great in
what they do. But there are a select few
that are influential in what they do; whose
impact on their area changes lives.

Dana James
Seven Rivers Christian School headmaster.


headmaster until 2004.
Meanwhile, the couple bought a
piece of property on Lake
Rousseau and built a vacation
house. Nine years ago, they
moved in permanently when
Wackes agreed to teach history
"temporarily" at SRCS when the
school's history teacher left to
have a baby
"I knew once he started teach-
ing he'd never do it for just a se-
mester," Mrs. Wackes said.
Even though Wackes spent most
of his career as an administrator,
at his core he's a teacher He es-
pecially loves teaching history
"You don't understand God un-
less you understand history," he
said. "History is like looking down
a sandy beach and seeing his foot-
prints, where he's been, what he's
been doing. The more you under-
stand about what he's doing, the
more you understand who he is."
It's with this same mindset that
Wackes is facing his future with
ALS. He believes that whether he
lives or dies, whether he dies in
three years or 30, his life and his
death are in God's hands.
When he was diagnosed in Jan-
uary and was given three to five
years to live, he told the doctor,


"Thank you. I know it's hard for
you to tell people that kind of
news, and you did a good job. But
I'm a Christian, so whether I'm on
this side of the grave or the other,
it doesn't make a difference. God
is with me and I'll live forever
"Secondly," he said, "God's
given me the world's best care-
giver, my wife."
He said when he got home, he
went into a funk as he faced his
own mortality, but his faith keeps
him buoyed and anchored.
Now fully retired, he plans to
continue learning history and
working on a world history text-
book that he's written and put on-
line at www worldhi story
kenwackes.net.
Wackes said he's had many hon-
ors throughout his career, and
he's happy and humbled to hear
people praise him.
"I'm glad there are kids who are
willing to say those kinds of
things," he said. "But when the
day is done, the only thing that
matters is that I've impacted them
spiritually That's the only thing
that counts."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicleonline.com.


m




A4 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Take action and proceed
with goals that you've left unfinished.
Maintain your focus if you allow
yourself to become sidetracked, you
will lose the momentum necessary to
reach your destination.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Negative
feedback may daunt you. If you know
in your heart that what you are doing is
right, don't be dissuaded by pessimism.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) It's not
much fun to sit on the outside looking
in. Find an organization or group that
inspires you, and join in.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It's time to
do something that pleases you. Let the
people who demand the most fumble
along without you, and you will be
more appreciated in the future.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Fulfill
your curiosity about unusual places,
people and cultures. Read up on areas
of interest, or consider attending a cul-
tural event.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Remem-
ber, there are people in your life who
look up to you. Abandon any bad
habits that may influence others. De-
vote time to making positive changes.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Now is
the right time to go full speed ahead to-
ward your dreams. Your tenacity and
hard work will lead to victory
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Eld-
erly relatives will appreciate any time
you can spare. A conscious effort to do
something good will bring you peace
and satisfaction.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
are due for a change of pace. Find a
challenge that is uncharacteristic of you,
and take part. Your enthusiasm will en-
sure that you have a wonderful time.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
let the upheaval around you dominate
your mood. Pleasurable distractions
will be the best way to resolve discord.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Any op-
portunity that allows you to use your
vivid imagination must be seized. Your
unconventional outlook and creative
skills will result in recognition.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
hide your feelings. If you value the
friends and relatives in your life, let
them know what is on your mind.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Friends
or relatives will provide you with impor-
tant information. Your employment op-
portunities are greater than ever, but
you will have to keep your emotions
under control if you want to get ahead.


ENTERTAINMENT


'Winter Sleep' wows
at Cannes festival
CANNES, France- "Winter
Sleep," the bookies' early front-
runner for the Palme d'Or, the
slow-burning but powerful Turk-
ish family drama, is unafraid to
tackle Sartrian questions of per-
sonal responsibility and the
hate that lurks beneath a seem-
ingly peaceful family.
Its director, Nuri Bilge
Ceylan, is a Cannes Film Festi-
val darling, having won the Jury
Prize in 2011 for the acclaimed
"Once Upon a Time in Anatolia."
His film explores the silent life
of the easygoing Aydin, played
majestically by Haluk Bilginer,
who runs a hotel with his wife
and sister in a snowy village the
rocky Turkish hills.
But all is not what meets the
eye especially when a young
boy throws a stone at a car,
nearly killing its passengers.
The relationships between the
rich Ayudin and the two women
slowly unravel to expose ten-
sions over how he runs his life,
presiding like a benevolent lord
over the village in which he owns
property and takes rent from his
poor and troubled tenants.
His sister, plagued by bore-
dom (the "sleep") in the quiet vil-
lage, accuses him of
self-importance in the column he
writes for the local newspaper.
His wife accuses him of selfish-
ness and is considering divorce.
But the film, shown through the
perspective of Ayudin himself,
doesn't really show how Ayudin,
a rather kind character, is at fault.
The relative virtues and vices of
all the characters remain am-
biguous an intentional point.
"It was kind of ambiguous
feeling I want to leave behind,"
Ceylan said in an interview with
The Associated Press.
"(Ayudin) has done nothing


Associated Press
Jury President Jane Campion, left, poses with director Nuri
Bilge Ceylan on Saturday after he won the Palme d'Or award
for the film "Winter Sleep" during the awards ceremony for the
67th international film festival in Cannes, southern France.


wrong. Problems between people
don't arise because we do wrong.
But because we need problems,
a certain amount unhappiness in
life. We create them," he said.
When the boy inexplicably
throws a rock smashing Ayudin's
car window, the backstory
emerges: his father, a tenant
who hasn't paid rent, has been
roughed up by one of Ayudin's
bailiffs. Ayudin doesn't accept re-
sponsibility, since he lets his as-
sistant and lawyer deal with his
estate so he doesn't have to
deal with the consequences.
The film asks, as did French
philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre:
Where does moral responsibility
begin and end?
Ceylan's film ambitiously ex-
plores the human soul and
poses questions that reach far.
He links this week's coal mine
fire in Turkey in which 301
workers were killed to the
message of the film.
"Now there is this big acci-
dent, no one will accept respon-
sibility, everybody blames
others," Ceylan said.


Miley Cyrus gets
restraining order
LOS ANGELES Miley
Cyrus obtained a temporary re-
straining order Friday against an
SArizona man
who was re-
cently de-
tained by
police while

.. trying to meet
the singer-
actress.
Miley ALosAn-
Cyrus geles judge
granted Cyrus the stay-away
order against Devon Meek after
Cyrus' lawyers filed court docu-
ments stating Meek, 24, believes
the singer is communicating to
him through her songs.
Los Angeles police arrested
the man on May 16, and he was
placed in a psychiatric hospital,
where he remains. Meek has
said he will continue to try to
meet Cyrus once he is released,
according to filings by Cyrus' at-
torneys and a police detective.
-From wire reports


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


H L FPcast City


194/71 0.0r| 162 u.0U
THREE DAY OUTLOOK da
P )T' TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High. 93* Low: 67
-ilw_,,,P Partly cloudy, 30% chance of afternoon,
'. '.' '" .. evening storms.


' MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High:93 Low:66
r "Partly cloudy, 20% chance of afternoon,
.... eVRenino storms.


- TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 66
.. ~Partly cloudy. 20a chance of afternoon.
--- "- evening storms


H L F'cast


Daytona Bch 88 70 pc Miami 91 74 pc
Fort Lauderdale 88 76 pc Ocala 93 69 ts
Fort Myers 93 71 ts Orlando 92 72 ts
Gainesville 91 68 ts Pensacola 84 70 pc
Homestead 87 74 pc Sarasota 90 72 ts
Jacksonville 88 69 ts Tallahassee 93 67 ts
Key West 88 79 pc Tampa 92 74 ts
Lakeland 95 72 ts Vero Beach 88 71 pc
Melbourne 90 73 pc W. Palm Bch. 88 75 pc

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: East then NW winds around Gulf water
5-10 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay temperature
and inland waters smooth. A slight 8 0
chance of thunderstorms in the 3
evening Tonight: East winds around
10 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay
and Inland waters a light chop. Taket n"t A1dP
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 2872 28.74 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.37 38.38 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.46 39.48 40.60
Tsala Apopka.Floral City 40.32 40.36 4220
Levels reported Mi flest above sea level Flood stage lor lakes are bas d on 2.33.year rlod.
the rnean-annual foo whch has a 43-Orcent chance o being equaled o exceeded n
any one year This dalta is obtained frnom the Soulthwest Filorida Wate Management Ditrct
arnd is &A lo revision In no event wi the Dirct or the Unted States Geoopcal Survey
ho iiata- t' %,isir'' wa. is.1 ooI-,lf lt o inis l d idi ,ou have any quesllons you
r :oQ.-.i,1 rbe H .iV.j.)CQi D au N Tro i3 ii I6 72 11

THE NATION
30 i6.]IIIIIIM


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/73
Record /60
Normal 89/72
Mean temp- 81
Departure from mean 1
PRECIPITATION* 0
Saturday 0-001
Total for the month 3.58'
Total for the year 14.37'
Normal for the year 11 .53'
'As I 7 am- at Innerrss
UV INDEX: 12
O-2minimal.,3-41ow,5-6moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.07


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 72.0
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 90%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, chenopods
Today's count: 3.6/12
Monday's count: 4.8
Tuesday's count: 4.7
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 63
Pollutant: Particulate matter


SOLUNAR TABLES ,S.SSS
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
05/25 SUNDAY 3:05 9:15 3:30 9:35
05/26 MONDAY 3!45 10:05 4:30 10:25
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S B T a .................... ... a:9 p-m .
M TIgA W.........-....-... 6:32 a.m
0 C0 10110M11111111UTOB ... --.. 420 a.m,
May28 Jun5 Jun13 Jun 19 M RT0T -- --.------5:31 p.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: Moderate. There is no bum ban.
For mote Intomiamon al FloriJa D; 06,n oF Friresry al (352) 75-6,777 FP, mcfe
Intennmionon drought ', niion o pl w-a i-i1 II DJvis ,n .1 F -,ek i s WeBr r-1
http:flaMne-flido -conmire weafh w/ fbd(
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m,. as
folows:
EVEN addresses n tiy waler on Thursday ardor Sunday.
ODD addresses may waleti on Wedrieday andtor Satunlay
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro ifnigalion of non-grass area suct
as vegetable gardens, flowers and sthiubs. can be done on any day and at any
lime
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
ptant matedal 352-527-7669. Soi ne ri pian-'j nrig y m iuaiity lor ad."ionrl
walirng allowances.
To repofl violation, pease call: Cly of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystial
River 0 32 795-421iF e' 313 unncorporatled Clrus County 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers -At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassahowltzka" 4:53am, 0.3 H, 5:13pm. O.Bft 1210a.m 0.1 f. 10:56a.rO.2 t,
CrysIal iver- 3:39 am, 1.6 t, 3:13p.m. 22 9:29am. 0.7 .10:28p.rO.0,
Wilhlacoocthee' l:16,am, 3.Ot, 1239pm. 3.7t. 7:19 am. 1.2" 8:29 pm.-0.2H
Homoeasa" 4;42a.m. 0.81, 4410pm. 1.3. 10:09 a.m. 0,3 fl


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlanic City
Austin
Balltmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burtlngton, VT
Charleston, S.C-
Charleston. W.V.
Chairltle
Chicago
CIncinnati
Clevelarnd
Columbia, SC
Columbus, 1OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detrot
El Paso
Evansvtis, IN
Harisbutg
Haiord
Houston
Indianapoills
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Mlwauukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomary
Nashville


SAT
H L Pep. H
69 54 .11 77
64 52 .05 69
79 56 78
B8 68 87
72 53 79
B6 70 .01 86
75 50 82
79 54 75
B8 65 B9
63 55 82
61 52 67
65 48 .02 76
72 56 .0275
87 68 86
76 47 83
81 62 82
74 47 79
78 49 81
74 47 78
68 59 .21 81
78 50 82
S8 51 .77 73
88 72 88
69 52 .04 72
81 61 80
79 51 80
06 59 .01 86
B2 56 83
75 54 78
69 53 .33 77
88 66 85
74 51 80
86 71 96
8 67 88
68 61 74
79 57 83
89 69 90
69 46 71
78 58 81
87 67 90
69 66 92
B3 65 88


SUN
L Fcst
53 ts
51 ts
56 Is
68 pc
56 pc
70 ts
57 pc
53 pc
67 pc
54 pc
58 ts
55 pC
55 Ts
65 pc
53 S
63 pc
63 pc
57 pc
56 pc
65 ts
58 pc
48 IS
67 pc
SO ts
64 ts
58 PC
62 pc
62 pc
54 pc
54 ts
72 pc
61 pc
76 pc
68 pc
64 t
64 pc
70 pc
56 pc
65 pc
66 pc
67 pc
65 pc


SAT


SUN


City H L Pcp. HL Fcst
NowOleans 84 69 86 69 pc
NewYork City 70 57 .99 79 63 pc
Norfolk 73 64 01 B0 62 pc
Oklahoma City 83 64 32 83 66 ts
Omhan 79 63 80 63 ts
Palm Sprngs 94 67 98 74 a
Pniladelphia 75 57 80 59 pc
Phoenix 91 69 97 74 pc
Pitlsburgh 75 48 77 50 pc
Portland. ME 63 51 60 50 pc
Portland. OR 68 56 69 54 sh
Povidance. AI 66 53 73 56 tS
Raleigh 79 53 83 60 pc
RapidCily 72 51 78 54 is
Reno 82 59 86 53 pc
Rocheosster. NY 75 50 78 56 pc
Sacramenlo 93 57 95 61 s
Salt Lake City 71 55 06 77 54 pc
SanAntonto 87 72 .04 87 71 sh
San Dego 67 63 65 60 cd
San Francisco 66 55 73 55 s
Savannah 90 70 88 67 pc
Seale 6453 64 54 r
Spokane 71 52 74 51 cd
St Louis 82 60 83 69 ts
St St .Marle 76 42 75 50 pc
Syracuse 71 53 75 54 pc
Topeka 74 63 .40 81 65 ts
Washington 78 57 83 63 pc
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
RIG 98. Imrmokae, Fla
LOW 28 GrurdCanyw. Ant
WORLD CITIES


SUN
CITY HILSKY
Acaputco 87/78/pc
Amsterdam 66/50k
Athens 77/6&'s
Beijing 7/62/t
Berlin 7S55/pc
Bermuda 77/69fts


KEY TO CO tONM S: cM'ck1ody; *, e. Cairol 87/6Ws
fiark h.hazr. pc-pfti clowey, raim; Calgary 6W46f/s
'raliVisnow mix; S lwn, sitsh owmr; Havana 87I69/s
rt-snow tos=tmludstorms; w-iwlndl Hong Kong 89i78/ts
WS rM4 Jerusalemn 82/64/s


Lisbon 64/5(3/s
London 60/48/s
Madrid 71/50/s
Mexico City 78/59/ts
Montreal 71/53/pc
Moscow 84/62/s
Paris 62/46/r
Rio 75f6wr
Rome 78/655s
Sydney 77/571s
Tokyo 78/64/pc
Toronto 6850/r
Warsaw 8459is


LEGAL NOTICES





Bid Notices........................D10

Lien Notices......................D10

Miscellaneous Notices......D10

Surplus Property...............D10


4- CITRUS COUNTY LNT



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FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 25, the
145th day of 2014. There are 220
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 25,1964, the U.S.
Supreme Court, in Griffin v. County
School Board of Prince Edward
County, ordered the Virginia county
to reopen its public schools, which
officials had closed in an attempt to
circumvent the Supreme Court's
1954 Brown v. Board of Education
of Topeka public school desegrega-
tion ruling.
On this date:
In 1895, playwright Oscar Wilde
was convicted of a morals charge in
London; he was sentenced to two
years in prison.
Ten years ago: The Boston
Archdiocese said it would close
65 of 357 parishes, an offshoot of
the clergy sex abuse scandal.
Five years ago: North Korea
claimed to have carried out a power-
ful underground nuclear test; Presi-
dent Barack Obama called on the
world to "stand up to" Pyongyang
and demand it honor a promise to
abandon its nuclear ambitions.
One year ago: Making his first
official trip to sub-Saharan Africa,
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
demanded that Nigeria respect
human rights as it cracked down on
Islamist extremists and pledged to
work hard in the coming months to
ease tensions between Sudan and
South Sudan.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Sir lan
McKellen is 75. Country singer Jessi
Colter is 71. Actress-singer Leslie
Uggams is 71. Movie director and
Muppeteer Frank Oz is 70. Actor-
comedian Mike Myers is 51. Actor Matt
Borlenghi is 47. Actress Anne Heche
is 45. Actresses Sidney and Lindsay
Greenbush (TV: "Little House on the
Prairie") are 44. Actor-comedian
Jamie Kennedy is 44. Actress Oc-
tavia Spencer is 44. Actress Molly
Sims is 41. Singer Lauryn Hill is 39.
Thought for Today: "There is
nothing final about a mistake, ex-
cept its being taken as final." -
Phyllis Bottome, English author
(1884-1963).


. ...... 44 U111.. .. .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUDGET AND STAFF
Animal Services budget and staff complement for the past five years, per year.


FY 09/10


Expenditures: $699,761
Revenues:
Fees/Fines/
Sales/Donations $269,489
General Fund $430,272
Staff: 14



SHELTER
Continued from Page Al

a new shelter Many of those vol-
unteers balked at the idea.
"There's no plan," said Maggie
Hypes, president of Humanitar-
ians of Florida. "They want us to
raise $2.5 million, but we don't
have a plan."
Mary Lee Johnson, who heads
up Snippet Citrus, an organiza-
tion that provides low-cost
spay/neuter vouchers, agreed.
"You can't tell a bunch of peo-
ple you need to raise $2.5 million
and won't tell us what they're
doing with it," she said.
Kenney may have an alterna-
tive. He said Corrections Corpo-
ration of America, which
operates the Citrus County jail,
is reviewing bids to possibly
build a new animal shelter on
property near the jail at no or lit-
tle cost to the county
Kenney, who included build-
ing a new animal shelter on his
priority list this year, said some-
thing has to be done soon.
"In my mind, there is a critical


FY 10/11 FY 11/12

$754,326 $747,493


$319,961 $338,739
$434,365 $408,754


FY 12/13

$837,225


$356,542
$480,683
14


FY 13/14
YTD
$849,453


$229,289
$620,164
14


Source: Citrus County Department of Community Services


need," he said. "It's on my gro-
cery list."
'Shelter's always been
on the back burner'
The Citrus County Animal
Shelter on Airport Road near
the county fairgrounds dates
back to 1991. While the number
of euthanized dogs and cats has
dropped significantly over the
years with a stronger focus on
adoptions, Kenney said the shel-
ter lacks basic necessities to
keep animals comfortable.
Groups such as the Humane
Society of Citrus County and an-
imal advocates like Frank
Yuelling are more blunt than
that. Some regularly approach
county commissioners during
their meetings, demanding more
be done to increase adoptions,
decrease or eliminate eu-
thanizations, and provide
enough funding that the shelter
has a veterinarian and director,
not one person fulfilling both
jobs.
"Any agency they have is sup-
ported with funds and with the
people they need," Yuelling
said. "Why should it be any dif-


VOLUNTEERS
Number of Animal Services
volunteers past five years,
per year.


* 2009:
* 2010:
* 2011:
* 2012:
* 2013:
* May 2014:


ANIMAL STATISTICS
Number of animals sheltered, adopted and euthanized by the


county in the past five years, per year.
Year Cat Dog


2009
Adopted
Euthanized
2010
Adopted
Euthanized
2011
Adopted
Euthanized
2012
Adopted
Euthanized


15 2013
30 Adopted
82 Euthanized


Source: Citrus County Department
of Community Services

ferent for the shelter? The shel-
ter's always been on the back
burner"
The county budgets about
$849,000 for shelter operations,
though the net is much lower be-
cause it receives about $350,000
annually in fees, fines, veteri-
nary services and donations.
Prior to 2009, Animal Control
was its own division with its own
director When the sheriff's of-
fice took over the enforcement
part of animal control, the county
downlisted it to Animal Services
and shifted it to the Community


Jan.-April 2014
Adopted
Euthanized


2,868
279
2,427
3,319
366
2,698
3,170
374
2,520
2,959
611
1,999
2856
753
1,862
652
233
284


2,376
734
843
2,701
954
896
2,584
916
693
2,734
1,180
517
2580
1,389
316
843
447
63


Other Totals
5,244


6,020



5,754



5,693


170 5,606
112
20
62 1,557
48
1


Source: Citrus County Department of Community Services


Services Department
It was run by a manager, but
then the county placed Dr Julie
Rosenberger in charge. Rosen-
berger, the shelter veterinarian,
recently left for a similar posi-
tion in another county, so the
shelter has a temporary veteri-
narian on staff
Heidi Blanchette, the county's
Housing Services officer, is the
interim acting director
Adams and Damato said they
have questions about the shel-
ter's direction and purpose.


"There are so many things we
need to talk about," Damato
said. "It's not a very clear path."
Kenney said he realizes a new
shelter may take more time.
"We can talk, we don't neces-
sarily have to act," he said.
"We've got to start looking for a
long-term or short-term correc-
tive action. Nobody has ever
talked about it before. At least
we're talking about it."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or
mwright@chronicleonline. corn.


EXHIBIT
Continued from PageAl

Embraced hopes will help
veterans to open up about
their own experiences in
war zones.
It often proves too much
for a soldier to just talk in
general about what they
have lived through, said
Jodi McCullah, director of
the group, whose acronym
is SAFE.
"One particular image
opens a door to conversa-
tion," McCullah said.
"It doesn't seem so
overwhelming."
The message is an im-
portant one for Danault, a
volunteer for SAFE, which
is encouraging the fami-
lies it works with to see
"War Journals" as a way to
begin conversations, espe-
cially between veterans
and their non-veteran
spouses.
SAFE, located near Fort
Campbell, a sprawling
Army base on the Ten-
nessee-Kentucky line, has
helped train docents and
volunteers at the Frist on
how to cope with veterans
who might have an emo-
tional reaction to the
exhibit.
Mumford's work, on dis-
play through June 8, is
being juxtaposed with a
collection of early 19th-
century etchings by the
Spanish master Francisco
de Goya in an adjacent
Frist exhibit titled "Goya:
The Disasters of War"
When Danault steps
closer to Mumford's paint-
ing of the memorial serv-
ice, she notices that some
of the artist's brush strokes
"are so much heavier than
others."
"It just makes me think,


Associated Press
Veteran Aaron Voris, with his wife, Stephanie, talks about
his experience in Iraq after viewing the "Steve Mumford's
War Journals: 2003-2013" exhibit. Veterans support
group Soldiers and Families Embraced (SAFE) has helped
train docents and volunteers at the Frist to help veterans
who have an emotional reaction to the exhibit. And SAFE
is encouraging families to see "War Journals" as a way to
begin conversations, especially between veterans and
their non-veteran spouses.
'I wonder if those are were coming through ...
(Mumford's) emotions that how difficult it was for him


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to put this image on paper
in the midst of everything
else that was going on."'
Speaking of the painting
during an earlier tour for
veterans and the news
media, Mumford ex-
plained that during the
memorial service, some-
one played taps and there
was a roll call that in-
cluded the fallen soldier
His name was called three
times, to silence.
"There was not a dry
eye, and I was crying my-
self, while I was drawing,"
he said.
Veteran Aaron Voris said
he was drawn to a pencil


sketch of an exhausted sol-
dier, eyelids drooping,
eyes staring into space.
In Afghanistan, he said,
"we were lucky if we got
maybe 4 1/2 hours' sleep
from them trying to either
overrun our base or mor-
tar our base with God
knows what they were
shooting at us."
Voris, 25, walks with a
cane and has memory
problems as a result of
three separate concussive
blasts during his time as a
heavy-machine gunner in
the Paktika province.
His wife, Stephanie
Voris, said the exhibit has


given the couple some-
thing to talk about
Because most troops
don't have photos of them-
selves out on patrol, the
exhibit's images help fam-
ily members to understand
more about their experi-
ences, said SAFE director
McCullah.
But Danault said she
wasn't ready to bring her
family along yet.
"You can tell them all
day long, but when they
match up stories with a
picture I don't know if
that's something I would
want in their heads," she
said.


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SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 A5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Franklin
Brock, 74
HERNANDO
Franklin Brock, age 74,
Hernando, died Saturday,
May 24, 2014. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is in charge of
private arrangements.




Merritt
Dyer, 88
INVERNESS
Merritt Calvin Dyer, 88,
of Inverness, Florida, went
to be with
our Lord
on May 18, -
2014. He
was born
in Endi-
cott, New .
York, to
Pearl and
Arthur
Dyer, for- Merritt
merlyresi- Dyer
dents of
Inverness, Florida. Merritt
graduated from the Navy
Hospital Corps School in
1944 and deployed as a
medic to the Philippines.
He moved to Inverness in
1972 to help take care of
his parents. Merritt was a
well-respected electrical
contractor in the area for
over 30 years. He was
known for always having a
song in his heart and a
smile on his face. A friend
to everyone, Merritt was a
founding member of Grace
Bible Church, where he
was the song leader until
Parkinsons took away his
singing voice, but never his
love of singing. To know
him was to know the un-
conditional love of God.
For his family, he was a
source of pride, strength,
optimism, honesty, in-
tegrity and joy
He is survived by his
wife of 67 years, Janet
Dyer of Inverness, Florida;
son Richard Dyer and wife
Judy of Memphis, Ten-
nessee; son Robert Dyer
and wife Margo of Jack-
sonville, Florida; son
Ronald Dyer and wife
Paula of Orlando, Florida;
son Randy Dyer and do-
mestic partner Ricky Kitts
of Inverness, Florida;
brother Roger Dyer and
wife Shary of Atlanta,
Georgia; eight grandchil-
dren; 13 great-grandchil-
dren; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
A celebration of his life
will be at 11 a.m. Saturday,
May 31, 2014, at Grace
Bible Fellowship, 4979 E.
Arbor St., Inverness, FL
34452. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations in
his honor to Hospice of
Citrus, East Citrus Team,
326 S. Line Ave., Inverness,
FL 34452.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660.


Carlos F. Gonzalez, MD
May, 26, 1930-May 26, 2013
If I searched the world, I
could never find a better
husband or father of our
two beautiful daughters. I
am so happy that we
remained close throughout
our 62 years. You were
always loving and caring
for our family and had
deep compassion and
concern for all those you
touched medically. Just
remembering you today,
on your birthday, reminds
me of the most important
things in life family and
wonderful friends.
We love you and miss you.
Helen, Laura & Gigi


Donald
Curler, 80
HOMOSASSA
Donald R. Curler, age 80,
of Homosassa, Florida,
died Saturday, May 10,
2014, in Lecanto, Florida.
Donald was born on
Oct. 31, 1933, in Bay City,
Michigan, the son of Alvin
and Margaret Curler In
1958, he started Linwood
Cycle Sales in his garage.
He went on to become
owner of Linwood Honda
in Linwood, Michigan. He
started the Valley Trail
Riders in Rhodes, Michi-
gan, where he made many
friends. Donald had a true
zest for life. He loved his
family, racing motorcycles,
traveling, dancing and
spending time with friends
from the Honda shop.
Donald was Baptist.
Donald was prede-
ceased by his first wife,
Virginia; son Chris; two
brothers and a sister
Survivors include his
wife of 14 years, Patricia
Curler of Homosassa,
Florida; sons, Roland and
his wife Colleen Curler,
Linwood, Michigan, and
Donald R. Curler Jr of Las
Vegas, Nevada; two step-
sons, Chuck and his wife
Vanesha McNett of Ho-
mosassa, Florida, and
David and his wife Jean-
nine Carll of Homosassa,
Florida; stepdaughter
Paula and her husband
Addam Miller of Inver-
ness, Florida; mother-in-
law Anna Wolfgram,
Deland, Florida; 11 grand-
children; three great-
grandchildren; and many
nieces and nephews.
The family will hold a
celebration of life for Mr
Curler at Valley Trail Rid-
ers, Rhodes, Michigan, at a
later date. Heinz Funeral
Home & Cremation, Inver-
ness, Florida.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Raymond
Martin, 63
FLORAL CITY
Raymond J. Martin, age
63, Floral City, Florida, was
born Nov 19, 1950, in
Presque Isle, Maine, where
he had a well drilling busi-
ness. From there he moved
to Denver, then Virginia
Beach, Homestead, Naples
and, for the last nine years,
he lived in Floral City,
Florida. He worked at
Brooksville Country Club
as a starter and made many
friends there. Ray was a
great carpenter He built
and installed high-end cab-
inetry His work ethic and
professionalism were ex-
emplary He loved sports,
but, by far, golf was his fa-
vorite. I'm sure he is teeing
off on Heaven's golf course
now
Ray passed peacefully
in his sleep on Wednesday,
May 21, 2014. His only rel-
ative was Connie Roberts,
with whom he shared his
heart, home and life for 23
years. Ray will be missed
and always loved. Heinz
Funeral Home, Inverness,
Florida.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

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Ruth Heath, 97
SUGARMILL WOODS
Ruth Lucille Heath, 97,
of Sugarmill Woods, Ho-
mosassa, Florida, passed
away peacefully and went
home to be with Jesus on
Sunday, May 18, 2014, at
Hospice House of Lecanto,
Florida. Born April 27,
1917, in Oregon, Illinois,
the daughter of Charles
Frederick Harris and
Edith Abigail Howard
Harris, she lived most of
her adult life in Hager-
stown, Indiana, with her
husband, Leonard, who
preceded her in death.
She then moved to Florida
in 1993. Ruth, a born-again
Christian, served 20 years
as assistant secretary to
the House of Prayer,
Lewisville, Indiana, and
led intercessory prayer
groups in Indiana and
Florida. She played golf
and tennis and was an avid
fan of both sports.
Ruth was the devoted
wife to her husband,
Leonard L. Heath; loving
mother to her son, Joel
Heath, Arizona, and
daughter, Kathleen Bryn,
Florida; loving grand-
mother to Col. Heather L.
Garrett, Kentucky, Jason J.
Bryn, Virginia, Eric N.
Heath, New Zealand,
Sheila Keys, California;
and loving great-grand-
mother to Megan, Thomas
and Ellie Bryn, Virginia.
She is survived by her
youngest brother, Philip
Harris, New Jersey
Her cremains will be
buried next to her hus-
band, Leonard L. Heath, in
West Lawn Cemetery,
Hagerstown, in August
2014, where graveside
services will be held in
celebration of her life.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Rita
Zareczny, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
A Funeral Mass for Mrs.
Rita E. Zareczny, age 86, of
Beverly Hills, Florida, will
be held 9:00 AM, Tuesday,
May 27,2014 at Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church,
Beverly Hills, FL. Crema-
tion will be under the di-
rection of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness,
Florida. Inurnment will
take place at Our Lady of
Hope Cemetery, South-
gate, MI. The family re-
quests expressions of
sympathy take the form of
Memorial Donations to
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, Beverly
Hills. Online condolences
may be sent to the family
at wwwHooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mrs. Zareczny was born
August 30, 1927 in Detroit,
MI, daughter of Ephrem
and Emmie (Ladouceur)
Allard. She passed away
May 22, 2014 in Lecanto,
FL. She worked as a book-
keeper and moved to Bev-
erly Hills from Wyandotte,
MI in 1979. Mrs. Zareczny



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was a member of Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church,
where she enjoyed singing
in the choir and taught
Catechism for 8 years. She
was also active in a ladies
dance troop.
Mrs. Zareczny was pre-
ceded in death by her par-
ents and her husband of 62
years, Charles L. Zareczny
Survivors include son,
David C. Zareczny of Bev-
erly Hills, 2 daughters,
Yvonne Zareczny of Saint
Petersburg and Diane
Zareczny of Crestview
Arrangements are under
the direction of the
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Betty Lynn, 84
HOMOSASSA
Betty Jo Lynn, 84, of Ho-
mosassa, passed away
Wednesday, May 21, 2014.
She was a native of Tampa,
born
b o r n ^, -
July 13,
1929, to
Duncan
and Mattie
(Leslie)
Jones, one
of nine
children.
She was a Betty
lifelong Lynn
h o m e -
maker and of the
Methodist faith. She loved
boating in Homosassa and
their North Carolina
cabin. She loved her fam-
ily and always had open
arms to welcome them and
their friends. She was al-
ways there to help anyone
in time of need.
She is survived by her
children, Charlene Harrell
(husband Leon), Wayne
Lynn, Virginia Barnes
(husband Danny), and
Carol Heflin (husband
Dave); seven grandchil-
dren; nine great-
grandchildren; one great-
great-grandchild and one
on the way Mrs. Lynn was
preceded in death by her
husband of 62 years, the
love of her life, "Ray"
Friends will be received
from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m.
Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa. Graveside serv-
ice will take place at 2 p.m.
at Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell. In lieu of
flowers, please make do-
nations to Autism
speaks.org. wwwwilder
funeralcom


Solveig 'Sue'
Spuhler
HOMOSASSA
Sue Spuhler, 84, of Ho-
mosassa, Florida, passed
away May 21, 2014. She
was born March 28, 1930,
in Brook-
lyn, New
York, to
the late
Arthur G
and Molly
Eriksen.
She had
moved to
Florida 14 solveig
years ago Spuhler
f r o m
Honesdale, Pennsylvania.
She is survived by her
husband, Gene Spuhler;
two children, John Spuh-
ler and Janet Johnson; one
sister, Alice Hauge; five
grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
She dedicated her life to
community service, in-
cluding service to the fol-
lowing organizations: Boy
Scouts of America, Girl
Scouts of America, plan-
ning board of Lebanon
Township, Honesdale,
Pennsylvania, board of di-
rectors for the Wayne Me-
morial Hospital, woman's
auxiliary for the Wayne
Memorial Hospital, organ-
izer of "The Other Shop"
for the Wayne Memorial
Hospital, founder of Bernt
Balchen Lodge Chapter of
Sons of Norway Lodge
No. 3-566 Rowland Penn-
sylvania, General Federa-
tion of Woman's Clubs
Northeast Pennsylvania,
past president of Crystal
River "GFWC" Woman's
Club, member of Women of
Sugarmill Woods, member
of Sons of Norway Sun
Viking Lodge of Spring
Hill, member of First
United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, Sugarmill
Woods Cancer Survivors
group, Sugar Mill Woods
Garden Club, Sassy Nan-
nies Red Hat Ladies.
Celebration of life serv-
ices will be 11 a.m. Friday,
May 30, 2014, at Strickland
Funeral Home. Memorial
contributions may be
made to Crystal River
Woman's Club "GFWC,"
Sugar Mill Woods Woman's
Club, or American Cancer
Society
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


James 'Jim'
Twitty Jr., 78
INVERNESS
James W "Jim" TwittyJr,
age 78, passed away
May 22, 2014, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital. Jim was
born
Feb. 14,
1936, in
Governor's
Island, ,df
New York,
to the late
James W
Twitty Sr
and Flo- James
r e n c e Twitty
(King)
Twitty He attended the
University of Florida and
was a member of Delta
Sigma Phi. He was a jour-
nalist and then bureau
manager of the Tampa
Tribune for 30 years. He
served his country in the
Army National Guard. Jim
was two-time president of
the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce and co-chair-
man of the Bicentennial
Committee. He was known
for his excellent cooking
and enjoyed reading, writ-
ing and traveling.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his wife of 57 years,
Kathryn Twitty; sons Fred-
erick "Rick" Twitty, Bev-
erly Hills, Florida, James
W Twitty III and wife Jen-
nifer, Inverness; brother
Gary L. and wife Claudia
Twitty, LaJolla, California;
and five grandchildren, Je-
remy and wife Bryceann,
Jonathan, Jordan, Joshua
and Nick; and last, but cer-
tainly not least, his
beloved dog, "Boo."
He was a parishioner at
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church for over
50 years. He will be deeply
missed by all who knew
him. A celebration and
tribute to Jim's life will be
at 3 p.m. Thursday, May 29,
2014, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Please consider
donations in Jim's memory
to the Humane Society in
lieu of flowers.
Sign the guestbook at
ww. chronicleonline. corn.

* Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


SDeath ELSEWHERE


Donald
Levine, 86
HASBRO EXEC
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -
Donald Levine, the Hasbro
executive credited as the
father of G.I. Joe for devel-
oping the world's first ac-
tion figure, has died. He
was 86.
He died of cancer early
Thursday at Home & Hos-
pice Care of Rhode Island,
said his wife, Nan. They
were just about to cele-
brate their 60th wedding
anniversary
Levine shepherded the
toy through design and de-
velopment as Hasbro's


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head of research and de-
velopment. He and his
team came up with an
11 1/2-inch articulated fig-
ure with 21 moving parts,
and since the company's
employees included many
military veterans, it was
decided to outfit the toy in
the uniforms of the Army,
Navy, Marines and Air
Force, with such acces-
sories as guns, helmets
and vehicles.
Levine, who served in
the Army in Korea, said he
got the idea for the move-
able figure as a way to
honor veterans.
G.I. Joe hit the shelves in


time for the 1964 Christ-
mas shopping season and
soon became a big seller at
$4 apiece.
"Don Levine and his
team took it from a good
concept to a great con-
cept," said Alan Hassen-
feld, Hasbro's former CEO
whose father, Merrill,
oversaw G.I. Joe's develop-
ment when he ran the
company
Levine's funeral will be
held today at Temple Beth-
El in Providence.
He is survived by his
wife, three children and
four grandchildren.
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A6 SUNDAY, MAY 2 5, 2014


m I







Children's hospital volunteer cheers the sickest


ANA
VECIANA-SUAREZ
Miami Herald
MIAMI Juan Man-
fredi is 72, retired, a
grandfather with hair as
white as a sheet of un-
blemished paper But in
the corridors of Holtz Chil-
dren's Hospital at the Uni-
versity of Miami/Jackson
Memorial Medical Center,
he is a rock star, a
celebrity
"Hey, Grandpa." one
nurse calls out.
"Grandpa!"
"You here today,
Grandpa?"
For the past decade,
Manfredi has been a vol-
unteer at the hospital, pri-
marily in the pediatric
intensive care, oncology
and transplant/surgical
units. During that time, he
has become a recognizable
figure in his blue polo shirt
with "Grandpa" stitched
on the front and a Spider-
Man backpack flung over a
shoulder
Three days a week, he
drives from his home in
Hollywood to brighten the
long days of Holtz's seri-
ously ill children, his
iPhone and iPad at the
ready
"There are plenty of toys
for them to play with," he
says, with a wry chuckle,
"but what they usually ask
me for is one of those." He
points to his stash of elec-
tronics. "They love the
games."
On this particular Fri-
day, there is no hint of the
spring heat in the climate-
controlled playroom, but
the warmth that surrounds
Manfredi and his 3-year-
old friend, Armonnie
Smith, is palpable. Armon-
nie is a multi-organ trans-
plant patient who has
been in and out of the hos-
pital his entire life. He and
Manfredi have developed
a strong attachment to
each other
Hair pulled tight on the
top of his head, a battery of
beeping medical machines
in his wake, Armonnie
tries to monopolize Man-
fredi's attention, saying


Associated Press
Nine-month-old Jayson Olguin-Lugo, of Arcadia, leans against Holtz Children's
Hospital volunteer Juan Manfredi during a quiet moment May 9 in Miami. Olguin-Lugo
had a heart transplant in April. Manfredi, 72, of Hollywood, volunteers at Holtz
Children's Hospital at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami three times a week, inspired
by his granddaughter who died in 2003.


"he's funny and he plays
with me."
One of their favorite
pastimes is painting. Man-
fredi dips a long-handled
brush into a paint jar and
Armonnie mashes the
brush on a large sheet of
paper, for an effect that is
not unlike a Kandinsky
abstract.
When two white-robed
women appear in the play-
room, ready to whisk Ar-
monnie away for a
procedure, the boy pleads:
"Can you come with me?"
The women shake their
head in warning, and Man-
fredi replies softly "I can't.
I'm sorry"
Armonnie shuffles off,
chin quivering, eyes dart-
ing back to Manfredi again
and again.
It's not easy volunteer-
ing with children who are
so sick, children in pain,
children alone, children
who might not make it to
the end of the year
"Sometimes it's too
much," Manfredi admits.
"It gets to me. I have to
take time off."
How much time? A
week? A month?
"Oh, no, no," he laughs.
"No more than a day, and


sometimes not even that. I
put the jazz very loud in
my car, and that helps."
Manfredi, who still does
occasional consulting work
in medical-equipment
sales for clients in Brazil
and Mexico, his old profes-
sion, knows the special
hurt of caring for a very
sick child. His grand-
daughter Amanda spent
more than nine months in
the pediatric intensive
care unit after a multi-
organ transplant She was
10 years old when she died
in October 2003, leaving a
devastated family and a
grandpa who had found a
new calling.
During Amanda's stay at
Holtz, Manfredi visited her
every day He noticed that
not every child had visi-
tors. Amanda noticed it,
too. Some parents were
working; others had aban-
doned their children to the
state, overwhelmed by
their care.
"She would tell me, 'Go,
go, play with the other
children.' I remembered
that. When she passed, I
continued to do that."
Manfredi said he was in-
spired by the pediatric in-
tensive care unit's nurses,


the child-life specialists
and the social workers. He
specifically cited Holtz
nurse Kim Juanico, who
founded People in Crisis
United, a nonprofit group
that sponsors monthly
family dinners and art
therapy sessions for pedi-
atric patients as well as
field trips for the kids
healthy enough to venture
outside the hospital.
"There is so much love
here, so much giving," he
says. "They inspire me to
volunteer"
Juanico refers to Man-
fredi as Grandpa, joking
that he specializes in bear
hugs. "He's family to us -
not just to the kids but to
the staff, too. He's been
here so long."
Manfredi started his
own nonprofit group,
Amanda's Friends, in
honor of his granddaugh-
ter Funded by donations
mostly from Manfredi's
family and friends, the
group helps caregivers
with their needs, every-
thing from clothing to
money for rent or funeral
expenses. He also works
closely with People in Cri-
sis United.
"I see the mothers..." he


begins, and pauses to
steady his voice. "It's hard
on the families, but it is so
hard on the mothers."
He recalls how much his
own mother suffered after
another one of her sons
died of brain cancer in
Buenos Aires, where Man-
fredi grew up before he
came to the United States
at age 19. "When my
mother died at 84," he re-
calls, "the last word she
said was my brother's
name."
Among the children he
has helped care for at
Holtz were two transplant
patients whom his daugh-
ter, Monica, eventually
adopted, Riana in Novem-
ber 2005 and, six months
later, Logan.
Both died, and many
might say this was another
loss, another heartbreak
for Manfredi.
He sees it differently
"My daughter loved those
kids like her own," he ex-
plains, "and those chil-
dren had at least that for
those years."
Manfredi does more
than play, color and read
books with the young pa-
tients. He also serves as
sounding board for family
members who, as he ex-
plains, "need somebody to
talk to. Sometimes they
just want a break so they
can go take a shower"
For Luis and Maria, par-
ents of Mariana Cuestas
Oyuela, Manfredi provides
emotional support for a
young couple far from
home. In the case of the
Cuestas, home is Honduras.
Mariana, who will turn 1
on May 21, has been in the
hospital since October, suf-
fering from pulmonary


hypoplasia, or undevel-
oped lungs.
"He gives us advice from
the years of experience he
has," Luis says. "He prays
with us. He is as much sup-
port for her" he ges-
tures to his baby in the
metal crib "as he is for
us."
Manfredi, a volunteer
member of the hospital's
pediatric palliative care
team and the Family Advi-
sory Council, teamed up
with People in Crisis
United and Holtz's Certi-
fied Child Life specialists,
healthcare professionals
who help sick children
and families cope with ill-
ness, to open a "simulation
room" that serves as a
place to teach caregivers
essential skills, such as
how to replace a feeding
tube.
The project's main
donor was the Mexico-
based MDI Care Group, a
client of Manfredi's when
he sold medical equip-
ment in Latin America.
All the volunteering
keeps Manfredi busy at a
time when his peers are
traveling or hitting the
links. He credits his wife of
53 years, Elsa, and daugh-
ters Monica and Sandra
for their unflagging sup-
port. He vows to continue
until his legs or his energy
give out. His heart cer-
tainly won't.
"I see kids suffering, and
sometimes there's no one
here to hold their hands,"
Manfredi says, his voice
breaking. "I think of
Amanda and what she
would tell me and what
she wanted me to do. I
think of her and I try my
best."


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STATE


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 A7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FACILITY
Continued from PageAl

and offices, plus supplies and
random stuff stacked every-
where because of no place to put
it.
"As you can see, we need a
storage area," he said.
He would also like to see 100
outdoor dog runs. Currently,
there are 19.
"We could use two surgical
suites," he said.
The shelter itself, located in
back of the main building and
built in 1991, lacks a quarantine
area for dogs with possible com-
municable diseases. The
biterss" are separated from the
general population only by a
sign.
The building also lacks air
conditioning, and it gets hot in
the summer, even with fans
blowing.
Shelter volunteers raised
money to create an Astroturf ex-
ercise area for dogs. Volunteers
walk the dogs every day Cur-
rently, there are 98 volunteers
and 14 full-time staff- seven in
administration and seven who
work in the kennel. There's one
part-time veterinarian.
"The staff and volunteers are
doing a great job, the best they
can with what they have to work
with," Kenney said.
MEN
To the right of the dog area is
the cat house. Lots and lots of
cats in cages.
"I envision cat rooms with
rocking chairs so people who
want to adopt can sit and get to
know them first," Kenney said.
Cats are a big concern for the
shelter They come in faster than
they can be adopted out.
"The ladies who advocate for
cats are constantly working with
them, taking them for spay and
neutering and getting them


MAITHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Commissioner John "JJ" Kenney says the shelter is overcrowded and all available space is used for storage.


ready for adoption," said Pattie
Amon, shelter operations
manager
Amon said there is no set
length of stay before an animal
is euthanized. Currently, the
save rate for all shelter animals
is 84 percent
"We do everything we can to
get these animals adopted,"
Amon said.
As for feral cats, Kenney said
a good place for them would be
on people's farms to be used as
barn cats.
Another concern he and shel-
ter staff have is with the number


of animals dropped off at the
shelter anonymously, either left
in the outdoor pen in the front or
tied to the fence.
"When somebody comes in to
surrender an animal, we try to
find out why," he said. "Some-
times it's as simple as they can't
afford to feed it. Our Nature
Coast Volunteer Center and the
home-delivered meal program
have made pet food available ...
and money for medical care -
there are ways around that.
There are foundations that help.
The big thing is to try to keep
pets in people's homes."


MEm
In a perfect world, there would
be no need for an animal shelter
In a perfect world, county com-
missioners could get their pet
projects approved and funded
with the snap of their fingers.
In this imperfect world, what
will it take to get a new animal
shelter built in Citrus County at
an estimated cost of $4 million?
Kenney said one possibility is
to tap property taxes, which
would not be the most popular
option.
"We've talked with CCA about
building a shelter," he said.


"They would build it and we'd
pay it back over an extended pe-
riod of time. That's what we're
doing with the new jail that they
built. It's probably the most ex-
peditious way to get it built."
Until then, Kenney emphati-
cally advocates for pet owners
spaying and neutering their
pets.
'"Also, if you're looking for a
pet, come to the shelter first," he
said.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicleonline.
corn.


NEIGHBOR
Continued from Page Al

a new barn and procedure
room."
Pasco Kevin Mal-
lory, animal services: '"An-
imal Services was started,
I believe, in 1973 with an
old vehicle maintenance
barn. Since then, the
admin building was
around 1988, the intake
building C was around
1990 and our newest addi-
tion is a 12,650-square-foot
adoption building com-
pleted in October 2010.
Marion Elaine
Delorio McClain, public
information officer: "Mar-
ion County's first animal
control shelter dates back
to at least the 1940s. In
1961, the county con-
structed a new shelter in
southeast Marion County
on Maricamp Road. The
shelter had 28 dog kennel
runs and 34 cat cages. In
1994, the shelter now
known as the Animal Cen-
ter was built and had 134
dog kennel runs and 108
cat cages.
2. How many animals
can it accommodate?
Sumter- Belancin:
"Up to 98 animals."
Jeffrey Atkin, Sumter
County assistant director
of services: "That would
be kennel animals. We also
have pasture and paddock
facilities for livestock."
"And cat condos that
house up to 25 to 30 cats,"
said Belancin.
Pasco- Mallory: "Our
capacity for care is 150 an-
imals; however, there are
about 300 total cages be-
tween dogs and cats."
Marion McClain:
"With continuous improve-
ment, the shelter now con-
tains 196 kennel runs, 120
cat cages, a modest live-
stock area as well as sev-
eral portable pens used for
small farm animals. The
department also has ac-
cess to 40 acres located
off-site that is used for
horses, cows and pigs."
3. Which county depart-
ment is in charge of the an-
imal shelter?
Sumter Public
Works.
Pasco Community
Services Department
under Public Services.
Marion McClain:
"The Animal Services de-
partment manages the an-
imal shelter (Marion
County Animal Center).
The department was
formed in 2008 when ani-
mal control moved from
Code Enforcement to
merge with the Animal
Center Before then, the
Animal Center was its own
county department."
4. Is the animal shelter
operated by county staff or


volunteers or both?
Sumter -Atkin: "We
have county staff that op-
erates the shelter Monday
through Friday and also
Saturday and Sunday for
animal care. We do have
volunteers that will come
and spend time with us,
but it is operated by county
staff."
Pasco Mallory:
"One customer service
person, 11 animal care
technicians, one adoption
coordinator, one full-time
veterinarian, one part-
time veterinarian, four
veterinary technicians and
a supervisor for the shel-
ter We also have one ra-
bies control officer and
seven animal control offi-
cers, one field supervisor,
one assistant manager and
a manager Additionally,
there is a secretary and a
data entry staff member
Our education program
consists of a full-time edu-
cation coordinator and a
part-time education coor-
dinator We also have a vol-
unteer program where
volunteers are able to help
with most tasks associated
with the shelter
Marion McClain:
"The Animal Center is op-
erated by county staff, but
we have a wonderful
group of volunteers that
provides immeasurable
help. Volunteers facilitate
adoptions by getting to
know the animals and
helping adopters find their
perfect match. They teach
the high-spirited animals
manners, coax the shyer
ones and bathe and groom
the ones who like getting
their paws dirty They also
sometimes accompany


staff during outreach
adoption events."
5. How much of its fund-
ing comes from ad valorem
taxes (general fund)?
Sumter-Atkin: "It is
wholly supported by the
general fund."
Pasco Mallory:
"Budget: $2,215,271; rev-
enue: $812,418; net:
$1,407,098 ad val-
orem/general revenue
funded."
Marion McClain:
"Animal Services is prima-
rily funded by ad valorem
taxes. However, a portion


of the department's budget
comes from fees (e.g. adop-
tion fees, Neuter Com-
muter fees, etc.). Fees
made up about 23 percent
of the department's budget
this year."
6. Has the concept of
contracting with a non-
profit animal rescue group
for cost savings ever come
before your county
commissioners?
Sumter-Atkin: "Not
that I'm aware of. But we
do work with animal res-
cues for adoption and
placement of animals.


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Mark is a native of be
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Mark has the experience
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Pasco-Mallory: "Not
that I am aware of. We do
work with rescue groups to
help place more animals
into adoptions and in-
crease our live-release
rate."
Marion McClain: "I
don't believe the concept
of contracting with a non-


profit has been proposed
in the past; our shelter is
the largest in the county
and many area nonprofit
rescues are full much of
the time. However, we do
regularly partner with res-
cue groups and other shel-
ters to help as many pets
find homes as possible."


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LOCAL







VA approves more private care for veterans


Associated Press

WASHINGTON More veter-
ans are being allowed to obtain
health care at private hospitals
and clinics in an effort to im-
prove their treatment following
allegations of falsified records
and delays in treatment.
In a statement issued Satur-
day, Veterans Affairs Secretary
Eric Shinseki also said VA facil-
ities are enhancing capacity of
their clinics so veterans can get
care sooner In cases where offi-
cials cannot expand capacity at
VA centers, the Department of
Veterans Affairs is "increasing
the care we acquire in the com-
munity through non-VA care,"
Shinseki said.
Lawmakers from both parties
have pressed for this policy
change as the VA confronts alle-
gations about treatment delays
and falsified records at VA cen-
ters nationwide.
The department's inspector
general said 26 VA facilities are
under investigation, including
the Phoenix VA hospital, where
a former clinic director said as
many as 40 veterans may have
died will awaiting treatment
Officials also are investigating
claims that VA employees have
falsified appointment records to
cover up delays in care. An ini-
tial review of 17 people who
died while awaiting appoint-
ments in Phoenix found that
none of their deaths appeared to
have been caused by delays in
treatment.
The allegations have raised


Associated Press
Speaker of the House John Boehner speaks May 8 at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.
The growing furor over veterans' health care moved to the political campaigns Thursday as
congressional candidates from both parties called for Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki to be fired.
Boehner said May 22 that reports of "horrors" at the VA were "appalling." His voice cracking, Boehner
said veterans "are men and women who served our country, and we've not just let them down, we've let
them die. This is awful stuff, and someone ought to be held accountable for it."


fresh concerns about the admin-
istration's management of a de-
partment that has been struggling
to keep up with the influx of vet-
erans returning home from the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and
Vietnam veterans needing more
care as they age.


The directive announced Sat-
urday should make it easier for
veterans to get medical care at
non-VA facilities, according to an
agency spokeswoman.
The VA spent about $4.8 billion
last year on medical care at non-
VA hospitals and clinics, spokes-


woman Victoria Dillon said. That
amounts to about 10 percent of
health care costs for the Veterans
Health Administration, the
agency's health care arm.
It was not clear how much the
new initiative would cost, Dillon
said.


Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla, chair-
man of the House Veterans' Af-
fairs Committee, welcomed
Shinseki's announcement, but
questioned why it took so long.
Reports about the veterans at
the Phoenix hospital surfaced
more than a month ago.
"It appears the department is
finally starting to take concrete
steps to address the problem,"
Miller said Saturday, calling the
directive "a welcome change
from the department's previous
approach, which was to wait
months for the results of yet an-
other investigation into a prob-
lem we already know exists."
Miller has accused Shinseki
and President Barack Obama of
focusing on internal reviews
while "overlooking VAs very
real, very deadly and very well-
documented delays-in-care
problem."
Miller has pledged to intro-
duce legislation that would give
any veteran who is unable to ob-
tain a VA appointment within
30 days the option to receive
non-VA care at the department's
expense.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has
called for the VA to allow more
veterans to receive medical care
at private hospitals.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi, D-Calif, said this past
week that she was open to the
idea of medical care at private
hospitals.
She said it was unacceptable
to have a backlog of patients
waiting for permission to go to a
federally qualified clinic.


Kids Central seeks host


families for young adults


Special to the Chronicle

OCALA-A bill extend-
ing foster care to older
youths was signed last May
by Gov Rick Scott. Senate
Bill 1036, sponsored by
Sen. Nancy Detert, was re-
named Nancy C. Detert
Common Sense and Com-
passion Independent Liv-
ing Act. Under the bill,
young adults in the child
welfare system have the
option to remain in foster
care until age 21 in order
to accomplish educational
goals such as graduating
high school, attending col-
lege or pursuing a techni-
cal degree.
Previously youths had to
leave foster care upon
turning 18. In conjunction
with the Let Kids Be Kids
Normalcy Bill, the Com-
passion Independent Liv-
ing Act strengthened the
role of foster care, restruc-
tured the Road to Inde-
pendence Program, and
empowered caregivers to
nurture youth, according
to a press release from
Kids Central Inc., which
serves Citrus and sur-
rounding counties.
Kids Central is the non-
profit lead agency selected
by the state of Florida to
coordinate child protec-
tion services in Florida's
5th Judicial Circuit
Kids Central independ-
ent living supervisor Han-
nah Rios said, "Moving out
on your own is a stressful
time for young adults. Giv-
ing these youth the oppor-
tunity to prepare and
remain in foster care until
they are older removes the
stress of moving out and
being on their own as soon
as they turn 18. Youth can
now better focus on their
educational goals and re-
main with their support
system."
As the local lead child
welfare agency, Kids Cen-
tral cares for the abused
and neglected children in
Citrus, Hernando, Lake,
Marion and Sumter coun-
ties. It is also responsible
for the case management,
educational coordination,
and safe housing of youths
who previously turned 18
while in foster care in
the Independent Living
program.
"The care of these young
adults is very complicated,
since the youth are old
enough to be on their own
but they aren't quite ready
yet," said Kids Central di-
rector of operations Kevin
Maloney "Due to the
trauma they've experi-
enced and the life setbacks
which have occurred, the
Independent Living youth
aren't equipped to live on
their own. They don't have
the support structure


ON THE NET
KidsCentralinc.org

commonly available to
most young adults who
move out on their own.
They only have us."
Under the new law, the
young adults in the Inde-
pendent Living program
have the option to remain
in foster care but, for vari-
ous reasons, most cannot
live in a traditional foster
home. Kids Central is cur-
rently seeking host fami-
lies and apartment-style
housing for these youths.
"The need is critical.
For these youth to be suc-


cessful and for them to
avoid more disruptions
and setbacks, we need
local housing for them,"
said John Cooper, CEO.
"Kids Central has released
a Request for Proposals to
find suitable and safe
housing options for these
young adults."
Placing young adults ex-
iting care in semi-
independent-style housing
will help them become in-
dependent gradually Also,
it will keep them in their
communities avoiding an-
other change in school.
Those interested may
visit KidsCentralinc.org
and click on the Request
for Proposals link.


Iowa students offer hygiene products


LAURA BIRD
Globe Gazette

HAMPTON, Iowa Needy families
in the Hampton area have a new re-
source for hygiene and cleaning prod-
ucts, thanks to a group of confirmation
students at Hampton United Methodist
Church.
The group of 12- and 13-year-olds
came up with the idea of the Clean Up
Closet after a mission trip in Cedar
Rapids last July, said Pastor Corby
Johnson.
The youngsters attended a poverty
simulation where they learned that a
family of four without their own washer
and dryer typically spends $80 per
month at a laundry


"The kids were shocked," Johnson
told the Globe Gazette.
The poverty simulation then gave the
group $50 to make a difference in some-
one's life. They spent it by taking laun-
dry detergent and rolls of quarters to a
laundry where it was greatly appreci-
ated, Johnson said.
After that, they researched other
needs that aren't covered through other
assistance programs and what they
could do in Hampton. The church's out-
reach committee also became involved
and it was decided to start a hygiene
closet.
The group applied for grants, gath-
ered donations, put up shelves in a
church storage room and finally opened
the Clean Up Closet in March.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOCAL/NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 A9








Obama goes out and about


Associated Press
WASHINGTON "The bear
is loose!"
Those were President Barack
Obama's words as he ditched his
motorcade and left the White
House on foot, favoring the fresh
air in a walk toward the Interior
Department.
Tourists near the White House
never expected to see the presi-
dent in person on a steamy
spring afternoon. One woman
squealed with delight; another
suggested she thought Wednes-
day's sighting might be an
Obama impostor
Since taking office, Obama has
grumbled periodically about the
claustrophobia that sets in when
his every move is surrounded by
intense security That makes it
nearly impossible to enjoy the
simple pleasures that others
take for granted.
"It's good to be out," Obama
said.
Traditionally, whenever the
president leaves the White
House, he travels by motorcade
or helicopter Before he arrives
at his destination, Secret Serv-
ice agents have prepared secu-
rity, which generally keeps
Obama at a distance from


Associated Press
President Barack Obama greets players May 19 during an unannounced stop to surprise members of the
Northwest Little League baseball teams at Friendship Park in Washington.


anything unpredictable.
Life in this bubble can feel
suffocating.
For Obama, relief frequently
comes in the form of a weekend
golf outing, usually at a military


base. But every once in a while,
the golf course just doesn't cut it
"I don't get a chance to take
walks very often," Obama said
this past week. "Secret Service
gets a little stressed. But every


once in a while I'm able to sneak
off."
Nearly six years into his pres-
idency, Obama seems to be
sneaking off just a bit more often.
Last week, diners at a Shake


Shack near the White House
looked up from their cheese-
burgers to see Obama and Vice
President Joe Biden stroll in.
The White House said Obama
was there to promote govern-
ment-financed work projects and
a proposed minimum-wage in-
crease, but the hastily arranged
visit raised a few eyebrows.
Three days later, Obama was
en route to a fundraiser in sub-
urban Maryland when his mo-
torcade made a detour and
pulled into a park.
Obama stopped by a baseball
field where Little League teams
were getting ready for a game.
Obama lobbed a few balls to-
ward home plate and posed for
photos.
White House officials offered
little explanation for the stop,
other than to point out that
Obama was scheduled later in
the week to travel to the Na-
tional Baseball Hall of Fame
and Museum in Cooperstown,
New York. That visit, officials
said, was aimed at promoting
tourism to the U.S. as a way to
boost the economy
"And, no, this not just an ex-
cuse to go the Baseball Hall of
Fame," Obama's senior adviser,
Dan Pfeiffer, wrote in a blog post.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


College president faces labor charge


Associated Press

FLORENCE, S.C. -
The president and
founder of Cathedral
Bible College faces fed-
eral charges that he made
international students
work long hours with little
pay by threatening their
legal status.
The Sun News ofMyrtle
Beach and WBTW


reported that bond was
set at $250,000 at a hear-
ing Friday for Reginald
Wayne Miller
Under the terms of his
bond, he is not allowed
to visit the college's cam-
pus in Marion or commu-
nicate with current
or former foreign
students.
Miller's attorney said
his friends and family will


try to raise the
bond money
Agents with Homeland
Security Investigations
filed a criminal com-
plaint against Miller this
week, saying they have
probable cause to charge
him with forced labor, a
felony that carries a max-
imum prison sentence
of 20 years for each
count.


Associated Press
San Jose police officer Huan Nguyen, right, visits with Dieu Hien Hyunh, left, and her
children Henry Lam, second from left, and Steven Lam on May 21 in San Jose, Calif.
Nguyen came to the aid of Hyunh after her husband, Phuoc Lam, was killed during a
road rage incident.


Road rage killing hits


policeman's 'soft spot'


Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. -
After 17 years on the force,
San Jose Police officer
Huan Ngyuen had learned
not to get emotionally in-
volved in his work.
But then one got
through.
On May 6, a road
rage slaying in his
Little Saigon
neighborhood, on
the streets where
he grew up and
now patrols, took HL
the life of a Viet- NgL
namese immigrant helped
like himself The $100,'
victim was a 37- slain
year-old bus fa
driver who left behind a
widow and two young
children, one with severe
autism.
"We try not to get emo-
tional, but sometimes
these things really affect
me," Nguyen said. "It kind
of hit the soft core of my
body"
Ngyuen and his col-
leagues sent texts to
friends and family asking
if they could help the
widow. Then, at his
friends' urging, he
launched a website, hop-
ing to raise a few thousand
dollars. Word spread
quickly: Now, less than
three weeks since the mur-
der, nearly $100,000 has
poured in from the local
Vietnamese community
and far beyond, including
Houston, Boston, New
York, even London.
"I'm very thankful, and
I'm very surprised," said
widow Dieu Huynh, a lim-
ited English speaker
whose husband's
cremated remains were


buried last weekend.
Sinking into her couch
with her 4- and 7-year-old
sons, she fought back
tears, telling Ngyuen in
Vietnamese how her
youngest son, Steven,
keeps asking her
to call his father.
Her older son,
SHenry, can't talk,
r but hugs and
S kisses her Unable
to function inde-
pendently, Henry
dashes out the
an door into the street
yen if left unattended,
J raise has seizures, and
)00 for will need a life-
nans time of constant
nily. care.
"When I met this family,
I could see they were going
to need help," said
Ngyuen, himself a father
of two. "It really, really got
to me."
Ngyuen, who sought ap-
proval before reaching out
publicly and has the full
support of San Jose Police
Chief Larry Esquivel, said
he's shy about being in the
spotlight.
"But this isn't about me
at all," he said. "My job is
to help others. No amount
of money can replace their
dad, but this can help
those boys as they grow
up."
Ngyuen also is keeping
an eye out on his patrols
for the suspect who shot
Huynh's husband, Phuoc
Lam. That morning, with a
rare few hours free, Lam
and Huynh were doing er-
rands for her upcoming
birthday party
Suddenly Lam slammed
on his brakes to avoid hit-
ting two men in a Volkswa-
gen Jetta who pulled out of


a mobile home park drive-
way in front of him, police
said. Lam climbed out of
the driver's side to survey
the scene. Words were ex-
changed, and as Huynh
was stepping out to see
what was going on, her
husband was shot. Police
said she told them she saw
Lam fall.
Huynh doesn't speak of
it in front of her children.
But at that moment, her
life crumbled.
They had no savings, she
says, and their rent for a
shabby, two-bedroom
apartment in a high-crime
neighborhood costs $1,200
a month. Her husband
drove for a Vietnamese
bus service, grueling
shifts, seven days a week,
up and down the state. On
Saturday, when he had
half a day free, they'd take
the kids to Chuck E.
Cheese's for pizza.
Lam refused to apply for
housing assistance or food
stamps, assuring his wife
he was young, diligent and
could provide.
"I miss him, but I'm
proud of how he lived his
life," said Huynh, her
hands clenched. "He was
hard-working, he was hon-
est, and he loved his
family"
San Jose has the second
largest Vietnamese popu-
lation in the U.S., after Los
Angeles. Many of the immi-
grants, including Ngyuen,
are boat people, Southeast
Asian refugees who fled
after the Vietnam War


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


World BRIEFS

Waiting


Associated Press
A volunteer places flags
on grave markers Saturday
at Massachusetts National
Cemetery in Bourne,
Mass. Hundreds of people
planted about 57,000
flags in the cemetery to
honor the country's
military veterans.


As snow melts,
Colorado wary of
another flood
LYONS, Colo. Deep
snow in the northern Col-
orado mountains is begin-
ning to melt, and officials are
worried that it could unleash
another flood in areas still
scarred by last fall's deluge.
The snowpack was
nearly 150 percent of the
mid-May average after a
wintry Mother's Day storm.
Officials said a heat wave
or a rainstorm could sud-
denly accelerate the annual
spring melt. That could
send water gushing down
streambeds that were dam-
aged by the September
floods and might not be
able to hold all the water.
So far, the long-term out-
look is uncertain, with about
equal chances for favorable
and unfavorable weather.
Naked man
playing violin at
courthouse jailed
PORTLAND, Ore.--A
naked man playing violin in
front of a downtown Port-
land courthouse Saturday
refused to walk to a squad
car and had to be carried by
police.
Police say they aren't
sure of the man's identity.
He told them his name is
Matthew T. Mglej and that
he is 25 years old.
The brand of the violin
was unknown on Saturday
morning.
The man was jailed
under the Portland city code
forbidding indecent
exposure.
Police said they warned
the man numerous times
about his "lack of attire," but
he refused to dress himself
or leave public view.
City police refrain from
enforcing the code during
Portland's World Naked
Bike Ride as long as partici-
pants keep to the desig-
nated route. The event
draws about 8,000 riders
each June.
Disability pay of
ex-cop, now FBI
agent probed
OAKLAND, Calif.--A
former police officer in
Northern California is being
investigated for collecting a
disability pension while he
is currently working for the
FBI.
Oakland city officials are
looking into how former po-
lice officer Aaron McFarlane
receives more than $52,000
in disability benefits from
the city while he has been
working as an FBI special
agent in Boston.
Oakland spokeswoman
Karen Boyd said the city is
investigating the matter.
McFarlane's name sur-
faced after he was recently
identified as the federal offi-
cer who last year shot and
killed Ibragim Todashev, a
friend of suspected Boston
Marathon bomber Tamerlin
Tsarnaev.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Richard Martinez, center, who said his son Christopher Martinez was killed in Friday night's mass shooting
that took place in Isla Vista, Calif., is comforted by his brother, Alan, on Saturday as he talks to members
of the media outside the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Headquarters.



Rampage mirrors threats


made on YouTube video


Associated Press

GOLETA, Calif.-A California
gunman who went on a rampage
near a Santa Barbara university
stabbed three people to death at
his apartment before shooting to
death three more in a terrorizing
crime spree through a neighbor-
hood, sheriff's officials said
Saturday
The three people in the apart-
ment were among the six left
dead Friday night during the
shootings near the campus of the
University of California, Santa
Barbara. Elliot Rodger, 22, the
suspected gunman, apparently
killed himself, authorities said.
At a news conference, Sheriff
Bill Brown called it a "chaotic,
rapidly unfolding convoluted in-
cident" that involved multiple
crime scenes.
Police provided new details
about the scope of the killings as
they described how he went from
one location to another and
opened fire on random people
and exchanged gunfire with law
enforcement before he crashed
his BMW Brown said the suspect
had more than 400 rounds of un-
spent ammunition in his car
Brown identified Rodger as a
student at Santa Barbara City
College.
Rodger fired for 10 minutes as he
made his way through the beach
community of Isla Vista where stu-
dents were walking, biking and
skateboarding in a deadly rampage
that chillingly mirrored threats
made on a YouTube video posted
that same night, authorities said.
Seven others remained hospi-
talized with serious injuries.
Authorities confirmed Rodger
was the shooter and said they had
seized a semi-automatic handgun.
It wasn't immediately clear
whether he was killed by gunfire
in two shootouts with deputies or
if he committed suicide.


Investigators were analyzing a
YouTube video in which a young
man who identifies himself as El-
liot Rodger sits in a car and looks
at the camera, laughing often, and
says he is going to take his re-
venge against humanity
"It's obviously the work of a
madman," Bill Brown said.
Earlier Saturday Alan Shifman
- a lawyer who represents Peter
Rodger, one of the assistant direc-
tors on "The Hunger Games" -
issued a statement saying his
client believes his son, Elliot
Rodger, was the shooter It was
unclear how the son would have
obtained a gun. The family is
staunchly against guns, he added.
"The Rodger family offers their
deepest compassion and sympathy
to the families involved in this ter-
rible tragedy We are experiencing
the most inconceivable pain, and
our hearts go out to everybody in-
volved," Shifman said.
Richard Martinez said his son
Christopher Martinez, 20, was
killed in the shooting. He blamed
politicians and gun-rights propo-
nents. "When will this insanity
stop? ... Too many have died. We
should say to ourselves 'not one
more,"' he said.
The shootings started around


9:30 p.m. in Isla Vista, a roughly
half-square-mile community next
to UC Santa Barbara's campus
and picturesque beachside cliffs.
Alexander Mattera, 23, said his
friend Chris Johnson was walking
out of an improve comedy show
when he was shot in front of a
popular pizza place. He stumbled
into a nearby house.
"He walked into these random
guys' house bleeding," he said.
Mattera was sitting at a bonfire
with friends when at least one
gunshot whizzed overhead. The
friends ran for cover when they
heard the barrage of gunfire.
"We heard so many gunshots. It
was unbelievable. I thought they
were firecrackers," he said.
Describing the shootings as "pre-
meditated mass murder," Brown
said a YouTube video posted Friday
that shows a young man describing
plans to shoot women appears to
be connected to the attack
In the video, Rodger describes
loneliness and frustration because
"girls have never been attracted to
me," and says, at age 22, he is still
a virgin. The video, which is al-
most seven minutes long, appears
scripted. The identity of the per-
son in the video could not be inde-
pendently confirmed.


Coup leaders summon academics, journalists


Associated Press


BANGKOK- In a chill-
ing move apparently
aimed at neutralizing crit-
ics and potential opposi-
tion, Thailand's new army
junta ordered dozens of
outspoken activists, aca-
demics and journalists to
surrender themselves to
military authorities.
The junta, which is al-
ready holding most of the
government it ousted in a
coup Thursday in secret lo-
cations against their will,
said it would keep former
Prime Minister Yingluck
Shinawatra and others in
custody for up to a week to
give them "time to think"
and keep the country calm.
Two days after the army
seized power in the nation's


first coup in eight years, it
also faced scattered
protests that came amid
growing concern over the
junta's intentions. Also Sat-
urday the military dis-
solved the Senate the last
functioning democratic in-
stitution left, and absorbed
its legislative powers.
"Military rule has
thrown Thailand's rights
situation into a free fall,"
said Brad Adams, Asia di-
rector at Human Rights
Watch. "The army is using
draconian martial law
powers to detain politi-
cians, activists and jour-
nalists, to censor media,
and to ban all public gath-
erings. This rolling crack-
down needs to come to an
end immediately"
More than 150 people,


Associated Press
A protester, second left, tries to free her colleague who
was detained Saturday by Thai soldiers at the Victory
Monument during an anti-coup demonstration in
Bangkok, Thailand.
mostly top politicians, banned from leaving the
have been detained in- country, according to
communicado so far and rights groups.


Associated Press
A young girl holds a photo
of Pope Francis and
Jordan's King Abdullah II
on Saturday as Jordanians
and Christians from
various nationalities and
denominations congregate
at Amman's International
Stadium waiting for the
arrival of Pope Francis in
Amman, Jordan.

Hundreds hurt as
quake rattles
Greece, Turkey
THESSALONIKI, Greece
-An earthquake beneath
the sea shook northern
Greece and western Turkey
Saturday, with 266 people
reportedly injured in Turkey.
The quake struck at
12:25 p.m. local time south-
west of the Greek island of
Samothraki, 130 miles east
of Thessaloniki and
185 miles northeast of the
capital Athens. It was also
close to the Turkish island
of Gokceada and the Greek
island of Lemnos.
The quake caused 266
injuries in Turkey, including
one person who was in se-
rious condition, according to
the government's emer-
gency and disaster man-
agement agency. The
injuries were mostly the re-
sult of panic, caused as
people tried to rush out of
buildings.
The Institute of Geo-
physics at the Aristotle Uni-
versity of Thessaloniki said
the magnitude of the quake
was 6.3. The U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey initially reported
a magnitude of 6.4, later re-
vised to 6.9.
Three killed, 1
injured at Brussels
Jewish Museum
BRUSSELS Three
people were shot dead and
a fourth seriously wounded
in an armed attack at the
Jewish Museum in Brussels
on Saturday, officials said.
Police detained one sus-
pect and were looking for a
second.
The bloodshed, which
came on the eve of national
and European Parliament
elections, led officials to im-
mediately raise anti-terror
measures.
Belgian Foreign Minister
Didier Reynders, who was
in the vicinity, said the
scene "was terrible and left
me shocked" as he saw the
bodies of two of the victims
lying at the entrance of the
museum, located in the
swanky Sablon neighbor-
hood of Belgium's capital.
Reynders said, "you can-
not help to think that when
we see a Jewish museum,
you think of an anti-Semitic
act. But the investigation
will have to show the
causes."
The three dead were two
women and a man, and all
were struck by bullets in the
face or throat, said Ine Van
Wymersch, spokeswoman
for the prosecutor's office.
No further details were
given.
One suspect was de-
tained after he drove away
from the museum around
the time of the attack. A
second person being
sought for questioning left
the area on foot. Van
Wymersch said security
camera footage was being
studied to try to identify the
person.
Prime Minister Elio Di
Rupo expressed support for
the Jewish community, and
said "everything has been
mobilized that can be mobi-
lized" to bring the killer or
killers to justice.
"All Belgians are united,"
he said.
-From wire reports


WORLD


This image from video posted on YouTube shows Elliot Rodger. Sheriff's
officials said Rodger was the gunman who went on a shooting rampage
Friday near the University of California at Santa Barbara.













EXCURSIONS


JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash.

A n undeveloped stretch of native
prairie in south Puget Sound offers
ne of the few habitats in the world
where a two-inch colorful checkered butter-
fly thrives. It also happens to be the main ar-
tillery impact range for Joint Base
Lewis-McChord.
The Army's Stryker combat brigade and
other troops regularly practice military ma-
neuvers and live-fire training on acres of
scenic, open grassland where a small popu-
lation of Taylor's checkerspot butterfly feed


on nectar of native blooms, mate and lay
eggs.
The butterfly's listing as a federal endan-
gered species last fall "has the potential to
cause major restrictions on training," said
Jeffrey Foster, an ecologist at the military in-
stallation.
That has the Army working to boost the
numbers of butterflies, once found at more
than 70 sites in Puget Sound, Oregon and
British Columbia but are now reduced to 14
sites. The effort mirrors others by the Army
at installations around the country
From Maryland to Louisiana to Colorado,


the Army has been conserving buffer areas
around bases to limit urban development,
while also preserving and restoring habitat
for rare species such as the red-cockaded
woodpecker and the golden-cheeked war-
bler
So far, the program has preserved over
200,000 acres of lands.
AtJBLM, 44 miles south of Seattle, the
program is helping not only the Taylor's
checkerspot butterfly but also the streaked
horned lark and Mazama pocket gopher


Y/Page A16


Taylor's checkerspot
butterflies are shown
on a prairie area
used for live-fire
exercises at Joint
Base Lewis-
McChord, Wash.
The Army has been
working to boost the
numbers of the
federally listed
endangered
butterflies.
Associated Press


Veterans ..A15, A17
Community ... A9
Crossword ... A14
Movies .......A14
TV Listings ... A14
Together ......A18


For questions or comments,
contact Features Editor Logan
Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext.
1141 or at mhnosby@dichronicle
online.com




A14 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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9 [UE PBS 5 5 5 41 AfterYou AfterYou Nature 'PG' National Memorial Day Concert National Memorial Day Concert Austin City Limits
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 .News Nightly Dateline NBC (In American Dream Belie.- ,.... -'(N) Crisis "You Do Not News Riches!
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SD WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *** "LA. Story" (1991) Steve Martin. Seinfeld Seinfeld Raymond ICommun Our Is Whacked Born/Ride Honor
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59 68 59 45 54 Stefanie Powers. c Delivered (N)'G' B Comedy) Brooke Burns. NR' B Delivered'G'Bc
S 302 0 30 2 2 ** "The Island" ** "Red 2" (2013, Action) Bruce Willis, John "The Normal Heart" (2014, Drama) Mark "The Normal Heart"
U__ _302 201 302 2 2 (2005) 'PG-13' Malkovich. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' B Ruffalo. Premiere. (In Stereo) Bc (2014) Mark Ruffalo.
2 3 2 3 VICE'MA' LastWeek Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones *** "Prisoners" (2013) Hugh Jackman. A desperate father 2 Days:
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51 54 51 32 42 'PG 'PG' PG PG PG 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Bounty Bounty
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24 38 24 31 Katherine igl.'R'B Premiere.'PG-13' m i...- iii Ii (2008) N
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T0
Time to forgive


and move on


D Dear Annie: After
my grandfather
died four years
ago, I invited my grand-
mother to move near me.
Unfortunately, she had a
stroke a few months
after moving, and I took
care of her until she
died earlier this year
While Grandma was
here, two of her sons (my
uncles) never called.
One of them
visited once,
but that was
only because
his wife at-
tended a con-
ference in my
town. I never
said anything
negative
about them to
my grand-
mother, even
making up AN N
excuses when M
she'd ask why MAIL
they didn't
call or come by
At her funeral, my un-
cles said hello to me, but
then informed me that I
was not invited to lunch
with them. They said it
was "only for the broth-
ers and their wives." One
uncle's wife and daugh-
ter didn't say a single
word to me. I have no
idea what the problem
is.
Having taken care of
their mother all these
years, you'd think they
would have shown a tiny


LE
I
.1


bit of appreciation, but I
saw only resentment. My
mother (their sister) is
no longer living, and
there is nothing connect-
ing me to my uncles any-
more. I don't want to
speak to either of them
again. What do you
think? Confused in
California
Dear Confused: The
main reason relatives
show resent-
ment after a
loved one dies
is money If
Grandma left
her money or
prized posses-
sions to you,
this could be
one cause. An-
other common
reason is the
possibility that
E'S your uncles
BOX feel guilty
about the way
they ignored
Grandma when she was
alive and resent you for
doing what they did not.
Maintaining contact is
up to you, but please for-
give them. If you can let
it go, you can move for-
ward in peace, knowing
you did the right thing
and are not responsible
for the way they behave.
Email anniesmailbox
@comcast.net, or write
to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o
Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St, Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


SToday's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 12:40 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Blended" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) In 3D. 4:15
p.m., 10:25 p.m. No passes.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
12:45 p.m.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG)
12:50 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:25 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:55 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m.
"X-Men: Days of Future
Past" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,5 p.m.,
6:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 8:15 p.m.,
9:50 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future
Past" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,


10:20 p.m. No passes.

Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
6:50 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Blended" (PG-13) 12:45
p.m.,4 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 1 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) In 3D.
4:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG)
12:15 p.m., 3:20 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future
Past" (PG-13) 3:45 p.m.,
10:10 p.m. No passes.
"X-Men: Days of Future
Past" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Ascot
6 Hits with open hand
11 Wrap
16 Fire
21 Bombeck's
bailiwick
22 City in Egypt
23 Chocolate drink
24 Dry out
25 Monastery
26 Long mountain range
27 Edible bulb
28 Nebraska city
29 Chum
30 Make welcome
31 Mertz or Flintstone
32 Play a part
34 Sawbuck
35 Vim
38 Black wood
40 River deposit
41 Before
42 Bring the bacon
44 Ignore
45 Farrow the actress
47 Yes, on the
open seas
49 Reduced
52 Ice crystals
54 Masonry material
56 Pitfall
60 Genus of olives
61 In flames
62 Tome
63 Cotton fabric
65 With 93-Down, Dog-
patch resident
66 Chatter
67 Granular snow field
68 Monkey
69 Impair
70 Black cuckoo
71 Edgar-
Burroughs
72 Strong wind
73 Feather scarf
74 Speckle
76 Hermit
78 Good fortune
79 Trumpet
80 Tall and thin
81 "-to Billie Joe"
82 Liver secretion
83 Region
84 Jewel
85 Orchard
88 Variety of seaweed
89 Patriot Nathan -


90 Indonesian island
94 Compare
95 Negative vote
96 Poison
97 Actress Kunis
98 Cut of meat
99 Idaho county
100 Abel's killer
102 Ethereal
103 Got going
104 -Arbor, Mich.
105 Put down
107 Rudimentary (Abbr.)
108 Loud sound
109 Sage
110 A Great Lake
111 Fall of rain
113 Daniel or Debby
114 Inhibit
115 Payable
117 Tyrannosaurus -
118 Matted fabric
119 Genuine
121 Honest-
124 Unexpected
difficulty
126 Coral island
128 Jackson or
Carnegie
132 Wire measure unit
133 Amerindian
134 Cut
135 Nixon's veep
139 Doctors'org.
140 Willow rod
142 Ghost
144 Item in a quiver
145 Shiny fabric
147 Unfettered
148 Hebrides
149 Rental contract
150 White poplar
151 Stage direction
152 Equals
153 Snake
154 Walked through water


DOWN
1 Condition
2 Man from Havana
3 Walk leisurely
4 Fish eggs
5 Cook
6 Wound aftermath
7 Shipping route
8 -de-camp
9 False show
10 Distress call


11 Contempt
12 Newlyweds'
vacation
13 Sour
14 Court
15 Hawaiian porch
16 Uneven in quality
17 Showy performer
18 Speechify
19 Earthy pigment
20 Old English
freeman
30 Jungle -
31 Watch pocket
33 Red wine
36 Running bird
37 Deity
39 Last not least
40 Perched
43 Erase
44 Achy
46 Annoy
48 Common abbr.
49 Kind of bear
50 Skirt shape (Hyph.)
51 Object from
antiquity
53 Ceremony
54 Additional
55 Of bees
57 Japanese noodle dish
58 Cry of woe
59 Spirited
61 Come to be
62 Cheat
64 Skilled shooter
66 Discretion
67 Visage
68 Went very quickly
72 Swallow greedily
73 Ossicle
75 Dalai -
77 Adore
78 Showy flower
79 Pit
82 Hit on the head
83 Wildly clownish
84 Soviet prison camp
85 Fierce look
86 Jockey
87 Giraffelike animal
88 Yiddish turnover
89 Damage
90 Official seal
91 Quality
92 Wash cycle
93 See 65-Across
96 Coffin stand
97 Intend


Agreement
- Graham Bell
Inky mark
Crimson
Female animal
Captured
Unwanted plant
Assoc. cousin
- canto
Demand payment from
Loan shark


Popinjay
Uncooked
Soap plant
Shaggy-maned
bovine
George or T.S.
Noted fabulist
Rows
Appraised
Work by Rousseau
Dwindled


Puzzle answer is on Page A16.
1 121I 14 15 M 15 1Tr1rl91l3 a


134 Gratify
136 Degree holder,
for short
137 Proboscis
138 Pitcher
141 Direction letters
143 Color
144 Neighbor of Miss.
145 Maxim
146 Goat-hair fabric


2014 UFS, Dtst. by Universal Uclick for UFS









ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Charter members wanted
It's not too late for women in the Sug-
armill Woods, Homosassa, Homosassa
Springs and Chassahowitzka areas to be-
come charter members of American
Legion Post Auxiliary Unit 166. Charter
member enrollment has been extended
until June 1.
The American Legion Auxiliary unit for
Post 166 will meet the second Wednesday
at 7 p.m. at the Fraternal Order of Eagles,
5340 W Grover Cleveland Blvd.
To find out if you are eligible to join, or
to inquire about other American Legion
programs, call Sandra Scott at 352-860-
2090, or write to American Legion Post 166
at PO. Box 767, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447.

Gallery & Caf6 honors vets
The Florida Artists Gallery & Caf6 will
celebrate the month of May with an exhi-
bition spotlighting military veteran artists
who live in Citrus and adjoining counties.
The exhibit will run through Saturday,
May 31. A special Memorial Day open
house will be hosted Monday afternoon.
The Florida Artists Gallery & Caf6 is in
the historic Knight House at 8219 Orange
Ave. in Floral City
The Gallery and Cafe are open 10 a.m. to
4 p.m., seven days a week. Admission is
free.
For more information, call 352-344-9300,
visit www.flartistsgallerycom or visit on
Facebook.

Post to serve chopped steak
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for a chopped steak din-
ner from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday May 31.
Dinner is $7, with music by Just Us from
6 to 9 p.m. and a May Birthday Party from
4 to 7 p.m.
The post is at 906 State Road 44 East,
Inverness.
For information, call 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org.

Post 77 invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 30 and June 6
and 20, with Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness.
For more information, call 352-476-2134,
352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

Enjoy pasta with Cooties
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
pasta dinner with meat sauce, salad, garlic
bread, dessert and coffee from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 30, at Leroy Rooks Jr
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl
G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, where
the helicopter is).
The public is invited. Tickets are $7 per
person and can be purchased at Post 4252.
Call 352-726-3339 or Seam Squirrel Paul
Kimmerling at 352-795-4142.

40&8 to have breakfast
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes the
public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.
the first Sunday monthly at American Le-
gion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.
The hall is smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the 40&8.

Rolling Thunder sets tourney
Rolling Thunder Florida Chapter 7 in-
vites all golfers to its annual Independ-
ence Day Golf Tournament on Saturday,
June 28, at Citrus Springs Golf and Coun-
try Club. The proceeds from the event go
toward helping Citrus County veterans
and their families and furthering our goal
of American POW/MIA awareness.
Shotgun start is 8:30 a.m. with coffee and
doughnuts. The "Hole in One" contest is
sponsored by Harley-Davidson of
Crystal River
The $60 entry fee also includes green
fees and cart, door prize ticket, goody bag,
one free putt in putting contest, two free
mulligans and ending with an old-
fashioned Fourth of July belly-busting
cookout.
For more information and to download
registration form, see the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.org, or call John
Jolicouer at 727-415-7728 or Citrus Springs
Country Club at 352-489-5045, or contact a
member of Rolling Thunder Chapter 7.

See PageAI7


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle file photo
Bonnie Bixler visits the graves of her mother and father at Fero Memorial Gardens during a Memorial Day service in 2013.
Bixler said her father fought on Omaha Beach as part of the 29th Division during World War II.


Posts plan public observances for Memorial Day


Central Ridge
VFW Post 4864
The public is welcome to join VFW
Post 4864 in Citrus Springs at noon
Monday for Memorial Day services
and a picnic.
On the menu are hamburgers, hot
dogs, corn, potato salad, coleslaw and
baked beans for $7.
For more information, call 352-
465-4864.

American Legion Post 58
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the
American Legion will have Memorial
Day services at 11 a.m. Monday at the
post A picnic lunch will follow
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

VFW Post 10087
VFW Post 10087 Men's Auxiliary in
Beverly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence Bank), will
have its annual Memorial Day picnic
from noon to 2 p.m. Monday The pub-
lic is welcome.
On the menu are sausage with pep-
pers and onions, Sloppy Joes, potato
salad, beans and dessert.
Tickets are $7. Music will be by Walt
Rogers.
For more information, call 352-
746-0440.


Floral City & Inverness
VFW Post 7122
VFW Post 7122 will hold a Memorial
Day service at 11 a.m. Monday, fol-
lowed by a "Burning of our Mortgage"
and flag retirement ceremony
The bloodmobile will be on the
premises from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lunch
will be available for $5 per plate.
The post is at 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City

American Legion Post 225
The Herbert Surber American Le-
gion Post 225 will host its 40th annual
observance of Memorial Day at 11 a.m.
at The Hills of Rest Cemetery in Flo-
ral City north of the traffic light.
With the help of the Air Force Jr
ROTC and student musicians of Citrus
High School, post members perform
the skits "Welcome to the Unseen
Guest" in memory of POW/MIAs and
"The Symbols of the Fallen" to honor
fallen service members. Helping this
year will be American Legion Post 77
of Inverness with its backdrops, the
Marine Corps League 819 of Beverly
Hills' rifle team and Kathy Garlock on
the bagpipes.
The keynote speaker will be Kerri
Surber, mother of Robert Surber, who
died in Iraq on June 3, 2007.
The public is welcome. Please bring
chairs. Water will be available.


VFW Post 4337
The public is invited to join the
VFW Post 4337 family for Memorial
Day on Monday at the post home, 906
State Road 44 East, Inverness.
An Honor Guard ceremony will be
presented at 11 a.m., followed by a
cookout, for which donations are wel-
come. Karaoke with Turner Camp
Dave will follow from 2 to 6 p.m. Call
352-344-3495 or visit www.vfw4337.org.

Homosassa
VFW Post 8189
Members of VFW Post 8189 will
present a Memorial Day ceremony at
three locations in Homosassa on
Monday
At 9:30 a.m., Commander Mark Long
will lead a service at Stage Stand
Cemetery on U.S. 19 in Homosassa.
The event is hosted by the Homosassa
River Garden Club.
Both the garden club and VFW post
members will also place flags on veter-
ans' gravesites.
At noon, post members will raise the
American flag and offer a small serv-
ice in honor of Memorial Day at the
post home on West Veterans Drive,
across from Harley-Davidson.
Then, at 1 p.m., VFW Post 8189 will
lay a wreath at the Veterans Memorial
on West Yulee Drive in old
Homosassa.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


BRING


RE




A16 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 EXCURSIONS CIus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Construction-themed park lets kids move earth


Associated Press

WEST BERLIN, N.J. (AP) -
A theme park opening next
month in New Jersey will let
kids, and adults, move some
earth with excavating equip-
ment.
The owners of Diggerland
USA outside Philadelphia say
it's the first theme park of its
kind in the U.S., though many
of its plans are based on four
similar parks in the United
Kingdom. Unlike a more in-
tense heavy equipment play-
ground in Las Vegas called Dig
This, Diggerland caters to both
kids and adults.
Visitors who are at least 4
feet tall can take a turn driving
a backhoe around a course with
the help of a staff member or
they can dig in sand piles with
a 7-ton excavator
Besides letting customers
dig, the park also has the Spin
Dizzy a ride where passengers
can spin at high speed strapped
into the bucket of a specially
designed earth-mover or go
around more slowly in a digger-
themed carousel.
The machines are the real
thing, not miniatures or repli-
cas. But they are modified to
limit their functionality and


Associated Press
Guests ride in modified earthmoving equipment buckets during a preview day at Diggerland USA
Thursday, May 22, 2014, in West Berlin, N.J.


danger
The machines used for dig-
ging are not able to be driven.


Those that can be driven have
safeguards so they won't go too
fast. And park employees can


remotely shut down the ma-
chines.
The New Jersey park is


owned by Ilya Girlya and his
family, who also run a nearby
water park. The new theme
park is set to open June 14, and
full-day tickets are $35. It does
not cost extra to go on any indi-
vidual rides.
At a preview event Thursday,
the Spin Dizzy zipped in quick
circles; its starts and stops were
as jerky as earth-moving equip-
ment is.
Unlike most spinning amuse-
ment rides, the operator also
spins in circles. Park marketing
director Chris Peters said that
adds a requirement for the
job: The workers who do it can't
get woozy from spinning in cir-
cles.
Lisa Rupertus, from Pine
Hill, took her 3-year-old son
Jace on the Dig-Around, for a
spin on the carousel. Jace,
whose T-shirt said "I make dirt
look good," is perhaps at the
target age for excavation infatu-
ation.
"He's very excited," Lisa Ru-
pertus said, pointing to her
other sons. "So is my 13-year-
old and my 11-year-old."
Other attractions include
standard carnival games
reimagined, including a duck
pond and a bowling game using
a small excavator


Taylor's checkerspot butterfies are shown on a prairie area used for live-fire exercises at Joint Base Lewis-McChord,
numbers of the federally listed endangered butterflies.


BUTTERFLY
Continued from PageA13

Last October, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service con-
cluded the Taylor's checkerspot was in danger of be-
coming extinct and designated nearly 2,000 acres in
Clallam County, Puget Sound and Oregon's Willamette
Valley as critical habitat for the creature.
The agency said it considered "military training
under present conditions a threat to the short-term
and long-term conservation of the Taylor's check-
erspot." The eight-wheeled, armored Stryker vehicle
and soldier foot traffic can crush larvae and damage
plants the butterflies rely on.
The Army has been working with the state, the Cen-
ter for Natural Lands Management and others to pre-
serve and restore habitat, both on and off the military
installation, so that the butterflies could be re-intro-
duced.
The military and its partners have committed about
$35 million and protected about several thousand
acres of land in and around JBLM for multiple
species. It will likely take years to increase the butter-
fly's numbers, but those working on the effort are al-
ready seeing some success.


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Taylor's checkerspot butterflies are establishing at
two of three sites atJBLM and on two other sites near
Olympia where they have been re-introduced.
"We're in a much better position now than were
five years ago," said Mary Linders, a conservation bi-
ologist with the Washington Department of Fish and
Wildlife.
The Army is working with the Center for Natural
Lands Management, a non-profit group that manages
lands that are purchased, works with partners who
raise the butterflies in captivity, propagates native
prairie plants and prepares sites where the check-
erspots can be re-introduced.
Hannah Anderson, rare species program manager
at CNLM, said the military's program helped "protect
lands off the base, restore them to high quality and
bring the animals there so we could protect these ani-
mals but also the military's ability to train."


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Associated Press
Wash. The Army has been working to boost the


On a recent day, Linders and others walked a sec-
tion of prairie at the artillery impact area to count
adult butterflies and monitor the timing of the flight
season.
It's prime season for the butterflies to mate, and
their orange and white checkered wings flutter as they
move from one plant to another They fly in groups
and dip into the center of Puget balsamroot, bright
sunflower-like plants that are in full bloom.
Nearby, pock-marked bunkers bear evidence of ar-
tillery fire. White stakes mark areas where vehicles
must stay on the road and where soldiers and others
are prohibited from digging or camping. Linders
points out a cluster of eggs at the base of a red harsh
paintbrush.
"You can see lots and lots of them as we're walking
through here," she said. "It's the largest population
left in the checkerspot's range."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page A15

Male descendants sought
The American Legion Post 166 of Ho-
mosassa Springs is seeking all male de-
scendants, adopted sons and stepsons of
members of the American Legion and
such male descendants of veterans who
died in service during times of war
Such men in the Chassahowitzka, Ho-
mosassa, Homosassa Springs and the
Sugarmill Woods area who are inter-
ested in becoming members of the Sons
of the American Legion are needed.
There is no form or class of member-
ship, except as active membership.
Those interested in becoming mem-
bers may contact Clay Scott, vice com-
mander of American Legion Post 166.
He may be reached by writing to Ameri-
can Legion Post 166, PO. Box 767, Ho-
mosassa Springs, FL 34447-0767, or at
928-848-8359. His email address is
eaglerider@gmx.com.
Interested men may stop by the post
on the regular meeting night, the first
Monday monthly, at 7 p.m. at the Spring
Lodge No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S.
Memorial Drive.

Come play games with post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa invites
the public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m. Wednesday
and food is available. Jam sessions are
from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.

Bingo open to public
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.;
games start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Post open for Friday dinners
Everyone is welcome to join Blanton-
Thompson American Legion Post 155 in
Crystal River in its nonsmoking hall
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday for dinner
Price depends on the dinner being
served.
All proceeds benefit veterans'
programs.
For more information, call 352-
795-6526.

Post welcomes all for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170
Vet Lane (County Road 491 behind Ca-
dence Bank), often has special events
that are open to the public.
On a regular basis, bingo is at 1 p.m.
Sunday in the smoke-free hall.
For more information, call 352-
746-0440.

Post open for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road 200 in
Hernando (with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the public at its meals
and activities.
Meals include lunch every day and
breakfast on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include bar bingo on
Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday Dance
music is on tap every Friday and bingo
is played in the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-can-eat fish
fry or New England boiled dinner
For more information and menus, call
the post at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabayrr.com and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.

DAV takes vets to clinic
The DAV transportation network has
received great response for volunteer
drivers for the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from
Lecanto to The Villages.
The Gainesville van goes each week-
day and The Villages run is made when
there is a need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto at 352-527-
5915 to be placed on the van list. All ap-
pointments must be made before 1 p.m.

Want to tell your story?
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a sin-
gular event or moment in your military


career that stands out to you. It can be
any type of event, from something from
the battlefield to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of service,
theater of war served, years served, out-
fit and veterans organization affilia-
tions.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak
at 352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set up ob-
taining thenf" and "now" photos to
publish with your story

Case manager aids vets
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday Coastal
Regional Library 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.

Memorial honors vets
Purple Heart recipients are sought to
be honored with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old Homosassa
Veterans' Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.

Assist USCG Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired military per-
sonnel are needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to help the Coast
Guard with non-military and non-law
enforcement programs such as public
education, vessel safety checks, safety
patrols search and rescue, maritime se-
curity and environmental protection.
Wear the Auxiliary uniform with
pride and your military ribbons. Crimi-
nal background check and membership
are required. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.

Hospice assists veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partnering agency
with the Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is trained to
provide Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique to each
military era or war It also provides
caregiver education and a recognition
program to honor veterans' services and
sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits. Call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-527-4600.

Prior enlisted sought
The U.S. Air Force is looking for prior
enlisted men and women from all serv-
ices interested in both direct duty as-
signments in previously obtained career
fields or retraining into select career
fields.
Some of the careers include aircraft
electronics/mechanical areas, cyber op-
eration fields, and various other
specialties.
Enlisted career openings that include
the opportunities to retrain consist of
special operations positions and un-
manned aerial vehicle.
Assignment locations are based on Air
Force needs.
Call 352-476-4915.

Free yoga classes for vets
Yoga teacher Ann Sandstrom is asso-
ciated with the national service organi-
zation, Yoga For Vets.
She teaches free classes to combat
veterans at several locations and times.
Call Sandstrom at 352-382-7397.

Chilton reunion scheduled
The next reunion for the USS Chilton
will be Sept. 17 to 24 in Louisville, Ky.
For information, call Joe at 352-
341-5959.

* Send information for Veterans Notes
to community@chronicleonline.com.
For more information, call Sarah
Gatling at 352-563-5660, et. 1197.


Legionnaire of the Year


4 -1,


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Special to the Chronicle
American Legion Post 155, Crystal River, had its Legionnaire of the Year dinner
May 13 for Robert Koch. The prestigious award is given to a post Legion member
annually. The past three recipients of the award choose the nominee from a list of
persons recommended for the next award. From left are: Honor Guard member
Jimmy White, Robert Koch, Commander John Foster and Honor Guard member
Kenny Deschamps.


Trip to Hawaii


Special to the Chronicle
A River Grotto Cruise was one of the activities enjoyed by the group of veterans
and families and friends who went on the winter trip to Hawaii this year. The fall
trip to Hawaii is in the planning stages now and will be from Oct. 29 to Nov. 15.
The trips include services on the USS Arizona, USS Utah and the National Ceme-
tery of the Pacific, tours of the islands of Oahu, Kauai, Hawaii and Maui and many
activities including golfing, parasailing and dinner cruises. For more information
and to reserve a spot for the fall excursion, call Cmdr. Don McLean, U.S. Navy,
retired, at 352-637-5131 or email dmclean8@tampabay.rr.com.


IN SERVICE


Amy L. Wheat
Amy L. Wheat, a 2011
graduate of Lecanto
High School and 2013
graduate of Florida State
University, was
commissioned as a sec-
ond lieutenant in the
U.S. Air Force on May 1,
2014, upon completion
of Basic Officer Training
at Maxwell AFB,
Alabama.
At the commissioning
ceremonies, Second Lt.


Wheat received the
General Daniel
"Chappie" James Award
of Merit.
She will report to
Tyndall AFB in Panama
City for one year of
education and training
as an air battle manager.
After leaving Tyndall
AFB, she will report to
her first duty station,
where she will be flying
the most advanced
aircraft in the United
States Air Force.


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SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 A17


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The evolution of food


J was in a restaurant the other
day, and it hit me that except
for the artisan hamburger -
served with locally grown sweet po-
tato fries on a homemade pretzel
bun dressed with the chef's own
brand of mustard there was very
little on the menu I would have rec-
ognized as food when I was our
server's age.
Most of the words on the menu -
potstickers, edamame, California
rolls, ciabatta, wraps, bloomin'
onions, pad Thai, naan, chipotle,
tilapia, Mongolian beef, latte,
mocha, gluten-free, bruschetta,
sushi and sashimi would have
been a mystery to me. Even the sec-
tion titles would have tripped
me up.
"Pasta? What is that?" I would
have asked, never having heard the
word before. My mother made
spaghetti. Everything else was noo-
dles. Pasta? We'd eaten a ton of it
without ever realizing it. Of course,
back in the Dark Ages of Dining, we
never would have heard, "My
name's Nevada and I'll be your
server tonight," either And she
wouldn't have had a tattoo of
barbed wire around her neck, a
ring in her eyebrow or been wear-
ing a T-shirt with the logo of her fa-
vorite band on it: "The Little
Buckets of Spit."
Thirty years ago, if you saw
chicken wings on the menu, you
would have gotten up and started
looking for another restaurant.
What kind of person would order a
chicken wing on purpose? Now
they're so common, you wonder if


there are enough chi
world to supply all th
Some mad scientist i
ing to develop a chic
wings as you read thi
working on making ti
You have to wonder'
with all the chicken'
they became so popu
you shouldn't.
I don't remember
ing with dipping sau
unless it was French
potato chips. The rea
thing is that I'm pret
French have never h
onion dip. Now ever:
with a dipping sauce
dipping sauce would
your dipping sauce?'
I'm sure to be asked
ture.
When did balsamic
come so popular? WI
mozzarella sticks con
day, a salad was som
tomato that came wil
you ordered for dinn
dinner Do I want gri
chicken on my Caesa
when did they start pi
in Caesar salads? Ify


they always have, but for many
years they didn't.
Jim But what would really surprise
my younger self would be the
Mullen names of the beers at the local
brewpub. Oh, yeah, I forgot: There
VILLAGE weren't any local brewpubs when I
IDIOT was young. In 1977 there was one
craft brewery in the U.S. Last year
there were 2,768 of them. They sold
about 15 million barrels of beer,
dickens in the which seems like a lot, but it's only
iose wings, about 8 percent of all the beer sold.
s probably try- Still, that's 8 percent the giant
ken with eight brewers didn't sell. And the small
is. Another is brewers did it without spending a
hem boneless, gazillion dollars on Super Bowl ad-
what they did vertising, without running 57 com-
wings before mercials on 57 channels every
[lar Or maybe night, without have to hire expen-
sive actors to be in those commer-
anything com- cials, without having to feed and
ce years ago pay the vet bills on a bunch of giant
onion dip for draft horses.
illy strange The trouble with craft beer is
ty sure the that I can never remember which
heard of French ones I liked and which ones I did-
ything comes n't. Did I have the Magic Hat the
. "What kind of last time I was here, or was it the
you like with Lagunitas? Or was it Ruination,
' is a question Racer 5, Little Sumpin', Torpedo,
in the near fu- Delirium Tremens, Oatmeal Stout,
Pliny the Elder, Three Philoso-
c vinegar be- phers, Green Flash, Loose Cannon,
here did fried Golden Monkey or one of about
ne from? One 4,000 others? I just can't remember
e lettuce and The server suggests I try the
th whatever Tasting Menu.
.er Now it is "What is a Tasting Menu?" my
lled or crispy younger self would have asked.


ir salad? Wait,
putting chicken
you're young,


Contact Jim Mullen at Jim
MullenBooks. corn.


NEW ARRIVAL


Layla Karma Eve Potter

Amanda Potter and
William Potter of
Inverness announce the
birth of a daughter, Layla
Karma Eve Potter, at
5:19 p.m. Sunday,
April 20,2014, at Citrus
Memorial hospital. The
baby weighed 7 pounds,
6 ounces.


NEW ARRIVAL


Kylee Hugar


Jessica McMillan and
Samuel Hugar of
Inverness announce the
birth of a daughter, Kylee
Hugar, at 5:34 p.m.
Thursday, May 8,2014, at
Seven Rivers Regional


Medical Center
The baby weighed
6 pounds, 12 1/2 ounces.
She was welcomed by
her big sister, Luxy
Hugar


NEW ARRIVAL


Cayden Kristopher Kresho

Kimberly Kresho and
Vincent Kresho of Citrus
Hills announce the birth
of a son, Cayden
Kristopher Kresho, at
6:25 p.m. Tuesday,
May 20, 2014, at Citrus
Memorial hospital. The
baby weighed 9 pounds,
2 ounces.


Leaders and Educators


NEWS OF RECORD


May 5-11, 2014
Divorces
Danny Lee Alley,
Dunnellon vs. Nancy Ann
Alley, Dunnellon
Marie Elena Gonzalez,
Inverness vs. Edwin
Gonzalez, Inverness
Pamela Ann Henderson,
Citrus Springs vs. Larry
Wayne Henderson, Eustis
James Alfred Payne,
Citrus Springs vs. Monica
Lynn Payne, Dunnellon
Jennifer L. Pineau, Floral
City vs. Stephen E. Pineau,
Inverness
Eric P. Scmidt,
Homosassa vs. Jodi D.
Schmidt, Brooksville
Sheila Anne Sivils, Crystal
River vs. Gary Michael Sivils,
Crystal River
Cindy Marlena Stellmach,
Inverness vs. Erik Lynn
Stellmach, Inverness

Marriages
Jonathan Thomas
Behnen, Hernando/Keli
Newman, Hernando
Tony Beecher Collins,
Hernando/Carla Collette


Larue, Hernando
Brandon Scott Jones,
Dunnellon/Ashton Ruby
Tuller, Dunnellon
David Robert Jones,
Inverness/Jennifer Raven
Holiga, Inverness
Brooks William Mance
Lawson, Hurlburt Field/
Courtney Jenae Valeros,
Inglis
David Robert Meier,
Dunnellon/Cindy Gay Fama,
Inverness
Manolo Montanez,
Inverness/Enid Arlene
Ramos, Inverness
Michael John Rail,
Homosassa/Tammy Sue
Macdonald, Homosassa
Lloyd Paul Smith,
Homosassa/Mary Lough
O'Toole, Homosassa
Christopher Scott
Swanson, Hernando/Dorothy
Amanda Abrahamson,
Hernando
David Robert Veres,
Homosassa/Brenda Kae
Bousho, Homosassa
Jack Taylor Wilber,
Inverness/Janice Evelyn
Streeter, Inverness


Special to the Chronicle
The local Mu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Society of Key Women in Education recently held its Founders Day
Celebration and officer installation at the Rose and Crown Restaurant at Citrus Hills. New officers pictured are:
First Vice President Cindy Staten, Recording Secretary Sam Tobias, chapter Parliamentarian and District 3
Director Bonnie Ignico, Second Vice President Phyllis Bolin, Corresponding Secretary Vera Swade and President
Bonnie Rybak. Not pictured is Treasurer Louise Martin. DKG is an international society of key women educators
who are both working and retired. Anyone interested in learning more about DKG may go online to www.dkg.org
or reach Bonnie Rybak by email at rybakb@yahoo.com or call 352-697-1552.


FOR THE RECORD
U Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


NEWS NOTES


Doll club to meet
at member's home
The Central Florida Sugar Babes Doll
Club will meet at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday
at the home of one of its newest mem-
bers. She will show her vast collection
of dolls.
Sugar Babes Doll Club is a member of
the United Federation of Doll Clubs.
The club welcomes visitors and all who
share an interest in the hobby
For information, call Laurie at 352-
382-2299 or Barbara at 352-344-1423.

Spaghetti dinner fundraiser
on tap in Chassahowitzka
The Chassahowitzka Community As-
sociation (CCA) will hold a spaghetti
dinner fundraiser from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Friday, May 30, at the Community Cen-
ter, 10300 S. Riviera Drive (old fire-


house), in Homosassa.
Cost is $5 in advance; $6 at the door
Takeouts will be available. Proceeds
will benefit the Chassahowitzka Com-
munity Association.
Tickets are available at the Chassa-
howitzka River Campground Store, 8600
W Miss Maggie Drive. The association
also needs volunteers for the event.
To volunteer, get information or buy
tickets, contact Lizzie Blauer
lizzieblauer5@gmail.com or 352-601-
8612, or email chassahowitzka@
outlook. com for tickets.

Learn how to help others
at health conditions class
Elder Options is seeking individuals
with one or more chronic health condi-
tions, who want to be able to support
and help others learn to take control of
their ongoing health conditions by facil-
itating workshops once a week for 2 1/2


hours for six weeks.
Chronic Disease Self-Management
Program Leader training is a four-day
training from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on July 14,
15,21 and 22, at Gainesville Technology
Entrepreneurship Center, 2153 S.E.
Hawthorne Road, Gainesville.
Registration is limited. For an appli-
cation, call Betty Flagg at Elder Options
at 352-692-5219 or email flaggb@
agingresources. org.

Walk a Mile'to benefit
Key Training Center
Friends, families, businesses, civic or-
ganizations and church groups wanting
a team in Walk a Mile in My Shoes at the
Key Training Center on July 19 have
until July 1 to register and receive a free
T-shirt with their team name.
Teams of 10 or more can sponsor a
Key client as its honorary captain and
make the one-mile walk through the


Key's Lecanto campus beginning at
11:30 a.m. Saturday July 19. Teams will
finish in time to join in the noon parade
to welcome home the runners returning
from the celebrated Run For The Money
180-mile run from Tallahassee.
Registration is $25 per person. This
event is sponsored by Altrusa Interna-
tional of Citrus County with all funds
going to the Key Training Center Run
For The Money campaign to provide de-
velopmentally disabled adults essential
year-round services.
To register call 352-428-0708 or email
Black25@tampabayrr.com.


U Send your club and fundraiser
news to community@
chronicleonline.com. For more
information, call Community
Editor Sarah Gatling at 352-
563-5660, ext. 1197.


The United Way Women's Leadership Council LIVE UNITED

POWER fthe_
AVU7ER _______


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A18 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY









SPORTS


There's a four-
way tie for the lead
and 13 within two
strokes headed into
the final round at
Colonial./B6

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Basketball/B2
0 Hockey/B2
0 Auto racing/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 Local recreation/B5
0 Golf/B6
0 Tennis/B6


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays pinch-runner Cole Figueroa races past third-base coach Tom Foley to score the game-winning run Saturday during the
15th inning in St. Petersburg.


SUDDENLY,


A


WIN


AFTER FIVE HOURS AND FIFTEEN
INNINGS, WINNING RUN SCORES
ON PITCHER'S THROWING ERROR


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG
ndrew Miller threw a force at-
tempt at second base into center
field, allowing pinch-runner Cole
Figueroa to score in the bottom of the
15th inning as the Tampa Bay Rays
handed the Boston Red Sox their ninth
consecutive loss, 6-5 Saturday
Boston scored five runs in the first in-
ning but still lost its ninth in a row for the
first time since Aug. 25 to Sept. 4, 2001.


James Loney opened the 15th with a
single off Miller (1-4). Figueroa ran for
Loney and went to second on Brandon
Guyer's bunt single. He scored when
Miller threw the ball into center field
while attempting to get a double play on
Desmond Jennings' grounder
Cesar Ramos (2-3) allowed an infield
single and two walks in three scoreless
innings for the win. Five Tampa Bay
pitchers limited Boston to six hits, with
just two coming after the first inning.
A.J. Pierzynski homered for the Red


Sox in a game that took 5 hours, 16 minutes.
MattJoyce had an RBI single and Guyer
drove in two with a double off Jake
Peavy in the fifth as the Rays rallied
from a five-run deficit to tie it at 5. Logan
Forsythe had a second-inning sacrifice
fly and an RBI single during the fourth.
The struggling Boston offense broke out
against David Price. After Mike Carp was
hit by a pitch with the bases loaded and
Jonny Gomes had a sacrifice fly, Pierzyn-
ski connected on a three-run homer
Boston, which scored just 16 runs in its
previous eight games, had just two
baserunners Gomes' walk in the third
and an eighth-inning single by Xander
Bogaerts over the next seven innings
against Price, who allowed five runs and
five hits in eight innings.
Peavy gave up five runs and eight hits
over six innings.
The Red Sox used a makeshift lineup
with David Ortiz, Mike Napoli and
Shane Victorino all out with injuries.
Saturday was a planned off day for Ortiz,
who has calf soreness. Napoli could sit out
a few games due to lingering affects of
flu-like symptoms along with hamstring,
calf and finger issues. Victorino was
placed on the 15-day disabled list after
aggravating a right hamstring injury


Triathletes easily beat


the heat at Fort Island


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER The race direc-
tor and announcer was warning that
this "day at the beach" could be a little
taxing for triathletes at Fort Island Gulf
Beach.
"It's going to be hot," Chris Moling
said Saturday morning. "It (the temper-
ature) will get up to 97 degrees today
The difference between 9 a.m. and 10
a.m. could be huge."
Fortunately, for the 253 participants
in the 2014 Crystal River Sprint
Triathlon No. 1, most were finished by
9:30 a.m. and a little sweaty


In other words, it turned out to be a
day at the beach.
"Perfect weather, but temperatures
are hot, though," Moling said. "Our cau-
tion today is not rain. We're looking at
97 degrees and for our athletes, that's
the danger zone. We have plenty of water
on the course. We have medical staff
here. Because we start so early in the
morning (7:30 a.m.), we get in and out."
Moling said there were some minor
problems with "no-see-ums," but other-
wise the event went as planned.
A pair of veteran triathlon organizers
won the race.


PageB3


For superstitious hitters,


every day a vision quest


Associated Press
DENVER Before he closes his
book, San Francisco Giants outfielder
Hunter Pence stares and stares at a
card marking his page.
It's an eye exercise, designed to
merge two 3D circles into one shape.
The task is trickier than it sounds,
and Pence insists the endeavor helps
him at the plate to decipher a tailing
fastball from a nasty slider
Just as Colorado third baseman
Nolan Arenado believes playing ping-
pong sharpens his eye-hand coordina-
tion and his teammate Charlie
Blackmon credits the video game "Call


of Duty" for his sizzling start Longtime
major leaguer Ellis Burks even used to
stare at a candle in a darkened room to
visualize locking onto a target.
Anything to help catch up with a pitch
that arrives in less time than it takes to
say "play ball."
The baseball adage used to be "see
ball, hit ball." Really, though, it's more
like "see ball, recognize and identify the
pitch, figure out if it's worth taking a
swing at and then hit ball."
Players generally have about two-
tenths of a second the blink of an eye
- to decide whether to swing or not.
See Page B6


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B2 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


All eyes

on Busch

in attempt

at 'Double'
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Kurt
Busch grew up glued to the
TV, watching the Indi-
anapolis 500 with his fa-
ther, and he remembered
the fervor caused in 1993
when Emerson Fittipaldi
bypassed the usual cele-
bratory post-race beverage
for a swig of orange juice
instead of milk.
"Oh, dad, I didn't know
you had a choice. I'd drink
OJ over milk," Busch said.
Tom Busch quickly set
him straight: "No, son. You
drink milk."
It was a crash course for
a young Busch on a mean-
ingful Indy lesson: Don't
screw with tradition when
everyone is watching.
"People got so upset,"
Busch said. "It just goes to
show how much people care
about what you do at Indy"
Fans certainly care this
weekend about Kurt
Busch and so do his fellow
drivers. On Sunday, Busch
will try to conquer the
Mount Everest of motor-
sports by finishing all 1,110
miles of the Indianapolis
500 and the Coca-Cola 600
in Concord, North Carolina.
"I can't wait to watch
and pull for him,"
NASCAR star Dale Earn-
hardtJr said. "He's repre-
senting the entire sport.
Whether he knows it or
not, he's got a lot of people,
drivers, crew and just
about everyone on the in-
field pulling for him to do
well because he is repre-
senting all of us."
Busch has been auto
racing's cover boy for more
than a month and the net-
works are ready to roll for
the first attempt at The
Double since 2004. Fox will
have a camera in place for
his made-for-TV landing at
Charlotte Motor Speed-
way, said Steve Craddock,
Fox senior vice president
of NASCAR Production.
The Indy 500 is easily
the most-watched race in
IndyCar and the Coca-Cola
600 is traditionally a big Me-
morial Day weekend draw
CMS President and CEO
Marcus Smith said there
were "special things"
planned for Busch should
he complete all 1,100 miles.
Busch's arrival by helicop-
ter at Charlotte, just past the
start/finish line, will surely
make highlight reels. Fox
will use a blimp to track
Busch on his way to CMS.
IndyCar, which scrambles
most weekends for view-
ers, has enjoyed the Busch
boost in May
"For someone who loves
the taxi cabs, I think he's
done a great job in the car,"
said Derrick Walker, Indy-
Car's president of compe-
tition and operations.
"We're not, in IndyCar, so
stuck up that we think we're
the only guys that can do
it," he said. "We'd like to
think the doors are open to
all. The more variety, the
better the competition Hope-
fully, there's more than one
or two NASCAR fans fol-
lowing these guys. I think
if some of our guys went
down there, we'd be
watching, too."


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. Kyle Larson showed he
could beat NASCAR's big boys in the Nationwide
Series.
Now he hopes to do the same on the Sprint
Cup circuit.
Larson raced to his second Nationwide Series
victory of the season Saturday, holding off Sprint
Cup drivers Brad Keselowski and Kyle Busch at
Charlotte Motor Speedway
"It was nice looking in the rear view mirror
and seeing them get smaller and smaller," Lar-
son said. "It's not often the 22 and 54 cars are get-
ting smaller in your mirror"
The 21-year-old Larson, also the winner at
Fontana, passed Keselowski on the 118th lap in
the 200-lap race and led the rest of the way
Keselowski was second, followed by Busch,
Kevin Harvick and Brian Scott.
It was Larson's first victory at Charlotte.
The win came on care owner Chip Ganassi's
56th birthday, and one week after Sprint Cup
teammate Jamie McMurray won the All-Star race.
"It sounds like he is having a great month,"
Larson said about Ganassi. "I know he's really
excited about the Indianapolis 500 and I think
Jamie and I both have a good chance to win
here" on Sunday at the Coca Cola 600.
Larson said the win will give him some mo-
mentum heading into the Coca-Cola 600, but ad-
mitted there isn't much he can carry over from
the Nationwide race.
"It's a different race in Sprint Cup," said Lar-
son, who has never won at the top level. "On Sun-
day we will start in daylight and go through the
night."


Montoya and Will Power
But Andretti feels just
as strongly about its
chances, especially after
James Hinchcliffe quali-
fied in the middle of the
front row three days after
he was medically cleared


Larson had to beat Harvick on a restart with
29 laps to go and was never challenged after that
That left Keselowski and Busch battling for
second.
Keselowski joked that "Kyle (Busch) and I had
a great race" but said he simply couldn't come
close to catching Larson.
"We just didn't have enough to run with him,"
Keselowski said.
Chase Elliott surrendered the Nationwide
points lead after finishing 37th when a broken
suspension caused his car to crash into the out-
side wall on Lap 86.
Regan Smith, who finished seventh, took the
points lead five points ahead of Elliott Sadler
Busch was the heavy favorite coming in after
winning the previous three Nationwide races at
Charlotte and eight times overall at the track in
the series. He started on the pole and bolted out
of the gates to an early lead.
But after a caution on lap 23, Matt Kenseth
beat Busch off the restart and Busch eventually
fell back to llth and never challenged for the
lead again. It capped a tough day for Busch, who
crashed his primary Sprint Cup car earlier in
the day and will have to start the Coca-Cola 600
from the rear of the field.
Keselowski passed Kenseth on Lap 93 before
getting caught in lapped traffic and getting
passed by Larson on Lap 118.
Only 12 cars finished on the lead lap, and the leaders
had to battle lapped traffic throughout the race.
"It was a pain when one is low and one is high
and you have to zigzag in between them," Busch said.
Said Keselowski: "It was a very difficult but
that is part of the deal when you run the
Nationwide Series."


Wide-open field vying for 98th Indy 500


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Dale Earnhardt Jr. is
going to watch. So will
Jimmie Johnson, Jeff
Gordon, Tony Stewart
and Clint Bowyer
NASCAR's biggest names
all plan to tune in to the
Indianapolis 500 to watch
Kurt Busch run the first
leg in his attempt to com-
plete The Double.
Millions of other ca-
sual fans will also turn
their attention to Indi-
anapolis Motor Speed-
way on Sunday, where
Busch's debut will bring
new eyeballs to the
"Greatest Spectacle In
Racing."
Fans will be treated to
one of the most wide-open
races in recent memory
No single driver or
team has risen to the top
this season. And with so


much attention on Busch,
so many other elements
of this magical race at
historic Indianapolis
Motor Speedway have been
somewhat overlooked.
"I don't know that
there's a favorite at all
this year," said Graham
Rahal. "I feel like it is ex-
tremely wide open at this
point, even as a driver
myself, I couldn't even
tell you who I would pick.
I have no clue."
Indy is a race in which
three owners-Andretti,
Ganassi and Penske -
typically have the cars to
beat. That, at least, is no
different this year as An-
dretti Autosport put three
of its five entries in the
top 10, while Team Penske
got all three of its cars in.
"I'm sure we've got the
winner sitting here," Roger
Penske said of Helio Cas-
troneves, Juan Pablo


pion Ryan Hunter-Reay
and Busch.
If one had to pick a fa-
vorite from that group, it
would be Marco Andretti,
who will make a ninth at-
tempt at ending the fam-
ily heartache in this race.
His grandfather, Mario, won
just once, in 1969, while
father and car owner
Michael never had the
chance to drink the cele-
bratory milk in victory lane.
Boy, does Marco want
this.
"This is the biggest race
in the world and I have so
much respect for it and I
want nothing more in my
life than to add my name
to the list of champions,"
Andretti said. "I feel like I
have the car and the team
and the crew to do it, but
being the ninth year in it
and seeing everything
under the sun go wrong, I
can't be overconfident."


to drive following a con-
cussion. He leads the
five-car Andretti stable,
which has Marco Andretti
and Carlos Munoz in the two
rows behind Hinchcliffe.
Further back in the
field is 2012 series cham-


SPORTS


of the Stanley Cup playoffs,
New York may not have
Carcillo the rest of the way
He was banned for 10 games
for physical abuse of an
on-ice official.


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Associated Press
Kyle Larson races along at the top of Turn 2 on Saturday during the History 300 at Charlotte Motor
Speedway in Concord, N.C. Larson won the race.




Larson sets up a




double of his own

After taking History 300, 21 year-old eyes Coca-Cola 600


I r
Associated Press
Jim Nabors, who will sign "(Back Home Again in) Indiana"
for his final time at tomorrow's Indianapolis 500, is
introduced during the drivers' meeting Saturday at the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Nabors has sung the
song for 37 years during pre-race festivities.


..........


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ibaka

mum on


potential

Game 3

return
Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY -
Serge Ibaka walked slowly
and carefully but without a
limp, before facing reporters
Saturday afternoon.
Much has been made of
the Oklahoma City defen-
sive star's absence in the
first two games of the West-
ern Conference finals series
against the San Antonio
Spurs. The 6-foot-10 power
forward strained his left
calf in the previous playoff
series, and the Thunder
said they expected him to
be out for the playoffs. The
team changed course Fri-
day and declared him day-
to-day He worked out
Saturday, but didn't
practice.
He is not sure if he will
play in Game 3 he said it
is up to doctors, and much
will depend on how he
feels in the morning.
Even if Ibaka returns, itwill
not fully solve Oklahoma
City's problems defending
the perimeter San Anto-
nio has made 18 of 40 3-
pointers in the series and
guards Tony Parker and
Manu Ginobili are slash-
ing into the paint with
stunning frequency, often
scoring or finding their
teammates for open shots.
The Spurs are off to a
good start, but experience
tells them they won't have
as easy a time in Oklahoma
City In 2012, Oklahoma
City fell behind San Anto-
nio 2-0 in the Western Con-
ference finals before
winning the series 4-2.



Fireworks

expected

in Rangers,

Canadiens

showdown
Associated Press

NEW YORK- Montreal
Canadiens coach Michel
TherrienisupsetwithRangers
assistant Ulf Samuelsson.
The Rangers are angry with
Montreal Canadiens right
wing Brandon Prust and
linesman Scott Driscoll.
The Eastern Conference
finals have plenty of juice.
Coming up is Game 4 on
Sunday night, with New
York leading the best-of-
seven series 2-1.
Therrien was none too
happy that Samuelsson
watched part of the Cana-
diens' practice at Madison
Square Garden on Saturday,
contending he violated a
"gentlemen's agreement"
"Coaches are not allowed
to attend practices between
games," Therrien said.
"Game day is different."
The Rangers remain upset
they will not have top-line
center Derek Stepan, who
had surgery Friday for a
broken jaw following a hit
from Prust in Game 3.
Both the Canadiens and
Rangers will be short-
handed Prust and New
York left wing Daniel Car-
cillo were suspended Friday
Prust will miss Games 4
and 5 for his hit on Stepan.
On Saturday, he lamented
the "timing" of the hit.
While the possibility ex-
ists that the Montreal wing
could return before the end


m4mobwkwal.- An 0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal River Fo the r- cod
Memorial Day Sprint ___ .ori .LOTTERY
Triathlon results LOTTERY


Men's overall winner: Patrick High, Lake
Placid, 1:02:42.4
Women's overall winner: Celia Dubey, Tarpon
Springs, 1:07:34.2
Top 10 Finishers
1. Patrick High, Lake Placid, 1:02:42.4
2. Gerry Gisclair, 1:04:48
3. Casey Rabon, 1:05:15.5
4. Samuel Shaffer, 1:05:41.3
5. Jacob Geisler, 1:06:29.8
6. Lachlan Hovius, Groveland, 1:06:41.2
7. Jon Leino, 1:06:43.7.
8. David Morrow, 1:06:45.9
9. John Hovius, Groveland, 1:06:59.2
10. Lukas High, Lake Placid, 1:07:12.6


History 300 results
Saturday at Charlotte Motor Speedway,
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200 laps, 139.6 rating, 0
points, $58,525.
2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200,129.8,0, $44,300.
3. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 115.9, 0, $41,000.
4.(5) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200,113.3,0, $26,550.
5. (6) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200,109.3, 39, $29,000.
6.(7) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200,121,0, $19,775.
7. (8) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200,102.3,37, $25,050.
8. (16)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 97.3, 36, $23,100.
9. (13) Chris Buescher, Ford, 200, 89.3, 35, $23,300.
10. (11)Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 89.9, 34, $22,825.
11. (15) James Buescher, Toyota, 200, 86.5, 34, $21,000.
12. (10) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 89.4, 32, $20,475.
13. (4) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet, 199,86,31, $19,975.
14. (23) Ryan Reed, Ford, 199, 70.5, 30, $19,400.
15. (12) Jeb Burton, Ford, 198,77.5,0, $19,680.
16. (24) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 198,66.8,0, $13,000.
17.(20)Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 198,67.5,27, $18,575.
18. (19) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 197,70.1,0, $18,350.
19. (27) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 197,57.6,25, $18,275.
20.(18) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 197, 68.6, 24, $18,825.
21. (21) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 197, 70.9, 23, $18,075.
22. (26) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 197,59.6,0, $12,020.
23.(31) JeremyClements, Chevrolet, 197,54,22, $17,970.
24. (22) David Starr, Toyota, 197,63.9,20, $17,905.
25. (29) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 196,46.9,19, $18,370.
26. (17) Chad Boat, Chevrolet, 196, 53.3, 18, $17,835.
27. (28) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 196, 52, 17, $17,800.
28. (25) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 195,48.4,0, $17,765.
29. (34) Eric McClure, Toyota, 194,40.8,15, $17,720.
30. (14) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193, 67.8,14, $17,975.
31. (32)TommyJoe Martins, Dodge, 191,41.2,13, $17,640.
32. (30) Kyle Fowler, Chevrolet, 191,39.1,12, $11,595.
33. (33) Cados Contreras, Chevrolet, 191,33.9,11, $17,550.
34. (38) Joey Gase, Toyota, 189,30.3,10, $17,520.
35. (39) Chns Cockrum, Chevrolet, 186,26,0, $17,485.
36. (36) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 184,30.9,8, $16,600.
37. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 174,78.4,7, $16,600.
38. (37) Harrison Rhodes, Dodge, engine, 135,29.4,6,
$16,556.
39. (35) Kevin Lepage, Dodge, rear gear, 95, 27.6, 5,
$10,435.
40. (40) Tanner Berryhill, Dodge, engine, 81, 38.7, 4,
$10,330.
Race statistics
Average Speed of RaceWinner: 149.771 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 0 minutes, 11 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.480 seconds.
Caution Flags: 3 for 13 laps.
Lead Changes: 9 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders: K.Busch 1-25; J.Clements 26;
K.Busch 27-28; M.Kenseth 29-83; B.Keselowski
84; M.Kenseth 85-96; B.Keselowski 97-117;
K.Larson 118-143; J.Buescher 144; K.Larson
145-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Larson, 2timesfor 82 laps; M.Kenseth,
2 timesfor67 laps; K.Busch, 2 times for27 laps;
B.Keselowski, 2 times for 22 laps; J.Buescher, 1
time for 1 lap; J.Clements, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 414; 2. E.Sadler,
409; 3. C.Elliott, 386; 4. T.Bayne, 379; 5. TDil-
Ion, 378; 6. B.Scott, 354; 7. B.Gaughan, 309; 8.
J.Buescher, 303; 9. C.Buescher, 295; 10.
D.Kwasniewski, 285.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

Coca-Cola 600
lineup
Race Sunday at Charlotte Motor Speedway
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 194.911.
2. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.567.
3. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 193.618.
4. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 193.334.
5. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 193.244.
6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 193.119.
7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 193.092.
8. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 192.472.
9. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 191.673.
10. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 191.272.
11. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.959.
12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 192.898.
13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 192.692.
14. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 192.486.
15. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 192.438.
16. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 192.027.
17. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 191.945.
18. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 191.925.
19. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 191.884.
20. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 191.829.
21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 191.707.
22. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 189.98.
23. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 189.208.
24.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 184.344.
25. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 190.84.
26. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 190.255.
27. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 189.673.
28. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 189.553.
29. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.514.
30. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 189.148.
31. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 189.115.
32. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 189.062.
33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.732.
34. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 188.534.
35. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 188.455.
36. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 188.422.
37. (98) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (32) Blake Koch, Ford, Owner Points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (44) J.J. Yeley Chevrolet, 188.062.
45. (77) Dave Blaney Ford, 187.143.

Indianapolis 500
lineup
After Sunday qualifying;
race Sunday, May 25
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis
Lap length: 2.5 miles
All cars Dallara chassis
1. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevy, 2:35.7992,231.067 mph.


2. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 2:35.9528, 230.839.
3. (12) Will Power, Chevy, 2:36.0488, 230.697.
4. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevy, 2:36.0812,230.649.
5. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 2:36.1049, 230.614.
6. (25) Marco Andretti, Honda, 2:36.1526, 230.544.
7. (34) Carlos Munoz, Honda, 2:36.4224, 230.146.
8. (67) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 2:36.5946, 229.893.
9. (21) JR Hildebrand, Chevy, 2:37.3938, 228.726.
10. (2) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 2:35.8396,231.007.
11. (9) Scott Dixon, Chevy, 2:35.8930, 230.928.
12. (26) Kurt Busch, Honda, 2:35.9913, 230.782.
13. (98) Jack Hawksworth, Honda, 2:36.1779, 230.506.
14. (19) Justin Wilson, Honda, 2:36.3480, 230.256.
15. (7) Mikhail Aleshin, Honda, 2:36.4881,230.049.


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
0 Ip 3-9-9
S*CASH 3 (late)
0 1 4-1-6

IPLAY 4 (early)


L 0* ..8-1-3-6
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 8-3-3-3



Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 1 3 10 -25
Mega Ball: 8


4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5
3-of-4 MB 39
3-of-4 1,047
2-of-4 MB 1,302
1-of-4 MB 9,571
2-of-4 27,067


$1,145.50
$321.50
$34.50
$20
$2.50
$2


Fantasy 5:3 -17 -18 -19 -34


5-of-5
4-of-5
3-of-5


4 winners
300
9,854


$57,631.32
$123.50
$10.50


Mega Millions: 12-14-21-38-70
Mega Ball: 15
5-of-5 MB No winner


5-of-5 1
4-of-5 MB 2
4-of-5 15
3-of-5 MB 58
3-of-5 939
2-of-5 MB 1,597
1-of-5 MB 12,718
O-of-5 MB 32,252


$1 million
$5,000
$500
$50
$5
$5
$2
$1


Players should verify winning
numbers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES,


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (NBC) Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix
10:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Monaco Grand Prix (same-day tape)
12 p.m. (ABC) Indianapolis 500
2 p.m. (CBS) Lucas Oil Off Road Racing From Lake Elsinore,
Calif. (taped)
5:30 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Coca-Cola 600. From
Charlotte Motor Speedway in Charlotte, N.C.
10 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Kansas Nationals. From
Topeka, Kan. (same-day tape) (CC)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (ESPNU) American Tournament, Final: Teams TBA.
From Clearwater, Fla.
1 p.m. (ESPN2) ACC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA. From
Greensboro, N.C.
1 p.m. (FS1) Big East Tournament, Final: Teams TBA. From
Brooklyn, N.Y
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA.
From Hoover, Ala.
5:30 p.m. (FS1) Big 12 Tournament, Final: Teams TBA. From
Oklahoma City.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Milwaukee Brewers at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (MLB) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays or
Cleveland Indians at Baltimore Orioles
1:30 p.m. (SUN, 104.3 WYKE-FM) Boston Red Sox at Tampa
Bay Rays
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at San Diego Padres
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds
3 a.m. (ESPN2) St. Louis Cardinals at Cincinnati Reds (same-
day tape)
BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m. (TNT) San Antonio Spurs at Oklahoma City Thunder.
Western Conference Final, Game 3
GOLF
7:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: BMW PGA Championship,
final round. From Surrey, England. (Live)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial,
final round. From Fort Worth, Texas
3 p.m. (NBC) Senior PGA Championship, final round. From
Benton Harbor, Mich.
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial,
final round
3 p.m. (NBC) Senior PGA Championship, final round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Airbus LPGA Classic, final round.
From Mobile, Ala.
HOCKEY
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2014 IIHF World Championship, final:
Teams TBA
2 p.m. (NHL) 2014 MasterCard Memorial Cup, semifinal:
Teams TBA. From London, Ont. (taped)
4 p.m. (NHL) 2014 MasterCard Memorial Cup, final: Guelph
Storm vs. TBA. From London, Ont.
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Montreal Canadiens at New York Rangers.
Game 4
LACROSSE
8 a.m. (ESPNU) Women's NCAA Tournament: Syracuse vs.
Virginia. First semifinal. From Towson, Md. (taped)
10 a.m. (ESPNU) Women's NCAA Tournament: Maryland vs.
Northwestern. Second semifinal. From Towson, Md. (taped)
8:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Women's NCAATournament, Final:
Teams TBA. From Towson, Md.
RODEO
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Bull Riding Championship (taped)
SOFTBALL
6 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs. Oregon.
Super Regional, Game 1. From Euguene, Ore. (taped)
12 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament: Florida vs. Washington.
Super Regional, Game 2. From Gainesville, Fla.
3 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament: Florida vs. Washington.
Super Regional, Game 3 (if necessary)
3 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Kentucky vs. UCLA.
Super Regional, Game 2. From Los Angeles
5 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs. Oregon.
Super Regional, Game 2. From Eugene, Ore.
6 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Kentucky vs. UCLA.
Super Regional, Game 3 (if necessary)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs. Oregon.
Super Regional, Game 3 (if necessary)
12 a.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs. Oregon.
Super Regional, Game 2 (same-day tape)
TENNIS
5 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open: first round
9 a.m. (ESPN2) French Open: first round
10 a.m. (TENNIS) French Open: first round
12 p.m. (NBC) French Open: first round

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


16. (10)Tony Kanaan, Chevy, 2:36.5750, 229.922.
17. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevy, 2:36.6259, 229.847.
18. (16) Oriol Servia, Honda, 2:36.6905, 229.752.
19.(28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 2:36.7132, 229.719.
20. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 2:36.7756, 229.628.
21. (18) Carlos Huertas, Honda, 2:37.0328,229.251.
22. (63) Pippa Mann, Honda, 2:37.0521,229.223.
23. (14)Takuma Sato, Honda, 2:37.0671,229.201.
24.(68) Alex Tagliani, Honda, 2:37.1038, 229.148.
25.(6) Townsend Bell, Chevy, 2:37.1990,229.009.
26. (83) Charlie Kimball, Chevy, 2:37.2376, 228.953.
27. (5) Jacques Villeneuve, Honda, 2:37.2400, 228.949.
28. (33) James Davison, Chevy, 2:37.2977, 228.865.
29. (41) Martin Plowman, Honda, 2:37.3333, 228.814.
30. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Chevy, 2:37.4028, 228.713.
31. (22) Sage Karam, Chevy, 2:37.5931,228.436.
32. (17) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevy, 2:37.8335, 228.088.
33. (91) Buddy Lazier, Chevy, 2:37.9501,227.920.


Rays 6, Red Sox 5
(15 innings)
Boston Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Holt3b 7 1 2 0 DeJessdh 4 1 1 0
Bogartsss 5 1 2 0 SRdrgzph-dh2 00 0
JHerrrss 2 00 0 Longori3b 7 1 2 0
Pedroia2b 4 1 0 0 Joyce rf 7 1 1 1
Carplb 5 1 0 1 Loneylb 7 01 0
JGoms rf-lf 3 0 0 1 CFigurpr 0 1 0 0
Przynsdh 5 1 1 3 Guyerl If 7 24 2
GSizmr If-cf 6 0 0 0 DJnngs cf 7 0 2 0
D.Rossc 6 0 1 0 Forsyth2b 5 03 2
BrdlyJrcf 3 0 0 0 YEscorss 4 00 0
D.Ortizph 1 00 0 JMolinc 3 00 0
Nava rf 2 00 0 Myersph 0 00 0
Hanignc 2 00 0
Totals 49 56 5 Totals 55614 5
Boston500 000 000 000 000 5
TampaOlO 130 000 000 001 6
No outs when winning run scored.
E A.Miller (1), C.Ramos (2). DP-Boston 1,
Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Boston 6, Tampa Bay 12.
2B-Guyer 2 (3), Forsythe (6). HR-Pierzyn-
ski (4). SB-De.Jennings (11). SF-J.Gomes,
Forsythe.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Peavy 6 8 5 5 1 5
Breslow 1 1 0 0 0 2
Tazawa 1 1 0 0 1 1
Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 2
Mujica 1 1 0 0 0 1
Capuano 12-30 0 0 0 1
Badenhop 2 1 0 0 1 1
A.MillerL,1-4 1-3 2 1 0 0 1
Tampa Bay
Price 8 5 5 5 2 7
McGee 1 0 0 0 0 2
Balfour 1 0 0 0 0 0
Boxberger 2 0 0 0 1 4
C.RamosW,2-3 3 1 0 0 2 3
A.Miller pitched to 3 batters in the 15th.
HBP-by Breslow (DeJesus), by Price (Carp).
WP Tazawa. PB-D.Ross.
T-5:16.A-23,569 (31,042).

Cardinals 6, Reds 3


St. Louis


ab rhbi


Cincinnati


MCrpnt3b 5 1 2 0 Heiseycf
Roinsnrf 5 00 0 Ondrskp
Hollidy If 4 1 3 1 SMrshll p
Craig lb 4 1 0 0 LeCurep
YMolinc 5 2 2 1 BHmltnph
JhPerltss 3 1 0 0 Frazier3b
Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Phillips 2b
M.Ellis2b 2 0 0 1 Mesorcc
Jaycf 4 0 3 2 Bruce rf
JGarci p 3 0 1 0 Ludwck If
CMrtnzp 0 00 0 B.Penalb
MAdmsph 1 0 1 1 Cozartss
Maness p 0 0 0 0 Cingrn p
Choatep 0 00 0 Hoover p
Motte p 0 0 0 0 Schmkr ph-cl
Descalsss 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 6126 Totals
St. Louis 100 102 020
Cincinnati 000 011 001
DP-St. Louis 1, Cincinnati 1. LOB-


ab
4
0
0
0
1
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
0
f 1

37

-S


r h bi
110
1 1 1 0
000
000
000
010
010
031
000
000
0 1 0


110
021
30 1 0
10 3 1


000
000
1 1 1 1
1 1 1 0
10 2 1
010 0
)0 0 0
10 1 0

311 3
- 6
- 3
t. Louis


9, Cincinnati 8. 2B-M.Carpenter (9), Heisey
(8), Phillips 2 (14), B.Pena (6). HR-YMolina
(5), Ludwick (3). S-M.Ellis. SF-M.Ellis.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
J.GarciaW,1-0 52-36 2 2 0 7
C.MartinezH,12 11-32 0 0 0 3
Maness 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
Motte 2-3 1 1 1 1 1
RosenthalS,15-17 1-3 1 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
CingraniL,2-4 6 7 4 4 3 4
Hoover 1 1 0 0 0 1
Ondrusek 1-3 1 2 2 1 0
S.Marshall 2-3 2 0 0 0 2
LeCure 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-C.Martinez, S.Marshall.
T-3:09.A-41,585 (42,319).


Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Traded LHP Troy
Patton to San Diego forC Nick Hundley. Recalled
INF Steve Lombardozzi from Norfolk (AL).
BOSTON RED SOX Placed OF Shane
Victorino on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Daniel
Nava from Pawtucket (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS- Optioned LHP Rudy
Owens to Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled LHP
Brett Oberholtzer from Oklahoma City.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Assigned OF
Justin Maxwell outrightto Omaha (PCL). Sent2B
Omar Infante to Omaha for a rehab assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Optioned INF
Efren Navarro to Salt Lake (PCL). Reinstated
LHP Sean Burnett from the 15-day DL.
SEATTLE MARINERS Sent OF Logan
Morrison and LHP James Paxton to Tacoma
(PCL) for a rehab assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS Sent RHP Tanner
Scheppers to Frisco (TL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS -Agreed to terms with
RHP Mickey Storey on a minor league contract.
National League
COLORADO ROCKIES Placed 3B Nolan
Arenado on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Josh
Rutledge from Colorado Springs (PCL).
MIAMI MARLINS Placed LHP Brad Hand
on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Dan Jennings
from New Orleans (PCL). SentRHPJim Henderson
to Huntsville (SL) for a rehab assignment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Placed RHP
Luis Garcia on the 15-day DL. Selected the con-
tract of RHP David Buchanan from LehighValley
(IL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES Selected the con-
tract of RHP Billy Buckner from El Paso (PCL).
American Association
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Re-
leased INF Andy White.
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Re-
leased RHP Mike Weatherly. Signed RHP Cole-
man Stephens and OF Cody Bishop.
LAREDO LEMURS-Signed C Carlos Ramirez.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS Sold the contract of
RHP Eric Brooks to the Arizona Diamondbacks.
Frontier League
EVANSVILLE OTTERS- Signed RHP Brian
Shimo.
FLORENCE FREEDOM Signed RHP
Greg McDaniel.
SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS Released
INF Ryan Normoyle.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS Signed
RHP ScottWeismann. Released RHPWilson Rivera.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS Sold the
contract of RHP ZakWasserman to the Arizona
Diamondbacks.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS- Signed DE Dee Ford.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Signed DBWaltAikens.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS- Signed DT
Quinn Everett, LB Aram Eisho and DB Kamaal
Mcllwain.


Down early, Heat

bounce back to win


Associated Press
Indiana Pacers forward Paul George defends
Miami Heat forward LeBron James on Saturday
during the second half of Game 3 in the Eastern
Conference finals in Miami. The Heat won 99-87.


Carter leads Kings past Chicago
4-3 in West final
LOS ANGELES Jeff Carter had a goal and two
assists, Tyler Toffoli scored the tiebreaking goal late
in the second period, and the Los Angeles Kings beat
the Chicago Blackhawks 4-3 on Saturday night to
take a 2-1 lead in the Western Conference finals.
Drew Doughty had a third-period goal and an as-
sist, and Jonathan Quick made 24 saves as the
Kings returned to Staples Center with an impres-
sive two-way effort against the defending Stanley
Cup champions.
Captain Jonathan Toews scored twice in the first
period for the Blackhawks, but they didn't score
again until Patrick Sharp's goal with 5 seconds left.
Corey Crawford stopped 28 shots for the Black-
hawks, who have lost the first road game in 10 con-
secutive playoff series since 2010.
Game 4 is Monday night at Staples Center.

Bouchard wins Nuremberg Cup
for first WTA title
NUREMBERG, Germany- Eugenie Bouchard
of Canada defeated Karolina Pliskova of the Czech
Republic 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 Saturday to win the Nurem-
berg Cup for her first WTA title.
The second-seeded Bouchard, who had not lost
a set on the way to her second career final, held
her nerve in the third set after five breaks of serve
in a row to win in 1 hour, 53 minutes.

Gulbis beats Delbonis
to win Nice title
NICE, France Second-seeded Ernests Gulbis
maintained his perfect record in ATP tour finals as
he defeated Federico Delbonis to win the Open de
Nice on Saturday.
The Latvian triumphed 6-1, 7-6 (5) for his sixth
career tournament victory.
Gulbis secured the opening set in just 26 min-
utes, but then wasted three break points early in the
second. He fell behind in the tiebreaker, but fought
back to win five of the next six points.
-From wire reports





TRIATHLON
Continued from Page B1

Patrick High, 51, of Lake Placid, didn't even
train for the event. He won it with a time of
1:02.42.4. Jerry Gisclair was second with a time of
1:04.48.4.
The High DNA was working Saturday.
Patrick's teenage son Lukas took 10th with a
1:07:34.2.
Patrick and his wife Cherie organize and run
the Heartland Triathlon in Sebring.
"We like Chris (Moling)," Cherie High said. "We
love the course and the way it is run."
"This is my one and only triathlon for the year,"
her husband said. "We love coming up to Crystal
River. Good, safe course. It was fun. We get to
swim and play with the manatees and go fishing
for the weekend. The objective is to have fun."
Celia Dubey of Tarpon Springs won the
women's division with a time of 1:07:34. She also
organizes and runs a triathlon in Tarpon Springs.
Crystal River High School business teacher
Laura Wingate could have run, swam and biked
to "School's Out" she said goodbye to her stu-
dents Friday, ran the race Saturday and will
leave for Michigan with her husband Harold to
find some cooler weather for the summer. She
finished 95th with a time of 1:27:31.8.
"It was warm; the water was great," said
Wingate, who has only been doing triathlons for
a few years. "The bike was fast. The run was re-
ally warm. I will be back for the fall one. It's a
great day to start the summer"
One triathlete may have run her final Citrus
County triathlon after more than 10 years.
Kristin Donahue, 26, is moving to Fort Collins,
Colorado, where she will teach first grade.
The Dade City resident finished 29th overall
with a time of 1:13:17.3. She won the Twilight
Triathlon in 2013. Her father Bill, 65, also ran
and was 64th with a time of 1:21.17.8.
Donahue was first in her 25-29 female age
group. A native of Webster, Florida, she was on
the University of Florida TriGators team and has
competed internationally as well. She was a
standout swimmer and cross country runner at
Zephyrhills High School.
This week, she will have something to tell her
first-graders at "Show and Tell" in Bushnell Ele-
mentary
"It's probably my last race in Florida for a lit-
tle bit," Donahue said. "Maybe (I will run) at the
Turkey Trot at Thanksgiving. I did OK. I don't
have all my leg speed. I think it went pretty well.
I'm happy My dad was out there racing. Of
course, we wanted to come to Crystal River"


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 B3


Ci n a l




B4 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Toronto
NewYork
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Boston




Atlanta
Miami
Washington
Philadelphia
NewYork


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Phillies 5, Dodgers 3
Los Angeles Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DGordn2b 4 0 1 1 Reverecf 4 34 1
JuTrnr3b 4 1 1 0 Rollinsss 4 0 1 2
Puigrf 4 1 2 0 Utley2b 4 1 1 2
AdGnzllb 4 00 0 Howard 1lb 4 00 0
Crwfrdl If 4 0 0 1 Byrdrf 3 0 1 0
Ethiercf 4 0 2 0 DBrwnl If 3 0 0 0
A.Ellisc 2 0 0 0 GwynJ If 1 0 0 0
Arrrrnss 3 1 1 0 Ruizc 2 0 0 0
VnSlykph 1 00 0 CHrndz3b 2 1 0 0
Harenp 2 0 0 0 Buchnnp 1 00 0
Kempph 1 00 0 Diekmnp 0 00 0
Mahlmp 0 0 0 0 Rufph 1 00 0
MAdmsp 0 00 0
Papelnp 0 00 0
Totals 33 37 2 Totals 29 5 7 5
LosAngeles 000 111 000 3
Philadelphia 220 010 00x 5
E-Haren (1), A.Ellis (2), Buchanan (1). DP-
Philadelphia 1. LOB-Los Angeles 5, Philadel-
phia 4.2B-Ju.Turner (5), Revere (1), Byrd (16).
3B-Puig (3). HR-Utley (4). S-Buchanan.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
HarenL,5-3 6 6 5 2 2 7
Maholm 2 1 0 0 0 2
Philadelphia
BuchananW,1-0 5 5 2 2 0 2
DiekmanH,6 2 1 1 0 1 1
Mi.AdamsH,6 1 0 0 0 0 1
PapelbonS,13-14 1 1 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Maholm (Byrd). PB-Ruiz. Balk-Ma-
holm.
T-2:37. A-32,287 (43,651).

Diamondbacks 3,
Mets 2
Arizona NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
GParra rf 5 0 2 0 Lagars cf 4 0 0 0
Owingsss 4 00 0 DnMrp2b 4 1 1 0
Gldschlb 4 1 0 0 DWrght3b 4 1 3 1
MMntrc 3 1 0 0 Grndrsrf 3 0 2 1
Hill2b 3 1 1 0 CYoungl If 3 0 1 0
Prado3b 3 0 2 2 Dudalb 4 0 0 0
CRossIf 4 0 1 1 Floresss 4 00 0
Inciartlf 0 0 0 0 Reckerc 3 0 0 0
Pollockcf 4 00 0 BAreuph 1 00 0
Cllmntrp 2 00 0 ZWhelrp 2 00 0
EMrshlp 0 0 0 0 Edginp 0 00 0
Zieglerp 0 00 0 EYongph 0 00 0
EChavz ph 0 0 0 0 CTorrs p 0 00 0
CAndrspr 0 0 0 0 Ricep 0 00 0
A.Reedp 0 0 0 0 Valvrdp 0 0 0 0
Campllph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 36 3 Totals 33 2 7 2
Arizona 021 000 000 3
NewYork 001 010 000 2
E-Flores (1). DP-Arizona 1. LOB-Arizona 8,
New York 8. 2B-Hill (12), D.Wright (12),
Granderson (8). HR-D.Wright (3). SB-
E.Young (17). S-Owings, Collmenter.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
CollmenterW,3-2 6 6 2 2 1 4
E.Marshall H,4 1 0 0 0 2 1
ZieglerH,12 1 1 0 0 1 0
A.Reed S,13-15 1 0 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Z.WheelerL,1-5 62-36 3 2 1 7
Edgin 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
C.Torres 11-30 0 0 0 1
RIce 1- 0 n n n 1 1


Valverde 1-3 0 0 1
HBP-byZ.Wheeler(Hill, Prado).
T-3:18.A-24,551 (41,922).

Rockies 3, Bra


Colorado

Barnes If
Stubbs cf
Tlwtzk ss
Cuddyr rf
Rosario c
Mornea 1 t
Culersn 3b
LeMahi 2b
Nicasio p
Blckmn ph
Belisle p
Logan p
Ottavin p
Hwkns p
Totals
Colorado
Atlanta


Atlanta


ab r h bi
4 0 0 0 Heywrd rf
3 0 1 0 BUptoncf
3 1 2 1 FFrmnlb
4 1 1 1 J.Upton If
4 00 0 Gattisc
S3 0 0 0 CJhnsn3b
S4 1 2 0 Smmnsss
4 00 0 R.Pena2b
2 00 0 Minorp
1 0 0 1 Varvarp
0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph
0 0 0 0 Hale p
0000
0000
32 36 3 Totals
010 001 100
000 000 010


DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Colorado 5
2B-Culberson (3), F.Freeman (13)
HR-Tulowitzki (14), Cuddyer (5).


(5). SF-J.Upton.
IP H
Colorado
Nicasio W,5-2 6 2
Belisle H,5 1 0
Logan H,6 1-3 2
Ottavino H,10 2-3 0
Hawkins S,11-12 1 0
Atlanta
Minor L,2-3 61-34
Varvaro 2-3 0
Hale 2 2
T-3:10.A-26,741 (49,586).


R ER


Marlins 2, Brew
Milwaukee Miami
ab r h bi
Segura ss 5 0 2 0 Yelich If
Braun rf 4 1 1 0 Dietrch 2b
Lucroyc 4 0 1 1 Cishekp
CGomzcf 4 02 0 Stantonrf
Rynl3b-lb 4 0 2 0 McGeh3b
Gennett2b 4 0 0 0 GJoneslb
KDavis If 3 0 1 0 Sltlmch c
Overay lb 2 0 1 0 Ozunacf
RWeks ph 1 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss
Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 JaTrnrp
Duke p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p
LSchfr ph 1 0 0 0 JeBakr ph
WPerltp 2 00 0 ARamsp
EHerrr ph-3b2 0 1 0 Lucas 2b
Totals 36 1111 Totals
Milwaukee 000 000 010
Miami 010 000 l10x
E-Saltalamacchia (7). DP-Mi
Miami 1. LOB-Milwaukee 9, Miam
croy(18), C.Gomez(14), K.Davis(1


Saltalamacchia
Hechavarria (2).


(8). SB-C.G

IP H RER


Milwaukee
W.Peralta L,4-4 6 6
Thornburg 1 2
Duke 1 0
Miami
Ja.TurnerW,1-2 61-38
M.Dunn H,6 2-3 0
A.Ramos H,6 2-3 2
CishekS,10-11 11-31
WP-M.Dunn, A.Ramos.
T-3:03. A-25,819 (37,442).


Str Home
W-5 12-11
W-1 11-11
L-1 10-12
W-3 11-14
L-9 10-17



Str Home
L-1 17-10
W-1 20-7
L-4 14-12
W-1 9-13
L-1 10-15


Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
17 .622 5-5 L-1 14-10
22 .511 5 /2 7-3 L-1 12-11
26 .490 6 1/2 6-4 L-1 13-11
24 .489 6 1/2 5-5 L-1 13-11
26 .480 61 2 5-5 W-1 15-11


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 29 21 .580 4-6 L-1 14-10 15-11
St. Louis 27 22 .551 1/2 8-2 W-1 14-7 13-15
Cincinnati 22 25 .468 5/2 4 5-5 L-1 12-11 10-14
Pittsburgh 22 26 .458 6 4/2 6-4 W-4 16-12 6-14
Chicago 17 29 .370 10 8/2 5-5 L-1 10-13 7-16


w
Oakland 30
Los Angeles 27
Seattle 24
Texas 24
Houston 17



W
San Francisco 30
Colorado 27
Los Angeles 26
San Diego 22
Arizona 19


V
L Pct
19 .612
20 .574
23 .511
25 .490
32 .347


\
L Pct
18 .625
22 .551
24 .520
27 .449
31 .380


Vest Division
GB WC


West Division
GB WC


Str Home
L-3 12-10
W-3 14-12
W-2 10-10
W-1 13-13
L-4 10-15



Str Home
W-2 15-8
W-1 16-7
L-1 9-13
W-1 13-14
W-1 6-18


Associated Press
White Sox starter John Danks throws against the New York Yankees on Saturday during the third inning in Chicago.



Yankees edge old-school Sox in 10


Associated Press

CHICAGO Jacoby Ellsbury
homered with two outs in the 10th
inning, and the New York Yankees
snapped an eight-game road los-
ing streak against the Chicago
White Sox with a 4-3 victory
The Yankees scored three times
in the ninth against Ronald Belis-
ario and then grabbed their first
lead of the day when Ellsbury hit
a drive to right off Zach Putnam
(2-1) for his second homer
Dellin Betances (3-0) pitched a
perfect inning for the win and
David Robertson finished for his
10th save in 11 chances, bouncing
back nicely after yielding Adam
Dunn's game-ending homer in
Chicago's 6-5 victory on Friday
Adam Eaton singled and stole
second with two down, but
Robertson struck out Gordon
Beckham to end the game.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Indians 9, Orioles 0


0 0 0 BALTIMORE Corey Kluber struck
out nine in seven innings, and the
Cleveland Indians beat former teammate
Ves 1 Ubaldo Jimenez and the Baltimore Orioles
9-0 for their fifth win in six games.
ab r h bi Carlos Santana homered and walked
3 00 0 three times for the Indians, who took
4 1 2 0 control with a five-run fifth and pulled
2 0 1 0
3 01 1 away by scoring four in the seventh.
3 00 0 Kluber (5-3) became the first pitcher
4 0 0 0 in the majors this season to have five
4 00 0 straight outings with at least eight

2 00 0 strikeouts. He gave up five hits,
0 0 0 0 walked two and did not allow a runner
1 00 0 past second base.
0 0 0 0 Jimenez (2-6) matched zeroes with

Kluber until the fifth inning, when the
30 14 1 first-year Oriole was pulled without
3 getting an out.
5, Atlanta 7 Blue Jays 5, Athletics 2
, J.Upton (9).
SB-Stubbs TORONTO R.A. Dickey won for
SSO the third time in four starts, Brett Lawrie
homered and the Toronto Blue Jays
0 4 5 beat the Oakland Athletics 5-2.
0 0 0 The AL East-leading Blue Jays (28-
1 0 1 22), who won for the 10th time in 12
0 0 1 games, haven't been atop the division
this late into the season since July 6,
3 3 6 2000, when they were 46-40.
9000
0 0 0 Dickey (5-4) allowed one run and
five hits in a season-high 8 1-3 innings.
vers I He walked one and struck out four.
Jose Reyes and Anthony Gose
ab r bi each scored two runs as Toronto used
ab r hbi
3 0 1 0 its speed to hand AL West-leading
4 0 1 0 Oakland its third straight loss, match-
0 0 0 0 ing its longest slump of the season.
3000
4 12 0 Lawrie's solo homer in the fifth was
3 00 0 Toronto's ML-leading 69th, and
4 0 1 1 marked the seventh straight game
4 0 0 0 that at least one Blue Jays batter has
3110
2 01 0 connected. Toronto also leads base-
0 0 0 0 ball with 37 homers in May.

0 0000 Rangers 12, Tigers 2
0000
31 2 8 2 DETROIT Nick Martinez pitched
1 six sharp innings for his first major
2 league win and fellow rookie Rougned
iwaukee 1,B Odor drove in five runs with a pair of
ni 8.2B--Lu-
1),Yelich (7), triples to lead the Texas Rangers to a
3omez (8), 12-2 rout of the Detroit Tigers.
RBB SO Martinez (1-1) allowed a run and eight
hits, and Adrian Beltre and Donnie
1 2 5 Murphy homered for Texas. The Rangers
1 1 1 scored four runs in the fourth, plus
0 0 2 three each in the sixth and seventh.

0 1 2 Rick Porcello (7-2) had won his last
0 0 2 six starts before being knocked
1 0 1 around by Texas. He allowed eight
runs and 12 hits in 5 1-3 innings.
Detroit has lost five of six.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Baltimore 8, Cleveland 4
Toronto 3, Oakland 2
Detroit 7, Texas 2
Tampa Bay 1, Boston 0
Chicago White Sox 6, N.YYankees 5
L.A. Angels 6, Kansas City 1
Seattle 6, Houston 1
San Francisco 6, Minnesota 2
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 9, Baltimore 0
Toronto 5, Oakland 2
N.YYankees 4, Chicago White Sox 3,10 innings
Texas 12, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5, 15 innings
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, late
Minnesota at San Francisco, late
Houston at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Oakland (Pomeranz 4-1) at Toronto (Happ 3-1), 1:07 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 3-3) at Detroit (Verlander 5-3), 1:08 p.m.
Cleveland (Bauer 1-1) at Baltimore (Gonzalez 2-3), 1:35 p.m.
Boston (Workman 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Odcrizzi 2-4), 1:40 p.m.
Yankees (Tanaka 6-1) at White Sox (Rienzo 4-0), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Vargas 4-2) at Angels (Richards 4-1), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Nolasco 2-4) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 5-3),
4:05 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 5-2) at Seattle (Iwakuma 3-0), 4:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 2, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 4, Washington 3
Milwaukee 9, Miami 5
Cincinnati 5, St. Louis 3
Arizona at NewYork, ppd., rain
Atlanta 3, Colorado 2
San Diego 11, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 6, Minnesota 2
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Arizona 3, N.Y Mets 2
Colorado 3, Atlanta 1
Miami 2, Milwaukee 1
St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 3
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2
Minnesota at San Francisco, late
Chicago Cubs at San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
Arizona (Arroyo 4-3) at N.Y Mets (Montero 0-2), 1:10 p.m.,
1st game
Milwaukee (Nelson 0-0) at Miami (Wolf 0-0), 1:10 p.m.
Dodgers (Beckett 2-1) at Philadelphia (Burnett 3-3), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Fister 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-4), 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Nolasco 2-4) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 5-3),
4:05 p.m.
Cubs (Hammel 5-2) at San Diego (Kennedy 2-6), 4:10 p.m.
Arizona (Spruill 0-0) at N.Y Mets (Matsuzaka 1-0), 4:40 p.m.,
2nd game
Colorado (Morales 3-3) at Atlanta (Teheran 3-3), 5:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 7-2) at Cincinnati (Leake 2-3), 8:05 p.m.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Phillies 5, Dodgers 3
PHILADELPHIA- David Buchanan
threw five effective innings in his major
league debut, Chase Utley hit a two-run
homer and the Philadelphia Phillies
beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-3.
Filling in for injured ace Cliff Lee,
Buchanan (1-0) gave the struggling Phillies
a lift. The 25-year-old righty allowed
two runs and five hits, striking out two.
Ben Revere went 4 for 4 in his first
game leading off since May 14 and
Jimmy Rollins drove in two runs to help
the Phillies snap a three-game skid.
Jonathan Papelbon tossed a score-
less ninth for his 13th save in 14 tries.

Diamondbacks 3, Mets 2
NEW YORK Josh Collmenter
provided another solid start, Martin
Prado hit a pair of RBI singles and the
Arizona Diamondbacks beat the New
York Mets 3-2 to end a three-game skid.
Aday after Aaron Hill had a home
run washed out when the game at Citi
Field was postponed because of rain,
he cracked a key hit that counted. His
second-inning double set up run-scor-
ing singles by Prado and Cody Ross
that put Arizona ahead to stay.
David Wright homered, doubled
and singled for the Mets.
Collmenter (3-2) won his third deci-
sion in a row over a span of six starts.
The righty allowed two runs in six innings
before the Arizona bullpen held on.


Rockies 3, Braves 1
ATLANTA- Michael Cuddyer and
Troy Tulowitzki each homered, Juan
Nicasio solved the Braves and the
Colorado Rockies beat Atlanta 3-1.
The Rockies were missing some of
their big bats as Carlos Gonzalez
missed his third straight start with a
swollen finger and Nolan Arenado was
placed on the 15-day disabled list with
a broken finger.
Nicasio (5-2) didn't need much of-
fense. The right-hander turned around
his ugly history against the Braves -
0-3 and 9.82 ERA in four starts. He
gave up only two hits in six shutout in-
nings. Nicasio pitched around four
walks and had five strikeouts.
Atlanta's Mike Minor (2-3) allowed
three runs on four hits including the
two homers in 6 2/3 innings.

Marlins 2, Brewers 1
MIAMI Jacob Turner pitched 6 1/3
scoreless innings to help the Miami
Marlins beat the Milwaukee Brewers 2-1.
Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Jeff
Baker drove in the runs for the Mar-
lins, who have won three of four.
Steve Cishek recorded the final four
outs for his 10Oth save in 11 chances.
It was the best outing of the season
for Turner (1-2), who struck out two and
walked one while allowing eight hits. It
was only the second time in six starts
that he has not allowed at least four runs.
Brewers starter Wily Peralta (4-4)
allowed one run and six hits in six innings.
Milwaukee's Ryan Braun was in the
lineup after missing Friday's game
with tightness in his right side and
went 1 for 4.

Pirates 3, Nationals 2
PITTSBURGH -Josh Harrison
had a tiebreaking, two-out single in
the seventh inning after Jose Tabata
hit a sacrifice fly and the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates beat the Washington Nationals
3-2 for their fourth straight win.
Gerrit Cole left after six innings trailing
by a run while facing Stephen Stras-
burg in the first matchup of No. 1 over-
all draft picks in almost nine years.
But Strasburg (3-4) allowed three
runs on seven hits with seven strike-
outs in seven innings.
Cole the top pick of the 2011
draft, two years after Strasburg went
first allowed two runs on five hits
with seven strikeouts.
Neil Walker hit his 10Oth home run
for the Pirates, who tied their season-
best winning streak.
Jered Hughes (3-1), Jeanmar Gomez
and Mark Melancon each worked a
perfect inning of relief for Pittsburgh.

Cardinals 6, Reds 3
CINCINNATI Left-hander Jaime
Garcia got his first victory in more than
a year and Yadier Molina homered
again in the city where he's always
booed, leading the St. Louis Cardinals
to a 6-3 victory over the Cincinnati
Reds.
The Cardinals evened their series
at a game apiece. St. Louis has won
nine of the last 10 series between the
NL Central rivals.
Garcia (1-0) gave up six hits and a
pair of runs in 5 2/3 innings, fanning
seven and retiring 12 batters in a row
over one span.
Ryan Ludwick homered in the ninth
off Jason Motte. Trevor Rosenthal
came on with two outs and fanned
Todd Frazier with two runners aboard
for his 15th save in 17 chances.


BASEBALL


Washington
ab
Span cf 5
Rendon3b 3
Werth rf 3
WRamsc 4
Dsmnd ss 3
Dobbs lb 4
Espinos2b 4
McLoth If 2
Strasrg p 2
Storen p 0
Blevins p 0
Walters ph 1


Pittsburgh
rhbi
0 0 0 JHrrsnrf
1 1 0 JGomzp
0 0 0 Melncn p
0 1 1 NWalkr2b
1 1 1 AMcCtcf
0 2 0 .Davis lb
0 0 0 RMartnc
0 0 0 PAIvrz3b
0 0 0 SMarte If
0 0 0 Barmesss
0 0 0 Tabata ph-rf
0 0 0 Cole p
JHughs p
Snider ph
Mercer ss


ab r h bi
4011
0000
0000
4111
4010
3010
2120
4000
3120
2000
0001
2000
0000
0000
0000
4 0 1 1

4 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
2 1 2 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 2 0
2 0 0 0
0 0 0 1
2 0 0 0
0 OO 0O
0 OO 0O
0 OO 0O


Totals 31 25 2 Totals 283 8 3
Washington 000 110 000 2
Pittsburgh 000 100 20x 3
DP Washington 1. LOB Washington 8, Pitts-
burgh 6. 2B-S.Marte (8). HR-Desmond (9),
N.Walker (10). SB-Rendon (3), McLouth (2).
CS-S.Marte (3). S-Strasburg. SF Tabata.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Strasburg L,3-4 7 7 3 3 2 7
Storen 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
Blevins 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Cole 6 5 2 2 3 7
J.HughesW,3-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
J.GomezH,2 1 0 0 0 0 0
MelanconS,9-11 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Strasburg (R.Martin), by Storen
(R.Martin), by Cole (McLouth, Desmond).
T-2:59. A-38,889 (38,362).


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Yankees 4,
White Sox 3
(10 innings)
NewYork Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Gardnrl If 5 0 0 0 Eaton cf 5 1 3 0
Jeterss 5 00 0 GBckh2b 4 1 3 0
Ellsury cf 5 2 2 1 Viciedo rf 4 1 1 1
Teixeirib 5 0 1 0 Sierrarf 0 0 0 0
ASorindh 4 1 1 1 A.DunnIb 2 00 1
Solarte3b 4 01 1 AIRmrzss 4 00 1
Jhnsn pr-3b0 1 0 0 Konerkdh 4 0 0 0
ISuzukirf 3 00 0 Semien3b 4 02 0
JMrphyc 3 0 1 0 Nietoc 3 0 1 0
McCnnph-c 1 01 1 DeAzaph 1 00 0
Ryan2b 4 0 1 0 LeGarc If 4 0 0 0
Totals 39 48 4 Totals 35310 3
NewYork 000 000 003 1 4
Chicago 300 000 000 0 3
E-Semien (7). DP-New York 2. LOB-New
York 6, Chicago 5. 2B-Teixeira (3), A.Soriano
(11), Viciedo (15). HR-Ellsbury (2). SB-Eaton
(4). S-G.Beckham. SF-A.Dunn.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Nuno 7 9 3 3 1 5
Daley 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Thornton 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
BetancesW,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
RobertsonS,10-11 1 1 0 0 0 3
Chicago
Joh.Danks 8 3 0 0 0 4
Belisario BS,2-4 1 4 3 3 1 1
PutnamL,2-1 1 1 1 1 0 1
Nuno pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
T-2:56.A-33,413(40,615).
Indians 9, Orioles 0
Cleveland Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bourn cf 4 1 2 0 Markksrf 4 0 0 0
Aviles2b 5 1 1 1 Lmrdzz2b 1 00 0
Brantlyl If 3 1 1 1 Hardyss 2 0 1 0
Chsnhll3b 5 12 1 Lough cf 1 00 0
Raburndh 5 1 1 2 A.Jones cf 3 0 1 0
DvMrprf 5 00 0 Pearcel If-rf 1 0 1 0
CSantnlb 2 21 2 C.Davislb 3 00 0
YGomsc 3 12 0 CJosph lb 0 00 0
Sellers ss 3 1 1 0 N.Cruz If-rf 4 0 2 0
R.Webbp 0 00 0
Clevngrc 4 0 1 0
DYongdh-lf 4 0 1 0
Flahrty 3b-ss 4 0 0 0
Schoop2b-3b4 0 1 0
Totals 35 9117 Totals 350 8 0
Cleveland 000 050 400 9
Baltimore 000 000 000 0
E-Chisenhall (6), Schoop (6). DP-Baltimore
2. LOB-Cleveland 7, Baltimore 10. 2B-
Chisenhall (14), Raburn (4), N.Cruz (9). HR-
C.Santana (6). SB-Brantley (7). S-Sellers.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
KluberW,5-3 7 5 0 0 2 9
Axford 1 2 0 0 0 1
Rzepczynski 1 1 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
U.Jimenez L,2-6 4 4 5 5 5 3
McFarland 21-35 3 3 1 1
Brach 12-32 1 1 0 2
R.Webb 1 0 0 0 0 1
U.Jimenez pitched to 5 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by McFarland (Brantley).
T-3:05. A-36,873 (45,971).
Blue Jays 5,
Athletics 2
Oakland Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crisp cf 4 00 0 Reyesss 4 2 2 0
DNorrs c 4 00 0 MeCarrl If 4 0 2 2
Dnldsn3b 3 10 0 Pillar If 0 00 0
Moss lb 4 0 1 0 Bautistrf 4 0 0 0
Cespdsdh 4 1 3 1 Lindlb 4 02 0
Reddckrf 3 00 0 Encrnc dh 4 00 0
Lowrie ph 0 00 1 JFrncs 3b 2 00 0
Callasp 2b 4 0 1 0 StTllsn ph-2b 0 0 0 0
Sogard ss 3 0 1 0 Lawrie 2b-3b 4 1 1 1
Gentry If 3 0 0 0 Thole c 3 0 1 0
Gosecf 3 2 1 0
Totals 32 26 2 Totals 325 9 3
Oakland 010 000 001 2
Toronto 001 030 10x 5
E-Moss (2), Gentry (1). DP-Oakland 2.
LOB-Oakland 5, Toronto 6. 2B-Reyes (13),
Lind (8). 3B-Cespedes (2). HR-Cespedes (8),
Lawrie (8). SF-Lowrie.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
J.Chavez L,4-2 51-38 4 2 1 4
Fe.Rodriguez 12-31 1 1 1 0
Francis 1 0 0 0 1 1
Toronto
DickeyW,5-4 81-35 2 2 1 4
McGowan 0 1 0 0 0 0
Cecil S,3-4 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
McGowan pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-J.Chavez.
T-2:35. A-29,372 (49,282).
Rangers 12, Tigers 2
Texas Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Chool If 3 0 1 0 Kinsler2b 5 0 3 1
Choice If 2 01 1 TrHntrrf 4 00 0
Andrusss 6 12 0 Holadyc 1 00 0
Morlndlb 6 01 1 MiCarrIb 2 0 0 0
ABeltre3b 4 22 1 D.Kellylb 2 00 0
Sardins pr-3b0 0 0 0 VMrtnzdh 5 0 3 0
Riosrf 5 1 3 0 AJcksncf 4 0 2 0
Gimenzc 5 1 1 1 Avilac 3 0 1 0
LMartncf 4 32 1 JMrtnzrf 1 00 0
DMrphdh 3 32 2 Cstllns3b 3 00 0
Odor2b 5 14 5 AnRmnss 4 1 2 0
RDavislf 4 1 2 1
Totals 43121912 Totals 38213 2
Texas 000 413 301 12
Detroit 010 000 001 2
E-Avila (2). DP-Texas 1, Detroit 2. LOB-
Texas 9, Detroit 11. 2B-Choice (2), Moreland
(9), Gimenez (1), Odor (1), V.Martinez (11),
A.Jackson (12), R.Davis 2 (8). 3B-Odor 2 (2).
HR-A.Beltre (5), Do.Murphy (2). SB-Andrus
(12), L.Martin (10). CS-Choo (3), Andrus (4),
R.Davis (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
N.MartinezW,1-1 6 8 1 1 1 2
Sh.Tolleson 1 1 0 0 0 2
Cotts 1 2 0 0 1 0
Poreda 1 2 1 1 0 1
Detroit
Porcello L,7-2 51-312 8 8 2 5
Knebel 1 3 3 3 2 1
Coke 12-31 0 0 1 2
Worth 1 3 1 1 0 0
T-3:43. A-43,447 (41,681).



NL

Pirates 3,
Nationals 2


1
1
0 0




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus Challenger League



celebrates end of season


Special to the Chronicle

On May 17, all the local
Little League teams were
recognized at a party at the
Beverly Hills fields.
One of the little known
and recognized divisions
of the National Associa-
tion of Little League is an
organization called the
Challenger League. This
branch, formed in 1989,
grew nationally to what
now has 30,000 children
in 900 divisions. The cen-
tral purpose was to give
children with physical
and development disabil-
ities ages five to 18-plus
an opportunity to play the
game with all the inher-
ent rewards of sportsman-
ship, physical exercise
and fun.
Tony Carione has al-
ways loved and played
baseball. He is a New York
native, was a special
forces military veteran
serving in Afghanistan
and member of the New
York Police Department,
working as security in
Yankee Stadium. His main
role now is vice president
of operations with several
collateral duties for the
Citrus County league. He
coaches his own competi-
tive team in an inspiring
spirit of tough love. His
players play to the very
best of their ability and re-
spect his technique, lead-


"'A .'' .. ."V "-, ... :.
Special to the Chronicle
Tony Carione, left, passes out Little League trophies. The New York native has brought
his love of baseball to Citrus County and now coaches a local Challenger League team.


ership and knowledge of
all aspects of the game.
His softer side was re-
vealed two years ago with
his unrelenting quest to
form a local Challenger
League. It began with a so-
licitation from Little
League officials, mer-
chants, parents and
friends to get behind this
great effort. Uniforms and
safety equipment were
deemed necessary and
provided.
Perhaps the only differ-


ence from conventional
team structure was a loos-
ening of the rules of the
game for the children to
play within their capabili-
ties and to maximize en-
thusiasm and reward
during the outings. Batting
skills, social interaction, a
positive spirit and charac-
ter building improved
along the way Every child
got a "hit" every time at
bat.
Tony will continue to
build on this success next


year with a hopeful desire
that the community will
rally around this program
and support the Chal-
lenger initiative even
more. All challenged chil-
dren are welcome and en-
couraged to play Athletic
ability is not even a con-
sideration. Citrus County
can be proud to have a
hard working and dedi-
cated citizen like Tony
who gives so much of his
time and works so hard for
the benefit of our youth.


Recreation B R I E FS


Citrus Springs
Horseshoe Club
May 17 results
Won all three games Ed Tauber
High Series Ed Tauber 251, Joe
Quadrini 228, Mike Trudel 225
High Game Ed Tauber 90 & 82,
Mike Trudel 90, Joe Quadrini 81
Scores are based on a handicap sys-
tem so all skill levels can compete.
The Club provides the horseshoes.
Stop by on any Tuesday or Saturday
morning at 9 a.m. at the old Community
Center on Route 39 in Citrus Springs.
Call Joe Warburton at 352-489-7537 for
information about the club.
Summer golf
program approaching
The Junior Golf Summer Program at
Seven Rivers Country Club will begin on
Wednesday, May 28.
Junior "Kamps for Kids" programs will
be offered for kids ages 8 to 12 on the
following dates: May 28 to 30, June 4 to
6 and July9 to 11 from 9 to 11 a.m.
Pee Wee classes will be offered on
Saturday mornings for ages 5 to 7 begin-
ning May 31.
Information sheets and enrollment
forms are available at the Seven Rivers
Golf Shop. Contact Mary Slinkard at
352-302-7965 or email mary@mary
slinkard.com if you have any questions.
Camp opportunity
for junior golfers
The Citrus Hills Junior Golf Camp be-
gins June 5.
Local area PGA professionals will
teach the juniors how to play golf in this
five-week clinic. Classes fill up quickly,
so contact the golf shop at Citrus Hills at
746-4425 to register your junior player.
All junior merchandise, including
equipment, is available in the pro shop if
needed.
Crystal River
volleyball camp
The Crystal River Volleyball Camp will
be held the week of June 2 to 6 from 5 to
8:30 p.m. at Lecanto High School.
The camp is open to girls ages 10 to
16. No experience is required. Crystal
River players and coaches will run the
camp. Emphasis will be on the funda-
mentals of passing, setting, hitting, serv-
ing, defense and team play. Campers
will be placed in groups with players of
similar skill levels.
The cost of the camp is $55 per player.
Contact coach Mike Ridley for details at
352-566-7789. Registration forms are
also available at Crystal River High
School, Crystal River Middle School and
Citrus Springs Middle School.
Lecanto volleyball camp
Lecanto High School is offering a
summer volleyball camp for students en-
tering fourth through ninth grade.
The camp will be June 2 to 5 and is
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. each day.
Volleyball skills will be taught through-
out the camp and there will be a tourna-
ment at the end of the week.
The cost is $65 per camper. Contact
Alice Christian at christiana@citrus.k12.
fl.us for more information.
Track/cross country
camp available
The third annual Panther Track and
Field/Cross County Camp will be held


June 10-12 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at
the Lecanto High School Sports Complex.
The camp is for students in second
through 12th grade (based on 2014-15
school year).
The last day of camp will be cross
country-style events followed by a track
and field meet. This day is open to all ages.
The cost is $50 for the entire camp,
$20 for one day June 4 or 5 and $17 for
the competitions on June 6. There is a
multiple sibling discount: $90 for two sib-
lings, $115 for three siblings. There is
also a $45 early bird special. Registra-
tion must be received by May 9 to re-
ceive the special discount.
Contact coach Roselle Lattin at
Lecanto High School at 352-746-2334)
or via email at lattinr@citrus.k12.fl.us for
more information.
Lecanto holds
basketball camp
A basketball camp for boys and girls
grades 3 to 9 will be held May 27 to 30 in
the Lecanto High School gym.
The camp runs from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
each day and the cost is $75 per child.
Deadline to sign up is May 27, the first
day of the camp. Each camper will re-
ceive a T-shirt.
Fundamentals and rules of basketball
will be taught in the mornings. Games
will be played in the afternoons after a
lunch break. Concessions will be avail-
able for lunch and snacks.
No experience is necessary and this is
a recreational program that stresses fun,
good sportsmanship, equal participation,
teamwork and the fundamentals of
basketball.
You can register online at www.hoops
linkinc.org. For more information or
questions, email JeffreyAnderson at
andersonj@citrus.k1l2.fl.us.
Joint soccer
tryouts offered
The Nature Coast and Citrus United
Soccer Clubs are pleased to announce a
new cooperation between the two clubs
for the betterment of soccer in Citrus
County.
For the first time, joint tryouts will be
held between the two clubs for the 2014-
15 competitive soccer season, with the
goal of working together to create
stronger teams than has been possible
in the past.
Please note that this is a cooperative
effort between the two clubs, and not a
merger. Each club will continue to field
its own teams, but the duplication of
teams with the same age and gender of
players will be minimized. The end result
will be a higher level of play on each
team than Citrus County has seen in the
past.
In order to provide equal access to
each team for all of our county's soccer
players, tryouts and practices will be held
at Citrus County's three soccer facilities
- Central Citrus in Holder, HARP field in
Homosassa, and Holden Park in Inver-
ness on a rotating basis. The sched-
ule for tryouts for the 2014-15 season is
as follows:
Boys
May 27, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at HARP
May 28, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Holden
May 29,5:30 to 8 p.m. at Central Campus
May 30, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at HARP
May 31,10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Holden
June 2, 5:30-8 p.m. at Central Campus
Girls
May 27,5:30 to 8 p.m. at Central Campus


May 28, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at HARP
May 29, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Holden
May 30,5:30 to 8 p.m. at Central Campus
May 31,10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at HARP
June 2, 5:30 to 8 p.m. at Holden
Walk, Bike, Hike,
Kayak for Fitness
The Nature Coast Ramblers Inc. is a
nonprofit social and recreational club of
friendly people of all ages who enjoy
self-paced hiking or walking, biking and
kayaking activities in the Citrus County
area.
Walking or hiking, biking or kayaking
with the club promotes fitness. Its goal is
to provide fun events that can challenge
people to keep active.
Outings are started in different loca-
tions to explore the many beautiful trails,
parks, forests and waterways in the
area. Bicycle outings are generally the
second Friday each month, hiking or
walking is generally the third Saturday of
each month and kayaking is usually the
last Tuesday of each month.
All events are free for members. Be-
come a member of Nature Coast Ram-
blers for $10 (or $15 per family) per
calendar year. Guests/visitors are always
welcome at no charge.
Members are informed of upcoming
club activities by email and through post-
ings on the website and Facebook.
Contact Marie Nail at 352 382-2525 or
marie428@earthlink.net.
Camp Patriot Basketball
Camp returns to Ocala
The 11th annual Camp Patriot Basket-
ball Camp will hold four sessions during
the months of June and July at the Col-
lege of Central Florida gymnasium in
Ocala.
The camps are for boys and girls ages
8 to 18. The first session is June 16 to
19, followed by camps June 23 to 26,
July 7-10 and July 21 to 24.
Cost is $165 per session, which in-
cludes daily clinics, instruction, demon-
strations, lectures and a camp T-Shirt.
There will also be 5-on-5 and 3-on-3
games and several awards handed out.
For more information contact coach
Tim Ryan at 352-427-7435 or visit
www.camppatriotbasketball.com.
Fightin' Gator
Fishin' Tournament
For the first time, Plantation on Crystal
River will host the 27th annual Fightin'
Gator Touchdown Club Fishin' Tourna-
ment featuring more than $10,000 in
cash and prizes.
Participants can register for The Lucky
Lotto Fishin' Tournament held on Friday,
June 20 for $25, which includes entry
into a seafood gumbo/shrimp boil dinner
event, and a tournament hat and shirt.
The main event will take place on Sat-
urday, June 21, with winning offshore
categories including largest grouper,
cobia, kingfish and Spanish mackerel;
and inshore categories including redfish,
spots, trout and mangrove snapper.
Registration starts at $60 and includes
an awards ceremony dinner and tourna-
ment hat and shirt.
The tournament takes place June 19
and 20 from daybreak to the 4 p.m.
weigh-in.
For entry forms, tournament rules and
additional information, contact Kip
Mueller at 352-303-2842 or visit
FGTC.org.
-From staff reports


I


Parkview Lanes
MONDAY COFFEE CLUB
SCHEDULE: The Monday
Coffee Club will not bowl on
May 26, in recognition of Me-
morial Day.
SUMMER LEAGUES:
Both the Parkview Summer
Owls and the Suncoast Sen-
iors NoTap will be 10-week
leagues due to holidays. The
Owls will start at 6:50pm
June 6 and end August 15,
and the Suncoast Seniors
will start at 12:50pm June 10
and end August 19. Both
leagues are mixed and the
fees are $12 a week for
each. Contact the Center at
352-489-6933 to register or
for more info.
League scores for the
week ending May 16,2014:
MONDAY SUMMER SPE-
CIAL: Kenneth Folk 278,779;
Wes Foley 265; Brian Carr
707; Bridget Foley 261,726';
Saad Bouve 255; Debbie
Smith 702. Scratch: Wes
Foley 257,675; Mark Smith
247,701; Saad Bouve
204,573; Bridget Foley 199;
Myla Wexler 557.
SUNCOAST SENIORS
12-WEEK: Hugh Hartley
245,724; Ken Meldrum
241,671; Carol Roberts
230,674. Scratch: Ken Mel-
drum 223,617; Jerry Ness
213,585; Carol Roberts
153,443.
SCRATCH CHALLENGE:
Trevor Roberts 257,633; Tim
Lawrence 235,586; Dorine
Fugere 221,565; Sandy LeP-
ree 190,531.
LATE STARTERS: Handi-
cap: Mark Ash 244,690; John
Marcucci 233; Ted Rafanan
635; Bunny Jackson
256,692; Millie George 253;
Mary Skoum 687. Scratch:
Mark Ash 244,690; Ted
Rafanan 225,632; Millie
George 213,544; Bunny
Jackson 203,533.
WOMEN'S SUMMER
TRIO: Handicap: Dorothy
Larson 254; Nancy Vaughan
251; Betty Weber 666; Trina
Paliwoda 654. Scratch: Gerry
Gumett 190,489; Nancy
Vaughan 186; Betty Weber
462.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS:
Handicap: Shorty Williams
268; Ted Apple 261,740;
Chuck Hindbaugh 724; Ellen
Bowman 282; Clara Myers
264,732; Joanne Hans 732;


Registration open


for youth clinics

Special to the Chronicle

Summer Baseball Clinic
Citrus County Parks and Recreation, in partnership
with Lecanto High School head coach David Logue
and coaching staff, will be hosting a summer baseball
clinic. The clinic will focus on the fundamentals of
baseball. The cost of the clinic is $75 per participant
($45 per additional sibling).
The clinic will be held from June 2 to 5 at Central
Ridge District Park (6905 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly
Hills) from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch will be provided.
The camp is open to boys and girls ages 6 to 13.
To register, go to the Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation office at 2804 W Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto.
For more information, visit citruscounty parks.com
or call Citrus County Parks and Recreation at 352-527-
7540.
Summer Tennis Clinics
Citrus County Parks & Recreation, in partnership
with tennis pro Mehdi Tahiri, will be hosting two
Summer Tennis Clinics. The first clinic will be geared
towards beginners and the second clinic will be for
those who have tennis experience.
Instruction will include conditioning, drills, foot-
work, match play, doubles and single strategy
The clinics will be held at Lecanto Park (3505 W
Educational Path, Lecanto.)
Week 1 (beginners) will be held from June 2 to 6.
This clinic is open to boys and girls ages 7 to 12 who
are new to the game of tennis. The clinic will run from
9 to 11 a.m. The cost will be $150 per participant ($40
off for additional siblings).
Week 2 (intermediate/advanced) will run from 9
a.m. to noon June 9-12. This clinic is open to boys and
girls ages 9 to 15 who have tennis experience. The
cost will be $190 per participant ($50 off for additional
siblings).
For more information visit citruscounty parks.com
or contact Citrus County Parks and Recreation at 352-
527-7540.
Summer Youth Golf
Registration for summer golf lessons is now open.
Citrus County Parks & Recreation, in partner-
ship with Pine Ridge Golf Course, will be holding
summer youth golf lessons. The lessons will be
held at Pine Ridge Golf Course on Wednesday
mornings from 9 to 10:30 a.m. or Thursday evenings
5:30 to 7 p.m., beginning on June 11 and 12. Partic-
ipants will meet one day a week for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 14 are eligible and the cost is $80
per child. Instruction will be given by golf pro
Randy Robbins and several of his volunteers. Dur-
ing these lessons participants will learn putting,
driving, chipping, on-course play and on-course
etiquette.
For more information contact Citrus County Parks
& Recreation at 352-527-7543, citruscounty parks.com,
or Randy Robbins at 352-746-6177.


Bowling SCORES


June Williams 711. Scratch:
Rich Williams 258,944;
Chuck Hindbaugh 211,577;
Ellen Bowman 207,480;
June Williams 171,462.
PARKVIEW OWLS:
Handicap: Jeremy Colegrove
269,705; Michael Andriuolo
249; Wes Foley 673; Debbie
Mills 262,633; Toni Mills-
Smith 228,650. Scratch: Wes
Foley 247,673; Jeremy Cole-
grove 247,639; Michael An-
driuolo 235; Debbie Mills
212,483; Toni Mills-Smith
171,479.
BOWLERS OF THE
WEEK: Bridget Foley, 87 pins
over her average, and Ken-
neth Folk, 146 pins over his
average.
Manatee Lanes
Tuesday Men's
Handicap League
Final Team Standings
1. Macrae's; 2. RR&D
Sunoco; 3. Davis Financial
Group; 4. Arrasses Dragon; 5.
Morris County Collision; 6.
Seagrass; 7. Cory & Hurley; 8.
Mona Vie; 9. Iron Horse Parts;
10. Crystal; 11. Collision Tech;
12. Sweetwater; 13. Big Dogs;
14. The Strikers.
Individual High Averages
1. Bob Clark, 222.43; 2.
Mike Buchanan, 221.37; 3.
Bob Wood, 216.74.
Season High Scores
Team Handicap Series
1. RR&D Sunoco, 3829; 2.
Arrasses Dragon, 3748; 3.
Seagrass, 3730.
Team Scratch Series
1. Sweetwater, 3300; 2.
Davis Financial Group, 3207;
3. Cory & Hurley, 3154.
Team Handicap Game
1. Big Dogs, 1348; 2. Crys-
tal, 1333; 3. Collision Tech,
1271.
Team Scratch Game
1. Morris County Collision,
1170; 2. Iron Horse Parts,
1140; 3. Mona Vie, 1069.
Handicap Series
1. Bob Wood, 848; 2. Bob
Christensen, 822; 3. Steve
Ratcliff, 819.
Scratch Series
1. Bob Clark, 777; 2. Rick
Barker, 762; 3. Art Rash, 744.
Handicap Game
1. Dan Curry, 328; 2. Car-
los DaSilva, 327; 3. Peter
Wilk, 319.
Scratch Game
1. TerryAustin, 300; 2.
Mike Buchanan, 300; 3. Dick
Hover, 290.


LOCAL RECREATION


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


At French Open, Williams hunting 18th Grand Slam


Associated Press

PARIS Serena
Williams was wrapping up
her pre-French Open news
conference when someone
seated in the front row
wanted to know whether
she would take one ques-
tion in the local language.
The tournament's defend-
ing champion gave the OK.
The reporter proceeded to
put forth a pair of queries,
and Williams arched her
eyebrows and kiddingly
chastised him in French,
of course for asking two.
She went on to answer
both, earning a thumb's up
from the media member
A year ago, Williams
won over the fickle Roland
Garros crowd by doing on-
court interviews in French
en route to the title, and


the American who has
an apartment in Paris and
is coached by a Frenchman
- is clearly prepared to do
more of the same this time
around. What's just as im-
pressive is her comfort
level playing on the Grand
Slam tournament's slow,
red clay these days.
Heading into her first-
round match Sunday against
138th-ranked Alize Lim, a
wild-card entry from
France who is making her
Grand Slam singles debut,
the No. 1-ranked Williams
is 53-2 (a .964 winning per-
centage) with eight titles
since 2012 on the surface
known around here as
"terre battue." Before that,
Williams was 86-29 (.748)
with three titles on clay for
her career
Williams is not entirely


sure how to explain that
surge, saying she didn't
alter her game.
"I don't know what
clicked or didn't click," she
said. "I have the capability
of playing on clay, so I don't
know why I wasn't more
consistent on clay before."
And then the 32-year-old
Williams broke into a wide
smile before adding: "But,
hey, I guess better late
than never, right?"
Absolutely Indeed, one
way to view her improve-
ment on clay is simply in
the context of a career ren-
aissance that began, not
coincidentally, right after a
surprising exit against
11 th-ranked Virginie Raz-
zano of France at the 2012
French Open, the only first-
round loss for Williams in
54 Grand Slam tournaments.


Associated Press
Defending champions Serena Williams and Rafael Nadal
pose Friday during the draw for the French Open at the
Roland Garros stadium in Paris. The French Open starts
today. At left is the women's trophy; at right, the men's.
It was after that setback tennis academy in France.
that Williams began work- She has since earned four
ing with Patrick singles trophies at the past
Mouratoglou, who runs a seven majors, raising her


Grand Slam total to 17, one
shy of Martina Navratilova
and Chris Evert.
Consider that the other
127 women in the field
when play begins Sunday
own a combined 19 Grand
Slam titles. That includes
seven for Williams' older
sister Venus.
The siblings could meet
in the third round, which
would be their earliest match
at a major since their first
- in the second round of
the 1998 Australian Open.
They have played eight all-
Williams Grand Slam finals
(Serena won six), but have
not met at any stage of a
major tournament since
the 2009 Wimbledon final.
"It never gets easier,"
Serena said. "She's essen-
tially the love of my life, so
it's definitely difficult"


Airbus Classic
par scores
Saturday at Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail,
Magnolia Grove, The Crossings, Mobile, Ala.
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,584, Par: 72
Third round:
Anna Nordqvist 68-66-66- 200 -16
Catriona Matthew 64-67-70-201 -15
Stacy Lewis 66-70-66- 202 -14
MichelleWie 71-66-66- 203 -13
Jessica Korda 67-67-69- 203 -13
Charley Hull 65-67-71 -203 -13
SoYeon Ryu 70-67-67 -204 -12
Jodi EwartShadoff 69-67-68-204 -12
Eun-Hee Ji 66-70-68- 204 -12
Jenny Shin 67-68-69- 204 -12
Paola Moreno 68-71-66 -205 -11
Belen Mozo 70-68-67 -205 -11
Katherine Kirk 70-67-68 -205 -11
Suzann Pettersen 66-70-69 -205 -11
Christina Kim 70-66-70- 206 -10
Haru Nomura 71-65-70- 206 -10
LexiThompson 70-65-71 -206 -10
NaYeon Choi 69-69-69-207 -9
Brittany Lang 68-70-69 207 -9
Brittany Lincicome 69-69-69 207 -9
Se Ri Pak 67-69-71 -207 -9
Hee Young Park 68-66-73-207 -9
Paula Creamer 71-71-66-208 -8
Paz Echeverria 70-71-67-208 -8
Jennifer Johnson 71-69-68-208 -8
Mina Harigae 73-66-69-208 -8
Chella Choi 69-68-71 -208 -8
Julieta Granada 67-70-71 -208 -8
XiYu Lin 69-68-71 -208 -8
Pornanong Phatlum 69-68-71 -208 -8
Ashleigh Simon 72-70-67-209 -7
Karine Icher 71-69-69-209 -7
Jennifer Song 68-70-71 -209 -7
Katie M. Burnett 72-70-68 210 -6
Veronica Felibert 72-70-68-210 -6
Carlota Ciganda 72-69-69-210 -6
Jacqui Concolino 70-71-69-210 -6
Ariya Jutanugarn 70-71-69-210 -6
Hannah Jun Medlock 73-66-71 -210 -6
Dori Carter 70-68-72-210 -6
Moira Dunn 67-70-73-210 -6
Moriya Jutanugarn 73-69-69-211 -5
Meena Lee 72-70-69-211 -5
Perrine Delacour 68-73-70-211 -5
MiHyang Lee 72-69-70-211 -5
Pernilla Lindberg 71-70-70-211 -5
AzaharaMunoz 69-72-70-211 -5
Nicole Castrale 67-73-71 -211 -5
Brooke Pancake 72-68-71 -211 -5
KarrieWebb 71-69-71 -211 -5
Jennifer Kirby 69-68-74- 211 -5
Felicity Johnson 69-67-75- 211 -5
Sydnee Michaels 70-72-70-212 -4
Lindsey Wright 70-72-70-212 -4
KellyTan 71-70-71 -212 -4
ChieArimura 73-67-72-212 -4
Sarah Kemp 72-69-72-213 -3
Jane Rah 70-71-72-213 -3
Giulia Sergas 73-68-72-213 -3
Thidapa Suwannapura 72-69-72-213 -3
Reilley Rankin 71-71-72-214 -2
Jenny Suh 69-72-73-214 -2
Sandra Changkija 70-72-73-215 -1
Katy Harris 72-70-73-215 -1
Lisa McCloskey 74-68-73-215 -1
Becky Morgan 75-67-73-215 -1
llhee Lee 71-69-75-215 -1
Jaye Marie Green 71-71-74 -216 E
Tiffany Joh 71-71-75-217 +1
Jaclyn Sweeney 70-70-77-217 +1


Colonial par scores
Saturday at Colonial Country Club,
Fort Worth, Texas
Purse: $6.4 million
Yardage: 7,204


Associated Press
A statue of golfing great Ben Hogan is silhouetted in the sun Saturday after the third round of the Colonial
in Fort Worth, Texas.



Toms, Matsuyama, Stroud,




Campbell lead at Colonial


Associated Press


FORT WORTH, Texas David Toms, Hideki
Matsuyama, Chad Campbell and Chris Stroud
shared the third-round lead at 7-under 203 on
Saturday at Colonial, where plenty of others also
are in contention.
There were 13 players within two strokes of the
leading quartet.
The closest chasers included Adam Scott, the
No. 1 player in the world, and Jimmy Walker, a
three-time winner this season and No. 1 in the
FedEx Cup standings. Kevin Chappell, whose early
7-under 63 was the low round of the day, moved
from a tie for 60th to within one stroke of the lead.
Matsuyama, the 22-year-old from Japan with
five wins at home, shot a bogey-free 64 Saturday
Toms, who got the last of his 13 PGA Tour victo-
ries at Colonial in 2011, had a 65, local resident
Campbell shot 68, and Stroud had a 69.


Walker was 6 under after a 69, and Scott was
another stroke back after a 66. Walker and Campbell
were playing together, and were tied for the lead at
8 under before both bogeyed the 161-yard 13th hole.
When Walker missed a 9-footer, it was his first
bogey this week at Hogan's Alley and he had
another two holes later when hitting from two
greenside bunkers. Campbell held the lead alone
only for a moment before missing his 4-foot par
chance at No. 13.
Walker saved par on the final hole after his
drive settled near the edge of the water and he
hit with an awkward stance into a greenside
bunker He blasted to 8 feet and made the putt.
Scott, who overtook injured Tiger Woods at No.
1 this week, started the round tied for 36th in the
same group with Matsuyama. Chappell had to
make a 6-foot par putt on his last hole Friday just
to make the cut at 1 over, but quickly made up
ground in his early-morning third round.


Montgomerie leads by I Nordqvist holds off Bjorn's birdies give him
in Benton Harbor Matthew at Airbus chasmic lead in U.K.


BENTON HARBOR, Mich. Colin
Montgomerie took the third-round
lead in the Senior PGA Championship,
making a winding, 30-foot birdie putt
on the final hole for a 3-under 68.
Trying to win his first senior major
after failing to capture one of golfs four
biggest events on the regular tours, the
51-year-old Scot took a 7-under 206
total into the final round.
Bernhard Langer was a stroke
back after a 70. Marco Dawson, Bart
Bryant and Kiyoshi Murota were tied
for third at 5 under.


MOBILE, Ala. -Anna Nordqvist
moved into position for her third vic-
tory of the year, shooting her second
straight 6-under 66 to take the third-
round lead in the Airbus LPGA Classic.
The 26-year-old Swede had a 16-
under 200 total.
Catriona Matthew, the 44-year-old
Scot who led after each of the first two
days, was a stroke back after a 70.
Second-ranked Stacy Lewis was third
after a 66. Michelle Wie, Jessica
Korda and Charley Hull were tied for
fourth at 13 under.


VIRGINIA WATER, England -
Thomas Bjorn birdied seven of his
last eight holes to take a five-stroke
lead after the third round of the
BMW PGA Championship.
The 43-year-old Dane fought back
from a double bogey on the first hole
by making six straight birdies from
the 11th and adding another one at
the last for a 5-under 67 and a 15-
under 201 total at Wentworth.
England's Luke Donald, the 2011
and 2012 winner, was second after
a 68.


VISION
Continued from Page B1l

The human eye really
isn't fast enough to follow a
95 mph fastball from the
pitcher's hand all the way
to the plate.
"I've been around the
game for 40 years, and it's
almost unbelievable that
hitters can actually hit the
opposing pitchers pitches
the way they do," said Dr
Bill Harrison, who works
with numerous major and
minor leaguers on improv-
ing their vision. "It's a phe-
nomenal capability"
But there are plenty of
creative ways to train the
brain to ensure the bat is
in the right place and the
eyes are spotting the right
pitch. Some methods are
learned from watching vet-
erans around the club-
house, others through
word of mouth.
As a young hitter, Giants
outfielder Angel Pagan
used to stare at tennis


balls shot out of a ma-
chine at 120 mph. He
would call out the num-
bers and colors painted
on the tennis balls as they
rocketed past him, an ap-
proach he first heard
about through Mariners
great Edgar Martinez and
eight-time All-Star Carlos
Beltran.
"Working your eyes like
that will send a proper
message to your brain so
you can recognize a pitch a
little bit quicker," Pagan
explained.
When Philadelphia first
base coach Juan Samuel
was in the big leagues, he
and Tony Fernandez used
to pitch kernels of corn to
each other and hit the
seeds with a broomstick.
They also spun beer caps
at each other, just to get
used to the spin.
They went through
plenty of kernels and caps
to hone their batting eye.
"If you get used to hit-
ting these little kernels,
then the baseball is going
to look this big for you,"


Samuel said as he held out
his hands about a foot
apart. "As much as we
train our hands and every-
thing, you've got to train
your eyes."
Harrison has been
teaching vision techniques
since he first worked with
Hall of Famer George
Brett. He believes vision
training is almost a hidden
secret, especially with hit-
ters focusing so much on
the biomechanics of a
swing. He instructs young
hitters like Miami slug-
ger Giancarlo Stanton to
follow the pitch all the way
through to the catcher's
glove.
"Because a hitter needs
to see pitches before they
can hit them. There's a
stored visual memory of
what a pitch looks like,"
Harrison explained.
For instance, a two-
seam fastball leaving a
pitcher's hand will have a
spin pattern that resem-
bles a railroad track and
a slider has a red-spot
appearance.


Associated rress
Dr. Bill Harrison demonstrates a device he uses with
Major League Baseball players to improve their vision
Thursday at the Baseball Performance Academy in San
Juan Capistrano, Calif.


'As they begin to know
what pitches look like,
they then pick it up early
and project what it's going
to do," Harrison said. "It
goes from a visual process
to a brain process. Our
brain really is aware of
things that we're not con-
sciously seeing. It's like a
subconscious vision."
Eye-hand coordination
is a big component, too,


which is why Arenado en-
joys pingpong. So does
Seattle designated hitter
Corey Hart.
Blackmon plays "Call of
Duty" with teammate D.J.
LeMahieu.
"Improves reaction
time, making us better hit-
ters," said Blackmon,
who's tied for fifth in the
NL with a .329 average.
"No game is ever the same


and you make in-game ad-
justments, just like in
baseball."
Burks is a legend
around the Rockies club-
house, with Drew Stubbs
and Michael Cuddyer talk-
ing reverently about him
honing his skills by staring
at a flickering flame for
five minutes in the dark.
Burks said the routine -
learned from a yoga in-
structor bolstered his
concentration.
"After staring at a can-
dle, you can really lock
onto a target," said Burks,
who spent 18 years in the
big leagues.
This helps, too: confidence.
"It's weird, because
when you're feeling good
at the plate and seeing
the ball well, you recog-
nize those pitches right
away," Stubbs said. "But
when you're scuffling, you
don't seem to see the spin
at all.
"The more confidence
you have, the more you
can slow the ball down,
track it and recognize it."


Hideki Matsuyama
David Toms
Chad Campbell
Chris Stroud
Kevin Chappell
Chris Kirk
Marc Leishman
Brian Harman
Tim Clark
Jimmy Walker
Adam Scott
John Senden
Brendan Todd
Freddie Jacobson
Jason Dufner
Brian Davis
Bo Van Pelt
William McGirt
Robert Allenby
Ryan Palmer
Nicholas Thompson
Tim Wilkinson
Jordan Spieth
Aaron Baddeley
Russell Knox
David Lingmerth
Cameron Tringale
Louis Oosthuizen
Bryce Molder
Graham DeLaet
Ben Martin
Bill Haas
Charley Hoffman
Heath Slocum
Hunter Mahan
Brice Garnett
George McNeill
J.J. Henry
Trevor Immelman
Andrew Loupe
Danny Lee
Martin Laird
Bud Cauley
Ken Duke
Michael Thompson
Sean O'Hair
Billy Hurley III
Brendon de Jonge
Robert Streb
Michael Putnam
Josh Teater
Jim Furyk
Brandt Snedeker
Harris English
Dustin Johnson
Jerry Kelly
Zach Johnson
John Rollins
Steve Flesch
Vijay Singh
Matt Jones
David Hearn
Justin Leonard
Jeff Overton
Jeff Curl
Tim Herron
Brian Gay
Ricky Barnes
Briny Baird
Jonathan Byrd
Daniel Summerhays
Kyle Stanley
BooWeekley
Davis Love III
Scott Langley


Par: 70
69-70-64
72-66-65
69-66-68
70-64-69
68-73-63
73-64-67
69-68-67
69-67-68
67-68-69
67-68-69
71-68-66
71-68-66
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67-71-67
67-69-69
68-67-70
67-68-70
72-67-67
68-70-68
69-69-68
69-68-69
66-71-69
67-69-70
68-67-71
71-70-66
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70-68-69
69-69-69
66-71-70
67-66-74
68-72-68
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75-65-68
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68-71-73
71-70-72
70-70-73
69-71-73
73-68-73
71-69-74
72-69-74
71-70-74


B6 SUNDAY, MAY 2 5, 2014


SPORTS









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Y effort takes a big step toward reaching its goal


YMCA takes a big step to-
ward goal
There is a YMCA in the
future of Citrus County
For the past few years, I
have been working closely
with a group of dedicated
volunteers who are trying to
make a YMCA happen in
our community
This was an eventful
week in that effort, as more
than $3.3 million was
pledged from various peo-


ple and businesses in our
community
It is going to take $8 mil-
lion in capital campaign
dollars to build the Y, and
with this week's successes
we are hovering at the
$7 million level of cash,
pledges and in-kind contri-
butions.
During the past few years
Jewel Lamb of Crystal
Motor Car Company and I
have headed up the capital


campaign committee for the
Y Joanna Castle, the execu-
tive director of the Citrus
County Y effort, has been
with us every step of the
way
On Monday evening the
Foundation board of Citrus
Memorial hospital in Inver-
ness supported its philan-
thropy board's
recommendation that
$3 million be contributed to
the Y effort.


The CMH philanthropy
and Foundation boards
have been raising money
for a number of years to
build a wellness center in
the Lecanto area. When the
decision was made to lease
or sell CMH to a private
company, the wellness
center's future came into
question.
It made total sense at that
time for the Foundation
board to combine its effort


with the Y to build a facility
in Lecanto. Stan Olsen, the
original developer of Black
Diamond, has donated 18
acres of prime property on
County Road 486 to build
the facility The county
school system has pur-
chased the property right
next door and will eventu-
ally build a new elementary
school on that site.


On new





grounds,





old rivals





lining up


DARA KAM AND BRANDON LARRABEE
The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE
In what might be a do-over of one of the fiercest Senate races in recent
history, former Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoffis mulling a possible run against
Delray Beach Democrat Maria Sachs, who bested Bogdanoff in an
incumbent-vs.-incumbent grudge match two years ago.
Sachs defeated Bogdanoff, a Fort Lauderdale Republican, by almost
6 percentage points in the newly drawn Senate District 34 in 2012.
Democrats now hold an 8-point voter registration edge over Republicans in
the district, which includes parts of Palm Beach and Broward counties.
Bogdanoffs team is analyzing the data to see if the seat is winnable
in a midterm election, when Democratic turnout historically drops off.


Qualifying is the week of June 16.


"We're doing our research, trying to un-
derstand the dynamics of that district and the
dynamics of the political environment. It's
changing significantly over the last several
weeks," said Bogdanoff, who represented
Senate District 25 for two years until the seat
was reconfigured due to the once-a-decade
redistricting process.
"I have told everybody that if it's truly a
winnable district, I would like the opportu-
nity to come back and finish a lot of work that
I didn't get to finish. That's what we're trying
to figure out right now Obviously time is run-
ning short," she said this week.
The Bogdanoff-Sachs battle was one of
2012's most expensive and vicious legislative
races. If Bogdanoff decides to enter the fray
again, she expects more of the same.
"This will be a brutal race. It will be a bru-
tal race. No question," she said.

LEGISLATIVE COLD WAR
Plenty of ink and a few tears have been
spilled over the dysfunctional end of the 2011


legislative session and how it affected the
Legislature in 2012. But testimony in a redis-
tricting trial in Tallahassee this week re-
vealed more about just how bad things had
gotten between then-House Speaker Dean
Cannon, R-Winter Park, and then-Senate
President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island.
Kirk Pepper a high-ranking aide to Can-
non- gave perhaps the bluntest assessment
of relations between the two sides leading up
to the 2012 session, after the 2011 meeting
crash-landed.
"There was a level of distrust between the
two presiding officers' offices to where there
was essentially zero communication," Pep-
per said.
Pepper said the relationship between the
two chambers had "globally soured," to the
point where political consultants served as a
kind of intelligence service. Cannon would
ask Marc Reichelderfer to find out what was
going on in the Senate. In turn, Reichelderfer
would talk to Rich Heffley, a consultant with
close ties to senators.


Current Senate President Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville, said the cold war between the
chambers was one reason that he and House
Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel,
tried to develop a closer relationship.
"We were sensitive to the fact that our
predecessors as presiding officers had had a
breakdown in their communications, and I
believe they would agree and most people
would agree that the legislative process suf-
fered as a result," Gaetz said.

WILL HE OR WON'T HE?
An upcoming gathering of newsies in
Miami has provided yet another opportunity
for Gov Rick Scott and challenger Charlie
Crist to engage in some gubernatorial snip-
ing in what has become an almost daily "I'm
rubber, you're glue" routine.
The Florida Society of Newspaper Editors
and the Florida Press Association invited
Scott and Crist to speak at the "Gubernator-
ial Candidate Forum" during the Thursday
opening session of a two-day meeting on
July 10 and 11.
Democratic candidate Nan Rich, a former
Senate minority leader, apparently received
short shrift She and "other candidates" were
invited to a Friday morning forum.
The ever-media-friendly Crist readily ac-
cepted the chance to get up close and per-
sonal with Scott.
"We look forward to seeing Gov. Scott in
July," Crist spokesman Kevin Cate said in a
news release Wednesday
But Scott didn't seem as willing to share
the stage with Crist.
"The governor will debate the Democratic
nominee in the fall. Charlie Crist should stop
playing games and stop hiding from Nan
Rich. What is he scared of?" Scott's campaign
manager Melissa Sellers said in an email.
Scott's campaign wouldn't directly answer
questions about whether Scott would attend
the event or not, but apparently didn't give
Florida Press Association CEO Dean Ridings
a flat-out "no."


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3


&Ato*',





0Page C2- SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
SGerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

ADMINISTRATOR'S RETIREMENT





Brad Thorpe




has served




county well


county Administrator
Brad Thorpe has per-
severed through an un-
enviable myriad of
challenges during his five
years in office.
In announcing
that he will retire THE I,
on Sept. 26, COL
Thorpe did so admini
with grace, to re
Despite all the
static from critics OUR OF
both in the public
and on the com- Ser
mission, Thorpe apprecia
has navigated to rebuil
county govern- goverr
ment through tu-
multuous times, executing
the direction of an often-at-
odds commission.
Providing four months' no-
tice will enable Thorpe, as
well as retiring Budget Direc-
tor Cathy Taylor, to present
the commission with a budget
for the upcoming fiscal year
- a major undertaking.
Compounding the depar-
ture of Thorpe and Taylor is
the exit by Assistant County
Administrator Cathy Pearson,
who is taking a similar job in
Pasco County
In giving notice of his re-
tirement, Thorpe was compli-
mentary toward the county
commission. What he didn't
say- and what seems appar-
ent to many is that elec-
tions are looming large and
the makeup of the commis-
sion is uncertain.
As Thorpe critic Commis-
sioner Scott Adams said, "I
don't wish nothing bad on any-
body, but it's time for the right
change for Citrus County's
sake, because if we don't
change, this little county's in a
bunch of trouble."
There are government gad-
flies who share Commis-
sioner Adams' opinions and
help to create a work envi-
ronment filled with distrac-
tions and innuendo, which do
little more than waste time
and energy. If those walking
the extreme edge of criticism
toward county government
are successful in electing a
commission majority respon-
sive to their sentiments, the
public can anticipate a new
cadre of gadflies, demanding
answers for how the prob-
lems of the day or month or
year will be rectified.
In reality, running county
government seldom involves
wholesale victories or de-
feats; it's executing the
wishes of the commission to
the best of one's ability. To
Thorpe supporters and mod-
erates who track county


OUND563-0579



563057


S
i.s

P



at
C
q
1c
ni


government, it's probable that
history will prove Thorpe to
have been among the most
stable, well-informed and
committed administrators
in the county's
history.
SUE: As noted in his
nty retirement an-
strator nouncement,
.tire. Thorpe's been at
the helm through
'INION: the staggering tax
and legal dispute
vice with Duke En-
:ed; time ergy, with those
d county waters now
ment. largely calmed.
While the fire
services fee is not popular,
Thorpe with a majority of
commissioners acknowl-
edged the budgetary realities
and saw to it that new rev-
enues became available for
public safety.
His work to bring consider-
ation of the medical corridor
on County Road 491 agree
with the proposed project or
not shows his effort to pro-
mote long-term opportunities
for economic growth.
Budgets and projects aside,
a very telling attribute of
Thorpe's character is his de-
fense of his staff, his cowork-
ers. He's been their advocate
and defender Once he's gone,
there's a fear that certain
commissioners will inappro-
priately meddle in the day-to-
day operations of workers.
Recent departures of high-
level county managers, plus
the impending departures,
will result in the eradication
of an abundance of institu-
tional knowledge.
Add to that, there are exist-
ing higher-ups in county gov-
ernment who are nearing
retirement and will have the
ability to exit quickly if their
work environment becomes
disruptive or hostile.
As Commissioner Rebecca
Bays said, "It's my under-
standing that several of our
senior staff members will
have the eligibility to retire
over the next one to three
years. We're going to have a
big void in the historical
knowledge within the county"
"A big void" sums it up
pretty well.
Brad Thorpe has had to
make difficult decisions on
difficult issues in difficult
times while carrying out the
wishes of the commission. He
has served Citrus County well
and can leave office holding
his head high while others
scramble to rebuild the solid
infrastructure he strived to
maintain.


Time for gas update
Hey, here's your gas update, Saturday, May 10,
and you're not going to believe this, but the gas sta-
tion reduced their price again one penny. So they
did it one penny. You know, I just figured you'd like
to know that. That means it's getting time for the
big one, probably on Monday. And when that hap-
pens, I'll call and make sure you know that. But, you
know, I just wanted to let you know that right now
they have a one-penny decrease.


"The test of a government is not how popular
it is with the powerful andprivilegedfew
but how honestly and fairly it deals with
the many who must depend on it."
President Jimmy Carter, Jan. 12, 1971


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dismantle Veterans Affairs department


n 1930, state and federal
services for injured veter-
ans dating from as far back
as the Revolutionary War were
joined together
under the federal
Department of Veter-
ans Affairs. After
World War II, educa-
tional benefits were
added to health and
disability benefits.
Later, eligibility for
benefits was broad-
ened to include al-
most anyone who Dr. Willi
served on active duty, GUI
and some civilian
contractors, as well. COL
Always offering free
health care to veterans with
service-connected disabilities,
the VA expanded its facilities to
offer discounted health care to
all veterans. Today, at 280,000
employees, the VA has become
the second-largest government
bureau with a budget of about
$160 billion.
The VA health system, man-
aged and financed by our gov-
ernment, has well-documented
quality and service issues at
many of its facilities. Long waits
for appointments, burdensome
forms to complete and slow re-
sponse times are the norm.
Shielded by congress and veter-
ans organizations from con-
structive change, the VA has
paid out over $200 million to
settle one thousand wrongful
death allegations. A private,
non-governmental health sys-
tem, doing what the VA has,
would have been bankrupted
by lawsuits. High-ranking offi-
cers would be serving jail
sentences.
The problems of the VA sys-
tem are the inherent flaws of all
large government bureaucra-
cies. (1) The number of employ-
ees is too large to permit


a
E
Il


effective management. (2) Nei-
ther pay nor promotion is
closely dependent upon pro-
ductivity or service quality (3)
Most federal employ-
ees are unionized
and can rarely be
disciplined or fired
for poor job perform-
ance.
What causes some
of the delays veter-
ans face in obtaining
service is that
salaried physicians
m Dixon across the board see
EST fewer patients than
fee-for-service physi-
JMN cians, even in a pri-
vate setting. For
example, a psychiatrist from
the St. Louis VA hospital re-
cently filed a whistleblower
lawsuit complaining that he
was demoted as chief after he
attempted to get staff psychia-
trists to see more than six pa-
tients per day half the
number seen by a private prac-
tice psychiatrist. He noted that
while actual productivity in the
St. Louis hospital was low, pa-
perwork made the hospital ap-
pear to be better than average
in output.
The latest scandal, 40 veter-
ans dying while waiting for
medical care, and the almost-
daily new scandals may strike a
fatal blow to this beast. Con-
gressmen from both parties are
now asking the administration
to make changes, fire those re-
sponsible for the failures, pros-
ecute those who falsified
records. They are wasting their
efforts: The VA system is too
large to be effectively managed.
Department of Veterans Af-
fairs ought to be dismantled
completely; the hospitals, nurs-
ing homes, clinics and adminis-
tration buildings sold to private
bidders. Entitlements to health


care must be reserved for vet-
erans with service-connected
disabilities only, as it originally
was. Vouchers should be issued
to these veterans to pay for cov-
ered health services at private
institutions where they can get
immediate, first-class care
without waiting in long lines.
Leaders of the American Le-
gion and other veterans organi-
zations will not agree with my
suggestions. They work hand-
in-glove with the Department of
Veterans Affairs to keep the en-
titlement funding coming. Vet-
erans who game the system
with trumped-up claims of
service-connected disability (I
have met some of you) and
many who enjoy the discounts
the VA provides will continue to
support the VA as it is. But deep
within their hearts, at least
some of them must know that
they are supporting a bureau-
cracy that provides second-rate
care to many veterans at an un-
sustainable cost to the nation.
If they are patriots as they
claim, if they really care about
those injured while fighting our
wars, if they are aware that our
nation is going broke on the
back of these and other entitle-
ments, they must support re-
structuring veterans benefits.

William Dixon is a graduate of
Columbia University, New
York Medical College and the
USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in
the Army as a surgeon and as
a Special Forces officer,
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. He was an
assistant professor of surgery
at the University of Georgia
before entering private
practice. Dr Dixon can be
reached at
Wdixon16@yahoo. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


May is hearing,
speech month
May is better speech and
hearing month and Citrus
Hearing Impaired Program
Services provides assistance to
those who cannot afford hear-
ing devices or aids on their
own. Through donations and
United Way of Citrus County,
we were able to provide over
50 individuals last year with
devices to aid their hearing.
Many individuals do not real-
ize they have hearing loss and
eventually start missing out on
conversations.
We would like to thank An-
gela Schenk of Gardner Audi-
ology who donated her time
last month to perform free
hearing screenings. We also
would like to thank the Chroni-
cle for helping get the word out
about the screenings and for
the wonderful support it gives
the community
Citrus Hearing Impaired
Program Services
Crystal River

Private roads in
deplorable shape
I live in what's called "The
Green Acres Area."
We out here have always
thought that commissioners and
newspapers were on the side of
everyone. But after sending in
letters and calling the county,


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.


we get shifted off to no one that
even attempts to help. All we
get is, "That is a private road."
Maybe so but it was written 50
years ago. Change the rules and
regulations and step into the
21st century
I have said and begged to
have your staff and at least one
commissioner to come look at
this deplorable situation. All of
us say the same thing: If a com-
missioner or newspaper boss
lived here, the roads would get
fixed in a hurry!
A half-block from my house,
if an ambulance or fire engine
had to come out here and was
delayed, can you say lawsuit?
This situation is past stupidity
It's time to change the rules
and regulations.
Please! No more, "contact so
and so," etc. All we get there is
rules and laws that are 50
years out of date, over and over
and over and over and over
and over!
William R. Ames
Homosassa


Take Stock in
Children thanks you
I would like to express our
sincere appreciation to indi-
viduals from our community
who supported our first Take
Stock in Children's College
Readiness "Career Fair" and
made it such a wonderful
learning experience for our
students.
We could not have done it
without the support of these
members of our incredible
community: Alpha
McGaughey, TD Bank;
Tiana Festa, massage thera-
pist; Jeanette Haag, lawyer;
Aldo Verderame, culinary arts
teacher, Citrus High School;
Ashley Jefferson, elementary
school teacher; Margie
Leturno, R.N.; Sandy
Vandervort, Withlacoochee
Technical Institute; Becca
York-Alcorn, College of Cen-
tral Florida; Phyllis Dixon,
Duke Energy; Nora Cloud,
R.Ph., pharmacist; Loretta
Rogers, author; and Ronnie
Allen, Crystal Burts and Liz
Laughlin, Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office.
Thank you for helping our
students get a glimpse into
what the future may hold for
them!

Pat Lancaster
program coordinator
Take Stock in Children


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I am who I am today because I've heard you


I know this column will
appear a few weeks
after the event, so
please forgive me for back-
tracking, but there is
something regarding the
most recently passed
Mother's Day that remains
in my mind and on my
heart and I want to share.
As always, on Mother's
Day weekend, I tried to
make my Cheryl know just
how much I appreciate
her being the mother of
our children, not only the
physical act of giving them
birth, but the way she nur-
tured them to adulthood and
her helping them become
the individuals they are.


I also observed as our
children paid tribute to
their mother Cards, gifts,
and in today's modern
world, messages on Face-
book, were the order of the
day All of them were quite
eloquent
I consistently limit the
number of words I use
each week in this space
and will not try to quote
every accolade, but there
is one message not
from one of our daugh-
ters, but from our son a
message from his heart to
hers:
"I've heard you.
"I've heard you tell me
to be careful and I've


heard you support me loving. I've heard you
when I wasn't. I've heard called generous to a fault
you scold me when I've and I've heard you dismiss
scared you and that as if there
I've heard the i could not ever
relief in your r be such a thing
voice when I as 'too kind,
you've known Fe loving, or
that I'm safe. generous.'
"I've heard "I've heard
you sing the you stop and
wrong lyrics to talk to
songs that I strangers be-
shouldn't know Fred Brannen cause you
better than LE could tell they
you and I've A SLICE needed some-
heard you har- OF LIFE one. I've heard
monize when I you offer
sing them correctly money, lodging, counsel,
"I've heard you called and friendship to anyone
kind. I've heard you called who set aside their pride


and asked and I've heard
you offer it to those who
didn't
"I've heard you keep
your temper
"I've heard you lose your
temper
"I've heard you ask for
forgiveness.
"I've heard you talk to
pets, plants, electronics,
and appliances just like
they understood you.
"I've heard you laugh.
I've heard you cry I've
heard you do both at the
same time.
"I've heard you love, un-
failingly, and uncondition-
ally
"I am who I am today be-


cause I've heard you."
And I know Fred 3 is a
better man than I will
ever be because of the
part of his innermost
being that is like his
mother and because he
has heard her


FredBrannen, an
Inverness resident,
has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and
is the author of the
recently published novel,
'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay." Fred
maybe contacted at
tbrannenjr@gmail.com or
via brannenbooksllc. com.


A drain on the aquifer
I'm just responding to the Sound Off on
May 5 in the Chronicle. It's entitled, "Don't
drain the aquifer." Listen, this guy makes
some sense. I've been on the river now for 32
years making my career, my living, on the
water. I've watched the Crystal River, Rainbow
River, Silver River. I'm on the Chassahowitzka
most of the time now. Now we've been off
septics for over 10 years. Sugarmill Woods
has been around a longtime, so has U.S. 19.
So all the other reasons we're looking at for
these problems with this Lyngbya, and it's got
to be draining the aquifer. It's got to be.
Slow down and save a critter
This Sound Off goes out to the young mo-
torcyclist that at 8 p.m. Monday night (May 5)
tried to break the sound barrier out here by
Bright House Cable on Lecanto Highway. I
just need to let you know that there are wild
animals that cross this street and we have
deer, possum, you know, and coyotes, and
every now and then an occasional cow, and
I'd really hate to see you
O NJND hit one going that fast be-
A OU D cause, after all, I don't
want to see an animal get
hurt.
S Make litterbugs pay
My husband and I just
Recently returned from At-
CAL^ lanta and I wanted the
SL Sound Off to know what
563-0579 we found. We found no lit-
ter. Everywhere it's posted
"$1,000 fines for littering,"
and the police up there strictly enforce it. So
Citrus County should do the same thing.
Change the littering fine from $500 to $1,000
and start giving out tickets.
If it's Microsoft, don't answer
I am glad the Chronicle printed on the front
page (May 6) the story about the computer
virus and I'm sorry for that man who had all
that trouble. But I have been receiving a phone
call by a man who said he was from Microsoft
and (he said), "You have a virus in your computer
I need to fix it." Well, naturally, I just hung up.
Before that I told him that my computer is dead
and hung up on him. But this man is persistent
and I found out he also called a good friend of
mine in California who has no computer. And
we're all asking, how did he get our phone
numbers? Anyway, I was so upset I called Mi-
crosoft and I talked to them. They said that
they had spent millions of dollars trying to
block these guys. They said, "Just don't listen
to them, we do not call you personally." Well,
that I could tell. But they recommended the
same things that were issued in the Chroni-
cle; to be careful who you give your email to
and don't download any unknown emails. Just
don't download it. Start blocking sites. I wish
everybody else good luck and I hope you don't
have the problems I've had with the computer.
EMTs respectful, compassionate
A short time ago, the rescue squad was
called to Forest View Estates. Our neighbor
had heart problems and he did not make it.
This, of course, was a very bad situation for
both his family and those of us who knew
him. Both the family and those of us at the
scene couldn't help but take note of the effi-
ciency and, at the same time, compassion by
the EMTs and all of the young men who re-
sponded to the call. They did an excellent job
and also were so caring to those who were
completely affected by the death of this man.
Give cards to Key
This is to the person who, in this morning's
paper (May 6), wanted to know where to take
the cards that they received from the dona-
tion organizations they have been giving to: I
take mine to the Key Training Center and they
put them for sale for a few cents. It's for a
good cause.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

Bob Collins, the chair of the
CMH Foundation philanthropy
board, deserves much of the
credit for making the combined
effort happen. His board mem-
bers Susan Gills, Gene Davis,
Clark Stillwell and Gerry Jones
helped work out the details.
Chris Pool, the director of
marketing and philanthropy at
the hospital, along with folks
like Ms. Gill and Ellen Zane, are
the ones who have raised the
contributions through the an-
nual ball, golf tournaments and
other events over the years.
The result of this combined ef-
fort is that we will break ground
soon for Citrus County's very
own YMCA.
A portion of the Y complex


Originally published in the
Citrus County Chronicle. In-
formation for Back in Time is
supplied by the Citrus County
Historical Society.
In 1954...
Charles F Hagerty, 22,
son of Mrs. Elizabeth
Hagerty, having success-
fully completed the initial
phase of his aviation cadet
training program, has been
graduated from the USAF
Pre-Flight School, Lack-
land Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas. He is now
ready for preliminary
training in actual flying.
His mother lives in Crystal
River

Five prisoners of the
State Road Depart-
ment convict camp at Flo-
ral City who risked their
lives in a break for freedom
Saturday were soon recap-
tured. Two were wounded
by shotgun slugs. One man
was recaptured immedi-
ately and the others were
caught two hours later in a
swamp a mile and a half
from camp. The men were
in the exercise yard when
they made their break at
11:20 a.m. A guard standing
about 25 yards from the
gate fired on them with his
shotgun.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus has long been big in Citrus County. Here some growers proudly show their products,
back before the turn of the century.


The Hernando school
and the Crystal River
school were both broken
into during the week-end.
At Hernando the front door
lock was evidently picked
with a knife, the lunch
room door was jimmied
and the lock broken off of
the freezer Deputy Sheriff
Bob Edson, who investi-
gated the burglary, said the


A loyal friend who
makes no demands
Lillie is 75 pounds of muscle on
four legs. Her haunting grey eyes
match the silver of her silky coat, but
she doesn't realize her beauty be-
cause she's a dog.
Still a pup at 17 months, she has
learned a lot and taught me even
more. Her strength is awesome, her
energy is amazing, and her dedica-
tion is certain as she drags my yard
wagon around behind her She is a
companion, protector, and best
friend, new to my cat, who is also Lil-
lie's best friend.
Life may've been different for this
canine had I not felt pity and concern
each time I passed the yard where
she was tied to a tree. In the rain,
heat of the day, and cool of the night
with tangled chain and empty water
dish, the puppy forlornly sat, hoping
someone would pay attention.
Weeks passed and the little dog
waited. One wet, muddy day, I en-
tered the open side-yard to untangle
her legs. She joyfully jumped on me,
fell to the ground to show her belly,
and take my heart. A few days later,
she became Lillie Bluebelle and left
her neglectful, lonely days behind.
It takes a lot of patience to train a
breed of dog known to be stubborn.
Since she became part of my family,
she has proven several things to me.
At the top of the list is that it's defi-
nitely possible to stretch a human
arm several inches when it's at-
tached to a hyperactive pit bull!
Shelters are crowded with this mis-
understood breed, those closely related,
or mixed. Only those who realize the


will now include a very large
community health living center
where all sorts of health events,
lectures and programs can be of-
fered to the residents of our
county The center will be open
to all physicians and health pro-
fessionals who want to offer free
educational programs.
And the great thing about the
Y is that it already has the cur-
riculum for all sorts of health
programming that deal with dia-
betes, CPR training, Livestrong
Cancer Survivor groups, First
Aid training and dozens of other
specialties.
It was more than 25 years ago
when another group came to-
gether to try and make a Y in
Citrus County The state's econ-
omy went south and the effort
failed.
Now we are close to reaching
the goal of making the Y happen.
When done, this $8 million capi-


freezer and refrigerator
had been disconnected and
had not defrosted.

ow bids on two highway
construction projects in
Citrus County were submit-
ted this week to the State
Road Department by the
Georgia-Alabama Paving Co.,
Columbus, Ga. This is the
same firm that is now resur-


Letters to THE EDITOR

importance of constant training and
control; those who will give their
time to earn the rewards of owner-
ship of a truly magnificent canine,
should accept the responsibilities of
pit bull terrier adoption.
Lillie loves the cats and allows the
Chihuahuas to use her as their personal
couch. No matter her gentleness, I never
leave her alone unless she is restrained
or in her kennel. Common sense is
not an option, the same as spaying
her was a choice sensibly made since
animals don't know the difference.
Besides avoiding various health com-
plications later in life, neutering tends
to mellow the wandering, breeding
stud and spaying will help reduce the
population of unwanted dogs and cats.
I'm glad I have Lillie and believe she's
glad she has me. When she sneaks in
a big slurpy kiss on my hand and rests
her head on my lap, I know she's for-
gotten her bad beginning. What could
be better than a loyal friend who makes
no demands, never criticizes, listens
when I talk, and doesn't care that my
left arm is a little longer than the right?!
Joanie Welch
Inverness

Religious freedom essential
This letter relates to four previous
letters on the subject of humanism
written by L. M. Eastman, Mike Sulli-
van, Ken Everts, and Joanie Welch.
My first reaction was that of gratitude
that we live in a country of religious
freedom where all may participate in
the religion of their choice or no reli-
gion at all. A reading of history re-
minds us that there were civilizations
including those under Christian con-


If you would like to make a contribution to the YMCA you can do
so by sending it to Gerry Mulligan, YMCA, c/o the Chronicle,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. If you want
additional information about helping the campaign, you can
reach me at gmulligan@chronicleonline.com or by calling 563-
3222.
The Citrus County YMCA board consists of Mike Bays, Dr. Joseph
Bennett; Mike Busier, Joe Cappuccilli, Paul Cash, the Rev. Craig
Davies; Chuck Dixon, Larry Gamble, William Grant, Rishi Gur-
nani, Jay Joines, Jewel Lamb, Dr. Vernon Lawter, Ron Lieberman,
Doug Lobel, Joe Marteski, Joe Meek, Gerry Mulligan, the late Ren
Renfro, Bonnie Rybak, Robert Savard, Rick Snell, Don Taylor,
Mike Tringali and David White. Additional capital campaign vol-
unteers include Carol Kimbrough, Linda Van Allen, Clark Stillwell,
Avis Craig and Matt Brannen.


tal campaign will be the largest
nonprofit effort ever completed
in this county
In truth, we have a YMCA in
Citrus County already Thou-
sands of children and adults al-
ready participate in Y programs
at schools, churches, medical fa-
cilities and community centers


throughout the county. Just a few
weeks ago the Y entered into a
contract to provide the before-
and after-school program for all
of the county's elementary
schools.
Summer camp begins this
coming week, and the atten-
dance at the Y camps has dou-


facing U.S. Route 41 along its
entire length in Citrus County
The new projects on which
the firm is low bidder are:
Surfacing about six miles of
State Road 200 from Hemando
to the Marion County line and
surfacing about six miles of
the Wildwood Road (SR 44)
from Inverness to the Sumter
County line. The apparently
successful bid was $99,683.


trol that killed people who did not
profess their version of Christianity.
The American Humanist Association
describes humanism as "a rational
philosophy informed by science, in-
spired by art, and motivated by com-
passion. Affirming the dignity of each
human being, it supports liberty and
opportunity consonant with social
and planetary responsibility Free of
theism and other supernatural beliefs,
humanism thus derives the goals of
life from human need and interest
rather than from theological or ideo-
logical abstractions, and asserts that
humanity must take responsibility for
its own destiny" In 1933 the Humanist
Manifesto was written. It describes
humanism as a religious movement
meant to transcend and replace pre-
vious, deity-based religions, and out-
lines a worldwide society based on
voluntary mutual cooperation.
There are many churches that have
survived into the 21st century that are
dedicated to achieving the ethical goals
of religion without beliefs and rites
resting upon the supernatural. In other
words, a person can be good without
God. Instead of being concerned about
life after death in heaven or hell, a focus
can be made on making this world a
better place to live, not just for all human
beings, but for all living things. A con-
gregation can be dedicated to doing this
through its services, through the inter-
action of its members with each other,
through good works in the community,
and by contributing to good works around
the world. Again, it is good that there
is freedom of religion in our country
The Rev. Mary Louise DeWolf
Crystal River


bled compared to just last year
The complete impact of the Y
won't be realized until the actual
campus is constructed.
We are not yet done with the
capital campaign, and still need
community support to pull to-
gether the final contributions
necessary to make this happen.
People who grew up in Citrus
County don't really know the
powerful impact a Y can make.
Residents who have moved
here from other locations do
understand everyplace I go,
people stop me and tell their Y
story
We need to make sure that the
next generation of Citrus County
residents will have their own Y
stories to tell.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Can anybody tell me how to get
the schedule for the Crystal River
Little League or Citrus Little
League? I love to watch. I used to
coach.
Editor's note: The Crystal River Lit-
tle League schedule can be found
eteamz.com/crystalriverlittleleague
and the Inverness Little League at
eteamz.com/inverness
I'll water when it rains
Another company in Citrus
County gets a permit to draw
463,800 gallons of water per day,
seven days a week, and tells us resi-
dents to conserve water. Baloney. I'll
water when I feel like it.
Loss to gun owners
The headline on Tuesday's May 6
paper was a major loss, not a win,
for gun owners. Read your own fine
print. The third paragraph which
says, "The biggest loss was legisla-
tion to extend carry and conceal
privileges during a declared state of
emergency," was killed by the sher-
iffs, who want a police state. And re-
member the debacle in New
Orleans when the police took the
guns away from citizens? There was
a crime wave that couldn't be
stopped.
Team up for water plant
This is Wednesday (May 7) and I
see in the paper the USG is com-
ing to town to build a drywall plant
and I think that's fantastic, both
for the job numbers and the local
economy. My only concern is,
we're now talking a little more
drain on our precious water sup-
ply. My thought is, since they're
tied in with Duke, or very close to,
could Duke and USG commonly to-
gether on their property build a
water recycling plant or facility
that would take the discharge from
both companies and recycle it and
use it again? And in doing that, I
think it would help save some of
our precious water that we have in
our overworked aquifers right now.
Anyway, just something to think
about. But if they could do that, it
would certainly relieve the pres-
sures and I think it would be good
for all.
Lots of junk
I'm thinking of canceling my tele-
vision cable. Out of all the hundreds
of shows available looking through
the TV guide, there's only two or
three that are worth watching. I'm
doing a lot more reading lately than
we had done before, but it's much
more pleasurable than hunting up,
trying to find something worth
watching on TV.


1(I16


I want to say thanks to the fellows
that picked me up when I fell in the
doctor's waiting room. You're my
guardian angels. God loves you; so
do I. My name is Isabelle Glowacki.
Thank you.
Buses speeding by
I'd like to know if the Citrus
County school buses have a differ-
ent speed limit when going on the
roads. Everywhere you go, they're
over the speed limit by 20 mph or
more. They speed down my road
where I live in Citrus Hills and on
(County Road) 486 they do way over
45 for driving. So I'd like to know if
they have a different speed limit for
school buses. I've never seen one
stopped and they speed all over.
Holocaust history
I'm calling in response to (a
story) I read about a school in Cali-
fornia where the children were
asked to write an essay about
whether the Holo-
OOUND caust really hap-
Spened or was it a
story. Both my
parents survived
R the war. My fa-
ther was an
Auschwitz sur-
vivor and
CAL watched his
56 059 whole family ex-
563-07 cept one sister go
into the gas
chambers before they took his eyes.
It is very important these children
and adults learn about what hap-
pens so history never repeats itself,
God forbid.
Happy to be smoke-free
Thankfully I grew up in a family
where my parents did not smoke,
even though much of my working
years were spent in places where ir-
ritating unhealthy smoking was per-
mitted. I am glad more and more
places do not allow it anymore.
Chickens carry diseases
This is for the lady that called the
Sound Off wanting to have chickens
in the city limits. I don't know what
the code says, but I know when peo-
ple live close, like in a city, the mos-
quitoes bite birds and chickens and
they carry encephalitis to humans.
That may be one of the reasons and
should be one of the reasons. Farm
animals such as chickens, dogs,
cats, horses, sheep, goats, pigs, you
name it, should be on a farm. Peo-
ple who live with animals, they al-
ways have the sniffles, colds.
They're sick all the time. You can
pick out people that live with ani-
mals in their house.


Juine
10.
.00 AM 1!1R

2:00 B~pm


JA D R Join us to celebrate

Extension's 100th anniversary!
Citrus County Canning Center
3405 W Southern Street Lecanto
The first 50 will receive a free goodie bag!
Fod 6 GCames $aad-cranked Iee Cream. fistoicdal Displays
SFuni, hads-a Children's ctivtks @Antique Tractor splays _
For more information, UF nsion
please call 527-5700. CiIi<<\!_ I_ .-._


Well, summer's here and I am
just letting everybody know my
summer job will be taking car rides
around neighborhoods to see whose
dogs are outside with no shelter
and no water. I will be the first one
to call the Animal Control people.
I'm on a first-name basis with them.
It's getting hot. Make sure you have
proper shade, nice clean water, not
moldy green buckets of water
where you only have to fill it up once
a week and a dog can't even get its
head down in to get a drink. So just
letting you know.
Where are you, Sugar?
I'm just calling in to try to find a
singer around here. Her name is
Sugar. I just need to know what bar
she's in.
Give credit where due
I am not knocking the people
who are bike riding for SOS, but
SOS was first established and
keeps going because of Shepherd
of the Hills Episcopal Church.
There are now five other churches
involved. I am not a member of ei-
ther Good Shepherd or Shepherd
of the Hills. I just want them to get
the credit.
Quite a circus
This situation with the county
and the gas company on that piece
of land -you talk about some-
thing that's a circus when you read
it in the paper. How the county
screwed up on this, I'll never guess.
But I'd certainly like to know whose
department it would fall under.
There's certainly got to be a head
there someplace who's responsible
for the lack of collection. And then
we should pay them to move out?
What's going on in this crazy
world?
Water off for nothing
Confused in Citrus County. April
11,4 p.m., did the closing on my
house. April 14, my water was shut
off. We arrived to do some cleaning.
I had three women to help me and
my girlfriend. No water. Why was
my water shut off? I have been pay-
ing taxes in Citrus County since
1985. Never late on taxes, sewer,
electric and water or whatever else
you want to throw in there. I have
been a good citizen. I'm trying to
figure out because I closed, it was
after 4 o'clock. The office was
closed. I never even thought of call-
ing. I figured there would be some
kind of a communication, but the
water was shut off with no commu-
nication and that really upset me
and I'd like to find out, what did I
do wrong?





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Letter to THE EDITOR

Liberal agenda promoting
climate change theory
More climate change; here we go again. This
morning, I read an article written by The Associ-
ated Press on climate change (formerly known as
global warming) but renamed for the upcoming
elections. Big headlines that read, "Climate
change affecting lives," showing a picture of
Route 4 in Killington, Vermont, partially washed
out.
Wow! Really? I read another article by The As-
sociated Press that said due to climate change
we are all sneezing more. Every time there is a
flood, drought, hurricane, tropical storm, wild-
fire or sniffle, we are going to hear these exag-
gerated predictions and statistics, backed up by
these so-called scientific reports.
These "scientists" are well funded by wealthy
millionaires who are motivated by socialist
agenda, and must file reports favorable toward
climactic doom or they simply will not be
funded. There is big political money behind this
socialist agenda. This socialist money also con-
trols the associated or shall I say the socialis-
sated press.
Liberal bias in the media occurs when liberal
ideas have undue influence on the coverage or
selection of news stories, that is why The Associ-
ated Press is so eager to print every little
weather-related event that occurs, with over-
exaggerated headlines such as; climate change
affecting lives, with a picture of a road washout
in Vermont.
Tom Steyer, a 56-year-old Democrat who accu-
mulated more than $1.5 billion as founder of Far-
allon Capital Management, is galvanizing donors
to raise as much as $100 million. His mission is
to enact climate change measures through a
campaign of attack ads aimed mostly at Republi-
can lawmakers. This will be the Democratic
theme of the upcoming elections; Vote for us or
else suffer the impending climatic doom of cli-
mate change.
It appears that money not only talks but walks;
President Obama and Secretary of State John
Kerry have both stepped up the rhetoric on cli-
mate change as of late. Perhaps the $100 million
soon to be available to underwrite key mid-term
campaigns may be the underlying impetus to
their recent homage to climate change. Our own
Secretary of State John Kerry, quote: "Climate
change is a fearsome weapon of mass destruc-
tion!" "Fearsome weapon of mass destruction?"
This fear mongering is a deception that they
are perpetrating on the American people, in
order to gain more power for the left. Climate
change is and always has been a very natural oc-
currence and reoccurrence.
Gerald Scott Antley
Homosassa
--,---i
May 25,26 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Florida Artist Gallery, Floral City
Featuring The Art Of Military Veterans
Contact Phone: 344-9300

May 26 9:30 AM
VFW 8189
Memorial Day Service
Stage Stand Cemetery, Homosassa

May 31 7:00 PM
Movie in the Pines "Frozen"
Along with face painting,
bungie trampoline, food vendors.
Movie starts about 8:45 p.m.

June 5 *9:00 AM I
6th Annual Mind, Body & Soul Health Fair
First United Methodist Church,
Homosassa. Contact 628-4083.

June 07 11:30 am
United Way of Citrus County
Power of the Purse
Black Diamond Country Club
$35.00 per person
Contact Phone: 352-795-5483

June 07 6:00 PM -12:00 AM
Spanish American Club of Citrus County
Installation/Anniversary Dinner Dance
Knights of Columbus Hall #6168, Lecanto
Members & Sponsors-$35
Non-members -$45
746-3599, 341-0979 or 270-8077
June 7-8
Cobia Big Fish Tournament
MacRae's or Twin Rivers
628-2602 or 628-0200
i June 14 *10:00 AM
I
UF/IFAS Citrus County Extension j
Extension's 100th Anniversary
Citrus County Canning Center
No Admission Fee
Contact Phone: 352-527-5720

June 23-27 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Science Discover Summer Camp
p Crystal Rivers State Parks


July 5
Third Annual Mullet Toss
Old Mill Tavern, Homosassa
Contact Phone: 628-2669

July 12 11:00 AM
GFWC Crystal River Womans Club
Fashions in Paradise
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
$25.00 Donation
Contact Phone: 352-794-0477
July 19
Walk a Mile in My Shoes
Key Training Center
Contact Phone: 428-0708


Batter up! Thanks for pick up You've been warned


c The Spanish American
^11 ^ Club of Citrus County
SInstallation/Anniversary
Pinner Pance
Saturday. June 7. 2014

Doors Open 6PM to Midnight Music by DJ Leo Roche
Catering by Cody's Roadhouse
DONATIONS:
$35.00 MEMBERS & SPONSOR O
$45.00 NON-MEMBERS 1.,
Knights of Columbus Hall #6168
2389 N. Norvell Bryant, Hwy., Lecanto, FL
For Ticket Information Call Maria Coimbre 341-0979
Carlos Suarez 270-8077 or Ben Cruz 746-3599


C4 SUNDAY, MAY 2 5, 2014


COMMENTARY










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Black Diamond bartender Chad Virgin pours a tall beer behind a newly renovated bar. Wide-screen televisions surround
the bar area for sports fans to get their fix.


in


the rough


Pat Faherty
Staff writer

LECANTO Black Diamond is well-
positioned to be part of the plan, and as
it continues to define "luxury golf com-
munity," the development is raising the
local profile of its amenities.
The "plan" refers to the Citrus
County Economic Development
Council's (EDC) five-year strategic
plan. One of its strategies is to recruit
high net worth retirees, an area
where Black Diamond brings more
than a quarter-century of expertise.
As the recession continues to fade,
Black Diamond has been experienc-
ing some of the optimism and re-
bound in the high end Florida real
estate market.
"We had a tremendous month,"
said Kerry Rosselet, Black Diamond
membership and real estate director
"We have had more sales in the first
quarter of 2014 than we did all of last
year in real estate sales and member-
ship sales."
"For so long it was stagnant with
the real estate bubble, we feel we're
on the other side of that," she said.
'And the numbers represent that."
She acknowledged it was combina-
tion of the improving economy and
incentives offered by Black Dia-
mond, such as new membership
options.
"We have reached out to all the Re-
altors in the county to make it more it
more Realtor accessible and friendly"


she said. 'All the Realtors I talked to
were busy it's really exciting."
And while it remains a private
club, not open to the public, they are
booking weddings and other events
and are hoping to get the Citrus Me-
morial Randal Jenkins fundraiser
back.
"That and business functions are
some of the things we're looking at,"
explained Brad Reid, Black Diamond
club manager "We kind of want to get
the word out; we're available."
He said they are open to hosting
corporate outings where they come
and breakfast and a meeting in the
morning, followed by lunch and golf
in the afternoon. "There are a lot of
different things we can do.
'"And we can accommodate almost
any size group," he said referring a
hosted wedding with more than
400 guests,
He acknowledged they are working
to overcome some of the past stigma
"that you can't do anything at Black
Diamond." "It's just not true," he
said.
Black Diamond also remains well-
known on the tournament golf circuit
and recently hosted the 2014 West
Coast of Florida Women's Champi-
onship and the IMG Junior Golf Tour
"We're heading in the right direc-
tion," said Rosselet, who's been there
seven years. "Escalante Golf, the
owners, are long-time golf course
owners and they've made a lot of
positive changes."


"We want to partner with the EDC
and the Chamber for Commerce and
what they want to accomplish for the
county" she said. "We want to be part
of what Citrus County has to offer"
Rosselet said when she saw the
EDC plan she reached out to execu-
tive director Don Taylor
"Obviously we want to do what's
right for our members of Black Dia-
mond and the ownership, Escalante,
but we also want to do what's right
for the county," she said. "We have to
work together"
With 1,200 rolling acres, Black Dia-
mond has over 500 homes and three
Tom Fazio designed golf courses; the
iconic Quarry Course, the Range
Course and the Highland Course.
The clubhouse, known for its stone
columns, soaring ceiling and patio
views has been remodeled. There is
a new visitors' center and there are
96 developer lots they are planning
to build out
'"And it still has the wow factor,"
she said, citing the experience of
first time visitors as they survey the
rolling hills.
"We're still up there," she con-
cluded with a reference the Black Di-
amond's exclusive reputation. "We
just want to be more accessible.
We're excited and motivated for the
benefit of all of Citrus County"

Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 orpfaherty
(@chronicleonline. corn.


What shopping will look like in the future


MAE ANDERSON
Associated Press
NEW YORK- One of America's
favorite pastimes is changing rapidly
When it comes to shopping, more
Americans are skipping the stores
and pulling out their smartphones
and tablets. Still, there's more on the
horizon for shopping than just point-
and-clicking.
No one thinks physical stores are
going away permanently But be-
cause of the frenetic pace of ad-
vances in technology and online
shopping, the stores that remain will
likely offer amenities and services
that are more about experiences and
less about selling a product. Think:
Apple Inc.'s stores.
Among the things industry watch-
ers are envisioning are holograms in
dressing rooms that will allow shop-
pers to try on clothes without getting
undressed. Their homes will be
equipped with smart technology that
will order light bulbs before they go


dark. And they'll be able to print out
a full version of coffee cups and
other products using 3-D technology
in stores.
"Physical shopping will become a
lot more fun because it's going to
have to be," retail futurist Doug
Stephens says.

MORE SERVICES
Forrester analyst Sucharita
Mulpuru says stores of the future
will be more about services, like day
care, veterinary services and beauty
services. Services that connect on-
line and offline shopping could in-
crease as well, with more drive-thru
pickup and order-online, pick-up-in-
store services. Checkout also will be
self-service or with cashiers using
computer tablets.
Some stores are taking self-service
further: A store in Seattle called
Hointer displays clothing not in piles
or on racks but as one piece hanging
at a time, like a gallery


Shoppers just touch their smart-
phones to a coded tag on the item
and then select a color and size on
their phone. Technology in the store
keeps track of the items, and by the
time a shopper is ready to try them
on, they're already at the dressing
room.
If the shopper doesn't like an item,
he tosses it down a chute, which au-
tomatically removes the item from
the shopper's online shopping cart.
The shopper keeps the items that he
or she wants, which are purchased
automatically when leaving the
store, no checkout involved.
Nadia Shouraboura, Hointer's
CEO, says once shoppers get used to
the process, they're hooked.
"They end up buying a lot more,
they're laughing and playing with it,"
she says.

ON-DEMAND COUPONS
Some stores like British retailer
See Page D4


Complicated


questions


call for some


expert help

EAR BRUCE: My father left
me an IRA worth $1 million.
The rest of the estate outside
the IRA is less than $75,000. My par-
ents had exhausted their gift exclu-
sion of $10,250,000, so the estate will
owe $400,000 in estate taxes
Can I pay the taxes with other
monies that I have in order to keep
more in the IRA? And if yes, will I be
able to deduct it as if the estate had
paid the taxes? My tax people don't
have any idea about this, and I am
going crazy trying to figure it out
Colleen
DEAR COLLEEN: Your final sen-
tence is the one that bothers me the
most The best help I can give you is
to urge you to find some new tax
people because, clearly folks who
specialize in this area should have
appropriate information.
As far as what my people tell me,
it doesn't matter where the monies
come from as far as it being de-
clared or providing any further tax
benefits, but you should very quickly
sit down with an established tax
consultant and figure out what is the
best way to protect your interests.
You may say you can look that up
and that's probably true, but the
difficulty is that nuances can make
all the difference in the world.
When you are talking about
$400,000, nuances or minor things
are very important. Do yourself a
kindness and find some people
who can help you. They are out
there, and they are not cheap.
DEAR BRUCE: What does it
mean for a company I have an ac-
count with to have "flagged my ac-
count"? I disputed an incorrect
charge to my account, and the agent
got mad and I got madder Now I am
told the company has flagged my ac-
count Does this damage me? Does
the company charge me higher fees
as a result of this flagging?
-James
DEAR JAMES: The answers to
your questions are yes, no and
maybe! The fact that the company
"flagged" your account means that
the account is now receiving spe-
cial attention from all of its people
and they may, because of your dis-
pute, charge you as much as the ac-
count will allow
You have another option: Find a
new company to do business with.
You must have started some kind
of action that made the company
angry, and as a consequence it is
giving your account undo atten-
tion. This may or may not be harm-
ful, but if you feel it is harmful,
please find a new company
DEAR BRUCE: Is cancer, heart
attack and stroke insurance a
worthwhile purchase or a waste of
money? We have health insurance
now My husband is 69 years old
and I am 58. We are both in good
health and are at a loss about
whether this is necessary or not
-K.B.
DEAR KB.: You ask a very good
question, and the answer is rela-
tively simple. If the health insur-
ance you carry offers adequate
coverage for all illnesses, then
there is no reason to buy a specific
policy If it doesn't offer coverage
for all illnesses, then you are ad-
vised to find a policy that does
offer that specific coverage.
DEAR BRUCE: Back in the mid-
1990s, I purchased 18 shares of a
company The problem is I have no
idea where this certificate is. I
have moved since the purchase
and possibly lost this in the move.
I have heard this company no
longer exists as it was bought out
by another company Can you point
me in the right direction to find
out how to recapture this money?
-E.S.
DEAR ES.: You mentioned that
the company has been absorbed by
another company The first step is to
find the new company that absorbed
the old one. If the old shares were
replaced by the new company and it
was a recent event, you should have
no problem having them replaced.




D2 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 BUSINESS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


--a'-


Associated Press
The construction of a $20 billion Hudson Yards project will fill 28 acres between the Hudson River and Tenth Avenue with 14 skyscrapers, after completely covering the
train yards with a platform foundation.



Big plans in works for NYCs gritty 'Wild West'


VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) It was
once a gritty stretch of Manhat-
tan known for rail yards, ware-
houses and aging industrial
buildings, so desolate it
was dubbed "The Wild, Wild
West."
Now, one of the nation's
biggest private construction
projects is transforming a
stretch of Manhattan's West
Side into a cluster of 20 new
buildings -17 of them high-
rises so tightly packed that it
has earned a new, not
always complimentary, nick-
name: "Hong Kong on the
Hudson."
"This is going to be the new
heart of New York," says
Michael Samuelian, a project
manager for the $20 billion
Hudson Yards a joint venture
of Related Companies and Ox-
ford Properties Group.
This development and the ad-
jacent $4.5 billion Manhattan
West complex comprise the
city's most ambitious private
real estate ventures since Rock-
efeller Center went up in the
1930s.


When fully completed in
2024, the two projects will offer
more than 22 million square
feet of space, including about
6,000 residential units more
footage than the rebuilt
World Trade Center in lower
Manhattan.
That is being accomplished,
in part, through a feat of engi-
neering: the construction of
massive concrete platforms that
allow the buildings to rise
above and around active rail-
road tracks and rail yards. Am-
trak and New Jersey Transit
trains will keep running from
New Jersey and other locations
to Penn Station, used by about
700,000 people daily
"This is what keeps me
awake at night," says Dennis
Friedrich, CEO of Manhattan
West developer Brookfield Of-
fice Properties, as he stands by
"The Launcher" a $7 million,
Italian-made hoisting machine
created to lift 16 bridge-like
concrete spans into place for
the $300 million platform.
Each of the 240-foot spans -
weighing about 2,400 tons, or
the equivalent of 187 city buses
- is inched into place in the
middle of the night when train


traffic is sparse.
Construction on Manhattan
West's first, 65-story office
tower will start after the plat-
form is finished by year's end.
Hudson Yards' wider platform
relies on more traditional tech-
nology, requiring 253 columns
to hold it up.
While the platforms are
strong enough to support the
weight of newly planned park-
lands and art-filled public
spaces, the new high-rises
themselves will rest on load-
bearing steel columns planted
into Manhattan bedrock.
The plan for Hudson Yards,
occupying an area between
30th and 34th streets bordered
by Tenth Avenue and the West
Side Highway, features 16
buildings -14 of them sky-
scrapers.
The first, 52-story tower ris-
ing over the rail yards is ex-
pected to open in 2015,
anchored by the Coach luxury
retailer with tenants including
EOreal USA and German soft-
ware giant SAP
Work also has begun on Hud-
son Yards' tallest building an
80-story skyscraper with an out-
door observation deck higher


than the open-air one at the
Empire State Building. It will
be home to the corporate head-
quarters of Time Warner by
2019.
Manhattan West fills the
block between Tenth and Ninth
avenues with three towers -
two more than 60 stories a
public plaza and walkway,
shops, garages and a hotel.
Tenants have yet to be an-
nounced.
Squeezed in-between the
budding complexes is a nearly
half-century-old, pyramid-
shaped building that Brook-
field purchased as part of
Manhattan West. The 16-story
building, which houses the
world headquarters of The As-
sociated Press among other
companies, is to undergo a $200
million renovation with glass
floor-to-ceiling exteriors by
2016.
New York University urban
planner Mitchell Moss says the
developments accelerate a shift
of the city's high-end commer-
cial heart away from the tradi-
tional stronghold of midtown
Manhattan surrounding Rocke-
feller Center
"They reflect New York's new


economic center of gravity,
shifting to the west and south
all the way down to the World
Trade Center," Moss says.
The neighborhood popularly
called Hell's Kitchen to the east
and Chelsea to the south had
briefly been considered as the
site of a proposed football sta-
dium for the Jets meant to help
win the city the 2012 Olympics.
But those plans fell apart when
New York lost the bid to Lon-
don.
Even before the latest con-
struction work, the area had
seen something of a rebirth
with its former elevated freight
tracks transformed into the
popular High Line park.
Some who live nearby are
skeptical of what lies ahead.
"Something was going to be
built over the rail yards that
was inevitable and this
would have been a nice oppor-
tunity to do something for the
community," says resident Ann
Warren, who owns a neighbor-
hood cupcake bakery and was
forced out of her apartment
building on West 35th Street by
eminent domain. "But all the
developers want is to make
money"






SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber lonnetion
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on
events, visit CitrusCounty
Chamber.corn/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber.corn
/mobile/lor call 352-795-
3149.
June 12 Mixer hosted by
the Mullet Hole Tavern, 5 to
7 p.m., 631 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River.
June 13 Chamber Lunch-
eon, 40 Under 40 Awards,
presented by the Chronicle,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club,
509 E. Hartford St., Hernando.
June 26 Mixer hosted by
Salon Suites by Underwood,
5 to 7 p.m., 306 S. Line
Ave., Inverness.
Aug. 8 Chamber Luncheon,
Health Care Hero Awards,
presented by the Chronicle,
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club,
509 E. Hartford St., Hernando.
Aug. 14 Mixer hosted by
Trotter Realty, 5 to 7 p.m.,
location to be determined.
Aug. 28 Mixer Claw-
daddy's Raw Bar & Grill, 5
to 7 p.m., 1601 S.E. Eighth
Ave. Crystal River.

Community
events
May 29 Let's Dance! Free
Lessons and Music at the
Mall, 6 to 8 p.m., 1801 NW
US Hwy 19. More informa-
tion at 352-795-2585
May 31 Free Movie in the
Pines Sing Along to Disney's
Frozen at Whispering Pines
Park, 1700 Forest Drive, In-
verness. Festivities begin at
7:30 a.m. and movie starts
at 8:45 a.m. and will feature
free face painting and
bungie trampoline and there
will be food and ice cream
vendors. Bring lawn chairs,
but no coolers, pets or tents
please.. More information
call 352-726-2611.
June 6- The Nature Coast
Chapter of the Florida Pub-
lic Relations Association will
hold its monthly professional
development luncheon at the
Citrus Hills Golf and Country
Club, Garden Room in Her-
nando. The luncheon is
scheduled for Friday, June 6.
Networking begins at 11:30
a.m. and the program is 12
to 1 p.m. Featured speaker
Devon Chestnut, APR, pub-
lic affairs manager for Cox
Communications' Southeast
region, will present "Corpo-
rate Giving: Creating a Win-
Win Strategy." The cost is $15
for members and $18 for
non-members. Reservation
deadline is June 4. Contact
Katie Mehl at 352-344-6501
or kmehl@citrusmh.org for
reservations.
June 7 Florida BOAT
SMART Course, 10 a.m. to
12 p.m., Prepare for the
Florida BOAT SMART test
for FREE. All Florida boaters
born after Jan. 1, 1988,
require a Florida BOAT
SMART card to operate
vessels with more than
10 horsepower. Join Capt.
Tony Boline in this interac-
tive two-hour session. Call
Gulf to Lake Marine for
more information at
352-527-0555.
June 14 Flag Day Cere-
mony and Purple Heart
Designation, 7 p.m., will
feature local veteran color
guard, patriotic songs and
keynote speaker, Inverness
Government Center, 212 W.
Main Street.
June 20 Friday Night Thun-
der, 5 p.m., Camaros and
Corvairs to Mustangs and
Mopars free event. Downtown
Inverness. For more infor-
mation, call 352-726-2611.
June 21 Rockin' Country
Pine, 6 p.m., Jamie Davis Band
will perform Southern rock and
country music live at 7 p.m.,
festival vendors as well as
beer and wine. It's a country
pub and restaurant crawl
route. Pick up a pub crawl
card at the Inverness tent.
For more information, call
352-726-2611.


Member spotlight:



CrossFit High Caliber


C rossFit is a strength and conditioning program with the aim of improving muscular
strength, cardio-respiratory endurance, and flexibility. It advocates a perpetually changing
mix of aerobic exercise, gymnastics (body weight exercises), and Olympic weight lifting.
CrossFit is a high intensity workout program designed to push you to the next level of fit-
ness. No matter what kind of condition you are in, our team will build a customized work-
out plan that is right for you and will coach you every step of the way. Whether you are the glorified
channel surfer on the couch looking to get back into shape, or an avid sports player wanting to kick
up your game a notch, CrossFit is for you.
We chose this business to bring Citrus County residents a new and ex-
citing way of getting in or staying in shape. So many people have come
by or called saying they felt that they could no longer exercise due to a
back, leg or shoulder injury. We work with each individual to modify
the daily exercises that meet their current abilities. Nearly every exer-
cise we do improves and strengthens the person's core muscles which
develops posture and strength. When individuals go to a gym but do
not receive frequent feedback, their form and posture may be causing
more harm than good. Our trainers observe and coach throughout the
class so you can avoid injury and increase the likelihood of continued
participation.
Don't sell yourself short. If you want to try us, please call or come by and watch a class in progress.
We modify to your current abilities and want to work with you to help you achieve your goal. We pro-
vide top notch training, nutritional advice, build self- esteem and confidence in our members. We oc-
casionally host member mixers to come in and meet each other and ask the trainers any questions or
share their experience.


Cayla's Coats
Founder: Jessica Barnes 352-316-6409 o caylas.coats@hotmail.com


Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Mike Buchanan,
Excel Printing; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Kelley Paul, Wollinka
Wikle Title Insurance; Jennifer Duca, Wollinka Wikle Title Insurance;
Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Janet Mayo, associate member;
Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel and Chamber CEO/President Josh
Wooten welcome Jessica Barnes and guests to the Chamber.


Address:
8303 Crystal
Street, Crystal River
Phone:
352-212-5312
Owner:
Lynne West
Online:
crossfithigh
caliber.com
Hours:
Monday through
Friday: 6 a.m.,
7 a.m., 8 a.m.,
9 a.m. and 10 a.m.
then 4 p.m., 5 p.m.,
6 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday: 8 a.m.,
9 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Closed on Sundays.


Clawdaddy's Raw Bar & Grill
Owner: Ray Bass 16ol S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River 352-564-2529


Karlene Feliciano, Holiday Inn Express; Romonda Tay-
lor, Servpro of Citrus County; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union;
Nicholle Fernandez, Citrus Hills; Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle Title
Insurance; Janet Mayo, associate member; Dan Pushee, associate
member; Jennifer Duca, Wollinka Wikle Title Insurance; George
Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Bonnie Hardiman, associate mem-
ber; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal;
Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers.


First responders honored at barbecue
The Citrus County Chamber and the Citrus ""-B
County Economic Development Council thank ,
our community's first responders for making I 1"
Citrus County a safe place to call home. We salute, -
your bravery and dedication. Together with our 7- 1 -
sponsors, a special lunch was served to our local p
heroes from organizations such as the Citrus li
County Sheriffs Office, Fire Rescue Services, \ i
Emergency Management and Nature Coast EMS. \I nL


Gold Sponsor
West Central Solutions

Silver Sponsor
Citrus Memorial Health
Systems

Bronze
Charles E. Davis Funeral
Home
Nick Nicholas Ford


Meal provided by:
Corrections Corporation
ofAmerica
F.D.S. Disposal, Inc.
Joe's Family Restaurant
M&B Dairy
Moose Lodge #2103
Powers Protection
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Sunflower Springs Assisted
Living Facility




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


. ,I 0:' ,.


Associated Press
In the wake of recent high-profile data breaches, including this week's revelation that hackers stole consumer data from eBay's computer systems, Visa and MasterCard
are renewing a push to speed the adoption of microchips into U.S. credit and debit cards.



Visa, MasterCard renew push for chip cards


BREE FOWLER
Associated Press

NEW YORK -Visa and Mas-
terCard are renewing a push to
speed the adoption of mi-
crochips into U.S. credit and
debit cards in the wake of recent
high-profile data breaches, in-
cluding this week's revelation
that hackers stole consumer data
from eBay's computer systems.
Card processing companies
argue that a move away from the
black magnetic strips on the
backs of credit cards would elimi-
nate a substantial amount of U.S.
credit card fraud. They say it's
time to offer U.S. consumers the
greater protections microchips
provide by joining Canada, Mex-
ico and most of Western Europe
in using cards with the more ad-
vanced technology
Chips aren't perfect, says Car-
olyn Balfany, MasterCard's
group head for U.S. product de-
livery, but the extra barrier
they present is one of the rea-
sons criminals often choose to
target U.S.-issued cards, whose
magnetic strips are easy to
replicate.
'Typically, fraudsters are
going to go to the path of least
resistance,' Balfany says.
The chip technology hasn't
been adopted in the U.S. be-
cause of costs and disputes
about how the network would
operate. Retailers have long
balked at paying for new cash
registers and back office sys-


teams to handle the new cards.
There have been clashes be-
tween retailers, card issuers
and processors over which pro-
cessing networks will get access
to the new system and whether
to stick with a signature-based
system or move to one that re-
quires a personal identification
number instead. These techni-
cal decisions impact how much
retailers and customers have to
pay and how much credit
card issuers make each time
a card is used.
The disputes have now
largely been resolved. And the
epic breach of Target's com-
puter systems in December,
which involved the theft of 40
million debit and credit card
numbers, along with smaller
breaches at companies such as
Neiman Marcus and Michaels,
helped garner support for chip-
based cards among retailers
who were previously put off by
the costs.
Chip cards are safer, argue
supporters, because unlike
magnetic strip cards that trans-
fer a credit card number when
they are swiped at a point-of-
sale terminal, chip cards use a
one-time code that moves be-
tween the chip and the re-
tailer's register The result is a
transfer of data that is useless
to anyone except the parties in-
volved. Chip cards, say experts,
are also nearly impossible to
copy
For its part, Target is acceler-


ating its $100 million plan to
roll out chip-based credit card
technology in its nearly 1,800
stores. New payment terminals
will appear in stores by Sep-
tember, six months ahead of
schedule. Last month, the re-
tailer announced that it will
team up with MasterCard to
issue branded Target payment
cards equipped with chip tech-
nology early in 2015. The move
will make Target the first major
U.S. retailer with its own
branded chip-based cards.
Even so, the protections
chips provide only go so far, ac-
cording to opponents who note
that chips don't prevent fraud
in online transactions, where
consumers often enter credit
card numbers into online
forms. Some opponents also
point to other technologies,
such as point-to-point encryp-
tion, as better long-term solu-
tions.
Ken Stasiak, founder and
CEO of SecureState, a Cleve-
land-based information secu-
rity firm that investigates data
breaches, says that while chips
would be a big security im-
provement, they wouldn't have
stopped the hackers from
breaching Target's computer
systems where they also stole
the personal information, in-
cluding names and addresses,
of as many as 70 million people,
putting them at risk of identity
theft
'Chip and pin is just another


security component,' Stasiak
says. 'What matters is how com-
panies like Target use con-
sumer information, how they
protect it'
Banks generally pick up the
tab for credit card-related
losses, but companies such as
Visa and MasterCard stand to
lose too, if data breaches con-
tinue to occur with increasing
frequency After all, if con-
sumers don't feel safe using
cards, they may choose other
ways to pay for purchases.
'It's not just about fraud and
losses, it's about the trust in-
volved in electronic payments
that's destroyed,' says Ellen
Ritchey, Visa's chief enterprise
risk officer
In March, Visa and Master-
Card announced plans to bring
together banks, credit unions,
retailers, makers of card pro-
cessing equipment and indus-
try trade groups in a group that
aims to strengthen the U.S. pay-
ment system for credit and
debit cards. The initial focus of
the new group will be on banks'
adoption of chip cards.
That comes ahead of a liabil-
ity shift set to occur in October
2015, when the costs resulting
from the theft of debit and
credit card numbers will
largely fall to the party involved
with the least advanced -and
most vulnerable- technology.
For example, if a bank has up-
dated to chip technology, but
the retailer involved hasn't, the


retailer will be liable for the
costs.
Stasiak says many of the re-
tailers he works with already
have the technology in place.
Once the banks start issuing
chip cards, the retailers will ac-
tivate their new systems, he
says.
Banks say that despite the
jump in high-profile data
breaches, fraud still accounts
for a small fraction of total
transactions processed, while
the cost related to issuing chip
cards to all of their customers
and switching out all of their
ATMs is substantial. Banks
have urged lawmakers to make
retailers more accountable for
their own security in hopes of
recouping more of the losses
from cybercrime.
Richard Hunt, CEO of Con-
sumer Bankers Association,
says that in cases of major
fraud, banks have generally
been able to collect only pen-
nies on the dollar from the re-
tailers involved.
Hunt says even if banks put
chips in cards, it won't do any
good if retailers don't upgrade
their systems.
'We have to improve fraud
prevention across the board,'
he says. 'There are people who
get up every day across the
world with one mission and
that's to break credit card
technology. But there's no
magic pill out there. The solu-
tion involves everyone.'


FUTURE
Continued from Page Dl


Tesco and drugstore Duane
Reade now are testing beacons,
Bluetooth-enabled devices that can
communicate directly with your
cellphone to offer discounts, direct
you to a desired product in a store
or enable you to pay remotely
For example, you can walk into a
drugstore where you normally buy
face cream. The beacon would rec-
ognize your smartphone, connect it
with past purchasing history and
send you a text or email with a
coupon for the cream.
The more we know about customers...
you can use promotions on not a macro
level but a micro level,' says Kasey
Lobaugh, chief retail innovation officer at
Deloitte Consulting A store could offer a
mother 20 percent offon Mother's Day
for example, or offer frequent buyers of
paper towels a discount on bulk pur-
chases.
That appeals to Seattle resident
Sarah Hamilton, 31, who says dis-
counts definitely draw her into
stores.
'I don't like the idea of my data
grabbed onto by random marketers
online, but if it was an actual store
I'm interested in, I would be OK
with that,' Hamilton says.

3-D PRINTING

Within 10 years, 3-D printing could


make a major disruption in retail,
Deloitte's Lobaugh predicts. Take a
simple item like a coffee cup. In-
stead of producing one in China,
transporting it and distributing it to
retail stores, you could just down-
load the code for the coffee cup and
3-D print it at a retail outlet or in
your own home.
'That starts a dramatic change in
terms of the structure of retail,'
Lobaugh said. And while 3-D print-
ing today is primarily plastic,
Lobaugh says there are tests at
places like MIT Media Lab and
elsewhere with other materials, in-
cluding fabric.
'The big question is when,' he
says. Right now a few stores offer
rudimentary 3-D-printing services,
but they are very limited. He pre-
dicts the shift will come in 10 to 20
years.

ORDER YOURSELF

Steve Yankovich, head of innova-
tion for eBay, thinks someday buy-
ing household supplies won't take
any effort at all. He says someday a
connected home could be able to
use previous customer history and
real-time data the house records to
sense when a light bulb burns out,
for example, and order a new one
automatically Or a washing ma-
chine will order more detergent
when it runs low
A box could show up on porch
with this disparate set of 10 things
the connected home and eBay de-
termined you needed to keep


things running smoothly,' he says.
'It's called zero-effort commerce.'
Raquel Ribera, 32, in Carpinte-
ria, California, said she cut back on
store shopping when she moved to
a less urban area, and would ap-
preciate a service like that.
'Everybody has that nagging to-
do list, the random light bulb or
batteries to purchase, that's super
easy to forget,' she says. 'If it came
to my door automatically that
would be nice.'

HOLOGRAMS

EBay recently bought PhiSix, a
company working on creating life-
size 3-D models of clothing that can
be used in dressing rooms to in-
stantly try on different colors of
clothing or different styles. You can
see 30 or 40 items of clothing realis-
tically without physically trying
them on.
EBay's Yankovich says the tech-
nology can be used in a virtual
dressing room as well, showing
what the clothes look like when you
are, say, walking down the street or
hitting a golf club.
Some companies have been test-
ing this already British digital
agency Engage created a Virtual
Style Pod that scanned shoppers
and created a life-size image onto
which luxury clothing from brands
like Alexander McQueen and
DKNY were projected. The Pod
was displayed in shopping centers
in Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the
United Arab Emirates.


Business Digest


* Submit information via

email to newsdesk @

chronicleonline.com or fax to

352-563-3280, attn: Business

Digest.

* The Chronicle reserves the

right to edit notices.

* High-resolution photos will

be considered for

publication. Images taken

with most cellphone cameras

do not reproduce well.

* Publication on a specific

date or in color cannot be

guaranteed.

* Submissions about specific

prices of products or sales

events are considered adver-

tising and are not eligible for

Business Digest.


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


EXCURSION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


F 3 6 5 l e 8 2E : *, I w c c i


Hp-L-mMelletl


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



BEVERLY HILLS
Sunday 25, 9a-3p
3819 W. Birds Nest Dr.
CORVETTE
1979 350 Auto, Air,
70% Restored, 20,500
miles on motor. $8,500
(352) 422-3952
Fleetwood Terry 32'
long, sleeps 6, full bth,
separate queen size
bdrm, great shape,
$4500 firm.
(352)201-4566
KIA
'06, Spectra, EX,
4 door, auto, air,
excel, cond. $4,995
obo (352) 621-0248
Pool Table 8ft 3/4
Italian Slate
All Equipment $1,200
Nikon Mount Sigma
Lens 300 mm 1: 4D
$250 (352) 422-3952
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



Fiberglass Boat
handyman project
352-601-7911
Free
1 orange male tabby, 2
female, 1 black &
white, one tiger strip-
ped. 3 mo. old black
cats, males.
(352)447-0072
Leave Message
Free Cats
3- 4 yrs. old
spayed nuetered
Free to good home
(954) 214-4645
Free Kitten
Orphan, 4 wks-?
(352) 795-0037
FREE KITTENS
7 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061
Free Pomeranian Mix,
Not neutered
(941) 447-1565
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
(352) 613-3205



U-pick Blueberries
$3.00 per lb. 7am-6pm
Tues & Thurs,
"last day Sat.
Pesticide Free
4752 W Abeline Dr
Citrus Springs,
(352)746-2511



Your World

% QWtM We44


CH 'ONlEI
C N' pi iI


.'i,. -IT,


3 yrs. old, female,
white & brown tabby
Pine Ridge Area
Corner of Lena
& Kingwood
Call (352) 270-0143
LOST CAT
Small spayed female.
Brown, tan, orange tor-
toise shell. Citrus
Springs N Caressa
Way. Woods south of
Rutland, west of
Deltona, East of Elcam.
Her name is Lola and
she is very timid. If
seen, please call Donna
(352)613-6499.
Lost Chihuahua
Tan, white markings
Near Diablo
Golf Course
(352) 835-6109
Lost Tabby
Black & Brown,
Vicinity of Holly
& Placid Ave.
in Highlands
(352) 367-2205



Found Black Male Cat
Green Eyes
Sugarmill Woods
(352) 382-4408
Found Lhasa Apso
Black & White
Small dog
Special markings call
to identify
Inverness Area
(352) 637-3967




CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!M
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS &SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41


-appy


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



Active Senior
Widower. Home
Owner, would like
mature lady compan-
ion. Age Not Impor-
tant. Blind Box 1867-P
Citrus Chronicle,
106 W. Main Street,
Inverness, FL 34450




WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER
Is now accepting
applications for
employment.Childcare
work exp. required
Apply M-F,12pm-2pm
No Phone Calls.




Immediate
Opening
Part-time Office
Worker Needed
5 days 20 hrs. Ece.
customer service,
phone & computer
skills required
FAX RESOURCE:
888-713-3272

P/T CLERICAL
Help Needed
Real Estate Office
Computer Skills &
Real Estate Lic.
Preferred. Email
jcentury@ampabay.rr.co
m or Call
352-726-6668


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966






CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
FOR ALL SHIFTS
Apply Online: home
instead.com/671


CNA'S
3P-11PM &1 1P-7AM

RN/LPN
11P-7A
7A-3P & 3P-I IP
APPLY IN PERSON
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo.com


F/T RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512


FLOAT POOL RNs
GREAT RATES!
Here at Leesburg
Regional Medical
Center and
The Villages
Regional Hospital
(Central Florida
Health Alliance),
we don't simply
match industry
standards for RN
pay. We take pride
in surpassing them.
We've raised our Pa-
tient Placement
team (Float Pool)
rates to new,
higher levels.
Call 352-323-5360
to speak with one of
our recruiters today
about opportunities
on our Patient Place-
ment team.
To learn more about
the facilities or to
apply online,visit us
at: http://www.
cfhacareers.com.
EEO/AA/H/V.
Drug -free
workplace
/Tobacco-free
Workplace.


FRONT DESK
F/T position for a
busy dental office.
Dental Experience &
experience with Ea-
glesoft a must.
Fax or email resume:
352-795-1637
Ivnn.swanson@ rsw
ansondental.com


OSivEN RiVERS
O .s.1.1....: ......:: .

Join Our Team

RN
ICU- DAYS
Apply for this and
other opportunities
at Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River Fl.
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


MDS Nurse,
RN/LPN
Crystal River Health
and Rehab is seeking:
a FIT MDS NURSE
The ideal candidate
must be an Exp.
RegisteredNurse/
Licensed Practical
Nurse, have MDS
long-term care exp.
Come be a part of our
team. We offer com-
petitive salary, 401 K,
Health, Dental, and
Vision. Email:
chris.delgado@north-
porthealth.com or
Call: 352-795-5044 to
come in for a tour....

Office Manager
Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
to: 352-746-3838

Ophthalmic
Assistant

needed part time or
full time, ophthalmic
exp. preferred.
Apply in person
Monday Friday
8:00am-5:30pm to:
West Coast Eve
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246




AC Sales
Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have Val. fl. DL,
Robert 352-586-0305

Exo. Appointmnt
Setters
Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits
EXP. AC installers
Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY,
Dave 352-419-7916

Experienced
Plumbers, Pipe
Fitters, Welders
and Helpers

needed for large
commercial health-
care project in Wild-
wood. DFWP, EEO.
Apply via resume.
Fax 352-748-2990
or email
resume: jmoser
@nashincp-m.com




Private Club with
Huge Tiki Hut
Needing
*Staff Supervisor,
* Bartender,.Servers,
*Hostess, *Food run-
ner, *Server's assis-
tant, *Bussers
and .Housekeeper
High volume
business. Must be
experienced & en-
ergetic with outgo-
ing personality. Must
have great cus-
tomer service skills.
Apply in Person at
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando,
Mon-Fri., 2pm-5pm



DRadeRs/
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624

DRIVERS
Medical Transport
Co. hiring. Clean DL.,
nights and wkends
Apply at: 204 W
Grace St. Inverness.
M-F 10a- 2p DFWP


Exp. Asphalt
Paver Operator

Dump Truck
Drivers
local, FIT & PIT
At Least 5 yrs. Exp.
Ref's. 352- 303-2525


Exp. Grant Writer
For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446


Experienced
A/C Installer
Needed for busy
AC company. Must
have valid DL
Apply Email: aalrlnc
@centurvllnk.net
or fax 352-860-0757




































Utilities Mainte-
nance Worker
Announcement
#14-59
Semi-skilled manual
work assisting in the
installation, opera-
tion, repair and
maintenance of
sewer forcemains,
gravity lines, man-
holes, lift stations,
water mains, fire
hydrants, water
meters, backflow
devices, valves,
valve boxes and
other appurte-
nances related to
water and waste-
water utility opera-
tions. H.S diploma,
GED certificate or
related vocational
training. Work expe-
rience in the repair
of water/ waste-
water mains and
facilities preferred.
Must possess a Flor-
ida CDL Class -A" or
be able to obtain
within one year of
employment. Start-
ing pay $8.70 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online
by Friday, May 30,
2014 EOE/ADA.


APPT. SETTERS
Great Pay Weekly.
Daily Bonuses
APPLY IN PERSON
6421 W. Homossa Tr.
352-503-6811

CAREER
OPPORTUNITY
Full Benefits
General Laborer
F/T, Clean Lic. Drug
Test, GED Required
Apply At
8189 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City. 8AM-3PM

Class A
CDL DRIVER
Apply in Person
Atlas Van Lines
5050 W. Norvell Bry-
ant Hwy, Crystal Riv
Drug Screen and
Background Check

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
**352-503-4930*

TOWER HAND
Starting at SlO$10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F

Part-time


2 PIT Openings:
SPianist/Organist
SChristian
Education Director
IN HOMOSASSA
Email Resume to:
8831admin@
1UMC.org

P/T Groundsman

For a Tree Service
352-628-9884, Iv.msg

CareeSr
Opportuities


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


TRAIN FROM HOME
MEDICAL BILLING,
ACCOUNTING
ASS'T, CUSTOMER
SERVICE, NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED. HS/GED
NEEDED TO APPLY.
Sullivan and
Cogliano Training
Centers.
1-800-451-0709










Night lsSchool
Instruction







NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School
Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM
Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE

(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu
START A CAREER
INA YEAR


GIFT SHOP/CAFE
seeks working
partner, or buyer
352-302-2194




2007 White Alum.
Shed. 10'X 20', $1500.
(352)601-6192,
(347)466-1506
ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



1800S CHILDS TOY
FLATIRON WITH HOT
PLATE 3.5"x2"x2" $40
OBO 352-270-3527
1800S CHILDS TOY
IRON SKILLET Horse n
Buggy pic imprint $40
OBO 352-270-3527
Antique Grinding
Wheel, early 1800's
heavy oak base
$120. (352) 341-2107



GOLD FLATWARE 5
PC PLACE SET KINGS
INN ROSE never used
$20 352-270-3527
MICHAEL JACKSON
PLATINUM EDITION
COLLECTORS VAULT
A MUST HAVE ONLY
$25. 464-0316
Norman Rockwell Col-
lector Plates, by
Knowles. Cert. & Boxed.
60 Plates, $175.
(352)726-7543


VVWUL-VVUUU IICHNA
Lavender Grapes on
Cream 1950s new
never used $90
352-270-3527



2 Person Hot Spot
New, used 1 time
health forces sale
Pd. $4,200, Sell $3,500
(352) 621-5427



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Kenmore Refrigerator
side by side white,
clean, like new $450
(352) 637-0765
or (352) 257-5779
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SUNBEAM TOASTER
OVEN & COFFEE
MAKER WHITE $20
BOTH 746-5453



ANTIQUE SLANT
FRONT DESK Vermont,
Red Lion
Cabinet,100yrs.
$100. 352-382-0069
COMPUTER DESK 5ft
long desk top, 2 draw-
ers, one door, keyboard
tray $25. 352-382-0069
DESK LAMP BLACK
Adjustable height for
close up, Halogen 50W
bulb $35 OBO Can
email pic 352-382-3650



4 Aluminum Ladders
two Extension,
one- 16ft, one 12ft.
$125.
Lawn Blower $20
352-382-3663
CONTRACTORS
STEEL WHEEL
BARROW 6 CUBIC
FT.NEEDS AIR IN TIRE
$45. (352)464-0316
Sears 12" Wood Lathe
on a bench w/ 2
drawers on wheel,
incl. turning chisels
and 1/3hp grinder
$150. (352) 382-1814



amp/receiver
$10
3524194464
Equalizer
$5.
(352)4194464
pair of speakers
$15.
3524194464
POWERED
SUBWOOFER 200
WATT model D-1010R,
manuals
$25. 352-382-0069


CHOOSE CAR SEAT:
BYAGE & SIZE


THE ONES

WHO

ACTUALLY


DO.


THE NUMBER
OF PEOPLE

WHO

THINK

THEY HAVE
THEIR CHILD
IN THE RIGHT
SEAT


KMOW FOR SURE
IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.


VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT


NHITSAk % Child Car
1SSafety


AUTOMOTIVE


SALES
EXPERIENCED
AUTOMOTIVE
PROFESSIONALS
needed at
Eagle Buick GMC
in Homosassa.
With one of the
largest inventories in
North Central Florida,
your expertise
will be rewarded.
Aggressive pay plan and full
benefits package including two
weeks paid vacation and medical.
For Immediate Consideration,
Apply In Person:

EAGLE BUICK GMC
1275 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
No phone calls please EOE/DFWP


Futd Yoar Drewu. Homeb
Search Hundreft oa Local UsUng I
www.; hto t 1 c o Iendercorm


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 D5


mi~lr




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1;


I I '


^i 4inv, .


IYOTI


SUPPORT
OUR


HURRYR! A
IN-STOCK"
VEHICLES <
ONLY


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS
Hybrid Synergy Drive System, Electric Power Steering, Display Audio: 6.1" Touch-Screen, AM/FM/CD, 6 Speakers, 51 MPG
Bluetooth, Cruise Control, Driver Door Smart Key System, Push Button Start, Power Locks, Power Windows /


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


125,060
$3,070


2014 ALL NEW REDESIGNED
TOYOTA COROLLA


36MPG
1.8L 4-CYL DOHC 16-VALVE
4-Speed Automatic
Transmission


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


$18,2


$1,265


I #150571
Electric Power Steering
Air Conditioning
USB Port w/iPod Conn.,
Hands-Free via Bluetooth
Power Door Locks, Power Windows


2014 TOYOTA SIENNA
r^4


p#T140720
6 Speed Automatic, Cruise Control,
Remote Keyless Entry,
6 Way Captains Chair,
4 Way Passenger Chair,
CD, MP3, PW/PL
O.R0% FOR60MOS.


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


$28,234
$4,244


OR 0O% FOR 72 MO0S. OR$239* FOR 36 MOS.


5 0O%FOR36 MOS.
OR 169 FOR 36 MOS.


$2 on RA.9%FOR172MOS.
2399 OR s 1269 MO.**


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS V
Hybrid Synergy Drive System, Electric Power Steering, Display Audio: 6.1" Touch-Screen, AM/FM/CD, 6 Speakers, Bluetooth, (PACKAGE 2)
Cruise Control, Driver Door Smart Key System, Push Button Start, Power Locks, Power Windows, Back-up Camera


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


$28,009
$3,019


s24,990


OR 0% FOR 60 MOS. OR290MO.**


201


TOYOTA CA


2.5L 4-CYL DOHC 16V W/DUAL WT-I ENGINE, 6-Speed ECT-I Transmission, Cruise Control, Power Windows/Door, Air
Conditioning, Bluetooth/USB/AUX/CD Entune Audio: 6:1" Touch Screen 6/Speakers, Locks, __
Audio & Bluetooth Hands-Free Controls, Color-Keyed Folding Power Outside Mirrors


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


$23,285
$4,290


35MPG
#797545


$10 OR 0% FOR 60 MOS.
1U,999 OR 1O99 FOR 36 MOS.


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS C
Hybrid Synergy Drive System, Electric Power Steering, Display Audio: 6.1" Touch-Screen, AM/FM/CD, 6 Speakers,
Bluetooth, Cruise Control, Driver Door Smart Key System, Push Button Start, Power Locks, Power Windows


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


#T140802


$19,940


$1,241


Stability Control, Traction Control
Air Conditioning, Entune Audio
w/6Speakers Audio and Bluetooth
Controls, Backup Camera,
Remote Keyless Entry System
Dn,,,nr\Afinrln,,,o/nnnr


2014 TOYOTA TUNDRA 4X2
ALL NEW
20 MPG REDESIGNED
FOR 2014!


2014
31 MPG
2.LDOHC
16V 4 CYL
ENGINE _
6-Speed
Automatic
Electronic
Power Steering


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


$18, 699

OR $188 MO.**


$24,705
$1,300


#032219


MSRP
VILLAGE
SAVINGS


$27,810
$2,320


^ ,rw uvvi iiuuvva/uuuI
4i0 o0%FOR 36 MOS.
P i40 5 on 249 FOR 36 MOS.


4.6LV6 DOHC 24V WT-1270 HP/278
LB-FT 5-Speed Automatic
Automatic Limited-Slip Differential
6.1" Touch Screen/Bluetooth/USB/
AUX/CD, Power Windows/Door Locks


e Toyota
2 YEARS
PREPAID SER
ON ALL NEW
PURCHASE


0 oR0% FOR 36 MOS.
$ 339* FOR 36 MOS.


*II


J144


I@via,


1,999 total down plus tax. Pictures for illustration purposes only. ALL OFFERS GOOD MAY 25 THRU MAY 26, 2014


Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm; Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm Sun 11am-4pm Service: Mon-Fri: 7am-6pm Sat: 8am-4pm


~4-~q
I


RY


III


D6 SUNDAY, MAY 225, 2014


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2


*$2399 cash cap reduction, 36 months @ 12,000 miles per year. W.A.C.


0001 CF3


if




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTALCHEVROLETONLINE.COM


Fh i,


I.


BA


TRADE A N THING

SALE


..... FROMA1* TO A
TRAILERS, MOTOR CYCLES, CAMPERS, LAWN MOWERS, GOLF CART, ANYT


2014 CHEVROLET
SPARK

NO MONEY DOWN!


2014 CHEVROLET
VOLT
LET US SHOW YOU
HOW TO DRIVE FREE!


PERo $
MO.


2014 CHEVROLET
IMPALA


2014 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX


2014 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
ALL STAR EDITION


CRYSTAL
CHEVROLT


Fl' -


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34448


CRYSTALCH EVROLETONLI N E.COM
*Must finance through Ally Finance Company. Includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. +
Payment is for 75 months at 2.39% APR. Includes all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $599.50. With approved credit. "Drive free
saving $10 per day on fuel. ++ Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $2688 due at signing and all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes
tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 With approved credit. ^^Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $3866 due at signing and all rebates and incentives, not
everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 With approved credit. **Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the lease. Includes $2869 due at signing and
all rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 With approved credit. With Approved Credit, Pictures are for illustration purposes only,
prior sales may restrict stock. Offers can not be combined.


$1


D8 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


800=584=8755 EXT.10 I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Pair of speakers
$5.
(352)419-4464



STILTS FOR DOING
SHEET ROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316

Computell
Video
BROTHER FAX
MACHINE WORKS
GREAT ONLY $40.
(352)464-0316
LAPTOP DOCKING
STATION & STAND for
Dell Latitude, Inspiron or
Precision $35
352-382-3650



Tractor
Implements
5'. Bush Hog
$600
5', compact
Disc $500
5 ft Rake $200
Titanium68@
yahoo.comrn



Table & 6 chairs,
PVC,
excellent condition
$300.
(352) 302-9129

Furniture

6 pc Living Room set
Rattan, 3 seat couch,
love seat, chair, 3 ta-
bles, green palms pat-
tern Very good Cond
$1100 (352) 746-5052
80-100 year old Chest
with mirror, & 3 long &
2 short drawers $100
Solid wood Table,
23 H, 50L, 32W
$65. (352) 621-0778
Bed, Trundle, like old
brass bed 8OW, 40D,
+ mattress, $300.
3 Bar Stools, 30"
Caned seats, Bent
wood style, New. $75.
ea. (352) 560-7526
BRAND NEW
Queen Size Pillow Top
Mattress Set $150.
Still in Original Plastic.
(352) 484-4772
CHINA CABINET,
cherry wood, will hold
service for 12, original
wedding turn.,
exc. cond., $650.
(352) 419-6474


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625



SHADYVIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


B MiIIl~y.~l jM-T17 l
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374


i



Youir orid first


Need a job

or a

qualified

employee?


This area's

#1

employment

source!


C .... .. ,.. I,'
LiRpNIECL
( i., ,1


COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
*352-795-0121*
DRESSER. Waterfall
Design 1940's. Great
condition. Asking only
$50. 527-6709
Entertainment Center
49" wide x 48" tall x
21" deep, dark wood
grain, $110.
Call Larry
(352) 344-1692
FIVE(5) OAK
CLAWFOOT DINING
CHAIRS, mid 1800's
upholstered seats one
with arms $125 set
(352)341-2107
GE 5 Cycle Dryer
Excellent $100.
1 Lrg. & 1 Small Office
Chairs Excellent
$50. ea or 2 for $75
352- 503-6313
Homosassa

v THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
* SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
Queen Inner spring,
Mattress & Spring
Excel. Cond $225.
White ext or Int. wood
Rockers $35 or 2 for
$50.352- 503-6313
Homosassa
Sealy Posture Premier
Plush Pillow Top. King
size bed & headboard.
$400, Ex. Cond.
(352)563-5386
Serta King
Pillow-top Mattress
like new $150.
(352) 270-1366
Sofa & Love Seat
rattan trim, 2 match-
ing lamps, excel cond
non smoking no pets
$175 obo
Patio Furniture, white
Octagon Tbl., 4 chairs
& cushions, very nice
$80. 352-341-1015
SOFAAND LOVE
SEAT camel back
striped matching set
Broyhill very good
condition $300.
352-637-2499
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
K.S. LAND
SERVICES LLC
352-302-2849



A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352-422-7279 **
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002


Cub Cadet Modle-
Lt1050. 50" mower
w/muncher attch. Kokler
23hp,140 hrs. New btry.
42"Sears
sweeper/dump cart,
$1200 OBO.
(352)503-6795
John Deer, L1I10
MOWER
Automatic, very nice
mower Hardly used
Always in Garage
$850 (352) 382-5773
PROPANE WEED
BURNING TORCH
NEW REGULATOR &
25' OF HOSE OF
HOSE 60.00 464 0316
Sears Riding Mower
19HP, V-Twin Eng.,
46" Cut $400.
Sears Push Mower
4.5HP 22" cut $60
(352) 507-1490
Troy Built
Rototiller
Jr. Reartine
5hp, manuals.
Forward/Rev. $275.
(352)465-7506
WEED EATER GASO-
LINE PUSH MOWER,
4.75 horsepower, excel-
lent condition, $80,
(352)465-1813











ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE

CHJ~pNid.E

CLASSIFIED

a, Call your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966

DUNNELLON
MOVING SALE *
Sat. & Sun. 8am-?
6794 W. Mable Lane

V THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
* SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
*RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508*
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625


Garden/Lawn
Supplies


Cinderella's Home
& OfficeCleaning &
Home Companions
Relax We'll Take Care
of you! 352-746-7760



Kat's Kritter Kare
Pet Sitting


(352) 270-4672



Kitchen looking tired?
Re-Face not Replacel
KITCHEN SOLUTIONS
*(352) 794-3747"



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086


AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Uc/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166








~iH


3'.NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374


BEVERLY HILLS
Sunday 25, 9a-3p
3819 W. Birds Nest Dr.



Citrus Hills
May 23rd 24th & 25th
9am to 4pm
**ESTATE SALE**
BY OWNER
full hshld of quality
furniture, and misc.
1821 E St. James Lp
Rt 44 to Croft, approx
3 mi. left on Stevens,
1 mile right on
St. James Loop



DESIGNER EVAN
PICONE SUIT DBL
BRESTED White Linen
size 12-14 good cond
$20 OBO 352-270-3527
EVAN PICONE SUIT
NAVY DBL BRESTED
Linen size 12-14 good
cond $20 OBO
352-270-3527



CELL PHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW with belt clip case
$28 352-382-3650



2 Eye Wood Burning
Stove,
late 20's early 30's
excellent shape
$450. All org. pieces
(352) 621-0778
3 Wheel Dog Stroller
holds upto 100 Ibs
Cost $200.
Asking $100
Hardly used
(352) 382-7783
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck
tire GREAT SHAPE
ONLY $50.
(352)464-0316
36" CURVED RIDGE
PIPE WRENCH-
$25.00
352-628-0033
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80. 464-0316
ADVENT (REMOTE)
STEREO SPEAKER.
TAKES D BATTERIES
ONLY $40.
(352)464-0316
AIR CONDITIONER
window LG 5000 btu
Light use works great
$40. 352-621-0175
Antique Horse Collar
Mirror $150.
Hepa Air Cleaners
$100. for both
(352) 628-5085


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765,352-513-5746
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Clean View: Pressure
washing windowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


I


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441





NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
AQUARIUM ACRYLIC
curved front 12 gal
good shape incl fil-
ters, air pump, extras
$30. 352-621-0175
AQUARIUM ACRYLIC
Eclipse corner 5 gal
Good shape includes
many extras $30.
352-621-0175
BREATHABLE CAR
COVER MEDIUM SIZE
CHEVY IMPALA ONLY
$25. (352)464-0316
CRAFTSMAN TWIN
CYLINDER ELECAIR
COMPRESSOR 1
HP.20 GALLON 100.00
FIRM 464 0316
FIBERGLASS HARD
SIDED PET CAGES
ONE 18"BY 24" 30.00
ONE 12" BY 18" 25.00
(352)464-0316
French Provincial Set
w/loveseat, couch & end
table, cherry, good cond
$325. Men's &
Ladies Golf Clubs
$150. for both sets
(352) 228-9145

G THIS OUT!


GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!I



6 lines
-10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50

OOOOOOO

Golf Clubs, Bag
& Accessories
$100
Air Compressor
2.5 HP, $25.
(352) 527-8603
HARLEY STOC
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY
$75. (352)464-0316
Homade quilt tops, 10
for $100. Cookie jars, 9
for $100. (352)795-7254


Electric Boars Head
COUNTER TOP
For Catering or
Restaurant $260.
(352) 287-9073
ORECK XL SIGNA-
TURE VACUUM UP-
RIGHT BAG Excel Cond
Works Great $90
352-270-3527
ORECK XL SIGNA-
TURE VACUUM UP-
RIGHT BAG Excel Cond
Works Great $100
352-270-3527
PFALTZGRAFF CHINA.
27 pcs including plates,
bowls, cups/saucers.
Tea Rose pattern. $30.
527-1239
Pool Table 8ft 3/4
Italian Slate
All Equipment $1,200
Nikon Mount Sigma
Lens 300 mm 1: 4D
$250 (352) 422-3952
QUILTING TABLE
by Grace Company
for Long arm quilting
Twin to King size,
$500.
(352) 560-7526
Rainbow Vacuum
Cleaner and
Shampooer
exc. cond. except power
head, all attachments
$300.(352) 628-5085
Red Lion
Concrete Mixer
$75.
Golf Dolly
$30.
(352) 697-1757
Smithbilt Low Profile
Shed 10 x14 w/5ft
door, excel cond.
$1,400. obo
Located in Floral City
Duval Is 954-695-6721
TRAILER HITCH FOR
DODGE OR CHRYS-
LER VAN 05-07 ONLY
$85. (352)464-0316
Trailer Hookup
goes up or down $95.
Reeses Hitch
for Jeep has bolts &
hardware $95
(352) 489-3661
Water Conditioner
5624 Econominder
$400.
Chassahowitzka
Ruth (352) 382-1000



DISPLAY RACKS and
store fixtures,
retail store closing at
105 W. Main St., Inver-
ness.



4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25.
(352)464-0316


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838











Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625







Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins


$1,000, (352)621-3987
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND BAG
ONLY $70. 464-0316
Adult Wheelchair
$50.
Bedside Commode
$40
(352) 628-1029
BEDSIDE COMMODE
&ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85. (352)464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR GREAT SHAPE
WITH FOOTRESTS
ONLY $100.
(352)464-0316
Small scooter, $350.
Large Scooter w/lift,
$1,000, (352)621-3987
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316
TRANSPORT WHEEL
CHAIR new condition
$50. Call (352)746-2729



ACCORDION older ac-
cordion large size $50.
Call (352)746-2729
First Act
electric guitar $35.
352-4194464
Hohner acoustic
guitar $30.
352-4194464
LAP STEEL FOR
LEARNING WITH
POWERED SPEAKER
AND GIGBAG! $100
352-601-6625
SX LAP STEEL LIKE
NEW WITH ORIGINAL
GIGBAG SOUNDS
GREAT!$95
352-601-6625



ELECTRIC TREADMILL
WITH DIGITAL
READOUT. FOLDS UP
FOR EASY STORAGE.
ONLY $100. 464 0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
Recumbent Bike,
stationary, Golds
Gym, Like brand new.
$125 obo
(352)527-1100
TREADMILL
Multi-Modes,
A 1 Shape,
$125.
(352)746-4879


MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
$100. (352)464-0316

S orting

3 WHEEL BIKE three
wheel bike $100. Call
(352)746-2729
4 Fishing Rods
3 of them custom
made, all with 10 reels
#704 and 712,
$25.00 to $65.00
(352) 382-1814
12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60.
464-0316
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Yamaha '00 GolfCart
Canvas Enclosure
New Batteries $2288.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678



Haulmark 6x12
'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand
New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678

Sell r Swa


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
Tree-services removal &
trimming cheapest
prices exp climber call
us today 352-364-2010



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


W.INDOV
GENIE. '
W. 0- and a Who. e 0 Lt M-1
*Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


SAME DAY SERVICE
at no extra cost
* Generators Lighting Fixtures
* Whole House Surge Fans Ballast
Protectors New Outlets
* Install, Service Panel Upgrades
& Repair
352-364-4610
MR.
\ ELECTRIC~
6575 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Crystal River, FL
I 24-l-i--nr-l-Saft- - --I -r-SaWeek
I24 Hours a DaY 7 DaYS a Weeki


rThis Sat 6pm
Antiques, Coins, Art Jewelry,
A Military and Estate Items
Red Barn Auctions
4535 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
Terms 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash F1 Sales Tax
AB 3172 AU4416


*-- Consign Now 4 .'."

Rates as low as 2 % We Buy Estates



B:11 It



NMIala


WATER HEATERS
SLAB LEAKS REPIPES
FAUCETS TOILETS
DRAIN CLEANING
WATER FILTRATION
ALL PLUMBING REPAIRS
LICENSED CFC1426865
www.modern-plumbing.com

^WSA*


Come visit our
Isisall Renir showroom for a
Pnipns.F Jrs huge selection of
Neameis ,y _1"0run
H r tile, pavers, pool
& Sau Ssleins finishes and pool
Ve equipment.


AS hl,-,nisfhes andpoon
Sugarmill ,, i i- I
W OOds Sering AiOn iCilriis Connr
Pool a Spa :,,,,,
SMWPOBLS eM 3212
Sfc 382-4421

I(.-R W N. ......G.....A N.T I f... ..
"'.. t . .. ... . ...


SERVING CITRUS COUNTY lONGER THAN THE REST,
CONSISTENTtY VOTED BEST OF THE BEST!


I UMRtEg

Irrigation Repairs & Installation
Sod Sales & Install
-J. ,7 3 Time Winner
ICY 2011 2012 2013

"746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home Repairs
o Small Carpentry
r 'fencing
St ".S.: reeni ng
FRE lean Dryer Vents
il e ,Jomle & Dependable
L s Epri fence lifelong
i 352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761



FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C
and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202
Lic.#CAC057482


GENERAL .
Stand Alone .i
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

I Generac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377





Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist

Summer Tune $ 995
Up Special $
Guaranteeing 1Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusve Laser Particle Scan to determine
thile quality of the air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE
Expires May 31,2014
1" 1 0[c#AC181589
0 I irBack To New s1997
Heating & Cooling
628-5700 newair.biz


?Oat.4


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 D9


Robin Long
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.
"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.


Fitness
Equipment


I Baty:


AIF




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966




WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted
Old Golf Cart
For Parts
(352) 564-2756


k M
ANDRE
Andre, beautiful
4-y.o. probable
Boxer mix, neutered,
HW negative, ap-
pears housebroken.
Very sweet boy,
good w/other dogs
& cats. Learning
new skills, interacts
well w/people.
Crate-trained,
eager to please.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.



oil





BELLA
Bella, 18-month-old
Chocolate lab mix,
spayed, housebrkn
& microchipped.
Sweet, kind, gentle
dog, good w/other
animals. UTD on
shots. Sits & waits
patiently for treats,
nice temperament.
Adoption fee $30.00
Call Wanda @
352-573-7821 or
rwmoak@att.net.


3I CLEANIG




D1O SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 CLzASSIFIEDS CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


holds up to 100 lbs
Cost $200.
Asking $100
Hardly used
(352) 382-7783
Birds for Sale
parakeets $10. ea.
cockatiels $35. ea.
lovebirds $30. ea.
Goffin cockatoo $400.
Mitred $100.
45 gal. aquarium
$75. 352-287-1522






BUD
THIS BUD'S FOR
YOU! Bud, young ter-
rier mix, brown/white
in color, HW-neg, ap-
pears housebrkn, very
friendly & playful.
Loves people, wants
to be your lapdog. All
shots current. Should
be only dog in the
home. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288
or 352-697-2682
Chihuahua AKC
Male 3 mo. Only to an
elderly couple that
has time to snuggle.
$300 (352) 419-7212
Cockatoo
7 yrs old looking for
good home, includes
large cage. $500
(352) 489-4127
Energetic 12 week
Deerhead Chihuahua
Male, H/C, $50.
Sweet 1lwk, Mini
Daschund Male $150.
Registered/Puppy Kits
Janet (352) 628-7852
FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
Husky Pups
12 wks old
1 male, 1 female
purebred, up to date
on shots, health cert.
$500. 352-246-3000
MIN PIN PUPPIES
2 Blue, 2 Fawn,
1 Chocolate 15 inch
10-15 Ibs, Health Certs
CKC. $1,200-$ 1,400.
(352) 503-7919

t I. I ii1 f"ll'(


Lour \\oIld hrst

E\oy Da)



CiiI(OiilE
r


QUAID
Quaid, a beautiful
approx. 3-5 y.o. Bull-
dog mix, very quiet
& patient. Appears
housebrkn, is eager
to please. Knows
some basic com-
mands, responds
well to a prong
training collar.
Should be only
pet in the home.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908.

Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
WESTINESE PUPPIES
All white, no shed,
m medical certicate,
9 weeks old, $500. ea
Call After 3pm.
(352) 586-0305



Minn Kota Trolling
Motor with Interstate
Batter, 451b Bow
Mount Foot Control
$250. Trailer Dolly $30.,
(352) 697-1757
Yamaha
2013, Motor
90 HP 4 stroke
25hrs on motor $7,400
(352) 423-0289




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*

BOAT TRAILER
Aluminum, NEW 2014
18 -20 FT, w/tortion
axle, folding tonque,
LED lights, and disc
brakes all below cost
@ $2,195. Open Mon.
Wednesday & Friday
Only(352) 527-3555
HURRICANE
'99, Deck Boat, w/ trir.
22ft 8 inch. 115 Yam.,
outboard, $2,900
(352) 228-1340
POLAR SKIFF
1995, 17ft, CC, 8ft Wide
75HP Yamaha, Trailer,
very good cond. $4,200
352-476-1113


Ies -


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




Newmar
96 Mountain Aire
great cond. clean,
newer Jasper engine
49,905 mi. Engine &
6.5 Kw Generator serv-
iced 3/14. Ready for
the road! $29k,
352-586-8121
or 318-245-4565
WE BUY RV'S,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




FLAGSTAFF
2006, 27 ft, Super Light
series, used 2 times,
due to illness must sell
excel, cond., 30" door
opening for wheelchair
access, one slide out
$11,400. 352-489-8637
Fleetwood Terry 32'
long, sleeps 6, full bth,
separate queen size
bdrm, great shape,
$4500 firm.
(352)201-4566

NATURE COAST RV
RV service darts sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.




CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41


Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

KIA
2003, Rio,
Ice cold AC
$4,390.
352-341-0018



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794, Call AJ
813-458-0584

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19& US44, CR
461-4518& 795-4440




CHEVROLET
2001, Impala
$4,495.
352-341-0018








SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE



CLASSIFIED

**3 SPECIALS **
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

,r Call your
Classified
representative
for details
352-563-5966
L ill iJ


'07, Fusion SEL, V6
34Kmi., $10, 500.
Excel. Condition.
(352) 489-6996
HYUNDAI
'06, Sonata, V6, 97k mi.
new AC, young tires,
perfect maint.
$6,200 (352) 231-2265
KIA
'06, Spectra, EX,
4 door, auto, air,
excel, cond. $4,995
obo (352) 621-0248

WE DO IT ALLL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CORVETTE
1979 350 Auto, Air,
70% Restored, 20,500
miles on motor. $8,500
(352) 422-3952
FORD
'64, Galaxy 500 2 door
hardtop, 352 modi-
fied, all original, needs
body work, runs excel.
$4,950 obo 476-3688





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII

MERCEDES
'84, Convertible, &
Hard top, New tires,
battery & lines. Runs
great, body excellent
10,500. 352-382-7022





ONE -ONE
e- FORD
2001 EXPLORER
SPORTTRAC
Good condition, 240k
miles, AC cold, 4 new
tires, 2WD, power
windows & doors
original owner,
clean title. $3,500
Call Doug at
352-207-0479


'97, Dakota, SLT
Excellent Running
Truck $2,400.
(352)419-5146

Larry's Auto Sales
1955S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333
BUY HERE, PAY HERE
2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down
2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down
'91 F 150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down
'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van 5.7, V-8,
Auto, $995 down
TOYOTA
'07. Tacoma, club cab
4cyl, auto, PW, PL, CD,
cruise, tow pkg. toolbx
looks like 2014, 59k mi
$12,800, 352-860-1106



CHEVROLET
1996, Blazer,
4 door, 89K miles
$2,900.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005,Equinox LS
power windows, locks,
AC, $3,990.
352-341-0018
DODGE
'09, Nitro, low miles
one owner, garage
kept, driven by little
old lady, $12,000.obo
Joan (352) 697-2595
FORD
1997 Explorer, 6 cyl.,
auto., Class II hitch
installed, $2,100
(352) 233-3837



GMC
1996, Safari
passenger Van
1 owner $3,450
352-341-0018



Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
Red 2012 CBR 250
Exc cond, transfer-
able warr. 4700 miles,
$2700 (352) 220-6032
KAWASAKI
2003 1600 Vulcan
classic. Full dress,
senior owner, X-clean,
4980 ml, $5800 obo
(352) 860-1106
SUZUKI
'05, Bergman,
400CC, Scooter
reconditioned $2,500
(352) 503-7583


Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678


Yamaha '05
V-star 1100, dressed
out, real low mi, eye
candy $4900 obo
(352) 746-9212


907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April
25, 2014-May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014


395-0525 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Robert W. Greaves
2405 W. Angler Ln
Citrus Springs, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 25, 2014.


396-0525 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE
RFQ 013-14
Sugarmill Woods Advanced Wastewater Treatment &
Reclaimed Water Production Project
EVALUATION TEAM MEETING
Purpose of Meeting:
RFQ 013-14-Sugarmill Woods Advanced Wastewater Treatment & Reclaimed Water
Production Project Evaluation Team- Meet the three firms that submitted proposal for
the Evaluation Team to determine which firm will be awarded the contract.
A Public Meeting will be held on June 3,2014 @8:30 A.M. at 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461. If any person decides to appeal any action made by the
Team with respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to in-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Contact person for
this meeting is Linda Morse, Accounting Clerk: Phone-352-527-5413 or e-mail
linda.morse @bocc.citrus.fl.us.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the pre-proposal conference or
the public opening because of a disability or physical impairment should call (352)
527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 25, 2014.


CHOOSE CAR SEAT:

BYAGE & SIZE


THE NUMBER

OF PEOPLE


WHO THINK


THEY HAVE THEIR

CHILD IN THE RIGHT

SEAT.


KNOW FOR SURE





IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.


VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT


HT 0A Child Car
NH5A :0Safety


397-0525 SUCRN
June 5, 2014 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned has
intent to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidd-
ing on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
are located at Adam's 24
Hr Towing, 4212 W Hwy
44, Lecanto, FL 34461
DOS:06-05-14@8AM
1991 BUIC
VIN#2G4WB54L1M1808823
1996 CHEV
VIN#1GIJC1242T7154182
Purchases must be paid
for at the time of sale,
cash only. All vehicles are
sold as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. All sales are subject
to cancellation in the
event of settlement be-
tween owner and the
obligated party.
May 25, 2014


I i oie


I i otcs


I ^^BidNtcs




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$500 MIUTARY APPRECATI0N OFFEt
To eliqgile members of the US Military g their spouses towarcs any new Honda
vehicle *hen you finance or ieas, rhru HFS
OVM 90 S & CERTIm uPROWu VMInIia
All PreOwned Vehicles Indude a
6 MONTH/6,OO0MILE
ULimited Powertrain Warranty
PUJS A MAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM
See dealer for complete details.


CELEBRATE

IN A NEW CHEVRQLEO -


A COMMITMENT TO SERVING ALL THAT HAVE SERVED
During Military Appreciation Month. now all Veterans along with
Active Duty, Reserves and Retirees are eligible for the Chevrolet Military Discount*.
The best Military Purchase Program in the industry.
i

& 2014 Chevy Silverado A
Double Cab 4x4 AH Star MSRP $44, 155 S


WYuy5 Discount
+ $3,52 Rebate
1, 1t f 1All Star
"*T I y &wDiscount
+ $500P c
i. $750usM
You Pay $35,100


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
so Security Deposit
Down Payment
First Month Payment
L~" p, 36Months
r Month 35Mo.PymtS
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees
ei, Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 36,000 miles.


2014 Equinox
$1,.00 ou T.1
, kMW ~bh,,,,,,ri, >,

$ .cL ..,


All Pre-Loved Certified


All Pre-Loved Certified
Vehicles include up to:
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY


PThvyAA West 352 ~A1 0018


~352.3411.0018
inmess, FL 34453lS
VECH EVYSALESo.COM


2014 Traverse LSFWD
$1,500WCustomer Cash
T" l*,w .:,,.-ii .."i:r,
+$5,000P u.h~.
fatal Cksh Aik*wAnczJ


2 YEARS OR
24,0O0 MILE
MAINTENANCE


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
$2 59Per Month
v; for 36 Months
$2j CC9 Due at Signing
9 After All Offers
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees
extra.Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 36,000 miles.


PIT-STOP
PROGRAM
INCLUDED
See dealerfor complete details.


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!


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2014 Cruze LTj
Sl500


Lot '-A leage Lease for Ou3iilie Lessees.
rfr Security Deposit
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[ pUFirst Month Payment
$fll Per 36Months
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Iy After All Offers
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees
r"in P i r .'h v r3lr .)1 '!, ['1, Ir, iw .)I- i r f 0)101) ITflr4,


9OVER0
Used & Certified
L Pre-Loved Vehicles


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 Dll




D12 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2014 NISSAN PER MONTH
ALTIMA $3,899 DUE AT SIGNING
A LY VVIN: 293676 MODEL: 13114


2 OR MORE A AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE!


FROM HERE TO


MEMPHIS


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937 S Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448


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Section E SUNDAY, MAY 25,2014


OME
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RONT
-TRLIS C<)OIINTY CHR)RONICIF RFAL EFSTATF


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--- -'1.1 PAGE E4


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E2 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE
I 1: 1111HZ I fll7.21 2 2417 INFO0LINE
'52137-28 Entrhou.822t637.~28
0 598958




745 INVERIE DRIVE 5989 H. ORCHIS TER. LAUREL RIDGE RUSAW BUILT VILLA BEVERLY HILLS!! MOVE-IN AND ENJOY!
NOMOREMOWING NEWLISTING PINE RIDGE 3BR,2BATH 2-CARGarage 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 1-CAR GARAGE Recently and tasteful updated golf course condo
OR MOIG'E ITN!PN IG R BT !SRGra!IBT,1CRGRG offers fresh paint, new loors, new kitchen cabinets and
Cool-abana-Clubhouse DCckon Lake *4BD/3BA/N3OG Over 3,600 SF Living *2002 Built Eat-In Kitchen w/Built-ln's BLOCK HOME, LARGE LEVEL LOT, new appliances. Man ificent view of the course. Pet
25x16 GreatRoom 2/2/1-Eat-ln kitchen *2ndStoryBonus Rm. or4th Bedroomw/Bath Screen Lanai Master Bath Double Sinks REMODELED, SCREEN PORCH, LARGE friendly and MOVE-IN ready. Nothing to do, but grab
SStore Boat or RV FLORIDA ROOM! *Office or Den *Many Extras Lawn Care Included Low Quarterly Fee FLORIDA ROOM TILE AND LAMINATE your clubs and enjoy the maintenance-free lifestyle!
ELLIE SUTTO 352-287-3997 PETER& MARVIA KOROL [' N THROUGHOUT.
i' (352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352476-8536 DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682 SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Enall ellIesUllTT oN 32 7e5 x ne P MRD31GHOU Email: sheryIpotts@aol.com
w o sgo (352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellstlorida.com t Email: dmfl@yahoo.om Wesite: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com



S3642 N. LUCILLE DR. BEAUTIFUL 5 BEDROOM HOME PINE RID OE ESTATE
STHE GLEN REALTY ONE ON 5 FENCED ACRES onT o is 11


,4D/35BTH 3CA -CrGrae *2BD/2BAN1CG Maintenance-Free Villa ** ^ ^ A fabulous home for your large family, this spacious 13 Fool Ceilings in the Study, Dining and Living Rooms
,FR LR ec. m .-ffi e ibr ry~ f M B O ve r 55 C o m m u nity M a ny U pg rades 2 4 / I U HF L I N E 5 bedroom 3.5 bath hom e has it alI. Hardw ood oo rs, high as erh as G ren T ,W al -n'hT .. .. & Close
,20 uitb Dem ,Ho u/IGONDPO Nice Deck in Back *Furnishings Available Z ~ ~ I E ceilings, fireplace, granite counters and an amazing kitchen. Which Is Also A Safe Room
ELLE UTTN 52-87399 PETER & MARVIA KOROLir 1 637 0000 Inr"nr '^l ~'^h~ 'i'm H" l'h^F nd rm.i uhMc MrcALL THE CUHHIHGHAM4 TEAM /H
S~3 S2 STEVE VARADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 (352)637-6200




w .lodUiinlocoa(3S52) 422-3875 ^M| ww qr ^ I,,(iiil :'(,(v,iin#,iA.( _i i ii.,(lf A-A Emall: kcunimmyham@remax.nelt ^
#61or Buyjoe#5r05 E hauSe 1&J2 Enter house #12-2














389RS BYPT MINI FRMS numbe "^ when 1530 ^ S E PlWHEEL DRIVE 3^/2/2 IHCOHELLHEIGHTS
-r .







5008 MUSTANG 3542 BATH, LU2 CA R GARAGE prompt CRYSTAIFU L RIV BEDROOM HOME P INE RIDGE ESTATE





,82q.F. iin Hg Uiit m.-toae! SALT WATER, SELF CLEANING POOL &- ^ IoWater Frontage q92 Ft. MOL Open floor plan with great room, formal dining,
2.75 2.5 ACRES COMPLETELY FEN RCED N ON 5 FENCED ACRESw Hm b reakfast room ailwith bedrooms 1Ox51' 4-season
4 BRi.5 BATHS 3-CAR+ -Car Garage 2BD2BA CG Maintenance-Free Villa A fabulous home for your large family, this spacnai, inside laundry with wet study Dinkng and 1x82'iving Roomsx2
Graniteu Counteed AlPodoaietBauulForn
irary Over 55 CJu 1 n 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath home has it all. Hardwood loor, high Master has Garden Tub Waik-in Shower & Cioset











FR-LR-RecN OmN-ce 'Lb Off MBR Co y M y Urnn v Bemutiurl Geated Pool_ parking. Ei-teC ,;t,, Wo, r,,,,;I, ,,--J ; ,;Ba ,1tiil F
GR2009 Built by Dream EATVHot TubI NGROUND POOL Nice Deck in Back Furnishin ceilings, fireplace, granit Hom e for Enters and an amazing kitchen. Which isAsoASafe Room
ELLE UTON 5221-397/7r INF LIN iniriind r- idthdpr 'H r ndm Much Much More
PETER & MARIA KOROL CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM





Emnimm eiiiesuiion e (352 PA 4 2-7ADOR4 ANh -1 b i ( 3 SVE. LEVA PALMER (352) 212-2619-61 CHEYILADA (352) 302-3555
www.FlotuidaLsiinglnlo.con (352 Engls or Spanish Email: lenpnlmeoitItemo-tx.nes l Email kcunigdal.mremax.netf
R THERE SHOW:
6~'37-282 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line F -
#rr ri637-2828




.....B L ..... ...,
III2 111 Buyer enters house 10i





3879PINE RIDGOSE BEAUTY lPATH MJCilc number when 1530 swSE 1ST AVE.PINWHE CRYSTAL RIVER SO322 IAR CONNELL HEIGHTS
You wll love targ e 222 open, 2414 Flo oor plan in this B TH 3 bedroomA 2 & 1/2 bathsGARAGE 2-car garage 2 2 built with vaulted with this RARE 3 Bedroom2005
'1,872 Sq. Ft. Living 'Huge Utility Rm. Storage. *2 SATACERESCOPEELY LEANNCE POOL Water Frontage 92 Ft. MOL Open floor plan with great room, formal dining,




carefree 3 bdrm/2 bateh home on 1.5 acraAC & Shingles 2 3 areaboat dock, lift and all on 1/2 acre. OPEN Solar pit bwedroome s 1x5 4in PinesRidgeason
Main living areas lead to the lanai and pool with WATnR a NO RID S Low, nd Low Power Blls Swimming Pool/Spax82 & 20x2
*LR Plus Family Rm. '1mmT Occupancy OPEN FLOOR PLAN 3 Buyer listens to B oat flock / Lift attached carports and detached carport/boat





serenity all around you. MOVE-IN READY F T O H LD OUd TH P yRV Covered Parking FreeStanding Workshop
ELLI LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 e2t Masteru.Great Home for Entertainin
KID DEVAlE (352) 257-5353 ~IEmall: iucybornes@rem)x.net C|1 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-357812
Email: kim@kime Email pparevanevi@ahoo.com English or Spanish Email: lenplmerremax.ne Email: nEsaeGeorgeSleeman conel
AVAILABLE "_

01. .. ..t a f a_"a I
PINE RIDGE BEAUTY MammaU~ihls "01 E 530 SW 1 ST AVE., CRYSTAL RIVER SOLAR SAVES BIG!
You will love the open, flowing floor plan in thi 3 bedroom, 2 & 1/2 baths, 2-car garage... 2002 built with vaulted with this RARE 3Bedroom
carefree 3 bdrm/2 bath home on 1.5 acres! ceilings, 3,136 ft. living area, boat dock, lift and all on 1/2 acre. OPEN Solar Powered Home in Pine Ridge
Main living areas lead to the lanai and pool with WATER& NO BRIDGES. Low, Low Power Bills Swimming Pool Spa
serenity all around you. MOVE-I N READY! RV Covered Parking Free-Standing Workshop
flLUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103 2I *Master Suites I l1:111-
KIM DEVANE (352) 257-5353 121Email- lucybarnesaweremax.netl GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-1812rif
Email. kim&kaimdevane.com Visual Tours- www crystlurivertl.com L i Email: RealEsalae@GleorgeSlee nun coin




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Dawn Ellie
Wright Sutton
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.

RE/MAX agents
reach for the stars
The associates and staff of RE/MAX
Realty One are very pleased to an-
nounce that two of their agents have sur-
passed production milestones this week.
Dawn Wright, a Realtor in their Crys-
tal River office, qualified for the Million
Dollar Club in sales volume.
Ellie Sutton, who works out of their
Lecanto office, qualified for the presti-
gious Multi-Million Dollar club.
Both Dawn and Ellie have a long his-
tory of success in the Citrus County real
estate market. The brokers of RE/MAX
congratulate both Dawn and Ellie on
these significant accomplishments.
EXIT Realty
produces winners
EXIT Realty Leaders wishes to
congratulate John Maisel, Nancy


Bernadette
Poorman
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


John Becky
Maisel Paradiso
EXIT Realty EXIT Realty
Leaders. Leaders.


Mike
Stokley
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


PHOTO REQUEST GUIDELINES
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests
to take photos of community events. Call
352-563-5660 for details.


-dh-CitrtisCounty I L
a~iDreamTeani^HH^^^^1
37 S. Davis St. 2/2/1 Imperial model. Home offers large master
with walk n closet and bath. Great family room with sliders out to a
Alllj11 3320 X 17 Screened lanai. Easy to maintain wood Laminate flooring.
Large laundry room/office space. Sellers are motivated!


Nancy
Ayres
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Trisha
Antonetti
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Ayres, Trisha Antonetti, Becky Par-
adiso, Bernadette Poorman, and
Mike Stokley for being named among
the the Top 100 agents for EXIT
Florida.
EXIT Realty's agents can be
reached at 352-794-0888 or 352-
527-1112.


^. -**' .'SSS*3/2/2, stainless
. t '. ^ steel appliances
9 &granite
countertops.
708572
$129,900
Yolanda
Canchola
219-2196


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate agents submitted for the Real Estate Digest
are kept on file in the Chronicle Editorial Department. It is the responsi-
bility of individuals submitting news notes to ensure headshots have
been sent to the newsroom. Photos need to be in sharp focus.
* Photos printed on home printers do not reproduce well; submit the
digital image via disk or e-mail. Staff will color correct and otherwise
"work up" the image to Chronicle publication standards.



John Warren White

PA ARCHITECT

THE MOST EXPERIENCED ARCHITECT

IN HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTY

Cell 352-540-8687 352-796-4972
jwhite198@tampabay.rr.com I


9 p 2.


Newcarpet, paint and appliances. 2/2
710461 $85,000
Pam Shemet422-2939


3/2/2 close to shopping and the 3/2 fenced backyard, new paint and
river. 709420 $78,500 carpet. 709659 $67,500
Steve McClory 422-3998 John Maisel 302-5351


Cute as a button, updated bathrooms.
2/1.710050 $49,900
Gary Ayers 302-9329


Lovely Decor 2/2
708789 $74,900
John Maisel 302-5351


New carpet, paint and appliances.
3/1.710272 $54,900
Steve McClory 422-3998


Wood cabinets, tile floor, massive
laundry room. 4/2 707899 $59,900
John Maisel 302-5351


*5-"C08 |


m


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E3




E4 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CiIR)9NidE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


US home sales rose



1.3 percent in April


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sales of existing U.S.
homes rebounded slightly in April, but
the pace of buying remained below last
year's level.
The National Association of Realtors
said Thursday that sales rose 1.3 percent
from March to a seasonally adjusted an-
nual rate of 4.65 million. Purchases of
homes over the past 12 months have
dropped 6.8 percent.
Much of the gains were concentrated in
the volatile condominium market, which
experienced growth of 7.3 percent. Sales
of single-family homes were up just 0.5
percent last month.
Nearly five years into the recovery
from the Great Recession, real estate
sales have yet to return to their historic
averages. The solid gains made through
the middle of 2013 have evaporated,
while demand continues to be strong for
the most expensive properties and falter-
ing for starter homes and those priced for
middle class buyers.
Home-buying continues to run signifi-


cantly below their 2013 pace, when 5.1
million existing-homes were bought.
That's well below the 5.5 million that is
consistent with a healthy housing market.
Snowstorms and cold weather delayed
sales in the Midwest and Northeast dur-
ing first two months of 2014. Would-be
buyers are also wrestling with higher
prices and rising interest rates over the
past 12 months, causing the real estate
market to lose some of its momentum
from last year
But in a positive sign, the April report
shows that would-be sellers are shaking
off the nasty winter and listing their
homes for sale. The market has a 5.9-
month supply of homes, up from 5.2
months a year ago.
"With the warmer weather and the
'promise' of higher prices, more home-
owners put their homes on the market,"
said Jennifer Lee, a senior economist at
BMO Capital Markets.
Prices continue to increase, yet the lim-
ited demand appears to have eased the

See SALES/Page E5


Inside...


Natural glam
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E9
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Bed likely of recent vintage; digging into desk's history


ear John: Could you
please tell me how old
you think this bed is?
I have been told
early to late 1800s.
It seems to have
various types of
woods. In a few of .
the pictures, you
will see the clunky
wood used to at-
tach the pieces
together
There are no
markings any- John S
where that I saw I SIKOE
am trying to deter- AT
mine the resale _____
value of this beau-
tiful bed. -M., Internet
Dear M.: The four-poster
bed is a combination of styles
taken from the 17th and 18th
century I think it was made
in Indonesia or somewhere


I

i
R


in Asia for the Western mar-
ket. Time of production is
likely within the past 25 to
50 years.
Potential dollar
value is catch-as-
Scatch-can. If you
like it, it would be
b ?.f better kept than
sold.
Dear John: You
might suggest the
lady with the tele-
graph from the
korski Civil War colonel
SKI'S contact a histori-
IC cal society in his
_____ home area of New
York, or the New
York Historical Society about
the telegram. Whoever col-
lects the gentleman's papers
might be quite interested in
acquiring it.
The content of the message


might make a big difference
in interest. If it has no major
financial interest, she could
donate it to the most-
interested agency and take a
modest tax deduction for the
donation, while having her
name included in the collec-
tion's records with the
telegram.
Here is the information
and background about the
desk I spoke to you about on
the radio show. The silver
plaque on the desk I men-
tioned said it was given to the
new CEO of the Montreal of-
fice of Canada GE by his
employees.
One drawer contained his
business card from Montreal
Electric Co., which he
headed until it was com-
bined with the Montreal Gas
Company and he had to find


another job. The desk plaque
was dated the next year
The librarian who looked
in the Montreal city directo-
ries told me when he retired
to Michigan, where I bought
the desk many years later
She also told me the ages and
names of his family and his
first name, which was not on
the plaque or card.
The desk was built by a
company on the shores of
Lake Huron in Ontario, sold
by a store in Montreal that
See ATTIC/Rage E10
This four-poster bed is a
combination of styles taken
from the 17th and
18th century, and it
was likely produced in Asia
sometime in recent
decades.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Community gardens can provide


options for urban green thumbs


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Community gardens are much
more than neighboring plots. Given
enough energy and enthusiasm, they
morph into support groups, horti-
culture classes, swap meets or mod-
est profit centers for low- and
fixed-income growers. Small won-
der there often is more demand
than availability
Many have waiting lists. In the Los
Angeles area, for example, it can be
a year or more before people are
able to acquire garden plots, said
Yvonne Savio of the University of
California Cooperative Extension in
Los Angeles County
"Sometimes, people drive clear
across town because that's where
their plot opened up first," Savio
said. "Some people bring their tools
with them on the bus."
Locations are advertised in news-
papers, on the Internet and on
neighborhood bulletin boards.
Sponsors vary from churches to hos-
pitals, municipalities to large
corporations.
"One of our gardens is run by five
guys from a church," Savio said.



SALES
Continued from Page E4

pace of growth. Median prices rose
5.2 percent to $201,700 in April, the
slowest growth rate since March
2012, the Realtors said.
Buying picked up last month in
the West and South, gains that were
offset slightly by a decline in the
Midwest and flat sales in the
Northeast.
The upper-tier of the market re-
mains healthier than the low-end.
Sales continued to fall last month for
homes priced below $250,000, while
rising for homes sold for more than
$750,000. First-time buyers who
tend to purchase lower priced prop-
erties represented 29 percent of
all sales, much less than the histori-
cal average of 40 percent.
Existing-home sales began to slow


DEAN FOSDICK/Chronicle
A woman prepares planting beds in
her personal plot at the South Whid-
bey Tilth Community Garden near
Freeland, Wash. Gardeners can re-
serve a 20-foot by 20-foot space for a
$50 annual fee, and must use organic
growing methods and materials.
"They literally farm. They plant
what the parishioners want, then
harvest the stuff and bring it to
church every Sunday"
See GARDENS/Page E12


in the second half of 2013 as mort-
gage rates crept up from historic
lows. Higher home prices, partly
due to meager home listings, began
to push some buyers out of the
market
Average rates for fixed, 30-year
mortgages last week were 4.2 per-
cent, compared to 3.51 percent a
year ago.
"Rising mortgage rates can ac-
count for much of the sluggishness
in existing home sales over the past
year," John Krainer, a senior econo-
mist at the Federal Reserve Bank of
San Francisco, wrote this week.
Rates have steadily fallen by 0.33
percentage points since January
2014, although that has yet to boost
purchases. An index measuring ap-
plications for new mortgages fell 3
percent over the past week and 12
percent over the past year, the Mort-
gage Bankers Association said
Wednesday


tSi z "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"
NANCY Direct: 352-634-4225
n ^A i l.^.L ^ KEY 1 REALTY INC. r
I pnNT ~ n "ancy@Nneynsco'm'
PONTICOS NanFNancyiows corn 4
i Multi-Million $$$ Producer ?T! ] '-
Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700





,- 15 DEER DRIVE 80 BYRSONIMA LOOP W
Private Golf Course Estate Wonderful Hammock Villa
Open Island Granite Kitchen PANORAMIC VIEWS to open GOLF fairway
New Master Suite Eat-In Kitchen
*. Separate Guest Wing Spacious Master Suite with Walk-In
S Huge 3-Car Garage Separate Guest Wing.
Soar Pool and Lots of Room Plush Updated Decor!
$290,000 MLS#705968 $169,700 MLS#706274
ak-effY 11111:1110


M i 1m 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Baltour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkins Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKER ASSOCIATE REALTOR


5T518 N ELKCA.
32210864,$149,000


I 9 DANIEL
35 2 /15/,503 $N L A 2,500 2/1/1 709478 $54,900 F 2L15 709482 $46,905 0
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465


PINE RIDGE


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Average US loan rate falls to 4.14 percent


Market traditionally heats up during summer months [ ,


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -Average U.S.
rates on fixed mortgages fell this
week for a fourth straight week.
The low rates could give a boost to
the spring home-buying season,
which has started slowly
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac
said Thursday that the average
rate for a 30-year loan declined to
4.14 percent from 4.20 percent last
week. The average for the 15-year
mortgage eased to 3.25 percent
from 3.29 percent.
Warmer weather has yet to boost


home-buying as it normally does.
Rising prices and higher rates
have made affordability a problem
for would-be buyers.
U.S home construction surged
in April to its highest pace in five
months, the government reported
last Friday, but nearly all the in-
crease came from the volatile
apartment sector a sign that
Americans are still struggling to
buy single-family homes.
And sales of existing U.S. homes
rebounded slightly in April, but
the pace of buying remained
below last year's level, according


to data released Thursday by the
National Association of Realtors.
Home sales and construction
have faltered since last fall, slow-
ing economic growth. A harsh win-
ter, higher buying costs and a
limited supply of available homes
have discouraged many potential
buyers.
Mortgage rates still are nearly a
full percentage point above record
lows reached about a year ago.
The increase over the year was
driven in part by speculation that

See LOANS/Page E7


Associated Press
In this May 14 photo, a new home is for sale in the Winthrop
subdivision in Riverview, Florida.


Specaialzig E errEVst

REALTY GROUP ww.er-sae *opco_


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 'VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777
DETACHED VILLA,
2 BED, 2 BATH,
2-CAR, HILLSIDE
__ ~~II1 I h


I',............


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS DETACHED VILLAS, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR .... .
NEW 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2 CAR GARAGE BRENTWOOD MAINTENANCE-FREE HOME. Woodview Villas immaculate 2 bedrooms, 2 baths with a den pool home located in .... ... i i . . . .
Absolutely beautiful, with many upgrades including custom wood cabinetry, granite Woodview Villas in Terra Vista. This Madiera model is beautifully appointed with .. .... ...... ..... .i
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS countertops, stainless steel appliances, tile floors and energy efficient comfort. Great room plantation shutters, oak flooring, solid surface counter tops, plus much more.. ..... ....... ...... . ....... ...........
oy maintenance free giving in this 2/2/2 w/office in Terra Vista's. Dual pane siding glass floor plan, screened in lanai and beautiful golf course view. Ifyou are looking fora carefree Sparkling pool with spill over spa surrounded by lush landscaping to create your own .. i i ....... .... i .... i
ketdoors lead outto a beautiful screened private inground pool and lanai. It's the perfect home, with the country club lifestyle of the premiere Citrus Hills Country Club social private oasis. Very well maintained great room floor plan. Carefree living at ts finest, ..... . .. .. .. .. .... ... . ..
ce to enjoyyourmorning coffee in the fresh Florida ai MLS358772 ...............$210,000 membership, this is a MUST SEE! MLS710654 ........................................................ 217,9 this Villa isa sMust-see! MLS710593 ................................................................... $269,900 ... ...... .. i n 274.900


Terram~a" isto /'rslsStutdnacr-frevilgehryuavtlndcpae Spctcua Codv DETAdel loddwt pgaeicuin rnt ontrosi xcuiepnrmi etn vrloigteSk"iwGl W1^-| ^^s^S^ ^^ f
DETACHED POINTE VISTA CONDOMINIUM
VILLA B t E 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths, 2-car garage nestled in the heart of
2.5 BATH. in th har o
d -iCARoa2-CAR. Terra Vista you'll find a unique private enclave at Pointe Vista.
i i HILLSIDE VILLAS This impressive 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2-car garage,
entertnng Be. maintenance- free carriage home is highlighted by striking
,,', ,,, ,-,design and refined architectural detailing. Elegant custom
SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3-CAR, WOODSIDE upgrades in every room and private elevator. With an
Terra Vista o Citru Hi Situatd a ca re-free vlage whre ve e landscape care Spectacular Cordova model loaded wh upgrades including granite countertops in exclusive panoramic setting overlooking the Sky View Golf
toothera... they lleven pant the exteror for you. This home offers an open "great roomr your beautiful gourmet kltchenwth built in sky light, custom windowtreatments and Course and beautiful lakes. Recognized as one of the most
plan with a forma dinng room, spacious ctchen, owners suste, 2 guest room PLUS a den. The gorgeous lighting fixtures. Formal dining and living areas plus a large family room give
den isloaded with bulltIn ca bnetrya ready forethath o ofice. Aspacioualanai pluaa beau- great spaces for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on your extended screened remarkable communities in Florida you will enjoy the private
tiful screen enclosed pool wIth 2 waterfall features & planter provides for a great sett g for lanai with Shoji hot tub. All this plus a 3+ car garage with a separate golf cart club amenities and active lifestyle. MLS 710004... $788,000
entertaining. Be sure to put it o you r"MUST SEE' hat, MLS 710549 .. $274,900 entrance. PRICED TO SELL! This home is a must see. MLS 353844 ........... $345,000
Terms 6 Mots or More
Ter Vist & rnw odR nas Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


II _____..... "1 Li'
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY DETACHED, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HUNT CLUB
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS Lovely Immaculate Home in Brentwood. Open floor plan includes 2 bedrooms Hunt Club 3 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage single family home DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished with a den. Beautifully furnished with modern tones. Includes large eat-in unfurnished, nicely upgraded kitchen, tile floors and carpet in Furnished 2 bedroom 2 bath 2 car garage. Spacious great room floor
etached villa ,2 bedrooms 2 baths and 2 car garage. Open floor plan kitchen, flat screen TV, king-size bed in master, desk area in den with a pull-out bedrooms. Extended lanai with pavers. All appliances. Citrus plan. Tile floors, gas fireplace. Social Membership and
vith lots of s pace. Social membership is included. #2121.............$1,200 sofa and much more. Social Club Membership Included. #1216............... $1,300 Hills Social M membership and lawn care included. #6251........$1,550 utilities included #4253........................................ ................... $1,900


E6 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Everybody wants



a better deal


GOT A NEWS TIP?
* The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the newsroom at
352-563-5660, and give your name, phone number, and the address of the news event.
* To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for Logan Mosby.
Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.


4 9 i'91111yi i_1cnw^F r 1 /IT AF At


Gypsy's Two Cents: Being located
next to the Ice Cream Doctor is risky
If you come in smelling like ice
cream, expect to be stalked. If you
bring in ice cream, ask for paper
towels not for the ice cream but
for the drool on your shoes.
ommonly asked questions
when shopping for
antiques should be:
How old is it? Is it a repro-
duction? Is it signed? Is it 1 4
original? Has it been
refinished?
Instead, most often we
hear: Can you do any bet-
ter? What's your best? (I
usually respond with "best ,
for you or best for me?"
Oddly enough, I always get Stev(
the same answer) TIMI
Discounting and negoti- T
ating is just part of the busi-
ness that other types of
retailers don't experience. At times
it can be fun; other times, not so
much. Our dealers will occasionally
put their booth on sale; as you might
expect, sale prices would not be eli-
gible for further discounts or
negotiation.
If there is a special or rare item,
very often there is no discount given.
Tip of the day: better discounts are
achieved if you exercise humor
Years ago, discounts started as a
courtesy to other dealers only; then
they were extended to regular cus-



LOANS
Continued from Page E6

the Federal Reserve would reduce
its bond purchases, which have
helped keep long-term interest rates
low Indeed, the Fed has announced
four declines in its monthly bond
purchases since December because
the economy appears to be steadily
healing. But the Fed has no plans to
raise its benchmark short-term rate.
Fed Chair Janet Yellen has told
Congress that the economy is im-
proving but noted that the job mar-
ket remains "far from satisfactory"


e
E
I


tomers and collectors. Since then,
the practice has evolved, it seems, to
include everybody, perhaps as a re-
sult of eBay, auctions, flea markets,
etc.
Currently, a tagged item is per-
ceived as an asking price by many
customers. This price has been ad-
justed for the antici-
pated discounts.
A friend recently gave
me the following info:
- I Hunt It
% I Find It. I Buy It
| I Load It. I Haul It
0 I Unload It.
0 I Clean It I Oil It
M I Research It.
SI Display It.
Barnes I Pay Taxes.
E WILL I Pay Rent.
ELL U Now, how can you
ask me to take less?
This month's story is
a follow-up of Dick Lewis' March
story A wooden bowl was purchased
at a thrift store by his friend Martin
for $7.
After research, the potential value
was more than $5,000, and the bowl
was headed for an auction house in
Chicago. Update: The bowl sold at
auction for $6,500!


Steve Barnes owns and, along
with his shop dog Gypsy, operates
Olde Inverness Antiques.

and that inflation is still below the
Fed's target rate. She said she ex-
pects the Fed's near-zero target for
short-term rates to remain appro-
priate for a "considerable time"
after the bond purchases end.
To calculate average mortgage
rates, Freddie Mac surveys lenders
across the country between Monday
and Wednesday each week. The av-
erage doesn't include extra fees,
known as points, which most bor-
rowers must pay to get the lowest
rates. One point equals 1 percent of
the loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-year
mortgage was unchanged from a
week earlier at 0.6 point.


(jp Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties
NEW LISTING


lVeIq600Yh00,I
T LeatING
NEW LISTING


i 861 N Spend A Buck Dr
1087 EAegrieDr MLS 710542 $239,950
MLS 710574 $275,000 Beautiful custom built 3/2/2 w/pool
Beautiful 3/2/3 w/pool, spa & family room. & family room.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Matt Robinson 352-502-3501
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING


C'- 690UE Glchrisl Ci 242B
MLS 710583 $84,000
Not your typical 2/2 townhome,
CP w/storage. A must see.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


-V,1,fA 936 W Sun Vista Ct
MLS 709571 $349,000
Elegant, spacious, true luxury...describe
this 3bd/2ba.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


. /L 701 E Falconry CI
MLS 709078 $224,900
A must see! 3 bdrm/2 bath home is
move-in ready.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


/ -. i- IU IM vuCK u Nr? rain
MLS 710578 $29,900
Great starter home, bachelor pad or
winter get-away place.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261






S.itls 141 E Liberty SI
MLS 707281 $294,900
Oaks Golf Course 18th fairway views
from this 3/2/3 pool home.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK


MLS 710631 $190,001
Like new 3/2/2 w/fireplace, private yard
+ much more.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


/ j 4141 W Bonanza ur
0 .h' ,:. -.4.,I $925.000
UNBELIEVABLE!! Executive,
turnkey home.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


-b fA 201 W Doerr Path
MLS 708247 $229,000
Relax, enjoy the private backyard.
3/2/2 home w/bonus room.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


inx

aflirtg t 1462 E. SI. James Loop rl
SMLS /uM3JJ $199,900 656 W Wild Pine Cir
Beautiful 4/4/2 pool home w/private U a e MLS 707940 $34,900
guest quarters. Super clean 1/1 villa in 55+ community.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


PINE RIDGE CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. .. 20W.Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 (352) 746-0744
S 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC An independentlyowned and operated brokermemrnberof BRERAffiliates LLC Prudental,the Prudential
WWW.FlohI rI,,ida ..h i,... m
.. 1 I. .II ,1 II ,,,S, .. lh h ,I I ,, ,, ll ,, ,,- I S O,,I .. i ii ,,,


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E7




E8 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


new designs give natural

material s a stylish sizzle


by kim cook
associated press


t his year's design shows,
- such as NY Now and the Ar-
chitectural Digest Home Design
Show, have featured eye-catch-
ing pieces by designers and
artists who take elements
from nature and give them glam-
orous makeovers.
We're seeing lots of metallic
paint, tweaked shapes and pol-
ished finishes. The resulting art
and furniture pieces can be as
stunning as the inspiration from
which they're drawn.
Molly McCall uses old tech-
niques to create contemporary
art pieces in her Carmel Valley,
California, studio. Images of
plants and butterflies are cap-
tured with light and sensitized
paper in a process known as pho-
togrammetry McCall transfers
some of the photograms onto
glass plates, fusing the layers
with a glaze of crushed glass that


results in a finished plate similar
to milk glass.
"I try to look for new ways to
see the world around me, and
then capture that moment," she
says. The collection of prints,
some on paper and others on
metal, contains delicate, often
ethereal imagery of wildflowers
and grasses, and even a hum-
mingbird in mid-flight
(wwwmollymccall.com)
Welsh artist Michael Angove's
prints of flowers and greenery
are made using 3-D scanning
techniques. His studio in Wilt-
shire, England, sits in a garden
full of ready inspiration.
A frothy hydrangea is visited
by lime-white butterflies; plump
roses cascade in rich tones of
velvety red, china blue or dovish
pink and gray His Topiary print
See Page Ell





inatura


W The Fathom
pendant from Corbett
Lighting features an open iron
sphere with multiple-sized circles
and convex crystal lenses in a
white finish, with polished
stainless accents.
Associated Press




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Black-eyed? Brown-eyed? Susans are always beautiful
lack-eyed ciduous in win-
Susan is ter, even in rela-
one of P 1tively warm
about 15 species Central Florida.
in the Rud- All Rudbeck-
beckia genus, ias have cor-
native to North p o s i t e ,
America. Some daisy-like flow-
are annuals ers, usually with
which grow, set yellow ray
seed and die Jane Weber petals around a
within a year central, promi-
Others are bien- JANE'S nent cone or
nials which GARDEN disk. Flowers
sprout and grow are single, dou-
one year, flower and set ble or semi-double, 1 to 2
..seed the next then die. A 1/2 inches in diameter The
few are perennials which raised cone may be black,
last many years. Rud-
beckia perennials are de- See Page E13



REAL ESTATE, INC. BST
____5569 W. GuLf To LAKE HwY. f r
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 Vt
(352) 795-6633 Rto
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-i I L: SALES@ALE,_,XRE.CO]M
11 at N


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bedroom, 1 5
All Rudbeckias have composite, daisy-like flowers, with yellow petals around a central, prominent cone or disk. baths, frame home ready to move in
condition, hard wood pine floors, metal
roof, bonus room off main bedroom, den
^ |Ioff living room, screen porch, 2 Ig out
buildings to store 3 cars & have 2
,.. workshops #709295 $85,000


ml


CO, wL


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E9




E10 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

was demolished to make
way for a freeway and later
declared surplus to the
needs of the Detroit Histor-
ical Museum, where I was
curator of industrial his-
tory I bought it from the
Detroit Historical Society
which received it from the
museum for disposal. It
was one of three such desks
declared surplus, and all
three were purchased by
staff members. The large
rolltop desk I used in my
museum office had been
owned by a Michigan lum-
ber baron. Our collections
also included a rare
Wooten folding/traveling
desk owned by PT. Bar-
num. -H.V, Internet
Dear H.V: I appreciate
the suggestion to donate
the telegram to a historical
society
The story about the desk
is quite interesting I am glad
you took the time to write it
As always, any comments
about subjects covered in
the column are welcome.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dear John: In approxi-
mately 1976, in Charleston,
South Carolina, I was
given a library table that
was in pieces. I had it re-
paired and was asked if I
knew how old the table
was, and I did not.
At that time I was told the
table appeared to be quite
old, possibly a couple hun-
dred years old. We have
been told by two different
people you may be able to
either appraise the table or
suggest someone whom we
can contact for an ap-
praisal. -A.R., Internet
Dear A.R.: Yes, I would
be glad to help you. Take
photographs of the front,
back, side, and the under-
side. Make sure the photo-
graphs are clear


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, P.O. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


Controlled burns promote



health of forest ecosystem


ost of us who have lived in
Florida for any period of
time have witnessed
columns of gray smoke
emanating from wooded
areas throughout Central
Florida. Some of these
smoke columns are sub- ,
stantial and may last for
several days. Sometimes .
they are adjacent to the
highways we are driving
on; other times, we see
them from a distance.
So what is all this
smoke anyway? More Eric]
often than not, it is from ARI
a controlled or pre- CULl
scribed burn. U
The term "prescribed
bumr" refers to the fact that the burn
is conducted following a written
prescription detailing the site, the
desired weather parameters, the
equipment and personnel needed
to safely conduct the burn, and
other information, such as down-


KAREN E. MORTON
Hall f~r : FaeCnuinMme
E-maiI: k-morton mtpob co s
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TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163
SHOWPLACE HOME ON 2.3 ACRES BEVERLY HILLS
Sweetwater Pointe 3 br 2.5 bath *Formal Living & M R T N R A ESTATE UPDATED AND NICELY MAINTAINED 2BR 2BA Home *
Dining Rooms Family Room with Gas Fireplace* .W M O RTO N REAL ESTATE Attached Garage Family Room Newer kitchen and
Caged Swimming Pool LuhBackyard ith Majestic I*. -:.:- : :- F. A -1- 1 .. i, ,,,,i ,,i.... ed Porch Fenced
Oaks Detached Workshop/Equipment Building S h \ :-- : _-: : i i. popping, Library,
Waterfront snAirhoat' Water. 2 1
MLSt710599 $249,900 .; 1 1,1,: $53,900



BEST OF THE BEST"'
ROYAL OA S Firs iTinne ollinel! etwater hoe on 5 acres Gorgeous hickory cabinets
LAKESIDE VILLAGE M n nance Free Vill"a e liup areaS 3 BR 25 Baths plus den/lbar* u 3car West Highlands Beauty*Spaciousand Sparkling
Hi oi u2 bedrooms 2 aths Great room Beautiful eat ae*Exceptional top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances 3 Bedrooms 2 baths 2 car garage Built 2003 *
Bevedy Hills Shows like a model calde-sac location E n eorooms a Grean room neauniu an [nineerd maple flooring and ceramic tile Spacious family Open Great room with amazing kitchen Spacious
Spotless and Sparkling Villa 55+ Community of Lakeside in kitchen *All appliances included Glassed in room with plass windows overlooking the Florida natural dacIrard breakfast nook Large master suite *Split
Village 2 Bedrooms 2 Baths Florida Room plus Family room (with Heat and /C) oversized 1 car with wildife feeding at your doorstep. Owner's feeders rinp the bedrooms Inside laundry "15 x 39 lanai with hot
garage Easy distance to shopping, doctors and Central garage with remote screen door! Screen front entry birds and wildlife in your acIrard...truly amazing. 45x23 IV tub covered grill area Ouiet neighborhood on
Ridge public library. Great value on HOA --water, sewer and basic cable storage duildinp plus workshop. This home is a showplace andu 125 x 187 lot. BRING YOUR MOTOR HOME ** ROOM
MLS #709677 $62,000 included! MLS #709832 $88,900 truly betterthan new. MLS I#7044. $299,900. TO PARK! MLS 709822 $169,900



BAYMEADOWS STUNNING AND STYLISH
SWEETWATER POINTE 3BR 3BA 2 Car Garage Family Room Master
Stated Elegance throughout this designer showplace Bedroom with Office & Beautiful Master Bath
GREENBRIAR home 4,300 + living area *3-car garage Volume WATERFRONT FLORIDA CRACKER HOME Updated in 2012* Great Kitchen with Newer
MAINTENANCE FREE ceilings 4 BR 4 BA Amazing gourmet kitchen with Handyman Special Water on Sides Boat Dock Appliances Beautiful Wood Flooring Bookcase
Beuiflbak Doc velokn te t .M .n *Mi n~ Large Etn-in nilncmen wooo melnen *n "1 a Fireplace*" French Doos ea ^ to1 Lar'e Screened
Beautiful back porch overlooking the all the whistles and bells Marvelous Master suite Large Eatin Kitchen Wood Ca inets Tile and Fireplace French Doors Lead to Large Screened
with bath/dressing area. Walk-in closets, sauna, Wood Floorsog Ce erng Ro mewith Real Lanai with Hot Tub* Heat Pump/AC replaced in 2008
Summing pool 2 Berooms 2 Baths t bt/dressig e lk Clsets, sun, Hardoood Floors .. Wow!! Oversized Garage oith Grapefruit, Tangerine and Orange Trees Located
iCarport. jetted tub PLUS private office area. Close to town and Workshop Area Screen Lanai with Stone/Slate on a Full Acre *
MLStT709385 $56,900 biketrail!MLSt707485$429,900 Floor. MLS:#708147 $57,900 MLStt705303 $269,900


wind smoke considerations, and
any special items noted (such as
bales of hay present piles of logging
slash, etc.). The prescrip-
tion should include a
map of the site, with the
location of the fire-
breaks, access points, lo-
cation of special items as
* jH described in the plan,
and any other pertinent
information which may
be useful.
A "smoke plume map"
must be included depict-
-oyer ing the desired direction
O0R of the smoke and the dis-
tance to any smoke-
URE sensitive areas such as
roads, schools, hospitals,
airports and other areas which may
be impacted by downwind smoke.
Prescriptions for burns by non-
Florida Forest Service (FFS) per-
sonnel, which are to be conducted
in urban interface areas, are usu-
ally reviewed in advance by a su-
pervisor from the FFS.
Prescribed burns are performed
by various land managers, both
public and private. While the FFS
is often the agency conducting the
burn, other entities may include
water management districts,
Florida parks, federal land owners
(e.g., national forests and military
installations), county governments
and private landowners and ranch-
ers. Prior to the ignition of the bum,
a burn authorization must be ob-
tained from the FFS dispatcher for
the relevant county. If the FFS be-
lieves that conditions are not suit-
able for conducting a safe burn,
they can deny the authorization.
So why would anyone conduct a
prescribed burn? There are many
reasons, and various land managers
have different objectives.
Probably the most common rea-
son is simply for hazardous fuel re-
duction. The pine ecosystems in our
area, as well as throughout Florida,
accumulate understory vegetation,
such as palmetto. This vegetation
can serve as fuel for a fire.
The understory vegetation needs


to burn approximately every three
to five years, and if left unburned
for many years, it becomes very tall
and dense. If a wildfire breaks out
in this dense understory such as
from a lightning strike or a care-
lessly tossed cigarette a hard-to-
control fire may result endangering
nearby homes, businesses and
other improvements. In addition,
thick smoke may blanket nearby
roads, creating very dangerous
driving conditions.
Thus, a prescribed burn to re-
duce this hazardous fuel buildup
can prevent a dangerous wildfire.
Personnel and equipment are avail-
able to conduct a burn safely when
weather conditions are suitable to
keep smoke away from highways
and other sensitive areas, and to
allow the burn to burn slowly
against the wind rather than rap-
idly and uncontrollably with the
wind.
Pine ecosystems also require ex-
posure of mineral soil to allow pine
seedlings to sprout. Dense vegeta-
tion buildup prevents a suitable
substrate for the successful estab-
lishment of pine seedlings. In addi-
tion, if left unburned, hardwoods
encroach into these ecosystems,
competing and interfering with
pine growth and reproduction. Pre-
scribed burns can reduce the hard-
wood encroachment and enhance
the ground conditions for pine
regeneration.
Wildlife also benefits from pre-
scribed bums. For example, gopher
tortoises prefer more open areas to
create their burrows and to forage
on grasses. Dense buildup of pal-
metto and hardwoods reduces their
preferred habitat Prescribed bums
can reduce this buildup of under-
story vegetation and enhance their
foraging and burrowing habitat
Wiregrass is a native grass found
in association with longleaf pine
forests. Wiregrass requires fire to
produce seed stalks for reproduc-
tion. A prescribed burn in May pro-
motes these seed stalks. Other

See BURNS/Page E12


I
I]




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E11


Associated Press
The Dauphin spout, crafted in brass and available in multiple finishes, evokes
a jumping dolphin, and is part of a luxe collection of bath fixtures from French
bath atelier THG-Paris.


GLAM
Continued from Page E8

was made by laying out 4,000 boxwood
leaves in an intricate, damask-like
pattern, to which Angove added tiny
glittering beetles. The 3-D process
creates a luxurious trompe l'oeil ef-
fect (www.michaelangove.com)
With a background in graphic de-
sign and fine art, Quebec-born Ys-
abel LeMay composes fantasy
scenes using hundreds of images of
flowers, trees, birds, insects and
other natural elements, layering
them in a process she calls "photo-
fusion." She plays with scale so that
an ibis appears to be taking nectar
from a lily, and a bunting is landing
on an iris as big as an oak tree.
There's a 'Alice in Wonderland"
vibe to the work that makes it strik-
ing wall art (wwwysabellemaycom)
At Z Gallerie, you'll find a
menagerie of faux creatures cast in
resin and finished with silver or
gold. A herd of galloping horses, a
slithering cobra, an octopus. There
also are pretty silvered-bamboo pic-
ture frames embellished with little
beveled-mirror butterflies. Nickel-


trimmed polished horn is crafted
into the curvy Cheyenne accent
table. The Antler side table's realis-
tic legs are cast in heavy-duty alu-
minum and then textured, just like
the real thing. (wwwzgallerie.com)
Former accessories designer Jay
Strongwater's collection at Horchow
includes Nautilus shells, starfish
and rabbits cast in metal, and then
hand-enameled and set with dozens
of Swarovski crystals. (www.
horchowcom)
If you're redoing a bathroom, con-
sider adding an unexpected luxe el-
ement like one of French atelier
THG Paris' solid-brass dolphin or
swan-shaped spouts, available in
different polished finishes. From the
same source, a handle crafted from
satiny Lalique crystal turns a
starfish into bathroom jewelry
(www.thgusa.com)
Corbett Lighting has the Fathom
LED pendant fixture formed of
dozens of crystal circles held to-
gether with white metal and stain-
less steel, evoking a stunning bubble
full of bubbles. Here too is the Rock-
star pendant, which incorporates
slivers of striated golden-hued agate
edged with gold leaf (wwwcorbett
lighting.corn)


lM Z/I w/ l livingig U U
$58,500 (705719) )-- H lM a
TOMIKA SPIRES-HANSSEN -.f f l"'
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1i .. ... ..|"1"" I.. ,1,, ,- ,-, .,, I.,,,, ,, ,,,-,I
OR 3/2/1 with 1176 living on over 1/2 acre for HOT PRICE! Its also a HOT MESS! 2007 3/2/2 txer
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1Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. 1710109.6233 E Waverly. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.




E12 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014


BURNS
Continued from Page EO10

grasses and wildflowers benefit from spring
burns, as well.
Cattle also benefit from prescribed burning. A
burn in late winter/early spring removes the
buildup of dead grass and promotes new growth,
providing fresh forage for cattle.
Many newcomers or snowbirds in Florida com-
plain about the smoke from these prescribed
burns. They do not understand the ecological ben-
efits and are unaccustomed to these burns be-
cause most northern ecosystems, unlike ours, do
not depend on burning to promote certain species
or entire ecosystems.
Granted, unwanted smoke is undesirable and
unhealthy Fortunately, most prescribed burns are
done safely, with little impact to residential com-
munities. Occasionally one reads of a prescribed
burn that "escaped" and became a wildlfire, with
dense smoke over roads or subdivisions. However,
these are rare in comparison to the total number
of prescribed burns performed without incident.
So please keep in mind that, although some-
times inconvenient and perhaps mildly irritating,
a prescribed burn is much more desirable than a
wildfire producing thick smoke, with flames rac-
ing toward homes or other buildings.
It'f s not an issue of ifan area will burn; it's a mat-
ter of when. Therefore, conducting a prescribed
burn safely, with established firebreaks and
equipment and personnel available to control the
burn, is preferable to uncontrolled wildfires such
as we have all seen on the news lately in southern
California.


Eric H. Hoyer is a certified arborist, a certified
forester, a registered consulting arborist and
a qualified tree risk assessor with Natural
Resource Planning Services Inc. He can be
contacted at erich@nrpsforesters.com.


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
The South Whidbey Good Cheer Food Bank Garden near
Langley, Wash. This communal garden run by the Good
Cheer Food Bank and Thrift Stores made available more
than 7,000 pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables to its
clients last year. Volunteers make up the bulk of the
work force.


GARDENS
Continued from Page E5

One Los Angeles-area hos-
pital subsidizes a serenity
garden. "They believe it's
healthier for people to be
outside in nature rather than
stuck in hospital rooms,"
Savio said. "It's not so much
what they harvest as it is the
occupational therapists
being able to exercise their
clients."
Many cities offer grants to
help get gardens started, said
Bill Dawson, a community
garden coordinator with the
Franklin Park Conservatory
and Botanical Gardens in
Columbus, Ohio. "They rec-
ognize it's an amenity, much
like a park. Corporations are
doing it, too, as a perk to
employees."
Community gardens range
in size from a few 4-by-10-foot
sections to several acres.
They are managed either
communally the people in
charge decide what needs to
be done and when or left
open for individual use. Sites
might be offered free, or
priced from $5 to $50 and
more per season.
"Most gardens set fees be-
cause their expenditures in
time, transportation (for
gathering fertilizer, compost,
mulch), water and storage
are so high," Savio said.
Consider these elements of


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

community gardening before
signing up:
Know what you're buy-
ing into. Many people join
simply to work on their own
in personal plots. Communal
gardening, however, is a com-
mitment- a chance to inter-
act and share cultures with
others, Dawson said. Be open
to teaching or learning.
Embrace giving. Part of
the harvest often is donated
to food pantries or people in
need.
Engage in inter-genera-
tional gardening. "Our chil-
dren come home from school
telling us about composting
and organic gardening,"
Dawson said. "The elderly
know how to preserve and
put things by Families
should learn from each other
and enjoy Share stories."
Turn surplus properties
into green spaces. "Haul
away the needles and trash
and convert the areas into
something beautiful and pro-
ductive," Dawson said.
Community gardening
prompts families to make
healthier food choices. "They
get better at understanding
the nutritional value of fresh
carrots over fast foods," he
said. "And if the kids are
growing it, they're eating it"
You can sell some or all
of what you grow, Dawson
said. "Gardeners can learn
marketing skills, while at the
same time get some seed
money from their gardens."


E2t'm ER "Always There For You"
KEY GAIL COOPER
REALTY A Multimillion Dollar Realtor
4 (352) 634-4346
i Office: (352) 382-1700
rD_ Y May 26 E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com

_" -- a w


METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED! ENJOY A RELAXED LIFESTYLE!
Custom pool home 3+office/2.5/2 One story end unit condo- 2/2/1
Pavered driveway and walkway Overlooks #3 green on Cypress course
Dual pared windows & sliding doors Updated kitchen with stainless steel
SExpanded pool deck for entertaining Raised panel cabinets w/ pass thru
SWood burning fireplace in the family room All appliances will convey
8' door clearance in garage- 2 bump-out areas Hardwoods in dining & Great room
SBeautiful landscaping in front and back Extra parking spaces for guests
Home warranty for the buyers Home warranty for the buyers
#705795 $215,000 *#707553 $63,500
S eVrul.Tous @ ,i."II ,iJ.UIJ^ IJ..resIaeu..- I.I..om


Gulf to Lake Hwy, Ciystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007-(727) 515-6571








JANE
Continued from Page E9

brown, greenish, rusty or
purplish. Common names
are Black-eyed Susan,
Brown-eyed Susan, Cone-
flower and others de-
pending on local custom
and names passed down
in a family or community
Using the scientific name
avoids confusion. This
name is easy to
pronounce: Think of a
"rude child named
Becky"
Two years ago, I planted
four little clumps of peren-
nial Rudbeckia 'Gold-
strum' from 4 inch pots on
each side of a grassy drive-
way Plants were about 18
to 20 inches apart.
These plants multiply
mainly by growing offsets
on root runners radiating
from the parent. To make
the garden tidier I had cut
off the dead flower stalks,
called scapes, in Novem-
ber The saved seeds were
broadcast in empty spots
in the garden early in
March. As 'Goldstrum' is a
manmade cultivar, seeds
are usually sterile.
When the eight drive-

Black-eyed Susan is one of
about 15 species in the
Rudbeckia genus, native
to North America.
JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle


way clumps put up leaves
in mid-April, they showed
each clump was more than
14 inches in diameter
They could be left for an-
other year before dividing
the clumps, but I had a lit-
tle spare time and volun-
teer in the gardens at
Dunnellon Library There
is plenty of room for Black-
eyed Susans at the library
so this propagation addict
took action.
I filled 6-inch-diameter
black reused flower pots
with a soil medium made
of half backyard sand and
half finely milled mulch
from Central Landfill on
State Road 44 west of
Inverness
This fine mulch is free
and made from yard
waste. The milling con-
tractor is paid from the fee
collected when these or-
ganic materials are
dumped for recycling. Any
weed seeds are dried and
cooked to death in the
more than 130-degree heat
of decomposition.
The first Rudbeckia
clump was dug up. I dug
straight down about 5
inches beyond the outer-
most leaves so as not to
cut any roots.
The ball was almost 2
feet in diameter. I shook
off as much soil as would
fall easily Then, with a
sharp kitchen knife, I cut
it in quarters in the mid-
dle through the thick,


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BANK OWNED-HOMOSASSA, FL COUNTRY LIVING-INVERNESS, FL
4BR/2BA DW mobile w/addition. 2.90 acres 2.33 acre wooded tract in Deerwood Fenced
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After Hours (, 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com


fleshy, main root.
Next, little plantlets on
single roots with many
fine feeder roots were cut
as long as possible. Three
of these rooted plantlets
were held in a pot with 2
inches of soil in the bot-
tom, then more soil mix
was poured around the
roots.
Tapping the pot lightly
settled soil around the
roots without damaging
them.
More plantlets were
teased from the main plant
with minimal root damage.
These were quickly
planted in 6 inch pots,
tapped and flooded with a
soft shower from the water
hose before any roots
could dry out
One clump of Rudbeckia
produced enough plantlets
to fill 21 six-inch pots.
They were put under
Turkey Oak trees my back-
yard nursery The nursery
gets overhead irrigation


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I-HIS tI'NU-UNI I VILLA, on a cul-de-sac,
has, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, an eat-in
IA rI. .... extended living room and a
etting off the rear patio.
u- iiefruits hang off the tree
r ~~.- n.1.4i breakfast nook window.
i. 169/mos offering exterior
.. are (tie), lawn/shrub care,
*,- ,able, clubhouse w/heated
n in on our 46 miie Raiis-To-
-,, ..lose to downtown, historic
I..,, Sup your foot into
,1, supper, transform this
1L Fii90,00 r ii.

VIBRANT VILLA
3 BRs, 2.5 BAs, office
I t, of h Illt-lns
-. 1 i floors
i r heater, dryer, range,
furnace
Extended Lana
G Gated community
State-of-the-art gym
S. .. $349,000 MLS707372
SPACE SPACE AND MORE SPACE
$35 00h 0 , 707544
h .1 ,12,1 :, ,= 11 1: 11 A, roof
i I i i I i', I I .O. r/w ater
.~~~ ~ -:= . .. ',, .:.. I yh ig hts
N l~ O I, h i ,,p h I i I, o l, acre
$335,000 r.11- 7 07544


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E13

twice a week if there is
no rain.
The new plants were
watched during the first
week for signs of drying,
but never needed more
irrigation, as they had
adequate feeder roots to
take up water.
Part-shade conditions
slowed evaporation.
After a week, I left to
visit family in Canada.
These Black-eyed Susans
grew twice as big by the
time I returned.


Jane Weber is a
professional gardener
and consultant
Semi-retired, she grows
thousands of native
plants. Visitors are
welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For
an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or
email her at JWeber
12385@gmail.com.


I www^^flitrsingss^com^^





E14 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014



Chronicle


To place an ad, call 563-5966


~- .. Classifieds



In Print


. .and


0.TOnline


All


The Time


Real Estate I. Aa rtments *.lex Waterfron Rea Esta


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

INVERNESS
1 Bd. Rm. $325. mo.
2 Bd. Rm. $360. mo.
Both $500. Dep. each
No Pets 352-726-7951
LECANTO
2BR DW Moble, $550.
mo. (352) 765-4135


-I..

MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

NEW NEW NEW
1460 Sq ft 3/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $60k
352-795-2377

NEW NEW NEW
MUST SEE
2036 Sq ft 4/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $70k
352-795-2377


Palm Harbor Parade
of Homes!!
7 new models to
view, 3 models that
MUST, must be liqui-
dated. Save over
$26k, 4/2 in the 70's.
FREE factory tours!
olantcitv.
oalmharbor.com or
800-622-2832

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




3/2 WATERFRONT,
DOUBLEWIDE
$75.900.
10480 S. McClung Lp.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000




Crystal River
2 BR/1 BA Mobile on
Fendced lot, well,
septic, appls. incld.
$19,500 352 -563-0534
HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on /2 acre
5192S. Amanda P.
$15,000 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/i1% BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds, must be
seen to appreciate
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330

WESTWOOD ACRES
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
$68000. 1768 SQ
FT..-PICS AT
ZILLOW.COM-9515W
MIDLAND LN C.R. No
owner finance Call
Terry-(352)697-1218


OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807






Perfectly Charming
2004 3/2 M.H. on 1+
acres; 18 x 31 Shed
Port. Wood fir scr
porch; light & bright
12x24 sun porch, pri
patio W/retrac. awn-
ing. Absolute move in
condition. $79,900
Call Louise Lubranecki
305-491-1051 w/
Parsley Real Estate
352-726-2628





must sell!
* 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441
2 Bedroom, I'Bath,
furn, Carport,
scrn rm good value,
In quiet 55+Park
$5,500. 386-234-0254
(352) 748-5325

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern 2/1 homes
from $7500 or Lease to
Own from $145/mo.
$700.down + Lot
rent of $265. mo.
10 yr. payoff at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional
55+Park 352 628-5977


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640











ATION I
RENTAL MANAGEMENT]
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
$1000 & UNDER
$1000-11770 W. Sunnybrook
3/2/2 on canal
$925-Beautiful Meadowcest Villa
2/2/1, pool & tennis
$900-3290 S. Michigan Blvd.
2/2 nostalgia 2 stoy
$850-6698 S. Wald Pft.
4/2 w/fened yadl

$675 & UNDER
$675-6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2/2 home w/dck
$650-7096 N Dawson Dr.
2/2 mobie in Hernando
$575-8019 W Grove St.
2/2SW on 1.25 aces
For More Listings Go To
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.wm








In
33NCrof veu

Ine] rn ]J [esls I 3445
352-341o)-4663.


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf


31212 .................$850
3/1 ....................... $700
3/2/Carport......$725
21211...................$750
2/11...................... $500
2/2/1 Condo......$900


2/2/11 .................. $600
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
R Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010





0315 617.MM1100




Citrus Springs 2/2
$650/mo
Screened patio, fenced yard
Crystal River 3/2/3
$1,100/mo
Screened patio, 1 acre, HUGE
352-637-3800





FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375. Mo. $400/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352)344-1025


INVERNESS
Sm place, S. Inverness,
for single person. Very
prv. UtI. incl. Prv prkg,
$500/mo. Call
(352)560-0370, Cell
(727)919-1119





CRYSTAL RIVER
Quiet, 1/1,
(352) 628-2815

INVERNESS
1st floor 2/1 with patio
in quiet area.
$525/mo + $525 Sec;
352-344-0238





Lecanto
2/1, $650. + elect.
(352) 628-7633




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514





US 19 Office-$550.
office/warehouse
1/b-lba $1200. util.
incl. 352-634-0129





BRENTWOOD
Townhome, 3/2.5
w/Social Membership
(352) 613-4459

CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished,
352-527-8002 or
352-476-4242


HOMOSASSA
1i/1, Duplex $435. mo.
2/1 Duplex $525 mo.
1st.& Sec, non smoker
Pets-? 352-212-4981



CRYSTAL RIVER
Remodeled Cottage
1/1, $460 mo 601-6314
HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
1 BR, 1 BA, Furnished
55+ Park $595. mo.
(352) 344-1380
INVERNESS
Waterfront Studio
$500 dep; $125/wk.
all utils. 352-364-7588



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/B $850., sec. $450.
Fenced Yd.563-9857



Beverly Hills
1 bdm, psbl 2, 1 bath
$500. first/last
352-220-2958
BEVERLY HILLS
Lrg. Remodeled 2/2/2,
$750. mo. 1st/last/sec.
No Pets 352-726-2280
CRYSTAL RIVER
4/2.5/2 POOL House
5 ACRES $1,300 mo
Call Nancy Wilson
for info 352-422-4137
Waybright Real Est.
Inverness
large 1 bd/lba/lcg
4 mi. East of Inverness
off 44, $625. per mo.
incl. electric, very
private, first & sec.
352-563-9796




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225


INVERNESS
LAKE FRONT HOME
spectacular views,
spacious 3/2/2,
$750 (908) 322-6529







CRYSTAL RIVER /
DUNNELLON
2 Dorm Style Rooms
For Rent (Available
6/1/2014), Shared Bath,
Furnished w/ Full size
Bed, Personal TV and
Mini Fridge w/ Freezer.
$600 All Inclusive
(Includes All Utilities,
Wi-Fi, Satellite, ETC...)
Contact for additional
amenities and benefits
Titanium68@yahoo.com
Homosassa
reliable, ref's, no pets
$350. mo.inc. util. w/d
access 352-228-3659















DEB
THOMPSON
SOne call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
w Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb(avahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPT 7 T I


Western NC New
cabin
on 2.51ac. w/2bdr,
loft, large deck,
covered porch, fpl,
minutes from the lake
$139,900. Call
828-286-1666


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For Sale
For Sale %4*

SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE
CHFpNICLE



CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL!

30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
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(352) 563-5966


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
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Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


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A VIEW TO
LOVE"
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crosslandrealty.comrn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







AUCTION
Waterfront Home
Lake Eufaula, 217
Cypress Cove Drive,
Eufaula, Al, 5
Bedroom-4 Bath,
Executive, Great
views. June 10,
1:00pm. Details,
pictures
GTAuctions.com
205.326.0833
Granger, Thagard &
Assoc, Inc. Jack F
Granger, #873


* ATTN Homebuvers
100% financing avail.
Government Program.
You do not need perfect
credit. Call or email
to get qualified.
Ph: (813) 470-8313
rickabfaamail.com
Rick Kedzierski lic. loan
originator.NLMS
#267854, FL#9096
NLMS ID 149709




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514









Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+ Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's,
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10 x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202
PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870




2 Bed 1 Bath CP. Tile
throughout. Updated
bath, roof '07. New paint
in/out. $45K. 527-1239

Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282


Hoe

2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12 x 20 shed,
etc. $135,000.
(352) 419-6327





For SaleI q i
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084



Inverness
Inverness
2 bedroom 1 bath
house. Lot 100x150.
Zoned industrial.
Move-in condition.
$25,000 cash as is.
1309 Bruce Street.
Phone 352-726-7362.





Realty Connect
Buying or Selling?
Waterfront,
Acreage, Golf
Homes & More!
FREE List of
Available Homes!
TheFLDream.com
Contact the
Premier Real
Estate Group
Realty Connect
(352) 341-2588 or
(352) 212-1446
T. Paduano, Broker




2BR, 1 BA, Singlewide,
Remodeled
Carport & Deck,
2 Storage sheds
55+Community $3,500
(440) 742-0559




w- Sugarmill Woods
2900 sq. ft 3bd/2/2 ba
pool, tile roof, 2 lots,
234k (352) 382-8957


IAMI SCTi I
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY!!!




4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282



3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods
$119.900.
1 Fig Court W.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000

I BCIOg


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


#1 Employment source is










www.chroniceoniecom


Hooas


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscritfers.com










Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office














BETY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward!"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatonedtamoabav.rr.c
om
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattd
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!



A


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments


Citrus County
Homes I


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855














Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com





Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


$100,000. + Closing
Cost will get you this
2,100 Sq. Ft.,
3BR, 3'/2BA, Fully Furn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268




LAKEFRONT
E. TENNESSEE
Norris Lake!
$39,900 Boat
ramp under-
ground electric,
city water, wide
paved roads,
mountain and lake
sunsets!
1-877-717-5263
extl91




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
my properties"




Floral City, 1 acre cnr
lot Oak Forest, S Fern
Pt. nice oaks & pine
trees, pretty cleared
home site only $14,500
obo 352- 678-7145










Ytu odrld first



Need a job

ora

qualified

employee?




This area's

#1

employment

source!



c ', 1l, '


i6,17i* 0II1 MenI [l II I No,[*] isI


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

a k

* FLORAL CITY *
Waterfront. 6 adj.
Lots, 3/4 acre on chain
of lakes. Huge oaks,
good fishing. $110,000
OBO. (352)596-2921


SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 E15


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor





E16 SUNDAY, MAY 25, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HEATHERWOOD PROPERTY
Vill. .:...r .r :* .: r. .: .. 1 il,:llli ii[ iin^.1l
h.rh. hcr ,.1h : 11 l mhih.> m:.h i ..

lIh [.rm .j L' :.1I .i. 1, : l., : .m r .: ,
t ,[ u.o.. [h,.[ .: I:r.r,:. :iomil,h lot
,:h,:r[m,,hJiLt. 7 = 10191:1
THIS IS A GREAT DEAL 'A S120K
Please call Shanna Casey ,', 352270.1352








STONERIDGE PARK

.. JJ '.:.l I .. ih-i...1. i ... i...I ',-'.., ..i ..L

h=.,iil '' '.II'
PRICED 5 $24500
,IIIIEF Ii ILL P I" T i 1111' II F IIT 'L h. II
Willard Pickrel 352 726 6668


BEAUTIFUL I INVITINII I rT ini Ii,,
,r, d ,I ,,, ,- I,, ,- r, FI ll 1 J Jl .I


I h,-i ,-,I ... Ti, -. I I i h


IlL: zi7"'JJ Asking S259,800
Pal Davis i3521212.7280


CUSTOM HOME ON 5 ACRES

I H i.:. -, H ,rh I .. ', 1 1
[I .1 ...... .. :. ..I .:.I h :jrt l :d
p p:1,. t = ,: I... :.. :1 : [: I=h.t H ,

ASKING S158,700
Call MaIltha Snder 352 47681727
and ask loI Vile 710139


I ... .-w," .1h H-


Li: li" 'i S229,727
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352 212 3410
ww w.CiirusCounl Sold.corn


RIVER LAKES MANOR WATERFRONT




ilL: "?lh.". ASKING S69.900
Call Nancy Jenks 352-4008072


STti iilin HiiMlE-Be T Li:iATI 1. iit| Ti:iwri ii,,


,1 , 1.- h 1 ,phlb 1 1,1, 1,, 11. , ,, ,,l , I .. ... ,,,

IhI ... h .,...-.

r.I :: i,',j Asking S374,900
Pal Davis 3521212 7280
Vie lislinq itI Ic21paidaVls con








S145,000 PRETTY PROPERTY!


I I ....:... II .. .,.,/


I, ...... Fo, I-,, :,r,
Call Ma1i' Parsons 352 ,t4 1273


GREAT WATERFRONT LOT IN
SUNRISE LAKE ESTATES
L i:. ,.iil, r:.- .i- f .i. i h [iii I . i I
I'1 v.S.. L .I. II a -. I n: u-. I.1 : H .- .. :

Er I.'.i i,) .-', L i ,l) `1 14 )
il :. =7':".22 S55,000
Call Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 352 212 3410


* B,,ilr,-,,,n,, 2 B- l Fl, n .,r '..l R,,,-iuu
* I :: 1:,,rn F f1: ,,,i I Priv i.r B i:,,:|, ,rIl
* All At itt =,,,, I JEW ROiiiF
* PLEA'AIJT GROVE 'E I.'.. i:rn,:
r1.L lii'i=0 506 103,000
Jeanne Or Willard Pickrel 212-3410
wwwv. CilrusCounlySold.coin


* 11 -iII .. rnihllll 1 -1 ir i -i r rii
* FI-ll, :: I 'r l ,,ll I ,',*r:: ,l ,,, llll lll

*2 C.-i 'l 1 2 lu J il ,lh.,.


1L3:7'7::.2' ASKING S49,500
Call Charles Ke/ll 352 422 2387


ZMLII


5109,900 SETTLE THIS ESTATE
l l ric-ic li- l iiii riv.. I l li rn i i: ir

Tl',r- in I, nliic r,,-, H i, I, l n ,, I H .iniic
I n' : ii-iul ul -r : l,,l l r I Irlr I [, r |-i|
Cl I[. an ,l PIar Ison, 3 52. IGM 1 2-i73.,|
Call Mary Parsons 352-634-1273


* ejas.- -.


54 ACRE FARM WITH HUGE BARN!
Pruiuu. rr, I:i~ i:-ur : 1lu-u- i'' 1l I iri,
h nri'i i'',Hli i.lir hnr :: ir : l1.1il : *'.i liI': .Ml .

r'i -rii I Iil iuri,,'iirr ,,, hi''..u-r, u "
ONLY 429K
Call Quade 352-302-7699


CANTERBURY LAKE EST.
Ip .. 1 I..:.f,..i . l I : 1 I..:.,. .I ... I .I I

r, :, i, . ..........


r "h;i ;iT.': ASKING: S118,500
Call Nanc' Jenks al 352 400 80712


DEEP WATER CANAL LOT
" :1,, I .. ):. 1, & .... h) I1 i -, .l i .:, rj. . ,,,

Mi.lii i 11 1 ,1 lh,- l i I -.ii ii.1

hI d h Iii 1. iiivhpp 1.1' F.., ..1 ,
r.IL: S:I.?., 569,000
Sltelan Start 352-212-0211


TRULY MOVE IN READY HOME I'., I :., .I I ..
lIiiITI ., i'h''' li I'''j 'lill l iil h .i i ,i lll I~ l-

h .. I,. .- h i I:I .- I .- I .- r,. -


r.IL: ii.:..- Asking S119,800
Pat Davis 3521212-7280
View listing iiiv c2lpaldavis comn