Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Citrus County Chronicle
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Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Full Text

Preakness: Chrome keeps Crown dreams alive /B1


I SUN IDAY I


CITRUS


COUNTY


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
86
LOW
55


VOL. 119 ISSUE 284


COMMENTARY:






Mrs. First
Amendment
The First Amendment
Foundation's Barbara
Petersen sits down for a
talk about this year's
legislative session.
/Page Cl




Alleged armed
robber arrested
A 20-year-old Floral
City man is in custody
after authorities said he
robbed a Floral City an-
tiques business.
Harley Ray Jenkins, of
6230 S. Woodwind Point,
was arrested on an
armed robbery charge
about two hours after rob-
bing the store known as
Pack Rats on U.S. 41
and running off, reports
state.
He was arrested at
about 2:30 p.m. at his
home. Reports said he
admitted to the robbery.
According to the arrest
report, Jenkins walked
into the business wearing
a hoodie, black mask and
sunglasses. He was car-
rying a handgun and
what victims believed
was a rubber mallet.
An employee recog-
nized his voice because
he believed Jenkins had
sold him some silverware
on Thursday.
After the robbery, Jenk-
ins ran off toward the
Withlacoochee State
Trail, the report states.
Deputies found the
hoodie about 100 yards
from U.S. 41. Awitness
saw a shirtless man get-
ting into the passenger
side of a Ford Ranger
pickup truck.
Deputies located the
truck at a Floral City resi-
dence, where they found
Jenkins.
He was jailed on
$20,000 bond.
The incident caused a
30-minute lockdown at
Floral City Elementary
School, during which time
no one was allowed to enter
or leave the school. As-
sistant Superintendent of
Schools Mike Mullen said
children were kept inside
the school until dismissal
Friday
-Mike Wright/staff writer


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ................D6
Crossword ..............A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ....................A16
Obituaries ................A6
Together...................A22
Veterans ........ A17
6 1112007n11onII


Arrive alive


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The Withlacoochee State Trail is a popular riding venue for bicyclists in Central Florida.
While bike riding is usually a safe activity, accidents can happen and injuries occur.

Bicyclists share road rights, responsibilities


Editor's note: May is National Bike
Safety Month, and Florida leads the na-
tion in bicycle-related fatalities. With the
Withlacoochee State Trail, the Withla-
coochee Bay Trail and bike paths else-
where around the area, Citrus County is
a destination place for cyclists.
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
In the movie "Butch Cassidy and the
Sundance Kid," Paul Newman rides a bi-


cycle with no hands, sitting backward,
and then with Katharine Ross sitting on
the handlebars while B.J. Thomas sings
"Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head."
It's a sweet scene, but would be
deemed unsafe and illegal by today's bi-
cycle safety laws, especially here in
Florida where we lead the nation in bi-
cyclist fatalities, according to the Na-
tional Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA).
See Page A5


Woman recalls bike riding injury


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Debbie
Davis doesn't like wearing a
bike helmet.
It messes up her hair and
she doesn't like how it makes
her all sweaty


But ever since she ended up
in the hospital with a head in-
jury after an accident while
riding her bike, she doesn't
pedal one step without one.
"I was riding on the (Withla-
coochee State) trail, and I
See INJURY/Page A5


Debbie
Davis
suffered head
injury.


For many at


CRHS, senior


year may not


be their last

Officials acknowledge

graduation problem, but
say they can't identify cause

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
It's cap-and-gown time, except for those un-
fortunate high school seniors who haven't yet
made the grade.


Linda
Connors
principal of
Crystal River
High School.


Pat
Deutschman
school board
member.


That situation is more
likely at Crystal River High
School than Citrus or
Lecanto. At least 16 percent
of the 247 senior Pirates
won't be hearing "Pomp and
Circumstance" this week.
It could have been worse.
First-year Principal Linda
Connors said she and her
staff learned in November
that over half the senior class
she inherited was at risk of
not graduating.
"I had not seen numbers
like that in my career," said
Connors, a 17-year Citrus dis-
trict schools administration
veteran.
She met with the seniors
and told them the situation
was serious and they should
treat it that way
Guidance counselors and
students hunkered down,
hoping to meet those mini-
mum requirements for a


standard diploma.
Most succeeded, but many did not.
As of Friday, 39 seniors will notbe graduating
See Page A8

2014 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES
Citrus County graduation this year by the
numbers*:


High
school
Citrus:


No. of No. not Grad
seniors graduating rate


Crystal River: 247
Lecanto: 375
District: 986


31** 91%
39 ** 84%
24 ** 94%
94** 91%


*Actual number of graduates is not yet de-
termined. With some students waiting for
results of final exams to determine if
they'll receive a diploma, these numbers
could fall or rise
throughout
this
week..
**Does not in-t
clude stu-
dents walking
with their
classes dur-
ing com-
mencement
ceremonies but not yet eligible for a
diploma. Students in that category likely
will finish their diploma requirements this
summer or early fall.
Source: Citrus County School District

PRIOR GRADUATION RATES
Graduation rates by school, other years:


School 2011
Citrus: 83%
Crystal River: 83%
Lecanto: 80%


2012 2013
82% 82%


76%
86%


77%
90%


Source: Citrus County School District


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Sunny.


PAGE A4




A2 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 LOCAL CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Learning about preparedness at All Hazards Expo


ABOVE: This year's Citrus County All Hazards & Hurricane
Expo was well attended Saturday at Crystal River Mall.
LEFT: Seven-year-old Caleigh Harder of Crystal River
learns what if feels like to be in near-80-mile-per-hour
winds in the hurricane booth at the All Hazards and
Hurricane Expo. RIGHT: Scent discrimination bloodhound
Roxanne takes a well-deserved break from the crowds
and a drink of ice water from a Junior Firefighter's hat at
the expo. Roxanne, owned and trained by Linda Boles,
has been called on four times this month to assist in
searches for missing people.


Summer

Food

Service

Program

to begin

in June

Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County
School System's Food and
Nutrition Services will be
participating in the Sum-
mer Food Service Pro-
gram during the months of
June, and July
Nutritionally balanced
meals will be provided
free to all children during
summer vacation when
school
For info, break-
For in fasts and
call 352- lunches
are not
726-1931, a v a i l-
able. All
ext. 2451. children
18 years
old and younger are eligi-
ble for meals at no charge
at an open site and there
will be no discrimination
in the course of the meal
service.
The programs are only
approved for geographical
areas of need where 50
percent or more of the
children qualify for free
and reduced-price meals
during the school year
There will be four open
sites throughout the
county: Lecanto Primary,
Inverness Middle, Crystal
River Middle School, and
Forest Ridge Elementary
The sites will be opened
June 2 through July 25.
Breakfast will be from 8
to 8:30 a.m. and lunch will
be served from 11 a.m. to
noon. All meals must be
consumed on site.
The goal is to make sure
no child goes hungry The
schedule is available on
the Food and Nutrition
Services website at
www.cafe.citrus.kl2.fl.us.
The menus will be avail-
able to view at https://
Citrus.Nutrislice.com.
For more information,
call Lora Fredrikson at
352-726-1931, ext. 2451.


L .....


a a~ii;


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Positively


SSEVEN RIVERS
---REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


6201 N. Suncoast Blvd. Crystal Ricr Your Life. Our Story.


-4.7


Insurance
www.sheldonpalmsinsurance.comn
Auto Home Life Business
Aut wer AFSUD &D K RE
-y 8469 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd. 1037 E. Norvell Bryant Hw. -
Hornosassa, FL Citrus Hills 6 (1 B
352-628-1030 352-341-4661


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licraukSoko thwannsin:NcBt i-a Pan

ChotR~i. Ntox-L Fngu, DinmCol.S~a LfqusOrI'


If you ever experience any of these symptoms,
call 911 and get to the nearest emergency room.






Page A3-SUNDAY, MAY 18,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

STATE

Citrus County

Citizens Academy
openings available
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
Citizens Academy 2014
summer session, which be-
gins in June, has a few
more spots open for inter-
ested citizens.
The academy is a free
course designed to educate
and inform citizens about
the departments that make
up Citrus County govern-
ment. Classes are once a
week for 12 weeks, and
give residents a hands-on,
inside look at what, how
and why the county's de-
partments do what they do,
from Parks and Recreation,
libraries, utilities and road
maintenance to Community
Services. This gives citi-
zens the opportunity to un-
derstand the board's
responsibilities and capabil-
ities and how the taxpayers'
resources are utilized.
There are no qualifica-
tions needed other than
being a resident of the
county and having an inter-
est in how local government
works.
Registration is on a firs-
come, first-served basis.
Applications are available
online at www.bocc.citrus.
flus and can be mailed to
Old Courthouse Heritage
Museum, 1 Courthouse
Square, Inverness, FL,
34450 Attn: Deborah Bloss;
or, by fax to 352-341-6445.
For more information,
please call 352-341-6429.
MOPH meeting
Tuesday in Lecanto
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will
conduct its bimonthly meet-
ing at 1 p.m. Tuesday,
May 20, at the Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491),
Lecanto, about a half-mile
south of State Road 44 on
the west side of C.R. 491.
All combat-wounded vet-
erans and parents, lineal
descendants, spouses and
siblings of living or de-
ceased Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited to attend
the meeting and to become
a Chapter 776 member. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
20/20 board
meeting Monday
The Citrus 20/20 Board of
Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, May 19,
in Room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto. All
directors are urged to attend.
Interested persons and
representatives of organiza-
tions are invited to attend.
For information about Cit-
rus 20/20 Inc., visit www.
citrus2020.org or call 352-
201-0149.

St. Pete Beach
Giant 'snorkel
aquarium' opens
A 33,500 gallon aquar-
ium overlooking the dining
room of an upcoming
restaurant has been re-
vealed on the hit Animal
Planet show "Tanked."
The giant "snorkel aquar-
ium" could be seen by the
public starting Saturday. It's
at the Guy Harvey Outpost,
a TradeWinds Beach Resort.
The aquarium is being
stocked with indigenous
fish such as snook, redfish,
trout, tarpon, grouper, snap-
per, small sharks and eels
for the largest tank the
show has ever created.
Guests will be able to get


behind-the-scenes tours
and even snorkel in the
tank and feed the fish.
The "Tanked" episode with
the aquarium aired Friday.
The restaurant is expected to
open at the end of May.
From staff and wire reports


Future of film in Fla. uncertain


Associated Press

MIAMI The future of
Florida's film and televi-
sion industry is uncertain
after lawmakers failed to
approve funding for a tax
credit program that is
broke.
That has studios looking
at moving production to
other states with aggres-
sive incentive programs.
Graham Winick, the city


of Miami Beach's film co-
ordinator and a past pres-
ident of Film Florida, said
it was disappointing when
the Legislature didn't ap-
prove additional funding
last year, but industry ad-
vocates were confident
they could win over law-
makers during the re-
cently concluded session.
The incentive program,
which was supposed to
run from 2010 to 2016, has


already used up the $296
million in tax credits it
was allocated.
A recent study by the
Motion Picture Association
of America concluded that
Florida's film incentive
program supported 87,870
jobs, $2.3 billion in wages,
and $7.2 billion in eco-
nomic spending across the
state, both through produc-
tion spending and added
tourism, over the last four


years. Its findings could
not be verified.
Besides jobs for actors
and film crews, the pro-
ductions often spend
money at gas stations, lum-
beryards, dry cleaners, ho-
tels and restaurants. As for
the impact on tourism, a
recent movie industry
study said that almost 20
percent of visitors said
viewing a movie or televi-
sion series filmed in


Florida contributed to
their decision to travel
here.
Similar bills for a new
program were introduced
in the House and Senate
(HB 983 and SB 1640) this
past legislative session.
But lawmakers ultimately
failed to include a new
film incentive plan to its
record $77 billion budget
by the time the session
ended May 2.


Blues and berries


STEPHEN E. LASKO/for the Chronicle
Guitarist Keith Crisp plays the blues for crowds at the Blues and Berries event at the Inverness Government Center on Saturday. Crisp
won the 2013 Cooter Idol Contest at the Great American Cooter Festival of Citrus County last October.


The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings, candi-
date appearances and the like
for this year's political cam-
paign. Send information to
mwright@chronicleonline.
com.
District 2 county commis-
sion candidates Renee
Christopher-McPheeters, Ron
Kitchen, John "JJ" Kenney (in-
cumbent) and Phillip Mulrain
will speak at 6 p.m. Thursday,
May 22, at the Homosassa
River Republican Club meet-
ing at the Homosassa Lions
Club on South Indiana Ter-
race, just off County
Road 490.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission District 2,
will greet the public from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May
24, at the Citrus County Fair-
grounds Market. Information:


Campaign TRAIL
352-257-5381.
Donna Fletcher, candi-
date for school board District
5, will have a fundraiser golf
tournament at 8:30 a.m. (7:30
a.m. registration) Saturday,
June 7, at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club. Information:
352-400-0839.
Doug Dodd, candidate
for school board District 3, will
have a barbecue fundraiser
from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday,
June 7, at the Realtors Asso-
ciation building on State Road
44 and Scarboro Avenue,
Lecanto. Information: 352-
637-3519.
Les Cook, Republican for
property appraiser, will greet
the public from 5 to 7 p.m. Fri-
day, June 20, at the Deco
Cafe in downtown Inverness.
Information: 352-628-7426.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican for
county commission District 2,


will have a fund-raiser from 4
to 7 p.m. Saturday, July 26 at
Mama's Kuntry Kafe on S.R.
44 across from Whispering
Pines Park, Inverness. Infor-
mation: 352-257-5381.
The Citrus County
Chronicle will have its pri-
mary forum at 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, at the Citrus
County Auditorium in Inver-
ness. The Chronicle's gen-
eral election forum is at
7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, at
the College of Central Florida
in Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will have a
forum for county commission
candidates at 6 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 12, at the College
of Central Florida.
The Citrus Hills Civic As-
sociation will have a candi-
dates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country Club.


ORLANDO Officials for
central Florida's new com-
muter train say more than
100,000 riders have used
the service during its initial
two weeks.
SunRail spokesman Steve
Olson announced Friday the
train has had an estimated
117,740 passengers board in
the 11 days it has run between
May 1 and May 15. It does not
run on the weekends.
Service on the first 32-mile
phase of $1.2 billion com-
muter train was offered free
for two weeks to help users
get acclimated to the train
and its schedule. A handful
of tweaks have been made
over that time to lessen
some midday delays and
parking issues. Paying serv-
ice is set to begin Monday.


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of Health
is warning residents about a
viral mosquito-borne disease.
Officials have received re-
ports of three Floridians who
recently traveled to the
Caribbean and contracted
chikungunya fever, which is
transmitted to humans by in-
fected mosquitoes.
Symptoms typically begin
three to seven days after
being bitten and include
fever and severe joint pains,
often in the hands and feet.
The Health Department
advised residents to drain
water from any garbage
cans, pool covers and other
items that may have col-
lected rain water and to wear
repellent.
From wire reports


State BRIEFS

SunRail gets more Officials warn of
than 100,000 riders mosquito disease




A4 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday There are plenty of people
willing to share their knowledge and
experience with you. Summon all of
your talents and resources, and you
will achieve your dreams.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be on
the lookout for appealing items at sales
or auctions. An older relative will offer
interesting facts about your family
background.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) A little
self-indulgence can't hurt. You don't
need to spend a lot of money to do
something that brings you joy
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Compro-
mise will be a necessary lesson. Bend
a little and see where it gets you.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Do some ex-
tensive research regarding a business
venture. There may not be as many
obstacles as you think.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Try to
combine romance and travel. A differ-
ent scenario can add a dash of excite-
ment to your usual routine. Someone
from your past may make an unex-
pected return.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Upsetting
emotional issues will surface. Don't try
to put the blame on someone else.
Even if you are feeling hurt, you will
eventually have to face facts and do
what's best for you.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Pass up
social or family gatherings today. There
is an underlying feeling of frustration
among those around you. Regain your
composure and decide your next move.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Put
your finances in order. Curtail any un-
necessary spending. You are holding
on to a false hope if you think you can
get by without a proper budget. Don't
count on a windfall.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It's ir-
rational to make decisions based on
unverified information. A relationship
with someone special will face discord
if you don't get your facts straight.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Don't
take part in anything that could dam-
age your reputation. You have too
much to lose if you make a poor
choice.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Home
improvements will go a long way to-
ward brightening your day. Trust your
intuition.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You may
be in the hot seat if you have reneged
on a promise. Apologize and do your
best to make amends.


ENTERTAINMENT


Bryan Cranston
almost turned down
'Godzilla' role
NEW YORK-- Bryan
Cranston says he's excited to be
part of "Godzilla 2014" but almost
turned down the role because he
was still working on "Breaking
Bad" and thought he had to fol-
low with "something serious."
In a recent interview about the
film, which opened Friday,
Cranston said he was worried
people might compare the two
roles and say, "Oh, that's not
anywhere near as good as
'Breaking Bad.'
"I didn't want to have that con-
versation," the actor said.
Cranston, who's currently
playing President Lyndon B.
Johnson in the Broadway play
"All the Way," said he read the
"Godzilla" script at his agent's
urging and that's what changed
his mind. "I was surprised by
what I read. I didn't anticipate
that," he said.
In chatting with "Godzilla" di-
rector Gareth Edwards,
Cranston said he realized that
the plan was to make a
"character-based monster movie
and I thought that's pretty cool."
He went on to conclude the TV
series and film were so different,
they couldn't be compared. "It's
different camps altogether," he
said.
Cranston, 58, said he loved
watching the Japanese Godzilla
films growing up and really
bought into the idea "they are
actually destroying a city, and I
didn't realize that it was a man in
a suit or anything."
In "Godzilla 2014," Cranston
plays a nuclear scientist who be-
comes obsessed with what
caused the destruction of a nu-
clear power plant in 1999.
The Emmy-winning and Tony-
nominated actor ended his role


Associated Press
Actress Salma Hayek, center, holds up a sign reading "bring
back our girls," part of a campaign calling for the release of
nearly 300 abducted Nigerian schoolgirls being held by
Nigerian Islamic extremist group Boko Haram, as she arrives
Saturday for the screening of "Saint-Laurent" at the 67th
Cannes International Rim Festival in Cannes, southern France.


as Walter White on "Breaking
Bad" with last year's series finale
after a five-year run. On his wish
list now is to do an "extremely
long" film series where he could
play the same character through
different story lines.
Asked if he's looking to be-
come intimate with another char-
acter the way he was able to be
with Walter White, Cranston re-
sponded, "Oh, yeah. That's the
whole goal."

Albuquerque car
wash that appeared
in 'Breaking Bad' sold
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-
The Albuquerque car wash
made famous in the hit TV se-
ries "Breaking Bad" has been
sold.


Tucson, Ariz.-based Mister
Car Wash announced Thursday
it was buying all sixAlbuquerque
locations of Octopus Car Wash,
including the one that regularly
appeared in the hitAMC show.
Octopus CEO Joel Jurkens
said signs will change in a few
months.
"Breaking Bad," which ended
last year and was filmed in Albu-
querque, followed former high
school teacher Walter White,
played by Bryan Cranston.
White produced methampheta-
mine with a former student,
Jesse Pinkman, played by
Aaron Paul.
The car wash, named A1A in
the series, was used to launder
drug money.

-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 18, the
138th day of 2014. There are 227
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 18, 1944, during World
War II, Allied forces finally occupied
Monte Cassino in Italy after a four-
month struggle with Axis troops.
On this date:
In 1896, the Supreme Court, in
Plessy v. Ferguson, endorsed "sep-
arate but equal" racial segregation,
a concept renounced 58 years later
in Brown v. Board of Education of
Topeka.
Ten years ago: Randy Johnson,
at age 40, became the oldest
pitcher in major league history to
throw a perfect game; the lefty re-
tired all 27 batters to lead the Ari-
zona Diamondbacks over the
Atlanta Braves 2-0.
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama told Israeli leader
Benjamin Netanyahu during a
White House meeting he needed to
stop Jewish settlements and should
grasp a "historic opportunity" to
make peace with the Palestinians.
One year ago: A car driven by
an 87-year-old man plowed into
dozens of hikers during a parade in
Damascus, Virginia, injuring about
50 people.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Bill
Macy is 92. Hall-of-Fame sports-
caster Jack Whitaker is 90. Actor
Robert Morse is 83. Actor Dwayne
Hickman is 80. Baseball Hall-of-
Famer Brooks Robinson is 77.
Country singer George Strait is 62.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Butch
Tavares (Tavares) is 61. Actor Chow
Yun-Fat is 59. Comedian-writer
Tina Fey is 44. Rapper Special Ed
is 40. Rock singer Jack Johnson is
39. Country singer David Nail is 35.
Actor Matt Long is 34. Actor Allen
Leech (TV: "Downton Abbey") is 33.
Christian-rock musician Kevin
Huguley (Rush of Fools) is 32.
Christian singer Francesca Battis-
telli is 29.
Thought for Today: "People find
life entirely too time-consuming." -
Stanislaw J. Lec, Polish writer
(1909-1966).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


city


H L Fcast City


Daytona Bch. 83
Fort Lauderdale 83
Fort Myers 88
Gainesville 87
Homestead 83
Jacksonville 85
Key West 84
Lakeland 87
Melbourne 83


H L Fcast


Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


185/58 0.00"] N/A/N/A
TUDE nA miT f~~lfExdusive daily
THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclsiby
-- TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 86W Low: 550
Sunny to mostly sunny

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh:87T Low: 58
i Partly cloudy
"TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 6;
-r Parly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 83/61
Record /53
Normal 88/70
Mean temp. 70
Departure from mean -9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.0"
Total for the month 3-59'
Total for the year 14.37
Normal for the year 11 .00"
* As d 7pm at Invome
UV INDEX: 14
O-2minimal,3-41ow, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very hiqh
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
30.15


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 53.1
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 72%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, oak
Today's count: 5.7/12
Monday's count: 5.7
Tuesday's count: 5.2
AIR QUALITY
Saturday observed: 48
Pollutant: Ozone


P ,JJ~
SOLUNAR TABLES ".
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
05/18 SUNDAY 23:09 03:18 09:21 15:49
05/19 MONDAY 23:09 04:16 10:25 16:45
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT .......................... 15 p.m.r
SUNRISE TOMORROW ................. B :to a m
44 0 MOO llSET TODAY.................... 0 0aHi
May21 May28 JunS5 Jun13 MOONETT Y------- P0aM
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating Is: Moderate. There Is no bum ban.
For more inlorrmatlon cal Firriih rMi".it F'nrl-t.r i ,1.' ) 754-6777. For more
. ui[ ,i ,,i f', I. ,II M i.ii Ii 'I |i," I it'. l i"i L',Iil-o.lii d. -or. trlys W eb sile:
ill, ie 1 .i *1 d i,.- -l ,- J'i. r 1bd1
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10a.m. or ater4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses maywater on Thursday andor Sunday.
ODD addresses may walar on Wedneday and'/or Saturday.
Hlari d i".enncg .mit, i .Jt-A.l nzloe O rTni' imgr hon- :1. rio giaru -are-'. :, jn
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shinufnA, can be done on any day and at any
Ime.
Citrus County Ulillies' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL now
pian m aterial352-527-7669. Some new plaIting may qualify for additional
waiting allowances.
To report violations, please cll: ity or Inverness 0 352-726-2321, ity of CTrystal
River 0 352-795-421 G xt 313, unincorporated Citius County @ 352-527-7GG9.

TIDES
'Fromi mouths of rivers "At King's Bay "'At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
(3afmhrmassan 10.46a-m. 0.211. 1050prm 0.71t 618a.m O,Oit. 3-00(p.mO,21
CyslalRiver-" 909a.m. 1711t 85pm. 2.31t. S16am Olt. 3-00p.m0.8ft
Wlhblaoochefa' 616a.m. 3.1 t. 5:13pm. 3.8t. 12:32am.-0.4ft. 12:12p.m.4ft
Ilomosa-m"' 9:546a.m. 6It. 9:05p.m. .Sft. 5:21 am. 0.1ft. 3:08p.mOi.3t.


Today: East-northeast winds around
10 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Bay
and inland waters a light chop.
Tonight: Northeast winds around 10
knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters a light chop.


Gulf water
temperature

77

Taken at ArIpeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Wilhla,:,oc.ne at Holder 29.09 29.18 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 38.52 38.55 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 39.60 39.63 40.60
Tsala Apopka-FIoral City 40.48 40.50 42.20
bUs' rfofrtd in fM_ abor o s levec Food stago fo rEla's are bas" on 23 year flrA,
tho maan nual ficrJ which ha a 4.3 cch chanco ci trng ,"olcod any ono Kw Thts fta is obtacd frr Su ttx. 8outhc-aa Ftida Vicfr Maa ,mert D Jra
ta^ Silate |or ieJty cferrh I: Hnrlnrl[ nut l3( !he IKH Ct [ll dEitH CJ II i hJ" aily qt[l4i( 'K you
san jId ari the Hy(tokl[rt [ Se iw a (35.) 2 1

THE NATION
m 4k1M2


"'*--.if *^--jy "'.* "' *


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Alany
AibuquLr qUe
Asheville
Atlaint
Atmanfic OCty
Austin
Baltimore
BIIngs
U~wnniinlmvn
Roston
Rtdlak,
R ingtonr VT
Cat esin, S RC
ChaGItslon, W.V.
Charlotto
Glwcago
ctlvelaivl
C, iurnimH SC
Colurnlms, OIt
ocxrd, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Uotioit
El Paso
Fvansville, IN
laimstbutu
HaWtord
Hcusmon
Indanapotis
LasVegas
Lille Rock
I nb AnqIurs~I


SA1
H L Pep. N
63 45 1. 1466
86 .S7 88

72 48 869
70 51 31 7C
866 116a
6/ 48 /t
65 47 73
6 49 .14 /2
f9 49 (w
75 02 65
S5 41 61fil
& 49 154 64
at) 51 79
62 42 .09 W9
71 43 G7
90 39 69
51 40 6b
52 39 .08 62
61 ,18 7C
57 44 .08 64
74 58 68 70
8459 84
70 43 84
6 39 71
bi 4b &ft
94 61 %
61 42 6p
64 45 67
72 51 1 8 69
86 W3 En
55 41 67
102 74 96
62 49 .11i 73
85 64 hA


SUN
I L Fcst
5 39 pc
I S pc
*43 h


56 ts
43 pc
3 4G ts
2 56 ts
S44 ts
t 5 pc
44 pc
\9 sh
P 38 pc
7 49 sh
P 4/ pc
5 44 s
? 40 pr
I5? pc
4 43 pc
) 3 pc
S6&3 pc
S" pc
52 pc
S48 pc
i 68 pr
S45 s
S41 pc
S43 pc
S67 pc
7 46 pc
69 pc
S58 ts
4 60


SAI SUN
City H L Pep. H L Fcst
New Orleoans 82 62 81 66 s
New York OiCy 70 S. 1 46 7P 40 pc
Nbdolk 09 57 70 55 pc
Oldahoma Cly 74 52 79 63 pc
(kOaha 68 9 71 59 pc
Palm Spings 108 72 97 67 pc
PrilladeTl6a W b3 68 48 pc
Phoenix 104 74 102 70 pc
filsburgh 54 45 .1/ 64 38 pc
(xortiar, ME W 5- 1-4168 4.3 pc
Portland,On 69 5S &M 51 Is
Piovkleni, RFI 76 61 48 68 48 pc
Raleigh 71 47 87 4, sh
FRapidCty 64 34 76 S? pc
Hono 84 b5 /0 4) pc
Fochoste, NY 57 42 02 42 pc
Sacrarnergo D so 80 S52 pC
Salt LalwCIty ) 52 It 49 IPC
S Afinloruo 8/ 60 88 W06 p
S nDiej) 71 6.1 67 6? pc
S, riaciso 67 57 65 54 pc
, janrnah 80 -S1 a 59 Is
Seallle 68 54 64 5S Is
Spokane 66 48 02 64 43 Is
St. Louis 65 42 71 53 s
SI.St Bt. Marine 49 32 .01 Y 41 sh
SYrause &. 40 62 42 pc
Tpliw 66B .136 04 73 61 pc
M,1,., ,Il r. . 72 52 pC
YESTEADY'1 NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGHl 109, lrnp l.al,
LOW 23CmiLu, Mi
WORLD CITIES


LnuISv1ll1 62 43 68 4/ s CITY HIlJKYN
Memphis 61 51 .68 72 59 ts ITY 5
MfAlwaukee 61 42 6/ 45 pc Arulw S9/?Wfc
MInneapois E6 41 70 54 pc Ainslel.arn WW/4s
Mohile 81 A 84 S9 pc Ahels 7511/S1'S
Mnlgomery 81 51 82 60 pc Braling 8,'1.5/:I
Nashville 64 49 71 48 pc Be e ff8W/
Bemluda 7 1-Mpl
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=lcudy;, dradizzl, h Cao S'4s
M-faii h-hazy; pc.partly cloudy; r.rain; Callaay 5941/pc
mrainlIsnow mix; a-suany; =sh-howw; Havana 84$6Ms
in-snow;is-thundeirstorms; w-wlndy. HInq Kon.q 81//0'
W51 02M4 .Jortalam 8?i0ts


I qIbonf 80W7/s
I indon 73'"/Is
M-rid 785/s
Mexico Oily 77/50?s
MWallo 60144/I
MmscoW 1/3fpc
Pans 6Wb3/s
I thl o 1fm4e/s
yfdinay 7S&ri6,,d
Tokyo 735/ws
Toronto 55142/pc
Warsaw 64FWoIWs


S LEGAL NOTICES

-!-. 70-2

Bid Notices.....................................D9

Meeting Notices.............................D9

Lien Notices...................................D9

Miscellaneous Notices..................D9

Surplus Property ............................D9


S C I T RULI S COUNTY I TI


CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
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For home delivery by mail:
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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
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Report a news tip:
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S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ARRIVE
Continued from PageAl

In the state of Florida, bicycles
are considered vehicles. They
have the same rights to the road
as cars and motorcycles and rid-
ers must obey the same traffic
laws.
If you're riding a bike on a
sidewalk or in a crosswalk, you
have the same rights and obliga-
tions as a pedestrian.
Basically, it comes down to
good manners, not demanding
your own way protecting yourself
from potential injury, staying
alert and not doing anything
stupid.
Andy Noel, manager at Sun-
coast Bicycles in Inverness, has a
bird's-eye view of bicycle safety
violations from the shop that's at
the trailhead of the Withla-
coochee State Trail.
"Not giving way to the right of
way is a big one," he said. "There
are some fast riders out there
and slower folks need to stay to
the right and stay out of the way
of fast riders if they're just
cruising."
Noel said whenever he rents
someone a bike to ride on the
trail, he always goes over shifting
and braking, plus some of the
rules of the trail.
"Staying to the right is one of
the most important rules," he
said.
The shop also rents helmets,
which are required by Florida
law for anyone age 16 and
younger riding a bicycle.
"We can't force people to wear
a helmet, but we strongly suggest
it," he said.
Other safety features include
reflective vests, safety lights and
flashers for front and rear


INJURY
Continued from Page Al

thought on the trail it
should be OK without
one," said the Inverness
city clerk. "But anything
can happen anywhere."
She was riding toward
Floral City with a friend
when their tires hit and
she flew over her handle-
bars and landed on her
head.
"I don't remember any-
thing about it," she said. "I
do remember seeing peo-


ple coming toward me
from the opposite direc-
tion and needing to move
over because they were
too far in the middle of the
trail," she said. "But that's
all I remember"
She spent about a week
in the hospital and then


some time in a rehab facil-
ity in Brooksville. She lost
a lot of her short-term
memory and still has trou-
ble concentrating some-
times.
Her accident was in
2006.
"People on the trail


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 A5


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Several safety items bicyclists are encouraged to utilize include a prop-
erly-fitted helmet; equipment to hydrate your body, such as this insu-
lated bottle; and lightweight clothing to prevent overexposure to the
sun. State law requires bicyclists riding between sunset and sunrise
to ride with lights on their bikes.


"If you're riding after dusk,
you're required to have front and
rear lights," Noel said. "It's for
folks to see you, rather than for
you to see."
A white light must be visible
from 500 feet to the front and
both a red reflector and rear
lamp with a red light visible from
600 feet to the rear




To stay safe, whether on two,
three or four wheels, here are
some bicycle safety tips:
U According to Florida law, a
bicycle must have a securely
fixed, regular seat.
No passengers riding on the
handlebars or cross bar Two can
ride a tandem bike, but only one


can ride a single-seat bike. A
child must be in a secured child
safety seat; an adult may carry an
infant in a backpack or sling
while riding a bike.
At least one hand must be on
the handlebars while riding.
When riding on a sidewalk or
in a crosswalk, bicyclists must
yield the right of way to pedestri-
ans and give an audible signal
(calling out or bell) before
passing.
No iPods or headsets while
riding that's the law Save the
music for riding a stationary bike
at the gym.
When sharing the road with
motor vehicles, ride your bike
the same direction as the traffic,
as actor Alec Baldwin discovered
recently when he was issued a ci-
tation for riding against traffic in
New York City


According to the NHTSA, rid-
ing with the flow of traffic, rather
than against it, is safer because:
motorists look for and expect all
traffic to move in one direction
and might not see a bicyclist rid-
ing the wrong way; traffic signs
and lights face traffic flowing in
one direction only and bicyclists
going against traffic can't read
and follow them. Also, motorists'
reaction time is greatly reduced
when bike riders ride toward
vehicles.
Ride "big," suggests the Cy-
clingSavvy website. A person on
a bicycle has every right to use
the entire lane on a road, the
same as a person driving vehicle
does, if the lane is not big enough
to share or there is no designated
bike lane. Rather than squishing
you and your bike way over to the
right, it's safer to position your-
self directly in the lane, making
yourself visible and discouraging
motorists from passing you too
closely and unsafely in the same
lane.
Never ride within 5 feet of a
parked car, the "door zone." A
suddenly opened car door could
do more than just surprise you.
Turn left from left-turn lanes
and never ride straight when in a
right-turn-only lane. A general
rule to follow: If you can't do it
while driving a car, you can't do it
while riding a bike.
Be courteous. Ride defen-
sively Signal when turning or
passing (point left with left arm
outstretched for left, pointing up-
ward with left arm for turning
right). Wear bright colors in the
daytime and wear reflective tape
on clothing at night. Be safe and
have fun.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicleonline.
corn.


need to pay attention,"
Davis said. "It's like driv-
ing or riding on a road. So
often I see people two,
three at a time going down
the middle of the trail, not
paying attention. You need
to stay in your own lane."
She said she wasn't
afraid to get back on her
bike, but she is a lot more
cautious and she's
adamant about wearing a
helmet. As she has
learned, anything can hap-
pen. Squirrels dart across
the trail, tires can hit a
rock.
"I still don't like wearing


one, but I won't go without
it," she said.
Contact Chronicle re-


BIKE SAFETY
BY THE NUMBERS
* In 2012, 726 Americans
were killed while riding a
bicycle, a 6.5 percent
increase from 2011.
* Of those killed, 634 were
male.
* Florida leads the nation
in bicyclist fatalities and
has ranked in the top
three states since 2001.
* Bicyclists ages 45 to 54
have the highest fatality
rate based on population;
those age 16 to 20 have
the highest non-fatal
injury rate.
* Most bicyclist fatalities
occur between 4 and
8 p.m.
* In 2011, more than
37 percent of bicyclist
fatalities involved alcohol,
either involving the bike
rider or driver of a motor
vehicle.
* In the most recent report
from the Florida
Department of Highway
Safety and Motor
Vehicles, 15 percent of
bicyclists and passengers
involved in crashes were
wearing safety helmets
* The 10- to 14-year-old
age group had a greater
number of pedestrian
and bicyclist injuries than
any other age group
younger than 20.
* Helmets are 85 percent
effective in protecting
against brain injury.
Sources: National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration
and Florida Department of
Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles


porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn.


& CLEAN IN LiW


ANY SERVICE SPECIAL


ORDERS OF s150 OR MORE

Cleaning Completed By 5/31/14



AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIAL


$


Cleaning Completed By 5/31/14


FL #CAC1816408
AL #08158


~jI


BEYOND CARPET CLEANING
CARPET I TILE & GROUT I HARDWOOD I UPHOLSTERY I AIR.DUOT
1-800-STEEMER. I stanleysteemera.u

CITRUS 726-4646


MARION 622-5885


noTbe combined with other coupons or offeRrs. Comnbined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are consider
sets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector Residential only; cannot be used for restoration ser
g.. . . alid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for Details._..........


People on the trail need
to pay attention. It's like driving
or riding on a road.
Debbie Davis
urges use of safety helmets for all bicyclists.


$


LOCAL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


David
Barclay, 41
DUNNELLON
David James Barclay, 41,
of Dunnellon, Florida, was
born Aug. 28,1972, in Corn-
wall, England, and died
May 13, 2014, in Citrus
County, Florida.
He is survived by his
son, James David Barclay;
wife, Amanda Barclay;
mother, Sheila Barclay of
Cornwall, England; and
his father, James (wife,
Julie) Barclay
A service is scheduled
for 4 p.m. Monday, May 19,
2014, at Rock Crusher
Road First Church of God
in Crystal River
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

John
Brown, 63
HOMOSASSA
John R. Brown, 63, of
Homosassa, Florida, died
Saturday, May 10, 2014, at
Citrus Memorial hospital,
Inverness, Florida. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness, Florida.

Roxanna
Lawless, 75
OCALA
Roxanna Lawless, 75, of
Ocala, Florida, died
May 14,2014.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto,
Florida, with further
arrangements taking place
under the direction of
Eaton-Watson Funeral
Home in Perry, New York.

Mildred 'Millie'
Melton, 69
INVERNESS
Mildred R. "Millie"
Melton, 69, of Inverness,
Florida, passed away
May 17,2014, at Hospice of
Citrus County, Inverness.
She was born Dec. 2,1944,
in Mount Eagle, Ten-
nessee, to the late William
M. and Ada R. (White)
Hendry Mildred was a
housekeeper for homes
and businesses, and ar-
rived in this area in 2007,
coming from Marathon,
Florida. She was a Baptist
by faith, and enjoyed cro-
cheting, knitting, NASCAR
races, flower gardening
and spending time with
her family
She is survived by her
loving husband of 39 years,
Lloyd Melton. Other sur-
vivors include children,
Lisa (Lloyd) Lumbert of
Loxahatchee, Florida,
Bobby Cotner of Lehigh
Acres, Florida, and Ila
(Mike) Sippel of Inverness;
six grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by
two children, Tommy and
Frankie Cotner
A celebration of life me-
morial service is sched-
uled at 1 p.m. Tuesday,
May 20, at the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory Inverness.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Cathleen
Nichols, 83
HERNANDO
Cathleen R. Nichols, 83,
of Hernando, Florida, died
Friday, May 16, 2014.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Florida.








'1 ' li S ' I I


Michael
Perez, 65
FLORAL CITY
Michael E. Perez, 65, of
Floral City, Florida, died
May 13,2014, at Citrus Me-
morial hospital in Inver-
ness, Florida.
Private arrangements
are by Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory, Inverness.

Judy Pieta, 62
DUNNELLON
Judy D. Pieta, 62, of
Dunnellon, Florida, died
Friday, May 16,2014.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Florida.

Karl
Schultz, 86
HOMOSASSA
Karl F Schultz, age 86,
Homosassa, died Saturday
May 17,2014.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
in charge of private
arrangements.

Linda
Shaffer, 60
BEVERLY HILLS
Linda Shaffer's memo-
rial service has been
rescheduled to 1 p.m.
June 7, 2014, at First Bap-
tist Church of Inverness.

Doris
Weber, 87
BEVERLY HILLS
Doris V Weber, 87, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Thursday, May 1, 2014, in
Lecanto. She was born
July 19, 1926, in Newark,
New Jersey, daughter of
the late Henry and Mar-
garet (Keane) Kapner She
retired from the telephone
company in New Jersey
after many years of service
as a telephone operator
She also drove school
buses for several years.
She moved to Beverly
Hills, Florida, from
Blairstown, New Jersey,
over 21 years ago. Doris
was a member of Our Lady
of Grace Catholic Church,
Beverly Hills. She volun-
teered for Daystar Life
Center and won an award
from the state of Florida
for her volunteer services.
Survivors include son,
Frederick A. (Bethel)
Weber Jr of Beverly Hills;
daughter, Carol
(Lawrence) Ratner of San
Francisco, Calif; two
brothers, Kenneth
(Shirley) Burham of Nev,
and William (Mary)
Burham of New Jersey;
beloved sister, Mary
(Harold) Hayes of Ho-
mosassa; three grandchil-
dren; and two
great-grandchildren.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory



CILa. . 2Wi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremaclon ^i-' 4\t\
--- I- ,'Mtlcmllr.jll .jri-

For Information and costs,_
call 726-8323 I



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Obituaries


Associated Press

TAOS, N.M. Motor-
cyclists and movie fanat-
ics from as far away as
Canada have made the
pilgrimage to northern
New Mexico to celebrate
Dennis Hopper and his
iconic counterculture
film "Easy Rider"
They are gathering
Saturday in the dusty,
adobe encircled plaza in
the community of Ran-
chos de Taos, 4 miles
south of Taos, to kick off
what town officials hope
will be an annual event
-Dennis Hopper Day-
with a rally and ride
through some of the
places made famous in
the film.
Saturday would have
been the late actor and
director's 78th birthday
Hopper lived in Taos -
a diverse town known for
skiing, art and Hispanic
and Native American
culture for years and
is buried here.
Town Manager Rick
Bellis said the day is
aimed at recognizing
Hopper's contributions
as a resident, a film-
maker, a supporter of the
arts and for simply being
a "colorful member" of
the community
"His image really rep-
resents the spirit of
Taos," Bellis said. "He
was independent,
slightly eccentric but in-
credibly talented. He sort
of became a symbol for a
whole new generation."
Hopper first came to
New Mexico in the late
1960s to scout locations
for "Easy Rider" Shot on
a shoestring budget, the
independent film summed
up the hopes and anxi-
eties of the '60s, romanti-
cized the open road and
ended up revolutioniz-
ing Hollywood by forcing
the studio gates to open
to a new generation of
film school graduates.
"Nothing like this had
ever been done before. It


Associated Press
Director-actor Dennis Hopper poses in Hollywood, Calif., in October 1971. To celebrate
the legacy of Hopper and his iconic counterculture film "Easy Rider," motorcyclists and
movie fanatics from as far away as Canada gathered Saturday in the dusty, adobe-
encircled plaza at Ranchos de Taos, N.M., to kick off what town officials hope will be an
annual event, Dennis Hopper Day. Saturday would have been the late actor's 78th birthday.


was a phenomenon," said
John Hellmann, an English
professor and a member of
the film studies program at
Ohio State University
The appeal of rebellion,
motorcycles and the open
road have sustained the
popularity of "Easy Rider"
over four decades, and
town officials are hopeful
the film and the legend of
Hopper will continue to
draw people to Taos.
This marks the first year
of the rally and ride, but
organizers have plans to


add more music and film
venues in the coming years.
Bellis said Hopper was
able to get some of the
area's traditional Hispanic
and Native American fam-
ilies to open up to out-
siders when he first
arrived in the '60s. In fact,
he was the only person to
get permission to film at
Taos Pueblo, an American
Indian community dating
to the late 13th and early
14th centuries that's recog-
nized as a UNESCO World
Heritage site.


Miss Beazley, Bush's


beloved Scottie, dies at 10


Associated Press

DALLAS Miss Beaz-
ley, former President
George W Bush's beloved
Scottish terrier, has died.
Bush's office an-
nounced Saturday that
Miss Beazley was "put to
rest" this weekend after
battling cancer She was
10 years old.


The statement says Miss
Beazley was "a source of
joy" during Bush's time in
Washington and in Dallas,
where he and his wife,
Laura, live.
Miss Beazley was born
in October 2004. The
pooch was later pre-
sented to Laura Bush as a
birthday president from
her husband.


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The family pet was fea-
tured in a December 2005
video, 'A Very Beazley
Christmas," which was a
look at White House holi-
day life presented from
the a dog's point of view
The dog was named for
the character Uncle Beazley,
a dinosaur in Oliver But-
terworth's children's book,
"The Enormous Egg."


"He walked across the
multicultural borders here.
I think that really started
with him and the movie
and has continued," Bellis
said. "In the last few years,
we have really become
that kind of community
that he saw, that there was
no difference between our
ethnicities and who, when
and where we came from.
"We all came here for
the same reason, that awe
of nature and that spirit of
the last of the wild West,
that independence," he said.

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An icon endures: Fans honor


Hopper at 'Easy Rider' festival


A6 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


my




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Group trying to map


Former defense contractor


state's giant cypress trees surrenders to US marshals


KEVIN LOLLAR
AP member exchange

NAPLES, Fla. -This was one big tree,
a giant even among the giants of
Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary-the mas-
sive bald cypress tree's lowest branch
was as big as a mature live oak.
Just the kind of tree Mike Knight and
Ralph Arwood were looking for recently:
The two men are in the first phase of an
Explorers Club expedition to study giant
bald cypress trees at Corkscrew, the


largest old-growth bald cy-
press stand in the world; the
sanctuary's average old-
growth cypress tree is 11 to
12 feet in circumference;
giant trees are 17 to 23 feet.
Knight, regional director
of The Explorers Club's
Florida Chapter, and
Corkscrew volunteer Ar-
wood measured the tree's
circumference at 20.2 feet,
which would make it about
700 years old; in other
words, the tree was growing
in Corkscrew during the
Black Death in Europe and
when Joan of Arc was
burned at the stake.
"That's a fun tree," Ar-
wood said. "I like that tree."
Founded in 1904, The Ex-


Corks
Swan
cypress
is 5,00(
old, bi
oldest tr
700 ye
because
burned
all of
Florida
years


plorers Club is an international society
that promotes field research and the ex-
ploration of land, sea, air and outer space.
Explorers Club members have in-
cluded Edmund Hillary, who led the first
successful ascent of Mount Everest in
1953, and Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Arm-
strong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.
Phase one of the Corkscrew expedition
is finding, mapping and measuring giant
cypress trees in Corkscrew's 800-acre for-
est, which represents 2 percent of the cy-
press forest that once covered the region.
Fbrphase two, researchers will climb some
of the giants and document every living
organism from the canopy to the ground.
"The reason The Explorers Club took
interest in this expedition is that you can
look... on Google Earth and see the whole
canopy, but you can't see the trees for the
forest," Knight said. "It's possible nobody
has ever walked through here. There are
still blank spots on the map, and here's
one of them in our own backyard."
Corkscrew's cypress forest is 5,000
years old, but the oldest trees are 700
years old because a fire burned nearly all
of South Florida 700 years ago.
"There are old historical accounts about
giant cypress trees out here that tower
150 high, measure 20 feet in girth and are 700
years old," Knight said. "We want to find how
many there are and where they are. We're
looking at a snapshot in time, a piece of old
Florida that has existed for centuries."

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call the newsroom at 352-563-5660 or
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.
Story ideas must be approved by an edi
reporter is assigned.


Finding Corkscrew's giants is not easy
When surveying an open area such as a
coral reef, researchers can simply run
transects, a series of straight lines, and
count whatever organisms they're inter-
ested in.
But Corkscrew's cypress forest doesn't
have any straight lines; it's a tangled
mass of living and dead vegetation.
Instead of transects, Knight and Arwood
employed the roaming- or creeping-line
technique: Using GPS as a guide, they
hiked through the forest looking for giant
trees until their path was
screw blocked by impenetrable
vegetation or water, then
mp's changed directions and
s forest walked until their path was
blocked again.
0 years "We don't know where the
trees are, so we weave
ut the through the forest in the gen-
eral direction we want to
rees are go," Knight said. "When we
ars old see a tree that might be big
enough, we throw a tape
e a fire measure around it"
It was tough going, climb-
nearly ing or tripping over fallen
uh logs, crawling under low
South branches, crashing through
a 700 thick vegetation, banging
shins on cypress knees,
ago. being scraped and cut by the
thorns of Smilax vines and
being bled by mosquitoes and deer flies.
Arwood, who has been nominated for
membership in The Explorers Club, and
Knight zigged and zagged through the for-
est for six hours; they covered almost 5
miles on their nonlinear course. When
they walked wearily out into Corkscrew's
North Marsh, they were about one linear
mile from their starting point
For the day, they discovered six giant
trees, ranging from 18.2 to 20.2 feet in cir-
cumference; to date, the project team,
which includes several other volunteers
who are not affiliated with The Explor-
ers Club, has discovered 49 giant trees.
About 200 acres of the sanctuary remain
to be explored.
"Out here, you can get the idea of these
ancient trees as an integral part of the
ecological community," Knight said.
"This is the remnant of a once huge, mag-
nificent forest. It's a treasure for us, part
of our cultural and ecological heritage."
Five giant trees, including one with a
23-foot circumference, can be seen from the
Corkscrew Sanctuary boardwalk and are
part of the sanctuary's Landmark Trees proj-
ect, through which visitors can learn about
each tree's history and its ecological role.
"This is pristine wilderness," Corkscrew
spokeswoman Beth Preddy said. "It's an
ancient forest just 30 miles from the beach,
and people can experience it as an ancient
forest, and get to know the awesomeness
of these monumental landmark trees."


email

itor before a


Associated Press


POWAY, Calif. A former defense
contractor convicted of bribing former
U.S. Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham of
California surrendered to U.S. marshals
after exhausting his appeals options.
Brent Wilkes was convicted in 2007
and sentenced to 12 years in prison for
bribery and other charges for lavishing
Cunningham with more than $700,000 in
cash and gifts in exchange for nearly $90
million in defense work.
Wilkes surrendered on Friday to fed-
eral marshals in San Antonio, Texas, to
serve his sentence. He had been out on
bond for most of the past seven years
while he appealed, the U-T San Diego
reported Saturday
Wilkes had been living in Texas near
his family since 2012, his federal public
defender, Shereen Charlick, said.


qw d6 1 ---------- I


Utah Supreme Court halts


same-sex adoption cases


Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY-
The Utah Supreme
Court has ordered a tem-
porary halt of several
district judges' orders
requiring the Utah De-
partment of Health to
issue birth certificates
in same-sex parent
adoptions.
The stay was granted
Friday night in response
to a Utah Attorney Gen-
eral's Office request for
clarity on whether the
department can issue
the birth certificates if
directed by court order
The attorney general's
office praised the deci-
sion, saying the stay will
remain in effect until the
issue has been resolved
by the court. The court
has not yet announced a
date for oral arguments.
The stay appears to
apply to a district judge's
order requiring Attorney
General Sean Reyes and
two top health officials
to explain the state's re-
fusal to recognize a
same-sex couple's adop-
tion, the attorney gen-
eral's office said.
Third District Judge


Andrew Stone ordered the
officials to appear at a
June 16 hearing to show
why they should not be
held in contempt for what
he called "their willful dis-
regard and refusal" to
honor the adoption.
Stone's order, dated
May 7, does not identify
the child or the two
women who adopted the
child. The two were among
more than 1,000 gay and
lesbian partners who mar-
ried after a federal judge
overturned Utah's same-
sex marriage ban Dec. 20.
Those weddings stopped
Jan. 6 when the U.S.
Supreme Court issued a
stay, prompting the attor-
ney general's office to
maintain adoptions also
should be on hold.
"The stay prevents fur-


their confusion as the dis-
trict court order required
the (health) department to
list same-sex parents as
the legal parents of an
adoptive child," the attor-
ney general's office said in
a statement. "The depart-
ment sought clarification
because the court orders
appear to conflict with
Utah law currently in ef-
fect, which prohibits the
state and any state entities
from recognizing same-sex
marriages.
"The attorney general's
office is encouraged that it
will be able to present the
department's full argu-
ments to the court so that
these issues may be re-
solved to give people who
seek adoption and the de-
partment clarity on the
issues."


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Citrus Chest and Lung Specialists, P.A.
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are closing our practice as of 6-16-14.
Make arrangements to obtain records before closing
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STATE/NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 A7


Wilkes, 59, is the last of several defen-
dants in the Cunningham corruption case
to be locked up. He spent 11 months in
prison in 2008 before a court ruled he
could be free while he pursued an appeal.
Earlierthis year, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals refused to order a new trial.
Cunningham, an eight-term Republi-
can congressman and Navy flying ace,
pleaded guilty in 2005 to accepting $2.4
million in bribes from Wilkes and others
- including antiques, boats, a used
Rolls-Royce and cash to pay the mort-
gage on his mansion.
Cunningham was sentenced to more
than eight years in prison and was re-
leased last year He served nearly all his
sentence at a minimum-security federal
work camp in Tucson, Arizona, where
inmates earn 12 to 40 cents an hour
doing landscaping, maintenance work
and food preparation.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRHS
Continued from Page Al

this week, according to Citrus
County School District officials. An-
other 33 were on the bubble and
hoping for positive outcomes from
final exams Thursday and Friday,
Connors said.
District officials noted the spike in
non-graduates at Crystal River High
School, but they acknowledge they
are not sure why it's happened.
"It's definitely something we're
concerned about," assistant super-
intendent of schools Mike Mullen
said. "Linda is the right person to fix
that. She's a curriculum-minded
principal."
School board member Pat
Deutschman and Chairman Thomas
Kennedy said high school students
are struggling with ever-increasing
state standards to graduate.
But, like their top administrators,
neither board member could point
to a single reason why the effect is
worse at Crystal River than Citrus or
Lecanto.
"Everyone wants an answer,"
Kennedy said. "There's probably a
multitude of reasons."
0 0 0
In order to graduate, seniors must
accomplish four tasks:
Pass at minimum 24 course
credits though high school, includ-
ing mandatory classes such as ad-
vanced algebra and geometry
Achieve a grade point average
at graduation time of at least 2.0.
Pass the Florida Comprehen-
sive Assessment Test, or FCAT, and
end-of-course (EOC) exams. (Some
students can still graduate without
passing FCAT or EOC exams if they
meet certain other criteria.)
Pass requirements associated
with the Post-secondary Education
Readiness Test, or PERT This test
assures that students are prepared
for college. All students must take
the test whether they plan to attend
college or not. If they fail the test,
they must take a remediation
course. Students can also meet re-
quirements if they reach a minimum
score on college-entrance exams.
Patrick Simon, the school dis-
trict's director of research and ac-
countability, said other
requirements are being added to
high schools every year
For example, next year's senior
class will have to take and pass an
online course during their time in
high school. Mullen said hundreds
of students throughout the district
have waited until their senior year
to take that course, putting addi-
tional pressure on them to pass the
class.
Deutschman said many students
are finding the requirements too dif-
ficult for four years of high school.


School board
members Pat
Deutschman and
Chairman Thomas
Kennedy said high
school students are
struggling with
ever-increasing
state standards to
graduate.

But, like their top
administrators,
neither board
member could
point to a single
reason why the
effect is worse at
Crystal River than
Citrus or Lecanto.

"Everyone wants
an answer,
Kennedy said.
"There's probably
a multitude of
reasons."

They fulfill the requirements in the
summer after graduation or take a
fifth year of high school.
"Some of these kids just need a lit-
tle more time," she said.
@ @
Connors, who has a doctoral de-
gree, was an assistant principal for
16 years before her appointment to
lead Crystal River High School this
year when former principal Mark
McCoy decided he wanted to return
to teaching.
Connors employs processes to
ensure students are meeting gradu-
ation requirements, but not every
factor of a student's success is within
her grasp.
If parents and students don't
keep up with the requirements, or
if students don't follow a guidance
counselor's suggestions to bring up
their grades, then all the processes
in the world won't save those
students.
"This is a partnership. We need
our kids to take responsibility," she
said. "We need parents to help us.
There really is no excuse not to
know the requirements."
Still, Connors has a hard time fig-
uring out why so many CRHS stu-
dents are at risk of failing this year


"I do know they did have some
turnover in counselors and things
were shifted and moved," she said,
referring to the 2012-2013 school
year "When there is turnover in
guidance counselors or caseloads
are split up or switched over, some-
times things fall through the cracks."
Connors said she has installed a
standardized form for guidance
counselors to follow students from
ninth grade forward. Regardless of
turnover, the checklist stays the
same.
Mullen, however, said he doubted
change in personnel under McCoy's
watch had anything to do with the
higher number of seniors not gradu-
ating.
If anything, McCoy instituted pro-
grams to help struggling seniors, in-
cluding the ability to take required
courses online at a student's own
pace, Mullen said.
"He put resources in place trying
to catch those kids up," he said.
Mullen, a former principal at Cit-
rus High, said other factors are
likely to blame. He said Crystal
River has a higher absenteeism rate
than the other high schools, and he
noted that the school had a large
construction project taking place for
two years.
Kennedy, whose son Ethan is com-
pleting his freshman year at Crystal
River High, noted the school has
had four principals in the past 10
years. Kennedy said he believes
Connors will bring stability to the
campus.
"What we didn't have at Crystal
River was a Dr Connors," Kennedy
said. "The guidance department is
critical to the success of the stu-
dents' academic career and ulti-
mately of them graduating. Dr
Connors rebuilt the guidance de-
partment and that was extremely
appropriate."
Connors already is facing chal-
lenges for the 2015 senior class. She
said her staff has identified 157 stu-
dents at risk of not graduating be-
cause they haven't met certain
requirements.
"It's an alarming number," she
said.
The staff is working with those
students to make sure they have
what's needed to graduate next year
Simon, a former CRHS principal,
said he hopes students who don't
graduate will continue following
through with myriad programs the
district offers to meet requirements.
Superintendent of Schools Sandra
"Sam" Himmel said it's difficult to
pinpoint trends because students
can be unpredictable.
"Every kid is different, every class
is different," she said. "It all de-
pends on what that individual kid
does."
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or
m wrigh t@chronicleonline. corn.


Atomic bomb survivors

address Key West forum


Associated Press

KEY WEST, Fla. -
Survivors of the atomic
bombings on Japan are
sharing their experience
at a home of the U.S. pres-
ident who authorized the
attacks.
The 1945 bombings of
Hiroshima and Nagasaki
were being explored in a
weekend symposium at
the Harry S. Truman Little
White House in Key West.
Two survivors of the
bombings opened the
Truman Legacy Sympo-
sium on Friday telling
those gathered about ex-
periencing the devasta-
tion as children.
Setsuko Thurlow, who
was 13 when Hiroshima
was bombed, recalled her
rescue from a collapsed
building before class-
mates were burned alive
inside it.
She recalled seeing a
blue-white flash and then
hearing the voices of her
classmates begging for
help in the collapsed
building. She was
trapped beneath boards
but pulled free from the
rubble, but said about 30
other girls were not so
lucky She ultimately fled
the city on foot, but the
sights of what she passed
will never leave her
"We saw streams of
people, streams of ghostly
people burned, black-


ened," she said. "When
darkness came, we sat on
the hillside and we
watched the city burn."
Yasuaki Yamashita, who
was 6 when his home was
destroyed in Nagasaki, said
he spent decades hiding
his background because
of discrimination against
survivors. He moved to
Mexico and kept his back-
ground a secret from all
but a few close friends
until 1995, when a
friend's son asked him to
speak at his university
He refused, then gave in
and delivered a presenta-
tion on his experience.
"When I finished, my
suffering started disap-
pearing," he said. "If we
don't tell what happened
in Nagasaki and Hi-
roshima, it could happen
again anywhere."
Now nuclear disarma-
ment advocates, the two
survivors are part of pre-
sentations continuing
through Sunday that in-
clude Truman's grandson
Clifton Truman Daniel,
who is authoring a book
on the bombings.
The annual Truman
Symposium, in its 12 year,
draws scholars, authors
and political figures to
discuss Truman's presi-
dency Events were being
held at sites including the
Little White House,
where Truman spent 11
working vacations.


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atorvastatin calcumr
tablets il^




















You pay $4 iryou have: You pay $30 iryou have:

I J .6 .--,.


ore
I oN 63.ns36rI ance.I
*. Eu n


S
Brought to you by Pfizer,
the makers of name-brand LIPITOR.


*LIPITOR CHOICE CARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS
By using the LIPITOR Choice Card (the "Card"), you
attest that you meet the eligibility criteria and will comply
with the Terms and Conditions described below:
You will pay $4 for a 30-day supply (30 tablets) if:
you use commercial/private insurance and your out-
of-pocket expense for a 30-day supply of name-brand
LIPITOR is $130 or less.
You will pay $30 for a 30-day supply (30 tablets) if:
you do not use prescription health coverage to purchase
your name-brand LIPITOR under this program or you use
commercial/private insurance and your out-of-pocket
expense for a 30-day supply of name-brand LIPITOR
is $130 or more. In addition:
a) Medicare Part D and Affordable Care Act (ACA)
Exchange patients may participate in this Card
Program, but cannot use any part of their
Medicare Part D or ACA Exchange prescription
benefit for LIPITOR during the term of this offer.
b) Out-of-pocket expenditures under this Card
Program cannot be applied towards a patient's
Medicare Part D true out of pocket (TrOOP) or
ACA Exchange expenses.

Important Facts About LIPITOR (LIP-ih-tore)
(atorvastatin calcium) tablets
Read the Patient Information that comes with LIPITOR before you
start taking it and each time you get a refill. There may be new
information. This information does not take the place of talking
with your doctor about your condition or treatment. If you have
any questions about LIPITOR, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
What Is the Most Important Information I Should Know
About LIPITOR?
LIPITOR can cause serious side effects. These side effects
have happened only to a small number of people. Your
doctor can monitor you for them. These side effects usually
go away if your dose is lowered or LIPITOR is stopped.
These serious side effects include:
Muscle problems. LIPITOR can cause serious muscle
problems that can lead to kidney problems, including kidney
failure. You have a higher chance for muscle problems if you
are taking certain other medicines with LIPITOR.
Liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to check
your liver before you start taking LIPITOR and if you have
symptoms of liver problems while you take LIPITOR. Call
your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms
of liver problems:
Feeling tired or weak
Loss of appetite
Upper belly pain
Dark, amber-colored urine
Yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes
What Is LIPITOR?
LIPITOR is a prescription medicine that lowers cholesterol in your
blood. It lowers the LDL-C ("bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides
in your blood. It can raise your HDL-C ("good" cholesterol) as well.
LIPITOR is for adults and children over 10 whose cholesterol does
not come down enough with exercise and a low-fat diet alone.
LIPITOR can lower the risk for heart attack, stroke, certain types
of heart surgery, and chest pain in patients who have heart disease
or risk factors for heart disease such as age, smoking, high blood
pressure, low HDL-C, or heart disease in the family.
LIPITOR can lower the risk for heart attack or stroke in patients
with diabetes and risk factors such as eye problems, kidney
problems, smoking, or high blood pressure.
LIPITOR starts to work in about 2 weeks.

LEP646030-02 2014 Pfizer Inc.


c) Patients participating in this category cannot
seek reimbursement for a purchase of LIPITOR
from any third party insurance entity during
the term of this offer.
This offer is not valid for prescriptions that are eligible
to be reimbursed, in whole or in part, by Medicaid or
other federal or state healthcare programs (including
any state prescription drug assistance programs
and the Government Health Insurance Plan available
in Puerto Rico [formerly known as "La Reforma
de Salud"]).
For all eligible patients, you can only qualify for up
to $2500 of savings per calendar year. After a
maximum of $2500, you will pay usual monthly
out-of-pocket costs.
This Card cannot be combined with any other rebate/
coupon, free trial, discount, prescription savings card, or
similar offer for the specified prescription.
The Card will be accepted only at participating
pharmacies.
This Card is not health insurance.

Who Should Not Take LIPITOR?
Do not take LIPITOR if you:
Are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, or are planning to
become pregnant. LIPFITOR may harm your unborn baby. If you get
pregnant, stop taking LIPITOR and call your doctor right away.
Are breast feeding. LIPITOR can pass into your breast milk and
may harm your baby.
Have liver problems.
Are allergic to LIPITOR or any of its ingredients. The active
ingredient is atorvastatin.
LIPITOR has not been studied in children under 10 years of age.
What Should I Tell My Doctor Before Taking LIPITOR?
Before you take LIPITOR, tell your doctor if you:
Have muscle aches or weakness
Drink more than 2 glasses of alcohol daily
Have diabetes
Have a thyroid problem
Have kidney problems
Have a history of stroke or mini-stroke
Some medicines should not be taken with LIPITOR. Tell your
doctor about all the medicines you take, including
prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and
herbal supplements. LIPITOR and certain other medicines
can interact causing serious side effects. Especially tell
your doctor if you take medicines for:
Your immune system: cyclosporine (Sandimmune)
Cholesterol: fibrate products, niacin (vitamin B3)
Infections: telaprevir (Incivek), clarithromycin
(Biaxin), itraconazole (Sporanox), rifampin (Rifadin),
boceprevir (Victrelis)
Birth control: norethindrone (Aygestin), ethinyl estradiol (Estinyl)
Heart failure: digoxin (Lanoxin)
HIV or AIDS: tipranavir (Aptivus), lopinavir (Kaletra), ritonavir
(Norvir), saquinavir (Onvirase9), darunavir (Prezista), fosamprenavir
(Lexiva), nelfinavir (Viracept)
Know all the medicines you take. Keep a list of them with you to
show your doctor and pharmacist.
What Should I Avoid While Taking LIPITOR?
Talk to your doctor before you start any new medicines.
This includes prescription and non-prescription medicines,
vitamins, and herbal supplements. LIPITOR and certain other
medicines can interact causing serious side effects.


Offer valid only in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, but not
for Massachusetts residents or where otherwise
prohibited by law.
The Card is limited to 1 use per person per month
during this offering period and is not transferable. It is
illegal to sell, purchase, trade, or counterfeit, or offer
to sell, purchase, trade, or counterfeit this Card.
Pfizer reserves the right to rescind, revoke or amend
the Card Program without notice at any time.
You must be 18 or older to participate in this Program.
Card Program expires December 31, 2015.
No membership fees.
For reimbursement when using mail order, mail copy of
original pharmacy receipt (cash register receipt NOT
valid) with product name, date and amount circled to:
LIPITOR Choice Card
14001 Weston Parkway, Suite 103
Cary, NC 27513-9967
Be sure to include a copy of the front of your Choice
Card, your name and mailing address.

Do not get pregnant. If you get pregnant, stop taking LIPITOR
right away and call your doctor.
What Are the Possible Side Effects of LIPITOR?
LIPITOR may cause serious side effects. See "What Is The
Most Important Information I Should Know About LIPITOR?"
Call your doctor right away if you have:
Muscle problems like weakness, tenderness, or pain that
happen without a good reason, especially if you also have
a fever or feel more tired than usual. This may be an early
sign of a rare muscle problem.
Muscle problems that do not go away even after your doctor
has advised you to stop taking LIPITOR. Your doctor may do
further tests to diagnose the cause of your muscle problems.
Allergic reactions including swelling of the face, lips,
tongue, and/or throat that may cause difficulty in breathing
or swallowing which may require treatment right away.
Nausea and vomiting.
Passing brown or dark colored urine.
You feel more tired than usual.
Your skin and whites of your eyes get yellow.
Stomach pain.
Allergic skin reactions.
In clinical studies, patients reported the following common
side effects while taking LIPITOR: diarrhea, upset stomach,
muscle and joint pain, and alterations in some laboratory
blood tests.
The following additional side effects have been reported with
LIPITOR: tiredness, tendon problems, memory loss, and confusion.
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have side effects that
bother you or that will not go away.
These are not all the side effects of LIPITOR. Ask your doctor
or pharmacist for a complete list. Patients should always
ask their doctors for medical advice about adverse events.
You may report an adverse event related to Pfizer products
by calling 1-800-438-1985 (US only). If you prefer, you may
contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly.
The FDA has established a reporting service known as MedWatch
where health care professionals and consumers can report
serious problems they suspect may be associated with the drugs
and medical devices they prescribe, dispense, or use.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


All rights reserved. Printed in USA/March 2014


Cet your free card at LipitorChoiceTP.co
or call 1-866-597-4227 today. I


( U.S. Pharmaceuticals




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


On high seas, Vietnam and China play tense game


Associated Press

ABOARD VIET-
NAMESE COAST GUARD
SHIP 4033 Each day the
Vietnamese ships tried to
get close to the rig. And
each day they were driven
back by the much larger
Chinese ships.
But before they sped
away, laboring engines
spewing black smoke, the
Vietnamese delivered a
message: 'Attention! At-
tention! We are warning
you about your provoca-
tive act," blasted out a
recording from a loud-
speaker in Vietnamese,
Chinese and English. "We
demand you respect Viet-
nam's sovereignty Please
immediately halt your ac-
tivities and leave Viet-
namese waters."
Occasionally colliding
with or firing water can-
nons at each other, Viet-
namese and Chinese
ships have been shadow
boxing in a sun-dazzled
patch of the South China
Sea since May 1, when
Beijing parked a hulking,
$1 billion deep sea oil rig,
drawing a furious re-
sponse from Vietnam.
Vietnam, ten times
smaller than its northern
neighbor and dependent
on it economically, needs
all the help it can get in
the dispute. Its leaders be-
lieve international opin-
ion is on their side. This
week they invited foreign
journalists to get a closer
look at the standoff, the
most serious escalation
between the countries in
years over their overlap-
ping claims.
Vietnam is determined
to defend what it regards
as its sovereign territory
against China, which in-
sists that most of the
South China Sea in-
cluding the Paracel Is-
lands it took from
U.S.-backed South Viet-
nam in 1974 belongs to
it. But Hanoi lacks options
in dealing with Beijing, as
China uses it burgeoning
economic and military
might to press its claims
in the seas.
Vietnam has accused
Chinese vessels of delib-
erately and dangerously
ramming its ships. TV
footage recorded last
week from a Vietnamese
ship showed a Chinese
vessel smashing into the
stern of the Vietnamese
ship then backing up and
ramming it again, damag-
ing its side. The Chinese
Ministry of Foreign Af-
fairs on Friday released
three photographs pur-
portedly showing a Viet-
namese vessel ramming a
Chinese maritime ship.
The media onboard this
week did not witness any
ramming.
"It is not that we want to
be in confrontation with
the Chinese, but it's our
duty to carry out daily pa-
trols in Vietnamese terri-
tory," said Col. Le Trung
Thanh, the skipper of the


. . .. .......


Associated Press
China Coast Guard Ship 3411, left, and Vietnam Coast Guard Ship 4032 sail in the waters claimed by both countries Thursday in the South China
Sea. China's deployment of an oil rig off Vietnam's coast has prompted a tense sea standoff and touched off deadly anti-China rioting. The
conflict pits two neighbors with very similar governments but whose people bear ill feelings rooted in a rivalry that dates back centuries and has
occasionally burst out into armed conflict.


Vietnamese coast guard
ship 4033. "We want to get
close to the rig to per-
suade them that their ac-
tions are illegal and they
must leave Vietnam's
water unconditionally"
That seems unlikely,
however many patrol
boats Hanoi sends to the
area, or pleads its case to
the world. For China, a
withdrawal would signal
weakness.
Beijing has said it plans
to keep the rig until Au-
gust. While most analysts
think neither side has any
interest in an armed con-
flict, the longer the con-
frontation lasts, the
greater the risk of an un-
planned incident that
could lead to a shooting
match.
China has set up a 6.21-
mile exclusion zone
around the rig, which was
visible on the horizon. On
occasion, Chinese surveil-
lance planes flew over the
Vietnamese vessels. Both
sides have deployed
dozens of vessels, mostly
coast guard and fisheries
protection fleets. At least
one of the Chinese ships
had cannons, which were
uncovered.
In 1974, China ousted
the South Vietnam navy
from the Paracel Islands,
close to where the rig is
currently deployed,
killing 75 South Viet-
namese sailors. The two
countries fought a brief
but bloody border war in
1979. In 1988, 64 Viet-
namese sailors were
killed in another skirmish
in the nearby Spratly Is-
lands, where territorial
spats between China and
the Philippines have re-
cently heated up.
As the latest standoff
plays out on high seas,
Hanoi's Communist gov-
ernment has been strug-
gling to contain rising


popular anger against
China, never far from the
surface in Vietnam. Pro-
testers this week vandal-
ized foreign-owned
factories and killed at
least one Chinese na-
tional, further inflaming
the situation.
Beijing has accused
Hanoi of not doing enough
to stop the violence. On
Friday, it criticized Viet-
nam for organizing the
media trip.
"It is clear that the aim
of the Vietnamese side is
to escalate the situation
and create tension, or in
other words, to generate
media hype and put up a
show in front of the inter-
national audience," said
Ouyang Yujing, the direc-
tor general of the Chinese
Foreign Ministry's De-
partment of Ocean and
Boundary Affairs.
Vietnam's Communist
Party has been trying to
leverage its links with the
party in China to quietly
resolve their differences,
mindful of the economic
importance of good rela-
tions. Just last month, one
of the coast guard ships
stationed close to the rig
took part in joint fishery
patrols with Chinese ves-
sels in the Gulf of Tonkin,
said Vietnam's coast
guard Col. Dinh Quoc
Ruan.
Unlike in the Paracels,
the two countries settled
their maritime border
in the Gulf of Tonkin in
2000.
Crew members boarded
each other's boats to
share fruit with each
other and take photos,
Ruan said.
"I'm not surprised
when the Chinese
switched from being
friends to being opposed
so quickly," he said.
"Being friends with China
is not so easy"


A security officer guards the entrance of an industrial park Saturday in Binh Duong
province, Vietnam, after mobs attacked foreign owned factories following anti-China
protests. Vietnam's prime minister ordered an end Saturday to all "illegal protests" in
the country after a week of violent demonstrations against China's deployment of an
oil rig in a disputed section of the South China Sea.


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WORLD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Testing inconclusive,


suspected bobcat


returned to owner


Associated Press
STAFFORD, N.J. -
Rocky's mother was 98
percent bobcat.
But because a DNA test
couldn't determine the 38-
pound feline's father's lin-
eage, a judge ruled Friday
that the runaway cat be re-
turned to a New Jersey
woman.
Municipal Court Judge
Damian Murray ruled that
Ginny Fine can regain cus-
tody of Rocky after a mito-
chondrial DNA test found
that the cat's mother was
98 percent bobcat, but
couldn't determine its fa-
ther's lineage, the Asbury
Park Press reported.


Mitochondrial DNA is
inherited solely from the
mother
'The bottom line is, Rocky
goes home," Murray said.
Fine, who has maintained
that Rocky is a hybrid bob-
cat and Maine coon, said
she was shocked by the
ruling.
"I don't even know what
to say I was not expecting
that," she said outside of
court.
She would have needed
a special permit from the
state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection to
get Rocky back if it was de-
termined to be a purebred
bobcat. The permit is only
issued for zoos, animal


exhibitors, for scientific
purposes or for agencies
that own animals for ad-
vertising or acting, accord-
ing to the DEP
Fine pleaded guilty to
letting the animal get loose
and was fined $1,000 after
Rocky ran away from her
home for a second time in
March.
The cat was missing for
12 days, leading police to
hunt through the woods. It
was lured back on April 7
and has been at the Pop-
corn Park Zoo in Lacey
since then.
Murray ordered that the
cat be kept in an enclosure
that will be periodically
inspected by the state.


Associated Press
A green sea turtle named "Hofesh," the Hebrew word for "freedom," lies on a table
Thursday after it received a prosthetic fin at the Sea Turtle Rescue Center in
Michmoret, Israel. The badly injured turtle's prospects are looking up, thanks to a
new prosthetic fin designed by an Israeli team and modeled after the wings of a U.S.
fighter jet.


Israeli team designs


prosthetic fin to save turtle


Court: Mom can be banned


from ranting on Facebook


Associated Press
FLEMINGTON, N.J. -
A New Jersey appellate
court has ruled that a
mother's rights were not
violated by a judge's ruling
that barred her from rant-
ing about her children and
ex-husband on Facebook.
The Courier News re-
ported the judge's 2011


order was a special condi-
tion of the woman's proba-
tion stemming from an
attempt to kidnap her two
children and take them to
Canada.
Her ex-husband's family
and Hunterdon County
prosecutors had argued
the woman's Facebook
postings were frightening,
saying they referenced the


Book of Revelation, serial
killer Jeffrey Dahmer,
Satan and Adolf Hitler
The woman said the order
violated her rights of free
speech and due process
because it was too vague.
The appellate panel dis-
agreed, finding the order
was specific and didn't
prevent her from making
posts about other issues.


Associated Press
CENTERVILLE, Pa. -
A Pennsylvania man has
been charged with tattoo-
ing a smiley face and a
derogatory word on a 12-
year-old girl's arm.
State police told the
Erie Times-News that


Randall Charlton III tat-
tooed the girl's left fore-
arm Wednesday night in a
Centerville home while
she was spending the
night.
He faces charges of
felony aggravated assault,
endangering the welfare of
a minor, corruption of


minors, simple assault and
tattooing a minor
Police say he tattooed
the derogatory word above
the smiley face.
According to online
court records, Charlton
was unable to post $20,000
bail and is confined in
Crawford County prison.


Associated Press
MICHMORET, Israel A badly in-
jured sea turtle's prospects are looking
up thanks to a new prosthetic fin de-
signed by an Israeli team and modeled
after the wings of a U.S. fighter jet.
The green sea turtle, named "Hofesh,"
the Hebrew word for "freedom," was
caught in a fishing net off Israel's
Mediterranean coast in early 2009. With
his two left flippers badly wounded, res-
cuers had to amputate, leaving him with
a pair of stumps that made it difficult to
swim.
Yaniv Levy, director of Israel's Sea
Turtle Rescue Center, said Hofesh was
initially fitted with a diver's fin, but it
provided little relief and he bumped
into things as he tried to swim.
Shlomi Gez, an industrial design stu-
dent at Jerusalem's Hadassah College,
read about the animal on the Internet
and wanted to help. He designed a pros-
thetic based on a fish's dorsal fin. The
contraption provided some improve-
ment, but Hofesh still had trouble
breathing and rising to the surface.
Then, inspired by the design of Lock-
heed Martin Corp.'s F-22 Raptor war-
plane, Gez designed a new prosthetic
with two fins. The device, somewhat re-
sembling the aircraft's wings, was
strapped onto Hofesh's back on Thurs-
day, allowing him to move easily around
his tank.


"I discovered it worked better than
one fin on the back," Gez explained.
"With two fins, he keeps relatively bal-
anced, even above the water"
Levy said that Hofesh will never be
able to return to the wild.
But he shares a tank with a blind fe-
male turtle named Tsurit, and re-
searchers are optimistic the pair will
mate, potentially adding to the local
population of the endangered green sea
turtles. He said it is difficult to say ex-
actly how old the two turtles are, but
they are estimated to be between the
ages of 20 and 25, and approaching the
age of sexual maturity.
"We have great plans for this guy,"
Levy said.
"They will never go back to the wild,
but their offspring will be released the
minute they hatch and go immediately
into the sea and live normally in the
wild," he added.


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Pennsylvania man charged with tattooing

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hill Country bison skeleton raises questions


CLAIRE OSBORN
AP member exchange
BRIGGS, Texas -
Ryan Murray was fishing
in Rocky Creek last sum-
mer when he looked up
and saw something
strange. Something white
was poking out of the
side of the creek em-
bankment on his parents'
ranch in northeastern
Burnet County. It was
about the size of a ciga-
rette, but it didn't look
like a rock.
So Murray, a 36-year-
old office administrator
for Austin Gastroenterol-
ogy, started digging that
August afternoon. He
dug for half an hour but
couldn't get it out, so he
came back the next
week.
"I had to tie a kayak
seat to a rope around a
tree to lower myself
down to it," he said.
Several hours later,
after striking an ant
colony and getting bitten
a few dozen times, Mur-
ray extracted two leg
bones.
"I didn't know if they
were human or animal,"
he told the Austin Ameri-
can-Statesman.
In September he took
them to a paleontology
open house at the Uni-
versity of Texas, where
the experts told him
what he had: bison
bones. But he didn't
know whether his find
was a few hundred years
old or a relic from the
prehistoric era.
Ancient bison roamed
through North America
as long as 2 million years
ago, according to re-
mains that were found in
Florida, said Jerry Mc-
Donald, the author of
"North American Bison:
Their Classification and
Evolution."
Modern bison the
kind that were hunted to
the brink of extinction
the late 1800s started
evolving about 10,000
years ago, said McDon-
ald, a research associate
at the Virginia Museum
of Natural History. Mod-
ern bison are about a
third smaller than their
predecessors and have
smaller horns, he said.
Murray, who has had a
lifelong interest in fossils
and artifacts since he in-
herited his grandfather's
collection of them, kept
digging for the rest of the
skeleton.
"I recognized there
might be some sort of sci-
entific value to studying
it," he said. He and his
cousin stood on a scaf-
fold suspended from the
bank of the creek and
worked with garden tools
to uncover more bones,
he said.
"Every time I would try
to dig one bone there
would be several more
bones all around it, and I
thought there might be
an entire animal in
there, so I stopped," he
said. In November, he de-
cided to seek help from


AUSTIN HUMPHREYS/Austin American-Statesman
David Calame, an archaeological enthusiast, removes dirt from around the ribs of a bison May 3 in Burnet County, Texas. Ryan Murphy found the
first bones from the bison while fishing last summer.


archaeologists.
He said he didn't touch
the site for five months
except to use a chain saw
to cut 100-year-old
barbed wire and clear
brush.
By this spring he had
found help from David
Calame, an archaeologi-
cal enthusiast from
South Texas who has
recorded hundreds of
prehistoric archaeologi-
cal sites. Murray's father,
Duane Murray, and his
brother, Tony Murray,
used an excavator to
scrape off 7 feet of dirt
piled above the bones be-
fore Calame arrived in
late April.
Then came another
discovery Calame, Ryan
Murray and another
helper named Bruce
Turner uncovered the
head of the bison two
weeks ago. It was filled
with so much dirt that it
weighed about 50 pounds
when they carefully
pulled it out of the earth.
Many of the teeth and one
horn were still intact.
During the first week-
end of May, Calame and
Turner used small tools
to pick away at the dirt
between the animal's
vertebrae and ribs. The
bison's back two legs are
missing, which means it
could have been killed by
American Indians, said
Calame.
"We won't know until
experts examine it and
find out if there are
butcher marks," he said.
While Calame and
Turner were carefully
pulling out bones, Ryan
Murray made another
discovery. As he sifted
dirt found between the
bones, he found small


pieces of flint. The flint
could have been left
there by Indians cutting
into the buffalo, said
Calame.
The flint could be a key
to the bison's age, said
retired UT paleontology
professor Ernie Lun-
delius, because prehis-
toric Indians hunted the
bison about 12,000 years
ago. Lundelius said it
wasn't common to find a
skeleton as complete as
the one Ryan Murray
found. Lundelius also ex-
amined photos that Mur-
ray took of the bison
skull.
"It has adult teeth,
from what I can see of it,"
Lundelius said. He also
said that the left horn on
the animal "looked odd."
"It does seem like it's
kind of big for a modern
bison," the professor said.
Murray said he has
spent about 70 hours dig-
ging and invested about
$100 in equipment for his
quest. Calame and
Turner provided their
services for free, he said.
No one in his family, in-
cluding his wife, has
given him a hard time
about his endeavor, he
said. "They've all been
very supportive," he said.
He won't know how old
the bison really is until
next year, when UT- San
Antonio runs carbon-
dating tests on it for free,
said Murray Until then,
he's working on clearing
the dirt off the bison's
skull, which he's keeping
in a building at the ranch.
"This has been reward-
ing and fascinating and
enjoyable," he said. "It's
better than sitting at
home and staring at an
iPad."


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NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Farmers battle over GMOs in Oregon


Associated Press

ASHLAND, Ore. Un-
able to find a good solution
to protecting their certified
organic seed crops from po-
tential contamination from
genetically engineered
crops, small organic farm-
ers in this Oregon valley are
appealing to a higher
power: voters.
They wanted to protect
their crops from being
cross-pollinated by geneti-
cally modified ones, and
asked voters in two coun-
ties to ban the cultivation
of GMOs a move that
would drive producer Syn-
genta out of the Rogue Val-
ley where it grows seed for
sugar beets resistant to the
popular weed killer
Roundup.
Mail-in ballots will be
counted in Jackson and
Josephine counties on
Tuesday
The vote is the latest ex-
ample of a growing resist-
ance to GMOs from Hawaii
to Vermont at a time when
genetically modified crops
dominate the production
of commodities like sugar
beets, corn and soybeans.
There is no mainstream
scientific evidence of a
health risk.
"People are becoming
more aware of the fact that
food in this country is ge-
netically engineered, and
they are starting to look
into what that might mean
in terms of health and the
environment," said Laura
Murphy of the Environ-
mental & Natural Re-
sources Law Clinic at
Vermont Law School.
Big agribusinesses,
spending millions, and
GMO opponents have
traded victories in recent
years.
This month, Vermont's
governor signed a law to
make the state the first re-
quiring disclosure of GMO
ingredients in food labels,
starting in 2016. The Na-
tional Conference of State
Legislatures reports 84 ge-
netically modified food la-
beling bills are pending in
30 states.
Since 2004, counties in
California, Hawaii and
Washington state have
adopted bans. In 2012,
agribusiness groups de-
feated ballot measures in
California and Washington
state to require statewide
GMO food labeling. There
is now an effort in Oregon
to ask voters to require
GMO food labeling.
A bill to nullify state la-
beling requirements is
pending in the U.S. House.
The Oregon vote is the
latest battle over the fu-
ture of agriculture. It is set
in this picturesque 41-
mile-long valley near the
California border, where
Syngenta has operated in
near anonymity since 1993,
and organic farmers have
tapped a growing demand
for local produce free of
pesticides.
Organic farmers real-
ized they had a problem in
2012, when Chris Hardy
tried to lease some land
and learned it was right
next to a field leased to
Syngenta. It soon became
clear Syngenta was spread
throughout the valley
Farmers started gather-
ing signatures for a ballot
measure banning GMOs,
and asked Oregon State
University Extension to
help create a mapping sys-
tem so GMO and organic
corps would each be free
of the other's pollen.
After about six months,
talks broke down, and the
organic farmers went
ahead with the ballot
measure.
Syngenta, a Swiss com-
pany with $14.7 billion in
worldwide sales, has been
joined by other agricul-
tural giants like Monsanto
Co., sugar producers like
Amalgamated Sugar, tim-
ber companies and farm
bureaus as far away as
Texas. They have pooled
more than $900,000 to de-
feat the measures.


Their media campaign
has focused on convincing
voters that enforcing the
ban would divert scarce
revenues away from sher-
iff's patrols and jails.
Syngenta referred com-
ment to the Biotechnology
Industry Organization.
The group's spokes-
woman, Karen Batra, said
the ban was "not just an
assault on the industry; it


Associated Press
Chuck Burr explains his organic seed growing techniques May 12 on his farm outside Ashland, Ore. Organic farmers are asking voters in
Jackson and Josephine counties to adopt a ban on cultivating genetically engineered crops, which organic farmers fear could cross-pollinate with
some of their crops.


"If
anybody
ever wanted to
push small
farms out of
the valley, that
is how they
would do it,
with GMO
crops.


Chuck Burr
farmer and president of the
Oregon Seed Growers
Association.

is an assault on farming. It
is telling one group of
farmers that you can't farm
the way that you want or
you need or you think is
best for your
operation."
The ban's supporters,
who have raised a third of
what opponents have, say
they want to protect their
crops from contamination
by genetically engineered
pollen, particularly chard
and beets, which could be
fertilized by Syngenta's
GMO sugar beet pollen.
Hoping to forestall a
patchwork of agricultural
regulation, Oregon Gov.
John Kitzhaber signed leg-
islation last year barring
counties from enacting
GMO bans, exempting
Jackson County because a
measure was already on
the ballot. He appointed a
task force to recommend a
way forward.
Chuck Burr grows more
than 300 varieties of certi-
fied organic seed outside
Ashland and is president
of the Southern Oregon
Seed Growers Associa-
tion. He said he could not
in good conscience try to
sell his crop of chard
seeds after learning Syn-
genta had a field close
enough to be pollenated
by them, and testing was
expensive.
"If anybody ever wanted
to push small farms out of
the valley, that is how they
would do it, with GMO
crops," he said.


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WHAT THEY ARE
* GMOs are hard for the
average consumer to
grasp. You can't touch
or feel a GMO.
* Genetically modified
foods are plants or ani-
mals that have had
genes copied from
other plants or animals
inserted into their DNA.
* Humans have been tin-
kering with genes for
centuries through se-
lective breeding. Think
dogs bred to be more
docile pets, cattle bred
to be beefier or toma-
toes bred to be
sweeter. Turkeys were
bred to have bigger
breasts better for
Thanksgiving dinner.
* What's different about
genetically modified or
engineered foods is
that the manipulation
is done in a lab. Engi-
neers don't need to
wait for nature to pro-
duce a desired gene.
They speed up the
process by transferring
a gene from one plant
or animal to another.
* What are the desired
traits? Most of the na-
tion's corn and


soybeans are geneti-
cally engineered to re-
sist pests and
herbicides. A papaya in
Hawaii is modified to
resist a virus. The FDA
is considering an appli-
cation from a Massa-
chusetts company to
approve a genetically
engineered salmon that
would grow faster than
traditional salmon.
IN YOUR
GROCERY CART
* Most of the genetically
modified corn and soy-
beans are used in cat-
tle feed or are made
into ingredients such
as corn oil, corn starch,
high fructose corn
syrup or soybean oil.
* Even in some of those
products, the manufac-
turing process eventu-
ally may remove some
of the modified genes.
* A few fruits and vegeta-
bles are engineered -
the Hawaiian papaya
and some squash and
zucchini, for example.
Only a small amount of
sweet corn, the corn
we eat, is genetically
modified.


* But there's no geneti-
cally modified meat or
fish, like the fast-grow-
ing salmon, currently in
the market for human
consumption. The FDA
has yet to approve any.

THE RISKS
* The vast majority of
scientific research has
found genetically engi-
neered foods to be gen-
erally safe.
* An Italian scientist's re-
view of 10 years of re-
search, published in
2013, concluded that
the scientific research
conducted so far has
not detected "any sig-
nificant hazard directly
connected with the use
of GM crops."
* One French research
team raised safety
questions. But their
much-criticized 2012
study linking geneti-
cally modified corn to
rat tumors was re-
tracted in 2013 by the
scientific publisher,
who cited weak evi-
dence supporting the
conclusions.
* Even the food police
say they are safe.


* The Center for Science
in the Public Interest, a
well-known critic of
food companies and ar-
tificial and unhealthy
ingredients in foods,
has not opposed genet-
ically modified foods,
on the basis that
there's no evidence
they are harmful.
* Though what we are
eating now appears
safe, the main con-
cerns for the future
would be new geneti-
cally engineered foods,
from the United States
or abroad, that some-
how become allergenic
or toxic through the en-
gineering process.
* The FDA says the foods
they have evaluated to
this point have not been
any more likely to cause
an allergic or toxic reac-
tion than foods from tra-
ditionally bred plants.
* The FDA is not required
to approve genetically
engineered crops for
consumption. But most
companies will go
through a voluntary
safety review process
with FDA before they
put them on the market.
From wire reports


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NATION


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obama, Congress move to address VA firestorm


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration and
Congress are moving
quickly to respond to a
growing political firestorm
over allegations of treat-
ment delays and falsified
records at veterans' hospi-
tals nationwide.
The top official for veter-
ans' health care resigned
Friday, and House Repub-
licans scheduled a vote for
Wednesday on legislation
that would give Veterans
Affairs Secretary Eric
Shinseki greater authority
to fire or demote senior ex-
ecutives and administra-
tors at the agency and its
152 medical centers.
The actions came as fed-
eral investigators visited a
VA hospital in suburban
Chicago to look into an al-
legation that secret lists
were used to conceal long
patient wait times for ap-
pointments. Sen. Tom
Udall, D-N.M., meanwhile,
called for an investigation
into reports that sched-
ulers at a VA medical cen-
ter in Albuquerque were
ordered to falsify patient
appointment records.
Sen. John McCain, R-
Ariz., said the Veterans Af-
fairs Department is


Associated Press
Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki speaks with the news media May 15 on
Capitol Hill in Washington after testifying before the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee
hearing to examine the state of Veterans Affairs health care.


suffering from "a systemic,
cultural problem" that can-
not be solved with piece-
meal responses, such as the
resignation of a top official.
"What's needed is a total
refocusing of the VA on its
core mission of serving
veterans stretching
from its top political lead-
ership all the way through
to its career civil ser-


vants," McCain said Satur-
day in the weekly Republi-
can radio and Internet
address.
Citing news reports that
VA managers received
performance bonuses
even as internal audits re-
vealed lengthy wait times
for health care, McCain
said top VA officials too
often have been "moti-


vated by all the wrong in-
centives and rewards."
McCain, a Vietnam vet-
eran, said Congress must
give VA administrators
greater ability to hire and
fire those charged with car-
ing for veterans, as well as
give veterans greater flexi-
bility in how they get qual-
ity care in a timely manner
Reports of long waits for


appointments and process-
ing benefit applications
have plagued the VA for
years. Officials have short-
ened benefits backlogs, but
allegations of preventable
deaths that may be linked
to delays at the Phoenix VA
hospital have triggered an
election-year uproar A for-
mer clinic director said up
to 40 veterans died while
awaiting treatment at the
Phoenix VA hospital, even
as hospital staff kept a se-
cret appointment list to
mask the delays.
A VA nurse in Cheyenne,
Wyoming, was put on leave
for allegedly telling em-
ployees to falsify appoint-
ment records. A VA
investigation in December
found that staffers at a
Fort Collins, Colorado,
clinic were trained to
make it appear as if veter-
ans got appointments
within 14 days, as VA
guidelines suggest.
Problems also have been
reported in Pennsylvania,
Georgia, Missouri, Texas,
Florida and elsewhere.
Amid a growing outcry,
the administration and
Congress took steps to re-
assure the public that
problems are being ad-
dressed.
Robert Petzel, the VAs


undersecretary for health
care, had been scheduled
to retire this year but in-
stead stepped down Fri-
day Petzel had said he
would remain until the
Senate confirmed a re-
placement, but a depart-
ment official said Shinseki
asked Petzel to leave im-
mediately
Republicans denounced
the move as a hollow ges-
ture. Rep. Jeff Miller, R-
Fla., chairman of the
House Veterans' Affairs
Committee, called the an-
nouncement "the pinnacle
of disingenuous political
doublespeak." Sen. John
Cornyn, R-Texas, said
Shinseki's "reticence to
hold fellow bureaucrats at
the VA accountable is ex-
actly why we need new
leadership that is willing
to take swift action to en-
sure we are living up to
our promises to our na-
tion's heroes."
Cornyn is among a hand-
ful of Republicans who
have called for Shinseki to
resign. The American Le-
gion, one of the nation's
largest veterans groups,
also has called for Shin-
seki's resignation and
called Petzel's departure
"a continuation of busi-
ness as usual."


Celebration and commemoration


Associated Press
Ultra-orthodox Jews stand next to bonfires Saturday during Lag Ba'Omer celebrations to commemorate the end of a plague said to have decimated Jews in Roman
times, in Bnei Brak, Israel.


Nation BRIEFS

CDC: MERS virus Crews prepare for Lawmaker promotes
has spread in US long wildfire season firing squads


NEW YORK- Health offi-
cials reported Saturday what
appears to be the first time
that a mysterious Middle East
virus has spread from one
person to another in the
United States.
The Illinois man probably
picked up an infection from an
Indiana man who earlier this
month became the first U.S.
case of Middle East respira-
tory syndrome, or MERS. The
Illinois man, however, never
needed medical treatment
and is reported to be feeling
well, officials at the Centers
for Disease Control and Pre-
vention said.
The two men met twice
before the Indiana man fell
ill.
MERS belongs to the coro-
navirus family that includes
the common cold and SARS,
or severe acute respiratory
syndrome, which caused
some 800 deaths globally in
2003.


ESCONDIDO, Calif. SALT LAKE CITY-A


Firefighters scoured charred
hillsides north of San Diego
on Saturday to guard against
a resurgence of flames that
ripped through the region,
while the last of tens of thou-
sands of evacuees prepared
to return home. For those bat-
tling a series of blazes for
days, the relief was mixed
with a sense of dread that
drought-sapped vegetation,
high temperatures and low
humidity portend a long fire
season ahead.
The California Department
of Forestry and Fire Protec-
tion has responded to more
than 1,500 fires this year,
compared with about 800 dur-
ing an average year.
Tinder-box conditions have
put firefighters on alert
throughout California. The
state firefighting agency went
to peak staffing in the first
week of April, instead of its
usual start in mid-May.


Utah lawmaker wants to res-
urrect firing squads as a
method of execution after a
botched lethal injection in
Oklahoma.
Republican Rep. Paul Ray
said firing squads would be a
quick and humane way to put
someone to death, especially
as lawsuits and drug short-
ages have complicated lethal
injections.
Ray plans to introduce his
proposal during Utah's next
legislative session in January.
Similar efforts have stalled in
Missouri and Wyoming.
Utah last used a firing
squad in 2010, when five po-
lice officers with .30-caliber
Winchester rifles executed
Ronnie Lee Gardner. Under
current law, death by firing
squad is only an option for
criminals sentenced to death
before 2004.
From wire reports


Word BRIEFS

Thousands flee in Lao defense chief Eastern Ukrainians
deadly floods killed in plane crash rap Kiev in talks


MAGLAJ, Bosnia -
Packed into buses, boats and
helicopters, carrying nothing
but a handful of belongings,
tens of thousands fled their
homes Saturday in Bosnia
and Serbia to escape the
worst flooding in a century.
Rapidly rising rivers surged
into homes, sometimes
reaching up to the second
floors, sending people climb-
ing to rooftops for rescue.
Hundreds were also evac-
uated in Croatia.
Authorities said 25 people
have died but warned the
death toll could rise. Tens of
thousands of homes were left
without electricity or drinking
water.
Landslides triggered by the
floods also raised the risk of
injury or death from land
mines left over from Bosnia's
1992-95 war. The landslides
swept away many of the
carefully placed warning
signs around the minefields.


BANGKOK -A military
plane carrying senior Lao
government officials crashed
Saturday in a wooded area
as it approached an airport in
the country's northeast, killing
at least five people, including
the defense minister and
other high-ranking members
of the authoritarian country's
ruling party.
Lao National Television
showed video of the mangled
wreckage of the plane, with
smoke rising from its badly
charred remains. The footage
showed rescuers pulling
away pieces of aircraft debris
and trying to dig through the
remaining fuselage with shov-
els, as medical crews stood
by watching.
About 18 people were be-
lieved to be on board the
plane, which left Vientiane,
Laos' capital, early Saturday
morning to bring the group to
an official ceremony in Xi-
angkhoung province.


KIEV, Ukraine Lawmak-
ers and officials from eastern
Ukraine on Saturday poured
criticism on the fledging cen-
tral government, accusing it
of ignoring legitimate griev-
ances of the regions which
have been overrun by pro-
Russia militia fighting for
independence.
The criticism came in the
second round of European-
brokered talks intended to re-
solve the country's worst
crisis since the fall of the So-
viet Union in 1991.
Ukraine's caretaker gov-
ernment came to power in
February following the ouster
of Kremlin-friendly President
Viktor Yanukovych after
months of protests in Kiev.
Moscow and many in
Ukraine's east have accused
the new government of in-
tending to trample the rights
of eastern Ukraine's Russian
speakers.
From wire reports








E Travel & Leisure



EXCURSIONS


- "YF








-r-Ew


Associated Press
Purple wildflowers dot the water's edge in the Chain Lakes region of the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes in Idaho. The trail is
one of two dozen pathways named to the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy Hall of Fame.



Rails-to-Trails



HatL of F"Aw rovctts


Carey J. Williams
Associated Press
WALLACE, Idaho
In many parts of the country, aban-
doned train tracks have been re-
purposed into multi-use exercise
trails. The best of them a little
more than two dozen routes in all -
are in the Rail-to-Trails Conservancy
Hall of Fame, and several of those are
located in the Northwest region of the
United States, in Idaho, Montana,
Oregon and Washington.
Some routes are within earshot of
an interstate or overrun with tumble-
weeds. Others take you outside of city
limits, perhaps following a river
around a mountain pass, offering an
opportunity to see and hear birds in
remote marshlands or spot wildlife in
an open meadow And since the origi-
nal tracks had gradient limits for lo-
comotives, the trails are relatively
flat, making for an easy bike ride,
hike or run.
The Hall of Fame trails, selected
between 2007 and 2011, were chosen
for reasons of "scenic value, high use,
trail and trailside amenities, histori-
cal significance, excellence in man-
agement and maintenance of facility,
community connections and geo-
graphic distribution."
The 72-mile Trail of the Coeur
d'Alenes features beautiful views of
the south end of Lake Coeur d'Alene,
the South Fork of the Coeur d'Alene
River and the peaks of the Bitterroot
Mountains.
The track, formerly occupied by
Union Pacific Railroad, goes from
Plummer, Idaho, to Mullan, Idaho.
Parts go through protected marsh-
lands near the chain lakes region
(east of the lake), giving trail users a
chance to see blue heron, swans, bald
eagles, moose, elk and other wildlife.
In the fall, the trail comes alive with
colorful autumn foliage from the
aspen and larch trees.
History buffs can visit Idaho's old-
est standing building, the Sacred
Heart Mission, which was built in the
1850s, or tour a silver mine in nearby
Kellogg or Wallace.


Carey Williams takes a self-portrait on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. The trail
is one of two dozen routes named to the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy Hall of
Fame.


Lodging is available along the way
for multi-day trips, from campsites at
Heyburn State Park to hotels and mo-
tels in towns.
Less than 20 miles from the trail-
head for the Coeur d'Alenes trail is
the trailhead for the Route of the Hi-
awatha, located just across the Mon-
tana border
The Hiawatha trail, where the Mil-
waukee Railroad once ran trains, of-
fers 10 tunnels and seven high
trestles with views of mountains in
Idaho and Montana. The Taft Tunnel
is the main starting point for the trail
and, for many, the highlight of the
trip, but bring a headlamp because
the pin-sized hole at the end of the
tunnel doesn't provide enough light
for safe riding.
The 15-mile track is advertised for
bicycle travel and the non-paved,
packed gravel surface can be ridden


on hybrid bike tires. Mountain bikes
can be rented at Lookout Pass Ski
Area, 7 miles from the trailhead. Visi-
tors must purchase a trail pass for $10
($6 for children) and have the option
to pay for a one-way return trip on a
bus ($6 to $9).
Seattle's Burke-Gilman Trail's first
sections were paved in 1974 after the
Burlington Northern Railroad aban-
doned the line. It goes through the
University of Washington, hugs north-
eastern Lake Washington and is popu-
lar for bicycle commuters, connecting
many suburban cities with various
Seattle neighborhoods.
The Springwater Corridor, outside of
Portland Ore., runs through industrial
and residential areas, agricultural
fields, along the Willamette River, and
near the Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge,
Tideman Johnson Nature Park and
Powell Butte Nature Park.


Al Hamage

RAILS TO
TRAILS




Thanks all


around for


efforts of


volunteers

after seven years of writing
columns for the Chronicle
about the Withlacoochee
State Trail, my columns will now
be located in the Excursions
section of the paper and will
normally run on the second
Sunday of each month. I hope you
will continue to read them and let
me hear from you about the trail.
We had our first planning meeting on
the upcoming Bike Ride, which will be
held on Oct. 5. We have laid out plans to
have another successful ride. We are now
looking for sponsorships for this year The
sponsorships come in all sizes, and we
would be glad to discuss them with you.
Volunteers are also needed for various
jobs on that special Sunday morning. We
would appreciate you donating your time
and ask that you call now and sign up to be
a volunteer
For any information regarding the bike
ride, call Dennis or Linda Reiland at 352-
637-6191 or you can call Al at 352-527-3263.
This will be our 20th year putting on the
bike ride, and it is our only event to make
money to put back into the trail. If you
want to secure information regarding the
ride itself, go to wwwrailstotrailsonline.
com. Registration can be secured through
the website.
I mentioned four projects in last
month's column- two projects have now
been finished.
Electricity to the pavilion at the Apopka
Trailhead has been completed by a volun-
teer that has knowledge of this type of
work and at a reasonable cost. Thanks!
The second project completed was fill-
ing pot holes and big cracks on the 46-mile
trail. This is a hard job and has to be done
under hot conditions, and when we can
get hot asphalt that has been mixed at that
time. Thanks to all of these volunteers for
doing this nasty job!
I would like to thank all of the people
who called about my column from last
month. One man has lived here longer
than the trail has been in existence, and
he knew Gerald Clark. Gerald Clark was
instrumental in bringing the trail into
being. We have created the "Gerald
Clark Award" to present to the outstand-
ing volunteer of the year in his honor
Another caller said that he moved here
solely because of the trail- we have
heard this many times. He went on to say
that it is amazing what the volunteers do
to keep the trail in such good shape. Many
callers ask questions about the trail and
praise the volunteers.
Speaking of the Gerald Clark Award, at
our meeting on April 17, Don Zutaut was
presented with this annual award for his
leadership in doing many projects with
his Wednesday work crew One of the big
jobs that he and his crew accomplished
last year was the trestle project Rails to
Trails of the Withlacoochee was honored
to present the 2014 Gerald Clark Award to
Don. His name will be added to the
master plaque in the kiosk at the Apopka
Trailhead.
The second award was the 2014
See Page A21


Veterans ..A17, A18
Travel ............
A19, A20, A22
Together ...... A22
Crossword ... A16


Movies ....
TV Listings.
Adopt a pet


..A16
..A16
..A22


For questions or comments,
contact Features Editor Logan
Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext.
1141 or at mhnosby@chronicle
online.com




A16 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 18, 2014 C:Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House DO1: 1Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/IF IH 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
SWESH NBC 19 19 News News Coldplay-Ghost Dream Builders The Women of SNL (In Stereo) '14' cc News Access
NewsHour WEDU John Glenn: A Life of Call the Midwife'14'c Masterpiece Classic "Mr. Selfridge, Season 2" AreYou Keeping
O WEDU PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus Service'G' c Justice and romance are served 'PG' Served? Up
o WUFI PBS 5 5 5 41 AfterYou AfterYou Nature (N)'G' Call the Midwife'14' Masterpiece Classic (In Stereo)'PG'c Austin City Limits
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 .News Nightly Coldplay: Ghost Stories American Dream The Women of SNL Women of "Saturday Night News Riches!
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News (N) c Builders (N) 'PG' Live." (In Stereo)'14' c
r 2 2 News World America's Funniest 2014 Billboard Music Awards Festivities recognize popular artists. (N) (In News Spo Night
SWFT ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo Live)'14, D,L,S' c on 9
E P B 1 0 0 1 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (In TheGood Wife"A The Mentalist "Blue 10 News Riches!
] WS CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo)N Stereo)'PG' WeirdYear"'14' Bird"'14' 11pm (NJ
S F 1 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's American The Family Guy Cosmos: A Spacetime FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
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m iE ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman Monum.;Study Great Awakening Love a Time of Doug Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Child G' Grace G' Kaufmann Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
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m i ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo Live)'14, D,L,S' c
O D 1 6 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee "The New Rachel" Glee Rachel adjust to The Office The Office We There We There
ED Cm IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory '14'm life in NewYork.'14' 'PG' '14'm Yet? Yet?
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55 64 55 a vicious criminal known as the Joker. PG-13 m protect Anna. (N) Strategy" (N)'14' c Strategy"'14'c
1 River Monsters: River Monsters: River Monsters: River Monsters "Bone River Monsters: Monster- River Monsters "Bone
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S 27 1 27 South Park South Park South Park South Park *** "Superbad" (2007) Jonah Hill. Co-dependent teens Katt Williams: The Pimp Tosh.O
27 61 27 33 14' 14' 14' 'MA hope to score booze and babes at a party. 'NR' Chronicles '14' m
S 9 4 9 2 7 "Jeff Dunham's Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham Ron White: A Little Unprofessional The come- Ron White's Vegas
Y 98 45 98 28 37 Achmed" returns with new characters. 14' c dian performs his new set.'14, D,L Salute to the Troops
N 43 42 43 Paid Paid Debt/Part On Marijuana- Am. America. Gun Failure to Recall Failure to Recall
NN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Inside Man Anthony Bourd.
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46 40 46 6 5 Maddie Maddie G'I G' ItGG' tG G' IttG' It'G' [Ally'G' Blog'G' Charlie Ally'G'
P 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Countdown MLB Baseball Detroit Ti ers at Boston Red Sox. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)
PN 34 28 34 43 49 Softball Update College Softball NHRA Drag Racing Summit Racing Equipment Southern Nationals.
WT 95 70 95 48 Church Crossing World Over Live'PG' Sunday Night Prime Chester IRosary Theology Roundtabe Life on the Rock'G'
S 29 2 29 20 *** "The Breakfast Club" *** "Grease" (1978) John Travolta. Disparate summer ylov- ** "Miss Congeniality" (2000, Comedy)
I 29 52 29 20 28 (1985) Emilio Estevez.'R' ers meet again as high-school seniors. 'PG' Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. PG-13'
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1S 732 112 7321 W College Baseball UFC UFC Countdown '14' Word Poker The Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
SNL 35 39 35 MLB Baseball Marlins Marlins World Poker The Best of Pride (N) World Poker World Poker
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( T] 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntlIntl Hunters HuntIntl Carib Carib Beach Beach Alaska Alaska Hunters HuntIntl
Bi Rig Bounty Hunters Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
51 54 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' *PG' 'PG'
E 24 38 24 31 Movie'PG' Movie'PG' Drop Dead Diva (N) Devious Maids Movie'PG'
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50 119 Nicholas Lea. NR' Fleiss" (2004) Jamie-Lynn DiScala. "Surrender' 14' "Surrender"'14' c
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31 59 31 26 29 Black" tive fights an invading ruler and his army'PG-13' Horror) Michael Sheen, Bill Nighy' R' Dennis Haysbert.
fS 49 23 49 16 19 **2 "Barbershop"(2002) Ice Cube. **_ "TowerHeist" (2011) Ben Stiller. **2 "Tower Heist"(2011) Ben Stiller.
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169 53 169 30 35 Sandra Dee, James barren.'NR'c Drama) Gregory Peck. Premiere.'NR' Ethel Barrymore.'NR'mc
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ni 350 261 350 *** "Coach Carter" (2005, Drama) Samuel L. *** "Hustle & Flow"(2005, Drama) Terrence *** "Blue Caprice" (2013) Isaiah "Best
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04) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14
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Should hubby


try to hang in?


D ear Annie: I have
been married to
my wife for 20
years, but only three
were truly happy My
wife is older and had
been married before.
She came to the relation-
ship with a 3-year-old
child. We then had a
daughter together
Not long after we mar-
ried, I learned that my
wife is a clut-
ter bug and
refuses to do
housework.
She always
has an ex-
cuse. Usually,
she's "too
tired" or says,
"I'm just not
good at clean- f
ing." For
years, I've
done all of ANN
the house- AL
keeping and MAL
laundry and
most of the cooking. I
also had a full-time job
while she would periodi-
cally be unemployed. I
had to work overtime
hours and get a second
job to make ends meet.
She once went an entire
year without working,
yet would not lift a finger
to help around the
house.
Needless to say, I've
built up a lot of resent-
ment toward her and
have lost any feeling of
intimacy We live like
roommates.
I have stuck it out for
my teenage daughter's


I
.E


sake, but due to my
wife's terrible example,
my daughter is now ex-
hibiting traits similar to
her mother's.
I've tried to talk to my
wife about this, but she
accuses me of being an
ungrateful taskmaster,
expecting her to do
more, and it turns into a
major fight. I don't think
I can take it any longer. I
want someone
I can love. Am I
wrong to want
out? Should I
suck it up and
be grateful she
isn't a drug ad-
dict or an alco-
holic? Do I stay
until my daugh-
ter is out of the
house? Please
help me out.-
E'S Trouble in
BOX Paradise
OX Dear
Trouble: The
bar must be set pretty
low in your house for
you to believe that a
marriage is good enough
because your spouse
isn't an addict Your re-
sentment has festered
too long.
Please talk to a coun-
selor, alone or with your
wife, and see whether
anything can be
changed.
Also discuss with the
counselor alternatives to
your current situation
(separation, divorce, res-
ignation, patience) to
help you figure out your
best next step.


-- Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) In 3D. 4:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Captain America: The Win-
ter Soldier" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
1:15p.m.
"Godzilla" (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m. No
passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) In 3D. 4 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Legends of Oz" (PG) 2 p.m.,
5p.m.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:35 p.m.,
4:35 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.


"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 12 p.m., 6:50 p.m.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) In 3D. 3:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) 12:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Godzilla" (PG) In 3D. 4 p.m.
No passes.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Million Dollar Arm" (PG)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Motor inn
6 De Mille or
Moorehead
11 Sofa
16 Weight unit for gems
21 Gladden
22 Demonstrate
23 Place of contest
24 Silly
25 Edgar-Poe
26 Femme fatale
27 Trapshooting
28 Synthetic fabric
29 Grande
30 Skirt border
31 Beery or Webster
33 Walk through water
35 Drug letters
36 Strip
39 Selflessness
43 Take it on the-
44 Indeed!
45 Where
Guadalajara is
47 Massage
49 Rodent
51 Utter nonsense
54 Bacteria-laden
57 Repair shop
59 Best or Ferber
63 Coal scuttle
64 Quixote
66 Kind of prize
68 Dwell
69 Gas that glows
70 Fateful day in March
72 Seed
74 Spill the beans
76 "- Misbehavin'"
78 Roman poet
79 True-to-life
82 Grow together
84 Startle
86 Grief
87 Code word for "E"
89 Old rum drink
91 Ocean
92 French article
93 Peruke
95 Female relative
97 Pull
99 "That's tasty!"
101 Skill
104 Maxim
106 Make untidy
108 Horse's gait
110 Elegant room
114 Disgruntled one


117 Word with white or fire
119 City in Spain
121 Calender abbr.
122 Big cat
124 -avis
126 Pair
127 A Deadly Sin
128 Coup d'-
129 Aquatic bird
131 Mutilate
133 Solemn fear
135 Teacher's favorite
136 Change the decor
137 Seagal or Tyler
139 Harsh
141 Devoutness
143 Letter before omega
145 Arboreal animal
147 Issue
149 Perform
152 Long-standing
154 Expression
157 Book for
schoolchildren
161 Long seat
162 Unpleasant
164 Dregs
165 Affectedly modest
167 Pie--mode
168 Dunderhead
170 Class
173 Greek letter
175 Send
177 Pearly substance
178 Word at parting
179 Distributes
(with "out")
180 Overact
181 Unripe
182 Kinds
183 Get going
184 Adjusted an engine


DOWN
1 Perceived
2 "Kukia, Fran &-"
3 Claw
4 H, inAthens
5 Novelist
Deighton
6 Church area
7 Contorted
expression
8 Likewise not
9 Occurrence
10 Man of La Mancha
11 Gallant
12 Annoy


Flight formation
Freshly
Of one's birth
Movie theater
Every
Pep-
Win by--
Inclines
Evil spell
Diving bird
Challenge
Game official,
for short
Exploit
Nobleman
Close securely
Ave -
Set ablaze
Bette or Jefferson
Certain singer
Fractional part
Roundup
Standard of
perfection
Unruly crowd
Egg portion
Biological group
Satan
Unwanted sound
South American range
Harvest deity
Sounded
Poky
Type measure
Avian creature
Deuce beater
- setter
Pal
Legal wrong
Temporary stop
Burden
Apparel
Scottish Highlander
Old Russian ruler
Prod
Shoppers' haven
Aflower
Itinerary
Tire surface
Middle
Close with force
Absent without permis-
sion
Jeweler's
magnifier
Start
Dapper
Bar legally
Wooden rod


Times
Farm denizen
Kind of orange
Small island
Captain of fiction
Office note
Sword
Storage tower
Atom part
Cattleman
Nest-egg letters


Grow more lenient
Regret
Attempt
Mimicking
Fragrant wood
Doubly
Old gold coin
Groups of players
Tiny bit of land
Actor Matt-
The cream


Appraised
Woman of rank
Kiln
Mineral
Drink slowly
Golf ball peg
School grp.
Soak, as flax
Big bird


Puzzle answer is on Page A22.


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


40&8 to have breakfast
June 1 at Legion Post 155
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219 welcomes
the public to breakfast from 8:30 to 11:30
a.m. the first Sunday monthly, at Ameri-
can Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway).
Donation is $6 for adults; special on
kids' (8 and younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1. The hall is
smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit programs of the
40&8.

Male descendants sought
for Sons of American Legion
The American Legion Post 166 of Ho-
mosassa Springs is seeking all male de-
scendants, adopted sons and stepsons of
members of the American Legion and
such male descendants of veterans who
died in the service to their country dur-
ing times of war
Such men in the Chassahowitzka, Ho-
mosassa, Homosassa Springs and the
Sugarmill Woods area who are inter-
ested in becoming members of the Sons
of the American Legion are needed.
There is no form or class of member-
ship, except as active membership.
Those interested in becoming mem-
bers may contact Clay Scott, vice com-
mander of American Legion Post 166.
He may be reached by writing to Ameri-
can Legion Post 166, PO. Box 767, Ho-
mosassa Springs, FL 34447-0767, or at
928-848-8359. His email address is ea-
glerider@gmx.com.
Interested men may stop by the post
on the regular meeting night, the first
Monday monthly, at 7 p.m. at the Spring
Lodge No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S. Memo-
rial Drive.

All welcome to come play
games with VFW post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa invites
the public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m. Wednesday
and food is available. Jam sessions are
from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans Drive,
Homosassa.

American Legion Post 77
invites all to jam sessions
Everyone is welcome to join the
American Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at
a jam from 6 to 9 p.m. May 30 with
Nashville artist John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing


instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are wel-
come. Cost is $5 at the door; food and
soft drinks are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in
Inverness. For more information, call
352-476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-
0444.

Public can come eat shrimp,
wings at Post 155
Everyone is welcome to join Blanton-
Thompson American Legion Post 155 in
Crystal River on Wednesday for wings
or shrimp basket lunches in the lounge
from noon to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit veterans'
programs.
For more information, call 352-
795-6526.

Beverly Hills VFW
welcomes public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly Hills, 2170
Vet Lane (County Road 491 behind Ca-
dence Bank), often has special events
that are open to the public.
On a regular basis, bingo is at 1 p.m.
Sunday in the smoke-free hall.
For more information, call 352-746-
0440.

VFW Post 4252 invites
all for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road 200 in
Hernando (with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the public at its meals
and activities.
Meals include lunch every day and
breakfast on Sunday from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Activities include bar bingo on
Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday Dance
music is on tap every Friday and bingo
is played in the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-can-eat fish
fry or New England boiled dinner
For more information and menus, call
the post at 352-726-3339, email
vfw4252@tampabayrr comn and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.

DAV network helps
veterans get to clinics
The DAV transportation network has
received great response for volunteer
drivers for the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going from
Lecanto to Gainesville, the other from
Lecanto to The Villages.
The Gainesville van goes each week-
day and The Villages run is made when
there is a need. Veterans who need to go


to appointments in Gainesville or The
Villages are asked to call the Veterans
Service Office in Lecanto at 352-527-
5915 to be placed on the van list. All ap-
pointments must be made before 1 p.m.

Bingo open to public on
Thursday in Dunnellon
The public is invited to play bingo
Thursday at American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open at 4 p.m.;
games start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

'In Their Words'
wants to hear your stories
The Chronicle features stories of local
veterans. The stories will be about a sin-
gular event or moment in your military
career that stands out to you. It can be
any type of event, from something from
the battlefield to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you provide
us with your rank, branch of service,
theater of war served, years served,
outfit and veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told, call C.J. Risak
at 352-586-9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now" photos to
publish with your story

Case manager aids
veterans with benefits
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department has a case manager who is
available to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes Region
Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday Homosassa
Library, 4100 S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday- Coastal Re-
gional Library, 8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To make
an appointment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.

Office has assistance
for vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department offers help for veterans
who have had their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been denied


within the past two years are asked to
contact the office to review the case and
discuss compensation/pension examina-
tion. All veterans who have been diag-
nosed by the Lecanto VA Mental Health
center and have been denied are en-
couraged to contact the Citrus County
Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment to dis-
cuss a claim, call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial letter and a
copy of your compensation examination
by Gainesville. You can get a copy of
your exam either by requesting it
through the VA medical records or from
the primary care window in Lecanto.
For more information about the Cit-
rus County Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

Transitioning veterans can
get help in Citrus County
The Citrus County Veterans Services
Department is looking for veterans who
have recently transitioned from the mil-
itary (or returning reservist from tours
of active duty) to Citrus County within
the past two years.
Veterans Services requests that veter-
ans and their spouses call to be placed
on a list for an upcoming seminar,
which will discuss what benefits or serv-
ices they need to help ease transition.
The office will schedule a seminar to
discuss benefits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a seat. For more
information about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commserv/vets.

HPH Hospice has special
program for veterans
HPH Hospice, as a partnering agency
with the Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care for veterans
and their families.
The program is provided in private
homes, assisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is trained to
provide Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique to each
military era or war It also provides
caregiver education and a recognition
program to honor veterans' services and
sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and programs do
not affect veterans' benefits. Call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-527-4600.


Chilton reunion scheduled
The next reunion for the USS Chilton
will be Sept. 17 to 24 in Louisville, Ky.
For information, call Joe at 352-
341-5959.


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Another patient safety service for all ages is

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VETERANS


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 A17










ERANS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Become charter member
of Auxiliary Unit 166
It's not too late for women in the Sug-
armill Woods, Homosassa, Homosassa
Springs and Chassahowitzka areas to be-
come charter members of American Le-
gion Post Auxiliary Unit 166. Charter
member enrollment has been extended
until June 1.
The American Legion Auxiliary unit for
Post 166 will meet the second Wednesday
at 7 p.m. at the Fraternal Order of Eagles,
5340 W Grover Cleveland Blvd.
To find out if you are eligible to join, or
to inquire about other American Legion
programs, call Sandra Scott at 352-860-
2090, or write to American Legion Post
166, PO. Box 767, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447.

VFW Post 7122 plans
Memorial Day service
VFW Post 7122 will hold a Memorial
Day service at 11 a.m. Monday, May 26, fol-
lowed by a "Burning of our Mortgage" and
Flag Retirement ceremony
The bloodmobile will be on the prem-
ises from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lunch will be
available for $5 per plate following the
ceremonies.
The post is at 8191 S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City

VFW Post 4864 invites public
for roast turkey, party, picnic
The public is welcome to join VFW Post
4864 in Citrus Springs from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, May 23, for a roast turkey dinner
Dinner is $8; children younger than 6 eat
for $4.
The post will also host a country/west-
ern night from 5 p.m. to midnight Saturday,
May 24, with live music and lots of fun.
Food will be served from 5 to 6:30 p.m. for
a charge of $5.
The public is welcome Monday May 26,
for a Memorial Day picnic at noon. Cost is
$7. For information, call 352-465-4864.

Public welcome at May 26
picnic at Dunnellon post
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the American
Legion will have Memorial Day services at
11 a.m. Monday May 26, at the post. A pic-
nic lunch will follow
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnellon.

Purple Heart order to
gather Tuesday in Lecanto
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776 Military
Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Citrus
County Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veterans and par-
ents, lineal descendants, spouses and sib-
lings of living or deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
MOPH, visit www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.

Vets week committee to meet
at Chronicle building
The Veterans Appreciation Week Ad
Hoc Coordinating Committee will meet at
1:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Conference
Room of the Citrus County Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River
All veterans' service organizations are
encouraged to send representatives to par-
ticipate in the planning process. Individ-
ual veterans are also welcome. For more
information, call Chris Gregoriou at 352-
795-7000.

Post auxiliary to host
Memorial Day picnic
VFW Post 10087 Men's Auxiliary in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County Road 491
behind Cadence Bank), will have its an-
nual Memorial Day picnic from noon to
2 p.m. Monday, May 26.
On the menu are sausage with peppers
and onions, Sloppy Joes, potato salad,
beans and dessert. Tickets are $7. Music
will be by Walt Rogers.
For more information, call 352-746-0440.

Cooties, auxiliary to serve
pasta dinner in Hemando
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will serve a
pasta dinner with meat sauce, salad, garlic
bread, dessert and coffee from 5 to 6:30
p.m. Friday, May 30, at Leroy Rooks Jr
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando (3190 N. Carl
G. Rose Highway, State Road 200, where
the helicopter is). The public is invited.
Tickets are $7 per person and can be
purchased at Post 4252. Call 352-726-3339
or Seam Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at 352-
795-4142.


Buddy Poppies


VFWpost has good drive prior to Memorial Day


Special to the Chronicle
The membership of VFW Post 10087,
along with the Ladies' and Men's Aux-
iliaries of Beverly Hills, had their
semi-annual Buddy Poppy Drive on
May 9 and 10 at Walmart, Winn-Dixie,
Walgreens and CVS.
The VFW conducted its first poppy
distribution before Memorial Day in
1922, becoming the first veterans' or-
ganization to organize a nationwide
distribution.
The poppy soon was adopted as the
official memorial flower of the Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars of the United
States.
It was during the 1923 encampment
that the VFW decided that VFW
Buddy Poppies be assembled by dis-
abled and needy veterans who would
be paid for their work to provide them
with some form of financial assistance.
The plan was formally adopted during
the VFW's 1923 encampment.


The next year, disabled veterans at
the Buddy Poppy factory in Pittsburgh
assembled VFW Buddy Poppies. The
designation "Buddy Poppy" was
adopted at that time.
In February 1924, the VFW regis-
tered the name "Buddy Poppy" with
the U.S. Patent Office. A certificate
was issued on May 20, 1924, grant-
ing the VFW all trademark rights in
the name of Buddy under the clas-
sification of artificial flowers.
The VFW has made that trade-
mark a guarantee that all pop-
pies bearing that name and the
VFW label are genuine prod-
ucts of the work of disabled and |
needy veterans. No other or-
ganization, firm or individual
can legally use the name
"Buddy" Poppy
Today, VFW Buddy Poppies
are still assembled by dis-
abled and needy veterans
in VA Hospitals.


The "
iii llill '" f
L s s -e s s '-i l i e l l t . I^ ^
(cost ot Buddy
Poppies) to VFW
units provides compen-
sation to the veterans who
assemble the poppies, provide fi-
nancial assistance in maintaining
state and national veterans' rehabilita-
tion and service programs and par-
tially supports the VFW National
Home for orphans and widows of our
nation's veterans.


Special to the Chronicle
The Florida Artists Gallery in the
historic Knight House in Floral City
will host an open house featuring its
Art of the Veterans of Citrus County
Exhibition from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun-
day, May 25, and Monday, May 26.
Military veterans, their families and
friends are invited to tour the gallery
and enjoy the special exhibit currently
on display in the Gallery Caf6.


Paintings and photography by
11 military veterans is on display
Artists selected for the juried exhi-
bition include: Francis Barnum, U.S.
Army Airborne, 1950-52; David V
Brett, U.S. Army, 1957-58; Charles
Chesnul, U.S. Army, 1955-57; Gregory
J. Cramer, U.S. Navy, 1966-72; Frank S.
Curtis, U.S. Coast Guard, 1960-66;
Warren Ellison, U.S. Army, 1943-45;
George Holman, U.S. Army, 1966-68;
John Liken, U.S. Navy, 1944-46; Dennis


Marshall, U.S. Navy, 1956-76; Robert
M. Scott, U.S. Army, 1960; and Melvin
F Zeoli, U.S. Air Force, 1963-67.
The veterans exhibition will run
through May 31. Admission is free.
The Florida Artists Gallery & Caf6
is at 8219 Orange Ave. The Gallery and
Cafe are open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven
days a week.
For more information, call 352-344-
9300, visit wwwflartistsgallery com, or
find it on Facebook.


Friends reunite

After 38 years, SFC Roger Jones, U.S.
Army retired (Inverness) and 1st Sgt.
James Clemons, U.S. Army retired (New
Concord, Kentucky) got together May 6,
2014, for a reunion in Silver Springs.
Jones and Clemons were stationed
together with the 164th TC detachment
at Fort Carson, Colorado, from 1970-71.
They were both transferred to the 119th
Aviation Co. in Fort Bragg, North
Carolina, until Jones was reassigned to
Germany in 1976. They both retired in
1985. They both served in Vietnam. They
originally made contact online through
vetfriends.com.

Special to the Chronicle


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


Annual awards banquet


Special to the Chronicle
VFW Post 10087 of Beverly Hills held its annual awards banquet May 1, where members honored local outstanding
citizens. Pictured, back row, from left, are: Scholarship Raechel Wilkens, FRrefighter of the Year Elliot Nieves,
Scholarship Francasco Sciolina, EMT of the Year Daniel Brady, Scholarship Sean Haerheide, Scout of the Year -
Thomas Daugherty and Policeman of the Year John Bennen. In front, from left, are: Teacher of the Year Shelley
Shantz, Voice of Democracy first place Callie Taylor, VOD third place Allie Miller, Patriot's Pen first place Emily
Rose Mailey and Patriot's Pen second place John Sapp.




Area veterans featured as artists


Florida Artists Gallery to host open house Memorial Day weekend




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


,..,


Associated Press
Contoured patterns are shown in the endless white sand dunes at White Sands National Monument in New Mexico. The park offers other-worldly scenery, bringing to mind a
blizzard or a beach when in fact it is a desert.




TAKE A HIKE TO THE


AMERICAN


SOUTHWEST


GIOVANNA DELL'ORTO
Associated Press
PICACHO PEAK STATE PARK, Ariz. "Excuse
me, coming through, sorry, thank you!" I kept repeat-
ing loudly and urgently as I hiked up Picacho Peak,
which rises like a Western saddle from the endless
desert just off1-10 between Phoenix and Tucson, Ari-
zona.
With not a soul in sight among the saguaro cactuses
and splashes of yellow desert marigolds, this was my
improvised technique to keep rattlesnakes away
A snake phobia had mostly confined me to the car,
or on horseback, in dozens of trips to the Southwest.
But the combination of a winter spent in Minnesota's
polar vortex, and life events that made being afraid of
invertebrates a quaint concern, pushed me onto the
trails on a two-week trip this spring.
In seven parks from Phoenix to near El Paso, Texas,
I wandered barefoot across blindingly white sand
dunes, climbed on all fours over red boulders, trekked
to waterfalls deep inside a canyon, and played rock-
hound for a day all while basking in uninterrupted
sunshine and without spotting a single rattler Here
are some highlights.
SAGUARO FORESTS
Two-story-high saguaros, ocotillo bushes tipped with
scarlet blooms and blossoming palo verde trees bor-
der the steeply rising switchbacks on the first mile of
the Hugh Norris Trail in the western district of
Saguaro National Park.
At the ridge top, falcons soared as dusk settled onto
one of the densest concentrations of saguaros in the
Sonoran desert, many more than a century old. In the
distance stood Signal Hill, where the Hohokam peo-
ple carved petroglyphs hundreds of years ago.
Although Tucson bisects the park's two districts, si-
lence on the trail is unbroken. I even stopped clapping
my hands, a snake-chasing technique suggested by
hikers startled by my monologue.
CANYON SWIM
Deep inside Bear Canyon, seven waterfalls gurgled


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amid rocky walls studded with cactus and spring flow-
ers. This 8-mile round-trip hike in Sabino Canyon
Recreation Area, just north of Tucson, is a parade of
Southwest wilderness bests: saguaro stands silhouet-
ted against mountain peaks, a cottonwood-lined river
gorge, and chilly rock pools, perfect for dipping bat-
tered feet.
ROCKS ALL AROUND
Follow 1-10 east more than 100 miles from Tucson,
across desert so wide that the mountains look like
they're hanging off a round horizon, like a child's
drawing of the earth. Then head toward the border to
either Rock Hound State Park, in Deming, New Mex-
ico, or Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona.
On the last 13 miles of the trip, from 1-10 to Rock
Hound, only three moving objects crossed my road: a
Border Patrol truck, a longhorn steer, and a tumble-
weed nearly as large as the other two.
A life-sized photo of a rearing rattler in the park
nearly destroyed my plan of poking through rocky
ravines hunting for minerals. But a geologist from
Michigan armed with a sturdy stick and pickaxe -
agreed to take me along the Jasper Trail.
The park allows visitors to collect up to 15 pounds
of rocks, and I filled my pockets with salmon-pink
jasper and translucent quartz. I also picked up a
weird, pimpled round rock, about 4 inches (10 cen-
timeters) across. The nearby Red Roof Rock Shop
sawed it in two $3 for a half-hour of work to re-
veal gorgeous sparkling blue agate nestled against
pale violet rhyolite, a type of rock known as a thun-
deregg. Take that, snakes.
At Chiricahua, a "sky island" mountain range
emerged from the emptiness, its dense formations of
millions-year-old, eroded volcanic ash spires like tur-
rets on a sand castle.
Starting from Massai Point, 6,870 feet high above the
desert, I hiked down to Echo Canyon Grotto, amid
pines and improbably perched rocks that seem ready
for a Wile E. Coyote's push.
SNOWY SAND
Strolling from bright marker to marker across white




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dunes, as the wind obliterated my footprints, I could
have been in a blizzard or on a beach.
But a few tall, spiky yucca plants sprouting from the
gypsum sand signaled that this was desert, part of 275
square miles of constantly shifting dunes at White
Sands National Monument.
The remote area sits in the middle of a missile
range in southern New Mexico. Call before driving the
54 miles from Las Cruces to make sure a test hasn't
closed the road.
CRAWLING UP CAMELBACK
One of the most iconic Southwest hikes is smack in
the middle of metro Phoenix.
The experience of clambering up the 2,704-foot
Camelback Mountain starts with fighting for a parking
spot and ends with the rush of bagging a genuine
peak. Hikers use metal handrails in spots to pull
themselves up the red rocks, which resemble the face
and hump of a camel.
When I wasn't climbing on all fours, or letting
crowds pass me, I took in 360-degree views of distant
mountain ranges and closer golf courses and pools,
framed by tall saguaros, blooming and fragrant cre-
osote, and orange poppy buds.
"Watch out, it's poisonous," I calmly informed a kid
who was getting too close to a Gila monster, a large,
venomous spotted lizard.
Then I smiled I sure had come a long way


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SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 A19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Afraid to camp? Nothing to fear but fear itself


Associated Press
The thought of camping out can be daunting, but packing a few strategically chosen items
like an inflatable mattress and food that's easy to grill can reduce the ick factor.


Associated Press

PINNACLES NATIONAL PARK
Calif. Growing up in Los Angeles,
I loved camping.
My family and I regularly escaped
the city's concrete sprawl for Cali-
fornia's wilder edges, driving deep
into the desert or high up into the
mountains. We'd set up a tent and
plunk down sleeping bags, each trip
a dusty, if slightly smelly, adventure.
Then something changed. As an
adult, I stopped camping. Though
still an avid nature-lover and hiker, I
didn't want to abandon the modern
perks of home roof, electricity,
bed! or similarly equipped hotels.
This year I decided to break that
15-year-long camping drought. I
joined my stepmother, sister, aunt,
uncle and Danish father, who has av-
eraged three camping trips a year
since he moved to California in 1977,
on a three-day camping excursion in
Pinnacles National Park, south of
San Jose. The experience turned out
fun, freeing and easier than I
thought it would be.
Here are five things you might be
worried about when it comes to
camping, along with ways to cope.

SLEEPING

Forgoing a comfy mattress for a
sleeping bag may not sound appeal-
ing, but there are ways to lessen the
ick. Driving to a campground versus
hiking in means you can stuff your
vehicle with provisions including
a tent you can stand up in for maxi-
mum comfort.
The taller the entrance to your tent,
the less it affects your back Then
make sure to have a self-inflating mat-
tress, like a Therm-a-Rest, or an air
mattress you can inflate with a pump.
Slip it under your sleeping bag to
avoid the sleepless scenes from "The
Princess and the Pea." Another option
is a collapsible camp cot
Camping in spring and summer
means using lighter rectangular
sleeping bags stuffed with synthetic
material. When it's cold, go with a
down-filled mummy-shaped sleep-
ing bag that cinches around your
face. I also found bringing a bed-
room pillow helped. It smelled and
felt like home.

UNPLUGGING

These days some commercially
operated campgrounds offer Inter-


net access. But if you're heading to
wilderness-type parks, depending
on location, you may not even have
cellphone service.
You can always bring an external
battery pack and angrily play Candy
Crush for hours, but that really de-
feats the purpose of being outdoors.
I did bring my excellent Jackery Fit
portable battery pack, but only to
make sure my iPhone was charged
enough to take photos during hikes
into Pinnacles' winding mountain
caves.
Channel the great naturalist
Henry David Thoreau, and remem-
ber that the internet will still be
there later Play cards, eat, drink,
breathe in fresh air, hike, build a
campfire and enjoy the company of
others in person instead of on-
line.

CRITTERS

You love food, and so do animals,
including squirrels and bears,
whose sense of smell overshadows
ours and who may find your fragrant
dinner supplies irresistible. Just re-
member: They want your food, not
you.
Never leave trash, toiletries, dirty
dishes, food or drinks unattended.
Don't leave trash and open contain-
ers in your car or around the camp-
site. Look for metal lockers to store
trash and food onsite. Keep your
tent zipped up, and keep in mind
that bugs and birds also enjoy nib-
bling on half-eaten peanut butter
sandwiches, so don't give them the
chance.
As for ticks and mosquitoes, insect
repellent works. For major bug pho-
bias or when biting insects are thick,
outdoor supply stores and websites
sell inexpensive, lightweight mesh
jackets that you can zip yourself into
- including your hands and face if
need be.

BATHROOMS AND ELECTRICITY

You can live without electricity, a
full-length mirror and private bath-
rooms without sacrificing hygiene or
general spiffiness.
Most developed tent campgrounds
you can drive to have communal
bathrooms with running drinking
water, sinks and showers, but check
in advance. Pretend you're at the
Coachella Valley Music and Arts
Festival, strap on a floppy hat and
embrace a wind-swept, natural look.


Helh*~elhr
UNIVRSIT OFFLORDA HALT

Whn own aneywa om apichd mblia crdket erbri fon gttngoxge orseerl il~0s
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A20 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


ExcURSIONS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Rapids leading to a waterfall into Yellowstone's Grand Canyon, a gorge formed by the Yellowstone River in Wyoming. Views along the way and at the top are magnificent.
There's a fire lookout tower with an observation deck at the top.




Yellowstone: Old Faithfu visit is just the start


ANICK JESDANUN
Associated Press

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK,
Wyo. Old Faithful likely comes to
mind when you think of Yellowstone
National Park. And it's certainly worth
seeing, along with other geysers. But the
geysers are just the start of what Yellow-
stone offers: hiking, biking, camping,
fishing, wildlife-spotting and more. If
the park were its own state, it would be
larger than both Rhode Island and
Delaware. With stops along the way, it
can take two full days to drive the 142-
mile Grand Loop. Here are some Yel-
lowstone basics, starting with the
geysers.

GEYSERS

Most of the park's easily accessible
and most famous geysers are concen-
trated along a 30-mile drive in the mid-
dle of the park, from West Thumb to
Madison Junction, and can be seen in a
half-day
Park visitor centers can provide pre-
dicted eruption times for about a half-
dozen geysers. Some predictions are in
windows of several hours, so you'll
likely spend some time waiting. Old
Faithful erupts every 60 to 90 minutes.
The exact timing depends on the previ-
ous eruption, so the park can predict
only one eruption at a time.
Several other geysers are within walk-
ing distance, including the tiny
Anemone erupting every 10 minutes or
so. A few more clusters of geysers and
hot springs are a short drive north along
Grand Loop.
If your timing is right, don't miss the
Grand Geyser, the tallest predictable


geyser in the world, reaching as high as
200 feet and lasting up to 12 minutes.
You might have to wait a few hours,
though. The Grand Geyser has been
erupting every seven or eight hours, and
the park's predictions are in four-hour
windows.

HIKES

The Divide hike is about 3.5 miles
round trip and takes you to the Conti-
nental Divide, the line where water
flows toward the Atlantic from one side
and toward the Pacific from the other
There's no sign or any other marker at
the top, so you'll have to use your imagi-
nation. The park rates the hike as mod-
erately strenuous, given the climb of
about 735 feet.
Mystic Falls is more scenic. The start
of the trail is close to the Biscuit Basin
cluster of geysers, so you can get geysers
and a hike both out of the way with one
stop.
Give yourself at least two hours for
the drive from the geysers to Mount
Washburn. The trail to the top is well-
maintained, but the hike isn't for those
out of shape: You'll climb some 1,400
feet to an elevation of 10,243 feet. There
are two ways up: The longer route, from
Dunraven Pass, is about 3 miles each
way, but it's less steep than the Chitten-
den Road option. Take the same route
down; the parking lots for each trail-
head are 6 miles apart.
Views along the way and at the top
are magnificent. In the distance, you
can glimpse Yellowstone's version of
Grand Canyon, a gorge formed by the
Yellowstone River There's a fire look-
out tower with an observation deck at
the top.
Outside of visitor centers and lodging


areas, Yellowstone does not have many
vendors, so bring food and water on
your hikes.

GRAND CANYON

Yellowstone's Grand Canyon is worth
its own visit. You have several long or
short hikes to choose from, along either
side of the canyon. If you're pressed for
time, drive to the Upper and Lower
Falls and view the rapids before a pair
of drops into the canyon. For both falls,
use paved overlooks or take short hikes
for closer views. Visit the Upper Falls in
the afternoon for a chance to see rain-
bows.

WILDLIFE AND DRIVING

Yellowstone is home to bison, moose,
elk, bighorn sheep, wolves and grizzly
bears. If you're looking to see a certain
type of animal, ask at visitor centers
where to go and best time of day Cars
stopped or parked haphazardly along a
road usually means there's something
worth seeing. You can't miss the bison
herds, but for other creatures, you may
need binoculars or a spotting scope.
Bear attacks are rare but especially if
you're camping or hiking, read up on
bear safety:
http://wwwnps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/be
arsafety.htm.

BIKING AND BOATING

You can bike along the Grand Loop on
your own bike or by renting one near
Old Faithful. There are boating and
fishing opportunities as well; permits
are required.

GETTING THERE AND LODGING


Yellowstone National Park covers
3,472 square miles over three states -
Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. The bulk
of the park is in northwest Wyoming.
The park has five entrances, with gate-
way towns offering food and lodging.
Cody, Wyoming, is 53 miles from the
East Entrance. Cooke City, Montana, is 4
miles from the Northeast Entrance. Gar-
diner, Montana is 1 mile from the North
Entrance. Jackson Hole, Wyoming is 57
miles from the South Entrance. And
West Yellowstone, Montana is 1 mile
from the West Entrance.
The drive from the entrances to the
main loop is long, so plan your access
point and lodging carefully There are
nine lodges inside the park; consider
switching hotels each night to be closer
to another part of the park the next
morning.
The park has a dozen campgrounds.
Seven are first come, first served.
Reservations for the others and for the
lodges fill up fast: http://wwwnps.gov/
yell/planyourvisit/lodging-in-yellow-
stone.htm and http://wwwyellowstone
nationalparklodges.com.
Nearest airports with car rentals are
in Cody and Jackson, Wyoming; Boze-
man, Billings and West Yellowstone,
Montana; and Idaho Falls, Idaho. If you
have time, it may be cheaper to fly to
Denver and drive the 550 miles (885
kilometers) to the park via Cody

GRAND TETONS

If you have an extra day or two, visit
Grand Teton National Park just south of
Yellowstone. The $25-per-car admission
for Yellowstone covers a week in both
parks. You'll get magnificent views of
the Teton mountain range, plus more
opportunities to hike and see wildlife.


Water pipes top Grand Canyon's
2014 summer maintenance list


Associated Press

A busted pipe that cut
off a water supply for hik-
ers at the Grand Canyon
this week is the latest sign
of aging infrastructure
that could cost up to $200
million to replace.
Two pipelines that feed


water from a spring deep
in the canyon to storage
tanks on the rim are the
top priority for mainte-
nance in the national
park. Grand Canyon offi-
cials are stashing away
entrance fees and doing
studies to determine how
best to move forward.


RAILS
Continued from PageA15S

Lifetime Achievement Award which was presented to
Ken and Brenda Spilios. They both have worn many
hats in our organization. They have volunteered with
the trail since 1989 and worked diligently to get the
trail up and running here in Citrus County They are
both retired and doing some traveling now. Thanks to
Don, Ken and Brenda.
The Withlacoochee Bicycle Riders are a group of
local people that ride the trail on different days of the
week and usually stop for breakfast or lunch.
The enjoy riding and visitors are welcome. For more
information or to get on their mailing list, e-mail
SusanStraley77@hotmail.com.

Thanks for your continued comments about the trail
and I can be contacted at 352-527-3263.


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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 A21




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FIVE GENERATIONS


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Lombardis


Angelo and Anna
Lombardi celebrated
their 50th wedding
anniversary on April 18,
2014.
They were married on
April 18,1964, in
Waterbury, Connecticut.
Upon retirement, they
moved to Citrus County
and have lived here for
19 years.
They have three


children one son and
two daughters and
seven grandchildren.
The couple renewed
their vows at Our Lady of
Fatima Church and had
an anniversary party for
family and friends at
Tuscany on the Meadows
in Hernando. They plan a
trip back to Connecticut
to celebrate with family
and friends.


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Crosses


Special to the Chronicle
Five generations gathered Easter Sunday at the home of Donna Carl. Pictured, from left, are: Donna Carl,
great-grandmother; Ashlee Avalar, mother; Kris Carl Boren, grandmother; Agnes Ritrovato, great-great-
grandmother; and Noah Avalar.


SPECIAL CELEBRATION


Humane Society
OF CITRUS COUNTY


Snickers


Great-grandmother Sally
Waugh and grandmother
Sylvia Waugh gave a
graduation luncheon
recently for Dana Waugh
at Sally Waugh's house
in Dunnellon. Pictured,
from left, are Dana
Waugh, Michelle Hobbs,
Sally Waugh, aunt Susan
Waugh, Ali Carameros
and sister Hannah
Waugh. Not pictured is
Dana's mother, Bobbi
Waugh, great-aunt
Helene Greenwood and
Sylvia Waugh. Dana will
graduate from Dunnellon
Christian Academy on
May 30, 2014.

Special to the Chronicle

FOR THE
RECORD
Divorces and
marriages filed in
the state of Florida
are a matter of
public record,
available from each
county's Clerk of
the Courts Office.
For Citrus County,
call the clerk at
352-341-6400 or
visit the website at
www.clerk.citrus.
fl.us.
FORMS
To announce your
news for Together,
call Sarah Gatling at
352-563-5660.


The Rev Marvin and
Martha Cross of
Homosassa Springs
celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on
March 21, 2014.


The couple were wed in
Georgia on March 21,
1964.
They have lived in
Citrus County for 20
years.


Sunday' PUZZLER


Puzzle is on Page A16.

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A22 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


TOGETHER










SPORTS


All eyes
on Johnny
at Cleveland
Browns
minicamp.
/B2

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Arizona Diamondbacks
hire La Russa to run
baseball operations
PHOENIX-Tony La Russa
is back in the big leagues,
though he won't filling out
lineup cards anytime soon.
The Arizona Diamondbacks
hired La Russa as their chief
baseball officer Saturday, hop-
ing the Hall of Fame manager
can help turn around the team
after one of the worst starts in
franchise history.
La Russa will report to Dia-
mondbacks President Derrick
Hall and oversee the entire
baseball operations department.
He will work with general man-
ager Kevin Towers and man-
ager Kirk Gibson in shaping the
future of the Diamondbacks.
La Russa won three World
Series titles and six league cham-
pionships and was a four-time
manager of the year in 33 sea-
sons before retiring in 2011. He
will be inducted into the Hall of
Fame in July and is third all-time
with 2,728 wins as a manager and
second with 70 postseason wins.
La Russa most recently
worked for Major League Base-
ball as a special assistant to
Commissioner Bud Selig.
Woman seriously
hurt in Fenway
elevator shaft fall
BOSTON Police and state
inspectors are trying to determine
why an elevator door at Boston's
Fenway Park was open before
a woman plunged two stories
down the elevator shaft after a
game, officials said Saturday.
The 22-year-old woman fell
from the fourth floor and landed
on the roof of the elevator,
which was stopped on the sec-
ond floor. It happened late Fri-
day after the Red Sox lost to
the Detroit Tigers, said Steve
MacDonald, a spokesman for
the Boston Fire Department.
Power to the elevator was
shut off, and firefighters
climbed through the elevator's
emergency hatch to reach the
woman, who was transported
to Beth Israel Deaconess Med-
ical Center, MacDonald said.
MacDonald said the woman
was unconscious at the scene
with injuries that appeared seri-
ous. A hospital spokesman said
no information would be released
about the woman's condition.
Terrel Harris, a spokesman for
the state Department of Public
Safety, said the elevator was
taken out of service and would
not be used again until inspec-
tors conduct a full investigation.
'Miracle' medal
auctioned for $262,900


MINNEAPOLIS -
gold medal earned
on the "Miracle on
U.S. Olympic tean
auctioned for near
It belonged to M
who had the assis
Eruzione's game-\
for Team USA aga
Soviet Union.
Heritage Auctior
says it fetched $2E
in an online-only sE
pany said it's just t
1980 U.S. Olympic
medal to reach the
being Mark Wells'
commanded $310


Associated Press
California Chrome, ridden by jockey Victor Espinoza, wins the 139th Preakness Stakes on Saturday at Pimlico Race
Course in Baltimore.



DOUBLE-PLATED


CALIFORNIA CHROME WINS PREAKNESS,

SECOND JEWEL OF THE TRIPLE CROWN


Associated Press


BALTIMORE


CALIFORNIA CHROME REPELLED ONE CHALLENGER AND THEN
put away another in the stretch to win the Preakness on Saturday, setting up
a Triple Crown try in three weeks. The chestnut colt with four white feet
will attempt to sweep the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes,
something that hasn't been done since Affirmed in 1978.


Since then, 12 horses have won
the first two legs and failed to com-
plete the sweep; the last was I'll
Have Another, who was scratched
on the eve of the Belmont two
years ago.
Maybe the horse with the mod-
est pedigree and average Joe own-
ers is the one.
California Chrome defeated Ride
On Curlin by 11/2 lengths at Pimlico,
covering 1 3/16 miles in 1:54.84.
He's now won six straight races by
a combined 27 1/2 lengths for 77-
year-old trainer Art Sherman.


"You have to have a very good
horse to win these three races,"
Sherman said. "I'm hoping I've got
one right now"
California Chrome's co-owner
Steve Coburn shed tears after his
colt crossed the finish line, dab-
bing them away with a blue-and-
white bandanna.
"I don't mean to be bold or cocky
or arrogant," Coburn said. "I saw
this baby when he was a day old, I told
my wife, "Carolyn, this horse is going
to do something big. I don't know
what it is, but we're going to stay in


the game to make sure this colt
gets to be the best that he can be."'
Quite a statement from a guy
with a one-horse stable.
Coburn and partner Perry Mar-
tin bred an $8,000 mare to a $2,500
stallion to produce California
Chrome. Based on the colt's hum-
ble breeding, he probably should-
n't be on the verge of making
history
His mother, named Love the
Chase, won just one race.


Page B3


'Dunkaneers' high on tall draft picks


Associated Press


TAMPA The Tamoa Bay


-An Olympic Buccaneers drafted three tall,
d by a player physical players who were once
Ice" 1980 basketball standouts with aspira-
n has been tions of playing in the NBA,
rly $263,000. prompting general manager
lark Pavelich, Jason Licht to jokingly refer to
o Mk the team as the Dunkaneers.
tn Mike Receiver Mike Evans, tight end
wininng goal Austin Seferian-Jenkins and tackle
inst the Kevin Pamphile are all listed at
6-foot-5 and figure into plans to
ns of Dallas improve an offense thatwas among
32,900 Friday the worst in the NFL last season.
ale. The corn- All were basketball stars in
the second high school.
c hockey gold Seferian-Jenkins tried his
block, the first hand at being a two-sport athlete
medal, which at Washington. Evans and Pam-
),700 in 2010. phile gave up their hoops dreams
-From wire reports late in their prep careers and
have only been playing football


for a relatively short period of
time.
Licht and coach Lovie Smith,
who have been overhauling the
Bucs since being hired in Janu-
ary, said it's purely coincidence
that half the team's draft picks
have basketball backgrounds.
But both feel, however, that
Evans, Seferian-Jenkins and
Pamphile have a chance to be
productive pros, in part because
of skills they honed as basketball
players.
"My experience with that is
that it's hard playing basketball.
Anybody can't go out there and
play basketball. It takes a good
athlete with quickness, size. It's a
lot of different things you get
playing basketball, and if every- Associated Press
body can't do it normally that Buccaneers first-round draft pick Mike Evans catches a pass Friday
during rookie camp in Tampa. Evans, the seventh pick overall,
See Page B3 played at Texas A&M.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rangers rout Canadiens 7-2 in Game 1


Associated Press

MONTREAL Martin
St. Louis started the scor-
ing and Henrik Lundqvist
won for the first time in
Montreal in more than two
years in the New York
Rangers' 7-2 victory over
the Canadiens on Satur-
day in Game 1 of the East-
ern Conference finals.
St. Louis, set to attend
his mother's funeral with
his teammates Sunday, got
the opening goal and Mats
Zuccarello, Chris Kreider,
Brad Richards, Ryan Mc-
Donagh, Derek Stepan and
Rick Nash also scored for
the Rangers. New York
had only four goals in its
past nine regular-season
visits to the Bell Centre.
Lundqvist made 20
saves. He had not played a
game in Montreal since al-
lowing four goals on Jan.
15, 2012. His last win at
Bell Centre was March 17,
2009.
Rene Bourque and Lars
Eller scored for Montreal,


which saw star goalie
Carey Price appeared to
injure his right leg when
he was run over early in
the second period. Price
was replaced by Peter
Budaj after the second pe-
riod but it was not clear if
it was because of an injury
It was Montreal's worst
playoff defeat since losing
8-2 to Carolina in 2002.
Budaj was beaten on the
first shot he faced, from
the slot by McDonagh on a
power play at 1:28.
The Canadiens then
took a succession of penal-
ties, including two minors
and a misconduct to for-
mer Rangers forward
Brandon Prust. Stepan
scored and Nash broke his
slump with his first in 15
playoff games this year
Montreal got one back
while short-handed with
4:38 left in the game when
Eller beat Lundqvist with
a quick, high shot from the
slot.
That St. Louis got the
Rangers started was fit-


ting. He became a rallying
point for his team for play-
ing a day after mother
France's death as they
erased a 3-1 series deficit
to beat Pittsburgh in the
second round.
The boost the Canadiens
got from their rousing
pregame ceremonies in
the first two series wasn't
there as the Rangers
showed all the speed and
intensity in the opening
period, outshooting Mon-
treal 12-6 and taking a 2-0
lead.
Dominic Moore jumped
on a loose puck after
Michael Bournival par-
tially blocked a point shot
and slipped a pass to a
wide open St. Louis at the
doorstep to open the scor-
ing at 4:35.
Moore was the play-
maker again as he slid a
pass in front of the net and
the trailing Zuccarello was
able to poke it into an open
side as the Rangers beat
Price twice on their first
five shots.


Bourque took consecu-
tive hooking calls late in
the first period, but made
up for it in the second as
he went hard to the net,
whacked at Brian
Gionta's pass and saw it
go in offMcDonagh's stick
at 12:38.
That brought the 21,273
at the Bell Centre back to
life, but they went quiet
again as Stepan broke in
alone on the left side and
beat Price with a low shot
at with 1:01 left.
With 12 seconds left in
the period, Zuccarello
made a reverse pass that
had Price out of position
for Richards to score into
an open side.
Notes: Rangers center
Derrick Brassard left the
game early in the first pe-
riod with an injury after a
hit from Mike Weaver and
did not return. .. The
Rangers went 3 for 7 on
the power play after scor-
ing only three times in 29
opportunities over their
first 14 playoff games.


Associated Press
Montreal Canadiens goalie Carey Price stands in his
crease Saturday after allowing a third goal on a shot from
New York Rangers left wing Chris Kreider during the
second period of Game I of the Eastern Conference finals
in Montreal.


Associated Press
Indiana Pacers forward David West and Miami Heat forward LeBron James watch a loose ball April 11 during the first half of game in Miami.



Heat, Pacers eager for next playoff battle


Eastern Conference heavyweights square off Sunday in Indianapolis


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Indiana
and Miami spent a whole season
hearing about the rematch.
On Sunday, the two Eastern
Conference heavyweights will
meet in the most intriguing fight
of the year
There is the possibility of a
head-to-head matchup between
the world's best player, LeBron
James, and the NBAs next young
superstar, Paul George. There
are battle lines drawn between
Miami's perimeter shooters and
Indiana's tough inside guys.
There is history with Miami
eliminating Indiana each of the
past two seasons despite the Pac-
ers pushing the Heat further
than anyone expected both
times, and, of course, everyone
wants to see if the young chal-
lengers will derail Miami's
quest for a third straight NBA
championship.


It's no wonder this is the most
anticipated matchup of the play-
offs.
"Two best teams in the Eastern
Conference. It's that simple,"
James said. "I mean both teams
defend at a high level, both
teams share the ball, both teams
get into the paint, both teams
have a desire to win, so that's
why it's been equal."
Here are five things to watch
in this series:
BIG ROY: Nobody has been
more inconsistent in these play-
offs than Roy Hibbert, and yet
nobody may be more crucial
than Hibbert in this series. A
year ago, the All-Star center
caused so many problems that
Miami signed injury-prone Greg
Oden. After an abysmal start to
the playoffs, Hibbert regained
his footing against Washington.
But if the Pacers are going to win
this series, they need Hibbert to
play well every night.


SMALL BALL: Hawks guard
Jeff Teague thought his team
provided the blueprint to beating
Indiana. Atlanta stretched Indi-
ana's defense by using five 3-
point shooters, and when the
Wizards copied the approach
and knocked down shots, that,
too, gave Indiana trouble. Will
Miami go small this time? Per-
haps, and it may be one way to
make Hibbert less of a factor, too.
HOLDINGAT HOME: Indiana
finished the regular season with
the best home record in the
league (35-6). It hasn't helped the
Pacers at all in the playoffs. Indi-
ana is 3-4 at Bankers Life Field-
house, giving away home-court
advantage Game 1 losses in each
of the first two series. Indiana
knows it can't do that this time.
"We can't allow ourselves to
come out flat," George said.
"Whatever it is, we've got to find
it and come out with energy-
treat this one like it's Game 7."


WADING THROUGH: Miami
played it safe with Dwyane Wade
all season, giving his problematic
knees extra rest so he could excel
in the playoffs. So far, that decision
has paid dividends. He has played
in all nine games, averaged 17.9
points and 4.0 assists while shoot-
ing 50 percent from the field. If
Wade continues playing this way, it
could spell trouble for Indiana. But
this may be his biggest challenge.
DE-FENSE: There is a lot of
star power in this series, but ulti-
mately, it will come down to de-
fense. Indiana had one of the
league's stingiest defenses all
season. Not surprisingly, the Pac-
ers have won in the postseason,
too, when they've been solid de-
fensively Miami might not have
the defensive reputation of the
Pacers, but they've played well
enough to win eight of nine play-
off games and good enough to
have beaten the Pacers in their
last two playoff series.


At Browns minicamp, all eyes on Johnny


Associated Press

BEREA, Ohio -Johnny
stretched. Johnny ran.
Johnny passed. Johnny
talked.
With all eyes well, at
least the ones allowed to
watch him on quarter-
back Johnny Manziel, the
most hyped college player
to enter the NFL in years
took his first steps with
the Browns, who haven't
promised Johnny Football
anything other than a
chance to win a starting
job.
And that's cool with him.
"I'm a rookie," Manziel
said. "I need to earn my
place. I need to earn my
keep. Nothing here needs
to be handed to me. I don't
need to be treated based
off what I did in the past,


because that doesn't
mean a thing at this
level."
The former Texas A&M
quarterback, who oozes
swagger every moment
he's on the field, is partic-
ipating in Cleveland's
rookie minicamp this
weekend along with its
other draft picks and un-
signed free agents.
Browns first-year coach
Mike Pettine restricted
access to Saturday's work-
out, which was held in-
side because of rainy
weather, to local media
members. Sunday's prac-
tice is closed.
Wearing a red No. 2 jer-
sey, Manziel stretched
with his teammates as
Jay-Z's "Public Service
Announcement" boomed
through the speakers in


Associated Press
Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel hands off
Saturday during rookie minicamp practice in Berea, Ohio.


the field house. With
Browns owner Jimmy
Haslam on the sideline,
Manziel made a few hand-
offs and threw three short
passes before the session
was closed after 15 min-
utes.


Manziel later answered
questions for 10 minutes
before the interview was
stopped by a member of
the team's media rela-
tions staff.
As for meshing with his
new teammates, Manziel


is fitting right in.
Offensive lineman Joe
Bitonio, a second-round
pick, said there was a mo-
ment of awe when he
walked into the locker
room and realized his
locker was next to
Manziel's.
'At first I was like, 'Man,
that's Johnny Manziel,"'
Bitonio said. "And then
once you get to know him,
he's a normal guy"
On the field, Manziel
has already made an im-
pression.
'Amazing," running
back Terrance West said.
"He's Manziel, right?
Everybody knows Johnny
Manziel. He makes plays.
He makes big plays. He's
a great player"
But right now, he's only
Johnny Rookie.


Thunder


confident


without


Ibaka

Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -
Thunder players fondly
described Serge Ibaka's
contributions to the team
this season and explained
how much he'd be missed.
Then, they moved on.
Ibaka, one of the NBAs
top shot blockers, hurt his
left calf in Game 6 of the
Western Conference semi-
final against the Los Ange-
les Clippers. A day after
the team learned it would
likely be without its best
defender for the rest of the
playoffs, Oklahoma City
began practicing for the
Western Conference finals
against the San Antonio
Spurs. Game 1 is Monday
night, and the Thunder will
take a business-as-usual
approach into San Antonio.
"It's unfortunate for us
and for Serge," league MVP
Kevin Durant said after
practice Saturday "He's a
guy that loves the game so
much and has to sit out at the
peak of the season, being in
the playoffs. But it happens
in this league.
"We're not going to panic.
We're going to continue to
stick to what we do."
During the regular sea-
son, Ibaka had career highs
with averages of 15.1 points
and 8.8 rebounds while
leading the league in total
blocks for the fourth con-
secutive season with 219.
The Thunder don't expect
to duplicate Ibaka's explo-
siveness or his ability to
protect the rim.
"We're going to play
team defense," guard Rus-
sell Westbrook said. "We're
not going to take the onus
on ourselves to block shots
and do what Serge does, be-
cause nobody can do that"
Brooks wouldn't say how
he would fill the minutes
or who would start in
Ibaka's place. He jokingly
named almost every reserve
as a possible replacement.
Based on past patterns,
rookie center Steven Adams
and veteran forward Nick
Collison will likely step in.
Adams has been excep-
tional recently The 7-
footer from New Zealand
was especially effective in
Game 6 against the Clip-
pers, when he had 10
points and 11 rebounds in
40 minutes. He had never
played more than 31 min-
utes in an NBA game.
Still, San Antonio has to
be ready for anything. The
Thunder have 10 players
who have started at some
point this season.
"They are going to change
their lineups," Spurs for-
ward Tim Duncan said.
"They have a lot of very ca-
pable players, very good
players and they're a very
good team. Obviously it's big
to lose such a part of their
team, but we're going to do
what we do and show up how
we have to show up and
bring the energy that we
have to bring."


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Preakness winners F or thei r- Td Saturday's Sports
Tranciapinne


1983 Deputed Testamony
1982 -Aloma's Ruler
1981 Pleasant Colony
1980 -Codex
1979 -Spectacular Bid
1978 -Affirmed
1977 -Seattle Slew
1976 -Elocutionist
1975 -Master Derby
1974 -Little Current
1973 -Secretariat
1972 -Bee Bee Bee
1971 -Canoneroll
1970 -Personality
1969 -Majestic Prince
1968 -Forward Pass
1967 -Damascus
1966 -Kauai King
1965 -Tom Rolfe
1964 Northern Dancer
1963 -Candy Spots
1962 -Greek Money
1961 -Carry Back
1960 -Bally Ache
1959 -Royal Orbit
1958 -Tim Tam
1957 -Bold Ruler
1956 -Fabius
1955 -Nashua
1954 -Hasty Road
1953 -Native Dancer
1952 -Blue Man
1951 -Bold
1950 Hill Prince
1949 -Capot
1948 -Citation
1947 -Faultless
1946 -Assault
1945 -Polynesian
1944 -Pensive
1943 -Count Fleet
1942 -Alsab
1941 -Whirlaway
1940 -Bimelech
1939 -Challedon
1938 -Dauber
1937 -War Admiral
1936 -Bold Venture
1935 -Omaha
1934 -High Quest
1933 -Head Play
1932 -Burgoo King
1931 -Mate
1930 -Gallant Fox
1929 -Dr. Freeland
1928 -Victorian
1927 -Bostonian
1926 -Display
1925 -Coventry
1924 -Nellie Morse
1923 -Vigil
1922 -Pillory
1921 -Broomspun
1920 -Man o'War
1919 -Sir Barton
1918 -War Cloud and Jack Hare, Jr.
1917 -Kalitan
1916 -Damrosch
1915 -Rhine Maiden
1914 -Holiday
1913 -Buskin
1912 -Colonel Holloway
1911 -Watervale
1910 -Lay Master
1909 -Effendi
1908 -Royal Tourist
1907 -Don Enrique
1906 -Whimsical
1905 -Cairngorm
1904 -Bryn Mawr
1903 -Flocarline
1902 -Old England
1901 -The Parader
1900 -Hindus
1899 -Half Time
1898 -Sly Fox
1897 -Paul Kauver
1896 -Margrave
1895 -Belmar
1894 -Assignee
1893-91 -No Races
1890 -Montague
1889 -Buddhist
1888 -Refund
1887 -Dubine
1886 -The Bard
1885 -Tecumseh
1884 -Knight of Ellerslie
1883 -Jacobus
1882 -Vanguard
1881 -Saunterer
1880 -Grenada
1879 -Harold
1878 -Duke of Magenta
1877 -Cloverbrook
1876 -Shirley
1875 -Tom Ochiltree
1874 -Culpepper
1873 -Survivor

First two legs
of the Triple Crown
ByThe Associated Press
Horses that have won the Kentucky Derby and
Preakness:
2014 -California Chrome
2012 -y-l'll Have Another
2008 Big Brown
2004 Smarty Jones
2003 Funny Cide
2002 -War Emblem
1999 -Charismatic
1998 -Real Quiet
1997 -Silver Charm
1989 -Sunday Silence
1987 -Alysheba
1981 -Pleasant Colony
1979 -Spectacular Bid
1978 -x-Affirmed
1977 -x-Seattle Slew
1973 -x-Secretariat
1971 -Canoneroll
1969 -Majestic Prince
1968 -Forward Pass
1966 -Kauai King
1964 -Northern Dancer
1961 -Carry Back
1958 -Tim Tam
1948 -x-Citation
1946 -x-Assault
1944 -Pensive
1943 -x-Count Fleet
1941 -x-Whirlaway
1937 -x-War Admiral
1936 -y-Bold Venture
1935 -x-Omaha
1932 -y-Burgoo King
1930 -x-Gallant Fox
1919 -x-Sir Barton
x-won Triple Crown.
y-did not run in Belmont Stakes.


Mega Money: 12 -31 -41 -42
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 4 $1,427
3-of-4 MB 29 $431
3-of-4 597 $62.50
2-of-4 MB 893 $29
1-of-4 MB 7,617 $3
2-of-4 19,760 $2

Fantasy 5:1 -13 -27 -33 -34
5-of-5 2 winners $116,338.04
4-of-5 261 $143.50
3-of-5 9,370 $11


Mega Millions: 13-14-16-50-56
Mega Ball: 11
5-of-5 MB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 MB 3 $5,000
4-of-5 19 $500
3-of-5 MB 95 $50
3-of-5 1,327 $5
2-of-5 MB 2,361 $5
1-of-5 MB 19,962 $2
0-of-5 MB 53,403 $1
Players should verify winning
numbers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ABC) Indianapolis 500, Pole Day
2 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Get To Know
Newton 250
2 p.m. (FS1) ARCA Series Racing Toledo
9 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Summit Racing Equip-
ment Southern Nationals (same-day tape)
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Indy Lights Series Grand Prix of
Indianapolis, Race 2 (taped)
1 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Get To Know
Newton 250 (same-day tape)
3 a.m. (FS1) FIAWorld Endurance Championship: Belgium (taped)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (MLB) Pittsburgh Pirates at New York Yankees
or Oakland Athletics at Cleveland Indians
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Milwaukee Brewers at Chicago Cubs
3:30 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Los
Angeles Angels
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Francisco Giants
8 p.m. (ESPN) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox
3 a.m. (ESPN2) Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
4:30 p.m. (FS1) Texas at Kansas State
NBA PLAYOFFS
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers. Eastern Con-
ference Final, Game 1
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers. Eastern
Conference Final, Game 1 (same-day tape)
BICYCLING
1 p.m. (NBC) Cycling Tour of California, Stage 8
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cyding Tour of Calimfornia, Stage 8 (same-day tape)
BOXING
12 p.m. (SUN) Alan Sanchez vs. Jorge Silva (taped)
GOLF
7 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Open de Espana, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour HP Byron Nelson Championship,
Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour HP Byron Nelson Championship,
Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Regions Tradition, Final
Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour Kingsmill Championship, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Web.com: BMW Charity Pro-Am,
Final Round (same-day tape)
HOCKEY
9:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2014 IIHF World Championship: Finland
vs. United States
12 p.m. (NHL) 2014 MasterCard Memorial Cup Edmonton
Oil Kings vs. Guelph Storm (taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) NHL Hockey Conference Final: Teams TBA
7 p.m. (NHL) 2014 MasterCard Memorial Cup Edmonton
Oil Kings vs. London Knights
LACROSSE
12 p.m. (ESPNU) College NCAA Tournament: Duke vs. Johns
Hopkins. Third Quarterfinal
12 p.m. (FSNFL) MLL: New York Lizards at Ohio Machine (taped)
2:30 p.m. (ESPNU) College NCAATournament: Denver vs.
Drexel. Fourth Quarterfinal
MOTORCYCLE RACING
7 a.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship: French
Grand Prix
COLLEGE SOFTBALL NCAA REGIONALS
6 a.m. (ESPNU) Teams TBA (taped)
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA
5:30 p.m. (ESPNU) Teams TBA
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA. Game 7
8 p.m. (ESPNU) Teams TBA
1 a.m. (ESPNU) Teams TBA (same-day tape)
TENNIS
7:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Internazionali BNL d'ltalia

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Triple Crown
near misses
By The Associated Press
Horses that have won the Kentucky Derby and
Preakness, but failed to win the Belmont
Stakes, with distance behind Belmont winner:
2008 Big Brown (9th, eased, Da'Tara).
2004 Smarty Jones (2nd, 1, Birdstone).
2003 Funny Cide (3rd, 5, Empire Maker).
2002 -War Emblem (8th, 19 1/2, Sarava).
1999 Charismatic (3rd, 1 1/2, Lemon Drop
Kid).
1998 Real Quiet (2nd, nose, Victory Gallop).
1997 Silver Charm (2nd, 3/4, Touch Gold).
1989 Sunday Silence (2nd, 8, Easy Goer).
1987 -Alysheba (4th, 14 1/4, Bet Twice).
1981 Pleasant Colony (3rd, 11/2, Summing).
1979 Spectacular Bid (3rd, 3 1/4, Coastal).
1971 -Canonero II (4th, 4 1/4, Pass Catcher).
1969 Majestic Prince (2nd, 5 1/2, Arts And
Letters).


1968 Forward Pass (2nd, 11/2, Stage Door
Johnny).
1966 Kauai King (4th, 7 1/2, Amberoid).
1964 Northern Dancer (3rd, 6, Quadrangle).
1961 Carry Back (7th, 143/4, Sherluck).
1958 -Tim Tam (2nd, 6, Cavan).
1944- Pensive (2nd, 1/2, Bounding Home).

Triple Crown winners
By The Associated Press
1978-Affirmed
1977-Seattle Slew
1973-Secretariat
1948-Citation
1946-Assault
1943-Count Fleet
1941-Whirlaway
1937 War Admiral
1935-Omaha
1930-Gallant Fox
1919-Sir Barton


ByThe Associated Press
- California Chrome
- Oxbow
- I'll Have Another
- Shackleford
- Lookin at Lucky
- Rachel Alexandra
- Big Brown
- Curlin
- Bernardini
- Afleet Alex
- Smarty Jones
- Funny Cide
-War Emblem
- Point Given
- Red Bullet
- Charismatic
- Real Quiet
- Silver Charm
- Louis Quatorze
- Timber Country
- Tabasco Cat
- Prairie Bayou
- Pine Bluff
- Hansel
- Summer Squall
- Sunday Silence
- Risen Star
- Alysheba
- Snow Chief
-Tank's Prospect
- Gate Dancer


San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, May 26
Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 27
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 28
x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 29
x-Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Friday, May 30
x-lndiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 31
x-San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 1
x-Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, June 2
x-Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
IPA 7-3-4
9 CASH 3 (late)
0 9-6-9

IPLAY 4 (early)
9-0-8-5
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 7-0-6-6



Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Placed 3B Will Middle-
brooks on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Brock
Holt from Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled LHP T.J.
House from Columbus (IL). Optioned RHP C.C.
Lee to Columbus.
HOUSTON ASTROS Signed RHP Kyle
Farnsworth. Optioned RHP Paul Clemens to
Oklahoma City (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Named Tony
La Russa chief baseball officer.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS Signed DT Timmy
Jernigan and DE Brent Urban to four-year
contracts.
BUFFALO BILLS-Signed LB Preston Brown.
DETROIT LIONS Signed CB Nevin Lawson
and WR TJ Jones to four-year contracts.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed S
Jerome Junior and RB Beau Blankenship.


NBA daily playoff
glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Saturday, April 19
Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87
Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105
Atlanta 101, Indiana 93
Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86
Sunday, April 20
San Antonio 90, Dallas 85
Miami 99, Charlotte 88
Washington 102, Chicago 93
Portland 122, Houston 120, OT
Monday, April 21
Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT
L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98
Tuesday, April 22
Indiana 101, Atlanta 85
Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95
Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT
Wednesday, April 23
Miami 101, Charlotte 97
Dallas 113, San Antonio 92
Portland 112, Houston 105
Thursday, April 24
Atlanta 98, Indiana 85,
Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT
L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96
Friday, April 25
Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98
Chicago 100, Washington 97
Houston 121, Portland 116, OT
Saturday, April 26
Indiana 91, Atlanta 88
Dallas 109, San Antonio 108
Miami 98, Charlotte 85
Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT
Sunday, April 27
Washington 98, Chicago 89
Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97
Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79
Portland 123, Houston 120, OT
Monday, April 28
Miami 109, Charlotte 98, Miami wins series 4-0
Atlanta 107, Indiana 97
San Antonio 93, Dallas 89
Tuesday, April 29
Washington 75, Chicago 69, Washington wins
series 4-1
Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT
L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103
Wednesday, April 30
San Antonio 109, Dallas 103
Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113
Houston 108, Portland 98
Thursday, May 1
Indiana 95, Atlanta 88
Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84
Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99, series tied
3-3
Friday, May 2
Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83
Dallas 113, San Antonio 111
Portland 99, Houston 98, Portland wins series
4-2
Saturday, May 3
Indiana 92, Atlanta 80, Indiana wins series 4-3
Oklahoma City 120, Memphis 109, Oklahoma
City wins series 4-3
L.A. Clippers 126, Golden State 121, L.A. Clip-
pers wins series 4-3
Sunday, May 4
Brooklyn 104, Toronto 103, Brooklyn wins se-
ries 4-3
San Antonio 119, Dallas 96, San Antonio wins
series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Monday, May 5
Washington 102, Indiana 96
L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105
Tuesday, May 6
Miami 107, Brooklyn 86
San Antonio 116, Portland 92
Wednesday, May 7
Indiana 86, Washington 82
Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clippers 101
Thursday, May 8
Miami 94, Brooklyn 82
San Antonio 114, Portland 97
Friday, May 9
Indiana 85, Washington 63
Oklahoma City 118, L.A. Clippers 112
Saturday, May 10
Brooklyn 104, Miami 90
San Antonio 118, Portland 103
Sunday, May 11
L.A. Clippers 101, Oklahoma City 99
Indiana 95, Washington 92
Monday, May 12
Miami 102, Brooklyn 96
Portland 103, San Antonio 92
Tuesday, May 13
Washington 102, Indiana 79
Oklahoma City 105, L.A. Clippers 104
Wednesday, May 14
Miami 96, Brooklyn 94, Miami wins series 4-1
San Antonio 104, Portland 82, San Antonio wins
series 4-1
Thursday, May 15
Indiana 93, Washington 80, Indiana wins series
4-2
Oklahoma City 104, L.A. Clippers 98, Oklahoma
City wins series 4-2
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Sunday, May 18
Miami at Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
Monday, May 19
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 20
Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 21
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Saturday, May 24
Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 25


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 B3


PREAKNESS
Continued from Page B1

The owners were long shots to get this far, too.
Coburn and Martin named their operation
DAP Racing, which stands for Dumb Ass Part-
ners. Their silks include an image of a donkey
Coburn and Perry who live on each side of the
California-Nevada border get up early for their
jobs Coburn working as a press operator and
Martin running a lab that tests high-reliability
equipment.
"We just hope that this horse is letting
America know that the little guy can win,"
Coburn said.
Sent off as the overwhelming favorite by a
record crowd of 123,469 on a sunny and cool day,
California Chrome bounced out of the gate run-
ning, with jockey Victor Espinoza moving the colt
into the clear Pablo Del Monte, a 34-1 shot,
charged to the lead and was soon joined by filly
Ria Antonia.
Espinoza tucked California Chrome into third,
an ideal spot behind the leaders. They stayed
there until making their move approaching the
final turn.
"I had so many cameras in my face that I actu-
ally couldn't see the race," Coburn said.
California Chrome made a move for the lead,
catching Pablo Del Monte while Social Inclusion
joined the chase. Pablo Del Monte soon dropped
back along the rail, and California Chrome
sprinted away from Social Inclusion at the top of
the stretch.
But there was one more challenge to come.
Ride On Curlin, next-to-last in the 10-horse
field, ranged up and briefly appeared ready to
overtake California Chrome. Once again show-
ing his class, California Chrome denied the
threat.
"It's an awesome feeling," Espinoza said.
"Today it was just a crazy race. I got more tired
mentally than physically I see another horse go
to the front. I was going to sit second... I sit back,
as soon as the other horse got clear of me, it
worked out perfect."
California Chrome paid $3, $3 and $2.40. Ride
On Curlin returned $5.60 and $3.80, while Social
Inclusion was another 6 V2 lengths back in third
and paid $3.40 as the 5-1 second choice.
General a Rod was fourth, followed by Ring
Weekend, Pablo Del Monte, Dynamic Impact,
Kid Cruz, Bayern and Ria Antonia.
Espinoza will get another crack at trying to
complete the Triple Crown, after missing with
War Emblem in 2002. He finished eighth in the
Belmont that year
"You have to be a super horse to win," the
jockey said. "Hopefully, California Chrome
comes back good, and he's the one that hopefully
can do it."
Bob Baffert trained War Emblem, one of his
three Triple tries that ended in failure. He
missed with Silver Charm in 1997 and again the
following year with Real Quiet, who lost the Bel-
mont by a nose.
"California Chrome is something. He's a cool
customer," Baffert said after the race. "He does
everything right. He's fast enough to stay out of
trouble."




BUCS
Continued from Page B1

translates to getting good production on the football
field," Smith said. "Same thing with everyone can't
run fast. All of those things if can do something
exceptional, it can help you as a football player"
The Bucs envision Evans, the seventh overall
pick in the draft, and second-rounder Seferian-
Jenkins teaming with veteran Vincent Jenkins,
another 6-5 receiver, to give quarterback Josh
McCown three big, physical targets capable pos-
ing matchup problems for opposing defenses.
McCown, signed in free agency to be Tampa
Bay's starter and being a backup for most of his
career, is coming off his best NFL season. He
threw for 1,829 yards, 13 touchdowns and just
one interception in eight games (five starts) for
the Chicago Bears, who featured a couple of big,
physical receivers in Brandon Marshall and Al-
shon Jeffery
"I saw what two big receivers can do," Smith
said. "It's a tough matchup if you just look at the
average height of most cornerbacks in this
league. You might have a 6-foot corner, but you
normally don't have two big guys that can match
up like that. We want to score points any way we
can. This is a combination that looked pretty at-
tractive to us."
Evans averaged 18.3 points, 8.4 rebounds and
5.2 assists as a senior in his school. The same
year, he took up football and did well enough to
land a scholarship offer to Texas A&M, who he
evolved from a raw prospect into one of the na-
tion's best receivers.
The first-round draft pick has learned to use
his basketball background to his advantage.
"It helps a lot. When you see me go up for
catches, I'm treating it like a rebound... using my
God-given talent and big body to box guys out for
catches," Evans said.
Seferian-Jenkins joined Washington's basket-
ball team as a freshman walk-on, serving a re-
serve forward for the Huskies, who won the
Pac-12 Conference regular season championship
and reached the semifinals of the National Invi-
tation Tournament.
"Being able to play basketball at a high level,
adjusting to the ball in the air, quick feet, quick
hands and all that stuff definitely translates to
playing tight end in the National Football
League," said Seferian-Jenkins, who had 146 re-
ceptions for 1,840 yards and 21 TDs in three sea-
sons at Washington.
"Foot work, hand-eye coordination. There's a


lot of things," the 262-pound tight end added. "If
you just watch basketball, you can tell where it
would help someone who's receiving the ball."
Pamphile is another former hoops star who didn't
start playing football until a coach at Miami Central
High persuaded him he could excel in both sports.
"He kept hounding me, telling me I should go
play football. After my junior year of playing bas-
ketball and receiving ) no scholarships, i came
and gave it a shot," said Pamphile, who went on
play at Purdue, where he made the transition
from defensive line to offensive tackle as a red-
shirt sophomore.
Less than two years later, he's in the NFL as a
fifth-round draft pick.
"I didn't think it was going to happen this fast
or happen the way it is happening right now,"
Pamphile said. "I'm just happy and blessed."




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto
Boston
Tampa Bay


Atlanta
Washington
Miami
NewYork
Philadelphia


East Division
Pct GB WC
.537 -
.537 -
.512 1 1
.476 2/ 2/2
.442 4 4


East Division
GB WC


NL

Cardinals 4, Braves 1
Atlanta St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Heywrdrf 4 02 0 MCrpnt3b 3 1 0 0
J.UptonlIf 4 00 0 Wong2b 4 22 0
Kimrelp 0 0 0 0 Hollidyl If 4 0 1 0
FFrmnlb 2 00 0 Craigrf 3 0 1 1
Gattisc 4 0 0 0 YMolin c 2 0 1 1
CJhnsn3b 4 00 0 MAdmslb 3 1 1 0
BUptoncf 4 0 0 0 JhPerltss 3 0 0 0
Smmnsss 3 1 3 0 Bourjos cf 3 02 1
Harangp 2 0 1 0 SMillerp 2 00 0
Doumitph 1 00 0 Descalsph 1 00 0
Varvarp 0 00 0 CMrtnzp 0 00 0
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
JSchafrl If 0 00 0 Rosnthlp 0 00 0
Pstrnck2b 2 00 0
Totals 30 16 0 Totals 284 8 3
Atlanta 010 000 000 1
St. Louis 000 102 10x 4
E-Gattis (5), Wong (3). DP-Atlanta 1, St. Louis
3. LOB-Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2. 2B-Simmons
(5). 3B-Ma.Adams (2). SB-Wong (5). CS-
Craig (1). SF YMolina.
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
HarangL,4-4 6 6 3 2 0 7
Varvaro 1-3 2 1 1 0 1
Avilan 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
S.MillerW,6-2 7 5 1 0 2 7
C.MartinezH,11 1-3 1 0 0 1 1
ChoateH,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
RosenthalS,13-14 1 0 0 0 0 2
HBP-by Harang (M.Carpenter).
T-2:31.A-44,981 (45,399).
Cubs 3, Brewers 0
Milwaukee Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
EHerrrl If 4 0 0 0 Bonifac cf 4 1 1 0
Gennett2b 4 0 0 0 Coghlnl If 2 0 0 0
Braunrf 4 0 1 0 Lake ph-lf 0 0 0 0
Lucroyc 4 0 2 0 Rizzolb 4 0 1 0
MrRynllb 4 00 0 SCastross 3 1 1 1
Segurass 3 0 1 0 Schrhltrf 2 1 0 0
LSchfr cf 2 00 0 Castillo c 3 0 1 2
Bianchi3b 3 00 0 Olt3b 3 00 0
Garzap 2 00 0 Barney2b 3 00 0
Overay ph 1 00 0 EJcksnp 2 00 0
Dukep 0 0 0 0 Kalishph 1 00 0
NRmrz p 0 00 0
HRndnp 0 00 0
Totals 31 04 0 Totals 273 4 3
Milwaukee 000 000 000 0
Chicago 300 000 OOx 3
E-Bianchi (1). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-Mil-
waukee 5, Chicago 3. 2B-S.Castro (10),
Castillo (8). S-Coghlan.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
GarzaL,2-4 7 4 3 3 1 7
Duke 1 0 0 0 1 0
Chicago
E.JacksonW,3-3 7 4 0 0 1 11
N.RamirezH,4 1 0 0 0 0 2
H.RondonS,4-4 1 0 0 0 0 1
WP-E.Jackson.
T-2:57.A-36,671 (41,072).
Mets 5, Nationals 2
NewYork Washington
ab rhbi ab rhbi
EYongl If 5 0 0 0 Span cf 4 00 0
DnMrp2b 4 1 2 0 Rendon3b 4 00 0
DWrght3b 4 1 1 0 Werthrf 3 1 1 0
CYoungrf 3 1 0 0 WRamsc 4 00 0
CampllIlb 4 1 2 2 Dsmndss 4 1 2 2
Lagarscf 4 1 2 3 Espinos2b 4 0 1 0
Reckerc 4 00 0 TMoorelb 3 00 0
Floresss 3 0 1 0 McLothl If 3 0 1 0
Mejiap 0 00 0 GGnzlzp 1 00 0
Colonp 3 00 0 Stmmnp 1 0 1 0
Tejada ph-ssl 0 0 0 Barrett p 0 0 0 0
Walters ph 1 00 0
Blevins p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 58 5 Totals 322 6 2
NewYork 302 000 000 5
Washington 000 200 000 2
E-T.Moore (2). DP-New York 1, Washington
1. LOB-New York 6, Washington 4. 2B-
McLouth (2), Stammen (1). HR-Lagares (2),
Desmond (6).


NewYork
Colon W,3-5
Mejia S,1-1
Washington
G.Gonzalez L,3-4
Stammen
Barrett
Blevins
T-2:48.A-41,225(
PhilliesJ
Cincinnati
ab r h b
BHmltn cf 4 0 0
Cozartss 4 1 10
Phillips2b 2 0 0
RSantg3b 1 0 0
Frazier3b 3 0 10
Heiseyrf 1 0 00
Ludwckl If 3 0 01
Shmkr rf-2b 4 0 0
N.Sotolb 3 0 10
LeCurep 0 0 00
Brnhrtc 3 0 0
Baileyp 0 0 0
Ondrskp 1 00 0
Hooverp 0 0 0
SMrshllp 0 0 0 0
B.Penalb 1 000
Totals 30 13 1
Cincinnati 10(
Philadelphia 00(
LOB-Cincinnati 5, F
(6), Byrd (14), Asche
(2). HR-C.Hernand
Hamels.


Str Home Away
L-1 9-10 13-9
W-3 10-10 12-9
W-2 10-11 12-10
L-3 10-13 10-9
W-1 8-12 11-12



Str Home Away
L-3 13-8 9-11
L-1 12-10 10-10
W-1 17-5 5-16
W-1 9-12 11-10
W-1 7-12 11-10


Detroit
Minnesota
Kansas City
Chicago
Cleveland


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
12 .684 7
20 .512 6/2 1 6
21 .500 7 1/2 6
23 .477 8 2/2 4
24 .442 91/ 4 5


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
16 .628 5
20 .535 4 6
22 .463 7 3 4
24 .415 9 5 5
27 .341 12 8 3


Str Home
W-5 13-8
W-3 12-10
W-1 11-9
L-1 11-10
L-3 12-10


Str Home
L-1 14-10
W-4 11-6
L-1 11-10
L-2 12-11
W-1 8-12


Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Texas
Houston


San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC
16 .628 -
19 .537 4 -
22 .476 6/ 2/2
22 .476 6/ 2/2
28 .349 12 8


West Division
t GB WC L10
8 6-4
8 3 5-5
5 4 5-5
5 7 3 5-5
4 11 % 7/2 5-5


Str Home
W-2 12-10
L-1 9-11
L-4 8-10
L-3 11-11
W-1 9-15



Str Home
L-1 13-7
W-1 14-5
W-1 9-13
L-1 12-11
L-2 4-18


Associated Press
Detroit Tiger Nick Castellanos, right, is forced out at second base as Boston Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts
throws to first on a ball hit by Alex Avila, who was safe, in the second inning Saturday in Boston. A run scored
on the play.




Surging Tigers clobber Sox 6-1


Associated Press

BOSTON Miguel Cabrera hit
a solo homer and RBI single, Rick
Porcello pitched eight solid in-
nings to win his sixth straight start
and the red-hot Detroit Tigers
beat the Boston Red Sox 6-1.
It was the 10th consecutive road
win for the Tigers, who are a ma-
jors' best 26-12. Detroit won for
the 14th time in 17 games.
Porcello (7-1) gave up one run,
six hits, striking out four and
walking one.
Xander Bogaerts had a solo
homer and Mike Napoli three sin-
gles for the slumping Red Sox,
who have scored just one run in
the first two games of the three-
game series.
John Lackey (5-3) gave up more
than two runs for the first time in
five starts, allowing six five earned
- on nine hits in 5 1/3 innings.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Astros 6, White Sox 5
HOUSTON Jason Castro hit a
three-run homer and Dexter Fowler


IP H R ER BB SO homered and drove in two runs to
8 5 2 2 1 5 help the Houston Astros outlast the
1 1 0 0 0 2 Chicago White Sox for a 6-5 win.
3 7 5 5 2 4 Castro's home run came in Hous-
4 1 0 0 1 2
1 0 0 0 0 1 ton's four-run first inning. The White
1 0 0 0 0 1 Sox scored two in the second and one
(41, 408) in the third to cut the lead to one be-
12, Reds I fore Fowler's solo shot in the fifth in-
SPhiladelphiaab r h bi ning. His RBI single in the seventh
SRollins ss 4 0 1 0 inning pushed the lead to 6-3.
0 Brigncph-ss 1 0 0 0
0 Ruizc c 4 1 2 1 Houston starter Jarred Cosart (3-3)
SUtley2b 3 1 1 1 allowed seven hits and three runs in
SCHrndz2b 1 1 1 1
SHoward lb 3 2 0 0 five innings.
1 Byrd rf 5 2 2 0 Kyle Farnsworth had a tough debut
0 Asche3b 4 2 2 3
SDBrwn If 5 2 2 5 with the Astros after being signed Sat-
SGwynJ cf 3 1 1 0 urday. Alejandro De Aza and Gordon
0 Hamelsp 2 0 0 0
SMayrry ph 1 0 1 1 Beckham each had an RBI off of the
SDiekmn p 0 0 0 0 veteran reliever in the eighth inning to
Papelnp 0 00 0
cut the lead to 6-5.
Total s 36121312 Athletics 6, Indians 2
0 000 000 --1


0 600 51x 12
'hiladelphia 7.2B-Cozart
(8), D.Brown (6), Mayberry
ez (1), D.Brown (2). S-
IP H RERBBSO


Cincinnati
Bailey L,3-3 32-37 6 6
Ondrusek 11-31 0 0
Hoover 1 0 0 0
S.Marshall 2-3 3 5 5
LeCure 11-32 1 1
Philadelphia
HamelsW,1-2 7 3 1 1
Diekman 1 0 0 0
Papelbon 1 0 0 0
HBP-by S.Marshall (Ruiz). WP-
PB-Barnhart.
T-2:54. A-30,075 (43,651).


2 10
0 0
1 0
-Ondrusek.


Interleague

Yankees 7, Pirates 1
Pittsburgh NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Tabatarf 4 0 1 0 Gardnr cf 3 2 1 1
NWalkr2b 3 00 0 Jeterss 4 1 2 0
AMcCtcf 3 00 0 Teixeirib 4 1 1 2
PAIvrz3b 4 00 0 McCnnc 4 1 1 2
SMartel If 3 1 3 1 ASorinrf 4 1 2 1
I.Davislb 3 00 0 ISuzukirf 0 00 0
GSnchzdh 4 0 1 0 Solarte3b 4 00 0
Mercerss 4 0 1 0 KJhnsndh 3 00 0
TSnchz c 4 02 0 BRorts2b 3 0 1 0
ZAImntlf 3 1 1 1
Totals 32 18 1 Totals 32 7 9 7
Pittsburgh 000 001 000 1
NewYork 201 001 12x 7
DP-Pittsburgh 1, NewYork 1. LOB-Pittsburgh
8, NewYork 2.2B-S.Marte (4), G.Sanchez (6),
A.Soriano (5). HR-S.Marte (2), Gardner (2),
Teixeira (5), McCann (5), A.Soriano (5), Z.AI-
monte (1). SB-A.McCutchen (5), S.Marte (6),
Gardner (5). CS-S.Marte (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
VolquezL,1-4 61-36 5 5 0 3
J.Hughes 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Mazzaro 1 2 2 2 1 0
NewYork
PhelpsW,1-0 5 5 0 0 3 5
BetancesH,4 2 2 1 1 0 3
Warren 1 1 0 0 0 2
Daley 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Phelps (S.Marte).
T-2:56. A-47,353 (49,642).


CLEVELAND Brandon Moss hit
a two-run homer and drove in three
runs and Josh Donaldson also had
three RBIs, helping the Oakland Ath-
letics overcome starter Scott Kazmir's
ejection in the second inning to beat
the Cleveland Indians 6-2.
Kazmir was ejected by plate umpire
Jerry Layne after the left-hander walked
Jesus Aguilar on a borderline full-
count pitch with one out in the second.
The walk was the third Kazmir allowed
and he was clearly unhappy with Layne's
strike zone. Kazmir yelled at the um-
pire, who quickly ejected the pitcher.
The Indians have lost three straight
and five of seven. Cleveland commit-
ted three errors and has made a major
league-high 43 errors in 43 games.

Twins 4, Mariners 3
MINNEAPOLIS Brian Dozier's
three-run homer in the fifth inning put
Minnesota ahead for good, and
Samuel Deduno tossed six sharp in-
nings for his first win as the Twins beat
the Seattle Mariners 4-3.
With Minnesota trailing 2-1, Dozier
followed consecutive singles by Aaron
Hicks and Eduardo Escobar by send-
ing a curveball from Roenis Elias (3-3)
into the seats in left field. It was
Dozier's 11th homer of the season.
Michael Saunders had a homer and
two RBIs for Seattle.
Deduno (1-2) struck out four, al-
lowed two hits and retired 18 of the 23
batters he faced.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Oakland 11, Cleveland 1
Pittsburgh at NewYork, ppd., rain
Detroit 1, Boston 0
Toronto 2, Texas 0
Baltimore 4, Kansas City 0
Chicago White Sox 7, Houston 2
Minnesota 5, Seattle 4
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. Angels 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 7, Pittsburgh 1
Houston 6, Chicago White Sox 5
Oakland 6, Cleveland 2
Kansas City 1, Baltimore 0
Detroit 6, Boston 1
Minnesota 4, Seattle 3
Toronto at Texas, late
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, late
Sunday's Games
Oakland (Chavez 3-1) at Cleveland (Masterson 2-2), 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 0-5) atYankees (Kuroda 2-3), 1:05 p.m.,
1st game
Baltimore (Jimenez 2-4) at Kansas City(Shields 5-3), 2:10 p.m.
White Sox (Danks 3-3) at Houston (Peacock 0-4), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Hernandez 4-1) at Minnesota (Ndasco 2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 4-3) at Texas (Martinez 0-1), 3:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 4-3) at Angels (Shoemaker 1-1), 3:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 3-3) atYankees (Nuno 1-1), 4:35 p.m., 2nd
game
Detroit (A.Sanchez 0-2) at Boston (Peavy 1-1), 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 3
Cincinnati 3, Philadelphia 0
Washington 5, N.Y Mets 2
Pittsburgh at NewYork, ppd., rain
St. Louis 5, Atlanta 2
Colorado 3, San Diego 1
L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 0
Miami 7, San Francisco 5
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 4, Atlanta 1
Chicago Cubs 3, Milwaukee 0
N.Y Mets 5, Washington 2
N.Y Yankees 7, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 12, Cincinnati 1
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late
San Diego at Colorado, late
Miami at San Francisco, late
Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh (Morton 0-5) atYankees (Kuroda 2-3), 1:05 p.m.,
1st game
Cincinnati (Cingrani 2-2) at Philadelphia (Lee 3-4), 1:35 p.m.
Mets(Wheeler 1-3) at Washington (Zimmermann 2-1), 1:35p.m.
Atlanta (Floyd 0-1) at St. Louis (Garcia 0-0), 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 3-1) at Cubs (Wood 3-4), 2:20 p.m.
Miami (Turner 0-1) at San Francisco (Vcgelsong 1-2), 4:05 p.m.
Dodgers (Haren 5-1) at Arizona (Collmenter 1-2), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Roach 1-0) at Cdolorado (Nicasio 4-2), 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 3-3) atYankees (Nuno 1-1), 4:35 p.m., 2nd
game


Royals 1, Orioles 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Danny Duffy
carried a perfect game into the seventh
inning, Billy Butler drove in the only run
and the Kansas City Royals held on to
beat the Baltimore Orioles 1-0.
The 25-year-old Duffy (2-3) retired
the first 20 batters he faced, rarely
running the count to three balls and
flirting with the first perfect game in
franchise history. Adam Jones finally
ended it with a weak groundball up the
middle with two outs in the seventh.
Bud Norris (2-4) was the hard-luck
loser, allowing four hits and a walk in 71/3.

INTERLEAGUE

Yankees 7, Pirates 1
NEW YORK Mark Teixeira hit a
two-run homer, ZoiloAlmonte connected
in his first start of the season and the
New York Yankees went deep five times
for a 7-1 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
Brett Gardner and Alfonso Soriano
also homered off a struggling Edinson
Volquez to back five scoreless innings
from David Phelps (1-0). Brian Mc-
Cann added a two-run drive in the
eighth against reliever Vin Mazzaro as
New York won for only the second
time in its past eight home games.
The Pirates are winless at Yankee
Stadium since Harvey Haddix pitched
them to a 5-2 victory in Game 5 of the
1960 World Series.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cardinals 4, Braves 1
ST. LOUIS Rookie Kolten Wong
keyed the St. Louis offense with his legs
in support of Shelby Miller's strongest
outing of the season, and the Cardi-
nals beat the Atlanta Braves 4-1.
Wong scored on Yadier Molina's
sacrifice fly just beyond the infield to
tie it in the fourth. He bunted for a hit
and drew a wild throw in St. Louis' go-
ahead, two-run rally off Aaron Harang
(4-4) in the sixth.
The Cardinals matched their sea-
son high with their fourth straight win.
Miller (6-2) allowed a run and five hits
in seven innings, one inning longer than
his previous high this season. He matched
his season best with seven strikeouts,
fanning B.J. Upton three times.
Trevor Rosenthal fanned two in the
ninth inning, with Upton striking out a
fourth time, to earn his 13th save in 14
chances.

Cubs 3, Brewers 0
CHICAGO Edwin Jackson struck
out 11 in seven innings and Welington
Castillo hit a two-run double to lead
the Chicago Cubs to a 3-0 win over
the Milwaukee Brewers.
Starlin Castro also added an RBI
double for the last-place Cubs, who
won just for the third time in 13 games.
Jackson (3-3) had his best outing
for the Cubs since signing a four-year,
$52 million deal before the 2013 sea-
son. The right-hander allowed four hits
and walked one. He struck out the side
in the first and struck out Elian Herrera
to end the fifth for his 10th strikeout.
He finished his outing by striking out
Jeff Bianchi on 95 mph fastball.

Mets 5, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON -Juan Lagares
drove in three runs with a homer and
a single, and Bartolo Colon allowed
five hits in eight innings and the New
York Mets defeated the Washington
Nationals 5-2.
Lagares came in 5 for 27 in his past
11 games, but he provided a jolt for
the struggling Mets.
He singled in a run during a three-
run first and homered with one on and
one out in the third to give New York a
5-0 lead.
The Mets' outfielder added a defen-
sive gem, robbing Jayson Werth of a
home run with a leaping catch against
the wall in center.
Colon (3-5) allowed both runs as
New York snapped a three-game los-
ing streak and won for the first time in
10 tries against Washington.

Phillies 12, Reds 1
PHILADELPHIA- Cole Hamels
threw seven sharp innings to earn his
100th career win, Domonic Brown had
a career-best five RBIs and the Philadel-
phia Phillies beat the Cincinnati Reds
12-1 to end a four-game losing streak.
Cody Asche snapped Philadelphia's
23-inning scoreless streak with a two-
run double that sparked a six-run
fourth. Cesar Hernandez capped the
scoring with his first career homer.
Hamels (1-2) didn't need much run
support.
Coming off a career-high 133-pitch
outing at the Mets last Sunday, the
three-time All-Star left-hander was im-
pressive. Hamels gave up one run
and three hits, striking out 10 on 90
pitches.


AL


Tigers 6, Red Sox I


Detroit

Kinsler 2b
TrHntr rf
MiCarr lb
VMrtnz dh
AJcksn cf
Cstllns 3b
Avila c
AnRmn ss
RDavis If
Totals
Detroit
Boston


Boston
r h bi
1 1 1 Pedroia2b
1 1 1 Victornrf
1 3 2 D.Ortizdh
1 2 0 Napolilb
0 1 0 GSizmrcf
0 1 0 Carp lf
1 1 1 Przynsc
0 0 0 Bogarts ss
1 1 1 Holt3b
6116 Totals
011 022 000
000 010 000


ab r h bi
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
4010
4 0 1 0
4030
4000
3000
4000
3121
3 1 2 1
3000
33 1 7 1
6
1


E-Mujica (1). DP-Detroit 1. LOB-Detroit 7,
Boston 6. 2B-Kinsler (10), Tor.Hunter (9),
Mi.Cabrera (12), A.Jackson (9), Avila (7),
R.Davis (5). HR-Mi.Cabrera (7), Bogaerts (2).
SF-Kinsler.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
PorcelloW,7-1 8 6 1 1 1 4
Coke 1 1 0 0 0 0
Boston
Lackey L,5-3 51-39 6 5 2 4
Mujica 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Capuano 2 1 0 0 0 3
Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 1
T-2:49. A-37,608 (37,499).

Astros 6, White Sox 5
Chicago Houston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
GBckh2b 5 1 2 1 Altuve 2b 5 12 0
Gillaspi3b 5 0 1 0 Springrrf 4 22 1
JAreudh 3 0 0 1 Fowler cf 4 23 2
Konerk ph-dh2 0 0 0 JCastro c 5 1 1 3
A.DunnIlb 3 1 1 0 MDmn3b 2 00 0
Viciedolf 4 2 2 0 Krausslb 3 01 0
AIRmrzss 3 1 2 1 Guzmnph-lbl 00 0
DeAza cf 2 0 1 1 Carterdh 3 00 0
Flowrs c 3 0 0 0 Presley If 4 0 2 0
Sierrarf 2 0 1 1 MGnzlzss 3 00 0
Totals 32 5105 Totals 34611 6
Chicago 021 000 020 5
Houston 400 010 10x 6
E-S.Downs (1). DP-Houston 2. LOB-
Chicago 9, Houston 10. 2B-G.Beckham (4),
AI.Ramirez (8). 3B-Springer (1). HR-Fowler
(3), J.Castro (6). SB-De Aza (5), Altuve (14),
Presley (1). S-Ma.Gonzalez. SF-AI.Ramirez,
De Aza, Sierra.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Noesi L,0-4
S.Downs
D.Webb
Houston
CosartW,3-3
Fields H,1
Sipp H,2


6 8 6
1-3 1 0
12-32 0


573342
110002
100001
5 7 3 3 4 2
1 1 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 1


Farnsworth H,1 2-3 2 2 2 2 0
D.DownsH,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Quails S,3-4 1 0 0 0 0 1
Noesi pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Cosart.
T-3:26. A-20,612 (42,060).

Athletics 6, Indians 2


Oakland


Cleveland


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crisp cf 5 2 1 0 Bourn cf 4 0 1 0
Jasodh 3 0 0 0 Swisherdh 4 0 1 0
Callasp ph-dh 1 1 0 0 Brantly If 3 1 1
0
Dnldsn3b 4 2 3 3 CSantn3b-1b4 0 1 0
Mosslb 3 1 2 3 Raburnrf 4 0 1 0
Cespdslf 4 00 0 ACarerss 2 10 1
Lowriess 4 00 0 YGomsc 4 01 0
DNorrsc 4 0 1 0 Aguilarib 1 00 0
Reddckrf 4 00 0 JRmrzph-2b 1 00 0
Punto2b 4 0 1 0 Aviles2b-3b 3 01 0
Totals 36 68 6 Totals 302 7 1
Oakland 003 000 300 6
Cleveland 010 001 000 2
E-Donaldson (8), A.Cabrera (6), C.Santana (5),
Aguilar (1). DP-Oakland 3, Cleveland 1. LOB-
Oakland 5, Cleveland 5.2B-Crisp (4), Moss (8),
D.Norris (7), YGomes (7). 3B-Donaldson (1).
HR-Moss (9). SF-A.Cabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Kazmir 11-31 1 1 3 1
OteroW,4-0 32-34 0 0 0 1
AbadH,4 1 2 1 1 0 0
Gregerson 2 0 0 0 0 3
Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cleveland
TomlinL,2-1 6 5 3 3 1 2
Rzepczynski 2-3 1 2 0 1 0
Shaw 1-3 2 1 1 0 0
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 0
House 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP-Kazmir.
T-3:00.A-18,358 (42,487).

Twins 4, Mariners 3


Seattle

J.Jones cf
MSndrs rf
Cano 2b
Hartdh
Seager3b
Smoak lb
Gillespi pr
Ackley If
Zunino c
BMiller ss
Romer ph
Blmqst ss
Totals
Seattle
Minnesot


Minnesota
ab r h bi
4 1 1 1 Dozier2b
3 1 1 2 Mauerlb
4 0 1 0 Plouffe3b
4 0 1 0 KSuzukdh
o 4 00 0 Pinto c
3 0 2 0 Colaell rf
0 0 0 0 Parmel rf
4 0 0 0 Nunezlf
3 0 0 0 A.Hickscf
1 1 0 0 EEscorss
1 000
1 000
32 36 3 Totals
002 000 010
a 100 030 00x


ab r h bi
3223
4000
4000
3011
3 0 1 1
3000
3000
0000
3010
2110
3110
3 0 1 0
2 1 1 0
3 1 1 0


284 6 4
3
4


E-Plouffe (4). DP-Seattle 2, Minnesota 1.
LOB-Seattle 6, Minnesota 2. 2B-Hart (5),
Smoak (10), K.Suzuki (10). 3B-J.Jones (1).
HR-M.Saunders(2), Dozier(11).SF-M.Saun-
ders.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
EliasL,3-3 7 6 4 4 1 4
Medina 1 0 0 0 0 1
Minnesota
DedunoW,1l-2 6 2 2 2 2 4
DuensingH,1 1 1 0 0 1 0
BurtonH,6 1 2 1 1 0 1
PerkinsS,12-14 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Elias (Dozier). WP-Elias, Deduno.
PB-Pinto. Balk-Elias.
T-2:26.A-29,717 (39,021).

Royals 1, Orioles 0


Baltimore

Markks rf
Machd 3b
A.Jones cf
C.Davis lb
N.Cruz If
Hardy ss
DYong dh
Schoop 2b
CJosph c
Clevngr ph


Kansas City
rhbi ab rhbi
0 0 0 Aokirf 4 12 0
0 1 0 Dyson cf 0 00 0
0 1 0 AEscorss 2 00 0
00 0 Hosmerib 4 00 0
0 1 0 BButlerdh 4 0 1 1
0 0 0 AGordnl If 3 00 0
00 0 L.Caincf-rf 2 00 0
0 0 0 Mostks3b 3 01 0
00 0 Giavtll2b 3 00 0
00 0 Ciriaco2b 0 00 0
Hayes c 3 00 0


Totals 30 03 0 Totals 281 4 1
Baltimore 000 000 000 0
Kansas City 100 000 OOx 1
E-Machado (4). LOB-Baltimore 5, Kansas
City 6. SB-Aoki (5), L.Cain (3). S-A.Escobar.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
B.Norris L,2-4 71-34 1 1 1 1
Matusz 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Tom.Hunter 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
DuffyW,2-3 7 2 0 0 0 2
WDavisH,8 1 0 0 0 0 2
G.HollandS,11-12 1 1 0 0 2 3
Duffy pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP-by B.Norris (A.Escobar).
T-2:37. A-24,064 (37,903).


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


BASEBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Newly drafted Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Blake Bortles puts his hand on running
back Storm Johnson on Friday in a huddle during the team's rookie minicamp.


Record crowd shows up


to watch Jaguars rookies


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Fans waited in
line to get in, filled every seat available
and then packed the perimeter of the
practice fields for a glimpse of quarter-
back Blake Bortles.
The crowd kept growing and growing,
forcing the Jacksonville Jaguars to open
an additional gate and create more
space. Some onlookers even stood out-
side the fence for a peek.
It was the kind of buzz unseen at
Jaguars camp since the franchise's in-
ception in 1995.
The Jaguars announced 6,214 in at-
tendance for the final day of a two-day
rookie minicamp that ended Saturday
That's nearly 4,000 more than any previ-
ous turnout for a rookie camp and about
1,700 more than the previous record set
in several training camp practices.
'"Are you kidding me? That is awe-
some, man," coach Gus Bradley said af-
terward.
It's easy to fathom, just hard to pin-
point, what brought so many to the prac-
tice field on a relatively cool and
cloudless day
Owner Shad Khan, team president
Mark Lamping, general manager Dave
Caldwell and Bradley have fans believ-
ing the team is on the verge of better
days. They drafted Bortles with the
third overall pick last weekend and
added receivers Marqise Lee and Allen
Robinson in the second round.
The city and team are installing $63
million scoreboards that are expected to
be the largest in the world and have
other plans to renovate an aging sta-
dium that lacks unique features and fan-
friendly amenities.
"You've got to credit Shad and Mark
and Dave and Gus," said former Jaguars
offensive tackle Tony Boselli, who was
on hand for Saturday's practice. "What
they've done on the business side and
the football side is remarkable. The en-
ergy is here, Gus Bradley is infectious,


and when you draft a quarterback No. 3
overall, you're going to get a bit of ex-
citement."
Bortles completed 12 of 18 passes dur-
ing 11-on-ll drills in his second prac-
tice, his numbers slightly hurt by two
drops.
Lee and Robinson were even better,
getting open early and often as the team
gave the rookies a chance to replay Fri-
day's script with more poise and
precision.
"We launched a couple today,"
Bradley said. "We got it going a little bit
... just to get everybody involved. We
talked about trying to find the playmak-
ers, so do those styles of throws just to
see what they can do. I think it's helpful
for us to learn about these guys."
The Jaguars saw enough from two work-
out rookies to sign them to contracts.
They added safety Jerome Junior and
running back Beau Blankenship, and
waived place-kicker Jeff Budzien and
punter Chad Zinchini.
But the bigger story was the unex-
pected crowd, a sign of how the city is
responding to Khan & Co., and what it
thinks about the future of the franchise.
"What a credit to Shad and his vision,"
Bradley said. "When I go around and
talk to people, it's just they feel so confi-
dent in his vision. It's a credit to him and
the organization. It feels good, I do know
that. Our fans, we talk about connect
with the following and try to help them
go along this journey with us. And when
we get excited, they get excited. When
we have tough times, they do.
"We're going to do this thing together,
and to be able to come out and to see a
group of people that are that passionate
for good football and to watch passion-
ate players is something."
For rookie tight end Reggie Jordan,
the crowd was bigger than some of the
ones he experienced at Missouri-
Western State.
"That's definitely exciting to see," he
said. "It's a new day"


Registration open for



summer youth clinics


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks and Recreation is
offering several youth clinics this
summer
Summer Baseball Clinic
Citrus County Parks and Recreation, in
partnership with Lecanto High School's
head coach David Logue and coaching staff,
will be hosting a summer baseball clinic.
The clinic will focus on the fundamentals
of baseball. The cost of the clinic is $75 per
participant ($45 per additional sibling).
The clinic will be held from June 2-5 at
Central Ridge District Park (6905 N.
Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills, FL) from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch will be provided.
The camp is open to boys and girls ages
6 to 13.
To register go to the Citrus County
Parks and Recreation office at 2804 W
Marc Knighton Ct. Lecanto, FL 34461.
For more information visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or contact Citrus
County Parks and Recreation at 352-527-
7540.
Summer Tennis Clinics
Citrus County Parks & Recreation, in
partnership with tennis pro Mehdi Tahiri,
will be hosting two Summer Tennis Clinics.
The first clinic will be geared towards be-
ginners and the second clinic will be for
those who have tennis experience.
Instruction will include conditioning,
drills, footwork, match play, doubles and
single strategy
The clinics will be held at Lecanto
Park (3505 West Educational Path,


Lecanto, FL 34461)
Week 1 (BEGINNERS) will be held
from June 2-6. This clinic is open to boys
and girls ages 7 to 12 who are new to the
game of tennis. The clinic will run from 9
to 11 a.m. The cost will be $150 per par-
ticipant ($40 off for additional siblings).
Week 2 (INTERMEDIATE/AD-
VANCED) will run from 9 a.m. to noon
June 9-12. This clinic is open to boys and
girls ages 9 to 15 who have tennis experi-
ence. The cost will be $190 per partici-
pant ($50 off for additional siblings).
For more information visit www.
citruscountyparks.com or contact Citrus
County Parks and Recreation at 352-527-
7540.
Summer Youth Golf
Registration for summer golf lessons is
now open.
Citrus County Parks & Recreation, in
partnership with Pine Ridge Golf Course,
will be holding summer youth golf les-
sons. The lessons will be held at Pine
Ridge Golf Course on Wednesday morn-
ings from 9 to 10:30 a.m. or Thursday
evenings 5:30 to 7 p.m., beginning on June
11 and 12. Participants will meet one day
a week for five weeks. Children ages 6 to
14 are eligible and the cost is $80 per
child. Instruction will be given by golf pro
Randy Robbins and several of his volun-
teers. During these lessons participants
will learn putting, driving, chipping, on-
course play and on-course etiquette.
For more information contact Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at 352-527-
7543, www.citruscountyparks.com, or
Randy Robbins at 352-746-6177.


CONGRATULATIONS: Phil Spencer rolled
his second perfect game at Parkview during
the Preserve Pinbusters final session April 29.
His first 300 game was Feb. 4, also during the
Pinbusters league.
CONGRATULATIONS: Wes Foley won the
league bowler's Bingo (worth $225) during the
Parkview Owls league May 8.
CITRUS COUNTY USBC TOURNEY RE-
SULTS: The team of James Malanga and
Ernie Reed won the May CCUSBC Sweeper
held at Parkview Lanes. Their series of 1565
pins edged Dorine Fugere and Jacob Reed
by 23 pins. Henry Quigley and Scott Brown
were third (1533 pins) and Edward Gruman
and Tim Hegedus were fourth (1513 pins).
League scores for the week ending May
11:
MONDAY SUMMER SPECIAL: Ron
Mesick 281,738; Jeremy Colegrove 260; Bill
Levert 716; Myla Wexler 286,757. Scratch:
Brian Poisson 253,656; Mark Smith 248,664;
Michelle Shirley 222,567; Myla Wexler
210,529.
SUNCOAST SENIORS 12-WEEK: Ken
Meldrum 280,760; Andre Boetius 268,671;
June Williams 242,712; Carol Roberts
233,613. Scratch: Ken Meldrum 257,691;
Jerry Ness 185,548; Carol Roberts 158,388;
June Williams 155,451.


SCRATCH CHALLENGE: Bobby Craft
277,696; Tim Lawrence 237,673; Sandy LeP-
ree 209,522; Dorine Fugere 194,550.
LATE STARTERS: Handicap: Rich Soletto
262,663; Ron Gable 253,718; Vicki Soletto
251,690; Sandy LePree 243,674. Scratch:
Rich Soletto 257,648; Mark Ash 217; Ted
Rafanan 635; Debbe Chung 203,552; Sandy
LePree 202,551.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Handicap: Ives
Chavez 303; Nick Di Costanzo 289; George
Munzing 289; Larry Nevels 770; Dennis
Flanagan 760. Scratch: Phil Spencer 259;
Mark Smith 258,718; Brian Camrney 691.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS: Handicap: Rich
Williams 280,716; Murphy Combs 268,705;
Andrea Kish 287,786; June Williams 258,677.
Scratch: Rich Williams 268,680; Murphy
Combs 219,558; Andrea Kish 177,456; Ellen
Bowman 177,435; June Williams 170.
PARKVIEW OWLS: Handicap: Stoney
Sinckler 265,713; Michael Andriuolo 260; Wes
Foley 703; Arlene Heaton 237,647; Barbara
Murray 225; Myla Wexler 628. Scratch: Wes
Foley 256,703; MA4vin Brigner 255,639; Myla
Wexler 192,538; Toni Mills-Smith 159,441.
BOWLERS OF THE WEEK: Vicki Soletto,
90 pins over her average, and Ron Gable, 118
pins over his average.


Recreation BRIEFS


Golf tourney
supports Operation
Welcome Home
The Inverness Golf and
Country Club is hosting a golf
tournament fundraiser for Op-
eration Welcome
Home/Honor Flight Saturday,
May 24.
The tournament format is a
four-person scramble and be-
gins with a 9 a.m. shotgun
start. Prizes for low gross, low
net and hole-in-one will be
awarded. Lunch is included.
Hole-in-one prizes include
a 2014 GMC Sierra, donated
by Eagle Buick GMC, and
$10,000, donated by Barbara
Mills Remax Realty One.
Hole sponsors are needed
and cost $100, or $300 to in-
clude a foursome. Single en-
tries will be accepted at $60
and will be assigned to teams.
For information or entry
forms, call Barbara at 352-
422-6236.
Camp opportunity
for junior golfers
The Citrus Hills Junior Golf
Camp begins June 5.
Local area PGA profession-
als will teach the juniors how
to play golf in this five-week
clinic. Classes fill up quickly,
so contact the golf shop at
Citrus Hills at 746-4425 to
register your junior player.
All junior merchandise, in-
cluding equipment, is avail-
able in the pro shop if
needed.
Camp Patriot
returns to Ocala
The 11th annual Camp Pa-
triot Basketball Camp will hold
four sessions during the
months of June and July at
the College of Central Florida
Gymnasium in Ocala.
The camps are for boys
and girls ages 8 to 18. The


first session is June 16-19,
followed by camps June 23-
26, July 7-10 and July 21-24.
Cost is $165 per session,
which includes daily clinics,
instruction, demonstrations,
lectures and a camp T-Shirt.
There will also be 5-on-5 and
3-on-3 games and several
awards handed out.
For more information con-
tact coach Tim Ryan at 352-
427-7435 or visit www.camp
patriotbasketball.com.
CR volleyball camp
The Crystal River Volleyball
Camp will be held the week of
June 2-6 from 5 to 8:30 p.m.
at Lecanto High School.
The camp is open to girls
ages 10 to 16. No experience
is required. Crystal River play-
ers and coaches will run the
camp. Emphasis will be on
the fundamentals of passing,
setting, hitting, serving, de-
fense and team play.
Campers will be placed in
groups with players of similar
skill levels.
The cost of the camp is $55
per player. Contact coach
Mike Ridley for details at 352-
566-7789. Registration forms
are also available at CRHS,
CRMS and CSMS.
Lecanto offers
volleyball camp
Lecanto High School is of-
fering a summer volleyball
camp for students entering
fourth through ninth grade.
The camp will be June 2-5
and is from 9 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. each day.
Volleyball skills will be
taught throughout the camp
and there will be a tourna-
ment at the end of the week.
The cost is $65 per
camper. Contact Alice Chris-
tian at
christiana@citrus.k1l2.fl.us for
more information.


Track/cross
country camp
available
The third annual Panther
Track and Field/Cross County
Camp will be held June 10-12
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the
Lecanto High School Sports
Complex.
The camp is for students in
second through 12th grade
(based on 2014-15 school
year).
The last day of camp will be
cross country-style events fol-
lowed by a track and field
meet. This day is open to all
ages.
The cost is $50 for the en-
tire camp, $20 for one day
June 4 or 5 and $17 for the
competitions on June 6.
There is a multiple sibling dis-
count: $90 for two siblings,
$115 for three siblings. There
is also a $45 early bird spe-
cial. Registration must be re-
ceived by May 9 to receive
the special discount.
Contact coach Roselle Lat-
tin at Lecanto High School
(746-2334) or email lat-
tinr@citrus.k1l2.fl.us for more
information.

Lecanto holds
hoops camp
A basketball camp for boys
and girls grades 3 to 9 will be
held May 27-30 in the
Lecanto High School Gym.
The camp runs from 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m. each day and the
cost is $75 per child. Deadline
to sign up is May 27, the first
day of the camp. Each
camper will receive a T-shirt.
Fundamentals and rules of
basketball will be taught in the
mornings. Games will be
played in the afternoons after
a lunch break. Concessions
will be available for lunch and
snacks.
No experience is necessary


and this is a recreational pro-
gram that stresses fun, good
sportsmanship, equal partici-
pation, teamwork and the fun-
damentals of basketball.
You can register online at
www.hoopslinkinc.org. For
more information or ques-
tions, contact Jeffrey Ander-
son at
andersonj@citrus.kl 2.fl.us or
918-315-0208.
Summer golf
program nears
The Junior Golf Summer
Program at Seven Rivers
Country Club will begin on
Wednesday, May 28.
Junior "Kamps for Kids"
programs will be offered for
kids ages 8 to 12 on the fol-
lowing dates: May 28-30,
June 4-6 and July 9-11 from 9
to 11 a.m.
Pee Wee classes will be of-
fered on Saturday mornings
for ages 5 to 7 beginning May
31.
Information sheets and en-
rollment forms are available at
the Seven Rivers Golf Shop.
Contact Mary Slinkard at 352-
302-7965 or email
mary@maryslinkard.com if
you have any questions.
Walk, Bike, Hike,
Kayak for Fitness
The Nature Coast Ram-
blers Inc. is a nonprofit social
and recreational club of
friendly people of all ages
who enjoy self-paced hiking
or walking, biking and kayak-
ing activities in the Citrus
County area.
Walking or hiking, biking or
kayaking with the club pro-
motes fitness. Its goal is to
provide fun events that can
challenge people to keep ac-
tive.
Outings are started in differ-
ent locations to explore the
many beautiful trails, parks,
forests and waterways in the


area. Bicycle outings are gen-
erally the second Friday each
month, hiking or walking is
generally the third Saturday of
each month and kayaking is
usually the last Tuesday of
each month.
All events are free for mem-
bers. Become a member of
Nature Coast Ramblers for
$10 (or $15 per family) per
calendar year. Guests/visitors
are always welcome at no
charge.
Members are informed of
upcoming club activities by
email and through postings on
the website and Facebook.
Contact Marie Nail at 352
382-2525 or
marie428@earthlink.net.
Citrus Springs
Horseshoe Club
Results for May 10:
Won all three games -
Sam Gonzalez, Joe Warbur-
ton, Norm Olewnik
High Series John Clark
235, Mike Trudel 220, Sam
Gonzalez 215, Joe Warburton
213
High Game Stan Cham-
pion 85, John Clark 81 & 81,
Joe Warburton 80
Scores are based on a
handicap system so all skill
levels can compete.
The Club provides the
horseshoes. Stop by on any
Tuesday or Saturday morning
at 9 a.m. at the old Commu-
nity Center on Route 39 in
Citrus Springs. Call Joe War-
burton at 352-489-7537 for in-
formation about the Club.
Joint soccer
tryouts offered
The Nature Coast and Cit-
rus United Soccer Clubs are
pleased to announce a new
cooperation between the two
clubs for the betterment of
soccer in Citrus County.
For the first time, joint try-
outs will be held between the


two clubs for the 2014-15
competitive soccer season,
with the goal of working to-
gether to create stronger
teams than has been possible
in the past.
Please note that this is a
cooperative effort between
the two clubs, and not a
merger. Each club will con-
tinue to field its own teams,
but the duplication of teams
with the same age and gen-
der of players will be mini-
mized. The end result will be
a higher level of play on each
team than Citrus County has
seen in the past.
In order to provide equal
access to each team for all of
our county's soccer players,
tryouts and practices will be
held at Citrus County's three
soccer facilities Central Cit-
rus in Holder, HARP field in
Homosassa, and Holden Park
in Inverness on a rotating
basis. The schedule for try-
outs for the 2014-15 season
is as follows:
Boys
May 27, 5:30-8 p.m. at
HARP
May 28, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Holden
May 29, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Central Campus
May 30, 5:30-8 p.m. at
HARP
May 31,10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
at Holden
June 2, 5:30-8 p.m. at Cen-
tral Campus
Girls
May 27, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Central Campus
May 28, 5:30-8 p.m. at
HARP
May 29, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Holden
May 30, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Central Campus
May 31, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
at HARP
June 2, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Holden


Parkview Lanes BOWLING


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 B5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Oosthuizen, Todd share Nelson lead after 3 rounds


Associated Press

IRVING, Texas Louis
Oosthuizen is still looking
for a remedy for his recur-
ring back issues.
A victory at the Byron
Nelson Championship
would sure make him feel
much better
"The last year and a half
was really frustrating," he
said.
Oosthuizen birdied four
of the last five holes for a
6-under 64 on Saturday
and a share of the third-
round lead with Brendon
Todd. The 2010 British
Open champion had the
low round of the day after
recovering from bogeys on
two of the first four holes.
"I made a nice birdie on
5, and just really made
some good putts," Oost-
huizen said. "Every oppor-
tunity I had for birdie I
actually made. My eye was
good today, and I hit a lot
of them really close."
Todd who made 12 con-
secutive pars before hol-
ing a 4-foot birdie at No. 18
for a 68 to match Oost-
huizen at 10-under 200.
On the morning of the
Nelson's final round last
year, Oosthuizen withdrew
because of a neck issue.
He missed extended time
last season, and is still
bothered by the back even
though he won at home in
South Africa in January
Mike Weir, James Hahn
and Gary Woodland were a
stroke back.
"That's what I've been
working toward the last
few years, to get myself
back here in this position,
and looking forward to the
challenge," said Weir, the
44-year-old left-hander
Weir, the 2003 Masters
champion who hasn't a
top-25 finish since 2010
when the Canadian had an
elbow injury, shot 67 while
missing 4-foot putts on
Nos. 15 and 16. Hahn's 65
included five birdies in a
row on the back nine, and
Woodland shot 66 with a
double bogey at No. 7.
Morgan Hoffmann twice
fell out of the lead after
hitting drives left into the
water and making double
bogey, at Nos. 11 and 18.
He finished with a 68 and
was tied for sixth at 8
under with three-time
major champion Padraig
Harrington, Marc Leish-
man and Graham DeLaet.
Todd's only bogey was at
the 420-yard fourth hole,
when his approach went
over the green and he two-
putted from 81/2 feet. But
that was sandwiched by
long birdies.
After beginning the day
with a two-stroke lead,
Todd had to make a 4-foot
birdie on No. 18 to regain
a share of the lead.
"I wanted to get one
more birdie under my belt
so I could be that much
closer to shooting the
score I need to win Sun-
day," Todd said.
Oosthuizen was 2 under
and well off the pace after
his bogey at No. 4, when he
hit his second and third
shots from the rough and
then was in a greenside
bunker The South African
blasted to about 10 feet
and had to make that putt
for bogey, then made three
birdies in a row.
He made an 8-foot birdie
putt at the par-3 fifth, and


Associated Press
Brendon Todd putts on the 17th green Saturday during the third round of the Byron Nelson Championship in Irving, Texas.


followed that with an ap-
proach to 6 feet at No. 6
and a two-putt from 58 feet
at the par-5 seventh. There
was another string of three
consecutive birdies at Nos.
14-16 before a closing 41/2-
footer at No. 18.
"It's always nice finish-
ing a round on a high,"
Oosthuizen said. "You sort
of feed off that the next
day, and that keeps you
going."
Hoffmann was at 10
under and alone in the
lead when he hit his drive
into the water to the left at
the 320-yard llth hole,
with Weir was just ahead
on the green.
Weir sank a 2-footer for
his fourth consecutive
birdie to get to 10 under
Hoffmann then hit another
drive after his penalty and
wound up with a double
bogey But Weir missed
putts from about 5 feet on
both Nos. 15 and 16, the
latter lipping the cup.
Hoffmann was again 10
under after birdies at Nos.
15-16, but hit his drive at
No. 18 into the water and
then hit twice out of the
same greenside bunker
Scott Scheffler, a 17-
year-old top junior from
Dallas playing on a spon-
sor exemption, made a
hole-in-one using a 5-iron
on the 218-yard second
hole. He is the fourth ama-
teur since 1983 with an ace
in a PGA Tour event. That
was part of his 69 that also
included five bogeys and
four birdies to get to 2
under for the tournament.
Dallas native Jordan
Spieth, now 20 and ranked
eighth in the world, made
the Nelson cut as an ama-
teur at ages 16 and 17. Spi-
eth shot 73 on Saturday
and was even par overall.


Salas leads by Perry passes Inman Davidson shares
three looking for at Shoal Creek lead at BMW Pro-Am
wI - _- _-


first tour victory
WILLIAMSBURG, Va.-
Lizette Salas moved into posi-
tion for her first LPGATour
victory, playing 25 holes in 6-
under par to take a three-
stroke lead in the Kingsmill
Championship.
The 24-year-old former
Southern California player
shot a 3-under 68 in the com-
pletion of the rain-delayed
second round and birdied
three of the last five holes in
the afternoon for a season-
best 65. She had a 13-under
200 total on Kingsmill Resort's
River Course.
South Korea's Hee Young
Park, the second-round
leader, was second. She bo-
geyed No. 18 for a 69.
Second-ranked Stacy
Lewis and No. 3 Lydia Ko
were five strokes back along
with Katherine Kirk.


BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Kenny
Perry shot a 3-under 69 on
Saturday at Shoal Creek to
take a one-stroke lead over
John Inman after the third
round of the Regions Tradition.
Perry is seeking his third
Champions Tour major title
after winning the Senior Play-
ers Championship and U.S.
Senior Open in consecutive
tour starts last year.
Perry had a 7-under 209
total. He had four birdies and
bogeyed No. 16.
Inman, a two-time PGA
Tour winner, shot a 66 after
two even-par rounds. He had
seven birdies before his first
slip-up, a bogey on No. 16.
Steve Elkington (71), second-
round leader Mark Calcavec-
chia (74), Jay Haas (73), John
Cook (71), Jeff Maggert (69),
Olin Browne (72) and Tom
Pernice Jr. (70) were 4 under.


GREER, S.C. Matt
Davidson shot a 5-under 67
for a share of the third-round
lead with Blayne Barber and
Ryan Blaum in the Web.com
Tour's BMW Charity Pro-Am.
Davidson had seven birdies
and two bogeys at The Reserve
at Lake Keowee to match
Barber and Blaum at 14-
under201.
Pieters widens lead
at Spanish Open
GIRONA, Spain Belgium's
Thomas Pieters shot a 1-under
71 to extend his Spanish Open
lead to two strokes over 50-
year-old Miguel Angel Jimenez.
Pieters had 7-under 209
total on PGA Catalunya Re-
sort's Stadium Course.
Jimenez shot 69. He fin-
ished fourth in the Masters
and won the Greater Gwinnett
Championship.


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GOLF


11


Byron Nelson
par scores
Saturday at TPC Four Seasons Resort,
Irving, Texas
Purse: $6.9 million, Yardage: 7,166, Par:
70, (a-amateur), Third Round:
Louis Oosthuizen 68-68-64-200-10
Brendon Todd 68-64-68 -200-10
James Hahn 71-65-65- 201 -9
Gary Woodland 68-67-66 -201 -9
Mike Weir 68-66-67 -201 -9
Padraig Harrington 68-68-66- 202 -8
Marc Leishman 66-68-68 -202 -8
Graham DeLaet 68-66-68 202 -8
Morgan Hoffmann 68-66-68-202 -8
Greg Chalmers 71-67-65 -203 -7
Boo Weekley 67-68-68 -203 -7
Charles Howell III 68-66-69-203 -7
John Huh 67-71-66 -204 -6
Matt Kuchar 69-67-68 -204 -6
Aaron Baddeley 68-70-67 -205 -5
Vijay Singh 69-68-68 -205 -5
Martin Kaymer 67-67-71 205 -5
Dustin Johnson 69-69-68 -206 -4
Scott Gardiner 70-69-67 -206 -4
Lee Williams 67-71-68 -206 -4
Keegan Bradley 70-68-68 -206 -4
Robert Garrigus 74-64-68 -206 -4
Andres Romero 71-66-69 -206 -4
Charlie Wi 73-67-66 -206 -4
Retief Goosen 70-65-71 -206 -4
Ryan Palmer 67-68-71 206 -4
Jimmy Walker 71-68-68 -207 -3
Brice Garnett 69-70-68 -207 -3
Billy Hurley III 70-69-68 -207 -3
Charl Schwartzel 73-67-67 -207 -3
Peter Hanson 65-73-69 -207 -3
Shawn Stefani 74-66-67 -207 -3
Carl Pettersson 69-71-67 -207 -3
Charlie Beljan 72-65-70 -207 -3
Tyrone V. Aswegen 67-68-72- 207 -3
James Driscoll 70-71-66 -207 -3
PaulCasey 71-63-73 -207 -3
Jason Allred 68-70-70 -208 -2
a-Scottie Scheffler 71-68-69- 208 -2
Ricky Barnes 72-68-68 -208 -2
Josh Teater 71-69-68 -208 -2
Angel Cabrera 73-67-68 -208 -2
John Senden 70-70-68 -208 -2
Tim Wilkinson 66-71-71 -208 -2
Tim Herron 68-66-74 -208 -2
Brendon de Jonge 73-68-67- 208 -2
Kris Blanks 70-69-70 -209 -1
Kevin Kisner 69-70-70 -209 -1
Rory Sabbatini 70-68-71 209 -1
Jason Dufner 70-70-69 -209 -1
J.J. Henry 70-71-68 -209 -1
Steve Marino 70-69-71 -210 E
Patrick Cantlay 70-69-71 -210 E
Chris Thompson 69-69-72-210 E
Alex Prugh 67-71-72- 210 E
Brian Gay 71-67-72- 210 E
Jordan Spieth 70-67-73- 210 E
Martin Flores 70-71-69- 210 E
Ken Duke 70-69-72 -211 +1
David Toms 71-68-72 -211 +1
Ben Crane 68-70-73 -211 +1
Jim Renner 69-71-71 -211 +1
Jamie Lovemark 73-67-71- 211 +1
Michael Putnam 70-70-71- 211 +1
Rod Pampling 68-72-71- 211 +1
Brian Davis 70-71-70- 211 +1
RobertAllenby 72-69-70- 211 +1
Chad Campbell 69-72-70- 211 +1
Jim Herman 70-68-74 -212 +2
Luke Guthrie 69-72-71 -212 +2
Brad Fritsch 72-69-71 -212 +2
Brian Harman 72-69-71 -212 +2
Sean O'Hair 69-72-71 -212 +2
Bryce Molder 71-70-71 -212 +2
Made cut did not finish
Daniel Chopra 70-68-75- 213 +3
Kevin Foley 70-71-72 -213 +3
Ryo Ishikawa 73-68-72 -213 +3
Alex Cejka 67-70-77 -214 +4
Will Wilcox 72-68-74 -214 +4
Jhonattan Vegas 70-71-73 -214 +4
MarkAnderson 73-68-74-215 +5
Johnson Wagner 73-68-74 -215 +5
Eric Axley 68-73-74 -215 +5
Kyle Stanley 74-66-76 -216 +6










COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



The comings and goings in Citrus County


here have been lots
of comings and go-
ings in Citrus County
over the last week.
Dave Burnell was offi-
cially named the new city
manager of Crystal River by
the council. Everyone
wishes him well and hopes
he has as much success as
retiring manager Andy
Houston has had.
Burnell was the city plan-
ner and was promoted to


Crystal River's top job. We
at the Chronicle criticized
the council for not posting
the job and interviewing in-
terested candidates in-
cluding Burnell. Our
editorial wasn't a criticism
of Burnell, it was a criticism
of the council for not taking
the time to consider all
options.
Who knows? Rudy Giu-
liani or Jeb Bush might
have recently retired to


Crystal River and shown an
interest in the job. Dave
may have still been the
choice and that would
have been fine. But follow-
ing the process of posting
the job and interviewing
candidates always sheds
more light on qualifications
and expectations.
For the record, Andy
Houston is enjoying life as
he nears retirement. He
pointed out the other day


that his average golf drive
has now increased from 170
yards to an amazing 177
yards. Each one is right
down the middle of the
fairway
The City of Inverness
has a different approach to
selecting a city manager
Longtime city manager
Frank DiGiovanni has iden-
tified his assistant Eric
Williams as the city man-
ager in training. The city re-


cruited Williams from
county government and he
is now learning the leader-
ship ropes. The training pe-
riod also gives the council
- and citizens the op-
portunity to learn about
Williams and see if they like
his style and ability before
he officially gets the job.
For the record, DiGio-
vanni isn't going anywhere.


Florida Society of News Editors
Barbara Petersen is a national expert on open-government issues. She's been president of the First Amendment Foundation since 1995, when it
was started by a group of media organizations and she became its sole employee.




FIVE QUESTIONS FOR




BARBARA PETERSEN


Open government expert weighs in on 2014 Legislative session


MARGIE MENZEL
The News Service of Florida
TALLAHASSEE
Barbara Petersen is a national ex-
pert on open-government issues.
She's been president of the First
Amendment Foundation since
1995, when it was started by a
group of media organizations and she be-
came its sole employee. The foundation pro-
motes the public's constitutional right to
oversee its government through the state's
government-in-the-sunshine and public-
records laws. Before taking the job, Petersen
had been a staff attorney for the Legislature's
Joint Committee on Information Technology
Resources.
Petersen also sits on the boards of the
Florida Center for Investigative Reporting
and the National Freedom of Information


Coalition. She served as chair of Florida's
Commission on Open Government Reform,
and in 2013, Florida Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, appointed her to the User
Experience Task Force, which reviewed the
state's transparency websites and made rec-
ommendations for improvement.
Petersen is a graduate of the University of
Missouri-Columbia and the Florida State
University College of Law She is married to
National Book Award-winning writer Bob
Shacochis.
(Disclosure: The News Service of Florida
is a member of the First Amendment Foun-
dation.)
The News Service of Florida has five ques-
tions for Barbara Petersen:
Q: You've called the 2014 legislative session
a "very frustrating" one for government in the
sunshine. Why?
PETERSEN: I have to say, it was a bad ses-


sion for public records. We saw a record num-
ber of new exemptions to the public-record
law and the open-meetings law pass this year
- best count right now is 22 new exemptions
passed and 10 existing exemptions re-en-
acted. Last year, in comparison, only 12 new
exemptions were created. The highest num-
ber we've had in the past was 15, and that was
in the five special sessions and one regular
session following 9/11.
I don't know why Most of them were not
terrible. But as former (state) Sen. Dan Gel-
ber used to warn people about, it's death by a
thousand paper cuts. Every exemption they
create is an exception to the Constitution. I
have no clue why we have so many There
weren't a lot of terrible ones that passed. I'm
worried about an exemption for family-trust
companies (SB 1320) that virtually cloaks


PageC4


Your vote is your voice don't silence yourself


s the 2014 election season
starts up, voter turnout is
expected to be low. The
percentage of eligible voter
turnout for midterm elections is
about 40 percent, somewhat
lower than turnout in presiden-
tial elections.
Yet, the midterm elections
have proven to be very impor-
tant in the role they play in
changing American politics.
They can dramatically change
the makeup of the Congress and


have an impact on the state.
This year voters will be decid-
ing who will be in the governor's
office, in our local state repre-
sentative's office and in local po-
sitions choosing County
Commissioners for District 2
and 4, and school board mem-
bers, among other offices.
With this in mind, the League
of Women Voters wants every-
one who has the right to vote to
know how to use it. We want to
reach out to each one and re-


mind them that they should not
take this right for granted. All we
can do is keep voters informed
and aware.
The League of Women Voters
is working with the Citrus
County Elections Board to help
all voters register or change their
registration if needed due to a
change of address, a name change,
your signature changed, or to
change your party designation.
As with any election, the bal-
lot contains information that


may need more clarity; the
League will work to provide a
nonpartisan review of the ballot
amendments and candidates.
What does the League do?
We educate citizens about is-
sues, legislation and candidates.
We encourage individual par-
ticipation in the political process.
We inform through in-depth,
objective study
We monitor local, state and
national government bodies and
activities.


We register voters.
We sponsor candidate debates
and public issue forums.
This year will continue to be
an active and eventful one; with
the interim election in Novem-
ber we are gearing up to provide
information and educational
materials to voters. A number
of our members are trained to
be League of Women Voters
registrars.
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Page C3





0Page C2- SUNDAY, MAY 18,2014



PINION


"Those who live by electronics die by electronics. Sic semper tyrannis."
Kurt Vonnegut, "Player Piano," 1952


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
a Mike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
S Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista .................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CRITICAL CONCERN





In hospital




boards'




final choice,




a final test


he final decision on the
future of Citrus Memo-
rial hospital is at hand.
It's important that the
leaders involved in making
this final choice keep their
heads clear of all of the pe-
ripheral noise and move
forward.
HCA, the nation's largest
for-profit hospital chain, is in
the final stages of due dili-
gence as it moves ahead with
a bid to lease Citrus Memo-
rial hospital.
CMH has been a public hos-
pital based in In-
verness for the T
past 50 years and THE 1
has done a A final de
tremendous job of Citrus N
meeting the
health needs of OUR 01
the community.
But over the past Move f
five years, a gov-
ernance dispute between the
two boards that share re-
sponsibility for the hospital
has put the institution on the
critical care list.
More than $12 million in
legal fees have been wasted
as the two boards fought over
the future operation of the
hospital. In the end, both
boards agreed that the only
viable financial option was to
lease the public hospital to a
for-profit hospital company
After a number of hospital
corporations made bids, the
two governing boards agreed
on HCA.
While the lawyers for both
sides argue over the final de-
tails of the agreement, it is a
given that the final contract
price offered by HCA will be
less than what was originally
discussed.
The hospital is in a more
distressed position than orig-
inally thought.
While the emotional posi-
tion of many is to retain the
hospital as a public facility,
the facts get in the way
The county hospital is in a
perilous financial position
and default can only be
avoided by moving forward
with a lease agreement.
For the health consumer,
taxpayer and hospital work-
ers, there is much to gain.
Through legislation
pushed by Sen. Charlie Dean,
the hospital governing board
has given up its right to levy a
local property tax. Most
everyone likes lower taxes.
The new operator of the
hospital will pay property
taxes, unlike the public hos-
pital, and that will help re-
duce the total burden on
taxpayers.
Employees will see a re-
turn to a more normal and
less stressful workplace after
years of turmoil. Pay in-
creases might even be in the
future.
The up-front funds from


Is
C
Je(


IP
fol
'1.

F
C


the lease will help the hospi-
tal pay its outstanding bonds
and avoid default.
The financial stability of
HCA will help Citrus Memo-
rial improve the quality of the
equipment and the facility
Tens of millions of new capi-
tal improvement dollars will
be infused into the hospital.
That investment will result in
better health care.
The hospital will be op-
erated in a more efficient
manner. Even though this
change will be disruptive to
physicians and
cSUE: some employees,
UE HCA will bring
cision on new processes
memorial. and procedures
to town that will
'INION: reduce overall
medical cost. And
reward. most all con-
sumers agree that
lower health care costs are a
good thing.
The buying power of a
large health care corporation
is much greater than a stand
alone hospital could ever
realize.
HCA's up-front lease pay-
ment will cover the hospital's
outstanding employee pen-
sion debt.
The proceeds from the
sale will go to a new founda-
tion that will use those pro-
ceeds to support health care
services in Citrus County
There are still some lead-
ers who would like to see the
lease proposal fail, but the
options left on the table are
very limited. The two govern-
ing boards have battled them-
selves into a stalemate where
their options are extremely
limited.
Some physicians and con-
tract providers are now dis-
tressed to learn that HCA is
considering lower cost solu-
tions. But it is the inability to
achieve a profitable financial
position that has put the hos-
pital in this position. New
strategies are going to be
needed to achieve different
results.
Some issues only signifi-
cant to the lawyers remain to
be resolved. The governing
board and foundation board
members should not permit
those procedural arguments
to get in the way of doing
what's right for the future of
the county hospital.
It has been that same legal
maneuvering that has al-
ready cost taxpayers and
health care consumers
$12 million in legal fees.
If a compromise was
found five years ago, this
critical step could have been
avoided. But that ship has
sailed.
It's now time for these same
board members to make the
final tough decision and put
this issue to rest.


A Democratic dilemma


WASHINGTON
en days before he died,
John E Kennedy met in
the White House for sev-
eral hours with his political ad-
visers. The 1964 campaign was
taking shape Barry Goldwa-
ter and Nelson Rockefeller
were the leading Republican ri-
vals and the president was
worrying about what -
his party had to offer
to average voters.
"(W)hat is it that
we can (do to) make .
them decide that-.
they want to vote for
us, Democrats and 0
Kennedy?" the pres-
ident asked. "We
hope we have to sell David S
them prosperity, but
for the average guy OTH
the prosperity is nil. VOl
He's not unprosper-
ous, but he's not very prosperous
... And the people who really
are well-off hate our guts..."
That very conversation could
be held in Barack Obama's
White House. He's not running
for re-election, but his Democ-
rats face the voters in Novem-
ber's midterm congressional
elections, and then his political
heirs do so again in the presi-
dential election two years
hence. And now, as on Nov 12,
1963, when Kennedy thought
out loud in front of his advisers,
the average guy is not very pros-
perous and the people who re-
ally are well-off hate the
Democrats' guts.
The Democrats do have some
advantages. Three of the four
biggest states have growing His-
panic populations and the
fourth, New York, seems per-
manently out of reach for the
GOP Mitt Romney took only a
quarter of the Hispanic vote in
2012 and John McCain won only
a third four years earlier
But that is not to say the De-
mocrats have smooth sailing
ahead. They face several sub-
stantial problems in 2016:
U The solidification of the
Solid South.
The Republicans can count
on the support of white voters
who are as loyal to the GOP as
black voters are to the Democ-
rats. Though Obama will not be
on the ballot in 2016, the De-
mocrats speak a language white
Southerners do not embrace.
Still, there are quiet but
growing hopes among Democ-
rats that they may eventually
return to power in Texas, which
has voted Republican in the
last nine presidential elections
and in 10 of the 11 elections
since 1972. Census figures show
the Hispanic portion of the pop-


Fh
&
I
I
Fl
I


ulation of Texas is more than
double the national rate -
more than a third of Texans do
not speak English at home -
and whites now constitute less
than half the state's population.
In 2012, 70 percent of Hispanics
in Texas voted for Obama.
Yet the Democrats harbor no
such bright hopes in Oklahoma
(67 percent for Rom-
ney), Alabama and
Arkansas (61 percent
each), Louisiana (58
Sl percent), Mississippi
9 (56 percent) and
^. even in a Southern-
oriented state that
broke away from the
h Confederacy a cen-
iribman tury and a half ago,
West Virginia (62
IER percent). Those
DES states account for 41
-- _electoral votes,
blunting the potential drift of
Texas' 38 electoral votes from
the Republican column.
Resentment over the state
of the economy and lingering
worries about Obamacare.
Several studies indicate that
the recovery from the Great Re-
cession has been less robust
than that of any post-war recov-
ery, producing a job market
more forbidding than that of
previous recessions.
That notion was underscored
by Fed Chair Janet Yellen, who
in a speech this spring ac-
knowledged, "the recovery still
feels like a recession to many
Americans, and it also looks
that way in some economic sta-
tistics." She noted national un-
employment is still higher
than it ever got during the 2001
recession.
This is a particular burden to
blacks, who won't have as great
an incentive to vote in 2016 as
they did when Obama ran in
2008 and 2012, and to younger
voters, who may not be as mobi-
lized for the 2016 Democratic
nominee as they were for
Obama in 2008. These two
groups, Yellen said, "are facing
a job market today that is nearly
as tough as it was during the
two downturns that preceded
the Great Recession."
At the same time, the public
remains skeptical of Oba-
macare, and the Republicans
remain convinced it can be an
important issue in both this
year's midterm congressional
elections and in the 2016 presi-
dential election.
U The Kennedy worry, ap-
plied to 2016: What can the De-
mocrats do to make Americans
vote for them, given the tepid
economy?
A century ago, it was not un-


LETTER to the


Sales tax bump
the best route
In 1982 my road was paved
by the county utilizing the
MSBU approach. This was
done under an initiative pro-
posed by then County Commis-
sioner John T Barnes, the best
county commissioner Citrus
County ever had. The cost to
me was $500, which was signif-
icant at the time. I can only as-
sume that the fee would be
much higher now
Unfortunately at the time
the county road department
was supervised by a fellow
who apparently knew nothing
about road construction and
his program was to pave the
roads with lime rock chips and
oil. I had to tell John that
everyone was very happy to
see the roads paved; however,
they would be very unhappy in
two years when the roads fell
apart from traffic on a soft
rock. They needed to get gran-
ite chips from Georgia if they
were to use oil and stone as a
paving surface. Eventually
they acquired hard rock chips
from Georgia and surfaced the
roads with that until they even-
tually went to surfacing the
roads with asphalt.
I see that the county commis-
sioners are also suggesting a dif-
ferent approach to the problem
of road maintenance and con-
struction, that being a 1 percent
sales tax. Also, I note that this
approach would allow visiting
tourists to pay for about 40 per-
cent of the cost of supporting
our road maintenance issues.
I am not a great supporter of


OPINIONS INVITED
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Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
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not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
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sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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taxes, but I can see a definite
advantage in going the 1 percent
sales tax approach since it would
spread out the costs to all and I
am sure would be a much smaller
financial burden on the property
owner than the MSBU approach.
However, I have an outlandish
thought that I am sure no one
in the government sector has
considered. If the sales tax would
effectively cover $11.6 million
of the estimated cost of the
road projects and the present
gas tax generates $3 million to-


usual for parties to hold the
presidency more than two con-
secutive terms; the Republi-
cans did it for three between
1921 and 1933 and for four from
1897 to 1913, and the Democrats
for five between 1933 and 1953.
Since then, only once (from
1981 to 1993, through Ronald
Reagan's two terms followed by
George H.W Bush's single term)
has a party exceeded two terms.
The challenge former Secre-
tary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton or any other Democrat
faces in the next presidential
election is that the party nomi-
nee will be portrayed as offer-
ing a reprise of the two Obama
terms.
Obama doesn't have public
support that remotely ap-
proaches that of Theodore Roo-
sevelt in 1908, Reagan in 1988
or even of Calvin Coolidge in
1928. Indeed, Gov. Al Smith of
New York, the Democrats' 1928
nominee and an unlikely
Coolidge admirer, said the 30th
president was "distinguished
for character more than for
heroic achievement"
By contrast, Obama's disap-
proval ratings have exceeded
his approval ratings for the past
49 weeks. That could turn
around, but hardly anyone re-
gards Obama as a political asset
at this point in the political
cycle. This is attributable not
only to concerns about the
economy, but also to worries
that the president seems pow-
erless in the face of the muscu-
lar foreign policy of Vladimir
Putin's Russia.
The Democrats have another
problem: If Clinton doesn't run,
the party has a weak bench, led
by Vice President Joseph R.
Biden Jr and followed by a
handful of relative unknowns.
Then again, Gov Jimmy Carter
and Sen. Barack Obama, not ex-
actly household names, moved
into the White House.
But the difficulty a Democrat
faces succeeding Obama is per-
haps the party's most difficult
hurdle, and also the most sur-
prising. Many analysts believed
that 2008 signaled a generation-
long Democratic breakthrough.
That seems less plausible today
In the long run, demography
suggests the Republicans are in
trouble. In the short run, the is-
sues suggest the Democrats
may be in trouble.
--In--
David M. Shribman is
executive editor of the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
He can be contacted at
dshribman@post-gazette. corn
or via 7Twvitter @ShribmanPG.


Editor
ward this endeavor, there is a
surplus of about $1.5 million
generated. So let's do some-
thing government never seems
to be able to do: Reduce one of
the taxes, that being the county
gas tax.
In 2005, the county gas tax was
increased from 6 cents per gallon
to 12 cents per gallon. So let's
reduce the gas tax back to 6 cents
per gallon and impose the
1 percent sales tax to be used
and dedicated only to the county
road programs. This would have
a major positive impact on the
local businesses and to the res-
idents purchasing fuel locally
The end effect is that with
the sales tax income of $11.6
million and the gas tax income
of $1.5 million would pay for
the estimated cost of $13 million
per year to maintain the roads
and 40 percent of these road
project costs would be absorbed
by the tourist industry which
enjoys the use of our roads.
County commissioners, let's
think out of the box for a
change and generate a resolu-
tion that will make all of us
grateful that we have possibly
elected a thoughtful Citrus
County Commission. The
MSBU approach would be a
very difficult approach for
many property owners when
you consider that about 40 per-
cent of the local population are
seniors and many are on very
limited incomes. A 1 percent
sales tax increase would be
much more manageable for the
low-income sector
Dan Groner
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Maybe one day it will show up on 'Antiques Roadshow'


here is an altogether
different rulebook
for when you grow
old, especially the chapters
concerning being retired.
Oh, I stay busy
Sometimes it seems as
though I'm even busier than
I was while I was still draw-
ing a paycheck. But nowa-
days, my list of things to do
no longer includes studying
new banking laws and reg-
ulations or preparing a vol-
ume of management reports
at the end of each month.
Nope.
My days are now occu-
pied with writing, painting
just a little bit keeping track
of friends on Facebook,


taking an afternoon nap
and watching TV- prima-
rily the offerings of PBS.
Speaking of PBS, Cheryl
and I both like very many
of the things they offer: old
musical events, a variety of
dramas and, of course, as
is required at our age, "An-
tiques Roadshow" Among
other things, the "Road-
show" does a segment that
evaluates "folk art."
Maybe 300 years from
now, some of my stuff might
be worth at least $20.
Staying on the subject,
one of the things I like is
the analysis of sewing sam-
plers created centuries
ago by young ladies trying


to attract a husband by found what I was looking
demonstrating their talents for, but I also stumbled
with a needle. The artistic upon a sewing sampler It
detail created wasn't the kind
in some of of work to grab
these items is "and hold a
not only lovely, young man's
it is amazing, heart, but it
and evidently, was one that
it was at least brought tears
thought to be of love and re-
effective in the membrance to
husband-catch- I the eyes of an
ing arena. Fred Brannen old man.
A few days Fe B rnE On a scrap of
ago, while look- A SLICE denim, with
ing for a partic- OF LIFE rough stitches
ular document I in pink thread
found myself going through sewn by the hand of an 8-
things in one of my special year-old, was the simple
storage boxes. I eventually message, "I Love You,


Daddy Becky"
I dried my eyes and was
thankful.
Thankful not only to have
once more seen this expres-
sion of the truest of loves,
but also that Becky was not
dependent on her sewing
skills to land a husband!
She married the young
man of her dreams. But, if
that had not worked out so
perfectly, she also had a
backup plan. Unlike her
father, who was able to
carve a career in the busi-
ness of banking with on-
the-job training, she did it
by first earning a degree in
business with an emphasis
on finance.


Beckyhas made me proud
with her many accomplish-
ments, but never more so
than each time I see her
precious sewing sampler
Who knows? Maybe one
day it will make its way to
"Antiques Roadshow!"


FredBrannen, an
Inverness resident,
has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and
is the author of the
recently published novel,
'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay." Fred
maybe contacted at
fbrannenjr@gmail.com or
via brannenbooksllc. com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page Cl

He has been a leader in the
city since before the first Bush
presidency, and rumors persist
that he was in the welcoming
committee when Eleanor Roo-
sevelt visited the city during
her husband's tenure in the
White House.
Leaving the city of Inver-
ness recently was Tom Dick, the
former Citrus County adminis-
trator who was hired by the city
after the county commission
unceremoniously fired him one
day He was terminated by the
county because someone al-
legedly put decaf coffee in the
commission break room.
Following that misguided de-
cision, the decaffeinated county
commission employed a new
administrator whose one ac-
complishment in office was that
she had the shortest term of
service of anyone who ever
held the job.
The commission eventually
had to pay Dick because of a
wrongful termination com-
plaint.
Tom Dick served the county
and the city well for many
decades and deserves our ap-
preciation.
Assistant county adminis-
trator Cathy Pearson an-
nounced this week that she is
resigning to take the same job
with Pasco County government.
Ms. Pearson has worked in
county government for decades
and came up through the com-
munity service departments.
She has been the right-hand
woman to county administrator
Brad Thorpe for many years.
While she has not said so
publicly, she is another victim
of County Commissioner Scott
Adams and his aggressive be-
havior toward staff.
The freshman county com-
missioner believes it shows
leadership when he attacks and
belittles county staff. The real
impact of the abuse is that com-
petent staffers go looking for
jobs in other places.
If you have any doubt, watch
last Tuesday's meeting on TV or
the county's website and look at
how the commissioner treated
the county engineer
County Commissioner Re-
becca Bays also joined the list of
people making an exit this week
when she announced she would
not seek re-election. Ms. Bays is
just finishing her first term on
the commission and has been
an energetic leader on trans-
portation and tourism issues.
She has been a business
owner for years and does not
have the patience to deal with
the very slow process of county
government. She is in line to
take over leadership of the Cit-
rus County Chamber of Com-
merce in 2015, so she will still
be a very public person.
There is an outside chance
she might run the for the state
senate seat now held by Sen.
Charlie Dean of Inverness.
Dean term-limits out in 2016.
On the very local front, Fri-
day was the last day of work for
Ken Melton, a senior editor at
the Chronicle who has been
with us for 22 years. Ken has
been in the business for 40
years and has performed many
jobs at the Chronicle including
a stint as the top editor at the
daily newspaper and the top
editor at one of our sister news-
papers, the Chiefland Citizen in
Levy County
His most recent responsibili-
ties included serving as the top
editor for all of our community
newspapers in Citrus County
and as editor of all special sec-
tions. Ken led the team that
produces such sections as Dis-
cover, Best of the Best and the
Hurricane Guide.
I will miss his guidance and
steady professionalism.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@
chronicleonline, com.


Originally published in the Citrus
County Chronicle. Information for
Back in Time is supplied by the
Citrus County Historical Society.
In 1939...
With a view toward reach-
ing a Sunday school at-
tendance of 100 or more, the
Baptist church last week ob-
served "Sunday School Visita-
tion Week." The drive was
successful in bringing out 98
people to Sunday school last
Sunday, or only two less than
its goal of 100. The pastor, Rev
E.C. Tyner, urges his congrega-
tion to put forth every effort to
get out the full attendance goal
of 100 for next Sunday

One Inverness business man
has already identified
himself with the approaching
town beautification campaign.
He is Paul Balasch, operator of
the Inverness Cleaning & Tai-
loring shop. Mr Balasch has
erected along the front of his
building a bright new awning
which serves both as an attrac-
tive ornament for that portion
of the street and as a means of
shading the interior of the
building from the morning sun.

In 1954...
N ew officers of the Her-
nando Lions Club was for-
mally installed at a ceremony
held at Hickory Lodge, Her-
nando, Tuesday night of last
week. Those included into of-
fice were Norvell C. Bryant,


Special to the Chronicle
It's believed this was a gathering of the United Confederate Veterans when this photo was made in
the early 1900s. A partial identification: Top row, from left: Mrs. George Dame, Inverness; W.H.H. Wit-
ten, Inverness; the Rev. Eugene Higgins, Floral City; J.C. Priest, Stage Pond; R. Waller, Istachatta;
George W. Butler, editor of the "Chronicle," Inverness; Charles Peterson, Floral City; Obediah E. Ed-
wards, Red Level and J.J. Brown, Ozello. Center row: Mrs. Louis Thompson; E.Y. Smith, Micanopy;
Mercy, Floral City; Jacob T. Landrum, Stage Pond; Eugene Zimmerman, Floral City; Chambers Graham,
Inverness and Alfred Thompkins, Inverness. Bottow row: Mrs. George J. Boswell and George Priest.


president; William T Kant vice
president; Frank Leslie, sec-
ond vice president; Griffin Mc-
Clain, third vice president;
Eugene Doss, secretary; D.L.
Savary, treasurer, and Miley
Baker, lion tamer


The Hyacinth Control Divi-
sion of the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission is work-
ing the waters of Citrus County
nowundercontrlmlto keep lhe spring
regrowth down, and to finish
sinking the hyacinths left on


Letter to THE EDITOR


Give teens means to
protect themselves
Two articles in the Chronicle
on May 1 implied current pro-
grams in our schools have re-
duced teen pregnancy rates
In reality, this favorable reduc-
tion is due to the use of contra-
ception and follows national
trends. Half of all babies born
in Citrus County are to unwed
girls. And teen rates of STIs and
HIV have increased nationally
The positive goals mentioned
are overshadowed by the glar-
ing omission that only "absti-



VOTE
Continued from Page Cl

Voter service and education,
including voter registration,
will take place at the Crystal
River Mall on the second and
fourth Saturdays of the month
from noon to 3 p.m.
There will be voter registra-
tion at the Daystar Life Center
Office, 6751 W Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River, from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. May 21, and at
other sites to be announced.
Also, we are looking forward


nence until marriage" is taught.
Specific, available and practical
means to avoid STDs, HIV/AIDS
and pregnancy are not pre-
sented. Valuable information is
being withheld from our students.
People, today are postponing
marriage until their late 20s.
But most kids do not waitf" until
marriage. Seventeen is the av-
erage age of initial sexual ac-
tivity We must give teens the
means to protect themselves.
Linda Myers
Citizens for Informed Teens
Beverly Hills


to partnering with various or-
ganizations for this purpose
and to be a presence in commu-
nity events. Look for us to par-
ticipate in candidate forums.
The right to vote is the single
most influential political force
in every citizen's possession. To
quote:
"The vote is the most power-
ful instrument ever devised by
man for breaking down injustice
and destroying the terrible walls
which imprison men because
they are different from other
men," declared President Lyn-
don B. Johnson when he signed
the Voting Rights Act of 1965.


Thanks from Daystar
Daystar would like to thank the
U.S. Postal Service, especially the
National Association of Letter
Carriers, for their annual Postal
Food Drive. We also extend our
gratitude to Publix food stores,
who assisted greatly
We thank all those generous
citizens that place food items out
be their mailbox and lastly, we
thanks all the ever giving Daystar
volunteers who give of themselves.

Ron Kornatowski
Daystar board secretary


Be an informed voter and ex-
ercise your right to vote. Your
vote is your voice.
As residents of Citrus County
and concerned citizens of
Florida, we expect to continue
to be involved in the political
and environmental issues af-
fecting us all. In addition, we
will explore other topics of
local concern and interest as se-
lected by our members. Attend
our meetings and let us know
what interests you. You do not
have to be a member to attend.
We are open to all men and
women and meet regularly on
the second Tuesday each month


the water from previous spray-
ing. Don Luethy, director of the
Hyacinth Control Division, re-
ports the Homosassa River in
good shape. Crystal River is
also well-controlled. Lake Tsala
Apopka is being worked now


Money misspent
The article by Mike Col-
bert and Harvey Gerber in
the Commentary section
of Sunday, May 4's Chroni-
cle is very typical of how
people will change the
story to try to get their
goal accomplished -that

OUND park in Bev-
erly Hills. If
our current
county com-
mission had
used the
CAL m money that
563-0579 they gave
530 5 away for Ot-
tawa Avenue and the money
they've spent on Port Citrus
and the money they've spent
on lobbyists and consultants,
we would have had a good
job done by our county
commissioners, and parks
and roads would be handled
in the appropriate manner.
Manatee-go-round
Today, Sunday, May 4, in
the Chronicle, the article
on the manatees you had,
Pat Rose had a quote: "In-
stead of aiding the
process to help increase
spring flow, working on
projects to help the mana-
tee habitats, now we're
going to be wasting all our
resources and time fight-
ing this in court." What a
joke. If he had been work-
ing with the rest of the
people all along, he would-
n't have to be worrying
about going to court or
anything. So what goes
around comes around and
the Manatee Club is a real
merry-go-round.


at the Central Ridge Library in
Beverly Hills. Our next meeting
on June 10 will feature the Na-
ture Coast Unitarian players
reading words by Elizabeth
Cady Stanton, an outspoken or-
ganizer for the women's move-
ment to acquire the right to vote
and founding member of the
League of Women Voters.


Contact the League of Women
Voters of Citrus County by
email at lwvcc2013@gmail. corn
or via Facebook at League of
Women Voters of Citrus
County


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 C3




C4 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


PETERSEN
Continued from Page Cl

these companies in a
thick veil of secrecy But
for the most part, most of
them were narrow and
fairly innocuous.
But it's the sheer volume
of them. And after all of
that pre-session talk about
improving our public-
records law we were
going to improve ethics,
we were going to improve
public records and the cit-
izens' constitutional right
of access to government
and government trans-
parency nothing hap-
pened. They passed an
ethics bill that made some
improvements in that
arena, but our good bill
(SB 1648/HB 1151) that re-
ally would have made a
difference in terms of the
public's right of access
passed the Senate unani-
mously (and) got stalled in
the House. And why the
speaker and the speaker's
office wouldn't let that bill
out, I have no idea. It was
stalled, it should be noted,
at the same time as Senate
Bill 846, the ethics bill.
They passed at the same
time; they both got stuck.
On the final day of session,
they pulled 846 out and
passed it, but that open-
government bill remained
clogged up and stuck. And
I think that's kind of odd,
particularly since there
were some issues with the
League of Cities the
League of Cities worked
very hard with us to ad-
dress those problems. We
came up with language
everybody agreed to. The
president of the League of
Cities put out an op-ed en-
dorsing passage of the bill.
It was dead as a doornail
the minute it hit the House,
and I don't know why
Q: And now you're
afraid you won't see it
again.
PETERSEN: I'm afraid
I won't see it again. That's
right. This is the first time
in 20 years the Legislature
really showed some incli-
nation towards reforming
our open-government
laws. And I should have
known better They just
are not interested in im-
proving, it would seem, the
public's right of access.
And with the departure of
President Gaetz I mean,
he'll be back for two more
years, and maybe he'll
bring it up as Sen. Gaetz-
but with his departure (as
Senate president), I
think, we're losing our
champion.
Q: Last month the AP re-
ported that Scott adminis-
tration employees are
using their personal com-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


munication devices to con-
duct state business, and
that the administration
maintains that employees
"are the 'custodians' of any
text messages or emails
done on personal accounts
even if they cover state
business." What does
this mean for the First
Amendment?
PETERSEN: This is re-
lated to a public-records
lawsuit that's been filed
against the governor and
the Executive Office of the
Governor And the request
was for email correspon-
dence of current and for-
mer (members of the)
governor's staff. And the
governor's response was
that each employee, both
current and former, is the
custodian of his or her own
records. And if the re-
questor wants an em-
ployee's records, the
requestor has to go to the
employee and make the
request directly to the em-
ployee.
And the rationale was
that even though the gov-
ernor has instituted a pol-
icy that says that staff
should not be using their
personal communication
devices to communicate
about public business, that
the governor doesn't have
control over those per-
sonal communication de-
vices. Well, that's true; he
doesn't. But he does have
control over his staff. And
if he knows that his staff is
using their personal com-
munication devices, con-
trary to the policy, the
governor can say to his
staff, "Stop." That's point
No. 1.
Point No. 2 is that, by
saying that each employee
is the custodian of his or
her records on their per-
sonal communication de-
vices, it means that you
will have to file a public-
records request with each
employee for all public-
record email or text mes-
sages on their personal
communication devices.
This is a problem in that,
one, instead of making one
public-records request,
you might have to make
13 or 14 public-records
requests. Say you wanted
to know more about the
governor's position and
how he reached it on in-
state tuition for students
who are in this country
illegally How do you
know what staff worked
on that policy? You're not
in the office of the gover-
nor, you don't know who
to make that public-
records request and
you're a reporter Imag-
ine a person down in Or-
lando who's simply
interested in how they
arrived at this policy or
this potential policy -


you wouldn't have a clue.
And it's also current or
former employees. How do
you know who is a former
employee? You're here in
Tallahassee, so you're fa-
miliar with the most obvi-
ous staff, but there are
probably another 30 or 40
or 50 you're probably not
familiar with, because
they work behind the
scenes. So it's virtually im-
possible to get access. It is
a tremendous barrier, a
very costly barrier to ac-
cess. And if the court goes
along with this assertion
by the governor, it could
eviscerate the public-
records law
The third concern I have
is the legal liability for
these employees, because
under our law, if we sue
someone a government
agency or entity for vio-
lation of the public-
records law, and we win,
that agency has to pay our
attorneys' fees and court
costs. So if each employee
is the custodian of his or
her records, that means
that that employee, as the
custodian, now has the
legal liability that attaches
to the right of access. So,
for example, if we file a
public-records request
with a former employee,
the former employee does-
n't respond or doesn't give
us all the records or some-
how violates the law, we
sue that employee. We
don't sue the Executive Of-
fice of the Governor And
that employee will be re-
sponsible for obtaining an
attorney and then for all of
our attorneys' fees and
court costs if we're right
and that employee vio-
lated the law
It's a mess. And I can't
believe that employees in
the governor's office aren't
concerned and alarmed by
this, because they are at a
huge risk themselves.
Q: How does the Scott
administration compare
with previous administra-
tions in terms of trans-
parency and access to
public records?


PETERSEN: We've had
problems, big and small,
with every governor since
I got here. We had prob-
lems with the Chiles ad-
ministration. We had big
problems with the Bush
administration. I mean,
the first day Jeb took of-
fice, he violated the consti-
tutional prohibition on
meeting in secret with the
Senate president and the
House speaker And he
was not fond of the public-
records law That was
pretty obvious.
Even Charlie Crist, who
was Mr Sunshine he
was fabulous, both as at-
torney general and as gov-
ernor We still had an
occasional problem, but if
we had a problem with the
Crist administration, we
had the Office of Open
Government, which actu-
ally acted as an advocate
for the public. Sometimes
we could talk directly to
the governor himself about
these problems, and they
were almost always cor-
rected quickly They were
always corrected, some-
times more quickly than
others.
With Gov. Scott, we've
had some significant prob-
lems, starting, I think, first
as he came into office,
again, with the transition
team. If you remember, we
had problems getting ac-
cess to those records. It
took us a very long time. To
his credit, he worked very
hard and got us access to
those records to the ex-
tent possible, because
many of them had been de-
stroyed.
In comparing the gover-
nors, Chiles and Crist had
both been in government
and were much more fa-
miliar with open-govern-
ment laws and their
purpose. Bush and Scott
came from the private sec-
tor, where transparency
and openness aren't some-
thing they have to be con-
cerned with.
So we've had problems
with the Scott administra-
tion. With the transition-


c I I R coU f c i "



1 2 3
45678910
11121314151617
18 19 20 2122 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31


ART CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTr


ART CfENTER OF CTRUS COUNTY
Art Center Theatre

Ken Ludwig's



( THE


May 2-18'14
Extra Sat Matinee May 10
Fri. & Sat. nights at 7:30 pm
Sunday Matinee at 2:00 pm
Tickets: $19.00
352-746-7606
t Box Office:
Hours 1-4 pm,
Mon. through Fri.
ww.artcenter.0c






SCllp)wilE


team records, he did a
very good job there, ulti-
mately We had Project
Sunshine, which may or
may not have been a suc-
cess. So, you know, I think
he's not high on the list in
terms of transparency and
access. This is why this
one issue right now really
concerns me deeply, be-
cause this argument that
he's putting forth about
each employee being the
custodian of his or her own
records if the courts buy
into that, it will, as I said,
eviscerate the law, in
which case we'd have to
put him at the bottom of
the list.
Q: Explain why your
bumper sticker says,
"Think. It's Patriotic."
PETERSEN: I fell in
love with that bumper
sticker when I first saw it,
and have actually had to
go find more, because, you
know, you do sell your cars
- and you can't peel off
your bumper stickers.
A democracy, a strong
democracy, depends on an
informed electorate, an in-
formed citizenry, which is
why we have access to gov-
ernment information, so
that we have the right of
oversight and accountabil-
ity And to challenge our
government, to challenge
decisions that are being
made, I think, is a critical
role for citizens to play


And in order to challenge,
in order to take positions
on issues, on candidates,
to get the best elected rep-
resentatives we can get, re-
quires critical thinking.
I'm quite passionate
about the idea of access to
government information,
but to have an informed
and engaged citizenry is
critically important. And
it's one of my big concerns,
because I see people
checking out. They're not
interested. You know, "all
news is bad news," accord-
ing to people I talk to. Or I
see people only accessing
news sources that spout
their views. And it's a con-
cern to me. You want as
many, as wide a variety of
news sources as you can
get, so you can make an in-
formed decision.
Today more and more, I
see people just going along
with the line. And you
have to stop and think
about "What is my per-
sonal position on this?"
and to understand that just
because your political af-
filiation might say X, Y
and Z, you might say X, Y
and A. You don't have to
buy the package. You can
buy parts of the package,
but you have to be able to
think about it and then
make an informed deci-
sion. And that is, I think,
critical to a successful
democracy


May 11-18
I ACT
Ken Ludwig's The Fox on the Fairway
Reception Fri.& Sat. Nights at 7:30pm
Sun. Matinee at 2:00pm
Entrance Fee: $19pp
Contact Phone: 746-7606

IMay 24
Senior Foundation
Day at The Sunken Gardens
Roundtrip from the CCC Resource Center
to The Sunken Gardens, St. Pete
Bus Pick Up 8:30 AM, Return 5:30 PM
Entrance Fee: $35pp
Contact Phone: 527-5959

June7* 11:30am
United Way of Citrus County
Power of the Purse
Black Diamond Country Club
Entrance Fee: $35.00pp
Contact Phone: 795-5483

June 7 6:00pm-12:00am
Spanish American Club of Citrus County
Installation/Anniversary Dinner Dance
Knights of Columbus Hall #6168, Lecanto
Entrance Fee: $35.00 for members & sponsors
j $45 for non-members I
Contact Phone: 746-3599,341-0979 or 270-8077

June 14 10:00am
UF/IFAS Citrus County Extension
Extension's 100th Anniversary
Citrus County Canning Center
Entrance Fee: FREE
Contact Phone: 527-5720

July 12 11:00am
GFWC Crystal River Womans Club
Fashions in Paradise
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: $25.00 Donation
Contact Phone: 794-0477

September 27 9:00am
Business Women's Alliance of the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
Women's HEALTH and FITNESS Expo
Crystal River Armory
Entrance Fee: FREE
Contact Phone: 726-7517


I November 1 & 2
Festival of the Arts
Downtown Inverness
Entrance Fee: FREE
Contact Email: smith.pati55@yahoo.com


The United Way Women's Leadership Council LIVE UNITED

. Po __

WER POFIof the ___
PO^A ^WER-fV ^wGMr*


Ladis Lnchon Deignr use- -Auto

Saturday, June 7, 2014 at 11:30 a.m.
Black Diamond Ranch
To reserve your seat/table now,
call for more information at 795-5483
or visit www.citrusunitedway.org


d


S-- The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County
i Installation/Anniversary
Pinner Pance
Saturday. June 7. 2014

Doors Open 6PM to Midnight Music by DJ Leo Roche
Catering by Cody's Roadhouse
DONATIONS: pZ
$35.00 MEMBERS & SPONSOR
$45.00 NON-MEMBERS 3cl ia
Knights of Columbus Hall #6168
2389 N. Norvell Bryant, Hwy., Lecanto, FL
For Ticket Information Call Maria Coimbre 341-0979
Carlos Suarez 270-8077 or Ben Cruz 746-3599


JOIN US FOR
A DAY AT

SUNKEN

GARDENS
ST. PETE
Saturday, May 24, 2014
TqF, nor- inorc-,,nn


-- 1 ?n per ers
Price includes bus ride to St. Petersburg, entrance to the Gardens and guided tour.
Bus Pickup: 8:30am at the Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
Tickets available from Sue at 352-527-5959
n, PROCEEDS BENEFITTING Return around 5:30pn
SENIOR THE SENIOR
FOUNFOUNDATION OF CI i)NICI,
FOUNDATION CITRUS COUNTY, INC


COMMENTARY


-1
?










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Jen Collins Moore, owner of Meez Meals places some of her ready-to-cook entries in a delivery container in her kitchen in Chicago.
Her company makes and delivers ingredients for dinner to customers whose busy lifestyles leave little time for meal preparation.


Don't pick what hot


Jumping on the latest hot trend seems like a sure-fire way to strike entrepreneurial
gold. But while yoga studios and gluten-free bakeries may be popular, investors
and business consultants say take a broader view. Trends in society, including
changing demographics and technology are the best guide. Instead of joining the
pack, would-be small business owners should look for a niche and fill it.


Make life easier
THE OPPORTUNITY: Products
or services that make life easier,
particularly for the well-to-do.
Businesses that deliver ready-to-
cook dinner ingredients or care for
elderly relatives are good bets, says
Brian Cohen, chairman of New
York Angels, a group of investors
that buy stakes in small or young
companies.
"Over and over again, the compa-
nies that are getting funding are
serving upper-income people,"
Cohen says.
Think about things that are con-
venient, save time and are fun to
use such as dinner ingredient
companies, which deliver to cus-
tomers all the makings of a dish
like stir-fried beef or vegetable
lasagna. They offer people who like
to cook the satisfaction of making a
meal, without having to shop.
Elder care companies, which
send aides to care or do housekeep-
ing for older or sick people, relieve
the stress on family members when
a parent or other relative needs
full- or part-time attention.
WHY NOW? The economy is
growing and people have more
money to spend on things that
aren't necessities. As for elder care,
people are living longer and are
more likely to need help.
ENTREPRENEUR BEWARE:
There's already a lot of competi-
tion. Two companies, Blue Apron
and Plated, already deliver dinner
ingredients to a large part of the
country And home-care businesses
abound.
BEEN THERE, DOING THAT:
Jen Collins Moore started Chicago-
based Meez Meals, which delivers
ready-to-cook ingredients to con-
sumers, in 2010. She realized there
was a demand for an ingredient de-
livery service when she worked
with focus groups of women at a
consumer products company The
women wanted to cook but didn't
have time to do all the work. She
started her business before Blue
Apron and Plated, but isn't worried
about the competition; unlike
Moore's rivals, Meez Meals delivers
food that's already cut up and
chopped, saving customers time.
"We do it differently We do the
prep work," Moore says.


Stand out from the
food crowd
THE OPPORTUNITY Organic,
natural and gluten-free foods.
The market for gluten-free foods,
estimated at $10.5 billion in 2013, is
expected to grow to more than $15
billion by 2016, according to market
research company Mintel. But
rather than trying to come up with
a product like another gluten-free
muffin, consider a business that
supports or services the gluten-free
industry, says Dwight Richmond, a
purchasing executive at Whole
Foods, the grocery chain. One ex-
ample: a company that creates
gluten-free ingredients like Pen-
ford Corp., based in Centennial Col-
orado. It makes tapioca and other
ingredients used in gluten-free
food.
"The people thriving are the ones
who find new and better ways to in-
novate," Richmond says.
A product that gives consumers
the information they want about
their food may also be a good
choice. Investor Alicia Syrett
bought a stake in a company that
makes high-end muffin and cake
mixes, Cisse Trading. She likes that
it allows people to go online and re-
search its ingredients and where
they come from.
"Consumers want transparency
They want to know, what are we
putting in our bodies?" says Syrett,
CEO of Pantegrion Capital, an
angel investment firm.
WHY NOW? About 3 million peo-
ple in the U.S. have celiac disease,
an intolerance for gluten. Millions
of others have food allergies. Many
people are concerned about food
additives like hormones and chemi-
cals and foods that have been ge-
netically modified. Others want
what are called fair trade foods,
produced by companies that treat
their workers and the environment
well.
ENTREPRENEUR BEWARE: By
the time many would-be entrepre-
neurs grab hold of an idea, the field
could be packed, says Dennis Ceru,
adjunct professor of entrepreneur-
ship at Babson College and a busi-
ness consultant. "The most hot
trend is probably at least at its mid-
point," he says.


BEEN THERE, DOING THAT:
Kelly LeDonni got the idea to sell
labels and tags for gluten-free food
after she was diagnosed with celiac
disease. A tiny amount of gluten
can make her very sick. She started
Gluten Free Labels in February
2013, selling to consumers online.
The Washington Crossing, Pennsyl-
vania, company's customers in-
clude restaurants, retailers and
university cafeterias.

Hunt and gather
THE OPPORTUNITY Busi-
nesses that gather or process infor-
mation.
Companies that use technology to
gather information to use in all
sorts of ways are valuable for web-
sites or mobile apps that allow peo-
ple and businesses to find the
information they need, or to navi-
gate daily life. The information can
help retailers and other companies
find good customers. Think busi-
nesses modeled after OpenTable,
the online restaurant reservation
service or Beauty Booked, a web-
site that allows users to book ap-
pointments for hair and nail salons,
spas and other personal care busi-
nesses.
WHY NOW? Consumers and
businesses expect to find answers
to their questions online, and to ac-
complish tasks fast.
ENTREPRENEUR BEWARE:
Hackers. They keep finding new
ways to infiltrate computer systems
and databases. Businesses must
comply with laws that aim to pro-
tect consumer data.
BEEN THERE, DOING THAT:
Jalem Getz started Wantable, in
2012, selling makeup, accessories
and lingerie based on information
supplied by customers. Wantable
first collects customers' answers to
detailed questions about their pref-
erences for makeup, colors and
clothes. Then, if they give Wantable
access to their Facebook account
the Milwaukee-based company
gathers information about their on-
line purchases and searches. The
information is used to suggest mer-
chandise for customers to buy
"We see ourselves as a match-
maker between customers and
products," Getz says.


- The Associated Press


Small Business
Administration
Media Advocate
of the Year



Chronicle


business


reporter


set to be


honored


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Chronicle busi-
ness reporter Pat Faherty is
among nine winners from across
the state that will be recognized by
the U.S. Small Business Adminis-
tration (SBA) for
their outstanding
contribution to the
state's economy
Faherty was
named the North
Florida District
winner of the
Small Business
Media Advocate of Pat
the Year Faherty
Faherty is an experienced jour-
nalist with more than 25 years in
the business.
In his career, he has served as
general manager, editor, reporter
and photographer
He has been with Citrus Pub-
lishing since 2007 working as
weekly newspaper editor with the
Riverland News, general manager
and editor with the Gadsden
County Times and in his present
position with the Citrus County
Chronicle, where he is responsible
for business and government re-
porting.
As part of National Small Busi-
ness Week, the SBA annually rec-
ognizes small business owners,
entrepreneurs, and advocates. The
Florida SBDC Celebration is May
22, at the University of North
Florida in Jacksoville. The nine
2014 SBA Small Business Award
recipients at the regional, state
and/or district levels are:
Small Business Person of the
Year
State of Florida Winner
Dr Amir Varshovi, Green Tech-
nologies, LLC, Gainesville
Small Business Exporter of the
Year
Regional, State and North
Florida District Winner
Carlton Smith, Heavy Equip-
ment Resources of Florida, Inc.
(HERO), Jacksonville
Woman-Owned Small Business
Person of the Year
State and North Florida District
Winner
Jing Zhou, Interventions Unlim-
ited, Inc., Oviedo
Small Business Financial Advo-
cate of the Year
State and North Florida District
Winner
Jennifer Hodges, SunTrust
Bank, Winter Park
Veteran-Owned Small Business
Person of the Year
North Florida District Winner
Jack Corthell, Aircraft Engineer-
ing & Installation Services, Inc.,
Orlando
Small Business Media Advocate
of the Year
North Florida District Winner
Patrick Faherty, Citrus County
Chronicle
Small Business Veteran-Owned
Business of the Year
State and South Florida District
Winner
Moses Harvin, American Serv-
ices Technology, Inc., Rockledge
Minority-Owned Small Business
Person of the Year
State and South Florida District
Winner
Patricia Bonilla, Lunacon Engi-
neering, Miami
Veterans Business Outreach


Center (VBOC) of the Year
2014 National Winner
VBOC at Gulf Coast State Col-
lege, Panama City
Brent Peacock, Director








D2


f ^..^^ ...... .............


hms- CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on
events, visit CitrusCounty-
Chamber.com/events/, Cit-
rusCountyChamber. com/m
obile/ or call 352-795-
3149.
June 3 Be Resourceful
Workshop presented by the
Chamber and the Crystal
River Area Council (CRAC).
This resource development
workshop is for small busi-
nesses in Crystal River;
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the
Plantation Inn, Palm Room.
Partner with CareerSource,
the county Planning and De-
velopment department, the
Tourist Development Coun-
cil, U.S. Fish and Wildlife,
the Agricultural Alliance,
SCORE, the Small Business
Development Council and
the city of Crystal River to
be resourceful and ready for
the future of Citrus County.
From presentations to one-
on-one networking, at this
workshop you'll learn how
to carry your small business
into the future.
To RSVR call 352-795-
2000.

ConInunity
events
May 24 Low-cost pet
vaccinations at Westend
Market, Crystal River
Mall. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,
presented by Precious
Paws Rescue. For more
information, visit
preciouspawsflorida.com
or 352-726-4700.
May 24- School's Out
Rock the Block event, 7 -
11 p.m., Courthouse
Square, downtown Inver-
ness. The city of Inverness
is partnering with Tobacco-
Free Florida at the Florida
Department of Health in
Citrus County to host the
2014 School's Out Rock the
Block concert. This event
will feature live music pro-
vided by UNRB, Under
Great Lights, Serotonic and
Inverness's own Mighty
Mongo. This is a free event
and there will be a photo
booth, rock climbing wall
and festival food. Come
and celebrate the end of
the school year and begin-
ning of summer! For more
information, call 352-726-
2611.
May 31 Free Movie in the
Pines sing-along to Dis-
ney's Frozen at Whispering
Pines Park, 1700 Forest
Drive, Inverness. Festivities
begin at 7:30 a.m. and
movie starts at 8:45 a.m.
and will feature free face
painting and bungie tram-
poline. There will be food
and ice cream vendors.
Bring lawn chairs, but no
coolers, pets or tents
please. For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-2611.


River Region recognized at

monthly Chamber luncheon


HPH Executive Director Jaysen Roa speaks on behalf of the organization, which sponsored the luncheon.


River Region Animal Hospital, 7660 W. Gulf- Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union, 6826 W. Gulf-to-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River, received the New Lake Highway, Crystal River, was named a Gold Star
Image Award. From left, Lisa Nash, Josh Wooten, Ambassador at the luncheon. From left, Dan Pushee,
Dr. Shane Henry and wife and Rebecca Bays. Jim Ferrara and Josh Wooten.


9


Speaker Gary Kuhl's presentation included a tour of Citrus County and information on water conservation.
From left, Ken Frink, Gary Kuhl and Josh Wooten.


April

showers

bring

Chamber

members
Amerilife &
Health Services
217 E. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
352-726-7722
Break Room
Billiards
210A Tompkins Street
Inverness, FL 34450
352-341-2777
CrossFit High
Caliber
8303 Crystal St.
Crystal River, FL 34428
352-634-5212
DJ DiOrio
352-220-4736
Insight Credit
Union
6826 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Crystal River, FL 34429
888-843-8328
Brenda Kenney
Associate member
Little & More
Resale
2623 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway
Inverness, FL 34450
352-419-6569
Morgan Stanley,
Cindy Van Heyde
1600 S.E. 17th Street
Ocala, FL 34471
352-401-3835
The Mortgage
Firm, Inc. Larry
Feldsen
352-388-1144
Redfynn Business
Consultants
813-279-6702


Members mingle at mixer hosted by Citrus Business Network


John Porter and Dusty Porter.


The League of Women Voters
352-6l01-6857


iIjIjIj ,,,li%[. I I I L1141 % I kIR
1W M( IIII ripwNr;
VOTE
Ambassadors Mary Pericht, Cadence Bank; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin
Pest Control; Romonda Taylor, Servpro of Citrus County; Nicholle Fernandez,
Citrus Hills; and Sarah Fitts, First International Title; along with Commissioner
John "JJ" Kenney, welcome the League of Women Voters' Sheila Jacobs, Jan
Hall, Linda Myers, Dottie Carson, Marie Pettibone, Kate Betsko, Vicky lozzia
and Kate Smith.


Mixer attendees enjoy networking and several displays.


FRPA honors Abramowich
T he Florida Public Relations Associa-
tion (FPRA) Nature Coast Chapter
recently awarded the first of its three col-
lege scholarships to Kelly Abramowich of
Citrus High School.
The scholarships are awarded to de-
serving Citrus County high school sen-
iors who have an interest in pursuing a
college education in public relations,
communications or a related field such as
advertising, journalism, radio/television,
graphic arts or visual communication.
"Kelly has excelled both academically _
and athletically throughout her high
school career," said Katie Mehl, APR,
president of the Nature Coast Chapter of
FPRA. "She has been involved in a vari-
ety of extracurricular activities and is a
true philanthropist. Her future goal to
work with new media is both inspired
and smart and I know her choice to _
major in digital media and communica-
tion arts will put her on the path to suc-
cess in her chosen field." Kelly Abramowich, left, and Katie Mehl, APR.


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.





Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association







Builder's Conneition


D3

SUNDAY
MAY 18, 2014


'Team effort' triumphs


FHBA wins Sadowski victory

with $167 million allocation


In a huge victory for
builders who provide af-
fordable housing in their
communities, the Florida
Home Builders Associa-
tion (FHBA) played a lead
role in convincing the
2014 Florida Legislature
to re-authorize the spend-
ing of $167 million for the
state's SHIP and SAIL
programs as part of the
Sadowski Affordable
Housing Trust Fund.
FHBA took a hard line
this legislative session on
Sadowski funds, which
had been "swept" into
general revenue the past
six years. Standing strong
with the Sadowski Coali-
tion, Florida Realtors and


housing advocates, FHBA
helped win $100 million
for SHIP (primarily for
down payment assistance)
and SAIL (used for fi-
nancing multi-family proj-
ects). Both programs
target low-to-moderate
income families.
Along with Sadowski,
FHBA achieved virtually
all of its Legislative Prior-
ities, including $250,000
in funding for the Future
Builders of America
(FBA) program, a state-
wide initiative that works
through high schools to
train young people for
careers in construction.
FHBA also garnered
legislative support for


State Rep. Jimmie T. Smith, left, stands with Florida
Home Builders Association President Ron Lieberman.


$650,000 to complete an
important multi-year
study on the safe and
efficient use of septic
tanks in Florida, and
$250,000 to fund "stings
and sweeps" in the


Florida Department of
Business and Profes-
sional Regulation's fight
against unlicensed
activity in the state.
Working with coalition
partners, FHBA success-


fully supported a building
code bill that contained
many provisions signifi-
cant for builders and their
associated professionals,
including expanding the
allowable training options
for funds from the Build-
ing Code Compliance &
Mitigation/Building a
Safer Florida Program to
include training for con-
sumer protection issues
and contractors' licensing
requirements such as
Florida Fire Prevention
Code, lien law, laws and
rules, and contracts.
Other bills among
FHBAs Legislative Prior-
ities that won Senate and
House approval dealt fa-
vorably with subsurface
(mineral) rights, the
condo bulk-buyer law,
training funds for the
Florida masonry industry,


and the potential privati-
zation of flood insurance.
Many important issues
that will carry over to the
2015 session include
springshed/water quality
growth management
measures related to de-
veloper exactions, the
Florida lien law, and ad-
ditional regulations of
homeowners associations.
"I'm very proud of our
governmental affairs vol-
unteer leadership (Chair-
man Jeff Spear) and staff
(Director Doug Buck) as
well as all the members
and executive officers
who made contacts with
their legislators on our is-
sues," said FHBA Presi-
dent Ron Lieberman. "It
was definitely a team ef-
fort and it paid off with a
very productive legisla-
tive session."


CCBA presents Jim Blackshear Golf Outing
proceeds to Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County


The Citrus County Builders Association (CCBA) Board of Directors presented the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County with fifty percent of the 2014 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing proceeds, in the amount of
$3,854.38 on Tuesday, May 6. The 2014 Golf Outing, presented by Crystal Chevrolet and held on Feb. 22 at
Inverness Golf & Country Club, was the second year of partnership between the CCBA and the Boys & Girls
Clubs, providing opportunity for the Boys & Girls Clubs to raise funds, and for the CCBA to continue their quest
in giving back to the community. The CCBA is pleased that this year's Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing
nearly doubled last year's donation to the Boys & Girls Clubs and looks forward to partnering with the Boys and
Girls Clubs again in 2015. The 2015 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing has been tentatively scheduled for
Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, with location to be determined. If you are interested in assisting through participation
or sponsorship for the 2015 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing, please contact the CCBA at 352-746-9028 or
the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County at 352-621-9225. For more information on the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County, visit bgccitrus.org.


IMPORTANT UPCOMING CCBA EVENTS
Dates have been chosen for some of our favorite
events, but details are still in the planning stages.
Save the Dates and check back soon for more
information!
* June 11 7 hours free CILB Continuing Education
from the Building Officials Association of Florida
and the Florida Home Builders Association at the
Citrus County Builders Association Headquarters.
$10 charge per person to cover lunch. Contact the
CCBA for more information.
* June 19-20 14 hours of CILB Continuing Educa-
tion Classes at the Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion headquarters. Contact the CCBA for more
information.
* June 26 CCBA General Membership Luncheon
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. with guest speaker: De-
partment of Business & Professional Regulations.
* July 24-26 Florida Home Builders Association
Southeastern Building Conference.
* Feb. 21, 2015-CCBA Jim Blackshear
Memorial Golf Outing to benefit A\
the Boys & Girls Clubs of ,!
Citrus County.
* April 18-19, 2015-CCBA
20th annual Family Fishing C
Tournament at Homosassa
Riverside Resort.


Biggest Family Fishing Tournament ever


Many thanks to the wonderful
people who helped make this
tournament a success!
Fishing Tournament Committee:
* Chairwoman Erin Ray, FDS
Disposal Inc.
* Vice-Chair John Jobe, City
Electric Supply
* Tournament Weighmaster James
Panetti, Florida Pest Control
* Dusty Porter, Porter's
Locksmithing
* John Porter, Porter's
Locksmithing
* Ana Sims, Nick Nicholas Ford
Lincoln
* Melissa Olbek, Sheldon-Palmes
Insurance
* Alan Bell, Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart
* Lee Helscel, Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart
* Barbara Branch, Coastal
Conservation Association -
Citrus Chapter
Tournament Volunteers:
* Kristina Harding, City Electric
Supply
* Citrus Pest Management: Eric
Swart and Julia Swart
* Marie Brotnitsky, Duke Energy
* FDS Disposal Inc.: Emma
Clemente, Suzanne Clemente,
Matt Dielo, Tara Faris, John Fink-
ley, Nikki Green, Summer Green,
Denise Green and James Young
* Sheldon-Palmes Insurance:
Steven Lial, Gabe Lindquist and
Kayci Lindquist.
* Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple
Heart: Bud Allen, Dolores Bell,
Ann Fair, Mickie Hunt, Richard
Hunt, Michael Jackson, Joe
McClister, Pat Michael, Phil
Pasay, "T" Pasay, Don Schroeder
and Gail Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Bertoch.

Special thanks to the following, who
all went above and beyond the
call of duty for our tournament!
0 Barramundi Corporation
0 FDS Disposal Inc.
0 Homosassa Riverside Resort
0 Porter's Locksmithing
0 Darlene Flynn


The 19th annual Family Fish-
ing Tournament, presented by
FDS Disposal Inc., reached full
payout based on 125 boats be-
fore close of business on
April 23, 2014. The first time to
ever hit full payout before the
Captain's Meeting, the tourna-
ment committee knew then that
they were facing their biggest
tournament ever
A final count of 157 paid boat
entries, 165 total boat entries
shattered every tournament
record the CCBA had up until
that point, and they stepped up
to the plate to pay 126 percent of
the promised prize money; their
first time paying more than the
promised amount
The tournament was doubly
blessed with excellent weather
while over 400 anglers fished for
a final prize total of $15, 620,
with $3,780 each to first place
trout and redfish and $1,890 for
first place grouper The Aaron


SAVE THE DATE
* Tournament: April 18-19, 2015, at the Homosassa Riverside
Resort (Captain's Meeting on April 17).


Monier Memorial Youth Tourna-
ment held by CCBA Youth Part-
ner Coastal Conservation
Association Citrus Chapter
remains a favorite for youths,
with parents and onlookers
alike beaming with smiles as the
kids did their learning stations
and received their rewards for a
weekend of hard fishing.
This tournament would not
be possible without its sponsors
and we humbly thank each and
every one of you.
* Exclusive Platinum Sponsor:
FDS Disposal Inc.
* Official Weigh In Sponsor:
Florian Masonry
* Purple Heart Sponsor:
Sodium Fishing Gear
* Charitable Partner:
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776


Military Order of the Purple Heart
* Youth Partner:
Coastal Conservation Association -
Citrus Chapter
* Gold Sponsors:
Citrus 95.3
The Fox 96.7
True Oldies 106.3
* Silver Sponsors:
Bluewater Drafting
City Electric Supply
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln
Sherwin Williams
The Village Crier newspaper
* Bronze Sponsor:
Gainesville Ice
Sheldon-Palmes Insurance
The Home Depot
Woods N Water Magazine
* Distribution Partner:
Baitmasters


* Prize & Goodie Bucket
Sponsors:
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple Heart
Applebee's
Bluewater Drafting
Breakfast Station
Budweiser
Chili's Bar & Grill
City Electric Supply
Colby Wright's House of Canvas
Craig Clark's Stump Grinding
Dan's Clam Stand
Dunkin Donuts
FDS Disposal Inc.
Glass Blowing by Renee Jacobson
High Octane Saloon
Homosassa Riverside Resort
Porter's Locksmithing
Progressive
Ryan Lampasona State Farm
SeaTow
Sherwin Williams
Woods N' Water Magazine
Woody Wax
Yappy Tail Pet Station


S .. r i I., INI I SFNJ.\S l *c.. C..
2 .kl i j r. -O ,.h
.,djL % 4^^Df T "^^*Bl BtL w Inc


2014 winners CCBA 19th annual Family Fishing Tournament

Place: Name Length Weight Place: Name Length Weight Place: Name Length Weight


Trout
1st: Chris Linhart
2nd: Bill Clark
3rd: Sam Gibson
Redfish


Redfish Most Spots # of Spots
5.28 1st: John Hendry 21 1/8" 3.74 12


4.66 2nd: Terry Myers


23 1/2" 4.56


18 1/2" 2.36 12


Catfish
1st: Scott Hague


1st: Randy Hodges Jr. 26 5/8" 7.72 2nd: Tony Hood


2nd: Randy Hodges, Sr 26 3/4" 7.68
3rd: Rhett Ghering 27" 7.56
Grouper


1st: Eric Willis
2nd: Steve Waugh
3rd: J.T Amorginas


Homosassa Slam


Randy Cribbs


14.96 1st: Chase Burlew
14.60 Red Grouper


30 1/2" 13.80


2nd: AsherScudder
Redfish


3rd: Sean Thatavakorn 36"
Needle Fish
4th: Jeffrey Ledford Jr. 25 1/4"
Spanish Mackerel


5th: Riley Green
4.66 Sail Catfish
4.24 Largest Shark Award
25 1/2"


Total Weight 14.42
Youth


24 1/2" 9.22

23 3/4" 5.22


3.20

2.98


19 3/4" 2.80

Sarah Schroder
1.94 Shark


The Citrus County Builders Association sin-
cerely thanks all of this year's sponsors,
participants, volunteers, donors and com-
mittee members that made this event
possible. For more information on this
event and the important businesses that
made it happen, visit the fishing tourna-
ment page of www.CitrusBuilders.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Low rates bad for CD holders


EAR BRUCE: I currently have
four IRAs and CDs invested
with a local bank. They pay
next to nothing. I am over 59 1/2. Do
you have any suggestions for reinvest-
ing these?
-TT
DEAR T.T: You know this is a seri-
ous problem. You're caught in a
squeeze, not of your making and not in
your control. The Federal Reserve is
still paranoid about inflation and as a
result, keeps the interest rate at
ridiculously low levels.
If you are a borrower, say you need
a mortgage or personal loan, that's a
good deal. The flip side is people such
as you, who are getting taken of ad-
vantage royally
If you are concerned about bank
rates, take a look at what money mar-
ket funds are paying these days: noth-
ing.
Unless you are prepared to get al-
most no return on your money, you're
forced to take some risk and that
means entering the marketplace. I
still maintain achieving a decent re-
turn is possible if you invest in a vari-
ety of solid American companies. You
will do far better in the marketplace
than you will with any bank, money
market and most bonds.
DEAR BRUCE: We love reading
your column and would appreciate
your advice on a sticky problem our
son is in. Against our advice, he pur-
chased a used vehicle that is more ex-
pensive than he can handle
financially The financing was through
the dealer 7 percent for five years.
He'd like to sell it to get cheaper
transportation, but would probably
not be able to cover the balance on the
loan. Also, privately selling a car with
a lien is pretty complicated.
Other than losing the car to repos-
session (and he still might be liable
for the financial gap), do you see any
other options? Possibly trading it in
for a less-expensive vehicle just to get
a more reasonable monthly payment?
-N.S.
DEAR N.S.: I can sympathize with
the spot your son is in, but think about
this: He signed a five-year loan on a
used car That's absurd! He'd like to
sell it to get cheaper transportation,
but unfortunately, I don't think that's
in his future.
Privately selling a car with a lien is
complicated, but doable, but only if
you have enough equity in the auto-
mobile. Losing the car to repossession
is regrettable and should be avoided,


V


s


Bruce
Villiams


SMART
MONEY


if at all possible. Trading for a less-ex-
pensive vehicle just to get more rea-
sonable monthly payments? Forget
about it.
Where do you go from here? The best
resolution for your son is to increase his
income. I think he's going to have to
consider getting a part-time job. If he
were to work just on Sundays bagging
groceries, that would give him an extra
$300 a month or more.
This is not a happy response, but he
has to pay for his bad choices, and this
is what it comes down to. Good luck.
DEAR BRUCE: I sold my home
after 36 years in residence and am
now preparing to do my taxes. My ex-
husband and I purchased the house in
1977 for $74,000. We divorced in 1991
and I bought him out at an agreed
property value of $230,000. He re-
ceived a $78,000 equity payment from
the refinanced loan and signed a quit
claim deed.
Over the next several years, I refi-
nanced the house several times to
provide housing for my children and
grandchildren.
This in turn resulted in a smaller
return on the property. The house sold
in 2013 for $540,000. My net return was
less than $200,000, and I am currently
leasing a condo in a 55-and-older com-
munity
Since my net income from the sale
was less than the $250,000 one-time
exemption, am I still responsible for
capital gains tax on the property? I
understand that I have until 2015 to
purchase another property What
would be the impact of doing so?
-D.E.
DEAR D.E.: It seems to me, given all
of the refinancing and financial ma-
neuvering, that it would be to your ad-
vantage to hire a knowledgeable
accountant to go through all of these
transactions and determine exactly
what your tax responsibility is. Since
you netted less than $200,000, I am
reasonably confident that there will
be no tax responsibility, given the


$250,000 exemption that goes to every
individual. That having been said, I
would be more comfortable having the
facts reviewed by a competent practi-
tioner
As to the repurchase of another
property, once again, with a $250,000
exemption, I don't think there would
be any impact at all. But why do you
need the aggravation?
At your age, you are far better off
leasing than owning a condo. Let
someone else have the problems of
ownership.
DEAR BRUCE: We read your re-
sponse to a letter about a tree falling
into a neighbor's yard and asking who
is responsible. Our neighbor has bam-
boo planted along our property line. It
has grown out of control 20 feet to
30 feet tall, and the roots constantly
erupt with growth on our side.
During storms, its branches fall over
his fence, breaking our horse fence
and restricting our horses' path to
their normal feeding area. This aver-
ages 30 to 100 stalks per storm. The
broken branches are still attached to
the root plant and need to be removed
from the pasture area after every rain,
snow or sleet storm.
Who's responsibility is this, due to
the invasive nature of the plant? We
reside in Pennsylvania, if state law is
a factor
-S.K.
DEAR S.K: I sympathize with your
situation. It's a shame that you can't
get together with your neighbor and
come to some kind of compromise.
If that is not possible, you might
wish to seek the help of an attorney
since the branches are constantly
falling and doing damage on your
property
You have a perfect right to cut any
branches that intrude in your air
space on your property, which may
dissuade the owner from continuing
this practice.
The same thing is true with roots.
Any roots that cross the property can
be cut. You have to be careful in re-
gard to any damage that you do to the
bamboo, but I don't think that would
be too much of a problem.
The best solution, in my opinion, is
to try to work something out with the
neighbor before seeking an attorney

Send questions to bruce@brucewil-
liams.com. Questions ofgeneral inter-
est will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume ofmail,
personal replies cannot be provided.


BUSINESS NOTES

The Holloway Group

adds agent to firm

The Holloway Group, PA- Realtors &
Consultants announce that Jeff Burke
has joined its real estate team.
Burke is a full-time agent who special-
izes in all facets of real estate through-
out Citrus County
His broker, John Hol- ..
loway, Sr said that, "We ....,
originally started work- ,.. .
ing with Jeff over 20 ..
years ago. We're really
looking forward to work-
ing with him once again.
As an honest and ethical
Realtor, he's exactly the Jleft
kind of agent we're look- Burke
ing for to build our company"
The Holloway Group is located in the
historic Brannen Bank building in the
heart of downtown Inverness. Jeff can be
reached at 352-341-6210 (office) or on his
cell at 352-201-6094.



Tips for parents

considering new

life insurance

ALEX VEIGA
Associated Press
Few personal milestones compel
someone to buy life insurance coverage
like becoming a parent
In the event of an untimely death, life
insurance can serve as a financial safety
net to ensure there's money available to
pay for everything from medical bills to
a home mortgage and the future college
education costs.
Many Americans have taken steps to
line up such a financial cushion.
At the end of 2012, there were 146.2
million individual life insurance poli-
cies in effect, with coverage totaling
$11.2 trillion, according to the American
Council of Life Insurers.
Here are five tips for new parents
looking to buy life insurance:
1. LEARN INSURANCE OPTIONS
Life insurance policies can vary
widely, but they generally fall under two
See OPTIONS/Page D5


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D4 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


BUSINESS


kl




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The powerful secondary law of a nonprofit


he bylaws of a nonprofit cor-
poration are a legal docu-
ment second only to the
articles of incorporation. The arti-
cles are the primary law of a non-
profit corporation, and bylaws the
secondary law The bylaws enhance
and work together with the articles.
The articles record the name, pur-
pose, location and board members
of the organization. Bylaws comple-
ment the articles by describing the
organization's management and op-
erating rules.
Bylaws are not required in some
states; however, they must be in-
cluded when applying for a federal
tax exemption. Best practices in
nonprofit management will stress
the creation of bylaws. Bylaws
should be drafted, presented to the
board of directors and adopted by
the membership.
The benefits and advantages
of bylaws
The benefits of comprehensive
bylaws established early on in the
life of a nonprofit can't be overem-
phasized. Systematic reconstruc-
tion of an outdated set is also
highly recommended.
Here is a review of what bylaws
provide the nonprofit:
Operating rules of organization
and governance.
Consistency and continuity of
operations.


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD

NONPROFIT
BRIEFS


Definition of the relationship
between the organization and
members.
Description of the duties and
powers of the officers and direc-
tors.
Minimization of confusion and
disagreement regarding structure
and operations.
Providing an essential docu-
ment to request a tax exemption
from IRS.
Formulation of an "agreement"
between the member and the non-
profit entity which can be enforced
by the courts.
Power to amend the rules of
operation.
Providing generally accepted
policies and procedures as to struc-
ture and operation.
Summary, conclusions and best
practices
Here are the best practices for


establishing and maintaining your
organization's bylaws:
Construct them early in the life
of the nonprofit.
Get professional help and use
model bylaws as guidelines.
Require membership accept-
ance via a vote.
Provide every member a copy
at the time they enter membership.
Follow the rules and always ex-
plain the importance to all who in-
quire.
Amend them only as needed
for the life of the organization.
Ensure best practices in all de-
cision-making.
The content of this column was
gleaned from the 'Association Law
Handbook" by attorney Jerald A.
Jacobs. Jacobs heads a team of non-
profit lawyers serving associations,
professional societies and nonprof-
its.
Credit is hereby given to Jacobs,
who was named "Outstanding Non-
profit Attorney" by the American
Bar Association.
DrFrederick JHerzog, PhD is
the Executive Director/Founder of
the NonProfit Resource Center in
Citrus County The Center assists
with state and federal required
document filings. DrHerzog can be
reached by phone at 847-899-9000
or via email: fherzog@tampabay
rrcom.


OPTIONS
Continued from Page D4

categories: Term insurance and permanent insur-
ance, which are often referred to as whole life or
universal insurance.
With term insurance you pay a premium for a
set period, commonly 10 years or 20 years, and
your policy entitles you to a specific amount of
money Unless the policyholder dies, triggering a
payout, any premiums paid are lost once the pol-
icy term ends.
2. DETERMINE COVERAGE PRIORITIES
Generally, an insurance agent will help you de-
termine an appropriate coverage amount for the
policy by examining some of the key costs your
family will have in years to come, such as the cost
of child care, education and the mortgage.
Another approach is to figure out how much in-
come you're expected to earn over your lifetime.
Still, while it might be tempting to think of life
insurance in terms of a dollar amount, it makes
more financial sense to tie that amount to a goal,
like paying off a mortgage or college tuition, said
Porter
3. BUY A POLICY EARLY
The cost of life insurance doesn't hinge on your
credit rating, savings or assets. It's determined by
your age and the results of a medical evaluation
that's required every time you seek coverage.
If you're a couple in your 20s and healthy, you'll
pay less than when you're in your 30s and 40s.
A 20-year-old man who is healthy and doesn't
smoke could be charged, on average, $32.53 a
month for $500,000 in coverage on a 20-year term
life insurance policy, according to an estimate by
insurance quote portal TrustedChoice.com.


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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 D5


mu


1I


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[ RIGAlTIONM




D6 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tint e


I. ,- -., I0 F" ,, -*- -...' I* AM I -,0, '* 0 ----0 O


\-W




Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Charles Frac'e print
RARE 3-pc. Print,
statute and plate.
"Double Trouble"
Bob cat kittens signed
& numbered, $6,600
(352) 419-6474
CHINA CABINET,
cherry wood, will hold
service for 12, original
wedding furn.,
exc. cond., $650.
(352) 419-6474
Free to Good Home
2 Husky's
Male & Female
pure bred, fully vetted
Call Joe 352-246-3000
HONDA
Red 2012 CBR 250
Exc cond, transfer
able warr. 4700 miles,
$2700 (352) 220-6032
Kitchen looking tired?
Re-Face not Replace!
KITCHEN SOLUTIONS
*(352) 794-3747"




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000


MASON
TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and
from work in Citrus &
surrounding counties
(352) 302-2395
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TILE INSTALLATION
quotes too high?
call 352-400-8226



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Lik

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 Parakeets
Male is Turquoise and
the female is mostly
white. 1 large cage.
Free to good home
(352) 344-8753
Free 32" 2006
Toshiba Color TV
Like New, Needs high
voltage transformer,
which I cant find.
(352) 634-2253
FREE KITTENS
6 weeks old,
litter trained
352-212-4061



BLUEBERRIES, you pick
$2.50 per pound.
44-E. to Little John,
Sherwood Forest
(352) 400-2436
U-pick Blueberries
$3.00 per lb. 7am-6pm
Tues & Thurs,
Sat, & Sun.
Pesticide Free
4752W Abeline Dr
Citrus Springs,
(352)746-2511
U-PICK
BLUEBERRIES
Misty Meadows
Blueberry Farm
Open Thursday
through Sunday
7:00 am to 7:00 pm
$3.50 per pound
(352) 726-7907




Lost Cat,
female, Blue/grey
color Rooks Rd.
Floral City
(352) 634-0482
Lost cat. By VFW area
in Floral City. Great
Mancoon. Recently trim-
med. Has collar & chip-
ped. Called Sammy. If
found call Debbie.
(352)201-9521


Missing llBl ac 1 ILk/LUolg
Haired Cat. Beloved
family pet. Female.
REWARD. Last seen in
Wakulla, May 9.
Call/Text Teddy
(850)459-1300.




Adult male cat
found in Green Acres
Estates Homosassa on
5/12. Unique beige
color, declawed
(352) 621-6884
FOUND
MOMS RING
Citrus Memorial
Hospital Emergency
Room Parking Lot
Call to describe
352-637-7152




CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS @Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41

PRAYER TO ST
JUDE
May the Sacred Heart
Of Jesus be adored,
glorified, loved and
praised throughout
theworld now and for-
ever, Sacred Heart of
Jesus, pray for us, St.
Jude, worker of mira-
cles, pray for us St.
Jude, helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
Say this prayer 9 times
a day for 7 days and
your prayer will be an-
swered. It has never
been known to fail.
Publication must be
promised. Thank you
St. Jude for your help.
AS


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


iME Cfl E C~ia




SEEKING A



SALES



REPRESENTATIVES

Full-Time with Great Benefits


Do you have an

outgoing personality?

)o you work well with others?

Are your people skills

outstanding?

Seeking dynamic individuals with strong

communication and computer skills.

Must be organized and detailed-oriented

and thrive in a fast-paced environment.

Base salary plus commission.

Reliable vehicle and

valid driver's license required.

If you light up a room when you enter,

apply today!

Send resume to

djkamlot@chronicleonline.com

Drug screen required for final applicant.

036R EOE


I apy o


Looking for someone
to help deliver the
paper on Sunday
morn. Call Jeanette
(352) 503-2246




F/T TEACHER

Experienced only
need apply. Paid,
holidays & vacation
40hrs. required
Send resume to
Citrus C Chronicle
Blind Box 1866
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River
Fl, 34429




Clerk Typist
Announcement
# 14-56

Full-time Clerical
and customer serv-
ice work providing
assistance in the
Citrus County Library
System administra-
tive office. Performs
regular office duties
such as answer a
multi-line telephone
system, data entry,
mail distribution,
and interacting with
customers and
library personnel.
Serves as backup
for other office
personnel. Performs
related tasks as
required. Requires
at least one year
of related work
experience.
$8.70 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 23, 2013
EOE/ADA

Clerk Typist
Announcement
# 14-56
Full-time Clerical
and customer serv-
ice work providing
assistance in the
Citrus County Library
System administra-
tive office. Performs
regular office duties
such as answer a
multi-line telephone
system, data entry,
mail distribution,
and interacting with
customers and
library personnel.
Serves as backup
for other office
personnel. Performs
related tasks as
required. Requires
at least one year
of related work
experience.
$8.70 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 23, 2013
EOE/ADA


BENEFITS PACKAGE
EOE / DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


V 1 IS0 VA UT3NO W6


CONSTRUCTION
SECRETARY

Must be proficient w/
word, excel, & adobe
acrobat; organized,
personable and able
to multi task.Full time
position, DFWP
Send resume to
aDolicants1tampa
bav.rr.com


F/T SECRETARY
For Beverly Hills, FL
Busy office seeks a
dedicated individ-
ual with secretarial
experience. The
candidate must
have the ability to
work independently
and as a team
player, and have
excellent computer
skills. Knowledge
of community
association's is help-
ful. Smoke free work
place.
Send Resume To:
PO Box 5315
Spring Hill, FL
34611-5315





Exp FT Sylist
For full service, busy
barber shop.Must be
cust serv. oriented
and professional.
Call:(352) 220-7260








Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Onfy $28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

AT HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
FOR ALL SHIFTS
Apply Online: home
instead.com/671


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo comr


Exp Medical
Assistant
Computer
experience a must!
email resume
to: ifamilypractice
@gmail.com.


F/T RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512


MEDICAL ASST
Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
352-746-3838


RN's, LPN's
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
exp. preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
HEALTH CENTER
AT BRENTWOOD
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF






S.E.T.
HOME HEALTH

1rREGISTERED NURSE
*- BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH NURSE
4 PHYSICAL
THERAPIST and PTA
Per Diem -
FT / PT / PRN
For established
agency with strong
interdisciplinary
teamwork. Experi-
enced preferred,
willing to mentor.
Must be passionate
about patient care.
Up to $250 towards
health insurance or
healthcare expense
reimbursement.
PTO/Holiday Time
CEUs, and
competitive pay.
CONTACT
SET Home Health
Phone:352-564-2738
Fax: 352/795-0990
or email resume to:
info@set
homehealth.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer

SUNSHINE GARDENS
Assisted Living
Facility, Seeking
Applications For

Part-time
Office Assistant
Part-Time
Weekend Dietary
And Certified CNA
Must Have excellent
organizational skills
Be a Team Player
Experience with
Alzheimer's and
Dementia popula-
tion preferred
Please Apply at:
SUSHINE GARDENS
Crystal River
311 NE 4th Ave.

WE ARE
GROWING
COME JOIN OUR
TEAM!

RN PT OT MSW
LPrNJ, HHA
Per Diem Positions:
Must have home
health experience

j COUPIIBIEHfiFE
No? rgCare
For more
information contact
Mikesha at:
352-861-8806 or
email resume to:
mbeam@cwshome
health.corn




The City of Crystal
River is seeking an
Administrative
Assistant
to provide highly
responsible
secretarial/adminstraive
support tothe
City Manager,
Mayor, and City
Councilmembers
and maintaining
public electronic
communications
including City
website. Also serves
as the Deputy City
Clerk, which
involves periodically
attending evening
meetings, preparing
meeting packets
and formal meeting
minutes for City
Council and
Boards/Commissions
High school diploma
required. Five (5)
years closely-related
experience, supple-
mented by addi-
tional college level
training in adminis-
trative, secretarial or
municipal clerical
work. For more de-
tails visit our website
at crystalriverfl.org
Resumes must be
received no later
than close of
business on Friday
May7 2014
Please forward
resumes to:
City of Crystal River
Office of the City
Manager
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL
34428
Fax: 352-795-6351


Exp Bartender
wanted
apply in person:
T-Backs Bar
4591 N Carl G Rose
Hwy, Hernando
ask for Tammy





A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic
Must have valid
driver's license.
Mm. 3 yrs. Exp.
Apply in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto, DFWP


ASPHALT QC
ROAD WAY TECH
LEVEL II CERT. (CTQP)

CW ROBERTS
Wildwood
Fax Resume
352-330-2609
EOE/DFWP

Averitt Express
New Pay increase
for Reginal Drivers!
40 to 46 CPM + Fuel
Bonus! Also,
Post Training Pay
increase for
Students!
(Depending on
Domocile) Get Home
EVERY Week +
Excellent Benefits
CDL-A Required
888-362-8608
Apply at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer -
Females, minorities,
protected veterans
and indivdiuals with
disabilities are
encouraged to
apply.


Commercial,
Residential and
Serv. Plumbers
Needed.

Call 352-726-5601 or
submit resume to
modernplumbing@
tampabay.rr.com.
DFWP


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624


Exp. Grant Writer
For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446


EXPERIENCED
GM TECHNICIAN
NEEDED FOR BUSY
SHOP/ TOP DOLLAR
PAID BENEFITS/
PAID VACATION
EOE/DFW CONTACT
SERVICE MANAGER
352-795-1515, 1050
fsegreti@
crystalautos.com


Fuel &
Lubrication
Technician
Busy construction
company. Has
immediate opening for
qualified fuel lubrica-
tion person. Must have
a clean Class ACDL
with Hazmat &
Airbreak Endorse-
ments. Must be willing
to work overtime as
required. DFW.
Contact Tom at
(352)266-3325.



NEWSPAPER/ = m

CARIERili[=
WANTED
Newpapr ,cai rrie

wan'ted foT r early






morning deilivery of I

theCitrus Couna'/ity
Chronicle andthe


Exp. Bucket
Truck Operator
Exp. Tree
climber and
doing tree work.
CDL License a plus
call 352-344-2696

MASON
TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and
from work in Citrus &
surrounding counties
(352) 302-2395




3 Yr Painter

Call
(352) 860-0187

Established
Lawn Care Co.

Lawn care company
needs a weed & vine
puller. Valid drivers
license. Own
transportation. Leave
message,
(352)746-5117.
Local Homosassa
Lawn Service

Needs experienced
Lawn Helper w/valid
Drivers Lic. vehicle
352-628-9848 or
352-634-0861
Maintenance
Worker
Announcement
#14-58

This position is
unskilled and
semi-skilled work
assisting in the
road maintenance
operations and use
of construction and
maintenance
equipment. Starting
pay $8.02 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 23, 2014
EOE/ADA.

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
*352-503-4930*

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F




HOUSEKEEPERS

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
now accepting
applications for
P/T housekeepers.
Apply in person at
505 E Hartford St
Mon-Sat from 2-5pm

parttime general
maintenance
Must be able to
work second shift &
have own vehicle.
Applv Tues-Fridav
@ 505 E Hartford St,
Hernando"




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com

Experienced Team,
Solo, Recent Grad
& Student Drivers
needed for dedi-
cated run in your
area! Ask about our
sign-on bonus and
guaranteed
hometime! Call
866-414-3402

MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School
Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM
Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE
(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu

START A CAREER
INA YEAR




AUTO DEALER
with 2 Locations wants
Parterner or investor
CONSIGNMENT USA
352-461-4518




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
S 13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S 15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



ANTIQUE FLATIRON
WITH HOT PLATE
1800 CHILDS TOP
3.5"x2"x2" $40
352-270-3527
ANTIQUE IRON
SKILLET 1800S
CHILDS TOY Horse n
Buggy inside $40 OBO
352-2370-3527
ANTIQUE WOODEN
DOOR Good Condition
(352)257-8752
PINE WOOD SIDE TA-
BLE W/DRAWER great
condition $60
(352)257-8752
VINTAGE SHIRT FORM
Great condition $40
(352)257-8752



Charles Frac'e print
RARE 3-pc. Print,
statute and plate.
"Double Trouble"
Bob cat kittens signed
& numbered, $6,600
(352) 419-6474
Double Bedroom Set
mattress, box spring,
headboard, &
6 drawer dresser
$125.
352-382-0069
LLADRO Retired piece
(Unexpected Visit)
Beautiful, in box Call for
details,will text pic if
interested. $185 OBO.
352-586-3380
Norman Rockwell Col-
lector Plates, by
Knowles. Cert. & Boxed.
60 Plates, $175.
(352)726-7543
VINTAGE PAIR FOO
DOGS Excellent Condi-
tion $90 (352)257-8752
WEDGEWOOD 14"
oval platter + 9" oval
veg dish lavender
grapes on cream $100
OBO 352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD CHINA
LABENDER ON
CREAM dinner plate
and salad plate $40
OBO 352-270-3527



APPLIANCES, hke new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


CIR us CouNTY (FL) CHRONIcLE


CLASSIFIED


jMdE QfliE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Electric Range
Whirlpool 30 Self
Cleaning 1st $100
Takes it. Heavy Duty
Wheelbarrow $40
(352) 795-5519
GE Electric Oven
Black, self clean, flat
burners, good cond.
$200.(516) 456-0228
HARVEST MAID
DEHYDRATOR New in
plastic. Expands to 30
trays. 2 books/extras.
$100 (203)509-7638
Kenmore Refrigerator
side by side, white,
clean, like new $450
(352) 637-0765
or (352) 257-5779
MICROWAVE KEN-
MORE MOUNTS
OVER THE STOVE 30"
WIDE WHITE $60
352-613-0529
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Washer & Dryer
General Electric
Working cond
$125/both
(812) 360-3834
Crystal River
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
(352)263-7398


white,
good condition
$125.
(678) 617-5560 Cell



ANTIQUE OAK CHAIR
W/LEATHER INSERT
excellent shape $75
(352)257-8752
SALON CHAIR
Black and chrome.
Used for shampooing
and cutting. $100
(203)509-7638



WERNER LADDER
8 ft. heavy-duty $95
Call 726-0040
Woodworking shop w/
elect. & hand tools, cab-
inets, cherry planks &
misc. contents. MAKE
CASH OFFER FOR
ALL. (352)489-1962.



SANYO TV, 27" TUBE
TV Good working con-
dition, $50.
(352)382-0069
SPEAKERS 2 SHARP
10" 150 WATTS $15
352-613-0529
SPEAKERS YAMAHA
SET OF 5 FOR SUR-
ROUND SOUND $70
352-613-0529


AUCTION
LUXURY HOME &


10am Saturday May 31st
8022 W Grove Street, Homosassa, FL 34446
5+ Bed / 7 bath Custom Home
9800 sq ft. on 1.57 Acres!
Indoor heated pool with 30' waterfall, grotto
Climate-controlled 5+ car garage, workshop
Pool table, tractor, furniture & more
more info: higgenbotham.com

800-257-4161
M. E. HIggenbotham, CAI, CES, AARE,FL Llc# AU305AB158


TV APEX 20" WITH
BUILT IN DVD PLAYER
& REMOTE $40
352-613-0529



2 DELTA BATH
FAUCETS
$10 each
513-4614



OUTDOOR RUG
NYLON WASHABLE
5' circular geometric
design Tan/Brown $30
OBO 352-270-3527
PATIO DINING TABLE
IRON FRAME 4 legs
3' circular glass top $40
OBO 352-270-3527
PATIO TABLE PORTA-
BLE FOLDING METAL
BASE 3 circular glass
top $25 OBO
352-270-3527
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



6 pc Living Room set
Rattan, 3 seat couch,
love seat, chair, 3 ta-
bles, green palms pat-
tern Very good Cond
$1100 (352) 746-5052
80-100 year old Chest
with mirror, & 3 long &
2 short drawers $100
Solid wood Table,
23 H, 50 L, 32W
$65. (352) 621-0778
CAROUSEL COFFEE
TABLE glass top rotates
in good condition
$99.3526372499
CHINA CABINET,
cherry wood, will hold
service for 12, original
wedding furn.,
exc. cond., $650.
(352) 419-6474
COUCH & LOVESEAT
La-Z-Boy, exc. cond.,
$200 obo
(352) 726-9394
DINETTE SET, Maple,
40" round table 4 cap-
tain chairs $75.
(352)382-0069
DINING ROOM SET,
4 hi back chairs, glass
table top, beautiful
stone base, $175 obo
(352) 726-9394
DINING TABLE IRON
FRAME 4 legs 3'circular
glass top $40 OBO
352-270-3527


END TABLE Blonde
Glass Top End Table.
$25.00 Excellent Condi-
tion 352-746-5421
END TABLE solid oak
end table 13x24x23
$50. 3526372499
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH
LIGHTS HOLDS 31 TV
WHITE WASHED $40
352-613-0529
Furniture chest of
Drawers & Items
$100
No calls before 11am
(352) 628-4766
Gently used King
Bedspread
Polar Fleece King
Sheet set
Down Blanket
$75.00 for all
Inv. (352) 423-4423
GLASS TOP ASIAN
STYLE TABLE Excellent
Shape Red & Gold
(352)257-8752

* THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
* SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491
LIVING ROOM
SECTIONAL two piece
Moss grey/green. Excel-
lent condition $89
(352) 564-1017
New Serta King
Euro Mattress Set
double sided,
Presidential Suite II,
$875. (352) 270-8917
OTTOMAN Retails for
$499.00 at Haverty's.
Asking $50.00.
352-419-4482
Queen Size Futon
seldom used,
navy blue, light wood
frame, upgaded
mattress 1o0.
(352) 746-0260
Sealy Posture Premier
Plush Pillow Top. King
size bed & headboard.
$400, Ex. Cond.
(352)563-5386
SOFAAND LOVE
SEAT camel back
striped matching set
Broyhill very good
condition $300.
352-637-2499
TABLES Four 48" round
tables used in school
cafeteria. Metal legs,
heavy & sturdy. $25
each. (352)419-4482
TABLES, set of 4
glass top, 2 end, one
sofa, one coffee, all
stone bases. $150 obo
(352) 726-9394


CLASSIFIED



PAIR OF MATCHING
LOVE SEATS unique in
style $100.00/pr OBO
352-527-1399
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TWO CORNER
CABINETS Light
Brown/good shape.
Asking $25.00 each.
352-419-4482
VINTAGE MAKE-UP
TABLE W/MIRROR &
CHAIR Metal frame $30
(352)257-8752



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
CRAFTSMAN 10HP rear
mtr 30" cut. $350 obo
WEEDEATER push
mower, 4.5HP 20" cut,
$60 obo 352-726-6461
352-201-7882
John Deer, L1I10
MOWER
Automatic, very nice
mower Hardly used
Always in Garage
$850 (352) 382-5773
JOHN DEERE LT 155
15.5 Kohler motor
38" cut, $650 obo
(352) 726-6461
352-201-7882
JOHN DEERE LX 178
734 CC Kawasaki
water cooled motor
38" cut. $950 obo
(352) 726-6461
352-201-7882
Riding Lawn Mower
Toro XL 420 Twin Cam
42 in cut. Only 97 hrs,
incld 36x48 wagon.
Ex. cond, both $750;
Power wheeled walk
behind $125
352-382-1481 or
352-220-3009
SEARS CRAFTSMAN
42" cut, 1 yr old, bag
system, used twice,
$750. (352) 637-4718
Sears Riding Mower
19HP, V-Twin Eng.,
46" Cut $400.
Sears Push Mower
4.5HP 22" cut $60
(352) 507-1490



BUTTERFLY BUSH
SEEDLINGS Nanho
Blue, orBlack knight,
6 for $10, Inv, Off Croft
(352)613-5818


CRAPE MYRTLE Seed-
lings Catawba(Purple)
Or Tuscarora(Dk Pink)
6 for $10,lnv,Off Croft
613-5818

Garage/









ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE

CH9NiJCLE

CLASSIFIED

a, Call your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966


V THIS OUT!
HIGH END FURNITURE
* SALE*, 2ND TIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803, 2165 Hy 491



DESIGN EVAN
PICONE SUIT double
breasted navy linen
12-14 good cond $20
OBO 352-270-3527
DESIGNER EVAN
PICONE SUIT DBL
BRESTED White Linen
size 12-14 good cond
$20 OBO 352-270-3527
MENS SUITS 2 SIZE
34X30 NAVY BLUE &
BLACK $40 EACH
352-613-0529




2 Clothes Racks
Chrome, Steel
$35. each
(352) 621-0778
2 CRAB TRAPs- coated
metal trap, 24" x 24" x
18" tall, Ex., $20 each.
(352)628-0033


Stove,
late 20's early 30's
excellent shape
$450. All org. pieces
(352) 621-0778
2 FLY RODS WITH
REELS- 8 ft. fiberglass
2 pc. rods, $25 ea.,
(352)628-0033
4 Chevy 6 lug
Wheels/tires/skins
Wrangler LT
255/70/16R
$400 obo
(352) 746-9212
8 FT. RADIUS
CASTING NET-
16 ft. diameter,
1/2" mesh, Ex., $40.
(352)628-0033
30 qt. Turkey fryer
w/ 45,000 BTU gas
burner $85.
Motorcycle or ATV
Jack, $60.
(352) 564-0726
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
AQUARIUMS (2)
Eclipse corner 5 gal
Curved 12 gal Good
cond Extras/All $50
(352)621-0175
AUTOMOTIVE ROLL-
ING CREEPER Use to
work under cars. $10.
Ruth (352)382-1000
Beverly Hills Moving
Sale, DR, LR and BR
Furniture, Kit items.
Beautiful wood desk &
Hutch. Much More Pis
call (989) 293-4404
Bissell Carpet Cleaner.
Used once. Cost $135,
$70 OBO. Adj. 2-tier roll-
ing garment rack, $10.
(352)341-1941
BOAT OARS- pair,
Feather Brand, 60
inches long, new, $40.
(352)628-0033
CAMCORDER
Panasonic Camcorder
with Case.Excellent
Condition $95.00
352-746-5421
CD'S Top artist holiday
classics 25 for $25
will separate
call 726-0040
Convertible
chair bed for child
$20.
(352) 860-0736
Craftsman Lawn
Tractor, 18HP 42"
elect, start $650. obo
GE Freezer
7 cu ft., $75.
(352) 503-9450
FIRE PROOF SAFE
WITH COMBINATION
$75 obo 302-5468


FOLDING
FOOT LON
WOO
352-61

THIS
***

GENE
MERCH
SPECI

$* 3

-61
10C
up to 2
***)l

$1 $
$11
$201-,
$16
$401-,
$21
$801-$
$26



GEORGE F
GRILL white
4" good c
352-27
GRAPPLE
BOAT AN
tines, 60ft c
Ex+,
(352)62
HOT DOG
Electric Bc
COUNT
For Cat
Restaura
(352) 28
METAL 8(
WITH LOCK
352-30
METAL
SAFE
352-30
MOEN K
FAUCET G
w/Sprayer *
penser like
Call 72
ORECK X
TURE VAC
RIGHT BAG
Works G
352-27
PFALTZGRi
27 pcs inclu
bowls, cup
Tea Rose p
527-
Restaura
ware, New.
boxes of 1
$100. (352


SUNDAY, MIAY 18, 2014 D7



'TABLES5 RIGID DIG E/ ZPS
IG BROWN HOLE DIGGER- profes-
D $25 sional grade, fiberglass
3-0529 handles, Ex. $30.
628-0033
O tfTI SAFEWAZE CLIMBING
U HARNESS & 6' LAN-
YARD- excellent
* condition, $75.
(352)628-0033
ERAL SHUTTERS 3 Pairs of
ANDISE wooden Shutters. Ex-
ALSIII cellent Condition $95.00
Indoor or Outdoors
352-746-5421
** SMALL SUNBEAM
TOASTER OVEN &
lines COFFEE POT white
days Both $25. 746-5453
Stems SPEAKERS Two 5 inch
70 Watt Speakers
I* ** $35.00. Very Good
Condition 352-746-5421
$200.. SUNBEAM TOASTER
.50 OVEN & COFFEE POT
$400.. WHITE BOTH $25.
-$ 746-5453
5.50 TIRES
$800.. 4 General Amer-trac
.50 Load range E, 95%
$1500.. tread, 235-85-16
$200 firm
5.50 352-228-7715
TOASTER OVEN,
t ** COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $25
FOREMAN 352-613-0529
S12" x 14" x Various used horse
cond $10 tack plus 2 buggy's.
0-3527 All in exc cond at give
ER REEF away prices. Call
CHOR- 5 Jack (352) 560-4284
of 1/2" line, Water Conditioner
$70. 5624 Econominder
28-0033 $400.
STEAMER Chassahowitzka
oars Head Ruth (352) 382-1000
TER TOP WEED EATER GASO-
ering or LINE PUSH MOWER,
ant $260. 4.75 horsepower, excel-
87-9073 lent condition, $90,
3UN SAFE (352) 465-1813


K/KEY $100
2-5468
L GUN
,$100
2-5468
KITCHEN
loose Neck
& soap dis-
e new $65
6-0040
IL SIGNA-
CUUM UP-
Excel Cond
reat $90
0-3527
\FF CHINA.
hiding plates,
ps/saucers.
pattern. $50.
1239
nt dinner-
Oneida. 10
2 pcs. ea.
2)503-2373


MANICURE TABLE
4 drawers, lamp and
stool. Like new.$100.
203-509-7638
STONE CRAB BUSI-
NESS for sale- Includes
30 ft. Morgan diesel
commercial boat with
side hydraulic puller,478
traps with tags,550 gal
diesel tank,Bait Freezer
$74,999 contact
ge.petnrie@gmail.com



HEARING HELPER
WILLIAM SOUND AM-
PLIFIER Brand New
Retails $700 Sell for
$100 (352)257-8752


~V4~


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374



ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
# 39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *"*
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
**ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
teRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
. FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
ve RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 k
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



Kitchen looking tired?
Re-Face not Replace!
KITCHEN SOLUTIONS
**(352) 794-3747"



AlI Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086



AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up,. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166

Misc Srvice


WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374


Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570




*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHEL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919




Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


Clean View: Pressure
washingwindowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Free Estimates
Eff. & Exp. Company
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066


PAINTING SERVICES
"Quality That Won't Rob The Nes;t Egg"E

Tweety's Completee
"Fainting Service, Inc.n

Interior/Exterior PaintingIn9
Drywall RepairsTextures
3 i VM ggte
Wallpaper Removal
Cefoe=9 Military & Senior
ry & Senior

2 3.5088
in Business Discounts
OU ntS
352-597-244 352-293-5088gS
Toll Free: %77-893-3895t

Insured Licensed Bond d L.nn,
t
www.TweetysPainting.com
0


ALL TYPES OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


GENERAL i "]
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


TILE INSTALLATION
quotes too high?
call 352-400-8226












Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.
A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
Budd Excavating
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


CITRUS

HOmELUATCH
We care for your home while
you're away.





www.homewatchcitrus.com
352-422-0025
Licensed, Bonded, Insured









Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C
and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202
Lic.#CAC057482




"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist

Summer Tune $4995
Up Special 4 -e199
Guaranteeing 1Ox Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Loser Particle Scan to determine
thie quality of thie air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires MH 31,2014
h, LIC AC1815891
Q r Back To New sl ,m99
Heating & Cooling
S628-5700 newair.biz









WATER HEATERS
SLAB LEAKS REPIPES
FAUCETS TOILETS
DRAIN CLEANING
WATER FILTRATION
ALL PLUMBING REPAIRS
LICENSED CFC1426865
www.modern-plumbing.com

S *B.


This Sat 6pm
Preview 5pm
Antiques, Coins, Art, Jewelry,
SMilitary and Estate Items

Red Barn Auctions
4535 S. FloridaAve., Inverness, FL
Temns 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash F1 Sales Tax
AB 3172 AU4416


Consign Now '
Rates as low as 2 % We Buy Estates


Come visit our

Inslall Reir showroom for a
Pps lle' huge selection of
Halers tile, pavers, pool
a Sail Syslems finishes and pool
Equipment.

I,- n Iih-, -, n
Sugarmnill *i i 1 i
W oods SeIvingAllOicinsCoiins
Poolf& Spa n1 ...... I ,.,..
smwPoos.mCM .382-4421
L .. .. ..... ....


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
*All Home Repairs
SSmall Carpentry
Fencing
S.:reening

S(lean Dryer Vents
4ffKrdoble & Dependable
Epeience lifelong
352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761




SERVING Cl/IUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE REST,
CONSISTENT VOTED BEST OF THEIR BEST




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
,. Sod Sales & Install
T ....T .. ,-,,-,,,


'746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded


F- Call -I

1-352-566-6615,
Dr. Vent

1-855-4DR-VENT
cally Ovmed 15+ Yrs
LZ Lic./ins., Bonded W




D8 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


1955 Juke Box
Rokola, 300+ records,
needs some TLC
$575. Crystal River
(812) 360-3834
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
PLAYSSOUNDS,
LOOKS,NEW(sold for
$179 new) ONLY $45
(352)601-6625



CEILING FAN with
lights. Ready to put up.
Works great. Text for
pics. $35.
(203)509-7638
SEWING MACHINE
Baby Lock Zig Zag &
more, prtbl. Just
Serviced. Runs Ex.
Brian (352)270-9254



Recumbent Bike,
stationary, Golds
Gym, Like brand new.
$125 obo
(352)527-1100
SIT UP BENCH 6'x16"
Commercial size. Black.
Great shape. $40 Bev-
erly Hills (203)509-7638



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF DRIVER 2013
RocketBallz Clone mrh
Grafalloy Reg EXC $85.
Dunnellon 465-8495
GOLF IRONS Adams
Idea mrh 7&8 graphite
new grips $15ea
$25pair Dunnellon
465-8495
GOLF WOODS MRH #7
#9 Graphite Good Grips
and Head Covers
$15ea $25pair
Dunnellon 465-8495
MEN'S SCHWINN DEL-
MAR BIKE- 26", 1 spd,
comfort ride, black, like
new, $80.
(352)628-0033
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
WATER SKI Taperflex
like new (352)257-8752
Yamaha '00 GolfCart
Canvas Enclosure
New Batteries $2288.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678



Haulmark 6x12
'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand
New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678



BOYS CLOTHING
SIZES 12MTHS-5 TOD-
DLER Priced .25-$1
each like new condition
50 items (352)257-8752
EDDIE BAUER HIGH
BACK CAR SEAT for
child over lyr expires
2018 $50
(352)257-8752
NEVER
USED...EXCELLENT
COND Crib matress
$30 302-5468

Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED CLASS A or C
with Slide, New Cond.
Under $15,000. Private
w/ cash. 352-400-2066


Robin Long
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.
"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience,


BUD
Looking for new
best friend? Here's
Bud, beautiful
red/white terrier mix,
heartworm- nega-
tive, housebrkn. Wt.
33 Ibs. Very friendly,
walks well on a
leash. Thinks he's
a lapdog. Should
be only dog in the
home. Call Joanne
@352-795-1288
or 352-697-2682.


Blue & Gold McCaw. 10
yrs. old, talks w/ huge 6'
cage & many extras.
$2,000. (352)637-7124
Chihuahua AKC
Male 3 mo. Only to an
elderly couple that
has time to snuggle.
$300 (352) 419-7212
Cockatoo
7 yrs old looking for
good home, includes
large cage. $500
(352) 489-4127
FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732


GROVER
Grover, cutest face
ever! Boxer/terrier
mix, 1 y.o., appears
housebrkn, Wt. 39
Ibs. Gets along well
with other dogs
and also cats! Not
treated well by
prev. owner, still
sweetest & most
loveable dog
you could find.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.










JENSEN
3-4 y.o. American
Bulldog, 50 Ibs,
beautiful red &
white. Appears
housebroken, walks
well on leash.
Knows certain com-
mands. Very
friendly & loves
people, best as only
dog in the home.
Would be a great
family member &
perfect companion.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.

MIN PIN PUPPIES
2 Blue, 2 Fawn,
1 Chocolate 15 inch
10-15 Ibs, Health Certs
CKC. $1,200-$1,400.
(352) 503-7919
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day


Livestock

Free Horses
Pasofino Mare
Quarter Horse Mare
Both good riders.
Free to good home
(727) 470-5374 cell




SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"*

ACHILLES
Inflatable boat
12'4", 25HPYamaha,
aluminum fl, on trlr,
garaged, used little
fresh water only. All
accessories $4300 obo
(352) 697-5677

BOAT TRAILER
Aluminum, NEW 2014
18 -20 FT, w/tortion
axle, folding tonque,
LED lights, and disc
brakes all below cost
@ $2,195. Open Mon.
Wednesday & Friday
Only(352) 527-3555
CANOE
16X4
Like brand new
$500
(352) 746-7357

FISHING BOAT
17'; wide beamExc
Cond, 5 HP 4 stroke
Honda; low hrs, $1200
must sell 352-726-9647

SCOUT 17' C.C.
90HP Yamaha (low
hours) Alum trlr, New
GarminGPS, Cplotter
very clean, gar kept
$9200 (352) 795-5519













Sportscraft 88
27' Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555"*
boatsupercenter.com




Break Buddy
accessories and
owners manual
$250
(352) 344-2161

HONDA
11,CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524


WEB
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



'07 Starcraft Pop-Up
Camper. Stove,
Refrigerator, & Furnace.
New tires. $1850. Mike
(352)447-4411
AVION
1976 26FT Travel
Trailer, fully equipped
excel, cond. $6,800
(352) 795-1958
CITATION
'01,22 ft, New awning,
3 new tires,
Ready to travel $3,900.
(352) 628-0173
FLAGSTAFF
2006, 27 ft, Super Light
series, used 2 times,
due to illness must sell
excel, cond., 30" door
opening for wheelchair
access, one slide out
$11,400. 352-489-8637
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.



'08 Chevy Chrome
Tailgate Handle
$30.
(352) 628-0173



Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeee*e
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41
KIA
2003, Rio,
Ice cold AC
$4,390.
352-341-0018

Look
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794, Call AJ
813-458-0584
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44,CR
461-4518& 795-4440



CHEVROLET
2001, Impala
$4,495.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2010 Equinox LT
excellent cond.
51k miles $17,000.
(352) 860-0736
il-l--if



I


SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE
C o~Nia E


CLASSIFIED

**3 SPECIALS **
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

W" Call your
Classified
representative
for details.
352-563-5966
f------ J
WE DO IT ALLL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44,CR
461-4518& 795-4440








IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


Larry's Auto Sales
1955 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333
BUY HERE, PAY HERE
2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down
2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down
'91 F150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down
'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van, 5.7, V-8,
Auto, $995 down


CHOOSE CAR SEAT:

BYAGE & SIZE


THE NUMBER

OF PEOPLE



WHO




THINK



THEY HAVE

THEIR CHILD

IN THE RIGHT

SEAT. i


THE ONES


WHO



ACTUALLY




DO.


KNOW FOR SURE



IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.





VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT


NHTSA Child Car
Trhsa go' Safety
www.nhtsa.gov


CIR us CoUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE


CLASSIFIED


Comcil




CITRUS COUNTY (aL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 D9


GMC
02,1500 Sierra/Denali
AWD, exc. condition
82k mi. $12,900.
(352) 637-0765

TOYOTA
'07. Tacoma, club cab
4cyl, auto, PW, PL, CD,
cruise, tow pkg. toolbx
looks like 2014, 59k mi
$12,800, 352-860-1106




CHEVROLET
1996, Blazer,
4 door, 89K miles
$2,900.
352-341-0018

CHEVROLET
2005,Equinox LS
power windows, locks,
AC, $3,990.
352-341-0018

DODGE
'09, Nitro, low miles
one owner, garage
kept, driven by little
old lady, Call Joan
(352) 697-2595

FORD
1997 Explorer, 6 cyl.,
auto., Class II hitch
installed, $2,100
(352) 233-3837




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-


CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchairvan with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
GMC
1996, Safari
passenger Van
1 owner $3,450
352-341-0018




Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wmind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678




sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
gqovdeals.com from April



Misc. otice


HONDA
2006 VTX1300C
7,400 miles
w/ accessories
$4,900, (352) 341-1187
HONDA
2008 Shadow Spirit
VT750C2, 3,775 mi.
w/ accessories $4,500
(352) 341-1187
HONDA
Red 2012 CBR 250
Exc cond, transfer-
able warr. 4700 miles,
$2700 (352) 220-6032
KAWASAKI
2003 1600 Vulcan
classic. Full dress,
senior owner, X-clean,
4980 mi, $5800 obo
(352) 860-1106
Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
Suzuki
Model GZ250. Street
Bike. Black. Less than
400 mi. $1995.
(352)527-0115
Yamaha '05
V-star 1100, dressed
out, real low mi, eye
candy $4900 obo
(352) 746-9212




25, 2014- May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014


908-0520 MIXCRN
Town of Inglis
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Town of Inglis is accepting sealed bids for two new work trucks. Years 2013, 2014
or 2015 truck. 2500 HDV8 diesel, single cab, 8ft Reading service body with 4 corner
strobe lights, LED mini light bar on cab roof, vise plate, DOT lights & reflectors, vinyl
seats 40/20/40 vinyl floor, power steering, ABS brakes, power windows & locks, A/C,
am / FM radio, automatic transmission. 3,000 watt power inverter (optional), tow
package, electric trailer brake control, white in color, 12 volt outlet.
The Town may reject any or all bids. Bids must be in by Friday May 23rd, at 3:00pm.
Please send to P.O. Drawer 429 Inglis, Florida 34449 or drop off at the Inglis Town Hall
135 Hwy 40 W.
Any questions please call Lance 352-221-5399
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 18, 19 & 20, 2014.


387-0518 SUCRN
5/29/14 Lien Foreclosure
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles on
5/29/2014 10:00:00 AM at
1635 NE 32nd Ave, Ocala,
FL 34470 pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Flor-
ida Statutes. S M Duggan
Towing LLC. reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1G2JB54T8R7521508



MBeetin
NoLFtice


1994 PONT SUNBIRD LE
May 18, 2014

390-0518 SUCRN
Lien Foreclosure Sale 5-29
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of Sale
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described
below under Florida Stat-
utes 71378 The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding
on Thursday, May 29th,
2014 at 9:00 am on the
premises where said vehicle


I S14


has been stored and which
are located at, Smitty's
Auto, Inc., 4631 W Cardi-
nal St, Homosassa, Citrus
County, Florida, the follow-
ing
1998 PONTIAC
GRAND PRIX VIN#
1G2WJ52MOWF227056
Purchase must be paid for
at the time of purchase in
cash only Vehicles sold as
is and must be removed at
the time of sale Sale is sub-
ject to cancellation in the
event of settlement between
owner and obligated party
Published May 18, 2014


'.I I A .


392-0518 SUCRN
Code Compliance 5/21 Master Hearing
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby noffied that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct


its monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 @ 9:OOAM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi-purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352)527-5350.
Accent Inc. of Central Florida
3232 E Thomas St, Inverness, Fl 34453
All buildings served by on site potable water systems, except approved community
water systems as defined in F.A.C. 62 550.200(7), developed under the provisions of
law & administrative rules, must connect to & utilize potable water from a publicly
owned or investor owned permitted central water system within 365 days after notfi-
cation by the publicly owned or investor owned water system that such a system is
available, pursuant to Section 42 39(b) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Dingman EST, William C.
2215 W Springlake Dr, Dunnellon, Fl 34434
All buildings served by on site potable water systems, except approved community
water systems as defined in F.A.C. 62 550.200(7), developed under the provisions of
law & administrative rules, must connect to & utilize potable water from a publicly
owned or investor owned permitted central water system within 365 days after notfi-
cation by the publicly owned or investor owned water system that such a system is
available, pursuant to Section 42 39(b) of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.

Fletcher, Patricia A.
150 S Otis Ave, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Permits required. Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Cit-
rus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 8(a) which states: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. Any person com-
mencing construction for which a permit is required, without having first obtained
such permit, in addition to the penalties described in this chapter, shall also be sub-
ject to a penalty equal to double the permit fee. To Wit: An above ground pool
and a house attached to the permitted detached garage.

Gudridge, Christie A. & Roger; Burke, Tiffanie R. & Hough III, William H.
2979 E Blueberry Ln, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, mattresses, air conditioners, plas-
tic containers, broken fence panels, and other miscellaneous junk.

Lolley, Marshall A. & Cynthia
588 N Palm Ridge Ave, Crystal River, Fl 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, toilets, carpet, household items,
plastic containers and buckets, tires, and large amounts of miscellaneous junk.

Lukowski, Michael J.
310 S Jefferson St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.

McCortney, Beverlee
809 S Honey Way, Inverness, Fl 34450
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household trash, plastic, wooden and paper trash and
junk.

Nelson, Andrew C. & Romine, Gwen L. **REPEAT VIOLATION-
3141 N Hooty Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Boat motor, mirrors, plywood, bicycles, children's toys,
air conditioners, propane tanks, tires, plastic containers, sofa chair, household items,
miscellaneous trash and debris.


Resinger EST, Terrence L. -RELEASE OF FOF**


5360 W Caraway PI, Lecanto, Fl 34461

Single Stream Processors Inc.
698 S Easy St, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Failure to comply with permit number 201303528. To Wit: Failed to install fence
around proposed storage area. Install 6' privacy chainlink fence around storage
area.

Tedder, Billy Lee
3388 S Aberdeen Ter, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit:There are seven different types and sizes of boats. Starting in the middle of
the lot and going all the way to the back. There are (2) 14' fiberglass boats, (2) 16'
bass boats, (1) Sea Ray style, (1) StarCraft style, and (1) Cobalt style.

Vukelja, Vaughn
11529 W Indian Cir, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for any person owning, leasing, occupying or having control of
any property subject to the provisions of this section to permit or maintain grass,
weeds, brush and undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of veg-
etative matter pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordi-
nances.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352)341 6580.
GREGG R. BRENNAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: May 18, 2014


393-0518 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
The City of Crystal River is soliciting responses from qualified attorneys interested in
providing contract services in the capacity of City Attorney. Responses are due by 2
pm on June 5, 2014. Interested parties should contact the Office of the City Man-
ager at (352)795-4216, ext. 302.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, Sunday, May 18, 2014.


391-0518 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID
PUBLIC NOTICE
ITB #017-14
Continuing Horizontal Directional Drilling Service Contract
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to serve as a general contractor for directional drilling services. The work shall
consist of furnishing all materials, labor, tools, equipment and supervision required to
perform directional drilling technology, also commonly called Horizontal Directional
Drilling (HDD) within the existing County utilities underground infrastructure. The pro-
posed work shall be performed in accordance with the Citrus County's Minimum
Standards & Construction Specifications for Water & Wastewater Systems (Latest Edi-
tion) Department of Water Resources/Utilities Division.
The resulting contracts) shall be in effect for one year, with four 1-year renewal op-
tions to be exercised at the discretion of the Water Resources Department. Unsatis-
factory performance may result in non-renewal, cancellation, and/or termination.
The Water Resources Department reserves the right to make multiple awards.
An award shall be made to one (1) Primary Contractor and one (1) Alternate Con-
tractor. If the Primary Contractor is unable to perform when a Work Authorization is
issued, the Alternate shall be contacted for the requested services.
Minimum Requirements for Submittina a Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Certified General Contractors License
2. Register General Contractors License If the license is registered in a county other
than Citrus County, Bidder must have obtained a competency card issued by the
County's ULicensing Board at time of submittal of a Bid.
3. HDD Contractor must have at least three (3) years of experience involving work of
a similar nature.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 18, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Linda Morse,
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for June 18, 2014 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 219, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: May 18, 2014


MBeting
noticesI


MeBeti
I Notes I~


Meeting
I Notices


MeBetin
I Notices I


MBeting
I Noices I


I Bi


I Bi


I Bi




DO SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CELEBRATE
IN A NEW CHEVROLET-


A COMMITMENT TO SERVING
ALL. THAT HAVE SERVED
During Military Appreciation Month, now all Veterans along with
Active Duty, Reserves and Retirees are eligible for the Chevrolet Military
Discount*. The best Military Purchase Program in the industry.


CHEVROLET


OVER90
Used & Certified
Pre-Loved Vehicles
qualified Lessees. 2014 Malibu LT
,osit All Pre-Loved Certified $2 000 U,,,, ,
ant $t 2' j v ofYUU~i.iiicueia
paymentt Vehicles include up to: 5. Cs08O h A, Pf,,ru,,s
36 -mou _-onu,, nL.is;
36 mo 100,000 MILE
35 Mo. iPymWs
"e l"n ;ird dierfees WARRANTY
,er:i-o m, WAKAN I IR


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
Secity Deposit
kf*Down Payment
k Fist MAonh Panment
SAQPer 36 Months
9 ivMonth 35Mo.Pymts'
'J" C'iiu'P, ,ijpusi ["iuir-d T., rige, license and dealerfees
extra. ',klv i: hij ,ul $25 rmii d r r 36.000 miles


2YEARSOR
24,000 MILE
MAINTENANCE'


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees. 2014 Traverse SFWD
O Per Month PIT-STOP $1,500
$1 for 36 Months PROGRAM +$50O0^irU ]
aer 1 u i(( I t[ JUdcu Tn~i lflI ii di t hwc iid daierfeee IN ~m^ im.^m^ 9(F ^ J^flmf^ ^
S Af219A ter Ao Iffer' IrNrU
wy I2CLSDEDeal 0W
,ir.3 Milpdeoa, y O 21: i p [4$2 meoer 36 00 1TNk4.See dealer for complete details.


~Hwy 44 West 352 3410018


H"s352.341.0018
ens, FL 3453
tVECH EVYSALES.COM


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
$259 PeMonth
for 36 Months
$ 2,669After Al l2er
'N, s-'cuii i il- pO T reoQjirtd Tax, title, license and dealer fees
e',l:i Mir a, rgo Sit 5 2 mil: ,vr 36 WO nilIl#s


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!


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HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUIDF


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PAGE E6


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E2 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


Al (52)632.
flter hous ~82
W ^^.#4413



4438 RATH RUE POINT
SOAKWOOD VILLAGE FLORIDA RM & PORCH
SLovingly Maintained '2/2/2 Split Plan
' Extra Nice Kitchen Lots of Tile
'Cul-De-Sac Location 'A MUST SEE!
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1
EFinim elliesuIIonZ leinoix nel
www.Flot iodnLfisiinginlo.coin


CITRus CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

52)6 IFLN 241 INFO l-21 NO LINE
Ene3 22t4/7 'INFO LN 3.216
52) 63~27F28 52)63.22 IN Ee -i00
Enter~e hoouse .#58n 4
#420 -Use#58.2.


4200 W. PINE RIDGE BLVD.
GREAT VALUE
* 4BD/2BA/2CG with POOL Over 3,000 SF Living Area
* New Roof in July 2013 Separate Game RM
* Beautifully Maintained Many Extras _
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


'^T' ~ ~ ~ ~ 1171 fl i"Xl~iU7'l'
10000 N. WAYLAND AVE.
CITRUS SPRINGS
*,4BD/4BA'3CG Over 3,400 SF Under A/C
*3/4 Acres on El Diablo Golf Course
* Large Heated Pool and Spa
*Custom Built Home in 2003 Like a Model _
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [,K
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


LAUREL RIDGE RUSAW BUILT VILLA
*3 BR, 2 BATH *2-CAR Garage
S2002 Built Eat-In Kitchen w/Built-ln's
* Screen Lanai Master Bath Double Sinks
* Lawn Care Included Low Quarterly Fee
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


10-0Va~ft("
'WMN





REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828
HERE'S HOW:


GREAT KENWOOD NORTH LOCATION!
JUST ADORABLE! Nicely Maintained 3 Bedroom 2 Bath
Features Open LR & DR, Oak Plank Laminate Floors, Tiled
Eat-In Kitchen, Split Bedroom Plan, Master Bedroom w/Walk-
In Closet & En Suite Bath w/Shower, 10x24 Screened Lanai,
Covered Patio. Completely Fenced Backyard, Beautiful Trees
& Landscaping. NEW ROOF 2008. A great Buy!
MARTHA SATHER (352) 212-3929
Email: martha.sather@remax.net

OPEN HOUSE SUN. MAY 18 1-3PM





6161 S SUNWAY PT., FLORAL CITY
Custom Lakefront Pool Home... This 3 bedroom, 3 bath
home is situated on an elevated lot offering a breathtaking
view of the lake. Heated pool with spa, gourmet kitchen
with tile countertops, great room with fireplace and wet bar,
master suite with fireplace, dock and party deck, and large
lanai with gas grill. Visit Today...
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


PIVIIIpIi 2/2/2 built up high & dry. Light,
I bright, & open floor plan, eat-in
3 Buyer listens to kitchen, indoor utility room, Florida
E property room, viewing dock and river.
presentation in JODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
English or Spanish Email: remaxgal22@yahoo.com







Min Citrus



-' County


MOVE-IN AND ENJOY!
Recently and tastefully updated golf course condo
offers fresh paint, new floors, new kitchen cabinets and
new appliances. Magnificent view of the course. Pet
friendly and MOVE-IN ready. Nothing to do, but grab
your clubs and enjoy the maintenance-free lifestyle!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 i!
Email: sherylpols@ aol.com L
Websile: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com i








Garden your way to a petite profusion


Tips for high yields in a small or thirsty garden


Associated Press
This 2010 photo provided by courtesy of Martha Stewart Living shows an
herb garden. Herbs that grow best in a small or water-wise garden include
basil, oregano, parsley, thyme and rosemary, says Sarah J. Browning, an ex-
tension educator for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, who also suggests
planting radishes, carrots, peppers, zucchini and summer squash for sum-
mertime bounty.


JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press
ow can you get the most yield from a
garden where space is limited, and
water is too?
Plant smart, and pay attention to the soil.
"Your garden is only as good as your soil,"
says David Salman, chief horticulturist at High
Country Gardens, a Santa Fe, N.M., catalog that
specializes in native and low-water plants.
Find out what nutrients your soil has and
what it's missing with a soil test, available
through local cooperative extension offices at
a nominal fee (home soil-test kits are less re-
liable, according to the Colorado State Uni-
versity Extension).


Encourage plant health by fertilizing with
natural, organic fertilizers, which include fish
emulsion and liquid seaweed, says Salman.
Limit the use of chemical fertilizers because
they don't help build the soil.
"You will have more nutritionally complete
vegetables if you have healthy soil," he promises.
One trick Salmon recommends, especially
for gardeners living in new housing develop-
ments, is adding a soil inoculant called myc-
orrhiza, a beneficial fungi. It's found naturally
in healthy soil, but often needs to be added to
a new garden.
"New gardens in new subdivisions, their
soil is scraped off as part of construction," says
See GARDEN/Page E5


X"f^ ^ Br01f 0E 10 V-11 VA Le00 0LF

*fcii'WWR- "'bin-11
Lovely Decor 2/2 Newcarpet, paint and gourmet Cute as a button, updated bathrooms. -i i, .- i ,
708789 $74,900 kitchen4/3/2.709634 $239,900 2/1. 710050 $54,900 appliances. 708705 $72,900
John Maisel 302-5351 Randy Morehouse 287-2934 Gary Ayers 302-9329 Gary Ayres 302-9329





3/2/2 close to shopping and the 3/2 fenced backyard, new paint and 3/2/2,stainless steel appliances & Move in ready 4/2/2
river. 709420 $78,500 carpet. 709659 $67,500 granite countertops. 708572 $137,900 708427 $139,500
Steve McClory422-3998 John Maisel 302-5351 YolandaCanchola219-2196 Becky Paradiso 634-4581
352-"-08 -: 5 -5 11 3 47 5


TR F!RDrJG


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




E4 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


Average US 30-year mortgage rate dips


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Aver-
age U.S. rates on fixed
mortgages declined this
week for a third straight
week. The low rates could
give a boost to the spring
home-buying season,
which has gotten off to a
slow start.
Mortgage buyer Freddie
Mac said Thursday that
the average rate for a 30-
year loan eased to 4.20
percent from 4.21 percent
last week. The average for
the 15-year mortgage fell
to 3.29 percent from 3.32
percent
Mortgage rates have
risen nearly a full percent-
age point since hitting
record lows about a year
ago.
Warmer weather has yet
to boost home-buying as it
normally does. Rising
prices and higher rates


have made affordability a
problem for would-be buy-
ers. And many homeown-
ers are reluctant to list
their properties for sale.
Home sales and con-
struction have faltered
since last fall, slowing the
economy A harsh winter,
higher buying costs and a
limited supply of available
homes have discouraged
many potential buyers. Ex-
isting-home sales in March
reached their lowest level
in 20 months.
The increase in mort-
gage rates over the year
was driven in part by spec-
ulation that the Federal
Reserve would reduce its
bond purchases, which
have helped keep long-
term interest rates low In-
deed, the Fed has
announced four declines
in its monthly bond pur-
chases since December
because the economy ap-


Jackie Davis
I American Realty & Investments
OEM 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
.EAL ESTATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com

A 3 BEDROOM, 2.5 BATH, POOL
HOME with an open, split plan;
showing off its hardwood floors and
Th gorgeous, warm granite counters.
hecnter-isle kitchen hasa
skylight that lets the sun glide
around the room. The roof, C/H/A
were replaced in 2010, pool has
been resurfaced. The lanai has glass
S doors for year round comfort. Sifting
on a sublime acre with central water
and underground utilities to keep it
looking handsome.
$195,000 MLS 710537

COUNTRY STYLEWITHA FLAIR
Built in 2006, 3 bdrm, 2.5 baths







1^ ARCHITECTURALLY EXCITING
*^j^^ flh ^^ *3Car garage
S Office plus 1 bedonus room, bath guest suite





BSVS~KSB~^U^H 3100 SFLA
*Wood floors, stone fireplace
H 1 $249,000 MLS 7083931 .
"~~ ~~~ ............. .... . .

-- $259000 r.h.-: -, ,-i
ARCHITECTURALLY EXCITING
3-Car garage
PLUS 1 bedroom, bath guest suite
3,100 SFLA
Will Heated pool
-One acre
$249,000 MLS 708393


pears to be steadily heal-
ing. But the Fed has no
plans to raise its bench-
mark short-term rate from
record lows.
Fed Chair Janet Yellen
has told Congress that the
economy is improving but
noted that the job market
remains "far from satisfac-
tory" and that inflation is
still below the Fed's target
rate. She said she expects
the Fed's near-zero target
for short-term rates to re-
main appropriate for a
"considerable time" after
the bond purchases end.
To calculate average
mortgage rates, Freddie
Mac surveys lenders
across the country be-
tween Monday and
Wednesday each week.


The average doesn't in-
clude extra fees, known as
points, which most bor-
rowers must pay to get the
lowest rates. One point
equals 1 percent of the
loan amount.
The average fee for a 30-
year mortgage was un-
changed from a week
earlier at 0.6 point. The fee
for a 15-year loan also re-
mained at 0.6 point.
The average rate on a
one-year adjustable-rate
was steady at 2.43 percent.
The average fee rose to 0.5
point from 0.4 point.
The average rate on a
five-year adjustable mort-
gage fell to 3.01 percent
from 3.05 percent. The fee
declined to 0.4 point from
0.5 point.


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney ,-
Realtor-, A HOUSE Realtor =1
502-3179 SOLDoName 287-9022 V
746-6700
pa. piti THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS'


.... _1
S9905 Citrus Springs Blvd. Beautiful Move in Ready Large 2/2/2. This home I
has been well taken care of. Large Eat in kitchen/family room separated from I
living/dining. NewerA/C, great floor plan, 10 X 12 shed, glass enclosed insulated I
lanai, screened entry, great Lot. Must see! Call today for your private viewing!


I Gulf to Lake Hwy. Ciystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007-(727) 515-6571


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

White House welcomes

Senate panel's housing vote
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The White House welcomed
bipartisan legislation to overhaul the nation's mort-
gage financing system that cleared a crucial Senate
hurdle on Thursday The legislation would wind
down the giant government-backed lenders Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac.
The Senate Banking Committee voted 13-9 to
send the bill to the Senate floor It still faces long
odds to pass this year
The bill would phase out Fannie and Freddie and
reduce the government's role in guaranteeing mort-
gage securities. The two firms had to be rescued by
a $187 billion taxpayer bailout during the financial
crisis. The bill would create a new Federal Mort-
gage Insurance Corp. that would provide backstop
insurance, available only after a substantial amount
of private capital is used up. Investors would pay in-
surance fees to the corporation while agreeing to
put a substantial amount of their own capital at risk.


|Ri EAL ESTATE, INC. Bf ST
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. ,
CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
OFFIcE: (352) 795-6633 Re to,
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM I
AENT l ON DT I SEE N DY 1 A EEK


HOMOSASSA 3 bedrm, 2 bath, screen
porch, carport, move in ready covered
front porch, cathedral ceilings, eat in
kitchen, rear fenced yard, A/C (2012),
paved road 100% laminated floors A


CRYSTAL RIVER commercial
opportunity in nursery, wholesale;
fencing & ...1 ,.1 ,1 acres
totally fenc i 1 i I. rpment,
greenhouse & samples of fence work
#704193 $300,000





LECANTO 2 separate parcels, total of 3
mobile homes/buildings, center of county,
1 well 2 septics, appointment only One
rented for $450/mo #703819
$106,000





CRYSTAL RIVER 2 bdrms, 1 bath,
carport, screen porch, inside laundry rm;
high on a hill, downtown Crystal River,
no flood insurance required #709076
$47,500


DUNNELLON 1998 nobility DAW M/H
w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres
Master bath garden tub w/dbl vanity &
shower Country kitchen, vaulted ceilings,
16 x 20 work shop electric, inside
laundry #703976 $55,000


INVERNESS 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car
garage, w/inground vinyl lined caged
pool, privacy fence on 3 sides cathedral
ceiling in great room, country kitchen w/
island and granite counter tops Tile
floors thin out #704467 $93,800




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

GARDEN
Continued from Page Al

Salman. "You need to put benefi-
cial fungi back in."
Peas, beans and soybeans could
benefit from legume inoculants,
which are species-specific (a soy-
bean inoculant cannot be used to
improve peas' growth). Read prod-
uct labels carefully or ask your
gardening center for assistance.
"Your beans will do OK (without
it), but if you really want to crank
out the beans, you can do that with
the inoculant," says Salman. "It's
kind of a 'grandma's secret' to
growing great beans."
Plants that can offer high yields
with low watering include leafy
vegetables such as kale, lettuce
and spinach; beans, snow peas
and sugar snap peas; and some va-
rieties of cucumbers and squash,
he says. Plant vining beans and
peas if you have space or can grow
them up a fence or trellis; plant
bush beans and peas in large pots
if space is limited.
Sarah J. Browning, an extension
educator for the University of Ne-
braska-Lincoln, suggests planting
radishes, carrots, peppers, zuc-
chini and summer squash for sum-
mertime bounty. Peppers grow
well in dry conditions, says
Browning, and root crops such
don't need frequent watering.
"If you watered them well and
then mulched them, I think you
could get a crop with fairly small
amounts of water input," she says.
Plant radishes early in the sea-
son or in part shade, and mulch
them and other plants to retain
moisture and combat weeds.
Browning recommends the
cherry tomato cultivar Sun Gold
and the slicers Big Beef and
Celebrity as great-tasting high
producers. Also look for disease-
resistant tomato varieties, which
are easier to grow. Browning
refers tomato lovers to Pennsylva-
nia State University's College of
Agricultural Sciences Extension's
"Tomato Report 2011," which lists
the best varieties in its tomato tri-
als.
Melissa Ozawa, a features editor
for gardening at Martha Stewart
Living magazine, recommends
growing okra and Swiss chard;
both are heat- and drought-toler-
ant. Melons also can handle less
water once established because of


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E5


their deep root systems, she says.
Not all vegetables grow well in
all regions, so read seed packets,
matching days to maturation to
your region's growing season,
Salman advises.
"One of the big problems with
horticulture in this country is
everyone tries to be one-size-fits-
all, and this is just too big of a con-
tinent to do that," he says. "You
don't want to grow a 120-day wa-
termelon in Denver. They can
grow those in Texas, but the matu-
ration period in Denver is much
shorter."
Online Prolific,
water-wise
www.extension. herbs include
unl.edu basil, oregano,
www.highcountry parsley, thyme
gardens.com and rosemary,
www.martha says Browning.
stewart.corm Salman of-
fers space-sav-
http://extension. ing planting
psu.edu/plants/ tips for herbs:
vegetable-fruit/ Plant lavender
research-reports/ and oregano
tomato-report- along the
2011 dryer edges of
your garden, since they're the
most heat-tolerant, and plant
Greek oregano and dill, plus an-
nual herbs such as basil and
cilantro, among the root vegeta-
bles.
Try growing perennials such as
rosemary, English thyme, tarragon
and lavender in your ornamental
beds. They don't require your veg-
etable garden's mineral-rich soil,
says Salman.
Drought-tolerant flower vari-
eties include coneflowers, hum-
mingbird mint, salvia and blanket
flowers, according to Ozawa.
Other cutting-garden winners are
cosmos, zinnias, sunflowers and
larkspur, says Salman. His fa-
vorite late-season bloomer is the
Mexican sunflower.
"If there's a bee or butterfly in a
10-mile radius, they'll find that
Mexican sunflower," he says.
Associated Press
Above, a National Park Service
worker tends to the White House
kitchen garden on the South Lawn
of the White House in Washington
on April 21, 2012, during a preview
for the media of the Spring Garden
Tour. Plants that can offer high
yields with low watering include
leafy vegetables such as kale, let-
tuce and spinach; beans, snow peas
and sugar snap peas; and some vari-
eties of cucumbers and squash.


U i 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Baffour Walt Engelken Y 0000 enk I
BROKER -REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKER ASSOCIATE REALTOR Free~ Home Pric AnIalys flis 3


PINE goO'- PIE-


2 00DAVIS
2/ / 083$62,500


PI558NE DELKA




E6 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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Ci ii()NWi1E

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
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The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Skunk vine, an invasive


and destructive pest


n alien invader has radiated from
the epicenter near Brooksville in
west Central Florida. Skunk vine,
Paederia foetida, native to Japan, was in-
troduced into Central Florida by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture in
1867 as an experimental ani-
mal fiber food. It was recog-
nized as a problem pest plant
by 1916 around Brooksville
after it escaped and natural-
ized in all habitats. Dry sand-
hills, moist forests and
wetlands all are degraded by
this vigorous, exotic woody 4
vine.
Locally, skunk vine loses its Jane
leaves after frost in winter It JAI
is evergreen in South Florida. A
In March, I sprayed newly GA
emerging skunk vine leaves
with 3 percent glyphosate herbicide at
the Dunnellon Library
I was careful not to spray desirable
plants. In April, volunteers Jan Salter,
John Dallas and I hand-pulled some roots
and stretchy, white vines that were criss-
crossing the ground under the library's


I

I
;1


ornamental shrubs and rose bushes.
Stems send down roots at the leaf nodes
that contact the soil. We pulled matted
vines climbing up trees and shrubs. In
May we spray again after new stems and
leaves sprout from the broken
roots.
One of three "Little Gem"
magnolias in the buffer border
planting along the library's
east property line was com-
pletely covered by skunk vine.
The tree was dying as the
leaves got no sunlight under
the blanket of vine leaves.
The thicker vines were sev-
Veber ered so their tops would die.
E'S All pulled vines were stuffed
in black plastic bags and left
DEN in the sun to die and cook.
There were many seeds still
attached. All would sprout if in contact
with the soil. Birds and wildlife eat the
skunk vine fruit and spread the seeds.
There are some 30 species of Paederia:
Sixteen from temperate and tropical


See JANE/Page E13


Inside...



210











Hang on, hang on -
there's no need to
sacrifice style for
safety's sake. Grab
bars can be dare
we say it? cool.
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E13
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Lucite, English silver and a bounty of Buddhas


Dear John: My mother recently
purchased this piece at a tag
sale, intact, unsigned. We
think it is Lucite and won-
dered if you knew any-
thing about it. The seller
said it is from the 1940s.
- D., Internet
Dear D.: I wish your
photograph were clearer
Lucite, a trade name, was
created by DuPont in the
1930s, and is the same as
Plexiglas.
You may have over- John S
looked the maker's mark. SIKOI
Take it out in bright sun- AT
light and examine it all _____
over closely Take a cou-
ple of good photographs so I can see
the facial details. Then perhaps I can
help you. Are you sure it is Lucite and
not glass? Tap it carefully but sharply
Lucite will sound flat. If the sound
has a ring to it, it may be glass.


"

1


Dear John: I have 27 original an-
tique Buddha carvings or amulets.
The two largest are approximately
14 by 5 inches. The four
smallest are about 1 inch
square. The remainder
vary in size but are
mostly about 2 by 3
S^i inches.
They are currently
'arranged in four wooden
picture frames. I am mov-
ing to a much smaller
place, and although they
korski have hung on my wall for
SKI'S many years, I will no
Ic longer have anywhere to
_____ display them.
I am attaching pictures
and I would be very interested if you
would know where I could have
them valued. Thank you. I listen to
your radio show regularly and read
your column and thoroughly enjoy it.
-H.H., Internet


Dear H.H.: Carved ivory Buddhas
have been produced for centuries
and in large quantities. Dollar values
are heavily influenced by quality of
detail. I suggest you contact the spe-
cialists at wwwigavelauctions.com.
Dear John: I hope you can help me.
My aunt collected English silver cups,
small boxes, and pitchers. She always
knew how old they were and lots of
information about each item. She
said each piece was made of sterling
silver and how old it was.
There are various marks on each
piece that I can see with my magni-
fier Do you know how to decipher
See ATTIC/Page E7
The owner believes this figure
might be made of Lucite, which
is a trade name for a plastic
material created by DuPont
in the 1930s. It's also possible
it could be made of glass.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I 4 9 9AZ^^0Ay^ 0^^w C71MUS COUA


Special to the Chronicle
Carved Buddhas such as these have been produced for centuries. Value is
heavily influenced by the workmanship of the piece.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

these marks or some-
one who can help me?
- TD., Crystal River
Dear T.D.: English
silver is currently a very
collectible category and
all the items you men-
tion are desirable. The
British have used hall-


marks to indicate silver
content, town and a
date letter for 600 years.
I can help you with
the marks if you can
take photographs clear
enough for me to see
the images. If not, then
make a drawing of the
marks. Be sure to in-
clude photos of each
item along with dimen-
sions and any other no-
table inscriptions.


John Sikorski has been
a professional in the
antiques business for
30years. He hosts a
call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Satur-
days from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions
to Sikorski's Attic,
PO. Box2513, Ocala,
FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties


il 435E Keller C
7T [.h_ i :ii"'.w S299.900
Spacious, open & bright 3bd/2ba pool
home on the Oaks Golf Course.
Dir: Rte 486 to south on Citrus Hills Blvd.
left on Keller Ct.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774
NEW LISTING


7"1 a

TNEW LISTING
NEW LISTING


I 1180 N Rock Ave
MLS 710443 $695,000
50 acres of pure PARADISE + a lovely
RANCH home.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261
NEW LISTING


v^ ; 3747 N Tyrone Ave O 4373 N Saddletree Dr
MLS 710503 $220,000 MLS 710531 $199,000
Country setting-3bd/2.5ba pool home on Beautiful &very clean 3/2/2 abuts
1 acre wooded lot. horse trails.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
NEW LISTING 1111M G ".


1, ee1.74 E Harthord Sl 24 5A
MLS 710457 $59,900
Greatvalue! Clean 2/2 furnished
top floor condo.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


,LLwL 453W Blueflax Ct
MLS 707227 $129,900
NEW ROOF FEB 2014,4/3/2 w/pool
on cul-de-sac.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


.J4jtlL 330 E Ireland CI
SMLS 707409 $299,900
Oaks Golf Course views in this 4/3/2 pool
home w/plenty of storage.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764

-we-


tillt 3566 N Timothy Ter
MLS 709258 $57,500
Lovely, refreshed villa in park-like
55+ community.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW LISTING


T, SWt, 915WSkyview Landing Dr
MLS 710500 $334,900
Hardly lived in 3/2/2 perfectly maintained
Skyview Villa.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976
NEW LISTING


.13l6- ji1Z N UeiDerr7 lt
MLS 710470 $75,000
IMMACULATE 2/2 + FL room &
screened lanai.
Andrea Mialiaccio 352-422-3261


,-7j\fA 60W Mickey Mantle Path
MLS 707861 $249,900
Top quality 3/2.5/2 pool home + den +
fireplace w/warming drawer.
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


ll Y 10985 W Bentbow Path
S MLS 709202 $39,900
GORGEOUS land, GREAT pole barn,
mobile needs TLC.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


PINE RIDGE CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. .. 20W.Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 (352) 746-0744
c 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC An independentlyowned and operated brokermemberof BRERAffiliates LLC Prudental,the Prudential
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SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E7




E8 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


W .. -


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Attention grabbed rs


bflTHf OOO h Ilflb bflPS fT5

KAREN SCHWARTZ
Associated Press

The renovation of the master bathroom in my

83-year-old father's new house turned out
beautifully, with a frameless glass shower and
handmade ceramic tile accents. Neither of us wanted
to make it look institutional with a grab bar.
We needn't have worried.


STTLIS 1

Many of today's grab bars are cleverly
disguised, looking instead like sleek soap
dishes, functional shampoo trays, trendy
towel racks and even toilet paper hold-
ers.
Take for instance the corner shelf from
American Standard's Invisia line. It looks
like nothing more than a solid white tray
set inside a tubular frame. But that tube,
available in brushed stainless or chrome,
functions as a grab bar and can support
up to 500 pounds.
Want fun and funky? Best Bath Systems
has a series of acrylic towel bars with
hidden mounts that come in more than
two dozen colors, some opaque, some


Page EO10


Horizon and Wave Signature Series grab bars in satin nickel. A 2012 survey found about half of those ages 55 to 64 thought that bathroom aids, such as grab bars and shower
seating, were "essential" or "desirable." That rose to nearly two-thirds among those age 65 and older.


The Invisia corner shelf. It looks like nothing more than
a solid white tray set inside a tubular frame. But that
tube, available in brushed stainless or chrome, functions
as a grab bar and can support up to 500 pounds.

S'"Always There For You"
EY1GAIL COOPER
KE Multimillion Dollar Realtor
REAL 1(352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700
| .- EB, E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com





OVER 2400 SQUARE FEET OF LIVING!
3+office/2.5/3 double boulevard lot Heated pool and spa
Island kitchen wood cabinetry Well for irrigation electronic air filter
Office has built-in desk/bookcases Half bath outdoor shower off the pool
Large double closet and sink in laundry Home warranty for the buyers
#708838 $249,700
See.JVirtua .l Tus, w..i.. alehJoIIJ.I...I IIo...


A Great Grabz Horizon aquarium acrylicgrab bar with The Great Grabz Signature Series of Burmese teak,
satin chrome fixtures in a bathroom, acrylic, oil rub bronze, stainless steel, polished brass
and satin nickel grab bars.


i /^ JOANN MARTIN
t!1referredc
REAL ESTATE Hi:
Broker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net




9330 E Kenosha Ct, Floral City 820 E Dakota Ct
Beautiful Waterfront Home Hernando FL
Gourmet kitchen, stainless steel appliances. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, with
New roof and air 2011, gazebo, double pane caged in-ground pool on the 12th tee box
windows, extra large lot. Fish from your own of The Meadows Golf Course. Newer roof
dock. and air conditioner, wood fireplace,
Offered for $259,000. MLS# 709137 intercom, security system.
Directions: U.S. 41 Fl Ave South from Inverness, Offered for $139,900.
Left on Orange Ave. (Hwy 48) Left on Duval Island. Dir: Rte 486 to Citrus Hills Blvd. to left on Dakota.
Left on Grove. Left on Kenosha. Home is located at the end of the cul-de-sac.


REGENCY PARK-INVERNESS, FL COUNTRY LIVING-INVERNESS, FL
Ground floor 2BR/2BA with fireplace. Close to 2.33 acre wooded tract in Deerwood. Fenced.
town. $49,900 MLS#709755 $27,750 MLS#709930
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
After Hours 52) 302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.corn


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E9




E10 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014

GRABBERS
Continued from Page E9

translucent, some with embedded
stones and some that even glow in
the dark.
Or for a spa feel, they make a teak
grab bar that comes in six different
lengths, from 10 inches to 42 inches.
Mounting hardware is available in a
choice of five finishes.
"We realized there were a lot of
people who wanted an attractive op-
tion for safety, and who didn't want
to be reminded of their inabilities
first thing in the morning and last
thing at night," said Abbie Sladick,
53, of Naples, Florida, a certified
contractor and remodeler who cre-
ated the GreatGrabz line. It was pur-
chased by Best Bath Systems last
year for an undisclosed amount.
Still, I wondered what having a
grab bar in the bathroom might do
to the eventual resale value of the
house. Turns out, it might just help
it.
A 2012 survey found that about
half of those ages 55 to 64 thought
that bathroom aids, such as grab
bars and shower seating, were "es-
sential" or "desirable." That rose to
nearly two-thirds among those age
65 and older Even in the younger
age groups, about a third of those
surveyed agreed.
The National Association of
Home Builders' online survey of
more than 3,860 respondents in-
cluded only those who had pur-
chased a house in the past three
years or were planning on doing so
in the next three years. In other
words, people who were "really
thinking" about what they wanted
in a home, said Stephen Melman,
NAHB's director of economic
services.
Statistics show that while people
85 and older are the most likely to
slip and fall, no age group is im-
mune. Nearly 22 million people


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


over the age of 15 went to the hospi-
tal because of a bathroom injury in
2008, according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
Falls accounted for more than 80
percent of the injuries.
Although 85 percent of those
taken to a hospital were treated and
released, the injuries still resulted
in approximately $67.3 billion in
lifetime medical costs, the CDC
said.
Some things to think about when
choosing a grab bar:
Consider the weight of the peo-
ple who will be using it. Some bars
are rated to support up to 250
pounds, the amount required to
comply with the Americans With
Disabilities Act. Others support up
to 500 pounds.
Compare prices and quality
The Invisia shampoo shelf retails
for about $285 online, depending on
the finish, while one made by Moen
is available at Home Depot for
about $40.
Be aware of how it will be
mounted. If you haven't reinforced
the back of your shower or tub with
plywood, you'll likely need a bar
with 16-inch offsets, or multiples
thereof, to secure it properly
Many people think of grab bars
for the shower and bathtub, but con-
sider putting one near the toilet, too.
The 10-inch bars from Best Bath
Systems can be mounted to hold a
roll of toilet paper Invisia, mean-
while, makes a more substantial, 13-
inch-high arched toilet paper
holder
With so many choices, it was easy
to find attractive options for my fa-
ther's bathroom. And the best part
is, no one knows it.
( citrusCounty
Dra en











SGORGEOUS WATER VIEWS from almost every room in this adorable
2/2 A-frame cottage on the Homosassa River Elevator accesses
the huge master and loft upstairs. Living area with wood burning
fireplace and 2nd bedroom/bath downstairs. Large laundry/
storage area. And a dock for that boat. Awesome weekender/
vacation home. Don't miss this one.
'4Wc CHERYL-
WJ, NHADAL
JoREALTY ONE (352)302-3555
O E mi:cdoreone


xt seasons HGTV episode! SKIP THE OPEN HOUSES! You'll be ready to close on this house! Fairview Estates 3/2.5/2 pool home MOVE IN
Enclosed porch, ea, living READY! Caged inground pool, BRAND NEW ROOF, NEW int. & ext. paint & NEW flooring! Gas fireplace formal living & dining
5789 Pennway. 1m Fuller rooms, int. laundry, split & open floor plans, kitchen island with sink, central vac., covered lanai. #708880. 4435 Aztec
$179,500 1m Fuller.
WE'RE TALKING CHUMP CHANGE for .. .
W E this GINORMOUS 2006 4/2.5 two story home
"'-:L' with 2,984 living REDUCED to $129,900! ___
E "h *- NEW int. paint flooring, apple rear deck, fenced, s
don/office (could be a bedroom), int. laundry GORGEOUS & STUNNING. THIS one WILL BE IN
THE RUNNINGi '05 4/2/3 pool home? 2,889 living
with cabinets, split plan, front covered porch & REDUCED TO $259,9001 NEW paint & flooring.
More. 8242 Verdino #709768 Tomika Spires- Gourmet kitchen, pavers around the pool, built-in
Hanssen 352-586-6598. entertainmentunit! #709888. 71 Oak Village 1m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Chronicle


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E11


To place an ad, call 563-5966


^ -"Cla. .__ .- ssifieds



In Print

F and
I ....Online




All


-The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclon~ne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
* 1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!


$12,000
In Homosassa
2Br/I1Ba 1982 SW
NO HIDDEN FEES!
Includes Delivery
1-727-967-4230




MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183


NEW NEW NEW
1460 Sq ft 3/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $60k
352-795-2377
NEW NEW NEW
MUST SEE
2036 Sq ft 4/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $70k
352-795-2377

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.


Home I Finder I


WVt wt i .'1 I.- '.


linder corn


Fkut Yoar Drwwu How&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


Ct-.

Palm Harbor Homes
Plant City!!
$5k Home replace-
ment. Over 22
models to view-Free
factory tours! New
Velocity homes
$67,903 includes
delivery, set and
A/C. plantcitv.
oalmharbor.com
or 800-622-2832
Se habla espanol




**FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
3/2 WATERFRONT,
DOUBLEWIDE
$75.900.
10480 S. McClung Lp.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000




Crystal River
2 BR/1BA Mobile on
Fendced lot, well,
septic, appls. incld.
$19,500 352 -563-0534
Hernando
15 minutes to
Ocala/ Hernando;
5 min to fishing
3/2 w/ land. $49k obo
(352) 795-1272
HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on /2 acre
5192S. Amanda P.
$15,000 212-2051

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


Perfectly Charming
2004 3/2 M.H. on 1+
acres; 18 x 31 Shed
Port. Wood fir scr
porch; light & bright
12x24 sun porch, pri
patio W/retrac. awn-
ing. Absolute move in
condition. $79,900
Call Louise Lubranecki
305-491-1051 w/
Parsley Real Estate
352-726-2628

WESTWOOD ACRES
3 bedroom. 2 bath.
$68000. 1768 SQ
FT..-PICSAT
ZILLOW.COM-9515W
MIDLAND LN C.R. No
owner finance Call
Terry-(352)697-1218




2 Bedroom, 1 2Bath,
furn, Carport,
scrn rm good value,
In quiet 55+Park
$5,500. 386-234-0254
(352) 748-5325

a 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern 2/1 homes
from $7500 or Lease to
Own from $145/mo.
$700.down + Lot
rent of $265. mo.
10 yr. payoff at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional
55+Park 352 628-5977

Nice Older Singlewide
in Singing Forest Adult
Park, has addition
and partially furn.
$18,300 obo,
Possible owner finan.
$365. Includes lot rent
352-726-9369


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640










ACTON]
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S1000 & UNDER
$1000-11770 W. Sunnybrook
3/2/2 on canal
$925-Beautiful Meadowaest Villa
2/2/1, pool tennis
$900-3290 S. Michigan Blvd.
2/2 nostlgt 2 stoy
$850-6698 S. Wald PFt.
4/2 w/inced yardl

$675 & UNDER
$675-6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2/2 home w/dck
$650-7096 N Dawson Dr.
2/2 mobile in Henndo
$575-8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SW on 1.25 acres
For More Listings Go To
www.CihrusountyHomieRentals.nm











.Inc
333; N. I "of I" v;e IIu

Inens IL 3445

352-34 : 1 -4663ltl#| g
CITU COUNTY' ;'


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf


2/1 .....................$500
3/2...................... $725
3/2/2.................$850
3/1 ....................... $700
I :]tllltllll!III

21211..................$650


3/2/2.................$850
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggqqs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010




FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





FLORAL OAKS
APARTMENTS
NOW RENTING *
352-860-0829
62+ Elderly/Disabled
With or Without
Children.
Central AC Heat
Water & Sewer
Included
Laundry Facilites
On-Site Managemnt
1 & 2 BD. APTS
8092 S. Floral Oaks
CIR., Floral City,
Fl 34436, TDD #771




EOE/Provider


FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




US 19 Office $550.
office/warehouse
1/b-lba $1200. util.
incl. 352-634-0129




BRENTWOOD
Townhome, 3/2.5
w/Social Membership
(352) 613-4459
CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished,
352-527-8002 or
352-476-4242
INVERNESS
2/2, immac. in town
$725. mo.+ $500. Sec.,
223 Trout Ave.
(352) 895-6549




INVERNESS
2/1 Brand New, Upscale
$599. (786)405-3503




HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




HOMOSASSA
1/1, Duplex $435. mo.
C. Riv. 3/2 House $650
1st.& Sec. 212-4981




CRYSTAL RIVER
3/B $850., sec. $450.
Fenced Yd.563-9857


*1
Beverly Hills
2 BR,1 BA, $675/mo,
1st month free.
(352)422-7794
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2 Beautiful Home
Many extras $950. mo
+ sec. 352-302-8265
INVERNESS
2/2 Waterfront, $800
mo., 1st, last sec.
352-364-2120
INVERNESS
3/2/1, sunroom,
fenced yard, app'd
pet with add'l fee,
$795/mo sec & 1st.
352-697-2195



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
Lake Front Home
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$750 (908) 322-6529


DEB
THOMPSON
SOne call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebS)vahoo.com
and
debthompson.com





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OPPORTUNITY


For Sle ,


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE




CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL!

30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandreatycom
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




Bank Owned
Auction-
160+/1 Acres
Divided of Higher
Elevation Pasture &
Timber Land with
Beautiful Views for
Miles in Clyde, NC,
Haywood County.
Saturday, May 31st
at 11am.
Auction At
Haywood County
Fairgrounds, Iron
Horse Auction Co.
Inc.
ironhorse
auction.com
800-997-2248.
NCAL3936




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514



PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870


Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+ Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10 x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202





2 Bed 1 Bath CP. Tile
throughout. Updated
bath, roof '07. New paint
in/out. $45K. 527-1239



. ^nS.m. -'

(M421 6,'71.VMO




2 bedroom, 2 bath
Maintenance Free
Villas & Condos
$750-$825
Many with amenities included!
352-637-3800


Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282






2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12x20 shed,
etc. $138,500.
(352) 419-6327


For Sale DI
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084




3/2/2 + Den On % acre,
Move in Condition!
Built in 2008
Selena Hills
$165,000.
352-341-0118





Realty Connect
Buying or Selling?
Waterfront,
Acreage, Golf
Homes & More!
FREE List of
Available Homes!
TheFLDream.com
Contact the
Premier Real
Estate Group
Realty Connect
(352) 341-2588 or
(352) 212-1446
T. Paduano, Broker




Nice private 1200sqft
home w/scrd patio,
carport & security lights.
Close to fishing, boat-
ing & gulf, $42,000 obo
As is. (786) 301-3805
w, Sugarmill Woods
2900 sq. ft 3bd/2/2 ba
pool, tile roof, 2 lots,
$234k (352) 382-8957


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is oreat
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY !




4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods
$119.900.
1 Fig Court W.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.





"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company+
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.corn
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscritters.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is thetime
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments




$100,000. + Closing
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Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268




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E. TENNESSEE
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Office Open
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LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921


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E12 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E6

Asia, 12 from Africa, mostly on
Madagascar, and two from trop-
ical America. Skunk vine is
cold hardy north to Zone 6. It
can grow as far north as the
42nd latitude and could poten-
tially invade northeastern
states and southern Canada. It
has spread from Florida into
separate places in Texas,
Louisiana, Georgia, North Car-
olina and South Carolina. It is a
problem in Hawaii, too.
Did birds spread the seeds so
widely? Ordid seeds and plantparts
get inadvertently transported by
the nursery industry or home-
owners migrating and taking
plants from Florida? Research
has provided no conclusive answer
or useful biological control.


REALTY GROUP
REALTYiGROUP


DETACHED VILLA
2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR
e BRENTWOOD VILLAS
-1 IT'' I- ICE FREE LIMIJi. IlJ
.- .... I maintained 2
.. ....r, 2 baths, 2 car
J" "' , -d-tached villa on
Ad di, I ndscaped cul-de-
ac lot in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Screened entry to this villa with a
spacious open floor plan, kitchen has eat-in dining area and breakfast
bar. Neutral colors. Both bathrooms are handicap equipped. The
sliders to the large rear lanai offer a view of a green expansive lawn.
Plenty of room for a pool. Home is readyforyou to move right in. Enjoy
he Citrus Hills Country Club Membership lifestyle with this home.
Hurrythis villa value will not last long. MLS 705084.......... $116,900
DETACHED VILLA
3 BED 2.5 BATH 2 CAR
HILLSIDE VILLAS
- .... ,i.- ,illa 3 bedroom, 2.5
ii- .. a den and pool in
Terra Vista. This
.,,.- r,, many beautiful
including porcelain
, throughout, formal
-' _"J.. ",',,,',, with custom chair
height molding, professional window treatments throughout, custom
naple cabinetry in the great room, den and kitchen have under
cabinet lighting & pullouts, gas fireplace, aquarium windowed
breakfast nook gives you an incredible view overlooking the 6th
airway of the popular Skyview Golf Course.
M LS 704750 ................................................................................ $ 2 9 9 ,0 0 0


Homeowners should conscientiously

pull and kill allflowers, seeds, stems

and roots. Newly emerging stems

and leaves that sprout from the

roots need to be sprayed with

glyphosate herbicide.


Homeowners need to be vigi-
lant to eradicate skunk vine
from their landscapes. More
volunteers are needed in all
public places to help control in-
vasive pest plants. In 1998 the
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Coun-
cil listed skunk Vine as a Cate-
gory 1 species, causing
disruption of native plant com-
munities. When native plants
are displaced by aliens, the an-
imals, birds, reptiles, amphib-
ians and insects are also
displaced.


Will Florida lose its many en-
demic, threatened and endan-
gered plants and creatures to
the invasion of rampant exotic
species?
Skunk vine smells strongly
fetid, as the leaves contain sul-
fur compounds. The Japanese
call it "human gas vine." It has
masses of pretty small flowers
followed by round, yellow-or-
ange fruit containing winged
seeds.
Homeowners should consci-
entiously pull and kill all flow-


SpeUializngTeraVit

. ^^^m^. ^
& gBren'Btwood Resales


WOODVIIEW VILLAS




neutral colors with lots of ceramic tile flooring in all wet areas plus the
great room Open floor plan design with a great use of space. Greatbso-


room overlooks the private screened lanai. This home is in an
excellent location in a maintenance free area of Terra Vista.
SMLS ............... ly 2 bed$199,000




SINGLE FAMILY HOME
3 BED, 2.5 BATH, caDEN,
......... 3 CAR, FOXFIRE
,,,.- .)me is taste-
1 .. ,. .l 14corated in
neutral colors with lots of ceramic tile flooring in all wet areas plus the
great room! Open floor plan design with a great use of space. Great


room overlooks the private screened lanai. This hom home is in an
excellent location in a maintenance free area of Terra Vista.
M LS 707735 ................................................................................ $ 1 9 9 ,0 0 0
I SINGLE FAMILY HOME
3 BED, 2.5 BATH, DEN,
3CAR, FOXFIRE
h -:,i, 1 ,.- 1, custom home in
,-,I ... :)xfire of Terra Vista.
S:,,,,,,, den, 2.5 bath with
.. ," on an oversized
,d,.i 1 homesite. Impres-
sive outdoor living area with exterior lighting, pool, hot tub, gas fire
pit, pavers and expanded lanai. Interior upgrades include wood
cabinets, stainless steel appliances, plantation shutters, designer
lightfixtures, stained glass entrance door and many more that make
this house a mustsee! Make this your next home!
M LS 710445 ........................................................................... $ 3 7 5 ,0 0 0


ers, seeds, stems and roots.
Newly emerging stems and
leaves that sprout from the
roots need to be sprayed with
glyphosate herbicide before
they get tall enough to climb
nearby plants. Always read and
follow the label instructions.
Homeowners and gardeners
dislike skunk vine. Alien inva-
sive plants should be eradi-
cated everywhere. Using more
native plants in the garden and
landscape benefits humans, an-
imals and the environment.
Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thou-
sands ofnative plants. Visitors
are welcome to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden. For an
appointment, call 352-249-6899
or contact
JWeber12385@gmail. corn.


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E13

Real Estate
DIGEST


Potts reaches for
stars at RE/MAX
Realtor Sherry Potts has suc-
cessfully surpassed the multimillion
dollar mark in
sales volume
this year.
Sherry joins a
very elite group
of agents who
have qualified
Sherr for the presti-
gSherry Potts ious Multi-Mil-
lion Dollar club. Sherry is an agent
with RE/MAX Realty One and
works out of their Crystal River of-
fice. The Brokers and staff of
RE/MAX congratulate Sherry on
her continued success.


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


S..................................... BRENTW OOD
3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR
"- "" BRENTWOOD VILLAS
This Former Builder's Show-
L case Model offers comfort-
able, affordable living in one
of Florida's Premier Lifestyle
Communities, Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Situated along the Brentwood
Golf Course in an area of newer homes this maintenance free home
offers an open great room plan with a casual dining nook, spacious
kitchen, owners suite, guest room PLUS a den/3rd bedroom, covered
lanai & 2 car garage. The home has been impeccably maintained both
inside & out and shows like a model. The furnishings are negotiable
making this a true TURN KEY OPPORTUNITY.
M LS 708241 ................................................................................ $ 1 9 9 ,9 0 0
SSINGLE FAMILY
- 3 BED. 3.5 BATH. 3 CAR
FOXFIRE



yard, to the incredible views of the golf course..,. this home is a complete
package. The interior is well thought out offering views from all vantage
points, abundant space from casual to formal living. The expansive lanai
complete with summer kitchen, heated pool with spill-over-spa and pool
bath provide for fantastic outdoor entertaining. One could go on but there
is just too much to describe ... THIS IS ONE THAT MUST BE SEEN TO
FULLY APPRICIATE. M LS 709969 ............................................. ..... $595,000


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS
Expanded Lantana model perfectly located on 1st tee of the Skyview
Golf Course. Professionally decorated, built-ins in living room,
surround sound, Cherry cabinets with roll-outs and so much more.
Move-in ready!
M LS 701779 ........................................................................... $ 2 5 9 ,0 0 0
SINGLE FAMILY HOME
|Bf 4 BED. 3 BATH. 2.5 CAR
I BELLAMY RIDGE
I1 .. .. i . . . .. i .,-, I,- -

h ,1 i .1 ,, [II.. .... 1 d, . .d
pool with waterfall feature. Custom designed fish pond complete with
water fountain. Exterior stone. Brick paver driveway, entrance and pool
deck. Golf Cart Garage. Private well for irrigation. This home is
immaculate inside and out. Granite countertops. 42" staggered wood
kitchen cabinets. Sliding doors throughout the home allowing for
maximum light. Custom Armstrong flooring.
M LS 706244 ................................................................................ $ 6 7 9 ,0 0 0


STerms 6 MonthS oSr Mor
Terra Vista &Bent oo ea l Sol Mp i d wh a l


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLA
locatedd in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished
detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2 car garage. Open floor
Ilan with lots of space. Social membership is included.
'2 12 1 ......................................................... ....................... ............ $ 1 ,2 0 0


DETACHED VILLA 2 BR, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Brentwood Villa with a great panoramic view of the Brentwood Golf
Course. Nice 2BD, 2Bath with Den/Office. Large kitchen with dining and
breakfast bar. Enjoy the spectacular view from your screened in lanai.
Close to the Brentwood Golf & Pro Shop. #9951 .....................$1 200


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED 2 BATH 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Brentwood Golf Course unfurnished home 2 bedroom with a den 2
bathrooms, 2 car garage. Come enjoy the view and take advantage
of a II the amenities the community has to offer. #2571 ........$1,300




E14 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014


Canners: Gardeners of the future


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

A canner's garden is not your typ-
ical vegetable patch. With its full-
scale production, distinctive
varieties and four-season harvests,
it's more for the future than the mo-
ment.
"Canner's gardens aren't really so
different in what they grow. Where
they're really different is in how
much they grow," said Daniel
Gasteiger, author of "Yes You Can!
And Freeze and Dry It, Too" (Cool
Springs Press, 2011).
"Do some serious planning," said
Gasteiger, of Lewisburg, Pennsylva-
nia. "How often do I serve corn?
How often do I serve broccoli? Then
consider how often you'll use it in
the form you'll use to preserve it. I
use broccoli much more often fresh
than I do frozen."
The biggest challenge facing food
preservationists tends to be deter-
mining how much to grow. The
Louisiana State University AgCen-
ter has created a vegetable produc-
tion chart for expected crop yields
per 100-foot rows of:
Lima beans (Bush): 1 bushel
shelled or 32 pounds
Beets: 100 pounds
Cabbage: 85 heads
Corn: 120 ears


Pepper (Bell): 125 pounds
Squash (Winter): 150 pounds
Cucumbers: 170 pounds
Strawberries: 170 pounds
Tomatoes (Slicers) 250 pounds
If you only have a 50-foot row of a
crop, cut the posted yield in half, LSU
says. If you have a 10-foot row, then
use one-tenth of the posted yield.
"The smaller your space, the
more important it is to use succes-
sion gardening," Gasteiger said.
That means planting a second crop
in the same space after the first one
is harvested. Shop for short-season
varieties if planting successive
crops.
Also, choose cultivars carefully
Some are better than others for can-
ning, freezing or dehydrating.
"If you're going to plant to pre-
serve, you'll probably want the high-
est density (yielding) producers you
can get," Gasteiger said. "Canning
tomatoes are typically much firmer
and less flavorful than slicing toma-
toes, but better (for canning) be-
cause they hold together when
cooked."
How long do canned foods last?
"If the food was canned safely, it
should remain safe indefinitely No
pathogens should grow on them,"
said Jeanne Brandt, a professor and
Master Food Preserver coordinator
with Oregon State University That


program trains and certifies volun-
teers who help county Extension
staff provide food safety and preser-
vation information.
"Try not to preserve more than
you can consume in a year or two
though because the quality deterio-
rates," Brandt said. "It breaks down
in the jar It toughens. The color also
changes dramatically"
Kimberly Culbertson of Hillsboro,
Oregon, is a Master Gardener who
later earned a Master Food Pre-
server certificate.
"I got into preserving in part be-
cause it's a step up from gardening,"
she said. "I used to be in a rush to
give away any surplus fresh vegeta-
bles before they'd spoil. Now, as
canned, I can share them through-
out the year"
She also recommends freezing,
pickling and dehydrating as a way of
preserving different food groups
and offering up different flavors.
"I individually quick-freeze fresh
fruit, then package it for the deep
freeze so I can portion it out for
cooking and snacking," she said.
"Dried fruits concentrate flavors
and sweetness and add another di-
mension to cooking.
"I pickle peppers and they can
easily," Culbertson said. "Tomatoes
bring back summer every time I
open a jar"


.' French Country Estate on 6 acre MOL in desirable location close to Inverness Secluded 80 acre farm close to Crystal River Rolling pastures, lush meadows,
4,078 sq ft of luxury living spacf '.11 t. IIt. end finishes you desire ponds, mature oak trees 2 spacious and luxuriously remodeldI .ttiu-p are
STATELY RIVERFRONT RETREAT gourmet kitchen, family room, pool' '". '1 r .. deck, 3 car garage, plus carefully positioned in a beautiful setting for maximum Ir, I visit
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an interactive tour $739,000 $800,000


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HIGHIVIEW ESTATES
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B R ,with lots of fruit t tly oo zone Beautiful kitchen w/custom treed 1 ac lot High filings,
great room boasts large picture wood cabinets, air conditioned sun eat-in kitchen, large master w/jetted tub
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REALTOR SSapp $274,000 $99,900 1$469,000 $189,900
Cell: (352) 220.0466

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Investors Realty kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of ,,. ., ,, ... i., w/laminate flooring, laj. "
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- U .











No Job Too Small
Residential & Commercial Buildings
APPROVING ASSISTANCE WITH BUILDING DEPARTMENTS
Country Architect Florida Registered Architect


John Warren White
PA ARCHITECT
THE MOST EXPERIENCED ARCHITECT IN HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTY
Cell 352-540-8687 352-796-4972
jwhite198@tampabay.rr.com In


FEATURED.HOMEI




CITUS COUNTY (FL) GIUONCLIE SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 E15


Add some majesty



to your garden with"'



crown imperial


LEE REICH
Associated Press
Crown imperial is exiting the gar-
den after another fabulous spring
show The orange blossoms are fad-
ing, wilting and will soon drop. Then
the rest of the plant will begin to dis-
solve back into the ground.
As befits nobility, crown imperial
comes and goes as it pleases, often
in a fickle or unpredictable manner
Mine was planted over 20 years ago,
and for its first half-dozen years re-
fused to show more than just leaves.
The flowers were worth the wait.
Eventually, a leafy stalk emerged
from the center of the ground-level
whorl of leaves, the stalk capped
with a crown: a tuft of leaves, below
which hung a ring of nodding, or-
ange blossoms. A teardrop of nectar
poised at the end of each petal.

HIS MAJESTY MOVES
After a couple years of enjoying
the flowers, I decided that the site
was not befitting this royal plant. So
I dug the bulb out from the back cor-
ner of my vegetable garden and
moved it to a more prominent place
beneath a cherry tree.
His Majesty evidentlywas displeased
with the move, for he never emerged
at his new location. I don't know if
he scooted underground the 30 feet
back to the original site or what, but
he has faithfully kept up his royal
appearances there ever since.
(Crown imperial is a bulb that
makes offsets. My plant's odd behav-
ior could be explained by my having
dug up a large offset and inadvertently
left the mother bulb or another large
offset in place. I also, then, must
have made some mistake in planting
the offset even though I tried to cater
to His Highness' needs with well-
drained soil, rich in humus, and a
topping of mulch. Some gardeners
suggest planting the bulb on its side


so that water does not collect on top
of the bulb, rotting it.)
A few summers ago, I decided to
expand the royal family As soon as the
leaves and stem disappeared, I care-
fully dug up the softball-size bulb and
pulled off a few outer layers of scales.

MULTIPLYING THE BULB
Crown imperial has naked scales,
like lilies, which similarly are sus-
ceptible to damage and drying out.
The scales went into a plastic bag
along with plenty of moist peat and
perlite, and then sat in a warm room
for a month or two while bulblets
formed at the base of each scale.
After that, I moved the bags to the
refrigerator for another two months,
where they would get the cool con-
ditions needed before growth could
begin. Once they were out of the re-
frigerator, I potted up the bulblets
and waited for spring. Then out they
went into the garden.
You might think a lot of coddling
was required to bring up this royal
family Given the price of crown im-
perial bulbs over $10 each! -
nurseries evidently do consider this
to be royal treatment.
But mostly what I supplied was
patience, which has now rewarded
me with a regal line of crown impe-
rials in a bed above a rock wall, and
another one sharing a bed with red-
currant bushes. The plants generally
need a year of growth in the ground
after planting before they've built up
sufficient energy reserves to flower
The patriarch of my family of
crown imperials, my original plant,
flowers as gloriously every spring as
any other
One caution if your interest has
been kindled in growing, perhaps
propagating, crown imperial: His
Highness does emit an odor that of-
fends some gardeners, an odor sim-
ilar to skunk. The aroma is mild,
though, and pleasing to many noses.
Associated Press


A crown imperial, a majestic spring bulb that deserves to be more widely
known and grown, is pictured May 5 in New Paltz, New York.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.'SERVINGcTU 1L"laIL J
i&nku^%l J.W. MOTO HOW :1 ] i fc


FORU HOME-



YEARS. 35276-666 A F Market
&PCOUNTY MANAGEMENT ... ) ',:',:" AnalysIis!

i^-"i iflr [Kiff~


WOODSY PRIVACY
,, rl *l,:~ ,:, II.,,l l, ,i I-. i: I, : l,,, ,r
1i i ll l [ 1,ii~ hl l i~i i t: 1i: l .rt. I i ,i Ir~ l
l:,,:r ,:,:,, ,,.,:,,,,: :: I,, _,,:,,:, :.l- I ,


PRICED TO SELL AT S148,900
Pal Dais 3521212 7.1280


ilvVcnivcoo niunLMIvUO jDnl/DM
P,:,,;,l l',:,i,,H ,:,,, ,;,vi;r I "' 1:,, rn N, ,
ill i I %.. 1 1 1 1 : I r I :II, in r

RC iLaranda.i Wa, l35-v129r
r..1LC -:71 '-',:) S147,900
Call LaWanrda Watt 352-212-1989


* L i II b.: i l. B i ,i ii l-'O ii

* L ir.j [ :l i ,1 i ,q ,:i1 ,: .1

'IL^'-l~';mlS 219,000
Jeanne O Willard Pickiel 3522123410
i vt vt v.Ciltrus CounlvSold.comn


COME HAVE A LOOK!
Anlraclive home al:
2809 W. Regan Sl.. Inverness. FL
01. ,: I. ll,, o hor ipl~n VV.,.hA,:rhd

r2 :.2.2. : i.:r i .'- .I :I [, I I: .I i r.1
1LL .. hIr:5* rS79,500


$96,900 COMMERCIAL -
DOWNTOWN DUNNELLON!


Mary Parsons 352.634.1273


J B'UHUUM Z .b BAI I1 "UUL IVUMI
* L I I ,,,, 11,: 1 1111. ,:
* I, i111:11 I . ., ,F: 1 1 .,I ....... ; i:lTlh i i
1 II F.l Hill 1.1I.1Iff.- HI
1.11 iII:iIA S229,727
Jeanne om Willad Plckel1352.212.3410
Ll 4 ClliSCoiiIh'Sold COil


2 BEDROOM 2 BATH FLORIDA ROOM
* I ': 1: r,- I I r, v ,:cl I. 11: I i r.I
* All ,llh ,: i JEW ROOF
* PLEA' A[ JT GRO' VE ,I', I -, :rI ,: [
r.1LC' = 70.067 S103,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-2410
www. CilrusCountyvSold.comn


:, i,1,,l ,,,,1 ,:,,,:- ,,,:,11 ,.:..:., ,, i,r I I.,,l

, I , ,r, I,,,r Ii : :l f,
ASKING S65,000 botli make an offe,
Call Ruth Fiedeick 1352 56 S0,66


i'i,.,c- I 5 ..- r.c- .-.hi [ I.. V [ :. ..:. I ..C-.
f',..- r l I[lld Il Vl/ t, Ell|i.', hr.) [ J
.-.r hl.c h .:.h [I, 2.. p :.l. t, :,(,-r Ir.nl. ,,oiir
,:.,,h : rd1 l-.r I[ .:.lwl..: r, .. [o:
, ,; .r I lln . [l II [
1L'.. =7/:7/0:.: ASKING S75.000
Call Jim Morton 3524222173


THIS WILL MAKE YOU SMILE!

II ,, ,h h ,, i ,,, h ,.,r ,: ,. ,, .,,,,, h, ,, , l l r
I~l,.,q 1" II I..,u l H, ... 1 1i ,: h ,:h ,,


ll i -... NOW S15,000
Ask loI Matliv Booth 63714904


HEATHERWOOD PROPERTY
M ill.[ .... r : ..:r. : .-.1 t.,. ll ii .i .[ .i .. .1

l,, ,r i,, i ,,: in I,, I, v. ,: ,oiir ,:, ,i, i,,o ,o,
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THIS IS A GREAT DEAL -& S120K
Please call Shanna Casey J- 352270 1352


CITRUS SPRINGS
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" i: i ir i, r nl, li.lr I h...n :r '::ri Fur.

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rrL'e71:)Oa4(r S139,900
Lorraine O'Regan 352-586-0075


10 ACRES ON THE RIVER!

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S139,900 Owner is very
nolivaled, bring all oilers!
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


AWESOME HOME ON 3 6 ACRES ON THE WATER
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U.hi ,,., S320 000
Slelan Stmaran 352.212.0211


RIVER LAKES MANOR
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h pl,,, .j :..: t.1: : rl ,,: 1 ,: :r I:, 1 1 h .
r.i L =. Ill 1ASKINGS69900
Call NancI Jenks 352.400.80712


SPACIOUS 3 22 POOL HOME
ON HALF ACRE ..HOMESIIE
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rl: .i S128.900
Pm Dia, i3r2I212 280
v, lo wy,5 1 I im iti ct2l',' t u, s cwi


E16 SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014