Citrus County chronicle

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 366622
oclc - 15802799
System ID:
UF00028315:03476

Full Text

Happy Mother's Day


Partly cloudy,
30% chance for
a storm.
PAGE A4


TODAY
& next "
morning


MAY 11, 2014 Florida's Best Communityl


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 119 ISSUE 277


110
hey were soldiers,
sailors, Seabees,
Marines.
Some had seen com-
bat, others stayed state-
side. All had served their
country when the world
was at war for a second
time in the 20th century
Not many if any
World War II veterans
consider themselves he-
roes. That's one of the
things that make these
men and women heroes
today Without hesita-
tion, they willingly
served their country
simply because it was
the right thing to do.
On Tuesday more
than 160 World War II
veterans, including five
from Citrus County took
a one-day once-in-a-
lifetime Honor Flight to
the nation's capital to
visit the World War II
Memorial, courtesy of
Honor Flight West Cen-
tral Florida.
Honor Flight is a na-
tional organization that
takes World War II veter-
ans to Washington at no
cost to them. Their fares
(around $450 to $500) are
paid through donations
raised by local organiza-
tions, individuals and
service clubs.
Every step of the way
from the 4:30 a.m. arrival
at the St. Petersburg-
Clearwater Interna-
tional Airport and
arrival at Baltimore In-
ternational Airport to
their destination at the
World War II Memorial
in Washington, and
home again much, much
later that night, these
veterans, most in the late
80s and 90s, were given


I


4


T


^^ -aK^ .*,,' .-i.rj,^. ." .. ."l. r- ja. .

-..
-_. .. : ,-....
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Honor Flight guardian Steve Burch, right, walks with World War II veteran Joe Losito Jr. around the Korean War Veterans
Memorial in Washington, D.C. Both men are Citrus County residents. The memorial honors those who served, were wounded or died
during the war. Nineteen stainless steel statues similar to the one at left depict a patrol walking through the rain-soaked region.


MORE PHOTOS INSIDE
Citrus County veterans................................................. Page A14
Honor Flight leaves lasting memories .........................Page A15
Honor Flight: A Tribute in Picture....................................Inside


George Schimpf stares out the window of the jet he and 160
other veterans fly aboard during the Honor Flight on Tuesday.


the honor due them.
Chronicle photogra-
pher Matthew Beck
went with them to cap-
ture their story in pho-


tos, beginning with a
bus trip that left from
the Citrus County
Builders Association at
2:30 a.m. Tuesday


Homosassa mom of eight

is blessed eight times over


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA Melissa
Correa Hollis can't go any-
where with her eight children
without someone asking, "How
do you do it?"
How do you raise eight kids
- eight kids who are well-
behaved and happy, who get
along, who cooperate?
Correa Hollis shrugs.
She doesn't know how she
does it. She just does it. It's
who she is, she says.
She's the mom who likes to
be goofy She talks with her


kids about everything; no sub-
ject is taboo.
She listens. She makes
things fun.
She keeps a cupboard filled
with snacks and welcomes
other kids from the neighbor-
hood into her home.
The more the merrier.
She does all this, and has
breast cancer
"You do what you need to
do," she says. "But I'm not
complaining. I have a great
life."
MEN
Correa Hollis grew up in
New York in a large, close-knit


family All
one broth
her five sit
with lots
and 14 cou
It was
have 70 p
dinner
"That w;
"So, I kne'
Inevertho
Two are
lationship
band's f
relations
are theirs


hough she has only
er, her mother with


World War II Navy veteran Bev Coleman arrives Tuesday in
Baltimore, Md., to a crowd of well-wishers thanking her and the
scores of other veterans disembarking from their aircraft.
Coleman was one of three women World War II veterans on the
recent Honor Flight.



Renaissance's success

is also its downfall


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer


blings made up for it, In the school popularity peck-
of aunts and uncles ing order, most would think the
isins. Renaissance Center doesn't get
not uncommon to a single vote.
people at Christmas Renaissance has no gradua-
tion, no prom. It doesn't have a
as normal," she says. football team or a booster club.
w I wanted kids, but Yet some students would
)ught I'd have eight." never succeed in school if not
from a previous re- for the Renaissance Center
; one is her hus- Starting out 16 years ago as a
'rom a previous way to remove disruptive stu-
ip and the other five dents from the mainstream
combined. The two school population, Renaissance
has morphed into a learning
See Page A7 center for some kids who thrive


on the small class sizes and in-
dividual attention from teach-
ers and classroom aides.
And that's the problem.
"We have had students re-
quest time and again to stay,"
Citrus County School Board
Chairman Thomas Kennedy
said. "Some students respond to
a smaller classroom environ-
ment. That's not the objective of
Renaissance."
Kennedy believes Renais-
sance should return to its roots
as a school for students with
disruptive behavior, and focus
less on academic improvement.
See Page A2


1184 i ii, NI I1!!l o


Classifieds ....... D4
Crossword ....... A18


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment ..... A4
Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers .. B3


Lottery Payouts . . B3
Movies .......... A18
Obituaries ........ A6


TV Listings ...... A18
Together ........ A20
Veterans Notes . .A19


DOUBLE-UP LEASE GUARANTEE



C LN OC R R D F 1Mill'1l
THEN!



ITH O D ITION 'O
*J -O RS L &IT.ODGE N
.eureetsSxcuesCareSSS0 n


CITRUUUS CNT UNTY




[Ir(oNICLE
^& www.chronicleonline.com


HIGH
88
LOW
68


(GI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCHOOL
Continued from PageAl

The reason is simple:
cost.
Other than CREST or
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute, Renaissance is
the costliest per-student
school to operate in the
district.
Unlike CREST and WTI,
however, the Renaissance
per-pupil total cost of
$11,026 comes directly from
the district's operating
funds. CREST students
bring the district more state
funding because of their
mental or physical disabili-
ties; WTI is funded largely
by the state's workforce de-
velopment program.
Until now, the school
board has done little to ad-
dress the Renaissance
issue. On Tuesday, the
school board will consider
placing Renaissance in the
hands of a private Marion
County business, which says
it can save the district
$700,000.
Kennedy who toured the
Ocala school earlier this
month, said that's an offer
too difficult to pass up in a
budget year when the dis-
trict must find $1 million in
cuts.
Veteran board member
Pat Deutschman, however,
said the issue is deeper
than that
"Before we talk about op-
tions, I want to discuss
whether those options are
necessary," she said. "I don't
want to look at this strictly
as a monetary issue."
MEN
Mike Mullen recalls
teaching alternative educa-
tion years ago, before Ren-
aissance came to be.
At that time, each mid-
dle and high school had a
portable classroom where
principals sent the
troublemakers.
Mullen taught science
and other courses at
Lecanto Middle School, one
of six teachers who would
move through the portable
classroom each day
"It was a group of maybe
15 to 20 kids that were the
same type of kids disrup-
tive at the school," said


c
In 2006, the Citrus County School District reloc
alternative Renaissance Center school to a
square-foot facility in Lecanto.


Mullen, now assistant su-
perintendent of schools.
"They didn't leave the class-
room. The portable had a
bathroom and lunch was
brought to them. They were
completely separated from
the rest of the school."
That changed in 1996
when the Renaissance Cen-
ter was born in a collection
of portable classrooms next
to the Citrus High School
campus in Inverness. The
idea was to have a central
location for schools to send
disruptive students where
they could be monitored
and mentored by teachers
and behavioral specialists.
"It was rough going the
first couple of months,"
Mullen said. 'All the schools
had to send an assistant
principal on a daily basis to
provide extra assistance to
calm those kids down. It
was really a disruptive en-
vironment Just because
you send them to another
school doesn't mean behav-
ior becomes better"
In time, though, some of
the focus shifted when stu-
dents began to excel in
small classrooms with spe-
cial attention from
teachers.


same resources as the other
schools, we don't," he said.
And he said the district's
job is to prepare students
for life beyond high school.
He said encouraging stu-
dents to stay in Renaissance
gives them a false idea of
S what's to come.
"There's no Renais-
S sance College," he said.
"There's no job out there
like Renaissance."
MEN
hronicle file Deutschman has long in-
ated its sisted that classrooms be
37,254- spared from annual budget
cuts. And she is firmly op-
posed to privatizing school


"Over the years, the em-
phasis went to the rehabili-
tation side and not the
discipline side," Deutsch-
man said.
Nine years ago, district
officials continued that
tweaking of the school
when it created a transition
program for middle school
students caught for the first
time possessing marijuana
or alcohol in school.
Rather than expel them
through the district's zero
tolerance policy these stu-
dents instead were sent to
Renaissance for a semes-
ter and given information
to help turn their lives
around.
And other students, while
reaching the level neces-
sary to be returned to their
home school, asked instead
to stay as their academics
improved.
That number is the small
minority however District
records show about 30 per-
cent or fewer Renaissance
students pass standardized
tests.
Mullen said Renaissance
is not equipped to provide a
full-time, fully rounded ed-
ucation for students.
"To think we have the


district programs, let alone
an entire school.
"The bottom line is:


What's the motivation into
privatizing one of our
schools? It's all about the
money," she said.
Deutschman said she
can't envision what parents
will do if they have a prob-
lem with their child's
teacher at a privately run
Renaissance.
"I can't change the ad-
ministrator, because we've
got a contract," she said.
"You take it out of the hands
of the taxpayers. Take the
public out of public schools,
the accountability is no
longer there."
Deutschman, who is re-
tiring this November after
16 years on the school
board, said the district


should look at alternatives
before signing a contract for
Renaissance.
"You have to look at the
cost of the program and
maybe cut back costs at cer-
tain levels," she said. "If it's
a real monetary issue,
maybe we cut back the en-
rollment a year"
Thomas, the board chair-
man, favors privatizing
Renaissance but left the
door open for alternatives.
"One way or another,"
he said, "Renaissance is
going to have to operate
differently"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright
(@chronicleonline. corn.


DAPIR. SHDS .UTR


tOCKlTN'Arod

I ,1/.

e^.


4.


/00



/ i


OAK HILL HOSPITAL IS THE AREA'S ONLY HOSPITAL PROVIDING 24/7

BOARD-CERTIFIED ON-SITE CRITICAL CARE PHYSICIAN SPECIALISTS.

ALL DAY, ALL NIGHT


With our team of on-site ICU Intensivists available 24/7, you can always get
the immediate, life-saving care you need. Also, Oak Hill is the only hospital
to provide 24/7 on-site radiologist coverage with rapid results... and prompt
consultations with ER physicians and other specialists. Oak Hill Hospital
rocks around the clock'til broad daylight with patient-centered care.



OakHillHospital.com 1352.596.6632 Hernando 1 352.628.6441 Citrus


Call Now For Free Physician Referral, Event
Reservations and Health Information at
1-877-4-HCA-DOCS
1-877-442-2362

{\ Oak Hill
Hospital
30 Years New
1984 2014


MMEMME9


mmmmmm


A2 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


LOCAL





Page A3-SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Vets Week planning
meeting May 21
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will have
its monthly coordination
meeting for Citrus County's
22nd annual Veterans Ap-
preciation Week at
1:30 p.m., Wednesday,
May 21, in the conference
room of the Citrus County
Chronicle building,
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans service or-
ganizations are encouraged
to send representatives to
participate in the planning
process. Individual veter-
ans are also welcome. For
more information, contact
Chris Gregoriou at 352-
795-7000.
Save Waters Week
organizers to meet
The Citrus 20/20 Inc.
Save Our Waters Week
Committee will meet at
10 a.m. Monday, May 19, in
Room 219 of the Lecanto
Government Center,
3600 W. Sovereign Path,
located off of County
Road 491.
The purpose of the
meeting is to plan and co-
ordinate activities for Cit-
rus County's 19th Annual
Save Our Waters Week,
which takes place in
September. All interested
organizations and individu-
als are welcome to attend
and encouraged to
participate.
For more information, call
Lace Blue-McLean at 352-
201-0149.
Road resurfacing
workshop scheduled
The Board of County
Commissioners will have a
public workshop on the Vol-
untary Road Resurfacing
Program at 5:15 p.m. Tues-
day, May 13, at the Citrus
County Courthouse. This
will directly follow the regu-
larly scheduled board
meeting and public is
invited.
Staff will make a presen-
tation on the specifics of the
proposed program. Ques-
tions and comments from
the public will follow.
The purpose of the work-
shop is to share information
and allow public comments;
board action on the volun-
tary program will not be
taken on this day.
For information, call
Tobey Phillips, public
information officer, at 352-
527-5484.
Sustainable gardens
topic of workshop

Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping is of-
fering a free workshop to
discuss designing sustain-
able gardens from 2 to
3:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
May 20.
Proper establishment and
management practices
should be considered to en-
sure garden success. When
planning landscape im-
provements always, con-
sider the commitments
required to properly estab-
lish and care for your
investment.
The Green Industry Best
Management Practices
should be followed. The
standards include irrigation,
fertilization, pest control and
cultural practices, which en-
courage and promote a
lasting garden.
The class will be at the


Citrus County Extension
Service building, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Call Steven Davis at 352-
527-5708 to confirm
participation.
-From staff reports


Real-time fire info available


Online tool allows users to see locations of existingfires on map
Special to the Chronicle possible to see where all The map will update as choose Withlacoochee
existing/active wildfires incidents occur, so it is Forestry Center, then
BROOKSVILLE The are in Florida, where all likely that the map at choose district. Authoriza-
Florida Forest Service's open burn authorizations 8 a.m. will be very differ- tions will show up as gray
Fire Management Infor- are or are planned to be ent from the map at push pins and wildfires
mation Systems (FMIS) In- on any particular day and 10 a.m. will show up as a red fire
ternet Mapping Tool other incidents that the Users are able to see the symbol. This helps to iden-
provides up-to-date infor- Florida Forest Service entire state or choose their tify an authorization from
mation for the public about has responsibility for district from the drop- a wildfire.
forest and brush fires, resolving, down menu on the left tab. For additional informa-
Using this tool, it is The data is real-time. Users click location, tion, choose the Blue


Identification option at
the top of the map and
click on the authorization
or wildfire.
Visit the website at
http://www.freshfrom
florida. com/Divisions-
Offices/Florida-Forest-
Service/Wildfire/
Resources/Fire-Tools-and-
Downloads/Fire-
Management-Information-
System-FMIS-Mapping-
Tool.


Swim, bike, run: local kids 'tri' their best


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
ABOVE: John Potkul, an 11-year-old from Inverness Primary School, transitions
to the bike portion of the second annual Kids Triathlon at Whispering Pines Park
on Saturday. RIGHT: Eleven-year-old Caleb Holloway of Inverness Primary School
is the first to cross the finish line Saturday at the Kids Triathlon. BELOW: Keanu
Wadhams, 14, of Inverness Middle school, swims in the first event of the
second annual Kids Triathlon held at Whispering Pines Park. According to event
Chairwoman Linda Van Allen, 230 kids were registered this year, which is
55 more than last year's count of 175. Van Allen said, "the triathlon is all about
the kids having fun and getting them interested in maintaining a healthy
lifestyle."


S7- -

___ .- ____


County to host


course on flood


insurance May 23


Special to the Chronicle
In cooperation with the
Florida Division of Emer-
gency Management (DEM),
the Florida Association of
Counties (FAC) will offer a
free course, "Protecting
Your Community from
Natural Disasters: A
Guide to Flood Insurance
& Flood Mitigation Pro-
grams," for the public from
9 to 11:30 a.m. Friday, May
23, at the Lecanto Govern-
ment Building in Room
166, at 3600 W Sovereign
Path in Lecanto.
To help understand is-
sues associated with the
National Flood Insurance
Program (NFIP), FAC has
developed this workshop
where attendees will re-
ceive information about
the following:
An overview of the


NFIP and the role of the
local government official.
The types of insur-
ance coverage offered
under the NFIP for home-
owners and businesses.
How the 2012 NFIP
changes will affect flood
insurance rates in your
community
What steps your com-
munity can take to help
lower rates flood insur-
ance rates.
An overview of fed-
eral grant programs avail-
able to your community to
reduce potential flood
damages and lower flood
insurance premiums.
Register at https://fl-
counties.portal. daxko. com.
For information, call
Tobey Phillips, public in-
formation officer, at 352-
527-5484 or email tobey.
phillips@bocc.citrus.fl.us.


UI


-doi.


FINISH
V ii- t if.1 _S PBBru'S.P.u', g'l ,








__1


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Sammie Osterloh decorates a heart-shaped vanilla cake with buttercream icing
Friday for her mom for Mother's Day. Provided by Doug Miller, Ray Parrish and Jerry
Levengood, 90 Citrus Resources for Exceptional Students in Transition (CREST)
students decorated their own cakes for their mothers. Miller, Parrish and Levengood
have been purchasing the cakes for seven years as a way to give back to the school
and help ensure that the student and mother are "happy on Mother's Day." Miller
said, "It means something to all children, but to these children it means the world.
You can see it on their faces."


Decorating cakes for moms


I


/i




A4 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Your hard work will lead to
lucrative responsibilities. While it's not
a good time to lend or borrow money,
you will have greater opportunity to in-
vest in something profitable.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Profes-
sionalism and persistence will help you
reach your goals. By staying true to
yourself and your convictions, you will
deflect negative comments.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- Trends
and fashions are constantly changing.
Give yourself a lift. This is a good time
to use your imagination and originality
to create a new look and a new you.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -An un-
pleasant situation needs to be resolved
before you can move forward. Listen to
the demands people are making and
look for a solution.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Romance,
popularity and travel will make your
day You will be more desirable than
ever. Enjoy the moment and have fun.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Decisive
action will be required today Directing
your energy into work, money and
health matters will be more profitable
than just worrying about them.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although you
may be involved in an emotional battle,
face the situation with a firm but mindful
manner. Don't relax your standards.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Partner-
ships are looking good. Consider a
joint venture. This is a good time to
make changes to your investments
and savings.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If
you are already in a relationship, plan
to do something special with your
loved one. If you're single, get out and
mingle. Love is in the stars.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Share
your brilliant ideas with others. Con-
sider starting your own business, or
look for someone who shares your
goals and form a partnership.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Take a
break from your daily routine. Consider
taking a day trip or engaging in an un-
familiar activity
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Resist
the urge to make an investment deci-
sion. The prospects of a good return are
questionable. Keep your cash in a se-
cure location until a sure thing comes
along.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- A differ-
ence of opinion is not worth driving a
wedge in an important relationship.
Choose your words carefully


ENTERTAINMENT


Patricia Heaton
talks about career,
motherhood
LOS ANGELES For Patri-
cia Heaton, the last 20 years
appear to have been a mother-
hood marathon.
'You can see where people
might think
Thatt" said the
Emmy-
winning ac-
E tress, who
played the
long-suffering
wife and
t mother of
Patricia tre o the
Heaton three on the
CBS comedy
"Everybody Loves Raymond."
Heaton, 56, stars as the matri-
arch on ABC's "The Middle." And
Heaton and her actor-husband,
David Hunt, are part of the en-
semble cast in the family com-
edy "Moms' Night Out," now in
theaters.
Heaton and Hunt have four
sons, ages 15 to 20.
Her sons "didn't want to come
out to the premiere of 'Moms'
Night Out,"' she said. "They don't
watch 'The Middle.' They are too
busy with their lives."
And that's exactly as Heaton
wants it.
"There's too many kids who
grow up as the children of
celebrities who cannot find their
own identities," she said, adding
that one of her children wants to
become an actor.
Heaton said she didn't move
to Los Angeles until her early
30s. "And it's not like I moved
here and I was (supermodel)
Kate Upton," she said.
She earned two Emmy
Awards for "Raymond."
Heaton said "Moms' Night
Out" is a film about families. "It's
kind of where I live now in my
life, with my kids."


Associated Press
Actress Jessica Alba accepts her Mother of the Year award as
her husband Cash Warren, right, and their daughters Honor
Marie, left, and Haven Garner look on Friday at the
85th Helping Hand of Los Angeles Mother's Day Luncheon in
Beverly Hills, Calif.


Larry Wilmore to
replace Colbert on
Comedy Central
NEW YORK Writer-comic
Larry Wilmore of "The Daily
Show"' has
earned
: Stephen Col-
bert's cov-
eted Comedy
Central times-
lot following
Jon Stewart
Larry each night.
Wilmore Comedy
Central said
Friday that Wilmore will host
"The Minority Report" at 11:30
each weeknight, starting in
January.

Wilmore, who's black, will add
a different perspective to a late-
night landscape dominated by
white men. The network said
"The Minority Report" will


provide a platform for "underrep-
resented voices in comedy and
media." It was created and will
be produced by Stewart, who
will continue to host "The Daily
Show."
Colbert, a fellow "Daily Show"
alumnus who was rewarded with
his own show a decade ago, is
wrapping "The Colbert Report"
at the end of this year and will
take over for David Letterman
at CBS' "Late Show" next year.
Wilmore will move from his
Los Angeles base to New York
to tape his new series.
"I'm beyond excited to have
this chance to continue my rela-
tionships with Comedy Central
and the brilliant Jon Stewart," he
said. "I love the city of New York
and promise to only wear my
Laker T-shirts when
I'm layering."


-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 11, the
131st day of 2014. There are 234
days left in the year. This is
Mother's Day.
Today's Highlight:
On May 11, 1944, during World
War II, Allied forces launched a
major offensive against Axis lines in
Italy.
On this date:
In 1858, Minnesota became the
32nd state of the Union.
Ten years ago: A grisly video on
an al-Qaida-linked website showed
the beheading of businessman Nick
Berg, an American who'd been kid-
napped in Iraq.
Five years ago: Five U.S.
troops were shot and killed at a
mental health clinic on a Baghdad
base; the shooter, Sgt. John Rus-
sell, was later sentenced to life in
prison without parole.
One year ago: Former Pakistani
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif de-
clared victory following a historic
election marred by violence.
A pair of car bomb attacks in
Turkey killed 52 people near the
Syrian border.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian
Mort Sahl is 87. Nation of Islam
leader Louis Farrakhan is 81.
Rock singer Eric Burdon (The Ani-
mals; War) is 73. Actress Shohreh
Aghdashloo is 62. Actress
Frances Fisher is 62. Actor Boyd
Gaines is 61. Country musician
Mark Herndon (Alabama) is 59.
Actress Martha Quinn is 55.
Country singer-musician Tim Ray-
bon (The Raybon Brothers) is 51.
Actor Tim Blake Nelson is 50.
Actor Jeffrey Donovan is 46.
Country musician Keith West
(Heartland) is 46. Actor Nicky Katt
is 44. Actor Coby Bell is 39. Cellist
Perttu Kivilaakso is 36. Actor-
singer Jonathan Jackson is 32.
Rapper Ace Hood is 26.
Thought for Today: "It is not
until you become a mother that
your judgment slowly turns to com-
passion and understanding." -
Erma Bombeck, American humorist
(1927-1996).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L PeF'cast City


Daytona Bch. 85
Fort Lauderdale 86
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 86
Homestead 85
JacKsonville 86
Key West 87
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 85


191/66 o "0. IN0A A 0.00"
Ed -.-' clu ,le ay
THREE DAY OUTLOOK 'e '"vy
pi )V TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING 103
High 88'" Lows 68,
Partly cloudy, 30% chance for an
,'r'* ... ,,., aftemoon/evening storm
-MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
SHigh:90 Low;67*
P. Partly cloudy

rW ^ TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 90 Low: 67
"- fi.-:" '; Partly cloudy, 20o chance for an afternoon
.. storm
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87072
Record /55
Normal 86/68
Mean temp. 82
Departure from mean 5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 66.
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 78'
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 3.49" Oak, hickory, grasses
Total for the year 14.28" Today's count: 4.4/12
Normal for the year 10.63" M c .
*As o7m atInv s Monday's count: 5.9
UV INDEX: II Tuesday's count: 6.2
0-2minimal.,3-4low,5-6moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 high 10. very high A QAI
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 41
30.12 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES zSb
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) AFTERNOONP
05/11 SUNDAY 03:29 10:12 16:20 21:46
05/12 MONDAY 04:07 22:35 17;18 22:37
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SE TT IT O T...................... 8:10 p.m .
SUN= SUUETOMORnBa.-.. -- 6:39 aRm.
\0- 10 MO SEN TO .......... .... :19 p.m
May 14 May21 May28 Jun5 II TTWAY 427a.m.
BURN CONDrITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Ratling i: MOD. There is no bum ban.
FO(m ne lntonnaion cat Flora Dl,.-on of F lresinr al t352i 754-6777 FOS tmoie
Informalion on drought cwrnii~ins piear icii IMh. DJis'in oi Forestry's Web site:
htlp:/,Mime l-dol comn/lire weaheardix
WATERING RULES
Lawn wate"n liimtled to two days per week, before 10am. orafter 4p.m.. as
folows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday ardtor Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday,
Hand waterng with a shut-off nozzle or micro igan of non-grass areas, sudi
as vegetable gardens, flowers and shru s. can be done on any day and at any
time
Citus County UlBiities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Sonre new planltrgs rnay qualrt oIr addiftnal
waleang allowaraces.
To repon violations, please cal CGIy cl invertass @ 352-726-2321, CAy Of C rysal
River 0 352-795-4216 exL 313 unncoTorrDrei Cirus County @ 3525227-7669.

TIDES
"From mouths of rivers "AI King s Bay -At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassahowltzka' 5:12a,m, o04tt, 5l6p.M,. 0o.6t, 1210.m 0.1 r. 11:3a.rU.2f,
Cryslal Rie 3:39am, t.It3:3,:,tt331 p.mi 2.1 t,. 9;54a.m. 0.7 I 10:36pr.If It,
Wilhlacoochee' :10a,m, 30 rn,. 12:55 p.m. 3.5ft. 7:32 a.m 1.0 825p.m-O,.O .
Homosassa*" 5:10 a.m. OBit. 4;29p.m. 1.3ft 12;02a.m 0 ft. 10:36 aiA.3ft.


H L F'cast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: Southeast then soulhwest Gulf water
winds around 6 to 12 knots. Seas 2 tern erature
feet. Bay and inland waters a light
chop. A slight chance of storms
inland. Tonight: Northeast winds 8 2
around 10 knots then. Seas 2 feet.
Bay and inland waters a light chop. Ta#*n at Ail*ls
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 2938 29.48 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.54 38.55 39.52
Tsala Apopka-lnvemess 39.84 39,89 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.55 40.56 42.20
Lees reported m leet above sea evl. Rood stage or akes are based on 2.33-year fkiod.,
m*e an annpji nocI.1 c if ni N 41 pre'cenr Ln%'ce ol ix-inq &tiaiedc e &' d 'I in
any orio ar ,5 -..s ciala ,5 obf.",r I t-o l, S.-, Out' ea .fi-T oIGrIIJO A.'11- M r.&Wr nT 'IQ 1.J,..'1
ar IS r In n om EiR r.? DI ,fi.cl orm e Ur,1 ] EjSIM Gerielt.'3 urWr.
b_? ifl-e o an-j av r._ a qsr,. oii afr.. L.. s of im d, If you have any questions you
v<-,,,jl,.] ,t-.l~i ff, HsvlJo.i 7. DaLi 5-.-io.T', i 1 m .2i -.'j 7211

THE NATION







W. 4-0,Wit


%-- i -"


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Atanta
Atlantic Ciy
Austin
SaIllmora
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charioston, S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charlotle
Chicago
Cinnata
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
ColumbuS, OH
Concord. NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detoit
El Paso
Evansvlles, IN
Hamsburg
Hartlord
Houslon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little RFock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Mineapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


SAT
H L Pep. H
81 62 05 75
79 48 73
71 57 .34 81
76 65 82
84 55 .02 81
91 60 90
80 62 81
56 43 51
76 66 .05 84
46 37 07 65
80 57 22 76
65 53 09 68
80 62 .26 71
87 71 87
71 62 .33 85
82 63 .42 85
76 47 77
74 62 20 83
70 61 .25 76
83 51 87
68 60 1.O483
78 48 .01 72
69 65 89
69 42 01 37
81 52 01 81
73 54 .01 76
89 59 89
79 64 1,0285
79 60 .16 78
83 59 25 79
87 63 32 88
77 57 79
87 64 78
81 65 86
72 58 83
75 60 1.51 88
84 64 87
67 46 68
70 41 67
81 65 4.3784
79 66 12584
84 63 .05 85


SUN SAT SUN
LFcst City H L Pep. H LFcst
51 pc NewOrteans 82 66 72 83 73 ts
38 pc NewYork City 83 57 03 83 61 pc
56 pC Nodolk 88 71 01 B8 61 pc
64 pc Oklahonma City 89 55 B8 56 PC
58 PC Omaha 84 55 77 52 ts
72 cd PalmSprings 90 68 86 63 s
59 pc Philadelphia 84 62 81 63 s
33 sh Phoe r 94 65 B4 61 pc
67 pc Pitsburgh 69 60 31 78 60 pc
39 a PorlandiME 74 48 22 71 52 pc
55 s Portland. OR 61 47 05 70 46 pc
55 pc Providence, RI 79 57 74 53 s
48 pc Raleigh 86 65 87 63 pc
68 pc Rapid City 62 40 45 34 sn
63 pc Reno 55 44 63 43 s
63 pc Rochestet.,NY 71 61 ,11 75 54 pc
68 ts Sacramenlo 75 46 83 53 s
64 ts Sal Lake City 57 45 53 37 sh
63 ts San Antonio 91 60 93 75 d
63 ts San Diego 69 62 70 59 pc
64 ts San Francisco 66 53 66 51 a
48 S Savannah 87 72 88 68 ts
67 pc Seattlle 59 44 01 67 49 pc
29 sni Spokane 57 38 62 38 pc
54 ts Sl. Louis 84 59 87 70 ts
61 ts St Ste Mane 49 47 01 64 44 pc
61 pc Syracuse 75 61 .45 71 51 s
68 t, Topeka 86 53 85 54 ta
58 PC Wal.rhm.i.n 78 67 16 6 ., t PC
53 s YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
74 pC HMH 100. ryden, Texas
67 ts LOW 23. Tnuce-Tahoo, Call
59 pc
69 PC WORLD CITIES
59 s
6 ts SUN Listbn 7&59/s
70 PC CITY H/L/SKY London 62/48h
70 pc
53 is Acaputco 87/78/1p Madrid 87/62/s
52 sh Amsterdam 59J5/r Mexico Clty78/5/9pc
68 IS Athes 71/60k Montreal 73/50&r
66 ts Beljing 71150/ed Moscow 71/51 pc
67 pc Bern 62/50pc Pans & 64148A


Bermuda n71ff/cd
KEY TO CONDITIONS: .cioudy dr.drlzJe Cairo 84/62/s
1an h-h, huy ; pc.pitily cloud; r-mrin: Calgary 48030/pc
IralnBVuww ml x; s. unnyr, sh-m hows Havana 89/69/pc
Wnumow4 tteumdeutosffe wawnd6. Hong Kong 60 77s
WSI CZOa4 Jerusalem 80621/s


RIO 75w64r
Rome 78&53/s
Sydney 69/57/pc
Tokyo 73/59/s
Toronlo 6&44]pc
Warsaw 601486r


S1LEGAL NOTICES




Department of
Planning & Development.............A25

Bid Notices........................................D6

Miscellaneous Notices......................D6

Surplus Property ................................D6


S C ITRUIS C L IC OUNTYIE



CHRpONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $39.64* 6 months: $70.63*
1 year: $133.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ............................ Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold .......................................................................................... E ditor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney...................... Production and Circulation Director, 563-3275
Tnrista Stokes.................................................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Tnrista Stokes .......................................................... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4F Phone 352-563-6363
^ POSTMASTER.: Send address changes to.:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WInniDixie


W'Reetby
JSUPE MRET^^^


F;'


_^ 5 ii~ I' *


1 i

* 1
I*


i


101EPl -45

^llAU


She's been giving you great

service for years. Now, she's


g prescriptions that

earn fuelperks!


Sweetbay is now Winn-Dixie.


Welcome to a whole new experience with new items and hundreds of new
ways to save at your neighborhood store. Sweetbay is now Winn-Dixie. At
the Winn-Dixie Pharmacy, we believe in making healthy easy for everyone.
That's why we offer free wellness screenings, a free app so you can refill on
the go, and a convenient place to get your immunizations. We'll provide
the same great service you've come to expect with a few more ways to save.
Now that's making healthy easy Because we're not just changing the name.
We're changing the way you shop. For the better.

V Your newest Winn-Dixie stores are located at 1202 West Main Street in
Inverness and 1651 SE Highway 19 in Crystal River.


kfuelperks!j


i~~i U


Q
0
Ocala Q


Q


Orlando 0
Spring Hill


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ralph Carr, 96
Ralph W Carr, age 96,
died April 28, 2014, at his
residence. Ralph was born
June 28, 1916, in Denver,
Colorado, to the late Ralph
M. and Ruby Carr He
served our country during
World War II in the U.S.
Army Ralph was em-
ployed by Phillips Petro-
leum Company as an
auditor He was a member
of the Inverness Elks
Lodge No. 2522, VFW Post
4337 of Inverness as well
as the Knights of Colum-
bus. He was adamant
about supporting local
businesses and especially
those owned by local citi-
zens. Ralph was a loving
husband, father, grandfa-
ther and great-grandfather,
who was also devoted to
his many friends in Citrus
County He loved a good
joke.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his son and
daughter-in-law Terry and
Honey Carr, Cooper City,
Florida; grandchildren Je-
remy Carr, Crystal Sherren
and Casey Carr; and great-
grandson Bryce Carr He is
also survived by his de-
voted dog and constant
companion, Puddles. He
was preceded in death by
his wife of 65 years,
Mildred.
A celebration and trib-
ute to Ralph's life will be
at 11 a.m. Saturday,
May 24, 2014, at Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory with military
honors. Please consider
donations to Wounded
Warrior Project in lieu
of flowers in Ralph's
memory
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Jacquelynn
Erney, 53
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jacquelynn "Jackie"
Erney, 53, of Crystal River,
Florida, passed away
Tuesday, May 6, 2014. She
was born Jan. 20, 1961, in
Paoli, Indiana, moving to
this area 44 years ago from
Savannah, Georgia.
She was preceded in
death by her father, Jackie
Lee Farris. She is survived
by two children, Hannah
Dean Erney and Donald
Chad (Jennifer) Owens;
mother, Alice M. Farris;
three brothers, Kevin Lee
Farris, Roger Duane Far-
ris and Michael Brent Far-
ris; and two sisters, Vickie
Farris Tolbert and Wendy
Farris Smith.
A celebration of her life
will be at 11 a.m. Wednes-
day, May 14,2014, at Strick-
land Funeral Home,
Crystal River In lieu of
flowers, memorial dona-
tion may be made in her
name to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.


CkWaoerle^

5%iv;wt
352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

^ Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyflorist.com


To Place Your
S"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931


Darrell Watson 564-2197
Coin t imfoplcn
adis uinesdy
f o P


David
Garrity, 75
LECANTO
David Garrity, 75, of
Lecanto, Florida, died Fri-
day, May 9,2014, under the
care of Hospice of Citrus
County in Lecanto,
Florida. Arrangements are
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando,
Florida.

Jackson
Headley-
Vazquez,
infant
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jackson Eric Headley-
Vazquez, infant, of Crystal
River, passed away Tues-
day, May 6,2014.
He is survived by his
parents, Audrey Vazquez
and Eric Headley of Crys-
tal River; maternal grand-
parents Carrie Barber and
Daniel Vazquez; paternal
grandparents Terri Simon
and Tony Headley; and
great-grandparents
Manuel Vazquez, Linda
and Jimmy Banks and Bar-
bara Dewey
Graveside services will
be at 10 a.m. Thursday,
May 15, in the Stage Stand
Cemetery, Homosassa.
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory of Crystal
River is assisting the fam-
ily with arrangements.
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.




John
Mariani, 84
DUNNELLON
John F Mariani, 84, of
Dunnellon, Florida, died
March 20, 2014. Celebra-
tion of life will be at
11 a.m. Friday, May 16,
2014, at Fero Funeral
Home. Inurnment with
military honors to follow
at 2 p.m. at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery Fero Fu-
neral Home.

DEADLINE
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.




"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"



Fuea oeadiCre mators


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland, LFD & Brian Ledsome, LFD
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


&i. E, avi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
SBurial Shipping
Cremation

Crenution
---- -- 0,111" -ln r;I.J.- 1-
/i ,'l^n-Crol sac

For Information and costs,_
call 726-8323


Nelson
Mys, 74
INVERNESS
Nelson G. Mys, age 74,
Inverness, went to his
heavenly home May 7,
2014, at his residence
under the loving care of
his family
Nelson was born
March 20,1940, in McBain,
Michigan, to the late
George and Martha (Stahl)
Mys. He enjoyed deep sea
fishing, hunting and was
an advocate for 4-wheel
drivers. He was a profes-
sional bowler and member
of the Senior PBA, having
rolled many 300 games.
He is survived by sons
Tim Mys, Willits, Califor-
nia, and Todd Mys, Inver-
ness; daughters Beth (Eric)
Davis, Homosassa, Florida,
and Pamela Mys, Inver-
ness; brothers Neal (Mari-
lyn) Mys, Grand Rapids,
Michigan, Richard (Sherry)
Mys, Allendale, Michigan,
Lee (Sue) Mys, Fremont,
Michigan, and Sydney Mys,
Grant, Michigan; and sister
Gladys (Syd) VanTunien,


Zeeland, Michigan; and
five grandchildren.
A celebration and trib-
ute to Nelson's life will be
at 11 a.m. Saturday,
May 17,2014, at The Citrus
Shrine Club Building on
Lake Nina Drive in Inver-
ness. If family and friends
so desire, donations in
Nelson's memory may be
made to HPH Hospice,
2939 W Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Lecanto, FL 34461 in
lieu of flowers. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory is assisting the
family with arrangements.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


Insurance
www.sheidonpaImsinsurance.comn
Auto Home Life Business

AutoOwnes AFESOUD &D KRE


8469 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Homosassa, FL
352-628-1030


1037 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Citrus Hills I(I.
352-341-4661 --


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

Irow'


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
rbf046656@centurylink.net / www.brownfuneralhome


In Loving Memory 'Ly
Sandra I
(Cofield) Altiere
A loving Daughter,
Sister, Mother &Wife
7/8/63- 7/31/13
At home with the angel's, you
will forever be in our hearts. /
Happy Mother's Day ,-


New Patient Specials


Full Mouth X-Rayvs, Sf
Comprehensive Exam 4 f
We Meet All Y u Not in conjunction with insurance
We Mvieet All Your Offer expires in 30 days
Dental Needs, In house denture lab
ts Free Denture Consults
IncludingImplan Financing available

Family Friendly Moas ncet
Call today! 352-527-1614
Alexsa Davila,
DMD DN 15390
Walton Van Hoose,
DMD DN 18101
Citrus Hills Dental
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mmin FeeADAcode D0210, D01500


Doris
Weber, 87
BEVERLY HILLS
Doris V Weber, 87, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Thursday, May 1, 2014, in
Lecanto. She was born
July 19, 1926, in Newark,
New Jersey, daughter of
the late Henry and Mar-
garet (Keane) Kapner She
retired from the telephone
company in New
Jersey after many years of
service as a telephone op-
erator She also
drove school buses for sev-
eral years. She moved to
Beverly Hills, Florida,
from Blairstown, New Jer-
sey, over 21 years
ago. Doris was a member
of Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, Beverly
Hills. She volunteered for
Daystar Life Cen-
ter and won an award from
the State of Florida for her
volunteer services.
Survivors include son,
Frederick A. (Bethel)


Weber Jr of Beverly Hills;
daughter, Carol (Law-
rence) Ratner of San Fran-
cisco, California; two
brothers, Kenneth (Shirley)
Burham of Nevada, and
William (Mary) Burham of
New Jersey; beloved sister,
Mary (Harold) Hayes of
Homosassa; three grand-
children; and two great-
grandchildren.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
are by the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory


* Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


Serving all your cremation needs,




lfloonzr
FUNERAL HOMES
& CREMATORY
Serving all of Citrus County
(352) 726-2271 www.HooperFuneralHome.com


I


CODY'S ROADHOUSE
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri., May23 11:00am


A6 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


Obituaries


TAVERNA MANOS
5705 Hwy. 44,1/4 mile East of Meadowcrest
Wed.,May14&21 *11:00am





S,,. ..


*........ ....... i.E i '. ; i .jir i.. . ;in f. ................


m




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MOTHER'S DAY
WORDS
FROM HER
CHILDREN

SMy mom is a very
strong person and
even more so since
she's been diagnosed.
She has taught me to
always give and be
grateful. The most
caring and thoughtful
person I know is my
mother, truly my one
and only role model.
-Taylor, 14

V I love my mommy
because her is so
awesome and pretty
and her makes food
so better. -Hunter, 5

I love my mother
V because she helps
me with my work and
takes us different
places and whenever I
was little she helped
me count. I love her
so much because I
care for her, and she's
the best mother ever!
-Aidyn, 9

I love my mom
cause she gave birth
to me and she keeps
on being nice to us
and I love her so
much. She taught me
how to do math cause
she's very good at
math, and she's
pretty! -Lucas, 8

I love Mommy
because she gets me
new toys and she's
nice. I love my
mommy and she's
beautiful. -Blake, 7

Y What I learned from
my mommy is to
help as much as I can
for no money or
anything. I love how
she will do anything
for all of us. It might
not be right away, but
she gets it always.
She will do anything. I
appreciate that and I
am so thankful to
have a mother that
cares about us like the
way she does. I just
love her so much. -
Julian, 12

I love Mom because
she helps me with
everything and I love
her cooking. I learned
to respect others from
my mom. -Brandon,
14

I love my mommy
because I love her. -
Liam, 3


I


Melissa Correa Hollis takes a walk with her eight children near their home in Homosassa.
Brandon, 8-year-old Lucas, 12-year-old Julian, 9-year-old Aidyn, mother Melissa, 3-year-old
5-year-old Hunter.


BLESSED
Continued from PageA1

oldest, a boy and girl, are
both 14. The rest, all boys,
range in age from 12 down
to 3.
"Going from one kid to
two, that's a big adjust-
ment," she says. "Two to
three is big, too. But after
four, you just do it."
Driving in the car is the
hardest part, she says.
That brings out the worst
in any kid, but multiply
that by eight, and it can be
a challenge.
But they all go out to-
gether, to the store, to a
restaurant, everywhere.
"When people see us
walking into a restaurant,
they panic," says Correa
Hollis, a former restaurant
server herself. "But some-
times people will tell us
how well-behaved the kids
are and they'll give us
things, gift cards or what-
ever I guess they're
surprised."
MEN
It's all about being regi-
mented. It's all about rou-
tine. Each evening,
everyone's clothes for the
next day are put in a sepa-
rate pile on the back of the
couch, youngest to oldest
so they know which pile is
theirs.
Shoes are lined up in
front of the fireplace.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/ For the Chronicle
Family members include, from left: 14-year-old
Liam, 14-year-old Taylor, 7-year-old Blake and


I still have my hair, but it's shorter; it's thinner.
If I lose my hair, oh well. All my kids said if I lose
my hair they'd shave their heads.
Even my daughter, and my mom, too.
They'd do that to support me, which is cool.
Melissa Correa Hollis
Homosassa mother of eight diagnosed with breast cancer.


There are eight chairs at
the dining table and a high
chair for the youngest.
Dad, Edward Hollis, works
a late shift and often
misses meals with the fam-
ily. When he's home, they
make room.
"It's second nature to
me," Correa Hollis says.
"I'm very structured, but I
believe in giving kids a lot
of love, a lot of openness. I
learned that from my
mom.
"I had a very good child-
hood, and I want to give my
kids everything I had, and
that doesn't mean material
things," she said.
When she was diag-
nosed with breast cancer
in April 2013, she started a
nonprofit organization,
Moms Helping Hands. The
purpose is an extension of
what she does already and
has always done giving
to others.
"My mom taught me
that," she says. "I learned
it from her, and now I
teach my kids that it's not


Pediatric and Young


A dult Medicine

(Birth through young adult years)


Private insurances,

United Healthcare,

& Medicaid HMOs Accepted


Hours:
Monday through Friday,
8 a.m. 5 p.m.
and varied Saturdays


David W. Powers, M.D.


310 S. Line Avenue,

Inverness, Florida 34452


always about you. It's not
what you get, but what you
give, and then what you get
is inside you, the good feel-
ing from doing things for
others."
She said she started
Moms Helping Hands,
which is still in its infancy
stages, because her cancer
diagnosis caused her to re-


alize life is short, and why
not do it?
"I've always wanted to
create a platform for my
children to take to the next
level, so they can give
back, do even more."
As for her cancer, she's
getting ready to start a
more aggressive form of
treatment, going from


ON THE NET
Facebook.com/Moms
HelpingHands

oral chemotherapy to
intravenous.
"I still have my hair," she
says, "but it's shorter; it's
thinner If I lose my hair,
oh well. All my kids said if
I lose my hair they'd shave
their heads. Even my
daughter, and my mom,
too. They'd do that to sup-
port me, which is cool."
To learn more about
Moms Helping Hands, go
to Facebook.com/Moms
HelpingHands.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
(@chronicleonline. corn.


I CD and savings accounts from FDIC Member Banks and other leading financial institutions inludin a select equity index annuities nationwide FIRST AMERICAN TRUST I
offers unconditional guarantees regarding our services .1 ... .. .. . , . ,I . 1 .. .... r., ...u da
and/or guaranteed. Complete details are important an .11,, , ,, ,, , r. i I
APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED





Total Skin Care


We offer a safe medical approach


STANDING STRONG


IN CITRUS COUNTY

: :"^l^ Pope John Paul II Catholic School -
->^,ro. l., '-1 0 o/ai l 1commun1 ) \hIih m.i cheistul ents to 0
. nD each then hihet i spiritual. ilt oci1.0 al. ano d .' h S10ca o l s : 1ic.I/ aI


EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES:
... . 1 I T, ,I i. ,,,.,


I I C 1 ,,, ,, I ,',,= '. 1" 1,-,= ," I , 1,,',


Ciru County Se ncea andEgierigF
frm 00 o reen.Poe oh a ul1 CtoicShol.,


' i CALL FOR A TOUR 352-746-2020


ENRICHED CURRICULUM:

Physical Education
Technology
Library
Body, Mind and Spirit 6th 8th
Enterprise Village 5th
Financial Park 8th
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
PROGRAMS
VPK (4 year olds attend free)
Sten un for Students basedd on financial


^^^^^^1^^ H need, to allow all children private education) ed a- o1
VISITOU WEBSchoi WW PP2hi Is

* VISIT OUR WEBSITE WWW.PJP2.ORG kI


CURRICULUM:

ii ,..,.. , ~i~,~Iiii, i,, i.


I I


air I


-A M m


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A7


.4%








Indian River Lagoon: What went wrong?


JAMES WAYMER
Florida Today

MELBOURNE What
ignited the "superbloom"
and brown algae that
killed 60 percent of Indian
River Lagoon seagrass?
And what snuffed out
135 manatees, 300 peli-
cans, 76 dolphins and a
half-billion dollars worth
of seagrass?
If William of Ockham
were trying to answer that,
he might have started with
the extreme cold, dry
weather of 2010 and 2011.
His 14th-century philo-
sophical precept, Occam's
Razor, holds that the sim-
plest among competing
theories is usually the
best starting point. First,
flesh out theories requir-
ing the fewest assump-
tions, before moving on
to more complex, refined
explanations.
That hasn't stopped an
army of armchair ecolo-
gists. They're filling a void
left by biologists con-
founded by the complex
unraveling of the lagoon
ecosystem, which began
swirling in a death spiral
in 2011. Few answers have
surfaced as to what cat-
alyzed so many casualties,
including a combined
73 square miles of sea-
grass, the estuary's pri-
mary nursery for life.
So semi-baked theories
abound.
They range from the
mundane cold snaps -
to the strange Doppler
radars slowly "baking" the
biology with microwave
radiation. That one's new
A theory blaming manatee
overpopulation has been
around for years.
Biologists working the
problem agree on the 2011
"superbloom" as the semi-
nal event. It nearly wiped
out the lagoon's seagrass.
Just two years earlier,
seagrass was thriving at
levels not seen since the
1940s. Restoration efforts
finally seemed to be pay-
ing off and the recent
drought meant less pollut-
ing runoff into the
waterway
Then in early spring of
2011, a green monster "su-
perbloom" of phytoplank-
ton cast a dark cloud over
that success. It eventually
stretched from southern
Mosquito Lagoon to just
north of Fort Pierce Inlet,
blocking sunlight from
seagrass and leaving death
in its path.
After rounding up all the
bodies, scientists continue
to sift through countless,
nebulous clues, most just
leading to more questions,
hypotheses and dead ends.
Scientists working the
problem say they're open
to new ideas, however
seemingly bizarre. But
first they must round up
all the usual suspects, be-
fore heading down more
rabbit holes, into more ex-


MALCOLM DENEMARK/Flonrida Today
The Indian River Lagoon near the Melbourne Causeway is seen April 23. Legislators set
aside $170 million for projects intended to help the Indian River Lagoon and other water
bodies dealing with discharges from Lake Okeechobee.


treme, data-deficient
pondering.
Everything's on the
table: Viruses. Bacteria.
Toxins. Red tides. Brown
tides. Green tides. Lack of
tides. Or maybe nature just
biting back from man-
made problems forged
over decades finally
reaching a tipping point.
Doppler radar, dark mat-
ter and manatee fecal mat-
ter will have to wait in
line, biologists say, while
other simpler theories are
exhausted first.
Here are just a few of
the theories waiting in the
wings:
Fertilizer is the main
culprit feeding toxic algae
blooms: Runoff carries ni-
trogen and phosphorous -
the active ingredients in
most fertilizer into the
lagoon to spur excess
algae.
Grass clippings, espe-
cially, can carry the two
nutrients into the lagoon.
So many local govern-
ments, including Brevard
County, have in the past
year adopted June 1 to
Sept. 30 bans on fertilizer
use and other measures
stricter than state recom-
mendations.
Advocates for the
stricter rules point to stud-
ies that show lawns sur-
vive just fine without
fertilizing during rainy
months.
Fertilizer counter-
point: Rainy-season bans
and other stricter rules
don't follow the best avail-
able science and can have
unintended consequences.
Fertilizer and lawn-care
interests point to an 8-year,
$4.2 million state-funded
study by the University of
Florida. It found that de-
priving lawns of nutrients
when grass is most able to
absorb them during
peak growing season -
can result in more nitro-
gen and phosphorus run-
ning off the weaker grass
when applied at other
times of the year


Drift algae doomed
the lagoon and its seacows:
Drift algae has been chok-
ing out seagrass for years.
And some scientists think
the reddish-brown, stringy
stuff may be linked with
the manatee deaths.
In healthy amounts,
drift algae provides food
and cover for marine life
and sponges up harmful
nutrients from the water
But in excess, it clogs out
seagrass.
Drift algae has entan-
gled the lagoon in a boom-
and-bust cycle in recent
years, leaving the estuary
with too much or too little.
In 2010, Nova Southeast-
ern University found drift
algae had increased by 46
percent in two years, to
102,162 metric tons over
the 109-square-mile study
area. But after severe cold
spells, drift algae crashed
in mid-2010, releasing a
huge pulse of nutrients
that may have spurred the
2011 superbloom.
Biologists speculate that
without enough seagrass
to eat manatees shifted to
mostly drift algae.
Many of the manatees
that died mysteriously had
the stuff in their guts. That
diet shift could have al-
tered the mix of good and
bad bacteria in the ani-
mals' digestive tracts, lead-
ing to immune
suppression, state biolo-
gists say
An FAU-Harbor Branch
researcher suspects toxins
from a microscopic algae
clinging to the drift algae.
Drift algae he collected
in Cocoa Beach last year


I ~

j


turned up toxins that
killed mammalian cells in
a lab.
Drift algae counter-
point: Scientists have yet
to identify a specific toxin
behind the manatee
deaths. Also, there were no
reports of twitching,
rolling and other odd man-
atee behaviors usually as-
sociated with toxins.
Just because the algae
toxins killed cells in a lab
doesn't mean that's specif-
ically what killed the man-
atees, state biologists say
"There's a long way be-
tween that and actually
demonstrating that it
could actually kill a mana-
tee in the Indian River La-
goon," said Jan Landsberg,
who's heading up the la-
goon investigation for the
state's Fish and Wildlife
Research Institute.
Biologists also aren't
sure whether the drift
algae die-off in mid-2010
was the major internal
source of nutrients fueling
the 2011 superbloom or
just one of many
Muck theory 1: A half-
century buildup of muck
that resembles "black
mayonnaise" coats the la-
goon bottom and that of its
tributaries, in some spots
more than 10 feet thick. It's
mostly soil runoff from
sod, construction sites,
farming and erosion along
lagoon tributaries, but also
rotting algae and dead
plants. Muck limits sea-
grass growth and the fish
and organisms that need
seagrass to survive. It con-
tributes to bacterial decay,
which consumes oxygen,


The

Bourbo
Burger^


"ILA.


causing fish kills.
Muck also produces nox-
ious chemical compounds,
such as the hydrogen
sulfide that creates the la-
goon's occasional rotten-
egg smell.
Some scientists say con-
taminants in the muck de-
posits may be contributing
to the cancers and other
wildlife health problems.
Lagoon sea turtles and
dolphins are riddled with
fungal growths and tu-
mors. And biologists are
finding higher incidence
in Brevard than elsewhere
in Florida of a strange can-
cer in redfin needlefish,
especially in the Banana
River. Needlefish are an
important bait fish.
Scientists say dredging
out muck could vastly im-
prove the lagoon, and bet-
ter land-use practices are
needed to prevent more
muck from entering the
estuary
A state senate commit-
tee has recommended $20
million in state funding to
dredge muck from the
northern lagoon, ranging
from about Titusville to
Sebastian, with the Eau
Gallie River topping the
list.
A coalition of five coun-
ties, including Brevard,
wants $100 million for
muck dredging and other
lagoon water quality im-
provement projects.
Brevard County Com-
mission is asking the state
for $887,000 to study and
reduce muck. If funded,
the project would remove
weeds that rot to form
muck in ponds, which ulti-
mately empty into the la-
goon. It also would pay to
map how thick and toxic
the muck is in specific
locations.
Counterpoint: Dredg-
ing muck is expensive,
takes years to permit and
is not a panacea. Where do
you put the muck? How do
you keep more from enter-
ing the lagoon?
Muck theory 2: A gov-
ernment restoration proj-
ect unleashed more
muck that triggered the
superbloom.
In June, a Volusia
County clammer lost a
legal attempt to stop the St
Johns River Water Man-
agement District from
restoring 600 acres of
coastal marshes in the
Mosquito Lagoon. Mike
Sullivan, who continues to
challenge the project, says


the district failed to main-
tain barriers to prevent
muck sediment from old
mosquito impoundments
from entering the lagoon
when they filled old
ditches in 2009, clouding
out his clams and other
wildlife near Cedar Creek
Island.
Counterpoint: District
officials say the su-
perbloom began in the Ba-
nana River area, then
spread to the Indian River
Lagoon and Mosquito La-
goon. The district has been
reconnecting mosquito im-
poundments and filling in
drag-line ditches for two
decades, without similar
ill effects.
State tests found no
spikes in cloudiness or
other water quality issues
near the restoration proj-
ect. Marsh restorations ul-
timately improve water
quality and habitat.
Doppler radars
caused the collapse: Stew-
art Simonson, a chemical
engineer in Atlanta, spells
out his theory on his blog
called, Dark Matters a Lot.
Simonson believes that
Doppler radar, by monitor-
ing the weather, actually
changes it, and puts the la-
goon on a "slow mi-
crowave bake" of sorts.
He finds many fish kills,
algae blooms and wildlife
die-offs in Florida and
elsewhere happen within
about 25 miles of radar
sites, and especially where
radars overlap.
About 10 high-powered
military, weather and avia-
tion radars within a 25-
mile area of Cape
Canaveral pump mi-
crowave energy into the at-
mosphere, Simonson says,
resulting in ionized plasma
bouncing back as weather
disturbances, waterspouts,
lightning and sinkholes. It
also ionizes the water, trig-
gering algae blooms, fish
kills and other wildlife die-
offs and diseases.
"It's more like Pandora's
Box, rather than outside-
of-the-box," Simonson said
of his theory
"You've got about 11 mil-
lion watts of pulsed radar
power going into the at-
mosphere in that area, and
a lot of it's reflecting back.
That's how Doppler works.
It reflects it back and it
scatters."
Pollution and chemicals
in the weakly ionized mi-
crowave "bath" become
See LAGOON/Page A9


Shrimp iaancling
. L Shrimp a i ALL TYPES OF
% Planttinoninnl I WARM WATER
FA a I Fort Island Trai I FIN FISH AND
Gra. ronny's o SHELLFISH





SPINE CARE



YOU CAN TRUST


Learn about
the Florida
Spine &
Neuro Center
and the
innovative
treatment
options
available.


Experience The Difference
That Dr. Lee Brings
Compassion, knowledge, and talent define Dr.
Jennifer Lee in her pursuit to provide the highest
quality of dentistry for everyone.
Dr. Lee received her Bachelors of Science from
the University of Florida. She then received her
Doctor of Dental Medicine Degree from the
University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Lee continued her
training and received her Advanced Education in
General Dentistry from UF.

ONLY THE BEST FOR OUR PATIENTS
/ Sensitive to Your Fears & Concerns / Digital Xrays
/ Crowns, Bridges & Fillings / Root Canals
/ Dentures & Partials / Invisalign
535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL
smilesoncitrus.com Call Us Today 795-1881


I Attend a FREE Spine Seminar:





Ocala
Quality Inn
3434 SW College Rd

call 1-888-847-8876 to RSVP.

Blue

SLargo Medical Center ,"
A Teaching Hospital .--Z=.

FLORIDA SPINE & NEURO CENTER -


Blackshears 11


MAluminumw
Rescreen Seamless Gutters Garage Screens
New Screen Room Glass Room Conversions
HWY. 44 7ff lW" Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER 75-Z.Z7 2 RR 0042388
"37 YearsAs Your Hometown Dealer"
FreeEtimates www.blacksheas.c


BAME fdw BRGER


A8 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







After 1,100 boys, Safe Harbor founders to retire


BETH REESE CRAVEY
The Florida Times-Union

JACKSONVILLE Robbie
and Doug Smith were preparing
for a round-the-world sailboat
cruise in 1982 when they and
their Jacksonville-based boat
temporarily took in a few trou-
bled boys to work on the water
They never went on that
cruise.
What was supposed to be a
yearlong detour turned into a 32-
year career Since the couple
founded the Safe Harbor Mar-
itime Academy a Christian ther-
apeutic boarding school for
boys, they have helped about
1,100 at-risk boys turn their lives
around.
But last year, Doug Smith, 61,
had a stroke, which led him and
his wife, 57, to ponder the future.
They said in a recent interview
that they love their "boys," but
the slower pace and freedom of
retirement beckoned.
"I'm too old for this," Doug
Smith said.
So on June 30, they will turn
over day-to-day operations to
former staffer Dustin Johnson,
whom they brought back to lead
the privately funded academy's
second act.
"We're tired," Robbie Smith
said. "It's time."
Robbie Smith is a licensed
mental health counselor Her
husband is a licensed clinical
pastoral counselor and an or-
dained minister
At Safe Harbor, on the banks
of the St. Johns River near
Blount Island, boys ages 14 to 17
find direction via the Smith doc-
trine of structure and stability,
discipline and caring. They
learn maritime skills and re-
ceive vocational training while
studying for their high school
diploma.
Some of the school's 30


BOB SELF/The Florida Times-Union
Robbie and Doug Smith sit April 30 with their dog, Sailor, aboard the yacht Amazing Grace. After over
30 years running the Safe Harbor Maritime Academy where they worked to turn around the lives of young
men, the two founders have decided to retire from the day-to-day running of the facility in Jacksonville.


donated boats are used as sleep-
ing quarters for the boys. Others
are used in the school's mar-
itime career training program or
for scuba-diving certification,
one of the extracurricular re-
wards available for students
who behave well and fulfill their
responsibilities.
The school has about 15 boys at
any one time, mostly from the
East Coast. Most stay a year, some
as long as four About a third of
graduates enter military service
and about 70 percent further
their education after leaving.
Steve Barnes arrived in 1985
at age 16.
He said he began getting in
trouble in middle school, trying
to fit in by drinking, smoking
marijuana, skipping school and
running away He spent six


weeks in a juvenile detention fa-
cility and six weeks in inpatient
drug treatment. He did "major
soul-searching" and became a
Christian, but said he still didn't
know how to proceed.
His parents feared a return to
his old ways if he came home.
Safe Harbor was recommended
and Barnes stayed there until
his 18th birthday
"I wasn't used to the strict dis-
cipline, the hard work or the
structure. But those were the
very things I needed at that
time," Barnes said. "It was a les-
son in the ways of life: One must
work to achieve, be respectful to
gain respect and, above all else,
become a person of integrity,
whose word is his bond and
someone who takes responsibil-
ity for his actions. Those lessons


have stayed with me."
Barnes, who now lives in San-
ford, ultimately became a high
school and college graduate and
a journalist. He was elected to
countywide office, ran unsuc-
cessfully for the Legislature and
is now an investor and consult-
ant, husband, father and mentor
"Without the skills and confi-
dence I learned at Safe Harbor, I
would never have even at-
tempted these challenges ... I
would likely be dead or in prison
today" he said.
Julian, 18, Celso, 16, and Josh,
17 their last names were with-
held at the request of the acad-
emy are among the Smiths'
last group of boys.
They are preparing to gradu-
ate from the program, to be fol-
lowed in coming months by new


residents selected by new exec-
utive director Johnson. Like
Barnes, they said they initially
chafed against the discipline
and rules but have come to real-
ize the positive effects.
Josh said he has learned the
importance of "thinking through
things," considering conse-
quences before acting. Celso
said he has learned the impor-
tance of "thinking ahead" and
setting goals.
The Smiths, they said, have
built them up.
"They do whatever they can to
help you," said Julian.
The Smiths said they find such
appreciation gratifying and are
particularly touched when the
boys-turned-men keep in touch
after they leave, as Barnes has
done. They are aware that boys
view them as tough when they
are under their thumbs but rel-
ish hearing from them later that
they came to appreciate the
Smith doctrine, Robbie Smith
said.
"They call me warden," she
said of her current charges.
Then she noted their open,
waterfront, marina-like sur-
roundings. "Look around. It's
not like they're in jail," she said.
After June 30, the Smiths plan
to travel for a few months, so
Johnson can get his bearings
without them around.
They then will return to live
on the Safe Harbor property but
separated from the daily opera-
tions. They will assume ambas-
sador roles, traveling near
and far to raise funds and
awareness.
"This is home," Robbie Smith
said. "We're not done.... We just
have to slow down."
Doug Smith said they could
hang up a new counseling shingle.
"I see us counseling groups of
parents," he said, "to keep kids
from ending up here."


LAGOON
Continued from PageAS

much more reactive, he
says.
"It's like the energy that
stirs up the soup," he said.
"You're on a really low
cook," Simonson added.
"The statistics show it's
significant ... It's speeding
up the ionization and
decay in the water," he
added. "Biologically,
things are simmering."
Counterpoint: Lagoon
investigators say this one's
barely a blip on their
radar, but that anything's
possible. Although, it
would take a much more
thorough examination to
establish the Doppler link.
Most of the radars have
been here for years.
"Ift's not like we've added
that much in the way of
new Doppler radar sta-
tions," said Chuck Jacoby,
the environmental scien-
tist with the St Johns River
Water Management Dis-
trict who's leading the "su-
perbloom" investigation.
"I don't think anybody's
nailed down those connec-
tions yet," he said of the
theory
Too many manatees
caused the crash: Local
boating-rights advocates
who opposed slow-speed
manatee zones have long
supported this theory It
goes as follows: Too many
manatees lured here by
warm-water power plant
discharges gobble up
seagrass by the roots.
Their excretions add ex-
cess free nitrogen for
seagrass-choking phyto-
plankton to feed on.
The two power plants in
Port St Johns pump in la-
goon water to cool equip-
ment at the plant,
discharging warm water
near the plants. That has
conditioned manatees to
stay farther north longer
than they otherwise
would, stressing seagrass
beds beyond their ability
to recover
Counts have spotted
more than 1,700 manatees
in Brevard.
Bob Atkins, president of
Citizens for Florida's Wa-
terways, recently spelled
out the theory in the boat-
ing-advocacy group's
newsletter
"We know that manatees
consume, on average,
somewhere between 40
and 150 lbs. of seagrass
each day," Atkins wrote.
"We also know that left un-
molested, a healthy acre of
seagrass can produce up to
10 tons of seagrass each
year So running the num-


bers, each manatee con-
sumes somewhere on the
order of 7 to 27 tons of sea-
grass in a single year"
Advocates of this theory
say the power plants
should install cooling tow-
ers to eliminate the "ther-
mal pollution," so
manatees will resume
their historical migration
pattern.
Counterpoint: State
biologists say there aren't
enough manatees to make
a significant difference
and that seacows mostly
recycle existing nutrients
in the system, rather than
adding new nutrients.
The 545,000 people in
Brevard County eclipse
the few thousand mana-
tees swimming around at
any given time. Humans
have added new nutrients
to the system from fertil-
izer and human waste.
"To some extent, mana-
tees, they're not importing
nutrients from very far
away," said Chuck Jacoby,
the scientist leading the
"superbloom" investiga-
tion for the St. Johns River
Water Management Dis-
trict. "In my mind, it's
more like a recycling than
it is an introduction."
Cooling towers would be
costly, and training mana-
tees to migrate would be
difficult
A "perfect storm" of
extremes aligned:
Drought, then cold, set the
stage for death.
Cold snaps in 2009, 2010
and 2011 killed fish, mana-
tees and stunned sea
turtles.
Lagoon water tempera-
tures dipped as low as 39
degrees Fahrenheit in
January 2010.
Then red drift algae, the
stringy stuff that looks like
seaweed, crashed in mid-
2010, rotting and increas-
ing nutrient availability
for phytoplankton growth.
Also, less drift algae was
around to sponge up nutri-
ents in the water
Decomposing fish and
other marine life that died
in the cold also left behind
more nutrients for algae to
thrive.
Drought made the la-
goon saltier than usual, fa-
voring the harmful algae
species that bloomed and
choked out seagrass.
Other possible factors
include wildfires in 2011
contributing to the nutri-
ent fallout.
"The system just didn't
have the sort of capacity to
cope with some of the
other events that hap-
pened," said Chuck Ja-
coby, the scientist leading
the "superbloom" investi-
gation for the St. Johns


River Water Management
District.
Counterpoint: The la-
goon withstood additional
nutrient influx and cold
snaps for decades, without
showing major signs of
stress.
Septic tanks and leaky
sewer pipes are leaching
nutrients into the lagoon:
An estimated 300,000 sep-
tic tanks along the lagoon,
including 90,000 in Bre-
vard, sit in sandy soils
that in most cases
are poorly suited for re-
moving contaminants from
wastewater
Brian LaPointe, a re-
search professor at FAU-
Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institute in
Fort Pierce, says septic
tanks remove 60 percent of
the nitrogen in waste-
water, leaving an esti-
mated 2.2 million pounds
of nitrogen per year enter-
ing the northern lagoon
region.
Septic tank waste in
groundwater can flow at
rates of 3 to 6 six feet or
faster per day, he says.
Lagoon-wide, he finds
evidence of human waste


in the forms of nitrogen
locked inside the drift
algae itself That waste
feeds toxic algae over-
growth. LaPointe suspects
a toxic microalgae clinging
to the lagoon's seaweed is
causing the manatee
deaths.
Dolphins could be at
risk, too. A 2011 paper by
FAU-Harbor Branch,
Georgia Aquarium and
NOAA cited septic tanks as
contributing to the pres-
ence of E. coli bacteria in
the lagoon's bottlenose
dolphins, especially those
captured near high densi-
ties of septic tanks, within
a few days of heavy rain.
Studies funded by the St.
Johns River Water Man-
agement District show
septic tanks do a fairly
good job treating human
waste, as long as they're
properly maintained. But
Florida counties with in-
spection programs find 8
to 11 percent of the septic
tanks are failing.
Assuming a 10 percent
failure rate, that could
mean 9,000 failing septic
tanks in Brevard.
Sewer systems aren't al-


KNEE PAIN?


4


Attend a FREE Seminar:





Crystal River
Hampton Inn
1103 N.Suncoast Blvd.

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1 -888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


SLargo Medical Center

ATeaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


ways better, especially
older ones with chronic
leaks and spills.
In March 2011, a broken
gear in a sewage-
treatment tank led to the
biggest sewage spill in
Cocoa Beach history The
city had to pump 10 mil-
lion gallons of partially
treated sewage into ponds
on the adjacent city-owned
golf course off Minutemen
Causeway between March
13 and 17 of that year. A
ditch links the series of
ponds directly to the Ba-
nana River
Counterpoint: Florida
Tech scientist Tom Be-
langer says septic tanks'
overall contribution of nu-
trients is minimal, because
the vast majority of tanks
function properly He finds
plumes of septic tank nu-


trients travel slowly: 1 to
3 feet a year
Belanger says excess ni-
trogen in the lagoon may
be coming more from
wildlife, such as manatees
and raccoons. There are
an estimated 12,000 feral
pigs on the Merritt Island
National Wildlife Refuge,
for example.
The Cocoa Beach spill is
not thought to be enough
volume to trigger the
superbloom.
At the time, the city ac-
knowledged some sewage
had reached the Banana
River, but how much is
uncertain.
The spill left behind no
immediate ecological
smoking gun, such as a di-
rectly resulting algae ex-
plosion in the Banana
River


V '



9


[ar & Retjauran


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STATE


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pregnant women gain new options


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
health care law has opened
up an unusual opportunity
for some mothers-to-be to
save on medical bills for
childbirth.
Lower-income women
who signed up for a pri-
vate policy in the new in-
surance exchanges will
have access to additional
coverage from their state's
Medicaid program if they
get pregnant. Some
women could save hun-
dreds of dollars on their
share of hospital and doc-
tor bills.
Medicaid already pays
for nearly half of U.S.
births, but this would cre-
ate a way for the safety-net
program to supplement
private insurance for
many expectant mothers.
Officials and advocates
say the enhanced cover-
age will be available
across the country,
whether or not a state ex-
pands Medicaid under the
health law. However,
states have different in-
come cutoffs for eligibility,
ranging from near the
poverty line to solid mid-
dle class.
The main roadblock
right now seems to be lo-
gistical: reprogramming
state and federal com-
puter systems to recognize
that certain pregnant
women have a legal right
to coverage both from
Medicaid and private
plans on the insurance ex-
change. Technically, they
can pick one or the other,
or a combination.
States and insurers will
have to sort out who pays
for what.
Another big challenge
will be educating the pub-
lic about this latest health
law wrinkle. It's compli-
cated for officials and pol-
icy experts, let alone the
average consumer
"This is an issue where
women are going to have
to figure out, 'I'm eligible
for both, now how do I do
that?"' said Matt Salo, ex-
ecutive director of the Na-
tional Association of
Medicaid Directors,


Associated Press
The South Portico of the White House is seen Friday in
Washington. A bevy of solar panels blanketing the roof of
the White House is getting its day in the sun. Technicians
have finished installing the panels at the nation's most
famous address.


White House sets


up solar panels


Associated Press
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., center, and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., center right,
and other Democratic lawmakers joined new mothers and their babies Sept. 25,
2013, at the Capitol to criticize Republican efforts to kill the Affordable Care Act,
popularly known as Obamacare, in Washington. The health care law has opened up
an unusual opportunity for some mothers-to-be to save on medical bills for childbirth.


which represents state
programs. "But what a
wonderful problem to
have. This is a great prob-
lem to have from the con-
sumer's perspective."
The cost impact for fed-
eral and state taxpayers is
uncertain. Providing
more generous coverage
increases costs, but com-
prehensive prenatal care
can save money by pre-
venting premature births
and birth defects.
Cynthia Pellegrini, head
of the March of Dimes'
Washington office, said
many women might not
have been thinking about
maternity benefits when
they signed up for cover-
age under the health law
After all, half of U.S. preg-
nancies are unplanned.
Often consumers just focus
on the monthly premium
when they select a plan.
The cost of normal un-
complicated childbirth
averages $5,000, said Pel-
legrini, and preterm
births can cost more than
10 times that. Copayments
and deductibles add up
fast.


'A lot of women, partic-
ularly in a situation like
childbirth, could end up
with significant out-of-
pocket costs," Pellegrini
said. "If they are eligible
for Medicaid, they could
be protected from costs
ranging from hundreds to
thousands of dollars." Her
group works to prevent
birth defects by promoting
healthy pregnancies.
Existing Medicaid poli-
cies, subsidized private
coverage under President
Barack Obama's law and
an obscure Treasury De-
partment ruling combined
to produce the new op-
tions for pregnant women.
Medicaid is a federal-
state program that covers
low-income and disabled
people. Before the health
law, states offered special,
time-limited coverage to
uninsured pregnant
women until their chil-
dren were born. That cov-
erage is not only for poor
women; some states pro-
vide benefits to middle-
class women as well.
Then came the Afford-
able Care Act, with feder-


ally subsidized private in-
surance for people who
don't have a health plan on
the job. The law, however,
drew a line between Med-
icaid and coverage
through the exchanges: If
you're eligible for Medi-
caid you generally can't get
government-subsidized
private insurance.
That barrier fell away
when the Treasury De-
partment ruled that Med-
icaid's targeted insurance
for pregnant women did
not meet the definition of
"minimum essential cov-
erage" required by the
health law That's because
the coverage is temporary
and states can restrict the
services the pay for
The ruling last summer
opened the possibility for
pregnant women to tap
both benefit programs,
said Dipti Singh, an attor-
ney with the National
Health Law Program in
Los Angeles.
"Usually you could only
be in one or the other," said
Singh. "This is different in
that pregnant women are
eligible for both."


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Tech-
nicians have finished in-
stalling solar panels on the
White House roof, capping
a project that President
Barack Obama hopes will
send a signal that renew-
able energy is feasible and
environmentally shrewd.
Obama said in 2010 that
he would retrofit his fam-
ily's new home with solar
panels starting in 2011,
then use the power gener-
ated to heat water for the
first family and provide
some electricity
But the project re-
mained dark until late
2013, when the installation
finally started.
Citing security and other
concerns, the White House
won't say how many panels
now encase the top of 1600
Pennsylvania Ave. or how
much they cost.
The panels are expected
to generate 6.3 kilowatts of
solar power whenever the
sun shines, the White
House said.
Obama wants to use his
personal example to spur
families and businesses to
do more to reduce re-
liance on foreign energy
and cut emissions blamed
for global warming.
"Solar panels at the
White House are a really


important message that
solar is here, we are doing
it, we can do a lot more,"
Energy Secretary Ernest
Moniz said in a video re-
leased by the White House.
The project required
technicians to first drill
down to the concrete on
the White House roof, then
use epoxy glue and
threaded rods to install a
gridded subassembly onto
which the solar panels
could be secured.
The solar components,
converters and the labor to
install the panels were all
domestic, according to the
White House, which de-
clined to name any of the
companies involved in the
project.
"Being at the White
House, we do have some
security concerns. We can't
cover the entire roof, al-
though that would be good
from an energy savings
standpoint," said James
Doherty, the White House
usher
Obama isn't the first
president to deploy solar
at the White House.
President Jimmy Carter
spent $30,000 on a solar
water-heating system for
West Wing offices in the
late 1970s, but his succes-
sor, Ronald Reagan, tossed
the panels after he moved
in.


352-465-6006


h-IijjdJPRIG .RMOION


beverly hills fl




Senior living


with comfort and style!


KINGSWAY IS AN INDEPENDENT SENIOR

LIVING RENTAL COMMUNITY FOR ADULTS

55 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER.






Our community is growing!



Space is limited.


Only a few villas remaining.


Call us at 352-465-6006


to schedule a tour.





WWW.KINGSWAYOFBEVERLYHILLS.COM


AlO SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


NATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kids reunite with locked-up moms

Program helps kids visit

incarceratedparents for v-.J /I m -

Mother's Day, Father's Day _-- i


Associated Press
FOLSOM, Calif. "Hi,
baby," Catherine La
France cooed as she swept
granddaughter Arianna
into her arms and danced
around the prison yard
with the 3-year-old.
She pulled her two
daughters into a bear hug,
and the girls burst into
tears. La France hadn't
seen Arianna's mother, 18-
year-old Samantha La
France, in six months, and
she last saw Summer La
France, 14, nearly three
years ago.
They soon dropped into
easy banter as barbed con-
certina wire high above
them glinted in the sun
and guards armed with
pepper spray discreetly
patrolled nearby
"This is my birthday
present and Mother's Day
at the same time," Cather-
ine La France said at the
stark, concrete-block-
walled prison for low-risk
offenders where she has
been locked up for nearly
two years. La France, who
has prior residential bur-
glary convictions, turned
39 two days earlier and
won't be released for three
more years, when she
completes a sentence for
repeatedly using a bogus
credit card to defraud
businesses.
Three generations of La
France women got 41 V pre-
cious hours together at
Folsom Women's Facility
east of Sacramento more
than a week before
Mother's Day, which is
Sunday It happened
through a free, nonprofit
program called Get on the
Bus that arranges for chil-
dren to visit their incar-
cerated parents in
California prisons around
Mother's and Father's
days.


Get on the Bus appears
to be unique in providing
free transportation to
children around the two
holidays and in offering
counseling and other sup-
port, said Ann Adalist-
Estrin, director of the Na-
tional Resource Center
on Children and Families
of the Incarcerated at
Rutgers University, Cam-
den. A handful of pro-
grams in other states,
including Florida and
New York, provide trans-
portation to kids as part of
a larger mission to help
prisoners and their
families.
"We have kids every
year that are meeting
their moms or dads for the
first time," California pro-
gram organizer Hilary
Carson said, while others
have not seen their parent
in years. The organiza-
tion's survey of partici-
pants, who average 8 years
old, shows that more than
half wouldn't otherwise be
able to see their impris-
oned parent without the
program.
On Saturday, 40 minors
and four young-adult chil-
dren of inmates made the
trip to Folsom Women's
Facility Tears of joy
streamed down mothers'
smiling faces as their kids
arrived, and lingering,
emotional embraces came
before the bus pulled
away The trip began be-
fore dawn in San Jose,
and the bus made stops to
pick up children along the
way
It's the second Mother's
Day the bus chartered by
the nonprofit Center for
Restorative Justice Works
visited the prison designed
to house 400 low-risk
women. But this year there
were about half as many
children, Carson said. Not
enough participants from


ABOVE: Inmate Erica Carmona, 21, tosses a soccer ball back and forth with her son, Dominic, 3, May 3 during his
visit to the Folsom Women's Facility in Folsom, Calif. Carmona, of Los Angeles County, who is serving time for
assault with a deadly weapon, had the chance to spend time with her son through a nonprofit program called Get
on the Bus that arranges for children of inmates to visit their parents in California prisons around Mother's and
Father's days. BELOW: Inmate Tiffany Dugan, left, greets her daughter, Arianne Skelton, 13, with a big hug May 3
at the Folsom Women's Facility.


Southern California
signed up to justify char-
tering a second bus.
Similar buses fan out to
10 of the state's 34 adult
prisons each year On Fri-
day, more than 250 chil-
dren visited two prisons in
central California.
At Folsom Women's Fa-
cility, Erica Carmona, 21,
tirelessly chased her 3-
year-old son the entire
visit, grinning as he kicked
a soccer ball around the
yard or tugged her along
with a jump rope. Other
children played pingpong
on two concrete tables,
had their faces painted
and played pickup games
with footballs and
basketballs.
"I was worried he would
forget who I was," said
Carmona, who is serving a
sentence for assault with a
deadly weapon.
When the youngsters
boarded the bus for the
ride home, they each re-
ceived a teddy bear and a
letter written by Mom.


BUSINESS OWNERS



YOU'RE INVITED


Digital Marketing

Seminars


Session 1
Tuesday, May 13th
8:30 AM breakfast/registration,
9 AM-10 AM seminar
Plantation on Crystal River


Session 2
Wednesday, May 14th
11:30 AM lunch/registration,
Noon-1 PM seminar
Plantation on Crystal River


Making Money

With Digital Media
Learn how local merchants are using a variety of digital
marketing strategies to GENERATE MORE
BUSINESS. Best practices for Social, Mobile, Display
and Video Marketing will be covered, including actionable
tips for generating more business today from Digital Media.

RSVP (3521563-5592
I2pcsUARANTE CITUS -COUNT'
w-c1o IROi)NICE ct


pLANTTmON


* Jim Green Jewelers
* Specialty Gems
* Gus's Gold & Gems


CITRUS COUNTY E
lII

-APP


l~innea


MOMMA AND HER BOYS
GRAND PRIZE
Brunch for 4 & 1/2 Day Pontoon Rental from Plantation on
Crystal River & Jewelry from Jim Green Jewelers


ARMS FULL OF LOVE
LOVES OF MY LIFE. 3 IE
2nd PRIZE 3nd PRIZE
2n PRIZ Silver Charm Bracelet from
Bracelet from Specialty Gems Gus's Gold & Gems


I Tan Yu o9Or9posos


NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 All


.ALI




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman, right, and first responder Carlos
Arredondo speak with reporters Saturday following commencement ceremonies for
Fisher College in Boston.

Marathon survivor, rescuer

address grads in Boston


Associated Press
BOSTON A Boston
Marathon bombing sur-
vivor and the man who
saved his life teamed up
again Saturday for a com-
mencement speech, telling
the new graduates of
Fisher College to "keep
running forward."
Jeff Bauman, who lost
his legs in last year's at-
tacks, told the crowded au-
ditorium in Boston how
his life was turned upside-
down 13 months ago. He
wasn't sure if he would
ever walk again, but he
never gave up, he said.
"We are all running a
marathon in one way or
another," said Bauman,
who now wears prosthet-
ics. "Today you are at the
finish line of one race, but
life is full of starting lines
and heartbreak hills. You


just have to keep running
forward," Bauman said.
Bauman and Carlos
Arredondo became sym-
bols of courage April 15,
2013, when tragedy struck
the streets of Boston.
Arredondo, who was don-
ning a cowboy hat and
passing out American flags
when the bombs exploded
near the finish line,
rushed to save Bauman in
a moment captured in an
Associated Press photo.
While in the hospital,
Bauman helped authori-
ties identify the bombing
suspects.
On Saturday, Bauman
and Arredondo beamed as
they were presented with
honorary college degrees.
Neither had graduated
from college. The pair
held their diplomas tight
as about 200 Fisher Col-
lege graduates walked


across the stage to receive
their own degrees.
Bauman and
Arredondo, now close
friends, touched on the
power of community in
their speeches, praising
the other first-responders
and residents who stepped
up and offered endless
support to the more than
260 survivors and the fam-
ilies of the three killed.


Associated Press
U.S. Marines participate in a training exercise at the Marine Corps Air Ground
Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, Calif., in this March 24, 2003, file photo. The
Marine Corps and off-road vehicle enthusiasts will share a rugged patch of desert
near the military base at Twentynine Palms under a compromise brokered by Con-
gress, according to a May 9 report.


Compromise made in dispute


between Marines, off-roaders


Associated Press
TWENTYNINE PALMS,
Calif. The Marine
Corps and off-road vehi-
cle enthusiasts will share
a rugged patch of desert
near the military base at
Twentynine Palms under
a compromise brokered
by Congress.
Neither side got all it
wanted in the nearly
decade-long dispute over
200,000 acres of Johnson
Valley adjacent to the
Marine Corps Air Ground
Combat Center in the Mo-


jave Desert, the LosAnge-
les Times reported Friday
As included in the 2014
defense bill signed by
President Obama, about
43,000 acres of Johnson
Valley will be for recre-
ational use only, while an-
other 79,000 acres will be
for the Marine Corps. And
53,000 acres will be shared
between the off-roaders
and the Marines.
"We would have


preferred something dif-
ferent. But this is probably
the best we can get," said
Steve Egbert, president of
the 6,000-member Califor-
nia Association of Four-
Wheel Drive Clubs, one of
several off-road organiza-
tions involved in the issue.
The annual King of the
Hammers off-road compe-
tition will continue, al-
though its course will have
to be redrawn slightly


$1.00 DRAFT ;"_/ ,.*s.*,
Every Day & Niqht ne Ky ail l
FREE
Pool i& Juke Box l So (352-- --2
Every Wed. & SatR Niqht
8 P.M.
Di
Every Fri. Night 8 P.M.
MON. TACO NIGHT
For Only $2.50
1/2 LB. BURGERS"-a&
Starting at $5 .00
^^^K^FI* *I I 0:^=~ ^?'^^'^MT~P^f^^
* *m I. Bj~^^3w^^w^


^^^^I A 1ggi^^B^


VOTE ONCE PER DAY FOR

YOUR FAVORITE BURGER






TRY ONE OF THESE PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS


* Anastasia's Restaurant Hernando
* Bentley's Restaurant Dunnellon
* Boulevard Bistro Citrus Springs
* Burger, BBQ & More Inglis
* Chassahowitzka River Lodge Homosassa
* Clawdaddy's Raw Bar & Grill Crystal River
* Eye Poppin' Cheese Steaks & Hoagies Inverness
* Fat Daddy's Roadhouse Homosassa


* Gator Cove Bar & Restaurant Homosassa
* Gruff's Tap & Grill- Dunnellon
* Grumpy Gators Bar & Grill Crystal River
* Mama's Kuntry Kafe Inverness
* Paiges Root Beer Lecanto
* The Rustic Ranch Inverness
* Skeet's Family Barbecue Beverly Hills
* Seafood Seller & Cafe Crystal River


TAYLOR MAE .!-." MOSAIC TILE %
HOMES gij and REMODELHOME SERVICES


00015BR

*WW.HONALEONLIMOSACMTIL rEP.BATTLE


The Villages
Comfort Suites
1202 Avenida Central

RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
www.LargoMedical.com


* Largo Medical Center
A Teaching Hospital

FLORIDA KNEE & ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION


BAME ofe BURGERS

Vot no fr yur faoieBrr.


~.x.


Citrus Chest and Lung Specialists, P.A.
Dr. Stephen D. Campbell, M.D.
and Luis E. Javier, M.D.
are closing our practice as of 6-16-14.
We will be custodian of our records.
Make arrangements to obtain records before closing by calling
352-637-5678. A signed authorization can be e-mailed to
cclmedrec@tampabay.rr.com or mailed to
P.O. Box 2138, Inverness, FL 34451.
Records can be faxed free of charge to a physician of your
choice. Payment will be required for mailed records
ail as allowed per Florida state law.


Ci RONICLE
*i ww~halialn~a


-11 --7s


A12 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


NATION


I I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For Hillary Clinton, a re-airing of past episodes


Associated Press
WASHINGTON For
Hillary Rodham Clinton,
the last few months might
be comparable to a spring
cleaning: An airing of her
political past before she
sets the course for her
much speculated-about
future.
As the former secretary
of state and first lady mulls
a presidential campaign in
2016, reminders of the tu-
multuous periods of her
career have re-emerged in
recent weeks: her hus-
band's affair in the White
House with Monica Lewin-
sky, her ill-fated attempt to
overhaul the health care
system and the deadly
2012 attack at a diplomatic
post in Benghazi, Libya.
Bill Clinton said presi-
dential campaigns always
need to be about the fu-
ture, but that gets compli-
cated if Hillary Clinton
runs again after losing out
to Barack Obama for the
Democratic nomination in
2008.
Republicans might
press the argument that at
a time when many Ameri-
cans are unhappy with the
nation's direction, she rep-
resents a bygone era
marked by political soap
operas.
Yet many Democrats say
reminders of the 1990s-
remember the booming
economy? could help
Clinton, and that rehash-
ing her past more than two
years before the next pres-
idential election could dis-
pense with a variety of
distractions.
If a Republican chal-
lenger or a Democratic


Associated Press
Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the 2014 National
Council for Behavioral Health Conference at Gaylord
National Resort and Convention Center Tuesday in
National Harbor, Md.


primary opponent invoked
Lewinsky, Whitewater, cat-
tle futures or other retro
story lines in 2016, Clin-
ton's team could try to dis-
miss it all as old news.
"For the majority of


people, this is an eye roll,"
contended Maria Cardona,
a former Clinton campaign
adviser
Vanity Fair magazine
published a first-person ac-
count this past week from


Lewinsky in which she said
Bill Clinton "took advan-
tage" of her, but that their
affair was consensual.
Lewinsky cited recently
released papers from a
longtime Hillary Clinton
friend, Diane Blair, in
which the former first lady
called the once White
House intern a "narcissis-
tic loony toon." Lewinsky
wrote that she found
Hillary Clinton's "impulse
to blame the Woman not
only me, but herself,
troubling."
When the magazine
posted excerpts of Lewin-
sky's account on its web-
site, Clinton was speaking
at a mental health confer-
ence and was asked about
the 1993 suicide of White
House counsel Vince
Foster
The magazine's story ar-
rived as the National
Archives continues to re-
lease documents from the
Clinton White House that
have shed more light on
Hillary Clinton's role lead-
ing the 1993 health care
task force. That's a politi-
cally volatile issue as both
parties debate the merits
of Obama's health law
Republicans, mean-
while, have created a spe-
cial House committee to
investigate the Benghazi
assault, and that could
mean a long spotlight on
Clinton's tenure as secre-
tary of state.
"The ghosts of Clinton
past are coming out to
haunt her future," said
Alice Stewart, an
Arkansas-based Republi-
can strategist.
Even her first political
event of the year brings


back memories of the Clin-
ton White House years.
She will raise money
Thursday for Marjorie
Margolies, a Democratic
candidate for Congress in
Philadelphia's suburbs.
Margolies served one


House term in the 1990s
and lost re-election after
casting a decisive vote in
favor of Bill Clinton's eco-
nomic plan. Margolies is
the mother-in-law of
the Clintons' daughter,
Chelsea.


* FREE ONION STRINGS I
W ITH THE PURCHASE OF A BURGER NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. EXPIRES 5/31/14
Live Music Full Liquor Bar Chicago Style Pizzas
Gorgeous Beer Garden w/Outdoor Dining & Events
SHorseshoes Pool Tables Karaoke

$2.00 Bloody Marys All Day Sunday -

Grumpy Gator's

Bar & Grill
4828 S. Suncoast Blvd. 352-503-2064 IbmnM l
Tuesday-Sunday llam-llpm Closed Mondays S- 46*


Fi\F:,.rJ( ,W I tOffARVny
fF: s.i.MAs. I Service Call I
1 New CustomersOnly.
J: MI H PLLJBING 30 YEARSEXPERIENCE
SERVICES 3 260-1973
SL L State Certified Master Plumber CFC 1427798
-


1 Able Locksmith
24 Hours 7 Days A Week
Commercial
O* Automotive Wiv
Residential
High Security Laser Automotive Keys
(352) 560-3178
00013uo www. 1lAbleLockSmith.com

CANVAS PRODUCTSTTTT^^


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist


628-5700
newair.biz
Exclusive
S IQ Air" Li#CC1815891
Audmitof li cakt


Summer Tune $4995
Up Special 139
Guaranteeing lOx Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Particle Scan
to determine the quality of the air you
breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS
THIS SERVICE!
Expires May 31, 2014


SHADY VIEW CANVAS
6828 S. Shady View Pt. Floral City
* Awnings Boat Covers
* Carports i Marine Upholste
* Repairs Boat Tops


ry


(352) 613-2518
Richard Rudman


A, A
SerdicISATg Our Services: Carpet Protector
SriCelMASTER Tile Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24 7 365 ReStOII Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

3 ROOMS & $1995:: UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
:1 HALWAY IU "flhl CHAIR OR'
;1 HALLWAY 9 FREE ECLINER CLEANED
:: 11111 (with purchase ofa
Expires 5/31/14 I Expires 5/31/14 couch & loveseat)
352-794-0270 .
CR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com m


BUDD EXCRVRTING
* Tree Work Site Prep
* Trim/Removal Bush Hogging
* Clearing Demolition
Lamar Budd. Debris Removal
owner Rock Driveways

352-400-1442


ADl R SN
For information about
how your business can
advertise on this page
please call
352-563-5592.

Ci 1,ii ......id,

ROi~N kiE
\*I
HOMEClilNTIN

O TTnTn^ o^


* *McKenzie

'Painting.
& & Pressure Cleaning ,


Interior Exterior Driveway Staiiu"
S ALL PHASES OF PAINTING '"
f 352-400-1404 ?


WHY r.----
1,100 [s25 I OFF I
IRIN Any NewhoeHo SERVICE
I R IN? I nWaterWSysteHUem. I SERVICE ALLI

ZAPPER L ESI'res53,14 New Cus.omes 0ny
,':+ It's Chemical Free Vwitou,
4:+ it removes rotten egg Showroomin
smell and discoloration Downtownlnvernes
+; It removes Iron, 102 W. Main St.
Hydrogen Sulfide Downtown
and Manganese 352-726-7300 Inverness

~I 0


Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!
WINDOWV

GENIE.,-)
Ne We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
|BONDED & INSURED
352.503.8465 www.windowgenie.com







INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
;- 341-0813 V ls MONFR8305
5El5h ic.3 SA 94
LICENSED -- .,EVENINGS BY
&INSURED wmw.michaolsfloorcovsringinc.nst APPOINTMENT


NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A13


%.


1I


i




A14 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 HONOR FLIGHT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


THE WAR'S END


Today the guns are silent. A great tragedy


has ended. A great victory has been won.


The skies no longer rain death


- the seas


bear only commerce men everywhere


walk upright in the sunlight. The entire


world is quietly at peace.






Gen. Douglas MacArthur







CITRUS COUNTY VETERANS


Name: Raymond Beaudry
Age: 95
Branch of service: U.S. Army
National Guard/U.S. Army
Why you enlisted: When
World War II broke out, I was
already in the National Guard
and my unit became part of the
U.S. Army's 43rd Division. I
joined because it was a good
way to earn money
Where you served/job you
did: I was a motor sergeant,
assembling field artillery
vehicles. I served in the
Pacific.
Wartime memory: We
headed for Guadalcanal to-
ward the fighting, but we lost a
ship in our convoy and spent
40 days on the water, then took
a detour to New Zealand. We
ended up on the island of
Munda, which was like a paid
vacation. People would come
out and feed us.
Honor Flight impression:
When I was discharged, we got
our papers outside of the bar-
racks and that was that. The
Honor Flight more than made
up for that. I guess I didn't re-
ally understand what it was all
about until I saw it for myself. I
was surprised by all the people
welcoming us. I didn't realize it
was for us.


Name: John Harper
Age: 86
Branch of service: U.S. Coast
Guard/Navy
Why you enlisted: It was war
time. I had four brothers in the
military, including one that
was in the Battle of the Bulge.
Where you served/job you
did: I was a cook on a troop
ship bringing troops, Army
nurses, even war brides back
from Europe.
Wartime memory: The best
thing was when the troops got
a glimpse of the Statue of
Liberty They went crazy It
meant they were home they
were back.
Honor Flight impression: It
was my first trip in a jet plane,
and it was great. I would like to
go back to Washington and
spend more time at the
memorials. Coming home, the
lines of people at the airport
shaking our hands I even
shook hands with four dogs -
I didn't deserve all that During
my time in service, I was only
one of a crew of 800. I just went
where the ship went.


Name: Joseph Losito Jr
Age: 89
Branch of service: Marines,
serving both in World War II
and the Korean War
Why you enlisted: I was 17
and wanted to go in with two of
my friends. I was too young and
my parents wouldn't sign for
me. But when I turned 18, I
joined.
Where you served/job you
did: Pacific, in the infantry
Wartime memory: I spent
most of my time on a ship. We'd
go from one island to the next
fighting, then go someplace on
shore to have a party, then on
to the next. We never knew
where we were going.
Honor Flight impression: It
hit the top. The memorials
brought back memories of
years ago, and the "heroes
welcome home" I couldn't
believe it. People grabbing my
hands I couldn't keep my
tears away I never thought
anything like this would ever
happen to me.


Name: Simon Magaddino
Age: 86
Branch of service: U.S. Navy
Seabees.
Why you enlisted: All my
buddies, we all wanted to fight.
We wanted to be a part of it.
Where you served/job you
did: Pacific, delivering bombs
to the 20th Air Force in Guam.
Wartime memory: When we
stopped in Tokyo harbor about
a month after the war ended,
there was an eerie feeling.
Something big had happened.
We had dropped those bombs,
and I thought about how many
people had died. We were
there for about four days, but
we weren't allowed off the
ship.
Honor Flight impression: I
was humbled. The beautiful
memorial, the welcome home,
it all brought tears to my eyes.
It was all something to behold.
The real heroes were the ones
who didn't come back.


Name: George Schimpf
Age: 87
Branch of service: U.S. Navy,
serving in both World War II
and the Korean War
Why you enlisted: When I
was in school, I met a couple of
guys who were on a submarine
and they said it was a great
service. I enlisted at age 17.
Where you served/job you
did: East coast, as an electri-
cian with the 40th escort divi-
sion during World War II and
submarine duty during the Ko-
rean War
Wartime memory: The North
Atlantic waters are rough.
Going out to sea was like being
in a cork. There were six de-
stroyer escorts and a carrier
When you were on the de-
stroyer, one minute we'd be 20
feet up in the air and the next,
20 feet down.
Honor Flight impression: It
was amazing, and I really ap-
preciated it. But as I try to tell
people, I enjoyed myself while
I was in the service. But this
Honor Flight program, it shows
that people care. Everyone
was so full of cheer You can't
forget something like this.


WPM "


I mk-'




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE HONOR FLIGHT SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A15


Retired Marine Pete Kristall has a friend take his picture in front of the
Iwo Jima Memorial.


Honor Flight leaves


memories


A rose tied to a fence at the Korean War Veterans Memorial pays
tribute to a fallen soldier.


Honor Flight members
proudly wear their hats
on the recent trip.
Many added medals
from their branch of
service to their caps.


Citrus County resident Ray Beaudry receives a handshake from Carrie Carter as the World War II veteran arrives in Baltimore. Dozens of men, women and children
greeted the vets on their arrival.


Photos ty


M ratthew Sec


The image of John Stewart and World War II veteran John Harper,
both Citrus County residents, is reflected in the Air Force
Memorial as the men read the inscription.


Barbara Mills, organizer of the Honor Right of West Central Florida,
hugs George Schimpf as he walks off the bus at Arlington National
Cemetery on Tuesday morning.










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Women boost Dems' hopes in tough year


Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
woman nicknamed Rocky.
A daughter of former mi-
grant farmworkers. A child
of politics.
These female candi-
dates for the House em-
body Democratic hopes in
a rough election year
President Barack
Obama's unpopularity is a
drag on his fellow Democ-
rats, and no one is talking
seriously about breaking
the GOP lock on the House
in midterm elections,
when the president's party
traditionally loses seats.
But Democrats, after ro-
bust recruiting of female
candidates, are counting
on women to knock out a
few GOP men.
That's where Rocky
from New Mexico 39-
year-old Roxanne "Rocky"
Lara comes in.
The former Eddy County
commissioner, who got her
nickname from an uncle, is
an underdog against Re-
publican Rep. Steve Pearce
in a district that stretches
across the southern part of
the state. The five-term
conservative has $1.4 mil-
lion cash on hand in a dis-
trict that leans Republican.
Lara is counting on


winning over voters with a
record of bipartisanship,
working-class issues such
as raising the minimum
wage, support for an immi-
gration overhaul in a His-
panic-leaning district and,
in a break with liberals,
backing of the Keystone
XL pipeline. She adds a
dose of gender politics.
Pearce, in his memoir
published this year, wrote
that the "wife is to volun-
tarily submit, just as the
husband is to lovingly lead
and sacrifice." The Baptist
lawmaker's writings were
based on his reading of the
Bible.
In a recent interview,
Lara said her campaign is
drawing "the contrast be-
tween my experience, my
beliefs and my values and
what I'm going to work for,
compared to those 1950s
beliefs that Congressman
Pearce lives by"
In California, 39-year-
old Amanda Renteria is
the daughter of a Mexican
immigrant, was educated
at Stanford and Harvard,
and was the first Latina
chief of staff in the U.S.
Senate. She worked for
two of the 20 women in the
Senate Democratic
Sens. Dianne Feinstein of
California and Debbie


Associated Press
House congressional candidates Amanda Renteria, D-Calif., left, Gwen Graham, D-Fla.,
center, daughter of former Florida senator and governor Bob Graham, and Roxanne
"Rocky" Lara, D-N.M., pose for a photo April 30 at the Democratic Campaign
Committee in Washington. Democrats, after robust recruiting of female candidates,
are counting on women to knock out a few GOP candidates in the 2014 midterm
elections.


Stabenow of Michigan.
Renteria is looking to
unseat first-term Rep.
David Valadao, a third-
generation farmer, in the
Central Valley She dis-
agrees with Obama's ef-
forts to cut crop insurance
in a district the president
won with 55 percent of the


vote, and criticizes her
rival as immigration legis-
lation founders in the
GOP-controlled House.
She says that sends a
clear message of disre-
spect to families and the
Hispanic community, and
offers a saying in Spanish.
The translation: "Tell me


who your friends are and
I'll tell you who you are."
In Florida, Gwen Gra-
ham, 51, is trying to emulate
the campaign success of her
father, Bob Graham, a for-
mer governor and senator,
in a race against two-term
Rep. Steve Southerland in
the Panhandle. She


criticizes his vote against
the Violence Against
Women Act, has adopted
her father's "work days" to
gain insights into the lives of
Florida residents and in-
sists that she'll be a prag-
matic Democrat in his mold.
Graham says complaints
that she was riding her fa-
ther's coattails initially
held her back.
"I don't think if my fa-
ther had had a son that
there would have been
that hesitation to make
sure that I had all the skill
sets before I offered my-
self for office," she said.
The three candidates,
who recently sat down for
an interview with The As-
sociated Press, are part of
the Democratic Congres-
sional Campaign Commit-
tee's "Red to Blue"
program focused on the
party's high-profile candi-
dates in competitive races.
Sixty-three of the 199 De-
mocrats in the House are
women, compared with just
19 of the 233 Republicans.
Democrats have recruited
102 women to run for open
seats and challenge incum-
bents this election, com-
pared with 66 Republicans,
according to the Center for
American Women and Poli-
tics at Rutgers University


Clashes continue in Ukraine


Associated Press
A local man stands atop a seized tank that was set alight Saturday in the center of Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, after fierce fighting between Ukrainian government
forces and pro-Russia protesters Friday in Mariupol. Recent clashes have left seven people dead, turned police headquarters into a smoldering ruin and left the
city center blocked off after residents built barricades of tires. The Donetsk region, which includes Mariupol, and the neighboring Luhansk region were to hold a
hastily organized referendum Sunday on declaring sovereignty.


College basketball
staffer was on
doomed balloon
DOSWELL, Va. -A fam-
ily spokeswoman said a Uni-
versity of Richmond women's
basketball team staff member
was one of two passengers
on a hot air balloon that
crashed in Virginia.
Julie Snyder told The As-
sociated Press on Saturday
that Natalie Lewis' body has
not been found.
The remains of the pilot
and the second passenger
have been recovered.
They have not been
identified.
The three were in a bal-
loon Friday night that wit-
nesses said crashed amid
screams for help from the
balloon.
Lewis was director of bas-
ketball operations at Richmond
and a former swimmer there.


Nation BRIEFS
First lady's
address focuses
on kidnapped girls
WASHINGTON -
Michelle Obama on Saturday
decried the kidnapping of
scores of Nigerian schoolgirls
who have been missing for
nearly a month and used
their plight to speak out for
the rights of all girls to get an
education.
Delivering the weekly pres-
idential radio and Internet ad-
dress on the eve of the U.S.
holiday honoring mothers,
the first lady and mother of
two said that, like millions of
people around the world, she
and President Barack
Obama are "outraged and
heartbroken" over the April
15 abduction of nearly 300
girls from their dormitory. She
asked the nation to pray for
their safe return and stressed
the importance of education.


Arkansas clerk
issues first gay
marriage license
EUREKA SPRINGS, Ark.
-An Arkansas clerk has is-
sued the state's first gay mar-
riage license, breaking a
barrier that voters put in
place with a constitutional
amendment 10 years ago.
A license was issued Sat-
urday morning to Kristin
Seaton and Jennifer Rambo
of Fort Smith.
Judge Chris Piazza in Little
Rock on Friday struck down
the 2004 ban, saying there
was no rational reason for it.
Piazza didn't issue a stay,
so local clerks can decide
whether to grant licenses.
Most Arkansas courthouses
are closed Saturdays, but the
one at Eureka Springs usu-
ally opens to issue marriage
licenses.
From wire reports


WorldBRIEFS

Search for missing Yemeni forces Thousands of
ferry passengers kill seven alleged Syrians return to
put on hold al-Qaida militants war-battered Homs


SEOUL, South Korea -
Bad weather and the deterio-
ration of internal partitions in a
sunken ferry are hampering
the search for those still miss-
ing in the disaster, South Ko-
rean officials said Saturday.
More than three weeks after
the ferry sank, 29 passengers
remain missing, with 275 bod-
ies recovered so far, most of
them high school students.
Internal partitions in the
ferry have become water-
logged and started to bend,
said government task force
spokesman Ko Myung-seok.
Coast guard officials said this
can prevent divers from enter-
ing different parts of the ferry.
Ko also said divers were
unable to carry out underwa-
ter searches Saturday be-
cause of bad weather.


SANAA, Yemen -
Yemeni forces killed seven
alleged al-Qaida militants in
the latest fighting as part of a
major offensive waged by the
military, the defense ministry
said Saturday.
Government forces have
stepped up attacks during the
past two weeks against al-
Qaida in the Arabian Penin-
sula, considered the most
active branch of the group in
the world.
Washington has assisted
the Yemeni authorities with
logistics, training and drone
attacks.
The seven were killed in
clashes while forces were
combing the southern cities
of Shabwa and Abyan, where
the fighting has been
centered.


HOMS, Syria Thou-
sands of Syrians returned to
war-battered parts of the cen-
tral city of Horns on Saturday,
as opposition activists ex-
pressed bitterness over the
rebels' surrender of their
strongholds to pro-government
forces and vowed to return.
The homecoming came as
rival jihadi factions fought
deadly battles to the east in
an oil-rich region bordering
Iraq, the latest clashes be-
tween groups trying to over-
throw the government in
Damascus.
Rebels surrendered their
stronghold in Horns in ex-
change for their safe pas-
sage to the nearby northern
countryside as part of a deal
that began Wednesday.
From wire reports







HONOR FLIGHT


A TRIBUTE IN PICTURE


PHOTOGRAPHS


BY CHRONICLE


PHOTOGRAPHER MATTHEW


Towering spires at the United States Air Force Memorial evoke the spirit of flight. Central to the design are the three stainless steel spires, which reach skyward, with the tallest
reaching 270 feet above the ground. The three spires have a special significance for the USAF, symbolizing its three core values, according to literature at the memorial. Those
values are: "Integrity first," "service before self" and "excellence in all we do." Here, World War II Air Force veteran Dick Gibson is accompanied by guardian Frank Valensi.


GRATEFULLY I STAND IN THE

SHADOWS OF GREAT AMERICANS

II TUESDAY WAS A SPECIAL DAY FOR A LOT OF MEN AND WOMEN IN FLORIDA, MYSELF INCLUDED.


A couple months ago, I was invited
by Barbara Mills to go along on an
Honor Flight for World War II veter-
ans who reside in West Central Florida.
Growing up in the Washington, D.C.,
suburbs, I knew all the familiar memorial
sites: the National World War II Me-
morial, Iwo Jima, Arlington National


Cemetery andthe like, each onthe Honor heroes. These men and women are ex- with airmen who engaged the Luft-
Flight's schedule. I didn't expect to see actly those for whom these pieces of waffe in dogfights over Europe and
anything new, because I'd been there granite, steel and marble were created, flew harrowing B-17 Flying Fortress
and done that many times in my youth. I stood with men who fought and bombing missions over the heart of
What I didn't expect was that each of bled at the Battle of the Bulge. I spoke German industrial targets, drastically
those memorial sites evoked a signifi- with men who sailed the Atlantic and weakening their war machine.
cantly different feeling in me when vis- Pacific oceans searching for German U-
iting with tried-and-true American boats and Japanese vessels. I visited See Page A21


BECK


Matthew Beck




AlS SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 11, 2014 C:Comcast,cCitrus B: Bright House DO1: 1Comcas Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H:. Holiday Heights
IC B D/IIF H 6:00 16:30 7:00 17:30 18:00 18:30 9:00 1 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
i WES NBC 19 19 PGA Tour Golf Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' c Rosemary's Baby (N) '14, S,V' -News Access
D S 1 6 NewsHour WEDU Pioneers of Television Call the Midwife (N) Masterpiece Classic Secrets of Chatsworth AreYou Keeping
S PBS 3 3 14 6 Wk Arts Plus *PG' '14'c (N)'PG' cNPG' cServed? Up
o WUFT PBS 5 5 5 41 Gone Gone Nature'PG' Call the Midwife'14' Masterpiece Classic Chatsworth Austin City Limits
o] ,, NBC 8 8 8 8 8 PGA Tour Golf Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo)'PG' Rosemary's Baby Rosemary and Guy move to News Paid
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 Paris. (N)'14, SV'c Program
o f ABC 20 20 20 n News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "Snow Drifts; There's No Revenge "Execution" News Spo Night
B ABC20 20 20 1News HomeVideos'PG' Place Like Home" (In Stereo) PG cc PGC'Z on9
C 1 1 1 Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife "The The Mentalist "Black 10 News Paid
B WI CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo)N 'PG'c One Percent" (N)'14' Hearts" (N)'14' 11pmr (NJ Program
S O 1 3 3 1 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's American The Family Guy Cosmos: A Spacetime FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
( V FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) Nc Burgers Dad 14' Simpsons '14' Odyssey'PG (In Stereo) N Notice'14'
t WJ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time (Season Finale) (N)'PG' Revenge'PG' c News Inside Ed.
m E Ij ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Watchman *** "Monumental" (2004) David Love a Gracefor Knowthe Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
SIND 2 2 2 22 22 Brower.'NR' Child G' Today G' Cause Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
WFIJ ABC 11 1 1 1 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time "Snow Drifts; There's No Revenge "Execution" News Castle'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' Place Like Home" (In Stereo) 'PG' 'PG'
O N 1 Modern Modern Big Bang Big Bang Glee "Nationals" (In Glee "Goodbye" (In The Office The Office We There We There
S CW IND 12 12 16 Family Family Theory Theory Stereo)'14' c Stereo)'14' PG' '14' m Yet? Yet?
SD WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "The Cutting Edge: Going for the Gold" Seinfeld Seinfeld Raymond Commun OurlIs Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM w TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanle y Rejoice in the Lord Connec Paid Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Paid Ministries
SC 1 Friends Friends Two and Two and CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami "Down to Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
I M CW 4 4 4 12 12 'PG' 'PG' Half Men Half Men '14'm the Wire"'14' Normal"'14'BN "Bloodline"'14'
Casita Big Rotary Chamber Crime Your Citrus County Court ISpy'G' Eye for an The Comedy
M YKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Chat Strike'14' Eye Shop
D [WOX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Burgers American Simpsons |Fam. Guy |Cosmos-Space News TMZ (N) 'PG'
n WVE UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero AquifyAhora (SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina(N)'14'(SS)Sal y Pimienta'PG' Comned. Noticiero
SWXPX ION 1 7 Leverage'PG' Leverage'14' c Leverage'14' Leverage'PG' Leverage'14' c Without a Trace'PG'
s Duck Duck Duck k ID uckI Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Dynasty: Mother's
A 54 48 54 25 2721 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Day
S** The Mummy Returns" (2001) Brendan Fraser. Two evil forces TURN "Mr. Culpeper" Mad Men "The TURN "Mr. Culpeper'
Llc 55 64 55 pursue the son of adventurer Rick O'Connell.'PG-13' c (N)'14'c Runaways" (N)'14' '14'1c
E F 52 35 52 19 2o01 To Be Announced River Monsters "Jungle River Monsters (In Rocky Mountain Bounty Rocky Mountain Bounty Rocky Mountain Bounty
) 52 35 52 19 21 Terminator"'PG Stereo) 'PG' Hunters '14' Hunters '14' Hunters '14'
S 96 1 9 ** "Jumping the Broom" (2011, Comedy) Angela Bassett. A bride ** "Joylul Noise" (2012) Queen Latifah. Two strong-willed women
96 19 96 and groom's parents clash at the wedding.'PG-13 M mustworktogethertowin achoircompetition.'PG-13
RAV 254 51 254 Atlanta |The Real Housewives of Atlanta The Real Housewives of Atlanta Married to Medicine Housewives/Atl. |Happens
Tosh.0 and Your Mom "Billy Madison" (1995, Comedy) Adam South Park: Momma's Boys The boys celebrate Mother's Day (N) 'MA,
CB 27 61 27 33 (N)'14, D,L Sandier.'PG-13' c [cL
S9 4 ** 8 "Rocky IV" (1985, Drama) *** "National Lampoon's Animal House" (1978, o s Cops Cops Cops
I J 98 45 98 28 37 Syvester Stallone.'PG' Comedy) John Belushi, Kevin Bacon. R' Readed Reloaded Rerloaded Rloaded
Nj 43 42 43 Paid |Paid Debt/Part On Shark Tank 'PG' Shark Tank 'PG' Shark Tank 'PG' Shark Tank 'PG'
NN 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Special (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Inside Man Anthony Bourd.
5 46 4 46 6 5 Jessie Liv& I Didn't Do Dog With a ** "Mars Needs Moms"(2011) Jessie Liv& Dog With a Austin & I Didn't Do
46 40 46 6 5 'G' Maddie It'G' Blog G' Voices of Seth Green. 'G' Maddie Blog G' AllyG' It G'
33Pj 2 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Countdown MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)
PN 34 28 34 43 49 Billiards (N) M Billiards cMSportsCenter Special (N) 2014 Draft Academy 30 for 30
WN 95 70 95 48 M. Angelica World Over Live'PG' Sunday Night Prime Mother Angelica With Cardinal Dolan Life on the Rock'G'
D 2 52 29 20 28 O **** "Forrest Gump"(1994, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks. An inno- ***; "The Blind Side" (2009 Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do
29 52 29 2 2 cent man enters history from the '50s to the '90s. PG-13' white couple adopts a homeless black een. PG-13
*** "Another Stakeout"(1993) Richard ** "Kindergarten Cop"(1990) Amrnold *** "Junior"(1994, Comedy) Arnold
(i"AJ 118 170 Dreyfuss. (In Stereo)'PG-13'c Schwarzenegger. (In Slereo)'PG-13'c Schwarzenegger. (In Stereo) PG-13 c
ji 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee
FOD 26 56 26 Cutthroat Kitchen G' Chopped 'G' Guy's Games America's Best Cook Cutthroat Kitchen 'G' Kitchen Casino 'G'
JS 732 112 732 Motorcycle Racing Monster Jam (N) UFC UFC Worud Poker 'he Ultimate Fighter FOX Sports Live (N)
SNL 35 39 35 MLB Baseball Marlins Marlins World Poker The Best of Pride (N) Cutting |Game 365 World Poker
X 3 0 3 *** "Crazy Stupid, Love." (2011, Romance- ** "Horrible Bosses" (2011, Comedy) Jason **4 "Horrible Bosses" (2011, Comedy) Jason
19 30 60 30 51 Comedy) Steve Carell. 'PG-13 Bateman, Charlie Day R' Bateman, Charlie Day R'
OLF 727 67 727 Fehertyh'14' Live From (N) (Live) Live From Live From
A 5 "Second Chances" (2013, Romance) Alison Signed, Sealed, "Mom's Day Away" (2014, Drama) Bonnie The Middle The Middle
6) 59 68 59 45 54 Sweeney, GregVaughan, Ed Asner. c Delivered (N)'G'c Somerville, Ona Grauer, James Tupper. c 'PG' 'PG'
W,_- 302 21 30 2 "Ocean's ***"Prisoners"(2013)HughJackman.AdesperatefatherGameofThrones(N) Silicon Veep(N) LastWeek Gameof
302 201 302 2 2 Twelve" takes the law into his own hands. 'R' c 'MA' c Valley (N) 'MA To. Thrones
O 3 2 3 VICE Last Week Real Time With Bill Game of Thrones (In ** "Bullet to the Head" (2012) ** "Constantine"(2005,
303 202 303 '14' c To. Maher'MA' c Stereo)'MA' c Sylvester Stallone.'R' Fantasy) Keanu Reeves. 'R' c
T 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntlIntl Hunters HuntIntl Carib Carib Beach Beach Alaska Alaska Hunters HuntIntl
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
IS 51 54 51 32 42 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' PG' PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
Ec 2 3 2 "Taken for Ransom" "The Good Sister" (2014, Suspense) Sonya Drop Dead Diva Devious Maids (N) "The Good Sister"
24 38 24 31 (2013) Teri Polo.'NR' Walger, Ben Bass. 'NR' "Identity Crdsis"'PG' 14' cc(2014) Sonya Walger.
"A Mother's Rage" (2013 Suspense) Lori Movie 'PG' Those Who Kill Those Who Kill
50 119 Loughlin, Kristen Dalton.'R' "Untethered" (N)'14' "Untethered"'14' c
S 320 221 30 3 *1"The Watch" ** "The Hobbit:An Unexpected Journey" (2012) lan McKellen. Bilbo *** "Batman Begins"(2005, Action) Christian
S320 221 320 3 3 (2012) Ben Stiller.'R' Baggins joins the quest to reclaim a lost kingdom. c Bale. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
1t 4 4 4 Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Lockup: Holman Lockup: Holman
42 41 42 "Man vs. Nature" ."Razors Edge" (N) Disruptive inmates.
W 1 6 1 4 Bloods and Crips: L.A. Wicked Tuna "Brotherly Wicked Tuna "Blue Wicked Tuna "Tuna Filthy Riches (N)'14' Wicked Tuna "Tuna
109 65 109 44 53 Gangs '14, L,V Shove"'14' Grit"'14' Beta Kappa" (N)'14' Beta Kappa"'14'
WitRJ 28 36 28 35 25 Haunted Thunder Sam& Sam& FullH'se FullH'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
[W 103 62 103___ Master Class Master Class Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Master Class Oprah's Lifeclass
XY 44 123 ___ Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
ni 3 21 3 "Twilight Penny Years of Living Californication Nurse Nurse Californication Penny Dreadful "Night Penny Dreadful "Night
340 241 340 4 Saga-2" Dreadful Dangerously 'PG' c Jackie Jackie (N) Work" 'MA' Work" 'MA'
S 37 3 37 27 3 Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "I Smell a Bar Rescue "Scary Bar Rescue "Muscle Hungry Investors (N) Bar Rescue "Taxed Out
) 37 43 :37 27 36 'PGC' Rat" 'PC' Mary's"'PC' Madness" (N)'PC' (In Stereo)'PC' in Texas"'PC'
(tA 3 3 "All Is ** "Fun With Dick & Jane" Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons *** "In the Line of Fire" (1993, Suspense)
370 271 370 Bright" (2005) Jim Carrey cc (iTV) 'MA' cc (iTV) 'MA' m Clint Eastwood. (In Stereo) R' c
4 36 3 36 Into the Saltwater Sport Ship Sportsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Inside the
36 31 36 B Blue'G' Exp. Fishing Shape TV Flats Fishing Tournament Series Animals G' Rays
S 31 9 31 26 29 **** "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981, Adventure) *** "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984, *** "The Prestige"
31 59 31 26 29 Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman. PG' Adventure) Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw. PG (2006)'PG-13'
TB 49 23 49 16 19 * "Killers"(2010)Ashton Kutcher. ** "It's Complicated" (2009) Meryl Streep. 'R' ** "Valentine's Day" (2010)
1 53 1 3 *** "Imitation of Life" (1959, Drama) Lana **** "I Remember Mama" (1948, Comedy-Drama) Irene ** "TheMatingSeason"(1951)
169 53 169 30 35 Turner, John Gavin.'NR' cc Dunne, Barbara Bel Geddes.'NR' c(DVS) Gene Tiemey'NR'&
SDeadliest Catch Alaska: The Last Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' Alaskan Bush People Alaska: The Last
53 34 53 24 26 "Darwin's Law"'PG' Frontier'14'c '14'c Frontier'PG'c
50 46 50 29 30 My Five Wives'PG' My Five Wives 'PG' Medium |Medium |Long Island Medium My Five Wives 'PG Long Island Medium
S2 n **3 "The Words" (2012, Drama) Bradley *** "Quartet" (2012) Maggie Smith, Billy ** "Diary of a Mad Black Woman" (2005)
50 261 350 Cooper. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Connolly Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Kimberly Elise. 'PG-13' cc
**1 "Hulk"(2003, Fantasy) Eric NBA Tip- NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at Washington Wizards. Inside the NBA (N) (In **
48 33 48 31 34 Bana.'PG-13' Off(N) Eastern Conference Semifinal, game 4. From Chicago. Stereo Live) c "Shaft"
TOON 38 58 38 33 "Diary-Wimpy" Clarence Clarence King/Hill |King/Hill Rick |Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken
TRA 9 106 9 44 Coa oast er aster Trip Flip Trip Flip Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Secrets- Lege. Mysteries-Museum
ruT 25 55 25 98 55 World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Inside Jokes
rMv 32 49 32 34 24 Cosby Cosby GoldGirs GoldGirs GoldGirls GoldGirls GoldGirls GoldGirls Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special
U0 ) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14
S 117 117 CSI: Miami "Chain CSI: Miami "Permanent CSI: Miami "StandYour CSI: Miami "CSI: My CSI: Miami "Guerillas in CSI: Miami "Deep
117 69 117 Reaction"'14'c Vacation"'14' Ground"'14' Nanny"'14'c the Mist"'14' Freeze"'14'c
1WN 18 118 18 118 20 ** "The Haunted Mansion" ** 'The Chronicles ofRiddick"(2004)Vin Diesel. Salem (N)'MA' c Salem'MA' c


Remember mom


on her special day


ear Readers:
Happy Mother's
Day Phone your
mother, grandmother,
mother-in-law, step-
mother or foster mother
and wish them the best
DearAnnie: Several
years ago, you reprinted a
Mother's Day letter that
appeared in the Ann Lan-
ders column. It started
with something like "one-
in-a- million Mom," but I
don't remem-
ber much
else. I only
know that it
reminded me
a great deal of
my own
mother Can
you print it
again? -
Cassiein
Kansas
Dear
Cassie: Here ANN
itis: ANN
To a one-in- MAIL
a-million
Mom, to you, dear lady for
all the dreams you
dreamed for us. Not one
of us became the balle-
rina or vocalist or pianist
or doctor or lawyer you
were hoping for The boys
didn't become million-
aires, and the girls didn't
learn to speak six lan-
guages. Instead we are
the children who forgot to
say "thank you" when it
probably would have
meant a lot to you. We are
the ones who talked when
we should have listened.
We are the little tykes
who woke you before
dawn to serve you the
breakfast-in-bed birthday


I
I


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) In 3D. 12:30 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Brick Mansions" (PG-13)
8p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:55 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Legends of Oz" (PG)
12:40 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Legends of Oz" (PG) In 3D.
3:50 p.m. No passes.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:30 p.m.,
3:35 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
7:50 p.m. No passes.


"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1:15 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 1:10 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
6:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Kind of gun
6 Pro-
10 Stiff
15 Opp.ofNNW
18 Like an acrobat
19 Criminals
21 Love a lot
22 Caprice
23 Weathercocks
24 Lacking ethical stan-
dards
25 Tumbler
26 Go underground
27 Genesis name
28 Salt water
29 Ait
31 Something
unimportant
33 Infamous emperor
35 Facilitate
36 Javelin
37 Croquette cousin
38 Highways
40 Oval nut
41 Ill-mannered
42 Beans and-
44 Imperial
45 Design detail
47 Cape
Canaveral grp.
51 Aflower
52 Bedlam
53 Hauls up
55 Short sleep
56 Mounds
57 Relative to a gator
58 Adequate
60 Throw with effort
62 Eye
63 Oakland player
65 "God's Little -"
66 Fool for a king
67 Tart
68 River in England
69 Beige
71 Vast quantity
73 Like a desert
75 CIA predecessor
76 Perceives
77 Persona grata
78 Decline
81 Indian of Mexico
83 70s do
84 Eschew
85 Time


87 Beams
90 Talk wildly
92 Plant also called leather-
wood
94 Baby buggy
95 Jason's wife
96 Duvall or Downey
98 Auction
99 Part ofAWOL
100 Miner's find
101 Unbind
103 To what place
105 Move unsteadily
106 Toothed wheel
108 Stake
109 Journal
110 Showed contempt
111 Attention-getter
113 Literary category
114 Throb
115 Plant
118 Duck
119 Traveled on
120 Conduit
124 Make indebted
125 Mother-of--
126 Spiral
127 Rocky hill
128 Troublesome bug
129 Reveals
131 Drawout
133 Upscale
135 Hackman or Kelly
136 Promotes
137 Minnesota city
138 Island near Sicily
139 Time periods (Abbr.)
140 Analyze
chemically
141 Pierce
142 Perspire


DOWN
1 Black bird
2 Century plant
3 Simple restaurant
4 Beer
5 -judicata
6 Careless
7 With no company
8 Shredded
9 Literary collection
10 Kind of sleeve
11 Lazybones
12 Nanny


13 Tax org. letters
14 Destroy
15 Work period
16 Move furtively
17 Arab VIP (Var.)
19 Electrical units
20 Box for a book
22 Bleach
28 Bills
30 Circus animal
32 Disencumber
34 Old Greek priest
36 -lily
37 Recently made
39 Burden
40 Tranquility
42 Very cold
43 Hair curler
44 -Island
45 Tart
46 Small
compartment
48 Bodily structure (Abbr.)
49 Rescue
50 Mimic
51 Mince
52 Move back and forth
over
53 -pocus
54 Former
N.Y stadium
57 Bring about
59 Kind of escape
61 Serf
63 Cheers
64 Double-breasted coat
66 Female donkey
70 Auto
72 Carriage
74 School in
Connecticut
76 Safe place
79 Criticize
80 Faced with courage
82 Ardor
84 Spooky
86 Part of AARP (Abbr.)
87 Air pollution
88 Nothing but
89 Notion
91 Aid and -
93 River in France
94 Looked
96 Spacious
97 Scintillated
99 Dregs


102 Musical
entertainment
104 Rabbit
105 Old messaging system
107 Flightless bird
109 Costly
110 Wife of Esau
112 Pig
113 Like a pasture
114 Well-mannered


Unclear
Li'l -
Septs
Greek letter
Happen again
Serviceable
Terra- -
Special pleasure
And
City in Hawaii


130 The dawn
personified
132 Haul
133 Letters
134 Jurisprudence


Puzzle answer is on Page A25.


@ 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


special: burnt toast, weak
tea, unscrambled eggs
and half-raw bacon swim-
ming in grease. We gath-
ered around your bed and
sang "Happy Birthday
Dear Mommy" You pre-
tended to be thrilled and
tried to eat the mess we
brought to your bed.
Our childhood is over,
and here are the "thank
yous," many years over-
due. Thank you for being
there when we
needed you.
Thanks for
being our tower
of strength
when you
needed support
yourself Thank
you for believ-
ing in us when
we had trouble
believing in
ourselves.
Thank you for
E'S saying what we
BOX needed to hear
and for knowing
when silence meant more
than words. Your wisdom
seemed to come from a
place that none of us
could ever figure out
Thank you, Mom, for al-
lowing us to dream our
own dreams, even though
your dreams were more
glamorous. Thank you,
too, for never letting on
when we disappointed
you.
Most of all, Mom, thank
you for giving us the room
we needed to grow and
the freedom to learn from
our own mistakes. We
hope we can do half as
well with our kids. -
Your Loving Children




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


GalUeiy & Caf6
honors vets
The Florida Artists
Gallery & Cafe will cele-
brate the month of May
with an exhibition spot-
lighting military veteran
artists who live in Citrus
and adjoining counties.
The exhibit will run
through May 31. A special
Memorial Day open
house will be hosted on
the afternoon of May 26.
The Florida Artists
Gallery & Cafe is in the
historic Knight House at
8219 Orange Ave. in Flo-
ral City The Gallery and
Cafe are open 10 a.m. to
4 p.m., seven days a week.
Admission is free.
For more information,
call 352-344-9300, visit
www. flartistsgallerycom
or visit on Facebook.

VFW post invites
all for food, fun
The public is welcome
to join VFW Post 4864 in
Citrus Springs from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 16,
for a pork roast dinner
Dinner is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
The post will also host a
country/western night
from 5 p.m. to midnight
Saturday, May 24, with
live music and lots of fun.
Food will be served from
5 to 6:30 p.m. for a charge
of $5.
For more information,
call 352-465-4864.

Legion Post 77
invites all to jam
Everyone is welcome to
join the American Legion
Allen Rawls Post 77 at a
jam from 6 to 9 p.m. May
16 with Nashville artist
John Thomas and the
Ramblin' Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who
enjoy playing instruments
or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the
music are welcome. Cost
is $5 at the door; food and
soft drinks are available
for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point in Inverness.
For more information,
call 352-476-2134, 352-476-
7001 or 352-726-0444.

Veterans Health
Fair is May 17
Everyone is invited to
the Seventh annual Tri-
County Women Veterans
Health Fair from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 17,
at the Citrus County Re-
source Center, 2804 W
Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.
A benefits coordinator
will be available to an-
swer questions. There
will also be health infor-
mation booths, vendor
booths, chair yoga and
massages.
The event is sponsored
by the Lecanto and Ocala
VA Community Based
Outpatient Clinics and


The Villages VA Outpa-
tient Clinic.
For more information,
call Christine Acker at
352-746-8014.

Public welcome at
Dunnellon post
Wall-Rives Post No. 58
of the American Legion
will have an outdoor flea
market and pancake
breakfast at 7:30 a.m.
Saturday, May 19.
On the menu are pan-
cakes, French toast,
scrambled eggs, sausages,
orange juice and coffee
for $5 per person.
Memorial Day services
will be at 11 a.m. Monday,
May 26, at the post.
A picnic lunch will
follow
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Purple Heart
meeting May 20
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of
the Purple Heart (MOPH)
will meet at 1 p.m. Tues-
day, May 20, at the Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road
491), Lecanto.
All combat-wounded
veterans and parents, lin-
eal descendants, spouses
and siblings of living or
deceased Purple Heart
recipients are invited.
To learn more about
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter
776 MOPH, visit www
citruspurpleheart.org or
call 382-3847.

Vets committee
to meet May 21
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will
meet at 1:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 21, in the Confer-
ence Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River
All veterans' service or-
ganizations are encour-
aged to send
representatives to partici-
pate in the planning
process. Individual veter-
ans are also welcome.
For more information,
call Chris Gregoriou at
352-795-7000.

Post auxiliary
to host picnic
VFW Post 10087 Men's
Auxiliary in Beverly Hills,
2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), will have its an-
nual Memorial Day picnic
from noon to 2 p.m. Mon-
day, May 26.
The public is welcome.
On the menu are
sausage with peppers and
onions, Sloppy Joes, po-
tato salad, beans and
dessert. Tickets are $7.
Music will be by Walt
Rogers.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.


Cooties, auxiliary
to serve pasta
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent
76 will serve a pasta din-
ner with meat sauce,
salad, garlic bread,
dessert and coffee from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, May
30, at Leroy Rooks Jr
VFW Post 4252 in Her-
nando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, where the helicopter
is). The public is invited.
Tickets are $7 per per-
son and can be purchased
at Post 4252. Call 352-726-
3339 or Seam Squirrel
Paul Kimmerling at 352-
795-4142.

40&8 to have
breakfast June 1
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 welcomes the public
to breakfast from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. the first Sunday
monthly, at American Le-
gion Post 155 on State
Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway).
Donation is $6 for
adults; special on kids' (8
and younger) meals. Spe-
cialty drinks available for
$1. The hall is smoke-free.
Proceeds benefit
programs of the 40&8.

Male descendants
sought for group
The American Legion
Post 166 of Homosassa
Springs is seeking all
male descendants,
adopted sons and step-
sons of members of the
American Legion and
such male descendants of
veterans who died in the
service to their country
during times of war
Such men in the Chas-
sahowitzka, Homosassa,
Homosassa Springs and
the Sugarmill Woods area
who are interested in be-
coming members of the
Sons of the American Le-
gion are needed. There is
no form or class of mem-
bership, except as active
membership.
Those interested in be-
coming members may
contact Clay Scott, vice
commander of American
Legion Post 166.
He may be reached by
writing to American Le-
gion Post 166, PO. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL
34447-0767, or at 928-848-
8359. His email address is
eaglerider@gmx.com.
Interested men may
stop by the post on the
regular meeting night, the
first Monday monthly, at
7 p.m. at the Spring Lodge
No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S.
Memorial Drive.


Come play games DAV helps vets Office has help for
with Post 8189 get to clinics vets with PTSD


VFW Post 8189 in
Homosassa invites the
public to have some fun.
Bingo is played at 2
p.m. Wednesday and
food is available. Jam ses-
sions are from 3 to 7 p.m.
Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Vet-
erans Drive, Homosassa.

Bingo open to
public Thursdays
The public is invited to
play bingo Thursdays at
American Legion Wall-
Rives Post 58. Doors open
at 4 p.m.; games start at
6p.m.
Dinner is available for
$5.
The post is at 10730 U.S.
41, Dunnellon.

Public can eat
shrimp, wings
Everyone is welcome to
join Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
in Crystal River on
Wednesday for wings or
shrimp basket lunches in
the lounge from noon to
3p.m.
All proceeds benefit
veterans' programs.
For more information,
call 352-795-6526.

Post welcomes
public for fun
VFW Post 10087 in Bev-
erly Hills, 2170 Vet Lane
(County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), often has
special events that are
open to the public.
On a regular basis,
bingo is at 1 p.m. Sunday
in the smoke-free hall.
For more information,
call 352-746-0440.

Post 4252 invites
all for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State
Road 200 in Hernando
(with the helicopter out
front), welcomes the pub-
lic at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch
every day and breakfast
on Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Activities include bar
bingo on Tuesday from 2
to 4 p.m. and Show Me the
Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday
Dance music is on tap
every Friday and bingo is
played Saturday
Friday features an all-
you-can-eat fish fry or
New England boiled din-
ner
For more information
and menus, call the post
at 352-726-3339.


The DAV transportation
network has received
great response for volun-
teer drivers for the two
vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one
going from Lecanto to
Gainesville, the other
from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van
goes each weekday and
The Villages run is made
when there is a need. Vet-
erans who need to go to
appointments in
Gainesville or The Vil-
lages are asked to call the
Veterans Service Office in
Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to
be placed on the van list.
All appointments must be
made before 1 p.m.

'In Their Words'
wants stories
The Chronicle features
stories of local veterans.
The stories will be about
a singular event or mo-
ment in your military ca-
reer that stands out to
you. It can be any type of
event, from something
from the battlefield to a
fun excursion while on
leave.
We also ask that you
provide us with your
rank, branch of service,
theater of war served,
years served, outfit and
veterans organization
affiliations.
To have your story told,
call C.J. Risak at 352-586-
9202 or email him at
cjrisak2@yahoo.com. C.J.
will put together your sto-
ries and help set up ob-
taining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with
your story

Case manager
aids veterans
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment has a case manager
who is available to assist
veterans to apply for ben-
efits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule
is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library,
1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W Crystal St.,
Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an ap-
pointment to meet with
the case manager, call
352-527-5915.


The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment offers help for
veterans who have had
their post-traumatic
stress disorder (PTSD)
claim denied.
Veterans who have
been denied within the
past two years are asked
to contact the office to re-
view the case and discuss
compensation/pension ex-
amination. All veterans
who have been diagnosed
by the Lecanto VA Mental
Health center and have
been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appoint-
ment to discuss a claim,
call 352-527-5915. You will
need to have your denial
letter and a copy of your
compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You
can get a copy of your
exam either by requesting
it through the VA medical
records or from the pri-
mary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information
about the Citrus County
Veterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/com
mserv/vets.

Transitioning vets
can get help
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Depart-
ment is looking for
veterans who have re-
cently transitioned from
the military (or returning
reservist from tours of ac-
tive duty) to Citrus County
within the past two years.
Veterans Services re-
quests that veterans and
their spouses call to be
placed on a list for an up-
coming seminar, which
will discuss what benefits
or services they need to
help ease transition.
The office will schedule
a seminar to discuss ben-
efits and solicit ideas. Call
352-527-5915 to reserve a
seat.

Assist Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs
such as public education,
vessel safety checks,
safety patrols search and
more.
Criminal background
check and membership
are required. Email Vince
Maida at vsm440@aol.
com, or call 917-597 6961.


. .I*A, BUR
Voe o fryorfaoit. ure. :.

Votig ens Ma 23 5e

ww croilenln.comburerbttl


* SMOKED RIBS ON THE WEEKENDS
SOFT SERVE ICE CREAM


Israel 10 Days
Go in a Group... Feb. 16, 2015
Full Fill Your Bucket List
Jerusalem Sea ol Galilee Bethlehem Nazarelh and much morel
Starting at 2998- All Inclusive
Includes: Deluxe Motor Coaches + C.u j: j ,i t -,, ,, .- r '; .,r J, .), ',
Buffet Breakfast & Dinner Daily+ Hotel Gratuities + Bible Study Guide + R/TAir from NY
Den. $300 PP required
THE ,TRAVEL CLUB
Pr gerryslravelclub'.aol.com
527-8002 476-4242 -". .

The Homosassa River Garden Club invites you to join us at the
Riu Guanacaste Resort, Costa Rica
October 25th November 1st
This is a 5 star resort and the all-inclusive package includes rt airfare
from Tampa, all taxes, tips, transfers to resort, food and beverages.
Space is very limited. A $250.00 per person deposit will hold your space.
Total for this trip is $1590 pp/do
Call Buzz at The Travel Authority (352) 628-0668
VAUkiEM 5390 South Suncoast Boulevard, Homosassa
.l (352) 628-0668
-the -- www.travelauthorityfl.com
S,,1, Email: buzzgwen@yahoo.com



If you want to

advertise here in the

Great Getaways

call 563-5592


SVIKING RIVER
RIVER CRUISESCRUISE 014
Bh, w inC,. ENJOYABLE WAY
*TO SEE EUROPE!
H Filling up quickly.
Hurry to reserve your stateroom.
Call to check availability and rates.


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

352-795-5797
Everyt hing Outdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS ..U .'J*


IWI5 |..... -BUY ONEoGET- GOOD THINGS
Becky's Trae" Store 50 HA TO
re--) 5F0 THOSE WHO PLAN
--", -SECOND GUEST- AHEAD.

Florida Aquarium & -r -TI
Dolphin Encounter Cruise May BOGO offer
July 16,2014 '- Book any 2015 or 2016 sailing and your
Admission to the traveling companion enjoys 50% savings.
Aquarium and f l"l l A
Dolphin Cruise. fr May 1 31,2014
Visit new exhibit Mado.c \ Offer Excludes Quantum ofthe Seas
Lunch on your own and Anthem of the Seas
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (2 5 78
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352)527-8855
.ww'beckystravlservi ce.com, 000167U


VETERANS


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


50th ANNIVERSARY

The Kohlers


70th ANNIVERSARY

The Runkises


ENGAGED

Sarver/Powers


Robert and Joan
Clements Kohler of Pine
Ridge Estates celebrated
their 50th anniversary
May 9, 2014.
The couple were wed
May 9,1964, in Astoria,
New York. Robert retired
as a maintenance
supervisor II in the
Division of Electrical
Systems for the New
York City Transit
Authority Joan, who is
vice president of the
Pine Ridge Property
Owners Association, was
a homemaker They have
lived in Citrus County
since June 1995.


iW


They have three
children Barbara,
James and Sharon-
who all reside in Beverly
Hills. Their grand-
children are Meredith
(Brian) Shadwill of
Chickamauga, Georgia,
and Briane Shane of
Gainesville.
They have three great-
grandchildren Robert,
Annaliesa and Brian Jr
Family and friends-
60 in all -feted the
Kohlers with a surprise
anniversary reception at
the Pine Ridge
Community Center to
celebrate the occasion.


April 21-27, 2014
Divorces
Jon Balogac, Citrus Springs vs.
Sheree Balogac, Citrus Springs
Diana Cooper, Inverness vs. Mark
Cooper, Crystal River
Catherine S. Jamroz, Homosassa vs.
MarkA. Jamroz, Inverness
John E. Maybin, Panama City Beach
vs. Kitty L. Maybin, Inverness
Gary Robert Polizzi, Beverly Hills vs.
Niki Ann Polizzi, Jacksonville
Daniel Provost, Gill, Mass. vs. Tina
M. Provost, Inverness
Casey David Ralph, Crystal River vs.
Melissa Riley Ralph, Crystal River
Patricia Marie Sanders, Homosassa
vs. Kevin John Johnson, Homosassa
Evelyn M. Snow, Inverness vs.
Richard L. Snow, Grand Island


Ray and Joan Runkis
celebrated their 70th
anniversary on May 8,
2014, with their family
Joan and Ray were
married in Detroit,
Michigan, in 1944. They
have three children,
two grandsons, five
great-grandchildren and
two great-great-grand-
children.
They also were loving
foster parents to 115
babies over a 30-year
period in Michigan and


FOR THE RECORD
Jack J. Waldron, Crystal River vs.
Tonia L. Waldron, Crystal River
Marriages
Jacob Paul Anderson, Lake
Panasoffkee/Nicole Ann Romano,
Lake Panasoffkee
Randall Scott Benfer,
Citrus Springs/Cynthia Leah Bivens,
Citrus Springs
Clifton Wayne Clayborn,
Inverness/Sonja Lynn Pennington,
Inverness
Tylor Jobe Herrera, Homosassa/
Jaclyn Anne Christiansen, Homosassa
Peter Thomas Koch Jr., Crystal
River/Samantha Lynn Panzarella,
Crystal River
Gary Allen Marriage Jr., Lecanto/
Jennifer Marie Frisch, Lecanto
Peter Sotiris Patides,


then in 1969, they moved
to Fort Lauderdale and
continued to foster
children.
They moved to Citrus
Springs in 1989, where
they are busy with their
crafts. Ray is a
woodworker and Joan
loves to sew. For many
years, Joan has made
children's clothes and
quilts that she has
donated to the Family
Resource Center of
Citrus County


Dunnellon/Tiffany Erin Geller,
Homosassa
Timothy Michael Ratulowski,
Inverness/Natasha Lee Parker,
Inverness
Timothy Jack Smith, Dunnellon/
Tara Lynn Anderson, Dunnellon
Craig Donald Vokey,
Hernando/Theresa Darlene Cain,
Beverly Hills
Gene Randel Wright, Lake
Panasoffkee/Sharon Faye Parkinson,
Lake Panasoffkee

FOR THE RECORD
For Citrus County records, call
the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Shauna Marie Sarver
and Mark Allan Powers
of Hernando have
announced their
engagement
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Thomas and
Cherie Sarver of Lecanto.
Her fiance is the son of
Richard and Lisa Powers
of Inverness.
She is a 2006 graduate
of Lecanto High School
and 2012 graduate of the
College of Central Florida
with a degree as a
physical therapy
assistant. The prospective
groom is a 2004 graduate


Robin Soehlman and
Chase Preucil of Orlando
exchanged nuptial vows
April 5, 2014, at Gallery J
Studios in Winter Springs.
The bride is the
daughter of Stan and
Ruth Soehlman of
Hernando. The groom is
the son of Jeff Preucil of
Boca Raton and Challee
Smith of Lexington,
Kentucky
Stacy Mason, the
bride's sister, was her
honor attendant. Erica
Blinkhorn and Alicia
Smith were bridesmaids.
Vladimir Fortune, Nick
Randall and Ryan Crane,
all best friends since
childhood, shared the
best man duties.
The bride, given in
marriage by her father,
Stan Soehlman, wore a
strapless ivory fit and
flare with jeweled
sweetheart neckline and
long organza layered
train.
A reception followed
the wedding at Gallery J.
A highlight of the recep-
tion was a surprise per-
formance by the bride's


EL]
of Nashua High School.
The couple plan a
spring 2015 wedding
on the beach in
St. Petersburg.


sister and father in honor
of the bride and groom.
Out-of-town guests
included family from
Kentucky, Georgia,
Illinois, Iowa,
Pennsylvania and
Tennessee.
After their honeymoon
trip to Cabo San Lucas,
Mexico, the newlyweds
are at home in Orlando,
where the bride is an
account executive with
Apple Textbooks and her
husband is general
manager of LA Fitness.
The Rev Scott Orcutt,
who officiated the
ceremony, also performed
the wedding ceremony of
the bride's parents 36
years ago and April 5 was
also the Rev and Mrs.
Ocutt's 40th anniversary


Timeless pieces to celebrate

your everlasting love.


Jim Green Jewelers

Crystal River Shopping Center i0'$
JKST /
1665 SE Hwy. 19 Next to Sweetbay ',STi/
352-563-0633
Layaway Available Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10am-5:00pm Sat. 11am-3:00pm 16 YEARS


I


*^ f Sit Avial
Let us cater
4 our wedding
or special event
.Event Planning
Rentals
.Site Available
Bakery
*Office Delivery Available
'The
Rustic Ranch
RESTAURANT & CATERING
S104 US HWY. 41, INVERNESS 726-7333


. ^ **..** q eq. .**.** ,**** ,***,*************I * *f *II*~*t**** *** !
~i h IeimliiI iioei i i i l l lI 1 1 t l lt l l l

,: Citrus County -



BRIDAL



1. DIRECTORY
. A 4 A i 0.00 0.00 0* * ** 4.. .... ..... .... ....
.T..... ht.. ..... 1 ^ ^*t 4 .* I
V^A

Contact us to discuss your event planning needs: 352-746-6855 or caterIng@citrushills.com


I..
I I,.,,,,
I I,,,,, I,,


WEDDING

Soehlman/Preucil


r v '^^^
BApi7'sS
. rtston


A20 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


TOGETHER


f ^-P






HONOR FLIGHT: A TRIBUTE IN PICTURE


The first stop Tuesday for the Honor Right guardians and World War II veterans
was the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Mike Beeman, left, supports his father, Harry
Beeman, as the two watch the changing of the guard Tuesday. Members
of the Honor Right unload from their buses at Arlington National Cemetery. They
arrived in time for the changing of the guard, which is performed every half-hour
from April 1 to Sept. 30. The changing of the guard attracts thousands of
visitors each day to the tomb at Arlington National Cemetery. Above, guards
go through the inspection process prior to the change in guard.


SHADOW
Continued from FRONT
Sadly, the number of these valiant
men and women of the Greatest Gener-
ation, most now in their late 8os and
90s, is quickly dwindling.
These veterans are true national
treasures who all too often are ignored
or forgotten. In many ways and far
from the monuments and memorials in
Washington, D.C. the 21st century
has forgotten the critical role they
played in shaping this world's history.
They emphatically dispelled the tyranny


of a German dictator and trampled
Japanese designs on empire.
We need to be ever thankful for them.
We need to slow down, look at history
and remember the freedom we share
has come at an enormous cost.
I feel honored to have spent the time
I did with the veterans who served in the
most costly war of the 20th century.
If you know a veteran, especially one
from the Greatest Generation, take time
this week to thank them for their service.
Without these brave men and women,
our world would be vastly different.
They deserve our sincere thanks,
respect and love.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A21


Tom OF THE


1UNKNOWN SOLDIER






. ..... ....* ...Y..t. .. .




... ... .............. .... ...















...... ..".


., -** .o.. .-












uN
..... ..............-...














.-j ,*j .*1
Irai-
4 -.-, ". -''- -.'.
"" : ":" ii
., . .. .i ..' ." .
/3 .' ;'
,/
.. .,z.. ,





.,.a.m,...









di i: =! =i;.=!.$.:.. ' ,4" .? ;.'. .L


C-w

4 FA

crK




















/ /1 ~



'7,/i.


.2
SliE





2oCL
(Do 0(




.= E= E
Ui



(D




(D 0

cis
C 5








2wU
p0 "




I _





u) U(D
418










(Dc
5 .2 E
2o










(DC
* 0 ^
0^-S

oo^








E (D


(D .

.2 -4
o2














0.c .2







0 4)
(D (D










E.2
Mo (D














41 0 C




(D
E .







0-2

















CU)
-&I
i.c
































(DC


0



(D
2'-
.0'a








4a -
0.<=
0l
0*^
U)
0|

C^
(U<
C)00




IE2.




04X-
()00




0
U)U
(U
.C5
(g



C












*Co(
(0



2.2


c >>
*C (U

C U)
.2 x


*i!


U)


























0) (D
I,. i 4-
0CM (D
LL5~ 00 ( L


:U.0- E0 (D CL. .
'3: (D = >


0t , "- o" 0.co ES*
0- ., 0) r- 0(D
20)cc(D (




2 z2 ..-. .' 2 .-c


0. .__. .0 a. o ,-
4o =0-oo =(D
(D.0 00~ CLE

-Z Ex(D (D.o




ccD--E
(D C (D ( (DCE(D (
01) L 0 4



CL.. m =-E
(D ,s...= = I. (D --....D.




.-.D


"(D- Z
(D c"4" (1)-























~.C...,C.
., , ....JrY!.% ..
(D,>., .. .:z-(D. (D
















iC
'FD 9000 0



0 mm *c
E- 20 r,- .o1),- M....
c t E. r- ".












0 L0 .
-A&-




















"Al
44 1 ,











ED











4 !'
aiE! t"


-.


Cq
4*W.Aw%




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sons of the American Revolution medal


Locks of Love


Special to the Chronicle
Gifted Students Class teacher Susan Barmon of the Floral City Elementary School was awarded the SAR Bronze
Good Citizenship Medal for use of the SAR Elementary School Americanism Poster Contest as a learning tool for
the history of the American Revolution. The theme of the contest was Francis Marion, "The Swamp Fox." Barmon
proudly displays her medal and certificate with some members of her class. The award was presented by SAR
Compatriot Norman Freyer, poster contest chairman. The medal was authorized in 1895 and recognizes persons
whose achievements are noteworthy in their school, community or state.


Quilting for kitties


JOAN NOVAK/Special to the Chronicle
Creative Quilters stopped by the Humanitarians of Florida's new facility at 1031 N. Commerce Terrace in Lecanto
to donate 18 beds for the animals' comfort while getting treatment. The quilt guild members bring all their
quilting scraps, and some completed beds, to the monthly guild meeting to be used as stuffing. So far, 140 beds
have been donated to various animal shelters since the project began. Humanitarians of Florida is a nonprofit,
low-cost spay/neuter and vaccination clinic. Volunteers and donations are always needed to continue the work
the organizations does. To learn more about the group visit http://hofspha.org/wp. Pictured: Maggie Hypes, the
HOF president, gratefully accepts the donated beds.


Humane Society
OF CITRUS CO.


Puppies


LIf


Special to the Chronicle
These two beautiful
puppies, Travis and Tory,
are part of a litter of seven
born to a sweet American
Staffordshire terrier. Born
in February, they now need
homes. When they are
adopted all age-
appropriate medical will
have been taken care of
and they will have been
microchipped. To access
an adoption application or
to view other available
pets, visit the website at
www.roomforonemore.net,
and for more information
call Karron at 352-
560-0051.


Monday All You Can Eat Snow Crabs...........$29.99
Tuesday 10 Oz. N.Y. Strip & Lobster................$17.99
4 Wednesday 10 Oz. N.Y. Strip & Shrimp.................$15.99
SThursday 16 Oz. T-Bone Steak...........................$11.99
Friday and Saturday Prime Rib.......12 Oz. $15.99 16 Oz. $17.99
sNew Salad Bar $2.75 with meal
Draft Beers $1.50 All Day, Every Day
iB Happy Hour Chicken Wings
750 All Day, Every Day
L *I.* L KARAOKE ON THURSDAY AND FRIDAY


Join us for our
Mother's Day Menu n
k Filet & Lobhster
Stuffed Grouper,
1/2 Price Drinks
- for Mother's & More
All Day


Steaks & Seafood, Raw Oyster Bar, Full Liquor Bar
(IN WINN DIXIE PLAZA) 1601 SE HWY. 19. CRYSTAL RIVER
E~~ ~352-564-CLAW (25291


Special to the Chronicle
Jenna Marie Fialkowski, 13, donated 12 inches of
hair to Locks of Love on April 27, at Nature's Way
Precision Hair in Hernando. The hair salon is operated
by her grandmother, Linda Evans. Jenna was visiting
with her family from Dayton, Nevada.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.

RADAR RATA RIEGV ID SSE
AG I L EBMF E L OI ADOREBW H I M
VA N ES FA M ELONAIDO E H I D E

VE BSI[ET TRFTEL
NER0 E A SE SE R F RIT TE R
I R; I-- RUS ID P iS C PAIRG AUDIT
FRANKS REGAL SPEs C N SA
CR 0 CluSlC H AOS HO I S T SINAIP.
HI LLS CCIR O E G H HO EAV
iG L EI- ABB-IY"-E-DYE'CSS'E J Eo

PIE 1U SE UCR 0CE AIN



ORMEB OOS E I HERL EILTEIAtETE
GEAR POST DI JOELA R Y J(EeRnEaD

F A C TO Y D RAK R DE D U CT
O LIDGE B P E-AILNE E-L-IX
G N A T TLE L S E L I C I T
G E N TO T S D U LAU T HN M LT A











Y ETN R PROCEDURESG R
5- 11 @ 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

102-0511 SUCRN

CITRUS COUNTY PLANNING
SSTAFAND DEVELOPMENT
1 COMMISSION
THURSDAY May 15, 2014 at 9:00AM and 1:00 PM
. ........... CITRUS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS AUDITORIUM
3610 S. Florida Avenue
Inverness, FL 34450
RONALD LUNDBERG, CHAIR DWIGHT HOOPER
KYLE CHRIETZBERG 1st VICE CHAIR WALLACE HIGGINS
JAMES BROOKS, 2nd VICE CHAIR CHERYL PHILLIPS (Alternate)
ZANA ENNIS JOEL BRENDER (Alternate)
PAUL WHEELER CHUCK DIXON (SCHOOL BOARD)
A. CALL TO ORDER
B. INVOCATION
C. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
D. ROLL CALL
E. CHAIRMAN TO READ THE APPEAL PROCESS AND
MEETING PROCEDURES
F. OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Receive comments from the
public
G. APPROVE MINUTES -
H. STAFF ANNOUNCEMENTS
I. EXPARTE COMMUNICATION COUNTY ATTORNEY
J. APPLICATIONS
1. COMPREHENSIVE PLAN APPLICATION -
This application is a time certain item for 9:00 A.M.


HCR Limestone. Inc.
REQUEST: This application is a request to amend
the Generalized Future Land Use Map (GFLUM) of
the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan from EXT,
Extractive District to TCU, Transportation,
Communication, Utilities District, and to amend the
Land Use Atlas Map (LUAM) of the Land
Development Code from EXT, Extractive District to
TCU, Transportation, Communication, and Utilities
District. A complete legal description of the property
is on file with the Geographic Resources and
Community Planning Division.
STAFF RECOMMENDATION: APPROVAL
STAFF CONTACT: Cynthia L. Jones, Senior
Planner, Geographic Resources and Community
Planning Division
2. LAND USE APPLICATION This application is a time
certain item for 1:00 PM
a. SV-14-01 David Quinn for Suqarmill Woods Oak
Village Association. Inc.
REQUEST: To vacate a portion of Oak Village
Boulevard S. lying south of Poppy Street in the plat
of Sugarmill Woods, as recorded in Plat Book 9,
Page 86-150; Plat Book 10, Pages 1-150; and Plat
Book 11, Pages 1-16 public records of Citrus County
(Section 32, Township 20 South, Range 18 East). A
complete legal description is on file with the Land
Development Division.
STAFF RECOMMENDATION: APPROVAL
STAFF CONTACT: Joanna L. Coutu, AICP, Director,
Land Development Division
K. ADDITIONAL ITEMS
L. PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION
MEMBER COMMENTS
M. ADJOURN
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by
the Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this
meeting because of a disability or physical impairment
should contact the County Administrator's Office, Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 A25


a CPA-AA-14-21


a. .


nD mk Fnernv Filrida. Inr frfr




A26 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


atorvastatin calcium
tablets


You pay $4 ifyou have: You pay $30 irfyou have:



I. a Ii.a sppy fI. IPF R.l
r. .


C
Brought to you by Pfizer,
the makers of name-brand LIPITOR.


*LIPITOR CHOICE CARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS
By using the LIPITOR Choice Card (the "Card"), you
attest that you meet the eligibility criteria and will comply
with the Terms and Conditions described below:
You will pay $4 for a 30-day supply (30 tablets) if:
you use commercial/private insurance and your out-
of-pocket expense for a 30-day supply of name-brand
LIPITOR is $130 or less.
You will pay $30 for a 30-day supply (30 tablets) if:
you do not use prescription health coverage to purchase
your name-brand LIPITOR under this program or you use
commercial/private insurance and your out-of-pocket
expense for a 30-day supply of name-brand LIPITOR
is $130 or more. In addition:
a) Medicare Part D and Affordable Care Act (ACA)
Exchange patients may participate in this Card
Program, but cannot use any part of their
Medicare Part D or ACA Exchange prescription
benefit for LIPITOR during the term of this offer.
b) Out-of-pocket expenditures under this Card
Program cannot be applied towards a patient's
Medicare Part D true out of pocket (TrOOP) or
ACA Exchange expenses.

Important Facts About LIPITOR (LIP-ih-tore)
(atorvastatin calcium) tablets
Read the Patient Information that comes with LIPITOR before you
start taking it and each time you get a refill. There may be new
information. This information does not take the place of talking
with your doctor about your condition or treatment. If you have
any questions about LIPITOR, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
What Is the Most Important Information I Should Know
About LIPITOR?
LIPITOR can cause serious side effects. These side effects
have happened only to a small number of people. Your
doctor can monitor you for them. These side effects usually
go away if your dose is lowered or LIPITOR is stopped.
These serious side effects include:
Muscle problems. LIPITOR can cause serious muscle
problems that can lead to kidney problems, including kidney
failure. You have a higher chance for muscle problems if you
are taking certain other medicines with LIPITOR.
Liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to check
your liver before you start taking LIPITOR and if you have
symptoms of liver problems while you take LIPITOR. Call
your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms
of liver problems:
Feeling tired or weak
Loss of appetite
Upper belly pain
Dark, amber-colored urine
Yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes
What Is LIPITOR?
LIPITOR is a prescription medicine that lowers cholesterol in your
blood. It lowers the LDL-C ("bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides
in your blood. It can raise your HDL-C ("good" cholesterol) as well.
LIPITOR is for adults and children over 10 whose cholesterol does
not come down enough with exercise and a low-fat diet alone.
LIPITOR can lower the risk for heart attack, stroke, certain types
of heart surgery, and chest pain in patients who have heart disease
or risk factors for heart disease such as age, smoking, high blood
pressure, low HDL-C, or heart disease in the family.
LIPITOR can lower the risk for heart attack or stroke in patients
with diabetes and risk factors such as eye problems, kidney
problems, smoking, or high blood pressure.
LIPITOR starts to work in about 2 weeks.

LEP646030-02 2014 Pfizer Inc.


c) Patients participating in this category cannot
seek reimbursement for a purchase of LIPITOR
from any third party insurance entity during
the term of this offer.
This offer is not valid for prescriptions that are eligible
to be reimbursed, in whole or in part, by Medicaid or
other federal or state healthcare programs (including
any state prescription drug assistance programs
and the Government Health Insurance Plan available
in Puerto Rico [formerly known as "La Reforma
de Salud"]).
For all eligible patients, you can only qualify for up
to $2500 of savings per calendar year. After a
maximum of $2500, you will pay usual monthly
out-of-pocket costs.
This Card cannot be combined with any other rebate/
coupon, free trial, discount, prescription savings card, or
similar offer for the specified prescription.
The Card will be accepted only at participating
pharmacies.
This Card is not health insurance.

Who Should Not Take LIPITOR?
Do not take LIPITOR if you:
Are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, or are planning to
become pregnant. UPITOR may harm your unborn baby. If you get
pregnant, stop taking LIPITOR and call your doctor right away.
Are breast feeding. LIPITOR can pass into your breast milk and
may harm your baby.
Have liver problems.
Are allergic to LIPITOR or any of its ingredients. The active
ingredient is atorvastatin.
LIPITOR has not been studied in children under 10 years of age.
What Should I Tell My Doctor Before Taking LIPITOR?
Before you take LIPITOR, tell your doctor if you:
Have muscle aches or weakness
Drink more than 2 glasses of alcohol daily
Have diabetes
Have a thyroid problem
Have kidney problems
Have a history of stroke or mini-stroke
Some medicines should not be taken with LIPITOR. Tell your
doctor about all the medicines you take, including
prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and
herbal supplements. LIPITOR and certain other medicines
can interact causing serious side effects. Especially tell
your doctor if you take medicines for:
Your immune system: cyclosporine (Sandimmune)
Cholesterol: fibrate products, niacin (vitamin B3)
Infections: telaprevir (Incivek), clarithromycin
(Biaxin), itraconazole (Sporanox), rifampin (Rifadin),
boceprevir (Victrelis)
Birth control: norethindrone (Aygestin), ethinyl estradiol (EsUtinyl)
Heart failure: digoxin (Lanoxin)
HIV or AIDS: tipranavir (Aptivus), lopinavir (Kaletra), ritonavir
(Norvir), saquinavir (Invirase), darunavir (Prezista), fosamprenavir
(Lexiva), nelfinavir (Viracept)
Know all the medicines you take. Keep a list of them with you to
show your doctor and pharmacist.
What Should I Avoid While Taking LIPITOR?
Talk to your doctor before you start any new medicines.
This includes prescription and non-prescription medicines,
vitamins, and herbal supplements. LIPITOR and certain other
medicines can interact causing serious side effects.


Offer valid only in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, but not
for Massachusetts residents or where otherwise
prohibited by law.
The Card is limited to 1 use per person per month
during this offering period and is not transferable. It is
illegal to sell, purchase, trade, or counterfeit, or offer
to sell, purchase, trade, or counterfeit this Card.
Pfizer reserves the right to rescind, revoke or amend
the Card Program without notice at any time.
You must be 18 or older to participate in this Program.
Card Program expires December 31, 2015.
No membership fees.
For reimbursement when using mail order, mail copy of
original pharmacy receipt (cash register receipt NOT
valid) with product name, date and amount circled to:
LIPITOR Choice Card
14001 Weston Parkway, Suite 103
Cary, NC 27513-9967
Be sure to include a copy of the front of your Choice
Card, your name and mailing address.

Do not get pregnant. If you get pregnant, stop taking LIPITOR
right away and call your doctor.
What Are the Possible Side Effects of LIPITOR?
LIPITOR may cause serious side effects. See "What Is The
Most Important Information I Should Know About LIPITOR?"
Call your doctor right away if you have:
Muscle problems like weakness, tenderness, or pain that
happen without a good reason, especially if you also have
a fever or feel more tired than usual. This may be an early
sign of a rare muscle problem.
Muscle problems that do not go away even after your doctor
has advised you to stop taking LIPITOR. Your doctor may do
further tests to diagnose the cause of your muscle problems.
Allergic reactions including swelling of the face, lips,
tongue, and/or throat that may cause difficulty in breathing
or swallowing which may require treatment right away.
Nausea and vomiting.
Passing brown or dark colored urine.
You feel more tired than usual.
Your skin and whites of your eyes get yellow.
Stomach pain.
Allergic skin reactions.
In clinical studies, patients reported the following common
side effects while taking LIPITOR: diarrhea, upset stomach,
muscle and joint pain, and alterations in some laboratory
blood tests.
The following additional side effects have been reported with
LIPITOR: tiredness, tendon problems, memory loss, and confusion.
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have side effects that
bother you or that will not go away.
These are not all the side effects of LIPITOR. Ask your doctor
or pharmacist for a complete list. Patients should always
ask their doctors for medical advice about adverse events.
You may report an adverse event related to Pfizer products
by calling 1 -800-438-1985 (US only). If you prefer, you may
contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) directly.
The FDA has established a reporting service known as MedWatch
where health care professionals and consumers can report
serious problems they suspect may be associated with the drugs
and medical devices they prescribe, dispense, or use.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


All rights reserved. Printed in USA/March 2014


SJ U.S. Pharmaceuticals


Cet your free card at LipitorChoiceTP.co
or call 1-866-597-4227 today. I









SPORTS


Rays
bounce
back after
a tough
loss to the
Indians./B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Local recreation/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 Prep sports/B5
0 Basketball/B6
0 Hockey/B6


Humrricanes' Dodd ready to jump into the Fire

Citrus senior signs to play tennis at Southeastern F60-


JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
After dominating area girls
tennis on the prep level for four
years at Citrus High School,
senior Melanie Dodd will take
her considerable talents to
Lakeland next fall after signing
a letter of intent to play tennis
at Southeastern University of
the Assemblies of God, a private
Christian liberal arts college.
The 18-year-old singles star
finished her four-year career as
a Lady 'Cane undefeated (76-0)
through the regular season and
against intracounty players.
"I want to be (remembered)
as a hard-working player who
never gave up on the courts,"


Dodd said. "That's the way I
wanted to finish my high school
career"
Bill May, head coach of the
SEU Fire women's tennis team,
was visibly excited at the sign-
ing. May sees Dodd making an
immediate impact for the Fire.
"I think Melanie comes in at
a higher level than our No. 3
player started out at," May said.
"They're both fighters. When I
think of those two, and if you
were to put them on the court
(together), it'd be a 12-hour
match; you'd have to replace
the balls during the match (sev-
eral times), because they're
fighters.
"I could see (Dodd) anywhere
from (No.) 5 to (No.) 3, probably


No. 3, in our lineup," May
added. "There's some competi-
tion (on the team) there, but
Melanie will fit right in."
SEU is a part of the NAIA
(National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletes) and re-
cently ended its first tennis -
season as a nationally ranked
team (23rd).
Stephanie Dodd, Melanie's
older sister and a Citrus
alumna, will be a senior at SEU
next year
Dodd, a defending Chronicle
Player of the Year in 2013, has
won an amazing five district ti- Special to the Chronicle
tles at Citrus: four singles titles Citrus senior Melanie Dodd recently signed to continue her tennis
(No. 4 as a freshman, No. 2 as a career at Southeastern University in Lakeland. Pictured, from left,
are mother Laurie Dodd, Southeastern coach Bill May, Melanie Dodd,
See Page B5 father Doug Dodd and Citrus head tennis coach Scott Waters.


4 NFL DRAFT


Associated Press
Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron throws a pass against Texas A&M during the second quarter Sept. 14 in College
Station, Texas. McCarron was selected by the Cincinnati Bengals on Saturday in the fifth round, 164th overall.



LAST DAY A BIG DAY



FOR BIG-NAME QBS


Associated Press
NEW YORK
t took a few hours on the
final day of the NFL draft
for A.J. McCarron, Aaron
Murray and Zach Metten-
berger to finally hear their
names called.
It took much longer, but Missouri
defensive end Michael Sam, the
first openly gay player to enter the
draft, heard his in the seventh and
final round.
Sam was taken 249th out of 256
picks, by St. Louis. There was ap-
plause at Radio City Music Hall
from the slim crowd on hand.
Scouts had pegged him to be a
mid- to late-round selection, but he


didn't perform well at the com-
bine; some questioned whether he
would be drafted at all.
The star quarterbacks of the
SEC went earlier, but will be long
shots to become early starters in
the pros.
McCarron led Alabama to two
national titles, but had to wait until
the 164th overall spot to be se-
lected by Cincinnati. Georgia's
Murray went one pick earlier Sat-
urday to Kansas City LSU's Met-
tenberger didn't go until the sixth
round, to Tennessee.
Virginia Tech's Logan Thomas,
not nearly as accomplished as the
SEC passers, was the first QB cho-
sen on the last day, by Arizona in
the fourth round.


Murray had a penchant for big
plays with the Bulldogs, but the
SEC's career passing leader tore
his ACL on Nov 8 and did not work
out during the NFL combine. He
figures to compete for a third-
string job this year
"There's no restrictions, no sec-
ond thought when I'm running,
cutting," Murray said. "It's full-
speed, full-go ahead."
McCarron expects to learn be-
hind Andy Dalton, who led the
Bengals to three straight playoff
berths for the first time in fran-
chise history
"I'm confident in myself, but at
the same time, I know Andy's the
See Page B3


Bucs use


draft to


overhaul


offense
Associated Press
TAMPA
The Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers defied the odds by
using their entire draft to up-
grade a struggling offense, and
the smile on Lovie Smith's
face suggested he couldn't be
happier about it
A one-time defensive coor-
dinator who had a long suc-
cessful run as coach of the
Chicago Bears because of his
ability to put players in a po-
sition to stop opponents is
confident his bid to turn
around a team that hasn't
made the playoffs since 2007
is headed in the right direc-
tion after selecting six play-
ers with the potential to help
the Bucs get into the end zone
more often.
"You can't assume people
are a certain way I do believe
in offensive football. You can't
win by just playing defense,"
Smith said. "I've been saying
that. I think now the actions
are speaking a little bit
louder than the words."
The Bucs spent the first two
days of the draft surrounding
Josh McCown with playmak-
ers. The final day was about
improving protection for their
new starting quarterback.
Smith continued the over-
haul of an offense that ranked
30th in scoring and last in
passing and total yardage a
year ago, selecting Tennessee
State Kadeem Edwards early
in the fifth round and pulling
off a trade to enable the Bucs
to add Purdue tackle Kevin
See Page B3


I !MJ="1J[ II l I 11 im


Wiper Blades Alignment
Installed $95 $5995
II I I
I k I iI
iL ,..--- --- ------ ------- ..
n- ,,tn. . n , , ,, p air n n.
IL _ _ iN I "I' i .. .,111 _.,I ...iT (, ^ _' I i


I I


I I 'I


BUY 3 TIRES 'Lube, Oil, & Filter
i AND GET ONE F '
i FIREEi with FREE Multi- $19
' 'Mn I point Inspection ,
See slore odeails Most nodeesI Plus lax & shop supplies where "' "' "1 'l" '
1 I I ...I , I"
I.----------------------L------------------l


r. ----------------------- 9






M Check & Top-Off Al Fluids
Check Tire Pressure on All 4 Tires
*27-Point Insction A
Battery Test a)IFf
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere'
L----------------------------------- -- - ----- -- -- - -------


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovehoncda.com
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Solaes 9AM-8PM Mort-Frt; 9AM-6PM Sat.; 11AM-4PM Sun
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Fr;t: 8AM-2PM Sat.


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453
352.341.0018
loveohevysaLes.coxn
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sates 9AM-8PM Mon.-FYL; 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-FrL; 8AM-Noon Sat.


20


I I


IwI9N''Aw


Immmmmm"ll


..........


Er~fl
UIRE~




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus United earns third-place honors


r il.'g ,'*. t 2- .^t-w*^.'r.. : '*v ",w~ a.dfi ...,ag '-7 a*. '',-^.* ^>.4" g """ Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus United U14 Girls won third place in the state of Florida Division 2 Soccer Cup, held April 5 and 6 at the
South County Regional Park in Punta Gorda. Pictured are, back row from left, Callie Borst, Katy Valerio, Haley
Waugh, Chichi Nkwocha, Yesenia Mondragon and coach James Waugh; middle row, kneeling, from left, head coach
Richard Valerio, Emily Akers, Jessie Walker, Kayci Lindquist and Allie Fisher; and front row, sitting, from left, Dana
Houpt, Kallie Weidner, Stacy Borgen, Cassie Pleus and Emily Hooper.


Parkview Lanes BOWLING


MIXED DOUBLES 7-9-8
NOTAP TOURNEY RESULTS:
The April Mixed Doubles
NoTap tourney was won by
Dorine Fugere and Mike
Weatherington with 1732 pins,
including three 300 games by
Mike and one 300 by Dorine.
Amber Krug and Cody Mullis
were second (1726), and each
had two 300 games. Third
place went to Bridget and Wes
Foley (1652), fourth to Brandy
and Ryan Burgard (1635), fifth
to Stephanie Flory and Matt
O'Brien (1621), and the last
payout spot went to Lori and
Brent Ciquera (1605). The
tourney also paid six singles
places. Matt O'Brien and Mike
Weatherington split the high
men's series with 900s, and
Brandy Burgard was high for
the women with 851. Dorine
Fugere defeated nine men in
the Krazy Eights rolloff, win-
ning $45.
League scores for the week
ending April 27, 2014:
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL:
Handicap: Jerry Thompson
282; Dennis Flanagan
277.772' Matt O'Brien 277;
Arta Norris 751; Stacy Christo-
pher 305,736; Linda Dudziak
269,756. Scratch: Mark Smith
258,664; Wes Foley 248;
Dennis Flanagan 673; Stacy
Christopher 240; Stephanie
Flory 227,611; K C Cridland
591.
PRESERVE PIN-
BUSTERS: Handicap: Larry
Kirk 278; Dave Huffman
273,771; Bob Swarm 712;
Melissa Widerman 278; Linda
Boland 271,722; Joyce
Swarm 732. Scratch: Jeff
Koch 252,638; Larry Kirk 237;
Dave Huffman 633; Linda
Boland 191,482; Joyce
Swarm 188,510.
SUNCOAST SENIORS 12-
WEEK: Andre Boetius 255;
Jack Connell 254,684; Shorty
Williams 693; Carol Roberts
263,699; June Williams
214,623. Scratch: Jerry Ness
205,582; Ken Meldrum
204,541; Carol Roberts
186,468; June Williams
131,374.
SCRATCH CHALLENGE:
Tim Lawrence 266,691;
Bobby Craft 255,708; Dorine
Fugere 244,647; Sandy LeP-
ree 182,479.


Special to the Chronicle
Pictured are three winners of the recent NoTap tourney at Parkview Lanes. Matt
O'Brien, left, and Mike Weatherington, right, tied for the men's high series with three
perfect games each. Dorine Fugere, center, and Weatherington won the doubles and
Fugere won the Krazy Eights.


LATE STARTERS: Handi-
cap: Bob Desmeules 260,668;
Rich Vehrs 251,668; Ken
Brown 672; Carolyn Wood-
ward 236,654; Debbe Chung
232; Marie Mooney 635.
Scratch: MarkAsh 235,660;
Skip George 210; John Mar-
cucci 572; Debbe Chung 194;
Peggy Murdock 179,530;
Rosemarie Marcucci 477.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
Handicap: Jim Randle
292,756; Bryan Craig 286;
Scott Brown 747. Scratch:
Brian Carney 279; Scott
Brown 268,708; Mark Smith
705.
HOLDER HOTSHOTS:
Handicap: Murphy Combs
277; Andre Boetius 270,719;
Bill Sullivan 277; Andrea Kish
285,822; Phyllis Ternes
281,753. Scratch: Rich
Williams 248,642; Chuck
Hindbaugh 233,632; Judy
Hindbaugh 214,521; June
Williams 187; Andrea Kish
474.
PARKVIEW OWLS: Handi-
cap: Bob Desmeules 237;
Ken Brown 237; Wes Foley
235,645; Stoney Sinckler 647;
Myla Wexler 245,655; June
Williams 227; Carol Holt 640.
Scratch: Wes Foley 235,645;
George Munzing 218; Ted


Rafanan 589; Myla Wexler
214,562; Mila Ragsdale 173;
Debbie Mills 472.
BOWLERS OF THE
WEEK: Andrea Kish, 162 pins
over her average, and Bobby
Craft, 117 pins over his aver-
age.
CONGRATULATIONS: Phil
Spencer rolled his second per-
fect game at Parkview during
the Preserve Pinbusters final
session April 29th. His first
300 game was February 4th,
also during the Pinbusters
league.
CITRUS COUNTY DOU-
BLES SWEEPER: The
Greater Citrus USBC Doubles
Sweeper will be at Parkview
Lanes May10 at 7:00pm.
Sign in will begin at 6:00.
$40.00 per doubles team.
League scores for the week
ending May 4, 2014:
SUNCOAST SENIORS 12-
WEEK: Ken Meldrum
279,727; Shorty Williams
270,687; June Williams
231,635. Scratch: Ken Mel-
drum 253,649; Jerry Ness
224,596; June Williams
146,380.
SCRATCH CHALLENGE:
Trevor Roberts 279,759; Tim
Lawrence 255,640; Dorine
Fugere 199,534; Sandy LeP-


ree 144,429.
LATE STARTERS: Handi-
cap: Myron Paliwoda
258,706; Marty Suehowicz
242; Rich Murdock 647;
Peggy Murdock 247; Sandy
LePree 240,652; Marilyn Sey-
mour 240; Betty Chapman
650. Scratch: Rich Murdock
218,590; Ted Rafanan
212,609; Peggy Murdock
214,512; Sandy LePree
198,526.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
Handicap: Raul Rosales 321;
Wes Foley 320,795; Larry
Fritz 807. Scratch: Wes Foley
288; Larry Fritz 279,741; Joe
Baierlein 279; Mark Smith
279,713; Charlie Stein 735;
Brian Carney 718; Scott
Brown 717.
PARKVIEW OWLS: Handi-
cap: Ted Rafanan 269,704;
Wes Foley 267,690; Debbie
Mills 235,619; Toni Mills Smith
220; Barbara Murray 220; Mila
Ragsdale 612. Scratch: Ted
Rafanan 269.704; Wes Foley
267,690; Debbie Mills
185,469; Myla Wexler
181,516.
BOWLERS OF THE
WEEK: Sandy LePree, 52
pins over her average, and
Larry Fritz, 126 pins over his
average.


Recreation B R I E FS


Beverly Hills
Senior Open
League bowling
The winners of the 1st 1/2
team # 13 Rosie Riveters
bowl a 2 frame roll-off against
the winners of the 2nd 1/2
team # Bottoms Up. Bottoms
Up won the roll-off by 4 pins.
Congratulations to Carey
Dabenigno, Bob Ecker, Lyle
Ternes and Frank Di Cosola.
The 1st 1/2 winners Rosie
Riveters was led by Rose-
marie Kinsey, Noemi Flores,
Don Levinson and Bill Sum-
ner.
Bowling Scores: Tom
Chees 257-237-210-699, Mar-
vin Chapman 166-225-218-
609, John Savarese
151-221-225-597, Bill John-
ston 172-190-227-589,
Richard Jacobs 192-199-176-
571, Jerry Thompson 163-
211-194-568, Mike Murray
197-193-177-567, Bob Griggs
157-204-201-562, Steve 0'-
Connor 198-157-206-561,
Rich Lieval 199-139-215-553,


Al Roque 546, Joe Brooks
533. John Hoagland 531,
Herb Sherrill 526, Fred Crogle
523, Doug Meiklejohn 212-
519, Bob Ecker 202-519, John
Schott 211-513, Phil Arena
203-512, Don Levinson 512,
ChuckAhn 509, Lee Ball 506,
Brendan Dooley 504, Bill
Sumner 502, Morn Paton 214-
500.
Buccheri golf
tourney set
for May 17
The second annual Joseph
Buccheri Foundation Charity
Golf Tournament will be held
on Saturday, May 17, at Citrus
Hills Oaks in Hernando.
All proceeds go toward
partial scholarships to Citrus
County students. The founda-
tion has been established to
continue the memory of Coach
Buccheri, who is remembered
for his passion for teaching
and coaching, but most impor-
tantly, his compassion for the
students who loved him.
Registration begins at


7:30 a.m. the day of the
tournament, with tee-off at
8:30 a.m.
The four-man scramble for-
mat tournament costs $60 per
person, which includes 18
holes of golf, cart, food, bever-
ages and chances to win great
prizes and raffles.
For more information, con-
tact Citrus Hills Golf Club at
352-746-4425 or the Joseph
Buccheri Foundation at
JBuccheri@joebuccheri.org or
972-897-9987.
Golf tourney
supports Operation
Welcome Home
The Inverness Golf and
Country Club is hosting a
golf tournament fundraiser
for Operation Welcome
Home/Honor Flight Saturday,
May 24.
The tournament format is a
four-person scramble and be-
gins with a 9 a.m. shotgun
start. Prizes for low gross, low
net and hole-in-one will be


awarded. Lunch is included.
Hole-in-one prizes include
a 2014 GMC Sierra, donated
by Eagle Buick GMC, and
$10,000, donated by Barbara
Mills Remax Realty One.
Hole sponsors are needed
and cost $100, or $300 to
inchl iId a furi ir m .innaie


entries will be ac
$60 and will be a
teams.
For information
forms, call Barba
422-6236.


14-24 PI
SOnly $45
S6933 SW 179th
Ave Rd
SDunnellon, FL
352-522-0309


;cepted at
assigned to

n or entry
ara at 352-

-From staff reports








ayers 1
I
SEach
Must present
coupon I
Expires 6115114 8


Citrus Fusion



brings together



top spikers in



Citrus County

Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus Fusion Volleyball Club, a new Citrus
County club as of October, caters to players ages 8 to
18. This year five teams were formed age groups
12U, 14U, 15U, 16U and 17U. The teams participated
in AAU and USAV volleyball tournaments in Orlando,
Tavares, Ocala and Atlanta, Georgia.
Citrus Fusion was formed by all the local head vol-
leyball coaches of Citrus County: Alice Christian,
Sandy VanDerVort, Mike Ridley and Wanda Grey
Recently, the 15U, 16U, and 17U teams all won first
place in a tournament held in Tavares called the
Spiketacular Tournament.
Any players interested in trying out for the 2014-15
season can visit the website at citrusfusion
volleyball.com. There will be an informational meet-
ing in September Also, the website has information
for upcoming summer clinics hosted by Citrus Fusion
featuring college coaches.


-' Nfl '


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Fusion 17U: Coach Wanda Grey, Cassidy
Wardlow, Courtney Miller, Allie Whited, Megan Bauer,
Shannon Fernandez, Myrcia Powell, Olivia Grey and
Olivia Townsend.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Fusion 16U: Coach Alice Christian, Morgan
Christian, DeeAnna Moehring, Gina Fernandez,
Mercedes Scott, Kayla Dumon, Amanda Zachar and
Sydney Clark. Not pictured: Deanne St. Martin and
Anna St. Martin.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Fusion 15U: Coach Mike Ridley, Kaylan Simms,
Abby Epstein, Brenna Towne, Katie Eichler, Madison
Pateracki, Tiffany Conklin, Clare Redrick and Chelsea
Strickland. Not pictured: Haley Coleman.

The Original
SUMMERTIME PLA ARD

On Sale Now

$ 00


Pay$2000.or.ourPlaca0
& Receive 20 OUNS O GL
As owAs OLY$2.0
A limte qanttyofca0s ncud 106bnu
rouns a noadd00 oal6 ost
Purhae ourcad ow


Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club 352-746-4425 $23.00'
(Oaks or Meadows course)
Inverness Golf and Country Club 352-637-2526 $23.00'
Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club 352-522-0309 $32.00'
Ocala National Golf Club 352-629-7980 $24.00'
Royal Oaks Golf Club 352-861-1818 $24.00'
Skyview at Terra Vista 352-746-3664 $32.00"**
Southern Woods Country Club 352-382-5996 $30.00"
Sugarmill Woods Country Club 352-382-3838 ext. 14 $30.00"
*Plus tax.


Purchase Your Card At One Of These Fine Courses
Or Call For Further Details.
Play Available *May 1 October 31, 2014 -"May 1 -October 12, 2014
**Play available only after 11:00 a.m., credit cards only. May 1 September 30, 2014


q


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


RECREATION


I


?


i




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




2014 NFL Draft
selections
By The Associated Press
At NewYork
(x-compensatory selection)
Thursday, May 8
First Round
1. Houston, Jadeveon Clowney, de, South Carolina.
2. St. Louis (from Washington), Greg Robinson, ot,
Auburn.
3. Jacksonville, Blake Bortles, qb, UCF.
4. Buffalo (from Cleveland), Sammy Watkins, wr,
Clemson.
5. Oakland, Khalil Mack, Ib, Buffalo.
6. Atlanta, Jake Matthews, ot, Texas A&M.
7. Tampa Bay, Mike Evans, wr, Texas A&M.
8. Cleveland (from Minnesota), Justin Gilbert, db,
Oklahoma State.
9. Minnesota (from Buffalo through Cleveland), An-
thony Barr, Ib, UCLA.
10. Detroit, Eric Ebron, te, North Carolina.
11. Tennessee, Taylor Lewan, ot, Michigan.
12. New York Giants, Odell Beckham, wr, LSU.
13. St. Louis, Aaron Donald, dt, Pittsburgh.
14. Chicago, Kyle Fuller, db, Virginia Tech.
15. Pittsburgh, Ryan Shazier, Ib, Ohio State.
16. Dallas, Zach Martin, g, Notre Dame.
17. Baltimore, C.J. Mosley, Ib, Alabama.
18. New York Jets, Calvin Pryor, db, Louisville.
19. Miami, Ja'Wuan James, ot, Tennessee.
20. New Orleans (from Arizona), Brandin Cooks, wr,
Oregon State.
21. Green Bay Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, db, Alabama.
22. Cleveland (from Philadelphia), Johnny Manziel,
qb, Texas A&M.
23. Kansas City, Dee Ford, de, Auburn.
24. Cincinnati, Darqueze Dennard, db, Michigan State.
25. San Diego, Jason Verrett, db, TCU.
26. Philadelphia (from Indianapolis through Cleve-
land), Marcus Smith, Ib, Louisville.
27. Arizona (from New Orleans), Deone Bucannon,
db, Washington State.
28. Carolina, Kelvin Benjamin, wr, Florida State.
29. New England, Dominique Easley, de, Florida.
30. San Francisco, Jimmie Ward, db, Northern Illinds.
31. Denver, Bradley Roby, db, Ohio State.
32. Minnesota (from Seattle), Teddy Bridgewater, qb,
Louisville.
Friday, May 9
Second Round
33. Houston, Xavier Su'a-Filo, g, UCLA.
34. Dallas (from Washington), Demarcus Lawrence,
de, Boise State.
35. Cleveland, Joel Bitonio, g, Nevada.
36. Oakland, Derek Carr, qb. Fresno State.
37. Atlanta, Ra'Shede Hageman, de, Minnesota.
38. Tampa Bay, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, te,
Washington.
39. Jacksonville, Marqise Lee, wr, Southern Cal.
40. Detroit (from Minnesota through Seattle), Kyle
Van Noy, Ib, BYU.
41. St. Louis (from Buffalo), Lamarcus Joyner, db,
Florida State.
42. Philadelphia (from Tennessee), Jordan Matthews,
wr, Vandrbilt.
43. NewYork Giants, Weston Richburg, c, Colorado
State.
44. Buffalo (from St. Louis), Cyrus Kouandjio, ot,
Alabama.
45. Seattle (from Detroit), Paul Richardson, wr,
Colorado.
46. Pittsburgh, Stephon Tuitt, de, Notre Dame.
47.Washington (from Dallas), Trent Murphy, Ib, Stan-
ford.
48. Baltimore, Timmy Jernigan, dt, Florida State.
49. New York Jets, Jace Amaro, te, Texas Tech.
50. San Diego (from Miami), Jeremiah Attaochu, te,
Georgia Tech.
51. Chicago, Ego Ferguson, dt, LSU.
52. Arizona, Troy Niklas, te, Notre Dame.
53. Green Bay Davante Adams, wr, Fresno State.
54. Tennessee (from Philadelphia), Bishop Sankey,
rb, Washington.
55. Cincinnati, Jeremy Hill, rb, LSU.
56. Denver (from Kansas City through San Fran-
cisco), Cody Latimer, wr, Indiana.
57. San Francisco (from San Diego through Miami),
Carlos Hyde, rb, Ohio State.
58. New Orleans, Stanley Jean-Baptiste, db, Nebraska.
59. Indianapolis, Jack Mewhort, g, Ohio State.
60. Carolina, Kony Ealy, de, Missouri.
61. Jacksonville (from San Francisco), Allen Robin-
son, wr, Penn State.
62. New England, JimmyGaroppdo, qb, Eastern Illinds.
63. Miami (from Denver through San Francisco),
Jarvis Landry wr, LSU.
64. Seattle, Justin Britt, ot, Missouri.
Third Round
65. Houston, C.J. Fiedorowicz, te, Iowa.
66. Washington, Morgan Moses, ot, Virginia.
67. Miami (from Oakland), Billy Turner, ot, North
Dakota State.
68. Atlanta, Dezmen Southward, db, Wisconsin.
69. Tampa Bay, Charles Sims, rb, West Virginia.
70. San Francisco (from Jacksonville), Marcus Mar-
tin, c, Southern Cal.
71. Cleveland, Christian Krksey, Ib, Iowa.
72. Minnesota, Scott Crichton, de, Oregon State.
73. Buffalo, Preston Brown, Ib, Louisville.
74. New York Giants, Jay Bromley, dt, Syracuse.
75. St. Louis, Tre Mason, rb, Auburn.
76. Detroit, Travis Swanson, c, Arkansas.
77. San Francisco (from Tennessee), Chris Borland,
Ib, Wisconsin.
78. Washington (from Dallas), Spencer Long, g,
Nebraska.
79. Baltimore, Terrence Brooks, db, Florida State.
80. New York Jets, Dexter McDougle, db, Maryland.
81. Oakland (from Miami), Gabe Jackson, g,
Mississippi State
82. Chicago, Will Sutton, dt, Arizona State.
83. Houston (from Pittsburgh through Cleveland and
Philadlephia), Louis Nix, dt, Notre Dame.
84. Arizona, Kareem Martin, de, North Carolina.
85. Green Bay, Kyi oThcrntn, de, Southern Mississippi.
86. Philadelphia, Josh Huff, wr, Oregon.
87. Kansas City, Phillip Gaines, db, Rice.
88. Cincinnati, Will Clarke, de, West Virginia.
89. San Diego, Chris Watt, g, Notre Dame.
90. Indianapolis, Donte Moncrief, wr, Mississippi.
91. Arizona (from New Orleans), John Brown, wr,
Pittsburg State.
92. Carolina, Trai Turner, g, LSU.
93. Jacksonville (from New England), Brandon Lin-
der, g, Miami.
94. Clevland (from San Francisco), Terrance West,
rb, Towson.
95. Denver, Michael Schofield, ot, Michigan.
96. Minnesota (from Seattle), Jerick McKinnon, rb,
Georgia Southern.
97. x-Pittsburgh, Dri Archer, rb, Kent State.
98. x-Green Bay, Richard Rodgers, te, California.
99. x-Baltimcre, Crockett Gillmore, te, Colorado State.
100. x-San Francisco, Brandon Thomas, g, Clemson.
Saturday
Fourth Round
101. Philadelphia (from Houston), Jaylen Watkins, db,
Florida.
102. Washington, Bashaud Breeland, db, Clemson.
103. Atlanta, Devonta Freeman, rb, Florida State.
104. New York Jets (from Tampa Bay), Jalen Saun-
ders, wr, Oklahoma.
105. New England (from Jacksonville), Bryan Stork,


c, Florida State.
106. San Francisco (from Cleveland), Bruce Elling-
ton, wr, South Carolina.
107. Oakland, Justin Ellis, dt, Louisiana Tech.
108. Seattle (from Minnesota), Cassius Marsh, de,
UCLA.
109. Buffalo, Ross Cockrell, db, Duke.
110. St. Louis, Maurice Alexander, db, Utah State.
111. Cincinnati (from Detroit through Seattle), Russell
Bodine, c, North Carolina.
112. Tennessee, DaQuan Jones, dt, Penn State.
113. New York Giants, Andre Williams, rb, Boston
College.
114. Jacksonville (from Baltimore), Aaron Colvin, db,
Oklahoma.
115. New York Jets, Shaquelle Evans, wr, UCLA.
116. Oakland (from Miami), Keith McGill, db, Utah.
117. Chicago, Ka'Deem Carey, rb, Arizona.
118. Pittsburgh, Martavis Bryant, wr, Clemson.
119. Dallas, Antony Hitchens, Ib, lowa.
120. Arizona, Logan Thomas, qb, Virginia Tech.
121. Green Bay Carl Bradford, Ib, Arizona State.
122. Tennessee (from Philadelphia), Marqueston
Huff, db, Wyoming.
123. Seattle (from Cincinnati), Kevin Norwood, wr,


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 B3


For the iricrd


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

CASH 3 (early)
AO s5-1-7
9 CASH 3 (late)
01-4-2

PLAY 4 (early)
7-6-9-1
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 0-2-6-4



Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 3 5 26 -34
Mega Ball: 21
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4
3-of-4 MB
3-of-4
2-of-4 MB
1-of-4 MB
2-of-4


2
28
787
1,191
9,390
23,729


Fantasy 5: 2 21 -
5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 266
3-of-5 8,611


$2,955.50
$462.50
$49
$22.50
$2.50
$2

31 -32-35
$232,019.50
$140.50
$12


Mega Millions: 10 28- 39 51 59
Mega Ball: 14
5-of-5 MB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 MB No winner
4-of-5 14 $500
3-of-5 MB 96 $50
3-of-5 1,224 $5
2-of-5 MB 1,955 $5
1-of-5 MB 16,439 $2
0-of-5 MB 43,318 $1

Players should verify winning
numbers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES,


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One Grand Prix of Spain
10 a.m. (FS1) Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge Laguna
Seca (taped)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami at Duke
1 p.m. (FS1) Creighton at St. John's
MLB BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Cleveland Indians at
Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves
2 p.m. (MLB) New York Yankees at Milwaukee Brewers or
Cleveland Indians at Tampa Bay Rays
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Diego Padres
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates
1 a.m. (ESPN2) St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates
(same-day tape)
NBA PLAYOFFS
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles Clippers.
Western Conference Semifinal, Game 4
8 p.m. (TNT) Indiana Pacers at Washington Wizards. Eastern
Conference Semifinal, Game 4
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles
Clippers. Western Conference Semifinal, Game 4 (same-day tape)
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Tour of California, Stage 1
EQUESTRIAN
4:30 p.m. (FS1) Jockey Club Racing Tour: Belmont Park
GOLF
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour The Players Championship,
Final Round
2 p.m. (NBC) PGATour The Players Championship, Final Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour The Players Championship,
Spotlight Coverage
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
1 p.m. (NHL) Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins. Eastern
Conference Semifinal, Game 5 (taped)
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA
COLLEGE LACROSSE
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament, First Round Johns
Hopkins at Virginia
3 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAATournament- Drexel at Pennsylvania
5:15 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament-Air Force at Duke
7:30 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament- Bryant at Syracuse
MOTORCYCLE RACING
6 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series: Salt Lake City (taped)
OUTDOORS
3 p.m. (CBS) Major League Fishing (taped)
RODEO
4 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR Last Cowboy Standing (taped)
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
9:59 a.m. (BRAVO) Hull CityAFC vs Everton FC
9:59 a.m. (MSNBC) Norwich City FC vs Arsenal FC
9:59 a.m. (SYFY) Southampton FC vs Manchester United FC
9:59 a.m. (USA) Tottenham Hotspur FC vs Aston Villa FC
10 a.m. (NBC) Manchester City FC vs West Ham United FC
10 a.m. (CNBC) Cardiff City FC vs Chelsea FC
10 a.m. (E!) Fulham FC vs Crystal Palace FC
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Liverpool FC vs Newcastle United FC
SOCCER
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division La Liguilla,
Semifinal: Vuelta Deportivo Toluca FC vs Club Leon
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Los Angeles Galaxy at Portland
Timbers
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 a.m. (ESPNU) ACC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA (taped)
10 a.m. (ESPNU) SEC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA (taped)
12 p.m. (ESPNU) Big South Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
TENNIS
8 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Mutua Madrid Open

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider


Alabama.
124. Kansas City, De'Anthony Thomas, rb, Oregon.
125. Miami (from San Diego), Walt Aikens, db, Liberty.
126. New Orleans, Khairi Fortt, Ib, California.
127. Cleveland (from Indianapolis), Pierre Desir, db,
Lindenwood.
128. Carolina, Tre Boston, db, North Carolina.
129. San Francisco, Dontae Johnson, db, N.C. State.
130. New England, James White, rb, Wisconsin.
131. Chicago (from Denver), Brock Vereen, db,
Minnesota.
132. Seattle, Kevin Pierre-Louis, Ib, Boston College.
133. x-Detroit, Nevmn Lawson, db, Utah St.
134. x-Baltimore, Brent Urban, de, Virginia.
135. x-Houston, Tom Savage, qb, Pittsburgh.
136. x-Detroit, Larry Webster, de, Bloomsburg.
137. x-New York Jets, Dakota Dozier, g, Furman.
138. x-Baltimore, Lorenzo Taliaferro, rb, Coastal
Carolina.
139. x-Atlanta, Prince Shembo, Ib, Notre Dame.
140.x-New England, Cameron Fleming, ct, Stanford.
Fifth Round
141. Philadelphia (from Houston), Taylor Hart, de,
Oregon.
142. Washington, Ryan Grant, wr, Tulane.


143. Tampa Bay, Kadeem Edwards, g, Tennessee
State.
144. Jacksonville, Telvin Smith, Ib, Florida State.
145. Minnesota (from Cleveland), David Yankey, ot,
Stanford.
146. Dallas (from Oakland through Seattle and De-
troit), Devin Street, wr, Pittsburgh.
147. Atlanta, Ricardo Allen, db, Purdue.
148. Carolina (from Minnesota), Bene' Benwikere,
db, San Jose State.
149. Tampa Bay (from Buffalo), Kevin Pamphile, ot,
Purdue.
150. San Francisco (from Detroit through Jack-
sonville, Aaron Lynch, de, South Florida.
151. Tennessee, Avery Williamson, Ib, Kentucky.
152. NewYork Giants, Nat Berhe, db, San Diego State.
153. Buffalo (from St. Louis), Cyril Richardson, g, Baylor
154. NewYork Jets, Jeremiah George, Ib, Iowa State.
155. Miami, Arthur Lynch, te, Georgia.
156. Denver (from Chicago), Lamin Barrow, Ib, LSU.
157. Pittsburgh, Shaquille Richardson, db, Arizona.
158. Detroit (from Dallas), Caraun Reid, dt, Princeton.
159. Jacksonville (from Baltimore), Chris Smith de,
Arkansas.
160. Arizona, Ed Stinson, de, Alabama.


161. Green Bay Corey Linsley, c, Ohio State.
162. Philadelphia, Ed Reynolds, db, Stanford.
163. Kansas City, Aaron Murray, qb, Georgia.
164. Cincinnati, A.J. McCarron, qb, Alabama.
165. San Diego, Ryan Carrethers, db, Arkansas
State.
166. Indianapolis, Jonathan Newsome, Ib, Ball State.
167. New Orleans, Vinnie Sunseri, db, Alabama.
168. Atlanta (from Carolina through Minnesota), Mar-
quis Spruill, Ib, Syracuse.
169. New Orleans (from New England through
Philadelphia), Ronald Powell, Ib, Florida.
170. San Francisco, Keith Reaser, db, FAU.
171. Miami (from Denver through San Francisco),
Jordan Tripp, Ib, Montana.
172. Seattle, Jimmy Staten, dt, Middle Tennessee.
173. x-Pittsburgh, Wesley Johnson, ot, Vanderbilt.
174.x-NewYork Giants, Devon Kennard, Ib, Southern
Cal.
175. x-Baltimore, John Urschel, c, Penn State.
176. x-Green Bay Jared Abbrederis, wr, Wisconsin.
Sixth Round
177. Houston, Jeoffrey Pagan, de, Alabama.
178. Tennessee (from Washington), Zach Metten-
berger, qb, LSU.
179. New England (from Jacksonville), Jon Halapio,
g, Florida.
180. San Francisco (from Cleveland), Kenneth Acker,
db, SMU.
181. Houston (from Oakland), Alfred Blue, rb, LSU.
182. Minnesota (from Atlanta), Antone Exum, db, Vir-
ginia Tech.
183. Chicago (from Tampa Bay), David Fales, qb, San
Jose State.
184. Minnesota, Kendall James, db, Maine.
185. Tampa Bay (from Buffalo), Robert Herron, wr,
Wyoming.
186. Washington (from Tennessee), Lache
Seastrunk, rb, Baylor.
187. New York Giants, Bennett Jackson, db, Notre
Dame.
188. St. Louis, E.J. Gaines, db, Missouri.
189. Detroit, T.J. Jones, wr, Notre Dame.
190. Miami, Matt Hazel, wr, Coastal Carolina.
191. Chicago, Patrick O'Donnell, p, Miami.
192. Pittsburgh, Jordan Zumwalt, Ib, UCLA.
193. Kansas City (from Dallas), Zach Fulton, g,
Tennessee.
194. Baltimore, Keith Wenning, qb, Ball State.
195. NewYork Jets, Brandon Dixon, db, Northwest
Missouri State.
196. Arizona, Walter Powell, wr, Murray State.
197. Green Bay Demetri Goodson, db, Baylor.
198. New England (from Philadelphia), Zach Moore,
dct, Concordia, St. Paul.
199. Seattle (from Cincinnati), Garrett Scott, ot, Marshall.
200. Kansas City, Laurent Duvernay-Tardif, ot, McGill.
201. San Diego, Marion Grice, rb, Arizona State.
202. New Orleans, Tavon Rooks, ot, Kansas State.
203. Indianapolis, Andrew Jackson, Ib, Western
Kentucky.
204. Carolina, Tyler Gaffney rb, Stanford.
205. Jacksonville (from San Francisco), Luke
Bowanko, c, Virginia.
206. New England, Jemea Thomas, db, Georgia Tech.
207. Denver, Matt Paradis, c, Boise State.
208. Seattle, Eric Pinkins, db, San Diego State.
209. x-NewYork Jets, Quincy Enunwa, wr, Nebraska.
210. x-NewYork Jets, IK Enemkpali, Ib, Louisiana Tech.
211. x-Houston, Jay Prosch, rb, Auburn.
212. x-Cincinnati, Marquis Flowers, Ib, Arizona.
213. x-New York Jets, Tajh Boyd, qb, Clemson.
214. x-St. Louis, Garrett Gilbert, qb, SMU.
215. x-Pittsburgh, Daniel McCullers, de, Tennessee.
Seventh Round
216. Houston, Andre Hal, db, Vanderbilt.
217. Washington, Ted Bolser, te, Indiana.
218. Baltimore (from Cleveland), Michael Campa-
naro, wr, Wake Forest.
219. Oakland, T.J. Carrie, db, Ohio.
220. Minnesota (from Atlanta), Shamar Stephen, nt,
UConn.
221. Buffalo (from Tampa Bay), Randell Johnson, Ib,
FAU.
222. Jacksonville, Storm Johnson, rb, UCF.
223. Minnesota, Brandon Watts, Ib, Georgia Tech.
224. Philadelphia (from Buffalo), Beau Allen, dt,
Wisconsin.
225. Minnesota (from New York Giants through Car-
dina), Jabari Price, db, North Carolina.
226. St. Louis, Michell Van Dyk, ot, Portland State.
227. Seattle (from Detroit), Kero Small, rb, Arkansas.
228. Washington (from Tennessee), Zach Hocker, k,
Arkansas.
229. Detroit (from Chicago through Dallas), Nate
Freese, k, Boston College.
230. Pittsburgh, Rob Blanchfower, te, UMass.
231. Dallas, Ben Gardner, de, Stanford.
232. Indianapolis (from Baltimore), Ulrick John, ot,
Georgia State.
233. New York Jets, Trevor Reilly, Ib, Utah.
234. Miami, Terrence Fede, de, Marist.
235. Oakland (from Arizona), Shelby Harris, de, Illinois.
236. Green Bay Jeff Janis, wr, SaginawValley State.
237. Buffalo (from Philadelphia), Seantrel Hender-
son, ot, Miami.
238. Dallas (from Kansas City), Will Smith, Ib, Texas
Tech.
239. Cincinnati, James Wright, wr, LSU.
240. San Diego, Tevin Reese, wr, Baylor.
241. St. Louis (from Indianapolis), Christian Bryant,
db, Ohio State.
242. Denver (from New Orleans through San Fran-
cisco), Corey Nelson, Ib, Oklahoma.
243. San Francisco (from Carolina), Kaleb Ramsey,
de, Boston College.
244. New England, Jeremy Gallon, wr, Michigan.
245. San Francisco, Trey Millard, rb, Oklahoma.
246. Chicago (from Denver), Charles Leno, ot, Bdse
State.
247. Oakland (from Seattle), Jonathan Dowling, db,
Western Kentucky.
248. x-Dallas, Ahmad Dixon, db, Baylor.
249. x-St. Louis, Michael Sam, de, Missouri.
250. x-St. Louis, Demetrius Rhaney, c, Tennessee State.
251. x-Dallas, Ken Bishop, dt, Northern Illinois.
252. x-Cincinnati, Lavelle Westbrooks, db, Georgia
Southern.
253. x-Atlanta, Yawin Smallwood, Ib, UConn.
254. x-Dallas, Terrance Mitchell, db, Oregon.
255. x-Atlanta, Tyler Starr, Ib, South Dakota.
256. x-Houston, Lonnie Ballentine, db, Memphis.


Saturday's Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Sent 1B Chris
Davis to Bowie (EL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX -Designated RHP
Maikel Cleto for assignment. Selected the con-
tract of RHP Frank Francisco from Charlotte (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Optioned RHP
Michael Mariotto Omaha (PCL). Recalled 2B
Johnny Giavotella from Omaha.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-- Sent LHP Sean
Burnett to Arkansas (TL) for a rehab assignment.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES Placed RHP Jordan
Walden on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Monday.
Recalled LHP Ian Thomas from Gwinnett (IL).
CINCINNATI REDS Optioned RHP Curtis
Partch to Louisville (IL). Reinstated LHP Aroldis
Chapman from the 15-day DL.
NEW YORK METS -Assigned INF Omar
Quintanilla outright to Las Vegas (PCL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Placed 1B
Brandon Belt on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
George Kontos to Fresno (PCL). Reinstated
RHP Matt Cain from the 15-day DL. Selected the


contract of OF Tyler Colvin from Fresno. Trans-
ferred INF Marco Scutaro to the 60-day DL.
American Association
AMARILLO SOX Signed OF Lyndon Estill.
Released RHP Ryan Mitchell. Traded INF Eli
Sonoqui to Southern Illinois for OF Justn Pearson.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES Traded SS
Stephen Rodgers to Evansville (Frontier) forfu-
ture considerations.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS Released
RHP Elisaul Pimentel.
Can-Am League
ROCKLAND BOULDERS Signed C Mar-
cus Nidiffer.
Frontier League
EVANSVILLE OTTERS Signed RHP Eric
Gonsalves.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS Sold the
contract of INF David Nickto the Atlanta Braves.
Released RHPs John Colella, Jeff Neptune,
Jordan Poole and Steven Upchurch and OF
Greg Kumpel.


DRAFT
Continued from Page B1

QB out there and I respect that," McCarron said.
"All I want to do is go in and help us in whatever
way I can. If that means me holding the clipboard
for a couple of years and givingAndy reports during
the week and watching film with him and help-
ing him in any way I can, I'm just ready to do it."
Thomas comes out of school healthy, but the in-
consistency that plagued his career hurt his draft
stock. Thomas never really improved to the level
expected with the Hokies after a strong debut.
He's big, with a strong arm, but is turnover prone.
"I've grown as a quarterback in this offseason,"
Thomas said. "Everybody's basing it off the sea-
son, which I understand. That's what's on film.
But this offseason was a chance I was able to re-
ally go refine some things."
In all, 14 quarterbacks were selected.
Early Saturday, many picks had ties to Clem-
son star receiver Sammy Watkins.
Watkins, the fourth overall selection in the first
round by Buffalo, saw his older brother, Florida
cornerback Jaylen Watkins, taken by Philadel-
phia to open the fourth round. Philadelphia ac-
quired the selection the previous day from
Houston, trading its third-round pick (No. 83) for
the Texans' fourth- and fifth-round spots.
"Today is a very big day for our family," Jaylen
said. "I texted him (Thursday) before he went on
stage and he just texted me ... we're both excited
for each other"
The next pick, by Washington, was Sammy
Watkins' college teammate, cornerback Bashaud
Breeland, who went up against the nation's top
wideout in practice for several years at Clemson.
Watkins' fellow receiver with the Tigers, Martavis
Bryant, also went in the fourth round, to Pittsburgh.
Andre Williams of Boston College, the nation's
leading rusher, went to the New York Giants,
whose backfield has been plagued by injuries.
Williams rushed for 2,177 yards and won the Doak
Walker Award as America's top running back in
2013, but he is considered a weak receiver
"Patience is a really valuable thing," Williams
said. "It worked out the best possible way it
could, no matter what round it ended up being."
Arizona's Ka'Deem Carey, like Williams, an
All-American runner, was taken four spots later
by Chicago. Oregon's De'Anthony Thomas went
to Kansas City, ostensibly to replace departed
Dexter McCluster
National champion Florida State had two players
go in the first five picks Saturday: running back
Devonta Freeman to Atlanta, and center Bryan
Stork, another All-American, to New England.
Big 12 power Oklahoma, which was blanked in
the first three rounds, broke through when the
New York Jets drafted receiver Jalen Saunders.
Another powerhouse program, Texas, did not
have anyone taken, although its former quarter-
back, Garrett Gilbert, who transferred to SMU,
was chosen at the end of the sixth round.
While the Longhorns were looking for someone
to be picked, Duke had a drafted player When
Buffalo made cornerback Ross Cockrell the 109th
overall selection, it was the highest a Blue Devil
had gone since offensive lineman Lennie Fried-
man went to Denver in the second round in 1999.
The final player chosen, dubbed "Mr Irrele-
vant," was Memphis safety Lonnie Ballentine.
He was taken by the Texans.
There were a record 102 early entrants into
this draft, and 61 were selected.




BUCS
Continued from Page B1

Pamphile later in the round.
Sixth-round pick, Wyoming receiver Robert
Herron, was the final selection for Tampa Bay,
which used its entire draft on offensive players
for the first time in franchise history
Tampa Bay drafted receiver Mike Evans, tight
end Austin Seferian-Jenkins and running back
Charles Sims in the first three rounds.
"It wasn't the plan," first-year general manager
Jason Licht said. "It just fell that way"
Offensive line became a priority this offseason
following the release of guard Davin Joseph and
tackle Donald Penn, one-time Pro Bowl picks
who became expendable when their perform-
ance declined during last year's 4-12 finish.
The Bucs didn't have a turn in the fourth round
because of the 2013 deal that brought Darrelle
Revis to town for one season. Saturday's maneu-
vering in the fifth round left them with only one
more pick, the sixth-rounder used to take the
speedy Herron, who will compete for a spot to
play slot receiver and return punts.
"Today was just another piece of the puzzle,"
Licht said, adding there's still work to be done in
free agency including the recruiting of undrafted
prospects. "We're still plugging away at it."
The 6-foot-4, 313-pound Edwards was the third
pick of the fifth round, No. 143 overall. The Bucs
traded a seventh-round pick this year and one of
the two fifth-rounder they scheduled to have in
2015 to move up and select the 6-5, 315-pound
Pamphile, who began his college career as a de-
fensive lineman before shifting to offensive
tackle during his red-shirt sophomore season.
The linemen grew up in Florida-- Edwards in
nearby Sanford, and Pamphile in Miami and
both are excited about having an opportunity to
play closer to home.
"It feels amazing," Pamphile said. "It was kind
of tough for my family to come see me all the way
up at Purdue."
Edwards said he doesn't anticipate having a
problem with the transition of playing at Football
Championship Division school to the NFL. He
was invited to play in the Senior Bowl and feels
he'll benefit from the experience of practicing


with and playing against upper-tier competition.
"It helped me out a lot because it showed me a
pro-style tempo of practice, and it's good compe-
tition," Edwards said. "I had to really get in my
playbook ... I always studied a lot, but I really had
to get in my playbook and execute my assignments."
The Bucs signed two new starters for the of-
fensive line in free agency tackle Anthony
Collins and center Evan Dietrich-Smith. The
team is also counting on veteran guard Carl
Nicks returning to the lineup and playing well
after missing most of the past two seasons be-
cause of injuries and a MRSA infection.
Draft picks will fly to Tampa on Sunday; par-
ticipate in meetings, get physical and meet vet-
erans participating in the offseason program on
Monday, and be on the practice field Tuesday A
three-day rookie minicamp convenes next weekend.


SCOREBOARD




B4 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto
Boston
Tampa Bay




Atlanta
Miami
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia


East Division
GB WC


East Division
GB WC


NL

Dodgers 6, Giai
San Francisco Los Angele
ab r h bi
Pagan cf 4 00 0 DGordn 2b
Pencerf 4 0 1 1 Puigrf
Poseylb 4 03 1 HRmrzss
Morse If 4 0 1 0 AdGnzllb
HSnchzc 4 00 0 Kempcf
Sandovl 3b 4 0 1 0 Crwfrd If
BCrwfrss 4 1 1 0 Figgins3b
B.Hicks2b 3 1 1 0 BWilsn p
M.Cain p 2 0 0 0 Ethierph
Affeldtp 0 00 0 C.Perezp
Machip 0 00 0 Buterac
Colvin ph 1 0 0 0 Greink p
JGutrrz p 0 0 0 0 JuTrnr ph-3
Totals 34 28 2 Totals
San Francisco 020 000 000
Los Angeles 000 002 22x
E-Figgins (1). DP-San Francisc
geles 1. LOB-San Francisco 12, Lo
2B-Pence (8), D.Gordon (6), Puig
(1). HR-Kemp (5). SB-D.Gord
C.Crawford (5). CS-Figgins (1).
SF-Pence, Butera.
IP H R ER
San Francisco
M.Cain 5 3 2 2
AffeldtL,0-1 BS,1-1 12-33 2 2
Machi 1-3 1 0 1
J.Gutierrez 1 2 2
Los Angeles
GreinkeW,6-1 7 6 2 2
B.Wilson H,3 1 2 0 1
C.Perez 1 0 0
M.Cain pitched to 3 batters in the
HBP-by M.Cain (H.Ramirez), by Gre
T-3:22.A-47,199 (56,000).
Rockies 11, Re
Colorado Cincinnati
ab r h bi
Blckmnrf 5 3 3 2 Schmkrcf-2
Dickrsn cf-lf 5 3 4 4 B.Penac
Tlwtzkss 4 1 2 1 Phillips2b
Culrsn ph-ssl 0 1 0 Ondrsk p
CGnzlz If 3 0 0 0 Leake ph
Barnes ph-cfl1 0 0 0 SMrshll p
Arenad 3b 5 1 2 0 Votto 1 b
Mornealb 4 1 1 2 N.Sotolb
McKnr ph-c 0 1 0 0 Frazier 3b
Pachecc-1b5 0 2 0 LudwckIlf
LeMahi2b 4 1 1 1 Berndn rf
Lyles p 4 0 0 0 Cozart ss
Massetp 0 00 0 Simonp
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 RSantg ph
Stubbs ph 1 0 0 0 Christn p
Brothrs p 0 00 0 BHmltn ph
Hoover p
Heisey ph-c
Totals 42111610 Totals
Colorado 203 203 001
Cincinnati 010 001 000
E-Belisle (1), McKenry (2). DP-
Cincinnati 1. LOB-Colorado 7, C
2B-Blackmon (9), Dickerson 2 (5
(14), Pacheco (6), Phillips (9). HR
(8), Dickerson 2 (4), Tulowitzki (11),M
Votto (6). SB-LeMahieu (3).
IP H R ER
Colorado
LylesW,5-0 6 4 2 2
Masset 1 0 0 1
Belisle 1 0 0 1
Brothers 1 1 0 1
Cincinnati
Simon L,4-2 3 8 5 5
Christiani 2 2 2
Hoover 2 4 3 3
Ondrusek 1 1 0 1
S.Marshall 1 1 1
WP-Ondrusek. PB-Pacheco.
T-3:10.A-37,984 (42,319).
Braves 2, Cut


Chicago
ab r h b


Bonifac cf
Kalish rf
Rizzo lb
SCastro ss
Valuen 2b
Castillo c
Olt3b
Lake If
Smrdzj p
Schlittr p
Russell p
Schrhlt ph
Grimm p

Totals
Chicago
Atlanta


4010
402
4010
3010
300
300
300
3010
200
000
000
1000
1 0 00
000

30 06 0
00(
00(


Atlanta

0 Heywrd rf
0 J.Upton If
SJSchafr pr-I
0 Fremn 1b
0 Gattis c
0 CJhnsn3b
0 BUptoncf
0 Smmnsss
0 ESantn p
0 Doumitph
0 R.Pena2b
0 Pstrnck2b
0 DCrpntp
Kimrel p
Totals
S 000 000
S 000 20x


DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Chicago 5, At
S.Castro (7), Doumit (1). S-B.UpF
nicky.
P H R ER
Chicago
Samardzija 6 2 0 0
Schlitter L,2-1 2-3 3 2 2
Russell 1-3 0 0 0
Grimm 1 0 0 0
Atlanta
E.SantanaW,4-0 7 5 0 0
D.Carpenter H,7 1 1 0 0
KimbrelS,10-12 1 0 0 0
HBP-by Samardzija (J.Upton).
T-2:19(Rain delay: 1:07). A-30,6

Pirates 4, Cardin
St. Louis Pittsburgh
ab r h bi
MCrpnt 3b 5 0 1 0 Tabata If-cf
JhPerltss 4 0 1 0 JHrrsn rf-lf
Hollidy If 4 0 1 0 NWalkr 2b
Craigrf 3 1 1 0 PAIvrz3b
MAdmslb 3 1 1 0 SMartecf
M.Ellis2b 4 1 1 1 GSnchzph.
Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 Watson p
T.Cruzc 4 0 0 0 Melncn p
Lynnp 1 0 0 0 I.Davislb
JButler ph 1 0 0 0 TSnchz c
Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 Mercer ss-r
Maness p 0 00 0 Volquez p
Descals ph 1 0 1 0 JHughsp
JuWIsn p
Morris p
Barmes ss
Totals 33 37 1 Totals
St. Louis 030 000 000
Pittsburgh 000 400 00x
DP-St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 1. LO
10, Pittsburgh 9. 2B-Ma.Adams
(6). SB-G.Sanchez (1).
IP H R ER
St. Louis
Lynn L,4-2 6 9 4 4
Siegrist 1 1 0 1
Maness 1 1 0 1
Pittsburgh
Volquez 42-34 3 3
J.HughesW,2-1 11-30 0 0
Ju.Wilson H,3 2-3 1 0 1
Morris H,2 1-3 0 0 1
WatsonH,7 1 1 0 0
Melancon S,4-5 1 1 0 1
HBP-by Lynn (TSanchez), by Vo
jos), by Melancon (Holliday). WP-
T-3:30. A-34,914 (38,362).


nts 2
!s
5
ab r h bi
3221
4121
1000
4010
4122
4110
2000
0000
1000
0000
3111
1000
b20100
29 69 5
3 2 2 1
4 1 2 1
1 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 1 2 2








--6
o 2, Los An-
os Angeles 6.
S(6), Butera
don 3 (24),
S--M.Cain.
R BB SO
4 1 1 0
2 00 1
1 0 0 0







200
1 0 0 0









6th.
einke (Morse).



ab r hbi
b 4 01 0 0











4000
3110
0000
1000
296 9 5
2
-6
)o2, Los An-
os Angeles 6.
3g (6), Butera
don 3 (24),
S-M.Cain.
R BIBSO
2 4 4
2 0 1
0 1 0
2 0 0
2 3 8
0 1 2
0 0 1
6th.
einke (Morse).

Dds 2

ab r In bi
2b 4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0


Str Home Away
W-4 8-6 11-8
L-1 9-8 10-8
L-2 7-9 11-10
L-1 10-11 7-7
W-1 8-11 8-10



Str Home Away
W-2 12-8 8-7
L-1 17-5 3-11
L-1 11-9 8-7
L-4 8-9 8-9
W-16-9 10-9


Detroit
Chicago
Kansas City
Cleveland
Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
11 .656 8
19 .500 5 1 5
18 .486 5% 1/2 4
20 .459 6/ 2/2 6
19 .457 61 221 4


Str Home
W-1 13-7
L-1 11-9
W-1 8-7
L-1 12-8
L-1 8-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 23 14 .622 3-7 W-1 11-9 12-5
St. Louis 18 19 .486 5 2/2 4-6 L-2 7-5 11-14
Cincinnati 16 19 .457 6 3/2 5-5 L-1 9-8 7-11
Pittsburgh 16 20 .444 6/2 4 6-4 W-4 12-10 4-10
Chicago 12 23 .343 10 7/2 4-6 L-2 7-11 5-12


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC
15 .583 -
17 .528 2 -
17 .514 2 /2 /2
17 .514 2 /2 /2
25 .306 10 8


West Division
t GB WC


Str Home
W-2 8-9
W-2 11-8
W-2 8-10
L-1 6-7
L-1 6-13



Str Home
L-1 10-5
W-1 13-5
W-1 7-11
W-1 10-11
W-1 3-15


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays center fielder Desmond Jennings slides into second base ahead of the tag by Cleveland
Indians shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera on Sunday during the third inning in St. Petersburg.



Rays manage seven runs, end skid


Associated Press


2 1 1 1 ST PETERSBURG, Fla. -Erik
1 0 0 Bedard gave up one hit in six
2 0 1 1 shutout innings, James Loney had
2 0 0 0 three hits and drove in two runs,
4 0 0 0 and the Tampa Bay Rays broke a
0000
1 0 0 o0 four-game skid Saturday night
0 0 0 0 with a 7-1 victory over the Cleve-
0 0 0 0 land Indians.
cf 2 0 0 0 Winning his second straight
31 2 5 2 start after 15 consecutive starts
-- 11
2 without a win, Bedard gave up a
Colorado 2, double to Ryan Raburn in the sec-
Cincinnati 7.
), Arenado 2 ond inning, Cleveland's only hit
-Blackmon until Lonnie Chisenhall led off the
Morneau (8), ninth with a single off Grant Balfour
R BB so Juan Carlos Oviedo took over in
the seventh for Bedard (2-1) and
0 0 pitched two perfect innings.
0 1 Zach McAllister (3-3) gave up
0 0 eight hits and five runs in 4 1-3 in-
5 0 0 nings for the Indians, who had
2 2 3 won four straight. McAllister is
S0 2 winless in four starts since win-
)02
1 1 1 ning three straight.
David DeJesus drove in Tampa
Bay's first run with a two-out sin-
)S 0 gle in the third.
The Rays made it 3-0 in the fourth
ab r h bi when Loney's first hit was followed
3 0 0 0 by Wil Myers' double and the first
2 01 0 of two sacrifice flies by MattJoyce.
f 1 0 0 0 Yunel Escobar drove in the sec-

4 0 0 0 ond run with a two-out single.
3 1 2 0 Raburn drove in the Indians'run
2 0 0 0 with a sacrifice fly in the ninth.
3 11 0 Ben Zobrist had two hits and
2 0 0 0 scored twice for the Rays, who
1 0 1 1 had lost six straight home games.
00 010 NOTES: John Axford is out as
0 0 0 0 the Indians' closer, manager Terry
0 0 0 0 Francona announced before the
272 5 2 game. A group of four relievers
0 that includes Cody Allen, Scott
anta5. 2 Atchison, Marc Rzepczynski and
tlanta 5.2B-- 1 ^ 1
pton, Pastor- Bryan Shaw could all get oppor-
tunities to fill the role. .. Rays
R BB so RHP Alex Cobb, who has been on
the DL since April 13 with a left
S1 7 oblique strain, is likely to pitch in
2 0 0 a simulated game Monday in Port
0 0
0 0 Charlotte, Florida, then make a
rehab start five days later Cobb
S1 7 hope to pitch for the Rays by the
0 3 end of the May
0 1 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
i58 (49,586). *
658(49,586). Angels 5, Blue Jays 3
TORONTO Tyler Skaggs pitched
into the ninth inning and retired 21
5 0 1 i straight batters, leading the Los Angeles
4 1 2 1 Angels over the Toronto Blue Jays 5-3.
4 0 1 0 Rookie C.J. Cron hit his first major
4 0 1 1 league homer and Chris lannetta
2 0 0 0 added a two-run shot as Angels won
i-rf 2 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 their fifth in a row at Toronto.
0 0 0 o0 Tyler Skaggs (3-1) gave up two
3 1 2 0 earned runs and four hits, leaving
3 11 0 after Jose Reyes and Melky Cabrera
3 110 started the bottom of the ninth with
1 0 0 0 back-to-back singles.
0 0 0 0oo Making his second start since mov-
0 0 0 0 ing from the bullpen into the rotation
1 4 1 4 last Monday, J.A. Happ (1-1) lasted
34411 4 latMnaJAHap(-)ase
3 just 2 1-3 innings, allowing four runs
4 and seven hits.
)B-St. Louis
(12), Davis Tigers 9, Twins 3
DETROIT Miguel Cabrera hit a
BB aSO three-run homer that capped a six-run
S2 5 second inning, sending Max Scherzer
0 2 and the Detroit Tigers past the Min-
0 0 nesota Twins 9-3 Saturday.
Cabrera connected for his fifth
04 4 homer, tagging Kyle Gibson (3-3).
1 2 Scherzer (5-1) wasn't sharp, giving
0 0 up three runs on five hits and four
0 0 2 walks in six innings. He struck out six
S0 2 his team-record streak of fanning at
Ilquez (Bour-
-Volquez 2.B least seven in seven starts to begin a
season ended.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Baltimore 4, Houston 3
L.A. Angels 4, Toronto 3
Minnesota 2, Detroit 1
Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 3
Texas 8, Boston 0
Chicago White Sox 9, Arizona 3
N.YYankees 5, Milwaukee 3
Oakland 8, Washington 0
Kansas City 6, Seattle 1
Saturday's Games
L.A. Angels 5, Toronto 3
Detroit 9, Minnesota 3
Houston at Baltimore, late (delayed)
Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 1
Milwaukee 5, N.Y Yankees 4
Boston at Texas, late
Washington at Oakland, late
Kansas City at Seattle, late
Sunday's Games
Angels (Weaver 3-2) at Toronto (Hutchison 1-2), 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota (Deduno 0-2) at Detroit (Ray 1-0), 1:08 p.m.
Houston (Cosart 1-3) at Baltimore (Tillman 3-1), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin 1-0) at Tampa Bay (Archer 2-1), 1:40 p.m.
Arizona (Anderson 0-0) at White Sox (Noesi 0-2), 2:10 p.m.
Yankees (Phelps 0-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 4-2) at Texas (Ross Jr. 1-3), 3:05 p.m.
Washington (Gonzalez 3-2) at Oakland (Kazmir 4-1), 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-2) at Seattle (Elias 3-2), 4:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 4
Cincinnati 4, Colorado 3
Philadelphia 3, N.Y Mets 2, 11 innings
Atlanta 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 9, Arizona 3
N.YYankees 5, Milwaukee 3
Oakland 8, Washington 0
San Diego 10, Miami 1
San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Saturday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 2
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3
Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Atlanta 2, Chicago Cubs 0
Colorado 11, Cincinnati 2
Milwaukee 5, N.Y Yankees 4
Philadelphia at N.Y Mets, late
Miami at San Diego, late
Washington at Oakland, late
Sunday's Games
Colorado (Nicasio 4-1) at Cincinnati (Bailey 2-2), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 0-2) at Mets (Niese 2-2), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Jackson 2-2) at Atlanta (Harang 3-3), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (Anderson 0-0) at White Sox (Noesi 0-2), 2:10 p.m.
Yankees (Phelps 0-0) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Washington (Gonzalez 3-2) at Oakland (Kazmir 4-1), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (H.Alvarez 2-2) at San Diego (Erlin 1-4), 4:10 p.m.
San Frandsco(Hudson 4-2) at Dodgers (Kershaw 2-0), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Miller 4-2) at Pittsburgh (Morton 0-4), 8:05 p.m.


INTERLEAGUE

Brewers 5, Yankees 4
MILWAUKEE Rickie Weeks hit a
two-out RBI single after Jonathan Lu-
croy moved to third on a balk, Fran-
cisco Rodriguez earned his
league-leading 15th save and the Mil-
waukee Brewers snapped a three-
game skid with a 5-4 win Saturday
over the New York Yankees.
Lucroy, Carlos Gomez and Aramis
Ramirez each homered off Yankees
starter CC Sabathia.
Weeks' chopper skipped through
the hole into left in the seventh offAl-
fredo Aceves (0-1), who was called for
a balk two pitches earlier.
Rodriguez allowed two flyouts to
the warning track in right in a score-
less ninth. The veteran closer hasn't
allowed a run in 19 appearances this
season.

Diamondbacks 4,
White Sox 3
CHICAGO Wade Miley pitched
seven strong innings, Cody Ross had
three hits and the Arizona Diamond-
backs beat the Chicago White Sox 4-3
Saturday night.
Miley (3-3) allowed two runs on four
hits while striking out six and not al-
lowing a walk. His only mistake came
on an 0-1 pitch in the fifth inning that
Paul Konerko hit over the left-field
fence for a two-run home run.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Dodgers 6, Giants 2
LOS ANGELES Yasiel Puig and
Dee Gordon broke open a tie game
with consecutive RBI doubles in the
seventh inning against San Fran-
cisco's bullpen, Matt Kemp homered
in the eighth and the Los Angeles
Dodgers beat the NL West-leading Gi-
ants 6-2 on Saturday.
Zack Greinke (6-1) allowed two
runs and six hits in seven innings,
striking out eight and walking three.
The right-hander extended his streak
to 20 consecutive starts in which he's
allowed fewer than three runs the
longest by any pitcher since the "dead
ball" era.
The Dodgers took the lead in the
seventh against reliever Jeremy Af-
feldt (0-1) when Drew Butera doubled
and scored on Gordon's hit inside
third base with Pablo Sandoval play-
ing in on the grass with the Dodgers'
speedy leadoff hitter at bat. Puig then
greeted Jean Machi with a ground-
rule double into the left field corner.

Rockies 11, Reds 2
CINCINNATI Corey Dickerson hit
two home runs and two doubles, driv-
ing in a career-high four runs Saturday
night as the Colorado Rockies routed
the Cincinnati Reds 11-2.
Charlie Blackmon, Justin Morneau
and Troy Tulowitzki also homered for
the Rockies. Nolan Arenado doubled
twice, a day after his 28-game hitting
streak ended.
The Rockies got 11 extra-base hits,
making things easy for Jordan Lyles
(5-0). He struck out eight in six innings
and left with a 10-2 lead.
Alfredo Simon (4-2) was tagged a
season-high eight hits and five runs in
three innings.

Braves 2, Cubs 0
ATLANTA- Ervin Santana pitched
five-hit ball for seven innings to remain
unbeaten, Ryan Doumit snapped a
scoreless tie with a pinch-hit double in
the seventh and the Atlanta Braves
beat the Chicago Cubs 2-0.
Santana (4-0) overcame a rain
delay in the third inning and outlasted
Cubs right-hander Jeff Samardzija,
who had his long winless streak con-
tinue. Samardzija lowered his ERA to
1.45, second in the NL, but he is still
without a win this season.
Santana walked one and struck out
seven. Samardzija allowed only two
hits with one walk and seven strike-
outs in six innings.
Braves left fielder Justin Upton is
day to day with a lower back muscle
bruise after being hit by a pitch from
Samardzija in the sixth and leaving
the game.
Braves closer Craig Kimbrel pitched
the ninth for his 10Oth save.

Pirates 4, Cardinals 3
PITTSBURGH Pedro Alvarez
singled in the go-ahead run and the
Pittsburgh Pirates won their season-
high fourth consecutive game Satur-
day night, 4-3 over the St. Louis
Cardinals.
Alvarez's hit capped a four-run
fourth inning against Lance Lynn (4-2)
that helped the Pirates wipe out a 3-0
deficit.
Josh Harrison and Ike Davis each
had two hits for the Pirates, who have
won 11 of their last 14 games against
the Cardinals in Pittsburgh. Harrison
also hit an RBI single in the fourth.


BASEBALL


Minnesota
ab
Dozier2b 5
KSuzuk c 4
Mauerdh 3
Colaell lb 4
Parmel rf 4
Nunez If 3
EEscor3b 4
A.Hickscf 3
DSantn ss 4
Totals 34
Minnesota
Detroit


Detroit
r h bi
1 1 3 Kinsler2b
0 1 0 TrHntrrf
0 1 0 MiCarrIb
0 0 0 VMrtnzdh
0 1 0 AJcksncf
0 0 0 D.Kellylf
0 2 0 Cstllns 3b
1 0 0 Avilac
1 2 0 AnRmnss
38 3 Totals
003 000 000
060 000 30x


ab r h bi
5010
3210
3213
4123
4010
4120
4110
4111
4111
35911 8
5 0 1 0
3 2 1 0
3 2 1 3
4 1 2 3
4 0 1 0
4 1 2 0
4 1 1 0
4 1 1 1
4 1 1 1
35 911 8
3
9


E-A.Hicks (1), Dozier (3), Castellanos (2).
DP-Minnesota 1, Detroit 1. LOB-Minnesota 8,
Detroit 4. 2B-E.Escobar 2 (8), D.Santana (3),
VMartinez (7), D.Kelly (2), Castellanos (6). HR-
Dozier (9), Mi.Cabrera (5), V.Martinez (8). SB-
Kinsler (4). CS-Parmelee (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
GibsonL,3-3 2 7 6 6 1 1
Swarzak 4 1 0 0 0 3
Tonkin 1 2 3 3 0 0
Burton 1 1 0 0 0 0
Detroit
ScherzerW,5-1 6 5 3 3 4 6
Alburquerque H,4 1 1 0 0 0 2
Chamberlain 1 1 0 0 0 2
Coke 1 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-byTonkin (Mi.Cabrera). WP-Scherzer.
T-2:50. A-42,312 (41,681).


Interleague

Brewers 5, Yankees 4
NewYork Milwaukee


ab
Ellsury cf 3
Gardnr If 3
ASorin ph 1
Aceves p 0
Beltran rf 4
Teixeirib 4
McCnnc 4
Solarte 3b-ss4
BRorts2b 4
Ryan ss 2
KJhnsn ph-3b
0


rhbi ab rhbi
1 0 0 CGomzcf 5 1 1 1
1 1 1 Segurass 4 10 0
0 1 1 Lucroyc 4 2 2 2
0 0 0 ArRmr3b 2 1 2 1
0 1 1 Bianchi 3b 2 00 0
1 2 1 RWeks2b 4 02 1
0 1 0 MrRynllb 3 01 0
0 1 0 KDavisl If 4 01 0
00 0 FrRdrgp 0 00 0
0 2 0 Gindlrf 3 01 0
1 1 0 0 Lohsep 20 0


Saathiap 2 0 0 0 Gennettph 1 00 0
Betncsp 0 0 0 0 Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0
ISuzuki ph-lf2 0 1 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0
WSmithp 0 00 0
LSchfr ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 4104 Totals 35 510 5
NewYork 002 001 100 4
Milwaukee 103 000 10x 5
E-Ryan (1), Lucroy (2). DP-Milwaukee 3.
LOB-New York 5, Milwaukee 8. 2B-Lucroy
(12). 3B-Gardner (1). HR Teixeira (6),
C.Gomez (9), Lucroy (2), Ar.Ramirez (5). CS-
Teixeira (1).
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Sabathia 51-38 4 1 1 4
Betances 2-3 0 0 0 0 2
AcevesL,0-1 2 2 1 1 1 1
Milwaukee
Lohse 6 8 3 2 0 2
Thornburg 0 1 1 1 1 0
DukeW,3-0BS,2-2 1 1 0 0 0 0
WSmithH,9 1 0 0 0 0 2
Fr.RodriguezS,15-15 1 0 0 0 0 0
Thornburg pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Balk Aceves.
T-2:48. A-43,085 (41,900).
Diamondbacks 4,
White Sox 3
Arizona Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pollockcf 4 1 2 1 GBckh2b 4 01 0
Prado 3b 4 02 1 Semien 3b 3 01 0
Gldschlb 3 0 0 0 Gillaspiph 1 1 1 0
Monterc 4 0 1 1 JAreudh 4 00 0
Hill2b 4 0 0 0 ViciedolIf-rf 4 1 1 0
CRossIf 4 0 3 0 AIRmrzss 4 01 1
Inciartlf 0 00 0 Konerklb 4 1 1 2
GParrarf 4 1 1 0 Sierrarf 2 00 0
AMartedh 3 1 1 1 A.Dunn ph-lf 1 0 0 0
EChavz ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Flowrsc 3 0 1
0
Owingsss 4 1 2 0 DeAzacf 3 00 0
Totals 35 4124 Totals 333 7 3
Arizona 000 030 100 4
Chicago 000 020 001 3
DP-Arizona 1, Chicago 2. LOB-Arizona 8,
Chicago 3.2B-A.Marte (2), Owings 2(8), Flow-
ers (4). 3B-Pollock (2). HR-Konerko (1). SB-
Pollock (3), AI.Ramirez (6). SF-Prado.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
MileyW,3-3 7 4 2 2 0 6
ZieglerH,7 1 1 0 0 0 1
A.ReedS,11-12 1 2 1 1 0 2
Chicago
QuintanaL,1-3 6 7 3 3 1 5
Putnam 1 3 1 1 2 0
D.Webb 2 2 0 0 0 0
WP-A.Reed.
T-2:58. A-24,634 (40,615).


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 7, Indians 1
Cleveland Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Avilesl If 4 0 0 0 DeJessdh 5 0 1 1
Swisherib 2 0 0 0 Zobrist2b 4 22 0
Chsnhlllb 1 1 1 0 Longori3b 3 21 1
Brantlycf 3 0 1 0 Loneylb 4 13 2
CSantn 3b 3 0 0 0 Myersrf 3 1 1 0
Raburndh 3 0 1 1 Joycel If 2 00 2
ACarerss 4 00 0 DJnngscf 2 1 1 0
YGomsc 2 00 0 YEscorss 4 01 1
DvMrprf 3 00 0 Hanignc 4 00 0
JRmrz2b 3 000
Totals 28 13 1 Totals 31 710 7
Cleveland 000 000 001 1
Tampa Bay 001 220 20x 7
DP Tampa Bay 1. LOB-Cleveland 5, Tampa
Bay 6.2B-Raburn (2), Zobrist (6), Longoria (7),
Myers (8). SB-De.Jennings (9). CS-De.Jen-
nings (2). SF-Raburn, Joyce 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
McAllister L,3-3 41-38 5 5 1 2
C.Lee 12-30 0 0 0 3
Outman 1-3 2 2 2 1 0
Carrasco 12-30 0 0 1 0
Tampa Bay
BedardW,2-1 6 1 0 0 3 4
Oviedo 2 0 0 0 0 2
Balfour 1 2 1 1 1 0
HBP-by C.Lee (De.Jennings).
T-3:03.A-29,212 (31,042).

Angels 5, Blue Jays 3
Los Angeles Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Aybarss 5 0 2 0 Reyesss 4 1 1 0
Troutcf 4 0 0 0 MeCarrlf 4 1 1 0
Pujolsdh 4 0 1 0 Bautistcf 4 1 1 1
HKndrc2b 4 1 1 0 Encrnclb 4 01 1
Cron lb 4 2 2 2 DNavrrdh 4 0 1 1
lannettc 4 1 2 2 Santospr 0 00 0
Green If 4 0 1 0 Kratzc 3 00 0
Cowgillrf 4 1 2 0 Lindph 1 00 0
JMcDnl3b 4 0 1 0 JFrncs3b 3 00 0
StTllsn rf 3 0 1 0
Getz 2b 3 00 0
Totals 37 5124 Totals 333 6 3
Los Angeles 031 001 000 5
Toronto 100 000 002 3
E-Skaggs (1), Reyes (2). DP-Los Angeles 1,
Toronto 1. LOB-Los Angeles 6, Toronto 3.2B-
Pujols (9), H.Kendrick (8), Encarnacion (11),
St.Tolleson (4). HR-Cron (1), lannetta (3). CS-
Green (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
SkaggsW,3-1 8 4 3 2 0 4
J.SmithS,4-6 1 2 0 0 0 0
Toronto
HappL,1-1 21-37 4 4 1 4
Redmond 42-35 1 0 0 1
Rogers 2 0 0 0 0 1
Skaggs pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
PB-lannetta.
T-2:46. A-31,412 (49,282).

Tigers 9, Twins 3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All-Chronicle winter sports teams


he annual Chronicle sports banquet
will be held Friday, May 16, at the
College of Central Florida Citrus
campus in Lecanto.
The reception begins at 5:30 p.m., with
the awards program to follow at
6:30 p.m.
Tickets are available at the Citrus
County Chronicle offices in Crystal
River and Inverness and are $10.
The top athletes in the county will be
celebrated, including the ones you see
on this page from the winter 2013-14
campaigns.


It was an outstanding boys basketball
season in the county Citrus finished with
26 victories, led by Player of the Year fi-
nalists Devin Pryor and Desmond
Franklin.
Seven Rivers senior Adam Gage was a
force all winter, averaging 27 points and
11 rebounds a game.
In girls basketball, Citrus fell one win
shy of a Final Four berth in the state play-
offs. Senior Shenelle Toxen was a big
reason for the Hurricanes' success,
averaging 13 points, 2.3 assists and
2.5 steals per game.


Alyssa Gage of Seven Rivers, like
brother Adam, led the county in scoring
at 17.4 points per game. Jasmyne Eason of
Crystal River averaged a double-double
(13 points, 11 rebounds) in the Pirates' 20-
win season.
The trio of individuals honored as fi-
nalists on the All-Chronicle wrestling
team all earned hardware at the state
tournament.
Brandon Taylor and Casey Bearden of
Citrus finished second and third, respec-
tively, in Class 2A action. Michael Allan
placed sixth in Class 1A for Crystal River


All three finalists for girls Weightlifter
of the Year advanced to the state meet,
with Citrus senior Hannah Evans leaving
with a sixth-place medal.
In boys soccer, Joshua Marsden of Cit-
rus and Jacob Rice of Lecanto gave their
respective teams an offensive spark,
while Dakota Gruzdas was solid in the net
all winter for the Hurricanes.
Finalists for Girls Soccer Player of the
Year include Lecanto forward Stephanie
Bandstra, Citrus forward Malene Peder-
sen and Lecanto midfielder Alexandra
Moore.


= BOYS BASKETBALL =

Player of the Year finalists


= GIRLS BASKETBALL =

Player of the Year finalists


Adam Gage, Devin Pryor,
Sr., Seven Rivers Sr., Citrus


Desmond Franklin, Shenelle Toxen,
Jr., Citrus Sr., Citrus


I






Jasmyne Eason, Alyssa Gage,
Jr., Crystal River Jr., Seven Rivers


All-Chronicle Team


All-Chronicle Team


Adam Gage, Sr., Seven Rivers
Christian, guard/forward
Devin Pryor, Sr., Citrus, point guard
Desmond Franklin, Jr., Citrus, forward


Brandon Burich, Jr., Lecanto, forward
Darius Sawyer, Jr., Lecanto, forward
Kaine McColley, Fr., Lecanto, guard
Sam Franklin, Jr., Citrus, forward


Micah Jenkins, Sr., Citrus
Shenelle Toxen, Sr., Citrus
Jasmyne Eason, Jr., Crystal River
DeeAnna Moehring, So., Lecanto


Alyssa Gage, Jr., Seven Rivers
Alexis Zachar, Sr., Seven Rivers
Katelyn Hannigan, Sr., Crystal River


WRESTLING

Player of the Year finalists


GIRLS SOCCER

Player of the Year finalists


Michael Allan,
Sr., Crystal River


Brandon Taylor,
Sr., Citrus


Casey Bearden,
Sr., Citrus


All-Chronicle Team


Alexandra Moore, Stephanie Bandstra, Malene Pedersen,
Jr., Lecanto So., Lecanto Jr., Citrus

All-Chronicle Team


106 Christopher Keene, So., Citrus
113 Chase Bunts, Fr., Crystal River
120 Chance Luckey, So., Crystal River
126- Michael Allan, Sr., Crystal River
132 Michael Ciccione, Jr., Crystal River
138- Joel Pelton, Jr., Crystal River
145- Nick Hooper, Sr., Crystal River


152 Justin Allan, So., Citrus
160 Brandon Taylor, Sr., Citrus
170- Casey Bearden, Sr., Citrus
182 Chris Ewing, Sr., Lecanto
195 -Andrew Bilby, Sr., Crystal River
220 Carlos Sanabria, Sr., Crystal River
285 Johnathan Loggins, Jr., Citrus


Forwards
Stephanie Bandstra, So., Lecanto
Malene Pedersen, Jr., Citrus
Christina Bresson, Jr., Crystal River
Taylor Falabella, Fr., Citrus
Midfielders
Alexandra (Lexi) Moore, Jr., Lecanto
Payton Wells, Sr., Citrus


Emma Van Cleef, Fr., Lecanto
Defenders
Danyelle Ulloa, Jr., Lecanto
Ashlynne Van Cleef, Sr., Lecanto
PaigeAntonelli, Sr., Citrus
Goal keeper
Elizabeth Rinaldi, Sr., Citrus


BOYS SOCCER

Player of the Year finalists


Jones on Manziel: 'He's Elvis'


Joshua Marsden, Jacob Rice,
Sr., Citrus Sr., Lecanto


Forwards
Joshua Marsden, Sr., Citrus
AJ Bass, So., Crystal River
Austin D'Anna, Fr., Lecanto
Defenders
Sean Flaherty, Sr., Citrus
Raymond Dingier, Jr., Crystal River
Tristan Deem, So., Lecanto


Hannah Evans, Anna Venero,
Sr., Citrus Sr., Citrus


101 -Jasmin Pryor, So., Citrus
110-Andreanna Van Quelef, Sr., Lecanto
119- Cheyenne Liebacher, Jr., Citrus
129- Chloe Kaufman, Sr., Lecanto
139 Breanna Johnson, Sr., Lecanto


Dakota Gruzdas,
So., Citrus


Midfielders
Caleb Russo, Fr., Crystal River
Austin Wilcoxon, Sr., Citrus
Jacob Rice, Sr., Lecanto
Ryan Dolan, Sr., Citrus
Goal keeper
Dakota Gruzdas, So., Citrus


Breanna Johnson,
Sr., Lecanto


154 Hannah Evans, Sr., Citrus
169 Savannah Banning, So., Citrus
183 -Anna Venero, Sr., Citrus
199- Sam Kanawall, Jr., Citrus
Unlimited Destiny Langley, Fr., Citrus


Associated Press
IRVING, Texas Dal-
las Cowboys owner and
general manager Jerry
Jones didn't pass on
Johnny Manziel because
he thinks the flashy for-
mer Heisman Trophy win-
ner will be a bust in the
NFL.
Quite the opposite.
"He's got a chance to
knock it out of the park
and we all know that,"
Jones said of Manziel,
who ended up going 22nd
overall to Cleveland -
six spots after the Cow-
boys took an offensive
lineman in the first
round for the third time
in four years.
Even with that high
praise, Jones reiterated
that he didn't think
Manziel could beat out
Tony Romo.
But he sees Johnny
Football on equal footing
with the guy who dated
Jessica Simpson and Car-


DODD
Continued from Page B1

sophomore, and No. 1 as a
junior and senior) and
once in doubles.
She finished her last
two seasons undefeated at
No. 1 singles (20-0 junior,
18-0 senior) until she
reached the 3A state fi-
nals, where she lost in the
first round to Eau Gallie's
Christi Woodson 6-1,6-1 in
2013. In 2014, Dodd
dropped two sets to Fort
Myers' Thandiwe Kangwa
in the opening round.
Citrus head coach Scott
Waters has watched Dodd
blossom into a fine tennis
player on the court and an
even better person off the


rie Underwood in his
early days as the Dallas
starter before settling
down with a wife and two
kids.
"He's Elvis Presley,"
Jones said of the former
Texas A&M star
And the Dallas owner
basically said there's no
room for two celebrities
under center for the
Cowboys.
Jones had no concerns
about the 34-year-old
Romo accepting Manziel
and bringing the young
quarterback along. The
marketing-savvy busi-
nessman also was well
aware of what kind of cir-
cus would have come to
town and probably
stayed for at least three
years.
"There's just too much
dynamic here for him, for
the franchise, for every-
body," Jones said. "That's
just too much for insur-
ance, and it's not the usual
development guy behind

court in his three years
coaching the program.
"She is one of the more
deserving kids," Waters
said. "This is a kid who
puts 100 percent in every
day She doesn't quit. To
see kids like her get this,
it's well deserved. That's
all I can say is that it is
well deserved."
An outstanding student
athlete, Dodd carries an
unweighted 3.91 grade
point average and a
weighted GPA of 4.5.
Dodd's favorite class at
CHS was anatomy, and
her career of choice is oc-
cupational therapy, which
she looks to pursue at
SEU. She aspires to work
with disabled children
one day
Besides tennis, Dodd


an accomplished quarter-
back."
Jones said he wasn't
tempted to take Manziel at
No. 16, where the Cow-
boys grabbed Notre Dame
offensive tackle Zack
Martin.
That's not to say Jones
wasn't intrigued by
Manziel.
"Now he's the kind of
guy who will change your
plans and change your di-
rection in my mind,"
Jones said. "He is that
good, and can make that
kind of difference. I'm
anxious to see how and
what he does in the
NFL."
That leaves just one
other question. If Manziel
is Elvis, who is Romo?
"George Strait," Jones
says, flashing a wide grin.
Ever the salesman, of
course. The country
music star is set for a
farewell concert at Jones'
$1.2 billion stadium on
June 7.

played four seasons ofvol-
leyball for the Hurricanes
(two junior varsity and two
varsity seasons), mostly on
defense. She was also Cit-
rus' homecoming queen
in 2013, as well as being
named Miss CHS.
"We're just proud of
Melanie's accomplish-
ments," father Doug Dodd
said. "She's worked hard
over the years and this is
the reward for all that
hard work."
"I'm excited to play at
the next level," Dodd said.
"I just want to thank my
parents and family coach
Waters, my teammates, for
all their support and guid-
ance.
"Thank God for the path
that I am on and trust in
its direction."


All-Chronicle Team


GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING


Player of the Year finalists


All-Chronicle Team


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 B5


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Miami Heat guard Mario Chalmers drives against Brooklyn
Nets guards Shaun Livingston and Deron Williams on
Saturday in the second period during Game 3 in New York.


Nets cool Heat,


hand them first



postseason loss


Brooklyn 104, Miami 90


Associated Press

NEW YORK Joe
Johnson scored 19 points,
Andray Blatche had career
playoff highs of 15 points
and 10 rebounds, and the
Brooklyn Nets handed the
Miami Heat their first loss
this postseason, 104-90 on
Saturday night in Game 3
of the Eastern Conference
semifinals.
Paul Pierce scored 14
points, Deron Williams and
Kevin Garnett bounced
back from awful offensive
efforts, and the Nets with-
stood LeBronJames' 16-point
first quarter and held him
to two baskets over the
final three quarters.
James scored 28 points
for the Heat, who hadn't
even faced a fourth-quar-
ter deficit in these playoffs
before having their eight-
game winning streak in the
postseason snapped. It
was their first loss since
Game 5 of the NBA Finals.
The Nets shook off the
Heat's sizzling start, then
held them to 33 points over
the middle two quarters to
take control.


MirzaTeletovic and Shaun
Livingston each scored 12
points for the Nets. Tele-
tovic made four of Brook-
lyn's 15 3-pointers.
Williams, 0 for 9 in Game
2, shot just 3 for 11 but fin-
ished with nine points and
11 assists. Garnett, just 2
for 10 for four total points
in Miami, shot 5 of 6 for 10
points and seven rebounds.
Dwyane Wade scored 20
points and James grabbed
eight rebounds, but his night
fell well short of what it
could have been.
He made a free throw to
bring Miami to 59-56 in the
third quarter, but Teletovic
made a 3-pointer, followed
by baskets by Blatche, John-
son and Livingston to make
it 68-56. Teletovic made two
more 3s and Williams knocked
down another before the end
of the quarter, which ended
with the Nets ahead 77-63.
Teletovic opened the fourth
with another 3, and Alan
Anderson hit a pair later in
the period while also getting
in a skirmish with RayAllen
that led to double technical
fouls. The Nets held Allen
to two baskets.


Associated Press
Martin Kaymer hits from the 18th tee Saturday during the third round of The Players Championship at
TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach.


Everything comes up Spieth


headed into Sunday at Sawgrass


Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH -Jor-
dan Spieth couldn't see any of the
240 yards to the green on the tough-
est hole at the TPC Sawgrass. He
was in the rough so far right of the
14th fairway that he was closer to a
water hazard on No. 12 that he did-
n't know even existed. His ball was
on the back side of a mound. One
wrong move could have led to a big
number
"Probably the best shot I've hit
here this week," Spieth said Saturday
The contact was perfect. The ball
landed about pin-high in a bunker,
setting up another par
It was like that all day at The
Players Championship.
Every time the 20-year-old Texan
landed in trouble, he answered
with a recovery shot, a chip-and-run,
and always a putt that kept him with-
out a bogey through 54 holes and gave
him a share of the lead with Martin
Kaymer going into the final round.
Spieth's final act was an escape
through the trees on the 18th hole
and a 12-foot par putt from the
fringe for a 1-under 71. Kaymer
missed his par putt from just inside
10 feet on the final hole and had to
settle for a 72.


They were at 12-under 204, three
shots clear of former Players win-
ner Sergio Garcia (69) and John
Senden (68).
Not since Greg Norman won The
Players in 1994 has anyone gone
through the opening three rounds
without a bogey Then again, Spieth
has shown over the last year that
he is capable of remarkable feats.
Kaymer wasn't too shabby on the
toughest day all week at Sawgrass
- warm, humid, blustery and in-
creasingly frightening. He picked
up a pair of birdies on the front
nine to build a two-shot lead, only
to lost two birdie opportunities on
the par 5s on the back nine.
Even when he heard a few cheers
after missing his par putt on the
18th, which allowed Spieth to share
the lead, Kaymer was in a good spot
A former world No. 1 and major
champion, Kaymer is trying to end
more than two years without winning.
For Spieth, who still didn't have
a PGA Tour card last year, the final
group is familiar territory He has
contended on the weekend in four
tournaments already this year, and
only a month ago had a two-shot
lead with 11 holes to play in the
Masters until he finished in a tie
for second behind Bubba Watson.


Fog reduces Madeira
Islands Open to 36 holes
SANTO DASERRA, Madeira Islands
The Madeira Islands Open was re-
duced to 36 holes because of persist-
ent fog on Saturday, with the first round
still incomplete.
Play in the European Tour's 1,500th
event couldn't start on Thursday, and
delays on Friday meant the tournament
was cut to 54 holes with 77 players yet
to finish. On Saturday, with the moun-
tain course still shrouded in fog, 36
players were yet to card a round when
play was suspended, and the tourna-
ment cut to 36 holes for the first time in
its 22-year history.
It was the first time since the inaugu-
ral Nelson Mandela Championship in
2012 that a European Tour event has
been reduced to 36 holes.
Scotland's Scott Jamieson won that
event in South Africa, and his country-
man Scott Henry led Madeira by one
shot after a 5-under par 67 he man-
aged on Friday.
If Henry secures his first Tour victory,
he will still be afforded the one-year tour
exemption despite the reduced event.
The English duo of Daniel Brooks
and Lloyd Kennedy shared second
place on 68.


Associated Press
Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask dives out of the crease
to cover the puck Saturday while pressured by Montreal
Canadiens right wing Brendan Gallagher during the second
period of Game 5 in Boston.


With 4-2 win, Bruins


take 3-2 series lead


Associated Press

BOSTON Reilly
Smith and Jarome Iginla
scored 22 seconds apart to
help the Boston Bruins
snap a five-year playoff
power-play drought
against Montreal and beat
the Canadiens 4-2 in Game
5 of the Eastern Confer-
ence semifinals Saturday
night.
The Bruins lead the
best-of-seven series 3-2,
with a chance to eliminate
the Canadiens in Montreal
on Monday night. Game 7
would be Wednesday night
back in Boston.
Carl Soderberg and Loui
Eriksson also scored, and
Tuukka Rask stopped 29
shots for Boston. He ex-
tended his shutout streak
to 122 minutes, 6 seconds
before Brendan Gallagher
scored to make it 3-1 on a
power play with 5:21 left in
the second period.
Carey Price made 26
saves for Montreal. PK
Subban had a late goal
power-play goal.
The Bruins had not
scored a power-play goal
in the playoffs against the
Canadiens in 39 tries over
14 games dating to 2009.
Soderberg gave Boston
the lead with 6:40 left in
the first, and it was still 1-0
at the end of the period
when Tomas Plekanec was
penalized for interfering
with the goaltender Just
64 seconds after the break,
Smith redirected Dougie


Hamilton's shot past Price
to make it 2-0.
Sixteen seconds later,
Plekanec was sent off
again this time for high-
sticking. It only took 6 sec-
onds into the power play
for the Bruins to make it 3-
0 on a backhand crossing
pass from Torey Krug to
Iginla.
Plekanec set up Gal-
lagher to cut the deficit to
two goals with 5:21 left in
the second period, but
Eriksson snapped in the
rebound of Game 4 hero
Matt Fraser's shot with
just under 6 minutes left in
the game to make it 4-1.
Montreal pulled Price
for most of the last 5 min-
utes, and Subban scored
on a 6-on-4 power play But
the Canadiens could not
get any closer
NOTES: The game was
played on the 44th an-
niversary of Bobby Orr's
Stanley Cup-winning goal
against the St. Louis Blues
that was immortalized
with a bronze statue out-
side the TD Garden.... The
Bruins had scored two
goals in the opening two
periods of the first four
games before tallying
three in the first in Game
5.... Price tied Gump Wors-
ley for fifth place on Mon-
treal's list for playoff
games by a goalie, with 39.
... Fraser, who scored in his
NHL playoff debut in over-
time in Game 4, had an as-
sist on Boston's fourth goal
Saturday


B6 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


SPORTS









COMMENTARY
C ITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Time flies


let's get the work done


ime is really flying by
I am not kidding.
We were having din-
ner at home recently when
the wall clock in the kitchen
went nuts.
The clock started spin-
ning out of control. It took
about two seconds in real
time for the clock to move
one minute. Then the hour
hand started moving as fast
as the second hand.
It took us about three


weeks to finish the main
course. We decided to skip
desert because it was going
to consume an entire week
of my summer vacation
time.
Being a very handy per-
son around the house, I
went to the garage to get the
hammer so I could put the
clock out of its misery and
stop the runaway time. If I
didn't stop it, Christmas
would soon be here and I


hadn't done any holiday
shopping.
Instead, my wife took the
clock off the wall and pulled
out the batteries.
She has the practical
genes in the family
The clock experience re-
minded me that time is
moving, and it's important
to publicly state a few top
priorities in my world.
There are a few things I'd
like to see accomplished in


Citrus County in the near
term, and I vow to help
achieve them.
First, I want to see a
YMCA built in our commu-
nity. We have been talking
about this for 25 years and
now we are in the final
stages of raising the money
to make it happen. The Y
will be located on 18 acres
of property on the newly im-
proved section of County
Road 486. It was donated by


Stan and Betty Olsen, the
original developers of Black
Diamond. The Citrus Y fa-
cility will be the place
where children, seniors and
families come together to
celebrate healthy lifestyles.
It is so appropriate that the
CMH Foundation is step-
ping up to be a major part-
ner in this Y endeavor to
improve lives, because they
See Page C3


Special to the Chronicle
Mosquitoes prefer water-holding containers to breed. Two species in particular are of concern to people living in Florida: Aedes albopictus and
Aedes aegypti, both of which spread chikungunya and dengue fever.


SORRY TO


YOU...


JOEL JACOBSON
Special to the Chronicle


Springtime in Florida: Warm gentle breezes, cool showers and
flowers in bloom. This spring, which historically is Florida's dry
season, it's been heavy downpours, high winds and escalating
pollen counts. So what's new? Mosquitoes! Heavy rains, warm
temperatures and a mild winter equal trouble. And this season there's the
possibility of the arrival of something other than a hurricane: disease.


Citizens be aware! Over the past few years,
Florida has experienced the resurgence of
an old mosquito-borne enemy dengue
fever In many cases, dengue will present it-
self with mild flu-like symptoms and general
aches and fever However, in some people,


these symptoms can escalate into life-threat-
ening problems, causing internal hemor-
rhaging, shock and even death.
Florida mosquito control agencies have
responded aggressively and, to date, have
managed to suppress this threat from


quickly spreading. Hopefully, such quick
and thorough responses will help protect us
from future outbreaks.
However, in December 2013 a new threat
reached the Americas: Chikungunya (chik-
un-goon-ya).
Chikungunya is similar to dengue fever in
how the disease is spread and symptoms of
the illness. Both dengue and chikungunya
are spread by two species of mosquito: Aedes
aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Both diseases
present flu-like symptoms, rash and severe
joint pain. Both diseases are usually mild,
but can progress rapidly to severe cases and
even death. These mosquitoes are found
throughout Florida and prefer to live around
people. The mosquitoes thrive in water-
holding containers such as tires, buckets and


Page C4


Let's care for each other as mom cared for us


"There is an instinct in a
woman to love most her
own child and an instinct
to make any child who
needs her love her own."
-Robert Bra ult
aron Cohen and
Minnie Golub, both
Russian immigrants,
lived in the same five-story
tenement house on Mercer
Street in New York's Lower
East Side. They knew each


other only by sight Since a
formal introduction was the
respected custom, Aaron's
sister dutifully introduced
them in the summer of 1915.
At ages 25 and 24, Aaron
and Minnie were the oldest
single children in their fam-
ilies. Many around them
wondered, "What are they
waiting for?" most of
their peers were already
married. Once the spark
was ignited, however, they


courted, married and Min-
nie became pregnant in
three months' time.
Minnie's pregnancy was
without any unusual prob-
lems, but it was it decided
she would not deliver at
home in their apartment.
She arrived at the Lying-In
Hospital of New York City
on Second Avenue a week
before her expected due
date and was led to a bright
and airy ward which she


shared with seven other
women.
Two of the women had al-
ready delivered their ba-
bies, but stayed on just to be
certain all was well. Minnie,
at 25, was the eldest. The
two youngest were 16 and
17, one of whom had a com-
plicated pregnancy That
girl was two weeks past her
due date, hurting and afraid.
It was early morning
when the sleeping women


were jolted awake by the
screams. Two nurses
rushed in and wheeled the
17-year-old girl off. The oth-
ers were silent, filled with
fear They looked to their
new big sister Minnie for
comfort.
After 20 minutes punctu-
ated by painful moans, hor-
rific shrieks and a brief,
chilling silence, there was a
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


BUG


Jack Levine
GUEST
COLUMN






0Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 11,2014



PINION


"What is not good for the swarm
is not good for the bee."
Marcus Aurelius,
"Meditations,"
2nd century B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SV Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold .............................................. editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PLENTY TO OFFER




Make Central


Ridge Community


Center part of


county parks


hen Beverly Hills
was developed more
than 50 years ago, it
was planned as a retirement
community with membership
amenities such as a large
multipurpose building, a
pool, horseshoe pits, a wood
shop, shuffleboard courts and
a large open space in the cen-
ter of the community
With churches and service
club buildings ringing the
area around the recreational
facilities, for many years the


amenities were
the social hub of
Beverly Hills.
But times
change. Interests
change. The com-
munity changes.
Club membership
is declining
across the coun-
try. Three years
ago, facing a sig-
nificant decline
in membership,
the Beverly Hills
Recreation Asso-


THE IS
Comrr
leaders
county t
comm
center|
park sy

OUR OF
A reasc
prop<


ciation was faced with having
to close the community cen-
ter and its associated
amenities.
At that point, the county
took ownership of the prop-
erty. This was based on an
agreement with the devel-
oper that should the recre-
ation association face
bankruptcy, the community
center and associated prop-
erties would revert to county
ownership.
The goal at the time was for
the county to spruce up
the property, offer new pro-
grams, and build member-
ship to make the facility
self-supporting.
The facility was renamed
the Central Ridge Commu-
nity Center. The county took
over management and spent
money to upgrade the facili-
ties. New programs were
started.
Despite this effort, mem-
bership in the community
center has not grown suffi-
ciently to make it self-
sustaining. In planning for
the upcoming budget, money


Bone marrow
donations
Is there any nearby
hospital that takes 0 c
bone marrow tests for
people to be on a list
for potential bone mar-
row transplants?
Help with animal f
shelter
The present veterinar- CAL
ian for Citrus County C5
Animal Services is leav- 563-
ing and the county is
advertising for a new veterinar-
ian. The county also needs to
hire a director to handle and
oversee the daily operations of
the shelter. This is a very stress-
ful and lifesaving business and it
is too much for one person to
handle. As more and more peo-
ple are concerned about the ani-
mals, both dogs and cats, it is


I

(


has been allocated to con-
tinue county support for the
facilities.
Looking into the future,
membership does not seem
like a long-term, sustainable
funding model for the
facilities.
Beverly Hills is still largely
a retirement community, but
there have been demo-
graphic changes in the com-
munity, with more young
people in the neighborhood,
and there are an increasing
number of
renters instead of
ISUE: owners.
Given the
unity change in demo-
s urge graphics within
o make the community,
unity along with
part of changes in tech-
istem. nology that serve
to keep people in-
'INION: doors, it is doubt-
onable ful if membership
osal. can ever sustain
the facility
Without a vi-
able long-term plan for how
the center can be self-sus-
taining, the county is facing a
continued future of deciding
on a year-to-year basis
whether to fund the commu-
nity center or shut it down.
But as two community lead-
ers pointed out in a recent
commentary, the community
center complex has signifi-
cant assets, such as its swim-
ming pool, tennis courts,
pool hall, workout areas,
card rooms, grand hall,
horseshoe pits and shuffle-
board courts.
Placing these in the county
park system would make
these assets available to
everyone in the county. This
would end the dependence
on membership and would
assure long-term funding to
keep the facilities open.
This seems like a positive
and reasonable resolution
that would preserve the as-
sets that are now in place and
make them available to both
the local Beverly Hills com-
munity and the county at
large.


imperative these two positions
be filled and filled with quali-
fied people committed to saving
JN the animals. This is im-
JND portant for the animals,
the volunteers and the
D employees. Please
make it happen.
Let's recognize
the students
SWhy is it that here in
Citrus County, the soon-
)57 to-be graduates that
)579 work so hard to be-
come first or second in
their class cannot be recognized
as valedictorian or salutatorian?
This not wanting to offend or
hurt others' feelings has gone
too far today. The ones that
excel are because they do ex-
tremely hard work and they
should be rewarded for it. How
do we fix this injustice, Citrus
County?


Don't expect to change many minds


S f on, never shovel sand
against the tide!" was
Sthe advice my dad
gave me long ago after I'd lost a
battle with my mom over some
insignificant issue. I never fully
learned that lesson when it
came to writing columns until
autumn of 2012.
By then I had
spent nearly four -
years writing
columns about poli-
tics, health care, the
culture and more, in '
hopes that by pre-
senting a well-
researched fact-
based discourse, I Dr. Wil
could cause some
people to re-exam- GUI
ine and perhaps COLI
change their opin-
ions. Each column
took an average of 12 hours to
research, compose, correct and
submit in acceptable form.
Why write columns in the
first place?
I had lived through the polit-
ical changes initiated in the
1960s that rejected market cap-
italism in favor of "progressive"
government as a means to im-
prove the general welfare. I
graduated medical school as
President Lyndon Johnson
forced Medicare through Con-
gress and started his war on
poverty expanding the welfare
state and the federal debt.
I approved, back then, of civil
rights legislation bringing full
citizenship to Americans of
color Later, I watched civil
rights legislation expand to in-
clude ethnicity, gender, disabil-
ity status and even sexual
preference.
I watched as civil rights
turned into affirmative-action
requirements that impaired the
civil rights of non-favored
groups. And I saw it devolve to
enforced political correctness,
speech codes and limitation of


a
E
u


First Amendment rights.
Then came radical environ-
mentalists restricting the use of
private property Property
rights, of course, are fundamen-
tal to the capitalist system that
has given Americans wealth be-
yond any nation in history
I saw that it was all
going bad and that,
without some correc-
tion to the course of
government and soci-
ety, no good would
come of it. I worried
daily about what the
future held for my
children and grand-
t. children. What could
m Dixon I do? I did not have
ST the resources of the
JMN liberal billionaire
-- George Soros or the
conservative Koch
brothers to influence political
outcomes.
Thus the columns. One man's
meager attempt to help turn the
ship of state to a different
course. Why did I not remem-
ber what my dad told me?
The end to my self-delusion
came during the Democratic
national convention in 2012, in
exchanges with some Columbia
University friends. Inadver-
tently, they copied me on some
emails praising president Bill
Clinton's speech accusing Re-
publicans of one malfeasance or
another I replied that his state-
ments were inaccurate and that
he was, according to the find-
ings of a federal court, a liar
My friends, liberals all, could
not understand how I could pos-
sibly support conservative
points of view Over the course
of four long exchanges, they
posed questions to me and
stated their political opinions as
fact As I researched their ques-
tions and debunked the accu-
racy of their pronouncements,
they chose not to respond but to
move on to new statements and


accusations. Their final email to
me was telling: "You can have
your Milton Friedmans (prize-
winning conservative econo-
mist) and Ayn Rands (author of
"Atlas Shrugged") but what we
believe is..."
That's when it occurred to me
that the tide had been coming
in all along. What mattered to
them was what they believed.
Facts, history, experience all be
damned. Their political outlook
was based on a system of beliefs
as strong as those professed by
devout Christians, Jews and
Muslims.
Truth is, closely held beliefs
cannot be changed by presenta-
tion of the facts. Nothing short
of a major crisis can change
those beliefs. That realization
spared me from writing
columns for the past 20 months.
Still, there is some value to
opinion pieces. People of differ-
ent ideologies can learn from
discussions of more local and
personal issues and come to an
agreement on a course of action.
As to addressing the ideolog-
ical differences that divide us,
my advice is to write a column if
you enjoy doing so. Exchange
views with adversaries for fun,
but don't expect to change any
minds. The beach remains un-
changed when one shovels sand
against the tide.


William Dixon is a graduate of
Columbia University, New
York Medical College and the
USF College ofBusiness
Administration. He served in
the Army as a surgeon and as a
special forces officer,
achieving the rank of
lieutenant colonel. He was an
assistant professor of surgery
at the University of Georgia
before enteringprivate
practice. Dr Dixon can be
reached at
Wdixonl6@yahoo. com.


_LETTER to the Editor


Lifting environmental
protections
On Sunday, May 4, we were
treated to three pieces on our
local environment in the Cit-
rus County Chronicle. In the
Commentary section, Pub-
lisher Gerry Mulligan
lamented the fact that Sen.
Charles Dean's legislation to
clean up the Florida springs
had been derailed by the
"tremendous organizations
fighting for the rights of big
business. You know them as
the Florida fertilizer manufac-
turers, the Florida Chamber of
Commerce and other big in-
dustrial lobbying organiza-
tions. .' (Read that as Mosaic.)
Also in the Commentary sec-
tion, Brad Rimbey, of the Ho-
mosassa River Alliance,
informed us that Southwest
Florida Water Management
District was ignoring federal
and state regulations in order
to implement policies that can
only further degrade the water
quality of the Homosassa and
Chassahowitzka rivers. In fact,
the secretary of the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, Herschel Vineyard,
refused to attend a public
hearing on the issue which he


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

was required to attend.
So we have a situation
where the state Legislature
sold out to lobbyists and


defended a program to clean
up our springs while the secre-
tary of the Florida DEP re-
fused to even attend a hearing
on water quality in two rivers
in Citrus County.
But on the front page was an
article that caught most of my
interest: Save Crystal River on
the wrong side of environmen-
tal protection. Although they
claim to be concerned about
the environment of King's Bay,
I believe they want to elimi-
nate speed limits. Now they
want to downlist the manatee
from endangered to only
threatened. So they're going to
sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service to force them to down-
list the manatee.
So in the spring of 2014 we
have a state government that
doesn't care to fund the
restoration of our springs and
a secretary of the Florida DEP
that doesn't care to even listen
to concerns about local rivers
and, at the local level, an or-
ganization, SCR, that wants to
reduce protections for the
manatee. Isn't a good portion
of our economy based on the
manatees? Ah, paradise.
Ralph Shafer
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


She was tough enough to be my mother


If I have learned anything at
all by watching the women
of my life be mothers my
wife, my daughters, my daugh-
ter-in-law, my grandmothers and
my mother it is that one size
does not fit all.
If a mother has more than one
child, she has to become some-
thing different with each one -
not a different person, but ad-
justing as necessary to deal with
each child in the manner
required.
After giving thought to each of
those wonderful ladies, for
today, Mother's Day, I've deter-
mined to allow my exposition on
motherhood to center on my
very own mother Hazel
Roberts Brannen.
She has been gone since 1992,
but not really, her presence re-
mains fresh in my memory every
day
As it is with any little boy, I
thought my mother was beauti-
ful. Of course, in my case it was
true, she really was.
She was tender and nurturing.


She quite capably saw a sickly
little boy through early child-
hood asthma before anyone had
ever even heard of inhalers.
She was talented.
She possessed all of
the domestic and
artistic ability neces-

from hand-sewing 'f
Halloween costumes
to baking dozens of
cupcakes for birth-
day parties.
And, she was Fred
tough.
She used object A SI
lessons, such as OF I
packing a suitcase
for a bratty preschooler and ush-
ering him outside when his
threats to run away became
intolerable.
But, what I believe most bears
remembering today, is the heart-
to-heart talks, more precisely,
the eye-to-eye talks, we had. Be-
ginning at a time when it was
necessary for me to look up at
her and continuing until well


I
_$

L
L


after the time had come when
she had to look up at me, at those
times that I needed some seri-
ous parenting, she would face
me, firmly grasp both
of my shoulders and
say, "Now, boy, you
look me in the eye
and you listen."
These talks oc-
curred on the appro-
priate occasions
during my growing
up years, but the one
that is at the fore-
annen front of my brain
LICE today, is one that
IFE happened after I was
---- a grown man. Cheryl
and I were already engaged, I
had recently completed a tour of
active duty as an army reservist
and was living at my boyhood
home awaiting our wedding day
A "so-called" friend had come to
me earlier that day with a spuri-
ous tale about seeing my fiance
being overly friendly with an-
other fellow I was incensed and
spewing forth all sorts of verbal


Special to the Chronicle
Hazel Roberts Brannen, 1924-
1992. Photograph circa 1940.
venom while getting dressed for
a date with my bride-to-be.
Then it happed.
I felt that familiar grasp on
both of my shoulders as she
turned me to face her and I
heard the words, "Now, boy, you
look me in the eye and you


listen."
She preached a sermon about
rumors, untruths and jealousy
run amok. She told me to get my-
self under control and if I felt
that I must talk with Cheryl
about the supposed incident, do
it as a gentleman and without
accusations.
She finished by saying, "I've
seen her look at you and I've
seen you look at her Cheryl is
the very best thing that could
ever happen to you. Don't you
dare let half-truths and outright
lies mess it up!"
Hazel Roberts Brannen -
beautiful, tender, talented, and
tough enough to be my mother

Fred Brannen, an Inverness
resident, has been a Chronicle
columnist since 1988 and is the
author of the recently
published novel, 'At the
Bottom ofBiscayne Bay."
Fred may be contacted at
fbrannenjr@gmail.com or
via brannenbooksllc.comn.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

have always been about healthy lifestyles.
Second, I want to see a Riverwalk constructed
along King's Bay in Crystal River so that tourists and
residents can experience our beautiful waterfront.
In building the Riverwalk, the city of Crystal River
can take a leadership role in improving the economy
and tourism of the region.
Inverness, through the leadership of city manager
Frank DiGiovanni, has become the center of public
life on the east side of the county Crystal River can
do the same thing on the west side, and the River-
walk is the key to that effort.
Third, I would just love to see the folks at the
county hospital end this awful governance dispute
that has been so damaging to such an important in-
stitution. The deal to lease Citrus Memorial needs to
be finalized and the effort to rebuild needs to start
ASAP
Fourth, I would love to be able to report that the
elected and appointed officials who run this place
can stop the nonsense and work together It is elec-
tion time, so it may be impossible to stop the ugli-
ness that has enveloped the public conversation of
Citrus County But folks have to realize that this
breakdown is having huge negative impacts on our
future. From Washington to Inverness, the bicker-
ing is diminishing us as a people. We all have much
to lose.
It's time for positive people to step forward and re-
build our county and country
And fifth and finally, I want us to wake up about
the pollution we are causing to our water in this part
of Florida. Everyone favors having clean springs and
fresh drinking water from the tap, but everyone is
waiting for the other guy to get the cleanup moving.
This will be one of the biggest news stories in Florida
over the next decade. Let's get ahead of the curve
and show other counties how responsible communi-
ties and residents should act.
And my real final point is that I would like the
clock to slow down. My kitchen clock has now been
replaced by a new one that I can not see because my
eyes are no longer that good, which is a sign of the
bigger problem it's impossible to slow things
down.
So let's get some things accomplished while we
can.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


- -


*


. *.
l S
.t




.5
&^We ffS
J^'K~W~, M


U.S. brain police
win over public
Our government is winning the
battle to usurp individual free
choice, and it is doing so by con-
vincing the public that free or indi-
vidual thought is un-American and
unacceptable in our society.
It seems like about time to start
embroidering scarlet letters to
show the world that you have
dared to have an opinion different
from the current, politically cor-
rect and publicly endorsed views.
An individual no longer has the
option of forming an opinion with-
out first getting approval of the es-
tablishment. This is true of public
statements and also for private
conversations with close associates.


Letter to THE EDITOR
To do so is to demand condemna-
tion and isolation upon yourself
No longer are you allowed to de-
cide for yourself whether you like
someone or some group of people.
Recent events indicate the government,
the media, and finally the public
will decide these matters for you
and if you don't accept it you are to
be shunned, possibly fined, and re-
stricted in your activities for as
long as the rest of your life! Never
mind asking why one feels the way
he does. Never mind attempting to
show him where he has erred in
forming his opinion Off with his head!
And while you're at it spread this
curse among his family and friends
as well. Guilt by association.
These criminal aversions must
be discovered for enforcement


through eavesdropping or through
encouraging tattletales. Control
lessons learned from the Gestapo
during World War II when citizens
were expected to rat out people of
the Jewish faith and were rewarded
as "patriots" for doing so. Methods
Americans at the time condemned
as unconscionable dastardly acts of
a rogue government.
I may not agree with what he has
to say, but I will defend to the
death his right to oh, never
mind. That's so five years ago.
It makes one proud to be part of
the majority of Americans, doesn't
it? And I mean that in the most sin-
cere way possible.
Steve Brown
Inverness


LEVINE
Continued from Page Cl

baby's yelp. A nurse
rushed to Minnie's beside
and whispered that the
young mother died after
delivering a healthy girl.
Minnie immediately told
the others, who were para-
lyzed with shock. She
ended the news-telling
with plans for a breast-
feeding system for the
hungry newborn. Minnie
was a natural networker
before the concept was de-
fined in the advocacy
literature.
The next night, June 30,
1916, my mother, Ruth, was
born.
News of the birth spread
to out-of-town family via
telegram. The next morn-
ing with telegram and sack
lunch in hand, Minnie's
cousin Hannah took the


ferry from New Jersey to
pay a visit. Entering the
large room, she saw two
babies at Minnie's bed -
one suckling at the breast,
the other crying bitterly in
a rattan bassinet.
The cousin said, "Min-
nie, the telegram didn't say
twins!" Minnie chuckled,
and told the story of the
young mother who died in
childbirth.
The cousin looked at the
nursing baby, then briefly
examined the crying crea-
ture in the bassinet, and
said, pointing to the baby
at Minnie's breast, "Your
baby is far prettier"
"That one is mine,"
laughed Minnie, pointing
to the crying one.
"You leave your own to
cry while you feed a
stranger's baby?" the
cousin whispered.
"Yes. There's a baby
with no mother, maybe no
home. Mine can cry for a


few minutes. She has both."
She motioned the cousin
to draw closer, her eyes
darting around the room.
"This is to show an exam-
ple to them, those other
girls. If we think just of
ourselves and our own ba-


bies, not only will others
needlessly suffer, but so
will our own. We all need
someone else at sometime.
This is good practice for
being a good mother"
Hannah understood.
Minnie's philosophy was


JOIN US FOR
JA DAY AT

SUNKEN

GARDENS
S ST PETE
Saturday, May 24, 2014


._&',Aw, P-A..x- $35per person
Price includes bus ride to St. Petersburg, entrance to the Gardens and guided tour.
Bus Pickup: 8:30am at the Citrus County Resource Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
Tickets available from Sue at 352-527-5959
PROCEEDS BENEFITTING Return around 5:30pr
SENIOR THE SENIOR
FOUNDATIO FOUNDATION OF CI i 1[
FOUNDATION CITRUS COUNTY, INC C1 I f\^ 'L.


ARI CEUTIROI cni'Uic(OuNfr
Art Center Theatre
PKen fwiSg's
Ken LudWig's


n
E


May 2-18'14
bExtra S,. titn May 10
Fh,&St.sa hsat 7:30Opm
Sunday Matee at 2:OOpm
Tickets: $19.00
352-746-7606
S BaOffce:
r Hours 1-4 pmn,
Mom.through Fri.
www.rtcenter.cc


simple: Care for your own,
but care about others, too.
Minnie believed we are all
connected in some way
under God's watchful eye,
but we are obligated to take
action to help others. The
gifts we give reward the


receiver and giver both.

Jack Levine is the
founder of the advocacy
organization 4Generations
Institute. Email him at
Jack@4Gen. org.


S The Spanish American
Club of Citrus County
HInstallation/Anniversary
SS Pinner Pance
Saturday, June 7. 2014

Doors Open 6PM to Midnight Music by DJ Leo Roche
Catering by Cody's Roadhouse
DONATIONS:
$35.00 MEMBERS & SPONSOR MEBR
$45.00 NON-MEMBERS 3 fl ta
Knights of Columbus Hall #6168
2389 N. Norvell Bryant, Hwy., Lecanto, FL
For Ticket Information Call Maria Coimbre 341-0979
Carlos Suarez 270-8077 or Ben Cruz 746-3599


Rotary Club of Inverness
ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT

Saturday, May 17, 2014
8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start
Inverness Golf & Country Club


For information call
302-0469

Download
Entry Form at:
www.invernessflrotary.org


IKnights of Columblsf
Council 6168

Annual
Fr. Willie"
Memorial Golf Classic (

May 17th -8:30 a.m. Shotgun start
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
Entry fee $60
Fee includes coffee/donuts, green and
cart fees, lunch at the club and prizes.
Proceeds will be donated to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Entries must be received by May 14th.
For information CI li-NIC.E
call 746-7563 L


~tj
.1


I Il ,'RI( I .I : .. .
OOOHJM6


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 C3




C4 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 COMMENTARY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters toTHE EDITOR


NRA phone survey
misleading
This morning I received a so-
licitation call from a represen-
tative of the National Rifle
Association. After he confirmed
that he was talking to me, he
started into his rhetorical sales
pitch in order to raise funds to be
used in the upcoming political
campaigns nationwide. Of
course, the funds are used to
support supposedly pro-gun ad-
vocates for various political of-
fices federal, state and local.
The rhetoric is that "Obama
and Bloomberg are going to
take your guns away from you."
The significant error in the
message is that neither person
has the ability to take your guns
away from you. A bill would
have to be passed through the
U.S. Congress to do that and
any intelligent person knows
that such a bill would never
make it through Congress.
The real objective in making
the solicitations is to build a
larger membership in the NRA
because that means money
money, money Of course, these
days everything is about money
because money represents
power
The targets for the membership
solicitations are the general
public, and the rhetorical pres-
entation is designed to attract
the paranoid individuals in the


public sector They don't even
have the courtesy to identify
President Obama in this rheto-
ric, but just use his last name
"Obama." Well you may not like
President Obama, but he is the
president of the United States
and should at least be identi-
fied as such. However, I am
sure that many of those tar-
geted by the calls are more than
thrilled that the title "presi-
dent" is not used. Well success
brings in new membership and
lots of money and paranoid in-
dividuals are the ones paying
for something that is unneces-
sary Folks, your guns are safe.
NRA membership today is at
it's highest in history, and much
of it is related to the pro-gun
rhetoric and also a special hate
for a president of color Being a
life member of the NRA since
1966, I take objection to the
present tactics of the NRA lead-
ership. I am not happy with the
thought that there is a signifi-
cant group of members who
could legitimately be classified
in the mental range of paranoid
and these are the folks who
wish to carry concealed
weapons wherever they go.
I joined the NRA in order to
receive information on the lat-
est hunting equipment and
read the history of various guns
and/or weapons. I did not de-
sire to be a member of an or-
ganization whose main


objective is to attem
our legislators. I mu
that they have been
on the legislative sid
we as a voting public
tendency to elect in
those who are easily
NRA money and do
the fortitude to vote
that are in the best
the public. They are
swayed by such as tU
campaign money an
Even though I dis
the NRA political rh
will not resign my m
as President George
did during his camp
election. After all, I
monthly magazine tl
have information at
and it does cost the
tain amount of mon
me this magazine. I
them off the hook!


Who pays the
The 2014 election
ing and so are the po
commercials. As vot
obligation to separa
wheat from the chaif
a favorite topic, so fi
let's consider the co
riety Some believe c
tions don't pay enou
after all, don't mem]
press report frequei


pt to control those great profits? Sadly, many
st admit of us assume we taxpayers will
successful pay less when businesses pay
de, because more toward "their fair share."
c have the In reality, corporations or busi-
to office nesses don't pay any taxes; the
y swayed by entire burden falls on us, the in-
not have dividual taxpayer All businesses,
for bills regardless of size, are tax col-
interest of lecting agents; they hand those
Easily taxes over to the government.
he NRA To see how all this works,
.d rhetoric, consider a company that manu-
agree with factures high-quality machin-
ietoric, I ery Yearly sales are excellent
membership and gross revenues are $20 mil-
SH. W Bush lion. It costs the company
)aign for re- $18 million for labor costs, raw
receive a materials and all federal taxes
hat does to bring their product to mar-
)out guns, ket. Profit is $2 million. But this
NRA a cer- year the federal government in-
ey to send creased corporate taxes by
will not let 5 percent; now the company
owes $100,000 more in taxes.
S G Where does that $100,000 come
Dan Groner from?
Lecanto
The company could pay the
e taxes? new tax bill out of the profits.
e xe Of course, every shareholder
s are com- gets a much smaller dividend
political check. Note the corporation
ters, it's our doesn't pay anything; only the
te the shareholders do. Let's increase
ff. Taxes are the price of the machinery But
or starters now their customers pay the
rporate va- extra money, not the corpora-
corpora- tion. Lay off employees and
gh taxes; hope for increased productivity
bers of the That might work, but the fired
ntly on employees have no jobs. Cut


employee benefits and employ-
ees are again hurt The company
could buy cheaper components.
These components are cheaper
because the new supplier prob-
ably pays lower wages and ben-
efits. No matter what,
corporations only collect taxes;
individuals pay them.
This raises an interesting
point. If individuals pay all the
taxes, why do we even have cor-
porate taxes? Don't be shocked,
but it's a way for politicians to
protect themselves by using
misdirection. This allows a
large percentage of federal rev-
enue to be disguised as corpo-
rate taxes hoping we won't
understand where the money
really comes from. If taxpayers
realized they are paying the full
freight, both income taxes and
corporate taxes, a revolution
might result. The deception is
made even worse because our
corporate tax rate is the highest
in the world.
In a final insult, small busi-
nesses, which create the bulk of
new jobs in America, spend
$725 in tax compliance costs for
every $100 they pay in taxes. In
simple terms, we not only pay
for the taxes but pay for an ad-
ditional seven times more be-
cause our current code is so
complicated.
Joseph P Ryan
Homosassa


MOSQUITOES
Continued from Page Cl

bird baths. These are "hotels" for
raising these mosquitoes. Anything
that traps as little as an ounce of
water is a potential breeding site.
The scariest thing about the disease
is that until a case is identified in
the human population, we won't
even know it has come to town.
So much doom and gloom. What
can we do to ward off this invader?


What can be done to minimize the
chance of an outbreak?
Unlike other mosquito-borne dis-
eases, both dengue fever and chikun-
gunya are among the easiest to keep
at bay Since these mosquitoes prefer
water-holding containers to breed
in, getting rid of the containers gets
rid of the problem. If you must keep
containers around for instance, dog
bowls, bird baths and kiddie pools -
flush them out every three to five days.
By flushing the containers out, any
mosquito larvae developing in the
water will be destroyed and, along


with them, the potential for disease.
In addition to periodic flushing,
scrub the containers out to remove
any mosquito eggs that may be stuck
to the sides of the containers.
It sounds too easy, and in all actuality,
it is. All that's required is initiative
and a little time. So, why should people
worry about an old tire behind the
shed? In this situation, it could be the
difference between life and death.
--
JoelJacobson is director of the Citrus
County Mosquito Control District


Ur 0 ,, -,


kI IIk)AIkI B
w- .chranlelnili lne. am
.*llJ. ,d 4%[] li[J1|,.Jl 1


WI OVER



$14r9000li]


IIiflhiI% I%% I II


June 7 & 8,2014.. .. .. 4 /
Fish out of MacRae's Bait & Tackle on the Homosassa
River or Twin Rivers on the Crystal River.
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
SCitrus County Chronicle FDS Disposal Budweiser Crystal Automotive
SHomosassa Marine Citrus 95 3 Sheldon Palmes Eiffert &Associates, PA
For more information or entry forms and rules, call
MacRae's 628-2602
or Barramundi Corp. 628-0200


May 11-18
I ACT
Ken Ludwig's The Fox on the Fairway
Reception Fri. & Sat. Nights at 7:30pm
Sun. Matinee at 2:00pm
Entrance Fee: $19pp
Contact Phone: 746-7606

j May 15
Citrus County Historical Society
Music at the Museum: I
Florida Singer/Storyteller Bob Patterson
Organization Contact Person:Jim Davis
S Old Courthouse Museum Inverness
Doors open at 6:15PM;
Music starts promptly at 7PM
I Contact Phone: 341-6427

May16
Citrus County Chronicle
Chronicle Student Athletic Recognitions
College of Central Florida
Entrance Fee: $10* Contact Phone: 563-3226

May 16
City of Inverness
DooWop Downtown Inverness
Contact Phone: 352-726-2611

p May 17 9:00AM- 1:00 PM
Citrus County Sheriff's Department
Blown Away ~ 21st Annual Hurricane
and All Hazards Expo
Crystal River Mall Contact Phone 341-7460

May 17 Shotgun start 8:30 AM
j Knights of Columbus #6168
Fr."Willie" Classic Golf Memorial
S Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: $60pp
Contact Phone: 746-7563

SMay 17 8:30 AM
Rotary Club of Inverness
Annual Charity Golf Tournament
Inverness Golf & Country Club
Entrance Fee: $50 per player
Contact Phone: 726-7517

May 24
Senior Foundation
Day at The Sunken Gardens
Roundtrip from the CCC Resource Center
to The Sunken Gardens, St. Pete
Bus Pick Up 8:30 AM, Return 5:30 PM
Entrance Fee: $35pp
Contact Phone: 527-5959


CHRONICLE

STUDENT

ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION
A night to recognize
outstanding student athletes

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM

Cost: $10

College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus

Jfl\M WHIJLE H OIDA
Tickets available at either Citrus County Chronicle location:
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River or 106 W. Main St., Inverness
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


CHRONICLE

STUDENT

A ATHLETIC

RECOGNITION
A night to recognize
outstanding student athletes

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM

Cost: $10

College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus

A-RiANIGLE *- UIOIIIi
Tickets available at either Citrus County Chronicle location:
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River or 106 W. Main St., Inverness
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


IESPONSORS:










BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I
CLAIRE PHILLIPS LAXTON/For the Chronicle
John Hodgkins II and wife Lindsey recently opened the Flip Flop Yogurt Shoppe on the corner of Northeast Fifth Street and Citrus
Avenue in downtown Crystal River. All the frozen yogurt is gluten-free.


FROZEN YOGURT COMES TO


DOWNTOWN CRYSTAL RIVER


CLAIRE PHILLIPS LAXTON
For the Chronicle
t all started with a prayer and a
dream.
Now it's reality: The Flip Flop
Yogurt Shoppe in downtown Crystal
River offers gluten-free, frozen yogurt
with lots of toppings served in a waffle
cone, waffle bowl or cup.
There's even a chocolate sugar-free
yogurt.
Owners Lindsey and John Hodgkins
II always knew they wanted to own
their own business in Citrus County,
where they both grew up.
Lindsey teaches English at Crystal
River High School and John is the as-
sistant vice president at Regions Bank
in Crystal River
Lindsey's grandparents, Frank and
the late Pat Wade, were in real estate
here, while John's grandfather, the late
John Hodgkins whom he is named
after, owned the Pyramid Diner in Ho-
mosassa Springs, the old skating rink in
Crystal River and served on the Citrus
County School Board.
"Growing up around my grandfa-
ther's businesses, I always knew I
wanted to own my own business some-
day," John said.
John's involved in the community,


Flip Flop Yogurt Shoppe
WHERE: 4 N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River.
PHONE: 352-564-7900.
ONLINE: facebook.com/flipflopyogurtshoppe
HOURS: Noon to 8 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, noon to 9 p.m. Friday and
Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. Sunday.

where he serves on the board of both the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce and
the Citrus County Boys & Girls Clubs.
The idea of opening a frozen yogurt
business came to the couple after a
chamber event called "Fire Up Citrus,"
where a group of Crystal River High
School students presented to the cham-
ber what they'd like to see here in Cit-
rus County
One of the new businesses the students
hoped for was a frozen yogurt shop.
"They said they have to go to Spring Hill
or Ocala for frozen yogurt," John said.
Being in the banking business, John
works with small-business owners, so
he researched the pros and cons, costs
and other factors to start up this new
venture, while Lindsey searched for
the ideal piece of property to lease.
Lindsey found the perfect spot on the
corner of Northeast Fifth Street and
Citrus Avenue in Crystal River's histor-


ical area on the bayside. Still unsure
about the new venture, John prayed for
guidance, then had a dream about the
business that evening where even the
name of the business came to him.
"We ran out of yogurt on April 17, the
first day we opened our business,"
Lindsey said. Crystal River High
School students really supported them,
along with teachers and families. Now
students and families come from all
over the county for frozen yogurt.
"We have a special Teacher Tuesdays
now and will run other specials during
the summer months," Lindsey said.
There are various flavors of yogurt,
like mint, cake batter, vanilla, butter-
scotch ripple, pomegranate, butter
creme cake, creme berry and more.
And there are about 25 yummy toppings
to choose from. They also serve coffee.
Soon, they said, they might delve into
shakes.
The business seems to draw a steady
flow of local customers and visitors.
"People see our business on Face-
book or learn about it from word of
mouth," Lindsey said.
Flip Flop Yogurt, 4 N.E. Fifth St, is open
from noon to 8 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, from noon to 9 p.m. Friday
and Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sun-
day The phone number is 352-564-7900.


Associated Press
NEW YORK- Do you
think a particular CEO makes
too much money? Would you
like to replace the directors
who signed off on that salary?
Or to vote on a company's en-
vironmental policy?
If you own stock in a com-
pany, you get such opportuni-
ties. Every year, companies
open the polls at their annual
meetings, and shareholders
elect directors to the board
and vote on various policies.
At Bank of America's meeting
on Wednesday, for example,
shareholders weighed in on


executive compensation and
whether to force the bank to
tally its impact on green-
house-gas emissions.
But investors who prefer
owning mutual funds to indi-
vidual stocks don't get to vote.
Instead, the managers of their
mutual funds do, carrying the
weight of all the investors in
the fund. Roughly half the
companies in the Standard &
Poor's 500 index hold their
annual meetings in May, so
many of those votes are occur-
ring now
Investors can see how their
mutual funds voted on issues
over the prior year: Funds


typically list their voting re-
sults on their websites, and
they also file documents with
the Securities and Exchange
Commission detailing their
choices.
Because fund managers
would rather spend time buy-
ing and selling stocks than
studying proposals for each
corporate meeting, many
funds hire an advisory firm to
help them. Institutional
Shareholder Services, better
known as ISS, is such a com-
pany It has about 1,700
clients and issues vote recom-
mendations on nearly 39,000
companies around the world.


The votes cast by mutual
funds carry big weight. Van-
guard, which controls more
than $2 trillion in assets, is
often a company's largest
shareholder after totaling the
investments across all of its
funds. Vanguard and other
large fund families say they
vote based on what will drive
the best long-term value for
their investments. Vanguard
prefers that the majority of
directors on a company's
board be independent of
management, for example.
Consider UPS, in which
See Page D2


BUSINESS
BRIEFS


US oil price flat
for the week
The price of oil slipped Friday
to just under $100 a barrel, leav-
ing crude nearly flat for the week.
Benchmark U.S. crude for June
delivery fell 27 cents to close at
$99.99 in New York. The contract
ended last week at $99.76.
Brent crude, a benchmark for
international varieties of oil used
by many U.S. refineries, declined
15 cents to close at $107.89 in
London.
Crude supplies in the U.S. fell
this week, which surprised traders
and gave some support to prices.
But supplies remain ample and
refineries are pumping out
enough fuel to meet demand.
That suggests refineries won't
need to quickly draw down sup-
plies in the coming weeks.
Overseas demand for crude
appears muted and supplies are
plentiful, but worries over the political
turmoil in the Ukraine and contin-
ued disruption of oil exports from
Libya have kept Brent prices up.
"Libya's two most important oil
terminals, Ras Lanuf and Es Sider,
will remain shut for the foreseeable
future which is likely to continue
to severely hamper the supply of
oil," said analysts at Commerzbank
in Frankfurt in a note to clients.
Pro-Russian insurgents in east-
ern Ukraine are planning a refer-
endum on independence over the
weekend, in apparent defiance of
a call by Russian President
Vladimir Putin to put off the vote.
Traders worry Russian energy
exports could be interrupted if fur-
ther instability in Ukraine results
in stronger Western sanctions
against Russia.
The average U.S. retail price of
gasoline fell less than a penny to
$3.66 a gallon.
In other energy futures trading
in New York:
Wholesale gasoline fell 0.9
cents to close at $2.896 a gallon.
Heating oil fell 1.3 cents to
close at $2.907 a gallon.
Natural gas fell 4.1 cents to
dose at $4.531 per 1,000 cubic feet.
-From wire reports


Bruce
Williams

SMART
MONEY




Read up


before


pulling


out
EAR BRUCE: I am 69
years old. I have three
annuities that are
growing. Are there any re-
tirement rules that prevent
me from making monthly
withdrawals purely for in-
come? Each time I contact
the respective companies,
they ask if I have checked
with my financial adviser I
am only looking for a yearly
amount of, say, 3 percent per
year from each one, broken
into monthly installments. I
saw my adviser several
weeks ago to set this up, but I
have heard nothing since. -
Dennis, via email
DEAR DENNIS: There are
many, many retirement rules.
If you haven't had the annu-
ities long, it may very well be
that there will be severe
penalties. It may also be that
one would have no penalties
and another may have high
penalties. You will have to
find out from each one.
Three percent from each


one broken into monthly in-
stallments may or may not be
possible, and it may be that it
would be better to take the
monies from one rather than
another
See Page D2


Figuring out how your



mutual fund manager votes




D2 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


A


Associated Press
Jenna Starr inspects a pair of Louis Vuitton handbags to authenticate them and make sure they meet brand standards April 9 at the
headquarters of The RealReal in San Francisco. An explosion of resale online sites from RealReal to Chairish allow shoppers to easily
trade in their gently used top-brand handbags, furniture and gadgets for cash, changing the way Americans buy. The ease of reselling
their possessions allows consumers to keep refreshing their wardrobes and homes without feeling guilty.





Buy high, sell high



For more Americans, resale just as trendy as that Louis Vuitton clutch


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Jenna Broems shops for
clothes the same way she hunts for a new
car: She considers resale value.
Broems, who lives in Stamford, Con-
necticut, only buys brands like Abercrom-
bie & Fitch and 7 For All Mankind because
she believes they will fetch the highest
prices when she's ready to move on.
"I'm now walking in like 'What's the re-
turn of this? Am I going to be able to resell?"'
said Broehms, 38, a teacher who has gotten
$2,500 from stuff she's resold on ThredUIP,
an online resale site for used clothes.
Americans increasingly are consider-
ing the resale value when they shop for
everything from jeans to handbags. The
habit is in part due to a growing number
of websites that make it easy for shoppers
to buy and resell pre-owned goods.
It's the latest reflection of the tough
economy Buying used goods at consign-
ment shops became popular during the
recession when Americans were hurting
for extra cash.
The habit has stuck during the economic
recovery as people have gotten used to being
able to wear the latest fashions without
paying top dollar: Just as people lease a new
car every couple of years so they're al-
ways riding in style, reselling clothes is a
way for Americans to trade up or splurge
without spending a lot of additional cash.
The trend also is a consequence of the
escalating cost of luxury Rising prices of


VOTE
Continued from Page Dl

Vanguard funds collectively
own about 5.1 percent of the
outstanding shares, according
to FactSet Last year, Van-
guard's Total Stock Market
Index fund the largest mu-
tual fund with $323.7 billion in
assets voted for a proposal
to make all shares of stock
have the same voting rights.
The fund's managers were
hoping to replace the current
system under which some UPS
shares carry greater influence,
with 10 votes per share.
The fund voted against the
recommendation of UPS man-
agement, though the proposal
failed to pass. The fund also
voted for all 12 of the nomi-
nees that management had
recommended for its board of
directors.
At Leggett & Platt, which
makes mattress innersprings


designer merchandise in recent years
have tested the willingness of even affluent
shoppers to pay full price. The price tag of
a classic Chanel handbag, for example, is
now $4,900 this year, up from $2,250 in 2007.
The size of the resale market is tiny:
about 10 percent of overall luxury goods -
including clothing, handbags, accessories
and home furnishings, are sold in the af-
termarket with about one percent of
pre-worn goods sold online, estimates
Forrester Research's Sucharita Mulpuru.
But data suggests it's a fast growing
area of retail: Shoppers seem to have re-
sale value in mind. According to a survey
conducted last year by market research
firm The Intelligence Group's Cassandra
Report, 44 percent of 900 shoppers be-
tween the ages of 14 and 34 think of re-
sale value when they purchase things like
electronics, furniture and clothing.
Shannon Dolan, who lives in San Fran-
cisco, said she'll buy a Louis Vuitton handbag
over a Gucci one based on how much she
believes it will command if she resells it.
"It absolutely changed the way I shop,"
said Dolan, who has made $10,000 on on-
line resale marketplace TheRealReal by
selling clothes. "I'm really thinking of the
value and investment of some of the
things I'm buying."
Resale sites have taken note. The sites
marry the discounts found on resale on-
line king eBay with tighter controls: They
have staff to make sure designer goods
are authentic.


and other products, Van-
guard's Total Stock Market
Index fund last year voted for
a proposal to explicitly pro-
hibit discrimination based on
sexual orientation and gender
identity at the company The
vote was against the recom-
mendation of the company's
management, which said that
it is already an equal-opportu-
nity employer The company
also said that it believes writ-
ten policies should specifically
list only the types of discrimi-
nation prohibited by federal
law The proposal failed to
pass.
Vanguard, though, acknowl-
edges that "it would be ex-
ceedingly difficult, if not
impossible" to reflect the so-
cial concerns of all its share-
holders while maximizing
returns. It suggests investors
who want to put more empha-
sis in their portfolio on hu-
manitarian, ethical and
environmental concerns to
look to specific kinds ofmu-


The sites also offer a faster way to sell
than consignment stores, where shoppers
can wait for months to have items sold
and reap no more than 50 percent of the
resale price. With the sites, items often
sell within days and shoppers get as
much as 80 percent of the resale value.
Many of the sites also have their own
resale guides. ThredUP is loosely calling
it their own version of the Official Kelley
Blue Book, referring to the online manual
that offers resale values for cars. TheRe-
alReal said its resale calculations are
based on prices of the 450,000 items it has
sold since its founding in 2011.
Julie Wainwright, CEO of TheRealReal,
said her office fields five or six calls a day
from customers wanting to know about
the resale value of a brand.
And the sites have all kinds of tricks of
the reselling trade. For instance, TheRe-
alReal said it doesn't carry Escada, St.
John and Max Mara because they've been
inconsistent or have lost buzz, and thus,
don't command high resale prices.
Some shoppers say the sites make them
more comfortable about spending money
in traditional stores.
Amy Fine Collins, a correspondent for
Vanity Fair magazine, sold a Chanel hand-
bag on Therealreal.com for about $1,000,
a few hundred dollars more than she paid
for it at the store. She had the bag for a year
"I don't have to get a nose bleed at the
prices the way I used to. I know there's a
strong secondary market," she said.


tual funds, ones that are typi-
cally called sustainable or so-
cially responsible mutual
funds.
These funds make it part of
their investment philosophy to
emphasize issues like execu-
tive compensation, climate
change and human rights. For
example, Calvert Investments
focuses on sustainable invest-
ments and says it allocates its
$13 billion in assets for both
principle and performance.
Calvert identifies companies
that it sees as strong in busi-
ness ethics, environmental
standards and other issues. It
invests in them and tries to
highlight those companies as
leaders to others at confer-
ences or in meetings with
other CEOs.
It also makes proposals to
try to advocate for corporate
policies: It was among the in-
vestors who called upon Bank
of America to tally the green-
house gases produced by com-
panies and projects for which


it's a lender The proposal
failed to pass on Wednesday
Sustainable-investing funds
may also own stocks that may
surprise some environmental-
ists, such as Exxon Mobil,
Royal Dutch Shell and utility
companies that burn a lot of
coal. Calvert says it owns such
companies in hopes of build-
ing long-term relationships
and driving change.
Over the years, corporate
America has grown more will-
ing to talk with investors about
such issues, says Stu Dalheim,
vice president of shareholder
advocacy at Calvert. That's
made the job easier for so-
cially responsible investors,
but it still isn't easy
"I think the trend is moving
in our direction," Dalheim
says. "There's more acknowl-
edgment from companies and
investors broadly that sustain-
ability factors are important,
but on some of these major
challenges, there's not enough
progress."


BUSINESS


The United Way Women's Leadership Council



POWER of the


I
1~


N'


Ladis Lnchon Deignr use- -Auto

Saturday, June 7, 2014 at 11:30 a.m.
Black Diamond Ranch
To reserve your seat/table now,
call for more information at 795-5483
or visit www.citrusunitedway.org


LIVE UNITED


I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

You say your adviser has
done nothing. Nonsense! You
must meet with him and tell
him exactly what you want to
know: How much can you
withdraw and what penalties
are involved, if any? Then
make your decision.
DEAR BRUCE: If a spouse
passes away and the will
states the surviving spouse
inherits the properties,
monies, etc., will the will
need to be probated? When
the surviving spouse passes
away, even with a benefici-
ary named, wouldn't the ben-
eficiary be required to
probate the will? Is there not
a cost to probate a will?
Aren't there estate taxes with
a will? CJ., via email
DEAR CJ.: You have a
bunch of little questions.
First, unless there is a very
substantial estate, in the mil-
lions of dollars, there will be
no federal taxes and, in most
cases, little or no state inher-
itance taxes. A will has noth-
ing to do with whether there
will or will not be estate
taxes. That is a matter of
statute.
You ask if the spouse
passes away, does the will
need to be probated? The
answer is yes. There are
some costs to probate the
will. You may or may not
wish to have an attorney
handle it, but if you do, you
will get a price for the filing
for probate, not a percentage
of the estate. It's strictly a
matter of cost. If the costs
are too high, seek somebody
else.
DEAR BRUCE: I am ex-
ecutor for my friend and
next-door neighbor's estate.
He is a 94-year-old widower,
has no children and is leav-
ing me his house, valued at
$200,000.
Would my wife and I have
a better tax situation if he
were to give the house to me
now, rather than leaving it in
his will? He's willing to do
that if it will put me in a
more favorable tax position.
We may consider selling the
house or keeping it as a
rental property As a general
rule, what would be the best
option? -AJ., via email
DEARAJ.: There should
be no taxes on a legacy of as
little as $200,000. If he gave it
to you now, he would have a
$28,000 deduction and, of
course, if he lives into the
next year, it will be another
$28,000.
Either way, I don't see any
advantage in putting the
house in your name other
than just getting it over and
done with. When he passes
away, file for probate and
pay the modest expenses.
DEAR BRUCE: My hus-
band is 60 years old and it
looks like it will take around
a year to get his Social Secu-
rity disability What are the
costs to us if we withdraw?
- W.P, via email
DEAR WP: I am not at all
sure what you are withdraw-
ing from. You mentioned you
are on disability, but you did-
n't give any further informa-
tion, such as what reasons
you are on disability, how
much is it providing and so
forth. You should certainly
sit down with a Social Secu-
rity Administration repre-
sentative and find out
exactly where you are and
what the consequences
would be of any actions
taken on your part.
With sketchy information, I
am reluctant to give you a
firm path, but on balance I
think you will find the Sup-
plemental Security Income
will be retained until such
time as you are approved for
regular Social Security

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume of mail, personal
replies cannot be provided.






SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Chamber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
May 15 Mixer hosted by Nick
Nicholas Ford, 5 to 7 p.m., 2901 State
Road 44, Inverness.
May 19 Ribbon-cutting for Morgan
Stanley Cindy Van Heyde, 4:30 p.m.,
Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crys-
tal River.
May 21 Ribbon-cutting for Wollinka
Wikle Title Insurance Agency, 5 to
7 p.m., 7076 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Celebration for follow
ribbon cutting.
May 22 Mixer hosted by Suncoast
Credit Union, 5:30 p.m. through
7 p.m., 2367 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
June 3 Be Resourceful Workshop
presented by the Chamber and the
Crystal River Area Council (CRAC) this
resource development workshop is for
small businesses in Crystal River at
the Plantation Inn, Palm Room,
5:30 to 7 p.m.

Community

events
May 14- Florida Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater invites you to participate
in Operation SAFE., Be Scam Smart,
a free workshop for seniors, their family,
and caregivers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
at the Master the Possibilities Center
for Lifelong Learning, 8415 S.W. 80
Street, Ocala. Register at myfloridacfo
.com/SAFE/registration.asp.
May 15 Peace Officers Memorial
Day Inverness Service at Cooter Pond
Park, 10 a.m. For more information,
call 352-726-2611.
May 15 Let's Dance! Lessons &
Dancing, Lesson from 6 to 7 p.m., live
music and instruction.
May 16 Doo Wop the Block Meets
Friday Night Thunder, 5 to 8 p.m. at
Historic Courthouse Square, Inverness.
The NYSE Guys perform favorites from
the '50s and '60s. More information
call 352-726-2611.
May 17 Blown Away! All Hazards &
Hurricane Expo at the Crystal River Mall.
May 17 Casino Night fundraiser
presented by Cayla's Coats will feature
gaming tables, cash bar, silent auc-
tion, heavy appetizers, desserts and
dancing. Tickets are $35. For more
information, call 316-6409 or visit
facebook.com/CaylasCoats.
May 17 Blues and Berries Farmer's
Market, with acoustic talent from Keith
Crisp, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Inverness Gov-
ernment Center.
May 17 Music in the Park with singer/
songwriter TJ. Brown at King's Bay Park
Band Shell, 268 N.W. Third Street,
Crystal River, 4 to 6 p.m. The perform-
ance will cover a variety of genres. For
information, call 352-795-4216.
May 20 Lifesouth Blood Drive, Triple
A Roofing, 1000 N.E. Fifth Street, Crys-
tal River. Receive $10 Publix gift card
from Triple A Roofing for donation. For
information, call 352-634-2562.
May 24 Low-cost pet vaccinations
at Westend Market, Crystal River Mall,
1 to 3 p.m. presented by Precious Paws
Rescue. For information, visit precious
pawsflorida.com or call 352-726-4700.


Barbara Mills stands with veterans as she is honored for her work with Operation Welcome
Home. Mills was awarded the Rick Quinn Distinguished Citizen Award at the Chamber's Pillar
Awards ceremony on May 2.


Difference-makers


honored at annual


Pillar Awards ceremony

he Citrus County Chamber of Commerce hosted the
2014 Pillar Awards on May 2 to celebrate the "pillars
of our community." It is designed to recognize both
high-profile and low-profile individuals who make Citrus
County a great place to work, live and play.


Award winners
Chamber Champions
Andy Smith, Citrus County
Parks and Recreation
Bill Hudson, Land Title
Brannen Bank, Floral City Branch
Brad Bautista, Citrus County
Chronicle
Citrus 95.3/The Fox
Classic Hits 96.7
Preston Lestinsky
Ambassador Service Award
Rhonda Lestinsky,
Nature Coast Bank
Lifetime Director Award
Kevin Cunningham
Jean Grant Business
Women's Award
Jennifer Duca
Ambassador of the Year
Lisa Nash
Outstanding Leadership
Citrus Graduate
Judge Mark Yerman
Mandi Warren Richard Rising
Star Award
Heather Cogar
Rick Quinn Distinguished
Citizen Award
Barbara Mills,
Operation Welcome Home
J.L. Hassel Award
Gailen Spinka, Comfort Keepers
Walt Conners Small Business
Award
Abitare' Salon and Day Spa
Outstanding Corporate
Citizen Award
FDS Disposal, Inc.
John T Barnes Award
Citrus County Historical Society
Shawn Harrison Outstanding
Youth Service Award
Liam Cash
Dr. O.J. Humphries
Community Service Award
Bonnie Rybak
Charles B. Fitzpatrick
Heritage Award
Charles E. Davis


...B






Gailen Spinka of Comfort Keepers speaks after receiving
the J.L. Hassel Award.


Jennifer
Award.


Duca accepts the Jean Grant Business Women's


Sponsors
Sponsored by Servpro of Citrus
County.
Auction sponsors
A Crystal River Kayak
Black Diamond
Citrus 95.3 / The Fox 96.7
Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce
Citrus County Chronicle


Clawdaddy's Raw Bar & Grill
Crystal Aero Group
Holiday Inn Express Lecanto
Sue Mayo
The Mullet Hole Tavern
New Concepts Hair Salon
Patriot Sporting Goods
The Plantation Inn
Ardath Prendergast
Specialty Gems
Sugarmill Woods Country Club
Terra Vista Golf Club


Chamber

welcomes

March's new

members

21st Century
Oncology
3406 N. Lecanto
Highway, Ste. A
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
352-746-1100
21concologymarion
citrus.corn

Bedinotti Photo
Lou and Lea Bedinotti
bedinottiphoto.com
352-621-5534
loubedinotti@
verizon.net

Citrus Youth
Educational
Symphonic
Orchestra
Dr. Walter Wynn
cyeso.org
352-697-1645
Yes2cyeso@gmail.com

Flynn
Builders, Inc.
5414 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
flynnbuilders.com
352-746-5991


CMHS

gets award

for quality

stroke care
Citrus Memorial
Health System has
received the Get With The
Guidelines Stroke Gold
Quality Achievement
Award for implementing
specific quality improve-
ment measures outlined
by the American Heart
Association and American
Stroke Association for the
treatment of stroke patients.
The Get With The
Guidelines Stroke program
helps hospital teams pro-
vide the most up-to-date,
research-based guidelines,
with the goal of speeding
recovery and reducing
death and disability. CMHS
earned the award by
meeting specific quality
achievement measures for
the rapid diagnosis and
treatment of stroke pa-
tients at a set level for a
designated period. These
measures include proper
use of medications and
aggressive risk-reduction
therapies aimed at re-
ducing death and disabil-
ity and improving the
lives of stroke patients.


Karma Resale Shoppe
109 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness 352-212-7122
Owner: Louise Clark o 10:3o a.m. to 5p.m. Tuesday through Saturday


Member spotlight:



Reel Burns Charter


inwuw m.-w

: Mary Pericht, Cadence Bank; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmet-
ics; Karlene Feliciano, Holiday Inn Express; George Bendtsen, Insurance by
George; David Heinz, Heinz Funeral Home; Sarah Fitts, First International Title
welcome Louise Clark to the Chamber.


Owner: Captain Rick Burns *352-201-6111
homosassafishingguide.com o Hours by appointment

eel Burns Charters is owned and oper-
ated by Captain Rick Burns, a U.S.
Coast Guard-approved guide who oper-
ates out of Homosassa and Crystal
River. Burns is a third-generation
Floridian and has over 30 years of experience on
local waters.
Reel Bums Charters offers scenic eco-tours,
manatee tours, navigational, scallop and fishing
charters. Burns enjoys educating the public with
his tours. He is available to speak to the public re-
garding boating safety and conservation.
He provides a weekly column on fishing and gen-
eral updates on local waterways to the Citrus
County Chronicle. Additionally, Burns is active in
the community with a committee role with the
Coastal Conservation Association and serves on the
board of directors of the Florida Guide Association
and the Floral City Heritage Council.


1 ^--y




D4 SUNDAY- MAY 1 1. 2014


CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 35)56-56 1TolFre:(88 82230 mal:casifes.hrnclonie om I *esie 0w honc 0olie 0o


Hello Mr J. and L.
Quad City in the 90's.
L. so tall. Good to see
your faces. Mr H. as
well. Sincerely, Runner


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



Beverly Hills Moving
Sale, DR, LR and BR
Furniture, Kit items.
Beautiful wood desk &
Hutch. Much More Pis
call (989) 293-4404
Commercial Tire
Technician
Must be skilled in
mount/dismount,tire
repairs, light
mechanical skills
needed. Must have
own hand tools. Major
tire tools, supplied by
shop. Hours: 6p-5a,
Wed- Sat. Wages
based on skills & exp.
Apply @ 6730 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal
River.
HONDA
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
Details (352) 746-0524
MASON
TENDERS
Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and
from work in Citrus &
surrounding counties
(352) 302-2395
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
SUNDANCE
19ft. 2004 Skiff.
60 yamaha motor,
plus many extras
$5000. 352-637-5661



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



4 yr old female
shepherd mix, good
with children of all
ages & adults. Unable
to care for due to
health issues. Christine
(352) 476-3783
10 month old
Large Male Black
Great Dane
energetic
free to approved
home, must have
experience with Giant
breed
352-860-2793

U













How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!


(352) 563-5966


www.chroniclonn.comE
www.chronicleonlinecom


fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings. great for gardens
or as mulch. U load and
haul away
352-628-9624
Free
3 Male kittens, approx
2 mos.old & 3 females
and 2 males, aprox 1
yr. old, To good home,
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free Firewood Cut,
18 to 22" long
You haul
(352) 489-7696
Free
Friendly Male Cat
White with
Brown spots,
(970) 317-8902, cell
FREE KITTENS
To good home
Must Go ASAP
(352) 634-2781



U-PICK
BLUEBERRIES
(352) 643-0717
U-pick Blueberries
$3.00 per lb. 7am-6pm
TuesThurs, Sat, & Sun
Pestiside Free *
4752 W Abeline Dr
Citrus SDrinas,


Female Black
Labrador Retriever
recently had puppies
lost in the vicinity off
hwy 200 in Hernando
pis call (352) 726-8080
Lost 7 yr old Male
Himalayan Cat
last seen May 5th
in the vicinity of
Beverly Hills, Publix
area, indoor cat,
requires special food
& medication.
REWARD
(352) 270-4640
Lost Bull Massive
Pitt Mix, named Roxie
Red w/ white marking
Friendly
Homosassa, Cardinal
Lane & Leisure Acres
REWARD
(352) 601-2761
Lost cat. By VFW area
in Floral City. Great
Mancoon. Recently trim-
med. Has collar & chip-
ped. Called Sammy. If
found call Debbie.
(352)201-9521
Lost Key Fob
Crystal River, creative
playground
Call (352) 586-1266



Found Very Friendly
Tan & White
Hound Dog
found on Ira Martin
Crystal River
Call to identify
(352) 795-5240
After Sunday
will go to pound
Small Dog in
vicinity of Turkey Oak
in Crystal River, call to
identify (352) 794-6314




CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41

Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cvoypress
Records.com


IB.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





49 yr old female, on
disability, looking to
rent room in the Inver-
ness area. Can do
some cooking/clean.
cell (417) 838-2268

Needed Donation
of 3/2 Singlewide
Mobile Home
for Family that lost
everything in a
house fire. Will move
to site. Thank you,
Contact Brenda
(347) 595-2250
(352) 613-3209

Senior Lady
Needs Transportation
to Doctors and Appts.
(352) 419-5454




Fero Memorial Garden
2 Cemetery Lots
w/ opening & closing
(352) 746-0945





Administrative
Assistant

Assist Program Dir.
with correspond-
ence, filing, organiz-
ing. Proficiency in
Microsoft office &
Excel, excellent
organizational skills.
Able to multi-task.
High school diploma
/GED required.
ApplyV in Person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
*EOE"


CONSTRUCTION
SECRETARY

Must be proficient w/
word, excel, & adobe
acrobat; organized,
personable and able
to multi task.Full time
position, DFWP
Send resume to
applicantsitampa
bav.rr.com


Payroll Clerk

Local Contractor
seeking exp. payroll
clerk. With
payroll/accounting
exp. Must be
proficient in Microsoft
Windows & Excel
spreadsheets. Also,
knowledge of OSHA
reporting, workers
comp., & all State &
Gov. taxes for payroll.
Experience with Union
payroll is preferred.
Looking for an
independent,
self-starter that is
dependable,
organized & detailed.
Background check &
DS required after
hiring. Qualified
applicants email
resume to:
jrogers@
fandhcontractors
.com


CHRgU!O CHRpN1CLE CWONoI(U


I SEEKING

SSALES

REPRESENTATIVES
' Full-Time with Great Benefits

Do you have an i
i outgoing personality?
SDo you work well with others?
z Are your people skills
outstanding?
Seeking dynamic individuals with strong
communication and computer skills.
SMust be organized and detailed-oriented '
S and thrive in a fast-paced environment. -
3 Base salary plus commission.
Reliable vehicle and
i valid driver's license required. '
SIf you light up a room when you enter,
apply today!
j Send resume to
S djkamlot@chronicleonline.com
SDrug screen required for final applicant. t
:r 00,3 EOE
000136R E9E
CIIRpMWLE CH1NI4E@MPfiGa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




CNAs
Expanding our
Nursing Services
3p-11 lp and 11p-7a
Excellent Benefits
Apply at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

CNA's/HHA's

Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo com

MEDICAL ASSET
Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
352-746-3838

REGISTERING NOW
CNA'S, HHA'S
Companions
Home Health
Business
Florida Caregivers
352-795-7800

RN/LPN
Immediate need for
physically disabled
young woman
TOP PAY!
Interim Health Care
Call 352-637-3111




*.NET Developer
with C# experience,
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com

PAYROLL
ANALYST
The Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Is now accepting
applications. For
more Information
and to apply visit
our webslte
www.sheriffcltrus.
org/career.asox
Equal Opportunity
Employer M/F/D/V

J^.ai__


Plans Examiner
Announcement
#14-52

Reviews permit ap-
plication packages
and construction
plans including
building, electric,
plumbing, mechani-
cal and energy for
compliance with
the Florida Building
Code, County
codes and ordi-
nances, ADA and
FEMA floodplain
regulations. Ability
to read and inter-
pret plans, specifi-
cations and blue-
prints quickly and
accurately. Knowl-
edge of building
standards, codes
and related laws
and ordinances.
Requires at least
(5) five years of
responsible con-
struction, inspection
or plan review
experience. Starting
pay $19.62 hourly.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You may also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online.
This job is open until
filled. EOE/ADA


Purchasing
Manager
Announcement
#14-53

Prepares bids, proc-
ess specifications,
agenda packages
and other exhibits
that may be
required. Monitors
and ensures
compliance with
purchasing policies,
procedures and
regulations. Coordi-
nates the County's
Purchasing Card
Program. Acts as li-
aison between
county and
contracts/vendors.
Requires Bache-
lor's degree and for-
mal training, special
courses or self
education that is
equivalent to satis-
factory completion
of college educa-
tion or specialized
advanced training.
Requires at least
two years of related
experience. Starting
pay $1 472.15 B/W
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 16, 2014
EOE/ADA






Exp Bartender
wanted
apply in person:
T-Backs Bar
4591 N Carl G Rose
Hwy, Hernando
ask for Tammy


CHRpN1CLE

F/T Classified
Sales
Representative

Seeking A
self motivated
individual
with strong sales/
communication/
customer service
skills for our
Crystal River office

The position will
consist of:
+ placing ads from
our incoming call
center and to
walk-in customers
and upselling
products/services.
+ outbound cold
calling to increase
print and online
revenue.
4 process payments
/handle billing
inquiries for
Classified customers

Successful candi-
date must have
proficient typing
and computer skills,
able to multi-task.
Also ability to work
well in a team
environment.
Send resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


The Gadsden
County Times
is seeking an..

F/T ADVERTISING
SALES REP
The Gadsden
County Times is
weekly publication
with a circulation of
about 4,200. This
position is responsi-
ble for maintaining
established
accounts, prospect-
ing successfully for
new advertising
revenue opportuni-
ties and meeting in-
dividual sales goals.
Essential Functions
Sell retail and
classified display
advertising to
customers to satisfy
customer expecta-
tions and meet and
exceed established
monthly sales goals.
Develop sales
ideas, promotions
and events to
attract new
revenue sources.
* Solicit advertising
lineage from existing
and prospective
advertisers.
Consult with
potential advertisers
in order to learn
information about
their individual
businesses.
* Provide customer
service assistance
to advertisers in a
timely, courteous
and professional
manner.
Send resume to
Human Resources
at
dikamlot@chroni-
cleonline.com
Drug screen
required for final
candidate. EOE


LOOKING FOR
Motivated,
Self- driven people
to prospect & sell
radio/tv advertising.
Must have strong ne-
gotiation skills, per-
suasive communica-
tor, enthusiastic,
able to develop &
keep relationships.
We offer a competi-
tive draw/ commis-
sion structure, bene-
fit package, 401k,
etc. Media sales ex-
perience preferred,
but not required.
APPLY IN PERSON @
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto FL
34461 *EOE*




AC Service Tech

Apply at Air Care
Heating & Cooling Inc.
7745 W Homosassa
Trail Homosassa
Drug Free Work Place

ASPHALT QC
ROAD WAY TECH
LEVEL II CERT. (CTQP)

CW ROBERTS
Wildwood
Fax Resume
352-330-2609
EOE/DFWP

ATTN: Drivers!
$$$ top Pay $$$
Be a name not a
number. Quality
Home time! BCBS +
Pet & Rider
Orientation
Sign On Bonus
CDL-A Req
877-258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com

Commercial Tire
Technician
Must be skilled in
mount/dismount,tire
repairs, light
mechanical skills
needed. Must have
own hand tools. Major
tire tools, supplied by
shop. Hours: 6p-5a,
Wed- Sat. Wages
based on skills & exp.
Apply @ 6730 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal
River.

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624

Exp. Grant Writer
For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446






YVOuI\wdrld first

Need a jil)
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Bm^
Trades/

Exp. Service
Technician/
Installer
Exoerlencd only
Need for busy AC
comp. Must be EPA
certified. Must have
valid drivers license.
Apply Email: aalrinc
@centurvllnk.net
or fax 352-860-0757

Fuel &
Lubrication
Technician

Busy construction
company. Has
immediate opening for
qualified fuel lubrica-
tion person. Must have
a clean Class ACDL
with Hazmat &
Airbreak Endorse-
ments. Must be willing
to work overtime as
required. DFW.
Contact Tom at
(352)266-3325.

MASON
TENDERS

Must be experienced
reliable and have
transportation to and
from work in Citrus &
surrounding counties
(352) 302-2395


































Traffic Control
Crew Chief
Announcement
# 14-54
Inspectsf traffic
control signs and
devices for possible
repair, replacement
or refurbishment.
Serves as a first
responder for
emergencies,
natural disasters or
unexpected events,
Installs ADA mats in
accordance with
American Disability
Act regulations.
Must be available to
perform routine and
extraordinary traffic
signal and safety
lighting mainte-
nance. Requires
on-call, 24 hour
response. Performs
related duties as
required. Starting
pay $13.46 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
for more information
please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 16, 2014
EOE/ADA.


BaB

CITRUS COUNTY
YMCA
The YMCA is now
hiring for a
School Age
Program
Senior Director
to manage
operations for
before and after
school childcare for
11 elementary
schools. B.A. or B.S.
degree preferred.
Two years of
childcare and
supervisory experi-
ence required.
Apply online by
5/23 at www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
DFWP/EOE
(352)-637-0132.

CLEANING STAFF

Days & Nights Avail.
Call (352) 503-2043
or Email Resume:
stacey@citrus
cleanteam.com

COOK

Full-Time
Exp. Preferred
APPLY AT:
611 Turner Camp Rd.
Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer, M/F/V/D
Grass Roots Lawn

Expert Shrub and lawn
person. Pay based on
Exp. Must have clean
license. 352-795-2287
HANDYMAN
Needed to assist in
moving, Must have
exp. in carpentry,
light plumbing &
General Repairs.
Ca11352 522-1109
Btw. 9a & 12p ONLY

Housekeeping
Person

Opening on house-
keeping staff at
Citrus Hills.
Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including
laundry, as well as
offices and models
as needed. Flexible
schedule to include
weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

Part-Time Front
Desk Reception
Busy sales office
needs receptionist,
schedule to Include
weekends. Must
be friendly,
professional, have
excellent phone
skills and be
customer service
oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
**352-503-4930*

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F




HOUSEKEEPERS
Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
now accepting
applications for
P/T housekeepers.
Apply in person at
505 E Hartford St
Mon-Sat from 2-5pi


Home o Finder
www. chrmniclehonmefinder.eom


Faiu Yowr t -wuHofsc
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


At Central Florida Health Alliance excellence is our
culture. Between three facilities, Leesburg Regional
Medical Center, The Villages Regional Hospital and
Leesburg Regional Rehabilitation Hospital, our 500
bed system offers a work environment that has
helped us rank as one of the Top 100 Companies for
Working Families.

Current Opportunities include:
Certified Phlebotomists
Certified Nursing Assistants
Certified Pharmacy Techs
Cardiovascular Techs

To learn more about these opportunities and other
Nursing, Healthcare Professional & Support Staff
positions visit us at, visit http://www.cfhacareers.com

EEO/AA/H/V. Drug-free Workplace/Tobacco-free Workplace.





G TOPVio
^^Mt.lrMr


Central Florida Health Alliance
I-km 1.0-W M-&-d C~ 71W V&M A481W H&Oftd I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Library Aide
Announcement
#14-55
Part Time working
20 hours weekly on
a flexible schedule
providing assistance
in the Citrus County
Library system. Must
be available to
work some evenings
and Saturdays
at various branch
locations. Must be
able to lift 20
pounds on occa-
sion. Graduation
from H.S or G.E.D.
$8.70 hourly to start.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 16, 2014
EOE/ADA



parttime general
maintenance
Must be able to
work second shift &
have own vehicle.
Apply v Tues-Fridav
@ 505 E Hartford St,
Hernando"




aI [TM M


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


OWN YOUR own
Medical Alert
Company. Be the
1st and Only
Distributor in your
area! Unlimited $
return. Small invest
ment required.
Call toll free
1-844-225-1200.










NgtSchools
Instruction




NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School
Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
SAll major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



ANTIQUE PATCH
QUILTS EARLY 1900S
ORIGINAL full size
many colors $100
352-270-3527


Your World

-./ 1- 11 -


FLAT IRON WITH
STAND 1800S CHILDS
TOY black solid iron
3.5" x 2" x 2" $40
352-270-3527
IRON SKILLET 1800
CHILDS TOY horse n'
buggy bottom pan 4" x
2" $40 352-270-3527



GOLD PLATED FLAT-
WARE SERVICE FOR
8 place setting 5pc +
serving utensils $100
352-270-3527
LLADRO Retired piece
(Unexpected Visit)
Beautiful, in box Call for
details,will text pic if
interested. $185 OBO.
352-586-3380
WEDGEWOOD 14"
PLATTER OVAL
lavender grapes
on cream $90
352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD 9"
VEG DISH OVAL
lavender grapes on
cream $50
352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD
DESSERT DISHES 8
lavender grapes on
cream $60
352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD
DISHES Plates 2 Dinner
$20ea -2 Salad $15 ea
352-270-3527



APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Electric Range
Whirlpool 30" Self
Cleaning 1st $100
Takes it. Heavy Duty
Wheelbarrow $40
(352) 795-5519
Freezer


CLASSIFIED



HARVEST MAID DEHY-
DRATOR New in plastic.
Expands to 30 trays.
2 books & extras.$100
(203)509-7638
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $70
352-613-0529
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
Used Electric
Jenn-Aire Cook Top
$50. and Microwave
$25. (352) 637-2450
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore,
$200
will sell separately
(678) 617-5560
Whirlpool Electric
Glass Top Stove
and
Microwave Almond
$125. for both
(352) 746-7366



SALON CHAIR
Black and chrome.
Shampoo/cutting chair.
$100 203-509-7638
SALON CHAIR
Black and chrome.
Shampoo/cutting chair.
$100 203-509-7638



Air Compressor
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. 220C,
125 PSI, used very little
$275. Call Al
(202) 425-4422 cell


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 D5


MISC. BUILDING MA-
TERIALS 4 ft florescent
fixtures, 3 ft hanging
shop lite, 30 in. 6 panel
interior door, 18 & 24 in.
wood louvre doors,
metal closet shelving in-
cluding parts. All for
$75. (352)503-9181




17" LCD Computer
MONITOR Envision
works great. $30. Have
book and disc.
352-566-6589
STAND & DOCKING
STATION for Dell
LatitudeAnspironPrecision lap-
tops $35 OBO
352-382-3650
SUCCESS SYSTEMS
10 cassettes n books
"Make more money in
your Bz" $20
352-270-3527




843 Bob Cat
$9,000. obo
(352) 302-5641



PATIO TABLE
FOLDING metal base
3'cir glasstop $30
352-270-3527
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf CartoSeatsoTops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
TABLE
Metal Circular
3'Glasstop
$50 352-270-3527


Chromecraft
4 Dining Rm.
Arm Chairs, Swivel,
rollers, Beige,
$200
(352) 445-9448
COUCH
2 Cushions,
dark olive color
$125.
(352) 358-4800
Dining Room Set,
china cab. glass top
table w/ 4 chairs
& buffet cabinet
excellent cond. $500.
2 CHAIRS, 1 recliner, 1
swivel $50. ea.
Moving 631-398-5946
DINING TABLE FOLD-
ING metal base 3'cir
glasstop $30
352-270-3527
DINING TABLE
Metal base 3' circular
glasstop $50
352-270-3527
Four rooms of furniture
/furnishings for sale.
Please call for appt.
352-746-0008
Lane Cedar Chest
$75.
(352) 726-7902
LIVING ROOM SEC-
TIONAL two pic. moss
gray/green exc. cond.
asking $89
352-467-1017
New Serta King
Euro Mattress Set
double sided,
Presidential Suite II,
$875. (352) 270-8917
Oak Dining room set
oval table w/ folding
leaf, 6 chairs and
pretty hutch w/ glass
doors. $2000 new,
never used. Asking
$1100. Two decorative
wood benches $75
ea. Moving must sell.
(352) 513-4427
Queen Size Mattress
& Box Spring $100.
2 Sofa Beds $100. ea.
will re-arrt


PLANT STAND GREEN
METAL 3 shelves 5' x 2'
$25 352-270-3527
Thomasville Califor-
nia King Sz. Bed, w/
pillowtop mattress,
dresser, 2 mirrors
night table, armoire,
dark mahogany
great cond. extra
sheets/ comforter
$350 (352) 637-6284
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TWO MATCHING
LOVE SEATS very
good condition $100.
(352)527-1399
WICKER BASKET
CHEST/TABLE iron feet
3' x 2' x 2' misc uses
$100 352-270-3527
WICKER BROWN
RECTANGULAR WITH
LID 18" x 18" x 12" misc
uses $25 352-270-3527



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
BOLENS 13.5 HP
RIDING MOWER 38"
Front Mount, Briggs/St.
Great Cond. 4 yrs. old
$400.
(352) 270-4087
BRONZE gobblers a
breading pair of Bronze
adult Gobblers $99
please call
352-564-1017
CRAFTSMAN 17.5
LAWN TRACTOR 42"
Automatic Trans.
Clean and Rebuilt
$400.
(352) 270-4087
a, GRASS SEEDS!!
Penrnolan RnBahia


BLUEBERRY PLANTS
Mature Rabbiteye blue-
berry bushes (Blue
Gems and Woodards)
We'll dig them up and
put them in your truck
$10.00 per bush. 352
726-7907
MEXICAN PETUNIAS
Pink & Purple
in 4 inch pots
6 for $10 Off Croft Rd
613-5818
PLANT STAND
GREEN METAL 3
shelves 5' x 2' $25
352-270-3527

PLANTS & TREES
Unusual flowering
evergreen perenni-
als...$3 and up. Fruit
trees, figs, persim-
mons, Loquat,
Pomegranite &
more, $5 off.
352-628-0156
surialpaca@yahoo.
com

ROSE OF SHARON
2 Year Old Seedlings
Mixed Colors 3 for
$12/$5 ea Inv. Off Croft
Rd 613-5818




.Glarag.,






ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE

CLASSIFIED
CL ASIFIEDS~


Mon Tues-Wed Kenmore--5.2--CF CONTRACTORS __________________II
MAIRLINE 5:00PM 9: 4 Kenmore05.2CF CONTRACTORS0M Moving 631-398-5946 Argentine Bahia
CAREERS 5 PM-9 PM upright, white used less STEEL WHEEL Queen sz. Futon Summer RyeCall your
then 6 me. Looks and BARROW 6 CUBIC AFGANI RUG WOOL Forest Green, Pine Great Prices! Call your
begin here- Get FAA Locations' runs like new $185 obo FT.NEEDS AIR IN TIRE reversible n washable w/clear finish con American Farm & Classified
provet AA NEW PORT RICHEY (352) 586-3380 45.00 352464 -0316 cream w/brown mosaic er f h t Feed (352) 795-6013 Representative
approved Aviation SPRING HILL design 8' x 5' $100 verts from couch to Fed35)95601 Rprsetaiv
Maintenance Techni- BROOKSVILLE GE Electric Oven 3 0 bed, like new, $200. SEARS CRAFTSMAN for details
cian training. Housing ru I r Black, self clean, flat _352-270-3527__ (352) 628-3526 42" cut, 1 yr old, bag and don't
and Financial aid for (727) 848-8415 CW NIcLE burners, good cond. Bureau & Dresser Sleeper Sofa & Love system, used twice,
qualified students. Job s$200.(516) 4560228 $750. (352) 637-4718 forget to ask
placement assistance. www.benes.edu$20(1)4628 w/ mirror solid wood, Seat, Exc Cond,
placement assistance. GEORGE FOREMAN TV APEX 20" WITH maple color, Country Blue YARDMAN 46" auto- about rain
Call AIM
877-741-9260 STARTA CAREER GRILL 12" x 14" x 4" BUILT IN DVD PLAYER excellent condition Tufted Camelback matic, 20HP, Kohler, insurance!
www.fixiets.com INA YEAR ...... -,, white good cond $15 & REMOTE $40 $180. solid oak trim $395 exc. cond. $900 352-563-5966
352-270-3527 352-613-0529 (352) 503-3446 (352) 726-1526 (352)637-4718






3...


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lie/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625
Will Provide Trips to
Appointments,
Grocery Stores, ETC.
JOAN (352) 382-8802




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Liec. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
Seeding Tree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352-422-7279 *
FENCE PRO all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lie/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lie.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V'FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County
Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured




*I I* kMJ h IU =M
MM1DO~



*Window Cleaning
*Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning
FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lie/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873


CONSISTENT VOTED EST OF THE EST! \













yo re away
Irrigation Repairs & Installation
j Sod Sales & Install



746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded




CITRUS

HOmEUJIT(H
We care for your home while
you're away.




www.homewatchcitrus.com
352-422-0025
Licensed, Bonded, Insured


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., LIc/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566


STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


Misc Syvice


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lie., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



s ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625


Ron's Affordable |
Handyman Services
l- All Home Repairs
L icen Small Carpentry
0 AM 0 -&Ai S. Sreeni ng
i (lean Dryer Vents
-niK .ohle & Dependable
EiSv .pert'iece lifelong
y 352-344-0905
|cell: 400-1722
9 JtLicensed & Insured Lic.#l3 7761


YOUR INTERLOCKING
BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST



P00L






i POOLAND PAVER LLC
352-400-3188


* 1N I'i[ ;-II


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919



Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Clean View: Pressure
washing windowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748








Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441


PAINTNG SEVICE
DQalyTa o' o h atEg


I 3o5-2-2935U 088-UOO I
Toll Free: 877-893-3895 I


All In One

Home Repair

Handyman Jobs

Painting
Pressure Washing
25 years experience, reliable and super cheap
Jim Maloney
352-246-2585


A/C& IR:QUAITYi


FREE DUCT Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Specialist
with purchase of Summer Tune $ 995
Mobile Home A/C Unit Up Special 4 Reg,

Lowest Prices Guaranteeing lOx Cleaner Air
on Residential A/C or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Particle Scan to determine
and Heat Pum p the quality of thile air you breathe in your home.
Units NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
U iExpiresi May31,2014
59AC
Dave's Heating & AC KQ3 k Back To New S-199
352-542-0202 Heating & Cooling
LIC.#CAC057482 628-5700 newair.biz


All phases of Tile INSTALLED!
Handicap Showers, Anthony Stender
Safety Bars, Firs. (352)628-4049
422-2019 Lie. #2713 COUNTYWIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
^ -- *^ic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.
SEWING &REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home ,
Boat Canvas & Seats .= ',
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066 4_4


Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
Attention STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
Consumers! 352-344-2696 Lie/ins.
Please make sure you T SRE
are using a licensed A TREE SURGEON
and insured service Lic. & Ins. Lowest
professional. Many Rates Free est.
service advertisers (352)860-1452
are required by state Bonbon Cleaning,
law to include their Lawn, & Prop Main.
state license Comm, Res, & Indus-
number in all adver- trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
tisements. If you 476-4202; 697-1625
don't see a license
number in the ad, you FeEsi
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to Bruce Onoday & Son
ensure that our ads Free Estimates
meet the require- Trim & Removal
ments of the law. 352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that dILl I,
they are licensed to Y%,lr ,,l Id III St.
do business.
For questions about L i LDa)
business licensing,
please call your city
or county iHC(iE
government offices. Classifieds


This Sat 6pm
Preview 5pm
Antiques, Coins, ArtJewelry,
RA Military and Estate Items
Red Barn Auctions
4535 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
Terms 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash Fl Sales lax
AB3172 AU4416


4- Consign Now
Rates as low as 2% We Buy Estates



7DUST BUSTERS


CLEANNG SERVICE
REIETACOMMERCIAL, VACATION
RENTALS & NEW HOME CLEAN-UP
Licensed, Insured,
Workers Comp.
WPressureP
Washing Too

352.942.8434
Call Today for a]
Ctean Tomorrow


F^Trac or Tree or
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lie/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Come visit our
iislall a Rf showroom for a
Pninns. i!"e?* huge selection of
Heaters y "
.ealers il, pavers, pool
SSalSseI s finishes and pool
equipment.



Sugarmill p i .
Woods servingAlloiC eilifnr
Pool-aSna I
SMWPOOiLS.COM 382-4421
l .. . ..... .... .... ... .. .. .





GENERAC r
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
General Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377








A CUT ABOVE L^WN
352-419-2779
or 352-201-2201



WE WILL BEAT ANY
WRITTEN ESTIMATE
Mowing, Hedging, Trimming, Blowing
Tree Trimming, Brush Removal,
Seasonal Planting.


.umiture


I lnt


-1




D6 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


Fri, Sat.& Sun
8am to ?
furn, tools, lawn
equipment etc..
5379 E Marsh Lake Dr




ALPACA SWEATERS
100% Baby Alpaca
Sweaters $129
Alpaca Socks $12
Great gifts for Mom
352-628-0156
surialpaca@
yahoo.com
DESIGNER SUITS
SIZE 12 AND 14 excel
cond black navy blue
white $20 ea
352-270-3527
LADIES TOPS 50 Pcs
Ladies Tops, size Med
& Large $2 ea.
Ill 352-476-7516



CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/case, Con-
sumer Cellular or unlock
$28 352-382-3650



8 PC COMFORTER
SET Like New 8 Pc
Comforter Set, $50, Lil
352-476-7516
30 qt. Turkey fryer
w/ 45,000 BTU gas
burner $85.
Motorcycle or ATV
Jack, $60.
(352) 564-0726
AAA MAPS US CAN-
ADA 50 states n all
Canada provinces $1
ea 352-270-3527
ADVENT (REMOTE)
STEREO SPEAKER.
TAKES D BATTERIES
ONLY 40.00
352-464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BEANIE BABY-
BONGO THE MONKEY
Price: $10
(352)465-1616
Beverly Hills Moving
Sale, DR, LR and BR
Furniture, Kit items.
Beautiful wood desk &
Hutch. Much More PIs
call (989) 293-4404
BOOKS FL REAL ES-
TATE STOCK MAR-
KET, Options, Futures,
Books, tapes etc $5-
$10 ea (352)270-3527
BREATHABLE CAR
COVER MEDIUM SIZE
CHEWVY IMPALA ONLY
25.00 352464-0316
BROTHER FAX
MACHINE WORKS
GREAT ONLY 40.00
3524640316
Craftsman Lawn
Tractor, 18HP42"
elect, start $650. obo
GE Freezer
7 cu ft., $75.
(352) 503-9450
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH
LIGHTS HOLDS 31"
TV WHITE WASHED
$40 352-613-0529
FIBERGLASS HARD
SIDED PET CAGES
ONE 18"BY. 24" 30.00
ONE 12" BY 18" 25.00
352-464-0316
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
WOOD $25
352-613-0529

P THIS OUT!
*******

GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!!!

*******

6 lines
-10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50

*******


GUN SHOW
CRYSTAL RIVER
ARMORY
8551 W Venable St.,
Crystal River, FL
Sat. May, 10, 9-5
Sun. May 11, 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Daily
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $5 EACH
352-613-0529
Restaurant dinner-
ware, New. Oneida. 10
boxes of 12 pcs. ea.
$100. (352)503-2373
SAFE WITH Combo
CODE $75
(352)302-5468
SAFEWAZE CLIMBING
HARNESS & 6' LAN-
YARD- excellent condi-
tion, $75. 352-628-0033
STAINED GLASS
LAMP SHADES, pair,
neutral colors, scalloped
edges, $80, Call
(352)465-1813
TIRES
4 General Amer-trac
Load range E, 95%
tread, 235-85-16
$200 firm
352-228-7715


Twin Bed
$50. obo
Electric Chainsaw
$40. obo
(352) 249-7064



MANICURE TABLE 4
drawers, lamp and stool.
Like new.$100 firm.
203-509-7638
MANICURE TABLE 4
drawers, lamp and stool.
Like new.$100.
203-509-7638

Medical

Aluminum Ramp
for a wheelchair
36"x40" $100.
Inflatable electric twin
mattress cover, $30.
(352) 726-5070


floora


Rascal Model R6-300
Like New, $1200
Cell (786) 523-4637
Larger Electric
Wheelchair,
leather, good
condition, $450. obo
(352) 746-1044
Traveling Wheelchair
$50.
Hospital Bedside Table
$25.
(352) 205-7973



DRUM SET, complete,
cymbals, high hat, dual
toms, floor tom, paid
$400, asking $200
(352) 419-2442
PIANO JANSSEN
SPINET GOOD
CONDITION
$100.00 OR BEST
OFFER (352) 249-9144



AEROBED TWIN -one
click inflation and quick
deflation, adjustable,
$40. 634-2004
HALOGEN DESK
LAMP Black, Hi/Lo set
50W $35 OBO can
email pic 352-382-3650



SIT UP BENCH 6'x16"
Commercial size. Black.
Great shape. $40 Bev-
erly Hills (203)509-7638
Weider Weight Bench
$35.
(352) 564-0726



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF DRIVER 2013
RocketBallz Clone mrh
Grafalloy Reg EXC $85.
Dunnellon 465-8495
GOLF IRONS Adams
Idea mrh 7&8 graphite
new grips $15ea
$25pair Dunnellon
465-8495
GOLF WOODS MRH #7
#9 Graphite Good Grips
and Head Covers
$15ea $25pair
Dunnellon 465-8495

GUN SHOW
CRYSTAL RIVER
ARMORY
8551 W Venable St.,
Crystal River, FL
Sat. May 10, 9-5
Sun. May 11, 9-4
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASSES
DAILY
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
INSTEP BIKE TRAILER
Seats 2, with rain cover.
Folds Compact,100lb
capacity.$60.00
352-795-9649
METAL HUNTER
GREEN GUN SAFE
$100 (352)302-5468
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
WILSON WOMEN'S
GOLF CLUBS
Set of Power Chamber
Golf Clubs, plus extras.
$75.00 352 795-9649


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




RV CORD ADAPTER
18 INCH NEW 30 amp
Female to 50 amp Male
w/Power Lt. $10
352-382-3650


352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.

"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.


WOODEN GUN CABI-
NET $100
(352)302-5468
Yamaha '00 GolfCart
Canvas Enclosure
New Batteries $2288.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678




Enclosed 5x8,
v-nose, w/ramp door,
holds 46" mower or 1
or 2 cycles, like new
$1500. firm
(352) 513-5436
Haulmark 6x12
'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand
New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678


Sell r Swa


BUD
Looking for new
best friend? Here's
Bud, beautiful
red/white terrier mix,
heartworm- nega-
tive, housebrkn. Wt.
33 Ibs. Very friendly,
walks well on a
leash. Thinks he's
a lapdog. Should
be only dog in the
home. Call Joanne
@352-795-1288
or 352-697-2682.

FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732


GROVER
Grover, cutest face
ever! Boxer/terrier
mix, 1 y.o., appears
housebrkn, Wt. 39
Ibs. Gets along well
with other dogs
and also cats! Not
treated well by
prev. owner, still
sweetest & most
loveable dog
you could find.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


JENSEN
3-4 y.o. American
Bulldog, 50 Ibs,
beautiful red &
white. Appears
housebroken, walks
well on leash.
Knows certain com-
mands. Very
friendly & loves
people, best as only
dog in the home.
Would be a great
family member &
perfect companion.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.


ii iI fill* ll t
Y'i.tll %,%fild Itrst.

CEaiiiDa d


CH"pNCLE
Classifieds


AhL^trS
ALPACAS Open
House
Pet/fleece quality
males $400 & up
Females start at
$1,200. Great gift for
Mom 352-628-0156
surialpaca6a


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED



German Rottweiller
Pups, 4 females 4 Sale
good temperament,
going to be LARGE
dogs! $500. each
(352) 422-6792
MIN PIN PUPPIES
2 Blue, 2 Fawn,
1 Chocolate 15 inch
10-15 Ibs, Health Certs
CKC. $1,200-$1,400.
(352) 503-7919
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day




SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510*

ACHILLES
Inflatable boat
12'4", 25HPYamaha,
aluminum fl, on trlr,
garaged, used little
fresh water only. All
accessories $4300 obo
(352) 697-5677
BOAT TRAILER
Aluminum, NEW 2014
18 -20 FT w/tortion
axle, folding tonque,
LED lights, and disc
brakes all below cost
@ $2,195. Open Mon.
Wednesday & Friday
Only(352) 527-3555
CAROLINA SKIFF
2011, J16, center con-
sole, 25HP, 4 stroke
Mercury, 2013 trlr.
$8700 obo
(352) 697-2323
CAROLINA SKIFF
21'2001 DLX115Su-
zuki 4 stroke. New
power head. $9,000.
Dave (352)563-1265
KEY WEST
2010, 177 Skiff, Honda
60HP, 4 strk. w/warr.,
Lots of storage, 8fft,
pwr. pole, 801b 24 V
troll, mtr. w/charger,
S/S prop, swim
platform w/ ladder,
2 live wells, Garmin FF
Compass, Forward
casting seat $12,995.
(352) 628-5545
SCOUT 17'C.C.
90HP Yamaha (low
hours) Alum trlr, New
GarminGPS, Cplotter
very clean, gar kept
$9200 (352) 795-5519














Sportscraft 88
27 Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768


Starcraft
16' aluminum
40 hp Johnson
$600.
(352) 419-4733
SUNDANCE
19ft. 2004 Skiff.
60 yamaha motor,
plus many extras
$5000. 352-637-5661
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




Break Buddy
w/ accessories and
owners manual
$250
(352) 344-2161
HONDA
'11, CRV, Equipped
with Blue Ox
Towing Package
details (352) 746-0524
TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River,
18ff L. 8ff wide, Living
quarters w/beds mi-
crowave, stove, refrig.
sink, bthrm., awning,
dish TV ready, full
back ramp, Pd$18K
Asking $10,500 obo
(352) 422-5622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
STAR CRAFT
2005 Pop-up Camper
Electric lift, frig, air,
stove + outside grill
$3750; 352-613-9627




Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS &SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090

SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41

SELLING OUT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Leek

Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE

CimoNJLE

CLASSIFIED

**3 SPECIALS **
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50


* Call your
I Classified
Representative
for details.
352-563-5966

SELLING OUT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
94 CORVETTE, CONY.
very clean, only 50k
mi. NADA $12,500.
$9500. (352) 419-4970







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966





CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794, Call AJ
813-458-0584



ACURA MDX
2006, exc. cond.
$14,000
(352) 513-4759
BUICK
92 Roadmaster Estate
Wagon, a/cp/w, seats
loaded, 350 fuel inj.
engine, runs good
$1800. (352) 628-6615
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
FORD
94 Mustg. GT, Cony.
5.0 eng. rebuilt trans.
garg. kept, great body
$3200 Firm 746-4620
r------

In'v

i&^Ki


GMC
02, 1500 Sierra/Denali
AWD, exc. condition
82k mi. $14,500.
(352) 637-0765


Larry's Auto Sales
1955S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333

BUY HERE, PAY HERE

2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down

2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down

'91 F150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down

'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van 5.7, V-8,
Auto, $995 down




KIA
2005 Sportilage EX
V6,auto, silver, sunroof,
garaged dealer maint.
$5900. (352) 382-9920
SUBARU
FORESTER
2013 Subaru Forester
2.5X Limited with 14,000
miles. Options include:
climate control,
AM/FM/CD audio, steer-
ing wheel audio con-
trols, Bluetooth hands
free phone, cruise con-
trol, tilt wheel, power
door locks and mirrors,
power windows, power
drivers seat, leather
seats, heated front
seats, roof rails, power
moonroof, all-wheel
drive, ABS, TPMS,
anti-theft alarm, back-up
camera, puddle light kit
and splash guard kit
and remaining warranty.
Price: $23,800, Call:
352-601-1319
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
HONDA
'07, Odyssey, EXL
144K miles
excel, cond. $9500
(352) 563-1680
HONDA
2004 Odyssey model
EX-L,V6 3.5 Liter ,New
Transmission, Brakes,
Belts, Timing Chain,
Water Pump, Spark
Plugs. FR&R A/C.
leather seats, DVD
player w remote & wire-
less headphones,
Premium Sound AM/FM
Stereo cassette & Cd
Player Excellent
Condition.
$6,000
352-726-7745




2006 Suzuki
650 Burgman with trike
kit, 4,700mi, lots of
extra's $8000 obo
(352) 637-4429
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055


Misc. Notice


388-0511 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Vallerie Pulcini
6752 W Gulf to Lake Hwy
Crystal River, FL 34429
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elections
at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 11, 2014.


389-0511 SUCRN
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PUBLIC NOTICE
Professional Real Estate Brokerage Services
RFP #018-14
Citrus County Neighborhood Stabilization Programs (NSP1 and NSP3)
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Proposal to provide real estate brokerage services for its Neighborhood Stabilization
Program (NSP), which includes NSP1 and NSP3. The NSP was established under the
Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 and additionally funding to support
the NSP was provided for under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009 and the Dodd-Frank Act. Citrus County received approximately $3.9 million un-
der NSP1 and NSP3. Funding under both programs is primarily used to acquire fore-
closed properties, provide rehabilitation and resale or rent properties to eligible par-
ticipants.
In an effort to expedite expenditure of program funds and sale of the properties, the
County is soliciting the services of a professional real estate brokerage firm to assist
with the acquisition and sale of properties under these programs. The services will in-
volve but will not be limited to assisting the County in acquiring eligible properties by
offering professional brokerage opinions using market data, facilitating acquisition
closings in accordance with the NSP parameters and coordinating the sale of the
properties to NSP eligible homebuyers. Eligible properties can only be acquired in
the following areas of Citrus County: Beverly Hills, Citrus Springs and Inverness High-
lands. More information concerning this can be found in the Scope of Services Sec-
tion of this Request for Proposal.
The Successful Proposer or Proposers will work in tandem with the County to identify
NSP eligible single-family properties and perform the due diligence required to allow
the County to decide as to whether or not to provide financing for such properties.
Once a purchase decision has been made, the Successful Proposer will facilitate ac-
quisition price negotiations and bring the properties to closing. After the property has
been acquired and rehabilitated, the Successful Proposer will facilitate the sale of
the property to an eligible buyer under the NSP program. The Successful Proposer will
represent the County in all real estate transactions and shall provide its expertise
throughout the County's acquisition phase as well as the homebuyer acquisition
phase.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before June 10, 2014 @ 2:00 PM to Linda
Morse, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for June 10, 2014 a 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J.J. Kenney, Chairman

Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 11, 2014


I Bi


I Bi


mB


Harley Davidson
100th Anniversary
2003 Heritage Soft tail
classic, lots of access.,
exccond., 10,500 mi.
$12,000 352-513-4759
Harley Davidson
2014, Heritage, soft
tail, black, factory
opt. + accessories,
1000 miles, serviced.
Title in hand $17,500.
(352) 601-2240
Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068
HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
2003 Scooter, model
Reflex, great
condition $1800
(352) 765-4011
HONDA
2006 VTX1300C
7,400 miles
w/ accessories
$4,900, (352) 341-1187
HONDA
2008 Shadow Spirit
VT750C2, 3,775 mi.
w/ accessories $4,500
(352) 341-1187
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200

'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295

'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900

'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999

KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 1500
Classic: Custom Paint,
18" Baron Bars, Saddle
Bags, Kuryakyn High-
way Pegs/Passenger
Floor Boards /Cable
&Grips. 3200 Miles!
Garage Kept, Exc.Cond
Reduced $4,999.
(813) 957-8605
Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
SUZUKI
Boulevard C50
Classic ,2007,
Exc Cond $3,700
(352) 634-4427
Suzuki
Model GZ250. Street
Bike. Black. Less than
400 mi. $1995.
(352)527-0115
YAMAHA
2007 Stratoliner S
15k mi, exc cond,
Extra's. $6800 obo
352-220-2923



907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April
25, 2014- May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014


Misc. Notice




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Really Surprise Her This Year For



Mother's Day


I


2014
F-150 XLT
SuperCab or SuperCrew 3.5L
EcoBoost w/Luxury/Leather/HID
Headlights Pkgs.
upt o$8,000
In Total Savings off MSRP


2014 Focus
0 APR 60 mo.
Ford Credit Financing
+$2,085 Savings off MSRP
or $4,085
Total Savings off MSRP
Focus "S" Model
starting at $20,230


4


2014
F150 Reg Cab
Automatic, Air
$25,640.................... ............ MSRP
-650............. .........NNFL Discount
-1,000..........Eco Boost Challenge Cash
-1,000. Ford Credit Financing Assistance
$22,990





2014 Ford
Mustang V6
$23,335........................ MSRP
-400................NNFL Discount
-3,000..............Customer Cash

$19,935


2014 Fusion
0 APR 60 mo.
Ford Credit Financing
+$1 ,500 Savings off MSRP
or $3,000
Total Savings off MSRP
Fusion "S" Model
starting at $22,920


2014 Ford
Taurus
M SRP ................................$29,905
-$5,000......Ford Customer Incentives
See dealer for details.

$24,905


2014 Escape
0 APR 60 mo.
Ford Credit Financing
+ $1 ,990 Savings off MSRP
or $2,990
Total Savings off MSRP
Escape "S" Model
starting at $24,100

0 0





MSR
Come ee fr yorsel


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
S FOo CErIFIEDOPRE-OWNED Call For Savings!
1 90 Relax, It's Covered. Call For Savings!
A R f *3 172-poniL inL pelorn-, Ford b faclor,-lrar -_pd Ipchricias 3 71
S7->ear 100 00,0-n-ide Ford Povverlrain 0/arranti, Co.erage 7
APR for 36 nths' 2-in.inoh 1. OOO-mile Ford Lni,,ed V.ar .era',p-"- 352 =795 =7371
l:I'-1,r h '- 1 1 F o r,: ] ] r.a|11 tr : l -, I -1 1 A I- IT C r.yl .:1, 1, 1\,1,E I1,, I ,\:r .1,
jl [l, l ,j l' l :,] .] i'j ',l'j i~g i, j 4' 4 n )'l'j. 4 llll '': ,!~ ~ 1: i'j, i .", T I! 1!, .,, n ,. l~ ,, J, i~ .! 1!j~ ,ali, -: j -, n l ]. l: .,jilb,. 1l l at l'' ,: l ,] { j J ll:. j J [,{ a l :l ] el[
.M I


2011 FORD TAURUS SEL 2012 FORD FUSION SEL 2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID SE 2010 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
12,000UUU, extra lean. GPR 127,8 1" il w Iwi- Illi-r -lir:Il GOF'e-':: Or ne uo rter luc- l ricdte. G4TITI0,IA .iiljlu'i J -I mi' 1 -Hli | I.H- 'I.ii'
$19,950 $22,950 $24,450 $24,950


2011 LINCOLN MKT AWD 2012 FORD FLEX LTD 2012 FORD EXPLORER SEL 2013 LINCOLN MKX
L$28liir ,,5r0:,. F-r U' U GPl2795 L0jlhi -'-'i I'n'ni hi.s G$F3"'2 95I36i95 l0ll.i.ii ii ,- ,,,,950 I .-P. '17,7 i I11. '32(u1) 953 ,9,,5l GP'I0:7-
$28,950 $32,950 $32,950 $36,950


2012 LINCOLN MKZ
|1 I $ ,I 9k u %II1.5 0 1 l. GFF' I'', I
$25,950


2012 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR L
4-'\ ni,.r: ,,j: l I ),,., ij 'l'f7
$43,950


Local owner 29 000 miles L4C005A 21 000 miles leather L4C043A 26,000 Miles, one owner. GP1768 30,000 miles, 5.0 Liter V8 GPR1277 I Leather, sun roof one owner L4C039A Laet, 6.7 L Diesel, 32,000 Miles GP1740B
$23,450 $24,950 $25,950 $25,950 $26,950 $43,950


Nick Nicholas 5LHyINCOLN
W ~~Nick C "
U- Nicholas
Hwy. 9 N.Ford
Crystal River F1i9 Lincolny
795.7371 I Cruz
C r ya RWWe.nicrho f ol ln.COm Salesperson of theMonth_________________
*Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only.
Not all buyer will qualify for Ford Credit financing. For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 5/17/14.


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 D7


mob,


p




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ALL OFFERS
GOOD MAY 3
THRU MAY 31, 2014

Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm
Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm
Sun 11am-4pm
Service: Mon-Fri: 7am-6pm
Sat: 8am-4pm


2431 S. SuncoastBlvd.,Homosassa, FL 34448
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448


ToyotaCare
2 YEARS
PREPAID SERVICE
ON ALL NEW CAR
PURCHASES


www.VILLAGETOYOTA.com 352-628-5100
*All leases with $2399 cash cap reduction, 36 months @ 12,000 miles per year. W.A.C. Pictures for illustration purposes only.


D8 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014




INSIDE


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUI DE 11


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


* ~."A


CA~4
~1


ON THE COVER:
wiviw:


Elijah Mosley thought he
was in paradise Tuesday
as he played in his brand
-. new sandbox. His
parents. Ken and Anna
Mosley. won the
Chronicle's ugliest
backyard makeover.
MICHAEL PATE r :,-.:


y1k


- 1... -


mm WE


HOWE AND GARDEN:

lmI ':i-K
E "' .l"


REAL ESTATE ..'

-OW') '


~nq
I ~


-. *~ &7K 2


.'.;..." ?"="








I 63L INFWOOD LOP 24THLC7 RIVERFRO LINHOMEACREERANCHEIN PNERIDGEE E ERFO TE
~ (~ 37282 0 7.82 E3 .8 ter ho.
flterhouse#4247 Eer house #3630 Enter' hos#3251

mior -I1,4

42 COMMERCIAL LANE 3630 H. LAURELWOOD LOOP WIHAOCEE RIVERFRONT HOME 6 ACRE RANCH IN PINE RIDGE! UNIQUE WATERFRONT RETREAT
4BEDROO3BATH 132X150LOT! LAKESIDE VILLAGE PLUS MOBILE ON 3.42 ACRES What a beautiful setting for you and your family .NoFloodZone .256 Feet on Lake Rousseau
Oh Nice Decor Granitecnter 2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance Free Villa 324 Ft. River Frontage *3 BR, 2 Bath Home 3 bedroom home on fenced acreage with barn and .Hardwood &Tile Floors Includes 3 Sub-dividable Lots
2007Built/ileRoof Large Family Room Over 55 Community 2002 Built Home Two Fireplaces stables. Caged inground pool, RV carport and
7 Su Rf Le n Prcmhes *Mi Mwo bile I ik Newi spacious home on the trails. Fireplace, huge family Detached 2-ar Garage Ponoon Boa and Moor Included
oPRIVACY FENCED YARD A AMUST SEE TO APPRECIATE! .LvlFordRomOeokig Green Space o2 Screen Porches o2006 Mobile Like New rpouhom, m oden ktchen tanbigs Figrepage. Augrefamil AtDtached 2-Car Garage .Potntiaoon Guest Cnottagnlued
roomo, modern kitchen and big 2-car garage A great *tAached 1-ar Garage Potental for Guest Coage
Lovely Flonda Room Overlookin Several Outbuildings Boat Dock value in a great location
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 1 PETER & MARVIA KOROLKL iA R Dr-78 loaRin *I SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 l
Em' iuol ii! e nem 352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661 Emailsherylpos alcom
www.FlodLslglnlocoI (352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellsorida.com Emdl: stevevarnadom xne Websilte: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com
IMY HIN IItj;A41 ];11247LNO IN v
--.-_52,6,7 3282
282 Ente hEu, te$0ouse
Enter hti~jo #65, #13322
.. _I -


6825 FALCON REST 332 S. BROOKFIELD DR. B M 6401 S. DOLPHIN, FLORAL CITY HOMOSASSA WATERFRONT
SINVERNESSSOUTH PRIVATEFENCEDYARD ECA OR EA LT N E 2/2 This 2/2 wth detached garage/workshop located on
INVERNESS~~~~tw SOUTH PRIVAT FECDron EANO 22t to Halts River, Homosassa River to
Beautiful Cabinets Large Screened Porch 3BD/2BA/2CG Built in 2003 On Nice Private Lot HaveFunontheLake & the River Too! t Gulf. Remodeled w/ranite counters and wood
*3/2 with Lg. Garage DecoFans & Ughts early 1500 SF Beautifully Decorated/Maintained f I U A Boat Dock- Outdoor Shed cabinets- wood laminate flooring updated baths and
Attractive Lg. Tile Split BR/Bath Plan Large Lanai with Vinyl Windows .N l I 4E Free-Standing Fireplace- Porches huge Florida room overlooking nature foliage- This is
ELLge SUTTON7 3I283 LINEf Flying Eagle Preserve On Other Side of Canal the piece of paradise you have been looking for
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 PETER & MARVIA KOROL LTi 6 7 D CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
"'"ww ".F ,,,I~~g~~~cm (352) 527-7842 U ikUEml:kungam eaxe
nni (352) 527-784 DEBRA PILNY (352) 464-0840 E (352) 637-6200
.oli eisiiiiong enomix ue (352) 422-3875 637 282 Email: debrapilnyoremax.net (mail: kcumighamremax.n0 t
i 637.28;HERE'S HOW:
E t 28 1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

Ii l 2 Buyerenters house I I I
3691 E SQUAW VALLEY 2-STORY HOME on one acre (MOL) number when GORGEOUS WATER VIEWS from almost every A little paint and new flooring will make this 4/2
SDOCK IN PLACE LAKE HERNANDO total of 4,461 sq. ft. under roof. 4BR/2.5 BA. prompted room in this adorable 2/2 A-frame cottage on the Skyline mobile into a lovely home for your family.
*. Homosassa River. Elevator accesses the huge
Cul-De-SacSt. Super Neat 2/2 DW Custom built with lots of extras. Dormers, a master and loft upstairs. Living area with wood Custom made cabinets enhance the kitchen.
12x32 Florida Rm. Overlooks the Water dream kitchen with natural cherry cabinets, open burning fireplace and 2nd bedroom/bath Centrally located in the heart of Crystal River,
Lg. Inside Laundry GREAT PLACE-GREAT PRICE! floor plan, office/den, house generator, tankless U i1l3 Buyer listens to downstairs.' Large laundry/storage area. And a close to town, shopping and medical. Come look
l c'J h r tat oat. Awesome weeken.er/vacation
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 water heater plus a 2-car garage. 0 property home. Don't miss this one. rand make an offer Owners need to sell
eumnl ei.. e.u.1r.on, m.e. ne BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 e keoCHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
|www.FloidULislinglnlo.co Emil barbaraimi Es@eathink.nt English or Spanish Email: cnadal@remax.net Email: cnadal@remax.net

I 0 Happy

217 INFO LINE 20 INFO LINE M other's Day
637-282 2 ~ 6782 H -
Enter ous5O Enter hous joi67 Ifrom
PINE RIDGE BEAUTY GRACEFUL SOUTHERN CHARMER MINI FARMS (M CONTROL ENERGY COSTS
Mom will love the open, flowing floor plan This large country home on 2.5 rolling acres 4 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR GARAGE ,with this RARE 3 Bedroom
ATWTR SELF CLEANING POOL Solar Powered Home in Pine Ridge
in this carefree 3 bdrm/2 bath home on features 3-LARGE bedrooms, vaulted great room 2.5 ACRES COMPLETELY FENCED REALTY ONE Solar Powered Home in Pine Ridge
1.5 acres! Main living areas lead to the and breezy screen lanai. HUGE detached 12X24 WORKSHOP AND BOAT PARKING Low, Low Power Bills *SwimmingPool Spa
lanai and pool with serenity all around you. GARAGE w/full electric AND room for 4-6 cars! OPEN FLOOR PLAN RV Covered Parking Free-Standing Workshop
MOVE-IN READY! MOVE-IN READY! F GREAT VIEWAND PRIVACY 2 Master Suites i i I:. .
KIM DEVANE (352) 257-5353 KIM DEVANE PAM ZADORIANY (941)726-3491 I M GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812
Email: kim@kimldevane.com Email: kim@kimdevgne.com Email: pfparvi@yahoo.com lei I Email: RealEslate@GeorgeSleenon coin.


E2 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SReal Estate DIGEST


New sales ',
associate at
Plantation ft
Plantation Realty
Inc. welcomes Katie ,
C. Ruble as a new
sales associate. t R b
Originally from Katie Ruble
Cherry Hills Village, Plantation
Colorado, Katie is a Realty Inc.
full-time real estate professional coming
from a commercial construction, real es-
tate and interior design family. After grad-
uating from the University of Southern
California with an engineering and busi-
ness degree, she continued her studies
in the executive MBA program at the
University of Montana.
As founder and CEO of her own insur-
ance brokerage firm, Hanes Hathaway
Inc., she was voted Montana Business
Woman of the Year in 2006.
Let Katie guide you through the won-
ders of the Nature Coast to find your
dream home.
Tolle completes
appraisal course


Hugh E. Tolle,
SRA, certified general
real estate appraiser
of Tolle Appraisal
Service Inc., Crystal
River, has completed
the Appraisal Insti-
tute's Marketability
Studies real estate
appraisal course in
Orlando.
The class covered


RE/MAX
agents
continue ,
winning streak
Realtor Kelly God-
dard has passed a
tremendous milestone Kelly
in sales production Goddard
this week. She quali- RE/MAX
fled for the distin- Realty One.
guished Multimillion
Dollar Club by closing more than $2 mil-


McEvoy
RE/MAX
Realty One.








Dianne
MacDonald
RE/MAX
Realty One.


mugn i ole
Tolle Appraisal
Service Inc.


market supply and demand analysis to
determine a commercial property's high-
est and best use.
Hugh Tolle can be reached at 352-
563-0222.
Ayres
strikes gold
at EXIT
EXIT Realty Lead-
ers wishes to congrat-
ulate Nancy Ayres for
being top listing agent
forApril. Nancy
Nancy is committed Ayres
to providing beyond EXIT Realty
excellent service in all Leaders.
of your real estate
needs.
Call her at 352-527-1112.


r[ I A I
Cheryl
Nadal
RE/MAX
Realty One.


lion in sales volume
this year.
Kelly is a veteran
Realtor in the Citrus
County area who
works out of the Cen-
tral Ridge office of
RE/MAX Realty One,
located on County
Road 491 in Lecanto.
Ron McEvoy, Di-
anne MacDonald and
Cheryl Nadal have
each qualified for the
Million Dollar Club in
sales production this
week.
All three of these
agents join an elite
group who have ex-
celled in sales produc-
tion very early in the
year.
Ron works out of
the Homosassa office
of RE/MAX Realty
One. Dianne and
Cheryl are Realtors in
the Crystal River
RE/MAX office.
The associates and
staff of RE/MAX con-
gratulate all of these
agents on their
hard-earned
accomplishments.


Average 30-year loan


rate falls to 4.21 percent


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Average U.S. rates on
fixed mortgages fell
this week for a sec-
ond straight week as
the spring home-buy-
ing season has gotten
off to a slow start.
Mortgage buyer
Freddie Mac said
Thursday the aver-
age rate for the 30-
year loan declined to
4.21 percent from


4.29 percent last
week. The average
for the 15-year mort-
gage eased to 3.32
percent from 3.38
percent.
Mortgage rates
have risen almost a
full percentage point
since hitting record
lows about a year
ago.
Warmer weather
has yet to boost
home-buying as it
normally does. Ris-


ing prices and higher
rates have made af-
fordability a problem
for would-be buyers,
while many home-
owners are reluctant
to list their proper-
ties for sale.
Roughly a third of
homeowners owe
more on their mort-
gage than they could
recoup from a sale.
Data released
Tuesday showed that
U.S. home prices


rose at a slightly
slower pace in the 12
months that ended in
March, a sign that
weak sales have
begun to restrain the
housing market's
sharp price gains.
Real-estate data
provider CoreLogic
said prices rose 11.1
percent in March
compared with
March 2013. Though

See RATES/Page E6


*Nl 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engelken Yvonne Jenkin Free Home Price Analysis
BROKER REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKERASSOCIATE REALTOR Fr m P c An l i

vvvvw.=~. itu_'_bu .= m


551IN. ELICGE
A// 041$4 0


DIGEST PHOTOS
* Headshots of real estate agents
and associates submitted for
the Real Estate Digest are kept
on file in the Chronicle Editorial
Department. It is the responsi-
bility of the individuals submit-
ting news notes to ensure
headshots have been sent to the
newsroom, and to advise staff
of any name changes.


HOMS -S


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 E3




E4 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Cifii "Ujici.E


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jane on the proper



layering of plants


ayering is a propagation method
where the shoot or stem of a plant
grows into a separate plant while
still attached to the original plant. Suck-
ers at the base of a Red Maple, Acer
rubrum, or Crape Myrtle,
Lagerstromea indica hybrid,
may be unwanted if a gardener
fancies growing a single or ,
multi-trunked tree form. Suck-
ers are generally snipped off
and trunks rubbed clean of un-
wanted shoots and leaves as
soon as they sprout.
Layers are shoots, sprouts or
branches that grow their own
roots and become individual Jane
plants. Root layers often JAN
sprout close to the parent. GARI
Yaupon Holly, Ilex vomitoria;
Ocala Anise, Illicum parviflo-
rum; Simpson's Stopper, Myrcianthes fra-
grans; Wax Myrtle, Myrica cerifera; and
Walter's Viburnum, Viburnum obovatum,
are dense, vigorous, native evergreen
shrubs that often spread by root runners.
The globally unique botanical names are


important so a gardener can be sure to
buy the exact species wanted for a par-
ticular space in the garden landscape.
These native plants are often planted
too close together to allow them to grow to
Z ~ maturity Last September I re-
moved 10 Walters Viburnum
from the entry beds at Dunnel-
lon Public library The planter
did not realize they grow 5 feet
in diameter and 8 to 12 feet tall.
I removed every other one,
planted them in large pots and
left them to recover under irri-
gation in my back yard nursery
This spring, the Walters Vibur-
Veber num will be replanted in the li-
E'S brary's east buffer zone, where
DEN they can grow to maturity as a
privacy screen to block the
view of the back of a row of
commercial buildings.
In front of the library porch railing,
someone planted too many Walters Vibur-
num. The selected variety was 'Densa.'


See JANE/Page E5


Inside...


Monograms for
mom
PAGE Ell
Backyard makeover
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Chair's purpose is a mystery; lamp likely from Japan


ear John: I came
across this piece of
furniture and would
like to know if you
know what it is; if I
it has any history;
and how old it is.
It is not very tall.
Someone said it
was a birthing
chair Of course, it
could be nothing.
It put curiosity to
work to the cat
here. John S
It has no mark- SIKOF
ing or symbols or A1
numbers. I took a
picture of the
hardware to help with the
age, maybe. Thank you any
help would be appreciated.
- KP, Brooksville
Dear K.P: I do not know
what you have, but it is defi-


nitely not a birthing chair My
guess is it is a boot pull chair
for removing one's boots.
Perhaps one of
our readers will
recognize it.
DearJohn: Here
S are pictures of a
S. lamp made from a
ceramic vase that
has been in my
family 50-plus
years. I first saw it
at my grand-
korski mother's house in
SKI'S Galesburg, Illinois.
IC There are no
markings on the
bottom or sides of
the vase. The paint on the
bird side has a raised gilded
outline that makes it look al-
most like cloisonne. The flow-
ers on the back have gilding,
but the paint is not raised.


I have always thought the
colors were beautiful. Do you
have any thoughts as to its
origin? C.K, Inverness
Dear C.K.: Your hand-
painted colorful lamp was
made in Japan. I think it was
produced between World I
and II.
There is no specific collec-
tor interest. Potential dollar
value is decorative. I suspect
it would sell in the $50 range,
perhaps more on a lucky day
Dear John: Enclosed is a
picture of a secretary my
daughter owns. She wants to
sell it. It is probably about
100 years old and in fairly
good condition.
I do not know what kind of
wood it is made out of, so I
am no help there. If you
could just give her an eyeball
estimate of what she could


ask for it, I would be most ap-
preciative. -JR., Internet
DearJ.R: You have a slant-
front secretary bookcase
with serpentine drawers. It
was made in America likely
100 years ago, as you suspect.
The style is taken from the
18th century, so you have an
antique reproduction.
Current market interest is
very soft. If your daughter
can use it, it would be better
kept than sold. Potential
See ATTIC/Page E6
Although someone told
the owner of this item that
it might be a "birthing chair,"
it's almost certainly no such
thing. Its exact purpose is
a mystery; John thinks it
might be a chair used for
pulling off boots.
Special to the Chronicle


i
I
T




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

After several years, they are too
crowded and need regular pruning
to keep them below the railing
height.
Hedges are always high mainte-
nance. Roots cannot get air or mois-
ture too far under the concrete
porch floor, so they stop growing in
that direction. These plants re-
sponded by sending strong roots out
away from the porch. When the roots
found there was light and moisture,
they sent up many root layers which
are now small shrubs.
There is no space in the land-
scape plan for these unwanted
plants to grow The plants need res-
cuing. I severed the main root that
attached the new layered shrubs to
their parent. The babies were left in
place for the wound to heal and to
adapt to growing on their own. A few
weeks later, the Friends of the Li-
brary will dig and put the plants in
pots. They will grow on under irri-
gation in my backyard. Walters
Viburnum will eventually be in-


In my well-drained, humus-rich garden soil,
many of the native screening plant species
are producing layered plants from their roots.


spected by the Department of Agri-
culture and offered for sale by the
library's Friends, supported by my
licensed nursery Money raised will
go toward maintaining the land-
scape plantings.
In my well-drained, humus-rich
garden soil, many of the native
screening plant species are produc-
ing layered plants from their roots.
The Ocala Anise got a head start as I
gently bent long branches stripped
of leaves and lay them in shallow
troughs radiating out from the
parent.
When covered with good, though
manmade soil, the stems sent down
roots at each former leaf node. The
rooted layers then sprouted several
stems with leaves to become many
individual plants. When developed
and strong enough, they will be sev-
ered from the parent and relocated
as needed to block unwanted views
of roads and neighboring homes.


Plant layering is an interesting
gardening activity Any homeowner
can propagate new plants by layer-
ing or rescuing plants that naturally
make plantlets while still attached
to the parent.

Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant Semi-re-

0 CitrusCounty
Nw^Dreaqfea00

M 16 M MJl T FL~ IF"I


tired, she grows thousands of na-
tive plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County, gar-
den. For an appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. corn.


37 S. Davis St. 2/2/1 Imperial model. Home offers large master I
with walk in closet and bath. Great family room with sliders out to a I
20 X 17 Screened lanai. Easy to maintain wood Laminate flooring.
Large laundry room/office space. Sellers are motivated!


4/3 SHAMROCK ACRES HOME on 5 ac nestled in the oaks & pines. Recently painted inside
& out ready for new owner. Fam rm w/pool table & all the toys. Det 2 car garage &
workshop. Call 352-344-5535 to see. $249,900.1583068/710039






WATERFRONT 3/2 home located on beautiful Duval Island adj. to the pastures of Ferris
Farms. The best of two worlds. Like living on a farm w/o the chores & the sparkling
waters of Floral City Lake off the backyard w/a deep water dock. Home has huge
rustic back porch w/separate workshop & 2-car gar. $224,900. Call 352-344-5535 for
appointment today. 1583132/706959.

*957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452

352-344-5535
Rea EMsa www.Cridland.com 12r


Privacy and room to roam in i ,.,i, :,: i : 2/2 with stone fireplace and split
this 2/2/2. 706156 $35,100 708445 $40,500 floor plan. 708448 $44,950
Gary Ayres 302-9329 Pam Shemet 422-2939 Pam Shemet 422-2939



A ir. iui 4
41La


3/2/2 close to shopping and the 3/2 fenced backyard, new paint and Beautifully updated!
river. 709420 $78,500 carpet. 709659 $67,500 709267 $223,000
Steve McClory 422-3998 John Maisel 302-5351 Steve McClory 422-3998


Prime waterfront commercial property
708144 $389,000
Steve McClory 422-3998


350 8 e1701-325711-324749


C^yINNAMONRIDGE


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 E5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RATES
Continued from Page E3

a sizable increase, that was down a
bit from February's 12.2 percent
year-over-year increase.
Home sales and construction have
faltered since last fall, slowing the
economy A harsh winter, higher


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

dollar value is less $500.
Dear John: I purchased an oil
painting at an auction in Ontario,
Canada. I currently reside in Crystal
River and listen to your radio show
often and read your column. I am
trying to research the painting, but


buying costs and a limited supply of
available homes have discouraged
many potential buyers. Existing-
home sales in March reached their
lowest level in 20 months.
Some signs suggest that buying
might be picking up a bit as the
spring season gets underway Signed
contracts to buy homes rose in
March for the first time in nine
months, the National Association of

cannot decipher the signature. Any
assistance from you would be ap-
preciated. -B.A., Internet
Dear BA: Yes, I would be glad to
help. The photograph you included is
out of focus. I need a couple of good
clear photographs of the painting, in-
cluding the front, back, and a close-up
of the signature. Make sure to exam-
ine the back of the painting for nota-
tions about subject matter or possibly
the artist, and then I will finish the


Realtors said last week.
The increase in mortgage rates
over the year was driven by specu-
lation that the Federal Reserve
would reduce its $85 billion-a-
month bond purchases, which have
helped keep long-term interest
rates low. Indeed, the Fed has an-
nounced four $10 billion declines in
its monthly bond purchases since
December

story But be aware that you may
never be able to solve the mystery

John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorskit2aol. com.


S 15HEUCHERACTE 22 CACTUS ST
S3 Car Garage Almost New Oversized Garage
Heated POOL& SPA Open Great Room
Double Lots Corian Kitchen Sweetwater Tradewinds
Stainless Appliances Light Neutral Decor
5 Quiet Cul-de-Sac Dual Pane Windows
j Lots of Cupboards &Cabinets Move In Condition @l
S$237,000 MLS#706997 $173,200 MLS#708265
F ie my Iv'ifatI te,,


REALTY GROUP
REALTYiGROUP


S-eaiigiTe.r it
& Brntwod Reale
www .Ter .it e*y. op~o


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 'VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


-TACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
en & bright definitely describes this beautifully updated maintenance-free DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
,2 villa located on a cul-de-sac in Brentwood in the Villages of Citrus Hills. Maintenance-free vlla with an open floor plan design with great use ofthe space.3 bedroom, Enjoy maintenance-free living in this 2/2/2 w/office in Terra Vista. Dual
N upgraded stainless appliances with gorgeous granite counter tops appoint 2 bath villa featuring eat-in kitchen, pantry, iving room, family room, formal dining room, pane sliding glass pocket doors lead out to a beautiful screened private
Sspacious kitchen. Triple pocket doors open out to extra large lanai. Only ceramic tile, enclosed lanai, screened courtyard, 2-car oversized garage, all situated in inground pool and lanai. It's the perfect place to enjoy your morning
ps from the community pool and golf course. MLS710313...............$165,900 beautiful Terra Vista. MLS703250 ................................................................. $179,000 coffee in the fresh Florida air. M LS 358772.................................$210,000


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
4 bedroom, office, 2 bath, 2 car garage, Cordova Model. Situated on the 3rd fairway of the
championship Skyview Golf Course. Completely upgraded in 200e. Cabinets, granite counter
tops, flooring, baseboards, designer paint and window treatments just to name a few. Added a
lovelysolar heated salt water pool complete with two waterfalls an a fountain in 2009. Pocket
spiders allow beautiful view of golf course Ifyou are quality conscious w/sophisticated tastes,
please don't miss seeing this wonderful home w/neutral colors. MLS 709872......$499,000


-
iii DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, LAKEVIEW VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 2.5 BATH, 3-CAR, WOODSIDE DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Situated along the 10th fairway of the Skyview GC is this NEARLY NEW & HIGHLY
immaculate Bristol model, split plan home in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Great Spectacular Cordova model loaded with upgrades, including granite countertops in Elegance, simplicity and breathtaking describes this 3/2.5/2 with den. This home AMENITIZED St. Moritz model. From the gourmet kitchen to the spacious owners
oor, dining room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy nook, your beautiful gourmet kitchen with built in sky light, custom window treatments and has arguably one of the best views in Terra Vista overlooking 8th green of suite this home incorporates too many options to list.., this home shows like a
nside laundry room. Neutral tile throughout the home, bedrooms are carpeted. gorgeous lighting fixtures. Formal dining and living areas plus a large family room give prestigious Skyview golf course. Professionally decorated throughout with MODEL. Sitting near the top of the hill the vantage point provides a true panoramic
3ated community with access to the world- class amenities of Citrus Hills great spaces for entertaining. Enloy a relaxing retreat on your extended screened completely upgraded kitchen featuring stately cabinets and Conan counters, view from the beautiful stand of trees, view of Skyview Clubhouse to a long vista
country Club. Just minutes to golf courses, pools, sauna, hot tub, Bella Vita lanai with Shoji hot tub. All this plus a 3+car garage with a separate golf cart Stone-accented front with brick pavers on driveway and lanai set this home apart down the fairway. Please ask your agent to see the"paperclip" list for a preview of
witness Centerand Brentwood recreation center. MLS707514...........$239,000 entrance. PRICED TO SELL! This home isa must see.MLS353844.............$345,000 from all others. Maintenance-free living atits best. MLS 707623............$349,000 the home's extensive features. MLS 710274.......................................................... $415,000

Terms 6 Moth or More
Ter Vist & rnw odR nas Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS BRENTWOOD, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS This home comes with all the luxuries you'd expect from this gated HUNT CLUB, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR GARAGE Come take a look atthisfullyfurnished home in the community of Brentwood.
Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished community. 2 bedroom plus a den, 2 bath and 2 car garage, high ceilings, Single Family Home Unfurnished, nicely upgraded kitchen, tile floors and 2 bedroom plus a bonus room. Convenient to the community pool and
detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, and 2-car garage. Open floor plan enclosed lanai with hot tub, plantation shutters, triple slider. Your backyard carpet in bedrooms. Extended lanai with pavers. All appliances. Citrus exercise area. Perfect for seasonal or full-time residence. All rental prices
with lots of space. Social membership is included. 2121.............$1,200 overlooking the waterfountain and it backs up tothe park 3288.......$1800 Hills Social Membership and lawn care included. #303317..........$1,550 are based on one year rental. 6 months are negotiable. #1126.............. $1,350


E6 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014




CITmUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-.00





VIAL


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
Pears can be dried, which concentrates their flavors and sweetness.
Add more variety to the family table by including fruit in your canning,
freezing or dehydrating mix.



Canner's garden


looks to the long term


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

A canner's garden is not your typi-
cal vegetable patch. With its full-scale
production, distinctive varieties and
four-season harvests, it's more for the
future than the moment
"Canner's gardens aren't really so
different in what they grow Where
they're really different is in how
much they grow," said Daniel
Gasteiger, author of "Yes You Can!
And Freeze and Dry It, Too" (Cool


Springs Press, 2011).
"Do some serious planning," said
Gasteiger, of Lewisburg, Pennsylva-
nia. "How often do I serve corn?
How often do I serve broccoli? Then
consider how often you'll use it in
the form you'll use to preserve it. I
use broccoli much more often fresh
than I do frozen."
The biggest challenge facing food
preservationists tends to be deter-
mining how much to grow.


See CANNING/Page EO10


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news releases about upcoming community
events. Write the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and where it will take place
and other details.
* News releases are subject to editing. Call 352-563-5660 for details.


-7 4 r )'I /9 I T Fi


(jp Prudential
Florida Showcase
Properties
NEW LISTING






$.4 505 W Chase St
S MLS 710381 $255,000
Spacious, open 3/2.5/2 pool home
w/family room, fireplace.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


NEW LISTING
NEW LISTING


Mr1? 4842 N Crestline Dr
- MLS 710320 $199,900
Many upgrades in this beautiful 3/2/2
w/pool. Must see!
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW LISTING


/,-fC ""- 651 E Hartflord SI 34-2A
10 MLS 710311 $69,900
Bright &welcoming 2/2 furnished
ground level condo.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


ww~j


10150W 541 W Ted Williams Ct
MLS 704863 $795,000
GRAND custom luxury w/GRAND views in
this stunning, exquisite home.
Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553


_dgs




,, i4962W Custer Dr
,- MLS 707737 $225,000
Open & bright, 3/2/2 pool home;
fenced area for pets.
Mike McHale 352-302-3203






. C^' .", .,.. .- -...
.T,,S 2136 N Lakecrest Lp
MLS 708329 $194,500
Beautiful Maintenance Free 3/2/2 is move
in ready w/private backyard.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


,Zij4 5278W Yuma Ln
MLS 709479 $248,900
EXQUISITE home w/a lanai to envy!
Landscaped, private yard.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952


V", m1- 1980 WTall Oaks Dr
MLS 706190 $224,900
Custom built, updated 3/2.5/2 pool home
w/new roof in 2012.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


/if l ~ 1121 N Chance Way
MLS 102458 $17711,300
Take a "chance" on this fine 3bd/2ba
pool home. Itwon't disappoint!
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


O I153 Linder Dr
MLS 708003 $220,000
Customized beauty w/lots of space;
3/3/3-two master suites & pool.
Andrea Migliaccio 352-422-3261







J,Ala$ 1571 E Seattle Slew Cir
MLS 705988 $199,900
Very nice, light, bright & open 3/2/2-gated
community. Near amenities.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


1 300 E Glassboro Ct 18-3B
MLS 705063 $68,500
Furnished 2bd/2.5ba Townhouse hop,
skip or jump to community pool.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


PINE RIDGE CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. .. 20W.Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 (352) 746-0744
@ 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC Anindependentlyowned and operated brokermemberofBRERAffiliates LLC Prudenmal,the Prudential

i I I,,,, I ,I oIe I 1,,eI,,hl I I I II ,, h iI I .
le~ zD EI .. I . I I I ,S .. I h ,h~ ,, I1 ,, S OI,,I .. ..i 1Sh,


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 E7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MICHAEL PATE/Chronicle
The Mosley family says that their new backyard oasis is a dream come true and is sure to be well used making family memories.

Pros team up to give owners of Citrus County's ugliest backyard the makeover of their dreams


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HERNANDO
after a long wait, the yard dubbed
the ugliest in Citrus County has a
new look.
It's all thanks to local compa-
nies that stepped up to the plate to help
a backyard in need.


The Mosley family knew for a while
they had an ugly yard. But now, thanks
to Jason Aguilar's Landscaping, Crystal
Casual Inc., Mosaic Tile and Remodel
and Color Country Nursery, it's gone
from awful to awesome.
'All of us combined made the final
product look great," said Clayton An-
drews, president of Mosaic Tile and Re-
model. "I think together we made a


great team. Through this we were able
to help the community, which was one of
the coolest things I have ever been in-
volved with."
Recently, the Mosleys won a $10,000
makeover at the Chronicle-sponsored
inaugural Home and Outdoor Living
Show The event brought together more
than 50 community and business part-
ners for home and outdoor enthusiasts


and featured an "ugliest backyard" con-
test. Entries were posted at chroni-
cleonline.com and readers cast their
votes for the top "honor"
Titled "Backyard not suitable for my
children," Anna described her backyard
online as, "Broken swing set and no
grass. There is nowhere to put their


Page EO10


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014




Cimrus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute
their expertise to columns in Health & Life./
Tuesday
* Read up on all things school-related in the Chron-
icle's Education section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting
recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for
the week in the Religion section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses in the Business
section./Sundays


> j


BANK OWNED-CITRUS SPRINGS, FLI
Two-story 4BR/2.5 BA. Formal DR,
office/study. $129,000 MLS#70791 2
1---.Sv


GREAT LOCATION-INVERNESS, FL
2BR/1.5 BAin Deerwood. 1 acre
$61,999 MLS#708261


COUNTRY LIVING-INVERNESS, FL 1
2.33 acre wooded tract in Deerwood. Fenced. I
a$27,750 MLS#709930 I


President of Mosaic Tile and Remodel Clayton Andrews, left, and Jason Aguilar's Landscaping assistant Ryan Aguilar,
right, ensure that final touches are in place for the Mosley family's new fire pit and grill.


GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220.0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


Investors Realty mma
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.nyflorida-house.con


CLASSIC ELEGANCE UNSPOILED NATURE
French Country Estate on 6 acre MOL in desirable location close to Inverness Secluded 80+ acre farm close to Crystal River Rolling pastures, lush meadows,
4,078 sq ft of luxury ', ,,, i '. I, ,i.h end finishes you desire ponds, mature oak trees 2 spacious and luxuriously remodel;I rtti-,hp are
I I I 1' i ... I .I I deck, 3 car garage, plus careful positioned in a beautiful setting for maximum Ir v isit
' i .. 1 .1.. I 1. VIsit WW MyCitrusCounty Estate co for www mycrystalriverfarm com for an interactive tour
....i.. , ,,

z2/1 situated on 1 z
with lots of fruit
great room boasts
$274.000


V RIVERFRONT RETREAT PINE RIDGE ESTATES Citrus Hills
Beautiful 2004 Avanzini Model, nicely
treed 1 ac lot High ceilings, fireplace,
w/Jetted tub
private lanai
Ji-|ustthe right size w/tons of upgrades
$499,000 $469,000 $189,900
W, -,..1.J I I W-I


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY FASCINATING RIVER VIEWS MOVE RIGHT IN BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! DESIRABLE CYPRESS
- no 1 2 master suites, apart 3/2 home built 2007 on 13 acres on Enjoy this 3/3/2 pool home on a 1 acre VILLAGE LOCATION!
ment lower level Upper level the banks of the Withlacoochee corner lot with mature oak trees and Elegant 3/2/2 pool home on quiet
accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane across from Half Moon-Gum Slough lots of privacyl Very well maintained, cul-de-sac Family room w/wood beams
shutters, security system, updated Preservel HW floors, fireplace, cherry fireplace Open kitchen w/eatng,
kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of I, , .1. ... .. .. I I I
seawall, boat liftl Everything just .1 i d ii
wating for you $488,000 j $489,000 i1 $169,000 ,i,. i' $165,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 A
After Hours 352302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.alldtrusrealty.corn


LuMiel ,AMERICAN
L hU Mieme Realtor EL'TR REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N.Ie.ntoH.
tcei:v (352) 697.1685 l-k FL346
L Cell:1351) 697.1685 = 352-746360


'4. 4~t~


*1 tl F I E iI -

TERRA VISTA
SFabulous "Richmond"
model pool home in
"The Hunt Club" with
over 2,300 s.f. with
Outstanding view of the
'- lake. MLS 707324
., $386,900


Beautiful gained :orniniBulii
rK f Belnirl Hills F~abulous,
312pool hone vvinih
lilslpacius rccns aridiqr
ceilirq A fluise
NILS 761


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 E9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A good rule of thumb from the LSU AgCenter is to expect 120 ears of sweet corn
for every 100-foot row. The biggest challenge facing food processors is
determining the right quantities to plant.


CANNING
Continued from Page E7

The Louisiana State University AgCenter
has created a vegetable production chart for
expected crop yields per 100-foot rows of:
Lima beans (Bush): 1 bushel shelled or
32 pounds.
Beets: 100 pounds.
Cabbage: 85 heads.
Corn: 120 ears.
Pepper (Bell): 125 pounds.
Squash (Winter): 150 pounds.
Cucumbers: 170 pounds.
Strawberries: 170 pounds.
Tomatoes (Slicers) 250 pounds.
If you only have a 50-foot row of a crop, cut
the posted yield in half, LSU says. If you
have a 10-foot row, then use one-tenth of the
posted yield.
"The smaller your space, the more im-
portant it is to use succession gardening,"
Gasteiger said. That means planting a sec-
ond crop in the same space after the first
one is harvested. Shop for short-season va-
rieties if planting successive crops.
Also, choose cultivars carefully Some are
better than others for canning, freezing or
dehydrating.
"If you're going to plant to preserve, you'll
probably want the highest density (yielding)
producers you can get," Gasteiger said.
"Canning tomatoes are typically much
firmer and less flavorful than slicing toma-


toes, but better (for canning) because they
hold together when cooked."
How long do canned foods last?
"If the food was canned safely, it should
remain safe indefinitely No pathogens
should grow on them," said Jeanne Brandt,
a professor and Master Food Preserver co-
ordinator with Oregon State University
That program trains and certifies volun-
teers who help county Extension staff pro-
vide food safety and preservation
information.
"Try not to preserve more than you can
consume in a year or two though because
the quality deteriorates," Brandt said. "It
breaks down in the jar It toughens. The
color also changes dramatically"
Kimberly Culbertson of Hillsboro, Ore-
gon, is a Master Gardener who later earned
a Master Food Preserver certificate.
"I got into preserving in part because it's a
step up from gardening," she said. "I used to
be in a rush to give away any surplus fresh veg-
etables before they'd spoil. Now, as canned, I
can share them throughout the year"
She also recommends freezing, pickling and
dehydrating as a way of preserving different
food groups and offering up different flavors.
"I individually quick-freeze fresh fruit, then
package it for the deep freeze so I can portion
it out for cooking and snacking," she said.
"Dried fruits concentrate flavors and sweet-
ness and add another dimension to cooking.
"I pickle peppers and they can easily,"
Culbertson said. "Tomatoes bring back sum-
mer every time I open a jar"


BACKYARD
Continued from Page E8

bikes and toys. The dogs need a good
backyard as well. I am hoping and
praying to win this for the kids to
have an awesome new backyard. I
know my seven kids would be so
excited."
To her disbelief, she won.
The family of nine Ken, Anna,
Krystal, Shelby, Brittany, Danyelle,
Noah, Abigail and Elijah envi-
sioned a family backyard where
they could enjoy a barbecue while
the kids swim or play in a sandbox
during the day, and where they can
sit around a fire pit in the
evenings.
"This is a dream come true, as we
are going to have fun barbecuing,
looking at the flowers and watching
the younger kids play in the sand-
box," Brittany Mosley said.
The Mosleys are now enjoying
something they couldn't a couple of


weeks ago their own backyard.
"I absolutely love it and come
out here every morning," Anna
Mosley said. "It is so quiet and I
hear the birds. It is my little
oasis."
Jason Aguilar explained the
family-friendly oasis features a
sandbox, fire pit, lawn furniture,
mulch and lots of colorful plants for
both colorful attraction and
framework.
"The designs of the Mosleys' vi-
sion has come out fabulous," said
Craig Collins, president of Color
Country Nursery Inc. "The team has
done a great job in this
transformation."
Anna Mosley said she couldn't be
happier and the grill is ready to be
fired up this weekend. In the mean-
time, she is going to be enjoying her
hobby of taking close-up photos of
insects.
Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn
Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@chronicle
online, com.


E10 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


.AM




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
This laser cut wood monogram from Girlytwirly.com can be painted and hung
or placed on a mantel or wreath as a unique gift for Mom.


Monogrammed gifts -
f n THE VIEW IS SO INSPIRING, YOU WIL
g r e a JCondo ON KINGS BAY! Pretty 3/2 end unit w/11
plantation shutters, REDUCED TO $179,901
are great for mom


KIM COOK
Associated Press
Thanks to modern technology,
we're now able to monogram just
about anything, cheaply and easily
Teens can initial their water bot-
tles, kids can get their names on
lunch boxes, dads have their own
golf balls, and moms ... well, let's
take a look at some fun, personal-
ized gift ideas for her
Pottery Barn offers lofty and light
faux-mohair throws in a palette of
soft hues, embroidered with an ini-


tial perfect for summer's air-con-
ditioned rooms. If Mom's lucky
enough to have a quiet space of her
own, consider giving her a lettered
linen pillow or a pretty art piece
with a monogrammed initial on
linen, framed in alder wood. Simple,
paperwhite-scented soaps etched
with Mom's initial would make a
nice-smelling gift for her bathroom.
(www.potterybarn.com)
Or consider an initialed acacia-
wood bath caddy, with spots for a
See GIFTS/Rage E12


SI --'--
PRIME 4.5 AC COMMERCIAL SITE w/4000 sq. ft. PARKSIDE VILLA HOME ........... i... ... APPROVED SHORT SALE Ready to close. 3/2/1
warehouse. $349,000 #357257 Debbie Tannery 352- 2 Bedrooms plus bonus room & garage. $40,000 fenced yard & room for a pool. $66,500 #708682.
613-3983 #7102113833 N Briarberry. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 1230 S Cornell Terr Jean Cassese 352-201-7034


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 Ell




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GIFTS
Continued from Page Ell

beverage, phone, and an e-
reader or book. A luxurious
linen throw can be embroi-
dered with either hot-pink or
lime-green thread. Or get really
creative: Come up with every-
body's favorite things about the
family matriarch, then order a
personalized love letter on can-
vas for her that's titled "Dear
Mom." (wwwredenvelope.com)
Jonathan Adler loves a mono-
gram. His chic, initialed Lucite
trays in Acapulco and Bargello
prints kick up the modem vibe.
Adler's also carrying New York
artist Trey Speegle's cus-
tomized vintage pop alphabet
collages, which incorporate
whimsical elements like vin-
tage paint-by-number art.
(www.j onathanadler.com)
Lily Pulitzer-print acrylic
trays with Mom's initials in the
center would make pretty yet
practical gifts for entertaining
or to hold fragrances or trin-
kets. For her home office, con-
sider a magnetic note board
covered in an elegant black-
and-white damask print.
(www.thestationerystudio.com)
Girly Twirly's got a wide
range of fun gifts that can be
monogrammed. Chinoiserie
and preppy-print cutting
boards, umbrellas and un-
scented candles are part of the
product mix. Also here: laser-
cut monograms in unfinished


wood that you can paint or dec-
orate yourself and hang with
ribbon on doors, windows or
anywhere Mom wants to make
her mark (www.girlytwirlycom)
For the gardening mom,
check out Williams-Sonoma's
monogram-able gardening
tools, including Sophie Con-
ran's potting scoop, and a chic
copper trowel. (www.williams-
sonoma.com)
San Francisco designer Jen-
nifer Morla offers her signed ty-
pographic giclee prints
exclusively through personal-
ized gift retailer Mark & Gra-
ham. She composes her pieces
using a variety of fonts and
midcentury elements.
Also at Mark & Graham are
linen shower curtains, cham-
bray pillow shams, and a selec-
tion of totes for Mom to take to
work, or weekends at the
cottage.
Company spokesman
Michelle Bowler says the
newest monograms have a
fresh, refined look. "Our li-
brary's top sellers are balanced
between modern and classic
designs. Sans-serif fonts like
Neutra, and single letter ini-
tials are popular," she says.
People are also adding their
own elements like dashes, dots,
lines, circles and parentheses.
(www. markandgraham.com)
If you're craft-savvy, there are
online tutorials on creating your
own monogram using Photoshop
or Word programs, and then af-
fixing them to all sorts of things.
(www.inmyownstyle.com)


Associated Press
Copper gardening tools from Williams-Sonoma. The tools inscribed with Mom's initials would make a
welcome gift for the green-thumbed matriarch.


Y1 "Always There For You"
KEYJ GAIL COOPER
REALTY Multimillion Dollar Realtor
.7 .(352) 634-4346
!I^7I.t Office: (352) 382-1700
rit-' .' E-mail me: homes4u3@mindspring.com


SMART STYLE SMART BUY!
Built in 2006 3+office/2/2
* Staggered wood cabinetry SS appliances
* Granite in kitchen and baths
* Interior painted and new carpeting in 2013
* Side entry garage finished floor
* Laminate flooring in Great room and office
All rooms are vaulted
* Move in and enjoy
4708505 $154.900


inA
PRIVATE DOCK AND BOAT LIFT!
* 2/2 detached single story condo
* Open views of the Indian River
* Fish cleaning sink w/electric and water
* Gorgeous engineered hardwood flooring
* New dual paned windows
* Updated granite island kitchen
* SS appliances refaced wood cabinetry
* Home warranty for the buyers
#710266 $229.900


K. w r w.-.~





LAKE ROUSSEAU FISHING SPECIAL.
2/2 in mobile home park on
the lake. Split floor plan w/
large enc. porch & shed.
$24,000. Call Capt. Lee Harris
at 352-489-4949. MHDO04.


WELL MAINTAINED OVERSIZED 2/2/2
VILLA W/ENLARGED SCREENED
ROOM. Solar tubes, great view,
oversized great room & many
more extras. $99,900. Call
352-344-5535 for appoint-
ment today. 1583130/705997.


E 957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452

352-344-5535
LII www.Cridland.com


I IGulf to Lake Hwy Ciystal Rivei
SCall (352) 795-7007-(727) 515-6571


E12 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014


17 ....iJI .., ..Tours. @ IJww IJ .I.I..lIIBJ.Iom




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 E13


Illinois governor's mansion gets brood of chickens


Animab promote sustainability t W*-F>


Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -
Things are getting a little
fowl at the Illinois gover-
nor's mansion.
A flock of eight clucking
hens has moved onto Exec-
utive Mansion property, lay-
ing eggs that are eaten by
guests dining at the home in
downtown Springfield.
The chickens, which peck
at flowers, recycle plant
waste and provide manure
for the gardens, live in a do-
nated coop that's inside a
fenced-in enclosure. The
poultry's part of an ongoing
sustainability effort
Backyard chickens are
legal in Springfield and
several other Illinois com-
munities and have become
increasing popular as part
of a local food movement,
among other reasons.
The Springfield bureau
of Lee Enterprises re-
ported the chickens typi-
cally lay an egg a day which


is often scrambled with
cream by mansion staff.
The barnyard animals have
also become a popular
spectacle for school chil-
dren visiting the 159-year-
old Italianate home.
"It's really the highlight,
much more so than the
house," said Mansion di-
rector Dave Bourland.
"They all ask, 'Why do you
have chickens at the gov-
ernor's mansion?"'
The hen house includes
various types of chickens,
including Rhode Island
Reds and Ameraucanas,
which were rescued from
a nearby farm. The hens
munch on chicken scratch
and garden vegetation.
There is, however, one
thing missing from the
backyard.
"We don't have a roos-
ter," said Herman Lewis,
the mansion's master gar-
dener who tends to the
chickens. "They'd make
too much noise."







&.'
my *


No Job Too Small
Residential & Commercial Buildings
APPROVING ASSISTANCE WITH BUILDING DEPARTMENTS
Country Architect Florida Registered Architect


John Warren White
PA ARCHITECT
THE MOST EXPERIENCED ARCHITECT IN HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTY
Cell 352-540-8687 352-796-4972
jwhite198@tampabay.rr.com In


Associated Press
Herman Lewis, the Illinois governor's mansion mas-
ter gardener and chief chicken tender, holds one of eight
chickens that peck at flowers, recycle plant waste and
provide manure for the gardens inside a fenced-in enclo-
sure at the property. They're part of an ongoing sustain-
ability effort championed by Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn.


Stone Fireplace
2600 sq. ft., well, new paint, deck,
3 bed + bonus room
#710208 $143,000


I ,ltezaadete -;
REAL ES IAIE, INC. BLfIST
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY. "
I I CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 "Vt
OcE: (352) 795-6633 Realtor
WWW.ATLEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


New A/C, Roof
Cabinets, appl., paint, tile,
2 baths, hot tub
#708977 $119,900


www.listerlistings.com





E14 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014







Real Estate


Classifieds

-iA -


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 5635966


Fa:132 UWN6 I Toll I-ei -M) 85-24 1 Em il -lsilcs~hoiloln~o I. h~e w w h nOo -nine


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Privacy, 5 Acres
alarm sys. $475. mo
352-464-3136,464-3499

HOMOSASSA
Furnished Dbl. Wide, /2
acre 2BD/2BA carport,
scrn. por., Nice $650
+ Dep. 352 628-1723

HOMOSASSA
unfurn. 2/2w/enclosed
back porch, shed w/
WD hkup., clean, pri-
vate, almost '/2 acre,
3771 S. Millston Pt.
$495.mo 352-503-6703

INVERNESS
1/1, $375/mo 1st, last
sec. Pets negotiable
9929 E Bass Circle
(352) 212-3385




$12,000
In Homosassa
2Br/1Ba 1982 SW
NO HIDDEN FEES!
Includes Delivery
1-727-967-4230

2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell


MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

NEW NEW NEW
1460 Sq ft 3/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $60k
352-795-2377

NEW NEW NEW
MUST SEE
2036 Sq ft 4/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $70k
352-795-2377

Palm Harbor Homes
limited time offer
$5k towards any
exterior package.
We have 24 wide,
26, 28 and 30 wide
homes. 3 stock units
reduced 26k, Homes
from the $60's.
plantcotv.
oalmharbor.com
or 800-622-2832
Se habla espanol


SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.





FLORAL CITY
2/1 Cent H/A,
1st, last, $525 mo.
(352) 419-5154


"FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
3/2 WATERFRONT,
DOUBLEWIDE
$75.900.
10480 S. McClung Lp.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000




Crystal River
2 BR/I BA Mobile on
Fendced lot, well,
septic, appls. incld.
$19,500 352 -563-0534
Hernando
15 minutes to
Ocala/ Hernando;
5 min to fishing
3/2 w/ land. $49k obo
(352) 795-1272
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on % acre. Mint"
Cond. $500/mo. $1500
clsng cost. 5k dwn. Nw
tile/wd fir. & pnt. 0/F avl.
(352)422-6974
HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on /2 acre
5192 S Amanda PT
$15,000 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/1 BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds
3901 Sonny Ter
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441
Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273

For Sale ,,,
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-
tivated seller will negoti


Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
furn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern 2/1 homes
from $7500 or Lease to
Own from $145/mo.
$700.down + Lot
rent of $265. mo.
10 yr. payoff at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional
55+Park 352 628-5977
Nice Older Singlewide
in Singing Forest Adult
Park, has addition
and partially furn.
Low Lot Rent
$18,300 obo
352-726-9369




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640


FoAr Rent


-ACTIONt
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
S925 & UNDER
$900-3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/unique home/Avail. May 1
$850-3094 N Satin Flower Ter
2/2/2 BH spEcious home
S925-Meadowcrest Villa
2/2/1, ice split pla
$7S100-1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 stoy townhome, canal side

S675 & UNDER
S650-7096 N Dawson Dr.
2/2 mobile Heroaodo
$615-6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2 Bedroom, 2 Barth
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/additinon 1.25 acre
For More Listings Go To
www.GtrustouityHoneRentals.oman

Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf

3/1 .......................$725
3/2...................... $725
2/2/1 ................... $700
AVAIL JUNE
2/1 ......................$500
APART
3/2/2 ................$1200
POOL CARE &LAWNCARE INCLUDED

/1 .......................$450

2/2/11 .................. $650
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggqqs
Property Manaqer/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDGS
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




US 19 Office-$550. |
office/warehouse
1/b-1ba $1200. until.
|incl. 352-634-0129|




CITRUS HILLS
2 story condo 2 bd/27/
ba fully furnished
w/social membership
(352) 201-7229




HOMOSASSA
2/2 Duplex, Lrg. Famin
Rm. carport. $650. mo
icp'ds water & lawn
Care. 352-302-8265

INVERNESS
2/1 Brand New, Upscale
$599. (786)405-3503


HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225



HOMOSASSA
1/1, Duplex $435. mo.
C. Riv. 3/2 House $650
1st.& Sec. 212-4981



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/B $850., sec. $450.
Fenced Yd.563-9857



Beverly Hills
2 BR,1 BA; $675/mo,
1st month free.
(352)442-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
3BR, 1 BA, $650 mo
Extremely Clean,
352 -461-4518


DEB
THOMPSON
SOne call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
r Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
- Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb()vahoo.com
and
debthomeson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.


SL


For Sale ,,


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE
CH~p.NiCE



CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL !

30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
'Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486
352-584-9496/464-2514








Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+ Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's,
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10 x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202

PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870


Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282









BEVERLY HILLS
Beautiful 2/2/2,
New Roof, New NC,
NewAppliances
MLS 707667
Call today!
352-637-3800




2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12x20 shed
etc. $138,500.
(352) 419-6327




For Sakle ,,i
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084



3/2/2 + Den On % acre,
Move in Condition!
Built in 2008
Selena Hills
$165,000.
352-341-0118





Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
BOUTIQUE
Real Estate Group
Buying or Selling?
We Tailor Our
Services.
Teri Paduano, Broker
352- 341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
119E. Dampier St.,
Inverness
TheFLDream.com




Nice private 1200sqft
home w/scrd patio,
carport & security lights.
Close to fishing, boat-
ing & gulf, $42,000 obo
As is. (786) 301-3805


IAMI Z5LLI
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY I




4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location -*
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!




3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods
$119.900.
1 Fig Court W.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Homl^a^^a
Homes jl


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
www.
citruscritters.com










Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BEMTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


EM
"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company+
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone(tamoabav.rr.c
om
ERA American
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt

NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watti
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classified!


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!


Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.corn
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921


$100,000 + Closing
Cost wll get you this
2,100 sq. ft.,
3BR 3'/2 BA Fully furn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268



"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Hoe

Floral City, nice 3/2
open view on Duval
Isl. owner fin. w/15 k
down, 15yrs @ 6%
call Justin Monahan
352-697-0240
ERA American Realty

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


Home Finder

www i r ., I, finder.com


Fikd Your )rw How&

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www. h rn nile I icri finder. corn


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classifieds!


Oak Forest, Floral City
1 acre corner lot off
S Fern Pt. High & Dry.
City Water, Home site
only. Price Reduced
$14,500 352- 678-7145

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!






Tweet,


SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 E15




E16 SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ign~k.%l J.W. MO TO HOW :1 ] i fc



E CITRUS jE i- idi 06.f 0
SCOUNTY ,. .,^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^p|B~B|^
FORUR HOME
OVER 37 e- L E I~ . .. WOREN
YEARS W. ai St. *nenes SUDA 34 5aloa o


ENJOY A LITTLE LUXURY!
I; [ ,.[I d ,,,,I ,.: ,,n n ,[ ,[I. A1
I,. .,- i...,I IIII ,. ,,[,i. i ,... .,,,, I .

I--1
t.tl'i : $,'. 134,900
Owner linancina considered.
Ask loI Mauil ,b Booth 637 4904


COUNTRY LIVING CLOSE TO TOWN




1011 11 ASKING: S145,000
Call Nanc&' Jenks 352 400 80172








MULTI USE, GREAT DOWNTOWN
CRYSTAL RIVER LOCATION
I;,, :.1, 1 ,,:,1 i n ,,h .: ,, I ,,, ,i .1 .,.,, [, r l, : ,
, a ,.,,.,i- .: UU' ,, "l UUh / 1 1' ,, h,,r ,, ,I ,








rhLC :i'ii::.1 LISTED AT $158,200
Call TeNri Slewa 352-220-1008


NATURE ABOUNDS
.'1 :1. ['. '. ':l i'rl.:.|.r [, ii. li.,.. r[.. : : [I. :.[
h..n: .1' ['0 El.. V.[Ill i:..:o.:h.!. ''.['.[.
P rl 1., Jl:l1:00 :00:1 :.:r,!: ,:,I [ l.- .l r ..1.n.
Biir)n, ,,':,'nr lI,,:,r :,! : .> lI.,.. : [,:,,: I
Bri.1 i.
ILt.. -70'5:S. 5250,000
Lorraine O'Regan 352-586-0075


,-.nI A HulL .niVEn EL.01 ft.flHLO I. HIGH ,-rji Elk. ,- ', ,,'I H I HMr.Ix
.,,. .... F, : .. .- 1, .. .i CITRUS HILLS POOL HOME GOLF COURSE .. ,,,,. ..... ,..:. ,,'I: .. H...;
E,,,, |, ,, hll I,,,,,.=. ..,,, .i hl,,,,,]^ 1, ,1 = T ill: ,:,lic- I n= : =i ll |I [,:lin nn h : ,. A: IicI:" ,I h I" I :H I. ... :.- I

.lL: '?i-iiNl S99,000 r IiclI ul iiF *,i r i ..'' '. '-. ASKING $148,900
David Kurtz Cell 954383.8786 r, 1 L ': 7 ::'E.:: PRICED RIGHT AT S199 900 Pal DaVis 3521 2127280
OFF 3527126 6668 Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699 Vieit listainq i, i, i c2iaidaiIs coin

^^ 1 X ^H OPEN HOUSE TODAY 11-3




A ll ,- l l n ll' Fl,,r .EW R ,-,,,h Th : h.:.,.,. In, : :, |. l .1 "* [1.. Fl.. r,. I III |
l P L: A 'A T,: F :, IlE rv [ I, -_:.: I, t.'~ ,,, dt u,,- 1 ,,..II.:,,:.:. : i i.-, ,:,h
P LE. 'ArA H T nG R O V E ';,:I'..'.l, I-h iri.,:l :h1" :. f-. l. ',rl '1,.1 ', .h*:i I.-l 1 1..I,,, .*I|,n,|. h .,:,, .I ,| \\ i.r.I =....I
=L' 71) ,irM 67 S 103 ,000 t i..:., 1 I 1, i 1. tH .h,: =,:1L3 1 ir,, l : ",.. ....., I,,, L
Jeanne or WillardPickrel 212-2410 lL: ::[ .".. 19,,I 900
r.IL : ?Ii )S 119,900rL :7i2'
www.CilrusCounlySold.com Call Stelan Smart at 352.212.0211 Luke WhilehursI 352-476-5578







WONDERFUL WINTER RETREAT I.... ,.,>. :,.,. :1,
FAMILY HOME OR RENTAL! *BI' B 1.i PiniL H ...... .. ,, ,,,,iH,,,-,
TlIr . h.. ,1r ,:,:, I '=. h u.[h I ,:.. .! I. : L ,, 1 .^.. 1,| ,1 1':., H l ',.1 fl I i, ,.i PI'II'IL .L ,. i, ,] ,;n ,,,- H ,.,h: i.,,,., ,l. ,, n ,:
l i,,l r o o n , [ h l l,:.| l L : .r l ., r [ H li li IH ,,,, r J l h.11 ,1I, ._..P. h , ,i.,l ,. ,.,, ,, .
CL 1, 1.. ':[ ,r l l ,! l,:. ,n,,,: 1: :,r : UTki. H ILL'. :EriB E:R'.H IP "l i' ''''H 'h "'"'= *
iL-.. -7.:.:A LISTED S58,500 1L'. I: Iil'i.:. S229727 ,,,r,,r,. ,,r ,, i ,,,,' "
Bring All Offers to Doris Miner Jeanne or Willard Pickiel 352 212 341u r.in- i h- ASKING S175,000
4 352.726.6668. www.CilrusCounylvSold.conm Charles Kelly 352 422 238/7





HOME PLEASES EYE PRICE PLEASES WALLET
RIVER LAKES MANOR I
lc ulc! ,', hc-rr,,n l -l,,,r:,,, 2 [,: h ll~l~ i 1,, 1 ,,:.. h ,,:, : .......... } h ,i, : : ,d ~ _
..i, I,,.iE. '. di,(h l FlI,:,rid F I,:,,,. h,,:1 h ...:: : r. :. W ATERFRONT PROPERTY
,. I. .1 ['by, ,C I, v.. ,i,:h.111,6,h p::[, ,.I:.t : :' :' ,:. _.:h .: .pn T .: i pc,:l,, I: :. hijh, h ,, :.. I ,-c- i ii l,,-iz
l-.r, i 'l ,'.,i-,i-l ,i-ln 1 ,:,r ,'. l~l ,! ,jil .:i.i ,'. :*1 ,u 1 :. = = i:..:.,. h .=" : ,, ,:,,l 1:=.l .:..:.l Il ,- ,l lh!r^ :. j. ".,, |,rl |,:, II -i ill 'r, ,,.i,,
h: I. -I-, I -I I-I.H LI I- -Ih,- I ': I:, :H II 1 -1 P ,.l .,:h l! l,,,, ~l "1 nl! lII illl
efi ,',i,,. ,,, I':Ii",, I,, ,,I': II": ,: im ',j,.nm f :,, h. :.. I,,.t'^ ^ l h:.,,: I,':t,; M: H h :ii ,.N l,,,,II ,,, ,
|',''.i. i I :.III,, .n.. II,, ;,n~h..,n.I, ,.I: .,i t Utl :'i :ii A SK IN G S67,900 .d,:,, I ..lh" I'-II.,! W ,.
kIL'.' I7 l.f.. ASKING 569,900 Pal Dai'is 352i212 7280 Al S25K Ihis won' lasi!
Call Nancy Jenks 352-400W-8072 VieiL listlinqs ii it i c21paidai'is coin Call Shanna Casey 4 352-270-1352


STONERIDGE PARK

,'. li-n 1 ',n I .:.i lr n'. n.:ini.I i .. I I ...:. .I L i.: .
.h. ."I '
PRICED _ $24 500
WIIEF I IIllL PJl I.3T 5 2l1,i'IH. LI I-26 I666
Willard Pichre1 352 726.6668


COUNTRY ACREAGE ON PAVED ROAD


TWO BEDROOM. ONE BATH HOME
IN BEVERLY HILLS
Cl.-.,: [.-. :h. opl'.. rl: .:.- lh.!

iL.. 7 1:.:. $S39,700
Call Isaac Baylon 352-697-2493 1o viewv


*;Lii: [.Pn BiLL i.0'-'1:11'
* ;:. :(.:.. PLU-.I D...:I .
L v.i.-.1 P.0.0l KV P i.1
* H.jI T:.T Ci.1 l.. :.1 i .r .l.I .
*Hi.11, Tr 1 :Lilinq iJ Hr:I!l 11-1
i"1L'. 70:( ::i: S219,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 352 212.3410
iviviv.CilnsCouiilySold.comn