Citrus County chronicle

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Citrus County chronicle
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Newspaper
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Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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Full Text

NFL draft: Buccaneers, Jaguars add offensive weapons /Bl


I[SATURDA II


C I T R U


Partly cloudy,
with a 20 percent
chance of rain.
PAGE A4


MAY 10, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


S C 0 U N TYiI





LONICLE


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
90
LOW
67


City at loggerhead over fire services


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS -As a result of the re-
cent Inverness City Council fire services
workshop, both sides in the issue the
city and the county may be heading to
court.


Not to sue, but to get clarification on
the law and for the city to get answers to
questions staff and council members
have been asking and that, they say, have
not been sufficiently answered.
"Right now you're at a loggerhead sit-
uation," said Mark Lawson, the
Tallahassee-based attorney hired by the


city as a consultant "You've had meet-
ings with county, but nothing is resolved.
If you just have a meeting every couple
of months, you're just kicking the can."
He advised that the city file a "Chap-
ter 164," which deals with governmental
disputes.
"Put your questions in black and white
and take it before the court," he said.
At issue: the county-imposed Munici-
pal Services Benefit Unit (MSBU) for
fire services. Currently, county residents


- excluding Crystal River and Inver-
ness residents pay a flat $54 fee per
residential property parcel. Businesses
pay according to square footage, plus a
fee for the land.
Crystal River is exempt because it has
its own fire department and provides its
own fire services to businesses and
residents.
Currently, the county provides fire
See Page A2


Court

fight kicks

off over

new

districts

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A
court fight over
Florida's political land-
scape kicked off Friday,
as attorneys for the
Republican-controlled
Legislature and groups
suing them clashed over
the question of whether
legislators intended to
thwart the will of voters
when they drew new dis-
tricts for congressional
seats in 2012.
Lawsuits were first
filed two years ago. The
trial is scheduled to start
later this month in a dis-
pute that could ultimately
change the current
makeup of the state's con-
gressional delegation,
where Republicans hold a
sizable majority
In an effort to speed up
the 11-day, non-jury pro-
ceedings, both sides were
allowed to give their
opening statements
Friday
David King, an attorney
representing the League
of Women Voters and
other groups suing the
state, told Judge Terry
Lewis that legislators
used a "shadow process"
which allowed them to
circumvent a constitu-
tional mandate prohibit-
ing legislators from
drawing districts in-
tended to protect incum-
bents or members of a
certain political party
King said evidence in
the case will show legisla-
tors were prodded by Re-
publican consultants to
increase the number of
minority voters in the dis-
trict represented by U.S.
Rep. Corrine Brown,
which stretches from
Jacksonville to Orlando,
in order to lessen the
number of registered De-
mocrats in other central
Florida congressional
seats.
"It was going to make a
significant difference to
these other central
Florida districts," said
See Page A5


Paddling the Withlacoochee


~.- c--- -


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Two paddlers in a tandem kayak make their way down the Withlacoochee River on
a recent morning. Early morning, weekday hours make for excellent paddling
conditions because the river is far less congested than during the weekend.




Officials: Woman bulldozes

home of disliked neighbor


Associated Press


ST AUGUSTINE -Authorities said
a northeast Florida woman who didn't
like her neighbors had their mobile
home demolished.
According to an arrest report, Ana
Maria Moreta Folch of St. Augustine
told a heavy-equipment operator that
she owned the trailer and wanted it
and its septic tank destroyed.
The Florida Times-Union reported
that St. Johns County Sheriff's
deputies were called when the
trailer's real owner arrived Monday


Iand found the demoli-
tion underway
The arrest report
S- said Moreta Folch
S wanted the trailer bull-
a dozed because she
thought its occupants
were unsavory and she
Ana Maria suspected they had
Folch broken into her car
Moreta Folch was charged with
criminal mischief, a third-degree
felony She was released Wednesday
on $10,000 bail. Jail records did not
show whether she had an attorney


CR set to ink


deal with


new manager

A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER City officials are set
to ink an employment deal with their pick
for city manager at Monday night's council
meeting.
The vote on the contract of Dave Burnell as
the next city manager tops the list of issues the
council is expected to tackle that night.
The city's current manager, Andy Houston,
announced his retire-
ment March 31 after IF YOU GO
eight years at the
helm. His last day is 0 WHAT: Crystal
July 18. River government
The city council meetings.
moved quickly to tap WHEN: Tuesday,
Burnell, the city's cur- CRA meeting
rent public works di- 6 p.m.; council
rector, as Houston's meeting 7 p.m.
successor during its WE :Cuc
April 14 meeting. WHERE: Council
Mayor Jim Farley and Chambers, City
the rest of the council Hall, 123 N.W.
said they were opting USRive rysta.
for continuity and
liked the fact that Bur- 0 CONTACT: 352-
nell worked as an un- 795-4216 or visit
derstudy to Houston crystalriverfl.org.
for three years. Hous-
ton, who is the longest-tenured manager in the
city' recent history, has received plaudits for
setting the city on a positive path.
Burnell's deal is set to be effective July 19
and the terms are as follows:
Burnell would receive an annual salary of
$82,000, with a provision that his salary would
be reviewed after one year of service. Officials
say the salary is based on comparable regional
market data for cities including Inverness,
Brooksville, Williston, Wildwood, High Springs
and Dade City
The city would provide health and life in-
surance to Burnell similar to plans extended
to other full-time city employees.
The city would continue to pay a dollar
See Page A2


Veterans honored


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
On Tuesday, more than 160 World War II veterans,
including five from Citrus County, took a one-day,
once-in-a-lifetime Honor Flight to the nation's capital
to visit the World War II Memorial. John Harper poses
with a group of women after returning home to Florida.
See Sunday's Chronicle for more on the Honor Right.


Classifieds ...
Comics ......
5 Crossword ...


.. C9
... C8
.. C7


Community ... .C5, C6
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers .
Lottery Payouts ..
Movies ..........


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C7


FROM HERE TO
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Inverness, county may be headed to court


2014 NISSAN

ALTIMA _


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A2 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


MSBU
Continued from PageAl

services to the city of In-
verness, as it has for many
years, even though the city
has not opted to join the
MSBU.
All county property own-
ers excluding Crystal
River pay a fire services
tax. Inverness pays
$250,000 per year
If Inverness joins the
MSBU, the city's share
would be $349,000, for a
total of $599,000 for fire
services.
The MSBU was imple-
mented by the county in
2013 as a way of raising an
additional $1.3 million for
new equipment and fire-
fighters, offsetting the
shortfall caused by Duke



CR
Continued from PageAl

amount into a 401(a) ac-
count with ICMA-RC as
would be paid on behalf of
Burnell if he were en-
rolled in the Florida Re-
tirement System (FRS).
Burnell would receive
160 hours of annual
leave/vacation each year
Burnell would be paid
a monthly car allowance of
$250, with mileage trav-
eled outside a 50-mile ra-
dius of Crystal River
reimbursed at the stan-
dard IRS rate.
Burnell would be eli-
gible for 20 weeks of sever-
ance if terminated without
just cause; there is also a
provision that would make
Burnell eligible for sever-
ance pay if he resigned at
the request of a majority of
council members in lieu of
being terminated.
The agreement would
be for an indefinite period.
Burnell also was ac-
corded the option of not
living within the city limits
because he has an active
bid on a house outside of
the city limits, and that his
very big boat can't operate
in the canals within the
city limits.
In other business,
Patrick Rose, executive di-
rector of the Save the Man-
atee Club, is expected to
make a 10-minute presen-
tation at the beginning of
the meeting. Rose is ex-
pected to address the sta-
tus of the relationship
between the city and his
organization.
The council will also
tackle the following:
Initiate a new bidding
process for services as city
attorney The city is cur-
rently represented by the
Hogan Law Firm and it is
being encouraged to re-
apply City officials said
they instituted a process in
2008 to have the service up
for bid every five years.
The Hogan Law Firm's
current agreement calls
for a monthly retainer of
$4,625 and for any hours
expended beyond 25 hours
per month to be compen-
sated at the rate of
$200/hour.
The council will also
look at the merger of the
Citrus County Transporta-
tion Planning Organiza-
tion with the Hernando
County Metropolitan Plan-
ning Organization. The in-
terlocal agreement for the
creation of the Metropoli-
tan Planning Organization
will involve the Florida

State BRIEF

Deputies: Man
killed wife and
kids, then self
TAMPA- Deputies said a
Florida man shot his wife and
two teenage children at the
upscale home they rented,
then set the house ablaze be-
fore killing himself.


Hillsborough County Sher-
iff's Col. Donna Lusczynski
said at a news conference
Friday that Darrin Campbell
had purchased fireworks,
gas cans and gasoline in the
days before the family was
killed.
Campbell shot his wife,
Kimberly, and two children
each in the head. Lusczynski
said Campbell then scattered
the fireworks and gas around
the house before setting it
ablaze.
Lusczynski said investiga-
tors are still working to deter-
mine a motive.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.. Energy's
tax dis-
pute in
** ". 2012. Duke
paid $19.6
million of
i its $35 mil-
lion tax
Jim bill in No-
Goodworth vember
Citrus County 2012 and
fire chief, promised
a similar
payment in 2013.
The workshop Thursday
allowed Inverness City
Council members to dis-
cuss what was best for city
residents and businesses
regarding the future of fire
services, since they need
to make a decision.
The one option they
adamantly oppose: joining
the county MSBU as it cur-
rently stands, with a 20-year
commitment and no guar-


Department of
Transportation
(FDOT), Hernando
County, Citrus
County, city of
Brooksville, city
of Crystal River,
and the city of
Inverness.
The MPO board Bur
will have nine vot- next C
ing members and Rive
one non-voting ad- man
visor: Hernando
County (four), Citrus
County (two), Brooksville
(one), Crystal River (one),
Inverness (one), and FDOT
District 7 representative (a
non-voting advisor). All
voting representatives
shall be elected officials
from the member counties
and cities.
The city will also pick a
representative to that
board.
The council will con-
sider a contract in an



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rn
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ar
a


antee of a
Scap on the
amount
residents
can be re-
quired to
pay
Y o u
Cabot don't hand
McBride over your
Inverness checkbook
councilman, to someone
else," said
Councilman Dave Ryan.
"If anyone on this coun-
cil agrees to that, they
ought to be run out of town
on a rail," added Council-
man Cabot McBride.
Some of the fire services
options the council agreed
to consider include:
Joining the MSBU, but
on a possible year-to-year
basis.
A shared program with
the city of Crystal River


amount not to ex-
ceed $3,687.13 to
Florida Aquatics for
removal of Lyngbya
S algae from areas of
Crystal River and
S King's Bay at the
rate of 95 cents per
e cubic foot
nell The city success-
stal fully applied for a
city $100,000 Florida
ager. Department of En-
vironmental Pro-
tection grant on behalf of
One Rake at a Time and
Save Crystal River Inc. for
cleanup of Lyngbya in
King's Bay
The grant funds have
been used primarily to
support the hand-raking
project operated through
the One Rake at a Time
program while SCR's ef-
forts at mechanical har-
vesting have been held up
by permitting issues and
challenges by an outside


If you give the perception
that this isn't about an
assessment, you'd be misleading
a lot of people.

Mark Lawson
Tallahassee-based attorney.


Forming its own fire
department with a combi-
nation of career and vol-
unteer firefighters.
Citrus County Fire Chief
Jim Goodworth addressed
the council near the end of
the two-hour workshop.
Among other things, he ad-
vised the council of the dif-
ficulty to attract and retain
volunteer firefighters in Cit-
rus County because of the
state-mandated level of
training, local economic is-
sues and the high percent-


organization. According to
officials, those issues have
been resolved and Save
Crystal River Inc. has re-
quested that action be
taken to accept the bid re-
ceived for mechanical har-
vesting and approve the
use of the remaining grant
funds to support mechani-
cal harvesting.
In its capacity as the
Community Redevelop-
ment Agency (CRA) board,
the panel will get an up-
date on the city's mini-
grant program that is
currently in place.
Officials will recap the
program from 2010 to date
as well as look at total in-
vestment by the property
owners and the contribu-
tion from the Tax Incre-
ment Financing (TIF) fund.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. corn.


age of elderly people.
"You mentioned several
times about the level of
service and affordability,"
Goodworth said. 'As fire
chief, it is my job to let you
and the county commis-
sioners know what level of
service is being provided.
It's up to you to decide
what level of service you
want to pay for"
McBride, whose son is a
firefighter in Georgia,
stressed that the council is
well aware of the impor-


tance of fire services, of
adequate personnel and
proper equipment to
safely fight fires.
"But folks, we need to
talk," he said, addressing
the communication break-
down between city and
county governments. "Right
now, we're throwing craps
every time we roll the dice."
Lawson concluded the
workshop by saying no
matter what they decide,
it's going to cost
"If you give the percep-
tion that this isn't about an
assessment, you'd be mis-
leading a lot of people," he
said. "It's not a question
about whether you have an
assessment; it's a question
of how it's allocated and
how you exert control over
its growth over a period of
time. Fire is 24/7 and 365,
and it's expensive."


MAY 2014


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This Sunday's CIORNICE
1www.chronicleonline.con


MOSQUITOES?


Contact:
Citrus County Mosquito Control District
www.citrusmosquito.org 352-527-7478


LOCAL/STATE






Page A3-SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Apply now for
Enterprise Zone
The Enterprise Zone De-
velopment Agency is ac-
cepting applications for one
position. The agency was
formed in December 2012
in accordance with state
statute requiring the gov-
erning body appoint a
board of commissioners of
the agency.
This board discusses
economic opportunities and
tax incentives for busi-
nesses within the enterprise
zones. The applicant for
this opening must reside
within one of the enterprise
zone areas. This position
will be for a term of four
years and will expire on
April 30, 2018.
The application form is
available at www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
advboards/advisory_board_
application.pdf.
Send a completed appli-
cation together with a re-
cent resume, to Citrus
County Board of County
Commissioners, Attn: Amy
Pace, 3600 W. Sovereign
Path, Suite 292, Lecanto,
FL 34461; or, for informa-
tion, call 352-527-5258.
Downtown Democrats
to meet Tuesday
The Downtown Demo-
cratic Club will meet at
6 p.m. Tuesday, May 13, at
the B&W drugstore in
Inverness.
Water line work to
cause lane closures
The city of Crystal River
is replacing and upgrading
water lines in the vicinity of
the high school during the
month of May.
This project is funded
from a Community Devel-
opment Block Grant the city
received from the Florida
Department of Economic
Opportunity.
During the course of this
second phase of work,
there will be intermittent
lane and road closures
north of State Road 44 at
the following locations:
Northeast Eighth Av-
enue at Northeast 12th
Street, Northeast 12th Ter-
race, Northeast 13th Street,
and Northeast 13th Terrace
Northeast Seventh Av-
enue at Northeast 12th
Street, Northeast 12th Ter-
race, Northeast 13th Street,
and Northeast 13th Terrace
Detour routes will be es-
tablished during road
closures.
Only one intersection will
be affected at a time.
For more information, call
352-795-4216, ext. 314.
Waterways task force
meeting set Monday
The Citrus County Task
Force of the Citrus/
Hernando Waterways
Restoration Council will
meet at 2 p.m. Monday,
May 12, at the Lecanto
Government Building,
Room 166.
There will be five presen-
tations, most short, with
question-and-answer
periods.
Also on the agenda:
Update on Homosassa
and Chassahowitzka Total
Maximum Daily Load
(TMDL) a scientific de-
termination of the maximum
amount of a given pollutant
that a surface water can ab-
sorb and still meet water
quality standards.
Mercury TMDL
discussion.
Freshwater Electrofish-
ing sampling efforts.
Managing forests for
increased regional water
yield.
Quarterly water quality
reports.
Questions and com-
ments are welcome.


Suggestions for projects
and ideas for consideration
are also welcome.
For more information, call
Al Grubman at 352-726-
2201 or Jennifer Noland at
352-796-7211, ext. 4378.
-From staff reports


Job fair Wednesday


Job-seekers should

prepare now

Special to the Chronicle

Representatives from nearly 30
local businesses with jobs to fill
plan to participate in the third an-
nual Spring Job Fair on Wednes-
day at the College of Central
Florida's Learning and Confer-
ence Center in Lecanto.
The job fair, sponsored by Ca-
reerSource Citrus Levy Marion in
conjunction with the college, runs
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and is open
to all job-seekers. There is no
charge to attend and registration


is not needed; however, profes-
sional attire is required and will
be strictly enforced.
"For job-seekers, this is a great
way to meet with employers and
apply for jobs before walking out
the door," said Frank Calascione,
CareerSource Citrus Levy Mar-
ion's business development man-
ager for Citrus County "For
businesses, the venue offers a fast,
efficient and cost-effective way to
recruit."
To date, the following employ-
ers plan to attend: Arcadia Home
Care and Staffing, AT&T Commu-
nications Connection (AT&T Au-
thorized Retailer), AT&T Inc.,
AutoZone Inverness/Crystal
River, C.E.M. Solutions, Care-
Here, CD Staffing, Childhood


Development Services, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office and Fire
Services, Citrus Memorial Health
System, Crystal River Health and
Rehabilitation, Experience
Works, Fountains Memorial Park,
Health Center at Brentwood, Hos-
pice of Citrus County/Hospice of
Nature Coast, Key Training Cen-
ter, Maxim Healthcare Services,
New Horizons Village, Plantation
on Crystal River, Staff America,
Sunflower Springs, Superior Res-
idences of Lecanto, Taylor Col-
lege, Walgreens (Store 11306),
West Coast Insurers of Crystal
River and Western & Southern Fi-
nancial Group.
"We are excited that there is
such interest and that so many
employers are participating,"


Calascione said. "This is a very big
opportunity for our community"
During the job fair, Career-
Source Citrus Levy Marion staff
will be available to help job-
seekers apply for jobs and register
with Employ Florida, the state's
premier online job bank. Job-
seekers who plan to attend are en-
couraged to show up early, bring
printed copies of their resume
and be prepared with a one- to
two-minute introduction, or "ele-
vator speech," highlighting work
experience, training and abilities.
Job Fair preparation tips can
be found in the Job Seekers
Resource Center section of
careersourceclm.com.
For information, call 352-249-
3278, ext. 3206, or 800-434-JOBS.


Tradition and technology


Insurer

values

independence

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

The history of
the Hagar
Group, which
parallels the
growth and develop-
ment of Citrus County
has taken another turn.
With deep roots as a
family business, the
Inverness-based com-
pany has evolved from
being the sideline of a
pioneer banker to a
full-service insurance
company
Along the way, it has
adjusted to area growth,
the expanding complex-
ity of the insurance in-
dustry and changing
needs of its customers.
And while its operat-
ing environment contin-
ues to be shaped by
government regulations,
more litigation, compe-
tition and new technol-
ogy, after 85 years, it
remains a community-
based business with a
hometown feel.
The company dates
back to 1929. It was
founded by banking pio-
neer George H. Bran-
nen Sr inside The Bank
of Inverness.
Brannen's son-in-law
Tom Hagar took over
the agency in 1962,
when a new law re-
quired separating banks
from insurance compa-
nies. About eight years
later, Hagar bought the
company, then known
as Hagar-Brannen
Insurance.
Through the years, as
the business grew, Tom
Hagar purchased other
insurance agencies.
About 25 years ago, his
son Greg Hagar re-
turned to Inverness and
entered the business. It
wasn't his first choice -
after college, he moved


' "M,'.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Greg Hagar, president of The Hagar Group, has recently taken over day-to-day
operations of the Inverness-based company.


to Nashville and tried to
break into the music
business as a songwriter.
"It was a great experi-
ence for me," he said.
"It made me appreciate
the opportunity I had
here, and another great
thing, there's a lot of
people who grew up in
Citrus County who
would like the opportu-
nity to come back. I was
very fortunate."


So he turned his ef-
forts to learning the in-
surance business and
helping the company
grow Now, after a
quarter-century of
working with his dad,
Tom Hagar, he has
taken over the agency
and is company presi-
dent. Tom Hagar serves
as chairman of the
board.
Brandel Eldridge,


Know rules, deadlines


for primary vote


Special to the Chronicle

Florida is a closed primary state,
which means voters are limited to
voting for candidates in the party in
which they are registered on the
last day of registration, which is 29
days prior to the election (July 28,
2014), as well as any non-partisan
candidates, such as school board,
judicial races and any referendums
on the ballot.
For the upcoming primary elec-
tion on Aug. 26, if you are registered
as Republican as of July 28, 2014,
you will vote a ballot with Republi-
can candidates, non-partisan can-
didates and referendums.
If you are registered as a Democ-
rat as of July 28, you will vote a bal-


lot with Democratic candidates,
non-partisan candidates and
referendums.
If you are registered in a minor
party or no party affiliation, you
will vote for non-partisan candi-
dates and referendums only
These rules only apply to the pri-
mary election. The primary elec-
tion is for the purpose of having the
major parties select their nominee
to go to the general election, on
Nov 4, 2014, when voters may vote
for any candidate.
Contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office for information or as-
sistance in preparing to vote in the
upcoming elections. Call 352-341-
6740 or visit the website at
wwwvotecitrus.com.


also from Inverness, is
vice president He has
been at the agency for
20 years. He grew up
with Greg Hagar and
left the area after col-
lege and the Army and
worked with a national
insurance company
"We're a full-service
agency; we do all lines
of insurance," ex-
plained Hagar "We do
property and casualty,


personal lines, home
and auto. We do com-
mercial insurance, we
have a full life and
health department and
we also have a financial
brokerage.
"So, we are really a
true one-stop shop in
the county, fully inde-
pendent, too, so we're
not tied to one product;
we can shop all
products."
He said they do not
have any one company
they try to push, but in-
stead try to do what is
best for the insured or
the investor
"Sometimes that
means finding them the
best product and giving
them the best profes-
sional advice," he said.
The company's
biggest insurance seg-
ment is property and ca-
sualty, but its fastest
growing segment is fi-
nancial services, which
includes retirement
planning, securities
and related financial
products.
The company, with 22
employees, has about
7,000 customers with
about $20 million in
premiums, up from
about $100,000 in the
early 1960s.
"Melding family val-
ues with new technol-
ogy has enabled us to
handle more customers
more efficiently," said
Eldridge. "We want to
help our customers; we
want to be there when
things go bad."
"In technology we're
on the cutting edge,"
Hagar said. "With tech-
nology we are always in
touch, we're always
available to our cus-
tomers. We want to
grow, but we still want
to have a hometown
feel.
"We've grown with the
area through the years,"
he said. And he still
writes songs.
Contact Chronicle
reporter Pat Faherty a t
352-564-2924 orpfaherty
(@chronicleonline. corn.


Relays raise


funds for ACS


ERYN
WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Bake sales, car washes and
all of the other assorted
fundraisers for Relay for Life
are over
And Citrus County's totals
are in, as the last of the two
Relay for Life community
events has come to a close.
Citrus County raised
$146,870.71 to benefit the Amer-
ican Cancer Society's efforts to
fund research, education, ad-
vocacy and services in efforts of
fighting cancer, according to In-
verness/Lecanto event co-
chairwoman Katie Mehl.


The Crystal River/Dunnellon
Relay for Life raised $59,511.85
and the Inverness/Lecanto
event raised $87,358.86.
Relay for Life is a national
community-wide event that cel-
ebrates those who have survived
cancer and those wishing to re-
member loved ones lost and
fight back against the disease.
During the event, teams
camped out at the Crystal River
High School in Crystal River
and Citrus High School in Inver-
ness overnight and took turns
walking or running around the
track A variety of activities took
place during the event
Fundraising continues until
the end of July


GRE-G'HAGAR


: :::: .........


v


*


I




A4 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Heightened awareness
and creativity lie ahead for you this
year. You can avoid jealousy and neg-
ative currents by being totally honest in
your personal and professional
endeavors.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Concen-
trate on career matters. Collaborating
with others will lead to positive
changes.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Make
changes to your appearance and your
image. Social activities look inviting
and favorable. The compliments you
get will help to raise your confidence.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You will
have to count on your own skills and
intellectual expertise. Your excellent
memory will help you put the finishing
touches on a project.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Be prepared
to jump into the spotlight. An idea you
have been considering shows poten-
tial. Your enthusiasm and creativity will
persuade others to join in your plans.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Climb the
ladder of success instead of helping
and watching others get ahead. Start
making the moves that will ensure your
prosperity
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Follow
your dreams and unleash your creative
talent. Own your destiny by making the
moves that will carry you to your goals.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Stay in
control of your emotions, and pay at-
tention to your intuition. You will benefit
from a friend's advice.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Part-
nerships will baffle you today. Strive for
greater compatibility Communication
will be the key to better relationships.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
expend too much energy or too many
dollars on an unreliable get-rich-quick
scheme. Research an investment be-
fore you take part.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Excit-
ing opportunities will be available as a
result of new and valuable connec-
tions. Travel will come into play as you
continue your quest for knowledge.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -An older
family member may resist some
changes you are considering making. If
you deal with the problem diplomati-
cally, you will learn something valuable.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- Keep
your emotions out of the equation in
business, investments or medical deci-
sions. Mull over the options, and you'll
choose the correct one.


ENTERTAINMENT


Jon Hamm gets Don
Draper wax figure
NEW YORK What's the
first thing Jon Hamm did when
he saw his wax figure unveiled
Friday at New York's Madame
Tussauds?
Took a selfie, of course.
"That's a no-brainer. I'm prob-
ably not done doing that either,"
he told The Associated Press.
As Hamm, who stars in the
AMC drama "Mad Men," posed
for photos next to the figure, he
joked about the stoic expression
on the mannequin saying "a lot
of people would say this kind of
describes my acting (on 'Mad
Men'). A lot of waxy stares, a lot
of silent brooding."
Hamm was joined by his long-
time girlfriend, actress Jennifer
Westfeldt, who marveled at how
much the figure looked like him.
Jolie, Pitt ponder
screen reunion
LONDON Angelina Jolie
says she plans to cut back on
movie roles to concentrate on her
humanitarian work, though she is
| mulling an on-
screen re-
union with
plo \partner Brad
Pitt.
1Attending a
L Kensington
Palace cos-
Angelina tume event for
Jolie her new Dis-
ney movie "Maleficent" with Pitt,
Jolie told reporters that "we are
thinking about it." They haven't ap-
peared in a movie together since
"Mr. and Mrs. Smith" in 2005.
But she said at a news confer-
ence Friday that her priority was
her work as an envoy for the
U.N. High Commissioner for
Refugees and the Preventing
Sexual Violence Initiative.
She said acting was "going to


Associated Press
Jon Hamm, right, poses with his wax likeness Friday at an
unveiling at Madame Tussauds in New York.


be taking more of a back seat."
"Maleficent" is out in the U.S.
on May 30.
'Noah' tops baby
names for 2013
WASHINGTON Noah
sailed past Jacob to become the
most popular baby name for
boys in 2013, ending Jacob's
14-year run at the top. Sophia
was the most popular baby
name for girls for the third
straight year.
The Social Security Adminis-
tration announced the most pop-
ular baby names Friday. Noah


was followed by Liam, Jacob,
Mason and William. Sophia was
followed by Emma, Olivia, Is-
abella and Ava.
The most popular baby
names aren't nearly as popular
as they used to be.
A little more than 18,000 ba-
bies born last year were named
Noah. In 1950, when James was
No. 1, more than 86,000 new-
borns got that name.
About 21,000 newborns were
named Sophia last year. In
1950, more than 80,000 were
named Linda.
-From wire reports


CITus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, May 10, the
130th day of 2014. There are 235
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 10, 1994, Nelson Man-
dela took the oath of office in Preto-
ria to become South Africa's first
black president.
On this date:
In 1611, Sir Thomas Dale arrived
in the Virginia Colony, where, as
deputy governor, he instituted harsh
measures to restore order.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush reacted with "deep
disgust and disbelief' during a Pen-
tagon visit as he examined new
photos and video clips of American
soldiers abusing Iraqi prisoners. Cit-
igroup agreed to pay $2.65 billion to
settle a lawsuit brought by World-
Comn investors who'd lost billions
when company went bankrupt in an
accounting scandal.
Five years ago: House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi made a surprise one-
day visit to Baghdad to discuss
U.S.-Iraqi economic relations with
the prime minister.
One year ago: The Internal Rev-
enue Service apologized for what it
acknowledged was "inappropriate"
targeting of conservative political
groups during the 2012 election to
see if they were violating their tax-
exempt status.
Today's Birthdays: Author Bel
Kaufman ("Up the Down Staircase")
is 103. Author Barbara Taylor Brad-
ford is 81. Actor Bruce Penhall is 57.
Former Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa.,
is 56. Actress Victoria Rowell is 55.
Rock singer Bono (U2) is 54. Rock
musician Danny Carey (Tool) is 53.
Playwright Suzan-Lori Parks is 51.
Model Linda Evangelista is 49. Actor-
singer Todd Lowe is 42. Actress An-
drea Anders is 39. Race car driver
Helio Castroneves is 39. Rock musi-
cian Jesse Vest is 37. Actress Lau-
ren Potter is 24. Olympic gold medal
swimmer Missy Franklin is 19.
Thought for Today: "Creative
minds always have been known to
survive any kind of bad training." -
Anna Freud, Austrian-born psycho-
analyst (1895-1982).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


H L Pcast City


Daytona Bch. 86
Fort Lauderdale 87
Fort Myers 91
Gainesville 87
Homestead 86
Jacksonville 86
Key West 87
Lakeland 91
Melbourne 85


193167 O.00- n/a n/a
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y
'* ^1^^TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING 151
J High: 90 Low: 67
.. ..'' Partly cloudy, 20% chance of a PM shower

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
}.' High:90 Low:68
", -.-'" 'Partly cloudy, 20% chance of a PM
_-,_ thunderstorm
? T W i MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
.. High: 91 Low. 68'
.- Sunny to partly cloudy, 10% chance of a
S- PM shower
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 90/73
Record /52
Normal 86/68
Mean temp. 81
Departure from mean 4
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 6T
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 85'
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 3.49" Oak, hickory, grasses
Total for the year 14.28" Today's count: 4.4/12
Normal for the year 10.58" u c 5.
*As 7 m at irn Sunday's count: 5.8
UV INDEX: 11 Monday's count: 6.0
O-2minimal, 3-4 low 5-6moaerale. AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday observed: 60
30.19 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES .: ,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) IAFTERNOONi
05/10 SATURDAY 02:53 09:24 15:25 20:59
05/11 SUNDAY 0329 10:12 16:20 21:46
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
Su E Tm T .....................,,B:10 p-m .
% @ M ----------------.............. 6:40 a& m.
SC MOONRISE TODAY 4 23 pm
May14 May21 May28 Jun5 1M 0 01Y.- ............3-52 a.m.
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: Mod. There ito no bum ban.
For mote Infoirmaihon call Florida Dlvreon of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 Fo r more
tnormalion on drought xcndilions, please vistt hae OvCsion o Foresry's Web site:
http:tameafl-t-dol-coroIire wethref4bc
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei an Wedw esdaarmoir SahjrrLy
Hand watering with a sht-off nozzle or micro itigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, Iowers anid shrubs, can be done a any day and at any
lime.
Citrus Countly Utilities' acstomers shoum CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material l 352-527-7669. Scrue re. pLantai;r may qaidty lor a3ildil n11
walening allowances
To report violations. please call: C iol invemess @ 352-726-2321, Cty Co C ,vsaI
River 3,52 795-421. e r 3 13 unjncororate' Cilrus County 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SATURDAY
CHy High Low
Chassahowltzka" 4:15am, 04At 4:30p.m 0.5 It, 11707a.m 0.2 ft
CrystaFivw- 2;42am, 17fl, 2;47p,m 2.0 t, 9:13a.m. 0,6 9:50p,m.O2ft,
Wilthlacoochee* 1224.am, 2-8 It, 12:286p.m. 3.3ft, 6:55a.m. 1.0 7'46p,mO,31t,
Homosassa"' 4:18a.m. 0,8 O8Itt, 400 p.m. t,3ft 10:-03 am. 0,3 fl1


H L Fecast


Miami
Ocata
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: Southeast wind 15 knots then Gulf water
west 5 to 10 knots in the afternoon, temperature
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland 8
waters a moderate to light chop. 0
Tonight: West wind 5 knots to East 8 1
wind 10 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and
inland waters a light chop Taken la.I ArPkl
LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.48 29.58 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 3855 38.55 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.89 39.92 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.56 40.56 42.20
Levels reported in t eet above sea level Flood stage lor taks are based on 2_33-year fIood.
the mean-annual tI Vxw ik'h ha, N 41 [e"pni chx of 1finq Rj'n uajf1 o r e.:'>ede. in
any one yearTh.-$ ,iaqa .5 A anr i.. .^11w i'.j r l For a Mr r.anTeni LI Liu..
and is subject tesa son In no eve w the Dlistri or fe Unrted Stales Geoloeal Survey
W b.ate Wy a'IV 'riaeqL. avl oI .1fl m6 uf of ii's oata. If you have any quesllons you
5.nc.v63,,.cn[.,A-. me 0,l. 3i. L3a D ei -vi t 0n ll-x: 'i 6 7211

THE NATION









us j ,, 4 ,'. ] 1. W% _:='"^

.; 4- .- ... "|..


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
A-larN'.5. CIh
Auslin
Batimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Bostoni
Buffalo
Burlngton, VT
Charlston. S.C.
Charleston, W.V.
Charofloe
Chicago
Cincinnati
Clevelaind
Coklumbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concod. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
Dalroit
El Paso
Evansvllle, IN
Harisburg
Hartloni
Houston
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock


FRI
H L Pcp. H
66 56 .23 77
76 38 80
77 54 75
78 64 .36 82
68 54 80
86 71 89
68 58 80
61 41 57
77 67 .09 80
61 50 .34 57
55 s50 74
82 59 66
70 49 02 76
90 69 85
86 56 79
86 61 .01 82
73 65 1,1372
75 62 .02 76
82 69 .03 70
75 59 .33 83
79 67 .03 75
54 49 76
89 64 91
64 34 .01 69
68 50 47 77
80 67 .02 73
84 48 90
7868 .06 80
72 59 77
60 54 .06 77
68 74 ,01 86
76 665 .04 75
87 64 87
77 62 1.388W
TAee f


SAT
L Fcst
53 tIs
51 pr
54 Is
64 tIs
58 ts
73 pc
59 is
35 sh
66 Is
38 1s
59 ts
46 Is
49 sh
67 pc
t56 Is
58 pc
61 is
51 sh
63 Is
55 Is
51 Is
72 pc
31 pc
57 tIs
49 pc
68 a
I6B S
64 Is
56 is
53 ts
73 pc
6O pc
63 pc
69 pc
I e -V


FRI SAT
City H L Pcp. H LFcst
NewOrfeans 81 71 .07 83 71 ts
NewYorkCity 62 55 .04 77 59 ts
Nodiok 88 63 85 65 ts
Oklahoma City 80 57 90 69 pc
Omaha 68 46 79 56 ts
Palm Spings 92 62 89 64 s
PhiladelpNia 77 57 79 61 ts
Phoenix 88 63 94 68 pc
Pitlsburgh 83 60 73 54 ts
Portland, ME 54 46 .04 71 52 (s
Poriland. OR 58 48 37 63 43 sh
Providence, lI 58 53 .03 73 54 ts
Releigh 89 63 .07 82 62 ts
Rapid Cily 62 27 62 36 ts
Reno 67 51 58 35 sh
Rochester, NY 87 53 .08 72 47 ts
Sactamenio 786 55 76 52 pc
Salt Lake Cty 60 43 .45 54 39 ts
SanAntonio 868 67 27 93 74 pc
SanDiego 70 57 63 58 pc
San Francisco 66 55 60 50 pc
Savannah 91 71 85 66 pc
Seatle 55 48 05 60 48 sh
Spokane 60 46 33 59 40 sh
St. Louis 81 69 02 84 67 (s
St.SteMane 63 49 .51 53 35 pc
Syracuse 84 52 .47 75 47 ts
Topeka 73 50 .10 85 64 ts
Washington 76 61 81 64 ts
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL NHGH & LOW
HM 97, Laedo, Texas
LOW 19,AlamwaC-09.
WORLD CmIS


os.uAnglU 25 oo 7 5 pc SAT
Louisville 78 69 .02 81 65 ts CIY NIASKY
Memphis 77 65 .37 84 69 pc 87
Miwaukee 73 61 28 68 48 pc Acpulco 8777/pc
Minneapolis 60 48 .01 69 51 ts Amsterdam 57/50W
Mobit 79 67 02 78 67 ts Athens 7159/pc
Montgomary 79 66 .40 84 65 is Sein 71f53/10
Nashville 75 70 .06 80 66 ts Berin 64/46te
Bermuda 73/X6/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c cloudy; r drizle- Cairo 82/64/s
.lfair; htry;, pc.pltly cloudy;: rrin; Calgary 51/35/r
rmltmnnow mix; -sum, h h- owimi Havana 93/69pc
srinlown ts iunderstlns; w-wlf Hong Kong W/75As
WSS ,014 Jerusalem 77Th6fc


Lisbon 78/5W9/pc
London 62/501r
Madrid 87/59/s
Mexico City 8W57/s
Montreal 68/59/t
Moscow 69/46/s
Paris 64/ pc
Rio SO/68/ts
Rome 781481/s
Sydney 73/57[pc
Tokyo 7553/s
Toronio 62/48/Is
Warsaw 88/53/pc


LEGAL NOTICES





Lien Notices8........................ C13


Miscellaneous Notices,.......C13


Surplus Property................C13


S C IT R ULIS LICOUNTY



CHRONICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-- For the RECORD


Associated Press
U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., left, speaks with New Hampshire Republican Chairwoman Jennifer Horn on Friday at
the Rockingham County Republican Committee's Freedom Founders Dinner in New Castle, N.H.


Rubio visits New Hampshire


as he weighs 2016 run

Associated Press RUBIO'S CAMPAIGN CHECKLIST


PORTSMOUTH, N.H. -
Fighting to revive his po-
litical prospects, Sen.
Marco Rubio is returning
to the presidential cam-
paign circuit and beefing
up a political organization
that could lay the ground-
work for a White House
bid.
In the clearest sign yet of
his interest in a presiden-
tial run, the Florida Re-
publican visited New
Hampshire on Friday, his
first appearance in an
early-voting state in more
than a year He was set to
headline a pair of
fundraisers in Republican-
rich counties and meet
with local officials, efforts
that will grant him an au-
dience with activists and
donors in the home of the
nation's first presidential
primary
At the same time, he has
reshuffled his staff and di-
rected his political re-
sources to three key
Senate races this year, in-
cluding a GOP primary in
Iowa. The first voting of
the presidential primary
season occurs in the Iowa
caucuses.
Taken together, Rubio's
actions are part of an ef-
fort to strengthen his
standing in a potentially
crowded 2016 presidential
field after a year in which
he saw his popularity slip
over his backing of an im-
migration overhaul.
The renewed push also
comes as the GOP estab-
lishment turns its atten-
tion to the freshman
senator's onetime mentor,
Jeb Bush. Many party in-



DISTRICTS
Continued from Page Al

King, who said four dis-
tricts that initially leaned
Democratic wound up get-
ting split between Repub-
licans and Democrats in
the 2012 elections.
Every 10 years, lawmak-
ers redraw legislative and
congressional districts
based on new population
figures. Voters in 2010
passed the "Fair Districts"
amendments, aimed at
preventing gerrymander-
ing when districts are
drawn.
King and other attorneys


* Book: Yes, now has a new book tentatively scheduled for release in late 2014,
from same publisher of his 2012 memoir "An American Son."
* Iowa visits: Yes, just days after 2012 election, but has been largely holding off
on a new wave of trips to early voting states. That's changing now.
* New Hampshire: In May, made his first visit of the 2016 season, headlining
several fundraisers, meeting local officials and giving interviews. Multiple
appearances before 2012 election
* South Carolina: Yes. In ahead of the 2016 pack, headlining state's Silver
Elephant dinner in 2012. Stay tuned for more.
* Baggage: A rift with his tea party constituency on immigration, "a real trial for
me." Deflection: Go aggressive on a matter of common ground, which he did in
pledging to take apart Obama's health law. Dry-mouthed Rubio suffered an
embarrassing moment when he clumsily reached for water while delivering GOP
response to Obama's State of the Union address. Deflection: Self-deprecating
jokes about it. Thin resume for presidency, but others Obama included have
powered through that problem. Bush shadow: unclear if he would run should his
mentor, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, get in the race.
* Networking: Yes, conservative and party activists, focused in part on repairing
tea party relationships strained over immigration. Speech to National Rifle
Association in April; also foreign policy speech at University of Texas. Well-
received speech to Conservative Political Action Conference in March, though he
lagged in the symbolic straw poll. Campaigned for Republican in Virginia
governor's race last fall. Spent more than $200,000 in early December 2013
from PAC to help U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, who's running for the U.S. Senate in
Arkansas. In October won standing ovations at Values Voter conference when
affirming his Christian faith and denouncing "rising tide of intolerance" toward
social conservatives.


siders and major donors
are signaling their prefer-
ence for the former
Florida governor, which
could threaten a potential
Rubio candidacy
Neither man has publicly
declared his intentions for
2016, but Rubio had proved
a prolific fundraiser, tap-
ping his donor-rich home
state and the political net-
works of the past three GOP
presidential nominees. Last
year, he raised about $8.3
million more than Sens.
Rand Paul of Kentucky or
Ted Cruz of Texas, both tea
party stars who are also
weighing White House bids.
For now, Rubio's advis-
ers say his political focus


representing the plaintiffs
said they plan to rely on
emails and other docu-
ments from political con-
sultants to assert that
consultants, party officials
and legislative staff worked
in a way to draw maps fa-
vorable to Republicans.
They are also expected
to put on the stand both
Senate President Don
Gaetz and House Speaker
Will Weatherford, who
were in charge of the re-
districting process.
George Meros, an attor-
ney representing the
Florida House, called
King's assertions a "fasci-
nating story" but said "it
would not be supported by


remains on helping Re-
publicans retake the Sen-
ate in November Last
month, he moved Cesar
Conda, his chief of staff
and a longtime GOP in-
sider who once worked for
Vice President Dick Ch-
eney, to his Reclaim Amer-
ica political action
committee. The group is
backing candidates in
Arkansas, Colorado and
Iowa efforts that aides
acknowledge could buoy a
presidential campaign
should Rubio run.
In Washington, Rubio has
muscled his way to the fore-
front of major domestic and
foreign policy debates, be-
coming a leading Republi-


the facts."
"Politics did not get into
the redistricting suite,"
said Meros, who said that
while Gaetz and Weather-
ford were "loyal" Republi-
cans they did not let that
influence their decisions.
Meros acknowledged
that a top aide to then-
House Speaker Dean Can-
non had shared
information with a GOP
consultant before it became
public. He said that the
aide, Kirk Pepper, made a
"terrible mistake" and had
"breached the duty he
owed to the speaker"
But Meros said the de-
feat of U.S. Rep. Allen
West in 2012 was proof


can voice for more robust
action in geopolitical hot
spots from Venezuela to
Russia to China. Next week,
he will detail his ideas to
bolster retirement security
and overhaul entitlement
programs.
"By every measure,
those who are struggling to
get ahead are worse off
than they were four years
ago," Rubio told The Asso-
ciated Press in an inter-
view. "I think both parties
are guilty of continuing to
debate how we can fix
these broken 20th century
institutions instead of hav-
ing a debate about how we
create new institutions for
the 21st century"


enough that the final maps
released were nonparti-
san. After redistricting,
West switched to another
district and lost a narrow
election to U.S. Rep.
Patrick Murphy Meros
also noted that U.S. Rep.
John Mica was forced to
run in a Republican pri-
mary against then-U.S.
Rep. Sandy Adams and
that U.S. Rep. Dan Web-
ster had a close re-election
contest.


DUI arrests
Edward Buckius, 59, of
South Coronado Terrace,
Lecanto, at 10:35 p.m. May 8
on misdemeanor charges of
driving under the influence
and possession of cannabis.
According to his arrest affi-
davit, Buckius was pulled over
for failing to maintain a single
lane of traffic. Deputies report-
edly saw a half-full bottle of
beer in the cup holder of his
vehicle. Buckius was asked to
perform field sobriety tests
and did poorly. Tests of his
breath showed his blood alco-
hol concentration was 0.128
percent and 0.125 percent.
The legal limit is 0.08 percent.
Buckius reportedly had ap-
proximately one gram of
cannabis in his possession.
Bond $1,500.
William Garlin, 58, of
North Elwyn Point, Hernando,
at 7:37 p.m. May 8 on a mis-
demeanor charge of driving
under the influence. Accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit, Gar-
lin was pulled over for a traffic
infraction. He was asked to
perform field sobriety tests
and did poorly. Tests of his
breath showed his blood alco-
hol concentration was 0.157
percent and 0.143 percent.
Bond $500.
Domestic
battery arrest
Michael Richards, 56,
of Inverness, at 6:49 p.m. May
8 on a misdemeanor charge
of domestic battery.
Other arrests
Michael Hallal, 59, of
South Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa, at 9:30 a.m. May
8 on an active warrant for two
counts of obtaining property
by means of a worthless
check. Bond $2,000.
Mark Hunter, 57, of
South Tropicana Avenue,
Lecanto, at 12:55 p.m. May 8
on an active warrant for a mis-
demeanor charge of causing
a condition capable of breed-
ing mosquitos. Bond $250.
Donnie Marshman Jr.,
54, of North Lyle Avenue,
Crystal River, at 3:20 p.m.
May 8 on an active warrant for
felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of possession of co-
caine. According to his arrest
report, Marshman was trans-
ported from the Citrus County
Courthouse to the Citrus
County Detention Facility.
Devin Denoncourt, 21,
of East Amity Street, Inver-
ness, at 2:53 p.m. May 8 on
an active warrant for felony vi-
olation of probation stemming
from original charges of grand
theft, burglary and conspiracy
to commit fraud.
Thomas Sarver, 18, of
East Tangelo Lane, Inver-
ness, at 2:53 p.m. May 8 on
an active warrant for felony
possession of a controlled
substance. Bond $2,000.
Gabrielle Berenger, 21,
of East Amity Street, Inver-
ness, at 2:53 p.m. May 8 on
an active Sumter County war-
rant for felony violation of pro-
bation stemming from an
original charge of grand theft.
Michael Thomas, 32, of
Southeast 21st Avenue,
Ocala, at 3:40 a.m. May 8 on


ON THE NET
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping
for a view of where
each type of crime
occurs in Citrus
County. Click on
Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.

an active Marion County war-
rant for a felony charge of ob-
taining property by means of
a worthless check. According
to his arrest affidavit, Thomas
turned himself in to the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. Bond
$1,000.
Harold Bean III, 47, of
North 14th Street, Leesburg,
at 5:27 p.m. May 8 on an ac-
tive warrant for felony violation
of probation stemming from
original charges of grand theft
and burglary. According to his
arrest affidavit, Bean was
transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility from
the Hillsborough County Jail.
Brian Williams Jr., 27,
of Homosassa, at 6:22 p.m.
May 8 on a misdemeanor
charge of trespassing in a
structure or conveyance after
warning. According to his ar-
rest affidavit, Williams refused
to leave a residence where he
had been trespassed in the
past. Bond $1,000.
Jason Turem, 27, of
South Lincoln Avenue, Bev-
erly Hills, at 9:40 p.m. May 8
on a felony charge of aggra-
vated stalking. According to
his arrest affidavit, Turem is
accused of calling the victim
47 times, sending 11 text
messages and eight Face-
book messages in a single
day. He reportedly made
threats on one of the phone
calls and showed up at the
victim's residence. The deputy
further states that Turem
called approximately20 times
while he was on scene with
the victim. Bond $10,000.
Ronald Speckner Jr.,
43, of South Berkshire Av-
enue, Inverness, at 11:40 p.m.
May 8 on a misdemeanor
charge of petit theft. According
to his arrest affidavit, Speck-
ner is accused of shoplifting a
hearing aid, valued at $31.79,
from the Inverness Wal-
greens. Bond $250.
George Wainwright Jr.,
53, of South Cedar Terrace,
Homosassa, at 2:21 a.m.
May 9 on a misdemeanor
charge of resisting an officer
without violence. According to
his arrest affidavit, Wainwright
is accused of interfering with
an investigation at a bar con-
cerning a possible trespass
case. He reportedly screamed
profanities at the officer and
came toward him in an ag-
gressive manner. Bond $500.


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Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


France honors



World War II vets


Associated Press

WEST POINT, N.Y Almost 70
years after Joseph Federico was
wounded and captured in the
hedgerows of France, he was person-
ally thanked Friday by that country's
government during a heartfelt cere-
mony at the U.S. MilitaryAcademy
The 88-year-old Belvidere, New
Jersey, resident was among 34
World War II veterans decorated as
knights of France's Legion of Honor
in a ceremony leading up to the
70th anniversary of the D-Day land-
ings that began June 6, 1944. Many
honorees had white hair and
stooped postures and rose slowly to
have the medals pinned to their
chests. But, to a man, they said the
honor was welcome seven decades
after their service.
"I'm just lucky that I'm here to get
this, you know, because it was aw-
fully tough for all of us," said Fed-
erico, who spent two months
recovering from a shrapnel wound


to his leg as a prisoner of war "I lost
good friends from my company, and
it was terrible."
Federico wore his new decora-
tion on his blazer, just below his
Purple Heart.
The French Legion of Honor is an
order of distinction established by
Napoleon Bonaparte in 1802. Hun-
dreds of Americans have been
awarded the medal in the decade
since France opened eligibility to
living U.S. veterans who fought on
French territory during any of four
major campaigns. But Consul Gen-
eral of France Bertrand Lortholary
said it was important to show their
gratitude at West Point in front of
the cadets who will make up the
next generation of U.S. officers.
Lortholary told the veterans and
their family members packed into a
high-ceilinged hall overlooking the
Hudson River that they will always
remember their sacrifices as well
as the ones made by their comrades
who rest in French soil.


Associated Press
Guy Wildenstein, president of the
American Society of the French
Legion of Honor, holds an insignia
before presenting it to a World War II
veteran during a ceremony Friday at
the U.S. Military Academy in West
Point, N.Y. Thirty-four veterans were
honored 70 years after of the D-Day
landings.


Bar cars make last run on trains


Associated Press

STAMFORD, Conn. -
Last call came Friday for
the bar cars on commuter
trains between Manhattan
and Connecticut, a final
run for rolling taverns
where city workers gath-
ered for decades to play
dice, find jobs and hold
annual Christmas parties
with a jazz band.
The cars on the Metro-
North Railroad are be-
lieved to be the last of their
kind in the United States.
With their faux-wood pan-
eling on the walls and red
leather lounges, they evoke
New York's "Mad Mefn" era
of martini lunches.
On the 7:07 p.m. train to
New Haven a day earlier,
commuters snapped pho-
tos and recorded videos of
the cars that became
much more than places to
simply have a drink.
"I moved to Connecticut
10 years ago, but I never
would have met as many
friends as I've met. It all
started on the bar car, re-
ally," said Nan Buziak
Lexow "It's a sad day for
all of us."
Her husband, Fred
Lexow, was a regular bar
car rider for more than 20
years and was one of the
original dice players.
When he died in Septem-
ber 2012, she described
him in his obituary as "a
former regular rider of
the 523 Club from Grand
Central." Fellow bar car
riders attended his wake.
Bartenders sent flowers.
The bar cars, which
date back at least 50 years,
are being retired because
they cannot be coupled to
a new fleet of train cars on
the New Haven line.
Transportation officials
are hoping to buy new bar
cars or retrofit some, but
no decisions have been
made yet.
Amtrak still serves alco-
hol in its dining cars. But
the American Public
Transportation Associa-
tion says Metro-North is
believed to be the last
commuter rail line with
bar cars.
"It was part of the com-
muter railroad experi-
ence," said Art Guzzetti,
the group's vice president
for policy "One by one
they've been going away"
The annual Christmas


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Service: Sat. 3:00 PM
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Service: Mon. 10:00AM
BONNEY L. KLOTZ
Arrangements Pending
JAMES FALCONER
Private Cremation
NELSON MYS
Service: Sat. (05/17) 11:00 AM
Shriner's Building
726-8323


Associated Press
Mark DeMonte, right, of Wallingford, Conn., joins other riders in the bar car on the
7:07 p.m. train to New Haven, Conn., at Grand Central Terminal on Thursday in
New York. DeMonte, a bar car regular, has been dubbed "Mayor of the 5:48" by
friends and riders of his usual train. Metro-North is retiring bar cars from the
New Haven Line after Friday's afternoon rush hour. They were the last commuter bar


cars in the United States.
party until a few years ago
featured a five-piece jazz
band underwritten by a
rider The bar cars were
also a place to make con-
tacts for new jobs and for
pranks, like gluing cans to
the bar to trick one man
who would come through
and guzzle half-drunk
beers, riders say
Kyle Elliott said he
started riding in the bar
car 10 years ago but a job
change two years ago has
kept him away He re-
turned Thursday after
hearing they were making
their last runs.
"I know all these peo-
ple," Elliott said. "I've
been to parties in the sum-
mer at their homes. I
know their children. I've
been to funerals of people
that I've known in this bar
car. We've shared all the
things that you share with
your friends in life
through meeting each
other in this bar car"
Meghan Miller, of Bran-
ford, who's been riding
the bar car since 1997,
said she showed up for the
birth of a fellow rider's
child before he did be-
cause she was on an ear-
lier train and the rider's
wife had called her as his
emergency contact. She
said bar car riders would
buy her drinks and smok-
ing used to be allowed.
"This is very much 1963.




(,K Na lie CSu





Crtl R IvFl l4429










Im'l'l;{q


I I I
FOS3.YAS WIT


It is a very'Mad Men' vibe,"
she said. "That would be
incredibly appropriate. If
females are going to be on
the bar car, you're ex-
pected to hold your own."
Mark DelMonte, of
Wallingford, was known as
the "mayor of the 5:48,"
sending email alerts to fel-
low bar car regulars up-
dating them on which of
the dwindling number of
bar cars were rolling.





352.795.1424
800.771.0057
Fresh & Silk Flower
Arrangements for All Occasions
Serving all of Citrus County

i Teleflora.
302 N.E. 3rd St., Crystal River, FL
www.waverleyfloristcom


"I wanted to take one of
these cars, because
they're going away, and
put it in my backyard,"
DelMonte said. "It's ugly
It's orange. But it's nostal-
gic and we love it."

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Richard
Alderman, 58
HOMOSASSA
Richard Michael Alder-
man, 58, of Homosassa,
Florida, died Thursday,
May 8, 2014, at HPH
Hospice.
Strickland Funeral
Home with Crematory of
Crystal River is assisting
the family with private
arrangements.

Thomas
Evans, 91
BROOKSVILLE
Thomas A. Evans, 91, of
Brooksville, Florida, died
May 5, 2014.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto,
with further arrangements
under the direction of
Craciun Funeral Home in
Middleburg Heights, Ohio.

James
Faulconer, 80
INVERNESS
James W Faulconer, 80,
died May 6, 2014, under
the loving care of his fam-
ily, the staff of Arbor Trail
and Hospice of Citrus
County
Left to cherish his mem-
ory is his wife of 37 years,
Joanne Faulconer, and
their combined family of
10 sons and daughters and
their families; and his sis-
ter and brother-in-law,
Ann and Gene Trelow
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Virginia
Timmons, 93
LECANTO
Virginia Timmons, 93, of
Lecanto, Florida, died Fri-
day, May 9, 2014, at Health
Center at Brentwood in
Lecanto.
Arrangements are by
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

* A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)


Bonney
Klotz, 65
INVERNESS
Bonney Lea Klotz, 65,
Inverness, Florida, went
peacefully to Heaven on
May 6, 2014, at her resi-
dence under the loving
care of her

Bonney
was born
April 18, A
1949, in
Norwalk,
Connecti-
cut, to the
late Frank Bonney
and Elsa Klotz
(Zinser)
Fitch. Bonney loved
music, her dog "Champ"
and had a passion for
birds. She especially liked
having "girl time" and hav-
ing fun with her friends
and daughters.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her daughters,
Christina (husband
Joseph) Pisciotta of Ala-
bama, Victoria Pendleton,
Jaclyn Klotz fiance6 Scott
Singer) both of Inverness;
and Melissa Smith, who
she considered a daugh-
ter; brothers, Scott and
Steven Fitch; sisters, Is-
abella (Dave) Hopp and
Annette Suares, all of
Nowalk, Connecticut; and
four granddaughters, Han-
nah, Hayden, Hayla and
Serenity.
A celebration and trib-
ute to Bonney's life will be
at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 17,
2014, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory Please consider
donations in Bonney's
memory to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!

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Obituaries


A6 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
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1,840. 10 DAYS .... -' : 1o0 DAYS
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1N84 0. ....... ... ........... .
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1 6 0 .. .. ." .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .: .. .. ..: .. .. ..:.. 15 ,6 0 0 .......... .......................... . . . . . ... . . .. .
1 '7 0 . . . . ... . . . . ... . . . . .... F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 1 5 6 0 0. . .I|. . .. ..|, . . .. .
1,720 ....- -......" '" ...... 15 ,200 .... .. ..... ............ ..... ...... ......***m ....... ** I *A M


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 2,963
Pvs. Volume 3,324
Advanced 1734
Declined 1341
New Highs 67
New Lows 61


NASD
1,938
2,359
1659
935
19
130


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16588.77
7727.26
549.18
10611.05
4071.87
1878.57
1353.95
19867.22
1107.38


LOW
16498.71
7655.75
539.31
10560.78
4025.24
1867.02
1342.61
19733.67
1091.50


CLOSE
16583.34
7719.30
539.55
10606.69
4071.87
1878.48
1353.79
19867.21
1107.22


CHG.
+32.37
+15.60
-7.89
-3.96
+20.37
+2.85
+3.26
+43.40
+9.79


%CHG.
+0.20%
+0.20%
-1.44%
-0.04%
+0.50%
+0.15%
+0.24%
+0.22%
+0.89%


YTD
+0.04%
+4.31%
+9.98%
+1.98%
-2.51%
+1.63%
+0.84%
+0.82%
-4.85%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.92 --- 8.47 6.72 -.12 -1.8 V V V -18.0 +92.1 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 -- 37.85 36.44 +.04 +0.1 A A A +3.6 +1.0 11 1.84
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -0- 62.05 52.97 -.16 0.3 A A A +0.6 +27.9 25 0.36f
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 0 111.38 109.00 -.21 -0.2 A A A +2.4 +14.4 2.82e
Bank of America BAG 12.13 -- 18.03 14.74 -.19 -1.3 V V V 5.3 +15.0 19 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -- 14.71 13.50 +.14 +1.0 A +14.7 +13.0 26 0.08
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 -- 38.40 36.56 -.30 -0.8 A A A +14.8 +4.6 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 45.06 --- 55.28 46.99 -.15 -0.3 V A -9.8 -4.3 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 19.55 --- 28.10 25.32 -.34 -1.3 T T T +8.6 +23.8 dd 1.00
Disney DIS 60.41 0 83.65 81.95 +.35 +0.4 A A A +7.3 +25.0 21 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -- 75.13 71.98 -.86 -1.2 A A +4.3 +4.2 18 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.69 -0- 61.18 54.11 +.12 +0.2 A A A +10.1 -3.1 17 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 0 103.45 101.95 +.32 +0.3 A A A +0.7 +14.3 11 2.76f
Ford Motor F 13.83 18.02 15.77 -.04 -0.3 V A A +2.2 +14.4 10 0.50
Gen Electric GE 22.32 28.09 26.42 -.02 -0.1 V A A -5.7 +18.5 20 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 35.20 53.81 51.51 +.33 +0.6 7 A 7 +8.0 +26.6 15
Home Depot HD 72.21 -0- 83.20 77.71 +.66 +0.9 7 A 7 -5.6 +4.3 21 1.88f
Intel Corp INTO 21.89 --0- 27.24 26.30 -.04 -0.2 A A A +1.3 +12.3 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0- 211.98 190.08 +1.17 +0.6 7 7 7 +1.3 -5.8 13 4.40f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 23.68 -0- 34.32 28.78 -.15 -0.5 V A A -12.5 +16.3 26
Lowes Cos LOW 38.87 -0- 52.08 45.71 +.69 +1.5 7 7 -7.7 +8.0 21 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 0 102.80 102.93 +.98 +1.0 A A A +6.1 +4.1 19 3.24
Microsoft Corp MSFT 30.84 --0- 41.66 39.54 -.10 -0.3 7 A 7 +5.7 +23.2 15 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.62 0 67.88 67.26 -.12 -0.2 A A A -0.4 +20.3 17 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 --0- 101.50 96.92 -1.57 -1.6 V A A +13.2 +25.0 21 2.90f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 -0-- 19.63 8.80 +.25 +2.9 A A A -3.8 -51.4 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 -0- 21.09 18.51 -.01 -0.1 A A A +12.0 -7.7 39 0.80
Regions Fncil RF 8.56 -0- 11.54 10.26 +.09 +0.9 A A V +3.7 +16.8 14 0.20f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 26.62 -0- 54.69 42.94 +1.18 +2.8 V A A +8.1 -2.1 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -0- 114.72 100.15 +.96 +1.0 A A A -3.3 -2.3 18 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 34.10 -- 49.77 45.84 -.27 -0.6 A A V +4.4 +27.5 24 1.20
Time Warner TWX 55.71 --0- 70.77 68.37 +.33 +0.5 A A A -1.9 +13.2 15 1.27
UniFirst Corp UNF 87.68 -0-- 117.91 94.94 +.72 +0.8 7 A 7 -11.3 +1.0 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 --*-- 53.67 48.48 -.01 ... A A A -1.3 -4.7 11 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 27.49 -- 42.14 38.00 -.26 -0.7 A A A -5.0 +22.8..
WalMartStrs WMT 71.51 -- 81.37 79.20 +.51 +0.6 A A A +0.6 +3.0 16 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 43.31 0 71.02 68.66 -.03 ... V A A +19.5 +42.3 24 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate Ij -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd- Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


SU


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
rose to 2.63
percent Friday.
Yields affect rates
on mortgages
and other
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
increased Fri-
day to just un-
der $108 a
barrel amid re-
newed concerns
over tensions in
Ukraine. Among
metals, gold, sil-
ver and copper
rose. Wheat and
soybeans fell.



OS
E222

EDr~g


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .02 0.02 ... .04
6-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .07
52-wk T-bill .09 0.09 ... .10
2-year T-note .39 0.39 .. .23
5-year T-note 1.63 1.63 ... .75
10-year T-note 2.63 2.62 +0.01 1.81
30-year T-bond 3.46 3.44 +0.02 2.99

NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.24 3.21 +0.03 2.68
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.56 4.56 ... 4.05
Barclays USAggregate 2.27 2.28 -0.01 1.80
Barclays US High Yield 5.02 5.04 -0.02 4.96
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.17 4.16 +0.01 3.78
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.85 1.85 ... 1.03
Barclays US Corp 2.95 2.97 -0.02 2.64


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 99.99
Ethanol (gal) 2.15
Heating Oil (gal) 2.91
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.53
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.90
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1287.30
Silver (oz) 19.08
Platinum (oz) 1429.90
Copper (Ib) 3.10
Palladium (oz) 799.90
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.38
Coffee (Ib) 1.81
Corn (bu) 5.05
Cotton (Ib) 0.92
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 338.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.59
Soybeans (bu) 15.01
Wheat (bu) 7.14


PVS.
100.26
2.15
2.92
4.57
2.91
PVS.
1287.40
19.09
1438.10
3.08
804.20
PVS.
1.38
1.93
5.13
0.93
337.00
1.58
14.74
7.27


%CHG
-0.27
-0.37
-0.46
-0.90
-0.31
%CHG
-0.01
-0.09
-0.57
+0.58
-0.53
%CHG
+0.09
-6.30
-1.61
-0.74
+0.45
+0.83
+1.81
-1.75


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.74 +.02 +1.8 +11.9 +11.4 +14.1
CaplncBuA m 60.17 -.13 +4.4 +9.4 +9.2 +12.4
CpWIdGrIA m 46.54 -.05 +3.1 +15.1 +9.9 +13.9
EurPacGrA m 49.14 -.04 +0.1 +11.6 +5.5 +11.6
FnlnvA m 51.59 +.07 +0.5 +16.1 +12.1 +16.1
GrthAmA m 42.91 +.14 -0.2 +17.9 +12.8 +15.8
IncAmerA m 21.34 -.03 +4.2 +11.8+10.7 +14.9
InvCoAmA m 37.89 +.02 +3.6 +19.8 +13.7 +16.1
NewPerspA m 37.37 +.01 -0.5 +13.5 +9.9 +15.2
WAMutlnvA m 40.32 +.05 +2.7 +18.1 +14.6 +17.3
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 44.94 -.01 +4.4 +19.9 +8.4 +14.6
Stock 170.03 +.29 +1.4 +22.4 +15.4 +18.4
Fidelity Contra 93.50 +.38 -1.7 +16.1 +13.1 +17.3
ContraK 93.47 +.38 -1.7 +16.2 +13.2 +17.5
LowPriStk d 49.74 +.02 +0.6 +16.6 +13.5 +19.4
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 66.73 +.11 +2.3 +17.9 +14.2 +17.6
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.54 -.01 +5.6 +11.3 +9.1 +14.1
IncomeA m 2.52 ... +6.3 +12.0 +9.8 +14.7
Harbor Intllnstl 72.85 -.08 +2.6 +11.6 +6.3 +13.4
Oakmark Intl 1 26.53 -.19 +0.8 +14.8 +11.0 +17.0
T Rowe Price Egtylnc 33.32 ... +2.1 +15.3 +13.2 +16.3
GrowStk 50.48 +.36 -4.0 +19.0 +13.9 +18.4
Vanguard 500Adml 173.57 +.29 +2.3 +17.9 +14.2 +17.6
500lnv 173.55 +.29 +2.3 +17.7 +14.0 +17.5
500Sgnl 143.37 +.24 +2.3 +17.9 +14.2 +17.6
MulntAdml 14.13 +.01 +4.2 +1.4 +5.0 +4.9
STGradeAd 10.76 ... +1.3 +1.6 +2.5 +4.6
Tgtet2025 16.11 +.01 +2.3 +10.8 +8.8 +13.1
TotBdAdml 10.78 -.01 +3.1 +0.4 +3.4 +4.8
Totlntl 17.00 -.02 +2.2 +9.3 +4.1 +10.9
TotStlAdm 47.29 +.11 +1.7 +18.0 +13.9 +18.1
TotStldx 47.27 +.11 +1.7 +17.9 +13.8 +18.0
Welltn 38.99 ... +3.4 +12.1 +10.9 +13.6


*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks edged higher Friday, with
technology and Internet stocks
among the big gainers. The Dow
Jones industrial average finished
ahead for the week. Investors
are looking to next week's retail
sales data for clues about the
health of U.S. consumer spend-
ing.

Ralph Lauren RL
Close:$148.81 V-3.18 or -2.1%
A weak sales outlook overshadowed
strong fourth-quarter and annual
earnings at the clothing maker,
sending shares to a 52-week low.





52-week range
$141.93 $192.03
Vol.: 4.8m (4.4x avg.) PE: 18.3
Mkt. Cap: $8.88 b Yield: 1.2%
Hilton Worldwide HLT
Close: $23.07 A0.43 or 1.9%
Rising room rates helped to more
than triple first-quarter earnings and
the hotel raised its outlook for the
year.
$24
23

21 F M A M
52-week range
$20.55 $25.95


Vol.:7.1m (3.6x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $22.72 b


PE:...
Yield:...


Chiquita Brands CQB
Close:S10.81 V-O.31 or -2.8%
Droughts in Central America and
winter storms in the North America
caused disruptions for the fruit and
vegetable company.
$1"

1'
1,f

52-week range
$8.34 $13.68
Vol.:1.0m (1.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap: $507.11 m Yield:...
Gap GPS
Close:$40.52A1.28 or 3.3%
Comparable-store sales jumped 9
percent last month beating analysts'
expectations, partially due to Easter
sales.
-i,



52-week range
$36.13 $46.56
Vol.:10.4m (2.0x avg.) PE: 14.5
Mkt. Cap: $18.1 b Yield: 2.2%
Netflix NFLX
Close:$328.55A6.89 or 2.1%
The Internet video company followed
through on promised price hikes,
pushing subscriptions up $1 per
month for new members.





52-week range
$205.75 $458.00
Vol.:2.6m (0.8x avg.) PE: 177.6
Mkt. Cap: $19.7 b Yield:...


Associated Press
Traders Kevin Walsh, left, and John Panin work on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange on April 30. On Friday, the Dow Jones industrial average hit a record.




Dow inches to




record as earnings




reports wind down


Associated Press

NEW YORK- The Dow
Jones industrial average hit
a record on Friday, but with-
out much conviction after a
choppy day of trading dur-
ing which investors couldn't
make up their minds
whether to buy or sell.
The blue-chip index flit-
ted between small gains
and losses at least a dozen
times, and ended up
beating its old record set
last week by less than
2.5 points, or just
0.02 percent.
"The market is having
trouble finding direction
here," said David Kelley,
JPMorgan Funds' chief
global strategist. But he
added, "I believe for the
rest of the year, a warming
economy ... will push the


market up."
The Standard & Poor's
500 index also eked out a
gain, but is no higher than
it was in early March, after
waffling between weekly
gains and losses most of
that time.
On Friday, stocks fell
broadly from the open as
investors took in the latest
corporate earnings re-
ports. It was an odd day in
which winners became
losers, and vice versa.
Stocks of utilities have
been in favor lately be-
cause of their stable earn-
ings and fat dividends, but
investors dumped them
Friday, and they closed
1.4 percent lower. That
was the biggest drop of the
S&P 500's ten sectors.
By contrast, a few big-
name Internet stocks that


had been crushed in a
recent sell-off in that in-
dustry managed healthy
gains.
Netflix announced it
was raising prices for new
subscribers of its stream-
ing video service and in-
vestors cheered, lifting its
stock 2 percent. Tesla Mo-
tors and Linkedln, both
down more than 10 per-
cent since April, rose
2 percent and 2.5 percent,
respectively
The Dow edged up 32.37
points for the day, or
0.2 percent, to 16,583.34.
That narrowly beat its pre-
vious record high of
16,580.84 set on April 30.
The S&P 500 index rose
2.85 points, or 0.2 percent,
to 1,878.48. The Nasdaq
composite rose 20.37 points,
or 0.5 percent, to 4,071.87.


SBusiness HIGHLIGHTS

Detergent pulled Court rejects hold Court sides with
over neo-Nazi code on mine rules US in phone case


BERLIN Procter & Gam-
ble has apologized for "any
false connotations" after stir-
ring anger in Germany for un-
intentionally placing a
neo-Nazi code on promotional
packages for its Ariel laundry
detergent.
Outraged shoppers had
posted pictures online of Ariel
powder boxes featuring a white
soccer jersey with a large num-
ber "88." The number is sensi-
tive because far-right
extremists in Germany often
use it as a code to skirt a ban
on the use of Nazi slogans in
public: since "H" is the eighth
letter of the alphabet, "88" rep-
resents the phrase "Heil Hitler."
Similarly, "18" is used to stand
for "A.H." or Adolf Hitler.
Procter & Gamble acknowl-
edged Friday that the number
was "unintentionally
ambiguous."
"We very much regret if
there are any false associa-
tions and distance ourselves
clearly from any far-right ide-
ology," company spokes-
woman Gabi Hassig said in a
statement. The number "88"
was intended to show how
many loads of laundry buyers
would be able to do with one
package.
Haessig said the company
has stopped shipping the of-
fending powder, as well as a
liquid detergent that was being
promoted as "Ariel 18." The
number also represented the
number of loads that could be
done, the company said.


I


ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-
The New Mexico Court of Ap-
peals on Friday rejected ef-
forts by the state attorney
general, environmentalists
and a ranch owned by billion-
aire mogul Ted Turner to put
on hold regulations that gov-
ern groundwater pollution by
copper mines.
Attorney General Gary
King, the Gila Resources In-
formation Project, Amigos
Bravos and Turner Ranch
Properties filed an appeal last
fall to challenge the new regu-
lations. They sought a stay
earlier this year to put the
rules on hold while the appeal
is heard.
The court said in a two-
page ruling that King and the
others failed to show irrepara-
ble harm would be caused if
the copper rules are enacted
while the appeal is pending.
The court also questioned the
appellants' likelihood of suc-
cess on the merits of the
case, but noted that it's still
early in the proceedings.
King, a Democrat running
for governor, said Friday he
was disappointed in the
court's ruling but still confident
in the case.
"The attorney general's of-
fice remains dedicated to
helping protect New Mexico's
groundwater from pollution
posed by chemicals associ-
ated with copper mining. We
maintain that the revised rule
violates the state's Water
Quality Control Act," he said.


WASHINGTON -The Jus-
tice Department does not
have to turn over information
on cases involving warrantless
cellphone tracking if the cases
ended without a defendant's
conviction, a divided federal
appeals court ruled Friday in
upholding privacy protections
for people acquitted of crimes.
The ruling came in a public
records lawsuit brought by the
American Civil Liberties
Union, which had requested
information on federal cases
in which prosecutors had ob-
tained cellphone tracking data
without a warrant to track a
user's whereabouts.
The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia Cir-
cuit had previously held that
the Justice Department was
obligated under the Freedom
of Information Act to disclose
case names and docket num-
bers for warrantless cellphone
tracking prosecutions that
ended with a conviction. But in
a 2-1 decision Friday, a three-
judge panel of the court said
defendants who have been ac-
quitted or who have had
charges against them dropped
enjoy extra privacy protections
that outweigh the public benefit
in disclosing that information.
Though the appeal cen-
tered on a small number of
cases, the dispute unfolded
against the backdrop of ever-
advancing law enforcement
technologies and the ongoing
debate over privacy.
From wire reports


Specials Include Choice oft Side, VC FAMOU
DOTOWM BALD., Hot Yeast Rolls & DBB

Slow Roasted
SPr hxibofBeefizom
$1699
Bacon Wrapped
Petite Filet Mfgnon
*169
kv Cke g=ed ahnon


;- -U 4- -:-i-
C salRier- dbmw.etins.iud SaPteIE lair --


WelltnAdm 67.35
WndsllAdm 67.48


... +3.4 +12.2 +11.0 +13.7
-.03 +3.4 +18.3 +14.3 +17.2


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 A7





OPage A8 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014



PINION


"It is common to forget a man and slight
him if his good will cannot help you."
Plautus, "The Captives," 3rd century B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SV Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ....................... ........copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus

URGENT APPEAL



Community's


help needed for


sustaining smiles


ral health is the gate-
way to general health.
Recognizing that oral
health is something to smile
about, Nature Coast Min-
istries and Catholic Charities
embarked on a crusade in Oc-
tober 2012 to establish a free
dental clinic for Citrus
County's elderly,
veterans, home-
less and low- THE IE
income adults Samarita
who qualify Cli
With Catholic
Charities under- OUR 01
taking the reno-
vation of a One
Homosassa build- can n
ing donated by differ
the Knights
of Columbus,
Nature Coast SAMA
Ministries dili- DENTAl
gently tackled
the tasks of ac- Send don
quiring dental Nature C(
equipment and Ministries
recruiting vol- 1590 N.
unteers for the Blvd.
clinic. Crystal Ri
Aided by 34429
local dentists U For appoi
who volunteer Call 352-'
their time and
skills, as well as
donations by individuals and
organizations in the commu-
nity, the dream of a free den-
tal clinic to fill cavities and to
do minor extractions became
a reality when the clinic's
doors opened for patients in
March.
The restoring of smiles for
the first 100 patients, how-
ever, revealed glaring dental
needs that were not antici-
pated. Knowing that treat-
ment of glaring dental needs
is essential to one's general
health, Nature Coast Min-
istries has committed to
adding teeth cleaning and
oral surgery to its services.
Although two oral surgeons
immediately stepped forward
to volunteer their services,
donations are needed for
equipment to support the


Try the car next time
Here we go again. People (are)
complaining because we don't
have a Perkins or a Bob Evans in
Inverness. So why do you move
here? You could have bought a
place close to those restaurants
if you like them so much. Try
driving. That's what we have
cars for.
Wake up, code
enforcers 01
I've lived in Citrus
Springs for many years.
I have to say a lot of
the houses are in disre-
pair. ... There's been a
mattress on a lady's
lawn for over a month
now. Where is Code En- CAL
forcement? Don't they 5Q
patrol around? I can't 5 0"
believe that the county
is paying Code Enforcement for
a job they just don't do. So
many houses in Citrus Springs
are really going to pot.
Burned about smoke
Coming home from Easter in
Deltona in the evening, there
was a large, ominous red cloud
hanging over Citrus County as


teeth cleaning and oral sur-
gery care. Furthermore, with
the goal of treating 50 pa-
tients each week to meet de-
mand, donations are needed
to sustain the clinic's day-to-
day delivery of dental serv-
ices at a cost of $57 per
patient.


SSUE:
an Dental
nic.

PINION:
donor
nake a
rence.


LRITAN
L CLINIC
nations to:
oast
s Samaritans
vMeadowcrest

river, FL

ntments:
422-4327.


I


(


Funded entirely
by the generosity
of the community
at large, Nature
Coast Ministries
is urgently seek-
ing one-time do-
nations from
individual resi-
dents, local busi-
nesses, area
churches and
civic organiza-
tions, as well as
monthly dona-
tions from $25
to $100 to keep
the clinic's
doors open and
its patients
smiling.
Nature Coast
Ministries' ur-
gent appeal to
the community
certainly ampli-
fies the need


for the charitable trust cre-
ated from the net proceeds of
the Citrus Memorial Health
System and Health Corpora-
tion of America lease agree-
ment to support
community health needs.
Given that the clinic's free
dental services offer a gate-
way to better general health,
this is precisely the type of
benevolent care that the com-
munity leaders who will over-
see the charitable trust must
make a top priority.
The Samaritan Dental
Clinic at 9020 W Atlas Drive,
Homosassa, is truly a blessing
for our community Each of us
can be part of that blessing by
making a difference with ei-
ther a one-time donation or a
monthly commitment no
matter how small.


we came into town. The next
morning was lovely until around
noon when the entire sky, from
horizon to the heavens, was a
solid mass of thick smoke.
There's a town in Texas called
Cut and Shoot. I think we should
rename Citrus Choke and Burn.
Speed stop needed
I'm calling to speak for the
people in Beverly Hills.
J|ND Rose Avenue is a highly
J traveled avenue and the
fl people who usually
/E | travel down there, travel
| at a high rate of speed.
I think that if I could
get someone's atten-
tion, they need to put
4 some sort of a speed
stop on that road.
H579 Someone the other day
)5 was sideswiped where
the car was badly dam-
aged. And if it's not going to be
a car, it's going to be a kid or
someone on a bicycle. Is there
anything we can do to raise our
awareness of safety on that
road? It's too narrow for two
cars and the kids ride their bicy-
cles up and down the street and
I'm afraid someone's going to
get very, very hurt.


The heavy hand of the IRS


FLINT, Mich.
earnest moralists lament
Americans' distrust of
government. What really
is regrettable is that govern-
ment does much to earn dis-
trust, as Terry Dehko, 70, and
his daughter Sandy Thomas, 41,
understand.
Terry, who came to -,
Michigan from Iraq
in 1970, soon did
what immigrants ,
often do: He went
into business, buying
Schott's Supermar- /
ket in Fraser, Michi- '
gan, where he still ,
works six days a
week. The IRS, a ten- Georg
tacle of a govern- OTI
ment that spent VOl
$3.5 trillion in 2013,
tried to steal more
than $35,000 from Terry and
Sandy that year
Sandy a mother of four, has a
master's degree in urban plan-
ning but has worked in the store
off and on since she was 12. She
remembers, "They just walked
into the store" and announced
that they had emptied the
store's bank account. The IRS
agents believed, or pretended
to believe, that Terry and Sandy
were or conceivably could be -
which is sufficient for the IRS
- conducting a criminal enter-
prise when not selling
groceries.
What pattern of behavior
supposedly aroused the suspi-
cions of a federal government
that is ignorant of how small
businesses function? Terry and
Sandy regularly make deposits
of less than $10,000 in the bank
across the street. Federal law,
aimed primarily at money laun-
dering by drug dealers, re-
quires banks to report cash
deposits of more than $10,000. It
also makes it illegal to "struc-
ture" deposits to evade such
reporting.
Because 35 percent of
Schott's Supermarket's receipts
are in cash, Terry and Sandy


(
I
I


make frequent trips to the bank
to avoid tempting actual crimi-
nals by having large sums at the
store. Besides, their insurance
policy covers no cash loss in ex-
cess of $10,000.
In 2010 and 2012, IRS agents
visited the store and examined
Terry's and Sandy's
conduct. In 2012, the
IRS notified them

violations" of bank-
ing laws. But on
Jan. 22, 2013, Terry
and Sandy discov-
ered that the IRS
had obtained a se-
cret warrant and
e Will emptied the store's
IER bank account Sandy
DES says that if the IRS
had acted "the day
before, there would
have been only about $2,000 in
the account." Should we trust
that today's IRS was just lucky
in its timing?
The IRS used "civil forfei-
ture," the power to seize prop-
erty suspected of being
produced by, or involved with,
crime. The IRS could have dis-
pelled its suspicions of Terry
and Sandy, if it actually had any
by simply asking them about the
reasons prudence, and the
insurance limits for their
banking practices. It had, how-
ever, a reason not to ask obvious
questions before proceeding.
The civil forfeiture law if
something so devoid of due
process can be dignified as law
- is an incentive for perverse
behavior: Predatory govern-
ment agencies get to pocket the
proceeds from property they
seize from Americans without
even charging them with, let
alone convicting them of,
crimes. Criminals are treated
better than this because they
lose the fruits of their criminal-
ity only after being convicted.
Sandy remembers her father
exclaiming, '"Aren't we in the
United States? We did nothing
wrong." They did something


'TIe FsireIMtE W?'r aw A PiATATR IU
oE 14 th."


LETTER / tothe


Bypass a better idea
A recent article in the Chron-
icle, by your writer, Mike
Wright suggested making
U.S. 41 into a four-lane from the
present two-lane highway going
through Floral City This, to al-
leviate traffic congestion. We
strongly disagree. It is certain
such an abomination of widen-
ing U.S. 41 through Floral City
would definitely ruin the rural
ambiance of our fair town.
It is our concerted opinion
such a travesty, beyond being an
exorbitant expense to the tax-
payer, would lure developers to
grab up hundreds of acres of
land adjacent to U.S. 41 per-
haps also grabbing up much
acreage adjacent to County
Road 48 increase commercial
traffic many fold, and give rise
to huge building booms in the
Floral City area (i.e. "big-box"
stores, shopping malls, apart-
ment complexes, et al), thereby
devastating the uniqueness of
rural eastern Citrus County
Our concerns for people's
safety include pedestrians
crossing U.S. 41 (local shoppers,
children en route to and from
school, visitors sightseeing and
shopping as they meander
about), vehicles entering and
exiting side streets or places of


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

business, and the welfare of ex-
isting small "mom-and-pop"
businesses which make up a
very large part of the color and


right in discovering the Insti-
tute for Justice's activities
against civil forfeiture abuse.
The IJ, a libertarian defender
of property rights and other
American premises, said what
was done to Terry is done rou-
tinely across the nation in-
deed, it was done almost
simultaneously to the owner of
a gas station near Schott's Su-
permarket who deposited his
cash receipts whenever he
could get to the bank, typically
every few days.
Civil forfeiture proceeds
on the guilty-until-proven-
innocent principle, forcing
property owners of limited
means to hire lawyers and en-
gage in protracted proceedings
against a government with lim-
itless resources, just to prove
their innocence. Says IJ:
"To make matters worse, for-
feiture law treats property own-
ers like random bystanders and
requires them to intervene in
the lawsuit filed by the govern-
ment against their property just
to get it back. That is why civil
forfeiture cases have such un-
usual names, such as United
States v $35,651.11 in U.S. Cur-
rency- the case involving
Terry and Sandy"
In what it probably consid-
ered an act of unmerited mercy
the IRS offered to return
20 percent of Terry's money
Such extortion pocketing
others people's money often
succeeds when the IRS bullies
bewildered people not repre-
sented by IJ, which forced the
government to return all of
Terry's and the gas station
owner's money
The IJ's countersuit seeks an
injunction to prevent such IRS
thefts and extortions. Mean-
while, earnest moralists might
consider the possibility that
Americans' distrust of govern-
ment is insufficient.


George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. corn.
























IT 8eiNf fbk_4FVo-



Editor
flavor of Floral City.
An immediate and very low-
cost solution in addressing a
particular sore point, the
speed limit on U.S. 41 going
through Floral City which is
presently at 40 mph, would be
to lower it to 30 mph, and deci-
sively enforced by both county
and state law enforcement. Too
many drivers upon approach-
ing the light while driving on
U.S. 41, when the light changes
to amber, speed up to beat the
light before it turns red. Obvi-
ously, this increases the
chances for accidents.
Insofar as the concern re-
garding traffic congestion, a far
better option than widening
U.S. 41 through Floral City
would be to build a bypass road
around the downtown area. Be-
sides alleviating through-traffic
congestion, residents, visitors
desiring to soak up our Old
Florida atmosphere and com-
mercial vehicles needing to
make local stops would still
have access to local points of
interest. Proper sings designat-
ing "Local Traffic Only," along
with county and state law en-
forcement would necessarily
be put in place.
Fred and Lore Stock


Floral City


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


What happens
when ACA self
destructs?
It was great to see Dr
William Dixon back in
print in the Sunday,
May 4, Chronicle. I was
ready enjoying his article
"ACA will surely self-
destruct" until I got to the
last paragraph. I can't dis-
agree with him, but I sure
hope he's wrong. He said
"When the Affordable
Care Act self-destructs, as
it surely must, something
different will be required.
The ignorant among us
will cry for even more
governmental interven-
tion, perhaps like the
British National Health
Service with a parallel
private insurance pro-
gram for the wealthy
Given the makeup of the
U.S. electorate, the igno-
rant will likely prevail."
The ignorant will likely
prevail. He could be right
I've written letters be-
moaning voter ignorance
demonstrated in exit in-
terviews from the polls
and that too many voters
are clueless about the is-
sues and the players they
just voted on. They vote
like it was a high school
Pop Tart contest for the
prettiest candidate or the
one that promises them
the most free stuff.
That's not an original
thought on my part. It's
time for a quiz on the sub-
ject. What great man said
"The best argument
against democracy is a
five-minute conversation
with the average voter"
If you are a senior citi-
zen, regardless of party af-
filiation, you should
realize we need to band
together and watch this
mess unfold. Obama has
made over 50 adjustments
to the ACA law passed by
Congress and it's all
based on not having the
full impact come to light
until after the 2014 elec-
tions. He just delayed the
Medicare cuts for this
year That just pushes the
bill higher and higher for
the cost of Obamacare.
The law calls for $716 bil-
lion dollars in cuts to
Medicare over 10 years or
$71.6 billion a year
The law calls for the
cuts to come mostly out of
the provider's pocket.
That would be your doc-
tor, your hospital, and
every medical person and
equipment manufacturer
you come in contact with.
If you were aware that
only 40 percent of
providers will accept
Medicaid patients be-
cause of the low reim-
bursement rates, you
should be smart enough
to figure out what they
will do when the govern-
ment slashes Medicare


reimbursement rates. We
haven't even started to
discuss Obamacare reim-
bursement rates, yet the
law is in effect. It's been
reported that major can-
cer centers are not in the
insurance networks and
we hear stories of two-
and three-hour drives to
hospitals that are in a pa-
tient's network.
I pray that when the Af-
fordable Care Act self-
destructs we can back out
of it slowly and carefully
keeping the good parts
and discarding the bad. I
would keep the no cance-
lations and pre-existing
condition sections and
pay the price for them. I
think everyone should
have health insurance,
but I would like to keep a
bloated, overreaching, in-
vasive federal govern-
ment out of it. The
government just drives
the cost of health care up.
With the exception of
the VA, the government
doesn't provide health
care. It's just a huge
middle-man sitting be-
tween the citizen his in-
surance company, and his
provider sucking money
out of the system. We've
seen how the VA is doing.
Forty veterans just died
in Phoenix waiting for
care from the VA, and
they covered it up. Re-
minds you of the State


Department, d
The administr
claims 8 millic
signed up for (
but won't discli
many of those
ance and had
My guess is the
track that, or a
it but are unwi
close the numb
litical reasons

Harkle


Latest a
on Oak
After three s
months of anal
South Oak Vill
plan for extend
Village Boulev
painfully obvio
the plan is allc
carried out, inrr
harm would be
the landscape
lage and to the
of its residents
immediately o
why the owner
Oak Village LI
Nachum Kalka
in demanding
sion to Oak Vil
vard knowing ]
harm it would
how much the
of Oak Village
it. Mr Kalka ha
quoted as sayii
is his only alte
However, we k


So 0;01


Shrimp Landiing

FI. Shrimp ALL TYPES OF
Planaton WARM WATER
1ortcsland T FIN FISH AND
F Granny' s ,SHELLFISH


doesn't it? own admission that he
ation has other routes. Then he
)n have has also said that using
Obamacare that existing road would
ose how be less expensive. Here
had insur- again, this appears to be
it canceled, not true, since we now
ey forgot to know from the county that
ire tracking the existing roadway is
killing to dis- not sufficient to carry the
ber for po- projected increase in traf-
fic from Mr Kalka's devel-
opment and would have
ey Lawrence to be "beefed up" consid-
Homosassa erably, most likely at
Kalka's expense. So if it's
assault not to save money, then
Village why is Mr Kalka spending
so much time and atten-
solid tion on getting approval to
lyzing go through Oak Village
age LLC's when he knows the
ding Oak process will hurt the resi-
ard, it is dents' peaceful lifestyles
ous that, if and reduce their property
)wed to be values? Why would he
reparable want to do that?
e done to It should be noted that
of Oak Vil- the current assault on
lifestyles Oak Village is but another
s. What isn't attack in the war that
obvious is began some eight years


r of South
-C, Mr.
a, persists
this exten-
lage Boule-
how much
cause and
residents
are against
as been
ng that this
native.
now by his


ago when Kalka's com-
pany, South Oak Village
LLC began to clear-cut
the 40-acre property that
borders the southwest
corner of Oak Village. At
that time, i.e. May of 2006,
Kalka's contractor
launched into the project
without the necessary
permits and with little no-
tification to the surround-
ing Oak Village neighbors
who voiced their com-
plaints to both the home
owners association and
the Citrus County govern-
ment. Despite the fact
that two separate "cease
and desist orders" were
issued and served by
county officials, the as-
sault on the land and in-
digenous wildlife
continued. Finally, the
county notified Mr
Kalka's lawyer who went
to the site and was able to
persuade the contractor
to stop at the end of that
workday For his part, Mr
Kalka pleaded ignorance


Session 1
Tuesday, May 13th
8:30 AM breakfast/registration,
9 AM-10 AM seminar
Plantation on Crystal River


of what was going on and
apologized.
As a consequence of
this illegal intrusion,
Kalka was fined heavily
and required to restore
the site. He was also re-
quired to sign a document
that has come to be
known as the "Joint Stipu-
lation Agreement," which
was supposed to docu-
ment Kalka's punishment
and protect Oak Village
from future assaults.
The signing of that doc-
ument took place in No-
vember of 2007. With that
background in mind, "fast
forward" to January of
2014. A second assault on
Oak Village quietly gets
under way Again Kalka's
contractor enters unan-
nounced and starts plac-
ing flags in the ground at
the end of Oak Village
Boulevard South in
preparation to the exten-
sion of that road. Had not
some of the homeowners
in the area started asking
questions we might have
been weeks or months
finding out just what Mr
Kalka's intentions were.
At this point, we still can't
be sure why this man is so
adamant about a project
that will bring pain and
suffering to so many
people.
Dave Groff
Homosassa

OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are
the opinions of the
newspaper's editorial
board.
Viewpoints depicted in
political cartoons,
columns or letters do not
necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial
board.
SEND LETTERS TO: The
Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Or, fax to 352-563-3280,
or email to letters@
chronicleonline.com.


Session 2
Wednesday, May 14th
11:30 AM lunch/registration,
Noon-1 PM seminar
Plantation on Crystal River


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Putin hails 'return' of Crimea


Fatafighting breaks out in city ofMariupol .A_
Associated Press "
SEAsSTOPOLPrmess NATO chief: Putin's Crimea

SEVASTOPOL, Crimea viiEiaporae
- Presiding over a tri- visit 'Inappropriate' ---
umphant spectacle of war-
ships and fighter jets, TALLINN, Estonia Asked about Putin's
President Vladimir Putin The head of NATO on Fri- first visit to Crimea since
hailed the return of Crimea day urged Russia to "step the region became part of
to Russia as the restoration back from the brink" and Russia, Fogh Ras-
of"historic justice" before a described President mussen noted that NATO !
jubilant, welcoming crowd Vladimir Putin's visit to re- doesn't recognize the
Friday on the holiday that cently annexed Crimea annexation.
Russians hold dearest as inappropriate. "We still consider
In Ukraine's east, where During a visit to Esto- Crimea as Ukrainian terri-
pro-Russia insurgents have nia like Ukraine a for- tory and from my knowl-
seized government build- mer Soviet republic-- edge the Ukrainian
ings and fought with Secretary-General An- authorities haven't invited wi
Ukrainian forces, fatal ders Fogh Rasmussen Putin to visit Crimea so
fighting broke out in the city also s aidtees n Pvisi t oview so
of Mariupol as a police sta- also said there's no "visi- from that point of view his
tion was set ablaze. The As- ble evidence" of Russian visit to Crimea is inappro-
sociated Press saw at least claims of a troop with- private he said.
three dead and Ukraine's drawal from the border In his speech, the
Interior Minister said with Ukraine. NATO chief accused
around 20 "terrorists" and "We've seen such an- Russia of destabilizing
one policeman were killed. nouncements also in the the security situation in
Russia's annexation of past, without any with- Europe.
Crimea in March, a few drawal of Russian troops "My first message is to
weeks after Ukraine's pres- so we're very cautious," Russia. Step back from
ident was toppled and fled the Dane told reporters the brink," he said. He
to Russia, was a key event after a speech in the capi- also reassured Estonia
in Ukrainian's months-long tal, Tallinn. "I would be the and Baltic neighbors
crisis, which has now de- first to welcome it if Russ- Latvia and Lithuania that
scended into violence. ian troops were pulled out, as NATO members they
Putin's visit to the if we see a dear and can count on the al-
Crimean port of Sevastopol, meaningful withdrawal, be- liance's "rock solid" com-
where Russia's Black Sea cause it would contribute mitment to defend them.
Fleet is based, was strongly to de-escalate the crisis." From wire reports
criticized by both NATO and
Ukraine's Foreign Ministry.
Ukraine is struggling cluded a massive show of most important secular hol-
with its most serious crisis military muscle in the iday and a key element of A,
in decades as insurgents in annual Red Square parade the country's national iden-
the east are grabbing build- in Moscow and then the ex- tity, honoring the armed
ings and territory, fighting travaganza in Sevastopol, forces and the millions who
the central government and rubbed salt in the wounds died in World War II. This Associated Press
preparing to hold a referen- of the interim government year it comes as Russia is Russian President Vladimir Putin, center, is greeted Friday after speaking at a gala
dum Sunday on secession. in Kiev without ever once locked in the worst crisis concert marking the Victory Day in Sevastopol, Crimea. Putin extolled the return of
Putin's two Victory Day mentioning its name. with the West since the end Crimea to Russia before tens of thousands Friday during his first trip to Black Sea
celebrations, which in- Victory Day is Russia's of the Cold War. peninsula since its annexation.


Nation BRIEFS


World BRIEFS


Man confesses to
killing US soldier
CINCINNATI -A man in
Iraqi custody has confessed
to killing an American soldier
from Ohio
whose re-
mains were
found four
years after
insurgents
captured
him.
Matt Lt. Col.
Maupin Alayne
soldier Conway, an
killed in Iraq. Army
spokeswoman, confirmed the
confession Friday to The As-
sociated Press.
Matt Maupin was 20 years
old when insurgents am-
bushed his fuel convoy near
Baghdad in April 2004 and
took him captive. His status
wasn't known until his re-
mains were found 2008.
Maupin was from Batavia, in
southwestern Ohio.
An Iraqi judge said the man
originally confessed to the
killing in 2009, and was tried
and sentenced to death. The
judge said the man is now
being retried because of a pa-
perwork problem. He de-
scribed him as Iraqi and an
al-Qaida leader.
Lawyers denounce
Marine Corps raid
SAN DIEGO-A Marine
Corps attorney at Camp
Pendleton said government
criminal investigators raided
defense counsel offices and
opened case files during a
2 1/2-hour search that could
compromise scores of mili-
tary criminal cases if confi-
dential and privileged
information was seen.
Lt. Col. Clay Plummer told
The Associated Press on Fri-
day that investigators raided
the offices last week in search
of a cellphone tied to a case
being tried at the base, north
of San Diego. Plummer over-
sees all Marine Corps defense
lawyers for the western U.S.
Marine Corps spokesman
Jeffrey Nyhart said it was a
rare but lawful and valid
search.
Plummer said the raid is
unacceptable and his lawyers
will be filing motions with the
courts against the action.


Associated Press
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks at her weekly news briefing
Friday on Capitol Hill, in Washington. House Democrats stand deeply divided over
whether to participate in a Republican-led investigation of the deadly attack on the
U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, with Pelosi calling the newest probe a


"political stunt."

Children could face
bullying charges
CARSON, Calif. Chil-
dren as young as kinder-
garten-age could face
misdemeanor charges for
bullying under a proposed
law advancing in a Southern
California city.
The Carson City Council
gave preliminary approval
this week to an ordinance
that would target anyone
from kindergarten to age 25
who makes another person
feel "terrorized, frightened, in-
timidated, threatened, ha-
rassed or molested" with no
legitimate purpose.
A final vote is set for
May 20, according to the
Daily Breeze.
House votes for
business tax credit
WASHINGTON -The
House voted Friday to make
permanent a tax credit that
rewards businesses for in-
vesting in research and de-
velopment, pushing
Congress toward an election-
year showdown over a series
of expired tax breaks that are
popular back home but add
billions to the budget deficit.
The research tax credit ex-
pired at the beginning of the
year, along with more than 50
other temporary tax breaks that
Congress routinely extends.


Climber dies on Death-row inmates
Mount McKinley seek sweat lodge


ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
A Washington state climber
has died descending Mount
McKinley after falling down a
hard-packed stretch of moun-
tain that has claimed 11 other
lives.
The body of Sylvia Mon-
tag, 39, of Tacoma, was spot-
ted Wednesday night by a
helicopter crew after strong
winds subsided and allowed
flights. Montag had become
separated from her climbing
partner and may have died
as early as Monday, the park
service said.
Jury hears details
in slaying case
LAS VEGAS -A woman
testified she was stunned
and confused when Jason
Omar Griffith told her that a
big plastic tub of cement he
wanted to store at her house
contained the remains of his
ex-girlfriend.
Kalae Casorso told a jury
in Las Vegas on Friday that
she didn't call police because
she feared what happened to
Deborah Flores Narvaez
could happen to her.
Griffith is standing trial on
charges that he killed Flores
in December 2010, dismem-
bered her body and tried to
dispose of it in tubs of cement.


LOUISVILLE, Ky. -
Three inmates on Kentucky's
death row want a sweat
lodge, pow wow and tradi-
tional foods to conduct Native
American religious cere-
monies behind bars re-
quests the prison system has
at least in part declined to
fulfill.
Now, the U.S. 6th Circuit
Court of Appeals is weighing
whether to reinstate a suit
brought by those inmates
and two others challenging
restrictions on pastoral visits
to condemned inmates. A
three-judge panel in Cincin-
nati heard oral arguments Fri-
day concerning the correct
balance of religious freedom
for the condemned versus
the safety and security needs
of the prison.
Attorney Jacob Roth, argu-
ing on behalf of the inmates,
said prison officials didn't
have good reasons for turn-
ing down the construction of
a sweat lodge or allowing
Foley, Stopher and Epperson
to spend their own money to
purchase traditional foods,
such as buffalo meat. Roth
noted that the inmates even
proposed an indoor sweat
lodge to alleviate security
concerns by prison staff.
From wire reports


Associated Press
Demonstrators hold banners Friday as they protest about
the kidnapping of girls in Nigeria, near the Nigerian High
Commission in London. Global outrage against the
abduction of more than 200 Nigerian girls by Islamist
militant sect Boko Haram heated up Thursday, as a social
media campaign drew worldwide support.


Syrians return to
damaged homes
HOMS, Syria Hundreds
of Syrians wandered down
paths carved out of rubble in
the old quarters of Horns on
Friday, getting their first
glimpse of the horrendous de-
struction that two years of
fighting inflicted on rebel-held
parts of the city.
For more than a year, Pres-
ident BasharAssad's troops
blockaded these neighbor-
hoods, pounding the rebel
bastions with his artillery and
air force. Under a deal struck
this week, the government as-
sumed control of the old quar-
ters, while in return some
2,000 rebel fighters were
granted safe passage to op-
position areas north of Horns.
Defense minister
escapes ambush
SANAA, Yemen -
Yemen's defense minister es-
caped an assassination at-
tempt Friday when alleged
al-Qaida militants ambushed
his motorcade as he was visit-
ing strategic areas in the
south and a sprawling al-
Qaida base recaptured by the
army, security and military of-
ficials said.


Officials said Mohammed
Nasser Ahmed was on his way
to check up on forces in the
Mahfad region when gunmen
opened fire on the convoy.
The attack came as gov-
ernment forces pushed back
militants in fighting atop a hill
overlooking the region's main
road, they added.
Photo of soldier,
body investigated
LONDON British military
officials say they are investi-
gating leaked photographs
which appear to show a U.K.
soldier posing next to the
body of a dead Taliban fighter
in Afghanistan.
The BBC, which published
the images on its website Fri-
day, said the photos were
taken after insurgents attacked
Camp Bastion, Britain's main
army base in Afghanistan, in
2012. The photos show a sol-
dier kneeling next to the body
of a dead man and giving a
thumbs-up sign.
The Ministry of Defense
said in a statement that the
Royal Air Force is treating the
incident seriously, and has
launched a military police in-
vestigation on the matter.
From wire reports









SPORTS


* Tight
at the
top
heading
into the
weekend
at TPC.
/B2


0 Golf/B2
0 NBA, NHL/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 NFL Draft/B3, B6
0 Baseball/B4
0 Auto racing/B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


20


4 NFL DRAFT


Associated Press
Former Dunnellon and Florida State star defensive back Terrence Brooks, shown at the NFL Combine in Indianapolis, Ind., in March, heard his name called Friday
night when he was selected in the third round of the 2014 NFL Draft with the 79th overall pick by the Baltimore Ravens.




Stocking up on talent




in day two of draft


Ravens select safety Teams add building blocks in second and third rounds
Brooks of Dunnellon


OWINGS MILLS, Md.- The
Baltimore Ravens have taken
Florida State safety Terrence
Brooks a former standout at
Dunnellon High School in the
third round of the NFL draft.
Brooks started 13 games at
free safety in 2012 and last sea-
son split time between free
safety and strong safety.
The Ravens need a safety to
replace the departed James
Ihedigbo, who signed as a free
agent with Detroit.
The 5-foot-11,198-pound
Brooks was the 79th pick overall.
Brooks said of the Ravens: "I
love that team, just how physical
they are."
Earlier Friday, Baltimore se-
lected one of Brooks' team-
mates, nose tackle Timmy
Jernigan, with the 48th overall
pick. The Ravens took Alabama
linebacker C.J. Mosley in the first
round.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
NEW YORK For once, Derek Carr
didn't emulate his older brother
David Carr was the top overall pick in
the 2002 NFL draft, the first player ever
taken by the Houston Texans. Derek,
who also went to Fresno State and, like A4
his elder brother enters the league with" .
a wife and child, went 36th overall when
Oakland selected him in the second
round Friday night.
Eleven years younger than David,
Derek Carr also must hope he gets bet-
ter protection with the Raiders than
David did with Houston. David Carr
never reached the expectations of a No.
1 pick, in great part because he was
sacked so often during his time with the
Texans.
"I learned everything that he did right
and everything that he did wrong,"
Derek Carr said. "He told me that if he
could do anything, he hopes he made
the path smoother for me as I transition
into the NFL."
Derek Carr rewrote the Bulldogs' Assocated Press
record book, throwing for more than USC wide receiver Marqise Lee, right, is greeted by NFL commissioner Roger
Goodell after being selected Friday as the 39th pick by the Jacksonville Jaguars in
See Page 133 the second round of the 2014 NFL Draft in New York.


DOUBLE-UP LEASE GUARANTEE

CRYSTAL GETS IT. WE HATE TO WAIT TOO.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tight at the top


Kaymer takes

1-shot lead

over Spieth at

The Players

Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- Martin Kaymer and Jor-
dan Spieth are having a
blast at The Players Cham-
pionship one because
he's playing good golf again,
the other because that's all
he's been doing.
Kaymer followed his
record-tying 63 on the Sta-
dium Course on the TPC
Sawgrass with a 3-under 69,
capping off his round by hit-
ting a pitching wedge to 3
feet on an island green with
a back pin on the 17th hole.
He had a one-shot lead
going into the weekend as
he tries to end more than
two years without a victory
"Everything is coming to-
gether nicely," said Kaymer,
a former PGA champion
and world No. 1.
Spieth, in his first big
tournament since his
runner-up finish at the Mas-
ters, hasn't shown any signs
of a letdown. He pieced to-
gether another bogey-free
round and converted pure
swings into tap-in birdies on
consecutive holes on the
back nine that carried him
to a 6-under 66.
"I don't think it's going to
be possible to stay bogey-
free for two more rounds
with the greens firming up,"
Spieth said, not sounding at
all like someone making his
Players Championship
debut "That's a nice goal to
have, I think When bogeys
come, it's going to be how I
rebound."
Kaymer was at 12-under
132. That matched the best
36-hole score on the Sta-
dium Course at the TPC
Sawgrass in 20 years, dating
to Greg Norman's record-
setting performance. Nor-
man made only one bogey
that week
Spieth hasn't made a
bogey all week he has
gone 51 holes without a
bogey going back to the
third round at Hilton Head
- though he had to make a
couple of tough chips look
easy to keep a clean card.
The 20-year-old Texan
was still on the practice
range when he saw Kaymer
finish at 12 under, a score
that felt impossible to catch
in warm, blustery weather
The grass remained soft on
the golf course, however, al-
lowing players to take aim
at the flags.
Some players had no
choice.
Adam Scott, in his first
tournament as a married
man, kept alive his hopes of
going to No. 1 in the world
this week with three birdies
in his last four holes for a 67.
That was a 10-shot improve-
ment from Thursday and
enabled him to make the
cut on the number at even-
par 144.
Rory Mcllroy shot 42 on
the front nine and ap-
peared headed home early
until making birdie on the
18th hole to salvage a 74 to
make the cut
Not so fortunate was Phil
Mickelson. He missed his
birdie attempt on No. 18
and had a 70 to miss by one.
Mickelson now has missed
the cut in the two biggest
events of the year the
Masters and The Players.
"I don't feel bad about the
game," Mickelson said. "But
mentally, I'm just really soft
right now."
Kaymer is winless dating
to the HSBC Champions in
Shanghai at the end of 2011.
The more good scores he
sees, the more often his
name is on a leaderboard,
the more confidence he
gains. Darren Clarke
watched it for two days, re-
ferring to him as a "finely
tuned engineer"
Even so, the 29-year-old
German is hesitant to look
beyond the next day He


knows it's tough to follow a
record-tying round with
anything remotely close. So
he lowered his expecta-
tions, figuring anything
around par would be suit-
able, and then kept his dis-
tance from the field.
"Yesterday was just a
very special day for me," he
said. "Even though I shot 9-
under par yesterday ... if


Associated Press
Jordan Spieth hits from the rough Friday on the ninth hole during the second round of
The Players Championship at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach. Spieth trails
Martin Kaymer by one stroke entering the weekend.


people want to talk negative
about it, I then shot six shots
worse. But you can always
go in the negative. I see very
positive things that I backed
up that 9-under par with an-
other decent round."
Spieth was even better
He had to scramble for
par from short of the ninth
green and from behind the
10th green. He hit his stride
in the middle of the back
nine with two shots that
were nearly identical a
6-iron on the par-3 13th that
rode the ridge down to
about 4 feet, and a 6-iron
from 184 yards on the 14th
to 3 feet
"It was a nice break to
land and roll to pin-high,
because it was a very tricky
pin with quite a bit of slope
around the hole," he said.
Spieth has said he was
proud of how he played the
final round of the Masters,
even with a two-shot lead
with 11 holes to play His
game looks every bit as
solid at Sawgrass, a course
he had only seen while
playing a junior event He
finished second in that one,
too.
And that's what keep him
going. Asked he if was get-
ting bored being in con-
tention so much, he smiled
and said, "No, because I
haven't won one."
"You should probably
have to win every time in
order for it to get boring," he
said. "But not even Tiger
gets bored."
Russell Henley didn't
make a par over his last six
holes -three bogeys, three
birdies for a 71 and was
in third place at 8-under
136. Sergio Garcia (71), U.S.
Open champion Justin
Rose (71), Gary Woodland
(71), Lee Westwood (71) and
Jim Furyk (68) were six
shots behind.
The course appeared to
be getting slightly firmer by
the end of the day The ex-
citement figures to start on
the weekend.
Henry takes lead
at fog-affected
Madeira Open
SANTO DA SERRA,
Madeira Islands Scott Henry
shot a 5-under 67 Friday to
take a two-shot clubhouse lead
*- -------------


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in the first round of the fog-
affected Madeira Islands Open.
The heavy fog that forced
Thursday's first day to be aban-
doned returned mid-morning
Friday and caused a four-hour
delay, forcing organizers to
shorten the event to 54 holes.
Only half of the 144-player field
managed to complete their first
round.
Henry had eight birdies in his
round, including three in suc-
cession from the 12th, as the
Scottish golfer seeks his first
European Tour title. However,
his round could have been
even better had he not finished
with consecutive bogeys.
England's Andrew Marshall,
Spain's Pedro Oriol and Aus-
tria's Martin Wiegele were tied
for second.
Finland's Tapio Pulkannen
hit a hole-in-one at the par-3
17th but finished with an 80.
The Players
Championship
Friday, At TPC Sawgrass, Players Sta-
dium Course, PonteVedra Beach
Purse: $10 million, Yardage: 7,215, Par
72, Second Round (qualifiers only):
Martin Kaymer 63-69- 132 -12
Jordan Spieth 67-66- 133 -11
Russell Henley 65-71 -136 -8
Jim Furyk 70-68- 138 -6
Lee Westwood 67-71 -138 -6
Gary Woodland 67-71 -138 -6
Justin Rose 67-71 -138 -6
Sergio Garcia 67-71 -138 -6
Brian Davis 72-67- 139 -5
John Senden 70-69- 139 -5
Bill Haas 68-71 -139 -5
Sang-Moon Bae 66-73-139 -5
George McNeill 71-68-139 -5
Geoff Ogilvy 69-70-139 -5
Matt Jones 70-69-139 -5
Kevin Na 70-69-139 -5
Charl Schwartzel 72-67- 139 -5
Scott Brown 68-71 -139 -5
Freddie Jacobson 70-70- 140 -4
Kevin Chappell 72-68-140 -4


Joost Luiten 68-72-
Zach Johnson 69-71 -
Graeme McDowell 69-71 -
Stewart Cink 70-70-
Jamie Donaldson 74-67-
Hideki Matsuyama 70-71 -
Pat Perez 68-73-
Justin Leonard 68-73-
John Huh 69-72-
Henrik Stenson 71-70-
Steve Stricker 71-70-
Bubba Watson 69-72-
David Hearn 70-71 -
Martin Flores 70-71 -
Bo Van Pelt 71-70-
Morgan Hoffmann 71-70-
Jeff Overton 70-72-
Daniel Summerhays 74-68-
Richard H. Lee 71-71 -
Charlie Beljan 73-69-
Kyle Stanley 73-69-
MattKuchar 71-71-
Francesco Molinari 72-70-
Erik Compton 72-70-
Marc Leishman 70-72-
Luke Donald 73-69-
Billy Horschel 72-70-
Dustin Johnson 68-74-
Retief Goosen 72-70-
Brendan Steele 69-73-
John Peterson 73-69-
Justin Hicks 73-70-
Jonas Blixt 71-72-
Rickie Fowler 71-72-
lan Poulter 74-69-
Jimmy Walker 75-68-
John Merrick 72-71 -
Scott Langley 71-72-
Brendon de Jonge 69-74-
Jeff Maggert 72-71 -
Brian Stuard 67-76-
Chris Stroud 76-67-
Jason Dufner 69-74-
Charley Hoffman 77-67-
J.J. Henry 74-70-
Angel Cabrera 70-74-
Steven Bowditch 72-72-
Seung-Yul Noh 76-68-
Brandt Snedeker 75-69-
Adam Scott 77-67-
John Rollins 73-71 -
Russell Knox 72-72-
Ryan Palmer 71-73-
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 67-77 -
Rory Sabbatini 71-73-
StuartAppleby 71-73-
K.J. Choi 74-70-
Ryan Moore 70-74-
Rory Mcllroy 70-74-
Scott Stallings 67-77-
Chris Kirk 71-73-
Ernie Els 68-76-


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Pacers smother



Wizards 85-63


Associated Press

WASHINGTON -Paul
George had his best game
of the series with 23
points and eight re-
bounds, Roy Hibbert was
again a factor by scoring
14 points, and the Indiana
Pacers held the Washing-
ton Wizards to a
franchise-low playoff
total Friday night in an
85-63 victory
The Pacers lead the
Eastern Conference
semifinal 2-1.
Washington made only


24 field goals, another
team postseason worst,
on 73 attempts, 32.9 per-
cent. That included 4 of
16 on 3s, and it didn't get
much better on free
throws, where the Wiz-
ards were 11 of 21.
So much for the
bandwagon-hopping in
Washington. There were
boos on occasion, and
most of the crowd started
heading to the exits after
George's 3 with 3-1/2 min-
utes left made it 75-58.
Game 4 is Sunday in
Washington.


Associated Press
Washington forward Martell Webster shoots past
Indiana forward Paul George Friday during the first half
of Game 3 of an Eastern Conference semifinal in
Washington.




Rangers fend


off elimination


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Der-
ick Brassard scored twice,
including New York's first
power-play goal in 10
games, and the Rangers
avoided elimination with
a 5-1 victory over the Pitts-
burgh Penguins in Game 5
of the Eastern Conference
semifinals Friday night
Brassard ended New
York's 0-for-36 slide with
the man advantage by
beating Marc-Andre
Fleury late in the first pe-
riod. Ryan McDonagh
added another power-play
goal in the second to help
the Rangers force Game 6
in New York on Sunday
Chris Kreider and
Kevin Klein also scored,
and Henrik Lundqvist
stopped 31 shots.
Evgeni Malkin had his
third goal of the series for
Pittsburgh. Fleury made
30 saves but lacked the
crispness that allowed the
Penguins to sweep Games
3 and 4 in New York.
Pittsburgh coach Dan
Bylsma stressed the im-


portance of not letting the
Rangers back in the se-
ries, but the fire he was
looking for came from the
other bench.
Part of the jolt came
from the presence of for-
ward Martin St Louis. The
veteran arrived in Pitts-
burgh just hours before
faceoff after spending the
night in Montreal follow-
ing the unexpected death
of his mother, France.
St Louis told his team-
mates his mother would
have wanted him on the
ice. He played 16 minutes
and watched the line of
Brassard, Mats Zuccarello
and Benoit Pouliot redis-
cover the success they en-
joyed against Pittsburgh in
the regular season and the
series opener
The linemates, who
powered the Rangers to
victory in Game 1, com-
bined for seven points
(two goals, five assists) to
give New York a chance to
buck team history The
Rangers have never ral-
lied to win a series after
trailing 3-1.


CHRONICLE

STUDENT

0 ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION
A night to recognize
outstanding student athletes

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM

Cost: $10

College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus

GL~ E "',1 RI
Tickets available at either Citrus County Chronicle location:
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River or 106 W. Main St., Inverness
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


B2 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




2014 NFL Draft
Thursday
First Round
1. Houston, Jadeveon Clowney, de, South
Carolina.
2. St. Louis (from Washington), Greg Robin-
son, ot, Auburn.
3. Jacksonville, Blake Bortles, qb, UCF.
4. Buffalo (from Cleveland), Sammy Watkins,
wr, Clemson.
5. Oakland, Khalil Mack, Ib, Buffalo.
6. Atlanta, Jake Matthews, ot, Texas A&M.
7.Tampa Bay, Mike Evans, wr, Texas A&M.
8. Cleveland (from Minnesota), Justin Gilbert,
db, Oklahoma State.
9. Minnesota (from Buffalo through Cleve-
land), Anthony Barr, Ib, UCLA.
10. Detroit, Eric Ebron, te, North Carolina.
11. Tennessee, Taylor Lewan, ot, Michigan.
12. New York Giants, Odell Beckham, wr,
LSU.
13. St. Louis, Aaron Donald, dt, Pittsburgh.
14. Chicago, Kyle Fuller, db, Virginia Tech.
15. Pittsburgh, Ryan Shazier, Ib, Ohio State.
16. Dallas, Zach Martin, g, Notre Dame.
17. Baltimore, C.J. Mosley, Ib, Alabama.
18. New York Jets, Calvin Pryor, db,
Louisville.
19. Miami, Ja'Wuan James, ot, Tennessee.
20. New Orleans (from Arizona), Brandin
Cooks, wr, Oregon State.
21. Green Bay, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, db, Ala-
bama.
22. Cleveland (from Philadelphia), Johnny
Manziel, qb, Texas A&M.
23. Kansas City, Dee Ford, de, Auburn.
24. Cincinnati, Darqueze Dennard, db, Michi-
gan State.
25. San Diego, Jason Verrett, db, TCU.
26. Philadelphia (from Indianapolis through
Cleveland), Marcus Smith, Ib, Louisville.
27. Arizona (from New Orleans), Deone Bu-
cannon, db, Washington State.
28. Carolina, Kelvin Benjamin, wr, Florida
State.
29. New England, Dominique Easley, de,
Florida.
30. San Francisco, Jimmie Ward, db, North-
ern Illinois.
31. Denver, Bradley Roby, db, Ohio State.
32. Minnesota (from Seattle), Teddy Bridge-
water, qb, Louisville.
Friday
(x-compensatory selection)
Second Round
33. Houston, Xavier Su'a-Filo, g, UCLA.
34. Dallas (from Washington), Demarcus
Lawrence, de, Boise State.
35. Cleveland, Joel Bitonio, g, Nevada.
36. Oakland, Derek Carr, qb. Fresno State.
37. Atlanta, Ra'Shede Hageman, de, Min-
nesota.
38. Tampa Bay, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, te,
Washington.
39. Jacksonville, Marqise Lee, wr, Southern
Cal.
40. Detroit (from Minnesota through Seattle),
Kyle Van Noy, Ib, BYU.
41. St. Louis (from Buffalo), Lamarcus Joyner,
db, Florida State.
42. Philadelphia (from Tennessee), Jordan
Matthews, wr, Vandrbilt.
43. New York Giants, Weston Richburg, c,
Colorado State.
44. Buffalo (from St. Louis), Cyrus Kouandjio,
ot, Alabama.
45. Seattle (from Detroit), Paul Richardson,
wr, Colorado.
46. Pittsburgh, Stephen Tuitt, de, Notre
Dame.
47. Washington (from Dallas), Trent Murphy,
Ib, Stanford.
48. Baltimore, Timmy Jernigan, dt, Florida
State.
49. New York Jets, Jace Amaro, te, Texas
Tech.
50. San Diego (from Miami), Jeremiah At-
taochu, te, Georgia Tech.
51. Chicago, Ego Ferguson, dt, LSU.
52. Arizona, Troy Niklas, te, Notre Dame.
53. Green Bay, Davante Adams, wr, Fresno
State.
54. Tennessee (from Philadelphia), Bishop
Sankey, rb, Washington.
55. Cincinnati, Jeremy Hill, rb, LSU.
56. Denver (from Kansas City through San
Francisco), Cody Latimer, wr, Indiana.
57. San Francisco (from San Diego through
Miami), Carlos Hyde, rb, Ohio State.
58. New Orleans, Stanley Jean-Baptiste, db,
Nebraska.
59. Indianapolis, Jack Mewhort, g, Ohio
State.
60. Carolina, Kony Ealy, de, Missouri.
61. Jacksonville (from San Francisco), Allen
Robinson, wr, Penn State.
62. New England, Jimmy Garoppolo, qb,
Eastern Illinois.
63. Miami (from Denver through San Fran-
cisco), Jarvis Landry, wr, LSU.
64. Seattle, Justin Britt, ot, Missouri.
Third Round
65. Houston, C.J. Fiedorowicz, te, Iowa.
66. Washington, Morgan Moses, ot, Virginia.
67. Miami (from Oakland), Billy Turner, ot,
North Dakota State.
68. Atlanta, Dezmen Southward, db, Wiscon-
sin.
69. Tampa Bay, Charles Sims, rb, West Vir-
ginia.
70. San Francisco (from Jacksonville), Mar-
cus Martin, c, Southern Cal.
71. Cleveland, Christian Kirksey, Ib, Iowa.
72. Minnesota, Scott Crichton, de, Oregon
State.
73. Buffalo, Preston Brown, Ib, Louisville.
74. New York Giants, Jay Bromley, dt, Syra-
cuse.
75. St. Louis, Tre Mason, rb, Auburn.
76. Detroit, Travis Swanson, c, Arkansas.
77. San Francisco (from Tennessee), Chris
Borland, Ib, Wisconsin.
78. Washington (from Dallas), Spencer Long,
g, Nebraska.
79. Baltimore, Terrence Brooks, db, Florida
State.
80. New York Jets, Dexter McDougle, db,
Maryland.
81. Oakland (from Miami), Gabe Jackson, g,
Mississippi State
82. Chicago, Will Sutton, dt, Arizona State.
83. Houston (from Pittsburgh through Cleve-
land and Philadlephia), Louis Nix, dt, Notre
Dame.
84. Arizona, Kareem Martin, de, North Car-
olina.
85. Green Bay, Khyri Thornton, de, Southern
Mississippi.
86. Philadelphia, Josh Huff, wr, Oregon.
87. Kansas City, Phillip Gaines, db, Rice.
88. Cincinnati, Will Clark, de, West Virginia.
89. San Diego, Chris Watt, g, Notre Dame.
90. Indianapolis, Donte Moncrief, wr, Missis-
sippi.
91. Arizona (from New Orleans), John Brown,


wr, Pittsburg State.
92. Carolina, Trai Turner, g, LSU.
93. Jacksonville (from New England), Bran-
don Linder, g, Miami.
94. Clevland (from San Francisco), Terrance
West, rb, Towson.
95. Denver, Michael Schofield, ot, Michigan.
96. Minnesota (from Seattle), Jerick McKin-
non, rb, Georgia Southern.
97. x-Pittsburgh, Dri Archer, rb, Kent State.
98. x-Green Bay, Richard Rodgers, te, Cali-
fornia.
99. x-Baltimore, Crockett Gillmore, te, Col-
orado State.
100. x-San Francisco, Brandon Thomas, g,
Clemson.



NBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Monday, May 5
Washington 102, Indiana 96
L.A. Clippers 122, Oklahoma City 105


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 B3


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On the AIRWAVES =


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One Grand Prix of Spain, Qualifying
3:30 p.m. (ABC) IndyCar Grand Prix of Indianapolis
7 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at Florida
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at North Carolina
3:15 p.m. (SUN) Missouri at South Carolina
4:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Oklahoma at Texas Christian
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (MLB) Minnesota Twins at Detroit Tigers or Los
Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Toronto Blue Jays
4 p.m. (FS1) San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers
7 p.m. (FS1, WYKE 104.3 FM) Cleveland Indians at Tampa
Bay Rays
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves
8:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Diego Padres
NBA PLAYOFFS
8:15 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at Brooklyn Nets. Eastern
Conference Semifinal, game 3
10:30 p.m. (ESPN) San Antonio Spurs at Portland Trail
Blazers. Western Conference Semifinal, game 3
3 a.m. (ESPN) Miami Heat at Brooklyn Nets. Eastern
Conference Semifinal, game 3 (same-day tape)
4 a.m. (ESPN2) San Antonio Spurs at Portland Trail Blazers.
Western Conference Semifinal, game 3 (same-day tape)
BOXING
8 p.m. (ESPN) Chris Arreola vs. Bermane Stiverne
FOOTBALL
12 p.m. (ESPN, NFL) 2014 NFL Draft
GOLF
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour The Players Championship,
Third Round
2 p.m. (NBC) PGATour The Players Championship, Third
Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour The Players Championship,
Spotlight Coverage
HOCKEY
12 p.m. (NHL) CHL Hockey (taped)
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2014 IIHF World Championship: Group
B, USAvs. Switzerland
2 p.m. (NHL) New York Rangers at Pittsburgh Penguins.
Eastern Conference Semifinal, game 5 (taped)
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins.
Eastern Conference Semifinal, game 5
9:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Anaheim Ducks at Los Angeles Kings.
Western Conference Semifinal, game 4
LACROSSE
12 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAATournament: Albany (N.Y) at Loyola (Md.)
2:30 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Harvard at Notre Dame
5 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament: Cornell at Maryland
7 p.m. (SUN) MLL: Ohio Machine at Florida Launch
7:30 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAATournament: North Carolina at
Denver
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
12 p.m. (FS1) Big East Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
2 p.m. (ESPN2) ACC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
4 p.m. (ESPN2) AAC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
8 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
10 p.m. (ESPNU) SWAC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
(same-day tape)
TENNIS
5:30 a.m. (TENNIS) ATP Mutua Madrid Open

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Tuesday, May 6
Miami 107, Brooklyn 86
San Antonio 116, Portland 92
Wednesday, May 7
Indiana 86, Washington 82
Oklahoma City 112, L.A. Clippers 101, series
tied 1-1
Thursday, May 8
Miami 94, Brooklyn 82, Miami leads series 2-0
San Antonio 114, Portland 97, San Antonio
leads series 2-0
Friday, May 9
Indiana 85, Washington 63, Indiana leads se-
ries 2-1
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, late
Today
Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 11
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Washington, 8 p.m.
Monday, May 12
Miami at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 13
Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m.



NHL Playoffs
SECOND ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Thursday, May 1
Montreal 4, Boston 3, 20T
Friday, May 2
N.Y Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Chicago 5, Minnesota 2
Saturday, May 3
Boston 5, Montreal 3
Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Sunday, May 4
Chicago 4, Minnesota 1
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y Rangers 0
Monday, May 5
Pittsburgh 2, N.Y Rangers 0
Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 1


Tuesday, May 6
Montreal 4, Boston 2
Minnesota 4, Chicago 0, Chicago leads se-
ries 2-1
Wednesday, May 7
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y Rangers 2
Thursday, May 8
Boston 1, Montreal 0, OT, series tied 2-2
Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2, Los Angeles
leads series 2-1
Friday, May 9
N.Y Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1, Pittsburgh leads
series 3-2
Chicago at Minnesota, late
Today
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 11
Pittsburgh at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, TBA
Monday, May 12
Boston at Montreal, TBA
Los Angeles at Anaheim, TBA



Yankees 5,
Brewers 3


NewYork


ab r h bi
Ellsurycf 4 0 1 0
Jeterss 4 0 0 0
Beltranrf 3 1 1 0
ISuzukipr-rfO0 1 0 0
Teixeirib 4 0 0 1
McCnnc 3 1 1 0
Solarte3b 4 1 1 3
Gardnrlf 3 1 1 0
BRorts2b 4 0 1 1
Tanakap 3 00 0
Warrenp 0 00 0
KJhnsnph 1 00 0
DvRrtsp 0 00 0
Totals 33 565
NewYork 000
Milwaukee 000
DP-NewYork 2. LOB-


Milwaukee


ab rhbi
CGomzcf 3 12 0
Gennett2b 3 1 1 1
Lucroyc 4 0 1 1
ArRmr3b 4 0 1 0
MrRynllb 4 1 1 1
KDavisl If 4 0 0 0
Segurass 4 0 1 0
LSchfrrf 3 0 1 0
Gallard p 2 0 0 0
Duke p 0 00 0
Overay ph 1 00 0
Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0
Wootenp 0 00 0
Totals 323 8 3
400 010 5
002 001 3
-NewYork 4, Milwaukee


4. 2B-Beltran (10), B.Roberts (4), C.Gomez
(10), Gennett (6). HR-Solarte (2),
Mar.Reynolds (8). SB-I.Suzuki (2), C.Gomez
(5). CS-L.Schafer(1). S-Gennett.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
TanakaW,5-0 61/37 2 2 1 7
Warren H,5 12/30 0 0 0 1
Dav.Robertson S,6-6 1 1 1 1 0 3
Milwaukee
Gallardo L,2-2 52/35 4 4 3 7
Duke 11/30 0 0 0 2
Kintzler 1 1 1 1 0 0
Wooten 1 0 0 0 0 1


Boston

Pedroia 2b
Victorn rf
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli lb
GSizmr If
Bogarts ss
Przyns c
Mdlrks 3b
BrdlyJr cf
Totals
Boston
Texas


Rangers 8,
Red Sox 0
Texas
ab rhbi
b 4 00 0 Choo lf
4 0 0 0 Andrusss
4 0 1 0 ABeltre3b
3 0 0 0 Fielder lb
3 0 0 0 Rios rf
s 2 00 0 Morlnddh
3 0 0 0 Arenciic
3 00 0 LMartncf
3 00 0 Odor2b
29 01 0 Totals
000 000 000
102 050 00x


ib r h bi
4110
4 1 1 0
5340
4011
3111
3112
4131
3001
4122
4010
34 814 8
4 0 1 1
-3 1 1 1
3 1 1 2
4 1 3 1
3 0 0 1
4 1 2 2
4 0 1 0
34 814 8
0
8


E-Rios (3). LOB-Boston 4, Texas 6.2B-An-
drus (8), A.Beltre (6). HR-L.Martin (2). CS-
L.Martin (3), Odor (1). SF-Rios, Arencibia.
IP H RERBBSO


Boston
Buchholz L,2-3
Capuano
Mujica
Breslow
Texas


41/310 6
12/33 2
1 0 0
1 1 0


DarvishW,3-1 82/31 0 0 2 12
Ogando 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
WP-Ogando. Balk-Capuano.
Umpires-Home, Greg Gibson; First, Bill Miller;
Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Adam Hamari.
T-3:10. A-45,392 (48,114).



NASCAR-Sprint Cup
5-hour ENERGY 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Saturday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.252 mph.
2. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 193.91.
3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 193.507.
4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 193.188.
5. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 193.05.
6. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.043.
7. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 192.816.
8. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 192.548.
9. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 192.452.
10. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 191.98.
11. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 191.782.
12. (43) AricAlmirola, Ford, 190.328.
13. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 193.202.
14. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 193.043.
15. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 193.023.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 192.892.
17. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 192.823.
18. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 192.809.
19. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 192.692.
20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 192.637.
21. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 192.63.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 192.246.
23. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.809.
24. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 189.72.
25. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 191.98.
26. (78) Martin Truex Jr, Chevrolet, 191.761.
27. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 191.68.
28. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 191.51.
29. (47) A J AIImendinger, Chevrolet, 191.096.
30. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 191.049.
31. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 190.665.
32. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 190.148.
33. (23)Alex Bowman, Toyota, 189.873.
34. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 189.341.
35. (44) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 189.195.
36. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 189.142.
37. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
41. (32)Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (33)Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (66) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, 188.442.



BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Sent OF Fran-
cisco Peguero to Norfolk (IL) for a rehab
assignment.
CLEVELAND INDIANS -Assigned INF El-
liot Johnson outright to Columbus (IL).
DETROITTIGERS-Sent RHP Luke Putko-
nen to Toledo (IL) for a rehab assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Optioned LHP Brett
Oberholtzer to Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed
RHP Jose Cisnero on the 15-day DL, retroac-
tive to Wednesday. Recalled RHP Paul Clemens
from Oklahoma City. Reinstated RHP Scott
Feldman from the 15-day DL.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Optioned LHPs
Brooks Raley and Nick Maronde to Salt Lake
(PCL). Recalled INF Efren Navarro from Salt
Lake.
MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned SS Pedro
Florimon and OF Chris Herrmann to Rochester
(IL). Designated OF Kenny Wilson for assign-
ment. Reinstated OF Aaron Hicks from the 7-
day DL. Selected the contract of INF/OF Chris
Parmelee from Rochester.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Optioned RHPs
Arnold Leon and Dan Straily to Sacramento
(PCL). Placed RHP Ryan Cook on the 15-day
DL, retroactive to Thursday. Recalled RHPs Fer-
nando Rodriguez and LHP Joe Savery from
Sacramento.
SEATTLE MARINERS Optioned RHP
Erasmo Ramirez to Tacoma (PCL).
National League
NEWYORK METS Designated SS Omar
Quintanilla for assignment. Recalled SSWilmer
Flores from Las Vegas (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Optioned
INF/OF Freddy Galvisto Lehigh Valley (IL). Sent
OF Darin Ruf to Clearwater (FSL) for a rehab
assignment. Announced RHP Shawn Camp de-
clined outright assignment and elected free
agency. Selected the contract of INF Reid
Brignac from Lehigh Valley.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Recalled INF
Brent Morel from Indianapolis (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Optioned OF
Randal Grichuk to Memphis (PCL). Selected
the contract of OF Joey Butler form Memphis.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Sent LHP
David Huff to Fresno (PCL) for a rehab assign-
ment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Optioned OF
Tyler Moore to Syracuse (IL). Reinstated RHP
Doug Fister from the 15-day DL.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Named Dick Parsons interim CEO of
the L.A. Clippers.
COLLEGE
ARIZONA- Announced men's basketball F
Ryan Anderson will transfer from Boston
College.
COLORADO COLLEGE Named Mike
Haviland men's hockey coach.
GEORGIA -Named Yasir Rosemond men's
assistant basketball coach.
GEORGIA TECH Announced DE Jabari
Hunt-Days has been declared academically in-
eligible for the 2014 season and RB Travis
Custis will transferto Georgia Military College.
OREGON Dismissed Gs Damyean Dot-
son, Dominic Artis and Brandon Austin from the
men's basketball team.
WEST VIRGINIA- Announced men's bas-
ketball G Terry Henderson will transfer.


Bucs draft




tight end in




second round

Associated Press

TAMPA The Tampa Bay Buccaneers ad-
dressed another pressing need in the NFL
draft, selecting Washington tight end Austin
Seferian-Jenkins in the second round on Fri-
day night.
Coach Lovie Smith is intent on retooling the
offense, trying to surround offseason acquisi-
tion and projected new starting quarterback
Josh McCown with playmakers capable of
jumpstarting the league's lowest-ranked
attack.
The Bucs finished 30th in scoring and last in
passing and total offense in 2013.
They began the draft by selecting Texas
A&M receiver Mike Evans instead of his much
higher-profile college teammate, Heisman
Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, in the first
round.
Seferian-Jenkins was the sixth player se-
lected in the second round, No. 38 overall.
The 6-foot-5, 262-pound tight end had 36 re-
ceptions for 450 yards and 8 touchdowns last
season.
"I'm going to bring explosiveness. I'm going
to bring playmaking ability I'm going to bring
blocking. I'm going to bring an all-around tight
who can play on all three downs, and a guy
who's going to work hard, chase Super bowls
and try to win as many games as possible," Se-
ferian Jenkins said.
A two-sport athlete at Washington, where he
also played on the basketball team for a por-
tion of his college career, Seferian-Jenkins is
the second tight end the Bucs have brought in
since last season. The team also added veteran
Brandon Myers in free agency
The Buccaneers selected West Virginia run-
ning back Charles Sims in the third round, the
third consecutive pick the team used to ad-
dress a struggling offense.
Although running back is considered one of
the team's strengths, general manager Jason
Licht said Sims was too good a prospect to pass
up Friday night.
Third-year running back Doug Martin was a
Pro Bowl selection as a rookie in 2012. Bobby
Rainey and Mike James are young players who
showed promise last season, when Martin was
out with a shoulder injury
Sims rushed for 1,095 yards last season.
Meanwhile, Evans flew to Tampa from New
York for an introductory news conference.




DRAFT
Continued from Page B1


10,000 yards and 100 touchdown passes.
He led Fresno State to consecutive Mountain
West Conference titles in his final two seasons
and passed for 5,082 yards and 50 touchdowns
in 2013. He guided a spread offense that relied
on his quick decision making, fast release and
ability to move in the pocket. All in a season
where his son was born with a serious problem
with his intestines a month before he stepped
on the field.
Oakland acquired veteran Matt Schaub to be
its starter, but he will get a serious push from
Carr
In other picks Friday:
Houston had 20 hours to think about the
first pick of the second round, then went for a
blocker The Texans selected UCLA guard
Xavier Su'a-Filo, who joins the first overall
pick, defensive disrupter Jadeveon Clowney of
South Carolina, in Houston. The two of them
can have fun colliding against each other in
minicamps and training camp. The 6-foot-4,307-
pound Su'a-Filo, who went on a Mormon mis-
sion while in college, also has played tackle.
The Cowboys took Boise State defensive
end Demarcus Lawrence, who they hope will
emulate their departed sacks leader with the
same first name, DeMarcus Ware, now with
Denver "I'm my own Demarcus," Lawrence
said. "I don't like to try to be nobody else. I'm
going to be me, and I'm going to do it well."
Cleveland, more active than any team in
the first round, added a protector for Johnny
Manziel by grabbing guard Joel Bitonio of Ne-
vada, who also can play tackle or center. The
Browns caused the biggest stir on opening night
when they traded up to No. 22 to get Johnny
Football. "I think he's a heck of a quarterback,"
Bitonio said. "Hopefully, he comes in and he's
ready to compete and just ready to work and do
well for the Cleveland Browns."
Cleveland did not choose any receivers even
though Josh Gordon is reportedly facing sus-
pension by the NFL for violating the league's
drug policy again. Gordon was suspended for
the first two games of 2013, but still led the
league with 1,646 yards receiving in 14 games.
He had 87 catches and nine touchdowns.
Eastern Illinois QB Jimmy Garoppolo, a
star on the FCS level from the school that pro-
duced Tony Romo, went to New England near
the end of the second round. Could he be the
heir to Tom Brady, who Garoppolo says has
been his favorite NFL player? "I feel good
about it," Garoppolo said. "Whether I was com-
ing in as the starter or as the backup, I'm going


to go in and approach it the same way I'm going
to go out there and try to get better each and
every day That's what good football players do."
-After Washington selected Virginia tackle
Morgan Moses, who was on hand at the draft,
with the 66th pick, Moses joked: "I thought my
phone was broken." Several mock drafts had
Moses going in the first round.
The teams already were busy on the trade
block, with five in the first 75 minutes of the sec-
ond round. There were only five all through the
opening round.
It took 54 selections, a draft record, for a run-
ning back to go. Bishop Sankey of Washington
was chosen by the Titans, who cut Chris John-
son this spring. Two more went in the next three
selections: Jeremy Hill of LSU to Cincinnati,
and Carlos Hyde of Ohio State to San Francisco.


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


East Division
GB WC


Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto
Boston
Tampa Bay




Miami
Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Philadelphia


Str Home Away
W-4 8-6 11-8
W-3 9-8 10-7
L-1 7-8 11-10
L-1 10-11 7-7
L-4 7-11 8-10



Str Home Away
W-5 17-5 3-10
W-1 11-8 8-7
W-1 11-9 8-6
L-3 8-8 8-9
L-4 6-9 9-9


Detroit
Chicago
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home
11 .645 8-2 L-2 12-7
18 .514 4 /2 5-5 W-1 11-8
19 .472 5/2 2 6-4 W-4 12-8
18 .471 5/2 2 4-6 L-1 8-7
18 .471 5% 2 4-6 W-1 8-9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 22 14 .611 3-7 L-3 10-9 12-5
St. Louis 18 18 .500 4 2 4-6 L-1 7-5 11-13
Cincinnati 16 18 .471 5 3 5-5 W-1 9-7 7-11
Pittsburgh 15 20 .429 6/2 4/2 5-5 W-3 11-10 4-10
Chicago 12 22 .353 9 7 4-6 L-1 7-11 5-11


Oakland
Seattle
Texas
Los Angeles
Houston




San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
15 .571 -
16 .529 1/2 -
17 .528 1/2 --
17 .500 2/2 1
25 .306 9/2 8 :


West Division
L Pct GB WC


Str Home
W-1 7-9
W-1 6-6
W-2 11-8
W-1 8-10
L-1 6-13



Str Home
W-1 10-5
L-2 13-5
L-2 6-10
L-3 9-11
L-1 3-15


Atlanta


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bonifac cf-2b4 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 4 1 1 0
Kalish If-cf 3 0 1 1 J.Upton If 4 0 0 0
Rizzo lb 4 0 0 0 Fremn lb 4 1 3 1
SCastross 3 0 0 0 Gattisc 4 1 2 0
Schrhltrf 4 00 0 CJhnsn3b 4 03 2
Valuen 2b-3b4 0 1 0 BUptoncf 4 0 0 0
Olt3b 2 1 1 1 Smmnsss 4 00 0
HRndnp 0 00 0 Tehernp 3 00 0
Lakeph 1 00 0 Kimrelp 0 00 0
Wrghtp 0 0 0 0 Doumitph 1 0 0 0
JoBakr c 4 00 0 A.Wood p 0 00 0
Hammlp 2 00 0 R.Pena2b 4 00 0
Rosscpp 0 000
Coghlnl If 2 1 1 0
Totals 33 242 Totals 363 9 3
Chicago 001 000 001 0 2
Atlanta 002 000 000 1 3
No outs when winning run scored.
E-J.Upton (4). LOB-Chicago 4, Atlanta 9.
HR-Olt (7). SB-Heyward (6), C.Johnson (1).
CS-Kalish (2).


Chicago
Hammel
Rosscup
H.Rondon
W.Wright L,0-1
Atlanta
Teheran
Kimbrel BS,2-11
A.Wood W,3-5
Reds 4,
Colorado


IP H RERBBSO

7 7 2 2 1 5
2/3 1 0 0 0 1
11/30 0 0 0 3
0 1 1 1 2 0

8 1 1 1 2 9
1 2 1 1 1 0
1 1 0 0 0 2
Rockies 3
Cincinnati


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Blckmnrf 4 0 1 1 Schmkrcf-lf 3 1 1 0
Stubbscf 4 0 0 0 B.Penac 3 0 0 1
Tlwtzkss 4 1 1 1 Phillips2b 3 0 1 1
CGnzlzlf 4 00 0 Vottolb 4 1 1 1
Arenad3b 3 1 0 0 Frazier3b 3 1 1 1
Mornealb 3 02 1 Ludwcklf 2 0 1 0
Pachec c 4 00 0 Broxtnp 0 00 0
LeMahi2b 4 1 1 0 Heiseyrf 3 00 0
Chacinp 2 0 1 0 Cozartss 3 00 0
Dickrsnph 1 00 0 Cuetop 2 0 0 0
Ottavinp 0 0 0 0 BHmltnph-cf 1 1 1 0
Logan p 0000


Totals 33 363
Colorado 00(
Cincinnati 110
No outs when winning
LOB-Colorado 5, Ci
(11), Chacin (1), Sch
B.Hamilton (4). HR--
Frazier (6). S-Schur
Phillips.

Colorado
Chain
Ottavino
Logan L,1-1
Cincinnati
Cueto
Broxton W,1-0
Pirates 6,
St. Louis
ab r h b
MCrpnt3b 5 0 1 0
JhPerltss 4 2 2
Hollidy lf 3 1 10
MAdmslb 4 000
YMolinc 4 0 0
Craigrf 4 1 2
Bourjos cf 4 0 10
M.Ellis2b 3 0 1 0
Wacha p 2 00
Jay ph 1 0 0
Neshekp 0 000
CMrtnzp 0 00
Fornatrp 0 0 0
Descals ph 1 0 10


Totals 35 494
St. Louis 00(
Pittsburgh 20(
DP-St. Louis 1, Pitts


Totals 274 6 4 ST PETERSBURG Mike
S110o 001 3 Avileshit a three-runhomerduring
S000 011O 4 a five-run seventh inning, Corey
g run scored. KIuber went 6 2/3 effective innings,
ncinnati 3.2B-Morneau
umaker (1), Phillips (8), and the Cleveland Indians stopped
Tulowitzki (10), Votto (5), a seven-game road losing streak by
naker. SF-B.Pena, beating the Tampa Bay Rays 6-3 on
Friday night
IP H R ER BB SO Cleveland also got solo homers
from Asdrubal Cabrera and
6 4 2 2 1 2 Michael Brantley Kluber (3-3) al-
l 0 0 0 0 0 lowedtwo runs ninehitsandhad

nine strikeouts.
8 5 2 2 1 8 Jake Odorizzi struck out a ca-
1 1 1 1 1 0 reer-highllandgaveupfivehitsin
Cardinals 4 five shutout innings for the Rays,
who have lost six straight at home.
Pittsburgh bi Brantley homered off Joel Per-
i|ab r hbi .
STabata rf 3 2 2 0 alta (1-3) before Yan Gomes hit an
1 NWalkr 2b 4 2 3 4 RBI single and Aviles had his
0 AMcCtcf 4 0 1 0 three-run shot against Brandon
0 PAIvrz 3b 3 0 0 0 Gomes as the Indians went ahead
0 SMarte If 4 0 0 0 6-2 in the seventh.
3 I.Davis lb 4 0 2 2 Cody Allen got one out for his
0 TSnchz c 4 0 0 0 first save.


J Mercer ss 4 1 3 u
0 Lirianop 1 0 0 0
0 Morelph 1 00 0
0 JGomzp 0 00 0
0 JuWlsnp 0 0 0 0
0 GSnchzph 1 1 1 0
0 Watsonp 0000
JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0
Melncnp 0 00 0
Totals 34612 6
0 300 100 4
0 010 30x 6
burgh 1. LOB- St. Louis 8,


Pittsburgh 6. 2B-M.Carpenter (6), M.Ellis (2),
Descalso (3), Tabata (4), I.Davis (5), Mercer (4).
3B-Bourjos (2). HR-Jh.Peralta (8), Craig (4),
N.Walker (7). SB-M.Ellis (1). S-Tabata.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Wacha 5 7 3 3 1 7
Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0
C.MartinezL,0-2 1 3 3 3 0 0
Fornataro 1 2 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Liriano 5 5 3 3 4 5
J.Gomez 12/32 1 1 0 1
Ju.WilsonW,1-0 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
WatsonH,6 1 1 0 0 0 2
Melancon S,3-4 1 1 0 0 0 0
Interleague
White Sox 9,
Diamondbacks 3


Arizona Chicago
ab r h bi
GParrarf 4 1 1 2 DeAzacf
Owingsss 4 00 0 GBckh2b
Gldschlb 4 0 0 0 Gillaspi3b
Monter c 4 0 0 0 JAreudh
Hill2b 3 0 0 0 A.Dunnlb
EChavz dh 3 0 0 0 Viciedo If
Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 AIRmrz ss
C.RossIf 4 2 2 0 Sierra rf
Pollock cf 3 0 1 1 Flowrsc
Totals 33 343 Totals
Arizona 002 010 000
Chicago 000 700 11x


ab r h bi
5131
5111
4110
4232
4000
4120
4124
4110
4121
38915 1 3 1
5 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
4 2 3 2
4 0 0 0
4 1 2 0
4 1 2 4
4 1 1 0
4 1 2 1
38915 9
3
9


E-AI.Ramirez 2 (4). DP-Arizona 1. LOB-Ari-
zona 5, Chicago 6.2B-C.Ross (1), De Aza (3).
3B-AI.Ramirez (2). HR-G.Parra (3), J.Abreu
(13), AI.Ramirez (5), Flowers (2). SB-Pollock
(2).
IP H RERBBSO


31/39 7
32/35 1
1 1 1

52/34 3
11/30 0
1 0 0
1 0 0


American League
Rangers 8, Red Sox 0
ARLINGTON, Texas-Yu Darvish
came within one out of a no-hitter for
the second time, giving up only a ninth-
inning single to David Ortiz in the Texas
Rangers' 8-0 victory over the Boston
Red Sox.
Darvish took a perfect game into the
seventh before Ortiz reached on a two-
out error by right fielder Alex Rios. The
right-hander walked his next batter and
another in the eighth but went into the
ninth looking for the first no-hitter in the
majors this season.
Dustin Pedroia grounded out and
Shane Victorino struck out, bringing
Ortiz to the plate. With the crowd in a
frenzy, the big slugger hit a sharp
grounder through Texas' defensive shift
on the right side of the diamond for a
clean single.

Orioles 4, Astros 3

BALTIMORE Steve Pearce and
Manny Machado homered and the Bal-
timore Orioles won a season-high
fourth consecutive game, 4-3 over the
Houston Astros.
Baltimore (19-14) is five games over
.500 for the first time this season.
Meanwhile, the Astros have lost six of
their past seven games.
Orioles starter Wei-Yin Chen (4-2)
had another effective outing, allowing
two runs and five hits with four strike-
outs and one walk and tied a season-
high by going seven innings.

Angels 4, Blue Jays 3
TORONTO Raul Ibanez drove in
the tiebreaking run with a sacrifice fly in
the ninth inning, Mike Trout hit a solo
home run and the Los Angeles Angels
won their fifth straight game in Toronto,
beating the Blue Jays 4-3.
Erick Aybar had three hits and
scored twice, including the decisive run
in the ninth, as the Angels won for the
eighth time in nine meetings with the
Blue Jays and halted Toronto's season-
long winning streak at five games.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay relief pitcher Brad Boxberger, center, wipes his forehead as he waits Friday with third baseman
Evan Longoria, left, and first baseman James Loney, right, for manager Joe Maddon to take him out of the
game against the Cleveland Indians during the sixth inning in St. Petersburg.



Home woes continue for Rays


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Baltimore 4, Houston 3
L.A. Angels 4, Toronto 3
Minnesota 2, Detroit 1
Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 3
Texas 8, Boston 0
Chicago White Sox 9, Arizona 3
N.Y Yankees 5, Milwaukee 3
Washington at Oakland, late
Kansas City at Seattle, late
Today's Games
L.A. Angels (Skaggs 2-1) atToronto (Happ 1-0), 1:07 p.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 3-2) at Detroit (Scherzer 4-1),
1:08 p.m.
Houston (McHugh 2-1) at Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez
1-3), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 2-3) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana
1-2), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 3-2) at Tampa Bay (Bedard
1-1), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 3-4) at Milwaukee (Lohse
4-1), 7:10 p.m.
Boston (Lester 3-4) atTexas (M.Perez 4-2), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (Roark 2-1) at Oakland (Gray 4-1), 9:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Ventura 2-1) at Seattle (C.Young 2-0),
9:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 4
Cincinnati 4, Colorado 3
Atlanta 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 9, Arizona 3
N.YYankees 5, Milwaukee 3
Washington at Oakland, late
Miami at San Diego, late
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, late
Philadelphia at N.Y Mets, late
Today's Games
San Francisco (M.Cain 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke
5-1), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 4-1) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 1-3), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 2-3) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana
1-2), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 0-3) at Atlanta (E.Santana
3-0), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Lyles 4-0) atCincinnati (Simon 4-1), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (Sabathia 3-4) at Milwaukee (Lohse
4-1), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-3) at N.Y Mets (Gee 3-1),
7:10 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 2-1) atSan Diego (Stults 1-3), 8:40 p.m.
Washington (Roark 2-1) at Oakland (Gray 4-1), 9:05 p.m.

Aybar tripled off Brett Cecil (0-3) to
begin the ninth and Trout reached
safely when first baseman Edwin En-
carnacion couldn't find the bag after
taking the throw on Trout's infield
grounder. Albert Pujols was intentionally
walked to load the bases for Ibanez.
Joe Smith (2-0) got the win despite
giving up a game-tying home run to
Jose Reyes in the eighth and Ernesto
Frieri finished for his fourth save in six
chances.

Twins 2, Tigers 1
DETROIT-- Phil Hughes pitched
seven scoreless innings, and the Min-
nesota Twins beat Justin Verlander for
the first time in over four years, 2-1.
Kurt Suzuki hit a two-run single off
Verlander (4-2) in the seventh to lift
Minnesota. Hughes (4-1) allowed eight
hits in his fourth consecutive win.
Hughes threw 86 pitches, and then
gave way to the bullpen. Casey Fien
pitched the eighth, and Glen Perkins al-
lowed a run in the ninth but held on for
his ninth save in 10 chances.
National League
Braves 3, Cubs 2,10 inn.
ATLANTA- Freddie Freeman's sin-
gle up the middle drove in Jason Hey-
ward from second base in the 10Oth
inning and the Atlanta Braves recov-
ered from Craig Kimbrel's blown save
to beat the Chicago Cubs 3-2.
Kimbrel couldn't hold a 2-1 lead in
the ninth after Julio Teheran allowed
only one hit Mike Olt's homer in
eight innings.
Wesley Wright (0-1) walked Heyward
to lead off the 10Oth. Heyward stole sec-


ond base. Wright issued an intentional
walk to Justin Upton before Freeman
ended the game with his single. Hey-
ward slid home with the winning run as
Ryan Klash's throw from center field
was off target.
Luis Valbuena led off the 10Oth with a
single to right field off Alex Wood (3-5),
who then recorded three straight outs in
his first relief appearance of the season.

Reds 4, Rockies 3
CINCINNATI Joey Votto hit a
game-ending solo homer, and the
Cincinnati Reds shut down Nolan Are-
nado in a 4-3 win over Colorado Rock-
ies.
Votto drove a 3-0 pitch from Boone
Logan (1-1) over the wall in center for
his fifth homer. Votto's fourth career
game-ending shot traveled an esti-
mated 437 feet.
Arenado went 0 for 3, snapping his
hitting streak at a club-record 28
games, the longest in the majors this
season. But Arenado walked and
scored on Justin Morneau's tying dou-
ble in the ninth, handing Jonathan Brox-
ton (1-0) his first blown save in six
opportunities.
Cincinnati's Johnny Cueto went eight
innings, giving him five consecutive
starts of eight or more innings. He gave
up five hits and two runs with one walk
and eight strikeouts.

Pirates 6, Cardinals 4
PITTSBURGH Neil Walker had
three hits, including a go-ahead three-
run home run in the seventh inning, and
drove in four runs to help the Pittsburgh
Pirates beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-4.
Walker's seventh homer came off
Carlos Martinez (0-2) and rallied the Pi-
rates from a 4-3 deficit for their third
straight victory.
Pittsburgh beat St. Louis for the 10Oth
time in 13 games at home.

Interleague
White Sox 9,
Diamondbacks 3
CHICAGO -Alexei Ramirez hit a
grand slam to fuel Chicago's seven-run
fourth inning and Jose Abreu hit his
major league-leading 13th homer and
drove in two runs to lead the White Sox
to an 8-3 victory over the Arizona Dia-
mondbacks.
Abreu was the designated hitter be-
cause of a nagging left ankle injury. He
went 3 for 4 and leads the AL with 37
RBIs.
Yankees 5, Brewers 3
MILWAUKEE Masahiro Tanaka
pitched into the seventh inning,
Yangervis Solarte hit a three-run homer
and the New York Yankees beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 5-3.
Afan jumped out of the left-field
stands and walked briskly toward Derek
Jeter's spot at shortstop while the
Brewers were batting in the sixth inning.
Jeter didn't appear to notice until the
fan was within an arm's length or so.
Jeter calmly took a few steps away as
several security guards rushed in to
tackle the person.
Jeter has said he will retire after this
season.
Tanaka (5-0) allowed two runs and
seven hits in his first interleague game.
The Japanese right-hander struck out
seven and walked one.
Tanaka also struck out in each of his
first three major league at-bats.


AL


East Division
GB WC L10
1 9-1
9 1 -- 2-8
9 1/2 6-4
5 3 2/2 3-7
5 4 3/2 4-6


Minnesota
PHughes W,4-1
Fien H,4
Perkins S,9-10
Detroit


Ver
AIb
Kro
E.R


780003
100000
121102
7 8 0 0 0 3
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 2 1 1 0 2


landerL,4-2 7 7 2 2 2 5
urquerque 2/3 0 0 0 1 2
I 2/31 0 0 0 2
Reed 2/31 0 0 0 0
Late Thursday
Orioles 3, Rays I


Baltimore Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Markksrf 5 0 1 0 Zobrist2b 2 0 1 0
Machd3b 3 00 0 DJnngscf 5 1 1 0
N.Cruzl If 4 0 1 0 Joyce If 3 0 1 0
Loughl If 0 0 0 0 Longori3b 4 01 1
A.Jones cf 4 1 2 0 Loneylb 4 01 0
Wietersdh 4 0 1 0 Myersrf 4 0 1 0
Hardyss 3 1 1 0 DeJessdh 3 01 0
Pearcelb 4 1 2 2 Forsyth ph-dh 1 0 0 0
Schoop2b 4 0 1 1 YEscorss 4 0 1 0
CJosph c 4 00 0 JMolin c 2 00 0
Hanign ph-c 2 0 1 0
Totals 35 393 Totals 34 1 9 1
Baltimore 020 100 000 3
Tampa Bay 100 000 000 1
DP-Baltimore 2. LOB-Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay
11. 2B-Hardy (5), YEscobar (6). HR-Pearce
(2). SB-De.Jennings 2 (8). CS-N.Cruz (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
U.JimenezW,2-4 51/37 1 1 2 3
R.WebbH,4 11/30 0 0 2 1
MatuszH,5 11/30 0 0 0 0
O'DayS,2-3 1 2 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Price L,3-3 5 9 3 3 1 3
Boxberger 11/30 0 0 1 3
Jo.Peralta 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Oviedo 2 0 0 0 0 2


Rays schedule


May 10
May 11
May 12
May 13
May 14
May 15
May 16
May 17
May 18


vs. Cleveland
vs. Cleveland
at Seattle
at Seattle
at Seattle
at LA Angels
at LA Angels
at LA Angels
at LA Angels


NL


Braves 3,
Cubs 2, 10 inn.


Chicago


Indians 6, Rays 3
Cleveland Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 DeJessdh 5 14 2
Swisherlb 5 0 2 0 Zobrist2b-ss 4 0 1 0
Brantlylf 5 1 1 1 Loneylb 4 0 1 1
CSantn3b 3 1 0 0 Longori3b 4 02 0
DvMrprf 5 00 0 Myersrf 4 00 0
ACarerss 4 23 1 Joycel If 4 1 1 0
YGomsc 5 1 2 1 Guyer cf 4 00 0
Chsnhlldh 3 0 1 0 YEscorss 0 00 0
Aviles2b 3 1 1 3 Forsyth2b 4 1 2 0
Hanignc 3 01 0
Totals 38 6116 Totals 36312 3
Cleveland 000 001 500 6
TampaBay 000 110 001 3
E-Y.Escobar (6). DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-
Cleveland 10, Tampa Bay 9. 2B-Swisher (10),
DeJesus 3 (6), Forsythe (5). 3B-Bourn (3).
HR-Brantley (7), A.Cabrera (3), Aviles (2).
CS-Zobrist(1). S Aviles. SF-Loney.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
KluberW,3-3 62/39 2 2 0 9
Rzepczynski 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
Shaw 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Axford 2/3 2 1 1 2 2
AlienS,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Tampa Bay
Odorizzi 5 5 0 0 2 11
BoxbergerH,1 1/3 2 1 1 0 0
McGee H,3 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Jo.PeraltaL,1-3 1/3 2 3 3 1 0
B.Gomes 2/3 2 2 2 0 1
Lueke 2 0 0 0 0 0
Orioles 4, Astros 3
Houston Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Altuve2b 4 0 1 0 Markksrf 4 03 1
Villarss 4 0 0 0 Machd3b 4 1 1 1
Fowler cf 4 1 1 0 N.Cruzl If 4 00 0
Guzmnlb 2 00 0 Loughl If 0 00 0
Kraussph 0 00 0 A.Jones cf 4 01 0
Carter dh 4 1 1 1 Wietersdh 4 00 0
Springrrf 4 00 0 Hardyss 3 1 1 0
MDmn3b 3 1 2 0 Clevngrc 3 00 0
Corprnc 3 00 0 Pearcelb 3 1 1 1
Hoes If 1 0 1 1 Schoop2b 3 1 1 1
Presley ph-lfl1 0 0 0
Totals 30 36 2 Totals 32 4 8 4
Houston 001 000 101 3
Baltimore 002 000 20x 4
E-Machado (3). DP-Baltimore 2. LOB-Hous-
ton 3, Baltimore 4. 2B-Fowler (5),
M.Dominguez 2 (8), Markakis (6), Hardy (6).
HR-Carter(5), Machado (1), Pearce (3). SB-
Fowler (4). CS-Altuve (2). SF-Hoes.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Feldman 6 5 2 2 0 6
Williams L,1-2 2 3 2 2 0 1
Baltimore
WChenW4-2 7 5 2 2 1 4
O'DayH,3 1 0 0 0 0 1
Tom.HunterS,11-12 1 1 1 1 1 1
Angels 4, Blue Jays 3
Los Angeles Toronto
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Aybarss 5 2 3 0 Reyesss 4 23 1
Trout cf 5 1 1 1 MeCarrlf 3 12 0
Pujolslb 3 0 0 0 Bautistrf 4 01 0
Ibanezdh 1 00 1 Encrnclb 3 00 0
HKndrc 2b 3 0 2 1 Frncsc 3b 4 00 0
IStewrt3b 4 00 0 Linddh 4 00 0
Cronph 1 0 0 0 DNavrrc 4000
JMcDnl3b 0 0 0 0 CIRsms cf 4 01 0
Congerc 4000 Getz2b 3000
ENavrrl If 4 1 20
Cowgillrf 4 0 1 1
Totals 34 49 4 Totals 333 7 1
LosAngeles 011 000 101 4
Toronto 101 000 010 3
E-Encarnacion (3). DP-Los Angeles 1,
Toronto 1. LOB-Los Angeles 11, Toronto 5.
2B-Aybar 2 (9), E.Navarro 2 (2), Reyes (7).
3B-Aybar (3). HR Trout (7), Reyes (3). SB-
Pujols (2), Ibanez (1), Me.Cabrera (4). SF-
Ibanez.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Richards 7 5 2 2 2 6
J.SmithW,2-0BS,2-5 1 2 1 1 0 1
FrieriS,4-6 1 0 0 0 0 2
Toronto
McGowan 5 7 2 2 2 2
Santos 12/31 1 1 2 2
Delabar 11/30 0 0 1 3
Cecil L,0-3 1 1 1 1 2 0
Twins 2, Tigers 1
Minnesota Detroit
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Dozier2b 3 0 2 0 Kinsler2b 4 0 1 0
KSuzuk c 5 02 2 TrHntrrf 4 01 0
Plouffe3b 4 0 0 0 MiCarrIb 4 01 0
Colaelllb 3 00 0 VMrtnzdh 4 00 0
Kubell If 4 0 1 0 AJcksn cf 4 1 3 0
Nunezdh 4 0 1 0 Cstllns3b 4 02 0
Parmelrf 4 1 2 0 Avila c 4 01 1
A.Hicks cf 4 0 0 0 Worthpr 0 00 0
DSantnss 4 1 1 0 AnRmnss 3 00 0
JMrtnz ph 1 00 0
RDavisl If 4 0 1 0
Totals 35 292 Totals 36110 1
Minnesota 000 000 200 2
Detroit 000 000 001 1
DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Minnesota 9, Detroit 8.
2B-A.Jackson (8), Avila (6), R.Davis (4). SB-
A.Jackson (5). CS-Dozier (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Darvish one out

shy of no-hitter

against Red Sox


Associated Press


Arizona
McCarthy L,1-6
Cahill
Thatcher
Chicago
RienzoW,3-0
Putnam H,2
Belisario
Lindstrom


B4 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


BASEBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


od mini master


Z-- -2! A. j.,.~2C



BUTCH CRAWFORD/For the Chronicle
James Ellis of Brooksville works his way around the track during a recent race in his modified mini stock class No. 98 car. Ellis has won all four
of his feature races in that class this season and returns to the Citrus County Speedway tonight.


Brooksville'sJames Ellis enjoys taking on the best of the


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

James Ellis is enjoying quite a
run. After years of success at a
multitude of tracks, the
Brooksville




BCrout Sped kae sEllsI
driver and car
owner has won8
all four of his fea-
ture races in the
modified mini
stock class, in-
cluding his out-
ing at the Citrus
County Speed- James Ellis
way on March 8.
"I just built this
(No. 98 mod mini) this year, and
it's the best of the best right now,"
said Ellis, who expects to make a
return to Citrus for today's 50-lap
event "It's phenomenal. After
about 25 years of racing, I've
learned a new way of doing it. I've
built it and designed it myself,
and did some trick stuff on it."
While Ellis has been dominant
the past five years he estimates
he's won at least 50 races over the
span he was an immediate
force upon entering racing, win-


ning his second race ever in the
class he still races today
"I just had the fire in the eye,
just this thrill of beating the best
of the best, that was my goal,"
Ellis said. "I watched my older
brother Ricky do it for years.
"Once I got in it, he quit be-
cause I was better than he was,"
Ellis added with a laugh.
Since then, Ellis, who owns
Capital Maintenance and Land-
scaping, took off a decade to raise
a family His return came with a
greater purpose, after his father
Richard, who bought James his
first racecar, suffered a stroke
around six years ago.
"The reason I'm still racing
now is for my dad," Ellis said.
"He's paralyzed on one side, and
the only thing he really loved to
do was racing. So I built the shop
and a handicap room in the back-
yard and he stays there. I'll prob-
ably do it until he dies. I do it for
the thrill of watching how happy
he is when I win. It makes me
happier when he's happy"
Ellis continues to build his rep-
utation as a top driver through
his willingness to face the best, no


matter the track. In his most re-
cent outing, he took a trip to New
Smyrna Speedway and beat the
venerable Ted "Mr Mini Stock"
Vulpius in a 25-lapper
"I like to float around and race
the best of the best," Ellis said.
"You've got to go where the good
stuff is. I don't want to master one
track. I've won at every track in
the area, (including) Orlando
(Speedworld) and Bradenton
(Desoto Speedway)."
Ellis' career highlight was scor-
ing a second-place finish and set-
ting fastest lap time in a 32-car
race at NASCAR's Bristol Motor
Speedway in Tennessee two
years ago.
"That was the best time of my
life right there," Ellis said.
"Whenever you can go to a
NASCAR track, it's going to be the
best. I had the race won, but
something broke on my steering. I
had to manhandle it for 35 laps."
Ellis says racing keeps him in
the shop about 10 hours a week,
and helps him relieve stress from
his business. He owns a car
driven by fellow Brooksville
driver LeRoy Moore, and is re-


best on his own

building one for Chris Hooker, of
Floral City
Ellis prefers to remain in the
modified mini class because it af-
fords him independence.
"I've been mod minis all the
way," he said. "I just didn't see
spending the money when you
can go just as fast in this class.
You really need a lot of help in
the other classes, and I prefer to
be by myself. I like to win by my-
self- I like to beat the best of the
best by myself."
Ellis' sons Jeffrey, 19, and Brad,
a freshman at Hernando High
School, aren't following their fa-
ther into racing, but have promis-
ing futures in sports, nonetheless.
"They don't really go to the
races," Ellis said. "They've got
their own thing. Jeffrey is a really
good bass fisherman. He goes to
tournaments every weekend, and
I sponsor him on that. And Brad
wants to play baseball and foot-
ball at Florida State. My uncles
went there, so we try to keep it in
the family
"Brad's already bigger than me.
I never played sports never
had the size."


I R~~-ACIGB IF


Harvick sets track
record to win pole for
Kansas night race
KANSAS CITY, Kan. Kevin
Harvick set a track record to win

Kansas
Speedway.
Harvick
posted his
record time of
194.658 mph
Friday in the
second round of
NASCAR's Kevin
knockout qualify- Harvick
ing format. Har-
vick then hit 194.252 in the third
round to win his second pole of
the season.
Joey Logano joins Harvick on
the front row today for the first
night race in Kansas history.
Brad Keselowski, Carl Edwards
and Kyle Larson round out the top
five.
Harvick has two wins this sea-
son and won from the pole at
Darlington.
Danica Patrick qualified ninth
for her second straight top-10
start.
Saavedra wins
IndyCar pole after
Hunter-Reay crash
INDIANAPOLIS Sebastian
Saavedra has won the pole for the
inaugural Grand Prix of Indianapo-
lis when Ryan Hunter-Reay was
stripped of his two fastest laps for
bringing out the red flag during the
final qualifying group.
Hunter-Reay had just moved to
the top of the Fast Six in Friday
qualifying when he lost control of


his car on a wet track while exiting
Turn 14. The car slid for some time
before backing into the wall.
The IndyCar rule is to strip a
driver of his two fastest laps for
bringing out a red flag during
qualifying.
That dropped Hunter-Reay to
third and Saavedra won the first
pole of his career. The Colombian
turned a lap at 1 minute, 23.8822
seconds. He'll start on the front row
next to rookie Jack Hawksworth.
Vettel sputters out of
practice, Hamilton
records top times
MONTMELO, Spain Sebast-
ian Vettel's day ended with the
four-time de-
fending Formula Sb ti
One champion
hitching a ride on
a scooter after a
his Red Bull put- i
tered out.
Lewis Hamil-
ton finished Fri-
day's opening Sebastian
day of practice at Vettel
the Spanish
Grand Prix with the top times from
both training sessions. The British
driver is looking to add to his three
poles positions and hat trick of
wins after four races this season.
Mercedes teammate and F1
leader Nico Rosberg set the after-
noon's second best time after his
crew fixed a cooling issue.
An electrical problem caused
Vettel's RB10 to come to a halt
after four laps on the Circuito de
Barcelona-Catalunya and ruled
him out of the second session.
That leaves Vettel with one session
today before qualifying.
-From wire reports


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

The Modified Mini Fab 4 Series
50 gets its start today during a
Mother's Day special at the Citrus
County Speedway, joining a 50-lap
Street Stock event as well as
25-lap runs from Mini Stocks, Pure
Stocks and Pro Figure Eights.
Also on the card is this year's
Citrus debut of the Daytona An-
tique Automobile RacingAssocia-
tion (DAARA), which features
antique classes of Sprints,
Midgets and Stocks.
Grandstand admission for
moms is $8, and intermission will
include an autograph session with
Mod Mini and Street Stock driv-
ers, and "Big Power Wheel" races
for children.
James Ellis, who won two weeks
ago at New Smyrna Speedway
and twice this season at Showtime
Speedway in Pinellas Park, will
look to extend his perfect record
on the year today in his second
visit to Citrus. He held off three-
time Citrus champion Clint Foley,
later disqualified, for a win on
March 8.
Homosassa's Johnny Siner (fea-
ture win, two heat wins) finished
second in the most recent Mod
Mini race, and leads Clermont's
Michael Lawhorn by nine points
in the standings.
Tim Wilson continued his 2014
dominance in Street Stocks with a
convincing feature win on April
26. Wilson (three heat wins) out-
dueled Mason Love of Pinellas
Park early in the race, en route to
collecting his fourth feature win


on the season. Brooksville's J.D.
Goff (feature win, two heat wins)
came in third, where he also sits
in the standings, behind Floral
City's Dora Thorne.
Richard Kuhn recently became
the latest of five drivers to win a
feature in the Mini Stocks divi-
sion. Kuhn bided his time behind
Largo's Kris Rummel, who led
most of the race, before grabbing
the lead on the final lap.
Bill Ryan leads Mini Stocks in
the point standings, behind a cou-
ple of feature wins and four heat
victories. Jason Terry, Tim Scalise
and Shannon Kennedy also have
feature wins this season in Minis.
After a disqualification to
would-be winner Jonathan Ap-
pleby, Larry Welter Sr claimed his
second feature win in the Pure
Stocks in the division's 50-lap
event on April 12.
Eric Sharrone showed patience
in collecting his second win in the
Pro Figure Eights class on April
12, as he shadowed fellow Floral
City driver Thomas Peet for 15
laps, before pulling ahead for an
impressive win. Sharrone leads
Charlie Meyer, who has the divi-
sion's other feature win, by
10 points.
Street Stocks and Modified
Minis start their qualifying laps at
5:30 p.m., followed by heat races
at 6 p.m. Grandstand admissions
are $13 for adults (moms are $8),
and $9 for students, seniors and
military personnel. Children 11
and under are $5, and free for
those shorter than 42 inches. Fam-
ily passes for two adults and two
students or children are $30.


AUTO RACING


Open Wheel Mods
Name
Gator Hise
L.J. Grimm
Robbie Cooper
Cody Johnson
Keith Brendel
Mod Mini Stocks
Name
Johnny Siner
Michael Lawhorn
Phil Edwards
Richard Kuhn
Kevin Harrod
Sportsman
Name
Jay Witfoth
Andy Nicholls
Billy Smith
Jay Curry
John Buzinec
Street Stocks
Name
Tim Wilson
Dora Thorne
J.D. Goff
Curtis Flanagan
Ted Head
Pure Stocks
Name
Larry Welter Sr.
Mike Autenrieth
Mike Gilkerson
Karlin Ray
Lori Ickes
Mini Stocks
Name
Bill Ryan
Jerry Daniels
Jason Terry
Tim Scalise
Mark Patterson
Pro Figure-Ss
Name
Eric Sharrone
Charlie Meyer
Thomas Peet
Shannon Lengell
William Stansbury
PRO Hornet
Name
Marvin Armstrong
Drew Jackson
Raymond Vann
Alan Harmon
Willie Lacey
Non-Wing Sprints
Name
Jimmy Alvis
Shane Butler
Dude Teate
Ty DeCaire
Keith Butler


Points
86
86
76
75
70
Points
133
124
118
114
82
Points
218
208
159
142
108
Points
283
201
179
135
113
Points
248
232
224
182
171
Points
261
247
241
214
108
Points
125
115
114
111
109
Points
240
213
198
126
116
Points
306
298
298
279
278


Loaded race card for



Mother's Day special


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 B5

Citrus County
Speedway
schedule
May
10 Modified Mini Fab 4 Series 50, Street
Stock 50, Pro F-8, DAARA Antiques, Mini-
stock, Pure Stock
17 Mini-stock 50, Modifieds, Legends,
Bando's, Sportsman, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie, Fan Participation Racing
24- Super Late Model 50, Street Stock, Pure
Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie,
Pure/Street Stock F-8
31 Sportsman 6 Pack Series 50, Modifieds,
Street Stock, Mod Mini-stock, Pure Stock,
Mini-stock
June
7 Non Winged Sprint Cars, Sportsman,
Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock,
Pure/Street Stock F-8, Cars ofYesteryear
14- Super Late Model 100, Pro F-8, Champ
Karts, Mod Mini-stock, Street Stock, Pure
Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
21 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Sportsman,
Legends, Bando's, Street Stock, Mini-stock,
Pure Stock, POWDER PUFF, Fan Participa-
tion Racing
28 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
50, Street Stock, Mod Mini-stock, Mini-stock,
Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
July
5 Non Winged Sprint Cars, Pure stock 50,
Street Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie
12 Sportman 6 Pack Series 50, Pro F-8,
Modifieds, Mod Mini-stock, Mini-stock, Hor-
net Pro, Hornet Rookie
19 Super Late Model 50, Legends, Ban-
doleros, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock,
Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie, Fan Participation
Racing
26 Sportsman, Street Stock, Mod Mini-
stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock, Pure/Street
Stock F-8
August
2 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Non-winged
Sprint cars, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Hornet
Pro, Hornet Rookie, Pure/Street Stock F-8
9 Super Late Model 50, Pro F-8, DAARA
Antiques, Sportsman, Street Stock, Mod
Mini-stock, Mini-stock
16 Mini-stock 50, Modifieds, Legends,
Bando's, Pure Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet
Rookie
23 Sportsman 6 Pack Series 50, Modifieds,
Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock, Pure/
Street Stock F-8, POWDER PUFF, Fan Par-
ticipation Racing
30 Super Late Model 50, Mod Mini Fab 4
Series 50, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-
stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
September
5 Street Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock,
POWDER PUFF, Flag Pole Race, Boat &
Trailer Race, Pure/Street Stock F-8, Suit
Case Race
6 Modified 6 Pack Series 50, Non-Winged
Sprints, (Sportsman, Mod Mini-stock- Double
Points), (Hornet Pro Double Points), Hornet
Rookie
13 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
50, Street Stock, Pro F-8, Champ Karts, Pure
Stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie, Fan Par-
ticipation Racing
20 Sportsman 6 Pack- Currys Roofing 100
Series, Modifieds, Legends, Bando's, Street
Stock, Pure Stock, Mini-stock
27 Super Late Model 50, Mod Mini Fab 4
Series 50, Pure Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet
Pro, Hornet Rookie
October
4 Modified 6 Pack Series, Non-Winged
Sprints, Street Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet Pro,
Hornet Rookie, Pure Stocks, Pure/Street
Stock F-8
11 Jack Smith Memorial Late Model 100
Race, Pro F-8, Sportsman, Mod Mini-stock,
Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie
18 TBARA Frank Riddle Memorial Winged
Sprints, DAARA, Champ Karts, Legends,
Bando's, Street Stock, Pure Stock, Fan Par-
ticipation Racing
25 Street-stock 57 Lap Stromquist Memo-
rial, Pure Stock, (Modifieds, Pro F-8 FINAL
POINTS NIGHT), Mod Mini-stock.
November
1st- (Non-Winged Sprint Cars, Sportsman
FINAL POINTS NIGHT), Street Stock, Pure
Stock, Mini-stock, Hornet Pro, Hornet Rookie,
POWDER PUFF
8 Mod Mini Fab 4 Series 100 Laps, Super
Late Model 50, Pro F-8, Street Stock, Mini-
stock, (Hornet Pro FINAL POINTS NIGHT),
Hornet Rookie
14- Modified Mini-stock State Championship
50, Street Stock End of the Season Champi-
onship 25, Pure Stock End of the Season
Championship 25, Mini-stock end of the Sea-
son Championship 25, Intermingled Practices
forTrucks, Modifieds, Sportsman, Late Models.
15 Joey Coulter Florida Pro-Truck Series
75/ State Chanpionship, Modifieds State
Championship 50, Sportsman State Cham-
pionship 50, Late Model State Championship
50, Champ Karts Triple Crown Race 25
laps, Fan Participation Racing State Cham-
pionship of the top nine race winners
December
12th & 13th To Be Announced

Points standings




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jaguars go big by drafting Bortles


Jacksonville

GM wanted a


QB who could

'take a beating'

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Jack-
sonville Jaguars general man-
ager Dave Caldwell returned
home from a scouting trip last
October, turned on the televi-
sion and saw Pittsburgh's Ben
Roethlisberger getting pounded
by Baltimore.
That's when it clicked.
Caldwell wanted a big, bulky
quarterback who could take a
beating.
So UCF's Blake Bortles be-
came Caldwell's guy, ranked
ahead of Johnny Manziel,
Teddy Bridgewater and every
other quarterback in the NFL
draft.
"As much as you say, 'Well,
you can protect him,' they're
going to get hit," Caldwell said
Friday as the team formally in-
troduced Bortles. "You have to
have a guy that can take a
beating."
Jacksonville surprisingly
chose the 6-foot-5, 240-pound
Bortles with the third overall
pick Thursday night, pointing
to his competitiveness and
toughness as what stood out
during the draft process. Bor-
tles did anything and every-
thing asked of him at the NFL
combine in February and was
equally impressive on tape and
in meetings.
"Just his stature," coach Gus
Bradley said. "It gives him a
chance to take some hits."
Bortles grew up playing tight
end, fullback and linebacker in
nearby Orlando because he
"enjoyed contact." He reluc-
tantly switched to quarterback
in high school, but carried "a
little edge" with him to his new
position. He flourished at UCF,
throwing 50 touchdown passes
and 16 interceptions as a two-
year starter. He also ran for 557
yards and 14 scores.
"It gives you a little edge,"
said Bortles, who never missed
time because of injury despite
being sacked 51 times in three
years at UCF "It's not (just)
being physical and running
into people. It's having an atti-


Associated Press
Central Florida quarterback Blake Bortles poses Thursday with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell after being selected as the third pick by
the Jacksonville Jaguars in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft in New York.


tude and competitiveness to
you. When it's third-and-
whatever and you're at the
sticks, instead of running out of
bounds, run into somebody
and get a first down or a
touchdown."
The Jaguars gave up 100
sacks the last two years, and al-
though Bortles won't be thrown
in as a starter, they felt it was
important to have someone
who could take a hit if needed.
Former Jaguars quarterback
Blaine Gabbert failed to stay
healthy in three seasons. He
missed time with a shoulder in-
jury, a forearm injury, a broken
thumb, a sliced-open hand, a
strained hamstring and a
sprained ankle.


The Jaguars traded Gabbert
to San Francisco in March in
exchange for a sixth-round
draft pick. They also re-signed
Chad Henne and named him
the starter
Caldwell and Bradley insist
Henne will remain the starter
while Bortles makes the transi-
tion from a spread offense to a
pro-style system. It could take
months or even a year.
"If you have the right mind-
set about it, I think you'll be all
right," Bortles said. "You're
going to practice and prepare
and study like you're the
starter whether you're the sec-
ond, third or fourth. That is the
mindset I'll have."
Jacksonville also realizes its


offensive line is a work in
progress. Caldwell and Bradley
want the line to be in better
shape when Bortles does take
over
"The great thing about Blake
is his athleticism and his abil-
ity to keep plays alive," said
Caldwell, who also worked
with big quarterbacks in Pey-
ton Manning (Indianapolis) and
Matt Ryan (Atlanta). "Every-
one's like, 'We want an athletic
quarterback like Russell Wil-
son or whoever it might be.'
"Well, he can do a lot of those
things, too. Maybe not to that
level, but he has really good
pocket presence and can keep
plays alive with his feet and
still be able to throw."


Jacksonville Jaguars:
Blake Bortles, QB,
UCF (6-5, 232)
Blossomed into one of college
football's best quarterbacks last
year, leading Central Florida to the
most successful season in the his-
tory of the program.
Has drawn comparisons to Ben
Roethlisberger because of his
combination of size and mobility.
Some questions about his ability
to throw deep accurately after play-
ing in an offense that featured
many short passes and quick
throws.
-From wire reports


Patriots draft


Florida's Easley


in first round


Associated Press


FOXBOROUGH, Mass. -
New England Patriots
coach Bill
Belichick
went back
to Florida
for his first-
round se-
lection in
the NFL
draft
The Pa- Dominique
triots se- Easley
1 e c t e d FloridaGator
Florida de- selected by
fensive New England
lineman in NFLdraft.
Dominique
Easley with the No. 29 over-
all pick on Thursday night
He's the seventh Gator se-
lected by Belichick since he
arrived in New England.
"When I was playing at
Florida, I always knew
there were a lot of Florida
players there," Easley said
in a conference call with
New England reporters.
Belichick said the quality
of competition in the South-
eastern Conference makes
it easier to evaluate players.
In most of the tape the team
watched from Easley's ca-
reer, he was lined up against
players who were already in
the NFL or on the Patriots'
draft board this year
"You can put on just about
any film and watch him
against quality players.
There was plenty of good
competition," Belichick
said. "Real good program,
they're well-coached down
there. I can see him playing
against a lot of good players
in that conference."
In the teams' first draft
since the arrest of tight end
Aaron Hernandez an-
other former Gator on
murder charges, the Patri-
ots weren't scared away by


Panthers draft
FSU's Benjamin
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
The Carolina Panthers se-
lected wide receiver Kelvin
Benjamin from Florida
State with the 28th overall
pick in the NFL draft Thurs-
day, giving them a potential
long-term replacement for
Steve Smith.
The 6-foot-5, 241-pound
Benjamin had 54 recep-
tions for 1,011 yards and
15 touchdowns last season
for the national champion
Seminoles.
-From wire reports

an altercation between
Easley and a former Ala-
bama football player Al-
though police
recommended Easley be
charged with a misde-
meanor, the State's Attor-
ney's office declined to
press charges.
A 6-foot-2,288-pound line-
man who could play on the
inside or outside, Easley
was said to have the talent
for a top 10 pick before a
pair of ACL operations
dropped his projections to
the second or third day of
the draft
Easley played in 12 games
as a sophomore before tear-
ing his left ACL in the
regular-season finale
against Florida State and
missing the Gator Bowl. He
started in 11 games as a jun-
ior, missing two games with
a sprained meniscus. He
lasted only three games his
senior year before tearing
his right ACL in practice.
"I'm healthy" he said.
"I'm just ready to get out
there and do whatever
coach Belichick needs me
to do."


B6 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


NFL DRAFT









RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


TURNING


THE


TIDE


Data: US Latinos less Catholic, more polarized


RACHEL ZOLL
Associated Press
NEW YORK
L atinos in the United States
are abandoning the Roman
Catholicism of their child-
hood in increasing numbers to be-
come evangelical Protestants or
leave organized religion altogether,
according to a new survey released
Wednesday
Only 55 percent of the nation's
Latinos consider themselves
Catholic, a 12 percentage point
drop since 2010. Of those who re-
main in the church, slightly more
said they could imagine leaving
than they have in previous years. At
the same time, the share of His-
panic evangelicals rose from
12 percent to 16 percent, while
Latinos with no religious affiliation
increased from 10 percent to
18 percent.
The Pew Research Center report,
"The Shifting Religious Identity of
Latinos in the United States," is
based on a 2013 survey of more
than 5,100 adults and points to the
challenges ahead for the U.S.


church, whose fortunes are inextri-
cably linked to the growth of the
Hispanic population.
The Catholic Church remains the
country's largest denomination by
far, with more than 66 million mem-
bers, but has been steadily losing
non-immigrant parishioners. In a
previous analysis, Pew found for-
mer U.S. Catholics collectively
would be the third-largest faith
group behind Catholics and
Baptists.
Hispanics are still expected to
become a majority within the U.S.
church in the coming years given
the overall increase in the general
Latino population. Already, one-
third of U.S. Catholic adults are
Latino, Pew researchers said. But
Catholic leaders have been strug-
gling to hold onto new immigrants
given the shortage of priests and
the competitive religious market-
place in the U.S. Nearly every
American faith tradition has inten-
sified its outreach to Latinos in
recent decades.
Pew found no single reason for
the changing Latino religious
landscape.


Respondents most commonly
said they gradually drifted away
from the faith of their childhood or
stopped believing the teachings.
About 30 percent said they found
another congregation that helps its
members more. Others said they
had a personal spiritual crisis or
left for family reasons. While a
large percentage of Latinos overall
said the church should do more to
address the clergy sex abuse scan-
dal, only a tiny percentage cited the
crisis as a reason they left.
The changes partly reflect reli-
gious trends in Latin America,
which has also seen a steady de-
cline in Catholics as the ranks of
evangelicals and nonbelievers have
grown. Concern about the region's
losses is believed to have been a
factor in the election of Pope Fran-
cis, an Argentine and the first pon-
tiff from the Southern Hemisphere.
Pew found about half of U.S. Lati-
nos who left Catholicism did so
before they arrived in this country
However, U.S. religious life has
also been an influence. The share


See Page C2


L Nancy
Kennedy

GRACE NOTES






Are you



'delight



worthy'?

T hose who know me know I'm a front-row
pew sitter
My pastor used to think I sit there be-
cause I want to hang on his every word
until I told him that it's because I'm short,
otherwise I'd head for the back row
The problem with sitting in the front row is
that when you're smack in the pastor's line of vi-
sion, it's difficult to slink down in your seat to
hide from God. As everyone knows, pastors have
a direct hotline to God. Whenever someone in
the congregation is straying, God whispers that
person's name in the pastor's ear so he can
tailor his sermon to make the strayer squirm.
I remember one sermon when my pastor
asked, "How many of you are satisfied with your
level of spiritual maturity?"
Squirm, squirm.
"In light of that, how do you think God feels
about you? Delighted? Disappointed? Mixed
feelings?" he asked.
I knew the correct answer was "delighted,"
but at that moment I didn't feel at all "delight
worthy" Actually, at that moment, despite my
best efforts to look holy and pious and spiritu-
ally mature, I had been daydreaming about a
shirt that was at home in a dye bath that I was
hoping to get a certain shade of aquamarine to
match a pair of pants that I had found on sale.
On top of that, I hadn't touched my Bible in
weeks other than to move it out of the way of my
coffee cup. Plus, I had been watching a lot of TV,
and not news or educational TV or anything up-
lifting, but the junky stuff that rots your brain
and your soul and I couldn't wait to get home
from church to watch the latest episode of "Who
the (Bleep) Did I Marry?"
Delight worthy? Hardly
It seems that I find myself returning to this
same place again and again and again.
I want God to be delighted in me, I want to be
satisfied with my level of spiritual maturity I
want to actually be spiritually mature.
And I want new shoes. And pie.
So, with all these competing thoughts in my
head, I sat there in my front-row pew spot in the
pastor's direct line of vision, squirming because
I knew God was pointing me out, which made
me try even harder to look as holy and sancti-
fied on the outside as I could while on the inside
trying to drum up God's favor, all the while be-
rating myself for not having my Bible with me so
I could open it and at least pretend I was an
object of God's delight.
Honestly, sometimes it's exhausting being me.
My pastor had asked, "How do you think God
feels about you?"
At that moment, and many moments since
then, I figured he felt disgusted. As proof, just a
few days before he had sent a plague upon me:
an itchy rash on my chin and cheeks after trying
a new "peach tree and coconut" facial scrub.
Could locusts and gnats be far behind?
A long time ago, the Apostle Paul scolded the
Galatians (as he scolds us), accusing them of
having a hex put on them. They had been gung
ho believers in "grace alone by faith alone in
Christ alone" until they started forgetting that
what made them eligible for God's delight was
not what they did or did not do. It was not the
rules they kept or the traditions they performed,
but that God delights in his own simply because
they trust in his Son.
Paul wrote: "How did your new life begin?
Was it by working your heads off to please God?
Or was it by responding to God's Message to
you? Are you going to continue this craziness?
For only crazy people would think they could
complete by their own efforts what was begun
See Page C2


Inside:

Religion
Notes .......... C2
Comics ........C8
Community ...C5, C6
Crossword .....C7
Movies ........C8
TV Listings .....C7

For questions or comments,
contact Features Editor Logan
Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext.
1141, or at mhnosby@chronicle
online.com




C2 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


LATINOS
Continued from Page Cl

of Americans overall who say
they have no religion, or
noness," has increased to about
20 percent in recent years. The
trend is more pronounced
among young people. Pew re-
searchers found similar pat-
terns among U.S. Latinos. Most
of those ages 18 to 29 who left
Catholicism now say they be-
long to no particular religious
group. Hispanics ages 30 to 49
moved toward both evangelical
Protestantism and no religion.
Some Latinos who became
Protestants have joined main-
line churches in the U.S., but
most Hispanic Protestants are
evangelical. Of those born-
again Christians, most belong
to Pentecostal groups, known
for their spirit-filled worship
and belief in divine healing.
Overall, 22 percent of U.S.
Latinos are Protestant.
Regarding political affilia-
tion, Latinos overall favor De-
mocrats over Republicans, but
support for Republicans is
higher among evangelicals.
Three in 10 evangelical His-
panics lean toward the GOP,
compared to 21 percent of His-
panic Catholics and 16 percent
of the religiously unaffiliated.



GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

by God. If you weren't smart
enough or strong enough to
begin it, how do you suppose
you could perfect it?" (Gala-
tians 3:2-4 The Message)
That passage always makes
me laugh and always brings
me back to the pastor's ques-
tion: How does God feel about
me?
If it's as we sing: "God has
smiled on me; he has set me
free. God has smiled on me;


Mark M. Gray, with the Cen-
ter for Applied Research in the
Apostolate at Georgetown Uni-
versity, said the decline is a
concern, but the movement of
Latinos among religious groups
is more complex and less
alarming to Catholics than it
appears.
Amid all the religious switch-
ing by Americans, the Catholic
Church overall has a higher re-
tention rate than any single
Protestant denomination, he
said. He also pointed out that
Catholic losses are so much
higher than other U.S. faith
groups because the denomina-
tion is so much bigger than any
other Gray noted, however, that
the U.S. Latino population has
grown the most in areas where
the church has fewer re-
sources, in the South and West,
instead of the older Catholic
population centers of the
Northeast and Midwest.
"More investment needs to
be made toward Hispanic min-
istry," Gray said. "But the
church doesn't really always
recognize population growth
where it's occurring very
quickly and it's difficult to
respond to it"
The Pew survey was con-
ducted from May 24 to July 28
of last year and has a margin of
error of plus or minus
2.1 percentage points.


he's been good to me," then he
delights in me, a daydreaming,
junk-TV-watching, Bible-
neglecting, spiritual slug.
He delights in me. Not my
sin, of course, but because of
Jesus, he smiles on me. He
smiles on you, too.

Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over, Victoria -I
Know the Real Secret," "Girl
on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace. "She can
be reached at 352-564-2927,
Monday through Thursday, or
via email at nkennedy@
chronicleonline. corn.


Religion NOTES


Special events
Come and sing the gospel fa-
vorites at "Gospel Karaoke Night"
from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday at
Mama's Kuntry Kafe, 1787 W. Main
St., Inverness. DJ Allan Ross plays
Southern Gospel, traditional, Broad-
man Hymnal and standards. If you
have your own karaoke disc, he can
play that also. Call Linda Ross at
352-464-0004.
Red Level Baptist Church has
rescheduled its yard sale due to the
rain. It is at 8 a.m. Saturday, May
24. All proceeds will go to sending
the children to summer camp where
they will learn more about God and
how they can spread the love that
God has for everyone.
"Awakening Florida" is coordi-
nating a statewide prayer gathering
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today at Park
Avenue Baptist Church, 2600 S.
ParkAve., Titusville. This is a day of
prayer and fasting, calling people to
cry out for God's purposes and seek
the destiny of the Lord for the state
of Florida. Everyone is invited to join
this solemn assembly. Entrance fee
is $10. Registration and information
at: awakeningflorida.com.
The "breakfast buffet to benefit
the homeless" was such a success
last month that the Serendipity
Men's group invites everyone to a
pancake breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m.
today at the United Methodist
Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., in
Homosassa. Cost is $5. On the
menu are pancakes and sausages,
coffee, juice and milk. All proceeds
help support the hungry and home-
less in Citrus County through Grace
House and The Sanctuary. Call
352-628-4083 or 352-382-0336.
House of Power Church wel-
comes the Wine Family, of Lake
Wales, to the Mothers' Day worship
service at 11 a.m. Sunday. The
Wine Family will share the love of
Christ through song and testimony.
Everyone is invited. The church is at
the corner of N. Lecanto Highway
and N. Dawson Drive, 1/2 mile west


of State Road 200, in Hernando.
Father Jim Gerhart of Holy
Faith Episcopal Church, Blue Cove,
Dunnellon, will present an "Emer-
gency Management Disaster
Planning Program" at 2 p.m. Sun-
day in Faith Hall. The public is wel-
come. Call the church office: at
352-489-2685.
FFRA (Family and Friends
Reaching for the Abilities) will have
Linda Carter, FEMA Coordinator for
persons with disabilities, as its
guest speaker at the next monthly
meeting from 9 to 11 a.m. Friday.
The public is invited to attend.
Carter will address procedures im-
portant for seniors and any persons
with a disability, in the event of a
community emergency situation
such as a hurricane or disaster.
(This information is especially im-
portant for those who may be rely-
ing on oxygen.) The disabled
community needs to be prepared
for such emergencies, and here is a
great opportunity to get the informa-
tion you need to be prepared, and
to register with a program called
"No Person Left Behind," who pro-
vides assistance in the event of
emergencies. Although the local
sheriff's office issues out emer-
gency information material, it does
not include as much material and
procedures dealing with Special
Needs persons, who need the extra
care and consideration when expe-
riencing an emergency situation.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office is
planning on sending a representa-
tive to the meeting to also answer
any questions from the public.
FFRA meets the third Friday
monthly at the Key Training Center
Building, 130 Heights Ave., Inver-
ness. Social time and a business
meeting begins at 9 a.m., followed
by the speaker at 10 a.m.
The "Third Saturday Sup-
per/Mystery Theater Western
Theme" will take place at 4:30 p.m.
May 17 in the Dewain Farris Fellow-
ship Hall at Community Congrega-


tional Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Menu includes beef stew, salad,
dessert, coffee and tea. Tickets are
$10 for adults, $5 for children and
can be purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
Grace Temple Church of the
Living God will host its annual Rev.
Leroy Bellamy Scholarship Fund
Memorial Service at 4 p.m. Sunday,
May 18. The community is invited to
attend. The church is at 7431 Old
Floral City Road, Floral City. The
pastor is Larry McReynolds. Call
352-726-0501.
The Heirborne Drama team of
North Oak Baptist Church is bring-
ing its program "Unchained" to Her-
nando United Methodist Church at 6
p.m. Sunday, May 18. The group of
high school youth combine lan-
guage and interpretive mime with
contemporary Christian music to
bring a message of hope to young
and old alike. There is no charge; a
love offering will be accepted. Re-
freshments will be served after the
performance. The church is at
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando.
Mary Magee-Allen, LUT, will
present a six-week health and
wholeness class from 4 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday through May 20 at Unity
of Citrus County, 2628 W. Wood-
view Lane, Lecanto. This course is
based in the spiritual laws and uni-
versal principles that support the ex-
pression of health and wholeness in
our minds, bodies and affairs. There
are three major topics in which the
teachings are based: The Source of
Healing; The Consciousness of
Healing; The Practice of Healing.
There will be a concert by
Annie & Tim's Bluegrass Gospel
Band at 7 p.m. Friday, May 23, at
First Presbyterian Church, 1501
S.E. U.S. 19 (Suncoast Boulevard),
Crystal River. A love offering will be
collected at the performance to
See NOTES/Page 03


Places of worship



that offer love, peace



and harmony to all.


Come on over to


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1lumc.org

Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page





"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN.
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
MMIN U..9
344-190


"His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!


B Crystal
I River
Foursquare

Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager

F 47 Yearsof
F RST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
S9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I Missouri Synod
www.1lstlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson



0_ 0 8

"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"

Sudy *coo :3 .M
Q oigSerie1:0AM


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15 AM
Worship Service..10:15 AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen


rNORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9-30-10-00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call/for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'
714S. Scarbor ...
Pastor Kennie Berger
S 352-302-5813


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
-Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
S9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


THE
SALVATION
CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CRSO.
A MY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish


II


- ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 am.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor


x
SPastor
Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GoD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday .\iT-,t Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.


unlty
of Citrus County

A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING



WE ARE A JOYOUS COMMUNITY
WHICH INSPIRES, EMBRACES,
AND NURTURES ALL THOSE ON
THEIR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY.
SERVICE OFFERINGS:
SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT
CLASSES, WEDDINGS,
CHRISTENINGS, MEMORIALS,
AND HOLY UNIONS
WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30
NURSERY/SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30
I ''ou da ,6 nl it,'r ('i "






KNOWING GOD, LOVING
GOD, SERVING GOD

2628 W WOODVIEW
LANE LECANTO, FL
S 34461
S 352-746-1270
WWW.UNITYOFCITRUS.ORG


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


"0









Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA

Coe






Worship


8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org I

327676


RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Muslim college
wrestler gets waiver
to keep beard
BUFFALO, N.Y -A Muslim col-
lege wrestler in New York who chose
to sit on the sidelines rather than
shave his beard has been granted a
waiver that will allow him to compete
with the facial hair.
The Council on American-Islamic
Relations on Monday praised the
NCAAs decision in the case of Uni-
versity at Buffalo wrestler Muhamed
McBryde.
NCAA rules say that wrestlers
must be clean shaven. But McBryde
said shaving his beard would com-
promise his faith. He missed nearly a
whole season of competition
because of the conflict.
In April, the NCAA Wrestling Rules
Committee said McBryde could com-
pete with a beard during the 2014-15
season, as long as he wears a face
mask and chin strap to cover it.
First openly gay
Episcopal bishop
divorces husband
CONCORD, N.H. -The first
openly gay bishop in the Episcopal
church and the global Anglican Com-
munion has announced he is
divorcing his husband.
Retired Bishop Gene Robinson an-
nounced that he is divorcing Mark


Andrew in an email to the Diocese of
New Hampshire and an article for
The Daily Beast.
The couple entered into a civil
union in 2008 that converted to a
marriage when New Hampshire
legalized gay marriage in 2010.
Robinson's election in 2003 as the
first openly gay Anglican bishop cre-
ated an international uproar and led
conservative Episcopalians to break
away from the main church in the
United States.
He writes that details of his divorce
are private and that he can't repay
the debt he owes Andrew "for his
standing by me through the
challenges of the last decade."
Robinson had previously been
married to a woman and had two chil-
dren before he and his wife divorced.
Records show Vatican
defrocked 848 priests
in 10 years for abuse
GENEVA-The Vatican has re-
leased comprehensive statistics for
the first time on how it has disciplined
priests accused of raping and molest-
ing children: It says 848 priests have
been defrocked and another 2,572
given lesser sanctions over the past
decade.
The Vatican's U.N. ambassador to
Geneva, Archbishop Silvano Tomasi,
revealed the figures during a second
day of grilling Tuesday by a U.N.


committee monitoring in
of the U.N. treaty against
Tomasi insisted the o
plied only inside the tiny
State. He nevertheless
tistics about how the Ho
adjudicated abuse case
SD lawma
discusses pe
homosexu
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -
Dakota state lawmaker
gay sex a moral and a h
said he regrets the word
cent Facebook post but
ment of his controversial
Republican Steve Hic
is a Sioux Falls pastor, I
both praise and backlash
marks. He believes peo
of hearing the religious
against homosexuality a
medical professionals tc
ward to explain the heal
homosexual activity.
The South Dakota Dei
has called the remarks "r
Hickey told the Argus
"could have spent more
more precise." But he al
believes homosexuality
"deviation" from "biology
Hickey said if people
views they can, in his w
me out."


nplementation
st torture.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2


convention ap- benefit the Intergenerational Vaca-
' Vatican City tion Bible School ecumenical pro-
released sta- gram sponsored by First
ily See has Presbyterian Church, St. Anne's
s globally. Church and St. Timothy Lutheran
iker Church. Enjoy an evening of fun, fel-
lowship and root beer floats. Inter-
ost on generational Vacation Bible School
ality will take place from 8:30 a.m. to
- A South noon Monday through Friday, June
who called 16-20, at First Presbyterian Church.
health issue Call 352-795-2259 for information
ing ofhisre- and to register for VBS.
not the senti- 0 Unity of Citrus County will
al comments, present the Rev. Dr. Rocco A.
-key, who also Errico on Saturday and Sunday,
has received May 24 and 25. Dr. Errico's topic is
;h for his re- "The Bible Through Near Eastern
sh for his re- 1
pie are tired Eyes." He will conduct seminars
armnt from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday and
and wants 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sunday
) come for- and will speak during the
th risks of 10:30 a.m. service Sunday.Free
lunch will be served at noon Satur-
mocratic Party day and at 11:30 a.m. Sunday. Dr.
reprehensible Errico, renowned Bible scholar, has
Leader he dedicated his life to the study of the
time to be Bible from ancient Aramaic texts.
iso said he He has helped thousands under-
is a stand the ancient Semitic culture
(and nature" and customs that are so essential
object to his to a meaningful understanding of
obj ct tot the Bible. He holds three doctoral
ords "vote degrees and was mentored by Dr.
George Lamsa. Tickets: Saturday
- From wire reports only seminar $25; Sunday only


Places of worship


that offer love, peace iA


and harmony to all. ,

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!
=mr. ,! i 'mow


(0 Crystal River
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurser
| Provided


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pm
795-4479












VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 AM.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 Pa.. to 3:15 P.L. Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills |
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
wwwourladyofgracefl
j, .catholicweb.com .:


First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy C -
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday Worship
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Children's Ministry
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Student Ministry
7:00 pm
Wednesday
UPLIFT Prayer & Praise 7 pm
Child Care Provided
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com

Homosassa Springs
SrEVw.t', ,E E1r.'n.T'CHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor William Bremmer
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 4:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com









Hwy. 44 E@
SWashington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services 0
Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
0 5th Sunday
0 of Any Month Combined 10am *
0 Sunday School for all ages 0
0 9:30 AM 0
0 Nursery Provided U
Fellowship & Youth Group
S Sunday Evening
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgf
" Podcast: fpcinv.com
SChurch Office 637-0770*
S Pastor James Capps


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
/7 ijj;'hing Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org


NORTH (ITR[S

CHRISTIAN

CHURCH
Phone: (352) 527-0021



Sunday Services: 10:30am
Bible Study:
Wednesday 6:30pm
Minister
George Plantz
Where your search for a
friendly Bible Church ends

HERNANDO

United
Methodist
Church

OPM


Minds, 1 1
OPew
Doew
1 , i , ,,|


2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(11/2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.


I First Baptist










Charck
of Lakc&koafeeand
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pmr
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: 7' ii. .1"1 ,,. I 'l l ,1 ,., ,,,
Check us out on Facebook





HP, YOU'LL FIND
CXkNC; FAMILY
IN CHkP-JST!

CKyTN\L di


VNIT D
SERVTHODICS

CHUKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
C, A Stephen Ministry Provider.


SFirst Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i'll Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


First Church of
Christ, Scientist
Inverness
224 N. OsceolaAve.
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting
4:00 PM
352-726-4033


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sirb., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong. A place to become."


gPRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les speramos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Telefono: (352) 341-1711






\. I.I(I ItlL h.- I l
INVERNESS
CHULIRCH OF GOD
.S ullnllh .Ser% ice%:

%ledinestlin N giL : 1

I ... j i ...I I I I- ll
illjh I i.l. i l- i I











Crystal River, FL 34465
I[I I i I "



West
Citrus.

Church of Christ

9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465

352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.


C')

C
US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30

Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
David Curry A


seminar $25; both seminars -
$45. All are invited to the Sunday
service. To register and purchase
tickets, visit www.unityofcitrus.org
or call 352-746-1270.
Seven Rivers Christian
School invites all girls ages 4 to
8th grade to Spirit Camp 2014
from 8:30 a.m. to noon Tuesday
through Friday, May 27-30, at the
Seven Rivers Christian School
Gymnasium. Cost of $45 includes
a snack each day and a souvenir
T-shirt. Spirit Camp is coached by
Julie Taylor, the former coach of
Camp Rah Rah at CRHS. Coach
Taylor brings 13 years of cheer-
leading and camp experience and
has established herself as a pre-
mier cheer coach in Citrus County.
Register early and save $5. Regis-
trations need to be received by
May 19. You can also register the
first day of camp. There will be a
pep rally and performance for
family and friends at noon Friday.
The ministry of multi-award-
winning singer Carman will visit
Grace Tabernacle, with his Live
Across America Tour at 7 p.m. Fri-
day, May 30, at 7279 E. County
Road 468 in Wildwood. Call 352-
748-3255. Tickets range from $18
to $25 with VIP for $100. Tickets
are available at Grace Tabernacle,
Family Christian Store (Lady
Lake), online at www.itickets.com
or charge by phone by calling
800-965-9324.
See NOTES/Page C4


RELIGION


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 C3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

The public is invited to the
"Sixth Annual Mind, Body & Soul
Health Fair" from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday, June 5, at First United
Methodist Church of Homosassa,
8831 W. Bradshaw St., Ho-
mosassa. Over 50 local business
and health organizations will pro-
vide health screenings and valu-
able information on services
available to the local community
There will also be a car show. Free
door prizes will be awarded. Re-
ceive free gifts and promotional
items. Call 352-628-4083.
Joy Evangelical Lutheran
Church will have "Jungle Safari" va-
cation bible school for children from
5 years of age through fifth grade
from 9 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, July 14-18. Kids will
explore the nature of God through
Bible stories, activities and projects.
Registration begins the first week of
July, Monday through Friday, from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the church of-
fice. VBS will be completed at 10
a.m. Sunday, July 20, when the
children present a singing perform-
ance during the worship service.
Call the church office at 854-4509,
Ext. 221. The church is at 7045
S.W. 83rd Place (State Road 200),
Ocala.
Helping Hands Thrift Store, a
ministry of Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, is open from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Sat-
urday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds
fund the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small
appliances. Call 352-726-1707.
The Genesis Project, an in-
depth analysis and discussion of
the text of Genesis, is conducted
from 7 to 8 p.m. Monday at Etz
Hayim Institute the Adult Educa-
tion Program of Congregation Beth
Sholom, 102 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. A class on American-Jewish
History is also offered from 8:15 to
9:15 p.m. Monday through June
23. Both classes are taught by Haz-
zan Mordecai Kamlot. Call 352-
643-0995.


Cornerstone Christian Supply,
a ministry of the Inverness Church
of God, has available for purchase
the newly released novel, "At the
Bottom of Biscayne Bay," by Fred
H. Brannen, Jr. The novel is a
quixotic courtroom drama, wrapped
in a love story, with a thread of the
inspirational truth concerning God's
unfailing faithfulness interwoven
within its lines. Cornerstone Chris-
tian Supply is an excellent source
for all your Christian needs: Bibles,
greeting cards, books, T-shirts,
gifts, etc. Cornerstone Christian
Supply is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call the store at 352-
344-2470.
The ladies of Lecanto Church
of Christ meet for Bible study at 10
a.m. the second Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a lunch-
eon. Studies have included such
subjects as prayer, love and pa-
tience. All ladies are invited to
attend and enjoy Christian fellowship.
Community Christian Karate
Club (CCKC) offers a Citrus County
group for learning karate skills,
working on cardio, and meeting
new friends. Three different classes
for three different age groups are
offered: the 4- to 7-year-old class,
8- to 12-year-old class, and the
teen/adult class. Classes take place
Tuesday evenings at New Hope
Baptist Church, 8635 W. Goodman
Lane, Homosassa. Cost is $25 a
month with discounts for families.
For more information, contact 5th
degree black belt instructor Greg
Gunn at 352-428-6348 or email
ggunn14@gmail.com or visit
www.topgunnkarate.com.
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church offers Bingo at 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday and 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days featuring regular, double and
special bingos, together with a jack-
pot and "pickle" game. Doors open
at 10 a.m. Tuesday and 4 p.m.
Wednesday. Kitchen features
"homemade" soups and sand-
wiches. The church is on U.S. 41,
three miles north of Dunnellon.
All widows in the community
are invited to join the Widows Min-
istry Group from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Cornerstone Bap-
tist Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't finished


with us yet!" Call Darla at 352-
270-8115.
A Christian Bible-based spiri-
tual recovery group meets from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Living Water Ministry Complex,
1 Beverly Hills Blvd., Beverly Hills.
Call Meg at 352-527-2443.
"Get in Touch With Your Faith,"
a Christian information class at
Peace Lutheran Church," continues
at 6 p.m. Thursday. Pastor Terry
McKee conducts the class for
1 hour weekly. Everyone is wel-
come. There is no fee. To register,
call the church office at 352-489-
5881 .The church is at 7201 S. U.S.
41, five miles north of Dunnellon.
Ladies, come to "The Well" for
refreshment and prophetic prayer
ministry at 7 p.m. the first Friday
monthly at FresHope Ministries,
2991 E. Thomas St., Inverness. If
you are hurting, need to hear a
word from God, and/or spiritual
growth and strength, then this is the
night just for you. Come comfortable
and come expecting to receive. You
will not leave the same way you
came in. Call 352-341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
The Men's Club of St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church on U.S. 41
in Dunnellon play horseshoes at 9
a.m. Saturday. Horseshoes are
provided to anyone needing them
along with instructions in pitching,
scoring and court maintenance.
Women, children and persons who
have never pitched horseshoes be-
fore are invited to attend and share
in the fun and fellowship. Call 352-
489-5954.
The Saturday night Gospel Ju-
bilee takes place the last Saturday
night monthly at First Church of
God 5510 Jasmine Lane, Inver-
ness. Everyone is invited to come
to enjoy or come and participate.
Prepare a number, bring your in-
strument if you have one and join in
this full-filled evening. Great music,
fun, food, fellowship and never a
charge. Call 352-344-3700.
The public is welcome to Zen
meditation sessions at 2:45 p.m.
Sunday at Unity Church, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto (off
County Road 491). Call 352-
464-4955.
From wire reports


Patriarch has


high hopes for


meeting with pope


Associated Press
ISTANBUL Bartholomew
I, spiritual leader of 250 million
Orthodox Christians, says a
meeting with Pope Francis in
Jerusalem this month will help
move the two churches closer to
ending their nearly 1,000-year
divide.
In an interview with The As-
sociated Press in his Istanbul of-
fice, Bartholomew also praised
Turkish Prime Minister Recep
Tayyip Erdogan for improving
rights for Christians but said
pointedly, "it is not enough."
The meetings between the ec-
umenical patriarch and the
leader of the world's Roman
Catholics on May 25-26 will
commemorate the historic visit
of their predecessors 50 years
ago that launched a dialogue
aimed at ending the two
churches' schism in 1054.
"We shall say through our
meeting and our prayer that it
is the intention of both of us to
work further for Christian unity
and reconciliation,"
Bartholomew said, sitting at his
desk piled high with papers in
his Patriarchate office. Around
him, golden icons from Byzan-
tium on the walls loomed over
standing photos of the patriarch
greeting world leaders, includ-
ing U.S. President Barack
Obama and Erdogan.
Although the Orthodox and
Catholic churches remain es-
tranged on key issues, including
married clergy and the central-
ized power of the Vatican, there
have been moves toward closer
understanding, beginning with
the 1964 meeting between Pope
Paul VI and Ecumenical Patri-
arch Athenagoras in Jerusalem.


It was the first encounter be-
tween a pope and Orthodox pa-
triarch in more than 500 years.
Following the meeting, mu-
tual excommunication edicts
were dropped, and a Catholic-
Orthodox Joint Declaration of
1965 called for greater harmony
Echoing that declaration,
Bartholomew said the road to
unity remains long, but that
Pope Francis's acceptance of the
invitation to meet in Jerusalem
demonstrates that both leaders
want to end the divide.
"When it will take place, we
don't know; how it will take
place, we don't know Only God
knows," he said.
The two leaders will hold a
prayer service together at the
Church of the Holy Sepulchre,
where the faithful believe Jesus
was crucified and buried, and
issue another declaration.
Bartholomew said it had not
been finalized.
In the interview, Bartholomew
expressed disappointment that
Erdogan had not re-opened the
Theological School of Halki, the
Orthodox Church's most impor-
tant seminary Bartholomew
spent seven years as a student
and another four more as an as-
sistant to the dean at the
grounds on an island in the sea
of Marmara. The school, whose
doors were closed in 1971 under
a Turkish law that required pri-
vate higher education to be con-
trolled by the state, have been
meticulously maintained since,
in case students are allowed to
return.
Many expected that the semi-
nary would be reopened last
year as part of a package of re-
forms aimed at boosting
minority rights in Turkey


Places of worship


that offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


A Temple

Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10OAM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


oad

tist

ch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I '- I l ,,I ,I ,r ,
., ] [ l, h l ] . I, n ] ]
-W -


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm

Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

210] N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernaz.org


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran
Church(L)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy.44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
a 7 w-,nthw.
,( 9&"t 9;- meolw I


Floral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.comn



W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship................... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Fom .
352-422-..(
Paelor
Todd
Langdon


Shepherd

s of the

W/ Hills

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offiilih known
for engaging all persons
in the love and intilli
of Jesus Ciriti.


I OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


C4 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


RELIGION


...............................





CPage C5 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

All invited to
Spring Festival today
Due to inclement weather
May 3, the Gift of PediAquatics
Spring Festival will be today from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2211 S. White-
hurst Ave., in Homosassa.
Children activities include a
double water slide donated by I
Jump, Thomas the train, water
balloon toss, doughnut on a string
contests and other fun games.
A hot dog lunch will be served,
with snow cones and a 50/50 raf-
fle. Entry is free to the festival.
Tickets will be sold for the
activities.
Proceeds benefit Gifts of Pedi-
Aquatics, which provides scholar-
ships to children for survival
swim lessons to decrease inci-
dents of youth drowning.
For information, call Sarah
Dodge at 352-586-6695.

Have Mother's Day
meal with Legion post
American Legion Post 155 in-
vites the public to a Mother's Day
breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. Sun-
day at the post, 6585 W Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River
On the menu are cooked-to-
order eggs, bacon or sausage,
homefries or hashbrowns, Bel-
gian waffle with whipped cream
and strawberries or pancakes,
biscuit and gravy, orange juice
and coffee. Cost is $6; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Proceeds benefit American Le-
gion programs to help veterans.
For information, call the post at
352-795-6526.

Camera Club to host
portrait workshop
The Citrus County Art Center
Camera Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Monday at 2644 N. Annapolis Ave.
in Hernando.
This will be a workshop con-
ducted by Larry Munne, a Cam-
era Club board member He will
host a hands-on portrait session
assisted by three models. There
will be three workstations where
members will be able to photo-
graph the models. Members will
bring their cameras and photo-
graph the models under different
lighting conditions.
Available at the workstation
will be studio strobes, LED lights
and fluorescent ring-lights. In ad-
dition, there will be instructions
on portraiture that will allow
members to get the best possible
photos. Cost for the workshop will
be $15 and class size will be lim-
ited to 30 members only
For information, call 352-
400-4466.

Sew-ciety to gather
at canning center
The Florida Sewing Sew-ciety
will meet at 9 a.m. Monday at the
Citrus County Canning Facility lo-
cated at 3405 W Southern St in
Lecanto.
There will be two interesting
projects on the agenda for the
meeting. All sewing enthusiasts
are invited to attend.
For information, call Dee at
352-527-8229.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Romance Group


Special to the Chronicle
This trio of adorable kittens is
officially the "Romance Group"
because they were born on
Valentine's Day. Jamie, Silhouette
and Claire are sweet, fixed and
excited to go to their own homes.
There are more varieties of felines
to choose from, as well. Drop by
and enjoy the felines in their
cage-free, homestyle environment
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to
4 p.m. Monday through Saturday
at the Humanitarians' Hardin
Haven on the corner of State Road
44 and North Conant Avenue, east
of Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, and
view more felines online at
www.petfinder.com/shelters/
f1186.html.


Father Willie Classic


Annual event to raise funds for Boys & Girls Clubs


Special to the Chronicle
The Knights of Columbus Abbot Francis
Sadlier Council 6168 will have its 20th an-
nual Father Willie Golf Classic on Saturday,
May 17, at Seven Rivers Golf and Country
Club in Crystal River Net proceeds from the
event will be donated to the Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County
Local merchants and organizations are in-
vited to sponsor one or more holes for $50
per hole. Sponsorship will be acknowledged
with a sign on the greens and in various
Knights' publications prior to the event.
Entry fee for the tournament, open to men
and women of all ages, is $60 per person.
This includes coffee and doughnuts prior to
the start, greens and cart fees, prizes and


lunch at the Country Club. Prizes will be
awarded for all par three holes and the per-
son hitting a hole in one on the seventh hole
will receive a prize of $10,000.
The winning teams will receive $200 for
first place, $150 for second place and $100
for third place. There will door prizes, 50/50
drawings and a separate raffle for a round of
golf for four at Black Diamond.
Play will be a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m.
with four player teams.
Participants can form their own team or
organizers will do it. Entries must be re-
ceived no later than May 14 with checks at-
tached made out to the Knights of Columbus.
Since the field must be limited to 120 play-
ers, make reservations quickly with Jim
Louque at 352-746-7563.


Doll
donation
The Episcopal Church
Women of St. Anne's
Episcopal Church
recently donated 36
handmade and stuffed
dolls to Camp
E-Nini-Hassee to be
given to the girls living
at the camp here in
Citrus County. From
left are: Evelyn Mayer,
vice president, ECW;
Gale Wire, teacher and
E-Nini-Hassee
representative; and
Doris Flynn, president,
ECW.

Special to the Chronicle


ills and more bills. You make money
and you spend money The routine is
constant and never ending.
Some of us get to do some things on our
bucket lists and some of us don't. Some of us
don't have enough money at the end of the
month, some of us are looking to make more
money and some us are just trying to invest
to make more money
If we are not talking about money, we talk
about our health.
We all know that someday everything
ends. We have been told that all of us die
and we have watched many others die, but
none of us know when it is our turn.
Nonetheless, knowing that someday it will
end for us, we talk about this body and it's
ever-declining performance.
Some of us like to talk about the glory days
when we could leap over tall buildings. It
also seems that many of us like to compare
our stories with those of others and it seems
like the story we personally endured is the
most important.
When I started down my road to start The
Path Rescue Mission, there was not just a
burden for homeless people. There was a
calling from God. I was dying and I knew I
was dying. I knew the clock was ticking and I
was scared I had wasted my life on things
that were not important. There has been an
urgency in my life to make something out of
my life for a long time.
I also understand that I will take nothing


DuWayne
Sipper

THE PATH
HOME


from this life in the material sense. So, my
wife and I have left everything we have as a
legacy for what little it is.
I just got a call from someone who has
owned some land with his family for years
and they are going to donate it to The Path.
He said "We just want to do something good
with it"
I have also noticed the same look with
other people now They are tired of money,
they know the clock is ticking and they want
to leave an impact by doing something good
before they die. Have you completed your
will? Do you have a trust fund? Do you know
many charities can liquidate most assets?
Please, help someone else now and if you
can't, for God's sake, help someone when
you are gone.

DuWayne Sipper is the executive director
of The Path of Citrus County a faith-based
homeless shelter Contact him at 527-6500 or
sipperd@pathofcitrus. org.


NEWS NOTES

Dog lovers welcome
at training meeting
The Citrus County Dog Train-
ing Center invites dog lovers to its
next monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m.
Monday at Shamrock Industrial
Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave. (County
Road 495), unit Q, Crystal River
The all-volunteer group wel-
comes input for future classes, in-
formational workshops and
activities with dogs.
The meeting will include a
demonstration by Lisa Russell on
search and
scenting.
For more information, call 352-
212-1697.

Boys & Girls Clubs
plan camp orientation
Orientation for this summer's
Boys & Girls Clubs camps will
cover the basics of B&GC behav-
ior standards, daily camp rou-
tines and field trip guidelines.
Parents should attend the orien-
tation at the club the children)
will be attending.
If you have not registered your,
child you may do so at this
orientation.
Orientations are at 6:15 p.m. at
the following Boys & Girls Club
locations: Evelyn Waters, Inver-
ness, Tuesday, 352-341-2507;
Robert Halleen, Homosassa,
Wednesday, 352-795-8624; and
Central Ridge, Beverly Hills,
Monday, May 19,352-270-8841.

Artists sought
for mall showcase
The Crystal River Mall is
searching for local artists for a
free indoor show from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. on Saturday, May 24.
During this time artists may
pass out business cards, fliers,
contact information and other
promotional materials.
Artists may sell their work, take
orders and set up times and
prices to teach classes.
Pre-resister by email, stop in or
call the mall office 325-795-2585
by Thursday, May 15.

Learn how to prepare
for natural disasters
June 1 to 30 Nov 30 do these
dates mean anything to you?
They should if you live in
Florida, and especially if you re-
member 2004. These are the tra-
ditional dates for the annual
hurricane season.
The free May Master Gardener
Seminars from Citrus Extension
Service will address these natu-
ral disasters, plants that are good
selections, ones to avoid and
what landscape steps you can
take before and following a
natural disaster
Leaders will explain what you
can do to help plants withstand
and then recover from such oc-
currences.
The schedule for these free
seminars is:
E 1 p.m. May 13 (second Tues-
day) at Lakes Region Library,
Inverness.
1:30 p.m. May 14 (second
Wednesday) at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
E 1 p.m. May21 (third Wednes-
day) at Citrus Springs Library
E 2 p.m. May 27 (fourth Tues-
day) at Homosassa Library
Master gardeners provide in-
formation from the University of
Florida, based upon UF research
and education.
They are available to answer
gardening questions, identify
samples or address concerns.
The Extension Service may be
contacted at 352-527-5700.

PFLAG to meet
Tuesday in Lecanto
PFLAG Lecanto (Parents, Fam-
ily and Friends of Lesbians and
Gays ) will meet from 7 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday at the Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
PFLAG's mission is to promote
the health and well-being of
LGBT persons, their families and
friends.
Meetings are open to everyone
and provide an opportunity for
dialog, discussion and support, as
well as education about LGBT is-
sues and concerns.
For more information, call


Linda at 352-419-2738 or email
pflag.lecanto@gmail. com.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Passing the gavel


RUTH LEVINS/Special to the Chronicle
Lynne Ann Renfold, left, passes the president's gavel to Margaret Williams, president of the
Crystal River United Methodist Women, at a recent luncheon meeting at the church.




Make impact, now or later




C6 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES
CENTRAL RIDGE LIBRARY
425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465-4281
352-746-6622
www.citruslibraries.org

May 12
Lakeside Village POA, 10 a.m.
Scrabble Game, 10 a.m.
Bodacious Beading Babes, 1 p.m.
Organizing for Citrus, 5 p.m.
May 13
Word: Formatting & Style
Sheets, 10:15 a.m.
Preschool Stories, 11 a.m.
Fun and Games, 1 p.m.
Pre-GED Math Foundations,
4:30 p.m.
May 14
TaiChi, 10a.m.
Mother Goose, 11 a.m.
Ask a Master Gardener, 1:30 p.m.
May 15
Depression & Anxiety
Support Group, 10 a.m.
Web Browsing: Getting
Started, 10:15 a.m.
Pre-GED Social Studies, 3 p.m.
May 16
Libraries closed for staff training day
May 17
Tipping Points, 10 a.m.
Writers & Poets Workshop, 1 p.m.


NEWS NOTES

Pine Ridge volunteers
show PRIDE
One of this county's best means
of crime prevention is citizen at-
tention. Like many Citrus County
communities, Pine Ridge has a
sheriff's crime watch unit known
as PRIDE. PRIDE has been a rec-
ognized value with continuous
community service since 1996.
Manned by volunteers, crime
watch units are a recognized line
in defense of communities. Every
time a PRIDE volunteer checks a
home or just patrols the commu-
nity, they discourage crime.
With continuing budget cuts,
every volunteer, allows dollars to
be placed in more critical crime
prevention needs. Volunteer par-
ticipation is now more important
than ever
The Pine Ridge Crime Watch
Unit needs more volunteers. New
residents especially are asked to
consider volunteering with
PRIDE.
For information and an appli-
cation, call the Citrus County
Sheriff's Volunteer Office at 352-
746-3484 or PRIDE Capt. Steve
Wagner at 352-527-0723.

BH Lions to serve
breakfast Sunday
The Beverly Hills Lions Club,
72 Civic Circle Drive, will have its
pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. for Mother's Day on
Sunday
Cost for adults is $4; children
younger than 12 eat for $2. This
includes all-you-can-eat pancakes
with choice of bacon or sausage
or combo, orange juice and coffee
or tea.
For more information, call 352-
897-4899.

Public welcome at
'Organizing' meeting
Organizing for Citrus is a grass-
roots group that meets once a
month to discuss ideas and write
letters about political issues that
affect the community, state and
country
The public is welcome to the
meetings at Central Ridge
Library in Beverly Hills.
Scheduled meetings are: Mon-
day, May 12, from 5 to 7 p.m. and
Monday June 16, from 5:15 to
7p.m.
For more information, call
Vicky Iozzia at 352-563-2651.

Civic Association
to convene Thursday
The next Citrus Springs Civic
Association general meeting will
be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Citrus
Springs Community Center
Guest speaker will be Les Cook,
property appraiser for Citrus
County.
Residents are welcome.

Civic group to hear
about sinkholes


Pine Ridge Civic Association
will meet at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Community Center
The speaker will be talking
about sinkholes. Those who at-
tend are asked to bring canned
goods for the food pantry collec-
tion. A box will be in the front
room.
Later in the month, enjoy a Hot
Dog and Bingo Night at 6 p.m.
Saturday, May 17.
The association will be cele-
brating Mother's Day Cost is $4
per person and $5 for five bingo
sheets.
RSVP to Louise Mathis at 352-
527-7443.


'The 11th Hour' at library



Citrus County Council offers environmental presentations for the public


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Council's Environment
and Natural Resources Committee is
hosting Tipping Points, a series of pre-
sentations pertaining to the environment
and vanishing water supply
"The llth Hour" will be shown, fol-
lowed by discussion, from 10 a.m. tol p.m.
Saturday May 17, at Central Ridge Li-
brary in Beverly Hills. The event is free.
"The llth Hour," produced and nar-
rated by Leonardo DiCaprio, looks at the


state of the world's environment and ex-
plores visionary and common-sense solu-
tions for restoring Earth's biological
systems. The film includes discussion
with 50 leading masterminds, re-
searchers and pioneers, including
Stephen Hawking and former Soviet
Prime Minister Mikhail Gorbachev The
film is rated PG.
Citrus County Council is a not-for-
profit, nonpartisan consortium of home-
owner associations, civic clubs and
environmental groups whose mission is


to protect the environment and natural
resources, thereby preserving the quality
of life in Citrus County
The CCC Environment and Natural Re-
sources Committee works to inform Cit-
rus County citizens of environmental
issues affecting this area. Meetings are
the first Monday of each month at 10 a.m.
at the Citrus County Extension Building,
3650 W Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
For information, call Roger Dobronyi at
352-726-7473 or visit wwwCitrusCounty
Council.org.


C news from the Central Ridge area

COMMUNITY






Local club members garner honors


yw i -.
'':
i1 ':: :-. :.-"


Special to the Chronicle
Preparing food for all the players and spectators were Jan Lemon, Ersi Brandt, Shelly Bissonnette, Fran Parent and Mark Stevens.
Not pictured are John Bissonnette, Nancy Trudel and Stan Champion, who was in charge of the beverages.


Horseshoepitching tournament draws competitors from across the state


EILEEN Fox
Special to the Chronicle
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club hosted a
successful and enjoyable Florida State
Horseshoe Pitching Championship Tour-
nament April 23 through the 26.
A banquet was held April 26 and
awards were presented to winners of the
different classes and to the Men, Women
and Elders Florida State Champion. Hall
of Fame inductees were also recognized.
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
members who placed in the top five Dou-
bles category for the different classes are:
Walter Ray Williams, Michael Trudel,
Bob Lemon, James Boorom, John Bisson-
nette, Lance Potter, Stanley Champion,
Chris Ogden, Ron Fair, Eileen Fox and
Mabel Adcox.
In the Men's Singles Handicapped
classes, placing for Beverly Hills, top
three positions were:
Elders Handicapped: Class E, second
place, Nick Borick; Class G, second place,
Stanley Champion.
Men's Handicapped: Class A, third
place, Walter Ray Williams; Class B, third
place, James Boorom; Class C, second
place, Michael Trudel; Class D, first
place, Bob Lemon.
Women's Handicapped: Class A, first
place, Eileen Fox; Class C, second place,
Mabel Adcox.
Men's State Champion: Walter Ray
Williams, 6-0, with 75.33 percent
Women's State Champion: Shalee
Cason, 6-0, 71.67 percent.
Elders State Champion: Larry Deck,
5-1, 65.67 ringer percent.
The Beverly Hills Horseshoe club had
a lot of help from its members to make
the state tournament a success. Food was
served every day for the players and


Linda Fair, who was in charge of the 50/50 drawing for all four days, chats with Chris
Ogden, who also helped the club prepare for the state tournament.


spectators to enjoy, by members Jan
Lemon, Fran Parent, Ersi Brandt, Shelly
Bissonnette, John Bissonnette and Nancy
Trudel. In charge of beverages for the en-
tire tournament was Stan Champion, with
assistant Mark Stevens.
Linda Fair did a great job taking care
of the 50-50 raffle all four days. Mabel
Adcox and daughter Doris furnished the
hors d'oeuvres for the Friday night social
gathering at the club, in honor of their
late husband/father who passed away in
2007.
Judging is not an easy job, but John
Clark did a fabulous job judging for all
four days. There were many compliments


from other clubs and spectators for a job
well done.
The club has 24 professional blue clay
courts, six which are under lights for
night play
The courts are open during daylight
hours seven days a week for anyone who
wishes to play or practice.
Club members and nonmembers may
make use of the facilities. New members
are always welcome.
For more information or to join the
club, call activity director Peggy Ogden at
352-489-1005 or email mwogden@
tampabayrr.com. Visit the website at
http://beverlyhillshc.9f.com.


Genealogical Society to gather Tuesday in Lecanto


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will meet at
10 a.m. Tuesday at the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day


Saints, 3474 W Southern St.,
Lecanto.
The speaker will be Bob
Bryan from the Pinellas
County Genealogical Society
He will talk about digital cam-


eras for genealogy. The digital
camera is one of the most im-
portant tools for genealogists.
This presentation will discuss
the important features of cam-
eras and demonstrate how to


make the best use of the digi-
tal camera in your research.
For information visit
www citrusgenealogy. com or
call Mary Ann Machonkin at
352-382-5515.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SWOLF ND 2 2 2 22 22 CTN Special Jack Van Prophecy To Be Truth Leslie Hale N 7th Street All Over Christ in Pure
S W IND 2 2 2 22 22 Impe in News Announced Theater the World Prophecy Passion
TS ABC 11 11 1 News World American Paid NBA Basketball Playoffs, Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. NBA News Private
E W News Medicine Program (N) (In Stereo Live) N Postgame Practice
N 1 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Leverage "The King Leverage "The Two Movie'PG'
m u IND 12 12 16 'PG' Theory Theory George Job"'PG' Horse Job"'PG'
ED WTT MNT 6 6 6 9 9 House RawTrav. Health Paid Bloopers Bloopers Futurama Futurama Ring of HonorWrest. Bones'14'm
MD COW X TBN 21 21 Paid Blair Jim Raley Healing Touch Minis Rabbi Messer Pad Gaither Paid Marye Anti-
C 4 4 4 12 1 King of King of Two and Two and White Collar "Where White Collar "Need to Engagement Engagement The Arsenio Hall Show
M W CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Half Men There's a Will"'PG' Know"'PG'm '14',c
S1 1 Naked City School Your Citrus County Court Da Vinci's Inquest (In ISpy'G' Eyeforan TheComedy
CWYKEFAM 16 16 16 15 'PG' Zone Stereo)'14'm Eye Shop
i C(WMX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup. From Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kan. (N) cc FOX 35 News at 10
CD fl UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Futbol Mexicano Primera Division (N) (SS) Sabado Gigante (N)'PG'(SS) Corned. INoticiero
M (WXPX ION 17 Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl The Listener'14' The Listener'14'
At 5 Criminal Minds "25 to Criminal Minds Criminal Minds'14' c Criminal Minds Criminal Minds "Hope" Criminal Minds'14' c
54 48 54 25 27 Life"'14'[c "Corazon"'14'c (DVS) "Epilogue"'14' 14' (DVS)
ENJ 55 -*** "The Last Samurai" (2003, Adventure) *** "300"(2007) Gerard Butler. Badly outnumbered ** "Reign of Fire" (2002)
55 64 55 Tom Cruise, Ken Watanabe.'R' cc Spartan warriors battle the Persian army'R' c Christian Bale.'PG-13 c
52 35 52 19 21 YTo Be Announced My Cat From Hell (N) My Cat From Hell My Cat From Hell: My Cat From Hell (In
S52 35 52 19 21 (In Stereo)'PG' c "Blood Thirsty"'PG' Scratch Tracks'PG' Stereo)'PG'
S 96 19 9 **'/, "Why Did I Get ** "This Christmas"(2007)Delroy Lindo. A reunion at **Y2 "Jumping the Broom"(2011) Angela Bassett. A bride
96 19 96 Married7" (2007) the holidays tests family ties. 'PG-13' m and grooms parents clash at the wedding. N
BRAV 254 51 254 TBA IThe Real Housewives of Atlanta *, "The Back-up Plan" (2010) Jennifer Lopez. I*Y "The Back-up Plan"
S 27 7 *** "Dumb & Dumber"(1994) Jim Carrey Two witless *** "Dumb & Dumber"(1994) Jim Carrey Two witless **, "Jackass 3D"
27 61 27 33 wonders take a cash-laden briefcase to Aspen. wonders take a cash-laden briefcase to Aspen. (2010)'R' cc
"Steptord **Y2 "Footloose" (1984) Kevin Bacon. Hip teen moves to Guntucky (N)'14' Tobacco Wars (N) Cops Cops
98 45 98 28 37 Wives" corn town where pastor taboos dancing. 'PG' Reloaded Reloaded
[N 43 42 43 Paid Paid Treasure Treasure Treasure ITreasure Suze Orman Show American Greed American Greed
[N 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) Spotlight Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd.
5 46 0 6 5 Good Luck Charlie (In Austin & Austin & Jessie I Didn't Do Liv & Dog With a Lab Rats Kickin' It I Didn't Do Dog With a
46 40 46 6 5 Stereo)'G' c Ally'G' Ally'G' 'G'I It G' Maddie BlogC' Y7' 'Y7' I It'G' Blog'G'
P 33 27 33 21 17 2014 NFL Draft (N) (Live) Bc Boxing SportCtr NBA Basketball TeamsTBA. (N)
ESP 34 28 34 43 49 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) College Softball -Baseball Tonight (N) SportsCenter (N)
E TH 95 70 95 48 Living Heroic Mother Angelica Live Karol: Man Who Became IKarol: Man Who Became Shaking the Earth
S 29 52 29 2 **2 "Mamma Mia!"(2008, Musical Comedy) **** "Forrest Gump"(1994, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks. An inno- *** "Spanglish"
29 52 29 20 28 Meryl Streep, Colin Firth.'PG-13' cent man enters history from the '50s to the '90s. 'PG-13' (2004) Adam Sandier.
S 11 17 ***0, "Do the Right Thing" (1989) Danny **t, "Beauty Shop" (2005, Comedy) Queen ** "Dangerous Minds" (1995, "Dazed&
118 170 Aiello. Premiere. (In Stereo)'H' [ Latifah. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Drama) Michelle Pfeiffer. 'R' Conf."
(FJ 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Jeanine Geraldo at Large (N) Red Eye
TDI 26 56 26 -Chopped 'G' Diners, Drive Guy's Games Guy's Games Guy's Games Restaurant: Im.
(JE 732 112 732 MLB Baseball MLB Baseball Cleveland Indians at Tampa Bay Rays. (N) c UFC Fight Night UFC: Brown vs. Silva. (N)
FSiFL 35 39 35 College Baseball IMarlins Marlins IMLB Baseball Miami Marlins at San Diego Padres. (N) IMarlins
**'Y "Hancock" (2008, Action) Will Smith, *Yi "This Means War" (2012, Action) Reese *Y2 "This Means War" (2012, Action) Reese
FX 30 60 30 51 CharlizeTheron. 'PG-13' jWitherspoon, Chris Pine.'PG-13' Witherspoon, Chris Pine.'PG-13'
fO 727 67 727 Big Break Florida ILive From (N) (Live) Live From Live From
hALLJ* 59 *8 59 45 "The Nanny Express" (2009, Drama) "Mom's Day Away" (2014, Drama) Bonnie "June in January" (2014, Romance-Comedy)
59 68 59 45 54 Vanessa Marcil, Brennan Elliot. cN Somerville, na Grauer. Premiere. cc Brooke D'Orsay, Wes Brown. cN
S 302 1 32 2 2 *** "The Bourne Legacy" (2012) Jeremy *** "Prisoners" (2013) Hugh Jackman. A desperate father Game ofThrones (In "Prisoners"
302 201 302 2 2 Renner. (In Stereo)'PG-13' N takes the law into his own hands. 'R' Stereo) 'MA' 'R'
f10 3 *** "Pacific Rim"(2013) Charlie Hunnam, VICE Silicon **to "Beautiful Creatures" (2013) Alden Veep 'MA' Silicon
303 202 303 Idris Elba. (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc'14' c Valley Ehrenreich. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' cc Valley
HGTV 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters HuntlIntl Hunters HuntlIntl Property Brothers'G' Propert Brothers'G' House Hunters Reno Hunters HuntlIntl
f 51 54 51 3 42 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
MT)S 51 54 51 32 42 p PG PG PG PG PG PG PG' PG PG PG PG' 'PG'
niEFJ 24^ 38 24 31 "Clara's Deadly Secret" (2013, Suspense) "The Good Sister" (2014, Suspense) Sonya ** "Premonition"(2007, Suspense) Sandra
24 38 24 31 EmmanuelleVaugier.'NR'[c Walger, Ben Bass. Premiere. 'NR' c Bullock, Julian McMahon. 'PG-13' m
50 119 Killer Kids14' Killer Kids'14' c Women on Death Row Pam Perillo; Debra Beyond Scared Straight Beyond Scared Straight
Bracewell.'14' c '14 c '14 c
fI. 30 21 3 3 3 "Road ** "Taken 2" (2012) Liam Neeson. *** "War of the Worlds"(2005, Science *** "Batman Begins" (2005, Action) Christian
320 221 320 3 3 Trip"'R (In Stereo)'NR'c Fiction) Tom Cruise. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Bale. (In Stereo)'FG-13' c
NC 42 41 42 uaugit on camera uaugnt on camera Uaugnt on camera LocKup LocKUp LOCKUp
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109 65 109 44 53 Cabin" PG' the World"'PG' Shove"'14' Grit"'14' Shove"'14'
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iIJ 103 62 103 -lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life Love in the City 'PG' lyanla, Fix My Life
-XT _44 123 "Sleep.-Enemy" **** "Titanic" (1997, Historical Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Billy Zane.'PG-13' m**** "Titanic"
.W 340 241 3**40 4 ,2 "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part "Scary Movie V" (2013) Ashley **2 "Sinister" (2012 Horror) EthanHawke, Penny
340 241 340 4 2"(2012) Kristen Stewart. c Tisdale. PG-13' James Ransone. (In Stereo) R'c Dreadful
3nii/- 37 43 37 27 36 Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' Cops'PG' o*** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert DowneyJr. A billionaire dons an
37 43c c 37 27 36 armored suit to fight criminals. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
370 21 30 *** "This Is the End" (2013, Comedy) James Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons
370 271 370 Franco. (In Stereo)'R' (iTV)'MA'm c(iTV) (N) 'MA' c (iTV) 'MA' c (iTV)'MA'[c
3 College Powerboating MLL Lacrosse Ohio Machine at Florida Launch. (N) (In to Do Boxing From Feb. 10, 2014. (N)
36 31 36 Baseball Stereo Live) Florida
S3 2 "Cirque- *Y, "Red Riding Hood" (2011) Amanda Seyfried. A woman **** "Raiders of the LostArk" (1981, Adventure) "The
31 59 31 26 29 Freak" suspects someone close to her is a werewolf. Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, Paul Freeman. PG Ruins"'R'
TB 49 23 49 16 19 Raymond Raymond IRaymond IRaymond Big Bang IBigBang Big Bang I Big Bang Big Bang IBigBang DealWith Bamrn
t D 169 5 169 30 ***35 "Le Mans" (1971, Action) Steve *** "Stella Dallas"(1937, Drama) Barbara *** "Anne of Green Gables" "Murder-
169 53 169 30 35 McQueen, Siegfried Rauch.'G' Stanwyck, John Boles.'NR' B (1934, Drama) Anne Shirley'NR' Sweet"
Rods N' Wheels (In Lords of the Car Lords of the Car Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud (In
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J 35 2 350in *** n"Coach Carter" **Y'"The Longest Yard" (2005) Adam Sandier. *** "Byzantium" (2012, Horror) Gemma ** "Saw ll" (2005)
350 261 350 (2005) Premiere. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' m Arterton. Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R N DonnieWahlberg.R'
i 48 3 48 3 **'/4 "Swordfish" (2001, Suspense) John *)Y "Rush Hour 3" (2007, Action) Jackie Chan, **t, "Hulk" (2003, Fantasy) Eric Bana, Jennifer
48 33 48 31 34 Travolta, Hugh Jackman.'R' ccChris Tucker. 'PG-13'N (DVS) Connelly Sam Elliott. 'PG-13' c
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L 32 49 32 34 24 Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond
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47 32 47 17 18 Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family Family House
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Wj 117 69 117 Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace Grace
[WN- 18 118 18 118 20 Funny Home Videos MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. (N) (Live) Funny Home Videos Bones'14' cc


North 05-10-14
4 K 10 8
V 7 4 3
A652
A72
West East
*h 6 3 2 5 4
S2 K J 10 9 fi
K 9 8 73 QJ 10
410 965 4 d KQJ
South
A Q J 9 7
V A Q 8 5
WAQB5
4
8 4 3
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
Pass 1 V
1 I Pass 2 V Pass
4 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V 2

SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

This week we have been looking at various
uses for the trump suit. Here is one more, a
technique that arises rarely, but is fun to exe-
cute when it does.
South is in four spades. West leads the heart
two, a known singleton. How should declarer
plan the play?
North's two-heart cue-bid raise showed at
least three-card spade support and a maxi-
mum initial pass. South, who expected the
heart finesse to work and liked having a single-
ton, jumped to four spades.
If the bidding had been perfect, North-South
would have reached three no-trump, which
has nine top tricks: five spades, two hearts
(with the aid of the finesse), one diamond and
one club.
Here, declarer is faced with four losers: two
hearts and two clubs. He has only those nine
top tricks just listed. Is there any hope?
Whenever declarer has a short suit and
dummy's trumps are strong, he should con-
sider a dummy reversal. He takes ruffs in his
own hand and uses dummy's trumps to remove
the opponents'.
South takes the first trick, plays a diamond
to dummy's ace, ruffs a diamond in his hand,
leads a trump to dummy and ruffs another dia-
mond in hand. Then declarer overtakes his
spade queen with dummy's king, ruffs the last
diamond with his spade ace, crosses to dummy
with a club to the ace, draws West's final trump
and takes his second heart winner
Declarer's 10 tricks are three spades in the
dummy, the heart ace-queen, the diamond ace,
the club ace and those three diamond ruffs in
his hand.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
| CPIR ,,

@2014 Tribune ContentAgency, LLC
All Rights Reserved
| KAROC



CHETAD



ROTECK

77m
^1Th_


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

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In.: i c.r )- I i r- h I i
flnlo l i~j I *r. rn,-,|lny ,cil I





INN, AT TH





FXPFN5IW S TE:AKROUWE
WA ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as -'

suggested by the above cartoon.
P INNNI AT THE
F-PE NSIVE 5TEAKHOUSE
V/AS ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer A L L s
here: U
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: EVOKE RIGID APATHY TEDIUM
I Answer: They wanted a purebred dog with a great
bloodline, but they couldn't "PET-AGREE"


ACROSS
1 Humdrum
5 Okra dish
10 Bug's antenna
12 Plunder and
pillage
13 Lily maid of
Astolat
14 Glamour
15 Cutting
remark
16 Monsieur's
wine
18 CD
predecessors
19 Climbing
tools (2 wds.)
23 W-2 info
26 Trotted
27 Abominable
Snowman
30 Shiny paint
32 "My Heart
Will Go On"
singer Oion
34 Rapids transit
35 Influence
36 Magnificence
37 Winter woe


38 Lauper's
"- Bop"
39 Pictures,
often
42 Hunk's pride
45 Make public
46 mater
50 Unprincipled
53 Suffused
55 Paving
material
56 Held down a
job
57 Genuflected
58 Pike's
discovery


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PRU|NTS N IMOY
STAI NS HORRID
STAIB[ E T A.V AI L S
EA U T A 'NNH I
BBIC K NCK HAS
AAIH ITCH TIA L L
B RIA V E S TIM AlP L El
BRII AR uSURPED
L E;N DAHS E'GG
EDS P I lOT N E E
NmWO ARC
STIRAND LEADED
IiLD I DE SAVORY
IBIEJITS D ENfSE
9 Lyric poems 20 Weird
10 Groundhog 21 Stunning
mO. sight
11 Tells all 22 Note to -
12 Tailless cat 23 Dry, as
17 Fleming of champagne
007 novels 24 Ginger cookie
1 25 Prefix for
Puzzles" books second
1m 28 Cravats
-67 g 29 Rainfall
measure
- - - 31 Some parents
32 Dieter's unit
.... 33 Riviera
summer
Wanted" org.
i i 40 Soda fountain
treat
.0 28 41 Buffalo
--- 4puckster
S142 Provide
. capital
43 Bad sign
S1 44 Taj Mahal
-- -feature
I 47 Moon
41 goddess
48 Gentle
46-- 4 4a 49 Say more
---- 51 Family mem.
52 Colony
.... member
54 Atlas page


5-10 (0 2014 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFrs

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: Six
months ago, I became
involved with a man
20 years my senior It has be-
come evident that his ex-
wife is still very much in the
picture.
They divorced 30 years
ago, when he
found out she was
cheating. He gave
her the house and
half of his earn- I
ings until their
children were
grown. Yet he still
phones her and
asks whether she
needs anything.
Those "needs" are
usually financial,
in spite of her ANI
cushy job and MAIL
mortgage-free life.
What sent me over the
edge was a recent visit to his
mother's house. I randomly
picked up a family photo of
his parents' 50th anniver-
sary party, and there she was
- right in the center.
I have voiced my displeas-
ure loud and clear: Either I
am "it," or I am out! He says
she is family What is a di-
vorce exactly if people are
going to exchange gifts and
phone calls and show up at
family functions? Too
Little Too Late
Dear Too Little: Every di-
vorced couple is different.
Many remain friendly with
each other. Those who have
children together have a
lifelong bond, no matter how
old the kids are. The in-laws
may still consider the ex to
be part of the family and so
invite her to all of their func-
tions. That is their business,
not yours. While giving her
money is not necessary, your


1
L


boyfriend is not going to stop
contacting his ex simply be-
cause you don't like it. If you
cannot deal with that, better
to get out now
DearAnnie: I am 61 years
old and own my own home. I
am retired and live off of my
investments. I
have lived in this
house for 30 years
r and have taken
good care of it.
I've been dating
"Ralph" for five
months, although
I've known him
for 20 years.
Ralph's house is
worth twice as
much as mine,
IE'S and he's hinting
BOX that if we marry, I
---- should move into
his home. I love his house,
but if we marry and he pre-
deceases me, I could not af-
ford the taxes, mortgage and
maintenance on such an ex-
pensive place. He's already
told me that he is leaving
everything to his adult chil-
dren. He claims I don't need
his assets unless I get sick.
I moved a lot when I was
young. I have no children
and want the security of
knowing that I will not have
to move again unless it's to a
nursing home. Ralph is very
nice, but I'd rather live in
my own house.
Also, he doesn't want me
to meet his daughters yet, so
I don't know whether they
will accept his having a girl-
friend, let alone a wife.
Nancy
Dear Nancy: Tell Ralph
you'd like to take things
more slowly and not discuss
marriage until you have met
his children. But Ralph also


could speak to a lawyer
about setting up a trust that
would pay the mortgage,
taxes and maintenance on
his house and allow you to
live there until your death
(whereupon it reverts to his
children). If that would ease
your mind, please look into
it.
DearAnnie: I feel sure
that, were she to pick up pen
and paper, my mother would
be among those parents
wailing over their "heart-
less" children's "abandon-
ing" them. My mother would
say that she was a loving,
wonderful parent, and I'm
sure she believes it.
Annie, this is a woman
who told me every day that
she wished she'd aborted
me. When I was very little,
she helpfully explained the
term so I would know ex-
actly what she meant. Very
rarely are abusive parents
capable of comprehending
that they are, in fact, abu-
sive. There is no child on
Earth who wants to not have
parents. If your kids have
cut you out of their lives,
there is a reason, and that
reason is YOU. S.

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcastnet,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 Third
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www.creators.com.


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 C7




CITmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


/TOcW'S r
ZTHE LAMTDAY
OF BEWJNO
TO AMFMAL
U2EEKJF


Garfield


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Beetle Bailey


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser

F"fO-IU. OF'<&X FINS1& F A.t CJt TO WI GOOb r WT'S kA4O.'FE- CEAF. TOCOOK'
'YOUk tl' AO t> LUtE WkS o 70 .O G..oo FooD 50 -TT, tstWE
W P, 5T F, UK-TAt!6 !


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie


WANNA GO ;O0 HONEY, WHY
A WALK? HUH, 00 YOU ICE-P
OAISV? SO REPEATING I1T
FORA WFALK .9 .
60 P02 A -~,,
W A L K ? - .
I- I
/'b -,.l-^ r ,


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury Classic


Big Nate


MRS. CLERWICKcL'5
R.IG6T! &INA' JUST
TRYING TO GET
UNE-RK MY SKIN!
WHEN T KESPONt
TO HER." I'M GIVIN6
REYrWoiNT SHE WAiTs'






Arlo and Janis


Millions of years ago, when dinosaurs I '
roamed and roamed and roamed the earth *ARE WU GONNA ?LANT SON\TtN' P? AY SMS
IM5 15 WERE WOU LAPItES'PISH TWE PVIT."

Betty


Frank & Ernest


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. No passes.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Brick Mansions" (PG-13) 10:35 p.m.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:55 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"God's Not Dead" (PG) 1:20 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
8p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 12:45 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
7:05 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"Legends of Oz" (PG) 12:40 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Legends of Oz" (PG) In 3D. 3:50 p.m., 10:15
p.m. No passes.
"Neighbors" (R) 1:30 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 4:05 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No
passes.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,


Sow I'V1
leDO)6IT!
0



% '


7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 1:10 p.m.

Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 7 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Neighbors" (R) 1 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:30 p.m. No passes.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:20 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public LOcal RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: n sienbe i

"PFD VOK RD FGXY JG PFGK M BGXX,


OKW PDIXW UDJG YVGRRC URDVC


RGXX, DV LMUU RFG YXOSG RD JOLG


MR PGXX? JC JDRFGV."


OKK ROCXDV

Previous Solution: "My mother told me that if you could not be a good loser,
then there's no way you could be a good winner." Halle Berry
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-10


"I hope you've been good this year,
Mommy. You know what
tomorrow is."


FROM t OW^ I-i,
Cr. ILL PEA
KEEP MYNW BKN
MOUTH n AVE
SkiUT! FUN IN
I WON'T PETENT1OM

TOER'-

C.'' .


WE'RE iOT E9.& OuYkCO5
AROO()D WIW MFWE A&
C)U6'
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Today% MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


SALLY FO


aCNSOREDJ


CS SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


COMICS




CLASSIFIED


Classifieds



w"


To place an ad, call 563=5966


.- _


* At.


4. 4


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa 55Tr. g.. l881l..T.T.... -0 0 0 -0 0 0i P c r i n i


M O 71- r IU70
Hello Mr J. and L.
Quad City in the 90's.
L. so tall. Good to see
your faces. Mr H. as
well. Sincerely, Runner


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


THIS OUT!


GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!!!



6 lines
-10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50

******* 1








YuII"urid firs[


Need aijob

or a

qualified

employee?



This area's

#1

employment

source!


CWii K E

S* S S?,.


2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12x20 shed,
etc. $138,500.
(352) 419-6327
Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625
Clean View: Pressure
washingwindowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Crystal River
Sat. May 10, 8a-?
2 Fam. Newer items &
Misc. 19N to 488, 2.5
mi to Ira Martin,
follow signs.
DUNNELLON
Fri & Sat 8a-5p
HUGE SALE *
computer parts
galore, boat top
cover & accessories,
lawn equip, 2 gar-
den tractors, tools,
craftsman toolbox,
new well water
pump, antique bolt
cutter, new Skil bis-
cuit plate joiner, lad-
ders, tires, ceramic
planters, marble top
end tables,
knick-knacks, pic-
tures/ frames & too
much more to list.
3837 SW Pompano rd
Rainbow Lake Est.
Electric Range
Whirlpool 30 Self
Cleaning 1st $100
Takes it. Heavy Duty
Wheelbarrow $40
(352) 795-5519
Freezer
Kenmore 5.2 CF
upright, white used less
then 6 mo. Looks and
runs like new $185 obo
(352) 586-3380
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on '/2 acre." Mint"
Cond. $500/mo. $1500
clsng cost. 5k dwn. Nw
tile/wd fir. & pnt. 0/F avl.
(352)422-6974



T~s

Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+ Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's,
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refnrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10 x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202


Fero Memorial Garden
2 Cemetery Lots
w/ opening & closing
(352) 746-0945
HONDA
2003 Scooter, model
Reflex, great
condition $1800
(352) 765-4011
LLADRO Retired piece
(Unexpected Visit)
Beautiful, in box Call for
details,will text pic if
interested. $185 OBO.
352-586-3380
Restaurant dinner-
ware, New. Oneida. 10
boxes of 12 pcs. ea.
$100. (352)503-2373
SEARS CRAFTSMAN
42" cut, 1 yr old, bag
system, used twice,
$750. (352) 637-4718
Starcraft
16' aluminum
40 hp Johnson
$600.
(352) 419-4733



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Pnrices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



4 yr old female
shepherd mix, good
with children of all
ages & adults. Unable
to care for due to
health issues. Christine
(352) 476-3783
10 month old
Large Male Black
Great Dane
energetic
free to approved
home, must have
experience with Giant
breed
352-860-2793
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings. great for gardens
or as mulch. U load and
haul away
352-628-9624
Free
3 Male kittens, approx
2 mos.old & 3 females
and 2 males, aprox 1
yr. old, To good home,
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message
Free Firewood Cut,
18 to 22" long
You haul
(352) 489-7696
Free
Friendly Male Cat
White with
Brown spots,
(970) 317-8902, cell
FREE KITTENS
To good home
Must Go ASAP
(352) 634-2781



U PICK
BLUEBERRIES
(352) 643-0717
U-pick Blueberries
$3.00 per lb. 7am-6pm
Tues,Thurs, Sat, & Sun
Pestiside Free *
4752 W Abeline Dr
Citrus Springs,
352-746-2511


Labrador Retriever
recently had puppies
lost in the vicinity off
hwy 200 in Hernando
pls call (352) 726-8080
Lost 7 yr old Male
Himalayan Cat
last seen May 5th
in the vicinity of
Beverly Hills, Publix
area, indoor cat
requires special food
& medication.
REWARD
(352) 270-4640
Lost Bull Massive
Pitt Mix, named Roxie
Red w/ white marking
Friendly
Homosassa, Cardinal
Lane & Leisure Acres
REWARD
(352) 601-2761
Lost cat. By VFW area
in Floral City. Great
Mancoon. Recently trim-
med. Has collar & chip-
ped. Called Sammy. If
found call Debbie.
(352)201-9521
Lost Key Fob
Crystal River, creative
playground
Call (352) 586-1266



Found Very Friendly
Tan & White
Hound Dog
found on Ira Martin
Crystal River
Call to identify
(352) 795-5240
After Sunday
will go to pound
Small Dog in
vicinity of Turkey Oak
in Crystal River, call to
identify (352) 794-6314



CONSIGNMENTS
WANTEDIII
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeeee
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



49 yr old female, on
disability, looking to
rent room in the Inver-
ness area. Can do
some cooking/clean.
cell (417) 838-2268
Needed Donation
of 3/2 Singlewide
Mobile Home
for Family that lost
everything in a
house fire. Will move
to site. Thank you,
Contact Brenda
(347) 595-2250
(352) 613-3209
Senior Lady
Needs Transportation
to Doctors and Appts.
(352) 419-5454



Fero Memorial Garden
2 Cemetery Lots
w/ opening & closing
(352) 746-0945



Administrative
Assistant
Assist Program Dir.
with correspond-
ence, filing, organiz-
ing. Proficiency in
Microsoft office &
Excel, excellent
organizational skills.
Able to multi-task.
High school diploma
/GED required.
Aoolv in Person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
*EOE"

Pavrul lip


Friends of Citrus County royilm ita CI
Animal Services
(FOCCAS) Local Contractor
is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit seeking exp. payroll
100% volunteer organi- clerk. With
nation formed in 2010 to payroll/accounting
assist in re-homing, exp. Must be
rescuing and providing proficient in Microsoft
for the medical needs Windows & Excel
of homeless pets spreadsheets. Also,
in Citrus County. knowledge of OSHA
For more info on events reporting, workers
projects and special comp., & all State &
needs dogs visit Gov. taxes for payroll.
www.fnriendsofccas.org Experience with Union
payroll is preferred.
Miss Sunshine Pop Looking for an
Star Music Pageant independent,
self-starter that is
Hey Girls! dependable,
Here's Your Chance organized & detailed.
Win $5,000 Cash, a Background check &
Recording Contract, DS required after
and Much More hiring. Qualified
Prizes! applicants email
18+ Only Call resume to:
(904) 246-8222 jrogers@
Cypress fandhcontractors
Records.com com


CHR$CL CHRICLE



I -SEEKINI


SSALES


REPRESENTS

Full-Time with Great

Do you have;

l outgoing person

Do you work well wit
Are your people

outstanding

3 Seeking dynamic individuals
:2 communication and compi
S Must be organized and detai
and thrive in a fast-paced er

Base salary plus comrr

Reliable vehicle ar
( valid driver's license re
If you light up a room whei
C apply today!

Send resume to
Sdjkamlot@chronicleonlir
Q Drug screen required for fine

EOE
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CONSTRUCTION
SECRETARY
Must be proficient w/
word, excel, & adobe
acrobat; organized,
personable and able
to multi task.Full time
position, DFWP











Notes.i
Send resume to
aDplicants(fftamoa












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966




Come grow with
us!
Busy medical office
needs experienced
people for fast-
paced team.
FT full benefits
including paid
health insurance,
401 k, PTO, paid
holidays and more!
Fully integrated EMR!
Professionalism in
appearance, de-
meanor and work
ethic a must. We
are a drug- and
smoke-freewkplace.
Currently we have a
need for:
w Nuclear RN to
monitor stress testing.
Experience in
stresses a plus. Must
read EKG's, ACLS
provided.
RVS Echo Tech to
conduct vascular
and echo studies.
r Billing Lead for
high volume billing
team. Monitor
charts, guide staff
and defend audits.
Previous supervisory
experience neces-
sary. CRC minimum,
CPCC commands a
premium wage!
w PT Admin Clerk to
obtain auths, sched-
ule patients, scan
charts, etc.
Highest level of
professionalism in at-
titude, appearance
and integrity. If you
want to work in an
environment of
mutual respect,
have a challenging
career and be part
of a high-performing
team, this is the
place for you!
If you want to work
with the best of the
best, send a cover
letter and your re-
sume with demon-
strated experience
to: jobs@
citruscardiology.org
fax 352-341-6885, or
visit: www.citrus
cardiology.org. No
phone calls please.


CHRfU~ff









rIVES

Benefits

n

lity?

otherss9

kills



vith strong
er skills.

d-oriented
'ironment.
ssion. <-


uired.

you enter,




3.com

applicant.



CHRQtff


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885



DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com


MEDICAL ASST
Needed for busy
family practice
Medical Office in
Citrus County.
Please Fax Resume
352-746-3838






*.NET Developer
with C# experience,
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com






Exp Bartender
wanted
apply in person:
T-Backs Bar
4591 N Carl G Rose
Hwy, Hernando
ask for Tammy







CSilsNiO4E

F/T Classified
Sales
Representative

Seeking A
self motivated
individual
with strong sales/
communication/
customer service
skills for our
Crystal River office
The position will
consist of:
+ placing ads from
our incoming call
center and to
walk-in customers
and upselling
products/services.
+ outbound cold
calling to increase
print and online
revenue.
+ process payments
/handle billing
inquiries for
Classified customers
Successful candi-
date must have
proficient typing
and computer skills,
able to multi-task.
Also ability to work
well in a team
environment.
Send resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


LOOKING FOR
Motivated,
Self- driven people
to prospect & sell
radio/tv advertising.
Must have strong ne-
gotiation skills, per-
suasive communica-
tor, enthusiastic,
able to develop &
keep relationships.
We offer a competi-
tive draw/ commis-
sion structure, bene-
fit package, 401 k,
etc. Media sales ex-
perience preferred,
but not required.
APPLY IN PERSON @
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto FL
34461 *EOE*






AC Service Tech
Apply at Air Care
Heating & Cooling Inc.
7745 W Homosassa
Trail Homosassa
Drug Free Work Place


Asphalt QC
Roadway Tech
Level II Cert. (CTQP)

CW ROBERTS
Wildwood
Fax Resume
352-330-2609
EOE/DFWP

Exp. Grant Writer
For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446

EXP. PLUMBER
Exp. in all 3 phases.
DONS PLUMBING
No Phone Calls
4184 Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto

Exp. Service
Technician/
Installer
Exeriencd only
Need for busy AC
comp. Must be EPA
certified. Must have
valid drivers license.
Apply Email: aarnc
@centurvlink.net
or fax 352-860-0757

Fuel &
Lubrication
Technician
Busy construction
company. Has
immediate opening for
qualified fuel lubrica-
tion person. Must have
a clean Class ACDL
with Hazmat &
Airbreak Endorse-
ments. Must be willing
to work overtime as
required. DFW.
Contact Tom at
(352)266-3325.





































CITRUS COUNTY
YMCA
The YMCA is now
hiring for a
School Age
Program
Senior Director

















to manage
operations for
before and after
school childcare for
11 elementary












schools. B.A. or B.S.
degree preferred.
Two years of
childcare and
ence required.
Apply online by
8am 5pamm






















5/23 at www.

ymcasuncoast.org.






DFWP/EOE
(352) -637-0 132.

CLEANING STAFF
Dys & Nights oAvil.








Call (352) 503-2043
or E-mail Resume:
staceyicitrus
cleanteam.com










COOK
Full-Time
Exp. Preferred










APPLY AT:
TheYMCAris now
Schioldarean
























611 Turner Camp Rd.
Seneorequirecto













Inveriness
befrendaftewww






















An F0 SAA
sEmployerl MFVDe
Ic lementamrco


degreePreferred.

e1 uncerequipred.
AplInlernessy
5/3at EEO/A
Emplunoyer, /F/V/


29-43 75 168
368219,547
7156 849 32
518:6 942 3 71j
4 7,2 1 5 3 6189
1 319 8 6 7 2;5'4
9 5 71413|1 82 6
8 4 15 26 7 9 3
6 2 3f7[98 4 1 5


Btjg
Grass Roots Lawn
Expert Shrub and lawn
person. Pay based on
Exp. Must have clean
license. 352-795-2287

Housekeeping
Person
Opening on house-
keeping staff at
Citrus Hills.
Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including
laundry, as well as
offices and models
as needed. Flexible
schedule to include
weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

Part-Time Front
Desk Reception
Busy sales office
needs receptionist,
schedule to include
weekends. Must
be friendly,
professional, have
excellent phone
skills and be
customer service
oriented.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd., Hernando, FL

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
*352-503-4930*

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F

Part-time


HOUSEKEEPERS
Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
now accepting
applications for
P/T housekeepers.
Aoolv in person at
505 E Hartford St
Mon-Sat from 2-5pm

parttime general
maintenance
Must be able to
work second shift &
have own vehicle.
Aoolv Tues-Fridav
@ 505 E Hartford St,
Hernando"




MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547









NOW
ENROLLING

Cosmetology
Day & Night School
Barber
Night School
Massage
Day & Night School

Nail & Skin Care
Day School
Starts Weekly
Night School
Mon-Tues-Wed
5:00PM-9:00PM
Campus Locations:
NEW PORT RICHEY
SPRING HILL
BROOKSVILLE
(727) 848-8415
www.benes.edu
START A CAREER
IN A YEAR


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 C9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CIO SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
S13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
S15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structureslic.com


ANTIQUE PATCH
QUILTS EARLY 1900S
ORIGINAL full size
many colors $100
352-270-3527



FLAT IRON WITH
STAND 1800S CHILDS
TOY black solid iron
3.5" x 2" x 2" $40
352-270-3527



IRON SKILLET 1800
CHILDS TOY horse n'
.qv'.' 'ft"tnm pan 4" x
S[4: : 70-3527








CRYSTAL Etched
STEMWARE Cham-
pagne, Wine, Water. 22
Elegant Pieces $85.
(352)513-5777



CRYSTAL Stemware 5
large wine etched leaf
design. Classically Ele-
gant. $40.
(352)513-5777


I#1 Employment source Is
ww.ch ron ici eonl lnecorn


Ultb
GOLD PLATED FLAT-
WARE SERVICE FOR
8 place setting 5pc +
serving utensils $100
352-270-3527
LLADRO Retired piece
(Unexpected Visit)
Beautiful, in box Call for
details,will text pic if
interested. $185 OBO.
352-586-3380
MICHAEL JACKSON
PLATINUM EDITION
COLLECTORS VAULT
A MUST HAVE ONLY
$25. 464-0316
WEDGEWOOD 14"
PLATTER OVAL
lavender grapes
on cream $90
352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD 9"
VEG DISH OVAL
lavender grapes on
cream $50
352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD
DESSERT DISHES 8
lavender grapes on
cream $60
352-270-3527
WEDGEWOOD
DISHES Plates 2 Dinner
$20 ea- 2 Salad $15 ea
352-270-3527




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Electric Range
Whirlpool 30 Self
Cleaning 1st $100
Takes it. Heavy Duty
Wheelbarrow $40
(352) 795-5519
Freezer
Kenmore 5.2 CF
upright, white used less
then 6 mo. Looks and
runs like new $185 obo
(352) 586-3380


GE Electric Oven
Black, self clean, flat
burners, good cond.
$200.(516) 456-0228
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL 12" x 14" x 4"
white good cond $15
352-270-3527
HARVEST MAID DEHY-
DRATOR New in plastic.
Expands to 30 trays.
Extras.$100
(203)509-7638
HARVEST MAID DEHY
DRATOR New in plastic.
Expands to 30 trays.
2 books & extras.$100
(203)509-7638
KENMORE DRYER
White, new bearing,
runs great. $100 firm.
Beverly Hills
(203)509-7638
Kenmore Refrigerator
Stove, Dishwasher
white, clean, like new
$1100.00
(352) 637-0765
or (352) 257-5779
KENMORE WASHER
Front loader, white, runs
great. $100 firm Beverly
Hills (203)509-7638
MICROWAVE
KENMORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $70
352-613-0529
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Ders. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
Used Electric
Jenn-Aire Cook Top
$50. and Microwave
$25. (352) 637-2450
Washer & Dryer
Kenmore,
$200
will sell separately
(678) 617-5560
Whirlpool Electric
Glass Top Stove
and
Microwave Almond
$125. for both
(352) 746-7366



SALON CHAIR
Black and chrome.
Shampoo/cutting chair.
$100 203-509-7638
SALON CHAIR
Black and chrome.
Shampoo/cutting chair.
$100 203-509-7638










DUDLEY'S
AUCM

TWO-AOCTONS

w5-8 Thurs ESTATE
ADVENTURE 3pm
outside: tools,
equip, furniture &
boxes of treasures
6pm inside Designer
furniture LR BR DR
like new, Cal King
waterbed,
Antiques+ 04'Ford
Van 87k mi. 09' KIA
Spectra 27K mi
-5-10 Sat ON SITE
Airboat Engine
Re-Mfg & Home
310 S Schmidt Ave
Inverness FL 34450
9am Full liquidation
of Business & shop-
equipment-tools-
engines-parts-
++ 3 BR home
furniture & contents

call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




Air Compressor
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. 220C,
125 PSI, used very little
$275. Call Al
(202) 425-4422 cell


CLASSIFIED



U =TRAR
STEEL WHEEL
BARROW 6 CUBIC
FT.NEEDS AIR IN TIRE
45.00 352-464 -0316
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80
HAND HELD MADE
OF METAL HEAVY
DUTY 419-5981



TV APEX 20" WITH
BUILT IN DVD PLAYER
& REMOTE $40
352-613-0529



Complete Galley
Kitchen Cabinets
incl. microwave, dish-
washer, sink & counter-
tops. $375. obo
(317) 947-8015
MISC. BUILDING MA
TERIALS 4 ft florescent
fixtures, 3 ft hanging
shop lite, 30 in. 6 panel
interior door, 18 & 24 in.
wood louvre doors,
metal closet shelving in-
cluding parts. All for
$75. (352)503-9181
STILTS FOR DOING
SHEET ROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316



17" LCD Computer
MONITOR Envision
works great. $30. Have
book and disc.
352-566-6589
STAND & DOCKING
STATION for Dell
Lattude/Inspiron/Precson lap-
tops $35 OBO
352-382-3650
SUCCESS SYSTEMS
10 cassettes n books
"Make more money in
your Bz" $20
352-270-3527




843 Bob Cat
$9,000. obo
(352) 302-5641



PATIO TABLE
FOLDING metal base
3'cir glasstop $30
352-270-3527
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
TABLE
Metal Circular
3'Glasstop
$50 352-270-3527



AFGANI RUG WOOL
reversible n washable
cream w/brown mosaic
design 8' x 5' $100
352-270-3527
Bureau & Dresser
w/ mirror solid wood,
maple color,
excellent condition
$180.
(352) 503-3446
Chromecraft
4 Dining Rm.
Arm Chairs, Swivel,
rollers, Beige,
$200
(352) 445-9448
COUCH
2 Cushions,
dark olive color
$125.
(352) 358-4800

CRYSTAL RIVER
Nature Coast
Ministries
YARD Sale
Saturday 8a-1p
*1 /2 price sale *
On entire store!!
1590 Meadowcrest
Blvd. Volunteers
Needed
Dining Room Set,
china cab. glass top
table w/ 4 chairs
& buffet cabinet
excellent cond. $500.
2 CHAIRS, 1 recliner, 1
swivel $50. ea.
Moving 631-398-5946


DIT ABLE LD
ING metal base 3'cir
glasstop $30
352-270-3527
DINING TABLE
Metal base 3' circular
glasstop $50
352-270-3527
Four rooms of furniture
/furnishings for sale.
Please call for appt.
352-746-0008
Lane Cedar Chest
$75.
(352) 726-7902
LIVING ROOM SEC-
TIONAL two pic. moss
gray/green exc. cond.
asking $89
352-467-1017
New Serta King
Euro Mattress Set
double sided,
Presidential Suite II,
$875. (352) 270-8917
Oak Dining room set
oval table w/ folding
leaf, 6 chairs and
pretty hutch w/ glass
doors. $2000 new,
never used. Asking
$1100. Two decorative
wood benches $75
ea. Moving must sell.
(352) 513-4427
PLANT STAND GREEN
METAL 3 shelves 5' x 2'
$25 352-270-3527
Queen Size Mattress
& Box Spring $100.
2 Sofa Beds $100. ea.
will separate
Moving 631-398-5946
Queen sz. Futon
Forest Green, Pine
w/clear finish, con-
verts from couch to
bed, like new, $200.
(352) 628-3526
Sleeper Sofa & Love
Seat, Exc Cond,
Country Blue
Tufted Camelback
solid oak trim $395
(352) 726-1526
Thomasville Califor-
nia King Sz. Bed, w/
pillowtop mattress,
dresser, 2 mirrors
night table, armoire,
dark mahogany
great cond. extra
sheets/ comforter
$350 (352) 637-6284
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50. *
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TWO MATCHING
LOVE SEATS very
good condition $100.
(352)527-1399
WICKER BASKET
CHEST/TABLE iron feet
3' x 2' x 2' misc uses
$100 352-270-3527
WICKER BROWN
RECTANGULAR WITH
LID 18"x 18" x 12" misc
uses $25 352-270-3527



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
BOLENS 13.5 HP
RIDING MOWER 38"
Front Mount, Briggs/St.
Great Cond. 4 yrs. old
$400.
(352) 270-4087
BRONZE gobblers a
breading pair of Bronze
adult Gobblers $99
please call
352-564-1017
CRAFTSMAN 17.5
LAWN TRACTOR 42"
Automatic Trans.
Clean and Rebuilt
$400.
(352) 270-4087
Craftsman
Riding Mower
42" deck, 15 HP Kolar
eng, grass catcher &
trlr, $700 352-746-7357
a, GRASS SEEDS!!
Pensacola Bahia
Argentine Bahia
Summer Rye
Great Prices!
American Farm &
Feed (352) 795-6013
SEARS CRAFTSMAN
42" cut, 1 yr old, bag
system, used twice,
$750. (352) 637-4718
YARDMAN 46" auto-
matic, 20HP, Kohler,
exc. cond. $900
(352) 637-4718


MEXICAN PETUNIAS
Pink & Purple
in 4 inch pots
6 for $10 Off Croft Rd
613-5818

PLANT STAND
GREEN METAL 3
shelves 5' x 2' $25
352-270-3527



PLANTS & TREES
Unusual flowering
evergreen perenni-
als...$3 and up. Fruit
trees, figs, persim-
mons, Loquat,
Pomegranite &
more, $5 off.
352-628-0156
surialpaca@yahoo.
com


ROSE OF SHARON
2 Year Old Seedlings
Mixed Colors 3 for
$12/$5 ea lnv. Off Croft
Rd 613-5818














ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE

CH pNIaE

CLASSIFIED

a, Call your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966


must self
BEVERLY HILLS
37 S. Davis St.
5/10&5/11 8am to noon
Moving sale, house-
wares, tools, welding
equip, Ford van, piano


BEVERLY HILLS
BIG YARD SALE *
Fri. & Sat. 8am-?
15 S. Washington St.


BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs, Fri, Sat 8am-2pm
Collectibles, Hsehold,
kids clothes, & more
*New items Daily *
8 S Columbus St


BEVERLY HILLS
Thurs. Fri. & Sat., 9a-3p
MOVING SALE *
871 Star Jasmine Pl.


CITRUS HILLS
Sat. 10th, 8a-12pm
Furniture, hshld. items
331 W. Massachusetts


CITRUS SPRING
Fri & Sat 8am-3pm
Furn, records, jewelry
tools, and Misc items
6493 N. Glacier Terr


CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri, Sat. 9a to 3p
HUGE YARD SALE!!
hunting equip, trailer,
record player &
records, golf clubs
Ping Nicholas, Harvey
Penick putters,
toys & lots more!
follow red arrows from
Cumberland Farms


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri, 8 3, Sat, 8 1,
'93 Linc Tn Car, New 3
whl. golf cart/balls
Furn, antiqs, kids, teen
clothes/toys, hsehold
808 N Venturi Ave,7 rvr


CRYSTAL RIVER
8:00-3:00PM
10795 W Spring Circle
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 8am-Until
3 FAMILY SALE
6125W. Woodside Cir.

CRYSTAL RIVER
Nature Coast
Ministries
YARD Sale
Saturday 8a-lp
/2 price sale *
On entire store!!
1590 Meadowcrest
Blvd. Volunteers
Needed

Crystal River
Sat. May 10, 8a-?
2 Famn. Newer items &
Misc. 19N to 488,
2.5 mi to Ira Martin,
follow signs.

DUNNELLON
Fri & Sat 8a-5p
HUGE SALE *
computer parts
galore, boat top
cover & accessories,
lawn equip, 2 gar-
den tractors, tools,
craftsman toolbox,
new well water
pump, antique bolt
cutter, new Skil bis-
cuit plate joiner, lad-
ders, tires, ceramic
planters, marble top
end tables,
knick-knacks, pic-
tures/ frames & too
much more to list.
3837 SW Pompano rd
Rainbow Lake Est.

HERNANDO
Fri, Sat.& Sun
8am to ?
furn, tools, lawn
equipment etc..
5379 E Marsh Lake Dr

HERNANDO
MOVING SALE *
Thurs. Fri, Sat, 8a-5p
Tools, lawn equip.
shelving, & More
Everything must go!
6654 N Silverbell Ter

HERNANDO
Saturday 8a-2p
481 Highview Ave
INVERNESS
BIG YARD SALE
Fri. & Sat. 8-4:30.
5942 E. Calico Lane


^sl^r Z, wk


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625
Will Provide Trips to
Appointments,
Grocery Stores, ETC.
JOAN (352) 382-8802




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873


A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
# 39765, 352-513-5746
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 *-k*
FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020
OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
**ABOVE ALL**
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail


47



I
K
Kas
ting


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Licl/Ins 352-795-5755

Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442

Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873


Landscaping

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086


76-4202; 697-1625 #1 Professional Leaf
. Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273

at's Kritter Kare & AFFORDABLE LAWN
stle Kleaner, Pet Sit- CARE Cuts $10 & Up
g & House Cleaning Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
*563-9824, 228-7320

Bonbon Cleaning,
K Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
; Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
(352) 270-4672 Free Est. 352-302-5641


FHnH and HrM...Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
SDringa Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING, TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166


NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



vbASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397


A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919




Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Clean View: Pressure
washingwindowsodd
jobs, Free Est. 407-591
-7572 or 352-860-3820
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748




All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441





NATURE COAST RV
RV service, parts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.

SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.


ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins

Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852


Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873


R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827


REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418


RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566


RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825






SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066






344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


I 'I


pr .,M#

HERMAN'
by Universal UChick for UFS, 2014


5-10 LaughingStock International Inc Dis


L I I L,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
Sat. only, 9AM-? Lots
of collectibles, tread-
mill, exercise bike,
Christmas stuff, etc.
845 S. Rooks Ave.
INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help
feed veterans
INVERNESS
Yard sale, Fri. & Sat.
8am-2pm Furn., tools,
adult & youth wheel
chairs, walkers,
household items,
women's clothes, auto
tow dolly & lots more
good stuff. 5725 E.
Avon St., West on Holly
off Apopka, or East on
Arbor off Pleasant
Grove. Follow signs.
No sales before 8am
LECANTO
Saturday Only 8a-2p
Collectibles, crafts &
sewing supplies, Furn,
Hsehold, Ladies bike,
Misc. Rain or Shine
1075 N Carney Ave-

PINE RIDGE
Fri & Sat 8a-3p
Tools, Colltibles, More
5747 N Pecanway
PINE RIDGE
Fri. 9 & Sat. 10, 8:30-?
HUGE 3 FAMILY SALE
VARIETY OF ITMES
4842 W. Pontiac Place



American Trading
Post Has been Hired
*to Liquidate*
HUGE ESTATE SALE
85 Sycamore Circle
Sugarmill Woods
Thurs, Fri, Sat.
8am to 2pm
turn, appliances,
hshld, tools, etc...
NOW ACCEPTING
CREDIT CARDS
HOMOSASSA
Fri & Sat 8a-4p
1581 S Trellis Dr




ALPACA SWEATERS
100% Baby Alpaca
Sweaters $129
Alpaca Socks $12
Great gifts for Mom
352-628-0156
surialpaca@yahoo.co
m
DESIGNER SUITS
SIZE 12 AND 14 excel
cond black navy blue
white $20 ea
352-270-3527
LADIES TOPS 50 Pcs
Ladies Tops, size Med
& Large $2 ea.
Ill 352-476-7516



CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/case, Con-
sumer Cellular or unlock
$28 352-382-3650



2 CRAB TRAPs- coated
metal trap, 24" x 24" x
18" tall, Ex., $20 each.
(352)628-0033
2 PIN FISH METAL
TRAPS- 24" x 18" x8"
and 18"x 14"x 11", $20
each, (352)628-0033
3 VISION & 1 PYREX
COOKWARE- Cran-
berry, sauce, casserole,
double boiler, cake pan,
$30. 628-0033
8 FT. RADIUS
CASTING NET-
16 ft. diameter,
1/2" mesh, Ex., $40.
(352)628-0033
8 PC COMFORTER
SET Like New 8 Pc
Comforter Set, $50, Lil
352-476-7516
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS
ANIMALS @ HEARTS
$15 PAINT/DECORATE
419-5981
30 qt. Turkey fryer
w/45,000 BTU gas
burner $85.
Motorcycle or ATV
Jack, $60.
(352) 564-0726
2015 TAMPA BAY
NCAA FINAL FOUR
PIN $40 WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
419-5981
225/75R -16
Goodyear light truck tire
GREAT SHAPE ONLY
$50 (352)464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80. 464-0316
AAA MAPS US CAN-
ADA 50 states n all
Canada provinces $1
ea 352-270-3527
ADVENT (REMOTE)
STEREO SPEAKER.
TAKES D BATTERIES
ONLY 40.00
352.464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


BEANIE BABY-
BONGO THE MONKEY
Price: $10
(352)465-1616
BOAT OARS- pair,
Feather Brand, 60
inches long, new, $40.
(352)628-0033
BOOKS FL REAL ES-
TATE STOCK MAR-
KET, Options, Futures,
Books, tapes etc $5-
$10 ea (352)270-3527
BREATHABLE CAR
COVER MEDIUM SIZE
CHEVY IMPALA ONLY
25.00 352-464-0316
BROTHER FAX
MACHINE WORKS
GREAT ONLY 40.00
3524640316
Craftsman Lawn
Tractor, 18HP 42"
elect, start $650. obo
GE Freezer
7 cu ft., $75.
(352) 503-9450
CUISINART FOOD
PROCESSOR DLC-10E
$50 COMPLETE WITH
4 EXTRA BLADES
419-5981
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH
LIGHTS HOLDS 31"
TV WHITE WASHED
$40 352-613-0529
FIBERGLASS HARD
SIDED PET CAGES
ONE 18"BY. 24" 30.00
ONE 12" BY 18" 25.00
352-464-0316
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
WOOD $25
352-613-0529

THIS OUT!
** *** *

GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!M

** *** *

6 lines
10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50

** *** *

GUN SHOW
CRYSTAL RIVER
ARMORY
8551 W Venable St.,
Crystal River, FL
Sat. May, 10, 9-5
Sun. May 11, 9-4
Concealed Weap-
ons Classes Daily
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
HANDCRAFTED SOLID
OAK ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE $55 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
HARLEY STOC
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY
$75 (352)464-0316
NEW NUTONE
MEDICINE CABINET
$15 STAINLESS
STEEL FRAME
RECESSED 419-5981
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $5 EACH
352-613-0529
Restaurant dinner-
ware, New. Oneida. 10
boxes of 12 pcs. ea.
$100. (352)503-2373
RIGID DIG EZ POST
HOLE DIGGER- profes-
sional grade, fiberglass
handles, Ex. $35.
628-0033
SAFE WITH Combo
CODE $75
(352)302-5468
SAFEWAZE CLIMBING
HARNESS & 6' LAN-
YARD- excellent condi-
tion, $75. 352-628-0033
STAINED GLASS
LAMP SHADES, pair,
neutral colors, scalloped
edges, $80, Call
(352)465-1813
TIRES
4 General Amer-trac
Load range E, 95%
tread, 235-85-16
$200 firm
352-228-7715
TRAILER HITCH FOR
DODGE OR CHRYS-
LER VAN 05-07 ONLY
$85. (352)464-0316
Twin Bed
$50. obo
Electric Chainsaw
$40. obo
(352) 249-7064



MANICURE TABLE 4
drawers, lamp and stool.
Like new.$100 firm.
203-509-7638
MANICURE TABLE 4
drawers, lamp and stool.
Like new.$100.
203-509-7638


l
4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 PRONGED CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND BAG
ONLY $70. 464-0316
Aluminum Ramp
for a wheelchair
36" x40" $100.
Inflatable electric twin
mattress cover, $30.
(352) 726-5070
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85. (352)464-0316
Electric Mobility Chair
Rascal Model R6-300
Like New, $1200
Cell (786) 523-4637
Larger Electric
Wheelchair,
leather, good
condition, $450. obo
(352) 746-1044
NEW SHOWER CHAIR
WITH BACK. ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS FIBER-
GLASS ONLY $30.
(352)464-0316
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY $50.
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316
Traveling Wheelchair
$50.
Hospital Bedside Table
$25.
(352) 205-7973



"NEW"$75!! ACOUS-
TIC BRAND LEAD GUI-
TAR AMP G35FX
ONBOARD EFFECTS
(352)601-6625
5 STRING BANJO
RESONATOR BACK,
30BRACKETS,PLAYS&SOU
NDSGREAT!$75
352-601-6625
$50 "NEW"SG STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
LOOKS, PLAYS,
SOUNDS GREAT!
(352)601-6625
DRUM SET, complete,
cymbals, high hat, dual
toms, floor tom, paid
$400, asking $200
(352) 419-2442
PIANO JANSSEN
SPINET GOOD
CONDITION
$100.00 OR BEST
OFFER (352) 249-9144
STUDENT/TRAVEL
LAP STEEL ELECTRIC
LOOKS, PLAYS,
SOUNDS GREAT $50.
(352)601-6625



2 PIECE BROILER PAN
LIKE NEW $15 SMALL
COUNTER TOP
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL $8. 419-5981
AEROBED TWIN -one
click inflation and quick
deflation, adjustable,
$40. 634-2004
AEROBED TWIN -one
click inflation and quick
deflation, adjustable,
$40. 634-2004
DISHES Fine China. 38
pieces includes large
platter.Excellent condi-
tion. $98.
(352)513-5777
HALOGEN DESK
LAMP Black, Hi/Lo set
50W $35 OBO can
email pic 352-382-3650



ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
$100. (352)464-0316
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
SIT UP BENCH 6'x16
black. Can hook over
bar for inverted sit ups.
$35 Beverly Hills
(203)509-7638
SIT UP BENCH 6'x16"
Commercial size. Black.
Great shape. $40 Bev-
erly Hills (203)509-7638
Weider Weight Bench
$35.
(352) 564-0726



12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60.
464-0316


2002 VOLVO CIO
CONVERTIBLE $6,995

4IS I'm[ S I

....... .. . HERE


owned Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF DRIVER 2013
RocketBallz Clone mrh
Grafalloy Reg EXC $85.
Dunnellon 465-8495
GOLF IRONS Adams
Idea mrh 7&8 graphite
new grips $15ea
$25pair Dunnellon
465-8495
GOLF WOODS MRH #7
#9 Graphite Good Grips
and Head Covers
$15ea $25pair
Dunnellon 465-8495

GUN SHOW
CRYSTAL RIVER
ARMORY
8551 W Venable St.,
Crystal River, FL
Sat. May 10, 9-5
Sun. May 11, 9-4
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASSES
DAILY
GunTrader
GunShows.com
352-359-0134
INSTEP BIKE TRAILER
Seats 2, with rain cover.
Folds Compact,100lb
capacity.$60.00
352-795-9649
MEN'S SCHWINN DEL-
MAR BIKE- 26", 1 spd,
comfort ride, black, like
new, $80.
(352)628-0033
METAL HUNTER
GREEN GUN SAFE
$100 (352)302-5468
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
WILSON WOMEN'S
GOLF CLUBS
Set of Power Chamber
Golf Clubs, plus extras.
$75.00 352 795-9649
WOODEN GUN CABI-
NET $100
(352)302-5468
Yamaha '00 GolfCart
Canvas Enclosure
New Batteries $2288.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678



Enclosed 5x8,
v-nose, w/ramp door,
holds 46" mower or 1
or 2 cycles, like new
$1500. firm
(352) 513-5436
Haulmark 6x12
'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand
New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday "
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



RV CORD ADAPTER
18 INCH NEW 30 amp
Female to 50 amp Male
w/Power Lt. $10
352-382-3650


Robin Long
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.
"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.


CLASSIFIED




ALLA/ectnJ'
ALPACAS Open
House
Pet/fleece quality
males $400 & up
Females start at
$1,200. Great gift for
Mom 352-628-0156
surialoacai
vahoo.com


BUD
Looking for new
best friend? Here's
Bud, beautiful
red/white terrier mix,
heartworm- nega-
tive, housebrkn. Wt.
33 Ibs. Very friendly,
walks well on a
leash. Thinks he's
a lapdog. Should
be only dog in the
home. Call Joanne
@352-795-1288
or 352-697-2682.
FREE KITTENS Two
male kittens 8 weeks
old. Fully weaned, litter
trained,healthy and
ready for a forever
home. 352-212-2094
FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
German Rottweiller
Pups, 4 females 4 Sale
good temperament,
going to be LARGE
dogs! $500. each
(352) 422-6792






r


GINGER
beautiful 1.5 y.o.
Dutch Shepherd
mix, spayed, HW
negative, house-
brkn. High energy,
needs strong leader
w/knowledge of
breed. Loves daily
walksw/jogger/
runner. Best as only
pet in home without
young kids.
Stunning dog.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908







GROVER
Grover, cutest face
ever! Boxer/terrier
mix, 1 y.o., appears
housebrkn, Wt. 39
Ibs. Gets along well
with other dogs
and also cats! Not
treated well by
prev. owner, still
sweetest & most
loveable dog
you could find.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.










JENSEN
3-4 y.o. American
Bulldog, 50 Ibs,
beautiful red &
white. Appears
housebroken, walks
well on leash.
Knows certain com-
mands. Very
friendly & loves
people, best as only
dog in the home.
Would be a great
family member &
perfect companion.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.


JENSEN
3-4 y.o. American
Bulldog, 50 Ibs,
beautiful red &
white. Appears
housebroken, walks
well on leash.
Knows certain com-
mands. Very
friendly & loves
people, best as only
dog in the home.
Would be a great
family member &
perfect companion.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.
MIN PIN PUPPIES
2 Blue, 2 Fawn,
1 Chocolate 15 inch
10-15 Ibs, Health Certs
CKC. $1,200-$1,400.
(352) 503-7919
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day



16 in Black Wintec
Saddle; Exc Cond,
never used $799
(352) 513-5547



BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
S1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/2, Privacy, 5 Acres
alarm sys. $475. mo
352-464-3136, 464-3499
HOMOSASSA
Furnished Dbl. Wide, /2
acre 2BD/2BA carport,
scrn. por., Nice $650
+ Dep. 352 628-1723
HOMOSASSA
unfurn. 2/2w/enclosed
back porch, shed w/
WD hkup., clean, pri-
vate, almost /2 acre,
3771 S. Millston Pt.
$495.mo 352-503-6703
INVERNESS
1/1, $375/mo 1st, last
sec. Pets negotiable
9929 E Bass Circle
(352) 212-3385



$12,000
In Homosassa
2Br/1Ba 1982 SW
NO HIDDEN FEES!
Includes Delivery
1-727-967-4230
2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183
NEW NEW NEW
1460 Sq ft 3/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $60k
352-795-2377
NEW NEW NEW
MUST SEE
2036 Sq ft 4/2
No Hidden Fees
Incls: Delv, Set-up, A/C
Heat, Skirt, Steps,
Furn & Decor $70k
352-795-2377
Palm Harbor Homes
limited time offer
$5k towards any
exterior package.
We have 24 wide,
26, 28 and 30 wide
homes. 3 stock units
reduced 26k, Homes
from the $60's.
nlantcitv.
nalmharbor.com
or 800-622-2832
Se habla espanol

SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$1 1,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.


2014 NAUTIC STAR
243 DECK BOAT IN
Yamaha F200XA Four Stroke, Stereo
-Tandem Axle Al uminum Trailer ilr~ 111111"

$49P9QQ
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


LEFTOVER- MUST GO!CAYkd8N6

2013 Nautic Star
2000XS Offshore
Yamaha F150TXR Four Stroke [ Livewell
Tandem Torsion Axle Aluminum Trailer w/Brakes
Was $39,900 S37,600
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


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CHOOSE CAR SEAT:
BYAGE & SIZE


THE NUMBER

OF PEOPLE



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THEIR CHILD

IN THE RIGHT

SEAT. 4






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KNOW FOR SURE
IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.


VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT













n NHTSA Child Car
(Ll &" I Safety
VJLJU H ~l www.nhtsa.tKW


We Sell Te at
CRYTAmRVERMAIN


SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 Cll


WORDYv UR DYn .....

WORDY GIJRD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Far-from-fast fawn's mother (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
|and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Smooch Kim Kardashian's mother (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Evenhanded mother of Chaz Bono (1) syllables in each word.

I I1 1 1 1 12014J FS, Dist. byUniv, Uclck forJUFS
4. Bash a den mother's Cub charge (1)


5. Lisa Simpson's mom's T-shirt sizes (2)


6. Caroline Kennedy's mom's casual pants (2)

1 1 1 i i i ~r 0 1 1 11
7. Nursery rhyme Old Mother sobbed (2)

1 1 1 I I I I 0 1 1 I I I I I I I
aaallIml a a nntH 'svL SIXVHn saixw *o9 sanVl saovw *s
I5-S LfIO013 I* I TaHT TIVa TSIH HSSI '-z ao(I OU s 'it
5-10-14 saHMSNV




C12 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014


FLORAL CITY
2/1 Cent H/A,
1st, last, $525 mo.
(352) 419-5154



-FLORAL CITY 3/2"
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
3/2 WATERFRONT,
DOUBLEWIDE
$75.900.
10480 S. McClung Lp.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000

LA I I 1

Hernando
15 minutes to
Ocala/ Hernando;
5 min to fishing
3/2 w/land. $49k obo
(352) 795-1272
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on '/2 acre." Mint"
Cond. $500/mo. $1500
clsng cost. 5k dwn. Nw
tile/wd fir. & pnt. 0/F avi.
(352)422-6974
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2BA, Fully fur-
nished, Great Location
Drastically Reduced
(352) 746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on /2 acre
5192 S Amanda PT
$15,000 212-2051
HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/1' BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds
3901 Sonny Ter
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330
OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807


-I.
d 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezer. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441

For SaWe 0
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-
tivated seller will neaoti-


Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273
Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
furn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern 2/1 homes
from $7500 or Lease to
Own from $145/mo.
$700.down + Lot
rent of $265. mo.
10 yr. payoff at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional
55+Park 352 628-5977
Nice Older Singlewide
in Singing Forest Adult
Park, has addition
and partially furn.
Low Lot Rent
$18,300 obo
352-726-9369



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640





_ ACTION7
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S925 & UNDER
$900-3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/ unique hiome/Avail. May 1
$850-3094 N Satin Flower Ter
2/2/2 BH spacious home
$925-Meadowcrest Villa
2/2/1 nice split plan
$700-1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 stoytownhomne, canal side

S675 & UNDER
$650-7096 N Dawson Dr.
2/2 mobile Hernando
$675-6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2 Bedroom, 2 Both
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/add ion on 1.25 acre
For More Listings Go To
www.CitrusCountyHoneRentals.com


EFurnshed

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514




US 19 Office-$550.
office/warehouse
1/b-1ba $1200. util.
incl. 352-634-0129


i~

CITRUS HILLS
2 story condo 2 bd/2/2
ba, fully furnished
w/social membership
(352) 201-7229
CITRUS HILLS
212, Furnished.
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242



HOMOSASSA
2/2 Duplex Lrg. Fam
Rm. carport. $650. mo
incl'ds water, & lawn
Care. 352-302-8265
INVERNESS
2/1 Brand New, Upscale
$599. (786)405-3503



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225




HOMOSASSA
1/1, Duplex $435. mo.
C. Riv. 3/2 House $650
1st.& Sec. 212-4981



CRYSTAL RIVER
3/B $850., sec. $450.
Fenced Yd.563-9857



Beverly Hills
2 BR,1 BA; $675/mo,
1st month free.
(352)442-7794
BEVERLY HILLS
3BR, IBA, $650 mo
Extremely Clean,
352-461-4518



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225


DEB
THOMPSON
One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
w Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebivahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination. Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






ForIk


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE
GH1pnLE



CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL!

30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


CLASSIFIED



Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514








Open floor plan built
in 2005 on 1+ Acres.
3 beige rugged BR's ,
2 tiled baths, 2 car
garage with ladder to
attic. Eat in Kitchen,
LR, DR, & inside laun-
dry. Eight appliances
installed new in 2012;
elec glass top range,
micro, refnrig (bottom
freezer) dishwasher
(never used) washer
& dryer. Each bath
has new low flow high,
elongated toilets.
Three ceiling fans with
globed lights, newly
painted interior/ext.,
Guest BR's have
sliding mirror closet
doors. MBR has sepa-
rate his/her walk-in
closets with closet
made shelving, duel
sinks, glass
enclosed tile area with
waterfall shower head
& bench seat, jetted
spa tub, & private
toilet. Plantation
shutters in LR, DR w/
wood planked vinyl;
tiled kitchen and entry
way. 10 x 30 rocked
area next to garage
for boat or other
vehicle space.
$2500 cash allowance
at closing for outside
planting
Must sell
Relocating
$173,000
Furniture for sale
too 352-513-5202
PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870



Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282


Home

2/2/2 on 1 acre
Family Room,
updated items, patio,
12x20 shed,
etc. $138,500.
(352) 419-6327





For SaleB,,,.
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084




3/2/2 + Den On acre,
Move in Condition!
Built in 2008
Selena Hills
$165,000.
352-341-0118





Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
BOUTIQUE
Real Estate Group
Buying or Selling?
We Tailor Our
Services.
Teri Paduano, Broker
352-341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
119 E. DampierSt.,
Inverness
TheFLDream.com




Nice private 1200sqft
home w/scrd patio,
carport & security lights.
Close to fishing, boat-
ing & gulf, $42,000 obo
As is. (786) 301-3805


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY II!




4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


3/2/2 Sugarmill Woods
$119.900.
1 Fig Court W.
OWNER FINANCING
Agent (352) 382-1000


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.






"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscrittffers.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward I"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bioowell@
netscaoe.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments




Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!



A


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatoneldtamoabav.rr.
com
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.wattO
centurv21.com

Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515









SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855









[I

Tony
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com






#I Employment
#1 source is...




jw chronicleoninecr


ALL OFFERS

GOOD

MAY3

THRU

MAY 31,

2014


2431 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448


www.VILLAGETOYOTA.com


Sales:

Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm

Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm

Sun 11lam-4pm

Service:

Mon-Fri: 7am-6pm

Sat: 8am-4pm


352-628-5100


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONCiLE


Hme


Hme
^^3'^^^t^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 C13


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!









Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments







$100,000 + Closing
Cost wll get you this
2,100 sq. ft.,
3BR 31/2 BA Fully turn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268







"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921


Floral City, nice 3/2
open view on Duval
Isl. owner fin. w/15 k
down, 15yrs @ 6%
call Justin Monahan
352-697-0240
ERA American Realty


-P


Oak Forest, Floral City
1 acre corner lot off
S Fern Pt. High & Dry.
City Water, Home site
only. Price Reduced
$14,500 352- 678-7145





SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066





** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
352-563-5510"*


ACHILLES
Inflatable boat
12'4", 25HPYamaha,
aluminum fl, on trlr,
garaged, used little
fresh water only. All
accessories $4300 obo
(352) 697-5677

BOAT TRAILER
Aluminum, NEW 2014
18 -20 FT, w/tortion
axle, folding tonque,
LED lights, and disc
brakes all below cost
@ $2,195. Open Mon.
Wednesday & Friday
Only(352) 527-3555

CAROLINA SKIFF
2011, J 16, center con-
sole, 25HP, 4 stroke
Mercury, 2013 trlr.
$8700 obo
(352) 697-2323


Waterfron
iHomesIij


CAROLINA SKIFF
21' 2001 DLX115Su-
zuki 4 stroke. New
power head. $9,000.
Dave (352)563-1265
KEY WEST
2010, 177 Skiff, Honda
60HP, 4 strk. w/warr.,
Lots of storage, 8ft,
pwr. pole, 801b 24 V
troll, mtr. w/charger,
S/S prop, swim
platform w/ ladder,
2 live wells, Garmin FF
Compass, Forward
casting seat $12,995.
(352) 628-5545
SCOUT 17'C.C.
90HP Yamaha (low
hours) Alum trlr, New
GarminGPS, Cplotter
very clean, gar kept
$9200 (352) 795-5519
SCOUT 17'C.C.
90HP Yamaha (low
hours) Alum trlr, New
GarminGPS, Cplotter
very clean, gar kept
$9200 (352) 795-5519













Sportscraft 88
27' Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
Starcraft
16' aluminum
40 hp Johnson
$600.
(352) 419-4733
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com

Recreation

Break Buddy
w/accessories and
owners manual
$250
(352) 344-2161
TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River,
18ft L. 8ft wide, Living
quarters w/beds mi-
crowave, stove, refrig.
sink, bthrm., awning,
dish TV ready, full
backramp, Pd $18K
Asking $10,500 obo
(352) 422-5622
WE BUY RVS,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



NATURE COAST RV
RV service. parts. sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
STAR CRAFT
2005 Pop-up Camper
Electric lift, frig, air,
stove + outside grill
$3750; 352-613-9627


I L L c


Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED!!!
cars, trucks, RV's,
vans, boats, trailers,
tractors, etc.
for INVERNESS
MOTORS & SHEDS
@ NEW LOCATION!
Rt 44 across from
Times Square- call
Bob@ 352-341-0090
eeeeeeee*
SEE AL for CARS &
SHEDS@ Hernando
location corner
of 486 and 41

SELLING OUT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


LQok
Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794, Call AJ
813-458-0584



ACURA MDX
2006, exc. cond.
$14,000
(352) 513-4759

B.H.P.H.
May Special

'97 Ford Taurus
$650 Down
'98 Chevy Cavalier
$650 Down
'00 Pontiac Gr. Am.
$650 Down
'00 Mitsubishi
Galant
$650 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl

BUICK
92 Roadmaster Estate
Wagon, a/cp/w, seats
loaded, 350 fuel inj.
engine, runs good
$1800. (352) 628-6615
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018


Saturday 9am
Furn, hsehold, clothing
Ladies size Lg, Exc
Cond, cookbook coll.
1112 N Mediterranean
Way






DUDLEY'S
TWO-'ACTIONS
u5-8Thurs ESTATE
ADVENTURE 3Dm
outside: tools,
equip, furniture &
boxes of treasures
6Dm inside Designer
furniture LR BR DR
like new, Cal King
waterbed,
Antiques++ 04'Ford
Van 87k mi. 09' KIA
Spectra 27K mi
w 5-10 Sat ON SITE
Airboat Engine
Re-Mfg & Home
310 S Schmidt Ave
Inverness FL 34450
9am Full liquidation
of Business & shop-
equipment-tools-
engines-parts-
++ 3 BR home
furniture & contents
call for info 637-9588
dudlevsauction.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US415) Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.

FORD
94 Mustg. GT, Cony.
5.0 eng. rebuilt trans.
garg. kept, great body
$3200 Firm 746-4620
--- ---



I


SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE



CLASSIFIED

**3 SPECIALS **
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

0 Call your
Classified
representative
for details.
352-563-5966
L------ J

SELLING OUT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44,CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

Classic
VehiclesH


CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018


I


CHEVROLET -
94 CORVETTE, CONV.
very clean, only 50k
mi. NADA $12,500.
$9500. (352) 419-4970





-Tm


n



11111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111




CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018
GMC
02, 1500 Sierra/Denali
AWD, exc. condition
82k mi. $14,500.
(352) 637-0765

Larry's Auto Sales
1955S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333
BUY HERE, PAY HERE
2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down
2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down
'91 F150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down
'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van, 5.7, V-8,
Auto, $995 down




KIA
2005 Sportage EX
V6,auto, silver, sunroof,
garaged dealer maint.
$5900. (352) 382-9920
SUBARU
FORESTER
2013 Subaru Forester
2.5X Limited with 14,000
miles. Options include:
climate control,
AM/FM/CD audio, steer-
ing wheel audio con-
trols, Bluetooth hands
free phone, cruise con-
trol, tilt wheel, power
door locks and mirrors,
power windows, power
drivers seat, leather
seats, heated front
seats, roof rails, power
moonroof, all-wheel
drive, ABS, TPMS,
anti-theft alarm, back-up
camera, puddle light kit
and splash guard kit
and remaining warranty.
Price: $23,800, Call:
352-601-1319
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018


CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
HONDA
'07, Odyssey, EXL
144K miles
excel, cond. $9500
(352) 563-1680
HONDA
2004 Odyssey model
EX-L,V6 3.5 Liter ,New
Transmission, Brakes,
Belts, Timing Chain,
Water Pump, Spark
Plugs. FR&R A/C.
leather seats, DVD
player w remote & wire-
less headphones,
Premium Sound AM/FM
Stereo cassette & Cd
Player Excellent
Condition.
$6,000
352-726-7745



2006 Suzuki
650 Burgman with trike
kit, 4,700mi, lots of
extra's $8000 obo
(352) 637-4429
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
Harley Davidson
2014, Heritage, soft
tail, black, factory
opt. + accessories,
1000 miles, serviced.
Title in hand $17,500.
(352) 601-2240




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Properly Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-


Harley Davidson
100th Anniversary
2003 Heritage Soft tail
classic, lots of access.,
exc cond., 10,500 mi.
$12,000 352-513-4759
Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr, SS eng,
trophy winner $ 12k
obo 727-439-0068
HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
2003 Scooter, model
Reflex, great
condition $1800
(352) 765-4011
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990
'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999




sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April


277-0510 SACRN
5/12 PUBLIC MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Sheriff's Office of Citrus County,
Florida, will be continuing collective bargaining talks with The Professional Firefighter
of Citrus County, Local 4562 on May 12, 2014 at the Withlacoochee Technical Insti-
tute located at 1201 W Main St, Rm 208, Inverness, FL 34450 beginning at 9:00 a.m.
These discussions are open to the public.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Human Resources Office, 1 Dr
Martin Luther King Jr Ave, Inverness, Fl 34450, (352)726-4488 a minimum of two days
prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone.
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE: May 10, 2014


276-0510 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned has
intent to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713 78 The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding
on the premises where said
vehicles) have been stored
and are located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
4212W Hwy 44,
Lecanto, FL 34461
DOS: 05-21-14@8AM


1997 MERC VIN#
2MELM75W8VX645994
1996 LINC VIN#
1LNLM81W9TY703567
DOS: 05-22-14@8AM
1986 DODG VIN#
1B7FD04HOGS023467
DOS: 05-23-14@8AM
1999 BUIC VIN#
1G4CU5219X4655342
DOS:06-02-14@8AM
1999 JEEP VIN#
1J4GW68N8XC787475
DOS:06-05-14@8AM
1991 BUICK VIN#
2G4WB54L1M1808823
DOS: 06-06-14@8AM


2003 HYUN VIN#
KMHDN45D83U646529
DOS: 06-10-14@8AM
1994 EKH1 VIN#
EKHD0699F394
1997 CONT VIN#
1ZJBE1911VM051324
Purchases must be paid for
at the time of sale, cash
only All vehicles are sold
as is and must be removed
at the time of sale All sales
are subject to cancellation
in the event of settlement
between owner and the
obligated party
May 10, 2014


4VJ 1 9.itI1'I :


A' A '' 1 i


I; B 1 Iiu I A1'[it*\ n


GGEFiED ^


BAiNKRUTCY.


1992 Cadillac Eldorado
-b t%- is~


Leather,KRear AL

Al


4.OL VB tflngile, e, 25Mr

SI


K ~ I I*Lr


.uL tEngine, automatic
I I I


2004 Buick LeSabre Limited


I rvl/rL,ey iylL IILIyt
J JIA


I Leaner, Manyl rower uptions
IU I -1


2000 Chevrolet Blazer LS


4WJ, 4.3L V6, ueep Iint

I4.4


2002 Ford Mustan








3.8L V6 Engine, PW/PL

^-^ I


28 MPG, Remote Keyless Entry

la;IPI:I


I ./L 'ti'i, Rain Sense wipers


1 ./L l7IVIi Vo Engine, Learner




2009 Pontiac G66


.4 U


2005 Chevrolet Colorado


ueep iunt, rIWrL, eKeyiess Entry


Keyless Eniry, unatar




2010 Honda CR-V EX-L


t Pre-owned prices are plus tax, tag, title and 549950 dealer fee. 000141A I


Automatic, rower windows

Bb^~I; '


HONDA
2006 VTX1300C
7,400 miles
w/accessories
$4,900, (352) 341-1187
HONDA
2008 Shadow Spirit
VT750C2, 3,775 mi.
w/accessories $4,500
(352) 341-1187
HONDA REBEL
2009, super low miles
many accessories, like
new.$2695 OBO. Pine
Ridge (419) 307-8954
KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 1500
Classic: Custom Paint,
18" Baron Bars, Saddle
Bags, Kuryakyn High-
way Pegs/Passenger
Floor Boards /Cable
&Gnps. 3200 Miles!
Garage Kept, Exc.Cond
Reduced $4,999.
(813) 957-8605
Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
SUZUKI
Boulevard C50
Classic,2007,
Exc Cond $3,700
(352) 634-4427
Suzuki
Model GZ250. Street
Bike. Black. Less than
400 mi. $1995.
(352)527-0115
YAMAHA
2007 Stratoliner S
15k mi, exc cond,
Extra's. $6800 obo
352-220-2923




25, 2014- May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014




CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CELEBRATE

INA NEW CHEVROLET
-A- .L A .L


S--- A COMMITMENT
M LITARY TO SERVING
MILITARY ALL THAT
***DISCOU T HAVE SERVED
During Military Appreciation Month, now all Veterans along with -
Active Duty, Reserves and Retirees are eligible for the Chevrolet Military --__ _-
Discount*. The best Military Purchase Program in the industry. -





14 Cruze LT Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees. 2014 Malibu LT
%1 5 N ) Security Deposit $
i st 00 Down Paymnt $2,o0 Customer Cash
S* First Month Payment % 50 May Purchase
Isomn r Cashn O per 36 Months BonusCash
L U 'Month 35Mo.Pymts'
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealerfees 5
extra. Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 36,000 miles. o AWoN ce


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
Security Deposit
Down Payment
First Month Payment
O 1par 36Months
fpO Month 35Mo.Pymts
No security deposit required.Tax, tile, license and dealer fees
extra. Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 36,000 miles.


2014 Equinox
$1, G Customer Cash
+ $=C May Purchase
+"$5"0 Bonus Cash
$1,500
total Cash Allowance


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.


2014 Traverse LSFWDI


1 99Q Per Month $1,500 Customer Cash
I for 36 Months $5" May Purchase
+,Kuu Bonus Cash
3 2 1 Due at Signing t Ao O r Cs
3y219A after All Offerse 000
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealerfees
extra.Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 36,000 miles. Allo a ce


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
$25 0Per Month
ffor 36 Months
$2669 Due at Signing
$ ,66 After All Offers6
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees
extra.Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 36,000 miles.


All Pre-Loved Certified OR I- S O
OVER 90V include up to:2YEARS P-
Used&Certifled 100,000 MILE 24,000 MILE PROGRAM
PUesved VehticesT INCLUDED
Pre-Loved Vehicles WARRANTY MAINTENANCE See dealterfor complete details.

GM CERTIFIED Vehicles! Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!

14ICHEVYMAUBULS 13CHEVYCAMAROLS 07CHRYSLERPTCRUISER 04CHEVYSILVERADO 07 CHRYSLERPTCRUISER 08CHEVYHHRLT 04CHEVYCOLORADOLS
12,94,PRilDOWIS/LOCKS,ON STR AUTOON~S TAR, BLUETOOIH,18"WHEELS 12459, CHROMEWHEELS 12440 REG CABV6 AUTOMATIC 12W8, PMELWAGONkPARR DOOR RELEASE 12489,CREWCAB
952 $2,"995 $S6,*9 S6,99s S6, $7,995 $8995

12 BUICKAIOSSE PREMIUM II 12 CHEVY SILVERADO LS 10KIASOUL 06 MZDA RX-8 09 CHEVYWMALIBU LT 10 PONTIACG6 13 HYUNDAIACCENT
12380 LEATHER,HARMANKARPOONSYSTEM 12499, EXCAB 12479, POWER WINDOWS& LOCKS 12500,SHNI(ASPECIALED]TION, LOW M 12491,17-CHROMEEWHEELS,ALLPOWER POWERWINDOWS P12249
522/.95 5 10,995 $11,995 $13,495 $1S9 14.,995

13CHEVYSILVERADO 12ICHEVYSUBURBANLT 06GMCSIERRA4X4SLT 10 FORDESCAPE4X4 13CHRYSLER200 08DODGERAMQUADCAB 12CHEVYSILVERADO
EX-CAB LT, LOWMILES LEATHER, HEATED 1ST& 2ND ROWSEATS 12478, EXTENDED CAB P12480,4 CYLOWEWINDOWS,TILT 12497,TOURING EDITION, ALLOYS ALLPOWER REGULARCAB
$30,495 $32,4595 $195 $ $17,495 $1995 $19995
irl-9 PLUSMANY
Plus MANY MORE wna ': MoETo
Certified Vehicles 11 NISSANFRONTIERs 9CHEVYSI VERADOLT I1TOYOTAHIGHiANDERs E 13 FORD F-150 S
to Choose From! J.F-, ,' p. .Ii-VRh 7:1'..) _A;PIIITLq 1237LEATHER SUPERCAB FROM!



Come See What LOVE Can Do For Youl !"1
2209 Hwy 44West 3lH
Inverness, FL 34453 35 .341.0 1
wet352s341.0018 gS^
LoveChevySales.com
1. Excludes leases. Not compatible some other offers. Take del ey by 6 /2114. See dealer for details. 2. Pay nts are for a 2014 Cuze LT wi h an M SRP (- TI $ 1 i jj .' r, n ii .I i'Tir' i i';. top1',iin lu i h r j t .i r rat] iivr jd i i jiTi,'u'il t) rtiv, r nr ,! I-C.t Iri' 'jM Fini., 5',i ru.,i ,\ur?. E P
l jl flk ii lt i iiIh RI M i3f li.l Ieii 'l 11w, Ar liiinl i Pui T~ri:,it1 Pi iirl Hi J ii 0 l iii 1i' iiru r l. 1'1114 r i,, 1,l I.- ;U EIII.ir I T.' 'iiilii'iTii '41 Ikl r-Iip'iY0 th F.C't4 l rr lrr I il nii 4 iV t nl-]rrt p( >o W hilnIT ioi i D rM jiF;.p
1.i, s i-ti., inlv tl 2.m E .1 .I l Fi ii h ,i LS '. 3 0 lIHr 1 1 .in .i, I t '. l ti j... i I j: ptli nl I. ir, '.p p l, ,,- W r(, .T. 11 4 l o I t# it .t i E I.ir 1; ,i r iii i g M fiii l. l iiuh' .LI i.ip tI, .ijF i. ,i .,. ri .i ^ ''iTiiI[ 1,11 1 ; lu i\.fj i1 Ii .HI ri 2i1 W,e l .l.IIfI
5 dm fit. ,11P V., 1 1.114 EqujirI1,,, L FWIND wil .inIJ U'::P. ,,11 1" Y, i li t, l ph' i- p iii I)u I"clll-I0 l$'1, IL f])t llUi .1'1 ], .Ihjl0 .3:p h, I to l III II tl~pl 7 U. 1 ''b lP NI h il .1 vt -i .t l l ig ."t j m f utg lM rtl I,' ~l"l l .mI ,I I) J' P .eItllov0.,M1itgrI hajigle ,!11 .",tzI e' v 3(,.'q) ~tI F1 :ix Le'.'. II if h 'd V-1 r' R'. I p f i~irl
may be higher in some states. Take deliery by 62/14, See dealer for lmt 6l' ir F,i),'mII-i, : I -r .1 ;'11.1 ii' II': 1:i',A'D iin I: W f .i 11 Oi; ;, iM, 11 i' hl A ,ri ,!I p1 [Jl: D I Itf, $' .' i lj l lo i iri.'r.ri, o ,11 Ie,HTi Ij EDid irn ,1 tjn l i, it il* Itl iii] ,1 I1'.i i'in 14 1 hrii,.,'i iruI Mif\\ t, ii'u rhro0 If
'i i t ii i L .. i ix 'r iii tiT yj for details. 1. l es are 36 mit j 2,500 sh or trade ejuit, ',i, '. ,r) r '' K i i' ir i, .ii Al i.'F itir1.'.. u' I lj 1; liii til ;,'., ; EI iii iii31val lnd ,11,11r',. i i i t ind 11I ri l ,,t r i ,i i '.rt t ,i i I r. .i .,rld; t1 .Ti t r li Ii LI S' i .itr, r
tar details. 1. All leases are 36 mnlHtis, 12K miles~er rith $2,5010 cash or trade eqi~ut, J4i R*iij CCR, O.';n~r [i''aii ;' lint 3iiiiiitiiC v"i~r 1irirr-ir 1' 1;: v i )r." Pir ~"i~fln 1. 1 v4D: ii i h i S ii~ii f aI iiir 1 ,i[tiiirii CI?':I i a Ihrih i i [t IPl ( ipinr Cq i[P' Ki [| 1' lilii ''fhir2i I '1r;. aie'. C.'i c~hpi.'iit #t si


20


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C14 SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Thanks Mom For

All That You Do!


2014 FOCUS
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $011st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.
\


2014 FIESTA
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $011st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 FUSION
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $011st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Doe not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 EDGE
$329 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $01st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


Show Mom you
appreciate everything she does for
you with a new or used vehicle
from Nick Nicholas Ford.







2014 ESCAPE
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $01 st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 EXPLORER
$339 mo.
36 Month Lease
$0 Down Payment $0 Due at Signing $0 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2009 FORD FUSION SEL 2008 FORD EXPLORER
Loaded SEL N4C126B Great price range for this low milea6 e SUV N3C
$ 14,968 | 15,668


2010 MERCURY MARINER PREMIER 2008 FORD MUSTANG CONVERT 2009 AUDI A4 2011 KIA SORENTO EX 2010 FORD EDGE LIMITED
Great smaller size SUV N4T163A Top down fun in the sun NP6023A This A4 Quatro has onlY 34k miles N4T307A Great price rane for a loaded SUV N4T186A Don't miss this loaded limited N3T491A
$18,968 $19,968 $21,968 $22,668 $22,968
AI..-Z- /
B -- -.^ I^ /^-.Bl^ M f^

2010 TOYOTA VENZA WAGON 2008 FORD SHELBY GT500 2010 FORD EXPEDITION 4X4 EL LIMITED 2011 FORD F150 PLATINUM CREW CAB 2012 FORD FISO LARIAT 4X4 SUPER CREW
Extreme ,ly nice cross over N4C189A Own a leend at an affordable pice N4T288B Reduced N3T621A This one has it all Don't miss it N4T224A Only 2k miles and loaded N4T175A
$23,968 $32,668 $33,900 $39,668 | $39,968




BLUE OVAL ;r


C al M SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00 Crystaly4 !!- 486
River -4 nverness
GENUINE PARTS.HW4TFlrlC
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND. F Nick Nicholas
-I.%" ~Homosass HY 9
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness a Springs Hwy. 98
SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT 2 Brad Hill Spring Hwy. 50
www.nicknicholasford.com Salesperson of the Month Hill _________ Brooksville
'2013 CY sales.**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will
qualify for Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 05/16/14.


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SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2014 C15


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XJIVA iK




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HURRY!. THESE SAVINGS END TODAY!


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$500 MILITARY APPRECIATION OPERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their spouses towards any new Honda
vehicle when you Finance or lease thru HFS.
so 90 & cunCEIWlII ru VEHUMIuEaIISl
AN Pre-Owned Vehicles Include a
6 MONTH/6000X MILE
limited Powertran Warrantyt
PLUS A 5-DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM
See dealer for complete details.


S'o//p r ,*
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In tte world
first, but j
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