Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
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Newspaper
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English
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Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text

Derby: California Chrome rides into the sunset /B1


I -SULN DAI Y I


r4 4
Sunny and less
humid with a
north breeze.
PAGE A4


C I TR U


MAY 4, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


S C 0 U N TY N





ONICLE
L www.chronicleonline.com
q Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VO


L. 119 ISSUE 270


MILITARY MATTERS:


Group files suit to downlist manatees


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER A local
citizens group has filed a lawsuit
against the U.S. government in
hopes of compelling the govern-
ment to "obey its own rules" and
downlist the manatee from en-
dangered to threatened.
The government said it is still


studying the issue and has been
delayed by budgetary constraints.
Save Crystal River Inc.,
through its attorneys at Pacific
Legal Foundation, filed the suit
Wednesday seeking, among other
things, that U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service respond to the group's
petition to have the service abide
by a 2007 recommendation that
the manatee be downlisted.


"In late 2012, PLF and Save
Crystal River submitted a petition
for the downlisting of the mana-
tee," said PLF attorney Christina
M. Martin, in a statement.
"But federal officials failed to
act. That failure means we must
sue to force regulators to do their
job."
Steve Lamb, of SCR, also said
the group was left with little


choice but to sue.
"It is important to preserve a
healthy environment," Lamb
said.
"It is also important to pre-
serve the rule of law and integrity
of the regulatory process. Unfor-
tunately, litigation has become
necessary in order to make the


PageA2


Vietnam veterans get
together after 46 years.
/Page A18
RIISINESS:


Job prospects
CareerSource Citrus
Levy Marion wants to
help job-seekers kick
the habit./Page Dl
INSIDE:









Spielberg
Oscar-winning director
Steven Spielberg talks
about his most
ambitious film project:
recording the personal
accounts of Holocaust
survivors./Inside

LOCAL NEWS:
Legislature
The state Legislature
wraps up its session
with some surprising
winners: in-state
tuition for some
undocumented
immigrants,
approval of a type
of medical marijuana
and a new starting
date for the 2016
session./Page A8
* Winners./Page A9
* Losers./Page AO10
EXCURSIONS:


Guard slain



in chain gang



escape to be



recognized


0/0


int Of the even
subseque.:nts of Prison guar R SPecial to the Cu
worked on ..esca of StWopo.....usWaitersoh
re Cases a, road gang wcnvacts hehe as
0SY bi Wa writenin ,f"Dynamic
ie 193- a u aa o 'd s t l "true crime ew"es yna zic
fl '40 magazine


II


FLORAL CITY
St was a hot, humid July day as 38
hardened road gang criminals
Worked in a trench near the prison
camp on County Road 48 in Floral City
One man, 22-year-old Bruce Parrish,
decided he'd had enough, dropped his
shovel and took off running.
Immediately, two prison guards raised
their shotguns and shouted for Parrish
to halt.
Meanwhile, as everyone's attention
stayed riveted on the drama of a fleeing


convict, another convict, 24-year-old
Arthur Sherman, drew out a shotgun
that was hidden in the trench, aimed at
prison guard Rufus Walters, who was
standing less than 50 feet away, ordered
Walters to drop his gun and shot him in
the chest
Parrish then reversed his course and
returned to join Sherman. Next, the two
plunged into a nearby swamp.
It was 2:30 p.m. July 22, 1938.


See Pae A7


,,/ LEFT: Arthur Sherman (top photo) was one of the escaped convicts who fled from the road
...... gang worksite in Floral City on July 22, 1938. Sherman was also the one who shot and killed prison
...- guard Rufus Walters (bottom photo). See images of some of the full pages from the eight-page story online with
this article at www.chronicleonline.com.


Birmingham
Alabama's largest city is
making a comeback
after decades of
dormancy, and there's
plenty of free stuff for
visitors to see and
do./Page A15


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ................D5
Crossword ...............A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
M ovies ..................... A16
Obituaries ................A6
Marriages, divorces A22
Veterans ........ A18


6 184578 2007511o


Community turns out for grand opening of

HPH Hospice Care Center of Citrus County


ERYN
WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
LECANTO The new
21,000-square-foot HPH
Hospice Care Center of
Citrus County facility
gives visitors the home-
away-from-home feeling
the moment they enter the
building.
"We want our patients to
feel at home and comfort-
able," said HPH Hospice


Citrus communications
coordinator Anne Black.
Approximately 150 Cit-
rus County residents felt
this homey feeling Satur-
day at the community
grand opening of the
$5 million facility at 2939
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway
in Lecanto.
'Although the building
is a wonderful resource,
the main thing is that hos-
pice is not just a place,"
executive director Jaysen


Kapri Robley, left, and Trentyn Roddenberry helped
release butterflies Saturday at the community grand
opening of HPH Hospice Citrus Care Center of Citrus
County.
ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle


Roa said to the attendees.
"Hospice is a wonderful
type of care where we
take care of not only the
patients and their needs,
but we truly take care of
the entire family through
one of the most tremulous
times in their life. Hos-
pice is a holistic type of
care, both for the patient,
family and friends."
Many of Citrus County's
veteran's organizations,
county commissioners
and special guests at-
tended the ceremony,
which included a dedica-
tion of the veterans'
See Page A7


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
81
LOW
52


/


By Nancy Kennedy
Chronicle


11




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Humanitarians of Florida opens new facility

Special to the Chronicle I
T he Humanitarians of f &
Florida need volun-
teers for its clinic and v
its Haven.
The clinic needs volun-
teers to help with the laun- .
dry, cage cleaning, general .>.. :
maintenance, weekend -
adopt-a-thons, cat grooming
and bathing and the social-
ization of the Haven cats.
The new facility is at 1031
N. Commerce Terrace in
Lecanto, two blocks east of i
the group's prior location at jl
Manchester House on Co- /
nantAvenue. .
Call 352-563-2370 for direc- /
tions and more information. '. .
Donations needed
The Humanitarians of
Florida also needs donations
for "Granny's Thrift Store,"
on site at the clinic. 'p "t
All proceeds go to support
this nonprofit organization, .,,,
which provides low-cost' "
spay/neuter and vaccinations ,
to cats and dogs, and oper- '
ates a cat/kitten adoption .
center
Donations are tax de- .
ductible, and may be
dropped off from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through -
Friday
For information about .....
thrift store donations, call J1 *" .
352-563-2370. V iiiii

TOP: Dr. Antonio Guzman .. :
greets Crystal Buschman ii '
and her dog Barney on ". "--.
Saturday during the grand
opening of the new
Humanitarians of Florida
facility at 1031 N.
Commerce Terrace in
Lecanto. To learn more
about the group, visit
hofspha.org or call
352-563-2370. BOTTOM:
Rosetta is cuddled by her -.
friend Donna Schmid of
Humanitarians of Florida at .t, ^.\ A ...-
the grand opening of the -I.I, b ... .
group's new office inL '
Lecanto.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/ForFthe Chronicle


MANATEES
Continued from Page Al

government follow the
findings of science and
obey its own rules."
Lamb said that SCR was
formed a couple of years
ago when the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service an-
nounced it was coming out
with a new rule governing
King's Bay A group of con-
cerned citizens decided "it
was time to slow down all
the bites U.S. Fish and
Wildlife was taking out of
our community."
He said the group found
out about a pro bono (free)
law firm, PLE which agreed
to take on their cause.
Lamb said the group re-
alizes that the issue of
manatees is emotional for
many, but that SCR be-
lieves manatees have re-
covered sufficiently, as far
as population goes, to be
downlisted.
"We are not anti-mana-
tee nor do we want to see
the speeds already set in
King's Bay changed. I
think the bay is crowded
and too busy, and those
speeds are needed. We
support the sanctuaries
and the protections for the
manatees, but we continue
to fear that the govern-
ment will take more bites
of the area and change the
speeds in the river leading
to the gulf to idle or slow,"
Lamb said.
He described the mana-
tee as the "rock star
species" of the wildlife
service and that several
lives depend on it being
kept on the endangered
species list.
"There are 86 mammals
on the endangered list;
what about the other 85?"
Lamb asked.
He said alligators used


THE PARTIES
* Pacific Legal Foundation (www.pacificlegal.org) is a
nonprofit public interest watchdog organization
that litigates for limited government, property
rights, and a balanced approach to environmental
regulation in courts across the country. PLF's
Atlantic Center is in Palm Beach Gardens.
* Save Crystal River Inc. is a nonprofit group that
says its mission is to educate the public regarding
current environmental, property and riparian rights,
and to represent the interest of the citizens of
Crystal River against excessive government
regulation of the Crystal River and the resources of
the surrounding area.
* Save the Manatee Club Florida says its mission is
to protect endangered manatees and their aquatic
habitat for future generations. Website:
savethemanatee.org.


to be protected, "but do
you know a Save the Alli-
gator Club?"
Lamb said manatee pop-
ulations have increased
exponentially since 2007,
even with the recent high
number of die-offs in 2010
and 2013.
As of last January, the
wildlife service said there
are 4,834 Florida mana-
tees. In contrast, in 2007,
the agency estimated
there were 3,300 manatees
in the state about 25
percent fewer than the
current number, which
formed the basis for the
downlisting recommenda-
tion in 2007.
However, Patrick Rose,
executive director of Save
the Manatee Club, said his
group is opposed to down-
listing the manatee and
will join the legal fight
when the time comes.
"Say SCR wins in court or
U.S. Fish and Wildlife de-
cides to go along with the
2007 recommendation, we
will definitely take the issue
back to court," Rose said.
He said many things
have changed since the
2007 study and the wildlife
service is perhaps trying
to figure out recent data


to make a sound
determination.
Rose said the recent
manatee mortality rates
(830 in 2013 and 766 in
2010) and the continuing
deterioration of manatee
habitats will make it un-
likely that SCR will suc-
ceed in court.
"Instead of aiding the
process to help increase
spring flow and working
on projects to help the
manatee habitats, now we
are all going to be wasting
our resources and time
fighting over this," he said.
He said SCR's dire pre-
dictions about the effects
of onerous government
rules in King's Bay after
the wildlife service de-
clared the bay a manatee
protection refuge have yet
to come true.
"They only like govern-
ment rules if it helps


them," he said.
Rose also challenged
Lamb's assertion that
manatee populations have
grown exponentially
He said alligator num-
bers grew exponentially
precisely because they
were protected and the
fact that alligators have
multiple births in a year
compared to manatees,
which give birth every


Homeless woman


held on charges of


sex with a minor


Chronicle

A 40-year-old homeless
woman was in custody Fri-
day, accused of having sex-
ual intercourse with a
16-year-old male.
Carol V Beamon was ar-
rested Friday as she left
the county and charged
with unlawful sexual ac-
tivity with a minor No
bond was allowed.
According to both Bea-


mon and the teen, they had
sexual encounters on two
occasions. The teen told
investigators he was never
forced in to the activity
Beamon reportedly ad-
mitted to authorities she
knew what she was doing
was wrong but that her
boyfriend was gone during
those times and she was
feeling lonesome. She was
transported to the Citrus
County Detention Facility


For the RECORD


DUI arrest
Nicholas Marsceill, 22, of
Davidson Avenue, Inverness,
at 8:24 p.m. May 1 on a misde-
meanor charge of driving under
the influence. According to his
arrest affidavit, Marsceill was
pulled over for running a stop
sign nearWallace Brooks Park.
He was asked to perform field
sobriety tests and did poorly.
Tests of his breath showed his
blood alcohol concentration
was 0.220 percent and
0.223 percent. The legal limit is
0.08 percent. Bond $500.
Domestic battery
arrests
Daniel Ball, 28, of Ho-
mosassa, at 11:28 a.m. May 1
on a felony charge of domestic
battery by strangulation.
Larry Crizer, 40, of Bev-
erly Hills, at 9:17 p.m. May 1 on
a misdemeanor charge of do-
mestic battery.
Kristopher Harder, 31, of
Crystal River, at 4:05 p.m.
May 1 on a felony charge of do-
mestic battery by strangulation.
Other arrests
Jeremy Borrego, 21, of
West Fairoak Court, Crystal
River, at 5:10 p.m. May 1 on


three to five years.
Chuck Underwood,
USFWS public informa-
tion officer, said his agency
is still working on PLF's
petition to reclassify the
manatee, but that work has
been delayed because of
budgetary constraints.
"Our lawsuit is neces-
sary because environmen-
tal policy has to be kept
honest," Martin said.


felony charges of possession
of firearm ammunition by a
convicted felon, possession of
a controlled substance and
felony violation of probation
stemming from an original
charge of attempted fraud. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
deputies were investigating
Borrego regarding a burglary
case. He reportedly cooper-
ated with deputies, turning over
both the ammunition and alpra-
zolam (Xanax) tablets. Bond
$12,000.
Steven Pratt, 57, of West
Sasser Street, Homosassa, at
7:11 p.m. May 1 on a felony
charge of failing to register
every six months as a sex of-
fender. According to his arrest
affidavit, Pratt is a bi-annual
registrant and failed to register
in the month of April. Bond
$20,000.
Marie Norris, 28, of
Northeast Michael Place, Lake
City, at 8 p.m. May 1 on an ac-
tive warrant for felony violation
of probation stemming from an
original charge of criminal mis-
chief. According to her arrest
affidavit, Norris turned herself in
to the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office.


"Changing the mana-
tee's status from endan-
gered to threatened won't
change the protections for
the species. But not chang-
ing that status when the
science says it should be
changed will under-
mine the credibility of en-
vironmental oversight, and
that's bad news for all
species and all environ-
mental concerns."


Should you need a new hip, it's good to know that Dr. Petrella was the first local surgeon to use
a new technique, the direct anterior approach, that doesn't cut through muscle and may make
recovery faster. You'll have no post-op motion restrictions, so you can bend down to tie your shoe
or pick up your golf ball whenever it feels comfortable. Dr. Petrella is part of a national team of
surgeons that helps design joint implants, and was one of the lead surgeons to design a hip implant
used nationwide. It's positively easy to see why Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center was named
one of America's 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery" in 2014 by Healthgrades, the
leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals.
Also, we are a designated Blue Distinction Center+ for Knee and Hip Replacement.
Ip'BST|
For a physician referral, call 352.795.1234 or learn more at 't_ .
SevenRiversRegional.com/ortho. I


Positively JJSEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


Blue F",,da
Distinction BoO y
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orth Citrus Ave., Crysta i
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i Hwy. 44 W. Inverness CR486
HOHWY. 44 Inverness

CHOLI (352)726-1231 IIee
-- nicknicholasford.com 4 Nick*iholas
0004x 11 SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 _____________


MANAGER'S SPECIALS


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A2 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


LOCAL


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Page A3 SUNDAY, MAY 4,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

STATE

Citrus County

County REC hosting
candidate forum
The regular monthly
meeting of the Citrus
County Republican Execu-
tive Committee will be at
7 p.m. Monday at the
Board of Realtors building,
714 Scarboro Ave.,
Lecanto.
After an abbreviated gen-
eral meeting the executive
committee will host a candi-
date open forum. All candi-
dates for county
commission, school board,
mosquito control and prop-
erty appraiser are invited
and encouraged to attend
to give a presentation on
their candidacy.
Members are encour-
aged to bring a guest.
Kids triathlon
scheduled May 10
The second annual Citrus
County Kids Triathlon is set
for Saturday May 10, at
Whispering Pines Park, 1700
Forest Drive, Inverness.
Participants will swim
laps, pedal bicycles and run
in healthy competition.
The triathlon will be di-
vided into three divisions:
junior division for ages 5
through 10, senior division
forages 11 to 15 and tri4fun
division for all ages.
Participants will receive a
colored drawstring back-
pack, finisher's medal and
more.
The proceeds from the
triathlon are donated to
United Way of Citrus
County.
For more information and
to register, go to www.
citruskidstri.com.
MOPH bimonthly
meeting set May 20
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will
hold its bimonthly meeting
at 1 p.m. Tuesday, May 20,
at the Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196
S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491),
Lecanto, located approxi-
mately a half mile south of
State Road 44 on the west
side of C.R. 491.
All combat wounded vet-
erans and parents, lineal
descendants, spouses and
siblings of living or de-
ceased Purple Heart recipi-
ents are cordially invited to
attend the meeting and to
become a Chapter 776
member. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 MOPH, visit
the Chapter 776 website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org
or call 352-382-3847.
Case manager not
available Wednesday
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Service Department will
not have a case manager
available Wednesday May 7,
at Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
For information, contact
Samuel Dininno, county
veteran service officer, at
352-527-5915.

Osprey

Trapper removes four
gators from school
Officials said a wildlife
trapper removed four alliga-
tors from a school campus
in one day this week.
Pine View School princi-
pal Stephen Covert said al-
ligators have been spotted
on the sprawling Osprey
campus in the past, but the
four that were captured
Thursday was an unusually
high number.
Covert said the trapper
played a mating call from a
recorder, removed them
from the school and let


them go at an unknown lo-
cation. One of the gators
was more than 8 feet long.
The animals were caught
during the school day, but
Covert said it was not a dis-
ruption to the students.
-From staff and reports


Folk musician closes concert series


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Historical
Society has announced the final
Music at the Museum concert
for the season featuring Bob
Patterson.
Patterson is a Florida folk mu-
sician, songwriter and storyteller
with more than 50 years of expe-
rience performing at clubs, festi-
vals and on nationally syndicated
radio and TV programs.
The concert is Thursday, May
15. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. and
the performance will run from 7


to 9 p.m., with a brief intermission
with light sweets and beverages
included.
Tickets are $10/per person. All
proceeds benefit the Citrus County
Historical Society and the Old
Courthouse Heritage Museum.
Patterson is one of the original
founders of the Gamble Rogers
Folk Festival and has functioned
as the event's artistic director for
18 years. He was awarded the
"Fellow Man and Mother Earth
Award" by the Stetson Kennedy
Foundation in 2011 for his work in
actively keeping folk culture alive


in Florida. He was a 2011 first-
place winner in the North Florida
Folk Network song writing contest
in the category of Best Florida
Song.
He has been a featured per-
former at the annual Florida Folk
Festival at White Springs for more
than 40 years. Besides his criti-
cally praised CDs, he's the author
of two books, "Forgotten Tales of
Florida" and "Dorothy" Both
books are loaded with Florida folk
lore and history and have become
very popular in the folk commu-
nity and beyond. To learn more, go


to wwwfloridastoryteller.com.
The Music at the Museum Con-
cert Series is supported in part by
the Citrus County Chronicle, Pub-
lix Super Markets Charities, Jor-
dan Engineering Inc., Accent
Travel, Wann and Mary Robinson,
Clark and Wendy Stillwell, Pho-
tography by Rebecca, Smith's Op-
tical Service and David Rom of
State Farm.
For more information, includ-
ing about sponsorship opportuni-
ties, call John Grannan at
352-341-6427 between 10 a.m. and
2 p.m. Monday through Friday


Waiting out the weather


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Judges, parents and participants take shelter from the rain Saturday while the second annual Southeast Middle School Championship
Regatta at Liberty Park is delayed due to nearby lightning. With four teams competing at last year's races in Gainesville, the numbers
more than doubled for this year's races with nine teams participating. According to Glynn Hayes, Gainesville area coach and an
organizer for the event, the fifth- through ninth-grade classes are the fastest-growing division in the sport.


Free dental clinic seeks help


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

Nearly 75 Citrus County patients
have received free dental services
at the new Samaritan Dental Clinic
in Homosassa since its opening in
March.
Services could soon end if assis-
tance is not quickly established.
"It's open, it's working, but it's
Black Friday at Walmart for the
dental clinic," said Nature Coast
Ministries director Tom Slagle. "We
need help and we can't keep our
doors open unless we get help."
Nature Coast Ministries has tran-
sitioned the old Knights of Columbus
building into offices, meeting rooms


and a free dental clinic.
Dental and medical professionals
volunteer their time and have re-
ceived sovereign immunity -
through the Florida Volunteer Health
Services Department to provide
dental and medical services free to
adults who qualify; that includes Cit-
rus County elderly veterans, home-
less and low-income adults.
"In order for us to keep this going,
we have to have the community's
physical and financial support," said
Bonnie McMullin, public relations
correspondent. "We need retired
dentists, dental assistants, inter-
viewers and financial assistance."
The Samaritan Dental Clinic
hopes to increase its patient load to


50 per week.
"People want to help but don't
know how," McMullin said. "We
need dental and medical personnel,
volunteers and donations. We need
the community to come together
with us to help those that need us.
Together we can do so much more
than we can separately"
The clinic is funded only by com-
munity organizations, businesses,
churches and individual donations
to the nonprofit ministry Nature
Coast Ministries, which has a new
location, 1590 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River
For more information, call 352-
563-1860 or visit Nature Coast Min-
istries in Crystal River


Court offers eRecording of documents


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Clerk of
Court Angela Vick has an-
nounced the launch of eRe-
cording following a
successful pilot program in
which 463 documents were
successfully eRecorded.
This service is now avail-
able to all citizens who
wish to record a document
in the official record.
Historically, deeds,
mortgages, liens, judg-
ments, agreements, etc.,


were all submitted as
paper documents for
recording via mail,
overnight delivery or
courier service. Upon re-
ceipt, the documents were
recorded, scanned and re-
turned to the customer
within 7 to 10 days. E-
Recording allows for doc-
uments to be recorded
and returned within min-
utes, accelerating the
recording process and
narrowing the gap of title
searches.


It's a simple process to
eRecord. Documents are
scanned and partially in-
dexed by the submitter
(title company, attorney
office, lending institution,
etc.), then forwarded to
the Clerk of Court Office
through the eRecording
portal. The clerk's office
receives the image and
index electronically, veri-
fies against statutory re-
quirements, and then
processes the document
for return to the submitter


within minutes.
To access the eRecord-
ing service or for more in-
formation, go to the
Simplifile website
www. s i mplifile.com.
Kristi Hugar, records di-
rector, is available to an-
swer questions at
352-341-6473 or citizens
may contact Simplifile di-
rectly through Pat
Sponem, sales account ex-
ecutive for Florida, at
pat@simplifile.com, or
801-223-1048.


Candidate qualifying dates approaching


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Supervisor
of Elections Susan Gill has
announced the following
schedule for potential can-
didates interested in run-
ning for election in 2014.
Candidates may prequalify
at any time prior to the final
qualification period.
Statewide, multi-county


county and district candi-
dates qualify from noon
June 16, through
noonJune 20. Petitions for
statewide, multi-county,
county and district candi-
dates must be submitted
prior to noon on May 19.
Statewide and multi-
county candidates qualify
with the Division of Elec-
tions. Citrus County can-


didates qualify at the Cit-
rus County Supervisor of
Elections Office.
County offices up for
election are property ap-
praiser, Board of County
Commissioners Districts 2
and 4, school board dis-
tricts 1, 3, 4 and 5, Ho-
mosassa Special Water
District seats 2 and 4, Mos-
quito Control Board seats


1, 2 and 3.
For information con-
cerning the elections for
the cities of Crystal River
and Inverness, call their
respective city clerks for
candidate information.
For more information,
call the elections office at
352-341-6740, or visit the
website at wwwvote
citrus.com.


The Campaign
TRAIL

The Campaign Trail is a
weekly announcement of
fundraisers, meetings,
candidate appearances
and the like for this year's
political campaign. Send
information to mwright@
chronicleonline. com.
Les Cook, Republican
for property appraiser, will
greet the public from 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday May 15, at
the Deco Cafe in down-
town Inverness.
Doug Dodd, candidate
for school board District 3,
will have a barbecue
fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, June 7, at the
Realtors Association
building on State Road 44
at Scarboro Avenue,
Lecanto. Information: 352-
637-3519.
Renee Christopher-
McPheeters, Republican
for county commission
District 2, will have a
fundraiser from 4 to
7 p.m. Saturday, July 26,
at Mama's Kuntry Kafe
on S.R. 44 across from
Whispering Pines Park,
Inverness. Information:
352-257-5381.
The Citrus County
Chronicle will have its pri-
mary forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 14, at the
Citrus County Auditorium
in Inverness. The Chroni-
cle's general election
forum is at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 21, at the College of
Central Florida in
Lecanto.
The Nature Coast Re-
publican Club will have a
forum for county commis-
sion candidates at 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 12, at
the College of Central
Florida.
The Citrus Hills Civic
Association will have a
candidates' forum at 7 p.m.
Thursday Oct. 9, at the Cit-
rus Hills Golf and Country
Club.


State BRIEFS


Coast Guard seizes
ton of marijuana
MIAMI BEACH-The U.S.
Coast Guard seized more
than a ton of marijuana after
intercepting a drug smugglers'
boat in the Caribbean Sea.


The 48 bales of marijuana
were unloaded last week at
the Coast Guard's station in
Miami Beach. The marijuana
is worth an estimated
$1.9 million wholesale.
Four suspected smugglers
were taken into custody.


Votran to offer free
rides to SunRail
ORLANDO -After high de-
mand caused parking lot over-
flows at Volusia County's
SunRail stop, the county's public
bus and shuttle provider said


that it is adding a temporary
service to help support it.
Votran announced that be-
ginning Monday it will provide
free weekday shuttle service
to the DeBary station from the
Deltona Plaza. Votran buses
will run nonstop every 30 min-


utes from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The temporary service will be
provided during the train's free
service, which runs through
May 16. Votran will discontinue
the shuttles when SunRail starts
charging full fares May 19.
-From wire reports


AN




A4 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Change is inevitable this
year. It's time to take control of your
journey to ensure that you reach your
destination. Emotional ups and downs
will be detrimental and time-consuming
if you aren't well-organized. Be ready
to solve a myriad of problems by mak-
ing your motives clear.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You may
be feeling uneasy and restless. Getting
involved in something creative or artis-
tic will help free up your imagination
and provide a new spark to your
routine.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)- The best
investment you can make is in you.
You will have a very rewarding experi-
ence if you take advantage of a finan-
cial opportunity
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Don't be
hard on yourself or let negativity get you
down. Find a class or seminar that will
help boost your mood and give you
greater confidence and a positive attitude.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Guessing or
speculating will not lead to a well-
rounded view of your situation. Rather
than overreact or make assumptions,
find out what is really happening be-
fore making a decision.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There are
many people who share your con-
cerns, but staying home will prevent
you from meeting them. Participate in
social events that are geared toward
making new friends.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -A personal
decision and general uncertainty will
cause turmoil. Don't hesitate to ask for
help.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You can
gain support if you present your ideas
creatively. Don't be deterred by some-
one who doesn't want to participate.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Hard
work will pay off. Surround yourself
with loved ones and celebrate your
accomplishments.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Think
before you speak or take action. Pres-
ent your opinions in a tactful manner.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -With
your talent and imagination, a small
business of your own may be a viable
option. Be bold.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Consider
attending charity orfundraising events as
a way to make new connections.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Accept that
others may have different ways of deal-
ing with certain issues. Let your peers
have their say and do their own thing.


ENTERTAINMENT


Cheech, Chong may
soon reunite on film
LAS CRUCES, N.M.--Actor
and comedian Cheech Marin
said he and longtime comedy
partner Tommy Chong may
soon reunite on film.
The Las Cruces Sun-News re-
ported Marin made the com-
ments Friday while launching an
exhibit of his art collection at the
Las Cruces Museum of Art in
southern New Mexico.
The 67-year-old, known as
one half of "Cheech & Chong,"
said there have been discus-
sions about starting a project
within the next year.
Meanwhile, the two have
been touring together.
An avid collector, Marin met
with artists and local high school
students before the exhibit's
opening.
"Chicanitas: Small Paints from
the Cheech Marin Collection"
features 70 paintings by 29 Chi-
cano artists.
Nas marks 20
years of music at
20th Essence Fest
NEW ORLEANS Nas
marks the 20th anniversary of
his now-iconic debut album, "III-
matic," as a headliner at the
2014 Essence Fest, which also
is celebrating 20 years July 3
through July 6.
Nas is headliner on the festi-
val's Now Playing stage, a new
addition to the event, which
started in 1995 as a one-time
celebration marking 25 years of
Essence Magazine.
Also scheduled to perform
July 3 in the Louisiana Super-
dome are Trey Songz, K.
Michelle and Jazmine Sullivan.
Singer-songwriter Prince,
who performed at Essence in
2004 at the festival's 10th an-
niversary, returns as headliner


Associated Press
Surrounded by Alma D'arte Charter School students, Cheech
Marin looks at a student's artwork Friday before the opening
of his "Chicanitas" show in Las Cruces, N.M.


on July 4.
Others scheduled to perform
are Mary J. Blige, Jill Scott and
The Roots, Lionel Richie, Charlie
Wilson, Erykah Badu, Stephanie
Mills, 112, Marsha Ambrosius,
Robert Glasper, Sevyn Streeter,
Elle Varner and New Orleans'
own August Alsina.
Author: Courtney
Love, not Kurt
Cobain, wrote note
SEATTLE One of the fore-
most experts on Kurt Cobain
said the late grunge rocker did
not pen a note mocking his wed-
ding vows to fellow musician
Courtney Love.
Love herself wrote it.
Police found the note in
Cobain's wallet after he killed
himself in 1994. It received a lot
of media attention last week
after CBS News published it,
saying it was presumably written
by Cobain and that it was sure to
stoke questions about what role
his marriage played in his death.
Charles R. Cross is a Seattle
author who has written several
books on Cobain, including the bi-
ography "Heavier Than Heaven."
He said Love emailed him to say


that she wrote the note and that
she gave it to Cobain before their
wedding in 1991.
Cross said the couple often
wrote each other such sarcastic
notes, and the handwriting is
Love's.
San Francisco mayor
wants filmmaker's
museum
SAN FRANCISCO Mayor
Edwin Lee isn't about to lose a
museum to be filled with George
Lucas' lifetime art collection and
movie memorabilia to another city.
The San Francisco mayor has
given his staff until the end of
May to come up with a list of
places both private and public
- to present the "Star Wars"
creator as possible locations in
the city for the museum.
Lee said in a statement that he
is well aware that San Francisco is
in competition with another city.
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel in
April gave orders to a dozen dcivic
leaders, telling them to find a place
in that city for Lucas' interactive
museum and collection. This is a
one-time opportunity for San Fran-
cisco, Lee said.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 4, the
124th day of 2014. There are 241
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 4, 1904, the United
States took over construction of the
Panama Canal.
On this date:
In 1942, the Battle of the Coral
Sea, the first naval dash fought en-
tirely with carrier aircraft, began in the
Pacific during World War II. (The out-
come was considered a tactical vic-
tory for Imperial Japan, but ultimately
a strategic one for the Allies.)
In 1970, Ohio National Guards-
men opened fire during an anti-war
protest at Kent State University,
killing four students and wounding
nine others.
In 1989, fired White House aide
Oliver North was convicted of
shredding documents and two other
crimes and acquitted of nine other
charges stemming from the Iran-
Contra affair. (However, the three
convictions were later overturned
on appeal.)
Ten years ago: The Army dis-
closed that the deaths of 10 prison-
ers and the abuse of 10 more in
Iraq and Afghanistan were under
criminal investigation, as U.S. com-
manders in Baghdad announced in-
terrogation changes.
Five years ago: Jeff Kepner, of
Augusta, Georgia, underwent the
nation's first double-hand transplant
at the University of Pittsburgh Med-
ical Center.
One year ago: A limousine taking
nine women to a bachelorette party
erupted in flames on the San
Mateo-Hayward Bridge over San
Francisco Bay, killing five of the pas-
sengers, including the bride-to-be.
Today's Birthdays: The former
president of Egypt, Hosni Mubarak,
is 86. Country singer Randy Travis
is 55. Sports reporter Erin Andrews
is 36. Singer Lance Bass ('N Sync)
is 35.
Thought for Today: "The greater
the number of laws and enactments,
the more thieves and robbers there
will be." Lao-tzu, Chinese philoso-
pher (c.604-531 B.C.).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


173/53 1.6" |d/NA NrA
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y
f 1 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING 1
High. 81 Low: 521
Yl Sunny and less humid with a north breeze.

II MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low:58*
Mostly sunny. NW wind at 5-10 mph.

1 | TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
IJ High: 87 Low-.59'
Mostly sunny. Light wind.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 75/64
Record /54
Normal 85/67
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean -1
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 038


H L Pcast City


H L Fecast


Daytona Bch. 82 61 s Miami 83 69 pc
Fort Lauderdale 84 71 pc Ocata 85 56 s
FortMyers 87 64 s Orlando 85 65 s
Gainesville 86 55 s Pensacola 81 65 s
Homestead 84 67 pc Sarasota 84 62 s
Jacksonville 86 58 s Tallahassee 87 55 s
Key West 84 74 pc Tampa 81 62 s
Lakeland 85 62 s Vero Beach 82 63 pc
Melbourne 81 63 s W. Palm Bch. 81 70 pc

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: North winds at 15 knots, Gulf water
down to 10 knots later today. Seas 2 temperature
to 4 feet. Bay and inland waters a 7
moderate chop. Tonight: Northwest 0
winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet. 7 6
Bay and inland waters a light chop.
lMkn at AliptMa
LAKE LEVELS
Location SAT FRI Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.33 29.08 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.47 38.44 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.84 39.78 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.48 40.41 42,20
Levels reported in teet above sea level Flood stage lor t akes are based on 2_33-year flood.
Ue mean -annual toI d V j hih ha. a 4i N 4 p nr h c"T 1? o Lf i ftino uajLJ or e,.:eeded in
any one year. ,1..5 laa ,- 'alr i..w 5.1 oi'.jr.. s fIoIIJal.i w Ma r,3.ag.Teni L IL.,'1
and is sujact a resion In no evem wal the Distri or the Unrted Staes Geoocal Survey
6? LatilTe NAy al' T riaL. CHJI ou 1tfm us o f I"s ata. If Ou have ay questions you
5-.63.THE N.ATIN me H.lI. c GLi i l-xZ '& 7211

THE NATION


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 69.8
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 100%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:


Total for the month 3.49" Oak, grasses, hickory
Total for the year 14.28" Today's count: 6.1/12
Normal for the year 10.25" M c 6.
*As o 7 p ,m- at ? mrnMonday's count: 6.0
UV INDEX: 15 Tuesday's count: 5.9
0-2minimal, 3-4 low 5-6mooerale. AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday observed: 27
29.90 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES ..:=b
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) AFTERNOON
05/04 SUNDAY 23:09 04:58 10:11 16:33
05/05 MONDAY 23:52 05:43 11:03 17:19
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S.w T .IMB ........- ..8:06 pm.
S ^ 4 WPM "WNSWT OB ............6:44 am.
WL '1. J1 01 MOONRIS TODAY 11 10 arm
May6 May 14 May21 May28 MQhS TMDAY ------- 12:0a m
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: LOW. There is no bum ban.
For mote Infoniahon call Florida Dlvreon of Forestry al (352) 754-6777 For more
Informalion on drought ondilions, please vistt Ihae Ovsion of Foresry's Web te:
http:flarnme-tfl-dol-conmnire wethef/Ibcd
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 am. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei ,n Wedwesdaarm.oir Sahtrday
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irigaion of nOn-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, Iowers and shrtiubs, can be done on any cday and at any
time.
Citrus Countly Utilities' customers shoub CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Sonrue re. pLanl-vji nmay qJaidyf lor addition
walening allowances
To report violations, please call: C ol inverness @ 352-726-2321, Cty Co C vstai
River 3,52 795-421I ef1 313 urnncortorate1 Clirus CouInty 0 352-527-7668.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers *At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SUNDAY
City High Low
Chassahowltzka" 10:59a.m, 03 l 1:23pm.m 0.6t, 6:54a.m. 0.1 1ft 3:31 p.rnmo.2a f,
CryslalFiver" 9:32am, 1.6I, 922p,m. 201t, 3:49a.m. 0,3f 3;26p,mO.8Of,
Withlacoochee* 7:05 am, 2-6t, 5:30p.n 3.Oft, 1:11 a.m. 0.4 N 12:45p-m.6I,
Homrosassa' 11:01a.m. 0.7 It. 932p.m. t.3ft. 5:55a.m. 0,2f1 3;49p.mrO.3It,


SUNDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
lalIr,,: CiN v
Auslin
Baltbmore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Bostoni
Buffalo
Burlngton, VT
Charlston. S.C.
Charleston. W.V.
Charotle
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concom. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
ODalrot
El Paso
Evansvllle, IN
Harisburg
Hartloni
Houslon
Indianapolis
Las Vegas
Little Rock


SAT
H L PCp. H
64 48 .01 60
81 46 85
73 46 80
75 49 83
67 45 72
94 58 90
72 51 73
45 41 63
79 46 85
67 51 70
67 50 64
56 45 05 51
64 47 .02 52
79 61 86
71 46 74
76 46 84
66 46 56
68 42 73
63 49 .02 56
7650 84
69 50 65
68 37 62
90 52 92
80 48 84
72 45 63
62 47 .04 58
86 51 91
72 45 82
66 45 .03 62
71 40 64
88 61 86
66 44 66
B6 70 96
83 47 89
aft RA 7A


SUN
L Fcst
44 Is
53 s
53 pc
62 s
44 sh
61 s
44 sh
43 ts
57 s
47 pc
48 its
37 shl
44 sh
61 s
49 1I
58 pc
40 sh
48 sh
38 sh
54 pc
43 sh
39 f
63 s
50 pc
46 pc
4O pc
64 S
54 pc
43 sh
45 ts
63 t
48 pc
68 pc
61 a


SAT SUN
City H L PCp. H L Fcst
NewOrleans 84 57 85 61 s
NewYorkCity 71 54 66 46 ts
Nodiok 76 55 82 54 pc
Oklahoma Cily 88 46 94 64 s
Omrnaha 73 45 67 48 pc
PalmSprngs 101 69 97 65 pc
PhiladelpNia 70 51 68 46 sh
Phoenix 102 68 99 70 pc
PItlsbuwgh 60 48 03 61 37 sh
Portlandl ME 65 40 59 42 r
Porland. OR 61 50 .01 60 48 r
Providence, lI 70 42 65 45 ts
Rleigh 76 53 85 55 pc
RapidCily 54 38 63 41 pc
Reno 79 55 71 40 pc
Rochesler. NY 59 49 55 38 sh
Sactamrienlo 73 55 76 54 pc
Salt Lake Cty 82 55 79 50 pc
SanAntonio 92 57 91 61 s
SanDiego 87 65 68 58 1
SanFrancisco 66 55 64 54 1
Savannah 78 59 86 61 s
Seatle 59 48 35 58 48 ts
Spokane 64 52 60 42 ts
St. Louis 77 57 85 58 pc
St Ste Mane 48 38 .13 47 30 fl
Syracusme 62 49 .01 55 40 sh
Topeka 79 46 8 e56 pc
Washington 74 57 75 48 sh
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HHGH & LOW
NIGH Im4, MB"" ,. Caf
LOW 23. Mi. WashirngtoWN H
WORLD cmnS


uosAn Mge le 9 o 15 3 7 7p cSUN
Louisville 73 45 79 54 pc CITY N H SKY
Memphis 79 50 86 63 s
Miwaukee 64 46 .03 52 38 pc Acapulco 87/78/pc
Minneapols 59 43 55 42 pc Amsterdam 53/3W9s
Mobite 80 50 86 58 s Athens 71/59/pc
Montgomery 91 54 87 58 s Selrl 75/42is
Nashville 78 44 84 59 pc Bein 57/3s
Bermuda 75/69/pc
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c cloud, dr- drizle Cairo 98/82/s
llair;. hdhiui, pc.pItly cloudy;: rin; Calgary 36128/sn
rs=mlntow mix; s'uumy drshioweiM Havana 891684s
sr-lsnow, tsiundemWtom Ws wwf Hong Kong e275/pc
WsiA 014 Jerusalem 9691s


Lisbon 78&57/s
London 57/4 1/s
Madrid 73/44/pc
Mexico Cily 7551I/s
Montreal 59/461r
Moscow 53#3/s
Paris 57/41ts
Rio 82/6/mo
Rome 66/48/pc
Sydney 64/4B/pc
Tokyo 6/551pc
Toronio 51/41tr
Warsaw 46/33/r


LEGAL NOTICES




Bid Notices.........................................D8

Meeting Notices..................................D8

Miscellaneous Notices.......................D8

Self Storage Notices..........................D8

Surplus Property ................................D8


S C ITRUIS C L IC OUNTYIE



CHRpONICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-sI.II eI-


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SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 AS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Dorothy
Petrazzolo, 97
BEVERLY HILLS
Dorothy Petrazzolo, age
97, Beverly Hills, died
Wednesday, April 30,2014.
Visitation is from 2 to
4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. with
wake service at 7 p.m.
Monday, May 5, 2014, at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
Mass is at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
May 6,2014, at Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church.




Marshall
Echols III, 90
CRYSTAL RIVER
Marshall Echols III, 90,
of Crystal River, Florida,
slipped away peacefully to
be with the Lord on
April 27,2014, surrounded
by his loving family at Hos-
pice of Citrus County,
Lecanto, Florida. He was
born Feb. 19, 1924, in
Brookhaven, Mississippi,
to the late Marshall and
Winiford (McCracken)
Echols Jr Marshall served
his country honorably dur-
ing World War II and the
Korean conflict in the U.S.
Marine Corps for over 22
years as an aerial naviga-
tor, attaining the rank of
master gunnery sergeant
prior to discharge. After-
ward, he became a leading
window (or as he would
say, "Winnder") salesman
for the Caradco Window
Company, based out of
Dubuque, Iowa, and was a
lifetime member of Dis-
abled American Veterans,
Sarasota, Florida, chapter
He arrived in this area six
years ago, coming from
Raleigh, North Carolina,
and attended Shepherd of
the Hills Episcopal Church
in Lecanto. He enjoyed air-
planes, playing poker,
reading, traveling and es-
pecially betting on football
games with his best friend
of many years, Mike Kester
He was preceded in
death by his sister, Irene
Mimms. He is survived by
his loving wife of 27 years,
Betty Echols. Other sur-
vivors include his son W
Joseph Echols of Floral
City, Florida; his daughter
Melody LeAnn Echols of
Willingboro, New Jersey;
stepsons David Bebeau of
Crystal River, Jon Bebeau
of Tampa, Florida, and
William Bebeau of Vienna,
Virginia; and stepdaughter
Judy Stange of Greens-
boro, North Carolina; his
brother Robert L. Echols
of Paducah, Kentucky; 15
grandchildren, five great-
grandchildren; several
nieces and nephews; and
his much-loved three-
legged cat, "Pirate."
A Celebration of Life
Memorial Service will be
at 1 p.m. Tuesday, May, 6, at
the Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Florida. Commit-
tal services with military
honors will follow the
service at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
Florida. The family wishes
to express its extreme
gratitude to Hospice of Cit-
rus County for making
Marshall's final days ones
of respect, dignity and
peace. He will be greatly
missed. In lieu of flowers,
please consider donations
in Marshall's name to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.






352.795.1424
800.771.0057
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Serving all of Citrus County

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Ernest
Haffner, 73
HERNANDO
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr Ernest
Harold Haffner, age 73, of
Hernando, Florida, will be
held 11:00 AM, Wednesday,
May 7, 2014 at the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Homes. Interment
will follow at Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell,
Florida. The family will
receive friends from 3:00 -
5:00 PM and 7:00-9:00 PM,
Tuesday at the Inverness
Chapel. The family re-
quests expressions of sym-
pathy take the form of
memorial donations to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mr Haffner was born
June 24,1940 in Cleveland,
OH, son of the late
Ernest and Elizabeth
(Hausknecht) Haffner. He
died May 1, 2014 in
Lecanto, FL. Mr Haffner
was an Army veteran of
the Vietnam Era serving in
Korea. He worked as a
cook for the Department of
the Army and moved to
Hernando from Gambrills,
MD in 2004.
Survivors include his
wife, Yong Cha (Toni)
Haffner of Hernando, FL,
2 sons, Charles Haffner
and wife, Miao of Beverly
Hills and Ernest E.
Haffner and husband,
David Watts of Washington,
DC, brother, Terrence
Young, sister, Charlotte
McGinnis and 2 grandchil-
dren, Maxwell J. Haffner
and Elizabell Haffner





Bernard
'Bernie'
Milazzo, 79
HOMOSASSA
Bernard "Bernie"
Leonard Milazzo, age 79, of
Homosassa, Florida,
passed away April 29,2014,
at his home under the care
of his family Born Oct 17,
1934, to Angelo and Bar-
bara (Uncapher) Milazzo.
Bernard moved to Citrus
County 11 years ago from
Atlanta, Georgia. He was a
member of the Beulah
United Methodist Church,
a second lieutenant in the
Marine Corps during the
Korean War and he was a
retired real estate broker
In addition to his par-
ents, He was preceded in
death by his wife, Joanne,
in 2011.
He is survived by his two
children, Victor Milazzo of
Homosassa, Florida, and
Carole Plato of Silver
Spring, Maryland; and two
grandchildren.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
and Crematory in Lecanto,
Florida. Graveside serv-
ices will be at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 6, 2014, at
the Florida National
Cemetery with the Marine
Corps providing honors.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Florida.
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


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John
Gordon, 69
John H. Gordon, 69,
passed away April 25,2014,
at his brother's home, the
Flying Eagle Ranch, in
Manvel, Texas. John
owned and operated John
Gordon Roofing Co. He
was an excellent roofer
and an avid horseman,
He is survived by three
children, his brother and
sister-in-law Garry and
Lee Gordon, Rucell Ne-
smith and Luci Hein.
Please send any dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County
Sign the guestbook at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Irene
Starzinger, 86
INVERNESS
Irene R. Starzinger, 86,
of Inverness, Florida,
passed away April 8, 2014,
at Hospice
of Citrus
and the
Nature


born H.



Reeder and Minnie Spru-
ell Reeder. Her career
highlights include owning
a business, managing traf-
fic for radio and TV sta-
tions in the Midwest and
auditing for state and local
governments. She lived for
30 years in Cocoa Beach
and was part of the space
program, working for
Aerojet and Convair. Irene
completed hHe baccalau-
reate in industrial rela-
tions from Florida
International College. She
moved to Tampa, Florida,
in 1956 to work for WTVT,
where she met her beloved
husband, Karl J.
Starzinger, marrying on
Aug. 9, 1957. Their space
and defense work took
them throughout the
Carihbbean, and Irene was
always game for another
adventure. Her volunteer
activities included Tri-
State Christian Camp and
working with children.
Irene was a member of the
First Christian Church.
Survivors include her
husband of 56 years, Karl
Starzinger of Inverness;
son Erich Starzinger of
Marietta, Georgia; daugh-
ter Tanya Davis and her
husband Chuck of Hugh-
esville, Maryland; grand-
children Charles and
Jenny Davis of Hugh-
esville, Maryland; sister
Ruby Swinford of Wood-
ward, Oklahoma; as well
as many extended family
members. Irene was pre-
ceded in death by three
siblings who died in in-
fancy, and her brothers
Col. John H. Reeder Jr.
(USA, ret.) and Hobert
Reeder.
The family will welcome
friends as we gather to re-
member Irene at 11 a.m.
Tuesday, May 6, 2014, at
the First Christian Church
of Inverness. In lieu of
flowers, please consider a
donation to Hospice of Cit-
rus and the Nature Coast,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464 in appreci-
ation of their loving and
compassionate care. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness.


Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

William 'Bill'
Sperry, 86
SPARTANBURG, S.C.
William Harley "Bill"
Sperry, 86, died Wednes-
day, April 30,2014, in Spar-
tanburg, South Carolina.
Bill was born Sept. 9,
1927, in Buffalo, New York.
He and his mother, Ida
Roth Sperry, moved to Get-
tysburg, Pennsylvania, in
1931. Bill was educated at
Gettysburg High School,
Gettysburg College, and
Duke University He was
called to educate and
spent 39 years as an edu-
cator, coach, counselor
and advisor at The Gover-
nor's Academy (GDA) in
Byfield, Massachusetts.
After retiring in 1993, he
and his wife, Marty, moved
to Florida and enjoyed
many years of golf and sun.
Marty passed away in 2011
and Bill moved to Spartan-
burg to be closer to family
He is survived by his
son, Steve Sperry and his
wife, Elizabeth; his daugh-
ter, Ann S. Vajda and her
husband, Peter; and his
two grandchildren, Jack
and Drew Vajda.
A memorial service for
Bill will be held in July at
The Governor's Academy
Chapel in Byfield, Massa-
chusetts. The date will be
announced in early June.
Bill will be buried be-
side Marty and her family
in the Exeter Cemetery in
New Hampshire.
Condolences may be ex-
pressed to the family at
wwwJMDunbar.com.
JM Dunbar Funeral
Home

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
A U.S. flag indicates
those who served in
the U.S. military.
Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Contact
Anne Farrior 564-2931
Darrell Watson 564-2197


Associated Press
Actor Efrem Zimbalist Jr. watches during an FBI
ceremony June 8, 2009, honoring him at the Federal
building in Los Angeles. Zimbalist, the son of famous
musicians who gained television stardom in the 1950s
hit "77 Sunset Strip" and later "The F.B.I.," died Friday
at his ranch in Solvang, Calif.


Efrem Zimbalist Jr.

dead at age 95


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
Efrem Zimbalist Jr, the
son of famous musical
parents who established
his own lasting celebrity
in two of television's most
popular series, "77 Sunset
Strip" and "The EBI.,"
died Friday at age 95.
Zimbalist died at his
Solvang home in Califor-
nia's bucolic horse coun-
try, said family friend
Judith Moose, who re-
leased a statement from
his children Stephanie
Zimbalist and Efrem Zim-
balist III.
"We are heartbroken to
announce the passing
into peace of our beloved
father, Efrem Zimbalist
Jr, today at his Solvang
ranch," the statement
read. "He actively en-
joyed his life to the last
day, showering love on his
extended family, playing
golf and visiting with
close friends."
Zimbalist's stunning
good looks and cool, de-
ductive manner made
him the ideal star as the
hip private detective fer-
reting out Hollywood mis-
creants in "77 Sunset
Strip," which aired from
1958 to 1964. As soon as
that show ended he
segued seamlessly into
"The FB.I." which aired
from 1965 to 1974.
At the end of each
episode of the latter show,
after Zimbalist and his fel-
low G-men had captured
that week's mobsters, sub-
versives, bank robbers or
spies, the series would
post photos from the FBI's


real-life most-wanted list
Some of those pictures led
to arrests, which helped
give the show the com-
plete seal of approval of
the agency's real-life di-
rector, J. Edgar Hoover
The son of violin virtu-
oso Efrem Zimbalist and
acclaimed opera singer
Alma Gluck, young Efrem
initially appeared
headed for a musical ca-
reer He studied violin for
seven years under the
tutelage of Jascha
Heifetz's father, but even-
tually developed more in-
terest in theater
He became an actor
and "77 Sunset Strip"
made him a star
During World War II he
served in the infantry, re-
ceiving a Purple Heart
for a shrapnel wound in
his leg.
In 1945, Zimbalist mar-
ried Emily McNair and
they had a daughter,
Nancy and son, Efrem III.
After his wife died in
1950 he gave up acting for
a time to teach at the Cur-
tis Institute in Philadel-
phia, where his father
was an artist in residence.
He returned to Holly-
wood five years later,
marrying Loranda
Stephanie Spalding in
1956, and she gave birth to
their daughter Stephanie.
Zimbalist was pre-
ceded in death by his sec-
ond wife and by his
daughter Nancy
In addition to his son
and other daughter,
Stephanie, he is survived
by four grandchildren
and several great-grand-
children.


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A6 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BRAVE
Continued from Page Al

MEN
On Monday, May 5, as part of
Police Memorial Month, local
members of the National Associ-
ation of Retired Law Enforce-
ment Officers (NARLEO) will be
in Tallahassee to formally induct
Florida prison guard Rufus R.W
Walters into the Florida State
Law Enforcement Memorial.
"It's a long time coming," said
NARLEO member Chris Talar
For more than 70 years,
NARLEO members had never
heard the name Rufus Walters
- until about two years ago
when the Chronicle ran a "this
date in history" item mentioning
his death. That set the wheels in
motion for local NARLEO mem-
bers to find information about
the prison guard so they could
give one of their own a formal
memorial.
Although Walters worked as a
prison guard, he was paid by the
state highway department,
which was the reason NARLEO
members couldn't find any
records through the Florida
State Corrections archives.
As they researched, they dis-
covered, tucked away in a 1938
newspaper article, mention of
the road gang escape, the mur-
der of Walters and the account of
the ensuing events in "Dynamic
Detective: True Police Cases," a
tabloid-type magazine popular
in those days.
"I knew of a rare book dealer
in New Jersey who had pur-
chased the archives of a number
of 'true detective' type maga-
zines ... and after many months
of searching the archives, we hit
pay dirt," Talar said. "We found
an edition of 'Dynamic Detec-
tive' that featured an eight-page
article titled 'Chain Gang
Killers!' with photos of Walters,
his killers, the crime scene, even
a photo of then-sheriff Charles
Dean Sr It was a treasure trove
of information and proved to be
the final piece of evidence that
would give Rufus Walters the
recognition he has been denied
for so long."
Sen. Charles Dean, former Cit-
rus County sheriff and son of
then-Sheriff Dean, said although
all this happened before he was
born, he remembers the old Flo-
ral City "convict camp" that was
part of the Florida state prison.
"I remember it was out there
on (County Road) 48 on the right-
hand side after you go through
the "S" curves my cousin
worked there as a guard," he
said. 'A few of the buildings, part
of the old sheds, I think are still
standing, but all the housing for


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 A7


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Special to the Chronicle
Sheriff Charles Dean Sr. served as Citrus County Sheriff from 1928 to 1946. He was sheriff at the time prison guard Rufus Walters was shot
by an inmate who was working on a road gang in Floral City when there was a prison camp on County Road 48.


* WHAT: National Association
of Retired Law Enforcement
Officers (NARLEO) annual
Peace Officers Memorial
Day service to honor fallen
officers.
WHEN: 10 a.m. Thursday,
May 15.
WHERE: Cooter Pond Park
next to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office in Inverness.

prisoners and guards and the
administration buildings are all
gone."
Most of it was torn down in ei-
ther the late 1970s or early '80s,
Dean said. He added that having
a statewide memorial dedicated
to law enforcement officers who
have lost their lives in the line of
duty is both "appropriate and
fitting."
'As a former sheriff, I cer-
tainly support that," he said,
"and I recognize the good work,
the efficiency and professional-
ism of NARLEO as an
organization."
MEN
As for the rest of the story, the
gun used in Walters' murder had


been supplied by a third man,
ex-convict James Ragean, who
had been released from the Flo-
ral City camp just days earlier
After Parrish and Sherman
fled, they stole a number of cars,
including one they hijacked
from two Florida legislators on
their way to Tampa to attend a
caucus. The escaped duo and
two other men they picked up
along the way eventually ended
up in Michigan, where they were
spotted by local police in
Dearborn.
That was Aug. 6,1938.
"All right, pile out, you fellows
- we want to check over the
car," the "Dynamic Detective"
account reads, taking creative li-
cense with the true-life incident.
Sullenly, the fourmen obeyed.
One casthis eyes furtively about.
Patrolman Clifford Gowing
came up just then and assisted
with the search. Officers Ray-
mond Baldi and Ralph Dahlen
kept their eyes on the smirking
quartet. Gowing suddenly called
out from inside the car
"They must have been up to
something. Here's a gun."
At that instant the shifty-eyed


member of the group
broke and fled.
"Stop!" called
Dahlen. "Stop, or I'll
letyou have it."
The fleeing man ig-
nored the man. He
ran the harder Officer
Dahlen leveled his re-
volver in the murky
light. His final com-
mand to halt was
ignored.
Dahlen fired a sin-
gle shot. The fleeing
man pitched headlong
to the pavement and
lay still.
MEN
The dead man was
Arthur Sherman. His
accomplice, Bruce
Parrish, was returned
to Florida where he


was later found guilty
of first-degree murder, given a
life sentence and sent to Raiford
state prison, where he was to be
"denied all privileges."
The two other men, William
Zahart and George Bergia, were
not charged with anything; as far
as anyone knows, James Ragean


. . .. ,?
: .. .::- .- .-. /

: .. . -: -: i--: ;




'UL



"Dynamic Detective" magazine's eight-page
spread about the incident was titled "Chain
Gang Killers!"


was never found.
And, thanks to NARLEO,
Florida prison guard Rufus Wal-
ters' memory lives on.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Nancy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
or nkennedy@chronicleonline.
comn.


HOSPICE
Continued from Page Al

walkway raising of the
American flag, flag-folding
ceremony, 21-gun salute
and Commissioner John
"JJ" Kenney singing the
National Anthem.
Following the ceremony,
attendees reassembled in
the back courtyard for a
release of 50 butterflies
and 10 doves. The doors
were then opened to the
facility for personal tours
and refreshments.
The facility rests on 16
acres and is complete with
a restaurant-size country
kitchen, wooded court-
yard, snack area, 30-foot
ceilings in the central
area, fireplace in the main
lobby, private conference
rooms, family waiting
area, "Quiet Room" that
serves as a chapel, en-


HPH HOSPICE FACTS
* Established in June 1982 and licensed in 1984 as Hernando-Pasco Hospice.
* Began service in Citrus County in June 2005.
* Changed name to HPH Hospice in June 2009.
* HPH Hospice has thrift stores in New Port Richey and Wesley Chapel.
* Mission statement: "HPH is where excellence in compassionate care maximizes
quality of life."
* Care centers: New Port Richey, Hudson, Dade City, Brooksville and Lecanto.
* Information and referrals: 866-940-0962.


* Website: www.hph-hospice.org.


closed patio, nurses sta- perce
tion, community meeting
room and upstairs staff of-
fices and work space.
Clearly, the care center
was designed for the spe-
cific needs of patients. F
"The hospitals will dis-
charge them here to get
their pain and symptoms
under control and then
they transition to their
home or assisted living fa-
cility," Black said. "Ninety


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keep people where they
are most comfortable."
Eight critical-care suites
with French doors lead out
to a patio. Also in the
suites is a sofa with a pull-
out bed for family mem-
bers to stay overnight.
Black said the facility
will begin serving patients


once the Agency for
Health Care Administra-
tion performs a safety
check.
Anyone who missed the
grand opening because of
the inclement weather is
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Weekly ROUNDUP



Week in state government: 'sine die'


The News Service
of Florida

TALLAHASSEE In
some ways, it was a session
of the unexpected.
When lawmakers de-
camped to Tallahassee at
the beginning of March,
the agenda was full of con-
servative red meat. Taxes
and fees would be slashed
by $500 million. The state's
de facto school-vouchers
program would be ex-
panded. Military veterans
would be given benefits in
something dubbed the
"Florida GI Bill." Public-
employee pensions would
be overhauled. And, if all
went well, Gov Rick Scott
would be placed on a glide
path to re-election.
Most of those things hap-
pened though, it should
be noted, the pension
changes went down in
flames. Some of them hap-
pened in an unexpected
way, such as the voucher
expansion, which seemed
dead 12 hours before it
was revived.
But other items that
weren't on the radar or at
best looked like long shots
before the Legislature was
gaveled into session in
March ended up headed to
Scott's desk by the time of
the Legislature's tradi-
tional adjournment "sine
die."
Some undocumented
immigrants will be able to
pay in-state tuition at
Florida colleges and could
become eligible to prac-
tice law in the state. And
Republicans furiously
fighting against a constitu-
tional amendment that
would allow the use of
marijuana for medical
problems backed a pro-
posal that would give ac-
cess to a non-euphoric
version of the drug to rein
in frequent seizures. Scott
said he would sign those
measures.
Other issues of interest
mostly to Adams Street in-
siders and the most politi-
cally active citizens also
moved through. Under one
bill, the 2016 session will
begin in January, as long
as Scott approves, allow-
ing Tallahassee-bound re-
porters to head to spring
training games and law-
makers to get back home
and start raising money Or
they could enjoy a spring
weekend at the beach in-
stead of in the Capitol's
Knott Building. Under an-
other measure, voters will
decide this fall whether
outgoing governors should
replace retiring Supreme
Court justices when
they're leaving office at
the same time.
As for Scott's re-election
- polls are all over the
map. Former Gov Charlie
Crist, the most likely Dem-
ocratic nominee, is ahead
by a lot, or a little, or in a
dead heat with his succes-
sor, depending on which
survey you prefer. Scott
has already spent what
Democrats estimate to be
about $20 million on cam-
paign ads, but if he
reaches his self-identified
fundraising goal for the
election, there's $80 mil-
lion more where that came
from. And most Floridians
are either just beginning
to tune into the contest or
waiting for a few more
months before they make
up their minds.
Which means that the
election this fall could be


Associated Press
Senate president Don Gaetz, R- Niceville, talks with house speaker Will Weatherford on the phone Friday as he
prepares to bang the gavel to end the session in Tallahassee. Florida legislators signed off on a record $77 billion
budget.


like the session that just
ended: some things pre-
dictable, some things un-
expected and an
interesting ride all the way
to the end.
2014 WORK PLAN:
NOT ACCORDING
TO PLAN
For the second year in a
row, House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, and Senate
President Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville, touted their
ability to compromise and
reach a joint "work plan"
for their chambers a
shared agenda meant to
serve as a contrast to the
often-toxic relationship
between their predeces-
sors, former House
Speaker Dean Cannon and
former Senate President
Mike Haridopolos.
For the second year in a
row, the document in-
cluded changes to the
Florida Retirement Sys-
tem as one of its compo-
nents. And for the second
year in a row, the work
plan was largely a success
- except for the FRS
changes. Gaetz said after-
ward that the two leaders
won approval for "about
4.3" of their five work plan
entries.
The failure of the pen-
sion overhaul was particu-
larly frustrating for
Weatherford, who was the
primary force behind
overhauling the retire-
ment system for hundreds
of thousands of state and
county employees. On
Wednesday, Weatherford
wasn't quite ready to con-
cede defeat on the initia-
tive but was already
eulogizing the plan, which
went through multiple ver-
sions as lawmakers looked
for the combination that
could pass the Senate.
"We've always known
that it wasn't going to be an
easy lift," he said.
Another one of Weather-
ford's work-plan priorities
came down to the very
end, when a drive to ex-
pand eligibility for the
state's de facto voucher
program passed in the
waning hours of the ses-


sion. The plan appeared
dead on Thursday evening
after Democrats used a
procedural move to block
it on the Senate floor
But Republicans re-
vived it Friday morning,
tacking it onto another ed-
ucation measure (SB 850).
That bill passed only to
twice be put on hold in the
House, as lawmakers dis-
cussed whether to take off
language dealing with
diplomas for students with
disabilities, an issue that
was a priority of Sen. Andy
Gardiner, an Orlando Re-
publican who will take
over from Gaetz following
the November elections.
Ultimately, the House let
the measure pass un-
changed.
Other work-plan priori-
ties including increas-
ing benefits for veterans,
slashing taxes and fees by
$500 million and improv-
ing state services for the
elderly and children -
proved easier to pass, usu-
ally by broad, bipartisan
margins.
"While there's dysfunc-
tion in Washington, D.C.,
and other states around
the country, you showed
that we could put policy
above politics. We could
put Florida above politics.
And we can pass a signifi-
cant work plan that
changes the way that our
state grows and changes
the way that we prosper,"
Weatherford said after the
session ended.
TRYING TO REGAIN
INNOCENTS
Gaetz and Weatherford
had already agreed to
focus on reforming the
child welfare system as
part of the work plan when


The Miami Herald began
running "Innocents Lost,"
a scathing series of articles
documenting 477 child
deaths over six years.
On the last day of the
session, lawmakers ap-
proved a far-reaching bill
designed to revamp Flori-
das child welfare system,
which had drawn legisla-
tive scrutiny over child
deaths even before the
Herald's reporting. The
measure (SB 1666) passed
both chambers unani-
mously, accompanied by
$47 million in new funding
for child protection.
I believe that this legis-
lation includes provisions
that will require informa-
tion about the tragedy of
children dying and make
that information available,
Gaetz said.
The measure was linked
to a sweeping human traf-
ficking bill (HB 7141), and
both were collaborations
by the House Healthy
Families Subcommittee
and the Senate Children,
Families and Elder Affairs
Committee.
Funding for the bills is
linked, also. The biggest
item is for child protective
investigators, with
$18.5 million for 191 posi-
tions at the Department of
Children and Families and
$8 million for the six
county sheriffs offices that
conduct investigations.
The goal is to reduce in-
vestigator caseloads.
GAMBLING
GOES BUST
A gambling overhaul
was a crap shoot from the
beginning, and in the end
it turned out to be no dice.
Lawmakers spent
$400,000 on a gambling


analysis by New Jersey-
based Spectrum Group,
didn't like the first version
the industry group pro-
vided and, ultimately,
shelved any gambling leg-
islation altogether
Out-of-state gambling
operators have pushed the
Legislature for several
years to approve "destina-
tion resorts" a term that
this spring morphed into
"integrated resorts." The
issue split the business
community, with the
Disney-friendly Florida
Chamber of Commerce ar-
dently opposed to the idea
while Associated Indus-
tries of Florida, after bud-
dying up with Las Vegas
Sands, arguing that casino
resorts would be an eco-
nomic and jobs boon to the
state.
The Senate Gaming
Committee took its show
on the road, holding six
hearings throughout the
state to take testimony
from folks on both sides of
the issue, before floating a
proposal that would have
allowed two casino resorts
- one each in Broward
and Miami-Dade counties
- that would have paired
hotels, retail and slots.
But Weatherford effec-
tively put any gambling
plans on ice early in the
session when he laid out
two requirements for any
legislation to pass his
chamber
Weatherford wanted a
constitutional amendment
to go on the November bal-
lot that, if approved by vot-
ers, would have required a
statewide vote on any fu-


ture gambling expansions.
What finally killed any
gambling proposals this
session was Weatherford's
almost insurmountable
second condition that
Scott complete a deal with
the Seminole Tribe of
Florida before the end of
the session.
Scott is negotiating the
portion of a 2010 compact
that gave the Seminoles
the "exclusive" rights to
banked card games, in-
cluding blackjack, at five
of its seven facilities in ex-
change for $1 billion over
five years. The card deal
expires on Aug. 1,2015.
Just a week before the
session ended, Scott's en-
voys- Lt. Gov. Carlos
Lopez-Cantera, the gover-
nor's chief of staff Adam
Hollingsworth and general
counsel Pete Antonacci -
told House and Senate
leaders in private meet-
ings that a deal with the
tribe was imminent.
Legislators who were
part of the huddles said
that Scott's team didn't re-
veal any details but were
instead "taking the tem-
perature" on the possibil-
ity of a special session in
mid-May so the Legisla-
ture could ratify the
compact.
But news leaked out that
the Seminoles were will-
ing to pay more than
$2.5 billion over seven
years to add another
casino in Fort Pierce, and
that the deal didn't appear
to include any sweeteners
for casino operators or the
state's pari-mutuels.
That put the kibosh, at
least for now, on a special
session.
GOING TO POT
The Republican-
dominated Legislature
doesn't like pot.
At least, not until this
year, when, in an amazing
turnaround, legislators
gave overwhelming sup-
port to a medical mari-
juana proposal Scott has
said he will sign. The pro-
posal deals with a strain of
marijuana that is low in
euphoria-inducing
tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC) but high in
cannabidiol (CBD). The
strain, known as "Char-
lotte's Web," is supposed to
dramatically reduce life-
threatening seizures in
children with a rare-form
of epilepsy but has not
been approved by the
U.S. Food and Drug
Administration.
Holley and Peyton
Moseley a Panhandle
couple who enlisted the
support of Rep. Matt
Gaetz, a Fort Walton Beach
Republican who just hap-
pens to be the Senate pres-
ident's son led the
charge on the issue on be-
half of their adopted
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


STATE
Continued from Page AS

daughter RayAnn and
about 150,000 other
Florida families they say
can benefit from the low-
THC marijuana.
Scott said he will sign
the proposal (SB 1030),
though the governor failed
to limit the bill as he had
hoped. The governor
wanted to only allow pa-
tients involved in clinical
trials to have access to the
marijuana, usually admin-
istered in paste or oil form.
"I'm a parent and a
grandparent. I want to
make sure my children, my
grandchildren, have the
access to the health care
they want," Scott told re-
porters after the measure
received final approval
from the Legislature on
Thursday
Politically, some Repub-
lican lawmakers were
faced with a dilemma. For
them, approving even a
strain of cannabis that
purportedly doesn't get
users high was troubling.
What made it even more
problematic was many Re-
publicans' staunch opposi-
tion to a proposed
constitutional amendment
on the November ballot
that would allow doctors to
order regular old mari-
juana for critically ill
patients.
"I think after people an-
alyze it they are going to
kind of line up. They'll ei-
ther say there is a right
way involving these deriv-
atives and there's a wrong
way and contrast it with
the amendment. Or they'll
say people are going to get
this all mixed up and think
I'm for (medical mari-
juana). It depends how
their district reads and
how they want to be seen,"
House Judiciary Chair-
man Dennis Baxley, R-
Ocala, said earlier this
year
Holley and RayAnn
Moseley met briefly with
Scott in his office after the
low-THC bill passed. For
Holley Moseley, the issue
is all about saving lives of
children like RayAnn, who
sometimes has hundreds
of seizures a week.


"I just look forward to
the day that she gets to
start it. Hopefully we'll be
coming back next year to
brag and show her off," she
said.
IMMIGRATING TO A
NEW POSITION
For years, Florida Re-
publicans have found
strong opposition to illegal
immigration and any-
thing that might encourage
it safe political ground.
Scott himself got elected in
part by labeling then-
Attorney General Bill
McCollum insufficiently
tough on illegal immigra-
tion during the 2010 GOP
primary
Then came the Mitt
Romney wipeout in 2012,
when Latinos helped pro-
pel President Barack
Obama's re-election vic-
tory nationwide and in
Florida. Suddenly, insid-
ers from Washington to
Tallahassee were looking
for new ways to appeal to
Hispanic voters, many of
whom viewed anti-illegal
immigration rhetoric as a
window into an anti-
Latino mindset among
some in the GOP
In Florida, Republicans
settled on two proposals:
One that would allow un-
documented immigrants
brought to America as chil-
dren to pay in-state tuition
at state colleges and uni-
versities, and another
paving the way for an un-
documented immigrant to
practice law in Florida.
In perhaps the highest-
profile turnaround, Scott
has promised to sign both
bills, and in particular
championed the tuition
legislation, which also
does away with the ability
of most state universities
to request tuition in-
creases from the Florida
Board of Governors with-
out legislative approval.
(The University of Florida
and Florida State Univer-
sity will keep that author-
ity, but at a much lower
level.)
The measure (HB 851)
allowed Scott to needle
Crist, who opposed similar
proposals when he was
governor but also now sup-
ports them.
"We are trying to right
the wrongs of the previous


WINNING LEGISLATION
TALLAHASSEE Legislation that passed during
the 2014 regular session of the Florida Legislature,
which ended Friday.
* See losing legislation./Page AO10
ABORTION
* Would ban abortions if a doctor determines the
fetus could survive outside the womb.
* Would allow criminal charges for the death or injury
of a fetus at any stage of development after crimes
committed against the mother. Current law only
allows murder or manslaughter charges after the
death of a fetus that has developed to the point it
can survive outside the womb.
CONSUMERS
* Will reduce motor vehicle registration fees.
* Would give shoppers buying clothes and school
supplies a three-day tax holiday in August, a three-
day sales tax holiday in September on the purchase
of energy efficient appliances and a nine-day sales
tax holiday on the sale of hurricane preparation
supplies such as batteries and generators.
CRIME
* Creates a mandatory minimum prison sentence of
50 years for people who rape children, elderly or
mentally disabled people.
* Revises the Jimmy Ryce Act to potentially make
more sexual predators go through a review to
determine if they should be committed to a
treatment center after finishing their sentences.
* Would increase the penalties for harvesting or
possessing spiny lobsters out of season.
* Increase penalties for leaving the scene of an
accident in which someone is injured or killed.
* Would eliminate mandatory life sentences for
juveniles who commit first-degree murder and
create a sentencing review for juveniles who
commit first-degree felonies. An exception would be
made for juveniles convicted of violent felonies
before committing a first-degree murder.
* Would enhance penalties for school employees or
volunteers who commit sexual offenses against
students.
EDUCATION
* Would allow state university foundation boards to
meet in secret if they are discussing research
proposals and funding for that research.
* Would ban school districts from being able to
collect information on the political or religious
affiliation of students and their parents. It would
also ban the collection of biometric information
including student fingerprints, palm scans or iris
scans.
* Would expand a private-school voucher program to
make more families eligible.
* Would allow parents a chance to object to
textbooks used at public schools.


administration that raised
the price of a college edu-
cation and opposed pro-
viding in-state tuition for
children of immigrants,"
he said in a statement Fri-
day "The Legislature did


the right thing, and I look
forward to signing this his-
toric legislation."
The more personal
measure, though, might
have been the one that will
allow Jose Godinez-


Samperio the right to be-
come a lawyer in Florida.
Helped out by a push from
influential Senate Rules
Chairman John Thrasher,
R-St. Augustine, and Sen.
Darren Soto, D-Orlando,
the measure became law
after being attached to an-
other bill (HB 755).
Posing for a photograph
while clutching the 26-7
vote sheet in his hand Fri-
day evening, Godinez-
Samperio said Friday
evening he "thought this
was going to be a disaster"
when he and his team first
started lobbying the Legis-
lature to change the law
"I'm ecstatic," he said.
"It's a dream come true. Ift's
a great day for Florida."
In a sign of the limits of
the GOP's evolution on im-
migration, neither bill
would have become law
without the support of
Democratic lawmakers.
But as he addressed the
House on the tuition bill,
Rep. Jose Javier Ro-
driguez, D-Miami, still en-
tertained the possibility
that things had changed in
Florida for good.
"I hope that this signals
an end to the anti-immi-
grant extremism that has
reigned in both of these
houses for over a decade,"
said Rep. Jose Javier Ro-
driguez, D-Miami.
AND ONE
MORE THING
One bill will never be a
surprise when it passes
the Legislature: The
budget for the coming fis-
cal year, which begins
July 1. Lawmakers are
constitutionally incapable
- literally of going
home without deciding
how to spend the tens of
billions of dollars that
come in from the state's
taxpayers and the federal
government.
In this case, it was
nearly $77.1 billion, a
record in terms of raw dol-
lars. The state's economic
recovery appears to be
picking up steam. And
while Scott and Crist ar-
gued over whether the gov-
ernor or the president
deserves more credit, the
Legislature was more than
happy to shower the extra
funding on public schools,
child welfare and more


than a few local projects.
Not to mention the
$500 million in tax and fee
reductions most of it
spoken for in a measure
Scott has already signed to
roll back an increase in
motor-vehicle fees signed
by (not coincidentally)
Crist. The other $105 mil-
lion was covered by a
mish-mash of tax holidays,
credits and exemptions
that the House sponsor,
Rep. Ritch Workman,
R-Melbourne, labeled
a "patchwork of
awesomeness."
What adjective did
Workman, R-Melbourne,
use to describe the final
version of HB 5601
approved Friday?
"Awesomer."
The handful of Democ-
rats who voted against the
bill were left with only one
complaint: Lawmakers
should have spent more,
particularly on education
and trimming waiting lists
for state services.
"The economy is good.
We're moving in the right
direction. There's more
money around. But there's
a problem with priorities,"
said Rep. Elaine Schwartz,
D-Hollywood.
The budget sailed
through, the session ad-
journed and lawmakers
were free to focus on their
re-election campaigns -
and ponder what surprises
might be in store when they
return in a little more than
300 days to start the annual
session all over again.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: The Legislature
adjourned its 2014 session
at 10:40 p.m. Friday, setting
the stage for the Novem-
ber elections.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "I've been wrongly
accused, I've been left on
Death Row and had one
hour to die in the electric
chair, and I prayed to ful-
fill my need. Sometimes
my fellow men have let me
down, but God have lifted)
me up." James Joseph
Richardson, 78-year-old
man who could finally re-
ceive payment for the 21
years he wrongly served in
prison after his seven chil-
dren died of poisoning.
The Legislature approved
a bill allowing him to apply
for compensation.


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SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 A9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LOSING LEGISLATION


TALLAHASSEE Measures that failed
to pass during the 2012 regular
session of the Florida Legislature,
which ended Friday, would have:
BUSINESS & ECONOMY
* Set aside state incentives for film and
television productions.
* Raised the state's minimum wage to
$10.10 an hour.
* Regulated the growing number of
craft breweries in the state.
* Permitted the sale of liquor in grocery
stores instead of requiring it to be
sold in a stand-alone facility.
CONSUMERS
* Legalized the sale of half-gallon
refillable beer containers known as
growlers. While Florida allows
unlimited gallon and quart growler
sales, the state's odd bottle laws ban


the 64-ounce size that is the industry
standard in 47 states.
EDUCATION
* Allowed school employees or
volunteers with law-enforcement or
military training to carry firearms
to fight back in the event of a
schoolhouse attack.
* Split the Florida A&M University and
Florida State University engineering
college.
* Removed from public record the
names of applicants for university and
college presidents.
* Mandated all school districts review
textbooks and ended a state approval
process for textbooks.
* Required high school students take a
semester-long course that deals with
personal finances.


* Changed the service requirements for
the Bright Futures college scholarship
program so that students could work
on political campaigns and get credit
for it.
* Halted implementation of Florida's
transition to new school standards
based primarily on Common Core
State Standards.
ENVIRONMENT
* Protected Florida's springs by trying
to limit overpumping of groundwater
and limiting potential sources of
pollution.
GAMBLING
* Allowed casinos in South Florida and
created a new statewide commission
to oversee gambling.
* Let dog tracks end greyhound racing
but keep their permits for other


gambling activities such as poker
rooms.
GOVERNMENT
* Closed off the state's pension plan to
newly elected officials and top
employees while also increasing the
vesting period.
* Ended the perk that allows the
governor and other top state
employees to pay lower premiums for
health insurance than other rank-and-
file state workers.
* Required drug testing of elected
officials and judges.
GUNS
* Repealed the state's "stand your
ground" self-defense law.
* Allowed someone to carry a concealed
weapon or gun while evacuating
during an emergency.


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FHP trooper killed on 1-75
OCALA-A Florida Highway Patrol trooper
was killed in the line of duty Saturday while
working a traffic crash on Interstate 75, ac-
cording to an FHP news release.
At 1:40 p.m., a trooper arrived on the scene
of a two-car crash on 1-75 southbound at mile
marker 341. Both cars involved in the crash
were on the shoulder of the highway. Just
after 2 p.m., as the trooper was talking with a
tow-truck driver, a multi-vehicle crash occurred
in the southbound lanes of 1-75, in the same
area.
During the crash, a southbound pickup
truck traveled onto the east shoulder and
struck the FHP Patrol vehicle, the trooper, the
tow-truck driver and another pedestrian as
they stood on the shoulder of the road.
The trooper and the tow truck driver were
pronounced dead on the scene. The third
pedestrian was transported in critical condition
to Ocala Regional Hospital.
Southbound lanes of 1-75 had heavy delays
due to the traffic homicide investigation.
Chase ends with deputy
shooting robbery suspect
LAKE WORTH -A man suspected of at-
tempting an armed robbery in Lake Worth, in
which shots were fired, is in the hospital after
later being shot by a deputy.
The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office
said it is investigating the incident, which oc-
curred early Saturday morning.
Authorities said deputies responded to the
area of the suspected robbery near Sixth Av-
enue. Later, a patrolling deputy later encoun-
tered the suspect, whose name was not
released. Afoot chase ensued into an alley,
where officials said the suspect pointed a gun
toward the deputy, prompting the deputy to
shoot.
The man was taken to Delray Medical,
where he was listed in critical condition with
non-life threatening injuries.
The deputy, whose name was also not re-
leased, has been placed on administrative
leave.
Teen guilty of fatally
shooting police dog
WEST PALM BEACH -A South Florida
teen was convicted of fatally shooting a police
dog during a burglary.
A Palm Beach County jury found 17-year-
old Ivins Rosier, who was tried as an adult,
guilty Thursday of animal cruelty, armed bur-
glary and shooting into an occupied building.
He previously declined a plea deal that would
have sent him to prison for 20 years.
Authorities said Rosier was one of three
teens who broke into the home of Florida
Highway Patrol Trooper Robert Boody in No-
vember 2012. During the break-in, a 5-year-
old German Shepherd who lived at the home
was shot several times. The retired K-9 had to
be euthanized five days later.
One of Rosier's co-defendants is still await-
ing trial.
Police officer found guilty
WEST PALM BEACH -A South Florida
police officer has pleaded guilty to selling
drugs illegally while in uniform and carrying his
service weapon.
Court records show that 45-year-old Dewitt
McDonald pleaded guilty in federal court last
week. McDonald is an officer with the West
Palm Beach Police Department.
Authorities said McDonald also operated a
pair of health and wellness clinics. Through
these, he acknowledged illegally selling
steroids and other prescription drugs.
McDonald also admitted in March that he
delivered drugs to another police officer while
carrying his weapon and on duty.
McDonald faces a sentence of between five
years and life in prison. A Fort Lauderdale fed-
eral judge is scheduled to sentence him on
July 18.


Memorial


Associated Press
Audrey Baker, 3, hugs a flag given to her
to honor the memory of her father, Sgt. 1st
Class Jeffrey Baker, on Saturday during
the Explosive Ordnance Disposal 45th
annual Memorial Service at the Kauffman
EOD Training Complex on Eglin Air Force
Base. Baker was killed in action May 14,
2013, while serving with an EOD unit in
Afghanistan.


Cubans who landed in Keys
settling into life in US
CORAL GABLES Twenty-three Cubans
who fled the island on a raft are settling into
life in the U.S. after making it safely to the
Florida Keys.
The Cubans left early Sunday, April 27, and
arrived 18 hours later in the Marquesas Keys.
Twenty-two of the migrants were adult men,
and one was a woman. A fisherman spotted
them on land and alerted the Coast Guard.
Cubans who arrive in the U.S. are generally
allowed to stay under the "wet-foot, dry-foot"
policy, while those stopped at sea are usually
returned home.
Thirty-five-year-old Leodan Cruz said he
and other migrants embraced and shouted
"Liberty!" when they made it to shore.
The nonprofit Church World Service organi-
zation is helping the migrants process their
paperwork and resettle in other parts of the
United States.
Megabus.com expanding
ORLANDO -An express bus service
known for affordable fares is expanding in
Florida.
Megabus.com announced last week it is ex-
panding the number destinations someone
can travel to from Orlando.
Riders can now travel to Miami, Tallahassee
and Tampa from Orlando. That's in addition to
existing routes to Atlanta, Gainesville and
Jacksonville.
Travelers also will now be able to ride from
Orlando to New Orleans, with a stop in Mo-
bile, Alabama.
The company said 60 new jobs will be cre-
ated from Megabus.com's expansion in
Florida.
I ticket wins $1.5 million
Mega Money jackpot
TALLAHASSEE One ticket matched all
four numbers plus the Mega Ball to win a
$1 million Mega Money jackpot, Florida Lot-
tery officials said Saturday.
The winning ticket was purchased in Pom-
pano Beach.
Six tickets won $1,112.50 for picking 4-of-4.
The numbers drawn Tuesday night were
26-30-39-41 and the Mega Ball was 01.
-From staff and wire reports


State BRIEFS


Associated Press
DALLAS A bungled execution in
Oklahoma in which the condemned
prisoner writhed and moaned as he re-
ceived a lethal injection outraged death-
penalty opponents, invited court
challenges and attracted worldwide
attention.
But the inmate's agony alone
is highly unlikely to change
minds about capital punishment
in the nation's most active death-
penalty states, where lawmakers I
say there is little political will to
move against lethal injections -
and a single execution gone
wrong won't change that. Cia:
Oklahoma Rep. Mike Chris- Loc
tian, a Republican lawmaker exec
who pushed to have state Tuesc
Supreme Court justices im- Oklat
peached for briefly halting Tues-
day's execution, was unsparing.
"I realize this may sound harsh,"
Christian said, "but as a father and for-
mer lawman, I really don't care if it's by
lethal injection, by the electric chair, fir-
ing squad, hanging, the guillotine or
being fed to the lions."
Attorneys for death-row inmates hope
Tuesday's spectacle provides new evi-
dence to argue that the injections are in-
humane and illegal. But beyond the
courtroom, support for capital punish-
ment is undeterred in the states that
perform the greatest number of execu-
tions Texas, Oklahoma, Florida, Mis-
souri, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. And
nowhere in those places are any elected
officials of either political party talking
seriously about using the incident to
seek an end to executions.
Missouri Rep. Paul Fitzwater, a Re-
publican who chairs the state House's
corrections committee, called the
botched execution "horrible" and "defi-
nitely not humane" but said it had not
sparked any calls for reform.
Oklahoma prison officials said Tues-
day's execution of Clayton Lockett went
awry when an intravenous line of
deadly drugs became dislodged. He
later died from an apparent heart at-
tack. Lockett had been condemned for
shooting a 19-year-old girl with a sawed-
off shotgun and watching as two accom-
plices buried her alive.
Oklahoma Gov Mary Fallin has stayed
an upcoming execution as prison offi-
cials investigate, but she too reaffirmed


her support for capital punishment.
On Friday, President Barack Obama
said the Oklahoma event highlighted
problems with the death penalty and
he's asking his attorney general for a
review.
National surveys by Gallup indicate
that support for the death penalty re-
mains strong, though it has de-
clined over the past 20 years,
S from 80 percent in favor of capi-
tal punishment in 1992 to 60 per-
S cent two years ago.
There are signs of a shift, pri-
S marily in the West and North-
S east, after almost four decades
Sin which no state legislatures
rton voted to end executions.
kett Five states New Jersey, New
uted Mexico, Illinois, Connecticut and
lay in Maryland have formally abol-
oma. ished the death penalty in the
last seven years, according to the
Death Penalty Information Center,
which opposes capital punishment. New
York's death penalty was abolished by a
court, and several other states have
placed executions on hold. An anti-death
penalty bill in New Hampshire fell one
vote short of passage.
Lawmakers in those states most often
cited factors besides problems with
lethal injection. Several governors cited
the risk that an innocent person could
be executed or the skyrocketing costs of
fighting appeals in death-row cases.
"The main factor was the miscarriage
of justice," former New Mexico Gov Bill
Richardson said Friday in an interview.
"I was aware of the serious problems
with lethal injections, but it was not at
the top."
Richardson signed his state's aboli-
tion bill in 2009 and has since cam-
paigned against the death penalty in
other states. He described meeting with
several exonerated death row inmates
there are more than 140 nationwide
as well as families of victims and law
enforcement officials. He predicted that
the botched execution would weigh on
other governors considering the death
penalty
Texas has executed 515 inmates since
reinstating the death penalty in 1982, by
far more than any other state. Gov Rick
Perry and both the Republican and
Democratic candidates for governor
have repeated their support for capital
punishment and their confidence in
Texas' system.


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Decoding the latest Apple-Samsung dispute


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -Many
of today's smartphones
share similar features,
from responsive touch-
screens that let users un-
lock the phone with a flick
of a finger, to pop-up ani-
mations that offer a short-
cut to dialing a number or
storing it in a digital ad-
dress book.
Those similarities are at
the center of an array of
patent disputes as Apple
and Samsung Electronics
sue each other in courts
and trade offices around
the world.
The companies' most-
recent legal tussle all but


concluded on Friday, when
a California jury found
that Samsung copied some
of Apple's smartphone fea-
tures. The panel also con-
cluded that Apple illegally
used one of Samsung's
patents in creating the
iPhone 4 and 5.
All told, the jury
awarded Samsung
$158,400 and Apple
$119 million, far less than
the $2.2 billion the com-
pany sought
Jurors were ordered to
return to court Monday to
continue deliberations on
a minor matter that could
result in a higher award
for Apple.
Before determining


whether the companies
copied phone technologies,
jurors had to consider sev-
eral patents. Here's a look
at select patents and the
jury's conclusions:
Patent 5,946,647
Official description:
System and method for
performing an action on a
structure in computer-
generated data.
What it really means:
In a mobile device, the tech-
nology described in this
patent is used to display a
pop-up menu of options.
One example: When you
highlight a phone number
on the touchscreen and the
software gives you a prompt
of options.


The jury's verdict:
The jury found that Apple
proved Samsung infringed
on the patent across sev-
eral mobile devices, in-
cluding the Galaxy
Nexus, Galaxy S III and
Stratosphere.
Patent 6,847,959
Official description:
Universal interface for re-
trieval of information in a
computer system.
What it really means:
This patent covers a
process that's similar to
the function of a search
engine. It enables the mo-
bile device to access infor-
mation from a variety of
locations, while only list-
ing relevant data for the


user
One of the features in
the patent is a graphic in-
terface showing a "Go-To"
menu option in a text
input window
The jury's verdict:
Apple failed to prove Sam-
sung infringed on this
patent.
Patent 7,761,414
Official description:
Asynchronous data syn-
chronization among
devices.
What it really
means: This patent in-
volves a way to synchro-
nize data across
computers and mobile
devices. In the case of a
smartphone, this could


Parading in celebration of Cinco de Mayo


Associated Press
Members of the Ector Junior High Mariachi Band perform while riding on a float Saturday during the Cinco de Mayo parade on Crane
Avenue in Odessa, Texas. Cinco de Mayo marks the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, when Mexican troops defeated a French army
of Napoleon III, then considered the mightiest military in the world. It is considered a bigger holiday in the U.S., celebrating Mexican
heritage in many cities.


Man's body found in RV cargo area


Associated Press
WINONA, Minn. A
group of men on their way
to the Kentucky Derby for
a bachelor party made a
gruesome discovery after
they pulled their rented
RV over in southeastern
Minnesota: a body inside
the vehicle's exterior
cargo compartment.
Authorities confirmed
Saturday that the body is
that of an Anoka, Min-
nesota, man who has been
missing since November
The Anoka County Sheriff's
Office said the death of
Kevin Casserly, 22, is being
investigated, and no addi-
tional updates were being
released on Saturday
Officials said the men
rented the recreational ve-
hicle from someone in
Anoka County on Thurs-
day, and they headed
south.
Jake Wanek, of Min-
neapolis, was a part of the



GM recalling

51,640 SUVs

Associated Press

DETROIT General
Motors is recalling 51,640
SUVs because the fuel
gauges may show inaccu-
rate readings.
The recall involves the
Buick Enclave, Chevrolet
Traverse and GMC Acadia
from the 2014 model year
All of the affected SUVs
were built between March
26 and Aug. 15 of 2013.
GM says the engine con-
trol module software may
cause the fuel gauge to
read inaccurately If that
happens, the vehicle might
run out of fuel and stall
without warning.
The company doesn't
know of any crashes or in-
juries related to the
problem.
GM said dealers will re-
program the software for
free, starting immediately


Then it was just all of us
asking each other, 'Just tell
me I'm not crazy. That's really
there, right?'
Jake Wanek
a member of the bachelor party.


bachelor party and said
the men pulled over in
Winona to pick up the last
members of their group.
While they were there,
they began investigating a
foul odor and found
Casserly's body lodged in a
compartment of the RV
that was accessible only
from the outside.
Wanek told the Star
Tribune that one of the
men opened and closed a
front compartment, which
stirred up the odor The
men opened the compart-
ment on the other side and
saw the body, with bare
feet and pants on.


"We kind of saw it one by
one. We didn't see it all to-
gether," Wanek told the St.
Paul Pioneer Press. "Then
it was just all of us asking
each other, Just tell me I'm
not crazy That's really
there, right?' You know,
just kind of confirming
what we saw"
Police in Winona ques-
tioned the men and seized
the RV
Groom-to-be Dan
Trainor, of Rochester, told
the Star Tribune he
thought the police were
suspicious at first but then
realized the men had noth-
ing to do with it.


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apply to synchronizing
address books on your
phone with online
storage.
The jury's verdict:
Samsung did not infringe
on Apple's patent.
Patent 8,046,721
Official description:
Unlocking a device by per-
forming gestures on an un-
lock image.
What it really means:
This patent refers to a way
of controlling an electronic
device with a touch-
sensitive display Specifi-
cally, Apple claimed Sam-
sung infringed on a feature
of the patent that describes
the swipe-and-unlock fea-
ture on iPhones.



Students

expelled,

accused

of hate

crime

Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif -San
Jose State University has
expelled three students
accused of bullying and
tormenting their black
roommate by putting a
bike lock around his neck
and calling him deroga-
tory names.
A fourth student has been
put on probation for the rest
of his college career if he
returns, the San Jose Mer-
cury News reported.
The four students, who
are white, have pleaded
not guilty to misdemeanor
battery and hate crime
charges. They are accused
of putting the bike lock on
then-freshman Donald
Williams and taunting him
with racial slurs, locking
him in his room and wav-
ing a Confederate flag.
Earlier this year,
Williams filed a $5 million
claim against the
university.


Five found dead in cabin
Five found dead in cabin


Associated Press

WILLIAMSPORT, Pa.-
Two adults and three chil-
dren were found dead
Saturday inside a small
cabin in north-central
Pennsylvania, authorities
said.
State Police Capt.
David Young told the
Williamsport Sun-Gazette
the bodies were discov-
ered by the owner of the
10- by 16-foot cabin just
before noon in rural
Washington Township in
Lycoming County.
Young said the prelimi-
nary investigation
showed no signs of foul
play and the cause of the
deaths was not consid-


ered suspicious. But state
police are looking at all
possibilities, including
carbon monoxide poison-
ing, he said. A propane
heater was found inside
the cabin.
The two adults were
identified as 23-year-old
Jacqueline R. Stack-
house, of New Columbia,
and 30-year-old Nathan L.
Reece, of Muncy Authori-
ties did not release the
names of the children a
9-year-old girl, a 4-year-
old girl, and Stackhouse's
3-year-old son. Aside from
the mother and son, po-
lice did not know how the
victims were related.
Authorities said the
property owner, whose


name was not released,
hosted a friendly get-to-
gether Friday night and
slept in his truck outside
the cabin before awaking
Saturday and later find-
ing the bodies.
County Coroner
Charles Kiessling pro-
nounced all five dead at
the scene.
Some relatives of the
victims watched near the
cabin, as authorities
investigated.
"It was a hysterical
scene, especially for the
parents of some of the vic-
tims," Young told the
newspaper in describing
the reaction from family
and friends when told of
the deaths


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE NATION/WORLD SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 A13


Ivory Coast tries ecotourism


to stem chimpanzees' decline


Associated Press

TAI NATIONAL PARK, Ivory
Coast Before dawn in the thick
rainforest of western Ivory Coast,
the air was filled with the sounds of
male chimpanzees screaming, hoot-
ing and banging on trees.
A baby chimpanzee named Dali
slowly stretched out his brown,
furry arms and clumsily scrambled
from a branch 65 feet high for a
breakfast of nuts and insects pro-
vided by game rangers. In the next
few minutes he would be joined by
15 others who soon clambered off
into the depths of Tai National
Park.
Chimpanzees normally resent hu-
mans, but scientists in the park
have spent decades "habituating"
them so they could be studied. Two
years ago, a Disney film got up close
for the Tim Allen-narrated "Chim-
panzee," which was set in Tai park.
Now, conservationists and the
Ivorian government hope to take
advantage of the fact that chimps in
Tai park are relatively comfortable
around humans by launching eco-
tourism projects designed to stem
the chimpanzee population's pre-
cipitous decline.
"Through ecotourism, local peo-
ple gain something. They see the
value of the forest ... and they will
preserve it," said Christophe
Boesch, director of West Africa's
Wild Chimpanzee Foundation who
has spent 35 years studying Ivory
Coast's chimps.
"The more tourists we have, the
more likely we will be able to win
the battle," he said.
Once a thriving population, chim-
panzees in Ivory Coast have experi-
enced a 90 percent decline in the past
two decades, according to the World
Wide Fund for Nature, which esti-
mates the global chimpanzee popu-
lation is between 150,000 and 200,000.
The last in-depth study, con-
ducted by Boesch's organization in
2008, said Ivory Coast's chimpanzee
population now is between 8,000
and 12,000. Though no new studies


Associated Press
Once a thriving population, chimpanzees in Ivory Coast have
experienced a 90 percent decline in the past two decades, according to
the World Wide Fund for Nature, which estimates the global chimpanzee
population is between 150,000 and 200,000.


have since been conducted and
chimpanzees are difficult to track,
Boesch said he was convinced the
drop has continued.
One of the biggest factors hurting
chimpanzees in Ivory Coast has
been environmental degradation -
a problem that was exacerbated
when the country's 2010-11 post-
election violence which killed more
than 3,000 people. Tai National
Park is located in the western re-
gion, which saw some of the con-
flict's worst fighting. Boesch said six
habituated chimpanzees were
killed, probably by poachers.
Long before the violence, how-
ever, humans were encroaching on
the chimps' home. Boesch said that
when he first approached the park
on a drive in 1979 he encountered
100 kilometers of uninterrupted
greenery "We saw elephants and
chimpanzees crossing," he said.
Now, cocoa fields have replaced
the dense vegetation at the edge of
the park, showing how migrants
from Ivory Coast and other West
African countries have reduced the
environment where the country's


wildlife can roam, he said.
The small, mud-brick village of
Gouleako is one of the many near
the park's edge that houses families
from throughout the country and
neighboring Burkina Faso. Resi-
dents make their living largely from
cocoa farming. As land pressure in-
creases, they have taken to burning
away sections of forest to make
room for more fields.
Victor Tere, the village chief, said
this has had a clear effect on the
environment.
"Before, when I was young, chim-
panzees came very close to the vil-
lage. They would sometimes even
come in. Now we don't see them,"
he said.
Despite these trends, conserva-
tionists see new hope in two gov-
ernment-run ecotourism projects
that have begun to attract visitors,
however slowly A typical tour lasts
three days and involves long forest
hikes, climbing the 554-foot Mount
Nienokoue and sleeping in tents.
The tourist activity creates employ-
ment and the tourists spend money
among local communities.


ArkansasAG

supports gay marriage,

will defend ban


Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -
Arkansas Attorney Gen-
eral Dustin McDaniel said
Saturday he supports al-
lowing same-sex couples
to wed but will continue
defending his state's 2004
ban on gay marriages in
court.
McDaniel, a Democrat
serving his final year as
the state's top at-
torney became the ,
first statewide offi-
cial in Arkansas to '
back same-sex 4
marriage.
"I want to tell
you I do support
marriage equality
and I do believe Dus
Arkansans should McD
have the right to be Arkc
equal in the eyes of atto
the law," said en
McDaniel, speaking at the
Associated Press Manag-
ing Editors convention.
Voters overwhelmingly
approved a constitutional
amendment defining mar-
riage as between a man
and a woman, but that ban
and others nationwide are
facing legal challenges.
Seventeen states allow
gay marriage, and federal
judges have struck down
bans in Michigan, Utah,
Texas, Oklahoma and Vir-
ginia. An Arkansas judge is
expected to rule by Friday
in a lawsuit challenging
Arkansas' ban.
"I'm going to zealously
defend our constitution,
but at the same time I
think it's important to let
people where I stand on
the matter," McDaniel
told the AP after his
speech.


i


I
II
ar
or
nE


McDaniel said during a
question and answer ses-
sion with editors that there
wasn't any single incident
that changed his mind
about gay marriage.
"It's become more and
more difficult for me to ac-
cept the idea of anyone
being treated as a second
class citizen," McDaniel
said.
McDaniel announced his
support for gay
marriage after crit-
icizing U.S. Attor-
i ney General Eric
Holder for telling
his state counter-
parts in February
they weren't obli-
gated to defend
stin laws in their states
aniel banning same-sex
nsas marriage if the
ney laws discriminate
al. in a way forbidden
by the Constitution.
McDaniel said he didn't
believe attorneys general
should allow their per-
sonal views to influence
whether they defend a
state law
"I do not take orders
from Eric Holder and I'm
determined to live up to
my obligation, and that in-
cludes with regard to our
state's definition of mar-
riage," McDaniel said.
McDaniel had voiced
support for civil unions
when he ran for attorney
general in 2006, but said
then he believed marriage
was between a man and a
woman. McDaniel ran
briefly for governor but
dropped out early last year
after admitting to an inap-
propriate relationship
with a Hot Springs
attorney


Immigration

crucial to

American

innovation

says Biden

Associated Press

MIAMI Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden extoled im-
migration as crucial to
American innovation Sat-
urday at a college gradua-
tion ceremony in South
Florida.
The Miami Dade College
graduates from two cam-
puses and their families,
2,000 strong, cheered as a
procession of 39 flags from
their home countries, en-
tered the gym and opened
the program. Biden ac-
knowledged that he was ad-
dressing many immigrants
and the children and grand-
children of immigrants,
many from South America
and the Caribbean.
Biden said a "constant,
substantial stream of im-
migrants" is important to
the American economy,
urging citizenship for im-
migrants living in the U.S.
illegally
"That's why we have to
actto bring 11 million peo-
ple out of the shadows and
put them on a path to citi-
zenship," Biden said.
"These people are already
Americans."
When someone in the
crowd shouted "Stop de-
portations!" he replied,
"We'll do that, too, kid, but
let me finish my speech."
Biden also applauded the
Florida Legislature for
passing a bill Friday to
allow students living in the
country illegally to pay in-
state tuition at the public
colleges and universities.
Florida is the latest of 20
states to enact such a meas-
ure, and its passage marks a
significant shift in the im-
migration debate in Florida
away from a focus on immi-
gration enforcement
"More than half of you
speak a language other
than English at home, but
you speak the language of
America," Biden said.
After the ceremony,
Biden met privately with
local Caribbean-American
business leaders to discuss
immigration issues and
then joined Rep. Joe Gar-
cia, D-Fla., at his new cam-
paign office.


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If you ever experience any of these symptoms,
call 911 and get to the nearest emergency room.


""...aa 'iii L:


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Positively --SEVEN RIVERS
S 1 REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

6201 N. Suncoast Bi1d. Cirial River Your Life. Our Story.


i ii. '*










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Pooch safe at home


Family loses dog during superstorm, finds it at pound a year and a half later


World BRIEFS

Searching


LIZZIE]~r X.^


Associated Press

EATONTOWN, N.J.- A
New Jersey family whose
terrier-pit bull mix es-
caped from their backyard
during superstorm Sandy
went to an animal shelter
this week to adopt a new
pet and came home with
their old dog.
Chuck James told The
Associated Press that his
family searched for the
brown-and-white dog
named Reckless for
months after the October
2012 storm before finally
giving up hope.
"We reported him
missing and called the
shelters periodically, just
hoping they had him,"
James said Saturday "We
always kept our hopes


Associated Press
Kelsey James hugs Reckless, her dog which the
Keansburg family found Thursday at the Monmouth
County SPCA, a year and a half after Reckless was lost
during superstorm Sandy.
up, but eventually it's had planned in recent
time to move on." weeks to get a new dog as
James said the family a 10th birthday surprise


for their eldest daughter,
Ally
But when the family of
five went to the Monmouth
County SPCA on Thursday
to adopt a new animal,
James and his wife ap-
proached the first cage
and saw a familiar face
inside.
"He was a little bigger
than I remembered be-
cause they had fed him
well," James joked. "But
then he was laying on my
wife's feet, and I knew it
was him.... I was in disbe-
lief I know this dog is
meant to be with our
family"
When SPCA officials
asked if they could prove
the animal was their dog, a
friend sent over a picture
showing the family with


their dog before Sandy hit
the Jersey shore.
"We're all so happy to
have him back," James
said. "Thank God for no-
kill shelters because
every time they kill an
animal, it's somebody's
friend who might be lost.
Thank God they didn't
put him down because
this would have been a
different story"
SPCA officials said
Reckless was picked up as
a stray and has now been
microchipped.
The family is living in a
hotel while their storm-
damaged Keansburg home
is repaired. This weekend,
the Jameses went on a
camping trip with Reck-
less to celebrate the dog's
return.


School's out, mud's in


Associated Press
An estimated 1,200 students celebrate the end of the school year Saturday at the 10th annual "Festivus," an independently thrown
mud party open to all Elon University students outside an apartment complex in Elon, N.C.


CDC confirms first case of MERS virus in US


Associated Press
NEW YORK Health
officials confirmed the
first case of an American
infected with a mysterious
virus that has sickened
hundreds in the Middle
East.
The man fell ill after fly-
ing to the U.S. late last


Dad of dead boy, 5,
apologizes for not
saving him
FITCHBURG, Mass. -
The father of a 5-year-old
Massachusetts boy who was
missing for months before his
body was found by the side of
a highway has apologized at
his funeral for not protecting
him.
Jose Oliver gave a tearful
eulogy Saturday for his son
Jeremiah Oliver at the Roll-
stone Congregational Church
in Fitchburg.
Addressing his son's small
white coffin, Jose Oliver
asked the boy for forgiveness,
saying "I am sorry, as a father
and as a man, that I could not
be there to protect you."
Jeremiah was last seen in
September but not reported
missing until December. His


week from Saudi Arabia
where he was a health
care worker
He is hospitalized in
good condition in north-
west Indiana with Middle
East respiratory syn-
drome, or MERS, the Cen-
ters for Disease Control
and Prevention and Indi-
ana health officials said


remains were found last
month.
His mother and her
boyfriend have been charged
in connection with his disap-
pearance, which helped spur
major changes in the state
child welfare agency.
Official: Boy who
stowed away on
jet leaves Hawaii
HONOLULU-The 15-
year-old boy who survived a
5 1/2-hour flight from Califor-
nia to Hawaii in a jet's wheel
well has left the state, an offi-
cial said.
Kayla Rosenfeld, the
spokeswoman for Hawaii's
Department of Human Serv-
ices, said late Friday that the
youth is "no longer in Hawaii."
Her brief emailed statement
did not specify how or when


Friday
The virus is not highly
contagious and this case
"represents a very low risk
to the broader, general
public," Dr Anne
Schuchat told reporters
during a CDC briefing.
The federal agency
plans to track down pas-
sengers he may have

Nation BRIEFS

Yahya Abdi left, whom he
traveled with or where he
went. A call to her office was
not immediately answered
early Saturday.
The boy's father, Abdilahi
Yusuf, arrived in Hawaii this
week from the family's home
in Santa Clara, California, to
bring him back.
Teen charged in
attack, child's
death in Virginia
RICHMOND, Va. Rich-
mond police said a 16-year-
old boy assaulted a young girl
and killed her 8-year-old
brother in their neighborhood.
Neighbors and relatives tell
The Richmond Times Dis-
patch that the 8-year-old boy
was trying help his 12-year-
old sister and was hit in the
head with a brick.
Richmond Deputy Com-


been in close contact
with during his travels; it
was not clear how many
may have been exposed
to the virus.
So far, it is not known
how he was infected,
Schuchat said.
Saudi Arabia has been
at the center of a Middle
East outbreak of MERS


monwealth's Attorney Mary E.
Langer said she could not
confirm whether a brick was
used but police told her the
boy, Martin Cobb, suffered se-
vere head trauma.
Martin died at the scene
and his sister was taken to a
hospital. An aunt of the sib-
lings, Geraldine Pitchford,
said the girl is OK.
Police spokeswoman
Dionne Waugh said Saturday
the 16-year-old boy was
charged with murder and
strangulation.
California
university students
protest party name
DAVIS, Calif. Students at
the University of California,
Davis, have cancelled plans for
a drinking party dubbed Cinco
de Drinko, after protesters
called it racially insensitive.


that began two years ago.
The virus has spread
among health care work-
ers, most notably at four fa-
cilities in that country last
spring.
Officials didn't provide
details about the Ameri-
can's job in Saudi Arabia
or whether he treated
MERS patients.


The party was to be held
Saturday ahead of Monday's
Cinco de May holiday that cel-
ebrates Mexican heritage.
The Sacramento Bee re-
ported about 100 students
protested and successfully
scuttled plans for the off-cam-
pus party. Many students or-
ganizing the party worked at
the on-campus Coffee House,
where the protest took place.
Student Edwin Roque
called the party offensive, but
Jonathan Beatty wore a som-
brero during the protest and
said the theme is harmless,
comparing it to St. Patrick's
Day festivities.
UC Davis Chancellor Linda
P.B. Katehi told the newspa-
per she believed that adding a
mandatory diversity course
could prevent future contro-
versies like this one.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Afghans search Saturday
for survivors after Friday's
landslide buried Abi-Barik
village in Badakhshan
province in northeastern
Afghanistan.

Rescuers search
for landslide
survivors
ABI BARIK, Afghanistan
-Afghan rescuers and vol-
unteers armed with shovels
and little more than their bare
hands dug through the mud
Saturday after a massive
landslide swept through a vil-
lage the day before, turning it
into an earthen tomb holding
hundreds of bodies, officials
said.
The government and aid
groups rushed to bring
food, water and shelter to
the survivors as the govern-
ment tried to ascertain just
how many people were
killed in the latest natural
disaster to hit a country al-
ready reeling from nearly
three decades of war.
Figures on the number of
people killed and missing in
the disaster Friday varied
from 255 to 2,700.
Three killed in
two blasts at
Kenyan coast
NAIROBI, Kenya--At
least three people were
killed in a grenade blast in
one of two explosions Sat-
urday along the coast of
Kenya, an east African
country working to crack
down on a recent wave of
terrorist attacks.
Authorities said the
grenade blast at a bus stop
in Mwembe Tayari, in the
coastal city of Mombasa,
also injured seven other
people. Separately, a bag
with an improvised explo-
sive device was spotted
near the coastal Reef Hotel
in Nyali, and passersby no-
ticed in time to take cover
before it detonated, the In-
terior Ministry said. No fatal-
ities were immediately
reported there.
Officials seize
44 tons of
marijuana
MEXICO CITY-- Mex-
ico's attorney general said
investigators have seized
44 tons of marijuana in Ti-
juana across the border
from San Diego, California.
A statement from the office
said that nearly 4,000 packets
of drugs were found in the
Granjas Familiares del Mata-
moros neighborhood based
on a federal warrant. Mexican
military and Tijuana police
conducted the raid. There
were no arrests.
The statement said the
seizure occurred Thursday.
Pope sex abuse
panel highlights
accountability
VATICAN CITY-- Mem-
bers of Pope Francis' sex-
ual abuse advisory board
said Saturday they will de-
velop "clear and effective"
protocols to hold bishops
and other church authorities
accountable if they fail to
report suspected abuse or
protect children from pe-
dophile priests.
Victims groups have long
blasted the Vatican for refus-
ing to sanction any bishop or
superior who covered up for
priests who raped and mo-
lested children. They have
listed accountability as one of
the core issues fadng Fran-
cis and a key test for his new
advisory board.
-From wire reports











EXCURSIONS


j m.

11772172c


Alabama's largest city is making a con
after decades ofdprmancy, and there's
of free stuff for visitosee and do ir
Birmintham.


back
ienty


.-A ( 04


Jay Reeves
Associated Press


DISTRICT


Re-energized by a wave of fresh develop
ad the emergence of a true downtown viBe,
e city once called the "Pittsburgh of the
South" for its steel industry is now varied
enough for a family trip or a weekend getaway
for a couple.





Veterans .A17-A20
Together.....A22
Travel ..... A21 City: Lecanto
Crossword A16 Favorite color: Green
Mrovssword 16 Favorite food: Pizza
Movies ....... A16 Dream Vacation location:
TV Listings .... A16 Bora Bora
Hobbies: Swimming,
getting out on the water
For questions or comments, Cot ey
contact Features Editor Logan "axvnad_
Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext.
1141 or at mhnosby@dichronicle
online.com


Visitorinterested in civil rights history can pay trib-
ute to the era on a pilgrimage to sites where headlines
were made. Walk a streets where police and fire-
fighters used dogs and fire hoses to rout black demon-
strators seeking equalityinh 1963. Stand at the spot
where a Ku Klux Klan bomb went off that same year
killing four black girls inside 16th Street Baptist
Church. Across from the church, sit in Kelly Ingrain
See ALABAMA/Page A21


A Star Wars fan wearing a
stormtrooper costume
parades along Tunis' stately
tree lined Bourguiba Avenue,
in Tunisia, The empire was
not striking back against the
poster child for Arab
democracy just an
innovative campaign to
encourage tourists to return
to this sunny desert and
beach nation in North Africa.


In 1932, mobster
Al Capone, convicted
of income-tax
evasion, entered the
federal penitentiary in
Atlanta. (Capone was
later transferred to
Alcatraz Island.)




A16 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 4, 2014 c:Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D11: Comcas Dunnellon & gligs F Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time Resurrection "Torn Revenge "Impetus" (N) News Spo Night
ABC 20 20 20News Home Videos'PG' "Kansas" (N)'PG' Apart"'PG' c 'PG' c on 9
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FOX 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's American The Family Guy Cosmos: A Spacetime FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
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0"The Craigslist Killer" (2011, Docudrama) *** "The Investigation" (2002, Docudrama) Those Who Kill Those Who Kill
50 119 Jake McDorman, William Baldwin. Nicholas Lea. Premiere. 'NR' "Insomnia" (N)'14' "Insomnia"'14' B
niA 32 22**130 3 "Snitch" (2013, Crime Drama) Dwayne *** "Magic Mike" (2012, Comedy-Drama) ** "2 Guns" (2013, Action) Denzel
320 221 320 3 3 Johnson. (In Stereo) PG-13 Bc Channing atum. (In Stereo) 'R' Bc Washington. (In Stereo) R' B
Caught on Camera A Caught on Camera Caught on Camera (N) Caught on Camera Lockup "Louisiana" Lockup "Return to
~1SIt 2 4 2 Caught on Camera A Caught on Camera Caught on Camera (N) "h~ ie"P a a
42 41 42 reporter under attack. "Narrow Escape""hos Fired"Pelican Bay"
W 1 1 4 Border Wars "Special Wicked Tuna "Battle Wicked Tuna "Brotherly Wicked Tuna "Blue Grit" Filthy Riches (N)'14' . i Tuna "Blue
109 65 109 44 53 0ps"'14' Royale"'14' Shove"'14' (N)'14' ',.i
Wt 28 36 28 35 25 Bread |Thunder Sam & Sam & *** "Charlotte's Web" (2006)'G'B mFull H'se |Full H'se Friends Friends
WN 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Lifeclass
XYJ 44 123 Snapped 'PG' B Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' B Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
*** "Rescue Dawn" Years of Living Californication Nurse Nurse Californication Years of Living Nurse Californication
:SDWJ 340 241 340 4 (2006) c Dangerously 'PG' B Jackie Jackie (N) Dangerously (N)'PG' Jackie
rBi 37 43 37 27 3 ar Rescue "Hostile Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "I Smell a i: ...... :. ary Hungry Investors (In Bar Rescue Scoreboard
37 43 :37 27 36 Takeover'PG' 'PC' Rat"'PG' ii iii i'. Stereo)'PG' to Death"'PG'
**"The Lone Ranger" (2013, Western) Da Vinci's Demons Da Vinci's Demons ** "1 Spy" (2002) Eddie Murphy DaVinci's
SAZ 370 271 370 Johnny Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13' B (iTV) 'MA' Bc (iTV)'MA' B (In Stereo)'PG-13' Bc Demons
S4 3 3 3 Into the Saltwater Sport Ship Sportsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Destination
:"J 36 31 36 Blue'PG' Exp. Fishing Shape TV Flats Fishing Tournament Series Animals 'G' Pol.D
S J 31 5 3 2c '9 "Final Destination ** "The Uninvited" (2009, Horror) Elizabeth ** "Underworld: Evolution" (2006, Horror) "30 Days of Night:
31 59 31 26 29 2"(2003)'R' Banks, Emily Browning. PG-13 Kate Beckinsale, Tony Curran.'R' Dark Days" (2010)
fS 49 23 49 16 19 ** "Zoolander"(2001) Ben Stiller. *** "The Hangover" (2009)'R'(DVS) *** "The Hangover" (2009)'R'(DVS)
169 53 169 n1 *** 3 3 "Wait Until Dark" (1967 Suspense) *** "With a Song in My Heart" (1952 *** "A Kiss Before Dying" (1956, Suspense)
169 53 169 30 35 Audrey Hepbumrn, Alan Arkin. NR' B Docudrama) Susan Hayward. Premiere. NR' Robert Wagner. 'NR' Bc
3 4 2 Dual Survival'14' B Dual Survival Joe faces Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid (In Naked and Afraid
53 4 53 24 26 1elephants.'14' Stereo)'14'B Stereo)'14'B Stereo) 'G'B "Mayan Misery" '14'
T 50 46 50 29 30 Marry Marry Marry Marry Medium |Medium Long Island Medium My Five Wives 'PG' Long Island Medium
ii 350 261 350 **'. "The Yards" (2000) Mark Wahlberg. ** "Bad News Bears" (2005, Comedy) Billy "The Three Musketeers" (2011, Action)
350 261 3 Premiere. (In Stereo) 'R' Bc Bob Thornton.'PG-13' mc Matthew MacFadyen.'PG-13' mc
iJ 48 33 48 3 ***1 3 "Inception" (2010, Science Fiction) *** "The Town" (2010) Ben Affleck. A woman doesn't real- *** "The Town"(2010) Ben
) 48 33 48 31 34 Leonardo DiCaprio.'PG-13' mize that her new beau is a bank robber. 'R' Affleck.'R'B .(DVS)
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S 17 9 17 CSI: Miami "Born to CSI: Miami "Dangerous CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami "Cyber-leb- CSI: Miami "Inside Out" CSI: Miami Possible
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Ex-felon granny


can find job help


D earAnnie: I am a
62-year-old great-
grandmother Ten
years ago, I committed a
nonviolent felony I
served weekends in jail
for a year, paid restitu-
tion, made every visit to
my probation officer and
complied with all of the
other terms of my con-
viction and release. I am
honest with any poten-
tial employer
about my
past my re-
habilitation
and my goal
to never do a
criminal act
again. I have
been a model
citizen since
this hap-
pened. I
know I have *
to do better
in my life ANN
than every- MAIL
one else to
make up for
what I did. But I cannot
get a job.
Society seems to view
anyone who commits a
crime as the scum of the
Earth and not worth em-
ploying (unless you are a
celebrity or have lots of
money).
Because I can't get a
job, I cannot buy a car or
find an apartment or
even buy my grandchil-


II
.1


dren a candy bar What is
the point of "paying your
debt to society" if "soci-
ety" never forgives you?
The death sentence
would have made more
sense than the five years'
probation I received.
No, I am not de-
pressed, only stating
what is true. Wish I
Could Turn Back Time
Dear Wish: We agree
that you de-
serve a second
chance. There
are places and
organizations
that specialize
in hiring and
placing those
with a criminal
record.
Please con-
tact the Safer
Foundation
(saferfounda-
E'S tion.org) and
BOX the National
Hire Network
(hirenetwork.
org). Consider volunteer-
ing at a local organiza-
tion that might
eventually offer a paid
position.
You might also find
help through the U.S.
Dept. of Labor (www.
doleta.gov/uswork
force/onestop/on-
estopmap.cfm) at 1-877-
872-5627 or service
locator org.


Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 3:15 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7p.m., 8p.m.,
8:30 p.m. No passes.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Brick Mansions" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 8 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:05 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"God's Not Dead" (PG)
2 p.m., 4:40 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R)
4:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1:15 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Quiet Ones" (PG-13)
1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 1:45 p.m.,
7:25 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:45 p.m.


No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 1:50 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
8 p.m. No passes.
"Amazing Spider-Man 2"
(PG-13) In 3D. 11:45 a.m.,
3:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Captain America: The
Winter Soldier" (PG-13) In
3D. 3:45 p.m. No passes.
"A Haunted House 2" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG)
1 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12 p.m., 1:30 p.m.,
7:40 p.m. No passes.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:15 p.m.
No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Flavorful
6 San Antonio site
11 Collections of tents
16 In accord with
the law
21 Armistice
22 Lawbreaker
23 On the left,
on a ship
24 Flavoring plant
25 Concur
26 Swoon
27 Certain singer
28 Performing group
29 Stage signal
30 City in Tuscany
31 High card
33 Leg joints
35 Be mistaken
36 Hold
38 Before
39 Quid--quo
40 Hiatus
41 Anti-narcotics org.
42 Utah city
44 Tip
48 Isinglass
51 Part of SSA
54 Middling (Hyph.)
55 God of war
57 Modern art
movement
61 Notched, as a leaf
62 Libertine
63 Hebrew prophet
65 Five (prefix)
66 Ceremony
67 Broad-minded
70 Sedate
72 Tit for-
73 Acquired
74 Prince in opera
75 Knock
77 Traffic light color
79 out (get with
effort)
80 Slaughter of
baseball
82 Kid
83 Skillful
85 Fashion
87 More pleasant
89 That young lady
90 Mine find
91 Coup -
92 Element
94 Vigil light
96 Part of Eur.


97 Present
100 Org. for lawyers
101 Irrigate
104 Gift for a dad
105 Kind of bond,
for short
106 pro nobis
107 Child
108 Faithful
110 Most nervous
112 Bothersome bug
113 English dynasty
116 Repulse
118 If not
119 Censure
120 Engraver's pointed tool
122 Buddhist deity
123 Loud sound
124 Merchant
125 Costly
127 Treat with contempt
129 Tie
130 Chem. orbiol., e.g.
133 Something sticky
135 Law (Abbr.)
136 Rotating machine part
137 Therefore
141 Get dark in the sun
142 Dud of a car
144 Lingus
145 Pool
146 Folklore creature
147 Golfer Palmer,
to friends
149 Wide
151 Cognizant
153 Storage facility
155 Martin or Madden
156 Insect stage
157 Croc's cousin
158 Century plant
159 Toast start
160 Fudd or Gantry
161 Foe
162 Senior member


DOWN
1 Heap
2 Contend
3 Blender setting
4 Diamonds
5 Poor grade
6 State positively
7 Rental contract
8 Inter-
9 Tues. preceder
10 AGreat Lake
11 Actress


Blanchett
Simian
Friar
Fork part
Rivulet
Cambodia
neighbor
Abbr. in business
Referred to
River in France
Aquarium fish
Rind
Against
The "Iliad" is one
Balance
Tough question
"Norma -"
Fireside implement
Scot's cap
God of love
Say again
differently
Mug
Honest -
Twilled fabric of wool
Mythical hunter
Spun sugar (2 wds.)
Wooden shoe
Line of stitches
Deliberate
Post
Alma -
Strictness
Bro or sis
Word-for-word
Burning
Household god
Mark against
Combined,
as resources
Rodent
Perch
Cry of discovery
Wrath
Broken-down horse
Farm animal
Abraded
Hard to penetrate
Eats nothing
Concerning
Expire
Invitee
Supporting
structure
Spud
Rocky hill
Looked at
City in Italy
Son of Jacob


Very, very cold
Clearing
Ancient
Regret
- Cruces, N.M.
London's Big -
Wise
Bombardment
Stop on a -
Deep rolling sound
Deer


129 Store for cakes and
pies
130 Hidden supply
131 Ala-
132 Central
134 Ethical
136 Ricochet
138 Settle a debt
139 Mitt
140 Frequently
142 Dregs


Standard, for short
Jewish month
Tardy
"-Got a Secret"
- Maria
Pale
Pop
The "I"


Puzzle answer is on Page A21.


2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS NOTES


Women Veterans
Health Fair is May 17
Everyone is invited to the
Seventh annual Tri-County
Women Veterans Health Fair
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
May 17, at the Citrus County
Resource Center, 2804 W Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
A benefits coordinator will be
available to answer questions.
There will also be health infor-
mation booths, vendor booths,
chair yoga and massages.
The event is sponsored by the
Lecanto and Ocala VA Commu-
nity Based Outpatient Clinics
and The Villages VA Outpatient
Clinic.
For more information, call
Christine Acker at 352-746-8014.

Public welcome at
Dunnellon post
Wall-Rives Post No. 58 of the
American Legion will have an
outdoor flea market and pan-
cake breakfast at 7:30 a.m.
Saturday, May 19.
On the menu are pancakes,
French toast, scrambled eggs,
sausages, orange juice and cof-
fee for $5 per person.
Memorial Day services will
be at 11 a.m. Monday May 26, at
the post. A picnic lunch will
follow
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Purple Heart meeting
to be held May 20
Aaron A. Weaver Chapter 776
Military Order of the Purple
Heart (MOPH) will meet at
1 p.m. Tuesday May 20, at the
Citrus County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491), Lecanto.
All combat-wounded veterans
and parents, lineal descen-
dants, spouses and siblings of
living or deceased Purple
Heart recipients are invited. To
learn more about Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 MOPH,
visit www.citruspurpleheart.org
or call 382-3847.

Vets week committee
to meet May 21
The Veterans Appreciation
Week Ad Hoc Coordinating
Committee will meet at 1:30


p.m. Wednesday, May 21, in the
Conference Room of the Citrus
County Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal
River
All veterans' service organi-
zations are encouraged to send
representatives to participate
in the planning process. Indi-
vidual veterans are also wel-
come. For more information,
call Chris Gregoriou at 352-795-
7000.

Post auxiliary to host
Memorial Day picnic
VFW Post 10087 Men's Auxil-
iary in Beverly Hills, 2170 Vet
Lane (County Road 491 behind
Cadence Bank), will have its an-
nual Memorial Day picnic from
noon to 2 p.m. Monday, May 26.
The public is welcome.
On the menu are sausage
with peppers and onions,
Sloppy Joes, potato salad,
beans and dessert Tickets are
$7. Music will be by Walt
Rogers.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.

Cooties, auxiliary to
serve pasta dinner
MOC/MOCA Pup Tent 76 will
serve a pasta dinner with meat
sauce, salad, garlic bread,
dessert and coffee from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 30, at
Leroy Rooks Jr VFW Post 4252
in Hernando (3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road 200,
where the helicopter is). The
public is invited.
Tickets are $7 per person and
can be purchased at Post 4252.
Call 352-726-3339 or Seam
Squirrel Paul Kimmerling at
352-795-4142.

Male descendants
sought for group
The American Legion Post
166 of Homosassa Springs is
seeking all male descendants,
adopted sons and stepsons of
members of the American Le-
gion and such male descen-
dants of veterans who died in
the service to their country dur-
ing times of war
Such men in the Chassahow-
itzka, Homosassa, Homosassa
Springs and the Sugarmill
Woods area who are interested
in becoming members of the


Sons of the American Legion
are needed. There is no form or
class of membership, except as
active membership.
Those interested in becoming
members may contact Clay
Scott, vice commander of Amer-
ican Legion Post 166. He may
be reached by writing to Ameri-
can Legion Post 166, PO. Box
767, Homosassa Springs, FL
34447-0767, or at 928-848-8359.
His email address is eaglerider
@gmx.com.
Interested men may stop by
the post on the regular meeting
night, the first Monday monthly,
at 7 p.m. at the Spring Lodge
No. 378 F&AM at 5030 S.
Memorial Drive.

Come play games
with Homosassa post
VFW Post 8189 in Homosassa
invites the public to have some
fun.
Bingo is played at 2 p.m.
Wednesday and food is avail-
able. Jam sessions are from 3 to
7 p.m. Thursday.
The post is at 8856 Veterans
Drive, Homosassa.

Bingo open to public
on Thursday
The public is invited to play
bingo Thursdays at American
Legion Wall-Rives Post 58.
Doors open at 4 p.m.; games
start at 6 p.m.
Dinner is available for $5.
The post is at 10730 U.S. 41,
Dunnellon.

Public can come eat
shrimp, wings at post
Everyone is welcome to join
Blanton-Thompson American
Legion Post 155 in Crystal
River on Wednesday for wings
or shrimp basket lunches in the
lounge from noon to 3 p.m.
All proceeds benefit veter-
ans' programs.
For more information, call
352-795-6526.

Post welcomes public
for fun events
VFW Post 10087 in Beverly
Hills, 2170 Vet Lane (County
Road 491 behind Cadence
Bank), often has special events
that are open to the public.


On a regular basis, bingo is at
1 p.m. Sunday in the smoke-
free hall.
For more information, call
352-746-0440.

Post 4252 invites all
for meals, more
VFW Post 4252, State Road
200 in Hernando (with the heli-
copter out front), welcomes the
public at its meals and
activities.
Meals include lunch every
day and breakfast on Sunday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Activities
include bar bingo on Tuesday
from 2 to 4 p.m. and Show Me
the Hand at 2 p.m. Thursday
Dance music is on tap every
Friday and bingo is played in
the hall Saturday
Friday features an all-you-
can-eat fish fry or New England
boiled dinner
For more information and
menus, call the post at 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@
tampabayrrcom and Google
VFW 4252, Hernando.

DAV helps veterans
get to clinics
The DAV transportation net-
work has received great re-
sponse for volunteer drivers for
the two vans assigned to the
Lecanto clinic one going
from Lecanto to Gainesville,
the other from Lecanto to The
Villages.
The Gainesville van goes
each weekday and The Villages
run is made when there is a
need. Veterans who need to go
to appointments in Gainesville
or The Villages are asked to
call the Veterans Service Office
in Lecanto at 352-527-5915 to be
placed on the van list All ap-
pointments must be made be-
fore 1 p.m.

'In Their Words'
wants your stories
The Chronicle features sto-
ries of local veterans. The sto-
ries will be about a singular
event or moment in your mili-
tary career that stands out to
you. It can be any type of event,
from something from the battle-
field to a fun excursion while
on leave. We also ask that you
provide us with your rank,
branch of service, theater of


war served, years served, outfit
and veterans organization affil-
iations.
To have your story told, call
C.J. Risak at 352-586-9202 or
email him at cjrisak2@
yahoo.com. C.J. will put to-
gether your stories and help set
up obtaining "then" and "now"
photos to publish with your
story

Case manager aids
vets about benefits
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department has a
case manager who is available
to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday Lakes
Region Library, 1511 Druid
Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library, 8619
W Crystal St., Crystal River
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To
make an appointment to meet
with the case manager, call 352-
527-5915.

Office has help for
vets with PTSD
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department offers
help for veterans who have had
their post-traumatic stress dis-
order (PTSD) claim denied.
Veterans who have been de-
nied within the past two years
are asked to contact the office
to review the case and discuss
compensation/pension exami-
nation. All veterans who have
been diagnosed by the Lecanto
VA Mental Health center and
have been denied are encour-
aged to contact the Citrus
County Veterans Office.
To schedule an appointment
to discuss a claim, call 352-527-
5915. You will need to have
your denial letter and a copy of
your compensation examina-
tion by Gainesville. You can get
a copy of your exam either by
requesting it through the VA
medical records or from the
primary care window in
Lecanto.
For more information about
theVeterans Office, log onto
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us.


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CITRUS I LEVY I MARION


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Job Fair 101 Workshop I May 5 & May 6 from 9-11 a.m.
CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion Career Center
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Annual Spring Job Fair I May 14 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Meet with 30 Local Employers with Jobs to Fill!
College of Central Florida Learning & Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto I 352.249.3278, ext. 3206


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VETERANS


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 A17








\U CT C I HROTNI A CLE
^^- citrus^^^^CITRUS COUNTY CHl-RONICLE


VETERANS NOTES

Legion Post 166 to do
auxiliary membership rally
American Legion Post 166 will have an
American Legion Auxiliary membership
rally for all those who would like to be-
come auxiliary members of the American
Legion Post 166.
The post will have a meatloaf dinner at
6 p.m. Monday Cost is $10 and proceeds
will go to the auxiliary unit treasury
RSVP to Sandra Scott at 352-860-2090.
The membership rally and dinner will
be at the Spring Lodge 378 F&AM, 5030 S.
Memorial Drive, Homosassa.

Florida Artists Gallery
& Caf6 honors veterans
The Florida Artists Gallery & Cafe will
celebrate the month of May with an exhi-
bition spotlighting military veteran artists
who live in Citrus and adjoining counties.
The exhibit will run through May 31. A
special Memorial Day open house will be
hosted on the afternoon of May 26.
The Florida Artists Gallery & Cafe is in
the historic Knight House at 8219 Orange
Ave. in Floral City The Gallery and Cafe
are open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven days a
week. Admission is free.
For more information, call 352-344-9300,
visit wwwflartistsgallerycom.

Barbecued chicken quarters
on menu for VFW Post 4864
VFW Edward W Penno Post 4864 invites
the public to a barbecued chicken quar-
ters dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, May
9, at 10199 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.,
Citrus Springs.
The cost is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. Call 352-465-4864.

VFW Post 4337 to serve
seafood alfredo dinner
The public is welcome to join the VFW
Post 4337 family for seafood alfredo from
5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 10. Dinner is $7,
with music by Nell from 6 to 9 p.m.
For information, call 352-344-3495, or
visit wwwvfw4337.org.

American Legion Post 77
invites all to bi-monthly jam
Everyone is welcome to join the Ameri-
can Legion Allen Rawls Post 77 at a jam
from 6 to 9 p.m. May 16 with Nashville
artist John Thomas and the Ramblin'
Fever Band.
Entertainers, those who enjoy playing
instruments or singing, and those who
want to just enjoy the music are welcome.
Cost is $5 at the door; food and soft drinks
are available for a donation.
The post is at 4375 Little Al Point in In-
verness. For more information, call 352-
476-2134, 352-476-7001 or 352-726-0444.

CCVC invites sellers to
take part in May 10 yard sale
The Citrus County Veterans Coalition
has yard sales September through May
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday
of the month Our Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church in Inverness, south of where
U.S. 41 and State Road 44 split.
Sellers may come and set up the day be-
fore (typically Friday afternoon) and are
responsible for the security of their own
items overnight. The spots are typically 15
feet by 30 feet and cost $10.
A donation of at least one can of food is
appreciated. For more information and to
make reservations, call Dan at 352-
400-8952.

MOPH will host
Armed Forces Day picnic
All Purple Heart recipients and their
guests are invited to attend an Armed
Forces Day picnic, hosted by Aaron A.
Weaver Chapter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart. The picnic is from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m., Saturday, May 10, at the pavilion
(next to tennis courts) in Bicentennial
Park off U.S. 19 in Crystal River near the
Crystal River Airport.
Come and share the camaraderie of fel-
low Purple Heart recipients and learn
more about the Military Order of the Pur-
ple Heart, the only veterans' service or-
ganization comprised exclusively of
combat veterans.
Call 352-382-3847.

Memorial in Homosassa
honors Purple Heart vets
Purple Heart recipients are honored
with centerpieces with their names on
them at The Old Homosassa Veterans'
Memorial.
Call Shona Cook at 352-422-8092.


VA to host Research Day event


Public welcome atfree Gainsville session


Special to the Chronicle
GAINESVILLE -An Inspirational
Research Day event is planned at the
Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs (VA)
Medical Center from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Friday, May 16, in the auditorium
at 1601 S.W Archer Road, Gainesville.
The event is free and open to the pub-
lic.
Research Day is part of a nation-
wide observance of National VA Re-
search Week. This year's theme "VA
Research: Making A Difference!"-
celebrates the achievements of VA re-


searchers and the role they play in
providing high-quality care for veter-
ans and advancing medical science. It
is an opportunity to share about re-
search being done by the VA and its
impact on treating and preventing dis-
ease and disability
The VA Research speakers this year
are Muna Canales, M.D.; Stephen E.
Borst, Ph.D.; William C. Mann, OTR,
M.D.; Diane C. Cowper Ripley, Ph.D.;
Charles E. Levy, M.D. and Floyd J.
Thompson, Ph.D. They will share
medical advances on kidney disease,
rehabilitation, testosterone treatment,


Buddies'


traumatic brain injury and more.
Guest speakers from the University
of Florida will be Executive Vice Pres-
ident for Research and Education
Thomas A. Pearson, M.D., MPH, Ph.D.,
and Director of the UF Health Cancer
Center Paul Okunieff, M.D.
The meet-and-greet portion of the
event begins at 8:30 a.m. The program
will begin at 9 a.m. and include a spe-
cial musical tribute to veterans and an
interactive research poster exhibit
showcase of 10 VA researchers and
their studies.
Visit wwwnorthflorida.va.gov/
NORTHFLORIDA/research/index. asp
for information about Research Day
speakers, agendas and parking.


reunion


Special to the Chronicle
Larry Tropf, left, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and David Severio of Walker, Louisiana, mug for the camera in Phucat,
Vietnam, at the ages of 18 and 19, respectively. Tropf, right, now 65, and Severio, 66, had a 46-year reunion this
year in Walker on April 7.



Vietnam vets


get together


after 46 years

SOR TROPF
Special to the Chronicle
A couple of years ago,
my husband,
Lawrence "Larry"
Tropf, was thinking about his
buddies who were with him in
combat in Vietnam.
While going through some old pic- surgery
tures, he told me the name of one of So, after the rehab, Larry contacted They
his friends and I started searching for his friend again and they agreed to an- were both so
him online. It took me about two other date. But, again, things were not happy to see each
weeks, but I found a phone number to be, when Larry had to have an other and it seemed as though they
and my husband called him. emergency bypass, picked up exactly where they left off.
They agreed to meet at the first op- We started making plans again to They talked a lot about their lives and
portunity we had to travel to Walker, travel to Louisiana, but this time we what they were up to nowadays.
Louisiana, where David Severio now decided on one day on a whim. With- It was very sad to see them say
lives. Sadly, the first day they agreed out thinking further about it, he called goodbye, as they both got teary-eyed.
to see each other, they could not do so his friend and decided on a date Larry and Sor Tropfhave lived in
because my husband had to have a hip April 7. Hernando since 2005.


Killian M. McLean
Air Force Airman Killian M. McLean grad-
uated from basic military training at Joint
Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an intensive, eight-
week program that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic training earn
four credits toward an associate in applied


IN SERVICE
science degree through the Community Col-
lege of the Air Force.
McLean is the son of Mark and Kristen
McLean of Inverness. He is a 2013 graduate
of Citrus High School.

Adam S. lovine
Air Force Airman Adam S. lovine gradu-
ated from basic military training at Joint
Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an intensive, eight-


week program that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic training earn
four credits toward an associate in applied
science degree through the Community Col-
lege of the Air Force.
lovine is the son of Shelley and stepson
of Johnathan Collins of Cedar Key, and son
of Francis lovine of Inverness. He is a 2014
graduate of Cedar Key High School.


* Submit information for the Veterans page at least
two weeks before the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreciated,


but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.
* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a specific day is not guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WinniDixie


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He's been your butcher

for years. Now, he's one

of The Beef People.


Sweetbay is now Winn-Dixie.


Welcome to a whole new experience with new items and hundreds of new ways
to save at your neighborhood store. Sweetbay is now Winn-Dixie. And that means
The Beef People are ready to help you with preparation advice, recipe ideas and the
right choice for any occasion. What's more, every steak, every roast every cut is
WD Brand Choice Angus Beef, aged for tenderness and exceptional flavor. Stop by
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Inverness and 1651 SE Highway 19 in Crystal River.


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SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 A19




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mass. vet enjoys baseball after Afghanistan


CARMINE FRONGILLO
The Sun

NASHUA, N.H.- The pres-
sure of performing between the
white lines is nothing com-
pared to the real life battles
Ariel Ramos endured in the
military while fighting to sur-
vive outside the wire of his base
camp.
After serving an eight-month
tour of duty as a Marine in
Afghanistan, even the roughest
of outings on the mound by
Daniel Webster College's senior
pitcher from Lowell should be
viewed as an enjoyable day at
the ballpark.
Ramos, 25, was stationed in
Afghanistan from March to Oc-
tober in 2011. He was a gunner
on an all-terrain vehicle as-
signed to guard convoys that
were the target of attacks.
Typically Ramos was in the
last vehicle of a convoy, provid-
ing security for the commander
and fuel trucks. During one
mission a truck exploded in
front of his vehicle. He saw his
share of combat and sustained
a pair of very bad concussions.
Ramos, who played his high
school ball at Greater Lowell
Tech, was stripped of his inno-
cence at far too young an age
while serving his country on
the front lines in a nation lo-
cated far from home. But he
never lost his love for our na-
tional pastime.
After three-and-a-half years
of full-time service in the
Marines and a stint in the re-
serves, Ramos made the transi-
tion from combat veteran to
Division 3 college baseball
newcomer in the spring of 2013.
He was 4-1 with a 4.57 ERA in
10 appearances (9 starts) last
season. This spring, Ramos, a 6-
foot, 210-pound right-hander, is
0-3 in seven appearances (2
starts).
"To make it home safe and
get this chance to play at
Daniel Webster is unbeliev-


pi,


Special to the Chronicle
Former U.S. Marine Ariel Ramos poses April 22 with a baseball.
After serving an eight-month tour of duty as a Marine in
Afghanistan, even the roughest of outings on the mound by the
Daniel Webster College senior pitcher from Lowell should be
viewed as an enjoyable day at the ballpark.


able," said Ramos. "I didn't
have playing baseball on my
mind when I got home. I had
other things and family issues I
was attending to. Baseball just
came out of nowhere.
"After what I went through in
Afghanistan, maybe it was my
destiny to play again. I can tell
you I cherish every single mo-
ment I'm on the field. I look for-


ward to every game, every prac-
tice and every bus ride. I love
being around my teammates,
even if some of them are seven
years younger than me and look
at me like a grandfather This
experience is something I'll
never forget."
His baseball experience
helps Ramos smile through the
pain of all that he experienced


in Afghanistan.
"The baseball field has be-
come my sanctuary," said
Ramos. "To me there's nothing
better than being on the mound
pitching.
"Once I'm handed the ball, I
never want to give it up until
the game is over It will always
bother me to get lifted for an-
other pitcher because I'm a
competitor, but after
Afghanistan I know this is just a
game."
Ramos graduated from
Greater Lowell Tech in 2006.
He worked construction for a
year before enrolling at North-
ern Essex Community College.
He pitched on the Northern
Essex baseball team in 2008
and threw a no-hitter Ramos
also spent time on Bunker Hill
Community College's baseball
team before being deployed.
After Bunker Hill his ties to
baseball consisted of pickup
softball games on base in
Afghanistan and playing catch
at Devens upon his return to
the U.S.
It was during his time at De-
vens that Ramos got in touch
with a former coach about pos-
sibly helping out with the
Chelmsford Merchants. One
thing led to another and he
ended up pitching for the Mer-
chants in the summer of 2012.
Ramos had enough velocity
left in his right arm that the
Merchants' coaches contacted
former Daniel Webster head
coach J.P Pyne, who is now an
assistant at UMaine, on his be-
half. He enrolled in Daniel
Webster last year and is major-
ing in homeland security
Ramos hopes to work for the
FBI or DEA after getting his de-
gree.
"He certainly has experi-
enced more life lessons than
your typical college baseball
player," said first-year Daniel
Webster head coach Nate
Goulet, who was an assistant
last season. "He doesn't open


up too much about his experi-
ences. I know he was a gunner
on a vehicle and he was in the
thick of things.
"When we were down in
Florida last year he struggled
in his first start I was the
bench coach and when he came
back to the dugout I asked him
how he felt out there? He said,
'Coach I was really nervous.' I
said, 'You spent time in
Afghanistan where you faced
life and death situations. We're
playing baseball in Florida. Go
out there and have fun.' There's
no sense in him ever being
nervous about pitching in any
baseball game after what he's
been through."
Ramos rose to the rank of ser-
geant and served in the re-
serves until being honorably
discharged earlier this year
"I was in a leadership posi-
tion at a young age," said
Ramos. "I knew I couldn't show
any sign of weakness in front of
my subordinates.
"Whenever you went outside
the wire you couldn't help but
think is this going to be my last
mission? Am I going to die
today? Will my leg get blown
off? You never showed any
signs of fear because it would
ruin morale. I had to stay posi-
tive so the men around me
would stay positive."
Ramos, who is hoping to get
another year of eligibility since
his season at Bunker Hill was
cut short, has certainly had a
positive impact on Daniel Web-
ster's baseball program. He can
still throw in the low to mid-80s
consistently, and has worked
hard at becoming a well-
rounded pitcher, rather than
strictly relying on his fastball.
"The thing that makes him
such a unique player is his
work ethic and I'm sure he gets
that from his family and his
military background," said
Goulet. "He pays attention to
detail. He's accountable for his
actions."


VETERANS & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS


This listing contains only
basic information regarding
each group. For more infor-
mation about scheduled activ-
ities, meetings, meals and
more for a specific post or
group, call or email the con-
tact listed. Posts and groups
may email changes or correc-
tions to community@
chronicleonline. com.

AMERICAN LEGION
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155,
6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Crystal River. Call 352-
795-6526, email blanton
thompsonPostl 55@gmail.
comn, or visit www.flPost
155.org.
American Legion
Auxiliary Unit 155. Call Unit
President Barbara Logan,
352-795-4233.
American Legion
Wall-Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Call 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza.
Visit www.Post237.org or call
352-746-5018.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and
Auxiliary Unit 77, 4375 Little
Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Commander
Norm Brumett at 352-476-
2134 orAuxiliary president
Alice Brumett at 352-476-
7001.
N American Legion Post
166 has a new schedule.
Meetings are the first Monday
at 7 p.m. at the Springs Lodge
No. 378 A&FM, 5030 S.
Memorial Drive, Homosassa.
To accommodate members
who cannot drive at night,
breakfast meetings are also
held at Olive Tree at 9 a.m.
weekly. Call Commander
Robert Scott at 352-860-2090
for days and other
information.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225, 6535
S. Withlapopka Drive, Floral
City. Call 352-860-1629.

VETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, County Road 491, di-
rectly behind Cadence Bank,
Beverly Hills. Call 352-
746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus


Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies
Auxiliary, 3190 N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, State Road
200, Hernando. Call 352-726-
3339, email vfw4252@tampa
bay.rr.com and Google VFW
4252, Hernando.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189, West Veterans
Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. Call 352-795-5012.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. Call
352-637-0100.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries,
906 State Road 44 E., Inver-
ness. Call Commander Victor
Houston at 352-344-3495, or
visit www.vfw4337.org.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698, 520 State
Road 40 E., Inglis, one mile
east of U.S. 19. Call 352-
447-3495.

OTHER GROUPS
Military Order of the
Cootie and MOC Auxiliary
members meet at 1:01 p.m.
the first Sunday monthly at
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW Post
4252 in Hernando (3190 N.
Carl G. Rose Highway/State
Road 200), where the
helicopter is.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, 405 E. State Road
40, Inglis, FL 34449. Call 352-
447-1816; email Amvet447
@comcast.net.
AMVETS Harry M.


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Bailey Post 89, Homosassa.
The newly formed post meets
the first Thursday of the
month. Call Roger Ingall Jr. at
352-697-1826 or Jerry Webb
at 352-220-4807.
Disabled American
Veterans Gerald A. Shonk
Chapter No. 70,1039 N.
Paul Drive, Inverness, at the
intersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41. Call
352-419-0207.
Disabled American
Veterans Auxiliary Unit No.
70. Call Commander Lucy
Godfrey at 352-794-3104.
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter No. 158,
Crystal River, meets at the
Crystal River Mall. For more
information, call Duane
Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at Leroy Rooks Jr.
VFW Post 4252 in Hernando.
Call Susan McQuiston at 352-
666-0084, or Joan Cecil at
352-726-0834.
The Korean War
Veterans Association,
Citrus Chapter 192 meets at
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
U.S. Submarine
Veterans (USSVI)-Sturgeon
Base meets at American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Call Base Commander
Billy Wein at 352-726-5926.
Navy Seabee Veterans
of America Island X-23


meets at 10:30 a.m. the third
Tuesday monthly at Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club,
Hernando. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Navy Seabee Veterans
of America Auxiliary
Island X-23 meets at
9:30 a.m. the third Tuesday
monthly at Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club, Hernando. Call
Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565.
Citrus 40&8 Voiture
1219 and Cabane 1219
meets at American Legion
Post 155 on State Road 44 in
Crystal River. Call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959.
Visit www.Post1l55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver
Chapter 776 Military Order
of the Purple Heart (MOPH)
meets at Citrus County
Builders Association, 1196 S.
Lecanto Highway (County
Road 491), Lecanto. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Citrus County Chapter
of Military Officers
Association of America
(MOAA) meets at 11:30 a.m.
the second Tuesday monthly
at the Olive Garden. Call
President Norm Cooney, Lt.
Col. U.S. Army, retired, at
352-746-1768, or Secretary
Jim Echlin, Capt. U.S. Air
Force, retired, at 352-746-
0806.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at Leroy Rooks
Jr. VFW 4252 in Hernando.


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Call Jerry Cecil at 352-726-
0834 or 352-476-6151, or
Wallace Turner at 352-637-
6206.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at VFW Post 10087 on
Vet Lane in Beverly Hills, be-
hind Cadence Bank. Call
Morgan Patterson at 352-746-
1135, Ted Archambault at
352-382-0462 or Bion St.
Bernard at 352-697-2389.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
the DAV Building, Independ-
ence Highway and U.S. 41
North, Inverness. Call Bob
Huscher, secretary, at 352-
344-0727.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) meets at Denny's in
Crystal River. Call Jimmie at
352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meets at 11:30 a.m. on
certain Saturdays at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill. The
remaining meeting in 2014
will be May 10.
West Central Florida
Coasties meets at the
Country Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). Call Charlie Jensen
at 352-503-6019.
U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Homosassa
Flotilla 15-4 meets at West
Citrus Community Center,
8940 Veterans Drive. Call
Wilbur B. Scott at 352-628-
0639 or email seacapt34447
@yahoo.com or Robert Currie
at 352-799-5250 or email


A


rgcurrie@bellsouth.net.
VFW Riders Group
meets at different VFW posts
throughout the year. Call
Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneu-
sawo@tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets at
10 a.m. second Saturday at
Elks Lodge No. 2522, 3580
Lemon Drive, Inverness.
Visit www.rollingthunder
fl7.com, call President Archie
Gooding at 352-464-0863 or
email GatorDad0527@
tampabay.rr.com.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. Call Mike Emig
at 352-854-8328.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition is on the DAV prop-
erty in Inverness at the corner
of Paul and Independence, off
U.S. 41 north. Appointments
are encouraged by calling
352-400-8952. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition; call Ed Murphy at
352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge,
developed by nonprofit
agency ServiceSource, seeks
to meet the needs of
wounded veterans. 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence
@servicesource.org.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Travel



The best time to book the cheapest flights


Associated Press

NEW YORK Booking a flight is
often confusing, annoying and frustrat-
ing. Prices fluctuate so frequently that
most vacationers can't tell if they are
getting a good deal.
We check multiple websites, often
several times a day Then, a few days
after we finally do book that non-re-
fundable ticket, there's a sale, confirm-
ing that we overpaid.
So when is the best time to book a
flight? One travel site dug through the
data and has an answer for us: 54 days
in advance. Well, except there are
plenty of caveats.
We'll get back to that number in a
minute, but first a little bit about how
the process works.
Airlines use sophisticated computer
programs to analyze booking trends and
constantly change prices to get the most
money out of each flight. That's why two
passengers in the same row might have
paid vastly different fares, depending
on when they booked. Complicating
matters is a bevy of fees added to help
the airlines offset higher jet fuel prices.
That's why booking at the right time is
so much more important today The av-
erage cost of a roundtrip domestic ticket
- including baggage and reservation
change fees grew to $378.62 from
$351.48 in the last five years, when ad-
justed for inflation.
That brings us to 54 days.
For a study published in February,
booking site CheapAircom looked at mil-
lions of trip combinations, searching as
far as 320 days in advance to one day
prior to departure and every possible day
between. That's 1.3 billion airfares. The
result: 54 days in advance was the best
time, on average, to buy domestic tickets.
This is not a hard-and-fast rule, however
Airfares to popular vacation destina-
tions tend to go up sooner So flights to
Phoenix, San Diego, Orange County,
Calif, as well as Ft. Lauderdale, West
Palm Beach, Pensacola, and Orlando in
Florida were actually cheapest 75 days
in advance, according to CheapAir's
study For Las Vegas, it was 81 days and


Associated Press
A plane takes off over a departure board at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, in Atlanta. Booking site ChaeapAir.com looked at millions
of trip combinations, searching as far as 320 days in advance to one day prior to departure and every possible day between, and
found that 54 days in advance was the best time, on average, to buy domestic airfare.


for airports in Hawaii it was 87 days.
Confused yet? That's why CheapAir
tried to simply things and come up with
a more-general rule: The prime
booking window is 29 to 104 days before
departure.
That fits with a report that the Airlines
Reporting Corp, which processes ticket
transactions for airlines and more than
9,400 travel agencies, including websites
such as Expedia and Orbitz. That 2012
study found that the optimal time to book
is about six weeks in advance. Fliers
booking then paid about 5.8 percent less
than the average domestic fare.
Now, here's some bad news: The for-
mula is completely different for those
peak travel periods when everybody
wants to fly So, if you still haven't
booked your flights to Europe for this
summer, forget about it. The best time to
buy those, according to ChaeapAir, was
a whopping 319 days in advance.
But at least you can start thinking now
about Thanksgiving and Christmas
travel. The cheapest day to book those


flight last year was June 4 roughly
five and six months prior to the respec-
tive holidays.
Here are some other tips to saving:
Look for connecting flights. Flying
nonstop is ideal, but that convenience
isn't free. Adding one stop could save
$100 round-trip. Just leave plenty of
time to connect.
Be flexible with your dates. Use a
flexible date search to find the cheapest
days in a month to fly
Consider the 24-hour rule. U.S. air-
lines are required to let you cancel most
tickets booked directly though their
websites. (There are exceptions for
those within a week of travel.) After you
book, check the next morning and see
whether the price fell. If so, call to can-
cel and rebook.
After 24 hours, still watch for price
declines. Any savings is typically wiped
out by fees to change your reservation,
ranging from $75 to $200. However,
Southwest Airlines doesn't impose
change fees and Alaska Airlines waives


them up to 60 days before a trip. If fares
on those carriers drop, you can get a
credit for the difference.
Book intra-Europe flights through
overseas websites. The flights are often
cheaper on the airline's home country
website. Google's Chrome browser will
translate it for you. If that doesn't work,
try the country specific site of Expedia.
Pick two different airlines. Most air-
lines now sell one-way flights at reason-
able prices. One airline might be
cheaper for the outbound flight and an-
other for the return.
Search multiple sites. The cheapest
flight doesn't always show up on every
website. Expedia, Orbitz and Traveloc-
ity are the biggest online ticket-sellers.
Sometimes better deals can be found on
Kayak, Hipmunk, AirfareWatchdog,
Yapta, FareCompare, CheapOair, Mobis-
simo and Flycom.
Some airlines, like Southwest,
aren't included on many sites. Look at
airport websites to make sure you aren't
missing a carrier


ALABAMA
Continued from Page A15

Park, where statues depict compelling scenes from
the city's civil rights struggles.

BIRMINGHAM MUSEUM OF ART

Billing itself as one the nation's best regional muse-
ums, the Birmingham Museum of Art houses more
than 25,000 drawings, paintings, prints, sculptures and
decorative pieces from all over the world. Its painting
collection includes Albert Bierstadt's "Looking Down
Yosemite Valley," selected by The National Endow-
ment for the Humanities as one of 40 American mas-
terpieces.

RAILROAD PARK

Once a trash-strewn empty lot beside train tracks,
Railroad Park opened in 2010 and quickly became a
favorite gathering spot. With features including ponds,
a wetlands area, a walking track and a natural am-
phitheater, the 19-acre park is a perfect spot to spend
a few hours watching people or reading a book.
ETERNAL WORD TELEVISION NETWORK
Located minutes from downtown in tree-covered
Irondale, Eternal Word Television Network offers
weekday tours of what it calls the world's largest reli-
gious media operation. Founded by an enterprising
nun, the operation is geared toward Catholics, but
anyone can see the studios and control rooms that are
used to beam shows to more than 150 million TV
households worldwide. The opulent Shrine of the
Most Blessed Sacrament and Monastery is located on
400 acres about a one-hour drive away
BIRMINGHAM BOTANICAL GARDENS
With 67 acres of land and more than two dozen
unique gardens, the Birmingham Botanical Gardens is
one of the most-visited free attractions in Alabama.
There are roses for flower fans, a Japanese garden for
Asian enthusiasts and a vegetable garden lush enough
to make any home gardener green with envy



Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

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5. a1 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Associated Press
Visitors interested in civil rights history can pay homage to the era on a pilgrimage to sites where headlines were
made. Walk along streets where police and firefighters used dogs and fire hoses to rout black demonstrators
seeking equality in 1963. Stand at the spot where a Ku Klux Klan bomb went off that same year, killing four black
girls inside 16th Street Baptist Church. Across from the church, sit in Kelly Ingram Park, where statues depict
compelling scenes from the city's civil rights struggles.


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

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EXCURSIONS


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 A21




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To B&B or not to B&B?




That is the question


In most small towns, the biggest
and most elegant building on
Main Street is the funeral
home. Or an old-age home. These
buildings always look as if they
might be the starring attraction in
Stephen King's next novel.
The biggest house in one nearby
town is a huge, white Victorian
that looks like a wedding cake. It
has a wide front porch that runs
the length of the house, along with
three-story turrets with curved
glass windows topped with
witches' hat roofs. Gables and
wings and filigree and shutters
and shingles hang off the house
like pearls around an old lady's
neck. It is bigger than Perkins' Fu-
neral Home and the Falling
Leaves Home for Seniors com-
bined the two other biggest
houses on Main Street
Anne and Jim bought the Wed-
ding Cake about two years ago. I
ran into Anne mowing the lawn
and introduced myself. She told
me they were going to turn it into a
bed and breakfast. She went on
and on about how wonderful it was
going to be, and how their only
worry was that they wouldn't have
enough room for all the guests who
would want to stay there. "This is
the most perfect little town," she
said. "It's not spoiled with a bunch
of tourist traps and souvenir shops
and outlet malls. It's like a movie
set. You could shoot a movie here.
Like 'The Music Man."'
Anne and Jim, it goes without


Jim
Mullen

VILLAGE
IDIOT


saying, were from the city. They
loved staying in B&Bs. They en-
joyed getting up at 10 in the morn-
ing and walking down to a dining
room that looked the way it did in
the 1880s, with crystal chandeliers
and wall sconces and sepia pic-
tures of the owner's relatives on
the wall. They enjoyed lolling
around until noon reading the
newspaper, then strolling through
the local antique shops. They
loved sitting in big overstuffed
chairs after dinner, drinking fine
wine and chatting with the other
guests.
'And that's just what they tell
you in the entrepreneur class we
took at City College. They say 'Do
what you know, do what you love.'
So Jim and I quit our jobs and took
the plunge."
Today I drove past the Wedding
Cake and there was a big red "For
Sale" sign staked in the lawn. It
turns out that Anne and Jim did
what they knew and did what they
loved. And while Anne and Jim
loved getting out of bed at 10 in the
morning and reading the paper


until noon, their guests, who got up
at half past 6, did not love it. Anne
and Jim ran a very fine "B," by all
reports, but they failed the "&B"
part miserably Even that might
have worked, had there been been
any other place to eat in town.
Mrs. Reticule, who lives next
door, said that the guests were so
desperate, they would see the
lights on in her kitchen and walk
over to her back door and beg her
for coffee. She finally started put-
ting a large coffee urn out on her
back porch with stack of styrofoam
cups and a tip jar But she stopped
doing that when she found a note
in the jar one morning that said,
"You call this coffee? Would it kill
you to put out some freshly ground
French roast?"
Not that there were ever many
guests to disappoint. Once you
have walked around the unspoiled
town without souvenir shops and
outlet malls, there is not much left
to do with the remaining 23-and-a-
half hours in your day
Anne was right; you could film
"The Music Mafn" here. But you'd
have to go to some other town with
a theater to watch it. And that town
got all their B&B business.
So now the real estate agent is
doing what he knows, doing what
he loves best selling the Wed-
ding Cake to the next dreamer for
whatever the market will bear
Contact Jim Mullen at Jim
MullenBooks. corn.


NEWS NOTES


April 14-20, 2014
Divorces
Judith A. Carlton, Beverly
Hills vs. Kenneth L. Carlton,
Beverly Hills
Roger Grimmet, Citrus
Springs vs. Angel Grimmet,
West Union, W.Va.
Michael A. Guastella,
Dunnellon vs. Cynthia A.
Guastella, Baxley, Ga.
Renee M. Huseman, Ocala
vs. Eric V. Huseman, Ocala
Matthew J. McHugh,
Inverness vs. Julia K.
McHugh, Inverness
Michelle A. Messere,
Inverness vs. Timothy
Messere, Inverness
JudyAnn Ofarrell, Lecanto
vs. Brian Michael Ofarrell,
Lecanto
Steven J. Pitts, Inverness
vs. Lavonne M. Pitts,
Inverness
Marli N. Pollard, Inverness
vs. Randall P. Pollard,
Inverness
Marissa K. Rogers,
Inverness vs. Matthew R.
Rogers, Lecanto
Robert A. Willis Jr., Lecanto
vs. Anne B. Willis, Lecanto
Marriages
John Alden Armstrong, Los
Angeles, Calif./Dawn Kathryn
Snyder, Los Angeles, Calif.
Bernardo Atan, Hallandale
Beach/Kimberly Lynn Posila,
Hernando
Jorge Luis Ayuso, Citrus
Springs/Zoraida Rivera
Cabrera, Citrus Springs
Gordon Roger Cannon,
Lecanto/Corby Lee Esarey,
Lawrenceville, Ill.
Blake Zachary Courter,


Somerville, Mass./Amber Lee
Simpson, Somerville, Mass.
Nicholas Raymond Davis,
Citrus Springs/Rochell
Danielle Ritchey, Citrus
Springs
Jeffrey Michael Dutkiewicz,
Inglis/Christina Lynn Dillon,
Inglis
WesleyAaron Garton, Jane
Lew, W.Va./Katelyn Morgan
McWhorter, Horner, W.Va.
William Charles Griffith,
Crystal River/Susan Rae
Vassallo, Crystal River
Michael Patrick Hall,
Inverness/Meghan Lynn
Grothus Brannon, Inverness
Christopher Justin Marks,
Hernando/Ariel Linn Jones,
Hernando
Roger Earl Miller,
Homosassa/Shana Radel
Stewart, Homosassa
Terry William Myers,
Dunnellon/Chelsea Nicole
Thaler, Dunnellon
Tyler Scott Myers,
Inverness/Jamie Lynn
Brownell, Inverness
Robert Allen Perrine,
Inverness/Sandra Gail Smith,
Inverness
Kelly Graham Radford Jr.,
Crystal River/Laura Anne
Giles, Crystal River
James Edward Ross Jr.,
Dunnellon/Marianne Nicole
Zarek, Homosassa
John Edward Schnapp Jr.,
Homosassa/Wendy Sue
Supulver, Floresville, Texas
Micah Joel Tybeck,
Columbus, Ohio/Christina
Ann Allen, Columbus, Ohio
David Robert Veres Jr.,
Homosassa/Lindsay Michelle
Danback, Lecanto


FOR THE RECORD


Humane Society OF CITRUS CO.

Asa
Asa is a handsome little 8-pound Chihuahua. He
would be happy just keeping his new family company
at home relaxing in front of the television or keeping
your lap warm while you read a good book. He would
also enjoy being your new travel companion. He would
probably do best in an adult home. Asa is just 3 years
old, is neutered, up to date on medical, microchipped
and crate trained. An approved application and
adoption fee are required. To access an application or
to view other, visit www.roomforonemore.net. For
more information, call Karron at 352-560-0051.





Oak Hill Hospital'


* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


NEED A REPORTER?
* Approval for story ideas must be granted by the
Chronicle's editors before a reporter is assigned.
* Call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-3225 for news
stories, or Logan Mosby, features editor, at 352-
563-5660 for feature stories.


For Your Health


Community Education Series


Harvey Schonwald, MD
Board Certified Urologist


Dr. Harvey Schonwald, a board certified urologist on staff
at Oak Hill Hospital, will discuss advances in bladder
disorders for men and women. Today a variety of bladder
disorders ranging from incontinence to bladder cancer can
be controlled or corrected through a variety of treatment
options, including medication, retraining and surgery.


" Hot Meal Will Be Served!

* Reserve Your Spot Today!

* Limited Seating!


i\ Oak Hill


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A22 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY









SPORTS


On the brink
of elimination,
Pacers manage
to find what
they've been
missing./B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


! Baseball/B2
" Scoreboard/B3
" Adult recreation/B4
" Golf/B4
" Hockey/B5
" Basketball/B5
" NASCAR/B5
0 All-Chronicle teams/B6


After strong start, battered bullpen betrays Rays


Day afterfive-hour, 14-inning slog,


,. mAssociated Press
NEW YORK Perfect
through three innings, Jake
Odorizzi was gone before he got
an out in the fifth.
The Yankees changed their
approach against the right-han-
der, started to take him the op-
posite way and rallied past the
Tampa Bay Rays 9-3 Saturday
Odorizzi is 0-3 with an 8.72
ERA in five starts since beating
Toronto in his season debut on
April 4.
He outdueled Yankees
b starter Masahiro Tanaka for
three innings, and the Rays
Associated Press gave him a 3-0 lead. But Jacoby
Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon takes starting pitcher Jake Ellsbury singled to lead off the
Odorizzi out of the game during the fifth inning Saturday in New York. fourth and, one batter later,


Mark Teixeira hit a two-run
homer Ellsbury chased Odor-
izzi with a long RBI double off
the wall in the fifth.
"Today I did the exact same
thing in the first three that I did
in the fourth and the fifth, the
exact same thing," Odorizzi
said. 'All the hits I gave up
today were opposite field. We
were sitting away, away, away,
and it worked the first time
through. We went back to it and
they did a good job of staying
back, hitting it where it was
pitched and they went the other
way with everything."
Teixeira homered for the
fourth time in his last five
games and drove in three runs
as the Yankees stopped a sea-


-; F ,:-ff q:- W,- .'.,- _&" ;E
Associated Press
Victor Espinoza rides California Chrome to victory Saturday during the 140th running of the Kentucky Derby
at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky.





BRILLIANT

CALIFORNIA CHROME SHINES AT DERBY
Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky.
Horse with a humble pedigree. A couple of working stiff
owners. A 77-year-old trainer with his first Kentucky Derby
horse. Even Hollywood couldn't have made this up.


California Chrome made it look easy on Saturday,
pulling away down the stretch to win the Derby by
13/4 lengths.
In a sport dominated by wealthy owners and
regally bred horses from Kentucky's bluegrass
country, this was a victory for the little guys. Owners
Perry Martin and Steve Coburn bred an $8,000
mare to a $2,500 stallion to produce the winner of
the world's most famous race with their one-horse
stable.
"This is just a dream come true and a great birthday
present,"' said Coburn, who turned 61 on Saturday
California Chrome ran 1 1/4 miles in 2:03.66 and
paid $7, $5.60 and $4.20. The chestnut colt was sent
off as the 5-2 favorite by the crowd of 164,906, the
second-largest in the Derby's 140-year history


His trainer, Art Sherman, became the oldest
trainer to win the Derby, 57 years after he traveled
from California as an exercise rider for Derby win-
ner Swaps. He watched that race from the barn
area; this time he smelled red roses in the winner's
circle.
Sherman was all smiles after the race. "He gave
me the biggest thrill I ever had in my life," he said.
California Chrome has the unlikeliest pedigree
for a Derby champion. His mother, named Love the
Chase, won just one race. She was purchased by
Coburn and Martin, a move that prompted a trainer
to call them "dumb asses" for getting involved in
racing.
See Page B3


Yankees win 9-3
son-high, three-game losing
streak.
Tanaka extended his regular-
season unbeaten streak to 40
starts, and Kelly Johnson hit a
tiebreaking solo homer in the
sixth inning off Josh Lueke (0-
2), who also gave up a run-scor-
ing single to Teixeira and a
sacrifice fly to Alfonso Soriano
in a two-run seventh.
Tanaka (4-0) gave up solo
homers to Desmond Jennings
and Wil Myers around an RBI
single by Ryan Hanigan, falling
behind 3-0 by the fourth and
looking shaky by the standard
set over his first five big league
starts.
See Page B3



Giardino


wins three


state titles

Distance ace

Farnsworth

medals in 3,200
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Inclement weather once
again proved a vexing adver-
sary Saturday in Jacksonville as
the 2014 FHSAA state tourna-
ment continued at the Univer-
sity of North Florida. Despite
the weather, six Lecanto state
qualifiers competed in the
Class 3A meet.
Lecanto senior Matt Giardino
won his third consecutive state
title in the adaptive shot put,
tossing the shot 24 feet, 3 inches
over 10 feet
further than the

Matt adptver 100fe
second-place
finisher, Van-
guard's Joey
Sn a Gibbs (13-6 1/2).
Giardino re-
deemed him-
Sself in the
Matt adaptive 200
Giardino meters after
losing in a photo finish to Gibbs
in last year's race. Giardino
won Saturday's race in a time of
36.50, two full seconds faster
than Gibbs' time of 38.50.
In the adaptive 800 meters,
Gibbs proved victorious for the
second year in a row, but it was
close, as a second stood be-
tween Giardino and an adap-
tive event sweep. Gibbs won the
race in a time of 2:44 to Gia-
rdino's 2:45.
Lecanto won the adaptive
team title with 28 points, its
third title in three years (last
year the title was shared with
Vanguard), while Gibbs' Van-
guard Knights finished second
with 18 points.
"I was proud of everybody.
They all put forth their best ef-
fort," Lecanto boys' head coach
Marcy Mills said. "They trained
hard to lead up to this, so I was
happy for them."
Sophomore Claire Farnsworth
capitalized on the promise of last
week's regional title win at Lake
Minneola in the 3,200 meters by
See Page B3


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B2 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NL

Cubs 3, Cardinals 0
St. Louis Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt 3b 4 0 0 0 Bonifac cf-2b 4 0 0 0
Craig rf 4 0 0 0 Valuen 2b-3b 3 0 0 0
Hollidylf 3 0 0 0 Rizzo lb 3 1 1 1
MAdmslb 4 03 0 SCastross 4 1 2 0
YMolinc 4 0 1 0 Schrhltrf 4 0 0 0
JhPerltss 4 0 2 0 Castilloc 4 0 0 0
Jay cf 3 0 0 0 Lake If-cf 3 1 3 2
GGarci2b 2 00 0 Olt3b 2 00 0
Ellisph-2b 2 0 1 0 NRmrzp 0 00 0
Wachap 2 00 0 Stropp 0 00 0
Grichkph 1 00 0 HRndnp 0 00 0
CMrtnzp 0 00 0 Arrietap 2 00 0
Choatep 0 00 0 Schlittrp 0 00 0
Neshekp 0 00 0 Russellp 0 00 0
Kalishl If 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 07 0 Totals 303 6 3
St. Louis 000 000 000 0
Chicago 000 002 01x 3
DP-Chicago 1. LOB-St. Louis 8, Chicago 6.
2B-S.Castro (6), Lake (4). HR-Rizzo (6), Lake (3).
IP H R ERBB SO
St. Louis
WachaL,2-3 6 5 2 2 3 6
C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 0
Choate 2-3 1 1 1 0 1
Neshek 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Chicago
Arrieta 51-34 0 0 2 7
SchlitterW,1-0 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Russell H,1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
N.RamirezH,2 2-3 1 0 0 0 2
StropH,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
H.RondonS,3-3 1 2 0 0 0 1
T-2:43. A-37,874(41,072).
Phillies 7,
Nationals 2
Washington Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Spancf 4 00 0 GwynJcf 4 1 2 0
Rendon3b 4 0 0 0 Rollinsss 5 2 4 0
Werthrf 4 00 0 Utley2b 3 1 0 0
SouzJrrf 0 0 0 0 Howard lb 4 1 1 3
LaRochilb 2 1 2 1 Byrdrf 4 02 2
TMoorelb 1 0 0 0 DBrwnl If 4 1 1 0
Dsmndss 3 0 1 0 Ruizc 4 0 1 1
Espinos2b 4 0 0 0 Asche3b 4 1 1 1
McLothl If 4 00 0 ABrnttp 3 00 0
Loatonc 1 0 0 0 Hollndsp 0 0 0 0
Leonph-c 2 00 0 MAdmsp 0 00 0
Roarkp 1 0 0 0 Revere ph 1 0 0 0
Matthsp 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
Walters ph 1 1 1 1
Stmmnp 0 000
Totals 31 24 2 Totals 36712 7
Washington 000 001 100 2
Philadetphia 310 120 00x 7
E-Asche(3). LOB-Washington 6, Philadelphia
8.2B-LaRoche (6), Byrd (7), D.Brown (4), Ruiz
(9). HR-LaRoche (5), Walters (3), Howard (6),
Asche (2). SB-Rollins(5). S-Roark.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
RoarkL,2-1 4 7 7 7 1 5
Mattheus 2 3 0 0 1 1
Stammen 2 2 0 0 1 0
Philadelphia
A.BurnettW,2-1 6 3 1 1 2 7
Hollands 1 1 1 1 0 1
Mi.Adams 1 0 0 0 0 2
Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 3
Roark pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
HBP- by A.Burnett (Lobaton).
T-2:57 (Rain delay: 0:24). A-33,441 (43,651).
Giants 3, Braves 1
San Francisco Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pagancf 4 0 0 0 Heywrdrf 3 1 1 0
Pencerf 4 0 0 0 BUptoncf 3 0 1 1
Poseyc 4 1 2 1 Fremnib 3 0 1 0
Morse If 3 1 1 1 J.Upton If 4 0 1 0
Arias3b 1 0 0 0 Gattisc 4 0 0 0
Belt lb 4 1 1 1 CJhnsn3b 4 00 0
Sandovl3b 3 0 0 0 Uggla2b 3 0 1 0
Affeldtp 0 00 0 Smmnsss 3 00 0
Machip 0 00 0 Tehernp 2 00 0
Romo p 0 00 0 Pstrnckph 1 00 0
BCrwfrss 3 00 0 DCrpntp 0 00 0
B.Hicks2b 3 00 0 Halep 0 00 0
Vglsng p 2 00 0
Banco f 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 34 3 Totals 30 1 5 1
San Francisco 010 100 100 3
Atlanta 001 000 000 1
E-B.Crawford (2). DP-San Francisco 3.
LOB-San Francisco 2, Atlanta 7.2B-Heyward
(6), B.Upton (4). HR-Posey(7), Morse (8), Belt
(8). SB-Heyward (5). CS-Freeman (1).
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
VogelsongW,1-1 6 5 1 1 4 6
AffeldtH,4 1 0 0 0 1 0
MachiH,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
RomoS,9-9 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
TeheranL,2-2 7 4 3 3 0 7
D.Carpenter 1 0 0 0 1 1
Hale 1 0 0 0 0 0
Affeldt pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
T-2:51. A-34,648 (49,586).
Reds 6, Brewers 2
Milwaukee Cincinnati
ab rhbi ab rhbi
CGomzcf 4 00 0 Heiseycf 4 00 0
Gennett2b 4 00 0 Votto 1b 5 00 0
Lucroyc 4 0 0 0 Phillips2b 4 2 3 0
ArRmr3b 4 1 1 1 Brucerf 4 1 1 0
MrRynllb 3 1 1 1 Frazier3b 3 22 1
Gindlrf 3 0 0 0 Ludwckl If 3 0 2 1
Segura ss 3 0 1 0 Schmkr pr-lf 0 0 0 0
LSchfrlf 3 0 0 0 B.Penac 4 1 2 2
Gallardp 2 00 0 Cozartss 4 00 0
Thrnrgp 0 0 0 0 Cuetop 3 0 1 1
Overayph 0 00 0 N.Sotoph 1 00 0
Wootenp 0 00 0 LeCurep 0 00 0
Totals 30 23 2 Totals 35611 5
Milwaukee 010 010 000 2
Cincinnati 000 301 20x 6
E-Ar.Ramirez (3). LOB-Milwaukee 2, Cincin-
nati 8. 2B-Phillips (5), Frazier (8). HR-
Ar.Ramirez (4), MarReynolds (7).
IP H RER BB SO
Milwaukee
Gallardo L,2-1 6 9 4 4 1 1
Thornburg 1 2 2 2 1 1
Wooten 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
CuetoW,3-2 8 3 2 2 1 10
LeCure 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Gallardo (Frazier). WP-Thornburg 2.
T-2:30. A-38,243 (42,319).

Interleague

Pirates 8, Blue Jays 6
Toronto Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Reyesss 4 0 1 1 JHrrsnrf 5 22 1
MeCarrl If 4 00 1 NWalkr2b 4 1 2 2
Bautistrf 5 22 1 AMcCtcf 4 1 1 0
Encrnclb 4 1 0 0 PAIvrz3b 3 1 1 1
Lawrie3b 5 1 3 1 GSnchzlb 1 1 0 0
Rasmscf 5 0 1 1 JGomzp 0 00 0
StTllsn2b 3 00 0 Mercerph 1 0 1 2
Loupp 0 00 0 Morrisp 0 00 0
Rdmndp 0 00 0 Sniderph 0 00 0
Jenkinsp 0 00 0 Melncnp 0 00 0
Tholec 3 2 2 0 SMartelf 5 0 1 0
Dickey p 3 0 0 0 TSnchzc 4 0 1 0
Getz2b 0 00 0 Barmesss 4 1 2 1
Liriano p 1 0 0 0
JHughsp 0 00 0
Tabata ph 1 0 0 0
Mazzarp 0 00 0
I.Davis lb 2 1 1 0
Totals 36 69 5 Totals 35812 7
Toronto 001 401 000 6
Pittsburgh 000 200 42x 8
E-Barmes (2), RAIvarez 2 (7), T.Sanchez (3).
DP Toronto 1, Pittsburgh 2. LOB Toronto 9,
Pittsburgh 10.2B-Reyes (4), Lawrie (3), J.Har-
rison (2), N.Walker (5), Mercer (2), Barmes (1).
HR-Bautista (9).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Dickey 6 5 3 3 4 3
Loup 1 4 3 3 1 1
Redmond L,0-3 2-3 3 2 2 2 1
Jenkins 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Liriano 32-36 5 4 3 3
J.Hughes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Mazzaro 2 2 1 1 2 0
J.Gomez 1 0 0 0 0 0
MorrisW,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 1
MelanconS,i-1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Dickey pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Morris (Getz).WP-Dickey. PB-Thole.
T-3:19.A-31,439 (38,362).


East Division
GB WC


Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .640 7-3
15 .483 4 1% 4-6
15 .464 4/2 2 4-6
17 .452 5 2/2 4-6
17 .433 5% 3 4-6


Str Home
W-4 9-5
L-3 8-6
W-1 7-9
L-4 9-7
W-2 9-6


Str Home Away
W-19-7 7-6
L-1 7-6 8-7
W-28-10 7-6
L-1 7-7 7-10
L-2 5-7 8-10



Str Home Away
L-5 9-5 8-7
L-1 9-8 8-5
L-2 8-8 7-5
W-413-4 2-10
W-1 5-7 9-7


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
W L Pct GB WC


12 .600
13 .552
14 .500
15 .464
20 .333


NewYork
Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Miami
Philadelphia


L10 Str Home
5-5 L-2 6-6
5-5 W-1 9-7
6-4 L-1 6-7
6-4 W-1 5-6
4-6 L-1 6-12


Str Home
W-4 10-5
W-2 10-4
L-1 6-9
L-3 7-7
W-2 3-15


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz flips his bat in front of Oakland Athletics catcher Derek Norris
Saturday after hitting a solo home run in the third inning in Boston.



Lester rings up 15 as four Sox go deep


Associated Press

BOSTON Jon Lester struck
out a career-high 15, allowing one
hit over eight scoreless innings
and pitching the Boston Red Sox
over the Oakland Athletics 6-3 on
Saturday
Jonny Gomes hit a grand slam
and David Ortiz and David Ross
added solo homers in Boston's
second straight win after losing a
day-night doubleheader to Tampa
Bay on Thursday
The only hit off Lester (3-4) was
Craig Gentry's leadoff bloop sin-
gle in the third over the head of
second baseman Dustin Pedroia.
Lester rebounded from taking
the loss in his previous two games
by striking out nine of his first 13
batters. His previous strikeout best
was 13 in 2010 during a loss at Seattle.
Oakland scored three runs in
the ninth against Chris Capuano.
Koji Uehara closed for his sev-
enth save in seven opportunities.
Gomes hit his slam in the first
inning off Tommy Milone (0-3).

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Twins 6, Orioles 1
MINNEAPOLIS Joe Mauer and
Brian Dozier both homered, Kevin
Correia earned his first win of the sea-
son and the Minnesota Twins ended
their four-game losing streak by beat-
ing the Baltimore Orioles 6-1 Saturday.
Mauer had three hits and four RBIs.
His three-run shot off reliever Brad
Brach in the seventh inning broke
open the game.
Dozier's eighth homer, a solo shot
off Wei-Yin Chen (3-2) in the third,
gave the Twins the lead for good.
Correia (1-3) worked effidciently through
Baltimore's lineup, allowing five hits in
seven innings. He won for the first time
since last Sept. 1, a span of nine starts.

Mariners 9, Astros 8
HOUSTON Justin Smoak homered
to cap an eight-run burst in the seventh
inning, leading Hisashi Iwakuma and
the Seattle Mariners over the Houston
Astros 9-8.
Four straight walks started the
Mariners' big burst as they overcame
a 2-1 deficit.
Iwakuma (1-0) made his first ap-
pearance after starting the season on
the disabled list because of a sprained
middle finger.
Iwakuma allowed four runs and six
hits in 6 2-3 innings. Fernando Rod-
ney pitched the final 1 1-3 innings for
his seventh save.

Indians 2, White Sox 0
CLEVELAND Justin Masterson
pitched neatly into the eighth inning
and the Cleveland Indians beat the
White Sox 2-0 Saturday night in a
game highlighted by Chicago rookie
Jose Abreu's snazzy glove toss.
Abreu, who leads the majors in
homers and RBIs, struck out with two
runners on base to end the eighth.
Earlier, the Cuban first baseman
made the play of the day.
Abreu fielded Lonnie Chisenhall's
grounder in the sixth and, unable to
get the ball out of his mitt, flipped the
glove about 10 feet to pitcher Scott
Carroll covering the bag for the out.
Masterson (1-1) held the AL's highest-
scoring offense in check, allowing four
hits and striking out six in his seventh
start of the season. The right-hander won
for the first time since last Aug. 21.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 5
Tampa Bay 10, N.YYankees 5,14 innings
Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 5
Boston 7, Oakland 1
Baltimore 3, Minnesota 0
Detroit 8, Kansas City 2
Houston 5, Seattle 4, 11 innings
Texas 5, L.A. Angels 2
Saturday's Games
N.Y Yankees 9, Tampa Bay 3
Boston 6, Oakland 3
Minnesota 6, Baltimore 1
Seattle 9, Houston 8
Cleveland 2, Chicago White Sox 0
Pittsburgh 8, Toronto 6
Detroit 9, Kansas City 2
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Sunday's Games
White Sox (Rienzo 2-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 2-3), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Bedard 0-1) atYankees (Sabathia 3-3), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Gray 4-1) at Boston (Lackey 4-2), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (McGowan 1-1) at Pttsburgh (Vdquez 1-2), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Gonzalez 1-2) at Minnesota (Hughes 2-1), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 3-1) at Kansas City (Vargas 2-0), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Maurer 0-0) at Houston (McHugh 2-0), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 1-1) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 2-0), 3:35 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 5
Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 5
Washington 5, Philadelphia 3
Miami 6, L.A. Dodgers 3
Milwaukee 2, Cincinnati 0
San Francisco 2, Atlanta 1
Colorado 10, N.Y Mets 3
Arizona 2, San Diego 0
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 0
Pittsburgh 8, Toronto 6
Philadelphia 7, Washington 2
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2
San Francisco 3, Atlanta 1
L.A. Dodgers at Miami, late
N.Y Mets at Colorado, late
Arizona at San Diego, late
Sunday's Games
Dodgers (Undecided) at Miami (Fernandez 4-1), 1:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 2-3) at Atlanta (Wood 2-4), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (McGowan 1-1) at Rttsburgh (Vdquez 1-2), 1:35 p.m.
Washington (Gonzalez 3-1) at Philadelphia (Hamels 0-2),
3:05 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 2-3) at San Diego (TRoss 3-3), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 4-1) at Cincinnati (Simon 4-1), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-1) at Colorado (Undecided), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 4-1) at Chicago Cubs (Hammel 4-1), 8:05 p.m.


Tigers 9, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Drew Smyly
picked up where fellow Tigers starter
Rick Porcello left off, tossing seven
shutout innings and leading Detroit to
a 9-2 rout of the Kansas City Royals.
Porcello and the Tigers bullpen re-
tired the final 18 hitters in an 8-2 vic-
tory the previous night, and Smyly
(2-1) retired the first four he faced.
After a issuing a walk to Alex Gordon,
the former reliever then retired the
next six in a dominant performance.
Smyly wound up allowing two hits
and two walks before giving way to
Joba Chamberlain, who threw a per-
fect eighth. Phil Coke allowed two
runs in the ninth to lose the shutout.
Nick Castellanos drove in three runs
the Tigers, the first off spot starter Danny
Duffy (1-2) and two more off the Royals'
bullpen. That was it until the ninth, when
Detroit tacked on six more runs, the
highlight a three-run shot by Torii Hunter.

INTERLEAGUE

Pirates 8, Blue Jays 6
PITTSBURGH Neil Walker hit a
tiebreaking, two-run double on the eighth
inning, capping a comeback from a
five-run deficit to lead the Pittsburgh
Pirates over the Toronto Blue Jays 8-6.
A night after wasting a 5-3, ninth-in-
ning lead in a 6-5 loss, Toronto surged
ahead 5-0 in the fourth and 6-2 in the
seventh.
Aaron Loup relieved R.A. Dickey after
Clint Barmes' leadoff double in the seventh,
and the Pirates tied the score on Josh
Harrison's RBI double, Pedro Alvarez's
run-scoring groundout and pinch-hitter
Jordy Mercer's two-run double.


One inning later, Ike Davis reached
on a one-out infield single against
Todd Redmond (0-3), Harrison singled
and Walker hit a drive off the top of the
center-field wall. The Pirates could
have boosted their lead, but Starling
Marte lined out to first against Chad
Jenkins with the bases loaded.
Bryan Morris (3-0) pitched a perfect
eighth, and Mark Melancon earned his
first save of the season in place of in-
jured closer Jason Grilli, retiring Colby
Ramus on a game-ending groundout
with two on.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cubs 3, Cardinals 0
CHICAGO Junior Lake and An-
thony Rizzo homered, leading Jake
Arrieta and the Chicago Cubs past the
St. Louis Cardinals 3-0 Saturday for
their season-best third win in a row.
Aday after the Cubs tagged St. Louis
ace Adam Wainwright, they came
back to beat Michael Wacha (2-3).
The Cubs have their longest win-
ning streak since a three-game sweep
of San Francisco in late July.
Arrieta struck out seven over 5 1-3
innings in his season debut. He gave
up four hits.
Chicago's bullpen combined to
pitch 3 2-3 scoreless innings. Brian
Schlitter (1-0) got two outs for the win
and Hector Rondon worked around a
pair of leadoff singles in the ninth for
his third save.

Phillies 7, Nationals 2
PHILADELPHIA- Ryan Howard
and Cody Asche homered, and A.J.
Burnett threw six solid innings to lead
the Philadelphia Phillies over the
Washington Nationals 7-2.
Jimmy Rollins had four hits and
Marion Byrd doubled and drove in a
pair of runs for Philadelphia. The
Phillies won for just the third time in 11
games against the Nationals.
Adam LaRoche and Zach Walters
homered for Washington.
Burnett (2-1) gave up one run on
three hits. The right-hander struck out
seven to up his career total to 2,215,
moving past Jim Palmer into 52nd
all-time.
Tanner Roark (2-1) had the worst
start of his two-year career, allowing
seven runs and seven hits in four-plus
innings.
The game was delayed by rain for
24 minutes after the sixth.

Giants 3, Braves 1
ATLANTA- Brandon Belt, Buster
Posey and Michael Morse hit home
runs, each to lead off an inning, and
the streaking San Francisco Giants
beat the slumping Atlanta Braves 3-1
on Saturday night in a matchup of
first-place teams.
The NL West-leading Giants have
won four straight and eight of nine.
The Braves, who lead the NL East,
have lost five straight, their longest
skid in two years.
The Giants have hit homers in 10
straight games, matching their longest
run in almost four years.
The Giants got only four hits. They
scored all their runs on homers for the
second straight night after hitting two
homers in Friday night's 2-1 win.
Ryan Vogelsong (1-1) allowed one
run on five hits and four walks in six
innings.
Julio Teheran (2-2) gave up just four
hits with no walks in seven innings,
but allowed a season-high three runs.


BASEBALL


Tampa Bay NewYork
ab r h bi
Zobrist ss 4 0 0 0 Ellsury cf
DJnngsdh 4 1 1 1 Gardnrlf
Joyce If 4 0 1 0 Teixeirib
Longori 3b 4 00 0 McCnnc
Loneylb 4 1 3 0 ASorindh
Myersrf 4 1 1 1 KJhnsn3b
DeJess cf 4 0 2 0 BRorts 2b
SRdrgz 2b 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf
Hanign c 4 0 1 1 Solarte ss
Totals 36 39 3 Totals


ab r h bi
4231
4 2 3 1
5222
4123
5010
3001
3111
4110
4221
3000
4 35912 9
5 0 1 0
3 0 0 1
3 1 1 1
4 1 1 0
4 2 2 1
3 0 0 0
35912 9


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 21 10 .677 6-4 L-1 9-6 12-4
St. Louis 15 16 .484 6 2/2 3-7 L-2 7-5 8-11
Cincinnati 14 16 .467 6/2 3 5-5 W-1 7-7 7-9
Pittsburgh 12 18 .400 8/2 5 3-7 W-2 8-8 4-10
Chicago 11 17 .393 8/2 5 5-5 W-3 7-8 4-9


Oakland


Boston


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crisp cf 4 1 1 0 Pedroia2b 3 1 1 0
Lowriess 4 0 1 1 Bogartsss 4 1 1 0
Dnldsn3b 3 1 0 0 D.Ortizdh 3 21 1
Cespdsdh 3 00 0 Napolilb 3 00 0
DNorrsc 2 0 0 0 JGomsl If 4 1 1 4
Callasplb 4 00 0 GSizmrcf 3 00 0
Gentry If 3 0 1 0 Mdlrks3b 4 0 1 0
Mossph 1 0 0 0 BrdlyJrrf 3 00 0
Reddckrf 3 00 0 D.Rossc 3 1 1 1
Punto2b 3 1 1 0
Totals 30 34 1 Totals 306 6 6
Oakland 000 000 003 3
Boston 401 100 00x 6
E-D.Ross (3), J.Gomes (2). DP-Boston 1.
LOB-Oakland 4, Boston 4. 2B-Lowrie (9),
Punto (2), Pedroia (11). HR-D.Ortiz (6),
J.Gomes (3), D.Ross (2). SB-Gentry (5).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Milone L,0-3
Otero
Gregerson
Doolittle
Boston
Lester W,3-4
Capuano
Uehara S,7-7


8 1 0 0 2 15
033200
100011
0 3 3 2 0 0
1 0 0 0 1 1


Capuano pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
Milone pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
HBP-by Capuano (Donaldson).
T-2:44. A-37,042 (37,071).
Twins 6, Orioles 1
Baltimore Minnesota
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Markksrf 4 0 2 0 Dozier2b 4 33 1
Machd3b 4 00 0 Mauerlb 4 23 4
N.Cruzdh 4 0 1 0 Plouffe3b 4 01 1
A.Jonescf 4 1 1 0 Colaellrf 4 01 0
Clevngrc 4 00 0 Hrmnnpr-rf 0 00 0
Hardyss 4 02 1 Kubell If 3 01 0
Pearcelb 4 0 0 0 Pinto dh 4 00 0
Loughl If 3 0 1 0 KSuzukc 4 02 0
Schoop2b 3 0 0 0 Fuldcf 4 00 0
Flormnss 4 1 1 0
Totals 34 17 1 Totals 35612 6
Baltimore 010 000 000 1
Minnesota 101 010 30x 6
E-Hardy (1), Machado (1). DP-Baltimore 1,
Minnesota 1. LOB-Baltimore 6, Minnesota 6.
2B-Markakis (5), Hardy (4), Plouffe (13),
K.Suzuki (5). HR-Dozier (8), Mauer (2). SB-
A.Jones (3), Florimon (5).
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
WChen L,3-2
Brach
Patton
Minnesota
Correia W, 1-3
Fien
Burton


563215
5 6 3 2 1 5
11-34 3 3 0 2
12-32 0 0 0 1
751103
110000
110001
7 5 1 1 0 3
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1


WChen pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Correia.
T-2:51. A-25,318 (39,021).
Mariners 9, Astros 8


Seattle

MSndrs cf
Romer rf
Cano 2b
Hartdh
Seager3b
Smoak lb
Gillespi If
BMiller ss
Zunino c
Totals
Seattle
Houston


Houston


ab r h bi
f 5 1 2 2 Altuve2b
5 1 2 1 Fowlercf
5 1 2 2 JCastroc
5 00 0 MDmn3b
o 5 1 1 1 Krausslb
3 2 2 2 Carterdh
3 1 0 0 Presleyrf
2 1 0 0 MGnzlzlf
2 1 0 1 Villarss
35 99 9 Totals
000 001 800
002 000 420


ab r h bi
3111
4010
3 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
5000
4110
4 1 1 0
5000
4222
4011
4 0 1 1
3230
3223
35811 7
9
8


E-B.Miller (3), J.Castro (2), Villar (4). DP-
Seattle 1. LOB-Seattle 5, Houston 6. 2B-
M.Saunders (3), Seager (6), Smoak (7),
M.Dominguez (5), Ma.Gonzalez (1). 3B-
Romero (1), Carter (1), Villar (2). HR-Smoak
(4), Carter (4), Villar (4). SB-Altuve (11). CS-
Fowler (2). SF-Altuve.
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
IwakumaW,1-0 62-36 4 4 1 3
Leone 0 2 2 1 1 0
BeimelH,4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
MedinaH,6 1-3 3 2 2 1 0
RodneyS,7-8 11-30 0 0 0 2
Houston
KeuchelL,2-2 6 4 4 4 3 3
CisneroBS,1-1 2-3 3 3 3 1 0
Valdes 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Fields 1 0 0 0 1 1
Williams 1 0 0 0 0 1
Keuchel pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Leone pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by Rodney (Fowler), by Medina (Gonzalez).
T-3:24.A-15,798 (42,060).
Indians 2, White Sox 0
Chicago Cleveland
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DeAzal If 4 0 1 0 Bourncf 2 01 0
GBckh2b 4 0 1 0 Avilesl If 1 00 0
JAreulb 4 0 0 0 Swisherib 2 00 1
A.Dunn dh 4 0 2 0 Brantly If-cf 4 0 1 0
Viciedorf 4 0 0 0 CSantnc 4 00 0
AIRmrzss 4 00 0 Chsnhll3b 3 1 1 0
JrDnkscf 2 00 0 ACarerss 2 01 0
Flowrsc 2 0 1 0 Giambidh 2 00 0
Semien3b 3 0 0 0 Raburnph-dhl1 00 0
DvMrprf 3 00 0
JRmrz2b 3 1 1 0
Totals 31 05 0 Totals 272 5 1
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Cleveland 010 010 OOx 2
E-Flowers (3), Semien (6), A.Cabrera (4),
Chisenhall (3). DP-Chicago 1, Cleveland 2.
LOB-Chicago 6, Cleveland 5.2B-G.Beckham
(2), A.Dunn (5), Chisenhall (7). CS-Flowers (1).
S-Aviles. SF-Swisher.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
CarrollL,1-1 6 5 2 0 1 0
Downs 1 0 0 0 0 0
Petricka 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cleveland
MastersonW,1-1 71-34 0 0 1 6
Allen H,7 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
AxfordS,9-10 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Carroll (A.Cabrera), by Masterson
(Flowers). WP-Masterson.
T-2:38.A-15,834 (42,487).


TampaBay 110 100 000 3
NewYork 000 211 23x 9
LOB-Tampa Bay 6, New York 7. 2B-Loney
(11), Ellsbury (10), McCann (3), I.Suzuki 2 (4).
HR-De.Jennings (4), Myers (3), Teixeira (5),
Ke.Johnson (4). SB-Ellsbury (10). SF-A.Soriano.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Odorizzi 4 5 3 3 2 4
C.Ramos 1 0 0 0 1 2
LuekeL,0-2 2 4 3 3 0 0
H.Bell 1 3 3 3 1 0
NewYork
TanakaW,4-0 7 8 3 3 0 5
BetancesH,3 1 1 0 0 0 2
Claiborne 1 0 0 0 0 1
Odorizzi pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
Umpires-Home, Doug Eddings; First, Marvin
Hudson; Second, Cory Blaser;Third, Brian O'Nora.
T-3:31. A-43,325 (49,642).
Red Sox 6,
Athletics 3


East Division
GB WC


West Division
t GB WC


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Yankees 9, Rays 3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Aaron's 499 lineup For the i-COrd


After Saturday qualifying; race
Sunday at Talladega Superspeedway,
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (33) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 198.29.
2. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 197.888.
3. (47) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 197.704.
4. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 197.37.
5. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 197.362.
6. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 197.297.
7. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 194.995.
8. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 194.393.
9. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.619.
10. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 193.615.
11. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 193.486.
12. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 188.958.
13. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 194.963.
14. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 194.959.
15. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 194.911.
16. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 194.88.
17. (7) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 194.098.
18. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 194.035.
19.(18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 193.541.
20. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 193.478.
21. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 193.458.
22. (36) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 190.89.
23. (21)TrevorBayne, Ford, 190.575.
24. (83) Ryan Truex, Toyota, 197.913.
25. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 197.908.
26. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 197.835.
27. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 197.806.
28. (66) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 197.806.
29. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 197.77.
30. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 197.765.
31. (26) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 197.721.
32. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 197.443.
33. (23) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 197.403.
34. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 197.378.
35.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 197.244.
36. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 197.029.
37. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, Owner Points.
38. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
39. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
42. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
43. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (77) Dave Blaney, Ford, 195.56.
45. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 194.551.
46. (35) Eric McClure, Ford, 194.366.
47. (44) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 192.154.

Aaron's 312 Results
Saturday at Talladega Superspeedway,
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 117 laps, 130.4 rating, 48
points.
2.(8) Chris Buescher, Ford, 117, 88.8, 43.
3. (32) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 117, 103.9, 42.
4. (13) David Ragan, Ford, 117,80.2,0.
5. (1) Sam Hornish Jr., Toyota, 117, 105.5,39.
6. (38) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 117,84.7,0.
7. (34) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 117, 74.4, 38.
8. (12) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 117, 86.7, 36.
9. (16) David Starr, Toyota, 117,86.3,36.
10. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 117, 83, 34.
11. (36) JoeyGase, Chevrolet, 117, 64.4, 34.
12. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 117,81.9,32.
13. (15) John WesTownley, Toyota, 117,84.3,0.
14. (29) Tommy Joe Martins, Dodge, 117,61.9,30.
15. (7) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 117, 75.8, 30.
16. (39) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 117,66,28.
17. (18) Eric McClure, Toyota, 117, 54.9, 27.
18. (5) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 117,74.3,26.
19. (37) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 117, 95.1, 26.
20. (27) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 117, 77, 24.
21. (6) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 116,98.8,0.
22. (31) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, accident, 111,97.3,0.
23. (33) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, accident, 111,
60.4, 22.
24. (4) Ryan Reed, Ford, 108, 78.3, 21.
25. (40) Chad Boat, Dodge, accident, 107, 81.4, 19.
26. (24) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, engine, 91,49.6,0.
27. (17) Jamie Dick, Chevrdolet, 87, 45, 17.
28. (26) Mike Harmon, Dodge, accident, 86, 35.7,16.
29. (9) James Buescher, Toyota, 86, 71.7,15.
30. (20) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 78,51,0.
31. (3) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 74, 72.7, 0.
32. (22) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, engine,
63, 48.1, 12.
33. (10) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, accident, 61, 83.8,12.
34. (11) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, accident, 61,
57.2, 11.
35. (28) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet, accident, 43,
54, 9.
36. (30) Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet, engine, 31,36.6,8.
37. (35) Carl Long, Dodge, electrical, 14,28.7,7.
38. (25) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 4,28.3,6.
39. (23) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, vibration, 3,26,5.
40. (14) Blake Koch, Toyota, vibration, 1,25.4,4.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 131.224 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 22 minutes, 18 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.124 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 29 laps.
Lead Changes: 27 among 13 drivers.
Lap Leaders: R.Reed 1-29; B.Gaughan 30;
T.Dillon 31-33; E.Sadler 34-39; B.Scott 40-41;
E.Sadler 42; B.Scott 43-45; J.Clements 46;
J.Gase 47; R.Blaney 48-49; B.Scott 50;
E.Sadler 51; B.Scott 52; E.Sadler 53; B.Scott
54; E.Sadler 55-57; B.Scott 58-59; E.Sadler 60-
66; J.Yeley 67; E.Sadler 68-83; R.Smith 84-103;
D.Starr 104-107; C.Elliott 108-110; D.Starr 111;
E.Sadler 112-115; C.Buescher 116; E.Sadler 117.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): E.Sadler, 9 times for 40 laps; R.Reed, 1
time for 29 laps; R.Smith, 1 time for 20 laps;
B.Scott, 6 times for 10 laps; D.Starr, 2 times for
5 laps; T.Dillon, 1 time for 3 laps; C.Elliott, 1 time
for 3 laps; R.Blaney, 1 time for 2 laps;
C.Buescher, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Yeley, 1 time for
1 lap; J.Gase, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Clements, 1
time for 1 lap; B.Gaughan, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. C.Elliott, 339; 2. E.Sadler,
338; 3. R.Smith, 336; 4.TBayne, 308; 5.T.Dillon,
308; 6. B.Scott, 277; 7. B.Gaughan, 250; 8.
J.Buescher, 244; 9. C.Buescher, 229; 10.
R.Reed, 225.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.


Kentucky Derby
winners
2014 -California Chrome
2013 -Orb
2012 -I'll Have Another
2011 -Animal Kingdom
2010 -Super Saver
2009 -Mine That Bird
2008 Big Brown
2007 -Street Sense
2006 Barbaro
2005 Giacomo
2004 Smarty Jones
2003 Funny Cide
2002 -War Emblem
2001 Monarchos
2000 Fusaichi Pegasus
1999 -Charismatic
1998 -Real Quiet
1997 -Silver Charm
1996 -Grindstone
1995 -Thunder Gulch
1994 -Go for Gin
1993 -Sea Hero
1992 -LilE.Tee
1991 -Strike the Gold
1990 -Unbridled
1989 -Sunday Silence
1988 -Winning Colors
1987 -Alysheba
1986 -Ferdinand


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


CASH 3 (early)
IPA 7-1-7
SCASH 3 (late)
9-1-8

IPLAY 4 (early)
8-0-7-8
PLAY 4 (late)
TM 9-0-0-3




Due to early deadlines, Fantasy 5, Florida Lotto
and Powerball numbers were unavailable. For those
numbers, please visit flalotto.com or see Monday's
edition.


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 13 -14 -20 -42
Mega Ball: 6
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $1.5 million
4-of-4 2 $3,563
3-of-4 MB 44 $354.50
3-of-4 865 $53.50
2-of-4 MB 1,256 $25.50
1-of-4 MB 10,464 $3
2-of-4 27,448 $2

Fantasy 5:7 -12 -27 -28 -34


5-of-5
4-of-5
3-of-5


2 winners
303
10,472


$120,105.62
$127.50
$10


Mega Millions: 1 -18-26-35-40
Mega Ball: 13
5-of-5 MB No winner
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 MB 2 winners $5,000
4-of-5 21 $500
3-of-5 MB 82 $50
3-of-5 1,243 $5
2-of-5 MB 2,121 $5
1-of-5 MB 16,543 $2
0-of-5 MB 41,493 $1

Players should verify winning
numbers by calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES,


AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Aaron's 499
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Lucas Oil Series (taped)
1 p.m. (FS1) United SportsCar Championship Laguna Seca
5:30 p.m. (FS1) United SportsCar Championship Laguna Seca
3 a.m. (FS1) FIA World Endurance Championship: England
(same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Dodgers at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at New
York Yankees
1:30 p.m. (MLB) San Francisco Giants at Atlanta Braves or
Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees
8 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs
3 a.m. (ESPN2) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs (same-
day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m. (ESPNU) LSU at Texas A&M
NBA PLAYOFFS
1 p.m. (ABC) First Round: Teams TBA
3:30 p.m. (ABC) First Round: Teams TBA
1 a.m. (ESPN2) Teams TBA (same-day tape)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) Teams TBA (same-day tape)
EQUESTRIAN
2 p.m. (NBC) Rolex Championships (taped)
FOOTBALL
5 p.m. (ESPNU) College: Texas Spring Game (taped)
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Arena: Spokane Shock at Los Angeles KISS
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour The Championship,
final round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Wells Fargo Championship, final round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour Wells Fargo Championship, final round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour North Texas Shootout, final round
7 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Insperity Invitational,
final round (same-day tape)
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
3 p.m. (NBC) Minnesota Wild at Chicago Blackhawks. Western
Conference Semifinal, Game 2
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) New York Rangers at Pittsburgh Penguins.
Eastern Conference Semifinal, Game 2
MLL LACROSSE
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Ohio Machine at Denver Outlaws
MOTORCYCLE RACING
7 a.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship: Grand
Prix of Spain
3:30 p.m. (FS1) National Arenacross Series: Hidalgo (taped)
4 a.m. (FS1) MotoGP Racing World Championship: Grand
Prix of Spain (same-day tape)
RODEO
1 p.m. (CBS) Bull Riding PBR Built Ford Tough Rumble in the
Rockies (taped)
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Arsenal FC vs
West Bromwich Albion FC
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) English Premier League: Chelsea FC vs
Norwich City FC
12:50 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division: La Liguilla,
Cuartos de Final Vuelta Deportivo Toluca FC vs Club Tijuana
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: Columbus Crew at Sporting Kansas City
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Florida at Arkansas
3 p.m. (ESPN) Stanford at UCLA
12 a.m. (ESPNU) Stanford at UCLA (same-day tape)
2 a.m. (ESPNU) Florida at Arkansas (same-day tape)
TENNIS
3 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Portugal Open, Final (taped)
5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Portugal Open, Final (same-day tape)
7 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP BMW Open, Final (same-day tape)


- Citation
- Jet Pilot
-Assault
- Hoop, Jr.
- Pensive
- Count Fleet
- Shut Out
-Whirlaway
-Gallahadion
- Johnstown
- Lawrin
-War Admiral
-Bold Venture
-Omaha
- Cavalcade
-Brokers Tip
- Burgoo King
-Twenty Grand
- Gallant Fox
-Clyde Van Dusen
- Reigh Count
-Whiskery
- Bubbling Over
- Flying Ebony
-Black Gold
-Zev
-Morvich
-Behave Yourself
- Paul Jones
- Sir Barton
- Exterminator
- Omar Khayyam
- George Smith
- Regret
- Old Rosebud
- Donerail
-Worth


-Meridan
-Donau
-Wintergreen
- Stone Street
-Pink Star
-Sir Huon
-Agile
- Elwood
-Judge Himes
-Alan-a-Dale
-His Eminence
- Lieut. Gibson
-Manuel
- Plaudit
-Typhoon II
- Ben Brush
- Halma
-Chant
- Lookout
-Azra
-Kingman
-Riley
-Spokane
-MacBeth II
- Montrose
-Ben Ali
- Joe Cotton
-Buchanan
- Leonatus
-Apollo
-Hindoo
- Fonso
-Lord Murphy
- Day Star
- Baden Baden
-Vagrant
-Aristides


-Spend A Buck
- Swale
- Sunny's Halo
- Gato Del Sol
-Pleasant Colony
-Genuine Risk
- Spectacular Bid
- Affirmed
- Seattle Slew
- Bold Forbes
- Foolish Pleasure
- Cannonade
- Secretariat
- Riva Ridge
-Canonero II
-Dust Commander
- Majestic Prince
- Forward Pass
- Proud Clarion
- Kauai King
- Lucky Debonair
- Northern Dancer
- Chateaugay
- Decidedly
- Carry Back
-Venetian Way
-To my Lee
-Tim Tam
- Iron Liege
- Needles
- Swaps
- Determine
- Dark Star
- Hill Gail
-Count Turf
- Middleground
- Ponder


Wells Fargo par scores
Saturday at Quail Hollow Club Course,
Charlotte, N.C.
Purse: $6.9 million, Yardage: 7,562, Par: 72,
Third Round:


J.B. Holmes
Martin Flores
Phil Mickelson
Kevin Kisner
Jason Bohn
Justin Rose
Martin Kaymer
Jonathan Byrd
MichaelThompson
Geoff Ogilvy
Rory Mcllroy
MarkWilson
Pat Perez
Ernie Els
Brendon de Jonge
Kevin Na
Zach Johnson
Roberto Castro
Jim Furyk
Charles Howell III
Angel Cabrera
Gary Woodland
Wes Roach
John Merrick
Derek Ernst
Webb Simpson
Robert Streb
Ricky Barnes
Bud Cauley
Danny Lee
Vijay Singh
Kevin Streelman
Scott Langley
Chris Kirk
Martin Laird
Stewart Cink
Shawn Stefani
Ben Martin
Andrew Svoboda
Brendan Steele
Kevin Chappell
Mike Weir
Rory Sabbatini
Hideki Matsuyama
Scott Brown
Sang-Moon Bae
Daniel Summerhays
Michael Putnam
Retief Goosen
Bill Haas
David Hearn
YE.Yang
Jim Herman
Will Wilcox
Jason Kokrak
Hunter Mahan
Davis Love III
Ryan Moore
RobertAllenby
Johnson Wagner
Carl Pettersson
Rickie Fowler
Heath Slocum
Jim Renner
Justin Hicks
Ted Potter, Jr.
Brian Davis
Kyle Stanley
Josh Teater
Kevin Tway
Bronson La'Cassie
CameronTringale
Brian Harman


70-67-66
67-68-69
67-75-63
72-66-68
73-67-67
69-67-71
69-69-70
68-71-70
71-69-69
72-67-70
69-76-65
72-72-66
73-71-66
76-67-67
80-62-68
69-72-69
71-70-69
71-70-69
72-69-69
69-71-70
66-69-75
71-72-68
71-71-69
71-70-70
73-68-70
68-73-70
71-69-71
72-72-68
71-71-70
71-71-70
69-72-71
72-69-71
70-71-71
71-70-71
69-70-73
68-70-74
69-68-75
71-73-69
72-72-69
72-72-69
73-70-70
72-71-70
74-68-71
69-72-72
71-73-70
72-71-71
70-72-72
73-69-72
70-70-74
75-70-70
70-74-71
73-72-71
76-68-72
71-72-73
75-68-73
72-73-72
75-68-74
70-71-76
73-72-73
75-70-73
73-71-74
74-71-74
77-68-74
71-74-74
74-71-74
72-73-74
74-71-75
74-71-75
72-73-75
73-72-75
71-73-77
74-68-79
70-74-78


Tigers 9, Royals 2


Detroit


Kansas City


ab r h bi
RDavisl If 5 1 1 0 Aokirf
Kinsler2b 4 0 2 1 Infante2b
D.Kellylb 0 0 0 0 Hosmerib
MiCarrlb 4 3 2 1 BButlerdh
AnRmn ss 0 00 0 AGordn If
VMrtnz dh 3 22 0 Valenci 3b
TrHntrrf 4 1 1 3 AEscorss
JMrtnz rf 0 00 0 Maxwll cf
AJcksncf 4 0 1 0 Hayesc
Cstllns3b 4 0 1 3
Holadyc 3 1 1 0
Worth ss-2b4 1 1 1
Totals 35 9129 Totals
Detroit 000 102 006
Kansas City 000 000 002
LOB-Detroit 7, Kansas City 4.2B-


ab r h bi
4110
4 1 1 0
4000
4120
2001
3011
4010
3000
3000
3000
4 12 2 0





--9
--2
2Kinsler (7),0 0 1
3 0 1 1
4 0 1 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0



302 5 2
9
2
-Kinsler (7),


Mi.Cabrera (9), V.Martinez (6), A.Jackson (7),
Castellanos (4), Worth (1), Hosmer 2 (12),
A.Gordon (12). HR Tor.Hunter (4). SB-
R.Davis (9). SF-Kinsler, Castellanos, B.Butler.
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
SmylyW,2-1 7 2 0 0 2 6
Chamberlain H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1
Coke 1 3 2 2 0 0
Kansas City
DuffyL,1-2 4 2 1 1 4 2
Coleman 11-32 2 2 1 1
K.Herrera 2-3 1 0 0 1 0
Crow 1 0 0 0 0 0
Brooks 2 7 6 6 0 2
WP-Smyly, Duffy.
T-2:55. A-29,200 (37,903).


MEET
Continued from Page B1


running over eight seconds faster (11:22.61) at
the state meet, breaking the school record she
set on April 24. Farnsworth placed fifth in her
first trip to the coveted meet, 27 seconds behind
race winner, Fort Walton's Emma Rudman, who
won in a time of 10:55.52. The top eight places
medal in all events at the meet
"I'm proud of the kids,"
Lecanto girls' head coach
Robert Thompson said. "For
them to make it to this level is
really something. It's the most
kids that I've ever accompa-
nied (to state) and I'm just glad
they did the best they could.
"The conditions here were
Claire just not considerate for the
Farnsworth throwers or the vaulters,"
Thompson said. "So you really can't expect the
kids to do their personal best under these kinds
of conditions, but they competed. They did well.
Every single one of them."
Harrison Mancke, who placed fourth at re-
gionals in the discus, took llth at the state meet
with a throw of 103-7.
In the pole vault, Lecanto's Jeff Burnette, an-
other fourth-place finisher at regionals, strug-
gled with the weather and tied for 10th place
with a leap of 12 feet.
Dylan Stoner, a regional champ in the discus,
settled for 13th at the state meet. Stoner threw
the disc 135 feet, 1 inch.
Senior Andreanna VanQuelef placed 13th in
the 800 meters with a time of 2:23.84. The state
mark bettered her fourth-place finishing time at
regionals (2:24.63) by just short of a full second.




DERBY
Continued from Page B1


Feeling inspired, they named their operation
DAP Racing, which stands for Dumb Ass Part-
ners. Their silks include an image of a donkey
Coburn lives near Reno, Nevada, rising at
4:30 a.m. for his job as a press operator at a 13-
employee company that makes magnetic strips
for credit cards and driver licenses.
Martin lives on the California side of the bor-
der near Reno, running a laboratory that tests
high-reliability equipment, like car air bags and
medical equipment.
Coburn and Martin's partnership is based on
a handshake, and their wives are friends who
enjoy the sport, too. The group came up with
California Chrome's name by drawing it out of a
hat The horse hadn't even been out of his home
state until this week.
"Sometimes you don't get a lot of respect,"
Sherman said. "We're in Kentucky and you
know most of the Derby winners are bred here
and few outside of Kentucky"
Sherman visited Swaps' grave near the Derby
museum earlier in the week and whispered a
prayer: "I hope he's another Swaps."
He sure was.
California Chrome extended his winning streak
to five races, won by a combined 26 lengths. It
was the second Derby win for Espinoza, who
rode War Emblem to victory in 2002.
Espinoza had California Chrome sitting com-
fortably in third in the 19-horse field as Uncle
Sigh and Chitu set the early pace.
California Chrome made his move on the final
turn in tandem with Samraat. It looked like those
two would decide the outcome, until California
Chrome sped away to become the first California-
bred to win the Derby since Decidedly in 1962.
"This horse has so much talent," Espinoza
said. "By the three-eighths pole I knew that was
it. I could see other horses struggling a little bit,
and he was just smooth."
Commanding Curve, a 37-1 shot, rallied for
second, with Danza third. Wicked Strong was
fourth and Samraat finished fifth.
Commanding Curve returned $31.80 and
$15.40, giving trainer Dallas Stewart his second
straight runner-up finish with a double-digit
longshot
Before the Derby Coburn had told anyone who
would listen that California Chrome "would go
down in history" He remains just as unabashed.
"I believe this horse will win the Triple
Crown," he said, something that hasn't been done
since 1978, when Affirmed swept the Derby,
Preakness and Belmont in a five-week span.
"That's where we're going."


Rays 10, Yankees 5 RAYS
(14 innings)


Tampa Bay NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Zobrist2b 8 1 1 0 Ellsury cf 6 0 4 1
DJnngscf 6 2 1 1 Lerouxp 0 00 0
Longori3b 6 1 3 1 Jeterss 7 00 0
Myersrf 7 2 3 2 Beltranrf 7 02 0
SRdrgzlf-1b6 2 3 1 Teixeirlb 6 1 2 1
Loneylb 4 03 1 ASorinl If 7 23 1
Guyer pr-lf 1 1 1 1 McCnn dh-c 7 1 2 2
Forsythdh 1 00 1 BRorts2b 6 1 3 0
Joyceph-dh4 1 0 0 Solarte3b 6 0 1 0
YEscorss 6 0 3 1 JMrphyc 3 0 1 0
JMolinc 4 0 0 0 KJhnsnph 1 00 0
DeJessph 1 0 0 0 Kelleyp 0 00 0
Hanignc 2 02 1 ISuzukiph 1 00 0
Warrenp 0 00 0
Gardnr ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 56102010 Totals 58518 5
Tampa Bay 010 210 001 000 05 10
NewYork 020 000 021 000 00 5
E-H.Bell (1). DP Tampa Bay 2, NewYork 5.
LOB Tampa Bay 13, NewYork 13.2B-S.Ro-
driguez 2 (5), J.Murphy (1). 3B-Longoria (1).
HR-De.Jennings (3), Teixeira (4), A.Soriano
(5), McCann (4). SB-Zobrist (3), De.Jennings
2 (6), Ellsbury (9), B.Roberts (4). SF-Forsythe.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Price 7 8 2 2 0 8
Jo.PeraltaBS,1-1 1 3 3 3 0 0
OviedoBS,1-1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
B.Gomes 2 1 0 0 0 0
H.BellW,1-1 21-34 0 0 1 0
Lueke 1 1 0 0 0 0
NewYork
Nuno 42-35 4 4 3 2
Betances 11-32 0 0 0 3
Claiborne 11-30 0 0 2 1
Thornton 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Dav.Robertson 1 2 1 1 0 1
Kelley 2 1 0 0 0 3
Warren 2 4 0 0 0 2
LerouxL,0-1 1 5 5 5 2 2
Jo.Peralta pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by H.Bell (Teixeira), byThornton (Loney).
WP-Nuno.
T-5:49. A-33,580 (49,642).


Continued from Page BI


"I think I was able to get my rhythm back as I
got deeper into the game," Tanaka said through
an interpreter
New York's offense did the rest. Teixeira hit a
two-run homer in the fourth, and Ellsbury's RBI
single in the fifth tied it at 3.
Signed by the Yankees from Japan's Rakuten
Golden Eagles during the offseason, Tanaka al-
lowed three runs and eight hits in seven in-
nings, striking out his last two batters to give
him five or the day
"He just grinded it out," said Matt Joyce, who
struck out attempting to bunt for a hit in the
first. "He was a little frustrated with himself at
times. You could tell. And he just kept working
through it"
After Odorizzi retired the first nine Yankees
in order, New York went 4 for 8 with two walks
before he was replaced by Cesar Ramos. Oppo-
nents are batting. 140 (7 for 50) against Odorizzi
in his first time through the batting order, .442
(19 for 43) his second time through and .500 (9
for 18) the third.
"He had a good fastball today Just once he
gave up the homer, things just started to erupt,"
Joe Maddon said.
The Rays manager was not discouraged, a day
after the Rays hung in for a 10-5, 14-inning win
in the series opener Saturday's loss ended a three-
game winning streak that tied a season high.
"I thought we had great at-bats. I was very
pleased with the whole thing. If we had just
pitched to our normal abilities, then we
would've had a good chance to win that game,"
Maddon said. "Understand one thing: These
guys have been playing really good baseball in
a really short period of time."


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 B3




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Holmes takes 1-shot lead at Quail Hollow


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Even with his best round
of the year, Phil Mickelson
knew it wouldn't be
enough for him to stay in
the lead Saturday at the
Wells Fargo Championship.
That was OK with Lefty
All he wanted was a
chance at Quail Hollow, and
Mickelson hasn't had a
better chance to win all year
Mickelson roared into
contention by playing a
six-hole stretch in 7-under
par on the front nine, and
keeping bogeys off his
card with a wedge that
danced around the cup on
the 18th for a 9-under 63.
He was leading when he
finished and wound up two
shots behind J.B. Holmes,
who overtook Martin Flores
for the lead on the last hole.
"I don't think I'll be
leading at the end of the
day because I think there
are some birdies out there,"
Mickelson said. "But just to
be in contention, and to have
a chance at a golf course
that I've become so close to
over the years, I'm excited
about tomorrow's round."
Holmes, pounding tee
shots and gaining confi-
dence along the way, had
a 9-iron left on the 490-yard
closing hole and made a
20-foot birdie putt from the
fringe. That gave him a 6-
under 66, and it made him
the outright leader when
Flores made his only big
mistake of the round. Flo-
res pulled his tee shot into
the stream that winds along
the left side of the 18th
fairway He at least gave
himself a chance to save par,
but missed a 20-foot putt
and had to settle for a 69.
And now he takes a one-
shot lead into the final
round at 13-under 203.
"I've worked really hard
to get there and it would
be a great accomplishment
to come back and get a win
in the bag," Holmes said.
Flores feels the same
way His best finish in four
seasons on the PGA Tour
was a tie for fourth in the
John Deere Classic last
year, when he closed with
a 63 and finished one shot
out of a three-way playoff
won by fellow Dallas resi-
dent Jordan Spieth.


Associated Press
Natalie Gulbis lines up a putt on the 17th hole Saturday during the third round of the
North Texas LPGA Shootout at Las Colinas Country Club in Irving, Texas.


Lewis, Lee third- Langer takes
round leaders at 3-shot lead in
North Texas LPGA The Woodlands


IRVING, Texas Stacy
Lewis was holding her 3-
year-old nephew after a frus-
trating round when someone
asked the little boy what his
aunt could do better.
"Make some putts," little
Cole Wysocki said.
Aunt Stacy, who had whis-
pered the response into his
ear, wholeheartedly agreed.
Missing several makeable
putts Saturday, including a
birdie chance on the 18th
hole, Lewis shot a 2-under 69
to grab a share of the lead
with South Korea's Meena
Lee after three rounds at the
North Texas LPGA Shootout.
Lewis, the third-ranked
player in the world, dropped
her head when the final birdie
chance rolled just left of the
hole after getting over the
green at the 518-yard, par-5
18th in two shots. The Texan
matched Lee at 9-under 204.
In nearly ideal scoring con-
ditions with little if any wind,
Lee shot 70 with plenty of
near-misses, too.
First-round leader Suzann
Pettersen, Dori Carter and
Julieta Granada shot 68 and
were a stroke behind the
leaders.
Cristie Kerr (69), Christina
Kim (70) and Natalie Gulbis
(71) were among seven play-
ers tied at 7 under and only
two strokes off the lead.


THE WOODLANDS,
Texas Bernhard Langer
shot a 4-under 68 on Satur-
day to open a three-stroke
lead in the Champions Tour's
Insperity Invitational.
Langer had a 10-under
134 total at The Woodlands
Country Club.
The 56-year-old German
player won the 2007 event at
Augusta Pines and success-
fully defended his title in 2008
at The Woodlands. He won
the season-opening event in
Hawaii for his 19th Champi-
ons Tour title.
Colin Montgomerie was
second after a 66, the best
round of the day. He eagled
the par-5 13th.
In his second year on the
tour, Montgomerie's best fin-
ish is a second in March in
Newport Beach, California.
Montgomerie is hoping to
get the upper hand over "good
friend" Langer when they're
grouped together Sunday.
Montgomerie played in col-
lege at Houston Baptist.
Defending champion Este-
ban Toledo, Gary Hallberg and
Bart Bryant were four strokes
back. Hallberg had a 67,
Toledo shot 71, and Bryant
- tied for the first-round lead
with Langer had a 72.
Fred Couples, the 2010
winner, was tied for sixth at 5
under after a 70.


Hansen, Panuphol
share lead at
Laguna National
SINGAPORE -Anders
Hansen of Denmark holed
three straight birdies to close
his round of 5-under 67 and
move into a share of the lead
with Thailand's Panuphol Pit-
tayarat after the third round of
The Championship at Laguna
National on Saturday.
Hansen, who won the last
of his three European Tour titles
at the Joburg Open in 2009,
is playing in just his fourth
event since returning from a
six-month layoff due to a wrist
injury. He was tied for fifth
last week at the China Open.
Panuphol, the leader after
the first two rounds, made
four birdies but dropped only
his second shot of the week
on the par-3 17th. He shot a
69.
The 21-year-old Thai will
be the underdog in the final
round on Sunday he has
never won on the European
Tour and hasn't even made
the cut in three events on the
Asian Tour this year.
Hansen's comeback has
been quick after undergoing
wrist surgery last year. He
missed his first two cuts but
has now shot below 70 in five
of his last six rounds.
Both golfers were at 16-
under 200 overall, two
strokes ahead of Dutchman
Robert-Jan Derksen and
American David Lipsky.


Registration


open for summer


youth clinics


Special to the Chronicle

Summer
baseball clinic
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation, in partnership
with Lecanto High
School's head coach David
Logue and coaching staff,
will be hosting a summer
baseball clinic. The clinic
will focus on the funda-
mentals of baseball. The
cost of the clinic is $75 per
participant ($45 per addi-
tional sibling).
The clinic will be held
from June 2-5 at Central
Ridge District Park (6905 N.
Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills,
FL) from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Lunch will be provided.
The camp is open to boys
and girls ages 6 to 13.
To register go to the Cit-
rus County Parks and
Recreation office at 2804 W
Marc Knighton Ct. Lecanto,
FL 34461.
For more information
visit wwwcitruscounty
parks.com or contact Citrus
County Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540.
Summer
tennis clinics
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with tennis pro Mehdi
Tahiri, will be hosting two
Summer Tennis Clinics.
The first clinic will be
geared towards beginners
and the second clinic will
be for those who have ten-
nis experience.
Instruction will include
conditioning, drills, foot-
work, match play, doubles
and single strategy
The clinics will be held
at Lecanto Park (3505 West
Educational Path, Lecanto,
FL 34461)
Week 1 (BEGINNERS)
will be held from June 2-6.
This clinic is open to boys
and girls ages 7 to 12 who
are new to the game of ten-
nis. The clinic will run
from 9 to 11 a.m. The cost
will be $150 per participant


($40 off for additional sib-
lings).
Week 2 (INTERMEDI-
ATE/ADVANCED) will run
from 9 a.m. to noon June 9-
12. This clinic is open to
boys and girls ages 9 to 15
who have tennis experi-
ence. The cost will be $190
per participant ($50 off for
additional siblings).
For more information
visit wwwcitruscounty
parks. com or contact Citrus
County Parks and Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540.
Summer youth golf
Registration for summer
golf lessons is now open.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with Pine Ridge Golf
Course, will be holding
summer youth golf lessons.
The lessons will be held at
Pine Ridge Golf Course on
Wednesday mornings from
9 to 10:30 a.m. or Thursday
evenings 5:30 to 7 p.m., be-
ginning on June 11 and 12.
Participants will meet one
day a week for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 14 are
eligible and the cost is $80
per child. Instruction will
be given by golf pro Randy
Robbins and several of his
volunteers. During these
lessons participants will
learn putting, driving,
chipping, on-course play
and on-course etiquette.
For more information
contact Citrus County Parks
& Recreation at 352-527-
7543, www.citruscounty
parks.com, or Randy Rob-
bins at 352-746-6177.


I [_.r ... I.


4-24 Players
I I
Only $45 Each
6933 SW 179th I
Ave Rd
AvellRd, Must present
Dunnellon, FL coupon
352-522-0309 Expires 6/15/14
-k _ _ _- _


Recreation B R I E FS


Joint soccer
tryouts offered
The Nature Coast and Cit-
rus United Soccer Clubs are
pleased to announce a new
cooperation between the two
clubs for the betterment of
soccer in Citrus County.
For the first time, joint try-
outs will be held between the
two clubs for the 2014-15
competitive soccer season,
with the goal of working to-
gether to create stronger
teams than has been possible
in the past.
Please note that this is a
cooperative effort between
the two clubs, and not a
merger. Each club will con-
tinue to field its own teams,
but the duplication of teams
with the same age and gen-
der of players will be mini-
mized. The end result will be
a higher level of play on each
team than Citrus County has
seen in the past.
In order to provide equal
access to each team for all of
our county's soccer players,
tryouts and practices will be
held at Citrus County's three
soccer facilities Central Cit-
rus in Holder, HARP field in
Homosassa, and Holden Park
in Inverness on a rotating
basis. The schedule for try-
outs for the 2014-15 season
is as follows:
Boys
May 27, 5:30-8 p.m. at
HARP
May 28, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Holden
May 29, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Central Campus
May 30, 5:30-8 p.m. at
HARP
May 31,10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
at Holden
June 2, 5:30-8 p.m. at Cen-
tral Campus
Girls
May 27, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Central Campus
May 28, 5:30-8 p.m. at
HARP
May 29, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Holden
May 30, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Central Campus
May 31,10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
at HARP
June 2, 5:30-8 p.m. at
Holden


Register for an
adult league
Join one of Citrus County
Parks and Recreations adult
leagues today. It's a great way
to meet new people and
spark new friendships. If
you're new in town or simply
like to meet people, sports
leagues are a fun way to ex-
pand your social network.
Adult leagues really are a
blast for athletes of all levels.
The only way to get the full
experience is to try it yourself.
Release your inner athlete
and get out there and play.
Registration is now open
and closes at 5 p.m. Monday,
May 5.
There is a $50 team com-
mitment fee due at registra-
tion and league fees will be
determined by the number of
teams that register.
Men's Softball, Coed Soft-
ball and Coed Kickball regis-
tration closes May 5.
Men's Flag Football and
Men's Basketball registration
closes May 5.
Sign up at the Citrus
County Parks and Recreation
Office located at 2804 W.
Marc Knighton Ct. Lecanto,
FL 34461.
Visit us online at citr-
uscountyparks.com or call us
352-527-7540.
BHHC summer
horseshoe pitching
league
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will start its summer
horseshoe pitching league on
May 7 at 9 a.m.
There is also pitching on
Monday evening under the
lights. All games will be handi-
capped to make equal play for
all.
The club is located at the
Civic Circle off Beverly Hills
Blvd in Beverly Hills. Horse-
shoes are available for those
who do not have them.
End of the summer league
party is held the first week in
September. Winter league will
start in October.
All levels of play welcome
and lessons are available.
Call Peggy Ogden 352-489-
1005 or email mwogden@
tampabay.rr.com


Women's disc golf
global event
On May 10, women from all
around the world will play two
rounds of disc golf at their
local participating Women's
Global Event.
Floral Park in Floral City will
be hosting the central
Florida's segment of this
event aptly named 2014 Wild
Flower DGC.
Presently, there are 59 reg-
istered tournaments sched-
uled, reaching across 24
states and 6 countries (includ-
ing the United States,
Canada, Finland, Australia,
Japan, Germany).
Interested women wanting
to play in this event should go
to
www.PDGA.com/women/glob
al-event. Online registration
ends May 3. If you want to
see some outstanding women
play world class disc golf,
come to Floral Park on May
10. Tee off begins at 9 a.m.
For more information, con-
tact tournament director Kim
Pruden at 321-412-2240.
Camp Patriot
returns to Ocala
The 11th annual Camp Pa-
triot Basketball Camp will
hold four sessions during the
months of June and July at
the College of Central Florida
Gymnasium in Ocala.
The camps are for boys
and girls ages 8 to 18. The
first session is June 16-19,
followed by camps June 23-
26, July 7-10 and July 21-24.
Cost is $165 per session,
which includes daily clinics,
instruction, demonstrations,
lectures and a camp T-Shirt.
There will also be 5-on-5 and
3-on-3 games and several
awards handed out.
For more information con-
tact coach Tim Ryan at 352-
427-7435 or visit www.camp
patriotbasketball.com.
CR volleyball camp
The Crystal River Volley-
ball Camp will be held the
week of June 2-6 from 5 to
8:30 p.m. at Lecanto High
School.
The camp is open to girls
ages 10 to 16. No experience
is required. Crystal River


players and coaches will run
the camp. Emphasis will be
on the fundamentals of pass-
ing, setting, hitting, serving,
defense and team play.
Campers will be placed in
groups with players of similar
skill levels.
The cost of the camp is
$55 per player. Contact
coach Mike Ridley for details
at 352-566-7789. Registration
forms are also available at
CRHS, CRMS and CSMS.
Lecanto volleyball
camp
Lecanto High School is of-
fering a summer volleyball
camp for students entering
fourth through ninth grade.
The camp will be June 2-5
and is from 9 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. each day.
Volleyball skills will be
taught throughout the camp
and there will be a tourna-
ment at the end of the week.
The cost is $65 per
camper. Contact Alice Chris-
tian at christiana@citrus.
k12.fl.us for more information.
Track/cross
country camp
available
The third annual Panther
Track and Field/Cross County
Camp will be held June 10-12
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the
Lecanto High School Sports
Complex.
The camp is for students in
second through 12th grade
(based on 2014-15 school
year).
The last day of camp will be
cross country-style events fol-
lowed by a track and field
meet. This day is open to all
ages.
The cost is $50 for the entire
camp, $20 for one day June 4
or 5 and $17 for the competi-
tions on June 6. There is a
multiple sibling discount: $90
for two siblings, $115 for three
siblings. There is also a $45
early bird special. Registration
must be received by May 9 to
receive the special discount.
Contact coach Roselle Lattin
at Lecanto High School (746-
2334) or email lattinr@citrus.
k1 2.fl.us for more information.
-From staff reports


CHRONICLE

STUDENT

L% ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION
A night to recognize
outstanding student athletes

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM

Cost: $10

College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus
CI C)* \ CENTRAL
&___F___ IORItA
Tickets available at either Citrus County Chronicle location:
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River or 106 W. Main St., Inverness
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


The Original
SUMMERTIME PLACARD
On Sale Now

$ 00


Pay$2000.or.ourPlaca0
& Receive 20 OUNS O GL
As owAs OLY$2.0
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Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club 352-746-4425 $23.00'
(Oaks or Meadows course)
Inverness Golf and Country Club 352-637-2526 $23.00'
Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club 352-522-0309 $32.00'
Ocala National Golf Club 352-629-7980 $24.00'
Royal Oaks Golf Club 352-861-1818 $24.00'
Skyview at Terra Vista 352-746-3664 $32.00"**
Southern Woods Country Club 352-382-5996 $30.00"
Sugarmill Woods Country Club 352-382-3838 ext. 14 $30.00"
*Plus tax.


Purchase Your Card At One Of These Fine Courses
Or Call For Further Details.
Play Available *May 1 October 31, 2014 -"May 1 -October 12, 2014
**Play available only after 11:00 a.m., credit cards only. May 1 September 30, 2014


1. 11


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


SPORTS/REcREATION


II




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bruins rally to beat Canadiens 5-3 in Game 2


Associated Press

BOSTON The Boston Bru-
ins rallied from two goals down
to avoid another two-game
deficit against the archrival
Montreal Canadiens.
Reilly Smith scored the go-
ahead goal with 3:32 left and
Boston scored four times in
eight minutes to beat the Cana-
diens 5-3 on Saturday and even
the Eastern Conference semifi-
nals at one game apiece.
Games 3 and 4 are on Tuesday
and Thursday in Montreal,
where in 2011 Boston won twice
in its first-round series after los-
ing the first two at home. The
Bruins won the series in seven
games and went on to win their
first Stanley Cup title in 39 years.


The Bruins trailed 3-1 with just
over nine minutes remaining be-
fore Dougie Hamilton scored, then
Patrice Bergeron tied it with 5:43
remaining. Smith then wristed a
cross-ice pass from Torey Krug
past Carey Price to give Boston the
lead. Milan Lucic added an empty-
net goal with 66 seconds left.
"We weren't expecting to come
in here and sweep two games,"
said Price, who stopped 30 shots.
"They poured it on a little and
they were a little lucky, I thought.
They were playing desperate at
the end. We've just got to re-
group and realize what situation
we're in. We're in a good spot."
Tuukka Rask had 25 saves for
Boston the first time in 10
tries in his career that he has
beaten the Bruins' Original Six


rival at the TD Garden. Montreal
won Game 1 in double overtime.
Thomas Vanek twice tipped
PK. Subban's slap shots into the
net, and Mike Weaver also scored
for the Canadiens, who lost for the
first time in this year's playoffs.
Subban scored twice in Game
1, including a double-overtime
goal that unleashed a series of
racial slurs on social media.
The Bruins distanced them-
selves from what team President
Cam Neely called "the racist,
classless views expressed by an
ignorant group of individuals,"
and NHL Commissioner Gary
Bettman joined in on Saturday
"We condemn bias and hatred,"
he said before the game. "It has
no place in our game and it's not
acceptable."


Associated Press
Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask makes a sprawling save Saturday
against the Montreal Canadiens during the second period of Game 2
in the second round of the playoff series in Boston.


Associated Press
Indiana Pacers center Roy Hibbert blocks the shot of Atlanta Hawks forward Paul Millsap on Saturday during the
first half in Game 7 in Indianapolis.




Change of pace?


Indiana finds what

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS Paul George
scored a playoff career-high 30
points and Roy Hibbert finally
came up big to lead the Indiana
Pacers past the Atlanta Hawks,
92-80 on Saturday night in
Game 7.
Indiana staved off elimination
for the second time in three days.
It's the first time since mid-March
the Pacers' regular starters have
won back-to-back games.
Instead of becoming the sixth
top seed to lose in the first round
of the current 16-team playoff for-
mat, the Pacers will be back on
their home floor Monday night
against Washington in the Eastern
Conference semifinals.
Kyle Korver scored 19 points
and Jeff Teague had 16 for At-
lanta, which won just 38 games in
the regular season but proved
to be a tough opponent for the
Pacers.
The game turned on a 24-6 run
over a 10:02 stretch that spanned
the second and third quarters.
That gave Indiana a 57-40 lead it
never surrendered.
Hibbert, who scored 20 points
total in the first four games, had a
series-high 13 points and seven
rebounds. Lance Stephenson fin-
ished with 19 points, 14 rebounds
and five assists, and George
added 11 rebounds for his sixth


it's been missing; rolls past Atlanta 92-80


double-double in the playoffs.
And they all played like they
had something to prove after
twice squandering chances to
take control of the series on their
home floor.
They refused to let it happen
again.
Indiana completely flipped the
script on Atlanta. Instead of chas-
ing the Hawks, the Pacers pulled
away Instead of yielding to the
Hawks' 3-point shooters, the Pac-
ers took advantage of their size by
dominating the glass and creating
openings for perimeter shooters.
And instead of trying to hide Hib-
bert, the All-Star center who had
failed to score in Games 5 or 6, the
All-Star center was his old impos-
ing self
The Pacers finished with a 55-
38 rebounding edge and with Hib-
bert clogging the way, the Hawks
were forced to rely primarily on 3-
pointers. Atlanta wound up just 11
of 44 from beyond the arc, most
coming as it tried to dig out of a
double-digit deficit.
It didn't take Indiana long to
demonstrate why this game would
be different from the first six.
After the Hawks went on a 7-0
run to take a 23-17 lead late in the
first quarter, Indiana answered
with its own 7-0 run to make it 24-
23 entering the second.
Then after trading the lead
seven times early in the second,


the Pacers seized control by clos-
ing the half on a 14-2 run for a 47-
36 lead. Indiana's usually stout
defense didn't allow a basket over
the final 6:12 and Ian Mahinmi
emphasized the point with a clean
block of Teague's dunk attempt at
the buzzer a play reminiscent
of Hibbert's series-changing block
of Carmelo Anthony in last year's
playoffs.
When the Hawks charged back
with a 13-4 run late in the third to
get within 66-58, David West hit a
midrange jumper and George fol-
lowed that with a 3. George then
opened the fourth by scoring the
first six points in the midst of a 9-
1 run that gave Indiana an 80-64
lead.
Atlanta never got closer than 10
again.
Notes: Indiana played Game 7
at home for the first time in its
NBA history.... The Pacers will
face Washington at home on Mon-
day and Wednesday, then hit the
road Friday and Sunday.... At-
lanta All-Star Paul Millsap didn't
make a basket until the third
quarter. ... Atlanta is 2-3 all-time
in Game 7s since the franchise
moved from St. Louis. ... Defend-
ing Indy 500 winner Tony Kanaan
attended the game. .. The 14-
point margin was Indiana's sec-
ond-largest victory margin in
Game 7, trailing only a 27-point
win at Boston in 2005.


Associated Press
Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant pumps his
fist Saturday as he heads back up the court following
a three-pointer in the second quarter of Game 7 in
Oklahoma City.


Durant keys



thunderous



comeback

OKC tops Memphis 120-109


Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY -
Kevin Durant scored 33
points, Russell Westbrook
had a triple-double, and
the Oklahoma City Thun-
der beat the Memphis
Grizzlies 120-109 on Sat-
urday night in Game 7 of
their first-round Western
Conference playoff series.
Westbrook had 27
points, 16 assists and 10
rebounds. His assist total
tied the franchise record
for a playoff game set in
1987 by Nate McMillan
when the team was still
in Seattle.
The gritty Grizzlies,
playing without leading
scorer Zach Randolph
because of a suspension,
led by 11 points in the first
half before the Thunder
overwhelmed them and
shot 66 percent after the
break.
Marc Gasol led Memphis
with 24 points. Grizzlies
point guard Mike Conley
had 20 points and nine
assists while playing with
a strained right hamstring.
It was Westbrook's sec-
ond triple-double in the
past three games. He made
10 of 16 shots from the field,
both of his 3-pointers and
five of his six free throws.
Durant, slowed for
much of the series, looked
like his normal self. The
regular-season scoring
champion made 12 of 18
field goals and all five of
his 3-pointers after strug-


gling from long range
throughout the series.
Guards Tony Allen and
Mike Miller started for
the first time in the series
in place of Randolph and
Tayshaun Prince, and the
Grizzlies beat the Thun-
der at their fast-paced
game in the first quarter
Memphis shot 60 percent
in the opening period to
take a 36-27 lead.
Oklahoma City
chipped away in the sec-
ond quarter, and the
Thunder finally took a
51-50 lead on a 3-pointer
by Durant.
Durant hit another 3-
pointer with 3.7 seconds
left to give the Thunder a
61-58 lead at the break.
He scored 21 points in
the first half and West-
brook had 13 points and
eight assists.
Gasol scored 15 points
in the first half, but he
and Allen both had three
fouls at the break.
The Thunder opened
the second half on a 10-2
run. Durant hit a 3-
pointer to give Oklahoma
City a 71-60 lead. Durant
hit another 3 that gave
Oklahoma City a 78-63
advantage and led to a
Memphis timeout.
Back-to-back 3s by
Derek Fisher and West-
brook and a breakaway
dunk by Caron Butler
gave the Thunder a 92-76
lead, and Oklahoma City
took a 94-81 edge into the
fourth quarter


Elliott Sadler finally wins on
Elliott Sadler finally wins oni


Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. -
Most of Elliott Sadler's
memories of Talladega Su-
perspeedway are unpleas-
ant. They either involve a
horrific 2003 crash in
which his car flipped sev-
eral times and slid forever
through the grass on its
roof, or many different
ways he'd come up empty
racing for a win.
Finally, he has a victory
that tops all those other
disappointments.
"I have such a love-hate
relationship with this race
track. We always run good
here, but I always doggone
flip or wreck or hit hard or
something," Sadler said in
Victory Lane. "Every auto-
graph session, everywhere
I go, everybody always re-
minds me of the flip I had


down the backstraighaway
here. Now maybe they can
ask me about winning here."
Sadler won a three-lap
shootout to the checkered
flag in the Nationwide Se-
ries race.
The race Saturday was
stopped for a little more
than nine minutes to clean
the track following a six-
car accident that began
when Jeremy Clement was
turning into an outside
wall and his car shot back
into traffic.
Sadler reflected on
many of his previous races
during the stoppage.
"Under the red flag, I was
playing all these scenarios
in my head," Sadler said.
"Really how many races I've
lost in the last couple laps not
making the right decisions."
There were three laps
remaining on the restart,


and Sadler had to throw
several blocks to hold off a
charge from the pack of
traffic behind him.
It was the 10th Nation-
wide Series victory ofSadler's
career, first at Talladega,
and first win since 2012.
"We just stayed to the
bottom and stuck to our
guns," Sadler said of his
strategy "We made the right
blocks at the right time."
"I was disappointed last
year we weren't able to do
it It means a lot to me to get
the JGR team to Victory
Lane they work their
butts off and we weren't
able to reward them."
After going winless last
season, his first with Joe
Gibbs Racing, finally grab-
bing a victory was a heavy
relief for Sadler He left
Richard Childress Racing to
join JGR in an attempt to


Kasey Kahne moves off the ti
during the Aaron's 312 at Ta
race tor the Nationwide title.
Instead, after winning
four races in 2012 and fin-
ishing second that year in
the standings, Sadler had
just nine top-10 finishes
and was a distant fourth in
the title race.
"When you come to a new
place and you are running
for such a respectable man
and owner, and you are not


e at Talladega

Chris Buescher finished
second and Regan Smith,
winner of last year's race,
was third. Sadler's win
ended a three-race win-
ning streak for JR Motor-
sports, which picked up
victories from Chase El-
o liott at Texas and Darling-
ton and Kevin Harvick last
week at Richmond.
Associated Press Elliott, who finished
rakonto Tnone, atu Pa s 19th, maintained his lead
ack into Turn 4 on Saturday as the Nationwide points
11adega Superspeedway. leader. But Sadler's vic-
able to give back to them, tory pulled him to just one
and not go to Victory Lane point behind Elliott.
and not able to run for the David Ragan finished
championship as strong as fourth and was followed by
youwantto, man, itweighed Sam Hornish Jr, making
on me heavy," Sadler said. his first race since losing
'To be able to go to Victory the Nationwide title by
Lane, and (Gibbs) call me three points last season.
on the phone, was amazing Hornish has a seven-race
tome. Thatwasafeelingthat deal with JGR and made
is really hard to put into his debut by winning the
words, but it feels good." pole in Friday qualifying.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 B5







All-Chronicle fall sports teams


he annual Chronicle sports banquet
will be held Friday, May 16, at the
College of Central Florida Citrus
campus in Lecanto.
The reception begins at 5:30 p.m., with
the awards program to follow at 6:30 p.m.
The top athletes in the county will be
celebrated, including the ones you see on
this page from the fall 2013 campaigns.
Fall saw an outstanding regular season
and state playoff berth by a powerful Cit-
rus High School football team. That talent
the Hurricanes possessed is represented
in five of the six Player of the Year finalists.
In swimming, a trio of Citrus County ath-
letes qualified for the state meet- Player
of the Year finalists Lindsey Cohee, Gavn
Russ and Dylan Eamnheart.


Cross Country in the county was also
well represented at the state meet The
Lecanto boys squad made the trip, as did
individuals Brandon Harris of Crystal
River, Claire Farnsworth of Lecanto and
Alyssa Weber of Citrus.
Golf was very successful in the county
this year Both Crystal River teams quali-
fied for state, with Player of the Year fi-
nalists Maycee Mullarkey, Kyle Kidd and
Matt Allen leading the way Camrin Kersh
of Citrus also made the trip to state.
Citrus, Crystal River and Seven Rivers
all made it to the volleyball regional quar-
terfinal round in their classes, led by their
Player of the Year candidates Amy
Abramowich, Aspen Phillips and Alexis
Zachar


FOOTBALL

Offensive Player of the Year finalists


Deion Moore,
Sr., Citrus


Ty Reynolds,
Sr., Crystal River


All-Chronicle Team


Offense
Quarterback
Deion Moore, Citrus, Sr.
Running back
James Pouncey, Citrus, Sr.
Jonah Nightengale, Lecanto, Sr.
Fullback
Javian Clark, Citrus, Sr.
Wide receiver
Ty Reynolds, Crystal River, Sr.
Sam Franklin, Cit., Jr.
Desmond Franklin, Citrus, Jr.
Offensive line
C.J. Barbee, Citrus, Sr.
Bryce Densmore, Citrus, Jr.
Levonte' White, Citrus, Sr.
Gray Langlo, Crystal River, So.
Mikey Pittman, Crystal River, So.


Defense
Defensive line
Steven Knowles, Citrus, Sr.
Travis Blotz, Citrus, Jr.
Jesse Vineyard, Citrus, Sr.
Ardante "DeDe" Anderson, Lecanto, Jr.
Linebacker
JaimeeJuse, Citrus, Sr.
Frankie Bartley, Citrus, Sr.
Tyler Pollard, Crystal River, Fr.
Nile Waters, Citrus, Sr.
Destin Dawsy, Crystal River, Sr.
Defensive back
Gabriel Wilcox, Citrus, Jr.
Khyrel Harvey, Crystal River, So.
Jeremiah Lucas, Lecanto, So.
Kicker
Joshua Marsden, Citrus, Sr.


Defensive Player of the Year finalists


r- KiwiL


Steven Knowles,
Sr., Citrus


per :lI "'- I E
Jaimee Juse, Travis Blotz,
Sr., Citrus Jr., Citrus


BOYS CROSS COUNTRY =

Player of the Year finalists


Brandon Harris,
Sr., Crystal River


Michael Lindsey,
Sr., Lecanto


VOLLEYBALL

Player of the Year finalists


!L0]00PO


Aspen Phillips,
Sr., Crystal River


Amy Abramowich, Alexis Zachar,
Sr., Citrus Sr., Seven Rivers


All-Chronicle Team


Outside hitter
Amy Abramowich, Citrus, Sr.
Annalee Garcia, Lecanto, Jr.
Kendra Kirby, Citrus, Sr.
Alyssa Gage, Seven Rivers, Jr.


Middle hitter
Alexis Zachar, Seven Rivers, Sr.
Setter
Aspen Phillips, Crystal River, Sr.


BOYS GOLF

Player of the Year finalists


Micah Sugioka,
Jr., Lecanto


All-Chronicle Team


Kyle Kidd, Crystal River, Jr.
Matt Allen, Crystal River, Jr.
Micah Sugioka, Lecanto, Jr.


Dylan Nelson, Citrus, Sr.
Dakota Homan, Citrus, So.


GIRLS GOLF

Player of the Year finalists
^I^^EJ^ S-a


Chynna Liu,
Sr., Lecanto


All-Chronicle Team


Maycee Mullarkey, Crystal River, Sr.
Camrin Kersh, Citrus, So.
Chynna Liu, Lecanto, Sr.


Marisa Wilder, Crystal River, Sr.
Caitlin Johnson, Citrus, Sr.


-BOYS SWIMMING

Player of the Year finalists


Gavn Russ,
Sr., Lecanto


All-Chronicle Team


Dylan Earnheart, Crystal River, Jr.
Jake Steel, Citrus, Jr.
Gavn Russ, Lecanto, Sr.


Quinn Sisto, Crystal River, So.
Ethan Kennedy, Crystal River, Fr.
Steven Swartz, Lecanto, Sr.


GIRLS SWIMMING

Player of the Year finalists


Lindsey Cohee,
Fr., Lecanto


Anna Lane, Lauren Macaisa,
So., Crystal River Fr., Lecanto


All-Chronicle Team


Lindsey Cohee, Lecanto, Fr.
Anna Lane, Crystal River, So.
Lauren Macaisa, Lecanto, Fr.


Cassandra Swartz, Lecanto, Fr.
Hayley Clark, Crystal River, Sr.
Hayley Bottona, Lecanto, Sr.


Brandon Harris, Crystal River, Sr.
Sam Alford, Lecanto, Jr.,
Michael Lindsey, Lecanto, Sr.
Makenzie Woods, Lecanto, Fr.


Jack Clark, Lecanto, Sr.
A.J. Bass, Crystal River, So.
Chase Benoist, Lecanto, So.


GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY =

Player of the Year finalists


Alyssa Weber, Claire Farnsworth,
Jr., Citrus So., Lecanto


Katie Mattingly,
Jr., Lecanto


All-Chronicle Team


Alyssa Weber, Citrus, Jr.
Claire Farnsworth, Lecanto, So.
Katie Mattingly, Lecanto, Jr.
Britny Vickers, Lecanto, Sr.


Olivia Huegel, Seven Rivers, So.
Shanise Emmanuel, Lecanto, Jr.
Kathryn DeSomma, Crystal River, So.


James Pouncey,
Sr., Citrus


Kyle Kidd, Matt Allen,
Jr., Crystal River Jr., Crystal River


Maycee Mullarkey, Camrin Kersh,
Sr., Crystal River So., Citrus


All-Chronicle Team


PI (F r-I v -
Dylan Earnheart, Jake Steel,
Jr., Crystal River Jr., Citrus


B6 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


HIGH SCHOOL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE









COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



For state, springs at the bottom of the ladder


he Florida Legislature
was awash in extra
money this year, but
that does not mean the pol-
luted springs of Florida are
going to catch a break.
And that's bad news for
Citrus County.
Because of the improving
economy, the state has a
$1.2 billion surplus, and leg-
islators spent the past week
trying to reward each other
by funding pet local projects.


Sen. Charles Dean (R-In-
verness) has led the effort
this year to pass legisla-
tion to safeguard our
springs including those
in Crystal River, Ho-
mosassa and Chassahow-
itzka. He was asking the
Legislature and governor
to step up and fund an ini-
tiative that would begin to
restore the springs and
protect our underground
water supply


On Friday, the last day of
the session, the Florida
House was being manipu-
lated by powerful industry
advocates and a speaker of
the House who was not
committed.
While Sen. Dean's legisla-
tion won support of his fel-
low senators, the legislation
also gained the opposition
of powerful industry groups
more concerned with gen-
erating corporate profits,


even if it means continued
polluting of the springs and
our water supply
The governor suggested
that $55 million be allo-
cated to begin this fight
against pollution in the
springs. The Florida House
wanted $50 million. The
Senate leadership felt the
power of the special inter-
est groups opposed to clean
water, so they only asked for
$20 million to $30 million.


Even that funding was in
jeopardy on the final day of
the legislative session, be-
cause the House of Repre-
sentatives failed to act.
This comes at a time
when there is a $1.2 billion
surplus.
At the same time, the Leg-
islature did approve $1.27
million to build a BMX su-
percross track in the city of


MATTHEW BECK/Chromnicle
The Beverly Hills Recreation Center, now known as the Central Ridge Community Center, has a number of events slated for May. With
advanced technology, people seem to spend more time online and less time using the recreation center, but guest columnists Mike Col-
bert and Harvey Gerber would like to see the center added to the county park system.



IN BEVERLY HILLS,



POTENTIAL FOR A



GREAT PARK


This concerns the former Beverly Hills
Recreation Association complex, now
known as the Central Ridge Commu-
nity Center, situated on a 36-acre
tract in the dead center of the unincorporated
community known as Beverly Hills.
e C & We're going to preface the following re-
Mike Colbert & marks by stating that our county commis-
Harvey Gerber sion has, for the last several years, done a
GUEST rather decent job of governing, not only
COLUMN this community but the county as a
___________ whole. Those are the facts. Just look at
your tax statements for the past five years,
note the drop in property values, understand that Citrus' largest
taxpayer, our electric utility company is contributing half of what
it used to, recognize how few vital services have been cut and re-
alize how fortunate we are. We have read and heard that our
See Page C3


.~. i --:-.d







Vandals recently forced county officials to delay the reopening of the
Central Ridge Pool at Beverly Hills. Beverly Hills Recreation Association
members would like to see the facility added to the county's park
system.


On water quality, justice delayed is denied


n Feb. 28,2013, the South-
west Florida Water Man-
agement District
(SWFWMD) adopted Minimum
Flows and Levels (MFL) rules
that would allow the continued
degradation of water quantity
and water quality in the Chassa-
howitzka and Homosassa rivers.
On March 28, 2013, a group of
concerned Floridians, including
me, petitioned the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection (FDEP) for a hearing


before FDEP Secretary Her- Rivers in its MFL studies. From
schel Vineyard pursuant to its Jan. 5, 1993, designation as
Florida Statutes Section OFWs forward, Florida and fed-
373.114(2) to present evidence eral law require water quality in
and argument as to the Chassahowitzka
why the MFLs are Brad Rimbey and Homosassa
not consistent with GUEST rivers to be protected
Florida law and state COLUMN against degradation.
water policy ___________ It took nearly six
The hearing was months for FDEP to
necessitated because SWFWMD schedule the petitioned hearing.
ignored the Outstanding Florida The hearing was held on Sept.
Waters (OFW) designation of the 10, 2013, at SWFWMD's head-
Chassahowitzka and Homosassa quarters. Attorney John Thomas


represented the petitioners at
the hearing. Contrary to the re-
quirements of Section 373.114(2)
ES., Secretary Vineyard did not
appear at the hearing, though
the hearing was properly no-
ticed and the secretary's pres-
ence was not optional.
In Mr Vineyard's absence,
FDEP's Francine Ffolkes
presided. Ms. Ffolkes made it
clear from the outset that she
had no intention of conducting
the hearing in a manner consis-


tent with the basic due process
normal to evidentiary hearings.
Nonetheless, FDEP repeatedly
assured the hearing petitioners
that Secretary Vineyard would
at least render a final determi-
nation and that determination
would be published in the
Florida Administrative Register
On March 14, 2014, after six
months had passed with no final
determination from FDEP, the
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


PageC3


1,3,&veny





0Page C2- SUNDAY, MAY 4,2014



PINION


"It is not abstinence from pleasures that is best,
but mastery over them without being worsted."
Aristippus, quoted in Diogenes Laertius' "Lives
and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers," third c. A.D.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SGerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M .............
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TRAGIC LOSS




Human

N


compassion



exemplified





in lost life


ince U.S. troops have been
withdrawn from once-
war-torn Afghanistan,
headlines about the troubled
country have largely faded
from the news.
Tragic shootings at a hospi-
tal in western Kabul on April
24, however, serve as a chill-
ing reminder that
stability and THE I
safety are not a
way of life in that Doctor
far-away land. ties k
Sadly, that mes- Afgha
sage is com-
pounded by the OUR 01
fact that one of
the three individ- Dr. Jerry
uals killed by a se- made
curity guard, a bettc
employed to pro-
vide protection, is the son of
Inverness resident Rome
Umanos.
Dr. Jerry Umanos, 57, was
at Cure International Hospi-
tal, where he had worked for
the past several years, when
the guard opened fire, killing
Dr. Umanos, John Gabel and
Gabel's visiting father, Gary
Gabel. Umanos and the
Gabels are from Chicago. An
American nurse was
wounded in the attack, as
well.
There are precious few
people who aspire to the


s
wi
W
i l
an

F
h

er


heights of service Dr Umanos
achieved. As widely reported,
he was spiritually driven to
serve impoverished children.
Trained as a pediatrician, he
did just that, both in Chicago
and in Afghanistan, where he
went 11 years ago to serve tu-
berculosis patients. Once
there, he became
$SUE: alarmed by the
number of chil-
'ith local dren who die be-
led in fore reaching age
iistan. 5 and broadened
the scope of his
'INION: work, serving the
health needs of
Umanos young and old.
e world Not naive to the
r place, dangers of
Afghanistan, he
once told his concerned fa-
ther, "The people of
Afghanistan need me there. I
don't have time to be afraid. I
have a job to do."
Reflecting on the tragic
death of his son, Rome
Umanos, 88, said, "It's un-
bearable. An enormous loss."
The enormity of the loss
can only be contrasted to the
magnitude of Dr. Jerry
Umanos' contributions to the
world. His death is tragic yet
his life was valiant. The
world is a better place thanks
to his time on Earth.


Checks are out of style Where's Dr. Shawn?


This morning's Chronicle
Sound Off section (May 1) says
"Take care of Americans."
Couldn't agree any more than
that. Joe Biden, the vice presi-
dent, is over in the West giving
out checks like they're going out
of style. President Obama is
over in the East giving out
checks like it's going out of
style. And children in this coun-
try are going to bed hungry. I'm
not talking about a few mil-
lions of children are going to
bed hungry. Veterans
laying in the street
don't have a place to C ,
live, don't know where
they're going to get
their next meal from,
and so on and so on.
Families are living in
cars. Let's stop giving
out checks to other
countries and let's stop CAL
this nonsense and let's 53Q
start worrying about t0
Americans. America
first, not last.
Touching story
I would like to comment on
the beautiful, touching and sad,
sad letter this lady (Joanie
Welch) wrote about the truck
driver. I mean that was the most
touching thing I have ever seen
in your paper yet. What a sad
situation, but yet and all, it had
such a beautiful tone to it.
Thank you very much for shar-
ing that with us. What a sad
story, but then I guess that's
how life is. Thank you very
much.


I


Is there any way that I can get
the name and address for Dr.
Shawn Harris? He's a veterinarian
on State Road 44. If I can get his
telephone number or his address
I can't seem to find it any-
where- I would appreciate it.
Editor's note: Well, we couldn't
find it either on Google. So, readers?
Children need the help
This is in reference to the
drive that was held on Saturday
at Walmart in Homosassa for di-
apers for babies and
|JND children's items. Many
J people have lost their
lEE jobs or some have fool-
Sishly had children when
they're not able to. But
the fact remains the
children are the ones
that suffer. That's why
people are asking oth-
ers to help and donate.


0579 Reclaim it again
It's Wednesday (April 30)
and there's a real good article.
With the water being boiled that
they use at the power plant, it
then becomes distilled and then
you see it go out the chimney. Is
there any way of recovering that
distilled water so it could be used
as clean water? Just curious.
A dressing-down
What's wrong with a businessper-
son being dressed in respectable
clothing? It sure is a lot better
than the way most people dress.
Even the governor of Florida
doesn't know how to dress prop-
erly when the president visits.


ACA will sm
government outlays for ance to t
health care and other sured, im
"entitlement" programs care and
have increased at more than ACA exp
double the inflation rate since erage by
the inception of Medicare in 1964. provide i
The money the federal govern- by demaD
ment borrowed to fund these insurance
programs accounts for nearly all sides, if
of the $17.4 trillion
U.S. national debt
Economists ad-
vised Congress that
taking on more fed-
eral debt would
damage the economy
and that entitlement
costs had to be re-
duced. Congress re-
sponded by enacting Dr. William Dixon
the Affordable Care
Act (ACA) in 2009. OTHER
Apparently it be- VOICES
lived that cutting
health care expenses could be ditional
accomplished with less politi- Congress
cal blowback than cutting other salaries a
entitlement programs. The ACA of high ea
is all about cutting government on the gr
expenses, nothing more. profits) c
Talk about 30 million Ameri- equipme
cans lacking health insurance, on high-(
unable to get care and perhaps ance bei
dying was propaganda to gain employee]
public support for regulation of complain
health care. That 30 million num- help offset
ber included those who chose Major
not to buy insurance, those eli- from yo
gible for programs like Medicaid people
who chose not to enroll and il- purchase
legal aliens. The "30 million" at prices fai
all times had access to emer- ues. This
agency and life-saving care. In fact, insurano
far, far more Americans were able the
dying each year from preventa- sicker an
ble automobile accidents than reduce 1
from lack of health insurance, ment sub
Equally bogus were claims Congre
that the quality of U.S. health cuts for
care was less than that of many Medicar
countries with socialized care. created a
To refute this, one needs only eliminate
follow the money Wealthy peo- services
ple from around the world age to
come to America to get the best The ACA
health care. Few, if any, Ameri- ferent wa
cans go to Europe or Canada to ical care
get better health care. use prev
Congress promised the ACA prove o0
would provide health insur- the goven


rely
the "30 milli
prove quality
bring down
anded insur
demanding e
insurance or
riding individ
e (with the he
needed) or p
by opening
caid and ot
lar progi
people al
poverty lin
hibiting ex
those with
ing serious
conditions
lowing you
ple to re
parents'
plans thr(
26.
To pay fc
insurance
s levied new
md investment
mrners. Taxes w
ross revenues
)f medical de
nt manufacti
dollar compa
nefits. Fines
rs and indivi
ig with the AC
et its costs.
funding was
unger and
who are req
insurance p
r above fair m
extra cash gi
e companies
m to reduce
id older client
;he need foi
bsidies.
ess mandated
doctors wl
e beneficiary:
a panel to ide
some costly hI
from Medica
reduce expe
Experiments
iys to coordin
Sto see if do
entive measi
itcomes whi
rnment mone


self-destruct
on" unin- The ACA requires insurance
y of health companies in the exchanges to
costs. The compete on price and to spend
ance cov- most of the premium money
employerss they collect on care. The result-
pay a fine, ing cost-cutting measures by the
duals buy companies produces policies
elp of sub- that have high out-of-pocket ex-
)ay a fine, penses and that limit the num-
ig Medi- ber of physicians and hospitals
their simi- available to subscribers.
rams to While no one should fault
above the Congress for trying to limit gov-
e, by pro- ernment entitlement costs, the
clusion of Affordable Care Act they en-
pre-exist- acted replaces the functional
s medical but costly current system with
and by al- one that is dysfunctional and ul-
nger peo- timately more costly
main on Congress' assumption that
health the public will purchase over-
)ugh age priced policies goes against
basic economic realities. Re-
Dr this ad- quirements that Americans re-
coverage, linquish their health care
taxes on freedoms in favor of choices
it incomes made by unelected bureaucrats
vere levied and insurance companies will
s (not just be rejected. Insurance man-
evice and dates, currently holding back
urers and job creation, will in any case, be
mny insur- ignored.
Said by When the Affordable Care
duals not Act self-destructs as it surely
'A were to must, something different will
be required. The ignorant
s to come among us will cry for even more
healthier government intervention, per-
quired to haps like the British National
policies at Health Service with a parallel
iarketval- private insurance program for
ven to the the wealthy Given the make up
was to en- of the U.S. electorate, the igno-
Scosts to rant will likely prevail.
nts and to William Dixon is a graduate of
r govern- U
Payment Columbia University New
'ho treat York Medical College and the
ies. They USF College ofBusiness Ad-
entify and ministration. He served in the
healthh care Army as a surgeon and as a
are cover- special forces officer, achiev-
'nditures. ing the rank of lieutenant
s with dif- colonel. He was an assistant
nate med- professor of surgery at the
ctors can University of Georgia before
ire to im- entering private practice.
le saving Dr Dixon can be reached at
y. Wdixonl6@yahoo.com.


LETTER to the Editor


Citrus lagging
in preventing
teen pregnancy
Since May is National Teen
Pregnancy Prevention
Month, it seems a good time
to have a dialog about how
our local teens are doing.
Compared with young peo-
ple across the country, young
people in Florida engage in
sex at younger ages and do
not use condoms or birth
control on a regular basis.
Conventional expectations
are that young people will re-
ceive information regarding
healthy sexual practices
from parents or the school
system. Although school-
based sex education is one
strategy to address the issue,
the content of sex education
is locally determined and in-
consistent throughout the
state as is family-based sex
information.
In Citrus County, more
than half of all births are to
unwed mothers, and mothers
under the age of 19 are more
common in Citrus County
than in the rest of the state.
Sixteen percent of births are
to mothers without a com-
pleted high school education,
and 70 percent of all births


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

have to be paid for by Medi-
caid. It seems obvious that
although there are well-
meaning efforts to help
young people with this issue


in place, something is not
working.
A study done of sex educa-
tion curricula and programs
in Florida school districts re-
ports that Citrus County
Schools use the Abstinence
Educator Guidebook; Aspire;
Choosing the Best; Game
Plan and Navigator in their
sex education curricula. Ac-
cording to the study, these
programs promote hetero-
sexual marriage, foster gen-
der stereotypes, employ
shame-based tactics, teach
misinformation on HIV/AIDS
and utilize abstinence-only
supplementary materials.
If abstinence-only is the
basis for sex education in
Citrus County Schools, possi-
bly other strategies should be
considered to reverse the
outcomes mentioned above.
It seems indefensible to
withhold vital sexual health
information from our young
people that can affect their
future and the future of the
next generation of Citrus
County If complete informa-
tion cannot be provided in
school curricula then it be-
hooves the community to find
another way
Jo Darling
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


qow




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Inspiration vs. perspiration redux: Writer's block


ow, a word from
your columnist:
Apologies to one
and all. Today's column is
a rerun.
"Genius is 1 percent in-
spiration and 99 percent
perspiration." Thomas
A. Edison, circa 1902.
I have no illusions about
being a genius in any form
or fashion whatsoever, but
I am more than a little bit
familiar with both inspira-
tion and perspiration.
While few, if any, can come
close to equaling the ac-
complishments Mr Edison
racked up during his life-
time, I'm not at all sure
that I agree with his analy-
sis of the ratio between in-
spiration and perspiration
- at least not in my own
work.
These little collections
of words I put together
each week are a good bit
more weighted toward in-
spiration than perspira-



CENTER
Continued from Page C1

county has long been on
an imprudent and intem-
perate spending spree,
but the facts dictate oth-
erwise. Despite dramati-
cally lower tax revenues,
the county has an out-
standing credit rating, a
10 percent budgetary re-
serve in the amount of
several million dollars
and levels of service
have remained fairly
constant.
That said, the Great
Recession that began six
years ago, virtually para-
lyzing the real estate
market here, nationally
and abroad, hit Citrus
County and Beverly Hills
in particular especially
hard. We're not out of the
woods yet
Beverly Hills was es-
tablished 60-odd years
ago as an employer-
funded, homeowner-
based retirement com-
munity with a large
recreational complex as
its centerpiece. With the
county as a silent part-
ner, facilities and activi-
ties were primarily
financed by voluntary
resident memberships.
To a large extent, it re-
mains that way today, ex-
cept that Citrus County is
now in total control.
Times change.
Sixty years ago, we had
no flat-screen TVs,
smartphones, Kindles,
tablets, etc., and use of
these, of course, trans-
lates into far fewer club
memberships everywhere.
While the lion's share
of the people here are
still retirees and home-
owners, many younger
folks are moving into
houses that have become
rental units and they've
come because this is a
pretty safe, rather con-
venient, fairly clean,
comparatively economi-
cal place to live. Crime is
not a huge factor, as sher-
iff's office statistics (i.e.
two robberies and four
auto thefts in all of 2013)
will bear out. These peo-
ple hope to work, enjoy
life and one day own
property here. That
recreational complex,
with its swimming pool,
tennis courts, pool hall,
workout areas, card
rooms, grand hall, horse-
shoe pits and shuffle-
board courts, is integral
to this area. Nothing sim-
ilar exists for miles
around.
That's the thrust here!
This facility, swimming
pool and all, should be
designated as a portion
of the county park system
so everyone can enjoy it
for it is exactly that: a
major-league amenity A
public hearing to ad-
dress this issue will be
held 2 p.m. Tuesday, May
27, on Apopka Avenue at
the county courthouse in
Inverness. Contact your


commissioners at 352-
341-6560, email them
care of
douglas.wright@bocc.
citrus.fl.gov or be there
May 27. Better yet, do all
of the above!


Mike Colbert and Harvey
Gerber are members of
the Beverly Hills Civic
Association.


tion. Inspiration is para-
mount for writing my col-
umn. Once the idea is there
- and the conclusion usu-
ally comes first-the writ-
ing of an introduction and
an exposition of the thought
will often take some re-
search, but the words
seem to flow quickly after
I've become engulfed in it.
Inspiration can be elusive.
I'm consistently on the
lookout for that little rascal
in the things Cheryl, the
children and the grand-
children say or do. I search
for it in newspapers. While
watching TV, my mind is
always subconsciously at-
tuned for the potential ap-
pearance of an idea. And,
at times, I simply sit and
think, searching for inspi-
ration while reliving the
times of my life as a child,
as a husband, as a father,
and as a grandfather
On the other hand, I
paint. And, for me, perspi-


ration is considerably so ago, I decided that after
more of the formula for one more attempt, I was
producing a canvas than is going to either put my
inspiration. brushes and
That's not to 1 paints away
say selecting a r forever or give
subject is al- them to some-
ways easy. 1 .. one else.
Nonetheless, What would
once the vision be my inspira-
is there, pro-- tion for this
during a paint- final painting?
ing usually ; It wasn't a diffi-
involves months Fred Brannen cult decision.
of preparing A SLICE Though I had
sketches, trans- ASi never before
ferring the OF LIFE even attempted
sketches to the to paint a for-
canvas, selecting the col- mal portrait, I chose my
ors, mixing the shades, ap- greatest inspiration of
plying the brush strokes, them all, my Cheryl, as the
and, quite often, scraping subject for what I thought
the paint off and doing it would be my finale. No,
all over again, she didn' t sit motionless for
Obviously, this has be- six months while I worked
come even more difficult on her image. I used a 3-
now that I find myself by-5-inch black-and-white
working with shaky hands. photo taken when she was
Speaking of painting with only 17, along with both of
shaky hands, six months or our memories, which re-


Doing the right thing
Avery close friend related a sad
tale of spite involving parents
who are divorced and a child who
bears the brunt of their harsh
feelings toward one another
Her granddaughter went
through a drawer in her
mother's room and found a
packet of birthday and Christ-
mas cards from her paternal
grandparents and father The
teenager had never seen them
or received the monetary gifts.
She questioned her mother who
admitted to keeping them from
her and confiscating the money
The same situation applied to
cards and gifts from her father
The family members all lived in
states far away from one another
When parents divorce, at
times mothers try to cut out the
paternal relatives and father
from their child's life. No matter
what one feels towards their ex-



WINDOW
Continued from Pai

Oldsmar. They also liked the ide
spending $50,000 for improvemer
a Little League field in west Hernm
County
Last I checked, Citrus County
the city of Inverness paid for their
Little League field improvements
no one has had the nerve to sug
government spend more than a mi
dollars to construct a BMX bi(
course.
The Legislature found $10 milli
build a performing arts center fo
community college in Pasco Co
and another $387,753 grant for
Palm Harbor Historical Society's
seum for a display on building a
der factory replica.
You can't make this stuff up.
Legislature can't find the func
begin to deal with cleaning up
drinking water or saving our spr
but they can find tax dollars to sui
a museum display on a ladder fadc
I'd rather drown myself in a
spring than have to go to a mus
dedicated to the story of a ladder
tory OK, that might be extreme.
The House, Senate, governor
the people of Florida all agree tha
should clean up our water before
all get sick. We have surplus tax m
in the state for the first time s
2008, but we can't figure out how 1
rect a significant amount of dollar
ward solving one of the
significant public issues the
faces.



RIMBEY
Continued from Page C1

hearing petitioners filed a De-
mand for Determination. Another
month has passed and FDEP and
SWFWMD remain mute.
The issue before FDEP is sim-
ple: Rule 62-302.700(1) states "It
shall be the Department (FDEP)
policy to afford the highest pro-
tection to Outstanding Florida
Waters and Outstanding National
Resource Waters. No degrada-
tion of water quality, other than
that allowed in subsections 62-
4.242(2) and (3), FAC., is to be
permitted in Outstanding Florida
Waters and Outstanding National
Resource Waters, respectively,
notwithstanding any other De-
partment rules that allow water
quality lowering." There is noth-
ing in 62-302.700(1), FA.C. that al-
lows SWFWMD, FDEP, or any
other state agency to perma-
nently degrade the water quality
of an OFW by reducing flow via
MFL rule-making or any other
rule-making for that matter.
However, SWFWMD contends
OFW designation is not relevant
to its decision to issue pumping


main in full color, as the
model for the work an
18-by-24-inch oil of my
sweetheart at about the
time we married.
Inspiration? Perspira-
tion? What percentage of
each? Mr Edison was truly
a genius and certainly a
wiser man than I, but for
me, it depends on the
medium. Putting words on
paper takes more inspira-
tion; putting paint on can-
vas takes more
perspiration.
The painting of Cheryl?
I now know why portrait
artists supposedly don't
allow their subjects to see
the work before it is com-
pleted. I suspect it is even
more trying when the
painter is basing the paint-
ing on a black-and-white
photo and the color memo-
ries of two different people
from almost 50 years ago.
But the portrait is now
finished; we are both rea-


nutrient impairment of these
rivers as evidenced by massive
algal mats. Both SWFWMD and
FDEP acknowledge that reduced
flows increase algal mat impair-
ment. However, FDEP prefers to
use the term "increased resi-
dence time" to muddy the clear
connection between the reduced
flows permitted by SWFWMD
and the CWA nutrient impair-
ment violations.
It is time to quit playing games
with semantics and get down to
the business of actually affording
"the highest protection to Out-
standing Florida Waters."


sonably pleased with it;
and I've changed my mind
about putting my brushes
and paints away forever In
spite of the months of per-
spiration, the pleasure of
completing the work was
worth more than the sweat
of producing it.
A final note: It might
take a bit of perspiration to
find it, but my old friend
inspirationf" will surely be
back in a few days, I have
no question about that,
and I'll offer a new collec-
tion of words to you faith-
ful readers next time!


Fred Brannen, an Inver-
ness resident, has been a
Chronicle columnist since
1988 and is the author of
the recently published
novel, 'At the Bottom of
Biscayne Bay." Fred may
be contacted at
tbrannenjr@gmail.com or
via brannenbooksllc. com.


Letters to THE EDITOR


permits that will reduce freshwa-
ter flow to these spring-fed rivers.
Reducing spring flow allows salt-
water to replace freshwater in
these coastal rivers and accelerates
the algal growth which has now
put these rivers on the Federal
Environmental Protection Agency's
(EPA) 303(d) impaired waters list
for nutrient imbalance.
FDEP is currently in the
process of setting Total Maximum
Daily Loads (TMDLs) to address
nutrient pollution in these rivers.
TMDLs are required by the Fed-
eral Clean Water Act (CWA) be-
cause FDEP has verified


spouse, it is cruel to the child.
The child will discover for them-
selves, upon reaching adult-
hood, who the real louse is.
Do the right thing for your child,
knowing in your heart they will
find out the truth eventually and
this will be reward enough.
Margo Blum
Homosassa

Cartoon not funny


knowledge
done to try
est nation i
Also, regz
Evelyn O'Br
the cartoon
strategy ou
government
forced corp
to the high
administrat
have impos
corporate ta


I do not know who Lee Judge is, or govern
but he certainly is not a comedian. eralrgovern
His cartoon, if you can call it that, Much ofrth
in the paper today Friday, April 25, in lost rave
was not funny We know, however, collected he
his political affiliation. Nothing if sensible ]
that George W Bush did as pres- are still the
ident of this country undermined the world. ]
this nation as has Barack Obama, can recover
his administration and the Dem- expires. Wa
ocratic Party How long can the
liberals continue to blame
George W Bush rather than ac-


The opposition came from those
tremendous organizations fighting for
the rights of big business. You know
,e Cl them as the Florida fertilizer manu-
facturers, the Florida Chamber of
ea of Commerce and other big industrial
its to lobbying organizations that don't want
ando any restrictions on how they do business.
It would be nice if big business did-
and n't need restrictions, but it is obvious
Sown by the current condition of our water
and supply that self-regulation does not
ggest work.
llion These are the same guys who fight to
cycle keep it legal for a startup business to
pump water from a well in Crystal
on to River so they can market bottled water
r the around the country They have manip-
runty ulated the Legislature so much that
r the neither the city of Crystal River nor
Mu- the water management district has the
lad- authority to deny the water bottling
company a permit.
The So even though we know reduced
is to water flow is one of the causes of our
) our spring's deterioration, local govern-
ings, ment can't do anything about it.
)port Hats off to Charlie Dean and his
tory? group of senators for fighting the good
dirty fight. Sen. Dean convinced the full
seum Senate to back his proposals, so we're
r fac- sure he will continue to address the
issue in the 2015 session.
and But we have to keep asking the ques-
atwe tion: How can anyone be opposed to
e we cleaning up the environmental mess
oney that we have all created? Who doesn't
since support clean water?
;o di-
rs to-
most Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
state of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


what Obama has
to destroy the great-
n the world?
arding the letter from
ien that appears below
n, "Corporate tax
trages:" The federal
at under Obama has
'orations overseas due
corporate tax rates his
ion and the Democrats
sed on them. When
ix rates are lower, more
received by the fed-
nment and more jobs
d plain and simple.
at supposed $3.4 billion
nue could have been
ere in the United States
heads prevailed. We
Greatest country in
Pray to God that we
r when Obama's term
ake up, America.
Dick Connell
Citrus Hills




Originally published in
Citrus County Chronicl
Information for Back in
is supplied by the Citru
County Historical Socie
In 1939...
ohn K. Strange,
Mrs. Bertha
Strange of Herr
was among the
men accepted for
ice in the U.S. lV
Corps this week ar
transferred to th
rine Barracks at
Island, S.C., for tr
prior to assignmE
some service s
ship or marine ba:
for duty, anno
Captain A.C. Smal
trict Recruiting C
at Savannah, Ga.
Strange former
tended the Citrus
School.

oe Pierce, the
lar barber, is 1
his many friends t
will be back at h
barber shop stand
ning Saturday I
the winter monti
Pierce is employ
Mrs. Howard B.
Mrs. Tuttle left yes
for her summer ho
Naugatuck, Conn
Mr Pierce will go b


Excellent editorial
I'd like to applaud Gerry Mul-
ligan and his staff for this won-
derful editorial (April 25). It was
written with much love, compas-
sion and sincerity. For such a
sensitive subject and one that
must be remembered forever, I
thank you sincerely
I have lived in Citrus County
just a couple years, and I will say
that I have been very impressed
with the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. I have always lived in larger
cities such as Detroit, Michigan,
Clearwater, Richmond and last
in St. Louis, before moving to
Citrus County This is a much
finer newspaper in regards to
not only local news but national
and world news than many of
the big cities listed.
Thanks for your fine work.
Michael Rubin
Hernando





the his regular occupation
e. as a barber
Time
is In 1953...
ety. f itrus County will re-
C ceive about $296,000
son of in the near future to fi-
L. nance an extensive school
aando, building program. This
young will be the county's share
r serv- from a large bond issue,
marine which the State Board of
id was Education is now in the
e Ma- process of validating.
Parris The State Board was em-
aining powered to issue bonds
ent to up to $100,000,000 by
school, Florida voters in No-
rracks vember, 1952.
unced
1, Dis- A public meeting will
officerr AX be held at Hernando
Young Civic Hall at 8 o'clock on
y at- Monday night for the
s High purpose of completing the
organization of a com-
munity development as-
popu- sociation. A nominating
sellingg committee was selected
hat he at a meeting last week.
is old This committee will
begin- present its nominations
duringg for officers of the new
is Mr group Monday night.
*ed by The Hernando Lions
Futtle. Club and the Hernando
terday Civic Club are making
Dme in every effort to assure a
., and large turn-out of Her-
)ackto nando area people.


Florida's continued attempts to
treat water quantity and water
quality as if they are not related
is pathetic and illegal. This inept
policy of ignoring water quality
degradation caused by ground-
water withdrawals has con-
tributed to the demise of many (if
not all) of Florida's most statuto-
rily protected waters our Out-
standing Florida Waters.
Let's hear it, Secretary Vine-
yard. Put your defense of FDEP's
failed water management policy
in writing. Perhaps the 60 some-
odd dolphins and 120 federally
protected manatees that died
from pollution exposure in the
Indian River OFW last summer
has given you pause. We are given
to wonder what part of"no degra-
dation of water quality" FDEP is
having trouble understanding.
We can be patient if we are wait-
ing for a plan to correct FDEP's
failed policy, but justice will pre-
vail. Let's get on with it.


Brad W Rimbey is spokesman
for the Chassahowitzka
River Restoration Committee,
director of the Homosassa River
Alliance and director of the
Withlacoochee Area Residents.


Florida's continued attempts to
treat water quantity and water
quality as if they are not related is
pathetic and illegal. This inept policy
of ignoring water quality degradation
caused by groundwater withdrawals
has contributed to the demise of
many (if not all) ofFlorida's most
statutorily protected waters -
our Outstanding Florida Waters.


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 C3




C4 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 COMMENTARY CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


CCEF thanks
community
The Citrus County Edu-
cation Foundation would
like to thank our incredi-
ble community for help-
ing us promote public
education, family fitness,
health and fun on Satur-
day, April 12, at the inau-
gural Suncoast Credit
Union Foundation
Schoolhouse Hustle
5K/10K/1M Walk. Thank
you all for helping us
raise funds in support of
the Foundation's mission
of "Funding Success in
the Classroom."
To our 509 runners and
walkers from near and
far, as well as those who
came out to support them
and enjoy the free health
expo and YMCA Kid
Zone, thank you for shar-
ing your Saturday morn-
ing with us at the
CREST/Lecanto Educa-
tional complex. The Cen-
tral Ridge Elementary
Ridgebacks won the Par-
ticipation Spirit Award,
and the Forest Ridge Ele-
mentary Owls took home
the Most School Spirit
Award. These two schools
can show off their trophy
all year and will receive
$1,000 for their SAEC. Our
Individual Spirit Award
winner was Lori
Casalvieri from Crystal
River Middle School, and
the Forest Ridge Fitness
Owls won more hardware,
taking home the Group
Spirit Award. Overall
Winners for the 5K were
Jillian Felton and Sam Al-
ford, with Masters win-
ners Sheri Vilardi and
Joel Rich. Overall for the
10K were Marjolein Baas
and Danny Stevens Jr,
with Masters Karen Tyler
and Danny Stevens.
Thank you Superinten-
dent Sam Himmel for
joining hundreds of par-
ents, students, teachers,
and community members
in our one-mile fun walk!
None of this would
have been possible with-
out the support of our
many sponsors who
jumped right in this very
first year A heartfelt
thank you goes out to our
Title Sponsor Suncoast
Credit Union Foundation,
without whom this event
would not have hap-
pened. We also appreci-
ate the tremendous
support of our Specialty
Sponsors: Awards: Nature
Coast Financial Advisors;
Bibs: Subway; Spirit
Awards: Citrus County
Chronicle and IM&P Well-
ness Center; Water sta-
tions: Crystal Automotive,
Citrus95.3/The Fox 96.7


and VanAllen Insurance;
Kids Zone: Citrus County
YMCA; our Racing Spon-
sors: Aaron's, Crossfit
High Caliber, Gulf to Lake
Marine & Trailers, MelJay
DJ Services, Mike Scott
Plumbing, Nature Coast
EMS, Staywell Kids, To-
bacco-Free Florida, the
Vaughn/McLaughlin Team
of Raymond James, Wal-
mart Inverness, West
Coast Insurers; our Expo
Sponsors: the Citrus County
Health Department, Citrus
County Library System,
Citrus County Parks & Rec,
Citrus Memorial Health
System, GNC, Meridien
Research, Nature Coast
Ministries, Walgreens In-
verness, Withlacoochee
Technical Institute; and
our Participating Spon-
sors: Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Nick
Nicholas Ford Lincoln,
PedIM Healthcare and
WYKE radio.
We are so appreciative
of our many volunteers at
registration and on the
course, manning the Fam-
ily Health Expo booths
and providing childcare
in the YMCA Kid Zone. It
goes without saying that
we couldn't have put on
an event such as this with-
out the professional serv-
ices of DRC Sports, and
we are grateful to Chris
Moling and crew, who did
an outstanding job.
We invite all of you to
join us next spring as we
continue to raise funds
and provide opportunities
for our county students
and teachers. For more


information about the
CCEF, visit wwwcitrus
education.org or "like" us
on Facebook under
Citruseducation. For pic-
tures from the race, visit
facebook.com/
schoolhousehustle.
Thank you again,
CCEF Board of Directors

Thanks for
helping with
golf tournament
FOCCAS (Friends of
Citrus County Animal
Services) would like to
thank the many individuals
who made this event hap-
pen. The event was held
on April 20, in spite of the
brisk weather The Royal
Oaks Golf Club graciously
hosted the event Lorie
Wilkes and Marti Little
organized everything and
made it happen. The golf
outing was a success and
the animals at Citrus
County Animal Services
are the beneficiaries.
We also want to thank
the businesses that gener-
ously sponsored the golf
holes for FOCCAS: Wa-
verly Florist and Curry's
Roofing Inc. located in
Crystal River, Nature
Coast Pet Cremation lo-
cated in Holder and
Bently's Restaurant lo-
cated in Dunnellon.
There were also many
local businesses that gave
donations of items and
gift certificates to be used
for the silent auction and
raffle. Businesses grouped
according to location:


Beverly Hills: Swan-
der's Auto Mart and
Kristy's Salon.
Crystal River:
MezMerEyes, Aardvark's
Florida Kayak Co. Inc,
Glass Werk, Just A Cup-
cake!, Oyster's Restau-
rant, Highlander Cafe,
Burkes of Ireland, Down-
stairs Art Gallery and Hot
Heads "The Art of Hair"
Citrus Springs: Connolly's
Sod and Nursery and Cor-
rine's Hair and Nails.
Dunnellon: To Your
Health Spas, Richard
Schreff's Hometown Auto
Mart, The Blue Gator,
Scally's Lube and Go and
Pets Plus.
Inverness: The Masonic
Business Center, Accents by
Grace, Pet SuperMarket,
Tire Kingdom, Trendy Ex-
pressions II, Grooming by
Glenda, Deco Caf6, Com-
puter Solutions and The
Ice Cream Dr
Lecanto: Black Dia-
mond Ranch.
Please support our
sponsors. We at FOCCAS
appreciate all your dona-
tions. FOCCAS has been
around for over four years
helping the animals at
Citrus County Animal
Services. Our Mission is
to help the animals find
homes, get them trans-
ported to rescues and
provide medical care be-
yond the scope of shelter
medicine. We also have
volunteers at the shelter
helping care for the animals,
getting the dogs out of
their kennels and bathing
and socializing them.
Everyone at FOCCAS is


grateful to all of the local
businesses that rallied to
support our cause and
make this event a success!
Team FOCCAS

Tax-Aide has
successful season
AARP Foundation Tax-
Aide is the nation's largest
free, volunteer-run tax as-
sistance and preparation
service. It serves taxpay-
ers of all ages. You do not
have to be an AARP mem-
ber or be a senior to re-
ceive assistance. AARP
Tax-Aide has just con-
cluded another successful
season. In Citrus County
the program assisted over
7,700 Citrus County residents.
AARP counselors completed
over 4,300 tax returns.
These returns led to
over $3.6 million in tax re-
funds being issued. A por-
tion of these refunds were


due to credits that were
claimed on the taxpayers'
returns totaling $525,000.
Most of this money will be
spent in Citrus County
and will contribute to the
overall health of the
county's economy and the
wellbeing of its citizens.
AARP Tax-Aide would
like to thank all those who
made this possible. Firstly,
we would like to thank the
100-plus volunteers who
contributed over 10,000
volunteer hours. We
would also like to thank
our partners who assisted
us in providing our serv-
ices. The Citrus County
Chronicle provided us
with publicity to both ad-
vertise our services, but
also to recruit volunteers.
The Citrus County Li-
brary System provided us
with five sites at which to
prepare returns and
whose librarians pro-
vided us with outstanding
support. The Citrus
Springs Memorial Library
allowed us to use their fa-
cility and also provided
us with stellar support.
Diamond Self-Storage
provided us with a stor-
age facility for our equip-
ment and supplies. The
Crystal River Moose
Lodge provided us with a
tax preparation site, and
also hosted our training
programs throughout the
month of January The
United Way of Citrus
County provided us with
access to the 211 system
for scheduling appoint-
ments. They also pro-
vided the program with
internet connectivity at
the Moose Lodge and
publicity on their website.
Without our partners,
we would not have been
able to perform this valu-
able service.
For questions, please
contact Paul Abels, Dis-
trict Coordinator, Citrus
County- 352-746-6383
Karen Mondrall
Communications coordinator


U6 0 0 *[! t:A


- SA 0Sop
0-6' Tthe)

PsRideMe Sponsored by: Crystal Automotive
I ,,Citrus County Chronicle,
Sig o lne atCitrus 95.3, The Fox 967
www~rotalybikeridef I Werner & Company PA,
Mike Scott Plumbing, Nature Coast EMS &
ej;tH.,-n,-;r1; I--..f-,;; surgery PA


Bob
Patterson
Singer/Storyteller
Thursday, May 15
Limited seating.
Reservations encouraged.
Call: 352-341-6427


Publix Supermarket Charities
Wann & Mary Robinson
Smith's Optical Services
Jordan Engineering
David Rom State Farm Insurance
Clark & Wendy Stillwell
Accent Travel
Photography by Rebecca Pujals-Jones
Deco Cafe
To BENEFIT THE CiTRus CoUwHism TOCAL SOCIETY!


There's always


something to do


in Citrus eountyI


Starring Billy Lindsey
Friday, May 9 4
Central Ridge Community Center
77 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills
Members $5.00, Non-Members $8
Doors open at 6pm r Show starts at 7pm
Call 352-746-4882 or 352-465-7007 for info
BURGER PLATES AND DRINKS
WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE
C i>


CHRONICLE

STUDENT

S ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION
A night to recognize
outstanding student athletes

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM

Cost: $10

College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus
C "%iII ~,b [(.

Tickets available at either Citrus County Chronicle location:
1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd, Crystal River or 106 W Main St, Inverness
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


I


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Rays a diamond
in the rough
I am writing to encour-
age your support of the
Tampa Bay Rays.
My support of the Rays
began some 12 years ago
shortly after I moved from
Long Island as I listened
to a player interview fol-
lowing a game-winning
home run. What fasci-
nated me was not the
slugger's on-field heroics,
but his downtrodden
expression.
"It's difficult to play
here," he said. "No one
comes out to the
ballpark!"
Over the years as I've
learned more about the
Rays, I have been incredi-
bly impressed by this
franchise. Maybe it's
hearing a 10-year-old in-
troduce the hitters during
an inning or seeing the
kids run the bases follow-
ing a game. Perhaps it's
the community service
the players and manage-
ment give by feeding the
homeless and reading to
school children, to men-
tion just two examples.
Maybe it's the quality of
the players who honor the
game both on and off the
field.
Certainly it's the pro-
duction on the field! Do
you know that the Rays
have the second best
record in Major League
baseball over the past six
years? And that's with a
team budget significantly
lower than the Yankees,
Red Sox, Dodgers and
Phillies and nearly every
major league team.
While wins have ranked
incredibly high among
MLB, the same cannot be
said for attendance. Num-
bers appears a bit better
this year, yet attendance
at the ballpark remains
toward the bottom of all
teams. Some say it's the
distant location of the sta-
dium, but I doubt it. The
St. Louis Cardinals draw
fans from three and four
states. I think it's commit-
ment and a desire to have
an area MLB team.
My fear is that one morn-
ing we'll read Chronicle
headlines indicating that
the Rays have decided an-
other area of the country
(or Canada, where rumors
suggest Montreal in-
vestors are interested) is
better suited for MLB.
Let's not let that hap-
pen! Support the Rays by
listening to 104.3 FM
radio, watching Sun
Sports, or better yet, by
going to the Trop for a
ball game. It's fun, whole-
some and quite entertain-
ing. Be part of the
solution before it's too
late to solve the problem!
Go Rays!
Earle W. Pratt
Lecanto


EARLY w W--EARLY vontEVl^ r-r~AN
^^I LIKE MAVIO TH1 Plc'W~ms;^/stS
?nom... Ow I c mN I C6ICAN HE
,% TO2f1AU ELECTION OUT
NE ATVE IO W


Testimony of faith Seek the laymen


I would like to counter
the atheistic viewpoint of
L.M. Eastman with the
greatest Christian testi-
mony I have ever wit-
nessed or been a part of.
In the mid-1980s I worked
with a woman of the Catholic
faith who had a spirit of
joy, peace and happiness
that was not only undeni-
able but extremely infec-
tious. I personally have
never seen anything like
it before or since.
One day I asked her why
she was so happy This is
the story she related to me:
One day while driving her
car, she was in a horrible
accident She was clinically
dead for 30 to 45 minutes.
She was also paralyzed
from the neck down.
During this death or near-
death experience she en-
tered a place called Heaven
She saw a place that was
so incredible it was beyond
words. She also met a glo-
rious savior named Jesus,
and it was obvious that he
was the only way in. She was
surrounded by love, joy and
peace that was incredible.
Eventually the Lord sent
her back into her body, but
she was still paralyzed
from the neck down. She
went to a church service,
hands were laid on her,
prayers were made in Jesus'
name, and she got out of
her wheelchair praising
Jesus' name. She had
been completely healed.
This woman loved the
Lord like no one I have
ever met Her joy was un-
deniable. Her dedication
to God was undeniable.
So, L.M. Eastman, con-
tinue to walk down the road
you're on, but in my heart
I know that God has a bet-
ter way Hopefully you'll
find it or just maybe,
God will find you.
Brad L. Block
Homosassa


Bishop Robert Lynch
made the right decision
allowing the Pope John
Paul II School to continue
educating children. The
preliminary decision to
not do this was a mistake,
and I am sure there was
quite a backlash over it.
The bishop should follow
the example of the Protestant
denominations that enlist
the help and support of
laymen in making impor-
tant decisions like this
one. Otherwise, the un-
happiness generated over
closing schools, and
churches, for that matter,
is focused on the bishop
alone.
Times for the bishop
could have been less acri-
monious had not millions
of dollars been siphoned
from the church's treas-
ury by opportunistic
lawyers seeking liability
payments for the victims
of clergy child abuse.
Here, too, the bishop
needs help from laymen
(and women) in selecting
candidates for the priest-
hood. What a disgrace it is
to the thousands of dedi-
cated priests in the uni-
versal church who keep
the promises of celibacy
From personal experi-
ences in my 80 years in
the Catholic Church, I can
testify that I never met or
suspected a deviant
priest However, I did
know and associate with
some outstanding men in
the priesthood who did
their work, skillfully, for
the Lord.
Bishops can prevent fi-
nancial disasters, and of
course school closings, if
they will enlist the expert-
ise of trained laymen, and
women, in the selection of
priests for church leader-
ship responsibilities.
David A. Carey
Homosassa


Please don't take
my gift away
Please, fellow neigh-
bors, citizens who want to
repeal the Affordable
Care Act, don't take my
health care away I'm in
my late 40s and corporate
spousal coverage dropped
when my husband turned
65 a few years ago.
Humana and Blue
Cross Blue Shield denied
me private coverage, cit-
ing slightly high blood
pressure readings in the
self-paid physical for ap-
plication. I could reapply
after six months of nor-
mal readings.
Meanwhile I broke my
ankle ($22,000 out of
pocket) and have another
pre-existing condition
that will not be covered.
My job doesn't offer part-
timers coverage, but wait
- the ACA, a gift to the
masses -happened. It
answered many a prayer
made to the Great Gifter.
No pre-existing condi-
tions can be grounds for
rejection and the premi-
ums are lower than the
previous corporate pre-
mium. The signup delay is


mild compared to some
other government or com-
pany software glitches
I've experienced in my
life.
In the big picture of
bountiful blessings gifted
to this wonderful nation,
this gift to the masses is
only one coin compared
to the many coins of war,
political infighting, inter-
national dealings, etc.
I'm the masses, your
neighbor, a daughter, a
mother, a working citizen
contributing all my life to
the country I've even
given a son over to the
military, in which his was
5 years old when the war
started.
Please don't take my
health insurance gift
away and bury the coin in
the ground.
The Great Gifter may
one day ask, "So, what re-
turn did you make with
my gift to the masses?"
Let us not say, "Oh, I
saved it safely in the
ground. I didn't want to
waste it on those masses,
my Lord."
K.M. Lavorgna
Homosassa


Column cuts
to heart of
environmental
problems, fixes
Dear Gerry,
In honor of Earth Day,
I wanted to tell you how
sound your article read
regarding spring, and
that means it's time to
get cleaning. I thought
your far-reaching ideas
for saving our wonderful
nature coast was a great
"Mulligan stew" every
ingredient (solution)
added to producing the
best recipe to saving our
waterways. There is not
one answer but many,
and it is time to stop try-
ing to put Band-Aids on
our pollution control. So
many efforts are vital,
but to compete with
whose approach is bet-
ter, is just childish
politics.
Many folks have con-
tributed endless hours of
environmental protec-
tion; and all the bullets
you made to a sensible
approach of cleaning up
our rivers work together
to get to the root of the
problem. Our city has to
think green, our citizens
and residents have to
start practicing less
waste and the use of
harsh fertilizers. Addi-
tionally, the use of envi-
ronmental friendly
fertilizers needs to have
tax breaks money in-
centives to keep using;
perhaps lower cost
biodegradable ones can
find a place in our com-
munity People will say
they have a right to use
what they want, but we
have a stronger right to
save our waters, habitats
and wildlife. We need a
"Mulligan Stew Attitude
Adjustment." Thanks for
your great unbiased arti-
cle and for your wise
thoughts.
Earth Day should be
every day
Carolyn Crowley
volunteer, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission


p


i--I


i


"^ ...."_M ay 1_ lt _


Let your mother know how much she is loved and
appreciated on her special day with a personal
message from you in the Chronicle Classifieds.

S15.95 Includes 20 lines of copy or 10 lines of copy and a photo.

Call 563-5966
Deadline is Thursday, May 8th at 1:00pm


* Household Pest Control 0 Termites 0 Structural Fumigation 0 Lawn & Shrub Care
Grills 0 Fire Pits 0 Mosquito Misting Systems Installed 0 Pavers 0 Fireplace
Wall, Steps & Columns 0 Ponds & Water Features 0 Kitchens 0 Landscape
Holiday Lighting 0 Mowing & Weeding 0 Shrub & Tree Trimming 0 Irrigation
Come and see our do-it-yourselfstore for all of your professionalpest, fertilizer,
irrigation and pond needs. We sell professional products and always offer
free advice. Stop in and talk to one of our consultants.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 CS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Scott's bad rap
undeserved
Support Rick Scott for
governor of Florida.
Almost every day, I see
another article or a news
report about the bad
things Gov Scott has
done. As always, the ac-
count includes a message
about our governor being
the former CEO of a
health care company that
paid the largest fine ever
for Medicare fraud.
Never have I seen the ex-
planation that he was ter-
minated because he
wanted to fight the allega-
tions. Also, no mention is
made of the fact that the
alleged fraudulent activi-
ties were actually legal at
the time they were sub-
mitted.
The re-election of Gov
Scott should be a given,
in that he has no real op-
ponent. The "would-be"
Democrat opponent is
just a fantasy If the De-
mocrat party were to de-
cide that they might have
a viable candidate, Char-
lie Crist would surely
again become an Inde-
pendent or decide to be-
come a member of the
Progressive Party
When Gov Scott first
took office, he was not the
darling of any political
party However, he looked
at the situation he faced
and made some principled
decisions. Several of those
decisions upset some of the
great citizens of our state;
yet, he saw a need and
took the heat to follow
through with them. As a
result, Florida has moved
ahead (we don't "lean for-
ward"). Instead, we are
sailing along with major
improvements designed
to help all our residents.
With outstanding job
growth, not created by
government, but fostered
by a positive government,
we have one of the best
economic climates in the
country Also, employers
know that, unlike our
president's philosophy,
they will not be threat-
ened if they are success-
ful. This means that
employees also have a fu-


ture knowing that their
jobs will not likely be on
the line.
Many of the cuts that
were necessitated by the
revenue shortfall at the
time the governor took of-
fice have been restored
as a result of fiscal poli-
cies that replenished our
treasury Other areas
have seen funding re-
stored responsibly We
now have a balanced
budget with a restored
reserve.
Several federal items
were rejected because
they did not appear
sound or responsible.
Borrowing from a foreign
country or printing
worthless dollars by the
Federal Reserve to pass
on to unsuspecting recipi-
ents is not necessarily a
great thing. Both the pos-
sibility of not being able
to sustain the projects
after the funding ends
and the possibility of the
federal government
reneging on the funding
in the middle of the proj-
ect are real. Also, the
president would like
nothing better than to
make every Republican-
led state look bad.
While Gov Scott and
our state legislators are
not perfect in every way,
they are trying to make
our state a better place in
which to live. For the
good of all Florida resi-
dents, I can see no reason
to vote for anyone other
than Rick Scott for gover-
nor The other guy does
not even know that some-
one else is a candidate in
his primary I know he
felt the same way in his
last gubernatorial cam-
paign. He told me person-
ally that even though I
was running our local
campaign office that it
would be ethical for me
to openly support him
against his primary
opponent.
Vote for Rick Scott and
keep our state moving
ahead, not "leaning," as
the Democrats suggest.
Robert E. Hagaman
Homosassa


1nigjhts of Columblus
Council 6168

Annual

Fr. "Willie"

Memorial Golf Classic (>

May 17th-8:30 a.m. Shotgun start t
Seven Rivers Golf & Country Club
Entry fee $60
Fee includes coffee/donuts, green and
cart fees, lunch at the club and prizes.
Proceeds will be donated to the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County
Entries must be received by May 14th.


For information
call 746-7563


Ci0()Ni`NLE


Obama by
the numbers
A letter in the April 23
paper is an excellent ex-
ample of liberals not
backing up their argu-
ments with numbers.
The writer calls the GOP
to task for its criticism of
President Obama's use of
executive orders, pointing
out that he is slightly less
prolific in their use than
past GOP presidents. It's
not the number that's at
issue. It's the content, and
the assumption of powers
he doesn't have under the
constitution. You ask for
specifics. Meddling with
the emigration laws is a
good example, as is the
constant fiddling with
Obamacare. He can't
change laws passed by
Congress by royal decree.
The next issue the writer
raises is increasing the
national debt. The writer
compares presidents by
percentages and doesn't
actually use a number She
just says Ronald Reagan and
George W Bush doubled
the national debt Reagan
did more than double it; he
increased it 168 percent in
eight years. He increased
the national debt $1.656
trillion. Obama ran it up
almost that much every
year of his first four years
in office. By the time he
leaves office, he will have
run up the national debt


$12 trillion dollars. Taking
inflation into account,
Reagan's $1.656 trillion is
$3.312 trillion in 2014 dollars.
A proper comparison be-
tween eight years of Rea-
gan and a projected eight
years of Obama in gener-
alities is Obama increased
the national debt four
times as much as Reagan
measured in 2014 dollars.
Reagan played a major
role in destroying the USSR
and bringing to an end a
Cold War that had raged for
almost 50 years. So far all
Obama has to show for six
years is a decrease in me-
dian family income by $5,000
a year, millions more on food
stamps and welfare and a
law nobody wanted which
will cost millions of dollars
and thousands of jobs.
The GOP is not running
against Obama, but he is
the official leader of hun-
dreds of idiots in Congress
who have supported him.
He is the poster boy of their
accomplishments. It's them
we are running against, but
he's helpful to point out
where they have taken the
country They are abandon-
ing Obama like rats from a
sinking ship, but that won't
save them. In the meantime
we will block Obama at
every step as he continues
to try and remake America
into a socialist country
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa


I jI ICl )AII,
^w-,chranlellnili llneT. cm
l, ]l I .


Something
from nothing
I am wondering what L.M.
Eastman believes about the
existence of our universe.
If we start from the very
beginning of anything,
certain questions must be
answered. If something
exists now, did something
have to always exist? Or is
it possible nothing existed?
Apparently, science has
concluded in the beginning,
something happened. They
call it the Big Bang. But this
implies something existed
prior to the Big Bang. The
law of cause and effect
states for every effect there
must be a cause. The Big
Bang was an effect, so
there is a cause. But isn't
a cause something? It
surely is not nothing.
Because nothing is a no-
thing, it does not have any
power to create. Therefore,
if something exists now, then
something had to always
exist This something could
be anything from a partic-
ulate of energy to the Fly-
ing Spaghetti Monster; or
perhaps something else.
Marianne Parker
Homosassa


Negligence led
to victimization
The recent Chronicle
lead article on Gold Crest
Homes is a serious dis-
service to Florida and to
Citrus County
First, the Florida lien law
or something very similar
is normal and common in
many areas of the country
Subcontractors must be
protected. If the builder
does not pay, the home-
owner must pay The sim-
ple fact is that the Meisels
are victims of their own
negligence. They ignored
information on the lien law,
even though a statement
on the lien law was prop-
erly included in the con-
tract and in each official
notice of commencement.
They chose not to have
an attorney review their
contract and advise them
on the lien law To save on
interest, they chose not to
use a bank. The low inter-
est rate on progress pay-
ments at that time would
have been minor compared
to their ability to pay out
$450,000 cash on the con-
tract. They chose not to
require the usual evidence
of completed payment to
every subcontractor before
paying out more money
They chose to manage this
major project from a remote
location instead of hiring
a local representative such
as a bank or an attorney
While the Chronicle ar-
ticle does explain proper
procedures in the contin-
uation page, the damage was
done in the quotes: "The
laws in Florida suck," and
"It's certainly not a con-
sumer-friendly state." The
law was not at fault; there
are no laws that can protect
a foolish or negligent con-
sumer Neither Florida
nor Citrus County nor the
lien law is at fault in any
way whatsoever
Ken Clark
Beverly Hills


May 9
Citrus County Parks & Rec
Music at the Museum:
Elvis starring Billy Lindsey
Central Ridge Community Center
Doors open at 6PM, Show starts at 7PM
Members $5, Non-Members $8
Contact Phone: 352-465-7007

May 10 7:00 AM
United Way of Citrus County
2014 KidsTriathlon Whispering Pines Park
Entrance Fee: $25 before April 14, $30
Contact Phone:637-2475I

i May 10 7:30 AM
SRotary of Central Citrus Let's Ride for the YMCA
Lake Hernando Park Entrance Fee: $35
Contact Phone: 860-906-8234

May 15
S Citrus County Historical Society
Music at the Museum:
Florida Singer/Storyteller Bob Patterson
Organization Contact Person: Jim Davis
Old Courthouse Museum Inverness
Doors open at 6:15PM; Music starts promptly at 7PM
Contact Phone:341-6427

May 16
Citrus County Chronicle
Chronicle Student Athletic Recognitions

j College of Central Florida
Entrance Fee: $10 Contact Phone: 563-3226

May 16
City of Inverness
Doo Wop Downtown Inverness
Contact Phone: 352-726-2611

i May 17 9:00 AM 1:00 PM
Citrus County Sheriff's Department
Blown Away ~ 21st Annual Hurricane
and All Hazards Expo
Crystal River Mall Contact Phone 341-7460

May 17 Shotgun start 8:30AM
Knights of Columbus #6168
Fr. "Willie" Classic Golf Memorial
Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club
Entrance Fee: $60pp
Contact Phone: 746-7563

May 17 8:30 AM
Rotary Club of Inverness
Annual Charity Golf Tournament
Inverness Golf & Country Club
Entrance Fee: $50 per player
Contact Phone: 726-7517


Rotary Club of Inverness

ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT

Saturday, May 17, 2014
8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start
Inverness Golf & Country Club

For information call
302-0469

Download i
Entry Form at:
www.invernessflrotary.org

OOOHJM6


ItFus Oral &
axillofacial Surgery, PA
hIRMltet LWiO IlMDE, E itn




V4"-m



CITRUO COUNTY
KIDI TRIATHLON
May 10, 2014 Inverness, Florida
Whispering Pines Park


3
Exciting
Divisions

Junior
Age 5- 10

Senior
Age 11 15

Tri4Fun
All Ages


Entry Fees
Before April 14th: $25
After April 15th May 7th: $30


For info go to www.CitrusKidsTri.com or contact
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475 or email: info@drcsports.com

..... j o__


C6 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


COMMENTARY









B USIN SCT4,Y
BUSINESS
CITRUIS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce
Williams


SMART
MONEY


Thank you for








Kicking the habit may improve job prospects



Kicking the habit may improve job prospects


If you've visited our career center in
Lecanto recently, you may have no-
ticed something that at first glance
seems a tad incongruous: we'd like to
help you kick the habit.
Doing so, we know, not only has
proven health and financial benefits,
but as more and more businesses be-
come tobacco free, it may improve job
prospects as well.
That's why on April 28, CareerSource
Citrus Levy Marion, the Florida Depart-
ment of Economic Opportunity and Ca-
reerSource Florida teamed up with the
Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida to as-
sist job seekers interested in giving up
cigarettes, cigars, pipes and/or any
other smoke-free tobacco products.
When you meet with a placement spe-
cialist at one of our centers, you'll have
the opportunity to gain access to cessa-
tion services online, by phone or in per-
son as well as receive counseling
sessions and self-help materials and
free nicotine replacement therapy
For years, we've been used to smoke-
free government offices, schools, and
businesses. More recently, companies
have begun banning smoking and in-
deed tobacco use anywhere on their
property There are even businesses
that require employees to be tobacco
free on and off the clock and some re-
quire new hires to be tobacco free
months prior to their employment.
The American Lung Association of-
fers compelling reasons why employers
- including, I might add, CareerSource


Laura
Byrnies

WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


Citrus Levy Marion are moving in
this direction. Among the reasons: a to-
bacco-free environment helps create a
safer, healthier workplace; direct health
care costs to the company are reduced;
employees may be less likely to miss
work due to tobacco-related illnesses;
and it may be possible to get lower
rates on health, life, and disability in-
surance coverage as fewer employees
use tobacco.
Moreover, federal law allows for nico-
tine-free hiring because tobacco users
are not recognized as a protected class.
So if you smoke or use other tobacco
products and you're looking for employ-
ment you have to ask if, in today's tight
labor market, you can really afford to
take any viable job options off the table.
Let's acknowledge right away that if
you have been out of work for a while,
chances are you are already stressed
out. We understand that quitting any-
thing at this time is not the easiest thing


to do; it may not even be something you
want to do. Believe me, I've been there.
If you need some inspiration to move
from thinking "I should quit" to "I must
quit," you might want to consider how
much the habit costs. In 2013, a pack of
Marlboro Reds cost about $6 in Florida,
the 28th most expensive state. In five
years, you'd spend enough to go on a
14-day European vacation for two plus
have a brand new 55-inch LED 3-D TV
plus get a fancy iPad tablet and still
have a nice chunk of change left over
Of course, the health benefits are
what're really priceless, among them:
10 years after quitting, your risk of dying
from lung cancer is about half that of a
smoker and risk of heart disease is that
of a person who never smoked.
Participation in the Tobacco Free
Florida program is completely volun-
tary If you use tobacco and are not in-
terested in quitting, we'll still happily
provide employment services, we'll
just steer you clear of tobacco free
workplaces.
If you're ready to get started, stop by
our career center at 863 S. Adolph Point
in Lecanto, give us a call at 352-249-3278
or visit www.TobaccoFreeFlorida.com.
Laura Byrnes, APR, is a Florida Certi-
fied Workforce Professional and com-
munications manager at CareerSource
Citrus Levy Marion, formerly Workforce
Connection. Please contact her at (352)
291-9559 or (800) 434-5627, ext 1234 or
lbyrnes@careersourceclm. com.


Drones, cufflinks: Q&A with Etsy's CEO


Associated Press
NEW YORK-There's a
lot to browse on Etsy Check
out the $2.50 earrings made
from the feathers of a "quail
raised with love" on a Col-
orado farm. Or take a look at
the $30,000 pub-style bar
made to order from pine and
cherry
Unique products such as
these are the reason Etsy
CEO Chad Dickerson calls
the online marketplace "a
personal shopping experi-
ence really in a sea of
impersonal retail."
Founded in 2005, the
Brooklyn-based company is
housed in the former home of
the Robert Gair Co., named
after the 19th-century inven-
tor of corrugated cardboard.
The 500-employee startup
has been profitable since
2009. Etsy doesn't disclose its
revenue figures, but Dicker-


son says the company is
growing. Its vendors sold
$1.35 billion worth of goods in
2013, up 51 percent from a
year earlier
Recently, the company an-
nounced a pricing policy for
its wholesale market which
allows its artists and craft
makers to sell directly to re-
tailers ranging from Nord-
strom and West Elm to the
Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
Etsy takes a 3.5 percent fee
for wholesale purchase or-
ders, the same as its regular
transaction rates.
Dickerson talked to the As-
sociated Press about Etsy,
comparisons to eBay and its
prospects for an initial public
offering.
The conversation has been
edited and condensed.
Question: Is there a typical
Etsy seller, and has that
changed over time?
Answer: There's no one-


size fits all for Etsy sellers.
There are sellers in 200 coun-
tries around the world so it's
very geographically diverse.
We have everyone from col-
lege students to retirees. The
one thing that we do hear is
that Etsy sellers really enjoy
Etsy because it gives them
flexibility to work in their
own terms.
There's a woman who sells
in Rockford, Illinois, named
Amy Michalek. Amy was like
many, starting a family She
started doing this as a way to
make money while she was
taking care of her daughter
One of the things they make
are neckties for babies,
they're really cute. She
started doing so well that she
needed help. So she taught
her husband how to sew And
her husband quit his job and
now he makes more money
than he made working at
Auto Zone and they're both at


home taking of their baby
Q: When are you looking to
do an initial public offering?
A: An IPO is a possible out-
come for Etsy We don't have
any plans in the next year
We're focused on building a
company We do want to stay
independent. We think it's re-
ally important to continue to
serve our community and we
think independence really
matters. We're not the tradi-
tional Silicon Valley type of
company where we just have
this bloodthirst to go public,
but it's definitely a possible
outcome.
Q: Can you talk about the
parallels with eBay?
A: We see ourselves as very
different from eBay, and of
course, people compare Etsy
to eBay, but if you look at the
type of goods sold on Etsy
versus eBay On eBay you'll
See .Page D2


Enough for


two wives,


even three

EAR BRUCE: My husband
was married 10 years ago to
his first wife. She is collect-
ing disability benefits on his Social
Security although she married
after they were divorced. Will this
affect me in any way as his present
wife?
EK., via email
DEAR EK.: The fact that your
husband's first wife is collecting
will in no way impair your ability
to collect from Social Security As-
suming you meet the other criteria
that are applied to the specific
program, you are home free. In
other words, even after 10 years di-
vorced, you can collect, the first
wife can collect, and possibly a
third could collect, should that per-
son meet the criteria that applies.
DEAR BRUCE: I am 49 years
old, married, with four children. I
would have had my house paid off,
but the money I put away for col-
lege didn't grow, so I used a home
equity loan and then refinanced at
3.1 percent for 15 years.
Because my house would have
been paid off, half of my life insur-
ance is expiring, and so I am shop-
ping for life insurance. I am
thinking $300,000 term life for me
and $200,000 for my wife.
Our house is worth $230,000
(mortgage payment is $961), and
the balance of the mortgage is
$121,000. We have a car payment of
$200 a month for three more years
($7,300 balance), and we owe
$20,000 on no-interest credit cards
(14 more months). The $20,000 was
on a home equity line of credit, but
I had it transferred to save interest
and protect me in case rates go up.
I also owe $7,000 on my home eq-
uity line.
We have $30,000 in accounts that
I can pull money out of with one
week's notice with no penalties.
We also have $50,000 in Roth IRA
accounts. We have $150,000 in our
401(k) and $354,000 in a lump-sum
pension fund (my wife would get it
in full if I die), which I can't touch
now Also, I have monthly pension
benefits that are calculated at
$1,485 a month, but the monthly
payout will probably be close to
$3,000 when I get to retirement age
of 57.
I have been paying into Social
Security since I was 17. I make
$96,000 and my wife makes $25,000
with her own business, while being
a super mom and wife to me on the
side.
I am leaning toward term life,
but am unsure of whether to go for
20 or 30 years, and I am unsure on
the amount Can you help me with
these two factors? Right now I
have $300,000 with $100,000 run-
ning out and $200,000 on my wife
with $100,000 running out.
K.K., via email
DEAR K.K: I appreciate your
lengthy letter, but cutting to the
chase: With all the different ex-
penses you have, it would seem to
me that you would be better ad-
vised to kick up your $200,000 to
$400,000 because you are the pri-
mary breadwinner For your wife,
who has less income, perhaps
$125,000 in term insurance. Argu-
ments can be made for a few dol-
lars in one direction or another,
but $400,000 on you and $125,000
on your wife, I think, would be ade-
quate.
Whether you want to go 20 or 30
years is another question. I would
consider the 30 years because that
will take you into your 80s and you
will clearly be more prone to natu-
ral death at that point.
DEAR BRUCE: I don't believe
all these celebrities who are push-
ing reverse mortgages. One large
brokerage house advises that they
are currently the biggest scam
going. Please give the public your
take.
In July, I sold a house and took
back the mortgage. My husband
and I have great income from re-
tirements, Social Security, VA,
See Page D2




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'R.U. Ready' to start that new business?


If you are contemplating
starting or buying a busi-
ness, ask yourself, "R.U.
Ready?" SCORE can help you
answer and understand the im-
portance of that basic question.
There are two equally impor-
tant areas of the "R.U. Ready?"
question. Both are concerned
with what you may bring to the
challenge of ownership. Your
personal motivation is first. Ask
yourself, "Why do I want to do
this?" Second is your skills and
work experience. It's what you
have to offer and what the pub-
lic is willing to pay for that has
value.
Both parts of the question
must be honestly answered if
you are to succeed in business.

Personal motivation
Examining one's personal
motivation for owning a business
requires a level of honesty that is
best shared with a trained men-




ETSY
Continued from Page Dl

find iPads, electronics, all
sorts of things like that. Etsy is
really a marketplace for mak-
ers and curators. A curator
refers to our vintage category,
which means anything that's
20 years old or older.
Q: What's most difficult
about running the company?
A: On a tactical level, we're
a company that depends heav-
ily on technology, so we always
have to have the talent we
need to continue to build serv-
ices on Etsy So just continuing
to build the talent, whether
it's engineering or marketing,
or finance or anything is super


Dr
Frederick
Herzog,
PhD




tor Our personalities have mech-
anisms that often delude under-
standing of reality. We might be
saying to ourselves, "When I own
a business I can have a luxury
car, bigger home, vacations, etc."
All of the foregoing is possible;
however, you must factor in the
financial risk, personal sacrifice
and years of preparation and
hard work. A certified SCORE
mentor will help with this aspect
of business ownership. The point
here is to be realistic about a
business venture.



challenging, h
We are (also) doing business h
in a different way, so I spend a Y
lot of time trying to break o
through conventional wisdom t:
about business. There's a o
dated view of business out e
there that's from the robber b
barons of the 1800s, and we're i:
in a world now where the In- s
ternet business can be really f
successful but also be really p
fair and support a community
Q: What's it like to attract t:
engineers to New York? How g
do you feel about the crop of I
engineers you have here and n
are you able to recruit people f
here pretty easily? u
A: I'll never forget when I u
joined in 2008, I talked to a i:
(chief technology officer) of a Y
major Internet company, who s


Experience
In today's complex economy,
a person's work experience
plays heavily into the mix of
what it takes to be successful.
Gone forever is the opportunity
to know just one thing well
and have people standing in
line to benefit from your single
skill.
Today business success re-
quires a blend of two or more
areas of expertise. A good ex-
ample is found in the informa-
tion technology industry:
Someone who writes code has a
highly valuable skill. So does
the website developer Profi-
ciency in both areas is a win-
ning combination. Know what
you bring to the marketplace
that will attract customers.
The marketplace
In the business world, one ei-
ther offers a service or a prod-
uct to the market. People will



iad just left that company and c(
ie came to visit me in New al
York. And we were facing a lot
of technology problems at the E
ime and he told me in the fall
of 2008, 'I don't think you're w
ver going to be able to m
build a good engineering team ci
n New York.' And to give ol
ome context, this is when the re
financial collapse was hap-
pening. w
What I found though, was y(
hat New York is easily the ci
greatest city in the world. And
nany engineers, many tech- o0
nology folks, many design ai
folks don't want to live in sub- ir
urbs. They want to live in h;
urban areas. They want to live m
n cities. So in that sense New di
York is more attractive than, a(
ay, Cupertino, California. Sili- m


buy depending on their percep-
tion of its value to them. Com-
petitors will impact their
buying decisions. Determine in
advance if you will have compe-
tition. Is what you offer better
than the competition? What
will cause them to buy from
you? Is it price, quality or
maybe an option competition
doesn't have? In the market-
place, all businesses are tested
by the consuming public.

Fnmding the business
The lifeblood of any business
is the flow of money Money to
start up the business and sus-
tain it for a minimum of usually
two years is normal. Within a
certain period of time, sales of
service and product must sup-
port the ongoing cost of doing
business. It also must generate
a profit. Cash flow must be able
to keep things going. Paying
your employees and vendors is



on Valley is great but it's re-
.ly very narrow in its focus.
Q: What have you bought on
tsy recently?
A: I bought the belt that I'm
hearing right now I bought
.y computer bag. I bought
ifflinks...two sets. One was
.d Subway tokens, which is
really cool.
The other one was a seller
ho takes vintage maps and
ou send her the name of the
ties that you want.
She cuts out the little piece
fthe city. So I have Berkeley
ind Brooklyn because I lived
i Berkeley and Brooklyn. We
ave an artist on Etsy who
rakes drones. So I bought a
rone on Etsy but it's not an
actually a working drone. It's
[ore of an art piece.


crucial. When money is needed
for growth, expansion and new
market demands, a source of
credit will be required. The
business owner must think and
plan ahead for expected and
unexpected challenges in order
to keep growing. Personal toler-
ance for acceptable risk and
normal business pressures
must be employed. Plan ahead
- come to SCORE.
Call 352-249-1236 for an ap-
pointment. Normal office hours
are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday If call-
ing during non-office hours,
leave enough contact informa-
tion so we can call you back.

Dr Frederick JHerzog, PhD
is the Immediate Past Presi-
dent of Citrus SCORE. He can
be reached via email: fher-
zog@tampabay.rrcom or call
847-899-9000.




BUSINESS DIGEST
Submit information via email
to newsdesk @chronicle
online.com or fax to 352-563-
3280, attn: Business Digest.
The Chronicle reserves the
right to edit notices.
High-resolution photos will
be considered for publica-
tion. Images taken with
most cellphone cameras
do not reproduce well.
Publication on a specific
date or in color cannot be
guaranteed.
Submissions about specific
prices of products or sales
events are considered adver-
tising and are not eligible
for Business Digest.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

dividends and interest I don't want a reverse mortgage
for us.
-J.B., via email
DEARJ.B.: No question about it, they are not for every-
one. But I don't understand why you are so opposed to re-
verse mortgages. You mentioned you have a great income
from retirements, and there is no reason for you to get a
reverse mortgage. But on the other hand, someone may
have a reasonably expensive home (possibly fully paid
for) and yet be short of daily operating cash.
A reverse mortgage is particularly suited for some-
one along in years. As you must understand, the older
you are, the more money you can pull out of your
home and still retain complete ownership. It may very
well be a solution for those individuals.
Yes, it can cost a little more than a conventional
mortgage, but there is never a payment until the last
person with the mortgage moves out of the house, as
long as the taxes and insurance are paid in a current
fashion. This can make life immeasurably more com-
fortable for people who have that particular need.
DEAR BRUCE: Is there a home financing option for
potential buyers with good incomes, but no money in
savings and a poor credit score?
-H.L., via email
DEAR H.L.: Yes, there are some home financing op-
tions for people with good incomes, poor credit scores
and no savings, but they are few and far between, and
they are generally going to be more costly In other
words, with a weak credit score and no savings, good
use of the income has to be questioned.
Why does someone with a good income have no sav-
ings and a poor credit score? The answer has to be
poor habits and bad decisions. It may be better to ask
what you can do to improve your poor credit score and
create savings.

Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams.com. Ques-
tions ofgeneral interest will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the volume ofmail, personal
replies cannot be provided.





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SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


(humber connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Chamber
events
For more information on events, visit
CitrusCountyChamber.com/events/,
CitrusCountyChamber. corn/mobile/
or call 352-795-3149.
May 7 Ribbon-cutting for the League
of Women Voters, 4:30 p.m., Chamber
Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River.
May 8 Mixer hosted by Citrus Busi-
ness Network, 5 to 7 p.m., Twisted
Oaks Golf Course, 4801 N. Forest
Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills.
May 9 Chamber Luncheon spon-
sored by HPH Hospice, 11:30 a.m. to
1 p.m., Old Courthouse, 1 Courthouse
Square, Inverness. Italian buffet pro-
vided by Joe's Deli and Catering.
Speaker TBD. Tickets available online;
$18 in advance for members. Reserva-
tions and prepayment due by May 7.
May 12 Ribbon-cutting for Claw-
daddy's, 4:30 p.m. 1601 S.E. Eighth
Ave., Crystal River.
May 13 Ribbon-cutting for Cayla's
Coats, 4:30 p.m., Chamber Office,
28 NW U.S. 19, Crystal River.
May 15 Mixer hosted by Nick
Nicholas Ford, 5 to 7 p.m. 2901
E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.
May 19 Ribbon-cutting for Morgan
Stanley Cindy Van Heyde, 4:30 p.m.,
Chamber Office, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
May 21 Ribbon-cutting for Wollinka
Wikle Title Insurance Agency, 5 to 7 p.m.,
7076 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Celebration to follow ribbon-cutting.
May 22 Mixer hosted by Suncoast
Credit Union, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,
2367 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness.

Community
events
May 8 Fox Den Winery presents FOX
Idol singing competition, starts at 6 p.m.,
Fox Den Winery & Cellar at 109 W. Main
Street, Inverness. Pick up an application
form or call 352-341-0305 after 3 p.m.
May 10 Westend Health Fair hosted
by the DAV of Crystal River, 10 a.m. Free
events at the Crystal River Mall to fea-
ture education, screenings and healthy
living consultations. Interested vendors
call Duane Godfrey at 352-228-0337.
May 10 The Rotary Club of Central
Citrus presents Let's Ride for the Y,
Lake Hernando Park. This 62-mile ride
will have times starting at 7:30 a.m.
$35 entry fee. Call 352-637-0132 or
visit rotarybikerideforthey.com.
May 10 United Way Kids Triathlon at
Whispering Pines Park, 12 to 4 p.m.,
1700 Forest Drive, Inverness. Presented
by DRC Sports in support of the United
Way. For information call 352-637-2475.
May 14- Florida Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater invites you to participate in
"Operation SAFE., Be Scam Smart," a
free workshop. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
at the Master the Possibilities Center
for Lifelong Learning, 8415 S.W. 80 Street,
Ocala. Register at myfloridacfo.com/
SAFE/registration.asp.
May 17 Casino Night fundraiser
presented by Cayla's Coats will feature
gaming tables, cash bar, silent auc-
tion, heavy appetizers, desserts and
dancing. Tickets are $35. For more in-
formation, call 352-316-6409 or visit
www.facebook.com/CaylasCoats.
May 20 Lifesouth Blood Drive, Triple
A Roofing, 1000 N.E. Fifth Street, Crystal
River. Receive $10 Publix gift card
from Triple A Roofing for donation.
More information, call 352-634-2562.


Citrus' top students get


nod at Scholar Awards


Sponsors


Rotary Clubs
of Citrus County
Inverness Walmart
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office
Citrus Memorial Health
System
Mike Bays State Farm
Hitters Hall of Fame
Museum
Nick Nicholas Ford
Grant and Dozier Law
Firm
Citrus County Chronicle


Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce
College of Central Florida
Citrus County Education
Foundation
The Law Office of
Deutschman & Zakaria
B& WRexall
Sandy Balfour
Ginger Bryant
Pat Deutschman
Tom Kennedy
Linda Powers


The Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, the Rotary Clubs of
Citrus County and the Citrus
County Chronicle held the
2014 Golden Citrus Scholar Awards.
This award ceremony recognizes out-
standing Citrus County high school sen-
iors for scholarship based on academic
achievement, personal accomplishment,
personal accomplishment and service to
their school and community.
We congratulate all the 2014 nomi-
nees and awardees. Citrus High
School's Abigale Mattingly was recog-
nized as the 2014 Hall of Fame winner.


Wollinka Wikle Title
Insurance Agency is
pleased to say that Tracy Kjos
and our Inverness office have
achieved great success in
our first year expanding
into the Inverness area.
Tracy came to us with
experience in the field of real
estate, having been a licensed
agent, an office coordinator
for a local real estate office and
a resident of the area since
early childhood. As a title agent
and with her past experience,
Tracy has seen real estate from
all sides. Her upbeat person-
ality, eye for detail and ex-
perience are assets to Wollinka
Wikle and the agents and
clients she works with.
Since our inception in
1993, our commitment has


Been to pro-
vide the best
service pos-
S sible. Our
goal is to
provide
TRC prompt,
TRACY KJOS courteous
and knowledgeable service
to our customers and clients.
Wollinka Wikle offers two
Citrus County locations, In-
verness and Crystal River,
in addition to offices in
Pasco, Hernando, Hillsbor-
ough and Pinellas counties.
You can reach Tracy at 352-
341-2500 or email Tracy@
Wollinka-Wikletitle.com.
Visit our website Wollinka-
WikleTitle.com and "like"
us on Facebook at
facebook.com/WWTIACR.


w %m Wm 0EM E 0mmm
to board of
directors


Suncoast Plumbing &
Electric's Todd Work-
man is the newest ad-
dition to the Chamber's
board of directors. Todd
can be reached at
352-628-6608 or via
suncoastplumber.com.


Plantation

welcomes

executive

chef
The Plantation on
Crystal River recently
named David Bolafios as
executive chef of the 196-
room resort. Chef Bolafios
will direct daily culinary

at the re-
^*^^*^Boperations

sort's sig-
nature
West 82
Bar &
Grill and
outlets,
DAVID and over-
BOLANOS see food
and beverage offerings for
the Plantation's 12,000
square feet of function
space for meetings, cor-
porate parties, local
catering events and spe-
cial occasions.
"Chef Bolafios' knowl-
edge of French classic
cooking, with his flair for
creative Floribbean
recipes, will build on our
longstanding tradition of
providing guests with the
highest-quality culinary
offerings," said Plantation
on Crystal River General
Manager Andrew Bartlett.
Prior to joining the
Plantation, Bolafios
worked as executive chef
of S.W. Grill and Sunset
Harbor Yacht Club in
Daytona Beach, where he
opened the restaurant and
oversaw banquets and
restaurant operations.
With more than 30 years
in the industry, Chef Bo-
lafios also honed his craft
as executive chef and
banquet chef at a number
of other hotel properties,
including Four Points by
Sheraton Hotel and
Sheraton Orlando Air-
port in Orlando.
Chef Bolafios earned
his advanced degree in
culinary arts and French
cooking from Vinton's
Hotel and Restaurant
School in Coral Gables,
Florida, and holds a
number of other certifi-
cations, including busi-
ness management, food
service management, and
Hazard Analysis & Critical
Control Points training.
A native of Blue Fields,
Nicaragua, Bolafios now
resides in Crystal River.
For more information on
Plantation on Crystal River,
visit Plantationon
CrystalRiver.com or call
800oo-632-6262.


HPH Hospice
2939 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Lecanto 352-527-46oo00 hph-hospice.org


In ^f^BH

^.. 4 d^B^H ^IH^l^


: Chamber Ambassadors Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control;
Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Jim Ferrara, Insight Credit Union;
Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Bill Hudson, Land Title
of Citrus County; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Jeanne Green, associate member; David Heinz, Heinz
Funeral Home; Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives & Computers; Lisa Nash, FDS Disposal; Chamber CEO and
President Josh Wooten; and County Commissioner Rebecca Bays welcome Hospice leadership, staff and
volunteers to their new location.


Reel Burns Charters
Capt. Rick Burns o352-201-6111 o reelburns2ool@yahoo.com


Chamber Ambassadors George Bendtsen, Insurance
by George; Kelley Paul, Wollinka Wikle Title Insurance; Bill Hudson,
Land Title of Citrus County; David Heinz, Heinz Funeral Home; Jennifer
Duca, Comfort Keepers; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; and Dennis
Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control, welcome Rick Burns to the Chamber.


Wollinka Wilde Title Chamber
welcomes
Insurance Agency expands Todd
Wnrkman




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Crystal Chevrolet earns third consecutive

Chevrolet "Mark Of Excellence" Award


For the Chronicle
Crystal Chevrolet has been
awarded the Chevrolet "Mark of
Excellence" Award three years in a
row It is the only dealer on the Na-
ture Coast to reach the milestone.
The "Mark of Excellence" award
is presented each year to the high-
est performing Chevrolet fealers
across the country Crystal Chevro-
let has been growing, while meet-
ing or exceeding all sales, service
and customer satisfaction objec-
tives in each of the past three
years. Very few Chevrolet dealers
across the country have grown
their sales each year, while also
being among the nation's highest in
customer satisfaction. Crystal pro-
vides a true "world class" sales and
service experience right here on
the Nature Coast.
Steve Lamb, owner, thanked
Chevrolet for the recognition and
award, but gave credit to his team
and loyal customers for making the
award possible.
"You must have team members
that put the customer first in order
to receive this award three in a
row," Lamb said. "We want to be
the 'trusted expert' and will always
put the customer first at Crystal
Chevrolet"


Stephen E. Lasko/for the Chronicle
Crystal Chevrolet General Service Manager Bo Strickland, left, and owners
Jewel and Steve Lamb receive the General Motors Mark of Excellence
award for an unprecedented third year running Wednesday from Chevrolet
District Sales Manager John Genesevich. Genesevich said that "this award
is the highest award given by GM and is based on customer satisfaction in
sales, service and production."


Eurozone jobless

down again in March
Associated Press
LONDON Further evidence emerged Friday
to show that unemployment across the 18-country
eurozone is falling on a consistent basis and that
the region's recovery is on a sounder footing.
Eurostat, the EU's statistics office, said unem-
ployment across the eurozone fell to 18.91 million
in March from 18.94 million the month before.
Though not a dramatic fall, it is a further im-
provement from last April's peak of 19.24 million.
The unemployment rate, however, was un-
changed at 11.8 percent for the third month running
following downward revisions to previous data
largely due to Spanish census data. Again, as in the
number of unemployed, the rate is down on the eu-
rozone's record, reached in 2013, of 12 percent
Timo del Carpio, European economist at RBC
Capital Markets, said the figures "lend more
weight to the view that unemployment in the euro
area peaked late last year, which will offer some
degree of reassurance to policymakers that the
recovery is slowly gaining traction."
Most economists expect unemployment to carry
on falling, albeit modestly, over the months ahead
as the economic recovery gathers pace.
Figures later this month are set to confirm that
the eurozone grew in the first three months of the
year, for the third quarter running.
A number of surveys have indicated that the
pace of growth may double from the 0.2 percent
quarter-on-quarter rate recorded in the last three
months of 2013. One of the main reasons behind
the pick-up is that the financial stresses have
eased in a number of the more indebted coun-
tries, such as Greece and Spain, following years
of spending cuts and tax increases.


1 24 H*OI:JIGC 1 2 u1
EiREj! L I Off Any

FREEE'Ii~rE ~I Service Call I
jL NewCustomers Only
: PLLIlIBING 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
IM SERVICES 352-860-1973
L T _State Certified Master PlumberCFC 1427798



1 Able Locksmith
24 Hours 7 Days A Week
Commercial I
.l^i Automotive N
Residential
High Security Laser Automotive Keys
(352) 560-3178 "
....3uo www. 1lAbleLockSmith.com

OL MAI NTE A


CitFUs.
POOL SERVICE
A VIVO Company
Call NOW for your FREE
No Obligation Estimate
(352) 637-6161
Celebrating 30 Years Since 1984


Full Pool Drain,
Cleanse and Fill
Turning Green
Pools Blue Again
Starting at $225
F ULL SERVICE
& REPAIR,
".',*,\ **<


W 0INDWCENI

Dirty Windows?
Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning
Window Tinting Free Estimates!


15.0 3.8

352.503.8465


WINDOW
GENIE.,
We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
BONDED & INSURED
www.windowgenie.com


Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Qualify Specialist
I I


628-5700
newair.biz
Exclusive
SOIQAir' L#CC1815891
Allairind D I r


Summer Tune $4 95
Up Special 49139
Guaranteeing lOx Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusive Laser Particle Scan
to determine the quality of the air you
breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS
THIS SERVICE!
Expires May 31, 2014


IWINOIWS


" .H l y s en mi i e I yorol, 9,tnit!


r- C ll I
1 -5 6-6m-
Dr. VeM
1854RVS


INC.
WHERE QUALITY AND VALUE COME TOGETHER
685 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (1 Mile West of Lowe's on Hwy. 44) Lecanto
34 f1l-0 1 VIS MON.FRI8305
1IU SAT -94
LICENSED -.Iih elsg-- c EVENINGS BY
& INSURED WWW.MiCBaIsIIUFoorcovsringInc.nIIAPPOINTMENT


SerVIceMASTER Our Services: Carpet Protector
Tle Floor Cleaning Pet Odor
24 7'365 Restore Removal Oriental Rugs
EMERGENCY SERVICE Spot Removal

3 ROOMS& $1995: UPHOLSTERY SPECIAL
iHALIAT ~CHAIR OR
1 HALLWAY : FREE RECLINERCLEANED
: F RE (with purchase of a
Fi Expires 5/31/14 I Expires 5/31/14 couch & loveseat)
352-794-0270 "E,
cR-C057844 www.smcflorida.com M


SHADY VIEW CANVAS
6828 S. Shady View Pt. Floral City
Awnings -* Boat Covers
Carports Marine Upholstery
Repairs Boat Tops


(352) 613-2518
Richard Rudman


IBUDD EXERVRTINGI


* Tree Work
* Trim/Removal
* Clearing
Lamar Budd, O t
owner /


Site Prep
Bush Hogging
Demolition
Debris Removal
Rock Driveways

352-400-1442


HOME PAINTING


* McKenzie

rPainting
S& Pressure Cleaning


- I


Interior Exterior Driveway Stainu]
0. ALL PHASES OF PAINTING
352-400-1404 T



oGqFFA/ W



RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
COMPLETE YEAR ROUND SERVICE I
Mowing Trimming Edging Mulch Fertilization
SSERVING CITRUS COUNTY SINCE 1995 352-503-7063

0 ; Nj3 JIA 13

.R. NI 100OFiF$25 OFF:
IRIN n uerSyte SERVICEE CALL
ZAPPER L P53114 New Customers Only- _J
:.+ It's Chemical Free Visitour
4.' it removes rotten egg Showroomin
smell and discoloration DowntownInverness
SIt removes Iron, 102 W. Main St.
Hydrogen Sulfide Downtown
and Manganese 352-726-7300 Inverness
I I 9, I


For information on
how your business can
advertise on the
Chronicle Website call
563-5592
KOn n I


I


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


BUSINESS


1I


I


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIEDS


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


0
10ax 35) 06-56 1TolFre. (88 52240 1 m il*lasii0scro .0enln 0m ebi0:ww hrn 0lonie 0o


YOU'LL mTHIS
Remember...
Mother's Day
is
Sunday
May Ith!


Let your mother
know how much
she is loved and
appreciated on her
special day with a
personalized mes-
sage from you in
the Chronicle
Classifieds.

$15.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday, May 8th
at 1:00pm.
I am looking for that
honest, fun loving
gentlemen in his late
70's-80's. I am also an
attractive, young at
heart widow. If you
think you have the
above requirements
please write me.
Citrus Cty Chronicle
Blind Box 1865
106W Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111



2 recliners and love
seat like new
$200 for all
(352) 341-0369
Crystal River
2 BR/ IBA Mobile on
Fendced lot, well,
septic, appls. incld.
$19,500 352 -563-0534
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191




W
~0


















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear..


Simply advertise

in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!


(352) 563-5966


Ci IRk)pNI.E


IQl



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 yr. old Male
Brindle Cur
all shots up to date
& tags, needs room to
roam, pis call
(352) 302-2201
Female Adult Shih-Tzu
free to good home
(352) 270-4585
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch, u load and
haul it away.
352-628-9624



FRESH BLUEBERRIES
Home Grown
8035 E GOSPEL ISLAND
RD. (352) 400-0750
SPICK
BLUEBERRIES
[(352)643-0717|
U-pick Blueberries
$3.00 per lb. 7am-6pm
Tues,Thurs, Sat, & Sun
Pestiside Free *
4752 W Abeline Dr
Citrus Springs,
352-746-2511



Short Haired black
cat. 9 month old
female lost on 5/1 in
Citrus Springs on
Golfcart Ln
(352) 256-0542



Female dachshund
found on Hwy 44
Inverness
(352) 489-7537





YOU'LL 4 THIS!
Remember...
Mother's Day
is
Sunday
May I1th!






Let your mother
know how much
she is loved and
appreciated on her
special day with a
personalized mes-
sage from you in
the Chronicle
Classifieds.
$15.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.

Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday, May 8th
at 1:00pm.


Bring Bowe Home!
Brina Bowe Home
project is in need
of volunteers
for various events to
get petitions signed
and to spread
awareness that our
only living POW is
still being held
captive in
Afghanistan.
June 30th will be the
5th anniversary of
his capture.
Please contact
Cynthia at
352-628-6481 or
cyn2719@yahoo.
com.

Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cypress
Records.com

We are Growing!
Thank you to all
our customers at
Inverness Sheds &
Inverness Motors,
We have moved to
A LARGER Location
formerly Inverness
Mobile Home Sales
3865 E Gulf to Lake
Highway, RT44
2nd location in
Hernando, cnr
486 &41. See Al
thanks again,
Bob and Joan!


IHB


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111





Janitorial Helper
Need exp. person to
strip floor for one day.
Call 352-697-1625





ExpStylist/Barber
wanted. Contact
Josh 352-257-2557












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onl'y $28.50
includes a
photo
Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966





Cert. Med. Asst.
with phlebotomy, in-
jections, EKG's, EMR,
etc. 2+ys. exp.
Front Office
exp. with EMR,
check in & out,
phones, ins. verif.,
referrals, etc.
Team Lead
with 2+ yrs. TL exp. in
medical office.
Front and Back of-
fice exp., EMR,
managed care,
Hedis, etc.
All require strong
cust. service, skills.
Great benefits.
Send resumes to:
glasser@access
healthcarellc.net or
fax to: 352-688-6189.

Come grow with
us!
Busy medical office
needs experienced
people for fast-
paced team.
FT full benefits
including paid
health insurance,
401k, PTO, paid
holidays and more!
Fully integrated EMR!
Professionalism in
appearance, de-
meanor and work
ethic a must. We
are a drug- and
smoke-freewkplace.
Currently we have a
need for:
0 Nuclear RN to
monitor stress testing.
Experience in
stresses a plus. Must
read EKG's, ACLS
provided.
w RVS Echo Tech to
conduct vascular
and echo studies.
0" Billing Lead for
high volume billing
team. Monitor
charts, guide staff
and defend audits.
Previous supervisory
experience neces-
sary. CRC minimum,
CPCC commands a
premium wage!
o PT Admin Clerk to
obtain auths, sched-
ule patients, scan
charts, etc.
Highest level of
professionalism in at-
titude, appearance
and integrity. If you
want to work in an
environment of
mutual respect,
have a challenging
career and be part
of a high-performing
team, this is the
place for you!
If you want to work
with the best of the
best, send a cover
letter and your re-
sume with demon-
strated experience
to: jobs@
cltruscardlology.org
fax 352-341-6885, or
visit: www.cltrus
cardiology.org. No
phone calls please.


CNA's/HHA's
Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885





FIT Front Office
Receptionist

Prior experience in
Eye Care or Medical
preferred.
Apply in person
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834




HEALTH CARE
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
RN I LPN
PRN positions
available for all shifts
Must be a Florida-
licensed nurse.
Must be able to
work weekends.

CERTIFIED NURSING
ASSISTANT
Full-time positions
available for 3
p.m.-11 p.m. and 11
p.m.-7 a.m. shifts.
PRN positions availa-
ble for all shifts.
Weekend availa-
bility required for
PRN. Must be a
Florida-certified
nursing assistant.
ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT
PRN position
available for a
Florida- certified
nursing assistant. Ex-
perience planning
and implementing
activities for seniors
preferred.

DRIVER
PRN position avail.
CDL license with
passenger endorse-
ment and good
driving record req.
Experience with the
geriatric population
preferred.

HOUSEKEEPING AIDE
PRN position availa-
ble. Housekeeping
exp. preferred.
Long-term care ex-
perience preferred.
We offer great pay
and benefits to
full-time associates
in a team-oriented
environment.

Apply in person or
email r6sum6 to
Hannah Mand.
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
HannahMand@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.com
EOE/M/F/V/D -
48282




LCfA











*.NET Developer
with C# experience,
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com




Administrative
Asst. P/T to F/T
For local Residential
Program. Efficient
in Microsoft Excel,
Word & Publisher.
Able to do all
aspects of clerical
duties. Send
complete Resume
to: 777111newhlre
@gmall.com


Aquatic Plant
Technician
Announcement
#14-50
Broad technical
and manual work
spraying or me-
chanically removing
aquatic vegetation
from County water-
ways. Ability to
safely operate
airboats, kicker
boats, automotive
and spray equip-
ment. High school
diploma or GED
certificate required.
Must possess or be
able to obtain
within six months
of employment a
Department of Agri-
culture Pesticide
Applicator License
with Aquatic
endorsement. Must
possess a valid Flor-
ida Driver License.
$11.09 hourly
to start. Excellent
benefits. Full time
position working
4-10 hour days,
Monday-Thursday.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 9, 2014
EOE/ADA.

SENIOR
SECRETARY
Announcement
#14-49
Advanced secretar-
ial work performing
general clerical
duties. Type's
correspondence,
composes letters,
answers telephone,
data entry, etc. Sets
up files, assembles
information, sched-
ules appointments
and meetings,
keeps records,
prepares reports,
and maintains files
and time sheets.
Works Independ-
ently. Performs
related work as
required. Must pos-
sess a current valid
Florida driver
license. $11.09
hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl 34461
to apply online by
Friday, May 9, 2014.
EOE/ADA.

The City of Crystal
River is seeking an
Administrative
Assistant
to provide highly
responsible
secretarial/adminstralive
supporttothe
City Manager,
Mayor, and City
Councilmembers
and maintaining
public electronic
communications
including City
website. Also serves
as the Deputy City
Clerk, which
involves periodically
attending evening
meetings, preparing
meeting packets
and formal meeting
minutes for City
Council and
Boards/Commissions
High school diploma
required. Five (5)
years closely-related
experience, supple-
mented by addi-
tional college level
training in adminis-
trative, secretarial or
municipal clerical
work. For more de-
tails visit our website
at crystalriverfl.org
Resumes must be
received no later
than close of
business on Friday
May 7 2014
Please forward
resumes to:
City of Crystal River
Office of the City
Manager
123 NW Highway 19
Crystal River, FL
34428
Fax: 352-795-6351


UTILITIES
TECHNICIAN I
Announcement
# 14-51
Skilled technical
work with assign-
ments encompass-
ing the operation,
maintenance and
construction of
Citrus County Utilities
water distribution
and wastewater
collection systems.
Some experience in
a related field or an
equivalent combi-
nation of training
and experience.
Certification in
backflow (testing/
repair), water distri-
bution or waste-
water collection
preferred. Ability to
respond to
after-hours emer-
gency repairs 24/7.
Must have or obtain
within 1 year of em-
ployment a valid
Florida CDL, class B.
Starting pay $11.88
hourly. Excellent
benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday May 9, 2014
EOE/ADA.







Servers &
Bartenders
for a huge Tiki Hut &
Restaurant. High
volume business.
Must be experi-
enced & energetic
with outgoing per-
sonality. Must have
great customer
service skills.
Aoolv in person at
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando, Mon-Fri
2:00pm-5:00pm"








CHikoNicif

F/T Classified
Sales
Representative

Seeking A
self motivated
individual
with strong sales/
communication/
customer service
skills for our
Crystal River office
The position will
consist of:
+ placing ads from
our incoming call
center and to
walk-in customers
and upselling
products/services.
+ outbound cold
calling to increase
print and online
revenue.
4 process payments
/handle billing
inquiries for
Classified customers
Successful candi-
date must have
computer and
proficient typing
ability and must be
able to multi-task!
Also ability to work
well in a team
environment.
Send resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn
or apply in person at
The Citrus County
Chronicle, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River.
No phone calls.
Drug Screen
required
for final applicant.
Equal Opportunity
Employer.


LOOKING FOR
Motivated,
Self- driven people
to prospect & sell
radio/tv advertising.
Must have strong ne-
gotiation skills, per-
suasive communica-
tor, enthusiastic,
able to develop &
keep relationships.
We offer a competi-
tive draw/ commis-
sion structure, bene-
fit package, 401k,
etc. Media sales ex-
perience preferred,
but not required.
APPLY IN PERSON @
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto FL
34461 *EOE*






















Trades/
Skills

LABORERS
Must have Dr Lic &
exp. doing tree ser-
vice work. Call M-F
8a-5p, 352-344-2696

AC Service Tech
5 + years exprlence
required. Clean
background and
driving record;
Must pass drug test.
Start Immediately
(352) 564-8822

Carpet Cleaners
Full Time Positions
Stanley Steemer
Clean Fl MVR record
22 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
Paid training, 401k,
holiday pay.
Fax: 352-726-8895 or
Email: toni.gronert
@steemer.com

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees
Needed NOW! Become
a driver for Werner En-
terprises. Earn $800 per
week! Local CDL
Training
(1-877)214-3624

Exp. Grant Writer
For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446

117-71TIF-1-J7 ,
CARRIER~lf
WANTED i I










newspapersfo


home deriver'yl 11L
customers


HELP

WANTED I











BENEFITS PACKAGE
AEOE DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Cla n Drvn eodAMs

BENFIS PACKAGE *
EO /DRGF REE WORKPLACE

APLYIN PRSO


Bm^

Exp. Service
Technician/
Installer
Experlencd only
Need for busy AC
comp. Must be EPA
certified. Must have
valid drivers license.
Apply Email: aalrinc
@centurvllnk.net
or fax 352-860-0757

NOW HIRING!
Property damage
inspectors needed,
no experience
necessary. Will train.
Full-time &
part-time.
877-207-6716
www.aaron
spa.biz/nowhiring

EXP PLUMBER
HELPERS

Must have Dr. Uc.
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa




DRIVERS
For Floral Holiday de-
liveries must have Van
or SUV (352) 726-9666

Key Training Ctr.
has positions availa-
ble in group home
setting. Assist adults
with disabilities in
daily living skills. HS
Diploma/GED req.
APPLY IN PERSON at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

LAWN MOWER
Full time
For local community
Fax Resume To:
352-794-7879

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
**352-503-4930**

TOWER HAND
Starting at $10.00/Hr.
Building
Communication
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F




P/T BARTENDER
ELKS LODGE
Hernando
applications may
be filled out btwn
Tues. thru Fri. 9am to
1 pm (352)726-2027




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com

HOME BASED
BUSINESS BE YOUR
OWN BOSS. FULL OR
PART TIME. EARN UP
TO SIX FIGURES, FIRST
YEAR. SERIOUS
INQUIRES ONLY
PLEASE
www.wavneiohn-
son.mvunicitv.net

HVAC Accelerated
Hands On
Training School.
National Certifica-
tions With Immedi-
ate Job Placement.
VA Benefits Eligible!
1-877-994-9904


MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547





JUST REDUCED
PRICE!!!!
POOL SUPPLY
STORE
Pat 813-230-7177





JUST REDUCED
PRICE!!!!
POOL SUPPLY
STORE
Pat 813-230-7177





JUST REDUCED
PRICE!!!!
POOL SUPPLY
STORE
Pat 813-230-7177





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS







130 MPH
25x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$ 13.995. INSTALLED
30 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
627.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic# CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Ice Cream Set
Table, marble top,
4 padded chairs
$175.
(352) 527-4301




1940'S SALT & PEP-
PER SHAKERS $2.00
per set (21) sets
available 352-257-5687

HUGE WORLDS
GREATEST MOM
TEDDY BEAR 4x3
20.00 OBO Linda
4234163

VNTG. BULL's HEAD
SKULL W/HORNS
EXC. COND. $100.
CALL FOR INFO
586-7222


CmRLE (mkNaLE CHpNICLE


IJ SEEKING i

SALES

REPRESENTATIVES
S Full-Time with Great Benefits 1

Do you have an
S outgoing personality? C
Do you work well with others?
Are your people skills
outstanding?
| Seeking dynamic individuals with strong
communication and computer skills.
Must be organized and detailed-oriented
and thrive in a fast-paced environment.
Base salary plus commission.
Reliable vehicle and
valid driver's license required.
If you light up a room when you enter,
apply today!
'!, Send resume tor
-! djkamlot@chronicleonline.com
SDrug screen required forfinal applicant.
3R 000136R EE
CO-Ni Cj4oq CiocNE


Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises

1 STORE MANAGER
High School diploma
or equal with five (5)
successful years of work
experience in a supervisory,
retail position.

ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER
High School diploma or equal with 2 yrs
Retail Mgmt experience.
Full-time position Excellent benefits
Apply in person Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 SE US HWY 19 Crystal River FL 34429
EOE/DFWP 0005K


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 D5


11




D6 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


(1) Budweiser Sign $10
& (1) Michelob Beer
Sign $8 352-257-5687



25.5 Cubic ft. Maytag
side by side
refrigerator/freezer.
Water & ice in door. Ex.
Cond.$275.
(352)726-1005
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Coleman Air/Heat
3 Ton Mobile Home
unit package
$300.
(678) 617-5560
Kenmore Refrigerator
Stove, Dishwasher
white, clean, like new
$1100.00
(352) 637-0765
or (352) 257-5779
Refrigerator
with ice maker $150
Washer & Dryer $200
will sell separately
(678) 617-5560
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SONY 24" TV
excellent condition
$20, call
352-257-5687
Trash Compacter
$25
Chest Freezer
$80
(352) 503-9189
Used Electric
Jenn-Aire Cook Top
$50. and Microwave
$25. (352) 637-2450
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398
Whirlpool Electric
Glass Top Stove
and
Microwave Almond
$125. for both
(352) 746-7366


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dyers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lie/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625

Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019 201-5147


DESK CHAIR High
back, adjustable, swivel.
Black. $30.00
(352)5644214









DUDLEY'S
-A-CTFWR
TWSO-A' INS

w Thur5-1 May Day
fun 3pm Walk About
Auction filled
w/shop & power
tool, Designer Furni-
ture, Bikes, outdoor
adventures & more
w Sun 5-4 Antique &
Collectible Auction
1pm 500+lots w Cus-
tom Imported Orien-
tal DR & BR, Primitive
to Victorian, Mid
Century, Restored
Gas pump, Coins,
Jewelry, Art, Signed
Memorabilia, +++
......................
call for Into 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon
.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




Air Compressor
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. 220C,
125 PSI, used very little
$275. Call Al
(202) 425-4422 cell
CAR REPAIR RAMPS
Rhino Ramps 6000# ca-
pacity 12000GVW
$25.pair Dunnellon
352465-8495
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80
HAND HELD MADE OF
METAL HEAVY DUTY
419-5981


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873





A- I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765,352-513-5746

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838





#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907





ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **

FENCE PRO all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lie/ins (352) 563-8020

OWENS QUALITY
FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002


i~
AV receiver/
amp $10.
352-4194464

Panasonic
42 in, HD, Flat Screen
Great Picture
Must Sell $200 obo
Homosassa
315-729-2634

PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $5 EACH
(352)613-0529

SPEAKERS 2 SHARP
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529

SPEAKERS YAMAHA
SET OF 5 FOR SUR-
ROUND SOUND $60
352-613-0529

TV APEX 20" WITH
BUILT IN DVD PLAYER
& REMOTE $40
(352)613-0529




Complete Galley
Kitchen Cabinets
incl. microwave, dish-
washer, sink & counter-
tops. $375. obo
(317) 947-8015




COMPUTER MONITOR
DEL FLAT SCREEN
14in.Works good. $15
obo Linda 423-4163

COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 16 in wide.
Works good $10 Linda
423-4263




8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
recliner, ottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
seFAST 100% Guar.
s AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
P AFFORDABLE
s RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352-476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


HEATING & A

FREE DUCT
with purchase of
Mobile Home A/C Unit

Lowest Prices
on Residential A/C
and Heat Pump
Units

Dave's Heating & AC
352-542-0202
Lic.#CAC057482


SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




2 recliners and love
seat like new
$200 for all
(352) 341-0369
Black Recliner
Stand w/light
White chair
w/microwave stand
All for $180.
(352) 795-7254
Coffee and 2 matching
End tables, modern
glass tops w/black base
Great Shape, $80. for all
(352) 746-1486

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH
LIGHTS HOLDS 31"
TV WHITE WASHED
$40 (352)613-0529

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH
LIGHTS WHITE
WASHED HOLDS 31"
TV $40 352-613-0529

MATTRESS QUEEN
Simmons Beautyrest
Cliffside Park Plush
pillow top queen mat-
tress and boxspring.
Used only two weeks.
Absolutely like new.
Bought recently for
$650. Asking $250.
Call 207 323-8246

Queen size Bed, Oak,
w/ chest & mirror
10 pc comforter set
$175
(352) 628-4051

QUEEN SIZE HEAD-
BOARD maple color
good condition 45.00
352-527-3177

QUEEN SIZE PILLOW
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING (LADY
ASHLEY)LIKE NEW.
$100 352-746-4160


Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavating
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


CLASSIFIED



CHAIRS 4 oak windsor
style chairs $50 for all
(352)563-5386
Queen sz. Futon
Forest Green, Pine
w/clear finish, con-
verts from couch to
bed, like new, $200.
(352) 628-3526
Sleeper Sofa & Love
Seat, Exc Cond,
Country Blue
Tufted Camelback
solid oak trim $395
(352) 726-1526
Sofa & Love Seat
Good cond. Neutral
Color $250; Oversized
Chair & Ottaman,
fabric, good cond
$100 (352) 503-9189
SOFA BED Sturdy and
clean in great condition
$100 352-257-5687
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
*Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500
TWIN MATTRESS &
BOX SPRING
unmatched set great
condition $50.00
352-527-1399
TWIN METAL BED
FRAME in decent
shape. $25.00
352-527-3177



42" LAWN
SWEEPER
$75
(352) 637-0560
AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
BOLENS 13.5 HP
RIDING MOWER 38"
Front Mount, Briggs/St.
Great Cond. 4 yrs. old
$400.
(352) 270-4087
CRAFTSMAN 17.5
LAWN TRACTOR 42"
Automatic Trans.
Clean and Rebuilt
$400.
(352) 270-4087


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lie/ins 352-465-3086




#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., LIc/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING, TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Craftsman
bagger only
good condition
$50. (352) 637-0560
Craftsman
Riding Mower
42" deck, 15 HP Kolar
eng, grass catcher &
trlr, $700 352-746-7357
w, GRASS SEEDSII
Pensacola Bahia
Argentine Bahia
Summer Rye
Great Prices!
American Farm &
Feed (352) 795-6013
Riding Lawn Mower
Simplicity Cornet, 34"
cut, 13 HP good cond
well maintained $275;
Black & Decker 18"
electric mower w/ grass
catcher $100
(352) 341-0557
YARDMAN 46" auto-
matic, 20HP, Kohler,
exc. cond. $900
(352) 637-4718












ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE

CH~KONICE

CLASSIFIED

w, Call your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966


~w NUISANCE
WILDLIFE CONTROL
David P Crissman
(352)563-5545



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lie., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



VASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-I Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lie
#39765, 352-513-5746
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lie/Ins 352-476-4919


INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, Sun 9a-5p
* 3 Family Sale *
DEK 5650 Elec genera-
tor- new in box; Lg
window AC, dorm
refrigcamping eq,
clothes & much more!
1405 S Bea Av




MENS PANTS MENS
JEANS/NEW Roots / 36
x 30 & 5 pr dress pants
$10 each Linda
423-4163




CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/case, Con-
sumer Cellular or unlock
$28 352-382-3650
STAND & DOCKING
STATION for Dell
Latitude/InspironPrecisbn lap-
tops $35 OBO
352-382-3650




2 FLY RODS WITH
REELS- 8 ft. fiberglass
2 pc. rods, $25 ea.,
352-628-0033
2 WHITE IN-CEILING
SPEAKERS
Indoor/Outdoor Brand
new in box Retails $300
Sell $100 352-257-5687
8 FT. RADIUS
CASTING NET-
16 ft. diameter,
1/2" mesh, Ex., $40.
352-628-0033
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS
ANIMALS @ HEARTS
$15 PAINT/DECORATE
419-5981
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Beanie Babies
$10 ea, 2 for $15
(352) 249-7064


Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lie/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066


e-
BEANIE BABY-
BONGO THE MONKEY
Price: $10
(352)465-1616
Cannondale
Men's bike, never
used. New-$600
asking $300;
Self propelled lawn
mower, Honda
Husqvarna, Like New
$200 352-382-3545
CUISINART FOOD
PROCESSOR DLC-10E
$60 COMPLETE WITH
4 EXTRA BLADES
419-5981
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new.
I own $50 obo Linda
4234163
FOLDING TABLE
5 FOOT LONG BROWN
WOOD $25
352-613-0529
FOLDING TABLE 5
FOOT LONG BROWN
WOOD $25
(352)613-0529


THIS OUT!



GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!!!



6 lines
-10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50


ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLEDi
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049

Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


o ...








Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lie/ins.


GRAPPLER REEF
BOAT ANCHOR- 5
tines, 60ft of 1/2" line,
Ex+, $70. 352-628-0033
HALOGEN DESK
LAMP Black, Counter
Balance, Hi/Lo 50W $35
OBO can email pic
352-382-3650
HANDCRAFTED SOLID
OAK ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE $55 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
Kirby Vacuum
all attachements, 2001
Limited Ed, like new
cond $125
Treadmill, Tunturi 620,
good running $175
(352) 341-0557
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING(FULL SIZE)
EXC.COND.&
CLEAN.$75.00
352-746-4160
MICROWAVE KEN-
MORE MOUNTS
ABOVE THE STOVE
30" WIDE WHITE $70
(352)613-0529
NEW NUTONE
MEDICINE CABINET
$15 STAINLESS
STEEL FRAME
RECESSED 419-5981
PORT. GENERATOR
Briggs & Stratton, 3500
watt, Model 030208
bought new, nvr used
$195 (352) 503-7031
QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS & BOX SPRING
PILLOW TOP IN
EXC.COND.$100
352-746-4160
RIGID DIG EZ POST
HOLE DIGGER- profes-
sional grade, fiberglass
handles, Ex. $35.
628-0033
SALON ITEMS All
NEW-8 pkgs Perm rods
& other related items,
5 brushes. $40 Call
Penny 527-2598
for details
WINDOW TREATMENT
Custom fabric covered
cornice, 72"x12" Beige.
$35.00. Call
352-621-7586


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lie/Ins
Budd Excavating
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lie/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lie/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lie., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


"Hasta La Bye Bye."



Tri-County

Services, Inc.
Pest Control, Termite
& Lawn Care
Family owned and operated
Serving Central Florida over 20 years
Toll Free 1-888-352-9290
or call Rick 352-266-4613
Licensed and Insured




Ips



Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


(ITRUS

HOmEUIWATEH
We care for your home while
you're away.











SondySan lesa nsinl
352-422-0025
SLicensed, Bonded, Insured




SERVING CITRUS COUNTY LONGER THAN THE EST,
CONSISTENTLY VOTED REST OF THE REST!




Irrigation Repairs & Installation
,. 1- 2 Sod Sales & Install
3 Time Winner
^f 2011 2012 -2013 ____

l746-4451
1723 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lic. #2646 Insured Bonded


All In One Home
' 1 Repair & Lawn Care
SLandscaping
'/ ,. .Mowing
SMulch &Weed
SCarpentry Remove Debris
SConcrete Trim Trees & Shrubs
SDrywall
SPaint
SPressure Washing f
25 years experience, reliable and super cheap
Jim Maloney
352-246-2585




Your Neighborhood Indoor Air Quality Spedalist

Summer Tune $ 995
Up Special 4 $ ,3
Guaranteeing lOx Cleaner Air
or tune-up is free
Includes Our Exclusve Laser Particle Scan to determine
the quality of the air you breathe in your home.
NO OTHER COMPANY OFFERS THIS SERVICE!
Expires May 31,2014
lin o [lc C1815891
, a ,BackTo News- ,1997
Heating & Cooling
S 628-5700 newair.biz


Wallpaper Removal
cI Int iiorEteriry &Paintior
in. Business Dirscountus


r352-597-2440 -352-293-5088






I1! LBA RIUM []

Come visit our
Islall & R~t ir showroom for a
Inus, filters. huge selection of
Healers tile pavers, pool
& Sail Systnles finishes and pool
equipment.

Construction
Leak Detection
Sugarmill Pool/File Repair
WOOds Serving 111 t Citrus County
Free Consultation
POUUI' Spa Call for appointment
SMWPOIS.COM 9382-4421
S P A M tat ote Cid Pool Contmrtor Lk #1458326


This Sat 6pm
Preview 5pm
Antiques, Coins, Art, Jewelry,
SMilitary and Estate Items

Red Barn Auctions
4535 S. FloridaAve., Inverness, FL
Terms 13%BP CC 10%BP Cash F Sales Tax
AB 3172 AU4416


, Consign Now "'a

Rates as low as 2% We Buy Estates


I I A F1

Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
9 All Home Repairs
o iSml. Carpentry
1 i~ijifencing
S,:reening

|* 'lean Dryer Vents
,ffordoble & Dependable
.Expf''ience lifelong
:%352-344-0905
cell: 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761


GENERAL
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-61-124


Ac Ultzp Aq 11 =01 -0 WN
352-419-2779
or 352-201-2201 '8



WE WILL BEAT ANY
WRITTEN ESTIMATE
Mowing, Hedging, Trimming, Blowing
Tree Trimming, Brush Removal,
Seasonal Planting.


FYI qua
mtlrejoa%
-W
=0 49,


I POOS AD PAERSIAU


I CLEANING I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Looknged to BLF
Aluminum Ramp Lookihtng fore
for a wheelchair Lift Chair to self assist
36" x40" $100 must be in good
Inflatable electric twin condition, pls call
mattress cover, $30. (352) 854-8167
(352) 726-5070 WANT TO BUY HOUSE
Bed Protective Pads or MOBILE Any Area,
2x3. 5 per package, Condition or Situation
$1 per package Fred, 352-726-9369
Floor to Ceiling PVP
poll w/ trapeze $150 Cm- -
(352) 726-5070 a i-
Larger Electric
Wheelchair, Jayco Pop Up
leather, good Camper. Still equip.
condition, $450. obo Dual Axle. Needs
(352) 746-1044 Repr., or make good
(324-104trlr. $395 or trade.
Permobil Wheelchair, (352)637-3983
does everything, incl.
tbl. Orig. cost $20,000, RV CORD ADAPTER
BO. portable lift, $500 18 INCH, NEW 30 amp
OBO. Orig. $2,000. Female to 50 amp Male
(352)726-5070 w/Pwr Lt. $10
352-382-3650


"NEW" LES PAUL
COPY BLOCK
INLAYSGOLD HARD-
WARE"BEAUTY" $100.
(352)601-6625
"NEW"5 STRING
BANJO,MAHOGANY
FINISH RESONATOR
READY TO PLAY $75.
(352)601-6625
ACOUSTIC BRAND
LEAD GUITAR AMP Robin Long
G35FX ONBOARD EF- Urban Suburban
FECTS"NEW" $80. Hair Studio
(352)601-6625 352-637-0777
First Act electric guitar "From Cutting Edge
with strap $45 to Care Free"
(352)419-4464 to Care Free
HOLLOWBODY Seeking new Color
GUITAR, IBANEZ and Foil Clients
AGR73T white w/gold looking for a
hardware & AG100C change. Come
hardshell case $495. give me a try.
FENDER TELECASTER, Wed-Sat
1986 '62 reissuecandy appointments
apple red w/white available.
binding ,soft case
$575. 352-746-1644 "Redken Educator
Korg remote and trained 20+
keyboard(keytar) years experience.
RK-100 $25.
352-4194464
ROGUE BASS GUITAR,
black $50.
BEHRINGER ULTRABASS
AMP, 1x12
180 watts -$195.
352-746-1644. ,, -
SILVERTONE/SAMICK v ,
ELECTRIC GUITAR
LOOKS, PLAYS,
SOUNDS GREAT!$50.
(352)601-6625
STUDENT/TRAVEL
LAP STEEL ELECTRIC
LOOKS, PLAYS,
SOUNDS GREAT $50.
(352)601-6625



2 PIECE BROILER PAN
LIKE NEW $15 SMALL 3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
COUNTER TOP The beautiful Rema!
GEORGE FOREMAN This girl is just as sweet
GRILL $8 419-5981 as she is gorgeous.
G MICOWAVE Very affectionate, loves
GTE WMICROWAVE to cuddle and lay her
WHITE WITH TURNTA head on you. Doing well
BLE $20. 419-5549 with leash training, gets
KING Patchwork along with some dogs,
design,COMFORTER/SHAM and does well with chil-
S wedding ring de- dren. Her $60 adoption
sign clean $50. fee includes her spay,
419-5549 all current vaccinations,
OREC K XL VACUUM microchip, heartworm
40TH ANNIVERSARY test, and 30 days of
EDITION WITH LIGHT health insurance. Call
$80.419-5549 Laci @ 352-212-8936
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
Delonghi
5 qt slow cooker, SS,
new @ $139.99.
like new $45
(352) 513-5547

BFitns BARON
Eq ipmen a SPECIAL NEEDS
Inversion System 6-10 y.o. St. Bernard
good condition mix male, came as
$75.00 stray to shelter. Ap-
(352) 621-0127 pears housebrkn,
weight 91 lbs. Avery
Sm itn calm older dog, in
search of what would
003 ~probably be his last
Concealed Weapons home. Very friendly,
Permit Course comes to people for
DAN'S GUN ROOM affection,
(352) 726-5238 Heartworm-negative,
amazingly. May be
EZ GO Golf Cart partially blind, but defi-
Diamond plate box nitely can see some-
on back, good cond. what. He still loves
$1200. obo life and wants to be
(352) 564-2756 the companion for a
POOL TABLE Slate top, kind, loving person or
heavy vinyl cover, couple who would un-
20 sticks with racks derstand his limita-
Ig overhead beer light tions. Would there be
3 custum highchairs, someone who would
All accessories, be willing to give this
excel, cond. $700 obo sweet dog a good
352-422-5622 home for his later
SEWING & REPAIR years?
Awnings RV & Home Call Joanne @
Boat Canvas & Seats 352-795-1288 or
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops 352-697-2682.
Patio Furn., 563-0066 CKC Deerhead
Yamaha '00 GolfCart Chihuahua pup M
Canvas Enclosure $150. 2 Mini Dasch-
New Batteries $2288. shund pups M $250.
Love Motorsports & Chiweenies, $200.
352-621-3678 w/h/c & puppy kits
.- Janet (352) 628-7852
Haulmark 6x12 -

'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand

New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports-
352-621-3678
SDIXIE
a 3-y.o. black lab
BOYS CLOTHING mix spayed female,
medium in size,
sizes 12mths S T 48 Ibs. Appears
.25-$1 each 50 articles housebrkn. Heart-
of clothing like new womnegative.
352-257-5687 Gets along with
EDDIE BAUER CAR other dogs, walks
SEAT Kids over 22 calmly on a leash.
pounds & over lyr Ex- Gentle, beautiful.
pires 2018 excellent $50 UTD on shots.
352-257-5687 Adoption fee
^$30.00. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.

r B TERED DOG neutered
and chipped, 2 1/2 yr.
Dalmatian/Husky mix.
Loves kids/cats, house
trained & rides in car.
Good, quiet, alert, clean.
phone, 352-503-7706


Tell that special Wj*
person ',
"Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes. GINGER
Only $28.50 beautiful 1.5 y.o.
includes a photo Dutch Shepherd
mix, spayed, HW
Call our Classified negative, house-
Dept for details brkn. High energy,
352-563-5966 needs strong leader
1 1 11 1 11 1 w/knowledge of
breed. Loves daily
I walksw/jogger/
runner. Best as only
pet in home without
A Treadmill young kids.
in good condition Stunning dog.
digital read-out Call Christina@
eve's (352) 382-4442 352-464-3908


I v 19


JENSEN
3-4 y.o. American
Bulldog, 50 Ibs,
beautiful red &
white. Appears
housebroken, walks
well on leash.
Knows certain com-
mands. Very
friendly & loves
people, best as only
dog in the home.
Would be a great
family member &
perfect companion.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.
Pure Bred Husky Pups
2 male, black & white
w/brown eyes, fully
vetted, CVI certs,
micro-chipped
$500. ea. obo
(352) 447-5595
(or) 352-246-3000
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827



16 in Black Wintec
Saddle; Exc Cond,
never used $799
(352) 513-5547



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



Two Yamaha
1998 Waverunners
1200xl, 70 Hrs, with trlr.
Like new mint cond
Part trade poss. $6000
352-422-1026/419-5374



BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**
20' Pontoon Boat.
Very nice. Motor
ready. $1900. Trailer
avble. Will Del.
(352)637-3983
Princess Marine
16' tri-hull, 35 hp
Evinrudeoutbrd clear
title, 1st $1 k takes it!
Joe (352) 476-4632




We[efll new, used, &'ff~:






Sportscraft 88
27' Coastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-05556
boatsupercenter.com



TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River,
18ff L. 8ff wide, Living
quarters w/beds mi-
crowave, stove, refrig.
sink, bthrm., awning,
dish TV ready, full
back ramp, Pd $18K
Asking $10,500 obo
(352) 422-5622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



04 Open Road
37', 5th wheel, good
cond. 4 season, 3
slides, can deliver
No smoking or pets
$10,900 352-341-1106
COLEMAN
1986 Popup camper,
stove sink, AC. Needs
Canvas $650 obo
(352) 419-4719
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500 352-201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
STAR CRAFT
2005 Pop-up Camper
Electric lift, frig, air,
stove + outside grill
$3750; 352-613-9627


I I


-j
male kittens 8 weeks
old. Fully weaned, litter
trained,healthy and
ready for a forever
home. 352-212-2094
FRENCH BULLDOG
PUPS,
2 Females & 1Male
2 Brindle, 1 fawn
AKC and all Shots
$1500. Call for info
(352) 613-3778
(352) 341-7732
German Rottweiller
Pups, 4 females 4 Sale
good temperament,
going to be LARGE
dogs! $500. each
(352) 422-6792
Green Amazon Parrot
with cage. 25 yrs old.
Asking $650
352-642-2823


BUYING JUNK CARS
* Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


CLASSIFIED



WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
u-ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939

WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


B.H.P.H.
May Special

'97 Ford Taurus
$650 Down
'98 Chevy Cavalier
$650 Down
'00 Pontiac Gr. Am.
$650 Down
'00 Mitsubishi
Galant
$650 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl


22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018


Your World


CI 9ImK NICE
Ci pNICI.E


JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
3/4, V10, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995
CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19 & US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


CHEVROLET
2005 Venture 8 passen-
ger, runs great, 186K
miles, $3500 OBO
352-212-1203

CHRYSLER
2000 Town & Country
passenger, loaded,
good cond., asking
$1,975. 352-637-2588

CHRYSLER
2003 Sebring/4
door/Runs Great/130k
miles/$4k OBO
(352)212-0893

NISSAN
1994 Maxima
low miles, runs great
Must sell $3000 obo
(352) 564-1818


CHOOSE CAR SEAT:
BYAGE & SIZE


THE NUMBER

OF PEOPLE



WHO



THINK


THEY HAVE

THEIR CHILD

IN THE RIGHT

SEAT.


THE ONES


WHO



ACTUALLY



DO.


KNOW FOR SURE


IF YOUR CHILD IS IN THE RIGHT CAR SEAT.





VISIT SAFERCAR.GOV/THERIGHTSEAT


N TSA Child Car
NHTSA Safety
wwvw.nhtsa.gov


SUNDAY, MAY 4,2014 D7


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100


C"tolni-l




DS SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 CLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I


SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE



CLASSIFIED
**3 SPECIALS **
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

w" Call your
Classified
representative
for details.
352-563-5966
- -- -- iJ
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAY 4th.
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET
2001 Corvette
Convertible ,garage
kept, 1 owner, C.R.
$26,500.(770) 773-0166
CHEVROLET
94 CORVETTE, CONV.
very clean, only 50k
mi. NADA $12,500.
$9500. (352) 419-4970
FORD
Roadster Convertible
Original 1929, other
classic cars avail
727- 422-4433



IIIIIIII


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018
Chevy
1998 Silverado/4 Ton
Heavy, Extended cap
long box, $2600
(612) 203-3408
DODGE
'05 Dakota Crewcab,
150k highway miles,
run exc. $4500 obo
Cl Jim 352-364-3376
Dodge
2003 Diesel Truck &
2010 Sundance Fifth
Wheel package for
$16,000.
(352)637-6679

Larry's Auto Sales
1955 S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333
BUY HERE, PAY HERE
2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down
2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down
'91 F 150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down
'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van 5.7, V-8,
Auto, $995 down



KIA
2005 Sportilage EX
V6,auto, silver, sunroof,
garaged dealer maint.
$5900. (352) 382-9920
SUBARU
FORESTER
2013 Subaru Forester
2.5X Limited with 14,000
miles. Options include:
climate control,
AM/FM/CD audio, steer-
ing wheel audio con-
trols, Bluetooth hands
free phone, cruise con-
trol, tilt wheel, power
door locks and mirrors,
power windows, power
drivers seat, leather
seats, heated front
seats, roof rails, power
moonroof, all-wheel
drive, ABS, TPMS,
anti-theft alarm, back-up
camera, puddle light kit
and splash guard kit
and remaining warranty.
Price: $23,800, Call:
352-601-1319
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018



CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018


CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
HONDA
2004 Odyssey model
EX-L,V6 3.5 Liter,New
Transmission, Brakes,
Belts, Timing Chain,
Water Pump, Spark
Plugs. FR&R A/C.
leather seats, DVD
player w remote & wire-
less headphones,
Premium Sound AM/FM
Stereo cassette & Cd
Player Excellent
Condition.
$6,000
352-726-7745


DODGE
2001 CARGO VAN
5.2 litre, Auto, A/C
Full Price $4495 + tax,
fees. (352) 564-8333
HONDA
'07, Odyssey, EXL
144K miles
excel, cond. $11,000
(352) 563-1680




2006 Suzuki
650 Burgman with trike
kit, 4,700mi, lots of
extra's $8000 obo
(352) 6374429
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068
HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County


HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678

HONDA
2002 VTX 1800
clean, priced to sell
$3995
(352) 564-8333

HONDA
2006 VTX1300C
7,400 miles
Cobra Pipes, Helmet
Windshields
$4,900
(352) 341-1187

IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990
'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999




Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April


HONDA
2005 Goldwing Any Ed
ABS, 13k mi, Exc. Cond,
Garage kept $13,000
obo (352) 637-0292
HONDA
2008 Shadow Spirit
VT750C2
3,775 miles
Cobra Pipes Helmet
Saddle Bags
Windshield
$4,500
(352) 341-1187
HONDA REBEL
2009, super low miles
many accessories, like
new.$2695 OBO. Pine
Ridge (419) 307-8954
KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 1500
Classic: Custom Paint,
18" Baron Bars, Saddle
Bags, Kuryakyn High-
way Pegs/Passenger
Floor Boards
/Cable&Grips. 3200
Miles! Garage Kept,
Exc.Condition $5999.
(813) 957-8605
Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
SUZUKI
Boulevard C50
Classic ,2007,
Exc Cond $3,700
(352) 634-4427




25, 2014-May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014


w


384-0504 SUCRN
5-14 Sale- Personal Mini Storage-Dunnellon
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH TO SAT-
ISFY RENTAL LIENS IN ACCORDANCE WITH FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF STORAGE FACILITY
ACT, SECTIONS 83-806 AND 83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
#141 Christina Stride
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, BEDDING, LUGGAGE, TOYS,
GAMES, PACKED CARTONS, FURNITURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING, TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON THE PREMISES AT 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2014.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE DUNNELLON
11955 N. FLORIDA AVE (HWY 41), DUNNELLON, FL 34434 352-489-6878
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, April 27 and May 4, 2014.


388-0504 SUCRN
CCTDCB Regular Meeting 5-15-14
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 15th day of May 2014 at the Citrus
County Transit Center, 1300 S Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto, FL 34460.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Director of Citrus County Transit,
1300 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 4, 2014.


385-0504 SUCRN
5/14/14 Regular Meeting CCTDC
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a Regular meeting on Wednesday, May 14th at 9:00 a.m. at the Lecanto
Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
JOHN "JJ" KENNEY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: May 4, 2014.

386-0504 SUCRN
5/8 Meeting CCAAB
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 8,2014 in Room 219 of the Lecanto Government
Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
J.J. KENNEY, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle: May 4, 2014.


389-0504 SUCRN
City of Crystal River
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
COPELAND PARK BARBEQUE BID #14-B-11I
The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for COPELAND PARK BARBEQUE. You
are hereby invited to submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is
the City of Crystal River
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on May 28, 2014, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work consists of design and construction of a masonry
barbeque grill at Copeland Park. This grill will be constructed per sketch and specifi-
cations out lined in the bid package.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is sub-
mittffed. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"COPELAND PARK BARBEQUE, BID #14-B-i1I" AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR
ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER


34428


CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL


All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge, downloaded
for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora) or picked up at City hall for no
charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents are advised to
check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages may be
picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address above, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The contact per-
son is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time sched-
uled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days from re-
ceipt of the notice to proceed by the owner.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE, May 4, 2014.


HyLE Jeep








CRYSTAL



AUTOMOTIVE

SPRING HILL HOMOSASSA INVERNESS BROOKSVILLE

WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM 877-MY CRYSTAL


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Section E SUNDAY, MAY 4,2014


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52)637.637 2^2
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5008 W MUSTANG DRIVE 3630 H. LAURELWOOD LOOP COMPLETELY UPDATED VILLA TREATED WITH TENDER LOVING CARE! UNIQUE WATERFRONT RETREAT
'SWIM LAPS IN POOL 'GUEST OR FAM. SUITE LAKESIDE VILLAGE IN 55+ COMMUNITY Spacious 4 Bedroom 2 Bath DW On Private Corner Lot
ROOL -GUEST2 B L CaPartially Fenced. Lg Eat-In Kitchen, Formal DR w/Built In 'No Flood Zone .256 Feet on Lake Rousseau
Gorgeous Granite! 1-Car Plus 3-Car Garage 2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance-Free Villa 2 BR, 2 BATH -Car Garage Hutch, Master En Suite Bath, Separate Entrance 4th 'Hardwood & Tile Floors Includes 3 Sub-dividable Lots
4orgEDOs3 Bathroomls 3-OvCr Gg Community Mantnaerades GRANITE Counters Stainless Appliances Bedroom/Office, 12x24 FR Addition w/Wood Stove, 2-Car Detached 2-Car Garage *Pontoon Boat and Motor Included
'4 or5 BEDROOM '3 Bathrooms Over 55 Community Many Upgrades Cathedral Ceilings New Lighting/Ceiling Fans Carport + 28x28 Detached Garage/Workshop w/Electric, RV 'Attached 1-Car Garage Potential for Guest Cottage
'Office Plus Library 'Huge Lanai/Hot Tub Lovely Florida Room Overlooking Green Space Enclosed Lanai Low Maintenance Fee Slab w/3OAmp Service & Sewer Connection. Great
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 | PETER & MARVIA KOROL K Y D 3 Permanent Or Winter Residence! Em-- OS 69 -0m
em elliesullon le x ne (352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929 Emai sherypols@aol.com
www.FloiduLisiinglnlo.comn (352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com Email: martha.sather@remax.net Websile: www.CrysalRiverLiving.com


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1862 ARROWWOOD LANE 3642 N. LUCILLE DR. IRMr xII 44 PINE DRIVE- SMW CITRUS HILLS
SWell Maintained 3BR/2BA/2CG 2,644 SF Living Area 3/3 Pool Home
'WHISPERING PINES WOOD CABINETS THE GLEN R EALTY u NE LivingRm./FamilyRm.-Style, Open Floor Plan 3-Car Garage
2 Bed/2 Ba Florida Room w/H/A *2BD/2BA/1CG Maintenance-Free Villa Formal DR & Wood Burning FP in Fam. Rm. Built 1995 w/2674 Sq Ft Living Area
Nook Plus Dining Area 'Move in ready Over 55 Community Many Upgrades 11417 IN O I E ll'x32'Enclosed Porch Overlooks Greenbelt 1/2Acre, Corner Lot On the MeadowsGolf Course
'COMMUNITY POOL 'LOW Monthly Fees Nice Deck in Back FurnishingsAvailable U IE Reroof 2013 w/50yr. shingles, A/C Repl. 2006 Modified MitchUnderwood Diplomat Model
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 2 / I F L Garage Bump-Out Workshop Area "Optional" Social Membership
SPECTER & MARIA KOROL Orig. Owners No pets & Never Smoked FT-- CALL THE CUNNINGHAM TEAM
rr 7ET7TrHALLEY (352) 527-7842
Eil"' e.i esu/uon "eumx e 2 5277842 LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 (352) 637-6200
www.Flo .dL.i.ngin o.co.n 52 422-3875 6 Emailounalley@tampabay.rr.com Email kcunningham@remax.net
'i i HERE'S HOW: .'W I..
Ei26 e7282, 1 Buyer calls exclusive I
.,24/7 Info Line -
OL637-2828 "I '

lBuyer enters house iii
4750 EL CAMINO DRIVE INVERNESS CITY LIMITS HOME number when GORGEOUS WATER VIEWS from almost every 3/2/2 IN CONNELL HEIGHTS
OUTSTANDING LANAI SCREENED W/PAVERS Originally built as a "Mother-in-Law" home. 3 bedrooms and prompted room in this adorable 2/2 A-frame cottage on the BUILT IN 2005
2 full baths in the main house and 3rd full bath, 2nd kitchen | Homosassa River. Elevator accesses the huge f a
3 Bedroom/3 Full Baths Wood Cabinets and 4th bedroom in back. Could also be used as family room aster and loft upstairs. Living area with wood e s floor plan with great room, formal l 4-sdining,
Fam rm/ofice/fml dining ,Huge Garage or den. Lots of space, almost 2,000 sq. ft. Living area. burning fireplace and 2nd bedroom/bath lanai, inside laundry with wet sink, 1 Ox82' 4 20x20
Lots ofle/GestWing Commnity Pool Attached 2-car garage with workshop and single carport. 3 Buyer listens to downstairs. Large laundry/storage area. And a attached carports and detached carport/boat
ELLtE SUTTON 352g 287 3997unity Pl 1acred and s ged wiarke p ad se pyerlsty s dock for that boat. Awesome weekender/vacation parking. Everything your family needs is right here.
ELLIE SUTTO352-287- 7 1/2 acre and shed.New on market. property home. Don't miss this one.
o...lJENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 I presentation in CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555 CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email eiesullon eminx nel Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.net Engish or Spanish
www.FOdL ngnoco www.CitrusCounlyHomes.com English or Spanish Email: cnadal@remax.net Email: cnadal@remax.net
2417 INFO LINEGTE
Q, COMMUNITY --

OLI~e~l61 '** -
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164 W. STAGGERBUSH PATH WITHLACOOCHEE GRACEFUL SOUTHERN CHARMER 131 N. SKYFLOWER PT., LECANTO CHARMING CONDO!
BEVERLY HILLS RIVERFRONT! This large country home on 2.5 rolling acres Affordable 3/3/2 pool home in beautiful, gated Heather Ridge. Parkside Village
Nicely maintained interior features split plan, high ceilings, 2 BD Parkside Village
Nice 2BR/2BA/2CG Home Estate sale just off the river. And on 1.2 ACRES! features 3-LARGE bedrooms, vaulted great room plant shelves, laminate flooring, upgraded carpet, sliders to Cozy Cul-De-Sac
SLg. Kitchen w/Lots of Cabinets Raised mound septic. Big house with metal roof Boat and breezy screen lanai. HUGE detached pool area, separate living room/family room. Master bath 55+ Living
SShingles Replaced 2009 dock. CHA updated in 2011. Oversized 2-car garage GARAGE w/full electric AND room for 4-6 cars! boasts separate shower, jetted bath and dual sinks. Pool area Large Front & Rear Porches
AC Replaced 2010 Eat-in kitchen. Needs some work, but lots of potential READY! overlooks over sized backyard Community offers c ubhouse A/C, Plumb & Electric Upgrades
Well Maintained IJENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200 MOVE-INREADY! pool, tennis and recreational vehicle parking.
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 Email: lenniferSioliz@remax ne I KIMDEVANE [ DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 GEORGE SLEEMAN (352) 464-7812
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net www.CitrusCountyHomes.com Email: kim@kimdevane.com Email: davidsivory@holmuil.com Email: RealEslale@ GeorgeSleeman.coin


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SReal Estate DIGEST


Barbara
Mills
RE/MAX
Realty One.


RE/MAX Realtors
forge ahead in 2014
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are pleased
to announce that Wayne Hem-
merich has surpassed $2 million
in closed sales volume this year.
This qualifies Wayne for the 2014
multimillion dollar club.


Wayne is a veteran Realtor in
Citrus County who has a long his-
tory of success in this area. He
works out of the Crystal River
RE/MAX office on U.S. 19.
Realtor Barbara Mills has
qualified for the 2014 million dol-
lar club.
Barbara has been active in
Citrus County real estate for
more than 20 years and is well-
known for her enthusiastic sup-
port of our veterans and military
personnel. She spends a lot of
time and energy organizing
events and appreciation parties
for our service people. She is
also a very successful Realtor in
our area who works out of the In-
verness RE/MAX office.
Coworkers congratulate


Wayne and Barbara on their
continued success.
Citrus Hills agent
doubles success
For the second month in a
row, Susan Mastrangelo has
been named
the top sales
agent at the Vil-
lages of Citrus
Hills.
The Wel-
come Center
for the Villages Susan
of Citrus Hills is Mastrangelo
at 2400 N. Villages of
Terra Vista Citrus Hills.
Blvd. in Citrus
Hills. Visit them online at
www.CitrusHills.com.


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
These Mason bee tunnels use bamboo bundles. To create an inviting habitat
for leaf cutter and mason bees, add nesting sites to your yard to maximize
the production of native bees.



Make your garden


a bee-friendly place


Associated Press

Bees are pulling a disappearing
act. Honeybees are vanishing from
their hives. Bumblebee numbers
have crashed so radically that some
species are believed extinct. Even
native solitary bees are in decline.
Food supplies dependent upon pol-
linators are threatened.
But gardeners can help.
There is no single explanation for
what is causing the pollinator losses,
said Matt O'Neal, an associate pro-
fessor of entomology at Iowa State
University
"There are multiple sources of
stress," he said. "There are your
basic pests, also pathogens like
viruses, pesticide exposure and land
use practices reducing the kinds of
forages bees can feed on. It looks
like a combination of all those."
As insect pollinators, bees
broaden our diets beyond meats and
wind-pollinated grains. An esti-
mated one-third of all foods and bev-
erages are made possible by
pollination, mainly by honeybees,


the U.S. Department of Agriculture
says. Pollinators also are essential
for flowering plants and entire plant
communities.
"Common species are disappear-
ing at a dramatic rate. I'm terrified
in the extreme," said Mace Vaughan,
pollinator program director with
The Xerces Society for Invertebrate
Conservation in Portland, Ore. "I
worry in particular about pollinator
species with limited ranges and that
have unique habitat requirements
that are being threatened. A lot of
species are dropping out of the
landscape."
You don't have to become a bee-
keeper to restore or boost bee popu-
lations. Gardeners can:
Plant flowers and create green
spaces, especially in urban areas.
Leave patches of bare soil, rocks and
brush piles for use by ground-
dwelling native bees. Add caterpil-
lar host plants. "I can't recommend
particular plants for all areas of the
country, but I can recommend the


10759 S Flutter Ter.
;1 Inverness 34452.
t" hi, "- I .. . I.

Listed by Nancy Ayres
352-279-5058
Left on S FlutterTer to 5th driveway on Right. From Inverness: 44 to 581,to Right
on Stage Coach & 1.3 mi.to Flutter.

@Oakwood Village
S'*" 871 Starjasmine PI.
41 2/2/1 Immaculate home
with great room, large
kitchen, den and 2 screen
rooms.
709749 $79,900
Rte. 491 to Forest Ridge,
rt.on Lincoln, rt at stop sign


2/2 picturesque condo
709556 $142,900
Sherri Orendorf 573-9968


3/1 new paint and appliances
710272 $54,900
Randy Morehouse 287-2934


0-gO J 1 l=0 ^ Iale D.C- CTjY,-Tr~1r19r *''HM




Two stories with over an acre 4/3/2. Move in ready 4/2/2
709634 $264,900 708427 $150,000
Pam Shemet422-2939 John Maisel 302-5351


~3/2/2
Tons of
Storage,
New Paint
I and Carpet
jl,,m 707574
$159,900
Becky Paradiso
634-4581


A0


3/2/2, stainless
steel appliances
& granite
countertops.
708572
$137,900
Randy
Morehouse
287-2934


3/1 Cuteasa button!! FencedYard
710050 $54,900
Sherri Orendorf 573-9968


i r room End unit condo,2 bed 2 bath
707391 $75,000 708789 $77,500
Yolanda Canchola 219-2196 Becky Paradiso 634-4581


See*BEES/P1ge E 5 3 *__1
F-352.-"4-0888 3257-12- 3I52c-447^-4594


Wayne
Hemmerich
RE/MAX
Realty One.


I I_ ; SUG AR IL W IlEV OIODS I


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 E3


See BEES/Page E5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Have flowers


blooming every


day of the year


ach year has 12
months, 52 weeks
and 365 days.
Daylily, Hemerocallis,
flowers each
last for one day
Daylily plants
may have sev-
eral flowers
open on each
stem and con-
tinue producing
flowering stems
for three to four
weeks from
April to May lo- Jane \
cally. Some se- JAN
elected cultivars
are repeat- GARI
blooming, such
as 'Yangsy,' 'Butterflake,'
and 'Double Talk.' Cut off
the dying flower stalks
and, after a rest, cultivated
daylilies will re-bloom.
Most flowering plants
bloom for several weeks
during their season, then
set seeds which will pro-
duce future generations of
the species. As pollen may
have come from a different
plant of the same species,
the seedling plant may have
slightly different character-
istics from the parents. Hy-
brids and cross-bred plants


are often sterile.
For example, the annual
pink phlox that bloomed
along roadsides, in un-
mowed fields
a and moist
ditches got pol-
linated and
made seeds
from March
through April.
By hot May,
these plants
stop flowering,
die off and drop
Veber their seeds.
E'S Wind, birds, an-
imals and lawn-
DEN mowers help
disperse the
seeds. The seeds lie dor-
mant through the hot, wet
Florida summer The cold
winter prevents germina-
tion, but gets phlox seeds
ready to germinate.
See JANE/Page E5
Each month, some plant
or another blooms. Wise
gardeners choose species
so there will be something
in flower every month. The
Bridal Wreath shown here
blooms four to six weeks
from March to April.
JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle


Jackie Oaff ney Jason Gaff ney
A Realo- usE Realtor@
302.3179 SOLDNae! 287-9022
746.6700 THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS!
he i odiien Giri WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


I wood cabinets in kitchen, new carpet, tile and real wood flooring. New paint I
in and out. Vinyl enclosed 12 x 30 Lanai. Absolutely Turn Key. Minutes to
shopping and restaurants. Call today for your private showing.


A American Realty For a VisualTour and all MLS: c i a i
OEM & Investments bjdavis.com Jackie Davis
ERA 117 S. Hwy. 41
EIA nverness, FL jackie@bjdavis.com (352) 634-2371 Cell





11 ARE -3,300 SFLA HOME LRAiLI
3 Bedrooms, 3 baths, living room, family room, dining room, WINDERMERE WITHIN LAUREL RIDGE
office. Eat-in kitchen with gorgeous maple cabinets, granite ,3 Bedrooms 2.5 baths Office 2 Bedroom 2 bath Screened lanai
counters. The entire home is tiled, new paint inside and out. Master ste-lstfl Eat-in kitchen New exterior paint
Long circular drive with 4 light posts. 10 Of the acres are $169/mos: exterior paint, roof care, lawn/shrub care, irrigation, NearTwisted Oaks Golf Corner parcel
currently leased for haying. In a community of similarly grand cable, clubhouse w/heated pool, RV/boat parking Lawn/shrub care
homes, all with 10 acres or more. Bring your horses, yourtoys. 0 M
$369,000 MLS 710169 $79,000 MLS 708363 $79,000 MLS 708182


E4 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

In February, the seeds get wet with
morning fog, dew and occasional
showers. As soil warms, the seeds
sprout Within weeks, pretty flowers
grace the roadsides and meadows.
As long as the site is not mowed be-
fore the seeds mature, the annual
display will continue every spring.
Plants produced from cuttings, di-
visions, layering and offsets from
bulbs and roots are identical to the
parent. The lovely Tasmanian Flax
Lily, Dianella tasmanica, with strik-
ing, variegated strap-like leaves, be-
comes a wide clump after several
years. The leaves grow less than 30
inches tall. Thin stems arching above
the leaves have tiny blue flowers from
spring to summer They are not flashy
or large. The variegated, cultivated
variety grows offsets fairly quickly No
gardeners grow flax lily from seeds.
To divide flax lily dig straight down
8 to 12 inches from the base so as not
to sever roots. Then lever up the
whole clump. Gently shake off the
soil, tease the roots apart and snap off
to separate individual plantlet bibs.
Immediately plant a group of
three to five plantlets in well-
drained, humus-rich soil. Do not let
roots dry Let flax lily grow into a
large, beautiful garden plant
Each month, some plant or an-



BEES
Continued from Page E3

concept" O'Neal said. "Provide pollen
and nectar throughout the (growing)
season. Plant the right habitat Every
state has land grant agencies and
agents. Look to them for help."
Install bee hotels around the
yard by drilling holes in wood blocks
and creating reed or bamboo bun-
dles. They provide instant habitat
and can be built on the cheap. "An-
other thing you can do is plant woody
plants elderberriess, raspberries,
sumac) with branches that have soft
insides," Vaughan said. "Grow these
shrubs up and then cut them back to
expose the stems. Carpenter and
mason bees will nest in them."
Eliminate or change the way
you apply pesticides. Don't use them
on plants that are blooming. Apply
them at night when bees are less ac-
tive. Spray from ground level to re-


other blooms. Flowering spans four
to eight weeks for most plants. Wise
gardeners choose species so there
will be something in flower every
month: Red Maple, a Camellia and
Carolina Jessamine for January;
plums, redbud, azaleas and Florida
Violets for February; dogwood, Wal-
ter's Viburnum, spiderwort, rain
lilies and coral honeysuckle for
March; red buckeye, fringe tree,
Amaryllis bulbs, coral bean, daylily
and Indian Hawthorn for April;
tuliptree, gladiolus, roses and re-
peat-blooming azaleas in May; then
magnolias, roses, crape myrtles and
oakleaf hydrangeas in June.
Gardeners research to find which
plants flower and when they bloom
in their garden location and climate
zone. Choosing a tree, shrub, vine,
herbaceous plant and wildflower for
each month will produce flowers at
varying heights, with different sizes,
shapes and colors. Selecting a wide
variety of flowering plants provides
nectar, pollen, fruit and seed for
wildlife that must coexist with dom-
inant humans.
Insects such as butterflies and
bees, reptiles and amphibians such
as turtles, lizards and snakes, mam-
mals such as squirrels, possum,
deer, foxes and moles, and birds
such as cardinals, bluebirds and
hummingbirds will live in gardens if
the necessary shelter, food, water,
nest sites, nest material and habitat
are provided or left intact for them


duce drift, and create buffer zones
next to agricultural areas. Rethink
the use of herbicides, which reduce
pollinator food sources by removing
flowers from the landscape.
Add signage to advertise the
presence of pollinators. Bees often
range several miles from their hives
or nests. Place pollinator habitat
signs around pastures, community
gardens, city parks, bike trails or sub-
urban yards to promote conservation.


TURN KEY Business & Real Estate Deal!
Grandfathered in Daycare licensed for 45
children, 24 years of operation, good
standing in community, teachers in place, in
downtown Inverness. Qualified Buyers for
Appointment Only. $159,900 MLS #705482
00011ZB


to survive and proliferate.
Gardeners love to grow flowers.
Choose wisely to have something in
bloom every day of the year


Jane Weber is a professional gar-


dener and consultant Semi-re-
tired, she grows thousands of na-
tive plants. Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion County, gar-
den. For an appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. corn.


I 4 9 9AZ^^0Ay^ 0^^w C71MUS COUA


Prudential
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Properties
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3


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il1 1l3. 6' w,4:. S;i89.40 -'- 6117 N Whisperinq Oak Lp
Light, bright & sunny! Well-appointed pool 11: ,.i.. S160.uu000
home on elevated half acre. Warm, comfortable &welcoming home
Dir. 486 to SoonAnnapolis, L on Hartford, Ron w/greenbeltto the rear=privacy.
Monopoly, Ron Lafayette Way Dir: Hwy 491 to Oak Ridge to home on Right
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


l~l '2723 N Crosswater Path
MLS 706407 $675,000
UNIQUE, high quality, very clean golf
course home. MUST SEE!
Jodie Trace Holder 352-302-2036


,"- t.A 990 W Silver Meadow Lp
MLS 356919 $194,900
You'll love Terra Vista's amenities as
much asyou'll love this villa!
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


s4stiLL
C"itl"'5 i 435 E Keller Cl
h .11: 3 i 'i S24.400
Enter & be amazed w/the beauty of this
home & its' Oaks Golf Course views.
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


Curb appeal draws you to the inside of
this Villa; AWESOME amenities draw you
to the community.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


L' 1708 W Spring Meadow Lp '1 "Z> O 636 E Gilchrist Cl, 23-4A
MLS 705820 $84,000 MLS 706786 $69,900
Like new, maintenance free Townhome "Cottage Unit"- 2/2, ground floor, end unit
with fabulous community amenities, fully furnished. Come see me!
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Maria Fleming 352-422-1976


OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW LISTING





/W tjO"" 2341 N Punam F1
[.l U : -.III I $69.900
Charming, maintenance free villa,
green belt surround, near many amenities.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


)0\,11t 463 WDoerr Path
MLS 703227 $268,000
Expanded, Improved, Upgraded! Well
maintained, maintenance free Villa
Mark Casper 352-364-1947


il SI 4531 N Saddle Dr
MLS 707511 $169,900
Reduced $26,900!, Large UNIQUE FIXER
w/Brady Bunch kitchen. 3/3.5./2w/pool.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


/I0,11l'1bi 7202uEGlchrnisl Cl 253a
MLS 355589 $63,900
Furnished 2bd/2ba ground floor unit
w/nice views of green spaces.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501


PINE RIDGE [ CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20W.Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 (352) 746-0744
c 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC An independentlyowned and operated brokermemrnberof BRERAffiliates LLC Prudental,the Prudential

S S- Si, I I l . i, ..


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 E5




E6 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
............................................ advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................... 352-563-5966
News information............................................. 352-563-5660
.............................................. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Ci IRONICLE

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Average US 30-year


loan at 4.29 percent


Despite drop, market still apprehensive


Associated Press
WASHINGTON- Average U.S. rates
on fixed mortgages declined slightly this
week as the spring home-buying season
has gotten off to a slow start.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday the average rate for the 30-year
loan eased to 4.29 percent from 4.33 per-
cent last week. The average for the 15-
year mortgage ticked down to
3.38 percent from 3.39 percent.
Mortgage rates have risen almost a full
percentage point since hitting record
lows about a year ago.
Warmer weather has yet to boost home-
buying as it normally does. Rising prices
and higher rates have made affordability
a problem for would-be buyers, while
many homeowners are reluctant to list
their properties for sale. Roughly a third
of homeowners owe more on their mort-
gage than they could recoup from a sale.
Data released Tuesday showed U.S.


home-price gains slowed in February from
a year earlier for the third straight month,
as harsh winter weather and high prices
have slowed sales. According to the Stan-
dard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home
price index, home prices fell in 13 of the 20
cities in February compared with January
Average prices nationally are expected
to rise by single digits this year, after a
double-digit surge last year as home val-
ues rebounded from the Great Recession.
The increase in mortgage rates over the
year was driven by speculation that the
Federal Reserve would reduce its $85 bil-
lion-a-month bond purchases, which have
helped keep long-term interest rates low
Indeed, the Fed has announced four
$10 billion declines in its monthly bond
purchases since December
The latest came this week as Fed offi-
cials decided to reduce the monthly
purchases to $45 billion a month, because
they believe the economy is steadily
healing.


Inside...


Real I


Jane Weber
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Ivory-handled corkscrew could be a very lucky find


D earJohn: My wife and I at- produced for hundreds of years
tended an auction in and cover a wide range of types.
northeast Geor- -The one you have is
gia last week. Every- ivory, and my guess is
thing we wanted sold it is a warthog tusk.
much higher than we The end cap has some
could afford. Toward nice detail at the edge.
the end of the sale, the .I I think it is sterling sil-
auctioneer sold a box ver that is heavily tar-
lot that had a couple of B nished. If so, there will
wine glasses my wife- be a hallmark or the
liked, so we bought the word sterling along the
box lot for $10. edge somewhere. If I
Wrapped up in some John Sikorski am correct, potential
newspapers was this SIKORSKI'S dollar value is $100 to
corkscrew. I have en- AT'IC $200.
closed a photograph. __________ Dear John: I hope
It appears to be ivory, these photographs are
but I am not sure. What can you good enough for you to evaluate
tell us about its value or anything for their worth. These figures are
else? Thank you for any help you from my sister's estate to me. Can
can provide. TD., Internet you tell me about them? -AC.,
Dear TD.: Well, that was a lucky Beverly Hills
buy Corkscrews are a popular cat- Dear AC.: I think your two fig-
egory of collecting. They have been urines were made in England.


The material has the look of mar-
ble but is porcelain. It is referred
to as bisque, an unglazed fired
porcelain that was produced in
large quantities during the Victo-
rian era in Europe, England and
America.
Bisque figures have been a cat-
egory of collecting for decades.
The two you have would sell in
the $75 to $150 each range.
Dear John: I have finally gotten
around to looking through a big
box of stuff my mother gave me
more than 30 years ago. I have al-
most thrown it out several times.
There are old newspapers from
See ATTIC/Page E7
The ivory handle of this
corkscrew likely came from the
tusk of a warthog. The metal is
possibly sterling silver; if so, this
would be a lucky find indeed.
Special to the Chronicle




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
Although the material used to make this figurine looks like marble, it's
actually bisque, a type of unglazed porcelain.


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

when Elvis died, Nixon quits,
etc. There are magazine cov-
ers from 1917 to 1925 like "Mc-
Clure's," and "Metropolitan"
with beautiful women and
pictures of artist paintings.
There are five 9 1/2 inch by
14 inch block prints in poor
condition that have the name
Hiroshige on them in pencil.
An art professor friend of
mine thinks they are authen-
tic, possibly 150 years old.
There are a few smaller
miscellaneous pictures; some
look like block prints. I would
like to have an expert ap-
praisal and have them re-
stored and properly mounted
or sell them I am not sure


what. They are beautiful, but
not my kind of thing. Are any
of these items worth any-
thing? -J.H., Internet
Dear J.H.: Japanese wood-
block prints are a specific cate-
gory of collector interest The
name Hiroshige is widely rec-
ognized by collectors. Since you
are thinking of selling them, it
would be best to contact a spe-
cialist Lark Mason is a nation-
ally recognized specialist in
Oriental antiques. The website
is www.igavelauctions.com.
The magazine covers are of


no specific collector interest,
but are often framed and sold
as decorative Remember
When items.
U
John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He
hosts a call-in radio show,
Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send ques-
tions to Sikorski's Attic, P.O.
Box2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@a ol. com.


U! B 746-9000
Kirk & Amanda Johnson Tom Balfour Walt Engeliken Y 0000 Fenke Ho m e P ce Analys I
BROKER -REALTOR, GRI REALTOR BROKER ASSOCIATE REALTOR S*H l1 ^ I Il~.f lI 3 .


PINRIDG I NRIDG


LARE RDG


BEERY LL


CU SPNRIENOGS


I think your two figurines were made
in England. The material has the
look of marble but is porcelain. It is
referred to as bisque.


COMMERCIAL RULDING + HOME


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 E7


el 5518 N. ELKCAM


CrMUS SMNGS
orl




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Santa Fe real estate

agent raises eyebrows

with drone cameras


Associated Press


SANTA FE, N.M.
A Santa Fe real estate agent is
taking marketing homes to new
heights, along with new compli-
cations in federal aviation laws.
Agent Brian Tercero has
been using a drone to help ad-
vertise homes on the market, ac-
cording to the Santa Fe New
Mexican. Video footage from a
drone can better convey the appeal
of a property than standard market-
ing photos of trees, he said.
"Flying over (the property) adds
a whole other dimension," Tercero
said. "It's powerful. And it was in-
strumental in getting the buyer to
bite."
The Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration has banned the use of
drones for commercial purposes
except in the cases of those with


special permission from the
agency But a federal judge re-
cently ruled that drones for com-
mercial use don't fall under FAA
regulations.
In March, a judge with the Na-
tional Transportation Safety Board
dismissed a $10,000 fine for a busi-
nessman who used a glider to take
aerial photos for a University of
Virginia Medical Center ad. The
judge said the drone was not an air-
craft as defined by the FAA's own
regulations.
The FAA is appealing the deci-
sion as it works on new regulations
to cover drones.
Congress recently requested that
the FAA devise a plan to safely in-
tegrate unmanned aircraft by Sep-
tember 2015.
Tercero said he should be able to


See Page E10


p




Jo


C


p





I


J


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


I


A


fp




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Brian Tercero, of Keller Williams Realty, uses a drone to create a high
definition video of a property that he is trying to sell for a client. He feels
video footage from a drone can better convey the appeal of a property
than standard marketing photos.


No Job Too Small
Residential & Commercial Buildings
APPROVING ASSISTANCE WITH BUILDING DEPARTMENTS
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John Warren White
PA ARCHITECT
THE MOST EXPERIENCED ARCHITECT IN HERNANDO AND CITRUS COUNTY
Cell 352-540-8687 352-796-4972
jwhite198@tampabay.rr.com


GITTA

BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220.046(
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


Investors Realty SISz
of Citrus County, Inc.
Visit my website at: www.r yflorida-houseucoi


SECONDS TO KINGS BAY FASCINATING RIVER VIEWS
no 1 2 master suites, apart- 3/2 home built 2007 on 13 acres on
menrt lower level Upper level the banks of the Withlacoochee
accessible via elevator Pool, hurricane across from Half Moon Gum Slough
shutters, security system, updated Preservel HW floors, fireplace, cherry
kitchen & bathrooms 190 ft of , i ,. ,,i .. i .... i ,
seawall, boat liftl Everything just ii
waiting foryou $488,000 $489,000


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 E9


*JFEATUREDIHME




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRONES
Continued from Page ES

use the drone as a real estate agent if the
homeowner gives consent. So far, he said,
the DJI Phantom, which is 18 inches in di-
ameter, has been used to show undevel-
oped land in northern New Mexico and
for more high-end listings.
"This just makes so much sense for out-
of-state and out-of-country clients," Ter-
cero said.
But what has become the latest trend in
the real estate industry has privacy advo-
cates concerned. Peter Simonson, direc-
tor of the American Civil Liberties Union
in New Mexico, said the public doesn't get
the same protections against invasions of
privacy when private entities use drones.
'A drone that hovers over a municipal
area with an extremely high-resolution
camera captures video of everything that
transpires over a long period of time," Si-
monson said. "That kind of data can dis-
cern people's movements, what meetings
they're attending, who is important in
their life and why"
Hal Wingo, a client of Tercero's who has
been trying to sell his home for the past six
months, said they are being respectful of
neighbors' privacy
"We're not going to home in on any other
property If someone felt you were looking
down on their house, they might not like
that," Wingo said.


Associated Press
Brian Tercero, of Keller Williams Realty, uses a
drone to create a high definition video of a property
that he is trying to sell for a client.


Like organic?



Plants do, too


Naturalfertilizers can be a good choice


LEE REICH
Associated Press
To get the most out of any organic
fertilizer, keep in mind how plants
feed and how these fertilizers act in
the soil.
The bulk of a plant's feeder roots
-whether it's a midget marigold or
a mighty oak lie just beneath the
surface, so generally there is no
need to dig fertilizer deep into the
soil. Anyway, low oxygen levels
there would retard microbial
growth, which is necessary to un-
lock nutrients from most organic
fertilizers.


To dig or not to dig
An exception to that "no dig" rule
is when phosphorus levels are low,
as indicated by a soil test or stunted
plants that are purplish when
young or late to ripen. (Cold soil in
spring also can cause a phosphorus
deficiency, a temporary one that
abates as soon as soil warms and
roots start reaching out.) Phospho-
rus moves very slowly in the soil, so
the only way to get it quickly into
the root zone is to mix it into the top
6 to 12 inches of soil.


See Page E14


WATERFRONT 3/2 home located on beautiful Duval Island adj. to the pastures of Ferris
Farms. The best of two worlds. Like living on a farm w/o the chores & the sparkling
waters of Floral City Lake off the backyard w/a deep water dock. Home has huge
rustic back porch w/separate workshop & 2-car gar. $224,900. Call 352-344-5535 for
appointment today. 1583132/706959.


U
Reliig


957 Lois Terrace, Suite 100
Inverness, FL 34452

352-344-5535 i
lS www.Cridland.com t


E10 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Behind the scenes at the world's top design show


Associated Press

NEW YORK- This year's Ar-
chitectural Home Design Show,
one of the industry's premier
events, was attended by tens of
thousands of interior designers,
architects and design enthusi-
asts looking for inspiration. Few
could have imagined all the ef-
fort and organized chaos that
went into making it.
On the day before the four-day
show opened late last month,
much of Pier 94's 130,000-odd
square feet on the Hudson River
was a sea of bubble wrap, card-
board, moving blankets and
bungee cords, providing only
glimpses of the glamour, ele-


gance and innovation that would
shortly be on display
Three hundred booths had to
be set up. Walkie-talkie-armed
wranglers herded a long line of
vans off the West Side Highway
and toward a staging door,
where another battalion of ex-
pediters made sure that the
goods they dropped off-
900,000 pounds of freight when
all was said and done re-
mained grouped and undam-
aged till teams came with carts
and dollies to deliver them to
the right booths.
Furniture, appliances, bath-
tubs, rugs, faucets, art and ac-
cent pieces had to wait for
flooring to be installed, walls


painted, lighting rigged. There
was 60,000 square feet of carpet-
ing alone.
Buckets of flowering
branches, boxes of exotic blooms
and bags full of moss stood near
the Dining by Design section of
DIFFA (Design Industries Foun-
dation Fighting AIDS), where
designers and companies pre-
sented imaginative dining
spaces in support of the organi-
zation's efforts against the
disease.
Calvin Klein Home ran a river
of moss down the center of a
massive wood table. A giant nest
of cherry blossoms hovered over
the table at Ralph Lauren
Home. Several men who looked


like they'd be comfortable on a
logging trail were at the Arteri-
ors space, carefully unwrapping
gilded tree stumps to put around
a glass-topped table. Jess Gor-
don's team at the Fashion Insti-
tute of Technology's booth slid
plastic vertebrae onto a massive
set of ribs for a conceptual
whale's belly Tin lanterns and
rope created a chandelier to an-
chor the nautical-themed space.
(wwwdiffa.org)
Designer Tucker Robbins,
who collaborates with artisans
around the world on sustainable
furniture and accessories, was
figuring out how to get a large
rug into a less-large space.
Ready to be placed were a group


of his Snaka Waka posts cir-
cular balls carved from coffee
wood in Cameroon and stacked
to make a snake shape. Sulawesi
rattan fish-basket lights were
strung overhead. (wwwtucker
robbins.com)
Patrick Weder showed pen-
dant lights made of wire and
opaque paper
"People always call them hon-
eycombs, but when I designed
them, I wasn't consciously think-
ing of that I just started form-
ing the wire and adding the
paper, and soon I had these won-
derful organic shapes," he says.
(wwwpatrickweder.com)

See SHOW/Page E15


REALTY GROUP
REALTY GROUP


Specalin i Te is

& Brentwood Resales
www .Ter st aty ru.com


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hemando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

CARL MANUCCI 352-302-9787' SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133' VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777
,i r 1


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Located in one of Florida's Premier Lifestyle Communities this popular Antigua model
spaciouss and absolutely lovely 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2-car garage plus den/office. with customize features is looking for a new owner having only known 1 owner! Home
lome is tastefully decorated in neutral colors with lots of ceramic tile flooring in all features expanded garage with a roll-up screened door, tile flooring in the main living
et areas plus the great room! Open floor plan design with a great use of space. area, security system, surround sound, double-paned windows and doors, custom
ireat room overlooks the private screened lanai. This home is in an excellent windowtreatments, tall upper kitchen cabinets & spacious master bath. Also offers a
cation in a maintenance-free area of Terra Vista. MLS 707735................$199,000 private rear setting & is located nearthetop ofthe HILL! MLS 708315.....$224,900


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS Immaculate Bristol model, split plan home in Brentwood of Citrus Hills. Great
Immaculate 2 bedrooms, plus Den/office, 2 baths, detached villa in gated room, dining room, spacious, open kitchen with breakfast bar and cozy nook,
community of Terra Vista. Large closet in the foyer. Great room open to kitchen inside laundry room. Neutral tile throughout the home, bedrooms are carpeted.
& nice size dining area. Very sunny atmosphere. Neutral colors throughout. Gated community, with access to the world- class amenities of Citrus Hills
Situated on a preserve home site offering privacy with a beautiful backyard Country Club. Just minutes to golf courses, pools, sauna, hot tub, Bella Vita
viewfrom either inside orfrom the expanded lanai. MLS 708400.....$224,900 Fitness Center and Brentwood recreation center. MLS 707514...........$239,000


HILLSIDE SOUTH
4 BED, 2A-AT 2-CR
1 i ,,, ,, bath, 2 car
,, .... a M odel.
-- I[1 ... ,, ,,, ,, -d fairway of

SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED. 25 BATH. 2-CAR FOXFIRE H S .I E '"' '.'. "OuT r
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Luryand torage'With over3600oquarefeeogorgeooyppotdbwgopaeeho ,,,, ,,i.,,, basnieboardsr
DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOOD'VIEW VILLAS Prof.ssionally decorated Lantana maintenance-free home. 2 bero, 2 baths, plus den/office with hom hasalltheoptions. Thetallcherrycabieto, Coran countertop, SS appbance and iB, ,, up^,,,,, bas widowrs
Situated on a beautiful lot in Terra Vista. Unique floor plan with access Fr0nch door entry. Op en floor plan d esign with ambi ent fighting throughout thw hom e. Kitch en has walk in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every cook. Massive formal r am u na e window
to both guest bedrooms from large guest bath. Spacious third bedroom Mllat cab&ets wth soft closefeature &crown moldng.Cohan countertops & gourmetstamlessstel living area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful Canadian Birch hardwood flooring dtrhhw Addedea nvely sonarheated sa
and expanded lanai. Large great room, dining room, eat-in kitchen, very titehen smnL Butler's pantry, Batain ktchen & formal dining room. Greatroom has specialty built in with which carries through to the spacious family room. Large master suite w/sitting area & Ade a lovely solarrisi^ theater did saltn
open floor plan. Experience living in a maintenance-free villa and spend custom arches & remote control fireplace. Minta rotating double-bladed ceiling fan 8 many more TWO walk in closets, Split floor plan, Guest bedrooms w/direct bath access & huge walk "ater po complete wth two wateralls and a fountain in 200. Pcture slders allow


gT s9 2 6 9Months or M o
Te r Vist Brn w o Rentals Soca Mebrsi inlue wit alRntl


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR
Located in the community of Brentwood. Immaculate unfurnished Cozy unfurnished inside unit Brentwood Townhome- 2 bedroom, 2.5
detached villa, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, and 2-car garage. Open floor plan baths, and 1-car garage. Spacious kitchen w/ breakfast bar. Nicely
with lots of space. Social membership is included. #2121............. $1,200 maintained, move-in ready. Social Membership included. #6106....$1,000


BRENTWOOD, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS I
Come take a look at this fully furnished home in the community of Brentwood
2 bedroom plus a bonus room. Convenient to the community pool and exercise
area. Perfect for seasonal or full time residence. All rental prices are based on c
one year rental. 6 months are negotiable. #1126.................................... $1,350 h


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 Ell





E12 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014




^^.IfChronic[le


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!

CR 2/2 on /2 acre
$550. H -3/2 on 1 acre
$650. neat and clean
Mona(727) 992-1010


2/1.5, LG Fenced
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$475; 352-220-6303





2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell


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Nice Home on /2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
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New appliances,
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ing. Financing avail-
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($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183


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end of year sale!!
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2Br/1Ba 1982 Single
Wide. NO HIDDEN
FEES! 20K Includes
Delv/Set/New AC,
Heat, skirting, steps,
gutters & down spouts
1-727-967-4230
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$ 11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.




-FLORAL CITY 3/2-
1+ACRE. treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527
Ij I



Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 352-795-1272
Crystal River
2 BR/1 BA Mobile on
Fendced lot, well,
septic, appls. incld.
$19,500 352 -563-0534
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on /2 acre. Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile.
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974

Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing


HOMOSASSA
2BR/2BA, Fully fur-
nished, Great Location
Drastically Reduced
(352) 746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on /2 acre
5192 S Amanda PT
$15,000 212-2051

HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/P1% BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds
3901 Sonny Ter
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330
INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352) 201-7081

OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807




0 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441

Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273


For Sale 9,.A
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-
tivated seller will negoti-


Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
furn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105



HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern 2/1 homes
from $7500 or Lease to
Own from $145/mo.
$700.down + Lot
rent of $265. mo.
10 yr. payoff at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional
55+Park 352 628-5977



Nice Older Singlewide
in Singing Forest Adult
Park, has addition
and partially furn.
Low Lot Rent
$18,300 obo
352-726-9369







CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for youf

3 2 2 ...............10
POOL HOME
2/1/1 ....................$625
2/2/11...................$900
CONDO
3/1 ....................... $725
NICE YARD
I '1'=1t,* lll!IIIK

2/2/11...................$650
2/1.5/1 ................$700
* .I II 0 J.l~ tII[.1!

3/2/2..................$900
Jennifer Fudge Cheryl Scruggs
Property Manager/
Realtor-Associates
352-726-9010


ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT]
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
S900& UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/unique home/Avail. May 1
S850-3094 N Satin Flower Ter
2/2/2 BH spacious home
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959 sq ft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 stry townhome, canal side

$650 & UNDER
$650- 7096 N Dawson Dr.
2/2 mobie Hernando
6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/oddibn on 1.25 acre
For More Listings Go To
www.'CirusCounty Ho ie R e ntals.


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/B $550. 3/B $850 Hs
sec. $450. 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025






RAINBOW
GARDEN
APARTMENTS
11850 Rainbow
Garden Circle.
Dunnellon, Fla
(352) 465-3309
TDD #711

OPEN
Mon. & Tues. 9a-4p
Wed. & Thurs. 9a-3p
Friday 9am-Noon
Lunch Noon-lpm
62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children
1 & 2 Bedrooms
"This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer"
(32)34-12


Business

FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514





US 19 Office- $550.
office/warehouse
1/b-lba $1200. util.
incl. 352-634-0129





CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished.
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242





HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225





HOMOSASSA
1/1, Duplex $435. mo.
C. Riv. 3/2 House $650
1st.& Sec. 212-4981





BEVERLY HILLS
Remodeled Lrg. 2/2/2,
CH/A, FL Rm, fncd yrd,
W/D, No Pets
$750. mo 1st last, sec.,
352-726-2280

INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1/I, opt.
3rd bd. Ig fenced yd
$650/mo Ist/last/sec
+ ref's (352)860-2793

RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM


Waterfront


HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225

INVERNESS
Lake Front Home
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$750 (908) 322-6529


Old Homosassa
Lrg. 1/1 liv & fam rm,
scrn prch, lots of stor-
age, dock w/ access
to gulf. $750., no pets
/smoke 352-628-2261





CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk. call Bruce
@ 352-445-9136 or
Ray @ 828-497-2610



Real EstateB


DEB
THOMPSON
SOne call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdeb()vahoo.com
and
debthompson.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.








Your World

,I "iNe 44te.





CH NWICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Retire to Kentucky's
BlueGrass Country!
Enjoy maintenance
free living! BRAND
NEW LUXURY HOMES
Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA,
1,800 sf, from the
low $200's. Lowest
price per sq ft in the
area! Mild climate,
low taxes, minutes
to shopping, dining,
medical &
Keeneland Horse
Racing. Perfect for
retirement/2nd
home. Call now for
details:
877-333-2412, x 121
SugarTree
Homes.com


For Sale IA


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE

Cit.pNitE


CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL !

30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966


Specializing in
AcreageFarms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


LOANS FOR
LANDLORDS!
We Finance From
5-500 Units
As Low As 5.5 %.
1-4 Family,
Townhome,
Condos OK.
Contact B2R:
1-855-940-0227
www.B2R
Finance.com




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486**
352-584-9496/464-2514




PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870




Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282


Laurel Ridge on
Twisted Oaks 1st
green. 2BR/2BA with
den & screened lanai
high ceilings and
open floor plan
$125k 352-746-4880
or 330-322-0329
553 W Player Path





For Sale B,,
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084


3/2/2 + Den On % acre,
Move in Condition!
Built in 2008
Selena Hills
$165,000.
352-341-0118







Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
BOUTIQUE
Real Estate Group
Buying or Selling?
We Tailor Our
Services.
Teri Paduano, Broker
352-341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
119 E. Dampier St.,
Inverness
TheFLDream.com



RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM







Nice 2BR 1 BA+ side
room w/ pri. entrance
bungulow style brick
Very priv $42k Cash,
As is. (786) 301-3805


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exittami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is areat!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home
LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY M







4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location -*
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.






"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
= SOLD! Sold! Sold!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
www.
citruscritters.com











Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office


Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!




A7


Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email:
Cfatone(dtampabav.rr.c
om
ERAAmerican
Realty &
Investments


LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watta
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com




Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments


Citrus Coun
Homes


$100,000 + Closing
Cost wll get you this
2,100 sq. ft.,
3BR 3'/2 BA Fully turn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268






LAKEFRONT
E. TENNESSEE
Norris Lake!
$39,900 Boat
ramp, under-
ground electric,
city water, wide
paved roads,
mountain and lake
sunsets!
1-877-717-5263
extl91l







Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Hoe

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNat-eoast
Proerties.com
"To view
my properties"






Oak Forest, Floral City
1 acre corner lot off
S Fern Pt. High & Dry.
City Water, Home site
only. Price Reduced
$14,500 352- 678-7145


Piii Your tMrwu MHom&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehorir i .-finder.com


I www.chronicleonline.comI


Ho e

Floral City, nice 3/2
open view on Duval
Isl. owner fin. w/15 k
down, 15 yrs @ 6%
call Justin Monahan
352-697-0240
ERA American Realty


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 E13




E14 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LEE REICH/Associated Press
If applied regularly and in sufficient amounts, compost or wood chips could
provide all the nutrients your plants need with a bit of soybean meal for a
few years if a soil is very poor.


ORGANIC
Continued from Page EO10

Once a soil is up to snuff with phos-
phorus, periodic surface applications
can trickle down through the soil fast
enough to maintain adequate levels
throughout the root zone.
Time your feeding
When should you apply organic
fertilizers? Remember that the nu-
trients in most of them are initially
insoluble and in forms that plants
cannot use. Account for the time lag
between application and nutrient
release by spreading organic fertil-
izers a few weeks before planting.
Even a few months before planting,
or way back late last fall.
Because soil microorganisms
need time, warmth and moisture to
release nutrients from organic fer-
tilizers, plants may have to wait to
eat in dry soil. Of course, plants grow
but little in dry soil, so their fertil-
izer needs are less. In this case, wa-
tering not only quenches a plant's
thirst, but also makes food available.
Occasionally you may have to tai-
lor your fertilizer to special condi-
tions. For instance, a spell of
unseasonably cool weather in spring
slows microbial activity If you must
spur plant growth then, apply a light
application of some soluble organic
fertilizer whose nutrients are
quickly available blood meal or
fish emulsion, for example.
A quick-acting fertilizer might also


be needed when a plant is so hungry
that it actually shows symptoms of
starvation, such as yellowing, older
leaves. Leaves can absorb nutrients
directly and for a really quick effect
you could spray a soluble organic fer-
tilizer such as seaweed extract or fish
emulsion right on leaves. Avoid plant
injury by reading label directions and
following specified rates carefully
Consider using quick-acting fertil-
izers as quick fixes only Build up
good reserves of nutrients in your
soil and such applications will be
unnecessary
Consider the slow action of or-
ganic fertilizers as a benefit. You
only need to apply them once a year
and, because heat and warmth spur
microbial activity and plant growth,
the nutrients are released in sync
with plant needs.
Simplify, simplify
As I point out in the fertilizer sec-
tion of my book "Weedless Gardening"
(Workman Publishing), spreading an
inch of compost or a few inches of
leaves, wood chips or some other or-
ganic mulch over the ground each
year will usually provide all the nour-
ishment your plants need.
The hungriest parts of the garden
are vegetable and formal flower
beds, so I like to feed the ground
there with compost which is an or-
ganic material relatively rich in nu-
trients. Less needy are trees and
shrubs, informal flowers and wild-
flowers; here, any organic mulch,
from wood ships to straw to pine
needles, will suffice.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Elizabeth Lyons/Associated Press
Elizabeth Lyons' glass chandelier from Elizabeth
lyons.com. She used leaf and blossom imagery to create
a unique lighting piece.



REAL ESTATE, INC. BESTG

nF 00015BM 5569 W. GULF To LAKE HWY. '*-
I ~ I CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 R
WWW.ATLFEXRE.COM F-MAI,: SALESALEXRE.C.fOM


MEADOWCREST-VILLA-CRYSTAL
RIVER; lovely 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar
villa fully furnished; ca'. 1. ,1 1i,,.
family room; Ig kitchen ,. .. i
S ...... .... l, L I. -11 1. | ,,
*i I jt i i9 $,I 94 ', i.Hlp.





HOMOSASSA 2 bedroom, 1 bath, S/W
M/H on 1 47 acres of land Impact fee
waived if M/H replaced, fenced rear &
one side, being sold "as is" no value
given to mobile Septic, no well


HERNANDO waterfront home
w/3bedrooms, 2 baths, (flood ins not
, ion-sink hole certified; gourmet
i .. w/granite counter tops, electric
fireplace i,, '. ... i ,... ; & hot tub
in family ...... into Tsala
Apopka lake chain in the Potts Wildlife
PRESERVE #707145 $169,900


mobile has been removed, 3 roll up doors,
1 '.i .... to drive RV i.. I I. ,
ha ,,, 1i "., washer dryer -, i i. .
of upstairs looks like it was planned on
being living area #703919 $80,000


CRYSTAL RIVER 3 bedroom, 2 bath
...." ... ...
screened porch Large kitchen
w/breakfast bar, lots of cabinets &
counter space #706582 $82,500


SHOW
Continued from Page Ell

The "Made" section of the show
featured up-and-coming designers.
Sculptor and designer Elizabeth
Lyons showed an enormous chande-
lier made of glass leaves and petals.
George Venson hung his illustrated
wallpaper rolls like whimsical wa-
terfalls from the top of the booth; the
tumbles of paper featured koi fish,
butterflies, even a seductive lip
print, in a riot of color
(wwwvoutsa.com)
Alex Rosenhaus and Drew Arri-
son, the young duo behind Alex Drew
& No One, hung a walnut-framed tri-
angle mirror on the backdrop of their
booth; they brought several of their
signature angular furniture pieces,


including a dining table perched on
24-karat-gold-painted legs, from their
new studio in Detroit. They see that
city as the next frontier for young fur-
niture designers.
"We're able to get a huge amount
of studio space there for next to
nothing," Arrison said. Besides,
Rosenhaus is from Detroit. "We'd
heard that artists were grabbing up
abandoned or foreclosed buildings
there, so we decided to check it out"
Many skilled tradespeople -
welders, fabricators who used to
work in the car industry are eager to
lend their expertise to furniture de-
signers in Detroit, the pair said. "You
can also find really high-quality met-
als and tool parts," Rosenhaus
added. (www.alex-drewcom)
The New York show's "Refresh"
section, where the big international
kitchen and bath folk were, was full


,_VJOANN MARTIN 212
11 Preferred
REALL ESTATE F

iBroker Associate 352-270-3255 www.prefin.net


3459 N. Honeylocust Drive
Beverly Hills
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, Imperial
Executive II offering 1604 sf of living area.
Granite countertops, new roof 2012, new
flooring, new tile in kitchen and bathrooms.
Freshly painted inside & out.
Priced at $79,900.
Directions: 491 to Forest Ridge Blvd. to
Honeylocust drive to #3459.


Beverly Hills
2/1.5/1 with caged in ground pool. New
stainless steel appliances, granite counter
tops. New carpeting, dual pane windows.
Tile in kitchen, baths and Florida room.
Don't miss out on this opportunity
Only $77,900.
Directions: From 491 or 486 turn onto Forest Ridge
Blvd., take Casurina to left onto Tamarisk Ave to #3398


4S "Always There For You"
KEY1 GAIL COOPER
REALTY Multimillion Dollar Realtor
"'" (352) 634-4346
3 Office: (352) 382-1700
S 'E-mai me: homes4u3, mindspnng.com


PERFECT SOUTHERN REAR EXPOSURE!
SCustom pool home built by Sweetwater
* 3/2/2 2309 sq feet of living
* Heated pool with total privacy
* Dual paned windows AND sliders
* Large filed dining has built-in buffet
* Newer carpeting in vaulted Great room
* Spacious laundry has lots of storage
* Home warranty for the buyers
#708734 $176.000


CUSTOM HOME HAS IN -LAW SU
'3+ office/2/3 on 59 acre setting
* 2880 square feet of living
* Open views of the #1 fairway on Pine
* Remodeled kitchen has newer appliances
* Gas fireplace in the vaulted family room
* AC/heat new in 2008 new roof in 2011
* Well with all new sprinkler system
* Convenient to clubhouse and golfing
#710083 $149.900


of high-end tubs, sinks, appliances
and countertops. Jenn-Air intro-
duced a fridge with an all-black in-
terior, making even leftovers look
good. Radiant Orchid, Pantone's
color of the year, found its way onto
a range hood at Prizer Dacor broke
up a long, sleek run of stainless steel
with a cheery backsplash of blue
skies and puffy clouds. (www.
jenn-aircom, www.prizerhoods.com,
wwwdacor.com)
Around the show, distressed wood
in grays, brown and "greige," a hy-
brid gray/beige, often mixed with
sleek elements. Ligne Roset clad
their booth walls in distressed wood;
JM Lifestyles installed an outdoor
kitchen using a proprietary engi-
neered-concrete. Scavolini and
Diesel partnered on an unfitted
kitchen with rugged modular pieces
in steel and weathered-looking wood.


I 1 I


k


CYPRESS CROSSINGS
Biand New ClassA Office
E< :ecutive Office Suites
Starting at $399/month
Gulf to Lake Hvwy ,Ciystal Rivei
Call (352) 795-7007 (727) 515-6571


ft^aw- -
REGENCY PARK-INVERNESS, FL COUNTRY LIVING-INVERNESS, FL
I st floor 2BR/2BA condo with fireplace. 2.33 acre wooded tract in Deerwood. Fenced.
Great location. $51,900 MLS#709755 $27,750 MLS#709930
CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 Ai
After Hours (2)302-6714 Email: roybass@tampabay.rrcom www.allcitmrusrealty.corn


U


See.JVirtual .IIIrs@..i resalehomesI..I IIB.I..I


SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014 E15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.& SERVINGcTUS In7 I l.R

COUNTY ,. ., St., I n FL 3 C T For


OVERS 3537666 A Fre MarketE
YEARS. ME I SUNDAYi


PROPERTY SIZE 5 ACRES MOL 2.5 ACRES
FENCED 2.5 ACRES CLEARED PASTURE
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ASKING $158,700
Call Martha Snadet 352 476 8727
ask lo file -710139


FIRE SALE IN THE WOODS?
Tril-, BEAi.iTIFI.IL i l. I.. -,:
, ,:i r ,,, H- ,I.,,r,',:,l, iOW NER HAS
REDUCED PRICE TO A RIDICULOUS
534,900 iI ..i : ii I i1
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Ask lot Marilyn Booth 637-4904


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ri. :, ,4- ASKING0 M. ,ii,
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VERY NICE 2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME
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r,1L iC71Il:i9I ASKING $54,900
Call Lawanda Watt 352-212-1989









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.1 iT I:: HILL: rlEr1EEf.:HI'
I.lL: -?II:il.-. $229,727
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickie 352 212-3410
wvivv CiltiisConnlvSold con


CALLING ALL UPSCALE BUYERS
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C.nnIol burld Iut Ihfs pierce $375,900
Call Ruth Fiedetick 1 352 5636866


WATERFRONT NEAR 3 SISTERS SPRINGS



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1.1ji=,i, ASKING $225,000
Nanci Jenks 352.400.8072


WOODSY PRIVACY . il II ,,i ,

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ilII: ;ill"i PRICED TO SELL AT $151,900
Pal Davis 13521212- 7280


OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-3







CALLING ALL GOLFERS TO SUGARMILL WOODS

35 Beech Slreel Unil 24. .i:: -- ,:.:
Call Tent Slerna& 352.220.1008
o0 anend the Open House 13









AMAZING WATERFRONT HOME!



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S324,900
Call Ouade Feeser 352-302-7699


IL/'ll I ,)/'tL/'t rorur-n
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,1L' :::,l:: ASKING S99,000
Call Jim Morton 352-422-2173


COUNTRY LIVING THAT IS
NOT FAR FROM TOWN
b vin li 'l -n .... I II nlln I~n( L. lnln
in.. n611ll'..I hill;i
Mi_ = i:-,'). ASKING $325,000
Call Jim Motion 422 2173
to see the lovel/ laim


I- I
RAILS TO TRAILS& LAKE ACCESS




i- -I,, S90,000
Call SI Iai S, lall 352 212 0211


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iLL'.. =C:l:":l: S219,000
Jeanne ot Willard Picktel 352 -212-3410
wwwizw.CiltusCountvSold.com


8149 W. Windhaven
Homosassa
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Isaac , I hlr irn 35 [26 [i7ilr
i,1L':. = IUI J
Isaac Baylon 352-697-2493


IN TOWN 2,'2,'1 WITH
FLA. ROOM & SCREENED PORCH

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1.11 : l.IIIIIAJ ASKING S84 900
Pal Dais i3521212 7280
Vie llstlinq iii iiL L c21oatdaL'is coin


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i,1L:. ,I:17 S103,000
Jeanne or Willard Pickrel 212-2410
ivwiiv. Citrus Count vSold. coin


E16 SUNDAY, MAY 4, 2014


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