Citrus County chronicle

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Title:
Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher:
Scofield Pub. Co. ( Inverness, Fla., Inverness, Fla )
Publication Date:

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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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oclc - 15802799
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Full Text

Bronx battle: Rays open series against N.Y Yankess /B1
m--w~diu m im5 a ....._____


C I T R U


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
73
LOW
55


MAY 3, 2014 Florida's Best Community I


s C 0 U N TY





IONICLE


~_www.chronicleonline.com
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500 VOL. 119 ISSUE 269


State OKs record budget


Legislators approve $77 billion at close ofsession


Millions for projects but none in Citrus


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida legislators
are signing off on a record $77 billion
budget.
The Florida Legislature approved a
new budget Friday night, right before it
ended its annual 60-day session.
The Senate passed the budget unani-
mously, while the House vote was 102-15.
The new budget is 3.5 percent higher


than last year's budget and includes a
boost in funding for schools, child wel-
fare and projects to battle water
pollution.
Legislators came into the annual ses-
sion with a $1.2 billion budget surplus.
They used part of the surplus to pay for
$500 million in tax and fee cuts, includ-
ing a rollback in auto registration fees.
But the extra money also enabled
See Page A5


Red brick and history define

Floral City's first bank

Editor's note: This is the first of an occasional "Then
and Now" series spotlighting historic buildings around
Citrus County what they were originally and what they
are used for now
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY
hen Laura Hennings first saw the building at
8305 E. Orange Ave. in Floral City, she knew she
wanted it
This past December, she and business partner Deedra
Harris opened it as Red Brick Place, an art gallery and
unique cultural gifts shop.
But originally, the building known as the Red Brick
Building that's just around the corner from U.S. 41, was
the first bank in Floral City, back when Floral City was a
boomtown during the thriving phosphate mining days.
When World War I began and the phosphate industry
died, the bank closed in 1914, and the Red Brick Build-
ing became the Floral City post office.
"Miss Mattie" D. Perry was postmaster from 1914 to
1942, when she retired.
Back in the day when the railroad was active, trains
brought the mail and the bags filled with letters were
hung on hooks. Then the postal employees wheeled a


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
On one hand, Gov Rick Scott will not
veto any Citrus County projects this
year.
Here's why: There are no Citrus
County projects for him to veto.
The Legislature's $75 billion budget
includes hundreds of millions of dol-


MEN6- JA A a- U I 0 j
Photo courtesy of the Floral City Heritage Council
Postmaster "Miss Mattie" D. Perry, center, is shown with
two unidentified friends. Perry was postmaster from
1914-1942.
cart down to the station to pick the bags up.
There's a cart on display at the Floral City Heritage
Museum on Orange Avenue next to the library
According to Frank Peters, Floral City Heritage Coun-
cil chairman, the building was constructed sometime be-
tween 1898 and 1905.
"We don't know the exact date," he said.
See Page A2


lars for local projects, but none of
them are targeted for Citrus County
That's because, unlike most years,
county and city governments that often
request assistance for public works
projects were silent with similar re-
quests this year
Crystal River City Manager Andy
See Page A2



Ocala

Democrat to

face Nugent

for Congress
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
The owner of a company that trains
developmentally disabled persons for
the workforce will attempt to remove
U.S. Rep. Rich Nugent from Congress.
Dave Koller, an Ocala Democrat, and
Nugent, R-Spring Hill,
will share the Novem-
ber ballot. There are no
other candidates in the
race for U.S. House
District 11. "
Nugent, the former -
Hernando County sher-
iff, was elected in 2010
and re-elected in 2012. Dave Koller
While Nugent often bemoans the slow
and bureaucratic pace of the federal
government, he said some progress does
take place.
"I do think we're making a differ-
ence," he said. "It may be miniscule at
times."
A harsh critic of the Affordable Care
Act, Nugent said he expects health care
to be a prime campaign issue.
See Page A2


Three challenge

Kautz for circuit

court seat
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Voters in Citrus and four other coun-
ties will decide whether Judge Sandy
Kautz keeps her seat on the bench and,
if not, who takes her place.
Three private attorneys and Kautz are
on the ballot for circuit court judge, having
qualified by the noon Friday deadline.
Kautz, first elected in 2008 when she
used the former name Sandy Hawkins,
waited until Wednesday to pre-qualify
with the state elections division and
then qualified on Friday
Kautz, whose responsibilities usually
fall with family law court, could not be
reached for comment.
Her opponents are Denise Dymond
Lyn, Mary Hatcher and Bo Samargya.
Dymond Lyn, who could not be
reached for comment, faced Kautz in
2008. She also lost in 2010 in an attempt
See Page A2


Classifieds ........ C9
Comics .......... C8
Crossword ........ C7


Community . .C5, C6
Editorial .........A8
Entertainment ..... A4


Horoscope ........ A4


Lottery Numbers .
Lottery Payouts ..
M ovies ..........


Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings .......C7


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PAGE A4


Building character


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Laura Hennings, left, and Deedra Harris own and operate Red Brick Place, an art gallery and unique cultural gifts shop
in Floral City. The circa-1898 building was the town's first bank and later was converted into a post office.


ONA*INrGLE[I

13UY OR:


- tv




A2 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


BRICK
Continued from PageAl

In later years, the post of-
fice moved and the Red
Brick Building went on to
house a variety of small
businesses, antique stores,
resale shops and the like,
which no one kept a record
of
But it always stayed red
brick.
As a resident of Floral
City since 1995, that's one
of the things Hennings
loved about it whenever
she would pass by
"I have loved this build-
ing forever, absolutely
ever, especially being the
first bank and post office,"
she said. "I told Marcia
Beasley (Floral City histo-
rian) that I've wanted to
buy it. When I learned it
was for sale that was it.
We bought it in July"
Hennings and Harris
opened their shop the first
weekend in December,
right in the middle of the
annual Floral City
Heritage Days.
"The building has a lot
of character," Harris said.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Photos courtesy of the Floral City Heritage Council
ABOVE:The Red Brick Building is the second building on the left with a lone man
standing in front. The time period is the early 1900s. RIGHT: This bank statement ad
for Floral City bank ran on the front page of the Chronicle in 1911.


Building character often
equals much-needed re-
pairs and restoration. The
women said the ceiling
had a lot of leaks, which
meant the floor had water
damage. They re-did the
drop ceiling and replaced
the flooring.
The back of the building
has a fireplace, but the
women don't know if that's
original to the building.
"The building's so old,
you could rub the bricks


and red dust would come
off," Harris said.
They "repointed" the
bricks, removing the old
mortar and replacing it with
new, and then sealing it
"We wanted to take our
time," Harris said.
She added that when
they were thinking of a
name for the business,
they wanted to incorpo-
rate the building's historic
red brick identity Thus,
Red Brick Place.


The shop carries hand-
made artwork, from photog-
raphy on canvas to baskets
and purses made by women
of Third World countries
under the Fair Trade Act
Cambodian women grow
the straw, dye it and make
the purses," Harris ex-
plained. "The Fair Trade
Act, the women get a fair
price for their work. We
pay a fair price for their
products, and they get the
money"


The store is open Friday
through Monday and is lo-
cated at 8305 E. Orange
Ave., Floral City For infor-
mation, call 352-419-7937.


Contact Chronicle
reporter Nancy Kennedy
at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicle
online, com.


From the CAPITAL


JUDGE Qualifying
JUDGE These Fift
Continued from Page Al without oF

to unseat Robert Hodges, J Richard Tc
and then unsuccessfully J Mark Hill
sought appointment to an Jonathan
open seat in 2011.
Samargya was on the J Richard "I
ballot in 2012 against Mike J Don Brigg
Graves for public de-
fender, losingthe race with J Richard S
38 percent. He also lost a
county judge race against "Three of u
incumbent Mark Yerman her seat. I
in 2004, receiving just seat becat
13 percent of the vote. open."
Samargya said he was Hatcher h
under the impression that family law in
Kautz would not be seek- 15 years.
ing re-election and was "The circ
surprised to see her qual- deserves the
ify for the ballot, sentation o01
"At the time I filed, it and I feel lik
was well known that vide the bes
Judge Kautz was not tion," she sai
going to run for re- Along wit]
election," he said. other county(



CONGRESS
Continued from Page Al

"I've had so many constituents come to
me, telling horror stories about losing in-
surance they had because of Oba-
macare," he said. "It's just a
wrong-headed way to go."
Koller could not be reached for com-
ment. According to his campaign Web
page, he is a married father of four
daughters. The family moved to Ocala in



PROJECTS
Continued from PageAl

Andy Houston said requests centered on
Sen. Charlie Dean's springs cleanup bill,
knowing that Dean in-
^IP % tended for a portion of
springs funding to come
to King's Bay
t"I don't remember
There being any specific
requests beyond that,"
: Houston said. "We feel
the state's been fairly
Andy kind to us."
Houston The appropriations
Crystal River budget includes $25 mil-
city manager. lion for springs projects,
but it isn't yet allocated to specific springs
projects.
Last year Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inver-
ness, inserted $100,000 in the budget for


g ended at noon Friday for judicial races.
h Judicial Circuit judges are re-elected
opposition:


ombrink Jr.

Ohlman
Ric" Howard
gs
ingeltary

us put in for
went for this
ise it was

as practiced
SBushnell for

uit certainly
e best repre-
i the bench
e I would pro-
t representa-
d.
h Citrus, the
es in the Fifth


SLisa Herndon
J Brian Lambert
J Curtis Neal
J Carol Falvey
J Mark Anthony Nacke


Judicial Circuit are Her-
nando, Lake, Marion and
Sumter
The nonpartisan race
will be on the August pri-
mary ballot If the overall
winner receives more than
50 percent of the vote, he or
she wins the race. If not, the
top two vote-getters face off
on the November ballot
Contact Chronicle
reporter Mike Wright at
352-563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn.


1996 from New York.
Koller's business, Developmental
Services Trainers, helps train develop-
mentally disabled individuals for em-
ployment, and it also trains businesses
and agencies to help the disabled.
Qualifying for federal offices and state
judicial races ended at noon Friday
Qualifying for other races, such as county
commission and state representative, is
the week of June 16 to 20.
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn.


ON THE NET
To view the budget:
http://bit.ly/R8FCfW.

Art Jones' "One Rake at a Time" project
of removing Lyngbya from King's Bay
Scott vetoed that allocation. He also ve-
toed the only other county project:
$200,000 for the State Road 44 traffic sig-
nal at Meadowcrest, which the county
eventually installed itself.
The appropriations budget is 432
pages. It includes large amounts for spe-
cific departments and agencies and
smaller amounts for projects. (To view
the budget, go to http://bit.ly/R8FCfW.)
The Legislature approved the budget
Friday night shortly before the session
concluded.
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn.


Legislators back changes
to child welfare system
Grappling with controversy about Florida's
troubled child-welfare system until the last
day of the legislative session, the House on
Friday unanimously passed a bill that sup-
porters said would increase transparency
and accountability at the
Department of Children
and Families and at priva-
tized community-based
care agencies. i
The Senate had al-
ready passed the wide-
ranging measure (SB
1666), which means it is
ready to go to Gov. Rick
Scott.
The bill survived with
transparency and ac-
countability provisions in- 2014 S
tact, despite an 11 th-hour
attempt by the governor's
office and DCF to amend the bill on the Sen-
ate floor.
Lawmakers boost protection
for sex-trafficking victims
The Florida House and Senate on Friday
unanimously passed a measure (HB 7141) that
would improve protections for sex-
trafficking victims, providing an array of services
such as medical care and specially trained child-
protective investigators and case managers.
The bill, which now goes to Gov. Rick
Scott, would also direct the Department of
Children and Families to inspect and certify
the "safe houses," where victims can find
shelter and services, and to establish serv-
ices in parts of the state where none exist.
The bill would also direct DCF to adopt
screening and assessment tools to identify
sexually exploited children and would allow
such children to be placed in safe houses if
the assessment determines that is the most
appropriate setting and a place is available.
Gov. Scott to sign pro
stadium funding bill
Requests for the state to approve money
for professional sports stadiums will have to
go through a new ranking process, poten-
tially reducing the lobbying of lawmakers for
the cash, under a bill Gov. Rick Scott is ex-
pected to sign.
But the measure (HB 7095) could also speed
$2 million a year to Daytona International Speed-
way and to soccer teams in Miami and Orlando,
while shutting out Major League Baseball until its
draft requirements for players defecting from
Cuba are revamped.
The House voted 89-27 on Friday to ap-
prove Senate changes to the overall meas-
ure. The bill requires the Department of
Economic Opportunity to evaluate economic
viability and rank funding proposals before


lawmakers are asked to approve sales-tax
dollars for multimillion-dollar construction
projects and improvements.
Bill to allow law licenses
for non-citizens passes
The Florida Supreme Court will be able to
grant law licenses to non-citizens under a bill
that's going to Gov. Rick
Scott.

Sfor the bill on Friday.
The Supreme Court
ruled in March that peo-
ple in the country illegally
can't be issued law li-
censes. The case in-
[ fl' volved Jose Godinez-
Samperio, who was
seeking his license after
passing the bar in 2011.
SS ION Godinez-Samperio came
to the United States with
his parents on a tourist
visa when he was 9, and they remained in
the country after it expired.
In-state tuition bill passes
Florida students living in the country ille-
gally will be allowed to qualify for in-state col-
lege tuition rates under a bill passed by the
Legislature.
The Florida House voted 84-32 on Friday
for the bill, which offers in-state college tuition
rates to undocumented students who had at-
tended a Florida school for at least three
years before graduation.
The Senate passed the bill Thursday It heads
to Gov. Rick Scott, who said he'll sign it into law.
The current in-state rate is one-quarter of
what out-of-state students and those in the
country illegally pay.
The in-state college tuition bill had been con-
sidered several times before, when it drew strong
opposition from many Republicans.
But this year, Scott and other GOP leaders
such as House Speaker Will Weatherford
backed the bill.
Juvenile sentencing
bill passes
The Florida legislature has passed a bill that
re-works mandatory life sentences for juveniles.
The bill passed the House 115-0 Friday
evening and passed the Senate 36-0 last week.
It now awaits the signature of Gov. Rick Scott.
The bill (HB 7035) would bring Florida law in
line with a U.S. Supreme Court 2012 ruling that
says life without parole for juveniles violates the
Constitution's ban against cruel and unusual
punishment, leaving Florida law in need of an
update. The bill leaves the mandatory minimum
for first-degree murder, creates judicial sen-
tencing reviews and denies those reviews for
those previously convicted of violent felonies
before committing first-degree murder.
-From wire reports


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Community Grand Opening

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Dedication of the Veteran's Walkway immediately followed by the ribbon cutting,
dove and butterfly release, tours and light refreshments.
No RSVPs required. Questions? Please call HPH Hospice at 527-4600.



flue Hospice Cur Center .1 Q Cofrs c h spp ce
2939 W. Gum to Lake Hwy. a not-for-profit organization initially licensed in 1984
Lecanto, Florida 34461 www.HPH-Hospice.org


LOCAL/STATE


El






Page A3- SATURDAY, MAY 3,2014



TATE& LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Kuhl to address
chamber May 9
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce will
have its monthly luncheon
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday, May 9, at the Old
Court-
house in ,
Inver- a
ness. The
luncheon *
will begin q '
with net- 2" '
working,
then the
program
begins at
noon. Gary Kuhl
The speaks to
featured Citrus County
speaker Chamber of
Commerce
will be Friday, May 9.
Gary
Kuhl, who will give a pres-
entation that includes a
tour of Citrus County and
information about water
conservation.
Kuhl is a former Citrus
County administrator and
an advocate for protecting
natural resources. His ex-
tensive background also in-
cludes being the executive
director of the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District and leadership
roles with Hernando County
and Sumter County
administration.
Cost is $18 for members
and $20 for nonmembers in
advance. The reservation
deadline is Wednesday,
May 7. For reservations,
visit citruscountycham-
ber.com and select events.
For additional event infor-
mation, contact Jeff Ingle-
hart at 352-795-3149 or
jeff@citruscountychamber.
com.
Community center
meeting today
The Beverly Hills Civic
Association invites anyone
interested to a meeting
from 4 to 6 p.m. today at
the Central Ridge Commu-
nity Center.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to seek advocates to
help with the association's
campaign to keep the com-
munity center under county
ownership.
Volunteers are needed to
help distribute 2014 mem-
bership information for the
pool and other facilities and
to get post cards signed for
presentation to the Citrus
County Commission. A de-
cision by the county is ex-
pected May 27.
For more information, call
352-746-2657.
Extension Service
offers workshop
Citrus County Florida-
Friendly Landscaping is of-
fering a free gardening
workshop from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 6.
Managing a healthy lawn
is often a full-time job and
recurring expense. Selec-
tion of the right materials to
accomplish a specific task
is the best place to start.
The sustainable lawn
varieties, typical weed in-
festations and pests that
target the varieties will be
highlighted during the
workshop.
The class will be at the
Citrus County Extension
Service building, 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Contact Steven Davis at
352-527-5708 to confirm
participation.
20/20 board meeting
scheduled May 19
The Citrus 20/20 Board
of Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, May 19,
in Room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are urged to
attend.
Interested persons and


representatives of organiza-
tions are cordially invited to
attend.
For information about Cit-
rus 20/20 Inc., visit its web-
site at www.citrus2020.org
or call 352-201-0149.
-From staff reports


Woman needs kidney transplant


Fundraiser

all day today
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
Karen Cooper has discov-
ered she has more friends
than she ever realized.
The 54-year-old who
grew up in Homosassa and
has lived and worked on
the west side of the county
for most of her life is now
pretty much confined to
her home with kidney fail-
ure, hoping and praying
for the day she can be put
on the transplant waiting
list the first step to her
only hope of surviving a
life without daily dialysis.


As for friends she never
knew she had, Cooper said
when she became ill this
past January and had to
stop working at Claw-
daddy's Raw Bar & Grill in
Crystal River, "people
came out of the wood-
work" to show their care
and support.
Today, the friends of
Karen Cooper welcome
the public to an all-day
fundraising event at the
plaza containing Moore
Bait & Tackle, Fort Island
Marine and The Nest, 9707
W Fort Island Trail, Crys-
tal River
From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
there will be activities for
the whole family music,
food, a bounce house for
kids, drawings and auctions.
From 5 p.m. on, the fes-


tivities continue
for the over-21
crowd at The Nest.
"Karen has
worked around
here all her life,
and is the kind of
person who would
do anything for
anybody," said Lau-
ren Moore. "We
want to do this for
her because she re-
ally deserves it"
Cooper said


Ia r
Coo
raising fi
get on I
transp
waiting(


learning she has kidney
failure was a complete
surprise. This past Janu-
ary, she thought she had
the flu. After having blood
work done, the following
day she got a call at work
telling her to get to a hos-
pital immediately she
had kidney failure.


S "They said if I
didn't, I could die
Within two days or
be in a coma," she
said.
Since being hos-
pitalized, Cooper
has been on dialy-
,en sis every day, three
per or four times a day
funds to and all night
kidney "The treatment
plant takes about 45
g list. minutes, then I can
do things like laun-
dry, watch TV or go into
town for about three or
four hours, but then I have
to be back for another
treatment," she said.
She can't get her name
on the kidney transplant
waiting list until she has
$5,000 in an escrow ac-
count and her creatinine


level, which measures kid-
ney function, is lowered.
Then she has to undergo a
stress test to see if her
heart is healthy enough for
a transplant, all before she
can be put on the list to
wait for a donor
She said she's tired all
the time, but knowing that
people care and are will-
ing to support her buoys
her spirits.
"I want to thank every-
body for their prayers and
support," she said. "It's
crazy when something
like this happens, you know
who your friends are."
For details, call Lauren
Moore at 352-794-3887.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
(@chronicleonline. corn.


Soldier, students reunite


Former

fifth-grade class

meets adopted

soldier in person
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HERNANDO
After five years of virtu-
ally no communica-
tion with Army human
intelligence collector
Richard "Ric" Downs, a group
of now-high-school students
were treated to the real deal
Thursday at Hernando Ele-
mentary School.
He reunited with 10 stu-
dents and their families from
Melissa Mitchell's 2008 fifth-
grade class.
"We adopted him through
Soldiers' Angels in August that
year," Mitchell said. "We
started writing him letters and
sending him gifts. Then in De-
cember of that same year, he
said he was coming home
and wanted to visit with the
students."
This visit turned out to be an
impactful experience for the
students.
"It is one thing that they
brought in socks or other items
to be sent to a soldier," said
fourth-grade teacher Jennifer
Berbert. "It didn't really mean
a whole lot until he came in
and they were able to make


.A :4A
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Ric Downs, left, visits with a number of high school students Thursday
night, including Ryan Schultz, center, and Christian Sanders. In 2008, Downs visited the Hernando
Elementary School and returned this week for a reunion with some of the students he met. On his first
meeting, Downs gave Sanders an Iraqi 250 dinar note, which the young man removed from his
wallet to show him. The students are now in ninth grade.


that connection."
Downs visited with the stu-
dents for the entire school day,
gave them a flag and coins
from Iraq. The rest is history
"I want to be a positive role
model," Downs said. "These
kids back in 2008 sent me let-
ters and didn't even know me.
I didn't know them. But to
come see them and get to
know them was great. I
wanted to take the time to


come visit them and show my
appreciation.
"Now, I want them to know
that years later they are still in
my heart and mind because of
what they did for me."
That was exactly his mes-
sage Thursday as the students
interacted with the solider
and reminisced with him
about their fifth-grade
experience.
"Who knows, 2017 when they


graduate I might be able to
come to their graduation,"
Downs said.
Downs is a St. Augustine res-
ident and served in the Army
for 25 years. He is now a con-
tractor for the United States
and does intelligence work
and security overseas.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext 1334, or eworthing-
ton@chronicleonline. corn.


'Robust' 5-year capital improvement

plan presented for city of Inverness


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS At a recent
Inverness City Council Capital
Improvement Program (CIP)
workshop, council members
were briefed on the city's five-
year plan, with emphasis on
2015, the next fiscal year
City Manager Frank DiGio-
vanni called the program
"robust"
The total amount of the 2015
CIP, which city council will vote
to adopt at a later date, is
$6,662,769.
Funding for projects will
come from a number of sources
including city reserves, grants, a
local tax and debt.
DiGiovanni said the city has-
n't incurred CIP debt in the past
few years, but for this one they
will in order to pay for the city's
"800-pound gorilla," the Valerie
Theatre project.
The plan is to take out a loan
for $1.5 million, with $500,000
going toward improvements for
Whispering Pines Park.
"To open the Valerie, we'll be
pushing $3 million before we're
done," DiGiovanni said. "We're
not refurbishing it; we're build-
ing a cultural center"
The tentative finish for the
Valerie Theatre is May 2015,
with construction beginning in
July
Other projects include:
Street improvements, such
as adding theme lighting and
"streetscaping" to Pine Street to


make it look more like North
Apopka's "Bicycle Boulevard,"
widening part of Highland
Boulevard, improving Zephyr
Street, and Dampier Street/Dr
ML King Jr Avenue.
Creating neighborhood cen-
ters with entry signage, building
a pavilion at Whispering Pines
Park Splash Park.
Utilities upgrades.
Purchasing and installing
art in public areas.
Planting trees at Liberty
Park to form a strong tree
canopy at the park.
Cooter Pond theme lighting
and improvements at Cooter
Pond Park.
Whispering Pines Park im-
provements such as equipment
upgrades, fence replacement,
road and parking area
refurbishing.
"This CIP is aggressive in the
best possible sense of the word,"
said Councilman Cabot
McBride.
McBride asked DiGiovanni
about the possible influx of
money from the county and also
Citrus Memorial hospital and
how that would relate to the CIP
"Because we are painfully
conservative, we do not base
our figures on the assumption of
new money coming in, but on
what we have," DiGiovanni
said. "If and when we get new
money, that money will be ear-
marked in the general fund
budget to begin replenishing re-
serves that are being tapped in
this."


Special to the Chronicle

Representatives from nearly 30
local businesses with jobs to fill
plan to participate in the third an-
nual Spring Job Fair on Wednes-
day, May 14, at the College of
Central Florida's Learning and
Conference Center in Lecanto.
The job fair, sponsored by Ca-
reerSource Citrus Levy Marion in
conjunction with the college, takes
place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and is
open to all job-seekers. There is no
charge to attend and registration is
not needed; however, professional
attire is required and will be
strictly enforced.
"For job-seekers, this is a great
way to meet with employers and
apply for jobs before walking out
the door," said Frank Calascione,
CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion's
business development manager for
Citrus County. "For businesses, the
venue offers a fast, efficient and
cost-effective way to recruit."
To date, the following employers
plan to attend: Arcadia Home Care
and Staffing, AT&T Communica-
tions Connection (AT&T Author-
ized Retailer), AT&T Inc.,
AutoZone Inverness/Crystal River,
C.E.M. Solutions, CareHere, CD
Staffing, Childhood Development
Services, Citrus County Sheriff's
Office and Fire Services, Citrus
Memorial Health System, Crystal
River Health and Rehabilitation,
Experience Works, Fountains Me-
morial Park, Health Center at
Brentwood, Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of Nature Coast,
Key Training Center, Maxim


Healthcare Services, New Hori-
zons Village, Plantation on Crystal
River, Staff America, Sunflower
Springs, Superior Residences of
Lecanto, Taylor College, Walgreens
(Store 11306), West Coast Insurers
of Crystal River and Western &
Southern Financial Group.
Calascione noted that a job fair
preparation workshop, set for Tues-
day, May 6, filled up so fast that a sec-
ond workshop will be offered
Monday May 5. Both take place from
9 to 11:30 a.m. at the CareerSource
Citrus Levy Marion career center,
683 S. Adolph Point in Lecanto.
The workshop covers how to
dress for success, soft skills em-
ployers seek and creating an effec-
tive "elevator speech" as well as
targeted r6sum6s. There is no
charge for the workshop, but par-
ticipants must register (visit the
workshop listing on the Calendar
of Events at careersourceclm.com
or call 352-249-3278, ext. 5200).
During the job fair, CareerSource
Citrus Levy Marion staff will
be available to help job-
seekers apply for jobs and register
with Employ Florida, the state's
premier online job bank. Job-
seekers who plan to attend are en-
couraged to show up early, bring
printed copies of their resume, and
be prepared with a one- to two-
minute introduction, or "elevator
speech," highlighting work experi-
ence, training and abilities. Job
Fair preparation tips can be found
in the Job Seekers Resource Center
section of careersourceclm.com.
For information, call 352-249-
3278, ext 3206, or 800-434-JOBS.


Citrus County spring job fair has

local employers ready to hire


F-.-,-




A4 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Don't waste time on re-
grets. Let go of the past and take ad-
vantage of the terrific things coming
your way. Keep a positive attitude and
a willingness to try something new.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You will
meet with someone who could have a
positive effect on your future. Clear
thinking will enable you to find a solu-
tion that will spark a proposal.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) -An ap-
prenticeship or educational course can
help lead the way to a brighter future.
Preparation is the key to success.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Sur-
round yourself with children or enter-
taining, creative individuals. Think
before you react. Keep positive
thoughts in the forefront of your mind.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) You may not
be seeing the whole picture regarding a
work situation. Do not offer suggestions
until you are sure of all the details.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You can
make a difference if you try Don't be
afraid to speak up. Your colleagues will
be interested in your suggestions and
will want to help you reach your goals.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't get
caught up in someone else's issues.
It's very unlikely that you can change
his or her mind. Keep a firm hold on
your own dreams.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Don't let
your creative ideas go to waste. Put
your innovations on paper and share
them with others. Romance will
heighten your personal life.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Posi-
tive financial changes are apparent.
Make money matters a priority and you'll
will benefit from your creativity Changes
at home will add to your comfort.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -A
business or personal partner may try to
discredit you. Listen carefully to the
whole story before you take a stand.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Enjoy
fraternizing with clients and colleagues
today. You will find that you have a lot
in common with your peers.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You are
in the right frame of mind to learn
something new. Discover different cul-
tures, traditions and beliefs by reading
about or visiting a different place.
Aries (March 21-April 19)-
Changes happening around you may
be confusing. Don't feel pressured into
making alterations of your own. Take
stock of what you have and what you
need before you make a move.


ENTERTAINMENT


'Simpsons' get new
look in Lego episode
LOS ANGELES Episode
No. 550 of Fox's "The Simp-
sons" was put together Lego
brick by brick, in a CGI manner
of speaking.
Using computer-generated
special effects, the town of
Springfield and its residents
have been reimagined in the
style of the famed plastic toys for
Sunday's episode, "Brick Like
Me" at 8 p.m.
It's a tart title a play on
"Black Like Me," the book for a
sweet episode, one that combines
CGI and the show's traditional ani-
mation to shake up Homer Simp-
son's world and teach him a
lesson about parenting.
Homer (voiced by Dan
Castellaneta) has morphed
from his familiar pudgy self into a
real hard-body: a square-
shaped, bullet-headed Lego
man. He's still yellow, as are wife
Marge (Julie Kavner), the kids
and the rest of the town's inhabi-
tants, but all easily and pain-
lessly disassembled.
With the box-office hit "The
Lego Movie," a newly launched
"Simpsons" Lego toy line and
now the TV episode, it could be
suspected that much corporate
plotting was involved.
"People are probably looking at
it going, 'All this fits and it's a plan.'
No, it was just the love of Lego"
and creativity, not cross-
promotion, Al Jean, 'The Simp-
sons" longtime executive producer,
told a teleconference this week.
'Yes, so all the cross-promotion
was just gravy, delicious gravy,"
joked Matt Selman, an executive
producer and co-writer, with Brian
Kelley, of the Lego episode.
Lego was consulted, he said,
and a Fox spokeswoman said
the toy maker paid for promo-
tional consideration.


Associated Press
This image released by FOX shows characters from the
animated series "The Simpsons." From left are Homer, Marge,
Lisa and Bart, as Lego figures in episode No. 550, titled,
"Brick Like Me," airing Sunday. Using computer-generated
special effects, the town of Springfield and its residents have
been reimagined in the style of the famed plastic toys.


It's a girl for
Kerry Washington
LOS ANGELES It's a girl
for Kerry Washington and
retired NFL player Nnamdi
Asomugha.

day shows the



WAsbrhinertificate ngeleasedFi
couple's
daughter
Isabelle
Amarachi
Asomugha
was born
around 5 p.m.
Kerry on April 21 in
Washington Los Angeles.
The parents haven't announced
the baby publicly. Washington's
publicist Amanda Silverman
said no statement was available.
Washington is the Emmy-
nominated star of the ABC series
"Scandal."
Asomugha, a former corner-
back with the Oakland Raiders,
Philadelphia Eagles and San
Francisco 49ers, announced his
retirement last year.


Bauer to save the
day in '24' revival
NEW YORK- Jack's back.
A counterterrorism agent forced
to go rogue, Jack Bauer had
been lying low since 2010. He's
been off the grid and off-screen
since the final cycle of "24."
For eight seasons, the in-
domitable Bauer repeatedly
saved the country from innumer-
able disasters (or tried to) at
grave cost to himself. But far from
being showered in the thanks of
a grateful nation, he was branded
and re-branded a most-wanted
villain for his service. He had no
choice but to go on the lam.
But on "24: Live Another Day,"
he is nabbed by the CIA shortly
after 11 a.m., London time, as this
real-time, sequential drama erupts
with the first of a dozen episodes
that will carry the saga to a breath-
less resolution 12 hours later in
the same hectic day.
The Fox miniseries premieres
Monday at 8 p.m.
-From wire reports


CIRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, May 3, the
123rd day of 2014. There are 242
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 3,1944, U.S. wartime
rationing of most grades of meats
ended (however, rationing returned
by year's end).
On this date:
In 1999, some 70 tornadoes
roared across Oklahoma and
Kansas, killing 46 people and injur-
ing hundreds.
Ten years ago: The U.S. military
said it had reprimanded seven offi-
cers in the abuse of inmates at
Baghdad's notorious Abu Ghraib
prison, the first known punishments
in the case; two of the officers were
relieved of their duties. Former
postmaster general Marvin Runyon
died in Nashville at age 79.
Five years ago: Mexican Presi-
dent Felipe Calderon told state televi-
sion a nationwide shutdown and an
aggressive informational campaign
appeared to have helped curtail an
outbreak of swine flu in Mexico.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama cast Mexico as a nation
ready to take "its rightful place in the
world" and move past the drug bat-
tles and violence that had defined its
relationship with the United States.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
George Gaynes is 97. Actress Ann
B. Davis is 88. Actor Alex Cord is
81. Singer Frankie Valli is 80.
Sports announcer Greg Gumbel is
68. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., is 65.
Country musician Cactus Moser
(Highway 101) is 57. Country musi-
cian John Hopkins (Zac Brown
Band) is 43. Actress Christina Hen-
dricks (TV: "Mad Men") is 39. Actor
Dule Hill is 39. Country singer Eric
Church is 37. Dancer Cheryl Burke
(TV: "Dancing with the Stars") is 30.
Soul singer Michael Kiwanuka is
27. Actress Jill Berard is 24.
Thought for Today: "A man can
become so accustomed to the
thought of his own faults that he will
begin to cherish them as charming
little 'personal characteristics."' -
Helen Rowland, American writer,
journalist and humorist (1876-1950).


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City


179/6g 1.2" Z |14/D 7 1.9u
THREE DAY OUTLOOK fDr y

TODAY TOMOOW MORNING
J^; High: 731 Low: 551
,,*^'.:" ~Areas of rain end, rain chance 60%/o

I SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
'' ". High:78 Low:55*
't Mostly sunny

r W MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
.. High: 83 Low-. 58'
h i Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 77/71
Record /52
Normal 85/66
Mean temp. 80
Departure from mean 5
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 2.94'
Total for the month 2.94"
Total for the year 13.73"
Normal fWr the war 1 0n2


*As or 7 m- atImives Sunday's count: 4.4
UV INDEX: 8 Monday's count: 5.5
O-2minimal, 3-4 low 5-6moerale. AIR QUALITY
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Friday observed: 26
29.92 Pollutant: Particulate matter
SOLUNAR TABLES .: ,
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) IAFTERNOONi
05/03 SATURDAY 23:09 04:11 09:19 15:45
05/04 SUNDAY 23:09 04:58 10:11 16:33
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S IM .. ..- .....8... ... :05 pm.
S 4 NS TOmM...............6:45 .m.
11M1M2 OONRISE TODAY 10 16 a m
MayMay ay 1Ma y ay2May21 ay28 MQ 1hS5IY .T-.........--- No qSet
BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is : Moderate.
For mote Informialhon call Florida Divsaon of Forestry al (352) 754"6777 For more
Informalion on drought oondcions, please vistt he DnvMsion o Foresry's Web site:
http:lflame-flB-tlol-cormire weathef4tbc
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as
follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may walei ,n Wedrwesdaarmoir SahjrrLy
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro itigalion of non-grass areas, such
as vegetable gardens, Ifowers anid shbs, can be done on any day and at any
lime.
Citrus Courtly Utilities' customers shoum CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Sorue re. pLantavij may 7 iaidf Ior add3ilin 1i
walening allowances
To report violations. please call: C0i ol inmvemess @ 352-726-2321, Cty Co C vstal
River 3,52 795-421I ef 313 3unrncororae'd Cilrus County 0 352-527-7669.

TIDES
'From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay ""At Mason's Creek
SATURDAY
CHy High Low
Chassahowltzka" '1011 a.m, 0,3 10:32p.m,. 0.6 It, :02a.m. 0.1 ft 2:45p.mo12 1,
Cryslallvw- 8,43 a,m, 1.6t, 829p,m. 22t, 3:01 a.m. 0.1 fl 2:38p,m0.8Of,
Wihlacoochee* 6:12am, 2-7t, 4:48p.i,. 3.2ft, t2:29a.m 0.1 N 11:54 a-m.4t,
Homosassa*" 9f57a.m. 0, O6,It 8;39p.m. t-4ft. 511 a.m. 02fl 2:50 p.mO,3 It,


H L F'cast City


H L Fecast


Daytona Bch. 74 60 ts Miami 87 71 ts
Fort Lauderdale 86 71 ts Ocata 78 54 sh
Fort Myers 82 67 ts Orlando 79 63 ts
Gainesville 79 52 sh Pensacola 74 64 s
Homestead 87 70 ts Sarasota 77 64 ts
Jacksonville 78 54 sh Tallahassee 80 50 pc
Key West 87 77 ts Tampa 74 63 ts
Lakeland 78 62 ts Vero Beach 85 64 ts
Melbourne 81 62 ts W. Palm Bch. 86 69 ts

MARINE OUTLOOK
Today: NNW winds 10 to 18 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2-3 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters a moderate chop. Showers
end. Tonight: Northwest winds 10 to 0
15 knots then. Seas 2 feet. Bay and 7 9
inland waters a moderate chop.
Taken at Adpeika
LAKE LEVELS
Location FRI THU Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 29.08 29.08 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hemando 38.44 38.44 39,52
Tsala Apopka-Invemess 39.78 39.78 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 40.41 40.41 42,20
Levels reported in t eet above sea level Flood stage lor takes are based on 2_33-year flood,
the meaen-ann.ual iij I x1 hikh ha. N 4 1 p.nr ,Ch mvp o. CA O t.irirju j@,J o e. :?Aeed. in
any oine year, .-$ aq 'a.r In 11w i.j w r t F'nlor Uii e.p St .agr..eni o ISLue
and is suiiact oa resion In no evetwa ll tft Disti or ft Urnted Stats Geologcal Survey
_? iwao.e W.y aV' dr iwaq CHJi I ol of m uf of ii's data. If you have any quesilons you
sne-vo .,.r n[,K1 me H..Ii;]. l c D0313 i t in lll-x: 'i6i 7211


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Ashevllle
Allanta
AlaINl,,: Civ
Auslin
Batimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Bunlngton, VT
Charloston. S.C.
Charleston, W.V.
Chafotle
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Coklumbia. SC
Columbus, OH
Concfd. NH
Oallas
Denver
Des Moines
Oalroit
El Paso
Evansvllle, IN
Harisburg
Hartlond
Houslon
Indianapols
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


FRI
H L Pcp. H
63 40 65
73 41 81
f8 45 70
72 52 78
69 53 72
83 56 89
70 49 15 73
68 51 58
72 52 77
64 48 78
69 50 .01 68
49 42 59
62 46 61
69 62 78
63 50 73
69 47 75
52 46 .01 65
60 44 70
58 48 .01 56
63 45 77
59 48 69
65 40 .23 68
82 50 89
77 38 80
68 41 72
58 47 59
77 45 B4
59 44 74
64 46 67
69 47 .01 70
81 51 88
52 42 69
B93 61 98
75 44 81
96 62 86
62 47 74
71 49 80
52 47 61
59 42 56
75 57 81
77 60 80
68 43 77


SAT
L Fcst
45 ts
52 pc
48 pc
51 pc
48 pc
59 s
49 sh
41 sh
53 s
51 pc
51 ts
42 ts
46 sh
55 pc
49 PC
54 pc
43 pc
51 pe
43 sh
53 pc
49 sh
43 si
58s
49 pc
46 pc
43 sh
60 s
52 pc
45 sh
47 tIs
61 s
49 pc
73 pc
56 s
59 PC
53 pc
59 pc
38 pc
37 pc
54 s
55 s
53 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c Qcloudy; drdzizle-
f-fainr hdhmzyi pc.pltly cloudy;: rrain;
rsmlhVsnow mix; s-'ummy shshoweig
Wn-snow ts=Usunde1to4ms w-wf
WM 2014


FRI SAT
City H L Pcp. H LFcst
NewOrfeans 75 61 80 63 pc
New York City 70 56 69 52 sh
Nodiolk 69 60 73 55 pc
Oklahoma City 75 43 89 60 s
Omaha 74 37 74 50 pc
PalmSplngs 102 66 101 69 pc
PhiladelpNia 69 56 02 72 50 pc
Phoenix 95 67 99 70 pc
Ptlsburgh 55 48 62 44 sh
Portland, ME 66 45 13 82 44 sh
Portland. OR 75 54 62 51 r
Providence, l 67 49 68 50 pc
Releigh 69 51 78 51 pc
Rapid Clliy 58 35 61 41 pc
Reno 84 50 77 42 pc
Rochestel.NY 56 47 01 62 44 sh
Sacramenlo 88 52 80 49 pc
Salt Lake Cty 77 46 82 56 pc
SanAntonio 83 53 92 59 s
SanDtego 91 65 74 59 pc
SanFncisco 72 54 62 52 pc
Savannah 69 61 79 54 pc
Seatle 66 55 59 49 r
Spokane 79 50 64 44 pc
St. Louis 62 48 79 54 pc
St Ste Marie 45 35 .04 48 34 sh
Syracuse 59 49 62 43 ts
Topeka 72 39 80 56 pc
Washington 72 55 72 50 sh
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
NIGH 102, Themal. Ca
LOW 17, Moriay, N M
WORLD cmEs
SAT Lisbon 78/5W9/pc
CITY ILSKY London 55r35/pc
Acaputco 87/77pc Madrid 73/415s
Amsterdam 5/41/pc Mexico Cly 75S53/s
Athens 71159/pc Montreal 57/42/r
Beijing 71/46/s Moscow 6W33/pc
Berlin 55/3W/r Paris 59/44/r
Bermuda 73i691cd Rio 82I66/s
Cairo 87/73is Rome 64/48ft
Calgary 4230kr Sydney 59/51/f
Havana 891W69s Tokyo 75/51/s
Hong Kong 8075/As Toronio 51/41/pc
Jerusalem 80/62/s Warsaw 5/4vpc


LEGAL NOTICES





Lien Notices

..................................... C 14


Surplus Property

..................................... C 14


S C Ic TRLuS C cOUNTY



CHRONICLE
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DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 73.9
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 90%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, grasses, hickory
Today's count: 0.7/12




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Scott approves Joint MPO

for Citrus and Hernando


Special to the Chronicle
On Wednesday, Gov.
Rick Scott approved the
Joint Hernando-Citrus
Metropolitan Planning Or-
ganization (MPO) planning
boundary and voting mem-
bership. This follows the
establishment of the Ho-
mosassa Springs-Beverly
Hills-Citrus Springs Ur-
banized Area from the
2010 Census and months of
local and state coordina-
tion and support, accord-
ing to a press release.
The Citrus Transporta-
tion Planning Organiza-
tion (TPO) and Hernando
MPO met in October 2013
and unanimously agreed
on the planning boundary
and voting membership,
and recommended the
merger of the transporta-
tion planning agencies.


This comes from months of
coordination between the
boards, staffs, the Tampa
Bay Area Regional Trans-
portation Authority
(TBARTA) and Florida De-
partment of Transporta-
tion (FDOT).
"Transportation plan-
ning requires looking at
current growth trends,
choosing how we grow by
planning our future to give
more choices to ourselves
and future generations,"
stated Citrus TPO Chair-
woman Rebecca Bays, who
is a county commissioner
"The official designation to
join the Hernando MPO is
an opportunity to work to-
gether to reflect the re-
gion's shared vision for the
future. Collectively, to-
gether we are stronger and
in today's transportation
industry, it's about partner-


ing and leveraging funds."
As staff finalizes the lo-
gistics of combining joint
Hernando-Citrus MPO, the
Citrus TPO will have a
final meeting to prepare
for the first Joint
Hernando-Citrus MPO or-
ganizational meeting,
which has been tentatively
scheduled for 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, July 15, at the
Hernando County Com-
mission Chambers in
Brooksville.
The Joint MPO will need
to hire an executive direc-
tor and employee in coor-
dination with the
Hernando County MPO
staff, which will remain
with the joint organization,
as well as appoint commit-
tee members, obtain
agency funding, and coor-
dinate the organizational
details of the joint agency


Associated Press
Debris from an explosion at the Escambia County Jail is scattered at the entrance
to the facility Thursday night in Pensacola. Two inmates were killed and nearly 200
others injured in the explosion according to an Escambia County spokeswoman.


Jail crippled from gas

explosion had past problems


Associated Press
House speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, right, is congratulated by Gov. Rick
Scott Friday after making his parting remarks during the closing of the legislative
session in Tallahassee.


BUDGET
Continued from PageAl

them to spread it around
on dozens of hometown
projects.
The budget heads next to
Gov Rick Scott, who can veto
individual spending items.
In the final hours, legis-
lators approved a measure
that would allow the sale
of a strain of low-THC mar-
ijuana for medical use.
They also voted to allow
students living illegally in
the country to qualify for
in-state tuition rates for
college. Both decisions
were unthinkable in the
past decade for many GOP
lawmakers. Scott is ex-
pected to sign both.
"It's a great day for all of
our students that want to
live the American dream,"
Scott said shortly after the
vote on the in-state tuition
bill.
The Legislature also
passed a sweeping bill
aimed at overhauling the
child-welfare system. The
bill states that protecting a
child from abuse is para-
mount and more important
than keeping a family to-
gether That's a significant
shift for the Department of
Children and Families,
which has placed a pre-
mium on putting fewer chil-
dren in foster care.
Lawmakers also voted
for a bill that will allow the
Florida Supreme Court to
grant law licenses to non-
citizens.
And in a turnabout from
last year, the Legislature
passed a bill that would
allow professional sports
teams to qualify for tax-
payer money A similar bill
died during the 2013
session.
Legislators also ap-
proved an expansion of
Florida's private-school
voucher program for low-
income children, largely
along partisan lines. They
also agreed to compensate
a former farmworker who
spent 21 years in prison
after being wrongfully con-
victed of killing his seven
children. The bill changes
a law that compensates
wrongfully incarcerated
prisoners so that James
Richardson can be paid
more than $1 million.
But a big focus on the
last day was the money
The state's economic
recovery gave lawmakers
the luxury of having a $1.2


billion budget surplus
even after they had paid
for school enrollment and
other pressing needs such
as growth in the state's
Medicaid program.
Most of that surplus was
set aside for $500 million in
tax and fee cuts, including
a rollback in auto registra-
tion fees that was signed
into law earlier this spring
by Scott. The rest of the tax
cuts included a three-day
back-to-school sales tax

I ..


holiday in August, as well
as tax holidays for hurri-
cane preparation supplies
and energy-efficiency
appliances.
Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, insisted
that the Legislature was not
"awash in cash."And House
Speaker Will Weatherford
said lawmakers had acted
responsibly because they
left roughly $3 billion aside
for reserves while also cut-
ting taxes.


Featured Performers
Shades of Gray


All Proceeds to Support Mission By
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Associated Press
PENSACOLA The
Florida jail crippled by
an apparent gas explosion
was the subject of a five-
year investigation that un-
covered a facility so
grossly understaffed that
posts went unmanned and
cells were seldom
searched. Violence was
pervasive and inmates
were segregated by race.
Investigators are now
trying to figure out
whether the blast was an
accident or something
that could have been pre-
vented. Inmates have told
family members, the news
media and their attorneys
they smelled gas ahead of
the explosion, but the
county said they had no
record of those concerns.
Still, questions were
being raised about a jail
with a well-documented
record of troubles. The
conditions at the Escambia
County Jail were outlined
in a Justice Department
report last year and led to
the facility being treated
like a hot potato among
local officials.
In the midst of the tur-
moil and during an un-
precedented rainstorm
this week- the jail's base-
ment was flooded with
more than 2 feet of water
It was running on genera-
tor power and one inmate
told The Associated Press
that toilets were broken
and prisoners were using


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plastic bags.
Then the blast hit. Two
prisoners died, nearly
200 inmates and guards
were injured and the jail
was all but destroyed in
the explosion late
Wednesday night. In the
confusion and chaos, 600
inmates rushed out of the
building and authorities
lost track of three in-
mates, who were later ac-
counted for
Bruce Miller, the
elected public defender
for the 1st Judicial Dis-
trict that includes Escam-
bia County, said Friday he
has long been worried
about conditions and un-
derstaffing at the jail and
hoped the explosion pro-
vided another opportu-
nity to review the facility.
"I've always had con-
cerns about the jail,"
Miller said.
A prison guard union
representative said the
past problems and the ex-
plosion may not have any-
thing to do with each
another He said officers
train for fires and other
emergencies every quarter
"Nobody went into the
day thinking anything was
going to happen. For them
to have gotten those people
out like they did, they fol-


lowed their procedures to
the button. It could have
been so, so, so much
worse," said Alan Miller of
the Northwest Florida
chapter of the Police
Benevolent Association.
The jail's problems
were highlighted a year
ago in a Justice Depart-
ment report to the county
commission and Sheriff
David Morgan, citing "ob-
vious and known systemic
deficiencies" that led to
the violation of inmates'
constitutional rights.
"Escambia County Jail
has ignored obvious and
serious risks to prisoner
safety by grossly under-
staffing its security com-
plement and by failing to
take reasonable steps to
adequately monitor pris-
oner violence," the report
said.
Violence, inadequate
medical and mental
health care and staffing
shortages were among the
biggest worries. The re-
port even cited a March
2011 study by the county
that said "large insuffi-
ciencies in jail staffing...
raise the likelihood that
something serious that
could happen that would
overwhelm the jail's abil-
ity to respond."


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dorothy
Croney, 93
SARASOTA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Dorothy
Croney, age 93, of Sarasota,
Florida, formerly of Inver-
ness, will be held 1:00 PM,
Sunday, May 4, 2014 at the
Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
Interment will follow at
Fountains Memorial Park,
Homosassa, Florida. The
family will receive friends
from 2:00 PM 4:00 PM and
6:00 8:00 PM, Saturday,
May 3, 2014 at the Inver-
ness Chapel. Online con-
dolences may be sent to
the family at wwwHooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Croney was born
May 9, 1920 in Brooklyn,
NY, daughter of the late
John and Elizabeth (Diet-
rich) Catterson. She died
April 30, 2014 in Sarasota,
FL. She was a homemaker
and moved to Sarasota in
2013.
Survivors include son,
William Girardin, 3 daugh-
ters, Kathleen Butler, Ar-
line Fernandez and Clair
Girardin, brother, John
Catterson, sister, Ethel
Galunas and 11 grandchil-
dren, Dona, Denise, Sue,
Billy, Danielle, Joey,
Tommy, William, Debbie,
Mechele and Patrick.

James
Easterbrook,
74
INVERNESS
James P Easterbrook,
74, of Inverness, died
Tuesday, April 29, 2014,
under the care of Hospice
of Citrus and the Nature
Coast in Inverness.
Arrangements are by
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.




Ruth
Manning, 94
LECANTO
Ruth A. Manning, 94, of
Lecanto, died May 1, 2014,
at HPH Hospice in New
Port Richey, Florida. Ruth
was born on April 24,1920,
in Orange, New Jersey,
daughter of Harrison and
Roseanne Corby. She
served in the U.S. Women's
Army Corps during World
War II. Ruth retired as a
manager for the Immacu-
late Conception Cemetery
She moved to Lecanto in
1986 from Montclair, New
Jersey Ruth was a mem-
ber of St. Scholastica
Catholic Church in
Lecanto and member of
the New Jersey Club of Cit-
rus County
Mrs. Manning was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band William J. Manning;
son William J. Manning;
brothers William and Wal-
ter Corby; and sisters Rose
Dayton and Alice Hess.
Survivors include her son
Walter Manning of Semi-
nole, Florida; and grand-
children John and Nicole
Manning of Seminole.
The family of Mrs. Man-
ning will receive friends
from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday,
May 4, 2014, at the Heinz
Funeral Home in Inver-
ness. Interment will be
at Arlington National
Cemetery
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.


Crmaiofl



Cente


Jerry
Wakeham, 71
Jerry E. Wakeham, 71,
died Thursday, May 1,
2014. Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory is in charge of private
arrangements.

Howard
Fuller, 78
CITRUS SPRINGS
Howard L. Fuller, 78, of
Citrus Springs, Florida,
passed away on April 16,
2014, at HPH Hospice in
Lecanto, Florida.
Howard was born on
March 11, 1936, to Howard
Bertram Fuller and Alice
Elizabeth Swartz in Aure-
lius, Michigan. He raised
his family in Suttons Bay,
Michigan, prior to moving
to Alaska. While in Alaska,
Howard obtained a pilot's
license and loved flying.
Howard spent his career
as a millwright and was a
member of the Teamsters.
He was an avid animal
lover who raised minia-
ture horses and goats be-
fore eventually moving to
Florida.
Howard was preceded in
death by his parents
Howard Bertram Fuller
and Alice Elizabeth
Swartz; his wife Mary Jane
Barch; his children Timo-
thy Louis Fuller and Vicki
Kaye Fuller; and his grand-
daughter Brandy Elizabeth
Fuller He is survived by his
siblings Marilyn Courtade,
Richard Fuller, William
Fuller, Elizabeth Neff,
Lawrence Fuller and Bar-
bara Rasmussen; his
grandchildren Shawn
Fuller, Mandy McIntyre
(Matthew), Jamie Fuller
and Brook Fuller; and his
great-grandchildren Ava
McIntyre and Lauren
McIntyre.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that me-
morials in Howard's name
be made to the Humane
Society According to
Howard's wishes, there
will be no memorial serv-
ice at this time. Cremation
will take place.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. corn.

Ethel
Haden, 92
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ethel Haden, 92, was
born Nov 10, 1921, in
Chicago, Ill., and passed
away April 28, 2014, at
Crystal River Health & Re-
habilitation Center under
the care of Hospice of Cit-
rus County Before that,
she lived happily at Cedar
Creek ALF for five years
with her dog Heidi. She
was the daughter of
Joseph and Anna Griger.
She was a dental hygienist,
homemaker and then
worked with American
Greeting Cards as a dis-
player She moved to Crys-
tal River from Dunedin,
Florida, in 2006. She loved
to cook, bake and garden.
She always kept an im-
maculate home for her
family
She was preceded in
death by her brother
George (Eleanor) Griger.
She is survived by her
daughters Jayne (Bob)
Bennett, Felton, Delaware,
and Kathryn (Mark) Gar-
lock, Crystal River; as well
as grandsons Christopher
and Matthew Garlock.
A memorial service will
be held at a later date with
interment at Masaryktown
Cemetery
Sign the guestbook at
www. chronicleonline. corn.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Marineland's bottlenose dolphin Nellie dies


Associated Press

MARINELAND Offi-
cials at Marineland say
61-year-old bottlenose
dolphin Nellie has died.
The attraction an-
nounced Nellie's death on
its website on Thursday,
noting she was euthanized
earlier this week after her
conditioned quickly
worsened.
They say she was the
oldest Atlantic bottlenose
dolphin in human care.
According to the web-


site, Nellie was born at
Marineland on Feb. 27,
1953.
She starred in several
TV shows filmed at
Marineland in the 1950s
and was featured in a
Timex watch commercial
in 1961 that aired on
Frank Sinatra's special
"Welcome Home Elvis."
A public celebration of
Nellie's life is planned for
May 15.
More information will
be announced on the Web
at www.marineland.net


Associated Press
Nellie, the oldest Atlantic bottlenose dolphin in human
care, is shown Feb. 27, 2011.


Advice to graduates: No selfies


Associated Press

TAMPA Toss your
cap. Turn your tassel. Just
don't snap that selfie.
Graduates at the Uni-
versity of South Florida
and Bryant University in
Smithfield, RI., have
been asked to refrain
from taking self-portraits
with their cellphones as
they collect their diplo-
mas. The seemingly sim-
ple directive is standing
out for placing the slight-
est curtailment on a col-
lective societal march
toward sharing every wak-
ing moment on Twitter, In-
stagram, Facebook and
the like.
Kyra Ciotti, a 22-year-
old mass communication
major at USF, has taken
selfies lying in bed, riding
in a car, posing with her
dog, taking a shot of
tequila and whenever she
feels her hair is having a
particularly good day She
had planned to keep her
arm extended as she
walked across the stage at
a ceremony Friday, cap-
turing the moment for a
sister in Australia.
Now, chastened by the
university's admonition
that it's improper and
fearful of a threat to with-
hold diplomas, she'll keep
her phone away
"I didn't think it was
that big of a deal," she
said as she posed on cam-
pus in her cap and gown
for some early graduation
pictures. "But I don't want
to be disrespectful."
For others, the simple
act of outlawing selfies
may have sparked the de-
sire for one.
Anthony Sanchez, a 22-
year-old microbiology
major at USF, said he's
only taken a few selfies in
his life. But he's not ruling
out another at this week-
end's ceremony
"It put the idea in my
head," he said. "I wouldn't
have thought of it until
they said don't do it."
Self-portraits have been
around since the early
days of photography, but it
was the growth of cell-
phone cameras that made
them into a pop cultural
phenomenon. A selfie
host Ellen DeGeneres
took at the Oscars this
year became the most
retweeted item in history,
but the snapshots have be-
come so widespread that
they've been taken by
everyone from President
Barack Obama (who was
criticized for one with
other world leaders at the
funeral of Nelson Man-
dela) to Japanese astro-
naut Aki Hoshide (who
took an other-worldly shot
outside the International
Space Station.) Selfie was
even declared the 2013
word of the year by Oxford
University Press.
Administrators at both
USF and Bryant said
their intentions were far
less dramatic than mak-
ing a statement about a
generation often accused
of oversharing. They said

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Associated Press
University of South Florida graduating seniors Kyra Ciotti, 22, of Tampa, left, and
Rita Sibaja, 24, of Winter Haven, look at photos that Sibaja took Tuesday of Ciotti in
her cap and gown in Tampa. The university has banned all self portraits, also known
as "selfies," during their 2014 graduation exercises.


Aloysius Ndeanaefo, a native of Nigeria, snaps a "selfie"
Thursday with the new Bishop of Wichita, Bishop Carl
Kemme. Ndeanaefo, now a priest in the Springfield,
Illinois, diocese, lived with Bishop Kemme when he first
came to seminary. Selfies have become so widespread
that they've been taken by everyone from President
Barack Obama (who was criticized for one with other
world leaders at the funeral of Nelson Mandela) to
Japanese astronaut Aki Hoshide (who took an other-
worldly shot outside the International Space Station.)


they were simply trying to
keep already long cere-
monies from dragging on
even longer
"It's your moment in the
sun right next to everyone
else's moment in the sun,"
said Michael Freeman,
the USF dean of students
who issued the guidelines
saying selfies were
banned along with march-
ing, strolling and other
fanciful methods of ac-
cepting a diploma. Free-
man said a handful of
graduates took on-stage
selfies during the Decem-
ber commencement and
he has noticed students
growing more and more
cavalier as they approach
the university president.
Aside from keeping the
ceremony on time, he
wanted to maintain
decorum.
"I don't have an anti-


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selfie bent," he said. "I
would just caution stu-
dents to think there's a
time and place."
Neither USF nor
Bryant has issued a blan-
ket ban on selfies. Stu-
dents are free to take
them throughout the cere-
mony, just not on stage.
Sheila Guay, the special
events director at Bryant,
said selfies would take
away from the ceremony
and ruin photos that fam-
ily members try to
capture.
She echoed Freeman,
saying: "There is a time
and place for them, and
here is not one of them."
Most schools have taken
no stance on the selfie


craze, but some are stak-
ing a position opposite to
USF and Bryant.
At Ripon College in
Ripon, Wis., all of this
year's graduation festivi-
ties are built around a
theme of new media. The
school is circulating a
hashtag they're encourag-
ing students to use to
tweet throughout the cel-
ebrations. They're setting
up a selfie booth with
props, but also have no
problem if students take
one on stage, too.
"The college will not
limit that kind of self-
expression," said Melissa
Anderson, the school's ex-
ecutive director of market-
ing and communications.
"As a point of pride, we
hope students take a lot of
selfies."
Similarly, Miami Uni-
versity in Oxford, Ohio, is
also eager to see its grad-
uates' selfies. Kelly Ben-
nett, the school's social
media coordinator, said
Miami would share stu-
dents' selfies on Twitter
and Instagram. She said
graduates were just ex-
hibiting their excitement
and that other colleges
should embrace it.
"I've never seen it dis-
ruptive," she said. "I think
when you make a big deal
out of it, then most people
want to push the line."
Whether students will
push the line remains to
be seen. USF's warning
that it might keep viola-
tors' diplomas has gotten
the attention of many sen-
iors on campus, but Free-
man, the dean, had a
confession.
"Between you, me and
the wall, that's basically
an empty threat," he said.


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Obituaries


1 -11- 1


A6 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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1 ,88 0 . i ., ... . . ., ............. ...... .. .. .. .. V. . . . .
1,800 ..... ........................
1 8 4 0 ""1,8 80,8 0 0) ........................ ..6......................... ...... | 1 5 ,6 001. .. ....................... .. ............. ..............
1,720 .. ............ ..... ......... .......... ..... 15,200 ... .. .. .. .J .... .... .. .. ......... ..
1,20....q .. 5 ....... ........ F M.......A 15,200 ..... ..b...... i....... ...... F ... .... A....


StocksRecap

NYSE
Vol. (in mil.) 3,092
Pvs. Volume 3,295
Advanced 1758
Declined 1318
New Highs 132
New Lows 16


NASD
1,803
2,012
1326
1250
43
60


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
16620.06
7772.43
555.54
10676.42
4145.06
1891.33
1371.21
20068.67
1137.80


LOW
16488.31
7691.56
541.33
10614.06
4115.89
1878.50
1357.78
19939.84
1126.39


CLOSE
16512.89
7698.84
543.81
10629.98
4123.90
1881.14
1361.57
19965.98
1128.80


%CHG.
-0.28%
-0.26%
-2.11%
+0.01%
-0.09%
-0.13%
+0.22%
-0.05%
+0.25%


YTD
-0.38%
+4.03%
+10.85%
+2.21%
-1.26%
+1.77%
+1.42%
+1.32%
-2.99%


Interestrates


SU


The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury fell to 2.59
percent Friday.
Yields affect
rates on mort-
gages and other
consumer loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MOAGO 3.25 .13
1YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
Gold rose for
the first time this
week, reaching
its highest
settlement price
since April 16.
Silver
rebounded a
day after
dropping to its
lowest
settlement price
since July.


OS
E222

EDr~g


NET 1YR
TREASURIES VEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .01 0.01 ... .05
6-month T-bill .04 0.04 ... .10
52-wk T-bill .10 0.10 ... .10
2-year T-note .37 0.41 -0.04 .20
5-year T-note 1.67 1.66 +0.01 .65
10-year T-note 2.59 2.62 -0.03 1.63
30-year T-bond 3.37 3.41 -0.04 2.82

NET 1YR
BONDS YVEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.19 3.23 -0.04 2.54
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.61 4.61 ... 3.99
Barclays USAggregate 2.30 2.31 -0.01 1.72
Barclays US High Yield 5.04 5.04 ... 5.17
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.16 4.21 -0.05 3.65
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.90 1.85 +0.05 .94
Barclays US Corp 2.97 3.00 -0.03 2.59


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 99.76
Ethanol (gal) 2.12
Heating Oil (gal) 2.92
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.67
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.94
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1302.60
Silver (oz) 19.49
Platinum (oz) 1440.70
Copper (Ib) 3.08
Palladium (oz) 812.55
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.38
Coffee (Ib) 2.01
Corn (bu) 4.94
Cotton (Ib) 0.94
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 344.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.56
Soybeans (bu) 14.81
Wheat (bu) 7.08


PVS.
99.42
2.20
2.91
4.72
2.94
PVS.
1283.10
18.99
1427.50
3.03
814.30
PVS.
1.39
2.01
5.03
0.94
337.50
1.52
14.74
6.99


%CHG %YTD
+0.34 +1.4
-1.05 +10.9
+0.28 -5.0
-0.95 +10.5
+0.19 +5.7
%CHG %YTD
+1.52 +8.4
+2.65 +0.8
+0.92 +5.1
+1.73 -10.5
-0.21 +13.3
%CHG %YTD
-0.86 +2.6
-0.42 +81.2
-1.84 +17.1
+0.13 +11.3
+2.07 -4.3
+2.56 +14.6
+0.49 +12.8
+1.29 +16.9


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 24.77 -.01 +1.9 +13.6 +11.2 +15.1
CaplncBuA m 59.94 -.05 +4.0 +9.4 +8.6 +13.2
CpWIdGrIA m 46.56 +.04 +3.1 +17.0 +9.1 +15.4
EurPacGrA m 49.50 +.06 +0.9 +14.1 +4.6 +13.2
FnlnvA m 51.65 -.06 +0.6 +18.7 +11.5 +17.5
GrthAmA m 43.09 -.04 +0.2 +21.1 +12.5 +17.0
IncAmerA m 21.35 -.03 +4.2 +12.6 +10.4 +15.8
InvCoAmA m 37.79 -.02 +3.4 +21.4 +13.1 +17.0
NewPerspA m 37.54 -.06 -0.1 +16.1 +9.2 +16.5
WAMutlnvA m 40.27 -.07 +2.6 +20.0 +14.1 +18.5
Dodge & Cox IntlStk 44.99 +.09 +4.5 +22.0 +7.3 +16.9
Stock 170.98 -.06 +1.9 +25.9 +15.1 +20.4
Fidelity Contra 94.04 -.10 -1.2 +19.0 +12.7 +18.5
ContraK 94.00 -.11 -1.1 +19.1 +12.9 +18.6
LowPriStk d 50.11 +.19 +1.3 +19.7 +13.3 +20.7
Fidelity Spartan 5001ldxAdvtg 66.76 -.09 +2.4 +20.2 +13.8 +18.9
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m 2.54 -.01 +5.6 +12.3 +9.0 +15.2
IncomeA m 2.52 ... +6.3 +13.0 +9.6 +15.9
Harbor Intllnstl 73.31 -.15 +3.2 +14.7 +5.2 +15.7
Oakmark Intl 1 26.79 -.10 +1.8 +18.8 +10.5 +19.5
T Rowe Price Egtylnc 33.32 -.02 +2.1 +17.6 +12.6 +18.2
GrowStk 50.99 +.03 -3.0 +23.1 +13.9 +19.4
Vanguard 500Adml 173.65 -.23 +2.4 +20.2 +13.8 +19.0
5001lnv 173.63 -.24 +2.4 +20.0 +13.7 +18.8
500Sgnl 143.44 -.19 +2.4 +20.2 +13.8 +19.0
MulntAdml 14.09 ... +3.8 +0.9 +5.1 +5.0
STGradeAd 10.74 -.01 +1.1 +1.3 +2.4 +4.7
Tgtet2025 16.14 +.01 +2.5 +12.2 +8.5 +14.2
TotBdAdml 10.78 ... +3.0 -0.3 +3.6 +4.9
Totlntl 17.02 +.01 +2.3 +10.9 +3.2 +12.7
TotStlAdm 47.45 -.03 +2.1 +20.8 +13.6 +19.5
TotStldx 47.43 -.03 +2.0 +20.7 +13.5 +19.4
Welltn 39.00 -.04 +3.4 +13.1 +10.5 +14.6
WelltnAdm 67.37 -.05 +3.5 +13.2 +10.6 +14.7
WndsllAdm 67.48 -.11 +3.4 +20.1 +13.9 +18.9
Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The stock market slipped lower
Friday as better news about the
job market failed to inspire in-
vestors. The government report-
ed that the unemployment rate
fell to its lowest level in more
than five years. The major in-
dexes posted modest gains for
the week.

InvenSense INVN
Close: $19.63 V-0.96 or -4.7%
The motion sensor company has an
unexpectedly tepid outlook for profit
and revenue, and also posted light
quarterly profits.
$24
22]

F M A
52-week range
$10.84 $24.34
Vol.:12.2m (4.5x avg.) PE:70.1
Mkt. Cap:$1.72 b Yield:...
CVS Caremark Cvs
Close:$73.86A0.77 or 1.1%
Profits at the drugstore chain and
pharmacy benefits manager jumped
18 percent on strong generic sales
as well as an acquisition.
$8_o_0 - -- --- --7



6 F M A
52-week range
$55.66 $76.36
Vol.:6.9m (1.2x avg.) PE: 19.7
Mkt. Cap: $87.78 b Yield: 1.5%
Estee Lauder EL
Close:$75.62A3.43 or 4.8%
Third-quarter profit rose 19 percent
at the cosmetics company, topping
expectations, and it also lifted its out-
look for the year.
$80- 7-7r




52-week range
$63.63.3 $76.24
Vol.:7.1m (2.6x avg.) PE:29.7
Mkt. Cap: $18.04 b Yield: 1.1%
Western Union WU
Close: $16.31 A0.46 or 2.9%
After five quarters of lackluster sales,
the money shuttling service posted
rising revenue and analysts expect
earnings growth.
$1-




52-week range
$14.60 $19.50
Vol.:9.1m (1.3x avg.) PE: 11.4
Mkt. Cap: $8.79 b Yield: 3.1%
Endocyte ECYT
Close: $6.62 V-10.76 or -61.9%
The biopharmaceutical company
ended a late-stage trial of its ovarian
cancer drug, citing a failure to im-
prove survival rates.
$30--------.-------
21


52-week range
$6.50 $33.70
Vol.:17.6m (11.0x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$269.14m Yield:...


Associated Press
Trader Thomas Ferrigno, left, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on
Friday. U.S. stock futures are up slightly after the U.S. unemployment rate hit its
lowest level in more than five years.



Stocks finish lower on



mixed earnings, Ukraine


Associated Press

NEW YORK The
stock market ended lower
on Friday as a surprisingly
strong report on job gains
failed to impress investors.
Stocks rose in the early
going after the government
reported that U.S. employ-
ers hired at the fastest
pace in two years last
month. The Standard and
Poor's 500 index briefly
rose above its record clos-
ing high.
The market started to
slump in late morning trad-
ing on news of downed hel-
icopters and killed fighters
in eastern Ukraine. Early
Friday, Ukrainian govern-
ment forces attacked pro-
Russian insurgents in the
region.
All three major U.S.


stock indexes wavered be- lowest since September
tween gains and losses for 2008.
most of the day A few details of the report
Among the biggest losers were less encouraging. The
was Linkedln. The online drop in the unemployment
professional networking rate likely reflected long-
service fell 8 percent after term jobless who had been
reporting its largest quar- out of work for six months
terly loss since going pub- or more before finally giv-
lic. Expedia, the online ing up looking for work.
travel site, fell nearly People aren't counted as
4 percent, and Pfizer fell unemployed unless they're
1.3 percent after the drug looking for a job.
company's latest offer to Among the stocks taking
buy AstraZeneca was re- big hits Friday was Madi-
jected by its board, son Square Garden, which
In the jobs report, the fell $3.62, or 6.6 percent, to
government said employ- $51.47. The owner of sports
ers added 288,000 jobs in teams and entertainment
April, 70,000 more than ex- venues like Radio City
pected. Hiring was Music Hall said its earn-
stronger in the prior two ings fell by half in its fiscal
months than initially esti- third quarter, partly due to
mated, too. The unemploy- a management change and
ment rate for April a costly delay for a Rock-
plunged to 6.3 percent, the ettes production.


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.92 -- 8.47 7.21 +.19 +2.7 A V V -12.1 +116.0 dd
AT&T Inc T 31.74 --- 37.97 35.63 +.05 +0.1 A A A +1.3 -0.4 11 1.84
Ametek Inc AME 39.46 -0- 62.05 52.70 -.05 -0.1 A A A +0.1 +33.1 25 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 83.94 -- 111.38 106.26 -.43 -0.4 V V A -0.2 +15.2 2.82e
Bank of America BAG 12.05 -0- 18.03 15.25 +.16 +1.1 V -2.1 +24.6 20 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 10.12 -- 14.71 13.50 -.32 -2.3 V 7 A +14.7 +16.8 26 0.08
CenturyLink Inc CTL 27.93 --- 38.40 34.83 -.13 -0.4 A A A +9.4 -0.2 dd 2.16
Citigroup C 45.06 --- 55.28 47.73 -.03 -0.1 A A -8.4 +4.2 11 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 19.55 -- 28.10 25.63 +.01 ... V 7 7 +10.0 +18.3 cc 1.00
Disney DIS 60.41 --0- 83.65 80.31 +.75 +0.9 A 7 A +5.1 +27.2 22 0.86f
Duke Energy DUK 64.16 -- 75.46 72.86 -1.72 -2.3 V A A +5.6 +3.7 19 3.12
EPR Properties EPR 46.69 -- 61.18 53.51 +.36 +0.7 V 7 A +8.8 +1.0 17 3.42
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 84.79 0 102.57 102.01 +.60 +0.6 A A A +0.8 +18.8 11 2.76f
Ford Motor F 13.35 18.02 15.90 -.01 -0.1 A 7 A +3.0 +22.3 10 0.50
Gen Electric GE 22.00 28.09 26.68 -.09 -0.3 A A A -4.8 +24.6 20 0.88
HCA Holdings Inc HCA 35.20 53.81 51.88 -.52 -1.0 7 A 7 +8.7 +32.7 15
Home Depot HD 72.21 --- 83.20 79.40 +.07 +0.1 A A -3.6 +11.3 21 1.88f
Intel Corp INTO 21.89 --0- 27.24 26.41 -.04 -0.2 A A A +1.8 +14.0 14 0.90
IBM IBM 172.19 -0- 211.98 191.44 -2.09 -1.1 A 7 7 +2.1 -1.2 13 4.40f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 22.83 -0- 34.32 29.26 +.14 +0.5 A A A -11.1 +22.2 27
Lowes Cos LOW 37.56 --- 52.08 46.98 +.61 +1.3 A 7 -5.2 +23.3 22 0.72
McDonalds Corp MCD 92.22 103.34 101.43 +.47 +0.5 A A A +4.5 +2.7 18 3.24
MicrosoftCorp MSFT 30.84 41.66 39.69 -.31 -0.8 V 7 7 +6.1 +25.4 15 1.12
Motorola Solutions MSI 53.62 67.69 65.51 +2.86 +4.6 A A A -2.9 +13.3 17 1.24
NextEra Energy NEE 74.78 101.50 97.99 -1.98 -2.0 A A A +14.4 +26.2 21 2.90f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 4.90 -0-- 19.63 8.58 +.14 +1.7 A 7 7 -6.2 -47.9 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 15.83 -0- 21.09 18.35 +.17 +0.9 A A A +11.1 -7.0 38 0.80
Regions Fncil RF 8.36 -0- 11.54 10.24 +.03 +0.3 A 7 7 +3.5 +22.5 13 0.20f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 26.62 --- 54.69 44.02 -.51 -1.1 A A A +10.8 +9.8 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 87.10 -0-- 114.72 96.94 -.23 -0.2 A 7 7 -6.4 -2.6 18 2.32
Texas Instru TXN 34.10 -- 49.77 45.78 +.55 +1.2 V 7 7 +4.3 +27.5 24 1.20
Time Warner TWX 55.71 --- 70.77 66.20 -.67 -1.0 A 7 A -5.0 +14.4 15 1.27f
UniFirst Corp UNF 87.68 -0-- 117.91 95.83 +.07 +0.1 A 7 7 -10.4 +7.9 16 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 45.08 -0-- 54.31 47.12 -.10 -0.2 A 7 7 -4.1 -5.9 11 2.12
Vodafone Group VOD 27.49 --- 42.14 37.49 +.20 +0.5 A A A -6.2 +18.3..
WalMartStrs WMT 71.51 -- 81.37 79.12 -.58 -0.7 A A A +0.5 +4.5 16 1.92f
Walgreen Co WAG 43.31 0 70.07 68.86 -.57 -0.8 A A A +19.9 +44.4 24 1.26
Dividend Footnotes: a- Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc -P/E exceeds 99 dd- Loss in last 12 months


Egypt in crisis as
elections approach
CAIRO Egypt's crippling
energy crisis is threatening to
mount, creating an immediate
political liability for the new
president to be elected this
month.
Rolling blackouts have al-
ready been hitting neighbor-
hoods of Cairo throughout the
winter and now summer's
heat is coming. The govern-
ment is scrambling to reduce
the impact.
Once an exporter of natural
gas, Egypt has increased im-
ports of substitute fuels, to
make up for shortages of nat-
ural gas and keep power sta-
tions running. Last week, the
Cabinet took the unpopular
step of raising prices for
home use of natural gas,
used in cooking, in some
cases quadrupling the price,
to chip away at the giant sub-
sidies the government pays
for energy and to cut down on
consumption.
US factory orders
increase in March
WASHINGTON Orders
to U.S. factories advanced
strongly for a second month in
March while demand in a key
category that signals business
investment plans increased
by the largest amount in more
than a year.
The strength was further
evidence that the economy
was rebounding after a harsh
winter.
The Commerce Depart-
ment said orders increased
1.1 percent in March after in-
creasing 1.5 percent in Febru-
ary. Those gains followed two
months of declines in Decem-
ber and January.
GM begins talks to
settle lawsuits
DETROIT The mediator
hired by General Motors to
settle claims from a deadly ig-
nition switch problem has
started talks about compen-
sating victims' families.
Kenneth Feinberg con-
firmed with the Associated
Press that he met Friday with
lawyer Robert Hilliard, who
represents families of 53 peo-
ple who died in crashes of
defective GM vehicles, and
another 273 who were
injured.
Feinberg says he is evalu-
ating GM's options regarding
compensation. Hilliard said no
dollar figures were mentioned
but he believes Feinberg
wants to reach fair
settlements.


k .


p *~ ~*


0


Associated Press
Egyptians buy rechargeable LED lamps April 30 at a shop
in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's crippling energy crisis is
threatening to mount, creating an immediate political
liability for the new president to be elected in the near
future.


Papa Murphy's
rises on first day
NEWYORK-- Papa Mur-
phy's Holdings Inc.'s shares
rose in the pizza maker's first
day of trading.
The Vancouver, Washington-
based company franchises
and operates the largest
"Take 'N' Bake" pizza chain in
the U.S.; its stores sell un-
cooked pizzas for baking at
home.
The company offered
5.8 million shares priced at
$11 per share and raised ap-
proximately $63.8 million in
the offering. Certain selling
stockholders are giving the
underwriters a 30-day option
to buy up to an additional
874,999 shares to cover any
excess demand.
The stock added 5 cents to
close at $11.05 Friday after hit-
ting as high as $12.10 earlier
in the day.
News Corp. to buy
Harlequin for $415M
NEW YORK- News Corp.
sees profit potential in the
tales of princes, sexy soldiers
and mysterious millionaires.
The publishing company
controlled by media mogul
Rupert Murdoch said Friday
that it has agreed to buy ro-
mance novel publisher Harle-
quin Enterprises from Torstar
Corp. for $415 million in cash.
Harlequin will become a di-
vision of News Corp.'s Harper-
Collins Publishers subsidiary
and remain based in Toronto.


Chevron Corp.
profit plunges
NEW YORK Chevron
Corp. reported a steep de-
cline in first-quarter profit be-
cause of lower global oil
prices and bad weather that
slowed oil production.
The company earned
$4.52 billion, o4 $2.36 per
share, for the quarter versus
$6.18 billion, or $3.18 per
share, last year. Revenue fell
to $50.98 billion from $54.3
billion.
Chevron and other major
oil companies are struggling
to maintain production as they
drain oil and gas from their
fields around the world.
Fruit of the Loom
launches briefs
NEW YORK-- It's a natural
fit. Fruit of the Loom is launch-
ing its new boxer briefs for men
with the help of Times Square
favorite the Naked Cowboy.
The New York City fixture
- real name Robert Burck -
who reached fame by strum-
ming his guitar clad in only his
underwear, cowboy boots and
a cowboy hat, will help launch
the new line.
While he usually wears tra-
ditional white briefs, the mar-
keting campaign will see him
switch to Fruit of the Loom's
new underwear, which have
tapered legs to prevent them
from riding up. Also on Tues-
day, samples and coupons will
be given out in Times Square.
-From wire reports


Money&Markets


Business HIGHLIGHTS


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 A7





OPage A8 SATURDAY, MAY 3,2014



PINION


"Many people today don't want honest answers
insofar as honest means unpleasant or disturbing.
They want a soft answer that turneth away anxiety."
Louis Kronenberger, "Unbrave New World," 1964


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
SV Gerry Mulligan ..................................... publisher
S M ike Arnold ............................................... editor
Charlie Brennan........................ managing editor
Ci urt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
$ Rebecca Martin .........................citizen member
Founded Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
by Albert M.
Williamson Logan Mosby .............................. features editor
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DELICATE BALANCE





It's down to




the dollars




and sense


he future of at-risk stu-
dents in Citrus County
has the attention of
parents, students and com-
munity members alike as ed-
ucational leaders ponder
what to do with the county's
alternative school.
Due to budgetary concerns,
officials are ex-
ploring the option
of replacing the THE IS
Renaissance Cen- Should
ter, the current at- district o
risk program that Renais
is overseen by the Cen
school district,
and staffed with OUR OF
school district
teachers and sup- Only i
port staff, by out- diligence
sourcing it to a
private nonprofit company,
Silver River Mentoring and
Instruction, which would
manage and maintain the
Lecanto school.
Seeking to enter into the
2014-15 school year with a
balanced budget, district
leaders are looking for ways
to save while still providing
the same level of service to
students, which is no easy
task for any school board.
It really comes down to the
dollars and the sense. Is out-
sourcing the center a fiscal
necessity for the school dis-
trict? And if it is, what does
that mean for the students?
Students enrolled in Citrus
County schools are funded by
the state of Florida based on
full-time equivalent (FTE) dol-
lars for example, each stu-
dent is funded at 100 percent
by the state. However, accord-
ing to school board Chairman
Thomas Kennedy, students en-
rolled at the Renaissance Cen-
ter are currently funded at
150 percent. Anything over
and above the 100 percent
threshold, the school district is
required to fund.
Should the district decide
to outsource, however, that
cost could potentially drop
dramatically, coming in at
90 percent FTE dollars per
student, resulting in an ap-
proximate $700,000 windfall
for the district.


Danger on the trail
I'm calling about the article in
the Saturday's Chronicle on (April
19), letters to the editor
section, regarding the O 1
trail maintenance along
Norvell Bryant Highway.
The overhanging
branches and excessive
litter on the trail are a
danger to all walkers, jog- ,
gers and cyclists. We are
daily users of this great C
trail and we notice the 563-(
situation is getting worse.
Who is responsible for that trail?


That's no chump change for
a district striving to balance
its budget and hoping to start
replenishing its emergency
funds. But what will those
savings mean when it comes
to the students at the center?
Will they still receive the
same level of care and atten-
tion, while cost-
ing the school
SUE: district less?
school What gets cut -
utsource curriculum,
sance salaries, atten-
ter? tion in order to
meet the new bot-
'INION: tom line? The
buck has to stop
f due somewhere, but
is met. wewonderwhere
exactly that is.
And now to the sense. Does
a move of this magnitude in
such a limited time frame re-
ally make sense at this time?
The Renaissance Center is
the closest thing to stability
that many of its students
have. Is now the appropriate
time to enter into a yearly
contract that is subject to
change every 12 months and
could potentially mean a host
of new teachers and new
rules? Furthermore, does Sil-
ver River personnel have
time to get its staff and infra-
structure in place and cur-
riculum developed with the
new school year just months
away?
Silver River, which has had
a contract with Marion
County for the past 19 years,
seems to have an impressive
track record, with a success
rate of 80 percent. If that
level of success can be repli-
cated with Citrus County stu-
dents, it could open new
doors and new opportunities
for our at-risk students.
As the district moves for-
ward, trying to balance
what's in its best interest with
the reality of the bottom line,
what can't get lost in all of the
discussions of dollars and
sense are the kids at Renais-
sance. They need their school
perhaps more than they even
know Let's give them the best
school we can.

tise and generate money for com-
panies that want to spend money
to put an advertisements on. And
that is so ridiculous and foolish.
In Europe years ago, the
JND German broadcasting sta-
lum tions used to only allow
S commercials between
7:30 and 8 p.m. That was
it. The rest of the time it
was, even though it was
S government run, ... the
O programs were broadcast
)579 and there was no com-
7 mercials on. And it's a
shame that's what they
use it for, to make money.


Germans knew their TV Get those rule-breakers


Television has become an inter-
esting thing to watch. I just
turned to five different channels I
selected at random. Every time I
hit one, there was a commercial
on and it's ridiculous. That's all
TV is used for today is to adver-


When are the police going to
stop people in their cars with
faulty equipment such as head-
lights, one headlight, brake
lights, no brake lights? Someone
had (no) brake lights. They're
not going by the rules, the law.


In a tangle over euphemisms


WASHINGTON
nodyne euphemisms
often indicate an uneasy
conscience or a political
anxiety Or both, as when the
1976 Democratic platform
chose "compensatory opportu-
nity" as a way of blur-
ring the fact that the -
party favored racial
discrimination in the
form of preferences _
and quotas for cer-
tain government-fa-
vored minorities in /
such matters as gov-
emrnment hiring, con-
tracting and college
admissions. Georg
Since then, "affir- OTI
mative action" has
become the ubiqui- VOl
tous semantic eva-
sion. Last Tuesday, however, in
her 58-page dissent that she
summarized from the bench to
emphasize her strenuous dis-
approval of the court's ruling in
a case from Michigan, Justice
Sonia Sotomayor, joined by Jus-
tice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, en-
tered the euphemism
sweepstakes. She suggested
adopting the phrase "race-
sensitive admissions policies."
Not that Michiganders are apt
to be mollified by such seman-
tic ether designed to tranquilize
them regarding practices they
correctly consider discordant
with American values.
In 2003, the Supreme Court
upheld the use of race as one
factor in evaluating applicants
for admission to the University
of Michigan's law school. In re-
sponse, three years later 58 per-
cent of Michigan voters
amended their state's Constitu-
tion to forbid discriminating
against or giving "preferential
treatment to any individual or
group on the basis of race, sex,
color, ethnicity or national ori-
gin." Michigan, like the seven
other states (New Hampshire,
Florida, Nebraska, Oklahoma,
California, Arizona and Wash-
ington) that have similar bans
on one remedy for supposedly
inadequate diversity in enroll-
ments, can continue to use


I







I
?'


other ways to rectify this.
Although the U.S. Constitu-
tion's 14th Amendment says
"No state shall ... deny to any
person within its jurisdiction
the equal protection of the
laws," the U.S. 6th Circuit Court
of Appeals divided
8-7 in ruling that
Michigan's constitu-
tional amendment
mandating equal
treatment violates
the U.S. Constitu-
tion's guarantee of
equal protection. It
reached this, shall
we say, counterintu-
e Will itive conclusion by
IER reasoning as follows:
The amended state
DES Constitution "re-
structures" the polit-
ical process in a way that
complicates the task of Michi-
ganders who favor racial prefer-
ences. Rather than just
persuade the administrators of
Michigan's institutions of post-
secondary education to adopt
racial preferences, they first
must mount a statewide cam-
paign to amend Michigan's Con-
stitution. If this reasoning is
correct, the U.S. Constitution re-
quires that states make it easy as
possible for their governments
to do what the 14th Amendment,
if its plain language is properly
construed, forbids.
Well, then: Does the U.S. Con-
stitution's First Amendment
commit a similar sin by pro-
scribing "establishment of reli-
gion," thereby restructuring the
political process to the discrim-
inatory detriment of those who
favor such establishment and
cannot advance their prefer-
ence without amending the
Constitution?
In the controlling opinion,
Justice Anthony Kennedy,
joined by only John Roberts
and Samuel Alito, stressed that
this ruling did not concern the
merits of racial preferences,
which are permitted within cer-
tain judicially enunciated pa-
rameters. Rather, it concerned
who should decide the merits.
Last Tuesday, the court held


that this decision must not be
placed beyond the reach of
electoral majorities.
Which is why Justice Stephen
Breyer, who usually is a mem-
ber of the liberal bloc, con-
curred in the court's judgment.
He was hoist by his own pro-
gressivism. Because Breyer be-
lieves that democracy the
right of majorities to have their
way trumps most competing
values most of the time, he is
generally deferential to the
preferences of legislatures,
and, in this instance, deferred
to the results of a popular ref-
erendum. Doing so, he re-
mained consistent with a stance
that generally serves the pro-
gressive agenda of reducing
constitutional impediments to
expansive government.
The moral of the story from
Michigan is: What a tangled web
we weave when first we practice
to deceive ourselves into think-
ing we can gracefully ignore the
great principle resoundingly af-
firmed in 1896 by Justice John
Marshall Harlan's dissent in the
Plessy v Ferguson decision. In
this, the court held that govern-
ment actions can take cog-
nizance of race if the resulting
treatment of racial groups is
"separate but equal." Justice An-
tonin Scalia, joined by Justice
Clarence Thomas, concluded his
concurrence in the court's judg-
ment about Michigan this way:
'As Justice Harlan observed
over a century ago, 'Our Consti-
tution is colorblind, and neither
knows nor tolerates classes
among citizens.' The people of
Michigan wish the same for
their governing charter It
would be shameful for us to
stand in their way"
The court's continuing fis-
sures regarding "race-sensi-
tive" policies six justices
used four opinions to reach the
result indicate that Harlan's
principle remains too clear for
the comfort of a court still too
fond of euphemisms. That is
shameful.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost. corn.


nmlml


Q OPIN CARRY)


W WJI w 5 Z."


LETTER to


Get involved in
bringing home POW
Regarding the Chronicle's
April 24 issue with coverage of
Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, prisoner
of war in Afghanistan since
2009:
Recently, with the assistance
of U.S. Rep. Richard Nugent,
we held a Citrus County peti-
tion drive to demand Secretary
of State John Kerry implement
immediate action to return Sgt.
Bergdahl to his family in Utah.
Over 8,000 petitions were
hand-carried by Nugent to Sec-
retary Kerry's office and a let-
ter was received from the
Congressman after attempting
to make the delivery It read, in
part: "Upon receiving the peti-
tions in Washington, my office
reached out directly to the Of-
fice of the Secretary of State
requesting a meeting between
myself and the Secretary to
personally deliver the peti-
tions. After several weeks and
numerous follow-ups, my
scheduler received a call from
the head of the congressional
liaison office at the State De-
partment saying that the Sec-
retary would not be available


OPINIONS INVITED
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Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
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Persons wishing to address the
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SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
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anytime in the 'near future.'
They were not inclined to ex-


the Editor


plain what 'near future' means,
however they did agree to
make one of the Secretary's
top lieutenants available to re-
ceive them."
Clearly, the effort Secretary
Kerry expressed in his inability
to be available is an insult to
those of us who have, or are,
serving in combat with the ex-
pectations that if we are impris-
oned by the enemy our country
will do everything to obtain our
release. But, as a Vietnam vet-
eran, I have observed the secre-
tary's action is a proven track
record of similar humiliating
actions to veterans.
This is a situation that will
only be resolved by American
citizens getting involved, pres-
suring Washington and de-
manding an "unavailable"
representative of our govern-
ment to rectify the situation in
bringing Sgt. Bergdahl home.
To learn what you can do
please go to wwwoperation
welcomehomeveterans.org or
http://advocate4victims.org/wp/.
Sgt Bowe Bergdahl must not
be forgotten.
John Stewart
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


SE

it,


if




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


Tax code driving
away companies
That is pretty scary
Evelyn O'Brien is out-
raged that Caterpillar has
a subsidiary in Switzer-
land that allowed them to
save $3.4 billion dollars in
taxes during the last 13
years, but like all liberals,
she never asks the ques-
tion, "How can they do
that?"
It might have something
to do with our tax laws
and the fact that in 2014,
Switzerland's corporate
tax rate is less than half
what America's is.
Switzerland's 2014 corpo-
rate tax rate is 19.3 per-
cent. America's is 40
percent. When you look at
it like that, I'm amazed
that we have any corpora-
tions left in America.
Switzerland isn't the only
place with sub-20 percent
corporate tax rates. Sev-
eral provinces of Canada
have equally low rates.
They are common all over
Europe.
When you have a tax
policy to sock it to the big
greedy corporations, you
should not be surprised
when they move their pro-
duction elsewhere. When
they do that, jobs are lost,
and lives are ruined. The
liberal will blame the low
wages in certain parts of
the world, but Switzerland
isn't a low-wage country
They get paid very well
there. They don't get to
keep all that much. It goes
to the government to fund
their social programs. I
can answer the question
of how many other big
companies are taking ad-
vantage of this tax strat-
egy The answer is,
everyone that can.
It obviously doesn't
work for retailers, but if
you manufacture a prod-
uct, it can work very well.
After we bailed out Gen-
eral Motors, they repaid
us by opening 11 factories
in China and closing fac-
tories here.
We need an overhaul of
the tax system, but it's not
going to happen during an
election year, and it's never
going to happen if the lib-
erals attempt to use it to
raise taxes. When you rage
against capitalism, you
paint yourself into a corner
where you can't offer any-
thing better There are
abuses, but following the
U.S. tax code as published
isn't one of them.
Governmental owner-
ship and control of prop-
erty and the means of
production isn't a solu-
tion. It's a call to disaster
It's not deep research to
look behind the old iron
curtain of yesterday or
study the conditions in
South American today
brought on by socialism
and communism. What I


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don't understand is why,
despite the obvious fail-
ures of those systems,
people keep trying to
bring them to America?
They don't work.
Evelyn goes on to attack
Paul Ryan for actually
coming up with a plan to
balance the budget and
says "that $3.4 billion
would sure be welcome to
help defray his cuts." Ac-
tually $3.4 billion is 1.2
percent of our 2014
$280 billion Medicaid and
CHIPs budget. It's
0.0009 percent of our $3.77
trillion total budget for
2014. That's where the out-
rage should be directed.
It should be directed at
politicians who can't con-
trol their spending and
will spend us into bank-
ruptcy buying votes.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Tournament help
appreciated
The St. Scholastica
Knights of Columbus
council No. 14485 would
like to thank all those who
made the Lenny Navickas
Memorial Golf Tourna-
ment a great success.
I want to express my


deepest gratitude to Bill
Fischer, who as council
trustee, gave his all to this
endeavor My other assis-
tants were Jack Fleming,
Mike Barry and Jack
King, who also spent nu-
merous hours sending out
letters and forms to busi-
nesses throughout the
county asking for their
contributions.
I personally want to
thank the Rev Robert Ro-
maine for his prayers and
kick-off of the event;
Steve Tamposi, a longtime
friend of Lenny, for his
generosity and kind
words; Les Cook, who
worked in the county ap-
praiser's office with
Lenny; and Michelle Nav-
ickas for her kind words
and support.
I thank all the sponsors
and those who donated
prizes and money for
their great generosity:
Brooks Systems; Rob
Brooks; Mystic, Ct, Burch
Automotive Services, Her-
nando; Chas E. Davis Fu-
neral & Crematory; Citrus
Hills Golf & Country
Club; Citrus Hills Medical
Center; Brad Ruben; Cit-
rus Ridge Realty; Kirk
Johnson; B.H. Connolly's
Sod & Lawn Service;
Crystal Automotive, Ho-


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mosassa/Inverness; Dr
Marc C. Rogers; Dr
Ronald Steffel and wife
Linda; Eagle Buick, Ho-
mosassa; Hall Of Fame, J.
Barry Cook; Prudential
Realty; Knights Of Colum-
bus Council No. 6168; Les
and co-workers; Lou
Ellen Davis, Inverness;
Bill and Ann Sulinski;
Claire and Richard
Croteau; David and Tonya
Caldwell; James and
Merry Guinn; John J.
Lyons; K. William and
Margaret Spahr; Peter
and Vickie Summers;
Mama Sally's South, Crys-
tal River; Mike Scott
Plumbing Inc.; Charles D.
Ingrilli; Shawn C. Loreth;
George McBride; Jim
Fowler; Nature Coast
Bank, Hernando; Nick
Nicholas Ford/Mercury;
Pediatric & Internal Med-
icine; Pete Summers and
wonderful staff, Property
Appraisers' Office; Gwen
and Schlabach Security &
Sound; Lecanto Special-


ists Pa.; Antoinette St.
Martin; St Scholastica
Christ Renews His
Parish; Sysco Food Serv-
ices Of Central Fla.; Ted
Williams Museum;
Skyview Golf& Country
Club; the Tamposi Foun-
dation, Mass.; Timberlane
Family Dentistry; Tropi-
cal Window Inc.; Heather
Moberley; VanAllen In-
surance Agency; Linda,
VanAllen, Inverness; and
West Coast Insurers,
Chrissy Everidge.
Lastly, I would like to
thank our council and all
those who volunteered to
make this event successful.
Bill Matos
Council Director

Talent abounds
in community
Accolades to the Citrus
High School Choral De-
partment under the direc-
tion of John Edel.
The Friday evening


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Let your mother know how much she is loved and
appreciated on her special day with a personal
message from you in the Chronicle Classifieds.

$15.95 Includes 20 lines of copy or 10 lines of copy and a photo.

Call 565-5966
Deadline is Thursday, May 8th at 1:00pm


I


[ FEESTMATES


............ l


I


OPINION


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 A9


&.. l


VI
46- ,


concert, "Let the Music
Play On," incorporated
the best of music tal-
ented singers, drummer,
guitarist pianist and so
much more.
I would highly recom-
mend community mem-
bers keep an ear tuned
for the next high school
choral concert. You will
be most pleased.
As the current activities
coordinator of a local 400-
site RV Park, we have
taken part in many Citrus
County events, but this
concert Friday evening
was one of the "Best of
the Best" of the season.
The musicians were
fantastic, several sharing
their musical talents
which won them superior
ratings in state and re-
gional music competi-
tions; simply awesome.
The choirs demon-
strated excellence in
music education in so
many ways the devel-
opment of a wide variety
of skills, superb pitch
maintenance, just full of
beautiful resonance.
Their rhythmic energy
was definitely evident
with their invitation for
audience participation.
Along with the musi-
cians, the enthusiasm, the
courtesy and etiquette
shown by all students,
parents, friends in the au-
dience was truly com-
mendable. Citrus High
School staff, students and
parents you are truly
treasured.
Thank you Mr Edel, di-
rector of the Citrus High
School music department,
students, and staff May
your legacy as expressed
in your final song, "For
Just a Little While," con-
tinue on long into the
future.
Thank you to the fam-
ily of First Baptist
Church of Inverness, for
being a gracious accom-
modating host to this
great event.
Judy Wagner
Lecanto










NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


US economy bounces back


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
American economy
shrugged off the end of a
brutal winter last month,
rebounding with the
biggest hiring surge in two
years and suggesting that
the job market's gains
could endure.
Employers added
288,000 jobs across indus-
tries from manufacturing
to construction to account-
ing. Even local govern-
ments hired. The


unemployment rate sank
to 6.3 percent, its lowest
point since 2008, from 6.7
percent.
But the rate fell that far
because many fewer peo-
ple began looking for work
in April, thereby reducing
the number of unem-
ployed. The proportion of
Americans who either
have a job or are looking
for one dropped to a three-
decade low
And the monthly em-
ployment report the gov-
ernment released Friday


showed that worker pay
has yet to pick up evi-
dence that the job market
has not fully recovered.
Yet April's robust hiring
gains suggested that the
economy is returning to the
solid pace of growth it
achieved in the second half
of 2013, before it was ham-
mered by a harsh winter
Job growth has averaged
203,000 a month in the past
six months, similar to last
year's average of 194,000.
Analysts said the econ-
omy is facing fewer hur-


dles now In addition to
better weather, growth is
no longer held back by
steep government spend-
ing cuts, which slowed
growth in 2013. Many com-
panies had also stockpiled
too many goods last fall,
forcing them to cut back in
the first quarter to clear
their shelves.
"The absence of these
factors is finally allowing
the economy's underlying
strength to come to the sur-
face," said Bart Van Ark,
chief economist at the


Conference Board. "The
result is not just a rela-
tively strong gain in jobs in
April but probably more of
the same in May and June."
Explorys, a health-care
data provider, has ramped
up hiring in the past six
months as more hospitals
have used its services to
limit their costs. Explorys'
software can analyze pa-
tient data to predict which
ones are most likely to
need follow-up visits at
home to prevent any
complications.


The Cleveland-based
company has added about
30 people in the past six
months, bringing its staff to
about 140.
"We need more software
developers, data analysts
and data scientists," says
CEO Steve McHale. "The
economy's improvement
has served us well."
April's solid job growth
wasn't enough to boost
stock prices. The Dow
Jones industrial average
fell 48 points in afternoon
trading.


Near-space satellite launch


/
/


Associated Press
Students from the Three Rivers HomeLink's STEM projects class, with the help of Paul Verhage, launched a near-space satellite with capsules and sensor arrays
attached to collect data from the earth's atmosphere Friday at Hermiston Junior Academy.


World BRIEFS


Unrest spreads
in Ukraine
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine-
Ukraine launched an offen-
sive against separatist forces
for control of a besieged east-
ern city Friday, while clashes
between pro- and anti-
government activists in the
previously calm southern port
of Odessa led to a fire that
police said killed 31 people.
The first serious offensive
by the government in Kiev
and the dozens of deaths in
Odessa sharply escalated
the crisis that has led to the
worst tensions between Rus-
sia and the West since the
Cold war. The Kremlin said
the battle for the separatist-
held city of Slovyansk effec-
tively destroyed the Geneva
pact aimed at cooling the un-
rest in the deeply divided
country.
Attack near
subway kills 1
CAIRO -An Egyptian se-
curity official said a car ex-
ploded in a busy Cairo district,
leaving one person dead and
injuring two others. It was the
fourth attack in one day and
brings death toll to five.
The official said the blast
rocked Ramses central district
near a subway station late Fri-
day. He added it was not clear
yet whether it was a car bomb
or if an attacker hurled an ex-
plosive device at a moving car.
The official said security
forces cordoned off the area
and explosive experts are in-
specting the site any more
possible bombs.


Associated Press
A rickshaw puller covers his face with a newspaper as
he takes a nap Friday afternoon in New Delhi, India.
Daytime temperatures reached 108 degrees Fahrenheit.
Report: Ford Police get more
threatened guard time to quiz Adams


TORONTO -A report re-
leased by Toronto City Hall
said Mayor Rob Ford was in-
toxicated at city hall this past
St. Patrick's Day and made a
threat against a guard who had
reported the mayor for similar
behavior two years ago.
The report released Friday
said Ford threatened to "get"
a guard who reported that on
St. Patrick's Day two years
ago, the mayor was walking
around City Hall with "a half
empty bottle of St-Remy
French Brandy."
Ford took a leave of ab-
sence this week and
checked into rehab after a re-
port surfaced of a video ap-
parently showing him
smoking crack last weekend.


BELFAST, Northern Ireland
- Northern Ireland police
said they have received an
extra 48 hours to question
Sinn Fein leader Gerry
Adams about an IRA killing
more than four decades ago.
The Police Service of
Northern Ireland confirmed in
a statement Friday its detec-
tives received permission at a
closed-door hearing with a
judge to detain Adams for two
more days. Had the request
been refused, Adams would
have had to be charged or re-
leased by Friday night, two
days after his arrest as a sus-
pect in the 1972 slaying of a
Belfast mother of 10. The
new deadline is Sunday
night.
From wire reports


Nation BRIEFS

Ominous fire
season ahead
LOS ANGELES -Federal
foresters are preparing for an
ominous wildfire season with
a budget that might run dry
and a fleet of air tankers that
in some cases aren't ready for
takeoff. Avast swath of the
West is primed for fire.
The U.S. Forest Service's
Tom Harbour told The Associ-
ated Press conditions are so
threatening in so many states
the agency could run out of
money trying to fight fires.
New York City
subway train derails
NEW YORK-A subway
train carrying 1,000 passen-
gers shook through a tunnel,
tilted and derailed on Friday,
injuring more than a dozen
people and frightening scores
of others with sparks, smoke
and sudden darkness.
Four people suffered seri-
ous injuries and were hospi-
talized, firefighters said. Some
complained of chest pains.
Fifteen others were treated at
the scene.
The express F train was
heading for Manhattan and
Brooklyn when six of its eight
cars derailed at 10:40 a.m.
about 1,200 feet south of the
65th Street station in the
Woodside section of Queens.
Emergency responders
used ladders to help passen-
gers descend from the train to
track level and guided them
along the track to a sidewalk
opening.
From wire reports


Associated Press
President Barack Obama gestures Friday as he speaks
during a joint news conference with German Chancellor
Angela Merkel in the Rose Garden of the White House
in Washington.


US, Germany


warn Putin not


to disrupt vote


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Pres-
ident Barack Obama and
German Chancellor An-
gela Merkel threatened
tough sanctions Friday on
broad swaths of Russia's
economy if Moscow dis-
rupts Ukraine's May 25
presidential elections, put-
ting President Vladimir
Putin on notice for harsher
penalties even if he stops
short of a full invasion.
Standing side by side in
the White House Rose
Garden, Obama and
Merkel sought to bat
down the notion of any
discord between the U.S.


and European ap-
proaches to dissuading
Putin from interfering in
Ukraine. Obama said the
U.S. and Europe have
shown "remarkable
unity" in their response
so far, though he acknowl-
edged that some Euro-
pean countries are
vulnerable to Russian re-
taliation for sanctions and
said those concerns must
be taken into account
"The next step is going
to be a broader-based sec-
toral sanctions regime,"
Obama declared, refer-
ring to entire segments of
Russia's economy such as
energy or arms.







ST B S MA 3,201


* Marlins
extend
home win
streak with
victory
over
Dodgers.
/B4


0 NBA, NHL/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Baseball/B4
0 Boxing, auto racing/B5
0 NFL draft/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Roessler, Clark, Byrne medal at state track


Athletes fight through
tough weather conditions
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
Despite horrible weather conditions at the Uni-
versity of North Florida in Jacksonville, the
FHSAA Class 2A state track and field tournament
slogged on Friday through the rain and the cold
as 11 Crystal River athletes competed for a cov-
eted top-eight finisher's medal.
"It was cold, and the rain was blowing side-
ways," Crystal River boys head coach Tim Byrne
said of the meet's conditions. "(The temperature)
was in the 50s to 60s and it was windy, but not a
heavy rain. Just enough to be a distraction."
In the pole vault, senior Hayley Clark, along
with junior teammate Angela Byrne, earned the
first two state medals for Crystal River in spite of
the cold, rainy vaulting conditions. Clark, who was
seeded eighth going into the tournament, finished


fifth with a vault of 10-6. Byrne, who won a district
and regional title in 2014, finished tied for seventh
with a vault of 10
feet
Lecanto's turn Junior Huyen
The Class 3AFHSAAState "Tina" Vo, Crystal
Finals in track and field will be River's third pole
held today in Jacksonville. vault state qualifier,
Six Lecanto individuals will placed 14th (8 feet).
compete in the final event of Tampa Catholic's
the season. Nicole Carroll won
The meet gets underway at the pole vault with a
9 a.m. at the University of leap of 12 feet.
North Florida. "They did excep-
tionally well consid-
ering the rain,"
Crystal River girls head coach Randy Owens said.
See /Page B3
Crystal River senior pole vaulter Hayley Clark
clears a height earlier this season at Lecanto.
Clark finished fifth at the State RFinals Friday in
Jacksonville with a height of 10-feet 6-inches.
MATT PFIFFNER/Chronicle file photo


Iort

'ort


Associated Press
Tampa Bay center fielder Desmond Jennings makes a catch at the wall Friday on a ball hit by New York's Derek Jeter during
the third inning at Yankee Stadium in New York. The American League East rivals were tied 5-5 after 11 innings when this
edition went to press.


California


Chrome


sets gold


standard


for Derby
Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -The owners
of California Chrome are putting
all their hopes into the chestnut
colt to win
the Ken- Run for the
t u c k y Roses
Derby
After all, 0 WHAT: 140th
he's the Kentucky Derby
only horse 0WHERE:
they own.- Churchill Downs
Califor- in Louisville, Ky.
n i a
Chrome, lTV: 4 p.m. (NBC)
based at 0 POSTTIME:
l e s s e r- 6:42 p.m.
known Los
Alamitos
racetrack in suburban Los Ange-
les, is the early 5-2 favorite for
today's 140th Derby with good rea-
son. He has won four straight races
by a combined 24 1/4 lengths under
Victor Espinoza, who won the
Derby in 2002 with War
Emblem.
"He's so light on his feet," Es-
pinoza said. "He just does things
so easy and makes my job easy"
California Chrome's owners,
Steve Coburn and Perry Martin,
are no Kentucky blue bloods.
They're a couple of working stiffs
who live near Reno, Nevada.
A trainer called them "dumb
asses" for getting into the racing
game, inspiring the duo to put the
letters DAP on their silks, which
stands for Dumb Ass Partners.
"We're going to go down in his-
tory," Coburn predicted.
California Chrome is the prod-
uct of an $8,000 mare and a $2,500
stallion. He's earned more than
$1 million already, making it some-
what easier for Coburn and Martin
to turn down a pre-Derby offer of
$6 million for a 51 percent stake in
the horse.
"We've been blessed with this
colt," Coburn said. "The first time
we saw him, we knew it was going
to be something special."
See I B/Page 133


DOUBLE-UP LEASE GUARANTEE


EA


t




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nets roll Raptors, force deciding Game 7


Mavericks also push

Spurs to the limit

Associated Press


NEW YORK


- Deron Williams scored


23 points, shaking off a
second-half injury, and the Rand
Brooklyn Nets forced a
seventh game in their suspend
first-round series by beat- Game
ing the Toronto Raptors punching,
97-83 on Friday night
Despite appearing to NEWYORK-
hurt his left foot or ankle ward Zach Rand
early in the third quarter, suspended for C
Williams dominated his Grizzlies' playoff
matchup with Kyle Lowry Oklahoma City f
and helped the Nets put it Thunder center
away with a 3-pointer with in the jaw.
1:13 left that made it 92-79. The ruling Frii
Game 7 is Sunday in leaves the Grizz
Toronto, with the winner leading scorer fc
advancing to face the de- klaho
fending champion Miami The play cam
Heat Therplay C
It became the fourth the Thunder's 1
first-round series ticketed Thursday night.
for a do-or-die game in elbowed Adams
these playoffs, with the At- tion with his left.
lantic Division champion struck Adams w
Raptors trying to get by a Randolph is a
Nets team that still has a best 18.2 points
chance to reach the high
expectations it had enter-
ing the season.
DeMar DeRozan scored 28 for the Rap-
tors, who will have to go the distance if they
are to win a seven-game series for the first
time in franchise history They haven't won
any postseason series since 2001, and
never really had a chance to wrap this one


:1


up after falling behind by 26 points.
Lowry shot 4 of 16 for 11 points after
scoring 36 in the Raptors' Game 5 victory
He was the only other Toronto player in
double figures.
Joe Johnson had 17 points and Kevin
Garnett 13 for the Nets, who will play in a
Game 7 for the second straight season.
They fell to Chicago last
year on their home floor
Olph and will try to win it this


ided for
7 for
g Adams
- Memohis for-


1d
Ga
ff s
for






ne
10
.R

elt
it
v<
Sin


time in Toronto, where
they won Game 1.
Mavericks 113,
Spurs 111


olph has been DALLAS Monta Ellis
ame 7 of the scored 12 of his 29 points to
series against lead a fourth-quarter come-
)r punching back, Dirk Nowitzki added 22
3teven Adams and the Dallas Mavericks
forced a Game 7 in their first-
ay by the NBA round series with top-seeded
es without their San Antonio, beating the
rthe deciding Spurs 113-111.
ia City tonight. The eighth-seeded Maver-
: with 6:42 left in icks bounced back from con-
4-84 victory secutive losses by handing
Randolph first the Spurs their first road de-
n the midsec- feat when leading after three
Ibow, then quarters this season.
h his right hand. Tony Parker scored 22 to
eraging a team- lead the heavily favored
n the series. Spurs, who are stuck in a
From wire reports tossup series after they won
-Fromall four games against Dallas
during the regular season.
San Antonio took a nine-game winning streak
against the Texas rival into the sixth postseason
meeting between the teams.
The second Game 7 between these teams is
Sunday in San Antonio. The Mavericks won the
other one there in 2006.


-NNW



Associated Press
Brooklyn's Kevin Garnett, left, knocks the ball away Friday from Toronto's DeMar
DeRozan during the first half of Game 6 of the opening-round NBA playoffs in New York.


Tied at the top


Cabrera,

Flores share

lead at

Quail Hollow

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.-
Angel Cabrera hit a pair of
superb short-game shots for
a 3-under 69 that gave him a
share of the lead with Mar-
tin Flores on Friday in the
Wells Fargo Championship.
Cabrera loves Quail Hol-
low because he hits driver
on just about every hole.
But it was a pitch-and-run
on the par-5 seventh hole
and perfectly judged flop
shot out of the rough on the
next hole that enabled him
to share the lead.
Flores played in the
morning and had a 68. They
were at 9-under 135, one
shot ahead of Justin Rose,
who had a 67.
Phil Mickelson and Rory
Mcllroy both went the
wrong direction. Mickelson
shot 75 and was seven shots
behind. Mcllroy shot 76 and
made the cut on the
number
Langer, Bryant
share Champions
Tour lead
THE WOODLANDS, Texas
- Bernhard Langer birdied the
final six holes for a share of the
lead with Bart Bryant in the
Champions Tour's Insperity
Invitational.
Langer matched Bryant at
6-under 66 at The Woodlands
Country Club. Langer won the
2007 event at Augusta Pines
and successfully defended his
title in 2008 at The Woodlands.
The 56-year-old German won
the season-opening event in
Hawaii for his 19th Champions
Tour title and has 20 straight
under-par rounds.
Defending champion Este-
ban Toledo was a stroke back.
Panuphol
maintains lead
in Singapore
SINGAPORE Panuphol
Pittayarat of Thailand birdied
two of his last three holes to
maintain a one-stroke lead
after the second round of The
Championship at Laguna
National.
Panuphol, the overnight
leader, shot a 4-under 68 for a
two-round total of 13-under
131, a stroke ahead of Scott
Hend of Australia, David Lip-
sky of the United States, and
Felipe Aguilar of Chile in a tie
for second place.
Lee, Masson tied
for LPGA Tour lead
IRVING, Texas Meena
Lee shot a season-best 64
that included a nine-hole
stretch without a par and Caro-
line Masson had her second
straight 67 to share the lead in


Associated Press
Martin Kaymer removes the cover from a club Friday while he waits to hit on the fourth
tee during the second round of the Wells Fargo Championship in Charlotte, N.C.


the North Texas LPGA
Shootout.
At 8-under 134, South
Korea's Lee and Germany's
Masson were stroke ahead of
Texan Stacy Lewis and fellow
American Natalie Gulbis.
The 65 on Friday for Gulbis
was her first sub-70 round this
season, putting her in con-
tention for her first victory in
seven years. She is playing
with an achy left wrist, and has
an appointment with a special-
ist next week to finally figure
out what is causing the pain.
Lewis, the No. 3 player in
the world, had a bogey-free 64
to match Lee for the best
round of the day.
Wells Fargo
Championship
Friday, At Quail Hollow Club Course,
Charlotte, N.C., Purse: $6.9 million,
Yardage: 7,562, Par: 72, Second Round
Note: Weekend qualifiers only
Martin Flores 67-68- 135 -9
Angel Cabrera 66-69- 135 -9
Justin Rose 69-67- 136 -8
Shawn Stefani 69-68-137 -7
J.B. Holmes 70-67-137 -7
Kevin Kisner 72-66- 138 -6
Martin Kaymer 69-69- 138 -6
Stewart Cink 68-70- 138 -6
Geoff Ogilvy 72-67-139 -5
Martin Laird 69-70- 139 -5
Jonathan Byrd 68-71 139 -5
Michael Thompson 71-69-140 -4
RetiefGoosen 70-70- 140 -4
Robert Streb 71-69- 140 -4
Jason Bohn 73-67- 140 -4
Charles Howell III 69-71 -140 -4
Roberto Castro 71-70- 141 -3
Jim Furyk 72-69- 141 -3
Zach Johnson 71-70- 141 -3
Webb Simpson 68-73-141 -3
Chris Kirk 71-70- 141 -3
Ryan Moore 70-71 -141 -3
Derek Ernst 73-68- 141 -3
Scott Langley 70-71 -141 -3
Kevin Streelman 72-69-141 -3
John Merrick 71-70- 141 -3


Vijay Singh 69-72- 141 -3
Kevin Na 69-72-141 -3
Hideki Matsuyama 69-72-141 -3
Michael Putnam 73-69-142 -2
Cameron Tringale 74-68-142 -2
Rory Sabbatini 74-68- 142 -2
Phil Mickelson 67-75-142 -2
Brendon de Jonge 80-62- 142 -2
Daniel Summerhays 70-72-142 -2
Danny Lee 71-71 -142 -2
Wes Roach 71-71 -142 -2
Bud Cauley 71-71 -142 -2
Jason Kokrak 75-68- 143 -1
Ernie Els 76-67- 143 -1
Kevin Chappell 73-70-143 -1
Mike Weir 72-71 -143 -1
Gary Woodland 71-72-143 -1
Davis Love III 75-68-143 -1
Sang-Moon Bae 72-71 -143 -1
Will Wilcox 71-72-143 -1
Brian Harman 70-74- 144 E
Carl Pettersson 73-71 -144 E
Scott Brown 71-73- 144 E
Brendan Steele 72-72- 144 E
Ben Martin 71-73- 144 E
Andrew Svoboda 72-72-144 E
David Hearn 70-74-144 E
Ricky Barnes 72-72- 144 E
MarkWilson 72-72-144 E
Pat Perez 73-71 -144 E
Jim Herman 76-68-144 E
Bronson La'Cassie 71-73- 144 E
Ted Potter, Jr. 72-73- 145 +1
JohnsonWagner 75-70-145 +1
Justin Hicks 74-71 145 +1
Kevin Tway 73-72-145 +1
Jim Renner 71-74- 145 +1
JoshTeater 72-73- 145 +1
Heath Slocum 77-68-145 +1
Kyle Stanley 74-71 -145 +1
Bill Haas 75-70-145 +1
Hunter Mahan 72-73- 145 +1
Rory Mcllroy 69-76- 145 +1
Rickie Fowler 74-71 -145 +1
RobertAllenby 73-72- 145 +1
YE.Yang 73-72-145 +1
Brian Davis 74-71 145 +1
Champions
Insperity
Invitational
Friday, At The Woodlands CC, The Wood-
lands, Texas, Purse: $2 million, Yardage:
7,002, Par: 72 (36-36), First Round
Note: Partial list
Bart Bryant 32-34- 66 -6
Bernhard Langer 35-31 -66 -6
Esteban Toledo 34-33-67 -5
Joe Daley 34-34-68 -4


Jeff Maggert 33-35-68 -4
Fred Funk 34-34-68 -4
Steve Lowery 34-35- 69 -3
Tommy Armour III 36-33-69 -3
Steve Pate 35-34- 69 -3
BobTway 32-37-69 -3
MarkO'Meara 35-34-69 -3
Fred Couples 35-34-69 -3
Joey Sindelar 35-34-69 -3
Mark Brooks 35-35-70 -2
Gene Sauers 37-33-70 -2
Wes Short, Jr. 36-34-70 -2
WillieWood 35-35-70 -2
Jay Haas 36-34-70 -2
Dan Forsman 35-35-70 -2
LPGA North
Texas Shootout
Friday, At Las Colinas Country Club
Course, Irving, Texas, Purse: $1.3 million,
Yardage: 6,410, Par: 71, Second Round,
a-denotes amateur
Note: Partial
Meena Lee 70-64-134 -8
Caroline Masson 67-67- 134 -8
Stacy Lewis 71-64-135 -7
Natalie Gulbis 70-65-135 -7
Christina Kim 67-69-136 -6
Julieta Granada 71-66- 137 -5
Dewi Claire Schreefel 71-66-137 -5
Dorin Carter 67-70- 137 -5
Cristie Kerr 67-70- 137 -5
Suzann Pettersen 66-71- 137 -5
Kim Kaufman 72-66-138 -4
Moira Dunn 70-68- 138 -4
Felicity Johnson 70-68- 138 -4
Megan McChrystal 70-68- 138 -4
AzaharaMunoz 70-68- 138 -4
Pornanong Phatlum 70-68- 138 -4
Thidapa Suwannapura 70-68-138 -4
Katherine Kirk 69-69- 138 -4
Jenny Shin 69-69- 138 -4
The Championship
Laguna National
Thursday, At Laguna National Golf and
Country Club, Masters Course, Singa-
pore, Purse: $1.5 million,Yardage: 7,109,
Par: 72, Second Round
Note: Partial
Panuphol Pittayarat, Thailand 63-68 -131
Scott Hend, Australia 67-65 -132
Felipe Aguilar, Chile 65-67-132
David Lipsky, United States 64-68 132
Anders Hansen, Denmark 67-66 -133
Rahil Gangjee, India 66-67-133
Baek Seuk-hyun, S. Korea 66-67-133
Arnond Vongvanij, Thailand 65-69-134
Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden 65-69- 134


Rangers skate



past Penguins

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Derick Brassard scored 3:06 into
overtime to give the New York Rangers a 3-2 victory
over the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game 1 of the East-
ern Conference semifinals Friday night.
Play continued after Brassard's goal, with Benoit
Pouliot pumping a shot past Marc-Andre Fleury sec-
onds after Brassard's shot. A review showed Bras-
sard's flip from in front beat Fleury cleanly
Game 2 is Sunday
Pouliot and Brad Richards gave the Rangers an
early 2-0 lead. Henrik Lundqvist stopped 34 shots and
stuffed a late Pittsburgh breakaway in the final sec-
onds of regulation.
Lee Stempniak and James Neal scored for the Pen-
guins. Fleury made 24 saves but was helpless on the
winner
Pittsburgh star Sidney Crosby was held without a
goal for the 12th straight playoff game.
The Penguins have never lost a playoff series
against the Rangers, rolling to victory in each of the
four postseason meetings, including a 4-1 win in the
Eastern Conference semifinals in 2008.
They split their four games during the regular sea-
son, all of them coming before the Olympic break. The
Penguins have looked sluggish in the ensuing three
months while the Rangers played their best hockey
down the stretch before needing seven games to dis-
patch Philadelphia in the opening round.


Associated Press
New York Ranger Ryan McDonagh, left, slides into the
boards Friday after colliding with Pittsburgh's Lee
Stempniak in the second period Friday in Pittsburgh.
The Rangers won Game 1 in overtime, 3-2.





CHRONICLE

STUDENT

(C ATHLETIC
RECOGNITION
A night to recognize
outstanding student athletes

Friday, May 16,2014

5:30PM

Cost: $10

College of Central Florida

Citrus Campus
Ns 1. %1 Ra(~i~r Aw I ^

Tickets available at either Citrus County Chronicle location:
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River or 106 W. Main St., Inverness
For more information, call (352) 563-6363.


B2 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


SPORTS




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
Wednesday, April 30
San Antonio 109, Dallas 103
Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113
Houston 108, Portland 98, Portland leads se-
ries 3-2
Thursday, May 1
Indiana 95, Atlanta 88, series tied 3-3
Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84, series tied
3-3
Golden State 100, L.A. Clippers 99, series
tied 3-3
Friday, May 2
Brooklyn 97, Toronto 83, series tied 3-3
Dallas 113, San Antonio 111, series tied 3-3
Houston at Portland, late
Today
Atlanta at Indiana, 5:30 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 4
Brooklyn atToronto, 1 or8 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 1 or 3:30 p.m.
x-Portland at Houston, 3:30 p.m.



NHL Playoffs
SECOND ROUND
Thursday, May 1
Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT, Montreal leads
series 1-0
Friday, May 2
N.Y Rangers 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT, N.Y
Rangers leads series 1-0
Minnesota at Chicago, late
Today
Montreal at Boston, 12:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 4
Minnesota at Chicago, 3 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, May 5
Pittsburgh at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10p.m.
Tuesday, May 6
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 7
Pittsburgh at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 8
Boston at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.



Brewers 2, Reds 0


Milwaukee Cincinnati
ab r h bi
CGomz cf 4 0 1 0 Heisey If
Gennett2b 4 0 0 0 Votto lb
Lucroy c 4 0 3 0 Frazier 3b
ArRmr3b 3 00 0 Brucerf
Overaylb 4 1 1 0 B.Penac
KDavis If 4 0 0 0 Cozart ss
Gindlrf 3 0 1 0 Berndncf
Segurass 3 1 0 0 RSantg2b
WPerltp 3 0 1 2 Leake p
FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 N.Soto ph
Ondrsk p
Totals 32 272 Totals
Milwaukee 000 020 000
Cincinnati 000 000 000


ab r h bi
4010
3010
4010
4000
4000
3000
3000
2000
2000
1000
0000
34 0 3 0
3 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
300 3 0
2
0


E-Segura (4), Cozart (1). DP-Milwaukee 1,
Cincinnati 2. LOB-Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 5.
2B-Lucroy (11), W.Peralta (2), Votto (7), Fra-
zier (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
W.PeraltaW,4-1 8 3 0 0 2 7
Fr.RodriguezS,14-14 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cincinnati
LeakeL,2-3 8 7 2 2 2 5
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 0 1
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Mike
DiMuro; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third,
Mike Estabrook.
T-2:35. A-32,759 (42,319).
Tigers 8, Royals 2
Detroit Kansas City
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Kinsler2b 4 1 2 0 Aokirf 4 00 0
TrHntrrf 5 2 2 0 Infante2b 4 1 2 0
MiCarrIb 5 1 1 1 Hosmerib 3 00 1
VMrtnzdh 5 1 3 2 BButlerdh 4 1 1 1
AJcksncf 5 0 1 0 AGordnl If 3 00 0
D.Kelly3b 5 0 1 0 S.Perezc 3 00 0
JMrtnzlf 4 1 2 2 Hayesc 0 0 0 0
Avilac 3 1 1 2 Mostks3b 3 0 1 0
AnRmnss 4 1 1 0 AEscorss 3 00 0
Dysoncf 3 00 0
Totals 40 8147 Totals 302 4 2
Detroit 002 300 300 8
Kansas City 100 100 000 2
E-Moustakas (3). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-
Detroit 7, Kansas City 2. 2B-Mi.Cabrera (8),
V.Martinez 2 (5), J.Martinez 2 (3), Moustakas
(5).3B-Infante (3). HR Avila (1), B.Butler (1).
SF-Hosmer.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
Porcello W,4-1
Krol
E.Reed
Kansas City
Shields L,3-3
K.Herrera
Mariot


742206
100000
100000
7 4 2 2 0 6
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
61/312 8 7 1 3
12/32 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 0


HBP-by Shields (Kinsler).WP-Shields.
Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, Todd
Tichenor; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Tim
Timmons.
T-2:41. A-28,021 (37,903).



Nationwide
Aaron's 312 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race today
AtTalladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (54) Sam Hornish Jr., Toyota, 186.783 mph.
2.(11) ElliottSadler, Toyota, 186.776.
3. (20) Darrell Wallace Jr, Toyota, 186.729.
4. (16) Ryan Reed, Ford, 184.08.
5. (43) Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 183.998.
6. (22) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 183.441.
7. (3)Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 183.262.
8. (60) Chris Buescher, Ford, 183.007.
9. (99) James Buescher, Toyota, 182.856.
10. (2) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 182.748.
11. (62) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 182.317.
12. (01) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 182.188.
13. (98) David Ragan, Ford, 186.645.
14. (10) Blake Koch, Toyota, 185.83.
15. (25) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 185.761.
16. (44) David Starr, Toyota, 185.664.
17. (55) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 185.639.
18. (14) Eric McClure, Toyota, 185.625.
19. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 185.52.
20. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 184.459.
21.(6)TrevorBayne, Ford, 184.406.
22. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet,
173.626.
23. (46) Matt DiBenedetto, Chevrolet, 189.868.
24. (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 187.54.
25. (91) Jeff Green, Toyota, 187.225.
26. (74) Mike Harmon, Dodge, 186.816.
27. (39) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 186.536.
28. (31) Dylan Kwasniewski, Chevrolet,
186.503.
29. (76) Tommy Joe Martins, Dodge, 186.467.
30. (85) Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet, 186.467.
31. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 185.294.
32. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 185.24.
33. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 183.663.
34. (28) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 183.501.
35. (93) Carl Long, Dodge, 182.644.
36. (52) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 181.967.
37. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, Owner Points.


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 B3


For their record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^OA^ 8-3-6
CASH 3 (late)
<9-9-9
PLAY 4 (early)
9-9-2-4
PLAY 4 (late)
1-2-0-9
FANTASY 5
7H 7-12-27-28-34
MEGA MONEY
Thursday's winning 13 -14 20 42
Thrs MEGA BALL
numbers and payouts: 6
Fantasy 5:8 9 14 -28 -34 MEGA MILLIONS
5-of-5 2 winners $111,792.51 1 18 26 35 40
4-of-5 295 $122 MEGA BALL
3-of-5 9,350 $10.50 13
Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES =

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (FS1) ARCA Series Racing Talladega
1 p.m. (FOX) NASCAR Sprint Cup: Aaron's 499, Qualifying
3 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Aaron's 312
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Rally America National Championship: 100
Acre Wood Rally (taped)
3:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Nationwide Series: Aaron's 312
(same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FS1) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs
1 p.m. (SUN, WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at New York
Yankees
4 p.m. (MLB) Seattle Mariners at Houston Astros
6 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Cleveland Indians
7 p.m. (FS1) Detroit Tigers at Kansas City Royals
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Los Angeles Dodgers at Miami Marlins
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN2) LSU at Texas A&M
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Arkansas at Mississippi
6:30 p.m. (SUN) Florida International at East Carolina
9:30 p.m. (SUN) Kentucky at Tennessee (same-day tape)
10 p.m. (ESPNU) Stanford at UCLA
NBA PLAYOFFS
5:30 p.m. (TNT) Atlanta Hawks at Indiana Pacers. Eastern
Conference First Round, game 7
8 p.m. (TNT) Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder.
Western Conference First Round, game 7
10:30 p.m. (TNT) Golden State Warriors at Los Angeles
Clippers. Western Conference First Round, game 7
EQUESTRIAN
4 p.m. (NBC) 140th Kentucky Derby
GOLF
6:30 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour The Championship,
Third Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Wells Fargo Championship, Third
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour Wells Fargo Championship, Third
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour North Texas Shootout, Third Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Champions: Insperity Invitational,
Second Round (same-day tape)
NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins.
Eastern Conference Semifinal, game 2
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Los Angeles Kings atAnaheim Ducks.
Western Conference Semifinal, game 1
LACROSSE
10 a.m. (ESPNU) College: America East Tournament, Final
12 p.m. (ESPNU) College: Army at Notre Dame
4:30 p.m. (FS1) College: Big East Tournament, Final
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) MLL: New York Lizards at Chesapeake
Bayhawks (same-day tape)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
10:30 p.m. (FS1) Monster Energy Supercross: Las Vegas
COLLEGE RUGBY
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) Varsity Cup
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER
7:45 a.m. (NBCSPT) West Ham United FC vs Tottenham
Hotspur FC
10 a.m. (NBCSPT) Manchester United FC vs SunderlandAFC
12 p.m. (CNBC) Everton FC vs Manchester City FC
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
2 p.m. (ESPNU) Alabama at Missouri
4 p.m. (ESPNU) Kentucky at Georgia
6 p.m. (ESPNU) Stanford at UCLA
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Florida at Arkansas
TENNIS
1 p.m. (TENNIS) WTA Portugal Open, Semifinal (same-day tape)
5 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP Portugal Open, Semifinal (same-day tape)
9 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP BMW Open, First Semifinal (same-day
tape)
11 p.m. (TENNIS) ATP BMW Open, Second Semifinal (same-
day tape)
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
8 p.m. (ESPNU) NCAA Tournament, Final: Teams TBA

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
TRACK AND FIELD
9 a.m. Lecanto at Class 3A State Meet at U of North Florida in
Jacksonville


38. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (4) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
40. (17) Tanner Berryhill, Dodge, 185.495.
Failed to Qualify
41. (84) Chad Boat, Chevrolet, 185.237.
42. (70) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 184.363.


Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
St. Louis -165 at Chicago +155
at Philadelphia-125 Washington +115
at Atlanta -170 San Francisco +160
LosAngeles -115 atMiami +105
at Cincinnati -155 Milwaukee +145
at Colorado -145 NewYork +135
at San Diego -140 Arizona +130


American League
at NewYork -180 Tampa Bay +170
at Boston -150 Oakland +140
Baltimore -120 atMinnesota +110
Seattle -150 at Houston +140
at Cleveland -165 Chicago +155
Detroit -115 at Kansas City +105
at Los Angeles-130 Texas +120
Interleague
atPittsburgh -140 Toronto +130
NBA Playoffs
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
at Indiana 6 (186)Atlanta
at Oklahoma City 8 (185) Memphis
at L.A. Clippers 7 (209/2) Golden State
NHL Playoffs
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atAnaheim -135 LosAngeles +115
at Boston -200 Montreal +170
Odds to Win Series
Anaheim -110 LosAngeles -110


Chicago's Noah
undergoes knee surgery
CHICAGO Bulls center Joakim Noah
is recovering after undergoing arthroscopic
left knee surgery.
Chicago announced the operation Fri-
day It was performed by team physician
Dr. Brian Cole. The team said Noah will
rehab his knee for eight to 12 weeks.
Noah is coming off his best season with
the Bulls, when he was the NBA Defensive
Player of the Year. The 6-foot-11 Noah set
career highs with averages of 12.6 points,
11.3 rebounds and 5.4 assists.
Noah helped the Bulls win 48 games
during the regular season, but it was clear
that the knee was bothering him when
Chicago was eliminated by Washington in
the first round of the playoffs. He had the
knee drained at some point during the sea-
son and the injury flared up again.
No charges against
Keyshawn Johnson
LOS ANGELES Prosecutors won't
file criminal charges against ESPN analyst
Keyshawn Johnson for a scuffle that
scratched his ex-girlfriend's finger.
Los Angeles County prosecutors an-
nounced Friday that there isn't enough evi-
dence to charge the former NFL wide
receiver with domestic violence. Authorities
said the victim was uncooperative and the
injury appeared to be minor and accidental.
In a statement, Johnson denies commit-
ting a crime and said he's pleased the mat-
ter has been resolved.
Johnson was arrested last month after
an argument with Jennifer Conrad at a
home in Calabasas.
Authorities said Johnson tried to take
her cellphone and during the struggle her
shirt collar was torn and she received a
small scratch.
Johnson spent 11 years in the NFL with
the New York Jets, Tampa Bay Bucca-



TRACK
Continued from Page B1

"They basically jumped in a rain-
storm. Girls were losing their poles
going down the runway It was tough,
but they rose to the occasion."
Senior Hunter Roessler nabbed the
third and final state medal for the Pi-
rates with a fifth-place showing in the
triple jump. Roessler,
the school record-
holder in the event,
jumped 44-4 3/4 -
more than three feet
short of Chaminade's .
Gino Brown Jr. who |"
jumped 47-7 Friday
afternoon to win the
state title. Hunter
"He did well today, Roessler
he was a very consis- CR senior
tent jumper," Byrne placed fifth in
said of Roessler. the triple jump.
"Good kid. Senior. He
did a good job and hung in there."
Sophomore Ryan Spivey, who
placed fourth at regionals in the pole
vault, placed 12th at the state meet
with a vault of 12 feet. Teammate jun-
ior Gabriel Charles also qualified for
the state meet (third at regionals) but
failed to jump the minimum opening
height of 12 feet to compete for a
medal.
"(Charles) didn't make the opening
height," Byrne said. "He didn't make
weight for a smaller pole so he had to
use a bigger pole that he hadn't used
at all this year He almost got on it but
he didn't quite make it."
Senior Brandon Harris set a school




DERBY
Continued from Page B1

If their tale seems improbable, well,
it's happened before at Churchill
Downs. Mine That Bird, a 50-1 shot
owned and trained by two guys from
New Mexico mocked as cowboys,
pulled off the stunning upset in the
2009 Derby
At 77, Art Sherman, who oversees
California Chrome, would be the old-
est trainer to win. His colt would be
the first California-bred to wear the
garland of red roses in 52 years.
"He's feeling good and he's doing
good," Sherman said. "He's coming up
to this race right."
Rosie Napravnik wants to grab his-
tory, too.
No female jockey has won the
Derby, although she came closest-
fifth last year. Napravnik will ride
20-1 shot Vicar's In Trouble. Her hus-
band, Joe Sharp, works closely with
the Louisiana-bred colt as assistant to
trainer Mike Maker.
"The story would almost be too good
if we won it," she said.
Wicked Strong is the early 6-1 sec-


ond choice. The colt is named for the
victims of last year's Boston Marathon
bombings and is trained by Jimmy
Jerkens, who has his first Derby
horse.
Trainer Todd Pletcher has four
horses in the Derby Danza and In-
tense Holiday are both 8-1 while his
other two are longer shots, 30-1 Vin-
ceremos and 50-1 We Miss Artie.
Danza is named for "Taxi" actor Tony
Danza, who planned to attend the
Derby
Maker will saddle three horses, all
long shots. Besides Vicar's In Trouble,


neers, Dallas Cowboys and Carolina
Panthers.
Former 100-yard dash
record-holder Budd dies
MARLTON, N.J. Olympic sprinter
and former 100-yard dash world record-
holder Frank Budd has died at 74.
Villanova University said Budd, an
alumnus, died Tuesday. A cause of death
has not been given.
Budd placed fifth in the 100 meters at
the 1960 Olympics. A year later, he set
the world record in the 100-yard dash,
finishing a race at Randall's Island in
New York in 9.2 seconds.
That earned Budd the unofficial title of
world's fastest man.
He later played wide receiver in both
the National Football League and Cana-
dian Football League.
Armstrong appeals to
Texas Supreme Court
AUSTIN, Texas Lance Armstrong
asked the Texas Supreme Court on Fri-
day to stop a Dallas company from trying
to force him to pay back about $12 mil-
lion in bonuses it paid him for winning the
Tour De France.
SCA Promotions sued Armstrong last
year after he admitted using performance
enhancing drugs during his career.
The dispute dates to 2005 when SCA
investigated allegations of drug use and
Armstrong gave sworn testimony deny-
ing doping.
The company arbitration eventually
settled in arbitration and agreed to pay
him.
The original arbitration panel has
agreed to reopen the case. Armstrong's
attorneys said Texas law won't allow par-
ties to revisit voluntary settlements.
Lower courts have refused to stop the
case. Now Armstrong is appealing to the
state's highest civil court.
-From wire reports


record by more than four seconds last
week at regionals (second place,
9:55.93) in the 3,200 to qualify for the
state meet, and won a 2014 district
title the week before, but was ham-
pered Friday by an incredibly fast first
mile set by the leaders 4:40 split -
which forced the distance ace to labor
slightly in the final mile. Harris fin-
ishedl2th in a time of 10:02.89.
"He just wasn't ready for that first
mile that they threw at him," Byrne
said of Harris. "So he struggled in the
second half of that race."
Immokalee's Leonel Delacruz won
the race in 9:44.33.
Harris, along with Spivey, also
made up two legs of Crystal River's
4x800 relay team that qualified for
state with a third-place showing at re-
gionals. Teammates Nick Hooper and
Adam Bennett completed the team
that finished 14th at state in a time of
8:54.61.
The Pirate girls 4x400 relay team
consisting of Byrne, Clark, Abigail Ep-
stein and Cassidy Wardlow took 16th
place out of 16 teams with a time of
4:22.57, just a bit more than four sec-
onds off their state qualifying (fourth
place) time of 4:18.30 clocked at
regionals.
"They were seeded 16th going in
and they finished 16th, but they did
really well," Owens said. "The
weather was miserable of course,
raining all day, but with everything
going on I was really impressed with
how my girls stepped up. It's been an
exceptional year and they've worked
hard.
"It's an honor for those five girls just
to (get to state)," Owens added. "It was
awesome."


he has 15-1 General a Rod and 50-1
Harry's Holiday
"When those gates open, anything
can happen," Maker said.
Three-time Derby winner Bob Baf-
fert is down to 20-1 shot Chitu after
being forced to scratch early second
favorite Hoppertunity because of a
minor foot problem.
"California Chrome has proven he's
a really good horse," Baffert said,
adding, "There's a lot of parity in this
field. Everybody might have a
chance."
Getting the ideal trip in the 1 1/4-
mile Derby is important, especially
with the traffic from 19 horses making
a chaotic charge into the first turn.
Jockeys want to avoid anything that
would prevent their horse from get-
ting into rhythm, like being bumped,
cut off or blocked.
Sherman believes the key is the first
70 yards.
"You want to get out and get your-
self some position," he said.
Trainer Steve Asmussen takes a
shot with Tapiture, who started three
times at Churchill Downs as a 2-year-
old. Asmussen is under investigation
by Kentucky and New York racing of-
ficials after an animal rights group al-


leged he and his former assistant
mistreated horses in their care.
The forecast calls for sunny skies
and a high of 73 degrees, with a crowd
of at least 140,000 expected.
Keep an eye on jockey Calvin Borel.
He and 15-1 shot Ride On Curlin will
break from the No. 18 spot in the start-
ing gate. Borel will try to hustle the
colt over to his favorite path on the
track-the rail. The rider nicknamed
"Bo-rail" for his fence-skimming rides
has three Derby wins in the last seven
years.
Post time is 6:32 p.m.


I S P RTS B RI FS


I I


SCOREBOARD




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Baltimore
NewYork
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
NewYork
Miami
Philadelphia


East Division
Pct GB WC
.556 -
.556 -
.467 2/ 2
.448 3 2/2
.448 3 21


East Division
GB WC


NL

Marlins 6, Dodgers 3
Los Angeles Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DGordn2b 5 1 3 1 Yelichl If 3 1 1 1
Puigrf 3 0 1 1 Dietrch2b 3 1 0 0
HRmrzss 4 0 0 0 Stantonrf 4 0 1 1
AdGnzllb 3 00 0 McGeh3b 4 02 1
Ethiercf 3 0 1 0 Sltlmchc 3 2 2 1
Kempph-cf 1 00 0 GJoneslb 4 1 3 1
Olivo c 4 1 1 0 Ozunacf 4 00 0
Crwfrdl If 4 0 0 1 Hchvrrss 4 0 1 0
Figgins3b 2 00 0 Koehlerp 2 00 0
JDmngp 0 00 0 RJhnsnph 1 1 1 1
VnSlykph 1 00 0 Marmlp 0 00 0
Beckettp 2 00 0 MDunnp 0 00 0
JuTrnr3b 1 1 1 0 Solanoph 1 00 0
Cishekp 0 00 0
Totals 33 373 Totals 33611 6
Los Angeles 000 000 021 3
Miami 010 100 40x 6
E-Dietrich (5). DP-Los Angeles 1, Miami 1.
LOB-Los Angeles 7, Miami 6. 2B-Ethier (2),
G.Jones 3 (5), Hechavarria (7). 3B-Olivo (1),
Yelich (3). HR-Saltalamacchia (6). SB-D.Gor-
don (16), Puig 2 (4). CS-D.Gordon (2), Yelich
(1).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
BeckettL,0-1 62/38 4 4 1 8
J.Dominguez 11/33 2 2 1 1
Miami
KoehlerW,3-2 7 3 0 0 2 4
Marmol 1/3 2 2 2 1 0
M.Dunn 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Cishek 1 2 1 1 0 1
HBP-by J.Dominguez (Dietrich), by Koehler
(Ad.Gonzalez). WP-Marmol.
T-3:08. A-20,722 (37,442).
Giants 2, Braves 1
San Francisco Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Pagancf 4 1 1 1 Heywrdrf 5 03 0
Pencerf 4 0 1 0 BUptoncf 5 0 1 0
Poseylb 4 00 0 Fremnib 4 0 1 1
Romo p 0 0 0 0 J.Upton If 3 00 0
Morse If 4 1 2 1 CJhnsn3b 4 00 0
J.Perezlf 0 00 0 Smmnsss 4 0 1 0
Sandovl3b 4 0 1 0 R.Pena2b 3 00 0
HSnchzc 4 0 1 0 Lairdc 3 1 1 0
B.Hicks2b 3 0 1 0 Minorp 2 0 1 0
BCrwfrss 3 0 1 0 Doumitph 1 00 0
Linccmp 1 00 0 Thornmsp 0 00 0
Adrianzph 0 00 0 Varvarp 0 00 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 JWaldn p 0 0 0 0
Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Kimrelp 0 0 0 0
Beltph-lb 1 00 0 Gattisph 1 00 0
Totals 32 2 8 2 Totals 351 8 1
San Francisco 100 001 000 2
Atlanta 000 010 000 1
DP-Atlanta 1. LOB-San Francisco 7, Atlanta
12. HR-Pagan (3), Morse (7). SB-B.Upton (6),
J.Upton (4). S-Lincecum, Adrianza.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
LincecumW,2-1 6 6 1 1 3 4
AffeldtH,3 2/3 1 0 0 0 2
Casilla H,5 11/30 0 0 1 1
RomoS,8-8 1 1 0 0 1 1
Atlanta
MinorL,0-1 6 7 2 2 0 4
Thomas 1/3 0 0 0 2 0
Varvaro 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
J.Walden 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP-Lincecum.
T-3:08. A-29,469 (49,586).
Nationals 5,
Phillies 3
Washington Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Spancf 5 1 1 1 Reverecf 4 00 0
Rendon3b 5 1 1 1 Rollinsss 2 00 0
Werthrf 4 1 3 0 Utley2b 4 1 2 0
LaRochIlb 4 0 1 1 Howard lb 4 1 1 0
McLoth pr-lf 0 0 0 0 Byrdrf 4 1 2 3
Dsmndss 5 0 1 1 DBrwnl If 4 00 0
Espinos2b 4 0 1 0 Ruizc 3 0 1 0
TMoorelf-1b4 2 2 1 Asche3b 4 0 2 0
Loatonc 3 0 0 0 CI.Leep 2 0 0 0
Strasrgp 0 00 0 GwynJph 0 00 0
Frndsnph 1 00 0 Mayrryph 1 00 0
Barrettp 0 00 0 MAdmsp 0 00 0
Blevinsp 0 00 0 Diekmnp 0 00 0
Waltersph 1 00 0 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Clipprdp 0 00 0 Galvisph 1 00 0
RSorinp 0 000
Totals 36 5105 Totals 333 8 3
Washington 001 010 030 5
Philadelphia 300 000 000 3
E Werth (2), Utley (1). DP Washington 2,
Philadelphia 1. LOB Washington 9, Philadel-
phia 6. 2B-Span (4), Desmond (5), Asche (4).
HR-T.Moore (2), Byrd (4). SB-Span (4), Es-
pinosa (4). S-Strasburg.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Strasburg 6 6 3 0 1 5
Barrett 1/3 1 0 0 0 0
BlevinsW,2-1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
ClippardH,6 1 1 0 0 1 2
R.Soriano S,6-6 1 0 0 0 1 0
Philadelphia
CI.Lee 7 4 2 1 2 5
Mi.AdamsL,1-1 0 3 3 3 0 0
Diekman 1 2 0 0 1 3
Bastardo 1 1 0 0 1 1
Mi.Adams pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
WP-Strasburg.
T-3:11.A-31,945 (43,651).
Cubs 6, Cardinals 5
St. Louis Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt 3b 3 2 1 1 Bonifac 2b-cf 4 1 2 0
JhPerltss 4 1 2 3 Valuen3b 4 1 1 0
Hollidylf 4 0 1 0 Rizzo ib 3 2 2 3
Craigib 4 0 1 0 SCastross 4 1 1 0
YMolinc 4 1 1 0 Schrhltrf 3 1 1 0
Jaycf 4 0 0 0 Sweenycf 3 0 2 1
Grichkrf 4 0 1 0 Barney2b 1 0 0 0
M.Ellis2b 3 1 0 0 Castilloc 4 03 2
Descals ph 1 0 0 0 Kalishlf 3 0 0 0
Wnwrgp 1 0 1 00ltph 1 00 0
Choatep 0 00 0 HRndnp 0 00 0
Bourjosph 1 00 0 T.Woodp 3 00 0
Lyonsp 0 00 0 Grimmp 0 00 0
Siegristp 0 00 0 Schlittrp 0 00 0
MAdmsph 1 00 0 Lakeph-lf 1 00 0
Totals 34 584 Totals 34612 6
St. Louis 002 100 020 5
Chicago 203 010 OOx 6
E-S.Castro (5). DP-St. Louis 1, Chicago 1.
LOB-St. Louis 4, Chicago 6. 2B-Jh.Peralta
(6), YMolina (8), Grichuk (1), Valbuena (4),
Sweeney (2), Castillo 3 (6). HR-Jh.Peralta (7),
Rizzo (5). CS-Bonifacio (3). S Wainwright.
IP H RERBBSO


St. Louis
Wainwright L,5-2
Choate
Lyons
Siegrist
Chicago
TWoodW,2-3
Grimm H,2
Schlitter H,4
H.Rondon S,2-2


7 6 3
1/3 2 2
2/3 0 0
1 0 0


T-3:08.A-28,160 (41,072).


Str Home Away
W-3 7-6 8-6
L-2 8-6 7-6
W-17-10 7-6
W-2 7-7 6-9
L-1 5-7 8-9



Str Home Away
L-4 9-4 8-7
W-3 9-8 8-4
L-1 8-8 7-4
W-413-4 2-10
L-2 4-7 9-7


Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
9 .625 7-3 W-3 9-5 6-4
14 .500 3 1 5-5 L-2 8-5 6-9
16 .467 4 2 4-6 L-3 9-7 5-9
15 .444 4/ 2/2 4-6 L-4 6-9 6-6
17 .414 5% 3% 3-7 W-1 8-6 4-11


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee 21 9 .700 6-4 W-1 9-6 12-3
St. Louis 15 15 .500 6 2 4-6 L-1 7-5 8-10
Cincinnati 13 16 .448 7/2 3/2 5-5 L-1 6-7 7-9
Pittsburgh 11 18 .379 9/2 5/2 3-7 W-1 7-8 4-10
Chicago 10 17 .370 9/2 5/2 5-5 W-2 6-8 4-9


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston




San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
Arizona


West Division
L Pct GB WC
11 .621 -
13 .536 2/2 -
13 .519 3 /2
14 .462 4/ 2
19 .321 8% 6


West Division
t GB WC L10
1 7-3
7 1% 7-3
7 1/2 5-5
8 5 3/2 4-6
0 10 8/2 4-6


Str Home
L-1 6-6
L-4 9-7
W-3 6-6
W-3 5-6
L-2 5-11



Str Home
W-3 10-5
W-1 9-4
L-1 6-9
L-2 7-6
W-1 3-15


Baltimore
ab
Markks rf 4
Machd 3b 4
N.Cruz If 4
A.Jones cf 4
Wieters c 3
Hardy ss 3
DYong dh 4
Pearce lb 4
Schoop2b 4
Totals 34
Baltimore
Minnesota


E-Schoop (5). DP-Minnesota 1. LOB-Balti-
more 6, Minnesota 6. 2B-N.Cruz (6), Wieters
(5), Pearce (3), Plouffe (12), E.Escobar (4).
HR-N.Cruz(8).SB-Dozier(9), Fuld (3), E.Es-
cobar (1).S-Hardy.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
JimenezW,1-4 71/33 0 0 1 10
Z.BrittonH,5 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Tom.HunterS,8-9 1 1 0 0 0 2
Minnesota
NolascoL,2-3 9 9 3 3 1 6
T-2:29.A-24,165 (39,021).

Red Sox 7, A's I


Associated Press
Miami's Jarrod Saltalamacchia beats the throw Friday to Los Angeles catcher Miguel Olivo to score on a
double by Garrett Jones in the fourth inning in Miami.


Marlins remain hot at home


Pedroia slam helps

Red Sox to 7-1

win overA's

Associated Press

MIAMI Surprising Tom
Koehler outpitched Josh Beckett,
and the Miami Marlins extended
their home winning streak to
seven games by beating the Los
Angeles Dodgers 6-3 Friday night.
Koehler (3-2) allowed three hits
in seven scoreless innings. The
right-hander began the year with
a career record of 5-11, made the
rotation as a fifth starter and now
has an ERA of 2.41.
Beckett (0-1) struck out eight but
gave up four runs in 6 2/3 innings.
He fell to 0-6 in his past 13 starts
and remained winless since the
end of the 2012 season, even
though his ERA this year is 3.14.
The Dodgers arrived in Miami
at 6:30 a.m. after playing for more
than 8 hours Thursday at Min-
nesota to earn their first double-
header sweep in 12 years, and
they looked travel-logged while
falling behind 6-0. Twice a bloop
single dropped among three Los
Angeles fielders to allow a run to
score.
American League
Red Sox 7, Athletics 1
BOSTON Dustin Pedroia hit a
grand slam for his 100th career home
run and Clay Buchholz picked up his
first win at home as the Red Sox beat
the Oakland Athletics 7-1.
Pedroia had yet to homer this season
before driving an 0-2 pitch out to left
field in the sixth inning to put Boston up
6-1. The cushion was plenty for Buch-
holz (2-2), who shut down the team with
the top record in the American League.
Buchholz pitched 6 1/3 innings, allow-
ing one run on three hits and striking out
five. He walked three and got himself
out of several jams as the As left five on
base and were 0-for-7 with runners in
scoring position against Buchholz.
John Jaso was the only Oakland
player to score, coming in on a wild
pitch after leading off the third with a
triple.

Orioles 3, Twins 0
MINNEAPOLIS Ubaldo Jimenez
struck out a season-high 10 over
seven-plus scoreless innings for his
first win with Baltimore, and Nelson
Cruz hit a two-run home run to pad
the lead for the Orioles in a 3-0 victory
over the Minnesota Twins.
Jimenez (1-4) allowed only three
hits while taking a significant step for-
ward from five rough starts to begin
his $50 million, four-year contract with
the Orioles.
Ricky Nolasco (2-3) gave the Twins a
complete game, giving up nine hits and
one walk while striking out six for his
eighth career nine-inning appearance.
Indians 12, White Sox 5
CLEVELAND Michael Brantley
homered and drove in three runs, Car-
los Santana also homered and the
Cleveland Indians broke a six-game
losing streak with a 12-5 win over the
Chicago White Sox.
Danny Salazar (1-3) was charged
with five runs, three earned, in five in-
nings and earned his first win of the


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 12, Chicago White Sox 5
Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 5
Boston 7, Oakland 1
Baltimore 3, Minnesota 0
Detroit 8, Kansas City 2
Tampa Bay at N.Y Yankees, late
Seattle at Houston, late
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 1-3) at N.Y Yankees (Tanaka
3-0), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 0-2) at Boston (Lester 2-4), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 3-1) at Minnesota (Correia 0-3),
2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 0-0) at Houston (Keuchel 2-1),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Carroll 1-0) at Cleveland (Mas-
terson 0-1), 6:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 2-3) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-3), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit(Smyly 1-1) at Kansas City (Duffy 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 0-0) at L.A Angels (Richards 2-0),
9:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 6, St. Louis 5
Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 5
Washington 5, Philadelphia 3
Miami 6, L.A. Dodgers 3
Milwaukee 2, Cincinnati 0
San Francisco 2, Atlanta 1
N.Y Mets at Colorado, late
Arizona at San Diego, late
Today's Games
St. Louis (Wacha 2-2) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 0-0),
1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 2-3) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 0-3), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Roark 2-0) at Philadelphia (Burnett
1-1), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Maholm 1-2) at Miami (Ja.Turner 0-0),
7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 2-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 2-2),
7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1) at Atlanta (Teheran
2-1), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Mejia 3-0) at Colorado (Morales 3-1),
8:10 p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 0-5) at San Diego (Kennedy 2-3),
8:40 p.m.

season.
Jose Abreu hit his major-league
leading 11th homer in the fifth, but the
White Sox couldn't overcome a shaky
start by John Danks (2-2), who al-
lowed eight runs in five innings.
Tigers 8, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Rick Por-
cello cruised through seven innings,
the Tigers battered James Shields
once again and Detroit rolled to an 8-2
victory over the Royals to open their
three-game set.
Victor Martinez had a pair of dou-
bles and drove in two runs, and J.D.
Martinez and Alex Avila also drove in
two runs apiece as the Tigers won
their fourth straight against the Royals.
Porcello (4-1) allowed four hits
while striking out six without a walk.
Meanwhile, Shields (3-3) allowed
eight runs seven of them earned -
on 12 hits, a walk and a hit batter in
6 1/3 innings.

National League
Nationals 5, Phillies 3
PHILADELPHIA-Adam
LaRoche's tiebreaking single in the
eighth inning helped the Washington
Nationals rally from an early deficit to
beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-3.
Cliff Lee outpitched Stephen Stras-
burg, but the Phillies' bullpen strug-
gled again. Mike Adams (1-1) and
Jake Diekman allowed three runs and
five hits in an inning.
Benches and bullpens emptied in
the fifth after Denard Span exchanged
words with Lee. Span was upset that
Lee threw an inside fastball as he
called time-out. After he grounded out,
Span stopped between the plate and
the mound on his way back to the


dugout and said something to Lee.
Players ran on the field, but nothing
happened.
Lee allowed two runs one
earned and four hits, striking out
five in seven innings.

Cubs 6, Cardinals 5
CHICAGO -Anthony Rizzo hit a
two-run single in the first that ended
Adam Wainwright's scoreless streak
at 25 innings, and the Chicago Cubs
beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-5 for
their third win in four games.
Wainwright (5-2) had allowed six
runs in 45 innings coming in, but the
Cubs matched that in just five innings
against the St. Louis ace, who gave
up 10 hits. His ERA rose from 1.20 to
2.16.
The scoreless streak was one in-
ning shy of the career high for Wain-
wright, who had not allowed an
extra-base hit since April 12 against
the Cubs in St. Louis.
Rizzo added a leadoff home run in
the fifth that put Chicago ahead 6-3.
Welington Castillo had three doubles
for Chicago, which sent the skidding
Cardinals to their 10Oth loss in 16
games.

Brewers 2, Reds 0
CINCINNATI-Wily Peralta dou-
bled home two runs the first RBIs
of his career and repeatedly es-
caped trouble during his eight innings,
leading the Milwaukee Brewers to a
2-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds.
Peralta (4-1) made his fifth quality
start of the season, holding the Reds
to three hits and a pair of walks while
throwing 110 pitches. Francisco Ro-
driguez retired the three batters he
faced for his 14th save in as many
chances.

Giants 2, Braves 1
ATLANTA- Michael Morse and
Angel Pagan homered, Tim Lincecum
allowed one run over six innings and
the San Francisco Giants beat the At-
lanta Braves 2-1.
San Francisco spoiled the season
debut of Braves starter Mike Minor
with its seventh victory in eight games.
Atlanta has a season-high four-
game losing streak.
After missing the first month of the
season with left shoulder tendinitis,
Minor (0-1) allowed seven hits, two
runs, no walks and struck out four.
Lincecum (2-1) gave up six hits and
three walks with four strikeouts.
Interleague
Pirates 6, Blue Jays 5
PITTSBURGH Pedro Alvarez hit
a tying two-run homer off Sergio San-
tos in the ninth inning and Starling
Marte following one out later with a
winning drive into the bullpen in left-
center, giving the Pittsburgh Pirates a
6-5 win over the Toronto Blue Jays.
Santos (0-2) entered with a 5-3 lead
and allowed a leadoff single to Neil
Walker. He struck out Andrew Mc-
Cutchen, and Alvarez followed with his
seventh homer this season. Pinch-
hitter Ike Davis flied out, and Marte hit
the first game-ending homer of his big
league career.
Mark Melancon (1-1) pitched a hit-
less ninth for the win. After saving his
first four save chances this season,
Santos has blown three of his last four
for the Blue Jays, who have lost seven
of their last nine games.


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Crisp cf 4 00 0 Pedroia2b 3 22 4
Lowriess 4 0 1 0 Victornrf 4 01 0
Dnldsn 3b 3 0 1 0 D.Ortiz dh 5 0 1 0
Mosslb 4 0 0 0 Napolilb 3 0 1 1
Cespdslf 3 0 1 0 GSizmrlf 5 1 1 0
Callaspdh 3 00 0 Bogartsss 4 1 2 0
Reddckrf 3 0 0 0 Przynsc 4 22 1
Gentryph 1 00 0 Mdlrks3b 4 00 0
Jasoc 2 1 2 0 BrdlyJrcf 2 1 1 1
DNorrsph 1 000
Sogard2b 2 000
Punto ph-2b2 0 0 0
Totals 32 150 Totals 34711 7
Oakland 001 000 000 1
Boston 020 004 01x 7
E-Jaso (1), Buchholz (1). DP-Oakland 1,
Boston 1. LOB-Oakland 8, Boston 10.2B-Ce-
spedes (8), Pedroia (10), D.Ortiz (5), G.Size-
more (4), Bradley Jr. (9). 3B-Jaso (1).
HR-Pedroia (1). SB-Pedroia (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
StrailyL,1-2 41/34 2 2 3 3
Abad 2/3 0 0 0 1 2
Otero 1/3 2 3 3 1 1
Cook 1/3 2 1 1 1 1
Pomeranz 21/33 1 1 1 2
Boston
BuchholzW,2-2 61/33 1 1 3 5
A.Miller 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
Mujica 1 2 0 0 0 0
Breslow 1 0 0 0 1 1
WP-Buchholz 2.
T-3:37. A-34,850 (37,499).

Indians 12,
White Sox 5


Chicago


Eaton cf
JrDnks cf
GBckh 2b
LeGarc 2b
JAreu 1 b
A.Dunn dh
Viciedo rf
AIRmrz ss
De Aza If
Semien 3b
Nieto c
Totals
Chicago
Cleveland


2 0 0 0 Bourncf
1 0 0 0 Aviles3b
4 0 1 0 Swisherlb
1 0 0 0 CSantndh
5 1 1 1 Raburnrf
4 0 1 0 DvMrpph-rf
3 1 0 0 BrantlyIlf
4 1 2 0 ACarerss
4 2 2 1 JRmrzss
4 00 0 YGomsc
4 0 3 1 EIJhns2b
36 5103 Totals
030 011 000
511 014 00x


E-G.Beckham (2), Semien (5), EI.Johnson 2
(2). DP-Chicago 1, Cleveland 3. LOB-Chicago
8, Cleveland 7. 2B-Nieto (2), Swisher (8),
C.Santana (4), YGomes 2 (5). HR-J.Abreu
(11), C.Santana (4), Brantley (5). SB Aviles (4).
CS-A.Cabrera (1).


Chicago
Joh.Danks L,2-2
Downs
Cleto
Lindstrom
Cleveland
SalazarW,1-3
Rzepczynski
Shaw H,5
C.Lee
Outman
Allen


Salazar pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Cleto, Shaw. PB-YGomes.
T-3:26. A-15,518 (42,487).

Interleague
Pirates 6,
Blue Jays 5
Toronto Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Reyesss 5 1 1 0 Tabatarf 4 0 1 0
MeCarrl If 5 0 1 0 Sadlerp 0 00 0
Gosel If 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0
Bautistrf 5 1 2 1 Melncnp 0 00 0
Encrnclb 4 0 1 1 NWalkr2b 4330
Frncsc3b 3 1 1 0 AMcCtcf 5 03 2
Cecilp 0 0 0 0 PAIvrz3b 5 1 2 2
Santosp 0 0 0 0 GSnchz 1 b 4 1 1 0
Lawrie 2b-3b4 1 2 0 I.Davis ph 1 0 0 0
Rasmscf 4 1 1 2 SMartel If 5 14 1
Tholec 4 00 0 TSnchzc 4 02 0
Morrowp 2 00 0 Mercerss 4 00 0
StTllsnph 1 0 1 1 Colep 1 00 0
Delaarp 0 0 0 0 JuWIsn p 0 00 0
Getz2b 1 00 0 Sniderph-rf 2 01 0
Totals 38 5105 Totals 40617 5
Toronto 100 211 000 5
Pittsburgh 011 010 003 6
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-G.Sanchez (1). DP Toronto 3. LOB-
Toronto 8, Pittsburgh 10.2B-Bautista 2 (6),
Encarnacion (10), Francisco (1), Lawrie (2),
Tabata (3), N.Walker 2 (4), A.McCutchen (9).
3B-St.Tolleson (1). HR-Rasmus (6), RAI-
varez (7), S.Marte (2). SB-Reyes (1), Encar-
nacion (2), A.McCutchen (4).
IP H RERBBSO


Toronto
Morrow 5 11 3 3
DelabarH,6 1 2 0 0
Cecil H,8 2 1 0 0
Santos L,0-2 BS,3-8 2/3 3 3 3
Pittsburgh
Cole 5 7 4 4
Ju.Wilson 1 2 1 1
Sadler 2 1 0 0
MelanconW,1-1 1 0 0 0
HBP-by Delabar (N.Walker). WP-
Cole 2, Sadler.
T-3:21.A-24,547 (38,362).


Rays schedule
May 3 at NYYankees
May 4 at NYYankees
May 6 vs. Baltimore
May 7 vs. Baltimore
May 8 vs. Baltimore
May 9 vs. Cleveland
May 10 vs. Cleveland
May 11 vs. Cleveland
May 12 at Seattle
May 13 at Seattle
May 14 at Seattle
May 15 at LA Angels
May 16 at LA Angels
May 17 at LA Angels
May 18 at LA Angels
May 20 vs. Oakland
May 21 vs. Oakland


AL


Orioles 3, Twins 0


Minnesota
r h bi
0 1 0 Dozier2b
1 1 0 Mauerlb
2 2 2 Plouffe 3b
0 1 0 Colaell rf
02 1 Kubel lf
0 0 0 Pintodh
00 0 KSuzukc
0 1 0 Fuld cf
0 1 0 EEscorss
393 Totals
000 102 000
000 000 000


ab r h bi
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
4010
4 0 1 0
4000
4000
4000
3000
3010
2010
3 0 1 0
2 0 1 0
320 4 0
3
0


Oakland


Boston


Cleveland


ab r h bi


ab r h bi
5011
5 0 1 1
5220
3211
3 2 1 1
4322
2112
2 1 1 2
1 100
5233
4010
4 0 1 0
0000
4122
4 1 2 2
4000
37121311
5
12


IP H RERBBSO

5 10 8 8 3 3
1/3 2 3 2 1 0
12/31 1 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 1

5 7 5 3 3 6
2/3 1 0 0 1 1
1/3 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1


1 6
0 0
1 2
0 0
-Morrow,


B4 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


BASEBALL




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mayweather works hard to sell latest fight


Welterweight

champ faces

Maidana

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Floyd
Mayweather Jr is enough
of a businessman to know
his latest fight would be a
tough sell, especially after
setting records with
Canelo Alvarez his last
time out.
But sell he must, even
though oddsmakers and
nearly everyone else give
Marcos Maidana little
chance in their welter-
weight title fight tonight. A
full house is already guar-
anteed at the MGM Grand
hotel arena, but May-
weather needs people at
home to pay $64.95 for the
fight if he is going to re-
coup his guaranteed
$32 million purse.
So Mayweather hinted
this week that this might
be his last fight, though
few in boxing believe that.
He also said he planned to
stand in front of Maidana
and trade punches with
the hard-hitting Argentine,
though his history in the
ring suggests he won't.


Oh, and he wants to
score a knockout, some-
thing he's done only once
in the last seven years.
"I want to look impres-
sive," Mayweather said. "I
want to put on a good
show We don't expect this
fight to go the distance."
Mayweather returns to
the ring for the first time
since dominating Alvarez
in boxing's richest bout,
taking on Maidana in a
fight that even May-
weather seems to have
trouble expressing much
enthusiasm about. He's a
bigger, much more skilled
fighter than the Argentine,
just part of the reason odd-
smakers make him a 11-1
pick to remain undefeated
in the 46th fight of a pro ca-
reer that has made him the
richest fighter ever
Still, Mayweather (45-0,
26 knockouts) says he has
to be wary of the power
Maidana brings into the
ring.
"He's got an 80 percent
knockout ratio so I can't go
to sleep on this guy," he
said. "But guys can't go to
the mental level I'm at. I
can beat them many ways."
The fight is part of a pay-
per-view card that features
former champion Amir
Khan moving up to welter-
weight to fight another for-


Associated Press
Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, poses with Marcos Maidana
Friday during the official weigh-in at the MGM Grand Hotel
in Las Vegas. Mayweather faces Maidana in a
welterweight title fight tonight.
mer champion in Luis Col- and won an online poll set
lazo. Khan had cam- up by Mayweather, who
paigned to be ended up picking Maidana
Mayweather's opponent instead.


If Khan is impressive,
though, and Mayweather
wins as expected, the two
could meet later this year
"I would have loved to
fight Floyd Mayweather,
but I believe it's really for
the best," Khan said. "It
gives me a chance to get to
147 and feel my way"
Maidana (35-3,31 knock-
outs) earned the fight with
a strong showing in his last
bout, twice knocking down
Adrien Broner on his way
to a decision win in De-
cember Though Maidana
hits hard, he will be up
against a fighter who is
such a defensive wizard
that he rarely gets hit with
more than one punch in
any exchange.
"It's very difficult to land
a punch against May-
weather," Maidana said.
"But when I land a punch
I'm going to hit him and
not let him go. I will go
after him."
Mayweather, who
weighed in Friday at 146
pounds to 146 1/2 for Maid-
ana, said he welcomes the
challenge after easily
beating Alvarez last Sep-
tember in a fight that was
supposed to be his tough-
est test
"If he brings his best
maybe he will be the first
guy that actually makes me


dig in my bag of tricks and
pull out my A' game," May-
weather said. "Hopefully
he will make me bring out
my A' game because my
whole career all I had to
use was a 'D' and 'C' game
to beat every guy"
If the Alvarez fight
showed anything other
than Mayweather's talent
for making money and
tons of it it was that a
conventional fighter
stands little chance
against him. He's been
dodging punches since be-
fore he could walk, and
he's a wizard at exploiting
whatever weakness he
finds in the fighter in front
of him.
"I can feel when a guy's
gonna punch. I can feel it,"
Mayweather said. "I don't
even have to see it; I can
feel it. You know, this is
just with experience and
being around the sport so
long."
Maidana says he can be-
come the first to beat May-
weather because he will
be the first to treat him just
like any other fighter in
the ring.
"Other fighters they
show respect, they show
fear," he said. "That's one
thing I won't show against
Mayweather"


InThe stakes are higternet
The stakes rehigh movement


Talladega could

get another driver

into the Chase

Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. David
Ragan's surprise victory last sea-
son at Talladega Superspeedway
gave his fledgling Front Row Mo-
torsports team a taste of the po-
tential inside the organization.
Back at Talladega to defend his
win, the stakes are far greater
Sunday
Should Ragan win again this
year, the victory could be worth a
spot in the 16-driver Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship field.
Under new Chase qualifying
rules enacted this season, drivers
can become eligible for
NASCAR's 10-race championship
format with a victory as long as
they are ranked inside the top-30
in the standings. Although there
have been no surprise winners
this season, Talladega is the lot-
tery ticket that can change the
fortune for one lucky driver
"In the back of our minds, we
do think a little bit about if we
can get that win," Ragan said.
"That's something we don't want
to be overwhelmed with and re-
ally think about that more than
we should, but it is something
that we think about it and I guar-
antee every other team that has
not got a win yet this year they
think about that too.
"In the closing laps of Sunday's
race, I guarantee the top six or
eight or top 10 guys that are in
contention for the win, they're
going to be thinking about that
Chase berth if they can cross the
finish line first."
There have been seven win-
ners through the first nine races
of the season, with Kevin Harvick
and Joey Logano leading the
pack with two victories each. But
the list of drivers still looking for
the win that could put them in the
Chase is long and distinguished.
Six-time and defending series
winner Jimmie Johnson hasn't
been to Victory Lane yet, and nei-
ther has Matt Kenseth. The two
raced each other down the
stretch for the Sprint Cup title
last season and combined to win
13 of the series' 36 races.
Now both are still seeking their
first wins of this season.
Both are divided on how the
stakes alter the racing.
"I just don't think it changes the
racing. I don't think it changes the
winners. I just think it changes
the reward you get for winning,"
Kenseth said. "I don't see any-
body showing up in May and
being like, 'Man, I hope I run 10th
today' Everybody goes out and
does everything they can to win
these races each and every week
no matter what the reward is and
no matter what it pays, points or
any of that stuff."
But Johnson believes it most
certainly changes the racing, es-
pecially for those drivers who al-
ready have a win. He pointed to
Dale Earnhardt Jr's race at Las
Vegas, where he tried to push his
fuel to the finish in a gamble
aimed at picking up his second
win of the season.


Associated Press
Tony Stewart playfully dodges Dale Earnhardt Jr., who drives by during practice Friday for Sunday's Aaron's
499 NASCAR race at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Ala.


"It definitely does change the
way you race," Johnson said. "I
think with that pretty-much
guaranteed lock with one win
lets you take two tires when
maybe you should take four, or
try for fuel. Look at what Junior
did in Las Vegas. Why not try?
They won at Daytona and
they're locked-in so let's go for
a W"
Also still seeking wins this
season are four-time series


champion Jeff Gordon, Denny
Hamlin, who has at least one
win in every season at the Cup
level, three-time champion Tony
Stewart and Clint Bowyer. Those
four drivers have a combined
nine wins at Talladega.
But, in a wrinkle this week-
end, they'll all have to make it
through today's qualifying ses-
sion to keep their primary cars
intact for the race.
NASCAR will debut knockout


qualifying at restrictor plate
tracks today, and the outcome
could be dicey as various strate-
gies are used throughout the
field during the one-hour ses-
sion. Some drivers could race at
the front of the pack, others
could lay back.
"It's just going to be out of con-
trol, in a good way There could
be some wrecks because there's
going to be a lot of cars out
there," Johnson said.


helps Wise

Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. -
Josh Wise made it to Tal-
ladega Superspeedway
the new-fashioned way
A movement started on
the online site Reddit by a
16-year-old fan using the
digital currency Dogecoin
generated a sponsorship
for Wise's No. 98 Ford Fu-
sion in Sunday's Sprint
Cup Series race.
Wise learned about the
effort through another so-
cial media site, Twitter
'At that time I didn't re-
ally know what Dogecoin
was," Wise said Friday "I
had heard of Reddit but I
hadn't been on there
much. It was easy to kind
of dismiss it at first be-
cause it was like, 'Well
yeah, they might have like
10 or 15 people want to
help us raise sponsorship
but I doubt they're going
to be able to raise the full
amount to sponsor us.'
"Five or six days later,
they had met the goal of
$55,000 to sponsor us and
we had a sponsor for Tal-
ladega. It was pretty cool."
Teen Denis Pavel of
Niles, Ill., had noticed
Wise's mostly unadorned
black car having a strong
run at Bristol before fin-
ishing 23rd. He thought of
past fundraisers he'd seen
on Reddit, and helped
pave Wise's road to Tal-
ladega. Phil Parsons Rac-
ing also let Reddit users
vote on a paint scheme for
Wise's car
"It's been so cool be-
cause having a crowd-
funded car like that, we
had a lot of excited people
that contributed," Wise
said. "And also people that
are part of Dogecoin and
the Reddit community...
For a small team like us
and for myself as a driver
who's really trying to
break out in the sport, it's
been just a really awe-
some opportunity."
Wise said he now has
become a regular on Red-
dit, engaging with fans
and others. Now, some of
them are helping with an-
other uphill battle to get
Wise into Sprint Cup's All-
Star Race on May 17. Fans
get to vote one driver into
the race.
"That's kind of the next
cool thing that's coming
down the pike," Wise said.
"Who knows? We're obvi-
ously going against Dan-
ica Patrick, which is going
to be a huge thing to over-
come. But just the thought
of it and the effort that
they're putting into that is
really cool. If we pulled
that off, it would be pretty
exciting. We're going to
just see how this weekend
goes. Hopefully we can do
for them, have good re-
sults and do some more
cool things in the future
like this."


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 B5


lq




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QBs, deep threats, and Jadeveon


Sizing up the

upcoming

NFL draft

Associated Press

NEW YORK Quarter-
backs, deep threats, and
Jadeveon.
For all the interest in
QBs such as Johnny Foot-
ball, and all the praise for
the deep class of deep-
threat receivers, the first
player off the board on
Thursday in the NFL draft
figures to be that most cov-
eted of defenders, the sack
master end.
South Carolina's Jade-
veon Clowney is expected
to wind up with the Hous-
ton Texans, who get the
first pick in the three-day
proceedings at Radio City
Music Hall.
Criticism of his work
ethic and suggestions that
he spent much of last sea-
son trying to avoid injury
have been overwhelmed
in most draft rooms by
video of Clowney at his
best Those clips show him
beating double-teams,
even triple-teams. He's
been so impressive that
many NFL insiders be-
lieve Clowney would have
been the top overall pick
had he been eligible after
his 2012 sophomore
season.
"With a player like Jade-
veon in his second year, he
was a tremendous player,"
says former NFL player
Tom Condon, now a promi-
nent agent. '"And then he
had to play his third year
and you hear the questions
about what kind of motor
does he have. I watched
him this year and I thought
he was a fantastic player"
Clowney disputes claims
he doesn't always bring it,
and all NFL coaches be-
lieve they can get the most


adi ,. .- -* -




Assoc
South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney (7) tackles Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray Sept. 7
during a game in Athens, Ga. Clowney has been a lightning rod for attention and those picking apart a tale
seems as promising as any to enter the league in the past few years.


out of any prospect.
"I think I work just as
hard as anybody," Clowney
says. "If you pick me and
pair me with guys, I'm
going to try and outwork
them also."
Should Houston bypass
adding Clowney to a de-
fense that already has a
disruptive star end in J.J.
Watt, the Texans could opt
for a quarterback. They
dealt incumbent Matt
Schaub to Oakland, leav-
ing Case Keenum and TJ.
Yates behind center
But grabbing Texas
A&M's often-spectacular
and unpredictable Johnny


Manziel at the top of the
draft could be a reach.
Same thing for the other
quarterbacks being dis-
sected by scouts for two
extra weeks this year, be-
cause the draft was moved
back into early May
Choosing Central
Florida's Blake Bortles,
Louisville's Teddy Bridge-
water, Fresno State's
Derek Carr (brother of
2002 overall top pick
David Carr of the same
school and an NFL bust)
or any other passer might
be a stretch.
Instead, many teams
drafting early may opt for


guys who stretch the field.
NFL draft guru Gil
Brandt calls it "a very
strong draft for re-
ceivers," and general
managers drool about
Sammy Watkins of Clem-
son, Mike Evans of Texas
A&M, Brandin Cooks of
Oregon State, Marqise
Lee of Southern Califor-
nia, Odell Beckham Jr. of
LSU, and Kelvin Ben-
jamin of Florida State.
Brandt lists eight wide-
outs in his top 50
prospects.
Asked what impact the
speedy, strong, elusive
workaholic Watkins might


have on the Brown
eral manager Ray]
says: "Big, big, rea
Ginormous.
"He's exp]
Farmer adds. "He's
ally good hands
demonstrated he c
all the routes. He
productive. So sadd
on the opposite s
Josh Gordon and V
Other WOW fact(
ers attracting atten
fore the draft i
Buffalo (the Bulls,
Bills) linebacker
Mack, UCLA line
Anthony Barr, A!
safety Ha Ha Clint


Clowney

and North Carolina tight
end Eric Ebron.
But the guys in the
trenches never should be
ignored, with three tackles
Greg Robinson of
Auburn, Jake Matthews of
Texas A&M (son of Hall of
Fame offensive lineman
Bruce Matthews) and Tay-
lor Lewan of Michigan -
projected to go in the first
dozen picks. Defensive
tackles Aaron Donald of
Pittsburgh, Tim Jernigan
of Florida State and Louis
Nix of Notre Dame also
are likely first-rounders.
Just like last year, when
no running backs went in
the first round, that posi-
tion is devalued in 2014.
Top ball carriers in this
crop include Carlos Hyde
of Ohio State and Tre
Mason of Auburn.
The impact of under-
classmen will be felt more
in this draft than ever,
with a record 98 declaring
for early entry Clowney,
Robinson, and Clinton-Dix
are among them.
Meanwhile, one player
not likely to go until later
Friday (the second and
third rounds) or even Sat-
urday (Round 4 through
iated Press Round 7) is Missouri de-
,2013, fensive end Michael Sam,
ent that the first openly gay player
in an NFL draft. Sam has
ns, gen- been a solid playmaker for
Farmer the Tigers, and prefers to
illy big. look at himself as a foot-
ball prospect, not a trail
losive," blazer
Sgot re- He's made that clear for
. He's months.
can run "I wish you guys would
can be just say, 'Michael Sam,
dle him how's football going?
side of How's training going?' I
VOW!" would love for you to ask
or play- me that question," Sam
tion be- said at the NFL combine.
include "But it is what it is. And I
not the just wish you guys would
Khalil just see me as Michael
*backer Sam the football player in-
labama stead of Michael Sam the
ton-Dix gay football player"


Big programs send stars and duds to the NFL


Rating the college

powerhouses

Associated Press

Even as NFL teams make a
huge deal out of their discoveries
from the hinterlands of college
football, it's the big schools from
the powerhouse conferences that
dominate the draft
Based on rosters for the open-
ing of the 2013 season, here's a
look at the best and worst selec-
tions from each of the 27 schools
that had at least 20 players in the
NFL at that time. So no, JaMarcus
Russell who was out of the
league- doesn't make the "cut,"
as the biggest flop from LSU.
Southern California (40)
Best Pittsburgh safety Troy Po-
lamalu, a borderline Hall of
Famer and big-time playmaker,
selected 16th in 2003.
Worst Another safety, Cincin-
nati's Taylor Mays, whose lack of
speed has made him a journey-
man after being chosen 49th over-
all in 2010.
Louisiana State (39)
Best Kyle Williams, Buffalo's
versatile defensive lineman, was
a fifth-round choice in 2006 and
has made three Pro Bowls.
Worst: Chiefs DE Tyson Jack-
son, taken third overall in 2009,
has had little impact and isn't
even a key to the team's defense.
Miami (38)
Best Beating out a tremendous
group of Hurricanes, safety Ed
Reed, Baltimore's first-rounder in
2002, has a Super Bowl ring and a
likely plaque in Canton.
Worst Taken 24th overall by
New England, safety Brandon
Meriweather, now with Washing-
ton, is best known for brutal and
fine-worthy hits.
Georgia (36)
Best The Saints' Champ Bai-
ley is one of the most accom-
plished cornerbacks in NFL
history, making his selection by
Washington at No. 7 overall in
1999 look very wise.
Worst: Only because there are
no long-term flops from the Bull-
dogs, Chiefs DB Sanders Com-
mings, a fifth-rounder last year,
is the choice for being on injured
reserve for much of his rookie
season.
Florida State (31)
Best The clutch catches, phys-
icality and precise route running
of San Francisco Anquan Boldin,


a second-rounder in 2003 by Ari-
zona, makes this a clear choice.
Worst Vikings QB Christian
Ponder, the 12th overall pick in
2011, is now wondering if he has
an NFL job.
Texas (31)
Best: Chiefs RB Jamaal
Charles was the 73rd choice in
2008 and has become one of the
league's most dangerous runners
and receivers.
Worst A seventh overall pick
should not be a journeyman, but
safety Michael Huff, late of Den-
ver, has been that since Oakland
took him in 2006.
Alabama (30)
Best For all the big names from
Alabama, less-heralded guard
Evan Mathis, the 79th overall se-
lection in 2005 by Carolina, now is
an All-Pro with the Eagles.
Worst Bengals T Andre Smith,
taken sixth in 2009, has improved
from bust to mediocre.
California (30)
Best We'll get an argument
here for Aaron Rodgers, but it's a
surefire Hall of Famer, TE Tony
Gonzalez, Kansas City's No. 1
(13th overall) in 1997.
Worst: Chosen 10th overall by
Jacksonville in 2010, DT
Tyson Alualu has been a
disappointment.
Tennessee (30)
Best Need we say more than
Denver QB Peyton Manning, first
overall by Indianapolis in 1998?
Worst DT Dan Williams, a first-
rounder in 2010 who barely has
made a blip on the NFLs radar
Ohio State (27)
Best All Jets for the Buckeyes.
Center Nick Mangold, 29th over-
all in 2006, is two-time All-Pro
and five-time Pro Bowler
Worst: WR Santonio Holmes,
26th in '06 draft and despite a
Super Bowl MVP award with
Pittsburgh -has been disruptive
with the Steelers and Jets.
Oregon (27)
Best Massive Baltimore DT
Haloti Ngata, 12th overall in 2006,
is two-time All-Pro, five-time Pro
Bowler
Worst: Safety Patrick Chung,
now back with Patriots, has been
so-so for the 34th pick in 2009.
Florida (26)
Best Browns CB Joe Haden,
seventh overall in 2010, is a rare
bright light in Cleveland.
Worst: WR Andre Caldwell,
Cincinnati's third-rounder in
2008 and now with Denver, has
averaged less than 25 catches a


Associated Press
Minnesota's Adrian Peterson is the NFL's best running back and the
best player in the league from the Oklahoma Sooners.


season.
Notre Dame (24)
Best Taken 74th in 2005, DE
Justin Tuck was a key to two
Super Bowl wins with the Giants.
Worst Cleveland's first-rounder
in 2007, QB Brady Quinn basically
has been a career backup.
Wisconsin (24)
Best Naturally Seattle QB Rus-
sell Wilson. A third-rounder in
2012, he's already a Super Bowl
winner
Worst OL Gabe Carimi, No. 29
in 2011 by Chicago, has been a
washout with Bears and Bucs.
Oklahoma (23)
Best The NFLs best running
back, 2,000-yarder Adrian Peter-
son, was the seventh pick by Min-
nesota in 2007. Brilliant selection.
Worst Atlanta CB Dominique
Franks, a fifth-rounder in 2010,
has barely had a role for Falcons.
Penn State (23)
Best San Francisco's NaVorro
Bowman has gone from third-
rounder in 2010 to All-Pro
linebacker
Worst LB Dan Connor, a terrific
college player, has had little im-
pact since going 74th in '08.
South Carolina (23)
Best John Abraham (13th over-


all in 2000) has been a pass-rush
specialist for the Jets and two
more teams.
Worst Highly touted since Ti-
tans took him in 2009's third
round, TE Jared Cook has
achieved little.
Iowa (22)
Best: Three-time Pro Bowl
guard Marshal Yanda was Balti-
more's third-rounder in 2007,86th
overall.
Worst Injuries have slowed OT
Bryan Bulaga, 23rd overall pick
by Green Bay in 2010, but he's
struggled when healthy
Clemson (21)
Best Yet to have a real break-
out season, Buffalo RB C.J. Spiller
(ninth overall in 2010) has been a
constant force.
Worst DE Da'Quan Bowers,
taken 51st in 2011, has been a non-
factor in Tampa Bay
Illinois (21)
Best Versatile OL David Diehl,
now retired, went from fifth-
rounder to 11-year mainstay with
the Giants.
Worst Not too soon to label
49ers' top pick of 2012 WR A.J.
Jenkins, now with KC, a bust
Mississippi (21)
Best Brother act: Peyton's QB


brother Eli (top pick in '04) has
two Super Bowls with Giants,
edges 49ers super LB Patrick
Willis.
Worst: Atlanta DT Peria Jerry
has never proven worthy of
being the 24th overall choice in
2009.
Rutgers (21)
Best: Do-everything RB Ray
Rice of Baltimore was a steal in
the second round in 2008.
Worst: Off-field issues have
plagued WR Kenny Britt, who
has been undependable on the
field, too, since Tennessee took
him 30th overall in 2009.
Virginia (21)
Best The second pick in 2008,
Rams DE Chris Long has 50 1/2
sacks and has been a force.
Worst: CB Chris Cook, Min-
nesota's pick at No. 34 overall in
2010, has had no interceptions
and little impact.
Auburn (20)
Best Yes, he's inconsistent, but
Carolina QB Cam Newton (No. 1
overall in 2011), is the real deal.
Worst: Jaguars 2008 second-
round LB Quentin Groves has
been with four teams already
Michigan (20)
Best: The classic great pick:
Patriots QB Tom Brady, No. 199
in 2000, and now three-time
Super Bowl winner
Worst: DE Brandon Graham
has done little to justify Philadel-
phia taking him 13th overall in
2010.
Nebraska (20)
Best: Detroit has gotten its
money's worth from center Do-
minic Raiola, 50th overall in
2001 and still a starter
Worst: For the 19th overall se-
lection in 2011, the Giants have
not gotten much from CB Prince
Amukamara.
Stanford (20)
Best No way to overlook Seat-
tle's Richard Sherman, the best
CB in football, and a fifth-
rounder in 2011.
Worst: OL Jonathan Martin,
now in San Francisco, was bul-
lied and left the Dolphins in
2013, but the 2012 second-
rounder struggled before that.
UCLA (20)
Best- RB Maurice Jones-Drew,
annoyed he slipped to 60th over-
all in 2006, was a star for Jack-
sonville before joining Oakland
this year
Worst: Denver safety Rahim
Moore, 45th overall in 2011,
hasn't lived up to that spot.


B6 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


NFL DRAFT









RELIGION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


I often comment to my husband
how complicated our lives are,
living in the present age. Today
you have to be somewhat of a com-
puter genius as you wind your way
through the supermarket with your
smart phone downloading facts and
recipes and picking up the deli
order you ordered online. A laser
device scans your items at the
check out, and everybody uses
reusable shopping totes for pur-
chases. Today's supermarket car-
ries all sorts of items, from ethnic
foods to mops and soaps, produce,
bakery, dairy, meat, canned goods,
and everything in between. Super
these places are, but growing up as
a young Jewish girl in New Britain,
Conn. in the early '60s, things were
a lot different.
Our local Jewish shopping dis-
trict's main street was called Hart-
ford Avenue. Even back in the early
'60s, the once central area of Jew-
ish settlement was going into decay
As in many urban areas in the
Northeast, the black population


L_


Judi
Siegal

JUDI'S
JOURNAL


was moving in, as the Jews were
moving out. Nevertheless, there
were still stores frequented by Jew-
ish shoppers in the days before the
supermarket.
My favorite was Cherniak's deli.
Step into this store, with its wooden
floors and dusty shelves of canned
goods hardly anyone bought, be-
cause the main attraction here
were the kosher sliced luncheon
meats. We always seemed to hit this
place at 5 p.m, close enough to din-
nertime that the mere aroma of
salami would make my mouth
water Mr Cherniak would always
offer me a slice, which I would eat


11








greedily, while my eyes would wan-
der over to the big barrels of half
sour pickles. 'A pickle for a nickel"
I used to quip, and on occasion, I
would be rewarded with one of the
garlicky delights. My mother would
also purchase hot dogs with their
casings intact, coleslaw and whole
smoked whitefish.
Across the street was the kosher
butcher shop. I still remember the
black and white tile floor and white
interior Bachrach's was a very
clean store, and all the meats were
neatly displayed in glass display
cases. My favorites were the lamb
chops, the kind that had the whole
chop plus an end piece, a cut I have
not seen in probably 50 years.
Nothing prepackaged there, and
everything was cut and slaughtered
according to Jewish ritual. I tried
not to think about the "back room"
where I knew they hung the fore-
quarters of beef on meat hooks
above the sawdust strewed wooden


s.- Page C2


L Nancy
Kennedy

GRACE NOTES


^SS



The plain



truth of it

Some people you can't forget.
Alta McNalley is one of them. Although I
can no longer picture her face, I can
clearly hear her saying, "I'm just plain. I like
old-fashioned singing; I like old-fashioned
ways."
When I met her some years back she was the
pastor of a little holiness church. I remember
her saying how she loved yard sales and flea
markets because you never know what kind of
blessings God had for you communion sets,
baby stuff for a church nursery, fabric for cur-
tains, even a husband.
The husband she found at an estate sale in
Michigan. She and a man she had never met be-
fore were talking about an old washing machine
when he invited her for a cup of coffee. She po-
litely refused, saying she didn't have coffee with
strange men.
And then she heard God tell her that the man
was the answer to her prayers.
Before that, she had lived a hard life, starting
with being one of 10 children of a poor Kentucky
coal miner "one holler over from Loretta Lynn,"
and then being married to a man who treated
her cruelly They had three children, whom she
took to church with her every Sunday
"He'd beat me for going and beat me for com-
ing home," she said. "Sometimes he wouldn't
even let me come in the house."
Her only relief came when he traveled to
Oklahoma from their home in Michigan, staying
away for months at a time. He eventually died
from lung cancer
She said one day she was working on the back
of a harvester out in the muck, harvesting pota-
toes, earning about 40 cents an hour She heard
God telling her, "Feed my lambs" and "Feed my
sheep."
She went to see her pastor who told her God
was calling her into the ministry She told him,
"Why would he call me? I'm unlearned I only
went to the eighth grade."
But he told her that God takes the "foolish
things of this world to confound the wise."
So, she learned the Bible, and once her hus-
band died and her kids were grown, she trav-
eled as an evangelist, preaching the gospel,
plain and simple.
She also started praying for a husband, a good
one.
"I never had one before," she said. "So, I
asked God for somebody to stand beside me and
help me."
Her first husband had told her she was too
stupid to preach.
Then she met Mr McNalley After they mar-
ried, they moved to Florida where Alta met
friends who urged her to start a church. They
rented a warehouse, bought old hymnals from a
nearby church so they could sing the old-time
songs and used seats that were originally from
the old Valerie Theatre in Inverness.
Whatever they needed, she prayed for it. She
had seen God's hand of blessing and miracles on
her life, including her daughter being healed of
cancer She simply, plainly, trusted God.
It's been a number of years since I visited with
Alta, and I don't know whatever happened to
her
The church was called Deliverance Taberna-
cle, which is aptly named. The Lord had deliv-
ered Alta from her old life of sadness and abuse
and she believed he could and would deliver
others.
I remember she was loving and full of compas-
sion, and she laughed. When Jesus touches peo-
ple with sad lives and makes them un-sad it's
akin to the blind being able to see or the lame
running a 5K, laughing all the way for the sheer
joy of it all.
She told me, "I don't know a whole lot, but I
believe in holiness and walking clean. I know
that when the Spirit of the Lord is on me, every-
thing is clear"
In this day of high-tech churches where you


Page C8


Inside:
Religion
Notes .......... C8
Comics ........C7
Community. C4-C5
Crossword .....C6
Movies ........C7
TV Listings .....C6
Adopt a pet. .... Cll

For questions or comments,
contact Features Editor Logan
Mosby at 352-563-6363, ext.
1141 or at mhnosby@dichronicle
online.com




C2 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


JUDI
Continued from Page Cl

floor Even with this informa-
tion, I still enjoyed hamburgers
and steaks.
A few blocks down was the
kosher bakery, Cousin's. There
my mother would buy challah
for Shabbat and rye bread for
the deli. You could get a loaf of
the chewy stuff for .25. They
were also famous for their
bagels. I remember the bakery
clerk giving my baby sister one
to chew on as we made our bak-
ery selections. What made a
Jewish bakery unique was that


no lard was used in baking.
Today, health conscious shop-
pers prefer all-vegetable short-
ening, but back in the '60s, it
was harder to find places and
products that featured kosher
shortening. We always left the
shop with a half dozen of my fa-
vorite donuts, plain with a
chocolate stripe on top, filled
with buttercream. Not exactly a
healthy choice but they sure
were good!
Our last stop was Marty
Sidoyian's produce shop. Marty
was not Jewish, but Armenian,
and catered to a Jewish crowd.
Of course, everything was sold
in bulk from wooden baskets
much like you see at the way-


side produce stands here in
Florida. Unlike today where
eating a variety of foods from
different cultures is a way of
life, back in the '60s, it was not
so popular to cross ethnic
boundaries. I often wanted my
mother to buy okra, but she
said that was something black
people ate and I never tasted it
until I was well into adulthood.
There were other vegetables
more indigenous to the South,
and were what we would now
call soul food since the green-
grocer also sold to the black
population who were rapidly
moving into the area. Still, if I
could have a sweet red pepper
or two I was content.


Things have certainly
changed in the years I have de-
scribed. The world is older,
faster and more impersonal.
Still, I wouldn't trade my mod-
em supermarket for the time-
consuming store-hopping
method my mother used to pa-
tronize.
Nor would I have put my
baby sister in a car seat unse-
cured by a seatbelt as we did in
those days riding back from our
shopping trips. But those were
the times we lived in, nostalgic
to be sure, but not necessarily
better
Still the past has a powerful
hold on us. When news leaked
recently that an iconic


RELIGION


Places of worship


that offer love, peace.:


and harmony to all. ,

Come on over to "His house, your spirits will be lifted!!!


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Spoken Holy communion
Worship 8:00 a.m.
Christian Education 9:00 a.m.
Sung Holy Communion
Worship 10:00am
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
!l lFLi!l llll ,'l t l .. i ,il


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School .............9:00
Worship..................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
Fm',.
352-422-1515 Y
Palor
Todd
Langdon


NORTH CITRUS

CHRISTIAN

CHURCH
Phone: (352) 527-0021



Sunday Services: 10:30am
Bible Study:
Wednesday 6:30pm
Minister
George Plantz
Where your search for a
friendly Bible Church ends

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church


", i 'andFamilies"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1V2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00AM
Nursery is Provided.


F 47 Years of
F IRST Bringing Christ
to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
4 9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I Missouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

THE m
SALVATION ,,
A D UIV CITRUS COUNTY
ARMY CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Capt. Phillip Irish
Capt. Lynn Irish





First apst
Ckhwck
of Lake Rtoatseaw
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: . 1 r ,, ,, .,
Check us out on Facebook



^J First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


[^^^^Pastor,
M Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


6 "First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN.
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS H
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.RayKelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





MD ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org







*q .v/_ -II .. 0 =
S4 ]ma 'lllews
Congr gation

SMALLSERVI C-
II Y IC
No ue

KIDDIS


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran
Church(L M
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
9&{".ta ',-ot te.
( 9&wrt 9;,-ohl..


M-'ll U


(4
"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"


Come To
ST. l

MARGARET' T
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Celebrating 120 years
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr. Gene Reuman, Pastor


First Church of
Christ, Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting
4:00 PM
352-726-4033


9 I 'Off
Hwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness
Sunday Services .
Traditional 0
S 8:00 AM 0
11:00 AM 0
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
0 5th Sunday
0 of Any Month Combined 10am *
SSunday School for all ages-
0 9:30 AM 0
0 Nursery Provided U
Fellowship & Youth Group
S Sunday Evening
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.orgf
" Podcast: fpcinv.com
SChurch Office 637-0770*
SPastor James Capps


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH



"Rooted in Scripture, Relevant for Today!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9-30-10-00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call/for location)
Non-Denominational Church
Citrus County Realtor'
714S. Scarbor ...
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813

St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES-
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30-4:30pmo
795-4479






\. [I).Il l I ul.L.I l\. I
INVERNESS
CHURCH OF GOD
Sunday Services:
Worship Services..8:30 AM & 10:30AM
Sunday School.....................9:30 AM
Wednesday Night:
Classes For All Ages at 7:00 PM I
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center" & "Cornerstone
Christian Supply"











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.x & 10:30 A.M.
s "s "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t
SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm.
t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t "t
CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P. to 3:15 PM Sat.
or ByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 Am.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills |
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
i. .catholicweb.com .:


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 US, Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
fWeekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30-3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June- August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


SSpecial

Event or
Weekly
Services
Please Call

Theresa

Holland at

564-2940
For Advertising
Information
_* ,_


'0








Good
Shepherd
Lutheran

Church
ELCA

Come






Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
SFellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
SNursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-76-16


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Connecticut Jewish supermar-
ket was in financial trouble, a
few Jewish philanthropists
stepped forward and bought
the store to keep the tradition
going, with plans to modernize
and improve the store's wares
for today's Jewish consumer
Just like Judaism itself, al-
ways evolving, the traditions
live on in new ways and in
new packaging, but the taste is
still the same, perhaps even
better
Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educator
She lives in Ocala with her hus-
band, Phil. She can be reached
at niejudis@yahoo.com.


I L




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Places of worship


that offer love, peace a


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His house, your spirits will be lifted!!! 'I -


ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
...............10:30A.M.
S I ,l . .I r -
ii Jii, ii I Ir H I,,




First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesu
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbefloralcity.org



1s UNI T ED~l/:


CURC

Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:30
Pastor Kip Younger
Phone 628-4083
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Learn More at
www.1 umc.org


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Siimd., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to belong. A place to become."


g PRIMERAIGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM- Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM- Estudios Bfblicos
Les sperawns!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


BEM Crystal
E-i River
Foursquare
Gospel Church
1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pmr
Pastor John Hager


unIrT
of Citrus County

A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING



WE ARE A JOYOUS COMMUNITY
WHICH INSPIRES, EMBRACES,
AND NURTURES ALL THOSE ON
THEIR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY
SERVICE OFFERINGS:
SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT
CLASSES, WEDDINGS,
CHRISTENINGS, MEMORIALS,
AND HOLY UNIONS
WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30
NURSERY/SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30
I Found a ,fttiFer 'iu d Und






KNOWING GOD, LOVING
GOD, SERVING GOD

2628 W WOODVIEW
LANE LECANTO, FL
S 34461
S 352-746-1270
WWW.UNITYOFCITRUS.ORG


, Homosassa Springs
somLEVITl-[,rAti AIMr MT) CH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor William Bremmer
Wednesday
Mid-Week Meeting 4:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion- 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship 1 ill Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
TroyAllen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org
0 00 GWV M_ ---^^-"^T i__

fill "'"*,' f ,! Timothy
\\i L~;~th 1I 21.: 5


Grace Bible
Fellowship
4947 East Arbor St., Inverness, FL
352-726-9972
Follows Les Feldick
Teaching
Sunday
Bible Study............9:15AM
Worship Service.. 10:15 AM
Wednesday
Bible Study.............7:00PM
Nursery and play yard.
Pastor John Fredericksen


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am

Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
S(352) 746-9422


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 PM Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in Dinners,
singing the old hymns? Then
you'll enjoy this Church family.
Home of Saturday .iih Gospel
Jubilee. Last Saturday of each
month at 6pm.


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 AM.' 11:00 AM.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239





Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please

Call

Theresa

Holland at

564-2940

For

Information

On Your

Religious

Advertising


L A


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


SFloral City
united Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(across from Floral City School) 1
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
I"We strive to make
newcomersfeel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


(J Crystal River
Churfch of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurse
| Provided


f Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon





First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy r
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday Worship
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Children's Ministry
9:00 am & 10:45 am
Student Ministry
7:00 pm
Wednesday
UPLIFT Prayer & Praise 7 pm
Child Care Provided
(352) 746-2970
www.fbcbh.com


Church of Christ | 1 W
lI/ W D-nn nnd I Ku Hills


um w. jT U w TUUua U.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.0
[****s" *j]0


US Hwy. 19


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30

Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
David Curry






HEKEP, YOU'LL FIND
CKPINC FA,,MILY
IN CHKIST!

CKyTNL
RIVEK y
VJNITCD
N- CTHODI ST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:. A Stephen Ministry Provider .:


EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon offitili known
for engaging all persons
in the love and triulh
of Jesus Christ.

Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
S Wednesday
S 10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org


I, Hernando
gl^DCWurchof
STheNazarene
APlace to Belong

210] N Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


rWest IF Shepherd
Citrus I -g 60 1


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 C3


I (






Page C4N SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NEWS NOTES

Public welcome at
Derby festivities
The public is welcome to join
the VFW Post 4337 family for a
Kentucky Derby Party beginning
at 4 p.m. today at the post home,
906 State Road 44 East, Inverness.
Enjoy mint julep specials, par-
ticipate in the hat contest and be
entertained with Turner Camp
Dave's Variety Show Fried
chicken dinner may be purchased
for $7 from 5 to 7 p.m. and in-
cludes mashed potatoes, gravy
green beans, coleslaw and
dessert.
Call352-344-3495 or visit
wwwvfw4337.org, for information
about all post events.


All invited to celebrate
with IR-RU on Sunday
Celebrate Cinco De Mayo with
gusto on Sunday at the IR-RU
Family Social Club, 922 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness.
Dinner will be served from 3 to
6 p.m. Menu includes Arizona
chicken, baked corn casserole
and black beans with Mexican
rice for $5. Drink specials will be
served from 3 to 8 p.m.
Entertainment will be provided
by Jimmy Sparks from 4 to 8 p.m.
For information, call 352-637-
5118.

Registered nurses
to meet in Ocala
The Citrus Marion Chapter of
Registered Nurses Retired (RNR)
will meet Monday, May 12, at West
Marion Medical Bldg. in Ocala.
Sign-in begins at 11 a.m. with
lunch and meeting to follow
Speaker will be Dr Jose
Gaudier, neurologist, who will
speak on multiple sclerosis up-
dates. The charity will be PACE;
beauty products for young women
are needed.
All retired or semi-retired reg-
istered nurses who wish to attend
should call Mary Jane at 352-726-
6882 or Gladys at 352-854-2677 by
Sunday, May 4, for reservations.

Volunteers sought
for pregnancy center
Volunteer orientation for the
Pregnancy and Family Life Cen-
ter of Citrus County will run from
10 a.m. to noon Monday, May 19,
at St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
Topics covered will include the
Center's philosophy, services of-
fered and explanations of the vol-
unteer opportunities available at
the center's two locations, in In-
verness and Homosassa.
Call Judy Knowlton at 352-344-
3030 by Friday, May 9, to reserve a
place.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Silhouette


Special Olympics athletes


'-i~N.


II&-;Rqp "r 4. % ~- n i -


Special to the Chronicle
Local Special Olympics athletes relax after a morning of competition April 26 at the Citrus High School track. Events included
running, walking, long jump, high jump, shot put, softball throw and cycling. After competition was over, the announcement was
made to let the athletes know who will move on to State Summer Games set for May 16 and 17. To qualify for State Games, an
athlete must compete at area games and be awarded a first-place ribbon. Citrus County Special Olympics took about 50 athletes to
area games, including 11 cyclists, and were given seven slots for Track and Field and nine slots for cycling.


NEWS NOTES


Camera club to focus
on theme of horses
The Citrus County Art Cen-
ter Camera Club will meet at
7 p.m. Monday, May 5, at 2644
N. Annapolis Ave. in Her-
nando (at the intersection of
County Road 486 and Annapo-
lis Avenue).
The Camera Club will have
its monthly meeting, which
will be a photo competition.
The theme of the May compe-
tition will be horses in any set-
ting or activity. Some members
will submit photos from the
horses in the jumping compe-
tition in Ocala or the polo
matches at The Villages. Some
may visit local stables to get a
close-up photo of the beautiful
animals.
The end result will be a col-
lection of images taken by en-
thusiastic photographers. The
photos will be submitted digi-
tally to two judges, who will
judge them and assign a point
score to the photos. Winners in
each category Novice, Inter-


mediate and Advanced will
receive a certificate if they
achieve the required points
for their photos.
Photo competition meetings
are always very well attended.
Judges will comment on the
photos as they are projected
on a screen, which helps mem-
bers improve their skills.
First-time visitors are
welcome.

Jerseyans, friends
plan May activities
The next meeting for mem-
bers of the New Jersey and
Friends Club of Citrus County
will be at 1 p.m. Monday
at the VFW Post 4252 on State
Road 200 in Hernando.
The club meets the first
Monday monthly unless there
is a holiday Then it's the sec-
ond Monday The speaker will
be from Duke Energy
Other activities include
lunch at 3 p.m. Wednesday
at Little Joey's at County Road
491 and U.S. 41 in Holder and


lunch at 3 p.m. Wednesday,
May 21, at Rustic Ranch. Mem-
bers will also attend the Show
Palace in Hudson for the pro-
duction of "The Wizard of Oz"
at 1 p.m. Sunday May 25.
For information, call Mary
Anne at 352-746-3386. The club
bowls at 10 a.m. Thursday at
Sportsmen's Bowl, 100 Florida
Ave. (U.S.41) in Inverness. eing
from New Jersey is not a re-
quirement to join.
For information, call 352-
527-3568 or visit on Facebook.

40&8 to serve
breakfast Sunday
Citrus 40&8 Voiture 1219
welcomes the public to break-
fast from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. the
first Sunday each month at
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal River
(6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way).
Donation is $6 for adults;
special on kids' (8 and
younger) meals. Specialty
drinks available for $1.


Model club to hear
about change of scale
The Citrus Model Railroad
Club will present its May
meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
in the horticulture building of
the Citrus County Fair-
grounds. All are welcome.
The program will be a pres-
entation by Program Director
John Abbott on his new HO-
scale layout.
For information, call John at
352-341-2538, or visit www.
citrusmodelrrclub.org.

Barbershop chorus
seeks male singers
The Citrus County Chapter
"Chorus of the Highlands" of
the Barbershop Harmony So-
ciety seeks men to join the
group, which has been in the
area for more than 28 years.
The chorus meets at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday in Inver-
ness. Call 352-382-0336 for
more information.


Summer programs keep kids active, sharp


ids' minds are like sponges, con-
tinually soaking up things you
want them to know, as well as
those things you don't want them to know
Even during summer vacation, a time you
like to think of as happy and carefree,
children need opportunities that help
them grow Their brains need to be
nourished.
Sadly, when kids are not in school, they
tend to lose some part of what they
gained academically during the year Re-
searchers report all young people experi-
ence learning losses when they do not
engage in educational activities during
the summer This research spans 100
years and tells us students typically score
lower on standardized tests at the end of
summer vacation than they do on the
same tests at the beginning of the sum-
mer Many children lose as much as two
months in math skills.
The National Summer Learning Asso-
ciation also reports concerns of rapid
weight gains and lack of activity during


Lane
Vick

BOYS
& GIRLS
CLUBS


summer months. The Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County summer programs open-
ing May 27 include lots of mental nourish-
ment with swimming and bowling,
cooking and healthy nutrition, reading
clubs, learning games, sports and recre-
ation, and arts and crafts. Kids will learn
about careers, self-actualization and tol-
erance of others. Field trips include the
Lowry Park Zoo and the Museum of Sci-
ence and Industry in Tampa (MOSI),
among others. We will feed their minds
and help them to be healthy kids.
Children may be enrolled weekly at
$75, or for the entire 10-week program.


Siblings receive a discount at $60 a week.
Scholarships are available. Field trips
are extra. Call the Central Ridge Boys &
Girls Club in Beverly Hills at 352-270-
8841, the Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls Club
in Inverness at 352-341-2507, or the
Robert Halleen Boys & Girls Club mid-
way between Crystal River and
Homosassa at 352-7995-8624 to enroll a
child or learn more about the summer
program.
Donations for summer scholarships are
welcome and will help to offset the fees
in hardship cases. A donation of $750 will
pay for one child for the entire summer
program. Call 352-621-9225 or visit bgcc-
itrus.org to make a donation.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County are partially funded by the United
Way of Citrus County, Kids Central, Inc.
and the Florida Department of
Education.

Lane Vickis grant coordinator of the
Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County


BRIDGE


Special to the Chronicle
Silhouette is a cute 11-week-old
white and brown tabby female
kitten. Since she was born on
Valentine's Day, along with her
two sisters, they were given
"romance" names. She's very
sweet and loving and lives up to
her name. Drop by and enjoy our
felines in their cage-free,
homestyle environment from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Hardin Haven on
the corner of State Road 44 and
North Conant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Call the Haven at
352-613-1629 for adoptions, or
view more felines online at
www.petfinder.com/shelters/
fl186.html.


SHARE Club Bridge
SHARE Bridge Club meets at
1 p.m. second and fourth Mondays
at Cornerstone Baptist Church,
1100 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness.
All levels of players are welcome.
For more information, call Julia
Grissom at 352-341-0554, or
Barbara Hackett at 352-341-0149.
Point 0' Woods
Are you a card player, need a
place to meet new friends and
enjoy a few hours of social mo-
ments? Point 0' Woods Country
Club, at 9228 E. Gospel Island
Road, welcomes residents in the
area to join us for lively afternoon
of cards and laughter.
Duplicate bridge is played at


noon Tuesday and Friday. Call
Barbara Pofahl at 352-341-1756 or
Elaine Spangenberg at 352-860-
0358. Party bridge is played
Wednesday afternoon and Satur-
day night. Call Mary Thomas at
352-637-0045.
For more information, call Presi-
dent Sandra Koonce at 352-341-
1747 or membership chairman
Marilyn Pruter at 352-287-2545.
Persons who are interested in
playing bridge during the summer
months are welcome to attend
Tuesday, Wednesday or Friday
games at the Point 0' Woods club-
house on Gospel Island. Tuesday
and Friday games attract duplicate
players and on Wednesday, party


bridge players. Guests play for $2.
Players without partners are most
welcome. For more information,
call Sandra Koonce at 352-
634-4216.
Citrus Bridge Club
Learn to play bridge at the Citrus
Bridge Club at the Nature Coast
Bank on the corner of County Road
486 and Citrus Hills Boulevard in
Hernando. Citrus Bridge Club con-
ducts games at 1 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.
Pat Peterson also gives a free lec-
ture for intermediate players at
12:15 p.m. Tuesday at the club.
Come and play anytime; partners
are guaranteed. Call Peterson at
352-746-7835 for more information.


Nature Coast Bridge Club
Nature Coast Bridge Club has
bridge games (open and points) at
12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
and at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at 3021
Commercial Way, south end of
Towne Square Mall, Spring Hill.
Games for all levels of players are
offered. Beginners' lessons are at
11 a.m. Thursday; other classes
are conducted occasionally.
The games attract many Citrus
County players. For details and a
complete schedule of games or
lessons, call Gary at 727-215-
7651, or Mary Ellen at 352-596-
1524. Visit the website at
daily-recap.com., orAnnabelle at
352-597-5221.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AT THE LIBRARY Helping Cayla's Coats
CENTRAL RIDGE LIBRARY
425 W. Roosevelt Boulevard li ots
Beverly Hills, FL 34465-4281
352-746-6622
www.citruslibraries.org


May 5
Scrabble Game, 10a.m.
Bodacious Beading Babes, 1 p.m.
Nature Coast Dulcimer Club, 3 p.m.
Tobacco Cessation Class, 5 p.m.
May 6
Word: Getting Started, 10:15 a.m.
Preschool Stories, 11 a.m.
Glen Homeowners'
Association, 12:30 p.m.
Fun and Games, 1 p.m.
Pre-GED Math Foundations, 5 p.m.
May 7
Tai Chi, 10a.m.
Mother Goose, 11 a.m.
Oakwood Village Homeowners,
1 p.m.
May 8
Depression & Anxiety
Support Group, 10a.m.
Getting Started with
Computers II, 10:15 a.m.
Emotions Anonymous, 12:30 p.m.
Pre-GED Social Studies, 3 p.m.
May 10
Make It for Mom, 10:30 a.m.
Central Citrus Democratic
Club, noon


NEWS NOTES

Make voices heard
on community center

The Beverly Hills Civic Associ-
ation invites the public to a meet-
ing from 4 to 6 p.m. today at the
Central Ridge Community Center
The purpose of the meeting is
to seek advocates to help with the
association's campaign to keep
the community center under
county ownership.
Volunteers are needed to help
distribute 2014 membership infor-
mation for the pool and other fa-
cilities and to get postcards
signed for presentation to the Cit-
rus County Commission. Sand-
wiches and various refreshments
will be served.
A decision by the county is ex-
pected May 27. For information,
call 352-746-2657.

Pine Ridge seeks
volunteers for PRIDE
Like many Citrus County com-
munities, Pine Ridge has a sher-
iff's crime watch unit known as
PRIDE.
PRIDE has been a recognized
value with continuous community
service since 1996.
Manned by volunteers, crime
watch units are a recognized line
in defense of communities. Every
time a PRIDE volunteer checks a
home or just patrols the commu-
nity they discourage crime.
With continuing budget cuts,
every volunteer, allows dollars to
be placed in more critical crime
prevention needs. Volunteer par-
ticipation is now more important
than ever
The Pine Ridge Crime Watch
Unit needs more volunteers. New
residents especially are asked to
consider volunteering with
PRIDE.
For information and an appli-
cation, call the Citrus County
Sheriff's Volunteer Office at 352-
746-3484 or PRIDE Capt Steve
Wagner at 352-527-0723.

Go country with
Knights in Dunnellon
The Knights of Columbus will
sponsor a Country Western Din-
ner Dance featuring an "encore
performance" by the Country
Sunshine Band tonight in the
parish hall of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, 7525 U.S. 41 S.
in Dunnellon.
The evening includes a coun-
try-style dinner, cash bar, 50/50,
basket raffles and a door prize.
Doors will open at 5:30 p.m., with
dinner served at 6:30. Tickets are
$15 and are available from the
Knights or by calling 352-489-6221
for tickets/table reservations.

Register now for
youth baseball clinic
Citrus County Parks and Recre-
ation, in partnership with
Lecanto High School's coaching
staff, is hosting a summer base-
ball clinic from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
June 2 to 5 at Central Ridge Dis-
trict Park, 6905 N. Lecanto High-
way, Beverly Hills.
The clinic will focus on the fun-
damentals of baseball and is open
to boys and girls ages 6 to 13.
The cost for the clinic is $75 per


participant and $45 per addi-
tional sibling. Lunch will be
provided.
To register, go to the Citrus
County Parks & Recreation office
at 2804 W Marc Knighton Court in
Lecanto.
For more information, visit
wwwcitruscountyparks.com or
call 352-527-7540.


Casino Nightfundraiser coming up May


Special to the Chronicle
Cayla's Coats will stage an upcoming
Casino Night fundraiser from 6:30 to
11 p.m. Saturday May, 17, at Tuscany on
the Meadows in the Quality Inn Confer-
ence Center near Citrus Hills on County
Road 486.
The evening includes heavy appetizers,
casino games, a DJ and dancing; there


will be a cash bar Tickets are $35 per
person for an evening of fun while raising
money for drowning and awareness pre-
vention and swimming lessons for chil-
dren.
To sponsor a table or purchase tickets,
visit facebook.com/caylas.coats or call
352-316-6409.
In 2010, Cayla Barnes, 20 months old,
drowned on a July afternoon in Citrus


17 at Tuscany on the Meadows


County. Since then, her parents, Sean and
Jessica Barnes, have channeled their loss
into the organization known as Cayla's
Coats. With help from the community,
Cayla's Coats is now a nonprofit group
with the mission to provide drowning
prevention and awareness and swimming
lessons during the warmer months, and
coats during the colder months to chil-
dren in need in Citrus County


C news from the Central Ridge area

COMMUNITY


170l


Beautiful
bonnets

In addition to Best Bonnet
winner Jeanie Fusco, Pine
Ridge residents Jane and
Gene Carey and Marie
Reeves also took home
honors from the Pine
Ridge Easter Bonnet
Parade.

Special to the Chronicle


Family of the Month


NEWS NOTES


Club to start pitching
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club will start its summer
horseshoe pitching league at 9
a.m. Wednesday There is also
pitching on Monday evenings
under the lights. All games
will be handicapped to make
equal play for all.
The club is on Civic Circle,
off Beverly Hills Boulevard.
Horseshoes are available for
those who do not have them.
An end of the summer league


party is held the first week in
September Winter league will
start in October Come meet
our summer members.
All levels of play are wel-
come and lessons are avail-
able.
For information, call Peggy
Ogden at 352-489-1005 or email
mwogden@tampabayrr. com

Ready for Round-Up
Central Ridge Elementary is
hosting its Kindergarten


Round-Up from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Wednesday
All parents registering a
child should bring their dri-
ver's license or identification
card, two proofs of residency
(such as electric, gas or cable
bill, or copy of lease, etc.) and
each child's original birth cer-
tificate, Social Security card
and immunization records.
Proof of a current physical
(the physical must take place
within one year of first day of
school) is required, also.


'Outsider' art exhibit opens


id Carol Mirando were the
ts of Columbus Council 6168
h Family of the Month. Recent
Is from Connecticut via Port St.
and Zephyrhills, they're busy
ig up a home in Citrus Hills, but
making time to help in the
unity. Both are extraordinary
ters of the Eucharist at Our Lady
ice Church, where Carol also is a
r. He started his own electronics
fabrication company in New
i, Connecticut, and later worked
:orsky Aircraft Corp. and Northrop
man Corp. She taught school from
mntary to high school, but her real
vas teaching special education.
any years, they were deeply
ed in state and world Special
pics, among them the 1995 World
pics in New Haven. They were
ptains then and their enthusiasm
remains as strong as ever. Sal is
r Force veteran who remembers
called back from leave to arm
s in Nebraska during the 1962
i missile crisis. They have a son,
iter and grandson, Andrew.

to the Chronicle





Homeowners to meet
in Oakwood Village
The Oakwood Village Home-
owners' Association will have
its quarterly meeting at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at the Central
Ridge Library
Guest speaker will be is
Stephanie Stevens of Citrus
County Code Enforcement
Light refreshments will be
provided.
All members are invited.




ring May, Dennis Koch, a 76-year-
d of resident of Dunnellon, will
hibit some of his work at the
innellon Branch of Brannen Bank.
e exhibition includes multi-media
arks referred to by Koch as his
merican Cultural Series." These
e raw, socially conscious collage
aphite drawings and acrylic on
nvas combined with wood.I
models are the artist's impressions
m photographs taken by photog-
phers of the Farm Security
administration who traveled
roughout the country between
935 and 1943. Also in this
utsider" artist's exhibit are
irited works from his continuing
tinged Migration" series, "lips"
ries (both include multi-media
eces), and his recent Limited
ition acrylics on canvas titled
reland." Exhibit hours are 9 a.m.
4 p.m. Monday to Thursdays and
a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Brannen
ink, Dunnellon branch, is at
A472 N. Williams St. (U.S. 41),
jacent to the post office. For
formation, call 352-489-2466 or
II Koch at 352-465-5025.


Special to the Chronicle


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 CS




C6SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 ENTERTAINMENT CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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West
* 1092
V K 10 8 4 3
* 6 :3
S9 5 2


North 05-03-14
* A J 4
I 9 5
* A Q 1087
*- A Q J


East
*K Q 8 7
V Q J 2
* K52
* 7 6 4


South
6 5 3
V A76
J 9 4
K 10 8 3
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Neither


South West North
1 *
1 NT Pass 3 NT


East
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: V 4

= Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

George Lucas said, "If the boy and girl walk
off into the sunset hand-in-hand in the last
scene, it adds 10 million to the box office."
If bridge partners do everything correctly,
they can picture themselves walking off into
the sunset, but it probably doesn't add anything
to their bank accounts.
This deal, though, requires a different box:
the one that you think outside of. The winning
defense requires a play that many would not
even consider
South is in three no-trump. West leads his
fourth-highest heart. Assuming that declarer
will hold up his ace until the third round, how
can East-West defeat the contract?
West leads the heart four and East puts up
his jack, bottom of touching honors when play-
ing third hand high. When South ducks, East
continues with his heart queen. Declarer plays
low again.
At this point, most Wests would follow suit
with their three, advertising that they have led
from a five-card suit. Then, South would take
the third heart and run his diamond nine (or
jack). East could win, but West has no entry
Declarer would take one spade, one heart, four
diamonds and four clubs for an overtrick. Yes,
East could shift to the spade king at trick
three, but that would only save the overtrick.
West has to realize that establishing his
heart suit is a waste of time, because he does
not have an entry At trick two, he should over-
take his partner's heart queen with his king
and shift to the spade 10. Then the defenders
will take three spades, two hearts and one dia-
mond for down two.

r;S THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
J1011 by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, I'myour its certainly
one letter to each square, biggest This is not your
to form four ordinary words. tan v b sagreati t '
'ir Spinal Tap. Kr "I l


@2014 Tribune ContentAgency, LLC r '
All Rghts Reserved
| SYRIK "| ,


L__ __ _1 BAhS/"'
PUMCAS \

I KATHY 5ATE5 ANP JAMES
CAAN WERE HAPPY AS
I CIDENU I COUL-P ET0BE---


Print your C
answer here:

Yesterday's Jumbles:
Answer:


r Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
TRUMP UNDUE PERSON ACTUAL
The fact that she was a good mom was -
APPARENT


ACROSS
1 Safari boss
6 "The -
Gatsby"
11 Drew,
in a way
12 Jumper cable
ends
13 Quits talking
14 Large digit
(2 wds.)
15 Up and about
16 Mortgage
17 Playground
shout
18 Duffer's goal
19 lang syne
23 Pull in,
as a horse
25 Gawker
26 Dejected
29 Tick off
31 Teachers'org.
32 Way back when
33 Kind of lily
34 Starfish part
35 Indian
potentate


37 Reformers'
targets
39 Heavy metal
40 Chromosome
material
41 Makes tracks
45 Rugged cliff
47 Spree
48 Rowdiness
51 Faculty
reward
52 Faints with
pleasure
53 Swerved
54 Class
55 Stock or bond
DOWN
1 Salon tool
2 Squander
3 More sore
4 -do-well


Answer to Previous Puzzle


DJS TI E DEWAN
XRAY AR LO H MO
LAD -BALLROOM
sTIETS0o|N LE A'KS
G GAL
A|NA LARIAT
RED BOAR CLAD
FRIED OBl SRA
Ox I NESBOOTH

PRUDEECASCADE
A UI REIL I U SKU S'E R
USUSER
N I L LOBSILI AR
E NISESUEYT AN


5 Billboards 10 Haifa
6 Smooth- dangerous fly
talking 11 Spring
7 Shabby warming
B Rescue squad 12 One with a
mern. an
9 GI address handle


16 Hanging
loose
18 colada
20 Bone below
the elbow
21 Lascivious
look
22 Wee drink
24 Apiece
25 Not written
26 Hindu attire
27 Seaweed
extract
28 Karate studio
30 Jazzy
Fitzgerald
36 Relay's last
runner
38 Polishes
40 Pond makers
42 Become
acclimated
43 Majestic
wader
44 Pit or stone
46 Magritte's
name
47 Nectar
gatherers
48 Flavor
enhancer,
for short
49 Astonish
50 Over there
51 Water-power
org.


5-3 () 2014 UFS, Dist by Universal Uclick for urs

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: I live in a
very small town. We
have one small, locally
owned family-friendly drive-
in restaurant with an at-
tached ice-cream shop. This
is a central meeting place in
our area.
Here's the prob-
lem: There is an
older woman work-
ing there who
makes me cringe
every time she
takes my order On
repeated occa-
sions, I've seen her
eating at the
counter that sepa-
rates the ice-cream
fountain area from
the patrons. She AN I
licks her fingers MAII
and then, without
washing her hands,
handles the cones for our
order
She also touches all of the
ice-cream machines and
spoons and pulls some stuff
out with her fingers. I can
only imagine what she does
behind the swinging doors. I
have gently commented that
perhaps she should wash her
hands, but it doesn't get
through.
This restaurant is owned by
a nice woman, but I don't
know her that well and am
not comfortable mentioning
this problem to her But I find
it hard to patronize the place,
because this woman's meth-
ods are so gross, and I don't
want to get sick.
We are lucky to have this
business in our town, as it
employs a lot of people. How
do I tactfully say something
without causing a stink in the
community? And to whom do
I say it? The owner is on the


m
I
L


board of some of the organi-
zations that my children are
involved in. Grossed Out in
a Small Town
Dear Small Town: We are
certain the owner would not
want to lose the patronage of
the community be-
cause one of her
employees doesn't
use proper hy-
giene. This is a
matter for your
local city, state or
county health de-
partment. You can
make an anony-
S mous report, and
they should inves-
tigate and, if neces-
sary, issue a
IE'S warning or cita-
.BOX tion.
DearAnnie: I
read the letter
from "Ft. Myers, Fla.," who
was upset because her
friends and relatives buy her
birthday gifts that she doesn't
want.
I am 50 years old, and for
my entire life, my mother has
passed judgment on the gifts
I give her She'll open some-
thing I may have spent hours
searching for and wrapped
elaborately and bluntly say, "I
don't need this" or "Take this
back."
I am a painter One year I
thought long and hard and
decided to reproduce in oil a
lovely photograph of my par-
ents sitting in a pretty piazza
in Italy I was excited to think
I had finally found the per-
fect gift. She opened it up
and said, "Can you repaint
my face and take the sun-
glasses off?" So I did.
She never mentioned the
painting again. I think it's
hanging in one of the spare


bedrooms. Would you address
this subject for all of us who
are in this sinking boat? -
Can't Please Mother
Dear Can't Please: Your
mother is never going to like
any gift enough to accept it as
is.
For whatever reason, she is
overly critical and not polite
enough to be gracious. It's
time to stop turning yourself
inside out trying to please
her
Get her a gift card to any
store you know she regularly
frequents, even the grocery
She certainly won't be any
less pleased, and she might
actually be delighted. Not
that she'd admit it to you, of
course. But at least you won't
have to return it.
DearAnnie: This is for
"Betsey," who complained
about parents in their 80s
wanting to know when their
kids would be out of town.
When my husband and I re-
tired, we often took short
trips. Both of our kids were
frantic not knowing where we
were and were insistent that
we get a cellphone. We
thought it was hilarious! -
Traveling Parents

Annie's Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcastnet, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. comn.




CiTRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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For Better or For Worse


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Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
3:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m., 8:30 p.m.,
10p.m. No passes.
"Brick Mansions" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
8p.m.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
1 p.m., 4:05 p.m.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
In 3D. 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"God's Not Dead" (PG) 2 p.m., 4:40 p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R) 4:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 3:55 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"Noah" (PG-13) 1:35 p.m.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Quiet Ones" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.


"Rio 2" (G) 1:45 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Amazing Spider-Man 2" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
1:50 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8:15
p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (PG-13)
12:45 p.m., 7p.m.
"A Haunted House 2" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Heaven Is For Real" (PG) 1 p.m., 5:05 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m.
"The Other Woman" (PG-13)1 p.m.,4 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) 12 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Rio 2" (G) In 3D. 4:15 p.m. No passes.
"Transcendence" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News l alk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 News Talk


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: msenbas


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Previous Solution: "As long as the world is turning and spinning, we're gonna be
dizzy and we're gonna make mistakes." Mel Brooks
(c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-3


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COMICS


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 C7




CS SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014



KENNEDY
Continued from Page Cl

can give your tithes and
offerings online and fol-
low the sermon notes on
your smart phone all
which I love because that
is how you reach a
younger generation -
there's something
intriguing and
appealing about plain and
simple:
Jesus loves me, this I
know, for the Bible tells
me so. God so loved the
world, that he gave his
only begotten Son,
that whosoever believeth
in him should not
perish, but have everlast-
ing life.
Amazing grace, how
sweet the sound, that
saved a wretch like me. I
once was lost, but now am
found, was blind but now
Isee.
The Lord is my shep-
herd; I have everything I
need.
Plain, simple, truth.

Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over, Vic-
toria -I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RELIGION NOTES


Special events

Our Lady of Grace Catholic
Church in Beverly Hills will host its
monthly outdoor flea market from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. today on the church
property at 6 Roosevelt Boulevard in
Beverly Hills off North Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491). Shoppers
are welcome. Up to 50 commercial
and private vendors from throughout
Citrus County will display their
wares. Coffee, sodas, doughnuts
and hotdogs are available for break-
fast and lunch. This church-spon-
sored flea market takes place the
first Saturday monthly, September
through May. The next flea market is
Sept. 6. For more information or to
reserve a space, call Rose Mary at
352-527-6459 or email
wjeselso@tampabay.rr.com.
Free men's breakfast at 9 a.m.
today at Calvary Chapel in Inver-
ness, 960 S. U.S. 41. Come join with
men, young and old, and enjoy
yummy food. Call 352-726-1480.
The Knights of Columbus will
sponsor a Country Western Dinner
Dance featuring an "encore perform-
ance" by the Country Sunshine Band
today in the parish hall of St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church, 7525
U.S. 41 South in Dunnellon. The
evening includes a country-style din-
ner, cash bar, 50/50, basket raffles
and a door prize. Doors open at 5:30
p.m., with dinner served at 6:30.
Tickets are $15 and are available at
the church office, from the Knights or
by calling 352-489-6221 for
tickets/table reservations.
Southern Gospel solo artist


Keith Plott will appear at 6:30 p.m.
today at Lifepoint Family Church,
6430 S. Lewdinger Drive, Ho-
mosassa, and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday
at First Baptist Church of Ho-
mosassa, 10540 W. Yulee Drive, Ho-
mosassa. Admission is free. A love
offering will be collected. Plott is a
Southern Gospel Music Dove Award
winner along with multiple-time win-
ner of the Southern Gospel Fanfare
Awards. He has performed at the
"Grand Ole Opry" and at the National
Quartet Convention, and with such
groups as "Brian Free and Assur-
ance," "Danny Funderburk & Mercy's
Way" and "Safe Harbor."
First Church of God of Crystal
River is celebrating kids (and the
grownups who love them) with a kid-
friendly service at 10 a.m. Sunday
followed by a picnic lunch from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. on the church prop-
erty, 419 N. Rock Crusher Road.
There are carnival games, prizes, a
bounce house, climbing wall and
other activities for people of all ages.
Everyone is invited to be a part of
the celebration. For more informa-
tion, call the church office at 352-
795-5553 or visit www.rockcrusher
church.com.
First Assembly of God of Dun-
nellon will have a "Blessing of the
Bikes" at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Pastor
Tom Golden rides an Ultra Classic
HD. He gets you and wants to bless
you and your machine. All makes
and models are welcome. All colors
welcome. The church is at 2872 W.
Dunnellon Road (County Road 488),
across from Nichols Lumber. Call the
church at 352-489-8455.


n The Dunnellon Community
Chorale will present its spring concert
titled "Down Memory Lane," at 3 p.m.
Sunday at First United Methodist
Church, 21501 W. State Road 40,
Dunnellon. The concert is free to the
public. A love offering will be accepted.
"Awakening Florida" is coordi-
nating a statewide prayer gathering
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
May 10, at Park Avenue Baptist
Church, 2600 S. ParkAve., Titusville.
This will be a day of prayer and fast-
ing, calling people to cry out for
God's purposes and seek the des-
tiny of the Lord for the state of
Florida. Everyone is invited to join
this solemn assembly. Entrance fee
is $10. Registration and information
at: awakeningflorida.com.
FFRA (Family and Friends Reach-
ing for the Abilities) will have Linda
Carter, FEMA Coordinator for persons
with disabilities, as its guest speaker at
the next monthly meeting from 9 to 11
a.m. Friday, May 16. The public is in-
vited to attend. Carter will address pro-
cedures important for seniors and any
persons with a disability, in the event of
a community emergency situation such
as a hurricane or disaster. (This infor-
mation is especially important for those
who may be relying on oxygen.) The
disabled community needs to be pre-
pared for such emergencies, and here
is a great opportunity to get the infor-
mation you need to be prepared, and
to register with a program called "No
Person Left Behind," who provides as-
sistance in the event of emergencies.
Although the local sheriff's office issues
out emergency information material, it
does not include as much material and


procedures dealing with Special Needs
persons, who need the extra care and
consideration when experiencing an
emergency situation. FFRA meets the
third Friday monthly at the Key Training
Center Building, 130 HeightsAve., In-
verness. Social time and a business
meeting begins at 9 a.m., followed by
the speaker at 10 a.m.
The third Saturday night supper
will take place at 4:30 p.m. May 17
in the Dewain Farris Fellowship Hall
at Community Congregational Chris-
tian Church, 9220 N. Citrus Springs
Blvd., Citrus Springs. Menu includes
beef stew, salad, dessert, coffee and
tea. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for
children and can be purchased at
the door. Takeouts available.
Grace Temple Church of the Liv-
ing God will host its annual Rev.
Leroy Bellamy Scholarship Fund
Memorial Service at 4 p.m. Sunday,
May 18. The community is invited to
attend. The church is at 7431 Old
Floral City Road, Floral City. The
pastor is Larry McReynolds. For
more information, call 352-726-0501.
Mary Magee-Allen, LUT, will
present a six-week health and
wholeness class from 4 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday through May 20 at Unity of
Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto. This course is based
in the spiritual laws and universal
principles that support the expres-
sion of health and wholeness in our
minds, bodies and affairs.
There are three major topics in
which the teachings are based: The
Source of Healing; The Conscious-
ness of Healing; The Practice of
Healing.


To place an ad, call 563=5966


ta ^ r f? t,.+. wfS r~


I.a: 32)53-65 ol.re:(88 82230 1 m il*lasfid *crnil* nie .0Iw bst: w*crnilonie0o


YOU'LL P THIS
Remember...
Mother's Day
is
Sunday
May 1Ith!





Let your mother
know how much
she is loved and
appreciated on her
special day with a
personalized mes-
sage from you in
the Chronicle
Classifieds.
$15.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday, May 8th
at 1:00pm.


I I King or aT
honest, fun loving
gentlemen in his late
70's-80's. I am also an
attractive, young at
heart widow. If you
think you have the
above requirements
please write me.
Citrus Cty Chronicle
Blind Box 1865
106 W Main St
Inverness, Fl 34450




il il' '
tI ll, '.' l IlI St.
EI) Dl)l


Classifieds


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
3521-563-5966
IIIIIIII


Sudoku****** 4puz.com

15468


9 1

4 2

7 93 8




J8 72 5

3 1
6




Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

All of our
structures
-x withstand
InstallationsbBriyanCBC1253853 12OmIh
eat9 352-628-7519

FREE +'f SIT !
Permit And I|||
I Engineering Fees I4
I Up to $200 value '

Siding Soffit Fascia *Skirting *Roofovers Carports Screen Rooms *Decks Windows Doors Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


*ASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE, 1,200 sq. ft.
Homosassa Springs
Good Location *
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282
A Treadmill
in good condition
digital read-out
eve's (352) 382-4442
Air Compressor
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. 220C,
125 PSI, used very little
$275. Call Al
(202) 425-4422 cell
Aluminum Ramp
for a wheelchair
36" x 40"
$100.
(352) 726-5070
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625
CHRYSLER
2003 Sebring/4
door/Runs Great/130k
miles/$4k OBO
(352)212-0893
Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282
COUCH
2 Cushions,
dark olive color
$125.
(352) 358-4800
German Rottweiller
Pups, 4 females 4 Sale
good temperament,
going to be LARGE
dogs! $500. each
(352) 422-6792
HONDA
'07, Odyssey, EXL
144K miles
excel, cond. $11,000
(352) 563-1680
INVERNESS
Lake Front Home
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$750 (908) 322-6529
POOL TABLE Slate top,
heavy vinyl cover,
20 sticks with racks
Ig overhead beer light
3 custum highchairs,
All accessories,
excel, cond. $700 obo
352-422-5622
PORT. GENERATOR
Briggs & Stratton, 3500
watt, Model 030208
bought new, nvr used
$195 (352) 503-7031
Princess Marine
16' tri-hull, 35 hp
Evinrudeoutbrd clear
title, 1st $1 k takes it!
Joe (352) 476-4632
TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River,
18ff L. 8ff wide, Living
quarters w/beds mi-
crowave, stove, refrig.
sink, bthrm., awning,
dish TV ready, full
back ramp, Pd$18K
Asking $10,500 obo
(352) 422-5622


LToday'

SUZUKI
Boulevard C50
Classic,2007,
Exc Cond $3700
(352) 634-4427
PICK
BLUEBERRIES
(352) 643-0717
Used Electric
Jenn-Aire Cook Top
$50. and Microwave
$25. (352) 637-2450
Whirlpool Electric
Glass Top Stove
and
Microwave Almond
$125. for both
(352) 746-7366
YARDMAN 46" auto-
matic, 20HP, Kohler,
exc. cond. $900
(352) 637-4718



BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


Taurus
Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100



2 Talking Quaker
Parrots.
with inside and
outside cage
free to good home
(352) 445-9523
2 yr. old Male
Brindle Cur
all shots up to date
& tags, needs room to
roam, pis call
(352) 302-2201
3 Hunting Beagles
2 female, 1 male
all spayed, neutered
tags, licenses, free to
good home. 3 years
old. please call be-
fore 6pm. ask for Mike
(352) 489-5637
Female Adult Shih-Tzu
free to good home
(352) 270-4585
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch, u load and
haul it away.
352-628-9624
Free
3 Male kittens, approx
2 mos.old & 3 females
and 2 males, aprox 1
yr. old, To good home,
(352) 447-0072
Leave Message



FRESH BLUEBERRIES
Home Grown
8035 E GOSPEL ISLAND
RD. (352) 400-0750
U PICK |
BLUEBERRIES
(352)643-0717


U-pick Blueberries
$3.00 per lb. 7am-6pm
Tues.Thurs, Sat, & Sun
Pestiside Free *
4752 W Abeline Dr
Citrus Springs,
352-746-2511




Female dachshund
found on Hwy 44
Inverness
(352) 489-7537





YOU'll THIS!
Remember...
Mother's Day
is
Sunday
May 1Ith!





Let your mother
know how much
she is loved and
appreciated on her
special day with a
personalized mes-
sage from you in
the Chronicle
Classifieds.
$15.95
Includes 20 lines of
copy or 10 lines of
copy and a photo.
Call 563-5966
Deadline is
Thursday, May 8th
at 1:00pm.


Bring Bowe Home!
Bring Bowe Home
project is in need
of volunteers
for various events to
get petitions signed
and to spread
awareness that our
only living POW is
still being held
captive in
Afghanistan.
June 30th will be the
5th anniversary of
his capture.
Please contact
Cynthia at
352-628-6481 or
cyn2719@yahoo.
com.








Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org


CWKpN1lE CHUiNICE CHffiiN1E

VI SEEKING

g SALES

REPRESENTATIVES
Full-Time with Great Benefits
Do you have an
. outgoing personality?
i Do you work well with others?
:-' Are your people skills
outstanding?
Seeking dynamic individuals with strong
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: Must be organized and detailed-oriented
S and thrive in a fast-paced environment.
,- Base salary plus commission.
vali Reliable vehicle and
valid driver's license required.
If you light up a room when you enter, |-:
apply today!
^ Send resume to
S djkamlot@chronicleonline.com -
Drug screen required forfinal applicant. 3
5 .13. EOE
CHW3j^^ Qika CHnijPCLE


Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cypress
Records.com

We are Growina!
Thank you to all
our customers at
Inverness Sheds &
Inverness Motors,
We have moved to
A LARGER Location
formerly Inverness
Mobile Home Sales
3865 E Gulf to Lake
Highway, RT 44
2nd location in
Hernando, cnr
486 & 41. See Al
thanks again,
Bob and Joan!


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Sheriffs Ranches Enterprises
^ STORE MANAGER
High School diploma
or equal with five (5)
successful years of work
experience in a supervisory,
retail position.

ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER
High School diploma or equal with 2 yrs
Retail Mgmt experience.
Full-time position Excellent benefits
Apply in person Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 SE US HWY 19 Crystal River FL 34429
EOE/DFWP 00015K4





HELP
WANTE9lD


1468712 359
982536147
573419682
729354861
615928473
438167295
354691728
897243516
261785934


J www.chronicleonline.com J


I HppVNo


I Anouneme^ts


Ha


RELIGION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Janitorial Helper
Need exp. person to
strip floor for one day.
Call 352-697-1625





ExpStylist/Barber

wanted. Contact
Josh 352-257-2557












Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only_$28.50
includes a
photo

Call our
Classified Dept
for details
352-563-5966






CNA's/HHA's

Experienced, Caring
& Dependable
Hourly & Live-in,
flexible schedule.
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885


FIT Front Office
Receptionist

Prior experience in
Eye Care or Medical
preferred.
Apply in person
West Coast Eye
Institute
240 N Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto FL 34461
352 746 2246 x834





*.NET Developer
with C# experience,
*Javascript
Developer
*Tester
*Technical Sales
Local Applicants
with 2 to 3 years
of experience.
Forward resumes to
kokeefe@
b-scada.com


Administrative
Asst. P/T to F/T

For local Residential
Program. Efficient
in Microsoft Excel,
Word & Publisher.
Able to do all
aspects of clerical
duties. Send
complete Resume
to: 777111newhlre
@gmall.com


Servers &
Bartenders

for a huge Tiki Hut &
Restaurant. High
volume business.
Must be experi-
enced & energetic
with outgoing per-
sonality. Must have
great customer
service skills.
Apply in person at
505 E Hartford St,
Hernando, Mon-Fri
2:00pm-5:00pm"






LOOKING FOR
Motivated,
Self- driven people
to prospect & sell
radio/tv advertising.
Must have strong ne-
gotiation skills, per-
suasive communica-
tor, enthusiastic,
able to develop &
keep relationships.
We offer a competi-
tive draw/ commis-
sion structure, bene-
fit package, 401k,
etc. Media sales ex-
perience preferred,
but not required.
APPLY IN PERSON @
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Highway, Lecanto FL
34461 *EOE*






























LABORERS

Must have Dr Lic &
exp. doing tree ser-
vice work. Call M-F
8a-5p, 352-344-2696


AC Service Tech
5 + years exprience


















required. Clean
background and
















driving record;
Must pass drug test.
Start immediately
















(352) 564-8822
Exp. GralFnt Writer


















For Non Profit
organization.
All inquiries Phone
(352) 628-3663 Ask
for Tom Chancey
or Mail Resume to
Community Food
Bank of Citrus Co.
5259 W. Cardinal St.
benefl;it packa I ge,










































Bid. B Homosassa
Fl. 34446
APLYABORERSONa

5399p.doing treeser




































Exp. Service
Technician!












Installer

Experoened onli
Need for busy AC
comp. Must be EPA
cesrtified. Must havel

xp.valid drivers license.











Apply Email: aairinc
icenturvllnk net

or 5ax 352-860-07576
ACoSrvTihaceyTc

5B yars of Ctrus Co
reqird. Clemoans


drivingSecrd;c
Mustpassdrglest
EStertlmendiately


comp.Grant WbierEP

cergaifid.Mutihave
vAllinquiriverslicense.
ApplyTEmCall arnce
or Mail352-860-075


EXP PLUMBER
HELPERS

Must have Dr. Lic.
4079 S Ohio Ave
Homosassa





Key Training Ctr.
has positions availa-
ble in group home
setting. Assist adults
with disabilities in
daily living sklls. HS
Diploma/GED eq
APPLY IN PERSON at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *E.O.E.*

LAWN MOWER
Full time

For local community
Fax Resume To:
352-794-7879

SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings customer
sales/serv, wll tran,
condtons apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
*352-503-4930*


TOWER HAND

Startlna at $10.00/Hr.
Bulldlng
Communlcatlon
Towers. Travel, Good
Pay & Benefits. OT,
352-694-8017, M-F





P/T BARTENDER

ELKS LODGE
Hernando
applications may
be filled out btwn
Tues. thru Fri. 9am to
1pm (352)726-2027





MEDICAL
OFFICE
TRAINEES
NEEDED!

Train to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)528-5547


JUST REDUCED
PRICE!!!!
POOL SUPPLY
STORE
Pat 813-230-7177






JUST REDUCED
PRICE!!!!
POOL SUPPLY
STORE
Pat 813-230-7177






JUST REDUCED
PRICE!!!!
POOL SUPPLY
STORE
Pat 813-230-7177





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang
2-10x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 FI. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com





Ice Cream Set
Table, marble top,
4 padded chairs
$175.
(352) 527-4301





1940'S SALT & PEP-
PER SHAKERS $2.00
per set (21) sets
available 352-257-5687

HUGE WORLDS
GREATEST MOM
TEDDY BEAR 4x3
20.00 OBO Linda
4234163

MICHAEL JACKSON
PLATINUM EDITION
COLLECTORS VAULT
A MUST HAVE ONLY
$25.464-0316

VINTAGE BAR SIGNS
(1) Budweiser Sign $10
& (1) Michelob Beer
Sign $8 352-257-5687

VNTG. BULL's HEAD
SKULL W/HORNS
EXC. COND. $100.
CALL FOR INFO
586-7222


CLASSIFIED




25.5 Cubic ft. Maytag
side by side
refrigerator/freezer.
Water & ice in door. Ex.
Cond.$275.
(352)726-1005
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Coleman Air/Heat
3 Ton Mobile Home
unit package
$300.
(678) 617-5560
Kenmore Refrigerator
Stove, Dishwasher
white, clean, like new
$1100.00
(352) 637-0765
or (352) 257-5779
MICROWAVE KEN-
MORE MOUNTS OVER
THE STOVE 30" WIDE
WHITE $70
352-613-0529
Refrigerator
with ice maker $150
Washer & Dryer $200
will sell separately
(678) 617-5560
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
SONY 24" TV
excellent condition
$20, call
352-257-5687
Trash Compacter
$25
Chest Freezer
$80
(352) 503-9189
Used Electric
Jenn-Aire Cook Top
$50. and Microwave
$25. (352) 637-2450
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 ea. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel
Working Cond, 60 day
Guar.Free Del/Set up.
352-263-7398
Whirlpool Electric
Glass Top Stove
and
Microwave Almond
$125. for both
(352) 746-7366




DESK CHAIR High
back, adjustable, swivel.
Black. $30.00
(352)564-4214
DESK CHAIR High
back, adjustable, swivel.
Black. $30.00
(352)564-4214










DUDLEY'S
"A0CTIgFW
TWO"ACT1ONS

Thur 5-1 May Day
fun 3pm Walk About
Auction filled
w/shop & power
tool, Designer Furni-
ture, Bikes, outdoor
adventures & more
w Sun 5-4 Antique &
Collectible Auction
1 pm 500+lots w Cus-
tom Imported Orien-
tal DR & BR, Primitive
to Victorian, Mid
Century, Restored
Gas pump, Coins,
Jewelry, Art, Signed
Memorabilia, +++
......................
call for Info 637-9588
dudlevsauctlon
.com
4000 S Florida Ave
(US41S)Inverness
Ab1667 10% bp
cash/ck.




Air Compressor
Upright, Craftsman,
6HP, 60gal. 220C,
125 PSI, used very little
$275. Call Al
(202) 425-4422 cell


SATURDAY, VMAY 3, 2014 C9


CAR REPAIR RAMPS
Rhino Ramps 6000# ca-
pacity 12000GVW
$25.pair Dunnellon
352465-8495
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $80
HAND HELD MADE OF
METAL HEAVY DUTY
419-5981




AV receiver/
amp $10.
352419-4464
Panasonic
42 in, HD, Flat Screen
Great Picture
Must Sell $200 obo
Homosassa
315-729-2634
PLANAR COMPUTER
MONITOR Good condi-
tion, black colored, has
speakers. $50
(352)465-1616
PLAYSTATION 2
GAMES MADAGAS-
CAR & SLY 2 BAND
OF THIEVES $5 EACH
(352)613-0529
SPEAKERS 2 SHARP
10" 150 WATTS $20
352-613-0529
SPEAKERS YAMAHA
SET OF 5 FOR SUR-
ROUND SOUND $60
352-613-0529
TV APEX 20" WITH
BUILT IN DVD PLAYER
& REMOTE $50
352-613-0529




Complete Galley
Kitchen Cabinets
incl. microwave, dish-
washer, sink & counter-
tops. $375. obo
(317) 947-8015
STILTS FOR DOING
SHEET ROCK WORK.
GREATOK SHAPE
(PAINT ON THEM)
ONLY $75. 464-0316




COMPUTER MONITOR
DEL FLAT SCREEN
14in.Works good. $15
obo Linda 4234163
COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 16 in wide.
Works good $10 Linda
4234263
NINTENDO GAMEBOY.
Vintage Handheld
Nintendo Gameboy.
Comes with 10 games.
$75.00 352-364-6704




8pc Patio Set
Large table w/4 chairs
reclinerottoman,
lounge chair all
w/cushions, good
condition $300.
(352) 746-5634
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
TABLECHAIR SET.
glass top table & 4
padded chairs, like new!
$65. neg. 352-344-8212




Black Leather
Office Chair
w/ottoman
exc. cond. $85.
(352) 418-5926
Black Recliner
Stand w/light
White chair
w/microwave stand
All for $180.
(352) 795-7254
CHAIRS 4 oak windsor
style chairs $50 for all
(352)563-5386
Coffee and 2 matching
End tables, modern
glass tops w/black base
Great Shape, $80. for all
(352) 746-1486


HERMAN"
5-3 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UChick for UFS, 2014

"There goes my tip, right?"


DRESSER WITH
MIRROR 66inch
triple draw
Mediterranean.$45.
352-344-8212
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER WITH
LIGHTS WHITE
WASHED HOLDS 31"
TV $40 352-613-0529
MATTRESS QUEEN
Simmons Beautyrest
Cliffside Park Plush
pillow top queen mat-
tress and boxspring.
Used only two weeks.
Absolutely like new.
Bought recently for
$650. Asking $250.
Call 207 323-8246
Queen size Bed, Oak,
w/ chest & mirror
10 pc comforter set
$175
(352) 628-4051
QUEEN SIZE HEAD-
BOARD maple color
good condition 45.00
352-527-3177
QUEEN SIZE PILLOW
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING (LADY
ASHLEY)LIKE NEW.
$100 352-746-4160
Queen sz. Futon
Forest Green, Pine
w/clear finish, con-
verts from couch to
bed, like new, $200.
(352) 628-3526
Sleeper Sofa & Love
Seat, Exc Cond,
Country Blue
Tufted Camelback
solid oak trim $395
(352) 726-1526
Sofa & Love Seat
Good cond. Neutral
Color $250; Oversized
Chair & Ottaman,
fabric, good cond
$100 (352) 503-9189
SOFA BED Sturdy and
clean in great condition
$100 352-257-5687
TRADE IN MATTRESS
SETS FOR SALE
Starting at $50.*
King, Queen, Full, Twin
Very good condition
352-621-4500


TWIN MATTRESS &
BOX SPRING
unmatched set great
condition $50.00
352-527-1399
TWIN METAL BED
FRAME in decent
shape. $25.00
352-527-3177



AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147
BOLENS 13.5 HP
RIDING MOWER 38"
Front Mount, Briggs/St.
Great Cond. 4 yrs. old
$400.
(352) 270-4087
CRAFTSMAN 17.5
LAWN TRACTOR 42"
Automatic Trans.
Clean and Rebuilt
$400.
(352) 270-4087
Craftsman
bagger only
good condition
$50. (352) 637-0560
Craftsman
Riding Mower
42" deck, 15 HP Kolar
eng, grass catcher &
trlr, $700 352-746-7357
a GRASS SEEDS!!
Pensacola Bahia
Argentine Bahia
Summer Rye
Great Prices!
American Farm &
Feed (352) 795-6013
Poulan XT
Riding Mower
30" Like New, Little Use
Paid $900.
Asking $650.
(352) 628-5553
Riding Lawn Mower
Simplicity Cornet, 34"
cut, 13 HP good cond
well maintained $275;
Black & Decker 18"
electric mower w/ grass
catcher $100
(352) 341-0557
YARDMAN 46" auto-
matic, 20HP, Kohler,
exc. cond. $900
(352) 637-4718


MEXICAN PETUNIAS
Pink & Purple
in 4 inch pots
6 for $10 Off Croft Rd
613-5818





**INVERNESS**
COMMUNITY
GARAGE SALE
SAT. MAY 3, 8 3
WWW.LPOA 1I.COM
FURN. APPLI. TOOLS,
TOYS. CASSETTES
S. GRAYMOR PATH
NEAR Inverness Golf
& Country Club










ADVERTISE
YOUR
GARAGE SALE
IN THE



CLASSIFIED

Call your
Classified
Representative
for details
and don't
forget to ask
about rain
insurance!
352-563-5966


BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET
SAT. May 3rd
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt Blvd


~*.I DwFMVy


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Caregiver avail for
inhome service Lic/Ins
Ref avail. Hourly or live
in; 352-697-1625

Private Home Care
Male CNA, avail 24
hours a day. 3 yrs exp
w/Ref. 352-875-9793





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
CLEANUP/HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal. Lic.
352-584-5374





Toum% rlJ lirst


Need a joIl)
oir a

qualified
employee?


This area's
#1

employment
source!


CHKOIclE


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE Top Soil,
Rock, Driveways
Hauling & Tractor Work
352-341-2019, 201-5147

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873




A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765, 352-513-5746

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352-422-7279 **,

FENCE PRO, all types
painting, repairs,
gates, free estimates
**veteran owned**
lic/ins (352) 563-8020


FENCING, ALL TYPES.
Free Est. Comm/Res.
352-628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
-ABOVE ALL-
M & W INTERIORS
Handyman services
Northern Quality
Southern prices!
(352) 537-4144
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
k 352-257-9508*
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Joel's Handyman Serv
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748


Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
tial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
Home/Office Cleaning
Catered to your needs,
reliable & exper., lic./ins.
Bonded 352-364-1080
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Kat's Kritter Kare &
Kastle Kleaner, Pet Sit-
ting & House Cleaning










(352) 270-4672



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Design & Install
Plant*Sod*Mulch
"Weed*Trim*Clean
lic/ins 352-465-3086


#1 Professional Leaf
Vac system why rake?
FULL LAWN SERVICE
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts $10 & Up
Res./Comm., Uc/ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
Lawncare N More
Sprin g Clean-Up. press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
MOWING, TRIMMING
MULCH AND MORE
Local AND Affordable
352-453-6005
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557
ZIEGLER'S LAWN
(Lic/Ins) Quality
Dependable Service
628-9848 or 634-0861


Misc Srvice


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
CLEANUP /HAULING
Clean outs/ Dump Runs
Brush Removal
Lic., 352-584-5374
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570



iVASAP PAINTING
CHRIS SATCHELL
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
A-1 Complete Repairs
Pres. Wash, Painting
(Int/Ext) 25 yrs, Ref, Lic
#39765,352-513-5746
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352- 476-4919



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
Bonbon Cleaning,
Lawn, & Prop Main.
Comm, Res, & Indus-
trial; Lic/Ins, Ref avail
476-4202; 697-1625

trll~l '.'ll llll t'
) iil 1111,11J t,


L Cwai s iDd)


ClsNifiE
Cm pClassifieds


CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
Joel's Handyman Serv.
Pressure Washing,
Painting, General Rpr.
Lic/Ins 352-476-4919
Lawncare N More
Spring Clean-Up, press.
wash, bushes, beds,
mulch, mow, handyman
service 352-726-9570
Pressure Washing,
Roof Coating, Drive
ways & any Handyman
Repair Lic# 39477
(352) 464-3748
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



Fie^iTTI
All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713






Floors /walls. Tubs to
shower conv. No job
too big or small. Ph:
352-613-TILE/lic# 2441




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST RV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lic/Ins.
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066




ALL TYPE S OF TILE
INSTALLED!
Anthony Stender
(352)628-4049


Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license
number in all adver-
tisements. If you
don't see a license
number in the ad, you
should inquire about it
and be suspicious
that you may
be contacting an un-
licensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads
meet the require-
ments of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to
do business.
For questions about
business licensing,
please call your city
or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling &Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838













Complete Tree Serv.
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
55ft. Bucket Truck
352-344-2696 Lic/ins.

A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Bruce Onoday & Son
Free Estimates
Trim & Removal
352-637-6641 Lic/Ins
Budd Excavatina
& Tree Work, clearing
hauling, rock drives,
demo, bushhogging
Lamar 352-400-1442
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
Heavy Bush-hogging
Land clearing, Fill Dirt
SeedingTree removal,
Lic/Ins 352-563-1873
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic. #
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
RIVENBARK
LAWN & LANDSCAPE.
15% off Tree Trimming
w/ Ad. (352) 464-3566
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


I Tee erv




C10 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CELEBRATE

INA NEW CHEVROLET

4-- **** A COMMITMENT

MILITARY msEIwNo
AUL THIAT
J StCaO UXT HAVE SERVED
During Military Appreciation Month, now all Veterans along with
Active Duty, Reserves and Retirees are eligible for the Chevrolet Military
Discount*. The best Military Purchase Program in the industry.


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees. 2014 Malibu LT
Shf Security Deposit$200 Custoer Cash
^&B* own Payment ?, UCstmrah
First Month PaymFent rnn May Purchase
ft t" 36* JUU Bonus Cash
U Month 35 Mo.Pymts
No security deposit required. Ta, title, license and dealer fees S-i W
extra. Mileage change of S 25/rnile over36,000 miles W l s Afluwac


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees. 2014 TraveWrse LS FWD
$f %O P Month $1,500customer Cash
$ 1 for 36 Months l MaBo Purchase
+ $53007Bonus Cash
3,219 After A Offe
No securih deposil required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees i
extra Mileage charge of S 25'mile over 36.000 miles. AIfuianc#


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
Security Deposit
0 I Down PaytMent
First Month Payment
AAm per 36 Months
$2 Month 35Mo.Pymnt
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees
extra. Mileage charge of $ 25imile over 36 000 miles.


Low-Mileage Lease for Qualified Lessees.
9C. PMr Month
$25 tor 36 Months
d2 t669 Due at Signing
$2, 5 After All Ofters'
No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees
eOra Mileage charge of $ 25,'mile over36,000 miles,


OVER fAoi 2 YEARS PIT-STOP
OqVE FR Vhile include up to:2YERORPT T P
used &Certified 100,000 MILE 24,000 MILE PROGRAM
PreLovedVehices WARRANTY MAINTENANCE INCLUDED
I 7r AINTE ANCE! See dealer for complete details.
GM RT1FmEO Vehicles! Check Out Our REALLY BIG SELECTION of Pre-Loved Vehicles!

14CHEVYMAUBULS 13CHEVYCAMAROLS 07CHRYSLERPTCriISER 04CHEVYSILVERADO 07CHRYSLER PTCRUISER 08CHEVYWHHRILT 04CHEVY COLORADO LS
Ihv& FVIPWIHDOI ,AL,'PY (11 R ALrTS,,., ", 1W L R ELU I'i 'W(R.I HE L Il, $' ,HROME WHEELS 244GREGCABV6 AUTOMATIC Ia4 M(ItCLWR PLJfOEISIL M 12489,CREWCAB
52A,9rS Szt.,9s S.995 $63995 $6,995 $7,995 $6,995
$2%WS$1.99S %W
12 BUIKLACROSS PREMIUM II 12 CHEVY9SILVERADOLS 10KIASOUL 06MZDARX-8 09CHEVYMALIBULT 10PONTIAC66 13 HYUNDAI ACCENT
l20OLEATHER, HMAN KWM IISYSIEM 12499,( 12479, POWER WINOOWS&LOCKS IN:iO,SHiNKASPE i AEDiTi'N i. m 2M ia29,rCHROMEWHEIS, ALLMPWER POWERWINDOWS P12249
S&2 0 S55 Sr9S S0139 S9 $09

13 CHEVY SILVERADO 12CHEVYSIJBURBANLT 06GMCSIERRA4X4SLT 10 FORDESCAPE4X4i 13CHRYSLER200 08DODGERAMQUADCAB 12CHEVYSILXRADO
D. C08 LI, LOW MILLS TUAIN LEAFLD lIli.NuIiWAAi 1.4,& EiTEIDLED(B PUA;S'..iCYL.PiJtlI1ND0w9.fIlI 1t97 IOuPINOGEDillO ALLOWS ALL POWE REGUIARCAB
53^5S~z,4 $199 16,495 517,49 $18995 519,9955
Plus MANY MORE 'kf MORE7e
Caertifd Vehicles CHOOSE
11 ie V h le NISSANFRONTIERSV OCHEVYSILVERADOLT 11TOYOTA HIGHLANDERSE 13FORDF-150 O
Io C o_ Fro- .$1 9 5i.7.Cfl lLAE.,AUO .Vt5. FP P P 0 3,IIBSllRMNkI B12374LEREU .U IPR FRM
to Choose hornm! s1i.995 s2zt9m s22.99 $29a9tes


Come See What LOVE Can Do For You!


2209 Hwy44West 52341.0018 CAIvI
Inverness, FL 34453 352341.0018
LoveChevySales.com
[I~ jl~ M 11 hut mp.ilitile *..ir 31 rle.ij l kvM i 'irn by 5 4 '.^ ikilyr fir t.i 2 R nnli i; ir *jN ?)14 fl.ry JLT with in M5RP et 121 131) 35 rronhitipa yrrnc rtnB $7 78 uytilow [i'inae dl Ieasf &d Im t an llimtfl i ip iTf iii ii (, Finp Lieri ( p ine W iiM1)
Milea,'q cNroe l S.25:." .'i'rvi 3.II'il mik, LiosWE [pr i r en,: ; ,tir P,Tllipnl, imy ib ri ,ii in ;rim n a i .,, ikp li pry t 'IbyE '1 l ri I l, IlP li j E01LI IPl 3 3E[ ffL l ,[aIlt .'qr" Nfi ii ril l er iel. d ivr y .1.>214 Se inea r i t I P' fi' 1. ire ti4',r i2 t ,ito114 M I riu Ll ii P it
4,l435 ;- n r1hly vnTni:ril7lrl i37 ii n OpHiiO rll n PJi oIall i l oo i Tle ii 11i a n ltr(, i] ne Ji .T rnSIJ lJ arnk muir i 'ppr'3v U ilW e I i m ll( 3 oi( $", lt' r 3 iu nTilts Le.. p I 4 ea ie',fSs t, r P'iT O Witn l 'I fti e1 311ii')iT l dal i i del ir,, d b& 4 14 ekdejl tr li deli
, hime ire IA A l014 E[iini:n L FIN wh A n M'FP ,it $2515 In l m onllym l m ;ent 1 io[ $, i li 14[ 0 r Pji3n 10 puhiar le:.e eI M II r m an rmIunl 1t ie be mnpd 31 Iped3 ssiTiin GiM F niianl3t mui 3 rave ltse hleae trae 0ol !."mile Dm 36 [ft m In Lv i tji nr d n ,re w.r FaomPinv.
n te higher m yiin iM T&le li n b td 4 i dein kr d iL 6 P'dyj i r, lt aI il014 Trj, L-SRID witi di MSRP ot $316.670 36 i. hi p,.ifrl lutl $9 til' 1p u( 10 ari' 1t lr e i e tor in anrw':l to b de srntd1 ai &e ,iiur MI Rn1ynl F i l ji, i[(v Ik, MilI e rif l nr f
$2ini ,,,l .[lYl ,T,, Lt'; 3 p.X likm L. r i'.P ?ns n,. If lFyvhr n ,ir, lnier I '.i ) lh lrer. ike14 'roe r y ir 5,rl4[5,ileAll iyr,.r' Tn(iR Ir pnyr e nflfJ.. f luy i it li B ,i &T. Ifi 2 oI er i ns! i o ,,ailt and (iCU., MP5.H., a di (,ii.i ,l iJ r inWO ,,,, J ,C, [,r oi ,e ei uily u..f S e.le r
fil O dil: I I d. ire pt inonllt. 16 ii nil.;, 1 ,i ViyJ SI' , l i i n tr t ,pily IJU ;,A ;R Ve fI'. (,frIa W C Nh i jvIl2 W ,iTia fin.iba ,:t ir Itn i or ) Pre-,clt iii;r P r itel:. ,iVrl "i 5$COL5 tdi ul trade luly Ce Om it' id [tr (it O'r, ttr, lrs l [i l ,I (tI ikd ri M 6 ![W lRr !(I' t stkruin.


2014 Cruze LT
J1,5L
.95tMe ai


2014 Equinox
$1, 000 Customer Cash
+ '$5 M"'ay Pwuchase
"1" RUU Bonus Css

VJfOO
Tota~asAUVIwawFe


NN.


L


WaSIML




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HURRY! THESE SAVINGS END TODAY!


* Hozida


J:;


a


a


I p


IilA


1E I st'
DOWN! Payment!

0.D9
L forup to 60 Mos.
Son select new Honda models
k on approved credit


Ir


7,


$500 MITARY APPRECIATION OFFERt
To eligible members of the US Military & their spouses towards any new Honda
vehicle when you finance or lease thru HFS.
OVER 0 USED & CURTIMED PRE OWNED VEHICLES
AM pre-owned Veidcles Include a
6 MONTH/6S000 MILE
United Powertrafin warrantytt
PLUS A 5-DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM
See dealer for complete details.


,_J


.T..Jgt.
.41i~u~4


!ili~


"Go
In


;L-p,'.m ~Ipp.k:wg ~ S


m lioudiai


I
PLOF I'll r
2A-V-'
_MW PA
Its,


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 Cll


pp,


4!




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAMRY


0% FINANCING


2014 TOYOTACAMRY SE


$


'1i9mo


ON MOST
MODELS


OVERi 200''JiJIPREOWNED I~i~ l VEICE*AVILABLE W:]


2013 FIAT 500
STOCK#14030501
114350


2009 CHEVROLET COLORADO
STOCK#14030120
15,o50


2006 TOYOTA TACOMA
STOCK#14040011
s15,995


2010 NISSAN FRONTIER
STOCK#14040223
16,495


2012 FORD EDGE
STOCK#14030127A
22,495


ALL OFFERS
GOOD MAY 3
THRU MAY 31, 2014
Sales: Mon-Thurs: 9am-7pm
Fri-Sat: 9am-6pm
Sun 11am-4pm
Service: Mon-Fri: 7am-6pm
Sat: 8am-4pm


JTOVO 0I


9 ToyotaCare
2 YEARS PREPAID SERVICE
ON ALL NEW CAR
PURCHASES


2431 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34448


www.VILLAGETOYOTA.com


352-628-5100


*AII leases with $3499 cash cap reduction, 36 months @ 12,000 miles per year. W.A.C.


2014 TOYOTA PRIUS

............ .......
EEEEEE ... : ...... ...



p219 .*


2014 TOYOTA COROLLA L


"iqumo


2014 TOYOTA RAV4


*mo
me


$


C12 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 CL3


Sat. & Sun 8a to 2p
MOVING: Kit items,
linens, holiday decor,
collectibles & morel
3085 N Dewberry PT
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat 8a-Ip
Sports eq, games,
wet suits, pool toys,
pet supplies, work-
shop tools & more I
11795W Bayshore Dr
Crystal River
Sat, Sun 8a-3p
MULTI-FAMILY
Household, tools,
appliances,kid items,
clothing, much more...
9382 W Dunnellon Rd
FLORAL CITY
5/1 to 5/4, 9a to?
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
tools, collectibles
hshld, china, Cronin,
multi-Holiday, med.
equip, craft supplies
and much more!!!
8642 E. Orange Ave.

Homosassa
Holy Spirit
Christian Church
Sat. 5/3 7a-lp
Nothing over $3.00
6570 W. Ostwest St.
Inverness
Fri & Sat Mornings
A variety of items
Hoping it all goes!
7431 E. Allen Dr
INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, Sun 9a-5p
** 3 Family Sale **
DEK 5650 Elec genera-
tor- new in box; Lg
window AC, dorm
refrigcamping eq,
clothes & much more!
1405 S Bea Av












MEANS PANTS MEANS
JEANS/NEW Roots / 36
x 30 & 5 pr dress pants
$10 each Linda
423-4163



CELLPHONE
MOTOROLA WX416
NEW w/case, Con-
sumer Cellular or unlock
$28 352-382-3650
STAND & DOCKING
STATION for Dell
Latiude/lnspiron/Predsion lap-
tops $35 OBO
352-382-3650



2 CRAB TRAPs- coated
metal trap, 24" x 24" x
18" tall, Ex., $20 each.
(352)628-0033
2 FLY RODS WITH
REELS- 8 ft. fiberglass
2 pc. rods, $25 ea.,
352-628-0033
2 WHITE IN-CEILING
SPEAKERS
Indoor/Outdoor Brand
new in box Retails $300
Sell $100 352-257-5687
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT AND BAG
ONLY 70.00 464 0316
8 FT. RADIUS
CASTING NET-
16 ft. diameter,
1/2" mesh, Ex., $40.
352-628-0033
23 UNFINISHED
WOOD FORMS
ANIMALS @ HEARTS
$15 PAINT/DECORATE
419-5981


Goodyear light
truck tire GREAT
SHAPE ONLY $50
352-464-0316
7- 5 GALLON METAL
OLD FUEL CANS WITH
SPOUTS ALL FOR
$80 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
Beanie Babies
$10 ea, 2 for $15
(352) 249-7064
BEANIE BABY-
BONGO THE MONKEY
Price: $10
(352)465-1616
Cannondale
Men's bike, never
used. New-$600
asking $300;
Self propelled lawn
mower, Honda
Husqvarna, Like New
$200 352-382-3545
CUISINART FOOD
PROCESSOR DLC-10E
$60 COMPLETE WITH
4 EXTRA BLADES
419-5981
DIRECT SATELLITE
DISH Like new.
I own $50 obo Linda
423-4163
FOLDING TABLE
5 FOOT LONG BROWN
WOOD $25
352-613-0529

v THIS OUT!



GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS!!!



6 lines
10 days
up to 2 items


$1 $200..
$11.50
$201-$400..
$16.50
$401-$800..
$21.50
$801-$1500..
$26.50

00.**00

GRAPPLER REEF
BOAT ANCHOR- 5
tines, 60ft of 1/2" line,
Ex+, $70. 352-628-0033
HALOGEN DESK
LAMP Black, Counter
Balance, Hi/Lo 50W $35
OBO can email pic
352-382-3650
HANDCRAFTED SOLID
OAK ROCKING DOLL
CRADLE $55 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
HARLEY STOC
EXHAUST PIPES
NEW FITS 1350-1450
SLIDE ON ONLY $75
(352)464-0316
Kirby Vacuum
all attachements, 2001
Limited Ed, like new
cond $125
Treadmill, Tunturi 620,
good running $175
(352) 341-0557
MATTRESS & BOX
SPRING(FULL SIZE)
EXC.COND.&
CLEAN.$75.00
352-746-4160
MEN'S SCHWINN DEL-
MAR BIKE- 26", 1 spd,
comfort ride, black, like
new, $80. 352-628-0033
NEW NUTONE
MEDICINE CABINET
$15 STAINLESS
STEEL FRAME
RECESSED 419-5981
PORT. GENERATOR
Briggs & Stratton, 3500
watt, Model 030208
bought new, nvr used
$195 (352) 503-7031


PILLOW TOP IN
EXC.COND.$100
352-746-4160
RIGID DIG EZ POST
HOLE DIGGER- profes-
sional grade, fiberglass
handles, Ex. $35.
628-0033
SALON ITEMS All
NEW-8 pkgs Perm rods
& other related items,
5 brushes. $40 Call
Penny 527-2598
for details
WINDOW TREATMENT
Custom fabric covered
cornice, 72"x12" Beige.
$35.00. Call
352-621-7586




4 INCH TOILET SEAT
RISER IT MAKES IT
EASIER TO GET UP
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316


WORDY I BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Close by a hearing organ (l) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
land DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Frog cousin rural lane (1) they will fit in the letter
-squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Construction lifter blotch (1) syllables in each word.
I 11 12014UFS,Dist. by Univ. Ucick forUFS
4. More elevated fibber (2)


5. Brandishes broadsword defenses (1)


6. First-year pro's bet middlemen (2)


7. Easily scared U.K. natives (2)


HSIIIII HSILLIIS 'L S3IOOH saI3001S '9 S(I3IHS SI'IIAM *
aIv 131IH '11' IVNIS Nva "o T oVOI flVOi '* 1 Va MHVN "I
5-3-14 SHIAKSNV


4 hRUNU-EU CANE
DON'T WAIT TO FALL
AND NEED IT LATER
ONLY $25
(352)464-0316
Aluminum Ramp
for a wheelchair
36" x40" $100.
Inflatable electric twin
mattress cover, $30.
(352) 726-5070
Bed Protective Pads
2x3. 5 per package,
$1 per package
Floor to Ceiling PVP
poll w/trapeze $150
(352) 726-5070
BEDSIDE COMMODE
&ALUMINUM WALKER
both have adjustable
legs only $20 each
(352)464-0316
CHILD'S MANUAL
WHEELCHAIR, GOOD
SHAPE, YELLOW W/
FOOT RESTS. ONLY
$85 (352)464-0316
Larger Electric
Wheelchair,
leather, good
condition, $450. obo
(352) 746-1044
NEW SHOWER CHAIR
WITH BACK. ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS FIBER-
GLASS ONLY 30.00
3524640316
Permobil Wheelchair,
does everything, incl.
tbl. Orig. cost $20,000,
BO. portable lift, $500
OBO. Orig. $2,000.
(352)726-5070
SHOWER BENCH FITS
INTO TUB. BENCH
ONLY. $20. 464-0316
THREE WHEELED
WALKER LARGE
WHEELS ONLY 50.00
464-0316
TRANSPORT CHAIR
(SMALL WHEELS)
GOOD SHAPE. WITH
FOOTRESTS ONLY
$100. 464-0316



"NEW" LES PAUL
COPY BLOCK
INLAYSGOLD HARD-
WARE"BEAUTY" $100.
(352)601-6625
"NEW"5 STRING
BANJO,MAHOGANY
FINISH RESONATOR
READY TO PLAY $75.
(352)601-6625
ACOUSTIC BRAND
LEAD GUITAR AMP
G35FX ONBOARD EF-
FECTS"NEW" $80.
(352)601-6625
First Act electric guitar
with strap $45.
(352)419-4464
HOLLOWBODY
GUITAR, IBANEZ
AGR73T white w/gold
hardware &AG100C
hardshell case $495.
FENDER TELECASTER,
1986 '62 reissuecandy
apple red w/white
bindingsoft case
$575. 352-746-1644


ELLIPTICAL EXERCISE
MACHINE ALL DIGITAL
WORKS GREAT ONLY
100.00 352 464 0316
Inversion System
good condition
$75.00
(352) 621-0127
MANUAL TREADMILL
DIGITAL READOUT,
FOLDS UP FOR EASY
STORAGE, ONLY
$75. 464-0316
TREK BICYCLE 2012
Trek Bike. 7000 Series
Mint condition with
mirror and bottle holder.
700X28 tires. $275.00
firm. 352-586-0426



12 SPEED WOMAN'S
HUFFY MOUNTAIN
BIKE 24 INCH SUPER
SHAPE ONLY $60
464-0316
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238


Mdical
Equipmen


X-w


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
11111111


Chronicle

Classifieds /



In Print ...


& Online







CIII(ONICI E I






(352) 563-5966


Korg remote
keyboard(keytar)
RK-100 $25.
352-419-4464
ROGUE BASS GUITAR,
black $50.
BEHRINGER ULTRABASS
AMP, 1x12,
180 watts -$195.
352-746-1644.
SILVERTONE/SAMICK
ELECTRIC GUITAR
LOOKS, PLAYS,
SOUNDS GREAT!$50.
(352)601-6625
STUDENT/TRAVEL
LAP STEEL ELECTRIC
LOOKS, PLAYS,
SOUNDS GREAT $50.
(352)601-6625

Household

2 PIECE BROILER PAN
LIKE NEW $15 SMALL
COUNTER TOP
GEORGE FOREMAN
GRILL $8 419-5981
GE MICROWAVE
WHITE WITH TURNTA-
BLE $20. 419-5549
KING Patchwork
desgn,COMFORTER/SHAM
S wedding ring de-
sign clean $50.
419-5549
OREC K XL VACUUM
40TH ANNIVERSARY
EDITION WITH LIGHT
$80. 419-5549
TOASTER OVEN,
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $30
352-613-0529
Delonghi
5 qt slow cooker, SS,
new ( $139.99.
like new $45
(352) 513-5547


EZ GO Golf Cart
Diamond plate box
on back, good cond.
$1200. obo
(352) 564-2756
GOLF DRIVER 2013
MRH Offset9.5 reg sft
R'ballz by Turner EXC
$85. Dunnellon
465-8495
POOL TABLE Slate top,
heavy vinyl cover,
20 sticks with racks
Ig overhead beer light
3 custum highchairs,
All accessories,
excel, cond. $700 obo
352-422-5622
SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066
Yamaha '00 GolfCart
Canvas Enclosure
New Batteries $2288.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678


A Treadmill
in good condition
digital read-out
eve's (352) 382-4442

Looking for
Lift Chair to self assist
must be in good
condition, pls call
(352) 854-8167

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




Jayco Pop Up
Camper. Still equip.
Dual Axle. Needs
Repr., or make good
trlr. $395 or trade.
(352)637-3983

RV CORD ADAPTER
18 INCH, NEW 30 amp
Female to 50 amp Male
w/Pwr Lt. $10
352-382-3650


3 YR OLD HOUND MIX
The beautiful Rema!
This girl is just as sweet
as she is gorgeous.
Very affectionate, loves
to cuddle and lay her
head on you. Doing well
with leash training, gets
along with some dogs,
and does well with chil-
dren. Her $60 adoption
fee includes her spay,
all current vaccinations,
microchip, heartworm
test, and 30 days of
health insurance. Call
Laci @ 352-212-8936











BARON
a SPECIAL NEEDS
6-10 y.o. St. Bernard
mix male, came as
stray to shelter. Ap-
pears housebrkn,
weight 91 Ibs. Avery
calm older dog, in
search of what would
probably be his last
home. Very friendly,
comes to people for
affection,
Heartworm-negative,
amazingly. May be
partially blind, but defi-
nitely can see some-
what. He still loves
life and wants to be
the companion for a
kind, loving person or
couple who would un-
derstand his limita-
tions. Would there be
someone who would
be willing to give this
sweet dog a good
home for his later
years?
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.

CKC Deerhead
Chihuahua pup M
$150.2 Mini Dasch-
shund pups M $250.
& Chiweenies, $200.
w/h/c & puppy kits
Janet (352) 628-7852


JENSEN
3-4 y.o. American
Bulldog, 50 Ibs,
beautiful red &
white. Appears
housebroken, walks
well on leash.
Knows certain com-
mands. Very
friendly & loves
people, best as only
dog in the home.
Would be a great
family member &
perfect companion.
Call Dreama @
813-244-7324.


OS? P -US C COUN S T~ ?^






Cnil


.-K- .v ~t. ...c. ..............


CALL FOR DETAILS '
noa6-noo0


GINGER
beautiful 1.5 y.o.
Dutch Shepherd
mix, spayed, HW
negative, house-
brkn. High energy,
needs strong leader
w/knowledge of
breed. Loves daily
walksw/jogger/
runner. Best as only
pet in home without
young kids.
Stunning dog.
Call Christina @
352-464-3908


DIXIE
a 3-y.o. black lab
mix spayed female,
medium in size,
48 Ibs. Appears
housebrkn. Heart-
worm-negative.
Gets along with
other dogs, walks
calmly on a leash.
Gentle, beautiful.
UTD on shots.
Adoption fee
$30.00. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


Haulmark 6x12
'12 Enclosed Trailer
Ramp Door Brand
New with Factory
Warranty $2388.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678




BOYS CLOTHING
sizes 12mths -5T
.25-$1 each 50 articles
of clothing like new
352-257-5687
EDDIE BAUER CAR
SEAT Kids over 22
pounds & over lyr Ex-
pires 2018 excellent $50
352-257-5687


Sell or Swa


Robin Long
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Seeking new Color
and Foil Clients
looking for a
change. Come
give me a try.
Wed-Sat
appointments
available.

"Redken Educator
and trained 20+
years experience.




Your World

pvw t "e a444


I et


I et




C14 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014


male kittens 8 weeks
old. Fully weaned, litter
trained,healthy and
ready for a forever
home. 352-212-2094
FREE MALE NEU-
TERED DOG neutered
and chipped, 2 1/2 yr.
Dalmatian/Husky mix.
Loves kids/cats, house
trained & rides in car.
Good, quiet, alert, clean.
phone, 352-503-7706
German Rottweiller
Pups, 4 females 4 Sale
good temperament,
going to be LARGE
dogs! $500. each
(352) 422-6792
Green Amazon Parrot
with cage. 25 yrs old.
Asking $650
352-642-2823
Pure Bred Husky Pups
2 male, black & white
w/brown eyes, fully
vetted, CVI certs,
micro-chipped
$500. ea. obo
(352) 447-5595
(or) 352-246-3000


DLE PUPS Red Minia-
ture Poodles; 10 weeks
old; Health Certifica-
tions; CKC registered;
$750.00 352-419-8233
Schnauzer Pups
2 male, Born Nov. 14
Shih-Tzu Pup
1 male Born Jan. 21,
352-795-5896 Day
SHIH-TZU PUPS,
Males Starting @$400
Peek-a-Zu PUPS
Males Starting @ $300.
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 270-8827



16 in Black Wintec
Saddle; Exc Cond,
never used $799
(352) 513-5547




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL

55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
incl. grass cutting
and your water
1 bedroom, 1 bath
@$425
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 800-747-4283
For Details!
CR 2/2 on 1/2 acre
$550. H -3/2 on 1 acre
$650. neat and clean
Mona(727) 992-1010


MUIVIUaMAaa
2/1.5, LG Fenced
Yard, References,
$475; 352-220-6303



2/2 Doublewide
In 55+ Park,
Homoassaa
Well maintained
very nice $23,500.
(407) 617-5507 Cell
MOVE IN NOW
Nice Home on '2 AC
fenced yard, 1500 sf
3/2 Home in new
cond., Drywall with
2 x 6 construction.
New appliances,
carpet, paint, decks,
& ceramic tile floor-
ing. Financing avail-
able only $69,900.
($450/mo.) W.A.C.
Call (352) 621-9183

Palm Harbor Homes
end of year salell
3 retirement models
MUST go....Save
over $26k, homes
from the low 60's this
week only plantcitv.
oalmharbor.com
or 800-622-2832
Se habia espanol
Ready to Show!
In Homosassa
2Br/1Ba 1982 Single
Wide. NO HIDDEN
FEES! 20K Includes
Delv/Set/New AC,
Heat, skirting, steps,
gutters & down spouts
1-727-967-4230
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE,
$3,000-$11,000 on
our huge lot model
sale going on now.
Only 3 left! Call
Taylor Made Homes
Call (352) 621-9181
New Homes from
$40.00 per sq. ft.



-FLORAL CITY 3/2**
1+ACRE, treed lot,
DOCK, garage,
very nice, $89,900
716-434-6527



Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2
bath, open floor plan,
porch/sheds on 1.5
Acres 352-795-1272
Homosassa 2006 DW
3/2 on /2 acre." Mint"
Prvt Street. New: tile
wood fir, DW & paint.
$69k owner fin. w/$
down. 352-422-6974
Homosassa 2BR/2BA
on approx 1 Acre. New
bathrooms, Lg screened
porch, dead end Rd.
$42,000. 352-302-1383
No Owner Financing
HOMOSASSA
2BR/2BA, Fully fur-
nished, Great Location
Drastically Reduced
(352) 746-0524
HOMOSASSA
3/2 singlewide
on '2 acre
5192 S Amanda PT
$15,000 212-2051


HOMOSASSA
RENT TO OWN
Large 2BR/1' BA, DW,
3360 Arundel Ter.;
SW with large add on
bedroom & living room
carport, sheds
3901 Sonny Ter
Call for appointment
Tony Tubolina Broker
Owner (727) 385-6330
INVERNESS 2/1 Turn
key, not in a park.
well maint. newer
appl., Remodeled
kitchen & bath, W/D
double carport, 2
sheds, RV hookup
2 mi. to town $34,900
352-201-5868
(352) 201-7081
OWNER
FINANCING!
Home for Sale
4/3 on 1.25 acres,
paved rd. fenced
yard, work shop &
utility shed, Florida
room, deck on back
& front concrete
driveway with car-
port. Only $79,900.
$14,000 down only
$648.92/mo W.A.C.
Call to View
352-621-3807



w 2br/2ba. 55+ Thun-
derbird Park. Lot 45
crpt, furnished, washer
dryer, freezr. Porch w/
sliding windows. For
Sale 352-794-3441
Crystal River 2 bed
1 bath partially furnished
home in 55+ park
includes carport, FL
room & shed. $ 7,000.
607-591-0273

For Sale ,1,I
Crystal River Village 3
bedroom. 2 bath. 1248
SqFt 2005 Merit MH
w/screen porch, 2-car
carport & storage shed
located in 55+ gated
comm. w/pool & club-
house. $28K OBO, mo-
tivated seller will negoti-
ate. (352)564 0819


Floral City- BEAUTIFUL
14X60, in Adult Park,
2BR, 2BA, 1 scr. room,
1 sunrm, completely
furn., Park Rent $183.
Shed, $25,000
352-860-2105

For SaleBl*
Hernando 55+ Comm
2BR/2BA. DW, 24X48,
own lot, new carport.
New AC, new stove &
frig, inside wd hookup,
wood floors, 2
screened porches,
shed/ workshop,
$55 mo. Association
fee, heated pool &
clubhouse, Cute!
REDUCED $63,000.
813-464-9858
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern 2/1 homes
from $7500 or Lease to
Own from $145/mo.
$700.down + Lot
rent of $265. mo.
10 yr. payoff at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional
55+Park 352 628-5977
Nice Older Singlewide
in Singing Forest Adult
Park, has addition
and partially furn.
Low Lot Rent
$18,300 obo
352-726-9369



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 on land, remod-
eled, rent $600. long
or short Sell $42K OBO
(352) 427-2640


-7A
I:ACTION I

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. j
352-795-7368
$900 & UNDER
3290 S Michigan Blvd.
2/2/unique home/Avail. May 1
$850-3094 N Satin Flower Ter
2/2/2 BH spacious home
1863 Elderberry Ln.
2/2/1 959sqft
1302 Cypress Cove Ct.
2/2.5 2 story townhome, c analside

S650& UNDER
$650- 7096NDawsonDr.
2/2 mobile Hernando
6315 N. Shorewood Dr.
2 Bedroom, 2 BIth
8019 W Grove St.
2/2 SWM
w/addition on 1.25 acre
For More Listings GoTo
www.CtrusCountyHomeRentals.om



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/B $550. 3/B $850 Hs
sec. $450. 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025



FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hw 486 Hernando
352-584-9496/464-2514



US 19 Office- $550.
office/warehouse
1/b-lba$1200. until.
incl. 352-634-0129



CITRUS HILLS
2/2, Furnished.
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225



HOMOSASSA
1/1, Duplex $435. mo.
C. Riv. 3/2 House $650
1st.& Sec. 212-4981


BEVERLY HILLS
Remodeled Lrg. 2/2/2,
CH/A, FL Rm, fncd yrd,
W/D, No Pets
$750. mo 1st last, sec.,
352-726-2280
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1 duplex, basic
watersewer incl $495.
220-2447 or 212-2051
INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1/1, opt.
3rd bd. Ig fenced yd
$650/mo Ist/last/sec
+ ref's (352)860-2793
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM



HERNANDO
Watson's Fish Camp
55+ Rental Community
(352) 726-2225
INVERNESS
Lake Front Home
spectacular views
spacious 3/2/2,
$750 (908) 322-6529
Old Homosassa
Lrg. 1/1, liv & famn rm,
scrn prch, lots of stor-
age, dock w/ access
to gulf. $750., no pets
/smoke 352-628-2261



CITRUS SPRINGS
Whole House Access
$125/wk. call Bruce
@ 352-445-9136 or
Ray @828-497-2610


DEB
THOMPSON
-One call away for
your buying and
selling needs.
- Realtor that you can
refer to your
family and friends.
w Service with a smile
seven days
a week.
Parsley Real Estate
Deb Thompson
352-634-2656
resdebi@vahoo.com
and
debthomoson.com

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate
advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to Fair Housing Act
which makes it illegal
to advertise "any
preference, limitation
or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or an
intention,
to make such prefer-
ence, limitation or
discrimination." Fa-
milial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of
discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



OBIR1UN.TV


For Sele"%


SELL YOUR
HOME
IN THE
Gri-RNiiE



CLASSIFIED
SPECIAL!

30 Days
$58.50

It's Easy
Call Today
(352) 563-5966

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Open House
Open House
Citrus Springs
Sat 5/3 11a-3p
3br/2ba/3
on beautiful pond
579 Grapewood Ln
Off CR 39


Sat. & Sun.

2p-4p
LAKESIDE GOLF/
COUNTRYCLUB
4646 E Van Ness
Rd Hernando
352-726-8197




FOR RENT 3200 Sq. Ft.
COMMERCIAL BLDG.
Large Paved Parking
Lot, Cent. Heat/Air
Open Floor Plan
1305 Hwy 486 **
352-584-9496/464-2514




PINE RIDGE GOLF
COURSE 1 AC LOT
HIGH, WOODED.
BLOSSOM DRIVE
MIDDLE OF FAIRWAY.
$55,000. WILL
FINANCE PART. JIM
RICH 941-223-6870




Comm.1 William Tell +
Storage Bldg. close 491
79K, 352-795-6282

PFor Sale





Laurel Ridge on
Twisted Oaks 1st
green. 2BR/2BA with
den & screened lanai
high ceilings and
open floor plan
$ 125k 352-746-4880
or 330-322-0329
553 W Player Path




ForSale10a
2/2/2 Open, lanai,
stucco, Ig screened
pool, tiki bar, 1 ac.
SS appl's, low assum-
able rate, $199,000
(352) 220-4060 or
352-220-4084




3/2/2 + Den On % acre,
Move in Condition!
Built in 2008
Selena Hills
$165,000.
352-341-0118





Realty Connect
THE PREMIER
BOUTIQUE
Real Estate Group
Buying or Selling?
We Tailor Our
Services.

Teri Paduano, Broker
352-341-2588 or
352-212-1446 Cell
119 E. Dampier St.,
Inverness
TheFLDream.com
RENT TO OWN
3 bd/ No credit ck!
352-464-6020
JADEMISSION.COM




Nice 2BR IBA+ side
room w/ pri. entrance
bungulow style brick
Very priv $42k Cash,
As is. (786) 301-3805


TAMISCOTT
Exit Realty Leaders
352-257-2276
exifttami@gmail.com
When it comes to
Real Estate ...
I'm there for you !
The fishing is great!
Call me for your new
Waterfront Home

LOOKING
TO SELL ?

CALL ME
TODAY II!




4/2, CEMENT HOME,
1/4 ACRE,
1,200 sq. ft.
Good Location -*
Easy to own. $65,000.
Cell (305) 619-0282














Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


CLASSIFIED



"It's a
SELLERS Market"
#1 Company +
Experienced Agent
SOLD! Sold! Sold!






A
DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL..
it's what I do.

ERA
American Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Adopt a Shelter Pet
WWW.
citruscritters.com









Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
THE MARKET
IS GOOD
Thinking of
selling?
Now Is the time
to get listed.
Still great values out
there. Call for
foreclosure lists
Phyllis Strickland
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
352-613-3503-Cell
352-419-6880- Office












BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments

Buying or
Selling,
it's time to make
your move!








&

Coleen
Fatone-Anderson
Realtor
Cell:
(352) 476-8579
email.
Cfatone=tamoabav.rr.
corn
ERA American
Realty &
Investments








A
LaWanda Watt


NOW IS A GREAT
TIME TO LIST
YOUR HOME
CALL LAWANDA
FOR A FREE,
NO OBLIGATION
MARKET ANALYSIS!
352-212-1989
lawanda.watti
centurv21.com
Century 21
J.W. Morton
Real Estate, Inc.













MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Yiuir' urid firt

Need a joI
"ir l1
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHRONICLE


SANDI HART
Realtor
Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855








[I



Tony

Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
I'LL TAKE
NEW LISTINGS
BUYING OR
SELLING


TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant

tpauelsen@
hotmail.com


Your Citrus County
Residential
Sales Specialist!






i


Michael J.
Rutkowski
(U.S. Army Retired)
Realtor
(352) 422-4362
Michael.Rutkowski
@ERA.com
"Integrity First in all
Aspects of Life!"
ERA
American Realty
& Investments





$ 100,000 + Closing
Cost wll get you this
2,100 sq. ft.,
3BR 3'/ BA Fully furn.
Condo in Citrus Hills
Call 352-419-5268





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


I1A


Desperately
Need Rentals

Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

Floral City
Waterfront. 6 adj. Lots,
3/4 acre on chain of
lakes. Huge oaks, good
fishing. $110,000 OBO.
(352)596-2921

Floral City, nice 3/2
open view on Duval
Isl. owner fin. w/15 k
down, 15yrs @ 6%
call Justin Monahan
352-697-0240
ERA American Realty

Your "High-Tech"
Citrus County
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureCoast
Propefliescom
"To view
my properties"





Oak Forest, Floral City
1 acre corner lot off
S Fern Pt. High & Dry.
City Water, Home site
only. Price Reduced
$14,500 352- 678-7145


Citrus COU
Homes


B.H.P.H.
May Special

'97 Ford Taurus
$650 Down
'98 Chevy Cavalier
$650 Down
'00 Pontiac Gr. Am.
$650 Down
'00 Mitsubishi
Galant
$650 Down
CALL 352-563-1902
1675 S Suncoast
Blvd. Homosassa, Fl
CHEVROLET
2001, Impala,
22", Chrome Wheels
$3,995.
352-341-0018


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

U K S'=f utlit
clesfim


SEWING & REPAIR
Awnings RV & Home
Boat Canvas & Seats
Golf Cart.Seats.Tops
Patio Furn., 563-0066



Two Yamaha
1998 Waverunners
1200xl, 70 Hrs, with trlr.
Like new mint cond
Part trade poss. $6000
352-422-1026/419-5374



** BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510"
20' Pontoon Boat.
Very nice. Motor
ready. $1900. Trailer
avble. Will Del.
(352)637-3983
21'Well Boat.
Merc. 40hp 4strk. w/
20hrs. use. Galv.
Tandem Axle Trailer.
$3700. (352)795-1093
Princess Marine
16' tri-hull, 35 hp
Evinrudeoutbrd clear
title, 1st $ 1k takes it!
Joe (352) 476-4632













Sportscraft 88
27 CCoastal Fisher-
man, cabin cruiser,
$7,995 813-244-3945
352-634-4768
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



TOY HAULER
2011 Forest River,
18ff L. 8ff wide, Living
quarters w/beds mi-
crowave, stove, refrig.
sink, bthrm. awning,
dish TV ready, full
back ramp, Pd $18K
Asking $10,500 obo
(352) 422-5622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRUCKS, TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
& MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



04 Open Road
37', 5th wheel, good
cood.4 season, 3
slides, can deliver
No smoking or pets
$10,900 352-341-1106
COLEMAN
1 986 Popup camper,
stove, sink AC, Needs
Canvas $650 obo
(352) 419-4719
EGG CAMPER
2007, 17 ft, 2000 Ibs;
eggcamper.inc,
fiberglass, Hernando
$7,500 256-244-6377
KEYSTONE PASS-
PORT ULTRA LITE
2012 238 ML like new
light weight 25' camper.
Fully equipped and lots
of storage. Must see,
$13,500352201-2865
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
NATURE COAST PRV
RV service. Darts, sales
Mobile Repair/Maint.
352-795-7820, Lie/Ins.
STAR CRAFT
2005 Pop-up Camper
Electric lift, frig, air,
stove + outside grill
$3750; 352-613-9627




Auto's, Truck's, SUV's
& Van's Cash Pd
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191



Taurus

Metal
Recycling Best Prices
for your cars or trucks
also biggest U-Pull-It
with thousands of vehi-
cles offering lowest price
for parts 352-637-2100
WE BUY ALL AUTOS
with or without titles
ANY CONDITION
Cindy (813) 505-6939
WE BUY ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model
813-335-3794
813-458-0584 Call AJ
WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44 CR
461-4518& 795-4440


FORESTER
2013 Subaru Forester
2.5X Limited with 14,000
miles. Options include:
climate control,
AM/FM/CD audio, steer-
ing wheel audio con-
trols, Bluetooth hands
free phone, cruise con-
trol, tilt wheel, power
door locks and mirrors,
power windows, power
drivers seat, leather
seats, heated front
seats, roof rails, power
moonroof, all-wheel
drive, ABS, TPMS,
anti-theft alarm, back-up
camera, puddle light kit
and splash guard kit
and remaining warranty.
Price: $23,800, Call:
352-601-1319


2004,Monte Carlo 22"
Chrome Wheels
$4,450.
352-341-0018
CHEVROLET
2005 Venture 8 passen-
ger, runs great, 186K
miles, $3500 OBO
352-212-1203
CHRYSLER
2003 Sebring/4
door/Runs Great/130k
miles/$4k OBO
(352)212-0893
JEEP
'00, Wrangler,
5 spd 4x4, HT, $5,995

'88, Bronco,
Mud, $2,495.

'95, Dodge Truck
3/4, V10, 4x4, $3,995.

20 ft. Sylvan
Pontoon Boat,
$5,995
CONSIGNMENT
USA
US 19&US 44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
1994 Maxima
low miles, runs great
Must sell $3000 obo
(352) 564-1818







SELL
YOUR VEHICLE
IN THE

CHRpN1LE:

CLASSIFIED

.3 SPECIALS
7 days $26.50
14 days $38.50
30 Days $58.50

W Call your
Classified
representative
for details.
352-563-5966

WE DO IT ALL
BUY SELL TRADE
VEHICLES, M H & RVs
Financing & Rentals
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19&US44, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




AUTO SWAP/
CORRAL
CAR SHOW
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAY 4th.
1-800-438-8559
CHEVROLET
2001 Corvette
Convertiblegarage
kept, 1 owner, C.R.
$26,500.(770) 773-0166
CHEVROLET
94 CORVETTE, CONV.
very clean, only 50k
mi. NADA $12,500.
$9500. (352) 419-4970
FORD
Roadster Convertible
Original 1929, other
classic cars avail
727- 422-4433





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday"
with a classified
ad under Happy
Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classified
Dept for details
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHEVROLET
2004, 3500 HD Diesel
crew Cab Dully
$12,495.
352-341-0018
Chevy
1998 Silverado, /Ton
Heavyw, Extended cap
long box, $2600
(612) 203-3408
DODGE
'05 Dakota Crewcab,
150k highway miles,
run exc. $4500 obo
CI Jim 352-364-3376
Dodge
2003 Diesel Truck &
2010 Sundance Fifth
Wheel package for
$16,000.
(352)637-6679

Larry's Auto Sales
1955S. Suncoast
Blvd. (352) 564-8333
BUY HERE, PAY HERE
2001 Suzuki Intruder
1300 CC $800 down
2007 Suzuki Forenza
low mi., $895 down
'91 F150 Short Bed,
AutoA/C,6 cyl
$995 Down
'93 Chevy Hi Top
Cony. Van 5.7 V-8
Auto, $995 down




SUBARU


25, 2014- May 30, 2014.
Published in the
Citrus County Chronicle
April 25, -May 30, 2014




275-0503 SACRN
5/14 LIEN SALE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
S M Duggan Towing LLC.
gives Notice of Foreclosure
of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on 5/14/2014
10:00:00 AM at 1635 NE
32nd Ave, Ocala, FL 34470
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes. S M Duggan Towing
LLC. reserves the right to
accept or reject any/or all
bids.
1LNHM86S02Y709817
2002 LINC LS
May 3, 2014


KIA
2005 Sportilage EX
V6,auto, silver, sunroof,
garaged dealer maint.
$5900. (352) 382-9920
TOYOTA
2009, Venza, Leather,
back up camera
$22,500.
352-341-0018




CHEVROLET
2007, Uplander L/T
Leather $5,495
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2012 Town & Country
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs Call Tom for
more info 352-325-1306
DODGE
2001 CARGO VAN
5.2 litre, Auto, A/C
Full Price $4495 + tax,
fees. (352) 564-8333
HONDA
'07, Odyssey, EXL
144K miles
excel, cond. $11,000
(352) 563-1680
HONDA
2004 Odyssey model
EX-L,V6 3.5 Liter ,New
Transmission, Brakes,
Belts, Timing Chain,
Water Pump, Spark
Plugs. FR&R A/C.
leather seats, DVD
player w remote & wire-
less headphones,
Premium Sound AM/FM
Stereo cassette & Cd
Player Excellent
Condition.
$6,000
352-726-7745




2006 Suzuki
650 Burgman with trike
kit, 4,700mi, lots of
extra's $8000 obo
(352) 637-4429
Harley
DAVIDSON
2012 FXDWG Dyn
Wide Glide Wind-
shield,6,000 miles, 7
year extended warranty,
2.5% assumable loan -
$11,295.00
(352)302-6055
Harley Davidson
'95 Cust Built, Glider kit
Spec. constr., SS eng,
trophy winner $12k
obo 727-439-0068
HONDA
'02 Shadow Spirit Trike
Recent Tow-Pac Kit
750cc Clean Bike
$4,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
'07, HELIX 250cc.
Easy to ride. Low
Seat Height $2,488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
HONDA
2002 VTX 1800
clean, priced to sell
$3995
(352) 564-8333
HONDA
2005 Goldwing Any Ed
ABS,13k mi, Exc. Cond,
Garage kept $13,000
obo (352) 637-0292
HONDA
2006 VTX1300C
7,400 miles
Cobra Pipes, Helmet
Windshields
$4,900
(352) 341-1187
HONDA
2008 Shadow Spirit
VT750C2
3,775 miles
Cobra Pipes Helmet
Saddle Bags
Windshield
$4,500
(352) 341-1187
HONDA REBEL
2009, super low miles
many accessories, like
new.$2695 OBO. Pine
Ridge (419) 307-8954
IRON HORSE PARTS
352-746-7655
visit: www.ironhorse
LecantoFL.com
Established 1990

'08 Harley Davidson
FLHTCUI, 1 owner,
low miles, $15,200
'06 Harley Davidson
XL1200 C, Custom
Wheels $6,295
'01 Harley Davidson
Road King $8,900
'13 Harley Davidson
Night Rod $14,200
'03 Harley Davidson
Road King $9,999

KAWASAKI
2005 Vulcan 1500
Classic: Custom Paint,
18" Baron Bars, Saddle
Bags, Kuryakyn High-
way Pegs/Passenger
Floor Boards
/Cable&Grips. 3200
Miles! Garage Kept,
Exc.Condition $5999.
(813) 957-8605
Suzuki
'11, S40 Old-school
Single Cylinder Low
Mileage. Low Seat
Height $4488.
Love Motorsports
352-621-3678
SUZUKI
Boulevard C50
Classic 2007,
Exc Cond $3,700
(352) 634-4427




907-0530 DAILY CRN
Surplus Property Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners will be selling sur-
plus property and equip-
ment via the internet at
aovdeals.com from April




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COAST-TO-COAST


2014 FOCUS
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 FUSION
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


--- ,



2014 ESCAPE
$279 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


See what everyone
is talking about.


2014 FIESTA
$229 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 EDGE
$329 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


2014 EXPLORER
$339 mo.
36 Month Lease
SO Down Payment SO Due oat Signing SO 1st Months Payment
Security deposit waived. Does not include tax, tag & title fees.


TICK


JI~U'o


SEE OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY AT


FORD CREDIT


BLUE OVAL


SALE HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5:00
GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.
Hwy. 44 W. Inverness
726-1231
www.nicknicholasford.com Brad Hill
www.nicknicholasford.com Salesperson of the Month


'2013 CY sales.**Plus tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. W.A.C. See dealer for additional details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only. Not all buyer will
qualify for Ford Credit financing. 0% APR financing for 36 months at $16.67 per $1,000 financed regardless of down payment. (PGM #20476). For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 05/09/14.


SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014 C1S




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-' FIND


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$ fPER
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BUY FOR
$9.988


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EVROLET
rebates and incentives, not everyone will qualify. E
3s and incentives, not everyone will qualify. Excludes
lies for the life of the lease. Includes $2688 due at i
"Lease is 39 months, 39,000 miles for the life of the I
559.50 With approved credit. **Lease is 39months,
tax, tag, title and dealer fee $559.50 Withapproved
prior sales may restrict stock. Offers can not be cc


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C16 SATURDAY, MAY 3, 2014